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Sample records for adult cardiac fibroblasts

  1. Cardiac fibroblast-derived extracellular matrix (biomatrix) as a model for the studies of cardiac primitive cell biological properties in normal and pathological adult human heart.

    PubMed

    Castaldo, Clotilde; Di Meglio, Franca; Miraglia, Rita; Sacco, Anna Maria; Romano, Veronica; Bancone, Ciro; Della Corte, Alessandro; Montagnani, Stefania; Nurzynska, Daria

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac tissue regeneration is guided by stem cells and their microenvironment. It has been recently described that both cardiac stem/primitive cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) change in pathological conditions. This study describes the method for the production of ECM typical of adult human heart in the normal and pathological conditions (ischemic heart disease) and highlights the potential use of cardiac fibroblast-derived ECM for in vitro studies of the interactions between ECM components and cardiac primitive cells responsible for tissue regeneration. Fibroblasts isolated from adult human normal and pathological heart with ischemic cardiomyopathy were cultured to obtain extracellular matrix (biomatrix), composed of typical extracellular matrix proteins, such as collagen and fibronectin, and matricellular proteins, laminin, and tenascin. After decellularization, this substrate was used to assess biological properties of cardiac primitive cells: proliferation and migration were stimulated by biomatrix from normal heart, while both types of biomatrix protected cardiac primitive cells from apoptosis. Our model can be used for studies of cell-matrix interactions and help to determine the biochemical cues that regulate cardiac primitive cell biological properties and guide cardiac tissue regeneration.

  2. Transcriptional control of cardiac fibroblast plasticity.

    PubMed

    Lighthouse, Janet K; Small, Eric M

    2016-02-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts help maintain the normal architecture of the healthy heart and are responsible for scar formation and the healing response to pathological insults. Various genetic, biomechanical, or humoral factors stimulate fibroblasts to become contractile smooth muscle-like cells called myofibroblasts that secrete large amounts of extracellular matrix. Unfortunately, unchecked myofibroblast activation in heart disease leads to pathological fibrosis, which is a major risk factor for the development of cardiac arrhythmias and heart failure. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control fibroblast plasticity and myofibroblast activation is essential to develop novel strategies to specifically target pathological cardiac fibrosis without disrupting the adaptive healing response. This review highlights the major transcriptional mediators of fibroblast origin and function in development and disease. The contribution of the fetal epicardial gene program will be discussed in the context of fibroblast origin in development and following injury, primarily focusing on Tcf21 and C/EBP. We will also highlight the major transcriptional regulatory axes that control fibroblast plasticity in the adult heart, including transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)/Smad signaling, the Rho/myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF)/serum response factor (SRF) axis, and Calcineurin/transient receptor potential channel (TRP)/nuclear factor of activated T-Cell (NFAT) signaling. Finally, we will discuss recent strategies to divert the fibroblast transcriptional program in an effort to promote cardiomyocyte regeneration. This article is a part of a Special Issue entitled "Fibrosis and Myocardial Remodeling".

  3. Cardiac Fibrosis: The Fibroblast Awakens

    PubMed Central

    Travers, Joshua G.; Kamal, Fadia A.; Robbins, Jeffrey; Yutzey, Katherine E.; Blaxall, Burns C.

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial fibrosis is a significant global health problem associated with nearly all forms of heart disease. Cardiac fibroblasts comprise an essential cell type in the heart that is responsible for the homeostasis of the extracellular matrix; however upon injury, these cells transform to a myofibroblast phenotype and contribute to cardiac fibrosis. This remodeling involves pathological changes that include chamber dilation, cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and apoptosis, and ultimately leads to the progression to heart failure. Despite the critical importance of fibrosis in cardiovascular disease, our limited understanding of this cell population impedes the development of potential therapies that effectively target this cell type and its pathological contribution to disease progression. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding the origins and roles of fibroblasts, mediators and signaling pathways known to influence fibroblast function after myocardial injury, as well as novel therapeutic strategies under investigation to attenuate cardiac fibrosis. PMID:26987915

  4. Cardiac Fibroblasts Regulate Sympathetic Nerve Sprouting and Neurocardiac Synapse Stability

    PubMed Central

    Mias, Céline; Coatrieux, Christelle; Denis, Colette; Genet, Gaël; Seguelas, Marie-Hélène; Laplace, Nathalie; Rouzaud-Laborde, Charlotte; Calise, Denis; Parini, Angelo; Cussac, Daniel; Pathak, Atul; Sénard, Jean-Michel; Galés, Céline

    2013-01-01

    Sympathetic nervous system (SNS) plays a key role in cardiac homeostasis and its deregulations always associate with bad clinical outcomes. To date, little is known about molecular mechanisms regulating cardiac sympathetic innervation. The aim of the study was to determine the role of fibroblasts in heart sympathetic innervation. RT-qPCR and western-blots analysis performed in cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts isolated from healthy adult rat hearts revealed that Pro-Nerve growth factor (NGF) and pro-differentiating mature NGF were the most abundant neurotrophins expressed in cardiac fibroblasts while barely detectable in cardiomyocytes. When cultured with cardiac fibroblasts or fibroblast-conditioned medium, PC12 cells differentiated into/sympathetic-like neurons expressing axonal marker Tau-1 at neurites in contact with cardiomyocytes. This was prevented by anti-NGF blocking antibodies suggesting a paracrine action of NGF secreted by fibroblasts. When co-cultured with cardiomyocytes to mimic neurocardiac synapse, differentiated PC12 cells exhibited enhanced norepinephrine secretion as quantified by HPLC compared to PC12 cultured alone while co-culture with fibroblasts had no effect. However, when supplemented to PC12-cardiomyocytes co-culture, fibroblasts allowed long-term survival of the neurocardiac synapse. Activated fibroblasts (myofibroblasts) isolated from myocardial infarction rat hearts exhibited significantly higher mature NGF expression than normal fibroblasts and also promoted PC12 cells differentiation. Within the ischemic area lacking cardiomyocytes and neurocardiac synapses, tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity was increased and associated with local anarchical and immature sympathetic hyperinnervation but tissue norepinephrine content was similar to that of normal cardiac tissue, suggesting depressed sympathetic function. Collectively, these findings demonstrate for the first time that fibroblasts are essential for the setting of cardiac sympathetic

  5. CARFMAP: A Curated Pathway Map of Cardiac Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Nim, Hieu T.; Furtado, Milena B.; Costa, Mauro W.; Kitano, Hiroaki; Rosenthal, Nadia A.; Boyd, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    The adult mammalian heart contains multiple cell types that work in unison under tightly regulated conditions to maintain homeostasis. Cardiac fibroblasts are a significant and unique population of non-muscle cells in the heart that have recently gained substantial interest in the cardiac biology community. To better understand this renaissance cell, it is essential to systematically survey what has been known in the literature about the cellular and molecular processes involved. We have built CARFMAP (http://visionet.erc.monash.edu.au/CARFMAP), an interactive cardiac fibroblast pathway map derived from the biomedical literature using a software-assisted manual data collection approach. CARFMAP is an information-rich interactive tool that enables cardiac biologists to explore the large body of literature in various creative ways. There is surprisingly little overlap between the cardiac fibroblast pathway map, a foreskin fibroblast pathway map, and a whole mouse organism signalling pathway map from the REACTOME database. Among the use cases of CARFMAP is a common task in our cardiac biology laboratory of identifying new genes that are (1) relevant to cardiac literature, and (2) differentially regulated in high-throughput assays. From the expression profiles of mouse cardiac and tail fibroblasts, we employed CARFMAP to characterise cardiac fibroblast pathways. Using CARFMAP in conjunction with transcriptomic data, we generated a stringent list of six genes that would not have been singled out using bioinformatics analyses alone. Experimental validation showed that five genes (Mmp3, Il6, Edn1, Pdgfc and Fgf10) are differentially regulated in the cardiac fibroblast. CARFMAP is a powerful tool for systems analyses of cardiac fibroblasts, facilitating systems-level cardiovascular research. PMID:26673252

  6. Cardiac imaging in adults

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book approaches adult cardiac disease from the correlative imaging perspective. It includes chest X-rays and angiographs, 2-dimensional echocardiograms with explanatory diagrams for clarity, plus details on digital radiology, nuclear medicine techniques, CT and MRI. It also covers the normal heart, valvular heart disease, myocardial disease, pericardial disease, bacterial endocarditis, aortic aneurysm, cardiac tumors, and congenital heart disease of the adult. It points out those aspects where one imaging technique has significant superiority.

  7. Metformin inhibits angiotensin II-induced differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts into myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jian; Zhang, Na; Hua, Ying; Wang, Bingjian; Ling, Lin; Ferro, Albert; Xu, Biao

    2013-01-01

    Differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts into myofibroblasts is a critical event in the progression of cardiac fibrosis that leads to pathological cardiac remodeling. Metformin, an antidiabetic agent, exhibits a number of cardioprotective properties. However, much less is known regarding the effect of metformin on cardiac fibroblast differentiation. Thus, in the present study, we examined the effect of metformin on angiotensin (Ang) II-induced differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts into myofibroblasts and its underlying mechanism. Adult rat cardiac fibroblasts were stimulated with Ang II (100 nM) in the presence or absence of metformin (10-200 µM). Ang II stimulation induced the differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts into myofibroblasts, as indicated by increased expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and collagen types I and III, and this effect of Ang II was inhibited by pretreatment of cardiac fibroblasts with metformin. Metformin also decreased Ang II-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in cardiac fibroblasts via inhibiting the activation of the PKC-NADPH oxidase pathway. Further experiments using PKC inhibitor calphostin C and NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin confirmed that inhibition of the PKC-NADPH oxidase pathway markedly attenuated Ang II-induced ROS generation and myofibroblast differentiation. These data indicate that metformin inhibits Ang II-induced myofibroblast differentiation by suppressing ROS generation via the inhibition of the PKC-NADPH oxidase pathway in adult rat cardiac fibroblasts. Our results provide new mechanistic insights regarding the cardioprotective effects of metformin and provide an efficient therapeutic strategy to attenuate cardiac fibrosis.

  8. Origin of Cardiac Fibroblasts and the Role of Periostin

    PubMed Central

    Snider, Paige; Standley, Kara N.; Wang, Jian; Azhar, Mohamad; Doetschman, Thomas; Conway, Simon J.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts are the most populous non-myocyte cell type within the mature heart and are required for extracellular matrix synthesis and deposition, generation of the cardiac skeleton, and to electrically insulate the atria from the ventricles. Significantly, cardiac fibroblasts have also been shown to play an important role in cardiomyocyte growth and expansion of the ventricular chambers during heart development. Although there are currently no cardiac fibroblast-restricted molecular markers, it is generally envisaged that the majority of the cardiac fibroblasts are derived from the proepicardium via epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation. However, still relatively little is known about when and where the cardiac fibroblasts cells are generated, the lineage of each cell, and how cardiac fibroblasts move to reside in their final position throughout all four cardiac chambers. In this review we summarize the current understanding regarding the function of Periostin, a useful marker of the non-cardiomyocyte lineages, and its role during cardiac morphogenesis. Characterization of the cardiac fibroblast lineage and identification of the signals that maintain, expand and regulate their differentiation will be required to improve our understanding of cardiac function in both normal and pathophysiological states. PMID:19893021

  9. A model of electrical conduction in cardiac tissue including fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Sachse, Frank B; Moreno, A P; Seemann, G; Abildskov, J A

    2009-05-01

    Fibroblasts are abundant in cardiac tissue. Experimental studies suggested that fibroblasts are electrically coupled to myocytes and this coupling can impact cardiac electrophysiology. In this work, we present a novel approach for mathematical modeling of electrical conduction in cardiac tissue composed of myocytes, fibroblasts, and the extracellular space. The model is an extension of established cardiac bidomain models, which include a description of intra-myocyte and extracellular conductivities, currents and potentials in addition to transmembrane voltages of myocytes. Our extension added a description of fibroblasts, which are electrically coupled with each other and with myocytes. We applied the extended model in exemplary computational simulations of plane waves and conduction in a thin tissue slice assuming an isotropic conductivity of the intra-fibroblast domain. In simulations of plane waves, increased myocyte-fibroblast coupling and fibroblast-myocyte ratio reduced peak voltage and maximal upstroke velocity of myocytes as well as amplitudes and maximal downstroke velocity of extracellular potentials. Simulations with the thin tissue slice showed that inter-fibroblast coupling affected rather transversal than longitudinal conduction velocity. Our results suggest that fibroblast coupling becomes relevant for small intra-myocyte and/or large intra-fibroblast conductivity. In summary, the study demonstrated the feasibility of the extended bidomain model and supports the hypothesis that fibroblasts contribute to cardiac electrophysiology in various manners.

  10. MiR-133 promotes cardiac reprogramming by directly repressing Snai1 and silencing fibroblast signatures.

    PubMed

    Muraoka, Naoto; Yamakawa, Hiroyuki; Miyamoto, Kazutaka; Sadahiro, Taketaro; Umei, Tomohiko; Isomi, Mari; Nakashima, Hanae; Akiyama, Mizuha; Wada, Rie; Inagawa, Kohei; Nishiyama, Takahiko; Kaneda, Ruri; Fukuda, Toru; Takeda, Shu; Tohyama, Shugo; Hashimoto, Hisayuki; Kawamura, Yoshifumi; Goshima, Naoki; Aeba, Ryo; Yamagishi, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Keiichi; Ieda, Masaki

    2014-07-17

    Fibroblasts can be directly reprogrammed into cardiomyocyte-like cells (iCMs) by overexpression of cardiac transcription factors or microRNAs. However, induction of functional cardiomyocytes is inefficient, and molecular mechanisms of direct reprogramming remain undefined. Here, we demonstrate that addition of miR-133a (miR-133) to Gata4, Mef2c, and Tbx5 (GMT) or GMT plus Mesp1 and Myocd improved cardiac reprogramming from mouse or human fibroblasts by directly repressing Snai1, a master regulator of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. MiR-133 overexpression with GMT generated sevenfold more beating iCMs from mouse embryonic fibroblasts and shortened the duration to induce beating cells from 30 to 10 days, compared to GMT alone. Snai1 knockdown suppressed fibroblast genes, upregulated cardiac gene expression, and induced more contracting iCMs with GMT transduction, recapitulating the effects of miR-133 overexpression. In contrast, overexpression of Snai1 in GMT/miR-133-transduced cells maintained fibroblast signatures and inhibited generation of beating iCMs. MiR-133-mediated Snai1 repression was also critical for cardiac reprogramming in adult mouse and human cardiac fibroblasts. Thus, silencing fibroblast signatures, mediated by miR-133/Snai1, is a key molecular roadblock during cardiac reprogramming.

  11. A-kinase anchoring protein-Lbc promotes pro-fibrotic signaling in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Cavin, Sabrina; Maric, Darko; Diviani, Dario

    2014-02-01

    In response to stress or injury the heart undergoes an adverse remodeling process associated with cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and fibrosis. Transformation of cardiac fibroblasts to myofibroblasts is a crucial event initiating the fibrotic process. Cardiac myofibroblasts invade the myocardium and secrete excess amounts of extracellular matrix proteins, which cause myocardial stiffening, cardiac dysfunctions and progression to heart failure. While several studies indicate that the small GTPase RhoA can promote profibrotic responses, the exchange factors that modulate its activity in cardiac fibroblasts are yet to be identified. In the present study, we show that AKAP-Lbc, an A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) with an intrinsic Rho-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity, is critical for activating RhoA and transducing profibrotic signals downstream of type I angiotensin II receptors (AT1Rs) in cardiac fibroblasts. In particular, our results indicate that suppression of AKAP-Lbc expression by infecting adult rat ventricular fibroblasts with lentiviruses encoding AKAP-Lbc specific short hairpin (sh) RNAs strongly reduces the ability of angiotensin II to promote RhoA activation, differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts to myofibroblasts, collagen deposition as well as myofibroblast migration. Interestingly, AT1Rs promote AKAP-Lbc activation via a pathway that requires the α subunit of the heterotrimeric G protein G12. These findings identify AKAP-Lbc as a key Rho-guanine nucleotide exchange factor modulating profibrotic responses in cardiac fibroblasts.

  12. Computational Approaches to Understanding the Role of Fibroblast-Myocyte Interactions in Cardiac Arrhythmogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Tashalee R.; Krogh-Madsen, Trine; Christini, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The adult heart is composed of a dense network of cardiomyocytes surrounded by nonmyocytes, the most abundant of which are cardiac fibroblasts. Several cardiac diseases, such as myocardial infarction or dilated cardiomyopathy, are associated with an increased density of fibroblasts, that is, fibrosis. Fibroblasts play a significant role in the development of electrical and mechanical dysfunction of the heart; however the underlying mechanisms are only partially understood. One widely studied mechanism suggests that fibroblasts produce excess extracellular matrix, resulting in collagenous septa. These collagenous septa slow propagation, cause zig-zag conduction paths, and decouple cardiomyocytes resulting in a substrate for arrhythmia. Another emerging mechanism suggests that fibroblasts promote arrhythmogenesis through direct electrical interactions with cardiomyocytes via gap junctions. Due to the challenges of investigating fibroblast-myocyte coupling in native cardiac tissue, computational modeling and in vitro experiments have facilitated the investigation into the mechanisms underlying fibroblast-mediated changes in cardiomyocyte action potential morphology, conduction velocity, spontaneous excitability, and vulnerability to reentry. In this paper, we summarize the major findings of the existing computational studies investigating the implications of fibroblast-myocyte interactions in the normal and diseased heart. We then present investigations from our group into the potential role of voltage-dependent gap junctions in fibroblast-myocyte interactions. PMID:26601107

  13. Inhibition of autophagy inhibits the conversion of cardiac fibroblasts to cardiac myofibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shivika S.; Zeglinski, Matthew R.; Rattan, Sunil G.; Landry, Natalie M.; Ghavami, Saeid; Wigle, Jeffrey T.; Klonisch, Thomas; Halayko, Andrew J.; Dixon, Ian M.C.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of heart failure with concomitant cardiac fibrosis is very high in developed countries. Fibroblast activation in heart is causal to cardiac fibrosis as they convert to hypersynthetic cardiac myofibroblasts. There is no known treatment for cardiac fibrosis. Myofibroblasts contribute to the inappropriate remodeling of the myocardial interstitium, which leads to reduced cardiac function and ultimately heart failure. Elevated levels of autophagy have been linked to stress-induced ventricular remodeling and other cardiac diseases. Previously, we had shown that TGF-β1 treatment of human atrial fibroblasts both induced autophagy and enhanced the fibrogenic response supporting a linkage between the myofibroblast phenotype and autophagy. We now demonstrate that with in vitro culture of primary rat cardiac fibroblasts, inhibition of autophagy represses fibroblast to myofibroblast phenoconversion. Culturing unpassaged cardiac fibroblasts for 72 hours on plastic tissue culture plates is associated with elevated α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression. This activation parallels increased microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC-3β II) protein expression. Inhibition of autophagy with bafilomycin-A1 (Baf-A1) and chloroquine (CQ) in cardiac fibroblasts significantly reduces α-SMA and extracellular domain A fibronectin (ED-A FN) protein vs untreated controls. Myofibroblast cell migration and contractility were significantly reduced following inhibition of autophagy. These data support the possibility of a causal link between cardiac fibroblast-to-myofibroblast phenoconversion and autophagy. PMID:27705938

  14. Gaining myocytes or losing fibroblasts: Challenges in cardiac fibroblast reprogramming for infarct repair.

    PubMed

    Nagalingam, Raghu S; Safi, Hamza A; Czubryt, Michael P

    2016-04-01

    Unlike most somatic tissues, the heart possesses a very limited inherent ability to repair itself following damage. Attempts to therapeutically salvage the myocardium after infarction, either by sparing surviving myocytes or by injection of exogenous cells of varied provenance, have met with limited success. Cardiac fibroblasts are numerous, resistant to hypoxia, and amenable to phenotype reprogramming to cardiomyocytes - a potential panacea to an intractable problem. However, the long-term effects of mass conversion of fibroblasts are as-yet unknown. Since fibroblasts play key roles in normal cardiac function, treating these cells as a ready source of replacements for myocytes may have the effect of swapping one problem for another. This review briefly examines the roles of cardiac fibroblasts, recaps the strides made so far in their reprogramming to cardiomyocytes both in vitro and in vivo, and discusses the potential ramifications of large-scale cellular identity swapping. While such therapy offers great promise, the potential repercussions require consideration and careful study.

  15. SPARC regulates collagen interaction with cardiac fibroblast cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Harris, Brett S; Zhang, Yuhua; Card, Lauren; Rivera, Lee B; Brekken, Rolf A; Bradshaw, Amy D

    2011-09-01

    Cardiac tissue from mice that do not express secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) have reduced amounts of insoluble collagen content at baseline and in response to pressure overload hypertrophy compared with wild-type (WT) mice. However, the cellular mechanism by which SPARC affects myocardial collagen is not clearly defined. Although expression of SPARC by cardiac myocytes has been detected in vitro, immunohistochemistry of hearts demonstrated SPARC staining primarily associated with interstitial fibroblastic cells. Primary cardiac fibroblasts isolated from SPARC-null and WT mice were assayed for collagen I synthesis by [(3)H]proline incorporation into procollagen and by immunoblot analysis of procollagen processing. Bacterial collagenase was used to discern intracellular from extracellular forms of collagen I. Increased amounts of collagen I were found associated with SPARC-null versus WT cells, and the proportion of total collagen I detected on SPARC-null fibroblasts without propeptides [collagen-α(1)(I)] was higher than in WT cells. In addition, the amount of total collagen sensitive to collagenase digestion (extracellular) was greater in SPARC-null cells than in WT cells, indicating an increase in cell surface-associated collagen in the absence of SPARC. Furthermore, higher levels of collagen type V, a fibrillar collagen implicated in collagen fibril initiation, were found in SPARC-null fibroblasts. The absence of SPARC did not result in significant differences in proliferation or in decreased production of procollagen I by cardiac fibroblasts. We conclude that SPARC regulates collagen in the heart by modulating procollagen processing and interactions with fibroblast cell surfaces. These results are consistent with decreased levels of interstitial collagen in the hearts of SPARC-null mice being due primarily to inefficient collagen deposition into the extracellular matrix rather than to differences in collagen production.

  16. EPAC expression and function in cardiac fibroblasts and myofibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Olmedo, Ivonne; Muñoz, Claudia; Guzmán, Nancy; Catalán, Mabel; Vivar, Raúl; Ayala, Pedro; Humeres, Claudio; Aránguiz, Pablo; García, Lorena; Velarde, Victoria; Díaz-Araya, Guillermo

    2013-10-15

    In the heart, cardiac fibroblasts (CF) and cardiac myofibroblasts (CMF) are the main cells responsible for wound healing after cardiac insult. Exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC) is a downstream effector of cAMP, and it has been not completely studied on CF. Moreover, in CMF, which are the main cells responsible for cardiac healing, EPAC expression and function are unknown. We evaluated in both CF and CMF the effect of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) on EPAC-1 expression. We also studied the EPAC involvement on collagen synthesis, adhesion, migration and collagen gel contraction. Method: Rat neonatal CF and CMF were treated with TGF-β1 at different times and concentrations. EPAC-1 protein levels and Rap1 activation were measured by western blot and pull down assay respectively. EPAC cellular functions were determined by adhesion, migration and collagen gel contraction assay; and collagen expression was determined by western blot. Results: TGF-β1 through Smad and JNK significantly reduced EPAC-1 expression in CF, while in CMF this cytokine increased EPAC-1 expression through ERK1/2, JNK, p38, AKT and Smad3. EPAC activation was able to induce higher Rap1-GTP levels in CMF than in CF. EPAC and PKA, both cAMP effectors, promoted CF and CMF adhesion on fibronectin, as well as CF migration; however, this effect was not observed in CMF. EPAC but not PKA activation mediated collagen gel contraction in CF, while in CMF both PKA and EPAC mediated collagen gel contraction. Finally, the EPAC and PKA activation reduced collagen synthesis in CF and CMF. Conclusion: TGF-β1 differentially regulates the expression of EPAC in CF and CMF; and EPAC regulates differentially CF and CMF functions associated with cardiac remodeling. - Highlights: • TGF-β1 regulates EPAC-1 expression in cardiac fibroblast and myofibroblast. • Rap-1GTP levels are higher in cardiac myofibroblast than fibroblast. • EPAC-1 controls adhesion, migration and collagen synthesis in cardiac

  17. The Living Scar – Cardiac Fibroblasts and the Injured Heart

    PubMed Central

    Rog-Zielinska, Eva A; Norris, Russell A; Kohl, Peter; Markwald, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac scars, often perceived as “dead” tissue, are very much alive, with heterocellular activity ensuring the maintenance of structural and mechanical integrity following heart injury. To form a scar, non-myocytes such as fibroblasts, proliferate and are recruited from intra- and extra-cardiac sources. Fibroblasts perform important autocrine and paracrine signalling functions. They also establish mechanical and, as is increasingly evident, electrical junctions with other cells. While fibroblasts were previously thought to act simply as electrical insulators, they may be electrically connected among themselves and, under certain circumstances, to other cells, including cardiomyocytes. A better understanding of these interactions will help target scar structure and function and facilitate the development of novel therapies aimed at modifying scar properties for patient benefit. This review explores available insight and recent concepts on fibroblast integration in the heart, and highlights potential avenues for harnessing their roles to optimise scar function following heart injury such as infarction, and therapeutic interventions such as ablation. PMID:26776094

  18. Isolation of cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts from neonatal rat pups.

    PubMed

    Golden, Honey B; Gollapudi, Deepika; Gerilechaogetu, Fnu; Li, Jieli; Cristales, Ricardo J; Peng, Xu; Dostal, David E

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM) and fibroblasts (FBs) serve as in vitro models for studying fundamental mechanisms underlying cardiac pathologies, as well as identifying potential therapeutic targets. Both cell types are relatively easy to culture as monolayers and can be manipulated using molecular and pharmacological tools. Because NRVM cease to proliferate after birth, and FBs undergo phenotypic changes and senescence after a few passages in tissue culture, primary cultures of both cell types are required for experiments. Below we describe methods that provide good cell yield and viability of primary cultures of NRVM and FBs from 0 to 3-day-old neonatal rat pups.

  19. Developmental stage-dependent effects of cardiac fibroblasts on function of stem cell-derived engineered cardiac tissues

    PubMed Central

    Liau, Brian; Jackman, Christopher P.; Li, Yanzhen; Bursac, Nenad

    2017-01-01

    We investigated whether the developmental stage of mouse cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) influences the formation and function of engineered cardiac tissues made of mouse embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (mESC-CMs). Engineered cardiac tissue patches were fabricated by encapsulating pure mESC-CMs, mESC-CMs + adult CFs, or mESC-CMs + fetal CFs in fibrin-based hydrogel. Tissue patches containing fetal CFs exhibited higher velocity of action potential propagation and contractile force amplitude compared to patches containing adult CFs, while pure mESC-CM patches did not form functional syncytium. The functional improvements in mESC-CM + fetal CF patches were associated with differences in structural remodeling and increased expression of proteins involved in cardiac function. To determine role of paracrine signaling, we cultured pure mESC-CMs within miniature tissue “micro-patches” supplemented with media conditioned by adult or fetal CFs. Fetal CF-conditioned media distinctly enhanced CM spreading and contractile activity, which was shown by pathway inhibitor experiments and Western blot analysis to be mediated via MEK-ERK signaling. In mESC-CM monolayers, CF-conditioned media did not alter CM spreading or MEK-ERK activation. Collectively, our studies show that 3D co-culture of mESC-CMs with embryonic CFs is superior to co-culture with adult CFs for in vitro generation of functional myocardium. Ensuring consistent developmental stages of cardiomyocytes and supporting non-myocytes may be a critical factor for promoting functional maturation of engineered cardiac tissues. PMID:28181589

  20. Age-Dependent Expression of Collagen Receptors and Deformation of Type I Collagen Substrates by Rat Cardiac Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Christopher G.; Stone, John W.; Fowlkes, Vennece; Morales, Mary O.; Murphy, Catherine J.; Baxter, Sarah C.; Goldsmith, Edie C.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about how age influences the ways in which cardiac fibroblasts interact with the extracellular matrix. We investigated the deformation of collagen substrates by neonatal and adult rat cardiac fibroblasts in monolayer and three-dimensional (3D) cultures, and quantified the expression of three collagen receptors [discoidin domain receptor (DDR) 1, DDR2, and β1 integrin] and the contractile protein alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in these cells. We report that adult fibroblasts contracted 3D collagen substrates significantly less than their neonate counterparts, whereas no differences were observed in monolayer cultures. Adult cells had lower expression of β1 integrin and α-SMA than neonate cultures, and we detected significant correlations between the expression of α-SMA and each of the collagen receptors in neonate cells but not in adult cells. Consistent with recent work demonstrating age-dependent interactions with myocytes, our results indicate that interactions between cardiac fibroblasts and the extracellular matrix change with age. PMID:21740617

  1. Cardiac Rehabilitation in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Schopfer, David W; Forman, Daniel E

    2016-09-01

    The biology of aging and the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease (CVD) overlap, with the effect that CVD is endemic in the growing population of older adults. Moreover, CVD in older adults is usually complicated by age-related complexities, including multimorbidity, polypharmacy, frailty, and other intricacies that add to the risks of ambiguous symptoms, deconditioning, iatrogenesis, falls, disability, and other challenges. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a comprehensive lifestyle program that can have particular benefit for older patients with cardiovascular conditions. Although CR was originally designed primarily as an exercise training program for younger adults after a myocardial infarction or coronary artery bypass surgery, it has evolved as a comprehensive lifestyle program (promoting physical activity as well as education, diet, risk reduction, and adherence) for a broader range of CVD (coronary heart disease, heart failure, and valvular heart disease). It provides a valuable opportunity to address and moderate many of the challenges pertinent for the large and growing population of older adults with CVD. Cardiac rehabilitation promotes physical function (cardiorespiratory fitness as well as strength and balance) that helps overcome disease and deconditioning as well as related vulnerabilities such as disability, frailty, and falls. Similarly, CR facilitates education, monitoring, and guidance to reduce iatrogenesis and promote adherence. Furthermore, CR fosters cognition, socialization, and independence in older patients. Yet despite all its conceptual benefits, CR is significantly underused in older populations. This review discusses benefits and the paradoxical underuse of CR, as well as evolving models of care that may achieve greater application and efficacy.

  2. Fibroblast growth factor 21 is induced upon cardiac stress and alters cardiac lipid homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Brahma, Manoja K.; Adam, Rene C.; Pollak, Nina M.; Jaeger, Doris; Zierler, Kathrin A.; Pöcher, Nadja; Schreiber, Renate; Romauch, Matthias; Moustafa, Tarek; Eder, Sandra; Ruelicke, Thomas; Preiss-Landl, Karina; Lass, Achim; Zechner, Rudolf; Haemmerle, Guenter

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a PPARα-regulated gene elucidated in the liver of PPARα-deficient mice or PPARα agonist-treated mice. Mice globally lacking adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) exhibit a marked defect in TG catabolism associated with impaired PPARα-activated gene expression in the heart and liver, including a drastic reduction in hepatic FGF21 mRNA expression. Here we show that FGF21 mRNA expression is markedly increased in the heart of ATGL-deficient mice accompanied by elevated expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers, which can be reversed by reconstitution of ATGL expression in cardiac muscle. In line with this assumption, the induction of ER stress increases FGF21 mRNA expression in H9C2 cardiomyotubes. Cardiac FGF21 expression was also induced upon fasting of healthy mice, implicating a role of FGF21 in cardiac energy metabolism. To address this question, we generated and characterized mice with cardiac-specific overexpression of FGF21 (CM-Fgf21). FGF21 was efficiently secreted from cardiomyocytes of CM-Fgf21 mice, which moderately affected cardiac TG homeostasis, indicating a role for FGF21 in cardiac energy metabolism. Together, our results show that FGF21 expression is activated upon cardiac ER stress linked to defective lipolysis and that a persistent increase in circulating FGF21 levels interferes with cardiac and whole body energy homeostasis. PMID:25176985

  3. Regulation of fibronectin gene expression in cardiac fibroblasts by scleraxis.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Rushita A; Lin, Justin; Wang, Ryan; Czubryt, Michael P

    2016-11-01

    The glycoprotein fibronectin is a key component of the extracellular matrix. By interacting with numerous matrix and cell surface proteins, fibronectin plays important roles in cell adhesion, migration and intracellular signaling. Up-regulation of fibronectin occurs in tissue fibrosis, and previous studies have identified the pro-fibrotic factor TGFβ as an inducer of fibronectin expression, although the mechanism responsible remains unknown. We have previously shown that a key downstream effector of TGFβ signaling in cardiac fibroblasts is the transcription factor scleraxis, which in turn regulates the expression of a wide variety of extracellular matrix genes. We noted that fibronectin expression tracked closely with scleraxis expression, but it was unclear whether scleraxis directly regulated the fibronectin gene. Here, we report that scleraxis acts via two E-box binding sites in the proximal human fibronectin promoter to govern fibronectin expression, with the second E-box being both sufficient and necessary for scleraxis-mediated fibronectin expression to occur. A combination of electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that scleraxis interacted to a greater degree with the second E-box. Over-expression or knockdown of scleraxis resulted in increased or decreased fibronectin expression, respectively, and scleraxis null mice presented with dramatically decreased immunolabeling for fibronectin in cardiac tissue sections compared to wild-type controls. Furthermore, scleraxis was required for TGFβ-induced fibronectin expression: TGFβ lost its ability to induce fibronectin expression following scleraxis knockdown. Together, these results demonstrate a novel and required role for scleraxis in the regulation of cardiac fibroblast fibronectin gene expression basally or in response to TGFβ.

  4. Phenylephrine promotes cardiac fibroblast proliferation through calcineurin-NFAT pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Yibing; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Xi; Chen, Xiangfan; Xiao, Wenyan; Zhang, Lingling; Chen, Yunxuan; Zhu, Weizhong

    2016-01-01

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent calcineurin (CaN) plays an important role in various Ca(+2) signaling pathways, among which are those involved in cardiac diseases. It has also been shown that a heightened sympathetic tone accelerates the development of heart failure. The present study investigates whether the CaN-mediated nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) pathway is involved in cultured neonatal rat cardiac fibroblast proliferation induced by phenylephrine. CF proliferation was assessed by a cell survival assay and cell counts. Green fluorescent protein-tagged NFAT3 was used to determine the cellular location of NFAT3. CaN activity and protein levels were also determined by an activity assay kit and Western blotting, respectively. Results showed that phenylephrine promoted CF proliferation, which was abolished by α1-adrenergic receptor antagonist (prazosin), a blocker of Ca(+2) influx (nifedipine), an intracellular Ca(2+) buffer (BAPTA-AM), CaN inhibitors (cyclosporin A and FK506), and over-expression of dominant negative CaN. Phenylephrine activated CaN and evoked NFAT3 nuclear translocation, both of which were blocked by cyclosporine A (CsA) or over-expression of dominant negative CaN. These results suggest that the Ca(2+)/CaN/NFAT pathway mediates PE-induced CF proliferation, and this pathway might be a possible therapeutic target in cardiac fibrosis.

  5. Angiotensin II upregulates K(Ca)3.1 channels and stimulates cell proliferation in rat cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Ping; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Li-Mei; Li, Gui-Rong; Deng, Xiu-Ling

    2013-05-15

    The proliferation of cardiac fibroblasts is implicated in the pathogenesis of myocardial remodeling and fibrosis. Intermediate-conductance calcium-activated K⁺ channels (K(Ca)3.1 channels) have important roles in cell proliferation. However, it is unknown whether angiotensin II (Ang II), a potent profibrotic molecule, would regulate K(Ca)3.1 channels in cardiac fibroblasts and participate in cell proliferation. In the present study, we investigated whether K(Ca)3.1 channels were regulated by Ang II, and how the channel activity mediated cell proliferation in cultured adult rat cardiac fibroblasts using electrophysiology and biochemical approaches. It was found that mRNA, protein, and current density of K(Ca)3.1 channels were greatly enhanced in cultured cardiac fibroblasts treated with 1 μM Ang II, and the effects were countered by the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT₁R) blocker losartan, the p38-MAPK inhibitor SB203580, the ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059, and the PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002. Ang II stimulated cell proliferation and the effect was antagonized by the K(Ca)3.1 blocker TRAM-34 and siRNA targeting K(Ca)3.1. In addition, Ang II-induced increase of K(Ca)3.1 expression was attenuated by transfection of activator protein-1 (AP-1) decoy oligodeoxynucleotides. These results demonstrate for the first time that Ang II stimulates cell proliferation mediated by upregulating K(Ca)3.1 channels via interacting with the AT₁R and activating AP-1 complex through ERK1/2, p38-MAPK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways in cultured adult rat cardiac fibroblasts.

  6. Effects of tanshinone VI on the hypertrophy of cardiac myocytes and fibrosis of cardiac fibroblasts of neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Maki, Toshiyuki; Kawahara, Yuji; Tanonaka, Kouichi; Yagi, Akira; Takeo, Satoshi

    2002-12-01

    The possible effects of tanshinone VI (tsh), a diterpene from the root of Tan-Shen (Salvia miltiorrhiza, Bunge (Labiatae)) on hypertrophy and fibrosis in cultured neonatal rat cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts were examined. Tsh had no significant effect on protein synthesis, which was evaluated by [3H]-leucine incorporation into the acid insoluble fraction in the cells, in the absence of stimulatory factors in cardiac myocytes. The amount of protein produced in cardiac myocytes was increased by 10(-8) M endothelin-1 (ET-1), 10(-6) M phenylephrine (PE), or 10(-8) M insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), suggesting that hypertrophy of cardiac myocytes in vitro was induced by these factors. The ET-1-, PE-, or IGF-1-induced increase in protein synthesis was attenuated by treatment with 10(-5) M tsh. Treatment with 10(-5) M tsh significantly decreased the synthesis of collagen by cardiac fibroblasts, which was evaluated by [3H]-proline incorpolation into acid-insoluble fraction of the fiblobrasts, in the absence of stimulatory factors for the production. Fetal bovine serum (FBS) or IGF-1 increased collagen synthesis in a concentration-dependent manner. The increase at 5% FBS or 10(-8) M IGF-1 was inhibited by 10(-5) M tsh. Fibroblast-conditioned medium (FB-CM) increased protein synthesis in cardiac myocytes in a concentration-dependent manner (10; - 100 %). Tsh attenuated the FB-CM-induced increase in protein synthesis by cardiac myocytes. These results show that tsh may attenuate the humoral factor-induced hypertrophy of cardiac myocytes and fibrosis of cardiac fibroblasts. The findings suggest that tsh may improve the development of cardiac remodeling under pathophysiological conditions. Abbreviations. ANP:atrial natriuretic peptide DMEM:Dulbecco-modified Eagle's medium ET-1:endothelin-1 FB-CM:fibroblast-conditioned medium FBS:fetal bovine serum IGF-1:insulin-like growth factor-1 PE:phenylephrine tsh:tanshinone VI

  7. Simvastatin induces apoptosis by a Rho-dependent mechanism in cultured cardiac fibroblasts and myofibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Copaja, Miguel; Venegas, Daniel; Aranguiz, Pablo; Canales, Jimena; Vivar, Raul; Catalan, Mabel; Olmedo, Ivonne; Rodriguez, Andrea E.; Chiong, Mario; Leyton, Lisette; Lavandero, Sergio; Diaz-Araya, Guillermo

    2011-08-15

    Several clinical trials have shown the beneficial effects of statins in the prevention of coronary heart disease. Additionally, statins promote apoptosis in vascular smooth muscle cells, in renal tubular epithelial cells and also in a variety of cell lines; yet, the effects of statins on cardiac fibroblast and myofibroblast, primarily responsible for cardiac tissue healing are almost unknown. Here, we investigated the effects of simvastatin on cardiac fibroblast and myofibroblast viability and studied the molecular cell death mechanism triggered by simvastatin in both cell types. Methods: Rat neonatal cardiac fibroblasts and myofibroblasts were treated with simvastatin (0.1-10 {mu}M) up to 72 h. Cell viability and apoptosis were evaluated by trypan blue exclusion method and by flow cytometry, respectively. Caspase-3 activation and Rho protein levels and activity were also determined by Western blot and pull-down assay, respectively. Results: Simvastatin induces caspase-dependent apoptosis of cardiac fibroblasts and myofibroblasts in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, with greater effects on fibroblasts than myofibroblasts. These effects were prevented by mevalonate, farnesylpyrophosphate and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate, but not squalene. These last results suggest that apoptosis was dependent on small GTPases of the Rho family rather than Ras. Conclusion: Simvastatin triggered apoptosis of cardiac fibroblasts and myofibroblasts by a mechanism independent of cholesterol synthesis, but dependent of isoprenilation of Rho protein. Additionally, cardiac fibroblasts were more susceptible to simvastatin-induced apoptosis than cardiac myofibroblasts. Thus simvastatin could avoid adverse cardiac remodeling leading to a less fibrotic repair of the damaged tissues. - Research Highlights: > Simvastatin decreases CF and CMF viability independent of cholesterol synthesis. > Simvastatin induces CF and CMF apoptosis in a caspase-dependent manner being CMF more resistant

  8. Role of integrins in mediating cardiac fibroblast-cardiomyocyte cross talk: a dynamic relationship in cardiac biology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Civitarese, Robert A; Kapus, Andras; McCulloch, Christopher A; Connelly, Kim A

    2017-01-01

    Integrins are a family of heterodimeric proteins expressed by cardiac fibroblasts and cardiomyocytes that provide critical adhesive and signaling functions through their interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the actin cytoskeleton. These adhesive processes are important for paracrine signaling, ECM homeostasis and for the intercellular interactions that impact cardiac cell biology and pathophysiological adaptation in disease. Despite considerable progress, our understanding of the interplay between cardiac cells, the ECM and integrins remains largely elusive. In this review, we examine the role of integrins in adhesive and signaling functions, and how these functions enable communication between cardiac fibroblasts, cardiomyocytes and the ECM. These processes strongly influence cardiac development and, later, the progression into cardiac disease. An improved understanding of this multi-dimensional system in cardiac tissues is needed to decipher the biological, spatiotemporal and mechanical cues that regulate cardiac health and the manifestation of cardiac disease. Greater insight into integrin function in cardiac tissues may also suggest new treatments for the prevention of heart failure.

  9. Neferine inhibits proliferation and collagen synthesis induced by high glucose in cardiac fibroblasts and reduces cardiac fibrosis in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xue; Song, Xiuhui; Lu, Jianjun; Chen, Xueying; Liang, Ershun; Liu, Xiaoqiong; Zhang, Mingxiang; Zhang, Yun; Du, Zhanhui; Zhao, Yuxia

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac fibrosis is a common pathological process accompanying diabetes mellitus. In this report, we studied the effects of neferine (a major bisbenzylisoquinline alkaloid derived from lotus embryos) on cardiac fibrosis induced by diabetes mellitus, as well as the underlying molecular pathways. In vivo, type 1 diabetes mellitus was induced in mice by administering streptozotocin. Diabetic mice were treated with neferine through oral gavage, and cardiac function was assessed using echocardiography. Total collagen deposition was assessed by Masson's trichrome and Picrosirius staining. In vitro, cardiac fibroblasts were cultured in normal or high-glucose medium with or without neferine. Neferine attenuated left ventricular dysfunction and remodeling and reduced collagen deposition in diabetic mice. In vitro, neferine inhibited cardiac fibroblast proliferation, migration, and differentiation into myofibroblasts. In addition, neferine reduced high-glucose-induced collagen production and inhibited TGF-β1-Smad, ERK and p38 MAPK signaling activation in cardiac fibroblasts. These results suggest that neferine may have antifibrogenic effects in diabetes-related cardiac fibrosis. PMID:27533252

  10. Autonomic cardiac innervation: development and adult plasticity.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Wohaib

    2013-01-01

    Autonomic cardiac neurons have a common origin in the neural crest but undergo distinct developmental differentiation as they mature toward their adult phenotype. Progenitor cells respond to repulsive cues during migration, followed by differentiation cues from paracrine sources that promote neurochemistry and differentiation. When autonomic axons start to innervate cardiac tissue, neurotrophic factors from vascular tissue are essential for maintenance of neurons before they reach their targets, upon which target-derived trophic factors take over final maturation, synaptic strength and postnatal survival. Although target-derived neurotrophins have a central role to play in development, alternative sources of neurotrophins may also modulate innervation. Both developing and adult sympathetic neurons express proNGF, and adult parasympathetic cardiac ganglion neurons also synthesize and release NGF. The physiological function of these "non-classical" cardiac sources of neurotrophins remains to be determined, especially in relation to autocrine/paracrine sustenance during development.   Cardiac autonomic nerves are closely spatially associated in cardiac plexuses, ganglia and pacemaker regions and so are sensitive to release of neurotransmitter, neuropeptides and trophic factors from adjacent nerves. As such, in many cardiac pathologies, it is an imbalance within the two arms of the autonomic system that is critical for disease progression. Although this crosstalk between sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves has been well established for adult nerves, it is unclear whether a degree of paracrine regulation occurs across the autonomic limbs during development. Aberrant nerve remodeling is a common occurrence in many adult cardiovascular pathologies, and the mechanisms regulating outgrowth or denervation are disparate. However, autonomic neurons display considerable plasticity in this regard with neurotrophins and inflammatory cytokines having a central regulatory

  11. Protective effect of kaempferol on LPS plus ATP-induced inflammatory response in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xi-Lan; Liu, Jian-Xun; Dong, Wei; Li, Peng; Li, Lei; Hou, Jin-Cai; Zheng, Yong-Qiu; Lin, Cheng-Ren; Ren, Jun-Guo

    2015-02-01

    Inflammatory response is an important mechanism in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Cardiac fibroblasts play a crucial role in cardiac inflammation and might become a potential therapeutic target in cardiovascular diseases. Kaempferol, a flavonoid commonly existing in many edible fruits, vegetables, and Chinese herbs, is well known to possess anti-inflammatory property and thus has a therapeutic potential for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. To date, the effect of kaempferol on cardiac fibroblasts inflammation is unknown. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of kaempferol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plus ATP-induced cardiac fibroblasts and explored the underlying mechanisms. Our results showed that kaempferol at concentrations of 12.5 and 25 μg/mL significantly suppressed the release of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-18 and inhibited activation of NF-κB and Akt in LPS plus ATP-induced cardiac fibroblasts. These findings suggest that kaempferol attenuates cardiac fibroblast inflammation through suppression of activation of NF-κB and Akt.

  12. Fibroblast proliferation alters cardiac excitation conduction and contraction: a computational study*

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, He-qing; Xia, Ling; Shou, Guo-fa; Zang, Yun-liang; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the effects of cardiac fibroblast proliferation on cardiac electric excitation conduction and mechanical contraction were investigated using a proposed integrated myocardial-fibroblastic electromechanical model. At the cellular level, models of the human ventricular myocyte and fibroblast were modified to incorporate a model of cardiac mechanical contraction and cooperativity mechanisms. Cellular electromechanical coupling was realized with a calcium buffer. At the tissue level, electrical excitation conduction was coupled to an elastic mechanics model in which the finite difference method (FDM) was used to solve electrical excitation equations, and the finite element method (FEM) was used to solve mechanics equations. The electromechanical properties of the proposed integrated model were investigated in one or two dimensions under normal and ischemic pathological conditions. Fibroblast proliferation slowed wave propagation, induced a conduction block, decreased strains in the fibroblast proliferous tissue, and increased dispersions in depolarization, repolarization, and action potential duration (APD). It also distorted the wave-front, leading to the initiation and maintenance of re-entry, and resulted in a sustained contraction in the proliferous areas. This study demonstrated the important role that fibroblast proliferation plays in modulating cardiac electromechanical behaviour and which should be considered in planning future heart-modeling studies. PMID:24599687

  13. Na/K-ATPase signaling regulates collagen synthesis through microRNA-29b-3p in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Christopher A; Hill, Michael C; Shi, Huilin; Fan, Xiaoming; Xie, Jeffrey X; Haller, Steven T; Kennedy, David J; Liu, Jiang; Garrett, Michael R; Xie, Zijian; Cooper, Christopher J; Shapiro, Joseph I; Tian, Jiang

    2016-03-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is accompanied by cardiac fibrosis, hypertrophy, and dysfunction, which are commonly referred to as uremic cardiomyopathy. Our previous studies found that Na/K-ATPase ligands or 5/6th partial nephrectomy (PNx) induces cardiac fibrosis in rats and mice. The current study used in vitro and in vivo models to explore novel roles for microRNA in this mechanism of cardiac fibrosis formation. To accomplish this, we performed microRNA profiling with RT-qPCR based arrays on cardiac tissue from rats subjected to marinobufagenin (MBG) infusion or PNx. The analysis showed that a series of fibrosis-related microRNAs were dysregulated. Among the dysregulated microRNAs, microRNA (miR)-29b-3p, which directly targets mRNA of collagen, was consistently reduced in both PNx and MBG-infused animals. In vitro experiments demonstrated that treatment of primary cultures of adult rat cardiac fibroblasts with Na/K-ATPase ligands induced significant increases in the fibrosis marker, collagen protein, and mRNA expression compared with controls, whereas miR-29b-3p expression decreased >50%. Transfection of miR-29b-3p mimics into cardiac fibroblasts inhibited cardiotonic steroids-induced collagen synthesis. Moreover, a specific Na/K-ATPase signaling antagonist, pNaKtide, prevented ouabain-induced increases in collagen synthesis and decreases in miR-29b-3p expression in these cells. In conclusion, these data are the first to indicate that signaling through Na/K-ATPase regulates miRNAs and specifically, miR-29b-3p expression both in vivo and in vitro. Additionally, these data indicate that miR-29b-3p expression plays an important role in the formation of cardiac fibrosis in CKD.

  14. The role of cardiac fibroblasts in extracellular matrix-mediated signaling during normal and pathological cardiac development.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Kelly Elizabeth; Black, Lauren Deems

    2013-07-01

    The extracellular matrix is no longer considered a static support structure for cells but a dynamic signaling network with the power to influence cell, tissue, and whole organ physiology. In the myocardium, cardiac fibroblasts are the primary cell type responsible for the synthesis, deposition, and degradation of matrix proteins, and they therefore play a critical role in the development and maintenance of functional heart tissue. This review will summarize the extensive research conducted in vivo and in vitro, demonstrating the influence of both physical and chemical stimuli on cardiac fibroblasts and how these interactions impact both the extracellular matrix and, by extension, cardiomyocytes. This work is of considerable significance, given that cardiovascular diseases are marked by extensive remodeling of the extracellular matrix, which ultimately impairs the functional capacity of the heart. We seek to summarize the unique role of cardiac fibroblasts in normal cardiac development and the most prevalent cardiac pathologies, including congenital heart defects, hypertension, hypertrophy, and the remodeled heart following myocardial infarction. We will conclude by identifying existing holes in the research that, if answered, have the potential to dramatically improve current therapeutic strategies for the repair and regeneration of damaged myocardium via mechanotransductive signaling.

  15. EGCG inhibits CTGF expression via blocking NF-κB activation in cardiac fibroblast.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yi; Yu, Shan-Shan; Chen, Ting-Ting; Gao, Si; Geng, Biao; Yu, Yang; Ye, Jian-Tao; Liu, Pei-Qing

    2013-01-15

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) has been reported to play an important role in tissue fibrosis and presents a promising therapeutic target for fibrotic diseases. In heart, inappropriate increase in level of CTGF promotes fibroblast proliferation and extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation, thereby exacerbating cardiac hypertrophy and subsequent failure. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the major polyphenol found in green tea, possesses multiple protective effects on the cardiovascular system including cardiac fibrosis. However, the molecular mechanism by which EGCG exerts its anti-fibrotic effects has not been well investigated. In this study, we found that EGCG could significantly reduce collagen synthesis, fibronectin (FN) expression and cell proliferation in rat cardiac fibroblasts stimulated with angiotensinII (AngII). It also ameliorated cardiac fibrosis in rats submitted to abdominal aortic constriction (AAC). Moreover, EGCG attenuated the excessive expression of CTGF induced by AAC or AngII, and reduced the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 subunit and degradation of IκB-α. Subsequently, we demonstrated that in cardiac fibroblasts NF-κB inhibition could suppress AngII-induced CTGF expression. Taken together, these findings provide the first evidence that the effect of EGCG against cardiac fibrosis may be attributed to its inhibition on NF-κB activation and subsequent CTGF overexpression, suggesting the therapeutic potential of EGCG on the prevention of cardiac remodeling in patients with pressure overload hypertrophy.

  16. Cardiac Fibroblasts Adopt Osteogenic Fates and Can Be Targeted to Attenuate Pathological Heart Calcification.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Indulekha C L; Li, Shen; Romay, Milagros; Lam, Larry; Lu, Yan; Huang, Jie; Dillard, Nathaniel; Zemanova, Marketa; Rubbi, Liudmilla; Wang, Yibin; Lee, Jason; Xia, Ming; Liang, Owen; Xie, Ya-Hong; Pellegrini, Matteo; Lusis, Aldons J; Deb, Arjun

    2017-02-02

    Mammalian tissues calcify with age and injury. Analogous to bone formation, osteogenic cells are thought to be recruited to the affected tissue and induce mineralization. In the heart, calcification of cardiac muscle leads to conduction system disturbances and is one of the most common pathologies underlying heart blocks. However the cell identity and mechanisms contributing to pathological heart muscle calcification remain unknown. Using lineage tracing, murine models of heart calcification and in vivo transplantation assays, we show that cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) adopt an osteoblast cell-like fate and contribute directly to heart muscle calcification. Small-molecule inhibition of ENPP1, an enzyme that is induced upon injury and regulates bone mineralization, significantly attenuated cardiac calcification. Inhibitors of bone mineralization completely prevented ectopic cardiac calcification and improved post injury heart function. Taken together, these findings highlight the plasticity of fibroblasts in contributing to ectopic calcification and identify pharmacological targets for therapeutic development.

  17. Regulation of mitochondrial oxidative stress by β-arrestins in cultured human cardiac fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Jennifer L.; Razzaque, Md. Abdur; Han, Mei; Li, Jinju; Theccanat, Tiju; Xu, Xianyao; Akhter, Shahab A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oxidative stress in cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) promotes transformation to myofibroblasts and collagen synthesis leading to myocardial fibrosis, a precursor to heart failure (HF). NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) is a major source of cardiac reactive oxygen species (ROS); however, mechanisms of Nox4 regulation are unclear. β-arrestins are scaffold proteins that signal in G-protein-dependent and -independent pathways; for example, in ERK activation. We hypothesize that β-arrestins regulate oxidative stress in a Nox4-dependent manner and increase fibrosis in HF. CFs were isolated from normal and failing adult human left ventricles. Mitochondrial ROS/superoxide production was quantitated using MitoSox. β-arrestin and Nox4 expressions were manipulated using adenoviral overexpression or short interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown. Mitochondrial oxidative stress and Nox4 expression in CFs were significantly increased in HF. Nox4 knockdown resulted in inhibition of mitochondrial superoxide production and decreased basal and TGF-β-stimulated collagen and α-SMA expression. CF β-arrestin expression was upregulated fourfold in HF. β-arrestin knockdown in failing CFs decreased ROS and Nox4 expression by 50%. β-arrestin overexpression in normal CFs increased mitochondrial superoxide production twofold. These effects were prevented by inhibition of either Nox or ERK. Upregulation of Nox4 seemed to be a primary mechanism for increased ROS production in failing CFs, which stimulates collagen deposition. β-arrestin expression was upregulated in HF and plays an important and newly identified role in regulating mitochondrial superoxide production via Nox4. The mechanism for this effect seems to be ERK-mediated. Targeted inhibition of β-arrestins in CFs might decrease oxidative stress as well as pathological cardiac fibrosis. PMID:26449263

  18. Aspirin suppresses cardiac fibroblast proliferation and collagen formation through downregulation of angiotensin type 1 receptor transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xianwei Lu, Jingjun; Khaidakov, Magomed; Mitra, Sona; Ding, Zufeng; Raina, Sameer; Goyal, Tanu; Mehta, Jawahar L.

    2012-03-15

    Aspirin (acetyl salicylic acid, ASA) is a common drug used for its analgesic and antipyretic effects. Recent studies show that ASA not only blocks cyclooxygenase, but also inhibits NADPH oxidase and resultant reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, a pathway that underlies pathogenesis of several ailments, including hypertension and tissue remodeling after injury. In these disease states, angiotensin II (Ang II) activates NADPH oxidase via its type 1 receptor (AT1R) and leads to fibroblast growth and collagen synthesis. In this study, we examined if ASA would inhibit NADPH oxidase activation, upregulation of AT1R transcription, and subsequent collagen generation in mouse cardiac fibroblasts challenged with Ang II. Mouse heart fibroblasts were isolated and treated with Ang II with or without ASA. As expected, Ang II induced AT1R expression, and stimulated cardiac fibroblast growth and collagen synthesis. The AT1R blocker losartan attenuated these effects of Ang II. Similarly to losartan, ASA, and its SA moiety suppressed Ang II-mediated AT1R transcription and fibroblast proliferation as well as expression of collagens and MMPs. ASA also suppressed the expression of NADPH oxidase subunits (p22{sup phox}, p47{sup phox}, p67{sup phox}, NOX2 and NOX4) and ROS generation. ASA did not affect total NF-κB p65, but inhibited its phosphorylation and activation. These observations suggest that ASA inhibits Ang II-induced NADPH oxidase expression, NF-κB activation and AT1R transcription in cardiac fibroblasts, and fibroblast proliferation and collagen expression. The critical role of NADPH oxidase activity in stimulation of AT1R transcription became apparent in experiments where ASA also inhibited AT1R transcription in cardiac fibroblasts challenged with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Since SA had similar effect as ASA on AT1R expression, we suggest that ASA's effect is mediated by its SA moiety. -- Highlights: ► Aspirin in therapeutic concentrations decreases mouse cardiac fibroblast

  19. A Heart of Stone: Cardiac Fibroblasts Turn to Bone in Calcified Hearts.

    PubMed

    Ivey, Kathryn N

    2017-02-02

    The identity of the cells and molecular events driving deleterious calcification of heart muscle remains elusive. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Pillai et al. (2017) report that cardiac fibroblasts respond to injury by adopting an osteogenic cell fate and creating damaging calcific deposits, which can be prevented by inhibiting the activated mineralization process.

  20. MicroRNA-29a suppresses cardiac fibroblasts proliferation via targeting VEGF-A/MAPK signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Tao, Hui; Chen, Ze-Wen; Yang, Jing-Jing; Shi, Kai-Hu

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts proliferation is the most important pathophysiological character of cardiac fibrosis while the underlying mechanisms are still incompletely known. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression by binding to specific sites. Studies have been indicated that miRNA-29a play a key role in cardiac fibrosis. VEGF-A carries out its functions through MAPK signaling pathway in cardiac fibrosis. Existing proofs predict that the VEGF-A is one of the potential targets of miRNA-29a. We therefore probe the role of miRNA-29a and its latent target VEGF-A during cardiac fibrosis. In our study, miRNA-29a was down-regulated while VEGF-A was up-regulated in cardiac fibrosis tissues. The rat cardiac fibroblasts that were transfected with miRNA-29a inhibitor exhibited low-expression of miRNA-29a, enhanced VEGF-A protein and mRNA expression. Nevertheless, the cardiac fibroblasts transfected with miRNA-29a mimics obtained the opposite expression result. Furthermore, over-expression of miRNA-29a suppresses cardiac fibroblasts proliferation. In conclusion, these results suggested that miRNA-29a suppresses cardiac fibrosis and fibroblasts proliferation via targeting VEGF-A/MAPK signal pathway implicating that miRNA-29a might play a role in the treatment of cardiac fibrosis.

  1. Class I HDACs Regulate Angiotensin II-Dependent Cardiac Fibrosis via Fibroblasts and Circulating Fibrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Sarah M.; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Ferguson, Bradley S.; Douglas, Katherine B.; Cavasin, Maria A.; Demos-Davies, Kim; Yeager, Michael E.; Stenmark, Kurt R.; McKinsey, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    Fibrosis, which is defined as excessive accumulation of fibrous connective tissue, contributes to the pathogenesis of numerous diseases involving diverse organ systems. Cardiac fibrosis predisposes individuals to myocardial ischemia, arrhythmias and sudden death, and is commonly associated with diastolic dysfunction. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors block cardiac fibrosis in pre-clinical models of heart failure. However, which HDAC isoforms govern cardiac fibrosis, and the mechanisms by which they do so, remains unclear. Here, we show that selective inhibition of class I HDACs potently suppresses angiotensin II (Ang II)-mediated cardiac fibrosis by targeting two key effector cell populations, cardiac fibroblasts and bone marrow-derived fibrocytes. Class I HDAC inhibition blocks cardiac fibroblast cell cycle progression through derepression of the genes encoding the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors, p15 and p57. In contrast, class I HDAC inhibitors block agonist-dependent differentiation of fibrocytes through a mechanism involving repression of ERK1/2 signaling. These findings define novel roles for class I HDACs in the control of pathological cardiac fibrosis. Furthermore, since fibrocytes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of human diseases, including heart, lung and kidney failure, our results suggest broad utility for isoform-selective HDAC inhibitors as anti-fibrotic agents that function, in part, by targeting these circulating mesenchymal cells. PMID:24374140

  2. Hydrogen sulfide suppresses transforming growth factor-β1-induced differentiation of human cardiac fibroblasts into myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, YouEn; Wang, JiaNing; Li, Hua; Yuan, LiangJun; Wang, Lei; Wu, Bing; Ge, JunBo

    2015-11-01

    In heart disease, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) converts fibroblasts into myofibroblasts, which synthesize and secrete fibrillar type I and III collagens. The purpose of the present study was to investigate how hydrogen sulfide (H2S) suppresses TGF-β1-induced differentiation of human cardiac fibroblasts to myofibroblasts. Human cardiac fibroblasts were serum-starved in fibroblast medium for 16 h before exposure to TGF-β1 (10 ng mL(-1)) for 24 h with or without sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, 100 µmol L(-1), 30 min pretreatment) treatment. NaHS, an exogenous H2S donor, potently inhibited the proliferation and migration of TGF-β1-induced human cardiac fibroblasts and regulated their cell cycle progression. Furthermore, NaHS treatment led to suppression of fibroblast differentiation into myofibroblasts, and reduced the levels of collagen, TGF-β1, and activated Smad3 in TGF-β1-induced human cardiac fibroblasts in vitro. We therefore conclude that H2S suppresses TGF-β1-stimulated conversion of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts by inhibiting the TGF-β1/Smad3 signaling pathway, as well as by inhibiting the proliferation, migration, and cell cycle progression of human cardiac myofibroblasts. These effects of H2S may play significant roles in cardiac remodeling associated with heart failure.

  3. Temporal alterations in cardiac fibroblast function following induction of pressure overload

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, James A.; Massey, Erin P.; Fix, Charity; Zhu, Jinyu; Goldsmith, Edie C.

    2014-01-01

    Increases in cardiovascular load (pressure overload) are known to elicit ventricular remodeling including cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and interstitial fibrosis. While numerous studies have focused on the mechanisms of myocyte hypertrophy, comparatively little is known regarding the response of the interstitial fibroblasts to increased cardiovascular load. Fibroblasts are the most numerous cell type in the mammalian myocardium and have long been recognized as producing the majority of the myocardial extracellular matrix. It is only now becoming appreciated that other aspects of fibroblast behavior are important to overall cardiac function. The present studies were performed to examine the temporal alterations in fibroblast activity in response to increased cardiovascular load. Rat myocardial fibroblasts were isolated at specific time-points (3, 7, 14, and 28 days) after induction of pressure overload by abdominal aortic constriction. Bioassays were performed to measure specific parameters of fibroblast function including remodeling and contraction of 3-dimensional collagen gels, migration, and proliferation. In addition, the expression of extracellular matrix receptors of the integrin family was examined. Myocardial hypertrophy and fibrosis were evident within 7 days after constriction of the abdominal aorta. Collagen gel contraction, migration, and proliferation were enhanced in fibroblasts from pressure-overloaded animals compared to fibroblasts from sham animals. Differences in fibroblast function and protein expression were evident within 7 days of aortic constriction, concurrent with the onset of hypertrophy and fibrosis of the intact myocardium. These data provide further support for the idea that rapid and dynamic changes in fibroblast phenotype accompany and contribute to the progression of cardiovascular disease. PMID:20217135

  4. Inhibition of fibroblast proliferation in cardiac myocyte cultures by surface microtopography.

    PubMed

    Boateng, Samuel Y; Hartman, Thomas J; Ahluwalia, Neil; Vidula, Himabindu; Desai, Tejal A; Russell, Brenda

    2003-07-01

    Cardiac myocyte cultures usually require pharmacological intervention to prevent overproliferation of contaminating nonmyocytes. Our aim is to prevent excessive fibroblast cell proliferation without the use of cytostatins. We have produced a silicone surface with 10-microm vertical projections that we term "pegs," to which over 80% of rat neonatal cardiac fibroblasts attach within 48 h after plating. There was a 50% decrease in cell proliferation by 5 days of culture compared with flat membranes (P < 0.001) and a concomitant 60% decrease (P < 0.01) in cyclin D1 protein levels, suggesting a G1/S1 cell cycle arrest due to microtopography. Inhibition of Rho kinase with 5 or 20 microM Y-27632 reduced attachment of fibroblasts to the pegs by over 50% (P < 0.001), suggesting that this signaling pathway plays an important role in the process. Using mobile and immobile 10-microm polystyrene spheres, we show that reactive forces are important for inhibiting fibroblast cell proliferation, because mobile spheres failed to reduce cell proliferation. In primary myocyte cultures, pegs also inhibit fibroblast proliferation in the absence of cytostatins. The ratio of aminopropeptide of collagen protein from fibroblasts to myosin from myocytes was significantly reduced in cultures from pegged surfaces (P < 0.01), suggesting an increase in the proportion of myocytes on the pegged surfaces. Connexin43 protein expression was also increased, suggesting improved myocyte-myocyte interaction in the presence of pegs. We conclude that this microtextured culture system is useful for preventing proliferation of fibroblasts in myocyte cultures and may ultimately be useful for tissue engineering applications in vivo.

  5. Metformin inhibits aldosterone-induced cardiac fibroblast activation, migration and proliferation in vitro, and reverses aldosterone+salt-induced cardiac fibrosis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mummidi, Srinivas; Das, Nitin A; Carpenter, Andrea J; Kandikattu, Hemanthkumar; Krenz, Maike; Siebenlist, Ulrich; Valente, Anthony J; Chandrasekar, Bysani

    2016-09-01

    The overall goals of this study were to investigate whether metformin exerts anti-fibrotic effects in aldosterone (Aldo)+salt-treated wild type mouse hearts, and determine the underlying molecular mechanisms in isolated adult cardiac fibroblasts (CF). In vitro, Aldo induced CF activation, migration, and proliferation, and these effects were inhibited by metformin. Further, Aldo induced PPM1A (Protein Phosphatase Magnesium Dependent 1A) activation and inhibited AMPK phosphorylation. At a pharmacologically relevant concentration, metformin restored AMPK activation, and inhibited Aldo-induced Nox4/H2O2-dependent TRAF3IP2 induction, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, and CF migration and proliferation. Further, metformin potentiated the inhibitory effects of spironolactone, a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist, on Aldo-induced collagen expression, and CF migration and proliferation. These results were recapitulated in vivo, where metformin reversed Aldo+salt-induced oxidative stress, suppression of AMPK activation, TRAF3IP2 induction, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, and cardiac fibrosis, without significantly modulating systolic blood pressure. These in vitro and in vivo data indicate that metformin has the potential to reduce adverse cardiac remodeling in hypertensive heart disease.

  6. Myocyte-Derived Hsp90 Modulates Collagen Upregulation via Biphasic Activation of STAT-3 in Fibroblasts during Cardiac Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Datta, Ritwik; Bansal, Trisha; Rana, Santanu; Datta, Kaberi; Datta Chaudhuri, Ratul; Chawla-Sarkar, Mamta; Sarkar, Sagartirtha

    2017-03-15

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT-3)-mediated signaling in relation to upregulated collagen expression in fibroblasts during cardiac hypertrophy is well defined. Our recent findings have identified heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) to be a critical modulator of fibrotic signaling in cardiac fibroblasts in this disease milieu. The present study was therefore intended to analyze the role of Hsp90 in the STAT-3-mediated collagen upregulation process. Our data revealed a significant difference between in vivo and in vitro results, pointing to a possible involvement of myocyte-fibroblast cross talk in this process. Cardiomyocyte-targeted knockdown of Hsp90 in rats (Rattus norvegicus) in which the renal artery was ligated showed downregulated collagen synthesis. Furthermore, the results obtained with cardiac fibroblasts conditioned with Hsp90-inhibited hypertrophied myocyte supernatant pointed toward cardiomyocytes' role in the regulation of collagen expression in fibroblasts during hypertrophy. Our study also revealed a novel signaling mechanism where myocyte-derived Hsp90 orchestrates not only p65-mediated interleukin-6 (IL-6) synthesis but also its release in exosomal vesicles. Such myocyte-derived exosomes and myocyte-secreted IL-6 are responsible in unison for the biphasic activation of STAT-3 signaling in cardiac fibroblasts that culminates in excess collagen synthesis, leading to severely compromised cardiac function during cardiac hypertrophy.

  7. Mature Cardiac Teratoma in an Adult

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Ronny A; Loarte, Pablo; Navarro, Victor; Mirrer, Brooks

    2012-01-01

    The incidental diagnosis in adult age is very unusual and the presence of clinical symptoms is related to its location, which is most commonly intrapericardial. The presence of intramyocardial teratoma lesions is even rarer and has been reported in few publications. The recommendations for the diagnosis and management of a cardiac teratoma depends upon the imaging studies and the pathological report after surgical excision. The prognosis of surgically treated patient is very good and a complete surgical excision is preferred in order to avoid complications.

  8. A critical role of cardiac fibroblast-derived exosomes in activating renin angiotensin system in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Linmao; Wang, Hui; Li, Bin; Qin, Qingyun; Qi, Lei; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Janicki, Joseph S; Wang, Xing Li; Cui, Taixing

    2015-12-01

    Chronic activation of the myocardial renin angiotensin system (RAS) elevates the local level of angiotensin II (Ang II) thereby inducing pathological cardiac hypertrophy, which contributes to heart failure. However, the precise underlying mechanisms have not been fully delineated. Herein we report a novel paracrine mechanism between cardiac fibroblasts (CF)s and cardiomyocytes whereby Ang II induces pathological cardiac hypertrophy. In cultured CFs, Ang II treatment enhanced exosome release via the activation of Ang II receptor types 1 (AT1R) and 2 (AT2R), whereas lipopolysaccharide, insulin, endothelin (ET)-1, transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)1 or hydrogen peroxide did not. The CF-derived exosomes upregulated the expression of renin, angiotensinogen, AT1R, and AT2R, downregulated angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, and enhanced Ang II production in cultured cardiomyocytes. In addition, the CF exosome-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was blocked by both AT1R and AT2R antagonists. Exosome inhibitors, GW4869 and dimethyl amiloride (DMA), inhibited CF-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy with little effect on Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Mechanistically, CF exosomes upregulated RAS in cardiomyocytes via the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and Akt. Finally, Ang II-induced exosome release from cardiac fibroblasts and pathological cardiac hypertrophy were dramatically inhibited by GW4869 and DMA in mice. These findings demonstrate that Ang II stimulates CFs to release exosomes, which in turn increase Ang II production and its receptor expression in cardiomyocytes, thereby intensifying Ang II-induced pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Accordingly, specific targeting of Ang II-induced exosome release from CFs may serve as a novel therapeutic approach to treat cardiac pathological hypertrophy and heart failure.

  9. Transplantation of genetically engineered cardiac fibroblasts producing recombinant human erythropoietin to repair the infarcted myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Ruvinov, Emil; Sharabani-Yosef, Orna; Nagler, Arnon; Einbinder, Tom; Feinberg, Micha S; Holbova, Radka; Douvdevani, Amos; Leor, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    Background Erythropoietin possesses cellular protection properties. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that in situ expression of recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) would improve tissue repair in rat after myocardial infarction (MI). Methods and results RhEPO-producing cardiac fibroblasts were generated ex vivo by transduction with retroviral vector. The anti-apoptotic effect of rhEPO-producing fibroblasts was evaluated by co-culture with rat neonatal cardiomyocytes exposed to H2O2-induced oxidative stress. Annexin V/PI assay and DAPI staining showed that compared with control, rhEPO forced expression markedly attenuated apoptosis and improved survival of cultured cardiomyocytes. To test the effect of rhEPO on the infarcted myocardium, Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to permanent coronary artery occlusion, and rhEPO-producing fibroblasts, non-transduced fibroblasts, or saline, were injected into the scar tissue seven days after infarction. One month later, immunostaining identified rhEPO expression in the implanted engineered cells but not in controls. Compared with non-transduced fibroblasts or saline injection, implanted rhEPO-producing fibroblasts promoted vascularization in the scar, and prevented cell apoptosis. By two-dimensional echocardiography and postmortem morphometry, transplanted EPO-engineered fibroblasts did not prevent left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and adverse LV remodeling 5 and 9 weeks after MI. Conclusion In situ expression of rhEPO enhances vascularization and reduces cell apoptosis in the infarcted myocardium. However, local EPO therapy is insufficient for functional improvement after MI in rat. PMID:19014419

  10. C-type natriuretic peptide activates a non-selective cation current in acutely isolated rat cardiac fibroblasts via natriuretic peptide C receptor-mediated signalling.

    PubMed

    Rose, R A; Hatano, N; Ohya, S; Imaizumi, Y; Giles, W R

    2007-04-01

    In the heart, fibroblasts play an essential role in the deposition of the extracellular matrix and they also secrete a number of hormonal factors. Although natriuretic peptides, including C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and brain natriuretic peptide, have antifibrotic effects on cardiac fibroblasts, the effects of CNP on fibroblast electrophysiology have not been examined. In this study, acutely isolated ventricular fibroblasts from the adult rat were used to measure the effects of CNP (2 x 10(-8) M) under whole-cell voltage-clamp conditions. CNP, as well as the natriuretic peptide C receptor (NPR-C) agonist cANF (2 x 10(-8) M), significantly increased an outwardly rectifying non-selective cation current (NSCC). This current has a reversal potential near 0 mV. Activation of this NSCC by cANF was abolished by pre-treating fibroblasts with pertussis toxin, indicating the involvement of G(i) proteins. The cANF-activated NSCC was inhibited by the compounds Gd(3+), SKF 96365 and 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of mRNA from rat ventricular fibroblasts revealed the expression of several transient receptor potential (TRP) channel transcripts. Additional electrophysiological analysis showed that U73122, a phospholipase C antagonist, inhibited the cANF-activated NSCC. Furthermore, the effects of CNP and cANF were mimicked by the diacylglycerol analogue 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG), independently of protein kinase C activity. These are defining characteristics of specific TRPC channels. More detailed molecular analysis confirmed the expression of full-length TRPC2, TRPC3 and TRPC5 transcripts. These data indicate that CNP, acting via the NPR-C receptor, activates a NSCC that is at least partially carried by TRPC channels in cardiac fibroblasts.

  11. HMGB1-stimulated human primary cardiac fibroblasts exert a paracrine action on human and murine cardiac stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rossini, Alessandra; Zacheo, Antonella; Mocini, David; Totta, Pierangela; Facchiano, Antonio; Castoldi, Raffaella; Sordini, Paolo; Pompilio, Giulio; Abeni, Damiano; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Germani, Antonia

    2008-04-01

    High Mobility Box 1 Protein (HMGB1) is a cytokine released into the extracellular space by necrotic cells and activated macrophages in response to injury. We recently demonstrated that HMGB1 administration into the mouse heart during acute myocardial infarction induces cardiac tissue regeneration by activating resident cardiac c-kit+ cells (CSCs) and significantly enhances left ventricular function. In the present study it was analyzed the hypothesis that human cardiac fibroblasts (cFbs) exposed to HMGB1 may exert a paracrine effect on mouse and human CSCs. Human cFbs expressed the HMGB1 receptor RAGE. Luminex technology and ELISA assays revealed that HMGB1 significantly enhanced VEGF, PlGF, Mip-1alpha, IFN-gamma, GM-CSF, Il-10, Il-1beta, Il-4, Il-1ra, Il-9 and TNF-alpha in cFbs cell culture medium. HMGB1-stimulated cFbs conditioned media induced CSC migration and proliferation. These effects were significantly higher to those obtained when HMGB1 was added directly to the culture medium. In conclusion, we provide evidence that HMGB1 may act in a paracrine manner stimulating growth factor, cytokine and chemokine release by cFbs which, in turn, modulate CSC function. Via this mechanism HMGB1 may contribute to cardiac tissue regeneration.

  12. Peptide-enhanced mRNA transfection in cultured mouse cardiac fibroblasts and direct reprogramming towards cardiomyocyte-like cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kunwoo; Yu, Pengzhi; Lingampalli, Nithya; Kim, Hyun Jin; Tang, Richard; Murthy, Niren

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of myocardial infarction is a major challenge in medicine due to the inability of heart tissue to regenerate. Direct reprogramming of endogenous cardiac fibroblasts into functional cardiomyocytes via the delivery of transcription factor mRNAs has the potential to regenerate cardiac tissue and to treat heart failure. Even though mRNA delivery to cardiac fibroblasts has the therapeutic potential, mRNA transfection in cardiac fibroblasts has been challenging. Herein, we develop an efficient mRNA transfection in cultured mouse cardiac fibroblasts via a polyarginine-fused heart-targeting peptide and lipofectamine complex, termed C-Lipo and demonstrate the partial direct reprogramming of cardiac fibroblasts towards cardiomyocyte cells. C-Lipo enabled the mRNA-induced direct cardiac reprogramming due to its efficient transfection with low toxicity, which allowed for multiple transfections of Gata4, Mef2c, and Tbx5 (GMT) mRNAs for a period of 2 weeks. The induced cardiomyocyte-like cells had α-MHC promoter-driven GFP expression and striated cardiac muscle structure from α-actinin immunohistochemistry. GMT mRNA transfection of cultured mouse cardiac fibroblasts via C-Lipo significantly increased expression of the cardiomyocyte marker genes, Actc1, Actn2, Gja1, Hand2, and Tnnt2, after 2 weeks of transfection. Moreover, this study provides the first direct evidence that the stoichiometry of the GMT reprogramming factors influence the expression of cardiomyocyte marker genes. Our results demonstrate that mRNA delivery is a potential approach for cardiomyocyte generation.

  13. Overlapping and Divergent Actions of Structurally Distinct Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors in Cardiac Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Schuetze, Katherine B; Stratton, Matthew S; Blakeslee, Weston W; Wempe, Michael F; Wagner, Florence F; Holson, Edward B; Kuo, Yin-Ming; Andrews, Andrew J; Gilbert, Tonya M; Hooker, Jacob M; McKinsey, Timothy A

    2017-04-01

    Inhibitors of zinc-dependent histone deacetylases (HDACs) profoundly affect cellular function by altering gene expression via changes in nucleosomal histone tail acetylation. Historically, investigators have employed pan-HDAC inhibitors, such as the hydroxamate trichostatin A (TSA), which simultaneously targets members of each of the three zinc-dependent HDAC classes (classes I, II, and IV). More recently, class- and isoform-selective HDAC inhibitors have been developed, providing invaluable chemical biology probes for dissecting the roles of distinct HDACs in the control of various physiologic and pathophysiological processes. For example, the benzamide class I HDAC-selective inhibitor, MGCD0103 [N-(2-aminophenyl)-4-[[(4-pyridin-3-ylpyrimidin-2-yl)amino]methyl] benzamide], was shown to block cardiac fibrosis, a process involving excess extracellular matrix deposition, which often results in heart dysfunction. Here, we compare the mechanisms of action of structurally distinct HDAC inhibitors in isolated primary cardiac fibroblasts, which are the major extracellular matrix-producing cells of the heart. TSA, MGCD0103, and the cyclic peptide class I HDAC inhibitor, apicidin, exhibited a common ability to enhance histone acetylation, and all potently blocked cardiac fibroblast cell cycle progression. In contrast, MGCD0103, but not TSA or apicidin, paradoxically increased expression of a subset of fibrosis-associated genes. Using the cellular thermal shift assay, we provide evidence that the divergent effects of HDAC inhibitors on cardiac fibroblast gene expression relate to differential engagement of HDAC1- and HDAC2-containing complexes. These findings illustrate the importance of employing multiple compounds when pharmacologically assessing HDAC function in a cellular context and during HDAC inhibitor drug development.

  14. Dynamic mass redistribution analysis of endogenous β-adrenergic receptor signaling in neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Carter, Rhonda L; Grisanti, Laurel A; Yu, Justine E; Repas, Ashley A; Woodall, Meryl; Ibetti, Jessica; Koch, Walter J; Jacobson, Marlene A; Tilley, Douglas G

    2014-02-01

    Label-free systems for the agnostic assessment of cellular responses to receptor stimulation have been shown to provide a sensitive method to dissect receptor signaling. β-adenergic receptors (βAR) are important regulators of normal and pathologic cardiac function and are expressed in cardiomyocytes as well as cardiac fibroblasts, where relatively fewer studies have explored their signaling responses. Using label-free whole cell dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) assays we investigated the response patterns to stimulation of endogenous βAR in primary neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts (NRCF). Catecholamine stimulation of the cells induced a negative DMR deflection resulting in a concentration-dependent pharmacological response that was competitively blocked by βAR blockade and non-competitively blocked by irreversible uncoupling of Gs proteins. Pharmacological profiling of subtype-selective βAR agonists and antagonists revealed a dominant role of β2AR in mediating the DMR responses, consistent with the relative expression levels of β2AR and β1AR in NRCF. Additionally, βAR-mediated cAMP generation was assessed via a fluorescence biosensor, revealing similar kinetics between DMR responses and cAMP generation. As such, βAR-dependent DMR responses were enhanced via inhibition of cAMP degradation, as well as dynamin-mediated receptor internalization. Finally, we assessed G protein-independent βAR signaling through epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). While inhibition of EGFR reduced the DMR response to βAR stimulation, our results demonstrate that G protein-dependent signaling produces a majority of the biological response to βAR stimulation in NRCF. Altogether, measurement of DMR responses in primary cardiac fibroblasts provides a sensitive readout for investigating endogenous βAR signaling via both G protein-dependent and -independent pathways.

  15. Cardiac fibroblasts mediate IL-17A-driven inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Ong, SuFey; Talor, Monica V; Barin, Jobert G; Baldeviano, G Christian; Kass, David A; Bedja, Djahida; Zhang, Hao; Sheikh, Asfandyar; Margolick, Joseph B; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Rose, Noel R; Ciháková, Daniela

    2014-06-30

    Inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMi) is a major cause of heart failure in individuals below the age of 40. We recently reported that IL-17A is required for the development of DCMi. We show a novel pathway connecting IL-17A, cardiac fibroblasts (CFs), GM-CSF, and heart-infiltrating myeloid cells with the pathogenesis of DCMi. Il17ra(-/-) mice were protected from DCMi, and this was associated with significantly diminished neutrophil and Ly6Chi monocyte/macrophage (MO/MΦ) cardiac infiltrates. Depletion of Ly6Chi MO/MΦ also protected mice from DCMi. Mechanistically, IL-17A stimulated CFs to produce key chemokines and cytokines that are critical downstream effectors in the recruitment and differentiation of myeloid cells. Moreover, IL-17A directs Ly6Chi MO/MΦ in trans toward a more proinflammatory phenotype via CF-derived GM-CSF. Collectively, this IL-17A-fibroblast-GM-CSF-MO/MΦ axis could provide a novel target for the treatment of DCMi and related inflammatory cardiac diseases.

  16. Inflammasome activation of cardiac fibroblasts is essential for myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Masanori; Takahashi, Masafumi; Hata, Takeki; Kashima, Yuichiro; Usui, Fumitake; Morimoto, Hajime; Izawa, Atsushi; Takahashi, Yasuko; Masumoto, Junya; Koyama, Jun; Hongo, Minoru; Noda, Tetsuo; Nakayama, Jun; Sagara, Junji; Taniguchi, Shun'ichiro; Ikeda, Uichi

    2011-02-15

    Background- Inflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury; however, the mechanism by which myocardial I/R induces inflammation remains unclear. Recent evidence indicates that a sterile inflammatory response triggered by tissue damage is mediated through a multiple-protein complex called the inflammasome. Therefore, we hypothesized that the inflammasome is an initial sensor for danger signal(s) in myocardial I/R injury. Methods and Results- We demonstrate that inflammasome activation in cardiac fibroblasts, but not in cardiomyocytes, is crucially involved in the initial inflammatory response after myocardial I/R injury. We found that inflammasomes are formed by I/R and that its subsequent activation of inflammasomes leads to interleukin-1β production, resulting in inflammatory responses such as inflammatory cell infiltration and cytokine expression in the heart. In mice deficient for apoptosis-associated speck-like adaptor protein and caspase-1, these inflammatory responses and subsequent injuries, including infarct development and myocardial fibrosis and dysfunction, were markedly diminished. Bone marrow transplantation experiments with apoptosis-associated speck-like adaptor protein-deficient mice revealed that inflammasome activation in bone marrow cells and myocardial resident cells such as cardiomyocytes or cardiac fibroblasts plays an important role in myocardial I/R injury. In vitro experiments revealed that hypoxia/reoxygenation stimulated inflammasome activation in cardiac fibroblasts, but not in cardiomyocytes, and that hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced activation was mediated through reactive oxygen species production and potassium efflux. Conclusions- Our results demonstrate the molecular basis for the initial inflammatory response after I/R and suggest that the inflammasome is a potential novel therapeutic target for preventing myocardial I/R injury.

  17. Cardiac myocyte diversity and a fibroblast network in the junctional region of the zebrafish heart revealed by transmission and serial block-face scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lafontant, Pascal J; Behzad, Ali R; Brown, Evelyn; Landry, Paul; Hu, Norman; Burns, Alan R

    2013-01-01

    The zebrafish has emerged as an important model of heart development and regeneration. While the structural characteristics of the developing and adult zebrafish ventricle have been previously studied, little attention has been paid to the nature of the interface between the compact and spongy myocardium. Here we describe how these two distinct layers are structurally and functionally integrated. We demonstrate by transmission electron microscopy that this interface is complex and composed primarily of a junctional region occupied by collagen, as well as a population of fibroblasts that form a highly complex network. We also describe a continuum of uniquely flattened transitional cardiac myocytes that form a circumferential plate upon which the radially-oriented luminal trabeculae are anchored. In addition, we have uncovered within the transitional ring a subpopulation of markedly electron dense cardiac myocytes. At discrete intervals the transitional cardiac myocytes form contact bridges across the junctional space that are stabilized through localized desmosomes and fascia adherentes junctions with adjacent compact cardiac myocytes. Finally using serial block-face scanning electron microscopy, segmentation and volume reconstruction, we confirm the three-dimensional nature of the junctional region as well as the presence of the sheet-like fibroblast network. These ultrastructural studies demonstrate the previously unrecognized complexity with which the compact and spongy layers are structurally integrated, and provide a new basis for understanding development and regeneration in the zebrafish heart.

  18. Cross talk between cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts: from multiscale investigative approaches to mechanisms and functional consequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, P; Su, J; Mende, U

    2012-12-15

    The heart is comprised of a syncytium of cardiac myocytes (CM) and surrounding nonmyocytes, the majority of which are cardiac fibroblasts (CF). CM and CF are highly interspersed in the myocardium with one CM being surrounded by one or more CF. Bidirectional cross talk between CM and CF plays important roles in determining cardiac mechanical and electrical function in both normal and diseased hearts. Genetically engineered animal models and in vitro studies have provided evidence that CM and CF can regulate each other's function. Their cross talk contributes to structural and electrical remodeling in both atria and ventricles and appears to be involved in the pathogenesis of various heart diseases that lead to heart failure and arrhythmia disorders. Mechanisms of CM-CF cross talk, which are not yet fully understood, include release of paracrine factors, direct cell-cell interactions via gap junctions and potentially adherens junctions and nanotubes, and cell interactions with the extracellular matrix. In this article, we provide an overview of the existing multiscale experimental and computational approaches for the investigation of cross talk between CM and CF and review recent progress in our understanding of the functional consequences and underlying mechanisms. Targeting cross talk between CM and CF could potentially be used therapeutically for the modulation of the cardiac remodeling response in the diseased heart and may lead to new strategies for the treatment of heart failure or rhythm disturbances.

  19. Inflammatory and fibrotic responses of cardiac fibroblasts to myocardial damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs).

    PubMed

    Turner, Neil A

    2016-05-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts (CF) are well-established as key regulators of extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover in the context of myocardial remodelling and fibrosis. Recently, this cell type has also been shown to act as a sensor of myocardial damage by detecting and responding to damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) upregulated with cardiac injury. CF express a range of innate immunity pattern recognition receptors (TLRs, NLRs, IL-1R1, RAGE) that are stimulated by a host of different DAMPs that are evident in the injured or remodelling myocardium. These include intracellular molecules released by necrotic cells (heat shock proteins, high mobility group box 1 protein, S100 proteins), proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1α), specific ECM molecules up-regulated in response to tissue injury (fibronectin-EDA, tenascin-C) or molecules modified by a pathological environment (advanced glycation end product-modified proteins observed with diabetes). DAMP receptor activation on fibroblasts is coupled to altered cellular function including changes in proliferation, migration, myofibroblast transdifferentiation, ECM turnover and production of fibrotic and inflammatory paracrine factors, which directly impact on the heart's ability to respond to injury. This review gives an overview of the important role played by CF in responding to myocardial DAMPs and how the DAMP/CF axis could be exploited experimentally and therapeutically.

  20. The cardiac fibroblast: Origin, identity and role in homeostasis and disease.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Milena B; Costa, Mauro W; Rosenthal, Nadia A

    2016-09-01

    The mammalian heart is responsible for supplying blood to two separate circulation circuits in a parallel manner. This design provides efficient oxygenation and nutrients to the whole body through the left-sided pump, while the right-sided pump delivers blood to the pulmonary circulation for re-oxygenation. In order to achieve this demanding job, the mammalian heart evolved into a highly specialised organ comprised of working contractile cells or cardiomyocytes, a directional and insulated conduction system, capable of independently generating and conducting electric impulses that synchronises chamber contraction, valves that allow the generation of high pressure and directional blood flow into the circulation, coronary circulation, that supplies oxygenated blood for the heart muscle high metabolically active pumping role and inlet/outlet routes, as the venae cavae and pulmonary veins, aorta and pulmonary trunk. This organization highlights the complexity and compartmentalization of the heart. This review will focus on the cardiac fibroblast, a cell type until recently ignored, but that profoundly influences heart function in its various compartments. We will discuss current advances on definitions, molecular markers and function of cardiac fibroblasts in heart homeostasis and disease.

  1. Cardiac Fibroblast-Dependent Extracellular Matrix Accumulation Is Associated with Diastolic Stiffness in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Kirk R.; Lord, C. Kevin; West, T. Aaron; Stewart, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications are a leading cause of death in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Diastolic dysfunction is one of the earliest manifestations of diabetes-induced changes in left ventricular (LV) function, and results from a reduced rate of relaxation and increased stiffness. The mechanisms responsible for increased stiffness are not completely understood. Chronic hyperglycemia, advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), and increased levels of proinflammatory and profibrotic cytokines are molecular pathways known to be involved in regulating extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis and accumulation resulting in increased LV diastolic stiffness. Experiments were conducted using a genetically-induced mouse model of T2DM generated by a point mutation in the leptin receptor resulting in nonfunctional leptin receptors (db/db murine model). This study correlated changes in LV ECM and stiffness with alterations in basal activation of signaling cascades and expression of profibrotic markers within primary cultures of cardiac fibroblasts from diabetic (db/db) mice with nondiabetic (db/wt) littermates as controls. Primary cultures of cardiac fibrobroblasts were maintained in 25 mM glucose (hyperglycemic-HG; diabetic db/db) media or 5 mM glucose (normoglycemic-NG, nondiabetic db/wt) media. The cells then underwent a 24-hour exposure to their opposite (NG; diabetic db/db) media or 5 mM glucose (HG, nondiabetic db/wt) media. Protein analysis demonstrated significantly increased expression of type I collagen, TIMP-2, TGF-β, PAI-1 and RAGE in diabetic db/db cells as compared to nondiabetic db/wt, independent of glucose media concentration. This pattern of protein expression was associated with increased LV collagen accumulation, myocardial stiffness and LV diastolic dysfunction. Isolated diabetic db/db fibroblasts were phenotypically distinct from nondiabetic db/wt fibroblasts and exhibited a profibrotic phenotype in normoglycemic conditions. PMID:23991045

  2. Inscribing Optical Excitability to Non-Excitable Cardiac Cells: Viral Delivery of Optogenetic Tools in Primary Cardiac Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinzhu; Entcheva, Emilia

    2016-01-01

    We describe in detail a method to introduce optogenetic actuation tools, a mutant version of channelrhodopsin-2, ChR2(H134R), and archaerhodopsin (ArchT), into primary cardiac fibroblasts (cFB) in vitro by adenoviral infection to yield quick, robust, and consistent expression. Instructions on adjusting infection parameters such as the multiplicity of infection and virus incubation duration are provided to generalize the method for different lab settings or cell types. Specific conditions are discussed to create hybrid co-cultures of the optogenetically modified cFB and non-transformed cardiomyocytes to obtain light-sensitive excitable cardiac syncytium, including stencil-patterned cell growth. We also describe an all-optical framework for the functional testing of responsiveness of these opsins in cFB. The presented methodology provides cell-specific tools for the mechanistic investigation of the functional bioelectric contribution of different non-excitable cells in the heart and their electrical coupling to cardiomyocytes under different conditions.

  3. Inscribing Optical Excitability to Non-Excitable Cardiac Cells: Viral Delivery of Optogenetic Tools in Primary Cardiac Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jinzhu; Entcheva, Emilia

    2016-01-01

    We describe in detail a method to introduce optogenetic actuation tools, a mutant version of channelrhodopsin- 2, ChR2(H134R), and archaerhodopsin (ArchT), into primary cardiac fibroblasts (cFB) in vitro by adenoviral infection to yield quick, robust, and consistent expression. Instructions on adjusting infection parameters such as the multiplicity of infection and virus incubation duration are provided to generalize the method for different lab settings or cell types. Specific conditions are discussed to create hybrid co-cultures of the optogenetically modified cFB and non-transformed cardiomyocytes to obtain light- sensitive excitable cardiac syncytium, including stencil-patterned cell growth. We also describe an all-optical framework for the functional testing of responsiveness of these opsins in cFB. The presented methodology provides cell-specific tools for the mechanistic investigation of the functional bioelectric contribution of different non-excitable cells in the heart and their electrical coupling to cardiomyocytes under different conditions. PMID:26965132

  4. MMI-0100 inhibits cardiac fibrosis in myocardial infarction by direct actions on cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts via MK2 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lei; Yates, Cecelia C.; Lockyer, Pamela; Xie, Liang; Bevilacqua, Ariana; He, Jun; Lander, Cynthia; Patterson, Cam; Willis, Monte

    2014-01-01

    The cell-permeant peptide inhibitor of MAPKAP kinase 2 (MK2), MMI-0100, inhibits MK2 and downstream fibrosis and inflammation. Recent studies have demonstrated that MMI-0100 reduces intimal hyperplasia in a mouse vein graft model, pulmonary fibrosis in a murine bleomycin-induced model and development of adhesions in conjunction with abdominal surgery. MK2 is critical to the pathogenesis of ischemic heart injury as MK2 −/− mice are resistant to ischemic remodeling. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that inhibiting MK2 with MMI-0100 would protect the heart after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in vivo. AMI was induced by placing a permanent LAD coronary ligation. When MMI-0100 peptide was given 30 minutes after permanent LAD coronary artery ligation, the resulting fibrosis was reduced/prevented ~50% at a 2 week time point, with a corresponding improvement in cardiac function and decrease in left ventricular dilation. In cultured cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts, MMI-0100 inhibited MK2 to reduce cardiomyocyte caspase 3/7 activity, while enhancing primary cardiac fibroblast caspase 3/7 activity, which may explain MMI-0100’s salvage of cardiac function and anti-fibrotic effects in vivo. These findings suggest that therapeutic inhibition of MK2 after acute MI, using rationally-designed cell-permeant peptides, inhibits cardiac fibrosis and maintains cardiac function by mechanisms that involve inhibiting cardiomyocyte apoptosis, while enhancing primary cardiac fibroblast cell death. PMID:25257914

  5. Cardiac fibroblasts mediate IL-17A–driven inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lei; Ong, SuFey; Talor, Monica V.; Barin, Jobert G.; Baldeviano, G. Christian; Kass, David A.; Bedja, Djahida; Zhang, Hao; Sheikh, Asfandyar; Margolick, Joseph B.; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Rose, Noel R.; Čiháková, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMi) is a major cause of heart failure in individuals below the age of 40. We recently reported that IL-17A is required for the development of DCMi. We show a novel pathway connecting IL-17A, cardiac fibroblasts (CFs), GM-CSF, and heart-infiltrating myeloid cells with the pathogenesis of DCMi. Il17ra−/− mice were protected from DCMi, and this was associated with significantly diminished neutrophil and Ly6Chi monocyte/macrophage (MO/MΦ) cardiac infiltrates. Depletion of Ly6Chi MO/MΦ also protected mice from DCMi. Mechanistically, IL-17A stimulated CFs to produce key chemokines and cytokines that are critical downstream effectors in the recruitment and differentiation of myeloid cells. Moreover, IL-17A directs Ly6Chi MO/MΦ in trans toward a more proinflammatory phenotype via CF-derived GM-CSF. Collectively, this IL-17A–fibroblast–GM-CSF–MO/MΦ axis could provide a novel target for the treatment of DCMi and related inflammatory cardiac diseases. PMID:24935258

  6. Acetylsalicylic Acid Inhibits IL-18-Induced Cardiac Fibroblast Migration Through the Induction of RECK

    PubMed Central

    SIDDESHA, JALAHALLI M.; VALENTE, ANTHONY J.; SAKAMURI, SIVA S.V.P.; GARDNER, JASON D.; DELAFONTAINE, PATRICE; NODA, MAKOTO; CHANDRASEKAR, BYSANI

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis and adverse remodeling is thought to involve the ROS-dependent induction of inflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and the activation and migration of cardiac fibroblasts (CF). Here we investigated the role of RECK (reversion-inducing-cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs), a unique membrane-anchored MMP regulator, on IL-18 induced CF migration, and the effect of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on this response. In a Matrigel invasion assay, IL-18 induced migration of primary mouse CF was dependent on both IKK/NF-κB- and JNK/AP-1-mediated MMP9 induction and Spl-mediated RECK suppression, mechanisms that required Nox4-dependent H2O2 generation. Notably, forced expression of RECK attenuated IL-18 induced MMP9 activation and CF migration. Further, therapeutic concentrations of ASA inhibited IL-18 induced H2O2 generation, MMP9 activation, RECK suppression, and CF migration. The salicylic acid moiety of ASA similarly attenuated IL-18 induced CF migration. Thus, ASA may exert potential beneficial effect in cardiac fibrosis through multiple protective mechanisms. PMID:24265116

  7. National Adult Cardiac Surgery Registry: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Uva, Miguel Sousa; Mota, João Carlos

    2003-10-01

    A task force commission was created with the support of the Portuguese Society for Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery with the aim of organizing a National Adult Cardiac Surgery Registry, collecting clinical data and types of cardiac surgical procedure performed in Portugal. Selected variables include risk factors, cardiac status, preoperative hemodynamics, surgical procedure, hospital stay and mortality. Information is collected into a database in each institution and sent via the internet to a central database responsible for grouping and data analysis. It is hoped that this National Registry, through standardized data collection, will provide information on cardiac surgery activity in Portugal and its risk adjusted results.

  8. Fibroblast Growth Factor-23 in Obese, Normotensive Adolescents is Associated with Adverse Cardiac Structure

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Farah N.; Falkner, Bonita; Gidding, Samuel S.; Price, Heather E.; Keith, Scott W.; Langman, Craig B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23) is a biomarker for cardiovascular (CV) disease. Obesity may promote FGF23 production in the absence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). We sought to determine among normotensive African American adolescents, whether FGF23 levels are higher in obese compared with normal weight African American adolescents; and to determine the relationship of FGF23 with markers of cardiac structure and insulin resistance. Study design Cross-sectional data were obtained from a cohort of 130 normotensive, African American adolescents aged 13-18 years old without CKD; 74 were obese; 56 were normal weight. Plasma C-terminal FGF23, fasting glucose and insulin, and hsCRP were measured; participants underwent M-mode echocardiography. Results FGF23 was skewed and approximately normally distributed after natural log transformation (logFGF23). FGF23 levels were higher in obese versus normal weight participants (geometric mean 43 vs. 23 RU/mL, p<0.01). FGF23 values were significantly higher in participants with eccentric or concentric cardiac hypertrophy compared with those without hypertrophy (p<0.01). LogFGF23 directly correlated with BMI, BMI z-score, waist circumference, fasting insulin levels, and HOMA scores. Regression models adjusted for age, sex, and hsCRP suggest that each 10% increase in FGF23 is associated with 1.31 unit increase in LVM (p<0.01), 0.29 unit increase in LVMI (p<0.01), and 0.01 unit increase in left atrial dimension indexed to height (p=0.02). Conclusions In this sample of obese African American adolescents, FGF23 blood levels were associated with abnormal cardiac structure. We postulate that FGF23 may be an early marker of cardiac injury in obese but otherwise healthy African American adolescents. PMID:25063724

  9. Oxygen sensing by primary cardiac fibroblasts: a key role of p21(Waf1/Cip1/Sdi1).

    PubMed

    Roy, Sashwati; Khanna, Savita; Bickerstaff, Alice A; Subramanian, Sukanya V; Atalay, Mustafa; Bierl, Michael; Pendyala, Srikanth; Levy, Dana; Sharma, Nidhi; Venojarvi, Mika; Strauch, Arthur; Orosz, Charles G; Sen, Chandan K

    2003-02-21

    In mammalian organs under normoxic conditions, O2 concentration ranges from 12% to <0.5%, with O2 approximately 14% in arterial blood and <10% in the myocardium. During mild hypoxia, myocardial O2 drops to approximately 1% to 3% or lower. In response to chronic moderate hypoxia, cells adjust their normoxia set point such that reoxygenation-dependent relative elevation of PO2 results in perceived hyperoxia. We hypothesized that O2, even in marginal relative excess of the PO2 to which cardiac cells are adjusted, results in activation of specific signal transduction pathways that alter the phenotype and function of these cells. To test this hypothesis, cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) isolated from adult murine ventricle were cultured in 10% or 21% O2 (hyperoxia relative to the PO2 to which cells are adjusted in vivo) and were compared with those cultured in 3% O2 (mild hypoxia). Compared with cells cultured in 3% O2, cells that were cultured in 10% or 21% O2 demonstrated remarkable reversible G2/M arrest and a phenotype indicative of differentiation to myofibroblasts. These effects were independent of NADPH oxidase function. CFs exposed to high O2 exhibited higher levels of reactive oxygen species production. The molecular signature response to perceived hyperoxia included (1) induction of p21, cyclin D1, cyclin D2, cyclin G1, Fos-related antigen-2, and transforming growth factor-beta1, (2) lowered telomerase activity, and (3) activation of transforming growth factor-beta1 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. CFs deficient in p21 were resistant to such O2 sensitivity. This study raises the vital broad-based issue of controlling ambient O2 during the culture of primary cells isolated from organs.

  10. Activation of Cardiac Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 4 Causes Left Ventricular Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Grabner, Alexander; Amaral, Ansel P.; Schramm, Karla; Singh, Saurav; Sloan, Alexis; Yanucil, Christopher; Li, Jihe; Shehadeh, Lina A.; Hare, Joshua M.; David, Valentin; Martin, Aline; Fornoni, Alessia; Marco, Giovana Seno Di; Kentrup, Dominik; Reuter, Stefan; Mayer, Anna B.; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Stypmann, Jörg; Kuhn, Christian; Hille, Susanne; Frey, Norbert; Leifheit-Nestler, Maren; Richter, Beatrice; Haffner, Dieter; Abraham, Reimar; Bange, Johannes; Sperl, Bianca; Ullrich, Axel; Brand, Marcus; Wolf, Myles; Faul, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Summary Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health threat that increases risk of death due to cardiovascular complications, including left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Novel therapeutic targets are needed to design treatments to alleviate the cardiovascular burden of CKD. Previously, we demonstrated that circulating concentrations of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 23 rise progressively in CKD and induce LVH through an unknown FGF receptor (FGFR)-dependent mechanism. Here, we report that FGF23 exclusively activates FGFR4 on cardiac myocytes to stimulate phospholipase Cγ/calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells signaling. A specific FGFR4 blocking antibody inhibits FGF23-induced hypertrophy of isolated cardiac myocytes and attenuates LVH in rats with CKD. Mice lacking FGFR4 do not develop LVH in response to elevated FGF23, whereas knock-in mice carrying an FGFR4 gain-of-function mutation spontaneously develop LVH. Thus, FGF23 promotes LVH by activating FGFR4, thereby establishing FGFR4 as a pharmacological target for reducing cardiovascular risk in CKD. PMID:26437603

  11. Core Transcription Factors, MicroRNAs, and Small Molecules Drive Transdifferentiation of Human Fibroblasts Towards The Cardiac Cell Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Christoforou, Nicolas; Chakraborty, Syandan; Kirkton, Robert D.; Adler, Andrew F.; Addis, Russell C.; Leong, Kam W.

    2017-01-01

    Transdifferentiation has been described as a novel method for converting human fibroblasts into induced cardiomyocyte-like cells. Such an approach can produce differentiated cells to study physiology or pathophysiology, examine drug interactions or toxicities, and engineer cardiac tissues. Here we describe the transdifferentiation of human dermal fibroblasts towards the cardiac cell lineage via the induced expression of transcription factors GATA4, TBX5, MEF2C, MYOCD, NKX2–5, and delivery of microRNAs miR-1 and miR-133a. Cells undergoing transdifferentiation expressed ACTN2 and TNNT2 and partially organized their cytoskeleton in a cross-striated manner. The conversion process was associated with significant upregulation of a cohort of cardiac-specific genes, activation of pathways associated with muscle contraction and physiology, and downregulation of fibroblastic markers. We used a genetically encoded calcium indicator and readily detected active calcium transients although no spontaneous contractions were observed in transdifferentiated cells. Finally, we determined that inhibition of Janus kinase 1, inhibition of Glycogen synthase kinase 3, or addition of NRG1 significantly enhanced the efficiency of transdifferentiation. Overall, we describe a method for achieving transdifferentiation of human dermal fibroblasts into induced cardiomyocyte-like cells via transcription factor overexpression, microRNA delivery, and molecular pathway manipulation. PMID:28071742

  12. Outcomes After Cardiac Arrest in an Adult Burn Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-07

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation Burn patients Thermal injury a b s t r a c t Objective: Adult burn patients who experience in-hospital cardiac arrest (CA) and...undergo cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) represent a unique patient population. We believe that they tend to be younger and have the added burden of the...Support; BICU, burn intensive care unit; BOR, burn operating room; CA, cardiac arrest; CPR, cardiopulmonary resuscitation; DNR, do not resuscitate; EG

  13. The Role of c-SKI in Regulation of TGFβ-induced Human Cardiac Fibroblast Proliferation and ECM Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Guo, Liping; Shen, Difei; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Jiaping; Han, Suxia; He, Wen

    2017-02-18

    Cardiac fibrosis is characterized by over-deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and over-proliferation of cardiac fibroblast, and contributes to both systolic and diastolic dysfunction in many cardiac pathophysiologic conditions. Transforming growth factor β 1 (TGFβ1) is as an essential inducing factor of cardiac fibrosis. C-Ski protein has been identified as an inhibitory regulator of TGFβ signaling. In the present study, we revealed the repressive effect of c-Ski on TGFβ1-induced human cardiac fibroblast (HCFB) proliferation and ECM protein increase (Collagen I and α-SMA). Moreover, miR-155 and miR-17 could inhibit SKI mRNA expression by direct binding to the 3'UTR of SKI, so as to reduce c-Ski protein level. Either miR-155 inhibition or miR-17 inhibition could reverse TGFβ1-induced HCFB proliferation and ECM protein increase. Taken together, we provided a potential therapy to treat cardiac fibrosis by inhibiting miR-155/miR-17 so as to restore the repressive effect of c-Ski on TGFβ1 signaling. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Raf-mediated cardiac hypertrophy in adult Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin; Daniels, Joseph; Glaser, Alex E; Wolf, Matthew J

    2013-07-01

    In response to stress and extracellular signals, the heart undergoes a process called cardiac hypertrophy during which cardiomyocytes increase in size. If untreated, cardiac hypertrophy can progress to overt heart failure that causes significant morbidity and mortality. The identification of molecular signals that cause or modify cardiomyopathies is necessary to understand how the normal heart progresses to cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling is essential for normal human cardiac function, and the inhibition of RTKs can cause dilated cardiomyopathies. However, neither investigations of activated RTK signaling pathways nor the characterization of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the adult fly heart has been previously described. Therefore, we developed strategies using Drosophila as a model to circumvent some of the complexities associated with mammalian models of cardiovascular disease. Transgenes encoding activated EGFR(A887T), Ras85D(V12) and Ras85D(V12S35), which preferentially signal to Raf, or constitutively active human or fly Raf caused hypertrophic cardiomyopathy as determined by decreased end diastolic lumen dimensions, abnormal cardiomyocyte fiber morphology and increased heart wall thicknesses. There were no changes in cardiomyocyte cell numbers. Additionally, activated Raf also induced an increase in cardiomyocyte ploidy compared with control hearts. However, preventing increases in cardiomyocyte ploidy using fizzy-related (Fzr) RNAi did not rescue Raf-mediated cardiac hypertrophy, suggesting that Raf-mediated polyploidization is not required for cardiac hypertrophy. Similar to mammals, the cardiac-specific expression of RNAi directed against MEK or ERK rescued Raf-mediated cardiac hypertrophy. However, the cardiac-specific expression of activated ERK(D334N), which promotes hyperplasia in non-cardiac tissues, did not cause myocyte hypertrophy. These results suggest that ERK is necessary, but not sufficient, for

  15. Deletion of the homeobox gene PRX-2 affects fetal but not adult fibroblast wound healing responses.

    PubMed

    White, Philip; Thomas, David W; Fong, Steven; Stelnicki, Eric; Meijlink, Fritz; Largman, Corey; Stephens, Phil

    2003-01-01

    The phenotype of fibroblasts repopulating experimental wounds in vivo has been shown to influence both wound healing responses and clinical outcome. Recent studies have demonstrated that the human homeobox gene PRX-2 is strongly upregulated in fibroblasts within fetal, but not adult, mesenchymal tissues during healing. Differential homeobox gene expression by fibroblasts may therefore be important in mediating the scarless healing exhibited in early fetal wounds. RNase protection analysis demonstrated that murine Prx-2 expression was involved in fetal but not adult wound healing responses in vitro. Using fibroblasts established from homozygous mutant (Prx-2-/-) and wild-type (Prx-2+/+) murine skin tissues it was demonstrated that Prx-2 affected a number of fetal fibroblastic responses believed to be important in mediating scarless healing in vivo; namely cellular proliferation, extracellular matrix reorganization, and matrix metalloproteinase 2 and hyaluronic acid production. These data demonstrate how Prx-2 may contribute to the regulation of fetal, but not adult, fibroblasts and ultimately the wound healing phenotype. This study provides further evidence for the importance of homeobox transcription factors in the regulation of scarless wound healing. A further understanding of these processes will, it is hoped, enable the targeting of specific therapies in wound healing, both to effect scarless healing and to stimulate healing in chronic, nonhealing wounds such as venous leg ulcers.

  16. FGF2-induced effects on transcriptome associated with regeneration competence in adult human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adult human fibroblasts grown in low oxygen and with FGF2 supplementation have the capacity to tip the healing outcome of skeletal muscle injury – by favoring regeneration response in vivo over scar formation. Here, we compare the transcriptomes of control adult human dermal fibroblasts and induced regeneration-competent (iRC) fibroblasts to identify transcriptional changes that may be related to their regeneration competence. Results We identified a unique gene-expression profile that characterizes FGF2-induced iRC fibroblast phenotype. Significantly differentially expressed genes due to FGF2 treatment were identified and analyzed to determine overrepresented Gene Ontology terms. Genes belonging to extracellular matrix components, adhesion molecules, matrix remodelling, cytoskeleton, and cytokines were determined to be affected by FGF2 treatment. Conclusions Transcriptome analysis comparing control adult human fibroblasts with FGF2-treated fibroblasts identified functional groups of genes that reflect transcriptional changes potentially contributing to their regeneration competence. This comparative transcriptome analysis should contribute new insights into genes that characterize cells with greater regenerative potential. PMID:24066673

  17. Fibroblast growth factor 10-fibroblast growth factor receptor 2b mediated signaling is not required for adult glandular stomach homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Speer, Allison L; Al Alam, Denise; Sala, Frederic G; Ford, Henri R; Bellusci, Saverio; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2012-01-01

    The signaling pathways that are essential for gastric organogenesis have been studied in some detail; however, those that regulate the maintenance of the gastric epithelium during adult homeostasis remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of Fibroblast growth factor 10 (FGF10) and its main receptor, Fibroblast growth factor receptor 2b (FGFR2b), in adult glandular stomach homeostasis. We first showed that mouse adult glandular stomach expressed Fgf10, its receptors, Fgfr1b and Fgfr2b, and most of the other FGFR2b ligands (Fgf1, Fgf7, Fgf22) except for Fgf3 and Fgf20. Fgf10 expression was mesenchymal whereas FGFR1 and FGFR2 expression were mostly epithelial. Studying double transgenic mice that allow inducible overexpression of Fgf10 in adult mice, we showed that Fgf10 overexpression in normal adult glandular stomach increased epithelial proliferation, drove mucous neck cell differentiation, and reduced parietal and chief cell differentiation. Although a similar phenotype can be associated with the development of metaplasia, we found that Fgf10 overexpression for a short duration does not cause metaplasia. Finally, investigating double transgenic mice that allow the expression of a soluble form of Fgfr2b, FGF10's main receptor, which acts as a dominant negative, we found no significant changes in gastric epithelial proliferation or differentiation in the mutants. Our work provides evidence, for the first time, that the FGF10-FGFR2b signaling pathway is not required for epithelial proliferation and differentiation during adult glandular stomach homeostasis.

  18. On-chip assessment of human primary cardiac fibroblasts proliferative responses to uniaxial cyclic mechanical strain.

    PubMed

    Ugolini, Giovanni Stefano; Rasponi, Marco; Pavesi, Andrea; Santoro, Rosaria; Kamm, Roger; Fiore, Gianfranco Beniamino; Pesce, Maurizio; Soncini, Monica

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac cell function is substantially influenced by the nature and intensity of the mechanical loads the cells experience. Cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) are primarily involved in myocardial tissue remodeling: at the onset of specific pathological conditions, CFs activate, proliferate, differentiate, and critically alter the amount of myocardial extra-cellular matrix with important consequences for myocardial functioning. While cyclic mechanical strain has been shown to increase matrix synthesis of CFs in vitro, the role of mechanical cues in CFs proliferation is unclear. We here developed a multi-chamber cell straining microdevice for cell cultures under uniform, uniaxial cyclic strain. After careful characterization of the strain field, we extracted human heart-derived CFs and performed cyclic strain experiments. We subjected cells to 2% or 8% cyclic strain for 24 h or 72 h, using immunofluorescence to investigate markers of cell morphology, cell proliferation (Ki67, EdU, phospho-Histone-H3) and subcellular localization of the mechanotransduction-associated transcription factor YAP. Cell morphology was affected by cyclic strain in terms of cell area, cell and nuclear shape and cellular alignment. We additionally observed a strain intensity-dependent control of cell growth: a significant proliferation increase occurred at 2% cyclic strain, while time-dependent effects took place upon 8% cyclic strain. The YAP-dependent mechano-transduction pathway was similarly activated in both strain conditions. These results demonstrate a differential effect of cyclic strain intensity on human CFs proliferation control and provide insights into the YAP-dependent mechano-sensing machinery of human CFs.

  19. Characterization of perceived hyperoxia in isolated primary cardiac fibroblasts and in the reoxygenated heart.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sashwati; Khanna, Savita; Wallace, William A; Lappalainen, Jani; Rink, Cameron; Cardounel, Arturo J; Zweier, Jay L; Sen, Chandan K

    2003-11-21

    Under normoxic conditions, pO2 ranges from 90 to <3 torr in mammalian organs with the heart at approximately 35 torr (5%) and arterial blood at approximately 100 torr. Thus, "normoxia" for cells is an adjustable variable. In response to chronic moderate hypoxia, cells adjust their normoxia set point such that reoxygenation-dependent relative elevation of pO2 results in perceived hyperoxia. We hypothesized that O2, even in marginal relative excess of the pO2 to which cells are adjusted, results in the activation of specific O2-sensitive signal transduction pathways that alter cellular phenotype and function. Thus, reperfusion causes damage to the tissue at the focus of ischemia while triggering remodeling in the peri-infarct region by means of perceived hyperoxia. We reported first evidence demonstrating that perceived hyperoxia triggers the differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts (CF) to myofibroblasts by a p21-dependent mechanism (Roy, S., Khanna, S., Bickerstaff, A. A., Subramanian, S. V., Atalay, M., Bierl, M., Pendyala, S., Levy, D., Sharma, N., Venojarvi, M., Strauch, A., Orosz, C. G., and Sen, C. K. (2003) Circ. Res. 92, 264-271). Here, we sought to characterize the genomic response to perceived hyperoxia in CF using GeneChips trade mark. Candidate genes were identified, confirmed and clustered. Cell cycle- and differentiation-associated genes represented a key target of perceived hyperoxia. Bioinformatics-assisted pathway reconstruction revealed the specific signaling processes that were sensitive to perceived hyperoxia. To test the significance of our in vitro findings, a survival model of rat heart focal ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) was investigated. A significant induction in p21 mRNA expression was observed in I-R tissue. The current results provide a comprehensive molecular definition of perceived hyperoxia in cultured CF. Furthermore, the first evidence demonstrating activation of perceived hyperoxia sensitive genes in the cardiac I-R tissue is presented.

  20. Extracellular matrix sub-types and mechanical stretch impact human cardiac fibroblast responses to transforming growth factor beta.

    PubMed

    Watson, Chris J; Phelan, Dermot; Collier, Patrick; Horgan, Stephen; Glezeva, Nadia; Cooke, Gordon; Xu, Maojia; Ledwidge, Mark; McDonald, Kenneth; Baugh, John A

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the impact of extracellular matrix sub-types and mechanical stretch on cardiac fibroblast activity is required to help unravel the pathophysiology of myocardial fibrotic diseases. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate pro-fibrotic responses of primary human cardiac fibroblast cells exposed to different extracellular matrix components, including collagen sub-types I, III, IV, VI and laminin. The impact of mechanical cyclical stretch and treatment with transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1) on collagen 1, collagen 3 and alpha smooth muscle actin mRNA expression on different matrices was assessed using quantitative real-time PCR. Our results revealed that all of the matrices studied not only affected the expression of pro-fibrotic genes in primary human cardiac fibroblast cells at rest but also affected their response to TGFβ1. In addition, differential cellular responses to mechanical cyclical stretch were observed depending on the type of matrix the cells were adhered to. These findings may give insight into the impact of selective pathological deposition of extracellular matrix proteins within different disease states and how these could impact the fibrotic environment.

  1. Differential regulation of collagen secretion by kinin receptors in cardiac fibroblast and myofibroblast

    SciTech Connect

    Catalán, Mabel; Smolic, Christian; Contreras, Ariel; Ayala, Pedro; Olmedo, Ivonne; Copaja, Miguel; Boza, Pía; Vivar, Raúl; Avalos, Yennifer; Lavandero, Sergio; Velarde, Victoria; Díaz-Araya, Guillermo

    2012-06-15

    Kinins mediate their cellular effects through B1 (B1R) and B2 (B2R) receptors, and the activation of B2R reduces collagen synthesis in cardiac fibroblasts (CF). However, the question of whether B1R and/or B2R have a role in cardiac myofibroblasts remains unanswered. Methods: CF were isolated from neonate rats and myofibroblasts were generated by an 84 h treatment with TGF-β1 (CMF). B1R was evaluated by western blot, immunocytochemistry and radioligand assay; B2R, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and cyclooxygenases 1and 2 (COX-1, and COX-2) were evaluated by western blot; intracellular Ca{sup +2} levels were evaluated with Fluo-4AM; collagen secretion was measured in the culture media using the picrosirius red assay kit. Results: B2R, iNOS, COX-1 and low levels of B1R but not eNOS, were detected by western blot in CF. Also, B1R, B2R, and COX-2 but not iNOS, eNOS or COX-1, were detected by western blot in CMF. By immunocytochemistry, our results showed lower intracellular B1R levels in CF and higher B1R levels in CMF, mainly localized on the cell membrane. Additionally, we found B1R only in CMF cellular membrane through radioligand displacement assay. Bradykinin (BK) B2R agonist increased intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels and reduced collagen secretion both in CF and CMF. These effects were blocked by HOE-140, and inhibited by L-NAME, 1400W and indomethacin. Des-Arg-kallidin (DAKD) B1R agonist did not increase intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels in CF; however, after preincubation for 1 h with DAKD and re-stimulation with the same agonist, we found a low increase in intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels. Finally, DAKD increased intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels and decreased collagen secretion in CMF, being this effect blocked by the B1R antagonist des-Arg9-Leu8-kallidin and indomethacin, but not by L-NAME or 1400 W. Conclusion: B1R, B2R, iNOS and COX-1 were expressed differently between CF and CMF, and collagen secretion was

  2. Effects of methylglyoxal on human cardiac fibroblast: roles of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channels.

    PubMed

    Oguri, Gaku; Nakajima, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Yumiko; Takano, Nami; Tanaka, Tomofumi; Kikuchi, Hironobu; Morita, Toshihiro; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Komuro, Issei

    2014-11-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiac remodeling. Methylglyoxal (MG) is an endogenous carbonyl compound produced under hyperglycemic conditions, which may play a role in the development of pathophysiological conditions including diabetic cardiomyopathy. However, the mechanism by which this occurs and the molecular targets of MG are unclear. We investigated the effects of MG on Ca(2+) signals, its underlying mechanism, and cell cycle progression/cell differentiation in human cardiac fibroblasts. The conventional and quantitative real-time RT-PCR, Western blot, immunocytochemical analysis, and intracellular Ca(2+) concentration [Ca(2+)]i measurement were applied. Cell cycle progression was assessed using the fluorescence activated cell sorting. MG induced Ca(2+) entry concentration dependently. Ruthenium red (RR), a general cation channel blocker, and HC030031, a selective transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) antagonist, inhibited MG-induced Ca(2+) entry. Treatment with aminoguanidine, a MG scavenger, also inhibited it. Allyl isothiocyanate, a selective TRPA1 agonist, increased Ca(2+) entry. The use of small interfering RNA to knock down TRPA1 reduced the MG-induced Ca(2+) entry as well as TRPA1 mRNA expression. The quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis showed the prominent existence of TRPA1 mRNA. Expression of TRPA1 protein was confirmed by Western blotting and immunocytochemical analyses. MG promoted cell cycle progression from G0/G1 to S/G2/M, which was suppressed by HC030031 or RR. MG also enhanced α-smooth muscle actin expression. The present results suggest that methylglyoxal activates TRPA1 and promotes cell cycle progression and differentiation in human cardiac fibroblasts. MG might participate the development of pathophysiological conditions including diabetic cardiomyopathy via activation of TRPA1.

  3. Newborn human skin fibroblasts senesce in vitro without acquiring adult growth factor requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, W.

    1984-01-01

    Cultures of human fibroblasts were prepared from chest skin obtained either from newborns (less than 3 months old) or adults (more than 35 years old) and maintained in vitro until they senesced. Adult cells grew logarithmically in medium supplemented with whole blood serum but not with platelet-poor plasma. Early passage cells obtained from newborns grew equally well in either plasma- or serum-supplemented medium. The difference in growth factor requirements between adult and newborn cells persisted through the lifespan of the cells; i.e., newborn cells did not develop adult hormonal requirements when maintained in culture. Thus, in vitro cellular aging can be distinguished from some types of differentiation.

  4. Modified ultrafiltration in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Zakkar, Mustafa; Guida, Gustavo; Angelini, Gianni D

    2015-03-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was the impact of modified ultrafiltration on adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery in terms of inflammatory and metabolic changes, blood loss and early clinical outcomes. A total of 155 papers were identified using the search as described below. Of these, six papers presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question as they reported data to reach conclusions regarding the issues of interest for this review. The author, date and country of publication, patient group, study type and weaknesses and relevant outcomes were tabulated. Modified ultrafiltration in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery seems to attenuate the levels of inflammatory molecules associated with surgery, reduces blood loss and blood transfusion and improves cardiac output, index and systemic vascular resistance. However, this was not translated in any reduction in length of stay in intensive care unit or hospital. Most studies were single-centre prospective non-blinded trials that included a small cohort of elective coronary artery bypass grafting patients, which makes it underpowered to provide unbiased evidence regarding clinical outcomes. Properly designed and conducted prospective randomized studies are required to answer whether the beneficial effect of modified ultrafiltration on systemic inflammatory molecules associated with surgery can translate with improvement in clinical outcome.

  5. Cardiac fibroblast cytokine profiles induced by proinflammatory or profibrotic stimuli promote monocyte recruitment and modulate macrophage M1/M2 balance in vitro.

    PubMed

    Humeres, Claudio; Vivar, Raúl; Boza, Pia; Muñoz, Claudia; Bolivar, Samir; Anfossi, Renatto; Osorio, Jose Miguel; Olivares-Silva, Francisco; García, Lorena; Díaz-Araya, Guillermo

    2016-10-27

    Macrophage polarization plays an essential role in cardiac remodeling after injury, evolving from an initial accumulation of proinflammatory M1 macrophages to a greater balance of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. Whether cardiac fibroblasts themselves influence this process remains an intriguing question. In this work, we present evidence for a role of cardiac fibroblasts (CF) as regulators of macrophage recruitment and skewing. Adult rat CF, were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or TGF-β1, to evaluate ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression using Western blot and proinflammatory/profibrotic cytokine secretion using LUMINEX. We performed in vitro migration and adhesion assays of rat spleen monocytes to layers of TGF-β1- or LPS-pretreated CF. Finally, TGF-β1- or LPS-pretreated CF were co-cultured with monocyte, to evaluate their effects on macrophage polarization, using flow cytometry and cytokine secretion. There was a significant increase in monocyte adhesion to LPS- or TGF-β1-stimulated CF, associated with increased CF expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. siRNA silencing of either ICAM-1 or VCAM-1 inhibited monocyte adhesion to LPS-pretreated CF; however, monocyte adhesion to TGF-β1-treated CF was dependent on only VCAM-1 expression. Pretreatment of CF with LPS or TGF-β1 increased monocyte migration to CF, and this effect was completely abolished with an MCP-1 antibody blockade. LPS-treated CF secreted elevated levels of TNF-α and MCP-1, and when co-cultured with monocyte, LPS-treated CF stimulated increased macrophage M1 polarization and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-12 and MCP-1). On the other hand, CF stimulated with TGF-β1 produced an anti-inflammatory cytokine profile (high IL-10 and IL-5, low TNF-α). When co-cultured with monocytes, the TGF-β1 stimulated fibroblasts skewed monocyte differentiation towards M2 macrophages accompanied by increased IL-10 and decreased IL-12 levels. Taken together, our results show for the first time that

  6. Resveratrol inhibits high glucose induced collagen upregulation in cardiac fibroblasts through regulating TGF-β1-Smad3 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junhui; Zhuo, Xiaozhen; Liu, Weimin; Wan, Zhaofei; Liang, Xiao; Gao, Shanshan; Yuan, Zuyi; Wu, Yue

    2015-02-05

    Cardiac fibrosis is a common pathological process presented in a variety of diseases, including hypertension and diabetes. Cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) have been identified as the most important participants in the development of cardiac fibrosis. Exposure of cultured CFs to high glucose (HG) or angiotensin II (Ang II) resulted in increased collagen synthesis. Resveratrol (Res) is a natural polyphenol exhibiting anti-fibrosis effects in a number of different organs fibrosis process, whether Res can prevent HG and Ang II induced fibrosis response in CFs remains unclear. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of Res in HG and Ang II induced fibrosis response in CFs. We cultured rat CFs in either normal glucose (5.6 mM) or HG (25 mM) media in the presence of Res or not and the changes in collagens synthesis and TGF-β1 production were assessed by Real-time PCR, Western blotting, and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Furthermore, normal and diabetic mice (induced by single dose of streptozotocin (100 mg/kg) via tail vein) receiving Res (10 mg/kg) were used to explore the effects of Res on cardiac fibrosis in vivo. Masson staining and immunohistochemistry were performed to visualize cardiac collagen deposition. Results indicate that CFs exposed to HG condition shows enhanced proliferation rate. Furthermore, in the presence of HG or Ang II, CFs exhibited increased collagens synthesis and TGF-β1 production. And these effects were abolished by Res intervention. In vivo results show that diabetic mice exhibit increased collagen deposition in the cardiac compared with the normal mice. And this change was prevented by the treatment of Res. These results suggest that Res possesses a potential antifibrogenic effect in hypertension and diabetes-related cardiac fibrosis. Moreover, the action mechanism is probably associated with its ability to reduce TGF-β1 content in CFs.

  7. Adenylyl cyclase type 6 overexpression selectively enhances beta-adrenergic and prostacyclin receptor-mediated inhibition of cardiac fibroblast function because of colocalization in lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqiu; Thangavel, Muthusamy; Sun, Shu Qiang; Kaminsky, Joseph; Mahautmr, Penden; Stitham, Jeremiah; Hwa, John; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2008-06-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts produce and degrade extracellular matrix and are critical in regulating cardiac remodeling and hypertrophy. Fibroblasts are activated by factors such as transforming growth factor beta and inhibited by agents that elevate 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels. cAMP signal generation and response is known to be compartmentalized in many cell types in part through the colocalization of receptors and specific adenylyl cyclase isoforms in lipid rafts and caveolae. The present study sought to define the localization of key G protein-coupled receptors with adenylyl cyclase type 6 (AC6) in lipid rafts of rat cardiac fibroblasts and to determine if this colocalization was functionally relevant. We found that cardiac fibroblasts produce cAMP in response to agonists for beta-adrenergic (isoproterenol), prostaglandin EP2 (butaprost), adenosine (adenosine-5'-N-ethylcarboxamide, NECA), and prostacyclin (beraprost) receptors. Overexpression of AC6 increased cAMP production stimulated by isoproterenol and beraprost but not by butaprost or NECA. A key function of fibroblasts is the production of collagen. Isoproterenol- and beraprostmediated inhibition of collagen synthesis was also enhanced by AC6 overexpression, while inhibition by butaprost and NECA were unaltered. Lipid raft fractions from cardiac fibroblasts contain the preponderance of beta-adrenergic receptors and AC6 but exclude EP2 receptors. While we could not determine the localization of native prostacyclin receptors, we were able to determine that epitope-tagged prostanoid IP receptors (IPR) expressed in COS7 cells did localize, in part, in lipid raft fractions. These findings indicate that IP receptors are expressed in lipid rafts and can activate raft-localized AC isoforms. AC6 is completely compartmentized in lipid raft domains where it is activated solely by coresident G protein-coupled receptors to regulate cardiac fibroblast function.

  8. NADPH Oxidase/ROS-Dependent VCAM-1 Induction on TNF-α-Challenged Human Cardiac Fibroblasts Enhances Monocyte Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Chung; Yang, Chien-Chung; Wang, Chen-Yu; Tseng, Hui-Ching; Pan, Chih-Shuo; Hsiao, Li-Der; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2016-01-01

    The inflammation-dependent adhesion molecule expressions are characterized in cardiovascular diseases and myocardial tissue infiltrations. Several pro-inflammatory cytokines are elevated in the acute myocardial injury and infarction. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, is raised in the injury tissues and inflammatory regions and involved in the pathogenesis of cardiac injury, inflammation, and apoptosis. In fibroblasts, TNF-α-triggered expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 aggravated the heart inflammation. However, the mechanisms underlying TNF-α-mediated VCAM-1 expression in cardiac fibroblasts remain unclear. Here, the primary cultured human cardiac fibroblasts (HCFs) were used to investigate the effects of TNF-α on VCAM-1 expression. The molecular evidence, including protein, mRNA, and promoter analyses, indicated that TNF-α-induced VCAM-1 gene expression is mediated through the TNFR-dependent manner. Activation of TNF-α/TNFR system triggered PKCα-dependent NADPH oxidase (Nox)/reactive oxygen species (ROS) signal linking to MAPK cascades, and then led to activation of the transcription factor, AP-1. Moreover, the results of mRNA and promoter assay demonstrated that c-Jun/AP-1 phosphorylated by TNF-α turns on VCAM-1 gene expression. Subsequently, up-regulated VCAM-1 on the cell surface of TNF-α-challenged HCFs increased the number of monocytes adhering to these cells. These results indicated that in HCFs, activation of AP-1 by PKCα-dependent Nox/ROS/MAPKs cascades is required for TNF-α-induced VCAM-1 expression. To clarify the mechanisms of TNF-α-induced VCAM-1 expression in HCFs may provide therapeutic strategies for heart injury and inflammatory diseases. PMID:26858641

  9. Carbon Nanohorns Promote Maturation of Neonatal Rat Ventricular Myocytes and Inhibit Proliferation of Cardiac Fibroblasts: a Promising Scaffold for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yujing; Shi, Xiaoli; Li, Yi; Tian, Lei; Bai, Rui; Wei, Yujie; Han, Dong; Liu, Huiliang; Xu, Jianxun

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering (CTE) has developed rapidly, but a great challenge remains in finding practical scaffold materials for the construction of engineered cardiac tissues. Carbon nanohorns (CNHs) may be a potential candidate due to their special structure and properties. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of CNHs on the biological behavior of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) for CTE applications. CNHs were incorporated into collagen to form growth substrates for NRVMs. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations demonstrated that CNHs exhibited a good affinity to collagen. Moreover, it was found that CNH-embedded substrates enhanced adhesion and proliferation of NRVMs. Immunohistochemical staining, western blot analysis, and intracellular calcium transient measurements indicated that the addition of CNHs significantly increased the expression and maturation of electrical and mechanical proteins (connexin-43 and N-cadherin). Bromodeoxyuridine staining and a Cell Counting Kit-8 assay showed that CNHs have the ability to inhibit the proliferation of cardiac fibroblasts. These findings suggest that CNHs can have a valuable effect on the construction of engineered cardiac tissues and may be a promising scaffold for CTE.

  10. TGF-β1 prevents simulated ischemia/reperfusion-induced cardiac fibroblast apoptosis by activation of both canonical and non-canonical signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Vivar, Raúl; Humeres, Claudio; Ayala, Pedro; Olmedo, Ivonne; Catalán, Mabel; García, Lorena; Lavandero, Sergio; Díaz-Araya, Guillermo

    2013-06-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion injury is a major cause of myocardial death. In the heart, cardiac fibroblasts play a critical role in healing post myocardial infarction. TGF-β1 has shown cardioprotective effects in cardiac damage; however, if TGF-β1 can prevent cardiac fibroblast death triggered by ischemia/reperfusion is unknown. Therefore, we test this hypothesis, and whether the canonical and/or non-canonical TGF-β1 signaling pathways are involved in this protective effect. Cultured rat cardiac fibroblasts were subjected to simulated ischemia/reperfusion. Cell viability was analyzed by trypan blue exclusion and propidium iodide by flow cytometry. The processing of procaspases 8, 9 and 3 to their active forms was assessed by Western blot, whereas subG1 population was evaluated by flow cytometry. Levels of total and phosphorylated forms of ERK1/2, Akt and Smad2/3 were determined by Western blot. The role of these signaling pathways on the protective effect of TGF-β1 was studied using specific chemical inhibitors. Simulated ischemia over 8h triggers a significant cardiac fibroblast death, which increased by reperfusion, with apoptosis actively involved. These effects were only prevented by the addition of TGF-β1 during reperfusion. TGF-β1 pretreatment increased the levels of phosphorylated forms of ERK1/2, Akt and Smad2/3. The inhibition of ERK1/2, Akt and Smad3 also blocked the preventive effects of TGF-β1 on cardiac fibroblast apoptosis induced by simulated ischemia/reperfusion. Overall, our data suggest that TGF-β1 prevents cardiac fibroblast apoptosis induced by simulated ischemia-reperfusion through the canonical (Smad3) and non canonical (ERK1/2 and Akt) signaling pathways.

  11. Effects of linagliptin and liraglutide on glucose- and angiotensin II-induced collagen formation and cytoskeleton degradation in cardiac fibroblasts in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xian-wei; Zhang, Fen-xi; Yang, Fen; Ding, Zu-feng; Agarwal, Nidhi; Guo, Zhi-kun; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors can not only lower blood glucose levels, but also alleviate cardiac remodeling after myocardial ischemia and hypertension. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a DPP-4 inhibitor (linagliptin) and a GLP-1 activator (liraglutide) on glucose- and angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced collagen formation and cytoskeleton reorganization in cardiac fibroblasts in vitro, and elucidated the related mechanisms. Methods: Cardiac fibroblasts were isolated from the hearts of 6-week-old C57BL/6 mice, and then exposed to different concentrations of glucose or Ang II for 24 h. The expression of fibrotic signals (fibronectin, collagen-1, -3 and -4), as well as ERK1/2 and NF-κB-p65 in the fibroblasts was examined using Western blotting assays. F-actin degradation was detected under inverted laser confocal microscope in fibroblasts stained with Rhodamine phalloidin. Results: Glucose (1–40 mmol/L) and Ang II (10−8–10−5 mol/L) dose-dependently increased the expression of fibronectin, collagens, phospho-ERK1/2 and phospho-NF-κB-p65 in cardiac fibroblasts. High concentrations of glucose (≥40 mmol/L) and Ang II (≥10−6 mol/L) caused a significant degradation of F-actin (less assembly F-actin fibers and more disassembly fibers). ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 (10 μmol/L) and NF-κB inhibitor JSH-23 (10 μmol/L) both markedly suppressed glucose- and angiotensin II-induced fibronectin and collagen expressions in cardiac fibroblasts. Furthermore, pretreatment with liraglutide (10–100 nmol/L) or linagliptin (3 and 30 nmol/L) significantly decreased glucose- and Ang II-induced expression of fibrotic signals, phospho-ERK1/2 and phospho-NF-κB-p65 in cardiac fibroblasts. Moreover, pretreatment with liraglutide (30 nmol/L) or liraglutide (100 nmol/L) markedly inhibited glucose-induced F-actin degradation, however, only liraglutide inhibited Ang II-induced F-actin degradation. Conclusion

  12. Cardiac involvement in adult and juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Thomas; Diederichsen, Louise Pyndt; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Sanner, Helga

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) include the main subgroups polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM), inclusion body myositis (IBM) and juvenile DM (JDM). The mentioned subgroups are characterised by inflammation of skeletal muscles leading to muscle weakness and other organs can also be affected as well. Even though clinically significant heart involvement is uncommon, heart disease is one of the major causes of death in IIM. Recent studies show an increased prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors in JDM and DM/PM, which need attention. The risk of developing atherosclerotic coronary artery disease is increased twofold to fourfold in DM/PM. New and improved diagnostic methods have in recent studies in PM/DM and JDM demonstrated a high prevalence of subclinical cardiac involvement, especially diastolic dysfunction. Interactions between proinflammatory cytokines and traditional risk factors might contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiac dysfunction. Heart involvement could also be related to myocarditis and/or myocardial fibrosis, leading to arrhythmias and congestive heart failure, demonstrated both in adult and juvenile IIM. Also, reduced heart rate variability (a known risk factor for cardiac morbidity and mortality) has been shown in long-standing JDM. Until more information is available, patients with IIM should follow the same recommendations for cardiovascular risk stratification and prevention as for the corresponding general population, but be aware that statins might worsen muscle symptoms mimicking myositis relapse. On the basis of recent studies, we recommend a low threshold for cardiac workup and follow-up in patients with IIM. PMID:27752355

  13. Epigenomic Reprogramming of Adult Cardiomyocyte-Derived Cardiac Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Zhong, Jiang F; Qiu, Hongyu; Robb MacLellan, W.; Marbán, Eduardo; Wang, Charles

    2015-01-01

    It has been believed that mammalian adult cardiomyocytes (ACMs) are terminally-differentiated and are unable to proliferate. Recently, using a bi-transgenic ACM fate mapping mouse model and an in vitro culture system, we demonstrated that adult mouse cardiomyocytes were able to dedifferentiate into cardiac progenitor-like cells (CPCs). However, little is known about the molecular basis of their intrinsic cellular plasticity. Here we integrate single-cell transcriptome and whole-genome DNA methylation analyses to unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the dedifferentiation and cell cycle reentry of mouse ACMs. Compared to parental cardiomyocytes, dedifferentiated mouse cardiomyocyte-derived CPCs (mCPCs) display epigenomic reprogramming with many differentially-methylated regions, both hypermethylated and hypomethylated, across the entire genome. Correlated well with the methylome, our transcriptomic data showed that the genes encoding cardiac structure and function proteins are remarkably down-regulated in mCPCs, while those for cell cycle, proliferation, and stemness are significantly up-regulated. In addition, implantation of mCPCs into infarcted mouse myocardium improves cardiac function with augmented left ventricular ejection fraction. Our study demonstrates that the cellular plasticity of mammalian cardiomyocytes is the result of a well-orchestrated epigenomic reprogramming and a subsequent global transcriptomic alteration. PMID:26657817

  14. Fibronectin functional domains coupled to hyaluronan stimulate adult human dermal fibroblast responses critical for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Kaustabh; Ren, Xiang-Dong; Shu, Xiao Zheng; Prestwich, Glenn D; Clark, Richard A F

    2006-03-01

    Fibronectin (FN) facilitates dermal fibroblast migration during normal wound healing. Proteolytic degradation of FN in chronic wounds hampers healing. Previously, three FN functional domains (FNfd) have been shown to be sufficient for optimal adult human dermal fibroblast migration. Here we report the development of an acellular hydrogel matrix comprised of the FNfds coupled to a hyaluronan (HA) backbone to stimulate wound repair. Employing Michael-type addition, the cysteine- tagged FNfds were first coupled to a homobifunctional PEG derivative. Thereafter, these PEG derivative FNfd solutions, containing bifunctional PEG-derivative crosslinker were coupled to thiol-modified HA (HA-DTPH) to obtain a crosslinked hydrogel matrix. When evaluated in vitro, these acellular hydrogels were completely cytocompatible. While spreading and proliferation of adult human dermal fibroblasts plateaued at higher FNfd bulk densities, their rapid and robust migration followed a typical bell-shaped response. When implanted in porcine cutaneous wounds, these acellular matrices, besides being completely biocompatible, induced rapid and en masse recruitment of stromal fibroblasts that was not observed with RGD-tethered or unmodified hydrogels. Such constructs might be of great benefit in clinical settings where rapid formation of new tissue is needed.

  15. Cardiac Fibroblast-Specific Activating Transcription Factor 3 Protects Against Heart Failure by Suppressing MAP2K3-p38 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Yulin; Li, Zhenya; Zhang, Congcong; Li, Ping; Wu, Yina; Wang, Chunxiao; Lau, Wayne Bond; Ma, Xin-Liang; Du, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Background -Hypertensive ventricular remodeling is a common cause of heart failure. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating ventricular remodeling remain poorly understood. Methods -We used a discovery-driven/nonbiased approach to indentify increased ATF3 expression in hypertensive heart. We employed loss/gain of function approaches to understand the role of ATF3 in heart failure. We also examine the mechanisms through transcriptome, CHIP-seq analysis and in vivo and vitro experiments. Results -ATF3 expression increased in murine hypertensive heart and human hypertrophic heart. Cardiac fibroblast cells are the primary cell type expressing high ATF3 levels in response to hypertensive stimuli. ATF3 knockout (ATF3KO) markedly exaggerated hypertensive ventricular remodeling, a state rescued by lentivirus-mediated/miRNA-aided cardiac fibroblast-selective ATF3 overexpression. Conversely, conditional cardiac fibroblast cell-specific ATF3 transgenic overexpression significantly ameliorated ventricular remodeling and heart failure. We identified Map2K3 as a novel ATF3 target. ATF3 binds with the Map2K3 promoter, recruiting HDAC1, resulting in Map2K3 gene-associated histone deacetylation, thereby inhibiting Map2K3 expression. Genetic Map2K3 knockdown rescued the pro-fibrotic/hypertrophic phenotype in ATF3KO cells. Finally, we demonstrated that p38 is the downstream molecule of Map2K3 mediating the pro-fibrotic/hypertrophic effects in ATF3KO animals. Inhibition of p38 signaling reduced TGF-β signaling-related pro-fibrotic and hypertrophic gene expression, and blocked exaggerated cardiac remodeling in ATF3KO cells. Conclusions -Our study provides the first evidence that ATF3 upregulation in cardiac fibroblasts in response to hypertensive stimuli protects heart by suppressing Map2K3 expression and subsequent p38-TGF-β signaling. These results suggest that positive modulation of cardiac fibroblast ATF3 may represent a novel therapeutic approach against hypertensive

  16. Human embryonic and fetal mesenchymal stem cells differentiate toward three different cardiac lineages in contrast to their adult counterparts.

    PubMed

    Ramkisoensing, Arti A; Pijnappels, Daniël A; Askar, Saïd F A; Passier, Robert; Swildens, Jim; Goumans, Marie José; Schutte, Cindy I; de Vries, Antoine A F; Scherjon, Sicco; Mummery, Christine L; Schalij, Martin J; Atsma, Douwe E

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) show unexplained differences in differentiation potential. In this study, differentiation of human (h) MSCs derived from embryonic, fetal and adult sources toward cardiomyocytes, endothelial and smooth muscle cells was investigated. Labeled hMSCs derived from embryonic stem cells (hESC-MSCs), fetal umbilical cord, bone marrow, amniotic membrane and adult bone marrow and adipose tissue were co-cultured with neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (nrCMCs) or cardiac fibroblasts (nrCFBs) for 10 days, and also cultured under angiogenic conditions. Cardiomyogenesis was assessed by human-specific immunocytological analysis, whole-cell current-clamp recordings, human-specific qRT-PCR and optical mapping. After co-culture with nrCMCs, significantly more hESC-MSCs than fetal hMSCs stained positive for α-actinin, whereas adult hMSCs stained negative. Furthermore, functional cardiomyogenic differentiation, based on action potential recordings, was shown to occur, but not in adult hMSCs. Of all sources, hESC-MSCs expressed most cardiac-specific genes. hESC-MSCs and fetal hMSCs contained significantly higher basal levels of connexin43 than adult hMSCs and co-culture with nrCMCs increased expression. After co-culture with nrCFBs, hESC-MSCs and fetal hMSCs did not express α-actinin and connexin43 expression was decreased. Conduction velocity (CV) in co-cultures of nrCMCs and hESC-MSCs was significantly higher than in co-cultures with fetal or adult hMSCs. In angiogenesis bioassays, only hESC-MSCs and fetal hMSCs were able to form capillary-like structures, which stained for smooth muscle and endothelial cell markers.Human embryonic and fetal MSCs differentiate toward three different cardiac lineages, in contrast to adult MSCs. Cardiomyogenesis is determined by stimuli from the cellular microenvironment, where connexin43 may play an important role.

  17. Mechanically induced orientation of adult rat cardiac myocytes in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samuel, J.-L.; Vandenburgh, H. H.

    1990-01-01

    The present study describes the spatial orientation of a population of freshly isolated adult rat cardiac myocytes using a computerized mechanical cell stimulator device for tissue cultured cells. A continuous unidirectional stretch of the substratum at 60 to 400 microns/min for 120 to 30 min, respectively, during the cell attachment period in a serum-free medium was found to induce a significant threefold increase in the number of rod-shaped myocytes oriented parallel to the direction of movement. The myocytes orient less well with unidirectional substratum stretching after their adhesion to the substratum. Adult myocytes plated onto a substratum undergoing continuous 10-percent stretch-relaxation cycling show no significant change in the myocyte orientation or cytoskeletal organization. In addition to the type of mechanical activity, orientation of rod-shaped myocytes is dependent on the speed of the substratum, the final stretch amplitude, and the timing between initiation of substratum stretching and adhesion of myocytes to the substratum.

  18. [Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart defects in adults].

    PubMed

    Bastarrika Alemañ, G; Gavira Gómez, J J; Zudaire Díaz-Tejeiro, B; Castaño Rodríguez, S; Romero Ibarra, C; Sáenz de Buruaga, J D

    2007-01-01

    The study of congenital cardiopathies (CC) is one of the most clearly established indications of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI). Different sequences, including anatomic, functional, flow (phase contrast), and 3D angiographic sequences, enable the diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-up of these conditions. CMRI allows the anatomy, function, and alterations of flow in these cardiopathies to be evaluated in a single examination. Three-dimensional MR angiography enables the study of the great vessels and the anomalies associated to congenital heart defects in adults. This article describes an examination protocol and provides examples of MR images of the most common CC in adults: atrial septal defect, interventricular communication, atrioventricular canal, tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, bicuspid aortic valve, subaortic stenosis, aortic coarctation, and Ebstein's anomaly.

  19. Fibulin-6 regulates pro-fibrotic TGF-β responses in neonatal mouse ventricular cardiac fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Arpita; Hasselbach, Lisa; Echtermeyer, Frank; Jyotsana, Nidhi; Theilmeier, Gregor; Herzog, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Fibulin-6, an essential component of extracellular matrix determines the architecture of cellular junctions in tissues undergoing strain. Increased expression and deposition of fibulin-6 facilitates fibroblast migration in response to TGF-β, following myocardial infarction in mouse heart. The underlying mechanism still remains elusive. In conjunction with our previous study, we have now demonstrated that in fibulin-6 knockdown (KD) fibroblasts, not only TGF-β dependent migration, but also stress fiber formation, cellular networking and subsequently fibroblast wound contraction is almost abrogated. SMAD dependent TGF-β pathway shows ~75% decreased translocation of R-SMAD and co-SMAD into the nucleus upon fibulin-6 KD. Consequently, SMAD dependent pro-fibrotic gene expression is considerably down regulated to basal levels both in mRNA and protein. Also, investigating the non-SMAD pathways we observed a constitutive increase in pERK-levels in fibulin-6 KD fibroblast compared to control, but no change was seen in pAKT. Immunoprecipitation studies revealed 60% reduced interaction of TGF-β receptor II and I (TGFRII and I) accompanied by diminished phosphorylation of TGFRI at serin165 in fibulin-6 KD cells. In conclusion, fibulin-6 plays an important role in regulating TGF-β mediated responses, by modulating TGF-β receptor dimerization and activation to further trigger downstream pathways. PMID:28209981

  20. Ketamine in adult cardiac surgery and the cardiac surgery Intensive Care Unit: An evidence-based clinical review

    PubMed Central

    Mazzeffi, Michael; Johnson, Kyle; Paciullo, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Ketamine is a unique anesthetic drug that provides analgesia, hypnosis, and amnesia with minimal respiratory and cardiovascular depression. Because of its sympathomimetic properties it would seem to be an excellent choice for patients with depressed ventricular function in cardiac surgery. However, its use has not gained widespread acceptance in adult cardiac surgery patients, perhaps due to its perceived negative psychotropic effects. Despite this limitation, it is receiving renewed interest in the United States as a sedative and analgesic drug for critically ill-patients. In this manuscript, the authors provide an evidence-based clinical review of ketamine use in cardiac surgery patients for intensive care physicians, cardio-thoracic anesthesiologists, and cardio-thoracic surgeons. All MEDLINE indexed clinical trials performed during the last 20 years in adult cardiac surgery patients were included in the review. PMID:25849690

  1. Revisiting Cardiac Cellular Composition

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Alexander R.; Ilinykh, Alexei; Ivey, Malina J.; Kuwabara, Jill T.; D'Antoni, Michelle L.; Debuque, Ryan; Chandran, Anjana; Wang, Lina; Arora, Komal; Rosenthal, Nadia; Tallquist, Michelle D.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Accurate knowledge of the cellular composition of the heart is essential to fully understand the changes that occur during pathogenesis and to devise strategies for tissue engineering and regeneration. Objective To examine the relative frequency of cardiac endothelial cells, hematopoietic-derived cells and fibroblasts in the mouse and human heart. Methods and Results Using a combination of genetic tools and cellular markers, we examined the occurrence of the most prominent cell types in the adult mouse heart. Immunohistochemistry revealed that endothelial cells constitute over 60%, hematopoietic-derived cells 5–10%, and fibroblasts under 20% of the non-myocytes in the heart. A refined cell isolation protocol and an improved flow cytometry approach provided an independent means of determining the relative abundance of non-myocytes. High dimensional analysis and unsupervised clustering of cell populations confirmed that endothelial cells are the most abundant cell population. Interestingly, fibroblast numbers are smaller than previously estimated, and two commonly assigned fibroblast markers, Sca-1 and CD90, underrepresent fibroblast numbers. We also describe an alternative fibroblast surface marker that more accurately identifies the resident cardiac fibroblast population. Conclusions This new perspective on the abundance of different cell types in the heart demonstrates that fibroblasts comprise a relatively minor population. By contrast, endothelial cells constitute the majority of non-cardiomyocytes and are likely to play a greater role in physiologic function and response to injury than previously appreciated. PMID:26635390

  2. In utero and lactational 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin exposure: effects on fetal and adult cardiac gene expression and adult cardiac and renal morphology.

    PubMed

    Aragon, Andrea C; Kopf, Phillip G; Campen, Matthew J; Huwe, Janice K; Walker, Mary K

    2008-02-01

    The mouse heart is a target of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) during fetal development, and microarray analysis demonstrates significant changes in expression of cardiac genes involved in extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. We tested the hypothesis that developmental TCDD exposure would disrupt cardiac ECM expression and be associated with changes in cardiac morphology in adulthood. In one study, time-pregnant C57BL/6 mice were dosed with corn oil or 1.5, 3.0, or 6.0 microg TCDD/kg on gestation day (GD) 14.5 and sacrificed on GD 17.5, when changes in fetal cardiac mRNA expression were analyzed using quantitative PCR. TCDD induced mRNA expression of genes associated with ECM remodeling (matrix metalloproteinase 9 and 13, preproendothelin-1 [preproET-1]), cardiac hypertrophy (atrial natriuretic peptide, beta-myosin heavy chain, osteopontin), and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) activation (cytochrome P4501A1, AHR repressor). Further, all TCDD-induced changes required the AHR since gene expression was not altered in AHR knockout fetuses. In a second study, time-pregnant mice were treated with corn oil or 6.0 microg TCDD/kg on GD 14.5, and male offspring were assessed for changes in cardiac gene expression and cardiac and renal morphology at 3 months. All TCDD-induced changes in cardiac gene expression observed fetally, except for preproET-1, remained induced in the hearts of adult male offspring. Adult male offspring of TCDD-exposed dams also displayed cardiac hypertrophy, decreased plasma volume, and mild hydronephrosis. These results demonstrate that in utero and lactational TCDD exposures alter cardiac gene expression and cardiac and renal morphology in adulthood, which may increase the susceptibility to cardiovascular dysfunction.

  3. Physical exercise and cardiac autonomic activity in healthy adult men.

    PubMed

    Panda, Kaninika; Krishna, Pushpa

    2014-01-01

    Physical inactivity is an important risk factor for cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Regular exercise is known to improve health and maintain physical fitness. The heart rate response to exercise reflects autonomic control of heart and has shown to predict cardiovascular prognosis. Decreased heart rate variability (HRV) is known as a risk factor for cardiovascular mortality. The objective of this study was to study the effect of exercise on cardiac autonomic activity. Thirty two healthy adult men in the age group of 18-25 years with normal body mass index (BMI) were recruited from different physical fitness centers, who were undergoing regular exercise for past 3 months. Resting ECG was recorded for 5 minutes and analyzed for frequency analysis of HRV. HRV parameters of the subjects were compared with fifty age and BMI matched subjects who were not undergoing any exercise program. Physical activity level of all subjects was assessed by using Global Physical Activity Questionnaire. The exercising (E) subjects were found to have a lesser heart rate (73.27 ± 8.6 vs 74.41 ± 8.59) compared to non-exercising (NE) group, which was not significant. No significant difference was found in frequency domain parameters of HRV between exercising and non-exercising group with LF (47.12 ± 19.17 vs 43.55 ± 16.66), HF (41.03 ± 17.65 vs 46.03 ± 15.89) and LF/HF (1.61 ± 1.16 vs 1.22 ± 0.93) respectively. Physical activity level was significantly different between the two groups (4175 ± 1481.53 vs 1176.4?1103.83, p<0.001). This study showed 3 months of exercise did not have any effect on cardiac autonomic activity despite the difference in physical activity.

  4. High molecular weight fibroblast growth factor-2 in the human heart is a potential target for prevention of cardiac remodeling.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Jon-Jon; McNaughton, Leslie J; Koleini, Navid; Ma, Xin; Bestvater, Brian; Nickel, Barbara E; Fandrich, Robert R; Wigle, Jeffrey T; Freed, Darren H; Arora, Rakesh C; Kardami, Elissavet

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) is a multifunctional protein synthesized as high (Hi-) and low (Lo-) molecular weight isoforms. Studies using rodent models showed that Hi- and Lo-FGF-2 exert distinct biological activities: after myocardial infarction, rat Lo-FGF-2, but not Hi-FGF-2, promoted sustained cardioprotection and angiogenesis, while Hi-FGF-2, but not Lo-FGF-2, promoted myocardial hypertrophy and reduced contractile function. Because there is no information regarding Hi-FGF-2 in human myocardium, we undertook to investigate expression, regulation, secretion and potential tissue remodeling-associated activities of human cardiac (atrial) Hi-FGF-2. Human patient-derived atrial tissue extracts, as well as pericardial fluid, contained Hi-FGF-2 isoforms, comprising, respectively, 53%(±20 SD) and 68% (±25 SD) of total FGF-2, assessed by western blotting. Human atrial tissue-derived primary myofibroblasts (hMFs) expressed and secreted predominantly Hi-FGF-2, at about 80% of total. Angiotensin II (Ang II) up-regulated Hi-FGF-2 in hMFs, via activation of both type 1 and type 2 Ang II receptors; the ERK pathway; and matrix metalloprotease-2. Treatment of hMFs with neutralizing antibodies selective for human Hi-FGF-2 (neu-AbHi-FGF-2) reduced accumulation of proteins associated with fibroblast-to-myofibroblast conversion and fibrosis, including α-smooth muscle actin, extra-domain A fibronectin, and procollagen. Stimulation of hMFs with recombinant human Hi-FGF-2 was significantly more potent than Lo-FGF-2 in upregulating inflammation-associated proteins such as pro-interleukin-1β and plasminogen-activator-inhibitor-1. Culture media conditioned by hMFs promoted cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, an effect that was prevented by neu-AbHi-FGF-2 in vitro. In conclusion, we have documented that Hi-FGF-2 represents a substantial fraction of FGF-2 in human cardiac (atrial) tissue and in pericardial fluid, and have shown that human Hi-FGF-2, unlike Lo-FGF-2, promotes deleterious

  5. Functional differences between neonatal and adult fibroblasts and keratinocytes: Donor age affects epithelial-mesenchymal crosstalk in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Mateu, Rosana; Živicová, Veronika; Krejčí, Eliška Drobná; Grim, Miloš; Strnad, Hynek; Vlček, Čestmír; Kolář, Michal; Lacina, Lukáš; Gál, Peter; Borský, Jiří; Smetana, Karel; Dvořánková, Barbora

    2016-01-01

    Clinical evidence suggests that healing is faster and almost scarless at an early neonatal age in comparison with that in adults. In this study, the phenotypes of neonatal and adult dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes (nestin, smooth muscle actin, keratin types 8, 14 and 19, and fibronectin) were compared. Furthermore, functional assays (proliferation, migration, scratch wound closure) including mutual epithelial-mesenchymal interactions were also performed to complete the series of experiments. Positivity for nestin and α smooth muscle actin was higher in neonatal fibroblasts (NFs) when compared with their adult counterparts (adult fibroblasts; AFs). Although the proliferation of NFs and AFs was similar, they significantly differed in their migration potential. The keratinocyte experiments revealed small, poorly differentiated cells (positive for keratins 8, 14 and 19) in primary cultures isolated from neonatal tissues. Moreover, the neonatal keratinocytes exhibited significantly faster rates of healing the experimentally induced in vitro defects in comparison with adult cells. Notably, the epithelial/mesenchymal interaction studies showed that NFs in co-culture with adult keratinocytes significantly stimulated the adult epithelial cells to acquire the phenotype of small, non-confluent cells expressing markers of poor differentiation. These results indicate the important differences between neonatal and adult cells that may be associated with improved wound healing during the early neonatal period. PMID:27513730

  6. Functional differences between neonatal and adult fibroblasts and keratinocytes: Donor age affects epithelial-mesenchymal crosstalk in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mateu, Rosana; Živicová, Veronika; Krejčí, Eliška Drobná; Grim, Miloš; Strnad, Hynek; Vlček, Čestmír; Kolář, Michal; Lacina, Lukáš; Gál, Peter; Borský, Jiří; Smetana, Karel; Dvořánková, Barbora

    2016-10-01

    Clinical evidence suggests that healing is faster and almost scarless at an early neonatal age in comparison with that in adults. In this study, the phenotypes of neonatal and adult dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes (nestin, smooth muscle actin, keratin types 8, 14 and 19, and fibronectin) were compared. Furthermore, functional assays (proliferation, migration, scratch wound closure) including mutual epithelial‑mesenchymal interactions were also performed to complete the series of experiments. Positivity for nestin and α smooth muscle actin was higher in neonatal fibroblasts (NFs) when compared with their adult counterparts (adult fibroblasts; AFs). Although the proliferation of NFs and AFs was similar, they significantly differed in their migration potential. The keratinocyte experiments revealed small, poorly differentiated cells (positive for keratins 8, 14 and 19) in primary cultures isolated from neonatal tissues. Moreover, the neonatal keratinocytes exhibited significantly faster rates of healing the experimentally induced in vitro defects in comparison with adult cells. Notably, the epithelial/mesenchymal interaction studies showed that NFs in co-culture with adult keratinocytes significantly stimulated the adult epithelial cells to acquire the phenotype of small, non-confluent cells expressing markers of poor differentiation. These results indicate the important differences between neonatal and adult cells that may be associated with improved wound healing during the early neonatal period.

  7. Cardiac muscle plasticity in adult and embryo by heart-derived progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hidemasa; Chi, Xuan; Bradfute, Steven B; Mishina, Yuji; Pocius, Jennifer; Michael, Lloyd H; Behringer, Richard R; Schwartz, Robert J; Entman, Mark L; Schneider, Michael D

    2004-05-01

    The evidence of cardiomyocyte proliferation in damaged heart implied cardiac regeneration might occur by resident or extra cardiac stem cells. However, the specification and origin of these cells remain unknown. Here, we report using fluorescence-activated cell sorting that cardiac progenitor cells resided in adult heart and colocalized with small capillary vessels, within the stem cell antigen (Sca-1) population expressing high telomerase activity. Notably, hematopoietic stem cells capable of efflux Hoechst 33342, termed side population cells, also were identified within the heart-derived cells. The cardiac progenitor cells (CD45(-)/CD34(-)) express neither cardiac muscle nor endothelial cell markers at an undifferentiated stage. The exposure of 5-azacytidine induced cardiac differentiation, which depends, in part, on Bmpr1a, a type IA receptor for bone morphogenetic protein (BMP). The capability of adult Sca1(+) cells to adopt a cardiac muscle in embryogenesis was substantiated by blastocyst injection, using progenitors from the adult hearts of transgenic mice that harbor a bacterial artificial chromosome expressing GFP via the Nkx-2.5 locus. Intravenously injected progenitors, shortly after ischemic/reperfusion, homed and functionally differentiated 3.5% of total left ventricle in the host myocardium. Differentiation included both fusion-independent and fusion-associated components, proved by the Cre/loxP donor/recipient system. Our studies suggest that endogenous cardiac progenitors reside in the adult heart, regenerate cardiomyocytes functionally, and integrate into the existing heart circuitry.

  8. Heart Development, Diseases, and Regeneration - New Approaches From Innervation, Fibroblasts, and Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Ieda, Masaki

    2016-09-23

    It is well known that cardiac function is tightly controlled by neural activity; however, the molecular mechanism of cardiac innervation during development and the relationship with heart disease remain undetermined. My work has revealed the molecular networks that govern cardiac innervation and its critical roles in heart diseases such as silent myocardial ischemia and arrhythmias. Cardiomyocytes proliferate during embryonic development, but lose their proliferative capacity after birth. Cardiac fibroblasts are a major source of cells during fibrosis and induce cardiac hypertrophy after myocardial injury in the adult heart. Despite the importance of fibroblasts in the adult heart, the role of fibroblasts in embryonic heart development was previously not determined. I demonstrated that cardiac fibroblasts play important roles in myocardial growth and cardiomyocyte proliferation during embryonic development, and I identified key paracrine factors and signaling pathways. In contrast to embryonic cardiomyocytes, adult cardiomyocytes have little regenerative capacity, leading to heart failure and high mortality rates after myocardial infarction. Leveraging the knowledge of developmental biology, I identified cardiac reprogramming factors that can directly convert resident cardiac fibroblasts into cardiomyocytes for heart regeneration. These findings greatly improved our understanding of heart development and diseases, and provide a new strategy for heart regenerative therapy. (Circ J 2016; 80: 2081-2088).

  9. Effect of culture conditions on microRNA expression in primary adult control and COPD lung fibroblasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ikari, Jun; Smith, Lynette M; Nelson, Amy J; Iwasawa, Shunichiro; Gunji, Yoko; Farid, Maha; Wang, Xingqi; Basma, Hesham; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol; Liu, Xiangde; DeMeo, Dawn L; Rennard, Stephen I

    2015-04-01

    In vitro cell cultures, including lung fibroblasts, have been used to identify microRNAs (miRNAs) associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) pathogenesis. However, culture conditions may affect miRNA expression. We examined whether miRNA expression in primary adult lung fibroblasts varies with cell density or passage in vitro and whether culture conditions confound the identification of altered miRNA expression in COPD lung fibroblasts. Primary adult control and COPD lung fibroblasts were cultured until passage 3 or 8, after which cells were further cultured for 3 or 7 d (low vs. high density). Then, cells at low density were cultured with serum-free media, and those at high density were cultured with serum-free media in the absence or presence of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) for 24 h. RNA was extracted to perform miRNA microarray from which 1.25-fold differential expression and 10% false discovery rate were applied to identify "invariant" and "variant" miRNA for the various culture conditions. Of the 2226 miRNAs evaluated, 39.0% for cell density, 40.7% for cell passage, and 29.4% for both conditions were identified as "invariant" miRNAs. Furthermore, 38.1% of the evaluated miRNAs were "invariant" for cell passage with IL-1β and TNF-α. Differentially expressed miRNAs between control and COPD lung fibroblasts were identified with and without IL-1β and TNF-α, and of these, 32 out of the 34 top-ranked miRNAs exceeded the differences due to culture conditions. Thus, culture conditions may affect miRNA expression of adult human lung fibroblasts. Nevertheless, in vitro cultures can be used to assess differential miRNA expression in COPD lung fibroblasts.

  10. Discovery and progress of direct cardiac reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Hidenori; Ieda, Masaki

    2017-02-14

    Cardiac disease remains a major cause of death worldwide. Direct cardiac reprogramming has emerged as a promising approach for cardiac regenerative therapy. After the discovery of MyoD, a master regulator for skeletal muscle, other single cardiac reprogramming factors (master regulators) have been sought. Discovery of cardiac reprogramming factors was inspired by the finding that multiple, but not single, transcription factors were needed to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts. We first reported a combination of cardiac-specific transcription factors, Gata4, Mef2c, and Tbx5 (GMT), that could convert mouse fibroblasts into cardiomyocyte-like cells, which were designated as induced cardiomyocyte-like cells (iCMs). Following our first report of cardiac reprogramming, many researchers, including ourselves, demonstrated an improvement in cardiac reprogramming efficiency, in vivo direct cardiac reprogramming for heart regeneration, and cardiac reprogramming in human cells. However, cardiac reprogramming in human cells and adult fibroblasts remains inefficient, and further efforts are needed. We believe that future research elucidating epigenetic barriers and molecular mechanisms of direct cardiac reprogramming will improve the reprogramming efficiency, and that this new technology has great potential for clinical applications.

  11. Electrophysiological Profiles of Induced Neurons Converted Directly from Adult Human Fibroblasts Indicate Incomplete Neuronal Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Koppensteiner, Peter; Boehm, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The direct conversion of human fibroblasts to neuronal cells, termed human induced neuronal (hiN) cells, has great potential for future clinical advances. However, previous studies have not provided an in-depth analysis of electrophysiological properties of adult fibroblast-derived hiN cultures. We have examined the electrophysiological profile of hiN cells by measuring passive and active membrane properties, as well as spontaneous and evoked neurotransmission. We found that hiN cells exhibited passive membrane properties equivalent to perinatal rodent neurons. In addition, 30% of hiN cells were incapable of action potential (AP) generation and did not exhibit rectifying membrane currents, and none of the cells displayed firing patterns of typical glutamatergic pyramidal neurons. Finally, hiN cells exhibited neither spontaneous nor evoked neurotransmission. Our results suggest that current methods used to produce hiN cells provide preparations in which cells do not achieve the cellular properties of fully mature neurons, rendering these cells inadequate to investigate pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:25437871

  12. Efficient Uptake and Dissemination of Scrapie Prion Protein by Astrocytes and Fibroblasts from Adult Hamster Brain

    PubMed Central

    Hollister, Jason R.; Lee, Kil Sun; Dorward, David W.; Baron, Gerald S.

    2015-01-01

    Prion infections target neurons and lead to neuronal loss. However, the role of non-neuronal cells in the initiation and spread of infection throughout the brain remains unclear despite the fact these cells can also propagate prion infectivity. To evaluate how different brain cells process scrapie prion protein (PrPres) during acute infection, we exposed neuron-enriched and non-neuronal cell cultures from adult hamster brain to fluorescently-labeled purified PrPres and followed the cultures by live cell confocal imaging over time. Non-neuronal cells present in both types of cultures, specifically astrocytes and fibroblasts, internalized PrPres more efficiently than neurons. PrPres was trafficked to late endosomal/lysosomal compartments and rapidly transported throughout the cell bodies and processes of all cell types, including contacts between astrocytes and neurons. These observations suggest that astrocytes and meningeal fibroblasts play an as yet unappreciated role in prion infections via efficient uptake and dissemination of PrPres. PMID:25635871

  13. Efficient uptake and dissemination of scrapie prion protein by astrocytes and fibroblasts from adult hamster brain.

    PubMed

    Hollister, Jason R; Lee, Kil Sun; Dorward, David W; Baron, Gerald S

    2015-01-01

    Prion infections target neurons and lead to neuronal loss. However, the role of non-neuronal cells in the initiation and spread of infection throughout the brain remains unclear despite the fact these cells can also propagate prion infectivity. To evaluate how different brain cells process scrapie prion protein (PrPres) during acute infection, we exposed neuron-enriched and non-neuronal cell cultures from adult hamster brain to fluorescently-labeled purified PrPres and followed the cultures by live cell confocal imaging over time. Non-neuronal cells present in both types of cultures, specifically astrocytes and fibroblasts, internalized PrPres more efficiently than neurons. PrPres was trafficked to late endosomal/lysosomal compartments and rapidly transported throughout the cell bodies and processes of all cell types, including contacts between astrocytes and neurons. These observations suggest that astrocytes and meningeal fibroblasts play an as yet unappreciated role in prion infections via efficient uptake and dissemination of PrPres.

  14. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database: 2016 Update on Outcomes and Quality.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, Richard S; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Badhwar, Vinay; Paone, Gaetano; Rankin, J Scott; Han, Jane M; McDonald, Donna; Shahian, David M

    2016-01-01

    The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Database is one of the longest-standing, largest, and most highly regarded clinical data registries in health care. It serves as the foundation for all quality measurement and improvement activities of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. This report summarizes current aggregate national outcomes in adult cardiac surgery and reviews database-related activities in the areas of quality measurement and performance improvement.

  15. Fibroblast Growth Factor-9 Enhances M2 Macrophage Differentiation and Attenuates Adverse Cardiac Remodeling in the Infarcted Diabetic Heart

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Dinender K.; Singla, Reetu D.; Abdelli, Latifa S.; Glass, Carley

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation has been implicated as a perpetrator of diabetes and its associated complications. Monocytes, key mediators of inflammation, differentiate into pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages upon infiltration of damaged tissue. However, the inflammatory cell types, which propagate diabetes progression and consequential adverse disorders, remain unclear. The current study was undertaken to assess monocyte infiltration and the role of fibroblast growth factor-9 (FGF-9) on monocyte to macrophage differentiation and cardioprotection in the diabetic infarcted heart. Db/db diabetic mice were assigned to sham, myocardial infarction (MI), and MI+FGF-9 groups. MI was induced by permanent coronary artery ligation and animals were subjected to 2D transthoracic echocardiography two weeks post-surgery. Immunohistochemical and immunoassay results from heart samples collected suggest significantly increased infiltration of monocytes (Mean ± SEM; MI: 2.02% ± 0.23% vs. Sham 0.75% ± 0.07%; p<0.05) and associated pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, MCP-1, and IL-6), adverse cardiac remodeling (Mean ± SEM; MI: 33% ± 3.04% vs. Sham 2.2% ± 0.33%; p<0.05), and left ventricular dysfunction (Mean ± SEM; MI: 35.4% ± 1.25% vs. Sham 49.19% ± 1.07%; p<0.05) in the MI group. Importantly, treatment of diabetic infarcted myocardium with FGF-9 resulted in significantly decreased monocyte infiltration (Mean ± SEM; MI+FGF-9: 1.39% ± 0.1% vs. MI: 2.02% ± 0.23%; p<0.05), increased M2 macrophage differentiation (Mean ± SEM; MI+FGF-9: 4.82% ± 0.86% vs. MI: 0.85% ± 0.3%; p<0.05) and associated anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10 and IL-1RA), reduced adverse remodeling (Mean ± SEM; MI+FGF-9: 11.59% ± 1.2% vs. MI: 33% ± 3.04%; p<0.05), and improved cardiac function (Fractional shortening, Mean ± SEM; MI+FGF-9: 41.51% ± 1.68% vs. MI: 35.4% ± 1.25%; p<0.05). In conclusion, our data suggest FGF-9 possesses novel therapeutic potential in its ability to

  16. The influence of hypoxia during different pregnancy stages on cardiac collagen accumulation in the adult offspring.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingxing; Li, Meimei; Huang, Ziyang; Wang, Zhenhua

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated whether the timing of maternal hypoxia during pregnancy influenced cardiac extracellular matrix accumulation in the adult offspring. Rats in different periods of pregnancy were assigned to maternal hypoxia or control groups. Maternal hypoxia from day 3 to 21 of pregnancy or day 9 to 21 of pregnancy increased collagen I and collagen III expression in the left ventricle of adult offspring (both P<0.05). Maternal hypoxia from day 15 to 21 of pregnancy had no effect on adult collagen levels. Our results indicate that maternal hypoxia at critical windows of cardiovascular development can induce pathological cardiac remodeling in the adult rat offspring.

  17. Second generation codon optimized minicircle (CoMiC) for nonviral reprogramming of human adult fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Diecke, Sebastian; Lisowski, Leszek; Kooreman, Nigel G; Wu, Joseph C

    2014-01-01

    The ability to induce pluripotency in somatic cells is one of the most important scientific achievements in the fields of stem cell research and regenerative medicine. This technique allows researchers to obtain pluripotent stem cells without the controversial use of embryos, providing a novel and powerful tool for disease modeling and drug screening approaches. However, using viruses for the delivery of reprogramming genes and transcription factors may result in integration into the host genome and cause random mutations within the target cell, thus limiting the use of these cells for downstream applications. To overcome this limitation, various non-integrating techniques, including Sendai virus, mRNA, minicircle, and plasmid-based methods, have recently been developed. Utilizing a newly developed codon optimized 4-in-1 minicircle (CoMiC), we were able to reprogram human adult fibroblasts using chemically defined media and without the need for feeder cells.

  18. Adult-onset Still's disease and cardiac tamponade: a rare association.

    PubMed

    Carrilho-Ferreira, Pedro; Silva, Doroteia; de Jesus Silva, Maria; André, Rui; Varela, Manuel Gato; Diogo, António Nunes

    2015-06-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare disorder with potentially severe clinical features, including cardiac involvement. This systemic inflammatory disease of unknown origin should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pericarditis, with or without pericardial effusion. Cardiac tamponade is a very rare sequela that requires an invasive approach, such as percutaneous or surgical pericardial drainage, in addition to the usual conservative therapy. The authors describe a case of adult-onset Still's disease rendered more difficult by pericarditis and cardiac tamponade, and they briefly review the literature on this entity.

  19. Adult-Onset Still's Disease and Cardiac Tamponade: A Rare Association

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Doroteia; de Jesus Silva, Maria; André, Rui; Varela, Manuel Gato; Diogo, António Nunes

    2015-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare disorder with potentially severe clinical features, including cardiac involvement. This systemic inflammatory disease of unknown origin should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pericarditis, with or without pericardial effusion. Cardiac tamponade is a very rare sequela that requires an invasive approach, such as percutaneous or surgical pericardial drainage, in addition to the usual conservative therapy. The authors describe a case of adult-onset Still's disease rendered more difficult by pericarditis and cardiac tamponade, and they briefly review the literature on this entity. PMID:26175648

  20. Up-regulated HMGB1 in EAM directly led to collagen deposition by a PKCβ/Erk1/2-dependent pathway: cardiac fibroblast/myofibroblast might be another source of HMGB1

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhaoliang; Yin, Jingping; Wang, Ting; Sun, Yingkun; Ni, Ping; Ma, Rui; Zhu, Haitao; Zheng, Dong; Shen, Huiling; Xu, Wenlin; Xu, Huaxi

    2014-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), an important inflammatory mediator, is actively secreted by immune cells and some non-immune cells or passively released by necrotic cells. HMGB1 has been implicated in many inflammatory diseases. Our previous published data demonstrated that HMGB1 was up-regulated in heart tissue or serum in experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM); HMGB1 blockade could ameliorate cardiac fibrosis at the last stage of EAM. And yet, until now, no data directly showed that HMGB1 was associated with cardiac fibrosis. Therefore, the aims of the present work were to assess whether (1) up-regulated HMGB1 could directly lead to cardiac fibrosis in EAM; (2) cardiac fibroblast/myofibroblasts could secrete HMGB1 as another source of high-level HMGB1 in EAM; and (3) HMGB1 blockade could effectively prevent cardiac fibrosis at the last stage of EAM. Our results clearly demonstrated that HMGB1 could directly lead to cardiac collagen deposition, which was associated with PKCβ/Erk1/2 signalling pathway; furthermore, cardiac fibroblast/myofibroblasts could actively secrete HMGB1 under external stress; and HMGB1 secreted by cardiac fibroblasts/myofibroblasts led to cardiac fibrosis via PKCβ activation by autocrine means; HMGB1 blockade could efficiently ameliorate cardiac fibrosis in EAM mice. PMID:24912759

  1. Hyperoxia Induces Inflammation and Cytotoxicity in Human Adult Cardiac Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Christina; Wu, Jing; Tiboldi, Akos; Hess, Moritz; Mitulovic, Goran; Kaun, Christoph; Krychtiuk, Konstantin Alexander; Wojta, Johann; Ullrich, Roman; Tretter, Eva Verena; Markstaller, Klaus; Klein, Klaus Ulrich

    2017-04-01

    Supplemental oxygen (O2) is used as adjunct therapy in anesthesia, emergency, and intensive care medicine. We hypothesized that excessive O2 levels (hyperoxia) can directly injure human adult cardiac myocytes (HACMs). HACMs obtained from the explanted hearts of transplantation patients were exposed to constant hyperoxia (95% O2), intermittent hyperoxia (alternating 10 min exposures to 5% and 95% O2), constant normoxia (21% O2), or constant mild hypoxia (5% O2) using a bioreactor. Changes in cell morphology, viability as assessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and trypan blue (TB) staining, and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), and various pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin, IL; chemokine C-X-C motif ligand, CXC; granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, G-CSF; intercellular adhesion molecule, ICAM; chemokine C-C motif ligand, CCL) were compared among treatment groups at baseline (0 h) and after 8, 24, and 72 h of treatment. Changes in HACM protein expression were determined by quantitative proteomic analysis after 48 h of exposure. Compared with constant normoxia and mild hypoxia, constant hyperoxia resulted in a higher TB-positive cell count, greater release of LDH, and elevated secretion of VEGF, MIF, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, CXCL-1, CXCL-10, G-CSF, ICAM-1, CCL-3, and CCL-5. Cellular inflammation and cytotoxicity gradually increased and was highest after 72 h of constant and intermittent hyperoxia. Quantitative proteomic analysis revealed that hypoxic and hyperoxic O2 exposure differently altered the expression levels of proteins involved in cell-cycle regulation, energy metabolism, and cell signaling. In conclusion, constant and intermittent hyperoxia induced inflammation and cytotoxicity in HACMs. Cell injury occurred earliest and was greatest after constant hyperoxia, but even relatively brief repeating hyperoxic episodes induced a substantial inflammatory response.

  2. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database: The Driving Force for Improvement in Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Winkley Shroyer, Annie Laurie; Bakaeen, Faisal; Shahian, David M; Carr, Brendan M; Prager, Richard L; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Ferraris, Victor; Edwards, Fred; Grover, Frederick L

    2015-01-01

    Initiated in 1989, the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) Adult Cardiac Surgery Database (ACSD) includes more than 1085 participating centers, representing 90%-95% of current US-based adult cardiac surgery hospitals. Since its inception, the primary goal of the STS ACSD has been to use clinical data to track and improve cardiac surgical outcomes. Patients' preoperative risk characteristics, procedure-related processes of care, and clinical outcomes data have been captured and analyzed, with timely risk-adjusted feedback reports to participating providers. In 2006, STS initiated an external audit process to evaluate STS ACSD completeness and accuracy. Given the extremely high inter-rater reliability and completeness rates of STS ACSD, it is widely regarded as the "gold standard" for benchmarking cardiac surgery risk-adjusted outcomes. Over time, STS ACSD has expanded its quality horizons beyond the traditional focus on isolated, risk-adjusted short-term outcomes such as perioperative morbidity and mortality. New quality indicators have evolved including composite measures of key processes of care and outcomes (risk-adjusted morbidity and risk-adjusted mortality), longer-term outcomes, and readmissions. Resource use and patient-reported outcomes would be added in the future. These additional metrics provide a more comprehensive perspective on quality as well as additional end points. Widespread acceptance and use of STS ACSD has led to a cultural transformation within cardiac surgery by providing nationally benchmarked data for internal quality assessment, aiding data-driven quality improvement activities, serving as the basis for a voluntary public reporting program, advancing cardiac surgery care through STS ACSD-based research, and facilitating data-driven informed consent dialogues and alternative treatment-related discussions.

  3. Molecular basis and functional significance of Angiotensin II-induced increase in Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 gene expression in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    George, Mereena; Vijayakumar, Anupama; Dhanesh, Sivadasan Bindu; James, Jackson; Shivakumar, K

    2016-01-01

    Delineation of mechanisms underlying the regulation of fibrosis-related genes in the heart is an important clinical goal as cardiac fibrosis is a major cause of myocardial dysfunction. This study probed the regulation of Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2) gene expression and the regulatory links between Angiotensin II, DDR2 and collagen in Angiotensin II-stimulated cardiac fibroblasts. Real-time PCR and western blot analyses showed that Angiotensin II enhances DDR2 mRNA and protein expression in rat cardiac fibroblasts via NADPH oxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species induction. NF-κB activation, demonstrated by gel shift assay, abolition of DDR2 expression upon NF-κB inhibition, and luciferase and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed transcriptional control of DDR2 by NF-κB in Angiotensin II-treated cells. Inhibitors of Phospholipase C and Protein kinase C prevented Angiotensin II-dependent p38 MAPK phosphorylation that in turn blocked NF-κB activation. Angiotensin II also enhanced collagen gene expression. Importantly, the stimulatory effects of Angiotensin II on DDR2 and collagen were inter-dependent as siRNA-mediated silencing of one abolished the other. Angiotensin II promoted ERK1/2 phosphorylation whose inhibition attenuated Angiotensin II-stimulation of collagen but not DDR2. Furthermore, DDR2 knockdown prevented Angiotensin II-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation, indicating that DDR2-dependent ERK1/2 activation enhances collagen expression in cells exposed to Angiotensin II. DDR2 knockdown was also associated with compromised wound healing response to Angiotensin II. To conclude, Angiotensin II promotes NF-κB activation that up-regulates DDR2 transcription. A reciprocal regulatory relationship between DDR2 and collagen, involving cross-talk between the GPCR and RTK pathways, is central to Angiotensin II-induced increase in collagen expression in cardiac fibroblasts.

  4. Older Adults in Cardiac Rehabilitation: A New Strategy for Enhancing Physical Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rejeski, W. Jack; Foy, Capri Gabrielle; Brawley, Lawrence R.; Brubaker, Peter H.; Focht, Brian C.; Norris, James L., III; Smith, Marci L.

    2002-01-01

    Contrasted the effect of a group-mediated cognitive- behavioral intervention (GMCB) versus traditional cardiac rehabilitation (CRP) upon changes in objective and self-reported physical function of older adults after 3 months of exercise therapy. Both groups improved significantly. Adults with lower function at the outset of the intervention…

  5. Research Resource: Comprehensive Expression Atlas of the Fibroblast Growth Factor System in Adult Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Fon Tacer, Klementina; Bookout, Angie L.; Ding, Xunshan; Kurosu, Hiroshi; John, George B.; Wang, Lei; Goetz, Regina; Mohammadi, Moosa; Kuro-o, Makoto; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Kliewer, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    Although members of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family and their receptors have well-established roles in embryogenesis, their contributions to adult physiology remain relatively unexplored. Here, we use real-time quantitative PCR to determine the mRNA expression patterns of all 22 FGFs, the seven principal FGF receptors (FGFRs), and the three members of the Klotho family of coreceptors in 39 different mouse tissues. Unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis of the mRNA expression data reveals that most FGFs and FGFRs fall into two groups the expression of which is enriched in either the central nervous system or reproductive and gastrointestinal tissues. Interestingly, the FGFs that can act as endocrine hormones, including FGF15/19, FGF21, and FGF23, cluster in a third group that does not include any FGFRs, underscoring their roles in signaling between tissues. We further show that the most recently identified Klotho family member, Lactase-like, is highly and selectively expressed in brown adipose tissue and eye and can function as an additional coreceptor for FGF19. This FGF atlas provides an important resource for guiding future studies to elucidate the physiological functions of FGFs in adult animals. PMID:20667984

  6. Optimizing Survival Outcomes For Adult Patients With Nontraumatic Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Jung, Julianna

    2016-10-01

    Patient survival after cardiac arrest can be improved significantly with prompt and effective resuscitative care. This systematic review analyzes the basic life support factors that improve survival outcome, including chest compression technique and rapid defibrillation of shockable rhythms. For patients who are successfully resuscitated, comprehensive postresuscitation care is essential. Targeted temperature management is recommended for all patients who remain comatose, in addition to careful monitoring of oxygenation, hemodynamics, and cardiac rhythm. Management of cardiac arrest in circumstances such as pregnancy, pulmonary embolism, opioid overdose and other toxicologic causes, hypothermia, and coronary ischemia are also reviewed.

  7. OPLA scaffold, collagen I, and horse serum induce an higher degree of myogenic differentiation of adult rat cardiac stem cells.

    PubMed

    Di Felice, Valentina; Ardizzone, Nella Maria; De Luca, Angela; Marcianò, Vito; Marino Gammazza, Antonella; Macaluso, Filippo; Manente, Lucrezia; Cappello, Francesco; De Luca, Antonio; Zummo, Giovanni

    2009-12-01

    In the last few years, a major goal of cardiac research has been to drive stem cell differentiation to replace damaged myocardium. Several research groups have attempted to differentiate potential cardiac stem cells (CSCs) using bi- or three-dimensional systems supplemented with growth factors or molecules acting as differentiating substances. We hypothesize that these systems failed to induce a complete differentiation because they lacked an architectural space. In the present study, we isolated a pool of small proliferating and fibroblast-like cells from adult rat myocardium. The phenotype of these cells was assessed and the characterized cells were cultured in a collagen I/OPLA scaffold with horse serum to obtain fine myocardial differentiation. C-Kit(POS)/Sca-1(POS) CSCs fully differentiated in vitro when an environment more similar to the CSC niche was created. These experiments demonstrated an important model for the study of the biology of CSCs and the biochemical pathways that lead to myocardial differentiation. The results pave the way for a new surgical approach.

  8. Angiotensin II induces phosphatidic acid formation in neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts: evaluation of the roles of phospholipases C and D.

    PubMed

    Booz, G W; Taher, M M; Baker, K M; Singer, H A

    1994-12-21

    Phosphatidic acid has been proposed to contribute to the mitogenic actions of various growth factors. In 32P-labeled neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts, 100 nM [Sar1]angiotensin II was shown to rapidly induce formation of 32P-phosphatidic acid. Levels peaked at 5 min (1.5-fold above control), but were partially sustained over 2 h. Phospholipase D contributed in part to phosphatidic acid formation, as 32P- or 3H-phosphatidylethanol was produced when cells labeled with [32P]H3PO4 or 1-O-[1,2- 3H]hexadecyl-2-lyso-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine were stimulated in the presence of 1% ethanol. [Sar1]angiotensin II-induced phospholipase D activity was transient and mainly mediated through protein kinase C (PKC), since PKC downregulation reduced phosphatidylethanol formation by 68%. Residual activity may have been due to increased intracellular Ca2+, as ionomycin also activated phospholipase D in PKC-depleted cells. Phospholipase D did not fully account for [Sar1]angiotensin II-induced phosphatidic acid: 1) compared to PMA, a potent activator of phospholipase D, [Sar1]angiotensin II produced more phosphatidic acid relative to phosphatidylethanol, and 2) PKC downregulation did not affect [Sar1]angiotensin II-induced phosphatidic acid formation. The diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor R59949 depressed [Sar1]angiotensin II-induced phosphatidic acid formation by only 21%, indicating that activation of a phospholipase C and diacylglycerol kinase also can not account for the bulk of phosphatidic acid. Thus, additional pathways not involving phospholipases C and D, such as de novo synthesis, may contribute to [Sar1]angiotensin II-induced phosphatidic acid in these cells. Finally, as previously shown for [Sar1]angiotensin II, phosphatidic acid stimulated mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Plasmid-Based Generation of Induced Neural Stem Cells from Adult Human Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Capetian, Philipp; Azmitia, Luis; Pauly, Martje G.; Krajka, Victor; Stengel, Felix; Bernhardi, Eva-Maria; Klett, Mariana; Meier, Britta; Seibler, Philip; Stanslowsky, Nancy; Moser, Andreas; Knopp, Andreas; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Nikkhah, Guido; Wegner, Florian; Döbrössy, Máté; Klein, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Direct reprogramming from somatic to neural cell types has become an alternative to induced pluripotent stem cells. Most protocols employ viral expression systems, posing the risk of random genomic integration. Recent developments led to plasmid-based protocols, lowering this risk. However, these protocols either relied on continuous presence of a variety of small molecules or were only able to reprogram murine cells. We therefore established a reprogramming protocol based on vectors containing the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-derived oriP/EBNA1 as well as the defined expression factors Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, L-myc, Lin28, and a small hairpin directed against p53. We employed a defined neural medium in combination with the neurotrophins bFGF, EGF and FGF4 for cultivation without the addition of small molecules. After reprogramming, cells demonstrated a temporary increase in the expression of endogenous Oct3/4. We obtained induced neural stem cells (iNSC) 30 days after transfection. In contrast to previous results, plasmid vectors as well as a residual expression of reprogramming factors remained detectable in all cell lines. Cells showed a robust differentiation into neuronal (72%) and glial cells (9% astrocytes, 6% oligodendrocytes). Despite the temporary increase of pluripotency-associated Oct3/4 expression during reprogramming, we did not detect pluripotent stem cells or non-neural cells in culture (except occasional residual fibroblasts). Neurons showed electrical activity and functional glutamatergic synapses. Our results demonstrate that reprogramming adult human fibroblasts to iNSC by plasmid vectors and basic neural medium without small molecules is possible and feasible. However, a full set of pluripotency-associated transcription factors may indeed result in the acquisition of a transient (at least partial) pluripotent intermediate during reprogramming. In contrast to previous reports, the EBV-based plasmid system remained present and active inside the cells at

  10. Provision of Transition Education and Referral Patterns from Pediatric Cardiology to Adult Cardiac Care.

    PubMed

    Harbison, Anna L; Grady, Stafford; Chi, Kevin; Fernandes, Susan M

    2016-02-01

    ACC/AHA guidelines recommend a structured preparation for and transfer to adult-oriented cardiac care for adult survivors of pediatric onset heart disease (POHD). Given this, we sought to describe the transition and transfer practices for a cohort of young adults with POHD and to determine factors associated with successful transfer to adult-oriented cardiac care. We performed a single-center, retrospective chart review on patients ≥18 years of age, with POHD likely to require lifelong cardiac care, who were seen in outpatient pediatric cardiology (PC) between 2008 and 2011. Successful transfer was defined as the subsequent attendance at adult cardiology (AC) within 2 years of PC visit. We identified 118 patients who met study criteria. Mean age 22.4 ± 2.0 years, 59 % male, 64 % white and 40 % Hispanic. Mean transition education topics noted was 3.3 ± 1.8 out of 20 and covered the underlying cardiac disease (89 %), follow-up and current medications (56 %) and exercise limitations (34 %). Recommendations for follow-up were AC (57 %) and PC (33 %). Of those told to transfer to AC, 79 % successfully transferred. Characteristics of successful transfer included: prior cardiac surgery (p = 0.008), cardiac medication use (p = 0.006) and frequency of follow-up ≤1 year (p = 0.037). One-quarter of all subjects did not follow-up within at least 2 years. Despite published guidelines, transition education appears lacking and the approach to transfer to adult cardiac care is not consistent. Given the increased risk of morbidity and mortality in this patient population, standardization of transition education and transfer processes appear warranted.

  11. Murine Dermal Fibroblast Isolation by FACS.

    PubMed

    Walmsley, Graham G; Maan, Zeshaan N; Hu, Michael S; Atashroo, David A; Whittam, Alexander J; Duscher, Dominik; Tevlin, Ruth; Marecic, Owen; Lorenz, H Peter; Gurtner, Geoffrey C; Longaker, Michael T

    2016-01-07

    Fibroblasts are the principle cell type responsible for secreting extracellular matrix and are a critical component of many organs and tissues. Fibroblast physiology and pathology underlie a spectrum of clinical entities, including fibroses in multiple organs, hypertrophic scarring following burns, loss of cardiac function following ischemia, and the formation of cancer stroma. However, fibroblasts remain a poorly characterized type of cell, largely due to their inherent heterogeneity. Existing methods for the isolation of fibroblasts require time in cell culture that profoundly influences cell phenotype and behavior. Consequently, many studies investigating fibroblast biology rely upon in vitro manipulation and do not accurately capture fibroblast behavior in vivo. To overcome this problem, we developed a FACS-based protocol for the isolation of fibroblasts from the dorsal skin of adult mice that does not require cell culture, thereby preserving the physiologic transcriptional and proteomic profile of each cell. Our strategy allows for exclusion of non-mesenchymal lineages via a lineage negative gate (Lin(-)) rather than a positive selection strategy to avoid pre-selection or enrichment of a subpopulation of fibroblasts expressing specific surface markers and be as inclusive as possible across this heterogeneous cell type.

  12. Therapeutic application of inhaled nitric oxide in adult cardiac surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Makker, Robina; Mehta, Yatin; Trehan, Naresh; Bapna, Rk

    2006-01-01

    Increased pulmonary vascular resistance can be detrimental to the cardiac output in post-operative cardiac surgical patients. Pulmonary vasodilator therapy by systemic pharmacologic agents is non-selective. Inhaled nitric oxide is a selective pulmonary vasodilator and does not cause systemic hypotension. In this prospective study, 14 adult post-operative cardiac surgical patients with pulmonary hypertension underwent inhaled nitric oxide therapy and their hemodynamic changes were evaluated. Inhaled nitric oxide was administered in doses of 5 ppm-25 ppm. The result was a decrease in pulmonary vascular resistance from 456.57 +/- 137.13 to 357.64 +/- 119.80 dynes-sec- Continued. - See Free Full Text.

  13. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database: 2017 Update on Outcomes and Quality.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, Richard S; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Badhwar, Vinay; Paone, Gaetano; Rankin, J Scott; Han, Jane M; McDonald, Donna; Edwards, Fred H; Shahian, David M

    2017-01-01

    Established in 1989, The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database is one of the most comprehensive clinical data registries in health care. It is widely regarded as the gold standard for benchmarking risk-adjusted outcomes in cardiac surgery and is the foundation for all quality measurement and improvement activities of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. This is the second in a series of annual reports that summarizes current aggregate national outcomes in cardiac surgery and reviews database-related activities in the areas of quality measurement and performance improvement during the past year.

  14. The protective effect of ursodeoxycholic acid in an in vitro model of the human fetal heart occurs via targeting cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Francisca; Hasan, Alveera; Alvarez-Laviada, Anita; Miragoli, Michele; Bhogal, Navneet; Wells, Sarah; Poulet, Claire; Chambers, Jenny; Williamson, Catherine; Gorelik, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids are elevated in the blood of women with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) and this may lead to fetal arrhythmia, fetal hypoxia and potentially fetal death in utero. The bile acid taurocholic acid (TC) causes abnormal calcium dynamics and contraction in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a drug clinically used to treat ICP, prevents adverse effects of TC. During development, the fetus is in a state of relative hypoxia. Although this is essential for the development of the heart and vasculature, resident fibroblasts can transiently differentiate into myofibroblasts and form gap junctions with cardiomyocytes in vitro, resulting in cardiomyocyte depolarization. We expanded on previously published work using an in vitro hypoxia model to investigate the differentiation of human fetal fibroblasts into myofibroblasts. Recent evidence shows that potassium channels are involved in maintaining the membrane potential of ventricular fibroblasts and that ATP-dependent potassium (KATP) channel subunits are expressed in cultured fibroblasts. KATP channels are a valuable target as they are thought to have a cardioprotective role during ischaemic and hypoxic conditions. We investigated whether UDCA could modulate fibroblast membrane potential. We established the isolation and culture of human fetal cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts to investigate the effect of hypoxia, TC and UDCA on human fetal cardiac cells. UDCA hyperpolarized myofibroblasts and prevented TC-induced depolarisation, possibly through the activation of KATP channels that are expressed in cultured fibroblasts. Also, similar to the rat model, UDCA can counteract TC-induced calcium abnormalities in human fetal cultures of cardiomyocytes and myofibroblasts. Under normoxic conditions, we found a higher number of myofibroblasts in cultures derived from human fetal hearts compared to cells isolated from neonatal rat hearts, indicating a possible increased number of myofibroblasts

  15. Increased fibroblast chymase production mediates procollagen autophagic digestion in volume overload

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Lianwu; Wei, Chih-Chang; Powell, Pamela C.; Bradley, Wayne E.; Ahmad, Sarfaraz; Ferrario, Carlos M.; Collawn, James F.; Dell’Italia, Louis J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous work has identified mast cells as the major source of chymase largely associated with a profibrotic phenotype. We recently reported increased fibroblast autophagic procollagen degradation in a rat model of pure volume overload (VO). Here we demonstrate a connection between increased fibroblast chymase production and autophagic digestion of procollagen in the pure VO of aortocaval fistula (ACF) in the rat. Methods and results Isolated LV fibroblasts taken from 4 and 12 week ACF Sprague–Dawley rats have significant increases in chymase mRNA and chymase activity. Increased intracellular chymase protein is documented by immunocytochemistry in the ACF fibroblasts compared to cells obtained from age-matched sham rats. To implicate VO as a stimulus for chymase production, we show that isolated adult rat LV fibroblasts subjected to 24 h of 20% cyclical stretch induces chymase mRNA and protein production. Exogenous chymase treatment of control isolated adult cardiac fibroblasts demonstrates that chymase is internalized through a dynamin-dependent mechanism. Chymase treatment leads to an increased formation of autophagic vacuoles, LC3-II production, autophagic flux, resulting in increased procollagen degradation. Chymase inhibitor treatment reduces cyclical stretch-induced autophagy in isolated cardiac fibroblasts, demonstrating chymase’s role in autophagy induction. Conclusion In a pure VO model, chymase produced in adult cardiac fibroblasts leads to autophagic degradation of newly synthesized intracellular procollagen I, suggesting a new role of chymase in extracellular matrix degradation. PMID:26807691

  16. The Role of Cardiac Side Population Cells in Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yellamilli, Amritha; van Berlo, Jop H.

    2016-01-01

    The heart has a limited ability to regenerate. It is important to identify therapeutic strategies that enhance cardiac regeneration in order to replace cardiomyocytes lost during the progression of heart failure. Cardiac progenitor cells are interesting targets for new regenerative therapies because they are self-renewing, multipotent cells located in the heart. Cardiac side population cells (cSPCs), the first cardiac progenitor cells identified in the adult heart, have the ability to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts. They become activated in response to cardiac injury and transplantation of cSPCs into the injured heart improves cardiac function. In this review, we will discuss the current literature on the progenitor cell properties and therapeutic potential of cSPCs. This body of work demonstrates the great promise cSPCs hold as targets for new regenerative strategies. PMID:27679798

  17. Development of human cloned blastocysts following somatic cell nuclear transfer with adult fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    French, Andrew J; Adams, Catharine A; Anderson, Linda S; Kitchen, John R; Hughes, Marcus R; Wood, Samuel H

    2008-02-01

    Nuclear transfer stem cells hold considerable promise in the field of regenerative medicine and cell-based drug discovery. In this study, a total of 29 oocytes were obtained from three young (20-24 years old) reproductive egg donors who had been successful in previous cycles. These oocytes, deemed by intended parents to be in excess of their reproductive needs, were donated for research without financial compensation by both the egg donor and intended parents after receiving informed consent. All intended parents successfully achieved ongoing pregnancies with the oocytes retained for reproductive purposes. Mature oocytes, obtained within 2 hours following transvaginal aspiration, were enucleated using one of two methods, extrusion or aspiration, after 45 minutes of incubation in cytochalasin B. Rates of oocyte lysis or degeneration did not differ between the two methods. Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos were constructed using two established adult male fibroblast lines of normal karyotype. High rates of pronuclear formation (66%), early cleavage (47%), and blastocyst (23%) development were observed following incubation in standard in vitro fertilization culture media. One cloned blastocyst was confirmed by DNA and mitochondrial DNA fingerprinting analyses, and DNA fingerprinting of two other cloned blastocysts indicated that they were also generated by SCNT. Blastocysts were also obtained from a limited number of parthenogenetically activated oocytes. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that SCNT can produce human blastocyst-stage embryos using nuclei obtained from differentiated adult cells and provides new information on methods that may be needed for a higher level of efficiency for human nuclear transfer.

  18. Early life exposure to air pollution induces adult cardiac dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gorr, Matthew W.; Velten, Markus; Nelin, Timothy D.; Youtz, Dane J.; Sun, Qinghua

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to ambient air pollution contributes to the progression of cardiovascular disease, particularly in susceptible populations. The objective of the present study was to determine whether early life exposure to air pollution causes persistent cardiovascular consequences measured at adulthood. Pregnant FVB mice were exposed to filtered (FA) or concentrated ambient particulate matter (PM2.5) during gestation and nursing. Mice were exposed to PM2.5 at an average concentration of 51.69 μg/m3 from the Columbus, OH region for 6 h/day, 7 days/wk in utero until weaning at 3 wk of age. Birth weight was reduced in PM2.5 pups compared with FA (1.36 ± 0.12 g FA, n = 42 mice; 1.30 ± 0.15 g PM2.5, n = 67 P = 0.012). At adulthood, mice exposed to perinatal PM2.5 had reduced left ventricular fractional shortening compared with FA-exposed mice (43.6 ± 2.1% FA, 33.2 ± 1.6% PM2.5, P = 0.001) with greater left ventricular end systolic diameter. Pressure-volume loops showed reduced ejection fraction (79.1 ± 3.5% FA, 35.5 ± 9.5% PM2.5, P = 0.005), increased end-systolic volume (10.4 ± 2.5 μl FA, 39.5 ± 3.8 μl PM2.5, P = 0.001), and reduced dP/dt maximum (11,605 ± 200 μl/s FA, 9,569 ± 800 μl/s PM2.5, P = 0.05) and minimum (−9,203 ± 235 μl/s FA, −7,045 ± 189 μl/s PM2.5, P = 0.0005) in PM2.5-exposed mice. Isolated cardiomyocytes from the hearts of PM2.5-exposed mice had reduced peak shortening (%PS, 8.53 ± 2.82% FA, 6.82 ± 2.04% PM2.5, P = 0.003), slower calcium reuptake (τ, 0.22 ± 0.09 s FA, 0.26 ± 0.07 s PM2.5, P = 0.048), and reduced response to β-adrenergic stimulation compared with cardiomyocytes isolated from mice that were exposed to FA. Histological analyses revealed greater picro-sirius red-positive-stained areas in the PM2.5 vs. FA group, indicative of increased collagen deposition. We concluded that these data demonstrate the detrimental role of early life exposure to ambient particulate air pollution in programming of adult cardiovascular

  19. Cardiac-Specific Disruption of GH Receptor Alters Glucose Homeostasis While Maintaining Normal Cardiac Performance in Adult Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Jara, Adam; Liu, Xingbo; Sim, Don; Benner, Chance M; Duran-Ortiz, Silvana; Qian, Yanrong; List, Edward O; Berryman, Darlene E; Kim, Jason K; Kopchick, John J

    2016-05-01

    GH is considered necessary for the proper development and maintenance of several tissues, including the heart. Studies conducted in both GH receptor null and bovine GH transgenic mice have demonstrated specific cardiac structural and functional changes. In each of these mouse lines, however, GH-induced signaling is altered systemically, being decreased in GH receptor null mice and increased in bovine GH transgenic mice. Therefore, to clarify the direct effects GH has on cardiac tissue, we developed a tamoxifen-inducible, cardiac-specific GHR disrupted (iC-GHRKO) mouse line. Cardiac GH receptor was disrupted in 4-month-old iC-GHRKO mice to avoid developmental effects due to perinatal GHR gene disruption. Surprisingly, iC-GHRKO mice showed no difference vs controls in baseline or postdobutamine stress test echocardiography measurements, nor did iC-GHRKO mice show differences in longitudinal systolic blood pressure measurements. Interestingly, iC-GHRKO mice had decreased fat mass and improved insulin sensitivity at 6.5 months of age. By 12.5 months of age, however, iC-GHRKO mice no longer had significant decreases in fat mass and had developed glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Furthermore, investigation via immunoblot analysis demonstrated that iC-GHRKO mice had appreciably decreased insulin stimulated Akt phosphorylation, specifically in heart and liver, but not in epididymal white adipose tissue. These changes were accompanied by a decrease in circulating IGF-1 levels in 12.5-month-old iC-GHRKO mice. These data indicate that whereas the disruption of cardiomyocyte GH-induced signaling in adult mice does not affect cardiac function, it does play a role in systemic glucose homeostasis, in part through modulation of circulating IGF-1.

  20. Simultaneous orientation and cellular force measurements in adult cardiac myocytes using three-dimensional polymeric microstructures.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi; Lim, Chee Chew; Sawyer, Douglas Brian; Liao, Ronglih; Zhang, Xin

    2007-09-01

    A number of techniques have been developed to monitor contractile function in isolated cardiac myocytes. While invaluable observations have been gained from these methodologies in understanding the contractile processes of the heart, they are invariably limited by their in vitro conditions. The present challenge is to develop innovative assays to mimic the in vivo milieu so as to allow a more physiological assessment of cardiac myocyte contractile forces. Here we demonstrate the use of a silicone elastomer, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), to simultaneously orient adult cardiac myocytes in primary culture and measure the cellular forces in a three-dimensional substrate. The realignment of adult cardiac myocytes in long-term culture (7 days) was achieved due to directional reassembly of the myofibrils along the parallel polymeric sidewalls. The cellular mechanical forces were recorded in situ by observing the deformation of the micropillars embedded in the substrate. By coupling the cellular mechanical force measurements with on-chip cell orientation, this novel assay is expected to provide a means of a more physiological assessment of single cardiac myocyte contractile function and may facilitate the future development of in vitro assembled functional cardiac tissue.

  1. CircRNA_000203 enhances the expression of fibrosis-associated genes by derepressing targets of miR-26b-5p, Col1a2 and CTGF, in cardiac fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chun-Mei; Zhang, Ming; Huang, Lei; Hu, Zhi-qin; Zhu, Jie-Ning; Xiao, Zhen; Zhang, Zhuo; Lin, Qiu-xiong; Zheng, Xi-Long; -Yang, Min; Wu, Shu-Lin; Cheng, Jian-Ding; Shan, Zhi-Xin

    2017-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) participate in regulating gene expression in diverse biological and pathological processes. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanism underlying the modulation of circRNA_000203 on expressions of fibrosis-associated genes in cardiac fibroblasts. CircRNA_000203 was shown upregulated in the diabetic mouse myocardium and in Ang-II-induced mouse cardiac fibroblasts. Enforced-expression of circRNA_000203 could increase expressions of Col1a2, Col3a1 and α-SMA in mouse cardiac fibroblasts. RNA pull-down and RT-qPCR assay indicated that circRNA_000203 could specifically sponge miR-26b-5p. Dual luciferase reporter assay revealed that miR-26b-5p interacted with 3′UTRs of Col1a2 and CTGF, and circ_000203 could block the interactions of miR-26b-5p and 3′UTRs of Col1a2 and CTGF. Transfection of miR-26b-5p could post-transcriptionaly inhibit expressions of Col1a2 and CTGF, accompanied with the suppressions of Col3a1 and α-SMA in cardiac fibroblasts. Additionally, over-expression of circRNA_000203 could eliminate the anti-fibrosis effect of miR-26b-5p in cardiac fibroblasts. Together, our results reveal that suppressing the function of miR-26b-5p contributes to the pro-fibrosis effect of circRNA_000203 in cardiac fibroblasts. PMID:28079129

  2. Inhibitory effects of C-type natriuretic peptide on the differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts, and secretion of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1

    PubMed Central

    LI, ZHI-QIANG; LIU, YING-LONG; LI, GANG; LI, BIN; LIU, YANG; LI, XIAO-FENG; LIU, AI-JUN

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) on the function of cardiac fibroblasts (CFs). Western blotting was used to investigate the expression of myofibroblast marker proteins: α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), extra domain-A fibronectin, collagen I and collagen III, and the activity of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). Immunofluorescence was used to examine the morphological changes; a transwell assay was used to analyze migration, and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and ELISA were employed to determine the mRNA expression and protein secretion of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). The results demonstrated that CNP significantly reduced the protein expression of α-SMA, fibronectin, collagen I and collagen III, and suppressed the migratory ability of CFs. Additionally, the mRNA and protein expression of MCP-1 and PAI-1 was inhibited under the CNP treatment; and this effect was mediated by the inhibition of the ERK1/2 activity. In conclusion, CNP inhibited cardiac fibroblast differentiation and migration, and reduced the secretion of MCP-1 and PAI-1, which demonstrates novel mechanisms to explain the antifibrotic effect of CNP. PMID:25352084

  3. Cardiac Autonomic Function during Submaximal Treadmill Exercise in Adults with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendonca, Goncalo V.; Pereira, Fernando D.; Fernhall, Bo

    2011-01-01

    This study determined whether the cardiac autonomic function of adults with Down syndrome (DS) differs from that of nondisabled persons during submaximal dynamic exercise. Thirteen participants with DS and 12 nondisabled individuals performed maximal and submaximal treadmill tests with metabolic and heart rate (HR) measurements. Spectral analysis…

  4. From ontogenesis to regeneration: learning how to instruct adult cardiac progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chimenti, Isotta; Forte, Elvira; Angelini, Francesco; Giacomello, Alessandro; Messina, Elisa

    2012-01-01

    Since the first observations over two centuries ago by Lazzaro Spallanzani on the extraordinary regenerative capacity of urodeles, many attempts have been made to understand the reasons why such ability has been largely lost in metazoa and whether or how it can be restored, even partially. In this context, important clues can be derived from the systematic analysis of the relevant distinctions among species and of the pathways involved in embryonic development, which might be induced and/or recapitulated in adult tissues. This chapter provides an overview on regeneration and its mechanisms, starting with the lesson learned from lower vertebrates, and will then focus on recent advancements and novel insights concerning regeneration in the adult mammalian heart, including the discovery of resident cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs). Subsequently, it explores all the important pathways involved in regulating differentiation during development and embryogenesis, and that might potentially provide important clues on how to activate and/or modulate regenerative processes in the adult myocardium, including the potential activation of endogenous CPCs. Furthermore the importance of the stem cell niche is discussed, and how it is possible to create in vitro a microenvironment and culture system to provide adult CPCs with the ideal conditions promoting their regenerative ability. Finally, the state of clinical translation of cardiac cell therapy is presented. Overall, this chapter provides a new perspective on how to approach cardiac regeneration, taking advantage of important lessons from development and optimizing biotechnological tools to obtain the ideal conditions for cell-based cardiac regenerative therapy.

  5. Pharmacological enhancement of beta-hexosaminidase activity in fibroblasts from adult Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff Patients.

    PubMed

    Tropak, Michael B; Reid, Stephen P; Guiral, Marianne; Withers, Stephen G; Mahuran, Don

    2004-04-02

    Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases are lysosomal storage disorders that result from an inherited deficiency of beta-hexosaminidase A (alphabeta). Whereas the acute forms are associated with a total absence of hexosaminidase A and early death, the chronic adult forms exist with activity and protein levels of approximately 5%, and unaffected individuals have been found with only 10% of normal levels. Surprisingly, almost all disease-associated missense mutations do not affect the active site of the enzyme but, rather, inhibit its ability to obtain and/or retain its native fold in the endoplasmic reticulum, resulting in its retention and accelerated degradation. By growing adult Tay-Sachs fibroblasts in culture medium containing known inhibitors of hexosaminidase we have raised the residual protein and activity levels of intralysosomal hexosaminidase A well above the critical 10% of normal levels. A similar effect was observed in fibroblasts from an adult Sandhoff patient. We propose that these hexosaminidase inhibitors function as pharmacological chaperones, enhancing the stability of the native conformation of the enzyme, increasing the amount of hexosaminidase A capable of exiting the endoplasmic reticulum for transport to the lysosome. Therefore, pharmacological chaperones could provide a novel approach to the treatment of adult Tay-Sachs and possibly Sandhoff diseases.

  6. Pharmacological Enhancement of β-Hexosaminidase Activity in Fibroblasts from Adult Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff Patients*

    PubMed Central

    Tropak, Michael B.; Reid, Stephen P.; Guiral, Marianne; Withers, Stephen G.; Mahuran, Don

    2010-01-01

    Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases are lysosomal storage disorders that result from an inherited deficiency of β-hexosaminidase A (αβ). Whereas the acute forms are associated with a total absence of hexosaminidase A and early death, the chronic adult forms exist with activity and protein levels of ~5%, and unaffected individuals have been found with only 10% of normal levels. Surprisingly, almost all disease-associated missense mutations do not affect the active site of the enzyme but, rather, inhibit its ability to obtain and/or retain its native fold in the endoplasmic reticulum, resulting in its retention and accelerated degradation. By growing adult Tay-Sachs fibroblasts in culture medium containing known inhibitors of hexosaminidase we have raised the residual protein and activity levels of intralysosomal hexosaminidase A well above the critical 10% of normal levels. A similar effect was observed in fibroblasts from an adult Sandhoff patient. We propose that these hexosaminidase inhibitors function as pharmacological chaperones, enhancing the stability of the native conformation of the enzyme, increasing the amount of hexosaminidase A capable of exiting the endoplasmic reticulum for transport to the lysosome. Therefore, pharmacological chaperones could provide a novel approach to the treatment of adult Tay-Sachs and possibly Sandhoff diseases. PMID:14724290

  7. Perioperative Hemoglobin Trajectory in Adult Cardiac Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Scott, David A.; Tung, Hon-Ming Andrew; Slater, Reuben

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Preoperative anemia and nadir hemoglobin (Hb) during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) have been identified as significant risk factors for blood transfusion during cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was to confirm the association between preoperative anemia, perioperative fluid management, and blood transfusion. In addition, the proportion of elective cardiac surgery patients presenting for surgery with anemia was identified to examine whether the opportunity exists for timely diagnosis and intervention. Data from referral until hospital discharge were comprehensively reviewed over a 12-month period for all nonemergency cardiac surgical patients operated on in our institution. Of the 342 patients identified, elective cases were referred a median of 35 days before preoperative clinic and operated on a median of 14 days subsequently. Subacute cases had a median of 3 days from referral to surgery. As per the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for anemia, 24.2% of elective and 29.6% of subacute patients were anemic. Blood transfusion was administered to 46.2% of patients during their admission. Transfusion was more likely in patients who were female (odds ratio [OR]: 2.45, 95%confidence interval [CI]: 1.28–4.70), had a low body mass index (BMI) (OR: .89, 95% CI: .84–.94), preoperative anemia (OR: 5.15, 95% CI: 2.59–10.24), or renal impairment (OR: 5.44, 95% CI: 2.42–12.22). Hemodilution minimization strategies reduced the Hb fall during CPB, but not transfusion rates. This study identifies a high prevalence of preoperative anemia with sufficient time for elective referrals to undergo appropriate diagnosis and interventions. It also confirms that low red cell mass (anemia and low BMI) and renal impairment are predictors of perioperative blood transfusion. Perfusion strategies to reduce hemodilution are effective at minimizing the intraoperative fall in Hb concentration but did not influence transfusion rate. PMID:26543251

  8. Developmental origin and lineage plasticity of endogenous cardiac stem cells.

    PubMed

    Santini, Maria Paola; Forte, Elvira; Harvey, Richard P; Kovacic, Jason C

    2016-04-15

    Over the past two decades, several populations of cardiac stem cells have been described in the adult mammalian heart. For the most part, however, their lineage origins and in vivo functions remain largely unexplored. This Review summarizes what is known about different populations of embryonic and adult cardiac stem cells, including KIT(+), PDGFRα(+), ISL1(+)and SCA1(+)cells, side population cells, cardiospheres and epicardial cells. We discuss their developmental origins and defining characteristics, and consider their possible contribution to heart organogenesis and regeneration. We also summarize the origin and plasticity of cardiac fibroblasts and circulating endothelial progenitor cells, and consider what role these cells have in contributing to cardiac repair.

  9. Reference Values for Cardiac and Aortic Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Healthy, Young Caucasian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Eikendal, Anouk L. M.; Bots, Michiel L.; Haaring, Cees; Saam, Tobias; van der Geest, Rob J.; Westenberg, Jos J. M.; den Ruijter, Hester M.; Hoefer, Imo E.; Leiner, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Background Reference values for morphological and functional parameters of the cardiovascular system in early life are relevant since they may help to identify young adults who fall outside the physiological range of arterial and cardiac ageing. This study provides age and sex specific reference values for aortic wall characteristics, cardiac function parameters and aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) in a population-based sample of healthy, young adults using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods In 131 randomly selected healthy, young adults aged between 25 and 35 years (mean age 31.8 years, 63 men) of the general-population based Atherosclerosis-Monitoring-and-Biomarker-measurements-In-The-YOuNg (AMBITYON) study, descending thoracic aortic dimensions and wall thickness, thoracic aortic PWV and cardiac function parameters were measured using a 3.0T MR-system. Age and sex specific reference values were generated using dedicated software. Differences in reference values between two age groups (25–30 and 30–35 years) and both sexes were tested. Results Aortic diameters and areas were higher in the older age group (all p<0.007). Moreover, aortic dimensions, left ventricular mass, left and right ventricular volumes and cardiac output were lower in women than in men (all p<0.001). For mean and maximum aortic wall thickness, left and right ejection fraction and aortic PWV we did not observe a significant age or sex effect. Conclusion This study provides age and sex specific reference values for cardiovascular MR parameters in healthy, young Caucasian adults. These may aid in MR guided pre-clinical identification of young adults who fall outside the physiological range of arterial and cardiac ageing. PMID:27732640

  10. Contrary microRNA Expression Pattern Between Fetal and Adult Cardiac Remodeling: Therapeutic Value for Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hualin; Li, Yifei; Wang, Chuan; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Cong; Zhou, Kaiyu; Hua, Yimin

    2016-08-10

    microRNAs (miRNAs) belong to a class of non-coding RNAs that regulate post-transcriptional gene expression during development and disease. Growing evidence indicates abundant miRNA expression changes and their important role in cardiac hypertrophy and failure. However, the role of miRNAs in fetal cardiac remodeling is little known. Here, we investigated the altered expression of fifteen miRNAs in rat fetal cardiac remodeling compared with adult cardiac remodeling. Among fifteen tested miRNAs, eleven and five miRNAs (miR-199a-5p, miR-214-3p, miR-155-3p, miR-155-5p and miR-499-5p) are significantly differentially expressed in fetal and adult cardiac remodeling, respectively. After comparison of miRNA expression in fetal and adult cardiac remodeling, we find that miRNA expression returns to the fetal level in adult cardiac failure and is activated in advance of the adult level in fetal failure. The current study highlights the contrary expression pattern between fetal and adult cardiac remodeling and that supports a novel potential therapeutic approach to treating heart failure.

  11. Does Glucagon Improve Survival in a Porcine (Sus Scrofa) of Adult Asphyxial Cardiac Arrest in Addition to Standard Epinephrine Therapy?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-17

    UDIIILI: oa. I..UN I ItA!.. I NUMDI:It Does Glucagon improve survival in a porcine (Sus Scrofa ) of adult asphyxial cardiac arrest in addition to...EXPIRATION DATE: 25 Mar 13 PROTOCOL TITLE: Does Glucagon Improve Survival in a Porcine (Sus scrofa ) Model of Adult Asphyxial Cardiac Arrest in Addition...Additions: Deletions: 2 Protocol No: A-2007-03 Protocol Title: Does Glucagon Improve Survival in a Porcine (Sus scrofa ) Model of Adult Asphyxial

  12. Two Forkhead transcription factors regulate cardiac progenitor specification by controlling the expression of receptors of the fibroblast growth factor and Wnt signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Shaad M.; Bhattacharyya, Pritha; Jeffries, Neal; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S.; Michelson, Alan M.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiogenesis involves the coordinated regulation of multiple biological processes by a finite set of transcription factors (TFs). Here, we show that the Forkhead TFs Checkpoint suppressor homologue (CHES-1-like) and Jumeau (Jumu), which govern cardiac progenitor cell divisions by regulating Polo kinase activity, play an additional, mutually redundant role in specifying the cardiac mesoderm (CM) as eliminating the functions of both Forkhead genes in the same Drosophila embryo results in defective hearts with missing hemisegments. This process is mediated by the Forkhead TFs regulating the fibroblast growth factor receptor Heartless (Htl) and the Wnt receptor Frizzled (Fz): CHES-1-like and jumu exhibit synergistic genetic interactions with htl and fz in CM specification, thereby implying that they function through the same genetic pathways, and transcriptionally activate the expression of both receptor-encoding genes. Furthermore, ectopic overexpression of either htl or fz in the mesoderm partially rescues the defective CM specification phenotype in embryos lacking both Forkhead genes. Together, these data emphasize the functional redundancy that leads to robustness in the cardiac progenitor specification process, and illustrate the pleiotropic functions of Forkhead TFs in different aspects of cardiogenesis. PMID:26657774

  13. Changing nature of cardiac interventions in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, John A; Maurer, Mathew S

    2011-01-01

    Older adults represent a rapidly growing segment of the population in developed countries. Advancing age is the most powerful risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and CVD-related mortality increases markedly in older individuals. Procedures for patients with CVD, including percutaneous coronary intervention, aortic valve replacement and implantable cardioverter defibrillators were all initially validated in younger individuals but are increasingly being applied in older adults who for the most part have been significantly understudied in clinical trials. While advanced age alone is not a contraindication to these procedures, with the advent of less invasive methods to manage CVD including percutaneous techniques to treat both coronary artery disease and valvular heart disease, future research will need to weigh the potential harms of intervention in a population of older adults with multiple medical comorbidities and complex physiologic phenotypes against outcomes that include preventing functional decline and improving quality of life. PMID:21743812

  14. Congenital subclavian arteriovenous malformation causing cardiac failure in an adult.

    PubMed

    Anoop, T M; Sreejith, P; Thomas, Joby K; Gailin, B; Jabbar, P K; Ittycheria, Cherian C; George, Raju

    2009-07-01

    Congenital arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the thoracic region are rarely reported in adults. The authors report an unusual case of a 30-year-old man who presented with a large congenital AVM and heart failure. The diagnosis was made using transthoracic Doppler echocardiography and computed tomography. Embolization followed by surgical resection of the AVM resulted in the prompt relief of heart failure.

  15. MicroRNA-98 inhibits TGF-β1-induced differentiation and collagen production of cardiac fibroblasts by targeting TGFBR1.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ranran; Dang, Ruiying; Zhou, Yan; Ding, Min; Hua, Huikun

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the effects of miR-98 on TGF-β1-induced cardiac fibrosis in human cardiac fibroblasts (HCFs), and to establish the mechanism underlying these effects, HCFs were transfected with miR-98 inhibitor or mimic, and then treated with or without TGF-β1. The level of miR-98 was determined by qRT-PCR in TGF-β1-induced HCFs. Cell differentiation and collagen accumulation of HCFs were detected by qRT-PCR and Western blot assays, respectively. The mRNA and protein expressions of TGFBR1 were determined by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. In this study, the outcomes showed that TGF-β1 could dramatically decrease the level of miR-98 in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Upregulation of miR-98 dramatically improved TGF-β1-induced increases in cell differentiation and collagen accumulation of HCFs. Moreover, bioinformatics analysis predicted that the TGFBR1 was a potential target gene of miR-98. Luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that miR-98 could directly target TGFBR1. Inhibition of TGFBR1 had the similar effect as miR-98 overexpression. Downregulation of TGFBR1 in HCFs transfected with miR-98 inhibitor partially reversed the protective effect of miR-98 overexpression on TGF-β1-induced cardiac fibrosis in HCFs. Upregulation of miR-98 ameliorates TGF-β1-induced differentiation and collagen accumulation of HCFs by downregulation of TGFBR1. These results provide further evidence for protective effect of miR-98 overexpression on TGF-β1-induced cardiac fibrosis.

  16. MicroRNA-9 inhibits high glucose-induced proliferation, differentiation and collagen accumulation of cardiac fibroblasts by down-regulation of TGFBR2

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiaxin; Dai, Yingnan; Su, Zhendong; Wei, Guoqian

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effects of miR-9 on high glucose (HG)-induced cardiac fibrosis in human cardiac fibroblasts (HCFs), and to establish the mechanism underlying these effects. HCFs were transfected with miR-9 inhibitor or mimic, and then treated with normal or HG. Cell viability and proliferation were detected by using the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay and Brdu-ELISA assay. Cell differentiation and collagen accumulation of HCFs were detected by qRT-PCR and Western blot assays respectively. The mRNA and protein expressions of transforming growth factor-β receptor type II (TGFBR2) were determined by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. Up-regulation of miR-9 dramatically improved HG-induced increases in cell proliferation, differentiation and collagen accumulation of HCFs. Moreover, bioinformatics analysis predicted that the TGFBR2 was a potential target gene of miR-9. Luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that miR-9 could directly target TGFBR2. Inhibition of TGFBR2 had the similar effect as miR-9 overexpression. Down-regulation of TGFBR2 in HCFs transfected with miR-9 inhibitor partially reversed the protective effect of miR-9 overexpression on HG-induced cardiac fibrosis in HCFs. Up-regulation of miR-9 ameliorates HG-induced proliferation, differentiation and collagen accumulation of HCFs by down-regulation of TGFBR2. These results provide further evidence for protective effect of miR-9 overexpression on HG-induced cardiac fibrosis. PMID:27756824

  17. Analysis of Fibroblast growth factor 15 cis-elements reveals two conserved enhancers which are closely related to cardiac outflow tract development.

    PubMed

    Saitsu, Hirotomo; Shiota, Kohei; Ishibashi, Makoto

    2006-09-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 15 (Fgf15) is expressed in the developing mouse central nervous system and pharyngeal arches. Fgf15 mutant mice showed defects of the cardiac outflow tract probably because of aberrant behavior of the cardiac neural crest cells. In this study, we examined cis-elements of the Fgf15 gene by transient transgenic analysis using lacZ as a reporter. We identified two enhancers: one directed lacZ expression in the hindbrain/spinal cord and the other in the posterior midbrain (pmb), rhombomere1 (r1) and pharyngeal epithelia. Interestingly, human genomic regions which are highly homologous to these two mouse enhancers showed almost the same enhancer activities as those of mice in transgenic mouse embryos, indicating that the two enhancers are conserved between humans and mice. We also showed that the mouse and human pmb/r1 enhancer can regulate lacZ expression in chick embryos in almost the same way as in mouse embryos. We found that the lacZ expression domain with this enhancer was expanded by ectopic Fgf8b expression, suggesting that this enhancer is regulated by Fgf8 signaling. Moreover, over-expression of Fgf15 resulted in up-regulation of Fgf8 expression in the isthmus/r1. These findings suggest that a reciprocal positive regulation exists between Fgf15 and Fgf8 in the isthmus/r1. Together with cardiac outflow tract defects in Fgf15 mutants, the conservation of enhancers in the hindbrain/spinal cord and pharyngeal epithelia suggests that human FGF19 (ortholog of Fgf15) is involved in early development and the distribution of cardiac neural crest cells and is one of the candidate genes for congenital heart defects.

  18. Modifiable Risk Factors and Major Cardiac Events Among Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Gregory T.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Chen, Yan; Kawashima, Toana; Yasui, Yutaka; Leisenring, Wendy; Stovall, Marilyn; Chow, Eric J.; Sklar, Charles A.; Mulrooney, Daniel A.; Mertens, Ann C.; Border, William; Durand, Jean-Bernard; Robison, Leslie L.; Meacham, Lillian R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relative contribution of modifiable cardiovascular risk factors on the development of major cardiac events in aging adult survivors of childhood cancer. Patients and Methods Among 10,724 5-year survivors (median age, 33.7 years) and 3,159 siblings in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and obesity was determined, along with the incidence and severity of major cardiac events such as coronary artery disease, heart failure, valvular disease, and arrhythmia. On longitudinal follow-up, rate ratios (RRs) of subsequent cardiac events associated with cardiovascular risk factors and cardiotoxic therapy were assessed in multivariable Poisson regression models. Results Among survivors, the cumulative incidence of coronary artery disease, heart failure, valvular disease, and arrhythmia by 45 years of age was 5.3%, 4.8%, 1.5%, and 1.3%, respectively. Two or more cardiovascular risk factors were reported by 10.3% of survivors and 7.9% of siblings. The risk for each cardiac event increased with increasing number of cardiovascular risk factors (all Ptrend < .001). Hypertension significantly increased risk for coronary artery disease (RR, 6.1), heart failure (RR, 19.4), valvular disease (RR, 13.6), and arrhythmia (RR, 6.0; all P values < .01). The combined effect of chest-directed radiotherapy plus hypertension resulted in potentiation of risk for each of the major cardiac events beyond that anticipated on the basis of an additive expectation. Hypertension was independently associated with risk of cardiac death (RR, 5.6; 95% CI, 3.2 to 9.7). Conclusion Modifiable cardiovascular risk factors, particularly hypertension, potentiate therapy-associated risk for major cardiac events in this population and should be the focus of future interventional studies. PMID:24002505

  19. Constitutive properties of adult mammalian cardiac muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zile, M. R.; Richardson, K.; Cowles, M. K.; Buckley, J. M.; Koide, M.; Cowles, B. A.; Gharpuray, V.; Cooper, G. 4th

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to determine whether changes in the constitutive properties of the cardiac muscle cell play a causative role in the development of diastolic dysfunction. METHODS AND RESULTS: Cardiocytes from normal and pressure-hypertrophied cats were embedded in an agarose gel, placed on a stretching device, and subjected to a change in stress (sigma), and resultant changes in cell strain (epsilon) were measured. These measurements were used to examine the passive elastic spring, viscous damping, and myofilament activation. The passive elastic spring was assessed in protocol A by increasing the sigma on the agarose gel at a constant rate to define the cardiocyte sigma-versus-epsilon relationship. Viscous damping was assessed in protocol B from the loop area between the cardiocyte sigma-versus-epsilon relationship during an increase and then a decrease in sigma. In both protocols, myofilament activation was minimized by a reduction in [Ca2+]i. Myofilament activation effects were assessed in protocol C by defining cardiocyte sigma versus epsilon during an increase in sigma with physiological [Ca2+]i. In protocol A, the cardiocyte sigma-versus-epsilon relationship was similar in normal and hypertrophied cells. In protocol B, the loop area was greater in hypertrophied than normal cardiocytes. In protocol C, the sigma-versus-epsilon relation in hypertrophied cardiocytes was shifted to the left compared with normal cells. CONCLUSIONS: Changes in viscous damping and myofilament activation in combination may cause pressure-hypertrophied cardiocytes to resist changes in shape during diastole and contribute to diastolic dysfunction.

  20. Role of transiently altered sarcolemmal membrane permeability and basic fibroblast growth factor release in the hypertrophic response of adult rat ventricular myocytes to increased mechanical activity in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, D; Pimental, D; Prasad, S; Mäki, T; Berger, H J; McNeil, P L; Smith, T W; Kelly, R A

    1996-01-01

    One of the trophic factors that has been implicated in initiating or facilitating growth in response to increased mechanical stress in several tissues and cell types is basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF; FGF-2). Although mammalian cardiac muscle cells express bFGF, it is not known whether it plays a role in mediating cardiac adaptation to increased load, nor how release of the cytosolic 18-kD isoform of bFGF would be regulated in response to increased mechanical stress. To test the hypothesis that increased mechanical activity induces transient alterations in sarcolemmal permeability that allow cytosolic bFGF to be released and subsequently to act as an autocrine and paracrine growth stimulus, we examined primary isolates of adult rat ventricular myocytes maintained in serum-free, defined medium that were continually paced at 3 Hz for up to 5 d. Paced myocytes, but not nonpaced control cells, exhibited a "hypertrophic" response, which was characterized by increases in the rate of phenylalanine incorporation, total cellular protein content, and cell size. These changes could be mimicked in control cells by exogenous recombinant bFGF and could be blocked in continually paced cells by a specific neutralizing anti-bFGF antibody. In addition, medium conditioned by continually paced myocytes contained significantly more bFGF measured by ELISA and more mitogenic activity for 3T3 cells, activity that could be reduced by a neutralizing anti-bFGF antibody. The hypothesis that transient membrane disruptions sufficient to allow release of cytosolic bFGF occur in paced myocytes was examined by monitoring the rate of uptake into myocytes from the medium of 10-kD dextran linked to fluorescein. Paced myocytes exhibited a significantly higher rate of fluoresceinlabeled dextran uptake. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that nonlethal, transient alterations in sarcolemmal membrane permeability with release of cytosolic bFGF is one mechanism by which increased

  1. PDE1C deficiency antagonizes pathological cardiac remodeling and dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Walter E.; Chen, Si; Zhang, Yishuai; Oikawa, Masayoshi; Wu, Meiping; Zhou, Qian; Miller, Clint L.; Cai, Yujun; Mickelsen, Deanne M.; Moravec, Christine; Small, Eric M.; Abe, Junichi; Yan, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 1C (PDE1C) represents a major phosphodiesterase activity in human myocardium, but its function in the heart remains unknown. Using genetic and pharmacological approaches, we studied the expression, regulation, function, and underlying mechanisms of PDE1C in the pathogenesis of cardiac remodeling and dysfunction. PDE1C expression is up-regulated in mouse and human failing hearts and is highly expressed in cardiac myocytes but not in fibroblasts. In adult mouse cardiac myocytes, PDE1C deficiency or inhibition attenuated myocyte death and apoptosis, which was largely dependent on cyclic AMP/PKA and PI3K/AKT signaling. PDE1C deficiency also attenuated cardiac myocyte hypertrophy in a PKA-dependent manner. Conditioned medium taken from PDE1C-deficient cardiac myocytes attenuated TGF-β–stimulated cardiac fibroblast activation through a mechanism involving the crosstalk between cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts. In vivo, cardiac remodeling and dysfunction induced by transverse aortic constriction, including myocardial hypertrophy, apoptosis, cardiac fibrosis, and loss of contractile function, were significantly attenuated in PDE1C-knockout mice relative to wild-type mice. These results indicate that PDE1C activation plays a causative role in pathological cardiac remodeling and dysfunction. Given the continued development of highly specific PDE1 inhibitors and the high expression level of PDE1C in the human heart, our findings could have considerable therapeutic significance. PMID:27791092

  2. Akt1/protein kinase B enhances transcriptional reprogramming of fibroblasts to functional cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huanyu; Dickson, Matthew E; Kim, Min Soo; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N

    2015-09-22

    Conversion of fibroblasts to functional cardiomyocytes represents a potential approach for restoring cardiac function after myocardial injury, but the technique thus far has been slow and inefficient. To improve the efficiency of reprogramming fibroblasts to cardiac-like myocytes (iCMs) by cardiac transcription factors [Gata4, Hand2, Mef2c, and Tbx5 (GHMT)], we screened 192 protein kinases and discovered that Akt/protein kinase B dramatically accelerates and amplifies this process in three different types of fibroblasts (mouse embryo, adult cardiac, and tail tip). Approximately 50% of reprogrammed mouse embryo fibroblasts displayed spontaneous beating after 3 wk of induction by Akt plus GHMT. Furthermore, addition of Akt1 to GHMT evoked a more mature cardiac phenotype for iCMs, as seen by enhanced polynucleation, cellular hypertrophy, gene expression, and metabolic reprogramming. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) acted upstream of Akt whereas the mitochondrial target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and forkhead box o3 (Foxo3a) acted downstream of Akt to influence fibroblast-to-cardiomyocyte reprogramming. These findings provide insights into the molecular basis of cardiac reprogramming and represent an important step toward further application of this technique.

  3. Adult non-cardiac ECMO for the treatment of ARDS--the Mississippi experience.

    PubMed

    Frei, Lonnie W

    2013-07-01

    The University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC) has become a center for ECMO (Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation), providing this service to patients requiring this life-saving modality. UMMC is the only ECMO center in the state. Prior to the cases presented, ECMO use at UMMC has been limited to neonates and the pediatric patient population as well as by the cardiothoracic service for patients with cardiac failure or inability to wean from bypass. The use of ECMO for non-cardiac support in the adult population has been limited in the past, but recent reports in the literature and experience elsewhere has proven the viability of the technology. This is a retrospective report of the first three adult non-cardiac cases employing ECMO for ARDS (Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome) in Mississippi. We achieved 100% survival in a disease process which reportedly carries a mortality ranging from 20-50%. A brief review of ECMO and its use in this population is also presented.

  4. Cardiac fibroblasts support endothelial cell proliferation and sprout formation but not the development of multicellular sprouts in a fibrin gel co-culture model.

    PubMed

    Twardowski, Rachel L; Black, Lauren D

    2014-05-01

    A primary impediment to cardiac tissue engineering lies in the inability to adequately vascularize the constructs to optimize survival upon implantation. During normal angiogenesis, endothelial cells (ECs) require a support cell to form mature patent lumens and it has been demonstrated that pericytes, vascular smooth muscle cells and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are all able to support the formation of mature vessels. In the heart, cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) provide important electrical and mechanical functions, but to date have not been sufficiently studied for their role in angiogenesis. To study CFs role in angiogenesis, we co-cultured different concentrations of various cell types in fibrin hemispheres with appropriate combinations of their specific media, to determine the optimal conditions for EC growth and sprout formation through DNA analysis, flow cytometry and immunohistology. ECs proliferated best when co-cultured with CFs and analysis of immunohistological images demonstrated that ECs formed the longest and most numerous sprouts with CFs as compared to MSCs. However, ECs were able to produce more multicellular sprouts when in culture with the MSCs. Moreover, these effects were dependent on the ratio of support cell to EC in co-culture. Overall, CFs provide a good support system for EC proliferation and sprout formation; however, MSCs allow for more multicellular sprouts, which is more indicative of the in vivo process.

  5. Interventional and surgical treatment of cardiac arrhythmias in adults with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Koyak, Zeliha; de Groot, Joris R; Mulder, Barbara J M

    2010-12-01

    Arrhythmias are a major cause of morbidity, mortality and hospital admission in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). The etiology of arrhythmias in this population is often multifactorial and includes electrical disturbances as part of the underlying defect, surgical intervention or hemodynamic abnormalities. Despite the numerous existing arrhythmia management tools including drug therapy, pacing and ablation, management of arrhythmias in adults with CHD remains difficult and challenging. Owing to improvement in mapping and ablation techniques, ablation and arrhythmia surgery are being performed more frequently in adults with CHD. However, there is little information on the long-term results of these treatment strategies. The purpose of this article is therefore to review the available data on nonpharmacological treatment of cardiac arrhythmias in adult patients with CHD and to give an overview of the available data on the early and late outcomes of these treatment strategies.

  6. Transformation of adult rat cardiac myocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Banyasz, Tamas; Lozinskiy, Ilya; Payne, Charles E; Edelmann, Stephanie; Norton, Byron; Chen, Biyi; Chen-Izu, Ye; Izu, Leighton T; Balke, C William

    2008-03-01

    We characterized the morphological, electrical and mechanical alterations of cardiomyocytes in long-term cell culture. Morphometric parameters, sarcomere length, T-tubule density, cell capacitance, L-type calcium current (I(Ca,L)), inward rectifier potassium current (I(K1)), cytosolic calcium transients, action potential and contractile parameters of adult rat ventricular myocytes were determined on each day of 5 days in culture. We also analysed the health of the myocytes using an apoptotic/necrotic viability assay. The data show that myocytes undergo profound morphological and functional changes during culture. We observed a progressive reduction in the cell area (from 2502 +/- 70 microm(2) on day 0 to 1432 +/- 50 microm(2) on day 5), T-tubule density, systolic shortening (from 0.11 +/- 0.02 to 0.05 +/- 0.01 microm) and amplitude of calcium transients (from 1.54 +/- 0.19 to 0.67 +/- 0.19) over 5 days of culture. The negative force-frequency relationship, characteristic of rat myocardium, was maintained during the first 2 days but diminished thereafter. Cell capacitance (from 156 +/- 8 to 105 +/- 11 pF) and membrane currents were also reduced (I(Ca,L), from 3.98 +/- 0.39 to 2.12 +/- 0.37 pA pF; and I(K1), from 34.34p +/- 2.31 to 18.00 +/- 5.97 pA pF(-1)). We observed progressive depolarization of the resting membrane potential during culture (from 77.3 +/- 2.5 to 34.2 +/- 5.9 mV) and, consequently, action potential morphology was profoundly altered as well. The results of the viability assays indicate that these alterations could not be attributed to either apoptosis or necrosis but are rather an adaptation to the culture conditions over time.

  7. Standardized echocardiographic assessment of cardiac function in normal adult zebrafish and heart disease models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Louis W; Huttner, Inken G; Santiago, Celine F; Kesteven, Scott H; Yu, Ze-Yan; Feneley, Michael P; Fatkin, Diane

    2017-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an increasingly popular model organism in cardiovascular research. Major insights into cardiac developmental processes have been gained by studies of embryonic zebrafish. However, the utility of zebrafish for modeling adult-onset heart disease has been limited by a lack of robust methods for in vivo evaluation of cardiac function. We established a physiological protocol for underwater zebrafish echocardiography using high frequency ultrasound, and evaluated its reliability in detecting altered cardiac function in two disease models. Serial assessment of cardiac function was performed in wild-type zebrafish aged 3 to 12 months and the effects of anesthetic agents, age, sex and background strain were evaluated. There was a varying extent of bradycardia and ventricular contractile impairment with different anesthetic drugs and doses, with tricaine 0.75 mmol l(-1) having a relatively more favorable profile. When compared with males, female fish were larger and had more measurement variability. Although age-related increments in ventricular chamber size were greater in females than males, there were no sex differences when data were normalized to body size. Systolic ventricular function was similar in both sexes at all time points, but differences in diastolic function were evident from 6 months onwards. Wild-type fish of both sexes showed a reliance on atrial contraction for ventricular diastolic filling. Echocardiographic evaluation of adult zebrafish with diphtheria toxin-induced myocarditis or anemia-induced volume overload accurately identified ventricular dilation and altered contraction, with suites of B-mode, ventricular strain, pulsed-wave Doppler and tissue Doppler indices showing concordant changes indicative of myocardial hypocontractility or hypercontractility, respectively. Repeatability, intra-observer and inter-observer correlations for echocardiographic measurements were high. We demonstrate that high frequency

  8. Standardized echocardiographic assessment of cardiac function in normal adult zebrafish and heart disease models

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Louis W.; Huttner, Inken G.; Santiago, Celine F.; Kesteven, Scott H.; Yu, Ze-Yan; Feneley, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an increasingly popular model organism in cardiovascular research. Major insights into cardiac developmental processes have been gained by studies of embryonic zebrafish. However, the utility of zebrafish for modeling adult-onset heart disease has been limited by a lack of robust methods for in vivo evaluation of cardiac function. We established a physiological protocol for underwater zebrafish echocardiography using high frequency ultrasound, and evaluated its reliability in detecting altered cardiac function in two disease models. Serial assessment of cardiac function was performed in wild-type zebrafish aged 3 to 12 months and the effects of anesthetic agents, age, sex and background strain were evaluated. There was a varying extent of bradycardia and ventricular contractile impairment with different anesthetic drugs and doses, with tricaine 0.75 mmol l−1 having a relatively more favorable profile. When compared with males, female fish were larger and had more measurement variability. Although age-related increments in ventricular chamber size were greater in females than males, there were no sex differences when data were normalized to body size. Systolic ventricular function was similar in both sexes at all time points, but differences in diastolic function were evident from 6 months onwards. Wild-type fish of both sexes showed a reliance on atrial contraction for ventricular diastolic filling. Echocardiographic evaluation of adult zebrafish with diphtheria toxin-induced myocarditis or anemia-induced volume overload accurately identified ventricular dilation and altered contraction, with suites of B-mode, ventricular strain, pulsed-wave Doppler and tissue Doppler indices showing concordant changes indicative of myocardial hypocontractility or hypercontractility, respectively. Repeatability, intra-observer and inter-observer correlations for echocardiographic measurements were high. We demonstrate that high

  9. cAMP inhibits transforming growth factor-beta-stimulated collagen synthesis via inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and Smad signaling in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqiu; Sun, Shu Qiang; Hassid, Aviv; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2006-12-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts produce and degrade extracellular matrix and are critical in regulating cardiac remodeling and hypertrophy. Cytokines such as transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) play a fundamental role in the development of tissue fibrosis by stimulating matrix deposition and other profibrotic responses, but less is known about pathways that might inhibit fibrosis. Increased cAMP formation inhibits myofibroblast differentiation and collagen production by cardiac fibroblasts, but the mechanism of this inhibition is not known. We sought to characterize the signaling pathways by which cAMP-elevating agents alter collagen expression and myofibroblast differentiation. Treatment with 10 microM forskolin or isoproterenol increased cAMP production and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation in cardiac fibroblasts and inhibited serum- or TGF-beta-stimulated collagen synthesis by 37% or more. These same cAMP-elevating agents blunted TGF-beta-stimulated expression of collagen I, collagen III, and alpha-smooth muscle actin. Forskolin or isoproterenol treatment blocked the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) induced by TGF-beta despite the fact that these cAMP-elevating agents stimulated ERK1/2 activation on their own. cAMP-elevating agents also attenuated the activation of c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase and reduced binding of the transcriptional coactivator CREB-binding protein 1 to transcriptional complexes containing Smad2, Smad3, and Smad4. Pharmacological inhibition of ERK completely blocked TGF-beta-stimulated collagen gene expression, but expression of an active mutant of MEK was additive with TGF-beta treatment. Thus, cAMP-elevating agents inhibit the profibrotic effects of TGF-beta in cardiac fibroblasts largely through inhibiting ERK1/2 phosphorylation but also by reducing Smad-mediated recruitment of transcriptional coactivators.

  10. Silk fibroin scaffolds enhance cell commitment of adult rat cardiac progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Di Felice, Valentina; Serradifalco, Claudia; Rizzuto, Luigi; De Luca, Angela; Rappa, Francesca; Barone, Rosario; Di Marco, Patrizia; Cassata, Giovanni; Puleio, Roberto; Verin, Lucia; Motta, Antonella; Migliaresi, Claudio; Guercio, Annalisa; Zummo, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) cultures may induce cardiac progenitor cells to synthesize their own extracellular matrix (ECM) and sarcomeric proteins to initiate cardiac differentiation. 3D cultures grown on synthetic scaffolds may favour the implantation and survival of stem cells for cell therapy when pharmacological therapies are not efficient in curing cardiovascular diseases and when organ transplantation remains the only treatment able to rescue the patient's life. Silk fibroin-based scaffolds may be used to increase cell affinity to biomaterials and may be chemically modified to improve cell adhesion. In the present study, porous, partially orientated and electrospun nanometric nets were used. Cardiac progenitor cells isolated from adult rats were seeded by capillarity in the 3D structures and cultured inside inserts for 21 days. Under this condition, the cells expressed a high level of sarcomeric and cardiac proteins and synthesized a great quantity of ECM. In particular, partially orientated scaffolds induced the synthesis of titin, which is a fundamental protein in sarcomere assembly.

  11. ANGPTL8 reverses established adriamycin cardiomyopathy by stimulating adult cardiac progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuyuan; Chen, Jiaxi; Meng, Xing-Li; Shen, Jin-Song; Huang, Jing; Huang, Pintong; Pu, Zhaoxia; McNeill, Nathan H.; Grayburn, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Established adriamycin cardiomyopathy is a lethal disease. When congestive heart failure develops, mortality is approximately 50% in a year. It has been known that ANGPTLs has various functions in lipid metabolism, inflammation, cancer cell invasion, hematopoietic stem activity and diabetes. We hypothesized that ANGPTL8 is capable of maintaining heart function by stimulating adult cardiac progenitor cells to initiate myocardial regeneration. We employed UTMD to deliver piggybac transposon plasmids with the human ANGPTL8 gene to the liver of rats with adriamycin cardiomyopathy. After ANGPTL8 gene liver delivery, overexpression of transgenic human ANGPTL8 was found in rat liver cells and blood. UTMD- ANGPTL8 gene therapy restored LV mass, fractional shortening index, and LV posterior wall diameter to nearly normal. Our results also showed that ANGPTL8 reversed established ADM cardiomyopathy. This was associated with activation of ISL-1 positive cardiac progenitor cells in the epicardium. A time-course experiment shown that ISL-1 cardiac progenitor cells proliferated and formed a niche in the epicardial layer and then migrated into sub-epicardium. The observed myocardial regeneration accompanying reversal of adriamycin cardiomyopathy was associated with upregulation of PirB expression on the cell membrane of cardiac muscle cells or progenitor cells stimulated by ANGPTL8. PMID:27823982

  12. A comprehensive analysis of cardiac valve plane displacement in healthy adults: age-stratified normal values by cardiac magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Marco M; Fritz, Thomas; André, Florian; Riffel, Johannes; Mereles, Derliz; Müller-Hennessen, Matthias; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Katus, Hugo A; Friedrich, Matthias G; Buss, Sebastian J

    2017-01-21

    Cardiac valve plane displacement (CVPD) reflects longitudinal LV function. The purpose of the present study was to determine regional heterogeneity of CVPD in healthy adults to provide normal values by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). We measured the anterior aortic plane systolic excursion (AAPSE); the anterior, anterolateral, inferolateral, inferior, and inferoseptal mitral annular plane systolic excursion (MAPSE); and the lateral tricuspid annulus plane systolic excursion (TAPSE). Systolic excursion was measured as the distance from peak end-diastolic to peak end-sysstolic annular position (peak-to-peak) in cine images acquired in 2-, 3- and 4-chamber views. Echocardiographic measurements of CVPD were performed in M-Mode as previously described. We retrospectively analyzed 209 healthy Caucasians (57% men), who participated in the Heidelberg normal cohort between March 2009 and September 2014. The analysis was possible in all participants. Mean values were: AAPSE = 14 ± 3 mm (8-20); MAPSEanterior = 14 ± 3 mm (8-20); MAPSEanterolateral = 16 ± 3 mm (10-22); MAPSEinferolateral = 16 ± 3 mm (10-22); MAPSEinferior = 17 ± 3 mm (11-23); MAPSEinferoseptal = 13 ± 3 mm (7-19) and TAPSE = 26 ± 4 mm (18-34) respectively. MAPSE was significantly elevated in lateral compared to septal regions (p = 0.0001). Sex-differences for CVPD were not found. Age-dependency of CVPD revealed distinct regional differences. AAPSE decreased the most with age (B=-0.48; p = 0.0001), whereas MAPSEinferior was the least age-dependent site (B=-0.17; p = 0.01). AAPSE revealed favorable intra-/interobserver reproducibility and interstudy agreement. Intermethod-comparison of CMR and M-Mode echocardiography showed good agreement between both measurements of CVPD. Age-stratified normal values of regional CVPD are provided. AAPSE revealed the most pronounced age-related decrease and provided favorable reproducibility

  13. Generation and Characterization of Leukemia Inhibitory Factor-Dependent Equine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Adult Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A.; Sun, Jane; Fortuna, Patrick R.J.; Wolvetang, Ernst J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we have reprogrammed dermal fibroblasts from an adult female horse into equine induced pluripotent stem cells (equiPSCs). These equiPSCs are dependent only on leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), placing them in striking contrast to previously derived equiPSCs that have been shown to be co-dependent on both LIF and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). These equiPSCs have a normal karyotype and have been maintained beyond 60 passages. They possess alkaline phosphatase activity and express eqNANOG, eqOCT4, and eqTERT mRNA. Immunocytochemistry confirmed that they produce NANOG, REX1, SSEA4, TRA1-60, and TRA1-81. While our equiPSCs are LIF dependent, bFGF co-stimulates their proliferation via the PI3K/AKT pathway. EquiPSCs lack expression of eqXIST and immunostaining for H3K27me3, suggesting that during reprogramming the inactive X chromosome has likely been reactivated to generate cells that have two active X chromosomes. EquiPSCs form embryoid bodies and in vitro teratomas that contain derivatives of all three germ layers. These LIF-dependent equiPSCs likely reflect a more naive state of pluripotency than equiPSCs that are co-dependent on both LIF and bFGF and so provide a novel resource for understanding pluripotency in the horse. PMID:24555755

  14. Perinatal DDT Exposure Induces Hypertension and Cardiac Hypertrophy in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    La Merrill, Michele A.; Sethi, Sunjay; Benard, Ludovic; Moshier, Erin; Haraldsson, Borje; Buettner, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) was used extensively to control malaria, typhus, body lice, and bubonic plague worldwide, until countries began restricting its use in the 1970s. However, the use of DDT to control vector-borne diseases continues in developing countries. Prenatal DDT exposure is associated with elevated blood pressure in humans. Objective: We hypothesized that perinatal DDT exposure causes hypertension in adult mice. Methods: DDT was administered to C57BL/6J dams from gestational day 11.5 to postnatal day 5. Blood pressure (BP) and myocardial wall thickness were measured in male and female adult offspring. Adult mice were treated with an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, captopril, to evaluate sensitivity to amelioration of DDT-associated hypertension by ACE inhibition. We further assessed the influence of DDT exposure on the expression of mRNAs that regulate BP through renal ion transport. Results: Adult mice perinatally exposed to DDT exhibited chronically increased systolic BP, increased myocardial wall thickness, and elevated expression of mRNAs of several renal ion transporters. Captopril completely reversed hypertension in mice perinatally exposed to DDT. Conclusions: These data demonstrate that perinatal exposure to DDT causes hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy in adult offspring. A key mechanism underpinning this hypertension is an overactivated renin angiotensin system because ACE inhibition reverses the hypertension induced by perinatal DDT exposure. Citation: La Merrill M, Sethi S, Benard L, Moshier E, Haraldsson B, Buettner C. 2016. Perinatal DDT exposure induces hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy in adult mice. Environ Health Perspect 124:1722–1727; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP164 PMID:27325568

  15. [In vitro effect of total flavones of Fructus Chorspondiatis on expression of collagen type I and type III mRNA and protein of cultured rat cardiac fibroblasts].

    PubMed

    Bao, Jun-Ping; Jin, Ming; Yang, Yu-Min; Gao, Xiao-Hui; Shu, Liang; Xing, Hui-Hui; Jia, Lei

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of total flavones of Fructus Chorspondiatis (TFFC) on the mRNA and protein expression of collagen type I and III of rat cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) induced by angiotensin II (Ang II), and explore its anti-myocardial fibrosis molecular mechanism. Neonatal rat CFs were prepared from Sprague-Dawley rats (1-3 d after birth). The expression of collagen type I and III mRNA and protein were measured by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The study showed that stimulation of neonatal rat CFs with 100 nmol.L-1 of Ang II for 72 h resulted in a significant increase of the expression of collagen type I and III mRNA and protein. The changes on the expression level were blocked by TFFC. The results demonstrated that TFFC can inhibit myocardial fibrosis induced by Ang II in rats, which is probably associated with the collagen type I and III mRNA and protein levels up-regulated by Ang II, and TFFC was shown to decrease the expression levels of collagen type I and III mRNA and protein.

  16. Novel approaches to determine contractile function of the isolated adult zebrafish ventricular cardiac myocyte

    PubMed Central

    Dvornikov, Alexey V; Dewan, Sukriti; Alekhina, Olga V; Pickett, F Bryan; de Tombe, Pieter P

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) has been used extensively in cardiovascular biology, but mainly in the study of heart development. The relative ease of its genetic manipulation may indicate the suitability of this species as a cost-effective model system for the study of cardiac contractile biology. However, whether the zebrafish heart is an appropriate model system for investigations pertaining to mammalian cardiac contractile structure–function relationships remains to be resolved. Myocytes were isolated from adult zebrafish hearts by enzymatic digestion, attached to carbon rods, and twitch force and intracellular Ca2+ were measured. We observed the modulation of twitch force, but not of intracellular Ca2+, by both extracellular [Ca2+] and sarcomere length. In permeabilized cells/myofibrils, we found robust myofilament length-dependent activation. Moreover, modulation of myofilament activation–relaxation and force redevelopment kinetics by varied Ca2+ activation levels resembled that found previously in mammalian myofilaments. We conclude that the zebrafish is a valid model system for the study of cardiac contractile structure–function relationships. PMID:24591576

  17. Neonatal Diesel Exhaust Particulate Exposure Does Not Predispose Mice to Adult Cardiac Hypertrophy or Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yonggang; Weldy, Chad S.; Chin, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: We have previously reported that in utero and early life exposure to diesel exhaust particulates predisposes mice to adult heart failure, and that in utero exposure alone is sufficient to confer this predisposition. This follow up study addresses whether neonatal exposure alone can also confer this predisposition. Methods: Newborn male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to diesel exhaust (DE) particulates immediately after birth until weaning at 21 days of age, whereupon they were transferred to filtered air (FA) conditions. At the age of 12 weeks, transverse aortic constriction (TAC) was performed followed by weekly echocardiography for three weeks. After the last echocardiogram, mice were euthanized for organ harvest, gravimetry and histology. Results: Neonatal exposure to DE particulates did not increase susceptibility to cardiac hypertrophy or heart failure after TAC when compared to FA exposed controls (ventricular weight/body weight ratio 7.505 vs. 7.517 mg/g, p = Not Significant (NS)). The left ventricular ejection fraction after TAC was similar between groups at one week, two weeks, and three weeks after procedure. Histological analysis showed no difference in the degree of cardiac hypertrophy or fibrosis. Conclusions: Neonatal exposure to DE particulates does not predispose mice to TAC-induced cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure in adulthood, in contrast to previously published results showing susceptibility due to in utero exposure. PMID:27886143

  18. Differential expression of embryonic epicardial progenitor markers and localization of cardiac fibrosis in adult ischemic injury and hypertensive heart disease.

    PubMed

    Braitsch, Caitlin M; Kanisicak, Onur; van Berlo, Jop H; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Yutzey, Katherine E

    2013-12-01

    During embryonic heart development, the transcription factors Tcf21, Wt1, and Tbx18 regulate activation and differentiation of epicardium-derived cells, including fibroblast lineages. Expression of these epicardial progenitor factors and localization of cardiac fibrosis were examined in mouse models of cardiovascular disease and in human diseased hearts. Following ischemic injury in mice, epicardial fibrosis is apparent in the thickened layer of subepicardial cells that express Wt1, Tbx18, and Tcf21. Perivascular fibrosis with predominant expression of Tcf21, but not Wt1 or Tbx18, occurs in mouse models of pressure overload or hypertensive heart disease, but not following ischemic injury. Areas of interstitial fibrosis in ischemic and hypertensive hearts actively express Tcf21, Wt1, and Tbx18. In all areas of fibrosis, cells that express epicardial progenitor factors are distinct from CD45-positive immune cells. In human diseased hearts, differential expression of Tcf21, Wt1, and Tbx18 also is detected with epicardial, perivascular, and interstitial fibrosis, indicating conservation of reactivated developmental mechanisms in cardiac fibrosis in mice and humans. Together, these data provide evidence for distinct fibrogenic mechanisms that include Tcf21, separate from Wt1 and Tbx18, in different fibroblast populations in response to specific types of cardiac injury.

  19. Cardiac expression profiles of the naked DNA vectors encoding vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Sun; Byun, Jonghoe; Kim, Jung Min; Kim, Chae Young; Kim, Byong Moon; Chung, Ji Hyung; Jang, Yangsoo; Kim, Duk Kyung

    2005-10-31

    We investigated expression profiles and biological effects of the naked DNA vectors in the heart. To this end, naked DNA vector was injected into the apex of the beating rat heart after thorocotomy. When the expression of LacZ reporter was examined by reverse transcription-PCR and histochemical staining for beta-galactosidase, LacZ expression was detected only in the heart, suggesting limited dissemination of the injected vector in vivo. Even within the heart, LacZ expression was limited to the injection area (apex). Similar observations were made with other transgenes such as VEGF and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), where 77% and 69% of the total transgene exprssion were detected in the heart segments containing the apex. Although VEGF and bFGF expressions were detected until 2 weeks after DNA injection, the highest levels of VEGF and bFGF were observed on day 5 and day 1, respectively. The optimal doses of the vectors were 10 microg and 25 microg for the VEGF and bFGF vectors, respectively. Interestingly, injection of bFGF vector led to 50% increase in the level of endogenous murine VEGF expression. Consistent with this finding, the number of vessels that stained positive for alpha-smooth muscle actin was increased in the bFGF vector-injected heart. These results suggest that simple injection of naked DNA vector may be sufficient to induce significant angiogenesis in the myocardium and that naked DNA gene therapy may be a feasible approach for the treatment of ischemic heart disease.

  20. Adolescents and adults differ in the immediate and long-term impact of nicotine administration and withdrawal on cardiac norepinephrine.

    PubMed

    Slotkin, Theodore A; Stadler, Ashley; Skavicus, Samantha; Seidler, Frederic J

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular responses to smoking cessation may differ in adolescents compared to adults. We administered nicotine by osmotic minipump infusion for 17 days to adolescent and adult rats (30 and 90 days of age, respectively) and examined cardiac norepinephrine levels during treatment, after withdrawal, and for months after cessation. In adults, nicotine evoked a significant elevation of cardiac norepinephrine and a distinct spike upon withdrawal, after which the levels returned to normal; the effect was specific to males. In contrast, adolescents did not show significant changes during nicotine treatment or in the immediate post-withdrawal period. However, beginning in young adulthood, males exposed to adolescent nicotine showed sustained elevations of cardiac norepinephrine, followed by later-emerging deficits that persisted through six months of age. We then conducted adolescent exposure using twice-daily injections, a regimen that augments stress associated with inter-dose withdrawal episodes. With the injection route, adolescents showed an enhanced cardiac norepinephrine response, reinforcing the relationship between withdrawal stress and a surge in cardiac norepinephrine levels. The relative resistance of adolescents to the acute nicotine withdrawal response is likely to make episodic nicotine exposure less stressful or aversive than in adults. Equally important, the long-term changes after adolescent nicotine exposure resemble those known to be associated with risk of hypertension in young adulthood (elevated norepinephrine) or subsequent congestive heart disease (norepinephrine deficits). Our findings reinforce the unique responses and consequences of nicotine exposure in adolescence, the period in which most smokers commence tobacco use.

  1. Adolescents and Adults Differ in the Immediate and Long-Term Impact of Nicotine Administration and Withdrawal on Cardiac Norepinephrine

    PubMed Central

    Slotkin, Theodore A.; Stadler, Ashley; Skavicus, Samantha; Seidler, Frederic J.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular responses to smoking cessation may differ in adolescents compared to adults. We administered nicotine by osmotic minipump infusion for 17 days to adolescent and adult rats (30 and 90 days of age, respectively) and examined cardiac norepinephrine levels during treatment, after withdrawal, and for months after cessation. In adults, nicotine evoked a significant elevation of cardiac norepinephrine and a distinct spike upon withdrawal, after which the levels returned to normal; the effect was specific to males. In contrast, adolescents did not show significant changes during nicotine treatment or in the immediate post-withdrawal period. However, beginning in young adulthood, males exposed to adolescent nicotine showed sustained elevations of cardiac norepinephrine, followed by later-emerging deficits that persisted through six months of age. We then conducted adolescent exposure using twice-daily injections, a regimen that augments stress associated with inter-dose withdrawal episodes. With the injection route, adolescents showed an enhanced cardiac norepinephrine response, reinforcing the relationship between withdrawal stress and a surge in cardiac norepinephrine levels. The relative resistance of adolescents to the acute nicotine withdrawal response is likely to make episodic nicotine exposure less stressful or aversive than in adults. Equally important, the long-term changes after adolescent nicotine exposure resemble those known to be associated with risk of hypertension in young adulthood (elevated norepinephrine) or subsequent congestive heart disease (norepinephrine deficits). Our findings reinforce the unique responses and consequences of nicotine exposure in adolescence, the period in which most smokers commence tobacco use. PMID:26993795

  2. HL-1 cells: a cardiac muscle cell line that contracts and retains phenotypic characteristics of the adult cardiomyocyte.

    PubMed

    Claycomb, W C; Lanson, N A; Stallworth, B S; Egeland, D B; Delcarpio, J B; Bahinski, A; Izzo, N J

    1998-03-17

    We have derived a cardiac muscle cell line, designated HL-1, from the AT-1 mouse atrial cardiomyocyte tumor lineage. HL-1 cells can be serially passaged, yet they maintain the ability to contract and retain differentiated cardiac morphological, biochemical, and electrophysiological properties. Ultrastructural characteristics typical of embryonic atrial cardiac muscle cells were found consistently in the cultured HL-1 cells. Reverse transcriptase-PCR-based analyses confirmed a pattern of gene expression similar to that of adult atrial myocytes, including expression of alpha-cardiac myosin heavy chain, alpha-cardiac actin, and connexin43. They also express the gene for atrial natriuretic factor. Immunohistochemical staining of the HL-1 cells indicated that the distribution of the cardiac-specific markers desmin, sarcomeric myosin, and atrial natriuretic factor was similar to that of cultured atrial cardiomyocytes. A delayed rectifier potassium current (IKr) was the most prominent outward current in HL-1 cells. The activating currents displayed inward rectification and deactivating current tails were voltage-dependent, saturated at >+20 mV, and were highly sensitive to dofetilide (IC50 of 46.9 nM). Specific binding of [3H]dofetilide was saturable and fit a one-site binding isotherm with a Kd of 140 +/- 60 nM and a Bmax of 118 fmol per 10(5) cells. HL-1 cells represent a cardiac myocyte cell line that can be repeatedly passaged and yet maintain a cardiac-specific phenotype.

  3. Disruption of Ah Receptor Signaling during Mouse Development Leads to Abnormal Cardiac Structure and Function in the Adult

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Vinicius S.; Fan, Yunxia; Kurita, Hisaka; Wang, Qin; Ko, Chia-I; Naticchioni, Mindi; Jiang, Min; Koch, Sheryl; Zhang, Xiang; Biesiada, Jacek; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying; Rubinstein, Jack; Puga, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) Theory proposes that the environment encountered during fetal life and infancy permanently shapes tissue physiology and homeostasis such that damage resulting from maternal stress, poor nutrition or exposure to environmental agents may be at the heart of adult onset disease. Interference with endogenous developmental functions of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), either by gene ablation or by exposure in utero to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a potent AHR ligand, causes structural, molecular and functional cardiac abnormalities and altered heart physiology in mouse embryos. To test if embryonic effects progress into an adult phenotype, we investigated whether Ahr ablation or TCDD exposure in utero resulted in cardiac abnormalities in adult mice long after removal of the agent. Ten-months old adult Ahr-/- and in utero TCDD-exposed Ahr+/+ mice showed sexually dimorphic abnormal cardiovascular phenotypes characterized by echocardiographic findings of hypertrophy, ventricular dilation and increased heart weight, resting heart rate and systolic and mean blood pressure, and decreased exercise tolerance. Underlying these effects, genes in signaling networks related to cardiac hypertrophy and mitochondrial function were differentially expressed. Cardiac dysfunction in mouse embryos resulting from AHR signaling disruption seems to progress into abnormal cardiac structure and function that predispose adults to cardiac disease, but while embryonic dysfunction is equally robust in males and females, the adult abnormalities are more prevalent in females, with the highest severity in Ahr-/- females. The findings reported here underscore the conclusion that AHR signaling in the developing heart is one potential target of environmental factors associated with cardiovascular disease. PMID:26555816

  4. Presynaptic size of associational/commissural CA3 synapses is controlled by fibroblast growth factor 22 in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Pasaoglu, Taliha; Schikorski, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Associational/commissural CA3-CA3 synapses define the recurrent CA3 network that generates the input to CA1 pyramidal neurons. We quantified the fine structure of excitatory synapses in the stratum radiatum of the CA3d area in adult wild type (WT) and fibroblast growth factor 22 knock-out (FGF22KO) mice by using serial 3D electron microscopy. WT excitatory CA3 synapses are rather small yet range 10 fold in size. Spine size, however, was small and uniform and did not correlate with the size of the synaptic junction. To reveal mechanisms that regulate presynaptic structure, we investigated the role of FGF22, a target-derived signal specific for the distal part of area CA3 (CA3d). In adult FGF22KO mice, postsynaptic properties of associational CA3 synapses were unaltered. Presynaptically, the number of synaptic vesicles (SVs), the bouton volume, and the number of vesicles in axonal regions (the super pool) were reduced. This concurrent decrease suggests concerted control by FGF22 of presynaptic size. This hypothesis is supported by the finding that WT presynapses in the proximal part of area CA3 (CA3p) that do not receive FGF22 signaling in WT mice were smaller than presynapses in CA3d in WT but of comparable size in CA3d of FGF22KO mice. Docked SV density was decreased in CA1, CA3d, and CA3p in FGF22KO mice. Because CA1 and CA3p are not directly affected by the loss of FGF22, the smaller docked SV density may be an adaptation to activity changes in the CA3 network. Thus, docked SV density potentially is a long-term regulator for the synaptic release probability and/or the strength of short-term depression in vivo.

  5. Fibroblast growth factor 10 alters the balance between goblet and Paneth cells in the adult mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Al Alam, Denise; Danopoulos, Soula; Schall, Kathy; Sala, Frederic G; Almohazey, Dana; Fernandez, G Esteban; Georgia, Senta; Frey, Mark R; Ford, Henri R; Grikscheit, Tracy; Bellusci, Saverio

    2015-04-15

    Intestinal epithelial cell renewal relies on the right balance of epithelial cell migration, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Intestinal epithelial cells consist of absorptive and secretory lineage. The latter is comprised of goblet, Paneth, and enteroendocrine cells. Fibroblast growth factor 10 (FGF10) plays a central role in epithelial cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation in several organs. The expression pattern of FGF10 and its receptors in both human and mouse intestine and their role in small intestine have yet to be investigated. First, we analyzed the expression of FGF10, FGFR1, and FGFR2, in the human ileum and throughout the adult mouse small intestine. We found that FGF10, FGFR1b, and FGFR2b are expressed in the human ileum as well as in the mouse small intestine. We then used transgenic mouse models to overexpress Fgf10 and a soluble form of Fgfr2b, to study the impact of gain or loss of Fgf signaling in the adult small intestine. We demonstrated that overexpression of Fgf10 in vivo and in vitro induces goblet cell differentiation while decreasing Paneth cells. Moreover, FGF10 decreases stem cell markers such as Lgr5, Lrig1, Hopx, Ascl2, and Sox9. FGF10 inhibited Hes1 expression in vitro, suggesting that FGF10 induces goblet cell differentiation likely through the inhibition of Notch signaling. Interestingly, Fgf10 overexpression for 3 days in vivo and in vitro increased the number of Mmp7/Muc2 double-positive cells, suggesting that goblet cells replace Paneth cells. Further studies are needed to determine the mechanism by which Fgf10 alters cell differentiation in the small intestine.

  6. Plasma Fatty Acid Binding Protein 4 and Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Djoussé, Luc; Maziarz, Marlena; Biggs, Mary L.; Ix, Joachim H.; Zieman, Susan J.; Kizer, Jorge R.; Lemaitre, Rozenn N.; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Tracy, Russell P.; Mukamal, Kenneth J.; Siscovick, David S.; Sotoodehnia, Nona

    2013-01-01

    Although fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) may increase risk of diabetes and exert negative cardiac inotropy, it is unknown whether plasma concentrations of FABP4 are associated with incidence of sudden cardiac death (SCD). We prospectively analyzed data on 4,560 participants of the Cardiovascular Health Study. FABP4 was measured at baseline using ELISA, and SCD events were adjudicated through review of medical records. We used Cox proportional hazards to estimate effect measures. During a median followup of 11.8 years, 146 SCD cases occurred. In a multivariable model adjusting for demographic, lifestyle, and metabolic factors, relative risk of SCD associated with each higher standard deviation (SD) of plasma FABP4 was 1.15 (95% CI: 0.95–1.38), P = 0.15. In a secondary analysis stratified by prevalent diabetes status, FABP4 was associated with higher risk of SCD in nondiabetic participants, (RR per SD higher FABP4: 1.33 (95% CI: 1.07–1.65), P = 0.009) but not in diabetic participants (RR per SD higher FABP4: 0.88 (95% CI: 0.62–1.27), P = 0.50), P for diabetes-FABP4 interaction 0.049. In summary, a single measure of plasma FABP4 obtained later in life was not associated with the risk of SCD in older adults overall. Confirmation of our post-hoc results in nondiabetic people in other studies is warranted. PMID:24455402

  7. Adult stem cells for cardiac repair: a choice between skeletal myoblasts and bone marrow stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lei; Haider, Husnain Kh; Sim, Eugene K W

    2006-01-01

    The real promise of a stem cell-based approach for cardiac regeneration and repair lies in the promotion of myogenesis and angiogenesis at the site of the cell graft to achieve both structural and functional benefits. Despite all of the progress and promise in this field, many unanswered questions remain; the answers to these questions will provide the much-needed breakthrough to harness the real benefits of cell therapy for the heart in the clinical perspective. One of the major issues is the choice of donor cell type for transplantation. Multiple cell types with varying potentials have been assessed for their ability to repopulate the infarcted myocardium; however, only the adult stem cells, that is, skeletal myoblasts (SkM) and bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMC), have been translated from the laboratory bench to clinical use. Which of these two cell types will provide the best option for clinical application in heart cell therapy remains arguable. With results pouring in from the long-term follow-ups of previously conducted phase I clinical studies, and with the onset of phase II clinical trials involving larger population of patients, transplantation of stem cells as a sole therapy without an adjunct conventional revascularization procedure will provide a deeper insight into the effectiveness of this approach. The present article discusses the pros and cons of using SkM and BMC individually or in combination for cardiac repair, and critically analyzes the progress made with each cell type.

  8. Natural and synthetic antifibrinolytics in adult cardiac surgery: efficacy, effectiveness and efficiency.

    PubMed

    Hardy, J F; Bélisle, S

    1994-11-01

    Epsilon-aminocaproic acid and tranexamic acid, two synthetic antifibrinolytics, and aprotinin, an antifibrinolytic derived from bovine lung, are used to reduce excessive bleeding and transfusion of homologous blood products (HBP) after cardiac surgery. This review analyzes the studies on the utilization of antifibrinolytics in adult cardiac surgery according to the epidemiological concepts of efficacy, effectiveness and efficiency. A majority of published studies confirm the efficacy of antifibrinolytics administered prophylactically to reduce postoperative bleeding and transfusion of HBP. More studies are needed, however, to compare antifibrinolytics and determine if any one is superior to the others. Despite their demonstrated efficacy, antifibrinolytics are only one of the options available to diminish the use of HBP. Other blood-saving techniques, surgical expertise, temperature during cardiopulmonary bypass and respect of established transfusion guidelines may modify the effectiveness of antifibrinolytics to the point where antifibrinolytics may not be necessary. At this time, insufficient data have been published to perform a cost vs benefit analysis of the use of antifibrinolytics. This complex analysis takes into account not only direct costs (cost of the drug and of blood products), but also the ensuing effects of treatment such as: length of stay in the operating room, in the intensive care unit and in the hospital; need for surgical re-exploration; treatment of transfusion or drug-related complications, etc. In particular, the risk of thrombotic complications associated with antifibrinolytics is the subject of an ongoing, unresolved controversy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. A 3-D cardiac muscle construct for exploring adult marrow stem cell based myocardial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Valarmathi, Mani T; Goodwin, Richard L; Fuseler, John W; Davis, Jeffrey M; Yost, Michael J; Potts, Jay D

    2010-04-01

    Adult bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are capable of differentiating into cardiomyocyte-like cells in vitro and contribute to myocardial regeneration in vivo. Consequently, BMSCs may potentially play a vital role in cardiac repair and regeneration. However, this concept has been limited by inadequate and inconsistent differentiation of BMSCs into cardiomyocytes along with poor survival and integration of neo-cardiomyocytes after implantation into ischemic myocardium. In order to overcome these barriers and to explore adult stem cell based myocardial regeneration, we have developed an in vitro model of three-dimensional (3-D) cardiac muscle using rat ventricular embryonic cardiomyocytes (ECMs) and BMSCs. When ECMs and BMSCs were seeded sequentially onto a 3-D tubular scaffold engineered from topographically aligned type I collagen-fibers and cultured in basal medium for 7, 14, 21, or 28 days, the maturation and co-differentiation into a cardiomyocyte lineage was observed. Phenotypic induction was characterized at morphological, immunological, biochemical and molecular levels. The observed expression of transcripts coding for cardiomyocyte phenotypic markers and the immunolocalization of cardiomyogenic lineage-associated proteins revealed typical expression patterns of neo-cardiomyogenesis. At the biochemical level differentiating cells exhibited appropriate metabolic activity and at the ultrastructural level myofibrillar and sarcomeric organization were indicative of an immature phenotype. Our 3-D co-culture system sustains the ECMs in vitro continuum of differentiation process and simultaneously induces the maturation and differentiation of BMSCs into cardiomyocyte-like cells. Thus, this novel 3-D co-culture system provides a useful in vitro model to investigate the functional role and interplay of developing ECMs and BMSCs during cardiomyogenic differentiation.

  10. Patient fibroblasts-derived induced neurons demonstrate autonomous neuronal defects in adult-onset Krabbe disease

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won Jun; Oh, Ki-Wook; Nahm, Minyeop; Xue, Yuanchao; Choi, Jae Hyeok; Choi, Ji Young; Kim, Young-Eun; Chung, Ki Wha; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Ki, Chang-Seok; Kim, Seung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Krabbe disease (KD) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder caused by defective β-galactosylceramidase (GALC), a lysosomal enzyme responsible for cleavage of several key substrates including psychosine. Accumulation of psychosine to the cytotoxic levels in KD patients is thought to cause dysfunctions in myelinating glial cells based on a comprehensive study of demyelination in KD. However, recent evidence suggests myelin-independent neuronal death in the murine model of KD, thus indicating defective GALC in neurons as an autonomous mechanism for neuronal cell death in KD. These observations prompted us to generate induced neurons (iNeurons) from two adult-onset KD patients carrying compound heterozygous mutations (p.[K563*];[L634S]) and (p.[N228_S232delinsTP];[G286D]) to determine the direct contribution of autonomous neuronal toxicity to KD. Here we report that directly converted KD iNeurons showed not only diminished GALC activity and increased psychosine levels, as expected, but also neurite fragmentation and abnormal neuritic branching. The lysosomal-associated membrane proteins 1 (LAMP1) was expressed at higher levels than controls, LAMP1-positive vesicles were significantly enlarged and fragmented, and mitochondrial morphology and its function were altered in KD iNeurons. Strikingly, we demonstrated that psychosine was sufficient to induce neurite defects, mitochondrial fragmentation, and lysosomal alterations in iNeurons derived in healthy individuals, thus establishing the causal effect of the cytotoxic GALC substrate in KD and the autonomous neuronal toxicity in KD pathology. PMID:27780934

  11. Gestational exposure to diethylstilbestrol alters cardiac structure/function, protein expression and DNA methylation in adult male mice progeny

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, Rami; Kasneci, Amanda; Mepham, Kathryn; Sebag, Igal A.; and others

    2013-01-01

    Pregnant women, and thus their fetuses, are exposed to many endocrine disruptor compounds (EDCs). Fetal cardiomyocytes express sex hormone receptors making them potentially susceptible to re-programming by estrogenizing EDCs. Diethylstilbestrol (DES) is a proto-typical, non-steroidal estrogen. We hypothesized that changes in adult cardiac structure/function after gestational exposure to the test compound DES would be a proof in principle for the possibility of estrogenizing environmental EDCs to also alter the fetal heart. Vehicle (peanut oil) or DES (0.1, 1.0 and 10.0 μg/kg/da.) was orally delivered to pregnant C57bl/6n dams on gestation days 11.5–14.5. At 3 months, male progeny were left sedentary or were swim trained for 4 weeks. Echocardiography of isoflurane anesthetized mice revealed similar cardiac structure/function in all sedentary mice, but evidence of systolic dysfunction and increased diastolic relaxation after swim training at higher DES doses. The calcium homeostasis proteins, SERCA2a, phospholamban, phospho-serine 16 phospholamban and calsequestrin 2, are important for cardiac contraction and relaxation. Immunoblot analyses of ventricle homogenates showed increased expression of SERCA2a and calsequestrin 2 in DES mice and greater molecular remodeling of these proteins and phospho-serine 16 phospholamban in swim trained DES mice. DES increased cardiac DNA methyltransferase 3a expression and DNA methylation in the CpG island within the calsequestrin 2 promoter in heart. Thus, gestational DES epigenetically altered ventricular DNA, altered cardiac function and expression, and reduced the ability of adult progeny to cardiac remodel when physically challenged. We conclude that gestational exposure to estrogenizing EDCs may impact cardiac structure/function in adult males. -- Highlights: ► Gestational DES changes cardiac SERCA2a and CASQ2 expression. ► Echocardiography identified systolic dysfunction and increased diastolic relaxation. ► DES

  12. Embryonic caffeine exposure acts via A1 adenosine receptors to alter adult cardiac function and DNA methylation in mice.

    PubMed

    Buscariollo, Daniela L; Fang, Xiefan; Greenwood, Victoria; Xue, Huiling; Rivkees, Scott A; Wendler, Christopher C

    2014-01-01

    Evidence indicates that disruption of normal prenatal development influences an individual's risk of developing obesity and cardiovascular disease as an adult. Thus, understanding how in utero exposure to chemical agents leads to increased susceptibility to adult diseases is a critical health related issue. Our aim was to determine whether adenosine A1 receptors (A1ARs) mediate the long-term effects of in utero caffeine exposure on cardiac function and whether these long-term effects are the result of changes in DNA methylation patterns in adult hearts. Pregnant A1AR knockout mice were treated with caffeine (20 mg/kg) or vehicle (0.09% NaCl) i.p. at embryonic day 8.5. This caffeine treatment results in serum levels equivalent to the consumption of 2-4 cups of coffee in humans. After dams gave birth, offspring were examined at 8-10 weeks of age. A1AR+/+ offspring treated in utero with caffeine were 10% heavier than vehicle controls. Using echocardiography, we observed altered cardiac function and morphology in adult mice exposed to caffeine in utero. Caffeine treatment decreased cardiac output by 11% and increased left ventricular wall thickness by 29% during diastole. Using DNA methylation arrays, we identified altered DNA methylation patterns in A1AR+/+ caffeine treated hearts, including 7719 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) within the genome and an overall decrease in DNA methylation of 26%. Analysis of genes associated with DMRs revealed that many are associated with cardiac hypertrophy. These data demonstrate that A1ARs mediate in utero caffeine effects on cardiac function and growth and that caffeine exposure leads to changes in DNA methylation.

  13. Beating and insulting children as a risk for adult cancer, cardiac disease and asthma.

    PubMed

    Hyland, Michael E; Alkhalaf, Ahmed M; Whalley, Ben

    2013-12-01

    The use of physical punishment for children is associated with poor psychological and behavioral outcomes, but the causal pathway is controversial, and the effects on later physical health unknown. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of asthma, cancer, and cardiac patients (150 in each category, 75 male) recruited from outpatient clinics and 250 healthy controls (125 male). All participants were 40-60 years old and citizens of Saudi Arabia, where the use of beating and insults is an acceptable parenting style. Demographic data and recalled frequency of beatings and insults as a child were assessed on an 8-point scale. Beating and insults were highly correlated (ρ = 0.846). Propensity score matching was used to control for demographic differences between the disease and healthy groups. After controlling for differences, more frequent beating (once or more per month) and insults were associated with a significantly increased risk for cancer (RR = 1.7), cardiac disease (RR = 1.3) and asthma (RR = 1.6), with evidence of increased risk for cancer and asthma with beating frequency of once every 6 months or more. Our results show that a threatening parenting style of beating and insults is associated with increased risk for somatic disease, possibly because this form of parenting induces stress. Our findings are consistent with previous research showing that child abuse and other early life stressors adversely affect adult somatic health, but provide evidence that the pathogenic effects occur also with chronic minor stress. A stress-inducing parenting style, even when normative, has long term adverse health consequences.

  14. Optimal range for parvalbumin as relaxing agent in adult cardiac myocytes: gene transfer and mathematical modeling.

    PubMed Central

    Coutu, Pierre; Metzger, Joseph M

    2002-01-01

    Parvalbumin (PV) has recently been shown to increase the relaxation rate when expressed in intact isolated cardiac myocytes via adenovirus gene transfer. We report here a combined experimental and mathematical modeling approach to determine the dose-response and the sarcomere length (SL) shortening-frequency relationship of PV in adult rat cardiac myocytes in primary culture. The dose-response was obtained experimentally by observing the PV-transduced myocytes at different time points after gene transfer. Calcium transients and unloaded mechanical contractions were measured. The results were as follows. At low estimated [PV] (approximately 0.01 mM), contractile parameters were unchanged; at intermediate [PV], relaxation rate of the mechanical contraction and the decay rate of the calcium transient increased with little effects on amplitude; and at high [PV] (approximately 0.1 mM), relaxation rate was further increased, but the amplitudes of the mechanical contraction and the calcium transient were diminished when compared with control myocytes. The SL shortening-frequency relationship exhibited a biphasic response to increasing stimulus frequency in controls (decrease in amplitude and re-lengthening time from 0.2 to 1.0 Hz followed by an increase in these parameters from 2.0 to 4.0 Hz). The effect of PV was to flatten this frequency response. This flattening effect was partly explained by a reduction in the variation in fractional binding of PV to calcium during beats at high frequency. In conclusion, experimental results and mathematical modeling indicate that there is an optimal PV range for which relaxation rate is increased with little effect on contractile amplitude and that PV effectiveness decreases as the stimulus frequency increases. PMID:11964244

  15. Plasma Levels of High Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin T in Adults with Repaired Tetralogy of Fallot

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Clare T. M.; Wong, Sophia J.; Ip, Janice J. K.; Wong, Wai-keung; Tsang, Kwong-cheong; Lam, Wendy W. M.; Cheung, Yiu-fai

    2015-01-01

    Detectable low circulating level of cardiac troponin T (cTnT) may reflect subclinical myocardial injury. We tested the hypothesis that circulating levels of hs-cTnT are altered in adults with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) and associated with ventricular volume load and function. Eighty-eight TOF patients and 48 controls were studied. Plasma hs-cTnT levels were determined using a highly sensitive assay (hs-cTnT). The right (RV) and left ventricular (LV) volumes and ejection fraction (EF) were measured using 3D echocardiography and, in 52 patients, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). The median (interquartile range) for male and female patients were 4.87 (3.83–6.62) ng/L and 3.11 (1.00–3.87) ng/L, respectively. Thirty percent of female but none of the male patients had increased hs-cTnT levels. Female patients with elevated hs-cTnT levels, compared to those without, had greater RV end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes and LV systolic dyssynchrony index (all p < 0.05). For patient cohort only, hs-cTnT levels correlated positively with CMR-derived RV end-diastolic volume and negatively with echocardiography-derived LV and RV EF (all p < 0.05). Multiple linear regression identified sex and RV EF as significant correlates of log-transformed hs-cTnT levels. Increased hs-cTnT levels occur in 30% of female patients after TOF repair, and are associated with greater RV volumes and worse RV EF. PMID:26360613

  16. Effects of DNA methyltransferase inhibitor RG108 on methylation in buffalo adult fibroblasts and subsequent embryonic development following somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Sun, H L; Meng, L N; Zhao, X; Jiang, J R; Liu, Q Y; Shi, D S; Lu, F H

    2016-09-02

    Buffalo are characteristic livestock of the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region of China, but their low reproductive capacity necessitates the use of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). We investigated the effects of RG108 on DNA methylation in buffalo adult fibroblasts, and on subsequent SCNT embryo development. RG108 treatment (0, 5, 10, 20, and 100 mM) had no effect on cell morphology, viability, or karyotype (2n = 48), and cell growth followed a typical "S" curve. Immunohistochemistry showed that relative DNA methylation gradually decreased as RG108 concentration increased, and was significantly lower in the 20 and 100 mM groups compared to the 0, 5, and 10 mM treatments (0.94 ± 0.03 and 0.92 ± 0.05 vs 1.0 ± 0.02, 0.98 ± 0.05, and 0.98 ± 0.09, respectively; P < 0.05). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that DNMT1 gene expression of fibroblasts administered 10, 20, and 100 mM RG108 was significantly lower than those in the 0 and 5 mM groups (0.2 ± 0.05, 0.18 ± 0.07, and 0.3 ± 0.09 vs 1.0 ± 0.12 and 1.4 ± 0.12, respectively; P < 0.05). Treatment with 20 mM RG108 resulted in the lowest expression levels. Fibroblasts incubated with 20 mM RG108 for 72 h were used as donor cells to generate SCNT embryos. A greater number of such embryos developed into blastocysts compared to the non-treated group (28.9 ± 3.9 vs 15.3 ± 3.4%; P < 0.05). RG108 treatment can modify DNA methylation in buffalo adult fibroblasts and promote development of subsequent SCNT embryos.

  17. Prevention and Monitoring of Cardiac Dysfunction in Survivors of Adult Cancers: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline.

    PubMed

    Armenian, Saro H; Lacchetti, Christina; Barac, Ana; Carver, Joseph; Constine, Louis S; Denduluri, Neelima; Dent, Susan; Douglas, Pamela S; Durand, Jean-Bernard; Ewer, Michael; Fabian, Carol; Hudson, Melissa; Jessup, Mariell; Jones, Lee W; Ky, Bonnie; Mayer, Erica L; Moslehi, Javid; Oeffinger, Kevin; Ray, Katharine; Ruddy, Kathryn; Lenihan, Daniel

    2016-12-05

    Purpose Cardiac dysfunction is a serious adverse effect of certain cancer-directed therapies that can interfere with the efficacy of treatment, decrease quality of life, or impact the actual survival of the patient with cancer. The purpose of this effort was to develop recommendations for prevention and monitoring of cardiac dysfunction in survivors of adult-onset cancers. Methods Recommendations were developed by an expert panel with multidisciplinary representation using a systematic review (1996 to 2016) of meta-analyses, randomized clinical trials, observational studies, and clinical experience. Study quality was assessed using established methods, per study design. The guideline recommendations were crafted in part using the Guidelines Into Decision Support methodology. Results A total of 104 studies met eligibility criteria and compose the evidentiary basis for the recommendations. The strength of the recommendations in these guidelines is based on the quality, amount, and consistency of the evidence and the balance between benefits and harms. Recommendations It is important for health care providers to initiate the discussion regarding the potential for cardiac dysfunction in individuals in whom the risk is sufficiently high before beginning therapy. Certain higher risk populations of survivors of cancer may benefit from prevention and screening strategies implemented during cancer-directed therapies. Clinical suspicion for cardiac disease should be high and threshold for cardiac evaluation should be low in any survivor who has received potentially cardiotoxic therapy. For certain higher risk survivors of cancer, routine surveillance with cardiac imaging may be warranted after completion of cancer-directed therapy, so that appropriate interventions can be initiated to halt or even reverse the progression of cardiac dysfunction.

  18. Adrenergic responsiveness is reduced, while baseline cardiac function is preserved in old adult conscious monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, N.; Kiuchi, K.; Shen, Y. T.; Vatner, S. F.; Vatner, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    To examine the physiological deficit to adrenergic stimulation with aging, five younger adult (3 +/- 1 yr old) and nine older adult (17 +/- 1 yr old) healthy monkeys were studied after instrumentation with a left ventricular (LV) pressure gauge, aortic and left atrial catheters, and aortic flow probes to measure cardiac output directly. There were no significant changes in baseline hemodynamics in conscious older monkeys. For example, an index of contractility, the first derivative of LV pressure (LV dP/dt) was similar (3,191 +/- 240, young vs. 3,225 +/- 71 mmHg/s, old) as well as in isovolumic relaxation, tau (24.3 +/- 1.7 ms, young vs. 23.0 +/- 1.0 ms, old) was similar. However, inotropic, lusitropic, and chronotropic responses to isoproterenol (Iso; 0.1 micrograms/kg), norepinephrine (NE; 0.4 micrograms/kg), and forskolin (For; 75 nmol/kg) were significantly (P < 0.05) depressed in older monkeys. For example. Iso increased LV dP/dt by by 146 +/- 14% in younger monkeys and by only 70 +/- 5% in older monkeys. Iso also reduced tau more in younger monkeys (-28 +/- 7%) compared with older monkeys (-13 +/- 3%). Furthermore, peripheral vascular responsiveness to Iso, NE, For, and phenylephrine (PE; 5 micrograms/kg) was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced in older monkeys. For example, phenylephrine (5 micrograms/kg) increased total peripheral resistence by 69 +/- 4% in younger monkeys and by only 45 +/- 3% in older monkeys. Thus in older monkeys without associated cardiovascular disease, baseline hemodynamics are preserved, but adrenergic receptor responsiveness is reduced systemically, not just in the heart.

  19. Phosphatidic acid stimulates inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate production in adult cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Kurz, T; Wolf, R A; Corr, P B

    1993-03-01

    The cellular content of phosphatidic acid can increase in response to several agonists either by phosphorylation of diacylglycerol after phospholipase C-catalyzed hydrolysis of phospholipids or directly through activation of phospholipase D. Although previous findings indicated that the generation of phosphatidic acid was exclusively a means of regulation of the cellular concentration of diacylglycerol, more recent studies have indicated that phosphatidic acid may also directly regulate several cellular functions. Accordingly, the present study was performed to assess whether phosphatidic acid could stimulate cardiac phospholipase C in intact adult rabbit ventricular myocytes. The mass of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate [Ins (1,4,5)P3] was determined by a specific and sensitive binding protein assay and by direct mass measurement using anion exchange chromatography for separation of selected inositol phosphates and gas chromatography and mass spectrometry for quantification of inositol monophosphate (IP1), inositol bisphosphate (IP2), inositol trisphosphate (IP3), and inositol tetrakisphosphate (IP4). Phosphatidic acid (10(-9)-10(-6) M) elicited a rapid concentration-dependent increase in Ins (1,4,5)P3 accumulation, with the peak fourfold to fivefold increase at 30 seconds of stimulation; the concentration required for 50% of maximal stimulation was 4.4 x 10(-8) M. The time course of individual inositol phosphates indicated a successive increase in the mass of IP3, IP4, IP2, and IP1 in response to stimulation with phosphatidic acid. The production of Ins (1,4,5)P3 in response to phosphatidic acid was not altered in the absence of extracellular calcium or in the presence of extracellular EGTA (10(-3) M). Thus, these findings indicate that phosphatidic acid is a potent activator of inositol phosphate production in adult ventricular myocytes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Basic fibroblast growth factor has a differential effect on MyoD conversion of cultured aortic smooth muscle cells from newborn and adult rats.

    PubMed Central

    van Neck, J. W.; Medina, J. J.; Onnekink, C.; van der Ven, P. F.; Bloemers, H. P.; Schwartz, S. M.

    1993-01-01

    MyoD is a master regulatory gene for myogenesis that also converts many mesoderm-derived cells into the skeletal muscle phenotype. Rat aortic smooth muscle cells do not contain MyoD homologous mRNA. However, expression of an exogenously supplied MyoD gene in aortic smooth muscle cells cultured from newborn and adult animals converts these cells to elongated myoblasts and myotubes expressing the skeletal muscle genes for titin, nebulin, myosin, and skeletal alpha-actin. The presence of basic fibroblast growth factor during growth and serum starvation completely inhibits MyoD-mediated conversion in cultures of newborn smooth muscle cells. However, in smooth muscle cell cultures derived from adult rats the presence of fibroblast growth factor increases the conversion frequency. The differential response of exogenous MyoD suggests that the two morphological types of aortic smooth muscle cells, one typical for the newborn rat, the other for the adult rat, represent two distinctive states of differentiation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:8391216

  1. In utero and lactational 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin exposure: Effects on fetal and adult cardiac gene expression and adult cardiac and renal morphology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mouse heart is a target of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) during fetal development, and microarray analysis demonstrates significant changes in expression of cardiac genes involved in extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. We tested the hypothesis that developmental TCDD exposure wo...

  2. The cardiac stem cell compartment is indispensable for myocardial cell homeostasis, repair and regeneration in the adult.

    PubMed

    Nadal-Ginard, Bernardo; Ellison, Georgina M; Torella, Daniele

    2014-11-01

    Resident cardiac stem cells in embryonic, neonatal and adult mammalian heart have been identified by different membrane markers and transcription factors. However, despite a flurry of publications no consensus has been reached on the identity and actual regenerative effects of the adult cardiac stem cells. Intensive research on the adult mammalian heart's capacity for self-renewal of its muscle cell mass has led to a consensus that new cardiomyocytes (CMs) are indeed formed throughout adult mammalian life albeit at a disputed frequency. The physiological significance of this renewal, the origin of the new CMs, and the rate of adult CM turnover are still highly debated. Myocyte replacement, particularly after injury, was originally attributed to differentiation of a stem cell compartment. More recently, it has been reported that CMs are mainly replaced by the division of pre-existing post-mitotic CMs. These latter results, if confirmed, would shift the target of regenerative therapy toward boosting mature CM cell-cycle re-entry. Despite this controversy, it is documented that the adult endogenous c-kit(pos) cardiac stem cells (c-kit(pos) eCSCs) participate in adaptations to myocardial stress, and, when transplanted into the myocardium, regenerate most cardiomyocytes and microvasculature lost in an infarct. Nevertheless, the in situ myogenic potential of adult c-kit(pos) cardiac cells has been questioned. To revisit the regenerative potential of c-kit(pos) eCSCs, we have recently employed experimental protocols of severe diffuse myocardial damage in combination with several genetic murine models and cell transplantation approaches showing that eCSCs are necessary and sufficient for CM regeneration, leading to complete cellular, anatomical, and functional myocardial recovery. Here we will review the available data on adult eCSC biology and their regenerative potential placing it in the context of the different claimed mechanisms of CM replacement. These data are in

  3. Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: complex congenital cardiac lesions.

    PubMed

    Silversides, Candice K; Salehian, Omid; Oechslin, Erwin; Schwerzmann, Markus; Vonder Muhll, Isabelle; Khairy, Paul; Horlick, Eric; Landzberg, Mike; Meijboom, Folkert; Warnes, Carole; Therrien, Judith

    2010-03-01

    With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. They have distinctive forms of heart failure and their cardiac disease can be associated with pulmonary hypertension, thromboemboli, complex arrhythmias and sudden death. Medical aspects that need to be considered relate to the long-term and multisystemic effects of single ventricle physiology, cyanosis, systemic right ventricles, complex intracardiac baffles and failing subpulmonary right ventricles. Since the 2001 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference report on the management of adults with CHD, there have been significant advances in the field of adult CHD. Therefore, new clinical guidelines have been written by Canadian adult CHD physicians in collaboration with an international panel of experts in the field. Part III of the guidelines includes recommendations for the care of patients with complete transposition of the great arteries, congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, Fontan operations and single ventricles, Eisenmenger's syndrome, and cyanotic heart disease. Topics addressed include genetics, clinical outcomes, recommended diagnostic workup, surgical and interventional options, treatment of arrhythmias, assessment of pregnancy risk and follow-up requirements. The complete document consists of four manuscripts, which are published online in the present issue of The Canadian Journal of Cardiology. The complete document and references can also be found at www.ccs.ca or www.cachnet.org.

  4. Fibroblast heterogeneity: more than skin deep.

    PubMed

    Sorrell, J Michael; Caplan, Arnold I

    2004-02-15

    Dermal fibroblasts are a dynamic and diverse population of cells whose functions in skin in many respects remain unknown. Normal adult human skin contains at least three distinct subpopulations of fibroblasts, which occupy unique niches in the dermis. Fibroblasts from each of these niches exhibit distinctive differences when cultured separately. Specific differences in fibroblast physiology are evident in papillary dermal fibroblasts, which reside in the superficial dermis, and reticular fibroblasts, which reside in the deep dermis. Both of these subpopulations of fibroblasts differ from the fibroblasts that are associated with hair follicles. Fibroblasts engage in fibroblast-epidermal interactions during hair development and in interfollicular regions of skin. They also play an important role in cutaneous wound repair and an ever-increasing role in bioengineering of skin. Bioengineered skin currently performs important roles in providing (1) a basic understanding of skin biology, (2) a vehicle for testing topically applied products and (3) a resource for skin replacement.

  5. Generation of fluorescently labeled cell lines, C3A hepatoma cells, and human adult skin fibroblasts to study coculture models.

    PubMed

    Samluk, Anna; Zakrzewska, Karolina Ewa; Pluta, Krzysztof Dariusz

    2013-07-01

    Hepatic/nonhepatic cell cocultures are widely used in studies on the role of homo- and heterotypic interactions in liver physiology and pathophysiology. In this article, for the first time, establishment of the coculture model employing hepatoma C3A cells and human skin fibroblasts, stably expressing fluorescent markers, is described. Suitability of the model in studying coculture conditions using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry was examined. C3A cells spontaneously formed island-like growth patterns surrounded by fibroblasts. The "islands" size and resulting intensity of the homo- and heterotypic interactions can easily be tuned by applying various plated cells ratios. We examined the capability of the hepatoma cells to produce albumin in hepatic/nonhepatic cell cocultures. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) tests showed that greater number of fibroblasts in coculture, resulting in smaller sizes of hepatoma "islands," and thus, a larger heterotypic interface, promoted higher albumin synthesis. The use of fluorescently labeled cells in flow cytometry measurements enabled us to separately gate two cell populations and to evaluate protein expression only in/on cells of interest. Flow cytometry confirmed ELISA results indicating the highest albumin production in hepatoma cells cocultured with the greatest number of fibroblasts and the inhibited protein synthesis in coculture with osteosarcoma cells.

  6. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and the assessment of ebstein anomaly in adults.

    PubMed

    Yalonetsky, Sergey; Tobler, Daniel; Greutmann, Matthias; Crean, Andrew M; Wintersperger, Bernd J; Nguyen, Elsie T; Oechslin, Erwin N; Silversides, Candice K; Wald, Rachel M

    2011-03-01

    No published studies have evaluated the role of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging for the assessment of Ebstein anomaly. Our objective was to evaluate the right heart characteristics in adults with unrepaired Ebstein anomaly using contemporary CMR imaging techniques. Consecutive patients with unrepaired Ebstein anomaly and complete CMR studies from 2004 to 2009 were identified (n = 32). Volumetric measurements were obtained from the short-axis and axial views, including assessment of the functional right ventricular (RV) end-diastolic volume (EDV) and end-systolic volume. The volume of the atrialized portion of the right ventricle in end-diastole was calculated as the difference between the total RVEDV and the functional RVEDV. The reproducibility of the measurements in the axial and short-axis views was determined within and between observers. The median value derived from the short-axis and axial views was 136 ml/m(2) (range 59 to 347) and 136 ml/m(2) (range 63 to 342) for the functional RVEDV, 153 ml/m(2) (range 64 to 441) and 154 ml/m(2) (range 67 to 436) for the total RVEDV, 49% (range 32% to 46%) and 50% (range 40% to 64%) for the functional RV ejection fraction, respectively. The axial measurements demonstrated lower intraobserver and interobserver variability than the short-axis approach for all values, with the exception of the intraobserver functional RVEDV and interobserver total RVEDV for which the limits of agreement and variance were not significantly different between the 2 views. In conclusion, measurements of right heart size and systolic function in patients with Ebstein anomaly can be reliably achieved using CMR imaging. Axial imaging appeared to provide more reproducible data than that obtained from the short-axis views.

  7. microRNA and Cardiac Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Gnecchi, Massimiliano; Pisano, Federica; Bariani, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Heart diseases are a very common health problem in developed as well as developing countries. In particular, ischemic heart disease and heart failure represent a plague for the patients and for the society. Loss of cardiac tissue after myocardial infarction or dysfunctioning tissue in nonischemic cardiomyopathies may result in cardiac failure. Despite great advancements in the treatment of these diseases, there is a substantial unmet need for novel therapies, ideally addressing repair and regeneration of the damaged or lost myocardium. Along this line, cardiac cell based therapies have gained substantial attention. Three main approaches are currently under investigation: stem cell therapy with either embryonic or adult stem cells; generation of patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells; stimulation of endogenous regeneration trough direct reprogramming of fibroblasts into cardiomyocytes, activation of resident cardiac stem cells or induction of native resident cardiomyocytes to reenter the cell cycle. All these strategies need to be optimized since their efficiency is low.It has recently become clear that cardiac signaling and transcriptional pathways are intimately intertwined with microRNA molecules which act as modulators of cardiac development, function, and disease. Moreover, miRNA also regulates stem cell differentiation. Here we describe how miRNA may circumvent hurdles that hamper the field of cardiac regeneration and stem cell therapy, and how miRNA may result as the most suitable solution for the damaged heart.

  8. Measurement of cardiac output in adult and newborn animals by ascorbic acid dilution.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, J K; Haselby, K A; Paradise, R R

    1984-05-01

    We have developed an ascorbic acid-dilution method for measuring cardiac output which requires minimal blood withdrawal. Ascorbate is injected into a central venous catheter. The indicator-dilution curve is obtained by drawing blood from an arterial catheter through an amperometric cell at 0.96 ml/min for 35 s. The current is measured by a picoammeter . A calibration curve is obtained in 15 s prior to each indicator-dilution curve. An on-line digital computer measures the curve areas and calculates the cardiac output. Cardiac outputs of heparinized dogs anesthetized with pentobarbital and halothane measured by this method (AA) compared closely to cardiac outputs measured by the dye-dilution method (CG) (AA = 0.96 CG + 20 ml/min, r = 0.98). Both the cardiac output and the arterial blood pressure remained stable during replicate measurements of the cardiac output of 1-day-old piglets. This system allows cardiac output determinations of neonatal subjects without excessive blood removal and, with further development, should be practical in human neonates.

  9. Human fetal cardiac progenitors: The role of stem cells and progenitors in the fetal and adult heart.

    PubMed

    Bulatovic, Ivana; Månsson-Broberg, Agneta; Sylvén, Christer; Grinnemo, Karl-Henrik

    2016-02-01

    The human fetal heart is formed early during embryogenesis as a result of cell migrations, differentiation, and formative blood flow. It begins to beat around gestation day 22. Progenitor cells are derived from mesoderm (endocardium and myocardium), proepicardium (epicardium and coronary vessels), and neural crest (heart valves, outflow tract septation, and parasympathetic innervation). A variety of molecular disturbances in the factors regulating the specification and differentiation of these cells can cause congenital heart disease. This review explores the contribution of different cardiac progenitors to the embryonic heart development; the pathways and transcription factors guiding their expansion, migration, and functional differentiation; and the endogenous regenerative capacity of the adult heart including the plasticity of cardiomyocytes. Unfolding these mechanisms will become the basis for understanding the dynamics of specific congenital heart disease as well as a means to develop therapy for fetal as well as postnatal cardiac defects and heart failure.

  10. Prophylactic furosemide infusion decreasing early major postoperative renal dysfunction in on-pump adult cardiac surgery: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Fakhari, Solmaz; Bavil, Fariba Mirzaei; Bilehjani, Eissa; Abolhasani, Sona; Mirinazhad, Moussa; Naghipour, Bahman

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Acute renal dysfunction is a common complication of cardiac surgery. Furosemide is used in prevention, or treatment, of acute renal dysfunction. This study was conducted to evaluate the protective effects of intra- and early postoperative furosemide infusion on preventing acute renal dysfunction in elective adult cardiac surgery. Methods Eighty-one patients, candidates of elective cardiac surgery, were enrolled in this study in either the furosemide (n=41) or placebo (n=40) group. Furosemide (2 mg/h) or 0.9% saline was administered and continued up to 12 hours postoperatively. We measured serum creatinine (Scr) at preoperative and on the second and fifth postoperative days. Then calculated estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at these times. An increase in Scr of >0.5 mg/dL and/or >25%–50%, compared to preoperative values, was considered as acute kidney injury (AKI). In contrast, an increase in Scr by >50% and/or the need for hemodialysis was regarded as acute renal failure (ARF). At the end we compared the AKI or ARF incidence between the two groups. Results On the second and fifth postoperative days, Scr was lower, and the eGFR was higher in the furosemide group. AKI incidence was similar in the two groups (11 vs 12 cases; P-value 0.622); however, ARF rate was lower in furosemide group (1 vs 6 cases; P-value 0.044). During the study period, Scr was more stable in the furosemide group, however in the placebo group, Scr initially increased and then decreased to its preoperative value after a few days. Conclusion This study showed that intra- and early postoperative furosemide infusion has a renal protective effect in adult cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Although this protective effect cannot be discovered in mild renal dysfunctions, it apparently reduces the rate of the more severe renal dysfunctions. A more multidisciplinary strategy may be needed in reducing the milder renal damage. PMID:28176949

  11. Cardiac structure/function, protein expression, and DNA methylation are changed in adult female mice exposed to diethylstilbestrol in utero.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Rami; Kasneci, Amanda; Sebag, Igal A; Chalifour, Lorraine E

    2013-09-01

    The detrimental effects of in utero exposure to the non-steroidal estrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES) are particularly marked in women. Fetal hearts express estrogen receptors, making them potentially responsive to DES. To examine whether gestational exposure to DES would impact the heart, we exposed pregnant C57bl/6n dams to DES (0.1, 1.0, and 10.0 μg·(kg body mass)(-1)·day(-1)) on gestation days 11.5-14.5, and examined the measured cardiac structure/function and calcium homeostasis protein expression in adult females. At baseline, echocardiography revealed eccentric hypertrophy in mice treated with 10.0 μg·(kg body mass)(-1)·day(-1) DES, and immunoblots showed increased SERCA2a in all DES-treated mice. Mice were swim-trained to assess cardiac remodeling. Swim-trained vehicle-treated mice developed eccentric hypertrophy without changing SERCA2 or calsequestrin 2 expression. In contrast, no DES-treated mice hypertrophied, and all increased in SERCA2a and calsequestrin 2 expression after training. To determine whether DES-induced changes in DNA methylation is part of the mechanism for its long-term effects, we measured DNA methyltransferase expression and DNA methylation. Global DNA methylation and DNA methyltransferase 3a expression were unchanged. However, DES-treated mice had increased DNA methylation in the calsequestrin 2 promoter. Thus, gestational exposure to DES altered female ventricular DNA, cardiac structure/function, and calcium homeostasis protein expression. We conclude that gestational exposure to estrogenizing compounds may impact cardiac structure/function in adult females.

  12. Evaluation of the estimated continuous cardiac output monitoring system in adults and children undergoing kidney transplant surgery: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Terada, Takashi; Maemura, Yumi; Yoshida, Akiko; Muto, Rika; Ochiai, Ryoichi

    2014-02-01

    Evaluation of the estimated continuous cardiac output (esCCO) allows non-invasive and continuous assessment of cardiac output. However, the applicability of this approach in children has not been assessed thus far. We compared the correlation coefficient, bias, standard deviation (SD), and the lower and upper 95 % limits of agreement for esCCO and dye densitography-cardiac output (DDG-CO) measurements by pulse dye densitometry (PDD) in adults and children. On the basis of these assessments, we aimed to examine whether esCCO can be used in pediatric patients. DDG-CO was measured by pulse dye densitometry (PDD) using indocyanine green. Modified-pulse wave transit time, obtained using pulse oximetry and electrocardiography, was used to measure esCCO. Correlations between DDG-CO and esCCO in adults and children were analyzed using regression analysis with the least squares method. Differences between the two correlation coefficients were statistically analyzed using a correlation coefficient test. Bland-Altman plots were used to evaluate bias and SD for DDG-CO and esCCO in both adults and children, and 95 % limits of agreement (bias ± 1.96 SD) and percentage error (1.96 SD/mean DDG-CO) were calculated and compared. The average age of the adult patients (n = 10) was 39.3 ± 12.1 years, while the average age of the pediatric patients (n = 7) was 9.4 ± 3.1 years (p < 0.001). For adults, the correlation coefficient was 0.756; bias, -0.258 L/min; SD, 1.583 L/min; lower and upper 95 % limits of agreement for DDG-CO and esCCO, -3.360 and 2.844 L/min, respectively; and percentage error, 42.7 %. For children, the corresponding values were 0.904; -0.270; 0.908; -2.051 and 1.510 L/min, respectively; and 35.7 %. Due to the high percentage error values, we could not establish a correlation between esCCO and DDG-CO. However, the 95 % limits of agreement and percentage error were better in children than in adults. Due to the high percentage error, we could not confirm a correlation

  13. Incidence of inferior vena cava thrombosis detected by transthoracic echocardiography in the immediate postoperative period after adult cardiac and general surgery.

    PubMed

    Saranteas, T; Kostopanagiotou, G; Tzoufi, M; Drachtidi, K; Knox, G M; Panou, F

    2013-11-01

    Venous thromboembolism is an important complication after general and cardiac surgery. Using transthoracic echocardiography, this study assessed the incidence of inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombosis among a total of 395 and 289 cardiac surgical and major surgical patients in the immediate postoperative period after cardiac and major surgery, respectively. All transthoracic echocardiography was performed by a specialist intensivist within 24 hours after surgery with special emphasis on using the subcostal view in the supine position to visualise the IVC. Of the 395 cardiac surgical patients studied, the IVC was successfully visualised using the subcostal view in 315 patients (79.8%) and eight of these patients (2.5%) had a partially obstructive thrombosis in the IVC. In 250 out of 289 (85%) general surgical patients, the IVC was also clearly visualised, but only one patient (0.4%) had an IVC thrombosis (2.5 vs 0.4%, P <0.05). In summary, visualisation of the IVC was feasible in most patients in the immediate postoperative period after both adult cardiac and major surgery. IVC thrombosis appeared to be more common after adult cardiac surgery than general surgery. A large prospective cohort study is needed to define the risk factors for IVC thrombus and whether early thromboprophylaxis can reduce the incidence of IVC thrombus after adult cardiac surgery.

  14. Electromechanical Conditioning of Adult Progenitor Cells Improves Recovery of Cardiac Function After Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Llucià-Valldeperas, Aida; Soler-Botija, Carolina; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Roura, Santiago; Prat-Vidal, Cristina; Perea-Gil, Isaac; Sanchez, Benjamin; Bragos, Ramon; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Bayes-Genis, Antoni

    2017-03-01

    Cardiac cells are subjected to mechanical and electrical forces, which regulate gene expression and cellular function. Therefore, in vitro electromechanical stimuli could benefit further integration of therapeutic cells into the myocardium. Our goals were (a) to study the viability of a tissue-engineered construct with cardiac adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells (cardiac ATDPCs) and (b) to examine the effect of electromechanically stimulated cardiac ATDPCs within a myocardial infarction (MI) model in mice for the first time. Cardiac ATDPCs were electromechanically stimulated at 2-millisecond pulses of 50 mV/cm at 1 Hz and 10% stretching during 7 days. The cells were harvested, labeled, embedded in a fibrin hydrogel, and implanted over the infarcted area of the murine heart. A total of 39 animals were randomly distributed and sacrificed at 21 days: groups of grafts without cells and with stimulated or nonstimulated cells. Echocardiography and gene and protein analyses were also carried out. Physiologically stimulated ATDPCs showed increased expression of cardiac transcription factors, structural genes, and calcium handling genes. At 21 days after implantation, cardiac function (measured as left ventricle ejection fraction between presacrifice and post-MI) increased up to 12% in stimulated grafts relative to nontreated animals. Vascularization and integration with the host blood supply of grafts with stimulated cells resulted in increased vessel density in the infarct border region. Trained cells within the implanted fibrin patch expressed main cardiac markers and migrated into the underlying ischemic myocardium. To conclude, synchronous electromechanical cell conditioning before delivery may be a preferred alternative when considering strategies for heart repair after myocardial infarction. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:970-981.

  15. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation of adults with in-hospital cardiac arrest using the Utstein style

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Rose Mary Ferreira Lisboa; Silva, Bruna Adriene Gomes de Lima e; Silva, Fábio Junior Modesto e; Amaral, Carlos Faria Santos

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to analyze the clinical profile of patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest using the Utstein style. Methods This study is an observational, prospective, longitudinal study of patients with cardiac arrest treated in intensive care units over a period of 1 year. Results The study included 89 patients who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation maneuvers. The cohort was 51.6% male with a mean age 59.0 years. The episodes occurred during the daytime in 64.6% of cases. Asystole/bradyarrhythmia was the most frequent initial rhythm (42.7%). Most patients who exhibited a spontaneous return of circulation experienced recurrent cardiac arrest, especially within the first 24 hours (61.4%). The mean time elapsed between hospital admission and the occurrence of cardiac arrest was 10.3 days, the mean time between cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was 0.68 min, the mean time between cardiac arrest and defibrillation was 7.1 min, and the mean duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation was 16.3 min. Associations between gender and the duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (19.2 min in women versus 13.5 min in men, p = 0.02), the duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the return of spontaneous circulation (10.8 min versus 30.7 min, p < 0.001) and heart disease and age (60.6 years versus 53.6, p < 0.001) were identified. The immediate survival rates after cardiac arrest, until hospital discharge and 6 months after discharge were 71%, 9% and 6%, respectively. Conclusions The main initial rhythm detected was asystole/bradyarrhythmia; the interval between cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was short, but defibrillation was delayed. Women received cardiopulmonary resuscitation for longer periods than men. The in-hospital survival rate was low. PMID:28099640

  16. Novel therapeutic strategies targeting fibroblasts and fibrosis in heart disease.

    PubMed

    Gourdie, Robert G; Dimmeler, Stefanie; Kohl, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Our understanding of the functions of cardiac fibroblasts has moved beyond their roles in heart structure and extracellular matrix generation and now includes their contributions to paracrine, mechanical and electrical signalling during ontogenesis and normal cardiac activity. Fibroblasts also have central roles in pathogenic remodelling during myocardial ischaemia, hypertension and heart failure. As key contributors to scar formation, they are crucial for tissue repair after interventions including surgery and ablation. Novel experimental approaches targeting cardiac fibroblasts are promising potential therapies for heart disease. Indeed, several existing drugs act, at least partially, through effects on cardiac connective tissue. This Review outlines the origins and roles of fibroblasts in cardiac development, homeostasis and disease; illustrates the involvement of fibroblasts in current and emerging clinical interventions; and identifies future targets for research and development.

  17. Parsing the roles of the transcription factors GATA-4 and GATA-6 in the adult cardiac hypertrophic response.

    PubMed

    van Berlo, Jop H; Aronow, Bruce J; Molkentin, Jeffery D

    2013-01-01

    The transcriptional code that programs cardiac hypertrophy involves the zinc finger-containing DNA binding factors GATA-4 and GATA-6, both of which are required to mount a hypertrophic response of the adult heart. Here we performed conditional gene deletion of Gata4 or Gata6 in the mouse heart in conjunction with reciprocal gene replacement using a transgene encoding either GATA-4 or GATA-6 in the heart as a means of parsing dosage effects of GATA-4 and GATA-6 versus unique functional roles. We determined that GATA-4 and GATA-6 play a redundant and dosage-sensitive role in programming the hypertrophic growth response of the heart following pressure overload stimulation. However, non-redundant functions were identified in allowing the heart to compensate and resist heart failure after pressure overload stimulation, as neither Gata4 nor Gata6 deletion was fully rescued by expression of the reciprocal transgene. For example, only Gata4 heart-specific deletion blocked the neoangiogenic response to pressure overload stimulation. Gene expression profiling from hearts of these gene-deleted mice showed both overlapping and unique transcriptional codes, which is presented. These results indicate that GATA-4 and GATA-6 play a dosage-dependent and redundant role in programming cardiac hypertrophy, but that each has a more complex role in maintaining cardiac homeostasis and resistance to heart failure following injury that cannot be compensated by the other.

  18. Inactivation of fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling in myelinating glial cells results in significant loss of adult spiral ganglion neurons accompanied by age-related hearing impairment.

    PubMed

    Wang, S J; Furusho, M; D'Sa, C; Kuwada, S; Conti, L; Morest, D K; Bansal, R

    2009-11-15

    Hearing loss has been attributed to many factors, including degeneration of sensory neurons in the auditory pathway and demyelination along the cochlear nerve. Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), which signal through four receptors (Fgfrs), are produced by auditory neurons and play a key role in embryonic development of the cochlea and in neuroprotection against sound-induced injury. However, the role of FGF signaling in the maintenance of normal auditory function in adult and aging mice remains to be elucidated. Furthermore, the contribution of glial cells, which myelinate the cochlear nerves, is poorly understood. To address these questions, we generated transgenic mice in which Fgfr1 and Fgfr2 were specifically inactivated in Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes but not in neurons. Adult mutant mice exhibited late onset of hearing impairment, which progressed markedly with age. The hearing impairment was accompanied by significant loss of myelinated spiral ganglion neurons. The pathology extended into the cochlear nucleus, without apparent loss of myelin or of the deletion-bearing glial cells themselves. This suggests that perturbation of FGF receptor-mediated glial function leads to the attenuation of glial support of neurons, leading to their loss and impairment of auditory functions. Thus, FGF/FGF receptor signaling provides a potentially novel mechanism of maintaining reciprocal interactions between neurons and glia in adult and aging animals. Dysfunction of glial cells and FGF receptor signaling may therefore be implicated in neurodegenerative hearing loss associated with normal aging.

  19. Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Associated Factor 2 Signaling Provokes Adverse Cardiac Remodeling in the Adult Mammalian Heart

    PubMed Central

    Divakaran, Vijay G.; Evans, Sarah; Topkara, Veli K.; Diwan, Abhinav; Burchfield, Jana; Gao, Feng; Dong, Jianwen; Tzeng, Huei-Ping; Sivasubramanian, Natarajan; Barger, Philip M.; Mann, Douglas L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily ligands that provoke a dilated cardiac phenotype signal through a common scaffolding protein termed TNF receptor associated factor 2 (TRAF2); however, virtually nothing is known with regard to TRAF2 signaling in the adult mammalian heart. Methods and Results We generated multiple founder lines of mice with cardiac restricted overexpression of TRAF2 and characterized the phenotype of mice with higher expression levels of TRAF2 (MHC-TRAF2HC). MHC-TRAF2HC transgenic mice developed a time-dependent increase in cardiac hypertrophy, LV dilation and adverse LV remodeling, and a significant decrease in LV +dP/dt and −dP/dt when compared to littermate (LM) controls (p < 0.05 compared to LM). During the early phases of LV remodeling there was a significant increase in total matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity that corresponded with a decrease in total myocardial fibrillar collagen content. As the MHC-TRAF2HC mice aged, there was a significant decrease in total MMP activity accompanied by an increase in total fibrillar collagen content and an increase in myocardial tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 levels. There was a significant increase in NF-κB activation at 4 – 12 weeks and JNK activation at 4 weeks in the MHCs TRAF2HC mice. Transciptional profiling revealed that > 95% of the hypertrophic/dilated cardiomyopathy-related genes that were significantly upregulated genes in the MHC-TRAF2HC hearts contained κB elements in their promoters. Conclusions These results show for the first time that targeted overexpression of TRAF2 is sufficient to mediate adverse cardiac remodeling in the heart. PMID:23493088

  20. Cardiac surgery as a stressor and the response of the vulnerable older adult.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Iva; Arora, Rakesh C; Rudolph, James L

    2017-01-01

    In an aging population, recovery and restoration of function are critical to maintaining independence. Over the past 50years, there have been dramatic improvements made in cardiac surgery processes and outcomes that allow for procedures to be performed on an increasingly older population with the goal of improving function. Although improved function is possible, major surgical procedures are associated with substantial stress, which can severely impact outcomes. Past literature has identified that frail patients, who are vulnerable to the stress of surgery, are more likely to have postoperative major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (OR 4.9, 95% confidence interval 1.6, 14.6). The objective of this manuscript is to examine preoperative frailty in biological, psychological, and social domains using cardiac surgery to induce stress. We systematically searched PubMed for keywords including "cardiac surgery, frailty, and aged" in addition to the biological, psychological, and social keywords. In the biological domain, we examine the association of physiological and physical vulnerabilities, as well as, the impact of comorbidities and inflammation on negative surgical outcomes. In the psychological domain, the impact of cognitive impairment, depression, and anxiety as vulnerabilities were examined. In the social domain, social structure, coping, disparities, and addiction as vulnerabilities are described. Importantly, there is substantial overlap in the domains of vulnerability. While frailty research has largely focused on discrete physical vulnerability criteria, a broader definition of frailty demonstrates that vulnerabilities in biological, psychological, and social domains can limit recovery after the stress of cardiac surgery. Identification of vulnerability in these domains can allow better understanding of the risks of cardiac surgery and tailoring of interventions to improve outcomes.

  1. Dose-dependent effect of Bisphenol-A on insulin signaling molecules in cardiac muscle of adult male rat.

    PubMed

    Sivashanmugam, Preethi; Mullainadhan, Vigneswari; Karundevi, Balasubramanian

    2017-03-25

    Environmental contaminant, Bisphenol-A (BPA) is a xenoestrogen, an essential component used for the production of two classes of polymers such as polycarbonate and epoxy resin which disrupts the normal endocrine function. BPA has intense effects on mice endocrine pancreas, an essential tissue involved in glucose metabolism. It disrupts pancreatic β-cell insulin content, induces hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in male rats. Cardiac muscle is an insulin responsive organ and insulin has direct effects on glucose transport. The present study was designed to assess the effect of BPA on insulin signaling molecules in the cardiac muscle of adult male Wistar rat. Adult male Wistar rats (200-250 g) were selected and divided into following groups: Group 1: Control (vehicle treated), Group 2: Rats treated with 10 mg BPA/kg b.wt./day for 30 days orally, Group 3: Rats treated with 100 mg BPA/kg b.wt./day for 30 days orally, Group 4: Rats treated with 400 mg BPA/kg b.wt./day for 30 days orally. IR (insulin receptor) and pIR(Tyr1162) proteins were significantly decreased in the high dose group (400 mg). There was no change in IRS1 (insulin receptor substrate-1) and Akt proteins. Whereas, a decrease in pIRS1(Tyr632) (100 mg and 400 mg), pAkt (Ser473) (400 mg) and GLUT4 (glucose transporter 4) (cytosolic and plasma membrane) proteins was observed which may affect the cardiovascular function. It is concluded that BPA exposure has adverse effect on cardiac insulin signal transduction which may affect its function.

  2. [Cardiac arrest during anaesthesia in a young adult with occult cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Fjølner, Jesper; Franzen, Niels; Sloth, Erik; Grøfte, Thorbjørn

    2012-05-07

    Severe heart failure is a significant risk factor in anaesthesia. We present a case of circulatory collapse and cardiac arrest during routine anaesthesia of a younger man, caused by occult dilated cardiomyopathy. We propose preoperative focus assessed transthoracic echocardiography as useful in detecting cardiopulmonary pathology.

  3. Lay Referral Patterns Involved in Cardiac Treatment Decision Making among Middle-Aged and Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenberg, Nancy E.; Amey, Cheryl H.; Stoller, Eleanor Palo; Muldoon, Susan B.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined age and contextually related factors that are influential in lay referral patterns during cardiac treatment decision making. Design and Methods: A complementary design was used. The Myocardial Infarction (MI) Onset Study identified demographic correlates of who sought medical care for 1,388 MI (heart attack) survivors.…

  4. Return of Viable Cardiac Function After Sonographic Cardiac Standstill in Pediatric Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Katherine; Thompson, W Reid; Pustavoitau, Aliaksei; Su, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Sonographic cardiac standstill during adult cardiac arrest is associated with failure to get return to spontaneous circulation. This report documents 3 children whose cardiac function returned after standstill with extracorporeal membranous oxygenation. Sonographic cardiac standstill may not predict cardiac death in children.

  5. Adult human brain neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and fibroblast-like cells have similar properties in vitro but only NPCs differentiate into neurons.

    PubMed

    Park, Thomas In-Hyeup; Monzo, Hector; Mee, Edward W; Bergin, Peter S; Teoh, Hoon H; Montgomery, Johanna M; Faull, Richard L M; Curtis, Maurice A; Dragunow, Mike

    2012-01-01

    The ability to culture neural progenitor cells from the adult human brain has provided an exciting opportunity to develop and test potential therapies on adult human brain cells. To achieve a reliable and reproducible adult human neural progenitor cell (AhNPC) culture system for this purpose, this study fully characterized the cellular composition of the AhNPC cultures, as well as the possible changes to this in vitro system over prolonged culture periods. We isolated cells from the neurogenic subventricular zone/hippocampus (SVZ/HP) of the adult human brain and found a heterogeneous culture population comprised of several types of post-mitotic brain cells (neurons, astrocytes, and microglia), and more importantly, two distinct mitotic cell populations; the AhNPCs, and the fibroblast-like cells (FbCs). These two populations can easily be mistaken for a single population of AhNPCs, as they both proliferate under AhNPC culture conditions, form spheres and express neural progenitor cell and early neuronal markers, all of which are characteristics of AhNPCs in vitro. However, despite these similarities under proliferating conditions, under neuronal differentiation conditions, only the AhNPCs differentiated into functional neurons and glia. Furthermore, AhNPCs showed limited proliferative capacity that resulted in their depletion from culture by 5-6 passages, while the FbCs, which appear to be from a neurovascular origin, displayed a greater proliferative capacity and dominated the long-term cultures. This gradual change in cellular composition resulted in a progressive decline in neurogenic potential without the apparent loss of self-renewal in our cultures. These results demonstrate that while AhNPCs and FbCs behave similarly under proliferative conditions, they are two different cell populations. This information is vital for the interpretation and reproducibility of AhNPC experiments and suggests an ideal time frame for conducting AhNPC-based experiments.

  6. Impairment of diastolic function in adult patients affected by osteogenesis imperfecta clinically asymptomatic for cardiac disease: casuality or causality?

    PubMed

    Migliaccio, Silvia; Barbaro, Giuseppe; Fornari, Rachele; Di Lorenzo, Gabriella; Celli, Mauro; Lubrano, Carla; Falcone, Stefania; Fabbrini, Elisa; Greco, Emanuela; Zambrano, Anna; Brama, Marina; Prossomariti, Giancarlo; Marzano, Sara; Marini, Mario; Conti, Francesco; D'Eufemia, Patrizia; Spera, Giovanni

    2009-01-09

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare inherited connective disorder causing increased bone fragility and low bone mass. OI includes severe bone fragility, impaired dentinogenesis, with less common alterations in the joints, blood vessels, heart valves, skin. Interestingly, description of left ventricular rupture, aortic dissection and heart valves incompetence has been previously described. Death may occur in OI patients for cardiac disease in asyntomatic subjects. Aim of our study has been to evaluate the presence of potential subclinical cardiac disorders and to characterize cardiac functional parameters by echocardiography in adults with OI in absence of cardiac symptoms. Forty patients (21 females and 19 males) affected by type I, III, IV OI and 40 control subjects (20 females and 20 males) were evaluated in the study. Patients and controls underwent clinical examination, screening for endocrine and metabolic disorders, 12-lead electrocardiogram and echocardiogram. In particular, all subjects were evaluated by two-dimensional echocardiography with continuous- and pulse-wave Doppler. Patients and controls belonged to NYHA class I and no significant electrocardiographic alteration was documented in both groups. Thirty-eight patients (95%) showed valvular regurgitation compared to one control subject (2.5%; P<0.001). As regards the diastolic function parameters, in OI patients E wave velocity was reduced by 23% (95% CI: 9% to 29%; P<0.001), E/A ratio was reduced by 17% (95% CI: 15% to 26%; P<0.001) while isovolumetric relaxation time (IRT) was increased by 47% (95% CI: 26% to 53%; P<0.001) and E wave deceleration time (DT) was increased by 18% (95% CI: 13% to 26%; P<0.001) compared to controls. In conclusion, our data indicate that adult patients affected by OI have an altered diastolic function in absence of other metabolic alterations. These diastolic echocardiographic parameters might worsen over time, especially if other cardiovascular risk factors (e

  7. Reduced Long-Term Relative Survival in Females and Younger Adults Undergoing Cardiac Surgery: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Enger, Tone Bull; Pleym, Hilde; Stenseth, Roar; Greiff, Guri; Wahba, Alexander; Videm, Vibeke

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess long-term survival and mortality in adult cardiac surgery patients. Methods 8,564 consecutive patients undergoing cardiac surgery in Trondheim, Norway from 2000 until censoring 31.12.2014 were prospectively followed. Observed long-term mortality following surgery was compared to the expected mortality in the Norwegian population, matched on gender, age and calendar year. This enabled assessment of relative survival (observed/expected survival rates) and relative mortality (observed/expected deaths). Long-term mortality was compared across gender, age and surgical procedure. Predictors of reduced survival were assessed with multivariate analyses of observed and relative mortality. Results During follow-up (median 6.4 years), 2,044 patients (23.9%) died. The observed 30-day, 1-, 3- and 5-year mortality rates were 2.2%, 4.4%, 8.2% and 13.8%, respectively, and remained constant throughout the study period. Comparing observed mortality to that expected in a matched sample from the general population, patients undergoing cardiac surgery showed excellent survival throughout the first seven years of follow-up (relative survival ≥ 1). Subsequently, survival decreased, which was more pronounced in females and patients undergoing other procedures than isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Relative mortality was higher in younger age groups, females and patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR). The female survival advantage in the general population was obliterated (relative mortality ratio (RMR) 1.35 (1.19–1.54), p<0.001). Increasing observed long-term mortality seen with ageing was due to population risk, and younger age was independently associated with increased relative mortality (RMR per 5 years 0.81 (0.79–0.84), p<0.001)). Conclusions Cardiac surgery patients showed comparable survival to that expected in the general Norwegian population, underlining the benefits of cardiac surgery in appropriately selected patients. The

  8. Cardiac catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization; CAD - cardiac catheterization; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization; Heart valve - cardiac catheterization; Heart failure - ...

  9. Effects of crude oil on in situ cardiac function in young adult mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus).

    PubMed

    Nelson, Derek; Heuer, Rachael M; Cox, Georgina K; Stieglitz, John D; Hoenig, Ronald; Mager, Edward M; Benetti, Daniel D; Grosell, Martin; Crossley, Dane A

    2016-11-01

    Exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) negatively impacts exercise performance in fish species but the physiological modifications that result in this phenotype are poorly understood. Prior studies have shown that embryonic and juvenile mahi-mahi (Coryphaeus hippurus) exposed to PAH exhibit morphological abnormalities, altered cardiac development and reduced swimming performance. It has been suggested that cardiovascular function inhibited by PAH exposure accounts for the compromised exercise performance in fish species. In this study we used in-situ techniques to measure hemodynamic responses of young adult mahi-mahi exposed to PAH for 24h. The data indicate that stroke volume was reduced 44% in mahi-mahi exposed to 9.6±2.7μgl(-1) geometric mean PAH (∑PAH) and resulted in a 39% reduction in cardiac output and a 52% reduction in stroke work. Maximal change in pressure over change in time was 28% lower in mahi-mahi exposed to this level of ∑PAH. Mean intraventricular pressures and heart rate were not significantly changed. This study suggests exposure to environmentally relevant PAH concentrations impairs aspects of cardiovascular function in mahi-mahi.

  10. MicroRNA-29a in Adult Muscle Stem Cells Controls Skeletal Muscle Regeneration During Injury and Exercise Downstream of Fibroblast Growth Factor-2.

    PubMed

    Galimov, Artur; Merry, Troy L; Luca, Edlira; Rushing, Elisabeth J; Mizbani, Amir; Turcekova, Katarina; Hartung, Angelika; Croce, Carlo M; Ristow, Michael; Krützfeldt, Jan

    2016-03-01

    The expansion of myogenic progenitors (MPs) in the adult muscle stem cell niche is critical for the regeneration of skeletal muscle. Activation of quiescent MPs depends on the dismantling of the basement membrane and increased access to growth factors such as fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2). Here, we demonstrate using microRNA (miRNA) profiling in mouse and human myoblasts that the capacity of FGF2 to stimulate myoblast proliferation is mediated by miR-29a. FGF2 induces miR-29a expression and inhibition of miR-29a using pharmacological or genetic deletion decreases myoblast proliferation. Next generation RNA sequencing from miR-29a knockout myoblasts (Pax7(CE/+) ; miR-29a(flox/flox) ) identified members of the basement membrane as the most abundant miR-29a targets. Using gain- and loss-of-function experiments, we confirm that miR-29a coordinately regulates Fbn1, Lamc1, Nid2, Col4a1, Hspg2 and Sparc in myoblasts in vitro and in MPs in vivo. Induction of FGF2 and miR-29a and downregulation of its target genes precedes muscle regeneration during cardiotoxin (CTX)-induced muscle injury. Importantly, MP-specific tamoxifen-induced deletion of miR-29a in adult skeletal muscle decreased the proliferation and formation of newly formed myofibers during both CTX-induced muscle injury and after a single bout of eccentric exercise. Our results identify a novel miRNA-based checkpoint of the basement membrane in the adult muscle stem cell niche. Strategies targeting miR-29a might provide useful clinical approaches to maintain muscle mass in disease states such as ageing that involve aberrant FGF2 signaling.

  11. Sublethal exposure to crude oil during embryonic development alters cardiac morphology and reduces aerobic capacity in adult fish

    PubMed Central

    Hicken, Corinne E.; Linbo, Tiffany L.; Baldwin, David H.; Willis, Maryjean L.; Myers, Mark S.; Holland, Larry; Larsen, Marie; Stekoll, Michael S.; Rice, Stanley D.; Collier, Tracy K.; Scholz, Nathaniel L.; Incardona, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to high concentrations of crude oil produces a lethal syndrome of heart failure in fish embryos. Mortality is caused by cardiotoxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), ubiquitous components of petroleum. Here, we show that transient embryonic exposure to very low concentrations of oil causes toxicity that is sublethal, delayed, and not counteracted by the protective effects of cytochrome P450 induction. Nearly a year after embryonic oil exposure, adult zebrafish showed subtle changes in heart shape and a significant reduction in swimming performance, indicative of reduced cardiac output. These delayed physiological impacts on cardiovascular performance at later life stages provide a potential mechanism linking reduced individual survival to population-level ecosystem responses of fish species to chronic, low-level oil pollution. PMID:21482755

  12. Evaluation of the influence of pulmonary hypertension in ultra-fast-track anesthesia technique in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Paulo Sérgio; Cartacho, Márcio Portugal Trindade; de Castro, Casimiro Cardoso; Salgado Filho, Marcello Fonseca; Brandão, Antônio Carlos Aguiar

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the influence of pulmonary hypertension in the ultra-fast-track anesthesia technique in adult cardiac surgery. Methods A retrospective study. They were included 40 patients divided into two groups: GI (without pulmonary hypertension) and GII (with pulmonary hypertension). Based on data obtained by transthoracic echocardiography. We considered as the absence of pulmonary hypertension: a pulmonary artery systolic pressure (sPAP) <36 mmHg, with tricuspid regurgitation velocity <2.8 m/s and no additional echocardiographic signs of PH, and PH as presence: a sPAP >40 mmHg associated with additional echocardiographic signs of PH. It was established as influence of pulmonary hypertension: the impossibility of extubation in the operating room, the increase in the time interval for extubation and reintubation the first 24 hours postoperatively. Univariate and multivariate analyzes were performed when necessary. Considered significant a P value <0.05. Results The GI was composed of 21 patients and GII for 19. All patients (100%) were extubated in the operating room in a medium time interval of 17.58±8.06 min with a median of 18 min in GII and 17 min in GI. PH did not increase the time interval for extubation (P=0.397). It required reintubation of 2 patients in GII (5% of the total), without statistically significant as compared to GI (P=0.488). Conclusion In this study, pulmonary hypertension did not influence on ultra-fast-track anesthesia in adult cardiac surgery. PMID:27163419

  13. Novel biomarkers for early diagnosis of acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery in adults

    PubMed Central

    Kališnik, Jurij Matija

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass is a common and serious complication and it is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis of acute kidney injury is based on the serum creatinine levels which rise several hours to days after the initial injury. Thus, novel biomarkers that will enable faster diagnosis are needed in clinical practice. There are numerous urine and serum proteins that indicate kidney injury and are under extensive research. Despite promising basic research results and assembled data, which indicate superiority of some biomarkers to creatinine, we are still awaiting clinical application. PMID:27212976

  14. Anesthetic Management of the Adult Patient with Concomitant Cardiac and Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Radosevich, Misty A; Brown, Daniel R

    2016-12-01

    Several common diseases of the cardiac and pulmonary systems and the interactions of the two in disease and anesthetic management are discussed. Management of these disease processes in isolation is reviewed and how the management of one organ system impacts another is then explored. For example, in a patient with acute lung injury and right heart failure, lung-protective ventilation may directly conflict with strategies to minimize right heart afterload. Such challenging clinical scenarios require appreciation of each disease entity, their appropriate management, and the balance between competing priorities.

  15. A multistep procedure to prepare pre-vascularized cardiac tissue constructs using adult stem sells, dynamic cell cultures, and porous scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Pagliari, Stefania; Tirella, Annalisa; Ahluwalia, Arti; Duim, Sjoerd; Goumans, Marie-Josè; Aoyagi, Takao; Forte, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    The vascularization of tissue engineered products represents a key issue in regenerative medicine which needs to be addressed before the translation of these protocols to the bedside can be foreseen. Here we propose a multistep procedure to prepare pre-vascularized three-dimensional (3D) cardiac bio-substitutes using dynamic cell cultures and highly porous biocompatible gelatin scaffolds. The strategy adopted exploits the peculiar differentiation potential of two distinct subsets of adult stem cells to obtain human vascularized 3D cardiac tissues. In the first step of the procedure, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are seeded onto gelatin scaffolds to provide interconnected vessel-like structures, while human cardiomyocyte progenitor cells (hCMPCs) are stimulated in vitro to obtain their commitment toward the cardiac phenotype. The use of a modular bioreactor allows the perfusion of the whole scaffold, providing superior performance in terms of cardiac tissue maturation and cell survival. Both the cell culture on natural-derived polymers and the continuous medium perfusion of the scaffold led to the formation of a densely packaged proto-tissue composed of vascular-like and cardiac-like cells, which might complete maturation process and interconnect with native tissue upon in vivo implantation. In conclusion, the data obtained through the approach here proposed highlight the importance to provide stem cells with complementary signals in vitro able to resemble the complexity of cardiac microenvironment. PMID:24917827

  16. Anatomic correction of ALCAPA in an adult presenting with sudden cardiac death

    PubMed Central

    Simry, Walid; Afifi, Ahmed; Hosny, Hatem; Elguindy, Ahmed; Yacoub, Magdi

    2015-01-01

    We report on a young adult with ALCAPA, who was successfully resuscitated after collapsing in ventricular fibrillation while playing football. This was followed by anatomical correction of the anomaly with a smooth recovery and return to his daily activities. The advantages of this approach are discussed in this brief report. PMID:26779521

  17. In Vitro and In Vivo Development of Horse Cloned Embryos Generated with iPSCs, Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Fetal or Adult Fibroblasts as Nuclear Donors

    PubMed Central

    Olivera, Ramiro; Moro, Lucia Natalia; Jordan, Roberto; Luzzani, Carlos; Miriuka, Santiago; Radrizzani, Martin; Donadeu, F. Xavier; Vichera, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    The demand for equine cloning as a tool to preserve high genetic value is growing worldwide; however, nuclear transfer efficiency is still very low. To address this issue, we first evaluated the effects of time from cell fusion to activation (<1h, n = 1261; 1-2h, n = 1773; 2-3h, n = 1647) on in vitro and in vivo development of equine embryos generated by cloning. Then, we evaluated the effects of using different nuclear donor cell types in two successive experiments: I) induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) vs. adult fibroblasts (AF) fused to ooplasts injected with the pluripotency-inducing genes OCT4, SOX2, MYC and KLF4, vs. AF alone as controls; II) umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (UC-MSCs) vs. fetal fibroblasts derived from an unborn cloned foetus (FF) vs. AF from the original individual. In the first experiment, both blastocyst production and pregnancy rates were higher in the 2-3h group (11.5% and 9.5%, respectively), respect to <1h (5.2% and 2%, respectively) and 1-2h (5.6% and 4.7%, respectively) groups (P<0.05). However, percentages of born foals/pregnancies were similar when intervals of 2-3h (35.2%) or 1-2h (35.7%) were used. In contrast to AF, the iPSCs did not generate any blastocyst-stage embryos. Moreover, injection of oocytes with the pluripotency-inducing genes did not improve blastocyst production nor pregnancy rates respect to AF controls. Finally, higher blastocyst production was obtained using UC-MSC (15.6%) than using FF (8.9%) or AF (9.3%), (P<0.05). Despite pregnancy rates were similar for these 3 groups (17.6%, 18.2% and 22%, respectively), viable foals (two) were obtained only by using FF. In summary, optimum blastocyst production rates can be obtained using a 2-3h interval between cell fusion and activation as well as using UC-MSCs as nuclear donors. Moreover, FF line can improve the efficiency of an inefficient AF line. Overall, 24 healthy foals were obtained from a total of 29 born foals. PMID:27732616

  18. 1,25 Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Inhibits TGFβ1-Mediated Primary Human Cardiac Myofibroblast Activation

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Anna; Boroomand, Seti; Carthy, Jon; Luo, Zongshu; McManus, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Aims Epidemiological and interventional studies have suggested a protective role for vitamin D in cardiovascular disease, and basic research has implicated vitamin D as a potential inhibitor of fibrosis in a number of organ systems; yet little is known regarding direct effects of vitamin D on human cardiac cells. Given the critical role of fibrotic responses in end stage cardiac disease, we examined the effect of active vitamin D treatment on fibrotic responses in primary human adult ventricular cardiac fibroblasts (HCF-av), and investigated the relationship between circulating vitamin D (25(OH)D3) and cardiac fibrosis in human myocardial samples. Methods and Results Interstitial cardiac fibrosis in end stage HF was evaluated by image analysis of picrosirius red stained myocardial sections. Serum 25(OH)D3 levels were assayed using mass spectrometry. Commercially available HCF-av were treated with transforming growth factor (TGF)β1 to induce activation, in the presence or absence of active vitamin D (1,25(OH)2D3). Functional responses of fibroblasts were analyzed by in vitro collagen gel contraction assay. 1,25(OH)2D3 treatment significantly inhibited TGFβ1-mediated cell contraction, and confocal imaging demonstrated reduced stress fiber formation in the presence of 1,25(OH)2D3. Treatment with 1,25(OH)2D3 reduced alpha-smooth muscle actin expression to control levels and inhibited SMAD2 phosphorylation. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that active vitamin D can prevent TGFβ1-mediated biochemical and functional pro-fibrotic changes in human primary cardiac fibroblasts. An inverse relationship between vitamin D status and cardiac fibrosis in end stage heart failure was observed. Collectively, our data support an inhibitory role for vitamin D in cardiac fibrosis. PMID:26061181

  19. Incremental value of cardiac magnetic resonance for the evaluation of cardiac tumors in adults: experience of a high volume tertiary cardiology centre.

    PubMed

    Giusca, Sorin; Mereles, Derliz; Ochs, Andreas; Buss, Sebastian; André, Florian; Seitz, Sebastian; Riffel, Johannes; Fortner, Philipp; Andrulis, Mindaugas; Schönland, Stefan; Katus, Hugo A; Korosoglou, Grigorios

    2017-01-30

    To assess the value of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) in evaluating cardiac tumours in a tertiary cardiology centre. Between 2004 and 2014, 125 patients (pts.) from a total of 17000 who received a CMR examination in our institution were referred with the suspicion of cardiac tumours. A dedicated protocol was used that included standard cine SSFP acquisitions as well as tissue characterization using T1 and T2 black-blood (T1 BB and T2 BB respectively) with and without fat suppression, perfusion of the structure and late gadolinium enhancement. Patients' files were retrospectively analysed and data related to clinical status, results from other examinations (echocardiography), therapeutic approach and histology results, when performed, were collected. In 65 pts., a diagnosis of cardiac tumour was reached. 45 Pts had a biopsy. The CMR examination was concordant with the histology results in 35 (76%) pts. superior to that showed by echocardiography, 26 (58%) pts., p = 0.03. Forty-two (65%) pts. had a benign tumour and 23 (35%) a malignant process. Myxoma was the most frequent benign tumour, 27 (65%) and cardiac metastases were the most frequent form of malignancies, 21 (91%), with B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma being the most frequent one, 4 (19%). Benign tumours were mostly located in the left atrium, 27 (64%) versus 6 (26%), p = 0.007, whereas malignant tumours had a predilection for the right atrium und left ventricle [11 (48%) vs. 3 (7%), p = 0.001 and 8 (35%) vs. 3 (7%), p = 0.03]. All benign cardiac tumours were single and did not show signs of infiltration. Conversely, malignant cardiac tumours were larger (43 ± 35 vs. 24 ± 16, p = 0.007) with a significant proportion (65%) showing myocardial infiltration. Pts with malignant cardiac tumours had a higher proportion of LGE (82 vs. 60%, p = 0.05) and exhibited more frequently an isointense signal in T1 BB images (78 vs. 61%, p = 0.04). Both groups showed similar

  20. Mending broken hearts: cardiac development as a basis for adult heart regeneration and repair.

    PubMed

    Xin, Mei; Olson, Eric N; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda

    2013-08-01

    As the adult mammalian heart has limited potential for regeneration and repair, the loss of cardiomyocytes during injury and disease can result in heart failure and death. The cellular processes and regulatory mechanisms involved in heart growth and development can be exploited to repair the injured adult heart through 'reawakening' pathways that are active during embryogenesis. Heart function has been restored in rodents by reprogramming non-myocytes into cardiomyocytes, by expressing transcription factors (GATA4, HAND2, myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) and T-box 5 (TBX5)) and microRNAs (miR-1, miR-133, miR-208 and miR-499) that control cardiomyocyte identity. Stimulating cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation and proliferation by activating mitotic signalling pathways involved in embryonic heart growth represents a complementary approach for heart regeneration and repair. Recent advances in understanding the mechanistic basis of heart development offer exciting opportunities for effective therapies for heart failure.

  1. Primary Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death in Adults with Transposition of the Great Arteries: A Review of Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Placement

    PubMed Central

    Cedars, Ari M.

    2015-01-01

    Transposition of the great arteries encompasses a set of structural congenital cardiac lesions that has in common ventriculoarterial discordance. Primarily because of advances in medical and surgical care, an increasing number of children born with this anomaly are surviving into adulthood. Depending upon the subtype of lesion or the particular corrective surgery that the patient might have undergone, this group of adult congenital heart disease patients constitutes a relatively new population with unique medical sequelae. Among the more common and difficult to manage are cardiac arrhythmias and other sequelae that can lead to sudden cardiac death. To date, the question of whether implantable cardioverter-defibrillators should be placed in this cohort as a preventive measure to abort sudden death has largely gone unanswered. Therefore, we review the available literature surrounding this issue. PMID:26413012

  2. Harnessing the potential of adult cardiac stem cells: lessons from haematopoiesis, the embryo and the niche.

    PubMed

    Balmer, Gemma M; Riley, Paul R

    2012-10-01

    Across biomedicine, there is a major drive to develop stem cell (SC) treatments for debilitating diseases. Most effective treatments restore an embryonic phenotype to adult SCs. This has led to two emerging paradigms in SC biology: the application of developmental biology studies and the manipulation of the SC niche. Developmental studies can reveal how SCs are orchestrated to build organs, the understanding of which is important in order to instigate tissue repair in the adult. SC niche studies can reveal cues that maintain SC 'stemness' and how SCs may be released from the constraints of the niche to differentiate and repopulate a 'failing' organ. The haematopoietic system provides an exemplar whereby characterisation of the blood lineages during development and the bone marrow niche has resulted in therapeutics now routinely used in the clinic. Ischaemic heart disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in humans and the question remains as to whether these principles can be applied to the heart, in order to exploit the potential of adult SCs for use in cardiovascular repair and regeneration.

  3. The neonate versus adult mammalian immune system in cardiac repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Susanne; Rosenthal, Nadia

    2016-07-01

    The immune system is a crucial player in tissue homeostasis and wound healing. A sophisticated cascade of events triggered upon injury ensures protection from infection and initiates and orchestrates healing. While the neonatal mammal can readily regenerate damaged tissues, adult regenerative capacity is limited to specific tissue types, and in organs such as the heart, adult wound healing results in fibrotic repair and loss of function. Growing evidence suggests that the immune system greatly influences the balance between regeneration and fibrotic repair. The neonate mammalian immune system has impaired pro-inflammatory function, is prone to T-helper type 2 responses and has an immature adaptive immune system skewed towards regulatory T cells. While these characteristics make infants susceptible to infection and prone to allergies, it may also provide an immunological environment permissive of regeneration. In this review we will give a comprehensive overview of the immune cells involved in healing and regeneration of the heart and explore differences between the adult and neonate immune system that may explain differences in regenerative ability. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  4. How I manage the adult potential organ donor: donation after cardiac death (part 2).

    PubMed

    Frontera, Jennifer A

    2010-02-01

    To address the gap between organs available for transplant and the number of patients on the transplant waiting list, the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, Institute of Medicine, United Network for Organ Sharing and the federal government have recommended the increased used of donation after cardiac death (DCD) (JCAHOnline http://www.jointcommission.org/Library/JCAHOnline/jo_06.06.htm ; UNOS, Highlights of the June Board Meeting, 2006). DCD is defined as organ donation once death is declared after irreversible cessation of circulatory and respiratory functions, as opposed to brain death (donation after neurological death). Though DCD is one of the fastest growing categories of organ donors, it comprises only 8% of all deceased donors (Steinbrook in N Engl J Med 357:209-213, 2007). Prior to 1968, when the Ad Hoc Committee of Harvard Medical School proposed a neurological definition of death based on brain-death criteria, organs from deceased donors came from patients who had suffered cardio-pulmonary demise (IOM, Non-heart-beating organ transplantation: practice and protocols, 2000). Early transplantation from DCD donors met with limited success and most transplant surgeons turned to brain-dead donors. Consequently, DCD fell out of vogue and, until recently, has not been the focus of transplant initiatives.

  5. Genetic manipulation of periostin expression reveals a role in cardiac hypertrophy and ventricular remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Toru; Xu, Jian; Kaiser, Robert A.; Melendez, Jaime; Hambleton, Michael; Sargent, Michelle A.; Lorts, Angela; Brunskill, Eric W.; Dorn, Gerald W.; Conway, Simon J.; Aronow, Bruce J.; Robbins, Jeffrey; Molkentin, Jeffery D.

    2009-01-01

    The cardiac extracellular matrix is a dynamic structural support network that is both influenced by, and a regulator of, pathological remodeling and hypertrophic growth. In response to pathologic insults the adult heart re-expresses the secreted extracellular matrix protein periostin (Pn). Here we show that Pn is critically involved in regulating the cardiac hypertrophic response, interstitial fibrosis, and ventricular remodeling following long-term pressure overload stimulation and myocardial infarction. Mice lacking the gene encoding Pn (Postn) were more prone to ventricular rupture in the first 10 days after a myocardial infarction, but surviving mice showed less fibrosis and better ventricular performance. Pn−/− mice also showed less fibrosis and hypertrophy following long-term pressure overload, suggesting an intimate relationship between Pn and the regulation of cardiac remodeling. In contrast, inducible overexpression of Pn in the heart protected mice from rupture following myocardial infarction and induced spontaneous hypertrophy with aging. With respect to a mechanism underlying these alterations, Pn−/− hearts showed an altered molecular program in fibroblast function. Indeed, fibroblasts isolated from Pn−/− hearts were less effective in adherence to cardiac myocytes and were characterized by a dramatic alteration in global gene expression (7% of all genes). These are the first genetic data detailing the function of Pn in the adult heart as a regulator of cardiac remodeling and hypertrophy. PMID:17569887

  6. Child-to-Adult Liver Transplantation With Donation After Cardiac Death Donors: Three Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liangshuo; Liu, Xuemin; Zhang, Xiaogang; Yu, Liang; Sha, Huanchen; Zhou, Ying; Tian, Min; Shi, Jianhua; Wang, Wanli; Liu, Chang; Guo, Kun; Lv, Yi; Wang, Bo

    2016-02-01

    Development of organ transplantation is restricted by the discrepancy between the lack of donors and increasing number of patients. The outcome of pediatric donors transplanted into adult recipients especially with donation after circulatory death (DCD) pattern has not been well studied. The aim of this paper is to describe our experience of 3 successful DCD donor child-to-adult liver transplantations lately. Three DCD donors were separately 7, 5, and 8 years old. The ratio between donor graft weight and recipient body weight was 1.42%, 1.00%, and 1.33%, respectively. Ratio between the volume of donor liver and the expected liver volume was 0.65, 0.46, and 0.60. Splenectomy was undertaken for the second recipient according to the portal vein pressure (PVP) which was observed during the operation. Two out of 3 of the recipients suffered with acute kidney injury and got recovered after renal replacement therapy. The first recipient also went through early allograft dysfunction and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The hospital course of the third recipient was uneventful. After 1 year of follow-up visit, the first and second recipients maintain good quality of life and liver function. The third patient was followed up for 5 months until now and recovered well. DCD child-to-adult liver transplantation should only be used for comparatively matched donor and recipient. PVP should be monitored during the operation. The short-term efficacy is good, but long-term follow-up and clinical study with large sample evaluation are still needed.

  7. Mending broken hearts: cardiac development as a basis for adult heart regeneration and repair

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Mei; Olson, Eric N.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda

    2013-01-01

    As the adult mammalian heart has limited potential for regeneration and repair, the loss of cardiomyocytes during injury and disease can result in heart failure and death. The cellular processes and regulatory mechanisms involved in heart growth and development can be exploited to repair the injured adult heart through ‘reawakening’ pathways that are active during embryogenesis. Heart function has been restored in rodents by reprogramming non-myocytes into cardiomyocytes, by expressing transcription factors (GATA4, HAND2, myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) and T-box 5 (TBX5)) and microRNAs (miR-1, miR-133, miR-208 and miR-499) that control cardiomyocyte identity. Stimulating cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation and proliferation by activating mitotic signalling pathways involved in embryonic heart growth represents a complementary approach for heart regeneration and repair. Recent advances in understanding the mechanistic basis of heart development offer exciting opportunities for effective therapies for heart failure. PMID:23839576

  8. Generation of GFAP::GFP astrocyte reporter lines from human adult fibroblast-derived iPS cells using zinc-finger nuclease technology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping-Wu; Haidet-Phillips, Amanda M; Pham, Jacqueline T; Lee, Youngjin; Huo, Yuqing; Tienari, Pentti J; Maragakis, Nicholas J; Sattler, Rita; Rothstein, Jeffrey D

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes are instrumental to major brain functions, including metabolic support, extracellular ion regulation, the shaping of excitatory signaling events and maintenance of synaptic glutamate homeostasis. Astrocyte dysfunction contributes to numerous developmental, psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. The generation of adult human fibroblast-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has provided novel opportunities to study mechanisms of astrocyte dysfunction in human-derived cells. To overcome the difficulties of cell type heterogeneity during the differentiation process from iPSCs to astroglial cells (iPS astrocytes), we generated homogenous populations of iPS astrocytes using zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) technology. Enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) driven by the astrocyte-specific glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) promoter was inserted into the safe harbor adeno-associated virus integration site 1 (AAVS1) locus in disease and control-derived iPSCs. Astrocyte populations were enriched using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) and after enrichment more than 99% of iPS astrocytes expressed mature astrocyte markers including GFAP, S100β, NFIA and ALDH1L1. In addition, mature pure GFP-iPS astrocytes exhibited a well-described functional astrocytic activity in vitro characterized by neuron-dependent regulation of glutamate transporters to regulate extracellular glutamate concentrations. Engraftment of GFP-iPS astrocytes into rat spinal cord grey matter confirmed in vivo cell survival and continued astrocytic maturation. In conclusion, the generation of GFAP::GFP-iPS astrocytes provides a powerful in vitro and in vivo tool for studying astrocyte biology and astrocyte-driven disease pathogenesis and therapy.

  9. Fibroblast growth factor receptors in in vitro and in vivo chondrogenesis: relating tissue engineering using adult mesenchymal stem cells to embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Hellingman, Catharine A; Koevoet, Wendy; Kops, Nicole; Farrell, Eric; Jahr, Holger; Liu, Wei; Baatenburg de Jong, Robert J; Frenz, Dorothy A; van Osch, Gerjo J V M

    2010-02-01

    Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are considered promising candidate cells for therapeutic cartilage and bone regeneration. Because tissue regeneration and embryonic development may involve similar pathways, understanding common pathways may lead to advances in regenerative medicine. In embryonic limb development, fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) play a role in chondrogenic differentiation. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare FGFR expression in in vivo embryonic limb development and in vitro chondrogenesis of MSCs. Our study showed that in in vitro chondrogenesis of MSCs three sequential stages can be found, as in embryonic limb development. A mesenchymal condensation (indicated by N-cadherin) is followed by chondrogenic differentiation (indicated by collagen II), and hypertrophy (indicated by collagen X). FGFR1-3 are expressed in a stage-dependent pattern during in vitro differentiation and in vivo embryonic limb development. In both models FGFR2 is clearly expressed by cells in the condensation phase. No FGFR expression was observed in differentiating and mature hyaline chondrocytes, whereas hypertrophic chondrocytes stained strongly for all FGFRs. To evaluate whether stage-specific modulation of chondrogenic differentiation in MSCs is possible with different subtypes of FGF, FGF2 and FGF9 were added to the chondrogenic medium during different stages in the culture process (early or late). FGF2 and FGF9 differentially affected the amount of cartilage formed by MSCs depending on the stage in which they were added. These results will help us understand the role of FGF signaling in chondrogenesis and find new tools to monitor and control chondrogenic differentiation.

  10. Effects of pressure- or volume-overload hypertrophy on passive stiffness in isolated adult cardiac muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, S.; Koide, M.; Cooper, G. 4th; Zile, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the changes in myocardial stiffness induced by chronic hemodynamic overloading are dependent on changes in the passive stiffness of the cardiac muscle cell (cardiocyte). However, no previous studies have examined the passive constitutive properties of cardiocytes isolated from animals with myocardial hypertrophy. Accordingly, changes in relative passive stiffness of cardiocytes isolated from animals with chronic pressure- or volume-overload hypertrophy were determined by examining the effects of anisosmotic stress on cardiocyte size. Anisosmotic stress was produced by altering superfusate osmolarity. Hypertrophied cardiocytes were enzymatically isolated from 16 adult cats with right ventricular (RV) pressure-overload hypertrophy induced by pulmonary artery banding (PAB) and from 6 adult cats with RV volume-overload hypertrophy induced by creating an atrial septal defect (ASD). Left ventricular (LV) cardiocytes from each cat served as nonhypertrophied, normally loaded, same-animal controls. Superfusate osmolarity was decreased from 305 +/- 3 to 135 +/- 5 mosM and increased to 645 +/- 4 mosM. During anisosmotic stress, there were no significant differences between hypertrophied RV and normal LV cardiocytes in pressure overload PAB cats with respect to percent change in cardiocyte area (47 +/- 2% in RV vs. 48 +/- 2% in LV), diameter (46 +/- 3% in RV vs. 48 +/- 2% in LV), or length (2.4 +/- 0.2% in RV vs. 2.0 +/- 0.3% in LV), or sarcomere length (1.5 +/- 0.1% in RV vs. 1.3 +/- 0.3% in LV). Likewise, there were no significant differences in cardiocyte strain between hypertrophied RV and normal LV cardiocytes from ASD cats. In conclusion, chronic pressure-overload hypertrophy and chronic volume-overload hypertrophy did not alter the cardiocyte response to anisosmotic stress. Thus chronic overload hypertrophy did not alter relative passive cardiocyte stiffness.

  11. The influence of patient size on dose conversion coefficients: a hybrid phantom study for adult cardiac catheterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry; Lee, Choonsik; Johnson, Kevin; Siragusa, Daniel; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2009-06-01

    In this study, the influence of patient size on organ and effective dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) was investigated for a representative interventional fluoroscopic procedure—cardiac catheterization. The study was performed using hybrid phantoms representing an underweight, average and overweight American adult male. Reference body sizes were determined using the NHANES III database and parameterized based on standing height and total body mass. Organ and effective dose conversion coefficients were calculated for anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left anterior oblique and right anterior oblique projections using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX 2.5.0 with the metric dose area product being used as the normalization factor. Results show body size to have a clear influence on DCCs which increased noticeably when body size decreased. It was also shown that if patient size is neglected when choosing a DCC, the organ and effective dose will be underestimated to an underweight patient and will be overestimated to an underweight patient, with errors as large as 113% for certain projections. Results were further compared with those published for a KTMAN-2 Korean patient-specific tomographic phantom. The published DCCs aligned best with the hybrid phantom which most closely matched in overall body size. These results highlighted the need for and the advantages of phantom-patient matching, and it is recommended that hybrid phantoms be used to create a more diverse library of patient-dependent anthropomorphic phantoms for medical dose reconstruction.

  12. Small Fractions of Muscular Dystrophy Embryonic Stem Cells Yield Severe Cardiac and Skeletal Muscle Defects in Adult Mouse Chimeras.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, J Patrick; Kyrychenko, Sergii; Kyrychenko, Viktoriia; Schneider, Joel S; Granier, Celine J; Himelman, Eric; Lahey, Kevin C; Zhao, Qingshi; Yehia, Ghassan; Tao, Yuan-Xiang; Bhaumik, Mantu; Shirokova, Natalia; Fraidenraich, Diego

    2017-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is characterized by the loss of the protein dystrophin, leading to muscle fragility, progressive weakening, and susceptibility to mechanical stress. Although dystrophin-negative mdx mouse models have classically been used to study DMD, phenotypes appear mild compared to patients. As a result, characterization of muscle pathology, especially in the heart, has proven difficult. We report that injection of mdx embryonic stem cells (ESCs) into Wild Type blastocysts produces adult mouse chimeras with severe DMD phenotypes in the heart and skeletal muscle. Inflammation, regeneration and fibrosis are observed at the whole organ level, both in dystrophin-negative and dystrophin-positive portions of the chimeric tissues. Skeletal and cardiac muscle function are also decreased to mdx levels. In contrast to mdx heterozygous carriers, which show no significant phenotypes, these effects are even observed in chimeras with low levels of mdx ESC incorporation (10%-30%). Chimeric mice lack typical compensatory utrophin upregulation, and show pathological remodeling of Connexin-43. In addition, dystrophin-negative and dystrophin-positive isolated cardiomyocytes show augmented calcium response to mechanical stress, similar to mdx cells. These global effects highlight a novel role of mdx ESCs in triggering muscular dystrophy even when only low amounts are present. Stem Cells 2017;35:597-610.

  13. Ganglioside GM2 N-acetyl-beta-D-galactosaminidase activity in cultured fibroblasts of late-infantile and adult GM2 gangliosidosis patients and of healthy probands with low hexosaminidase level.

    PubMed Central

    Conzelmann, E; Kytzia, H J; Navon, R; Sandhoff, K

    1983-01-01

    A sensitive assay was developed to assess the ability of extracts from cultured fibroblasts to catabolize ganglioside GM2, in the presence of the natural activator protein but without detergents. This method, which permitted the reliable determination of residual activities as low as 0.1% of normal controls, was then used to measure ganglioside GM2 hydrolase activities in fibroblasts from several hexosaminidase variants. The residual activities thus determined correlated well with the clinical status of the respective proband: infantile Tay-Sachs (0.1% of normal controls), late-infantile (0.5%), and adult GM2 gangliosidoses (2%-4%) and healthy probands with "low hexosaminidase" (11% and 20%). In contrast, beta-hexosaminidase A levels as measured with the synthetic substrate 4-MU-GlcNAc could not be relied on for diagnostic purposes (the late-infantile patient studied retained 80% of the activity of controls). PMID:6614006

  14. Linking an Anxiety-Related Personality Trait to Cardiac Autonomic Regulation in Well-Defined Healthy Adults: Harm Avoidance and Resting Heart Rate Variability

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Lien-Cheng; Liu, Yu-Wen; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Kuo, Terry B. J.; Huang, San-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Anxiety trait, anxiety and depression states have all been reported to increase risks for cardiovascular disease (CVD), possibly through altering cardiac autonomic regulation. Our aim was to investigate whether the relationship between harm avoidance (HA, an anxiety-related personality trait) and cardiac autonomic regulation is independent of anxiety and depression states in healthy adults. Methods We recruited 535 physically and mentally healthy volunteers. Participants completed the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Tri-dimensional Personality Questionnaire. Participants were divided into high or low HA groups as discriminated by the quartile value. Cardiac autonomic function was evaluated by measuring heart rate variability (HRV). We obtained the time and frequency-domain indices of HRV including variance (total HRV), the low-frequency power (LF; 0.05–0.15 Hz), which may reflect baroreflex function, the high-frequency power (HF; 0.15–0.40 Hz), which reflects cardiac parasympathetic activity, as well as the LF/HF ratio. Results The BDI and HA scores showed associations with HRV parameters. After adjustment for the BDI scores and other control variables, HA is still associated with reduced variance, LF and HF power. Compared with the participants with low HA, those with high HA displayed significant reductions in variance, LF and HF power and a significant increase in their LF/HF ratio. Conclusion This study highlights the independent role of HA in contributing to decreased autonomic cardiac regulation in healthy adults and provides a potential underlying mechanism for anxiety trait to confer increased risk for CVD. PMID:27482240

  15. Comparative study of the effect of verapamil and vitamin D on iron overload-induced oxidative stress and cardiac structural changes in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Abd Allah, Eman S H; Ahmed, Marwa A; Abdel Mola, Asmaa Fathi

    2014-11-01

    The present study was designed to compare the effect of verapamil and vitamin D on the expression of the voltage-dependent LTCC alpha 1c subunit (Cav1.2) and thereby on iron overload-induced cardiac dysfunction in adult male rat. Forty rats were randomly divided into four groups. Control group received the vehicle, iron overload group received ferrous sulfate intraperitoneally (IP) for 4 weeks, iron overload+verapamil received ferrous sulfate and verapamil IP concurrently for 4 weeks and iron overload+vitamin D group received ferrous sulfate IP and vitamin D3 orally concurrently for 4 weeks. Serum ferritin, total antioxidant capacity (TAC), total peroxide (TP) and cardiac iron and calcium were determined. Oxidative stress index (OSI) was calculated. Histopathological studies using H&E, Masson trichrome and Prussian blue stains and immunohistochemical studies using Cav1.2 antibody were also carried out. Administration of ferrous sulfate induced a significant increase in serum ferritin, OSI, cardiac iron and calcium contents. Moreover, cardiomyocytes were degenerated and the expression of Cav1.2 protein was increased in iron overload group as compared to control. Verapamil decreased ferrous sulfate-induced increase in serum ferritin, OSI and cardiac iron deposition. In addition, verapamil improved myocardial degeneration and decreased the expression of Cav1.2 protein. In contrast, vitamin D produced insignificant changes in ferrous sulfate-induced increase in cardiac iron content, myocardial degeneration and the expression of Cav1.2 protein. These results indicate that verapamil has a protective effect against iron overload-induced cardiac dysfunction, oxidative stress and structural changes, while vitamin D has an insignificant effect on these parameters.

  16. Cardiac and metabolic effects of chronic growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor I excess in young adults with pituitary gigantism.

    PubMed

    Bondanelli, Marta; Bonadonna, Stefania; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Doga, Mauro; Gola, Monica; Onofri, Alessandro; Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Giustina, Andrea; degli Uberti, Ettore C

    2005-09-01

    Chronic growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) excess is associated with considerable mortality in acromegaly, but no data are available in pituitary gigantism. The aim of the study was to evaluate the long-term effects of early exposure to GH and IGF-I excess on cardiovascular and metabolic parameters in adult patients with pituitary gigantism. Six adult male patients with newly diagnosed gigantism due to GH secreting pituitary adenoma were studied and compared with 6 age- and sex-matched patients with acromegaly and 10 healthy subjects. Morphologic and functional cardiac parameters were evaluated by Doppler echocardiography. Glucose metabolism was assessed by evaluating glucose tolerance and homeostasis model assessment index. Disease duration was significantly longer (P<.05) in patients with gigantism than in patients with acromegaly, whereas GH and IGF-I concentrations were comparable. Left ventricular mass was increased both in patients with gigantism and in patients with acromegaly, as compared with controls. Left ventricular hypertrophy was detected in 2 of 6 of both patients with gigantism and patients with acromegaly, and isolated intraventricular septum thickening in 1 patient with gigantism. Inadequate diastolic filling (ratio between early and late transmitral flow velocity<1) was detected in 2 of 6 patients with gigantism and 1 of 6 patients with acromegaly. Impaired glucose metabolism occurrence was higher in patients with acromegaly (66%) compared with patients with gigantism (16%). Concentrations of IGF-I were significantly (P<.05) higher in patients with gigantism who have cardiac abnormalities than in those without cardiac abnormalities. In conclusion, our data suggest that GH/IGF-I excess in young adult patients is associated with morphologic and functional cardiac abnormalities that are similar in patients with gigantism and in patients with acromegaly, whereas occurrence of impaired glucose metabolism appears to be higher in

  17. Plasma IL-6 and IL-10 Concentrations Predict AKI and Long-Term Mortality in Adults after Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, William R.; Garg, Amit X.; Coca, Steven G.; Devereaux, Philip J.; Eikelboom, John; Kavsak, Peter; McArthur, Eric; Thiessen-Philbrook, Heather; Shortt, Colleen; Shlipak, Michael; Whitlock, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation has an integral role in the pathophysiology of AKI. We investigated the associations of two biomarkers of inflammation, plasma IL-6 and IL-10, with AKI and mortality in adults undergoing cardiac surgery. Patients were enrolled at six academic centers (n=960). AKI was defined as a ≥50% or ≥0.3-mg/dl increase in serum creatinine from baseline. Pre- and postoperative IL-6 and IL-10 concentrations were categorized into tertiles and evaluated for associations with outcomes of in-hospital AKI or postdischarge all-cause mortality at a median of 3 years after surgery. Preoperative concentrations of IL-6 and IL-10 were not significantly associated with AKI or mortality. Elevated first postoperative IL-6 concentration was significantly associated with higher risk of AKI, and the risk increased in a dose-dependent manner (second tertile adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.61 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.10 to 2.36]; third tertile adjusted OR, 2.13 [95% CI, 1.45 to 3.13]). First postoperative IL-6 concentration was not associated with risk of mortality; however, the second tertile of peak IL-6 concentration was significantly associated with lower risk of mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.75 [95% CI, 0.57 to 0.99]). Elevated first postoperative IL-10 concentration was significantly associated with higher risk of AKI (adjusted OR, 1.57 [95% CI, 1.04 to 2.38]) and lower risk of mortality (adjusted HR, 0.72 [95% CI, 0.56 to 0.93]). There was a significant interaction between the concentration of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, an established AKI biomarker, and the association of IL-10 concentration with mortality (P=0.01). These findings suggest plasma IL-6 and IL-10 may serve as biomarkers for perioperative outcomes. PMID:25855775

  18. Preoperative evaluation of the adult patient undergoing non-cardiac surgery: guidelines from the European Society of Anaesthesiology.

    PubMed

    De Hert, Stefan; Imberger, Georgina; Carlisle, John; Diemunsch, Pierre; Fritsch, Gerhard; Moppett, Iain; Solca, Maurizio; Staender, Sven; Wappler, Frank; Smith, Andrew

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of these guidelines on the preoperative evaluation of the adult non-cardiac surgery patient is to present recommendations based on available relevant clinical evidence. The ultimate aims of preoperative evaluation are two-fold. First, we aim to identify those patients for whom the perioperative period may constitute an increased risk of morbidity and mortality, aside from the risks associated with the underlying disease. Second, this should help us to design perioperative strategies that aim to reduce additional perioperative risks. Very few well performed randomised studies on the topic are available and many recommendations rely heavily on expert opinion and are adapted specifically to the healthcare systems in individual countries. This report aims to provide an overview of current knowledge on the subject with an assessment of the quality of the evidence in order to allow anaesthetists all over Europe to integrate - wherever possible - this knowledge into daily patient care. The Guidelines Committee of the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA) formed a task force with members of subcommittees of scientific subcommittees and individual members of the ESA. Electronic databases were searched from the year 2000 until July 2010 without language restrictions. These searches produced 15 425 abstracts. Relevant systematic reviews with meta-analyses, randomised controlled trials, cohort studies, case-control studies and cross-sectional surveys were selected. The Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network grading system was used to assess the level of evidence and to grade recommendations. The final draft guideline was posted on the ESA website for 4 weeks and the link was sent to all ESA members, individual or national (thus including most European national anaesthesia societies). Comments were collated and the guidelines amended as appropriate. When the final draft was complete, the Guidelines Committee and ESA Board ratified the guidelines.

  19. Comparison of del Nido cardioplegia and St. Thomas Hospital solution – two types of cardioplegia in adult cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Prashant; Jadhav, Ranjit B.; Khandekar, Jayant; Raut, Chaitanya; Ammannaya, Ganesh Kumar; Seth, Harsh S.; Singh, Jaskaran; Shah, Vaibhav

    2016-01-01

    Introduction St. Thomas’ cardioplegic solution No. 2 (ST), although most widely used in adult cardiac surgery, needs to be given at short intervals, causing additional myocardial injury. Aim To determine whether del Nido (DN) cardioplegia, with longer periods of arrest, provides equivalent myocardial protection as compared to ST. Material and methods The study population comprised 100 patients who underwent elective coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or double valve replacement (DVR) surgery between January 2015 and January 2016. The patients were divided into two groups based on the type of cardioplegia administered during surgery: 1) intermittent ST (ST, n = 50) and 2) DN cardioplegia (DN, n = 50). We compared the aortic cross clamp (CC) and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) times, number of intra-operative DC shocks required, and postoperative changes in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in the two groups. Results The aortic cross clamp and bypass times were shorter with DN (110.15 ±36.84 vs. 133.56 ±35.66 and 158.60 ±39.92 vs. 179.81 ±42.36 min respectively, p < 0.05). Fewer cardioplegia doses were required in the DN group vs. the ST group (1.38 ±0.59 vs. 4.15 ±1.26; p = 0.001), while a single cardioplegia dose was given to 35 DN patients (70%) vs. 0 ST patients (p < 0.001). Postoperative LVEF was better preserved in the DN group. Conclusions The use of DN leads to shorter cross clamp and CPB times, reduces cardioplegia dosage, and provides potentially better myocardial protection in terms of LVEF preservation, with a safety profile comparable to ST cardioplegia. PMID:28096823

  20. Outcomes of Adult In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Treated with Targeted Temperature Management: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei-Tien; Tsai, Min-Shan; Yu, Ping-Hsun; Wu, Yen-Wen; Chen, Wen-Jone

    2016-01-01

    Aim Targeted temperature management (TTM) for in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) is given different recommendation levels within international resuscitation guidelines. We aimed to identify whether TTM would be associated with favourable outcomes following IHCA and to determine which factors would influence the decision to implement TTM. Methods We conducted a retrospective observational study in a single medical centre. We included adult patients suffering IHCA between 2006 and 2014. We used multivariable logistic regression analysis to evaluate associations between independent variables and outcomes. Results We included a total of 678 patients in our analysis; only 22 (3.2%) patients received TTM. Most (81.1%) patients met at least one exclusion criteria for TTM. In all, 144 (21.2%) patients survived to hospital discharge; among them, 60 (8.8%) patients displayed favourable neurological status at discharge. TTM use was significantly associated with favourable neurological outcome (OR: 3.74, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.19–11.00; p-value = 0.02), but it was not associated with survival (OR: 1.41, 95% CI: 0.54–3.66; p-value = 0.48). Arrest in the emergency department was positively associated with TTM use (OR: 22.48, 95% CI: 8.40–67.64; p value < 0.001) and having vasopressors in place at the time of arrest was inversely associated with TTM use (OR: 0.08, 95% CI: 0.004–0.42; p-value = 0.02). Conclusion TTM might be associated with favourable neurological outcome of IHCA patients, irrespective of arrest rhythms. The prevalence of proposed exclusion criteria for TTM was high among IHCA patients, but these factors did not influence the use of TTM in clinical practice or neurological outcomes after IHCA. PMID:27820847

  1. MONTE CARLO STUDY OF THE CARDIAC ABSORBED DOSE DURING X-RAY EXAMINATION OF AN ADULT PATIENT.

    PubMed

    Kadri, O; Manai, K; Alfuraih, A

    2016-12-01

    The computational voxel phantom 'High-Definition Reference Korean-Man (HDRK-Man)' was implemented into the Monte Carlo transport toolkit Geant4. The voxel model, adjusted to the Reference Korean Man, is 171 cm in height and 68 kg in weight and composed of ∼30 million voxels whose size is 1.981 × 1.981 × 2.0854 mm(3) The Geant4 code is then utilised to compute the dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) expressed in absorbed dose per air kerma free in air for >30 tissues and organs, including almost all organs required in the new recommendation of the ICRP 103, due to a broad parallel beam of monoenergetic photons impinging in antero-postero direction with energy ranging from 10 to 150 keV. The computed DCCs of different organs are found to be in good agreement with data published using other simulation codes. Also, the influence of patient size on DCC values was investigated for a representative body size of the adult Korean patient population. The study was performed using five different sizes covering the range of 0.8-1.2 magnification order of the original HDRK-Man. It focussed on the computation of DCC for the human heart. Moreover, the provided DCCs were used to present an analytical parameterisation for the calculation of the cardiac absorbed dose for any arbitrary X-ray spectrum and for those patient sizes. Thus, the present work can be considered as an enhancement of the continuous studies performed by medical physicist as part of quality control tests and radiation protection dosimetry.

  2. Centrifugal pump and roller pump in adult cardiac surgery: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Saczkowski, Richard; Maklin, Michelle; Mesana, Thierry; Boodhwani, Munir; Ruel, Marc

    2012-08-01

    Centrifugal pump (CP) and roller pump (RP) designs are the dominant main arterial pumps used in cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Trials reporting clinical outcome measures comparing CP and RP are controversial. Therefore, a meta-analysis was undertaken to evaluate clinical variables from randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Keyword searches were performed on Medline (1966-2011), EmBase (1980-2011), and CINAHL (1981-2011) for studies comparing RP and CP as the main arterial pump in adult CPB. Pooled fixed-effects estimates for dichotomous and continuous data were calculated as an odds ratio and weighted-mean difference, respectively. The P value was utilized to assess statistical significance (P < 0.05) between CP and RP groups. Eighteen RCTs met inclusion criteria, which represented 1868 patients (CP = 961, RP = 907). The prevailing operation was isolated coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CP = 88%, RP = 87%). Fixed-effects pooled estimates were performed for end-of-CPB (ECP) and postoperative day one (PDO) for platelet count (ECP: P = 0.51, PDO: P = 0.16), plasma free hemoglobin (ECP: P = 0.36, PDO: P = 0.24), white blood cell count (ECP: P = 0.21, PDO: P = 0.66), and hematocrit (ECP: P = 0.06, PDO: P = 0.51). No difference was demonstrated for postoperative blood loss (P = 0.65) or red blood cell transfusion (P = 0.71). Intensive care unit length of stay (P = 0.30), hospital length of stay (P = 0.33), and mortality (P = 0.91) were similar between the CP and RP groups. Neurologic outcomes were not amenable to pooled analysis; nevertheless, the results were inconclusive. There was no reported pump-related malfunction or mishap. The meta-analysis of RCTs comparing CP and RP in adult cardiac surgery suggests no significant difference for hematological variables, postoperative blood loss, transfusions, neurological outcomes, or mortality.

  3. Micromanaging cardiac regeneration: Targeted delivery of microRNAs for cardiac repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kamps, Jan AAM; Krenning, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The loss of cardiomyocytes during injury and disease can result in heart failure and sudden death, while the adult heart has a limited capacity for endogenous regeneration and repair. Current stem cell-based regenerative medicine approaches modestly improve cardiomyocyte survival, but offer neglectable cardiomyogenesis. This has prompted the need for methodological developments that crease de novo cardiomyocytes. Current insights in cardiac development on the processes and regulatory mechanisms in embryonic cardiomyocyte differentiation provide a basis to therapeutically induce these pathways to generate new cardiomyocytes. Here, we discuss the current knowledge on embryonic cardiomyocyte differentiation and the implementation of this knowledge in state-of-the-art protocols to the direct reprogramming of cardiac fibroblasts into de novo cardiomyocytes in vitro and in vivo with an emphasis on microRNA-mediated reprogramming. Additionally, we discuss current advances on state-of-the-art targeted drug delivery systems that can be employed to deliver these microRNAs to the damaged cardiac tissue. Together, the advances in our understanding of cardiac development, recent advances in microRNA-based therapeutics, and innovative drug delivery systems, highlight exciting opportunities for effective therapies for myocardial infarction and heart failure. PMID:26981212

  4. A cardiac-specific health-related quality of life module for young adults with congenital heart disease: development and validation.

    PubMed

    Kamphuis, M; Zwinderman, K H; Vogels, T; Vliegen, H W; Kamphuis, R P; Ottenkamp, J; Verloove-Vanhorick, S P; Bruil, J

    2004-05-01

    This study represents the development and validation of a cardiac-specific module of the generic health-related quality of life (HRQoL) instrument, the TAAQOL (TNO/AZL Adult Quality Of Life), for young adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). Items were selected based on literature, an explorative previous study in CHD patients, interviews with patients, and the advice of experts. The newly developed Congenital Heart Disease-TNO/AZL Adult Quality of Life (CHD-TAAQOL) was tested in 156 patients with mild or complex CHD and consisted of three hypothesised subject scales: 'Symptoms' (9 items), 'Impact Cardiac Surveillance' (7 items), and 'Worries' (10 items). Cronbach's alpha for the three scales were 0.77, 0.78, and 0.82, respectively. Scale structure was confirmed by Principal Component Analysis, corrected item-scale and interscale correlations. Overall, 55% of reported health status problems were associated with negative emotions, which is an argument for assessing HRQoL as a concept distinct from health status. Convergent validity with validated generic instruments (TAAQOL and Short Form-36, SF-36) showed satisfactory coefficients. Discriminant validity was proven by significantly higher scores for mild CHD patients compared with those with complex CHD. In conclusion, the CHD-TAAQOL module together with the generic TAAQOL can be used to assess group differences for cardiac-specific HRQoL in young adults with CHD. Testing psychometric properties of the CHD-TAAQOL shows satisfactory results. However, to detect changes in HRQoL over time, further research is needed.

  5. Cardiac arrhythmias as the initial manifestation of adult primary Sjögren's syndrome: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Liang, Minrui; Bao, Liwen; Xiong, Nanqing; Jin, Bo; Ni, Huanchun; Zhang, Jinjin; Zou, Hejian; Luo, Xinping; Li, Jian

    2015-09-01

    Two middle-aged female patients presenting with heart palpitation and electrocardiogram revealed complex cardiac arrhythmias. A review of systems was positive for dry mouth and transient arthralgia, while laboratory and instrumental tests enabled us to make the diagnosis of primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS). Cardiac electrophysiology revealed atrioventricular node dysfunction and impaired intraventricular conduction. Prednisone therapy induced a significant improvement in symptoms and electrocardiographic readings. The diagnosis of pSS should be considered in a patient presenting with complex cardiac arrhythmias.

  6. Global transcriptomic analysis of induced cardiomyocytes predicts novel regulators for direct cardiac reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Talkhabi, Mahmood; Razavi, Seyed Morteza; Salari, Ali

    2017-04-04

    Heart diseases are the most significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the world. De novo generated cardiomyocytes (CMs) are a great cellular source for cell-based therapy and other potential applications. Direct cardiac reprogramming is the newest method to produce CMs, known as induced cardiomyocytes (iCMs). During a direct cardiac reprogramming, also known as transdifferentiation, non-cardiac differentiated adult cells are reprogrammed to cardiac identity by forced expression of cardiac-specific transcription factors (TFs) or microRNAs. To this end, many different combinations of TFs (±microRNAs) have been reported for direct reprogramming of mouse or human fibroblasts to iCMs, although their efficiencies remain very low. It seems that the investigated TFs and microRNAs are not sufficient for efficient direct cardiac reprogramming and other cardiac specific factors may be required for increasing iCM production efficiency, as well as the quality of iCMs. Here, we analyzed gene expression data of cardiac fibroblast (CFs), iCMs and adult cardiomyocytes (aCMs). The up-regulated and down-regulated genes in CMs (aCMs and iCMs) were determined as CM and CF specific genes, respectively. Among CM specific genes, we found 153 transcriptional activators including some cardiac and non-cardiac TFs that potentially activate the expression of CM specific genes. We also identified that 85 protein kinases such as protein kinase D1 (PKD1), protein kinase A (PRKA), calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CAMK), protein kinase C (PRKC), and insulin like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) that are strongly involved in establishing CM identity. CM gene regulatory network constructed using protein kinases, transcriptional activators and intermediate proteins predicted some new transcriptional activators such as myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PPARGC1A), which may be required for qualitatively and

  7. Chemical genetics and its potential in cardiac stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Joaquim M; Riley, Paul R

    2013-05-01

    Over the last decade or so, intensive research in cardiac stem cell biology has led to significant discoveries towards a potential therapy for cardiovascular disease; the main cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. The major goal within the field of cardiovascular regenerative medicine is to replace lost or damaged cardiac muscle and coronaries following ischaemic disease. At present, de novo cardiomyocytes can be generated either in vitro, for cell transplantation or disease modelling using directed differentiation of embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells, or in vivo via direct reprogramming of resident adult cardiac fibroblast or ectopic stimulation of resident cardiac stem or progenitor cells. A major bottleneck with all of these approaches is the low efficiency of cardiomyocyte differentiation alongside their relative functional immaturity. Chemical genetics, and the application of phenotypic screening with small molecule libraries, represent a means to enhance understanding of the molecular pathways controlling cardiovascular cell differentiation and, moreover, offer the potential for discovery of new drugs to invoke heart repair and regeneration. Here, we review the potential of chemical genetics in cardiac stem cell therapy, highlighting not only the major contributions to the field so far, but also the future challenges.

  8. Novel all-extremity high-intensity interval training improves aerobic fitness, cardiac function and insulin resistance in healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Chueh-Lung; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Kim, Han-Kyul; Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Handberg, Eileen M; Petersen, John W; Christou, Demetra D

    2016-09-01

    Aging is associated with decreased aerobic fitness and cardiac remodeling leading to increased risk for cardiovascular disease. High-intensity interval training (HIIT) on the treadmill has been reported to be more effective in ameliorating these risk factors compared with moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) in patients with cardiometabolic disease. In older adults, however, weight-bearing activities are frequently limited due to musculoskeletal and balance problems. The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility and safety of non-weight-bearing all-extremity HIIT in older adults. In addition, we tested the hypothesis that all-extremity HIIT will be more effective in improving aerobic fitness, cardiac function, and metabolic risk factors compared with all-extremity MICT. Fifty-one healthy sedentary older adults (age: 65±1years) were randomized to HIIT (n=17), MICT (n=18) or non-exercise control (CONT; n=16). HIIT (4×4min 90% of peak heart rate; HRpeak) and isocaloric MICT (70% of HRpeak) were performed on a non-weight-bearing all-extremity ergometer, 4×/week for 8weeks under supervision. All-extremity HIIT was feasible in older adults and resulted in no adverse events. Aerobic fitness (peak oxygen consumption; VO2peak) and ejection fraction (echocardiography) improved by 11% (P<0.0001) and 4% (P=0.001), respectively in HIIT, while no changes were observed in MICT and CONT (P≥0.1). Greater improvements in ejection fraction were associated with greater improvements in VO2peak (r=0.57; P<0.0001). Insulin resistance (homeostatic model assessment) decreased only in HIIT by 26% (P=0.016). Diastolic function, body composition, glucose and lipids were unaffected (P≥0.1). In conclusion, all-extremity HIIT is feasible and safe in older adults. HIIT, but not MICT, improved aerobic fitness, ejection fraction, and insulin resistance.

  9. Curvature Analysis of Cardiac Excitation Wavefronts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    computational cardiac-cell network accurately reproduces a particular kind of cardiac arrhythmia , such as ventricular fibrillation. Curvature Analysis of Cardiac...network accurately reproduces a particular kind of cardiac arrhythmia , such as ventricular fibrillation. Index Terms Cardiac excitation waves...isopotentials, Bézier curves, curvature, cardiac arrhythmia and fibrillation Ç 1 INTRODUCTION AN estimated 81,000,000 American adults, more than onein three

  10. Crosstalk of cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts in co-cultures

    PubMed Central

    Rother, J.; Richter, C.; Turco, L.; Knoch, F.; Mey, I.; Luther, S.; Janshoff, A.; Bodenschatz, E.; Tarantola, M.

    2015-01-01

    Electromechanical function of cardiac muscle depends critically on the crosstalk of myocytes with non-myocytes. Upon cardiac fibrosis, fibroblasts translocate into infarcted necrotic tissue and alter their communication capabilities. In the present in vitro study, we determined a multiple parameter space relevant for fibrotic cardiac tissue development comprising the following essential processes: (i) adhesion to substrates with varying elasticity, (ii) dynamics of contractile function, and (iii) electromechanical connectivity. By combining electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) with conventional optical microscopy, we could measure the impact of fibroblast–cardiomyocyte ratio on the aforementioned parameters in a non-invasive fashion. Adhesion to electrodes was quantified via spreading rates derived from impedance changes, period analysis allowed us to measure contraction dynamics and modulations of the barrier resistance served as a measure of connectivity. In summary, we claim that: (i) a preferred window for substrate elasticity around 7 kPa for low fibroblast content exists, which is shifted to stiffer substrates with increasing fibroblast fractions. (ii) Beat frequency decreases nonlinearly with increasing fraction of fibroblasts, while (iii) the intercellular resistance increases with a maximal functional connectivity at 75% fibroblasts. For the first time, cardiac cell–cell junction density-dependent connectivity in co-cultures of cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts was quantified using ECIS. PMID:26085516

  11. Cardiac Outcomes in Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer Exposed to Cardiotoxic Therapy: A Cross-Sectional Study from the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Mulrooney, Daniel A.; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Huang, Sujuan; Ness, Kirsten K.; Ehrhardt, Matthew J.; Joshi, Vijaya M.; Plana, Juan Carlos; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Green, Daniel M.; Srivastava, Deokumar; Santucci, Aimee; Krasin, Matthew J.; Robison, Leslie L.; Hudson, Melissa M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies of cardiac disease among adult survivors of childhood cancer have generally relied upon self-reported or registry-based data. Objective Systematically assess cardiac outcomes among childhood cancer survivors Design Cross-sectional Setting St. Jude Children's Research Hospital Patients 1,853 adult survivors of childhood cancer, ≥18 years old, and ≥10 years from treatment with cardiotoxic therapy for childhood cancer. Measurements History/physical examination, fasting metabolic and lipid panels, echocardiogram, electrocardiogram (ECG), 6-minute walk test (6MWT) all collected at baseline evaluation. Results Half (52.3%) of the survivors were male, median age 8.0 years (range: 0-24) at cancer diagnosis, 31.0 years (18-60) at evaluation. Cardiomyopathy was present in 7.4% (newly identified at the time of evaluation in 4.7%), coronary artery disease (CAD) in 3.8% (newly identified in 2.2%), valvular regurgitation/stenosis in 28.0% (newly identified in 24.8%), and conduction/rhythm abnormalities in 4.6% (newly identified in 1.4%). Nearly all (99.7%) were asymptomatic. The prevalences of cardiac conditions increased with age at evaluation, ranging from 3-24% among those 30-39 years to 10-37% among those ≥40 years. On multivariable analysis, anthracycline exposure ≥250 mg/m2 increased the odds of cardiomyopathy (odds ratio [OR] 2.7, 95% CI 1.1-6.9) compared to anthracycline unexposed survivors. Radiation to the heart increased the odds of cardiomyopathy (OR 1.9 95% CI 1.1-3.7) compared to radiation unexposed survivors. Radiation >1500 cGy with any anthracycline exposure conferred the greatest odds for valve findings. Limitations 61% participation rate of survivors exposed to cardiotoxic therapies, which were limited to anthracyclines and cardiac-directed radiation. A comparison group and longitudinal assessments are not available. Conclusions Cardiovascular screening identified considerable subclinical disease among adult survivors of childhood

  12. Transesophageal Echocardiography in Healthy Young Adult Male Baboons (Papio hamadryas anubis): Normal Cardiac Anatomy and Function in Subhuman Primates Compared to Humans.

    PubMed

    Bert, Arthur A; Drake, William B; Quinn, Rachael W; Brasky, Kathleen M; O'Brien, James E; Lofland, Gary K; Hopkins, Richard A

    2013-08-01

    Implantable, viable tissue engineered cardiovascular constructs are rapidly approaching clinical translation. Species typically utilized as preclinical large animal models are food stock ungulates for which cross species biological and genomic differences with humans are great. Multiple authorities have recommended developing subhuman primate models for testing regenerative surgical strategies to mitigate xenotransplant inflammation. However, there is a lack of specific quantitative cardiac imaging comparisons between humans and the genomically similar baboons (Papio hamadryas anubis). This study was undertaken to translate to baboons transesophageal echocardiographic functional and dimensional criteria defined as necessary for defining cardiac anatomy and function in the perioperative setting. Seventeen young, healthy baboons (approximately 30 kg, similar to 5 year old children) were studied to determine whether the requisite 11 views and 52 measurement parameters could be reliably acquired by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). The obtained measurements were compared to human adult normative literature values and to a large relational database of pediatric "normal heart" echo measurements. Comparisons to humans, when normalized to BSA, revealed a trend in baboons toward larger mitral and aortic valve effective orifice areas and much larger left ventricular muscle mass and wall thickness, but similar pulmonary and tricuspid valves. By modifying probe positioning relative to human techniques, all recommended TEE views except transgastric could be replicated. To supplement, two transthoracic apical views were discovered that in baboons could reliably replace the transgastric TEE view. Thus, all requisite echo views could be obtained for a complete cardiac evaluation in Papio hamadryas anubis to noninvasively quantify cardiac structural anatomy, physiology, and dimensions. Despite similarities between the species, there are subtle and important physiologic and

  13. Evaluation of the preliminary effectiveness of hand massage therapy on postoperative pain of adults in the intensive care unit after cardiac surgery: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Boitor, Mădălina; Martorella, Géraldine; Arbour, Caroline; Michaud, Cécile; Gélinas, Céline

    2015-06-01

    Although many intensive care unit patients experience significant pain, very few studies explored massage to maximize their pain relief. This study aimed to evaluate the preliminary effects of hand massage on pain after cardiac surgery in the adult intensive care unit. A pilot randomized controlled trial was used for this study. The study was conducted in a Canadian medical-surgical intensive care unit. Forty adults who were admitted to the intensive care unit after undergoing elective cardiac surgery in the previous 24 hours participated in the study. They were randomly assigned to the experimental (n = 21) or control (n = 19) group. The experimental group received a 15-minute hand massage, and the control group received a 15-minute hand-holding without massage. In both groups the intervention was followed by a 30-minute rest period. The interventions were offered on 2-3 occasions within 24 hours after surgery. Pain, muscle tension, and vital signs were assessed. Pain intensity and behavioral scores were decreased for the experimental group. Although hand massage decreased muscle tension, fluctuations in vital signs were not significant. This study supports potential benefits of hand massage for intensive care unit postoperative pain management. Although larger randomized controlled trials are necessary, this low-cost nonpharmacologic intervention can be safely administered.

  14. Lactate Elevation During and After Major Cardiac Surgery in Adults: A Review of Etiology, Prognostic Value, and Management.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Lars W

    2017-03-08

    Elevated lactate is a common occurrence after cardiac surgery. This review summarizes the literature on the complex etiology of lactate elevation during and after cardiac surgery, including considerations of oxygen delivery, oxygen utilization, increased metabolism, lactate clearance, medications and fluids, and postoperative complications. Second, the association between lactate and a variety of outcomes are described, and the prognostic role of lactate is critically assessed. Despite the fact that elevated lactate is strongly associated with many important outcomes, including postoperative complications, length of stay, and mortality, little is known about the optimal management of postoperative patients with lactate elevations. This review ends with an assessment of the limited literature on this subject.

  15. Components of the interleukin-33/ST2 system are differentially expressed and regulated in human cardiac cells and in cells of the cardiac vasculature.

    PubMed

    Demyanets, Svitlana; Kaun, Christoph; Pentz, Richard; Krychtiuk, Konstantin A; Rauscher, Sabine; Pfaffenberger, Stefan; Zuckermann, Andreas; Aliabadi, Arezu; Gröger, Marion; Maurer, Gerald; Huber, Kurt; Wojta, Johann

    2013-07-01

    Interleukin-33 (IL-33) is a recently described member of the IL-1 family of cytokines, which was identified as a ligand for the ST2 receptor. Components of the IL-33/ST2 system were shown to be expressed in normal and pressure overloaded human myocardium, and soluble ST2 (sST2) has emerged as a prognostic biomarker in myocardial infarction and heart failure. However, expression and regulation of IL-33 in human adult cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts was not tested before. In this study we found that primary human adult cardiac fibroblasts (HACF) and human adult cardiac myocytes (HACM) constitutively express nuclear IL-33 that is released during cell necrosis. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-1β significantly increased both IL-33 protein and IL-33 mRNA expression in HACF and HACM as well as in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMC). The nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) inhibitor dimethylfumarate inhibited TNF-α- and IL-1β-induced IL-33 production as well as nuclear translocation of p50 and p65 NF-κB subunits in these cells. Mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase inhibitor U0126 abrogated TNF-α-, IFN-γ-, and IL-1β-induced and Janus-activated kinase inhibitor I reduced IFN-γ-induced IL-33 production. We detected IL-33 mRNA in human myocardial tissue from patients undergoing heart transplantation (n=27) where IL-33 mRNA levels statistically significant correlated with IFN-γ (r=0.591, p=0.001) and TNF-α (r=0.408, p=0.035) mRNA expression. Endothelial cells in human heart expressed IL-33 as well as ST2 protein. We also reveal that human cardiac and vascular cells have different distribution patterns of ST2 isoforms (sST2 and transmembrane ST2L) mRNA expression and produce different amounts of sST2 protein. Both human macrovascular (aortic and coronary artery) and heart microvascular endothelial cells express specific mRNA for both ST2 isoforms (ST2L and sST2) and are a source for sST2 protein, whereas

  16. Stimulating endogenous cardiac repair

    PubMed Central

    Finan, Amanda; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration, a combination of these approaches could ameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation of multiple cellular players. PMID:26484341

  17. Mechanisms of Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Uygur, Aysu; Lee, Richard T.

    2016-01-01

    Adult humans fail to regenerate their hearts following injury, and this failure to regenerate myocardium is a leading cause of heart failure and death worldwide. Although all adult mammals appear to lack significant cardiac regeneration potential, some vertebrates can regenerate myocardium throughout life. In addition, new studies indicate that mammals have cardiac regeneration potential during development and very soon after birth. The mechanisms of heart regeneration among model organisms, including neonatal mice, appear remarkably similar. Orchestrated waves of inflammation, matrix deposition and remodeling, and cardiomyocyte proliferation are commonly seen in heart regeneration models. Understanding why adult mammals develop extensive scarring instead of regeneration is a crucial goal for regenerative biology. PMID:26906733

  18. Administration of anabolic steroid during adolescence induces long-term cardiac hypertrophy and increases susceptibility to ischemia/reperfusion injury in adult Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Cruz Seara, Fernando de Azevedo; Barbosa, Raiana Andrade Quintanilha; Oliveira, Dahienne Ferreira de; Silva, Diorney Luiz Souza Gran da; Carvalho, Adriana Bastos; Ferreira, Andrea Claudia Freitas; Nascimento, José Hamilton Matheus; Olivares, Emerson Lopes

    2017-02-05

    Chronic administration of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) in adult rats results in cardiac hypertrophy and increased susceptibility to myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury. Molecular analyses demonstrated that hyperactivation of type 1 angiotensin II (AT1) receptor mediates cardiac hypertrophy induced by AAS and also induces down-regulation of myocardial ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP), resulting in loss of exercise-induced cardioprotection. Exposure to AAS during adolescence promoted long-term cardiovascular dysfunctions, such as dysautonomia. We tested the hypothesis that chronic AAS exposure in the pre/pubertal phase increases the susceptibility to myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury in adult rats. Male Wistar rats (26day old) were treated with vehicle (Control, n=12) or testosterone propionate (TP) (AAS, 5mgkg(-1) n=12) 5 times/week during 5 weeks. At the end of AAS exposure, rats underwent 23days of washout period and were submitted to euthanasia. Langendorff-perfused hearts were submitted to IR injury and evaluated for mechanical dysfunctions and infarct size. Molecular analysis was performed by mRNA levels of α-myosin heavy chain (MHC), βMHC and brain-derived natriuretic peptide (BNP), ryanodine receptor (RyR2) and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase 2a (SERCA2a) by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). The expression of AT1 receptor and KATP channel subunits (Kir6.1 and SURa) was analyzed by qRT-PCR and Western Blot. NADPH oxidase (Nox)-related reactive oxygen species generation was assessed by spectrofluorimetry. The expression of antioxidant enzymes was measured by qRT-PCR in order to address a potential role of redox unbalance. AAS exposure promoted long-term cardiac hypertrophy characterized by increased expression of βMHC and βMHC/αMHC ratio. Baseline derivative of pressure (dP/dt) was impaired by AAS exposure. Postischemic recovery of mechanical properties was impaired (decreased left ventricle [LV] developed pressure and

  19. The Alberta Cardiac Access Collaborative: improving the cardiac patient journey.

    PubMed

    Blackadar, Robyn; Houle, Mishaela

    2009-01-01

    The Alberta Cardiac Access Collaborative (ACAC) is a joint initiative of Alberta's health system to improve access to adult cardiac services across the patient journey. ACAC has created new care delivery models and implemented best practices across Alberta in four streams across the continuum: heart attack, patient navigation, heart failure and arrhythmia. Emergency medical providers, nurses, primary care physicians, hospitals, cardiac specialists and clinicians are all working together to integrate services, bridge jurisdictions and geography with one aim--improving the patient journey for adults in need of cardiac care.

  20. Comparison of three point-of-care testing devices to detect hemostatic changes in adult elective cardiac surgery: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bleeding complications in cardiac surgery may lead to increased morbidity and mortality. Traditional blood coagulation tests are not always suitable to detect rapid changes in the patient's coagulation status. Point-of-care instruments such as the TEG (thromboelastograph) and RoTEM (thromboelastometer) have been shown to be useful as a guide for the clinician in the choice of blood products and they may lead to a reduction in the need for blood transfusion, contributing to better patient blood management. Methods The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of the TEG, RoTEM and Sonoclot instruments to detect changes in hemostasis in elective cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass and to investigate possible correlations between variables from these three instruments and routine hematological coagulation tests. Blood samples from thirty-five adult patients were drawn before and after surgery and analyzed in TEG, RoTEM, Sonoclot and routine coagulation tests. Data were compared using repeated measures analysis of variance and Pearson's test for linear correlation. Results We found significant changes for all TEG variables after surgery, for three of the RoTEM variables, and for one variable from the Sonoclot. There were significant correlations postoperatively between plasma fibrinogen levels and variables from the three instruments. Conclusions TEG and RoTEM may be used to detect changes in hemostasis following cardiac surgery with CPB. Sonoclot seems to be less suitable to detect such changes. Variables from the three instruments correlated with plasma fibrinogen and could be used to monitor treatment with fibrinogen concentrate. PMID:25276093

  1. MicroRNAs and cardiac regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkinson, Conrad P.; Kang, Martin H.; Dal-Pra, Sophie; Mirotsou, Maria; Dzau, Victor J.

    2015-01-01

    The human heart has a very limited capacity to regenerate lost or damaged cardiomyocytes following cardiac insult. Instead, myocardial injury is characterized by extensive cardiac remodeling by fibroblasts, resulting in the eventual deterioration of cardiac structure and function. Cardiac function would be improved if these fibroblasts could be converted into cardiomyocytes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding RNAs that promote mRNA degradation and inhibit mRNA translation, have been shown to be important in cardiac development. Using this information various researchers have utilized miRNAs to promote the formation of cardiomyocytes through a number of approaches. Several miRNAs acting in combination promote the direct conversion of cardiac fibroblasts into cardiomyocytes. Moreover, a number of miRNAs have been identified that aid the formation of iPS cells and miRNAs also induce these cells to adopt a cardiac fate. MiRNAs have also been implicated in resident cardiac progenitor cell differentiation. In this review we will discuss the current literature as it pertains to these processes as well as discussing the therapeutic implications of these findings. PMID:25953925

  2. Efficacy of methylprednisolone and lignocaine on propofol injection pain: A randomised, double-blind, prospective study in adult cardiac surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Shivanna, Shivaprakash; Priye, Shio; Singh, Dipali; Jagannath, Sathyanarayan; Mudassar, Syed; Reddy, Durga Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Propofol (2, 6-di-isopropylphenol) used for the induction of anaesthesia often causes mild to severe pain or discomfort on injection. We designed this double-blind study to compare the efficacy of methylprednisolone and lignocaine in reducing the pain of propofol injection in patients scheduled for cardiac surgery. Methods: A total of 165 adult patients, scheduled for elective cardiac surgery, were divided into three groups: saline (group S, n = 55), lignocaine 20 mg (Group L, n = 55) and methylprednisolone 125 mg diluted into 2 ml of distilled water (Group MP, n = 55). Drugs were administered after tourniquet application and occlusion was released after 1 min and 1/4th of the total dose of propofol (2 mg/kg) was administered at the rate of 0.5 ml/s. Pain on propofol injection was evaluated by four-point verbal rating scale. Statistical methods used included Student's t-test and Chi-square test/Fisher's exact test. Results: The overall incidence of pain was 70.9% in the saline group, 30.9% in the lignocaine group and 36.4% in the methylprednisolone group. The intensity of pain was significantly less in patients receiving methylprednisolone and lignocaine than those receiving saline (P < 0.012). Conclusion: Pre-treatment with intravenous methylprednisolone was found to be as effective as lignocaine in reducing propofol injection-induced pain. PMID:27942060

  3. Bivalirudin as an Alternative Anticoagulant for Cardiopulmonary Bypass During Adult Cardiac Surgery-A Change in Practice.

    PubMed

    Gatt, Peter; Galea, Samuel Anthony; Busuttil, Walter; Grima, Charles; Muscat, Jeffrey; Farrugia, Yvette

    2017-03-01

    The referral of patients for open heart surgery, presenting with a history of heparin hypersensitivity instigated a multidisciplinary effort to find an alternative anticoagulant to heparin. The various options mentioned in the literature call for changes in the routine practice of open heart surgery on cardiopulmonary bypass. These changes involve mostly the perfusion setup and conduct on bypass and to a lesser extent the anesthetic and surgical practice. Nevertheless, the different professions involved in the cardiac surgical firm discussed the proposed changes in a multidisciplinary effort. A new protocol was drafted, endorsed, and executed. The authors highlight these changes and their successful use in the subsequent case study.

  4. Effects of an 18 week walking programme on cardiac function in previously sedentary or relatively inactive adults.

    PubMed Central

    Woolf-May, K; Bird, S; Owen, A

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of an 18 week walking programme upon cardiac function. METHODS: 29 sedentary or relatively inactive but otherwise healthy subjects (15 walkers and 14 controls, aged 40-68 years) completed the study. The walkers completed a progressive 18 week walking programme which required an estimated average energy expenditure of 900 kcal week-1 for the total duration of the study and 1161 kcal week-1 during the final six weeks. Walking was carried out at an intensity of 67.8 (SD 4.99)% of maximum oxygen consumption and 73.8(6.99%) of maximum heart rate. Before and after the intervention all subjects underwent an M mode echocardiogram, graded treadmill walking test, and step test for the assessment of aerobic fitness. RESULTS: After 18 weeks the results of the control group showed no change in any of the variables measured while the walkers showed a statistically significant increase in the velocity of relaxation of the longitudinal myocardial fibres of the left ventricle and a decrease in heart rate measured during the step tests, indicating an improvement in aerobic capacity. CONCLUSIONS: Walking promotes improvements in cardiovascular fitness. Moderate forms of exercise may improve cardiac function. Images p50-a PMID:9132212

  5. Procedural pain does not raise plasma levels of cortisol or catecholamines in adult intensive care patients after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    van Gulik, L; Ahlers, Sjgm; van Dijk, M; Bruins, P; Meima, M E; de Rijke, Y B; Biemond-Moeniralam, H S; Tibboel, D; Knibbe, C A J

    2016-01-01

    The gold standard for quantification of pain is a person's self-report. However, we need objective parameters for pain measurement when intensive care patients, for example, are not able to report pain themselves. An increase in pain is currently thought to coincide with an increase in stress hormones. This observational study investigated whether procedure-related pain is associated with an increase of plasma cortisol, adrenaline, and noradrenaline. In 59 patients receiving intensive care after cardiac surgery, cortisol, adrenaline, and noradrenaline plasma levels were measured immediately before and immediately after patients were turned for washing, either combined with the removal of chest tubes or not. Numeric rating scale scores were obtained before, during, and after the procedure. Unacceptably severe pain (numeric rating scale ≥ 4) was reported by seven (12%), 26 (44%), and nine (15%) patients, before, during and after the procedure, respectively. There was no statistically significant association between numeric rating scale scores and change in cortisol, adrenaline, and noradrenaline plasma levels during the procedure. Despite current convictions that pain coincides with an increase in stress hormones, procedural pain was not associated with a significant increase in plasma stress hormone levels in patients who had undergone cardiac surgery. Thus, plasma levels of cortisol, adrenaline, and noradrenaline seem unsuitable for further research on the measurement of procedural pain.

  6. Mechanoregulation of cardiac myofibroblast differentiation: implications for cardiac fibrosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Yong, Kar Wey; Li, YuHui; Huang, GuoYou; Lu, Tian Jian; Safwani, Wan Kamarul Zaman Wan; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Xu, Feng

    2015-08-15

    Cardiac myofibroblast differentiation, as one of the most important cellular responses to heart injury, plays a critical role in cardiac remodeling and failure. While biochemical cues for this have been extensively investigated, the role of mechanical cues, e.g., extracellular matrix stiffness and mechanical strain, has also been found to mediate cardiac myofibroblast differentiation. Cardiac fibroblasts in vivo are typically subjected to a specific spatiotemporally changed mechanical microenvironment. When exposed to abnormal mechanical conditions (e.g., increased extracellular matrix stiffness or strain), cardiac fibroblasts can undergo myofibroblast differentiation. To date, the impact of mechanical cues on cardiac myofibroblast differentiation has been studied both in vitro and in vivo. Most of the related in vitro research into this has been mainly undertaken in two-dimensional cell culture systems, although a few three-dimensional studies that exist revealed an important role of dimensionality. However, despite remarkable advances, the comprehensive mechanisms for mechanoregulation of cardiac myofibroblast differentiation remain elusive. In this review, we introduce important parameters for evaluating cardiac myofibroblast differentiation and then discuss the development of both in vitro (two and three dimensional) and in vivo studies on mechanoregulation of cardiac myofibroblast differentiation. An understanding of the development of cardiac myofibroblast differentiation in response to changing mechanical microenvironment will underlie potential targets for future therapy of cardiac fibrosis and failure.

  7. Diabetes, cardiac disorders and asthma as risk factors for severe organ involvement among adult dengue patients: A matched case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Junxiong; Hsu, Jung Pu; Yeo, Tsin Wen; Leo, Yee Sin; Lye, David C.

    2017-01-01

    Progression to severe organ involvement due to dengue infection has been associated with severe dengue disease, intensive care treatment, and mortality. However, there is a lack of understanding of the impact of pre-existing comorbidities and other risk factors of severe organ involvement among dengue adults. The aim of this retrospective case-control study is to characterize and identify risk factors that predispose dengue adults at risk of progression with severe organ involvement. This study involved 174 dengue patients who had progressed with severe organ involvement and 865 dengue patients without severe organ involvement, matched by the year of presentation of the cases, who were admitted to Tan Tock Seng Hospital between year 2005 and 2008. Age group of 60 years or older, diabetes, cardiac disorders, asthma, and having two or more pre-existing comorbidities were independent risk factors of severe organ involvement. Abdominal pain, clinical fluid accumulation, and hematocrit rise and rapid platelet count drop at presentation were significantly associated with severe organ involvement. These risk factors, when validated in a larger study, will be useful for triage by clinicians for prompt monitoring and clinical management at first presentation, to minimize the risk of severe organ involvement and hence, disease severity. PMID:28045096

  8. Development of a chemically defined in vitro culture system to effectively stimulate the proliferation of adult human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Seong; Yun, Jung Im; Gong, Seung Pyo; Ahn, Ji Yeon; Lim, Jeong Mook; Song, Young Han; Park, Kyu Hyun; Lee, Seung Tae

    2015-07-01

    Despite the fact that dermal fibroblasts are a practical model for research related to cell physiology and cell therapy, an in vitro culture system excluding serum, which complicates standardization and specificity and induces variability and unwanted effects, does not exist. We tried to establish a CDCS that supports effective proliferation of aHDFs. KDMEM supplemented with 5% (v/v) KSR, 12 ng/ml bFGF, 5 ng/ml EGF and 1 μg/ml hydrocortisone supported sufficient proliferation of aHDFs for 1 week. However, aHDF proliferation was decreased greatly after subculture. This problem could be overcome by culturing aHDFs in CDCM in culture plates coated with 10 μg/ml FN. Long-term culture of aHDFs was achieved using CDCM and FN-coated culture plates for 7 weeks. The optimized CDCS increased the proliferation of aHDFs significantly, without any increase in the senescence rate or alteration in morphology of aHDFs, despite long-term culture. In conclusion, we established a CDCS that improved proliferation of aHDFs while inhibiting cellular senescence. The CDCS will contribute to advances in various future research related to clinical skin regeneration.

  9. Basic fibroblast growth factor induces matrix metalloproteinase-13 via ERK MAP kinase-altered phosphorylation and sumoylation of Elk-1 in human adult articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Im, Hee-Jeong; Sharrocks, Andrew D; Lin, Xia; Yan, Dongyao; Kim, Jaesung; van Wijnen, Andre J; Hipskind, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    Degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and release of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) are principal aspects of the pathology of osteoarthritis (OA). ECM disruption leads to bFGF release, which activates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) pathway and its downstream target the Ets-like transcription factor Elk-1. Previously we demonstrated that the bFGF-ERK-Elk-1 signaling axis is responsible for the potent induction of MMP-13 in human primary articular chondrocytes. Here we report that, in addition to phosphorylation of Elk-1, dynamic posttranslational modification of Elk-1 by small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) serves as an important mechanism through which MMP-13 gene expression is regulated. We show that bFGF activates Elk-1 mainly through the ERK pathway and that increased phosphorylation of Elk-1 is accompanied by decreased conjugation of SUMO to Elk-1. Reporter gene assays reveal that phosphorylation renders Elk-1 competent for induction of MMP-13 gene transcription, while sumoylation has the opposite effect. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the SUMO-conjugase Ubc9 acts as a key mediator for Elk-1 sumoylation. Taken together, our results suggest that sumoylation antagonizes the phosphorylation-dependent transactivation capacity of Elk-1. This attenuates transcription of its downstream target gene MMP-13 to maintain the integrity of cartilage ECM homeostasis.

  10. GPCR signaling and cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Capote, Leany A; Mendez Perez, Roberto; Lymperopoulos, Anastasios

    2015-09-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), such as β-adrenergic and angiotensin II receptors, located in the membranes of all three major cardiac cell types, i.e. myocytes, fibroblasts and endothelial cells, play crucial roles in regulating cardiac function and morphology. Their importance in cardiac physiology and disease is reflected by the fact that, collectively, they represent the direct targets of over a third of the currently approved cardiovascular drugs used in clinical practice. Over the past few decades, advances in elucidation of their structure, function and the signaling pathways they elicit, specifically in the heart, have led to identification of an increasing number of new molecular targets for heart disease therapy. Here, we review these signaling modalities employed by GPCRs known to be expressed in the cardiac myocyte membranes and to directly modulate cardiac contractility. We also highlight drugs and drug classes that directly target these GPCRs to modulate cardiac function, as well as molecules involved in cardiac GPCR signaling that have the potential of becoming novel drug targets for modulation of cardiac function in the future.

  11. Cardiac catheterization - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - cardiac - discharge; Heart catheterization - discharge: Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization discharge; CAD - cardiac catheterization discharge; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization ...

  12. Hyperlactatemia in patients undergoing adult cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass: Causative factors and its effect on surgical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Rakesh; George, Gladdy; Karuppiah, Sathappan; Philip, Madhu Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Objectives of the Study: To identify the factors causing high lactate levels in patients undergoing cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and to assess the association between high blood lactate levels and postoperative morbidity and mortality. Methods: A retrospective observational study including 370 patients who underwent cardiac surgeries under cardiopulmonary bypass. The patients were divided into 2 groups based on serum lactate levels; those with serum lactate levels greater than or equal to 4 mmol/L considered as hyperlactatemia and those with serum lactate levels less than 4 mmol/L. Blood lactate samples were collected intraoperatively and postoperatively in the ICU. Preoperative and intraoperative risk factors for hyperlactatemia were identified using the highest intraoperative value of lactate. The postoperative morbidity and mortality associated with hyperlactatemia was studied using the overall (intraoperative and postoperative values) peak lactate levels. Preoperative clinical data, perioperative events and postoperative morbidity and mortality were recorded. Results: Intraoperative peak blood lactate levels of 4.0 mmol/L or more were present in 158 patients (42.7%). Females had higher peak intra operative lactate levels (P = 0.011). There was significant correlation between CPB time (Pearson correlation coefficient r = 0.024; P = 0.003) and aortic cross clamp time (r = 0.02, P = 0.007) with peak intraoperative blood lactate levels. Patients with hyperlactatemia had significantly higher rate of postoperative morbidity like atrial fibrillation (19.9% vs. 5.3%; P = 0.004), prolonged requirement of inotropes (34% vs. 11.8%; P = 0.001), longer stay in the ICU (P = 0.013) and hospital (P = 0.001). Conclusions: Hyperlactatemia had significant association with post-operative morbidity. Detection of hyperlactatemia in the perioperative period should be considered as an indicator of inadequate tissue oxygen delivery and must be aggressively

  13. Acute effects of tai chi exercise on cardiac autonomic function in healthy adults with tai chi experience.

    PubMed

    Kalsaria, Pratik; Li, Hongtao; Waite, Gabi N; Moga, Margaret M; Kingsley, Derek J; Geib, Roy W

    2012-01-01

    About 1 in 3 American adults have cardiovascular disease associated with risk factors such as physical inactivity, obesity, and stress. Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis is considered a non-invasive procedure for analyzing cardiovascular autonomic influence. Depressed HRV has been linked to abnormal cardiovascular autonomic modulation.

  14. Cardiomyocyte FGF signaling is required for Cx43 phosphorylation and cardiac gap junction maintenance.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Takashi; Tsuchida, Mariko; Lampe, Paul D; Murakami, Masahiro

    2013-08-15

    Cardiac remodeling resulting from impairment of myocardial integrity leads to heart failure, through still incompletely understood mechanisms. The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) system has been implicated in tissue maintenance, but its role in the adult heart is not well defined. We hypothesized that the FGF system plays a role in the maintenance of cardiac homeostasis, and the impairment of cardiomyocyte FGF signaling leads to pathological cardiac remodeling. We showed that FGF signaling is required for connexin 43 (Cx43) localization at cell-cell contacts in isolated cardiomyocytes and COS7 cells. Lack of FGF signaling led to decreased Cx43 phosphorylation at serines 325/328/330 (S325/328/330), sites known to be important for assembly of gap junctions. Cx43 instability induced by FGF inhibition was restored by the Cx43 S325/328/330 phospho-mimetic mutant, suggesting FGF-dependent phosphorylation of these sites. Consistent with these in vitro findings, cardiomyocyte-specific inhibition of FGF signaling in adult mice demonstrated mislocalization of Cx43 at intercalated discs, whereas localization of N-cadherin and desmoplakin was not affected. This led to premature death resulting from impaired cardiac remodeling. We conclude that cardiomyocyte FGF signaling is essential for cardiomyocyte homeostasis through phosphorylation of Cx43 at S325/328/330 residues which are important for the maintenance of gap junction.

  15. Functional Assessment of Cardiac Responses of Adult Zebrafish (Danio rerio) to Acute and Chronic Temperature Change Using High-Resolution Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Cua, Michelle; Sheng, Xiaoye; Rayani, Kaveh; Beg, Mirza F.; Sarunic, Marinko V.; Tibbits, Glen F.

    2016-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an important organism as a model for understanding vertebrate cardiovascular development. However, little is known about adult ZF cardiac function and how contractile function changes to cope with fluctuations in ambient temperature. The goals of this study were to: 1) determine if high resolution echocardiography (HRE) in the presence of reduced cardiodepressant anesthetics could be used to accurately investigate the structural and functional properties of the ZF heart and 2) if the effect of ambient temperature changes both acutely and chronically could be determined non-invasively using HRE in vivo. Heart rate (HR) appears to be the critical factor in modifying cardiac output (CO) with ambient temperature fluctuation as it increases from 78 ± 5.9 bpm at 18°C to 162 ± 9.7 bpm at 28°C regardless of acclimation state (cold acclimated CA– 18°C; warm acclimated WA– 28°C). Stroke volume (SV) is highest when the ambient temperature matches the acclimation temperature, though this difference did not constitute a significant effect (CA 1.17 ± 0.15 μL at 18°C vs 1.06 ± 0.14 μl at 28°C; WA 1.10 ± 0.13 μL at 18°C vs 1.12 ± 0.12 μl at 28°C). The isovolumetric contraction time (IVCT) was significantly shorter in CA fish at 18°C. The CA group showed improved systolic function at 18°C in comparison to the WA group with significant increases in both ejection fraction and fractional shortening and decreases in IVCT. The decreased early peak (E) velocity and early peak velocity / atrial peak velocity (E/A) ratio in the CA group are likely associated with increased reliance on atrial contraction for ventricular filling. PMID:26730947

  16. Cardiac Uptake of Minocycline and Mechanisms for In Vivo Cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Perez, Diego; Fricovsky, Eduardo; Yamasaki, Katrina Go; Griffin, Michael; Barraza-Hidalgo, Maraliz; Dillmann, Wolfgang; Villarreal, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    Objectives The ability of minocycline to be transported into cardiac cells, concentrate in normal and ischemic myocardium and act as in vivo cardioprotector was examined. We also determined minocycline's capacity to act as a reducer of myocardial oxidative stress and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. Background The identification of compounds with the potential to reduce myocardial ischemic injury is of great interest. Tetracyclines (TTCs) are antibiotics with pleiotropic cytoprotective properties that accumulate in normal and diseased tissues. Minocycline is highly lipophilic and has shown promise as a possible cardioprotector. However, minocycline's potential as an in vivo cardioprotector as well as the means by which this action is attained are not well understood. Methods Rats were subjected to 45 min of ischemia and 48 h of reperfusion. Animals were treated 48 h before and 48 h after thoracotomy with either vehicle or 50 mg/kg/day minocycline. Tissue samples were used for biochemical assays and cultured cardiac cells for minocycline uptake experiments. Results Minocycline significantly reduced infarct size (∼33%), tissue MMP-9 activity and oxidative stress. Minocycline was concentrated ∼24-fold in normal (0.5 mM) and ∼50-fold in ischemic regions (1.1 mM) vs. blood. Neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts, myocytes and adult fibroblasts demonstrate a time- and temperature-dependent uptake of minocycline to levels that approximate those of normal myocardium. Conclusions Given the high intracellular levels observed and results from the assessment of in vitro antioxidant and MMP inhibitor capacities, it is likely that minocycline acts to limit myocardial ischemic injury via mass action effects. PMID:18848143

  17. Effect of Vortioxetine on Cardiac Repolarization in Healthy Adult Male Subjects: Results of a Thorough QT/QTc Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Nomikos, George G; Karim, Aziz; Munsaka, Melvin; Serenko, Michael; Liosatos, Maggie; Harris, Stuart

    2013-10-01

    This double-blind, randomized, placebo- and positive-controlled, parallel-group study evaluated the effect of vortioxetine (Lu AA21004), an investigational multimodal antidepressant, on QT interval in accordance with current guidelines of the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH-E14). A total of 340 healthy men were randomized to receive 1 of 4 treatments for 14 days: (1) vortioxetine 10 mg once daily (QD), (2) vortioxetine 40 mg QD, (3) placebo QD, or (4) placebo QD on Days 1 through 13 followed by a single dose of moxifloxacin 400 mg (positive control). The primary endpoint was the largest time-matched, baseline-adjusted least-squares (LS) mean difference for the individual-corrected QT interval (QTcNi [linear]) between vortioxetine and placebo. Alternative QT correction formulas (i.e., Fredericia [QTcF], Bazett [QTcB], Framingham [QTcFm], and QTcNi [nonlinear]) were used as secondary endpoints. The upper bound of the 2-sided 90% confidence interval around the LS mean difference from placebo for baseline-adjusted QTcNi (linear), QTcF, QTcB, QTcFm, and QTcNi (nonlinear) did not exceed 10 ms at any time point after multiple doses of vortioxetine 10 mg (therapeutic) or 40 mg (supratherapeutic). Overall, the study results indicate that vortioxetine is unlikely to affect cardiac repolarization in healthy subjects.

  18. [Congenital heart disease in adults: residua, sequelae, and complications of cardiac defects repaired at an early age].

    PubMed

    Oliver Ruiz, José María

    2003-01-01

    Nowadays, it is estimated that 85% of the infants born with congenital heart disease (CHD) will survive to adulthood, thanks mainly to surgical or therapeutic procedures performed during infancy or childhood. The clinical profile and disease pattern of adults with CHD is changing. The prevalence of certain adult CHDs, such as tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries or univentricular heart, is rising, but these conditions have practically become new diseases as a result of therapy. Most surviving patients present residua, sequelae, or complications, which can progress during adult life. These disorders can present electrophysiological disturbances, valvular disease, persistent shunts, myocardial dysfunction, pulmonary or systemic vascular disease, problems caused by prosthetic materials, infectious complications, thromboembolic events, or extravascular disorders involving multiple organs or systems. In tetralogy of Fallot, the most striking problems that affect long-term prognosis are pulmonary valve regurgitation, right ventricle dysfunction, and atrial or ventricular arrhythmias. The main problems appearing after physiological atrial repair of transposition of the great arteries are related to right ventricular function, since it is structurally unprepared for systemic circulation, and atrial arrhythmias. Surgical repair of univentricular heart using Fontan techniques should be considered a palliative procedure that does not modify the underlying structural disorder and exposes the postoperative patient to severe complications and problems. The increase in the number of patients with CHD who will reach adulthood in the coming decades makes it necessary to carefully consider the new healthcare demands that are being generated, who should be responsible for them, and how and where solutions can be found.

  19. Walnut ingestion in adults at risk for diabetes: effects on body composition, diet quality, and cardiac risk measures

    PubMed Central

    Njike, Valentine Yanchou; Ayettey, Rockiy; Petraro, Paul; Treu, Judith A; Katz, David L

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite their energy density, walnuts can be included in the diet without adverse effects on weight or body composition. The effect of habitual walnut intake on total calorie intake is not well studied. Effects on overall diet quality have not been reported. Methods Randomized, controlled, modified Latin square parallel design study with 2 treatment arms. The 112 participants were randomly assigned to a diet with or without dietary counseling to adjust calorie intake. Within each treatment arm, participants were further randomized to 1 of the 2 possible sequence permutations to receive a walnut-included diet with 56 g (providing 366 kcal) of walnuts per day and a walnut-excluded diet. Participants were assessed for diet quality, body composition, and cardiac risk measures. Results When compared with a walnut-excluded diet, a walnut-included diet for 6 months, with or without dietary counseling to adjust caloric intake, significantly improved diet quality as measured by the Healthy Eating Index 2010 (9.14±17.71 vs 0.40±15.13; p=0.02 and 7.02±15.89 vs -5.92±21.84; p=0.001, respectively). Endothelial function, total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol improved significantly from baseline in the walnut-included diet. Body mass index, percent body fat, visceral fat, fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin, and blood pressure did not change significantly. Conclusions The inclusion of walnuts in an ad libitum diet for 6 months, with or without dietary counseling to adjust calorie intake, significantly improved diet quality, endothelial function, total and LDL cholesterol, but had no effects on anthropometric measures, blood glucose level, and blood pressure. Trial registration number: NCT02330848 PMID:26688734

  20. Mitochondrial calcium transients in adult rabbit cardiac myocytes: inhibition by ruthenium red and artifacts caused by lysosomal loading of Ca(2+)-indicating fluorophores.

    PubMed Central

    Trollinger, D R; Cascio, W E; Lemasters, J J

    2000-01-01

    A cold/warm loading protocol was used to ester-load Rhod 2 into mitochondria and other organelles and Fluo 3 into the cytosol of adult rabbit cardiac myocytes for confocal fluorescence imaging. Transient increases in both cytosolic Fluo 3 and mitochondrial Rhod 2 fluorescence occurred after electrical stimulation. Ruthenium red, a blocker of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter, inhibited mitochondrial Rhod 2 fluorescence transients but not cytosolic Fluo 3 transients. Thus the ruthenium red-sensitive mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter catalyzes Ca(2+) uptake during beat-to-beat transients of mitochondrial free Ca(2+), which in turn may help match mitochondrial ATP production to myocardial ATP demand. After ester loading, substantial amounts of Ca(2+)-indicating fluorophores localized into an acidic lysosomal/endosomal compartment. This lysosomal fluorescence did not respond to electrical stimulation. Because fluorescence arose predominantly from lysosomes after the cold loading/warm incubation procedure, total cellular fluorescence failed to track beat-to-beat changes of mitochondrial fluorescence. Only three-dimensionally resolved confocal imaging distinguished the relatively weak mitochondrial signal from the bright lysosomal fluorescence. PMID:10866936

  1. Association of interatrial septal abnormalities with cardiac impulse conduction disorders in adult patients: experience from a tertiary center in Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    Bakalli, Aurora; Pllana, Ejup; Koçinaj, Dardan; Bekteshi, Tefik; Dragusha, Gani; Gashi, Masar; Musliu, Nebih; Gashi, Zaim

    2011-01-01

    Interatrial septal disorders, which include: atrial septal defect, patent foramen ovale and atrial septal aneurysm, are frequent congenital anomalies found in adult patients. Early detection of these anomalies is important to prevent their hemodynamic and/or thromboembolic consequences. The aims of this study were: to assess the association between impulse conduction disorders and anomalies of interatrial septum; to determine the prevalence of different types of interatrial septum abnormalities; to assess anatomic, hemodynamic, and clinical consequences of interatrial septal pathologies. Fifty-three adult patients with impulse conduction disorders and patients without ECG changes but with signs of interatrial septal abnormalities, who were referred to our center for echocardiography, were included in a prospective transesophageal echocardiography study. Interatrial septal anomalies were detected in around 85% of the examined patients. Patent foramen ovale was encountered in 32% of the patients, and in combination with atrial septal aneurysm in an additional 11.3% of cases. Atrial septal aneurysm and atrial septal defect were diagnosed with equal frequency in 20.7% of our study population. Impulse conduction disorders were significantly more suggestive of interatrial septal anomalies than clinical signs and symptoms observed in our patients (84.91% vs 30.19%, P=0.002). Right bundle branch block was the most frequent impulse conduction disorder, found in 41 (77.36%) cases. We conclude that interatrial septal anomalies are highly associated with impulse conduction disorders, particularly with right bundle branch block. Impulse conduction disorders are more indicative of interatrial septal abnormalities in earlier stages than can be understood from the patient’s clinical condition. PMID:21977304

  2. Direct Cardiac Reprogramming: From Developmental Biology to Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Li; Srivastava, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Heart disease affects millions worldwide and is a progressive condition involving loss of cardiomyocytes. The human heart has limited endogenous regenerative capacity and is thus an important target for novel regenerative medicine approaches. While cell-based regenerative therapies hold promise, cellular reprogramming of endogenous cardiac fibroblasts, which represent more than half of the cells in the mammalian heart, may be an attractive alternative strategy for regenerating cardiac muscle. Recent advances leveraging years of developmental biology point to the feasibility of generating de novo cardiomyocyte-like cells from terminally differentiated non-myocytes in the heart in situ after ischemic damage. Here, we review the progress in cardiac reprogramming methods and consider the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead in refining this technology for regenerative medicine. PMID:24030021

  3. Comparison of Bispectral Index Monitoring With the Critical-Care Pain Observation Tool in the Pain Assessment of Intubated Adult Patients After Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Faritous, Zahra; Barzanji, Arvin; Azarfarin, Rasoul; Ghadrdoost, Behshid; Ziyaeifard, Mohsen; Aghdaei, Nahid; Alavi, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Background Detecting pain is crucial in sedated and mechanically ventilated patients, as they are unable to communicate verbally. Objectives This study aimed to compare Bispectral index (BIS) monitoring with the Critical-care pain observation tool (CPOT) and vital signs for pain assessment during painful procedures in intubated adult patients after cardiac surgery. Materials and Methods Seventy consecutive patients who underwent cardiac surgery (coronary artery bypass graft or valvular surgery) were enrolled in the study. Pain evaluations were performed early after the operation in the intubated and sedated patients by using BIS and CPOT, and also checking the vital signs. The pain assessments were done at three different times: 1) baseline (immediately before any painful procedure, including tracheal suctioning or changing the patient’s position), 2) during any painful procedure, and 3) five minutes after the procedure (recovery time). Results The mean values for CPOT, BIS, and mean arterial pressure (MAP) scores were significantly different at different times; they were increased during suctioning or changing position, and decreased five minutes after these procedures (CPOT: 3.98 ± 1.65 versus 1.31 ± 1.07, respectively (P ≤ 0.0001); BIS: 84.94 ± 10.52 versus 63.48 ± 12.17, respectively (P ≤ 0.0001); MAP: 92.88 ± 15.37 versus 89.77 ± 14.72, respectively (P = 0.003)). Change in heart rate (HR) was not significant over time (95.68 ± 16.78 versus 93.61 ± 16.56, respectively; P = 0.34). CPOT scores were significantly positively correlated with BIS at baseline, during painful stimulation, and at recovery time, but were not correlated with HR or MAP, except at baseline. BIS scores were significantly correlated with MAP but not with HR. Conclusions It appears that BIS monitoring can be used for pain assessment along with the CPOT tool in intubated patients, and it is much more sensitive than monitoring of hemodynamic changes. BIS monitoring can be used more

  4. Decreased lysosomal storage in the adult MPS VII mouse brain in the vicinity of grafts of retroviral vector-corrected fibroblasts secreting high levels of beta-glucuronidase.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R M; Wolfe, J H

    1997-07-01

    A deficiency of beta-glucuronidase (GUSB) causes the multisystem progressive degenerative syndrome, mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type VII (Sly disease), which includes mental retardation. Animal homologues of MPS VII (ref. 3, 4) are models for testing somatic gene transfer approaches to treat the central nervous system in this and other lysosomal storage disorders. Previous attempts to correct murine MPS VII by gene therapy have successfully treated lesions in some organs but not in the brain. Other experimental modalities have forestalled some disease progression in the brain, but only if done at birth, before the onset of severe lesions, when the animals are phenotypically normal. We tested whether therapeutic amounts of GUSB could be delivered to the diseased adult brain by transplanting cells engineered to super-secrete the normal enzyme for export to surrounding neural tissues. Lysosomal distention was cleared from neurons and glial cells in the vicinity of the grafts, showing that the secreted enzyme could reach the diseased cells and reverse lesions in the severely diseased brain. The ability to correct established lesions will be important for the treatment of many lysosomal storage diseases affecting the brain, because most patients are not diagnosed until lesions are advanced enough to affect phenotype or developmental milestones in early childhood, and some forms of the diseases do not become apparent until later in life.

  5. Prevalence of coronary artery ectasia in older adults and the relationship with epicardial fat volume by cardiac computed tomography angiography

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun-Jie; Yang, Xia; Chen, Zhi-Ye; Wang, Qi; He, Bai; Du, Luo-Shan; Chen, Yun-Dai

    2013-01-01

    Objective Coronary artery ectasia (CAE) refers to abnormal dilation of coronary artery segments to 1.5 times of adjacent normal ones. Epicardial fat is associated with cardiovascular risk factors. The relationship between CAE and epicardial fat has not yet been investigated. This study aimed to assess the relationship between CAE and epicardial fat volume (EFV) in older people by dual-source computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA). Methods We prospectively enrolled 1400 older adults who were scheduled for dual-source CTCA. Under reconstruction protocols, patients with abnormal segments 1.5 times larger than the adjacent segments were accepted as CAE. EFV was measured by semi-automated software. Traditional risk factors in CAE patients, as well as the extent of EFV, were analyzed and compared to non-CAE group. Results A total of 885 male and 515 female older patients were enrolled. CAE was identified by univariable analysis in 131 patients and significantly correlated to hypertension, smoking, hyperlipidemia, prior percutaneous coronary intervention and ascending aorta aneurysm. EFV was shown to be significantly higher in CAE patients than patients without ectasia. In multivariable analyses, EFV (P = 0.018), hypertension (P < 0.001) and hyperlipidemia (P < 0.001) were significantly correlated to CAE. There was a significant negative correlation between EFV and Markis classification. Conclusions CAE can be reliably recognized by dual-source CTCA. Epicardial fat might play a role in etiopathogenesis and progression of CAE, providing a new target for treating ectasia. PMID:23610568

  6. Whole-body cardiovascular MRI for the comparison of atherosclerotic burden and cardiac remodelling in healthy South Asian and European adults

    PubMed Central

    Cassidy, Deirdre B; Belch, Jill J F; Gandy, Stephen J; Lambert, Matthew A; Littleford, Roberta C; Rowland, Janice; Struthers, Allan D; Khan, Faisel

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the feasibility of using whole-body cardiovascular MRI (WB-CVMR) to compare South Asians (SAs)—a population known to have a higher risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) but paradoxically lower prevalence of peripheral arterial disease—and Western Europeans (WEs). Methods: 19 SAs and 38 age-, gender- and body mass index-matched WEs were recruited. All were aged 40 years and over, free from CVD and with a 10-year risk of CVD <20% as assessed by the adult treatment panel (ATP) III risk score. WB-CVMR was performed, comprising a whole-body angiogram (WBA) and cardiac MR (CMR), on a 3-T MRI scanner (Magnetom® Trio; Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) following dual-phase injection of gadolinium-based contrast agent. A standardized atheroma score (SAS) was calculated from the WBA while indexed left ventricular mass and volumes were calculated from the CMR. Results: SAs exhibited a significantly lower iliofemoral atheroma burden (regional SAS 0.0 ± 0.0 vs 1.9 ± 6.9, p = 0.048) and a trend towards lower overall atheroma burden (whole-body SAS 0.7 ± 0.8 vs 1.8 ± 2.3, p = 0.1). They had significantly lower indexed left ventricular mass (46.9 ± 11.8 vs 56.9 ± 13.4 ml m−2, p = 0.008), end diastolic volume (63.9 ± 10.4 vs 75.2 ± 11.4 ml m−2, p=0.001), end systolic volume (20.5 ± 6.1 vs 24.6 ± 6.8 ml m−2, p = 0.03) and stroke volume (43.4 ± 6.6 vs 50.6 ± 7.9 ml m−2, p = 0.001), but with no significant difference in ejection fraction, mass-volume ratio or global functioning index. These differences persisted after accounting for CVD risk factors. Conclusion: WB-CVMR can quantify cardiac and atheroma burden and can detect differences in these metrics between ethnic groups that, if validated, may suggest that the paradoxical high risk of CVD compared with PVD risk may be due to an adverse cardiac haemodynamic status incurred by the smaller heart rather than

  7. DIOL Triterpenes Block Profibrotic Effects of Angiotensin II and Protect from Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Jurado-López, Raquel; Martínez-Martínez, Ernesto; Gómez-Hurtado, Nieves; Delgado, Carmen; Visitación Bartolomé, Maria; San Román, José Alberto; Cordova, Claudia; Lahera, Vicente; Nieto, Maria Luisa; Cachofeiro, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    Background The natural triterpenes, erythrodiol and uvaol, exert anti-inflammatory, vasorelaxing and anti-proliferative effects. Angiotensin II is a well-known profibrotic and proliferative agent that participates in the cardiac remodeling associated with different pathological situations through the stimulation and proliferation of cardiac fibroblasts. Therefore, the aim of the study was to investigate the preventive effects of the natural triterpenes erythrodiol and uvaol on the proliferation and collagen production induced by angiotensin II in cardiac myofibroblasts. Their actions on cardiac hypertrophy triggered by angiotensin II were also studied. Methodology/Principal Findings The effect of erythrodiol and uvaol on angiotensin II-induced proliferation was evaluated in cardiac myofibroblasts from adult rats in the presence or the absence of the inhibitors of PPAR-γ, GW9662 or JNK, SP600125. The effect on collagen levels induced by angiotensin II was evaluated in cardiac myofibroblasts and mouse heart. The presence of low doses of both triterpenes reduced the proliferation of cardiac myofibroblasts induced by angiotensin II. Pretreatment with GW9662 reversed the effect elicited by both triterpenes while SP600125 did not modify it. Both triterpenes at high doses produced an increase in annexing-V binding in the presence or absence of angiotensin II, which was reduced by either SP600125 or GW9662. Erythrodiol and uvaol decreased collagen I and galectin 3 levels induced by angiotensin II in cardiac myofribroblasts. Finally, cardiac hypertrophy, ventricular remodeling, fibrosis, and increases in myocyte area and brain natriuretic peptide levels observed in angiotensin II-infused mice were reduced in triterpene-treated animals. Conclusions/Significance Erythrodiol and uvaol reduce cardiac hypertrophy and left ventricle remodeling induced by angiotensin II in mice by diminishing fibrosis and myocyte area. They also modulate growth and survival of cardiac

  8. New Developments in Cardiac Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Le, Thi Yen Loan; Thavapalachandran, Sujitha; Kizana, Eddy; Chong, James Jh

    2017-04-01

    Numerous pharmacological and device therapies have improved adverse cardiac remodelling and mortality in heart failure. However, none are able to regenerate damaged cardiac tissue. Stem cell based therapies using multipotent (adult) stem cells and pluripotent stem cells are new approaches that could potentially achieve the elusive goal of true cardiac regeneration. Over the past two decades, various stem cell based approaches have been shown to improve left ventricular function in pre-clinical animal models. Promising results rapidly led to clinical trials, initially using bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells, then mesenchymal stromal cell populations and, more recently, progenitor cells from the adult heart itself. These have been shown to be safe and have advanced our understanding of potential suitable recipients, cell delivery routes, and possible mechanisms of action. However, efficacy in these trials has been inconsistent. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are another potential source of stem cells for cardiac regeneration. They could theoretically provide an unlimited source of cardiomyocytes or cardiac progenitors. Pre-clinical studies in both small and large animal models have shown robust engraftment and improvements in cardiac function. The first clinical trial using hPSC-derived cardiac derivatives has now commenced and others are imminent. In this brief review article, we summarise recent developments in stem cell therapies aimed at cardiac regeneration, including discussion of types of cell and non-cell-based strategies being explored.

  9. Dupuytren's Contracture: Fibroblast Contraction?

    PubMed Central

    Gabbiani, Giulio; Majno, Guido

    1972-01-01

    In 6 cases of Dupuytren's disease and 1 of Ledderhose's disease, the nodules of the palmar and plantar aponeurosis were examined by light and electron microscopy. The cells composing these nodules, presumably fibroblasts, showed three significant ultrastructural features: (1) a fibrillar system similar to that of smooth muscle cells; (2) nuclear deformations such as are found in contracted cells, the severest being recognizable by light microscopy (cross-banded nuclei); (3) cell-to-cell and cell-to-stroma attachments. Based on these data and on recent information about the biology of the fibroblasts, it is suggested that these cells are fibroblasts that have modulated into contractile cells (myofibroblasts), and that their contraction plays a role in the pathogenesis of the contracture observed clinically. ImagesFig 10Fig 5Fig 11Fig 6 and 7Fig 8Fig 1Fig 2Fig 9Fig 3Fig 4 PMID:5009249

  10. Action of SNAIL1 in Cardiac Myofibroblasts Is Important for Cardiac Fibrosis following Hypoxic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Hirak; Longmore, Gregory D.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic injury to the heart results in cardiac fibrosis that leads to cardiac dysfunction and heart failure. SNAIL1 is a zinc finger transcription factor implicated in fibrosis following organ injury and cancer. To determine if the action of SNAIL1 contributed to cardiac fibrosis following hypoxic injury, we used an endogenous SNAIL1 bioluminescence reporter mice, and SNAIL1 knockout mouse models. Here we report that SNAIL1 expression is upregulated in the infarcted heart, especially in the myofibroblasts. Utilizing primary cardiac fibroblasts in ex vivo cultures we find that pro-fibrotic factors and collagen I increase SNAIL1 protein level. SNAIL1 is required in cardiac fibroblasts for the adoption of myofibroblast fate, collagen I expression and expression of fibrosis-related genes. Taken together this data suggests that SNAIL1 expression is induced in the cardiac fibroblasts after hypoxic injury and contributes to myofibroblast phenotype and a fibrotic scar formation. Resultant collagen deposition in the scar can maintain elevated SNAIL1 expression in the myofibroblasts and help propagate fibrosis. PMID:27706205

  11. The effect of head up tilting on bioreactance cardiac output and stroke volume readings using suprasternal transcutaneous Doppler as a control in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Critchley, Lester A H; Lee, Daniel C W; Khaw, Kim S; Lee, Shara W Y

    2016-10-01

    To compare the performance of a bioreactance cardiac output (CO) monitor (NICOM) and transcutaneous Doppler (USCOM) during head up tilting (HUT). Healthy young adult subjects, age 22 ± 1 years, 7 male and 7 female, were tilted over 3-5 s from supine to 70° HUT, 30° HUT and back to supine. Positions were held for 3 min. Simultaneous readings of NICOM and USCOM were performed 30 s into each new position. Mean blood pressure (MBP), heart rate (HR), CO and stroke volume (SV), and thoracic fluid content (TFC) were recorded. Bland-Altman, percentage changes and analysis of variance for repeated measures were used for statistical analysis. Pre-tilt NICOM CO and SV readings (6.1 ± 1.0 L/min and 113 ± 25 ml) were higher than those from USCOM (4.1 ± 0.6 L/min and 77 ± 9 ml) (P < 0.001). Bland-Altman limits of agreement for CO were wide with a percentage error of 38 %. HUT increased MBP and HR (P < 0.001). CO and SV readings decreased with HUT. However, the percentage changes in USCOM and NICOM readings did not concur (P < 0.001). Whereas USCOM provided gravitational effect proportional changes in SV readings of 23 ± 15 % (30° half tilt) and 44 ± 11 % (70° near full tilt), NICOM changes did not being 28 ± 10 and 33 ± 11 %. TFC decreased linearly with HUT. The NICOM does not provide linear changes in SV as predicted by physiology when patients are tilted. Furthermore there is a lack of agreement with USCOM measurements at baseline and during tilting.

  12. Phospholemman Overexpression Inhibits Na+-K+-ATPase in Adult Rat Cardiac Myocytes: Relevance to Decreased Na+ pump Activity in Post-Infarction Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xue-Qian; Moorman, J. Randall; Ahlers, Belinda A.; Carl, Lois L.; Lake, Douglas E.; Song, Jianliang; Mounsey, J. Paul; Tucker, Amy L.; Chan, Yiu-mo; Rothblum, Lawrence I.; Stahl, Richard C.; Carey, David J.; Cheung, Joseph Y.

    2005-01-01

    Messenger RNA levels of phospholemman (PLM), a member of the FXYD family of small single-span membrane proteins with putative ion-transport regulatory properties, were increased in postinfarction (MI) rat myocytes. We tested the hypothesis that the previously observed reduction in Na+-K+-ATPase activity in MI rat myocytes was due to PLM overexpression. In rat hearts harvested 3 and 7 days post-MI, PLM protein expression was increased by 2- and 4-fold, respectively. To simulate increased PLM expression post-MI, PLM was overexpressed in normal adult rat myocytes by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer. PLM overexpression did not affect the relative level of phosphorylation on serine68 of PLM. Na+-K+-ATPase activity was measured as ouabain-sensitive Na+-K+ pump current (Ip). Compared to control myocytes overexpressing green fluorescent protein alone, Ip measured in myocytes overexpressing PLM was significantly (P<0.0001) lower at similar membrane voltages, pipette Na+ ([Na+]pip) and extracellular K+ concentrations ([K+]o). From −70 to +60 mV, neither [Na+]pip nor [K+]o required to attain half-maximal Ip was significantly different between control and PLM myocytes. This phenotype of decreased Vmax without appreciable changes in Km for Na+ and K+ in PLM overexpressed myocytes was similar to that observed in MI rat myocytes. Inhibition of Ip by PLM overexpression was not due to decreased Na+-K+-ATPase expression since there were no changes in either protein or messenger RNA levels of either α1 or α2 isoforms of Na+-K+-ATPase. In native rat cardiac myocytes, PLM co-immunoprecipitated with α-subunits of Na+-K+-ATPase. Inhibition of Na+-K+-ATPase by PLM overexpression, in addition to previously reported decrease in Na+-K+-ATPase expression, may explain altered Vmax but not Km of Na+-K+-ATPase in postinfarction rat myocytes. PMID:16195392

  13. Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Birnie, David; Ha, Andrew C T; Gula, Lorne J; Chakrabarti, Santabhanu; Beanlands, Rob S B; Nery, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Studies suggest clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in 5% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis. The principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. Data indicate that an 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic (clinically silent) cardiac involvement. An international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS recommends that patients be screened for cardiac involvement. Most studies suggest a benign prognosis for patients with clinically silent CS. Immunosuppression therapy is advocated for clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, with implantable cardioverter defibrillators, is recommended for some patients.

  14. Direct reprogramming of mouse fibroblasts into cardiomyocytes with chemical cocktails.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yanbin; Huang, Chenwen; Xu, Xinxiu; Gu, Haifeng; Ye, Youqiong; Jiang, Cizhong; Qiu, Zilong; Xie, Xin

    2015-09-01

    The direct conversion, or transdifferentiation, of non-cardiac cells into cardiomyocytes by forced expression of transcription factors and microRNAs provides promising approaches for cardiac regeneration. However, genetic manipulations raise safety concerns and are thus not desirable in most clinical applications. The discovery of full chemically induced pluripotent stem cells suggest the possibility of replacing transcription factors with chemical cocktails. Here, we report the generation of automatically beating cardiomyocyte-like cells from mouse fibroblasts using only chemical cocktails. These chemical-induced cardiomyocyte-like cells (CiCMs) express cardiomyocyte-specific markers, exhibit sarcomeric organization, and possess typical cardiac calcium flux and electrophysiological features. Genetic lineage tracing confirms the fibroblast origin of these CiCMs. Further studies show the generation of CiCMs passes through a cardiac progenitor stage instead of a pluripotent stage. Bypassing the use of viral-derived factors, this proof of concept study lays a foundation for in vivo cardiac transdifferentiation with pharmacological agents and possibly safer treatment of heart failure.

  15. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation Appears to Attenuate Particulate Air Pollution-induced Cardiac Effects and Lipid Changes in Healthy Middle-aged Adults.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Context: Air pollution exposure has been associated with adverse cardiovascular effects. A recent epidemiologic study reported that omega-3 fatty acid (fish oil) supplementation blunted the cardiac responses to air pollution exposure. Objective: To evaluate in a randomized contro...

  16. Dogs cloned from fetal fibroblasts by nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Hong, So Gun; Jang, Goo; Kim, Min Kyu; Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Kang, Jung Taek; Koo, Ok Jae; Kim, Dae Yong; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2009-10-01

    Fetal fibroblasts have been considered as the prime candidate donor cells for the canine reproductive cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in regard to the future production of transgenic dogs, mainly due to their higher developmental competence and handling advantage in gene targeting. In this study, the cloning efficiency with canine fetal fibroblasts as donor cells was determined. A total of 50 presumptive cloned embryos were reconstructed, activated and transferred into the oviducts of naturally synchronous recipient bitches. While the fusion rate (76.9%) was similar to those of our earlier studies with adult fibroblasts as donor cells (73.9-77.1%), a high cloning efficiency (4.0%; 2 births/50 embryos transferred) was found compared to the previous success rate with adult fibroblasts (0.2-1.8%). The cloned beagles were healthy and genotypically identical to the donor fibroblast cells. This study shows that a fetal fibroblast cell would be an excellent donor for future production of transgenic dogs via gene targeting in this cell followed cloning using SCNT technology.

  17. Protein therapeutics for cardiac regeneration after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Segers, Vincent F M; Lee, Richard T

    2010-10-01

    Although most medicines have historically been small molecules, many newly approved drugs are derived from proteins. Protein therapies have been developed for treatment of diseases in almost every organ system, including the heart. Great excitement has now arisen in the field of regenerative medicine, particularly for cardiac regeneration after myocardial infarction. Every year, millions of people suffer from acute myocardial infarction, but the adult mammalian myocardium has limited regeneration potential. Regeneration of the heart after myocardium infarction is therefore an exciting target for protein therapeutics. In this review, we discuss different classes of proteins that have therapeutic potential to regenerate the heart after myocardial infarction. Protein candidates have been described that induce angiogenesis, including fibroblast growth factors and vascular endothelial growth factors, although thus far clinical development has been disappointing. Chemotactic factors that attract stem cells, e.g., hepatocyte growth factor and stromal cell-derived factor-1, may also be useful. Finally, neuregulins and periostin are proteins that induce cell-cycle reentry of cardiomyocytes, and growth factors like IGF-1 can induce growth and differentiation of stem cells. As our knowledge of the biology of regenerative processes and the role of specific proteins in these processes increases, the use of proteins as regenerative drugs could develop as a cardiac therapy.

  18. Cardiac Function Remains Impaired Despite Reversible Cardiac Remodeling after Acute Experimental Viral Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Gotzhein, Frauke; Escher, Felicitas; Blankenberg, Stefan; Westermann, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Background. Infection with Coxsackievirus B3 induces myocarditis. We aimed to compare the acute and chronic phases of viral myocarditis to identify the immediate effects of cardiac inflammation as well as the long-term effects after resolved inflammation on cardiac fibrosis and consequently on cardiac function. Material and Methods. We infected C57BL/6J mice with Coxsackievirus B3 and determined the hemodynamic function 7 as well as 28 days after infection. Subsequently, we analyzed viral burden and viral replication in the cardiac tissue as well as the expression of cytokines and matrix proteins. Furthermore, cardiac fibroblasts were infected with virus to investigate if viral infection alone induces profibrotic signaling. Results. Severe cardiac inflammation was determined and cardiac fibrosis was consistently colocalized with inflammation during the acute phase of myocarditis. Declined cardiac inflammation but no significantly improved hemodynamic function was observed 28 days after infection. Interestingly, cardiac fibrosis declined to basal levels as well. Both cardiac inflammation and fibrosis were reversible, whereas the hemodynamic function remains impaired after healed viral myocarditis in C57BL/6J mice. PMID:28352641

  19. Single adult rabbit and rat cardiac myocytes retain the Ca2+- and species-dependent systolic and diastolic contractile properties of intact muscle

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    The systolic and diastolic properties of single myocytes and intact papillary muscles isolated from hearts of adult rats and rabbits were examined at 37 degrees C over a range of stimulation frequencies and bathing [Ca2+]o (Cao). In both rabbit myocytes and intact muscles bathed in 1 mM Cao, increasing the frequency of stimulation from 6 to 120 min-1 resulted in a positive staircase of twitch performance. During stimulation at 2 min-1, twitch performance also increased with increases in Cao up to 20 mM. In the absence of stimulation, both rabbit myocytes and muscles were completely quiescent in less than 15 mM Cao. Further increases in Cao caused the appearance of spontaneous asynchronous contractile waves in myocytes and in intact muscles caused scattered light intensity fluctuations (SLIF), which were previously demonstrated to be caused by Ca2+-dependent spontaneous contractile waves. In contrast to rabbit preparations, intact rat papillary muscles exhibited SLIF in 1.0 mM Cao. Two populations of rat myocytes were observed in 1 mM Cao: approximately 85% of unstimulated cells exhibited low-frequency (3-4 min-1) spontaneous contractile waves, whereas 15%, during a 1-min observation period, were quiescent. In a given Cao, the contractile wave frequency in myocytes and SLIF in intact muscles were constant for long periods of time. In both intact rat muscles and myocytes with spontaneous waves, in 1 mM Cao, increasing the frequency of stimulation from 6 to 120 min-1 resulted, on the average, in a 65% reduction in steady state twitch amplitude. Of the rat myocytes that did not manifest waves, some had a positive, some had a flat, and some had a negative staircase; the average steady state twitch amplitude of these cells during stimulation at 120 min-1 was 30% greater than that at 6 min-1. In contrast to rabbit preparations, twitch performance during stimulation at 2 min-1 saturated at 1.5 mM Cao in both intact rat muscles and in the myocytes with spontaneous waves. We

  20. Cardiac Cephalgia

    PubMed Central

    Wassef, Nancy; Ali, Ali Turab; Katsanevaki, Alexia-Zacharoula; Nishtar, Salman

    2014-01-01

    Although most of the patients presenting with ischemic heart disease have chest pains, there are other rare presenting symptoms like cardiac cephalgia. In this report, we present a case of acute coronary syndrome with an only presentation of exertional headache. It was postulated as acute presentation of coronary artery disease, due to previous history of similar presentation associated with some chest pains with previous left coronary artery stenting. We present an unusual case with cardiac cephalgia in a young patient under the age of 50 which was not reported at that age before. There are four suggested mechanisms for this cardiac presentation. PMID:28352454

  1. Effect of exercise training and anabolic androgenic steroids on hemodynamics, glycogen content, angiogenesis and apoptosis of cardiac muscle in adult male rats

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Asmaa F.; Kamal, Manal M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effects of exercise training and anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) on hemodynamics, glycogen content, angiogenesis, apoptosis and histology of cardiac muscle. Methods Forty rats were divided into 4 groups; control, steroid, exercise-trained and exercise-trained plus steroid groups. The exercise-trained and trained plus steroid groups, after one week of water adaptation, were exercised by jumping into water for 5 weeks. The steroid and trained plus steroid groups received nandrolone decanoate, for 5 weeks. Systolic blood pressure and heart rate (HR) were monitored weekly. Heart weight/body weight ratio (HW/BW ratio) were determined. Serum testosterone, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), cardiac caspase-3 activity and glycogen content were measured. Results Compared with control, the steroid group had significantly higher blood pressure, HR, sympathetic nerve activity, testosterone level, HW/BW and cardiac caspase-3 activity. Histological examination revealed apoptotic changes and hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes. In exercise-trained group, cardiac glycogen, VEGF and testosterone levels were significantly higher while HR was significantly lower than control. HW/BW was more than control confirmed by hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes with angiogenesis on histological examination. Trained plus steroid group, had no change in HR, with higher blood pressure and HW/BW than control, cardiac glycogen and serum VEGF were higher than control but lower than exercise-trained group. Histological examination showed hypertrophy of cardiomyoctes with mild angiogenesis rather than apoptosis. Conclusion When exercise is augmented with AAS, exercise-associated cardiac benefits may not be fully gained with potential cardiac risk from AAS if used alone or combined with exercise. PMID:23559905

  2. Hypoxia Enhances Direct Reprogramming of Mouse Fibroblasts to Cardiomyocyte-Like Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanyan; Shi, Shujun; Liu, Huiwen; Meng, Li

    2016-02-01

    Recent work has shown that mouse and human fibroblasts can be reprogrammed to cardiomyocyte-like cells with a combination of transcription factors. Current research has focused on improving the efficiency and mechanisms for fibroblast reprogramming. Previously, it has been reported that hypoxia enhances fibroblast cell reprogramming to pluripotent stem cells. In this study, we observed that 6 h of hypoxic conditions (2% oxygen) on newborn mouse dermal fibroblasts can improve the efficiency of reprogramming to cardiomyocyte-like cells. Expression of cardiac-related genes and proteins increased at 4 weeks after transfer of three transcription factors (Gata4/Mef2c/Tbx5 [GMT]). However, beating cardiomyocyte cells were not detected. The epigenetic mechanism of hypoxia-induced fibroblast reprogramming to cardiomyocyte cells requires further study.

  3. Human Dermal Fibroblasts Demonstrate Positive Immunostaining for Neuron- and Glia- Specific Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Janmaat, C. J.; de Rooij, K. E; Locher, H; de Groot, S. C.; de Groot, J. C. M. J.; Frijns, J. H. M.; Huisman, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    In stem cell cultures from adult human tissue, undesirable contamination with fibroblasts is frequently present. The presence of fibroblasts obscures the actual number of stem cells and may result in extracellular matrix production after transplantation. Identification of fibroblasts is difficult because of the lack of specific fibroblast markers. In our laboratory, we isolate and expand neural-crest-derived stem cells from human hair follicle bulges and investigate their potential to differentiate into neural cells. To establish cellular identities, we perform immunohistochemistry with antibodies specific for glial and neuronal markers, and use fibroblasts as negative control. We frequently observe that human adult dermal fibroblasts also express some glial and neuronal markers. In this study, we have sought to determine whether our observations represent actual expression of these markers or result from cross-reactivity. Immunohistochemistry was performed on human adult dermal fibroblasts using acknowledged glial and neuronal antibodies followed by verification of the data using RT-qPCR. Human adult dermal fibroblasts showed expression of the glia-specific markers SOX9, glial fibrillary acidic protein and EGR2 (KROX20) as well as for the neuron-specific marker class III β-tubulin, both at the protein and mRNA level. Furthermore, human adult dermal fibroblasts showed false-positive immunostaining for S100β and GAP43 and to a lower extent for OCT6. Our results indicate that immunophenotyping as a tool to determine cellular identity is not as reliable as generally assumed, especially since human adult dermal fibroblasts may be mistaken for neural cells, indicating that the ultimate proof of glial or neuronal identity can only be provided by their functionality. PMID:26678612

  4. Nuclear cardiac

    SciTech Connect

    Slutsky, R.; Ashburn, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between nuclear medicine and cardiology has continued to produce a surfeit of interesting, illuminating, and important reports involving the analysis of cardiac function, perfusion, and metabolism. To simplify the presentation, this review is broken down into three major subheadings: analysis of myocardial perfusion; imaging of the recent myocardial infarction; and the evaluation of myocardial function. There appears to be an increasingly important relationship between cardiology, particularly cardiac physiology, and nuclear imaging techniques. (KRM)

  5. Instability of spiral and scroll waves in the presence of a gradient in the fibroblast density: the effects of fibroblast-myocyte coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimik, Soling; Pandit, Rahul

    2016-12-01

    Fibroblast-myocyte coupling can modulate electrical-wave dynamics in cardiac tissue. In diseased hearts, the distribution of fibroblasts is heterogeneous, so there can be gradients in the fibroblast density (henceforth we call this GFD) especially from highly injured regions, like infarcted or ischemic zones, to less-wounded regions of the tissue. Fibrotic hearts are known to be prone to arrhythmias, so it is important to understand the effects of GFD in the formation and sustenance of arrhythmic re-entrant waves, like spiral or scroll waves. Therefore, we investigate the effects of GFD on the stability of spiral and scroll waves of electrical activation in a state-of-the-art mathematical model for cardiac tissue in which we also include fibroblasts. By introducing GFD in controlled ways, we show that spiral and scroll waves can be unstable in the presence of GFDs because of regions with varying spiral- or scroll-wave frequency ω, induced by the GFD. We examine the effects of the resting membrane potential of the fibroblast and the number of fibroblasts attached to the myocytes on the stability of these waves. Finally, we show that the presence of GFDs can lead to the formation of spiral waves at high-frequency pacing.

  6. Cardiac cameras.

    PubMed

    Travin, Mark I

    2011-05-01

    Cardiac imaging with radiotracers plays an important role in patient evaluation, and the development of suitable imaging instruments has been crucial. While initially performed with the rectilinear scanner that slowly transmitted, in a row-by-row fashion, cardiac count distributions onto various printing media, the Anger scintillation camera allowed electronic determination of tracer energies and of the distribution of radioactive counts in 2D space. Increased sophistication of cardiac cameras and development of powerful computers to analyze, display, and quantify data has been essential to making radionuclide cardiac imaging a key component of the cardiac work-up. Newer processing algorithms and solid state cameras, fundamentally different from the Anger camera, show promise to provide higher counting efficiency and resolution, leading to better image quality, more patient comfort and potentially lower radiation exposure. While the focus has been on myocardial perfusion imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography, increased use of positron emission tomography is broadening the field to include molecular imaging of the myocardium and of the coronary vasculature. Further advances may require integrating cardiac nuclear cameras with other imaging devices, ie, hybrid imaging cameras. The goal is to image the heart and its physiological processes as accurately as possible, to prevent and cure disease processes.

  7. Cardiac Regeneration and Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Mignone, John; MacLellan, W. Robb

    2015-01-01

    After decades of believing the heart loses the ability to regenerate soon after birth, numerous studies are now reporting that the adult heart may indeed be capable of regeneration, although the magnitude of new cardiac myocyte formation varies greatly. While this debate has energized the field of cardiac regeneration and led to a dramatic increase in our understanding of cardiac growth and repair, it has left much confusion in the field as to the prospects of regenerating the heart. Studies applying modern techniques of genetic lineage tracing and carbon-14 dating have begun to establish limits on the amount of endogenous regeneration after cardiac injury, but the underlying cellular mechanisms of this regeneration remained unclear. These same studies have also revealed an astonishing capacity for cardiac repair early in life that is largely lost with adult differentiation and maturation. Regardless, this renewed focus on cardiac regeneration as a therapeutic goal holds great promise as a novel strategy to address the leading cause of death in the developed world. PMID:26269526

  8. Cardiac fibroblast–derived microRNA passenger strand-enriched exosomes mediate cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Claudia; Batkai, Sandor; Dangwal, Seema; Gupta, Shashi Kumar; Foinquinos, Ariana; Holzmann, Angelika; Just, Annette; Remke, Janet; Zimmer, Karina; Zeug, Andre; Ponimaskin, Evgeni; Schmiedl, Andreas; Yin, Xiaoke; Mayr, Manuel; Halder, Rashi; Fischer, Andre; Engelhardt, Stefan; Wei, Yuanyuan; Schober, Andreas; Fiedler, Jan; Thum, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In response to stress, the heart undergoes extensive cardiac remodeling that results in cardiac fibrosis and pathological growth of cardiomyocytes (hypertrophy), which contribute to heart failure. Alterations in microRNA (miRNA) levels are associated with dysfunctional gene expression profiles associated with many cardiovascular disease conditions; however, miRNAs have emerged recently as paracrine signaling mediators. Thus, we investigated a potential paracrine miRNA crosstalk between cardiac fibroblasts and cardiomyocytes and found that cardiac fibroblasts secrete miRNA-enriched exosomes. Surprisingly, evaluation of the miRNA content of cardiac fibroblast–derived exosomes revealed a relatively high abundance of many miRNA passenger strands (“star” miRNAs), which normally undergo intracellular degradation. Using confocal imaging and coculture assays, we identified fibroblast exosomal–derived miR-21_3p (miR-21*) as a potent paracrine-acting RNA molecule that induces cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Proteome profiling identified sorbin and SH3 domain-containing protein 2 (SORBS2) and PDZ and LIM domain 5 (PDLIM5) as miR-21* targets, and silencing SORBS2 or PDLIM5 in cardiomyocytes induced hypertrophy. Pharmacological inhibition of miR-21* in a mouse model of Ang II–induced cardiac hypertrophy attenuated pathology. These findings demonstrate that cardiac fibroblasts secrete star miRNA–enriched exosomes and identify fibroblast-derived miR-21* as a paracrine signaling mediator of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy that has potential as a therapeutic target. PMID:24743145

  9. Evidence of epigenetic tags in cardiac fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Vincenzo; De Pascale, Maria Rosaria; Zullo, Alberto; Soricelli, Andrea; Infante, Teresa; Mancini, Francesco Paolo; Napoli, Claudio

    2017-02-01

    In cardiac fibrosis, following an injury or a stress, non-functional fibrotic tissue substitutes normal myocardium, thus leading to progressive heart failure. Activated fibroblasts are principal determinants of cardiac fibrosis by producing excessive fibrotic extracellular matrix and causing hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes. Epigenetic changes, such as DNA methylation, histone modifications, and miRNAs have been involved in these mechanisms. Therefore, there is a strong interest in reverting such epigenetic transformations in order to arrest myocardial fibrotic degeneration. Demethylating agents, such as 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, 5-azacytidine, some selective histone deacetylase inhibitors, including mocetinostat, trichostatin A, and MPT0E014, have a direct action on important inducers of cardiac fibrosis. Also dietary compounds, such as resveratrol, can suppress the differentiation of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts. Although in vivo and in vitro studies suggest specific epigenetic therapies to treat cardiac fibrosis, the related clinical trials are still lacking. A better understanding of the epigenetic effects of dietary compounds (e.g. curcumin and green tea catechins) on the onset and progression of cardiac fibrosis, will allow the identification of protective dietary patterns and/or the generation of novel potential epidrugs.

  10. Spirituality and Autonomic Cardiac Control

    PubMed Central

    Berntson, Gary G.; Norman, Greg J.; Hawkley, Louise C.; Cacioppo, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Background Spirituality has been suggested to be associated with positive health, but potential biological mediators have not been well characterized. Purpose and Methods The present study examined, in a population based sample of middle-aged and older adults, the potential relationship between spirituality and patterns of cardiac autonomic control, which may have health significance. Measures of parasympathetic (high-frequency heart rate variability) and sympathetic (pre-ejection period) cardiac control were obtained from a representative sample of 229 participants. Participants completed questionnaires to assess spirituality (closeness to and satisfactory relation with God). Personality, demographic, anthropometric, health behavior, and health status information was also obtained. A series of multivariate regression models was used to examine the relations between spirituality, the autonomic measures, and two derived indexes-- cardiac autonomic balance (CAB, reflecting parasympathetic to sympathetic balance) and cardiac autonomic regulation (CAR, reflecting total autonomic control). Results Spirituality, net of demographics or other variables, was found to be associated with enhanced parasympathetic as well as sympathetic cardiac control (yielding a higher CAR); but was not associated with CAB. Although the number of cases was small (N=11), both spirituality and CAR were significant negative predictors of the prior occurrence of a myocardial infarction. Conclusions In a population based sample, spirituality appears to be associated with a specific pattern of cardiac autonomic regulation, characterized by a high level of cardiac autonomic control, irrespective of the relative contribution of the two autonomic branches. This pattern of autonomic control may have health significance. PMID:18357497

  11. Relationship of cardiac structure and function to cardiorespiratory fitness and lean body mass in adolescents and young adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate the relationships of cardiac structure and function with body composition and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) among adolescents with type 2 diabetes in the Treatment Options for Type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth (TODAY) Study Group. Cross-sectional evaluation of 233 participant...

  12. Characterization of rat very small embryonic-like stem cells and cardiac repair after cell transplantation for myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin-Hong; Wang, Hai-Jie; Tan, Yu-Zhen; Li, Zhi-Hua

    2012-05-20

    Stem cell therapy is a promising therapeutic strategy for treating myocardial infarction (MI). However, it is necessary to identify ideal adult stem cells for transplantation and explore mechanisms of the transplanted cells in improving cardiac functions after MI. In this study, a population of embryonic-like stem cells (ELSCs) was isolated from rat bone marrow. The cells express pluripotent stem cell transcriptional factors and present high proliferative activity on mouse embryonic fibroblast feeder. ELSCs retain clonal expansion and may form embryoid-like bodies in soft agarose containing leukemia inhibitory factor and basic fibroblast growth factor. The cells of the embryoid-like bodies can differentiate into the cells from 3 germ layers. Under induction, the cells can differentiate into cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells. In MI models of female rats, the transplantation of preinduced ELSCs of male rats reduce scar area and improve cardiac function significantly. Comparing with marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and ELSCs without induction, effects of the preinduced ELSCs on myocardial repair and improvement of cardiac function are greater. Survival of the transplanted cells in the peri-infarcted and infarcted regions was examined by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Y chromosome-positive cells may differentiate toward cardiomyocytes and express cTnT and Cx43. Cx43 expression was observed at conjunction of Y chromosome-positive cells and recipient cardiomyocytes. Some Y chromosome-positive cells express CD31 and incorporate into the microvessels in the infarcted tissue. These results suggest that a population of ELSCs resides in rat bone marrow and display similar biological characteristics of ESCs. ELSCs can differentiate into cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells and contribute to cardiomyogenesis and angiogenesis in vivo. Cardiac function after MI may be significantly improved with transplantation of the preinduced ELSCs. Therefore, ELSCs are novel seed

  13. Natural product derivative BIO promotes recovery after myocardial infarction via unique modulation of the cardiac microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Sook; Jeong, Hye-Yun; Kim, Ah Ra; Kim, Woong-Hee; Cho, Haaglim; Um, JungIn; Seo, Youngha; Kang, Wan Seok; Jin, Suk-Won; Kim, Min Chul; Kim, Yong-Chul; Jung, Da-Woon; Williams, Darren R; Ahn, Youngkeun

    2016-08-11

    The cardiac microenvironment includes cardiomyocytes, fibroblasts and macrophages, which regulate remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI). Targeting this microenvironment is a novel therapeutic approach for MI. We found that the natural compound derivative, BIO ((2'Z,3'E)-6-Bromoindirubin-3'-oxime) modulated the cardiac microenvironment to exert a therapeutic effect on MI. Using a series of co-culture studies, BIO induced proliferation in cardiomyocytes and inhibited proliferation in cardiac fibroblasts. BIO produced multiple anti-fibrotic effects in cardiac fibroblasts. In macrophages, BIO inhibited the expression of pro-inflammatory factors. Significantly, BIO modulated the molecular crosstalk between cardiac fibroblasts and differentiating macrophages to induce polarization to the anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype. In the optically transparent zebrafish-based heart failure model, BIO induced cardiomyocyte proliferation and completely recovered survival rate. BIO is a known glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibitor, but these effects could not be recapitulated using the classical inhibitor, lithium chloride; indicating novel therapeutic effects of BIO. We identified the mechanism of BIO as differential modulation of p27 protein expression and potent induction of anti-inflammatory interleukin-10. In a rat MI model, BIO reduced fibrosis and improved cardiac performance. Histological analysis revealed modulation of the cardiac microenvironment by BIO, with increased presence of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. Our results demonstrate that BIO produces unique effects in the cardiac microenvironment to promote recovery post-MI.

  14. Leptin and Pro-Inflammatory Stimuli Synergistically Upregulate MMP-1 and MMP-3 Secretion in Human Gingival Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Rachel C.; Skelton, Andrew J.; Todryk, Stephen M.; Rowan, Andrew D.; Preshaw, Philip M.; Taylor, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gingival fibroblast-mediated extracellular matrix remodelling is implicated in the pathogenesis of periodontitis, yet the stimuli that regulate this response are not fully understood. The immunoregulatory adipokine leptin is detectable in the gingiva, human gingival fibroblasts express functional leptin receptor mRNA and leptin is known to regulate extracellular matrix remodelling responses in cardiac fibroblasts. We therefore hypothesised that leptin would enhance matrix metalloproteinase secretion in human gingival fibroblasts. Methods and Results We used in vitro cell culture to investigate leptin signalling and the effect of leptin on mRNA and protein expression in human gingival fibroblasts. We confirmed human gingival fibroblasts expressed cell surface leptin receptor, found leptin increased matrix metalloproteinase-1, -3, -8 and -14 expression in human gingival fibroblasts compared to unstimulated cells, and observed that leptin stimulation activated MAPK, STAT1/3 and Akt signalling in human gingival fibroblasts. Furthermore, leptin synergised with IL-1 or the TLR2 agonist pam2CSK4 to markedly enhance matrix metalloproteinase-1 and -3 production by human gingival fibroblasts. Signalling pathway inhibition demonstrated ERK was required for leptin-stimulated matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression in human gingival fibroblasts; whilst ERK, JNK, p38 and STAT3 were required for leptin+IL-1- and leptin+pam2CSK4-induced matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression. A genome-wide expression array and gene ontology analysis confirmed genes differentially expressed in leptin+IL-1-stimulated human gingival fibroblasts (compared to unstimulated cells) were enriched for extracellular matrix organisation and disassembly, and revealed that matrix metalloproteinase-8 and -12 were also synergistically upregulated by leptin+IL-1 in human gingival fibroblasts. Conclusions We conclude that leptin selectively enhances the expression and secretion of certain matrix

  15. Strategies for blood conservation in pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarvesh Pal

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac surgery accounts for the majority of blood transfusions in a hospital. Blood transfusion has been associated with complications and major adverse events after cardiac surgery. Compared to adults it is more difficult to avoid blood transfusion in children after cardiac surgery. This article takes into account the challenges and emphasizes on the various strategies that could be implemented, to conserve blood during pediatric cardiac surgery. PMID:27716703

  16. Myocardial hypoperfusion detected by cardiac computed tomography in an adult patient with heart failure after classic repair for corrected transposition of the great arteries.

    PubMed

    Okayama, Satoshi; Seno, Ayako; Soeda, Tsunenari; Takami, Yasuhiro; Horii, Manabu; Uemura, Shiro; Saito, Yoshihiko

    2011-08-01

    A 69-year-old male with a history of classic repair for corrected transposition of the great arteries (TGA) arrived at our hospital with dyspnoea upon exertion. Echocardiography revealed severe dilation and diffuse hypokinesis of the systemic ventricle without obvious valvular dysfunction. Cardiac computed tomography (CT) revealed no significant stenosis. However, the morphological right coronary artery (CA) on the left side was unequally distributed to the large systemic ventricle and was mostly obscured, especially on the anterior wall. A low attenuation area in the anterior wall of the systemic ventricle and prominent trabeculations suggested ischaemia or infarction. We considered that chronic myocardial hypoperfusion due to an inadequate coronary arterial supply was one cause of the exacerbated heart failure long after the classic repair. Cardiac CT is useful for evaluating the distribution of the CA and to predict blood supply to the myocardium in corrected TGA.

  17. Electrophysiological and functional effects of sphingosine-1-phosphate in mouse ventricular fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Benamer, Najate; Bois, Patrick

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} In cardiac fibroblasts, SUR2/Kir6.1 channel is activated by S1P via the S1P3R. {yields} S1P increases cell proliferation through SUR2/Kir6.1 activation. {yields} S1P decreases collagen and IL-6 secretion through SUR2/Kir6.1 activation. {yields} S1P stimulates fibroblast migration independently from SUR2/Kir6.1 channel. -- Abstract: The aim of this study was to characterize the effects of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) on cardiac ventricular fibroblasts. Impacts of S1P on fibroblast excitability, cell migration, proliferation and secretion were characterized. The patch-clamp technique in the whole-cell configuration was used to study the S1P-induced current from mouse ventricular fibroblasts. The expression level of the S1P receptor during cell culture duration was evaluated by western-blot. Fibroblast proliferation and migration were quantified using the methylene blue assay and the Boyden chamber technique, respectively. Finally, fibroblast secretion properties were estimated by quantification of the IL-6 and collagen levels using ELISA and SIRCOL collagen assays, respectively. We found that S1P activated SUR2/Kir6.1 channel and that this effect was sensitive to specific inhibition of the S1P receptor of type 3 (S1P3R). In contrast, S1P1R receptor inhibition had no effect. Moreover, the S1P-induced current increased with cell culture duration whereas S1P3R expression level remained constant. The activation of SUR2/Kir6.1 channel by S1P via S1P3R stimulated cell proliferation and decreased IL-6 and collagen secretions. S1P also stimulated fibroblast migration via S1P3R but independently from SUR2/Kir6.1 channel activation. This study demonstrates that S1P, via S1P3R, affects cardiac ventricular fibroblasts function independently or through activation of SUR2/Kir6.1 channel. The latter effect occurs after fibroblasts differentiate into myofibroblasts, opening a new potential therapeutic strategy to modulate fibrosis after cardiac

  18. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... your risk of future heart problems, and to improve your health and quality of life. Cardiac rehabilitation programs increase ... exercise routine at home or at a local gym. You may also continue to ... health concerns. Education about nutrition, lifestyle and weight loss ...

  19. Galectin-3 blockade inhibits cardiac inflammation and fibrosis in experimental hyperaldosteronism and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, Ernesto; Calvier, Laurent; Fernández-Celis, Amaya; Rousseau, Elodie; Jurado-López, Raquel; Rossoni, Luciana V; Jaisser, Frederic; Zannad, Faiez; Rossignol, Patrick; Cachofeiro, Victoria; López-Andrés, Natalia

    2015-10-01

    Hypertensive cardiac remodeling is accompanied by molecular inflammation and fibrosis, 2 mechanisms that finally affect cardiac function. At cardiac level, aldosterone promotes inflammation and fibrosis, although the precise mechanisms are still unclear. Galectin-3 (Gal-3), a β-galactoside-binding lectin, is associated with inflammation and fibrosis in the cardiovascular system. We herein investigated whether Gal-3 inhibition could block aldosterone-induced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis and its potential role in cardiac damage associated with hypertension. Aldosterone-salt-treated rats presented hypertension, cardiac inflammation, and fibrosis that were prevented by the pharmacological inhibition of Gal-3 with modified citrus pectin. Cardiac inflammation and fibrosis presented in spontaneously hypertensive rats were prevented by modified citrus pectin treatment, whereas Gal-3 blockade did not modify blood pressure levels. In the absence of blood pressure modifications, Gal-3 knockout mice were resistant to aldosterone-induced cardiac inflammation. In human cardiac fibroblasts, aldosterone increased Gal-3 expression via its mineralocorticoid receptor. Gal-3 and aldosterone enhanced proinflammatory and profibrotic markers, as well as metalloproteinase activities in human cardiac fibroblasts, effects that were not observed in Gal-3-silenced cells treated with aldosterone. In experimental hyperaldosteronism, the increase in Gal-3 expression was associated with cardiac inflammation and fibrosis, alterations that were prevented by Gal-3 blockade independently of blood pressure levels. These data suggest that Gal-3 could be a new molecular mechanism linking cardiac inflammation and fibrosis in situations with high-aldosterone levels, such as hypertension.

  20. BMI is a Better Indicator of Cardiac Risk Factors, as against Elevated Blood Pressure in Apparently Healthy Female Adolescents and Young Adult Students: Results From a Cross-Sectional Study in Tripura

    PubMed Central

    Debnath, Surajit

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anthropometric measures are used as indicators of elevated blood pressure, but reported to have variable sensitivity among populations. This study was undertaken to identify the better indicator of Cardiac-risk factors by statistical comparison of BMI, Waist circumference, and Waist to Height (WtHr) ratio in apparently healthy adolescents and young adult female students of Tripura. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in a resource limited setup on 210 apparently healthy female adolescents and young adult students in Tripura. Mean (±SD) of all parameters were compared (ANOVA) to recognize significant independent (anthropometric measures) and dependent factors (blood pressure indices and so on). Correlation (r) analysis was used to identify the better (p) indicator of blood pressure indices (dependent variable) and its impact was assessed by Multiple Regression analysis. Results: blood pressure indices are comparatively higher in obese and overweight participants with statistically significant (95.5% confidence) mean differences. Significant correlation with dependent factors is observed with BMI followed by WtHr and Waist Circumference. Impact of anthropometric measures with blood pressure Indices is most significant for BMI (P ≤ 0.020) followed by WtHr (P ≤ 0.500) and waist circumference (P ≤ 0.520). Conclusion: BMI is a superior indicator of blood pressure indices and can identify participants at risk even in apparently healthy adolescent and young adult females. PMID:27890980

  1. CARDIAC-LIKE OSCILLATION IN LIVER STEM CELLS INDUCE THEIR ACQUISITION OF CARDIAC PHENOTYPE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined in a cardiac microenvironment the plasticity of a liver stem cell line (WB F344) generated from a cloned, single, non-parenchymal epithelial cell from a normal adult male rat. Our previous studies suggested that WB F344 cells acquire a cardiac phenotype in the absenc...

  2. Normal cardiac function in mice with supraphysiological cardiac creatine levels.

    PubMed

    Santacruz, Lucia; Hernandez, Alejandro; Nienaber, Jeffrey; Mishra, Rajashree; Pinilla, Miguel; Burchette, James; Mao, Lan; Rockman, Howard A; Jacobs, Danny O

    2014-02-01

    Creatine and phosphocreatine levels are decreased in heart failure, and reductions in myocellular phosphocreatine levels predict the severity of the disease and portend adverse outcomes. Previous studies of transgenic mouse models with increased creatine content higher than two times baseline showed the development of heart failure and shortened lifespan. Given phosphocreatine's role in buffering ATP content, we tested the hypothesis whether elevated cardiac creatine content would alter cardiac function under normal physiological conditions. Here, we report the creation of transgenic mice that overexpress the human creatine transporter (CrT) in cardiac muscle under the control of the α-myosin heavy chain promoter. Cardiac transgene expression was quantified by qRT-PCR, and human CrT protein expression was documented on Western blots and immunohistochemistry using a specific anti-CrT antibody. High-energy phosphate metabolites and cardiac function were measured in transgenic animals and compared with age-matched, wild-type controls. Adult transgenic animals showed increases of 5.7- and 4.7-fold in the content of creatine and free ADP, respectively. Phosphocreatine and ATP levels were two times as high in young transgenic animals but declined to control levels by the time the animals reached 8 wk of age. Transgenic mice appeared to be healthy and had normal life spans. Cardiac morphometry, conscious echocardiography, and pressure-volume loop studies demonstrated mild hypertrophy but normal function. Based on our characterization of the human CrT protein expression, creatine and phosphocreatine content, and cardiac morphometry and function, these transgenic mice provide an in vivo model for examining the therapeutic value of elevated creatine content for cardiac pathologies.

  3. Tropoelastin regulates chemokine expression in fibroblasts in Costello syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Tatano, Yutaka; Fujinawa, Reiko; Kozutsumi, Yasunori; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Tsuji, Daisuke; Takeuchi, Naohiro; Tsuta, Kohji; Takada, Goro; Sakuraba, Hitoshi; Itoh, Kohji

    2008-08-08

    Costello syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly associated with growth and mental retardation, cardiac and skeletal anomalies, and a predisposition to develop neoplasia. Comprehensive expression analysis revealed remarkable up-regulation of several cytokines and chemokines including Gro family proteins, interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), IL-8 and MCP-1 but down-regulation of extracellular matrix components including collagens and proteoglycans of skin fibroblasts derived from a Japanese Costello syndrome patient characterized by significantly reduced tropoelastin mRNA, impaired elastogenesis and enhanced cell proliferation. In contrast, decreases in these chemokines and IL-1{beta} expression were observed in Costello fibroblastic cell lines stably expressing the bovine tropoelastin (btEln) gene and in restored elastic fibers. These results strongly suggest that the human TE gene (ELN) transfer could be applicable for the gene therapy of a group of Costello syndrome patients with reduced ELN gene expression.

  4. IN VITRO EFFECTS OF CHLORPYRIFOS, PARATHION, METHYL PARATHION AND THEIR OXONS ON CARDIAC MUSCARINIC RECEPTOR BINDING IN NEONATAL AND ADULT RATS. (R825811)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organophosphorus insecticides elicit toxicity by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase. Young animals are generally more sensitive than adults to these toxicants. A number of studies reported that some organophosphorus agents also bind directly to muscarinic receptors, in particular...

  5. Cardiac optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Optogenetics is an emerging technology for optical interrogation and control of biological function with high specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. Mammalian cells and tissues can be sensitized to respond to light by a relatively simple and well-tolerated genetic modification using microbial opsins (light-gated ion channels and pumps). These can achieve fast and specific excitatory or inhibitory response, offering distinct advantages over traditional pharmacological or electrical means of perturbation. Since the first demonstrations of utility in mammalian cells (neurons) in 2005, optogenetics has spurred immense research activity and has inspired numerous applications for dissection of neural circuitry and understanding of brain function in health and disease, applications ranging from in vitro to work in behaving animals. Only recently (since 2010), the field has extended to cardiac applications with less than a dozen publications to date. In consideration of the early phase of work on cardiac optogenetics and the impact of the technique in understanding another excitable tissue, the brain, this review is largely a perspective of possibilities in the heart. It covers the basic principles of operation of light-sensitive ion channels and pumps, the available tools and ongoing efforts in optimizing them, overview of neuroscience use, as well as cardiac-specific questions of implementation and ideas for best use of this emerging technology in the heart. PMID:23457014

  6. Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weisse, Allen B.

    2011-01-01

    Well into the first decades of the 20th century, medical opinion held that any surgical attempts to treat heart disease were not only misguided, but unethical. Despite such reservations, innovative surgeons showed that heart wounds could be successfully repaired. Then, extracardiac procedures were performed to correct patent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of the aorta, and tetralogy of Fallot. Direct surgery on the heart was accomplished with closed commissurotomy for mitral stenosis. The introduction of the heart-lung machine and cardiopulmonary bypass enabled the surgical treatment of other congenital and acquired heart diseases. Advances in aortic surgery paralleled these successes. The development of coronary artery bypass grafting greatly aided the treatment of coronary heart disease. Cardiac transplantation, attempts to use the total artificial heart, and the application of ventricular assist devices have brought us to the present day. Although progress in the field of cardiovascular surgery appears to have slowed when compared with the halcyon times of the past, substantial challenges still face cardiac surgeons. It can only be hoped that sufficient resources and incentive can carry the triumphs of the 20th century into the 21st. This review covers past developments and future opportunities in cardiac surgery. PMID:22163121

  7. Cardiac cell proliferation assessed by EdU, a novel analysis of cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Bin; Tong, Suiyang; Ren, Xiaofeng; Xia, Hao

    2016-08-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that mammalian hearts maintain the capacity for cardiac regeneration. Rapid and sensitive identification of cardiac cellular proliferation is prerequisite for understanding the underlying mechanisms and strategies of cardiac regeneration. The following immunologically related markers of cardiac cells were analyzed: cardiac transcription factors Nkx2.5 and Gata 4; specific marker of cardiomyocytes TnT; endothelial cell marker CD31; vascular smooth muscle marker smooth muscle myosin IgG; cardiac resident stem cells markers IsL1, Tbx18, and Wt1. Markers were co-localized in cardiac tissues of embryonic, neonatal, adult, and pathological samples by 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) staining. EdU was also used to label isolated neonatal cardiomyocytes in vitro. EdU robustly labeled proliferating cells in vitro and in vivo, co-immunostaining with different cardiac cells markers. EdU can rapidly and sensitively label proliferating cardiac cells in developmental and pathological states. Cardiac cell proliferation assessed by EdU is a novel analytical tool for investigating the mechanism and strategies of cardiac regeneration in response to injury.

  8. Fibroblasts of Machado Joseph Disease patients reveal autophagy impairment

    PubMed Central

    Onofre, Isabel; Mendonça, Nuno; Lopes, Sara; Nobre, Rui; de Melo, Joana Barbosa; Carreira, Isabel Marques; Januário, Cristina; Gonçalves, António Freire; de Almeida, Luis Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Machado Joseph Disease (MJD) is the most frequent autosomal dominantly inherited cerebellar ataxia caused by the over-repetition of a CAG trinucleotide in the ATXN3 gene. This expansion translates into a polyglutamine tract within the ataxin-3 protein that confers a toxic gain-of-function to the mutant protein ataxin-3, contributing to protein misfolding and intracellular accumulation of aggregates and neuronal degeneration. Autophagy impairment has been shown to be one of the mechanisms that contribute for the MJD phenotype. Here we investigated whether this phenotype was present in patient-derived fibroblasts, a common somatic cell type used in the derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells and subsequent differentiation into neurons, for in vitro disease modeling. We generated and studied adult dermal fibroblasts from 5 MJD patients and 4 healthy individuals and we found that early passage MJD fibroblasts exhibited autophagy impairment with an underlying mechanism of decreased autophagosome production. The overexpression of beclin-1 on MJD fibroblasts reverted partially autophagy impairment by increasing the autophagic flux but failed to increase the levels of autophagosome production. Overall, our results provide a well-characterized MJD fibroblast resource for neurodegenerative disease research and contribute for the understanding of mutant ataxin-3 biology and its molecular consequences. PMID:27328712

  9. [Fibroblast growth factor-2].

    PubMed

    Faitová, J

    2004-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-2 is a member of a large family of proteins that bind heparin and heparan sulfate and modulate the function of a wide range of cell types. FGF-2 occurs in several isoforms resulting from alternative initiations of traslation: an 18 kDa cytoplasmic isoform and four larger molecular weight nuclear isoforms (22, 22.5, 24 and 34 kDa). It acts mainly through a paracrine/autocrine mechanism involving high affinity transmembrane receptors and heparan sulfate proteoglycan low affinity receptors. It is expressed mostly in tissues of mesoderm and neuroectoderm origin, and plays an important role in mesoderm induction, stimulates the growth and development of the new blood vessels (angiogenesis), normal wound healing and tissue development. FGF-2 positively regulates hematopoiesis by acting on various cellular targets: stromal cells, early and committed hematopoietic progenitors and possibly some mature blood cells. FGF-2 is a potent hematopoietic growth factor that is likely to play an important role in physiological and pathological hematopoiesis.

  10. Prostacyclin analogs inhibit fibroblast migration.

    PubMed

    Kohyama, Tadashi; Liu, Xiangde; Kim, Hui Jung; Kobayashi, Tetsu; Ertl, Ronald F; Wen, Fu-Qiang; Takizawa, Hajime; Rennard, Stephen I

    2002-08-01

    The controlled accumulation of fibroblasts to sites of inflammation is crucial to effective tissue repair after injury. Either inadequate or excessive accumulation of fibroblasts could result in abnormal tissue function. Prostacyclin (PGI(2)) is a potent mediator in the coagulation and inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of PGI(2) on chemotaxis of human fetal lung fibroblasts (HFL-1). Using the blind well chamber technique, we found that the PGI(2) analog carbaprostacyclin (10(-6) M) inhibited HFL-1 chemotaxis to human plasma fibronectin (20 microg/ml) 58.0 +/- 13.2% (P < 0.05) and to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB (10 ng/ml) 48.7 +/- 4.6% (P < 0.05). Checkerboard analysis demonstrated that carbaprostacyclin inhibits both directed and undirected migration. The inhibitory effect of the carbaprostacyclin was concentration dependent and blocked by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibitor KT-5720, suggesting that a cAMP-PKA pathway may be involved in the process. Two other PGI(2) analogs, ciprostene and dehydro-15-cyclohexyl carbaprostacyclin (both 10(-6) M), significantly inhibited fibroblast migration to fibronectin. In summary, PGI(2) appears to inhibit fibroblast chemotaxis to fibronectin and PDGF-BB. Such an effect may contribute to the regulation of fibroblasts in wound healing and could contribute to the pathogenesis of diseases characterized by abnormal tissue repair remodeling.

  11. Alternatively activated macrophages determine repair of the infarcted adult murine heart

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Manabu; Shintani, Yasunori; Shintani, Yusuke; Ishida, Hidekazu; Saba, Rie; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Adachi, Hideo; Yashiro, Kenta

    2016-01-01

    Alternatively activated (also known as M2) macrophages are involved in the repair of various types of organs. However, the contribution of M2 macrophages to cardiac repair after myocardial infarction (MI) remains to be fully characterized. Here, we identified CD206+F4/80+CD11b+ M2-like macrophages in the murine heart and demonstrated that this cell population predominantly increases in the infarct area and exhibits strengthened reparative abilities after MI. We evaluated mice lacking the kinase TRIB1 (Trib1–/–), which exhibit a selective depletion of M2 macrophages after MI. Compared with control animals, Trib1–/– mice had a catastrophic prognosis, with frequent cardiac rupture, as the result of markedly reduced collagen fibril formation in the infarct area due to impaired fibroblast activation. The decreased tissue repair observed in Trib1–/– mice was entirely rescued by an external supply of M2-like macrophages. Furthermore, IL-1α and osteopontin were suggested to be mediators of M2-like macrophage–induced fibroblast activation. In addition, IL-4 administration achieved a targeted increase in the number of M2-like macrophages and enhanced the post-MI prognosis of WT mice, corresponding with amplified fibroblast activation and formation of more supportive fibrous tissues in the infarcts. Together, these data demonstrate that M2-like macrophages critically determine the repair of infarcted adult murine heart by regulating fibroblast activation and suggest that IL-4 is a potential biological drug for treating MI. PMID:27140396

  12. Klotho and Phosphate Are Modulators of Pathologic Uremic Cardiac Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Mingjun; Cho, Han Jun; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Paek, Jean; Hill, Kathy; Shelton, John; Amaral, Ansel P.; Faul, Christian; Taniguchi, Masatomo; Wolf, Myles; Brand, Markus; Takahashi, Masaya; Kuro-o, Makoto; Hill, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction in CKD is characterized by aberrant cardiac remodeling with hypertrophy and fibrosis. CKD is a state of severe systemic Klotho deficiency, and restoration of Klotho attenuates vascular calcification associated with CKD. We examined the role of Klotho in cardiac remodeling in models of Klotho deficiency—genetic Klotho hypomorphism, high dietary phosphate intake, aging, and CKD. Klotho-deficient mice exhibited cardiac dysfunction and hypertrophy before 12 weeks of age followed by fibrosis. In wild-type mice, the induction of CKD led to severe cardiovascular changes not observed in control mice. Notably, non-CKD mice fed a high-phosphate diet had lower Klotho levels and greatly accelerated cardiac remodeling associated with normal aging compared with those on a normal diet. Chronic elevation of circulating Klotho because of global overexpression alleviated the cardiac remodeling induced by either high-phosphate diet or CKD. Regardless of the cause of Klotho deficiency, the extent of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis correlated tightly with plasma phosphate concentration and inversely with plasma Klotho concentration, even when adjusted for all other covariables. High-fibroblast growth factor–23 concentration positively correlated with cardiac remodeling in a Klotho-deficient state but not a Klotho-replete state. In vitro, Klotho inhibited TGF-β1–, angiotensin II–, or high phosphate–induced fibrosis and abolished TGF-β1– or angiotensin II–induced hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes. In conclusion, Klotho deficiency is a novel intermediate mediator of pathologic cardiac remodeling, and fibroblast growth factor–23 may contribute to cardiac remodeling in concert with Klotho deficiency in CKD, phosphotoxicity, and aging. PMID:25326585

  13. About Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More About Cardiac Arrest Updated:Mar 10,2017 What is cardiac arrest? Cardiac arrest is the abrupt loss of heart function in a person who may or may not have diagnosed heart ...

  14. Physical Activity Measured by Accelerometry and its Associations With Cardiac Structure and Vascular Function in Young and Middle‐Aged Adults

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Charlotte; Lyass, Asya; Larson, Martin G.; Spartano, Nicole L.; Vita, Joseph A.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Esliger, Dale W.; Blease, Susan J.; Hamburg, Naomi M.; Mitchell, Gary F.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Physical activity is associated with several health benefits, including lower cardiovascular disease risk. The independent influence of physical activity on cardiac and vascular function in the community, however, has been sparsely investigated. Measures and Results We related objective measures of moderate‐ to vigorous‐intensity physical activity (MVPA, assessed by accelerometry) to cardiac and vascular indices in 2376 participants of the Framingham Heart Study third generation cohort (54% women, mean age 47 years). Using multivariable regression models, we related MVPA to the following echocardiographic and vascular measures: left ventricular mass, left atrial and aortic root sizes, carotid–femoral pulse wave velocity, augmentation index, and forward pressure wave. Men and women engaged in MVPA 29.9±21.4 and 25.5±19.4 min/day, respectively. Higher values of MVPA (per 10‐minute increment) were associated with lower carotid–femoral pulse wave velocity (estimate −0.53 ms/m; P=0.006) and lower forward pressure wave (estimate −0.23 mm Hg; P=0.03) but were not associated with augmentation index (estimate 0.13%; P=0.25). MVPA was associated positively with loge left ventricular mass (estimate 0.006 loge [g/m2]; P=0.0003), left ventricular wall thickness (estimate 0.07 mm; P=0.0001), and left atrial dimension (estimate 0.10 mm; P=0.01). MVPA also tended to be positively associated with aortic root dimension (estimate 0.05 mm; P=0.052). Associations of MVPA with cardiovascular measures were similar, in general, for bouts lasting <10 versus ≥10 minutes. Conclusions In our community‐based sample, greater physical activity was associated with lower vascular stiffness but with higher echocardiographic left ventricular mass and left atrial size. These findings suggest complex relations of usual levels of physical activity and cardiovascular remodeling. PMID:25792127

  15. PINOCYTOSIS IN FIBROBLASTS

    PubMed Central

    Steinman, Ralph M.; Silver, Jonathan M.; Cohn, Zanvil A.

    1974-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was used as a marker to determine the rate of ongoing pinocytosis in several fibroblast cell lines. The enzyme was interiorized in the fluid phase without evidence of adsorption to the cell surface. Cytochemical reaction product was not found on the cell surface and was visualized only within intracellular vesicles and granules. Uptake was directly proportional to the administered concentration of HRP and to the duration of exposure. The rate of HRP uptake was 0.0032–0.0035% of the administered load per 106 cells per hour for all cells studied with one exception: L cells, after reaching confluence, progressively increased their pinocytic activity two- to fourfold. After uptake of HRP, L cells inactivated HRP with a half-life of 6–8 h. Certain metabolic requirements of pinocytosis were then studied in detail in L cells. Raising the environmental temperature increased pinocytosis over a range of 2–38°C. The Q10 was 2.7 and the activation energy, 17.6 kcal/mol. Studies on the levels of cellular ATP in the presence of various metabolic inhibitors (fluoride, 2-desoxyglycose, azide, and cyanide) showed that L cells synthesized ATP by both glycolytic and respiratory pathways. A combination of a glycolytic and a respiratory inhibitor was needed to depress cellular ATP levels as well as pinocytic activity to 10–20% of control values, whereas drugs administered individually had only partial effects. In spite of the availability of an accurate quantitative assay for fluid and solute uptake, the function of pinocytosis in tissue culture cells remains unknown. PMID:4140194

  16. "String theory" of c-kit(pos) cardiac cells: a new paradigm regarding the nature of these cells that may reconcile apparently discrepant results.

    PubMed

    Keith, Matthew C L; Bolli, Roberto

    2015-03-27

    Although numerous preclinical investigations have consistently demonstrated salubrious effects of c-kit(pos) cardiac cells administered after myocardial infarction, the mechanism of action remains highly controversial. We and others have found little or no evidence that these cells differentiate into mature functional cardiomyocytes, suggesting paracrine effects. In this review, we propose a new paradigm predicated on a comprehensive analysis of the literature, including studies of cardiac development; we have (facetiously) dubbed this conceptual construct "string theory" of c-kit(pos) cardiac cells because it reconciles multifarious and sometimes apparently discrepant results. There is strong evidence that, during development, the c-kit receptor is expressed in different pools of cardiac progenitors (some capable of robust cardiomyogenesis and others with little or no contribution to myocytes). Accordingly, c-kit positivity, in itself, does not define the embryonic origins, lineage capabilities, or differentiation capacities of specific cardiac progenitors. C-kit(pos) cells derived from the first heart field exhibit cardiomyogenic potential during development, but these cells are likely depleted shortly before or after birth. The residual c-kit(pos) cells found in the adult heart are probably of proepicardial origin, possess a mesenchymal phenotype (resembling bone marrow mesenchymal stem/stromal cells), and are capable of contributing significantly only to nonmyocytic lineages (fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells). If these 2 populations (first heart field and proepicardium) express different levels of c-kit, the cardiomyogenic potential of first heart field progenitors might be reconciled with recent results of c-kit(pos) cell lineage tracing studies. The concept that c-kit expression in the adult heart identifies epicardium-derived, noncardiomyogenic precursors with a mesenchymal phenotype helps to explain the beneficial effects of c

  17. Sudden cardiac death: A reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Christian; Laksman, Zachary W M; Krahn, Andrew D

    2016-11-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is still among the leading causes of death in women and men, accounting for over 50% of all fatal cardiovascular events in the United States. Two arrhythmia mechanisms of SCD can be distinguished as follows: shockable rhythms (ventricular fibrillation and pulseless ventricular tachycardia) and non-shockable rhythms including asystole or pulseless electrical activity. The overall prognosis of cardiac arrest due to shockable rhythms is significantly better. While the majority of SCDs is attributed to coronary artery disease or other structural heart disease, no obvious cause can be identified in 5% of all events, and those events are labeled as sudden unexplained deaths (SUD). Those unexplained events are typically caused by rare hereditary electrical disorders or arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies. A systematic approach to the diagnosis of cardiac arrest followed by tailored therapy based on etiology has emerged in the last 10-15 years, with significant changes of medical practice and risk management of cardiac arrest victims. The aim of this review is to summarize our contemporary understanding of SCD/SUD in adults and to discuss current concepts of management and secondary prevention in cardiac arrest victims. A full discussion of the topic of primary prevention of SCD is beyond the scope of this article.

  18. The Prognostic Value of Using Ultrasonography in Cardiac Resuscitation of Patients with Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Bolvardi, Ehsan; Pouryaghobi, Seyyed Mohsen; Farzane, Roohye; Chokan, Niaz Mohamad Jafari; Ahmadi, Koorosh; Reihani, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary arrest is the final result of many diseases and therefore, need for a careful implementation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) protocols in these cases is undeniably important. The introduction of ultrasound into the emergency department has potentially allowed the addition of an extra data point in the decision about when to cease cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The aim of this study is to evaluate the ability of cardiac ultrasonography performed by emergency physicians to predict resuscitation outcome in adult cardiac arrest patients. Ultrasonographic examination of the subxiphoid cardiac area was made immediately after admission to the emergency department with pulseless cardiac arrest. Sonographic cardiac activity was defined as any detectable motion within the heart including the atria, ventricles or valves. Successful resuscitation was defined as: return of spontaneous circulation for ≥ 20 min; return of breathing; palpable pulse; measurable blood pressure. The present study includes 159 patients. The presence of sonographic cardiac activity at the beginning of resuscitation was significantly associated with a successful outcome (41/49 [83.7%] versus 15/110 [13.6%] patients without cardiac activity at the beginning of resuscitation). Ultrasonographic detection of cardiac activity may be useful in determining prognosis during cardiac arrest. Further studies are needed to elucidate the predictive value of ultrasonography in cardiac arrest patients. PMID:27829827

  19. Fibroblastic activities post implantation of cobalt chromium alloy and pure germanium in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Carter, J M; Natiella, J R; Baier, R E; Natiella, R R

    1984-02-01

    Different preimplantation surface finishes were applied to surgical vitallium discs and germanium prisms implanted for 20 days within the back muscles of adult rabbits. Histopathologic analysis of the numbers of nuclei of active fibroblasts immediately adjacent to the implants was carried out. The mean apparent volume fractions (MAVF) for the subdermal implant sites were found to depend on the surface cleanliness of the implant, the cleanest or highest-surface-energy surfaces giving the highest MAVF values for active fibroblasts.

  20. [Histopathological and immunohistochemical features of cardiac myxomas].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Bringas, Omar; Ortiz-Hidalgo, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Mixomas are the most common primary cardiac tumors with an estimate incidence of 0,5-1 per 10(6) individuals per year. These tumors have generated interest due to their unique location (left side of the atrial septum near the fossa ovalis), variable clinical presentation and undefined histogenesis. Most cardiac myxomas occur sporadically while approximately 10% of diagnosed cases develop as part of Carney complex. This neoplasm is of uncertain histogenesis, however, endothelial, neurogenic, fibroblastic, and cardiac and smooth muscle cells differentiation has been proposed, and rarely glandular differentiation has been observed. Recently, due to the expression of certain cardiomyocyte-specific factors, an origin of mesenchymal cardiomyocytes progenitor cells has been suggested. Histologically cardiac myxomas are mainly composed of stellated, fusiform and polygonal cells, immersed in an amorphous myxoid matrix. Immunohistochemically some endothelial markers, such as CD31, CD34, FVIIIAg, are present. Positive staining has also been reported for S-100 protein, calretinin, vimentin, desmin, smooth muscle myosin, CD56, α1 antitrypsin and α 1antichymotrypsin. Surgical resection is currently the only treatment of choice. We present in this article a histopathological and immunohistochemical review of cardiac myxomas.

  1. NOD1 Activation Induces Cardiac Dysfunction and Modulates Cardiac Fibrosis and Cardiomyocyte Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Velasco, María; Prieto, Patricia; Terrón, Verónica; Benito, Gemma; Flores, Juana M.; Delgado, Carmen; Zaragoza, Carlos; Lavin, Begoña; Gómez-Parrizas, Mónica; López-Collazo, Eduardo; Martín-Sanz, Paloma; Boscá, Lisardo

    2012-01-01

    The innate immune system is responsible for the initial response of an organism to potentially harmful stressors, pathogens or tissue injury, and accordingly plays an essential role in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory processes, including some cardiovascular diseases. Toll like receptors (TLR) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs) are pattern recognition receptors that play an important role in the induction of innate immune and inflammatory responses. There is a line of evidence supporting that activation of TLRs contributes to the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases but less is known regarding the role of NLRs. Here we demonstrate the presence of the NLR member NOD1 (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing 1) in the murine heart. Activation of NOD1 with the specific agonist C12-iEDAP, but not with the inactive analogue iE-Lys, induces a time- and dose-dependent cardiac dysfunction that occurs concomitantly with cardiac fibrosis and apoptosis. The administration of iEDAP promotes the activation of the NF-κB and TGF-β pathways and induces apoptosis in whole hearts. At the cellular level, both native cardiomyocytes and cardiac fibroblasts expressed NOD1. The NLR activation in cardiomyocytes was associated with NF-κB activation and induction of apoptosis. NOD1 stimulation in fibroblasts was linked to NF-κB activation and to increased expression of pro-fibrotic mediators. The down-regulation of NOD1 by specific siRNAs blunted the effect of iEDAP on the pro-fibrotic TGF-β pathway and cell apoptosis. In conclusion, our report uncovers a new pro-inflammatory target that is expressed in the heart, NOD1. The specific activation of this NLR induces cardiac dysfunction and modulates cardiac fibrosis and cardiomyocyte apoptosis, pathological processes involved in several cardiac diseases such as heart failure. PMID:23028889

  2. Tissue-engineered 3-dimensional (3D) microenvironment enhances the direct reprogramming of fibroblasts into cardiomyocytes by microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanzhen; Dal-Pra, Sophie; Mirotsou, Maria; Jayawardena, Tilanthi M.; Hodgkinson, Conrad P.; Bursac, Nenad; Dzau, Victor J.

    2016-01-01

    We have recently shown that a combination of microRNAs, miR combo, can directly reprogram cardiac fibroblasts into functional cardiomyocytes in vitro and in vivo. Reprogramming of cardiac fibroblasts by miR combo in vivo is associated with improved cardiac function following myocardial infarction. However, the efficiency of direct reprogramming in vitro is relatively modest and new strategies beyond the traditional two-dimensional (2D) culture should be identified to improve reprogramming process. Here, we report that a tissue-engineered three-dimensional (3D) hydrogel environment enhanced miR combo reprogramming of neonatal cardiac and tail-tip fibroblasts. This was associated with significantly increased MMPs expression in 3D vs. 2D cultured cells, while pharmacological inhibition of MMPs blocked the effect of the 3D culture on enhanced miR combo mediated reprogramming. We conclude that 3D tissue-engineered environment can enhance the direct reprogramming of fibroblasts to cardiomyocytes via a MMP-dependent mechanism. PMID:27941896

  3. Effect of pre-cardiac and adult stages of Dirofilaria immitis in pulmonary disease of cats: CBC, bronchial lavage cytology, serology, radiographs, CT images, bronchial reactivity, and histopathology.

    PubMed

    Ray Dillon, A; Tillson, D M; Wooldridge, A; Cattley, R; Hathcock, J; Brawner, W R; Cole, R; Welles, B; Christopherson, P W; Lee-Fowler, T; Bordelon, S; Barney, S; Sermersheim, M; Garbarino, R; Wells, S Z; Diffie, E B; Schachner, E R

    2014-11-15

    A controlled, blind study was conducted to define the initial inflammatory response and lung damage associated with the death of precardiac stages of Dirofilaria immitis in cats as compared to adult heartworm infections and normal cats. Three groups of six cats each were used: UU: uninfected untreated controls; PreS I: infected with 100 D. immitis L3 by subcutaneous injection and treated topically with selamectin 32 and 2 days pre-infection and once monthly for 8 months); IU: infected with 100 D. immitis L3 and left untreated. Peripheral blood, serum, bronchial lavage, and thoracic radiographic images were collected from all cats on Days 0, 70, 110, 168, and 240. CT images were acquired on Days 0, 110, and 240. Cats were euthanized, and necropsies were conducted on Day 240 to determine the presence of heartworms. Bronchial rings were collected for in vitro reactivity. Lung, heart, brain, kidney, and liver tissues were collected for histopathology. Results were compared for changes within each group. Pearson and Spearman correlations were performed for association between histologic, radiographic, serologic, hematologic and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) results. Infected cats treated with selamectin did not develop radiographically evident changes throughout the study, were heartworm antibody negative, and were free of adult heartworms and worm fragments at necropsy. Histologic lung scores and CT analysis were not significantly different between PreS I cats and UU controls. Subtle alveolar myofibrosis was noted in isolated areas of several PreS I cats and an eosinophilic BAL cytology was noted on Days 75 and 120. Bronchial ring reactivity was blunted in IU cats but was normal in PreS I and UU cats. The IU cats became antibody positive, and five cats developed adult heartworms. All cats with heartworms were antigen positive at one time point; but one cat was antibody positive, antigen negative, with viable adult females at necropsy. The CT revealed early involvement

  4. Cardiac action potential imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qinghai; Lipp, Peter; Kaestner, Lars

    2013-06-01

    Action potentials in cardiac myocytes have durations in the order of magnitude of 100 milliseconds. In biomedical investigations the documentation of the occurrence of action potentials is often not sufficient, but a recording of the shape of an action potential allows a functional estimation of several molecular players. Therefore a temporal resolution of around 500 images per second is compulsory. In the past such measurements have been performed with photometric approaches limiting the measurement to one cell at a time. In contrast, imaging allows reading out several cells at a time with additional spatial information. Recent developments in camera technologies allow the acquisition with the required speed and sensitivity. We performed action potential imaging on isolated adult cardiomyocytes of guinea pigs utilizing the fluorescent membrane potential sensor di-8-ANEPPS and latest electron-multiplication CCD as well as scientific CMOS cameras of several manufacturers. Furthermore, we characterized the signal to noise ratio of action potential signals of varying sets of cameras, dye concentrations and objective lenses. We ensured that di-8-ANEPPS itself did not alter action potentials by avoiding concentrations above 5 μM. Based on these results we can conclude that imaging is a reliable method to read out action potentials. Compared to conventional current-clamp experiments, this optical approach allows a much higher throughput and due to its contact free concept leaving the cell to a much higher degree undisturbed. Action potential imaging based on isolated adult cardiomyocytes can be utilized in pharmacological cardiac safety screens bearing numerous advantages over approaches based on heterologous expression of hERG channels in cell lines.

  5. Lack of correlation between MMF dose and MPA level in pediatric and young adult cardiac transplant patients: does the MPA level matter?

    PubMed

    Gajarski, Robert J; Crowley, Dennis C; Zamberlan, Mary C; Lake, Kathleen D

    2004-09-01

    To determine the correlation between mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) dose and mycophenolic acid (MPA) level as well as its impact on rejection among young cardiac transplant recipients (OHT), trough concentrations of MPA and its metabolite, mycophenolic acid glucuronide (MPAG), were measured following MMF doses of 1200 mg/m2/d (max 3000 mg/d). Corresponding endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) grades and calcineurin inhibitor levels were recorded with simultaneous MPA/MPAG levels. Correlation coefficients were derived between MMF dose and MPA/MPAG levels. Contingency analysis evaluated the relation between MPA level and EMB score. Twenty-six patients (median age 15.4 years) had 120 MPA/MPAG levels measured. Average MMF dose was 1208.8 mg/m2/d with median MPA and MPAG concentrations: 2.1 (therapeutic: 1.0-3.5 microg/mL) and 48 microg/mL (reference range: 35-100 microg/mL), respectively. Only 50% of patients consistently achieved therapeutic levels with standard dosing. No correlation was found between MMF dose and MPA/MPAG levels. In the presence of therapeutic calcineurin inhibition, EMB grade > or = 2 occurred more with MPA concentrations < 2.5 microg/mL (p = 0.01). In young OHT patients, MMF dose does not correlate with MPA/MPAG levels, and standard MMF dosing fails to consistently achieve 'therapeutic' MPA concentrations. An MPA trough level < 2.5 microg/mL was more frequently associated with EMB grade > or = 2. Concentration rather than dose-driven management is a more prudent strategy when using MMF.

  6. Cardiac autonomic and haemodynamic recovery after a single session of aerobic exercise with and without blood flow restriction in older adults.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Marina Lívia Venturini; Sardeli, Amanda Veiga; Souza, Giovana Vergínia De; Bonganha, Valéria; Santos, Lucas Do Carmo; Castro, Alex; Cavaglieri, Cláudia Regina; Chacon-Mikahil, Mara Patrícia Traina

    2016-12-28

    This study investigated the autonomic and haemodynamic responses to different aerobic exercise loads, with and without blood flow restriction (BFR). In a crossover study, 21 older adults (8 males and 13 females) completed different aerobic exercise sessions: low load without BFR (LL) (40% VO2max), low load with BFR (LL-BFR) (40% VO2max + 50% BFR) and high load without BFR (HL) (70% VO2max). Heart rate variability and haemodynamic responses were recorded during rest and throughout 30 min of recovery. HL reduced R-R interval, the root mean square of successive difference of R-R intervals and high frequency during 30 min of recovery at a greater magnitude compared with LL and LL-BFR. Sympathetic-vagal balance increased the values for HL during 30 min of recovery at a greater magnitude when compared with LL and LL-BFR. Post-exercise haemodynamic showed reduced values of double product at 30 min of recovery compared to rest in LL-BFR, while HL showed higher values compared to rest, LL-BFR and LL. Reduced systolic blood pressure was observed for LL-BFR (30 min) compared to rest. Autonomic and haemodynamic responses indicate lower cardiovascular stress after LL-BFR compared to HL, being this method, besides the functional adaptations, a potential choice to attenuate the cardiovascular stress after exercise in older adults.

  7. Safe and easy method with little modification in technique is useful for successful internal jugular vein cannulation on same side even after intra-arterial puncture without using ultrasound guidance in adult cardiac patients

    PubMed Central

    Thosani, Rajesh; Patel, Jigar; Gandhi, Hemang; Doshi, Chirag; Kothari, Jignesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The modification in technique is useful for successful right-sided internal jugular vein (IJV) cannulation on the same side even after intra-arterial puncture without using ultrasound guidance in adult patients. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out in total 160 adult patient from American Society of Anesthesiologists Grade II to III patients male (n = 95) and female (n = 65) who underwent cardiac surgery where cannulation was done on right sided by triple lumen catheter (7 French) using Seldinger technique. Results: Majority of patients were cannulated successfully by Seldinger technique with single or double attempt except for five patients in which arterial puncture occurred. All five patients were cannulated successfully on the same side with this modified technique without any significant major complications. They were managed by application of blocker at the end of arterial needle puncture without removing it. In our routine practice, we were used to removing this needle and applying compression for few minutes to prevent hematoma formation after an arterial puncture. In this study, cannula was used as a marker or guideline for the relocation of IJV on the same side and recannulation was performed by changing the direction of needle on same side lateral to the previous one and without going towards the same direction to prevent the arterial puncture again. Conclusion: Most simple and useful modified technique for institutes where the complications are most common with trainee doctors and in hospitals where there is no advanced facility like ultrasound-guided cannulation available. By this modification, it will be time saving, very comfortable, and user-friendly technique with high success rate. PMID:27052069

  8. Key Regulatory Role of Dermal Fibroblasts in Pigmentation as Demonstrated Using a Reconstructed Skin Model: Impact of Photo-Aging

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Christine; Cohen, Catherine; Chagnoleau, Corinne; Flouret, Virginie; Bourreau, Emilie; Bernerd, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    To study cutaneous pigmentation in a physiological context, we have previously developed a functional pigmented reconstructed skin model composed of a melanocyte-containing epidermis grown on a dermal equivalent comprising living fibroblasts. The present studies, using the same model, aimed to demonstrate that dermal fibroblasts influence skin pigmentation up to the macroscopic level. The proof of principle was performed with pigmented skins differing only in the fibroblast component. First, the in vitro system was reconstructed with or without fibroblasts in order to test the global influence of the presence of this cell type. We then assessed the impact of the origin of the fibroblast strain on the degree of pigmentation using fetal versus adult fibroblasts. In both experiments, impressive variation in skin pigmentation at the macroscopic level was observed and confirmed by quantitative parameters related to skin color, melanin content and melanocyte numbers. These data confirmed the responsiveness of the model and demonstrated that dermal fibroblasts do indeed impact the degree of skin pigmentation. We then hypothesized that a physiological state associated with pigmentary alterations such as photo-aging could be linked to dermal fibroblasts modifications that accumulate over time. Pigmentation of skin reconstructed using young unexposed fibroblasts (n = 3) was compared to that of tissues containing natural photo-aged fibroblasts (n = 3) which express a senescent phenotype. A stimulation of pigmentation in the presence of the natural photo-aged fibroblasts was revealed by a significant increase in the skin color (decrease in Luminance) and an increase in both epidermal melanin content and melanogenic gene expression, thus confirming our hypothesis. Altogether, these data demonstrate that the level of pigmentation of the skin model is influenced by dermal fibroblasts and that natural photo-aged fibroblasts can contribute to the hyperpigmentation that is

  9. Nucleus transfer efficiency of ear fibroblast cells isolated from Bama miniature pigs at various ages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Hua; Peng, Yun; Cai, Xin-Yong; Wan, Meng; Liu, Yu; Wei, Hong

    2015-08-01

    Somatic cell nucleus transfer (SCNT) has been considered the most effective method for conserving endangered animals and expanding the quantity of adult animal models. Bama miniature pigs are genetically stable and share similar biological features to humans. These pigs have been used to establish animal models for human diseases, and for many other applications. However, there is a paucity of studies on the effect of ear fibroblasts derived from different age of adult Bama miniature pigs on nucleus transfer (NT). The present study examined the NT efficiency of ear fibroblasts from fetal, newborn, 1-, 2-, 4-, 6-, 12-month-old miniature pigs by using trypan blue staining, flow cytometry and NT technique, etc., and the cell biological function and SCNT efficiency were compared between groups. The results showed that ear fibroblasts grew well after passage in each group. Spindle-shaped cells initially predominated, and gradually declined with increase of culture time and replaced by polygonal cells. Irregular cell growth occurred in the 2-month-old group and the elder groups. The growth curves of the ear fibroblasts were "S-shaped" in different age groups. The cell proliferation of postnatal ear fibroblasts, especially those from 2-, 4-, 6-, 12-month-old miniature pigs was significantly different from that of fetus ear fibroblasts (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Two-month- and 4-month-old ear fibroblasts had a significantly higher proportion of G1 stage cells (85% to 91%) than those at 6 and 12 months (66% to 74%, P<0.01). The blastocyst rate of reconstructed embryos originating from newborn, 1-, 2-, 4-month-old donor pigs was 6.06% to 7.69% with no significant difference from that in fetus fibroblast group (8.06%). It was concluded that <4-month-old adult Bama miniature pigs represent a better donor cell resource than elder pigs.

  10. Cardiac xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    DiSesa, V J

    1997-12-01

    Heart failure is an important medical and public health problem. Although medical therapy is effective for many people, the only definitive therapy is heart transplantation, which is limited severely by the number of donors. Mechanical devices presently are used as "bridges" to transplantation. Their widespread use may solve the donor shortage problem, but at present, mechanical devices are limited by problems related to blood clotting, power supply, and foreign body infection. Cardiac xenotransplantation using animal donors is a potential biologic solution to the donor organ shortage. The immune response, consisting of hyperacute rejection, acute vascular rejection, and cellular rejection, currently prevents clinical xenotransplantation. Advances in the solution of these problems have been made using conventional immunosuppressive drugs and newer agents whose use is based on an understanding of important steps in xenoimmunity. The most exciting approaches use tools of molecular biology to create genetically engineered donors and to induce states of donor and recipient bone marrow chimerism and tolerance in xenogeneic organ recipients. The successful future strategy may use a combination of a genetically engineered donor and a chimeric recipient with or without nonspecific immunosuppressive drugs.

  11. Fibroblast-Myocyte Coupling in the Heart: Potential Relevance for Therapeutic Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Ongstad, Emily; Kohl, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac myocyte-fibroblast electrotonic coupling is a well-established fact in vitro. Indirect evidence of its presence in vivo exists, but few functional studies have been published. This review describes the current knowledge of fibroblast-myocyte electrical signalling in the heart. Further research is needed to understand the frequency and extent of heterocellular interactions in vivo in order to gain a better understanding of their relevance in healthy and diseased myocardium. It is hoped that associated insight into myocyte-fibroblast coupling in the heart may lead to the discovery of novel therapeutic targets and the development of agents for improving outcomes of myocardial scarring and fibrosis. This article is part of a special issue entitled “Exploring Fibrosis as the Next Target for Myocardial Remodeling.” PMID:26774702

  12. A distinct de novo expression of Nav1.5 sodium channels in human atrial fibroblasts differentiated into myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Chatelier, Aurélien; Mercier, Aurélie; Tremblier, Boris; Thériault, Olivier; Moubarak, Majed; Benamer, Najate; Corbi, Pierre; Bois, Patrick; Chahine, Mohamed; Faivre, Jean François

    2012-09-01

    Fibroblasts play a major role in heart physiology. They are at the origin of the extracellular matrix renewal and production of various paracrine and autocrine factors. In pathological conditions, fibroblasts proliferate, migrate and differentiate into myofibroblasts leading to cardiac fibrosis. This differentiated status is associated with changes in expression profile leading to neo-expression of proteins such as ionic channels. The present study investigates further electrophysiological changes associated with fibroblast differentiation focusing on the activity of voltage-gated sodium channels in human atrial fibroblasts and myofibroblasts. Using the patch clamp technique we show that human atrial myofibroblasts display a fast inward voltage gated sodium current with a density of 13.28 ± 2.88 pA pF(-1) whereas no current was detectable in non-differentiated fibroblasts. Quantitative RT-PCR reveals a large amount of transcripts encoding the Na(v)1.5 α-subunit with a fourfold increased expression level in myofibroblasts when compared to fibroblasts. Accordingly, half of the current was blocked by 1 μm of tetrodotoxin and immunocytochemistry experiments reveal the presence of Na(v)1.5 proteins. Overall, this current exhibits similar biophysical characteristics to sodium currents found in cardiac myocytes except for the window current that is enlarged for potentials between -100 and -20 mV. Since fibrosis is one of the fundamental mechanisms implicated in atrial fibrillation, it is of great interest to investigate how this current could influence myofibroblast properties. Moreover, since several Na(v)1.5 mutations are related to cardiac pathologies, this study offers a new avenue on the fibroblasts involvement of these mutations.

  13. Calcium-Alginate Hydrogel-Encapsulated Fibroblasts Provide Sustained Release of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Nicola C.; Shelton, Richard M.; Henderson, Deborah J.

    2013-01-01

    Vascularization of engineered or damaged tissues is essential to maintain cell viability and proper tissue function. Revascularization of the left ventricle (LV) of the heart after myocardial infarction is particularly important, since hypoxia can give rise to chronic heart failure due to inappropriate remodeling of the LV after death of cardiomyocytes (CMs). Fibroblasts can express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which plays a major role in angiogenesis and also acts as a chemoattractant and survival factor for CMs and cardiac progenitors. In this in vitro model study, mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts encapsulated in 2% w/v Ca-alginate were shown to remain viable for 150 days. Semiquantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that over 21 days of encapsulation, fibroblasts continued to express VEGF, while enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that there was sustained release of VEGF from the Ca-alginate during this period. The scaffold degraded gradually over the 21 days, without reduction in volume. Cells released from the Ca-alginate at 7 and 21 days as a result of scaffold degradation were shown to retain viability, to adhere to fibronectin in a normal manner, and continue to express VEGF, demonstrating their potential to further contribute to maintenance of cardiac function after scaffold degradation. This model in vitro study therefore demonstrates that fibroblasts encapsulated in Ca-alginate provide sustained release of VEGF. PMID:23082964

  14. Notch Inhibition Enhances Cardiac Reprogramming by Increasing MEF2C Transcriptional Activity.

    PubMed

    Abad, Maria; Hashimoto, Hisayuki; Zhou, Huanyu; Morales, Maria Gabriela; Chen, Beibei; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N

    2017-03-14

    Conversion of fibroblasts into functional cardiomyocytes represents a potential means of restoring cardiac function after myocardial infarction, but so far this process remains inefficient and little is known about its molecular mechanisms. Here we show that DAPT, a classical Notch inhibitor, enhances the conversion of mouse fibroblasts into induced cardiac-like myocytes by the transcription factors GATA4, HAND2, MEF2C, and TBX5. DAPT cooperates with AKT kinase to further augment this process, resulting in up to 70% conversion efficiency. Moreover, DAPT promotes the acquisition of specific cardiomyocyte features, substantially increasing calcium flux, sarcomere structure, and the number of spontaneously beating cells. Transcriptome analysis shows that DAPT induces genetic programs related to muscle development, differentiation, and excitation-contraction coupling. Mechanistically, DAPT increases binding of the transcription factor MEF2C to the promoter regions of cardiac structural genes. These findings provide mechanistic insights into the reprogramming process and may have important implications for cardiac regeneration therapies.

  15. Downregulation of connexin43 by microRNA-130a in cardiomyocytes results in cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Osbourne, Appledene; Calway, Tyler; Broman, Michael; McSharry, Saoirse; Earley, Judy; Kim, Gene H

    2014-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are now recognized as critical regulators of diverse physiological and pathological processes; however, studies of miRNAs and arrhythmogenesis remain sparse. Connexin43 (Cx43), a major cardiac gap junction protein, has elicited great interest in its role in arrhythmias. Additionally, Cx43 was a potential target for miR-130a as predicted by several computational algorithms. This study investigates the effect of miR-130a overexpression in the adult heart and its effect on cardiac rhythm. Using a cardiac-specific inducible system, transgenic mice demonstrated both atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. We performed ventricular-programmed electrical stimulation and found that the αMHC-miR130a mice developed sustained ventricular tachycardia beginning 6weeks after overexpression. Western blot analysis demonstrated a steady decline in Cx43 after 2weeks of overexpression with over a 90% reduction in Cx43 levels by 10weeks. Immunofluorescent staining confirmed a near complete loss of Cx43 throughout the heart. To validate Cx43 as a direct target of miR-130a, we performed in vitro target assays in 3T3 fibroblasts and HL-1 cardiomyocytes, both known to endogenously express miR-130a. Using a luciferase reporter fused to the 3'UTR of Cx43, we found a 52.9% reduction in luciferase activity in 3T3 cells (p<0.0001) and a 47.6% reduction in HL-1 cells (p=0.0056) compared to controls. Addition of an antisense miR-130a inhibitor resulted in a loss of inhibitory activity of the Cx43 3'UTR reporter. We have identified an unappreciated role for miR-130a as a direct regulator of Cx43. Overexpression of miR-130a may contribute importantly to gap junction remodeling and to the pathogenesis of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias.

  16. Fibroblasts that resist cigarette smoke-induced senescence acquire profibrotic phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Kanaji, Nobuhiro; Basma, Hesham; Nelson, Amy; Farid, Maha; Sato, Tadashi; Nakanishi, Masanori; Wang, Xingqi; Michalski, Joel; Li, YingJi; Gunji, Yoko; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol; Liu, Xiangde; Rennard, Stephen I

    2014-09-01

    This study assessed the effect of extended exposure to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) on tissue repair functions in lung fibroblasts. Human fetal (HFL-1) and adult lung fibroblasts were exposed to CSE for 14 days. Senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA β-gal) expression, cell proliferation, and tissue repair functions including chemotaxis and gel contraction were assessed. HFL-1 proliferation was inhibited by CSE and nearly half of the CSE-exposed cells were SA β-gal positive after 14 days exposure, whereas 33% of adult lung fibroblasts were SA β-gal positive in response to 10% CSE exposure. The SA β-gal-positive cells did not proliferate as indicated by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. In contrast, cells negative for SA β-gal after CSE exposure proliferated faster than cells never exposed to CSE. These nonsenescent cells migrated more and contracted collagen gels more than control cells. CSE exposure stimulated TGF-β1 production, and both inhibition of TGF-β receptor kinase and TGF-β1 siRNA blocked CSE modulation of fibroblast function. Extended exposure to CSE might induce two different fibroblast phenotypes, a senescent and a profibrotic phenotype. The fibroblasts that resist CSE-induced cellular senescence may contribute to the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and could contribute to fibrotic lesions in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease acting through a TGF-β1-mediated pathway. In contrast, the senescent cells may contribute to the pathogenesis of emphysema.

  17. Genetic dissection of cardiac growth control pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLellan, W. R.; Schneider, M. D.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac muscle cells exhibit two related but distinct modes of growth that are highly regulated during development and disease. Cardiac myocytes rapidly proliferate during fetal life but exit the cell cycle irreversibly soon after birth, following which the predominant form of growth shifts from hyperplastic to hypertrophic. Much research has focused on identifying the candidate mitogens, hypertrophic agonists, and signaling pathways that mediate these processes in isolated cells. What drives the proliferative growth of embryonic myocardium in vivo and the mechanisms by which adult cardiac myocytes hypertrophy in vivo are less clear. Efforts to answer these questions have benefited from rapid progress made in techniques to manipulate the murine genome. Complementary technologies for gain- and loss-of-function now permit a mutational analysis of these growth control pathways in vivo in the intact heart. These studies have confirmed the importance of suspected pathways, have implicated unexpected pathways as well, and have led to new paradigms for the control of cardiac growth.

  18. Cardiac assessment of African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Black, Peter A; Marshall, Cecilia; Seyfried, Alice W; Bartin, Anne M

    2011-03-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a common finding in captive African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris) at postmortem exam. To date, treatment attempts have been mostly empirical and unrewarding. The objective of this study was to determine reference cardiac values for captive African hedgehogs based on echocardiogram, electrocardiogram (ECG), and radiographs. Adult African hedgehogs with no clinical signs of cardiac disease (n = 13) were selected. Each animal was anesthetized with isoflurane via facemask and an echocardiogram, ECG, and radiographs were performed. Standard measurements were taken and the descriptive statistics performed. Values were comparable to limited data available in other hedgehog species and other similar-sized exotic species. Two animals were removed from consideration of reference values due to valvular defects that were considered significant. These data are the first establishing cardiac parameters in normal African hedgehogs using radiographic cardiac measurement, echocardiogram, and ECG. Evaluating animals with possible cardiomyopathy may allow for earlier diagnosis and more successful treatment.

  19. Translational aspects of cardiac cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng-Han; Sereti, Konstantina-Ioanna; Wu, Benjamin M; Ardehali, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy has been intensely studied for over a decade as a potential treatment for ischaemic heart disease. While initial trials using skeletal myoblasts, bone marrow cells and peripheral blood stem cells showed promise in improving cardiac function, benefits were found to be short-lived likely related to limited survival and engraftment of the delivered cells. The discovery of putative cardiac ‘progenitor’ cells as well as the creation of induced pluripotent stem cells has led to the delivery of cells potentially capable of electromechanical integration into existing tissue. An alternative strategy involving either direct reprogramming of endogenous cardiac fibroblasts or stimulation of resident cardiomyocytes to regenerate new myocytes can potentially overcome the limitations of exogenous cell delivery. Complimentary approaches utilizing combination cell therapy and bioengineering techniques may be necessary to provide the proper milieu for clinically significant regeneration. Clinical trials employing bone marrow cells, mesenchymal stem cells and cardiac progenitor cells have demonstrated safety of catheter based cell delivery, with suggestion of limited improvement in ventricular function and reduction in infarct size. Ongoing trials are investigating potential benefits to outcome such as morbidity and mortality. These and future trials will clarify the optimal cell types and delivery conditions for therapeutic effect. PMID:26119413

  20. The Ski-Zeb2-Meox2 pathway provides a novel mechanism for regulation of the cardiac myofibroblast phenotype.

    PubMed

    Cunnington, Ryan H; Northcott, Josette M; Ghavami, Saeid; Filomeno, Krista L; Jahan, Fahmida; Kavosh, Morvarid S; Davies, Jared J L; Wigle, Jeffrey T; Dixon, Ian M C

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac fibrosis is linked to fibroblast-to-myofibroblast phenoconversion and proliferation but the mechanisms underlying this are poorly understood. Ski is a negative regulator of TGF-β-Smad signaling in myofibroblasts, and might redirect the myofibroblast phenotype back to fibroblasts. Meox2 could alter TGF-β-mediated cellular processes and is repressed by Zeb2. Here, we investigated whether Ski diminishes the myofibroblast phenotype by de-repressing Meox2 expression and function through repression of Zeb2 expression. We show that expression of Meox1 and Meox2 mRNA and Meox2 protein is reduced during phenoconversion of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts. Overexpression of Meox2 shifts the myofibroblasts into fibroblasts, whereas the Meox2 DNA-binding mutant has no effect on myofibroblast phenotype. Overexpression of Ski partially restores Meox2 mRNA expression levels to those in cardiac fibroblasts. Expression of Zeb2 increased during phenoconversion and Ski overexpression reduces Zeb2 expression in first-passage myofibroblasts. Furthermore, expression of Meox2 is decreased in scar following myocardial infarction, whereas Zeb2 protein expression increases in the infarct scar. Thus Ski modulates the cardiac myofibroblast phenotype and function through suppression of Zeb2 by upregulating the expression of Meox2. This cascade might regulate cardiac myofibroblast phenotype and presents therapeutic options for treatment of cardiac fibrosis.

  1. Expression of fibroblast growth factor 23 by canine soft tissue sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Hardcastle, M R; Dittmer, K E

    2016-09-01

    Tumour-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome of humans. Some mesenchymal tumours (often resembling haemangiopericytomas) express molecules that normally regulate phosphorus metabolism; most frequently, fibroblast growth factor 23. Patients develop renal phosphate wasting and inappropriately low serum concentrations of 1, 25 (OH)2 vitamin D3 , leading to osteomalacia. Surgical removal of the tumour is curative. The authors examined expression of canine fibroblast growth factor 23 in 49 soft tissue sarcomas, and control tissues from normal adult dogs. RNA extracted from bone or formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues was analysed by end point and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Fibroblast growth factor 23 expression was detected in bone, lung, kidney, lymph node and thymus. Fifteen of 49 sarcomas (31%) expressed fibroblast growth factor 23, three of these had high relative expression and some features resembling phosphatonin-expressing mesenchymal tumours of humans. Further work is required to determine whether TIO may occur in dogs.

  2. Harnessing the secretome of cardiac stem cells as therapy for ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Khanabdali, Ramin; Rosdah, Ayeshah A; Dusting, Gregory J; Lim, Shiang Y

    2016-08-01

    Adult stem cells continue to promise opportunities to repair damaged cardiac tissue. However, precisely how adult stem cells accomplish cardiac repair, especially after ischemic damage, remains controversial. It has been postulated that the clinical benefit of adult stem cells for cardiovascular disease results from the release of cytokines and growth factors by the transplanted cells. Studies in animal models of myocardial infarction have reported that such paracrine factors released from transplanted adult stem cells contribute to improved cardiac function by several processes. These include promoting neovascularization of damaged tissue, reducing inflammation, reducing fibrosis and scar formation, as well as protecting cardiomyocytes from apoptosis. In addition, these factors might also stimulate endogenous repair by activating cardiac stem cells. Interestingly, stem cells discovered to be resident in the heart appear to be functionally superior to extra-cardiac adult stem cells when transplanted for cardiac repair and regeneration. In this review, we discuss the therapeutic potential of cardiac stem cells and how the proteins secreted from these cells might be harnessed to promote repair and regeneration of damaged cardiac tissue. We also highlight how recent controversies about the efficacy of adult stem cells in clinical trials of ischemic heart disease have not dampened enthusiasm for the application of cardiac stem cells and their paracrine factors for cardiac repair: the latter have proved superior to the mesenchymal stem cells used in most clinical trials in the past, some of which appear to have been conducted with sub-optimal rigor.

  3. Inhibition of β-catenin signalling in dermal fibroblasts enhances hair follicle regeneration during wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Celine; Pisco, Angela Oliveira; Rawlins, Emma L.; Simons, Ben D.

    2016-01-01

    New hair follicles (HFs) do not form in adult mammalian skin unless epidermal Wnt signalling is activated genetically or within large wounds. To understand the postnatal loss of hair forming ability we monitored HF formation at small circular (2 mm) wound sites. At P2, new HFs formed in back skin, but HF formation was markedly decreased by P21. Neonatal tail also formed wound-associated HFs, albeit in smaller numbers. Postnatal loss of HF neogenesis did not correlate with wound closure rate but with a reduction in Lrig1-positive papillary fibroblasts in wounds. Comparative gene expression profiling of back and tail dermis at P1 and dorsal fibroblasts at P2 and P50 showed a correlation between loss of HF formation and decreased expression of genes associated with proliferation and Wnt/β-catenin activity. Between P2 and P50, fibroblast density declined throughout the dermis and clones of fibroblasts became more dispersed. This correlated with a decline in fibroblasts expressing a TOPGFP reporter of Wnt activation. Surprisingly, between P2 and P50 there was no difference in fibroblast proliferation at the wound site but Wnt signalling was highly upregulated in healing dermis of P21 compared with P2 mice. Postnatal β-catenin ablation in fibroblasts promoted HF regeneration in neonatal and adult mouse wounds, whereas β-catenin activation reduced HF regeneration in neonatal wounds. Our data support a model whereby postnatal loss of hair forming ability in wounds reflects elevated dermal Wnt/β-catenin activation in the wound bed, increasing the abundance of fibroblasts that are unable to induce HF formation. PMID:27287810

  4. Cardiac tamponade (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Cardiac tamponade is a condition involving compression of the heart caused by blood or fluid accumulation in the space ... they cannot adequately fill or pump blood. Cardiac tamponade is an emergency condition that requires hospitalization.

  5. Cardiac conduction system

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... cardiac muscle cells in the walls of the heart that send signals to the heart muscle causing it to contract. The main components ... the cardiac conduction system's electrical activity in the heart.

  6. Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... from American Heart Association Aneurysms and Dissections Angina Arrhythmia Bundle Branch Block Cardiomyopathy Carotid Artery Disease Chronic ... terms: SCA, sudden cardiac death (SCD), sudden death, arrhythmias, ... ventricular fibrillation, defibrillator, automatic cardiac defibrillator ( ...

  7. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    MedlinePlus

    ANSWERS by heart Treatments + Tests What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? A cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) program takes place in a hospital or ... special help in making lifestyle changes. During your rehabilitation program you’ll… • Have a medical evaluation to ...

  8. Cardiac sarcoid: a chameleon masquerading as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy in the same patient.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anushree; Sulemanjee, Nasir Z; Cheema, Omar; Downey, Francis X; Tajik, A Jamil

    2014-05-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem, granulomatous disease of unknown etiology often seen in young adults, with cardiac involvement in more than one-quarter of sarcoid patients. The clinical presentation of cardiac sarcoid depends upon the location and extent of myocardium involved. Although cardiac sarcoid may produce asymmetrical septal hypertrophy, it is most commonly considered in the differential diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy. The hypertrophic stage of cardiac sarcoid is rarely seen. We describe a case of cardiac sarcoid in a young patient wherein a distinctive appearance of the cardiac sarcoid spectrum from "hypertrophic" stage to thinned/scarred stage, masquerading as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy followed by dilated cardiomyopathy, is demonstrated.

  9. [Preoperative evaluation of adult patients prior to elective, non-cardiac surgery. Joint recommendations of German Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, German Society of Surgery and German Society of Internal Medicine].

    PubMed

    2011-09-01

    Evaluation of the patient's medical history and a physical examination are the cornerstones of risk assessment prior to elective surgery and may help to optimize the patient's preoperative medical condition and to guide perioperative management. Whether the performance of additional technical tests (e.g. blood chemistry, ECG, spirometry, chest-x-ray) can contribute to a reduction of perioperative risk is often not very well known or controversial. Similarly, there is considerable uncertainty among anesthesiologists, internists and surgeons with respect to the perioperative management of the patient's long-term medication. Therefore, the German Scientific Societies of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DGAI), Internal Medicine (DGIM) and Surgery (DGCH) have joined to elaborate and publish recommendations on the preoperative evaluation of adult patients prior to elective, non-cardiac and non-lung resection surgery. In the first part the general principles of preoperative evaluation are described (part A). The current concepts for extended evaluation of patients with known or suspected major cardiovascular disease are presented in part B. Finally, the perioperative management of patients' long-term medication is discussed (part C). The concepts proposed in these interdisciplinary recommendations endorsed by the DGAI, DGIM and DGCH provide a common basis for a structured preoperative risk assessment and management. These recommendations aim to ensure that surgical patients undergo a rational preoperative assessment and at the same time to avoid unnecessary, costly and potentially dangerous testing. The joint recommendations reflect the current state-of-the-art knowledge as well as expert opinions because scientific-based evidence is not always available. These recommendations will be subject to regular re-evaluation and updating when new validated evidence becomes available.

  10. Identification of the early and late responder genes during the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from mouse fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Seokjin; Hong, Chang-Pyo; Seo, Seonghye; Choe, Moon Kyung; Shin, So-I; Lee, Choon-Soo; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2017-01-01

    Background The generation of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC), a substitute for embryonic stem cell (ESC), requires the proper orchestration of a transcription program at the chromatin level. Our recent approach for the induction of pluripotent stem cells from fibroblasts using protein extracts from mouse ESCs could overcome the potential tumorigenicity risks associated with random retroviral integration. Here, we examine the epigenetic modifications and the transcriptome of two types of iPSC and of partially reprogrammed iPSCs (iPSCp) generated independently from adult cardiac and skin fibroblasts to assess any perturbations of the transcription program during reprogramming. Results The comparative dissection of the transcription profiles and histone modification patterns at lysines 4 and 27 of histone H3 of the iPSC, iPSCp, ESC, and somatic cells revealed that the iPSC was almost completely comparable to the ESC, regardless of their origins, whereas the genes of the iPSCp were dysregulated to a larger extent. Regardless of the origins of the somatic cells, the fibroblasts induced using the ESC protein extracts appear to be completely reprogrammed into pluripotent cells, although they show unshared marginal differences in their gene expression programs, which may not affect the maintenance of stemness. A comparative investigation of the iPSCp generated by unwanted reprogramming showed that the two groups of genes on the pathway from somatic cells to iPSC might function as sequential reprogramming-competent early and late responders to the induction stimulus. Moreover, some of the divergent genes expressed only in the iPSCp were associated with many tumor-related pathways. Conclusions Faithful transcriptional reprogramming should follow epigenetic alterations to generate induced pluripotent stem cells from somatic cells. This genome-wide comparison enabled us to define the early and late responder genes during the cell reprogramming process to iPSC. Our results

  11. Spatiotemporal Tracking of Cells in Tissue Engineered Cardiac Organoids

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Rohin K.; Chui, Jane; Radisic, Milica

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering aims to create myocardial patches for repair of defective or damaged native heart muscle. The inclusion of non-myocytes in engineered cardiac tissues has been shown to improve the properties of cardiac tissue compared to tissues engineered from enriched populations of myocytes alone. While attempts to mix non-myocytes (fibroblasts, endothelial cells) with cardiomyocytes have been made, very little is understood about how the tissue properties are affected by varying the respective ratios of the three cell types and how these cells assemble into functional tissues with time. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of modulating the ratios of the three cell types as well as to spatially and temporally track cardiac tri-cultures of cells. Primary neonatal cardiac fibroblasts and D4T endothelial cells were incubated in 5µM of CellTracker™ Green dye and CellTracker™ Red dye respectively while neonatal cardiomyocytes were labeled with 20µg/mL of DAPI. The non-myocytes were seeded either sequentially (Pre-culture) or simultaneously (Tri-culture) in Matrigel-coated microchannels and allowed to form organoids, as in our previous studies. We also varied the seeding percentage of cardiomyocytes while keeping the total cell number constant in an attempt to improve the functional properties of the organoids. Organoids were imaged on days 1 and 4. Endothelial cells were seen to aggregate into clusters when Simultaneously Tri-cultured with myocytes and fibroblasts, while Pre-cultures contained elongated cells. Functional properties of organoids were improved by increasing the seeding percentage of enriched cardiomyocytes from 40% to 80%. PMID:19235264

  12. Decellularized zebrafish cardiac extracellular matrix induces mammalian heart regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, William C. W.; Wang, Zhouguang; Missinato, Maria Azzurra; Park, Dae Woo; Long, Daniel Ward; Liu, Heng-Jui; Zeng, Xuemei; Yates, Nathan A.; Kim, Kang; Wang, Yadong

    2016-01-01

    Heart attack is a global health problem that leads to significant morbidity, mortality, and health care burden. Adult human hearts have very limited regenerative capability after injury. However, evolutionarily primitive species generally have higher regenerative capacity than mammals. The extracellular matrix (ECM) may contribute to this difference. Mammalian cardiac ECM may not be optimally inductive for cardiac regeneration because of the fibrotic, instead of regenerative, responses in injured adult mammalian hearts. Given the high regenerative capacity of adult zebrafish hearts, we hypothesize that decellularized zebrafish cardiac ECM (zECM) made from normal or healing hearts can induce mammalian heart regeneration. Using zebrafish and mice as representative species of lower vertebrates and mammals, we show that a single administration of zECM, particularly the healing variety, enables cardiac functional recovery and regeneration of adult mouse heart tissues after acute myocardial infarction. zECM-treated groups exhibit proliferation of the remaining cardiomyocytes and multiple cardiac precursor cell populations and reactivation of ErbB2 expression in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, zECM exhibits pro-proliferative and chemotactic effects on human cardiac precursor cell populations in vitro. These contribute to the structural preservation and correlate with significantly higher cardiac contractile function, notably less left ventricular dilatation, and substantially more elastic myocardium in zECM-treated hearts than control animals treated with saline or decellularized adult mouse cardiac ECM. Inhibition of ErbB2 activity abrogates beneficial effects of zECM administration, indicating the possible involvement of ErbB2 signaling in zECM-mediated regeneration. This study departs from conventional focuses on mammalian ECM and introduces a new approach for cardiac tissue regeneration. PMID:28138518

  13. Cardiac ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Priest, Birgit T; McDermott, Jeff S

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels are critical for all aspects of cardiac function, including rhythmicity and contractility. Consequently, ion channels are key targets for therapeutics aimed at cardiac pathophysiologies such as atrial fibrillation or angina. At the same time, off-target interactions of drugs with cardiac ion channels can be the cause of unwanted side effects. This manuscript aims to review the physiology and pharmacology of key cardiac ion channels. The intent is to highlight recent developments for therapeutic development, as well as elucidate potential mechanisms for drug-induced cardiac side effects, rather than present an in-depth review of each channel subtype. PMID:26556552

  14. Some growth factors stimulate cultured adult rabbit ventricular myocyte hypertrophy in the absence of mechanical loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, R. S.; Cook, M. G.; Behnke-Barclay, M.; Decker, M. L.

    1995-01-01

    Cultured adult rabbit cardiac myocytes treated with recombinant growth factors display enhanced rates of protein accumulation (ie, growth) in response to insulin and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), but epidermal growth factor, acidic or basic fibroblast growth factor, and platelet-derived growth factor failed to increase contractile protein synthesis or growth of the heart cells. Insulin and IGF-1 increased growth rates by stimulating anabolic while simultaneously inhibiting catabolic pathways, whereas IGF-2 elevated growth modestly by apparently inhibiting lysosomal proteolysis. Neutralizing antibodies directed against either IGF-1 or IGF-2 or IGF binding protein 3 blocked protein accumulation. A monoclonal antibody directed against the IGF-1 receptor also inhibited changes in protein turnover provoked by recombinant human IGF-1 but not IGF-2. Of the other growth factors tested, only transforming growth factor-beta 1 increased the fractional rate of myosin heavy chain (MHC) synthesis, with beta-MHC synthesis being elevated and alpha-MHC synthesis being suppressed. However, the other growth factors were able to modestly stimulate the rate of DNA synthesis in this preparation. Bromodeoxyuridine labeling revealed that these growth factors increased DNA synthesis in myocytes and nonmyocytes alike, but the heart cells displayed neither karyokinesis or cytokinesis. In contrast, cocultures of cardiac myocytes and nonmyocytes and nonmyocyte-conditioned culture medium failed to enhance the rate of cardiac MHC synthesis or its accumulation, implying that quiescent heart cells do not respond to "conditioning" by cardiac nonmyocytes. These findings demonstrated that insulin and the IGFs promote passively loaded cultured adult rabbit heart cells to hypertrophy but suggest that other growth factors tested may be limited in this regard.

  15. Cardiac fibrosis and arrhythmogenesis: the road to repair is paved with perils.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thao P; Qu, Zhilin; Weiss, James N

    2014-05-01

    In the healthy heart, cardiac myocytes form an electrical syncytium embedded in a supportive fibroblast-rich extracellular matrix designed to optimize the electromechanical coupling for maximal contractile efficiency of the heart. In the injured heart, however, fibroblasts are activated and differentiate into myofibroblasts that proliferate and generate fibrosis as a component of the wound-healing response. This review discusses how fibroblasts and fibrosis, while essential for maintaining the structural integrity of the heart wall after injury, have undesirable electrophysiological effects by disrupting the normal electrical connectivity of cardiac tissue to increase the vulnerability to arrhythmias. We emphasize the dual contribution of fibrosis in altering source-sink relationships to create a vulnerable substrate while simultaneously facilitating the emergence of triggers such as afterdepolarization-induced premature ventricular complexes-both factors combining synergistically to promote initiation of reentry. We also discuss the potential role of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts in directly altering myocyte electrophysiology in a pro-arrhythmic fashion. Insight into these processes may open up novel therapeutic strategies for preventing and treating arrhythmias in the setting of heart disease as well as avoiding potential arrhythmogenic consequences of cell-based cardiac regeneration therapy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Myocyte-Fibroblast Signaling in Myocardium."

  16. Cell motility and local viscoelasticity of fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Park, S; Koch, D; Cardenas, R; Käs, J; Shih, C K

    2005-12-01

    Viscoelastic changes of the lamellipodial actin cytoskeleton are a fundamental element of cell motility. Thus, the correlation between the local viscoelastic properties of the lamellipodium (including the transitional region to the cell body) and the speed of lamellipodial extension is studied for normal and malignantly transformed fibroblasts. Using our atomic force microscopy-based microrheology technique, we found different mechanical properties between the lamellipodia of malignantly transformed fibroblasts (H-ras transformed and SV-T2 fibroblasts) and normal fibroblasts (BALB 3T3 fibroblasts). The average elastic constants, K, in the leading edge of SV-T2 fibroblasts (0.48 +/- 0.51 kPa) and of H-ras transformed fibroblasts (0.42 +/- 0.35 kPa) are significantly lower than that of BALB 3T3 fibroblasts (1.01 +/- 0.40 kPa). The analysis of time-lapse phase contrast images shows that the decrease in the elastic constant, K, for malignantly transformed fibroblasts is correlated with the enhanced motility of the lamellipodium. The measured mean speeds are 6.1 +/- 4.5 microm/h for BALB 3T3 fibroblasts, 13.1 +/- 5.2 microm/h for SV-T2 fibroblasts, and 26.2 +/- 11.5 microm/h for H-ras fibroblasts. Furthermore, the elastic constant, K, increases toward the cell body in many instances which coincide with an increase in actin filament density toward the cell body. The correlation between the enhanced motility and the decrease in viscoelastic moduli supports the Elastic Brownian Ratchet model for driving lamellipodia extension.

  17. Controlled Cardiac Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenglin; Liu, Ying; Wang, Ge

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) has been a hot topic for years because of the clinical importance of cardiac diseases and the rapid evolution of CT systems. In this paper, we propose a novel strategy for controlled cardiac CT that may effectively reduce image artifacts due to cardiac and respiratory motions. Our approach is radically different from existing ones and is based on controlling the X-ray source rotation velocity and powering status in reference to the cardiac motion. We theoretically show that by such a control-based intervention the data acquisition process can be optimized for cardiac CT in the cases of periodic and quasiperiodic cardiac motions. Specifically, we formulate the corresponding coordination/control schemes for either exact or approximate matches between the ideal and actual source positions, and report representative simulation results that support our analytic findings. PMID:23165017

  18. The Fibroblast Growth Factor signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ornitz, David M; Itoh, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The signaling component of the mammalian Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) family is comprised of eighteen secreted proteins that interact with four signaling tyrosine kinase FGF receptors (FGFRs). Interaction of FGF ligands with their signaling receptors is regulated by protein or proteoglycan cofactors and by extracellular binding proteins. Activated FGFRs phosphorylate specific tyrosine residues that mediate interaction with cytosolic adaptor proteins and the RAS-MAPK, PI3K-AKT, PLCγ, and STAT intracellular signaling pathways. Four structurally related intracellular non-signaling FGFs interact with and regulate the family of voltage gated sodium channels. Members of the FGF family function in the earliest stages of embryonic development and during organogenesis to maintain progenitor cells and mediate their growth, differentiation, survival, and patterning. FGFs also have roles in adult tissues where they mediate metabolic functions, tissue repair, and regeneration, often by reactivating developmental signaling pathways. Consistent with the presence of FGFs in almost all tissues and organs, aberrant activity of the pathway is associated with developmental defects that disrupt organogenesis, impair the response to injury, and result in metabolic disorders, and cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25772309

  19. The immune system and cardiac repair

    PubMed Central

    Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G.

    2008-01-01

    Myocardial infarction is the most common cause of cardiac injury and results in acute loss of a large number of myocardial cells. Because the heart has negligible regenerative capacity, cardiomyocyte death triggers a reparative response that ultimately results in formation of a scar and is associated with dilative remodeling of the ventricle. Cardiac injury activates innate immune mechanisms initiating an inflammatory reaction. Toll Like Receptor-mediated pathways, the complement cascade and reactive oxygen generation induce Nuclear Factor (NF)-κB activation and upregulate chemokine and cytokine synthesis in the infarcted heart. Chemokines stimulate the chemotactic recruitment of inflammatory leukocytes into the infarct, while cytokines promote adhesive interactions between leukocytes and endothelial cells, resulting in transmigration of inflammatory cells into the site of injury. Monocyte subsets play distinct roles in phagocytosis of dead cardiomyocytes and in granulation tissue formation through the release of growth factors. Clearance of dead cells and matrix debris may be essential for resolution of inflammation and transition into the reparative phase. Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-β plays a crucial role in cardiac repair by suppressing inflammation while promoting myofibroblast phenotypic modulation and extracellular matrix deposition. Myofibroblast proliferation and angiogenesis result in formation of highly vascularized granulation tissue. As the healing infarct matures, fibroblasts become apoptotic and a collagen-based matrix is formed, while many infarct neovessels acquire a muscular coat and uncoated vessels regress. Timely resolution of the inflammatory infiltrate and spatial containment of the inflammatory and reparative response into the infarcted area are essential for optimal infarct healing. Targeting inflammatory pathways following infarction may reduce cardiomyocyte injury and attenuate adverse remodeling. In addition, understanding the

  20. Gastrointestinal Fibroblasts Have Specialized, Diverse Transcriptional Phenotypes: A Comprehensive Gene Expression Analysis of Human Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Genichiro; Aoyagi, Kazuhiko; Sasaki, Hiroki; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Background Fibroblasts are the principal stromal cells that exist in whole organs and play vital roles in many biological processes. Although the functional diversity of fibroblasts has been estimated, a comprehensive analysis of fibroblasts from the whole body has not been performed and their transcriptional diversity has not been sufficiently explored. The aim of this study was to elucidate the transcriptional diversity of human fibroblasts within the whole body. Methods Global gene expression analysis was performed on 63 human primary fibroblasts from 13 organs. Of these, 32 fibroblasts from gastrointestinal organs (gastrointestinal fibroblasts: GIFs) were obtained from a pair of 2 anatomical sites: the submucosal layer (submucosal fibroblasts: SMFs) and the subperitoneal layer (subperitoneal fibroblasts: SPFs). Using hierarchical clustering analysis, we elucidated identifiable subgroups of fibroblasts and analyzed the transcriptional character of each subgroup. Results In unsupervised clustering, 2 major clusters that separate GIFs and non-GIFs were observed. Organ- and anatomical site-dependent clusters within GIFs were also observed. The signature genes that discriminated GIFs from non-GIFs, SMFs from SPFs, and the fibroblasts of one organ from another organ consisted of genes associated with transcriptional regulation, signaling ligands, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Conclusions GIFs are characteristic fibroblasts with specific gene expressions from transcriptional regulation, signaling ligands, and extracellular matrix remodeling related genes. In addition, the anatomical site- and organ-dependent diversity of GIFs was also discovered. These features of GIFs contribute to their specific physiological function and homeostatic maintenance, and create a functional diversity of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26046848

  1. Computing effective dose in cardiac CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda, Walter; Tipnis, Sameer; Sterzik, Alexander; Schoepf, U. Joseph

    2010-07-01

    We present a method of estimating effective doses in cardiac CT that accounts for selected techniques (kV mAs-1), anatomical location of the scan and patient size. A CT dosimetry spreadsheet (ImPACT CT Patient Dosimetry Calculator) was used to estimate effective doses (E) using ICRP 103 weighting factors for a 70 kg patient undergoing cardiac CT examinations. Using dose length product (DLP) for the same scans, we obtained values of E/DLP for three CT scanners used in cardiac imaging from two vendors. E/DLP ratios were obtained as a function of the anatomical location in the chest and for x-ray tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kV. We also computed the ratio of the average absorbed dose in a water cylinder modeling a patient weighing W kg to the corresponding average absorbed dose in a water cylinder equivalent to a 70 kg patient. The average E/DLP for a 16 cm cardiac heart CT scan was 26 µSv (mGy cm)-1, which is about 70% higher than the current E/DLP values used for chest CT scans (i.e. 14-17 µSv (mGy cm)-1). Our cardiac E/DLP ratios are higher because the cardiac region is ~30% more radiosensitive than the chest, and use of the ICRP 103 tissue weighting factors increases cardiac CT effective doses by ~30%. Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV increases the E/DLP conversion factor for cardiac CT by 17%. For the same incident radiation at 120 kV, doses in 45 kg adults were ~22% higher than those in 70 kg adults, whereas doses in 120 kg adults were ~28% lower. Accurate estimates of the patient effective dose in cardiac CT should use ICRP 103 tissue weighting factors, and account for a choice of scan techniques (kV mAs-1), exposed scan region, as well as patient size.

  2. Connective tissue growth factor induces cardiac hypertrophy through Akt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Hayata, Nozomi; Fujio, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Iwakura, Tomohiko; Obana, Masanori; Takai, Mika; Mohri, Tomomi; Nonen, Shinpei; Maeda, Makiko; Azuma, Junichi

    2008-05-30

    In the process of cardiac remodeling, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) is secreted from cardiac myocytes. Though CTGF is well known to promote fibroblast proliferation, its pathophysiological effects in cardiac myocytes remain to be elucidated. In this study, we examined the biological effects of CTGF in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. Cardiac myocytes stimulated with full length CTGF and its C-terminal region peptide showed the increase in cell surface area. Similar to hypertrophic ligands for G-protein coupled receptors, such as endothelin-1, CTGF activated amino acid uptake; however, CTGF-induced hypertrophy is not associated with the increased expression of skeletal actin or BNP, analyzed by Northern-blotting. CTGF treatment activated ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, JNK and Akt. The inhibition of Akt by transducing dominant-negative Akt abrogated CTGF-mediated increase in cell size, while the inhibition of MAP kinases did not affect the cardiac hypertrophy. These findings indicate that CTGF is a novel hypertrophic factor in cardiac myocytes.

  3. Generation of cardiac pacemaker cells by programming and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Husse, Britta; Franz, Wolfgang-Michael

    2016-07-01

    A number of diseases are caused by faulty function of the cardiac pacemaker and described as "sick sinus syndrome". The medical treatment of sick sinus syndrome with electrical pacemaker implants in the diseased heart includes risks. These problems may be overcome via "biological pacemaker" derived from different adult cardiac cells or pluripotent stem cells. The generation of cardiac pacemaker cells requires the understanding of the pacing automaticity. Two characteristic phenomena the "membrane-clock" and the "Ca(2+)-clock" are responsible for the modulation of the pacemaker activity. Processes in the "membrane-clock" generating the spontaneous pacemaker firing are based on the voltage-sensitive membrane ion channel activity starting with slow diastolic depolarization and discharging in the action potential. The influence of the intracellular Ca(2+) modulating the pacemaker activity is characterized by the "Ca(2+)-clock". The generation of pacemaker cells started with the reprogramming of adult cardiac cells by targeted induction of one pacemaker function like HCN1-4 overexpression and enclosed in an activation of single pacemaker specific transcription factors. Reprogramming of adult cardiac cells with the transcription factor Tbx18 created cardiac cells with characteristic features of cardiac pacemaker cells. Another key transcription factor is Tbx3 specifically expressed in the cardiac conduction system including the sinoatrial node and sufficient for the induction of the cardiac pacemaker gene program. For a successful cell therapeutic practice, the generated cells should have all regulating mechanisms of cardiac pacemaker cells. Otherwise, the generated pacemaker cells serve only as investigating model for the fundamental research or as drug testing model for new antiarrhythmics. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  4. Oleandrin: A cardiac glycosides with potent cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arvind; De, Tanmoy; Mishra, Amrita; Mishra, Arun K.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac glycosides are used in the treatment of congestive heart failure and arrhythmia. Current trend shows use of some cardiac glycosides in the treatment of proliferative diseases, which includes cancer. Nerium oleander L. is an important Chinese folk medicine having well proven cardio protective and cytotoxic effect. Oleandrin (a toxic cardiac glycoside of N. oleander L.) inhibits the activity of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B chain (NF-κB) in various cultured cell lines (U937, CaOV3, human epithelial cells and T cells) as well as it induces programmed cell death in PC3 cell line culture. The mechanism of action includes improved cellular export of fibroblast growth factor-2, induction of apoptosis through Fas gene expression in tumor cells, formation of superoxide radicals that cause tumor cell injury through mitochondrial disruption, inhibition of interleukin-8 that mediates tumorigenesis and induction of tumor cell autophagy. The present review focuses the applicability of oleandrin in cancer treatment and concerned future perspective in the area. PMID:24347921

  5. Glucose metabolism and cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kolwicz, Stephen C.; Tian, Rong

    2011-01-01

    The most notable change in the metabolic profile of hypertrophied hearts is an increased reliance on glucose with an overall reduced oxidative metabolism, i.e. a reappearance of the foetal metabolic pattern. In animal models, this change is attributed to the down-regulation of the transcriptional cascades promoting gene expression for fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in adult hearts. Impaired myocardial energetics in cardiac hypertrophy also triggers AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), leading to increased glucose uptake and glycolysis. Aside from increased reliance on glucose as an energy source, changes in other glucose metabolism pathways, e.g. the pentose phosphate pathway, the glucosamine biosynthesis pathway, and anaplerosis, are also noted in the hypertrophied hearts. Studies using transgenic mouse models and pharmacological compounds to mimic or counter the switch of substrate preference in cardiac hypertrophy have demonstrated that increased glucose metabolism in adult heart is not harmful and can be beneficial when it provides sufficient fuel for oxidative metabolism. However, improvement in the oxidative capacity and efficiency rather than the selection of the substrate is likely the ultimate goal for metabolic therapies. PMID:21502371

  6. Generation of Functional Human Cardiac Progenitor Cells by High-Efficiency Protein Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Hong; Li, Qianqian; Jiang, Lin; Deng, Chunyu; Liu, Zaiyi; Fu, Yongheng; Zhang, Mengzhen; Tan, Honghong; Feng, Yuliang; Shan, Zhixin

    2015-01-01

    The reprogramming of fibroblasts to induced pluripotent stem cells raises the possibility that somatic cells could be directly reprogrammed to cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs). The present study aimed to assess highly efficient protein-based approaches to reduce or eliminate the genetic manipulations to generate CPCs for cardiac regeneration therapy. A combination of QQ-reagent-modified Gata4, Hand2, Mef2c, and Tbx5 and three cytokines rapidly and efficiently reprogrammed human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) into CPCs. This reprogramming process enriched trimethylated histone H3 lysine 4, monoacetylated histone H3 lysine 9, and Baf60c at the Nkx2.5 cardiac enhancer region by the chromatin immunoprecipitation quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay. Protein-induced CPCs transplanted into rat hearts after myocardial infarction improved cardiac function, and this was related to differentiation into cardiomyocyte-like cells. These findings demonstrate that the highly efficient protein-transduction method can directly reprogram HDFs into CPCs. This protein reprogramming strategy lays the foundation for future refinements both in vitro and in vivo and might provide a source of CPCs for regenerative approaches. Significance The findings from the present study have demonstrated an efficient protein-transduction method of directly reprogramming fibroblasts into cardiac progenitor cells. These results have great potential in cell-based therapy for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26564862

  7. Strategies for heart regeneration: approaches ranging from induced pluripotent stem cells to direct cardiac reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Yamakawa, Hiroyuki; Ieda, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains a leading cause of death for which current therapeutic regimens are limited. Following myocardial injury, endogenous cardiac fibroblasts, which account for more than half of the cells in the heart, proliferate and synthesize extracellular matrix, leading to fibrosis and heart failure. As terminally differentiated cardiomyocytes have little regenerative capacity following injury, development of cardiac regenerative therapy is highly desired. Embryonic stem (ES) and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are promising tools for regenerative medicine; however, these stem cells demonstrate variable cardiac differentiation efficiency and tumorigenicity, which should be solved for clinical applications. Up until the last decade, it was an established theory that cardiomyocytes could only be produced from fibroblasts mediating through stem cells. However, in 2010, we reported for the first time a novel method of the direct reprogramming of fibroblasts into cardiomyocytes, demonstrating various reprogramming pathways exist. This review summarizes the latest trends in stem cell and regenerative research, touching upon iPS cells, partial reprogramming strategy, and direct cardiac reprogramming. Specifically, we examine the many recent advances in both in vitro and in vivo direct cardiac reprogramming, and explore the application of these methods to cardiovascular regenerative medicine.

  8. Targeting LOXL2 for cardiac interstitial fibrosis and heart failure treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jin; Savvatis, Konstantinos; Kang, Jong Seok; Fan, Peidong; Zhong, Hongyan; Schwartz, Karen; Barry, Vivian; Mikels-Vigdal, Amanda; Karpinski, Serge; Kornyeyev, Dmytro; Adamkewicz, Joanne; Feng, Xuhui; Zhou, Qiong; Shang, Ching; Kumar, Praveen; Phan, Dillon; Kasner, Mario; López, Begoña; Diez, Javier; Wright, Keith C.; Kovacs, Roxanne L.; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Quertermous, Thomas; Smith, Victoria; Yao, Lina; Tschöpe, Carsten; Chang, Ching-Pin

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial fibrosis plays a key role in the development and progression of heart failure. Here, we show that an enzyme that crosslinks collagen—Lysyl oxidase-like 2 (Loxl2)—is essential for interstitial fibrosis and mechanical dysfunction of pathologically stressed hearts. In mice, cardiac stress activates fibroblasts to express and secrete Loxl2 into the interstitium, triggering fibrosis, systolic and diastolic dysfunction of stressed hearts. Antibody-mediated inhibition or genetic disruption of Loxl2 greatly reduces stress-induced cardiac fibrosis and chamber dilatation, improving systolic and diastolic functions. Loxl2 stimulates cardiac fibroblasts through PI3K/AKT to produce TGF-β2, promoting fibroblast-to-myofibroblast transformation; Loxl2 also acts downstream of TGF-β2 to stimulate myofibroblast migration. In diseased human hearts, LOXL2 is upregulated in cardiac interstitium; its levels correlate with collagen crosslinking and cardiac dysfunction. LOXL2 is also elevated in the serum of heart failure (HF) patients, correlating with other HF biomarkers, suggesting a conserved LOXL2-mediated mechanism of human HF. PMID:27966531

  9. TRPC3-GEF-H1 axis mediates pressure overload-induced cardiac fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Numaga-Tomita, Takuro; Kitajima, Naoyuki; Kuroda, Takuya; Nishimura, Akiyuki; Miyano, Kei; Yasuda, Satoshi; Kuwahara, Koichiro; Sato, Yoji; Ide, Tomomi; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Sumimoto, Hideki; Mori, Yasuo; Nishida, Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    Structural cardiac remodeling, accompanying cytoskeletal reorganization of cardiac cells, is a major clinical outcome of diastolic heart failure. A highly local Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane has been suggested to code signals to induce Rho GTPase-mediated fibrosis, but it is obscure how the heart specifically decodes the local Ca2+ influx as a cytoskeletal reorganizing signal under the conditions of the rhythmic Ca2+ handling required for pump function. We found that an inhibition of transient receptor potential canonical 3 (TRPC3) channel activity exhibited resistance to Rho-mediated maladaptive fibrosis in pressure-overloaded mouse hearts. Proteomic analysis revealed that microtubule-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor, GEF-H1, participates in TRPC3-mediated RhoA activation induced by mechanical stress in cardiomyocytes and transforming growth factor (TGF) β stimulation in cardiac fibroblasts. We previously revealed that TRPC3 functionally interacts with microtubule-associated NADPH oxidase (Nox) 2, and inhibition of Nox2 attenuated mechanical stretch-induced GEF-H1 activation in cardiomyocytes. Finally, pharmacological TRPC3 inhibition significantly suppressed fibrotic responses in human cardiomyocytes and cardiac fibroblasts. These results strongly suggest that microtubule-localized TRPC3-GEF-H1 axis mediates fibrotic responses commonly in cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts induced by physico-chemical stimulation. PMID:27991560

  10. A systemic Pasteurella multocida toxin aggravates cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Weise, Markus; Vettel, Christiane; Spiger, Katharina; Gilsbach, Ralf; Hein, Lutz; Lorenz, Kristina; Wieland, Thomas; Aktories, Klaus; Orth, Joachim H C

    2015-09-01

    Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) persistently activates heterotrimeric G proteins of the Gαq/11 , Gα12/13 and Gαi family without interaction with G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). We show that PMT acts on heart tissue in vivo and on cardiomyocytes and cardiac fibroblasts in vitro by deamidation of heterotrimeric G proteins. Increased normalized ventricle weights and fibrosis were detected after intraperitoneal administration of PMT in combination with the GPCR agonist phenylephrine. In neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, PMT stimulated the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, which is crucial for the development of cellular hypertrophy. The toxin induced phosphorylation of the canonical phosphorylation sites of the extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 and, additionally, caused phosphorylation of the recently recognized autophosphorylation site, which appears to be important for the development of cellular hypertrophy. Moreover, PMT stimulated the small GTPases Rac1 and RhoA. Both switch proteins are involved in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. In addition, PMT stimulated RhoA and Rac1 in neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts. RhoA and Rac1 have been implicated in the regulation of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) secretion and expression. Accordingly, we show that PMT treatment increased secretion and expression of CTGF in cardiac fibroblasts. Altogether, the data indicate that PMT is an inducer of pathological remodelling of cardiac cells and identifies the toxin as a promising tool for studying heterotrimeric G protein-dependent signalling in cardiac cells.

  11. Role of human pulp fibroblasts in angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tran-Hung, L; Mathieu, S; About, I

    2006-09-01

    After pulp amputation, complete pulp healing requires not only reparative dentin production but also fibroblast proliferation, nerve fiber growth, and neoangiogenesis. This study was designed to investigate the role of pulp fibroblasts in angiogenesis. Human pulp fibroblasts from third molars co-cultured with human umbilical vein endothelial cells induced the organization of endothelial cells and the formation of tubular structures corresponding to capillaries in vivo. The direct contact between both cells was not necessary to induce angiogenesis, and the observed effect was due to soluble factors. This was confirmed with neutralizing antibodies against FGF-2 and VEGF, which decreased the angiogenic effects of these soluble factors. Immunohistochemistry showed that both FGF-2 and VEGF were expressed in human dental pulp fibroblasts, and this expression increased after injury. These results suggest that the pulp fibroblasts secrete angiogenic factors, which are necessary for complete pulp healing, particularly at the pulp injury site.

  12. "Young at heart": Regenerative potential linked to immature cardiac phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Renata S M; Skroblin, Philipp; Munster, Alex B; Tomlins, Hannah; Langley, Sarah R; Zampetaki, Anna; Yin, Xiaoke; Wardle, Fiona C; Mayr, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    The adult human myocardium is incapable of regeneration; yet, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) can regenerate damaged myocardium. Similar to the zebrafish heart, hearts of neonatal, but not adult mice are capable of myocardial regeneration. We performed a proteomics analysis of adult zebrafish hearts and compared their protein expression profile to hearts from neonatal and adult mice. Using difference in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE), there was little overlap between the proteome from adult mouse (>8weeks old) and adult zebrafish (18months old) hearts. Similarly, there was a significant degree of mismatch between the protein expression in neonatal and adult mouse hearts. Enrichment analysis of the selected proteins revealed over-expression of DNA synthesis-related proteins in the cardiac proteome of the adult zebrafish heart similar to neonatal and 4days old mice, whereas in hearts of adult mice there was a mitochondria-related predominance in protein expression. Importantly, we noted pronounced differences in the myofilament composition: the adult zebrafish heart lacks many of the myofilament proteins of differentiated adult cardiomyocytes such as the ventricular isoforms of myosin light chains and nebulette. Instead, troponin I and myozenin 1 were expressed as skeletal isoforms rather than cardiac isoforms. The relative immaturity of the adult zebrafish heart was further supported by cardiac microRNA data. Our assessment of zebrafish and mammalian hearts challenges the assertions on the translational potential of cardiac regeneration in the zebrafish model. The immature myofilament composition of the fish heart may explain why adult mouse and human cardiomyocytes lack this endogenous repair mechanism.

  13. The effect of valinomycin in fibroblasts from patients with fatty acid oxidation disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Ndukwe Erlingsson, Uzochi Chimdinma; Iacobazzi, Francesco; Liu, Aiping; Ardon, Orly; Pasquali, Marzia; Longo, Nicola

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •Valinomycin can cause mitochondrial stress and stimulate fatty acid oxidation. •Cells with VLCAD deficiency fail to increase fatty acid oxidation in response to valinomycin. •Response to valinomycin can help in the diagnosis of VLCAD deficiency. -- Abstract: Disorders of the carnitine cycle and of the beta oxidation spiral impair the ability to obtain energy from fats at time of fasting and stress. This can result in hypoketotic hypoglycemia, cardiomyopathy, cardiac arrhythmia and other chronic medical problems. The in vitro study of fibroblasts from patients with these conditions is impaired by their limited oxidative capacity. Here we evaluate the capacity of valinomycin, a potassium ionophore that increases mitochondrial respiration, to increase the oxidation of fatty acids in cells from patients with inherited fatty acid oxidation defects. The addition of valinomycin to fibroblasts decreased the accumulation of the lipophilic cation tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP{sup +}) at low concentrations due to the dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential. At higher doses, valinomycin increased TPP{sup +} accumulation due to the increased potassium permeability of the plasma membrane and subsequent cellular hyperpolarization. The incubation of normal fibroblasts with valinomycin increased [{sup 14}C]-palmitate oxidation (measured as [{sup 14}C]O{sub 2} release) in a dose-dependent manner. By contrast, valinomycin failed to increase palmitate oxidation in fibroblasts from patients with very long chain acyl CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency. This was not observed in fibroblasts from patients heterozygous for this condition. These results indicate that valinomycin can increase fatty acid oxidation in normal fibroblasts and could be useful to differentiate heterozygotes from patients affected with VLCAD deficiency.

  14. A decade of discoveries in cardiac biology.

    PubMed

    Olson, Eric N

    2004-05-01

    The heart is the first organ to form in the embryo, and all subsequent events in the life of the organism depend on its function. Inherited mutations in cardiac regulatory genes give rise to congenital heart disease, the most common form of human birth defects, and abnormalities of the adult heart represent the most prevalent cause of morbidity and mortality in the industrialized world. The past decade has marked a transition from physiological and functional studies of the heart toward a deeper understanding of cardiac function (and dysfunction) at genetic and molecular levels. These discoveries have provided new therapeutic approaches for prevention and palliation of cardiac disease and have raised new questions, challenges and opportunities for the future.

  15. Gallic acid prevents isoproterenol-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis through regulation of JNK2 signaling and Smad3 binding activity

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Yuhee; Jin, Li; Kee, Hae Jin; Piao, Zhe Hao; Cho, Jae Yeong; Kim, Gwi Ran; Choi, Sin Young; Lin, Ming Quan; Jeong, Myung Ho

    2016-01-01

    Gallic acid, a type of phenolic acid, has been shown to have beneficial effects in inflammation, vascular calcification, and metabolic diseases. The present study was aimed at determining the effect and regulatory mechanism of gallic acid in cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. Cardiac hypertrophy was induced by isoproterenol (ISP) in mice and primary neonatal cardiomyocytes. Gallic acid pretreatment attenuated concentric cardiac hypertrophy. It downregulated the expression of atrial natriuretic peptide, brain natriuretic peptide, and beta-myosin heavy chain in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, it prevented interstitial collagen deposition and expression of fibrosis-associated genes. Upregulation of collagen type I by Smad3 overexpression was observed in cardiac myoblast H9c2 cells but not in cardiac fibroblasts. Gallic acid reduced the DNA binding activity of phosphorylated Smad3 in Smad binding sites of collagen type I promoter in rat cardiac fibroblasts. Furthermore, it decreased the ISP-induced phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) protein in mice. JNK2 overexpression reduced collagen type I and Smad3 expression as well as GATA4 expression in H9c2 cells and cardiac fibroblasts. Gallic acid might be a novel therapeutic agent for the prevention of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis by regulating the JNK2 and Smad3 signaling pathway. PMID:27703224

  16. p53 regulates the cardiac transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Tak W.; Hauck, Ludger; Grothe, Daniela; Billia, Filio

    2017-01-01

    The tumor suppressor Trp53 (p53) inhibits cell growth after acute stress by regulating gene transcription. The mammalian genome contains hundreds of p53-binding sites. However, whether p53 participates in the regulation of cardiac tissue homeostasis under normal conditions is not known. To examine the physiologic role of p53 in adult cardiomyocytes in vivo, Cre-loxP–mediated conditional gene targeting in adult mice was used. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses of conditional heart-specific p53 knockout mice were performed. Genome-wide annotation and pathway analyses of >5,000 differentially expressed transcripts identified many p53-regulated gene clusters. Correlative analyses identified >20 gene sets containing more than 1,000 genes relevant to cardiac architecture and function. These transcriptomic changes orchestrate cardiac architecture, excitation-contraction coupling, mitochondrial biogenesis, and oxidative phosphorylation capacity. Interestingly, the gene expression signature in p53-deficient hearts confers resistance to acute biomechanical stress. The data presented here demonstrate a role for p53, a previously unrecognized master regulator of the cardiac transcriptome. The complex contributions of p53 define a biological paradigm for the p53 regulator network in the heart under physiological conditions. PMID:28193895

  17. Clinical cardiac regenerative studies in children

    PubMed Central

    Pavo, Imre J; Michel-Behnke, Ina

    2017-01-01

    Although the incidence of pediatric heart failure is low, the mortality is relatively high, with severe clinical symptoms requiring repeated hospitalization or intensive care treatment in the surviving patients. Cardiac biopsy specimens have revealed a higher number of resident human cardiac progenitor cells, with greater proliferation and differentiation capacity, in the neonatal period as compared with adults, demonstrating the regeneration potential of the young heart, with rising interest in cardiac regeneration therapy in critically ill pediatric patients. We review here the available literature data, searching the MEDLINE, Google Scholar and EMBASE database for completed, and www.clinicaltrials.gov homepage for ongoing studies involving pediatric cardiac regeneration reports. Because of difficulties conducting randomized blinded clinical trials in pediatric patients, mostly case reports or cohort studies with a limited number of individuals have been published in the field of pediatric regenerative cardiology. The majority of pediatric autologous cell transplantations into the cardiac tissue have been performed in critically ill children with severe or terminal heart failure. Congenital heart disease, myocarditis, and idiopathic hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy leading to congestive heart failure are some possible areas of interest for pediatric cardiac regeneration therapy. Autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells, progenitor cells, or cardiospheres have been applied either intracoronary or percutaneously intramyocardially in severely ill children, leading to a reported clinical benefit of cell-based cardiac therapies. In conclusion, compassionate use of autologous stem cell administration has led to at least short-term improvement in heart function and clinical stability in the majority of the critically ill pediatric patients. PMID:28289528

  18. Clinical cardiac regenerative studies in children.

    PubMed

    Pavo, Imre J; Michel-Behnke, Ina

    2017-02-26

    Although the incidence of pediatric heart failure is low, the mortality is relatively high, with severe clinical symptoms requiring repeated hospitalization or intensive care treatment in the surviving patients. Cardiac biopsy specimens have revealed a higher number of resident human cardiac progenitor cells, with greater proliferation and differentiation capacity, in the neonatal period as compared with adults, demonstrating the regeneration potential of the young heart, with rising interest in cardiac regeneration therapy in critically ill pediatric patients. We review here the available literature data, searching the MEDLINE, Google Scholar and EMBASE database for completed, and www.clinicaltrials.gov homepage for ongoing studies involving pediatric cardiac regeneration reports. Because of difficulties conducting randomized blinded clinical trials in pediatric patients, mostly case reports or cohort studies with a limited number of individuals have been published in the field of pediatric regenerative cardiology. The majority of pediatric autologous cell transplantations into the cardiac tissue have been performed in critically ill children with severe or terminal heart failure. Congenital heart disease, myocarditis, and idiopathic hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy leading to congestive heart failure are some possible areas of interest for pediatric cardiac regeneration therapy. Autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells, progenitor cells, or cardiospheres have been applied either intracoronary or percutaneously intramyocardially in severely ill children, leading to a reported clinical benefit of cell-based cardiac therapies. In conclusion, compassionate use of autologous stem cell administration has led to at least short-term improvement in heart function and clinical stability in the majority of the critically ill pediatric patients.

  19. Large cardiac fibroma and teratoma in children- case reports.

    PubMed

    Jha, Neerod Kumar; Kiraly, Laszlo; Tamas, Csaba; Talo, Haitham; Khan, Mohammad Daud; El Badaoui, Hazem; Jain, Anurag; Hammad, Azzam

    2015-03-22

    Primary cardiac tumours in paediatric population are an unusual occurrence. Although, majority of such tumours are benign (90%), the frequency and type of cardiac tumours in this age group is different from the adult population. There are several consecutive series published in the last decade on cardiac neoplasms. Therefore, this is not only an effort to contribute to the existing literature for better understanding and management of similar patients but also to highlight the importance of early detection either by prenatal imaging or careful evaluation of differential diagnosis of common symptoms. We herein, describe two infants with large cardiac tumours (fibroma and teratoma) both arising from the interventricular septum and underwent surgical excision. A possible role of cardiac remodeling in myocardial tissue healing after extensive tissue resection in such patients is hypothesised through available experimental or limited clinical information.

  20. Automated cardiac sarcomere analysis from second harmonic generation images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Canadilla, Patricia; Gonzalez-Tendero, Anna; Iruretagoyena, Igor; Crispi, Fatima; Torre, Iratxe; Amat-Roldan, Ivan; Bijnens, Bart H.; Gratacos, Eduard

    2014-05-01

    Automatic quantification of cardiac muscle properties in tissue sections might provide important information related to different types of diseases. Second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging provides a stain-free microscopy approach to image cardiac fibers that, combined with our methodology of the automated measurement of the ultrastructure of muscle fibers, computes a reliable set of quantitative image features (sarcomere length, A-band length, thick-thin interaction length, and fiber orientation). We evaluated the performance of our methodology in computer-generated muscle fibers modeling some artifacts that are present during the image acquisition. Then, we also evaluated it by comparing it to manual measurements in SHG images from cardiac tissue of fetal and adult rabbits. The results showed a good performance of our methodology at high signal-to-noise ratio of 20 dB. We conclude that our automated measurements enable reliable characterization of cardiac fiber tissues to systematically study cardiac tissue in a wide range of conditions.

  1. Fibroblast migration in fibrin gel matrices.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, L. F.; Lanir, N.; McDonagh, J.; Tognazzi, K.; Dvorak, A. M.; Dvorak, H. F.

    1993-01-01

    In healing wounds and many solid tumors, locally increased microvascular permeability results in extravasation of fibrinogen and its extravascular coagulation to form a fibrin gel, with concomitant covalent cross-linking of fibrin by factor XIIIa. Subsequently, inflammatory cells, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells migrate into the gel and organize it into granulation tissue and later into mature collagenous connective tissue. To gain insight into some of the cell migration events associated with these processes, we developed a quantitative in vitro assay that permits the study of fibroblast migration in fibrin gels. Early passage human or rat fibroblasts were allowed to attach to tissue culture dishes and then were overlaid with a thin layer of fibrinogen that was clotted with thrombin. Fibroblasts began to migrate upwards into the fibrin within 24 hours and their numbers and the distance migrated were quantified over several days. The extent of fibroblast migration was affected importantly by the nature of the fibrin clot. Fibroblasts migrated optimally into gels prepared from fibrinogen at concentrations of -3 mg/ml; ie, near normal plasma fibrinogen levels. Migration was greatly enhanced by extensive cross-linking of the fibrin alpha-chains by factor XIIIa, as occurs when clotting takes place in vivo. When fibrinogen was clotted in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium, gamma-chains were cross-linked, but alpha-chain cross-linking was strikingly inhibited, and fibroblasts migrated poorly. Gels prepared from factor XIII-depleted fibrinogen exhibited neither alpha-nor gamma-chain cross-linking and did not support fibroblast migration. Further purification of fibrinogen by anion exchange high pressure liquid chromatography depleted fibrinogen of fibronectin, plasminogen, and other impurities; this purified fibrinogen clotted to form fibrin gels that supported reproducible fibroblast migration. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:8424460

  2. Cardiac Hegemony of Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqi, Sailay; Sussman, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac senescence and age-related disease development have gained general attention and recognition in the past decades due to increased accessibility and quality of health care. The advancement in global civilization is complementary to concerns regarding population aging and development of chronic degenerative diseases. Cardiac degeneration has been rigorously studied. The molecular mechanisms of cardiac senescence are on multiple cellular levels and hold a multilayer complexity level, thereby hampering development of unambiguous treatment protocols. In particular, the synergistic exchange of the senescence phenotype through a senescence secretome between myocytes and stem cells appears complicated and is of great future therapeutic value. The current review article will highlight hallmarks of senescence, cardiac myocyte and stem cell senescence, and the mutual exchange of senescent secretome. Future cardiac cell therapy approaches require a comprehensive understanding of myocardial senescence to improve therapeutic efficiency as well as efficacy. PMID:24349878

  3. Pre-transplantation specification of stem cells to cardiac lineage for regeneration of cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Mayorga, Maritza; Finan, Amanda; Penn, Marc

    2009-03-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a lead cause of mortality in the Western world. Treatment of acute MI is focused on restoration of antegrade flow which inhibits further tissue loss, but does not restore function to damaged tissue. Chronic therapy for injured myocardial tissue involves medical therapy that attempts to minimize pathologic remodeling of the heart. End stage therapy for chronic heart failure (CHF) involves inotropic therapy to increase surviving cardiac myocyte function or mechanical augmentation of cardiac performance. Not until the point of heart transplantation, a limited resource at best, does therapy focus on the fundamental problem of needing to replace injured tissue with new contractile tissue. In this setting, the potential for stem cell therapy has garnered significant interest for its potential to regenerate or create new contractile cardiac tissue. While to date adult stem cell therapy in clinical trials has suggested potential benefit, there is waning belief that the approaches used to date lead to regeneration of cardiac tissue. As the literature has better defined the pathways involved in cardiac differentiation, preclinical studies have suggested that stem cell pretreatment to direct stem cell differentiation prior to stem cell transplantation may be a more efficacious strategy for inducing cardiac regeneration. Here we review the available literature on pre-transplantation conditioning of stem cells in an attempt to better understand stem cell behavior and their readiness in cell-based therapy for myocardial regeneration.

  4. Lessons for cardiac regeneration and repair through development.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jeffrey M; Bruneau, Benoit G

    2010-09-01

    Cell-based regenerative strategies have the potential to revolutionize the way cardiovascular injury is treated, but successful therapies will require a precise understanding of the mechanisms that dictate cell fate, survival and differentiation. Recent advances in the study of cardiac development hold promise for unlocking the keys for successful therapies. Using mouse models and embryonic stem cells, researchers are uncovering cardiac progenitor cells in both embryonic and adult contexts. Furthermore, the signaling molecules and transcriptional regulators that govern these cells and their behavior are being revealed. Here, we focus on the recent advances in these areas of cardiac develo