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Sample records for adult brain tissue

  1. Efficient Cargo Delivery into Adult Brain Tissue Using Short Cell-Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Alvin Kuriakose; Bhattarai, Prabesh; Zhang, Yixin; Brand, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish brains can regenerate lost neurons upon neurogenic activity of the radial glial progenitor cells (RGCs) that reside at the ventricular region. Understanding the molecular events underlying this ability is of great interest for translational studies of regenerative medicine. Therefore, functional analyses of gene function in RGCs and neurons are essential. Using cerebroventricular microinjection (CVMI), RGCs can be targeted efficiently but the penetration capacity of the injected molecules reduces dramatically in deeper parts of the brain tissue, such as the parenchymal regions that contain the neurons. In this report, we tested the penetration efficiency of five known cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and identified two– polyR and Trans – that efficiently penetrate the brain tissue without overt toxicity in a dose-dependent manner as determined by TUNEL staining and L-Plastin immunohistochemistry. We also found that polyR peptide can help carry plasmid DNA several cell diameters into the brain tissue after a series of coupling reactions using DBCO-PEG4-maleimide-based Michael’s addition and azide-mediated copper-free click reaction. Combined with the advantages of CVMI, such as rapidness, reproducibility, and ability to be used in adult animals, CPPs improve the applicability of the CVMI technique to deeper parts of the central nervous system tissues. PMID:25894337

  2. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  3. The adult brain tissue response to hollow fiber membranes of varying surface architecture with or without cotransplanted cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ning

    A variety of biomaterials have been chronically implanted into the central nervous system (CNS) for repair or therapeutic purposes. Regardless of the application, chronic implantation of materials into the CNS induces injury and elicits a wound healing response, eventually leading to the formation of a dense extracellular matrix (ECM)-rich scar tissue that is associated with the segregation of implanted materials from the surrounding normal tissue. Often this reaction results in impaired performance of indwelling CNS devices. In order to enhance the performance of biomaterial-based implantable devices in the CNS, this thesis investigated whether adult brain tissue response to implanted biomaterials could be manipulated by changing biomaterial surface properties or further by utilizing the biology of co-transplanted cells. Specifically, the adult rat brain tissue response to chronically implanted poly(acrylonitrile-vinylchloride) (PAN-PVC) hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) of varying surface architecture were examined temporally at 2, 4, and 12 weeks postimplantation. Significant differences were discovered in the brain tissue response to the PAN-PVC HFMs of varying surface architecture at 4 and 12 weeks. To extend this work, whether the soluble factors derived from a co-transplanted cellular component further affect the brain tissue response to an implanted HFM in a significant way was critically exploited. The cells used were astrocytes, whose ability to influence scar formation process following CNS injury by physical contact with the host tissue had been documented in the literature. Data indicated for the first time that astrocyte-derived soluble factors ameliorate the adult brain tissue reactivity toward HFM implants in an age-dependent manner. While immature astrocytes secreted soluble factors that suppressed the brain tissue reactivity around the implants, mature astrocytes secreted factors that enhanced the gliotic response. These findings prove the feasibility

  4. In Vivo Neural Tissue Engineering: Cylindrical Biocompatible Hydrogels That Create New Neural Tracts in the Adult Mammalian Brain.

    PubMed

    Clark, Amanda R; Carter, Arrin B; Hager, Lydia E; Price, Elmer M

    2016-08-01

    Individuals with neurodegenerative disorders or brain injury have few treatment options and it has been proposed that endogenous adult neural stem cells can be harnessed to repopulate dysfunctional nonneurogenic regions of the brain. We have accomplished this through the development of rationally designed hydrogel implants that recruit endogenous cells from the adult subventricular zone to create new relatively long tracts of neuroblasts. These implants are biocompatible and biodegradable cylindrical hydrogels consisting of fibrin and immobilized neurotrophic factors. When implanted into rat brain such that the cylinder intersected the migratory path of endogenous neural progenitors (the rostral migratory stream) and led into the nonneurogenic striatum, we observed a robust neurogenic response in the form of migrating neuroblasts with long (>100 μm) complex neurites. The location of these new neural cells in the striatum was directly coincident with the original track of the fibrin implant, which itself had completely degraded, and covered a significant area and distance (>2.5 mm). We also observed a significant number of neuroblasts in the striatal region between the implant track and the lateral ventricle. When these fibrin cylinders were implanted into hemiparkinson rats, correction of parkinsonian behavior was observed. There were no obvious behavioral, inflammatory or tumorigenic sequelae as a consequence of the implants. In conclusion, we have successfully engineered neural tissue in vivo, using neurogenic biomaterials cast into a unique cylindrical architecture. These results represent a novel approach to efficiently induce neurogenesis in a controlled and targeted manner, which may lead toward a new therapeutic modality for neurological disorders. PMID:27295980

  5. Spectromicroscopy of Brain Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazer, Bradley; Cannara, Rachel; Gilbert, Benjamin; Destasio, Gelsomina; Ogg, Mandy; Gough, Kathy

    2001-03-01

    X-ray PhotoElectron Emission Microscopy (X-PEEM) was originally developed for studying the surface microchemistry of materials science specimens. It has then evolved into a valuable tool to investigate the magnetic properties of materials and the microchemistry of cells and tissues. We used the MEPHISTO X-PEEM instrument, installed at the UW-Synchrotron Radiation Center to detect trace concentrations of non-physiological elements in senile brain tissue specimens. These tissues contain a large number of plaques, in which all the compounds and elements that the brain does not need are disposed and stored. We hypothesized that plaques should contain elements, such as Si, B, and Al which are very abundant on the Earth crust but absent from healthy tissues. We verified this hypothesis with MEPHISTO and found evidence of Si and B, and suspect Al. We also found a higher than normal concentration of Fe.

  6. Comparison of specific absorption rate induced in brain tissues of a child and an adult using mobile phone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Mai; Ueno, Shoogo

    2012-04-01

    The steady increase of mobile phone usage, especially mobile phones by children, has led to a rising concern about the possible adverse health effects of radio frequency electromagnetic field exposure. The objective of this work is to study whether there is a larger radio frequency energy absorption in the brain of a child compared to that of an adult. For this reason, three high-resolution models, two child head models (6 - and 11-year old) and one adult head model (34-year old) have been used in the study. A finite-difference time-domain method was employed to calculate the specific absorption rate (SAR) in the models from exposure to a generic handset at 1750 MHz. The results show that the SAR distributions in the human brain are age-dependent, and there is a deeper penetration of the absorbed SAR in the child's brain. The induced SAR can be significantly higher in subregions of the child's brain. In all of the examined cases, the SAR values in the brains of a child and an adult are well below the IEEE safety standard.

  7. Adult stem cells and tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Körbling, M; Estrov, Z; Champlin, R

    2003-08-01

    Recently, adult stem cells originating from bone marrow or peripheral blood have been suggested to contribute to repair and genesis of cells specific for liver, cardiac and skeletal muscle, gut, and brain tissue. The mechanism involved has been termed transdifferentiation, although other explanations including cell fusion have been postulated. Using adult stem cells to generate or repair solid organ tissue obviates the immunologic, ethical, and teratogenic issues that accompany embryonic stem cells. PMID:12931235

  8. Neural repair in the adult brain

    PubMed Central

    Jessberger, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Acute or chronic injury to the adult brain often results in substantial loss of neural tissue and subsequent permanent functional impairment. Over the last two decades, a number of approaches have been developed to harness the regenerative potential of neural stem cells and the existing fate plasticity of neural cells in the nervous system to prevent tissue loss or to enhance structural and functional regeneration upon injury. Here, we review recent advances of stem cell-associated neural repair in the adult brain, discuss current challenges and limitations, and suggest potential directions to foster the translation of experimental stem cell therapies into the clinic. PMID:26918167

  9. Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Adults Download Printable ... the topics below to get started. What Is Brain/CNS Tumors In Adults? What are adult brain ...

  10. Photoacoustic Measurements in Brain Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Kasili, P.M.; Mobley, J.; Vo-Dinh, T.

    1999-09-19

    In this work, we develop and evaluate the photoacoustic technique for recording spectra of white and gray mammalian brain tissues. In addition to the experimental work, we also discuss the geometric aspects of photoacoustic signal generation using collimated light. Spectra constructed from the peak-to-peak amplitude of the photoacoustic waveforms indicate differences in the two tissue types at wavelengths between 620 and 695 nm. The potential of the technique for non-invasive diagnosis is discussed.

  11. Adult soft tissue sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... free at 5 years. Most people who survive 5 years can expect to be cancer-free at 10 years. ... most soft tissue sarcomas, and there is no way to prevent it. ... them can increase your chance of surviving this type of cancer.

  12. Measurement of steroid concentrations in brain tissue: methodological considerations.

    PubMed

    Taves, Matthew D; Ma, Chunqi; Heimovics, Sarah A; Saldanha, Colin J; Soma, Kiran K

    2011-01-01

    It is well recognized that steroids are synthesized de novo in the brain (neurosteroids). In addition, steroids circulating in the blood enter the brain. Steroids play numerous roles in the brain, such as influencing neural development, adult neuroplasticity, behavior, neuroinflammation, and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. In order to understand the regulation and functions of steroids in the brain, it is important to directly measure steroid concentrations in brain tissue. In this brief review, we discuss methods for the detection and quantification of steroids in the brain. We concisely present the major advantages and disadvantages of different technical approaches at various experimental stages: euthanasia, tissue collection, steroid extraction, steroid separation, and steroid measurement. We discuss, among other topics, the potential effects of anesthesia and saline perfusion prior to tissue collection; microdissection via Palkovits punch; solid phase extraction; chromatographic separation of steroids; and immunoassays and mass spectrometry for steroid quantification, particularly the use of mass spectrometry for "steroid profiling." Finally, we discuss the interpretation of local steroid concentrations, such as comparing steroid levels in brain tissue with those in the circulation (plasma vs. whole blood samples; total vs. free steroid levels). We also present reference values for a variety of steroids in different brain regions of adult rats. This brief review highlights some of the major methodological considerations at multiple experimental stages and provides a broad framework for designing studies that examine local steroid levels in the brain as well as other steroidogenic tissues, such as thymus, breast, and prostate. PMID:22654806

  13. General Information about Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  14. Measurement of Steroid Concentrations in Brain Tissue: Methodological Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Taves, Matthew D.; Ma, Chunqi; Heimovics, Sarah A.; Saldanha, Colin J.; Soma, Kiran K.

    2011-01-01

    It is well recognized that steroids are synthesized de novo in the brain (neurosteroids). In addition, steroids circulating in the blood enter the brain. Steroids play numerous roles in the brain, such as influencing neural development, adult neuroplasticity, behavior, neuroinflammation, and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. In order to understand the regulation and functions of steroids in the brain, it is important to directly measure steroid concentrations in brain tissue. In this brief review, we discuss methods for the detection and quantification of steroids in the brain. We concisely present the major advantages and disadvantages of different technical approaches at various experimental stages: euthanasia, tissue collection, steroid extraction, steroid separation, and steroid measurement. We discuss, among other topics, the potential effects of anesthesia and saline perfusion prior to tissue collection; microdissection via Palkovits punch; solid phase extraction; chromatographic separation of steroids; and immunoassays and mass spectrometry for steroid quantification, particularly the use of mass spectrometry for “steroid profiling.” Finally, we discuss the interpretation of local steroid concentrations, such as comparing steroid levels in brain tissue with those in the circulation (plasma vs. whole blood samples; total vs. free steroid levels). We also present reference values for a variety of steroids in different brain regions of adult rats. This brief review highlights some of the major methodological considerations at multiple experimental stages and provides a broad framework for designing studies that examine local steroid levels in the brain as well as other steroidogenic tissues, such as thymus, breast, and prostate. PMID:22654806

  15. Organization of brain tissue - Is the brain a noisy processor.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adey, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    This paper presents some thoughts on functional organization in cerebral tissue. 'Spontaneous' wave and unit firing are considered as essential phenomena in the handling of information. Various models are discussed which have been suggested to describe the pseudorandom behavior of brain cells, leading to a view of the brain as an information processor and its role in learning, memory, remembering and forgetting.

  16. Mature brain tissue in the sacrococcygeal region.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Binod Bade; Ghimire, Pradeep; Ghartimagar, Dilasma; Jwarchan, Bishnu; Lalchan, Subita; Karmacharya, Mikesh

    2016-01-01

    Complete mature brain tissue in sacrococcygeal region is a rare congenital anomaly in a newborn, which usually is misdiagnosed for sacrococcygeal teratoma. Glial tumor-like ependymoma is also common in sacrococcygeal area but mostly appears later in life. We present a case of complete heterotopic brain tissue in the sacrococcygeal region. The patient underwent total excision of mass with coccygectomy. To our knowledge it is the second case being reported. PMID:27194682

  17. Mature brain tissue in the sacrococcygeal region

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Binod Bade; Ghimire, Pradeep; Ghartimagar, Dilasma; Jwarchan, Bishnu; Lalchan, Subita; Karmacharya, Mikesh

    2016-01-01

    Complete mature brain tissue in sacrococcygeal region is a rare congenital anomaly in a newborn, which usually is misdiagnosed for sacrococcygeal teratoma. Glial tumor-like ependymoma is also common in sacrococcygeal area but mostly appears later in life. We present a case of complete heterotopic brain tissue in the sacrococcygeal region. The patient underwent total excision of mass with coccygectomy. To our knowledge it is the second case being reported. PMID:27194682

  18. The landscape of genomic imprinting across diverse adult human tissues.

    PubMed

    Baran, Yael; Subramaniam, Meena; Biton, Anne; Tukiainen, Taru; Tsang, Emily K; Rivas, Manuel A; Pirinen, Matti; Gutierrez-Arcelus, Maria; Smith, Kevin S; Kukurba, Kim R; Zhang, Rui; Eng, Celeste; Torgerson, Dara G; Urbanek, Cydney; Li, Jin Billy; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R; Burchard, Esteban G; Seibold, Max A; MacArthur, Daniel G; Montgomery, Stephen B; Zaitlen, Noah A; Lappalainen, Tuuli

    2015-07-01

    Genomic imprinting is an important regulatory mechanism that silences one of the parental copies of a gene. To systematically characterize this phenomenon, we analyze tissue specificity of imprinting from allelic expression data in 1582 primary tissue samples from 178 individuals from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project. We characterize imprinting in 42 genes, including both novel and previously identified genes. Tissue specificity of imprinting is widespread, and gender-specific effects are revealed in a small number of genes in muscle with stronger imprinting in males. IGF2 shows maternal expression in the brain instead of the canonical paternal expression elsewhere. Imprinting appears to have only a subtle impact on tissue-specific expression levels, with genes lacking a systematic expression difference between tissues with imprinted and biallelic expression. In summary, our systematic characterization of imprinting in adult tissues highlights variation in imprinting between genes, individuals, and tissues. PMID:25953952

  19. The landscape of genomic imprinting across diverse adult human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Yael; Subramaniam, Meena; Biton, Anne; Tukiainen, Taru; Tsang, Emily K.; Rivas, Manuel A.; Pirinen, Matti; Gutierrez-Arcelus, Maria; Smith, Kevin S.; Kukurba, Kim R.; Zhang, Rui; Eng, Celeste; Torgerson, Dara G.; Urbanek, Cydney; Li, Jin Billy; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R.; Burchard, Esteban G.; Seibold, Max A.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Zaitlen, Noah A.; Lappalainen, Tuuli

    2015-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an important regulatory mechanism that silences one of the parental copies of a gene. To systematically characterize this phenomenon, we analyze tissue specificity of imprinting from allelic expression data in 1582 primary tissue samples from 178 individuals from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project. We characterize imprinting in 42 genes, including both novel and previously identified genes. Tissue specificity of imprinting is widespread, and gender-specific effects are revealed in a small number of genes in muscle with stronger imprinting in males. IGF2 shows maternal expression in the brain instead of the canonical paternal expression elsewhere. Imprinting appears to have only a subtle impact on tissue-specific expression levels, with genes lacking a systematic expression difference between tissues with imprinted and biallelic expression. In summary, our systematic characterization of imprinting in adult tissues highlights variation in imprinting between genes, individuals, and tissues. PMID:25953952

  20. Expansion of Multipotent Stem Cells from the Adult Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Murrell, Wayne; Palmero, Emily; Bianco, John; Stangeland, Biljana; Joel, Mrinal; Paulson, Linda; Thiede, Bernd; Grieg, Zanina; Ramsnes, Ingunn; Skjellegrind, Håvard K.; Nygård, Ståle; Brandal, Petter; Sandberg, Cecilie; Vik-Mo, Einar; Palmero, Sheryl; Langmoen, Iver A.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of stem cells in the adult human brain has revealed new possible scenarios for treatment of the sick or injured brain. Both clinical use of and preclinical research on human adult neural stem cells have, however, been seriously hampered by the fact that it has been impossible to passage these cells more than a very few times and with little expansion of cell numbers. Having explored a number of alternative culturing conditions we here present an efficient method for the establishment and propagation of human brain stem cells from whatever brain tissue samples we have tried. We describe virtually unlimited expansion of an authentic stem cell phenotype. Pluripotency proteins Sox2 and Oct4 are expressed without artificial induction. For the first time multipotency of adult human brain-derived stem cells is demonstrated beyond tissue boundaries. We characterize these cells in detail in vitro including microarray and proteomic approaches. Whilst clarification of these cells’ behavior is ongoing, results so far portend well for the future repair of tissues by transplantation of an adult patient’s own-derived stem cells. PMID:23967194

  1. Tissue engineering using adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Eberli, Daniel; Atala, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Patients with a variety of diseases may be treated with transplanted tissues and organs. However, there is a shortage of donor tissues and organs, which is worsening yearly because of the aging population. Scientists in the field of tissue engineering are applying the principles of cell transplantation, material science, and bioengineering to construct biological substitutes that will restore and maintain normal function in diseased and injured tissues. The stem cell field is also advancing rapidly, opening new options for cellular therapy and tissue engineering. The use of adult stem cells for tissue engineering applications is promising. This chapter discusses applications of these new technologies for the engineering of tissues and organs. The first part provides an overview of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering techniques; the second highlights different adult stem cell populations used for tissue regeneration. PMID:17161702

  2. Inflammation is detrimental for neurogenesis in adult brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekdahl, Christine T.; Claasen, Jan-Hendrik; Bonde, Sara; Kokaia, Zaal; Lindvall, Olle

    2003-11-01

    New hippocampal neurons are continuously generated in the adult brain. Here, we demonstrate that lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation, which gives rise to microglia activation in the area where the new neurons are born, strongly impairs basal hippocampal neurogenesis in rats. The increased neurogenesis triggered by a brain insult is also attenuated if it is associated with microglia activation caused by tissue damage or lipopolysaccharide infusion. The impaired neurogenesis in inflammation is restored by systemic administration of minocycline, which inhibits microglia activation. Our data raise the possibility that suppression of hippocampal neurogenesis by activated microglia contributes to cognitive dysfunction in aging, dementia, epilepsy, and other conditions leading to brain inflammation.

  3. Adult mouse brain gene expression patterns bear an embryologic imprint

    PubMed Central

    Zapala, Matthew A.; Hovatta, Iiris; Ellison, Julie A.; Wodicka, Lisa; Del Rio, Jo A.; Tennant, Richard; Tynan, Wendy; Broide, Ron S.; Helton, Rob; Stoveken, Barbara S.; Winrow, Christopher; Lockhart, Daniel J.; Reilly, John F.; Young, Warren G.; Bloom, Floyd E.; Lockhart, David J.; Barlow, Carrolee

    2005-01-01

    The current model to explain the organization of the mammalian nervous system is based on studies of anatomy, embryology, and evolution. To further investigate the molecular organization of the adult mammalian brain, we have built a gene expression-based brain map. We measured gene expression patterns for 24 neural tissues covering the mouse central nervous system and found, surprisingly, that the adult brain bears a transcriptional “imprint” consistent with both embryological origins and classic evolutionary relationships. Embryonic cellular position along the anterior–posterior axis of the neural tube was shown to be closely associated with, and possibly a determinant of, the gene expression patterns in adult structures. We also observed a significant number of embryonic patterning and homeobox genes with region-specific expression in the adult nervous system. The relationships between global expression patterns for different anatomical regions and the nature of the observed region-specific genes suggest that the adult brain retains a degree of overall gene expression established during embryogenesis that is important for regional specificity and the functional relationships between regions in the adult. The complete collection of extensively annotated gene expression data along with data mining and visualization tools have been made available on a publicly accessible web site (www.barlow-lockhart-brainmapnimhgrant.org). PMID:16002470

  4. The adult human brain harbors multipotent perivascular mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Paul, Gesine; Özen, Ilknur; Christophersen, Nicolaj S; Reinbothe, Thomas; Bengzon, Johan; Visse, Edward; Jansson, Katarina; Dannaeus, Karin; Henriques-Oliveira, Catarina; Roybon, Laurent; Anisimov, Sergey V; Renström, Erik; Svensson, Mikael; Haegerstrand, Anders; Brundin, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    Blood vessels and adjacent cells form perivascular stem cell niches in adult tissues. In this perivascular niche, a stem cell with mesenchymal characteristics was recently identified in some adult somatic tissues. These cells are pericytes that line the microvasculature, express mesenchymal markers and differentiate into mesodermal lineages but might even have the capacity to generate tissue-specific cell types. Here, we isolated, purified and characterized a previously unrecognized progenitor population from two different regions in the adult human brain, the ventricular wall and the neocortex. We show that these cells co-express markers for mesenchymal stem cells and pericytes in vivo and in vitro, but do not express glial, neuronal progenitor, hematopoietic, endothelial or microglial markers in their native state. Furthermore, we demonstrate at a clonal level that these progenitors have true multilineage potential towards both, the mesodermal and neuroectodermal phenotype. They can be epigenetically induced in vitro into adipocytes, chondroblasts and osteoblasts but also into glial cells and immature neurons. This progenitor population exhibits long-term proliferation, karyotype stability and retention of phenotype and multipotency following extensive propagation. Thus, we provide evidence that the vascular niche in the adult human brain harbors a novel progenitor with multilineage capacity that appears to represent mesenchymal stem cells and is different from any previously described human neural stem cell. Future studies will elucidate whether these cells may play a role for disease or may represent a reservoir that can be exploited in efforts to repair the diseased human brain. PMID:22523602

  5. Expression of tmp21 in normal adult human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jian; Yang, Yuan; Li, Jianbo; Hou, Jing; Xia, Kun; Song, Weihong; Liu, Shengchun

    2014-01-01

    TMP21, known as p23 protein, is one important member of the p24 protein families. The degradation of TMP21 is mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, as with the other presenilin-associated γ-secretase complex members. NFAT plays a very important role in regulation of human TMP21 gene expression. Compared with the function of TMP21, the studies about the distribution of this protein in human tissues are limited. We collected 19 normal adult human tissues from a healthy adult man died in a traffic accident and did examination of all the tissues collected for ICH, western blot and RT-PCR. It was shown that the expression of TMP21 is at high levels in heart, liver, lung, kidney and adrenal gland; moderate levels in brain, pancreas, prostate gland, testicle, small intestine, colon, stomach, gall bladder, thyroid gland and trachea; low levels in skeletal muscle, skin and lymphonodus. TMP21 is widely existed in normal adult human tissues. The current study provided for the first time a comprehensive expression of TMP21 in normal adult human tissues. It will benefit on helping in the design and interpretation of future studies focused on expounding the function of TMP21. PMID:25356171

  6. Neonatal Brain Tissue Classification with Morphological Adaptation and Unified Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Beare, Richard J.; Chen, Jian; Kelly, Claire E.; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Smyser, Christopher D.; Rogers, Cynthia E.; Loh, Wai Y.; Matthews, Lillian G.; Cheong, Jeanie L. Y.; Spittle, Alicia J.; Anderson, Peter J.; Doyle, Lex W.; Inder, Terrie E.; Seal, Marc L.; Thompson, Deanne K.

    2016-01-01

    Measuring the distribution of brain tissue types (tissue classification) in neonates is necessary for studying typical and atypical brain development, such as that associated with preterm birth, and may provide biomarkers for neurodevelopmental outcomes. Compared with magnetic resonance images of adults, neonatal images present specific challenges that require the development of specialized, population-specific methods. This paper introduces MANTiS (Morphologically Adaptive Neonatal Tissue Segmentation), which extends the unified segmentation approach to tissue classification implemented in Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) software to neonates. MANTiS utilizes a combination of unified segmentation, template adaptation via morphological segmentation tools and topological filtering, to segment the neonatal brain into eight tissue classes: cortical gray matter, white matter, deep nuclear gray matter, cerebellum, brainstem, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), hippocampus and amygdala. We evaluated the performance of MANTiS using two independent datasets. The first dataset, provided by the NeoBrainS12 challenge, consisted of coronal T2-weighted images of preterm infants (born ≤30 weeks' gestation) acquired at 30 weeks' corrected gestational age (n = 5), coronal T2-weighted images of preterm infants acquired at 40 weeks' corrected gestational age (n = 5) and axial T2-weighted images of preterm infants acquired at 40 weeks' corrected gestational age (n = 5). The second dataset, provided by the Washington University NeuroDevelopmental Research (WUNDeR) group, consisted of T2-weighted images of preterm infants (born <30 weeks' gestation) acquired shortly after birth (n = 12), preterm infants acquired at term-equivalent age (n = 12), and healthy term-born infants (born ≥38 weeks' gestation) acquired within the first 9 days of life (n = 12). For the NeoBrainS12 dataset, mean Dice scores comparing MANTiS with manual segmentations were all above 0.7, except for the cortical gray

  7. Brain size and limits to adult neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Mercedes F; Sorrells, Shawn F; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose M; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2016-02-15

    The walls of the cerebral ventricles in the developing embryo harbor the primary neural stem cells from which most neurons and glia derive. In many vertebrates, neurogenesis continues postnatally and into adulthood in this region. Adult neurogenesis at the ventricle has been most extensively studied in organisms with small brains, such as reptiles, birds, and rodents. In reptiles and birds, these progenitor cells give rise to young neurons that migrate into many regions of the forebrain. Neurogenesis in adult rodents is also relatively widespread along the lateral ventricles, but migration is largely restricted to the rostral migratory stream into the olfactory bulb. Recent work indicates that the wall of the lateral ventricle is highly regionalized, with progenitor cells giving rise to different types of neurons depending on their location. In species with larger brains, young neurons born in these spatially specified domains become dramatically separated from potential final destinations. Here we hypothesize that the increase in size and topographical complexity (e.g., intervening white matter tracts) in larger brains may severely limit the long-term contribution of new neurons born close to, or in, the ventricular wall. We compare the process of adult neuronal birth, migration, and integration across species with different brain sizes, and discuss how early regional specification of progenitor cells may interact with brain size and affect where and when new neurons are added. PMID:26417888

  8. A revised dosimetric model of the adult head and brain

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchet, L.G.; Bolch, W.E.; Weber, D.A.

    1996-06-01

    During the last decade, new radiopharmaceutical have been introduced for brain imaging. The marked differences of these tracers in tissue specificity within the brain and their increasing use for diagnostic studies support the need for a more anthropomorphic model of the human brain and head. Brain and head models developed in the past have been only simplistic representations of this anatomic region. For example, the brain within the phantom of MIRD Pamphlet No. 5 Revised is modeled simply as a single ellipsoid of tissue With no differentiation of its internal structures. To address this need, the MIRD Committee established a Task Group in 1992 to construct a more detailed brain model to include the cerebral cortex, the white matter, the cerebellum, the thalamus, the caudate nucleus, the lentiform nucleus, the cerebral spinal fluid, the lateral ventricles, and the third ventricle. This brain model has been included within a slightly modified version of the head model developed by Poston et al. in 1984. This model has been incorporated into the radiation transport code EGS4 so as to calculate photon and electron absorbed fractions in the energy range 10 keV to 4 MeV for each of thirteen sources in the brain. Furthermore, explicit positron transport have been considered, separating the contribution by the positron itself and its associated annihilations photons. No differences are found between the electron and positron absorbed fractions; however, for initial energies of positrons greater than {approximately}0.5 MeV, significant differences are found between absorbed fractions from explicit transport of annihilation photons and those from an assumed uniform distribution of 0.511-MeV photons. Subsequently, S values were calculated for a variety of beta-particle and positron emitters brain imaging agents. Moreover, pediatric head and brain dosimetric models are currently being developed based on this adult head model.

  9. How Somatic Adult Tissues Develop Organizer Activity.

    PubMed

    Vogg, Matthias C; Wenger, Yvan; Galliot, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    The growth and patterning of anatomical structures from specific cellular fields in developing organisms relies on organizing centers that instruct surrounding cells to modify their behavior, namely migration, proliferation, and differentiation. We discuss here how organizers can form in adult organisms, a process of utmost interest for regenerative medicine. Animals like Hydra and planarians, which maintain their shape and fitness thanks to a highly dynamic homeostasis, offer a useful paradigm to study adult organizers in steady-state conditions. Beside the homeostatic context, these model systems also offer the possibility to study how organizers form de novo from somatic adult tissues. Both extracellular matrix remodeling and caspase activation play a key role in this transition, acting as promoters of organizer formation in the vicinity of the wound. Their respective roles and the crosstalk between them just start to be deciphered. PMID:26970630

  10. Astaxanthin reduces ischemic brain injury in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hui; Kuo, Chi-Chung; Chou, Jenny; Delvolve, Alice; Jackson, Shelley N.; Post, Jeremy; Woods, Amina S.; Hoffer, Barry J.; Wang, Yun; Harvey, Brandon K.

    2009-01-01

    Astaxanthin (ATX) is a dietary carotenoid of crustaceans and fish that contributes to their coloration. Dietary ATX is important for development and survival of salmonids and crustaceans and has been shown to reduce cardiac ischemic injury in rodents. The purpose of this study was to examine whether ATX can protect against ischemic injury in the mammalian brain. Adult rats were injected intracerebroventricularly with ATX or vehicle prior to a 60-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). ATX was present in the infarction area at 70-75 min after onset of MCAo. Treatment with ATX, compared to vehicle, increased locomotor activity in stroke rats and reduced cerebral infarction at 2 d after MCAo. To evaluate the protective mechanisms of ATX against stroke, brain tissues were assayed for free radical damage, apoptosis, and excitoxicity. ATX antagonized ischemia-mediated loss of aconitase activity and reduced glutamate release, lipid peroxidation, translocation of cytochrome c, and TUNEL labeling in the ischemic cortex. ATX did not alter physiological parameters, such as body temperature, brain temperature, cerebral blood flow, blood gases, blood pressure, and pH. Collectively, our data suggest that ATX can reduce ischemia-related injury in brain tissue through the inhibition of oxidative stress, reduction of glutamate release, and antiapoptosis. ATX may be clinically useful for patients vulnerable or prone to ischemic events.—Shen, H., Kuo, C.-C., Chou, J., Delvolve, A., Jackson, S. N., Post, J., Woods, A. S., Hoffer, B. J., Wang, Y., Harvey, B. K. Astaxanthin reduces ischemic brain injury in adult rats. PMID:19218497

  11. Visceral adipose tissue inflammation is associated with age-related brain changes and ischemic brain damage in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jin A; Jeong, Sae Im; Kim, Minsuk; Yoon, Joo Chun; Kim, Hee-Sun; Park, Eun-Mi

    2015-11-01

    Visceral adipose tissue is accumulated with aging. An increase in visceral fat accompanied by low-grade inflammation is associated with several adult-onset diseases. However, the effects of visceral adipose tissue inflammation on the normal and ischemic brains of aged are not clearly defined. To examine the role of visceral adipose tissue inflammation, we evaluated inflammatory cytokines in the serum, visceral adipose tissue, and brain as well as blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in aged male mice (20 months) underwent sham or visceral fat removal surgery compared with the young mice (2.5 months). Additionally, ischemic brain injury was compared in young and aged mice with sham and visceral fat removal surgery. Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels in examined organs were increased in aged mice compared with the young mice, and these levels were reduced in the mice with visceral fat removal. Increased BBB permeability with reduced expression of tight junction proteins in aged sham mice were also decreased in mice with visceral fat removal. After focal ischemic injury, aged mice with visceral fat removal showed a reduction in infarct volumes, BBB permeability, and levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the ischemic brain compared with sham mice, although the neurological outcomes were not significantly improved. In addition, further upregulated visceral adipose tissue inflammation in response to ischemic brain injury was attenuated in mice with visceral fat removal. These results suggest that visceral adipose tissue inflammation is associated with age-related changes in the brain and contributes to the ischemic brain damage in the aged mice. We suggest that visceral adiposity should be considered as a factor affecting brain health and ischemic brain damage in the aged population. PMID:26184082

  12. Astaxanthin reduces ischemic brain injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui; Kuo, Chi-Chung; Chou, Jenny; Delvolve, Alice; Jackson, Shelley N; Post, Jeremy; Woods, Amina S; Hoffer, Barry J; Wang, Yun; Harvey, Brandon K

    2009-06-01

    Astaxanthin (ATX) is a dietary carotenoid of crustaceans and fish that contributes to their coloration. Dietary ATX is important for development and survival of salmonids and crustaceans and has been shown to reduce cardiac ischemic injury in rodents. The purpose of this study was to examine whether ATX can protect against ischemic injury in the mammalian brain. Adult rats were injected intracerebroventricularly with ATX or vehicle prior to a 60-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). ATX was present in the infarction area at 70-75 min after onset of MCAo. Treatment with ATX, compared to vehicle, increased locomotor activity in stroke rats and reduced cerebral infarction at 2 d after MCAo. To evaluate the protective mechanisms of ATX against stroke, brain tissues were assayed for free radical damage, apoptosis, and excitoxicity. ATX antagonized ischemia-mediated loss of aconitase activity and reduced glutamate release, lipid peroxidation, translocation of cytochrome c, and TUNEL labeling in the ischemic cortex. ATX did not alter physiological parameters, such as body temperature, brain temperature, cerebral blood flow, blood gases, blood pressure, and pH. Collectively, our data suggest that ATX can reduce ischemia-related injury in brain tissue through the inhibition of oxidative stress, reduction of glutamate release, and antiapoptosis. ATX may be clinically useful for patients vulnerable or prone to ischemic events. PMID:19218497

  13. NMR imaging of cell phone radiation absorption in brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gultekin, David H.; Moeller, Lothar

    2013-01-01

    A method is described for measuring absorbed electromagnetic energy radiated from cell phone antennae into ex vivo brain tissue. NMR images the 3D thermal dynamics inside ex vivo bovine brain tissue and equivalent gel under exposure to power and irradiation time-varying radio frequency (RF) fields. The absorbed RF energy in brain tissue converts into Joule heat and affects the nuclear magnetic shielding and the Larmor precession. The resultant temperature increase is measured by the resonance frequency shift of hydrogen protons in brain tissue. This proposed application of NMR thermometry offers sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to characterize the hot spots from absorbed cell phone radiation in aqueous media and biological tissues. Specific absorption rate measurements averaged over 1 mg and 10 s in the brain tissue cover the total absorption volume. Reference measurements with fiber optic temperature sensors confirm the accuracy of the NMR thermometry. PMID:23248293

  14. NMR imaging of cell phone radiation absorption in brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Gultekin, David H; Moeller, Lothar

    2013-01-01

    A method is described for measuring absorbed electromagnetic energy radiated from cell phone antennae into ex vivo brain tissue. NMR images the 3D thermal dynamics inside ex vivo bovine brain tissue and equivalent gel under exposure to power and irradiation time-varying radio frequency (RF) fields. The absorbed RF energy in brain tissue converts into Joule heat and affects the nuclear magnetic shielding and the Larmor precession. The resultant temperature increase is measured by the resonance frequency shift of hydrogen protons in brain tissue. This proposed application of NMR thermometry offers sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to characterize the hot spots from absorbed cell phone radiation in aqueous media and biological tissues. Specific absorption rate measurements averaged over 1 mg and 10 s in the brain tissue cover the total absorption volume. Reference measurements with fiber optic temperature sensors confirm the accuracy of the NMR thermometry. PMID:23248293

  15. Evaluation of an automatic brain segmentation method developed for neonates on adult MR brain images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeskops, Pim; Viergever, Max A.; Benders, Manon J. N. L.; Išgum, Ivana

    2015-03-01

    Automatic brain tissue segmentation is of clinical relevance in images acquired at all ages. The literature presents a clear distinction between methods developed for MR images of infants, and methods developed for images of adults. The aim of this work is to evaluate a method developed for neonatal images in the segmentation of adult images. The evaluated method employs supervised voxel classification in subsequent stages, exploiting spatial and intensity information. Evaluation was performed using images available within the MRBrainS13 challenge. The obtained average Dice coefficients were 85.77% for grey matter, 88.66% for white matter, 81.08% for cerebrospinal fluid, 95.65% for cerebrum, and 96.92% for intracranial cavity, currently resulting in the best overall ranking. The possibility of applying the same method to neonatal as well as adult images can be of great value in cross-sectional studies that include a wide age range.

  16. Robotic multimodality stereotactic brain tissue identification: work in progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, R.; Mah, R.; Galvagni, A.; Guerrero, M.; Papasin, R.; Wallace, M.; Winters, J.

    1997-01-01

    Real-time identification of tissue would improve procedures such as stereotactic brain biopsy (SBX), functional and implantation neurosurgery, and brain tumor excision. To standard SBX equipment has been added: (1) computer-controlled stepper motors to drive the biopsy needle/probe precisely; (2) multiple microprobes to track tissue density, detect blood vessels and changes in blood flow, and distinguish the various tissues being penetrated; (3) neural net learning programs to allow real-time comparisons of current data with a normative data bank; (4) three-dimensional graphic displays to follow the probe as it traverses brain tissue. The probe can differentiate substances such as pig brain, differing consistencies of the 'brain-like' foodstuff tofu, and gels made to simulate brain, as well as detect blood vessels imbedded in these substances. Multimodality probes should improve the safety, efficacy, and diagnostic accuracy of SBX and other neurosurgical procedures.

  17. Adult stem cell plasticity: will engineered tissues be rejected?

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Te-Chao; Alison, Malcolm R; Wright, Nicholas A; Poulsom, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The dogma that adult tissue-specific stem cells remain committed to supporting only their own tissue has been challenged; a new hypothesis, that adult stem cells demonstrate plasticity in their repertoires, is being tested. This is important because it seems possible that haematopoietic stem cells, for example, could be exploited to generate and perhaps deliver cell-based therapies deep within existing nonhaematopoietic organs. Much of the evidence for plasticity derives from histological studies of tissues from patients or animals that have received grafts of cells or whole organs, from a donor bearing (or lacking) a definitive marker. Detection in the recipient of appropriately differentiated cells bearing the donor marker is indicative of a switch in phenotype of a stem cell or a member of a transit amplifying population or of a differentiated cell. In this review, we discuss evidence for these changes occurring but do not consider the molecular basis of cell commitment. In general, the extent of engraftment is low but may be increased if tissues are damaged. In model systems of liver regeneration, the repeated application of a selection pressure increases levels of engraftment considerably; how this occurs is unclear. Cell fusion plays a part in regeneration and remodelling of the liver, skeletal muscle and even regions of the brain. Genetic disease may be amenable to some forms of cell therapy, yet immune rejection will present challenges. Graft-vs.-host disease will continue to present problems, although this may be avoided if the cells were derived from the recipient or they were tolerized. Despite great expectations for cellular therapies, there are indications that attempts to replace missing proteins could be confounded simply by the development of specific immunity that rejects the new phenotype. PMID:15255965

  18. Treatment Options for Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ...

  19. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ...

  20. Stages of Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ...

  1. Backscatter and attenuation properties of mammalian brain tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijekularatne, Pushpani Vihara

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a common category of brain injuries, which contributes to a substantial number of deaths and permanent disability all over the world. Ultrasound technology plays a major role in tissue characterization due to its low cost and portability that could be used to bridge a wide gap in the TBI diagnostic process. This research addresses the ultrasonic properties of mammalian brain tissues focusing on backscatter and attenuation. Orientation dependence and spatial averaging of data were analyzed using the same method resulting from insertion of tissue sample between a transducer and a reference reflector. Apparent backscatter transfer function (ABTF) at 1 to 10 MHz, attenuation coefficient and backscatter coefficient (BSC) at 1 to 5 MHz frequency ranges were measured on ovine brain tissue samples. The resulting ABTF was a monotonically decreasing function of frequency and the attenuation coefficient and BSC generally were increasing functions of frequency, results consistent with other soft tissues such as liver, blood and heart.

  2. Experience-Dependent Neural Plasticity in the Adult Damaged Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Abigail L.; Cheng, Shao-Ying; Jones, Theresa A.

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral experience is at work modifying the structure and function of the brain throughout the lifespan, but it has a particularly dramatic influence after brain injury. This review summarizes recent findings on the role of experience in reorganizing the adult damaged brain, with a focus on findings from rodent stroke models of chronic upper…

  3. aBEAT: a toolbox for consistent analysis of longitudinal adult brain MRI.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yakang; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Li; Wu, Guorong; Shi, Feng; Shen, Dinggang

    2013-01-01

    Longitudinal brain image analysis is critical for revealing subtle but complex structural and functional changes of brain during aging or in neurodevelopmental disease. However, even with the rapid increase of clinical research and trials, a software toolbox dedicated for longitudinal image analysis is still lacking publicly. To cater for this increasing need, we have developed a dedicated 4D Adult Brain Extraction and Analysis Toolbox (aBEAT) to provide robust and accurate analysis of the longitudinal adult brain MR images. Specially, a group of image processing tools were integrated into aBEAT, including 4D brain extraction, 4D tissue segmentation, and 4D brain labeling. First, a 4D deformable-surface-based brain extraction algorithm, which can deform serial brain surfaces simultaneously under temporal smoothness constraint, was developed for consistent brain extraction. Second, a level-sets-based 4D tissue segmentation algorithm that incorporates local intensity distribution, spatial cortical-thickness constraint, and temporal cortical-thickness consistency was also included in aBEAT for consistent brain tissue segmentation. Third, a longitudinal groupwise image registration framework was further integrated into aBEAT for consistent ROI labeling by simultaneously warping a pre-labeled brain atlas to the longitudinal brain images. The performance of aBEAT has been extensively evaluated on a large number of longitudinal MR T1 images which include normal and dementia subjects, achieving very promising results. A Linux-based standalone package of aBEAT is now freely available at http://www.nitrc.org/projects/abeat. PMID:23577105

  4. [Radiotherapy of adult soft tissue sarcoma].

    PubMed

    Le Péchoux, C; Moureau-Zabotto, L; Llacer, C; Ducassou, A; Sargos, P; Sunyach, M P; Thariat, J

    2016-09-01

    Incidence of soft tissue sarcoma is low and requires multidisciplinary treatment in specialized centers. The objective of this paper is to report the state of the art regarding indications and treatment techniques of main soft tissue sarcoma localisations. PMID:27523415

  5. Multimodality stereotactic brain tissue identification: the NASA smart probe project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, R.; Mah, R.; Aghevli, A.; Freitas, K.; Galvagni, A.; Guerrero, M.; Papsin, R.; Reed, C.; Stassinopoulos, D.

    1999-01-01

    Real-time tissue identification can benefit procedures such as stereotactic brain biopsy, functional neurosurgery and brain tumor excision. Optical scattering spectroscopy has been shown to be effective at discriminating cancer from noncancerous conditions in the colon, bladder and breast. The NASA Smart Probe extends the concept of 'optical biopsy' by using neural network techniques to combine the output from 3 microsensors contained within a cannula 2. 7 mm in diameter (i.e. the diameter of a stereotactic brain biopsy needle). Experimental data from 5 rats show the clear differentiation between tissues such as brain, nerve, fat, artery and muscle that can be achieved with optical scattering spectroscopy alone. These data and previous findings with other modalities such as (1) analysis of the image from a fiberoptic neuroendoscope and (2) the output from a microstrain gauge suggest the Smart Probe multiple microsensor technique shows promise for real-time tissue identification in neurosurgical procedures. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Analysis of RF exposure in the head tissues of children and adults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiart, J.; Hadjem, A.; Wong, M. F.; Bloch, I.

    2008-07-01

    This paper analyzes the radio frequencies (RF) exposure in the head tissues of children using a cellular handset or RF sources (a dipole and a generic handset) at 900, 1800, 2100 and 2400 MHz. Based on magnetic resonance imaging, child head models have been developed. The maximum specific absorption rate (SAR) over 10 g in the head has been analyzed in seven child and six adult heterogeneous head models. The influence of the variability in the same age class is carried out using models based on a morphing technique. The SAR over 1 g in specific tissues has also been assessed in the different types of child and adult head models. Comparisons are performed but nevertheless need to be confirmed since they have been derived from data sets of limited size. The simulations that have been performed show that the differences between the maximum SAR over 10 g estimated in the head models of the adults and the ones of the children are small compared to the standard deviations. But they indicate that the maximum SAR in 1 g of peripheral brain tissues of the child models aged between 5 and 8 years is about two times higher than in adult models. This difference is not observed for the child models of children above 8 years old: the maximum SAR in 1 g of peripheral brain tissues is about the same as the one in adult models. Such differences can be explained by the lower thicknesses of pinna, skin and skull of the younger child models.

  7. Brain tumor imaging of rat fresh tissue using terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Sayuri; Fukushi, Yasuko; Kubota, Oichi; Itsuji, Takeaki; Ouchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2016-07-01

    Tumor imaging by terahertz spectroscopy of fresh tissue without dye is demonstrated using samples from a rat glioma model. The complex refractive index spectrum obtained by a reflection terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system can discriminate between normal and tumor tissues. Both the refractive index and absorption coefficient of tumor tissues are higher than those of normal tissues and can be attributed to the higher cell density and water content of the tumor region. The results of this study indicate that terahertz technology is useful for detecting brain tumor tissue.

  8. Brain tumor imaging of rat fresh tissue using terahertz spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Sayuri; Fukushi, Yasuko; Kubota, Oichi; Itsuji, Takeaki; Ouchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Tumor imaging by terahertz spectroscopy of fresh tissue without dye is demonstrated using samples from a rat glioma model. The complex refractive index spectrum obtained by a reflection terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system can discriminate between normal and tumor tissues. Both the refractive index and absorption coefficient of tumor tissues are higher than those of normal tissues and can be attributed to the higher cell density and water content of the tumor region. The results of this study indicate that terahertz technology is useful for detecting brain tumor tissue. PMID:27456312

  9. Guidelines for Better Communication with Brain Impaired Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... A You are here Home Guidelines for Better Communication with Brain Impaired Adults Printer-friendly version Communicating ... easy solutions, following some basic guidelines should ease communication, and lower levels of stress both for you ...

  10. Localization of PPAR isotypes in the adult mouse and human brain

    PubMed Central

    Warden, Anna; Truitt, Jay; Merriman, Morgan; Ponomareva, Olga; Jameson, Kelly; Ferguson, Laura B.; Mayfield, R. Dayne; Harris, R. Adron

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear hormone receptors that act as ligand-activated transcription factors. PPAR agonists have well-documented anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective roles in the central nervous system. Recent evidence suggests that PPAR agonists are attractive therapeutic agents for treating neurodegenerative diseases as well as addiction. However, the distribution of PPAR mRNA and protein in brain regions associated with these conditions (i.e. prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, ventral tegmental area) is not well defined. Moreover, the cell type specificity of PPARs in mouse and human brain tissue has yet to be investigated. We utilized quantitative PCR and double immunofluorescence microscopy to determine that both PPAR mRNA and protein are expressed ubiquitously throughout the adult mouse brain. We found that PPARs have unique cell type specificities that are consistent between species. PPARα was the only isotype to colocalize with all cell types in both adult mouse and adult human brain tissue. Overall, we observed a strong neuronal signature, which raises the possibility that PPAR agonists may be targeting neurons rather than glia to produce neuroprotection. Our results fill critical gaps in PPAR distribution and define novel cell type specificity profiles in the adult mouse and human brain. PMID:27283430

  11. Memory and Brain Volume in Adults Prenatally Exposed to Alcohol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coles, Claire D.; Goldstein, Felicia C.; Lynch, Mary Ellen; Chen, Xiangchuan; Kable, Julie A.; Johnson, Katrina C.; Hu, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    The impact of prenatal alcohol exposure on memory and brain development was investigated in 92 African-American, young adults who were first identified in the prenatal period. Three groups (Control, n = 26; Alcohol-related Neurodevelopmental Disorder, n = 36; and Dysmorphic, n = 30) were imaged using structural MRI with brain volume calculated for…

  12. Characterisation and modelling of brain tissue for surgical simulation.

    PubMed

    Mendizabal, A; Aguinaga, I; Sánchez, E

    2015-05-01

    Interactive surgical simulators capable of providing a realistic visual and haptic feedback to users are a promising technology for medical training and surgery planification. However, modelling the physical behaviour of human organs and tissues for surgery simulation remains a challenge. On the one hand, this is due to the difficulty to characterise the physical properties of biological soft tissues. On the other hand, the challenge still remains in the computation time requirements of real-time simulation required in interactive systems. Real-time surgical simulation and medical training must employ a sufficiently accurate and simple model of soft tissues in order to provide a realistic haptic and visual response. This study attempts to characterise the brain tissue at similar conditions to those that take place on surgical procedures. With this aim, porcine brain tissue is characterised, as a surrogate of human brain, on a rotational rheometer at low strain rates and large strains. In order to model the brain tissue with an adequate level of accuracy and simplicity, linear elastic, hyperelastic and quasi-linear viscoelastic models are defined. These models are simulated using the ABAQUS finite element platform and compared with the obtained experimental data. PMID:25676499

  13. Childhood Onset Schizophrenia: Cortical Brain Abnormalities as Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstein, Deanna; Lerch, Jason; Shaw, Philip; Clasen, Liv; Giedd, Jay; Gochman, Peter; Rapoport, Judith; Gogtay, Nitin

    2006-01-01

    Background: Childhood onset schizophrenia (COS) is a rare but severe form of the adult onset disorder. While structural brain imaging studies show robust, widespread, and progressive gray matter loss in COS during adolescence, there have been no longitudinal studies of sufficient duration to examine comparability with the more common adult onset…

  14. Infiltrating cells from host brain restore the microglial population in grafted cortical tissue.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong; Tao, Sijue; Fang, Yukun; Guo, Jing; Zhu, Lirui; Zhang, Shengxiang

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of embryonic cortical tissue is considered as a promising therapy for brain injury. Grafted neurons can reestablish neuronal network and improve cortical function of the host brain. Microglia is a key player in regulating neuronal survival and plasticity, but its activation and dynamics in grafted cortical tissue remain unknown. Using two-photon intravital imaging and parabiotic model, here we investigated the proliferation and source of microglia in the donor region by transplanting embryonic cortical tissue into adult cortex. Live imaging showed that the endogenous microglia of the grafted tissue were rapidly lost after transplantation. Instead, host-derived microglia infiltrated and colonized the graft. Parabiotic model suggested that the main source of infiltrating cells is the parenchyma of the host brain. Colonized microglia proliferated and experienced an extensive morphological transition and eventually differentiated into resting ramified morphology. Collectively, these results demonstrated that donor tissue has little contribution to the activated microglia and host brain controls the microglial population in the graft. PMID:27615195

  15. 65zinc uptake from blood into brain and other tissues in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Pullen, R.G.; Franklin, P.A.; Hall, G.H. )

    1990-10-01

    Zinc is essential for normal growth, development and brain function although little is known about brain zinc homeostasis. Therefore, in this investigation we have studied 65Zn uptake from blood into brain and other tissues and have measured the blood-brain barrier permeability to 65Zn in the anaesthetized rat in vivo. Adult male Wistar rats within the weight range 500-600 g were used. 65ZnCl2 and (125I)albumin, the latter serving as a vascular marker, were injected in a bolus of normal saline I.V. Sequential arterial blood samples were taken during experiments that lasted between 5 min and 5 hr. At termination, samples from the liver, spleen, pancreas, lung, heart, muscle, kidney, bone, testis, ileum, blood cells, csf, and whole brain were taken and analysed for radio-isotope activity. Data have been analysed by Graphical Analysis which suggests 65Zn uptake from blood by all tissues sampled was unidirectional during this experimental period except brain, where at circulation times less than 30 min, 65Zn fluxes were bidirectional. In addition to the blood space, the brain appears to contain a rapidly exchanging compartment(s) for 65Zn of about 4 ml/100g which is not csf.

  16. Three-dimensional assessment of brain tissue morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bert; Germann, Marco; Jeanmonod, Daniel; Morel, Anne

    2006-08-01

    The microstructure of brain tissues becomes visible using different types of optical microscopy after the tissue sectioning. This preparation procedure introduces stress and strain in the anisotropic and inhomogeneous soft tissue slices, which are several 10 μm thick. Consequently, the three-dimensional dataset, generated out of the two-dimensional images with lateral submicrometer resolution, needs algorithms to correct the deformations, which can be significant for mellow tissue such as brain segments. The spatial resolution perpendicular to the slices is much worse with respect to the lateral sub-micrometer resolution. Therefore, we propose as complementary method the synchrotron-radiation-based micro computed tomography (SRμCT), which avoids any kind of preparation artifacts due to sectioning and histological processing and yields true micrometer resolution in the three orthogonal directions. The visualization of soft matter by the use of SRμCT, however, is often based on elaborate staining protocols, since the tissue exhibits (almost) the same x-ray absorption as the surrounding medium. Therefore, it is unexpected that human tissue from the pons and the medulla oblongata in phosphate buffer show several features such as the blood vessels and the inferior olivary nucleus without staining. The value of these tomograms lies especially in the precise non-rigid registration of the different sets of histological slices. Applications of this method to larger pieces of brain tissue, such as the human thalamus are planned in the context of stereotactic functional neurosurgery.

  17. Brain stem auditory evoked responses in human infants and adults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecox, K.; Galambos, R.

    1974-01-01

    Brain stem evoked potentials were recorded by conventional scalp electrodes in infants (3 weeks to 3 years of age) and adults. The latency of one of the major response components (wave V) is shown to be a function both of click intensity and the age of the subject; this latency at a given signal strength shortens postnatally to reach the adult value (about 6 msec) by 12 to 18 months of age. The demonstrated reliability and limited variability of these brain stem electrophysiological responses provide the basis for an optimistic estimate of their usefulness as an objective method for assessing hearing in infants and adults.

  18. Epimorphic regeneration approach to tissue replacement in adult mammals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Urodeles and fetal mammals are capable of impressive epimorphic regeneration in a variety of tissues, whereas the typical default response to injury in adult mammals consists of inflammation and scar tissue formation. One component of epimorphic regeneration is the recruitment of resident progenitor...

  19. Measuring the local electrical conductivity of human brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtari, M.; Emin, D.; Ellingson, B. M.; Woodworth, D.; Frew, A.; Mathern, G. W.

    2016-02-01

    The electrical conductivities of freshly excised brain tissues from 24 patients were measured. The diffusion-MRI of the hydrogen nuclei of water molecules from regions that were subsequently excised was also measured. Analysis of these measurements indicates that differences between samples' conductivities are primarily due to differences of their densities of solvated sodium cations. Concomitantly, the sample-to-sample variations of their diffusion constants are relatively small. This finding suggests that non-invasive in-vivo measurements of brain tissues' local sodium-cation density can be utilized to estimate its local electrical conductivity.

  20. Adult neurogenesis in the decapod crustacean brain: A hematopoietic connection?

    PubMed Central

    Beltz, Barbara S.; Zhang, Yi; Benton, Jeanne L.; Sandeman, David C.

    2011-01-01

    New neurons are produced and integrated into circuits in the adult brains of many organisms, including crustaceans. In some crustacean species, the 1st- generation neuronal precursors reside in a niche exhibiting characteristics analogous to mammalian neurogenic niches. However, unlike mammalian niches where several generations of neuronal precursors coexist, the lineage of precursor cells in crayfish is spatially separated allowing the influence of environmental and endogenous regulators on specific generations in the neuronal precursor lineage to be defined. Experiments also demonstrate that the 1st-generation neuronal precursors in the crayfish Procambarus clarkii are not self-renewing. A source external to the neurogenic niche must therefore provide cells that replenish the 1st-generation precursor pool, because although these cells divide and produce a continuous efflux of 2nd-generation cells from the niche, the population of 1st-generation niche precursors is not diminished with growth and aging. In vitro studies show that cells extracted from the hemolymph, but not other tissues, are attracted to and incorporated into the neurogenic niche, a phenomenon that appears to involve serotonergic mechanisms. We propose that in crayfish, the hematopoietic system may be a source of cells that replenish the niche cell pool. These and other studies reviewed here establish decapod crustaceans as model systems in which the processes underlying adult neurogenesis, such as stem cell origins and transformation, can be readily explored. Studies in diverse species where adult neurogenesis occurs will result in a broader understanding of fundamental mechanisms and how evolutionary processes may have shaped the vertebrate/mammalian condition. PMID:21929622

  1. New Nerve Cells for the Adult Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kempermann, Gerd; Gage, Fred H.

    1999-01-01

    Contrary to dogma, the human brain does produce new nerve cells in adulthood. The mature human brain spawns neurons routinely in the hippocampus, an area important to memory and learning. This research can make it possible to ease any number of disorders involving neurological damage and death. (CCM)

  2. Light Scattering Properties Vary across Different Regions of the Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Stubblefield, Elizabeth A.; Felsen, Gidon

    2013-01-01

    Recently developed optogenetic tools provide powerful approaches to optically excite or inhibit neural activity. In a typical in-vivo experiment, light is delivered to deep nuclei via an implanted optical fiber. Light intensity attenuates with increasing distance from the fiber tip, determining the volume of tissue in which optogenetic proteins can successfully be activated. However, whether and how this volume of effective light intensity varies as a function of brain region or wavelength has not been systematically studied. The goal of this study was to measure and compare how light scatters in different areas of the mouse brain. We delivered different wavelengths of light via optical fibers to acute slices of mouse brainstem, midbrain and forebrain tissue. We measured light intensity as a function of distance from the fiber tip, and used the data to model the spread of light in specific regions of the mouse brain. We found substantial differences in effective attenuation coefficients among different brain areas, which lead to substantial differences in light intensity demands for optogenetic experiments. The use of light of different wavelengths additionally changes how light illuminates a given brain area. We created a brain atlas of effective attenuation coefficients of the adult mouse brain, and integrated our data into an application that can be used to estimate light scattering as well as required light intensity for optogenetic manipulation within a given volume of tissue. PMID:23874433

  3. MRI of brain tissue oxygen tension under hyperbaric conditions.

    PubMed

    Muir, Eric R; Cardenas, Damon P; Duong, Timothy Q

    2016-06-01

    The brain depends on a continuous supply of oxygen to maintain its structural and functional integrity. This study measured T1 from MRI under normobaric air, normobaric oxygen, hyperbaric air, and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) conditions as a marker of tissue pO2 since dissolved molecular oxygen acts as an endogenous contrast agent. Brain tissue T1 decreased corresponding to increased pO2 with increasing inhaled oxygen concentrations, and tissue oxygenation was estimated from the T1 changes between different inhaled oxygen levels. Tissue pO2 difference maps between different oxygen conditions showed heterogeneous pO2 changes in the brain. MRI-derived tissue pO2 was markedly lower than the arterial pO2 but was slightly higher than venous pO2. Additionally, for comparison with published extracellular tissue pO2 data obtained using oxygen electrodes and other invasive techniques, a model was used to estimate extracellular and intracellular pO2 from the MRI-derived mean tissue pO2. This required multiple assumptions, and so the effects of the assumptions and parameters used in modeling brain pO2 were evaluated. MRI-derived pO2 values were strongly dependent on assumptions about the extra- and intracellular compartments but were relatively less sensitive to variations in the relaxivity constant of oxygen and contribution from oxygen in the cerebral blood compartment. This approach may prove useful in evaluating tissue oxygenation in disease states such as stroke. PMID:27033683

  4. Changes in Brain Tissue and Behavior Patterns Induced by Single Short-Term Fasting in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hisatomi, Yuko; Asakura, Kyo; Kugino, Kenji; Kurokawa, Mamoru; Asakura, Tomiko; Nakata, Keiko

    2013-01-01

    In humans, emaciation from long-term dietary deficiencies, such as anorexia, reportedly increases physical activity and brain atrophy. However, the effects of single short-term fasting on brain tissue or behavioral activity patterns remain unclear. To clarify the impact of malnutrition on brain function, we conducted a single short-term fasting study as an anorexia model using male adult mice and determined if changes occurred in migratory behavior as an expression of brain function and in brain tissue structure. Sixteen-week-old C57BL/6J male mice were divided into either the fasted group or the control group. Experiments were conducted in a fixed indoor environment. We examined the effects of fasting on the number of nerve cells, structural changes in the myelin and axon density, and brain atrophy. For behavior observation, the amount of food and water consumed, ingestion time, and the pattern of movement were measured using a time-recording system. The fasted mice showed a significant increase in physical activity and their rhythm of movement was disturbed. Since the brain was in an abnormal state after fasting, mice that were normally active during the night became active regardless of day or night and performed strenuous exercise at a high frequency. The brain weight did not change by a fast, and brain atrophy was not observed. Although no textural change was apparent by fasting, the neuronal neogenesis in the subventricular zone and hippocampus was inhibited, causing disorder of the brain function. A clear association between the suppression of encephalic neuropoiesis and overactivity was not established. However, it is interesting that the results of this study suggest that single short-term fasting has an effect on encephalic neuropoiesis. PMID:24224039

  5. Mechanical response of brain tissue under blast loading.

    PubMed

    Laksari, Kaveh; Sadeghipour, Keyanoush; Darvish, Kurosh

    2014-04-01

    In this study, a framework for understanding the propagation of stress waves in brain tissue under blast loading has been developed. It was shown that tissue nonlinearity and rate dependence are the key parameters in predicting the mechanical behavior under such loadings, as they determine whether traveling waves could become steeper and eventually evolve into shock discontinuities. To investigate this phenomenon, in the present study, brain tissue has been characterized as a quasi-linear viscoelastic (QLV) material and a nonlinear constitutive model has been developed for the tissue that spans from medium loading rates up to blast rates. It was shown that development of shock waves is possible inside the head in response to high rate compressive pressure waves. Finally, it was argued that injury to the nervous tissue at the microstructural level could be partly attributed to the high stress gradients with high rates generated at the shock front and this was proposed as a mechanism of injury in brain tissue. PMID:24457112

  6. [Adjuvant chemotherapy of adults soft tissue sarcomas].

    PubMed

    Bui-Nguyen, B; Italiano, A; Delva, F; Toulmond, M

    2010-06-01

    The main progress in the management of soft tissue sarcomas have been obtained in the field of local control. Although the main evolutive, vital, risk of these diseases is metastatic dissemination, efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy remains a controversial issue. Thus, adjuvant chemotherapy cannot be considered as a standard for any situation. The last results of clinical trials, meta-analysis and population studies are presented and discussed in this article. New therapeutic strategies are to be developed to prevent metastases in soft tissue sarcomas. This needs a better understanding of the biology of those tumors, of metastases risk factors and of the determinants of systemic therapies efficacy in these tumors. PMID:20547481

  7. Substance use and brain reward mechanisms in older adults.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Marsha; Platt, Lois

    2013-07-01

    Substance use among older adults is on the rise, with statistics indicating this to be a growing health problem. Brain changes in the reward center of the brain that naturally occur with aging are offered as one source of these statistics. Aging is generally associated with increased prevalence of chronic disease, disability, and death, and therefore a public health goal for older adults is to maintain health, independence, and function. Psychiatric-mental health nurses are uniquely positioned to assist older adults in achievement of these goals through health assessment and promotion. The use of client-centered counseling approaches that recognize the older adult's developmental need for autonomy and choice in decision making have been shown to be effective in increasing motivation in this adult population. PMID:23758223

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of light propagation in the adult brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudra, Regina M.; Nadler, Andreas; Keller, Emanuella; Niederer, Peter

    2004-06-01

    When near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is applied noninvasively to the adult head for brain monitoring, extra-cerebral bone and surface tissue exert a substantial influence on the cerebral signal. Most attempts to subtract extra-cerebral contamination involve spatially resolved spectroscopy (SRS). However, inter-individual variability of anatomy restrict the reliability of SRS. We simulated the light propagation with Monte Carlo techniques on the basis of anatomical structures determined from 3D-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exhibiting a voxel resolution of 0.8 x 0.8 x 0.8 mm3 for three different pairs of T1/T2 values each. The MRI data were used to define the material light absorption and dispersion coefficient for each voxel. The resulting spatial matrix was applied in the Monte Carlo Simulation to determine the light propagation in the cerebral cortex and overlaying structures. The accuracy of the Monte Carlo Simulation was furthermore increased by using a constant optical path length for the photons which was less than the median optical path length of the different materials. Based on our simulations we found a differential pathlength factor (DPF) of 6.15 which is close to with the value of 5.9 found in the literature for a distance of 4.5cm between the external sensors. Furthermore, we weighted the spatial probability distribution of the photons within the different tissues with the probabilities of the relative blood volume within the tissue. The results show that 50% of the NIRS signal is determined by the grey matter of the cerebral cortex which allows us to conclude that NIRS can produce meaningful cerebral blood flow measurements providing that the necessary corrections for extracerebral contamination are included.

  9. Histomorphological Phenotyping of the Adult Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Mikhaleva, Anna; Kannan, Meghna; Wagner, Christel; Yalcin, Binnaz

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a series of standard operating procedures for morphological phenotyping of the mouse brain using basic histology. Many histological studies of the mouse brain use qualitative approaches based on what the human eye can detect. Consequently, some phenotypic information may be missed. Here we describe a quantitative approach for the assessment of brain morphology that is simple and robust. A total of 78 measurements are made throughout the brain at specific and well-defined regions, including the cortex, the hippocampus, and the cerebellum. Experimental design and timeline considerations, including strain background effects, the importance of sectioning quality, measurement variability, and efforts to correct human errors are discussed. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27584555

  10. Using Network Science to Evaluate Exercise-Associated Brain Changes in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Burdette, Jonathan H.; Laurienti, Paul J.; Espeland, Mark A.; Morgan, Ashley; Telesford, Qawi; Vechlekar, Crystal D.; Hayasaka, Satoru; Jennings, Janine M.; Katula, Jeffrey A.; Kraft, Robert A.; Rejeski, W. Jack

    2010-01-01

    Literature has shown that exercise is beneficial for cognitive function in older adults and that aerobic fitness is associated with increased hippocampal tissue and blood volumes. The current study used novel network science methods to shed light on the neurophysiological implications of exercise-induced changes in the hippocampus of older adults. Participants represented a volunteer subgroup of older adults that were part of either the exercise training (ET) or healthy aging educational control (HAC) treatment arms from the Seniors Health and Activity Research Program Pilot (SHARP-P) trial. Following the 4-month interventions, MRI measures of resting brain blood flow and connectivity were performed. The ET group's hippocampal cerebral blood flow (CBF) exhibited statistically significant increases compared to the HAC group. Novel whole-brain network connectivity analyses showed greater connectivity in the hippocampi of the ET participants compared to HAC. Furthermore, the hippocampus was consistently shown to be within the same network neighborhood (module) as the anterior cingulate cortex only within the ET group. Thus, within the ET group, the hippocampus and anterior cingulate were highly interconnected and localized to the same network neighborhood. This project shows the power of network science to investigate potential mechanisms for exercise-induced benefits to the brain in older adults. We show a link between neurological network features and CBF, and it is possible that this alteration of functional brain networks may lead to the known improvement in cognitive function among older adults following exercise. PMID:20589103

  11. The effects of vitamin D on brain development and adult brain function.

    PubMed

    Kesby, James P; Eyles, Darryl W; Burne, Thomas H J; McGrath, John J

    2011-12-01

    A role for vitamin D in brain development and function has been gaining support over the last decade. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that this vitamin is actually a neuroactive steroid that acts on brain development, leading to alterations in brain neurochemistry and adult brain function. Early deficiencies have been linked with neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, and adult deficiencies have been associated with a host of adverse brain outcomes, including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, depression and cognitive decline. This review summarises the current state of research on the actions of vitamin D in the brain and the consequences of deficiencies in this vitamin. Furthermore, we discuss specific implications of vitamin D status on the neurotransmitter, dopamine. PMID:21664231

  12. [A brain tissue bank in a neuropathology laboratory. Basic methodology].

    PubMed

    Rivas, E; Teijeira, S; Tardio, A; Fachal, C; Quintáns, B; Navarro, C

    2003-12-01

    The Meixoeiro Hospital Brain Bank (BB) was established at the end of 2002. A BB is a tissue collection and storage system, established under the best conditions to carry out prospective morphological, biochemical or molecular studies. The BB should ideally be supported by a donor program, although samples may also be obtained from autopsy material from patients with neurodegenerative diseases. Recruitment of control cases from brains without neurological diseases is basic. The main goal of a BB is to provide brain tissue for research. Each case requires accurate clinical data, a definite diagnosis and optimal conditions of tissue preservation. The use of protocols to standardize the handling and processing of tissues, data recruitment and neuropathological diagnosis is fundamental to assure the quality and homogeneity of samples. Close collaboration between neuropathologists, neurologists and other specialists is essential in all the process. Although important advances in the tissue banking field have been achieved, the number of donors in Spain still remains low. Stronger institutional support as well as public awareness through better diffusion of the information is necessary to increase the number of donors and improve BB development. PMID:14648346

  13. General solutions to poroviscoelastic model of hydrocephalic human brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Mehrabian, Amin; Abousleiman, Younane

    2011-12-21

    Hydrocephalus is a well-known disorder of brain fluidic system. It is commonly associated with complexities in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation in brain. In this paper, hydrocephalus and shunting surgery which is used in its treatment are modeled. Brain tissues are considered to follow a poroviscoelastic constitutive model in order to address the effects of time dependence of mechanical properties of soft tissues and fluid flow hydraulics. Our solution draws from Biot's theory of poroelasticity, generalized to account for viscoelastic effects through the correspondence principle. Geometrically, the brain is conceived to be spherically symmetric, where the ventricles are assumed to be a hollow concentric space filled with cerebrospinal fluid. A generalized Kelvin model is considered for the rheological properties of brain tissues. The solution presented is useful in the analysis of the disorder of hydrocephalus as well as the treatment associated with it, namely, ventriclostomy surgery. The sensitivity of the solution to various factors such as aqueduct blockage level and trabeculae stiffness is thoroughly analyzed using numerical examples. Results indicate that partial aqueduct stenosis may be a cause of hydrocephalus. However, only severe occlusion of the aqueduct can cause a significant increase in the ventricle and brain's extracellular fluid pressure. Ventriculostomy shunts are commonly used as a remedy to hydrocephalus. They serve to reduce the ventricular pressure to the normal level. However, sensitivity analysis on the shunt's fluid deliverability parameter has shown that inappropriate design or selection of design shunt may cause under-drainage or over-drainage of the ventricles. Excessive drainage of CSF may increase the normal tensile stress on trabeculae. It can cause rupture of superior cerebral veins or damage to trabeculae or even brain tissues which in turn may lead to subdural hematoma, a common side-effect of the surgery. These Post

  14. A brain sexual dimorphism controlled by adult circulating androgens.

    PubMed

    Cooke, B M; Tabibnia, G; Breedlove, S M

    1999-06-22

    Reports of structural differences between the brains of men and women, heterosexual and homosexual men, and male-to-female transsexuals and other men have been offered as evidence that the behavioral differences between these groups are likely caused by differences in the early development of the brain. However, a possible confounding variable is the concentration of circulating hormones seen in these groups in adulthood. Evaluation of this possibility hinges on the extent to which circulating hormones can alter the size of mammalian brain regions as revealed by Nissl stains. We now report a sexual dimorphism in the volume of a brain nucleus in rats that can be completely accounted for by adult sex differences in circulating androgen. The posterodorsal nucleus of the medial amygdala (MePD) has a greater volume in male rats than in females, but adult castration of males causes the volume to shrink to female values within four weeks, whereas androgen treatment of adult females for that period enlarges the MePD to levels equivalent to normal males. This report demonstrates that adult hormone manipulations can completely reverse a sexual dimorphism in brain regional volume in a mammalian species. The sex difference and androgen responsiveness of MePD volume is reflected in the soma size of neurons there. PMID:10377450

  15. Transistor needle chip for recording in brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felderer, Florian; Fromherz, Peter

    2011-07-01

    We report on a proof-of-principle experiment for the direct interfacing of transistors with intact brain tissue. A transistor needle chip (TNC) with a TiO2 surface is fabricated from a silicon-on-insulator wafer and impaled into an acute brain slice cut from hippocampus of the rat. While stimulating the Schaffer collateral, a local field potential is recorded in stratum radiatum of the CA1 region with field-effect transistors in the central part of the slice where the tissue is not damaged by the cutting process. After the impalement, the signal amplitude is small. Within an hour, it increases to a stable level around -2 mV as is recorded with a conventional micropipette electrode. The recovery indicates that the tissue is able to adapt to the impaled chip. Upon repeated impalements at the same position, the large signal is observed without delay. A profile of the transistor signal across the slice is due to the boundary conditions of a brain slice with both surfaces held near ground potential. The experiments with the TNC prototype are a basis for the development of silicon needle chips with a large multi-transistor array (MTA) for applications in brain-computer interfacing.

  16. Functional Tissue Pulsatility Imaging of the Brain during Visual Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kucewicz, John C.; Dunmire, Barbrina; Leotta, Daniel F.; Panagiotides, Heracles; Paun, Marla; Beach, Kirk W.

    2007-01-01

    Functional tissue pulsatility imaging (fTPI) is a new ultrasonic technique being developed to map brain function by measuring changes in tissue pulsatility due to changes in blood flow with neuronal activation. The technique is based in principle on plethysmography, an older, non-ultrasound technology for measuring expansion of a whole limb or body part due to perfusion. Perfused tissue expands by a fraction of a percent early in each cardiac cycle when arterial inflow exceeds venous outflow and relaxes later in the cardiac cycle when venous drainage dominates. Tissue pulsatility imaging (TPI) uses tissue Doppler signal processing methods to measure this pulsatile “plethysmographic” signal from hundreds or thousands of sample volumes in an ultrasound image plane. A feasibility study was conducted to determine if TPI could be used to detect regional brain activation during a visual contrast-reversing checkerboard block paradigm study. During a study, ultrasound data were collected transcranially from the occipital lobe as a subject viewed alternating blocks of a reversing checkerboard (stimulus condition) and a static, gray screen (control condition). Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) was used to identify sample volumes with significantly different pulsatility waveforms during the control and stimulus blocks. In 7 out 14 studies, consistent regions of activation were detected from tissue around the major vessels perfusing the visual cortex. PMID:17346872

  17. Neural stem cells display extensive tropism for pathology in adult brain: Evidence from intracranial gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Aboody, Karen S.; Brown, Alice; Rainov, Nikolai G.; Bower, Kate A.; Liu, Shaoxiong; Yang, Wendy; Small, Juan E.; Herrlinger, Ulrich; Ourednik, Vaclav; Black, Peter McL.; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Snyder, Evan Y.

    2000-01-01

    One of the impediments to the treatment of brain tumors (e.g., gliomas) has been the degree to which they expand, infiltrate surrounding tissue, and migrate widely into normal brain, usually rendering them “elusive” to effective resection, irradiation, chemotherapy, or gene therapy. We demonstrate that neural stem cells (NSCs), when implanted into experimental intracranial gliomas in vivo in adult rodents, distribute themselves quickly and extensively throughout the tumor bed and migrate uniquely in juxtaposition to widely expanding and aggressively advancing tumor cells, while continuing to stably express a foreign gene. The NSCs “surround” the invading tumor border while “chasing down” infiltrating tumor cells. When implanted intracranially at distant sites from the tumor (e.g., into normal tissue, into the contralateral hemisphere, or into the cerebral ventricles), the donor cells migrate through normal tissue targeting the tumor cells (including human glioblastomas). When implanted outside the CNS intravascularly, NSCs will target an intracranial tumor. NSCs can deliver a therapeutically relevant molecule—cytosine deaminase—such that quantifiable reduction in tumor burden results. These data suggest the adjunctive use of inherently migratory NSCs as a delivery vehicle for targeting therapeutic genes and vectors to refractory, migratory, invasive brain tumors. More broadly, they suggest that NSC migration can be extensive, even in the adult brain and along nonstereotypical routes, if pathology (as modeled here by tumor) is present. PMID:11070094

  18. Tourette's syndrome: a neurochemical analysis of postmortem cortical brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Singer, H S; Hahn, I H; Krowiak, E; Nelson, E; Moran, T

    1990-04-01

    Postmortem frontal, temporal, and occipital regions of the brain from adult patients who had a diagnosis of Tourette's syndrome were analyzed for neurochemical alterations. In 3 of 4 TS-affected brains, the concentration of adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) was reduced in all brain regions evaluated. This diminution in cyclic AMP was not associated with a significant change in the activity of the synthesizing enzyme, adenylate cyclase. No significant differences were identified for the neurotransmitter-synthesizing enzymes choline acetyltransferase and glutamate decarboxylase. Concentrations of dopamine, norepinephrine, and the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were not altered. Postsynaptic receptor-binding activity for muscarinic cholinergic ([3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate) and beta receptors ([125I]iodocyanopindolol) showed no generalized impairment. It is suggested that symptoms of Tourette's syndrome might be related to an abnormality within a second messenger system. PMID:1972320

  19. Using autopsy brain tissue to study alcohol-related brain damage in the genomic age

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Greg T; Sheedy, Donna; Kril, Jillian J

    2013-01-01

    The New South Wales Tissue Resource Centre (NSW TRC) at the University of Sydney, Australia is one of the few human brain banks dedicated to the study of the effects of chronic alcoholism. The bank was affiliated in 1994 as a member of the National Network of Brain Banks and also focuses on schizophrenia and healthy control tissue. Alcohol abuse is a major problem worldwide, manifesting in such conditions as fetal alcohol syndrome, adolescent binge drinking, alcohol dependency and alcoholic neurodegeneration. The latter is also referred to as alcohol-related brain disease (ARBD). The study of postmortem brain tissue is ideally suited to determining the effects of long-term alcohol abuse, but it also makes an important contribution to understanding pathogenesis across the spectrum of alcohol misuse disorders and potentially other neurodegenerative diseases. Tissue from the bank has contributed to 330 peer-reviewed journal articles including 120 related to alcohol research. Using the results of these articles, this review chronicles advances in alcohol-related brain research since 2003, the so-called genomic age. In particular it concentrates on transcriptomic approaches to the pathogenesis of ARBD and builds on earlier reviews of structural changes (Harper et al. Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry 2003;27:951–61) and proteomics (Matsumoto et al. Expert Rev Proteomics 2007;4:539–52). PMID:24033426

  20. Automatic Segmentation of Eight Tissue Classes in Neonatal Brain MRI

    PubMed Central

    Anbeek, Petronella; Išgum, Ivana; van Kooij, Britt J. M.; Mol, Christian P.; Kersbergen, Karina J.; Groenendaal, Floris; Viergever, Max A.; de Vries, Linda S.; Benders, Manon J. N. L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Volumetric measurements of neonatal brain tissues may be used as a biomarker for later neurodevelopmental outcome. We propose an automatic method for probabilistic brain segmentation in neonatal MRIs. Materials and Methods In an IRB-approved study axial T1- and T2-weighted MR images were acquired at term-equivalent age for a preterm cohort of 108 neonates. A method for automatic probabilistic segmentation of the images into eight cerebral tissue classes was developed: cortical and central grey matter, unmyelinated and myelinated white matter, cerebrospinal fluid in the ventricles and in the extra cerebral space, brainstem and cerebellum. Segmentation is based on supervised pixel classification using intensity values and spatial positions of the image voxels. The method was trained and evaluated using leave-one-out experiments on seven images, for which an expert had set a reference standard manually. Subsequently, the method was applied to the remaining 101 scans, and the resulting segmentations were evaluated visually by three experts. Finally, volumes of the eight segmented tissue classes were determined for each patient. Results The Dice similarity coefficients of the segmented tissue classes, except myelinated white matter, ranged from 0.75 to 0.92. Myelinated white matter was difficult to segment and the achieved Dice coefficient was 0.47. Visual analysis of the results demonstrated accurate segmentations of the eight tissue classes. The probabilistic segmentation method produced volumes that compared favorably with the reference standard. Conclusion The proposed method provides accurate segmentation of neonatal brain MR images into all given tissue classes, except myelinated white matter. This is the one of the first methods that distinguishes cerebrospinal fluid in the ventricles from cerebrospinal fluid in the extracerebral space. This method might be helpful in predicting neurodevelopmental outcome and useful for evaluating neuroprotective clinical

  1. [Chemotherapy for brain tumors in adult patients].

    PubMed

    Weller, M

    2008-02-01

    Chemotherapy has become a third major treatment option for patients with brain tumors, in addition to surgery and radiotherapy. The role of chemotherapy in the treatment of gliomas is no longer limited to recurrent disease. Temozolomide has become the standard of care in newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Several ongoing trials seek to define the role of chemotherapy in the primary care of other gliomas. Some of these studies are no longer only based on histological diagnoses, but take into consideration molecular markers such as MGMT promoter methylation and loss of genetic material on chromosomal arms 1p and 19q. Outside such clinical trials chemotherapy is used in addition to radiotherapy, e.g., in anaplastic astrocytoma, medulloblastoma or germ cell tumors, or as an alternative to radiotherapy, e.g., in anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors or low-grade gliomas. In contrast, there is no established role for chemotherapy in other tumors such as ependymomas, meningiomas or neurinomas. Primary cerebral lymphomas are probably the only brain tumors which can be cured by chemotherapy alone and only by chemotherapy. The chemotherapy of brain metastases follows the recommendations for the respective primary tumors. Further, strategies of combined radiochemotherapy using mainly temozolomide or topotecan are currently explored. Leptomeningeal metastases are treated by radiotherapy or systemic or intrathecal chemotherapy depending on their pattern of growth. PMID:18253773

  2. Chemoselective imaging of mouse brain tissue via multiplex CARS microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pohling, Christoph; Buckup, Tiago; Pagenstecher, Axel; Motzkus, Marcus

    2011-08-01

    The fast and reliable characterization of pathological tissue is a debated topic in the application of vibrational spectroscopy in medicine. In the present work we apply multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (MCARS) to the investigation of fresh mouse brain tissue. The combination of imaginary part extraction followed by principal component analysis led to color contrast between grey and white matter as well as layers of granule and Purkinje cells. Additional quantitative information was obtained by using a decomposition algorithm. The results perfectly agree with HE stained references slides prepared separately making multiplex CARS an ideal approach for chemoselective imaging. PMID:21833351

  3. Bilateral Brain Regions Associated with Naming in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obler, Loraine K.; Rykhlevskaia, Elena; Schnyer, David; Clark-Cotton, Manuella R.; Spiro, Avron, III; Hyun, JungMoon; Kim, Dae-Shik; Goral, Mira; Albert, Martin L.

    2010-01-01

    To determine structural brain correlates of naming abilities in older adults, we tested 24 individuals aged 56-79 on two confrontation-naming tests (the Boston Naming Test (BNT) and the Action Naming Test (ANT)), then collected from these individuals structural Magnetic-Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) data. Overall,…

  4. Tissue adaptations to gravitational stress - Newborn versus adult giraffes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, Alan R; Gershuni, David H.; Danzig, Larry A.; Millard, Ronald W.; Pettersson, Knut

    1988-01-01

    Preliminary results on developmental alterations in load-bearing tissues of newborn and adult giraffes are presented. Attention is focused on vascular wall thickness in relation to local blood pressure, and on meniscal adaptations to increased load bearing in the developing giraffe. It is believed that the developing giraffe provides an excellent model for investigations of adaptive mechanisms of increased weight bearing.

  5. Alkaline diets favor lean tissue mass in older adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maintaining muscle mass in aging is important to prevent falls and fractures. The net acid load from diets that are rich in acidogenic protein and cereal grains relative to their content of alkalinogenic fruits and vegetables may contribute to reduced lean tissue mass in older adults. This analysis ...

  6. [Exchange reactions in brain tissue under chronic ethanol intoxication].

    PubMed

    Gil'miiarova, F N; Radomskaia, V M; Vinogradova, L N

    1982-01-01

    The paper deals with characterization of systems utilizing ethanol and reactions conjugated with its exchange in the brain tissue under chronic alcohol intoxication. The following is established: the absence of the alcoholdehydrogenase pathway of ethanol oxidation in rabbits, unbalanced splitting of carbohydrates under two-months ethanol load, disturbance of oxidative processes in the tricarboxylic acids cycle, a decrease in the pool of oxidized nicotin amide coenzymes. PMID:7036487

  7. Pharmacological mitigation of tissue damage during brain microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, Kathryn M; Jaquins-Gerstl, Andrea; Skoda, Erin M; Wipf, Peter; Michael, Adrian C

    2013-09-01

    Microdialysis sampling in the brain is employed frequently in the chemical analysis of neurological function and disease, but implanting the probes, which are substantially larger than the size and spacing of brain cells and blood vessels, is injurious and triggers ischemia, gliosis, and cell death at the sampling site. The nature of the interface between the brain and the microdialysis probe is critical to the use of microdialysis as a neurochemical analysis technique. The objective of the work reported here was to investigate the potential of two compounds, dexamethasone, a glucocorticoid anti-inflammatory agent, and XJB-5-131, a mitochondrially targeted reactive oxygen species scavenger, to mitigate the penetration injury. Measurements were performed in the rat brain striatum, which is densely innervated by axons that release dopamine, an electroactive neurotransmitter. We used voltammetry to measure electrically evoked dopamine release next to microdialysis probes during the retrodialysis of dexamethasone or XJB-5-131. After the in vivo measurements, the brain tissue containing the microdialysis probe tracks was examined by fluorescence microscopy using markers for ischemia, neuronal nuclei, macrophages, and dopamine axons and terminals. Dexamethasone and XJB-5-131 each diminished the loss of evoked dopamine activity, diminished ischemia, diminished the loss of neuronal nuclei, diminished the appearance of extravasated macrophages, and diminished the loss of dopamine axons and terminals next to the probes. Our findings confirm the ability of dexamethasone and XJB-5-131 to mitigate, but not eliminate, the effects of the penetration injury caused by implanting microdialysis probes into brain tissue. PMID:23927692

  8. Potassium Channel Complex Autoimmunity Induced by Inhaled Brain Tissue Aerosol

    PubMed Central

    Meeusen, Jeffrey W.; Klein, Christopher J.; Pirko, Istvan; Haselkorn, Keegan E.; Kryzer, Thomas J.; Pittock, Sean J.; Lachance, Daniel H.; Dyck, P. James; Lennon, Vanda A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Test the hypothesis that autoimmunity induced by inhalation of aerosolized brain tissue caused outbreaks of sensory-predominant polyradiculoneuropathy among swine abattoir employees in Midwestern USA Methods Mice were exposed intranasally, 5 days weekly, to liquefied brain tissue. Serum from exposed mice, patients and unaffected abattoir employees were analyzed for clinically pertinent neural autoantibodies. Results Patients, coworkers and mice exposed to liquefied brain tissue had an autoantibody profile dominated by neural cation channel IgGs. The most compelling link between patients and exposed mice was MRI evidence of grossly swollen spinal nerve roots. Autoantibody responses in patients and mice were dose-dependent and declined after antigen exposure ceased. Autoantibodies detected most frequently, and at high levels, bound to detergent-solubilized macromolecular complexes containing neuronal voltage-gated potassium channels ligated with a high affinity Kv1 channel antagonist, 125I-α-dendrotoxin. Exposed mice exhibited a behavioral phenotype consistent with potassium channel dysfunction recognized in drosophila with mutant (“shaker”) channels: reduced sensitivity to isoflurane-induced anesthesia. Pathological and electrophysiological findings in patients supported peripheral nerve hyperexcitability over destructive axonal loss. The pain-predominant symptoms were consistent with sensory nerve hyperexcitability Interpretation Our observations establish that inhaled neural antigens readily induce neurological autoimmunity and identify voltage-gated potassium channel complexes as a major immunogen. PMID:22451206

  9. In vivo bubble nucleation probability in sheep brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Gateau, J; Aubry, J-F; Chauvet, D; Boch, A-L; Fink, M; Tanter, M

    2011-11-21

    Gas nuclei exist naturally in living bodies. Their activation initiates cavitation activity, and is possible using short ultrasonic excitations of high amplitude. However, little is known about the nuclei population in vivo, and therefore about the rarefaction pressure required to form bubbles in tissue. A novel method dedicated to in vivo investigations was used here that combines passive and active cavitation detection with a multi-element linear ultrasound probe (4-7 MHz). Experiments were performed in vivo on the brain of trepanated sheep. Bubble nucleation was induced using a focused single-element transducer (central frequency 660 kHz, f-number = 1) driven by a high power (up to 5 kW) electric burst of two cycles. Successive passive recording and ultrafast active imaging were shown to allow detection of a single nucleation event in brain tissue in vivo. Experiments carried out on eight sheep allowed statistical studies of the bubble nucleation process. The nucleation probability was evaluated as a function of the peak negative pressure. No nucleation event could be detected with a peak negative pressure weaker than -12.7 MPa, i.e. one order of magnitude higher than the recommendations based on the mechanical index. Below this threshold, bubble nucleation in vivo in brain tissues is a random phenomenon. PMID:22015981

  10. Pedophilic brain potential responses to adult erotic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Knott, Verner; Impey, Danielle; Fisher, Derek; Delpero, Emily; Fedoroff, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Cognitive mechanisms associated with the relative lack of sexual interest in adults by pedophiles are poorly understood and may benefit from investigations examining how the brain processes adult erotic stimuli. The current study used event-related brain potentials (ERP) to investigate the time course of the explicit processing of erotic, emotional, and neutral pictures in 22 pedophilic patients and 22 healthy controls. Consistent with previous studies, early latency anterior ERP components were highly selective for erotic pictures. Although the ERPs elicited by emotional stimuli were similar in patients and controls, an early frontal positive (P2) component starting as early as 185 ms was significantly attenuated and slow to onset in pedophilia, and correlated with a clinical measure of cognitive distortions. Failure of rapid attentional capture by erotic stimuli suggests a relative reduction in early processing in pedophilic patients which may be associated with relatively diminished sexual interest in adults. PMID:26683083

  11. Developmental Vitamin D3 deficiency alters the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Féron, F; Burne, T H J; Brown, J; Smith, E; McGrath, J J; Mackay-Sim, A; Eyles, D W

    2005-03-15

    There is growing evidence that Vitamin D(3) (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3)) is involved in brain development. We have recently shown that the brains of newborn rats from Vitamin D(3) deficient dams were larger than controls, had increased cell proliferation, larger lateral ventricles, and reduced cortical thickness. Brains from these animals also had reduced expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. The aim of the current study was to examine if there were any permanent outcomes into adulthood when the offspring of Vitamin D(3) deficient dams were restored to a normal diet. The brains of adult rats were examined at 10 weeks of age after Vitamin D(3) deficiency until birth or weaning. Compared to controls animals that were exposed to transient early Vitamin D(3) deficiency had larger lateral ventricles, reduced NGF protein content, and reduced expression of a number genes involved in neuronal structure, i.e. neurofilament or MAP-2 or neurotransmission, i.e. GABA-A(alpha4). We conclude that transient early life hypovitaminosis D(3) not only disrupts brain development but leads to persistent changes in the adult brain. In light of the high incidence of hypovitaminosis D(3) in women of child-bearing age, the public health implications of these findings warrant attention. PMID:15763180

  12. Adult stem cell lineage tracing and deep tissue imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Juergen; Andersson-Rolf, Amanda; Koo, Bon-Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    Lineage tracing is a widely used method for understanding cellular dynamics in multicellular organisms during processes such as development, adult tissue maintenance, injury repair and tumorigenesis. Advances in tracing or tracking methods, from light microscopy-based live cell tracking to fluorescent label-tracing with two-photon microscopy, together with emerging tissue clearing strategies and intravital imaging approaches have enabled scientists to decipher adult stem and progenitor cell properties in various tissues and in a wide variety of biological processes. Although technical advances have enabled time-controlled genetic labeling and simultaneous live imaging, a number of obstacles still need to be overcome. In this review, we aim to provide an in-depth description of the traditional use of lineage tracing as well as current strategies and upcoming new methods of labeling and imaging. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(12): 655-667] PMID:26634741

  13. Microscopy and chemical imaging of Behcet brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranyosiova, Monika; Michalka, Miroslav; Kopani, Martin; Rychly, Boris; Jakubovsky, Jan; Velic, Dusan

    2008-12-01

    Chemical composition and distribution of molecules and elements in a human brain tissue of Behcet diseased patient are of interest. Behcet disease is a multi-system disorder of which pathogenesis and chemical causality are still uncertain. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry is used along with scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis providing complex composition in Behcet disease and control tissues. Determined organic compounds are represented by fragments of carbohydrates, phospholipids, amino acids, and peptides. The distributions of inorganic species are well represented by heavy trace elements and by oxides in positive and negative polarities of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, respectively. Organic and inorganic compounds are qualitatively determined in both samples, Behcet and control, providing complementary chemical images. The complementary chemical images interestingly change with the quantitative regression of organic compounds distribution, characteristic for the healthy control, towards inorganic compounds distribution, characteristic for Behcet tissue.

  14. Intracellular distribution of the vitamin D receptor in the brain: comparison with classic target tissues and redistribution with development.

    PubMed

    Eyles, D W; Liu, P Y; Josh, P; Cui, X

    2014-05-30

    Apart from its role in regulating calcium there is growing evidence that vitamin D is a neuroactive steroid capable of regulating multiple pathways important for both brain development and mature brain function. Vitamin D induces its genomic effects through its nuclear receptor the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Although there is abundant evidence for this receptor's presence in the mammalian brain from studies employing immunohistochemistry, Western blot or quantitative RNA studies there remains some dispute regarding the validity of these studies. In this study we provide unambiguous confirmation for the VDR in adult rodent brain using proteomic techniques. However Western blot experiments show that compared to more classic target organs such as the gut and kidney, VDR expression is quantitatively lower in the brain. In addition we have examined VDR subcellular distribution in the gut, kidney and brain from both embryonic and adult tissues. We show that in all embryonic tissues VDR distribution is mostly nuclear, however by adulthood it appears that at least in the gut and kidney, VDR presence in the plasma membrane is more prominent perhaps reflecting some change in VDR function with the maturation of these tissues. Finally the subcellular distribution of VDR in the embryo did not appear to be altered by vitamin D deficiency indicating that perhaps there are other mechanisms at play in vivo to stabilize this receptor in the absence of its ligand. PMID:24607320

  15. Raman molecular imaging of brain frozen tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Kast, Rachel E; Auner, Gregory W; Rosenblum, Mark L; Mikkelsen, Tom; Yurgelevic, Sally M; Raghunathan, Aditya; Poisson, Laila M; Kalkanis, Steven N

    2014-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy provides a molecular signature of the region being studied. It is ideal for neurosurgical applications because it is non-destructive, label-free, not impacted by water concentration, and can map an entire region of tissue. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the meaningful spatial molecular information provided by Raman spectroscopy for identification of regions of normal brain, necrosis, diffusely infiltrating glioma and solid glioblastoma (GBM). Five frozen section tissues (1 normal, 1 necrotic, 1 GBM, and 2 infiltrating glioma) were mapped in their entirety using a 300-µm-square step size. Smaller regions of interest were also mapped using a 25-µm step size. The relative concentrations of relevant biomolecules were mapped across all tissues and compared with adjacent hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections, allowing identification of normal, GBM, and necrotic regions. Raman peaks and peak ratios mapped included 1003, 1313, 1431, 1585, and 1659 cm(-1). Tissue maps identified boundaries of grey and white matter, necrosis, GBM, and infiltrating tumor. Complementary information, including relative concentration of lipids, protein, nucleic acid, and hemoglobin, was presented in a manner which can be easily adapted for in vivo tissue mapping. Raman spectroscopy can successfully provide label-free imaging of tissue characteristics with high accuracy. It can be translated to a surgical or laboratory tool for rapid, non-destructive imaging of tumor margins. PMID:25038847

  16. The brain and the braincase: a spatial analysis on the midsagittal profile in adult humans.

    PubMed

    Bruner, Emiliano; Amano, Hideki; de la Cuétara, José Manuel; Ogihara, Naomichi

    2015-09-01

    The spatial relationships between brain and braincase represent a major topic in surgery and evolutionary neuroanatomy. In paleoneurology, neurocranial landmarks are often used as references for brain areas. In this study, we analyze the variation and covariation of midsagittal brain and skull coordinates in a sample of adult modern humans in order to demonstrate spatial associations between hard and soft tissues. The correlation between parietal lobe size and parietal bone size is very low, and there is a marked individual variation. The distances between lobes and bones are partially influenced by the dimensions of the parietal lobes. The main pattern of morphological variability among individuals, associated with the size of the precuneus, apparently does not influence the position of the neurocranial sutures. Therefore, variations in precuneal size modify the distance between the paracentral lobule and bregma, and between the parietal lobe and lambda. Hence, the relative position of the cranial and cerebral landmarks can change as a function of the parietal dimensions. The slight correlation and covariation among these elements suggests a limited degree of spatial integration between soft and hard tissues. Therefore, although the brain influences the cranial size and shape during morphogenesis, the specific position of the cerebral components is sensitive to multiple effects and local factors, without a strict correspondence with the bone landmarks. This absence of correspondent change between brain and skull boundaries suggests caution when making inferences about the brain areas from the position of the cranial sutures. The fact that spatial relationships between cranial and brain areas may vary according to brain proportions must be considered in paleoneurology, when brain anatomy is inferred from cranial evidence. PMID:26200138

  17. Life Satisfaction in Adult Survivors of Childhood Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Crom, Deborah B.; Li, Zhenghong; Brinkman, Tara M.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Neglia, Joseph; Ness, Kirsten K.

    2014-01-01

    Adult survivors of childhood brain tumors experience multiple, significant, life-long deficits as a consequence of their malignancy and therapy. Current survivorship literature documents the substantial impact such impairments have on survivors’ physical health and quality of life. Psychosocial reports detail educational, cognitive, and emotional limitations characterizing survivors as especially fragile, often incompetent, and unreliable in evaluating their circumstances. Anecdotal data suggests some survivors report life experiences similar to those of healthy controls. The aim of our investigation was to determine whether life satisfaction in adult survivors of childhood brain tumors differs from that of healthy controls and to identify potential predictors of life satisfaction in survivors. This cross-sectional study compared 78 brain tumor survivors with population–based matched controls. Chi-square tests, t-tests, and linear regression models were used to investigate patterns of life satisfaction and identify potential correlates. Results indicated life satisfaction of adult survivors of childhood brain tumors was similar to that of healthy controls. Survivors’ general health expectations emerged as the primary correlate of life satisfaction. Understanding life satisfaction as an important variable will optimize the design of strategies to enhance participation in follow-up care, reduce suffering, and optimize quality of life in this vulnerable population. PMID:25027187

  18. On the relationship between cellular and hemodynamic properties of the human brain cortex throughout adult lifespan.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Wen, Jie; Cross, Anne H; Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A

    2016-06-01

    Establishing baseline MRI biomarkers for normal brain aging is significant and valuable for separating normal changes in the brain structure and function from different neurological diseases. In this paper for the first time we have simultaneously measured a variety of tissue specific contributions defining R2* relaxation of the gradient recalled echo (GRE) MRI signal in human brains of healthy adults (ages 22 to 74years) and related these measurements to tissue structural and functional properties. This was accomplished by separating tissue (R2t(⁎)) and extravascular BOLD contributions to the total tissue specific GRE MRI signal decay (R2(⁎)) using an advanced version of previously developed Gradient Echo Plural Contrast Imaging (GEPCI) approach and the acquisition and post-processing methods that allowed the minimization of artifacts related to macroscopic magnetic field inhomogeneities, and physiological fluctuations. Our data (20 healthy subjects) show that in most cortical regions R2t(⁎) increases with age while tissue hemodynamic parameters, i.e. relative oxygen extraction fraction (OEFrel), deoxygenated cerebral blood volume (dCBV) and tissue concentration of deoxyhemoglobin (Cdeoxy) remain practically constant. We also found the important correlations characterizing the relationships between brain structural and hemodynamic properties in different brain regions. Specifically, thicker cortical regions have lower R2t(⁎) and these regions have lower OEF. The comparison between GEPCI-derived tissue specific structural and functional metrics and literature information suggests that (a) regions in a brain characterized by higher R2t(⁎) contain higher concentration of neurons with less developed cellular processes (dendrites, spines, etc.), (b) regions in a brain characterized by lower R2t(⁎) represent regions with lower concentration of neurons but more developed cellular processes, and (c) the age-related increases in the cortical R2t(⁎) mostly

  19. Frog Virus 3 dissemination in the brain of tadpoles, but not in adult Xenopus, involves blood brain barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    De Jesús Andino, Francisco; Jones, Letitia; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.; Robert, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    While increasing evidence points to a key role of monocytes in amphibian host defenses, monocytes are also thought to be important in the dissemination and persistent infection caused by ranavirus. However, little is known about the fate of infected macrophages or if ranavirus exploits immune privileged organs, such as the brain, in order to establish a reservoir. The amphibian Xenopus laevis and Frog Virus 3 (FV3) were established as an experimental platform for investigating in vivo whether ranavirus could disseminate to the brain. Our data show that the FV3 infection alters the BBB integrity, possibly mediated by an inflammatory response, which leads to viral dissemination into the central nervous system in X. laevis tadpole but not adult. Furthermore, our data suggest that the macrophages play a major role in viral dissemination by carrying the virus into the neural tissues. PMID:26931458

  20. Immunological regulation of neurogenic niches in the adult brain

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar; Gutierrez-Fernandez, Fernando; Lopez-Virgen, Veronica; Collas-Aguilar, Jorge; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose M.

    2012-01-01

    In mammals, neurogenesis and oligodendrogenesis are germinal processes that occur in the adult brain throughout life. The subventricular (SVZ) and subgranular (SGZ) zones are the main neurogenic regions in adult brain. Therein, it resides a subpopulation of astrocytes that act as neural stem cells. Increasing evidence indicates that pro-inflammatory and other immunological mediators are important regulators of neural precursors into the SVZ and the SGZ. There are a number of inflammatory cytokines that regulate the function of neural stem cells. Some of the most studied include: interleukin-1, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, insulin-like growth factor-1, growth-regulated oncogene-alpha, leukemia inhibitory factor, cardiotrophin-1, ciliary neurotrophic factor, interferon-gamma, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha. This plethora of immunological mediators can control the migration, proliferation, quiescence, cell-fate choices and survival of neural stem cells and their progeny. Thus, systemic or local inflammatory processes represent important regulators of germinal niches in the adult brain. In this review, we summarized the current evidence regarding the effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines involved in the regulation of adult neural stem cells under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Additionally, we described the role of proinflammatory cytokines in neurodegenerative diseases and some therapeutical approaches for the immunomodulation of neural progenitor cells. PMID:22986164

  1. Neurodevelopment. Live imaging of adult neural stem cell behavior in the intact and injured zebrafish brain.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Joana S; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Rosario; Di Giaimo, Rossella; Baumgart, Emily Violette; Theis, Fabian J; Götz, Magdalena; Ninkovic, Jovica

    2015-05-15

    Adult neural stem cells are the source for restoring injured brain tissue. We used repetitive imaging to follow single stem cells in the intact and injured adult zebrafish telencephalon in vivo and found that neurons are generated by both direct conversions of stem cells into postmitotic neurons and via intermediate progenitors amplifying the neuronal output. We observed an imbalance of direct conversion consuming the stem cells and asymmetric and symmetric self-renewing divisions, leading to depletion of stem cells over time. After brain injury, neuronal progenitors are recruited to the injury site. These progenitors are generated by symmetric divisions that deplete the pool of stem cells, a mode of neurogenesis absent in the intact telencephalon. Our analysis revealed changes in the behavior of stem cells underlying generation of additional neurons during regeneration. PMID:25977550

  2. Consent for Brain Tissue Donation after Intracerebral Haemorrhage: A Community-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Samarasekera, Neshika; Lerpiniere, Christine; Farrall, Andrew J.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; White, Philip M.; Torgersen, Antonia; Ironside, James W.; Smith, Colin; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam

    2015-01-01

    Background Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage is a devastating form of stroke and its incidence increases with age. Obtaining brain tissue following intracerebral haemorrhage helps to understand its cause. Given declining autopsy rates worldwide, the feasibility of establishing an autopsy-based collection and its generalisability are uncertain. Methods We used multiple overlapping sources of case ascertainment to identify every adult diagnosed with intracerebral haemorrhage between 1st June 2010-31st May 2012, whilst resident in the Lothian region of Scotland. We sought consent from patients with intracerebral haemorrhage (or their nearest relative if the patient lacked mental capacity) to conduct a research autopsy. Results Of 295 adults with acute intracerebral haemorrhage, 110 (37%) could not be approached to consider donation. Of 185 adults/relatives approached, 91 (49%) consented to research autopsy. There were no differences in baseline demographic variables or markers of intracerebral haemorrhage severity between consenters and non-consenters. Adults who died and became donors (n = 46) differed from the rest of the cohort (n = 249) by being older (median age 80, IQR 76–86 vs. 75, IQR 65–83, p = 0.002) and having larger haemorrhages (median volume 23ml, IQR 13–50 vs. 13ml, IQR 4–40; p = 0.002). Conclusions Nearly half of those approached consent to brain tissue donation after acute intracerebral haemorrhage. The characteristics of adults who gave consent were comparable to those in an entire community, although those who donate early are older and have larger haemorrhage volumes. PMID:26302447

  3. In vivo evidence of methamphetamine induced attenuation of brain tissue oxygenation as measured by EPR oximetry

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, John; Yang, Yirong; Purvis, Rebecca; Weatherwax, Theodore; Rosen, Gerald M.; Liu, Ke Jian

    2014-03-01

    Abuse of methamphetamine (METH) is a major and significant societal problem in the US, as a number of studies have suggested that METH is associated with increased cerebrovascular events, hemorrhage or vasospasm. Although cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in METH-induced toxicity are not completely understood, changes in brain O{sub 2} may play an important role and contribute to METH-induced neurotoxicity including dopaminergic receptor degradation. Given that O{sub 2} is the terminal electron acceptor for many enzymes that are important in brain function, the impact of METH on brain tissue pO{sub 2}in vivo remains largely uncharacterized. This study investigated striatal tissue pO{sub 2} changes in male C57BL/6 mice (16–20 g) following METH administration using EPR oximetry, a highly sensitive modality to measure pO{sub 2}in vivo, in situ and in real time. We demonstrate that 20 min after a single injection of METH (8 mg/kg i.v.), the striatal pO{sub 2} was reduced to 81% of the pretreatment level and exposure to METH for 3 consecutive days further attenuated striatal pO{sub 2} to 64%. More importantly, pO{sub 2} did not recover fully to control levels even 24 h after administration of a single dose of METH and continual exposure to METH exacerbates the condition. We also show a reduction in cerebral blood flow associated with a decreased brain pO{sub 2} indicating an ischemic condition. Our findings suggests that administration of METH can attenuate brain tissue pO{sub 2}, which may lead to hypoxic insult, thus a risk factor for METH-induced brain injury and the development of stroke in young adults. - Highlights: • Explored striatal tissue pO{sub 2}in vivo after METH administration by EPR oximetry. • pO{sub 2} was reduced by 81% after a single dose and 64% after 3 consecutive daily doses. • pO{sub 2} did not recover fully to control levels even 24 h after a single dose. • Decrease in brain tissue pO{sub 2} may be associated with a decrease in

  4. Protective effects of some creatine derivatives in brain tissue anoxia.

    PubMed

    Perasso, Luisa; Lunardi, Gian Luigi; Risso, Federica; Pohvozcheva, Anna V; Leko, Maria V; Gandolfo, Carlo; Florio, Tullio; Cupello, Aroldo; Burov, Sergey V; Balestrino, Maurizio

    2008-05-01

    Some derivatives more lipophylic than creatine, thus theoretically being capable to better cross the blood-brain barrier, were studied for their protective effect in mouse hippocampal slices. We found that N-amidino-piperidine is harmful to brain tissue, and that phosphocreatine is ineffective. Creatine, creatine-Mg-complex (acetate) and phosphocreatine-Mg-complex (acetate) increased the latency to population spike disappearance during anoxia. Creatine and creatine-Mg-complex (acetate) also increased the latency of anoxic depolarization, while the delay induced by phosphocreatine-Mg-complex (acetate) was of borderline significance (P = 0.056). Phosphocreatine-Mg-complex (acetate) significantly reduced neuronal hyperexcitability during anoxia, an effect that no other compound (including creatine itself) showed. For all parameters except reduced hyperexcitability the effects statistically correlated with tissue levels of creatine or phosphocreatine. Summing up, exogenous phosphocreatine and N-amidino piperidine are not useful for brain protection, while chelates of both creatine and phosphocreatine do replicate some of the known protective effects of creatine. In addition, phosphocreatine-Mg-complex (acetate) also reduced neuronal hyperexcitability during anoxia. PMID:17940889

  5. Diffusion MRI at 25: Exploring brain tissue structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Bihan, Denis Le; Johansen-Berg, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion MRI (or dMRI) came into existence in the mid-1980s. During the last 25 years, diffusion MRI has been extraordinarily successful (with more than 300,000 entries on Google Scholar for diffusion MRI). Its main clinical domain of application has been neurological disorders, especially for the management of patients with acute stroke. It is also rapidly becoming a standard for white matter disorders, as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can reveal abnormalities in white matter fiber structure and provide outstanding maps of brain connectivity. The ability to visualize anatomical connections between different parts of the brain, non-invasively and on an individual basis, has emerged as a major breakthrough for neurosciences. The driving force of dMRI is to monitor microscopic, natural displacements of water molecules that occur in brain tissues as part of the physical diffusion process. Water molecules are thus used as a probe that can reveal microscopic details about tissue architecture, either normal or in a diseased state. PMID:22120012

  6. Ribosomal protein L11 is related to brain maturation during the adult phase in Apis cerana cerana (Hymenoptera, Apidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fei; Lu, Wenjing; Yu, Feifei; Kang, Mingjiang; Guo, Xingqi; Xu, Baohua

    2012-05-01

    Ribosomal proteins (RPs) play pivotal roles in developmental regulation. The loss or mutation of ribosomal protein L11 ( RPL11) induces various developmental defects. However, few RPs have been functionally characterized in Apis cerana cerana. In this study, we isolated a single copy gene, AccRPL11, and characterized its connection to brain maturation. AccRPL11 expression was highly concentrated in the adult brain and was significantly induced by abiotic stresses such as pesticides and heavy metals. Immunofluorescence assays demonstrated that AccRPL11 was localized to the medulla, lobula and surrounding tissues of esophagus in the brain. The post-transcriptional knockdown of AccRPL11 gene expression resulted in a severe decrease in adult brain than in other tissues. The expression levels of other brain development-related genes, p38, ERK2, CacyBP and CREB, were also reduced. Immunofluorescence signal attenuation was also observed in AccRPL11-rich regions of the brain in ds AccRPL11-injected honeybees. Taken together, these results suggest that AccRPL11 may be functional in brain maturation in honeybee adults.

  7. Isolation and culture of neurospheres from the adult newt brain.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Liyakath Ali Shahul; Simon, András

    2015-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) give rise to neurons in the adult brain and are possible targets in regenerative therapies. In vitro cultures of NSCs as neurospheres have been established from cells isolated from diverse species. Newts are exceptional regenerators among vertebrates. These animals are able to efficiently replace neurons following ablation of those by activation and subsequent differentiation of NSCs. Here we describe the method for isolating and culturing of NSCs from the newt brain both during self-renewing and differentiating conditions. Newt NSC culture provides a useful tool for functional studies of NSC fate with the potential of resulting in novel regenerative strategies. PMID:25740488

  8. INTERINDIVIDUAL VARIATION IN SERUM CHOLESTEROL IS ASSOCIATED WITH REGIONAL WHITE MATTER TISSUE INTEGRITY IN OLDER ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Victoria J.; Leritz, Elizabeth C.; Shepel, Juli; McGlinchey, Regina E.; Milberg, William P.; Rudolph, James L.; Lipsitz, Lewis A.; Salat, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Prior research has demonstrated links among vascular health and the occurrence of stroke, mild cognitive decline, and dementia in older adults. However, little is known about whether normal variation in vascular indicators may be related to changes in neural tissue integrity. Even less is known about how the brain is affected by cholesterol levels in the normal to moderate risk range, leading up to overt disease pathology. This study examined associations between serum lipid levels and DTI indicators of white matter (WM) structural integrity in a sample of 125 generally healthy older adults aged 43–87 years. Whole-brain voxelwise analysis, controlling for age and gender, revealed low density lipoprotein levels (LDL) as the most robust correlate of regional WM structural integrity of the measured lipids. Higher LDL was associated with decreased WM integrity in right frontal and temporal regions, the superior longitudinal fasciculus and internal/external capsules. Increasing LDL was associated with increased radial and axial diffusivity; however, more widespread statistical effects were found for radial diffusivity. These findings suggest that normal inter-individual variation in lipid levels is associated with compromised regional WM integrity, even in individuals below clinical thresholds for hyperlipidemia. Given the prevalence of cholesterol-associated sequelae in older adults, and mounting evidence suggesting a vascular role in the etiology of dementia, the current data suggest that understanding the relationship between cholesterol and brain tissue microstructure may have important clinical implications for early detection of vascular-related cognitive disorders and optimal regulation of serum lipids to maintain neural health in older adults. PMID:22438182

  9. Adult axolotls can regenerate original neuronal diversity in response to brain injury.

    PubMed

    Amamoto, Ryoji; Huerta, Violeta Gisselle Lopez; Takahashi, Emi; Dai, Guangping; Grant, Aaron K; Fu, Zhanyan; Arlotta, Paola

    2016-01-01

    The axolotl can regenerate multiple organs, including the brain. It remains, however, unclear whether neuronal diversity, intricate tissue architecture, and axonal connectivity can be regenerated; yet, this is critical for recovery of function and a central aim of cell replacement strategies in the mammalian central nervous system. Here, we demonstrate that, upon mechanical injury to the adult pallium, axolotls can regenerate several of the populations of neurons present before injury. Notably, regenerated neurons acquire functional electrophysiological traits and respond appropriately to afferent inputs. Despite the ability to regenerate specific, molecularly-defined neuronal subtypes, we also uncovered previously unappreciated limitations by showing that newborn neurons organize within altered tissue architecture and fail to re-establish the long-distance axonal tracts and circuit physiology present before injury. The data provide a direct demonstration that diverse, electrophysiologically functional neurons can be regenerated in axolotls, but challenge prior assumptions of functional brain repair in regenerative species. PMID:27156560

  10. Electrophysiological recording in the brain of intact adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Lindsey; Ball, Rebecca E; Acuff, Seth; Gaudet, John; Sornborger, Andrew; Lauderdale, James D

    2013-01-01

    Previously, electrophysiological studies in adult zebrafish have been limited to slice preparations or to eye cup preparations and electrorentinogram recordings. This paper describes how an adult zebrafish can be immobilized, intubated, and used for in vivo electrophysiological experiments, allowing recording of neural activity. Immobilization of the adult requires a mechanism to deliver dissolved oxygen to the gills in lieu of buccal and opercular movement. With our technique, animals are immobilized and perfused with habitat water to fulfill this requirement. A craniotomy is performed under tricaine methanesulfonate (MS-222; tricaine) anesthesia to provide access to the brain. The primary electrode is then positioned within the craniotomy window to record extracellular brain activity. Through the use of a multitube perfusion system, a variety of pharmacological compounds can be administered to the adult fish and any alterations in the neural activity can be observed. The methodology not only allows for observations to be made regarding changes in neurological activity, but it also allows for comparisons to be made between larval and adult zebrafish. This gives researchers the ability to identify the alterations in neurological activity due to the introduction of various compounds at different life stages. PMID:24300281

  11. Longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging studies of older adults: a shrinking brain.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Susan M; Pham, Dzung L; Kraut, Michael A; Zonderman, Alan B; Davatzikos, Christos

    2003-04-15

    Age-related loss of brain tissue has been inferred from cross-sectional neuroimaging studies, but direct measurements of gray and white matter changes from longitudinal studies are lacking. We quantified longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of 92 nondemented older adults (age 59-85 years at baseline) in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging to determine the rates and regional distribution of gray and white matter tissue loss in older adults. Using images from baseline, 2 year, and 4 year follow-up, we found significant age changes in gray (p < 0.001) and white (p < 0.001) volumes even in a subgroup of 24 very healthy elderly. Annual rates of tissue loss were 5.4 +/- 0.3, 2.4 +/- 0.4, and 3.1 +/- 0.4 cm3 per year for total brain, gray, and white volumes, respectively, and ventricles increased by 1.4 +/- 0.1 cm3 per year (3.7, 1.3, 2.4, and 1.2 cm3, respectively, in very healthy). Frontal and parietal, compared with temporal and occipital, lobar regions showed greater decline. Gray matter loss was most pronounced for orbital and inferior frontal, cingulate, insular, inferior parietal, and to a lesser extent mesial temporal regions, whereas white matter changes were widespread. In this first study of gray and white matter volume changes, we demonstrate significant longitudinal tissue loss for both gray and white matter even in very healthy older adults. These data provide essential information on the rate and regional pattern of age-associated changes against which pathology can be evaluated and suggest slower rates of brain atrophy in individuals who remain medically and cognitively healthy. PMID:12716936

  12. Functional mitochondrial analysis in acute brain sections from adult rats reveals mitochondrial dysfunction in a rat model of migraine

    PubMed Central

    Fried, Nathan T.; Moffat, Cynthia; Seifert, Erin L.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in many neurological disorders that only develop or are much more severe in adults, yet no methodology exists that allows for medium-throughput functional mitochondrial analysis of brain sections from adult animals. We developed a technique for quantifying mitochondrial respiration in acutely isolated adult rat brain sections with the Seahorse XF Analyzer. Evaluating a range of conditions made quantifying mitochondrial function from acutely derived adult brain sections from the cortex, cerebellum, and trigeminal nucleus caudalis possible. Optimization of this technique demonstrated that the ideal section size was 1 mm wide. We found that sectioning brains at physiological temperatures was necessary for consistent metabolic analysis of trigeminal nucleus caudalis sections. Oxygen consumption in these sections was highly coupled to ATP synthesis, had robust spare respiratory capacities, and had limited nonmitochondrial respiration, all indicative of healthy tissue. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this technique by identifying a decreased spare respiratory capacity in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis of a rat model of chronic migraine, a neurological disorder that has been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. This technique allows for 24 acutely isolated sections from multiple brain regions of a single adult rat to be analyzed simultaneously with four sequential drug treatments, greatly advancing the ability to study mitochondrial physiology in adult neurological disorders. PMID:25252946

  13. Exploration and visualization of connectivity in the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Feng, David; Lau, Chris; Ng, Lydia; Li, Yang; Kuan, Leonard; Sunkin, Susan M; Dang, Chinh; Hawrylycz, Michael

    2015-02-01

    The Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas is a mesoscale whole brain axonal projection atlas of the C57Bl/6J mouse brain. All data were aligned to a common template in 3D space to generate a comprehensive and quantitative database of inter-areal and cell-type-specific projections. A suite of computational tools were developed to search and visualize the projection labeling experiments, available at http://connectivity.brain-map.org. We present three use cases illustrating how these publicly-available tools can be used to perform analyses of long range brain region connectivity. The use cases make extensive use of advanced visualization tools integrated with the atlas including projection density histograms, 3D computed anterograde and retrograde projection paths, and multi-specimen projection composites. These tools offer convenient access to detailed axonal projection information in the adult mouse brain and the ability to perform data analysis and visualization of projection fields and neuroanatomy in an integrated manner. PMID:25637033

  14. Brain tissue tessellation shows absence of canonical microcircuits.

    PubMed

    Peters, James F; Tozzi, Arturo; Ramanna, Sheela

    2016-07-28

    We provide a novel, fast and cheap method for the morphological evaluation of simple 2-D images taken from histological samples. This method, based on computational geometry, leads to a novel kind of "tessellation" of every type of biological picture, in order to locate the zones equipped with very fine-grained differences in the tissue texture, compared with the surrounding ones. As an example, we apply the technique to the evaluation of histological images from brain sections and demonstrate that the cortical layers, rather than being a canonical assembly of homogeneous cells as usually believed, display scattered neuronal micro-clusters equipped with higher activity than the surrounding ones. PMID:27222926

  15. Ketone-body utilization by homogenates of adult rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes-Cardozo, M.; Klein, W.

    1982-06-01

    The regulation of ketone-body metabolism and the quantitative importance of ketone bodies as lipid precursors in adult rat brain has been studied in vitro. Utilization of ketone bodies and of pyruvate by homogenates of adult rat brain was measured and the distribution of /sup 14/C from (3-/sup 14/C)ketone bodies among the metabolic products was analysed. The rate of ketone-body utilization was maximal in the presence of added Krebs-cycle intermediates and uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. The consumption of acetoacetate was faster than that of D-3-hydroxybutyrate, whereas, pyruvate produced twice as much acetyl-CoA as acetoacetate under optimal conditions. Millimolar concentrations of ATP in the presence of uncoupler lowered the consumption of ketone bodies but not of pyruvate. Indirect evidence is presented suggesting that ATP interferes specifically with the mitochondrial uptake of ketone bodies. Interconversion of ketone bodies and the accumulation of acid-soluble intermediates (mainly citrate and glutamate) accounted for the major part of ketone-body utilization, whereas only a small part was oxidized to CO/sub 2/. Ketone bodies were not incorporated into lipids or protein. We conclude that adult rat-brain homogenates use ketone bodies exclusively for oxidative purposes.

  16. Novel Cell and Tissue Acquisition System (CTAS): Microdissection of Live and Frozen Brain Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kudo, Lili C.; Vi, Nancy; Ma, Zhongcai; Fields, Tony; Avliyakulov, Nuraly K.; Haykinson, Michael J.; Bragin, Anatol; Karsten, Stanislav L.

    2012-01-01

    We developed a novel, highly accurate, capillary based vacuum-assisted microdissection device CTAS - Cell and Tissue Acquisition System, for efficient isolation of enriched cell populations from live and freshly frozen tissues, which can be successfully used in a variety of molecular studies, including genomics and proteomics. Specific diameter of the disposable capillary unit (DCU) and precisely regulated short vacuum impulse ensure collection of the desired tissue regions and even individual cells. We demonstrated that CTAS is capable of dissecting specific regions of live and frozen mouse and rat brain tissues at the cellular resolution with high accuracy. CTAS based microdissection avoids potentially harmful physical treatment of tissues such as chemical treatment, laser irradiation, excessive heat or mechanical cell damage, thus preserving primary functions and activities of the dissected cells and tissues. High quality DNA, RNA, and protein can be isolated from CTAS-dissected samples, which are suitable for sequencing, microarray, 2D gel-based proteomic analyses, and Western blotting. We also demonstrated that CTAS can be used to isolate cells from native living tissues for subsequent recultivation of primary cultures without affecting cellular viability, making it a simple and cost-effective alternative for laser-assisted microdissection. PMID:22855692

  17. Experimental studies with selected light sources for NIRS of brain tissue: quantifying tissue chromophore concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myllylä, Teemu; Korhonen, Vesa; Kiviniemi, Vesa; Tuchin, Valery

    2015-03-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) based techniques are utilised in quantifying changes of chromophore concentrations in tissue. Particularly, non-invasive in vivo measurements of tissue oxygenation in the cerebral cortex are of interest. The measurement method is based on illuminating tissue and measuring the back-scattered light at wavelengths of interest. Tissue illumination can be realised using different techniques and various light sources. Commonly, lasers and laser diodes (LD) are utilised, but also high-power light emitting diodes (HPLED) are becoming more common. At the moment, a wide range of available narrow-band light sources exists, covering basically the entire spectrum of interest in brain tissue NIRS measurements. In this paper, in the centre of our interest are LDs and HPLEDs, because of their affordability, efficiency in terms of radiant flux versus size and easiness to adopt in in vivo medical applications. We compare characteristics of LDs and HPLEDs at specific wavelengths and their suitability for in vivo quantifying of different tissue chromophore concentration, particularly in cerebral blood flow (CBF). A special focus is on shape and width of the wavelength bands of interest, generated by the LDs and HPLEDs. Moreover, we experimentally study such effects as, spectroscopy cross talk, separability and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when quantifying tissue chromophore concentration. Chromophores of our interest are cytochrome, haemoglobin and water. Various LDs and HPLEDs, producing narrow-band wavelengths in the range from 500 nm to 1000 nm are tested.

  18. Analysis of potassium dynamics in mammalian brain tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner-Medwin, A R

    1983-01-01

    Equations are derived for potassium (K+) dynamics in simplified models of brain tissue. These describe K+ movement in extracellular space, transfer of K+ associated with current flow through cells (the so-called spatial buffer mechanism) and equilibration between extracellular space and cytoplasm. Numerical calculations show that the principal data on K+ dynamics from various laboratories can be accounted for with simple assumptions about spatial buffer action and uptake. Much of the data is inconsistent with extracellular diffusion being the main mechanism for K+ flux through brain tissue, including some that has earlier been cited in support of this hypothesis. The buffering actions of spatial buffer transfer of K+ and of cytoplasmic equilibration, in which these mechanisms reduce rises of [K+]o that would otherwise occur, are analysed quantitatively for specific K+ source distributions and for spatial and temporal frequency components of general disturbances. Spatial buffer action has most effect in reducing [K+]o rises with net release over extensive zones of tissue (greater than ca. 200 micron in diameter) for periods of the order of minutes. Reductions greater than 75% may be achieved. With localized but prolonged release, the maximum [K+]o rise is little affected but the volume of tissue affected by more moderate rises is substantially reduced. Cytoplasmic K+ uptake also has most effect with widespread release, but its effect diminishes with prolonged periods of release. The effects of the buffering mechanisms and of K+ re-uptake into active neurones in determining the decline of [K+]o after a period of stimulation are considered. Re-uptake is unlikely to be the major factor responsible for [K+]o decline when this has a time course of only a few seconds. The properties necessary for the cells mediating the spatial buffer mechanisms, possibly glial cells, are assessed. PMID:6875885

  19. Brain Network Activity in Monolingual and Bilingual Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Grady, Cheryl L.; Luk, Gigi; Craik, Fergus I.M.; Bialystok, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Bilingual older adults typically have better performance on tasks of executive control (EC) than do their monolingual peers, but differences in brain activity due to language experience are not well understood. Based on studies showing a relation between the dynamic range of brain network activity and performance on EC tasks, we hypothesized that life-long bilingual older adults would show increased functional connectivity relative to monolinguals in networks related to EC. We assessed intrinsic functional connectivity and modulation of activity in task vs. fixation periods in two brain networks that are active when EC is engaged, the frontoparietal control network (FPC) and the salience network (SLN). We also examined the default mode network (DMN), which influences behavior through reduced activity during tasks. We found stronger intrinsic functional connectivity in the FPC and DMN in bilinguals than in monolinguals. Although there were no group differences in the modulation of activity across tasks and fixation, bilinguals showed stronger correlations than monolinguals between intrinsic connectivity in the FPC and task-related increases of activity in prefrontal and parietal regions. This bilingual difference in network connectivity suggests that language experience begun in childhood and continued throughout adulthood influences brain networks in ways that may provide benefits in later life. PMID:25445783

  20. High-strain-rate brain injury model using submerged acute rat brain tissue slices.

    PubMed

    Sarntinoranont, Malisa; Lee, Sung J; Hong, Yu; King, Michael A; Subhash, Ghatu; Kwon, Jiwoon; Moore, David F

    2012-01-20

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) has received increasing attention in recent years due to ongoing military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. Sudden impacts or explosive blasts generate stress and pressure waves that propagate at high velocities and affect sensitive neurological tissues. The immediate soft tissue response to these stress waves is difficult to assess using current in vivo imaging technologies. However, these stress waves and resultant stretching and shearing of tissue within the nano- to microsecond time scale of blast and impact are likely to cause initial injury. To visualize the effects of stress wave loading, we have developed a new ex vivo model in which living tissue slices from rat brain, attached to a ballistic gelatin substrate, were subjected to high-strain-rate loads using a polymer split Hopkinson pressure bar (PSHPB) with real-time high-speed imaging. In this study, average peak fluid pressure within the test chamber reached a value of 1584±63.3 psi. Cavitation due to a trailing underpressure wave was also observed. Time-resolved images of tissue deformation were collected and large maximum eigenstrains (0.03-0.42), minimum eigenstrains (-0.33 to -0.03), maximum shear strains (0.09-0.45), and strain rates (8.4×10³/sec) were estimated using digital image correlation (DIC). Injury at 4 and 6 h was quantified using Fluoro-Jade C. Neuronal injury due to PSHPB testing was found to be significantly greater than injury associated with the tissue slice paradigm alone. While large pressures and strains were encountered for these tests, this system provides a controllable test environment to study injury to submerged brain slices over a range of strain rate, pressure, and strain loads. PMID:21970544

  1. Relationship between Concentrations of Lutein and StARD3 among Pediatric and Geriatric Human Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Tanprasertsuk, Jirayu; Li, Binxing; Bernstein, Paul S.; Vishwanathan, Rohini; Johnson, Mary Ann; Poon, Leonard; Johnson, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    Lutein, a dietary carotenoid, selectively accumulates in human retina and brain. While many epidemiological studies show evidence of a relationship between lutein status and cognitive health, lutein’s selective uptake in human brain tissue and its potential function in early neural development and cognitive health have been poorly evaluated at a molecular level. The objective of this study was to evaluate the cross-sectional relationship between concentrations of brain lutein and StARD3 (identified as its binding protein in retinal tissue) among three age groups: infants (1–4 months, n = 10), older adults (55–86 years, n = 8), and centenarians (98–105 years, n = 10). Brain lutein concentrations were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography and StARD3 levels were analyzed by Western Blot analysis. The strong relationship in infant brains (r = 0.75, P < 0.001) suggests that lutein has a role in neural development. The relationship remained significant but weaker in older adults (r = 0.51, P < 0.05) and insignificant in centenarians (r = 0.08, P > 0.05), seven of whom had mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia. These exploratory findings suggest an age-related decrease or abnormality of StARD3 activity in human brain. Given that StARD3 is also involved in cholesterol transportation, a process that is aberrant in neurodegenerative diseases, the potential protective function of lutein against these diseases remains to be explored. PMID:27205891

  2. Comparative Tissue Stainability of Lawsonia inermis (Henna) and Eosin as Counterstains to Hematoxylin in Brain Tissues.

    PubMed

    Alawa, Judith N; Gideon, Gbenga O; Adetiba, Bamidele; Alawa, Clement B

    2015-04-01

    We hyposthesized that henna staining could provide an alternative to eosin when used as a counterstain to hematoxylin for understanding basic neurohistological principles. Therefore, this study was aimed at investigating the suitability of henna as counterstain to hematoxylin for the demonstration of the layer stratification and cellular distribution in the brain tissue. Henna stained nervous tissue by reacting with the basic elements in proteins via its amino groups. It stained the neuropil and connective tissue membranes brown and effectively outlined the perikarya of neurons with no visible nuclei demonstrating that it is an acidic dye. Henna as a counterstain to hematoxylin demonstrated reliability as a new neurohistological stain. It facilitated identification of cortical layer stratification and cellular distribution in brain tissue sections from Wistar rats. This was comparable to standard hematoxylin and eosin staining as morphological and morphometrical analyses of stained cells did not show significant differences in size or number. This study presents a method for staining with henna and demonstrates that although henna and eosin belong to different dye groups (anthraquinone and xanthenes, respectively) based on their chromophores, they share similar staining techniques and thus could be used interchangeably in neurohistology. PMID:25772039

  3. Reduced Cerebral Oxygen Content in the DG and SVZ In Situ Promotes Neurogenesis in the Adult Rat Brain In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liying; Huang, Xin; Wu, Kuiwu; Xu, Lun; Li, Dahu; Liu, Shuhong; Zhao, Yongqi; Fan, Ming; Zhu, Lingling

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenesis in the adult brain occurs mainly within two neurogenic structures, the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus and the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ) of the forebrain. It has been reported that mild hypoxia promoted the proliferation of Neural Stem Cells (NSCs)in vitro. Our previous study further demonstrated that an external hypoxic environment stimulated neurogenesis in the adult rat brain in vivo. However, it remains unknown how external hypoxic environments affect the oxygen content in the brain and result in neurogenesis. Here we use an optical fiber luminescent oxygen sensor to detect the oxygen content in the adult rat brain in situ under normoxia and hypoxia. We found that the distribution of oxygen in cerebral regions is spatiotemporally heterogeneous. The Po2 values in the ventricles (45∼50 Torr) and DG (approximately 10 Torr) were much higher than those of other parts of the brain, such as the cortex and thalamus (approximately 2 Torr). Interestingly, our in vivo studies showed that an external hypoxic environment could change the intrinsic oxygen content in brain tissues, notably reducing oxygen levels in both the DG and SVZ, the major sites of adult neurogenesis. Furthermore, the hypoxic environment also increased the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF, two factors that have been reported to regulate neurogenesis, within the DG and SVZ. Thus, we have demonstrated that reducing the oxygen content of the external environment decreased Po2 levels in the DG and SVZ. This reduced oxygen level in the DG and SVZ might be the main mechanism triggering neurogenesis in the adult brain. More importantly, we speculate that varying oxygen levels may be the physiological basis of the regionally restricted neurogenesis in the adult brain. PMID:26466323

  4. An anatomic gene expression atlas of the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Ng, Lydia; Bernard, Amy; Lau, Chris; Overly, Caroline C; Dong, Hong-Wei; Kuan, Chihchau; Pathak, Sayan; Sunkin, Susan M; Dang, Chinh; Bohland, Jason W; Bokil, Hemant; Mitra, Partha P; Puelles, Luis; Hohmann, John; Anderson, David J; Lein, Ed S; Jones, Allan R; Hawrylycz, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Studying gene expression provides a powerful means of understanding structure-function relationships in the nervous system. The availability of genome-scale in situ hybridization datasets enables new possibilities for understanding brain organization based on gene expression patterns. The Anatomic Gene Expression Atlas (AGEA) is a new relational atlas revealing the genetic architecture of the adult C57Bl/6J mouse brain based on spatial correlations across expression data for thousands of genes in the Allen Brain Atlas (ABA). The AGEA includes three discovery tools for examining neuroanatomical relationships and boundaries: (1) three-dimensional expression-based correlation maps, (2) a hierarchical transcriptome-based parcellation of the brain and (3) a facility to retrieve from the ABA specific genes showing enriched expression in local correlated domains. The utility of this atlas is illustrated by analysis of genetic organization in the thalamus, striatum and cerebral cortex. The AGEA is a publicly accessible online computational tool integrated with the ABA (http://mouse.brain-map.org/agea). PMID:19219037

  5. Distribution of bisphenol A into tissues of adult, neonatal, and fetal Sprague-Dawley rats

    SciTech Connect

    Doerge, Daniel R.; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Vanlandingham, Michelle; Brown, Ronald P.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2011-09-15

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an important industrial chemical used in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastic products and epoxy resin-based food can liners. The presence of BPA metabolites in urine of > 90% of Americans aged 6-60 suggests ubiquitous and frequent exposure in the range of 0.02-0.2 {mu}g/kg bw/d (25th-95th percentiles). The current study used LC/MS/MS to measure placental transfer and concentrations of aglycone (receptor-active) and conjugated (inactive) BPA in tissues from Sprague-Dawley rats administered deuterated BPA (100 {mu}g/kg bw) by oral and IV routes. In adult female rat tissues, the tissue/serum concentration ratios for aglycone BPA ranged from 0.7 in liver to 5 in adipose tissue, reflecting differences in tissue perfusion, composition, and metabolic capacity. Following IV administration to dams, placental transfer was observed for aglycone BPA into fetuses at several gestational days (GD), with fetal/maternal serum ratios of 2.7 at GD 12, 1.2 at GD 16, and 0.4 at GD 20; the corresponding ratios for conjugated BPA were 0.43, 0.65, and 3.7. These ratios were within the ranges observed in adult tissues and were not indicative of preferential accumulation of aglycone BPA or hydrolysis of conjugates in fetal tissue in vivo. Concentrations of aglycone BPA in GD 20 fetal brain were higher than in liver or serum. Oral administration of the same dose did not produce measurable levels of aglycone BPA in fetal tissues. Amniotic fluid consistently contained levels of BPA at or below those in maternal serum. Concentrations of aglycone BPA in tissues of neonatal rats decreased with age in a manner consistent with the corresponding circulating levels. Phase II metabolism of BPA increased with fetal age such that near-term fetus was similar to early post-natal rats. These results show that concentrations of aglycone BPA in fetal tissues are similar to those in other maternal and neonatal tissues and that maternal Phase II metabolism, especially following oral

  6. Regeneration, Plasticity, and Induced Molecular Programs in Adult Zebrafish Brain

    PubMed Central

    Cosacak, Mehmet Ilyas; Papadimitriou, Christos; Kizil, Caghan

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative capacity of the brain is a variable trait within animals. Aquatic vertebrates such as zebrafish have widespread ability to renew their brains upon damage, while mammals have—if not none—very limited overall regenerative competence. Underlying cause of such a disparity is not fully evident; however, one of the reasons could be activation of peculiar molecular programs, which might have specific roles after injury or damage, by the organisms that regenerate. If this hypothesis is correct, then there must be genes and pathways that (a) are expressed only after injury or damage in tissues, (b) are biologically and functionally relevant to restoration of neural tissue, and (c) are not detected in regenerating organisms. Presence of such programs might circumvent the initial detrimental effects of the damage and subsequently set up the stage for tissue redevelopment to take place by modulating the plasticity of the neural stem/progenitor cells. Additionally, if transferable, those “molecular mechanisms of regeneration” could open up new avenues for regenerative therapies of humans in clinical settings. This review focuses on the recent studies addressing injury/damage-induced molecular programs in zebrafish brain, underscoring the possibility of the presence of genes that could be used as biomarkers of neural plasticity and regeneration. PMID:26417601

  7. Strategies to Optimize Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shan; Zhou, Jingli; Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Yang; Chen, Jin; Hu, Bo; Song, Jinlin; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy aims to replace damaged or aged cells with healthy functioning cells in congenital defects, tissue injuries, autoimmune disorders, and neurogenic degenerative diseases. Among various types of stem cells, adult stem cells (i.e., tissue-specific stem cells) commit to becoming the functional cells from their tissue of origin. These cells are the most commonly used in cell-based therapy since they do not confer risk of teratomas, do not require fetal stem cell maneuvers and thus are free of ethical concerns, and they confer low immunogenicity (even if allogenous). The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of the art and advances in using stem cell therapy for tissue repair in solid organs. Here we address key factors in cell preparation, such as the source of adult stem cells, optimal cell types for implantation (universal mesenchymal stem cells vs. tissue-specific stem cells, or induced vs. non-induced stem cells), early or late passages of stem cells, stem cells with endogenous or exogenous growth factors, preconditioning of stem cells (hypoxia, growth factors, or conditioned medium), using various controlled release systems to deliver growth factors with hydrogels or microspheres to provide apposite interactions of stem cells and their niche. We also review several approaches of cell delivery that affect the outcomes of cell therapy, including the appropriate routes of cell administration (systemic, intravenous, or intraperitoneal vs. local administration), timing for cell therapy (immediate vs. a few days after injury), single injection of a large number of cells vs. multiple smaller injections, a single site for injection vs. multiple sites and use of rodents vs. larger animal models. Future directions of stem cell-based therapies are also discussed to guide potential clinical applications. PMID:27338364

  8. Strategies to Optimize Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shan; Zhou, Jingli; Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Yang; Chen, Jin; Hu, Bo; Song, Jinlin; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy aims to replace damaged or aged cells with healthy functioning cells in congenital defects, tissue injuries, autoimmune disorders, and neurogenic degenerative diseases. Among various types of stem cells, adult stem cells (i.e., tissue-specific stem cells) commit to becoming the functional cells from their tissue of origin. These cells are the most commonly used in cell-based therapy since they do not confer risk of teratomas, do not require fetal stem cell maneuvers and thus are free of ethical concerns, and they confer low immunogenicity (even if allogenous). The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of the art and advances in using stem cell therapy for tissue repair in solid organs. Here we address key factors in cell preparation, such as the source of adult stem cells, optimal cell types for implantation (universal mesenchymal stem cells vs. tissue-specific stem cells, or induced vs. non-induced stem cells), early or late passages of stem cells, stem cells with endogenous or exogenous growth factors, preconditioning of stem cells (hypoxia, growth factors, or conditioned medium), using various controlled release systems to deliver growth factors with hydrogels or microspheres to provide apposite interactions of stem cells and their niche. We also review several approaches of cell delivery that affect the outcomes of cell therapy, including the appropriate routes of cell administration (systemic, intravenous, or intraperitoneal vs. local administration), timing for cell therapy (immediate vs. a few days after injury), single injection of a large number of cells vs. multiple smaller injections, a single site for injection vs. multiple sites and use of rodents vs. larger animal models. Future directions of stem cell-based therapies are also discussed to guide potential clinical applications. PMID:27338364

  9. Differentiation in boron distribution in adult male and female rats' normal brain: a BNCT approach.

    PubMed

    Goodarzi, Samereh; Pazirandeh, Ali; Jameie, Seyed Behnamedin; Khojasteh, Nasrin Baghban

    2012-06-01

    Boron distribution in adult male and female rats' normal brain after boron carrier injection (0.005 g Boric Acid+0.005 g Borax+10 ml distilled water, pH: 7.4) was studied in this research. Coronal sections of control and trial animal tissue samples were irradiated with thermal neutrons. Using alpha autoradiography, significant differences in boron concentration were seen in forebrain, midbrain and hindbrain sections of male and female animal groups with the highest value, four hours after boron compound injection. PMID:22484141

  10. Multipotent progenitor cells isolated from adult human pancreatic tissue.

    PubMed

    Todorov, I; Nair, I; Ferreri, K; Rawson, J; Kuroda, A; Pascual, M; Omori, K; Valiente, L; Orr, C; Al-Abdullah, I; Riggs, A; Kandeel, F; Mullen, Y

    2005-10-01

    The supply of islet cells is a limiting factor for the widespread application of islet transplantation of type-1 diabetes. Islets constitute 1% to 2% of pancreatic tissue, leaving approximately 98% as discard after islet isolation and purification. In this report we present our data on the isolation of multipotent progenitor cells from discarded adult human pancreatic tissue. The collected cells from discarded nonislet fractions, after enzymatic digestion and gradient purification of islets, were dissociated for suspension culture in a serum-free medium. The cell clusters grown to a size of 100 to 150 mum contained cells staining for stage-specific embryonic antigens, but not insulin or C-peptide. To direct cell differentiation toward islets, clusters were recultured in a pancreatic differentiation medium. Insulin and C-peptide-positive cells by immunocytochemistry appeared within a week, reaching over 10% of the cell population. Glucagon and somatostatin-positive cells were also detected. The cell clusters were found to secrete insulin in response to glucose stimulation. Cells from the same clusters also had the capacity for differentiation into neural cells, as documented by staining for neural and glial cell markers when cultured as monolayers in media containing neurotrophic factors. These data suggest that multipotent pancreatic progenitor cells exist within the human pancreatic tissue that is typically discarded during islet isolation procedures. These adult progenitor cells can be successfully differentiated into insulin-producing cells, and thus they have the potential for treatment of type-1 diabetes mellitus. PMID:16298614

  11. Brain tissue slice thickness monitored by ion-profile measurement.

    PubMed

    Lipinski, H G

    1992-04-01

    The thickness of a brain tissue slice preparation governs the amount of time required for substances to diffuse from the bathing solution to preparation. Slice thickness may increase during the experiment, e.g., in cases of hypoxia where osmotic pressure within the tissue changes, enabling water to enter the preparation. With increasing slice thickness diffusion paths from the bath to central layers of the preparation increase possibly resulting in an insufficient O2 supply to central layers. Therefore, the actual slice thickness should be monitored during the experiment especially in cases where osmolarity is changed or during hypoxia. This paper describes a simple method to monitor the actual slice thickness using ion profiles measured by ion selective micro-electrodes driven at a constant rate of approximately 10 microns/s (sample rate ca. 10/s). The method is based on steep changes in the concentration gradients at the upper and lower surfaces of the preparation induced by simple diffusion in the presence of concentration gradients between the non-tortuous bath and the tortuous tissue. The thickness of the preparation is derived from the location of the steep gradient changes as reflected by the registered profile. PMID:1405733

  12. Magnetic resonance brain tissue segmentation based on sparse representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    Segmentation or delineation of specific organs and structures in medical images is an important task in the clinical diagnosis and treatment, since it allows to characterize pathologies through imaging measures (biomarkers). In brain imaging, segmentation of main tissues or specific structures is challenging, due to the anatomic variability and complexity, and the presence of image artifacts (noise, intensity inhomogeneities, partial volume effect). In this paper, an automatic segmentation strategy is proposed, based on sparse representations and coupled dictionaries. Image intensity patterns are singly related to tissue labels at the level of small patches, gathering this information in coupled intensity/segmentation dictionaries. This dictionaries are used within a sparse representation framework to find the projection of a new intensity image onto the intensity dictionary, and the same projection can be used with the segmentation dictionary to estimate the corresponding segmentation. Preliminary results obtained with two publicly available datasets suggest that the proposal is capable of estimating adequate segmentations for gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) tissues, with an average overlapping of 0:79 for GM and 0:71 for WM (with respect to original segmentations).

  13. Acute moderate exercise enhances compensatory brain activation in older adults.

    PubMed

    Hyodo, Kazuki; Dan, Ippeita; Suwabe, Kazuya; Kyutoku, Yasushi; Yamada, Yuhki; Akahori, Mitsuya; Byun, Kyeongho; Kato, Morimasa; Soya, Hideaki

    2012-11-01

    A growing number of reports state that regular exercise enhances brain function in older adults. Recently a functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) study revealed that an acute bout of moderate exercise enhanced activation of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (L-DLPFC) associated with Stroop interference in young adults. Whether this acute effect is also applicable to older adults was examined. Sixteen older adults performed a color-word matching Stroop task before and after 10 minutes of exercise on a cycle ergometer at a moderate intensity. Cortical hemodynamics of the prefrontal area was monitored with a fNIRS during the Stroop task. We analyzed Stroop interference (incongruent-neutral) as Stroop performance. Though activation for Stroop interference was found in the bilateral prefrontal area before the acute bout of exercise, activation of the right frontopolar area (R-FPA) was enhanced after exercise. In the majority of participants, this coincided with improved performance reflected in Stroop interference results. Thus, an acute bout of moderate exercise improved Stroop performance in older adults, and this was associated with contralateral compensatory activation. PMID:22300952

  14. A revised dosimetric model of the adult head and brain

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchet, L.G.; Bolch, W.E.; Weber, D.A.; Atkins, H.L.; Poston, J.W. ||

    1996-07-01

    During the last decade, several new radiopharmaceuticals have been introduced for brain imaging. The marked differences of these tracers in tissue specificicity within the brain and their increasing use for diagnostic studies support the need for a more antihropomorphic model of the human brain and head. Brain and head models developed in the past have comprised only simplistic representations of this anatomic region. A new brain model has been developed which includes eight subregions: the caudate nucleus, the cerebellium, the cerebral cortex, the lateral ventricles, the lentiform nucleus, the thalamus, the third ventricle and the white matter. This brain model has been included within a slightly modified version of the head model developed by Poston et al. in 1984. The head model, which includes both the thyroid and eyes, was modified in this work to include the cerebrospinal fluid within the cranial and spinal regions. Absorbed fractions of energy for photon and electron sources located in thirteen source regions within the new head model were calculated using the EGS4 Monte Carlo radiation transport code for radiations in the energy range 10 keV to 4 MeV. S-values were calculated for five radionuclides used in brain imaging ({sup 11}C, {sup 15}O, {sup 18}F, {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 123}I) and for three radionuclides showing selective uptake in the thyroid ({sup 99m}Tc, {sup 123}I, and {sup 131}I). S-values were calculated using 100 discrete energy points in the beta-emission spectrum of the different radionuclides. 17 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Neuroimaging in adult penetrating brain injury: a guide for radiographers

    SciTech Connect

    Temple, Nikki; Donald, Cortny; Skora, Amanda; Reed, Warren

    2015-06-15

    Penetrating brain injuries (PBI) are a medical emergency, often resulting in complex damage and high mortality rates. Neuroimaging is essential to evaluate the location and extent of injuries, and to manage them accordingly. Currently, a myriad of imaging modalities are included in the diagnostic workup for adult PBI, including skull radiography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and angiography, with each modality providing their own particular benefits. This literature review explores the current modalities available for investigating PBI and aims to assist in decision making for the appropriate use of diagnostic imaging when presented with an adult PBI. Based on the current literature, the authors have developed an imaging pathway for adult penetrating brain injury that functions as both a learning tool and reference guide for radiographers and other health professionals. Currently, CT is recommended as the imaging modality of choice for the initial assessment of PBI patients, while MRI is important in the sub-acute setting where it aids prognosis prediction and rehabilitation planning, Additional follow-up imaging, such as angiography, should be dependent upon clinical findings.

  16. Neuroimaging in adult penetrating brain injury: a guide for radiographers.

    PubMed

    Temple, Nikki; Donald, Cortny; Skora, Amanda; Reed, Warren

    2015-06-01

    Penetrating brain injuries (PBI) are a medical emergency, often resulting in complex damage and high mortality rates. Neuroimaging is essential to evaluate the location and extent of injuries, and to manage them accordingly. Currently, a myriad of imaging modalities are included in the diagnostic workup for adult PBI, including skull radiography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and angiography, with each modality providing their own particular benefits. This literature review explores the current modalities available for investigating PBI and aims to assist in decision making for the appropriate use of diagnostic imaging when presented with an adult PBI. Based on the current literature, the authors have developed an imaging pathway for adult penetrating brain injury that functions as both a learning tool and reference guide for radiographers and other health professionals. Currently, CT is recommended as the imaging modality of choice for the initial assessment of PBI patients, while MRI is important in the sub-acute setting where it aids prognosis prediction and rehabilitation planning, Additional follow-up imaging, such as angiography, should be dependent upon clinical findings. PMID:26229677

  17. Switching roles: the functional plasticity of adult tissue stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wabik, Agnieszka; Jones, Philip H

    2015-05-01

    Adult organisms have to adapt to survive, and the same is true for their tissues. Rates and types of cell production must be rapidly and reversibly adjusted to meet tissue demands in response to both local and systemic challenges. Recent work reveals how stem cell (SC) populations meet these requirements by switching between functional states tuned to homoeostasis or regeneration. This plasticity extends to differentiating cells, which are capable of reverting to SCs after injury. The concept of the niche, the micro-environment that sustains and regulates stem cells, is broadening, with a new appreciation of the role of physical factors and hormonal signals. Here, we review different functions of SCs, the cellular mechanisms that underlie them and the signals that bias the fate of SCs as they switch between roles. PMID:25812989

  18. Switching roles: the functional plasticity of adult tissue stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wabik, Agnieszka; Jones, Philip H

    2015-01-01

    Adult organisms have to adapt to survive, and the same is true for their tissues. Rates and types of cell production must be rapidly and reversibly adjusted to meet tissue demands in response to both local and systemic challenges. Recent work reveals how stem cell (SC) populations meet these requirements by switching between functional states tuned to homoeostasis or regeneration. This plasticity extends to differentiating cells, which are capable of reverting to SCs after injury. The concept of the niche, the micro-environment that sustains and regulates stem cells, is broadening, with a new appreciation of the role of physical factors and hormonal signals. Here, we review different functions of SCs, the cellular mechanisms that underlie them and the signals that bias the fate of SCs as they switch between roles. PMID:25812989

  19. Cortical activity evoked by an acute painful tissue-damaging stimulus in healthy adult volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Gemma; Lee, Amy; Meek, Judith; Slater, Rebeccah; Olhede, Sofia; Fitzgerald, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Everyday painful experiences are usually single events accompanied by tissue damage, and yet most experimental studies of cutaneous nociceptive processing in the brain use repeated laser, thermal, or electrical stimulations that do not damage the skin. In this study the nociceptive activity in the brain evoked by tissue-damaging skin lance was analyzed with electroencephalography (EEG) in 20 healthy adult volunteers (13 men and 7 women) aged 21–40 yr. Time-frequency analysis of the evoked activity revealed a distinct late event-related vertex potential (lance event-related potential, LERP) at 100–300 ms consisting of a phase-locked energy increase between 1 and 20 Hz (delta-beta bands). A pairwise comparison between lance and sham control stimulation also revealed a period of ultralate stronger desynchronization after lance in the delta band (1–5 Hz). Skin application of mustard oil before lancing, which sensitizes a subpopulation of nociceptors expressing the cation channel TRPA1, did not affect the ultralate desynchronization but reduced the phase-locked energy increase in delta and beta bands, suggesting a central interaction between different modalities of nociceptive inputs. Verbal descriptor screening of individual pain experience revealed that lance pain is predominantly due to Aδ fiber activation, but when individuals describe lances as C fiber mediated, an ultralate delta band event-related desynchronization occurs in the brain-evoked activity. We conclude that pain evoked by acute tissue damage is associated with distinct Aδ and C fiber-mediated patterns of synchronization and desynchronization of EEG oscillations in the brain. PMID:23427303

  20. Brain white matter structure and COMT gene are linked to second-language learning in adults.

    PubMed

    Mamiya, Ping C; Richards, Todd L; Coe, Bradley P; Eichler, Evan E; Kuhl, Patricia K

    2016-06-28

    Adult human brains retain the capacity to undergo tissue reorganization during second-language learning. Brain-imaging studies show a relationship between neuroanatomical properties and learning for adults exposed to a second language. However, the role of genetic factors in this relationship has not been investigated. The goal of the current study was twofold: (i) to characterize the relationship between brain white matter fiber-tract properties and second-language immersion using diffusion tensor imaging, and (ii) to determine whether polymorphisms in the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene affect the relationship. We recruited incoming Chinese students enrolled in the University of Washington and scanned their brains one time. We measured the diffusion properties of the white matter fiber tracts and correlated them with the number of days each student had been in the immersion program at the time of the brain scan. We found that higher numbers of days in the English immersion program correlated with higher fractional anisotropy and lower radial diffusivity in the right superior longitudinal fasciculus. We show that fractional anisotropy declined once the subjects finished the immersion program. The relationship between brain white matter fiber-tract properties and immersion varied in subjects with different COMT genotypes. Subjects with the Methionine (Met)/Valine (Val) and Val/Val genotypes showed higher fractional anisotropy and lower radial diffusivity during immersion, which reversed immediately after immersion ended, whereas those with the Met/Met genotype did not show these relationships. Statistical modeling revealed that subjects' grades in the language immersion program were best predicted by fractional anisotropy and COMT genotype. PMID:27298360

  1. Brain white matter structure and COMT gene are linked to second-language learning in adults

    PubMed Central

    Mamiya, Ping C.; Richards, Todd L.; Coe, Bradley P.; Eichler, Evan E.; Kuhl, Patricia K.

    2016-01-01

    Adult human brains retain the capacity to undergo tissue reorganization during second-language learning. Brain-imaging studies show a relationship between neuroanatomical properties and learning for adults exposed to a second language. However, the role of genetic factors in this relationship has not been investigated. The goal of the current study was twofold: (i) to characterize the relationship between brain white matter fiber-tract properties and second-language immersion using diffusion tensor imaging, and (ii) to determine whether polymorphisms in the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene affect the relationship. We recruited incoming Chinese students enrolled in the University of Washington and scanned their brains one time. We measured the diffusion properties of the white matter fiber tracts and correlated them with the number of days each student had been in the immersion program at the time of the brain scan. We found that higher numbers of days in the English immersion program correlated with higher fractional anisotropy and lower radial diffusivity in the right superior longitudinal fasciculus. We show that fractional anisotropy declined once the subjects finished the immersion program. The relationship between brain white matter fiber-tract properties and immersion varied in subjects with different COMT genotypes. Subjects with the Methionine (Met)/Valine (Val) and Val/Val genotypes showed higher fractional anisotropy and lower radial diffusivity during immersion, which reversed immediately after immersion ended, whereas those with the Met/Met genotype did not show these relationships. Statistical modeling revealed that subjects’ grades in the language immersion program were best predicted by fractional anisotropy and COMT genotype. PMID:27298360

  2. Testosterone affects language areas of the adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Andreas; Kranz, Georg S.; Sladky, Ronald; Kaufmann, Ulrike; Ganger, Sebastian; Hummer, Allan; Seiger, Rene; Spies, Marie; Vanicek, Thomas; Winkler, Dietmar; Kasper, Siegfried; Windischberger, Christian; Swaab, Dick F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although the sex steroid hormone testosterone is integrally involved in the development of language processing, ethical considerations mostly limit investigations to single hormone administrations. To circumvent this issue we assessed the influence of continuous high‐dose hormone application in adult female‐to‐male transsexuals. Subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging before and after 4 weeks of testosterone treatment, with each scan including structural, diffusion weighted and functional imaging. Voxel‐based morphometry analysis showed decreased gray matter volume with increasing levels of bioavailable testosterone exclusively in Broca's and Wernicke's areas. Particularly, this may link known sex differences in language performance to the influence of testosterone on relevant brain regions. Using probabilistic tractography, we further observed that longitudinal changes in testosterone negatively predicted changes in mean diffusivity of the corresponding structural connection passing through the extreme capsule. Considering a related increase in myelin staining in rodents, this potentially reflects a strengthening of the fiber tract particularly involved in language comprehension. Finally, functional images at resting‐state were evaluated, showing increased functional connectivity between the two brain regions with increasing testosterone levels. These findings suggest testosterone‐dependent neuroplastic adaptations in adulthood within language‐specific brain regions and connections. Importantly, deteriorations in gray matter volume seem to be compensated by enhancement of corresponding structural and functional connectivity. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1738–1748, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26876303

  3. Testosterone affects language areas of the adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Andreas; Kranz, Georg S; Sladky, Ronald; Kaufmann, Ulrike; Ganger, Sebastian; Hummer, Allan; Seiger, Rene; Spies, Marie; Vanicek, Thomas; Winkler, Dietmar; Kasper, Siegfried; Windischberger, Christian; Swaab, Dick F; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2016-05-01

    Although the sex steroid hormone testosterone is integrally involved in the development of language processing, ethical considerations mostly limit investigations to single hormone administrations. To circumvent this issue we assessed the influence of continuous high-dose hormone application in adult female-to-male transsexuals. Subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging before and after 4 weeks of testosterone treatment, with each scan including structural, diffusion weighted and functional imaging. Voxel-based morphometry analysis showed decreased gray matter volume with increasing levels of bioavailable testosterone exclusively in Broca's and Wernicke's areas. Particularly, this may link known sex differences in language performance to the influence of testosterone on relevant brain regions. Using probabilistic tractography, we further observed that longitudinal changes in testosterone negatively predicted changes in mean diffusivity of the corresponding structural connection passing through the extreme capsule. Considering a related increase in myelin staining in rodents, this potentially reflects a strengthening of the fiber tract particularly involved in language comprehension. Finally, functional images at resting-state were evaluated, showing increased functional connectivity between the two brain regions with increasing testosterone levels. These findings suggest testosterone-dependent neuroplastic adaptations in adulthood within language-specific brain regions and connections. Importantly, deteriorations in gray matter volume seem to be compensated by enhancement of corresponding structural and functional connectivity. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1738-1748, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26876303

  4. Experimental and numerical study on the mechanical behavior of rat brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Karimi, A; Navidbakhsh, M; Yousefi, H; Haghi, A Motevalli; Sadati, Sja

    2014-02-01

    Brain tissue is a very soft tissue in which the mechanical properties depend on the loading direction. While few studies have characterized these biomechanical properties, it is worth knowing that accurate characterization of the mechanical properties of brain tissue at different loading directions is a key asset for neuronavigation and surgery simulation through haptic devices. In this study, the hyperelastic mechanical properties of rat brain tissue were measured experimentally and computationally. Prepared cylindrical samples were excised from the parietal lobes of rats' brains and experimentally tested by a tensile testing machine. The effects of loading direction on the mechanical properties of brain tissue were measured by applying load on both longitudinal and circumferential directions. The general prediction ability of the proposed hyperelastic model was verified using finite element (FE) simulations of brain tissue tension experiments. The uniaxial experimental results compared well with those predicted by the FE models. The results revealed the influence of loading direction on the mechanical properties of brain tissue. The Ogden hyperelastic material model was suitably represented by the non-linear behavior of the brain tissue, which can be used in future biomechanical simulations. The hyperelastic properties of brain tissue provided here have interest to the medical research community as there are several applications where accurate characterization of these properties are crucial for an accurate outcome, such as neurosurgery, robotic surgery, haptic device design or car manufacturing to evaluate possible trauma due to an impact. PMID:24519528

  5. Microwave irradiation of human brain tissue: production of microscopic slides within one day.

    PubMed Central

    Boon, M E; Marani, E; Adriolo, P J; Steffelaar, J W; Bots, G T; Kok, L P

    1988-01-01

    A three step method using microwave irradiation enabled microscopic slides of human brain tissue to be obtained within one working day: steps 1 and 2 hardened and solidified brain tissue; step 3 completed formalin fixation. The efficacy and precision of the method was compared with slides of conventionally processed brain tissue that had been fixed in formalin for six weeks. The microscopic quality of the sections was excellent with good presentation of brain tissue and equalled that of conventionally processed slides. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 PMID:3290268

  6. Roles for Oestrogen Receptor β in Adult Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Handa, R. J.; Ogawa, S.; Wang, J. M.; Herbison, A. E.

    2012-01-01

    Oestradiol exerts a profound influence upon multiple brain circuits. For the most part, these effects are mediated by oestrogen receptor (ER)α. We review here the roles of ERβ, the other ER isoform, in mediating rodent oestradiol-regulated anxiety, aggressive and sexual behaviours, the control of gonadotrophin secretion, and adult neurogenesis. Evidence exists for: (i) ERβ located in the paraventricular nucleus underpinning the suppressive influence of oestradiol on the stress axis and anxiety-like behaviour; (ii) ERβ expressed in gonadotrophin-releasing hormone neurones contributing to oestrogen negative-feedback control of gonadotrophin secretion; (iii) ERβ controlling the offset of lordosis behaviour; (iv) ERβ suppressing aggressive behaviour in males; (v) ERβ modulating responses to social stimuli; and (vi) ERβ in controlling adult neurogenesis. This review highlights two major themes; first, ERβ and ERα are usually tightly inter-related in the oestradiol-dependent control of a particular brain function. For example, even though oestradiol feedback to control reproduction occurs principally through ERα-dependent mechanisms, modulatory roles for ERβ also exist. Second, the roles of ERα and ERβ within a particular neural network may be synergistic or antagonistic. Examples of the latter include the role of ERα to enhance, and ERβ to suppress, anxiety-like and aggressive behaviours. Splice variants such as ERβ2, acting as dominant negative receptors, are of further particular interest because their expression levels may reflect preceeding oestradiol exposure of relevance to oestradiol replacement therapy. Together, this review highlights the predominant modulatory, but nonetheless important, roles of ERβ in mediating the many effects of oestradiol upon adult brain function. PMID:21851428

  7. 5-hydroxymethylcytosine is detected in RNA from mouse brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhigang; Xin, Ning; Wei, Bin; Hua, Xiaodong; Zhang, Gaocai; Leng, Cuihua; Zhao, Chenyu; Wu, Di; Li, Jizhen; Ge, Wei; Sun, Miao; Xu, Xingshun

    2016-07-01

    5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) is considered as a novel DNA modification and plays an important role in cancer, stem cells, and developmental diseases. In this study, we demonstrated the existence of RNA 5hmC modification in mouse brain RNA by using a dot blot analysis method. Our data indicated that 5hmC modification in RNA samples was less than that in DNA samples. Further, we optimized the conditions for 5hmC detection in RNA samples such as DNase treatment, denature reagents, denature time, sample air-dry time, and the cross-linking time between RNA and membrane. Our results demonstrated that DNase treatment and denature reagents were two important factors that affected the 5hmC detection in RNA samples. By using the optimal conditions for RNA 5hmC detection, we found that the brainstem, the hippocampus, and the cerebellum had high levels of 5hmC modification and 5mC modification in RNA. Finally, we found that RNA 5hmC modification decreased in MPTP-induced Parkinson's disease model in mice. These suggest that 5hmC modification in RNA might play an important regulative role on protein or microRNA expression in these brain tissues. Because DNA 5hmC modification plays an important role in neural differentiation and development as well as neurological diseases, the significance of 5hmC modification in RNA in different neurological diseases needs further investigation. In summary, our study demonstrated for the first time the abundance of 5hmC modification in brain RNA by using a dot blot analysis method and proved that dot blot analysis is a useful method for 5hmC detection in RNA samples. PMID:27117867

  8. Optical changes of porcine brain tissue after thermal coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzmaier, Hans-Joachim; Goldbach, Thomas; Yaroslavsky, Ilya V.; Ulrich, Frank; Bettag, Martin; Kahn, Thomas; Kaufmann, Raimund

    1995-05-01

    Porcine brain tissue is a model for human brain structures in laser induced thermo-therapy. However, its optical properties including possible heat-related changes were basically unknown so far. To simulate laser coagulation, 12 specimens (6 grey and 6 white matter) were heated in a saline bath (80°C, 2 hours) and compared to 11 untreated samples (5 grey and 6 white matter). The optical constants were obtained from transmission (total and collimated) and reflection (diffuse) measurements using the inverse Monte-Carlo method. The absorption coefficient ((mu) a) of untreated grey substance decreased from 0.35 +/- 0.06/mm (340 nm) to 0.03 +/- 0.02/mm (800 nm). The scattering coefficient ((mu) s) varied between 20.42 +/- 3.65/mm (340 nm) and 6.85 +/- 2.07/mm (800 nm). The anisotropy factor (g) increased from 0.848 +/- 0.013 (340 nm) to 0.889 +/- 0.009 (800 nm). Coagulation increased (mu) a up to a factor of 2 (340-540 nm; p < 0.05), and (mu) s by a factor up to 3 (340-800 nm, all data p < 0.001) while g was decreased up to 18% (340-560 nm; p < 0.05). White substance exhibited a (mu) a between 0.24 +/- 0.07/mm (340 nm) and 0.04 +/- 0.02/mm (800 nm) while (mu) s varied between 26.72 +/- 9.10/mm (340 nm) and 21.78 +/- 3.88/mm (800 nm). The g-value increased from 0.561 +/- 0.180 (340 nm) to 0.834 +/- 0.068 (800 nm). Coagulation increased (mu) a by a factor up to 2 (340-800 nm; all data p < 0.05) while (mu) s and g remained unchanged. Thermal denaturation changes the absorption and scattering properties of porcine brain significantly.

  9. Neurogenesis in the adult brain: implications for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Galvan, Veronica; Bredesen, Dale E

    2007-10-01

    The function of neurogenesis in the adult brain is still unknown. Interventions such as environmental enrichment and exercise impinge on neurogenesis, suggesting that the process is regulated by experience. Conversely, a role for neurogenesis in learning has been proposed through 'cellular plasticity', a process akin to synaptic plasticity but operating at the network level. Although neurogenesis is stimulated by acute injury, and possibly by neurodegenerative processes such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), it does not suffice to restore function. While the role and direction of change in the neurogenic response at different stages of AD is still a matter of debate, it is possible that a deficit in neurogenesis may contribute to AD pathogenesis since at least one of the two regions ostensibly neurogenic in the adult human brain (the subgranular zone of the dentage gyrus and the ventriculo-olfactory neurogenic system) support high-level functions affected in early AD (associative memory and olfaction respectively). The age of onset and the rate of progression of sporadic forms of AD are highly variable. Sporadic AD may have a component of insufficient neurogenic replacement or insufficient neurogenic stimulation that is correlated with traits of personal history; the rate of neurogenesis and the survival of replicating progenitors is strongly modified by behavioral interventions known to impinge on the rate of neurogenesis and the probability of survival of newly born neurons--exercise, enriched experience, and learning. This view is consistent with epidemiological data suggesting that higher education and increased participation in intellectual, social and physical aspects of daily life are associated with slower cognitive decline in healthy elderly ("cognitive reserve") and may reduce the risk of AD. Although neurogenesis can be modulated exogenously by growth factors, stimulation of neurogenesis as a mean to treat neurodegeneration is still for the most part

  10. Biochemical effect of a ketogenic diet on the brains of obese adult rats.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Hoda E; El-Swefy, Sahar E; Rashed, Leila A; Abd El-Latif, Sally K

    2010-07-01

    Excess weight, particularly abdominal obesity, can cause or exacerbate cardiovascular and metabolic disease. Obesity is also a proven risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Various studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of a ketogenic diet (KD) in weight reduction and in modifying the disease activity of neurodegenerative disorders, including AD. Therefore, in this study we examined the metabolic and neurodegenerative changes associated with obesity and the possible neuroprotective effects of a KD in obese adult rats. Compared with obese rats fed a control diet, obese rats fed a KD showed significant weight loss, improvement in lipid profiles and insulin resistance, and upregulation of adiponectin mRNA expression in adipose tissue. In addition, the KD triggered significant downregulation of brain amyloid protein precursor, apolipoprotein E and caspase-3 mRNA expression, and improvement of brain oxidative stress responses. These findings suggest that a KD has anti-obesity and neuroprotective effects. PMID:20395146

  11. MEASUREMENT OF SMALL MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS OF BRAIN TISSUE EXPOSED TO EXTREMELY-LOW-FREQUENCY ELECTRIC FIELDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electromagnetic fields can interact with biological tissue both electrically and mechanically. This study investigated the mechanical interaction between brain tissue and an extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electric field by measuring the resultant vibrational amplitude. The exposur...

  12. Adult Head and Neck Soft Tissue Sarcomas: Treatment and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rabindra P.; Grimer, Robert J.; Bhujel, Nabina; Carter, Simon R.; Tillman, Roger M.; Abudu, Adesegun

    2008-01-01

    We have retrospectively analysed the experience of a musculoskeletal oncological unit in the management of adult head and neck soft tissue sarcomas from 1990 to 2005. Thirty-six patients were seen, of whom 24 were treated at this unit, the remainder only receiving advice. The median age of the patients was 46 years. Most of the sarcomas were deep and of high or intermediate grade with a median size of 5.5 cm. Eleven different histological subtypes were identified. Wide excision was possible only in 21% of the cases. 42% of the patients developed local recurrence and 42% developed metastatic disease usually in the lungs. Overall survival was 49% at 5 years. Tumour size was the most important prognostic factor. Adult head and neck soft tissue sarcomas have a high mortality rate with a high risk of local recurrence and metastatic disease. The rarity of the disease would suggest that centralisation of care could lead to increased expertise and better outcomes. PMID:18382622

  13. Microwave dielectric measurements and tissue characteristics of the human brain: potential in localizing intracranial tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axer, Hubertus; Gräßel, David; Steinhauer, Matthias; Stöhr, Peter; John, Andreas; Coenen, Volker A.; Jansen, Rolf H.; Keyserlingk, Diedrich Graf v.

    2002-05-01

    This study describes the measurements of dielectric properties in the microwave range to differentiate various human central nervous structures. Using a vector network analyser transmission and reflection coefficients were measured from 500 MHz to 18 GHz in four human formalin fixed human brains. The positions of the electrodes were marked, and the tissue was histologically stained to visualize the myelo- and the cytoarchitecture as well as the nerve fibre orientation at the electrodes. The profiles of the transmission coefficients showed a characteristic minimum peak. In order to describe this peak, a mathematical function was fitted. Parameters derived from digital image processing were used to characterize the myelo- and cytoarchitecure of the tissue at the electrodes. A multiple regression model, with the frequency at the transmission peak minimum as a dependent variable and two tissue characteristics at the two electrodes as independent variables, showed a multiple regression coefficient of 0.765. A neural network model was able to estimate the frequency at the transmission peak minimum from the tissue characteristics at the electrode. The measurements of dielectric properties are well suited to differentiate distinct intracerebral structures. The method could be used for online monitoring of the needle's position during a stereotactic intervention in neurosurgery.

  14. Regrowth of Serotonin Axons in the Adult Mouse Brain Following Injury.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yunju; Dougherty, Sarah E; Wood, Kevin; Sun, Landy; Cudmore, Robert H; Abdalla, Aya; Kannan, Geetha; Pletnikov, Mikhail; Hashemi, Parastoo; Linden, David J

    2016-08-17

    It is widely believed that damaged axons in the adult mammalian brain have little capacity to regrow, thereby impeding functional recovery after injury. Studies using fixed tissue have suggested that serotonin neurons might be a notable exception, but remain inconclusive. We have employed in vivo two-photon microscopy to produce time-lapse images of serotonin axons in the neocortex of the adult mouse. Serotonin axons undergo massive retrograde degeneration following amphetamine treatment and subsequent slow recovery of axonal density, which is dominated by new growth with little contribution from local sprouting. A stab injury that transects serotonin axons running in the neocortex is followed by local regression of cut serotonin axons and followed by regrowth from cut ends into and across the stab rift zone. Regrowing serotonin axons do not follow the pathways left by degenerated axons. The regrown axons release serotonin and their regrowth is correlated with recovery in behavioral tests. PMID:27499084

  15. Diminished adult neurogenesis in the marmoset brain precedes old age

    PubMed Central

    Leuner, Benedetta; Kozorovitskiy, Yevgenia; Gross, Charles G.; Gould, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    With aging there is a decline in the number of newly generated neurons in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. In rodents and tree shrews, this age-related decrease in neurogenesis is evident long before the animals become aged. No previous studies have investigated whether primates exhibit a similar decline in hippocampal neurogenesis with aging. To investigate this possibility, young to middle aged adult common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) were injected with BrdU and perfused 3 weeks later. The number of newly generated cells in the subgranular zone/granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus was significantly lower in older animals and decreased linearly with age. A similar age-related decline in new cells was observed in the subventricular zone but not in the hilar region of the dentate gyrus. These data demonstrate that a substantial decrease in neurogenesis occurs before the onset of old age in the adult marmoset brain, suggesting the possibility that similar alterations occur in the human brain. PMID:17940008

  16. Noncanonical Sites of Adult Neurogenesis in the Mammalian Brain.

    PubMed

    Feliciano, David M; Bordey, Angélique; Bonfanti, Luca

    2015-10-01

    Two decades after the discovery that neural stem cells (NSCs) populate some regions of the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), deep knowledge has been accumulated on their capacity to generate new neurons in the adult brain. This constitutive adult neurogenesis occurs throughout life primarily within remnants of the embryonic germinal layers known as "neurogenic sites." Nevertheless, some processes of neurogliogenesis also occur in the CNS parenchyma commonly considered as "nonneurogenic." This "noncanonical" cell genesis has been the object of many claims, some of which turned out to be not true. Indeed, it is often an "incomplete" process as to its final outcome, heterogeneous by several measures, including regional location, progenitor identity, and fate of the progeny. These aspects also strictly depend on the animal species, suggesting that persistent neurogenic processes have uniquely adapted to the brain anatomy of different mammals. Whereas some examples of noncanonical neurogenesis are strictly parenchymal, others also show stem cell niche-like features and a strong link with the ventricular cavities. This work will review results obtained in a research field that expanded from classic neurogenesis studies involving a variety of areas of the CNS outside of the subventricular zone (SVZ) and subgranular zone (SGZ). It will be highlighted how knowledge concerning noncanonical neurogenic areas is still incomplete owing to its regional and species-specific heterogeneity, and to objective difficulties still hampering its full identification and characterization. PMID:26384869

  17. Specific binding of naloxone to ovine brain tissue: comparison of brain regions and endocrine states.

    PubMed

    Weesner, G D; Trout, W E; Malven, P V

    1989-06-01

    Binding of [3H]naloxone ([3H]NAL) to brain membranes was quantified by Scatchard analysis using two methods of separating bound from free [3H]NAL. In the centrifugation method, membranes that were soluble at 1,000 x g, but sedimented at 20,000 x g, were incubated with [3H]NAL. For filtration, all membranes that sedimented at 20,000 x g were incubated and filtered through glass filter fibers. Nonspecific binding was estimated using greater than 500-fold excess of unlabeled naloxone (10(-6) M). Specific binding of [3H]NAL was used to generate linear multiple-point Scatchard plots, which indicated a single class of high-affinity sites. In Exp. 1, 10 ovariectomized (OVX) ewes were injected with estradiol-17 beta alone or in combination with progesterone. Compared with OVX controls, these hormonal treatments did not affect binding of [3H]NAL (centrifugation method) to combined hypothalamus (HYP) + preoptic (POA) tissues. In cyclic ewes (Exp. 2, filtration method), affinity constants (2.4 +/- .2 x 10(8) M-1) did not differ among HYP, POA and basal forebrain (BF) tissues, but BF had more sites (39 +/- 3 fmol/mg) than either HYP (14 +/- 1) or POA (17 +/- 1). Binding affinity and concentration of sites within each brain area (HYP, POA, BF) did not differ between d 8 and d 16 (preovulatory but after luteolysis) in normally cycling ewes. Overall, neural tissue dissected from BF had a greater concentration of binding sites than HYP or POA. Exogenous and endogenous fluctuations in ovarian steroids did not affect binding of [3H]NAL to these tissues. PMID:2768110

  18. Building Biocompatible Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering of the Brain and Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Aurand, Emily R.; Wagner, Jennifer; Lanning, Craig; Bjugstad, Kimberly B.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering strategies employing biomaterials have made great progress in the last few decades. However, the tissues of the brain and spinal cord pose unique challenges due to a separate immune system and their nature as soft tissue. Because of this, neural tissue engineering for the brain and spinal cord may require re-establishing biocompatibility and functionality of biomaterials that have previously been successful for tissue engineering in the body. The goal of this review is to briefly describe the distinctive properties of the central nervous system, specifically the neuroimmune response, and to describe the factors which contribute to building polymer hydrogels compatible with this tissue. These factors include polymer chemistry, polymerization and degradation, and the physical and mechanical properties of the hydrogel. By understanding the necessities in making hydrogels biocompatible with tissue of the brain and spinal cord, tissue engineers can then functionalize these materials for repairing and replacing tissue in the central nervous system. PMID:24955749

  19. Cyclophilin D-Sensitive Mitochondrial Permeability Transition in Adult Human Brain and Liver Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Morota, Saori; Chen, Li; Matsuyama, Nagahisa; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Nakajima, Satoshi; Tanoue, Tadashi; Omi, Akibumi; Shibasaki, Futoshi; Shimazu, Motohide; Ikeda, Yukio; Uchino, Hiroyuki; Elmér, Eskil

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) is considered to be a major cause of cell death under a variety of pathophysiological conditions of the central nervous system (CNS) and other organs. Pharmacological inhibition or genetic knockout of the matrix protein cyclophilin D (CypD) prevents mPT and cell degeneration in several models of brain injury. If these findings in animal models are translatable to human disease, pharmacological inhibition of mPT offers a promising therapeutic target. The objective of this study was to validate the presence of a CypD-sensitive mPT in adult human brain and liver mitochondria. In order to perform functional characterization of human mitochondria, fresh tissue samples were obtained during hemorrhage or tumor surgery and mitochondria were rapidly isolated. Mitochondrial calcium retention capacity, a quantitative assay for mPT, was significantly increased by the CypD inhibitor cyclosporin A in both human brain and liver mitochondria, whereas thiol-reactive compounds and oxidants sensitized mitochondria to calcium-induced mPT. Brain mitochondria underwent swelling upon calcium overload, which was reversible upon calcium removal. To further explore mPT of human mitochondria, liver mitochondria were demonstrated to exhibit several classical features of the mPT phenomenon, such as calcium-induced loss of membrane potential and respiratory coupling, as well as release of the pro-apoptotic protein cytochrome c. We concluded that adult viable human brain and liver mitochondria possess an active CypD-sensitive mPT. Our findings support the rationale of CypD and mPT inhibition as pharmacological targets in acute and chronic neurodegeneration. PMID:21121808

  20. Adult stem cells in bone and cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Salgado, António J; Oliveira, João T; Pedro, Adriano J; Reis, Rui L

    2006-09-01

    The progressive increase in life expectancy within the last century has led to the appearance of novel health related problems, some of those within the musculoskeletal field. Among the latter, one can find diseases such as osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis and bone cancer, just to mention some of the most relevant. Other related problems are those that arise from serious injuries, often leading to non-recoverable critical size defects. The therapies currently used to treat this type of diseases/injuries are based on the use of pharmaceutical agents, auto/allotransplant and synthetic materials. However, such solutions present a number of inconveniences and therefore, there is a constant search for novel therapeutic solutions. The appearance of a novel field of science called Tissue engineering brought some hope for the solution of the above mentioned problems. In this field, it is believed that by combining a 3D porous template--scaffold--with an adequate cell population, with osteo or chondrogenic potential, it will be possible to develop bone and cartilage tissue equivalents that when implanted in vivo, could lead to the total regeneration of the affected area. This ideal cell population should have a series of properties, namely a high osteo and chondrogenic potential and at the same time, should be easily expandable and maintained in cultures for long periods of time. Due to its natural and intrinsic properties, stem cells are one of the best available cell types. However, after this sentence, the readers may ask, "Which Stem Cells?". During the last 10/15 years, the scientific community witnessed and reported the appearance of several sources of stem cells with both osteo and chondrogenic potential. Therefore, the present review intends to make an overview of data reported on different sources of adult stem cells (bone marrow, periosteum, adipose tissue, skeletal muscle and umbilical cord) for bone and cartilage regenerative medicine, namely those focusing on

  1. Enhancement of Sexual Behavior in Female Rats by Neonatal Transplantation of Brain Tissue from Males

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arendash, Gary W.; Gorski, Roger A.

    1982-09-01

    Transplantation of preoptic tissue from male rat neonates into the preoptic area of female littermates increased masculine and feminine sexual behavior in the recipients during adulthood. This suggests that functional connections develop between the transplanted neural tissue and the host brain. A new intraparenchymal brain transplantation technique was used to achieve these results.

  2. Age-specific MRI brain and head templates for healthy adults from 20 through 89 years of age

    PubMed Central

    Fillmore, Paul T.; Phillips-Meek, Michelle C.; Richards, John E.

    2015-01-01

    This study created and tested a database of adult, age-specific MRI brain and head templates. The participants included healthy adults from 20 through 89 years of age. The templates were done in five-year, 10-year, and multi-year intervals from 20 through 89 years, and consist of average T1W for the head and brain, and segmenting priors for gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). It was found that age-appropriate templates provided less biased tissue classification estimates than age-inappropriate reference data and reference data based on young adult templates. This database is available for use by other investigators and clinicians for their MRI studies, as well as other types of neuroimaging and electrophysiological research.1 PMID:25904864

  3. Axonal injury and regeneration in the adult brain of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ayaz, Derya; Leyssen, Maarten; Koch, Marta; Yan, Jiekun; Srahna, Mohammed; Sheeba, Vasu; Fogle, Keri J.; Holmes, Todd C.; Hassan, Bassem A.

    2009-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a leading genetic model system in nervous system development and disease research. Using the power of fly genetics in traumatic axonal injury research will significantly speed up the characterization of molecular processes that control axonal regeneration in the Central Nervous System (CNS). We developed a versatile and physiologically robust preparation for the long-term culture of the whole Drosophila brain. We use this method to develop a novel Drosophila model for CNS axonal injury and regeneration. We first show that, similar to mammalian CNS axons, injured adult wild type fly CNS axons fail to regenerate, whereas adult-specific enhancement of Protein Kinase A activity increases the regenerative capacity of lesioned neurons. Combined, these observations suggest conservation of neuronal regeneration mechanisms following injury. We next exploit this model to explore pathways that induce robust regeneration and find that adult-specific activation of JNK signalling is sufficient for de novo CNS axonal regeneration after injury, including the growth of new axons past the lesion site and into the normal target area. PMID:18524906

  4. Stroke Incidence Following Traumatic Brain Injury in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Jennifer S.; Liu, Xinggang; Smith, Gordon S.; Baumgarten, Mona; Rattinger, Gail B.; Gambert, Steven R.; Langenberg, Patricia; Zuckerman, Ilene H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Following traumatic brain injury (TBI), older adults are at increased risk of hemorrhagic and thromboembolic events, but it is unclear whether the increased risk continues after hospital discharge. We estimated incidence rates of hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke following hospital discharge for TBI among adults ≥65 and compared them with pre-TBI rates. Participants 16,936 Medicare beneficiaries aged ≥65 with a diagnosis of TBI in any position on an inpatient claim between 6/1/2006 and 12/31/2009 who survived to hospital discharge. Design Retrospective analysis of a random 5% sample of Medicare claims data Main Measures Hemorrhagic stroke was defined as ICD-9 codes 430.xx-432.xx. Ischemic stroke was defined as ICD-9 codes 433.xx-435.xx, 437.0x, and 437.1x. Results There was a six-fold increase in the rate of hemorrhagic stroke following TBI compared to the pre-TBI period (adjusted Rate Ratio (RR) 6.5; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 5.3, 7.8), controlling for age and sex. A smaller increase in the rate of ischemic stroke was observed (adjusted RR 1.3; 95% CI 1.2, 1.4). Conclusion Future studies should investigate causes of increased stroke risk post-TBI as well as effective treatments to reduce stroke risk and improve outcomes post-TBI among older adults. PMID:24816156

  5. Resting-State Brain Activity in Adult Males Who Stutter

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chaozhe; Wang, Liang; Yan, Qian; Lin, Chunlan; Yu, Chunshui

    2012-01-01

    Although developmental stuttering has been extensively studied with structural and task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), few studies have focused on resting-state brain activity in this disorder. We investigated resting-state brain activity of stuttering subjects by analyzing the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF), region of interest (ROI)-based functional connectivity (FC) and independent component analysis (ICA)-based FC. Forty-four adult males with developmental stuttering and 46 age-matched fluent male controls were scanned using resting-state fMRI. ALFF, ROI-based FCs and ICA-based FCs were compared between male stuttering subjects and fluent controls in a voxel-wise manner. Compared with fluent controls, stuttering subjects showed increased ALFF in left brain areas related to speech motor and auditory functions and bilateral prefrontal cortices related to cognitive control. However, stuttering subjects showed decreased ALFF in the left posterior language reception area and bilateral non-speech motor areas. ROI-based FC analysis revealed decreased FC between the posterior language area involved in the perception and decoding of sensory information and anterior brain area involved in the initiation of speech motor function, as well as increased FC within anterior or posterior speech- and language-associated areas and between the prefrontal areas and default-mode network (DMN) in stuttering subjects. ICA showed that stuttering subjects had decreased FC in the DMN and increased FC in the sensorimotor network. Our findings support the concept that stuttering subjects have deficits in multiple functional systems (motor, language, auditory and DMN) and in the connections between them. PMID:22276215

  6. In vivo multiphoton microscopy of deep brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Levene, Michael J; Dombeck, Daniel A; Kasischke, Karl A; Molloy, Raymond P; Webb, Watt W

    2004-04-01

    Although fluorescence microscopy has proven to be one of the most powerful tools in biology, its application to the intact animal has been limited to imaging several hundred micrometers below the surface. The rest of the animal has eluded investigation at the microscopic level without excising tissue or performing extensive surgery. However, the ability to image with subcellular resolution in the intact animal enables a contextual setting that may be critical for understanding proper function. Clinical applications such as disease diagnosis and optical biopsy may benefit from minimally invasive in vivo approaches. Gradient index (GRIN) lenses with needle-like dimensions can transfer high-quality images many centimeters from the object plane. Here, we show that multiphoton microscopy through GRIN lenses enables minimally invasive, subcellular resolution several millimeters in the anesthetized, intact animal, and we present in vivo images of cortical layer V and hippocampus in the anesthetized Thy1-YFP line H mouse. Microangiographies from deep capillaries and blood vessels containing fluorescein-dextran and quantum dot-labeled serum in wild-type mouse brain are also demonstrated. PMID:14668300

  7. Experimental research of mechanical behavior of porcine brain tissue under rotational shear stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Zhang, Jianhua; Wang, Kan; Wang, Mingyu; Gao, Changqing; Ma, Chao

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate mechanical behavior of porcine brain tissue with a series of rotational shear stress control experiments. To this end, several experiments including stress sweep tests, frequency sweep tests and quasi-static creep tests were designed and conducted with a standard rheometer (HAAKE RheoStress6000). The effects of the loading stress rates to mechanical properties of brain tissue were also studied in stress sweep tests. The results of stress sweep tests performed on the same brain showed that brain tissue had an obvious regional inhomogeneity and the mechanical damage occurred at the rotational shear stress of 10-15Pa. The experimental data from three different loading stress rates demonstrated that the mechanical behavior of porcine brain tissue was loading stress rate dependent. With the decrease of loading stress rate, a stiffer mechanical characteristic of brain tissue was observed and the occurrence of mechanical damage can be delayed to a higher stress. From the results of frequency sweep tests we found that brain tissue had almost completely elastic properties at high frequency area. The nonlinear creep response under the rotational shear stress of 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9Pa was shown in results of creep tests. A new nonlinear viscoelastic solid model was proposed for creep tests and matched well with the test data. Considering the regional differences, loading stress rates and test conditions effects, loss tangent tan δ in porcine brain tissue showed a high uniformity of 0.25-0.45. PMID:26735181

  8. A stereotaxic, population-averaged T1w ovine brain atlas including cerebral morphology and tissue volumes.

    PubMed

    Nitzsche, Björn; Frey, Stephen; Collins, Louis D; Seeger, Johannes; Lobsien, Donald; Dreyer, Antje; Kirsten, Holger; Stoffel, Michael H; Fonov, Vladimir S; Boltze, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Standard stereotaxic reference systems play a key role in human brain studies. Stereotaxic coordinate systems have also been developed for experimental animals including non-human primates, dogs, and rodents. However, they are lacking for other species being relevant in experimental neuroscience including sheep. Here, we present a spatial, unbiased ovine brain template with tissue probability maps (TPM) that offer a detailed stereotaxic reference frame for anatomical features and localization of brain areas, thereby enabling inter-individual and cross-study comparability. Three-dimensional data sets from healthy adult Merino sheep (Ovis orientalis aries, 12 ewes and 26 neutered rams) were acquired on a 1.5 T Philips MRI using a T1w sequence. Data were averaged by linear and non-linear registration algorithms. Moreover, animals were subjected to detailed brain volume analysis including examinations with respect to body weight (BW), age, and sex. The created T1w brain template provides an appropriate population-averaged ovine brain anatomy in a spatial standard coordinate system. Additionally, TPM for gray (GM) and white (WM) matter as well as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) classification enabled automatic prior-based tissue segmentation using statistical parametric mapping (SPM). Overall, a positive correlation of GM volume and BW explained about 15% of the variance of GM while a positive correlation between WM and age was found. Absolute tissue volume differences were not detected, indeed ewes showed significantly more GM per bodyweight as compared to neutered rams. The created framework including spatial brain template and TPM represent a useful tool for unbiased automatic image preprocessing and morphological characterization in sheep. Therefore, the reported results may serve as a starting point for further experimental and/or translational research aiming at in vivo analysis in this species. PMID:26089780

  9. A stereotaxic, population-averaged T1w ovine brain atlas including cerebral morphology and tissue volumes

    PubMed Central

    Nitzsche, Björn; Frey, Stephen; Collins, Louis D.; Seeger, Johannes; Lobsien, Donald; Dreyer, Antje; Kirsten, Holger; Stoffel, Michael H.; Fonov, Vladimir S.; Boltze, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Standard stereotaxic reference systems play a key role in human brain studies. Stereotaxic coordinate systems have also been developed for experimental animals including non-human primates, dogs, and rodents. However, they are lacking for other species being relevant in experimental neuroscience including sheep. Here, we present a spatial, unbiased ovine brain template with tissue probability maps (TPM) that offer a detailed stereotaxic reference frame for anatomical features and localization of brain areas, thereby enabling inter-individual and cross-study comparability. Three-dimensional data sets from healthy adult Merino sheep (Ovis orientalis aries, 12 ewes and 26 neutered rams) were acquired on a 1.5 T Philips MRI using a T1w sequence. Data were averaged by linear and non-linear registration algorithms. Moreover, animals were subjected to detailed brain volume analysis including examinations with respect to body weight (BW), age, and sex. The created T1w brain template provides an appropriate population-averaged ovine brain anatomy in a spatial standard coordinate system. Additionally, TPM for gray (GM) and white (WM) matter as well as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) classification enabled automatic prior-based tissue segmentation using statistical parametric mapping (SPM). Overall, a positive correlation of GM volume and BW explained about 15% of the variance of GM while a positive correlation between WM and age was found. Absolute tissue volume differences were not detected, indeed ewes showed significantly more GM per bodyweight as compared to neutered rams. The created framework including spatial brain template and TPM represent a useful tool for unbiased automatic image preprocessing and morphological characterization in sheep. Therefore, the reported results may serve as a starting point for further experimental and/or translational research aiming at in vivo analysis in this species. PMID:26089780

  10. The Sequential Tissue Distribution of Duck Tembusu Virus in Adult Ducks

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li; Liu, Jinxiong; Chen, Pucheng; Jiang, Yongping; Ding, Leilei; Lin, Yuan; Li, Qimeng; He, Xijun; Chen, Qiusheng; Chen, Hualan

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, a novel Tembusu virus (TMUV) that caused a severe decrease in the egg production of ducks was isolated in southeast China. Given the novelty of this duck pathogen, little information is available regarding its pathogenesis. Here, we systematically investigated the replication kinetics of TMUV PTD2010 in adult male and female ducks. We found that PTD2010 was detectable in most of the parenchymatous organs as well as the oviduct and intestinal tract from days 1 to 7 after inoculation. Viral titers were maintained at high levels for at least 9 days in the spleen, kidney, bursa of Fabricius, brain, and ovary. No virus was detected in any of these organs or tissues at 18 days after inoculation. PTD2010, thus, causes systemic infections in male and female ducks; its replication kinetics show similar patterns in most organs, with the exception of the ovaries and testes. PMID:25215289

  11. Spatial cluster analysis of nanoscopically mapped serotonin receptors for classification of fixed brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sams, Michael; Silye, Rene; Göhring, Janett; Muresan, Leila; Schilcher, Kurt; Jacak, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    We present a cluster spatial analysis method using nanoscopic dSTORM images to determine changes in protein cluster distributions within brain tissue. Such methods are suitable to investigate human brain tissue and will help to achieve a deeper understanding of brain disease along with aiding drug development. Human brain tissue samples are usually treated postmortem via standard fixation protocols, which are established in clinical laboratories. Therefore, our localization microscopy-based method was adapted to characterize protein density and protein cluster localization in samples fixed using different protocols followed by common fluorescent immunohistochemistry techniques. The localization microscopy allows nanoscopic mapping of serotonin 5-HT1A receptor groups within a two-dimensional image of a brain tissue slice. These nanoscopically mapped proteins can be confined to clusters by applying the proposed statistical spatial analysis. Selected features of such clusters were subsequently used to characterize and classify the tissue. Samples were obtained from different types of patients, fixed with different preparation methods, and finally stored in a human tissue bank. To verify the proposed method, samples of a cryopreserved healthy brain have been compared with epitope-retrieved and paraffin-fixed tissues. Furthermore, samples of healthy brain tissues were compared with data obtained from patients suffering from mental illnesses (e.g., major depressive disorder). Our work demonstrates the applicability of localization microscopy and image analysis methods for comparison and classification of human brain tissues at a nanoscopic level. Furthermore, the presented workflow marks a unique technological advance in the characterization of protein distributions in brain tissue sections.

  12. Wnts in adult brain: from synaptic plasticity to cognitive deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Carolina A.; Vargas, Jessica Y.; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2013-01-01

    During development of the central nervous system the Wnt signaling pathway has been implicated in a wide spectrum of physiological processes, including neuronal connectivity and synapse formation. Wnt proteins and components of the Wnt pathway are expressed in the brain since early development to the adult life, however, little is known about its role in mature synapses. Here, we review evidences indicating that Wnt proteins participate in the remodeling of pre- and post-synaptic regions, thus modulating synaptic function. We include the most recent data in the literature showing that Wnts are constantly released in the brain to maintain the basal neural activity. Also, we review the evidences that involve components of the Wnt pathway in the development of neurological and mental disorders, including a special emphasis on in vivo studies that relate behavioral abnormalities to deficiencies in Wnt signaling. Finally, we include the evidences that support a neuroprotective role of Wnt proteins in Alzheimer’s disease. We postulate that deregulation in Wnt signaling might have a fundamental role in the origin of neurological diseases, by altering the synaptic function at stages where the phenotype is not yet established but when the cognitive decline starts. PMID:24348327

  13. Donepezil markedly potentiates memantine neurotoxicity in the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Creeley, Catherine E; Wozniak, David F; Nardi, Anthony; Farber, Nuri B; Olney, John W

    2008-02-01

    The NMDA antagonist, memantine (Namenda), and the cholinesterase inhibitor, donepezil (Aricept), are currently being used widely, either individually or in combination, for treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). NMDA antagonists have both neuroprotective and neurotoxic properties; the latter is augmented by drugs, such as pilocarpine, that increase cholinergic activity. Whether donepezil, by increasing cholinergic activity, might augment memantine's neurotoxic potential has not been investigated. In the present study, we determined that a dose of memantine (20mg/kg, i.p.), considered to be in the therapeutic (neuroprotective) range for rats, causes a mild neurotoxic reaction in the adult rat brain. Co-administration of memantine (20 or 30 mg/kg) with donepezil (2.5-10mg/kg) markedly potentiated this neurotoxic reaction, causing neuronal injury at lower doses of memantine, and causing the toxic reaction to become disseminated and lethal to neurons throughout many brain regions. These findings raise questions about using this drug combination in AD, especially in the absence of evidence that the combination is beneficial, or that either drug arrests or reverses the disease process. PMID:17112636

  14. Exploratory case-control study of brain tumors in adults

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, J.D.; Craib, K.J.; Choi, B.C.; Miller, A.B.; Risch, H.A.; Howe, G.R.

    1987-04-01

    An exploratory study of brain tumors in adults was carried out using 215 cases diagnosed in Southern Ontario between 1979 and 1982, with an individually matched, hospital control series. Significantly elevated risks were observed for reported use of spring water, drinking of wine, and consumption of pickled fish, together with a significant protective effect for the regular consumption of any of several types of fruit. While these factors are consistent with a role for N-nitroso compounds in the etiology of these tumors, for several other factors related to this hypothesis, no association was observed. Occupation in the rubber industry was associated with a significant relative risk of 9.0, though no other occupational associations were seen. Two previously unreported associations were with smoking nonfilter cigarettes with a significant trend and with the use of hair dyes or sprays. The data do not support an association between physical head trauma requiring medical attention and risk of brain tumors and indicate that exposure to ionizing radiation and vinyl chloride monomer does not contribute any appreciable fraction of attributable risk in the population studied. The findings warrant further detailed investigation in future epidemiologic studies.

  15. Blockage of VIP during mouse embryogenesis modifies adult behavior and results in permanent changes in brain chemistry.

    PubMed

    Hill, Joanna M; Hauser, Janet M; Sheppard, Lia M; Abebe, Daniel; Spivak-Pohis, Irit; Kushnir, Michal; Deitch, Iris; Gozes, Illana

    2007-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) regulates growth and development during the early postimplantation period of mouse embryogenesis. Blockage of VIP with a VIP antagonist during this period results in growth restriction, microcephaly, and developmental delays. Similar treatment of neonatal rodents also causes developmental delays and impaired diurnal rhythms, and the adult brains of these animals exhibit neuronal dystrophy and increased VIP binding. These data suggest that blockage of VIP during the development of the nervous system can result in permanent changes to the brain. In the current study, pregnant mice were treated with a VIP antagonist during embryonic days 8 through 10. The adult male offspring were examined in tests of novelty, paired activity, and social recognition. Brain tissue was examined for several measures of chemistry and gene expression of VIP and related compounds. Glial cells from the cortex of treated newborn mice were plated with neurons and examined for VIP binding and their ability to enhance neuronal survival. Treated adult male mice exhibited increased anxiety-like behavior and deficits in social behavior. Brain tissue exhibited regionally specific changes in VIP chemistry and a trend toward increased gene expression of VIP and related compounds that reached statistical significance in the VIP receptor, VPAC-1, in the female cortex. When compared to control astrocytes, astrocytes from treated cerebral cortex produced further increases in neuronal survival with excess synaptic connections and reduced VIP binding. In conclusion, impaired VIP activity during mouse embryogenesis resulted in permanent changes to both adult brain chemistry/cell biology and behavior with aspects of autism-like social deficits. PMID:17726225

  16. Traumatic brain injury: endocrine consequences in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Erick; Rogol, Alan D

    2014-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common cause of death and disability in young adults with consequences ranging from physical disabilities to long-term cognitive, behavioral, psychological and social defects. Recent data suggest that pituitary hormone deficiency is not infrequent among TBI survivors; the prevalence of reported hypopituitarism following TBI varies widely among published studies. The most common cause of TBI is motor vehicle accidents, including pedestrian-car and bicycle car encounters, falls, child abuse, violence and sports injuries. Prevalence of hypopituitarism, from total to isolated pituitary deficiency, ranges from 5 to 90 %. The time interval between TBI and pituitary function evaluation is one of the major factors responsible for variations in the prevalence of hypopituitarism reported. Endocrine dysfunction after TBI in children and adolescents is common. Adolescence is a time of growth, freedom and adjustment, consequently TBI is also common in this group. Sports-related TBI is an important public health concern, but many cases are unrecognized and unreported. Sports that are associated with an increased risk of TBI include those involving contact and/or collisions such as boxing, football, soccer, ice hockey, rugby, and the martial arts, as well as high velocity sports such as cycling, motor racing, equestrian sports, skiing and roller skating. The aim of this paper is to summarize the best evidence of TBI as a cause of pituitary deficiency in children and adults. PMID:24030696

  17. Behavioral responses to and brain distribution of morphine in mature adult and aged mice

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, C.K.; Ho, I.K.; Hoskins, B.

    1986-03-01

    Mature adult (3-6 mo old) and aged (2 yr old) male ICR mice were injected with 10 to 100 mg/kg morphine, s.c. The ED50 values for running behavior (as measured using Stoelting activity monitors and having each mouse serve as its own control) representing 5 times control activity was approximately 7.5 mg/kg for aged mice and approximately 17.5 mg/kg for the mature adults. The ED50 values for analgesia 1 hr after morphine administration using the tail-flick method (max. response time = 8 sec) were approx. 70 mg/kg for the aged mice and 15 mg/kg for the mature adults. One hour after injecting /sup 3/H-morphine at doses of 30 and 100 mg/kg, 0.13 and 0.14% of the doses appeared in brains of aged and mature adult mice, respectively. Regional distribution of the morphine was the same for both age groups. Expressed as percent of total brain morphine, it was as follows: cortex, 30%; midbrain, 18%; cerebellum, 17%; medulla, 12%; pons, 9%; striatum, 8% and periaqueductal gray, 6%. Expressed as g morphine/g tissue for the 2 doses, the distribution was; periaqueductal gray, 30 and 80; striatum, 9 and 34; medulla, 6 and 20 pons; 5 and 19; cerebellum, 4 and 13; midbrain 2.5 and 8.5 and cortex, 2 and 8. These results suggest that the differences in response to morphine by the two age groups were due to age-related differences in opioid receptor populations and/or affinities.

  18. Temporal dynamics and determinants of whole brain tissue volume changes during recovery from alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Gazdzinski, Stefan; Durazzo, Timothy C; Meyerhoff, Dieter J

    2005-06-01

    Brain shrinkage and its partial reversibility with abstinence is a common neuroimaging finding in alcohol dependent individuals. We used an automated three-dimensional whole brain magnetic resonance imaging method (boundary shift integral) in 23 alcohol dependent individuals to measure the temporal dynamics of cerebral tissue and spinal fluid volume changes over a 12-month interval and to examine the major determinants of brain tissue change rates during abstinence and non-abstinence. We found more rapid brain tissue gain during the first month of sobriety than in the following months. The most rapid volume recovery was observed in abstinent individuals with the greatest baseline brain shrinkage and drinking severity. The rapid reversal of brain volume gains in non-abstinent individuals and tissue volume changes are modulated by duration of abstinence and non-abstinence periods, as well as recency of non-abstinence. Age, family history density of alcoholism, relapse severity, and duration or age of onset of heavy drinking were not major determinants of brain shrinkage and brain volume recovery rates. Treatment providers may use this tangible information to reinforce the biomedical benefits of sobriety. Previous quantitative measurements of brain volumes in alcohol dependent individuals performed after several weeks of abstinence likely underestimated the full extent of chronic alcohol-associated brain shrinkage. PMID:15893157

  19. Global Proteomic Analysis of Brain Tissues in Transient Ischemia Brain Damage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiann-Hwa; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Lee, Kam-Fai; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury resulting from arterial occlusion or hypotension in patients leads to tissue hypoxia with glucose deprivation, which causes endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and neuronal death. A proteomic approach was used to identify the differentially expressed proteins in the brain of rats following a global ischemic stroke. The mechanisms involved the action in apoptotic and ER stress pathways. Rats were treated with ischemia-reperfusion brain injuries by the bilateral occlusion of the common carotid artery. The cortical neuron proteins from the stroke animal model (SAM) and the control rats were separated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) to purify and identify the protein profiles. Our results demonstrated that the SAM rats experienced brain cell death in the ischemic core. Fifteen proteins were expressed differentially between the SAM rats and control rats, which were assayed and validated in vivo and in vitro. Interestingly, the set of differentially expressed, down-regulated proteins included catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) and cathepsin D (CATD), which are implicated in oxidative stress, inflammatory response and apoptosis. After an ischemic stroke, one protein spot, namely the calretinin (CALB2) protein, showed increased expression. It mediated the effects of SAM administration on the apoptotic and ER stress pathways. Our results demonstrate that the ischemic injury of neuronal cells increased cell cytoxicity and apoptosis, which were accompanied by sustained activation of the IRE1-alpha/TRAF2, JNK1/2, and p38 MAPK pathways. Proteomic analysis suggested that the differential expression of CALB2 during a global ischemic stroke could be involved in the mechanisms of ER stress-induced neuronal cell apoptosis, which occurred via IRE1-alpha/TRAF2 complex formation, with activation of JNK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Based on these results, we also provide the molecular evidence supporting the ischemia-reperfusion-related neuronal injury

  20. Irradiation-injured brain tissues can self-renew in the absence of the pivotal tumor suppressor p53 in the medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryo

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Takako; Kimori, Yoshitaka; Nagata, Kento; Igarashi, Kento; Watanabe-Asaka, Tomomi; Oda, Shoji; Mitani, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein, p53, plays pivotal roles in regulating apoptosis and proliferation in the embryonic and adult central nervous system (CNS) following neuronal injuries such as those induced by ionizing radiation. There is increasing evidence that p53 negatively regulates the self-renewal of neural stem cells in the adult murine brain; however, it is still unknown whether p53 is essential for self-renewal in the injured developing CNS. Previously, we demonstrated that the numbers of apoptotic cells in medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos decreased in the absence of p53 at 12–24 h after irradiation with 10-Gy gamma rays. Here, we used histology to examine the later morphological development of the irradiated medaka brain. In p53-deficient larvae, the embryonic brain possessed similar vacuoles in the brain and retina, although the vacuoles were much smaller and fewer than those found in wild-type embryos. At the time of hatching (6 days after irradiation), no brain abnormality was observed. In contrast, severe disorganized neuronal arrangements were still present in the brain of irradiated wild-type embryos. Our present results demonstrated that self-renewal of the brain tissue completed faster in the absence of p53 than wild type at the time of hatching because p53 reduces the acute severe neural apoptosis induced by irradiation, suggesting that p53 is not essential for tissue self-renewal in developing brain. PMID:26410759

  1. Terahertz spectroscopy of brain tissue from a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lingyan; Shumyatsky, Pavel; Rodríguez-Contreras, Adrián; Alfano, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The terahertz (THz) absorption and index of refraction of brain tissues from a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and a control wild-type (normal) mouse were compared using THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). Three dominating absorption peaks associated to torsional-vibrational modes were observed in AD tissue, at about 1.44, 1.8, and 2.114 THz, closer to the peaks of free tryptophan molecules than in normal tissue. A possible reason is that there is more free tryptophan in AD brain tissue, while in normal brain tissue more tryptophan is attached to other molecules. Our study suggests that THz-absorption modes may be used as an AD biomarker fingerprint in brain, and that THz-TDS is a promising technique for early diagnosis of AD.

  2. Propagation of damage in brain tissue: coupling the mechanics of oedema and oxygen delivery.

    PubMed

    Lang, Georgina E; Vella, Dominic; Waters, Sarah L; Goriely, Alain

    2015-11-01

    Brain tissue swelling, or oedema, is a dangerous consequence of traumatic brain injury and stroke. In particular, a locally swollen region can cause the injury to propagate further through the brain: swelling causes mechanical compression of the vasculature in the surrounding tissue and so can cut off that tissue's oxygen supply. We use a triphasic mathematical model to investigate this propagation, and couple tissue mechanics with oxygen delivery. Starting from a fully coupled, finite elasticity, model, we show that simplifications can be made that allow us to express the volume of the propagating region of damage analytically in terms of key parameters. Our results show that performing a craniectomy, to alleviate pressure in the brain and allow the tissue to swell outwards, reduces the propagation of damage; this finding agrees with experimental observations. PMID:25822263

  3. Schizophrenia susceptibility alleles are enriched for alleles that affect gene expression in adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Alexander L; Jones, Lesley; Moskvina, Valentina; Kirov, George; Gejman, Pablo V; Levinson, Douglas F; Sanders, Alan R; Purcell, Shaun; Visscher, Peter M; Craddock, Nick; Owen, Michael J; Holmans, Peter; O’Donovan, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    It is widely thought that alleles that influence susceptibility to common diseases, including schizophrenia, will frequently do so through effects on gene expression. Since only a small proportion of the genetic variance for schizophrenia has been attributed to specific loci, this remains an unproven hypothesis. The International Schizophrenia Consortium (ISC) recently reported a substantial polygenic contribution to that disorder, and that schizophrenia risk alleles are enriched among SNPs selected for marginal evidence for association (p<0.5) from genome wide association studies (GWAS). It follows that if schizophrenia susceptibility alleles are enriched for those that affect gene expression, those marginally associated SNPs which are also eQTLs should carry more true association signals compared with SNPs which are not. To test this, we identified marginally associated (p<0.5) SNPs from two of the largest available schizophrenia GWAS datasets. We assigned eQTL status to those SNPs based upon an eQTL dataset derived from adult human brain. Using the polygenic score method of analysis reported by the ISC, we observed and replicated the observation that higher probability cis-eQTLs predicted schizophrenia better than those with a lower probability for being a cis-eQTL. Our data support the hypothesis that alleles conferring risk of schizophrenia are enriched among those that affect gene expression. Moreover, our data show that notwithstanding the likely developmental origin of schizophrenia, studies of adult brain tissue can in principle allow relevant susceptibility eQTLs to be identified. PMID:21339752

  4. Neuronal Organization of Deep Brain Opsin Photoreceptors in Adult Teleosts

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Chong Yee; Kitahashi, Takashi; Parhar, Ishwar S.

    2016-01-01

    Biological impacts of light beyond vision, i.e., non-visual functions of light, signify the need to better understand light detection (or photoreception) systems in vertebrates. Photopigments, which comprise light-absorbing chromophores bound to a variety of G-protein coupled receptor opsins, are responsible for visual and non-visual photoreception. Non-visual opsin photopigments in the retina of mammals and extra-retinal tissues of non-mammals play an important role in non-image-forming functions of light, e.g., biological rhythms and seasonal reproduction. This review highlights the role of opsin photoreceptors in the deep brain, which could involve conserved neurochemical systems that control different time- and light-dependent physiologies in in non-mammalian vertebrates including teleost fish. PMID:27199680

  5. Ionic charge transport between blockages: Sodium cation conduction in freshly excised bulk brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emin, David; Akhtari, Massoud; Ellingson, B. M.; Mathern, G. W.

    2015-08-01

    We analyze the transient-dc and frequency-dependent electrical conductivities between blocking electrodes. We extend this analysis to measurements of ions' transport in freshly excised bulk samples of human brain tissue whose complex cellular structure produces blockages. The associated ionic charge-carrier density and diffusivity are consistent with local values for sodium cations determined non-invasively in brain tissue by MRI (NMR) and diffusion-MRI (spin-echo NMR). The characteristic separation between blockages, about 450 microns, is very much shorter than that found for sodium-doped gel proxies for brain tissue, >1 cm.

  6. Ionic charge transport between blockages: Sodium cation conduction in freshly excised bulk brain tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Emin, David; Akhtari, Massoud; Ellingson, B. M.; Mathern, G. W.

    2015-08-15

    We analyze the transient-dc and frequency-dependent electrical conductivities between blocking electrodes. We extend this analysis to measurements of ions’ transport in freshly excised bulk samples of human brain tissue whose complex cellular structure produces blockages. The associated ionic charge-carrier density and diffusivity are consistent with local values for sodium cations determined non-invasively in brain tissue by MRI (NMR) and diffusion-MRI (spin-echo NMR). The characteristic separation between blockages, about 450 microns, is very much shorter than that found for sodium-doped gel proxies for brain tissue, >1 cm.

  7. Alkaline diets favor lean tissue mass in older adults1234

    PubMed Central

    Dawson-Hughes, Bess; Harris, Susan S; Ceglia, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Background Maintaining muscle mass while aging is important to prevent falls and fractures. Metabolic acidosis promotes muscle wasting, and the net acid load from diets that are rich in net acid–producing protein and cereal grains relative to their content of net alkali–producing fruit and vegetables may therefore contribute to a reduction in lean tissue mass in older adults. Objective We aimed to determine whether there was an association of 24-h urinary potassium and an index of fruit and vegetable content of the diet with the percentage lean body mass (%LBM) or change in %LBM in older subjects. Design Subjects were 384 men and women ≥65 y old who participated in a 3-y trial comparing calcium and vitamin D with placebo. Potassium was measured in 24-h urine collections at baseline. The %LBM, defined as total body nonfat, nonbone tissue weight ÷ weight × 100, was measured by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at baseline and at 3 y. Physical activity, height, and weight were assessed at baseline and at 3 y. Results At baseline, the mean urinary potassium excretion was 67.0 ± 21.1 mmol/d. Urinary potassium (mmol/d) was significantly positively associated with %LBM at baseline (β = 0.033, P = 0.006; adjusted for sex, weight, and nitrogen excretion) but not with 3-y change in %LBM. Over the 3-y study, %LBM increased by 2.6 ± 3.6%. Conclusion Higher intake of foods rich in potassium, such as fruit and vegetables, may favor the preservation of muscle mass in older men and women. PMID:18326605

  8. Adult human adipose tissue contains several types of multipotent cells.

    PubMed

    Tallone, Tiziano; Realini, Claudio; Böhmler, Andreas; Kornfeld, Christopher; Vassalli, Giuseppe; Moccetti, Tiziano; Bardelli, Silvana; Soldati, Gianni

    2011-04-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are a type of adult stem cells that can be easily isolated from various tissues and expanded in vitro. Many reports on their pluripotency and possible clinical applications have raised hopes and interest in MSCs. In an attempt to unify the terminology and the criteria to label a cell as MSC, in 2006 the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) proposed a standard set of rules to define the identity of these cells. However, MSCs are still extracted from different tissues, by diverse isolation protocols, are cultured and expanded in different media and conditions. All these variables may have profound effects on the selection of cell types and the composition of heterogeneous subpopulations, on the selective expansion of specific cell populations with totally different potentials and ergo, on the long-term fate of the cells upon in vitro culture. Therefore, specific molecular and cellular markers that identify MSCs subsets as well as standardization of expansion protocols for these cells are urgently needed. Here, we briefly discuss new useful markers and recent data supporting the rapidly emerging concept that many different types of progenitor cells are found in close association with blood vessels. This knowledge may promote the necessary technical improvements required to reduce variability and promote higher efficacy and safety when isolating and expanding these cells for therapeutic use. In the light of the discussed data, particularly the identification of new markers, and advances in the understanding of fundamental MSC biology, we also suggest a revision of the 2006 ISCT criteria. PMID:21327755

  9. Adult axolotls can regenerate original neuronal diversity in response to brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Amamoto, Ryoji; Huerta, Violeta Gisselle Lopez; Takahashi, Emi; Dai, Guangping; Grant, Aaron K; Fu, Zhanyan; Arlotta, Paola

    2016-01-01

    The axolotl can regenerate multiple organs, including the brain. It remains, however, unclear whether neuronal diversity, intricate tissue architecture, and axonal connectivity can be regenerated; yet, this is critical for recovery of function and a central aim of cell replacement strategies in the mammalian central nervous system. Here, we demonstrate that, upon mechanical injury to the adult pallium, axolotls can regenerate several of the populations of neurons present before injury. Notably, regenerated neurons acquire functional electrophysiological traits and respond appropriately to afferent inputs. Despite the ability to regenerate specific, molecularly-defined neuronal subtypes, we also uncovered previously unappreciated limitations by showing that newborn neurons organize within altered tissue architecture and fail to re-establish the long-distance axonal tracts and circuit physiology present before injury. The data provide a direct demonstration that diverse, electrophysiologically functional neurons can be regenerated in axolotls, but challenge prior assumptions of functional brain repair in regenerative species. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13998.001 PMID:27156560

  10. Selective expression of prion protein in peripheral tissues of the adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Ford, M J; Burton, L J; Morris, R J; Hall, S M

    2002-01-01

    The level of expression of normal cellular prion protein, PrP(c) (cellular prion protein), controls both the rate and the route of neuroinvasive infection, from peripheral entry portal to the CNS. Paradoxically, an overview of the distribution of PrP(c) within tissues outside the CNS is lacking. We have used novel antibodies that recognise cellular prion protein in glutaraldehyde-fixed tissue (in order to optimise immunohistochemical labelling of this conformationally labile protein), in combination with in situ hybridisation, to examine the expression of PrP(c) in peripheral tissues of the adult mouse. We found that although prion protein is expressed in many tissues, it is expressed at high levels only in discrete subpopulations of cells. Prominent amongst these are elements of the "hardwired neuroimmune network" that integrate the body's immune defence and neuroendocrine systems under CNS control. These prion protein-expressing elements include small diameter afferent nerves in the skin and the lamina propria of the aerodigestive tract, sympathetic ganglia and nerves, antigen presenting and processing cells (both follicular and non-follicular dendritic cells) and sub-populations of lymphocytes particularly in skin, gut- and bronchus-associated lymphoid tissues. Prion protein is also expressed in the parasympathetic and enteric nervous systems, in the dispersed neuroendocrine system, and in peripheral nervous system axons and their associated Schwann cells. This selective expression of cellular prion protein provides a variety of alternative routes for the propagation and transport of prion infection entering from peripheral sites, either naturally (via the aerodigestive tract or abraded skin) or experimentally (by intraperitoneal injection) to the brain. Key regulatory cells that express prion protein, and in particular enteroendocrine cells in the mucosal wall of the gut, and dendritic cells that convey pathogens from epithelial layers to secondary lymphoid

  11. Mitochondrial DNA Rearrangement Spectrum in Brain Tissue of Alzheimer’s Disease: Analysis of 13 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yucai; Liu, Changsheng; Parker, William Davis; Chen, Hongyi; Beach, Thomas G.; Liu, Xinhua; Serrano, Geidy E.; Lu, Yanfen; Huang, Jianjun; Yang, Kunfang; Wang, Chunmei

    2016-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial dysfunction may play a central role in the pathologic process of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), but there is still a scarcity of data that directly links the pathology of AD with the alteration of mitochondrial DNA. This study aimed to provide a comprehensive assessment of mtDNA rearrangement events in AD brain tissue. Patients and Methods Postmortem frozen human brain cerebral cortex samples were obtained from the Banner Sun Health Research Institute Brain and Body Donation Program, Sun City, AZ. Mitochondria were isolated and direct sequence by using MiSeq®, and analyzed by relative software. Results Three types of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) rearrangements have been seen in post mortem human brain tissue from patients with AD and age matched control. These observed rearrangements include a deletion, F-type rearrangement, and R-type rearrangement. We detected a high level of mtDNA rearrangement in brain tissue from cognitively normal subjects, as well as the patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The rate of rearrangements was calculated by dividing the number of positive rearrangements by the coverage depth. The rearrangement rate was significantly higher in AD brain tissue than in control brain tissue (17.9%versus 6.7%; p = 0.0052). Of specific types of rearrangement, deletions were markedly increased in AD (9.2% versus 2.3%; p = 0.0005). Conclusions Our data showed that failure of mitochondrial DNA in AD brain might be important etiology of AD pathology. PMID:27299301

  12. Correlation between light scattering signal and tissue reversibility in rat brain exposed to hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Uozumi, Yoichi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Miya; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2010-02-01

    Light scattering signal is a potential indicator of tissue viability in brain because cellular and subcellular structural integrity should be associated with cell viability in brain tissue. We previously performed multiwavelength diffuse reflectance measurement for a rat global ischemic brain model and observed a unique triphasic change in light scattering at a certain time after oxygen and glucose deprivation. This triphasic scattering change (TSC) was shown to precede cerebral ATP exhaustion, suggesting that loss of brain tissue viability can be predicted by detecting scattering signal. In the present study, we examined correlation between light scattering signal and tissue reversibility in rat brain in vivo. We performed transcranial diffuse reflectance measurement for rat brain; under spontaneous respiration, hypoxia was induced for the rat by nitrogen gas inhalation and reoxygenation was started at various time points. We observed a TSC, which started at 140 +/- 15 s after starting nitrogen gas inhalation (mean +/- SD, n=8). When reoxygenation was started before the TSC, all rats survived (n=7), while no rats survived when reoxygenation was started after the TSC (n=8). When reoxygenation was started during the TSC, rats survived probabilistically (n=31). Disability of motor function was not observed for the survived rats. These results indicate that TSC can be used as an indicator of loss of tissue reversibility in brains, providing useful information on the critical time zone for treatment to rescue the brain.

  13. Permeabilization of brain tissue in situ enables multiregion analysis of mitochondrial function in a single mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Eric AF; Holloway, Graham P

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondria function as the core energy providers in the brain and symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases are often attributed to their dysregulation. Assessing mitochondrial function is classically performed in isolated mitochondria; however, this process requires significant isolation time, demand for abundant tissue and disruption of the cooperative mitochondrial reticulum, all of which reduce reliability when attempting to assess in vivo mitochondrial bioenergetics. Here we introduce a method that advances the assessment of mitochondrial respiration in the brain by permeabilizing existing brain tissue to grant direct access to the mitochondrial reticulum in situ. The permeabilized brain preparation allows for instant analysis of mitochondrial function with unaltered mitochondrial morphology using significantly small sample sizes (∼2 mg), which permits the analysis of mitochondrial function in multiple subregions within a single mouse brain. Here this technique was applied to assess regional variation in brain mitochondrial function with acute ischaemia–reperfusion injuries and to determine the role of reactive oxygen species in exacerbating dysfunction through the application of a transgenic mouse model overexpressing catalase within mitochondria. Through creating accessibility to small regions for the investigation of mitochondrial function, the permeabilized brain preparation enhances the capacity for examining regional differences in mitochondrial regulation within the brain, as the majority of genetic models used for unique approaches exist in the mouse model. PMID:25529987

  14. A Novel Procedure for Rapid Imaging of Adult Mouse Brains with MicroCT Using Iodine-Based Contrast

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Ryan; Maga, A. Murat

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been the primary modality for obtaining 3D cross-sectional anatomical information in animals for soft tissue, particularly brain. However, costs associated with MRI can be considerably high for large phenotypic screens for gross differences in the structure of the brain due to pathology and/or experimental manipulations. MicroCT (mCT), especially benchtop mCT, is becoming a common laboratory equipment with throughput rates equal or faster than any form of high-resolution MRI at lower costs. Here we explore adapting previously developed contrast based mCT to image adult mouse brains in-situ. We show that 2% weight per volume (w/v) iodine-potassium iodide solution can be successfully used to image adult mouse brains within 48 hours post-mortem when a structural support matrix is used. We demonstrate that hydrogel can be effectively used as a perfusant which limits the tissue shrinkage due to iodine. PMID:26571123

  15. Construction of brain atlases based on a multi-center MRI dataset of 2020 Chinese adults.

    PubMed

    Liang, Peipeng; Shi, Lin; Chen, Nan; Luo, Yishan; Wang, Xing; Liu, Kai; Mok, Vincent C T; Chu, Winnie C W; Wang, Defeng; Li, Kuncheng

    2015-01-01

    Despite the known morphological differences (e.g., brain shape and size) in the brains of populations of different origins (e.g., age and race), the Chinese brain atlas is less studied. In the current study, we developed a statistical brain atlas based on a multi-center high quality magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dataset of 2020 Chinese adults (18-76 years old). We constructed 12 Chinese brain atlas from the age 20 year to the age 75 at a 5 years interval. New Chinese brain standard space, coordinates, and brain area labels were further defined. The new Chinese brain atlas was validated in brain registration and segmentation. It was found that, as contrast to the MNI152 template, the proposed Chinese atlas showed higher accuracy in hippocampus segmentation and relatively smaller shape deformations during registration. These results indicate that a population-specific time varying brain atlas may be more appropriate for studies involving Chinese populations. PMID:26678304

  16. Plasticity of Nonneuronal Brain Tissue: Roles in Developmental Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Willie K.; Greenough, William T.

    2004-01-01

    Neuronal and nonneuronal plasticity are both affected by environmental and experiential factors. Remodeling of existing neurons induced by such factors has been observed throughout the brain, and includes alterations in dendritic field dimensions, synaptogenesis, and synaptic morphology. The brain loci affected by these plastic neuronal changes…

  17. ALKYTIN INHIBITION OF ATPASE ACTIVITIES IN TISSUE HOMOGENATES AND SUBCELLULAR FRACTIONS FROM NEONATAL AND ADULT RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of triethyltin (TET) on ATPase activities in brain and liver homogenates and subcellular fractions were compared in neonatal and adult rats. n 5 day old rats, relative sensitivities to TET inhibition were: brain and liver mitochondrial ATPase >> rain Na+/K+ ATPase > b...

  18. GABA regulates synaptic integration of newly generated neurons in the adult brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Shaoyu; Goh, Eyleen L. K.; Sailor, Kurt A.; Kitabatake, Yasuji; Ming, Guo-Li; Song, Hongjun

    2006-02-01

    Adult neurogenesis, the birth and integration of new neurons from adult neural stem cells, is a striking form of structural plasticity and highlights the regenerative capacity of the adult mammalian brain. Accumulating evidence suggests that neuronal activity regulates adult neurogenesis and that new neurons contribute to specific brain functions. The mechanism that regulates the integration of newly generated neurons into the pre-existing functional circuitry in the adult brain is unknown. Here we show that newborn granule cells in the dentate gyrus of the adult hippocampus are tonically activated by ambient GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) before being sequentially innervated by GABA- and glutamate-mediated synaptic inputs. GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain, initially exerts an excitatory action on newborn neurons owing to their high cytoplasmic chloride ion content. Conversion of GABA-induced depolarization (excitation) into hyperpolarization (inhibition) in newborn neurons leads to marked defects in their synapse formation and dendritic development in vivo. Our study identifies an essential role for GABA in the synaptic integration of newly generated neurons in the adult brain, and suggests an unexpected mechanism for activity-dependent regulation of adult neurogenesis, in which newborn neurons may sense neuronal network activity through tonic and phasic GABA activation.

  19. Brief Report: The Role of National Brain and Tissue Banks in Research on Autism and Developmental Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zielke, H. Ronald; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the establishment and work of two brain and tissue banks, which collect brain and other tissues from newly deceased individuals with autism and make these tissues available to researchers. Issues in tissue collection are identified, including the importance of advance planning, religious concerns of families, and the need for…

  20. Mimicking brain tissues by doping scatterers into gelatin tissue phantoms and determination of chemical species responsible for NMPPAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Sudhir; Cullum, Brian M.

    2012-06-01

    It has been shown that non-resonant multiphoton photoacoustic spectroscopy (NMPPAS) has a great potential to be used as a high resolution surgical guidance technique during brain tumor surgery due to its ability of non-invasive or minimally invasive tumor differentiation. However, for experimental purposes associated with method validation, the use of real tissues is not always ideal because of issues such as availability, safety, storage, chemical doping, necessary control of size and shape, etc. To overcome these issues, tissue phantoms made from animal tissues and/or biochemical constituents, are often employed for such analyses. This work demonstrates the ability to develop and characterize gelatin based tissue phantoms with comparable optical and acoustic properties to real tissues by doping the phantoms with a scattering substance, 0.3 μm diameter Al2O3 particles. Using these phantoms, light scattering coefficients (μs) of 39 cm-1 have been generated, which are comparable to real brain tissue, thus making them a great alternative to real tissue for validation studies. In addition, this work also investigates the non-fluorescent species NAD+ found in the tissues, to evaluate its potential for being detected by NMPPAS. NMPPAS spectra of NAD+ shows a very promising beginning to determine other chemical species such as flavins, collagen, tryptophan, etc responsible for NMPPAS spectral signatures, associated with tumorogenesis.

  1. A Dense Poly(ethylene glycol) Coating Improves Penetration of Large Polymeric Nanoparticles within Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Nance, Elizabeth A.; Woodworth, Graeme F.; Sailor, Kurt A.; Shih, Ting-Yu; Xu, Qingguo; Swaminathan, Ganesh; Xiang, Dennis; Eberhart, Charles; Hanes, Justin

    2013-01-01

    Prevailing opinion suggests that only substances up to 64 nm in diameter can move at appreciable rates through the brain extracellular space (ECS). This size range is large enough to allow diffusion of signaling molecules, nutrients, and metabolic waste products, but too small to allow efficient penetration of most particulate drug delivery systems and viruses carrying therapeutic genes, thereby limiting effectiveness of many potential therapies. We analyzed the movements of nanoparticles of various diameters and surface coatings within fresh human and rat brain tissue ex vivo and mouse brain in vivo. Nanoparticles as large as 114-nm in diameter diffused within the human and rat brain, but only if they were densely coated with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). Using these minimally adhesive PEG-coated particles, we estimated that human brain tissue ECS has some pores larger than 200 nm, and that more than one-quarter of all pores are ≥100 nm. These findings were confirmed in vivo in mice, where 40- and 100-nm, but not 200-nm, nanoparticles, spread rapidly within brain tissue, only if densely coated with PEG. Similar results were observed in rat brain tissue with paclitaxel-loaded biodegradable nanoparticles of similar size (85 nm) and surface properties. The ability to achieve brain penetration with larger nanoparticles is expected to allow more uniform, longer-lasting, and effective delivery of drugs within the brain, and may find use in the treatment of brain tumors, stroke, neuroinflammation, and other brain diseases where the blood-brain barrier is compromised or where local delivery strategies are feasible. PMID:22932224

  2. Differentiation of cancerous and normal brain tissue using label free fluorescence and Stokes shift spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Wang, Leana; Liu, Cheng-hui; He, Yong; Yu, Xinguang; Cheng, Gangge; Wang, Peng; Shu, Cheng; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-03-01

    In this report, optical biopsy was applied to diagnose human brain cancer in vitro for the identification of brain cancer from normal tissues by native fluorescence and Stokes shift spectra (SSS). 77 brain specimens including three types of human brain tissues (normal, glioma and brain metastasis of lung cancers) were studied. In order to observe spectral changes of fluorophores via fluorescence, the selected excitation wavelength of UV at 300 and 340 nm for emission spectra and a different Stokes Shift spectra with intervals Δλ = 40 nm were measured. The fluorescence spectra and SSS from multiple key native molecular markers, such as tryptophan, collagen, NADH, alanine, ceroid and lipofuscin were observed in normal and diseased brain tissues. Two diagnostic criteria were established based on the ratios of the peak intensities and peak position in both fluorescence and SSS spectra. It was observed that the ratio of the spectral peak intensity of tryptophan (340 nm) to NADH (440 nm) increased in glioma, meningioma (benign), malignant meninges tumor, and brain metastasis of lung cancer tissues in comparison with normal tissues. The ratio of the SS spectral peak (Δλ = 40 nm) intensities from 292 nm to 366 nm had risen similarly in all grades of tumors.

  3. Effect of exposure to diazinon on adult rat's brain.

    PubMed

    Rashedinia, Marzieh; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein; Imenshahidi, Mohsen; Lari, Parisa; Razavi, Bibi Marjan; Abnous, Khalil

    2016-04-01

    Diazinon (DZN), a commonly used agricultural organophosphate insecticide, is one of the major concerns for human health. This study was planned to investigate neurotoxic effects of subacute exposure to DZN in adult male Wistar rats. Animals received corn oil as control and 15 and 30 mg/kg DZN orally by gastric gavage for 4 weeks. The cerebrum malondialdehyde and glutathione (GSH) contents were assessed as biomarkers of lipid peroxidation and nonenzyme antioxidants, respectively. Moreover, activated forms of caspase 3, -9, and Bax/Bcl-2 ratios were evaluated as key apoptotic proteins. Results of this study suggested that chronic administration of DZN did not change lipid peroxidation and GSH levels significantly in comparison with control. Also, the active forms of caspase 3 and caspase 9 were not significantly altered in DZN-treated rat groups. Moreover, no significant changes were observed in Bax and Bcl-2 ratios. This study indicated that generation of reactive oxygen species was probably modulated by intracellular antioxidant system. In conclusion, subacute oral administration of DZN did not alter lipid peroxidation. Moreover, apoptosis induction was not observed in rat brain. PMID:24217015

  4. TIN DISTRIBUTION IN ADULT RAT TISSUES AFTER EXPOSURE TO TRIMETHYLTIN AND TRIETHYLTIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The time course of distribution of tin in the adult rat was determined in brain, liver kidney, heart, and blood following single ip administrations of trimethyltin hydroxide (TMT) and triethyltin bromide (TET). Adult Long-Evans rats were killed 1 hr, 4 hr, 12 hr, 24 hr, 5 days, 1...

  5. Automatic recognition and analysis of synapses. [in brain tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungerleider, J. A.; Ledley, R. S.; Bloom, F. E.

    1976-01-01

    An automatic system for recognizing synaptic junctions would allow analysis of large samples of tissue for the possible classification of specific well-defined sets of synapses based upon structural morphometric indices. In this paper the three steps of our system are described: (1) cytochemical tissue preparation to allow easy recognition of the synaptic junctions; (2) transmitting the tissue information to a computer; and (3) analyzing each field to recognize the synapses and make measurements on them.

  6. Encoding of mechanical nociception differs in the adult and infant brain

    PubMed Central

    Fabrizi, Lorenzo; Verriotis, Madeleine; Williams, Gemma; Lee, Amy; Meek, Judith; Olhede, Sofia; Fitzgerald, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Newborn human infants display robust pain behaviour and specific cortical activity following noxious skin stimulation, but it is not known whether brain processing of nociceptive information differs in infants and adults. Imaging studies have emphasised the overlap between infant and adult brain connectome architecture, but electrophysiological analysis of infant brain nociceptive networks can provide further understanding of the functional postnatal development of pain perception. Here we hypothesise that the human infant brain encodes noxious information with different neuronal patterns compared to adults. To test this we compared EEG responses to the same time-locked noxious skin lance in infants aged 0–19 days (n = 18, clinically required) and adults aged 23–48 years (n = 21). Time-frequency analysis revealed that while some features of adult nociceptive network activity are present in infants at longer latencies, including beta-gamma oscillations, infants display a distinct, long latency, noxious evoked 18-fold energy increase in the fast delta band (2–4 Hz) that is absent in adults. The differences in activity between infants and adults have a widespread topographic distribution across the brain. These data support our hypothesis and indicate important postnatal changes in the encoding of mechanical pain in the human brain. PMID:27345331

  7. Encoding of mechanical nociception differs in the adult and infant brain.

    PubMed

    Fabrizi, Lorenzo; Verriotis, Madeleine; Williams, Gemma; Lee, Amy; Meek, Judith; Olhede, Sofia; Fitzgerald, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Newborn human infants display robust pain behaviour and specific cortical activity following noxious skin stimulation, but it is not known whether brain processing of nociceptive information differs in infants and adults. Imaging studies have emphasised the overlap between infant and adult brain connectome architecture, but electrophysiological analysis of infant brain nociceptive networks can provide further understanding of the functional postnatal development of pain perception. Here we hypothesise that the human infant brain encodes noxious information with different neuronal patterns compared to adults. To test this we compared EEG responses to the same time-locked noxious skin lance in infants aged 0-19 days (n = 18, clinically required) and adults aged 23-48 years (n = 21). Time-frequency analysis revealed that while some features of adult nociceptive network activity are present in infants at longer latencies, including beta-gamma oscillations, infants display a distinct, long latency, noxious evoked 18-fold energy increase in the fast delta band (2-4 Hz) that is absent in adults. The differences in activity between infants and adults have a widespread topographic distribution across the brain. These data support our hypothesis and indicate important postnatal changes in the encoding of mechanical pain in the human brain. PMID:27345331

  8. In vivo detection of epileptic brain tissue using static fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Nitin; Bhatia, Sanjiv; Ragheb, John; Mehta, Rupal; Jayakar, Prasanna; Yong, William; Lin, Wei-Chiang

    2013-02-01

    Diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy are used to detect histopathological abnormalities of an epileptic brain in a human subject study. Static diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectra are acquired from normal and epileptic brain areas, defined by electrocorticography (ECoG), from pediatric patients undergoing epilepsy surgery. Biopsy specimens are taken from the investigated sites within an abnormal brain. Spectral analysis reveals significant differences in diffuse reflectance spectra and the ratio of fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectra from normal and epileptic brain areas defined by ECoG and histology. Using these spectral differences, tissue classification models with accuracy above 80% are developed based on linear discriminant analysis. The differences between the diffuse reflectance spectra from the normal and epileptic brain areas observed in this study are attributed to alterations in the static hemodynamic characteristics of an epileptic brain, suggesting a unique association between the histopathological and the hemodynamic abnormalities in an epileptic brain.

  9. Compliant intracortical implants reduce strains and strain rates in brain tissue in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Arati; Nguyen, Jessica K.; Capadona, Jeffrey R.; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2015-06-01

    Objective. The objective of this research is to characterize the mechanical interactions of (1) soft, compliant and (2) non-compliant implants with the surrounding brain tissue in a rodent brain. Understanding such interactions will enable the engineering of novel materials that will improve stability and reliability of brain implants. Approach. Acute force measurements were made using a load cell in n = 3 live rats, each with 4 craniotomies. Using an indentation method, brain tissue was tested for changes in force using established protocols. A total of 4 non-compliant, bare silicon microshanks, 3 non-compliant polyvinyl acetate (PVAc)-coated silicon microshanks, and 6 compliant, nanocomposite microshanks were tested. Stress values were calculated by dividing the force by surface area and strain was estimated using a linear stress-strain relationship. Micromotion effects from breathing and vascular pulsatility on tissue stress were estimated from a 5 s interval of steady-state measurements. Viscoelastic properties were estimated using a second-order Prony series expansion of stress-displacement curves for each shank. Main results. The distribution of strain values imposed on brain tissue for both compliant nanocomposite microshanks and PVAc-coated, non-compliant silicon microshanks were significantly lower compared to non-compliant bare silicon shanks. Interestingly, step-indentation experiments also showed that compliant, nanocomposite materials significantly decreased stress relaxation rates in the brain tissue at the interface (p < 0.05) compared to non-compliant silicon and PVAc-coated silicon materials. Furthermore, both PVAc-coated non-compliant silicon and compliant nanocomposite shanks showed significantly reduced (by 4-5 fold) stresses due to tissue micromotion at the interface. Significance. The results of this study showed that soft, adaptive materials reduce strains and strain rates and micromotion induced stresses in the surrounding brain tissue

  10. Compliant Intracortical Implants Reduce Strains and Strain Rates in Brain Tissue In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Arati; Nguyen, Jessica K.; Capadona, Jeffrey R.; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this research is to characterize the mechanical interactions of (1) soft, compliant and (2) non-compliant implants with the surrounding brain tissue in a rodent brain. Understanding such interactions will enable the engineering of novel materials that will improve stability and reliability of brain implants. Approach Acute force measurements were made using a load cell in n=3 live rats, each with 4 craniotomies. Using an indentation method, brain tissue was tested for changes in force using established protocols. A total of 4 non-compliant, bare silicon microshanks, 3 non-compliant polyvinyl acetate (PVAc)-coated silicon microshanks, and 6 compliant, nanocomposite microshanks were tested. Stress values were calculated by dividing the force by surface area and strain was estimated using a linear stress-strain relationship. Micromotion effects from breathing and vascular pulsatility on tissue stress were estimated from a 5 sec interval of steady-state measurements. Viscoelastic properties were estimated using a second-order Prony series expansion of stress-displacement curves for each shank. Main results The distribution of strain values imposed on brain tissue for both compliant nanocomposite microshanks and PVAc-coated, non-compliant silicon microshanks were significantly lower compared to non-compliant bare silicon shanks. Interestingly, step-indentation experiments also showed that compliant, nanocomposite materials significantly decreased stress relaxation rates in the brain tissue at the interface (p<0.05) compared to non-compliant silicon and PVAc-coated silicon materials. Further, both PVAc-coated non-compliant silicon and compliant nanocomposite shanks showed significantly reduced (by 4–5 fold) stresses due to tissue micromotion at the interface. Significance The results of this study showed that soft, adaptive materials reduce strains and strain rates and micromotion induced stresses in the surrounding brain tissue

  11. In vivo multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of human brain tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Kantelhardt, Sven R; Kalasauskas, Darius; König, Karsten; Kim, Ella; Weinigel, Martin; Uchugonova, Aisada; Giese, Alf

    2016-05-01

    High resolution multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging differentiates glioma from adjacent brain in native tissue samples ex vivo. Presently, multiphoton tomography is applied in clinical dermatology and experimentally. We here present the first application of multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging for in vivo imaging on humans during a neurosurgical procedure. We used a MPTflex™ Multiphoton Laser Tomograph (JenLab, Germany). We examined cultured glioma cells in an orthotopic mouse tumor model and native human tissue samples. Finally the multiphoton tomograph was applied to provide optical biopsies during resection of a clinical case of glioblastoma. All tissues imaged by multiphoton tomography were sampled and processed for conventional histopathology. The multiphoton tomograph allowed fluorescence intensity- and fluorescence lifetime imaging with submicron spatial resolution and 200 picosecond temporal resolution. Morphological fluorescence intensity imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging of tumor-bearing mouse brains and native human tissue samples clearly differentiated tumor and adjacent brain tissue. Intraoperative imaging was found to be technically feasible. Intraoperative image quality was comparable to ex vivo examinations. To our knowledge we here present the first intraoperative application of high resolution multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of human brain tumors in situ. It allowed in vivo identification and determination of cell density of tumor tissue on a cellular and subcellular level within seconds. The technology shows the potential of rapid intraoperative identification of native glioma tissue without need for tissue processing or staining. PMID:26830089

  12. Evaluation of three-dimensional anisotropic head model for mapping realistic electromagnetic fields of brain tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Woo Chul; Wi, Hun; Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Oh, Tong In; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2015-08-01

    Electromagnetic fields provide fundamental data for the imaging of electrical tissue properties, such as conductivity and permittivity, in recent magnetic resonance (MR)-based tissue property mapping. The induced voltage, current density, and magnetic flux density caused by externally injected current are critical factors for determining the image quality of electrical tissue conductivity. As a useful tool to identify bio-electromagnetic phenomena, precise approaches are required to understand the exact responses inside the human body subject to an injected currents. In this study, we provide the numerical simulation results of electromagnetic field mapping of brain tissues using a MR-based conductivity imaging method. First, we implemented a realistic three-dimensional human anisotropic head model using high-resolution anatomical and diffusion tensor MR images. The voltage, current density, and magnetic flux density of brain tissues were imaged by injecting 1 mA of current through pairs of electrodes on the surface of our head model. The current density map of anisotropic brain tissues was calculated from the measured magnetic flux density based on the linear relationship between the water diffusion tensor and the electrical conductivity tensor. Comparing the current density to the previous isotropic model, the anisotropic model clearly showed the differences between the brain tissues. This originates from the enhanced signals by the inherent conductivity contrast as well as the actual tissue condition resulting from the injected currents.

  13. Influence of preservation temperature on the measured mechanical properties of brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Badar; Destrade, Michel; Gilchrist, Michael D

    2013-04-26

    The large variability in experimentally measured mechanical properties of brain tissue is due to many factors including heterogeneity, anisotropy, age dependence and post-mortem time. Moreover, differences in test protocols also influence these measured properties. This paper shows that the temperature at which porcine brain tissue is stored or preserved prior to testing has a significant effect on the mechanical properties of brain tissue, even when tests are conducted at the same temperatures. Three groups of brain tissue were stored separately for at least 1h at three different preservation temperatures, i.e., ice cold, room temperature (22 °C) and body temperature (37 °C), prior to them all being tested at room temperature (~22 °C). Significant differences in the corresponding initial elastic shear modulus μ (Pa) (at various amounts of shear, 0≤K≤1.0) were observed. The initial elastic moduli were 1043±271 Pa, 714±210 Pa and 497±156 Pa (mean±SD) at preservation temperatures of ice cold, 22 °C and 37 °C, respectively. Based on this investigation, it is strongly recommended that brain tissue samples must be preserved at an ice-cold temperature prior to testing in order to minimize the difference between the measured in vitro test results and the in vivo properties. A by-product of the study is that simple shear tests allow for large, almost perfectly homogeneous deformation of brain matter. PMID:23523381

  14. Molecular Mechanism of Adult Neurogenesis and its Association with Human Brain Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, He; Song, Ni

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroscience challenge the old dogma that neurogenesis occurs only during embryonic development. Mounting evidence suggests that functional neurogenesis occurs throughout adulthood. This review article discusses molecular factors that affect adult neurogenesis, including morphogens, growth factors, neurotransmitters, transcription factors, and epigenetic factors. Furthermore, we summarize and compare current evidence of associations between adult neurogenesis and human brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and brain tumors. PMID:27375363

  15. Molecular Mechanism of Adult Neurogenesis and its Association with Human Brain Diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, He; Song, Ni

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroscience challenge the old dogma that neurogenesis occurs only during embryonic development. Mounting evidence suggests that functional neurogenesis occurs throughout adulthood. This review article discusses molecular factors that affect adult neurogenesis, including morphogens, growth factors, neurotransmitters, transcription factors, and epigenetic factors. Furthermore, we summarize and compare current evidence of associations between adult neurogenesis and human brain diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and brain tumors. PMID:27375363

  16. Stress response of bovine artery and rat brain tissue due to combined translational shear and fixed unconfined compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Lauren

    During trauma resulting from impacts and blast waves, sinusoidal waves permeate the brain and cranial arterial tissue, both non-homogeneous biological tissues with high fluid contents. The experimental shear stress response to sinusoidal translational shear deformation at 1 Hz and 25% strain amplitude and either 0% or 33% compression is compared for rat brain tissue and bovine aortic tissue. Both tissues exhibit Mullins effect in shear. Harmonic wavelet decomposition, a novel application to the mechanical response of these tissues, shows significant 1 Hz and 3 Hz components. The 3 Hz component magnitude in brain tissue, which is much larger than in aortic tissue, may correlate to interstitial fluid induced drag forces that decrease on subsequent cycles perhaps because of damage resulting in easier fluid movement. The fluid may cause the quasiperiodic, viscoelastic behavior of brain tissue. The mechanical response differences under impact may cause shear damage between arterial and brain connections.

  17. Characterization of a Raman spectroscopy probe system for intraoperative brain tissue classification

    PubMed Central

    Desroches, Joannie; Jermyn, Michael; Mok, Kelvin; Lemieux-Leduc, Cédric; Mercier, Jeanne; St-Arnaud, Karl; Urmey, Kirk; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Marple, Eric; Petrecca, Kevin; Leblond, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    A detailed characterization study is presented of a Raman spectroscopy system designed to maximize the volume of resected cancer tissue in glioma surgery based on in vivo molecular tissue characterization. It consists of a hand-held probe system measuring spectrally resolved inelastically scattered light interacting with tissue, designed and optimized for in vivo measurements. Factors such as linearity of the signal with integration time and laser power, and their impact on signal to noise ratio, are studied leading to optimal data acquisition parameters. The impact of ambient light sources in the operating room is assessed and recommendations made for optimal operating conditions. In vivo Raman spectra of normal brain, cancer and necrotic tissue were measured in 10 patients, demonstrating that real-time inelastic scattering measurements can distinguish necrosis from vital tissue (including tumor and normal brain tissue) with an accuracy of 87%, a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 89%. PMID:26203368

  18. Physical performance limitations among adult survivors of childhood brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ness, Kirsten K.; Morris, E. Brannon; Nolan, Vikki G.; Howell, Carrie R.; Gilchrist, Laura S.; Stovall, Marilyn; Cox, Cheryl L.; Klosky, James L.; Gajjar, Amar; Neglia, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Young adult survivors of childhood brain tumors (BT) may have late-effects that compromise physical performance and everyday task participation. Objective To evaluate muscle strength, fitness, physical performance, and task participation among adult survivors of childhood BT. Design/Method In-home evaluations and interviews were conducted for 156 participants (54% male). Results on measures of muscle strength, fitness, physical performance, and participation were compared between survivors and population-group members with chi-squared statistics and two-sample t-tests. Associations between late effects and physical performance, and physical performance and participation, were evaluated in regression models. Results BT survivors were a median age of 22 (18–58), and 14.7 (6.5–45.9) years from diagnosis. Survivors had lower estimates of grip strength (Female: 24.7±9.2 vs. 31.5±5.8, Male: 39.0±12.2 vs. 53.0±10.1 kilograms), knee extension strength (Female: 246.6±95.5 vs. 331.5±5.8, Male: 304.7±116.4 vs. 466.6±92.1 Newtons) and peak oxygen uptake (Female: 25.1±8.8 vs. 31.3±5.1, Male: 24.6±9.5 vs. 33.2±3.4 milliliters/kilogram/minute) than population-group members. Physical performance was lower among survivors and associated with not living independently (OR=5.0, 95% CI=2.0–12.2) and not attending college (OR=2.3, 95% CI 1.2–4.4). Conclusion Muscle strength and fitness values among BT survivors are similar to those among persons 60+ years, and are associated with physical performance limitations. Physical performance limitations are associated with poor outcomes in home and school environments. These data indicate an opportunity for interventions targeted at improving long-term physical function in this survivor population. PMID:20564409

  19. Correspondence of DNA Methylation Between Blood and Brain Tissue and Its Application to Schizophrenia Research.

    PubMed

    Walton, Esther; Hass, Johanna; Liu, Jingyu; Roffman, Joshua L; Bernardoni, Fabio; Roessner, Veit; Kirsch, Matthias; Schackert, Gabriele; Calhoun, Vince; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Given the difficulty of procuring human brain tissue, a key question in molecular psychiatry concerns the extent to which epigenetic signatures measured in more accessible tissues such as blood can serve as a surrogate marker for the brain. Here, we aimed (1) to investigate the blood-brain correspondence of DNA methylation using a within-subject design and (2) to identify changes in DNA methylation of brain-related biological pathways in schizophrenia.We obtained paired blood and temporal lobe biopsy samples simultaneously from 12 epilepsy patients during neurosurgical treatment. Using the Infinium 450K methylation array we calculated similarity of blood and brain DNA methylation for each individual separately. We applied our findings by performing gene set enrichment analyses (GSEA) of peripheral blood DNA methylation data (Infinium 27K) of 111 schizophrenia patients and 122 healthy controls and included only Cytosine-phosphate-Guanine (CpG) sites that were significantly correlated across tissues.Only 7.9% of CpG sites showed a statistically significant, large correlation between blood and brain tissue, a proportion that although small was significantly greater than predicted by chance. GSEA analysis of schizophrenia data revealed altered methylation profiles in pathways related to precursor metabolites and signaling peptides.Our findings indicate that most DNA methylation markers in peripheral blood do not reliably predict brain DNA methylation status. However, a subset of peripheral data may proxy methylation status of brain tissue. Restricting the analysis to these markers can identify meaningful epigenetic differences in schizophrenia and potentially other brain disorders. PMID:26056378

  20. Experimental study on the toxicity of povidone-iodine solution in brain tissues of rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu-Hua; Wang, Yu; Gao, Hai-Bin; Zhao, Kun; Hou, Yu-Chen; Sun, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether Povidone-iodine was toxic to brain tissues by rinsing the cerebral cortex of New Zealand rabbits with Povidone-iodine Solution of different concentrations. Methods: 12 New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into 4 groups (Group A, B, C and D, 3 rabbits each group). In each group, the left cerebral cortex of rabbits was rinsed with physiological saline after the craniotomy; in Group A and B, the right cerebral cortex of rabbits was also locally rinsed with Povidone-iodine Solution (0.01%), in Group C and D, the right cerebral cortex of rabbits was also locally rinsed with Povidone-iodine Solution (0.05%). In Group A and C, the rabbits were sacrificed at D3 after the operation, and the brain was taken out; and in Group B and D, the rabbits were sacrificed at D7 after the operation, and the brain was taken out. Under the optical and electron microscope, the change in micro-structure of brain tissues was observed in each group. Results: In each group, there was no epilepsy or paralysis during and after the operation. At the treatment side of physiological saline, there was no significant cell damage in the local brain tissues. At the treatment side of Povidone-iodine Solution, there was no cell apoptosis or degeneration in the local brain tissues. Conclusion: The Povidone-iodine Solution (0.05% and 0.01%) was toxic to brain tissues, with a more obvious damage of brain tissues for the former concentration. The histological sign was more serious at D7 than that at D3. PMID:26628968

  1. A hybrid hierarchical approach for brain tissue segmentation by combining brain atlas and least square support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Kasiri, Keyvan; Kazemi, Kamran; Dehghani, Mohammad Javad; Helfroush, Mohammad Sadegh

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we present a new semi-automatic brain tissue segmentation method based on a hybrid hierarchical approach that combines a brain atlas as a priori information and a least-square support vector machine (LS-SVM). The method consists of three steps. In the first two steps, the skull is removed and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is extracted. These two steps are performed using the toolbox FMRIB's automated segmentation tool integrated in the FSL software (FSL-FAST) developed in Oxford Centre for functional MRI of the brain (FMRIB). Then, in the third step, the LS-SVM is used to segment grey matter (GM) and white matter (WM). The training samples for LS-SVM are selected from the registered brain atlas. The voxel intensities and spatial positions are selected as the two feature groups for training and test. SVM as a powerful discriminator is able to handle nonlinear classification problems; however, it cannot provide posterior probability. Thus, we use a sigmoid function to map the SVM output into probabilities. The proposed method is used to segment CSF, GM and WM from the simulated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using Brainweb MRI simulator and real data provided by Internet Brain Segmentation Repository. The semi-automatically segmented brain tissues were evaluated by comparing to the corresponding ground truth. The Dice and Jaccard similarity coefficients, sensitivity and specificity were calculated for the quantitative validation of the results. The quantitative results show that the proposed method segments brain tissues accurately with respect to corresponding ground truth. PMID:24696800

  2. Optical imaging for brain tissue characterization using relative fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papour, Asael; Taylor, Zach; Sherman, Adria; Sanchez, Desiree; Lucey, Gregory; Liau, Linda; Stafsudd, Oscar; Yong, William; Grundfest, Warren

    2013-06-01

    An autofluorescence lifetime wide-field imaging system that can generate contrast in underlying tissue structures of normal and malignant brain tissue samples with video rate acquisition and processing time is presented. Images of the investigated tissues were acquired with high resolution (˜35 μm) using an algorithm to produce contrast based on differences in relative lifetimes. Sufficient contrast for delineation was produced without the computation of fluorescence decay times or Laguerre coefficients. The imaged tissues were sent for histological analysis that confirmed the detected imaged tissues morphological findings and correlations between relative lifetime maps and histology identified.

  3. Numerical analysis of the diffusive mass transport in brain tissues with applications to optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neculae, Adrian P.; Otte, Andreas; Curticapean, Dan

    2013-03-01

    In the brain-cell microenvironment, diffusion plays an important role: apart from delivering glucose and oxygen from the vascular system to brain cells, it also moves informational substances between cells. The brain is an extremely complex structure of interwoven, intercommunicating cells, but recent theoretical and experimental works showed that the classical laws of diffusion, cast in the framework of porous media theory, can deliver an accurate quantitative description of the way molecules are transported through this tissue. The mathematical modeling and the numerical simulations are successfully applied in the investigation of diffusion processes in tissues, replacing the costly laboratory investigations. Nevertheless, modeling must rely on highly accurate information regarding the main parameters (tortuosity, volume fraction) which characterize the tissue, obtained by structural and functional imaging. The usual techniques to measure the diffusion mechanism in brain tissue are the radiotracer method, the real time iontophoretic method and integrative optical imaging using fluorescence microscopy. A promising technique for obtaining the values for characteristic parameters of the transport equation is the direct optical investigation using optical fibers. The analysis of these parameters also reveals how the local geometry of the brain changes with time or under pathological conditions. This paper presents a set of computations concerning the mass transport inside the brain tissue, for different types of cells. By measuring the time evolution of the concentration profile of an injected substance and using suitable fitting procedures, the main parameters characterizing the tissue can be determined. This type of analysis could be an important tool in understanding the functional mechanisms of effective drug delivery in complex structures such as the brain tissue. It also offers possibilities to realize optical imaging methods for in vitro and in vivo

  4. Biological fiducial point based registration for multiple brain tissues reconstructed from different imaging modalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huiqun; Zhou, Gangping; Geng, Xingyun; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Jiang, Kui; Tang, Lemin; Zhou, Guomin; Dong, Jiancheng

    2013-10-01

    With the development of computer aided navigation system, more and more tissues shall be reconstructed to provide more useful information for surgical pathway planning. In this study, we aimed to propose a registration framework for different reconstructed tissues from multi-modalities based on some fiducial points on lateral ventricles. A male patient with brain lesion was admitted and his brain scans were performed by different modalities. Then, the different brain tissues were segmented in different modality with relevant suitable algorithms. Marching cubes were calculated for three dimensional reconstructions, and then the rendered tissues were imported to a common coordinate system for registration. Four pairs of fiducial markers were selected to calculate the rotation and translation matrix using least-square measure method. The registration results were satisfied in a glioblastoma surgery planning as it provides the spatial relationship between tumors and surrounding fibers as well as vessels. Hence, our framework is of potential value for clinicians to plan surgery.

  5. A protein homeostasis signature in healthy brains recapitulates tissue vulnerability to Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Freer, Rosie; Sormanni, Pietro; Vecchi, Giulia; Ciryam, Prajwal; Dobson, Christopher M.; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2016-01-01

    In Alzheimer’s disease, aggregates of Aβ and tau in amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles spread progressively across brain tissues following a characteristic pattern, implying a tissue-specific vulnerability to the disease. We report a transcriptional analysis of healthy brains and identify an expression signature that predicts—at ages well before the typical onset—the tissue-specific progression of the disease. We obtain this result by finding a quantitative correlation between the histopathological staging of the disease and the expression patterns of the proteins that coaggregate in amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, together with those of the protein homeostasis components that regulate Aβ and tau. Because this expression signature is evident in healthy brains, our analysis provides an explanatory link between a tissue-specific environmental risk of protein aggregation and a corresponding vulnerability to Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:27532054

  6. Using kinetic parameter analysis of dynamic FDOPA-PET for brain tissue classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hong-Dun; Lin, Kang-Ping; Chung, Being-Tau; Yu, Chin-Lung; Wang, Rong-Fa; Wu, Liang-Chi; Liu, Ren-Shyan

    2002-04-01

    In clinically, structural image based brain tissue segmentation as a preprocess plays an important and essential role on a number of image preprocessing, such as image visualization, object recognition, image registration, and so forth. However, when we need to classify the tissues according to their physiological functions, those strategies are not satisfactory. In this study, we incorporated both tissue time-activity curves (TACs) and derived kinetic parametric curves (KPCs) information to segment brain tissues, such as striatum, gray and white matters, in dynamic FDOPA-PET studies. Four common clustering techniques, K-mean (KM), Fuzzy C-mean (FCM), Isodata (ISO), Markov Random Fields (MRF), and our method were compared to evaluate its precision. The results show 41% and 48% less mean errors in mean difference for KPCs and TACs, respectively, than other methods. Combined KPCs and TACs based clustering method provide the ability to define brain structure effectively.

  7. A protein homeostasis signature in healthy brains recapitulates tissue vulnerability to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Freer, Rosie; Sormanni, Pietro; Vecchi, Giulia; Ciryam, Prajwal; Dobson, Christopher M; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2016-08-01

    In Alzheimer's disease, aggregates of Aβ and tau in amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles spread progressively across brain tissues following a characteristic pattern, implying a tissue-specific vulnerability to the disease. We report a transcriptional analysis of healthy brains and identify an expression signature that predicts-at ages well before the typical onset-the tissue-specific progression of the disease. We obtain this result by finding a quantitative correlation between the histopathological staging of the disease and the expression patterns of the proteins that coaggregate in amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, together with those of the protein homeostasis components that regulate Aβ and tau. Because this expression signature is evident in healthy brains, our analysis provides an explanatory link between a tissue-specific environmental risk of protein aggregation and a corresponding vulnerability to Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27532054

  8. Determination of the elasticity parameters of brain tissue with combined simulation and registration.

    PubMed

    Soza, G; Grosso, R; Nimsky, C; Hastreiter, P; Fahlbusch, R; Greiner, G

    2005-09-01

    Reliable elasticity parameters describing the behavior of a given material are an important issue in the context of physically-based simulation. In this paper we introduce a method for the determination of the mechanical properties of brain tissue. Elasticity parameters Young's modulus E and Poisson's ratio nu are estimated in an iterative framework coupling a finite element simulation with image registration. Within this framework, the outcome of the simulation is parameterized with both elasticity moduli that are automatically varied until optimal image correspondence between the simulated and the intraoperative data is achieved. We calculated optimal mechanical properties of brain tissue in six cases. The statistical analysis of the obtained values showed a good correlation of the results, thus proving the value of the method. An approach combining simulation and registration for the determination of the mechanical brain tissue properties is presented. This contributes to performing reliable physically-based simulation of soft tissue movement. PMID:17518395

  9. Characteristics of diffusion-tensor imaging for healthy adult rhesus monkey brains

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinxiang; Pu, Jun; Fan, Yaodong; Niu, Xiaoqun; Yu, Danping; Zhang, Yanglin

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion-tensor imaging can be used to observe the microstructure of brain tissue. Fractional sotropy reflects the integrity of white matter fibers. Fractional anisotropy of a young adult brain is low in gray matter, high in white matter, and highest in the splenium of the corpus callosum. Thus, we selected the anterior and posterior limbs of the internal capsule, head of the caudate nucleus, semioval center, thalamus, and corpus callosum (splenium and genu) as regions of interest when using diffusion-tensor imaging to observe fractional anisotropy of major white matter fiber tracts and the deep gray matter of healthy rhesus monkeys aged 4–8 years. Results showed no laterality ferences in fractional anisotropy values. Fractional anisotropy values were low in the head of date nucleus and thalamus in gray matter. Fractional anisotropy values were highest in the splenium of corpus callosum in the white matter, followed by genu of the corpus callosum and the posterior limb of the internal capsule. Fractional anisotropy values were lowest in the semioval center and posterior limb of internal capsule. These results suggest that fractional anisotropy values in major white matter fibers and the deep gray matter of 4–8-year-old rhesus monkeys are similar to those of healthy young people. PMID:25206616

  10. Recovery from Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Previously Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Losoi, Heidi; Silverberg, Noah D; Wäljas, Minna; Turunen, Senni; Rosti-Otajärvi, Eija; Helminen, Mika; Luoto, Teemu M; Julkunen, Juhani; Öhman, Juha; Iverson, Grant L

    2016-04-15

    This prospective longitudinal study reports recovery from mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) across multiple domains in a carefully selected consecutive sample of 74 previously healthy adults. The patients with MTBI and 40 orthopedic controls (i.e., ankle injuries) completed assessments at 1, 6, and 12 months after injury. Outcome measures included cognition, post-concussion symptoms, depression, traumatic stress, quality of life, satisfaction with life, resilience, and return to work. Patients with MTBI reported more post-concussion symptoms and fatigue than the controls at the beginning of recovery, but by 6 months after injury, did not differ as a group from nonhead injury trauma controls on cognition, fatigue, or mental health, and by 12 months, their level of post-concussion symptoms and quality of life was similar to that of controls. Almost all (96%) patients with MTBI returned to work/normal activities (RTW) within the follow-up of 1 year. A subgroup of those with MTBIs and controls reported mild post-concussion-like symptoms at 1 year. A large percentage of the subgroup who had persistent symptoms had a modifiable psychological risk factor at 1 month (i.e., depression, traumatic stress, and/or low resilience), and at 6 months, they had greater post-concussion symptoms, fatigue, insomnia, traumatic stress, and depression, and worse quality of life. All of the control subjects who had mild post-concussion-like symptoms at 12 months also had a mental health problem (i.e., depression, traumatic stress, or both). This illustrates the importance of providing evidence-supported treatment and rehabilitation services early in the recovery period. PMID:26437675

  11. Low Current-driven Micro-electroporation Allows Efficient In Vivo Delivery of Nonviral DNA into the Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Vry, Jochen De; Martínez-Martínez, Pilar; Losen, Mario; Bode, Gerard H; Temel, Yasin; Steckler, Thomas; Steinbusch, Harry WM; Baets, Marc De; Prickaerts, Jos

    2010-01-01

    Viral gene transfer or transgenic animals are commonly used technologies to alter gene expression in the adult brain, although these approaches lack spatial specificity and are time consuming. We delivered plasmid DNA locally into the brain of adult C57BL/6 mice in vivo by voltage- and current-controlled electroporation. The low current-controlled delivery of unipolar square wave pulses of 125 µA with microstimulation electrodes at the injection site gave 16 times higher transfection rates than a voltage-controlled electroporation protocol with plate electrodes resulting in currents of about 400 mA. Transfection was restricted to the target region and no damage due to the electric pulses was found. Our current-controlled electroporation protocol indicated that the use of very low currents resulting in applied voltages within the physiological range of the membrane potential, allows efficient transfection of nonviral plasmid DNA. In conclusion, low current-controlled electroporation is an excellent approach for electroporation in the adult brain, i.e., gene function can be influenced locally at a high level with no mortality and minimal tissue damage. PMID:20389292

  12. Effects of simulated microgravity on human brain nervous tissue.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianghan; Du, Jianxin; Wang, Demei; Zeng, Fan; Wei, Yukui; Wang, Fuli; Feng, Chengcheng; Li, Nuomin; Dai, Rongji; Deng, Yulin; Quan, Zhenzhen; Qing, Hong

    2016-08-01

    During spaceflight, the negative effects of space microgravity on astronauts are becoming more and more prominent, and especially, of which on the nervous system is urgently to be solved. For this purpose tissue blocks and primary cells of nervous tissues obtained from glioma of patients were cultivated after culturing for about 7days, explanted tissues and cells were then randomly divided into two groups, one for static culture (control group, C), and the other for rotary processing for 1day, 3days, 5days, 7days and 14days (experiment group, E). Figures captured by inverted microscope revealed that, with short time rotating for 1day or 3days, morphology changes of tissue blocks were not obvious. When the rotary time was extended to 7days or 14days, it was found that cell somas is significantly larger and the ability of adhesion is declined in comparison with that in control group. Additionally, the arrangement of cells migrated from explanted tissues was disorganized, and the migration distance became shorter. In immunofluorescence analysis, β-tubulin filaments in control group appeared to organize into bundles. While in experiment group, β-tubulin was highly disorganized. In conclusion, simulated microgravity treatment for a week affected the morphology of nervous tissue, and caused highly disorganized distribution of cytoskeleton and the increase of cell apoptosis. These morphological changes might be one of the causes of apoptosis induced by simulated microgravity. PMID:27268042

  13. SU-E-J-212: MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Assessment of Tumor and Normal Brain Tissue Responses of Juvenile Pilocytic Astrocytoma Treated by Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, P; Park, P; Li, H; Zhu, X; Mahajan, A; Grosshans, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can measure molecular mobility at the cellular level, quantified by the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). DTI may also reveal axonal fiber directional information in the white matter, quantified by the fractional anisotropy (FA). Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma (JPA) is a rare brain tumor that occurs in children and young adults. Proton therapy (PT) is increasingly used in the treatment of pediatric brain tumors including JPA. However, the response of both tumors and normal tissues to PT is currently under investigation. We report tumor and normal brain tissue responses for a pediatric case of JPA treated with PT assessed using DTI. Methods: A ten year old male with JPA of the left thalamus received passive scattered PT to a dose of 50.4 Gy (RBE) in 28 fractions. Post PT, the patient has been followed up in seven years. At each follow up, MRI imaging including DTI was performed to assess response. MR images were registered to the treatment planning CT and the GTV mapped onto each MRI. The GTV contour was then mirrored to the right side of brain through the patient’s middle line to represent normal brain tissue. ADC and FA were measured within the ROIs. Results: Proton therapy can completely spare contra lateral brain while the target volume received full prescribed dose. From a series of MRI ADC images before and after PT at different follow ups, the enhancement corresponding to GTV had nearly disappeared more than 2 years after PT. Both ADC and FA demonstrate that contralateral normal brain tissue were not affect by PT and the tumor volume reverted to normal ADC and FA values. Conclusion: DTI allowed quantitative evaluation of tumor and normal brain tissue responses to PT. Further study in a larger cohort is warranted.

  14. Tissue-specific expression of the human brain natriuretic peptide gene in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    LaPointe, M C; Wu, G; Garami, M; Yang, X P; Gardner, D G

    1996-03-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a cardiac hormone constitutively expressed in the adult heart. To identify the cis-acting elements involved in regulation of the human BNP gene, we subcloned the full-length promoter (-1818 to +100) and deletions thereof upstream from a luciferase reporter gene and transiently transfected them into primary cultures of neonatal rat atrial and ventricular myocytes and myocardial fibroblasts. Luciferase activity of the full-length construct was higher in ventricular (39064 +/- 8488 relative light units, N=11) and atrial (11225 +/- 1907, N=17) myocytes than myocardial fibroblasts (329 +/- 113, n=5). Maximal promoter activity in ventricular and atrial myocytes was maintained by sequences positioned between -1818 and -1283 relative to the transcription start site. Deletion to -1175 resulted in a decrease, whereas further deletion to -500 effected an increase in reporter activity in both cell types. In ventricular and atrial myocytes, deletion from -500 to -40 reduced luciferase activity 20-fold and 2-fold, respectively, whereas in myocardial fibroblasts, deletion to -40 upregulated the BNP promoter 2-fold. Of note, deleting 16 bp between -127 and -111 reduced luciferase activity 7-fold and 4-fold in ventricular and atrial myocytes, respectively, but had essentially no effect on luciferase activity in fibroblasts. Placement of sequences lying between -127 and -40 upstream from a heterologous thymidine kinase promoter resulted in reporter expression that was 7.4-fold greater than the vector alone in ventricular myocytes, approximately 2-fold greater in atrial myocytes, and equivalent to the vector alone in fibroblasts. For study of activity of the human BNP promoter in adult myocytes, either 408 or 97 bp of 5' flanking sequence coupled to the luciferase reporter gene was injected into the apex of adult male Sprague-Dawley rat hearts. After 7 days, luciferase activity in the injected myocardium was 9.8-fold higher for the longer construct

  15. Dairy intake is associated with brain glutathione concentration in older adults123

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Phil; Denney, Douglas R; Spaeth, Kendra; Nast, Olivia; Ptomey, Lauren; Roth, Alexandra K; Lierman, Jo Ann; Sullivan, Debra K

    2015-01-01

    Background: A reduction in key antioxidants such as glutathione has been noted in brain tissue undergoing oxidative stress in aging and neurodegeneration. To date, no dietary factor has been linked to a higher glutathione concentration. However, in an earlier pilot study, we showed evidence of a positive association between cerebral glutathione and dairy intake. Objective: We tested the hypothesis that dairy food consumption is associated with cerebral glutathione concentrations in older adults. Design: In this observational study, we measured cerebral glutathione concentrations in 60 healthy subjects (mean ± SD age: 68.7 ± 6.2 y) whose routine dairy intakes varied. Glutathione concentrations were measured by using a unique, noninvasive magnetic resonance chemical shift imaging technique at 3 T and compared with dairy intakes reported in 7-d food records. Results: Glutathione concentrations in the frontal [Spearman's rank-order correlation (rs) = 0.39, P = 0.013], parietal (rs = 0.50, P = 0.001), and frontoparietal regions (rs = 0.47, P = 0.003) were correlated with average daily dairy servings. In particular, glutathione concentrations in all 3 regions were positively correlated with milk servings (P ≤ 0.013), and those in the parietal region were also correlated with cheese servings (P = 0.015) and calcium intake (P = 0.039). Dairy intake was related to sex, fat-free mass, and daily intakes of energy, protein, and carbohydrates. However, when these factors were controlled through a partial correlation, correlations between glutathione concentrations and dairy and milk servings remained significant. Conclusions: Higher cerebral glutathione concentrations were associated with greater dairy consumption in older adults. One possible explanation for this association is that dairy foods may serve as a good source of substrates for glutathione synthesis in the human brain. PMID:25646325

  16. Development of a Conceptual Model to Predict Physical Activity Participation in Adults with Brain Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driver, Simon

    2008-01-01

    The purpose was to examine psychosocial factors that influence the physical activity behaviors of adults with brain injuries. Two differing models, based on Harter's model of self-worth, were proposed to examine the relationship between perceived competence, social support, physical self-worth, affect, and motivation. Adults numbering 384 with…

  17. Future Concerns of Adult Siblings of Persons with Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degeneffe, Charles Edmund; Olney, Marjorie F.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined future concerns conveyed by adult siblings who provided regular caregiving support to their brothers and sisters with traumatic brain injury (TBI). The authors surveyed a national sample of 280 adult siblings of persons with TBI. Using a constant comparative approach to text analysis, the authors analyzed responses to the…

  18. Long-term changes in the material properties of brain-tissue at the implant-tissue interface

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Arati; Rajan, Subramanian D.; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2013-01-01

    Objective Brain tissue undergoes dramatic molecular and cellular remodeling at the implant-tissue interface that evolves over a period of weeks after implantation. The biomechanical impact of such remodeling on the interface remains unknown. In this study, we aim to assess the changes in mechanical properties of the brain-electrode interface after chronic implantation of a microelectrode. Approach Microelectrodes were implanted in the rodent cortex at a depth of 1 mm for different durations - 1 day (n=4), 10-14 days (n=4), 4 weeks (n=4), 6 - 8 weeks (n=7). After the initial duration of implantation, the microelectrodes were moved an additional 1 mm downward at a constant speed of 10 μm/sec. Forces experienced by the microelectrode were measured during movement and after termination of movement. The biomechanical properties of the interfacial brain tissue were assessed from measured force-displacement curves using two separate models — a 2-parameter Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic model and a viscoelastic model with a 2nd order prony series. Main results Estimated shear moduli using a 2nd order viscoelastic model increased from 0.5 - 2.6 kPa (day 1 of implantation) to 25.7 - 59.3 kPa (4 weeks of implantation) and subsequently decreased to 0.8 - 7.9 kPa after 6-8 weeks of implantation in 6 of 7 animals. Estimated elastic moduli increased from 4.1-7.8 kPa on the day of implantation to 24 - 44.9 kPa after 4 weeks. The elastic moduli was estimated to be 6.8-33.3 kPa in 6 of 7 animals after 6-8 weeks of implantation. The above estimates suggest that the brain tissue surrounding the microelectrode evolves from a stiff matrix with maximal shear and elastic moduli after 4 weeks of implantation into a composite of two different layers with different mechanical properties – a stiff compact inner layer surrounded by softer brain tissue that is biomechanically similar to brain tissue during the first week of implantation. Tissue micromotion induced stresses on the

  19. Optimal Gaussian Mixture Models of Tissue Intensities in Brain MRI of Patients with Multiple-Sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yiming; Shah, Mohak; Francis, Simon; Arnold, Douglas L.; Arbel, Tal; Collins, D. Louis

    Brain tissue segmentation is important in studying markers in human brain Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) of patients with diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Parametric segmentation approaches typically assume unimodal Gaussian distributions on MRI intensities of individual tissue classes, even in applications on multi-spectral images. However, this assumption has not been rigorously verified especially in the context of MS. In this work, we evaluate the local MRI intensities of both healthy and diseased brain tissues of 21 multi-spectral MRIs (63 volumes in total) of MS patients for adherence to this assumption. We show that the tissue intensities are not uniform across the brain and vary across (anatomical) regions of the brain. Consequently, we show that Gaussian mixtures can better model the multi-spectral intensities. We utilize an Expectation Maximization (EM) based approach to learn the models along with a symmetric Jeffreys divergence criterion to study differences in intensity distributions. The effects of these findings are also empirically verified on automatic segmentation of brains with MS.

  20. Cell and tissue kinetics of the subependymal layer in mouse brain following heavy charged particle irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, N.B.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Alpen, E.L.

    1988-12-01

    The following studies investigate the cellular response and cell population kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain exposed to heavy charged particle irradiation. Partial brain irradiation with helium and neon ions was confined to one cortex of the brain. Both the irradiated and the unirradiated contralateral cortex showed similar disturbances of the cell and tissue kinetics in the subependymal layers. The irradiated hemisphere exhibited histological damage, whereas the unirradiated side appeared normal histologically. This study concerns the cell population and cell cycle kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain, and the effects of charged particle irradiations on this cell population. Quantitative high resolution autoradiography was used to study the kinetic parameters in this cell layer. This study should help in understanding the effects of these high-energy heavy ions on normal mammalian brain tissue. The response of the mammalian brain exposure to charged particle ionizing radiation may be extremely variable. It varies from minimal physiological changes to overt tissue necrosis depending on a number of factors such as: the administered dose, dose-rate, the volume of the irradiated tissue, and the biological end-point being examined.

  1. Somatomedin-C/insulin-like growth factor-I and Insulin-like growth factor-II mRNAs in rate fetal and adult tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, P.K.; Moats-Staats, B.M.; Hynes, M.A.; Simmons, J.G.; Jansen, M.; D'ercole, A.J.; Van Wyk, J.J.

    1986-11-05

    Somatomedin-C or insulin-like growth factor I (Sm-C/IGF-I) and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) have been implicated in the regulation of fetal growth and development. In the present study /sup 32/P-labeled complementary DNA probes encoding human and mouse Sm-C/IGF-I and human IGF-II were used in Northern blot hybridizations to analyze rat Sm-C/IGF-I and IGF-II mRNAs in poly(A/sup +/) RNAs from intestine, liver, lung, and brain of adult rats and fetal rats between day 14 and 17 of gestation. In fetal rats, all four tissues contained a major mRNA of 1.7 kilobase (kb) that hybridized with the human Sm-C/IGF-I cDNA and mRNAs of 7.5, 4.7, 1.7, and 1.2 kb that hybridized with the mouse Sm-C/IGF-I cDNA. Adult rat intestine, liver, and lung also contained these mRNAs but Sm-C/IGF-I mRNAs were not detected in adult rat brain. These findings provide direct support for prior observations that multiple tissues in the fetus synthesize immunoreactive Sm-C/IGF-I and imply a role for Sm-C/IGF-I in fetal development as well as postnatally. Multiple IGF-II mRNAs of estimated sizes 4.7, 3.9, 2.2, 1.75, and 1.2 kb were observed in fetal rat intestine, liver, lung, and brain. The 4.7- and 3.9-kb mRNAs were the major hybridizing IGF-II mRNAs in all fetal tissues. Higher abundance of IGF-II mRNAs in rat fetal tissues compared with adult tissues supports prior hypotheses, based on serum IGF-II concentrations, that IGF-II is predominantly a fetal somatomedin. IGF-II mRNAs are present, however, in some poly(A/sup +/) RNAs from adult rat tissues. The brain was the only tissue in the adult rat where the 4.7- and 3.9-kb IGF-II mRNAs were consistently detected. These findings suggest that a role for IGF-II in the adult rat, particularly in the central nervous system, cannot be excluded.

  2. Brain tissue modifications induced by cholinergic therapy in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bozzali, Marco; Parker, Geoff J M; Spanò, Barbara; Serra, Laura; Giulietti, Giovanni; Perri, Roberta; Magnani, Giuseppe; Marra, Camillo; G Vita, Maria; Caltagirone, Carlo; Cercignani, Mara

    2013-12-01

    A previous preliminary investigation based on a novel MRI approach to map anatomical connectivity revealed areas of increased connectivity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) but not in mild cognitive impairment patients. This prompted the hypothesis tested here, that these areas might reflect phenomena of brain plasticity driven by acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs). Thirty-eight patients with probable AD (19 under medication with AChEIs and 19 drug-naïve) were recruited together with 11 healthy controls. All subjects had MRI scanning at 3T, including volumetric and diffusion-weighted scans. Probabilistic tractography was used to initiate streamlines from all parenchymal voxels, and anatomical connectivity maps (ACMs) were obtained by counting, among the total number of streamlines initiated, the fraction passing through each brain voxel. After normalization into standard space, ACMs were used to test for between-group comparisons, and for interactions between the exposure to AChEIs and global level of cognition. Patients with AD had reduced ACM values in the fornix, cingulum, and supramarginal gyri. The ACM value was strongly associated with the AChEI dosage-x-duration product in the anterior limb (non-motor pathway) of the internal capsule. Tractography from this region identified the anterior thalamic radiation as the main white matter (WM) tract passing through it. The reduced connectivity in WM bundles connecting the hippocampi with the rest of the brain (fornix/cingulum) suggests a possible mechanism for the spread of AD pathology. An intriguing explanation for the interaction between AChEIs and ACM is related to the mechanisms of brain plasticity, partially driven by neurotrophic properties of acetylcholine replacement. PMID:22711258

  3. Magnetic iron compounds in the human brain: a comparison of tumour and hippocampal tissue

    PubMed Central

    Brem, Franziska; Hirt, Ann M; Winklhofer, Michael; Frei, Karl; Yonekawa, Yasuhiro; Wieser, Heinz-Gregor; Dobson, Jon

    2006-01-01

    Iron is a central element in the metabolism of normal and malignant cells. Abnormalities in iron and ferritin expression have been observed in many types of cancer. Interest in characterizing iron compounds in the human brain has increased due to advances in determining a relationship between excess iron accumulation and neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. In this work, four different magnetic methods have been employed to characterize the iron phases and magnetic properties of brain tumour (meningiomas) tissues and non-tumour hippocampal tissues. Four main magnetic components can be distinguished: the diamagnetic matrix, nearly paramagnetic blood, antiferromagnetic ferrihydrite cores of ferritin and ferrimagnetic magnetite and/or maghemite. For the first time, open hysteresis loops have been observed on human brain tissue at room temperature. The hysteresis properties indicate the presence of magnetite and/or maghemite particles that exhibit stable single-domain (SD) behaviour at room temperature. A significantly higher concentration of magnetically ordered magnetite and/or maghemite and a higher estimated concentration of heme iron was found in the meningioma samples. First-order reversal curve diagrams on meningioma tissue further show that the stable SD particles are magnetostatically interacting, implying high-local concentrations (clustering) of these particles in brain tumours. These findings suggest that brain tumour tissue contains an elevated amount of remanent iron oxide phases. PMID:17015303

  4. Impact of brain tissue filtering on neurostimulation fields: a modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Tim; Eden, Uri; Rushmore, Jarrett; Russo, Christopher J.; Dipietro, Laura; Fregni, Felipe; Simon, Stephen; Rotman, Stephen; Pitskel, Naomi B.; Ramos-Estebanez, Ciro; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Zahn, Markus; Valero-Cabre, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Electrical neurostimulation techniques, such as deep brain stimulation (DBS) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), are increasingly used in the neurosciences, e.g., for studying brain function, and for neurotherapeutics, e.g., for treating depression, epilepsy, and Parkinson’s disease. The characterization of electrical properties of brain tissue has guided our fundamental understanding and application of these methods, from electrophysiologic theory to clinical dosing-metrics. Nonetheless, prior computational models have primarily relied on ex-vivo impedance measurements. We recorded the in-vivo impedances of brain tissues during neurosurgical procedures and used these results to construct MRI guided computational models of TMS and DBS neurostimulatory fields and conductance-based models of neurons exposed to stimulation. We demonstrated that tissues carry neurostimulation currents through frequency dependent resistive and capacitive properties not typically accounted for by past neurostimulation modeling work. We show that these fundamental brain tissue properties can have significant effects on the neurostimulatory-fields (capacitive and resistive current composition and spatial/temporal dynamics) and neural responses (stimulation threshold, ionic currents, and membrane dynamics). These findings highlight the importance of tissue impedance properties on neurostimulation and impact our understanding of the biological mechanisms and technological potential of neurostimulatory methods. PMID:23850466

  5. Cutaneous Heterotopic Brain Tissue (Neuroglial Choristoma) with Dysplastic Features in a Kitten.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, G A; Ressel, L; Altimira, J; Vilafranca, M

    2016-07-01

    A 3-month-old, male European shorthair kitten exhibited an ill-defined, soft mass on the skin of the frontal head, which was present since birth. The surgically resected tissue was representative of a discrete dermal and subcutaneous mass comprising islands of neurons, glial and meningothelial elements, sometimes atypical or dysplastic, separated by dense collagenous connective tissue. There was no evident connection between this tissue and the brain. Immunohistochemical examination confirmed the presence of neurons and a pleocellular glial population, supporting a diagnosis of cutaneous neuroglial choristoma believed to be secondary to sequestered (resolved) meningoencephalocoele. Ectopic brain tissue is very rare in small animals. Some atypical features displayed by this tissue may be misdiagnosed as neoplasia. Communication between surgeon and pathologist to clarify the relationship of the lesion to surrounding structures is helpful to avoid misdiagnosis. PMID:27324745

  6. Differentiation of healthy brain tissue and tumors using surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Omer; Altaş, Murat; Kahraman, Mehmet; Bayrak, Omer Faruk; Culha, Mustafa

    2009-10-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a powerful technique for characterization of biological samples. SERS spectra from healthy brain tissue and tumors are obtained by sudden freezing of tissue in liquid nitrogen and crashing and mixing it with a concentrated silver colloidal suspension. The acquired spectra from tissues show significant spectral differences that can be used to identify whether it is from a healthy region or tumor. The most significant change on SERS spectra from the healthy/peripheral brain tissue to tumor is the increase of the ratio of the peaks at around 723 to 655 cm(-1). In addition, the spectral changes indicate that the protein content in tumors increases compared to the peripheral/healthy tissue as observed with tumor invasion. The preliminary results show that SERS spectra can be used for a quick diagnosis due to the simplicity of the sample preparation and the speed of the spectral acquisition. PMID:19843358

  7. JC Polyomavirus Abundance and Distribution in Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) Brain Tissue Implicates Myelin Sheath in Intracerebral Dissemination of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wharton, Keith A.; Quigley, Catherine; Themeles, Marian; Dunstan, Robert W.; Doyle, Kathryn; Cahir-McFarland, Ellen; Wei, Jing; Buko, Alex; Reid, Carl E.; Sun, Chao; Carmillo, Paul; Sur, Gargi; Carulli, John P.; Mansfield, Keith G.; Westmoreland, Susan V.; Staugaitis, Susan M.; Fox, Robert J.; Meier, Werner; Goelz, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Over half of adults are seropositive for JC polyomavirus (JCV), but rare individuals develop progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), a demyelinating JCV infection of the central nervous system. Previously, PML was primarily seen in immunosuppressed patients with AIDS or certain cancers, but it has recently emerged as a drug safety issue through its association with diverse immunomodulatory therapies. To better understand the relationship between the JCV life cycle and PML pathology, we studied autopsy brain tissue from a 70-year-old psoriasis patient on the integrin alpha-L inhibitor efalizumab following a ~2 month clinical course of PML. Sequence analysis of lesional brain tissue identified PML-associated viral mutations in regulatory (non-coding control region) DNA, capsid protein VP1, and the regulatory agnoprotein, as well as 9 novel mutations in capsid protein VP2, indicating rampant viral evolution. Nine samples, including three gross PML lesions and normal-appearing adjacent tissues, were characterized by histopathology and subject to quantitative genomic, proteomic, and molecular localization analyses. We observed a striking correlation between the spatial extent of demyelination, axonal destruction, and dispersion of JCV along white matter myelin sheath. Our observations in this case, as well as in a case of PML-like disease in an immunocompromised rhesus macaque, suggest that long-range spread of polyomavirus and axonal destruction in PML might involve extracellular association between virus and the white matter myelin sheath. PMID:27191595

  8. Three-dimensional structure of brain tissue at submicrometer resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiga, Rino; Mizutani, Ryuta; Inomoto, Chie; Takekoshi, Susumu; Nakamura, Naoya; Tsuboi, Akio; Osawa, Motoki; Arai, Makoto; Oshima, Kenichi; Itokawa, Masanari; Uesugi, Kentaro; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Terada, Yasuko; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Biological objects are composed of submicrometer structures such as cells and organelles that are essential for their functions. Here, we report on three-dimensional X-ray visualization of cells and organelles at resolutions up to 100 nm by imaging microtomography (micro-CT) equipped with Fresnel zone plate optics. Human cerebral tissue, fruit fly cephalic ganglia, and Escherichia coli bacteria labeled with high atomic-number elements were embedded in epoxy resin and subjected to X-ray microtomography at the BL37XU and BL47XU beamlines of the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility. The obtained results indicated that soft tissue structures can be visualized with the imaging microtomography.

  9. The Social Environment and Neurogenesis in the Adult Mammalian Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lieberwirth, Claudia; Wang, Zuoxin

    2012-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis – the formation of new neurons in adulthood – has been shown to be modulated by a variety of endogenous (e.g., trophic factors, neurotransmitters, and hormones) as well as exogenous (e.g., physical activity and environmental complexity) factors. Research on exogenous regulators of adult neurogenesis has focused primarily on the non-social environment. More recently, however, evidence has emerged suggesting that the social environment can also affect adult neurogenesis. The present review details the effects of adult–adult (e.g., mating and chemosensory interactions) and adult–offspring (e.g., gestation, parenthood, and exposure to offspring) interactions on adult neurogenesis. In addition, the effects of a stressful social environment (e.g., lack of social support and dominant–subordinate interactions) on adult neurogenesis are reviewed. The underlying hormonal mechanisms and potential functional significance of adult-generated neurons in mediating social behaviors are also discussed. PMID:22586385

  10. Age-Related Differences in the Brain Areas outside the Classical Language Areas among Adults Using Category Decision Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Yong Won; Song, Hui-Jin; Lee, Jae Jun; Lee, Joo Hwa; Lee, Hui Joong; Yi, Sang Doe; Chang, Hyuk Won; Berl, Madison M.; Gaillard, William D.; Chang, Yongmin

    2012-01-01

    Older adults perform much like younger adults on language. This similar level of performance, however, may come about through different underlying brain processes. In the present study, we evaluated age-related differences in the brain areas outside the typical language areas among adults using a category decision task. Our results showed that…

  11. Long-term changes in the material properties of brain tissue at the implant-tissue interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Arati; Rajan, Subramaniam D.; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2013-12-01

    Objective. Brain tissue undergoes dramatic molecular and cellular remodeling at the implant-tissue interface that evolves over a period of weeks after implantation. The biomechanical impact of such remodeling on the interface remains unknown. In this study, we aim to assess the changes in the mechanical properties of the brain-electrode interface after chronic implantation of a microelectrode. Approach. Microelectrodes were implanted in the rodent cortex at a depth of 1 mm for different durations—1 day (n = 4), 10-14 days (n = 4), 4 weeks (n = 4) and 6-8 weeks (n = 7). After the initial duration of implantation, the microelectrodes were moved an additional 1 mm downward at a constant speed of 10 µm s-1. Forces experienced by the microelectrode were measured during movement and after termination of movement. The biomechanical properties of the interfacial brain tissue were assessed from measured force-displacement curves using two separate models—a two-parameter Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic model and a viscoelastic model with a second-order Prony series. Main results. Estimated shear moduli using a second-order viscoelastic model increased from 0.5-2.6 kPa (day 1 of implantation) to 25.7-59.3 kPa (after 4 weeks of implantation) and subsequently decreased to 0.8-7.9 kPa after 6-8 weeks of implantation in 6 of the 7 animals. The estimated elastic modulus increased from 4.1-7.8 kPa on the day of implantation to 24-44.9 kPa after 4 weeks. The elastic modulus was estimated to be 6.8-33.3 kPa in 6 of the 7 animals after 6-8 weeks of implantation. The above estimates suggest that the brain tissue surrounding the microelectrode evolves from a stiff matrix with maximal shear and elastic modulus after 4 weeks of implantation into a composite of two different layers with different mechanical properties—a stiff compact inner layer surrounded by softer brain tissue that is biomechanically similar to brain tissue—during the first week of implantation. Tissue micromotion

  12. Removal of brain tissue by 1940-nm Tm-Fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunç, Burcu; Gülsoy, Murat

    2011-03-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the thermal effects of the 1940-nm Tm-fiber laser on the dead brain tissue. 4-5 mm coronal sections were taken from lamb brains. Tm-fiber laser was applied at the back (cortical) and below the cortex (subcortical) of these slices with 0.5 mm distance. At the beginning of the research in order to find appropriate laser parameter to be compared for 1940-nm Tm-fiber laser, the carbonization and coagulation times of the brain slices were recorded for each power value, both for cortical and subcortical tissue. The appropriate laser parameters for lamb brain tissue were selected according to this study. Lasers were applied in both continuous and pulsed modes. In continuous mode, doses were changed with fixed application time. In pulsed mode, doses were modified with the change in pulse width. The lesions were detected with microscope. The radius of ablation and coagulation for each laser application was recorded. By calculating ablation efficiency (100xablation/calculation radius) the aproppriate laser doses were determined for both cortical and subcortical tissue. The maximum ablation efficiency for cortical tissue in continuous mode was 200 mW and 600 mW and in pulsed mode was 600 mW and for subcortical tissue maximum ablation efficiency was found 600 mW in both continuous mode and pulsed mode.

  13. Adolescent binge ethanol treatment alters adult brain regional volumes, cortical extracellular matrix protein and behavioral flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Leon Garland; Liu, Wen; Oguz, Ipek; Styner, Martin; Crews, Fulton T.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents binge drink more than any other age group, increasing risk of disrupting the development of the frontal cortex. We hypothesized that adolescent binge drinking would lead to persistent alterations in adulthood. In this study, we modeled adolescent weekend underage binge-drinking, using adolescent mice (post-natal days [P] 28–37). The adolescent intermittent binge ethanol (AIE) treatment includes 6 binge intragastric doses of ethanol in an intermittent pattern across adolescence. Assessments were conducted in adulthood following extended abstinence to determine if there were persistent changes in adults. Reversal learning, open field and other behavioral assessments as well as brain structure using magnetic imaging and immunohistochemistry were determined. We found AIE did not impact adult Barnes Maze learning. However, AIE did cause reversal learning deficits in adults. AIE also caused structural changes in the adult brain. AIE was associated with adulthood volume enlargements in specific brain regions without changes in total brain volume. Enlarged regions included the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, 4%), cerebellum (4.5%), thalamus (2%), internal capsule (10%) and genu of the corpus callosum (7%). The enlarged OFC volume in adults after AIE is consistent with previous imaging studies in human adolescents. AIE treatment was associated with significant increases in the expression of several extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in the adult OFC including WFA (55%), Brevican (32%), Neurocan (105%), Tenacin-C (25%), and HABP (5%). These findings are consistent with AIE causing persistent changes in brain structure that could contribute to a lack of behavioral flexibility. PMID:24275185

  14. Control of adult neurogenesis by programmed cell death in the mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jae Ryun; Hong, Caroline Jeeyeon; Kim, Joo Yeon; Kim, Eun-Kyoung; Sun, Woong; Yu, Seong-Woon

    2016-01-01

    The presence of neural stem cells (NSCs) and the production of new neurons in the adult brain have received great attention from scientists and the public because of implications to brain plasticity and their potential use for treating currently incurable brain diseases. Adult neurogenesis is controlled at multiple levels, including proliferation, differentiation, migration, and programmed cell death (PCD). Among these, PCD is the last and most prominent process for regulating the final number of mature neurons integrated into neural circuits. PCD can be classified into apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagic cell death and emerging evidence suggests that all three may be important modes of cell death in neural stem/progenitor cells. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate PCD and thereby impact the intricate balance between self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation during adult neurogenesis are not well understood. In this comprehensive review, we focus on the extent, mechanism, and biological significance of PCD for the control of adult neurogenesis in the mammalian brain. The role of intrinsic and extrinsic factors in the regulation of PCD at the molecular and systems levels is also discussed. Adult neurogenesis is a dynamic process, and the signals for differentiation, proliferation, and death of neural progenitor/stem cells are closely interrelated. A better understanding of how adult neurogenesis is influenced by PCD will help lead to important insights relevant to brain health and diseases. PMID:27098178

  15. Long-Term Upregulation of Inflammation and Suppression of Cell Proliferation in the Brain of Adult Rats Exposed to Traumatic Brain Injury Using the Controlled Cortical Impact Model

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Sandra A.; Tajiri, Naoki; Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Grimmig, Bethany; Diamond, David; Sanberg, Paul R.; Bickford, Paula C.; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2013-01-01

    The long-term consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI), specifically the detrimental effects of inflammation on the neurogenic niches, are not very well understood. In the present in vivo study, we examined the prolonged pathological outcomes of experimental TBI in different parts of the rat brain with special emphasis on inflammation and neurogenesis. Sixty days after moderate controlled cortical impact injury, adult Sprague-Dawley male rats were euthanized and brain tissues harvested. Antibodies against the activated microglial marker, OX6, the cell cycle-regulating protein marker, Ki67, and the immature neuronal marker, doublecortin, DCX, were used to estimate microglial activation, cell proliferation, and neuronal differentiation, respectively, in the subventricular zone (SVZ), subgranular zone (SGZ), striatum, thalamus, and cerebral peduncle. Stereology-based analyses revealed significant exacerbation of OX6-positive activated microglial cells in the striatum, thalamus, and cerebral peduncle. In parallel, significant decrements in Ki67-positive proliferating cells in SVZ and SGZ, but only trends of reduced DCX-positive immature neuronal cells in SVZ and SGZ were detected relative to sham control group. These results indicate a progressive deterioration of the TBI brain over time characterized by elevated inflammation and suppressed neurogenesis. Therapeutic intervention at the chronic stage of TBI may confer abrogation of these deleterious cell death processes. PMID:23301065

  16. The NSW brain tissue resource centre: Banking for alcohol and major neuropsychiatric disorders research.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, G T; Sheedy, D; Stevens, J; McCrossin, T; Smith, C C; van Roijen, M; Kril, J J

    2016-05-01

    The New South Wales Brain Tissue Resource Centre (NSWBTRC) at the University of Sydney (Australia) is an established human brain bank providing tissue to the neuroscience research community for investigations on alcohol-related brain damage and major psychiatric illnesses such as schizophrenia. The NSWBTRC relies on wide community engagement to encourage those with and without neuropsychiatric illness to consent to donation through its allied research programs. The subsequent provision of high-quality samples relies on standardized operational protocols, associated clinical data, quality control measures, integrated information systems, robust infrastructure, and governance. These processes are continually augmented to complement the changes in internal and external governance as well as the complexity and diversity of advanced investigation techniques. This report provides an overview of the dynamic process of brain banking and discusses the challenges of meeting the future needs of researchers, including synchronicity with other disease-focus collections. PMID:27139235

  17. Long-term treatment with responsive brain stimulation in adults with refractory partial seizures

    PubMed Central

    Bergey, Gregory K.; Mizrahi, Eli M.; Goldman, Alica; King-Stephens, David; Nair, Dileep; Srinivasan, Shraddha; Jobst, Barbara; Gross, Robert E.; Shields, Donald C.; Barkley, Gregory; Salanova, Vicenta; Olejniczak, Piotr; Cole, Andrew; Cash, Sydney S.; Noe, Katherine; Wharen, Robert; Worrell, Gregory; Murro, Anthony M.; Edwards, Jonathan; Duchowny, Michael; Spencer, David; Smith, Michael; Geller, Eric; Gwinn, Ryder; Skidmore, Christopher; Eisenschenk, Stephan; Berg, Michel; Heck, Christianne; Van Ness, Paul; Fountain, Nathan; Rutecki, Paul; Massey, Andrew; O'Donovan, Cormac; Labar, Douglas; Duckrow, Robert B.; Hirsch, Lawrence J.; Courtney, Tracy; Sun, Felice T.; Seale, Cairn G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The long-term efficacy and safety of responsive direct neurostimulation was assessed in adults with medically refractory partial onset seizures. Methods: All participants were treated with a cranially implanted responsive neurostimulator that delivers stimulation to 1 or 2 seizure foci via chronically implanted electrodes when specific electrocorticographic patterns are detected (RNS System). Participants had completed a 2-year primarily open-label safety study (n = 65) or a 2-year randomized blinded controlled safety and efficacy study (n = 191); 230 participants transitioned into an ongoing 7-year study to assess safety and efficacy. Results: The average participant was 34 (±11.4) years old with epilepsy for 19.6 (±11.4) years. The median preimplant frequency of disabling partial or generalized tonic-clonic seizures was 10.2 seizures a month. The median percent seizure reduction in the randomized blinded controlled trial was 44% at 1 year and 53% at 2 years (p < 0.0001, generalized estimating equation) and ranged from 48% to 66% over postimplant years 3 through 6 in the long-term study. Improvements in quality of life were maintained (p < 0.05). The most common serious device-related adverse events over the mean 5.4 years of follow-up were implant site infection (9.0%) involving soft tissue and neurostimulator explantation (4.7%). Conclusions: The RNS System is the first direct brain responsive neurostimulator. Acute and sustained efficacy and safety were demonstrated in adults with medically refractory partial onset seizures arising from 1 or 2 foci over a mean follow-up of 5.4 years. This experience supports the RNS System as a treatment option for refractory partial seizures. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that for adults with medically refractory partial onset seizures, responsive direct cortical stimulation reduces seizures and improves quality of life over a mean follow-up of 5.4 years. PMID:25616485

  18. Tissue Non-specific Alkaline Phosphatase (TNAP) in Vessels of the Brain.

    PubMed

    Deracinois, Barbara; Lenfant, Anne-Marie; Dehouck, Marie-Pierre; Flahaut, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The microvessels of the brain represent around 3-4 % of the brain compartment but constitute the most important length (400 miles) and surface of exchange (20 m(2)) between the blood and the parenchyma of brain. Under influence of surrounding tissues, the brain microvessel endothelium expresses a specific phenotype that regulates and restricts the entry of compounds and cells from blood to brain, and defined the so-called blood-brain barrier (BBB). Evidences that alkaline phosphatase (AP) is a characteristic feature of the BBB phenotype that allows differentiating capillary endothelial cells from brain to those of the periphery have rapidly emerge. Thenceforth, AP has been rapidly used as a biomarker of the blood-brain barrier phenotype. In fact, brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) express exclusively tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP). There are several lines of evidence in favour of an important role for TNAP in brain function. TNAP is thought to be responsible for the control of transport of some compounds across the plasma membrane of the BCECs. Here, we report that levamisole-mediated inhibition of TNAP provokes an increase of the permeability to Lucifer Yellow of the endothelial monolayer. Moreover, we illustrate the disruption of the cytoskeleton organization. Interestingly, all observed effects were reversible 24 h after levamisole removal and correlated with the return of a full activity of the TNAP. This reversible effect remains to be studied in details to evaluate the potentiality of a levamisole treatment to enhance the entry of drugs in the brain parenchyma. PMID:26219710

  19. Automated Brain Tissue Segmentation Based on Fractional Signal Mapping from Inversion Recovery Look-Locker Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Wanyong; Geng, Xiujuan; Gu, Hong; Zhan, Wang; Zou, Qihong; Yang, Yihong

    2010-01-01

    Most current automated segmentation methods are performed on T1- or T2-weighted MR images, relying on relative image intensity that is dependent on other MR parameters and sensitive to B1 magnetic field inhomogeneity. Here, we propose an image segmentation method based on quantitative longitudinal magnetization relaxation time (T1) of brain tissues. Considering the partial volume effect, fractional volume maps of brain tissues (white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid) were obtained by fitting the observed signal in an inversion recovery procedure to a linear combination of three exponential functions, which represents the relaxations of each of the tissue types. A Look-Locker acquisition was employed to accelerate the acquisition process. The feasibility and efficacy of this proposed method were evaluated using simulations and experiments. The potential applications of this method in the study of neurological disease as well as normal brain development and aging are discussed. PMID:20452444

  20. Distribution of lead in the brain tissues from DNTC patients using synchrotron radiation microbeams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide-Ektessabi, Ari; Ota, Yukihide; Ishihara, Ryoko; Mizuno, Yutaka; Takeuchi, Tohru

    2005-12-01

    Diffuse neurofibrillary tangles with calcification (DNTC) is a form of dementia with certain characteristics. Its pathology is characterized by cerebrum atrophy, calcification on globus pallidus and dentate nucleus and diffuse neurofibrillary tangles without senile plaques. In the present study brain tissues were prepared from patients with patients DNTC, calcified and non-calcified Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. The brain tissues were examined non-destructively by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation (SR) microbeams for trace metallic elements Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn and Pb. The XRF analysis showed that there were Pb concentrations in the calcified areas in the brain tissues with both DNTC and AD but there was none in those with non-calcified AD.

  1. Extraction, Identification, and Quantification of Histones from Small Quantities of Specific Brain Tissue.

    PubMed

    Beldjoud, Hassiba; Messanvi, Fany; Nadif Kasri, Nael; Roozendaal, Benno

    2016-01-01

    Histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs), by their action on the chromatin state, play a central role in the regulation of gene expression. The discovery that some PTMs in the brain are dynamically regulated by experience and environmental factors makes them an important subject for the study of plasticity changes in learning and memory, addiction, and psychiatric disorders. Current histone isolation protocols, however, require large amounts of tissue, which limits their application for analyzing small tissue samples from a specific brain region. We describe here a step-by-step protocol for histone extraction and isolation from 1 mm(3) of tissue from brain punches, which allows reproducible and reliable results for histone PTM identification and quantification without losing anatomical precision. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27367963

  2. Insulin-like growth factor I is required for vessel remodeling in the adult brain

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Lopez, C.; LeRoith, D.; Torres-Aleman, I.

    2004-01-01

    Although vascular dysfunction is a major suspect in the etiology of several important neurodegenerative diseases, the signals involved in vessel homeostasis in the brain are still poorly understood. We have determined whether insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), a wide-spectrum growth factor with angiogenic actions, participates in vascular remodeling in the adult brain. IGF-I induces the growth of cultured brain endothelial cells through hypoxiainducible factor 1α and vascular endothelial growth factor, a canonical angiogenic pathway. Furthermore, the systemic injection of IGF-I in adult mice increases brain vessel density. Physical exercise that stimulates widespread brain vessel growth in normal mice fails to do so in mice with low serum IGF-I. Brain injury that stimulates angiogenesis at the injury site also requires IGF-I to promote perilesion vessel growth, because blockade of IGF-I input by an anti-IGF-I abrogates vascular growth at the injury site. Thus, IGF-I participates in vessel remodeling in the adult brain. Low serum/brain IGF-I levels that are associated with old age and with several neurodegenerative diseases may be related to an increased risk of vascular dysfunction. PMID:15210967

  3. Medulloblastoma with soft-tissue and skeletal metastases in an adult: A case report

    PubMed Central

    GENG, DIANZHONG; SONG, XIAOHUA; LIU, JING; YU, ZESHUN; NING, FANGLING

    2015-01-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is a highly malignant primary brain tumor, which occurs in the cerebellum or posterior cranial fossa. MB is most commonly identified in children <10 years of age. The disease is rare in adults, affecting patients aged between 30 and 50 years of age, with an incidence of 0.5 cases per 1,000,000 individuals. Extraneural metastases are reported in 7–10% of cases, most commonly involving the bones and more rarely involving the lymph nodes, visceral organs and bone marrow. The current study presents the case of a 36-year-old male who underwent a gross total resection followed by radiation therapy to the craniospinal axis for the treatment of MB. The patient subsequently developed widespread metastasis, which involved the soft tissue of the occipital bone. Subsequently, the patient was administered palliative radiotherapy and initially exhibited a good clinical response. However, the patient succumbed at 18 months post-diagnosis due to dissemination of the disease. The literature on the extraneural metastasis of MB is also reviewed in the current study. PMID:26622837

  4. Preparation of mouse brain tissue for immunoelectron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Marie-Eve; Riad, Mustapha; Majewska, Ania

    2010-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is extremely useful for visualizing microglial, oligodendrocytic, astrocytic, and neuronal subcellular compartments (dendrite, dendritic spine, axon, axon terminal, perikaryon), as well as their intracellular organelles and cytoskeleton, in the central nervous system at high spatial resolution. Combined with TEM, pre-embedding immunocytochemistry allows the discrimination of cellular elements with few distinctive features and identification criteria (e.g., microglial perikarya and processes, when using an antibody against the microglia-specific marker Iba1 (ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1; as presented here)), identifying the neurotransmitter contents of cellular elements (e.g., serotonergic) and their ultrastructural localization of soluble or membrane-bound proteins (e.g., 5 HT1A and EphA4 receptors). Here, we describe a protocol for transcardiac perfusion of mice with acrolein fixative, removal and sectioning of the brain, as well as immunoperoxidase-diaminobenzidine (DAB) staining, resin embedding, and ultrathin sectioning of the brain sections. Upon completion of these procedures, the immunostained material is ready for examination with TEM. When rigorously performed, this technique provides an excellent compromise between optimal ultrastructural preservation and immunocytochemical detection. PMID:20689505

  5. Debra-mediated Ci degradation controls tissue homeostasis in Drosophila adult midgut.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhouhua; Guo, Yueqin; Han, Lili; Zhang, Yan; Shi, Lai; Huang, Xudong; Lin, Xinhua

    2014-02-11

    Adult tissue homeostasis is maintained by resident stem cells and their progeny. However, the underlying mechanisms that control tissue homeostasis are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that Debra-mediated Ci degradation is important for intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation in Drosophila adult midgut. Debra inhibition leads to increased ISC activity and tissue homeostasis loss, phenocopying defects observed in aging flies. These defects can be suppressed by depleting Ci, suggesting that increased Hedgehog (Hh) signaling contributes to ISC proliferation and tissue homeostasis loss. Consistently, Hh signaling activation causes the same defects, whereas depletion of Hh signaling suppresses these defects. Furthermore, the Hh ligand from multiple sources is involved in ISC proliferation and tissue homeostasis. Finally, we show that the JNK pathway acts downstream of Hh signaling to regulate ISC proliferation. Together, our results provide insights into the mechanisms of stem cell proliferation and tissue homeostasis control. PMID:24527387

  6. Debra-Mediated Ci Degradation Controls Tissue Homeostasis in Drosophila Adult Midgut

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhouhua; Guo, Yueqin; Han, Lili; Zhang, Yan; Shi, Lai; Huang, Xudong; Lin, Xinhua

    2014-01-01

    Summary Adult tissue homeostasis is maintained by resident stem cells and their progeny. However, the underlying mechanisms that control tissue homeostasis are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that Debra-mediated Ci degradation is important for intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation in Drosophila adult midgut. Debra inhibition leads to increased ISC activity and tissue homeostasis loss, phenocopying defects observed in aging flies. These defects can be suppressed by depleting Ci, suggesting that increased Hedgehog (Hh) signaling contributes to ISC proliferation and tissue homeostasis loss. Consistently, Hh signaling activation causes the same defects, whereas depletion of Hh signaling suppresses these defects. Furthermore, the Hh ligand from multiple sources is involved in ISC proliferation and tissue homeostasis. Finally, we show that the JNK pathway acts downstream of Hh signaling to regulate ISC proliferation. Together, our results provide insights into the mechanisms of stem cell proliferation and tissue homeostasis control. PMID:24527387

  7. Are brain and heart tissue prone to the development of thiamine deficiency?

    PubMed

    Klooster, Astrid; Larkin, James R; Wiersema-Buist, Janneke; Gans, Reinold O B; Thornalley, Paul J; Navis, Gerjan; van Goor, Harry; Leuvenink, Henri G D; Bakker, Stephan J L

    2013-05-01

    Thiamine deficiency is a continuing problem leading to beriberi and Wernicke's encephalopathy. The symptoms of thiamine deficiency develop in the heart, brain and neuronal tissue. Yet, it is unclear how rapid thiamine deficiency develops and which organs are prone to development of thiamine deficiency. We investigated these issues in a thiamine deficient animal model. Twenty-four male Lewis rats were fed a thiamine deficient diet, which contained 0.04% of normal thiamine intake. Six control rats were fed 200 μg of thiamine per day. Every week a group of six rats on the thiamine-deficient diet was sacrificed and blood, urine and tissue were stored. Blood and tissue transketolase activity, thiamine and thiamine metabolites were measured and PCR of thiamine transporter-1 (ThTr-1) was performed. Transketolase activity was significantly reduced in red blood cells, liver, lung, kidney and spleen tissue after two weeks of thiamine deficient diet. In brain tissue, transketolase activity was not reduced after up to four weeks of thiamine deficient diet. The amount of thiamine pyrophosphate was also significantly conserved in brain and heart tissue (decrease of 31% and 28% respectively), compared to other tissues (decrease of ~70%) after four weeks of thiamine deficient diet. There was no difference between tissues in ThTr-1 expression after four weeks of thiamine deficient diet. Despite the fact that the heart and the brain are predilection sites for complications from thiamine deficiency, these tissues are protected against thiamine deficiency. Other organs could be suffering from thiamine deficiency without resulting in clinical signs of classic thiamine deficiency in beriberi and Wernicke's encephalopathy. PMID:23357554

  8. High-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of metal compounds in neurodegenerative brain tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Collingwood, J.F.; Mikhaylova, A.; Davidson, M.R.; Batich, C.; Streit, W.J.; Eskin, T.; Terry, J.; Barrea, R.; Underhill, R.S.; Dobson, J.

    2008-06-16

    Fluorescence mapping and microfocus X-ray absorption spectroscopy are used to detect, locate and identify iron biominerals and other inorganic metal accumulations in neurodegenerative brain tissue at sub-cellular resolution (< 5 microns). Recent progress in developing the technique is reviewed. Synchrotron X-rays are used to map tissue sections for metals of interest, and XANES and XAFS are used to characterize anomalous concentrations of the metals in-situ so that they can be correlated with tissue structures and disease pathology. Iron anomalies associated with biogenic magnetite, ferritin and haemoglobin are located and identified in an avian tissue model with a pixel resolution {approx} 5 microns. Subsequent studies include brain tissue sections from transgenic Huntington's mice, and the first high-resolution mapping and identification of iron biominerals in human Alzheimer's and control autopsy brain tissue. Technical developments include use of microfocus diffraction to obtain structural information about biominerals in-situ, and depositing sample location grids by lithography for the location of anomalies by conventional microscopy. The combined techniques provide a breakthrough in the study of both intra- and extra-cellular iron compounds and related metals in tissue. The information to be gained from this approach has implications for future diagnosis and treatment of neurodegeneration, and for our understanding of the mechanisms involved.

  9. Segmenting Brain Tissues from Chinese Visible Human Dataset by Deep-Learned Features with Stacked Autoencoder.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guangjun; Wang, Xuchu; Niu, Yanmin; Tan, Liwen; Zhang, Shao-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Cryosection brain images in Chinese Visible Human (CVH) dataset contain rich anatomical structure information of tissues because of its high resolution (e.g., 0.167 mm per pixel). Fast and accurate segmentation of these images into white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid plays a critical role in analyzing and measuring the anatomical structures of human brain. However, most existing automated segmentation methods are designed for computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging data, and they may not be applicable for cryosection images due to the imaging difference. In this paper, we propose a supervised learning-based CVH brain tissues segmentation method that uses stacked autoencoder (SAE) to automatically learn the deep feature representations. Specifically, our model includes two successive parts where two three-layer SAEs take image patches as input to learn the complex anatomical feature representation, and then these features are sent to Softmax classifier for inferring the labels. Experimental results validated the effectiveness of our method and showed that it outperformed four other classical brain tissue detection strategies. Furthermore, we reconstructed three-dimensional surfaces of these tissues, which show their potential in exploring the high-resolution anatomical structures of human brain. PMID:27057543

  10. BDNF promoter I methylation correlates between post-mortem human peripheral and brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Stenz, Ludwig; Zewdie, Seblewongel; Laforge-Escarra, Térèse; Prados, Julien; La Harpe, Romano; Dayer, Alexandre; Paoloni-Giacobino, Ariane; Perroud, Nader; Aubry, Jean-Michel

    2015-02-01

    Several psychiatric disorders have been associated with CpG methylation changes in CG rich promoters of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mainly by extracting DNA from peripheral blood cells. Whether changes in peripheral DNA methylation can be used as a proxy for brain-specific alterations remains an open question. In this study we aimed to compare DNA methylation levels in BDNF promoter regions in human blood cells, muscle and brain regions using bisulfite-pyrosequencing. We found a significant correlation between the levels of BDNF promoter I methylation measured in quadriceps and vPFC tissues extracted from the same individuals (n = 98, Pearson, r = 0.48, p = 4.5 × 10(-7)). In the hippocampus, BDNF promoter I and IV methylation levels were strongly correlated (Pearson, n = 37, r = 0.74, p = 1.4 × 10(-7)). We found evidence for sex-dependent effect on BDNF promoter methylation levels in the various tissues and blood samples. Taken together, these data indicate a strong intra-individual correlation between peripheral and brain tissue. They also suggest that sex determines methylation patterns in BDNF promoter region across different types of tissue, including muscle, brain, and blood. PMID:25450314

  11. Segmenting Brain Tissues from Chinese Visible Human Dataset by Deep-Learned Features with Stacked Autoencoder

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guangjun; Wang, Xuchu; Niu, Yanmin; Tan, Liwen; Zhang, Shao-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Cryosection brain images in Chinese Visible Human (CVH) dataset contain rich anatomical structure information of tissues because of its high resolution (e.g., 0.167 mm per pixel). Fast and accurate segmentation of these images into white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid plays a critical role in analyzing and measuring the anatomical structures of human brain. However, most existing automated segmentation methods are designed for computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging data, and they may not be applicable for cryosection images due to the imaging difference. In this paper, we propose a supervised learning-based CVH brain tissues segmentation method that uses stacked autoencoder (SAE) to automatically learn the deep feature representations. Specifically, our model includes two successive parts where two three-layer SAEs take image patches as input to learn the complex anatomical feature representation, and then these features are sent to Softmax classifier for inferring the labels. Experimental results validated the effectiveness of our method and showed that it outperformed four other classical brain tissue detection strategies. Furthermore, we reconstructed three-dimensional surfaces of these tissues, which show their potential in exploring the high-resolution anatomical structures of human brain. PMID:27057543

  12. Graphene Functionalized Scaffolds Reduce the Inflammatory Response and Supports Endogenous Neuroblast Migration when Implanted in the Adult Brain.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kun; Motamed, Sepideh; Thouas, George A; Bernard, Claude C; Li, Dan; Parkington, Helena C; Coleman, Harold A; Finkelstein, David I; Forsythe, John S

    2016-01-01

    Electroactive materials have been investigated as next-generation neuronal tissue engineering scaffolds to enhance neuronal regeneration and functional recovery after brain injury. Graphene, an emerging neuronal scaffold material with charge transfer properties, has shown promising results for neuronal cell survival and differentiation in vitro. In this in vivo work, electrospun microfiber scaffolds coated with self-assembled colloidal graphene, were implanted into the striatum or into the subventricular zone of adult rats. Microglia and astrocyte activation levels were suppressed with graphene functionalization. In addition, self-assembled graphene implants prevented glial scarring in the brain 7 weeks following implantation. Astrocyte guidance within the scaffold and redirection of neuroblasts from the subventricular zone along the implants was also demonstrated. These findings provide new functional evidence for the potential use of graphene scaffolds as a therapeutic platform to support central nervous system regeneration. PMID:26978268

  13. Graphene Functionalized Scaffolds Reduce the Inflammatory Response and Supports Endogenous Neuroblast Migration when Implanted in the Adult Brain

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Kun; Motamed, Sepideh; Thouas, George A.; Bernard, Claude C.; Li, Dan; Parkington, Helena C.; Coleman, Harold A.; Finkelstein, David I.; Forsythe, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Electroactive materials have been investigated as next-generation neuronal tissue engineering scaffolds to enhance neuronal regeneration and functional recovery after brain injury. Graphene, an emerging neuronal scaffold material with charge transfer properties, has shown promising results for neuronal cell survival and differentiation in vitro. In this in vivo work, electrospun microfiber scaffolds coated with self-assembled colloidal graphene, were implanted into the striatum or into the subventricular zone of adult rats. Microglia and astrocyte activation levels were suppressed with graphene functionalization. In addition, self-assembled graphene implants prevented glial scarring in the brain 7 weeks following implantation. Astrocyte guidance within the scaffold and redirection of neuroblasts from the subventricular zone along the implants was also demonstrated. These findings provide new functional evidence for the potential use of graphene scaffolds as a therapeutic platform to support central nervous system regeneration. PMID:26978268

  14. Brain banks: benefits, limitations and cautions concerning the use of post-mortem brain tissue for molecular studies.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Isidre; Martinez, Anna; Boluda, Susana; Parchi, Piero; Barrachina, Marta

    2008-09-01

    Brain banks are facilities providing an interface between generous donation of nervous tissues and research laboratories devoted to increase our understanding of the diseases of the nervous system, discover new diagnostic targets, and develop new strategies. Considering this crucial role, it is important to learn about the suitabilities, limitations and proper handling of individual brain samples for particular studies. Several factors may interfere with preservation of DNA, RNA, proteins and lipids, and, therefore, special care must be taken first to detect sub-optimally preserved tissues and second to provide adequate material for each specific purpose. Basic aspects related with DNA, RNA and protein preservation include agonal state, post-mortem delay, temperature of storage and procedures of tissue preservation. Examination of DNA and RNA preservation is best done by using bioanalyzer technologies instead of less sensitive methods such as agarose gels. Adequate RNA preservation is mandatory in RNA microarray studies and adequate controls are necessary for proper PCR validation. Like for RNA, the preservation of proteins is not homogeneous since some molecules are more vulnerable than others. This aspect is crucial in the study of proteins including expression levels and possible post-translational modifications. Similarly, the reliability of functional and enzymatic studies in human post-mortem brain largely depends on protein preservation. Much less is known about other aspects, such as the effects of putative deleterious factors on epigenetic events such as methylation of CpGs in gene promoters, nucleosome preservation, histone modifications, and conservation of microRNA species. Most brains are appropriate for morphological approaches but not all brains are useful for certain biochemical and molecular studies. PMID:18543077

  15. Rheological regional properties of brain tissue studied under cyclic creep/ recovery shear stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjema, F.; Lounis, M.; Khelidj, B.; Bessai, N.

    2015-04-01

    The rheological properties of brain tissue were studied by repeated creep-recovery shear tests under static conditions for different regions. Corpus callosum CC, Thalamus Th and Corona radiata CR. Non-linear viscoelastic model was also proposed to characterize the transient/steady states of shear creep results. From the creep-recovery data it was obvious that the brain tissues show high regional anisotropy. However. the both samples exhibit fluid viscoelastic properties in the first shear stress cycle of 100 Pa, while this behaviour evolutes to solid viscoelastic with cyclic effect.

  16. Modeling invasion of brain tissue by glioblastoma cells: ECM alignment and motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, L. M.

    2013-03-01

    A key stage in the development of highly malignant brain tumors (Glioblastoma Multiforme) is invasion of normal brain tissue by motile cells moving through a crowded, complex environment. Evidence from in vitro experiments suggests the cell motion is accompanied by considerable deformation and alignment of the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) of the brain. In the case of breast cancer, alignment effects of this sort have been seen in vivo. We have modeled features of this system including stress confinement in the non-linear elasticity of the ECM and contact guidance of the cell motion.

  17. Detection of AIDS Virus in Macrophages in Brain Tissue from AIDS Patients with Encephalopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Scott; Gendelman, Howard E.; Orenstein, Jan M.; Canto, Mauro C.; Pezeshkpour, Gholam H.; Yungbluth, Margaret; Janotta, Frank; Aksamit, Allen; Martin, Malcolm A.; Fauci, Anthony S.

    1986-09-01

    One of the common neurological complications in patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a subacute encephalopathy with progressive dementia. By using the techniques of cocultivation for virus isolation, in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy, the identity of an important cell type that supports replication of the AIDS retrovirus in brain tissue was determined in two affected individuals. These cells were mononucleated and multinucleated macrophages that actively synthesized viral RNA and produced progeny virions in the brains of the patients. Infected brain macrophages may serve as a reservoir for virus and as a vehicle for viral dissemination in the infected host.

  18. Mitochondrial Respiration Chain Enzymatic Activities in the Human Brain: Methodological Implications for Tissue Sampling and Storage.

    PubMed

    Ronsoni, Marcelo Fernando; Remor, Aline Pertile; Lopes, Mark William; Hohl, Alexandre; Troncoso, Iris H Z; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Boos, Gustavo Luchi; Kondageski, Charles; Nunes, Jean Costa; Linhares, Marcelo Neves; Lin, Kátia; Latini, Alexandra Susana; Walz, Roger

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes enzymatic (MRCCE) activities were successfully evaluated in frozen brain samples. Epilepsy surgery offers an ethical opportunity to study human brain tissue surgically removed to treat drug resistant epilepsies. Epilepsy surgeries are done with hemodynamic and laboratory parameters to maintain physiology, but there are no studies analyzing the association among these parameters and MRCCE activities in the human brain tissue. We determined the intra-operative parameters independently associated with MRCCE activities in middle temporal neocortex (Cx), amygdala (AMY) and head of hippocampus (HIP) samples of patients (n = 23) who underwent temporal lobectomy using multiple linear regressions. MRCCE activities in Cx, AMY and HIP are differentially associated to trans-operative mean arterial blood pressure, O2 saturation, hemoglobin, and anesthesia duration to time of tissue sampling. The time-course between the last seizure occurrence and tissue sampling as well as the sample storage to biochemical assessments were also associated with enzyme activities. Linear regression models including these variables explain 13-17 % of MRCCE activities and show a moderate to strong effect (r = 0.37-0.82). Intraoperative hemodynamic and laboratory parameters as well as the time from last seizure to tissue sampling and storage time are associated with MRCCE activities in human samples from the Cx, AMYG and HIP. Careful control of these parameters is required to minimize confounding biases in studies using human brain samples collected from elective neurosurgery. PMID:26586405

  19. Profile analysis of hepatic porcine and murine brain tissue slices obtained with a vibratome.

    PubMed

    Mattei, G; Cristiani, I; Magliaro, C; Ahluwalia, A

    2015-01-01

    This study is aimed at characterizing soft tissue slices using a vibratome. In particular, the effect of two sectioning parameters (i.e., step size and sectioning speed) on resultant slice thickness was investigated for fresh porcine liver as well as for paraformaldehyde-fixed (PFA-fixed) and fresh murine brain. A simple framework for embedding, sectioning and imaging the slices was established to derive their thickness, which was evaluated through a purposely developed graphical user interface. Sectioning speed and step size had little effect on the thickness of fresh liver slices. Conversely, the thickness of PFA-fixed murine brain slices was found to be dependent on the step size, but not on the sectioning speed. In view of these results, fresh brain tissue was sliced varying the step size only, which was found to have a significant effect on resultant slice thickness. Although precision-cut slices (i.e., with regular thickness) were obtained for all the tissues, slice accuracy (defined as the match between the nominal step size chosen and the actual slice thickness obtained) was found to increase with tissue stiffness from fresh liver to PFA-fixed brain. This quantitative investigation can be very helpful for establishing the most suitable slicing setup for a given tissue. PMID:25945319

  20. The Neuroprotective Effect of Cornus mas on Brain Tissue of Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Francik, Renata; Kryczyk, Jadwiga; Krośniak, Mirosław; Berköz, Mehmet; Sanocka, Ilona; Francik, Sławomir

    2014-01-01

    Cornelian cherry (Cornus mas) is a valuable source of phenolic antioxidants. Flavonoid derivatives as nonenzymatic antioxidants are important in the pathophysiology of many diseases including neurological disorders (e.g., Alzheimer's disease) or heart disease. In this study, we examined the effect of an addition of freeze-dried fruit of cornelian cherry on three types of diets: control diet, fructose diet, and diet enriched in fats (high-fat diet). This effect was studied by determining the following antioxidant parameters in both brain tissue and plasma in rats: catalase, ferric reducing ability of plasma, paraoxonase, protein carbonyl groups, and free thiol groups. Results indicate that both fructose diet and high-fat diet affect the antioxidant capacity of the organism. Furthermore, an addition of cornelian cherry resulted in increased activity of catalase in brain tissue, while in plasma it caused the opposite effect. In turn, with regard to paraoxonase activity in both brain tissue and plasma, it had a stimulating effect. Adding cornelian cherry to the tested diets increased the activity of PON in both tested tissues. Moreover, protective effect of fruits of this plant was observed in the process of oxidation of proteins by decreasing levels of protein carbonyl groups and thiol groups in brain tissue as well as in plasma. PMID:25401157

  1. Profile analysis of hepatic porcine and murine brain tissue slices obtained with a vibratome

    PubMed Central

    Mattei, G; Cristiani, I; Magliaro, C

    2015-01-01

    This study is aimed at characterizing soft tissue slices using a vibratome. In particular, the effect of two sectioning parameters (i.e., step size and sectioning speed) on resultant slice thickness was investigated for fresh porcine liver as well as for paraformaldehyde-fixed (PFA-fixed) and fresh murine brain. A simple framework for embedding, sectioning and imaging the slices was established to derive their thickness, which was evaluated through a purposely developed graphical user interface. Sectioning speed and step size had little effect on the thickness of fresh liver slices. Conversely, the thickness of PFA-fixed murine brain slices was found to be dependent on the step size, but not on the sectioning speed. In view of these results, fresh brain tissue was sliced varying the step size only, which was found to have a significant effect on resultant slice thickness. Although precision-cut slices (i.e., with regular thickness) were obtained for all the tissues, slice accuracy (defined as the match between the nominal step size chosen and the actual slice thickness obtained) was found to increase with tissue stiffness from fresh liver to PFA-fixed brain. This quantitative investigation can be very helpful for establishing the most suitable slicing setup for a given tissue. PMID:25945319

  2. A new use for long-term frozen brain tissue: Golgi impregnation

    PubMed Central

    Melendez-Ferro, Miguel; Perez-Costas, Emma; Roberts, Rosalinda C.

    2009-01-01

    The study of dendritic spine shape and number has become a standard in the analysis of synaptic transmission anomalies since a considerable number of neuropsychiatric and neurological diseases have their foundation in alterations in these structures. One of the best ways to study possible alterations of dendritic spines is the use of Golgi impregnation. Although usually the Golgi method implies the use of fresh or fixed tissue, here we report the use of Golgi-Cox for the staining of human and animal brain tissue kept frozen for long periods of time. We successfully applied the Golgi-Cox method to human brain tissue stored for up to 15 years in a freezer. The technique produced reliable and reproducible impregnation of dendrites and dendritic spines in different cortical areas. We also applied the same technique to rat brain frozen for up to one year, obtaining the same satisfactory results. The fact that Golgi-Cox can be successfully applied to this type of tissue adds a new value for hundreds of frozen human or animal brains kept in the freezers of the laboratories, that otherwise would not be useful for anything else. Researchers other than neuroanatomists, i.e. in fields such as biochemistry and molecular biology can also benefit from a simple and reliable technique that can be applied to tissue left from their primary experiments. PMID:18789970

  3. Cellular telephones and effects on the brain: the head as an antenna and brain tissue as a radio receiver.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, Z; Richter, E D

    2002-12-01

    Headache and other neuropsychological symptoms occur in users of cellular telephones, and controversy exists concerning risks for brain cancer. We hypothesize these effects result from the head serving as an antenna and brain tissue as a radio receiver. The frequencies for transmission and reception by cellular telephones, about 900 MHz for analog and 1800 MHz for digital transmission, have wavelengths of 33-35 and 16-17 cm, respectively. Human heads are oval in shape with a short axis about 16 to 17 cm in length. Near the ear there will be a cross-section in the head with an axis half the wavelength of RF/MW transmissions of 900 MHz and equal to the wavelength of RF/MW transmissions at 1800 MHz. Therefore, the human head can serve as a lossy resonator for the electromagnetic radiation emitted by the cellular telephone, absorbing much of the energy specifically from these wavelengths. Brain cells and tissues demodulate the cell-phone's audio frequencies from the radio frequency carrier. Low audio frequencies in the ranges of alpha and beta waves affect these waves and thereby influence brain function. These effects state the case for a precautionary policy. PMID:12445512

  4. Non-diffeomorphic registration of brain tumor images by simulating tissue loss and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Zacharaki, Evangelia I; Hogea, Cosmina S; Shen, Dinggang; Biros, George; Davatzikos, Christos

    2009-07-01

    Although a variety of diffeomorphic deformable registration methods exist in the literature, application of these methods in the presence of space-occupying lesions is not straightforward. The motivation of this work is spatial normalization of MR images from patients with brain tumors in a common stereotaxic space, aiming to pool data from different patients into a common space in order to perform group analyses. Additionally, transfer of structural and functional information from neuroanatomical brain atlases into the individual patient's space can be achieved via the inverse mapping, for the purpose of segmenting brains and facilitating surgical or radiotherapy treatment planning. A method that estimates the brain tissue loss and replacement by tumor is applied for achieving equivalent image content between an atlas and a patient's scan, based on a biomechanical model of tumor growth. Automated estimation of the parameters modeling brain tissue loss and displacement is performed via optimization of an objective function reflecting feature-based similarity and elastic stretching energy, which is optimized in parallel via APPSPACK (Asynchronous Parallel Pattern Search). The results of the method, applied to 21 brain tumor patients, indicate that the registration accuracy is relatively high in areas around the tumor, as well as in the healthy portion of the brain. Also, the calculated deformation in the vicinity of the tumor is shown to correlate highly with expert-defined visual scores indicating the tumor mass effect, thereby potentially leading to an objective approach to quantification of mass effect, which is commonly used in diagnosis. PMID:19408350

  5. Brain tissue segmentation in 4D CT using voxel classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Boom, R.; Oei, M. T. H.; Lafebre, S.; Oostveen, L. J.; Meijer, F. J. A.; Steens, S. C. A.; Prokop, M.; van Ginneken, B.; Manniesing, R.

    2012-02-01

    A method is proposed to segment anatomical regions of the brain from 4D computer tomography (CT) patient data. The method consists of a three step voxel classification scheme, each step focusing on structures that are increasingly difficult to segment. The first step classifies air and bone, the second step classifies vessels and the third step classifies white matter, gray matter and cerebrospinal fluid. As features the time averaged intensity value and the temporal intensity change value were used. In each step, a k-Nearest-Neighbor classifier was used to classify the voxels. Training data was obtained by placing regions of interest in reconstructed 3D image data. The method has been applied to ten 4D CT cerebral patient data. A leave-one-out experiment showed consistent and accurate segmentation results.

  6. BDNF Expression in Larval and Adult Zebrafish Brain: Distribution and Cell Identification

    PubMed Central

    Cacialli, Pietro; Gueguen, Marie-Madeleine; Coumailleau, Pascal; D’Angelo, Livia; Kah, Olivier; Lucini, Carla; Pellegrini, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a member of the neurotrophin family, has emerged as an active mediator in many essential functions in the central nervous system of mammals. BDNF plays significant roles in neurogenesis, neuronal maturation and/or synaptic plasticity and is involved in cognitive functions such as learning and memory. Despite the vast literature present in mammals, studies devoted to BDNF in the brain of other animal models are scarse. Zebrafish is a teleost fish widely known for developmental genetic studies and is emerging as model for translational neuroscience research. In addition, its brain shows many sites of adult neurogenesis allowing higher regenerative properties after traumatic injuries. To add further knowledge on neurotrophic factors in vertebrate brain models, we decided to determine the distribution of bdnf mRNAs in the larval and adult zebrafish brain and to characterize the phenotype of cells expressing bdnf mRNAs by means of double staining studies. Our results showed that bdnf mRNAs were widely expressed in the brain of 7 days old larvae and throughout the whole brain of mature female and male zebrafish. In adults, bdnf mRNAs were mainly observed in the dorsal telencephalon, preoptic area, dorsal thalamus, posterior tuberculum, hypothalamus, synencephalon, optic tectum and medulla oblongata. By combining immunohistochemistry with in situ hybridization, we showed that bdnf mRNAs were never expressed by radial glial cells or proliferating cells. By contrast, bdnf transcripts were expressed in cells with neuronal phenotype in all brain regions investigated. Our results provide the first demonstration that the brain of zebrafish expresses bdnf mRNAs in neurons and open new fields of research on the role of the BDNF factor in brain mechanisms in normal and brain repairs situations. PMID:27336917

  7. High-resolution gene expression atlases for adult and developing mouse brain and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Henry, Alex M; Hohmann, John G

    2012-10-01

    Knowledge of the structure, genetics, circuits, and physiological properties of the mammalian brain in both normal and pathological states is ever increasing as research labs worldwide probe the various aspects of brain function. Until recently, however, comprehensive cataloging of gene expression across the central nervous system has been lacking. The Allen Institute for Brain Science, as part of its mission to propel neuroscience research, has completed several large gene-mapping projects in mouse, nonhuman primate, and human brain, producing informative online public resources and tools. Here we present the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas, covering ~20,000 genes throughout the adult mouse brain; the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas, detailing expression of approximately 2,000 important developmental genes across seven embryonic and postnatal stages of brain growth; and the Allen Spinal Cord Atlas, revealing expression for ~20,000 genes in the adult and neonatal mouse spinal cords. Integrated data-mining tools, including reference atlases, informatics analyses, and 3-D viewers, are described. For these massive-scale projects, high-throughput industrial techniques were developed to standardize and reliably repeat experimental goals. To verify consistency and accuracy, a detailed analysis of the 1,000 most viewed genes for the adult mouse brain (according to website page views) was performed by comparing our data with peer-reviewed literature and other databases. We show that our data are highly consistent with independent sources and provide a comprehensive compendium of information and tools used by thousands of researchers each month. All data and tools are freely available via the Allen Brain Atlas portal (www.brain-map.org). PMID:22832508

  8. Effects of tissue fixation on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering images of brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Roberta; Uckermann, Ortrud; Koch, Edmund; Schackert, Gabriele; Kirsch, Matthias; Steiner, Gerald

    2014-07-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is an emerging multiphoton technique for the label-free histopathology of the central nervous system, by imaging the lipid content within the tissue. In order to apply the technique on standard histology sections, it is important to know the effects of tissue fixation on the CARS image. Here, we report the effects of two common fixation methods, namely with formalin and methanol-acetone, on mouse brain and human glioblastoma tissue. The variations induced by fixation on the CARS contrast and intensity were compared and interpreted using Raman microspectroscopy. The results show that, whenever unfixed cryosections cannot be used, fixation with formalin constitutes an alternative which does not deteriorate substantially the contrast generated by the different brain structures in the CARS image. Fixation with methanol-acetone strongly modifies the tissue lipid content and is therefore incompatible with the CARS imaging.

  9. Acute brain slice methods for adult and aging animals: application of targeted patch clampanalysis and optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Daigle, Tanya L.; Chen, Qian; Feng, Guoping

    2014-01-01

    Summary The development of the living acute brain slice preparation for analyzing synaptic function roughly a half century ago was a pivotal achievement that greatly influenced the landscape of modern neuroscience. Indeed, many neuroscientists regard brain slices as the gold-standard model system for detailed cellular, molecular, and circuitry level analysis and perturbation of neuronal function. A critical limitation of this model system is the difficulty in preparing slices from adult and aging animals, and over the past several decades few substantial methodological improvements have emerged to facilitate patch clamp analysis in the mature adult stage. In this chapter we describe a robust and practical protocol for preparing brain slices from mature adult mice that are suitable for patch clamp analysis. This method reduces swelling and damage in superficial layers of the slices and improves the success rate for targeted patch clamp recordings, including recordings from fluorescently labeled populations in slices derived from transgenic mice. This adult brain slice method is suitable for diverse experimental applications, including both monitoring and manipulating neuronal activity with genetically encoded calcium indicators and optogenetic actuators, respectively. We describe the application of this adult brain slice platform and associated methods for screening kinetic properties of Channelrhodopsin (ChR) variants expressed in genetically-defined neuronal subtypes. PMID:25023312

  10. Clonal development and organization of the adult Drosophila central brain

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hung-Hsiang; Awasaki, Takeshi; Schroeder, Mark David; Long, Fuhui; Yang, Jacob S.; He, Yisheng; Ding, Peng; Kao, Jui-Chun; Wu, Gloria Yueh-Yi; Peng, Hanchuan; Myers, Gene; Lee, Tzumin

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background The insect brain can be divided into neuropils that are formed by neurites of both local and remote origin. The complexity of the interconnections obscures how these neuropils are established and interconnected through development. The Drosophila central brain develops from a fixed number of neuroblasts (NBs) that deposit neurons in regional clusters. Results By determining individual NB clones and pursuing their projections into specific neuropils we unravel the regional development of the brain neural network. Exhaustive clonal analysis revealed 95 stereotyped neuronal lineages with characteristic cell body locations and neurite trajectories. Most clones show complex projection patterns, but despite the complexity, neighboring clones often co-innervate the same local neuropil(s) and further target a restricted set of distant neuropils. Conclusions These observations argue for regional clonal development of both neuropils and neuropil connectivity throughout the Drosophila central brain. PMID:23541733

  11. Brain Gray Matter Changes Associated with Mindfulness Meditation in Older Adults: An Exploratory Pilot Study using Voxel-based Morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Kurth, Florian; Luders, Eileen; Wu, Brian; Black, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) have previously been associated with structural gray matter changes in normal healthy adults. However, it remains unknown if standardized MBIs can induce similar changes in older adults and those with health complaints as well. The objective of this investigation was to examine the effect of a standardized MBI on the gray matter tissue of older adults with sleep disturbances. Methods This exploratory single-group pilot longitudinal study examined local gray matter changes over a six-week MBI period. Participants included six older adult community volunteers (M=66.5 years of age, SD=5.5, range=58–75; 66% female) with sleep disturbances recruited through advertisement in local newspapers/flyers posted at a university medical center and affiliated clinics in Los Angeles, CA. The MBI was delivered as a weekly, two-hour, six-session, group-based course in mindfulness meditation. Gray matter was measured voxel-wise pre- and post-intervention. Results A significant gray matter increase was identified within the precuneus, possibly implicating meditation-induced changes of the default mode network. In contrast, observed significant gray matter decreases may have been driven by MBI-related remediation of brain architecture subserving sleep complaints. Conclusions Exploratory findings suggest that mindfulness meditation practice is associated with a detectable alteration of cerebral gray matter in older adults. PMID:25632405

  12. Does acute caffeine ingestion alter brain metabolism in young adults?

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Liu, Peiying; Pekar, James J; Lu, Hanzhang

    2015-04-15

    Caffeine, as the most commonly used stimulant drug, improves vigilance and, in some cases, cognition. However, the exact effect of caffeine on brain activity has not been fully elucidated. Because caffeine has a pronounced vascular effect which is independent of any neural effects, many hemodynamics-based methods such as fMRI cannot be readily applied without a proper calibration. The scope of the present work is two-fold. In Study 1, we used a recently developed MRI technique to examine the time-dependent changes in whole-brain cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) following the ingestion of 200mg caffeine. It was found that, despite a pronounced decrease in CBF (p<0.001), global CMRO2 did not change significantly. Instead, the oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) was significantly elevated (p=0.002) to fully compensate for the reduced blood supply. Using the whole-brain finding as a reference, we aim to investigate whether there are any regional differences in the brain's response to caffeine. Therefore, in Study 2, we examined regional heterogeneities in CBF changes following the same amount of caffeine ingestion. We found that posterior brain regions such as posterior cingulate cortex and superior temporal regions manifested a slower CBF reduction, whereas anterior brain regions including dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and medial frontal cortex showed a faster rate of decline. These findings have a few possible explanations. One is that caffeine may result in a region-dependent increase or decrease in brain activity, resulting in an unaltered average brain metabolic rate. The other is that caffeine's effect on vasculature may be region-specific. Plausibility of these explanations is discussed in the context of spatial distribution of the adenosine receptors. PMID:25644657

  13. Macroautophagic process was differentially modulated by long-term moderate exercise in rat brain and peripheral tissues.

    PubMed

    Bayod, S; Del Valle, J; Pelegri, C; Vilaplana, J; Canudas, A M; Camins, A; Jimenez, A; Sanchez-Roige, S; Lalanza, J F; Escorihuela, R M; Pallas, M

    2014-04-01

    The autophagic process is a lysosomal degradation pathway, which is activated during stress conditions, such as starvation or exercise. Regular exercise has beneficial effects on human health, including neuroprotection. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying these effects are incompletely understood. Endurance and a single bout of exercise induce autophagy not only in brain but also in peripheral tissues. However, little is known whether autophagy could be modulated in brain and peripheral tissues by long-term moderate exercise. Here, we examined the effects on macroautophagy process of long-term moderate treadmill training (36 weeks) in adult rats both in brain (hippocampus and cerebral cortex) and peripheral tissues (skeletal muscle, liver and heart). We assessed mTOR activation and the autophagic proteins Beclin 1, p62, LC3B (LC3B-II/LC3B-I ratio) and the lysosomal protein LAMP1, as well as the ubiquitinated proteins. Our results showed in the cortex of exercised rats an inactivation of mTOR, greater autophagy flux (increased LC3-II/LC3-I ratio and reduced p62) besides increased LAMP1. Related with these effects a reduction in the ubiquitinated proteins was observed. No significant changes in the autophagic pathway were found either in hippocampus or in skeletal and cardiac muscle by exercise. Only in the liver of exercised rats mTOR phosphorylation and p62 levels increased, which could be related with beneficial metabolic effects in this organ induced by exercise. Thus, our findings suggest that long-term moderate exercise induces autophagy specifically in the cortex. PMID:24781732

  14. Magnetic Resonance Microscopy at 14 Tesla and Correlative Histopathology of Human Brain Tumor Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Segura, Ana; Morales, Jose Manuel; Gonzalez-Darder, Jose Manuel; Cardona-Marsal, Ramon; Lopez-Gines, Concepcion; Cerda-Nicolas, Miguel; Monleon, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Microscopy (MRM) can provide high microstructural detail in excised human lesions. Previous MRM images on some experimental models and a few human samples suggest the large potential of the technique. The aim of this study was the characterization of specific morphological features of human brain tumor samples by MRM and correlative histopathology. We performed MRM imaging and correlative histopathology in 19 meningioma and 11 glioma human brain tumor samples obtained at surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first MRM direct structural characterization of human brain tumor samples. MRM of brain tumor tissue provided images with 35 to 40 µm spatial resolution. The use of MRM to study human brain tumor samples provides new microstructural information on brain tumors for better classification and characterization. The correlation between MRM and histopathology images allowed the determination of image parameters for critical microstructures of the tumor, like collagen patterns, necrotic foci, calcifications and/or psammoma bodies, vascular distribution and hemorrhage among others. Therefore, MRM may help in interpreting the Clinical Magnetic Resonance images in terms of cell biology processes and tissue patterns. Finally, and most importantly for clinical diagnosis purposes, it provides three-dimensional information in intact samples which may help in selecting a preferential orientation for the histopathology slicing which contains most of the informative elements of the biopsy. Overall, the findings reported here provide a new and unique microstructural view of intact human brain tumor tissue. At this point, our approach and results allow the identification of specific tissue types and pathological features in unprocessed tumor samples. PMID:22110653

  15. Proteomics analyses for the global proteins in the brain tissues of different human prion diseases.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qi; Chen, Li-Na; Zhang, Bao-Yun; Xiao, Kang; Zhou, Wei; Chen, Cao; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Tian, Chan; Gao, Chen; Wang, Jing; Han, Jun; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2015-04-01

    Proteomics changes of brain tissues have been described in different neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. However, the brain proteomics of human prion disease remains less understood. In the study, the proteomics patterns of cortex and cerebellum of brain tissues of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, fatal familial insomnia, and G114V genetic CJD were analyzed with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation combined with multidimensional liquid chromatography and MS analysis, with the brains from three normal individuals as controls. Global protein profiling, significant pathway, and functional categories were analyzed. In total, 2287 proteins were identified with quantitative information both in cortex and cerebellum regions. Cerebellum tissues appeared to contain more up- and down-regulated proteins (727 proteins) than cortex regions (312 proteins) of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, fatal familial insomnia, and G114V genetic CJD. Viral myocarditis, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, lysosome, oxidative phosphorylation, protein export, and drug metabolism-cytochrome P450 were the most commonly affected pathways of the three kinds of diseases. Almost coincident biological functions were identified in the brain tissues of the three diseases. In all, data here demonstrate that the brain tissues of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, fatal familial insomnia, and G114V genetic CJD have obvious proteomics changes at their terminal stages, which show the similarities not only among human prion diseases but also with other neurodegeneration diseases. This is the first study to provide a reference proteome map for human prion diseases and will be helpful for future studies focused on potential biomarkers for the diagnosis and therapy of human prion diseases. PMID:25616867

  16. Morphological brain network assessed using graph theory and network filtration in deaf adults.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunkyung; Kang, Hyejin; Lee, Hyekyoung; Lee, Hyo-Jeong; Suh, Myung-Whan; Song, Jae-Jin; Oh, Seung-Ha; Lee, Dong Soo

    2014-09-01

    Prolonged deprivation of auditory input can change brain networks in pre- and postlingual deaf adults by brain-wide reorganization. To investigate morphological changes in these brains voxel-based morphometry, voxel-wise correlation with the primary auditory cortex, and whole brain network analyses using morphological covariance were performed in eight prelingual deaf, eleven postlingual deaf, and eleven hearing adults. Network characteristics based on graph theory and network filtration based on persistent homology were examined. Gray matter density in the primary auditor cortex was preserved in prelingual deafness, while it tended to decrease in postlingual deafness. Unlike postlingual, prelingual deafness showed increased bilateral temporal connectivity of the primary auditory cortex compared to the hearing adults. Of the graph theory-based characteristics, clustering coefficient, betweenness centrality, and nodal efficiency all increased in prelingual deafness, while all the parameters of postlingual deafness were similar to the hearing adults. Patterns of connected components changing during network filtration were different between prelingual deafness and hearing adults according to the barcode, dendrogram, and single linkage matrix representations, while these were the same in postlingual deafness. Nodes in fronto-limbic and left temporal components were closely coupled, and nodes in the temporo-parietal component were loosely coupled, in prelingual deafness. Patterns of connected components changing in postlingual deafness were the same as hearing adults. We propose that the preserved density of auditory cortex associated with increased connectivity in prelingual deafness, and closer coupling between certain brain areas, represent distinctive reorganization of auditory and related cortices compared with hearing or postlingual deaf adults. The differential network reorganization in the prelingual deaf adults could be related to the absence of auditory speech

  17. Bimodal Spectroscopy of Formalin Fixed Samples to Discriminate Dysplastic and Tumor Brain Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, S.; Cicchi, R.; Giordano, F.; Buccoliero, A. M.; Guerrini, R.; Pavone, F. S.

    2014-12-01

    Biomedical spectroscopy has gained attention in the past few years for disease diagnosis. Fluorescence and Raman spectroscopies provide finger-print information related to biochemical and morphological alterations when tissues progress from the normal to a malignant stage. Usually, freshly excised tissue specimens are preferred for bio-spectroscopic studies. However, ethical issues, sample availability and distance between the surgery room and the laboratory provide an impelling restriction for in-vitro spectroscopic studies using freshly excised samples. After surgical resection tissues are fixed in 4% formalin for histological studies under a light microscope. The process of fixation prevents degradation of tissues. In this study, we probe the use of formalin fixed sample for differentiating normal and dysplastic brain tissues using fluorescence and Raman spectroscopies. It was found that fluorescence spectral profile changes in the wavelength range from 550-750 nm between dysplastic and tumor samples. Also, significant differences were found in the Raman spectral profiles of such samples. The results indicate a potential diagnostic application of spectroscopy in formalin fixed brain samples for differentiating dysplastic and tumor brain tissues.

  18. Optical properties of mouse brain tissue after optical clearing with FocusClear™

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moy, Austin J.; Capulong, Bernard V.; Saager, Rolf B.; Wiersma, Matthew P.; Lo, Patrick C.; Durkin, Anthony J.; Choi, Bernard

    2015-09-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is commonly used to investigate disease progression in biological tissues. Biological tissues, however, are strongly scattering in the visible wavelengths, limiting the application of fluorescence microscopy to superficial (<200 μm) regions. Optical clearing, which involves incubation of the tissue in a chemical bath, reduces the optical scattering in tissue, resulting in increased tissue transparency and optical imaging depth. The goal of this study was to determine the time- and wavelength-resolved dynamics of the optical scattering properties of rodent brain after optical clearing with FocusClear™. Light transmittance and reflectance of 1-mm mouse brain sections were measured using an integrating sphere before and after optical clearing and the inverse adding doubling algorithm used to determine tissue optical scattering. The degree of optical clearing was quantified by calculating the optical clearing potential (OCP), and the effects of differing OCP were demonstrated using the optical histology method, which combines tissue optical clearing with optical imaging to visualize the microvasculature. We observed increased tissue transparency with longer optical clearing time and an analogous increase in OCP. Furthermore, OCP did not vary substantially between 400 and 1000 nm for increasing optical clearing durations, suggesting that optical histology can improve ex vivo visualization of several fluorescent probes.

  19. Event-related brain potentials - Comparison between children and adults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Courchesne, E.

    1977-01-01

    The reported investigation shows that nontarget stimuli which are infrequently presented and deviate from the background elicit Nc and Pc waves in children. The same stimuli elicit P3 waves in adults. The scalp distribution of P3 waves in adults appears to vary with the ease of stimulus recognition or the degree of stimulus novelty. However, the Nc and Pc distributions in children do not seem to vary with these factors. The differences between children and adults in event-related potentials suggest corresponding differences in the mode of processing employed by each when rare, deviant stimuli are encountered

  20. Does acute caffeine ingestion alter brain metabolism in young adults?

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Liu, Peiying; Pekar, James J.; Lu, Hanzhang

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine, as the most commonly used stimulant drug, improves vigilance and, in some cases, cognition. However, the exact effect of caffeine on brain activity has not been fully elucidated. Because caffeine has a pronounced vascular effect which is independent of any neural effects, many hemodynamics-based methods such as fMRI cannot be readily applied without a proper calibration. The scope of the present work is two-fold. In Study 1, we used a recently developed MRI technique to examine the time-dependent changes in whole-brain cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) following the ingestion of 200mg caffeine. It was found that, despite a pronounced decrease in CBF (p<0.001), global CMRO2 did not change significantly. Instead, the oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) was significantly elevated (p=0.002) to fully compensate for the reduced blood supply. Using the whole-brain finding as a reference, we aim to investigate whether there are any regional differences in the brain’s response to caffeine. Therefore, in Study 2, we examined regional heterogeneities in CBF changes following the same amount of caffeine ingestion. We found that posterior brain regions such as posterior cingulate cortex and superior temporal regions manifested a slower CBF reduction, whereas anterior brain regions including dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and medial frontal cortex showed a faster rate of decline. These findings have a few possible explanations. One is that caffeine may result in a region-dependent increase or decrease in brain activity, resulting in an unaltered average brain metabolic rate. The other is that caffeine’s effect on vasculature may be region-specific. Plausibility of these explanations is discussed in the context of spatial distribution of the adenosine receptors. PMID:25644657

  1. Mercury speciation in brain tissue of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from the Canadian Arctic.

    PubMed

    Krey, Anke; Kwan, Michael; Chan, Hing Man

    2012-04-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a neurotoxicant that has been found at elevated concentrations in the Arctic ecosystem. Little is known about its internal dose in wildlife such as polar bears. We measured concentrations of mercury (Hg) in three different brain regions (cerebellum, frontal lobe and brain stem) of 24 polar bears collected from the Nunavik, Canada between 2000 and 2003. Speciation of Hg was measured by High Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled to Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (HPLC-ICP-MS). Concentrations of mean total Hg in brain tissue were up to 625 times lower (0.28 ± 0.07 mg kg(-1) dry weight (dw) in frontal lobe, 0.23 ± 0.07 mg kg(-1) dw in cerebellum and 0.12 ± 0.0 3mg kg(-1) dw in brain stem) than the mean total Hg concentration previously reported in polar bear liver collected from Eastern Baffin Island. Methylmercury (MeHg) accounted for 100% of the Hg found in all three brain regions analyzed. These results suggest that polar bear might reduce the toxic effects of Hg by limiting the uptake into the brain and/or decrease the rate of demethylation so that Hg can be excreted from the brain more easily. The toxicokinetics and the blood-brain-barrier mechanisms of polar bears are still unknown and further research is required. PMID:22406289

  2. Diazepam binding inhibitor gene expression: Location in brain and peripheral tissues of rate

    SciTech Connect

    Alho, H.; Fremeau, R.T. Jr.; Tiedge, H.; Wilcox, J.; Bovolin, P.; Brosius, J.; Roberts, J.L.; Costa, E.

    1988-09-01

    Diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI), an endogenous 10-kDa polypeptide was isolated from rat and human brain by monitoring displacement of radioactive diazepam bound to specific recognition sites in brain synaptic and mitochondrial membranes. The cellular location of DBI mRNA was studied in rat brain and selected peripheral tissues by in situ hybridization histochemistry with a /sup 35/S-labeled single-stranded complementary RNA probe. DBI mRNA was heterogeneously distributed in rat brain, with particularly high levels in the area postrema, the cerebellar cortex, and ependyma of the third ventricle. Intermediate levels were found in the olfactory bulb, pontine nuclei, inferior colliculi, arcuate nucleus, and pineal gland. Relatively low but significant levels of silver grains were observed overlying many mesencephalic and telencephalic areas that have previously been shown to contain numerous DBI-immunoreactive neurons and a high density of central benzodiazepine receptors. In situ hybridizations also revealed high levels of DBI mRNA in the posterior lobe of the pituitary gland, liver, and germinal center of the white pulp of spleen, all tissues that are rich in peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites. The tissue-specific pattern of DBI gene expression described here could be exploited to further understand the physiological function of DBI in the brain and periphery.

  3. Elderly depression diagnostic of diabetic patients by brain tissue pulsatility imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachemi, Mélouka Elkateb; Remeniéras, Jean-pierre; Desmidt, Thomas; Camus, Vincent; Tranquart, François

    2010-01-01

    Pulsatile motion of brain parenchyma results from cardiac and breathing cycles and consists in a rapid displacement in systole, with slow diastolic recovery. Based on the vascular depression concept and recent studies where a correlation was found between cerebral haemodynamics and depression in the elderly, we emitted the hypothesis that tissue brain motion due to perfusion is correlated to elderly depression associated with cardiovascular risk factors. Tissue Pulsatlity Imaging (TPI) is a new ultrasound technique developed firstly at the University of Washington to assess the brain tissue motion. We used TPI technique to measure the brain displacement of two groups of elderly patients with diabetes as a vascular risk factor. The first group is composed of 11 depressed diabetic patients. The second group is composed of 12 diabetic patients without depressive symptoms. Transcranial acquisitions were performed with a 1.8 MHz ultrasound phased array probe through the right temporal bone window. The acquisition of six cardiac cycles was realized on each patient with a frame rate of 23 frames/s. Displacements estimation was performed by off-line analysis. A significant decrease in brain pulsatility was observed in the group of depressed patients compared to the group of non depressed patients. Mean displacement magnitude was about 44±7 μm in the first group and 68±13 μm in the second group.

  4. Development of a conceptual model to predict physical activity participation in adults with brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Driver, Simon

    2008-10-01

    The purpose was to examine psychosocial factors that influence the physical activity behaviors of adults with brain injuries. Two differing models, based on Harter's model of self-worth, were proposed to examine the relationship between perceived competence, social support, physical self-worth, affect, and motivation. Adults numbering 384 with brain injuries completed a series of questionnaires measuring each psychosocial variable. The structural analysis indicated a nonsignificant chi squared value and good fit indices for model two which included affect as the mediating variable. Findings indicate that affect is critical in shaping the physical activity cognitions and behaviors of adults with brain injuries. Suggestions are made on practical ways to enhance affect and subsequently physical activity participation. PMID:18955746

  5. Autonomous control for mechanically stable navigation of microscale implants in brain tissue to record neural activity.

    PubMed

    Anand, Sindhu; Kumar, Swathy Sampath; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2016-08-01

    Emerging neural prosthetics require precise positional tuning and stable interfaces with single neurons for optimal function over a lifetime. In this study, we report an autonomous control to precisely navigate microscale electrodes in soft, viscoelastic brain tissue without visual feedback. The autonomous control optimizes signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of single neuronal recordings in viscoelastic brain tissue while maintaining quasi-static mechanical stress conditions to improve stability of the implant-tissue interface. Force-displacement curves from microelectrodes in in vivo rodent experiments are used to estimate viscoelastic parameters of the brain. Using a combination of computational models and experiments, we determined an optimal movement for the microelectrodes with bidirectional displacements of 3:2 ratio between forward and backward displacements and a inter-movement interval of 40 s for minimizing mechanical stress in the surrounding brain tissue. A regulator with the above optimal bidirectional motion for the microelectrodes in in vivo experiments resulted in significant reduction in the number of microelectrode movements (0.23 movements/min) and longer periods of stable SNR (53 % of the time) compared to a regulator using a conventional linear, unidirectional microelectrode movement (with 1.48 movements/min and stable SNR 23 % of the time). PMID:27457752

  6. CALCIUM ION EFFLUX INDUCTION IN BRAIN TISSUE BY RADIO-FREQUENCY RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the most interesting and controversial papers on the biological effects of nonionizing radiation was published by Bawin, Kaczmarek and Adey in 1975. They found a 147 MHz carrier wave could elicit and enhance efflux of calcium ions from chick brain tissue only when amplitud...

  7. Brain tissue deforms similarly to filled elastomers and follows consolidation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franceschini, G.; Bigoni, D.; Regitnig, P.; Holzapfel, G. A.

    2006-12-01

    Slow, large deformations of human brain tissue—accompanying cranial vault deformation induced by positional plagiocephaly, occurring during hydrocephalus, and in the convolutional development—has surprisingly received scarce mechanical investigation. Since the effects of these deformations may be important, we performed a systematic series of in vitro experiments on human brain tissue, revealing the following features. (i) Under uniaxial (quasi-static), cyclic loading, brain tissue exhibits a peculiar nonlinear mechanical behaviour, exhibiting hysteresis, Mullins effect and residual strain, qualitatively similar to that observed in filled elastomers. As a consequence, the loading and unloading uniaxial curves have been found to follow the Ogden nonlinear elastic theory of rubber (and its variants to include Mullins effect and permanent strain). (ii) Loaded up to failure, the "shape" of the stress/strain curve qualitatively changes, evidencing softening related to local failure. (iii) Uniaxial (quasi-static) strain experiments under controlled drainage conditions provide the first direct evidence that the tissue obeys consolidation theory involving fluid migration, with properties similar to fine soils, but having much smaller volumetric compressibility. (iv) Our experimental findings also support the existence of a viscous component of the solid phase deformation. Brain tissue should, therefore, be modelled as a porous, fluid-saturated, nonlinear solid with very small volumetric (drained) compressibility.

  8. OFF-CENTER SPHERICAL MODEL FOR DOSIMETRY CALCULATIONS IN CHICK BRAIN TISSUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents calculations for the electric field and absorbed power density distribution in chick brain tissue inside a test tube, using an off-center spherical model. It is shown that the off-center spherical model overcomes many of the limitations of the concentric spheri...

  9. Changes in Rat Brain Tissue Microstructure and Stiffness during the Development of Experimental Obstructive Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Jugé, Lauriane; Pong, Alice C; Bongers, Andre; Sinkus, Ralph; Bilston, Lynne E; Cheng, Shaokoon

    2016-01-01

    Understanding neural injury in hydrocephalus and how the brain changes during the course of the disease in-vivo remain unclear. This study describes brain deformation, microstructural and mechanical properties changes during obstructive hydrocephalus development in a rat model using multimodal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Hydrocephalus was induced in eight Sprague-Dawley rats (4 weeks old) by injecting a kaolin suspension into the cisterna magna. Six sham-injected rats were used as controls. MR imaging (9.4T, Bruker) was performed 1 day before, and at 3, 7 and 16 days post injection. T2-weighted MR images were collected to quantify brain deformation. MR elastography was used to measure brain stiffness, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was conducted to observe brain tissue microstructure. Results showed that the enlargement of the ventricular system was associated with a decrease in the cortical gray matter thickness and caudate-putamen cross-sectional area (P < 0.001, for both), an alteration of the corpus callosum and periventricular white matter microstructure (CC+PVWM) and rearrangement of the cortical gray matter microstructure (P < 0.001, for both), while compression without gross microstructural alteration was evident in the caudate-putamen and ventral internal capsule (P < 0.001, for both). During hydrocephalus development, increased space between the white matter tracts was observed in the CC+PVWM (P < 0.001), while a decrease in space was observed for the ventral internal capsule (P < 0.001). For the cortical gray matter, an increase in extracellular tissue water was significantly associated with a decrease in tissue stiffness (P = 0.001). To conclude, this study characterizes the temporal changes in tissue microstructure, water content and stiffness in different brain regions and their association with ventricular enlargement. In summary, whilst diffusion changes were larger and statistically significant for majority of the brain regions studied

  10. Changes in Rat Brain Tissue Microstructure and Stiffness during the Development of Experimental Obstructive Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Jugé, Lauriane; Pong, Alice C.; Bongers, Andre; Sinkus, Ralph; Bilston, Lynne E.; Cheng, Shaokoon

    2016-01-01

    Understanding neural injury in hydrocephalus and how the brain changes during the course of the disease in-vivo remain unclear. This study describes brain deformation, microstructural and mechanical properties changes during obstructive hydrocephalus development in a rat model using multimodal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Hydrocephalus was induced in eight Sprague-Dawley rats (4 weeks old) by injecting a kaolin suspension into the cisterna magna. Six sham-injected rats were used as controls. MR imaging (9.4T, Bruker) was performed 1 day before, and at 3, 7 and 16 days post injection. T2-weighted MR images were collected to quantify brain deformation. MR elastography was used to measure brain stiffness, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was conducted to observe brain tissue microstructure. Results showed that the enlargement of the ventricular system was associated with a decrease in the cortical gray matter thickness and caudate-putamen cross-sectional area (P < 0.001, for both), an alteration of the corpus callosum and periventricular white matter microstructure (CC+PVWM) and rearrangement of the cortical gray matter microstructure (P < 0.001, for both), while compression without gross microstructural alteration was evident in the caudate-putamen and ventral internal capsule (P < 0.001, for both). During hydrocephalus development, increased space between the white matter tracts was observed in the CC+PVWM (P < 0.001), while a decrease in space was observed for the ventral internal capsule (P < 0.001). For the cortical gray matter, an increase in extracellular tissue water was significantly associated with a decrease in tissue stiffness (P = 0.001). To conclude, this study characterizes the temporal changes in tissue microstructure, water content and stiffness in different brain regions and their association with ventricular enlargement. In summary, whilst diffusion changes were larger and statistically significant for majority of the brain regions studied

  11. PIXE analysis of low concentration aluminum in brain tissues of an Alzheimer's disease patient

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, R.; Takeuchi, T.; Hanaichi, T.; Ektessabi, A. M.

    1999-06-10

    An excess accumulation and presence of metal ions may significantly alter a brain cell's normal functions. There have been increasing efforts in recent years to measure and quantify the density and distribution of excessive accumulations of constituent elements (such as Fe, Zn, Cu, and Ca) in the brain, as well as the presence and distribution of contaminating elements (such as Al). This is particularly important in cases of neuropathological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and ALS. The aim of this paper was to measure the Al present in the temporal cortex of the brain of an Alzheimer's disease patient. The specimens were taken from an unfixed autopsy brain which has been preserved for a period of 4 years in the deep freezer at -80 degree sign C. Proton Induced X-ray Emission Spectroscopy was used for the measurement of Al concentration in this brain tissue. A tandem accelerator with 2 MeV of energy was also used. In order to increase the sensitivity of the signals in the low energy region of the spectra, the absorbers were removed. The results show that the peak height depends on the measurement site. However, in certain cases an extremely high concentration of Al was observed in the PIXE spectra, with an intensity higher than those in the other major elements of the brain's matrix element. Samples from tissues affected by the same disease were analyzed using the EDX analyzer. The results are quantitatively in very good agreement with those of the PIXE analysis.

  12. Computational Assessment of Neural Probe and Brain Tissue Interface under Transient Motion.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Michael; Bawab, Sebastian; Yoon, Hargsoon

    2016-01-01

    The functional longevity of a neural probe is dependent upon its ability to minimize injury risk during the insertion and recording period in vivo, which could be related to motion-related strain between the probe and surrounding tissue. A series of finite element analyses was conducted to study the extent of the strain induced within the brain in an area around a neural probe. This study focuses on the transient behavior of neural probe and brain tissue interface with a viscoelastic model. Different stages of the interface from initial insertion of neural probe to full bonding of the probe by astro-glial sheath formation are simulated utilizing analytical tools to investigate the effects of relative motion between the neural probe and the brain while friction coefficients and kinematic frequencies are varied. The analyses can provide an in-depth look at the quantitative benefits behind using soft materials for neural probes. PMID:27322338

  13. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency alters levels of glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid in brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Jadavji, N.M.; Wieske, F.; Dirnagl, U.; Winter, C.

    2015-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is an enzyme key regulator in folate metabolism. Deficiencies in MTHFR result in increased levels of homocysteine, which leads to reduced levels of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). In the brain, SAM donates methyl groups to catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), which is involved in neurotransmitter analysis. Using the MTHFR-deficient mouse model the purpose of this study was to investigate levels of monoamine neurotransmitters and amino acid levels in brain tissue. MTHFR deficiency affected levels of both glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid in within the cerebellum and hippocampus. Mthfr−/− mice had reduced levels of glutamate in the amygdala and γ-aminobutyric acid in the thalamus. The excitatory mechanisms of homocysteine through activation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor in brain tissue might alter levels of glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid. PMID:26937386

  14. Computational Assessment of Neural Probe and Brain Tissue Interface under Transient Motion

    PubMed Central

    Polanco, Michael; Bawab, Sebastian; Yoon, Hargsoon

    2016-01-01

    The functional longevity of a neural probe is dependent upon its ability to minimize injury risk during the insertion and recording period in vivo, which could be related to motion-related strain between the probe and surrounding tissue. A series of finite element analyses was conducted to study the extent of the strain induced within the brain in an area around a neural probe. This study focuses on the transient behavior of neural probe and brain tissue interface with a viscoelastic model. Different stages of the interface from initial insertion of neural probe to full bonding of the probe by astro-glial sheath formation are simulated utilizing analytical tools to investigate the effects of relative motion between the neural probe and the brain while friction coefficients and kinematic frequencies are varied. The analyses can provide an in-depth look at the quantitative benefits behind using soft materials for neural probes. PMID:27322338

  15. Joining microelectronics and microionics: Nerve cells and brain tissue on semiconductor chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromherz, Peter

    2008-09-01

    The direct electrical interfacing of semiconductor chips with individual nerve cells and with brain tissue is considered. At first, the structure of the cell-chip contact is described and then the electrical coupling is characterized between ion channels, the electrical elements of nerve cells, and transistors and capacitors of silicon chips. On that basis, the signal transmission between microelectronics and microionics is implemented in both directions. Simple hybrid systems are assembled with neuron pairs and with small neuronal networks. Finally, the interfacing with capacitors and transistors is extended to brain tissue on silicon. The application of CMOS chips with capacitively coupled recording sites allows an imaging of neuronal activity with high spatiotemporal resolution. Goal of the work is an integration of neuronal network dynamics and digital electronics on a microscopic level for applications in brain research, medical prosthetics and information technology.

  16. Ephrin/Eph receptor expression in brain of adult nonhuman primates: implications for neuroadaptation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Danqing; Miller, Gregory M; Jassen, Amy; Westmoreland, Susan V; Pauley, Douglas; Madras, Bertha K

    2006-01-01

    In developing brain, Eph receptors and their ephrin ligands (Ephs/ephrins) are implicated in facilitating topographic guidance of a number of pathways, including the nigrostriatal and mesolimbic dopamine (DA) pathways. In adult rodent brain, these molecules are implicated in neuronal plasticity associated with learning and memory. Cocaine significantly alters the expression of select members of this family of axonal guidance molecules, implicating Ephs, ephrins in drug-induced neuroadaptation. The potential contribution of Ephs, ephrins to cocaine-induced reorganization of striatal circuitry brain in primates [Saka, E., Goodrich, C., Harlan, P., Madras, B.K., Graybiel, A.M., 2004. Repetitive behaviors in monkeys are linked to specific striatal activation patterns. J. Neurosci. 24, 7557-7565] is unknown because there are no documented reports of Eph/ephrin expression or function in adult primate brain. We now report that brains of adult old and new world monkeys express mRNA encoding EphA4 receptor and ephrin-B2 ligand, implicated in topographic guidance of dopamine and striatal neurons during development. Their encoded proteins distributed highly selectively in regions of adult monkey brain. EphA4 mRNA levels were prominent in the DA-rich caudate/putamen, nucleus accumbens and globus pallidus, as well as the medial and orbitofrontal cortices, hippocampus, amygdala, thalamus and cerebellum. Immunocytochemical localization of EphA4 protein revealed discrete expression in caudate/putamen, globus pallidus, substantia nigra, cerebellar Purkinje cells, pyramidal cells of frontal cortices (layers II, III and V) and the subgranular zone of the hippocampus. Evidence for EphA4 expression in dopamine neurons emerged from colocalization with tyrosine-hydroxylase-positive terminals in striatum and substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area cell bodies. The association of axonal guidance molecules with drug-induced reorganization of adult primate brain circuitry warrants

  17. Limited predictability of postmortem human brain tissue quality by RNA integrity numbers.

    PubMed

    Sonntag, Kai-C; Tejada, George; Subburaju, Sivan; Berretta, Sabina; Benes, Francine M; Woo, Tsung-Ung W

    2016-07-01

    The RNA integrity number (RIN) is often considered to be a critical measure of the quality of postmortem human brains. However, it has been suggested that RINs do not necessarily reflect the availability of intact mRNA. Using the Agilent bioanalyzer and qRT-PCR, we explored whether RINs provide a meaningful way of assessing mRNA degradation and integrity in human brain samples by evaluating the expression of 3'-5' mRNA sequences of the cytochrome C-1 (CYC1) gene. Analysis of electropherograms showed that RINs were not consistently correlated with RNA or cDNA profiles and appeared to be poor predictors of overall cDNA quality. Cycle thresholds from qRT-PCR analysis to quantify the amount of CYC1 mRNA revealed positive correlations of RINs with amplification of full-length transcripts, despite the variable degree of linear degradation along the 3'-5' sequence. These data demonstrate that in postmortem human brain tissue the RIN is an indicator of mRNA quantity independent of degradation, but does not predict mRNA integrity, suggesting that RINs provide an incomplete measure of brain tissue quality. Quality assessment of postmortem human brains by RNA integrity numbers (RINs) may be misleading, as they do not measure intact mRNAs. We show that the RIN is an indicator of mRNA quantity independent of degradation, but does not predict mRNA integrity, suggesting that RINs provide an incomplete measure of brain tissue quality. Our results resolve controversial assumption on interpreting quality assessments of human postmortem brains by RINs. PMID:27062510

  18. Effects of tissue preservation temperature on high strain-rate material properties of brain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiangyue; Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A; Guan, Yabo; Shender, Barry; Paskoff, Glenn; Laud, Purushottam

    2011-02-01

    Postmortem preservation conditions may be one of factors contributing to wide material property variations in brain tissues in literature. The objective of present study was to determine the effects of preservation temperatures on high strain-rate material properties of brain tissues using the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB). Porcine brains were harvested immediately after sacrifice, sliced into 2 mm thickness, preserved in ice cold (group A, 10 samples) and 37°C (group B, 9 samples) saline solution and warmed to 37°C just prior to the test. A SHPB with tube aluminum transmission bar and semi-conductor strain gauges were used to enhance transmitted wave signals. Data were gathered using a digital acquisition system and processed to obtain stress-strain curves. All tests were conducted within 4 h postmortem. The mean strain-rate was 2487±72 s(-1). A repeated measures model with specimen-level random effects was used to analyze log transformed stress-strain responses through the entire loading range. The mean stress-strain curves with ±95% confidence bands demonstrated typical power relationships with the power value of 2.4519 (standard error, 0.0436) for group A and 2.2657 (standard error, 0.0443) for group B, indicating that responses for the two groups are significantly different. Stresses and tangent moduli rose with increasing strain levels in both groups. These findings indicate that storage temperatures affected brain tissue material properties and preserving tissues at 37°C produced a stiffer response at high strain-rates. Therefore, it is necessary to incorporate material properties obtained from appropriately preserved tissues to accurately predict the responses of brain using stress analyses models, such as finite element simulations. PMID:21055756

  19. Fitted hyperelastic parameters for Human brain tissue from reported tension, compression, and shear tests.

    PubMed

    Moran, Richard; Smith, Joshua H; García, José J

    2014-11-28

    The mechanical properties of human brain tissue are the subject of interest because of their use in understanding brain trauma and in developing therapeutic treatments and procedures. To represent the behavior of the tissue, we have developed hyperelastic mechanical models whose parameters are fitted in accordance with experimental test results. However, most studies available in the literature have fitted parameters with data of a single type of loading, such as tension, compression, or shear. Recently, Jin et al. (Journal of Biomechanics 46:2795-2801, 2013) reported data from ex vivo tests of human brain tissue under tension, compression, and shear loading using four strain rates and four different brain regions. However, they do not report parameters of energy functions that can be readily used in finite element simulations. To represent the tissue behavior for the quasi-static loading conditions, we aimed to determine the best fit of the hyperelastic parameters of the hyperfoam, Ogden, and polynomial strain energy functions available in ABAQUS for the low strain rate data, while simultaneously considering all three loading modes. We used an optimization process conducted in MATLAB, calling iteratively three finite element models developed in ABAQUS that represent the three loadings. Results showed a relatively good fit to experimental data in all loading modes using two terms in the energy functions. Values for the shear modulus obtained in this analysis (897-1653Pa) are in the range of those presented in other studies. These energy-function parameters can be used in brain tissue simulations using finite element models. PMID:25446271

  20. An analytical model for nanoparticles concentration resulting from infusion into poroelastic brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Pizzichelli, G; Di Michele, F; Sinibaldi, E

    2016-02-01

    We consider the infusion of a diluted suspension of nanoparticles (NPs) into poroelastic brain tissue, in view of relevant biomedical applications such as intratumoral thermotherapy. Indeed, the high impact of the related pathologies motivates the development of advanced therapeutic approaches, whose design also benefits from theoretical models. This study provides an analytical expression for the time-dependent NPs concentration during the infusion into poroelastic brain tissue, which also accounts for particle binding onto cells (by recalling relevant results from the colloid filtration theory). Our model is computationally inexpensive and, compared to fully numerical approaches, permits to explicitly elucidate the role of the involved physical aspects (tissue poroelasticity, infusion parameters, NPs physico-chemical properties, NP-tissue interactions underlying binding). We also present illustrative results based on parameters taken from the literature, by considering clinically relevant ranges for the infusion parameters. Moreover, we thoroughly assess the model working assumptions besides discussing its limitations. While not laying any claims of generality, our model can be used to support the development of more ambitious numerical approaches, towards the preliminary design of novel therapies based on NPs infusion into brain tissue. PMID:26656677

  1. Spatial mapping of drug delivery to brain tissue using hyperspectral spatial frequency-domain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh-Moon, Rajinder P.; Roblyer, Darren M.; Bigio, Irving J.; Joshi, Shailendra

    2014-09-01

    We present an application of spatial frequency-domain imaging (SFDI) to the wide-field imaging of drug delivery to brain tissue. Measurements were compared with values obtained by a previously validated variation of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, the method of optical pharmacokinetics (OP). We demonstrate a cross-correlation between the two methods for absorption extraction and drug concentration determination in both experimental tissue phantoms and freshly extracted rodent brain tissue. These methods were first used to assess intra-arterial (IA) delivery of cationic liposomes to brain tissue in Sprague Dawley rats under transient cerebral hypoperfusion. Results were found to be in agreement with previously published experimental data and pharmacokinetic models of IA drug delivery. We then applied the same scheme to evaluate IA mitoxantrone delivery to glioma-bearing rats. Good correlation was seen between OP and SFDI determined concentrations taken from normal and tumor averaged sites. This study shows the feasibility of mapping drug/tracer distributions and encourages the use of SFDI for spatial imaging of tissues for drug/tracer-tagged carrier deposition and pharmacokinetic studies.

  2. A Device for Long-Term Perfusion, Imaging, and Electrical Interfacing of Brain Tissue In vitro

    PubMed Central

    Killian, Nathaniel J.; Vernekar, Varadraj N.; Potter, Steve M.; Vukasinovic, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Distributed microelectrode array (MEA) recordings from consistent, viable, ≥500 μm thick tissue preparations over time periods from days to weeks may aid in studying a wide range of problems in neurobiology that require in vivo-like organotypic morphology. Existing tools for electrically interfacing with organotypic slices do not address necrosis that inevitably occurs within thick slices with limited diffusion of nutrients and gas, and limited removal of waste. We developed an integrated device that enables long-term maintenance of thick, functionally active, brain tissue models using interstitial perfusion and distributed recordings from thick sections of explanted tissue on a perforated multi-electrode array. This novel device allows for automated culturing, in situ imaging, and extracellular multi-electrode interfacing with brain slices, 3-D cell cultures, and potentially other tissue culture models. The device is economical, easy to assemble, and integrable with standard electrophysiology tools. We found that convective perfusion through the culture thickness provided a functional benefit to the preparations as firing rates were generally higher in perfused cultures compared to their respective unperfused controls. This work is a step toward the development of integrated tools for days-long experiments with more consistent, healthier, thicker, and functionally more active tissue cultures with built-in distributed electrophysiological recording and stimulation functionality. The results may be useful for the study of normal processes, pathological conditions, and drug screening strategies currently hindered by the limitations of acute (a few hours long) brain slice preparations. PMID:27065793

  3. Focally Elevated Creatine Detected in Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) Transgenic Mice and Alzheimer Disease Brain Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Gallant,M.; Rak, M.; Szeghalmi, A.; Del Bigio, M.; Westaway, D.; Yang, J.; Julian, R.; Gough, K.

    2006-01-01

    The creatine/phosphocreatine system, regulated by creatine kinase, plays an important role in maintaining energy balance in the brain. Energy metabolism and the function of creatine kinase are known to be affected in Alzheimer diseased brain and in cells exposed to the {beta}-amyloid peptide. We used infrared microspectroscopy to examine hippocampal, cortical, and caudal tissue from 21-89-week-old transgenic mice expressing doubly mutant (K670N/M671L and V717F) amyloid precursor protein and displaying robust pathology from an early age. Microcrystalline deposits of creatine, suggestive of perturbed energetic status, were detected by infrared microspectroscopy in all animals with advanced plaque pathology. Relatively large creatine deposits were also found in hippocampal sections from post-mortem Alzheimer diseased human brain, compared with hippocampus from non-demented brain. We therefore speculate that this molecule is a marker of the disease process.

  4. Detection, identification and mapping of iron anomalies in brain tissue using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhaylova, A.; Davidson, M.; Toastmann, H.; Channell, J.E.T.; Guyodo, Y.; Batich, C.; Dobson, J.

    2008-06-16

    This work describes a novel method for the detection, identification and mapping of anomalous iron compounds in mammalian brain tissue using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We have located and identified individual iron anomalies in an avian tissue model associated with ferritin, biogenic magnetite and haemoglobin with a pixel resolution of less than 5 {micro}m. This technique represents a breakthrough in the study of both intra- and extra-cellular iron compounds in brain tissue. The potential for high-resolution iron mapping using microfocused X-ray beams has direct application to investigations of the location and structural form of iron compounds associated with human neurodegenerative disorders - a problem which has vexed researchers for 50 years.

  5. Impact of wavefront distortion and scattering on 2-photon microscopy in mammalian brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Chaigneau, Emmanuelle; Wright, Amanda J.; Poland, Simon P.; Girkin, John M.; Silver, R. Angus

    2011-01-01

    Two-photon (2P) microscopy is widely used in neuroscience, but the optical properties of brain tissue are poorly understood. We have investigated the effect of brain tissue on the 2P point spread function (PSF2P) by imaging fluorescent beads through living cortical slices. By combining this with measurements of the mean free path of the excitation light, adaptive optics and vector-based modeling that includes phase modulation and scattering, we show that tissue-induced wavefront distortions are the main determinant of enlargement and distortion of the PSF2P at intermediate imaging depths. Furthermore, they generate surrounding lobes that contain more than half of the 2P excitation. These effects reduce the resolution of fine structures and contrast and they, together with scattering, limit 2P excitation. Our results disentangle the contributions of scattering and wavefront distortion in shaping the cortical PSF2P, thereby providing a basis for improved 2P microscopy. PMID:22109156

  6. Detection, identification and mapping of iron anomalies in brain tissue using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mikhaylova, A; Davidson, M; Toastmann, H; Channell, J.E.T; Guyodo, Y; Batich, C; Dobson, J

    2005-01-01

    This work describes a novel method for the detection, identification and mapping of anomalous iron compounds in mammalian brain tissue using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We have located and identified individual iron anomalies in an avian tissue model associated with ferritin, biogenic magnetite and haemoglobin with a pixel resolution of less than 5 μm. This technique represents a breakthrough in the study of both intra- and extra-cellular iron compounds in brain tissue. The potential for high-resolution iron mapping using microfocused X-ray beams has direct application to investigations of the location and structural form of iron compounds associated with human neurodegenerative disorders—a problem which has vexed researchers for 50 years. PMID:16849161

  7. Evaluation of Raman spectra of human brain tumor tissue using the learning vector quantization neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tuo; Chen, Changshui; Shi, Xingzhe; Liu, Chengyong

    2016-05-01

    The Raman spectra of tissue of 20 brain tumor patients was recorded using a confocal microlaser Raman spectroscope with 785 nm excitation in vitro. A total of 133 spectra were investigated. Spectra peaks from normal white matter tissue and tumor tissue were analyzed. Algorithms, such as principal component analysis, linear discriminant analysis, and the support vector machine, are commonly used to analyze spectral data. However, in this study, we employed the learning vector quantization (LVQ) neural network, which is typically used for pattern recognition. By applying the proposed method, a normal diagnosis accuracy of 85.7% and a glioma diagnosis accuracy of 89.5% were achieved. The LVQ neural network is a recent approach to excavating Raman spectra information. Moreover, it is fast and convenient, does not require the spectra peak counterpart, and achieves a relatively high accuracy. It can be used in brain tumor prognostics and in helping to optimize the cutting margins of gliomas.

  8. A Simplified Workflow for Protein Quantitation of Rat Brain Tissues Using Label-Free Proteomics and Spectral Counting.

    PubMed

    Boutté, Angela M; Grant, Shonnette F; Dave, Jitendra R

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics is an increasingly valuable tool for determining relative or quantitative protein abundance in brain tissues. A plethora of technical and analytical methods are available, but straightforward and practical approaches are often needed to facilitate reproducibility. This aspect is particularly important as an increasing number of studies focus on models of traumatic brain injury or brain trauma, for which brain tissue proteomes have not yet been fully described. This text provides suggested techniques for robust identification and quantitation of brain proteins by using molecular weight fractionation prior to mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Detailed sample preparation and generalized protocols for chromatography, mass spectrometry, spectral counting, and normalization are described. The rat cerebral cortex isolated from a model of blast-overpressure was used as an exemplary source of brain tissue. However, these techniques may be adapted for lysates generated from several types of cells or tissues and adapted by the end user. PMID:27604744

  9. Brain function differences in language processing in children and adults with autism.

    PubMed

    Williams, Diane L; Cherkassky, Vladimir L; Mason, Robert A; Keller, Timothy A; Minshew, Nancy J; Just, Marcel Adam

    2013-08-01

    Comparison of brain function between children and adults with autism provides an understanding of the effects of the disorder and associated maturational differences on language processing. Functional imaging (functional magnetic resonance imaging) was used to examine brain activation and cortical synchronization during the processing of literal and ironic texts in 15 children with autism, 14 children with typical development, 13 adults with autism, and 12 adult controls. Both the children and adults with autism had lower functional connectivity (synchronization of brain activity among activated areas) than their age and ability comparison group in the left hemisphere language network during irony processing, and neither autism group had an increase in functional connectivity in response to increased task demands. Activation differences for the literal and irony conditions occurred in key language-processing regions (left middle temporal, left pars triangularis, left pars opercularis, left medial frontal, and right middle temporal). The children and adults with autism differed from each other in the use of some brain regions during the irony task, with the adults with autism having activation levels similar to those of the control groups. Overall, the children and adults with autism differed from the adult and child controls in (a) the degree of network coordination, (b) the distribution of the workload among member nodes, and (3) the dynamic recruitment of regions in response to text content. Moreover, the differences between the two autism age groups may be indicative of positive changes in the neural function related to language processing associated with maturation and/or educational experience. PMID:23495230

  10. Brain Function Differences in Language Processing in Children and Adults with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Diane L.; Cherkassky, Vladimir L.; Mason, Robert A.; Keller, Timothy A.; Minshew, Nancy J.; Just, Marcel Adam

    2015-01-01

    Comparison of brain function between children and adults with autism provides an understanding of the effects of the disorder and associated maturational differences on language processing. Functional imaging (functional magnetic resonance imaging) was used to examine brain activation and cortical synchronization during the processing of literal and ironic texts in 15 children with autism, 14 children with typical development, 13 adults with autism, and 12 adult controls. Both the children and adults with autism had lower functional connectivity (synchronization of brain activity among activated areas) than their age and ability comparison group in the left hemisphere language network during irony processing, and neither autism group had an increase in functional connectivity in response to increased task demands. Activation differences for the literal and irony conditions occurred in key language-processing regions (left middle temporal, left pars triangularis, left pars opercularis, left medial frontal, and right middle temporal). The children and adults with autism differed from each other in the use of some brain regions during the irony task, with the adults with autism having activation levels similar to those of the control groups. Overall, the children and adults with autism differed from the adult and child controls in (a) the degree of network coordination, (b) the distribution of the workload among member nodes, and (3) the dynamic recruitment of regions in response to text content. Moreover, the differences between the two autism age groups may be indicative of positive changes in the neural function related to language processing associated with maturation and/or educational experience. PMID:23495230

  11. The molecular nature of very small embryonic-like stem cells in adult tissues.

    PubMed

    Kim, YongHwan; Jeong, Jaeho; Kang, Hyunsook; Lim, Jisun; Heo, Jinbeom; Ratajczak, Janina; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z; Shin, Dong-Myung

    2014-11-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have been considered as the most important cells in regenerative medicine as they are able to differentiate into all types of cells in the human body. PSCs have been established from several sources of embryo tissue or by reprogramming of terminally differentiated adult tissue by transduction of so-called Yamanaka factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and cMyc). Interestingly, accumulating evidence has demonstrated the residence of PSCs in adult tissue and with the ability to differentiate into multiple types of tissue-committed stem cells (TCSCs). We also recently demonstrated that a population of pluripotent Oct4(+) SSEA-1(+)Sca-1(+)Lin(-)CD45(-) very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) resides in the adult murine bone marrow (BM) and in other murine tissue. These very small (∼3-6 μm) cells express pluripotent markers such as Oct4, Nanog, and SSEA-1. VSELs could be specified into several tissue-residing TCSCs in response to tissue/organ injury, and thus suggesting that these cells have a physiological role in the rejuvenation of a pool of TCSCs under steady-state conditions. In this review article, we discuss the molecular nature of the rare population of VSELs which have a crucial role in regulating the pluripotency, proliferation, differentiation, and aging of these cells. PMID:25473442

  12. The Molecular Nature of Very Small Embryonic-Like Stem Cells in Adult Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kim, YongHwan; Jeong, Jaeho; Kang, Hyunsook; Lim, Jisun; Heo, Jinbeom; Ratajczak, Janina; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z.; Shin, Dong-Myung

    2014-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have been considered as the most important cells in regenerative medicine as they are able to differentiate into all types of cells in the human body. PSCs have been established from several sources of embryo tissue or by reprogramming of terminally differentiated adult tissue by transduction of so-called Yamanaka factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and cMyc). Interestingly, accumulating evidence has demonstrated the residence of PSCs in adult tissue and with the ability to differentiate into multiple types of tissue-committed stem cells (TCSCs). We also recently demonstrated that a population of pluripotent Oct4+ SSEA-1+Sca-1+Lin−CD45− very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) resides in the adult murine bone marrow (BM) and in other murine tissue. These very small (∼3–6 μm) cells express pluripotent markers such as Oct4, Nanog, and SSEA-1. VSELs could be specified into several tissue-residing TCSCs in response to tissue/organ injury, and thus suggesting that these cells have a physiological role in the rejuvenation of a pool of TCSCs under steady-state conditions. In this review article, we discuss the molecular nature of the rare population of VSELs which have a crucial role in regulating the pluripotency, proliferation, differentiation, and aging of these cells. PMID:25473442

  13. Facial soft tissue thickness in individuals with different occlusion patterns in adult Turkish subjects.

    PubMed

    Kurkcuoglu, Ayla; Pelin, Can; Ozener, Bariş; Zagyapan, Ragiba; Sahinoglu, Zahira; Yazici, Ayse Canan

    2011-08-01

    Knowledge of variation in facial soft tissue thickness is important for forensic anthropologists, dentists, and plastic surgeons. Forensic anthropologists use such information as a guide in facial reconstruction and superimposition methods. The purpose of this study was to measure facial tissue thicknesses of adult males and females of Turkish origin across different types of occlusion, and to compare the results with each other and with values obtained for other populations. The study was conducted on 200 healthy individuals. The analysis of facial tissue thickness included 20 landmarks (10 dentoskeletal and 10 soft tissue) and 10 linear variables. Sex-based variation in facial tissue thickness was noted. The highest soft tissue thickness values were observed in the group with Class III occlusion type at Sn-A point for both the females (16.9, SD=2.4) and the males (17.8, SD=3.3). In the Class I group, the highest tissue depth was observed at Sn-A point (15.3, SD=2.1) in females, and at Li-Id point (17.1, SD=1.9) in males. In the Class II group, contrary to the findings for Class I, the highest soft tissue depth was at Li-Id point (16.0, SD=1.4) in females, and at Sn-A point (18.1, SD=2.6) in males. In conclusion, facial tissue thickness varied in adults depending on the sex and on the type of occlusion. PMID:21741647

  14. Mechanical characterization of brain tissue in simple shear at dynamic strain rates.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Badar; Destrade, Michel; Gilchrist, Michael D

    2013-12-01

    During severe impact conditions, brain tissue experiences a rapid and complex deformation, which can be seen as a mixture of compression, tension and shear. Diffuse axonal injury (DAI) occurs in animals and humans when both the strains and strain rates exceed 10% and 10/s, respectively. Knowing the mechanical properties of brain tissue in shear at these strains and strain rates is thus of particular importance, as they can be used in finite element simulations to predict the occurrence of brain injuries under different impact conditions. However, very few studies in the literature provide this information. In this research, an experimental setup was developed to perform simple shear tests on porcine brain tissue at strain rates ≤120/s. The maximum measured shear stress at strain rates of 30, 60, 90 and 120/s was 1.15±0.25kPa, 1.34±0.19kPa, 2.19±0.225kPa and 2.52±0.27kPa, (mean±SD), respectively at the maximum amount of shear, K=1. Good agreement of experimental, theoretical (Ogden and Mooney-Rivlin models) and numerical shear stresses was achieved (p=0.7866-0.9935). Specimen thickness effects (2.0-10.0mm thick specimens) were also analyzed numerically and we found that there is no significant difference (p=0.9954) in the shear stress magnitudes, indicating a homogeneous deformation of the specimens during simple shear tests. Stress relaxation tests in simple shear were also conducted at different strain magnitudes (10-60% strain) with the average rise time of 14ms. This allowed us to estimate elastic and viscoelastic parameters (initial shear modulus, μ=4942.0Pa, and Prony parameters: g1=0.520, g2=0.3057, τ1=0.0264s, and τ2=0.011s) that can be used in FE software to analyze the non-linear viscoelastic behavior of brain tissue. This study provides new insight into the behavior in finite shear of brain tissue under dynamic impact conditions, which will assist in developing effective brain injury criteria and adopting efficient countermeasures against

  15. Mapping drug distribution in brain tissue using liquid extraction surface analysis mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Swales, John G; Tucker, James W; Spreadborough, Michael J; Iverson, Suzanne L; Clench, Malcolm R; Webborn, Peter J H; Goodwin, Richard J A

    2015-10-01

    Liquid extraction surface analysis mass spectrometry (LESA-MS) is a surface sampling technique that incorporates liquid extraction from the surface of tissue sections with nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry. Traditional tissue analysis techniques usually require homogenization of the sample prior to analysis via high-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS), but an intrinsic weakness of this is a loss of all spatial information and the inability of the technique to distinguish between actual tissue penetration and response caused by residual blood contamination. LESA-MS, in contrast, has the ability to spatially resolve drug distributions and has historically been used to profile discrete spots on the surface of tissue sections. Here, we use the technique as a mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) tool, extracting points at 1 mm spatial resolution across tissue sections to build an image of xenobiotic and endogenous compound distribution to assess drug blood-brain barrier penetration into brain tissue. A selection of penetrant and "nonpenetrant" drugs were dosed to rats via oral and intravenous administration. Whole brains were snap-frozen at necropsy and were subsequently sectioned prior to analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) and LESA-MSI. MALDI-MSI, as expected, was shown to effectively map the distribution of brain penetrative compounds but lacked sufficient sensitivity when compounds were marginally penetrative. LESA-MSI was used to effectively map the distribution of these poorly penetrative compounds, highlighting its value as a complementary technique to MALDI-MSI. The technique also showed benefits when compared to traditional homogenization, particularly for drugs that were considered nonpenetrant by homogenization but were shown to have a measurable penetration using LESA-MSI. PMID:26350423

  16. Multichannel optical brain imaging to separate cerebral vascular, tissue metabolic, and neuronal effects of cocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hugang; Luo, Zhongchi; Yuan, Zhijia; Pan, Yingtian; Du, Congwu

    2012-02-01

    Characterization of cerebral hemodynamic and oxygenation metabolic changes, as well neuronal function is of great importance to study of brain functions and the relevant brain disorders such as drug addiction. Compared with other neuroimaging modalities, optical imaging techniques have the potential for high spatiotemporal resolution and dissection of the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), blood volume (CBV), and hemoglobing oxygenation and intracellular Ca ([Ca2+]i), which serves as markers of vascular function, tissue metabolism and neuronal activity, respectively. Recently, we developed a multiwavelength imaging system and integrated it into a surgical microscope. Three LEDs of λ1=530nm, λ2=570nm and λ3=630nm were used for exciting [Ca2+]i fluorescence labeled by Rhod2 (AM) and sensitizing total hemoglobin (i.e., CBV), and deoxygenated-hemoglobin, whereas one LD of λ1=830nm was used for laser speckle imaging to form a CBF mapping of the brain. These light sources were time-sharing for illumination on the brain and synchronized with the exposure of CCD camera for multichannel images of the brain. Our animal studies indicated that this optical approach enabled simultaneous mapping of cocaine-induced changes in CBF, CBV and oxygenated- and deoxygenated hemoglobin as well as [Ca2+]i in the cortical brain. Its high spatiotemporal resolution (30μm, 10Hz) and large field of view (4x5 mm2) are advanced as a neuroimaging tool for brain functional study.

  17. Dynamic effects of point source electroporation on the rat brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Sharabi, Shirley; Last, David; Guez, David; Daniels, Dianne; Hjouj, Mohammad Ibrahim; Salomon, Sharona; Maor, Elad; Mardor, Yael

    2014-10-01

    In spite of aggressive therapy, existing treatments offer poor prognosis for glioblastoma multiforme due to tumor infiltration into the surrounding brain as well as poor blood-brain barrier penetration of most therapeutic agents. In this paper we present a novel approach for a minimally invasive treatment and a non-invasive response assessment methodology consisting of applying intracranial point-source electroporation and assessing treatment effect volumes using magnetic resonance imaging. Using a unique setup of a single intracranial electrode and an external surface electrode we treated rats' brains with various electroporation protocols and applied magnetic resonance imaging to study the dependence of the physiological effects on electroporation treatment parameters. The extent of blood-brain barrier disruption and later volumes of permanent brain tissue damage were found to correlate significantly with the treatment voltages (r(2)=0.99, p<0.001) and the number of treatment pulses (r(2)=0.94, p<0.002). Blood-brain barrier disruption depicted 3.2±0.3 times larger volumes than the final permanent damage volumes (p<0.0001). These results indicate that it may be beneficial to use more than one modality of electroporation when planning a treatment for brain tumors. PMID:24976141

  18. Educating the adult brain: How the neuroscience of learning can inform educational policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowland, Victoria C. P.; Thomas, Michael S. C.

    2014-05-01

    The acquisition of new skills in adulthood can positively affect an individual's quality of life, including their earning potential. In some cases, such as the learning of literacy in developing countries, it can provide an avenue to escape from poverty. In developed countries, job retraining in adulthood contributes to the flexibility of labour markets. For all adults, learning opportunities increase participation in society and family life. However, the popular view is that adults are less able to learn for an intrinsic reason: their brains are less plastic than in childhood. This article reviews what is currently known from neuroscientific research about how brain plasticity changes with age, with a particular focus on the ability to acquire new skills in adulthood. Anchoring their review in the examples of the adult acquisition of literacy and new motor skills, the authors address five specific questions: (1) Are sensitive periods in brain development relevant to learning complex educational skills like literacy? (2) Can adults become proficient in a new skill? (3) Can everyone learn equally effectively in adulthood? (4) What is the role of the learning environment? (5) Does adult education cost too much? They identify areas where further research is needed and conclude with a summary of principles for enhancing adult learning now established on a neuroscience foundation.

  19. The effects of sleep deprivation on brain functioning in older adults.

    PubMed

    Almklov, Erin L; Drummond, Sean P A; Orff, Henry; Alhassoon, Omar M

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined the effects of total sleep deprivation (TSD) on cognitive performance and brain activation using functional MRI (fMRI) in older adults. The current study examines blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) activation in older adults and younger adults during the sustained attention (GO) and response inhibition (NOGO) portions of a GO-NOGO cognitive task following 36 hr of total sleep deprivation. No significant performance differences were observed between the groups on the behavioral outcome measures of total hits and false alarms. Neuroimaging results, however, revealed a significant interaction between age-group and sleep-deprivation status. Specifically, older adults showed greater BOLD activation as compared to younger adults after 36 hours total sleep deprivation in brain regions typically associated with attention and inhibitory processes. These results suggest in order for older adults to perform the GO-NOGO task effectively after sleep deprivation, they rely on compensatory recruitment of brain regions that aide in the maintenance of cognitive performance. PMID:24787041

  20. Automated tissue classification of pediatric brains from magnetic resonance images using age-specific atlases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Andrew; Benavides, Amanda; Nopoulos, Peg; Magnotta, Vincent

    2016-03-01

    The goal of this project was to develop two age appropriate atlases (neonatal and one year old) that account for the rapid growth and maturational changes that occur during early development. Tissue maps from this age group were initially created by manually correcting the resulting tissue maps after applying an expectation maximization (EM) algorithm and an adult atlas to pediatric subjects. The EM algorithm classified each voxel into one of ten possible tissue types including several subcortical structures. This was followed by a novel level set segmentation designed to improve differentiation between distal cortical gray matter and white matter. To minimize the req uired manual corrections, the adult atlas was registered to the pediatric scans using high -dimensional, symmetric image normalization (SyN) registration. The subject images were then mapped to an age specific atlas space, again using SyN registration, and the resulting transformation applied to the manually corrected tissue maps. The individual maps were averaged in the age specific atlas space and blurred to generate the age appropriate anatomical priors. The resulting anatomical priors were then used by the EM algorithm to re-segment the initial training set as well as an independent testing set. The results from the adult and age-specific anatomical priors were compared to the manually corrected results. The age appropriate atlas provided superior results as compared to the adult atlas. The image analysis pipeline used in this work was built using the open source software package BRAINSTools.

  1. Vitamin D as a neurosteroid affecting the developing and adult brain.

    PubMed

    Groves, Natalie J; McGrath, John J; Burne, Thomas H J

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent throughout the world, and growing evidence supports a requirement for optimal vitamin D levels for the healthy developing and adult brain. Vitamin D has important roles in proliferation and differentiation, calcium signaling within the brain, and neurotrophic and neuroprotective actions; it may also alter neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity. Recent experimental studies highlight the impact that vitamin D deficiency has on brain function in health and disease. In addition, results from recent animal studies suggest that vitamin D deficiency during adulthood may exacerbate underlying brain disorders and/or worsen recovery from brain stressors. An increasing number of epidemiological studies indicate that vitamin D deficiency is associated with a wide range of neuropsychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Vitamin D supplementation is readily available and affordable, and this review highlights the need for further research. PMID:25033060

  2. Systemic delivery of blood-brain barrier-targeted polymeric nanoparticles enhances delivery to brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Saucier-Sawyer, Jennifer K; Deng, Yang; Seo, Young-Eun; Cheng, Christopher J; Zhang, Junwei; Quijano, Elias; Saltzman, W Mark

    2015-01-01

    Delivery of therapeutic agents to the central nervous system is a significant challenge, hindering progress in the treatment of diseases such as glioblastoma. Due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), therapeutic agents do not readily transverse the brain endothelium to enter the parenchyma. Previous reports suggest that surface modification of polymer nanoparticles (NPs) can improve their ability to cross the BBB, but it is unclear whether the observed enhancements in transport are large enough to enhance therapy. In this study, we synthesized two degradable polymer NP systems surface-modified with ligands previously suggested to improve BBB transport, and tested their ability to cross the BBB after intravenous injection in mice. All the NP preparations were able to cross the BBB, although generally in low amounts (<0.5% of the injected dose), which was consistent with prior reports. One NP produced significantly higher brain uptake (∼0.8% of the injected dose): a block copolymer of polylactic acid and hyperbranched polyglycerol, surface modified with adenosine (PLA-HPG-Ad). PLA-HPG-Ad NPs provided controlled release of camptothecin, killing U87 glioma cells in culture. When administered intravenously in mice with intracranial U87 tumors, they failed to increase survival. These results suggest that enhancing NP transport across the BBB does not necessarily yield proportional pharmacological effects. PMID:26453169

  3. Systemic Delivery of Blood-Brain Barrier Targeted Polymeric Nanoparticles Enhances Delivery to Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Saucier-Sawyer, Jennifer K.; Deng, Yang; Seo, Young-Eun; Cheng, Christopher J.; Zhang, Junwei; Quijano, Elias; Saltzman, W. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Delivery of therapeutic agents to the central nervous system is a significant challenge, hindering progress in the treatment of diseases such as glioblastoma. Due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), therapeutic agents do not readily transverse the brain endothelium to enter the parenchyma. Previous reports suggest that surface modification of polymer nanoparticles can improve their ability to cross the BBB, but it is unclear whether the observed enhancements in transport are large enough to enhance therapy. In this study, we synthesized two degradable polymer nanoparticle systems surface-modified with ligands previously suggested to improve BBB transport, and tested their ability to cross the BBB after intravenous injection in mice. All nanoparticle preparations were able to cross the BBB, although generally in low amounts (<0.5% of the injected dose), which was consistent with prior reports. One nanoparticle produced significantly higher brain uptake (~0.8% of the injected dose): a block copolymer of polylactic acid and hyperbranched polyglycerol, surface modified with adenosine (PLA-HPG-Ad). PLA-HPG-Ad nanoparticles provided controlled release of camptothecin, killing U87 glioma cells in culture. When administered intravenously in mice with intracranial U87 tumors, they failed to increase survival. These results suggest that enhancing nanoparticle transport across the BBB does not necessarily yield proportional pharmacological effects. PMID:26453169

  4. Two follistatin-like 1 homologs are differentially expressed in adult tissues and during embryogenesis in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus).

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi-Wen; Li, Fu-Gui; Chen, Jie; Jiang, Xia-Yun; Zou, Shu-Ming

    2015-11-01

    Follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1) peptides play important roles in inhibiting myoblast proliferation and differentiation. Here, we characterized and examined the expression patterns of fstl1a and -b in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus). These genes encode 314 aa and 310 aa peptides, respectively, sharing a sequence identity of 83%. Except for the existence of the follistatin-N-terminal (FOLN) and Kazal-type 2 serine protease inhibitor (Kazal 2) domains, grass carp Fstl1a and -b do not share amino acid sequence similarity with Fst1 and -b. Both fstl1a and -b mRNAs were widely expressed in adult tissues. During embryogenesis, grass carp fstl1a and -b mRNA was detected in the presomitic mesoderm and somites at 12h post fertilization (hpf). At 24hpf, fstl1a mRNA was expressed in the hindbrain, somites, notochord and tailbud, while fstl1b mRNA was only detected in the tailbud. At 36hpf, fstl1a mRNA was detected in the hindbrain and notochord, and fstl1b was also expressed in the notochord. Furthermore, fstl1a and -b were downregulated in brain and liver tissue following injection with 10 or 50μg hGH, while fstl1b was significantly up-regulated in muscle tissue after 10μg hGH treatment. Both fstl1a and -b were significantly up-regulated at 2, 4 or 6days of nutrient restriction, and fstl1a was still highly expressed in the liver and muscle after 3days of refeeding, as was fstl1b in the brain and muscle. The expression of these genes returned to near control levels following 6days of refeeding. Our findings suggest that the two fstls play important but divergent roles in embryonic development and tissue growth regulation in grass carp. PMID:26439673

  5. Fetal Alcohol Exposure Reduces Adult Brain Plasticity. Science Briefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Science Briefs" summarize the findings and implications of a recent study in basic science or clinical research. This Brief summarizes the findings and implications of "Moderate Fetal Alcohol Exposure Impairs the Neurogenic Response to an Enriched Environment in Adult Mice" (I. Y. Choi; A. M. Allan; and L. A. Cunningham). Observations of mice…

  6. Amphetamine modulates brain signal variability and working memory in younger and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Douglas D.; Nagel, Irene E.; Preuschhof, Claudia; Burzynska, Agnieszka Z.; Marchner, Janina; Wiegert, Steffen; Jungehülsing, Gerhard J.; Nyberg, Lars; Villringer, Arno; Li, Shu-Chen; Heekeren, Hauke R.; Bäckman, Lars; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2015-01-01

    Better-performing younger adults typically express greater brain signal variability relative to older, poorer performers. Mechanisms for age and performance-graded differences in brain dynamics have, however, not yet been uncovered. Given the age-related decline of the dopamine (DA) system in normal cognitive aging, DA neuromodulation is one plausible mechanism. Hence, agents that boost systemic DA [such as d-amphetamine (AMPH)] may help to restore deficient signal variability levels. Furthermore, despite the standard practice of counterbalancing drug session order (AMPH first vs. placebo first), it remains understudied how AMPH may interact with practice effects, possibly influencing whether DA up-regulation is functional. We examined the effects of AMPH on functional-MRI–based blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal variability (SDBOLD) in younger and older adults during a working memory task (letter n-back). Older adults expressed lower brain signal variability at placebo, but met or exceeded young adult SDBOLD levels in the presence of AMPH. Drug session order greatly moderated change–change relations between AMPH-driven SDBOLD and reaction time means (RTmean) and SDs (RTSD). Older adults who received AMPH in the first session tended to improve in RTmean and RTSD when SDBOLD was boosted on AMPH, whereas younger and older adults who received AMPH in the second session showed either a performance improvement when SDBOLD decreased (for RTmean) or no effect at all (for RTSD). The present findings support the hypothesis that age differences in brain signal variability reflect aging-induced changes in dopaminergic neuromodulation. The observed interactions among AMPH, age, and session order highlight the state- and practice-dependent neurochemical basis of human brain dynamics. PMID:26034283

  7. Structural and functional rich club organization of the brain in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Grayson, David S; Ray, Siddharth; Carpenter, Samuel; Iyer, Swathi; Dias, Taciana G Costa; Stevens, Corinne; Nigg, Joel T; Fair, Damien A

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have proposed that the brain's white matter is organized as a rich club, whereby the most highly connected regions of the brain are also highly connected to each other. Here we use both functional and diffusion-weighted MRI in the human brain to investigate whether the rich club phenomena is present with functional connectivity, and how this organization relates to the structural phenomena. We also examine whether rich club regions serve to integrate information between distinct brain systems, and conclude with a brief investigation of the developmental trajectory of rich-club phenomena. In agreement with prior work, both adults and children showed robust structural rich club organization, comprising regions of the superior medial frontal/dACC, medial parietal/PCC, insula, and inferior temporal cortex. We also show that these regions were highly integrated across the brain's major networks. Functional brain networks were found to have rich club phenomena in a similar spatial layout, but a high level of segregation between systems. While no significant differences between adults and children were found structurally, adults showed significantly greater functional rich club organization. This difference appeared to be driven by a specific set of connections between superior parietal, insula, and supramarginal cortex. In sum, this work highlights the existence of both a structural and functional rich club in adult and child populations with some functional changes over development. It also offers a potential target in examining atypical network organization in common developmental brain disorders, such as ADHD and Autism. PMID:24505468

  8. Regulation of brain water during acute glucose-induced hyperosmolality in ovine fetuses, lambs, and adults.

    PubMed

    Stonestreet, Barbara S; Petersson, Katherine H; Sadowska, Grazyna B; Patlak, Clifford S

    2004-02-01

    We tested the hypothesis that, during acute glucose-induced hyperosmolality, the brain shrinks less than predicted on the basis of an ideal osmometer and that brain volume regulation is present in fetuses, premature and newborn lambs. Brain water responses to glucose-induced hyperosmolality were measured in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and medulla of fetuses at 60% of gestation, premature ventilated lambs at 90% of gestation, newborn lambs, and adult sheep. After exposure of the sheep to increases in osmolality with glucose plus NaCl, brain water and electrolytes were measured. The ideal osmometer is a system in which impermeable solutes do not enter or leave in response to an osmotic stress. In the absence of volume regulation, brain solute remains constant as osmolality changes. The osmotically active solute demonstrated direct linear correlations with plasma osmolality in the cerebral cortex of the fetuses at 60% of gestation (r = 0.72, n = 24, P = 0.0001), premature lambs (r = 0.58, n = 22, P = 0.005), newborn lambs (r = 0.57, n = 24, P = 0.004), and adult sheep (r = 0.70, n = 18, P = 0.001). Similar findings were observed in the cerebellum and medulla. Increases in the quantity of osmotically active solute over the range of plasma osmolalities indicate that volume regulation was present in the brain regions of the fetuses, premature lambs, newborn lambs, and adult sheep during glucose-induced hyperosmolality. We conclude that, during glucose-induced hyperosmolality, the brain shrinks less than predicted on the basis of an ideal osmometer and exhibits volume regulation in fetuses at 60% of gestation, premature lambs, newborn lambs, and adult sheep. PMID:14578364

  9. In vivo penetration mechanics and mechanical properties of mouse brain tissue at micrometer scales.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Andrew A; Ortega, Alicia M; Restrepo, Diego; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Gall, Ken

    2009-01-01

    Substantial advancement in the understanding of the neuronal basis of behavior and the treatment of neurological disorders has been achieved via the implantation of various devices into the brain. To design and optimize the next generation of neuronal implants while striving to minimize tissue damage, it is necessary to understand the mechanics of probe insertion at relevant length scales. Unfortunately, a broad-based understanding of brain-implant interactions at the necessary micrometer scales is largely missing. This paper presents a generalizable description of the micrometer-scale penetration mechanics and material properties of mouse brain tissue in vivo. Cylindrical stainless steel probes were inserted into the cerebral cortex and olfactory bulb of mice. The effects of probe size, probe geometry, insertion rate, insertion location, animal age, and the presence of the dura and pia on the resulting forces were measured continuously throughout probe insertion and removal. Material properties (modulus, cutting force, and frictional force) were extracted using mechanical analysis. The use of rigid, incompressible, cylindrical probes allows for a general understanding of how probe design and insertion methods influence the penetration mechanics of brain tissue in vivo that can be applied to the quantitative design of most future implantable devices. PMID:19224718

  10. The average baboon brain: MRI templates and tissue probability maps from 89 individuals.

    PubMed

    Love, Scott A; Marie, Damien; Roth, Muriel; Lacoste, Romain; Nazarian, Bruno; Bertello, Alice; Coulon, Olivier; Anton, Jean-Luc; Meguerditchian, Adrien

    2016-05-15

    The baboon (Papio) brain is a remarkable model for investigating the brain. The current work aimed at creating a population-average baboon (Papio anubis) brain template and its left/right hemisphere symmetric version from a large sample of T1-weighted magnetic resonance images collected from 89 individuals. Averaging the prior probability maps output during the segmentation of each individual also produced the first baboon brain tissue probability maps for gray matter, white matter and cerebrospinal fluid. The templates and the tissue probability maps were created using state-of-the-art, freely available software tools and are being made freely and publicly available: http://www.nitrc.org/projects/haiko89/ or http://lpc.univ-amu.fr/spip.php?article589. It is hoped that these images will aid neuroimaging research of the baboon by, for example, providing a modern, high quality normalization target and accompanying standardized coordinate system as well as probabilistic priors that can be used during tissue segmentation. PMID:26975558

  11. Evidence for Fungal Infection in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Brain Tissue from Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Ruth; Pisa, Diana; Marina, Ana Isabel; Morato, Esperanza; Rábano, Alberto; Rodal, Izaskun; Carrasco, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Among neurogenerative diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal illness characterized by a progressive motor neuron dysfunction in the motor cortex, brainstem and spinal cord. ALS is the most common form of motor neuron disease; yet, to date, the exact etiology of ALS remains unknown. In the present work, we have explored the possibility of fungal infection in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and in brain tissue from ALS patients. Fungal antigens, as well as DNA from several fungi, were detected in CSF from ALS patients. Additionally, examination of brain sections from the frontal cortex of ALS patients revealed the existence of immunopositive fungal antigens comprising punctate bodies in the cytoplasm of some neurons. Fungal DNA was also detected in brain tissue using PCR analysis, uncovering the presence of several fungal species. Finally, proteomic analyses of brain tissue demonstrated the occurrence of several fungal peptides. Collectively, our observations provide compelling evidence of fungal infection in the ALS patients analyzed, suggesting that this infection may play a part in the etiology of the disease or may constitute a risk factor for these patients. PMID:25892962

  12. Colorization and Automated Segmentation of Human T2 MR Brain Images for Characterization of Soft Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Attique, Muhammad; Gilanie, Ghulam; Hafeez-Ullah; Mehmood, Malik S.; Naweed, Muhammad S.; Ikram, Masroor; Kamran, Javed A.; Vitkin, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of tissues like brain by using magnetic resonance (MR) images and colorization of the gray scale image has been reported in the literature, along with the advantages and drawbacks. Here, we present two independent methods; (i) a novel colorization method to underscore the variability in brain MR images, indicative of the underlying physical density of bio tissue, (ii) a segmentation method (both hard and soft segmentation) to characterize gray brain MR images. The segmented images are then transformed into color using the above-mentioned colorization method, yielding promising results for manual tracing. Our color transformation incorporates the voxel classification by matching the luminance of voxels of the source MR image and provided color image by measuring the distance between them. The segmentation method is based on single-phase clustering for 2D and 3D image segmentation with a new auto centroid selection method, which divides the image into three distinct regions (gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) using prior anatomical knowledge). Results have been successfully validated on human T2-weighted (T2) brain MR images. The proposed method can be potentially applied to gray-scale images from other imaging modalities, in bringing out additional diagnostic tissue information contained in the colorized image processing approach as described. PMID:22479421

  13. Adipose tissue gene expression and metabolic health of obese adults.

    PubMed

    Das, S K; Ma, L; Sharma, N K

    2015-05-01

    Obese subjects with a similar body mass index (BMI) exhibit substantial heterogeneity in gluco- and cardiometabolic heath phenotypes. However, defining genes that underlie the heterogeneity of metabolic features among obese individuals and determining metabolically healthy and unhealthy phenotypes remain challenging. We conducted unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis of subcutaneous adipose tissue transcripts from 30 obese men and women ⩾40 years old. Despite similar BMIs in all subjects, we found two distinct subgroups, one metabolically healthy (group 1) and one metabolically unhealthy (group 2). Subjects in group 2 showed significantly higher total cholesterol (P=0.005), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P=0.006), 2-h insulin during oral glucose tolerance test (P=0.015) and lower insulin sensitivity (SI, P=0.029) compared with group 1. We identified significant upregulation of 141 genes (for example, MMP9 and SPP1) and downregulation of 17 genes (for example, NDRG4 and GINS3) in group 2 subjects. Intriguingly, these differentially expressed transcripts were enriched for genes involved in cardiovascular disease-related processes (P=2.81 × 10(-11)-3.74 × 10(-02)) and pathways involved in immune and inflammatory response (P=8.32 × 10(-5)-0.04). Two downregulated genes, NDRG4 and GINS3, have been located in a genomic interval associated with cardiac repolarization in published GWASs and zebra fish knockout models. Our study provides evidence that perturbations in the adipose tissue gene expression network are important in defining metabolic health in obese subjects. PMID:25520251

  14. Long-term oral methylphenidate treatment in adolescent and adult rats: differential effects on brain morphology and function.

    PubMed

    van der Marel, Kajo; Klomp, Anne; Meerhoff, Gideon F; Schipper, Pieter; Lucassen, Paul J; Homberg, Judith R; Dijkhuizen, Rick M; Reneman, Liesbeth

    2014-01-01

    Methylphenidate is a widely prescribed psychostimulant for treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents, which raises questions regarding its potential interference with the developing brain. In the present study, we investigated effects of 3 weeks oral methylphenidate (5 mg/kg) vs vehicle treatment on brain structure and function in adolescent (post-natal day [P]25) and adult (P65) rats. Following a 1-week washout period, we used multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess effects of age and treatment on independent component analysis-based functional connectivity (resting-state functional MRI), D-amphetamine-induced neural activation responses (pharmacological MRI), gray and white matter tissue volumes and cortical thickness (postmortem structural MRI), and white matter structural integrity (postmortem diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)). Many age-related differences were found, including cortical thinning, white matter development, larger dopamine-mediated activation responses and increased striatal functional connectivity. Methylphenidate reduced anterior cingulate cortical network strength in both adolescents and adults. In contrast to clinical observations from ADHD patient studies, methylphenidate did not increase white matter tissue volume or cortical thickness in rat. Nevertheless, DTI-based fractional anisotropy was higher in the anterior part of the corpus callosum following adolescent treatment. Furthermore, methylphenidate differentially affected adolescents and adults as evidenced by reduced striatal volume and myelination upon adolescent treatment, although we did not observe adverse treatment effects on striatal functional activity. Our findings of small but significant age-dependent effects of psychostimulant treatment in the striatum of healthy rats highlights the importance of further research in children and adolescents that are exposed to methylphenidate. PMID:23851400

  15. Automatic tissue segmentation of neonate brain MR Images with subject-specific atlases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherel, Marie; Budin, Francois; Prastawa, Marcel; Gerig, Guido; Lee, Kevin; Buss, Claudia; Lyall, Amanda; Zaldarriaga Consing, Kirsten; Styner, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Automatic tissue segmentation of the neonate brain using Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) is extremely important to study brain development and perform early diagnostics but is challenging due to high variability and inhomogeneity in contrast throughout the image due to incomplete myelination of the white matter tracts. For these reasons, current methods often totally fail or give unsatisfying results. Furthermore, most of the subcortical midbrain structures are misclassified due to a lack of contrast in these regions. We have developed a novel method that creates a probabilistic subject-specific atlas based on a population atlas currently containing a number of manually segmented cases. The generated subject-specific atlas is sharp and adapted to the subject that is being processed. We then segment brain tissue classes using the newly created atlas with a single-atlas expectation maximization based method. Our proposed method leads to a much lower failure rate in our experiments. The overall segmentation results are considerably improved when compared to using a non-subject-specific, population average atlas. Additionally, we have incorporated diffusion information obtained from Diffusion Tensor Images (DTI) to improve the detection of white matter that is not visible at this early age in structural MRI (sMRI) due to a lack of myelination. Although this necessitates the acquisition of an additional sequence, the diffusion information improves the white matter segmentation throughout the brain, especially for the mid-brain structures such as the corpus callosum and the internal capsule.

  16. Requirement for interleukin-1 to drive brain inflammation reveals tissue-specific mechanisms of innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Giles, James A; Greenhalgh, Andrew D; Davies, Claire L; Denes, Adam; Shaw, Tovah; Coutts, Graham; Rothwell, Nancy J; McColl, Barry W; Allan, Stuart M

    2015-01-01

    The immune system is implicated in a wide range of disorders affecting the brain and is, therefore, an attractive target for therapy. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) is a potent regulator of the innate immune system important for host defense but is also associated with injury and disease in the brain. Here, we show that IL-1 is a key mediator driving an innate immune response to inflammatory challenge in the mouse brain but is dispensable in extracerebral tissues including the lung and peritoneum. We also demonstrate that IL-1α is an important ligand contributing to the CNS dependence on IL-1 and that IL-1 derived from the CNS compartment (most likely microglia) is the major source driving this effect. These data reveal previously unknown tissue-specific requirements for IL-1 in driving innate immunity and suggest that IL-1-mediated inflammation in the brain could be selectively targeted without compromising systemic innate immune responses that are important for resistance to infection. This property could be exploited to mitigate injury- and disease-associated inflammation in the brain without increasing susceptibility to systemic infection, an important complication in several neurological disorders. PMID:25367678

  17. Concentration of organochlorines in human brain, liver, and adipose tissue autopsy samples from Greenland.

    PubMed Central

    Dewailly, E; Mulvad, G; Pedersen, H S; Ayotte, P; Demers, A; Weber, J P; Hansen, J C

    1999-01-01

    Organochlorines are persistent lipophilic compounds that accumulate in Inuit people living in circumpolar countries. Organochlorines accumulate as a result of the Inuits' large consumption of sea mammal fat; however, available data are limited to blood lipids, milk fat, and adipose tissue. We report results of organochlorine determination in liver, brain, omental fat, and subcutaneous abdominal fat samples collected from deceased Greenlanders between 1992 and 1994. Eleven chlorinated pesticides and 14 polychlorinated biphenyl congeners were measured in tissue lipid extracts by high-resolution gas chromatography with electron capture detection. Mean concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls, 2, 2'-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethylene, ss-hexachlorocyclohexane, hexachlorobenzene, mirex, trans-nonachlor, and oxychlordane in adipose tissue samples from Greenlanders were 3-34-fold higher than those measured using the same analytical method in samples from Canadians in Quebec City, Quebec. Brain lipids contained lower concentrations of all organochlorines than lipids extracted from other tissues. Organochlorine residue levels in lipid extracts from liver, omental fat, and subcutaneous abdominal fat samples were similar, with the exception of ss-hexachlorocyclohexane, which reached a greater concentration in liver lipids than in lipids from both adipose tissues (4-fold; p < 0. 05). Comparisons with available international data on adipose tissue levels reveal that the organochlorine body burden in the Inuit population of Greenland is presently among the highest resulting from environmental exposure. Images Figure 1 PMID:10504150

  18. Chronic tissue response to untethered microelectrode implants in the rat brain and spinal cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ersen, Ali; Elkabes, Stella; Freedman, David S.; Sahin, Mesut

    2015-02-01

    Objective. Microelectrodes implanted in the central nervous system (CNS) often fail in long term implants due to the immunological tissue response caused by tethering forces of the connecting wires. In addition to the tethering effect, there is a mechanical stress that occurs at the device-tissue interface simply because the microelectrode is a rigid body floating in soft tissue and it cannot reshape itself to comply with changes in the surrounding tissue. In the current study we evaluated the scar tissue formation to tetherless devices with two significantly different geometries in the rat brain and spinal cord in order to investigate the effects of device geometry. Approach. One of the implant geometries resembled the wireless, floating microstimulators that we are currently developing in our laboratory and the other was a (shank only) Michigan probe for comparison. Both electrodes were implanted into either the cervical spinal cord or the motor cortices, one on each side. Main results. The most pronounced astroglial and microglial reactions occurred within 20 μm from the device and decreased sharply at larger distances. Both cell types displayed the morphology of non-activated cells past the 100 μm perimeter. Even though the aspect ratios of the implants were different, the astroglial and microglial responses to both microelectrode types were very mild in the brain, stronger and yet limited in the spinal cord. Significance. These observations confirm previous reports and further suggest that tethering may be responsible for most of the tissue response in chronic implants and that the electrode size has a smaller contribution with floating electrodes. The electrode size may be playing primarily an amplifying role to the tethering forces in the brain whereas the size itself may induce chronic response in the spinal cord where the movement of surrounding tissues is more significant.

  19. Canonical Genetic Signatures of the Adult Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Hawrylycz, Michael; Miller, Jeremy A.; Menon, Vilas; Feng, David; Dolbeare, Tim; Guillozet-Bongaarts, Angela L.; Jegga, Anil G.; Aronow, Bruce J.; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Bernard, Amy; Glasser, Matthew F.; Dierker, Donna L.; Menche, Jörge; Szafer, Aaron; Collman, Forrest; Grange, Pascal; Berman, Kenneth A.; Mihalas, Stefan; Yao, Zizhen; Stewart, Lance; Barabási, Albert-László; Schulkin, Jay; Phillips, John; Ng, Lydia; Dang, Chinh; Haynor, David R.; Jones, Allan; Van Essen, David C.; Koch, Christof; Lein, Ed

    2015-01-01

    The structure and function of the human brain are highly stereotyped, implying a conserved molecular program responsible for its development, cellular structure, and function. We applied a correlation-based metric of “differential stability” (DS) to assess reproducibility of gene expression patterning across 132 structures in six individual brains, revealing meso-scale genetic organization. The highest DS genes are highly biologically relevant, with enrichment for brain-related biological annotations, disease associations, drug targets, and literature citations. Using high DS genes we identified 32 anatomically diverse and reproducible gene expression signatures, which represent distinct cell types, intracellular components, and/or associations with neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. Genes in neuron-associated compared to non-neuronal networks showed higher preservation between human and mouse; however, many diversely-patterned genes displayed dramatic shifts in regulation between species. Finally, highly consistent transcriptional architecture in neocortex is correlated with resting state functional connectivity, suggesting a link between conserved gene expression and functionally relevant circuitry. PMID:26571460

  20. Canonical genetic signatures of the adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Hawrylycz, Michael; Miller, Jeremy A; Menon, Vilas; Feng, David; Dolbeare, Tim; Guillozet-Bongaarts, Angela L; Jegga, Anil G; Aronow, Bruce J; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Bernard, Amy; Glasser, Matthew F; Dierker, Donna L; Menche, Jörg; Szafer, Aaron; Collman, Forrest; Grange, Pascal; Berman, Kenneth A; Mihalas, Stefan; Yao, Zizhen; Stewart, Lance; Barabási, Albert-László; Schulkin, Jay; Phillips, John; Ng, Lydia; Dang, Chinh; Haynor, David R; Jones, Allan; Van Essen, David C; Koch, Christof; Lein, Ed

    2015-12-01

    The structure and function of the human brain are highly stereotyped, implying a conserved molecular program responsible for its development, cellular structure and function. We applied a correlation-based metric called differential stability to assess reproducibility of gene expression patterning across 132 structures in six individual brains, revealing mesoscale genetic organization. The genes with the highest differential stability are highly biologically relevant, with enrichment for brain-related annotations, disease associations, drug targets and literature citations. Using genes with high differential stability, we identified 32 anatomically diverse and reproducible gene expression signatures, which represent distinct cell types, intracellular components and/or associations with neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. Genes in neuron-associated compared to non-neuronal networks showed higher preservation between human and mouse; however, many diversely patterned genes displayed marked shifts in regulation between species. Finally, highly consistent transcriptional architecture in neocortex is correlated with resting state functional connectivity, suggesting a link between conserved gene expression and functionally relevant circuitry. PMID:26571460

  1. Light microscopic localization of brain opiate receptors: a general autoradiographic method which preserves tissue quality

    SciTech Connect

    Herkenham, M.; Pert, C.B.

    1982-08-01

    A general technique is described for using slide-mounted unfixed tissue sections to characterize and visualize drug and neurotransmitter receptors in brain or other tissues. The preparation of material, from fresh frozen, unfixed brain to dried sections securely attached to slides, is described in detail. The tissue can be kept intact during incubation at varying temperatures in solutions containing radiolabeled ligand, ions, buffers, and allosteric effectors. Strategies are described for determining optimal stereospecific binding with highest signal-to-noise ratios and for determining that a meaningful receptor is being studied. Dry formaldehyde fixation by vapors from heated paraformaldehyde preserves the tissue quality and traps the ligand near its site on the receptor, permitting subsequent histological processing through alcohols, solvents, and aqueous media, including liquid nuclear track emulsion. Visualization of (/sup 3/H)naloxone- or (/sup 3/H)enkephalin-labeled opiate receptor distributions in rat and human brains is achieved by tritium-sensitive film or by classical wet emulsion autoradiography. The advantages of the film include its ease of use and the ability to quantify receptor density by densitometry which can be computer-assisted. The advantage of the emulsion is the greater resolution and the concomitant appearance of morphology in cell-stained sections. Examples of correlations of opiate receptor distributions which underlying cytoarchitecture illustrate the potential for receptor localization studies.

  2. Development of hyaluronic acid-based scaffolds for brain tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tzu-Wei; Spector, Myron

    2009-09-01

    Three-dimensional biodegradable porous scaffolds play vital roles in tissue engineering. In this study, a hyaluronic acid-collagen (HA-Coll) sponge with an open porous structure and mechanical behavior comparable to brain tissue was developed. HA-Coll scaffolds with different mixing ratios were prepared by a freeze-drying technique and crosslinked with water-soluble carbodiimide to improve mechanical stability. The pore structure of the samples was evaluated by light and scanning electron microscopy, and the mechanical behavior was analyzed by mechanical compression and tension testing. The degree of crosslinking was determined by the water absorption and trinitrobenzene sulfonic assay, and the HA content was determined by a carbazole assay. The results showed that HA-Coll scaffolds containing an open porous structure with a homogeneous pore size distribution could be fabricated. Certain features of the mechanical properties of HA-Coll scaffolds prepared with a Coll:HA mixing ratio of 1:2, and pure HA sponges, were comparable with brain tissue. Neural stem cells (NSCs) were expanded in number in monolayer culture and then seeded onto the three-dimensional scaffolds in order to investigate the effects of the different types of scaffolds on neurogenic induction of the cells. This study contributes to the understanding of the effects of HA content and crosslink treatment on pore characteristics, and mechanical behavior essential for the design of HA-Coll scaffolds suitable for NSC growth and differentiation for brain tissue engineering. PMID:19403351

  3. Neuropathological alterations in alcoholic brains. Studies arising from the New South Wales Tissue Resource Centre.

    PubMed

    Harper, Clive; Dixon, Gavin; Sheedy, Donna; Garrick, Therese

    2003-09-01

    Alcohol dependence and abuse are among the most costly health problems in the world from both social and economic points of view. Patterns of drinking appear to be changing throughout the world with more women and young people drinking heavily. Excessive drinking can lead to impairment of cognitive function and structural brain changes--some permanent, some reversible. Patterns of damage appear to relate to lifetime alcohol consumption but, more importantly, to associated medical complications. The most significant of these is the alcohol-related vitamin deficient state, the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS), which is caused by thiamin deficiency but is seen most commonly in alcoholics. Careful selection and classification of alcoholic cases into those with and without these complications, together with detailed quantitative neuropathological analyses has provided data that gives clues to the most vulnerable regions and cells in the brain. Brain shrinkage is largely accounted for by loss of white matter. Some of this damage appears to be reversible. Alcohol-related neuronal loss has been documented in specific regions of the cerebral cortex (superior frontal association cortex), hypothalamus and cerebellum. No change is found in basal ganglia, nucleus basalis, or serotonergic raphe nuclei. Many of these regions which are normal in uncomplicated alcoholics are damaged in those with the WKS. Dendritic and synaptic changes have been documented in alcoholics and these, together with receptor and transmitter changes, may explain functional changes and cognitive deficits, which precede more severe structural neuronal changes. A resource to provide human brain tissues for these types of studies has been developed at the University of Sydney--the New South Wales Tissue Resource Centre. The aim of this facility is to provide research groups throughout the world with fresh and/or frozen tissues from well-characterized cases of alcohol-related brain damage and matched

  4. Measuring cell-type specific differential methylation in human brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Montaño, Carolina M; Irizarry, Rafael A; Kaufmann, Walter E; Talbot, Konrad; Gur, Raquel E; Feinberg, Andrew P; Taub, Margaret A

    2013-01-01

    The behavior of epigenetic mechanisms in the brain is obscured by tissue heterogeneity and disease-related histological changes. Not accounting for these confounders leads to biased results. We develop a statistical methodology that estimates and adjusts for celltype composition by decomposing neuronal and non-neuronal differential signal. This method provides a conceptual framework for deconvolving heterogeneous epigenetic data from postmortem brain studies. We apply it to find cell-specific differentially methylated regions between prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. We demonstrate the utility of the method on both Infinium 450k and CHARM data. PMID:24000956

  5. Stromal vascular progenitors in adult human adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerlin, Ludovic; Donnenberg, Vera S.; Pfeifer, Melanie E.; Meyer, E. Michael; Péault, Bruno; Rubin, J. Peter; Donnenberg, Albert D.

    2014-01-01

    Background The in vivo progenitor of culture-expanded mesenchymal-like adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC) remains elusive, owing in part to the complex organization of stromal cells surrounding the small vessels, and the rapidity with which adipose stromal vascular cells adopt a mesenchymal phenotype in vitro. Methods Immunohistostaining of intact adipose tissue was used to identify 3 markers (CD31, CD34, CD146) which together unambiguously discriminate histologically distinct inner and outer rings of vessel-associated stromal cells, as well as capillary and small vessel endothelial cells. These markers were used in multiparameter flow cytometry in conjunction with stem/progenitor markers (CD90, CD117) to further characterize stromal vascular fraction (SVF) subpopulations. Two mesenchymal and two endothelial populations were isolated by high speed flow cytometric sorting, expanded in short term culture and tested for adipogenesis. Results The inner layer of stromal cells in contact with small vessel endothelium (pericytes) was CD146+/α-SMA+/CD90±/CD34−/CD31−; the outer adventitial stromal ring (designated supra adventitial-adipose stromal cells, SA-ASC) was CD146−/α-SMA−/CD90+/CD34+/CD31−. Capillary endothelial cells were CD31+/CD34+/CD90+ (endothelial progenitor), while small vessel endothelium was CD31+/CD34−/CD90− (endothelial mature). Flow cytometry confirmed these expression patterns and revealed a CD146+/CD90+/CD34+/CD31− pericyte subset that may be transitional between pericytes and SA-ASC. Pericytes had the most potent adipogenic potential, followed by the more numerous SA-ASC. Endothelial populations had significantly reduced adipogenic potential compared to unsorted expanded SVF cells. Conclusions In adipose tissue perivascular stromal cells are organized in two discrete layers, the innermost consisting of CD146+/CD34− pericytes, and the outermost of CD146−/CD34+ SA-ASC, both of which have adipogenic potential in culture. A CD146+/CD

  6. Normal-appearing brain tissue analysis in radiologically isolated syndrome using 3 T MRI.

    PubMed

    Labiano-Fontcuberta, Andrés; Mato-Abad, Virginia; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; Martínez-Ginés, María Luisa; Aladro, Yolanda; Ayuso, Lucía; Domingo-Santos, Ángela; Benito-León, Julián

    2016-07-01

    To date, it remains largely unknown whether there is in radiologically isolated syndrome (RIS) brain damage beyond visible T2 white matter lesions. We used single- voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging (3 T MRI) to analyze normal-appearing brain tissue regions in 18 RIS patients and 18 matched healthy controls. T2-hyperintense lesion volumes and structural brain volumes were also measured. The absolute metabolite concentrations and ratios of total N-acetylaspartate+N-acetylaspartyl glutamate (NAA), choline-containing compounds, myoinositol, and glutamine-glutamate complex to creatine were calculated. Spectral analysis was performed by LCModel. Voxelwise morphometry analysis was performed to localize regions of brain tissue showing significant changes of fractional anisotropy or mean diffusivity. Compared with healthy controls, RIS patients did not show any significant differences in either the absolute concentration of NAA or NAA/Cr ratio in mid-parietal gray matter. A trend toward lower NAA concentrations (-3.35%) was observed among RIS patients with high risk for conversion to multiple sclerosis. No differences in the other metabolites or their ratios were observed. RIS patients showed lower fractional anisotropy only in clusters overlapping lesional areas, namely in the cingulate gyrus bilaterally and the frontal lobe subgyral bilaterally (P < 0.001). Normalized brain and cortical volumes were significantly lower in RIS patients than in controls (P = 0.01 and P = 0.03, respectively). Our results suggest that in RIS, global brain and cortical atrophy are not primarily driven by significant occult microstructural normal appearing brain damage. Longitudinal MRI studies are needed to better understand the pathological processes underlying this novel entity. PMID:27399108

  7. Genetic Methods to Identify and Manipulate Newly Born Neurons in the Adult Brain

    PubMed Central

    Imayoshi, Itaru; Sakamoto, Masayuki; Kageyama, Ryoichiro

    2011-01-01

    Although mammalian neurogenesis is mostly completed by the perinatal period, new neurons are continuously generated in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle and the subgranular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Since the discovery of adult neurogenesis, many extensive studies have been performed on various aspects of adult neurogenesis, including proliferation and fate-specification of adult neural stem cells, and the migration, maturation and synaptic integration of newly born neurons. Furthermore, recent research has shed light on the intensive contribution of adult neurogenesis to olfactory-related and hippocampus-mediated brain functions. The field of adult neurogenesis progressed tremendously thanks to technical advances that facilitate the identification and selective manipulation of newly born neurons among billions of pre-existing neurons in the adult central nervous system. In this review, we introduce recent advances in the methodologies for visualizing newly generated neurons and manipulating neurogenesis in the adult brain. Particularly, the application of site-specific recombinases and Tet inducible system in combination with transgenic or gene targeting strategy is discussed in further detail. PMID:21562606

  8. Brain Blood Flow Related to Acoustic Laryngeal Reaction Time in Adult Developmental Stutterers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Ben C.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This study sought to identify patterns of impaired acoustic laryngeal reaction time as a function of response complexity parallel to metabolic measures of brain function. Findings indicated that the disruption in speech motor control for 16 adult male developmental stutterers was systematically related to metabolic asymmetry in left superior and…

  9. Brain Mapping of Language and Auditory Perception in High-Functioning Autistic Adults: A PET Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, R-A.; Behen, M. E.; Rothermel, R. D.; Chugani, D. C.; Muzik, O.; Mangner, T. J.; Chugani, H. T.

    1999-01-01

    A study used positron emission tomography (PET) to study patterns of brain activation during auditory processing in five high-functioning adults with autism. Results found that participants showed reversed hemispheric dominance during the verbal auditory stimulation and reduced activation of the auditory cortex and cerebellum. (CR)

  10. Humor, Rapport, and Uncomfortable Moments in Interactions with Adults with Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovarsky, Dana; Schiemer, Christine; Murray, Allison

    2011-01-01

    We examined uncomfortable moments that damaged rapport during group interactions between college students in training to become speech-language pathologists and adults with traumatic brain injury. The students worked as staff in a community-based program affiliated with a university training program that functioned as a recreational gathering…

  11. Adding chemo after radiation treatment improves survival for adults with a type of brain tumor

    Cancer.gov

    Adults with low-grade gliomas, a form of brain tumor, who received chemotherapy following completion of radiation therapy lived longer than patients who received radiation therapy alone, according to long-term follow-up results from a NIH-supported random

  12. Combined Cognitive-Psychological-Physical Intervention Induces Reorganization of Intrinsic Functional Brain Architecture in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhiwei; Zhu, Xinyi; Yin, Shufei; Wang, Baoxi; Niu, Yanan; Huang, Xin; Li, Rui; Li, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that enriched mental, physical, and socially stimulating activities are beneficial for counteracting age-related decreases in brain function and cognition in older adults. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to demonstrate the functional plasticity of brain activity in response to a combined cognitive-psychological-physical intervention and investigated the contribution of the intervention-related brain changes to individual performance in healthy older adults. The intervention was composed of a 6-week program of combined activities including cognitive training, Tai Chi exercise, and group counseling. The results showed improved cognitive performance and reorganized regional homogeneity of spontaneous fluctuations in the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals in the superior and middle temporal gyri, and the posterior lobe of the cerebellum, in the participants who attended the intervention. Intriguingly, the intervention-induced changes in the coherence of local spontaneous activity correlated with the improvements in individual cognitive performance. Taken together with our previous findings of enhanced resting-state functional connectivity between the medial prefrontal cortex and medial temporal lobe regions following a combined intervention program in older adults, we conclude that the functional plasticity of the aging brain is a rather complex process, and an effective cognitive-psychological-physical intervention is helpful for maintaining a healthy brain and comprehensive cognition during old age. PMID:25810927

  13. Neural Underpinnings of Working Memory in Adult Survivors of Childhood Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    King, Tricia Z; Na, Sabrina; Mao, Hui

    2015-08-01

    Adult survivors of childhood brain tumors are at risk for cognitive performance deficits that require the core cognitive skill of working memory. Our goal was to examine the neural mechanisms underlying working memory performance in survivors. We studied the working memory of adult survivors of pediatric posterior fossa brain tumors using a letter n-back paradigm with varying cognitive workload (0-, 1-, 2-, and 3-back) and functional magnetic resonance imaging as well as neuropsychological measures. Survivors of childhood brain tumors evidenced lower working memory performance than demographically matched healthy controls. Whole-brain analyses revealed significantly greater blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) activation in the left superior / middle frontal gyri and left parietal lobe during working memory (2-back versus 0-back contrast) in survivors. Left frontal BOLD response negatively correlated with 2- and 3-back working memory performance, Auditory Consonant Trigrams (ACT), and Digit Span Backwards. In contrast, parietal lobe BOLD response negatively correlated with 0-back (vigilance task) and ACT. The results revealed that adult survivors of childhood posterior fossa brain tumors recruited additional cognitive control resources in the prefrontal lobe during increased working memory demands. This increased prefrontal activation is associated with lower working memory performance and is consistent with the allocation of latent resources theory. PMID:26234757

  14. Traumatic Brain Injury Activation of the Adult Subventricular Zone Neurogenic Niche.

    PubMed

    Chang, Eun Hyuk; Adorjan, Istvan; Mundim, Mayara V; Sun, Bin; Dizon, Maria L V; Szele, Francis G

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common in both civilian and military life, placing a large burden on survivors and society. However, with the recognition of neural stem cells in adult mammals, including humans, came the possibility to harness these cells for repair of damaged brain, whereas previously this was thought to be impossible. In this review, we focus on the rodent adult subventricular zone (SVZ), an important neurogenic niche within the mature brain in which neural stem cells continue to reside. We review how the SVZ is perturbed following various animal TBI models with regards to cell proliferation, emigration, survival, and differentiation, and we review specific molecules involved in these processes. Together, this information suggests next steps in attempting to translate knowledge from TBI animal models into human therapies for TBI. PMID:27531972

  15. Traumatic Brain Injury Activation of the Adult Subventricular Zone Neurogenic Niche

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Eun Hyuk; Adorjan, Istvan; Mundim, Mayara V.; Sun, Bin; Dizon, Maria L. V.; Szele, Francis G.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common in both civilian and military life, placing a large burden on survivors and society. However, with the recognition of neural stem cells in adult mammals, including humans, came the possibility to harness these cells for repair of damaged brain, whereas previously this was thought to be impossible. In this review, we focus on the rodent adult subventricular zone (SVZ), an important neurogenic niche within the mature brain in which neural stem cells continue to reside. We review how the SVZ is perturbed following various animal TBI models with regards to cell proliferation, emigration, survival, and differentiation, and we review specific molecules involved in these processes. Together, this information suggests next steps in attempting to translate knowledge from TBI animal models into human therapies for TBI. PMID:27531972

  16. [Regulation of neurogenesis: factors affecting of new neurons formation in adult mammals brain].

    PubMed

    Respondek, Michalina; Buszman, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenesis is a complex and multi-step process of generating completely functional neurons. This process in adult brain is based on pluripotentional neuronal stem cells (NSC), which are able to proliferation and differentiation into mature neurons or glial cells. NSC are located in subgranular zone inside hippocampus and in subventricular zone. The new neurons formation depends on many endo- and exogenous factors which modulate each step of neurogenesis. This article describes the most important regulators of adult neurogenesis, mainly: neurotrophins, growth factors, hormones, neurotransmitters and microenvironment of NSC. Some drugs, especially antipsychotics, antidepressants and normothymics may affect the neurogenic properties of adult brain. Moreover pathological processes such as neuroinflammation, stroke or epilepsy are able to induce proliferation of NSC. The proneurogenic effects of psychotropic drugs and pathological processes are associated with their ability to increase some hormones and neurotrophins level, as well as with rising the expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein and metalloproteinase MMP-2. Additionaly, some drugs, for example haloperidol, are able to block prolactin and dopaminergic neuroblasts receptors. Down-regulation of adult neurogenesis is associated with alcohol abuse and high stress level. Negative effect of many drugs, such as cytostatics, COX-2 inhibitors and opioides was also observed. The proneurogenic effect of described factors suggest their broad therapeutic potential and gives a new perspective on an effective and modern treatment of many neuropsychiatric disorders. This effect can also help to clarify the pathogenesis of disorders associated with proliferation and degeneration of adult brain cells. PMID:27259217

  17. Robust Volume Assessment of Brain Tissues for 3-Dimensional Fourier Transformation MRI via a Novel Multispectral Technique

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Jyh-Wen; Chen, Clayton C.; Wu, Yi-Ying; Chen, Hung-Chieh; Tsai, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Hsian-Min; Lan, Tsuo-Hung; Ouyang, Yen-Chieh; Lee, San-Kan

    2015-01-01

    A new TRIO algorithm method integrating three different algorithms is proposed to perform brain MRI segmentation in the native coordinate space, with no need of transformation to a standard coordinate space or the probability maps for segmentation. The method is a simple voxel-based algorithm, derived from multispectral remote sensing techniques, and only requires minimal operator input to depict GM, WM, and CSF tissue clusters to complete classification of a 3D high-resolution multislice-multispectral MRI data. Results showed very high accuracy and reproducibility in classification of GM, WM, and CSF in multislice-multispectral synthetic MRI data. The similarity indexes, expressing overlap between classification results and the ground truth, were 0.951, 0.962, and 0.956 for GM, WM, and CSF classifications in the image data with 3% noise level and 0% non-uniformity intensity. The method particularly allows for classification of CSF with 0.994, 0.961 and 0.996 of accuracy, sensitivity and specificity in images data with 3% noise level and 0% non-uniformity intensity, which had seldom performed well in previous studies. As for clinical MRI data, the quantitative data of brain tissue volumes aligned closely with the brain morphometrics in three different study groups of young adults, elderly volunteers, and dementia patients. The results also showed very low rates of the intra- and extra-operator variability in measurements of the absolute volumes and volume fractions of cerebral GM, WM, and CSF in three different study groups. The mean coefficients of variation of GM, WM, and CSF volume measurements were in the range of 0.03% to 0.30% of intra-operator measurements and 0.06% to 0.45% of inter-operator measurements. In conclusion, the TRIO algorithm exhibits a remarkable ability in robust classification of multislice-multispectral brain MR images, which would be potentially applicable for clinical brain volumetric analysis and explicitly promising in cross

  18. Microglial Kv1.3 Channels and P2Y12 Receptors Differentially Regulate Cytokine and Chemokine Release from Brain Slices of Young Adult and Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Brain tissue damage following stroke or traumatic brain injury is accompanied by neuroinflammatory processes, while microglia play a central role in causing and regulating neuroinflammation via production of proinflammatory substances, including cytokines and chemokines. Here, we used brain slices, an established in situ brain injury model, from young adult and aged mice to investigate cytokine and chemokine production with particular focus on the role of microglia. Twenty four hours after slice preparation, higher concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines, i.e. TNF-α and IL-6, and chemokines, i.e. CCL2 and CXCL1, were released from brain slices of aged mice than from slices of young adult mice. However, maximal microglial stimulation with LPS for 24 h did not reveal age-dependent differences in the amounts of released cytokines and chemokines. Mechanisms underlying microglial cytokine and chemokine production appear to be similar in young adult and aged mice. Inhibition of microglial Kv1.3 channels with margatoxin reduced release of IL-6, but not release of CCL2 and CXCL1. In contrast, blockade of microglial P2Y12 receptors with PSB0739 inhibited release of CCL2 and CXCL1, whereas release of IL-6 remained unaffected. Cytokine and chemokine production was not reduced by inhibitors of Kir2.1 K+ channels or adenosine receptors. In summary, our data suggest that brain tissue damage-induced production of cytokines and chemokines is age-dependent, and differentially regulated by microglial Kv1.3 channels and P2Y12 receptors. PMID:26011191

  19. Quantitative Expression Profile of Distinct Functional Regions in the Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Nagano, Mamoru; Uno, Kenichiro D.; Tsujino, Kaori; Hanashima, Carina; Shigeyoshi, Yasufumi; Ueda, Hiroki R.

    2011-01-01

    The adult mammalian brain is composed of distinct regions with specialized roles including regulation of circadian clocks, feeding, sleep/awake, and seasonal rhythms. To find quantitative differences of expression among such various brain regions, we conducted the BrainStars (B*) project, in which we profiled the genome-wide expression of ∼50 small brain regions, including sensory centers, and centers for motion, time, memory, fear, and feeding. To avoid confounds from temporal differences in gene expression, we sampled each region every 4 hours for 24 hours, and pooled the samples for DNA-microarray assays. Therefore, we focused on spatial differences in gene expression. We used informatics to identify candidate genes with expression changes showing high or low expression in specific regions. We also identified candidate genes with stable expression across brain regions that can be used as new internal control genes, and ligand-receptor interactions of neurohormones and neurotransmitters. Through these analyses, we found 8,159 multi-state genes, 2,212 regional marker gene candidates for 44 small brain regions, 915 internal control gene candidates, and 23,864 inferred ligand-receptor interactions. We also found that these sets include well-known genes as well as novel candidate genes that might be related to specific functions in brain regions. We used our findings to develop an integrated database (http://brainstars.org/) for exploring genome-wide expression in the adult mouse brain, and have made this database openly accessible. These new resources will help accelerate the functional analysis of the mammalian brain and the elucidation of its regulatory network systems. PMID:21858037

  20. Rapid and efficient gene delivery into the adult mouse brain via focal electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Tadashi; Nishimura, Yusuke; Gotoh, Hitoshi; Ono, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    In vivo gene delivery is required for studying the cellular and molecular mechanisms of various biological events. Virus-mediated gene transfer or generation of transgenic animals is widely used; however, these methods are time-consuming and expensive. Here we show an improved electroporation technique for acute gene delivery into the adult mouse brain. Using a syringe-based microelectrode, local DNA injection and the application of electric current can be performed simultaneously; this allows rapid and efficient gene transduction of adult non-neuronal cells. Combining this technique with various expression vectors that carry specific promoters resulted in targeted gene expression in astrocytic cells. Our results constitute a powerful strategy for the genetic manipulation of adult brains in a spatio-temporally controlled manner. PMID:27430903

  1. Rapid and efficient gene delivery into the adult mouse brain via focal electroporation.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Tadashi; Nishimura, Yusuke; Gotoh, Hitoshi; Ono, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    In vivo gene delivery is required for studying the cellular and molecular mechanisms of various biological events. Virus-mediated gene transfer or generation of transgenic animals is widely used; however, these methods are time-consuming and expensive. Here we show an improved electroporation technique for acute gene delivery into the adult mouse brain. Using a syringe-based microelectrode, local DNA injection and the application of electric current can be performed simultaneously; this allows rapid and efficient gene transduction of adult non-neuronal cells. Combining this technique with various expression vectors that carry specific promoters resulted in targeted gene expression in astrocytic cells. Our results constitute a powerful strategy for the genetic manipulation of adult brains in a spatio-temporally controlled manner. PMID:27430903

  2. Removing brakes on adult brain plasticity: from molecular to behavioral interventions

    PubMed Central

    Bavelier, D.; Levi, D.M.; Li, R.W.; Dan, Y.; Hensch, T.K.

    2010-01-01

    Adult brain plasticity, although possible, remains more restricted in scope than during development. Here, we address conditions under which circuit rewiring may be facilitated in the mature brain. At a cellular and molecular level, adult plasticity is actively limited. Some of these “brakes” are structural, such as peri-neuronal nets or myelin, which inhibit neurite outgrowth. Others are functional, acting directly upon excitatory-inhibitory balance within local circuits. Plasticity in adulthood can be induced either by lifting these brakes through invasive interventions or by exploiting endogenous permissive factors, such as neuromodulators. Using the amblyopic visual system as a model, we discuss genetic, pharmacological, and environmental removal of brakes to enable recovery of vision in adult rodents. Although these mechanisms remain largely uncharted in the human, we consider how they may provide a biological foundation for the remarkable increase in plasticity after action video game play by amblyopic subjects. PMID:21068299

  3. Effects of the Variation in Brain Tissue Mechanical Properties on the Intracranial Response of a 6-Year-Old Child

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Shihai; Li, Haiyan; Li, Xiangnan; Ruan, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    Brain tissue mechanical properties are of importance to investigate child head injury using finite element (FE) method. However, these properties used in child head FE model normally vary in a large range in published literatures because of the insufficient child cadaver experiments. In this work, a head FE model with detailed anatomical structures is developed from the computed tomography (CT) data of a 6-year-old healthy child head. The effects of brain tissue mechanical properties on traumatic brain response are also analyzed by reconstruction of a head impact on engine hood according to Euro-NCAP testing regulation using FE method. The result showed that the variations of brain tissue mechanical parameters in linear viscoelastic constitutive model had different influences on the intracranial response. Furthermore, the opposite trend was obtained in the predicted shear stress and shear strain of brain tissues caused by the variations of mentioned parameters. PMID:26495031

  4. Effects of the Variation in Brain Tissue Mechanical Properties on the Intracranial Response of a 6-Year-Old Child.

    PubMed

    Cui, Shihai; Li, Haiyan; Li, Xiangnan; Ruan, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    Brain tissue mechanical properties are of importance to investigate child head injury using finite element (FE) method. However, these properties used in child head FE model normally vary in a large range in published literatures because of the insufficient child cadaver experiments. In this work, a head FE model with detailed anatomical structures is developed from the computed tomography (CT) data of a 6-year-old healthy child head. The effects of brain tissue mechanical properties on traumatic brain response are also analyzed by reconstruction of a head impact on engine hood according to Euro-NCAP testing regulation using FE method. The result showed that the variations of brain tissue mechanical parameters in linear viscoelastic constitutive model had different influences on the intracranial response. Furthermore, the opposite trend was obtained in the predicted shear stress and shear strain of brain tissues caused by the variations of mentioned parameters. PMID:26495031

  5. Regional Brain Volumes and ADHD Symptoms in Middle-Aged Adults: The PATH Through Life Study.

    PubMed

    Das, Debjani; Cherbuin, Nicolas; Anstey, Kaarin J; Abhayaratna, Walter; Easteal, Simon

    2014-02-24

    Objective: We investigated whether volumetric differences in ADHD-associated brain regions are related to current symptoms of inattention and hyperactivity in healthy middle-aged adults and whether co-occurring anxiety/depression symptoms moderate these relationships. Method: ADHD Self-Report Scale and Brief Patient Health Questionnaire were used to assess current symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, anxiety, and depression in a population-based sample (n = 269). Brain volumes, measured using a semi-automated method, were analyzed using multiple regression and structural equation modeling to evaluate brain volume-inattention/hyperactivity symptom relationships for selected regions. Results: Volumes of the left nucleus accumbens and a region overlapping the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex were positively associated with inattention symptoms. Left hippocampal volume was negatively associated with hyperactivity symptoms. The brain volume-inattention/hyperactivity symptom associations were stronger when anxiety/depression symptoms were controlled for. Conclusion: Inattention and hyperactivity symptoms in middle-aged adults are associated with different brain regions and co-occurring anxiety/depression symptoms moderate these brain-behavior relationships. (J. of Att. Dis. XXXX; XX(X) XX-XX). PMID:24567365

  6. JH Biosynthesis by Reproductive Tissues and Corpora Allata in Adult Longhorned Beetles, Apriona germari

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report on juvenile hormone (JH) biosynthesis from long-chain intermediates by specific reproductive system tissues and the corpora allata (CA) prepared from adult longhorned beetles, Apriona germari. Testes, male accessory glands (MAGs), ovaries and CA contain the long-chain intermediates in the ...

  7. Acquired Tissue-Specific Promoter Bivalency Is a Basis for PRC2 Necessity in Adult Cells.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Unmesh; Nalapareddy, Kodandaramireddy; Saxena, Madhurima; O'Neill, Nicholas K; Pinello, Luca; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Orkin, Stuart H; Shivdasani, Ramesh A

    2016-06-01

    Bivalent promoters in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) carry methylation marks on two lysine residues, K4 and K27, in histone3 (H3). K4me2/3 is generally considered to promote transcription, and Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) places K27me3, which is erased at lineage-restricted genes when ESCs differentiate in culture. Molecular defects in various PRC2 null adult tissues lack a unifying explanation. We found that epigenomes in adult mouse intestine and other self-renewing tissues show fewer and distinct bivalent promoters compared to ESCs. Groups of tissue-specific genes that carry bivalent marks are repressed, despite the presence of promoter H3K4me2/3. These are the predominant genes de-repressed in PRC2-deficient adult cells, where aberrant expression is proportional to the H3K4me2/3 levels observed at their promoters in wild-type cells. Thus, in adult animals, PRC2 specifically represses genes with acquired, tissue-restricted promoter bivalency. These findings provide new insights into specificity in chromatin-based gene regulation. PMID:27212235

  8. Segmentation of tumor and edema along with healthy tissues of brain using wavelets and neural networks.

    PubMed

    Demirhan, Ayşe; Toru, Mustafa; Guler, Inan

    2015-07-01

    Robust brain magnetic resonance (MR) segmentation algorithms are critical to analyze tissues and diagnose tumor and edema in a quantitative way. In this study, we present a new tissue segmentation algorithm that segments brain MR images into tumor, edema, white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The detection of the healthy tissues is performed simultaneously with the diseased tissues because examining the change caused by the spread of tumor and edema on healthy tissues is very important for treatment planning. We used T1, T2, and FLAIR MR images of 20 subjects suffering from glial tumor. We developed an algorithm for stripping the skull before the segmentation process. The segmentation is performed using self-organizing map (SOM) that is trained with unsupervised learning algorithm and fine-tuned with learning vector quantization (LVQ). Unlike other studies, we developed an algorithm for clustering the SOM instead of using an additional network. Input feature vector is constructed with the features obtained from stationary wavelet transform (SWT) coefficients. The results showed that average dice similarity indexes are 91% for WM, 87% for GM, 96% for CSF, 61% for tumor, and 77% for edema. PMID:25265636

  9. Dielectric properties of brain tissue between 0.01 and 10 GHz.

    PubMed

    Foster, K R; Schepps, J L; Stoy, R D; Schwan, H P

    1979-11-01

    Dielectric permittivity and conductivity are reported for grey and white matter from dog brain tissue between 0.01 and 10 GHz. Between 0.01 and approximately 1 GHz, the permittivity decreases and conductivity increases as a power law of frequency. Above 1 GHz, the conductivity increases quadratically with frequency due to dipolar reorientation of free water molecules in tissue; the apparent rotational relaxation frequency at 37 degrees C is 21--25 GHz, slightly below the 25 GHz characteristic frequency of pure water at that temperature. The microwave data are analysed using the Maxwell mixture theory applicable for a suspension of nonconducting, low permittivity spheres in bulk water. From the increase in conductivity above 1 GHz, and the tissue permittivity at 2--4 GHz, the apparent volume fraction of water is approximately 0.70 and 0.55 for grey and white matter, respectively, about 10--15% lower than respective values from the literature. This discrepancy is apparently due to a small fraction of water which does not contribute to the tissue permittivity above 1 GHz. Empirical equations are given to summarise the dielectric properties of 'average' brain tissue at 37 degrees C for future theoretical studies of microwave absorption in the head. PMID:531093

  10. Brain tissue oxygen, carbon dioxide, and pH in neurosurgical patients at risk for ischemia.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, W E; Charbel, F T; Edelman, G

    1996-03-01

    A sensor that measures oxygen pressure (PO2), carbon dioxide pressure (PCO2), and pH was evaluated in brain tissue of patients at risk for ischemia. The sensor is 0.5 mm in diameter and was inserted into cortex tissue in 14 patients undergoing craniotomy for cerebrovascular surgery. A compromised cerebral circulation was identified in 8 of 14 patients by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scan, cerebral angiography, and transient ischemic episodes before surgery. Under baseline conditions with isoflurane anesthesia and normal blood gases, tissue P02 was lower in the eight compromised compared to six noncompromised patients (noncompromised 37 +/- 12 mm Hg, compromised 10 +/- 5 mm Hg; P < 0.05), PCO2 was increased (noncompromised 49 +/- 5 mm Hg, compromised 72 +/- 23 mm Hg; P < 0.05), and pH was decreased (noncompromised 7.16 +/- 0.08, compromised 6.82 +/- 0.21; P < 0.05). Critical tissue values for the identification of ischemia were a P02 of 20 mm Hg, PCO2 of 60 mm Hg, and a pH of 7.0. These results suggest that brain tissue measures of P02, PCO2, and pH provide information on the adequacy of cerebral perfusion in neurosurgical patients. PMID:8623965

  11. Gradient-based Magnetic Resonance Electrical Properties Imaging of Brain Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiaen; Zhang, Xiaotong; Schmitter, Sebastian; Van de Moortele, Pierre-Francois; He, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Electrical properties tomography (EPT) holds promise for noninvasively mapping at high spatial resolution the electrical conductivity and permittivity of biological tissues in vivo using a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. In the present study, we developed a novel gradient-based EPT approach with greatly improved tissue boundary reconstruction and largely elevated robustness against measurement noise compared to existing techniques. Using a 7 Tesla MRI system, we report high-quality in vivo human brain electrical property images with refined structural details, which can potentially merit clinical diagnosis (such as cancer detection) and high-field MRI applications (local SAR quantification) in the future. PMID:25571378

  12. Analgesic use and the risk of primary adult brain tumor.

    PubMed

    Egan, Kathleen M; Nabors, Louis B; Thompson, Zachary J; Rozmeski, Carrie M; Anic, Gabriella A; Olson, Jeffrey J; LaRocca, Renato V; Chowdhary, Sajeel A; Forsyth, Peter A; Thompson, Reid C

    2016-09-01

    Glioma and meningioma are uncommon tumors of the brain with few known risk factors. Regular use of aspirin has been linked to a lower risk of gastrointestinal and other cancers, though evidence for an association with brain tumors is mixed. We examined the association of aspirin and other analgesics with the risk of glioma and meningioma in a large US case-control study. Cases were persons recently diagnosed with glioma or meningioma and treated at medical centers in the southeastern US. Controls were persons sampled from the same communities as the cases combined with friends and other associates of the cases. Information on past use of analgesics (aspirin, other anti-inflammatory agents, and acetaminophen) was collected in structured interviews. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) for analgesic use adjusted for potential confounders. All associations were considered according to indication for use. A total of 1123 glioma cases, 310 meningioma cases and 1296 controls were included in the analysis. For indications other than headache, glioma cases were less likely than controls to report regular use of aspirin (OR 0.69; CI 0.56, 0.87), in a dose-dependent manner (P trend < 0.001). No significant associations were observed with other analgesics for glioma, or any class of pain reliever for meningioma. Results suggest that regular aspirin use may reduce incidence of glioma. PMID:26894804

  13. Brain Pathology in Adult Rats Treated With Domoic Acid.

    PubMed

    Vieira, A C; Alemañ, N; Cifuentes, J M; Bermúdez, R; Peña, M López; Botana, L M

    2015-11-01

    Domoic acid (DA) is a neurotoxin reported to produce damage to the hippocampus, which plays an important role in memory. The authors inoculated rats intraperitoneally with an effective toxic dose of DA to study the distribution of the toxin in major internal organs by using immunohistochemistry, as well as to evaluate the induced pathology by means of histopathologic and immunohistochemical methods at different time points after toxin administration (6, 10, and 24 hours; 5 and 54 days). DA was detected by immunohistochemistry exclusively in pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus at 6 and 10 hours after dosing. Lesions induced by DA were prominent at 5 days following treatment in selected regions of the brain: hippocampus, amygdala, piriform and perirhinal cortices, olfactory tubercle, septal nuclei, and thalamus. The authors found 2 types of lesions: delayed death of selective neurons and large areas of necrosis, both accompanied by astrocytosis and microgliosis. At 54 days after DA exposure, the pathology was characterized by still-distinguishable dying neurons, calcified lesions in the thalamus, persistent astrocytosis, and pronounced microgliosis. The expression of nitric oxide synthases suggests a role for nitric oxide in the pathogenesis of neuronal degeneration and chronic inflammation induced by DA in the brain. PMID:25939577

  14. Buyanghuanwu decoction promotes angiogenesis after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury: mechanisms of brain tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen-Qiang; Song, Jun-Ying; Jia, Ya-Quan; Zhang, Yun-Ke

    2016-03-01

    Buyanghuanwu decoction has been shown to protect against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, rats were intragastrically given Buyanghuanwu decoction, 15 mL/kg, for 3 days. A rat model of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury was established by middle cerebral artery occlusion. In rats administered Buyanghuanwu decoction, infarct volume was reduced, serum vascular endothelial growth factor and integrin αvβ3 levels were increased, and brain tissue vascular endothelial growth factor and CD34 expression levels were increased compared with untreated animals. These effects of Buyanghuanwu decoction were partially suppressed by an angiogenesis inhibitor (administered through the lateral ventricle for 7 consecutive days). These data suggest that Buyanghuanwu decoction promotes angiogenesis, improves cerebral circulation, and enhances brain tissue repair after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:27127482

  15. Changes of amino acid gradients in brain tissues induced by microwave irradiation and other means

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, C.F.; Parsons, J.E.; Oh, C.C.; Wasterlain, C.G.; Baldwin, R.A. )

    1989-09-01

    Focused microwave irradiation to the head (FMI) has been used extensively by neurochemists for rapid inactivation of enzymatic activity in brain tissues and the preservation, for in vitro analysis, of in vivo substrate concentrations. Periodically the suitability of this technique for regional studies has been questioned. Evidence has now been obtained, on the basis of altered concentration gradients for GABA and taurine from the Substantia Nigra (SN) to an Adjacent Dorsal Area (ADJ), that FMI not only inactivates enzymes, but also facilitates rapid diffusion of small molecules from areas of high concentrations to adjacent areas of lower concentration. To a lesser extent, the implantation of plastic injection cannulas also decreased these concentration gradients. These results offer clear evidence that FMI is ill suited and unreliable for studies designed to map and compare the in vivo regional concentrations of diffusible organic molecules (such as amino acids) in brain tissues. Any invasive technique that compromises membrane barriers is likely to produce smaller similar effects.

  16. Buyanghuanwu decoction promotes angiogenesis after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury: mechanisms of brain tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen-qiang; Song, Jun-ying; Jia, Ya-quan; Zhang, Yun-ke

    2016-01-01

    Buyanghuanwu decoction has been shown to protect against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, rats were intragastrically given Buyanghuanwu decoction, 15 mL/kg, for 3 days. A rat model of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury was established by middle cerebral artery occlusion. In rats administered Buyanghuanwu decoction, infarct volume was reduced, serum vascular endothelial growth factor and integrin αvβ3 levels were increased, and brain tissue vascular endothelial growth factor and CD34 expression levels were increased compared with untreated animals. These effects of Buyanghuanwu decoction were partially suppressed by an angiogenesis inhibitor (administered through the lateral ventricle for 7 consecutive days). These data suggest that Buyanghuanwu decoction promotes angiogenesis, improves cerebral circulation, and enhances brain tissue repair after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:27127482

  17. Open lung ventilation in neurosurgery: an update on brain tissue oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Wolf, S; Plev, D V; Trost, H A; Lumenta, C B

    2005-01-01

    Recently, we showed the feasibility of ventilating neurosurgical patients with acute intracranial pathology and concomitant acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) according the so-called Open Lung approach. This technique consists of low tidal volume, elevated positive expiratory pressure (PEEP) level and initial recruitment maneuvers to open up collapsed alveoli. In this report, we focus on our experience to guide recruitment with brain tissue oxygenation (pbrO2) probes. We studied recruitment maneuvers in thirteen patients with ARDS and acute brain injury such as subarachnoid hemorrhage and traumatic brain injury. A pbrO2 probe was implanted in brain tissue at risk for hypoxia. Recruitment maneuvers were performed at an inspired oxygen frcation (FiO2) of 1.0 and a PEEP level of 30 40 cmH2O for 40 seconds. The mean FiO2 necessary for normoxemia could be decreased from 0.85 +/- 0.17 before recruitment to 0.55 +/- 0.12 after 24 hours, while mean PbrO2 (24.6 mmHg before recruitment) did not change. At a mean of 17 minutes after the first recruitment maneuver, PbrO2 showed peak a value of 35.6 +/- 16.6 mmHg, reflecting improvement in arterial oxygenation at an FiO2 of 1.0. Brain tissue oxygenation monitoring provides a useful adjunct to estimate the effects of recruitment maneuvers and ventilator settings in neurosurgical patients with acute lung injury. PMID:16463830

  18. Efficacy of 68Ga-DOTATOC Positron Emission Tomography (PET) CT in Children and Young Adults With Brain Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-07

    Acoustic Schwannoma; Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Meningioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Choroid Plexus Tumor; Adult Craniopharyngioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade I Meningioma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Papillary Meningioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET); Childhood Choroid Plexus Tumor; Childhood Craniopharyngioma; Childhood Ependymoblastoma; Childhood Grade I Meningioma; Childhood Grade II Meningioma; Childhood Grade III Meningioma; Childhood High-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Infratentorial Ependymoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Medulloepithelioma; Childhood Supratentorial Ependymoma; Meningeal Melanocytoma; Newly Diagnosed Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Diffuse Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Fibrillary Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Gemistocytic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Gliomatosis Cerebri; Recurrent Childhood Gliosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood

  19. Brain tissue interaction with three-dimensional, honeycomb polycaprolactone-based scaffolds designed for cranial reconstruction following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Choy, David Kim Seng; Nga, Vincent Diong Weng; Lim, Jing; Lu, Jia; Chou, Ning; Yeo, Tseng Tsai; Teoh, Swee-Hin

    2013-11-01

    Following traumatic brain injury (TBI), resultant voids are unable to support injections of suspension treatments, leading to ineffective healing. Moreover, without a structure to support the large defect, the defect site suffers from mechanical instability, which may impair the healing process. Therefore, having a delivery vehicle that can temporarily fill and provide mechanical support to the defect site may alleviate the healing process. In this work, we reported for the first time, the inflammatory response of brain tissue with polycaprolactone (PCL) and PCL-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) scaffolds designed and fabricated for cranial reconstruction. After cranial defects were created in Sprague-Dawley rats, PCL and PCL-TCP scaffolds were implanted for a period of 1 week and 1 month. Following histology and immunofluorescence staining with the ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule-1 (IBA-1), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), nestin, and neuronal nuclei (NeuN), results indicated that IBA-1-positive activated microglia were observed across all groups, and declined significantly by 1 month (p<0.05). Interestingly, IBA-1-positive microglia were significantly fewer in the PCL-TCP group (p<0.05), suggesting a relatively milder inflammatory response. A decrease in the number of GFAP-positive cells among all groups over time (>29%) was also observed. Initially, astrocyte hypertrophy was observed proximal to the TBI site (55% in PCL and PCL-TCP groups, 75% in control groups), but it subsided by 1 month. Proximal to the TBI site, nestin immunoreactivity was intense during week 1, and which reduced by 1 month across all groups. NeuN-positive neurons were shrunken proximal to the TBI site (<0.9 mm), 32% smaller in the PCL-TCP group and 27% smaller in the PCL group. Based on above data indicating the comparatively milder, initial inflammatory response of brain tissue to PCL-TCP scaffolds, it is suggested that PCL-TCP scaffolds have notable clinical advantages as

  20. Rejecting familiar distracters during recognition in young adults with traumatic brain injury and in healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    Ozen, Lana J; Skinner, Erin I; Fernandes, Myra A

    2010-05-01

    The most common cognitive complaint reported by healthy older adults and young adults with traumatic brain injury (TBI) is memory difficulties. We investigated the effects of normal aging and the long-term effects of TBI in young adults on the susceptibility to incorrectly endorse distracter information on a memory test. Prior to a study phase, participants viewed a "pre-exposure" list containing distracter words, presented once or three times, and half of the target study words. Subsequently, during the study phase, all target words were presented such that, across lists, study words were viewed either once or three times. On the recognition test, TBI and older adult participants were more likely to falsely endorse "pre-exposed" distracter words viewed three times as being from the target study list, compared to non-head-injured young controls. Normal aging and head injury in young may similarly compromise one's ability to reject highly familiar, but distracting, information during recognition. Older adult and TBI participants were also slower to complete the Trail Making task and had poorer output on a Digit Span task, suggesting these two populations share a deficit in executive function and working memory. Similar changes in frontal lobe function may underlie these shared cognitive deficits. PMID:20211048

  1. The brain tissue response to surgical injury and its possible contribution to glioma recurrence.

    PubMed

    Hamard, Lauriane; Ratel, David; Selek, Laurent; Berger, François; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Wion, Didier

    2016-05-01

    Surgery is the first line therapy for glioma. However, glioma recurs in 90 % of the patients in the resection margin. The impact of surgical brain injury (SBI) on glioma recurrence is largely overlooked. Herein, we review some of the mechanisms involved in tissue repair that may impact glioma recurrence at the resection margin. Many processes or molecules involved in tissue repair after brain injury are also critical for glioma growth. They include a wide array of secreted growth factors, cytokines and transcription factors including NFКB and STAT3 which in turn activate proliferative and anti-apoptotic genes and processes such as angiogenesis and inflammation. Because some residual glioma cells always remain in the tumor resection margin, there are now compelling arguments to suggest that some aspects of the brain tissue response to SBI can also participate to glioma recurrence at the resection margin. Brain tissue response to SBI recruits angiogenesis and inflammation that precede and then follow tumor recurrence at the resection margin. The healing response to SBI is double edged, as inflammation is involved in regeneration and healing, and has both pro- and anti-tumorigenic functions. A promising therapeutic approach is to normalize and re-educate the molecular and cellular responses at the resection margin to promote anti-tumorigenic processes involved in healing while inhibiting pro-tumorigenic activities. Manipulation of the inflammatory response to SBI to prevent local recurrence could also enhance the efficacy of other therapies such as immunotherapy. However, our current knowledge is far from sufficient to achieve this goal. Acknowledging, understanding and manipulating the double-edged role played by SBI in glioma recurrence is surely challenging, but it cannot be longer delayed. PMID:26961772

  2. Validation of partial tissue segmentation of single-channel magnetic resonance images of the brain.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, T J; Frank, R J; Szumski, N R; Brown, C K; Damasio, H

    2000-12-01

    We describe and evaluate a practical, automated algorithm based on local statistical mixture modeling for segmenting single-channel, T1-weighted volumetric magnetic resonance images of the brain into gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid. We employed a stereological sampling method to assess, prospectively, the performance of the method with respect to human experts on 10 normal T1-weighted brain scans acquired with a three-dimensional gradient echo pulse sequence. The overall kappa statistic for the concordance of the algorithm with the human experts was 0.806, while that among raters, excluding the algorithm, was 0.802. The algorithm had better agreement with the modal expert decision (kappa = 0.878). The algorithm could not be distinguished from the experts by this measure. We also validated the algorithm on a simulated MR scan of a digital brain phantom with known tissue composition. Global gray matter and white matter errors were 1% and <1%, respectively, and correlation coefficients with the underlying tissue model were 0.95 for gray matter, 0.98 for white matter, and 0.95 for cerebrospinal fluid. In both approaches to validation, we evaluated both local and global performance of the algorithm. Human experts generated slightly higher global gray matter proportion estimates on the test brain scans relative to the algorithm (3.7%) and on the simulated MR scan relative to the true tissue model (4.4%). The algorithm underestimated gray in some subcortical nuclei which contain admixed gray and white matter. We demonstrate the reliability of the method on individual 1 NEX data sets of the test subjects, and its insensitivity to the precise values of initial model parameters. The output of this algorithm is suitable for quantifying cerebral cortical tissue, using a commonly performed commercial pulse sequence. PMID:11112396

  3. Adult-derived stem cells and their potential for use in tissue repair and molecular medicine.

    PubMed

    Young, Henry E; Duplaa, Cecile; Katz, Ryan; Thompson, Tina; Hawkins, Kristina C; Boev, Angel N; Henson, Nicholas L; Heaton, Matthew; Sood, Rajiv; Ashley, Dennis; Stout, Christopher; Morgan, Joe H; Uchakin, Peter N; Rimando, Marylen; Long, Gypsy F; Thomas, Crystal; Yoon, Jee-In; Park, Ji Eun; Hunt, Darren J; Walsh, Nancy M; Davis, Josh C; Lightner, Joel E; Hutchings, Anna M; Murphy, Meredith L; Boswell, Elizabeth; McAbee, Jessica A; Gray, Brandon M; Piskurich, Janet; Blake, Lisa; Collins, Julie A; Moreau, Catherine; Hixson, Douglas; Bowyer, Frank P; Black, Asa C

    2005-01-01

    This report reviews three categories of precursor cells present within adults. The first category of precursor cell, the epiblast-like stem cell, has the potential of forming cells from all three embryonic germ layer lineages, e.g., ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm. The second category of precursor cell, the germ layer lineage stem cell, consists of three separate cells. Each of the three cells is committed to form cells limited to a specific embryonic germ layer lineage. Thus the second category consists of germ layer lineage ectodermal stem cells, germ layer lineage mesodermal stem cells, and germ layer lineage endodermal stem cells. The third category of precursor cells, progenitor cells, contains a multitude of cells. These cells are committed to form specific cell and tissue types and are the immediate precursors to the differentiated cells and tissues of the adult. The three categories of precursor cells can be readily isolated from adult tissues. They can be distinguished from each other based on their size, growth in cell culture, expressed genes, cell surface markers, and potential for differentiation. This report also discusses new findings. These findings include the karyotypic analysis of germ layer lineage stem cells; the appearance of dopaminergic neurons after implantation of naive adult pluripotent stem cells into a 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned Parkinson's model; and the use of adult stem cells as transport mechanisms for exogenous genetic material. We conclude by discussing the potential roles of adult-derived precursor cells as building blocks for tissue repair and as delivery vehicles for molecular medicine. PMID:16202227

  4. Evaluation of a Reading Comprehension Strategy Package to Improve Reading Comprehension of Adult College Students with Acquired Brain Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Gina G.

    2013-01-01

    Adults with mild to moderate acquired brain injury (ABI) often pursue post-secondary or professional education after their injuries in order to enter or re-enter the job market. An increasing number of these adults report problems with reading-to-learn. The problem is particularly concerning given the growing population of adult survivors of ABI.…

  5. Super Resolution Imaging of Genetically Labeled Synapses in Drosophila Brain Tissue.

    PubMed

    Spühler, Isabelle A; Conley, Gaurasundar M; Scheffold, Frank; Sprecher, Simon G

    2016-01-01

    Understanding synaptic connectivity and plasticity within brain circuits and their relationship to learning and behavior is a fundamental quest in neuroscience. Visualizing the fine details of synapses using optical microscopy remains however a major technical challenge. Super resolution microscopy opens the possibility to reveal molecular features of synapses beyond the diffraction limit. With direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, dSTORM, we image synaptic proteins in the brain tissue of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Super resolution imaging of brain tissue harbors difficulties due to light scattering and the density of signals. In order to reduce out of focus signal, we take advantage of the genetic tools available in the Drosophila and have fluorescently tagged synaptic proteins expressed in only a small number of neurons. These neurons form synapses within the calyx of the mushroom body, a distinct brain region involved in associative memory formation. Our results show that super resolution microscopy, in combination with genetically labeled synaptic proteins, is a powerful tool to investigate synapses in a quantitative fashion providing an entry point for studies on synaptic plasticity during learning and memory formation. PMID:27303270

  6. Simultaneously multiparametric spectroscopic monitoring of tissue viability in the brain and small intestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolmasov, Michael; Barbiro-Michaely, Efrat; Mayevsky, Avraham

    2007-02-01

    Under body O II imbalance, the Autonomic Nervous System is responsible for redistribution of blood flow with preference to the most vital organs (brain, heart), while the less vital organs (intestine, GI tract) are hypoperfused. The aim of this study was to develop and use an animal model for real time monitoring of tissue viability in the brain, and the small intestine, under various levels of oxygen and blood supply. Male Wistar rats were anesthetized, the brain cortex and intestinal serosa were exposed and connected by optical fibers to the Multi-Site Multi-Parametric (MSMP) monitoring system. Tissue blood flow (TBF) and mitochondrial NADH redox state were monitored simultaneously in the two organs. The rats were subjected to short anoxia, 20 minutes hypoxia or epinephrine (2& 8μg/kg I.V.). Under oxygen deficiency, cerebral blood flow (CBF) was elevated, whereas intestinal TBF was reduced. Mitochondrial NADH was significantly elevated in both organs. Systemic injection of Adrenaline showed a dose-depended increase in systemic blood pressure and CBF response whereas, intestinal TBF similarly decreased in both doses. In addition, NADH was elevated (reduced form) in the intestine whereas oxidation was observed in the brain. In conclusion, our preliminary results may imply the ability of using of the MSMP for monitoring non-vital organs in order to detect early changes in the balance between oxygen supply and demand in the body.

  7. Super Resolution Imaging of Genetically Labeled Synapses in Drosophila Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Spühler, Isabelle A.; Conley, Gaurasundar M.; Scheffold, Frank; Sprecher, Simon G.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding synaptic connectivity and plasticity within brain circuits and their relationship to learning and behavior is a fundamental quest in neuroscience. Visualizing the fine details of synapses using optical microscopy remains however a major technical challenge. Super resolution microscopy opens the possibility to reveal molecular features of synapses beyond the diffraction limit. With direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, dSTORM, we image synaptic proteins in the brain tissue of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Super resolution imaging of brain tissue harbors difficulties due to light scattering and the density of signals. In order to reduce out of focus signal, we take advantage of the genetic tools available in the Drosophila and have fluorescently tagged synaptic proteins expressed in only a small number of neurons. These neurons form synapses within the calyx of the mushroom body, a distinct brain region involved in associative memory formation. Our results show that super resolution microscopy, in combination with genetically labeled synaptic proteins, is a powerful tool to investigate synapses in a quantitative fashion providing an entry point for studies on synaptic plasticity during learning and memory formation. PMID:27303270

  8. Imaging Nicotine in Rat Brain Tissue by Use of Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Thomas, Mathew; Carson, James P.; Smith, Jordan N.; Timchalk, Charles; Laskin, Julia

    2013-01-15

    Imaging mass spectrometry offers simultaneous detection of drugs, drug metabolites and endogenous substances in a single experiment. This is important when evaluating effects of a drug on a complex organ system such as the brain, where there is a need to understand how regional drug distribution impacts function. Nicotine is an addictive drug and its action in the brain is of high interest. Here we use nanospray desorption electrospray ionization, nano-DESI, imaging to discover the localization of nicotine in rat brain tissue after in vivo administration of nicotine. Nano-DESI is a new ambient technique that enables spatially-resolved analysis of tissue samples without special sample pretreatment. We demonstrate high sensitivity of nano-DESI imaging that enables detection of only 0.7 fmole nicotine per pixel in the complex brain matrix. Furthermore, by adding deuterated nicotine to the solvent, we examined how matrix effects, ion suppression, and normalization affect the observed nicotine distribution. Finally, we provide preliminary results suggesting that nicotine localizes to the hippocampal substructure called dentate gyrus.

  9. Effect of ginkgolide B on brain metabolism and tissue oxygenation in severe haemorrhagic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Chun-Ling; Shen, Dong-Fang; Wang, Peng-Jun; Li, Hu-Lun; Zhang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Ginkgolide B, a diterpene, is an herbal constituent isolated from the leaves of Ginkgo biloba tree. The present study demonstrates the effect of ginkgolide B in osmotherapy on brain metabolism and tissue oxygenation. Multimodality monitoring including intracranial pressure (ICP), cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), partial pressure of brain tissue oxygen (PbtO2), lactate/pyruvate ratio (LPR) and microdialysis were employed to study the effect of ginkgolide B osmotherapy. The results demonstrated that administration of 15% solution of ginkgolide B to the comatose patients with raised ICP (> 20 mm Hg) and resistant to standard therapy led to a significant decrease in ICP. The cerebral microdialysis was used to compare mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), ICP, CPP, PbtO2, brain lactate, pyruvate and glucose level after hourly intervals starting 3 h before and up to 4 h after hyperosmolar therapy. There was a decrease in ICP in 45 min from 23 ± 14 mm Hg (P < 0.001) to 18 ± 24 mm Hg and increase in CPP after 1 h of gingkolide B infusion from 74 ± 18 to 85 ± 22 mm Hg (P < 0.002). However there was no significant effect on MAP but PbtO2 was maintained in the range of 22-26. The peak lactate/pyruvate ratio was recorded at the time of initiation of osmotherapy (44 ± 20) with an 18% decrease over 2 h following gingkolide B therapy. Also the brain glucose remained unaffected. PMID:26064244

  10. PDT-induced apoptosis in brain tissue in vivo: a retrospective study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilge, Lothar D.; Portnoy, Michelle; Wilson, Brian C.

    1999-07-01

    The apoptotic response of normal brain and intracranial VX2 tumor following photodynamic therapy mediated by five different photodynamic drugs, Photofrin, ALA, AlClPc, SnET2 and mTHPC, was evaluated in a preliminary retrospective analysis. Rabbit brain, with or without tumor, was treated by PDT with interstitial light delivery. Histological sections at 24 h post PDT were assessed by the TUNEL assay. Confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to determine the total apoptotic cell count and the spatial distribution of apoptotic bodies within the tissue. The data were confirmed qualitatively by light microscopy on adjacent H&E-stained sections. Light-only and drug-only controls produced background levels. The highest apoptotic count was seen with Photofrin. The counts in AlClPc-treated animals were not above the background level, while the other 3 photosensitizers gave intermediate levels. With some, but not all, drugs the spatial distribution of apoptotic bodies correlated well with the light fluence distribution. Apoptosis was seen outside the zone of frank coagulative necrosis. There was not apparent drug-dose dependency at the relatively high doses used here. The retrospective nature of this study did not allow optimization of the treatment parameters. Nevertheless, the findings have potentially significant implications, both for understanding the mechanisms of apoptosis in brain tissue and for improving the clinical use of PDT for treatment of patients with malignant brain tumors.

  11. Optical vortex beam transmission with different OAM in scattering beads and brain tissue media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. B.; Shi, Lingyan; Lindwasser, Lukas; Marque, Paulo; Lavery, M. P. J.; Alfano, R. R.

    2016-03-01

    Light transmission of Laguerre Gaussian (LG) vortex beams with different orbital angular momentum (OAM) values (L) in scattering beads and mouse brain tissue media were experimentally investigated for the first time in comparison with Gaussian (G) beams. The LG beams with different OAM were generated using a spatial light modulator (SLM) in reflection mode. The scattering beads media consist of various sizes and concentrations of latex beads in water solutions. The transmissions of LG and G beams through scattering beads and brain tissue media were measured with different ratios of sample thicknesses (z) to scattering mean free path (ls) of the turbid media, z/ls. The results indicate that within the ballistic region where z/ls is small, the LG and G beams show no significant difference, while in the diffusive region where z/ls is higher, the vortex beams show higher transmission than G beams. In the diffusive region, the LG beams with higher L values show higher transmission than the beams with lower L values due to the eigen channels in the media. The transition points from the ballistic to diffusive regions for different scattering beads and brain tissue media were studied.

  12. [Characteristics of brain tissue damage in kaolin-induced infantile rat hydrocephalus].

    PubMed

    Okuyama, T; Hashi, K; Okada, T; Sasaki, S

    1986-01-01

    Experimental hydrocephalus was induced by an intracisternal injection of 4% or 40% kaolin suspension in 2 days old Wistar rats. They were examined histologically and microangiographically 2 weeks after the injection of kaolin. Hydrocephalic rats were classified into 2 groups, severe hydrocephalic group A and mild hydrocephalic group B. In group A, a marked enlargement of the entire ventricular system with a thinning of the cerebral mantle was observed. On the other hand, the dilatation of the fourth ventricle was more pronounced compared with the other ventricles in group B. In group A, a spongy appearance of brain tissue was observed in the periventricular white matter accompanied with an intracerebral cavity. In these edematous areas, the lack of carbon black perfusion was apparent indicating an occurrence of microcirculatory disturbances. These microcirculatory disturbances and mechanical compression to the cerebral parenchyma may produce defective brain tissue (intracerebral cavity formation). The ependymal cell walls and subependymal glial cell layers were well preserved in spite of the damaged periventricular white matter. In group A, kaolin was present in the fourth ventricle and Sylvian aqueduct. Subependymal gliosis containing macrophages and newly produced blood vessels were observed in the region between the periventricular brain tissue and kaolin granules. These findings indicate that kaolin may produce changes in the ependymal cell and cerebral parenchyma as well as fibrosis and meningitis in the subarachnoid space. PMID:3964487

  13. Realistic Numerical and Analytical Modeling of Light Scattering in Brain Tissue for Optogenetic Applications123

    PubMed Central

    Meitav, Nizan; Shoham, Shy

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In recent years, optogenetics has become a central tool in neuroscience research. Estimating the transmission of visible light through brain tissue is of crucial importance for controlling the activation levels of neurons in different depths, designing optical systems, and avoiding lesions from excessive power density. The Kubelka–Munk model and Monte Carlo simulations have previously been used to model light propagation through rodents' brain tissue, however, these prior attempts suffer from fundamental shortcomings. Here, we introduce and study two modified approaches for modeling the distributions of light emanating from a multimode fiber and scattering through tissue, using both realistic numerical Monte Carlo simulations and an analytical approach based on the beam-spread function approach. We demonstrate a good agreement of the new methods' predictions both with recently published data, and with new measurements in mouse brain cortical slices, where our results yield a new cortical scattering length estimate of ∼47 µm at λ = 473 nm, significantly shorter than ordinarily assumed in optogenetic applications. PMID:26866055

  14. Chronic histological effects of ultrasonic hyperthermia on normal feline brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Lyons, B E; Obana, W G; Borcich, J K; Kleinman, R; Singh, D; Britt, R H

    1986-05-01

    The histopathological changes associated with ultrasonic heating of normal cat brain have been correlated with thermal distributions. Ultrasound energy was applied for 50 min at different intensities to generate tissue temperatures from 42 to 48 degrees C. Animals were sacrificed at various intervals from 1 to 56 days. The organization and resolution of thermal damage was characterized by three stages of histopathological changes within the nervous tissue. The acute stage (Days 1-3) was defined by (1) extensive coagulation necrosis, (2) pyknosis of neuronal elements in the gray matter, (3) edema and vacuolation in the white matter, and (4) polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The subacute stage (Days 3-21) was characterized by (1) the appearance of lipid-laden macrophages, (2) liquefaction of the necrotic regions, (3) fibroblastic proliferation, and (4) vascular proliferation with some perivascular inflammatory infiltration (lymphocytes). Lastly, the chronic stage (Days 21-56) was defined by (1) fibrosis (reticulin and collagen formation) and (2) gliosis (reactive astrocytic proliferation) occurring around the fluid-filled necrotic center. Analysis of these data has also included a study of the lesion size versus the dose (temperature for 50 min) of heating. The results demonstrate a significant linear dose-response correlation. The results of this study indicate that the histological appearance and time course of repair of thermal injury in the normal brain tissue are analogous to acute brain necrosis resulting from cerebral infarction, except the thermal damage does not result in significant hemorrhage. PMID:3704114

  15. Protein analysis through Western blot of cells excised individually from human brain and muscle tissue

    PubMed Central

    Koob, A.O.; Bruns, L.; Prassler, C.; Masliah, E.; Klopstock, T.; Bender, A.

    2016-01-01

    Comparing protein levels from single cells in tissue has not been achieved through Western blot. Laser capture microdissection allows for the ability to excise single cells from sectioned tissue and compile an aggregate of cells in lysis buffer. In this study we analyzed proteins from cells excised individually from brain and muscle tissue through Western blot. After we excised individual neurons from the substantia nigra of the brain, the accumulated surface area of the individual cells was 120,000, 24,000, 360,000, 480,000, 600,000 μm2. We used an optimized Western blot protocol to probe for tyrosine hydroxylase in this cell pool. We also took 360,000 μm2 of astrocytes (1700 cells) and analyzed the specificity of the method. In muscle we were able to analyze the proteins of the five complexes of the electron transport chain through Western blot from 200 human cells. With this method, we demonstrate the ability to compare cell-specific protein levels in the brain and muscle and describe for the first time how to visualize proteins through Western blot from cells captured individually. PMID:22402104

  16. Distinction of brain tissue, low grade and high grade glioma with time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yong, William H; Butte, Pramod V; Pikul, Brian K; Jo, Javier A; Fang, Qiyin; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Black, Keith; Marcu, Laura

    2006-01-01

    Neuropathology frozen section diagnoses are difficult in part because of the small tissue samples and the paucity of adjunctive rapid intraoperative stains. This study aims to explore the use of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy as a rapid adjunctive tool for the diagnosis of glioma specimens and for distinction of glioma from normal tissues intraoperatively. Ten low grade gliomas, 15 high grade gliomas without necrosis, 6 high grade gliomas with necrosis and/or radiation effect, and 14 histologically uninvolved "normal" brain specimens are spectroscopicaly analyzed and contrasted. Tissue autofluorescence was induced with a pulsed Nitrogen laser (337 nm, 1.2 ns) and the transient intensity decay profiles were recorded in the 370-500 nm spectral range with a fast digitized (0.2 ns time resolution). Spectral intensities and time-dependent parameters derived from the time-resolved spectra of each site were used for tissue characterization. A linear discriminant analysis diagnostic algorithm was used for tissue classification. Both low and high grade gliomas can be distinguished from histologically uninvolved cerebral cortex and white matter with high accuracy (above 90%). In addition, the presence or absence of treatment effect and/or necrosis can be identified in high grade gliomas. Taking advantage of tissue autofluorescence, this technique facilitates a direct and rapid investigation of surgically obtained tissue. PMID:16368511

  17. Mathematical model of the effect of ischemia-reperfusion on brain capillary collapse and tissue swelling.

    PubMed

    Mohamed Mokhtarudin, M J; Payne, S J

    2015-05-01

    Restoration of an adequate cerebral blood supply after an ischemic attack is a primary clinical goal. However, the blood-brain barrier may break down after a prolonged ischemia causing the fluid in the blood plasma to filtrate and accumulate into the cerebral tissue interstitial space. Accumulation of this filtration fluid causes the cerebral tissue to swell, a condition known as vasogenic oedema. Tissue swelling causes the cerebral microvessels to be compressed, which may further obstruct the blood flow into the tissue, thus leading to the no-reflow phenomenon or a secondary ischemic stroke. The actual mechanism of this however is still not fully understood. A new model is developed here to study the effect of reperfusion on the formation of vasogenic oedema and cerebral microvessel collapse. The formation of vasogenic oedema is modelled using the capillary filtration equation while vessel collapse is modelled using the tube law of microvessel. Tissue swelling is quantified in terms of displacement, which is modelled using poroelastic theory. The results show that there is an increase in tissue displacement and interstitial pressure after reperfusion. In addition, the results also show that vessel collapse can occur at high value of reperfusion pressure, low blood osmotic pressure, high cerebral capillary permeability and low cerebral capillary stiffness. This model provides insight on the formation of ischemia-reperfusion injury by tissue swelling and vessel collapse. PMID:25749185

  18. Influence of brain tumors on the MR spectra of healthy brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Busch, M; Liebenrodt, K; Gottfried, S; Weiland, E; Vollmann, W; Mateiescu, S; Winter, S; Lange, S; Sahinbas, H; Baier, J; van Leeuwen, P; Grönemeyer, D

    2011-01-01

    The neurochemical environment of nontumorous white matter tissue was investigated in 135 single voxel spectra of "healthy" white matter regions of 43 tumor patients and 129 spectra of 52 healthy subjects. Spectra were acquired with short TE and TR values. With the data of tumor patients, it was examined whether differences were caused by the tumor itself or aggressive tumor therapies as confounding factors. Comparing the spectra of both classes, an excellent differentiation was possible based on the metabolite peak of N-acetylaspartate (P ≈ 0) and myoinositol (P < 0.03). The area under curve of the receiver operating characteristic was calculated as 0.86 and 0.62, respectively. With linear discriminant analysis using combinations of integrals, a prediction was possible, whether a spectrum belonged to the patient or the healthy subject class with an overall accuracy above 80%. The confounding factors could be ruled out as source of the differences. The results show strong evidence for an influence of malignant growth on the biochemical environment of nontumorous white matter tissue. Because of the T(1) weighting, the measured differences between both classes were most likely concentration changes interfered by T(1) effects. The underlying processes will be subject of future studies. PMID:20859993

  19. Sleep and synaptic plasticity in the developing and adult brain.

    PubMed

    Frank, Marcos G

    2015-01-01

    Sleep is hypothesized to play an integral role in brain plasticity. This has traditionally been investigated using behavioral assays. In the last 10-15 years, studies combining sleep measurements with in vitro and in vivo models of synaptic plasticity have provided exciting new insights into how sleep alters synaptic strength. In addition, new theories have been proposed that integrate older ideas about sleep function and recent discoveries in the field of synaptic plasticity. There remain, however, important challenges and unanswered questions. For example, sleep does not appear to have a single effect on synaptic strength. An unbiased review of the literature indicates that the effects of sleep vary widely depending on ontogenetic stage, the type of waking experience (or stimulation protocols) that precede sleep and the type of neuronal synapse under examination. In this review, I discuss these key findings in the context of current theories that posit different roles for sleep in synaptic plasticity. PMID:24671703

  20. Identification of some volatile endogenous constituents in rat brain tissue and the effects of lithium carbonate and chloral hydrate.

    PubMed

    Politzer, I R; McDonald, L K; Laseter, J L

    1976-11-01

    Nine endogenous volatile compounds were found in rat brain tissue, and were identified by mass spectrometry as chloroform, a 5-C-aldehyde, dimethyl disulphide, 2,5-dimethyl tetrahydrofuran, a 8-C-alkane, xylene, 2-heptanone, heptaldehyde and 2-n-pentylfuran. Using gas chromatographic and gas chromatographic mass spectrometric techniques, it was established that lithium carbonate did not induce the production of detectable amounts of any new volatile compounds in brain tissue. However, after administration of chloral hydrate, trichloroethanol, a compound not normally present in rat brain tissue, was found to be present. PMID:996360

  1. Brain metabolite concentrations across cortical regions in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Bracken, Bethany K.; Jensen, J. Eric; Prescot, Andrew P.; Cohen, Bruce M.; Renshaw, Perry F.; Öngür, Dost

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) can provide in vivo information about metabolite levels across multiple brain regions. This study used MRS to examine concentrations of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), a marker of neuronal integrity and function, and choline (Cho) which is related to the amount of cell membrane per unit volume, in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and parieto-occipital cortex (POC) in healthy individuals. Data were drawn from two experiments which examined glutamatergic and GABAergic signaling in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. After controlling for gray matter percentages, NAA/Creatine (Cr) was 18% higher in POC than in ACC (p<0.001); Cho/Cr was 46% lower in POC than in ACC (p<0.001). There was an effect of study (p<0.001 for both metabolites), but no region by study interaction (NAA p=0.101, Cho p=0.850). Since NAA is localized to the intracellular space, these data suggest that ACC neuronal compartment is reduced as compared with POC, or that there is a lower concentration of NAA per cell in the ACC than POC, or both. Since elevated Cho suggests more cell membrane per unit volume, reduced NAA in ACC appears to be coupled with increases in overall cell membrane compartment. These findings are consistent with a number of previous studies using proton MRS which found increasing NAA and decreasing Cho moving caudally, and with post mortem anatomical studies which found neurons in more widely spaced bundles in ACC when compared to parietal and occipital cortices. MRS may be a useful tool for studying physical properties of the living human brain. PMID:21081116

  2. Microarray analysis of thyroid hormone-induced changes in mRNA expression in the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Haas, Michael J; Mreyoud, Amjad; Fishman, Miriam; Mooradian, Arshag D

    2004-07-15

    To determine which genes in the adult rat brain are regulated by thyroid hormone (TH), we used microarrays to examine the effect of hyperthyroidism on neuron-specific gene expression. Four-month-old male Fisher 344 rats were rendered hyperthyroid by intraperitoneal injection of 3,5,3'-L-triiodothyronine (T3, 15 microg/100 g body weight) for 10 consecutive days. To minimize interindividual variability, pooled cerebral tissue RNA from four-control and five-hyperthyroid rats was hybridized in duplicates to the Affymetrix (Santa Clara, CA) U34N rat neurobiology microarray, which contains probes for 1224 neural-specific genes. Changes in gene expression were considered significant only if they were observed in both pair-wise comparisons as well as by Northern blot analysis. Hyperthyroidism was associated with modest changes in the expression of only 11 genes. The expression of the phosphodiesterase Enpp2, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (Mog), microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2), growth hormone (GH), Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase beta-subunit (Camk2b), neuron-specific protein PEP-19 (Pcp4), a sodium-dependent neurotransmitter, and the myelin-associated glycoprotein (S-MAG) was significantly increased. Three genes were suppressed by hyperthyroidism, including the activity and neurotransmitter-induced early genes-1 and -7 (ANIA-1 and ANIA-7) and the guanine nucleotide-binding protein one (Gnb1). The present study underscores the paucity of TH responsive genes in adult cerebral tissue. PMID:15234464

  3. New tissue priors for improved automated classification of subcortical brain structures on MRI.

    PubMed

    Lorio, S; Fresard, S; Adaszewski, S; Kherif, F; Chowdhury, R; Frackowiak, R S; Ashburner, J; Helms, G; Weiskopf, N; Lutti, A; Draganski, B

    2016-04-15

    Despite the constant improvement of algorithms for automated brain tissue classification, the accurate delineation of subcortical structures using magnetic resonance images (MRI) data remains challenging. The main difficulties arise from the low gray-white matter contrast of iron rich areas in T1-weighted (T1w) MRI data and from the lack of adequate priors for basal ganglia and thalamus. The most recent attempts to obtain such priors were based on cohorts with limited size that included subjects in a narrow age range, failing to account for age-related gray-white matter contrast changes. Aiming to improve the anatomical plausibility of automated brain tissue classification from T1w data, we have created new tissue probability maps for subcortical gray matter regions. Supported by atlas-derived spatial information, raters manually labeled subcortical structures in a cohort of healthy subjects using magnetization transfer saturation and R2* MRI maps, which feature optimal gray-white matter contrast in these areas. After assessment of inter-rater variability, the new tissue priors were tested on T1w data within the framework of voxel-based morphometry. The automated detection of gray matter in subcortical areas with our new probability maps was more anatomically plausible compared to the one derived with currently available priors. We provide evidence that the improved delineation compensates age-related bias in the segmentation of iron rich subcortical regions. The new tissue priors, allowing robust detection of basal ganglia and thalamus, have the potential to enhance the sensitivity of voxel-based morphometry in both healthy and diseased brains. PMID:26854557

  4. New tissue priors for improved automated classification of subcortical brain structures on MRI☆

    PubMed Central

    Lorio, S.; Fresard, S.; Adaszewski, S.; Kherif, F.; Chowdhury, R.; Frackowiak, R.S.; Ashburner, J.; Helms, G.; Weiskopf, N.; Lutti, A.; Draganski, B.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the constant improvement of algorithms for automated brain tissue classification, the accurate delineation of subcortical structures using magnetic resonance images (MRI) data remains challenging. The main difficulties arise from the low gray-white matter contrast of iron rich areas in T1-weighted (T1w) MRI data and from the lack of adequate priors for basal ganglia and thalamus. The most recent attempts to obtain such priors were based on cohorts with limited size that included subjects in a narrow age range, failing to account for age-related gray-white matter contrast changes. Aiming to improve the anatomical plausibility of automated brain tissue classification from T1w data, we have created new tissue probability maps for subcortical gray matter regions. Supported by atlas-derived spatial information, raters manually labeled subcortical structures in a cohort of healthy subjects using magnetization transfer saturation and R2* MRI maps, which feature optimal gray-white matter contrast in these areas. After assessment of inter-rater variability, the new tissue priors were tested on T1w data within the framework of voxel-based morphometry. The automated detection of gray matter in subcortical areas with our new probability maps was more anatomically plausible compared to the one derived with currently available priors. We provide evidence that the improved delineation compensates age-related bias in the segmentation of iron rich subcortical regions. The new tissue priors, allowing robust detection of basal ganglia and thalamus, have the potential to enhance the sensitivity of voxel-based morphometry in both healthy and diseased brains. PMID:26854557

  5. Segmentation of center brains and optic lobes in 3D confocal images of adult fruit fly brains.

    PubMed

    Lam, Shing Chun Benny; Ruan, Zongcai; Zhao, Ting; Long, Fuhui; Jenett, Arnim; Simpson, Julie; Myers, Eugene W; Peng, Hanchuan

    2010-02-01

    Automatic alignment (registration) of 3D images of adult fruit fly brains is often influenced by the significant displacement of the relative locations of the two optic lobes (OLs) and the center brain (CB). In one of our ongoing efforts to produce a better image alignment pipeline of adult fruit fly brains, we consider separating CB and OLs and align them independently. This paper reports our automatic method to segregate CB and OLs, in particular under conditions where the signal to noise ratio (SNR) is low, the variation of the image intensity is big, and the relative displacement of OLs and CB is substantial. We design an algorithm to find a minimum-cost 3D surface in a 3D image stack to best separate an OL (of one side, either left or right) from CB. This surface is defined as an aggregation of the respective minimum-cost curves detected in each individual 2D image slice. Each curve is defined by a list of control points that best segregate OL and CB. To obtain the locations of these control points, we derive an energy function that includes an image energy term defined by local pixel intensities and two internal energy terms that constrain the curve's smoothness and length. Gradient descent method is used to optimize this energy function. To improve both the speed and robustness of the method, for each stack, the locations of optimized control points in a slice are taken as the initialization prior for the next slice. We have tested this approach on simulated and real 3D fly brain image stacks and demonstrated that this method can reasonably segregate OLs from CBs despite the aforementioned difficulties. PMID:19698789

  6. The functional organisation of glia in the adult brain of Drosophila and other insects

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Tara N.; Meinertzhagen, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    This review annotates and categorises the glia of adult Drosophila and other model insects and describes the developmental origins of these in the Drosophila optic lobe. The functions of glia in the adult vary depending upon their sub-type and location in the brain. The task of annotating glia is essentially complete only for the glia of the fly's lamina, which comprise: two types of surface glia - the pseudocartridge and fenestrated glia; two types of cortex glia - the distal and proximal satellite glia; and two types of neuropile glia - the epithelial and marginal glia. We advocate that the term subretinal glia, as used to refer to both pseudocartridge and fenestrated glia, be abandoned. Other neuropiles contain similar glial subtypes, but other than the antennal lobes these have not been described in detail. Surface glia form the blood brain barrier, regulating the flow of substances into and out of the nervous system, both for the brain as a whole and the optic neuropiles in particular. Cortex glia provide a second level of barrier, wrapping axon fascicles and isolating neuronal cell bodies both from neighbouring brain regions and from their underlying neuropiles. Neuropile glia can be generated in the adult and a subtype, ensheathing glia, are responsible for cleaning up cellular debris during Wallerian degeneration. Both the neuropile ensheathing and astrocyte-like glia may be involved in clearing neurotransmitters from the extracellular space, thus modifying the levels of histamine, glutamate and possibly dopamine at the synapse to ultimately affect behaviour. PMID:20109517

  7. Localization and regulation of PML bodies in the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Hall, Małgorzata H; Magalska, Adriana; Malinowska, Monika; Ruszczycki, Błażej; Czaban, Iwona; Patel, Satyam; Ambrożek-Latecka, Magdalena; Zołocińska, Ewa; Broszkiewicz, Hanna; Parobczak, Kamil; Nair, Rajeevkumar R; Rylski, Marcin; Pawlak, Robert; Bramham, Clive R; Wilczyński, Grzegorz M

    2016-06-01

    PML is a tumor suppressor protein involved in the pathogenesis of promyelocytic leukemia. In non-neuronal cells, PML is a principal component of characteristic nuclear bodies. In the brain, PML has been implicated in the control of embryonic neurogenesis, and in certain physiological and pathological phenomena in the adult brain. Yet, the cellular and subcellular localization of the PML protein in the brain, including its presence in the nuclear bodies, has not been investigated comprehensively. Because the formation of PML bodies appears to be a key aspect in the function of the PML protein, we investigated the presence of these structures and their anatomical distribution, throughout the adult mouse brain. We found that PML is broadly expressed across the gray matter, with the highest levels in the cerebral and cerebellar cortices. In the cerebral cortex PML is present exclusively in neurons, in which it forms well-defined nuclear inclusions containing SUMO-1, SUMO 2/3, but not Daxx. At the ultrastructural level, the appearance of neuronal PML bodies differs from the classic one, i.e., the solitary structure with more or less distinctive capsule. Rather, neuronal PML bodies have the form of small PML protein aggregates located in the close vicinity of chromatin threads. The number, size, and signal intensity of neuronal PML bodies are dynamically influenced by immobilization stress and seizures. Our study indicates that PML bodies are broadly involved in activity-dependent nuclear phenomena in adult neurons. PMID:25956166

  8. Calpain proteolysis of alpha II-spectrin in the normal adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Huh, G Y; Glantz, S B; Je, S; Morrow, J S; Kim, J H

    2001-12-01

    The proteolysis of alphaII-spectrin by calpain may be physiologically involved with synaptic remodeling, long-term potentiation, and memory formation. Calpain activation may also mediate neuronal apoptosis, responses to hypoxic insult, and excitotoxic injury. Surprisingly little is known of the activity of these calpain-mediated processes in the adult human brain. Using an antibody that specifically recognizes calpain-cleaved alphaII-spectrin, we have mapped the topographic distribution of the major alphaII-spectrin break-down product (alphaII-bdp1) in six adult brains examined post-mortem. All brains were from patients without evident neurological disease. Focally positive alphaII-bdp1 was consistently detected in the neuropil of the cortical gray matter, in occasional pyramidal neurons, and in rare reactive astrocytes in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Cerebellar Purkinje cells were more frequently, and more intensely, immunopositive. In all fields, staining was most intense in the soma and dendrites of neurons. There was no correlation of the frequency of positive cells with the postmortem interval or clinical condition. While these findings do not rigorously exclude contributions from postmortem calpain activation, they do suggest that a low-level of calpain processing of alphaII-spectrin is likely to be a constitutive process in the adult human brain. PMID:11720774

  9. Restraint Stress-Induced Morphological Changes at the Blood-Brain Barrier in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sántha, Petra; Veszelka, Szilvia; Hoyk, Zsófia; Mészáros, Mária; Walter, Fruzsina R.; Tóth, Andrea E.; Kiss, Lóránd; Kincses, András; Oláh, Zita; Seprényi, György; Rákhely, Gábor; Dér, András; Pákáski, Magdolna; Kálmán, János; Kittel, Ágnes; Deli, Mária A.

    2016-01-01

    Stress is well-known to contribute to the development of both neurological and psychiatric diseases. While the role of the blood-brain barrier is increasingly recognized in the development of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier has been linked to stress-related psychiatric diseases only recently. In the present study the effects of restraint stress with different duration (1, 3, and 21 days) were investigated on the morphology of the blood-brain barrier in male adult Wistar rats. Frontal cortex and hippocampus sections were immunostained for markers of brain endothelial cells (claudin-5, occluding, and glucose transporter-1) and astroglia (GFAP). Staining pattern and intensity were visualized by confocal microscopy and evaluated by several types of image analysis. The ultrastructure of brain capillaries was investigated by electron microscopy. Morphological changes and intensity alterations in brain endothelial tight junction proteins claudin-5 and occludin were induced by stress. Following restraint stress significant increases in the fluorescence intensity of glucose transporter-1 were detected in brain endothelial cells in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. Significant reductions in GFAP fluorescence intensity were observed in the frontal cortex in all stress groups. As observed by electron microscopy, 1-day acute stress induced morphological changes indicating damage in capillary endothelial cells in both brain regions. After 21 days of stress thicker and irregular capillary basal membranes in the hippocampus and edema in astrocytes in both regions were seen. These findings indicate that stress exerts time-dependent changes in the staining pattern of tight junction proteins occludin, claudin-5, and glucose transporter-1 at the level of brain capillaries and in the ultrastructure of brain endothelial cells and astroglial endfeet, which may contribute to neurodegenerative processes, cognitive and

  10. Expression of defective measles virus genes in brain tissues of patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    SciTech Connect

    Baczko, K.; Liebert, U.G.; Billeter, M.; Cattaneo, R.; Budka, H.; Ter Meulen, V.

    1986-08-01

    The persistence of measles virus in selected areas of the brains of four patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) was characterized by immunohistological and biochemical techniques. The five measles virus structural proteins were never simultaneously detectable in any of the bran sections. Nucleocapsid proteins and phosphoproteins were found in every diseased brain area, whereas hemagglutinin protein was detected in two cases, fusion protein was detected in three cases, and matrix protein was detected in only one case. Also, it could be shown that the amounts of measles virus RNA in the brains differed from patient to patient and in the different regions investigated. In all patients, plus-strand RNAs specific for these five viral genes could be detected. However, the amounts of fusion and hemagglutinin mRNAs were low compared with the amounts in lytically infected cells. The presence of particular measles virus RNAs in SSPE-infected brains did not always correlate with mRNA activity. In in vitro translations, the matrix protein was produced in only one case, and the hemagglutinin protein was produced in none. These results indicate that measles virus persistence in SSPE is correlated with different defects of several genes which probably prevent assembly of viral particles in SSPE-infected brain tissue.

  11. Gender and age related expression of Oct-6--a POU III domain transcription factor, in the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Ilia, Maria; Sugiyama, Yuka; Price, Jack

    2003-06-26

    Oct-6 is a POU III domain transcription factor whose primary role is thought to be developmental. It is expressed in embryonic stem cells, Schwann cells, and in neuronal subpopulations during telencephalic development. Its best characterised role is in Schwann cells where it is thought to regulate myelin specific gene expression. Expression of Oct-6 was recently discovered in neurons in post-mortem human schizophrenic specimens while being undetectable in matched controls. This study of human tissue contrasted in a number of regards with earlier studies of rodent brain, and questioned what we can consider to be normal adult expression of this gene. In this study, we have investigated Oct-6 expression via in situ hybridisation and Western blot analysis in normal adult female mice of different ages. We show that both RNA and protein levels of Oct-6 expression are highly sustained in the adult and aging cerebellum, whereas they are attenuated in the telencephalon by PW30 (postnatal week 30). These observations suggest that Oct-6 expression takes place in a sex and age dependent way. PMID:12782346

  12. Structural and Functional Rich Club Organization of the Brain in Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Grayson, David S.; Ray, Siddharth; Carpenter, Samuel; Iyer, Swathi; Dias, Taciana G. Costa; Stevens, Corinne; Nigg, Joel T.; Fair, Damien A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have proposed that the brain’s white matter is organized as a rich club, whereby the most highly connected regions of the brain are also highly connected to each other. Here we use both functional and diffusion-weighted MRI in the human brain to investigate whether the rich club phenomena is present with functional connectivity, and how this organization relates to the structural phenomena. We also examine whether rich club regions serve to integrate information between distinct brain systems, and conclude with a brief investigation of the developmental trajectory of rich-club phenomena. In agreement with prior work, both adults and children showed robust structural rich club organization, comprising regions of the superior medial frontal/dACC, medial parietal/PCC, insula, and inferior temporal cortex. We also show that these regions were highly integrated across the brain’s major networks. Functional brain networks were found to have rich club phenomena in a similar spatial layout, but a high level of segregation between systems. While no significant differences between adults and children were found structurally, adults showed significantly greater functional rich club organization. This difference appeared to be driven by a specific set of connections between superior parietal, insula, and supramarginal cortex. In sum, this work highlights the existence of both a structural and functional rich club in adult and child populations with some functional changes over development. It also offers a potential target in examining atypical network organization in common developmental brain disorders, such as ADHD and Autism. PMID:24505468

  13. Nuclear receptors of the honey bee: annotation and expression in the adult brain

    PubMed Central

    Velarde, Rodrigo A; Robinson, Gene E; Fahrbach, Susan E

    2006-01-01

    The Drosophila genome encodes 18 canonical nuclear receptors. All of the Drosophila nuclear receptors are here shown to be present in the genome of the honey bee (Apis mellifera). Given that the time since divergence of the Drosophila and Apis lineages is measured in hundreds of millions of years, the identification of matched orthologous nuclear receptors in the two genomes reveals the fundamental set of nuclear receptors required to ‘make’ an endopterygote insect. The single novelty is the presence in the A. mellifera genome of a third insect gene similar to vertebrate photoreceptor-specific nuclear receptor (PNR). Phylogenetic analysis indicates that this novel gene, which we have named AmPNR-like, is a new member of the NR2 subfamily not found in the Drosophila or human genomes. This gene is expressed in the developing compound eye of the honey bee. Like their vertebrate counterparts, arthropod nuclear receptors play key roles in embryonic and postembryonic development. Studies in Drosophila have focused primarily on the role of these transcription factors in embryogenesis and metamorphosis. Examination of an expressed sequence tag library developed from the adult bee brain and analysis of transcript expression in brain using in situ hybridization and quantitative RT-PCR revealed that several members of the nuclear receptor family (AmSVP, AmUSP, AmERR, AmHr46, AmFtz-F1, and AmHnf-4) are expressed in the brain of the adult bee. Further analysis of the expression of AmUSP and AmSVP in the mushroom bodies, the major insect brain centre for learning and memory, revealed changes in transcript abundance and, in the case of AmUSP, changes in transcript localization, during the development of foraging behaviour in the adult. Study of the honey bee therefore provides a model for understanding nuclear receptor function in the adult brain. PMID:17069634

  14. Advanced biomaterial strategies to transplant preformed micro-tissue engineered neural networks into the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J. P.; Struzyna, L. A.; Murphy, P. L.; Adewole, D. O.; Kuo, E.; Cullen, D. K.

    2016-02-01

    Objective. Connectome disruption is a hallmark of many neurological diseases and trauma with no current strategies to restore lost long-distance axonal pathways in the brain. We are creating transplantable micro-tissue engineered neural networks (micro-TENNs), which are preformed constructs consisting of embedded neurons and long axonal tracts to integrate with the nervous system to physically reconstitute lost axonal pathways. Approach. We advanced micro-tissue engineering techniques to generate micro-TENNs consisting of discrete populations of mature primary cerebral cortical neurons spanned by long axonal fascicles encased in miniature hydrogel micro-columns. Further, we improved the biomaterial encasement scheme by adding a thin layer of low viscosity carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) to enable needle-less insertion and rapid softening for mechanical similarity with brain tissue. Main results. The engineered architecture of cortical micro-TENNs facilitated robust neuronal viability and axonal cytoarchitecture to at least 22 days in vitro. Micro-TENNs displayed discrete neuronal populations spanned by long axonal fasciculation throughout the core, thus mimicking the general systems-level anatomy of gray matter—white matter in the brain. Additionally, micro-columns with thin CMC-coating upon mild dehydration were able to withstand a force of 893 ± 457 mN before buckling, whereas a solid agarose cylinder of similar dimensions was predicted to withstand less than 150 μN of force. This thin CMC coating increased the stiffness by three orders of magnitude, enabling needle-less insertion into brain while significantly reducing the footprint of previous needle-based delivery methods to minimize insertion trauma. Significance. Our novel micro-TENNs are the first strategy designed for minimally invasive implantation to facilitate nervous system repair by simultaneously providing neuronal replacement and physical reconstruction of long-distance axon pathways in the brain

  15. Analysis of the influence of handset phone position on RF exposure of brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Ghanmi, Amal; Varsier, Nadège; Hadjem, Abdelhamid; Conil, Emmanuelle; Picon, Odile; Wiart, Joe

    2014-12-01

    Exposure to mobile phone radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields depends on many different parameters. For epidemiological studies investigating the risk of brain cancer linked to RF exposure from mobile phones, it is of great interest to characterize brain tissue exposure and to know which parameters this exposure is sensitive to. One such parameter is the position of the phone during communication. In this article, we analyze the influence of the phone position on the brain exposure by comparing the specific absorption rate (SAR) induced in the head by two different mobile phone models operating in Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) frequency bands. To achieve this objective, 80 different phone positions were chosen using an experiment based on the Latin hypercube sampling (LHS) to select a representative set of positions. The averaged SAR over 10 g (SAR10 g) in the head, the averaged SAR over 1 g (SAR1 g ) in the brain, and the averaged SAR in different anatomical brain structures were estimated at 900 and 1800 MHz for the 80 positions. The results illustrate that SAR distributions inside the brain area are sensitive to the position of the mobile phone relative to the head. The results also show that for 5-10% of the studied positions the SAR10 g in the head and the SAR1 g in the brain can be 20% higher than the SAR estimated for the standard cheek position and that the Specific Anthropomorphic Mannequin (SAM) model is conservative for 95% of all the studied positions. PMID:25263784

  16. Clinical feasibility of using mean apparent propagator (MAP) MRI to characterize brain tissue microstructure.

    PubMed

    Avram, Alexandru V; Sarlls, Joelle E; Barnett, Alan S; Özarslan, Evren; Thomas, Cibu; Irfanoglu, M Okan; Hutchinson, Elizabeth; Pierpaoli, Carlo; Basser, Peter J

    2016-02-15

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is the most widely used method for characterizing noninvasively structural and architectural features of brain tissues. However, the assumption of a Gaussian spin displacement distribution intrinsic to DTI weakens its ability to describe intricate tissue microanatomy. Consequently, the biological interpretation of microstructural parameters, such as fractional anisotropy or mean diffusivity, is often equivocal. We evaluate the clinical feasibility of assessing brain tissue microstructure with mean apparent propagator (MAP) MRI, a powerful analytical framework that efficiently measures the probability density function (PDF) of spin displacements and quantifies useful metrics of this PDF indicative of diffusion in complex microstructure (e.g., restrictions, multiple compartments). Rotation invariant and scalar parameters computed from the MAP show consistent variation across neuroanatomical brain regions and increased ability to differentiate tissues with distinct structural and architectural features compared with DTI-derived parameters. The return-to-origin probability (RTOP) appears to reflect cellularity and restrictions better than MD, while the non-Gaussianity (NG) measures diffusion heterogeneity by comprehensively quantifying the deviation between the spin displacement PDF and its Gaussian approximation. Both RTOP and NG can be decomposed in the local anatomical frame for reference determined by the orientation of the diffusion tensor and reveal additional information complementary to DTI. The propagator anisotropy (PA) shows high tissue contrast even in deep brain nuclei and cortical gray matter and is more uniform in white matter than the FA, which drops significantly in regions containing crossing fibers. Orientational profiles of the propagator computed analytically from the MAP MRI series coefficients allow separation of different fiber populations in regions of crossing white matter pathways, which in turn improves our

  17. A comparison of hyperelastic constitutive models applicable to brain and fat tissues

    PubMed Central

    Mihai, L. Angela; Chin, LiKang; Janmey, Paul A.; Goriely, Alain

    2015-01-01

    In some soft biological structures such as brain and fat tissues, strong experimental evidence suggests that the shear modulus increases significantly under increasing compressive strain, but not under tensile strain, whereas the apparent Young's elastic modulus increases or remains almost constant when compressive strain increases. These tissues also exhibit a predominantly isotropic, incompressible behaviour. Our aim is to capture these seemingly contradictory mechanical behaviours, both qualitatively and quantitatively, within the framework of finite elasticity, by modelling a soft tissue as a homogeneous, isotropic, incompressible, hyperelastic material and comparing our results with available experimental data. Our analysis reveals that the Fung and Gent models, which are typically used to model soft tissues, are inadequate for the modelling of brain or fat under combined stretch and shear, and so are the classical neo-Hookean and Mooney–Rivlin models used for elastomers. However, a subclass of Ogden hyperelastic models are found to be in excellent agreement with the experiments. Our findings provide explicit models suitable for integration in large-scale finite-element computations. PMID:26354826

  18. A comparison of hyperelastic constitutive models applicable to brain and fat tissues.

    PubMed

    Mihai, L Angela; Chin, LiKang; Janmey, Paul A; Goriely, Alain

    2015-09-01

    In some soft biological structures such as brain and fat tissues, strong experimental evidence suggests that the shear modulus increases significantly under increasing compressive strain, but not under tensile strain, whereas the apparent Young's elastic modulus increases or remains almost constant when compressive strain increases. These tissues also exhibit a predominantly isotropic, incompressible behaviour. Our aim is to capture these seemingly contradictory mechanical behaviours, both qualitatively and quantitatively, within the framework of finite elasticity, by modelling a soft tissue as a homogeneous, isotropic, incompressible, hyperelastic material and comparing our results with available experimental data. Our analysis reveals that the Fung and Gent models, which are typically used to model soft tissues, are inadequate for the modelling of brain or fat under combined stretch and shear, and so are the classical neo-Hookean and Mooney-Rivlin models used for elastomers. However, a subclass of Ogden hyperelastic models are found to be in excellent agreement with the experiments. Our findings provide explicit models suitable for integration in large-scale finite-element computations. PMID:26354826

  19. Protein synthesis in the rat brain: a comparative in vivo and in vitro study in immature and adult animals

    SciTech Connect

    Shahbazian, F.M.

    1985-01-01

    Rates of protein synthesis of CNS and other organs were compared in immature and adult rats by in vivo and slice techniques with administration of flooding doses of labeled precursor. The relationship between synthesis and brain region, cell type, subcellular fraction, or MW was examined. Incorporation of (/sup 14/C)valine into protein of CNS regions in vivo was about 1.2% per hour for immature rats and 0.6% for adults. For slices, the rates decreased significantly more in adults. In adult organs, the highest synthesis rate in vivo was found in liver (2.2% per hour) followed by kidney, spleen, lung, heart, brain, and muscle (0.5% per hour). In immature animals synthesis was highest in liver and spleen (2.5% per hour) and lowest in muscle (0.9% per hour). Slices all showed lower rates than in vivo, especially in adults. In vivo, protein synthesis rates of immature neurons and astrocytes and adult neurons exceeded those of whole brain, while that in adult astrocytes was the same. These results demonstrate a developmental difference of protein synthesis (about double in immature animals) in all brain cells, cell fractions and most brain protein. Similarly the decreased synthesis in brain slices - especially in adults, affects most proteins and structural elements.

  20. Normative data for subcortical regional volumes over the lifetime of the adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Potvin, Olivier; Mouiha, Abderazzak; Dieumegarde, Louis; Duchesne, Simon

    2016-08-15

    Normative data for volumetric estimates of brain structures are necessary to adequately assess brain volume alterations in individuals with suspected neurological or psychiatric conditions. Although many studies have described age and sex effects in healthy individuals for brain morphometry assessed via magnetic resonance imaging, proper normative values allowing to quantify potential brain abnormalities are needed. We developed norms for volumetric estimates of subcortical brain regions based on cross-sectional magnetic resonance scans from 2790 healthy individuals aged 18 to 94years using 23 samples provided by 21 independent research groups. The segmentation was conducted using FreeSurfer, a widely used and freely available automated segmentation software. Models predicting subcortical regional volumes of each hemisphere were produced including age, sex, estimated total intracranial volume (eTIV), scanner manufacturer, magnetic field strength, and interactions as predictors. The mean explained variance by the models was 48%. For most regions, age, sex and eTIV predicted most of the explained variance while manufacturer, magnetic field strength and interactions predicted a limited amount. Estimates of the expected volumes of an individual based on its characteristics and the scanner characteristics can be obtained using derived formulas. For a new individual, significance test for volume abnormality, effect size and estimated percentage of the normative population with a smaller volume can be obtained. Normative values were validated in independent samples of healthy adults and in adults with Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. PMID:27165761

  1. X-ray diffraction from intact tau aggregates in human brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Landahl, Eric C.; Antipova, Olga; Bongaarts, Angela; Barrea, Raul; Berry, Robert; Binder, Lester I.; Irving, Thomas; Orgel, Joseph; Vana, Laurel

    2011-01-01

    We describe an instrument to record x-ray diffraction patterns from diseased regions of human brain tissue by combining an in-line visible light fluorescence microscope with an x-ray diffraction microprobe. We use thiazine red fluorescence to specifically label and detect the filamentous tau protein pathology associated with Pick’s disease, as several labs have done previously. We demonstrate that thiazine red-enhanced regions within the tissue show periodic structure in x-ray diffraction that is not observed in healthy tissue. One observed periodicity (4.2 Å) is characteristic of cross-beta sheet structure, consistent with previous results from powder diffraction studies performed on purified, dried tau protein. PMID:21876609

  2. X-ray diffraction from intact tau aggregates in human brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Landahl, Eric C; Antipova, Olga; Bongaarts, Angela; Barrea, Raul; Berry, Robert; Binder, Lester I; Irving, Thomas; Orgel, Joseph; Vana, Laurel; Rice, Sarah E

    2011-09-01

    We describe an instrument to record x-ray diffraction patterns from diseased regions of human brain tissue by combining an in-line visible light fluorescence microscope with an x-ray diffraction microprobe. We use thiazine red fluorescence to specifically label and detect the filamentous tau protein pathology associated with Pick's disease, as several labs have done previously. We demonstrate that thiazine red-enhanced regions within the tissue show periodic structure in x-ray diffraction that is not observed in healthy tissue. One observed periodicity (4.2 Å) is characteristic of cross-beta sheet structure, consistent with previous results from powder diffraction studies performed on purified, dried tau protein. PMID:21876609

  3. Quantifying the local tissue volume and composition in individual brains with MRI

    PubMed Central

    Mezer, Aviv; Yeatman, Jason D.; Stikov, Nikola; Kay, Kendrick N.; Cho, Nam–Joon; Dougherty, Robert F.; Perry, Michael L.; Parvizi, Josef; Hua, Le H.; Butts-Pauly, Kim; Wandell, Brian

    2013-01-01

    We describe a quantitative neuroimaging method to estimate the macromolecular tissue volume (MTV), a fundamental measure of brain anatomy. By making measurements over a range of field strengths and scan parameters, we tested the key assumptions and the robustness of the method. The measurements confirm that a consistent, quantitative estimate of macromolecular volume can be obtained across a range of scanners. MTV estimates are sufficiently precise to enable a comparison between data obtained from an individual subject with control population data. We describe two applications. First, we show that MTV estimates can be combined with T1 and diffusion measurements to augment our understanding of the tissue properties. Second we show that MTV provides a sensitive measure of disease status in individual patients with multiple sclerosis. The MTV maps are obtained using short clinically appropriate scans that can reveal how tissue changes influence behavior and cognition. PMID:24185694

  4. X-ray diffraction from intact tau aggregates in human brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landahl, Eric C.; Antipova, Olga; Bongaarts, Angela; Barrea, Raul; Berry, Robert; Binder, Lester I.; Irving, Thomas; Orgel, Joseph; Vana, Laurel; Rice, Sarah E.

    2011-09-01

    We describe an instrument to record X-ray diffraction patterns from diseased regions of human brain tissue by combining an in-line visible light fluorescence microscope with an X-ray diffraction microprobe. We use thiazine red fluorescence to specifically label and detect the filamentous tau protein pathology associated with Pick's disease, as several laboratories have done previously. We demonstrate that thiazine red-enhanced regions within the tissue show periodic structure in X-ray diffraction, which is not observed in healthy tissue. One observed periodicity (4.2 Å) is characteristic of cross-beta sheet structure, consistent with previous results from powder diffraction studies performed on purified, dried tau protein.

  5. X-ray diffraction from intact tau aggregates in human brain tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Landahl, Eric C.; Antipova, Olga; Bongaarts, Angela; Barrea, Raul; Berry, Robert; Binder, Lester I.; Irving, Thomas; Orgel, Joseph; Vana, Laurel; Rice, Sarah E.

    2011-09-15

    We describe an instrument to record X-ray diffraction patterns from diseased regions of human brain tissue by combining an in-line visible light fluorescence microscope with an X-ray diffraction microprobe. We use thiazine red fluorescence to specifically label and detect the filamentous tau protein pathology associated with Pick's disease, as several laboratories have done previously. We demonstrate that thiazine red-enhanced regions within the tissue show periodic structure in X-ray diffraction, which is not observed in healthy tissue. One observed periodicity (4.2 {angstrom}) is characteristic of cross-beta sheet structure, consistent with previous results from powder diffraction studies performed on purified, dried tau protein.

  6. X-gal Staining on Adult Mouse Brain Sections

    PubMed Central

    Kokubu, Hiroshi; Lim, Janghoo

    2016-01-01

    Knowing expression patterns of given proteins is very important to understand their functions. Immunostaining analysis with specific antibodies is commonly used to identify cells or tissues expressing proteins of interest. Although this technique is regularly used, it requires high quality of specific antibodies and there is no good quality of antibody available for certain proteins. Alternatively, X-gal staining is also used to analyze protein expression pattern. It is simple and routinely used to detect expression pattern of any proteins of interest in vivo. In this method, genetically modified animals that express beta-galactosidase under the control of certain regulatory elements will be used to reveal the expression pattern of proteins that use the same regulatory elements.

  7. Recent Progress on Tissue-Resident Adult Stem Cell Biology and Their Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Recent progress in the field of the stem cell research has given new hopes to treat and even cure diverse degenerative disorders and incurable diseases in human. Particularly, the identification of a rare population of adult stem cells in the most tissues/organs in human has emerged as an attractive source of multipotent stem/progenitor cells for cell replacement-based therapies and tissue engineering in regenerative medicine. The tissue-resident adult stem/progenitor cells offer the possibility to stimulate their in vivo differentiation or to use their ex vivo expanded progenies for cell replacement-based therapies with multiple applications in human. Among the human diseases that could be treated by the stem cell-based therapies, there are hematopoietic and immune disorders, multiple degenerative disorders, such as Parkinson’s and Alzeimeher’s diseases, type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus as well as eye, liver, lung, skin and cardiovascular disorders and aggressive and metastatic cancers. In addition, the genetically-modified adult stem/progenitor cells could also be used as delivery system for expressing the therapeutic molecules in specific damaged areas of different tissues. Recent advances in cancer stem/progenitor cell research also offer the possibility to targeting these undifferentiated and malignant cells that provide critical functions in cancer initiation and progression and disease relapse for treating the patients diagnosed with the advanced and metastatic cancers which remain incurable in the clinics with the current therapies. PMID:18288619

  8. Spontaneous myogenic differentiation of Flk-1-positive cells from adult pancreas and other nonmuscle tissues.

    PubMed

    Di Rocco, Giuliana; Tritarelli, Alessandra; Toietta, Gabriele; Gatto, Ilaria; Iachininoto, Maria Grazia; Pagani, Francesca; Mangoni, Antonella; Straino, Stefania; Capogrossi, Maurizio C

    2008-02-01

    At the embryonic or fetal stages, autonomously myogenic cells (AMCs), i.e., cells able to spontaneously differentiate into skeletal myotubes, have been identified from several different sites other than skeletal muscle, including the vascular compartment. However, in the adult animal, AMCs from skeletal muscle-devoid tissues have been described in only two cases. One is represented by thymic myoid cells, a restricted population of committed myogenic progenitors of unknown derivation present in the thymic medulla; the other is represented by a small subset of adipose tissue-associated cells, which we recently identified. In the present study we report, for the first time, the presence of spontaneously differentiating myogenic precursors in the pancreas and in other skeletal muscle-devoid organs such as spleen and stomach, as well as in the periaortic tissue of adult mice. Immunomagnetic selection procedures indicate that AMCs derive from Flk-1(+) progenitors. Individual clones of myogenic cells from nonmuscle organs are morphologically and functionally indistinguishable from skeletal muscle-derived primary myoblasts. Moreover, they can be induced to proliferate in vitro and are able to participate in muscle regeneration in vivo. Thus, we provide evidence that fully competent myogenic progenitors can be derived from the Flk-1(+) compartment of several adult tissues that are embryologically unrelated to skeletal muscle. PMID:18094147

  9. Robert Feulgen Prize Lecture. Grenzgänger: adult bone marrow cells populate the brain.

    PubMed

    Priller, Josef

    2003-08-01

    While the brain has traditionally been considered a rather secluded site, recent studies suggest that adult bone marrow (BM)-derived stem cells can generate glia and neurons in rodents and humans. Macrophages and microglia are the first to appear in the murine brain after transplantation of genetically marked BM cells. Within weeks after transplantation, some authors have found astrocytes and cells expressing neuronal antigens. We detected cerebellar Purkinje neurons and interneurons, such as basket cells, expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) 10-15 months after transplantation of GFP-labeled BM cells. The results push the boundaries of our classic view of lineage restriction. PMID:12898276

  10. The expression of c-kit protein in human adult and fetal tissues.

    PubMed

    Horie, K; Fujita, J; Takakura, K; Kanzaki, H; Suginami, H; Iwai, M; Nakayama, H; Mori, T

    1993-11-01

    The c-kit proto-oncogene encodes a tyrosine kinase receptor and is allelic with the dominant white-spotting (W) locus of the mouse. In this study we investigated the expression of human c-kit protein in various adult and fetal human tissues immunohistochemically using anti-human c-kit monoclonal antibody. To discriminate c-kit+ cells from mast cells expressing c-kit, mast cells were identified by staining with Toluidine blue. In oogonia, spermatogonia and skin melanocytes of the fetus and in oocytes of adult ovary, c-kit expression was detected. In adult uterus, c-kit+ cells were widely distributed in the basal layer of the endometrium, myometrium and cervix, the number and distribution being almost identical to those of mast cells. In fetal uterus, c-kit+ non-mast cells clustered beneath the epithelium and a few mast cells were observed in the myometrium and subserosal layer. In both adult and fetus, c-kit+ non-mast cells were detected within smooth muscle layers of the intestine, colon and oesophagus, while mast cells were observed in the mucosal and submucosal layers of these organs. In contrast to mice, no expression of c-kit protein was detected in the human placenta and decidua. Thus, the distribution of c-kit+ cells in various tissues is similar but not identical between adult and fetus and between human and mouse. PMID:7507133

  11. Supervised novelty detection in brain tissue classification with an application to white matter hyperintensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuijf, Hugo J.; Moeskops, Pim; de Vos, Bob D.; Bouvy, Willem H.; de Bresser, Jeroen; Biessels, Geert Jan; Viergever, Max A.; Vincken, Koen L.

    2016-03-01

    Novelty detection is concerned with identifying test data that differs from the training data of a classifier. In the case of brain MR images, pathology or imaging artefacts are examples of untrained data. In this proof-of-principle study, we measure the behaviour of a classifier during the classification of trained labels (i.e. normal brain tissue). Next, we devise a measure that distinguishes normal classifier behaviour from abnormal behavior that occurs in the case of a novelty. This will be evaluated by training a kNN classifier on normal brain tissue, applying it to images with an untrained pathology (white matter hyperintensities (WMH)), and determine if our measure is able to identify abnormal classifier behaviour at WMH locations. For our kNN classifier, behaviour is modelled as the mean, median, or q1 distance to the k nearest points. Healthy tissue was trained on 15 images; classifier behaviour was trained/tested on 5 images with leave-one-out cross-validation. For each trained class, we measure the distribution of mean/median/q1 distances to the k nearest point. Next, for each test voxel, we compute its Z-score with respect to the measured distribution of its predicted label. We consider a Z-score >=4 abnormal behaviour of the classifier, having a probability due to chance of 0.000032. Our measure identified >90% of WMH volume and also highlighted other non-trained findings. The latter being predominantly vessels, cerebral falx, brain mask errors, choroid plexus. This measure is generalizable to other classifiers and might help in detecting unexpected findings or novelties by measuring classifier behaviour.

  12. Dual-porosity poroviscoelasticity and quantitative hydromechanical characterization of the brain tissue with experimental hydrocephalus data.

    PubMed

    Mehrabian, Amin; Abousleiman, Younane N; Mapstone, Timothy B; El-Amm, Christian A

    2015-11-01

    Hydromechanical brain models often involve constitutive relations which must account for soft tissue deformation and creep, together with the interstitial fluid movement and exchange through capillaries. The interaction of rather unknown mechanisms which produce, absorb, and circulate the cerebrospinal fluid within the central nervous system can further add to their complexity. Once proper models for these phenomena or processes are selected, estimation of the associated parameters could be even more challenging. This paper presents the results of a consistent, coupled poroviscoelastic modeling and characterization of the brain tissue as a dual-porosity system. The model draws from Biot's theory of poroviscoelasticity, and adopts the generalized Kelvin's rheological description of the viscoelastic tissue behavior. While the interstitial space serves as the primary porosity through which the bulk flow of the interstitial fluid occurs, a secondary porosity network comprising the capillaries and venous system allows for its partial absorption into the blood. The correspondence principle is used in deriving a time-dependent analytical solution to the proposed model. It allows for identical poroelastic formulation of the original poroviscoelastic problem in the Laplace transform space. Hydrocephalus generally refers to a class of medical conditions which share the ventricles enlargement as a common feature. A set of published data from induced hydrocephalus and follow-up perfusion of cats' brains is used for quantitative characterization of the proposed model. A selected portion of these data including the ventricular volume and rate of fluid absorption from the perfused brain, together with the forward model solution, is utilized via an inverse problem technique to find proper estimations of the model parameters. Results show significant improvement in model predictions of the experimental data. The convoluted and coupled solution results are presented through the time

  13. Postprandial Responses to Lipid and Carbohydrate Ingestion in Repeated Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue Biopsies in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Dordevic, Aimee L.; Pendergast, Felicity J.; Morgan, Han; Villas-Boas, Silas; Caldow, Marissa K.; Larsen, Amy E.; Sinclair, Andrew J.; Cameron-Smith, David

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue is a primary site of meta-inflammation. Diet composition influences adipose tissue metabolism and a single meal can drive an inflammatory response in postprandial period. This study aimed to examine the effect lipid and carbohydrate ingestion compared with a non-caloric placebo on adipose tissue response. Thirty-three healthy adults (age 24.5 ± 3.3 year (mean ± standard deviation (SD)); body mass index (BMI) 24.1 ± 3.2 kg/m2, were randomised into one of three parallel beverage groups; placebo (water), carbohydrate (maltodextrin) or lipid (dairy-cream). Subcutaneous, abdominal adipose tissue biopsies and serum samples were collected prior to (0 h), as well as 2 h and 4 h after consumption of the beverage. Adipose tissue gene expression levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) increased in all three groups, without an increase in circulating TNF-α. Serum leptin (0.6-fold, p = 0.03) and adipose tissue leptin gene expression levels (0.6-fold, p = 0.001) decreased in the hours following the placebo beverage, but not the nutrient beverages. Despite increased inflammatory cytokine gene expression in adipose tissue with all beverages, suggesting a confounding effect of the repeated biopsy method, differences in metabolic responses of adipose tissue and circulating adipokines to ingestion of lipid and carbohydrate beverages were observed. PMID:26140541

  14. Postprandial Responses to Lipid and Carbohydrate Ingestion in Repeated Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue Biopsies in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Dordevic, Aimee L; Pendergast, Felicity J; Morgan, Han; Villas-Boas, Silas; Caldow, Marissa K; Larsen, Amy E; Sinclair, Andrew J; Cameron-Smith, David

    2015-07-01

    Adipose tissue is a primary site of meta-inflammation. Diet composition influences adipose tissue metabolism and a single meal can drive an inflammatory response in postprandial period. This study aimed to examine the effect lipid and carbohydrate ingestion compared with a non-caloric placebo on adipose tissue response. Thirty-three healthy adults (age 24.5 ± 3.3 year (mean ± standard deviation (SD)); body mass index (BMI) 24.1 ± 3.2 kg/m2, were randomised into one of three parallel beverage groups; placebo (water), carbohydrate (maltodextrin) or lipid (dairy-cream). Subcutaneous, abdominal adipose tissue biopsies and serum samples were collected prior to (0 h), as well as 2 h and 4 h after consumption of the beverage. Adipose tissue gene expression levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) increased in all three groups, without an increase in circulating TNF-α. Serum leptin (0.6-fold, p = 0.03) and adipose tissue leptin gene expression levels (0.6-fold, p = 0.001) decreased in the hours following the placebo beverage, but not the nutrient beverages. Despite increased inflammatory cytokine gene expression in adipose tissue with all beverages, suggesting a confounding effect of the repeated biopsy method, differences in metabolic responses of adipose tissue and circulating adipokines to ingestion of lipid and carbohydrate beverages were observed. PMID:26140541

  15. Increased TRH and TRH-like peptide release in rat brain and peripheral tissues during proestrus/estrus.

    PubMed

    Pekary, A E; Sattin, Albert

    2014-02-01

    Women are at greater risk for major depression, PTSD, and other anxiety disorders. ERβ-selective agonists for the treatment of these disorders are the focus of pharmacologic development and clinical testing. Estradiol and its metabolites contribute to the neuroprotective effects of this steroid class, particularly in men, due to local conversion of testosterone to estiradiol in key brain regions which are predisposed to neurodegenerative diseases. We have used young adult female Sprague-Dawley rats to assess the role of TRH and TRH-like peptides, with the general structure pGlu-X-Pro-NH2 where "X" can be any amino acid residue, as mediators of the neurobiochemical effects of estradiol. The neuroprotective TRH and TRH-like peptides are coreleased with excitotoxic glutamate by glutamatergic neurons which contribute importantly to the regulation of the estrus cycle. The levels of TRH and TRH-like peptides during proestrus and/or estrus in the 12 brain regions analyzed were significantly decreased (due to accelerated release) 106 times but increased only 25 times when compared to the corresponding levels during diestrus days 1 and 2. These changes, listed by brain region in the order of decreasing number of significant decreases (↓) and/or increases (↑), were: striatum (20↓,1↑), medulla oblongata (16↓,2↑), amygdala (14↓,1↑), cerebellum (13↓,1↑), hypothalamus (12↓,1↑), entorhinal cortex (6↓,6↑), posterior cingulate (10↓,1↑), frontal cortex (3↓,5↑), nucleus accumbens (5↓,3↑), hippocampus (5↓,2↑), anterior cingulate (2↓,1↑), and piriform cortex (1↑). In peripheral tissues the corresponding changes were: ovaries (23↓), uterus (16↓,1↑), adrenals (11↓,3↑), and pancreas (1↓,6↑). We conclude that these peptides may be downstream mediators of some of the therapeutic effects of estrogen. PMID:24296042

  16. A fully automatic unsupervised segmentation framework for the brain tissues in MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Qaiser; Chodorowski, Artur; Ehteshami Bejnordi, Babak; Persson, Mikael

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a novel fully automatic unsupervised framework for the segmentation of brain tissues in magnetic resonance (MR) images. The framework is a combination of our proposed Bayesian-based adaptive mean shift (BAMS), a priori spatial tissue probability maps and fuzzy c-means. BAMS is applied to cluster the tissues in the joint spatialintensity feature space and then a fuzzy c-means algorithm is employed with initialization by a priori spatial tissue probability maps to assign the clusters into three tissue types; white matter (WM), gray matter (GM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The proposed framework is validated on multimodal synthetic as well as on real T1-weighted MR data with varying noise characteristics and spatial intensity inhomogeneity. The performance of the proposed framework is evaluated relative to our previous method BAMS and other existing adaptive mean shift framework. Both of these are based on the mode pruning and voxel weighted k-means algorithm for classifying the clusters into WM, GM and CSF tissue. The experimental results demonstrate the robustness of the proposed framework to noise and spatial intensity inhomogeneity, and that it exhibits a higher degree of segmentation accuracy in segmenting both synthetic and real MR data compared to competing methods.

  17. Brain metabolism and memory in age differentiated healthy adults

    SciTech Connect

    Riege, W.H.; Metter, E.J.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    The (F-18)-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) scan method with positron emission tomography was used to determine age differences in factors underlying both the performances on 18 multivariate memory tests and the rates of cerebral glucose utilization in 9 left and 9 right hemispheric regions of 23 healthy adults in the age range of 27-78 years. Young persons below age 42 had higher scores than middle-aged (age 48-65 yrs) or old (age 66-78 yrs) persons on two of seven factors, reflecting memory for sequences of words or events together with metabolic indices of Broca's (and its mirror region) and Thalamic areas. Reliable correlations (critical r = 0.48, p<0.02) indicated that persons with high Superior Frontal and low Caudate-Thalamic metabolic measures were the same who performed well in tests of memory for sentences, story, designs, and complex patterns; while metabolic indices of Occipital and Posterior Temporal regions were correlated with the decision criteria adopted in testing. The mean metabolic ratio (b = -0.033, F = 5.47, p<0.03) and those of bilateral Broca's regions (b = -0.002, F = 13.65, p<0.001) significantly declined with age. The functional interrelation of frontal-subcortical metabolic ratios with memory processing was more prominent in younger persons under study and implicates decreasing thalamo-frontal interaction with age.

  18. Pediatric Cancers and Brain Tumors in Adolescents and Young Adults.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Martin G; Valteau-Couanet, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Embryonal tumors classically occur in young children, some principally within the first year of life. Prospective national and international clinical trials during recent decades have brought about progressive improvements in survival, and associated biological studies have advanced our understanding of tumor biology, in some cases allowing biological tumor characteristics to be harnessed for therapeutic benefit. Embryonal tumors continue to occur, albeit less commonly, during childhood, adolescence and throughout adulthood. These tumors are less well understood, usually not managed according to standardized protocols and rarely included in clinical trials. Survival outcomes are generally poorer than their childhood equivalents. We present here a summary of the published literature on embryonal tumors that present ectopically during adolescence and adulthood. We show that for some tumors protocol-driven treatment, supported by accurate and complete diagnostics and staging, can result in equivalent outcomes to those seen during childhood. We make the case that clinical trial eligibility criteria should be disease-based rather than age-based, and support improvements in dialogue between children's and adults' cancer clinicians to improve outcomes for these rare tumors. PMID:27595358

  19. Plasticity in the Adult: How Should the Waddington Diagram Be Applied to Regenerating Tissues?

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, Jayaraj; Stanger, Ben Z

    2016-01-25

    Conrad Waddington's eponymous 1957 diagram provided a metaphorical framework for considering how sequential developmental fate decisions allow an egg to develop into an embryo. In recent years, the Waddington diagram has been repurposed to illustrate how cellular identity changes in the context of reprogramming. In this Perspective, we revisit the Waddington diagram in light of the emerging recognition that plasticity is part and parcel of adult regeneration. Specifically, we speculate that the "epigenetic landscapes" that define identity in adult tissues are dynamic, facilitating cellular de-differentiation and trans-differentiation in the setting of injury. PMID:26812013

  20. ALKYLTIN INHIBITION OF ATPASE ACTIVITIES IN TISSUE HOMOGENATES AND SUBCELLULAR FRACTIONS FROM ADULT AND NEONATAL RATS (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inhibition of ATPase activities by triethyltin (TET), diethyltin (DET), monoethyltin (MET) and trimethyltin (TMT) was studied in homogenates of brain and liver from adult rats. MET did not produce significant inhibition. ATPase activities in brain and liver homogenates from TET-t...

  1. Effects of compression injury on brain mitochondrial and tissue viability evaluated by a multiparametric monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbiro-Michaely, Efrat; Bachbut, Galit; Mayevsky, Avraham

    2008-02-01

    Neurosurgical procedures involve brain compression created by retractors. Although it is clear that retractors are causing damage to the brain tissue, the pathophysiology of the retraction was not investigated in details. In the present study we used the multiparametric monitoring approach for real time evaluation of mitochondrial function, hemodynamic, ionic and electrical activities monitored contralaterally to the retractor placement on the brain. The aims of the study were to test the effects of retractor size and severity of the compression on the degree of damage to the cerebral tissue. A special probe was lowered towards the cerebral cortex, (2mm and 4mm in depth) using a micromanipulator. Compression lasted for 30 minutes, than the retractor was elevated back to its initial position and monitoring continued for two hours. Additionally, two sizes of retractors were used 6mm and 3mm in diameter, the 3mm retractor included an intracranial pressure (ICP) probe. The results show that the combination of a large retractor with the depth of 4mm yielded high mortality rate (62%) of the rats while the use of a smaller retractor decreased significantly the percentage of mortality. Also, compression to the depth of 4mm increased tissue injury as compared to 2mm depth. In conclusion, the present study raises the importance and significance of multiparametric monitoring, and not only ICP and cerebral blood flow of the areas nearby the retractor position and not only the retraction site, as well as the effect of the retractor size on the damage induced to the cerebral tissue.

  2. Rehabilitation for Adults with Traumatic Brain Injury: Where Will We Be Clinically in 2026?

    PubMed

    Turkstra, Lyn S

    2016-08-01

    In 10 years, there might be fewer adults who need rehabilitation after traumatic brain injury because of advances in injury prevention and very early treatment. For adults who do need rehabilitation, assessment might include biosensor recordings in their everyday communication contexts, and home practice might be delivered by a robot that can be programmed to mimic target characteristics of human behavior. These advances in science and technology will enhance rehabilitation, but it will always be our responsibility as speech-language pathologists to advocate for our patients and clients and support them in achieving the best possible quality of communication life. PMID:27232097

  3. Plasticity of Brain Networks in a Randomized Intervention Trial of Exercise Training in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Michelle W.; Prakash, Ruchika S.; Erickson, Kirk I.; Basak, Chandramallika; Chaddock, Laura; Kim, Jennifer S.; Alves, Heloisa; Heo, Susie; Szabo, Amanda N.; White, Siobhan M.; Wójcicki, Thomas R.; Mailey, Emily L.; Gothe, Neha; Olson, Erin A.; McAuley, Edward; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown the human brain is organized into separable functional networks during rest and varied states of cognition, and that aging is associated with specific network dysfunctions. The present study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine low-frequency (0.008 < f < 0.08 Hz) coherence of cognitively relevant and sensory brain networks in older adults who participated in a 1-year intervention trial, comparing the effects of aerobic and non-aerobic fitness training on brain function and cognition. Results showed that aerobic training improved the aging brain's resting functional efficiency in higher-level cognitive networks. One year of walking increased functional connectivity between aspects of the frontal, posterior, and temporal cortices within the Default Mode Network and a Frontal Executive Network, two brain networks central to brain dysfunction in aging. Length of training was also an important factor. Effects in favor of the walking group were observed only after 12 months of training, compared to non-significant trends after 6 months. A non-aerobic stretching and toning group also showed increased functional connectivity in the DMN after 6 months and in a Frontal Parietal Network after 12 months, possibly reflecting experience-dependent plasticity. Finally, we found that changes in functional connectivity were behaviorally relevant. Increased functional connectivity was associated with greater improvement in executive function. Therefore the study provides the first evidence for exercise-induced functional plasticity in large-scale brain systems in the aging brain, using functional connectivity techniques, and offers new insight into the role of aerobic fitness in attenuating age-related brain dysfunction. PMID:20890449

  4. Dietary Iron Concentration May Influence Aging Process by Altering Oxidative Stress in Tissues of Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Lorena Fernandes; Arruda, Sandra Fernandes; Campos, Natália Aboudib; de Valencia, Fernando Fortes; Siqueira, Egle Machado de Almeida

    2013-01-01

    Iron is an essential element. However, in its free form, iron participates in redox-reactions, leading to the production of free radicals that increase oxidative stress and the risk of damaging processes. Living organisms have an efficient mechanism that regulates iron absorption according to their iron content to protect against oxidative damage. The effects of restricted and enriched-iron diets on oxidative stress and aging biomarkers were investigated. Adult Wistar rats were fed diets containing 10, 35 or 350 mg/kg iron (adult restricted-iron, adult control-iron and adult enriched-iron groups, respectively) for 78 days. Rats aged two months were included as a young control group. Young control group showed higher hemoglobin and hematocrit values, lower levels of iron and lower levels of MDA or carbonyl in the major studied tissues than the adult control group. Restricted-iron diet reduced iron concentrations in skeletal muscle and oxidative damage in the majority of tissues and also increased weight loss. Enriched-iron diet increased hematocrit values, serum iron, gamma-glutamyl transferase, iron concentrations and oxidative stress in the majority of tissues. As expected, young rats showed higher mRNA levels of heart and hepatic L-Ferritin (Ftl) and kidneys SMP30 as well as lower mRNA levels of hepatic Hamp and interleukin-1 beta (Il1b) and also lower levels of liver protein ferritin. Restricted-iron adult rats showed an increase in heart Ftl mRNA and the enriched-iron adult rats showed an increase in liver nuclear factor erythroid derived 2 like 2 (Nfe2l2) and Il1b mRNAs and in gut divalent metal transporter-1 mRNA (Slc11a2) relative to the control adult group. These results suggest that iron supplementation in adult rats may accelerate aging process by increasing oxidative stress while iron restriction may retards it. However, iron restriction may also impair other physiological processes that are not associated with aging. PMID:23593390

  5. Interleukin-6 gene (IL-6): a possible role in brain morphology in the healthy adult brain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cytokines such as interleukin 6 (IL-6) have been implicated in dual functions in neuropsychiatric disorders. Little is known about the genetic predisposition to neurodegenerative and neuroproliferative properties of cytokine genes. In this study the potential dual role of several IL-6 polymorphisms in brain morphology is investigated. Methodology In a large sample of healthy individuals (N = 303), associations between genetic variants of IL-6 (rs1800795; rs1800796, rs2069833, rs2069840) and brain volume (gray matter volume) were analyzed using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Selection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) followed a tagging SNP approach (e.g., Stampa algorigthm), yielding a capture 97.08% of the variation in the IL-6 gene using four tagging SNPs. Principal findings/results In a whole-brain analysis, the polymorphism rs1800795 (−174 C/G) showed a strong main effect of genotype (43 CC vs. 150 CG vs. 100 GG; x = 24, y = −10, z = −15; F(2,286) = 8.54, puncorrected = 0.0002; pAlphaSim-corrected = 0.002; cluster size k = 577) within the right hippocampus head. Homozygous carriers of the G-allele had significantly larger hippocampus gray matter volumes compared to heterozygous subjects. None of the other investigated SNPs showed a significant association with grey matter volume in whole-brain analyses. Conclusions/significance These findings suggest a possible neuroprotective role of the G-allele of the SNP rs1800795 on hippocampal volumes. Studies on the role of this SNP in psychiatric populations and especially in those with an affected hippocampus (e.g., by maltreatment, stress) are warranted. PMID:22695063

  6. Cytochrome c oxidase response to changes in cerebral oxygen delivery in the adult brain shows higher brain-specificity than haemoglobin☆

    PubMed Central

    Kolyva, Christina; Ghosh, Arnab; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Highton, David; Cooper, Chris E.; Smith, Martin; Elwell, Clare E.

    2014-01-01

    The redox state of cerebral mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase monitored with near-infrared spectroscopy (Δ[oxCCO]) is a signal with strong potential as a non-invasive, bedside biomarker of cerebral metabolic status. We hypothesised that the higher mitochondrial density of brain compared to skin and skull would lead to evidence of brain-specificity of the Δ[oxCCO] signal when measured with a multi-distance near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system. Measurements of Δ[oxCCO] as well as of concentration changes in oxygenated (Δ[HbO2]) and deoxygenated haemoglobin (Δ[HHb]) were taken at multiple source-detector distances during systemic hypoxia and hypocapnia (decrease in cerebral oxygen delivery), and hyperoxia and hypercapnia (increase in cerebral oxygen delivery) from 15 adult healthy volunteers. Increasing source-detector spacing is associated with increasing light penetration depth and thus higher sensitivity to cerebral changes. An increase in Δ[oxCCO] was observed during the challenges that increased cerebral oxygen delivery and the opposite was observed when cerebral oxygen delivery decreased. A consistent pattern of statistically significant increasing amplitude of the Δ[oxCCO] response with increasing light penetration depth was observed in all four challenges, a behaviour that was distinctly different from that of the haemoglobin chromophores, which did not show this statistically significant depth gradient. This depth-dependence of the Δ[oxCCO] signal corroborates the notion of higher concentrations of CCO being present in cerebral tissue compared to extracranial components and highlights the value of NIRS-derived Δ[oxCCO] as a brain-specific signal of cerebral metabolism, superior in this aspect to haemoglobin. PMID:23707584

  7. Cytochrome c oxidase response to changes in cerebral oxygen delivery in the adult brain shows higher brain-specificity than haemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Kolyva, Christina; Ghosh, Arnab; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Highton, David; Cooper, Chris E; Smith, Martin; Elwell, Clare E

    2014-01-15

    The redox state of cerebral mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase monitored with near-infrared spectroscopy (Δ[oxCCO]) is a signal with strong potential as a non-invasive, bedside biomarker of cerebral metabolic status. We hypothesised that the higher mitochondrial density of brain compared to skin and skull would lead to evidence of brain-specificity of the Δ[oxCCO] signal when measured with a multi-distance near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system. Measurements of Δ[oxCCO] as well as of concentration changes in oxygenated (Δ[HbO2]) and deoxygenated haemoglobin (Δ[HHb]) were taken at multiple source-detector distances during systemic hypoxia and hypocapnia (decrease in cerebral oxygen delivery), and hyperoxia and hypercapnia (increase in cerebral oxygen delivery) from 15 adult healthy volunteers. Increasing source-detector spacing is associated with increasing light penetration depth and thus higher sensitivity to cerebral changes. An increase in Δ[oxCCO] was observed during the challenges that increased cerebral oxygen delivery and the opposite was observed when cerebral oxygen delivery decreased. A consistent pattern of statistically significant increasing amplitude of the Δ[oxCCO] response with increasing light penetration depth was observed in all four challenges, a behaviour that was distinctly different from that of the haemoglobin chromophores, which did not show this statistically significant depth gradient. This depth-dependence of the Δ[oxCCO] signal corroborates the notion of higher concentrations of CCO being present in cerebral tissue compared to extracranial components and highlights the value of NIRS-derived Δ[oxCCO] as a brain-specific signal of cerebral metabolism, superior in this aspect to haemoglobin. PMID:23707584

  8. Treatment of near-skull brain tissue with a focused device using shear-mode conversion: a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichardo, Samuel; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2007-12-01

    Shear mode transmission through the skull has been previously proposed as a new trans-skull propagation technique for noninvasive therapeutic ultrasound (Clement 2004 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 115 1356-64). The main advantage of choosing shear over longitudinal mode resides on the fact that there is less wavefront distortion with the former. In the present study, the regions of the brain suitable for shear-mode transmission were established for a simple focused ultrasound device. The device consists of a spherically curved transducer that has a focal length of 10 cm, an aperture between 30° and 60° and operates at 0.74 MHz. The regions suitable for shear-mode transmission were determined by the shear wave acoustic windows that matched the shape of the device acoustic field. The acoustic windows were calculated using segmentation and triangulation of outer and inner faces of skull from 3D-MRI head datasets. Nine heads of healthy adults were analyzed. The surface considered for the calculations was the head region found above the supra-orbital margin. For every inspected point in the brain volume, the axis of the device was determined by the vector between this inspection point and a point located in the center of the brain. Numerical predictions of the acoustic field, where shear-mode conversion through the skull was considered, were obtained and compared to the case of water-only conditions. The brain tissue that is close to the skull showed suitable acoustic windows for shear waves. The central region of the brain seems to be unreachable using shear-mode. Analysis of the acoustic fields showed a proportional relation between the acoustic window for shear mode and the effective degree of focusing. However, this relation showed significant differences among specimens. In general, highly focused fields were obtained whe