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Sample records for adult celiac patients

  1. Nutritional profile of adult patients with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Abenavoli, L; Delibasic, M; Peta, V; Turkulov, V; De Lorenzo, A; Medić-Stojanoska, M

    2015-11-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic immune-mediated gluten dependent enteropathy induced by ingestion of gluten, characterized by intestinal malabsorption and subtotals or total atrophy of intestinal villi. The predominant consequence of CD in untreated patients, is malnutrition as a result of malabsorption. Moreover, several and increasing extra-intestinal clinical manifestations have been described in the CD patients. Strict adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD) improves nutritional status, inducing an increase in fat and bone compartments, but does not completely normalize body composition and nutritional deficiencies. An early and accurate evaluation of nutritional status can be of the pivotal step in the clinical management of the adult CD patients. The aim of this review is to present the most important and recent data on nutritional and metabolic features in the CD adult patients, the related implications and the effects of the GFD on these conditions.

  2. Long-term consumption of oats in adult celiac disease patients.

    PubMed

    Kaukinen, Katri; Collin, Pekka; Huhtala, Heini; Mäki, Markku

    2013-11-06

    Many celiac disease patients tolerate oats, but limited data are available on its long-term consumption. This was evaluated in the present study, focusing on small-bowel mucosal histology and gastrointestinal symptoms in celiac adults maintaining a strict gluten-free diet with or without oats. Altogether 106 long-term treated celiac adults were enrolled for this cross-sectional follow-up study. Daily consumption of oats and fiber was assessed, and small-bowel mucosal morphology and densities of CD3+, αβ+ and γσ+ intraepithelial lymphocytes determined. Gastrointestinal symptoms were assessed by a validated Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale questionnaire. Seventy (66%) out of the 106 treated celiac disease patients had consumed a median of 20 g of oats (range 1-100 g) per day for up to eight years; all consumed oat products bought from general stores. Daily intake and long-term consumption of oats did not result in small-bowel mucosal villous damage, inflammation, or gastrointestinal symptoms. Oat-consumers had a significantly higher daily intake of fiber than those who did not use oats. Two thirds of celiac disease patients preferred to use oats in their daily diet. Even long-term ingestion of oats had no harmful effects.

  3. Adult Celiac Disease: Patients Are Shorter Compared with Their Peers in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeilzadeh, Abbas; Ganji, Azita; Goshayeshi, Ladan; Ghafarzadegan, Kamran; Afzal Aghayee, Mehdi; Mosanen Mozafari, Homan; Saadatniya, Hassan; Hayatbakhs, Abdolrasol; Ghavami Ghanbarabadi, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Delay in diagnosis of celiac disease (CD) occurs frequently, although its consequences are mostly not known. One of the presented symptoms in pediatric patients with CD is the short stature. However, far too little attention has been paid to physical features including height of adult patients with CD. This study was undertaken to evaluate whether patients suffering from CD are shorter in comparison with the general population without CD. As well, we evaluated probable correlations between demographic and physical features, main complains, serum anti tTG level, and intestinal pathology damage between short (lower quartile) versus tall stature (upper quartile) patients with CD. METHODS This was a retrospective cross-sectional study on 219 adult patients diagnosed as having CD in the Celiac Disease Center, between June 2008 and June 2014 in Mashhad, Iran. The exclusion criteria were ages less than 18 and more than 60 years. Height was compared with a group of 657 age- and sex matched control cases from the healthy population. The probable influencing factors on height such as intestinal pathology, serum level of anti-tissue transglutaminase(anti-tTG), serum vitamin D, and hemoglobin level at the time of diagnosis were assessed and were compared in short (lower quartile) versus tall stature (upper quartile) patients with CD. RESULTS Both male (n=65) and female (n=154) patients with CD were shorter than their counterpart in the general population (males: 168.5±8.6 to 171.3±7.2cm, p <0.01 and females: 154.8±10.58 to 157.8±7.2 cm, p <0.01). Spearman linear correlation showed height in patient with CD was correlated with serum hemoglobin (p <0.001, r=0.285) and bone mineral density (p<0.001) and not with serum vitamin D levels (p =0.024, r=0.237), but was not correlated with anti-tTG serum levels (p=0.97). CD patients with upper and lower quartile of height in men and women had no significant difference in the anti-tTG level and degree of duodenal pathology

  4. Celiac disease in adult patients: specific autoantibodies in the diagnosis, monitoring, and screening.

    PubMed

    Trigoni, Evagelia; Tsirogianni, Alexandra; Pipi, Elena; Mantzaris, Gerassimos; Papasteriades, Chryssa

    2014-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of celiac disease (CD), especially in adults, its atypical clinical presentation, and the strict, lifelong adherence to gluten-free diet (GFD) as the only option for healthy state create an imperative need for noninvasive methods that can effectively diagnose CD and monitor GFD. Aim. Evaluation of anti-endomysium (EmA) and anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA (tTG-A) antibodies in CD diagnosis, GFD monitoring, and first degree relatives screening in CD adult patients. Methods. 70 newly diagnosed Greek adult patients, 70 controls, and 47 first degree relatives were tested for the presence of EmA and tTG-A. The CD patients were monitored during a 3-year period. Results. EmA predictive ability for CD diagnosis was slightly better compared to tTG-A (P = 0.043). EmA could assess compliance with GFD already from the beginning of the diet, while both EmA and tTG-A had an equal ability to discriminate between strictly and partially compliant patients after the first semester and so on. Screening of first degree relatives resulted in the identification of 2 undiagnosed CD cases. Conclusions. Both EmA and tTG-A are suitable markers in the CD diagnosis, in the screening of CD among first degree relatives, having also an equal performance in the long term monitoring.

  5. Metagenomics Reveals Dysbiosis and a Potentially Pathogenic N. flavescens Strain in Duodenum of Adult Celiac Patients

    PubMed Central

    D'Argenio, Valeria; Casaburi, Giorgio; Precone, Vincenza; Pagliuca, Chiara; Colicchio, Roberta; Sarnataro, Daniela; Discepolo, Valentina; Kim, Sangman M; Russo, Ilaria; Del Vecchio Blanco, Giovanna; Horner, David S; Chiara, Matteo; Pesole, Graziano; Salvatore, Paola; Monteleone, Giovanni; Ciacci, Carolina; Caporaso, Gregory J; Jabrì, Bana; Salvatore, Francesco; Sacchetti, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Celiac disease (CD)-associated duodenal dysbiosis has not yet been clearly defined, and the mechanisms by which CD-associated dysbiosis could concur to CD development or exacerbation are unknown. In this study, we analyzed the duodenal microbiome of CD patients. METHODS: The microbiome was evaluated in duodenal biopsy samples of 20 adult patients with active CD, 6 CD patients on a gluten-free diet, and 15 controls by DNA sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA libraries. Bacterial species were cultured, isolated and identified by mass spectrometry. Isolated bacterial species were used to infect CaCo-2 cells, and to stimulate normal duodenal explants and cultured human and murine dendritic cells (DCs). Inflammatory markers and cytokines were evaluated by immunofluorescence and ELISA, respectively. RESULTS: Proteobacteria was the most abundant and Firmicutes and Actinobacteria the least abundant phyla in the microbiome profiles of active CD patients. Members of the Neisseria genus (Betaproteobacteria class) were significantly more abundant in active CD patients than in the other two groups (P=0.03). Neisseria flavescens (CD-Nf) was the most abundant Neisseria species in active CD duodenum. Whole-genome sequencing of CD-Nf and control-Nf showed genetic diversity of the iron acquisition systems and of some hemoglobin-related genes. CD-Nf was able to escape the lysosomal compartment in CaCo-2 cells and to induce an inflammatory response in DCs and in ex-vivo mucosal explants. CONCLUSIONS: Marked dysbiosis and an abundance of a peculiar CD-Nf strain characterize the duodenal microbiome in active CD patients thus suggesting that the CD-associated microbiota could contribute to the many inflammatory signals in this disorder. PMID:27045926

  6. Serological Screening for Celiac Disease in Adult Chinese Patients With Diarrhea Predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongling; Zhou, Guoying; Luo, Linjie; Crusius, J. Bart A.; Yuan, Anlong; Kou, Jiguang; Yang, Guifang; Wang, Min; Wu, Jing; von Blomberg, B. Mary E.; Morré, Servaas A.; Peña, A. Salvador; Xia, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Celiac disease (CD) is common in Caucasians, but thought to be rare in Asians. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of CD in Chinese patients with chronic diarrhea predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D). From July 2010 to August 2012, 395 adult patients with IBS-D and 363 age and sex-matched healthy controls were recruited in Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University and Xiaogan Central Hospital in Hubei province, central China. Patients with IBS-D were diagnosed according to the Rome III criteria. Serum Immunoglobulin (IgA/IgG) anti-human tissue transglutaminase (anti-htTG)-deamidated gliadin peptide (DGP) antibodies were measured in a single ELISA (QUANTA Lite h-tTG/DGP Screen). Upper endoscopy with duodenal biopsies and HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 genotyping were performed in seropositive subjects and a gluten-free diet was prescribed. Seven IBS-D patients (7/395, 1.77%) and 2 healthy controls (2/363, 0.55%), were positive for anti-htTG/DGP antibodies. Of these 9 cases, 1 was lost to follow-up, 3 were suspected to have CD and 5 were eventually diagnosed as CD with intestinal histological lesions classified as Marsh Type II in 2 and Type III in 3. Of these 5 diagnosed CD patients, 4 (4/395, 1.01%) were from the IBS-D group and 1 (1/363, 0.28%) from the healthy control had asymptomatic CD. Two Type III CD patients with relatively high titers in the serologic assay were homozygous and heterozygous for haplotype HLA-DQA1∗03-DQB1∗03:03 (HLA-DQ9.3), respectively. In the present study, CD was present in 1.01% of patients with IBS-D and in 0.28% of the control group. We like to suggest that the haplotype HLA-DQA1∗03-DQB1∗03:03 (HLA-DQ9.3), which is common in Chinese, is a new susceptibility factor for CD in China. Larger screening and genetic studies are needed in the Chinese population of different regions. PMID:26496305

  7. Prevalence of Eating Disorders in Adults with Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Passananti, V.; Siniscalchi, M.; Zingone, F.; Bucci, C.; Tortora, R.; Iovino, P.; Ciacci, C.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Symptoms of celiac disease negatively impact social activities and emotional state. Aim was to investigate the prevalence of altered eating behaviour in celiac patients. Methods. Celiac patients and controls completed a dietary interview and the Binge Eating Staircases, Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2), Eating Attitudes Test, Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale, State Trait Anxiety Inventory Forma Y (STAI-Y1 and STAI-Y2), and Symptom Check List (SCL-90). Results. One hundred celiac adults and 100 controls were not statistically different for gender, age, and physical activity. STAI-Y1 and STAI-Y2, Somatization, Interpersonal, Sensitivity, and Anxiety scores of the SLC-90 were higher in CD patients than controls. EDI-2 was different in pulse thinness, social insecurity, perfectionism, inadequacy, ascetisms, and interpersonal diffidence between CD and HC women, whilst only in interceptive awareness between CD and HC men. A higher EAT-26 score was associated with the CD group dependently with gastrointestinal symptoms. The EAT26 demonstrated association between indices of diet-related disorders in both CD and the feminine gender after controlling for anxiety and depression. Conclusion. CD itself and not gastrointestinal related symptoms or psychological factors may contribute pathological eating behavior in celiac adults. Eating disorders appear to be more frequent in young celiac women than in CD men and in HC. PMID:24369457

  8. Preventing complications in celiac disease: our experience with managing adult celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Mulder, C J; Wierdsma, N J; Berkenpas, M; Jacobs, M A J M; Bouma, G

    2015-06-01

    Celiac disease is, as we know it, rather than being a rare and incurable disease until the 1950's, both quite common in screening studies and readily treatable. Three conditions are triggered by gluten consumption: celiac disease, the skin rash dermatitis herpetiformis and gluten ataxia. We describe our follow up for out clinic management, as evidence based data about such an approach are lacking in current literature. No food, beverages or medications containing any amount of gluten can be taken. Compliance is often difficult especially when patients are asymptomatic. We control a cohort, in daily practice, of over 700 adult patients. The majority of patients manage the diet without any problems. We describe our follow up in general, for serology, laboratory and histology. Forty percent of our newly diagnosed celiac patients do have a BMI over 25 kg/m(2). An appropriate attitude for this problem is lacking. The problem of slowly weaning off Dapsone over 5-10 years in DH is recognized. The bone density is checked in all newly diagnosed celiac patients. We control, if necessary, by telephone and lab controls done in local cities and see our patients only every two years face-to-face for follow up. The main question is if the adherence to a GFD, quality of life and prevention of complications is improved by visiting a dedicated celiac clinic. We hope to standardize this attitude on evidence data in the years to come.

  9. Gluten-free diet normalizes mouth-to-cecum transit of a caloric meal in adult patients with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Chiarioni, G; Bassotti, G; Germani, U; Battaglia, E; Brentegani, M T; Morelli, A; Vantini, I

    1997-10-01

    The mechanisms responsible for bowel disturbances in celiac disease are still relatively unknown. Recent reports suggested that small bowel motor abnormalities may be involved in this pathological condition; however, there are no studies addressing small bowel transit in celiac disease before and after a gluten-free diet. We studied the mouth-to-cecum transit time of a caloric liquid meal in a homogeneous group of celiac patients presenting with clinical and biochemical evidence of malabsorption and complaining of diarrhea. Sixteen patients were recruited and investigated by means of hydrogen breath test through ingestion of 20 g lactulose together with an enteral gluten-free diet formula. A urinary D-xylose test was also done in each patient. Both breath tests and D-xylose tests were carried out basally and after a period of gluten-free diet. Twenty healthy volunteers were recruited as a control group and underwent the same breath testing. At the time of the diagnosis, mouth-to-cecum transit time was significantly prolonged in celiacs with respect to controls (243 +/- 10 vs 117 +/- 6 min, P = 0.0001). The D-xylose test was also abnormal (average urinary concentration 2.8 +/- 0.25 g, normal values >4.5). No correlation was found in patients between mouth-to-cecum transit time and urinary D-xylose output (r = 0.22). After the gluten-free diet period, mouth-to-cecum transit time in celiacs was significantly reduced compared to prediet transit (134 +/- 8 vs 243 +/- 10 min, P = 0.0001) and did not show statistical difference when compared to that found in controls (P = 0.1). The D-xylose test reverted to normal in all but two subjects, who were found to be noncompliant with the diet. Mouth-to-cecum transit time is significantly prolonged in patients affected by untreated celiac disease when compared to healthy controls. This alteration might not be correlated to intestinal malabsorption, and the prolonged orocecal transit could be due to impaired small bowel function

  10. Abnormal gastrointestinal motility in patients with celiac sprue.

    PubMed

    Bassotti, G; Castellucci, G; Betti, C; Fusaro, C; Cavalletti, M L; Bertotto, A; Spinozzi, F; Morelli, A; Pelli, M A

    1994-09-01

    No study to date has objectively investigated whether the motor behavior of the small bowel is abnormal in celiac sprue. The purpose of this study was to systematically address this topic by means of intraluminal pressure recordings in a series of such patients. Sixteen subjects (nine adults, seven children, age range 2-69 years) with celiac sprue were recruited and studied while untreated. Manometric examination was carried out for 6 hr during fasting and 3 hr after a meal. Adult celiac patients displayed a significantly (mean +/- SEM) greater frequency of migrating motor complexes in comparison to controls during fasting (4.44 +/- 1.6 vs 2.45 +/- 0.20, P < 0.01), whereas no differences were found in the pediatric group with respect to this variable. Fasting motor abnormalities, chiefly represented by discrete clustered contractions, giant jejunal contractions, and bursts of nonpropagated contractions, were discovered in a high percentage in both groups of celiac subjects (89% in adults and 44% in children, respectively). Similar abnormalities were observed in the postprandial period, especially in adults. In conclusion, patients with celiac sprue frequently display discrete gastrointestinal motor abnormalities, which though perhaps nonspecific may account for several symptoms complained of by such patients.

  11. Celiac crisis in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and hypogammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Krishna, K; Krishna, S G; Coviello-malle, J M; Yacoub, A; Hutchins, L F

    2011-01-01

    Celiac crisis is an acute, fulminant form of celiac disease manifesting with severe diarrhea, metabolic and electrolyte abnormalities, and weight loss. It is mostly seen in children, and there are very few reports in adults. We present a 67-year-old patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) who presented with weight loss of 40 pounds, severe diarrhea, hypoalbuminemia and hypokalemia. The patient was immunosuppressed with hypogammaglobulinemia, which is common in CLL. Thus, the patient had negative serological studies for celiac disease. An endoscopic evaluation and HLA typing supported the diagnosis of celiac disease. Although the differential diagnosis was broad, exclusion of other etiologies for diarrhea, prompt diagnosis of celiac disease and initiation of gluten-free diet resolved the crisis. This is the first such report of a patient presenting with celiac crisis on a background of hypogammaglobulinemia.

  12. Quinoa Well Tolerated in Patients with Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Quinoa Well Tolerated in Patients with Celiac Disease Quinoa Well Tolerated in Patients with Celiac Disease FOR ... 263-9000 Bethesda, Maryland (January 21, 2014) – Adding quinoa to the gluten-free diet of patients with ...

  13. The role of flow cytometry in celiac disease screening using human leukocyte antigen in adult patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Arregui, Miren Vicuña; Urmeneta, Jose Manuel Zozaya; Brito, Helena León; De Esteban, Juan Pablo Martínez; Martínez, Carlos Prieto; Llenas, Lluis Forga; Urtasun, Erkuden Aranburu; Pericas, Francisco Sala; Musgo, Ramón Angós; Gutierrez, Maria Rosario Mercado; Sarrasqueta, Mercedes Palacios

    2017-01-01

    Background Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) have an increased risk of celiac disease (CD). Since CD can be seronegative, more sensible tests for detection are needed. In seronegative patients, CD diagnosis may be difficult because of a lack of specificity. Flow cytometry analysis of lymphocyte populations can be useful in this situation. We aimed to study the prevalence of CD in adult DM1 using human leukocyte antigen (HLA) compatibility-based screening. A secondary goal was to study the role of flow cytometry as a complementary tool in these patients. Methods We selected 200 patients with DM1, of whom 190 (95%) had HLA DQ2, DQ8 or both. Of these, 136 agreed to participate and provided epidemiological data. All patients underwent blood tests and gastroscopy. Results Sixteen patients had a histology consistent with CD. After ruling out other diagnoses, 6 patients were diagnosed with CD, 2 of whom had negative antibodies. All were DQ2.5 homozygous, with a CD prevalence of 9.8% in this group. In the flow cytometry analysis of duodenal biopsy samples, when we compared all non-CD with CD patients, we found that the γ/δ intraepithelial lymphocyte (IEL) percentage was significantly higher and the CD3 negative IEL percentage significantly lower in the CD group. We found similar results when we compared only those with histological lesions. Conclusions Screening of CD in patients with DM1 by HLA detects only 1% of seronegative patients with CD. DQ2.5 homozygous patients are at most risk of developing CD. The study of lymphocyte populations in the duodenal biopsy by flow cytometry discriminates patients with CD from those without CD with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:28243038

  14. Bone and mineral metabolism in adult celiac disease

    SciTech Connect

    Caraceni, M.P.; Molteni, N.; Bardella, M.T.; Ortolani, S.; Nogara, A.; Bianchi, P.A.

    1988-03-01

    Bone mineral density (/sup 125/I photon absorptiometry) was lower in 20 untreated adult celiac patients than in sex- and age-matched controls (p less than 0.001), and plasma alkaline phosphatase, parathyroid hormone, urinary hydroxyproline/creatinine levels were higher than normal (p less than 0.05, less than 0.001, less than 0.05, respectively). Gluten-free diet was started, and the patients were divided randomly into two treatment groups, one which received oral 25-hydroxyvitamin D 50 micrograms/day and one which did not. After 12 months' treatment, bone turnover markers showed a decrease, which did not reach statistical significance, and bone mineral density did not show significant modifications compared with base line in either group. It was found that a gluten-free diet followed for 1 yr can prevent further bone loss, but no significant differences were detected between the two groups.

  15. Foods for patients with celiac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    As a general rule patients with celiac disease must avoid five cereals--wheat rye, triticale, barley and oats. Very sensitive individuals must also avoid two products of these cereals--malt and hydrolyzed vegetable protein. Some less sensitive individuals may be able to tolerate barley and oats in small quantities. All other foods are acceptable, including the cereals corn, rice, buckwheat, millet and sorghum, as well as malt-flavored breakfast cereals. Wine, spirits, beer and ale are also acceptable unless otherwise contraindicated. Monosodium glutamate, other food additives and pharmaceutical preparations are also acceptable. The ingredients of prepackaged processed foods are listed on the labels. Patients with celiac disease must examine labels to ensure that they avoid the harmful cereals. With appropriate precautions they need not be concerned about eating away from home. PMID:7139445

  16. Rationale for Using Social Media to Collect Patient-Reported Outcomes in Patients with Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Kt; Harris, Merissa; Khavari, Nasim; Khosla, Chaitan

    2014-02-01

    Patients with celiac disease (CD) are increasingly interconnected through social media, exchanging patient experiences and health-tracking information between individuals through various web-based platforms. Social media represents potentially unique communication interface between gastroenterologists and active social media users - especially young adults and adolescents with celiac disease-regarding adherence to the strict gluten-free diet, gastrointestinal symptoms, and meaningful discussion about disease management. Yet, various social media platforms may be underutilized for research purposes to collect patient-reported outcomes data. In this commentary, we summarize the scientific rationale and potential for future growth of social media in patient-reported outcomes research, focusing on college freshmen with celiac disease as a case study and provide overview of the methodological approach. Finally, we discuss how social media may impact patient care in the future through increasing mobile technology use.

  17. Back pain and sacroiliitis in long-standing adult celiac disease: a cross-sectional and follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Vereckei, Edit; Mester, Adám; Hodinka, László; Temesvári, Péter; Kiss, Emese; Poór, Gyula

    2010-02-01

    There have been only scattered reports suggesting that musculoskeletal manifestations including back pain and sacroiliac joint involvement may be associated with celiac disease. In order to confirm this issue in a larger cohort, rheumatic manifestations were analyzed in 21 adult celiac patients using a comprehensive clinical, laboratory and radiological analysis. The diagnosis of celiac disease was based on the histopathology of jejunal biopsy specimens. The mean duration of celiac disease was 15 (0-31) years. All patients were currently on gluten-free diet and none of the patients had gastrointestinal symptoms at the time of the study. Using various imaging techniques, involvement of the sacroiliac joints was confirmed in 70% of celiac patients. Imaging revealed different morphological changes in the sacroiliac joint, e.g. accumulation of synovial fluid, synovitis, erosion with concomitant sclerosis, sacroiliitis or calcification of the ligament. These changes probably represent different clinical stages and/or manifestations of the same process. In a follow-up study of eight patients, after 11 years on a gluten-free diet, the great majority of patients had no clinical symptoms; yet, a subclinical progression of the sacroiliac joint involvement could be verified. Our results suggest the importance of regular rheumatologic follow-up of patients with celiac disease.

  18. Celiac disease in a patient with a congenital deficiency of intestinal enteropeptidase.

    PubMed

    Moroz, S P; Hadorn, B; Rossi, T M; Haworth, J C

    2001-07-01

    We report on a 40-yr-old man with both primary enteropeptidase deficiency and celiac disease. He suffered from severe intestinal malabsorption and growth failure as a child. Enteropeptidase deficiency was found and pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy resulted in a growth spurt. Enteropeptidase levels in his intestinal mucosa and intraluminal fluid remained very low throughout childhood and early adult life. Celiac disease was confirmed by characteristic abnormalities in tests of intestinal function and in mucosal biopsies, which recovered when he instituted a gluten-free diet. He remains clinically intolerant to gluten as an adult. Enteropeptidase levels have remained abnormally low whether or not his intestinal mucosa has been normal in response to gluten restriction. Enteropeptidase levels have previously been shown to be normal in untreated celiac patients. The relationship between the two disorders remains unclear.

  19. [2 cases of adult celiac disease simulating Berger's disease].

    PubMed

    Usai, P; Cherchi, M V; Boy, M F; Cogoni, G; Santa Cruz, G; Balestrieri, A

    1989-03-01

    The authors describe two cases of celiac disease that simulated mesangial IgA nephropathy (Berger's disease). In both cases, gluten-free diet rapidly abated the histological and clinical picture, renal as well as intestinal. The authors conclude that all patients with Berger's disease should be tested systematically for antigliadin antibodies of the IgA class with a view to more accurate clinical classification and therapeutic planning.

  20. Normal Bone Mineral Density Associates with Duodenal Mucosa Healing in Adult Patients with Celiac Disease on a Gluten-Free Diet

    PubMed Central

    Larussa, Tiziana; Suraci, Evelina; Imeneo, Maria; Marasco, Raffaella; Luzza, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Impairment of bone mineral density (BMD) is frequent in celiac disease (CD) patients on a gluten-free diet (GFD). The normalization of intestinal mucosa is still difficult to predict. We aim to investigate the relationship between BMD and duodenal mucosa healing (DMH) in CD patients on a GFD. Sixty-four consecutive CD patients on a GFD were recruited. After a median period of a 6-year GFD (range 2–33 years), patients underwent repeat duodenal biopsy and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan. Twenty-four patients (38%) displayed normal and 40 (62%) low BMD, 47 (73%) DMH, and 17 (27%) duodenal mucosa lesions. All patients but one with normal BMD (23 of 24, 96%) showed DMH, while, among those with low BMD, 24 (60%) did and 16 (40%) did not. At multivariate analysis, being older (odds ratio (OR) 1.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03–1.18) and having diagnosis at an older age (OR 1.09, 95% CI 1.03–1.16) were associated with low BMD; in turn, having normal BMD was the only variable independently associated with DMH (OR 17.5, 95% CI 1.6–192). In older CD patients and with late onset disease, BMD recovery is not guaranteed, despite a GFD. A normal DXA scan identified CD patients with DMH; thus, it is a potential tool in planning endoscopic resampling. PMID:28146115

  1. Delayed gastric emptying does not normalize after gluten withdrawal in adult celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Usai-Satta, Paolo; Oppia, Francesco; Scarpa, Mariella; Giannetti, Cristiana; Cabras, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Objective Delayed gastric emptying has been frequently detected in patients with untreated celiac disease. According to several studies, gluten withdrawal showed to be effective in normalizing the gastric emptying rate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the gastric emptying rate of solids in patients with celiac disease before and after a gluten-free diet. Methods Twelve adult patients with celiac disease (age range 20-57 years) and 30 healthy controls (age range 30-54 years) underwent a (13)C-octanoic acid breath test to measure gastric emptying. Half emptying time (t1/2) and lag phase (tlag) were calculated. After at least 12 months of a gluten-free diet, celiac patients underwent a new (13)C-octanoic acid breath test. A symptom score was utilized to detect dyspeptic and malabsorption symptoms in all the patients. Results The gastric motility parameters, t1/2 and tlag, were significantly longer in patients than in controls. On a gluten-free diet, surprisingly, the gastric emptying did not normalize despite an improvement of symptom score. No significant correlation between abnormal gastric emptying and specific symptom patterns, anthropometric parameters or severity of histological damage was found. Conclusions This finding supports the hypothesis that gluten-driven mucosal inflammation might determine motor abnormalities by affecting smooth muscle contractility or impairing gut hormone function. The persistence of these abnormalities on a gluten free diet suggests the presence of a persistent low-grade mucosal inflammation with a permanent perturbation of the neuro-immunomodulatory regulation.

  2. [All-Russian Consensus on Diagnosis and Treatment of Celiac Disease in Children and Adults].

    PubMed

    Parfenov, A I; Bykova, S V; Sabel'nikova, E A; Maev, I V; Baranov, A A; Bakulin, I G; Krums, L M; Bel'mer, S V; Borovik, T E; Zakharova, I N; Dmitrieva, Yu A; Roslavtseva, E A; Kornienko, E A; Khavkin, A I; Potapov, A S; Revnova, M O; Mukhina, Yu G; Shcherbakov, P L; Fedorov, E D; Belousova, E A; Khalif, I L; Khomeriki, S G; Rotin, D L; Vorob'eva, N G; Pivnik, A V; Gudkova, R B; Chernin, V V; Vokhmyanina, N V; Pukhlikova, T V; Degtyarev, D A; Damulin, I V; Mkrtumyan, A M; Dzhulai, G S; Tetruashvili, N K; Baranovsky, A Yu; Nazarenko, L I; Kharitonov, A G; Loranskaya, I D; Saifutdinov, R G; Livzan, M A; Abramov, D A; Osipenko, M F; Oreshko, L V; Tkachenko, E I; Sitkin, S I; Efremov, L I

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the All-Russian consensus on the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease in children and adults, which has been elaborated by leading experts, such as gastroenterologists and pediatricians of Russia on the basis of the existing Russian and international guidelines. The consensus approved at the 42nd Annual Scientific Session of the Central Research Institute of Gastroenterology on Principles of Evidence-Based Medicine into Clinical Practice (March 2-3, 2016). The consensus is intended for practitioners engaged in the management and treatment of patients with celiac disease. Evidence for the main provisions of the consensus was sought in electronic databases. In making recommendations, the main source was the publications included in the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, and PubMed. The search depth was 10 years. Recommendations in the preliminary version were reviewed by independent experts. Voting was done by the Delphic polling system.

  3. miRNA-regulated gene expression differs in celiac disease patients according to the age of presentation.

    PubMed

    Buoli Comani, Gaia; Panceri, Roberto; Dinelli, Marco; Biondi, Andrea; Mancuso, Clara; Meneveri, Raffaella; Barisani, Donatella

    2015-09-01

    Celiac disease is an intestinal disease which shows different symptoms and clinical manifestations among pediatric and adult patients. These variations could be imputable to age-related changes in gut architecture and intestinal immune system, which could be characterized by gene expression differences possibly regulated by miRNAs. We analyzed a panel of miRNAs and their target genes in duodenal biopsies of Marsh 3AB and 3C pediatric celiac patients, compared to controls. Moreover, to assess variation of expression in plasma samples, we evaluated circulating miRNA levels in controls and patients at diagnosis or on gluten-free diet. We detected a decreased miR-192-5p expression in celiac patients, but no variations in NOD2 and CXCL2, targets previously identified in adults. Conversely, we detected a significant increase in mRNA and protein levels of another target, MAD2L1, protein related to cell cycle control. miR-31-5p and miR-338-3p were down-regulated and their respective targets, FOXP3 and RUNX1, involved in Treg function, resulted up-regulated in celiac patients. Finally, we detected, in celiac patients, an increased expression of miR-21-5p, possibly caused by a regulatory loop with its putative target STAT3, which showed an increased activation in Marsh 3C patients. The analysis of plasma revealed a trend similar to that observed in biopsies, but in presence of gluten-free diet we could not detect circulating miRNAs values comparable to controls. miRNAs and their gene targets showed an altered expression in duodenal mucosa and plasma of celiac disease pediatric patients, and these alterations could be different from adult ones.

  4. Is adult celiac disease really uncommon in Chinese?

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ling-ling; Zhang, Bing-ling; Liu, You-shi

    2009-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a type of intestinal malabsorption syndrome, in which the patients are intolerant to the gliadin in dietary gluten, resulting in chronic diarrhea and secondary malnutrition. The disease is common in Europe and the United States, but only sporadic reports are found in East Asia including China. Is CD really rare in China? We examined 62 patients by capsule endoscopy for chronic diarrhea from June 2003 to March 2008. Four patients with chronic diarrhea and weight loss were diagnosed to have CD. Under the capsule endoscopy, we observed that the villi of the proximal small bowel became short, and that the mucous membrane became atrophied in these four patients. Duodenal biopsies were performed during gastroscopy and the pathological changes of mucosa were confirmed to be Marsh 3 stage of CD. A gluten free diet significantly improved the conditions of the four patients. We suspect that in China, especially in the northern area where wheat is the main food, CD might not be uncommon, and its under-diagnosis could be caused by its clinical manifestations that could be easily covered by the symptoms from other clinical situations, particularly when it came to subclinical patients without obvious symptom or to patients with extraintestinal symptoms as the initial manifestations. PMID:19283870

  5. Are xenogeneic anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies the holy grail for celiac patients?

    PubMed

    Ivanovski, Petar Ilija; Ivanovski, Ivan P; Sedlarevic, Rade

    2007-01-01

    Celiac disease is an immune mediated disorder, the only one with a well-established origin, resulting from a permanent gluten intolerance. Although a gluten-free diet is currently the "safe" and appropriate therapy for celiac disease, this is not always an easy and simple option as "harmful" gluten may contaminate food during the processing and preparation phases. There are also further social pressures, which might be more pressing for young celiac patients, in following a strict gluten-free diet. Therefore, a new therapeutic approaches are sought which would permit celiacs to "peacefully" coexist with gluten. Presently, the most promising looks search for genetically modified wheat lacking toxic gluten peptides and the use of oral endopeptidases in attempt to curb gluten toxicity. Recently discovered role of anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies in celiac pathogenesis has brought a prospect for a new hypothetical therapeutic approach, an oral immunization of celiacs with xenogeneic anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies.

  6. Resolution of metabolic syndrome after following a gluten free diet in an adult woman diagnosed with celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    García-Manzanares, Álvaro; Lucendo, Alfredo J; González-Castillo, Sonia; Moreno-Fernández, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    Adult celiac disease (CD) presents with very diverse symptoms that are clearly different from those typically seen in pediatric patients, including ferropenic anemia, dyspepsia, endocrine alterations and elevated transaminase concentration. We present the case of a 51-year-old overweight woman with altered basal blood glucose, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia and persisting elevated transaminase levels, who showed all the symptoms for a diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. Because she presented iron deficiency anemia, she was referred to the gastroenterology department and subsequently diagnosed with celiac disease after duodenal biopsies and detection of a compatible HLA haplotype. Gluten-free diet (GFD) was prescribed and after 6 mo the patient showed resolution of laboratory abnormalities (including recovering anemia and iron reserves, normalization of altered lipid and liver function parameters and decrease of glucose blood levels). No changes in weight or waist circumference were observed and no significant changes in diet were documented apart from the GFD. The present case study is the first reported description of an association between CD and metabolic syndrome, and invites investigation of the metabolic changes induced by gluten in celiac patients. PMID:21860836

  7. Problems and challenges to adaptation of gluten free diet by Indian patients with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Rajpoot, Preeti; Makharia, Govind K

    2013-11-27

    Celiac disease is emerging in India and has become a public health problem. Almost 6-8 million Indians are estimated to have celiac disease. While there is a large pool of patients with celiac disease in India, until now, only a fraction of them have been diagnosed. With increasing awareness about celiac disease amongst health care providers and the general population, a massive increase in the number of patients with celiac disease is expected now and in the subsequent decade in India. While the number of patients with celiac disease is increasing, the country's preparedness towards the emerging epidemic of this disease is minimal. There are a number of issues, which requires urgent attention. Some of the key issues include increased awareness amongst health care professionals and the general public about the disease and its management, team-based management of patients with celiac disease, proper counseling and supervision of patients, training of dietitians in the management of patients with celiac disease, industrial production of reliable and affordable gluten-free food, and food labeling for gluten contents.

  8. The surface-associated proteins of wheat starch granules: suitability of wheat starch for celiac patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat starch is used to make baked products for celiac patients in several European countries, but is avoided in the US because of uncertainty about the amounts of associated grain storage (gluten) proteins. People with celiac disease (CD) must avoid wheat, rye and barley proteins and products that...

  9. Prevalence of celiac disease in patients with severe food allergy.

    PubMed

    Pillon, R; Ziberna, F; Badina, L; Ventura, A; Longo, G; Quaglia, S; De Leo, L; Vatta, S; Martelossi, S; Patano, G; Not, T; Berti, I

    2015-10-01

    The association between food allergy and celiac disease (CD) is still to be clarified. We screened for CD 319 patients with severe food allergy (IgE > 85 kU/l against food proteins and a history of severe allergic reactions) who underwent specific food oral immunotherapy (OIT), together with 128 children with mild allergy who recovered without OIT, and compared the prevalence data with our historical data regarding healthy schoolchildren. Sixteen patients (5%) with severe allergy and one (0.8%) with mild allergy tested positive for both genetic and serological CD markers, while the prevalence among the schoolchildren was 1%. Intestinal biopsies were obtained in 13/16 patients with severe allergy and in the one with mild allergy, confirming the diagnosis of CD. Sufferers from severe food allergy seem to be at a fivefold increased risk of CD. Our findings suggest that routine screening for CD should be recommended in patients with severe food allergy.

  10. An Italian prospective multicenter survey on patients suspected of having non-celiac gluten sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is still an undefined syndrome with several unsettled issues despite the increasing awareness of its existence. We carried out a prospective survey on NCGS in Italian centers for the diagnosis of gluten-related disorders, with the aim of defining the clinical picture of this new syndrome and to establish roughly its prevalence compared with celiac disease. Methods From November 2012 to October 2013, 38 Italian centers (27 adult gastroenterology, 5 internal medicine, 4 pediatrics, and 2 allergy) participated in this prospective survey. A questionnaire was used in order to allow uniform and accurate collection of clinical, biochemical, and instrumental data. Results In total, 486 patients with suspected NCGS were identified in this 1-year period. The female/male ratio was 5.4 to 1, and the mean age was 38 years (range 3–81). The clinical picture was characterized by combined gastrointestinal (abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea and/or constipation, nausea, epigastric pain, gastroesophageal reflux, aphthous stomatitis) and systemic manifestations (tiredness, headache, fibromyalgia-like joint/muscle pain, leg or arm numbness, 'foggy mind,' dermatitis or skin rash, depression, anxiety, and anemia). In the large majority of patients, the time lapse between gluten ingestion and the appearance of symptoms varied from a few hours to 1 day. The most frequent associated disorders were irritable bowel syndrome (47%), food intolerance (35%) and IgE-mediated allergy (22%). An associated autoimmune disease was detected in 14% of cases. Regarding family history, 18% of our patients had a relative with celiac disease, but no correlation was found between NCGS and positivity for HLA-DQ2/-DQ8. IgG anti-gliadin antibodies were detected in 25% of the patients tested. Only a proportion of patients underwent duodenal biopsy; for those that did, the biopsies showed normal intestinal mucosa (69%) or mild increase in intraepithelial

  11. Celiac anti-type 2 transglutaminase antibodies induce differential effects in fibroblasts from celiac disease patients and from healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Paolella, Gaetana; Lepretti, Marilena; Barone, Maria Vittoria; Nanayakkara, Merlin; Di Zenzo, Marina; Sblattero, Daniele; Auricchio, Salvatore; Esposito, Carla; Caputo, Ivana

    2017-03-01

    Type 2 transglutaminase (TG2) has an important pathogenic role in celiac disease (CD), an inflammatory intestinal disease that is caused by the ingestion of gluten-containing cereals. Indeed, TG2 deamidates specific gliadin peptides, thus enhancing their immunogenicity. Moreover, the transamidating activity seems to provoke an autoimmune response, where TG2 is the main autoantigen. Many studies have highlighted a possible pathogenetic role of anti-TG2 antibodies, because they modulate TG2 enzymatic activity and they can interact with cell-surface TG2, triggering a wide range of intracellular responses. Autoantibodies also alter the uptake of the alpha-gliadin peptide 31-43 (p31-43), responsible of the innate immune response in CD, thus partially protecting cells from p31-43 damaging effects in an intestinal cell line. Here, we investigated whether anti-TG2 antibodies protect cells from p31-43-induced damage in a CD model consisting of primary dermal fibroblasts. We found that the antibodies specifically reduced the uptake of p31-43 by fibroblasts derived from healthy subjects but not in those derived from CD patients. Analyses of TG2 expression and enzymatic activity did not reveal any significant difference between fibroblasts from healthy and celiac subjects, suggesting that other features related to TG2 may be responsible of such different behaviors, e.g., trafficking or subcellular distribution. Our findings are in line with the concept that a "celiac cellular phenotype" exists and that TG2 may contribute to this phenotype. Moreover, they suggest that the autoimmune response to TG2, which alone may damage the celiac mucosa, also fails in its protective role in celiac cells.

  12. Celiac disease and overweight in children: an update.

    PubMed

    Diamanti, Antonella; Capriati, Teresa; Basso, Maria Sole; Panetta, Fabio; Di Ciommo Laurora, Vincenzo Maria; Bellucci, Francesca; Cristofori, Fernanda; Francavilla, Ruggiero

    2014-01-02

    The clinical presentation of celiac disease in children is very variable and differs with age. The prevalence of atypical presentations of celiac disease has increased over the past 2 decades. Several studies in adults and children with celiac disease indicate that obesity/overweight at disease onset is not unusual. In addition, there is a trend towards the development of overweight/obesity in celiac patients who strictly comply with a gluten-free diet. However, the pathogenesis and clinical implications of the coexistence of classic malabsorption (e.g., celiac disease) and overweight/obesity remain unclear. This review investigated the causes and main clinical factors associated with overweight/obesity at the diagnosis of celiac disease and clarified whether gluten withdrawal affects the current trends of the nutritional status of celiac disease patients.

  13. Restless legs syndrome is a common feature of adult celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Moccia, Marcello; Pellecchia, Maria Teresa; Erro, Roberto; Zingone, Fabiana; Marelli, Sara; Barone, Damiano Giuseppe; Ciacci, Carolina; Strambi, Luigi Ferini; Barone, Paolo

    2010-05-15

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurological condition, frequently idiopathic, sometimes associated with specific disorders such as iron deficiency. We investigated RLS prevalence in celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune disease characterized by several features such as malabsorption-related iron deficiency anemia and peripheral neuropathy. We screened a population of 100 adult CD patients for CD features, iron metabolism, clinical and neurological conditions, and enrolled 100 age- and sex-matched controls in the general population. RLS was ascertained in CD patients and controls by both the presence of the four essential International RLS Study Group diagnostic criteria and neurological examination. The International RLS Study Group rating scale was used to measure RLS severity. We found a 31% prevalence of RLS in the CD population that was significantly higher than the prevalence in the control population (4%; P < 0.001). The average severity of RLS in CD population was moderate (17 +/- 6.5). In the CD population, no significant correlation was found between RLS and either gluten-free diet or iron metabolism, despite hemoglobin levels were significantly lower in CD patients with RLS than without RLS (P = 0.003). We found no correlation between RLS and other possible causes of secondary RLS, including signs of peripheral neuropathy, pregnancy, end-stage renal disease, and pharmacological treatments.Our study broadens the spectrum of neurological disorders associated with CD and indicates that RLS should be sought for in all patients with CD.

  14. Altered Esophageal Mucosal Structure in Patients with Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pinto-Sánchez, María Inés; Nachman, Fabio D.; Fuxman, Claudia; Iantorno, Guido; Hwang, Hui Jer; Ditaranto, Andrés; Costa, Florencia; Longarini, Gabriela; Wang, Xuan Yu; Huang, Xianxi; Vázquez, Horacio; Moreno, María L.; Niveloni, Sonia; Bercik, Premysl; Smecuol, Edgardo; Mazure, Roberto; Bilder, Claudio; Mauriño, Eduardo C.; Verdu, Elena F.; Bai, Julio C.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim. Reflux symptoms (RS) are common in patients with celiac disease (CD), a chronic enteropathy that affects primarily the small intestine. We evaluated mucosal integrity and motility of the lower esophagus as mechanisms contributing to RS generation in patients with CD. Methods. We enrolled newly diagnosed CD patients with and without RS, nonceliac patients with classical reflux disease (GERD), and controls (without RS). Endoscopic biopsies from the distal esophagus were assessed for dilated intercellular space (DIS) by light microscopy and electron microscopy. Tight junction (TJ) mRNA proteins expression for zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and claudin-2 and claudin-3 (CLDN-2; CLDN-3) was determined using qRT-PCR. Results. DIS scores were higher in patients with active CD than in controls, but similar to GERD patients. The altered DIS was found even in CD patients without RS and normalized after one year of a gluten-free diet. CD patients with and without RS had lower expression of ZO-1 than controls. The expression of CLDN-2 and CLDN-3 was similar in CD and GERD patients. Conclusions. Our study shows that patients with active CD have altered esophageal mucosal integrity, independently of the presence of RS. The altered expression of ZO-1 may underlie loss of TJ integrity in the esophageal mucosa and may contribute to RS generation. PMID:27446827

  15. Neuropsychiatric symptoms and celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Urban-Kowalczyk, Małgorzata; Œmigielski, Janusz; Gmitrowicz, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuropsychiatric symptoms may represent an atypical manifestation of celiac disease that occur before a gastroenterological diagnosis is made. Some studies suggest that a gluten-free diet is effective in treating the depression, anxiety, and neurological complications associated with celiac disease. Method The article describes the case of a patient suffering from chronic, treatment-resistant symptoms of depression and anxiety. The diagnosis of celiac disease and introduction of an elimination diet caused a significant improvement in mental state and everyday functioning in the presenting patient. Conclusion The presence of persistent anxiety and depressive symptoms, with a poor reaction to pharmacological treatment, indicates a need to identify somatic reasons for the underlying condition. It is important to remember that celiac disease can occur at any age, not only in childhood. The presence of this somatic cause of persistent depressive and anxiety symptoms should be considered in the diagnostic process in adults. PMID:25342904

  16. Fatal Streptococcus pneumoniae Sepsis in a Patient With Celiac Disease-Associated Hyposplenism

    PubMed Central

    Ouseph, Madhu M.; Simons, Malorie; Treaba, Diana O.; Yakirevich, Evgeny; Green, Peter H.; Bhagat, Govind; Moss, Steven F.

    2016-01-01

    We present a 59-year-old male with poorly controlled celiac disease (CD) and fatal Streptococcus pneumoniae sepsis, describe the morphologic findings, and stress the need for monitoring splenic function and pneumococcal vaccination in these patients. PMID:27761478

  17. Wellbeing, illness perception and coping strategies in Italian Celiac patients.

    PubMed

    Baiardini, I; Braido, F; Menoni, S; Bellandi, G; Savi, E; Canonica, G W; Macchia, D

    2012-01-01

    The clinical features of Celiac Disease (CD) are heterogeneous and both severity and extent of villous atrophy do not correlate with clinical presentation. This study aims to evaluate the psychological wellbeing of CD patients with a similar clinical pattern and to explore whether patients with different levels of wellbeing differed in illness perception and coping strategies. CD outpatients with proven diagnosis filled in validated questionnaires to investigate wellbeing (PGWBI), illness perception (IPQ-R) and coping style (COPE). One hundred and four patients underwent data analysis. Compared to Italian reference sample, CD patients reported a significantly reduced PGWBI total score (p<0.001), self-control (p<0.001), general health (p=0.002) and vitality (p<0.001) and increased anxiety (p=0.009). 7.7% of patients reported a positive wellbeing, 40.4% distress absence, 28.8% a moderate distress and 23.1% a severe distress. Patients with distress showed a different illness perception and reported more frequently two dysfunctional strategies: focus on and venting emotions (p= 0.009) and substance abuse (p= 0.01) compared to those having a positive wellbeing. A high percentage of CD patients experience distress and differ from those who reach wellbeing in illness perception and use of coping strategies. Assessing subjective viewpoint with standardized methods can provide useful information for a better management of CD patients.

  18. A distinctive 'microbial signature' in celiac pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Celiac Disease (CD) is an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine in which dietary gluten ingestion leads to a chronic enteropathy. Recently, scientific evidence suggested a potential role of gut microbiota in CD. To have a snapshot of dominant duodenal microbiota we analyzed the mucosa-associated microbiota of 20 children with CD, before and after a gluten-free diet (GFD) regimen, and of 10 controls. Total DNA was extracted from duodenal biopsies and amplification products of 16S ribosomal DNA were compared by temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE). TTGE profiles were analyzed by statistical multivariate analysis. Results The average number of bands in TTGE profiles was significantly higher (P < 0.0001) in active (n.b. 16.7 ± 0.7) and inactive states (n.b. 13.2 ± 0.8) than in controls (n.b. 3.7 ± 1.3). Mean interindividual similarity index was 54.9% ± 14.9% for active disease, 55.6% ± 15.7% for remission state and 21.8% ± 30.16% for controls. Similarity index between celiac children before and after GFD treatment was 63.9% ± 15.8%. Differences in microbiota biodiversity were among active and remission state (P = 0.000224) and amid active CD and controls (P < 0.001). Bacteroides vulgatus and Escherichia coli were detected more often in CD patients than in controls (P < 0.0001). Conclusions Overall, the results highlighted a peculiar microbial TTGE profile and a significant higher biodiversity in CD pediatric patients' duodenal mucosa. The possible pathophysiological role of these microbial differences needs further characterization. PMID:20565734

  19. Celiac Disease Presenting as Profound Diarrhea and Weight Loss – A Celiac Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Bul, Vadim; Sleesman, Brett; Boulay, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 46 Final Diagnosis: Celiac crisis Symptoms: Abdominal pain • chronic diarrhea • lightheadedness • weakness • weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Celiac disease is a hypersensitivity enteropathy that can have various presentations in adults. Rarely, patients can present with severe lab abnormalities, dehydration and weight loss caused by celiac disease – a celiac crisis. Case Report: A 46-year-old male with a past medical history significant for diabetes mellitus, type 2 (DM2) and recently treated Bell’s Palsy presented to the emergency room complaining of weakness, diarrhea and lightheadedness. On presentation, the patient had a systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 60 mm Hg and a lactic acidosis with pH of 7.28. Infectious etiologies of diarrhea were ruled out. The patient had an EGD which showed erythema of the duodenal bulb. Serum anti-gliadin and anti-TTG IgA were both elevated suggesting Celiac disease. Biopsies showed histopathology consistent with celiac disease. The patient’s diarrhea resolved after initiation of a gluten free diet. He gained 25 kilograms after discharge and did not require further hospitalizations for diarrhea. Conclusions: Celiac crisis is a very rare presentation of celiac disease in adults but nonetheless should be considered in patients with marked metabolic derangements in the setting of osmotic diarrhea. Treatment consists of a gluten free diet and may require management with steroids and total parenteral nutrition (TPN). PMID:27492679

  20. Gynecologic and obstetric findings related to nutritional status and adherence to a gluten-free diet in Brazilian patients with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Kotze, L M S

    2004-08-01

    This study shows a broad analysis of gynaecological and obstetrical disturbances in patients with celiac disease in relation to their nutritional status and adherence to a gluten-free diet. Seventy-six adult celiac patients were analyzed according to nutritional status and 18 children/adolescents to gluten-free diet adherence. As controls, 84 adults and 22 adolescents with irritable bowel syndrome were used The significant findings were observed as follow: adult celiac patients, irrespective of the nutritional status, were younger than controls, presented delayed menarche, secondary amenorrhea, a higher percentage of spontaneous abortions, anemia and hypoalbuminemia. No differences were observed regarding the number of pregnancies, age at menopause and duration of the reproductive period. After treatment, patients presented with normal pregnancies and one patient presented spontaneous abortion. The adolescents who were not adherent to gluten-free diet presented delayed menarche and secondary amenorrhea. In conclusion, gluten per se could explain the disturbances and malnutrition would worsen the disease in a consequent vicious cycle. Therefore, celiac disease should be included in the screening of reproductive disorders.

  1. Support for patients with celiac disease: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Card, Tim; Ciclitira, Paul J; Swift, Gillian L; Nasr, Ikram; Sanders, David S; Ciacci, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) is a lifelong disorder. Patients are at increased risk of complications and comorbidity. Objectives We conducted a review of the literature on patient support and information in CD and aim to issue recommendations about patient information with regards to CD. Methods Data source: We searched PubMed for English-language articles published between 1900 and June 2014, containing terms related to costs, economics of CD, or education and CD. Study selection: Papers deemed relevant by any of the participating authors were included in the study. Data synthesis: No quantitative synthesis of data was performed. Instead we formulated a consensus view of the information that should be offered to all patients with CD. Results There are few randomized clinical trials examining the effect of patient support in CD. Patients and their families receive information from many sources. It is important that health care personnel guide the patient through the plethora of facts and comments on the Internet. An understanding of CD is likely to improve dietary adherence. Patients should be educated about current knowledge about risk factors for CD, as well as the increased risk of complications. Patients should also be advised to avoid other health hazards, such as smoking. Many patients are eager to learn about future non-dietary treatments of CD. This review also comments on novel therapies but it is important to stress that no such treatment is available at present. Conclusion Based on mostly observational data, we suggest that patient support and information should be an integral part of the management of CD, and is likely to affect the outcome of CD. PMID:25922674

  2. Frequency of Celiac Disease in Patients With Increased Intestinal Gas (Flatulence).

    PubMed

    Masoodi, Mohsen; Mokhtare, Marjan; Agah, Shahram; Sina, Mohammad; Soltani-Kermanshahi, Mojtaba

    2015-10-26

    Excessive flatulence which impairs social performance in patients is one of the common reasons for referrals to gastroenterology clinics. Celiac Disease is a rare but important cause of increased intestinal gas (bloating) and if not diagnosed, patients face complications such as malabsorption, anemia, osteoporosis and even intestinal lymphoma. This study aimed to determine the frequency of Celiac Disease in patients with excessive flatulence.One hundred and fifty patients with a chief complaint of experiencing flatulence more than 15 times a day and lasting for three months were referred to the gastroenterology clinic of Rasoul-e-Akram Teaching Hospital. Serological tests for Celiac Disease, Anti TTG Ab (IgA-IgG) were requested and the patients with positive tests underwent upper GI endoscopy. Biopsies of the second part of the duodenum were then sent to the laboratory.From one hundred and thirty patients who completed the study, 92 (70.7%) were female. Mean age of the patients was 32 ± 13 years. Anti TTG Ab was found in 5 patients (3.85%). Only 2 patients (1.5%) had a documented positive pathology for Celiac Disease.According to the results of this study and other studies, we conclude that Celiac Disease is an uncommon etiology for excessive flatulence but it is of importance to investigate it in excessive flatulence patients.

  3. Influence of previously ingested wheat on fasting breath hydrogen in celiac patients.

    PubMed

    Rana, S V; Sharma, S; Sinha, S K; Kaur, J; Prasad, K K; Singh, K

    2009-06-01

    The excretion of hydrogen in breath commonly persists, despite an overnight fast. Although the elevation of hydrogen concentration above the fasting value after the administration of a test sugar is evidence of malabsorption, the level of the fasting value itself in untreated celiac patients is unknown. Therefore, we studied the fasting breath hydrogen (FBH(2)) concentration in 40 healthy controls, 35 subjects with functional bowel disorders, and 30 patients of untreated celiac disease with and without bread or wheat diet one day before the test. The fasting level of hydrogen concentration in untreated celiac patients (28.7 +/- 19.5 ppm) was significantly higher than those in healthy volunteers (9.5 +/- 3.4 ppm) and subjects with functional bowel disorders (10.6 +/- 4.5 ppm). The percentage of patients with elevated H(2) fasting levels in untreated celiac disease (82.5%) was significantly higher than that in healthy controls (10%) and subjects with functional bowel disorders (17.1%). In 30 celiac patients, studied with and without wheat-free diet one day before the test, the fasting hydrogen levels decreased from 28.7 +/- 19.5 ppm to 10.6 +/- 3.5 ppm, and becoming normal in all patients of celiac disease. Our results show that the patients of untreated celiac disease should be instructed not to eat things made up of wheat one day before hydrogen breath testing so that the normal fasting hydrogen concentration can be obtained and false-negative hydrogen breath test results can be avoided.

  4. Managing the pediatric patient with celiac disease: a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Daniela Migliarese; Wu, Jessica; Mager, Diana R; Turner, Justine M

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune reaction to gluten, leading to intestinal inflammation, villous atrophy, and malabsorption. It is the most common autoimmune gastrointestinal disorder, with an increasing prevalence. A life-long gluten-free diet (GFD) is an effective treatment to alleviate symptoms, normalize autoantibodies, and heal the intestinal mucosa in patients with CD. Poorly controlled CD poses a significant concern for ongoing malabsorption, growth restriction, and the long-term concern of intestinal lymphoma. Achieving GFD compliance and long-term disease control poses a challenge, with adolescents at particular risk for high rates of noncompliance. Attention has turned toward innovative management strategies to improve adherence and achieve better disease control. One such strategy is the development of multidisciplinary clinic approach, and CD is a complex life-long disease state that would benefit from a multifaceted team approach as recognized by multiple national and international bodies, including the National Institutes of Health. Utilizing the combined efforts of the pediatric gastroenterologist, registered dietitian, registered nurse, and primary care provider (general practitioner or general pediatrician) in a CD multidisciplinary clinic model will be of benefit for patients and families in optimizing diagnosis, provision of GFD teaching, and long-term adherence to a GFD. This paper discusses the benefits and proposed structure for multidisciplinary care in improving management of CD.

  5. Managing the pediatric patient with celiac disease: a multidisciplinary approach

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, Daniela Migliarese; Wu, Jessica; Mager, Diana R; Turner, Justine M

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune reaction to gluten, leading to intestinal inflammation, villous atrophy, and malabsorption. It is the most common autoimmune gastrointestinal disorder, with an increasing prevalence. A life-long gluten-free diet (GFD) is an effective treatment to alleviate symptoms, normalize autoantibodies, and heal the intestinal mucosa in patients with CD. Poorly controlled CD poses a significant concern for ongoing malabsorption, growth restriction, and the long-term concern of intestinal lymphoma. Achieving GFD compliance and long-term disease control poses a challenge, with adolescents at particular risk for high rates of noncompliance. Attention has turned toward innovative management strategies to improve adherence and achieve better disease control. One such strategy is the development of multidisciplinary clinic approach, and CD is a complex life-long disease state that would benefit from a multifaceted team approach as recognized by multiple national and international bodies, including the National Institutes of Health. Utilizing the combined efforts of the pediatric gastroenterologist, registered dietitian, registered nurse, and primary care provider (general practitioner or general pediatrician) in a CD multidisciplinary clinic model will be of benefit for patients and families in optimizing diagnosis, provision of GFD teaching, and long-term adherence to a GFD. This paper discusses the benefits and proposed structure for multidisciplinary care in improving management of CD. PMID:27785047

  6. [IgA-class antigliadin antibodies in the screening and follow-up of celiac disease patients].

    PubMed

    Papadatou, B; Ferretti, F; Colistro, F; Castellucci, G; Lucidi, V; Ricci, S; Cerminara, R; Bella, S; Colombo, A M; Gambarara, M

    1992-01-01

    IgA antigliadin antibodies (IgA-AGA) have been determined with an enzyme immunoassay in 2.141 pediatric patients. High levels of IgA were found in 98% of 53 celiac patients (1st biopsy), in 81% of 16 celiac patients after gluten challenge, while high levels of these antibodies were not found in 200 patients on gluten-free diet. Moreover high levels of IgA-AGA were found in 29% of 48 patients with normal jejunal biopsy and in 4% of 1.824 patients with gastrointestinal problems other than celiac disease. Our results confirm the data report in literature about the sensibility and the specificity of the IgA-AGA dosage as a screening test for celiac disease, but the possibility of false pathological and false normal values confirms the intestinal biopsy, as the main procedure for the diagnosis of celiac disease.

  7. Celiac Disease Presenting as Profound Diarrhea and Weight Loss - A Celiac Crisis.

    PubMed

    Bul, Vadim; Sleesman, Brett; Boulay, Brian

    2016-08-05

    BACKGROUND Celiac disease is a hypersensitivity enteropathy that can have various presentations in adults. Rarely, patients can present with severe lab abnormalities, dehydration and weight loss caused by celiac disease - a celiac crisis. CASE REPORT A 46-year-old male with a past medical history significant for diabetes mellitus, type 2 (DM2) and recently treated Bell's Palsy presented to the emergency room complaining of weakness, diarrhea and lightheadedness. On presentation, the patient had a systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 60 mm Hg and a lactic acidosis with pH of 7.28. Infectious etiologies of diarrhea were ruled out. The patient had an EGD which showed erythema of the duodenal bulb. Serum anti-gliadin and anti-TTG IgA were both elevated suggesting Celiac disease. Biopsies showed histopathology consistent with celiac disease. The patient's diarrhea resolved after initiation of a gluten free diet. He gained 25 kilograms after discharge and did not require further hospitalizations for diarrhea. CONCLUSIONS Celiac crisis is a very rare presentation of celiac disease in adults but nonetheless should be considered in patients with marked metabolic derangements in the setting of osmotic diarrhea. Treatment consists of a gluten free diet and may require management with steroids and total parenteral nutrition (TPN).

  8. Analysis of the concentration of vitamin E in erythrocytes of patients with celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Szaflarska-Popławska, Anna; Chełchowska, Magdalena; Hozyasz, Kamil K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Consumption of gluten proteins leads to an enteropathy characterised by lymphocytic infiltration of mucous membrane, crypts hypertrophy, and atrophy of villi. Enteropathy leads to disturbances in the immune system as well as secondary deficiency of vitamin E. Aim Analysis of the concentration of vitamin E in erythrocytes of patients with celiac disease. Material and methods Three experimental groups were distinguished among 77 patients with histologically confirmed celiac disease (mean age: 17 years): those who strictly respected gluten-free diet (group I, n = 48), patients breaking dietary recommendations (group II, n = 22), and those with newly diagnosed disease (group III, n = 7). Additionally, a control group consisting of healthy individuals with negative serological markers of celiac disease was formed (group IV, n = 20). Vitamin E concentration was determined by high performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detector. Results Significantly lower average concentration of vitamin E was demonstrated in erythrocytes in all examined groups of patients with celiac disease compared to the control group. Among the patients with celiac disease, the highest average concentration of vitamin E in erythrocytes was observed in the group who respected the gluten-free diet, a little lower in patients who violated dietary recommendations, and lowest among patients with newly diagnosed disease. These relationships, however, were not statistically significant. Conclusions Patients with celiac disease are at risk of vitamin E deficiency irrespective of their diet. Vitamin supplementation should be considered in their case, especially immediately after diagnosis of the disease and in case of breaking a gluten-free diet regime. PMID:28053684

  9. Assessment of Aortic Elasticity in Patients with Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Çekin, Ayhan Hilmi; Arslan, Şakir; Çağırcı, Göksel; Küçükseymen, Selçuk; Çay, Serkan; Harmandar, Ferda Akbay; Yeşil, Bayram

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic autoimmune disorder induced by dietary gluten intake by individuals who are genetically sensitive. Many studies report an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases in such patients. The aim of this study is to assess aortic elasticity properties in patients with CD that may be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Subjects and Methods Eighty-one patients diagnosed with CD by antibody test and biopsy and 63 healthy volunteers were included in this prospective study. Electrocardiographic and echocardiographic examinations were performed. Results The CD group did not have any differences in the conventional echocardiographic parameters compared to the healthy individuals. However, patients in the CD group had an increased aortic stiffness beta index (4.3±2.3 vs. 3.6±1.6, p=0.010), increased pressure strain elastic modulus (33.6±17.0 kPa vs. 28.5±16.7 kPa, p=0.037), decreased aortic distensibility (7.0±3.0×10-6 cm2/dyn vs. 8.2±3.6×10-6 cm2/dyn, p=0.037), and similar aortic strain (17.9±7.7 vs. 16.0±5.5, p=0.070) compared to the control group. Patients with CD were found to have an elevated neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio compared to the control group (2.54±0.63 vs. 2.24±0.63, p=0.012). However, gluten-free diet and neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio were not found to be associated with aortic elasticity. Conclusion Patients with CD had increased aortic stiffness and decreased aortic distensibility. Gluten-free diet enabled the patients with CD to have a reduction in the inflammatory parameters whereas the absence of a significant difference in the elastic properties of the aorta may suggest that the risk of cardiovascular disease persists in this patient group despite a gluten-free diet. PMID:27014355

  10. Celiac sprue.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Andrés; Kelly, Ciarán P

    2002-10-01

    Celiac sprue, celiac disease, or gluten-sensitive enteropathy, is a malabsorption disorder of the small intestine that occurs after ingestion of wheat gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. This disease is characterized by intestinal malabsorption associated with villous atrophy of the small intestinal mucosa, clinical and histological improvement after adherence to strict gluten free diet, and relapse when gluten is reintroduced. Celiac sprue has a high prevalence in Western Europe and North America where it is estimated to affect 1:120 to 1:300 individuals. The pathogenesis of celiac sprue is related to inappropriate intestinal T-cell activation in HLA-DQ2 positive individuals triggered by antigenic peptides from wheat gluten or prolamins from barley and rye. Although previously thought to be mainly a disease of childhood onset, the diagnosis is increasingly being made in adults. There are a wide variety of presentations, which range from asymptomatic forms to severe diarrhea, weight loss and nutritional deficiencies. Extraintestinal manifestations including anemia, osteopenia or neurological disorders and associated conditions such as diabetes or hypothyroidism are commonly present. The availability of highly sensitive and specific serologic markers has dramatically facilitated the diagnosis of celiac sprue. However, the demonstration of characteristic histological abnormalities in a biopsy specimen of the small intestine remains the mainstay of diagnosis. Treatment consists of life-long avoidance of dietary gluten to control symptoms and to prevent both immediate and long-term complications.

  11. Arsenic speciation in rice-based food for adults with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Munera-Picazo, Sandra; Burló, Francisco; Carbonell-Barrachina, Ángel Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) may affect up to 1% of the Western population. It is a disease whose diagnosis has been made mainly in childhood, but now the profile has changed, with one out of five newly diagnosed individuals being over 65 years old. The only treatment for this population is a gluten-free diet. Therefore, the objective of this study was to analyse the occurrence of arsenic (As) in gluten-free products, basically those rice-based, intended for celiac adult consumers. The current study demonstrated that these rice-based products contained important contents of total arsenic (t-As) (up to 120 μg kg(-1)) and inorganic arsenic (i-As) (up to 85.8 μg kg(-1)). It was estimated that the contents of t-As and i-As in rice used as the main ingredient of these foods were as high as 235 and 198 μg kg(-1), respectively. The estimated daily intake of i-As was 0.46 and 0.45 μg kg(-1) bw in women and men of 58 and 75 kg of body weight (bw), respectively. These values indicate that a health risk to these consumers cannot be excluded. Finally, legislation is needed to delimit the safety intake by health agencies and to improve the labelling of these special rice-based foods for celiac adult consumers. The label should include information about percentage, geographical origin and cultivar of the rice used; besides and if companies want to clearly prove the safety of their products, the exact content of i-As should also be included.

  12. Validation of celiac disease diagnoses recorded in the Danish National Patient Register using duodenal biopsies, celiac disease-specific antibodies, and human leukocyte-antigen genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Dydensborg Sander, Stine; Størdal, Ketil; Plato Hansen, Tine; Nybo Andersen, Anne-Marie; Murray, Joseph A; Lillevang, Søren Thue; Husby, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to validate the celiac disease diagnoses recorded in the Danish National Patient Register. To validate the diagnoses, we used information on duodenal biopsies from a national register of pathology reports (the Patobank) and information on celiac disease-specific antibodies and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotypes obtained from patient medical records. Patients and methods We included all the children who were born from 1995 to 2012 and who were registered as having celiac disease in the Danish National Patient Register. We reviewed all the pathology reports on duodenal biopsies in the Patobank and the information in the medical records on celiac disease-specific antibodies (ie, anti-tissue transglutaminase 2 IgA and IgG, endomysial antibodies IgA, and anti-deamidated gliadin peptide IgG) and HLA genotypes. Results We identified 2,247 children who were registered in the Danish National Patient Register with celiac disease. Duodenal biopsies for 1,555 of the children (69%) were registered in the Patobank; 1,127 (50%) had a biopsy that was compatible with celiac disease (ie, Marsh 2–3). We accessed the medical records of 95% of the children who were registered in the Danish National Patient Register with celiac disease. We found that 1,510 (67%) had one or more positive antibody-test results; 1,120 (50%) had anti-tissue transglutaminase 2, IgA at tenfold or greater the upper limit of the normal range and/or positive endomysial antibody results. The positive predictive value depended on the criteria used for validation and the types and numbers of registrations that were included in the analysis and ranged from 62% (95% confidence interval: 60%–64%) to 86% (95% confidence interval: 84%–87%). Conclusion Our findings indicate that the Danish National Patient Register is a valuable source to identify patients who have been diagnosed with celiac disease. However, validation of the diagnoses is warranted before data on the

  13. Vitamin and Mineral Deficiencies Are Highly Prevalent in Newly Diagnosed Celiac Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wierdsma, Nicolette J.; van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren, Marian A. E.; Berkenpas, Marijke; Mulder, Chris J. J.; van Bodegraven, Ad A.

    2013-01-01

    Malabsorption, weight loss and vitamin/mineral-deficiencies characterize classical celiac disease (CD). This study aimed to assess the nutritional and vitamin/mineral status of current “early diagnosed” untreated adult CD-patients in the Netherlands. Newly diagnosed adult CD-patients were included (n = 80, 42.8 ± 15.1 years) and a comparable sample of 24 healthy Dutch subjects was added to compare vitamin concentrations. Nutritional status and serum concentrations of folic acid, vitamin A, B6, B12, and (25-hydroxy) D, zinc, haemoglobin (Hb) and ferritin were determined (before prescribing gluten free diet). Almost all CD-patients (87%) had at least one value below the lower limit of reference. Specifically, for vitamin A, 7.5% of patients showed deficient levels, for vitamin B6 14.5%, folic acid 20%, and vitamin B12 19%. Likewise, zinc deficiency was observed in 67% of the CD-patients, 46% had decreased iron storage, and 32% had anaemia. Overall, 17% were malnourished (>10% undesired weight loss), 22% of the women were underweight (Body Mass Index (BMI) < 18.5), and 29% of the patients were overweight (BMI > 25). Vitamin deficiencies were barely seen in healthy controls, with the exception of vitamin B12. Vitamin/mineral deficiencies were counter-intuitively not associated with a (higher) grade of histological intestinal damage or (impaired) nutritional status. In conclusion, vitamin/mineral deficiencies are still common in newly “early diagnosed” CD-patients, even though the prevalence of obesity at initial diagnosis is rising. Extensive nutritional assessments seem warranted to guide nutritional advices and follow-up in CD treatment. PMID:24084055

  14. Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes in Adults: Is This a High-Risk Group for Screening?

    PubMed

    DeMelo, Emilia N; McDonald, Charlotte; Saibil, Fred; Marcon, Margaret A; Mahmud, Farid H

    2015-12-01

    The association between celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune condition involving intestinal inflammation related to gluten ingestion, and type 1 diabetes has long been recognized. CD prevalence rates 4 to 6 times greater in adults with type 1 diabetes than in the general population. Much of the existing literature focuses on important implications related to the impact of a gluten-free diet on short-term outcomes in metabolic control and quality of life. Canadian Diabetes Association guidelines recommend targeted CD screening in patients with type 1 diabetes who have classic symptoms, such as abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea, unexplained weight loss or labile metabolic control; however, a significant proportion (40% to 60%) of patients may have mild or absent symptoms. Recent evidence suggests that adult patients with both conditions are at higher risk for diabetes microvascular comorbidities, increased mortality and impaired bone health if the CD is untreated. The purpose of this review is to describe the association between CD and type 1 diabetes and to summarize recent literature that evaluates risks in patients with both conditions.

  15. Follow-up of patients with celiac disease: achieving compliance with treatment.

    PubMed

    Pietzak, Michelle Maria

    2005-04-01

    Celiac disease is the only autoimmune condition for which we know the environmental trigger: gluten. Complete removal of gluten from the diet in a patient with celiac disease should result in symptomatic, serologic, and histologic remission. However, compliance with the gluten-free diet, especially in the United States, is extremely challenging. Compliance can be measured both noninvasively, by dietary history and measurement of serum antibodies, and invasively, by using endoscopic and histologic criteria. The advantages and disadvantages of these various modalities are discussed. The highest rates of compliance are reported in patients who are diagnosed as young children, whereas adolescents and those diagnosed via mass serologic screening have the most transgressions. Barriers to compliance include the poor palatability of gluten-free foods, confusing food-labeling practices, and common comorbid psychologic burdens such as anxiety and depression. Because celiac disease is a multisystemic disorder, physicians need to be aware of the potential autoimmune, nutritional, and malignant complications. An algorithm for the follow-up and management of the newly diagnosed celiac disease patient is presented, which includes regular follow-up; measurement of serum antibodies; eliciting a detailed dietary history; and examination for signs and symptoms of nutritional deficiencies, malignancy, and other autoimmune diseases. Ideally, a team approach to the follow-up of the newly diagnosed patient should include regular supervision by an interested physician, medical nutritional counseling by a registered dietician, and access to local and national support groups knowledgeable about this condition.

  16. Different Gene Expression Signatures in Children and Adults with Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Pascual, V; Medrano, L M; López-Palacios, N; Bodas, A; Dema, B; Fernández-Arquero, M; González-Pérez, B; Salazar, I; Núñez, C

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is developed after gluten ingestion in genetically susceptible individuals. It can appear at any time in life, but some differences are commonly observed between individuals with onset early in life or in adulthood. We aimed to investigate the molecular basis underlying those differences. We collected 19 duodenal biopsies of children and adults with CD and compared the expression of 38 selected genes between each other and with the observed in 13 non-CD controls matched by age. A Bayesian methodology was used to analyze the differences of gene expression between groups. We found seven genes with a similarly altered expression in children and adults with CD when compared to controls (C2orf74, CCR6, FASLG, JAK2, IL23A, TAGAP and UBE2L3). Differences were observed in 13 genes: six genes being altered only in adults (IL1RL1, CD28, STAT3, TMEM187, VAMP3 and ZFP36L1) and two only in children (TNFSF18 and ICOSLG); and four genes showing a significantly higher alteration in adults (CCR4, IL6, IL18RAP and PLEK) and one in children (C1orf106). This is the first extensive study comparing gene expression in children and adults with CD. Differences in the expression level of several genes were found between groups, being notorious the higher alteration observed in adults. Further research is needed to evaluate the possible genetic influence underlying these changes and the specific functional consequences of the reported differences.

  17. Local communication among mucosal immune cells in patients with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    van Bergen, Jeroen; Mulder, Chris J; Mearin, M Luisa; Koning, Frits

    2015-05-01

    In patients with celiac disease, gluten consumption causes inflammation of the duodenum, and, to a lesser extent, the proximal jejunum. Immune-dominant gluten peptides are modified by the enzyme TG2, leading to their high-affinity binding to HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 molecules, present in people with a predisposition to celiac disease. Gluten peptide-loaded HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 molecules are recognized by highly conserved receptors on CD4(+) T cells in the lamina propria. B cells specific for TG2 and modified gluten peptides are also abundant in the lamina propria of patients with celiac disease. In the epithelium, interleukin-15 activates intraepithelial lymphocytes that promote destruction of epithelial cells. However, it is not clear how the immune responses in the lamina propria and the epithelium, separated by a basement membrane, are linked. We review the immune processes that occur in the lamina propria and their potential effects on epithelial pathology in celiac disease.

  18. Characterization of celiac disease related oat proteins: bases for the development of high quality oat varieties suitable for celiac patients.

    PubMed

    Giménez, María J; Real, Ana; García-Molina, M Dolores; Sousa, Carolina; Barro, Francisco

    2017-02-17

    Some studies have suggested that the immunogenicity of oats depends on the cultivar. RP-HPLC has been proposed as a useful technique to select varieties of oats with reduced immunogenicity. The aim of this study was to identify both the avenin protein patterns associated with low gluten content and the available variability for the development of new non-toxic oat cultivars. The peaks of alcohol-soluble avenins of a collection of landraces and cultivars of oats have been characterized based on the RP-HPLC elution times. The immunotoxicity of oat varieties for patients with celiac disease (CD) has been tested using a competitive ELISA based on G12 monoclonal antibody. The oat lines show, on average, seven avenin peaks giving profiles with certain similarities. Based on this similarity, most of the accessions have been grouped into avenin patterns. The variability of RP-HPLC profiles of the collection is great, but not sufficient to uniquely identify the different varieties of the set. Overall, the immunogenicity of the collection is less than 20 ppm. However, there is a different distribution of toxicity ranges between the different peak patterns. We conclude that the RP-HPLC technique is useful to establish groups of varieties differing in degree of toxicity for CD patients.

  19. Characterization of celiac disease related oat proteins: bases for the development of high quality oat varieties suitable for celiac patients

    PubMed Central

    Giménez, María J.; Real, Ana; García-Molina, M. Dolores; Sousa, Carolina; Barro, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Some studies have suggested that the immunogenicity of oats depends on the cultivar. RP-HPLC has been proposed as a useful technique to select varieties of oats with reduced immunogenicity. The aim of this study was to identify both the avenin protein patterns associated with low gluten content and the available variability for the development of new non-toxic oat cultivars. The peaks of alcohol-soluble avenins of a collection of landraces and cultivars of oats have been characterized based on the RP-HPLC elution times. The immunotoxicity of oat varieties for patients with celiac disease (CD) has been tested using a competitive ELISA based on G12 monoclonal antibody. The oat lines show, on average, seven avenin peaks giving profiles with certain similarities. Based on this similarity, most of the accessions have been grouped into avenin patterns. The variability of RP-HPLC profiles of the collection is great, but not sufficient to uniquely identify the different varieties of the set. Overall, the immunogenicity of the collection is less than 20 ppm. However, there is a different distribution of toxicity ranges between the different peak patterns. We conclude that the RP-HPLC technique is useful to establish groups of varieties differing in degree of toxicity for CD patients. PMID:28209962

  20. Bone Mass and Mineral Metabolism Alterations in Adult Celiac Disease: Pathophysiology and Clinical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Di Stefano, Michele; Mengoli, Caterina; Bergonzi, Manuela; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Osteoporosis affects many patients with celiac disease (CD), representing the consequence of calcium malabsorption and persistent activation of mucosal inflammation. A slight increase of fracture risk is evident in this condition, particularly in those with overt malabsorption and in postmenopausal state. The adoption of a correct gluten-free diet (GFD) improves bone derangement, but is not able to normalize bone mass in all the patients. Biomarkers effective in the prediction of bone response to gluten-free diet are not yet available and the indications of guidelines are still imperfect and debated. In this review, the pathophysiology of bone loss is correlated to clinical aspects, defining an alternative proposal of management for this condition. PMID:24284619

  1. Detection of Active Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Duodenal Mucosa of Patients With Refractory Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Perfetti, Vittorio; Baldanti, Fausto; Lenti, Marco Vincenzo; Vanoli, Alessandro; Biagi, Federico; Gatti, Marta; Riboni, Roberta; Dallera, Elena; Paulli, Marco; Pedrazzoli, Paolo; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2016-08-01

    Refractory celiac disease is characterized by mucosal damage in patients with celiac disease despite a gluten-free diet. Little is known about the mechanisms that cause persistent intestinal inflammation in these patients. We performed a case-control study of 17 consecutive patients diagnosed with refractory celiac disease from 2001 through 2014 (median age, 51 y; 10 women) and 24 patients with uncomplicated celiac disease (controls) to determine whether refractory disease is associated with infection by lymphotropic oncogenic viruses. We performed real-time PCR analyses of duodenal biopsy samples from all patients to detect Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human herpesvirus-8, and human T-cell lymphotropic virus-I, -II, or -III. We used in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analyses to identify infected cells and viral proteins. We did not detect human herpesvirus-8 or human T-cell lymphotropic viruses in any of the biopsy specimens. However, 12 of 17 (70.5%) biopsy specimens from patients with refractory celiac disease were positive for EBV, compared with 4 of 24 (16.6%) biopsy specimens from controls (P < .001). EBV was detected in inflammatory cells and enterocytes. An analysis of latency- and replication-associated proteins confirmed active infection. Further studies are needed to determine whether EBV infection contributes to the pathogenesis of refractory celiac disease and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma.

  2. Self-compassion directly and indirectly predicts dietary adherence and quality of life among adults with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Dowd, A Justine; Jung, Mary E

    2017-06-01

    Strict adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD) is the only treatment for preventing both short- and long-term consequences of celiac disease. Given that following a strict GFD can be difficult, evidence-based strategies are needed to improve the psychological experience of living with celiac disease and following the GFD. Self-compassion appears to be an important component of effectively self-regulating one's behavior to cope with a chronic disease. The main goal of this study was to examine the relationships between self-compassion and management of celiac disease as assessed by (a) adherence to a strict GFD and (b) celiac-specific quality of life (CQoL). The secondary goal of this study was to explore self-regulatory efficacy (i.e., confidence in one's ability to self-manage behavior to follow a strict GFD) and concurrent self-regulatory efficacy (i.e., one's confidence to self-manage other valued life goals while following a strict GFD) as mediators of the relationship between self-compassion and the primary outcomes (adherence and CQoL). In this prospective study, 200 North American adults diagnosed with celiac disease completed online questionnaires at two time points (baseline and 1 month later). Self-compassion at baseline directly predicted stricter adherence (at Time 2; b = -0.63, p = 0.006) and enhanced CQoL (at Time 2; b = -0.50, p = 0.001). Further, self-compassion (at Time 1) also indirectly predicted stricter Time 2 adherence through self-regulatory efficacy (at Time 1; b = -0.26, 95% CI [-0.58, -0.04], R(2) = 0.29) and enhanced Time 2 CQoL through concurrent self-regulatory efficacy (at Time 1; b = -0.07, 95% CI [-0.14, -0.03], R(2) = 0.33). This was the first study to assess the effects of self-compassion in relation to the psychological experience of coping with celiac disease and following a GFD. The findings indicate that self-compassion, self-regulatory efficacy and concurrent self-regulatory efficacy are important cognitions in

  3. Advances in celiac disease and gluten-free diet.

    PubMed

    Niewinski, Mary M

    2008-04-01

    Celiac disease is becoming an increasingly recognized autoimmune enteropathy caused by a permanent intolerance to gluten. Once thought to be a rare disease of childhood characterized by diarrhea, celiac disease is actually a multisystemic disorder that occurs as a result of an immune response to ingested gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. Screening studies have revealed that celiac disease is most common in asymptomatic adults in the United States. Although considerable scientific progress has been made in understanding celiac disease and in preventing or curing its manifestations, a strict gluten-free diet is the only treatment for celiac disease to date. Early diagnosis and treatment, together with regular follow-up visits with a dietitian, are necessary to ensure nutritional adequacy and to prevent malnutrition while adhering to the gluten-free diet for life. The purpose of this review is to provide clinicians with current updated information about celiac disease, its diverse clinical presentation and increased prevalence, the complex pathophysiology and strong genetic predisposition to celiac disease, and its diagnosis. This review focuses in detail on the gluten-free diet and the importance of intense expert dietary counseling for all patients with celiac disease. Recent advances in the gluten-free diet include food allergen labeling as well as the US Food and Drug Administration's proposed definition of the food-labeling term gluten-free. The gluten-free diet is complex and patients need comprehensive nutrition education from a skilled dietitian.

  4. Evaluation of the response to vaccination with hepatitis B vaccine in pediatric patients diagnosed with celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Egberg, Matthew; Nelson, Catherine; Eickoff, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Background: A gap exists in the literature on celiac disease populations and the response to hepatitis B vaccination. Objective: To identify pediatric patients with celiac disease who received the primary hepatitis B vaccination and investigate their response to vaccine. Design/Methods: Patients underwent blood draw for hepatitis B surface antibody titers. Patients with undetectable or non-protective HBsAb titers were contacted. Study outcome measures and patient characteristics variables were summarized by means, standard deviations, medians, and ranges. A two-sample t-test was used to compare normally distributed continuous variables between responders and non-responders. Results: In all, 58% of patients did not meet the threshold for “protective” antibody titers. The mean time between completion of hepatitis B vaccination and diagnosis of celiac disease was 8.1 years for responders versus 10.5 years for non-responders. In a multivariate analysis, time between completion of vaccine and diagnosis of celiac disease was statistically significant predictor of response with an adjusted odds ratio of 0.69 (95% confidence interval: 0.50–0.95; p = 0.021). Conclusion: Our celiac disease population shows a high hepatitis B vaccine failure. The time between completion of vaccine series and diagnosis of celiac disease is an independent predictor for response. PMID:26770758

  5. Different Gene Expression Signatures in Children and Adults with Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    López-Palacios, N.; Bodas, A.; Dema, B.; Fernández-Arquero, M.; González-Pérez, B.; Salazar, I.; Núñez, C.

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is developed after gluten ingestion in genetically susceptible individuals. It can appear at any time in life, but some differences are commonly observed between individuals with onset early in life or in adulthood. We aimed to investigate the molecular basis underlying those differences. We collected 19 duodenal biopsies of children and adults with CD and compared the expression of 38 selected genes between each other and with the observed in 13 non-CD controls matched by age. A Bayesian methodology was used to analyze the differences of gene expression between groups. We found seven genes with a similarly altered expression in children and adults with CD when compared to controls (C2orf74, CCR6, FASLG, JAK2, IL23A, TAGAP and UBE2L3). Differences were observed in 13 genes: six genes being altered only in adults (IL1RL1, CD28, STAT3, TMEM187, VAMP3 and ZFP36L1) and two only in children (TNFSF18 and ICOSLG); and four genes showing a significantly higher alteration in adults (CCR4, IL6, IL18RAP and PLEK) and one in children (C1orf106). This is the first extensive study comparing gene expression in children and adults with CD. Differences in the expression level of several genes were found between groups, being notorious the higher alteration observed in adults. Further research is needed to evaluate the possible genetic influence underlying these changes and the specific functional consequences of the reported differences. PMID:26859134

  6. Surface-associated proteins of wheat starch granules: suitability of wheat starch for celiac patients.

    PubMed

    Kasarda, Donald D; Dupont, Frances M; Vensel, William H; Altenbach, Susan B; Lopez, Rocio; Tanaka, Charlene K; Hurkman, William J

    2008-11-12

    Wheat starch is used to make baked products for celiac patients in several European countries but is avoided in the United States because of uncertainty about the amounts of associated grain storage (gluten) proteins. People with celiac disease (CD) must avoid wheat, rye, and barley proteins and products that contain them. These proteins are capable of initiating damage to the absorptive lining of the small intestine in CD patients, apparently as a consequence of undesirable interactions with the innate and adaptive immune systems. In this study, starch surface-associated proteins were extracted from four commercial wheat starches, fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography and gel electrophoresis, and identified by tandem mass spectrometry analysis. More than 150 proteins were identified, many of which (for example, histones, purothionins, and glutenins) had not been recognized previously as starch-associated. The commercial starches were analyzed by the R-5 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method to estimate the amount of harmful gluten protein present. One of these starches had a low gluten content of 7 ppm and actually fell within the range proposed as a new Codex Alimentarius Standard for naturally gluten-free foods (maximum 20 ppm). This low level of gluten indicates that the starch should be especially suitable for use by celiac patients, although wheat starches with levels up to 100 ppm are deemed safe in the proposed Codex standards.

  7. Celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Scherer, John R

    2008-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder caused by the continued ingestion of gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley and rye, by predisposed individuals. With the development of highly sensitive serologic tests, this has become an increasingly recognized disease with prevalence as high as 1% in certain patient populations, such as Caucasian females. Almost all celiac patients carry the human leukocyte antigen DQ2/DQ8 gene. Much has recently been discovered about the role of the innate immune system in exposing genetically vulnerable patients to the pathogenic gliadin fraction of gluten. The "classical" presentation of chronic diarrhea and malabsorption is now a rarity. Due to earlier detection and increased awareness, celiac disease now presents with a myriad of "atypical" signs and symptoms such as iron-deficiency anemia and osteoporosis. Associated conditions include T-cell lymphoma, dermatitis herpetiformis, autoimmune thyroiditis and type 1 diabetes. Diagnosis requires serologic confirmation with either antiendomysial or antitransglutaminase antibodies as well as histologic confirmation from endoscopic small bowel biopsy. The only effective treatment necessitates a lifelong, continual adherence to a gluten-free diet.

  8. A survey of celiac-sprue patients: effect of dietary restrictions on religious practices.

    PubMed

    Bentley, A C

    1988-01-01

    Celiac-Sprue Disease, also referred to as Non-Tropical Sprue, is a dietary disease. Celiac-Sprue patients were asked to complete a questionnaire regarding the effect of dietary restrictions on participation in the Passover meal and reception of Communion. A pilot study suggested that subjects made changes in their religious practices because of dietary restrictions. A second, more detailed survey, was performed in which 58 subjects participated and 14 religions were represented. The results indicated that many subjects made changes in their religious practices (p less than .01), made changes on their own initiative (p less than .01), or violated diet prescribed for the disease under the religious setting versus other settings (p less than .05).

  9. Celiac disease serology in patients with different pretest probabilities: Is biopsy avoidable?

    PubMed Central

    Sugai, Emilia; Moreno, María L; Hwang, Hui J; Cabanne, Ana; Crivelli, Adriana; Nachman, Fabio; Vázquez, Horacio; Niveloni, Sonia; Argonz, Julio; Mazure, Roberto; Motta, Graciela La; Caniggia, María E; Smecuol, Edgardo; Chopita, Néstor; Gómez, Juan C; Mauriño, Eduardo; Bai, Julio C

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To establish the diagnostic performance of several serological tests, individually and in combination, for diagnosing celiac disease (CD) in patients with different pretest probabilities, and to explore potential serological algorithms to reduce the necessity for biopsy. METHODS: We prospectively performed duodenal biopsy and serology in 679 adults who had either high risk (n = 161) or low risk (n = 518) for CD. Blood samples were tested using six assays (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) that detected antibodies to tissue transglutaminase (tTG) and deamidated gliadin peptide (DGP). RESULTS: CD prevalence was 39.1% in the high-risk population and 3.3% in the low-risk group. In high-risk patients, all individual assays had a high diagnostic efficacy [area under receiving operator characteristic curves (AU ROC): 0.968 to 0.999]. In contrast, assays had a lower diagnostic efficacy (AU ROC: 0.835 to 0.972) in the low-risk group. Using assay combinations, it would be possible to reach or rule out diagnosis of CD without biopsy in 92% of cases in both pretest populations. We observed that the new DGP/tTG Screen assay resulted in a surplus compared to more conventional assays in any clinical situation. CONCLUSION: The DGP/tTG Screen assay could be considered as the best initial test for CD. Combinations of two tests, including a DGP/tTG Screen, might be able to diagnose CD accurately in different clinical scenarios making biopsy avoidable in a high proportion of subjects. PMID:20593499

  10. Are Treated Celiac Patients at Risk for Mycotoxins? An Italian Case-Study

    PubMed Central

    Cirlini, Martina; Mazzeo, Teresa; Roncoroni, Leda; Lombardo, Vincenza; Elli, Luca; Bardella, Maria T.; Agostoni, Carlo; Doneda, Luisa; Brighenti, Furio; Dall’Asta, Chiara; Pellegrini, Nicoletta

    2016-01-01

    Urinary biomarkers of mycotoxin exposure were evaluated in a group of celiac patients (n = 55) and in a control group of healthy subjects (n = 50) following their habitual diet. Deoxynivalenol (DON), zearalenone (ZEN), and fumonisin B1 (FB1) were monitored in 105 urinary samples collected from the two groups. Dietary habits were also recorded through compilation of a seven-day weighed dietary diary. Biomarkers of mycotoxin exposure were detected in 21 celiac patients and in 15 control subjects, corresponding to about 34% of total participants. In particular, ZEN was the most detected mycotoxin among all the studied subjects with a total of 19 positive cases. Results did not show a statistically significant difference in mycotoxin exposure between the two groups, and the presence of specific mycotoxins was not related to the intake of any particular food category. Our findings suggest little urgency of specific regulation for gluten free products, although the prevalence of exposure observed in free-living diets of both celiac and healthy subjects underlines the need of a constant surveillance on mycotoxins occurrence at large. PMID:28036017

  11. MR-guided Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Ablation: An Evaluation of Effect and Injection Spread Pattern in Cancer Patients with Celiac Tumor Infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Akural, Etem; Ojala, Risto O.; Jaervimaeki, Voitto; Kariniemi, Juho; Tervonen, Osmo A.; Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto

    2013-04-15

    ObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, the initial accuracy, and the effects of the MR-guided neurolytic celiac plexus ablation as a method to treat cancer-induced chronic abdominal pain. Thirteen celiac plexus ablations were performed for 12 patients. A 0.23-T open MRI scanner with optical navigation was used for procedural guidance. As an adjunct to the MR-guided needle positioning, the needle location was confirmed with saline injection and consequent MR imaging (STIR sequence). The spread of the ablative injection material (alcohol-lidocaine mix) was observed by repeating this sequence after the therapeutic injection. Pain scores from seven patients (eight ablations) were used to assess the therapy effect. MR guidance allowed adequate needle positioning and visualization of injection material in all cases. The rest pain scores significantly decreased from 4 (median) at baseline to 1 (median) at 2 weeks (p < 0.05). Average and worst pain experienced during the past week were significantly lower at the 2-week time point compared with the baseline (p < 0.05). However, the intervention did not result in reduction of opioid use at 2 weeks.MR guidance is an accurate and safe method for celiac plexus ablation with positive therapeutic effect.

  12. The gluten-free diet: testing alternative cereals tolerated by celiac patients.

    PubMed

    Comino, Isabel; Moreno, María de Lourdes; Real, Ana; Rodríguez-Herrera, Alfonso; Barro, Francisco; Sousa, Carolina

    2013-10-23

    A strict gluten-free diet (GFD) is the only currently available therapeutic treatment for patients with celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine associated with a permanent intolerance to gluten proteins. The complete elimination of gluten proteins contained in cereals from the diet is the key to celiac disease management. However, this generates numerous social and economic repercussions due to the ubiquity of gluten in foods. The research presented in this review focuses on the current status of alternative cereals and pseudocereals and their derivatives obtained by natural selection, breeding programs and transgenic or enzymatic technology, potential tolerated by celiac people. Finally, we describe several strategies for detoxification of dietary gluten. These included enzymatic cleavage of gliadin fragment by Prolyl endopeptidases (PEPs) from different organisms, degradation of toxic peptides by germinating cereal enzymes and transamidation of cereal flours. This information can be used to search for and develop cereals with the baking and nutritional qualities of toxic cereals, but which do not exacerbate this condition.

  13. The Gluten-Free Diet: Testing Alternative Cereals Tolerated by Celiac Patients

    PubMed Central

    Comino, Isabel; de Lourdes Moreno, María; Real, Ana; Rodríguez-Herrera, Alfonso; Barro, Francisco; Sousa, Carolina

    2013-01-01

    A strict gluten-free diet (GFD) is the only currently available therapeutic treatment for patients with celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine associated with a permanent intolerance to gluten proteins. The complete elimination of gluten proteins contained in cereals from the diet is the key to celiac disease management. However, this generates numerous social and economic repercussions due to the ubiquity of gluten in foods. The research presented in this review focuses on the current status of alternative cereals and pseudocereals and their derivatives obtained by natural selection, breeding programs and transgenic or enzymatic technology, potential tolerated by celiac people. Finally, we describe several strategies for detoxification of dietary gluten. These included enzymatic cleavage of gliadin fragment by Prolyl endopeptidases (PEPs) from different organisms, degradation of toxic peptides by germinating cereal enzymes and transamidation of cereal flours. This information can be used to search for and develop cereals with the baking and nutritional qualities of toxic cereals, but which do not exacerbate this condition. PMID:24152755

  14. Interaction between psychiatric and autoimmune disorders in celiac disease patients in the Northeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    GARUD, S.; LEFFLER, D.; DENNIS, M.; EDWARDS-GEORGE, J.; SARYAN, D.; SHETH, S.; SCHUPPAN, D.; JAMMA, S.; KELLY, C. P.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background Previous studies yielded conflicting results regarding the presence of an association between celiac disease (CD) and psychiatric disorders including depression. This association has not been studied in the United States. Aim To determine the prevalence of psychiatric and autoimmune disorders in patients with CD in the US compared to control groups. Methods In a case control study, the prevalence of psychiatric and autoimmune disorders was compared in 600 CD patients, 200 irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients and 200 healthy controls. Results The prevalence of depression in CD was 17.2% and was similar to that in IBS (18.5%, P = 0.74) and controls (16.0%, P = 0.79). Among CD patients, type I DM was identified as a significant risk factor for depression (P < 0.01) with 37% of patients with both CD and type I DM having clinical depression. Conclusion The prevalence of depression in CD is similar to that in other chronic gastrointestinal diseases and healthy controls. However, there is a markedly elevated risk of depression in patients with both type I DM and CD. Differing rates of type 1 DM among celiac populations may account for disparity in published rates of depression in patients with CD. PMID:19183153

  15. Approach to diagnosing celiac disease in patients with low bone mineral density or fragility fractures

    PubMed Central

    Rios, Lorena P.; Khan, Aliya; Sultan, Muhammad; McAssey, Karen; Fouda, Mona A.; Armstrong, David

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To provide clinicians with an update on the diagnosis of celiac disease (CD) and to make recommendations on the indications to screen for CD in patients presenting with low bone mineral density (BMD) or fragility fractures. Quality of evidence A multidisciplinary task force developed clinically relevant questions related to the diagnosis of CD as the basis for a literature search of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL databases (January 2000 to January 2009) using the key words celiac disease, osteoporosis, osteopenia, low bone mass, and fracture. The existing literature consists of level I and II studies. Main message The estimated prevalence of asymptomatic CD is 2% to 3% in individuals with low BMD. Routine screening for CD is not justified in patients with low BMD. However, targeted screening for CD is recommended for patients who have T-scores of −1.0 or less at the spine or hip, or a history of fragility fractures in association with any CD-related symptoms or conditions; family history of CD; or low urinary calcium levels, vitamin D insufficiency, and raised parathyroid hormone levels despite adequate intake of calcium and vitamin D. Celiac disease testing should be performed while the subject is consuming a gluten-containing diet; initial screening should be performed with human recombinant immunoglobulin (Ig) A tissue transglutaminase or other IgA tissue transglutaminase assays, in association with IgA endomysial antibody immunofluorescence. Duodenal biopsy is necessary to confirm the diagnosis of CD. Human leukocyte antigen typing might assist in confirming or ruling out the diagnosis of CD in cases where serology and histology are discordant. Definitive diagnosis is based on clinical, serologic, and histologic features, combined with a positive response to a gluten-free diet. Conclusion Current evidence does not support routine screening for CD in all patients with low BMD. A targeted case-finding approach is appropriate for patients

  16. CD103+ γδ T cell large granular lymphocytosis in a patient with refractory celiac disease: a diagnostic enigma.

    PubMed

    Sreedharanunni, Sreejesh; Varma, Neelam; Sachdeva, Man Updesh Singh; Gupta, Kirti; Pai, Rekha; Kochhar, Rakesh; Malhotra, Pankaj; Varma, Subhash

    2015-06-01

    Indolent γδ T cell lymphomas/leukemias are rare and overlap with the morphological spectrum of large granular lymphocyte (LGL) leukemia. We report an extremely rare case of CD103(+) γδ T LGL leukemia in a patient with celiac disease who presented with refractory diarrhea. Whether the refractory diarrhea in our patient was a manifestation of LGL leukemia itself or whether the clonal LGL expansion is a manifestation of refractory celiac disease (RCD) remains an enigma. This report highlights the diagnostic difficulties and the need of consensus in categorizing clonal CD103(+) lymphocytosis in patients with RCD.

  17. [The role of celiac disease and type 1 diabetes coexistance. Is celiac disease responsible for diabetic status?].

    PubMed

    Galicka-Latała, Danuta; Zwolińska-Wcisło, Małgorzata; Sosin-Rudnicka, Lucyna; Rozpondek, Piotr

    2009-01-01

    Celiac disease is the status of the autoimmune answer provoked by gluten ingestion in genetically predisposed people. Recently gluten entheropathy was considered as a rare clinical problem in adults. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that can coexist with other diseases, such as diabetes mellitus type 1 (DMID), thyroid gland diseases. The aim of our study was evaluation of the frequency of coexistence of celiac disease with DMID using the level of anti tissue transglutaminase antibodies (IgA- tTG) and mucosal biopsy from the distal part of the duodenum. An attempt was made to estimate the influence of celiac disease on the intensity of clinical symptoms and metabolic balance in patients with DMID. Our study included 109 patients with DMID, aged 18-52 years. The frequency of the incidence of celiac disease in DMID patients was 9.71%. Gastric symptoms, such as diarrhea, abdominal pain were more frequent in patients with villous atrophy in the intestine. Hyperglycemia and problems with glucose balance in the serum were observed. Introduction of the gluten free diet led to improvement quality of life, less frequent hypoglycemic episodes and disappearance of diarrhea, increase of serum iron and decrease of IgA-tTG level in the serum. It is necessary to measure the level of IgA- tTG in patients with DMID. Diagnosis of celiac disease in patients with DMID and its treatment with gluten free diet causes the clinical, histological and biochemical improvement in these patients.

  18. Celiac Disease Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Leffler, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease is one of the most prevalent autoimmune gastrointestinal disorders but as the case of Ms. J illustrates, diagnosis is often delayed or missed. Based on serology studies, the prevalence of celiac disease in many populations is estimated to be approximately 1% and has been increasing steadily over the last 50 years. Evaluation for celiac disease is generally straightforward, and uses commonly available serologic tests, however the signs and symptoms of celiac disease are nonspecific and highly heterogeneous making diagnosis difficult. While celiac disease is often considered a mild disorder treatable with simple dietary changes, in reality celiac disease imparts considerable risks including reduced bone mineral density, impaired quality of life, and increased overall mortality. In addition, the gluten free diet is highly burdensome and can profoundly affect patients and their families. For these reasons, care of individuals with celiac disease requires prompt diagnosis and ongoing multidisciplinary management. PMID:21990301

  19. Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... small intestine. People with celiac disease cannot eat gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye. ... Treatment Doctors treat celiac disease by prescribing a gluten-free diet. Symptoms significantly improve for most people ...

  20. Maize Prolamins Could Induce a Gluten-Like Cellular Immune Response in Some Celiac Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Sánchez, Juan P.; Cabrera-Chávez, Francisco; Calderón de la Barca, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune-mediated enteropathy triggered by dietary gluten in genetically prone individuals. The current treatment for CD is a strict lifelong gluten-free diet. However, in some CD patients following a strict gluten-free diet, the symptoms do not remit. These cases may be refractory CD or due to gluten contamination; however, the lack of response could be related to other dietary ingredients, such as maize, which is one of the most common alternatives to wheat used in the gluten-free diet. In some CD patients, as a rare event, peptides from maize prolamins could induce a celiac-like immune response by similar or alternative pathogenic mechanisms to those used by wheat gluten peptides. This is supported by several shared features between wheat and maize prolamins and by some experimental results. Given that gluten peptides induce an immune response of the intestinal mucosa both in vivo and in vitro, peptides from maize prolamins could also be tested to determine whether they also induce a cellular immune response. Hypothetically, maize prolamins could be harmful for a very limited subgroup of CD patients, especially those that are non-responsive, and if it is confirmed, they should follow, in addition to a gluten-free, a maize-free diet. PMID:24152750

  1. Maize prolamins could induce a gluten-like cellular immune response in some celiac disease patients.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Sánchez, Juan P; Cabrera-Chávez, Francisco; de la Barca, Ana M Calderón

    2013-10-21

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune-mediated enteropathy triggered by dietary gluten in genetically prone individuals. The current treatment for CD is a strict lifelong gluten-free diet. However, in some CD patients following a strict gluten-free diet, the symptoms do not remit. These cases may be refractory CD or due to gluten contamination; however, the lack of response could be related to other dietary ingredients, such as maize, which is one of the most common alternatives to wheat used in the gluten-free diet. In some CD patients, as a rare event, peptides from maize prolamins could induce a celiac-like immune response by similar or alternative pathogenic mechanisms to those used by wheat gluten peptides. This is supported by several shared features between wheat and maize prolamins and by some experimental results. Given that gluten peptides induce an immune response of the intestinal mucosa both in vivo and in vitro, peptides from maize prolamins could also be tested to determine whether they also induce a cellular immune response. Hypothetically, maize prolamins could be harmful for a very limited subgroup of CD patients, especially those that are non-responsive, and if it is confirmed, they should follow, in addition to a gluten-free, a maize-free diet.

  2. Suggestions for automatic quantitation of endoscopic image analysis to improve detection of small intestinal pathology in celiac disease patients.

    PubMed

    Ciaccio, Edward J; Bhagat, Govind; Lewis, Suzanne K; Green, Peter H

    2015-10-01

    Although many groups have attempted to develop an automated computerized method to detect pathology of the small intestinal mucosa caused by celiac disease, the efforts have thus far failed. This is due in part to the occult presence of the disease. When pathological evidence of celiac disease exists in the small bowel it is visually often patchy and subtle. Due to presence of extraneous substances such as air bubbles and opaque fluids, the use of computerized automation methods have only been partially successful in detecting the hallmarks of the disease in the small intestine-villous atrophy, fissuring, and a mottled appearance. By using a variety of computerized techniques and assigning a weight or vote to each technique, it is possible to improve the detection of abnormal regions which are indicative of celiac disease, and of treatment progress in diagnosed patients. Herein a paradigm is suggested for improving the efficacy of automated methods for measuring celiac disease manifestation in the small intestinal mucosa. The suggestions are applicable to both standard and videocapsule endoscopic imaging, since both methods could potentially benefit from computerized quantitation to improve celiac disease diagnosis.

  3. Celiac disease during pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Rebecca; Koren, Gideon

    2004-01-01

    QUESTION: One of my patients was diagnosed with celiac disease and maintains a strict gluten-free diet. Is her fetus at risk of neural tube defects because she does not get folic acid from bread and other flour-based foods? ANSWER: A woman with celiac disease must supplement her diet with multivitamins, including folic acid. Most prenatal vitamins contain 0.8 to 0.9 mg of folic acid, double the amount recommended by Health Canada for prevention of neural tube defects. Without supplementation (eg, undiagnosed pregnancy), women with celiac disease might not take in enough folate to maintain protective levels. PMID:15526871

  4. Trichotillomania in Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lihabi, Abeer Ayad Al

    2016-01-01

    Trichotillomania is an underreported and underdiagnosed condition associated with significant impairments in social and functional relationships. The connection between celiac disease and trichotillomania is not yet established clearly. Only a few cases of trichotillomania have been reported to date. Here, we report the case of a 22-year-old Saudi female, who presented with celiac disease and trichotillomania to the psychiatry clinic. This is the first report of its kind in Saudi Arabia. By reporting this case, I highlight the importance of psychiatric and comprehensive approaches in patients with celiac disease. PMID:27920650

  5. Exposure assessment to mycotoxins in gluten-free diet for celiac patients.

    PubMed

    Brera, C; Debegnach, F; De Santis, B; Di Ianni, S; Gregori, E; Neuhold, S; Valitutti, F

    2014-07-01

    Mycotoxins are low molecular weight secondary metabolites produced by certain strains of filamentous fungi such as Aspergillus, Penicillium and Fusarium, which attack crops in the field, and grow on foods also during storage under favorable conditions of temperature and humidity. Foods mainly contributing to the intake of mycotoxins with diet are cereals, maize being the most risky commodity due to the potential co-occurrence of more than one mycotoxin, this can be of particular concern especially for vulnerable group of population such as celiac patients that show increased maize-based products consumption. In this study the exposure of celiac patients to fumonisins (FBs) and zearalenone (ZON) has been assessed. The higher exposures, for all the matrices and for both the selected mycotoxins, were for children age group. The lower and upper bound exposure ranged between 348-582 ng/kg bw/day for FBs and 22-83 ng/kg bw/day for ZON; these values result well below the TDI for the selected mycotoxins, representing the 17-29% and 9-33% of the TDI set for FBs and ZON, respectively. Even considering the worst scenario the exposure values reported for children were lower, namely 1385 ng/kg bw/day for FBs and 237 ng/kg bw/day for ZON, than the corresponding toxicological thresholds.

  6. Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Celiac Disease Patients on a Long-Term Gluten-Free Diet

    PubMed Central

    Laurikka, Pilvi; Salmi, Teea; Collin, Pekka; Huhtala, Heini; Mäki, Markku; Kaukinen, Katri; Kurppa, Kalle

    2016-01-01

    Experience suggests that many celiac patients suffer from persistent symptoms despite a long-term gluten-free diet (GFD). We investigated the prevalence and severity of these symptoms in patients with variable duration of GFD. Altogether, 856 patients were classified into untreated (n = 128), short-term GFD (1–2 years, n = 93) and long-term GFD (≥3 years, n = 635) groups. Analyses were made of clinical and histological data and dietary adherence. Symptoms were evaluated by the validated GSRS questionnaire. One-hundred-sixty healthy subjects comprised the control group. Further, the severity of symptoms was compared with that in peptic ulcer, reflux disease, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Altogether, 93% of the short-term and 94% of the long-term treated patients had a strict GFD and recovered mucosa. Untreated patients had more diarrhea, indigestion and abdominal pain than those on GFD and controls. There were no differences in symptoms between the short- and long-term GFD groups, but both yielded poorer GSRS total score than controls (p = 0.03 and p = 0.05, respectively). Furthermore, patients treated 1–2 years had more diarrhea (p = 0.03) and those treated >10 years more reflux (p = 0.04) than controls. Long-term treated celiac patients showed relatively mild symptoms compared with other gastrointestinal diseases. Based on our results, good response to GFD sustained in long-term follow-up, but not all patients reach the level of healthy individuals. PMID:27428994

  7. Genome Sequence of Kocuria palustris Strain CD07_3 Isolated from the Duodenal Mucosa of a Celiac Disease Patient

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Ramesan Girish; Kaur, Gurwinder; Kochhar, Rakesh; Dhawan, Devinder Kumar

    2016-01-01

    We report here the 2.8-Mb genome of Kocuria palustris strain CD07_3 isolated from the duodenal mucosa of a celiac disease (CD) patient. The genome of the bacterium consists of specific virulence factor genes and antibiotic resistance genes that depict its pathogenic potential. PMID:27125478

  8. Magneto immunosensor for gliadin detection in gluten-free foodstuff: towards food safety for celiac patients.

    PubMed

    Laube, T; Kergaravat, S V; Fabiano, S N; Hernández, S R; Alegret, S; Pividori, M I

    2011-09-15

    Gliadin is a constituent of the cereal protein gluten, responsible for the intolerance generated in celiac disease. Its detection is of high interest for food safety of celiac patients, since the only treatment known until now is a lifelong avoidance of this protein in the diet. Therefore, it is essential to have an easy and reliable method of analysis to control the contents in gluten-free foods. An electrochemical magneto immunosensor for the quantification of gliadin or small gliadin fragments in natural or pretreated food samples is described for the first time and compared to a novel magneto-ELISA system based on optical detection. The immunological reaction was performed on magnetic beads as solid support by the oriented covalent immobilization, of the protein gliadin on tosyl-activated beads. Direct, as well as indirect competitive immunoassays were optimized, achieving the best analytical performance with the direct competitive format. Excellent detection limits (in the order of μg L(-1)) were achieved, according to the legislation for gluten-free products. The matrix effect, as well as the performance of the assays was successfully evaluated using spiked gluten-free foodstuffs (skimmed milk and beer), obtaining excellent recovery values in the results.

  9. The Celiac Patient Antibody Response to Conventional and Gluten-Removed Beer.

    PubMed

    Allred, Laura K; Lesko, Katherine; McKiernan, Diane; Kupper, Cynthia; Guandalini, Stefano

    2017-03-01

    Enzymatic digestion, or hydrolysis, has been proposed for treating gluten-containing foods and beverages to make them safe for persons with celiac disease (CD). There are no validated testing methods that allow the quantitation of all the hydrolyzed or fermented gluten peptides in foods and beverages that might be harmful to CD patients, making it difficult to assess the safety of hydrolyzed products. This study examines an ELISA-based method to determine whether serum antibody binding of residual peptides in a fermented barley-based product is greater among active-CD patients than a normal control group, using commercial beers as a test case. Sera from 31 active-CD patients and 29 nonceliac control subjects were used to assess the binding of proteins from barley, rice, traditional beer, gluten-free beer, and enzymatically treated (gluten-removed) traditional beer. In the ELISA, none of the subjects' sera bound to proteins in the gluten-free beer. Eleven active-CD patient serum samples demonstrated immunoglobulin A (IgA) or immunoglobulin G (IgG) binding to a barley extract, compared to only one nonceliac control subject. Of the seven active-CD patients who had an IgA binding response to barley, four also responded to traditional beer, and two of these responded to the gluten-removed beer. None of the nonceliac control subjects' sera bound to all three beer samples. Binding of protein fragments in hydrolyzed or fermented foods and beverages by serum from active-CD patients, but not nonceliac control subjects, may indicate the presence of residual peptides that are celiac-specific.

  10. Ophthalmologic manifestations of celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Thiago Gonçalves dos Santos; Costa, Ana Luiza Fontes de Azevedo; Oyamada, Maria Kiyoko; Schor, Paulo; Sipahi, Aytan Miranda

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that affects the small intestine of genetically predisposed individuals. Ophthalmic manifestations are within the extra-intestinal manifestations, and can be divided into those of autoimmune disorders or those due to absorptive disabilities. This article reviewed the ophthalmologic manifestation of celiac disease. Ophthalmic symptoms are rare, but should be investigated in patients with celiac disease and taken into consideration as the first systemic manifestation. PMID:26949627

  11. Screening for celiac disease, by endomysial antibodies, in patients with unexplained articular manifestations.

    PubMed

    Ghozzi, Mariam; Sakly, Wahiba; Mankaï, Amani; Bouajina, Elyes; Bahri, Fethi; Nouira, Rafiaa; Kechrid, Chedia; Ghedira, Ibtissem

    2014-05-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune systemic disease characterized by not only gastrointestinal but also extraintestinal manifestations. The aim of our study was to do a serological screening for CD, by IgA endomysial antibodies (EmA), in patients with unexplained articular manifestations. Two hundred and eleven patients suffering from arthritis or arthralgia without evident cause were studied. EmA were determined by indirect immunofluorescence on human umbilical cord. Two thousand and five hundred blood donors served as control group. Out of 211 patients, 5 had EmA (2.37 %). The frequency of EmA in our patients was significantly higher than in the control group (2.37 vs. 0.28 %, p < 0.01). All patients with positive EmA were female. EmA were significantly more frequent in female patients than in female healthy subjects (3 vs. 0.4 %, p < 0.01). Medical records revealed: diarrhea (one patient), short size (one patient), anemia (three patients), weight loss (two patients) spontaneous abortion (three patients), secondary amenorrhea (one patient), early menopause (one patient) and early baby death (one patient). Biochemical analysis showed decreased level of calcium (one patient), vitamin D (one patient) and cholesterol (one patient). Unexplained liver cytolysis was observed in two patients. Radiological examination showed demineralization of two hands in one patient. Bone osteodensitometry done in one patient out of five revealed lumbar osteopenia. The articular manifestations of the five patients did not respond to corticosteroid treatment. CD must be considered among the differential diagnosis in a patient with arthritis or arthralgia.

  12. Celiac disease: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Pelkowski, Timothy D; Viera, Anthony J

    2014-01-15

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. It is triggered by exposure to dietary gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. Gluten is a storage protein in wheat, rye, and barley, which are staples in many American diets. Celiac disease is characterized by chronic inflammation of the small intestinal mucosa, which leads to atrophy of the small intestinal villi and subsequent malabsorption. The condition may develop at any age. Intestinal manifestations include diarrhea and weight loss. Common extraintestinal manifestations include iron deficiency anemia, decreased bone mineral density, and neuropathy. Most cases of celiac disease are diagnosed in persons with extraintestinal manifestations. The presence of dermatitis herpetiformis is pathognomonic for celiac disease. Diagnosis is supported by a positive tissue transglutaminase serologic test but, in general, should be confirmed by a small bowel biopsy showing the characteristic histology associated with celiac disease. The presence of human leukocyte antigen alleles DQ2, DQ8, or both is essential for the development of celiac disease, and can be a useful genetic test in select instances. Treatment of celiac disease is a gluten-free diet. Dietary education should focus on identifying hidden sources of gluten, planning balanced meals, reading labels, food shopping, dining out, and dining during travel. About 5% of patients with celiac disease are refractory to a gluten-free diet. These patients should be referred to a gastroenterologist for reconsideration of the diagnosis or for aggressive treatment of refractory celiac disease, which may involve corticosteroids and immunomodulators.

  13. Chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma via the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery in patients with celiac artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, M; Higashihara, H; Ono, H; Koganemaru, F; Fujimitsu, R; Mizuma, Y; Nakamura, T; Sato, S; Kimura, S; Kodama, S

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-one patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) accompanied by extensive celiac artery stenosis or obstruction were treated by chemoembolization via the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (IPDA). The tip of the catheter was placed in the arteries in front of the confluence with the proper hepatic artery in 12 patients (group A: the proximal portion of the IPDA in 10, and common hepatic artery in 2), and in the proper hepatic artery or branches of it (group B) in 9 using a coaxial catheter system. Transient hyperamylasemia was observed in 10 of the 12 patients in group A and in 3 of the 9 patients in group B after chemoembolization. Splenic infarction developed in 8 patients in group A and in none in group B. Intrapancreatic fluid collection was present in 2 patients in group A following chemoembolization. No fatal complications were encountered. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates of the 10 patients in group A treated by only chemoembolization were 90, 57, and 23%, respectively (mean survival 780 days). The 1- and 2-year survival rates of 9 patients in group B were 85.8 and 85.8% (mean 879 days), respectively. Considering the severity of complications and the survival rates in groups A and B, chemoembolization by superselective catheterization into the hepatic artery via the IPDA is the treatment of choice. However, chemoembolization from the arteries in front of the confluence with the proper hepatic artery seems to be acceptable in cases of hypervascular HCC which fail to be superselectively catheterized.

  14. The effects of modified versus unmodified wheat gluten administration in patients with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Marino, Mariacatia; Casale, Rossella; Borghini, Raffaele; Di Nardi, Sara; Donato, Giuseppe; Angeloni, Antonio; Moscaritolo, Salvatore; Grasso, Lorenza; Mazzarella, Giuseppe; Di Tola, Marco; Rossi, Mauro; Picarelli, Antonio

    2017-03-23

    Celiac disease (CD) treatment requires a gluten-free diet (GFD), although alternative approaches have been proposed. Modification of gliadin peptides using microbial transglutaminase (mTG) inhibits their ability to induce immune response in vitro. Our aim was to evaluate the safety of mTG-modified wheat flour ingestion in CD patients. Twenty-one CD patients in remission were randomized to receive mTG-modified (n=11) or unmodified (n=10) wheat flour rusks, in double-blind fashion. Monthly, patients completed a symptom questionnaire. Serum anti-tTG, EMA and creatinine levels were monitored. At baseline and after 90days, serum anti-actin antibodies (AAA) were measured and upper endoscopy was performed. Data were analyzed by non-parametric tests. 7/11 patients eating modified rusks and 7/10 patients receiving unmodified rusks completed the study. At baseline, all patients showed negative serum anti-tTG and EMA results. At the end, 2/7 (28.6%) patients ingesting modified and 4/7 (57.1%) patients taking unmodified rusks presented positive serum anti-tTG and EMA results. Creatinine results were unmodified. Moreover, 1/7 (14.3%) patients ingesting modified and 4/7 (57.1%) patients taking unmodified rusks presented villous atrophy. In patients who received unmodified rusks, the AAA levels increased significantly and duodenal anti-tTG levels appeared higher than those measured in patients who ate modified rusks. Abdominal swelling, bloating and nausea were more severe in patients ingesting unmodified rusks than those taking modified rusks. Our results may support larger clinical trials to confirm the enzymatic treatment of wheat flour as an alternative to GFD. Clinicaltrials.gov registration no: NCT02472119.

  15. Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial: Gluten versus Placebo Rechallenge in Patients with Lymphocytic Enteritis and Suspected Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Anna; Ibarra, Montserrat; Temiño, Rocío; Salas, Antonio; Esteve, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background The role of gluten as a trigger of symptoms in non-coeliac gluten sensitivity has been questioned. Aim To demonstrate that gluten is the trigger of symptoms in a subgroup of patients fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for non-coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), which presented with lymphocytic enteritis, positive celiac genetics and negative celiac serology. Methods Double-blind randomized clinical trial of gluten vs placebo rechallenge. Inclusion criteria: >18 years of age, HLA-DQ2/8+, negative coeliac serology and gluten-dependent lymphocytic enteritis, and GI symptoms, with clinical and histological remission at inclusion. Eighteen patients were randomised: 11 gluten (20 g/day) and 7 placebo. Clinical symptoms, quality of life (GIQLI), and presence of gamma/delta+ cells and transglutaminase deposits were evaluated. Results 91% of patients had clinical relapse during gluten challenge versus 28.5% after placebo (p = 0.01). Clinical scores and GIQLI worsened after gluten but not after placebo (p<0.01). The presence of coeliac tissue markers at baseline biopsy on a gluten-free diet allowed classifying 9 out of the 18 (50%) patients as having probable ‘coeliac lite’ disease. Conclusion This proof-of-concept study indicates that gluten is the trigger of symptoms in a subgroup of patients fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for NCGS. They were characterized by positive celiac genetics, lymphocytic enteritis, and clinical and histological remission after a gluten-free diet. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02472704 PMID:27392045

  16. Adipokine profile in celiac patients: differences in comparison with patients suffering from diarrhea-predominant IBS and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Russo, Francesco; Chimienti, Guglielmina; Clemente, Caterina; D'Attoma, Benedetta; Linsalata, Michele; Orlando, Antonella; De Carne, Massimo; Cariola, Filomena; Semeraro, Francesco P; Pepe, Gabriella; Riezzo, Giuseppe

    2013-12-01

    OBJECTIVE. The role of adipokines such as resistin, leptin, and adiponectin could be pivotal in the molecular crosstalk between the inflamed intestine and the surrounding mesenteric adipose tissue. Our aims were to a) evaluate their circulating concentrations in patients with active celiac disease (ACD) and compare them to those in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-d) and healthy subjects; b) establish the impact of genetic variability in resistin; and c) evaluate whether a 1-year gluten-free diet (GFD) modifies circulating concentrations of resistin, leptin, and adiponectin in celiac patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS. The study included 34 ACD patients, 29 IBS-d patients, and 27 healthy controls. Circulating concentrations of resistin, leptin, adiponectin, IL-6, and IL-8 were evaluated at the time of enrollment. Resistin +299 G/A polymorphism was also analysed. In CD patients, biochemical measurements were repeated after a 1-year GFD. RESULTS. Along with higher IL-6 and IL-8 plasma levels, higher resistin and adiponectin concentrations were found in ACD and IBS-d patients compared with controls (p: 0.0351 and p: 0.0020, respectively). Resistin values proved to be predictable from a linear combination of IL-8 and +299 polymorphism. GFD affected resistin (p: 0.0009), but not leptin and adiponectin concentrations. CONCLUSIONS. Our data suggest that these adipokines are involved in modulating inflammatory processes in both CD and IBS-d patients. Alterations in the adipokine profile as well as the higher prevalence of the resistin +299 G/A SNP A allele compared to controls support the hypothesis that, at least in well-defined cases of IBS, a genetic component may also be supposed.

  17. Contact Dermatitis Due to Nickel Allergy in Patients Suffering from Non-Celiac Wheat Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    D’Alcamo, Alberto; Mansueto, Pasquale; Soresi, Maurizio; Iacobucci, Rosario; La Blasca, Francesco; Geraci, Girolamo; Cavataio, Francesca; Fayer, Francesca; Arini, Andrea; Di Stefano, Laura; Iacono, Giuseppe; Bosco, Liana; Carroccio, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Background: Non-celiac wheat sensitivity (NCWS) is a new clinical entity in the world of gluten-related diseases. Nickel, the most frequent cause of contact allergy, can be found in wheat and results in systemic nickel allergy syndrome and mimics irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Objective: To evaluate the frequency of contact dermatitis due to nickel allergy in NCWS patients diagnosed by a double-blind placebo-controlled (DBPC) challenge, and to identify the characteristics of NCWS patients with nickel allergy. Methods: We performed a prospective study of 60 patients (54 females, 6 males; mean age 34.1 ± 8.1 years) diagnosed with NCWS from December 2014 to November 2016; 80 age- and sex-matched subjects with functional gastrointestinal symptoms served as controls. Patients reporting contact dermatitis related to nickel-containing objects underwent nickel patch test (Clinicaltrials.gov registration number: NCT02750735). Results: Six out of sixty patients (10%) with NCWS suffered from contact dermatitis and nickel allergy and this frequency was statistically higher (p = 0.04) than observed in the control group (5%). The main clinical characteristic of NCWS patients with nickel allergy was a higher frequency of cutaneous symptoms after wheat ingestion compared to NCWS patients who did not suffer from nickel allergy (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Contact dermatitis and nickel allergy are more frequent in NCWS patients than in subjects with functional gastrointestinal disorders; furthermore, these patients had a very high frequency of cutaneous manifestations after wheat ingestion. Nickel allergy should be evaluated in NCWS patients who have cutaneous manifestations after wheat ingestion. PMID:28157173

  18. Biomarkers to Monitor Gluten-Free Diet Compliance in Celiac Patients

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, María de Lourdes; Rodríguez-Herrera, Alfonso; Sousa, Carolina; Comino, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Gluten-free diet (GFD) is the only treatment for celiac disease (CD). There is a general consensus that strict GFD adherence in CD patients leads to full clinical and histological remission accompanied by improvement in quality of life and reduced long-term complications. Despite the importance of monitoring the GFD, there are no clear guidelines for assessing the outcome or for exploring its adherence. Available methods are insufficiently accurate to identify occasional gluten exposure that may cause intestinal mucosal damage. Serological tests are highly sensitive and specific for diagnosis, but do not predict recovery and are not useful for follow-up. The use of serial endoscopies, it is invasive and impractical for frequent monitoring, and dietary interview can be subjective. Therefore, the detection of gluten immunogenic peptides (GIP) in feces and urine have been proposed as new non-invasive biomarkers to detect gluten intake and verify GFD compliance in CD patients. These simple immunoassays in human samples could overcome some key unresolved scientific and clinical problems in CD management. It is a significant advance that opens up new possibilities for the clinicians to evaluate the CD treatment, GFD compliance, and improvement in the quality of life of CD patients. PMID:28067823

  19. Celiac Disease Does Not Influence Fracture Risk in Young Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Norelle R; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Mollazadegan, Kaziwe; Michaëlsson, Karl; Green, Peter HR; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine the risk of any fractures in patients with both type 1 diabetes (T1D) and celiac disease (CD) vs patients with T1D only. Study design We performed a population-based cohort study. We defined T1D as individuals aged ≤30 years who had a diagnosis of diabetes recorded in the Swedish National Patient Register between 1964–2009. Individuals with CD were identified through biopsy report data between 1969–2008 from any of Sweden’s 28 pathology departments. Some 958 individuals had both T1D and CD and were matched for sex, age and calendar period with 4,598 reference individuals with T1D only. We then used a stratified Cox regression analysis, where CD was modeled as a time-dependent covariate, to estimate the risk of any fractures and osteoporotic fractures (hip, distal forearm, thoracic and lumbar spine, and proximal humerus) in patients with both T1D and CD compared with that in patients with T1D only. Results During follow-up, 12 patients with T1D and CD had a fracture (1 osteoporotic fracture). CD did not influence the risk of any fracture (adjusted Hazard Ratio=0.77; 95%CI=0.42–1.41) or osteoporotic fractures (adjusted Hazard Ratio=0.46; 95%CI=0.06–3.51) in patients with T1D. Stratification for time since CD diagnosis did not affect risk estimates. Conclusion Having a diagnosis of CD does not seem to influence fracture risk in young patients with T1D. Follow-up in this study was, however, too short to ascertain osteoporotic fractures which traditionally occur in old age. PMID:26589343

  20. Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... immune disease in which people can't eat gluten because it will damage their small intestine. If you have celiac disease and eat foods with gluten, your immune system responds by damaging the small ...

  1. Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. Gluten is poison to people who have celiac ... free diet avoid all foods that contain wheat, barley, rye, spelt, and triticale products, including many breads, ...

  2. Proximal Limb Weakness in a Patient with Celiac Disease: Copper Deficiency, Gluten Sensitivity, or Both as the Underlying Cause?

    PubMed Central

    Lacomis, David

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease has been associated with several neurologic disorders which may result from micronutrient deficiencies, coexisting autoimmune conditions, or gluten sensitivity. Copper deficiency can produce multiple neurologic manifestations. Myeloneuropathy is the most common neurologic syndrome and it is often irreversible, despite copper replacement. We report the case of a 55-year-old man who presented with progressive proximal limb weakness and weight loss in the setting of untreated celiac disease without gastrointestinal symptoms. He had anemia, neutropenia, and severe hypocupremia. The pattern of weakness raised the suspicion that there was an underlying myopathy, although this was not confirmed by electrodiagnostic studies. Weakness and hematologic abnormalities resolved completely within 1 month of total parenteral nutrition with copper supplementation and a gluten-free diet. Myopathy can rarely occur in patients with celiac disease, but the mechanism is unclear. Pure proximal limb weakness has not been previously reported in copper deficiency. We propose that this may represent a novel manifestation of hypocupremia and recommend considering copper deficiency and gluten sensitivity in patients presenting with proximal limb weakness. PMID:27994896

  3. Proximal Limb Weakness in a Patient with Celiac Disease: Copper Deficiency, Gluten Sensitivity, or Both as the Underlying Cause?

    PubMed

    Avila, J David; Lacomis, David

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease has been associated with several neurologic disorders which may result from micronutrient deficiencies, coexisting autoimmune conditions, or gluten sensitivity. Copper deficiency can produce multiple neurologic manifestations. Myeloneuropathy is the most common neurologic syndrome and it is often irreversible, despite copper replacement. We report the case of a 55-year-old man who presented with progressive proximal limb weakness and weight loss in the setting of untreated celiac disease without gastrointestinal symptoms. He had anemia, neutropenia, and severe hypocupremia. The pattern of weakness raised the suspicion that there was an underlying myopathy, although this was not confirmed by electrodiagnostic studies. Weakness and hematologic abnormalities resolved completely within 1 month of total parenteral nutrition with copper supplementation and a gluten-free diet. Myopathy can rarely occur in patients with celiac disease, but the mechanism is unclear. Pure proximal limb weakness has not been previously reported in copper deficiency. We propose that this may represent a novel manifestation of hypocupremia and recommend considering copper deficiency and gluten sensitivity in patients presenting with proximal limb weakness.

  4. A Refractory Celiac Patient Successfully Treated With Mesenchymal Stem Cell Infusions.

    PubMed

    Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Gallia, Alessandra; Avanzini, Maria A; Betti, Elena; Picone, Cristina; Vanoli, Alessandro; Paganini, Chiara; Biagi, Federico; Maccario, Rita; Corazza, Gino R

    2016-06-01

    Type II refractory celiac disease (RCD), as defined according to the amount of aberrant intraepithelial lymphocytes, is a condition characterized by severe malabsorption syndrome and poor prognosis, with no effective treatment. Based on the regenerative and immunomodulatory properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), we investigated the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of serial infusions of autologous bone marrow-derived MSCs in a 51-year-old woman with type II RCD. Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated, expanded, and characterized following standard protocols. Monitoring of the patient's malabsorption indexes, mucosal architecture, and percentage of aberrant intraepithelial lymphocytes was scheduled for the time of enrollment, at each infusion, and after 6 months. Determination of mucosal expression of interleukin (IL)-15 and its receptor was also performed. Expansion of MSCs was feasible, and the patient underwent 4 systemic infusions of 2 × 10(6) MSCs/kg body weight 4 months apart, without adverse effects. During the treatment period, she experienced gradual and durable amelioration of her general condition, with normalization of stool frequency, body mass index, laboratory test results, and mucosal architecture. Remarkably, the expression of IL-15 and its receptor almost completely disappeared. Thus, treatment of RCD with serial MSC infusions seems promising, leading to recovery from the life-threatening condition while blocking the IL-15 pathogenic pathway.

  5. Celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Green, Peter H R; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Greywoode, Ruby

    2015-05-01

    This review will focus on the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of celiac disease (CD). Given an increasing awareness of gluten-related disorders, medical professionals of all varieties are encountering patients with a diagnosis of CD or who are thought to have food intolerance to gluten. The prevalence of CD among the general population is estimated to be 1% in Western nations, and there is growing evidence for underdiagnosis of the disease, especially in non-Western nations that were traditionally believed to be unaffected. The development of serologic markers specific to CD has revolutionized the ability both to diagnose and monitor patients with the disease. Additionally, understanding of the clinical presentations of CD has undergone a major shift over the past half century. Although it is well understood that CD develops in genetically predisposed subjects exposed to gluten, the extent of other environmental factors in the pathogenesis of the disease is an area of continued research. Currently, the main therapeutic intervention for CD is a gluten-free diet; however, novel nondietary agents are under active investigation. Future areas of research should also help us understand the relationship of CD to other gluten-related disorders.

  6. Recommendations to quantify villous atrophy in video capsule endoscopy images of celiac disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Ciaccio, Edward J; Bhagat, Govind; Lewis, Suzanne K; Green, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    AIM To quantify the presence of villous atrophy in endoscopic images for improved automation. METHODS There are two main categories of quantitative descriptors helpful to detect villous atrophy: (1) Statistical and (2) Syntactic. Statistical descriptors measure the small intestinal substrate in endoscope-acquired images based on mathematical methods. Texture is the most commonly used statistical descriptor to quantify villous atrophy. Syntactic descriptors comprise a syntax, or set of rules, for analyzing and parsing the substrate into a set of objects with boundaries. The syntax is designed to identify and distinguish three-dimensional structures based on their shape. RESULTS The variance texture statistical descriptor is useful to describe the average variability in image gray level representing villous atrophy, but does not determine the range in variability and the spatial relationships between regions. Improved textural descriptors will incorporate these factors, so that areas with variability gradients and regions that are orientation dependent can be distinguished. The protrusion syntactic descriptor is useful to detect three-dimensional architectural components, but is limited to identifying objects of a certain shape. Improvement in this descriptor will require incorporating flexibility to the prototypical template, so that protrusions of any shape can be detected, measured, and distinguished. CONCLUSION Improved quantitative descriptors of villous atrophy are being developed, which will be useful in detecting subtle, varying patterns of villous atrophy in the small intestinal mucosa of suspected and known celiac disease patients. PMID:27803772

  7. Psychiatric comorbidities in patients with celiac disease: Is there any concrete biological association?

    PubMed

    Sharma, Taral R; Kline, Daniel B; Shreeve, Daniel F; Hartman, David W

    2011-06-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a unique autoimmune disorder that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals after the ingestion of gluten, a protein found in wheat and some other cereals. The immunologically based inflammation induces atrophy of the villous structure of the jejunum, leading to malabsorption of variable severity. Subclinical and nonspecific forms of CD have been found to be increasingly common with a classic presentation of malabsorption syndrome (reference A). We present a case of OCD (obsessive compulsive disorder) in combination with depressive symptoms with the further complication of eating disorder not otherwise specified, in an adolescent male, for whom psychiatry was consulted because of treatment-refractory weight loss. We compare the elements of the case to other descriptions in the current, English language professional literature. Our literature review includes multiple search terms for the professional journals including, but not limited to, psychiatric comorbidities in celiac disease, behavioral disturbances of celiac disease, celiac disease in psychiatry, etc., to establish a possible association of psychiatric disorders, especially obsessive compulsive disorder and Celiac disease.

  8. Celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, Luis

    2006-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a common autoimmune disorder, induced by the intake of gluten proteins present in wheat, barley and rye. Contrary to common belief, this disorder is a protean systemic disease, rather than merely a pure digestive alteration. CD is closely associated with genes that code HLA-II antigens, mainly of DQ2 and DQ8 classes. Previously, it was considered to be a rare childhood disorder, but is actually considered a frequent condition, present at any age, which may have multiple complications. Tissue transglutaminase-2 (tTG), appears to be an important component of this disease, both, in its pathogenesis and diagnosis. Active CD is characterized by intestinal and/or extra-intestinal symptoms, villous atrophy and crypt hyperplasia, and strongly positive tTG auto-antibodies. The duodenal biopsy is considered to be the “gold standard” for diagnosis, but its practice has significant limitations in its interpretation, especially in adults. Occasionally, it results in a false-negative because of patchy mucosal changes and the presence of mucosal villous atrophy is often more severe in the proximal jejunum, usually not reached by endoscopic biopsies. CD is associated with increased rates of several diseases, such as iron deficiency anemia, osteoporosis, dermatitis herpetiformis, several neurologic and endocrine diseases, persistent chronic hypertransami-nasemia of unknown origin, various types of cancer and other autoimmune disorders. Treatment of CD dictates a strict, life-long gluten-free diet, which results in remission for most individuals, although its effect on some associated extraintestinal manifestations remains to be established.

  9. Celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Guandalini, Stefano

    2003-03-01

    Celiac disease is a genetically determined, permanent intolerance to gluten, a protein complex found in wheat, rye and barley. As many as 1:163 people are affected by it, but only a small percentage are aware of the condition, which begins either in infancy, with gastrointestinal symptoms, or in childhood and later years with non-Gl signs and symptoms, such as fatigue, depression, anxiety, anemia, stunted growth, and delayed puberty. A strong association with Type 1 diabetes and Down syndrome is also found, thus making screening mandatory for these subjects. Celiac disease is often entirely clinically silent, yet it must be detected in order to prevent long-term complications.

  10. Recognition and management of the cutaneous manifestations of celiac disease: a guide for dermatologists.

    PubMed

    Collin, Pekka; Reunala, Timo

    2003-01-01

    In celiac disease, the ingestion of gluten-containing cereals, such as wheat, rye, and barley, results in small-bowel mucosal inflammation and villous atrophy with crypt hyperplasia. The prevalence of the condition may be as high as 1% in the adult population. The disease can also embrace various extraintestinal manifestations, of which dermatitis herpetiformis is the best known. Earlier, dermatitis herpetiformis was considered a skin disease occurring often concomitantly with celiac disease. At present, a body of evidence shows that dermatitis herpetiformis is a cutaneous manifestation of celiac disease, and affects approximately 25% of patients with celiac disease. Both conditions can appear in the same family and are closely linked to HLA class II locus in chromosome 6; 90% of patients have HLA DQ2 and, almost all the remainder, HLA DQ8. All patients with dermatitis herpetiformis have at least some-degree of mucosal inflammation or lesion consistent with celiac disease. The etiology of celiac disease in not fully understood, but tissue transglutaminase seems to be the predominant autoantigen both in the intestine and the skin. Serum antibodies against tissue transglutaminase can be used in the serologic screening and follow-up of dietary compliance of patients with celiac disease. Gluten-free diet is essential in the treatment of both conditions, and oral dapsone is usually needed in newly detected dermatitis herpetiformis in order to alleviate symptoms. Oral mucosal lesions, alopecia areata, and vitiligo probably occur more frequently in patients with dermatitis herpetiformis than in the general population. By contrast, the reported association of celiac disease with psoriasis seems to be coincidental.

  11. Coexistence of Celiac Disease and Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simila, Seppo; Kokkonen, Jourma

    1990-01-01

    Three Finnish patients with Down syndrome and celiac disease are described. The incidence of celiac disease among patients with Down syndrome was calculated to be 20 times greater than in children without Down syndrome, indicating that it should be kept in mind when patients suffer from recurrent diarrhea and/or delayed puberty. (Author/JDD)

  12. Osteodystrophy in celiac disease: ultimate complications and possible treatment.

    PubMed

    Eid, Wael E

    2009-11-01

    Hypovitaminosis D and its consequences are significant complications in the course of untreated celiac disease (CD). We report a case that illustrates the natural evolution of osteomalacia in an adult patient with untreated CD and his response to vitamin D supplementation. In patients with complicated CD and hypovitaminosis D, vitamin D-2 replacement in high enough doses is important to improving functional performance and for the treatment of osteomalacia.

  13. Pediatric Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition Nurses Print Share Celiac Disease Many kids have sensitivities to certain foods, ... protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. Pediatric Celiac Disease If your child has celiac disease, consuming ...

  14. Celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lebwohl, Benjamin; Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Green, Peter H R

    2015-10-05

    Celiac disease is a multisystem immune based disorder that is triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The prevalence of celiac disease has risen in recent decades and is currently about 1% in most Western populations. The reason for this rise is unknown, although environmental factors related to the hygiene hypothesis are suspected. The pathophysiology of celiac disease involves both the innate and adaptive immune response to dietary gluten. Clinical features are diverse and include gastrointestinal symptoms, metabolic bone disease, infertility, and many other manifestations. Although a gluten-free diet is effective in most patients, this diet can be burdensome and can limit quality of life; consequently, non-dietary therapies are at various stages of development. This review also covers non-celiac gluten sensitivity. The pathophysiology of this clinical phenotype is poorly understood, but it is a cause of increasing interest in gluten-free diets in the general population.

  15. Celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Lebwohl, Benjamin; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is a multisystem immune based disorder that is triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The prevalence of celiac disease has risen in recent decades and is currently about 1% in most Western populations. The reason for this rise is unknown, although environmental factors related to the hygiene hypothesis are suspected. The pathophysiology of celiac disease involves both the innate and adaptive immune response to dietary gluten. Clinical features are diverse and include gastrointestinal symptoms, metabolic bone disease, infertility, and many other manifestations. Although a gluten-free diet is effective in most patients, this diet can be burdensome and can limit quality of life; consequently, non-dietary therapies are at various stages of development. This review also covers non-celiac gluten sensitivity. The pathophysiology of this clinical phenotype is poorly understood, but it is a cause of increasing interest in gluten-free diets in the general population. PMID:26438584

  16. Bone and Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Zanchetta, María Belén; Longobardi, Vanesa; Bai, Julio César

    2016-04-01

    More than 50% of untreated patients with celiac disease (CD) have bone loss detected by bone densitometry (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry:DXA). Moreover, patients with CD are more likely to have osteoporosis and fragility fractures, especially of the distal radius. Although still controversial, we recommend DXA screening in all celiac disease patients, particularly in those with symptomatic CD at diagnosis and in those who present risk factors for fracture such as older age, menopausal status, previous fracture history, and familial hip fracture history. Bone microarchitecture, especially the trabecular network, may be deteriorated, explaining the higher fracture risk in these patients. Adequate calcium and vitamin D supplementation are also recommended to optimize bone recovery, especially during the first years of gluten free diet (GFD). If higher fracture risk persists after 1 or 2 years of GFD, specific osteoactive treatment may be necessary to improve bone health.

  17. Celiac disease in children.

    PubMed

    Garnier-Lengliné, Hélène; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Ruemmele, Frank M

    2015-10-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune enteropathy, triggered by ingestion of gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. Since the use of anti-transglutaminase and anti-endomysium antibodies in the early 1990s, two main groups of clinical presentation can be identified: patients with a symptomatic form of the disease, and patients with a pauci (a)-symptomatic form detected during the work-up of another autoimmune disease or due to a family history of celiac disease. The prevalence of both forms of the disease is currently estimated between 1/100 and 1/400. Classical form of the disease is characterized by occurrence of diarrhoea, failure to thrive, and abdominal bloating in young infants in the months following gluten introduction. Serological tests show high level of anti-transglutaminase and anti-endomysium antibodies. Until recently, the diagnosis required duodenal biopsies that show villous atrophy. HLA genotype can help for diagnosis: the absence of the HLA-DQ2 or DQ8 alleles has a high negative predictive value. European guidelines recently proposed to reconsider the need for systematic endoscopy in typical symptomatic forms with high level of anti-transglutaminase and positive anti-endomysium. These recommendations are being assessed now. Currently, the gluten-free diet remains the only effective treatment for celiac disease. Children with celiac disease have to exclude from their diet all products containing wheat, barley and rye. Gluten-free diet causes clinical remission within a few weeks, but normalization of the small bowel mucosa and negativity of anti-transglutaminase antibodies are obtained in several months or even years. Gluten-free diet is useful to obtain clinical assessment, but also to prevent long-term complications of celiac disease, mainly osteoporosis, other autoimmune diseases, decreased fertility and cancers.

  18. Gut Microbiota and Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Marasco, Giovanni; Di Biase, Anna Rita; Schiumerini, Ramona; Eusebi, Leonardo Henry; Iughetti, Lorenzo; Ravaioli, Federico; Scaioli, Eleonora; Colecchia, Antonio; Festi, Davide

    2016-06-01

    Recent evidence regarding celiac disease has increasingly shown the role of innate immunity in triggering the immune response by stimulating the adaptive immune response and by mucosal damage. The interaction between the gut microbiota and the mucosal wall is mediated by the same receptors which can activate innate immunity. Thus, changes in gut microbiota may lead to activation of this inflammatory pathway. This paper is a review of the current knowledge regarding the relationship between celiac disease and gut microbiota. In fact, patients with celiac disease have a reduction in beneficial species and an increase in those potentially pathogenic as compared to healthy subjects. This dysbiosis is reduced, but might still remain, after a gluten-free diet. Thus, gut microbiota could play a significant role in the pathogenesis of celiac disease, as described by studies which link dysbiosis with the inflammatory milieu in celiac patients. The use of probiotics seems to reduce the inflammatory response and restore a normal proportion of beneficial bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract. Additional evidence is needed in order to better understand the role of gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of celiac disease, and the clinical impact and therapeutic use of probiotics in this setting.

  19. Cereal-based gluten-free food: how to reconcile nutritional and technological properties of wheat proteins with safety for celiac disease patients.

    PubMed

    Lamacchia, Carmela; Camarca, Alessandra; Picascia, Stefania; Di Luccia, Aldo; Gianfrani, Carmen

    2014-01-29

    The gluten-free diet is, to date, the only efficacious treatment for patients with Celiac Disease. In recent years, the impressive rise of Celiac Disease incidence, dramatically prompted changes in the dietary habit of an increasingly large population, with a rise in demand of gluten-free products. The formulation of gluten-free bakery products presents a formidable challenge to cereal technologists. As wheat gluten contributes to the formation of a strong protein network, that confers visco-elasticity to the dough and allows the wheat flour to be processed into a wide range of products, the preparation of cereal-based gluten-free products is a somehow difficult process. This review focuses on nutritional and technological quality of products made with gluten-free cereals available on the market. The possibility of using flour from naturally low toxic ancient wheat species or detoxified wheat for the diet of celiacs is also discussed.

  20. Cereal-Based Gluten-Free Food: How to Reconcile Nutritional and Technological Properties of Wheat Proteins with Safety for Celiac Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lamacchia, Carmela; Camarca, Alessandra; Picascia, Stefania; Di Luccia, Aldo; Gianfrani, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The gluten-free diet is, to date, the only efficacious treatment for patients with Celiac Disease. In recent years, the impressive rise of Celiac Disease incidence, dramatically prompted changes in the dietary habit of an increasingly large population, with a rise in demand of gluten-free products. The formulation of gluten-free bakery products presents a formidable challenge to cereal technologists. As wheat gluten contributes to the formation of a strong protein network, that confers visco-elasticity to the dough and allows the wheat flour to be processed into a wide range of products, the preparation of cereal-based gluten-free products is a somehow difficult process. This review focuses on nutritional and technological quality of products made with gluten-free cereals available on the market. The possibility of using flour from naturally low toxic ancient wheat species or detoxified wheat for the diet of celiacs is also discussed. PMID:24481131

  1. The likelihood ratio and frequency of DQ2/DQ8 haplotypes in Iranian patients with celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Asghar; Mansouri, Masoume; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Shahbazkhani, Bijan; Ekhlasi, Golnaz; Kalantari, Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the likelihood ratio and frequency of DQ2 and DQ8 in Iranian patients with celiac disease (CD). Background: The HLA DQ2 and HLA DQ8 are the important mediators in the development of celiac disease. A few studies evaluated the frequency of HLA DQ2 and HLA DQ8 haplotypes among the Iranian population with low sample size. Patients and methods: In this cross-sectional study, to predict HLA–DQ2 and DQ8 haplotypes, 141(73 male, 78 female) confirmed CD patients compared to 151 healthy controls were enrolled into this study during 2013-2014. HLA DQ2/ DQ8 haplotypes was determined in cases and controls using PCR-SSP technique. Results: DQ2 and DQ8 were positive in 80% (n=111) and 49% (n= 69) of CD patients and 36% (n=61) and 13% (n=21) of control group respectively. Moreover, 32% (n=45) of CD patients and 5.3% (n=8) of the control group were carrier of both haplotypes. In the case group about one-third of patients (32.2%) were positive for carrying both DQ2 and DQ8 heterodimers while only 5.3% (n=8) of the control group were carrier. In addition, the positive likelihood ratio of DQ2 and DQ8 were 1.74 (CI: 1.4- 2.1), and 2.6 (CI: 1.8– 2.7), respectively. Conclusion: The result of this study showed that the frequency of DQ8 among our population is higher than those reported by European countries, but it is close to those founded in South America and Middle East. This result suggests that the higher prevalence of HLA DQ8 pattern in Iranian CD patients is similar to non-European patients. PMID:26744610

  2. Repertoire of gluten peptides active in celiac disease patients: perspectives for translational therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Camarca, Alessandra; Del Mastro, Andrea; Gianfrani, Carmen

    2012-06-01

    Celiac disease is a common and lifelong food intolerance, affecting approximately 1% of the population. Because of a mechanism not completely understood, the ingestion of wheat gluten, and of homologue proteins of barley and rye, induces in genetically predisposed individuals pronounced inflammatory reactions mainly at the site of small intestine. Gluten, the triggering factor, is a complex protein mixture highly resistant to the gastrointestinal enzymatic proteolysis, and this results in the presence of large, and potentially immunogenic, peptides at the intestinal mucosa surface. During the last decade, several studies have defined gluten peptides able to stimulate adaptive T cells, of either CD4 or CD8 phenotype, and to activate innate (non T) immune cells. This review examines the complete repertoire of gluten peptides recognized by celiac T cells and discusses the several translational implications that the identification of these epitopes opens.

  3. Responses of peripheral blood mononucleated cells from non-celiac gluten sensitive patients to various cereal sources.

    PubMed

    Valerii, Maria Chiara; Ricci, Chiara; Spisni, Enzo; Di Silvestro, Raffaella; De Fazio, Luigia; Cavazza, Elena; Lanzini, Alberto; Campieri, Massimo; Dalpiaz, Alessandro; Pavan, Barbara; Volta, Umberto; Dinelli, Giovanni

    2015-06-01

    Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is still an undefined syndrome whose triggering mechanisms remain unsettled. This study aimed to clarify how cultured peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMC) obtained from NCGS patients responded to contact with wheat proteins. Results demonstrated that wheat protein induced an overactivation of the proinflammatory chemokine CXCL10 in PBMC from NCGS patients, and that the overactivation level depends on the cereal source from which proteins are obtained. CXCL10 is able to decrease the transepithelial resistance of monolayers of normal colonocytes (NCM 460) by diminishing the mRNA expression of cadherin-1 (CDH1) and tight junction protein 2 (TJP2), two primary components of the tight junction strands. Thus, CXCL10 overactivation is one of the mechanisms triggered by wheat proteins in PBMC obtained from NCGS patients. This mechanism is activated to a greater extent by proteins from modern with respect to those extracted from ancient wheat genotypes.

  4. The present and the future in the diagnosis and management of celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Natalia E.; Theethira, Thimmaiah G.; Leffler, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune enteropathy caused by gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. In celiac disease, adaptive and innate immune activation results in intestinal damage and a wide range of clinical manifestations. In the past, celiac disease was thought to result in signs and symptoms solely related to the gastrointestinal tract. Now, more than half of the adult population presents with extra-intestinal manifestations that can also be expected to improve on a gluten-free diet. For this reason, it is recommended that physicians have a low threshold of suspicion for celiac disease. Current knowledge of the immune pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease has served as a catalyst for the development of novel diagnostic tools and therapeutics. Over the years, highly sensitive and specific serological assays, in addition to genetic markers, have been found to target specific steps in the cascade pathway of celiac disease. Also the advent of the gluten challenge has enabled experts to design diagnostic algorithms and monitor clinical responses in clinical trials. The gluten challenge has provided substantial benefit in the advance of novel therapeutics as an adjuvant treatment to the gluten free diet. Generally, a strict gluten-free diet is highly burdensome to patients and can be limited in its efficacy. Alternative therapies—including gluten modification, modulation of intestinal permeability and immune response—could be central to the future treatment of celiac disease. PMID:25326000

  5. [Frequency of celiac disease and irritable bowel syndrome coexistance and its influence on the disease course].

    PubMed

    Zwolińska-Wcisło, Małgorzata; Galicka-Latała, Danuta; Rozpondek, Piotr; Rudnicka-Sosin, Lucyna; Mach, Tomasz

    2009-01-01

    Celiac disease is increasingly recognized autoimmune enteropathy caused by a permanent gluten intolerance. Gluten is the main storage protein of wheat, in genetically predisposed individuals. Celiac disease risk in first degree relatives is about 10%. Diarrhea and changes of bowel movement, observed as well in celiac disease as in IBS, may lead to misdiagnosis of IBS basing on the Rome criteria or may be associated with coexistence of both diseases. The aim of the study was to assess the celiac disease prevalence in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. The study group comprised 200 patients (120 women and 80 men) aged 18-78 years (mean: 46.7 years) with diarrhoeal form of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), according to the Rome criteria II. At the beginning and after a three month period anti tissue transglutaminase antibodies (IgA tTG) were estimated. Gastroscopy with biopsy where performed in those with IgA tTG titre above 1/200. 40 patients were immunologically positive and 14 of them have histopathologically proven celiac disease. In the group of patients with detected celiac disease, gluten free diet was applied besides the treatment with trimebutin or mebewerin, recommended for IBS. After 6 months the decrease of IgA tTG titre in the serum was observed. In 5 of these patients IgA tTG level was negative. It was associated with the significant decrease of clinical symptoms, such as diarrhea and flatulence. The remaining symptoms, such as abdominal pain, feeling of incomplete defecation demanded continuation of IBS treatment. With regard to often atypical celiac disease symptoms--adult active searching should be performed to differentiate from irritable bowel syndrome.

  6. Celiac disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC), and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) in one patient: a family study.

    PubMed

    Cadahía, V; Rodrigo, L; Fuentes, D; Riestra, S; de Francisco, R; Fernández, M

    2005-12-01

    We discuss the case of a 17-year-old male who at the age of 7 was diagnosed with celiac disease (CD) together with ulcerative colitis (UC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). The patient was treated with gluten-free diet and immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine), and currently remains asymptomatic. The patient's younger, 12-year-old sister was diagnosed with CD when she was 1.5 years old, and at 7 years she developed type-I diabetes mellitus, which was difficult to control. A family study was made, and both parents were found to be affected with silent CD. All were DQ2 (+). In relation to the case and family study, we provide a series of comments related to CD and its complications.

  7. Maize prolamins resistant to peptic-tryptic digestion maintain immune-recognition by IgA from some celiac disease patients.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Chávez, Francisco; Iametti, Stefania; Miriani, Matteo; de la Barca, Ana M Calderón; Mamone, Gianfranco; Bonomi, Francesco

    2012-03-01

    Maize is used as an alternative to wheat to elaborate food stuffs for celiac patients in a gluten-free diet.However, some maize prolamins (zeins) contain amino acid sequences that resemble the wheat gluten immunodominant peptides and their integrity after gastrointestinal proteolysisis unknown. In this study, the celiac IgA-immunoreactivity to zeins from raw or nixtamalized grains, before and after peptic/tryptic digestion was evaluated and their possible immunogenicity was investigated by in silico methods.IgA from some celiac patients with HLA-DQ2 or DQ8 haplotypes recognized two alpha-zeins even after peptic/ tryptic proteolysis. However, digestion affected zeins after denaturation, reduction, and alkylation, used for identification of prolamins as alpha-zein A20 and A30 by MS/MS sequencing. An in silico analysis indicated that other zeins contain similar sequences, or sequences that may bind even better to the HLA-DQ2/DQ8 molecules compared to the already identified ones. Results concur to indicate that relative abundance of these zeins, along with factors affecting their resistance to proteolysis, may be of paramount clinical relevance, and the use of maize in the formulation and preparation of gluten-free foods must be reevaluated in some cases of celiac disease.

  8. Celiac Disease in Patients Fulfilling the Rome III Criteria for Irritable Bowel Syndrome Attending Gastroenterology Department of A Tertiary Care Hospital in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, M K; Chakraborty, R; Gope, S; Rahman, M A; Miah, A R; Raihan, A S; Sarkar, S; Paul, B K; Ferdousi, K R

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic gastrointestinal disorder that substantially affects patients' quality of life and is associated with a considerable drain of health-care resources and economic burden. But some IBS patients may have celiac disease that could be treated by gluten-free diet which will subsequently improve their quality of life. This study was done to see the prevalence of celiac disease among the IBS patients fulfilling Rome III criteria. The present cross-sectional study was conducted in the Department of Gastroenterology at BSMMU, Dhaka from July 2010 to September 2011. A total of 107 patients aged ranging between 16-60 years clinically labeled as IBS and fulfilled Rome III criteria were included as study sample. The test statistics used to analyze the data were descriptive statistics. The mean age of the patients was 31.5±10.3 years and male to female ratio was roughly 6:1. The mean duration of IBS was 32.0±2.1 months. All of the patients had abdominal discomfort or pain in the preceding 6 months and had a history of loose (mushy) or watery stool, 99.1% had pain or discomfort relieved with defaecation. The prevalence of diarrhoea was found in 78.5% and mixed 21.5% of the patients. About 5% of the patients had raised ESR and majority (86.9%) of the patients had normal level of hemoglobin. Ten (9%) of 107 patients were found positive for anti-t TG (IgA). These findings suggest that an around one-tenth of IBS especially diarrhoea predominant patients may have celiac disease who will respond to simple gluten-free diet thus minimizing the morbidity and mortality. So, all clinically diagnosed IBS patients especially diarrhoea predominant cases should be suggested for the screening for celiac disease.

  9. Celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Isabel

    2008-08-01

    Celiac disease is an immunologically mediated enteropathy of the small intestine, characterized by lifelong intolerance to the gliadin and related prolamines from wheat and other cereals, that occurs in genetically predisposed individuals. Symptoms result from structural damage to the mucosa of the small intestine, which may cause malabsorption with positive autoantibodies in the sera. Normal mucosal architecture is restored after the use of a gluten-free diet and the normalization of the autoantibodies. Villous atrophy and high levels of autoantibodies reappear when gluten is reintroduced into the diet (gluten challenge).

  10. Efficient chemo-enzymatic gluten detoxification: reducing toxic epitopes for celiac patients improving functional properties.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Miguel; Nunes, Fernando M; Guedes, Sofia; Domingues, Pedro; Silva, Amélia M; Carrillo, Jose Maria; Rodriguez-Quijano, Marta; Branlard, Gérard; Igrejas, Gilberto

    2015-12-22

    Protein engineering of gluten, the exogenous effector in celiac disease, seeking its detoxification by selective chemical modification of toxic epitopes is a very attractive strategy and promising technology when compared to pharmacological treatment or genetic engineering of wheat. Here we present a simple and efficient chemo-enzymatic methodology that decreases celiac disease toxic epitopes of gluten proteins improving its technological value through microbial transglutaminase-mediated transamidation of glutamine with n-butylamine under reducing conditions. First, we found that using low concentrations of amine-nucleophile under non-reducing conditions, the decrease in toxic epitopes is mainly due to transglutaminase-mediated cross-linking. Second, using high amine nucleophile concentrations protein cross-linking is substantially reduced. Third, reducing conditions increase 7-fold the transamidation reaction further decreasing toxic epitopes amount. Fourth, using n-butylamine improves gluten hydrophobicity that strengthens the gluten network. These results open the possibility of tailoring gluten for producing hypoallergenic flours while still taking advantage of the unique viscoelastic properties of gluten.

  11. Efficient chemo-enzymatic gluten detoxification: reducing toxic epitopes for celiac patients improving functional properties

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Miguel; Nunes, Fernando M.; Guedes, Sofia; Domingues, Pedro; Silva, Amélia M.; Carrillo, Jose Maria; Rodriguez-Quijano, Marta; Branlard, Gérard; Igrejas, Gilberto

    2015-01-01

    Protein engineering of gluten, the exogenous effector in celiac disease, seeking its detoxification by selective chemical modification of toxic epitopes is a very attractive strategy and promising technology when compared to pharmacological treatment or genetic engineering of wheat. Here we present a simple and efficient chemo-enzymatic methodology that decreases celiac disease toxic epitopes of gluten proteins improving its technological value through microbial transglutaminase-mediated transamidation of glutamine with n-butylamine under reducing conditions. First, we found that using low concentrations of amine-nucleophile under non-reducing conditions, the decrease in toxic epitopes is mainly due to transglutaminase-mediated cross-linking. Second, using high amine nucleophile concentrations protein cross-linking is substantially reduced. Third, reducing conditions increase 7-fold the transamidation reaction further decreasing toxic epitopes amount. Fourth, using n-butylamine improves gluten hydrophobicity that strengthens the gluten network. These results open the possibility of tailoring gluten for producing hypoallergenic flours while still taking advantage of the unique viscoelastic properties of gluten. PMID:26691232

  12. Gliadin-specific, HLA-DQ(alpha 1*0501,beta 1*0201) restricted T cells isolated from the small intestinal mucosa of celiac disease patients

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is most probably an immunological disease, precipitated in susceptible individuals by ingestion of wheat gliadin and related proteins from other cereals. The disease shows a strong human HLA association predominantly to the cis or trans encoded HLA- DQ(alpha 1*0501,beta 1*0201) (DQ2) heterodimer. T cell recognition of gliadin presented by this DQ heterodimer may thus be of immunopathogenic importance in CD. We therefore challenged small intestinal biopsies from adult CD patients on a gluten-free diet in vitro with gluten (containing both gliadin and other wheat proteins), and isolated activated CD25+ T cells. Polyclonal T cell lines and a panel of T cell clones recognizing gluten were established. They recognized the gliadin moiety of gluten, but not proteins from other cereals. Inhibition studies with anti-HLA antibodies demonstrated predominant antigen presentation by HLA-DQ molecules. The main antigen- presenting molecule was established to be the CD-associated DQ(alpha 1*0501, beta 1*0201) heterodimer. The gluten-reactive T cell clones were CD4+, CD8-, and carried diverse combinations of T cell receptor (TCR) V alpha and V beta chains. The findings suggest preferential mucosal presentation of gluten-derived peptides by HLA-DQ(alpha 1*0501, beta 1*0201) in CD, which may explain the HLA association. PMID:8315377

  13. Celiac Injury Due to Arcuate Ligament: An Endovascular Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zini, Chiara Corona, Mario Boatta, Emanuele Wlderk, Andrea Salvatori, Filippo Maria Fanelli, Fabrizio

    2013-06-15

    Celiac trunk injures are rare events, with high mortality rates and difficult management. Endovascular treatment may be considered to avoid bleeding. We report a case of severe bleeding in a 37-year-old man resulting from celiac trunk stretching after a motorcycle crash. Because direct celiac trunk catheterization was not possible, a retrograde catheterization of the common hepatic artery was performed via the superior mesenteric artery. Two vascular plugs (type IV) were released, and the exclusion of the celiac trunk origin was completed with the deployment of an aortic cuff. The patient's clinical condition immediately improved, and after 6 months' follow-up, imaging confirmed the complete exclusion of the celiac trunk.

  14. Celiac injury due to arcuate ligament: an endovascular approach.

    PubMed

    Zini, Chiara; Corona, Mario; Boatta, Emanuele; Wlderk, Andrea; Salvatori, Filippo Maria; Fanelli, Fabrizio

    2013-06-01

    Celiac trunk injures are rare events, with high mortality rates and difficult management. Endovascular treatment may be considered to avoid bleeding. We report a case of severe bleeding in a 37-year-old man resulting from celiac trunk stretching after a motorcycle crash. Because direct celiac trunk catheterization was not possible, a retrograde catheterization of the common hepatic artery was performed via the superior mesenteric artery. Two vascular plugs (type IV) were released, and the exclusion of the celiac trunk origin was completed with the deployment of an aortic cuff. The patient's clinical condition immediately improved, and after 6 months' follow-up, imaging confirmed the complete exclusion of the celiac trunk.

  15. Lymphadenopathy in celiac disease: computed tomographic observations

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Bayless, T.M.; Fishman, E.K.; Siegelman, S.S.

    1984-06-01

    Lymphadenopathy in patients with celiac disease is generally viewed with alarm due to the association between celiac disease and intestinal lymphoma. Four patients with celiac disease are described in whom significant mesenteric and paraaortic adenopathy was demonstrated by computed tomogrophy (CT). The subsequent clinical course of these patients revealed no evidence of lymphoma. In two patients with longstanding celiac disease and recent relapse, exploratory laparotomy revealed reactive hyperplasia in the enlarged glands; in one patient this was associated with intestinal ulceration, and in the other no underlying pathology was found. Follow-up CT scans in both these patients demonstrated regression of the findings with clinical improvement. In the other two patients, CT was performed as part of the initial evaluation.

  16. Immunopathogenesis and therapeutic approaches in pediatric celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Shreya; Kovilam, Oormila; Zach, Terence L; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2016-08-01

    Celiac Disease is an autoimmune enteropathy with increasing incidence worldwide in both adults and children. It occurs as an inflammatory condition with destruction of the normal architecture of villi on consumption of gluten and related protein products found in wheat, barley and rye. However, the exact pathogenesis is not yet fully understood. A gluten-free diet remains the main modality of therapy to date. While some patients continue to have symptoms even on a gluten-free diet, adherence to this diet is also difficult, especially for the children. Hence, there is continued interest in novel methods of therapy and the current research focus is on the promising novel non-dietary modalities of treatment. Here, we critically reviewed the existing literature regarding the pathogenesis of celiac disease in children including the role of in-utero exposure leading to neonatal and infant sensitization and its application for the development of new therapeutic approaches for these patients.

  17. Celiac disease and obstetrical-gynecological contribution

    PubMed Central

    Casella, Giovanni; Orfanotti, Guido; Giacomantonio, Loredana; Bella, Camillo Di; Crisafulli, Valentina; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Baldini, Vittorio; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) shows an increased prevalence in female, particularly during the fertile period. Celiac disease should be researched in infertility, spontaneous and recurrent abortions, delayed menarche, amenorrhea, early menopause, and children with low birth-weight. Celiac disease is still little considered during the evaluation of infertility. Up to 50% of women with untreated CD refer an experience of miscarriage or an unfavorable outcome of pregnancy. Celiac patients taking a normal diet (with gluten) have a shorter reproductive period. Women with undiagnosed CD had a higher risk of small for gestation age infants very small for gestational age infants and pre-term birth when compared with women with noted CD. The link between NCGS and infertility is actually unknown. The goal of our work is to perform an actual review about this topic and to increase the awareness in the medical population to research celiac disease in selected obstetric and gynecological disorders. PMID:27895849

  18. Targeted modification of wheat grain protein to reduce the content of celiac causing epitopes.

    PubMed

    Osorio, C; Wen, N; Gemini, R; Zemetra, R; von Wettstein, D; Rustgi, S

    2012-08-01

    The prolamin peptides in wheat gluten and in the homologous storage proteins of barley and rye cause painful chronic erasure of microvilli of the small intestine epithelium in celiac patients. If untreated, it can lead to chronic diarrhea, abdominal distension, osteoporosis, weight-loss due to malabsorption of nutrients, and anemia. In addition to congenital cases, life-long exposure to gluten proteins in bread and pasta can also induce development of celiac sprue in adults. To date, the only effective treatment is life-long strict abstinence from the staple food grains. Complete exclusion of dietary gluten is, however, difficult due to use of wheat in many foods, incomplete labeling and social constraints. Thus, finding alternative therapies for this most common foodborne disease remained an active area of research, which has led to many suggestions in last few years. The pros and cons associated with these therapies were reviewed in the present communication. As different celiac patients are immunogenic to different members of the undigestible proline/glutamine rich peptides of ~149 gliadins and low molecular weight glutenin subunits as well as the six high molecular weight glutenin subunits, an exhaustive digestion of the immunogenic peptides in the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, and ileum of celiacs is required. In view of the above, we evaluated the capacity of cereal grains to synthesize and store the enzymes prolyl endopeptidase from Flavobacterium meningosepticum and the barley cysteine endoprotease B2, which in combination are capable of detoxifying immunogenic gluten peptides in a novel treatment of celiac disease.

  19. Treatment for Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease How do doctors treat celiac disease? A gluten-free diet Doctors treat celiac disease with a ... absorb nutrients from food into the bloodstream normally. Gluten-free diet and dermatitis herpetiformis If you have ...

  20. Celiac disease - sprue

    MedlinePlus

    ... your provider if you have symptoms of celiac disease. Prevention Because the exact cause is unknown, there is no known way to prevent the development of celiac disease. However, being aware of the risk factors (such ...

  1. The Spectrum of Differences between Childhood and Adulthood Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Kruzliak, Peter; Cangemi, Giuseppina C.; Pohanka, Miroslav; Betti, Elena; Lauret, Eugenia; Rodrigo, Luis

    2015-01-01

    An old saying states that ‘’children are not little adults” and this certainly holds true for celiac disease, as there are many peculiar aspects regarding its epidemiology, diagnosis, clinical presentations, associated diseases, and response to treatment in pediatric compared to adult populations, to such an extent that it merits a description of its own. In fact, contrary to the past when it was thought that celiac disease was a disorder predominantly affecting childhood and characterized by a malabsorption syndrome, nowadays it is well recognized that it affects also adult and elderly people with an impressive variability of clinical presentation. In general, the clinical guidelines for diagnosis recommend starting with specific serologic testing in all suspected subjects, including those suffering from extraintestinal related conditions, and performing upper endoscopy with appropriate biopsy sampling of duodenal mucosa in case of positivity. The latter may be omitted in young patients showing high titers of anti-transglutaminase antibodies. The subsequent management of a celiac patient differs substantially depending on the age at diagnosis and should be based on the important consideration that this is a lifelong condition. PMID:26506381

  2. Immune response to Hepatitis B vaccine in patients with celiac disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Opri, R; Veneri, D; Mengoli, C; Zanoni, G

    2015-01-01

    It is debated whether patients with celiac disease (CD) have non-protective antibody responses to HBV vaccination more frequently than non-affected subjects. To perform a literature review and meta-analysis on protective response to HBV vaccination in CD patients. RCTs and observational controlled studies were eligible. Outcome of interest was an anti-HBs (HBsAb) titer ≥10 IU/L after last vaccine dose. Comparative index was rate ratio (RR). Heterogeneity between studies was addressed and funnel plots were analyzed. Meta-regression models were applied to investigate effect size due to study-specific variables. Twelve retrospective studies on a total of 1,447 participants and 4 prospective studies on 184 subjects were selected. The RR was 0.732 (95% C.I.: 0.664-0.808) and 0.777 (95% C.I.: 0.629-0.960) in the prospective and retrospective studies, respectively. The I2, indicating heterogeneity, was 51.1% in retrospective, 39.8% in prospective studies. Non-protective antibody responses occurred more frequently in patients than controls. Due to limitations in the available studies, additional trials to evaluate post-vaccination HBsAb titer in CD patients are needed. PMID:26378476

  3. Clinical Utility of Serologic Testing for Celiac Disease in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    on a GFD. Since IgA measurement is the standard for the serologic celiac disease tests, false negatives may occur in IgA-deficient individuals. Incidence and Prevalence of Celiac Disease The incidence and prevalence of celiac disease in the general population and in subjects with symptoms consistent with or at higher risk of celiac disease based on systematic reviews published in 2004 and 2009 are summarized below. Incidence of Celiac Disease in the General Population Adults or mixed population: 1 to 17/100,000/year Children: 2 to 51/100,000/year In one of the studies, a stratified analysis showed that there was a higher incidence of celiac disease in younger children compared to older children, i.e., 51 cases/100,000/year in 0 to 2 year-olds, 33/100,000/year in 2 to 5 year-olds, and 10/100,000/year in children 5 to 15 years old. Prevalence of Celiac Disease in the General Population The prevalence of celiac disease reported in population-based studies identified in the 2004 systematic review varied between 0.14% and 1.87% (median: 0.47%, interquartile range: 0.25%, 0.71%). According to the authors of the review, the prevalence did not vary by age group, i.e., adults and children. Prevalence of Celiac Disease in High Risk Subjects Type 1 diabetes (adults and children): 1 to 11% Autoimmune thyroid disease: 2.9 to 3.3% First degree relatives of patients with celiac disease: 2 to 20% Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Subjects with Symptoms Consistent with the Disease The prevalence of celiac disease in subjects with symptoms consistent with the disease varied widely among studies, i.e., 1.5% to 50% in adult studies, and 1.1% to 17% in pediatric studies. Differences in prevalence may be related to the referral pattern as the authors of a systematic review noted that the prevalence tended to be higher in studies whose population originated from tertiary referral centres compared to general practice. Research Questions What is the sensitivity and specificity of serologic

  4. Increased Incidence of Thyroid Disease in Patients with Celiac Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xin; Lu, Li; Yang, Rong; Li, Yanbin; Shan, Ling; Wang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of thyroid disease is likely increased among individuals with celiac disease (CD). In addition, exposure to gluten-free treatment may be associated with a risk of thyroid disease, but this association remains controversial. A systematic review was performed to evaluate the association between thyroid disease and CD. The articles were obtained from the PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, and Chinese WanFang bibliographical databases for the period up to May 2016. The results were analysed in a meta-analysis with odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). There were 13 articles in this meta-analysis, including 15629 CD cases and 79342 controls. Overall, the prevalence of thyroid disease in patients with CD was significantly increased compared with that in the control groups (OR 3.08, 95% CI 2.67–3.56, P<0.001). Moreover, there was no significant difference in the OR between the gluten-treated and untreated groups (OR 1.08, 95% CI 0.61–1.92, P = 0.786). The results of our meta-analysis support the hypothesis that the prevalence of thyroid disease in patients with CD is increased compared with that in controls, which suggests that CD patients should be screened for thyroid disease. The effect of gluten-free treatment on thyroid disease needs further investigation. PMID:28030626

  5. Management of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Kalra, K K; Jain, N; Mittal, S K

    1999-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD), perceived as a rare cause of chronic diarrhea three decades ago, was diagnosed as a cause of diarrhea in 60 (7.5%) post weaned children among 800 cases of chronic diarrhea. The diagnosis was established on the basis of a detailed clinical history, histopathological studies on small bowel mucosa and a complete recovery on gluten free diets. Thirty four children were followed up for a period of 0.3 to 8.2 years (mean 3.45 +/- 2.28). Catch up growth was seen in all. A rapid gain in height and weight was observed in first year following exclusion of gluten from the diet. However, on subsequent follow up, flattening of growth curve was seen in 9 subjects which was attributed to non-compliance of gluten free diets and dietary inadequacies. Strict dietary compliance is difficult to adhere to with wheat being a staple cereal in India. Other factors affecting compliance include lack of awareness and non availability of gluten free diets as well as contamination of other items with wheat at grocery shops. A few cases may present as celiac crisis which is a medical emergency requiring aggressive management including use of corticosteroids to improve survival in this otherwise life threatening situation. Effective management of CD requires intense family cooperation as well as concerted national efforts to provide these patients easy access to gluten free diets. The evolution of Celiac Societies, and widespread dissemination of knowledge through all available media will greatly help in management of patients with this chronic disease.

  6. Protein expression profile of celiac disease patient with aberrant T cell by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    De Re, Valli; Simula, Maria Paola; Caggiari, Laura; Ortz, Nicoletta; Spina, Michele; Da Ponte, Alessandro; De Appolonia, Leandro; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Canzonieri, Vincenzo; Cannizzaro, Renato

    2007-08-01

    One complication of celiac disease (CD) is refractory CD. These patients frequently show aberrant intraepithelial T cell clones and an increasing risk of evolution into enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma (EATL). There is debate in the literature whether these cases are actually a smoldering lymphoma from the outset. The mechanism inducing T cell proliferation and prognosis remains unknown. Recently, alemtuzumab has been proposed as a promising new approach to treat these patients. Only few single cases have been tested presently, nevertheless, in all of them a clinical improvement has been observed, while intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) effectively targeted by alemtuzumab are still a debated issue. Using 2D-DIGE, we found hyperexpressed proteins specifically associated with aberrant T cell in a patient with CD by comparing the protein expression with that of patients with CD and polyclonal T cell or with that of control subjects (patients with polyclonal T cell and no CD). Proteins with a higher expression in duodenal biopsy of the patient with aberrant T cell were identified as IgM, apolipoprotein C-III, and Charcot-Leyden crystal proteins. These preliminary data allow hypothesizing different clinical effects of alemtuzumab in patients with CD, since besides the probable effect of alemtuzumab on T cell, it could effect inflammatory-associated CD52(+) IgM(+)B cell and eosinophils cells, known to produce IgM and Charcot-Leyden crystal proteins, which we demonstrated to be altered in this patient. Results also emphasize the possible association of apolipoprotein with aberrant T cell proliferation.

  7. A new morphological classification during follow-up in patients with celiac disease: a three-dimensional observation by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Magliocca, F M; Bonamico, M; Petrozza, V; Mariani, P; Correr, S; Familiari, G; Carpino, F

    1996-04-01

    The structure and ultrastructure of the villi of small intestinal mucosa was examined in 237 duodenal or jejunal biopsies taken from children with active celiac disease and during gluten-free diet. All biopsies were processed for light and scanning electron microscopy. Conventional histology showed four different morphological aspects: total and subtotal villous atrophy in patients on unrestricted diet, partial villous atrophy and normal mucosa during gluten-free diet. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that in active celiac disease the severity of the intestinal lesions was related to individual vulnerability to gluten. Our results showed that during dietary treatment the process of mucosal healing was constant and strictly time-dependent. Furthermore, the ultrastructural examination has been relevant in evaluating the evolution of the villous regeneration. In this study a classification regarding the healing process of the small intestinal mucosa correlated with the time of start of dietary therapy is proposed.

  8. Infective Endocarditis in a Patient with Celiac Disease after Central Venous Catheter Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Suryanarayan; Arobelidze, Salome; Gundelly, Parveen; Changarath Vijayan, Anil Kumar

    2017-01-01

    There is an increasing incidence of infective endocarditis secondary to central venous catheters, which is termed as 'healthcare-associated infective endocarditis'. There is an increased risk of getting infective endocarditis in conditions with malnutrition and also if the tip of the central venous catheter is deep in the right atrium close to the tricuspid valve. We present a case of 31-year-old female who had all these risk factors. She was admitted to the hospital for the work up of the weight loss and was diagnosed with celiac disease. Central venous access was obtained because of poor peripheral intravenous access via the peripherally inserted central catheter which was complicated by thrombosis and removed after three days of insertion, and she was started on anticoagulation. Two weeks after being discharged, she presented to the emergency department with fever, shortness of breath, and had signs of congestive heart failure. A computed tomography of the chest for pulmonary embolism was taken and showed small clot burden pulmonary embolism and two cavitary lesions in the right lung. A transthoracic echocardiogram was taken and showed vegetation on the tricuspid valve and blood cultures were positive for Staphylococcus aureus. Hence, a diagnosis of infective endocarditis was made, and she was treated with intravenous antibiotics for a total of six weeks after a long and complicated hospital stay. PMID:28348945

  9. Celiac disease. CME update for family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, Shane M.; Andrews, Christopher N.; Beck, Paul L.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review current understanding of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of celiac disease. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Few recent randomized controlled trials (level I evidence) have studied treatments for celiac disease. There are recent comparative studies (level II evidence) and there is well established consensus (level III evidence) on diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease. MAIN MESSAGE: Celiac disease is an immune-mediated small bowel enteropathy caused by exposure to wheat gluten protein. The disease can be insidious and often presents with only subtle extraintestinal manifestations in a variety of organ systems. Recent epidemiologic surveys suggest celiac disease is much more common in North America than previously thought. Advances in immunology and screening have made diagnosis more reliable than in the past. Removing gluten from the diet is effective in most cases. CONCLUSION: Celiac disease manifests subtly and is an easy diagnosis to miss. Good laboratory screening tests and effective treatment are available. Family practitioners should consider celiac disease in patients who present with confounding symptoms. PMID:15171674

  10. [Serum metabolome by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in patients with ulcerative colitis and celiac disease].

    PubMed

    Sitkin, S I; Tkachenko, E I; Vakhitov, T Ia; Oreshko, L S; Zhigalova, T N

    2013-01-01

    Metabolomics is the emerging science of measurement and analysis of metabolome--the complete set of low molecular weight compounds in a cell, tissue, organ or whole organism. One of the aims of metabolomics is to research the response of an organism to a pathophysiological insult by measuring the concentrations of small molecule metabolites in biofluids and tissues and its dynamics. Intestinal microbiota is most probably involved in the development and maintenance of autoimmune inflammation in ulcerative colitis and celiac disease. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC - MS) of serum generates comprehensive metabolic profiles, reflecting integrated human (systemic) and gut microbial metabolism which may be altered in disease states. The aim of this study was to investigate GC - MS-based serum metabolomic profiles in UC and CD patients. Serum metabolic profiles were collected from 75 individuals: 20 patients with mild-moderate active UC, 35 CD patients, and 20 healthy controls (HC). We characterized 84 serum metabolites by use GC-MS. 18 metabolites at least have a combined (human + microbial) origin. In serum of UC patients, phenylacetic acid (PAA), 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (4-HPAA), 3-indolylacetic acid (IAA), succinic acid (SA) and fumaric acid (FA) were the metabolites most prominently increased, whereas 3-phenylpropionic acid (PPA) was significantly decreased. Serum of CD patients showed significant increases in IAA, 3-indolepropionic acid (IPA), SA and FA. Increased serum levels of succinic acid suggest its possible damaging effect on intestinal mucosa especially in ulcerative colitis. Orally administered butyrate + inulin as supplement to mesalazine in UC or gluten free diet in CD was effective in reducing disease activity with a marked improvement of serum metabolomic profiles (including SA reduction) and gut microbiota in both diseases. There were no any adverse events.

  11. Replication of GWAS Coding SNPs Implicates MMEL1 as a Potential Susceptibility Locus among Saudi Arabian Celiac Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Saadah, Omar I.; Shaik, Noor Ahmad; Banaganapalli, Babajan; Salama, Mohammed A.; Al-Harthi, Sameer E.; Wang, Jun; Shawoosh, Harbi A.; Alghamdi, Sharifa A.; Bin-Taleb, Yagoub Y.; Alhussaini, Bakr H.; Elango, Ramu; Al-Aama, Jumana Y.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD), a gluten intolerance disorder, was implicated to have 57 genetic susceptibility loci for Europeans but not for culturally and geographically distinct ethnic populations like Saudi Arabian CD patients. Therefore, we genotyped Saudi CD patients and healthy controls for three polymorphisms, that is, Phe196Ser in IRAK1, Trp262Arg in SH2B3, and Met518Thr in MMEL1 genes. Single locus analysis identified that carriers of the 518 Thr/Thr (MMEL1) genotype conferred a 1.6-fold increased disease risk compared to the noncarriers (OR = 2.6; 95% CI: 1.22–5.54; P < 0.01). This significance persisted even under allelic (OR = 1.55; 95% CI: 1.05–2.28; P = 0.02) and additive (OR = 0.35; 95% CI: 0.17–0.71; P = 0.03) genetic models. However, frequencies for Trp262Arg (SH2B3) and Phe196Ser (IRAK1) polymorphisms were not significantly different between patients and controls. The overall best MDR model included Met518Thr and Trp262Arg polymorphisms, with a maximal testing accuracy of 64.1% and a maximal cross-validation consistency of 10 out of 10 (P = 0.0156). Allelic distribution of the 518 Thr/Thr polymorphism in MMEL1 primarily suggests its independent and synergistic contribution towards CD susceptibility among Saudi patients. Lack of significant association of IRAK and SH2B3 gene polymorphisms in Saudi patients but their association in European groups suggests the genetic heterogeneity of CD. PMID:26843707

  12. Essential Amino Acids in the Gluten-Free Diet and Serum in Relation to Depression in Patients with Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    van Hees, Nathalie J. M.; Giltay, Erik J.; Tielemans, Susanne M. A. J.; Geleijnse, Johanna M.; Puvill, Thomas; Janssen, Nadine; van der Does, Willem

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Celiac disease (CD) is associated with an increased risk of major depressive disorder, possibly due to deficiencies in micronutrients in the gluten-free diet. We aimed to investigate whether essential amino acids (i.e., the precursors of serotonin, dopamine and other neurotransmitters) are depleted in the diet and serum of CD patients with major depressive disorder. Methods In a cross-sectional study we assessed dietary intake of amino acids and serum levels of amino acids, in 77 CD patients on a gluten-free diet and in 33 healthy controls. Major depressive disorder was assessed with structured interviews (using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview Plus). Dietary intake was assessed using a 203-item food frequency questionnaire. Results Participants had a mean age of 55 years and 74% were women. The intake of vegetable protein was significantly lower in CD patients than in healthy controls (mean difference of 7.8 g/d; 95% CI: 4.7–10.8), as were serum concentrations of tyrosine, phenylalanine and tryptophan (all p < 0.005). However, within the CD patient group, the presence of major depressive disorder (n = 42) was not associated with intake or serum levels of essential amino acids. Conclusions Patients with CD on a long-term gluten-free diet, with good adherence, consume significantly less vegetable protein than controls, and their serum levels of several essential amino acids were also lower. Despite its potential adverse effect, intake and serum levels of essential amino acids were not related to major depression. PMID:25884227

  13. Treatment of both native and deamidated gluten peptides with an endo-peptidase from Aspergillus niger prevents stimulation of gut-derived gluten-reactive T cells from either children or adults with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Toft-Hansen, Henrik; Rasmussen, Karina S; Staal, Anne; Roggen, Erwin L; Sollid, Ludvig M; Lillevang, Søren T; Barington, Torben; Husby, Steffen

    2014-08-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is characterized by an inappropriate immunological reaction against gluten driven by gluten-specific CD4+ T cells. We screened 25 proteases and tested 10 for their potential to degrade gluten in vitro. Five proteases were further tested for their ability to prevent the proliferative response by a gluten-specific CD4+ T cell clone and seven gluten-reactive T cell lines to protease-digested gluten peptides. A proline-specific endo-peptidase from Aspergillus niger (AnP2) was particularly efficient at diminishing proliferation after stimulation with cleaved antigen, and could completely block the response against both native and deamidated gluten peptides. We found that AnP2 was efficient down to a 1:64 protease:substrate ratio (w:w). When AnP2 was tested in assays using seven gluten-reactive T cell lines from individual CD patients (three adults and four children), the response to gluten was diminished in all cases. Our study indicates a therapeutic benefit of AnP2 to CD patients.

  14. Fequency distribution of HLA DQ2 and DQ8 in celiac patients and first-degree relatives in Recife, northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Antunes, Margarida Maria; Crovella, Sergio; Brandão, Lucas André Cavalcanti; Guimarães, Rafael Lima; Motta, Maria Eugênia Farias Almeida; da Silva, Giselia Alves Pontes

    2011-01-01

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequencies of the HLA genotypes DQ2 and DQ8 and the alleles A1*05, A1*0201, B1*0201 and B1*0302 in individuals with celiac disease in Recife, northeastern Brazil. METHODS: HLA DQ2 and DQ8 genotyping was performed for 73 individuals with celiac disease and 126 first-degree relatives with negative transglutaminase serology. The alleles DQA1*05, DQA1*0201, DQB1*02 and DQB1*0302 were identified by sequencing using specific primers and the EU-DQ kit from the Eurospital Laboratory, Trieste, Italy and double-checked by the All Set SPP kit (Dynal). RESULTS: Among the 73 cases, 50 (68.5%) had the genotype DQ2, 13 (17.8%) had DQ8, 5 (6.8%) had DQ2 and DQ8, and 5 did not have any of these genotypes. Among the 5 negative individuals, four had the B1*02 allele and one did not have any of the alleles studied. B1*02 was the most frequent allele in both groups (94% in the patients and 89% in the control relatives). CONCLUSIONS: In this study, celiac disease was associated with the genotypes DQ2 and DQ8. DQ2 predominated, but the distribution of the frequencies was different from what has been found in European populations and was closer to what has been found in the Americas. The high frequencies of the HLA genotypes DQ2 and DQ8 that were found in first-degree relatives would make it difficult to use these HLA genotypes for routine diagnosis of celiac disease in this group. PMID:21484038

  15. Serological markers of enterocyte damage and apoptosis in patients with celiac disease, autoimmune diabetes mellitus and diabetes mellitus type 2.

    PubMed

    Hoffmanová, I; Sánchez, D; Hábová, V; Anděl, M; Tučková, L; Tlaskalová-Hogenová, H

    2015-01-01

    Impairment of mucosal barrier integrity of small intestine might be causative in immune-mediated gastrointestinal diseases. We tested the markers of epithelial apoptosis - cytokeratin 18 caspase-cleaved fragment (cCK-18), and enterocyte damage - intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP) and soluble CD14 (sCD14) in sera of patients with untreated celiac disease (CLD), those on gluten-free diet (CLD-GFD), patients with autoimmune diabetes mellitus (T1D), T1D with insulitis (T1D/INS), and diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2D). We found elevated levels of cCK-18 (P<0.001), I-FABP (P<0.01) and sCD14 (P<0.05) in CLD when compared to healthy controls. However, the levels of cCK-18 (P<0.01) and I-FABP (P<0.01) in CLD-GFD were higher when compared with controls. Interestingly, elevated levels of cCK-18 and I-FABP were found in T2D and T1D (P<0.001), and T1D/INS (P<0.01, P<0.001). Twenty-two out of 43 CLD patients were seropositive for cCK-18, 19/43 for I-FABP and 11/43 for sCD14; 9/30 of T2D patients were positive for cCK-18 and 5/20 of T1D/INS for sCD14, while in controls only 3/41 were positive for cCK-18, 3/41 for I-FABP and 1/41 for sCD14. We documented for the first time seropositivity for sCD14 in CLD and potential usefulness of serum cCK-18 and I-FABP as markers of gut damage in CLD, CLD-GFD, and diabetes.

  16. Celiac Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Celiac Disease Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment Past Issues / Spring 2015 ... Contents What are some of the symptoms of celiac disease? Some people with celiac disease may not ...

  17. Resection of Celiac Artery Aneurysm with Bypass Grafting to the Splenic and Common Hepatic Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Pattakos, Gregory; Tolpin, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Celiac artery aneurysms are rare and typically warrant surgical treatment. Atherosclerosis is their chief cause. Symptomatic patients usually present with abdominal pain. Surgical resection of celiac artery aneurysms is associated with low morbidity and mortality rates. We report the case of a patient whose 2.2-cm celiac artery aneurysm we resected, with subsequent saphenous vein bypass grafting from the celiac trunk to the splenic and common hepatic arteries. In addition, we briefly discuss other treatment options. PMID:28265220

  18. Fecal Gluten Peptides Reveal Limitations of Serological Tests and Food Questionnaires for Monitoring Gluten-Free Diet in Celiac Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Comino, Isabel; Fernández-Bañares, Fernando; Esteve, María; Ortigosa, Luís; Castillejo, Gemma; Fambuena, Blanca; Ribes-Koninckx, Carmen; Sierra, Carlos; Rodríguez-Herrera, Alfonso; Salazar, José Carlos; Caunedo, Ángel; Marugán-Miguelsanz, J M; Garrote, José Antonio; Vivas, Santiago; lo Iacono, Oreste; Nuñez, Alejandro; Vaquero, Luis; Vegas, Ana María; Crespo, Laura; Fernández-Salazar, Luis; Arranz, Eduardo; Jiménez-García, Victoria Alejandra; Antonio Montes-Cano, Marco; Espín, Beatriz; Galera, Ana; Valverde, Justo; Girón, Francisco José; Bolonio, Miguel; Millán, Antonio; Cerezo, Francesc Martínez; Guajardo, César; Alberto, José Ramón; Rosinach, Mercé; Segura, Verónica; León, Francisco; Marinich, Jorge; Muñoz-Suano, Alba; Romero-Gómez, Manuel; Cebolla, Ángel; Sousa, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Treatment for celiac disease (CD) is a lifelong strict gluten-free diet (GFD). Patients should be followed-up with dietary interviews and serology as CD markers to ensure adherence to the diet. However, none of these methods offer an accurate measure of dietary compliance. Our aim was to evaluate the measurement of gluten immunogenic peptides (GIP) in stools as a marker of GFD adherence in CD patients and compare it with traditional methods of GFD monitoring. Methods: We performed a prospective, nonrandomized, multicenter study including 188 CD patients on GFD and 84 healthy controls. Subjects were given a dietary questionnaire and fecal GIP quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Serological anti-tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG) IgA and anti-deamidated gliadin peptide (anti-DGP) IgA antibodies were measured simultaneously. Results: Of the 188 celiac patients, 56 (29.8%) had detectable GIP levels in stools. There was significant association between age and GIP in stools that revealed increasing dietary transgressions with advancing age (39.2% in subjects ≥13 years old) and with gender in certain age groups (60% in men ≥13 years old). No association was found between fecal GIP and dietary questionnaire or anti-tTG antibodies. However, association was detected between GIP and anti-DGP antibodies, although 46 of the 53 GIP stool-positive patients were negative for anti-DGP. Conclusions: Detection of gluten peptides in stools reveals limitations of traditional methods for monitoring GFD in celiac patients. The GIP ELISA enables direct and quantitative assessment of gluten exposure early after ingestion and could aid in the diagnosis and clinical management of nonresponsive CD and refractory CD. Trial registration number NCT02711397. PMID:27644734

  19. Dietary guidelines and implementation for celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Kupper, Cynthia

    2005-04-01

    Medical nutrition therapy is the only accepted treatment for celiac disease. This paper summarizes a review of scientific studies using the gluten-free diet, nutritional risk factors, controversial elements of the diet, and its implementation in treating celiac disease. Treatment for celiac disease requires elimination of the storage proteins found in wheat, rye, and barley. The inclusion of oats and wheat starch is controversial. Research supports that oats may be acceptable for patients with celiac disease and can improve the nutritional quality of the diet. However, use of oats is not widely recommended in the United States because of concerns of potential contamination of commercial oats. Studies assessing the contamination of commercial oats are limited. Research indicates no differences in patients choosing a strict wheat starch-containing, gluten-free diet vs. a naturally gluten-free diet. Factors other than trace gluten may be the cause of continued villous atrophy in some patients. The impact of nutrient malabsorption caused from untreated celiac disease is well documented. The diet and gluten-free products are often low in B vitamins, calcium, vitamin D, iron, zinc, magnesium, and fiber. Few gluten-free products are enriched or fortified, adding to the risk of nutrient deficiencies. Patients newly diagnosed or inadequately treated have low bone mineral density, imbalanced macronutrients, low fiber intake, and micronutrient deficiencies. Also troubling is the increased incidence of obesity seen in persons with celiac disease following a gluten-free diet. Because of the nutritional risks associated with celiac disease, a registered dietitian must be part of the health care team that monitors the patient's nutritional status and compliance on a regular basis.

  20. A rare association of celiac disease and aplastic anemia: case report of a child and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Badyal, Rama Kumari; Sachdeva, Man Updesh Singh; Varma, Neelam; Thapa, Babu Ram

    2014-01-01

    An association between severe aplastic anemia and other autoimmune diseases is rare and has been described in adults for eosinophilic fasciitis, thymomas, systemic lupus erythematosus, and thyroid disorders. Herein we report a patient with celiac disease who was not strictly following a gluten-free diet and presented with progressive pallor, fever, and weakness of 1 month's duration. On investigation, he had pancytopenia, which on subsequent evaluation revealed aplastic anemia. An association between aplastic anemia and celiac disease has rarely been reported. To the best of author's knowledge, only 1 pediatric case of celiac disease associated with aplastic anemia has been published. This is the second report to suggest such an association in children.

  1. Diagnosis of gluten related disorders: Celiac disease, wheat allergy and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Elli, Luca; Branchi, Federica; Tomba, Carolina; Villalta, Danilo; Norsa, Lorenzo; Ferretti, Francesca; Roncoroni, Leda; Bardella, Maria Teresa

    2015-06-21

    Cereal crops and cereal consumption have had a vital role in Mankind's history. In the recent years gluten ingestion has been linked with a range of clinical disorders. Gluten-related disorders have gradually emerged as an epidemiologically relevant phenomenon with an estimated global prevalence around 5%. Celiac disease, wheat allergy and non-celiac gluten sensitivity represent different gluten-related disorders. Similar clinical manifestations can be observed in these disorders, yet there are peculiar pathogenetic pathways involved in their development. Celiac disease and wheat allergy have been extensively studied, while non-celiac gluten sensitivity is a relatively novel clinical entity, believed to be closely related to other gastrointestinal functional syndromes. The diagnosis of celiac disease and wheat allergy is based on a combination of findings from the patient's clinical history and specific tests, including serology and duodenal biopsies in case of celiac disease, or laboratory and functional assays for wheat allergy. On the other hand, non-celiac gluten sensitivity is still mainly a diagnosis of exclusion, in the absence of clear-cut diagnostic criteria. A multimodal pragmatic approach combining findings from the clinical history, symptoms, serological and histological tests is required in order to reach an accurate diagnosis. A thorough knowledge of the differences and overlap in clinical presentation among gluten-related disorders, and between them and other gastrointestinal disorders, will help clinicians in the process of differential diagnosis.

  2. Synthetic peptides reproducing tissue transglutaminase-gliadin complex neo-epitopes as probes for antibody detection in celiac disease patients' sera.

    PubMed

    Di Pisa, Margherita; Pascarella, Simona; Scrima, Mario; Sabatino, Giuseppina; Real-Fernández, Feliciana; Chelli, Mario; Renzi, Daniela; Calabrò, Antonio; D'Ursi, Anna Maria; Papini, Anna Maria; Rovero, Paolo

    2015-02-12

    Celiac disease (CD) patients usually present high levels of circulating IgA antibodies directed to different antigens, in particular tissue transglutaminase (tTG), gliadin (Glia), and endomysium. A series of synthetic peptide constructs containing cross-linked tTG and Glia deamidated peptides have been synthesized. Peptides were tested in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays against celiac disease patients' sera versus normal blood donors, and their conformational features were evaluated by molecular modeling techniques. Four peptides were recognized as epitopes by autoantibodies (IgG class) circulating in CD patients' sera before gluten-free diet. The peptide II, containing Ac-tTG(553-564)-NH2 sequence cross-linked with deamidated Ac-α2-Glia(63-71)-NH2, was able to identify specific disease antibodies with a sensitivity of 50% and a specificity of 94.4%. Structural conformations of the linear fragments Ac-tTG(553-564)-NH2 and Ac-α2-Glia(63-71)-NH2 and the corresponding cross-linked peptide II were calculated by molecular modeling. Results showed that cross-linking is determinant to assume conformations, which are not accessible to the linear fragments.

  3. [Celiac disease and "gluten sensitivity"].

    PubMed

    Tronconi, G M; Parma, B; Barera, G

    2010-01-01

    It is known that celiac disease is characterized by a huge variety of clinical forms ranging from classical ones to silent forms, potential ones and to an increased number of cases of gluten-sensitivity. The latter is an abnormal non-allergic sensibility to gluten. Clinical manifestations can be very different without a severe intestinal damage (Marsh/Oberhuber 0-I) and this condition seems to benefit from a gluten free diet. Cases of gluten-sensitivity appear very interesting in the search of histological markers with elevated specificity, which are able to identify slight and early gluten dependent enteropathy, especially in at risk patients for celiac disease even before classical autoantibodies appear: for instance, this is the case of intraepithelial lymphocytes T-cell receptor gamma delta and mucosal deposits of class IgA anti transglutaminase antibodies. Other studies are investigating transglutaminase isoenzimes (different from tissue one), that can be identified in patients with gluten dependent symptoms without classical autoantibodies. Forms of gluten allergy have a different pathogenesis from celiac disease and are represented by "backer's asthma" or by classical allergy to wheat proteins. Clinical manifestations can vary from anaphylactic reactions to dermatological, respiratory and intestinal symptoms. Also in these cases the therapeutic approach is based on gluten free diet.

  4. Is celiac disease a lifelong disorder?

    PubMed

    Schmitz, J

    1996-10-01

    That celiac disease is a lifelong disorder was suggested by clinical case records and was considered to have been demonstrated through the widespread use of intestinal biopsies by the end of the 1950s. It was clear that the mucosal lesions observed in children and adults were identical and responded similarly to gluten withdrawal. In fact, in 1970 the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition instituted the practice of a challenge after diagnosis. A relapse of clinical symptoms and of the intestinal lesions after gluten was reintroduced into the diet demonstrated the "permanent" nature of sensitivity to gluten in children with celiac disease. Twenty-five years later, the permanence of the sensitivity of the intestinal mucosa to gluten is again a matter of debate. Several lines of evidence, gathered during recent years, show that celiac disease is not always a lifelong condition. First, the long-term follow-up of children with proven celiac disease shows that 10% to 20% of them become "tolerant" (defined on clinical, biological and histologic grounds) to gluten during adolescence. Second, it has also been shown, in individual cases, that the mucosal lesions typical of the disease may appear during adulthood. Our increasing knowledge of the long-term evolution of the disease suggests that celiac disease develops and, in some cases, fades in a predisposed group of people with intestinal sensitivity to gluten, which is probably a common condition. The factors leading to the appearance or disappearance of the disease, however, are still unknown.

  5. ACG clinical guidelines: diagnosis and management of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Tapia, Alberto; Hill, Ivor D; Kelly, Ciarán P; Calderwood, Audrey H; Murray, Joseph A

    2013-05-01

    This guideline presents recommendations for the diagnosis and management of patients with celiac disease. Celiac disease is an immune-based reaction to dietary gluten (storage protein for wheat, barley, and rye) that primarily affects the small intestine in those with a genetic predisposition and resolves with exclusion of gluten from the diet. There has been a substantial increase in the prevalence of celiac disease over the last 50 years and an increase in the rate of diagnosis in the last 10 years. Celiac disease can present with many symptoms, including typical gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g., diarrhea, steatorrhea, weight loss, bloating, flatulence, abdominal pain) and also non-gastrointestinal abnormalities (e.g., abnormal liver function tests, iron deficiency anemia, bone disease, skin disorders, and many other protean manifestations). Indeed, many individuals with celiac disease may have no symptoms at all. Celiac disease is usually detected by serologic testing of celiac-specific antibodies. The diagnosis is confirmed by duodenal mucosal biopsies. Both serology and biopsy should be performed on a gluten-containing diet. The treatment for celiac disease is primarily a gluten-free diet (GFD), which requires significant patient education, motivation, and follow-up. Non-responsive celiac disease occurs frequently, particularly in those diagnosed in adulthood. Persistent or recurring symptoms should lead to a review of the patient's original diagnosis to exclude alternative diagnoses, a review of the GFD to ensure there is no obvious gluten contamination, and serologic testing to confirm adherence with the GFD. In addition, evaluation for disorders associated with celiac disease that could cause persistent symptoms, such as microscopic colitis, pancreatic exocrine dysfunction, and complications of celiac disease, such as enteropathy-associated lymphoma or refractory celiac disease, should be entertained. Newer therapeutic modalities are being studied in

  6. Elderly Onset Celiac Disease: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Cappello, Maria; Morreale, Gaetano C.; Licata, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Celiac sprue is a chronic disease, which usually occurs in children and young adults. However, it can develop in any age group, and the prevalence is increasing even in the elderly population. The atypical patterns of clinical presentation in this age group sometimes can cause a delay in diagnosis. Given the lower sensitivity and specificity of serological tests in the aged population, clinical suspect often arises in the presence of complications (autoimmune disorders, fractures, and finally, malignancy) and must be supported by endoscopic and imaging tools. In this review, we highlight the incidence and prevalence of celiac disease in the elderly, the patterns of clinical presentation, diagnosis, and the most frequent complications, with the aim of increasing awareness and reducing the diagnostic delay of celiac disease even in the elderly population. PMID:27486350

  7. Role of oats in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Comino, Isabel; Moreno, María de Lourdes; Sousa, Carolina

    2015-11-07

    A gluten-free diet is currently the only effective means of treating individuals with celiac disease. Such a diet enables celiac patients to control their symptoms and avoid various complications associated with this condition. However, while the quality of gluten-free foods has significantly improved during recent decades, maintenance of a gluten-free diet does not necessarily ensure adequate nutritional intake. Because oats are an important source of proteins, lipids, vitamins, minerals, and fibre, their inclusion in a gluten-free diet might improve the nutritional status of a celiac patient. Although oats are included in the list of gluten-free ingredients specified in European regulations, their safety when consumed by celiac patients remains debatable. Some studies claim that pure oats are safe for most celiac people, and contamination with other cereal sources is the main problem facing people with this disease. However, it is necessary to consider that oats include many varieties, containing various amino acid sequences and showing different immunoreactivities associated with toxic prolamins. As a result, several studies have shown that the immunogenicity of oats varies depending on the cultivar consumed. Thus, it is essential to thoroughly study the variety of oats used in a food ingredient before including it in a gluten-free diet.

  8. Role of oats in celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Comino, Isabel; Moreno, María de Lourdes; Sousa, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    A gluten-free diet is currently the only effective means of treating individuals with celiac disease. Such a diet enables celiac patients to control their symptoms and avoid various complications associated with this condition. However, while the quality of gluten-free foods has significantly improved during recent decades, maintenance of a gluten-free diet does not necessarily ensure adequate nutritional intake. Because oats are an important source of proteins, lipids, vitamins, minerals, and fibre, their inclusion in a gluten-free diet might improve the nutritional status of a celiac patient. Although oats are included in the list of gluten-free ingredients specified in European regulations, their safety when consumed by celiac patients remains debatable. Some studies claim that pure oats are safe for most celiac people, and contamination with other cereal sources is the main problem facing people with this disease. However, it is necessary to consider that oats include many varieties, containing various amino acid sequences and showing different immunoreactivities associated with toxic prolamins. As a result, several studies have shown that the immunogenicity of oats varies depending on the cultivar consumed. Thus, it is essential to thoroughly study the variety of oats used in a food ingredient before including it in a gluten-free diet. PMID:26557006

  9. Analysis of Body Composition and Food Habits of Spanish Celiac Women.

    PubMed

    Churruca, Itziar; Miranda, Jonatan; Lasa, Arrate; Bustamante, María Á; Larretxi, Idoia; Simon, Edurne

    2015-07-08

    The purpose of the present work was both to analyze composition of Spanish celiac women and to study the food habits and gluten-free diet of these celiac patients, in order to determine whether they achieve a balanced and healthy diet as well as to highlight nutritional qualitative and/or quantitative differences. 54 adult celiac women (34 ± 13 years) took part in the six-month study. Height, weight and body composition were measured. An analysis of energy consumption and of the macronutrient distribution of their diet was carried out. Their fulfillment of micronutrient intake recommendations was verified. Participants showed a Body Mass Index of 21.6 ± 2.4 kg/m2. Energy Intake was slightly lower than the Dietary Reference Intakes. Excessive protein apart from over-consumption of fat was observed. More than three quarters of participants consumed meat in excess. Carbohydrate consumption along with that of fiber was below recommended levels. Vitamin D, iron, and iodine had a low percentage of recommendation compliance. In general, participants followed the recommendations of dairy products and fruit intake whereas vegetable consumption was not enough for the vast majority. We conclude that although the diet of celiac women does not differ much from the diet of general population, some considerations, such as reducing fat and protein consumption and increasing fiber intake, must be taken into account.

  10. Analysis of Body Composition and Food Habits of Spanish Celiac Women

    PubMed Central

    Churruca, Itziar; Miranda, Jonatan; Lasa, Arrate; Bustamante, María Á.; Larretxi, Idoia; Simon, Edurne

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present work was both to analyze composition of Spanish celiac women and to study the food habits and gluten-free diet of these celiac patients, in order to determine whether they achieve a balanced and healthy diet as well as to highlight nutritional qualitative and/or quantitative differences. 54 adult celiac women (34 ± 13 years) took part in the six-month study. Height, weight and body composition were measured. An analysis of energy consumption and of the macronutrient distribution of their diet was carried out. Their fulfillment of micronutrient intake recommendations was verified. Participants showed a Body Mass Index of 21.6 ± 2.4 kg/m2. Energy Intake was slightly lower than the Dietary Reference Intakes. Excessive protein apart from over-consumption of fat was observed. More than three quarters of participants consumed meat in excess. Carbohydrate consumption along with that of fiber was below recommended levels. Vitamin D, iron, and iodine had a low percentage of recommendation compliance. In general, participants followed the recommendations of dairy products and fruit intake whereas vegetable consumption was not enough for the vast majority. We conclude that although the diet of celiac women does not differ much from the diet of general population, some considerations, such as reducing fat and protein consumption and increasing fiber intake, must be taken into account. PMID:26184289

  11. Nutrition assessment in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Suzanne; Thompson, Tricia

    2012-10-01

    The gluten-free diet is currently the only treatment for celiac disease, and patients should be monitored closely by a dietitian who is knowledgeable regarding this diet. Evaluation by a dietitian includes a comprehensive assessment of dietary history, with an emphasis on caloric and micronutrient intake. Patient knowledge of the gluten-free diet is assessed and interpretation of food labels is taught. Identification of micronutrient deficiencies or comorbid gastrointestinal conditions may occur during a comprehensive dietary assessment. In patients with evidence of gluten exposure, a thorough evaluation for cross-contamination is performed.

  12. Pancreatic developmental defect evaluated by celiac artery angiography in a patient with MODY5

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Naoko; Tsurumi, Masashi; Asai, Kuniya; Shimuzu, Wataru; Watanabe, Atsushi; Ogata, Makiko; Takizawa, Miho; Ide, Risa; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Saito, Kayoko

    2016-01-01

    The hepatocyte nuclear factor 1β gene (HNF1B) is responsible for maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 5 (MODY5), which is characterized by early-onset diabetes mellitus and urogenital malformations. HNF1B is expressed during visceral endoderm formation. We identified a disruption of the great pancreatic artery in a patient with MODY5 with no pancreatic body or tail. Our finding supports the significance of HNF1B in the development of the pancreas. PMID:27468355

  13. Celiac Node Failure Patterns After Definitive Chemoradiation for Esophageal Cancer in the Modern Era

    SciTech Connect

    Amini, Arya; Xiao Lianchun; Allen, Pamela K.; Suzuki, Akihiro; Hayashi, Yuki; Liao, Zhongxing; Hofstetter, Wayne; Crane, Christopher; Komaki, Ritsuko; Bhutani, Manoop S.; Lee, Jeffrey H.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Welsh, James

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The celiac lymph node axis acts as a gateway for metastatic systemic spread. The need for prophylactic celiac nodal coverage in chemoradiation therapy for esophageal cancer is controversial. Given the improved ability to evaluate lymph node status before treatment via positron emission tomography (PET) and endoscopic ultrasound, we hypothesized that prophylactic celiac node irradiation may not be needed for patients with localized esophageal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the radiation treatment volumes for 131 patients who underwent definitive chemoradiation for esophageal cancer. Patients with celiac lymph node involvement at baseline were excluded. Median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy. The location of all celiac node failures was compared with the radiation treatment plan to determine whether the failures occurred within or outside the radiation treatment field. Results: At a median follow-up time of 52.6 months (95% CI 46.1-56.7 months), 6 of 60 patients (10%) without celiac node coverage had celiac nodal failure; in 5 of these patients, the failures represented the first site of recurrence. Of the 71 patients who had celiac coverage, only 5 patients (7%) had celiac region relapse. In multivariate analyses, having a pretreatment-to-post-treatment change in standardized uptake value on PET >52% (odds ratio [OR] 0.198, p = 0.0327) and having failure in the clinical target volume (OR 10.72, p = 0.001) were associated with risk of celiac region relapse. Of those without celiac coverage, the 6 patients that later developed celiac failure had a worse median overall survival time compared with the other 54 patients who did not fail (median overall survival time: 16.5 months vs. 31.5 months, p = 0.041). Acute and late toxicities were similar in both groups. Conclusions: Although celiac lymph node failures occur in approximately 1 of 10 patients, the lack of effective salvage treatments and subsequent low morbidity may justify prophylactic treatment

  14. Quantitative image analysis of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Ciaccio, Edward J; Bhagat, Govind; Lewis, Suzanne K; Green, Peter H

    2015-03-07

    We outline the use of quantitative techniques that are currently used for analysis of celiac disease. Image processing techniques can be useful to statistically analyze the pixular data of endoscopic images that is acquired with standard or videocapsule endoscopy. It is shown how current techniques have evolved to become more useful for gastroenterologists who seek to understand celiac disease and to screen for it in suspected patients. New directions for focus in the development of methodology for diagnosis and treatment of this disease are suggested. It is evident that there are yet broad areas where there is potential to expand the use of quantitative techniques for improved analysis in suspected or known celiac disease patients.

  15. Burning Tongue as Initial Presentation of Celiac Disease in an Elderly Woman: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Andrea; Zamulko, Alla

    2016-06-01

    There are few reports in the literature where celiac disease presents with tongue manifestations, although atypical presentations of celiac disease are not uncommon. This case report highlights an atypical presentation of celiac disease in an elderly female. Our patient presented to clinic with complaints of a burning tongue for the past two years as well as occasional loose stools and fatigue. Work-up revealed iron deficiency anemia, zinc deficiency and an abnormal celiac panel. Complete symptom improvement was noted by 10 weeks into the initiation of a gluten free diet. Celiac disease can present at any age and should be considered as a differential in findings of malabsorption and gastrointestinal symptoms.

  16. Celiac disease: how complicated can it get?

    PubMed

    Tjon, Jennifer May-Ling; van Bergen, Jeroen; Koning, Frits

    2010-10-01

    In the small intestine of celiac disease patients, dietary wheat gluten and similar proteins in barley and rye trigger an inflammatory response. While strict adherence to a gluten-free diet induces full recovery in most patients, a small percentage of patients fail to recover. In a subset of these refractory celiac disease patients, an (aberrant) oligoclonal intraepithelial lymphocyte population develops into overt lymphoma. Celiac disease is strongly associated with HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8, as both genotypes predispose for disease development. This association can be explained by the fact that gluten peptides can be presented in HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 molecules on antigen presenting cells. Gluten-specific CD4(+) T cells in the lamina propria respond to these peptides, and this likely enhances cytotoxicity of intraepithelial lymphocytes against the intestinal epithelium. We propose a threshold model for the development of celiac disease, in which the efficiency of gluten presentation to CD4(+) T cells determines the likelihood of developing celiac disease and its complications. Key factors that influence the efficiency of gluten presentation include: (1) the level of gluten intake, (2) the enzyme tissue transglutaminase 2 which modifies gluten into high affinity binding peptides for HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8, (3) the HLA-DQ type, as HLA-DQ2 binds a wider range of gluten peptides than HLA-DQ8, (4) the gene dose of HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8, and finally,(5) additional genetic polymorphisms that may influence T cell reactivity. This threshold model might also help to understand the development of refractory celiac disease and lymphoma.

  17. Celiac Support Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... America and support CSA. Click here to start shopping! Celiac SUPPORT ASSOCIATION ® GLUTEN-FREE RESOURCE DIRECTORY These ... visit www.schwans.com and register for an online account. Orders must be placed online to be ...

  18. Cutaneous manifestations in celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Abenavoli, L; Proietti, I; Leggio, L; Ferrulli, A; Vonghia, L; Capizzi, R; Rotoli, M; Amerio, PL; Gasbarrini, G; Addolorato, G

    2006-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune gluten-dependent enteropathy characterized by atrophy of intestinal villi that improves after gluten-free diet (GFD). CD is often associated with extra-intestinal manifestations; among them, several skin diseases are described in CD patients. The present review reports all CD-associated skin manifestations described in the literature and tries to analyze the possible mechanisms involved in this association. The opportunity to evaluate the possible presence of CD in patients affected by skin disorders is discussed. PMID:16521210

  19. Celiac Disease in Women with Hip Fractures

    PubMed Central

    LeBoff, Meryl S.; Cobb, Haley; Gao, Lisa Y.; Hawkes, William; Yu-Yahiro, Janet; Kolatkar, Nikheel S.; Magaziner, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Objective Celiac disease is associated with decreased bone density, however, the risk of fractures in celiac disease patients is unclear. We compared the prevalence of celiac disease between a group of women with hip fractures and a group of women undergoing elective joint replacement surgery and the association between celiac disease and vitamin D levels. Methods Two hundred eight community dwelling and postmenopausal women were recruited from Boston, MA (n=81) and Baltimore, MD (n=127). We measured tissue transglutaminase IgA by ELISA to diagnose celiac disease and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels by radioimmunoassay in both women with hip fractures (n=157) and the control group (n=51), all of whom were from Boston. Subjects were excluded if they took any medications or had medical conditions that might affect bone. Results Median serum 25(OH)D levels were significantly lower (p< 0.0001) in the hip fracture cohorts compared to the elective joint replacement cohort (14.1 ng/ml vs. 21.3 ng/ml, respectively). There were no differences in the percentage of subjects with a positive tissue transglutaminase in the women with hip fractures versus the control group (1.91% vs. 1.61%, respectively). Conclusion Vitamin D levels are markedly reduced in women with hip fractures, however hip fracture patients did not show a higher percentage of positive tissue transglutaminase levels compared with controls. These data suggest that routine testing for celiac disease among hip fracture patients may not prove useful, although larger prospective studies among hip fracture subjects are needed. PMID:23732553

  20. Oral enzyme therapy for celiac sprue

    PubMed Central

    Bethune, Michael T; Khosla, Chaitan

    2012-01-01

    Celiac sprue is an inflammatory disease of the small intestine caused by dietary gluten and treated by adherence to a lifelong gluten-free diet. The recent identification of immunodominant gluten peptides, the discovery of their cogent properties, and the elucidation of the mechanisms by which they engender immunopathology in genetically-susceptible individuals have advanced our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of this complex disease, enabling the rational design of new therapeutic strategies. The most clinically advanced of these is oral enzyme therapy, in which enzymes capable of proteolyzing gluten (i.e. glutenases) are delivered to the alimentary tract of a celiac sprue patient to detoxify ingested gluten in situ. In this chapter, we discuss the key challenges for discovery and preclinical development of oral enzyme therapies for celiac sprue. Methods for lead identification, assay development, gram-scale production and formulation, and lead optimization for next-generation proteases are described and critically assessed. PMID:22208988

  1. Intestinal permeability to (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA in children with Crohn's disease and celiac disease

    SciTech Connect

    Turck, D.; Ythier, H.; Maquet, E.; Deveaux, M.; Marchandise, X.; Farriaux, J.P.; Fontaine, G.

    1987-07-01

    (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA was used as a probe molecule to assess intestinal permeability in 7 healthy control adults, 11 control children, 17 children with Crohn's disease, and 6 children with untreated celiac disease. After subjects fasted overnight, 75 kBq/kg (= 2 microCi/kg) /sup 51/Cr-labeled EDTA was given by mouth; 24-h urinary excretion of (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA was measured and expressed as a percentage of the total oral dose. Mean and SD were as follows: control adults 1.47 +/- 0.62, control children 1.59 +/- 0.55, and patients with Crohn's disease or celiac disease 5.35 +/- 1.94. The difference between control children and patients was statistically significant (p less than 0.001). These results show that intestinal permeability to (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA is increased among children with active or inactive Crohn's disease affecting small bowel only or small bowel and colon, and with untreated celiac disease. The (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA permeability test could facilitate the decision to perform more extensive investigations in children suspected of small bowel disease who have atypical or poor clinical and biological symptomatology.

  2. [Oral cavity changes in the child with celiac disease].

    PubMed

    Petrecca, S; Giammaria, G; Giammaria, A F

    1994-04-01

    Twenty-nine patients (of both sexes aged between 8 and 18 years old) were referred to our attention with a probable history of celiac disease; intestinal biopsy was positive for the said pathology. Biopsies were compared to a second group of 29 age- and sex-matched control subjects not suffering from gastrointestinal diseases and/or disorders of the phosphocalcium metabolism. The aim of the study was to highlight the possible presence, frequency and extent of oral alterations in confirmed celiac subjects in order to evaluate their greater or lesser incidence compared to controls. The results obtained confirm that celiac patients are more likely to manifest oral pathologies.

  3. Bovine milk intolerance in celiac disease is related to IgA reactivity to alpha- and beta-caseins.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Chávez, Francisco; de la Barca, Ana María Calderón

    2009-06-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease triggered mainly by ingestion of wheat gluten proteins. However, some other dietary proteins, such as those of cow's milk, induce celiac disease-like symptoms in some patients with celiac disease. Different approaches have been done to detect the component responsible for this problem, including the possibility of gluten peptides present in cow's milk.

  4. Review and practice guidelines for celiac disease in 2014.

    PubMed

    Nadhem, Omar N; Azeez, Ghassan; Smalligan, Roger D; Urban, Steven

    2015-04-01

    Celiac disease, or gluten-sensitive enteropathy, is defined as a state of heightened immunologic responsiveness to ingested gluten (from wheat, barley, or rye) in genetically susceptible individuals. Ingestion of the offending proteins leads to inflammation and intestinal mucosal damage, which may result in a spectrum of gastrointestinal symptoms, nutritional abnormalities, and systemic complications ranging from anemia and osteoporosis to secondary autoimmunity and malignancy. The genetic influence in the pathogenesis of celiac disease is indicated by its familial occurrence. Celiac disease does not develop unless a person has alleles that encode for human leukocyte antigen DQ2 or DQ8 proteins. The clinical picture of celiac disease has changed considerably during the past 30 years. Diarrhea, which was the presenting symptom in > 90% of celiac disease patients before 1981, is now the chief complaint in < 40%. In contrast, the increased frequency of atypical celiac disease presentations, including anemia and bone disease, is revealed by the widespread availability of serologic testing. An association between celiac disease and autoimmune disorders, such as type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid disease, and Sjögren's syndrome, has been well documented. The tissue transglutaminase immunoglobulin antibody and the endomysial immunoglobulin antibody are the most sensitive and specific serologic tests, respectively, for identifying individuals who need to undergo an intestinal biopsy. If the suspicion of celiac disease is high, intestinal biopsy should be pursued even if serologic tests are negative. The gold standard for the diagnosis of celiac disease is a small bowel biopsy showing villous atrophy. The treatment for celiac disease is lifelong adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD). Despite the proven benefits of the GFD, it can be exceedingly difficult to completely avoid gluten-containing foods, and adherence to a GFD is estimated to be only 45% to 80%.

  5. Extended HLA-D region haplotype associated with celiac disease

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, M.D.; Smith, J.R.; Austin, R.K.; Kelleher, D.; Nepom, G.T.; Volk, B.; Kagnoff, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    Celiac disease has one of the strongest associations with HLA (human leukocyte antigen) class II markers of the known HLA-linked diseases. This association is primarily with the class II serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2. The authors previously described a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) characterized by the presence of a 4.0-kilobase Rsa I fragment derived from an HLA class II ..beta..-chain gene, which distinguishes the class II HLA haplotype of celiac disease patients from those of many serologically matched controls. They now report the isolation of this ..beta..-chain gene from a bacteriophage genomic library constructed from the DNA of a celiac disease patient. Based on restriction mapping and differential hybridization with class II cDNA and oligonucleotide probes, this gene was identified as one encoding an HLA-DP ..beta..-chain. This celiac disease-associated HLA-DP ..beta..-chain gene was flanked by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..-chain genes and, therefore, was probably in its normal chromosomal location. The HLA-DP..cap alpha..-chain genes of celiac disease patients also were studied by RFLP analysis. Celiac disease is associated with a subset of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 haplotypes characterized by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-chain gene RFLPs. Within the celiac-disease patient population, the joint segregation of these HLA-DP genes with those encoding the serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2 indicates: (i) that the class II HLA haplotype associated with celiac disease is extended throughout the entire HLA-D region, and (ii) that celiac-disease susceptibility genes may reside as far centromeric on this haplotype as the HLA-DP subregion.

  6. Osteoarticular manifestations of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Stéphanie; Lioté, Frédéric

    2016-11-04

    Celiac disease is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune enteropathy based disorder that is triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The global prevalence of 1% to 2% represents only the tip of the iceberg. The diagnosis is confirmed by positive specific antibody, anti-transglutaminase or anti-endomysium, specific lesions of the small intestine and a response to strict gluten-free diet. The diagnosis is difficult and often delayed because the clinical variability is very large, ranging from digestive clinical presentation "classic" to "atypical" symptoms, often extra-intestinal, that are sometimes attributed to a concomitant disease or a complication. Among them, there are frequent musculoskeletal manifestations such as osteoporosis and osteomalacia. In the absence of risk factor, osteoporosis, in a premenopausal women or in a man less than 55 years, more is if it is severe and refractory to medications, need to rheumatologists on the track of celiac disease in the absence of digestive symptoms. Osteomalacia is related to secondary hypovitaminosis D malabsorption. Supplementation by calcifediol, water-soluble vitamin D, may be indicated. Celiac disease is associated with an autoimmune disease in almost 1/3 of the cases. Knowing these potential associations allows earlier diagnosis in patients whose only manifestation, a concomitant disease. Anemia, chronic fatigue or unexplained polyarthralgia are symptoms associated with celiac disease to look for specific antibodies. The aim of early diagnosis is to prevent the emergence of other systemic disorders and avoid complications such as bone fractures and cancer, especially intestinal lymphoma. Non-celiac gluten intolerance is a new entity defined by symptomatology similar to that of celiac disease induced by the ingestion of gluten and disappearing after crowding-out, among patients without specific antibodies and without intestinal lesion of celiac disease. This entity is a cause, at

  7. Folate Insufficiency Due to Celiac Disease in a 49-Year-Old Woman of Southeast Asian-Indian Ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Datta Mitra, Ananya; Gupta, Asha; Jialal, Ishwarlal

    2016-08-01

    The clinical presentation of celiac disease has evolved from chronic diarrhea and malnutrition to mild nutrient insufficiencies. Recently diagnosed adults with celiac disease should be assessed for micronutrient deficiencies because early institution of a gluten-free diet (GFD) prevents morbidity and reduces the incidence of gastrointestinal malignant neoplasms and osteoporosis. In this report, we present the case of a 49-year-old woman of Southeast Asian-Indian descent living in the United States who had folate insufficiency, as manifested by low serum and red blood cell (RBC) folate levels. Further investigation, including serologic testing and intestinal biopsy, confirmed a diagnosis of celiac disease and other nutrient deficiencies. Managing the condition of this patient with folate supplements and implementation of a recommended GFD reversed the folate insufficiency. In conclusion, when serum and/or RBC levels are low in a person of Southeast Asian-Indian descent living in a country with folate fortification of the grain supply, such as the United States, the medical team needs to look for an organic cause, as in our patient, to diagnose and manage celiac disease early and, hopefully, forestall complications.

  8. Are gastric hyperplastic polyps an additional manifestation in celiac disease?

    PubMed Central

    Dore, Maria Pina; Pes, Giovanni Mario; Rocchi, Chiara; Loria, Maria Francesca; Soro, Sara; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Gastric polyps are frequently reported in patients undergoing upper endoscopic procedures. In this retrospective study, the association between hyperplastic polyps and celiac disease in Northern Sardinia was estimated. Age, gender, body mass index, and medications taken in the 2 preceding months, including proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs), H2 receptor blockers (anti-H2), Helicobacter pylori status, endoscopic findings, and histology from charts of patients undergoing esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy were reviewed. Polyps were classified as hyperplastic, fundic gland, inflammatory, and adenomatous. 3.7% (423/11379) patients had celiac disease. Prevalence of gastric polyps was 4.2% (3.8% among celiac vs 4.2% nonceliac patients). Inflammatory polyp was the most common histotype (55.8% and 56.2%) followed by fundic gland polyps (31.4% and 43.7%), hyperplastic (8.7% and 0%), and adenomas, in celiac and nonceliac patients, respectively. Fundic gland polyps were more common in PPI users (odds ratio: 4.06) than in nonusers (2.65, P = 0.001) among celiac and nonceliac patients. Age older than 50, female gender, esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy year, and PPI use were associated with the presence of polyps, whereas active H pylori infection was not. Gastric polyps were common in Sardinian patients undergoing esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy. However, the previously reported association between hyperplastic polyps and celiac disease was not confirmed in our study. PMID:28151870

  9. Celiac disease: pathogenesis of a model immunogenetic disease

    PubMed Central

    Kagnoff, Martin F.

    2007-01-01

    Celiac disease is characterized by small-intestinal mucosal injury and nutrient malabsorption in genetically susceptible individuals in response to the dietary ingestion of wheat gluten and similar proteins in barley and rye. Disease pathogenesis involves interactions among environmental, genetic, and immunological factors. Although celiac disease is predicted by screening studies to affect approximately 1% of the population of the United States and is seen both in children and in adults, 10%–15% or fewer of these individuals have been diagnosed and treated. This article focuses on the role of adaptive and innate immune mechanisms in the pathogenesis of celiac disease and how current concepts of immunopathogenesis might provide alternative approaches for treating celiac disease. PMID:17200705

  10. Recent Advances in Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Murch, Simon

    2016-11-01

    Recent diagnostic advances have demonstrated that celiac disease is relatively common although most patients have less florid symptoms than previously recognised. The mucosal lesion of this autoimmune disorder depends on both adaptive and innate immune responses. The characteristic antibodies to tissue transglutaminase-2 (tTG-2) and deamidated gliadin peptides may be produced in persons possessing the relevant HLA-DQ genotypes if intact gliadin peptides can penetrate the epithelial barrier to reach antigen presenting cells. Progression from celiac autoimmunity to overt disease may depend on innate immune mechanisms, not HLA-restricted, where IL-15 is generated within the epithelial compartment. A specific innate immune response previously thought restricted to invertebrates, the encapsulation reaction, may contribute to mucosal volume expansion through recruitment of syndecan-expressing leukocytes and stimulated matrix production. It is notable that tissue transglutaminase is critical in this reaction in insects, and that the very few insects that can predate wheat, possess specific salivary or intestinal enzymes that degrade gluten. Animal models in HLA-DQ transgenic mice suggest that the microbial flora of the intestine may play a role in host responses and modulate the evolution of the disease. This suggests that therapeutic modulation of the microbiome may contribute to management of celiac disease. In developing world countries, there is a potential difficulty in histological diagnosis because of the widespread incidence of environmental enteropathy amongst apparently healthy children. Thus, recognition of local patterns of enteropathy will be important for histopathologists, and high titre tTG-2 autoantibody titres may hold considerable diagnostic significance.

  11. Comparative Evaluation of Retrocrural versus Transaortic Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block for Pain Relief in Patients with Upper Abdominal Malignancy: A Retrospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Tewari, Saipriya; Agarwal, Anil; Dhiraaj, Sanjay; Gautam, Sujeet K; Khuba, Sandeep; Madabushi, Rajashree; Shamshery, Chetna; Kumar, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare retrocrural versus transaortic techniques for neurolytic celiac plexus block (NCPB) in patients suffering from upper abdominal malignancy. Methods: In this retrospective observational study between October 2013 and April 2015, 64 patients with inoperable upper abdominal malignancy received fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous NCPB in our institute. Their case files were reviewed and the patients were divided into two groups depending on the technique used to perform NCPB: retrocrural (Group R; n = 36) versus transaortic (Group T; n = 28). The primary outcome measure was pain as assessed with a numeric rating scale (NRS) from 0 to 10; the secondary outcome measures were morphine consumption per day (M), quality of life (QOL) as assessed by comparing the percent of positive responses in each group, and complications if any. These were noted and analyzed prior to intervention and then on day 1, weeks 1, 2, 3, and months 1, 2, 3, 6 following NCPB. Results: Patients in Group R had significantly reduced NRS pain scores at week 1, 2, 3, month 1 and 2 as compared to Group T (P < 0.05). Morphine consumption also reduced significantly in Group R at day 1, week 1, 2, and 3 (P < 0.05). QOL was found to be comparable between the groups, and no major complications were noted. Conclusion: Retrocrural NCPB provides superior pain relief along with a reduction in morphine consumption as compared to transaortic NCPB in patients with pain due to upper abdominal malignancy. PMID:27559259

  12. Immune modulation by non-hodgkin lymphoma in a patient with two primary intestinal T-cell lymphomas and long-standing celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Mühr-Wilkenshoff, F; Friedrich, M; Foss, H-D; Hummel, M; Zeitz, M; Daum, S

    2010-01-01

    Tumors may influence immunologic reactions. Here, we report on a 72-year-old patient who suffered from celiac disease (CD) that had been diagnosed 20 years before. Under a normal diet but without any evidence of enteropathy or CD-associated antibodies, the patient developed a jejunal T-cell lymphoma. It was resected due to perforation and four courses of IMVP-16 were added. The patient started and kept a strict gluten-free diet (GFD). Two years later, he presented with weight loss and a clonally divergent refractory sprue type II with loss of antigen (CD8; T-cell receptor-beta) expression in intraepithelial lymphocytes. At this time point, he showed high titers of CD-associated antibodies, although he was on a strict GFD. This case report highlights several questions: the missing enteropathy under a gluten-containing diet supports the notion of immune suppression in malignant diseases, especially non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Secondly, the patient developed an early form of a second independent T-cell lymphoma (refractory sprue type II) under a strict GFD, then with CD-associated antibodies, which raises the question whether the clonal intraepithelial lymphocytes were stimulating antibody production. Thus, the single detection of CD-associated antibodies in patients with CD is not itself proof of noncompliance with GFD.

  13. Persistent Intraepithelial Lymphocytosis in Celiac Patients Adhering to Gluten-Free Diet Is Not Abolished Despite a Gluten Contamination Elimination Diet.

    PubMed

    Zanini, Barbara; Marullo, Monica; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Salemme, Marianna; Lanzarotto, Francesco; Ricci, Chiara; Lanzini, Alberto

    2016-08-26

    The gluten-free diet (GFD) is the only validated treatment for celiac disease (CD), but despite strict adherence, complete mucosal recovery is rarely obtained. The aim of our study was to assess whether complete restitutio ad integrum could be achieved by adopting a restrictive diet (Gluten Contamination Elimination Diet, GCED) or may depend on time of exposure to GFD. Two cohorts of CD patients, with persisting Marsh II/Grade A lesion at duodenal biopsy after 12-18 months of GFD (early control) were identified. Patients in Cohort A were re-biopsied after a three-month GCED (GCED control) and patients in Cohort B were re-biopsied after a minimum of two years on a standard GFD subsequent to early control (late control). Ten patients in Cohort A and 19 in Cohort B completed the study protocol. There was no change in the classification of duodenal biopsies in both cohorts. The number of intraepithelial lymphocytes, TCRγδ+ (T-Cell Receptor gamma delta) T cell and eosinophils significantly decreased at GCED control (Cohort A) and at late control (Cohort B), compared to early control. Duodenal intraepithelial lymphocytosis persisting in CD patients during GFD is not eliminated by a GCED and is independent of the length of GFD. [NCT 02711696].

  14. Persistent Intraepithelial Lymphocytosis in Celiac Patients Adhering to Gluten-Free Diet Is Not Abolished Despite a Gluten Contamination Elimination Diet

    PubMed Central

    Zanini, Barbara; Marullo, Monica; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Salemme, Marianna; Lanzarotto, Francesco; Ricci, Chiara; Lanzini, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The gluten-free diet (GFD) is the only validated treatment for celiac disease (CD), but despite strict adherence, complete mucosal recovery is rarely obtained. The aim of our study was to assess whether complete restitutio ad integrum could be achieved by adopting a restrictive diet (Gluten Contamination Elimination Diet, GCED) or may depend on time of exposure to GFD. Two cohorts of CD patients, with persisting Marsh II/Grade A lesion at duodenal biopsy after 12–18 months of GFD (early control) were identified. Patients in Cohort A were re-biopsied after a three-month GCED (GCED control) and patients in Cohort B were re-biopsied after a minimum of two years on a standard GFD subsequent to early control (late control). Ten patients in Cohort A and 19 in Cohort B completed the study protocol. There was no change in the classification of duodenal biopsies in both cohorts. The number of intraepithelial lymphocytes, TCRγδ+ (T-Cell Receptor gamma delta) T cell and eosinophils significantly decreased at GCED control (Cohort A) and at late control (Cohort B), compared to early control. Duodenal intraepithelial lymphocytosis persisting in CD patients during GFD is not eliminated by a GCED and is independent of the length of GFD. [NCT 02711696] PMID:27571100

  15. Celiac disease--a worldwide problem.

    PubMed

    Horvath, K; Mehta, D I

    2000-10-01

    Celiac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis are caused by the alcohol soluble fractions of wheat, barley, and rye. Reliable serological tests are available for both mass and risk group screening and recent epidemiological studies on celiac disease suggest that the prevalence varies between 1:100-300 in different continents. The clinical manifestations of the disease has changed in the West and the classical symptomatic cases represent only approximately 1/7th of all diagnosed cases. Symptoms such as, anemia, short stature, dental enamel defect or osteoporosis can be the only manifestations of the atypical disease. There is an increased prevalence of celiac disease in patients with autoimmune diseases. Recent data suggest that there is a correlation between the prevalence of autoimmune diseases and the number of years that an individual consumes gluten-containing foods. Genetic studies revealed a high prevalence of certain HLA antigens in celiac patients, however, there is likelihood that non-HIA genes are also important in the pathomechanism. An interesting new development is the recognition of tissue transglutaminase (tTG), an enzyme that probably forms an autoantigen with gluten. It is generally accepted that antibodies to tTG are identical to the previously described antiendomysium antibodies. Whether or not tTG is responsible for the initiation of an immunoreaction against prolamines or just exacerbates the immune response is a subject of further investigations.

  16. Enteroscopy in the diagnosis and management of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Rondonotti, Emanuele; Villa, Federica; Saladino, Valeria; de Franchis, Roberto

    2009-07-01

    Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) with 3 to 6 biopsies in the descending duodenum is the gold standard for the diagnosis of celiac disease. At the time of the first diagnosis of celiac disease, an extensive evaluation of the small bowel is not recommended. However, video capsule endoscopy, because of its good sensitivity and specificity in recognizing the Endoscopic features of celiac disease, can be considered a valid alternative to EGD in patients unable or unwilling to undergo EGD with biopsies. Capsule endoscopy is also a possible option in selected cases with strong suspicion of celiac disease but negative first-line tests. In evaluating patients with refractory or complicated celiac disease, in whom a complete evaluation of the small bowel is mandatory (at least in refractory celiac disease type II patients) because of the possible presence of complications beyond the reach of conventional endoscopes, both capsule endoscopy and balloon-assisted enteroscopy have been found to be helpful. In these patients, capsule endoscopy offers several advantages: it is well tolerated, it allows inspection of the entire small bowel, and it is able to recognize subtle mucosal changes. However, in this setting, capsule endoscopy should ideally be coupled with imaging techniques that provide important information about the thickness of the wall of the intestine and about extraluminal abnormalities. Although deep enteroscopy (such as balloon enteroscopy) is expensive, time-consuming, and potentially risky in these frail patients, they may have a key role, because they make it possible to take tissue samples from deep in the small intestine.

  17. Sourdough lactobacilli and celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Gobbetti, Marco; Giuseppe Rizzello, Carlo; Di Cagno, Raffaella; De Angelis, Maria

    2007-04-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is one of the most common food intolerance. The only effective treatment for CD is a strict adherence to a gluten-free diet throughout the patient's lifetime. Gluten-free products are not widely available and are usually more expensive than their gluten-containing counterparts. There is, therefore, an urgent need to develop safe and effective therapeutic alternatives, to develop high-quality gluten-free products and to investigate the potential of the bread making biotechnology following ancient protocols which include long-time fermentation by selected sourdough lactic acid bacteria. This review describes the most relevant results related to biotechnologies that use selected sourdough lactic acid bacteria and probiotics as starters for sourdough fermentation to investigate their potential to decrease the risk of gluten contamination in gluten-free products. As shown by studies in vitro on celiac intestinal tissue and in vivo on CD patients, the bacterial proteolytic activity is rather promising not only as currently demonstrated for eliminating traces of contaminant gluten but probably also in perspective for the manufacture of tolerated baked goods.

  18. Association between celiac disease and chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Casella, Giovanni; Viganò, Davide; Romano Settanni, Carlo; Morelli, Olivia; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Baldini, Vittorio; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease is characterized by a gluten-induced damage of the small bowel in sensitive individuals that may cause malabsorption. Non-intestinal inflammatory diseases may trigger immunologic gluten intolerance in susceptible people and the HCV virus may be considered as a suitable candidate. Interferon therapy could precipitate symptom onset in subjects with silent celiac disease. In fact, symptoms such as diarrhea, anemia, and weight loss may occur during interferon therapy and are associated with serological positivity of anti-tranglutaminase antibodies. To date, considering the available literature data, it is very difficult to support a firm association between HCV chronic hepatitis and celiac disease. Thus, such a serological screening in HCV patients before starting interferon therapy should not be recommended. However, serology for celiac disease must be considered in patients who develop diarrhea and/or weight loss during such therapy. PMID:27458507

  19. Difficulties in Celiac Disease Diagnosis in Children - A case report.

    PubMed

    Samasca, Gabriel; Bruchental, Manuela; Butnariu, Angela; Pirvan, Alexandru; Andreica, Mariana; Cristea, Victor; Dejica, Doru

    2011-01-01

    Diagnosis of celiac disease in a patient with lactose intolerance has special importance having implications for the treatment of both diseases. The authors present the case of a 2 years old girl, first diagnosed with enterocolitis, but her clinical evolution revealed a complex situation: both celiac disease and secondary lactose intolerance. We present the case as a special situation in clinical pediatric practice that must be taken into account more often.

  20. Non responsive celiac disease due to coexisting hereditary fructose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Bharadia, Lalit; Shivpuri, Deepak

    2012-04-01

    Celiac disease is associated with several genetic disorders, but its association with hereditary fructose intolerance is rare. Hereditary fructose intolerance is a rare autosomal recessive disease of fructose metabolism presenting as vomiting after intake of fructose. An association between these two distinct genetic gastrointestinal disorders is important as treatment failure of celiac disease calls for careful evaluation for hereditary fructose intolerance. We report a patient with an association of these two disorders.

  1. Celiac Disease Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities PLEASE NOTE: Your web browser does not have JavaScript enabled. Unless you enable Javascript , your ability to navigate and access the features of this website will ... Celiac Disease Antibody Tests Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ...

  2. MicroRNA-449a Overexpression, Reduced NOTCH1 Signals and Scarce Goblet Cells Characterize the Small Intestine of Celiac Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tinto, Nadia; Montanaro, Donatella; Capobianco, Valentina; Izzo, Valentina; Tucci, Francesca; Troncone, Giancarlo; Greco, Luigi; Sacchetti, Lucia

    2011-01-01

    MiRNAs play a relevant role in regulating gene expression in a variety of physiological and pathological conditions including autoimmune disorders. MiRNAs are also important in the differentiation and function of the mouse intestinal epithelium. Our study was aimed to look for miRNA-based modulation of gene expression in celiac small intestine, and particularly for genes involved in cell intestinal differentiation/proliferation mechanisms. A cohort of 40 children (20 with active CD, 9 on a gluten-free diet (GFD), and 11 controls), were recruited at the Paediatrics Department (University of Naples Federico II). The expression of 365 human miRNAs was quantified by TaqMan low-density arrays. We used bioinformatics to predict putative target genes of miRNAs and to select biological pathways. The presence of NOTCH1, HES1, KLF4, MUC-2, Ki67 and beta-catenin proteins in the small intestine of CD and control children was tested by immunohistochemistry. The expression of about 20% of the miRNAs tested differed between CD and control children. We found that high miR-449a levels targeted and reduced both NOTCH1 and KLF4 in HEK-293 cells. NOTCH1, KLF4 signals and the number of goblet cells were lower in small intestine of children with active CD and in those on a GFD than in controls, whereas more nuclear beta-catenin staining, as a sign of the WNT pathway activation, and more Ki67 staining, as sign of proliferation, were present in crypts from CD patients than in controls. In conclusion we first demonstrate a miRNA mediated gene regulation in small intestine of CD patients. We also highlighted a reduced NOTCH1 pathway in our patients, irrespective of whether the disease was active or not. We suggest that NOTCH pathway could be constitutively altered in the celiac small intestine and could drive the increased proliferation and the decreased differentiation of intestinal cells towards the secretory goblet cell lineage. PMID:22194996

  3. MicroRNA-449a overexpression, reduced NOTCH1 signals and scarce goblet cells characterize the small intestine of celiac patients.

    PubMed

    Capuano, Marina; Iaffaldano, Laura; Tinto, Nadia; Montanaro, Donatella; Capobianco, Valentina; Izzo, Valentina; Tucci, Francesca; Troncone, Giancarlo; Greco, Luigi; Sacchetti, Lucia

    2011-01-01

    MiRNAs play a relevant role in regulating gene expression in a variety of physiological and pathological conditions including autoimmune disorders. MiRNAs are also important in the differentiation and function of the mouse intestinal epithelium. Our study was aimed to look for miRNA-based modulation of gene expression in celiac small intestine, and particularly for genes involved in cell intestinal differentiation/proliferation mechanisms. A cohort of 40 children (20 with active CD, 9 on a gluten-free diet (GFD), and 11 controls), were recruited at the Paediatrics Department (University of Naples Federico II). The expression of 365 human miRNAs was quantified by TaqMan low-density arrays. We used bioinformatics to predict putative target genes of miRNAs and to select biological pathways. The presence of NOTCH1, HES1, KLF4, MUC-2, Ki67 and beta-catenin proteins in the small intestine of CD and control children was tested by immunohistochemistry. The expression of about 20% of the miRNAs tested differed between CD and control children. We found that high miR-449a levels targeted and reduced both NOTCH1 and KLF4 in HEK-293 cells. NOTCH1, KLF4 signals and the number of goblet cells were lower in small intestine of children with active CD and in those on a GFD than in controls, whereas more nuclear beta-catenin staining, as a sign of the WNT pathway activation, and more Ki67 staining, as sign of proliferation, were present in crypts from CD patients than in controls. In conclusion we first demonstrate a miRNA mediated gene regulation in small intestine of CD patients. We also highlighted a reduced NOTCH1 pathway in our patients, irrespective of whether the disease was active or not. We suggest that NOTCH pathway could be constitutively altered in the celiac small intestine and could drive the increased proliferation and the decreased differentiation of intestinal cells towards the secretory goblet cell lineage.

  4. Thermoablation of Liver Metastases: Efficacy of Temporary Celiac Plexus Block

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, A.N. Schaefer, M.; Werk, M.; Pech, M.; Wieners, G.; Cho, C.; Ricke, J.

    2005-05-15

    Purpose. To determine the efficacy of celiac plexus block during thermoablation of liver metastases. Methods. Fifty-five consecutive patients underwent thermoablation therapy of liver tumors by laser-induced thermotherapy. Twenty-nine patients received a temporary celiac plexus block, 26 patients acted as control group. In both groups fentanyl and midazolam were administered intravenously upon request of the patient. The duration of the intervention, consumption of opiates, and individual pain sensations were documented. Results. No complications resulting from the celiac plexus block were recorded. Celiac plexus block significantly reduced the amount of pain medication used during thermoablation therapy of liver tumors (with block, 2.45 {mu}g fentanyl per kg body weight; without block, 3.58 {mu}g fentanyl per kg body weight, p < 0.05; midazolam consumption was not reduced) in patients with metastases {<=}5 mm from the liver capsule. For metastases farther away from the capsule no significant differences in opiate consumption were seen. Celiac plexus block reduced the time for thermoablation significantly (178 min versus 147 min, p < 0.05) no matter how far the metastases were from the liver capsule. Average time needed to set the block was 12 min (range 9-15 min); additional costs for the block were marginal. As expected (as pain medications were given according to individual patients' needs) pain indices did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusion. In patients with liver metastases {<=}5 mm from the liver capsule, celiac plexus block reduces the amount of opiates necessary, simplifying patient monitoring. In addition celiac plexus block reduces intervention time, with positive effects on overall workflow for all patients.

  5. Mesenchymal stem cells as potential therapeutic approaches in celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Moheb-Alian, Ali; Forouzesh, Flora; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Rostami, Kamran

    2016-01-01

    As a chronic immune complication, celiac disease has a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations and gluten ingestion as an external trigger will induce the onset of this disease in genetically predisposed individuals. Because of the complex nature of celiac disease and various cascades of immunological pathways, therapies which are tend to target a single pathway or factor, often have unsatisfactory results. Thus, it should be considered that the new emerging area of cellular therapy by targeting multiple pathways may hold the key for treating celiac affected patients with complicated forms of this disease. The aim of this review is to discuss different pathways which are affected by celiac disease and to compare how various strategies, mainly cellular therapies, can regulate these pathways. PMID:28224021

  6. [Treatment and management of celiac disease].

    PubMed

    Holtmeier, W

    2006-11-01

    In most patients the clinical course of celiac disease is unproblematic after the diagnosis has been made and a strict gluten-free diet is established. However, in rare cases complications like refractory sprue or lymphoma can occur. Individual management is required since the clinical presentation of celiac disease can be very heterogeneous. For example, it is a matter of controversy if asymptomatic patients, who have the same typical histological changes in their small bowel like patients with symptomatic celiac disease, should adhere to a gluten-free diet. A major problem is the compliance and the unintentional intake of gluten. A 100 % gluten-free diet is not possible since most food components are contaminated with trace amounts of gluten. Fortunately most patients tolerate these contaminations. Furthermore, the threshold for gluten contamination can differ highly among patients. One central point in patient care is the monitoring of a gluten-free diet and the timely recognition of complications. Therefore, the role of antibodies and duodenal histology in monitoring the course of the disease will be discussed.

  7. Evaluation of gluten in gluten-free-labeled foods and assessment of exposure level to gluten among celiac patients in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Hussein; Elaridi, Jomana; Bassil, Maya

    2017-03-21

    The aim of the study was to evaluate gluten contamination in all the gluten-free (GF)-labeled food products sold in Lebanon. Over a 2-year period, a total of 173 food samples collected from 135 brand names were analyzed. Gluten contamination was detected in 33 of 173 (19%) samples, and its content ranged between 2.5 and >80 mg kg(-1). In 10 of the 173 samples (6%), the quantity of gluten exceeded the upper limit of 20 mg kg(-1). Out of the 10 contaminated products, eight (80%) were locally manufactured. Among these 10 products, eight (80%) were wheat-starch-based foods. Of the 40 brand names tested twice in 2014 and 2015, 15 (38%) showed significantly (p < .05) different gluten content between the 2 years. Using a food frequency questionnaire, exposure level to gluten through the contaminated products was evaluated among 15 celiac patients. Two patients reported consuming these products more than twice per week.

  8. Improved Quantitation of Gluten in Wheat Starch for Celiac Disease Patients by Gel-Permeation High-Performance Liquid Chromatography with Fluorescence Detection (GP-HPLC-FLD).

    PubMed

    Scherf, Katharina Anne; Wieser, Herbert; Koehler, Peter

    2016-10-12

    Purified wheat starch (WSt) is commonly used in gluten-free products for celiac disease (CD) patients. It is mostly well-tolerated, but doubts about its safety for CD patients persist. One reason may be that most ELISA kits primarily recognize the alcohol-soluble gliadin fraction of gluten, but insufficiently target the alcohol-insoluble glutenin fraction. To address this problem, a new sensitive method based on the sequential extraction of gliadins, glutenins, and gluten from WSt followed by gel-permeation high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (GP-HPLC-FLD) was developed. It revealed that considerable amounts of glutenins were present in most WSt. The gluten contents quantitated by GP-HPLC-FLD as sum of gliadins and glutenins were higher than those by R5 ELISA (gluten as gliadin content multiplied by a factor of 2) in 19 out of 26 WSt. Despite its limited selectivity, GP-HPLC-FLD may be applied as confirmatory method to ELISA to quantitate gluten in WSt.

  9. Celiac disease: progress towards diagnosis and definition of pathogenic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Mauro; Bot, Adrian

    2011-08-01

    The current issue of the International Reviews of Immunology is dedicated entirely to Celiac Disease (CD). Recent development of additional biomarkers and diagnostics resulted in a sharp revision of the prevalence of this condition, with a previously unrecognized subclinical occurrence in the adult population. This was paralleled by groundbreaking progress in understanding its molecular pathogenesis: while gluten-derived peptides activate the innate immunity, post-translationally modified gluten elicits an adaptive immunity. These arms amplify each other, resulting in a self- perpetuating autoimmune condition, influenced by disturbances of the gut flora and mucus chemistry. The process evolves dramatically in a subset of patients with vulnerable immune homeostasis (eg. Treg cells) explaining the progressive, aggravating syndrome in the clinically overt version of CD. In depth understanding of the pathogenesis of CD thus creates the premises of developing novel, more accurate animal models that should support a rationale development of new prophylactic and therapeutic interventions.

  10. Celiac disease in children and adolescents: special considerations.

    PubMed

    Newton, Kimberly P; Singer, Shereen A

    2012-07-01

    Although there are many commonalities between adult and pediatric celiac disease (CD), special considerations must be taken into account when working with children and adolescents. In this patient population, there are unique aspects of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, presentation, diagnosis, and management of CD. In terms of management, early and timely recognition of CD can maximize childhood and adolescent development and prevent complications. This requires insight into the unique presentations of CD in the pediatric population. Furthermore, health care providers must use proper screening methods and continue surveillance of at-risk individuals throughout childhood. Potential interventions for primary prevention of CD in children, although not completely understood, may offer some benefit. The goals of this article are to discuss in detail these special considerations when dealing with pediatric CD.

  11. Celiac Disease in an Adoptive Child with Recurrent Giardia Infection.

    PubMed

    Tchidjou, Hyppolite K; De Matteis, Arianna; Di Iorio, Laura; Finocchi, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an inflammatory disease of the small intestine. A complete management and differential diagnosis of such disease includes food intolerances, intestinal infections, and irritable bowel syndrome. We describe an 8-years-old adoptive girl from Congo with negative medical history. Patient followed for recurrent abdominal pain and diarrhea associated to Giardia infection, unresponsive to antiparasitic therapy. Persistence of symptoms despite antiparasitic therapy, prompted us to perform: 1- Blood screening of Celiac disease, which was negative; 2- Genetic evaluation of celiac disease, which revealed the presence of HLA-DQ2 heterodimer; and 3- Esophagogastroduodenoscopy, which showed duodenal villous atrophy and crypt hyperplasia, associated with Helicobacter Pylori infection. The child was treated in accordance with international recommendations using a Gluten-free diet and specific antibiotics, which lead to the resolution of the symptoms. Our patient's clinical history seems peculiar, considering that, recurrent Giardiasis may mimic the symptoms of Celiac disease and may simulate clinical and histological picture of active Celiac disease. Early diagnosis may help prevent the complications of untreated celiac disease.

  12. [Non-celiac gluten sensitivity].

    PubMed

    Hoffmanová, Iva; Sánchez, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Non-celiac gluten sensitivity has recently been recognized by the scientific community as a part of gluten-related disorders, and is defined as a condition with gastrointestinal and/or extra-intestinal symptoms triggered by gluten ingestion in the absence of celiac disease and wheat allergy. Currently, there is no specific serological marker and non-celiac gluten sensitivity remains a diagnosis of exclusion: testing for celiac disease and wheat allergy must be negative, symptoms must improve with a gluten-free diet, and diagnosis must be confirmed by the gluten challenge. In this article, we discuss current knowledge of pathophysiology, clinical and epidemilogical spectrum, diagnosis, and treatment of NCGS.

  13. Celiac Crisis in a 64-Year-Old Woman: An Unusual Cause of Severe Diarrhea, Acidosis, and Malabsorption

    PubMed Central

    Mrad, Rachel Abou; Ghaddara, Hussein Abou; Green, Peter H.; El-Majzoub, Nadim

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) rarely presents with life-threatening complications in older individuals. We report a 64-year-old woman who presented with profuse diarrhea, weight loss, hemodynamic instability, hypokalemia, hypoproteinemia, acidosis, and vitamin and iron deficiency. Pathologic and serologic studies confirmed CD presenting with celiac crisis with extensive and severe intestinal disease. Although celiac crisis occurs mostly in childhood and early adulthood, it should be considered in adults presenting with acute severe diarrheal illness, electrolyte abnormalities, and malabsorption. PMID:26157925

  14. Cystic fibrosis lung disease in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Vender, Robert L

    2008-04-01

    As the longevity of all patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) continues to increase (median 2005 survival=36.8 years), more adult patients will be receiving their medical care from nonpediatric adult-care providers. Cystic fibrosis remains a fatal disease, with more than 80% of patients dying after the age of 18 years, and most deaths resulting from pulmonary disease. The changing epidemiology requires adult-care providers to become knowledgeable and competent in the clinical management of adults with CF. Physicians must understand the influence of specific genotype on phenotypic disease presentation and severity, the pathogenic factors determining lung disease onset and progression, the impact of comorbid disease factors such as CF-related diabetes and malnutrition upon lung disease severity, and the currently approved or standard accepted therapies used for chronic management of CF lung disease. This knowledge is critical to help alleviate morbidity and improve mortality for the rapidly expanding population of adults with CF.

  15. Ingestion of oats and barley in patients with celiac disease mobilizes cross-reactive T cells activated by avenin peptides and immuno-dominant hordein peptides.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Melinda Y; Tye-Din, Jason A; Stewart, Jessica A; Schmitz, Frederike; Dudek, Nadine L; Hanchapola, Iresha; Purcell, Anthony W; Anderson, Robert P

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a common CD4(+) T cell mediated enteropathy driven by gluten in wheat, rye, and barley. Whilst clinical feeding studies generally support the safety of oats ingestion in CD, the avenin protein from oats can stimulate intestinal gluten-reactive T cells isolated from some CD patients in vitro. Our objective was to establish whether ingestion of oats or other grains toxic in CD stimulate an avenin-specific T cell response in vivo. We fed participants a meal of oats (100 g/day over 3 days) to measure the in vivo polyclonal avenin-specific T cell responses to peptides contained within comprehensive avenin peptide libraries in 73 HLA-DQ2.5(+) CD patients. Grain cross-reactivity was investigated using oral challenge with wheat, barley, and rye. Avenin-specific responses were observed in 6/73 HLA-DQ2.5(+) CD patients (8%), against four closely related peptides. Oral barley challenge efficiently induced cross-reactive avenin/hordein-specific T cells in most CD patients, whereas wheat or rye challenge did not. In vitro, immunogenic avenin peptides were susceptible to digestive endopeptidases and showed weak HLA-DQ2.5 binding stability. Our findings indicate that CD patients possess T cells capable of responding to immuno-dominant hordein epitopes and homologous avenin peptides ex vivo, but the frequency and consistency of these T cells in blood is substantially higher after oral challenge with barley compared to oats. The low rates of T cell activation after a substantial oats challenge (100 g/d) suggests that doses of oats commonly consumed are insufficient to cause clinical relapse, and supports the safety of oats demonstrated in long-term feeding studies.

  16. Multiple autoimmune syndrome with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Harpreet, Singh; Deepak, Jain; Kiran, B

    2016-01-01

    Multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) is a condition characterised by three or more autoimmune disorders in a same individual. Familial, immunologic and infectious factors are implicated in the development of MAS. Here we report a case of a 32-year-old woman with co-existence of four auto-immune diseases, namely autoimmune hypothyroidism, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and celiac disease which leads to the final diagnosis of multiple autoimmune syndrome type 3 with celiac disease. Patients with single autoimmune disorder are at 25% risk of developing other autoimmune disorders. The present case emphasises to clinicians that there is a need for continued surveillance for the development of new autoimmune disease in predisposed patients.

  17. Multiple autoimmune syndrome with celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Harpreet, Singh; Kiran, B.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) is a condition characterised by three or more autoimmune disorders in a same individual. Familial, immunologic and infectious factors are implicated in the development of MAS. Here we report a case of a 32-year-old woman with co-existence of four auto-immune diseases, namely autoimmune hypothyroidism, Sjögren’s syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and celiac disease which leads to the final diagnosis of multiple autoimmune syndrome type 3 with celiac disease. Patients with single autoimmune disorder are at 25% risk of developing other autoimmune disorders. The present case emphasises to clinicians that there is a need for continued surveillance for the development of new autoimmune disease in predisposed patients. PMID:28115785

  18. Effective Identification of Low-Gliadin Wheat Lines by Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS): Implications for the Development and Analysis of Foodstuffs Suitable for Celiac Patients

    PubMed Central

    García-Molina, María Dolores; García-Olmo, Juan; Barro, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Scope The aim of this work was to assess the ability of Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) to distinguish wheat lines with low gliadin content, obtained by RNA interference (RNAi), from non-transgenic wheat lines. The discriminant analysis was performed using both whole grain and flour. The transgenic sample set included 409 samples for whole grain sorting and 414 samples for flour experiments, while the non-transgenic set consisted of 126 and 156 samples for whole grain and flour, respectively. Methods and Results Samples were scanned using a Foss-NIR Systems 6500 System II instrument. Discrimination models were developed using the entire spectral range (400–2500 nm) and ranges of 400–780 nm, 800–1098 nm and 1100–2500 nm, followed by analysis of means of partial least square (PLS). Two external validations were made, using samples from the years 2013 and 2014 and a minimum of 99% of the flour samples and 96% of the whole grain samples were classified correctly. Conclusions The results demonstrate the ability of NIRS to successfully discriminate between wheat samples with low-gliadin content and wild types. These findings are important for the development and analysis of foodstuff for celiac disease (CD) patients to achieve better dietary composition and a reduction in disease incidence. PMID:27018786

  19. Celiac Disease in an Adoptive Child with Recurrent Giardia Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tchidjou, Hyppolite K.; De Matteis, Arianna; Di Iorio, Laura; Finocchi, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an inflammatory disease of the small intestine. A complete management and differential diagnosis of such disease includes food intolerances, intestinal infections, and irritable bowel syndrome. We describe an 8-years-old adoptive girl from Congo with negative medical history. Patient followed for recurrent abdominal pain and diarrhea associated to Giardia infection, unresponsive to antiparasitic therapy. Persistence of symptoms despite antiparasitic therapy, prompted us to perform: 1- Blood screening of Celiac disease, which was negative; 2- Genetic evaluation of celiac disease, which revealed the presence of HLA-DQ2 heterodimer; and 3- Esophagogastroduodenoscopy, which showed duodenal villous atrophy and crypt hyperplasia, associated with Helicobacter Pylori infection. The child was treated in accordance with international recommendations using a Gluten-free diet and specific antibiotics, which lead to the resolution of the symptoms. Our patient’s clinical history seems peculiar, considering that, recurrent Giardiasis may mimic the symptoms of Celiac disease and may simulate clinical and histological picture of active Celiac disease. Early diagnosis may help prevent the complications of untreated celiac disease. PMID:26309440

  20. Oats can diversify a gluten-free diet in celiac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis.

    PubMed

    Peräaho, Markku; Collin, Pekka; Kaukinen, Katri; Kekkonen, Leila; Miettinen, Sanna; Mäki, Markku

    2004-07-01

    Finnish celiac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis patients have used oat-containing gluten-free diets since 1997. The aim of this study was to evaluate how the use of oats has been adopted. The use of oats and the effect of oats on symptoms and quality of life were investigated in 1,000 randomly selected members of the Celiac Society. Altogether, 710 patients responded: 423 (73%) with celiac disease and 70 (55%) with dermatitis herpetiformis were currently consuming oats. Patients appreciated the taste, the ease of use, and the low costs; 94% believed that oats diversified the gluten-free diet; 15% of celiac disease and 28% of dermatitis herpetiformis patients had stopped eating oats. The most common reasons for avoiding oats were fear of adverse effects or contamination. There is a market demand for oats, and celiac societies and dietitians should make efforts to promote the development of products free of wheat contamination.

  1. Therapeutic approaches for celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Plugis, Nicholas M.; Khosla, Chaitan

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is a common, lifelong autoimmune disorder for which dietary control is the only accepted form of therapy. A strict gluten-free diet is burdensome to patients and can be limited in efficacy, indicating there is an unmet need for novel therapeutic approaches to supplement or supplant dietary therapy. Many molecular events required for disease pathogenesis have been recently characterized and inspire most current and emerging drug-discovery efforts. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) confirm the importance of human leukocyte antigen genes in our pathogenic model and identify a number of new risk loci in this complex disease. Here, we review the status of both emerging and potential therapeutic strategies in the context of disease pathophysiology. We conclude with a discussion of how genes identified during GWAS and follow-up studies that enhance susceptibility may offer insight into developing novel therapies. PMID:26060114

  2. Diagnosis of Adult Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nick, Jerry A; Nichols, David P

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) is being made with increasing frequency in adults. Patients with CF diagnosed in adulthood typically present with respiratory complaints, and often have recurrent or chronic airway infection. At the time of initial presentation individuals may appear to have clinical manifestation limited to a single organ, but with subclinical involvement of the respiratory tract. Adult-diagnosed patients have a good response to CF center care, and newly available cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor-modulating therapies are promising for the treatment of residual function mutation, thus increasing the importance of the diagnosis in adults with unexplained bronchiectasis.

  3. Redo thoracic endovascular aortic repair due to endoleak with celiac artery snorkeling.

    PubMed

    Planer, David; Bliagos, Dimitrios; Gray, William A

    2011-10-01

    Reintervention due to endoleak of aortic endograft repair is often challenging. Herein, we report endovascular endoleak repair in a patient with previous thoracic and abdominal endovascular grafts with extensive coverage of the aorta. The present technique included snorkeling of the celiac trunk to preserve antegrade flow in the celiac artery and to maintain future options for reintervention.

  4. Pure Oats as Part of the Canadian Gluten-Free Diet in Celiac Disease: The Need to Revisit the Issue.

    PubMed

    de Souza, M Cristina P; Deschênes, Marie-Eve; Laurencelle, Suzanne; Godet, Patrick; Roy, Claude C; Djilali-Saiah, Idriss

    2016-01-01

    The question about recommending pure, noncontaminated oats as part of the gluten-free diet of patients with celiac disease remains controversial. This might be due to gluten cross contamination and to the possible immunogenicity of some oat cultivars. In view of this controversy, a review of the scientific literature was conducted to highlight the latest findings published between 2008 and 2014 to examine the current knowledge on oats safety and celiac disease in Europe and North America. Results showed that regular oats consumed in Canada are largely contaminated. Overall, the consumption of pure oats has been generally considered to be safe for adults and children. However, it appears that some oat cultivars may trigger an immune response in sensitive individuals. Therefore, further long-term studies on the impact of consumption of oats identifying the cultivar(s) constitute an important step forward for drawing final recommendations. Furthermore, a closer and more accurate monitoring of the dietary intake of noncontaminated oats would be paramount to better determine what its actual contribution in the gluten-free diet of adults and children with celiac disease are in order to draw sound recommendations on the safety of pure oats as part of the gluten-free diet.

  5. Celiac Disease and Autoimmune-Associated Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lauret, Eugenia; Rodrigo, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is frequently accompanied by a variety of extradigestive manifestations, thus making it a systemic disease rather than a disease limited to the gastrointestinal tract. This is primarily explained by the fact that CD belongs to the group of autoimmune diseases. The only one with a known etiology is related to a permanent intolerance to gluten. Remarkable breakthroughs have been achieved in the last decades, due to a greater interest in the diagnosis of atypical and asymptomatic patients, which are more frequent in adults. The known presence of several associated diseases provides guidance in the search of oligosymptomatic cases as well as studies performed in relatives of patients with CD. The causes for the onset and manifestation of associated diseases are diverse; some share a similar genetic base, like type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D); others share pathogenic mechanisms, and yet, others are of unknown nature. General practitioners and other specialists must remember that CD may debut with extraintestinal manifestations, and associated illnesses may appear both at the time of diagnosis and throughout the evolution of the disease. The implementation of a gluten-free diet (GFD) improves the overall clinical course and influences the evolution of the associated diseases. In some cases, such as iron deficiency anemia, the GFD contributes to its disappearance. In other disorders, like T1D, this allows a better control of the disease. In several other complications and/or associated diseases, an adequate adherence to a GFD may slow down their evolution, especially if implemented during an early stage. PMID:23984314

  6. Celiac disease and autoimmune-associated conditions.

    PubMed

    Lauret, Eugenia; Rodrigo, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is frequently accompanied by a variety of extradigestive manifestations, thus making it a systemic disease rather than a disease limited to the gastrointestinal tract. This is primarily explained by the fact that CD belongs to the group of autoimmune diseases. The only one with a known etiology is related to a permanent intolerance to gluten. Remarkable breakthroughs have been achieved in the last decades, due to a greater interest in the diagnosis of atypical and asymptomatic patients, which are more frequent in adults. The known presence of several associated diseases provides guidance in the search of oligosymptomatic cases as well as studies performed in relatives of patients with CD. The causes for the onset and manifestation of associated diseases are diverse; some share a similar genetic base, like type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D); others share pathogenic mechanisms, and yet, others are of unknown nature. General practitioners and other specialists must remember that CD may debut with extraintestinal manifestations, and associated illnesses may appear both at the time of diagnosis and throughout the evolution of the disease. The implementation of a gluten-free diet (GFD) improves the overall clinical course and influences the evolution of the associated diseases. In some cases, such as iron deficiency anemia, the GFD contributes to its disappearance. In other disorders, like T1D, this allows a better control of the disease. In several other complications and/or associated diseases, an adequate adherence to a GFD may slow down their evolution, especially if implemented during an early stage.

  7. Aneurysms of Peripancreatic Arterial Arcades Coexisting with Celiac Trunk Stenosis or Occlusion: Single Institution Experience.

    PubMed

    Antoniak, Robert; Grabowska-Derlatka, Laretta; Nawrot, Ireneusz; Cieszanowski, Andrzej; Rowiński, Olgierd

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. True aneurysms of peripancreatic arterial arcades (PAAAs) are rare. Most of them coexist with celiac axis stenosis/occlusion due to median arcuate ligament (MAL) compression or atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cause of celiac axis lesion and characterize the anatomy of the aneurysms. These findings may have important management implications. Material and Methods. A retrospective analysis of 15 patients with true PAAAs was performed. The diagnosis was established by contrast-enhanced CT, using a 64-MDCT scanner. We evaluated the most probable cause of celiac axis lesion. Aneurysms were characterized by their number, location, size, and morphology. Location of the aneurysms was classified either as pancreaticoduodenal arteries (PDA) or as dorsal pancreatic arteries (DPA) as they may represent different collateral pathways between superior mesenteric artery and celiac trunk. Results. A total of 32 true PAAAs were identified. Celiac trunk was occluded in 12 patients and critically narrowed in 3 patients. Celiac axis lesion was categorized as secondary to MAL compression in 14 cases and due to atherosclerosis in 1 case. The most common location of the aneurysms was inferior pancreaticoduodenal arteries. Only in 1 case aneurysms involved both PDA and DPA. Conclusions. Coexistence of PAAAs with celiac axis compression as well as involvement of either PDAs or DPAs has important therapeutic implications. The uninvolved collateral pathway may be sufficient to preserve effective circulation in celiac trunk branches in case of resection or embolization of the aneurysms. However, further studies are crucial to confirm our findings.

  8. Aneurysms of Peripancreatic Arterial Arcades Coexisting with Celiac Trunk Stenosis or Occlusion: Single Institution Experience

    PubMed Central

    Antoniak, Robert; Cieszanowski, Andrzej; Rowiński, Olgierd

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. True aneurysms of peripancreatic arterial arcades (PAAAs) are rare. Most of them coexist with celiac axis stenosis/occlusion due to median arcuate ligament (MAL) compression or atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cause of celiac axis lesion and characterize the anatomy of the aneurysms. These findings may have important management implications. Material and Methods. A retrospective analysis of 15 patients with true PAAAs was performed. The diagnosis was established by contrast-enhanced CT, using a 64-MDCT scanner. We evaluated the most probable cause of celiac axis lesion. Aneurysms were characterized by their number, location, size, and morphology. Location of the aneurysms was classified either as pancreaticoduodenal arteries (PDA) or as dorsal pancreatic arteries (DPA) as they may represent different collateral pathways between superior mesenteric artery and celiac trunk. Results. A total of 32 true PAAAs were identified. Celiac trunk was occluded in 12 patients and critically narrowed in 3 patients. Celiac axis lesion was categorized as secondary to MAL compression in 14 cases and due to atherosclerosis in 1 case. The most common location of the aneurysms was inferior pancreaticoduodenal arteries. Only in 1 case aneurysms involved both PDA and DPA. Conclusions. Coexistence of PAAAs with celiac axis compression as well as involvement of either PDAs or DPAs has important therapeutic implications. The uninvolved collateral pathway may be sufficient to preserve effective circulation in celiac trunk branches in case of resection or embolization of the aneurysms. However, further studies are crucial to confirm our findings. PMID:28286755

  9. [Total villous atrophy, mesenteric lymph-node cavitation, splenic atrophy. An unusual form of celiac disease in adults, apropos of a new case].

    PubMed

    Hoang, C; Galian, A; Maitre, F; Degois, T; Celerier, M; Modigliani, R

    1983-09-01

    The authors report a new case concerning the syndrome "total villous atrophy, mesenteric lymph-node cavity formation and splenic atrophy" in a 41 year old woman. This pathologic association is characterized by: a) a clinical and biological malabsorption syndrome; b) proximal small bowel alterations as observed in coeliac disease, with, especially subtotal or total villous atrophy, abnormal enterocytic epithelium, hyperplastic crypts and lymph-plasmacytic infiltrate in the lamina propria; c) lymph node mesenteric cavity formation with an heterogeneous necrotic, sometimes liquefied, substance, without germ or parasite. Rare cortical lymphoid follicles are still persistent; 3) a splenic atrophy. A temporary improvement with gluten-diet (G.F.D.) was followed by a one-year period of total resistance. A treatment including corticotherapy was then successful and since the 14 past months her health remained satisfactory. Clinical, pathological data and the evolution about this patient are compared with those of the six published cases. The aetiology of this syndrome only observed in adults at the present time is unknown; the fact that patient's child presents with a coeliac disease, allows to authenticate, for the first time, this syndrome as a special form of adult coeliac disease.

  10. What is Celiac Disease? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Celiac Disease What is Celiac Disease? Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table of Contents ... people choose the right foods. How common is celiac disease? Celiac disease affects people in all parts ...

  11. HLA-G and susceptibility to develop celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Catamo, Eulalia; Zupin, Luisa; Segat, Ludovica; Celsi, Fulvio; Crovella, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    The Human Leukocyte Antigen-G has immunomodulatory function and its expression has been associated with several diseases. In our study we analyzed HLA-G polymorphisms in order to evaluate their possible association with susceptibility to celiac disease development. A total of 420 celiac patients and 509 controls were genotyped for HLA-G polymorphisms. We sequenced 800bp upstream the ATG codon (5' upstream regulatory region) and the whole 3' untranslated region of the HLA-G gene, whereas the ΔC deletion at exon 3 was detected by RFLP-PCR. Five polymorphisms (namely -477 C>G, -369 C>A, 14bp del/ins, 3187 A>G, 3196 C>G) and one haplotype (TCGGTACGAAITCCCGAG) were significantly more frequent in celiac patients than controls and associated with increased disease susceptibility. The 14bp I/I, 3187 G/G, 3196 G/G genotypes and TCGGTACGAAITCCCGAG haplotype, were still significantly associated with increased disease susceptibility (and in addition also the 3003 C/C genotype) when the analysis was restricted to patients and controls presenting the DQ2.5 or DQ8 HLA-DQ celiac disease risk haplotypes. Our findings indicate an association between HLA-G gene polymorphisms and susceptibility to celiac disease development, suggesting that HLA-G molecule is possibly involved in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  12. Celiac disease, gluten-free diet, and oats.

    PubMed

    Fric, Premysl; Gabrovska, Dana; Nevoral, Jiri

    2011-02-01

    Oats in a gluten-free diet increase the diet's nutritional value, but their use remains controversial. Contamination with prolamins of other cereals is frequent, and some clinical and experimental studies support the view that a subgroup of celiac patients may be intolerant to pure oats. Thus, this issue is more complex than previously suggested. In order to produce oats that are safe for all celiac patients, the following topics should be addressed: selection of oat cultivars with low avenin content, research on such recombinant varieties of oats, development of assay methods to detect avenins in oat products, guidelines for the agricultural processing of oats and the manufacture of oat products, as well as guidelines for following up with celiac patients who consume oats.

  13. Population pharmacokinetics of micafungin in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Gumbo, Tawanda; Hiemenz, John; Ma, Lei; Keirns, James J; Buell, Donald N; Drusano, George L

    2008-03-01

    We performed population pharmacokinetic analysis of micafungin in adult patients treated with doses between 12.5 and 200 mg/day. Our analysis identified a breakpoint patient weight of 66.3 kg above which serum clearance increased by approximately 50%. Patients with weight >66.3 kg may need larger doses to achieve similar exposures to those <66.3 kg. However, the clinical implications are still unknown.

  14. Is Celiac Disease an Etiological Factor in Children with Nonsyndromic Intellectual Disability?

    PubMed

    Sezer, Taner; Balcı, Oya; Özçay, Figen; Bayraktar, Nilufer; Alehan, Füsun

    2016-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in children and adolescents with nonsyndromic intellectual disability, we investigated serum levels of tissue transglutaminase antibody and total IgA from 232 children with nonsyndromic intellectual disability and in a healthy control group of 239 children. Study participants who were positive for tissue transglutaminase antibody underwent a duodenal biopsy. A total of 3 patients in the nonsyndromic intellectual disability group (5.45%) and 1 in the control group (0.41%) had positive serum tissue transglutaminase antibody (P > .05). Duodenal biopsy confirmed celiac disease in only 1 patient who had nonsyndromic intellectual disability. In this present study, children with nonsyndromic intellectual disability did not exhibit a higher celiac disease prevalence rate compared with healthy controls. Therefore, we suggest that screening test for celiac disease should not be necessary as a part of the management of mild and moderate nonsyndromic intellectual disability. However, cases of severe nonsyndromic intellectual disability could be examined for celiac disease.

  15. Celiac axis stenosis as a rare but critical condition treated with pancreatoduodenectomy: report of 2 cases

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyeong Min; Lee, Eung Chang; Lee, In Joon; Han, Sung-Sik; Kim, Hyun Boem; Kim, Seoung Hoon; Lee, Soon-ae; Park, Sang-Jae

    2016-01-01

    We describe 2 cases of patients with loss of hepatic arterial flow during surgery for pancreatic head cancer due to celiac stenosis caused by median arcuate ligament compression. The first case underwent pylorus-resecting pancreatoduodenectomy for pancreatic head cancer. After resection of the gastroduodenal artery, flow in the common hepatic artery disappeared, and celiac axis stenosis was identified. Interventional stent insertion was attempted, however, it failed due to the acute angle of the celiac orifice (os). This problem was resolved by arterial reconstruction. The second case underwent pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy for pancreatic head cancer and the same phenomenon occurred during the procedure. Interventional stent insertion was also tried; in this patient, however, it failed due to the acute angle of the celiac os. The problem was resolved by changing a femoral approach to a brachial approach, and the stent was inserted into the celiac os successfully. PMID:27617257

  16. Aorto-gastroduodenal bypass grafting for an inferior pancreaticoduodenal aneurysm and celiac trunk thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Jens C; Johnston, Malcolm; Caruana, Mario F; Laws, Peter E

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of a male patient diagnosed with a large inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (IPDA) aneurysm, associated with a fresh thrombotic occlusion of the celiac trunk. Given the risk of splanchnic ischaemia, radiologic embolisation of the aneurysm combined with celiac axis stenting was deemed unsafe. Management was therefore modified to elective revascularisation of the celiac axis prior to surgical resection of the aneurysm. A retropancreatic aorto-gastroduodenal artery bypass graft was performed prior to exposing and resecting the pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm. This ensured near uninterrupted retrograde supply to the celiac axis during the procedure. This is an effective, efficient and expeditious patient pathway for these rare and complex aneurysms complicated by celiac trunk involvement.

  17. AMERICAN COLLEGE OF GASTROENTEROLOGY CLINICAL GUIDELINE: DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF CELIAC DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Tapia, Alberto; Hill, Ivor D; Kelly, Ciarán P; Calderwood, Audrey H; Murray, Joseph A

    2013-01-01

    This guideline presents recommendations for the diagnosis and management of patients with celiac disease. Celiac disease is an immune-based reaction to dietary gluten (storage protein for wheat, barley and rye) that primarily affects the small intestine in those with a genetic predisposition and resolves with exclusion of gluten from the diet. There has been a substantial increase in the prevalence of celiac disease over the last 50 years and an increase in the rate of diagnosis in the last 10 years. Celiac disease can present with many symptoms, including typical gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g. diarrhea, steatorrhea, weight loss, bloating, flatulence, abdominal pain) and also non-gastrointestinal abnormalities (e.g. abnormal liver function tests, iron deficiency anemia, bone disease, skin disorders, and many other protean manifestations). Indeed, many individuals with celiac disease may have no symptoms at all. Celiac disease is usually detected by serologic testing of celiac-specific antibodies. The diagnosis is confirmed by duodenal mucosal biopsies. Both serology and biopsy should be performed on a gluten-containing diet. The treatment for celiac disease is primarily a gluten-free diet (GFD), which requires significant patient education, motivation, and follow-up. Non-responsive celiac disease occurs frequently, particularly in those diagnosed in adulthood. Persistent or recurring symptoms should lead to a review of the patient’s original diagnosis to exclude alternative diagnoses, a review of the GFD to ensure there is no obvious gluten contamination, and serologic testing to confirm adherence with the GFD. In addition, evaluation for disorders associated with celiac disease that could cause persistent symptoms, such as microscopic colitis, pancreatic exocrine dysfunction, and complications of celiac disease, such as enteropathy-associated lymphoma or refractory celiac disease, should be entertained. Newer therapeutic modalities are being studied in clinical

  18. Consumption of pure oats by individuals with celiac disease: a position statement by the Canadian Celiac Association.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Mohsin; Butzner, Decker; Burrows, Vernon; Zarkadas, Marion; Case, Shelley; Molloy, Mavis; Warren, Ralph; Pulido, Olga; Switzer, Connie

    2007-10-01

    The treatment of celiac disease is a strict adherence to a gluten-free diet for life. In the past, oats were considered to be toxic to individuals with celiac disease and were not allowed in a gluten-free diet. However, recent evidence suggests that oats that are pure and uncontaminated with other gluten-containing grains, if taken in limited quantities, are safe for most individuals with celiac disease. For adults, up to 70 g (1/2 to 3/4 cup) of oats per day and for children, up to 25 g (1/4 cup) per day are safe to consume. These oats and oat products must fulfill the standards for a gluten-free diet set by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and Health Canada. The Canadian Celiac Association, in consultation with Health Canada, Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, has established requirements for growing, processing, and purity testing and labelling of pure oats. These strategies have led to the production of pure, uncontaminated oats for the first time in Canada. Oats and oat products that are safe for consumption by individuals with celiac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis are now commercially available in Canada.

  19. The Adult Diabetic Patient: An Education Challenge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    finding that he/she, too, must care for sicker patients. To better prepare these patients for life after discharge, patient education must be initiated as...admitted, patient education often begins at the physicians’ office. This paper explores diabetes mellitus in relation to concepts of self-care and adult...betting foj.L eduuation and iio.w, wore ofteni, patient education and follow-up sercvices- a:leL beiny p~rovided on ani outpatient bcdtsis" (p. 36) . Thet

  20. Genome Insight and Comparative Pathogenomic Analysis of Nesterenkonia jeotgali Strain CD08_7 Isolated from Duodenal Mucosa of Celiac Disease Patient

    PubMed Central

    Chander, Atul M.; Nair, Ramesan G.; Kaur, Gurwinder; Kochhar, Rakesh; Dhawan, Devinder K.; Bhadada, Sanjay K.; Mayilraj, Shanmugam

    2017-01-01

    Species of the genus Nesterenkonia have been isolated from different ecological niches, especially from saline habitats and reported as weak human pathogens causing asymptomatic bacteraemia. Here, for the first time we are reporting the genome sequence and pathogenomic analysis of a strain designated as CD08_7 isolated from the duodenal mucosa of a celiac disease patient, identified as Nesterenkonia jeotgali. To date, only five strains of the genus Nesterenkonia (N. massiliensis strain NP1T, Nesterenkonia sp. strain JCM 19054, Nesterenkonia sp. strain F and Nesterenkonia sp. strain AN1) have been whole genome sequenced and annotated. In the present study we have mapped and compared the virulence profile of N. jeotgali strain CD08_7 along with other reference genomes which showed some characteristic features that could contribute to pathogenicity. The RAST (Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology) based genome mining revealed more genes responsible for pathogenicity in strain CD08_7 when compared with the other four sequenced strains. The studied categories were resistance to antibiotic and toxic compounds, invasion and intracellular resistance, membrane transport, stress response, osmotic stress, oxidative stress, phages and prophages and iron acquisition. A total of 1431 protein-encoding genes were identified in the genome of strain CD08_7 among which 163 were predicted to contribute for pathogenicity. Out of 163 genes only 59 were common to other genome, which shows the higher levels of genetic richness in strain CD08_7 that may contribute to its functional versatility. This study provides a comprehensive analysis on genome of N. jeotgali strain CD08_7 and possibly indicates its importance as a clinical pathogen. PMID:28210247

  1. Pharmacological approaches in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    McCarville, Justin L; Caminero, Alberto; Verdu, Elena F

    2015-12-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune enteropathy triggered by the ingestion of gluten, characterized by immune responses toward gluten constituents and the autoantigen transglutaminase 2. The only current treatment available for celiac disease is a gluten-free diet, however there are a plethora of therapies in development for the treatment of celiac disease (e.g. vaccine), management of symptoms while consuming gluten (e.g. Necator americanus) or adjuvant therapies in conjunction with the gluten-free diet (e.g. larazotide acetate). Current approaches in development target barrier function, immune responses, detoxifying gluten or sequestering gluten. Developing therapies include those targeting environmental factors, such as the microbiota or proteases.

  2. Remission of severe aphthous stomatitis of celiac disease with etanercept

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease is a common autoimmune disease triggered by gluten-containing foods (wheat, barley and rye) in genetically predisposed individuals. We present a patient with celiac disease complicated by severe aphthous stomatitis resulting in impairing swallowing, chewing and speaking. This led to weight loss, psychosocial problems as well as inability to perform her work. A variety of topical and systemic medications used resulted in either no improvement or only partial alleviation of the patient’s symptoms. After informed consent, etanercept was initiated and resulted in complete remission of aphthous stomatitis, decrease in arthralgia and fatigue and considerable improvement in her quality of life. The use of newer biological agents for selected and severe manifestations of celiac disease may lead to improved morbidity in these patients, but more studies are needed to determine long-term efficacy as well as safety of these drugs in the mucosal and/or systemic complications of this disease. PMID:24365222

  3. Endocrine manifestations in celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune small intestinal mucosal disorder that often presents with diarrhea, malabsorption and weight loss. Often, one or more associated endocrine disorders may be associated with CD. For this review, methods involved an extensive review of published English-language materials. In children and adolescents, prospective studies have demonstrated a significant relationship to insulin-dependent or type 1 diabetes, whereas in adults, autoimmune forms of thyroid disease, particularly hypothyroidism, may commonly co-exist. In some with CD, multiple glandular endocrinopathies may also occur and complicate the initial presentation of the intestinal disease. In others presenting with an apparent isolated endocrine disorder, serological screening for underlying subclinical CD may prove to be positive, particularly if type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid or other autoimmune endocrine diseases, such as Addison’s disease are first detected. A number of reports have also recorded hypoparathyroidism or hypopituitarism or ovarian failure in CD and these may be improved with a strict gluten-free diet. PMID:27784959

  4. Serologic testing in celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Mohsin; Lee, Jennie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To address the questions and challenges commonly faced by primary care physicians when ordering serologic tests for celiac disease (CD) and provide practical clinical tips to help in the interpretation of test results. Sources of information MEDLINE was searched from 2000 to 2015 for English-language guidelines on the diagnosis and management of CD published by professional gastroenterological organizations. Main message To screen patients for CD, measurement of the immunoglobulin A (IgA) tissue transglutaminase antibody is the preferred test. Total serum IgA level should be measured to exclude selective IgA deficiency and to avoid false-negative test results. Patients with positive serologic test results should be referred to a gastroenterologist for endoscopic small intestinal biopsies to confirm the diagnosis. Testing for human leukocyte antigens DQ2 and DQ8 can help exclude the diagnosis. A gluten-free diet should not be started before confirming the diagnosis of CD. Conclusion Serologic testing is very useful for screening patients with suspected CD. Early diagnosis is essential to prevent complications of CD. PMID:26796833

  5. Celiac Disease Facts and Figures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Field, with 40,000 seats) to watch the Chicago White Sox 55 times. • U.S. fans with celiac ... could fill Soldier Field, the home of the Chicago Bears, 37 times. • The number of people with ...

  6. Celiac Disease Diagnosis: Endoscopic Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Diagnosis If antibody tests and symptoms suggest celiac disease, the physician needs to establish the diagnosis by obtaining tiny pieces of tissue from the upper small intestine to check for damage ...

  7. Study Links Celiac Disease, Anorexia

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_164453.html Study Links Celiac Disease, Anorexia Chances of being diagnosed with eating disorder were ... face a heightened risk of being diagnosed with anorexia, a new study suggests. The Swedish researchers found ...

  8. Epilepsy, occipital calcifications, and oligosymptomatic celiac disease in childhood.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Hugo A; De Rosa, Susana; Ruggieri, Victor; de Dávila, María T G; Fejerman, Natalio

    2002-11-01

    The association of epilepsy, occipital calcifications, and celiac disease has been recognized as a distinct syndrome. The objective of this study was to present the clinical, electrophysiologic, and neuroradiologic features in a series of patients with this syndrome. Thirty-two patients with the constellation of epilepsy, occipital calcifications, and celiac disease were identified in our epilepsy clinic. The mean age was 11 years and the mean length of follow-up was 7.4 years. The 1990 criteria of the European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition were used to diagnose celiac disease. The Kruskal-Wallis statistics test was employed with a signficance of P < .05. Thirty-one patients had partial seizures, 21 of them with symptoms related to the occipital lobe. In most patients, the epilepsy was controlled or the seizures were sporadic. Three developed severe epilepsy. Occipital calcifications were present in all cases. Computed tomography in 7 patients showed hypodense areas in the white matter around calcifications, which decreased or disappeared after a period of gluten-free diet in 3 patients. A favorable outcome of epilepsy was detected in patients with the earliest dietary therapy. This study presents the largest series of children with this syndrome outside Italy. White-matter hypodensities surrounding calcifications are rarely reported. A prompt diagnosis of celiac disease might improve the evolution of the epilepsy and may improve cognitive status.

  9. Is the Prevalence of Celiac Disease Higher than the General Population in Inflammatory Bowel Diseaese?

    PubMed

    Jandaghi, Elahe; Hojatnia, Mona; Vahedi, Homayoon; Shahbaz-Khani, Bijan; Kolahdoozan, Shadi; Ansari, Reza

    2015-04-01

    BACKGROUND In some studies inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and celiac disease were considered to be associated and some belive that this association may influence the prognosis of IBD. However, there is a cosiderable controversy regarding this association. Therefore ,we aimed to assess the association of these two common digestive diseases and evaluate the complications of this association. METHODS In this comparative study, 200 patients with ulceritive colitis (UC) and 206 patients with Crohn's disease (CD) were evaluated for celiac disease using relevant diagnostic tests and pathologic studies. Total IgA, IgA tissue transgulaminase antibody and specific IgA anti endomysial antibody were asseyed. In cases of IgA deficiency, total IgG and IgG tissue TG and IgG anti endomyseal Ab were measured. Patients with increased specific IgA and IgG antibodies for celiac disease, underwent endoscopy and 4 standard samples were obtained. Our results were compared with the results of the prevalence study of celiac disease in the general population. Data were analyzed using analytic and descriptive statistics at a significance level of 5%. RESULTS Among the studied patients, 1 patient with UC had elevated IgA anti tTG antibody and IgA anti-endomysial antibody who underwent endoscopy and celiac was confirmed on pathology. Hence, of the 200 patientswith UC, the diagnosis of celiac disease was confirmed in 1 patient (1:200) with no significant difference with the prevalence of celiac disease in the general population (1:166). However, none of our patients with Crohn's disease had celiac disease (0:206). CONCLUSION We found no significant difference in the prevalence of celiac disease between patients with UC and the general population. Since most of our participants had a mild level of Crohn's activation, none of those with Crohn's disease had celiac disease. Complications of IBD including sclerosing cholangitis, may be more common in patients with concurrent celiac disease

  10. Serum markers in the clinical management of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Adriaanse, Marlou; Leffler, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    The advent of highly reliable noninvasive celiac diagnostic tests has transformed the field of celiac disease, from diagnosis, to evaluation of epidemiology, to clinical and translational research. Serologic tests in their modern forms are highly sensitive and specific for diagnosis, allowing for consideration of avoidance of diagnostic intestinal biopsy in some settings. On the other hand, as predictors of intestinal damage and for use in monitoring disease activity, currently available noninvasive tests have been disappointing. Serologic tests, while a measure of disease activity, do not correlate well with histology or symptomatology, and it is unclear if they predict long-term risk. Additionally, while the many clinically available tests have improved accessibility, they can have widely different cutoff levels and overall performance, making the comparison of levels in individual patients over time and across populations quite difficult. In the future, we can expect to see improvement in the currently available serologic tests including tissue transglutaminase and deamidated gliadin peptide with expansion of the dynamic range of the tests, and the celiac care community should push for a standardization of assays that would simplify research and patient care. Additionally, current serologic tests are measures of the adaptive immune response in celiac disease but do not directly measure intestinal inflammation. Promising work on intestinal fatty acid-binding protein and other assays which directly measure intestinal damage may complement traditional serologic tests and further improve our ability to noninvasively diagnose and monitor celiac disease. The coming years hold promise for the continuing evolution of serum-based tests in celiac disease with the possibility of substantial improvement of patient care and clinical research.

  11. Mass spectrometry analysis of gliadins in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Ferranti, Pasquale; Mamone, Gianfranco; Picariello, Gianluca; Addeo, Francesco

    2007-12-01

    In recent years, scientific research on wheat gluten proteins has followed three main directions aimed at (1) finding relationships between individual genetic alleles coding for gliadins, high or low molecular weight glutenin subunits, and the viscoelastic dough properties of flour-derived products such as pasta and bread; (2) identifying prolamins and derived peptides involved in celiac disease, a pathological condition in which the small intestine of genetically predisposed individuals is reversibly damaged; and (3) developing and validating sensitive and specific methods for detecting trace amounts of gluten proteins in gluten-free foods for celiac disease patients. In this review, the main aspects of current and perspective applications of mass spectrometry and proteomic technologies to the structural characterization of gliadins are presented, with focus on issues related to detection, identification, and quantification of intact gliadins, as well as gliadin-derived peptides relevant to the biochemical, immunological, and toxicological aspects of celiac disease.

  12. Celiac Disease Testing (for Health Care Professionals)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tract Imaging Urodynamic Testing Virtual Colonoscopy Celiac Disease Testing (for Health Care Professionals) Serologic tests for celiac ... MA, Loots CM, Salvatore S, Vandenplas Y, ESPGHAN EURO-PIG Working Group. Indications, methodology, and interpretation of combined ...

  13. Celiac Disease Testing (for Health Care Professionals)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Urodynamic Testing Virtual Colonoscopy Celiac Disease Testing (for Health Care Professionals) Serologic tests for celiac disease provide an ... 6332) or visit www.fda.gov . Consult your health care provider for more information. September 2013 Share Alternate ...

  14. The role of infectious mediators and gut microbiome in the pathogenesis of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Rostami Nejad, Mohammad; Ishaq, Sauid; Al Dulaimi, David; Zali, Mohammad Reza; Rostami, Kamran

    2015-04-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune disorder that is associated with gluten sensitivity in people who are genetically predisposed. In celiac disease, food containing gluten mounts inflammatory response that results in villous atrophy in small bowel and increased permeability. This disorder is not only related to complications in the small bowel, but also has association with manifestations outside the GI tract. Small bowel mucosal immunity, exposed to infectious agents, is affected by CD; therefore, it is likely that patients with untreated celiac disease are more susceptible to infectious diseases. It is possible that sensitivity to gluten increases in patients infected with infectious diseases, and consequently infection may trigger CD in susceptible individuals. It is likely that, due to reduced immunity following the loss of intestinal villi, viral, bacterial, and parasitic infections develop faster in celiac disease patients and systemic complication occur more frequently. In addition, increased permeability, changing the microbiota following the chronic inflammation of the small intestine and abnormal immunological reactions are associated with celiac disease. PubMed, Medline, Google scholar, SID, and Magiran were searched for full text articles published between 1999 and 2014 in Persian and English. The associated keywords were used, and papers, which described particularly the impact of infectious agents on celiac disease, were selected. In this review, we have focused on the role of infectious agents and gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of celiac disease.

  15. Celiac disease: is it really possible to overcome duodenal biopsy?

    PubMed

    Grande, Elisabetta; Ferranti, Silvia; Gaggiano, Carla; Di Virgilio, Nicola; Vascotto, Marina

    2016-05-06

    We report the case of a two-year-five-month-old child who underwent screening for celiac disease due to strong familiarity. During the first observation body weight and height were at 25th and 50th centile for gender and age. Physical examination did not reveal any sign of disease. Blood tests showed increased transaminases levels and antibodies research showed: tTG IgA: 100 UI/ml, tTG IgG: 36,6 UI/ml, EMA IgA: positive. HLA study revealed homozygous allelic combination DRB1*07;DQA102:01; DQB1* 02:02 with presence of a double copy of beta chain in the composition of the  DQ2 heterodymer. Biopsy with histological examination did find neither mucosal alteration  nor lymphocytic infiltrates (Marsh 0). During follow up with free diet the patient remained asymptomatic and all antibody titers decreased up to normalization. According to ESPGHAN guidelines the finding of hypertransaminasemia as sign of celiac hepatic inflammation, a more than 10-fold increase of tTG IgA and a high-risk HLA would permit diagnosis of celiac disease but histological examination done due to mismatch between paucity of clinical sings and a "multiple risk combination" excluded it, allowing diagnosis of potential celiac disease.  We believe that this case is interesting because of its being in contrast with current literature data that suggest a linear relationship between antibodies levels and histological damage with tTG IgA at the upper reference range in case of potential celiac disease. According to guidelines we could have avoided intestinal biopsy but we would have considered as celiac a patient who is maybe just potentially affected.

  16. The metabonomic signature of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Bertini, Ivano; Calabrò, Antonio; De Carli, Valeria; Luchinat, Claudio; Nepi, Stefano; Porfirio, Berardino; Renzi, Daniela; Saccenti, Edoardo; Tenori, Leonardo

    2009-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a multifactorial disorder involving genetic and environmental factors, thus, having great potential impact on metabolism. This study aims at defining the metabolic signature of CD through Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) of urine and serum samples of CD patients. Thirty-four CD patients at diagnosis and 34 healthy controls were examined by (1)H NMR of their serum and urine. A CD patients' subgroup was also examined after a gluten-free diet (GFD). Projection to Latent Structures provided data reduction and clustering, and Support Vector Machines provided pattern recognition and classification. The classification accuracy of CD and healthy control groups was 79.7-83.4% for serum and 69.3% for urine. Sera of CD patients were characterized by lower levels (P < 0.01) of several metabolites such as amino acids, lipids, pyruvate and choline, and by higher levels of glucose and 3-hydroxybutyric acid, while urines showed altered levels (P < 0.05) of, among others, indoxyl sulfate, meta-[hydroxyphenyl]propionic acid and phenylacetylglycine. After 12 months of GFD, all but one of the patients were classified as healthy by the same statistical analysis. NMR thus reveals a characteristic metabolic signature of celiac disease. Altered serum levels of glucose and ketonic bodies suggest alterations of energy metabolism, while the urine data point to alterations of gut microbiota. Metabolomics may thus provide further hints on the biochemistry of the disease.

  17. Multiple immune disorders in unrecognized celiac disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Giorgio La; Pantaleo, Pietro; Tarquini, Roberto; Cirami, Lino; Perfetto, Federico; Mancuso, Francesco; Laffi, Giacomo

    2003-01-01

    We reported a female patient with unrecognized celiac disease and multiple extra intestinal manifestations, mainly related to a deranged immune function, including macroamilasemia, macrolipasemia, IgA nephropathy, thyroiditis, and anti-b2-glicoprotein-1 antibodies, that disappeared or improved after the implementation of a gluten-free diet. PMID:12800261

  18. [Reproductive aspects of celiac disease].

    PubMed

    Stazi, Anna Velia; Trinti, Biagino

    2005-01-01

    In the past, celiac disease (CD), or intolerance to gluten, was considered a rare disease of infancy characterized by chronic diarrhea with malabsorption and delayed growth. Besides the overt enteropathy, there are other clinic and subclinical forms which appear later in life. Target organs are not limited to the gut, but include liver, thyroid, skin and female and male reproductive systems. CD interference on reproduction is related to the multifactorial nature of the disease, whose pathological manifestations can be modulated, besides gluten, by different concurrent genetic and environmental factors. CD induces malabsorption with consequent deficiencies of micronutrients such as iron, folic acid and vitamin K, which are essential for organogenesis, and fat-soluble vitamins important for spermatogenesis. Regarding endocrine disorders, the deficiencies of specific trace elements on ovarian function could explain its involvement in the increased risk of female osteoporosis in CD patients. Affected males show a picture of tissue resistance to androgens; the increases of follicle-stimulating hormone and prolactin, not associated with infertility, may indicate an imbalance at hypothalamus-pituitary level, with general effects on health. Since reproductive alterations are reversible, adoption of a gluten-free diet supported by early diagnosis is important. Therefore, the detection of early biomarkers, such as deficiencies of vitamins and/or iron and andrological or endocrinological dysfunctions, should trigger timely strategies for prevention and treatment.

  19. Are gastric hyperplastic polyps an additional manifestation in celiac disease?: Results from a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Dore, Maria Pina; Pes, Giovanni Mario; Rocchi, Chiara; Loria, Maria Francesca; Soro, Sara; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2017-02-01

    Gastric polyps are frequently reported in patients undergoing upper endoscopic procedures. In this retrospective study, the association between hyperplastic polyps and celiac disease in Northern Sardinia was estimated.Age, gender, body mass index, and medications taken in the 2 preceding months, including proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs), H2 receptor blockers (anti-H2), Helicobacter pylori status, endoscopic findings, and histology from charts of patients undergoing esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy were reviewed. Polyps were classified as hyperplastic, fundic gland, inflammatory, and adenomatous.3.7% (423/11379) patients had celiac disease. Prevalence of gastric polyps was 4.2% (3.8% among celiac vs 4.2% nonceliac patients). Inflammatory polyp was the most common histotype (55.8% and 56.2%) followed by fundic gland polyps (31.4% and 43.7%), hyperplastic (8.7% and 0%), and adenomas, in celiac and nonceliac patients, respectively. Fundic gland polyps were more common in PPI users (odds ratio: 4.06) than in nonusers (2.65, P = 0.001) among celiac and nonceliac patients. Age older than 50, female gender, esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy year, and PPI use were associated with the presence of polyps, whereas active H pylori infection was not.Gastric polyps were common in Sardinian patients undergoing esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy. However, the previously reported association between hyperplastic polyps and celiac disease was not confirmed in our study.

  20. Motility alterations in celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Sanchez, Maria Ines; Bercik, Premysl; Verdu, Elena F

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of gut motility is complex and involves neuromuscular, immune and environmental mechanisms. It is well established that patients with celiac disease (CD) often display gut dysmotility. Studies have shown the presence of disturbed esophageal motility, altered gastric emptying, and dysmotility of the small intestine, gallbladder and colon in untreated CD. Most of these motor abnormalities resolve after a strict gluten-free diet, suggesting that mechanisms related to the inflammatory condition and disease process are responsible for the motor dysfunction. Motility abnormalities are also a hallmark of functional bowel disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), where it has been proposed as underlying mechanism for symptom generation (diarrhea, constipation, bloating). Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is a poorly defined entity, mostly self-diagnosed, that presents clinically with IBS symptoms in the absence of specific celiac markers. Patients with NCGS are believed to react symptomatically to wheat components, and some studies have proposed the presence of low-grade inflammation in these patients. There is little information regarding the functional characterization of these patients before and after a gluten-free diet. A study suggested the presence of altered gastrointestinal transit in NCGS patients who also have a high prevalence of nonspecific anti-gliadin antibodies. Results of an ongoing clinical study in NCGS patients with positive anti-gliadin antibodies before and after a gluten-free diet will be discussed. Elucidating the mechanisms for symptom generation in NCGS patients is important to find new therapeutic alternatives to the burden of imposing a strict gluten-free diet in patients who do not have CD.

  1. CD62LnegCD38+ expression on circulating CD4+ T cells identifies mucosally differentiated cells in protein fed mice and in human celiac disease patients and controls

    PubMed Central

    du Pré, M. Fleur; van Berkel, Lisette A.; Ráki, Melinda; van Leeuwen, Marieke A.; de Ruiter, Lilian F.; Broere, Femke; ter Borg, Mariëtte N.D.; Lund, Frances E.; Escher, Johanna C.; Lundin, Knut E. A.; Sollid, Ludvig M.; Kraal, Georg; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E. S.; Samsom, Janneke N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to identify new markers of mucosal T cells to monitor ongoing intestinal immune responses in peripheral blood. Design Expression of cell-surface markers was studied in mice on ovalbumin (OVA)-specific T cells in the gut-draining mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) after OVA feed. The effect of the local mucosal mediators retinoic acid (RA) and TGF-β on the induction of a mucosal phenotype was determined in in vitro T-cell differentiation assays with murine and human T cells. Tetramer stainings were performed to study gluten-specific T cells in the circulation of patients with celiac disease, a chronic small intestinal inflammation. Results In mice, proliferating T cells in MLN were CD62LnegCD38+ during both tolerance induction and abrogation of intestinal homeostasis. This mucosal CD62LnegCD38+ T-cell phenotype was efficiently induced by RA and TGF-β in mice, whereas for human CD4+ T cells RA alone was sufficient. The CD4+CD62LnegCD38+ T-cell phenotype could be used to identify T cells with mucosal origin in human peripheral blood, as expression of the gut-homing chemokine receptor CCR9 and β7 integrin were highly enriched in this subset whereas expression of cutaneous leukocyte associated antigen was almost absent. Tetramer staining revealed that gluten-specific T cells appearing in blood of treated celiac disease patients after oral gluten challenge were predominantly CD4+CD62LnegCD38+. The total percentage of circulating CD62LnegCD38+ of CD4 T cells was not an indicator of intestinal inflammation as percentages did not differ between pediatric celiac disease patients, inflammatory bowel disease patients and respective controls. However, the phenotypic selection of mucosal T cells allowed cytokine profiling as upon restimulation of CD62LnegCD38+ cells IL-10 and IFN-γ transcripts were readily detected in circulating mucosal T-cells. Conclusions By selecting for CD62LnegCD38+ expression which comprises 5–10% of the cells within

  2. Mycotic Aneurysm of the Celiac Trunk: From Early CT Sign to Rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Serafino, Gianpiero Vroegindeweij, Dammis; Boks, Simone; Harst, Erwin van der

    2005-06-15

    We present a case of the rapid development and rupture of a mycotic celiac trunk aneurysm. Initiallyon multislice computed tomography (ms-CT) there was a normal celiac trunk with minimal haziness of the surrounding fat. Only 2 weeks later the patient went into hypovolemic shock due to a ruptured celiac aneurysm. Although aneurysms of the visceral arteries are rare, they are of major clinical importance as they carry a life-threatening risk of rupture. This case illustrates the use of ms-CT in detecting and evaluating visceral aneurysms, in order to prevent emergency operation.

  3. Ab interno trabeculectomy in the adult patient.

    PubMed

    SooHoo, Jeffrey R; Seibold, Leonard K; Kahook, Malik Y

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a potentially blinding disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The mainstay of treatment is lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP) through the use of medications, laser and/or incisional surgery. The trabecular meshwork (TM) is thought to be the site of significant resistance to aqueous outflow in open angle glaucoma. Theoretically, an incision through TM or TM removal should decrease this resistance and lead to a significant reduction in IOP. This approach, commonly referred to as goniotomy or trabeculotomy, has been validated in the pediatric population and has been associated with long-term IOP control. In adults, however, removal of TM tissue has been historically associated with more limited and short-lived success. More recent evidence, reveals that even adult patients may benefit significantly from removal of diseased TM tissue and can lead to a significant reduction in IOP that is long-lasting and safe. In this review, we discuss current evidence and techniques for ab interno trabeculectomy using various devices in the adult patient.

  4. Ab Interno Trabeculectomy in the Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    SooHoo, Jeffrey R.; Seibold, Leonard K.; Kahook, Malik Y.

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a potentially blinding disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The mainstay of treatment is lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP) through the use of medications, laser and/or incisional surgery. The trabecular meshwork (TM) is thought to be the site of significant resistance to aqueous outflow in open angle glaucoma. Theoretically, an incision through TM or TM removal should decrease this resistance and lead to a significant reduction in IOP. This approach, commonly referred to as goniotomy or trabeculotomy, has been validated in the pediatric population and has been associated with long-term IOP control. In adults, however, removal of TM tissue has been historically associated with more limited and short-lived success. More recent evidence, reveals that even adult patients may benefit significantly from removal of diseased TM tissue and can lead to a significant reduction in IOP that is long-lasting and safe. In this review, we discuss current evidence and techniques for ab interno trabeculectomy using various devices in the adult patient. PMID:25624670

  5. Trauma injury in adult underweight patients

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ching-Hua; Lai, Wei-Hung; Wu, Shao-Chun; Chen, Yi-Chun; Kuo, Pao-Jen; Hsu, Shiun-Yuan; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the injury characteristics, severity, and outcome between underweight and normal-weight patients hospitalized for the treatment of all kinds of trauma injury. This study was based on a level I trauma center Taiwan. The detailed data of 640 underweight adult trauma patients with a body mass index (BMI) of <18.5 kg/m2 and 6497 normal-weight adult patients (25 > BMI ≥ 18.5 kg/m2) were retrieved from the Trauma Registry System between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2014. Pearson's chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, and independent Student's t-test were performed to compare the differences. Propensity score matching with logistic regression was used to evaluate the effect of underweight on mortality. Underweight patients presented a different bodily injury pattern and a significantly higher rate of admittance to the intensive care unit (ICU) than did normal-weight patients; however, no significant differences in the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, injury severity score (ISS), in-hospital mortality, and hospital length of stay were found between the two groups. However, further analysis of the patients stratified by two major injury mechanisms (motorcycle accident and fall injury) revealed that underweight patients had significantly lower GCS scores (13.8 ± 3.0 vs 14.5 ± 2.0, P = 0.020), but higher ISS (10.1 ± 6.9 vs 8.4 ± 5.9, P = 0.005), in-hospital mortality (odds ratio, 4.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.69–11.35; P = 0.006), and ICU admittance rate (24.1% vs 14.3%, P = 0.007) than normal-weight patients in the fall accident group, but not in the motorcycle accident group. However, after propensity score matching, logistic regression analysis of well-matched pairs of patients with either all trauma, motorcycle accident, or fall injury did not show a significant influence of underweight on mortality. Exploratory data analysis revealed that underweight patients

  6. The immunopathogenesis of celiac disease reveals possible therapies beyond the gluten-free diet.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Christopher S; Kagnoff, Martin F

    2012-07-01

    Celiac disease is a T cell-mediated autoimmune inflammatory disease of the small intestine that is activated by gluten. The diagnosis of celiac disease is challenging as patients display a wide range of symptoms and some are asymptomatic. A lifelong gluten-free diet is the only currently approved treatment of celiac disease. Although the diet is safe and effective, the compliance rates and patient acceptance vary. Furthermore, many patients treated with a gluten-free diet continue to be mildly to severely symptomatic with persistent histological abnormalities, and a small number of patients develop refractory celiac disease. New therapeutic adjuncts and potential alternatives to the gluten-free diet could improve the treatment options for these patients. Advances in understanding the immunopathogenesis of celiac disease have suggested several types of therapeutic strategies that may augment or supplant the gluten-free diet. Some of these strategies attempt to decrease the immunogenicity of gluten-containing grains by manipulating the grain itself or by using oral enzymes to break down immunogenic peptides that normally remain intact during digestion. Other strategies focus on preventing the absorption of these peptides, preventing tissue transglutaminase from rendering gluten peptides more immunogenic, or inhibiting their binding to celiac disease-specific antigen-presenting molecules. Strategies that limit T cell migration to the small intestine or that reestablish mucosal homeostasis and tolerance to gluten antigens are also being explored. Additionally, it is vital to develop new therapeutic options for refractory celiac disease patients. This review highlights therapeutic strategies that may ultimately improve the health and well-being of individuals with celiac disease.

  7. Nodular lymphoid hyperplasia in the gastrointestinal tract in adult patients: A review.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Andreia

    2014-11-16

    Nodular lymphoid hyperplasia of the gastrointestinal tract is characterized by the presence of multiple small nodules, normally between between 2 and 10 mm in diameter, distributed along the small intestine (more often), stomach, large intestine, or rectum. The pathogenesis is largely unknown. It can occur in all age groups, but primarily in children and can affect adults with or without immunodeficiency. Some patients have an associated disease, namely, common variable immunodeficiency, selective IgA deficiency, Giardia infection, or, more rarely, human immunodeficiency virus infection, celiac disease, or Helicobacter pylori infection. Nodular lymphoid hyperplasia generally presents as an asymptomatic disease, but it may cause gastrointestinal symptoms like abdominal pain, chronic diarrhea, bleeding or intestinal obstruction. A diagnosis is made at endoscopy or contrast barium studies and should be confirmed by histology. Its histological characteristics include markedly hyperplasic, mitotically active germinal centers and well-defined lymphocyte mantles found in the lamina propria and/or in the superficial submucosa, distributed in a diffuse or focal form. Treatment is directed towards associated conditions because the disorder itself generally requires no intervention. Nodular lymphoid hyperplasia is a risk factor for both intestinal and, very rarely, extraintestinal lymphoma. Some authors recommend surveillance, however, the duration and intervals are undefined.

  8. Distal Pancreatectomy With En Bloc Resection of the Celiac Trunk for Extended Pancreatic Tumor Disease: An Interdisciplinary Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Denecke, Timm; Andreou, Andreas; Podrabsky, Petr; Grieser, Christian; Warnick, Peter; Bahra, Marcus; Klein, Fritz; Hamm, Bernd; Neuhaus, Peter; Glanemann, Matthias

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: Infiltration of the celiac trunk by adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic body has been considered a contraindication for surgical treatment, thus resulting in a very poor prognosis. The concept of distal pancreatectomy with resection of the celiac trunk offers a curative treatment option but implies the risk of relevant hepatic or gastric ischemia. We describe initial experiences in a small series of patients with left celiacopancreatectomy with or without angiographic preconditioning of arterial blood flow to the stomach and the liver. Materials and Methods: Between January 2007 and October 2009, six patients underwent simultaneous resection of the celiac trunk for adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic body involving the celiac axis. In four of these cases, angiographic occlusion of the celiac trunk before surgery was performed to enhance collateral flow from the gastroduodenal artery. Radiologic and surgical procedures, findings, and outcome were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Complete tumor removal (R0) succeeded in two patients, whereas four patients underwent R1-tumor resection. After surgery, one of the two patients without angiographic preparation experienced an ischemic stomach perforation 1 week after surgery. The other patient died from severe bleeding from an ischemic gastric ulcer. Of the four patients with celiac trunk embolization, none presented ischemic complications after surgery. Mean survival was 371 days. Conclusion: In this small series, ischemic complications after celiacopancreatectomy occurred only in those patients who did not receive preoperative celiac trunk embolization.

  9. Prevalence of celiac disease in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) is a common systemic disease related to a permanent intolerance to gluten and is often associated with different autoimmune and neurological diseases. Its mean prevalence in the general population is 1-2% worldwide. Our aim was to study the prevalence of celiac disease in a prospective series of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients and their first-degree relatives. Methods We analyzed the prevalence of serological, histological and genetic CD markers in a series of 72 MS patients and in their 126 first-degree relatives, compared to 123 healthy controls. Results Tissue IgA-anti-transglutaminase-2 antibodies were positive in 7 MS patients (10%), compared to 3 healthy controls (2.4%) (p < 0.05). OR: 5.33 (CI-95%: 1.074-26.425). No differences were found in HLA-DQ2 markers between MS patients (29%) and controls (26%) (NS). We detected mild or moderate villous atrophy (Marsh III type) in duodenal biopsies, in 8 MS patients (11.1%). We also found a high proportion of CD among first-degree relatives: 23/126 (32%). Several associated diseases were detected, mainly dermatitis 41 (57%) and iron deficiency anemia in 28 (39%) MS patients. We also found in them, an increased frequency of circulating auto-antibodies such as anti-TPO in 19 (26%), ANA in 11 (15%) and AMA in 2 (3%). Conclusions We have found an increased prevalence of CD in 8 of the 72 MS patients (11.1%) and also in their first-degree relatives (23/126 [32%]). Therefore, increased efforts aimed at the early detection and dietary treatment of CD, among antibody-positive MS patients, are advisable. PMID:21385364

  10. Genetic variants associated with celiac disease and the risk for coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Henning; Willenborg, Christina; Schlesinger, Sabrina; Ferrario, Paola G; König, Inke R; Erdmann, Jeanette; Samani, Nilesh J; Lieb, Wolfgang; Schunkert, Heribert

    2015-10-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that patients with celiac disease are at increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). Genetic-epidemiological analyses identified many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with celiac disease. If there is a causal relation between celiac disease and CAD, one might expect that risk alleles primarily associated with celiac disease also increase the risk of CAD. In this study we identified from literature 41 SNPs that have been previously described to be genome-wide associated with celiac disease (p < 5 × 10(-08)). These SNPs were evaluated for their association with CAD in the Coronary ARtery DIsease Genome-wide Replication and Meta-analysis (CARDIoGRAM) dataset, a meta-analysis comprising genome-wide SNP association data from 22,233 CAD cases and 64,762 controls. 24 out of 41 (58.5 %) risk alleles for celiac disease displayed a positive association with CAD (CAD-OR range 1.001-1.081). The remaining risk alleles for celiac disease (n = 16) revealed CAD-ORs of ≤1.0 (range 0.951-1.0). The proportion of CAD associated alleles was greater but did not differ significantly from the proportion of 50 % expected by chance (p = 0.069). One SNP (rs653178 at the SH2B3/ATXN2 locus) displayed study-wise statistically significant association with CAD with directionality consistent effects on celiac disease and CAD. However, the effect of this locus is most likely driven by pleiotropic effects on multiple other diseases. In conclusion, this genetically based approach provided no convincing evidence that SNPs associated with celiac disease contribute to the risk of CAD. Hence, common non-genetic factors may play a more important role explaining the coincidence of these two complex disease conditions.

  11. A universal approach to eliminate antigenic properties of alpha-gliadin peptides in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Mitea, Cristina; Salentijn, Elma M J; van Veelen, Peter; Goryunova, Svetlana V; van der Meer, Ingrid M; van den Broeck, Hetty C; Mujico, Jorge R; Montserrat, Veronica; Monserrat, Veronica; Gilissen, Luud J W J; Drijfhout, Jan Wouter; Dekking, Liesbeth; Koning, Frits; Smulders, Marinus J M

    2010-12-16

    Celiac disease is caused by an uncontrolled immune response to gluten, a heterogeneous mixture of wheat storage proteins, including the α-gliadins. It has been shown that α-gliadins harbor several major epitopes involved in the disease pathogenesis. A major step towards elimination of gluten toxicity for celiac disease patients would thus be the elimination of such epitopes from α-gliadins. We have analyzed over 3,000 expressed α-gliadin sequences from 11 bread wheat cultivars to determine whether they encode for peptides potentially involved in celiac disease. All identified epitope variants were synthesized as peptides and tested for binding to the disease-associated HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 molecules and for recognition by patient-derived α-gliadin specific T cell clones. Several specific naturally occurring amino acid substitutions were identified for each of the α-gliadin derived peptides involved in celiac disease that eliminate the antigenic properties of the epitope variants. Finally, we provide proof of principle at the peptide level that through the systematic introduction of such naturally occurring variations α-gliadins genes can be generated that no longer encode antigenic peptides. This forms a crucial step in the development of strategies to modify gluten genes in wheat so that it becomes safe for celiac disease patients. It also provides the information to design and introduce safe gluten genes in other cereals, which would exhibit improved quality while remaining safe for consumption by celiac disease patients.

  12. Celiac Disease Changes Everything | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Celiac Disease Celiac Disease Changes Everything Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table ... your thoughts when you were told you had celiac disease? I was actually thrilled when I was ...

  13. Frequency of Celiac Disease In Children With Chronic Functional Constipation in Shiraz-Iran.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Ehsaei, Zahra; Honar, Naser; Javaherizadeh, Hazhir

    2015-07-01

    BACKGROUND Celiac disease is an autoimmune mediated small intestine inflammation which occurs due to hypersensitivity reaction to gluten and related proteins in diet in genetically predisposed individuals. Prevalence of celiac among the population is about 0.5 - 1 % in most countries. Frequency of celiac disease in children is the subject of a few research. In this study, we aim to determine the frequency of celiac disease in patients presenting with functional constipation. METHODS This cross-sectional study was conducted on children referring to Imam Reza Clinic, affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences during one year starting from 2011, March 20. One hundred and one children 2-18 years of age with constipation for more than 2 months according to ROME III criteria. The entire participants underwent serologic studies of Total IgA and IgA TTG. Serum IgG TTG was measured in cases with reported values of Total IgA below the lowest normal limits. Moreover, endoscopic biopsy of the small intestine was also performed for patients with positive serology. RESULTS Of all the 101 studied participants, only four individuals (3.96 %) had positive test results for IgA TTG ( potential celiac disease). one of these patients refused to do endoscopy and endoscopic small intestine biopsy was performed for 3 patients. Two of them had normal pathology and one of them(0.99 %) was confirmed for celiac disease. CONCLUSION The frequency of celiac disease in children with chronic constipation is slightly higher than general population but without significant difference( 0.99% VS 0.6% ; p=0.64). So the screening serologic test for celiac disease is not recommended in children with chronic constipation.

  14. An Unusual Case of Stent Migration After Celiac Trunk Endovascular Revascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Negri, Silvia; Ferraro, Stefania; Piffaretti, Gabriele Rivolta, Nicola; Bossi, Matteo; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Castelli, Patrizio

    2012-08-15

    A 61-year-old woman underwent celiac trunk stenting to treat abdominal angina. Three months later, she was readmitted for recurrent symptoms. Computed tomography control revealed the migration of the stent into the splenic artery. No sign of vessel injury or end-organ ischemia was detected. Repeat stenting of the celiac trunk was performed; the postoperative course was uneventful. 12 months later, the patient was asymptomatic with the second stent in its correct position, and she was asymptomatic for mesenteric ischemia.

  15. Celiac disease and giardiasis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Edling, Lars; Rathsman, Sandra; Eriksson, Sune; Bohr, Johan

    2012-08-01

    When investigating a patient with suspected celiac disease (CD), several other conditions must be considered, including potential infection with Giardia lamblia. Although giardiasis is rare, its histopathological and serological picture may resemble that of CD. We report the case of a young man with diabetes mellitus and a family history of CD referred to our hospital because of diarrhoea and weight loss. Investigation showed, among other factors, partial villous atrophy in duodenal biopsies and elevated immunoglobulin A antitissue transglutaminase antibodies. The patient was diagnosed with CD and recommended a gluten-free diet. At the same time, faecal tests were conducted, indicating the presence of G. lamblia. The patient was treated and improved, even after discontinuing the gluten-free diet. Subsequent follow-up after 6 months showed total regression of mucosal histopathology and a normal antitissue transglutaminase antibodies level.

  16. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus block and neurolysis.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Ichiro; Wang, Hsiu-Po

    2017-02-03

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis (EUS-CPN) is widely used for reducing pain originating from upper abdominal organs. It is mainly indicated to treat pancreatic cancer pain, but also to relieve pain as a result of chronic pancreatitis. Real-time guidance and color Doppler imaging by EUS made the procedure easier and safer, resulting in greater pain relief. Currently, two techniques are used for EUS-CPN. The classic approach, known as the central technique, involves injection of a neurolytic agent at the base of the celiac axis. In the bilateral technique, the neurolytic agent is injected on both sides of the celiac axis. In addition, EUS-guided direct celiac ganglia neurolysis (EUS-CGN) was introduced recently. Pain relief is achieved by EUS-CPN in 70-80% of patients with pancreatic cancer and in 50-60% of those with chronic pancreatitis. The bilateral technique may be more efficient than the central technique, although the central technique is easier and possibly safer. Moreover, EUS-CGN may provide greater pain relief than conventional EUS-CPN. Procedure-related complications include transient pain exacerbation, transient hypotension, transient diarrhea, and inebriation. Although most complications are not serious, major adverse events such as retroperitoneal bleeding, abscess, and ischemic complications occasionally occur.

  17. Magneto immunofluorescence assay for diagnosis of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Kergaravat, Silvina V; Beltramino, Luis; Garnero, Nidia; Trotta, Liliana; Wagener, Marta; Fabiano, Silvia N; Pividori, Maria Isabel; Hernandez, Silvia R

    2013-10-10

    A magneto immunofluorescence assay for the detection of anti-transglutaminase antibodies (ATG2) in celiac disease was developed. The ATG2 were recognized by transglutaminase enzyme immobilized on the magnetic beads and then the immunological reaction was revealed by antibodies labeled with peroxidase. The fluorescent response of the enzymatic reaction with o-phenylenediamine and H2O2 as substrates was correlated with anti-transglutaminase titer, showing EC50 and LOD values of 1:11,600 and 1:74,500 of antibody titers, respectively. A total number of 29 sera samples from clinically confirmed cases of celiac disease and 19 negative control samples were tested by the novel magneto immunofluorescence assay. The data were submitted to the receiver-operating characteristic plot (ROC) analysis which indicated that 8.1 U was the most effective cut-off value to discriminate correctly between celiac and non-celiac patients. The immunofluorescence assay exhibited a sensitivity of 96.6%, a specificity of 89.5% and an efficiency 93.8% compared with the commercial optical ELISA kit.

  18. Cold urticaria and celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa Delgado, M; Martín Muñoz, F; Polanco Allué, I; Martín Esteban, M

    2008-01-01

    Cold urticaria can be associated with blood and thyroid disorders, drugs, or infections. Celiac disease is an autoimmune enteropathy caused by permanent gluten intolerance. It is often associated with other autoimmune diseases, such as chronic idiopathic urticaria. Nevertheless, association with cold urticaria has not yet been described. A boy aged 3 years 8 months presented local urticaria-angioedema when exposed to cold temperatures. An ice cube test was positive and iron deficiency anemia was demonstrated. He later developed legume intolerance, rhinoconjunctivitis related to pollen sensitization, and asthma. Due to persistence of cold urticaria symptoms and refractory anemia, a test for immunoglobulin A autoantibodies to tissue transglutaminase and an intestinal biopsy were performed. Results of both tests were compatible with celiac disease.A study of human leukocyte antigen indicated a high risk phenotype (HLA, DR6/DR7; DQA 0501, 0201; DQB 0301, 0201). After 7 months of a gluten-free diet, the boy's anemia resolved and he is free of symptoms when exposed to cold. This is a first description of the possibility of an association between celiac disease and cold urticaria. A poor course of cold urticaria in the absence of evidence of another underlying condition should lead to suspicion of celiac disease.

  19. Celiac disease presenting as severe osteopenia.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Christopher J; Cardile, Anthony P; Dickert, Judith

    2011-11-01

    The authors describe a unique presentation of celiac disease as multiple non-traumatic fractures in a young male without gastrointestinal complaints. A 29-year-old man presented with back pain and was found to have a non-traumatic compression fracture of the lumbar and thoracic spine on plain X-ray. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) confirmed osteoporosis at the L3/L4 vertebral bodies. Parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcium, and vitamin D levels were normal. He had no gastrointestinal complaints, but serologic studies were positive to include an elevated gliadin IgA Ab, gliadin IgG Ab, and an elevated tissue transglutaminase IgA Ab. He was treated with a gluten-free diet, calcium, and vitamin D supplementation as well as teriparatide. Follow up bone density showed improvement and has no further fractures to date. Primary care physicians, gastroenterologists, and endocrinologists must have a high index of clinical suspicion for celiac disease in any patient who presents with low bone density regardless of the serum 25-OH vitamin D levels or presence of gastrointestinal complaints.

  20. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Oats: A Canadian Position Based on a Literature Review.

    PubMed

    La Vieille, Sébastien; Pulido, Olga M; Abbott, Michael; Koerner, Terence B; Godefroy, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the latest scientific data related to the safety of uncontaminated oats (<20 ppm of gluten) in the diet of individuals with celiac disease (CD). It updates the previous Health Canada position posted on the Health Canada website in 2007 and a related paper published in 2009. It considers a number of recent studies published between January 2008 and January 2015. While recognizing that a few people with celiac disease seem to be clinically intolerant to oats, this review concludes that oats uncontaminated by gluten-containing cereals (wheat, rye, and barley) can be safely ingested by most patients with celiac disease and that there is no conclusive evidence that the consumption of uncontaminated or specially produced oats containing no greater than 20 ppm gluten by patients with celiac disease should be limited to a specific daily amount. However, individuals with CD should observe a stabilization phase before introducing uncontaminated oats to the gluten-free diet (GFD). Oats uncontaminated with gluten should only be introduced after all symptoms of celiac disease have resolved and the individual has been on a GFD for a minimum of 6 months. Long-term regular medical follow-up of these patients is recommended but this is no different recommendation to celiac individuals on a GFD without oats.

  1. Clinical phenotypes in adult patients with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Aliberti, Stefano; Lonni, Sara; Dore, Simone; McDonnell, Melissa J; Goeminne, Pieter C; Dimakou, Katerina; Fardon, Thomas C; Rutherford, Robert; Pesci, Alberto; Restrepo, Marcos I; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Chalmers, James D

    2016-04-01

    Bronchiectasis is a heterogeneous disease. This study aimed at identifying discrete groups of patients with different clinical and biological characteristics and long-term outcomes.This was a secondary analysis of five European databases of prospectively enrolled adult outpatients with bronchiectasis. Principal component and cluster analyses were performed using demographics, comorbidities, and clinical, radiological, functional and microbiological variables collected during the stable state. Exacerbations, hospitalisations and mortality during a 3-year follow-up were recorded. Clusters were externally validated in an independent cohort of patients with bronchiectasis, also investigating inflammatory markers in sputum.Among 1145 patients (median age 66 years; 40% male), four clusters were identified driven by the presence of chronic infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosaor other pathogens and daily sputum: "Pseudomonas" (16%), "Other chronic infection" (24%), "Daily sputum" (33%) and "Dry bronchiectasis" (27%). Patients in the four clusters showed significant differences in terms of quality of life, exacerbations, hospitalisations and mortality during follow-up. In the validation cohort, free neutrophil elastase activity, myeloperoxidase activity and interleukin-1β levels in sputum were significantly different among the clusters.Identification of four clinical phenotypes in bronchiectasis could favour focused treatments in future interventional studies designed to alter the natural history of the disease.

  2. [Celiac disease: evolution in knowledge since its original centennial description up to the present day].

    PubMed

    Sdepanian, V L; de Morais, M B; Fagundes Neto, U

    1999-01-01

    In the recent past, some celiac disease features have been discussed in literature specially related to genetic susceptibility, pathogenesis, clinical presentation and diagnostic criteria. Immunological abnormalities characteristic of celiac disease, such as circulating antibodies and increased numbers of intra-epithelial lymphocytes containing a high percentage of gamma-delta T cells have been demonstrated. Other pictures of clinical presentation besides the classical one deserve attention namely short stature, iron-resistant anaemia, enamel hypoplasia, constipation, neurological manifestation and osteoporosis, among others. Asymptomatic presentation has been recognized since development of serological markers such as anti-gliadin, anti-reticulin and anti-endomysium antibodies. Up to now, small intestinal biopsy is the only decisive diagnostic approach. A Federal law has recently imposed food manufactures to place labels informing the presence of gluten in industrialized foods in Brazil. Lately there has been an increase in celiac disease patients registered in the Brazilian Celiac Association.

  3. Assisting sexually abused adults. Practical guide to interviewing patients.

    PubMed Central

    Leach, M. M.; Bethune, C.

    1996-01-01

    Millions of adults have been sexually abused. Patients often confide in their family physicians concerning their abuse. Physicians must understand their own issues surrounding sexual abuse and its sequelae before they attempt to treat sexually abused patients. The PLISSIT model offers a practical guide for assisting abused adult patients. PMID:8924817

  4. Dysbiosis a risk factor for celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Girbovan, Anamaria; Sur, Genel; Samasca, Gabriel; Lupan, Iulia

    2017-04-01

    Celiac disease remains one of the most challenging pathologies of the small intestine. It involves multiple pathogenic pathways and there are no disease-changing pharmacological agents available against it yet. The term microbiota refers to the community of microorganisms that inhabit a particular region of the body. Normal gut microbiota has a vital role in maintaining the intestinal homeostasis and promoting health. Celiac disease is associated with microbiota alteration, especially with an increase in the number of Gram-negative bacteria and a decrease in the number of Gram-positive bacteria. There is a strong relationship between intestinal dysbiosis and celiac disease, and recent studies are aimed at determining whether the celiac disease is a risk factor for dysbiosis or dysbiosis is for celiac disease. Therefore, the aim of this review was to assess the latest findings regarding the gut microbiota and its impact on the celiac disease, including therapeutic aspects.

  5. Transition of gastroenterological patients from paediatric to adult care: A position statement by the Italian Societies of Gastroenterology.

    PubMed

    Elli, Luca; Maieron, Roberto; Martelossi, Stefano; Guariso, Graziella; Buscarini, Elisabetta; Conte, Dario; di Giulio, Emilio; Staiano, Annamaria; Barp, Jacopo; Bassotti, Gabrio; Bianco, Maria Antonia; Buri, Luigi; Carrara, Maurizio; Ghidini, Benedetta; Giannini, Olivia; Knafelz, Daniela; Miele, Erasmo; Peralta, Sergio; Riccio, Elisabetta; Tomba, Carolina; Zilli, Maurizio; Guadagnini, Tiziana

    2015-09-01

    In 2013, four Italian Gastroenterological Societies (the Italian Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, the Italian Society of Hospital Gastroenterologists and Endoscopists, the Italian Society of Endoscopy, and the Italian Society of Gastroenterology) formed a joint panel of experts with the aim of preparing an official statement on transition medicine in Gastroenterology. The transition of adolescents from paediatric to adult care is a crucial moment in managing chronic diseases such as celiac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, liver disease and liver transplantation. Improved medical treatment and availability of new drugs and surgical techniques have improved the prognosis of many paediatric disorders, prolonging survival, thus making the transition to adulthood possible and necessary. An inappropriate transition or the incomplete transmission of data from the paediatrician to the adult Gastroenterologist can dramatically decrease compliance to treatment and prognosis of a young patient, particularly in the case of severe disorders. For these reasons, the Italian gastroenterological societies decided to develop an official shared transition protocol. The resulting document discusses the factors influencing the transition process and highlights the main points to accomplish to optimize compliance and prognosis of gastroenterological patients during the difficult transition from childhood to adolescence and adulthood.

  6. Association between celiac disease and primary lactase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Basso, M S; Luciano, R; Ferretti, F; Muraca, M; Panetta, F; Bracci, F; Ottino, S; Diamanti, A

    2012-12-01

    Primary lactase deficiency (PLD) is a common inherited condition caused by a reduced activity of lactase. Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms C/T(-13910) and G/A(-22018) upstream of the lactase gene are associated with lactase nonpersistence. In celiac disease (CD) patients, lactose intolerance could be due to secondary lactase deficiency and to PLD. The aim of this study were to evaluate the association of PLD and CD using genetic test, and to define the prevalence of PLD in celiac subjects compared with a control population. A total of 188 controls and 92 biopsy-proven CD patients were included in the study. More than 70% of all subjects were found homozygous for the polymorphisms. Differences in the prevalence of PLD were not found between CD patients and controls.In conclusions, the hereditary lactase deficiency is frequent in Italian CD children as in control population.

  7. Celiac disease: epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and nutritional management.

    PubMed

    Schuppan, Detlef; Dennis, Melinda D; Kelly, Ciaran P

    2005-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an inflammatory small intestinal disorder that can lead to severe villous atrophy, malabsorption, and malignancy. It is triggered by the gluten proteins of wheat, barley, and rye. All patients express the antigen-presenting molecules human leukocyte antigen-DQ2 (HLA-DQ2) and/or HLA-DQ8, which bind gluten peptides and thus activate destructive intestinal T cells. Patients with untreated CD have circulating IgA autoantibodies to the enzyme tissue transglutaminase (tTG), a component of endomysium. Testing for serum IgA tTG has a high predictive value. Therapy of CD is a lifelong gluten-free diet. Counseling by an expert dietitian and association with a celiac support group are important in helping the patient embark on a healthy gluten-free diet. Current research focuses on non-dietary therapies and treatment of refractory (diet-unresponsive) CD.

  8. In vitro models for gluten toxicity: relevance for celiac disease pathogenesis and development of novel treatment options.

    PubMed

    Lindfors, Katri; Rauhavirta, Tiina; Stenman, Satumarja; Mäki, Markku; Kaukinen, Katri

    2012-02-01

    In genetically predisposed individuals, dietary gluten in wheat, rye and barley triggers celiac disease, a systemic autoimmune disorder hallmarked by an extensive small-bowel mucosal immune response. The current conception of celiac disease pathogenesis is that it involves components of both innate and adaptive immunity whose activation typically leads to small-bowel villous atrophy with crypt hyperplasia. Currently, the only effective treatment for celiac disease is a strict lifelong gluten-free diet excluding all wheat-, rye- and barley-containing food products. During the diet, the clinical symptoms improve and the small-bowel mucosal damage recovers, while re-introduction of gluten into the diet leads to re-appearance of the symptoms and deterioration of the small-bowel mucosal architecture. In view of the restricted nature of the diet, alternative treatment is warranted. Improved understanding of the molecular basis of celiac disease has enabled researchers to suggest other therapeutic approaches. Although there is no animal model reproducing all features of celiac disease, the use of in vitro approaches including a variety of cell lines and the celiac patient small-bowel mucosal biopsy organ culture has generated knowledge about pathogenesis of celiac disease. In these culture systems, gluten induces different effects that can be quantified, thus also enabling studies concerning the efficacy of candidate therapeutic compounds for celiac disease. This review describes the intestinal epithelial cell models, celiac patient T-cell lines and clones, as well as the small-bowel mucosal organ culture methods widely used in studies of celiac disease, and summarizes the major findings obtained with these systems.

  9. [Celiac disease--the chameleon among the food intolerances].

    PubMed

    Ströhle, Alexander; Wolters, Maike; Hahn, Andreas

    2013-10-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder resulting from gluten intolerance and is based on a genetically predisposition. Symptoms occur upon exposure to prolamin from wheat, rye, barley and related grain. The pathogenesis of celiac disease has not yet been sufficiently elucidated but is being considered as an autoimmune process. At its core are the deamidation of prolamin fragments, the building of specific antibodies and the activation of cytotoxic T-cells. The immunological inflammatory process is accompanied by structural damages of the enterocytes (villous atrophy, colonization and crypt hyperplasia). The symptoms and their extent depend on the type of the celiac disease; classic and non-classic forms are being distinguished (atypical, oligosymptomatic, latent and silent celiac disease). Characteristics of the classic presentation are malabsorption syndrome and intestinal symptoms such as mushy diarrhea and abdominal distension. The diagnosis of celiac disease is based on four pillars: Anamnesis and clinical presentation, serological evidence of coeliac specific antibodies (IgA-t-TG; IgA-EmA), small intestine biopsy and improvement of symptoms after institution of a gluten-free diet. The basis of the therapy is a lifelong gluten-free diet, i. e. wheat, rye, barley, spelt, green-core, faro-wheat, kamuth and conventional oats as well as food items obtained therefrom. Small amounts of up to 50 mg gluten per day are usually tolerated by most patients; amounts of > or = 100 mg/day lead mostly to symptoms. Gluten-free foods contain < or = 20 ppm or 20 mg/kg (Sign: symbol of the 'crossed ear' or label 'gluten-free'). At the beginning of the therapy the fat and lactose intake may need to be reduced; also the supplementation of single micronutrients (fat-soluble vitamins, folic acid, B12, iron, and calcium) may be required. Alternative therapies are being developed but have not yet been clinically tested.

  10. Diagnosis and Updates in Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Shannahan, Sarah; Leffler, Daniel A

    2017-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder induced by gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. It can result in intraintestinal and extraintestinal manifestations of disease including diarrhea, weight loss, anemia, osteoporosis, or lymphoma. Diagnosis of celiac disease is made through initial serologic testing and then confirmed by histopathologic examination of duodenal biopsies. Generally celiac disease is a benign disorder with a good prognosis in those who adhere to a gluten-free diet. However, in refractory disease, complications may develop that warrant additional testing with more advanced radiologic and endoscopic methods. This article reviews the current strategy to diagnose celiac disease and the newer modalities to assess for associated complications.

  11. Serendipity in Refractory Celiac Disease: Full Recovery of Duodenal Villi and Clinical Symptoms after Fecal Microbiota Transfer.

    PubMed

    van Beurden, Yvette H; van Gils, Tom; van Gils, Nienke A; Kassam, Zain; Mulder, Chris J J; Aparicio-Pagés, Nieves

    2016-09-01

    Treatment of refractory celiac disease type II (RCD II) and preventing the development of an enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma in these patients is still difficult. In this case report, we describe a patient with RCD II who received fecal microbiota transfer as treatment for a recurrent Clostridium difficile infection, and remarkably showed a full recovery of duodenal villi and disappearance of celiac symptoms. This case suggests that altering the gut microbiota may hold promise in improving the clinical and histological consequences of celiac disease and/or RCD II.

  12. Celiac disease: prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Selimoğlu, Mukadder Ayşe; Karabiber, Hamza

    2010-01-01

    Celiac disease is a common multisystemic disorder that may be diagnosed at any age. Owing to the increasing prevalence, prevention strategies, including encouragement of breastfeeding and introduction of small amounts of gluten whereas still on breastfeeding at fourth to sixth month of age, become more important than before. For avoiding complications of celiac disease, a strict gluten-free diet is essential. A lifelong gluten-free diet may bring about difficulties as avoiding gluten completely is problematic owing to the contamination with gluten of presumably gluten free foods. New therapeutic approaches include enzyme supplementation, correction of the intestinal barrier defect against gluten entry, blocking of gliadin presentation by human leukocyte antigen blockers and tissue transglutaminase inhibitors.

  13. Organ culture system as a means to detect celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Picarelli, Antonio; Libanori, Valerio; De Nitto, Daniela; Saponara, Annarita; Di Tola, Marco; Donato, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Anti-endomysial and anti-transglutaminase antibodies can be produced in vitro by the intestinal mucosa of celiac disease (CD) patients in clinical remission, when the culture is performed in the presence of gliadin peptides. Our aim was to use this organ culture system as a means to detect the pathognomonic antibodies of celiac disease (CD) in the culture supernatants. Organ culture was performed in the presence of three different activators to evaluate which one induced the strongest antibody response in intestinal mucosa from patients in clinical remission of CD. Our data confirm the high efficiency of synthetic peptide 31-43 as a specific immunological activator in CD and demonstrate its capability to stimulate production/secretion of CD-specific antibodies. We envision that this organ culture system may prove to be useful as a new technique for CD diagnosis.

  14. Glyphosate, pathways to modern diseases II: Celiac sprue and gluten intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Samsel, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease, and, more generally, gluten intolerance, is a growing problem worldwide, but especially in North America and Europe, where an estimated 5% of the population now suffers from it. Symptoms include nausea, diarrhea, skin rashes, macrocytic anemia and depression. It is a multifactorial disease associated with numerous nutritional deficiencies as well as reproductive issues and increased risk to thyroid disease, kidney failure and cancer. Here, we propose that glyphosate, the active ingredient in the herbicide, Roundup®, is the most important causal factor in this epidemic. Fish exposed to glyphosate develop digestive problems that are reminiscent of celiac disease. Celiac disease is associated with imbalances in gut bacteria that can be fully explained by the known effects of glyphosate on gut bacteria. Characteristics of celiac disease point to impairment in many cytochrome P450 enzymes, which are involved with detoxifying environmental toxins, activating vitamin D3, catabolizing vitamin A, and maintaining bile acid production and sulfate supplies to the gut. Glyphosate is known to inhibit cytochrome P450 enzymes. Deficiencies in iron, cobalt, molybdenum, copper and other rare metals associated with celiac disease can be attributed to glyphosate's strong ability to chelate these elements. Deficiencies in tryptophan, tyrosine, methionine and selenomethionine associated with celiac disease match glyphosate's known depletion of these amino acids. Celiac disease patients have an increased risk to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, which has also been implicated in glyphosate exposure. Reproductive issues associated with celiac disease, such as infertility, miscarriages, and birth defects, can also be explained by glyphosate. Glyphosate residues in wheat and other crops are likely increasing recently due to the growing practice of crop desiccation just prior to the harvest. We argue that the practice of “ripening” sugar cane with glyphosate may explain the recent

  15. Glyphosate, pathways to modern diseases II: Celiac sprue and gluten intolerance.

    PubMed

    Samsel, Anthony; Seneff, Stephanie

    2013-12-01

    Celiac disease, and, more generally, gluten intolerance, is a growing problem worldwide, but especially in North America and Europe, where an estimated 5% of the population now suffers from it. Symptoms include nausea, diarrhea, skin rashes, macrocytic anemia and depression. It is a multifactorial disease associated with numerous nutritional deficiencies as well as reproductive issues and increased risk to thyroid disease, kidney failure and cancer. Here, we propose that glyphosate, the active ingredient in the herbicide, Roundup(®), is the most important causal factor in this epidemic. Fish exposed to glyphosate develop digestive problems that are reminiscent of celiac disease. Celiac disease is associated with imbalances in gut bacteria that can be fully explained by the known effects of glyphosate on gut bacteria. Characteristics of celiac disease point to impairment in many cytochrome P450 enzymes, which are involved with detoxifying environmental toxins, activating vitamin D3, catabolizing vitamin A, and maintaining bile acid production and sulfate supplies to the gut. Glyphosate is known to inhibit cytochrome P450 enzymes. Deficiencies in iron, cobalt, molybdenum, copper and other rare metals associated with celiac disease can be attributed to glyphosate's strong ability to chelate these elements. Deficiencies in tryptophan, tyrosine, methionine and selenomethionine associated with celiac disease match glyphosate's known depletion of these amino acids. Celiac disease patients have an increased risk to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, which has also been implicated in glyphosate exposure. Reproductive issues associated with celiac disease, such as infertility, miscarriages, and birth defects, can also be explained by glyphosate. Glyphosate residues in wheat and other crops are likely increasing recently due to the growing practice of crop desiccation just prior to the harvest. We argue that the practice of "ripening" sugar cane with glyphosate may explain the recent

  16. Symptoms of Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... enamel • Unexplained infertility, recurrent miscarriage • Osteopenia (mild) or osteoporosis (more serious bone density problem) • Peripheral Neuropathy • Psychiatric disorders such as anxiety, depression How do these symptoms tend to appear in children and adults? Children tend to have the more classic signs ...

  17. Epidemiology of Celiac Disease in Iran: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Rostami Nejad, M; Rostami, K; Emami, MH; Zali, MR; Malekzadeh, R

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) was traditionally believed to be a chronic enteropathy, almost exclusively affecting people of European origin. Celiac disease is the permanent intolerance to dietary gluten, the major protein component of wheat. The availability of new, simple, very sensitive and specific serological tests has shown that CD is as common in Middle Eastern countries as in Europe, Australia and New Zealand where the major dietary staple is wheat. A high prevalence of CD has been found in Iran, in both the general population and the at-risk groups, i.e. patients with type 1 diabetes or irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In developing countries, serological testing in at risk groups is necessary for early identification of celiac patients. Clinical studies show that presentation with non-specific symptoms or a lack of symptoms is as common in the Middle East as in Europe. Wheat is a major component of the Iranian diet and exposure to wheat proteins induces some degree of immune tolerance, leading to milder symptoms that may be mistaken with other GI disorders. The implementation of gluten free diet (GFD) is a major challenge for both patients and clinicians in Iran, especially since commercial gluten-free products are not available in this area. PMID:25197526

  18. Epidemiology of celiac disease in iran: a review.

    PubMed

    Rostami Nejad, M; Rostami, K; Emami, Mh; Zali, Mr; Malekzadeh, R

    2011-03-01

    Celiac disease (CD) was traditionally believed to be a chronic enteropathy, almost exclusively affecting people of European origin. Celiac disease is the permanent intolerance to dietary gluten, the major protein component of wheat. The availability of new, simple, very sensitive and specific serological tests has shown that CD is as common in Middle Eastern countries as in Europe, Australia and New Zealand where the major dietary staple is wheat. A high prevalence of CD has been found in Iran, in both the general population and the at-risk groups, i.e. patients with type 1 diabetes or irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In developing countries, serological testing in at risk groups is necessary for early identification of celiac patients. Clinical studies show that presentation with non-specific symptoms or a lack of symptoms is as common in the Middle East as in Europe. Wheat is a major component of the Iranian diet and exposure to wheat proteins induces some degree of immune tolerance, leading to milder symptoms that may be mistaken with other GI disorders. The implementation of gluten free diet (GFD) is a major challenge for both patients and clinicians in Iran, especially since commercial gluten-free products are not available in this area.

  19. Quantification of peptides causing celiac disease in historical and modern hard red spring wheat cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Celiac disease (CD) is prevalent in 0.5 to 1.26% of adolescents and adults. The disease develops in genetically susceptible individuals as a result of ingestion of gluten forming proteins found in cereals such as, wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), rye (Secale cereale L.) and barley (Hordeum sativum L.)...

  20. Enteroscopy and radiology for the management of celiac disease complications: Time for a pragmatic roadmap.

    PubMed

    Branchi, Federica; Locatelli, Martina; Tomba, Carolina; Conte, Dario; Ferretti, Francesca; Elli, Luca

    2016-06-01

    Celiac disease is the most common autoimmune enteropathy in Western countries, and is usually associated with a good response to the gluten free diet and an excellent prognosis. However, a minority of patients develop complications of the disease, such as refractory celiac disease, ulcerative jejunoileitis and neoplastic complications such as adenocarcinoma of the small bowel and enteropathy associated T cell lymphoma. Neoplastic complications described in association with celiac disease have a high mortality rate, due to their aggressive behavior and to the usual advanced stage at the time of diagnosis. In recent years, the detection of small bowel lesions has dramatically improved thank to the availability of highly performing radiologic and endoscopic techniques. The diagnostic delay of malignant complications in patients with celiac disease may be improved by establishing a pragmatic flowchart for the identification and follow up of "at risk" patients. We performed a comprehensive review of the articles published on this issue in order to promote a roadmap to be applied when facing with celiac patients with suspected small bowel complications.

  1. [Intolerance of gluten--a new disease or undiagnosed celiac disease].

    PubMed

    Sabel'nikova, E A

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease is about 1% in the population and is growing due to the wide use of immunological methods of diagnosis. In recent years, in-depth research of the celiac disease has led not only to an increase in the number of patients with celiac disease, but also to the emergence of a broad spectrum of diseases associated with the ingestion of gluten. In this regard, a new pathology, known as "gluten intolerance or gluten sensitivity", attracted special attention of researchers. Studies in recent years have established that patients with this pathology may have both gastrointestinal symptoms and extraintestinal manifestations. Examinations of such patients usually do not find histological changes of the mucous membrane of the small intestine and autoimmune antibodies (to tissue transglutaminase (tTG) and endomysial (EMA)); however an increased level of gliadin antibodies (AGA) is often observed. Allergy to gluten is also absent. A gluten-free diet for such patients, like in case of the celiac disease, leads to the disappearance of clinical symptoms. Exact criteria for the diagnosis of this nosology have not been identified so far, but most researchers believe that prevalence of "gluten intolerance" is much higher than that of celiac disease.

  2. Noninflammatory Gluten Peptide Analogs as Biomarkers for Celiac Sprue

    PubMed Central

    Bethune, Michael T.; Crespo-Bosque, Mónica; Bergseng, Elin; Mazumdar, Kaushiki; Doyle, Lara; Sestak, Karol; Sollid, Ludvig M.; Khosla, Chaitan

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY New tools are needed for managing celiac sprue, a lifelong immune disease of the small intestine. Ongoing drug trials are also prompting a search for noninvasive biomarkers of gluten-induced intestinal change. We have synthesized and characterized noninflammatory gluten peptide analogs in which key Gln residues are replaced by Asn or His. Like their proinflammatory counterparts, these biomarkers are resistant to gastrointestinal proteases, susceptible to glutenases, and permeable across enterocyte barriers. Unlike gluten peptides, however, they are not appreciably recognized by transglutaminase, HLA-DQ2, or disease-specific T cells. In vitro and animal studies show that the biomarkers can detect intestinal permeability changes as well as glutenase-catalyzed gastric detoxification of gluten. Accordingly, controlled clinical studies are warranted to evaluate the use of these peptides as probes for abnormal intestinal permeability in celiac patients and for glutenase efficacy in clinical trials and practice. PMID:19716477

  3. [Collagenous sprue: secondary or independent from celiac disease?].

    PubMed

    Alventosa Mateu, Carlos; Larrey Ruiz, Laura; Pérez Zahonero, Maria Dolores; Navarro Gonzales, Atilio Javier; Canelles Gamir, Pilar; Huguet Malavés, José María; Luján Sanchís, María Soledad; Martorell Cebollada, Miguel Ángel; Medina Chuliá, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Collagenous sprue is a rare disease that goes with persistent diarrhea, weight loss and bad absortion, because it affects the small intestine, mainly duodenum and proximal jejunum. Diagnosis is made by having clinical signs and histological proof of atrophy and subepitelial deposit of collagenous material. Its etiology is not known completely, it is proposed that the origin is autoimmune because its relationship with celiac disease. Also there is a proposal that is a celiac evolution to gluten free diet. Is because this is not clear that we present a case of a patient with bad absorptive diarrhea and a clinical expression of collagenous sprue, that had a great clinical response to corticosteroids with home parenteral nutrition center.

  4. Endovascular Repair of Supra-Celiac and Abdominal Aortic Pseudo Aneurysms Concomitant with a Right Atrial Mass in a Patient with Behçet’s Disease: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kassaian, Seyed Ebrahim; Abbasi, Kyomars; Shirzad, Mahmood; Anvari, Maryam Sotoudeh; Shahrzad, Maryam; Molavi, Behnam

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Behcet’s disease is a rare immune mediated systemic vasculitis which besides it’s more frequent involvement of eyes and skin, sometimes present with aortic pseudo aneurysm and more rarely cardiac inflammatory masses.A 51-year-old patient with Behçet’s Disease presented with two symptomatic aortic pseudoaneurysms concomitant with a right atrial mass. Computed tomography (CT) revealed one supra-celiac and another infrarenal aortic pseudoaneurysms. Echocardiography showed a large mobile mass in the right atrium. Both pseudoaneurysms were successfully excluded simultaneously via endovascular approach with Zenith stent-grafts, and the atrial mass was surgically removed 10 days later. Post-implant CT showed successful exclusion of both pseudo-aneurysms, patency of all relevant arteries, and patient is now asymptomatic and has returned to normal lifestyle. Multiple pseudoaneurysms concomitant with a right atrial mass can be an initial manifestation of Behçet’s disease. Endovascular repair can be a good treatment option for the pseudoaneurysms. PMID:25870643

  5. Exploring Adult Care Experiences and Barriers to Transition in Adult Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bemrich-Stolz, CJ; Halanych, JH; Howard, TH; Hilliard, LM; Lebensburger, JD

    2015-01-01

    Background Young adults with sickle cell anemia are at high risk for increased hospitalization and death at the time of transition to adult care. This may be related to failure of the transition system to prepare young adults for the adult healthcare system. This qualitative study was designed to identify factors related to transition that may affect the health of adults with sickle cell anemia. Procedure Ten patients currently treated in an adult hematology clinic participated in semi-structured qualitative interviews to describe their experience transitioning from pediatric to adult care and differences in adult and pediatric healthcare systems. Results Participants were generally unprepared for the adult healthcare system. Negative issues experienced by participants included physician mistrust, difficulty with employers, keeping insurance, and stress in personal relationships. Positive issues experienced by participants included improved self efficacy with improved self care and autonomy. Conclusions In the absence of a formalized transition program, adults with sickle cell anemia experience significant barriers to adult care. In addition to medical history review and identification of an adult provider, transition programs should incorporate strategies to navigate the adult medical system, insurance and relationships as well as encouraging self efficacy. PMID:26900602

  6. [Bacterial parotitis in an immunocompromised patient in adult ICU].

    PubMed

    Vassal, O; Bernet, C; Wallet, F; Friggeri, A; Piriou, V

    2013-09-01

    Bacterial parotitis is a common childhood disease with a favorable outcome. Staphylococcus aureus is the most frequently involved pathogen. Clinical presentation in adult patients can be misleading, Onset occurs in patients with multiple comorbidities, making diagnosis difficult--particularly in ICU. Different pathogens are found in adults with worse outcomes observed. We report here the case of a critically ill patient and discuss diagnosis and management of bacterial parotitis.

  7. Current and emerging therapy for celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Makharia, Govind K

    2014-01-01

    At present, strict and lifelong gluten-free diet is the only effective treatment for celiac disease. Even small amounts of gluten (50 mg/day) can be immunogenic; therefore all food and food items and drugs that contain gluten and its derivatives must be eliminated completely from the diet. While prescribing gluten-free diet is easy; the key to the success is the dietary counseling by a nutrition specialist and maintenance of adherence to GFD by the patient. In recent times, a number of targets to halt the process of immunological injury have been explored to find out alternative treatment for celiac disease. These targets include exploration of ancient wheat if they are less immunogenic, intra-luminal digestion of gluten using prolylendopeptidases, pretreatment of whole gluten with bacterial-derived peptidase before ingestion; prevention of passage of immunogenic peptides through the tight junctions such as zonulin antagonists, Blocking of HLA-DQ2 to prevent binding of immunogenic peptides, inhibition of transglutaminase 2, immune-modulation, and induction of tolerance to gluten using gluten tolerizing vaccines, use of gluten-sequestering polymers, use of anti-inflammatory drugs (glucocorticoids, budesonides) and anti-cytokines such as anti TNF-α, and anti-interleukin-15. While many of these targets are still in the pre-clinical phase, some of them including zonulin antagonist and endopeptidases have already reached phase II and phase III clinical trials. Furthermore, while these targets appear very exciting; they at best are likely to be used as adjunctive therapy rather than a complete replacement for gluten-free diet.

  8. Current and Emerging Therapy for Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Makharia, Govind K.

    2014-01-01

    At present, strict and lifelong gluten-free diet is the only effective treatment for celiac disease. Even small amounts of gluten (50 mg/day) can be immunogenic; therefore all food and food items and drugs that contain gluten and its derivatives must be eliminated completely from the diet. While prescribing gluten-free diet is easy; the key to the success is the dietary counseling by a nutrition specialist and maintenance of adherence to GFD by the patient. In recent times, a number of targets to halt the process of immunological injury have been explored to find out alternative treatment for celiac disease. These targets include exploration of ancient wheat if they are less immunogenic, intra-luminal digestion of gluten using prolylendopeptidases, pretreatment of whole gluten with bacterial-derived peptidase before ingestion; prevention of passage of immunogenic peptides through the tight junctions such as zonulin antagonists, Blocking of HLA-DQ2 to prevent binding of immunogenic peptides, inhibition of transglutaminase 2, immune-modulation, and induction of tolerance to gluten using gluten tolerizing vaccines, use of gluten-sequestering polymers, use of anti-inflammatory drugs (glucocorticoids, budesonides) and anti-cytokines such as anti TNF-α, and anti-interleukin-15. While many of these targets are still in the pre-clinical phase, some of them including zonulin antagonist and endopeptidases have already reached phase II and phase III clinical trials. Furthermore, while these targets appear very exciting; they at best are likely to be used as adjunctive therapy rather than a complete replacement for gluten-free diet. PMID:25705619

  9. Variations in the Origin of Inferior Phrenic Arteries and Their Relationship to Celiac Axis Variations on CT Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Aslaner, Ramazan; Sahin, Hilal; Toka, Onur

    2017-01-01

    Objective Knowing the origin of the inferior phrenic artery (IPA) is important prior to surgical interventions and interventional radiological procedures related to IPA. We aimed to identify variations in the origin of IPA and to investigate the relationship between the origin of IPA and celiac axis variations using computed tomography angiography (CTA). Materials and Methods The CTA images of 1000 patients (737 male and 263 female, the mean age 60, range 18–94 years) were reviewed in an analysis of IPA and celiac axis variations. The origin of IPA was divided into two groups, those originating as a common trunk and those originating independently without a truncus. The relationship between the origin of IPA and celiac axis variation was analyzed using Pearson's chi-square test. Results Both IPAs originated from a common trunk in 295 (29.5%) patients. From which the majority of the common trunk originated from the aorta. Contrastingly, the inferior phrenic arteries originated from different origins in 705 (70.5%) patients. The majority of the right inferior phrenic artery (RIPA) and the left inferior phrenic artery (LIPA) originated independently from the celiac axis. Variation in the celiac axis were detected in 110 (11%) patients. The origin of IPA was found to be significantly different in the presence of celiac axis variation. Conclusion The majority of IPA originated from the aorta in patients with a common IPA trunk, while the majority of RIPA and LIPA originating from the celiac axis in patients without a common IPA trunk. Thus, the origin of IPA may widely differ in the presence of celiac axis variation. PMID:28246513

  10. Evaluation and management of skeletal health in celiac disease: Position statement

    PubMed Central

    Fouda, Mona A; Khan, Aliya A; Sultan, Muhammad; Rios, Lorena P; McAssey, Karen; Armstrong, David

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the evaluation and management of skeletal health in patients with celiac disease (CD), and to make recommendations on screening, diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of low bone mineral density (BMD) in CD patients. METHODS: A multidisciplinary team developed clinically relevant questions for review. An electronic search of the literature was conducted using the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases from 1996 to 2010. All original studies, reviews and guidelines, both pediatric and adult, were included. A document summarizing the results of the review and proposed recommendations was prepared and underwent multiple revisions until consensus was reached. RESULTS: At diagnosis, approximately one-third of adult CD patients have osteoporosis, one-third have osteopenia and one-third have normal BMD. Children with CD have low bone mass at diagnosis. Adult and pediatric CD patients are at increased risk of fractures. DISCUSSION: For adults, serum calcium, albumin, 25(OH) vitamin D3, parathyroid hormone and 24 h urine calcium testing should be performed at diagnosis; patients with ‘classic’ CD and those at risk for osteoporosis should undergo a dual x-ray absorptiometry scan. An abnormal baseline dual x-ray absorptiometry scan should be repeated one to two years after initiation of a gluten-free diet (GFD). For children, BMD should be assessed one year after diagnosis if GFD adherence is not strict. A GFD is the most important treatment for bone loss. Supplemental antiresorptives may be justified in those who remain at high fracture risk (eg, postmenopausal women, older men) after implementation of a GFD. CONCLUSION: Current evidence does not support the screening of all CD patients for low BMD at diagnosis. Follow-up BMD assessment should be performed one to two years after initiation of a GFD. PMID:23166906

  11. Evidence for the Presence of Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity in Patients with Functional Gastrointestinal Symptoms: Results from a Multicenter Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Gluten Challenge.

    PubMed

    Elli, Luca; Tomba, Carolina; Branchi, Federica; Roncoroni, Leda; Lombardo, Vincenza; Bardella, Maria Teresa; Ferretti, Francesca; Conte, Dario; Valiante, Flavio; Fini, Lucia; Forti, Edoardo; Cannizzaro, Renato; Maiero, Stefania; Londoni, Claudio; Lauri, Adriano; Fornaciari, Giovanni; Lenoci, Nicoletta; Spagnuolo, Rocco; Basilisco, Guido; Somalvico, Francesco; Borgatta, Bruno; Leandro, Gioacchino; Segato, Sergio; Barisani, Donatella; Morreale, Gaetano; Buscarini, Elisabetta

    2016-02-08

    Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is characterized by the onset of symptoms after eating gluten-containing food. We aimed to single out NCGS subjects among subjects with functional gastrointestinal symptoms. Patients were enrolled in a multicenter double-blind placebo-controlled trial with crossover. Symptoms and quality of life were evaluated by means of 10-cm VAS and SF36. Iron parameters, transaminases and C reactive protein (CRP) were evaluated. After a three-week-long gluten-free diet (GFD), responsive patients were randomly assigned to gluten intake (5.6 g/day) or placebo for seven days, followed by crossover. The primary endpoint was the worsening of symptoms (VAS increase ≥3 cm) during gluten ingestion compared to placebo. One hundred and forty patients were enrolled and 134 (17 males, mean age 39.1 ± 11.7 years, BMI 22.4 ± 3.8) completed the first period. A total of 101 subjects (10 males, mean age 39.3 ± 11.0 years, BMI 22.3 ± 4.0) reported a symptomatic improvement (VAS score 2.3 ± 1.2 vs. 6.5 ± 2.2 before and after GFD, p = 0.001). 98 patients underwent the gluten challenge and 28 (all females, mean age 38.9 ± 12.7 years, BMI 22.0 ± 2.9) reported a symptomatic relapse and deterioration of quality of life. No parameters were found to be statistically associated with positivity to the challenge. However, 14 patients responded to the placebo ingestion. Taking into account this finding, about 14% of patients responding to gluten withdrawal showed a symptomatic relapse during the gluten challenge. This group is suspected to have NCGS.

  12. Evidence for the Presence of Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity in Patients with Functional Gastrointestinal Symptoms: Results from a Multicenter Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Gluten Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Elli, Luca; Tomba, Carolina; Branchi, Federica; Roncoroni, Leda; Lombardo, Vincenza; Bardella, Maria Teresa; Ferretti, Francesca; Conte, Dario; Valiante, Flavio; Fini, Lucia; Forti, Edoardo; Cannizzaro, Renato; Maiero, Stefania; Londoni, Claudio; Lauri, Adriano; Fornaciari, Giovanni; Lenoci, Nicoletta; Spagnuolo, Rocco; Basilisco, Guido; Somalvico, Francesco; Borgatta, Bruno; Leandro, Gioacchino; Segato, Sergio; Barisani, Donatella; Morreale, Gaetano; Buscarini, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is characterized by the onset of symptoms after eating gluten-containing food. We aimed to single out NCGS subjects among subjects with functional gastrointestinal symptoms. Patients were enrolled in a multicenter double-blind placebo-controlled trial with crossover. Symptoms and quality of life were evaluated by means of 10-cm VAS and SF36. Iron parameters, transaminases and C reactive protein (CRP) were evaluated. After a three-week-long gluten-free diet (GFD), responsive patients were randomly assigned to gluten intake (5.6 g/day) or placebo for seven days, followed by crossover. The primary endpoint was the worsening of symptoms (VAS increase ≥3 cm) during gluten ingestion compared to placebo. One hundred and forty patients were enrolled and 134 (17 males, mean age 39.1 ± 11.7 years, BMI 22.4 ± 3.8) completed the first period. A total of 101 subjects (10 males, mean age 39.3 ± 11.0 years, BMI 22.3 ± 4.0) reported a symptomatic improvement (VAS score 2.3 ± 1.2 vs. 6.5 ± 2.2 before and after GFD, p = 0.001). 98 patients underwent the gluten challenge and 28 (all females, mean age 38.9 ± 12.7 years, BMI 22.0 ± 2.9) reported a symptomatic relapse and deterioration of quality of life. No parameters were found to be statistically associated with positivity to the challenge. However, 14 patients responded to the placebo ingestion. Taking into account this finding, about 14% of patients responding to gluten withdrawal showed a symptomatic relapse during the gluten challenge. This group is suspected to have NCGS. PMID:26867199

  13. Characterization of globulin storage proteins of a low prolamin cereal species in relation to celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Gell, Gyöngyvér; Kovács, Krisztina; Veres, Gábor; Korponay-Szabó, Ilma R.; Juhász, Angéla

    2017-01-01

    Brachypodium distachyon, a small annual grass with seed storage globulins as primary protein reserves was used in our study to analyse the toxic nature of non-prolamin seed storage proteins related to celiac disease. The main storage proteins of B. distachyon are the 7S globulin type proteins and the 11S, 12S seed storage globulins similar to oat and rice. Immunoblot analyses using serum samples from celiac disease patients were carried out followed by the identification of immune-responsive proteins using mass spectrometry. Serum samples from celiac patients on a gluten-free diet, from patients with Crohn’s disease and healthy subjects, were used as controls. The identified proteins with intense serum-IgA reactivity belong to the 7S and 11–12S seed globulin family. Structure prediction and epitope predictions analyses confirmed the presence of celiac disease-related linear B cell epitope homologs and the presence of peptide regions with strong HLA-DQ8 and DQ2 binding capabilities. These results highlight that both MHC-II presentation and B cell response may be developed not only to prolamins but also to seed storage globulins. This is the first study of the non-prolamin type seed storage proteins of Brachypodium from the aspect of the celiac disease. PMID:28051174

  14. Association of Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody Titer with Duodenal Histological Changes in Children with Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zoubi, Basim

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease is usually diagnosed by demonstrating gluten enteropathy in small bowel biopsy. Celiac specific antibodies are used as an initial screening test. The goal of this study is to test the relationship of the anti-tTG titer and severity of histological changes in Jordanian children with celiac disease. Method. The medical records of 81 children who had elevated anti-tTG titer and had duodenal biopsies available were retrospectively reviewed. Result. Assessing the association of anti-tTG titer with duodenal histopathological changes, 94% of those with high anti-tTG titer (≥180 U/mL) had histological evidence of celiac disease. There was statistically significant positive association between high anti-tTG titer and Marsh grading as 82% of patients with Marsh III had high anti-tTG titer (Chi2 18.5; P value 0.00; Odds Ratio 8.5). The fraction of patients with Marsh III who were correctly identified as positive by anti-tTG titer ≥ 180 U/mL was high (sensitivity = 81.6). Moreover, the fraction of patients with anti-tTG titer ≥ 180 U/mL who had Marsh III was also high (positive predictive value = 78.4). Conclusion. Anti-tTG titer ≥ 180 U/mL had significant positive association with Marsh III histopathological changes of celiac disease. PMID:27867394

  15. Low serum somatomedin activity in celiac disease. A misleading aspect in growth failure from asymptomatic celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Lecornu, M; David, L; François, R

    1978-12-01

    In 4 children with celiac disease, aged 7 months to 11 years, serum somatomedin activities (SMA) were consistently low: less than 0.40 U/ml (N greater than 0.50 U/ml). Basal plasma growth hormone (GH) levels were not elevated and increased normally under arginine-insulin stimulation in 3 patients. Human GH administration at a dosage which usually determines an increase of serum SMA in children with GH deficiency (4 mg/day/2 days) did not modify significantly the low serum SMA. However, in 1 child a clear-cut increase of serum SMA (0.22-0.82 U/ml) was noted under a higher dosage of human GH (8 mg/day/2 days). In 3 patients serum SMA was studied 3 weeks to 4 months after starting the gluten-free diet and was found to be normal. A limitation of the somatomedin generation unrelated to a deficit in GH secretion and probably resistant to GH appears therefore to be present in celiac disease. The rapid normalization of serum SMA under gluten-free diet suggests that the low serum SMA is induced through some unknown hormonal or metabolic signal by the protein malabsorption and/or the nutritional deficiency present in celiac disease.

  16. Association of Celiac Disease With Idiopathic Pulmonary Hemosiderosis; Lane Hamilton Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nacaroglu, Hikmet Tekin; Sandal, Ozlem Sarac; Bag, Ozlem; Erdem, Semiha Bahceci; Bekem Soylu, Ozlem; Diniz, Gulden; Ozturk, Aysel; Can, Demet

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Idiopathic Pulmonary Hemosiderosis (IPH) is a rare cause of alveolar hemorrhage, which is seen primarily in childhood. Celiac disease is defined as a chronic, immune-mediated enteropathy of the small intestine, caused by exposure to dietary gluten in genetically pre-disposed individuals. Association of IPH and celiac disease is known as Lane Hamilton syndrome. There are limited number of case reports of this syndrome in literature. Case Presentation: Although there were no growth and developmental delay and gastrointestinal symptoms like chronic diarrhea, chronic constipation, vomiting, abdominal bloating and pain in the two patients with IPH, they were diagnosed with Lane Hamilton Syndrome. After initiation of gluten-free diet, their IPH symptoms disappeared and hemoglobin levels were observed to return to normal. Conclusions: Even if there were no gastrointestinal symptoms in a patient with IPH, celiac disease should be investigated. These patients may benefit from gluten free diet and IPH symptoms may disappear. PMID:26495097

  17. Celiac artery aneurysm repair in Behcet disease complicated by recurrent thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Ullery, Brant W; Pochettino, Alberto; Wang, Grace J; Jackson, Benjamin M; Fairman, Ronald M; Woo, Edward Y

    2010-02-01

    Behçet's disease is a chronic, relapsing multisystemic inflammatory disorder characterized by recurrent orogenital aphthous ulcers, uveitis, and skin lesions. Vascular involvement occurs in up to 38% of these patients. Herein, we report a 19-year-old male who initially presented with an isolated celiac artery aneurysm that was treated with open surgical repair. The patient was subsequently diagnosed with Behçet's disease after the development of oral aphthous ulcers and multiple recurrent postoperative deep venous thromboses and thoracoabdominal arterial aneurysms. Ultimately, a hybrid approach was undertaken. This is the fifth celiac artery aneurysm ever reported in this patient group and the first to present with an isolated celiac artery aneurysm as the initial manifestation of Behçet's disease.

  18. Distal pancreatectomy with celiac axis resection for pancreatic body and tail cancer invading celiac axis

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Hyemin; Kim, Sang Geol; Ha, Heontak; Choi, Young Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Pancreatic body/tail cancer often involves the celiac axis (CA) and it is regarded as an unresectable disease. To treat the disease, we employed distal pancreatectomy with en bloc celiac axis resection (DP-CAR) and reviewed our experiences. Methods We performed DP-CAR for seven patients with pancreatic body/tail cancer involving the CA. The indications of DP-CAR initially included tumors with definite invasion of CA and were later expanded to include borderline resectable disease. To determine the efficacy of DP-CAR, the clinico-pathological data of patients who underwent DP-CAR were compared to both distal pancreatectomy (DP) group and no resection (NR) group. Results The R0 resection rate was 71.4% and was not statistically different compared to DP group. The operative time (P = 0.018) and length of hospital stay (P = 0.022) were significantly longer in DP-CAR group but no significant difference was found in incidence of the postoperative pancreatic fistula compared to DP group. In DP-CAR group, focal hepatic infarction and transient hepatopathy occurred in 1 patient and 3 patients, respectively. No mortality occurred in DP-CAR group. The median survival time (MST) was not statistically different compared to DP group. However, the MST of DP-CAR group was significantly longer than that of NR group (P < 0.001). Conclusion In our experience, DP-CAR was safe and offered high R0 resection rate for patients with pancreatic body/tail cancer with involvement of CA. The effect on survival of DP-CAR is comparable to DP and better than that of NR. However, the benefits need to be verified by further studies in the future. PMID:26446424

  19. Physical and psychosocial challenges in adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    duTreil, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Numerous challenges confront adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors, including difficulty in controlling bleeding episodes, deterioration of joints, arthritic pain, physical disability, emotional turmoil, and social issues. High-intensity treatment regimens often used in the treatment of patients with inhibitors also impose significant scheduling, economic, and emotional demands on patients and their families or primary caregivers. A comprehensive multidisciplinary assessment of the physical, emotional, and social status of adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors is essential for the development of treatment strategies that can be individualized to address the complex needs of these patients. PMID:25093002

  20. En Masse Resection of Pancreas, Spleen, Celiac Axis, Stomach, Kidney, Adrenal, and Colon for Invasive Pancreatic Corpus and Tail Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kutluturk, Koray; Alam, Abdul Hamid; Kayaalp, Cuneyt; Otan, Emrah; Aydin, Cemalettin

    2013-01-01

    Providing a more comfortable life and a longer survival for pancreatic corpus/tail tumors without metastasis depends on the complete resection. Recently, distal pancreatectomy with celiac axis resection was reported as a feasible and favorable method in selected pancreatic corpus/tail tumors which had invaded the celiac axis. Additional organ resections to the celiac axis were rarely required, and when necessary it was included only a single extra organ resection such as adrenal or intestine. Here, we described a distal pancreatic tumor invading most of the neighboring organs—stomach, celiac axis, left renal vein, left adrenal gland, and splenic flexure were treated by en bloc resection of all these organs. The patient was a 60-year-old man without any severe medical comorbidities. Postoperative course of the patient was uneventful, and he was discharged on postoperative day eight without any complication. Histopathology and stage of the tumor were adenocarcinoma and T4 N1 M0, respectively. Preoperative back pain of the patient was completely relieved in the postoperative period. As a result, celiac axis resection for pancreatic cancer is an extensive surgery, and a combined en masse resection of the invaded neighboring organs is a more extensive surgery than the celiac axis resection alone. This more extensive surgery is safe and feasible for selected patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:24159408

  1. En masse resection of pancreas, spleen, celiac axis, stomach, kidney, adrenal, and colon for invasive pancreatic corpus and tail tumor.

    PubMed

    Kutluturk, Koray; Alam, Abdul Hamid; Kayaalp, Cuneyt; Otan, Emrah; Aydin, Cemalettin

    2013-01-01

    Providing a more comfortable life and a longer survival for pancreatic corpus/tail tumors without metastasis depends on the complete resection. Recently, distal pancreatectomy with celiac axis resection was reported as a feasible and favorable method in selected pancreatic corpus/tail tumors which had invaded the celiac axis. Additional organ resections to the celiac axis were rarely required, and when necessary it was included only a single extra organ resection such as adrenal or intestine. Here, we described a distal pancreatic tumor invading most of the neighboring organs-stomach, celiac axis, left renal vein, left adrenal gland, and splenic flexure were treated by en bloc resection of all these organs. The patient was a 60-year-old man without any severe medical comorbidities. Postoperative course of the patient was uneventful, and he was discharged on postoperative day eight without any complication. Histopathology and stage of the tumor were adenocarcinoma and T4 N1 M0, respectively. Preoperative back pain of the patient was completely relieved in the postoperative period. As a result, celiac axis resection for pancreatic cancer is an extensive surgery, and a combined en masse resection of the invaded neighboring organs is a more extensive surgery than the celiac axis resection alone. This more extensive surgery is safe and feasible for selected patients with pancreatic cancer.

  2. Approximate Quantification in Young, Healthy Older Adults', and Alzheimer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandini, Delphine; Lemaire, Patrick; Michel, Bernard Francois

    2009-01-01

    Forty young adults, 40 healthy older adults, and 39 probable AD patients were asked to estimate small (e.g., 25) and large (e.g., 60) collections of dots in a choice condition and in two no-choice conditions. Participants could choose between benchmark and anchoring strategies on each collection of dots in the choice condition and were required to…

  3. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity: Time for sifting the grain.

    PubMed

    Elli, Luca; Roncoroni, Leda; Bardella, Maria Teresa

    2015-07-21

    In the last few years, a new nomenclature has been proposed for the disease induced by the ingestion of gluten, a protein present in wheat, rice, barley and oats. Besides celiac disease and wheat allergy, the most studied forms of gluten-related disorders characterized by an evident immune mechanism (autoimmune in celiac disease and IgE-mediated in wheat allergy), a new entity has been included, apparently not driven by an aberrant immune response: the non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). NCGS is characterized by a heterogeneous clinical picture with intestinal and extraintestinal symptoms arising after gluten ingestion and rapidly improving after its withdrawal from the diet. The pathogenesis of NCGS is largely unknown, but a mixture of factors such as the stimulation of the innate immune system, the direct cytotoxic effects of gluten, and probably the synergy with other wheat molecules, are clues for the complicated puzzle. In addition, the diagnostic procedures still remain problematic due to the absence of efficient diagnostic markers; thus, diagnosis is based upon the symptomatic response to a gluten-free diet and the recurrence of symptoms after gluten reintroduction with the possibility of an important involvement of a placebo effect. The temporary withdrawal of gluten seems a reasonable therapy, but the timing of gluten reintroduction and the correct patient management approach are have not yet been determined.

  4. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity: Time for sifting the grain

    PubMed Central

    Elli, Luca; Roncoroni, Leda; Bardella, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years, a new nomenclature has been proposed for the disease induced by the ingestion of gluten, a protein present in wheat, rice, barley and oats. Besides celiac disease and wheat allergy, the most studied forms of gluten-related disorders characterized by an evident immune mechanism (autoimmune in celiac disease and IgE-mediated in wheat allergy), a new entity has been included, apparently not driven by an aberrant immune response: the non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). NCGS is characterized by a heterogeneous clinical picture with intestinal and extraintestinal symptoms arising after gluten ingestion and rapidly improving after its withdrawal from the diet. The pathogenesis of NCGS is largely unknown, but a mixture of factors such as the stimulation of the innate immune system, the direct cytotoxic effects of gluten, and probably the synergy with other wheat molecules, are clues for the complicated puzzle. In addition, the diagnostic procedures still remain problematic due to the absence of efficient diagnostic markers; thus, diagnosis is based upon the symptomatic response to a gluten-free diet and the recurrence of symptoms after gluten reintroduction with the possibility of an important involvement of a placebo effect. The temporary withdrawal of gluten seems a reasonable therapy, but the timing of gluten reintroduction and the correct patient management approach are have not yet been determined. PMID:26217073

  5. Parallels between Pathogens and Gluten Peptides in Celiac Sprue

    PubMed Central

    Bethune, Michael T; Khosla, Chaitan

    2008-01-01

    Pathogens are exogenous agents capable of causing disease in susceptible organisms. In celiac sprue, a disease triggered by partially hydrolyzed gluten peptides in the small intestine, the offending immunotoxins cannot replicate, but otherwise have many hallmarks of classical pathogens. First, dietary gluten and its peptide metabolites are ubiquitous components of the modern diet, yet only a small, genetically susceptible fraction of the human population contracts celiac sprue. Second, immunotoxic gluten peptides have certain unusual structural features that allow them to survive the harsh proteolytic conditions of the gastrointestinal tract and thereby interact extensively with the mucosal lining of the small intestine. Third, they invade across epithelial barriers intact to access the underlying gut-associated lymphoid tissue. Fourth, they possess recognition sequences for selective modification by an endogenous enzyme, transglutaminase 2, allowing for in situ activation to a more immunotoxic form via host subversion. Fifth, they precipitate a T cell–mediated immune reaction comprising both innate and adaptive responses that causes chronic inflammation of the small intestine. Sixth, complete elimination of immunotoxic gluten peptides from the celiac diet results in remission, whereas reintroduction of gluten in the diet causes relapse. Therefore, in analogy with antibiotics, orally administered proteases that reduce the host's exposure to the immunotoxin by accelerating gluten peptide destruction have considerable therapeutic potential. Last but not least, notwithstanding the power of in vitro methods to reconstitute the essence of the immune response to gluten in a celiac patient, animal models for the disease, while elusive, are likely to yield fundamentally new systems-level insights. PMID:18425213

  6. Appropriate nutrient supplementation in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Roberta; Pallone, Francesco; Stasi, Elisa; Romeo, Samanta; Monteleone, Giovanni

    2013-12-01

    Reduced levels of iron, folate, vitamin B12, vitamin D, zinc, and magnesium are common in untreated celiac disease (CD) patients probably due to loss of brush border proteins and enzymes needed for the absorption of these nutrients. In the majority of patients, removal of gluten from the diet leads to histological recovery and normalization of iron, vitamin, and mineral levels. Iron deficiency anemia is the most common extra-intestinal sign of CD and usually resolves with adherence to a gluten-free diet. However, deficiencies of both folate and vitamin B12 may persist in some patients on a gluten-free diet, thus requiring vitamin supplementation to improve subjective health status. Similarly, exclusion of gluten from the diet does not always normalize bone mineral density; in these cases, supplementation of vitamin D and calcium is recommended. Resolution of mucosal inflammation may not be sufficient to abrogate magnesium deficiency. Since gluten-free cereal products have a lower magnesium content as compared with gluten-containing counterparts, a magnesium-enriched diet should be encouraged in CD patients. In this article we discuss the frequency and clinical relevance of nutrient deficiency in CD and whether and when nutrient supplementation is needed.

  7. Celiac axis compression syndrome: laparoscopic approach in a strange case of chronic abdominal pain in 71 years old man

    PubMed Central

    Eretta, Costantino; Olcese, Sonja; Imperatore, Mikaela; Francone, Elisa; Bianchi, Claudio; Bruno, Maria Santina; Sagnelli, Carlo; Di Martino, Maria; Ranghetti, Savina; Martino, Valter; Falco, Emilio; Berti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Celiac Axis Compression Syndrome by the Median Arcuate Ligament is a very rare condition characterized by chronic postprandial abdominal pain (angina abdominis), nausea, vomiting, which occurs mostly in young patients. The main treatment is a surgical procedure that consists of the division of the arcuate ligament combined with the section of the close diaphragmatic crus and the excision of the celiac plexus. Actually laparoscopic management is feasible and safe.

  8. Characterization of Adults With a Self-Diagnosis of Nonceliac Gluten Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Biesiekierski, Jessica R; Newnham, Evan D; Shepherd, Susan J; Muir, Jane G; Gibson, Peter R

    2014-08-01

    Background: Nonceliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), occurring in patients without celiac disease yet whose gastrointestinal symptoms improve on a gluten-free diet (GFD), is largely a self-reported diagnosis and would appear to be very common. The aims of this study were to characterize patients who believe they have NCGS. Materials and Methods: Advertising was directed toward adults who believed they had NCGS and were willing to participate in a clinical trial. Respondents were asked to complete a questionnaire about symptoms, diet, and celiac investigation. Results: Of 248 respondents, 147 completed the survey. Mean age was 43.5 years, and 130 were women. Seventy-two percent did not meet the description of NCGS due to inadequate exclusion of celiac disease (62%), uncontrolled symptoms despite gluten restriction (24%), and not following a GFD (27%), alone or in combination. The GFD was self-initiated in 44% of respondents; in other respondents it was prescribed by alternative health professionals (21%), dietitians (19%), and general practitioners (16%). No celiac investigations had been performed in 15% of respondents. Of 75 respondents who had duodenal biopsies, 29% had no or inadequate gluten intake at the time of endoscopy. Inadequate celiac investigation was common if the GFD was initiated by self (69%), alternative health professionals (70%), general practitioners (46%), or dietitians (43%). In 40 respondents who fulfilled the criteria for NCGS, their knowledge of and adherence to the GFD were excellent, and 65% identified other food intolerances. Conclusions: Just over 1 in 4 respondents self-reporting as NCGS fulfill criteria for its diagnosis. Initiation of a GFD without adequate exclusion of celiac disease is common. In 1 of 4 respondents, symptoms are poorly controlled despite gluten avoidance.

  9. Celiac Artery Thrombosis and Superior Mesenteric Artery Stenoses with Essential Thrombocythemia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Keskin, Hasan Attila; Yetisir, Fahri; Bayram, Huseyin; Bayraktaroglu, Mehmet Selahattin; Simsek, Erdal; Kilic, Mehmet; Katircioglu, Salih Fehmi

    2012-01-01

    Thrombosis of the celiac artery trunk is a rare cause of acute abdominal pain. Thrombosis of the celiac artery carries a high mortality and morbidity when the diagnoses and treatment are delayed. It is frequently associated with other cardiovascular events. The most common etiology is atherosclerosis. 20–30% of cases may have symptoms of chronic mesenteric ischemia. Main goal of the treatment is to reestablish the diminished or stopped mesenteric blood flow and to avoid end-organ ischemia. Essential thrombocythemia is a chronic myeloproliferative disorder characterized by marked increase in thrombocyte number and clinical presentation may be with thrombotic episodes, hemorrhage, or both. To our knowledge this is the first report of celiac artery thrombosis and superior mesenteric artery stenoses in a patient with essential thrombocythemia. The patient was managed successfully with surgical treatment. PMID:23304160

  10. [Conservative management of a ruptured inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm associated with celiac artery occlusion].

    PubMed

    Kidogawa, Hideo; Okamoto, Kohji; Yamayoshi, Takatomo; Noguchi, Junya

    2013-10-01

    A 45-year-old female presented at our hospital with a one-day history of upper abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed that the root of the celiac artery was obstructed and that a large hematoma was present in the retroperitoneum. The patient was diagnosed with retroperitoneal hemorrhage associated with the rupture of an inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm, which was caused by increased blood flow in the pancreaticoduodenal arterial arcade. Because the patient's general condition was stable, she was managed conservatively and discharged on achieving remission after a month. Follow-up CT revealed spontaneous resolution of the celiac artery obstruction and aneurysm. The celiac artery obstruction in this case was assumed to be caused by segmental arterial mediolysis.

  11. [Hemothorax complicated with celiac artery compression syndrome (CACS); report of a case].

    PubMed

    Uga, Naoko; Adachi, Katsutoshi; Tarukawa, Tomohito; Okuda, Yasuyuki; Tanigawa, Kanji; Nakaya, Hitoshi; Sato, Tomoaki; Hioki, Iwao

    2014-05-01

    We report a case of hemothorax complicated with celiac artery compression syndrome (CACS). A 43-year-old man presented with a sudden onset left back pain. Computed tomography (CT) showed its hemothorax, esophageal artery aneurysm and severe stenosis of the celiac truncus with its anterior compression by median accurate ligament, and a diagnosis of CACS associated with rupture of the aneurysm was made. Emergent transcatheter arterial embolization of the aneurysm resulted in a technical failure, although the patient's condition was stable and performed esophageal artery ligation through video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery on day 5 after onset. After surgery, the patient recovered without significant incidents. A cause of this aneurysmal development was supposed to be a significantly increased esophageal arterial blood flow with its luminal dilation to compensate a decreased celiac blood flow. Segmental arterial mediolysis could not be excluded as another cause.

  12. [Coexistence of Celiac Disease and autoimmune hepatitis case study and literature review].

    PubMed

    Tagle, Martín; Nolte, Cecilia; Luna, Eduardo; Scavino, Yolanda

    2006-01-01

    The case of a patient who was initially diagnosed with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, with subsequent documentation of Celiac Disease histologically and serologically is reported. The patient presented elevation of the aminotransferases, upon detection of the Celiac Disease which was initially attributed to the underlying disease. However, despite the complete resolution of her articular symptoms with a gluten-free diet, the liver chemistry abnormalities persisted. This led to consider an autoimmune hepatitis as the cause which was documented with a liver biopsy three months after the diagnosis of the celiac disease and under a strict gluten-free diet. Treatment with prednisone and azathioprine was initiated with complete normalization of aminotransferase levels. We present the sequence of events with the results and a review of the literature.

  13. Is gluten a cause of gastrointestinal symptoms in people without celiac disease?

    PubMed

    Biesiekierski, Jessica R; Muir, Jane G; Gibson, Peter R

    2013-12-01

    The avoidance of wheat- and gluten-containing products is a worldwide phenomenon. While celiac disease is a well-established entity, the evidence base for gluten as a trigger of symptoms in patients without celiac disease (so-called 'non-celiac gluten sensitivity' or NCGS) is limited. The problems lie in the complexity of wheat and the ability of its carbohydrate as well as protein components to trigger gastrointestinal symptoms, the potentially false assumption that response to a gluten-free diet equates to an effect of gluten withdrawal, and diagnostic criteria for coeliac disease. Recent randomized controlled re-challenge trials have suggested that gluten may worsen gastrointestinal symptoms, but failed to confirm patients with self-perceived NCGS have specific gluten sensitivity. Furthermore, mechanisms by which gluten triggers symptoms have yet to be identified. This review discusses the most recent scientific evidence and our current understanding of NCGS.

  14. Celiac Crisis Associated with Herpes Simplex Virus Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Linz, Christopher M.; Tsay, Julie L.; Jin, Ming; El-Dika, Samer S.

    2016-01-01

    Celiac crisis is a rare presentation of celiac disease that is characterized by life-threatening electrolyte abnormalities, vitamin and mineral deficiencies, and diarrhea. Triggers for celiac crisis include major surgeries, pancreatitis, and infections of cytomegalovirus, and salmonella. A 24-year-old woman presented with celiac crisis associated with severe herpes simplex virus (HSV) esophagitis. This case demonstrates that nutritional deficiencies seen in celiac disease can result in a relative immunodeficiency, which may lead to other infectious complications. Additionally, early recognition of celiac crisis is imperative as the metabolic derangements may be life-threatening, and therapy with gluten restriction and nutritional repletion is effective. PMID:27921058

  15. [Irritable bowel syndrome, celiac disease and gluten].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Montoro, Miguel

    2014-08-04

    For many years irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and celiac disease (CD) have been considered 2 completely separate entities, with CD being clearly related to a permanent gluten intolerance and IBS having no relation with gluten ingestion. However IBS and CD symptoms may be indistinguishable, especially when diarrhea, bloating or abdominal pain predominate. In the last decade several studies have shown that the separation between CD and IBS is not so clear. Thus, some patients who have been diagnosed of IBS suffer in fact from CD. In addition, it seems that there is a group of patients who, without having CD, suffer gluten intolerance that cause them digestive symptoms similar to those of IBS. Gluten sensitivity is defined as the spectrum of morphological, immunological and functional abnormalities that respond to a gluten-free diet. This concept includes histological, immunological and clinical manifestations in the absence of evident morphological abnormalities. Therefore, it is mandatory to establish in a scientific way in which patients a gluten-free diet will be beneficial as well as when this is not justified.

  16. Intensive care of the adult patient with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Allan, Catherine K

    2011-01-01

    Prevalence of congenital heart disease in the adult population has increased out of proportion to that of the pediatric population as survival has improved, and adult congenital heart disease patients make up a growing percentage of pediatric and adult cardiac intensive care unit admissions. These patients often develop complex multiorgan system disease as a result of long-standing altered cardiac physiology, and many require reoperation during adulthood. Practitioners who care for these patients in the cardiac intensive care unit must have a strong working knowledge of the pathophysiology of complex congenital heart disease, and a full team of specialists must be available to assist in the care of these patients. This chapter will review some of the common multiorgan system effects of long-standing congenital heart disease (eg, renal and hepatic dysfunction, coagulation abnormalities, arrhythmias) as well as some of the unique cardiopulmonary physiology of this patient population.

  17. A Surprising Culprit Behind Celiac Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... is director of research at the University of Chicago's Celiac Disease Center. "However, the specific virus and ... 7 in the journal Science . SOURCE: University of Chicago, news release, April 6, 2017 HealthDay Copyright (c) ...

  18. Hepatitis B vaccine in celiac disease: yesterday, today and tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Vitaliti, Giovanna; Praticò, Andrea Domenico; Cimino, Carla; Di Dio, Giovanna; Lionetti, Elena; La Rosa, Mario; Leonardi, Salvatore

    2013-02-14

    Some studies showed that in celiac patients the immunological response to vaccination is similar to that one found in general population except for vaccine against hepatitis B virus (HBV). The non-responsiveness to HBV vaccine has also been described in healthy people, nevertheless the number of non-responders has been demonstrated to be higher in celiac disease (CD) patients than in healthy controls. Several hypothesis explaining this higher rate of unresponsiveness to HBV vaccine in CD patients have been described, such as the genetic hypothesis, according with CD patients carrying the disease-specific haplotype HLA-B8, DR3, and DQ2, show a lower response to HBV vaccine both in clinical expressed CD patients and in healthy people carrying the same haplotype. On the other hand, it has been demonstrated that the gluten intake during the vaccination seems to influence the response to the same vaccine. Moreover, it has been demonstrated a possible genetic predisposition to hepatitis B vaccine non-responsiveness likely due to the presence of specific human leukocyte antigen haplotypes and specific single nucleotide polymorphism in genes of cytokine/cytokine receptors and toll like receptors, but the pathogenic mechanism responsible for this low responsiveness still remains unclear. The aim of this review is to focus on the possible pathogenic causes of unresponsiveness to HBV vaccine in CD patients and to propose an alternative vaccination schedule in order to improve the responsiveness to HBV vaccine in this at-risk patients.

  19. Screening for Celiac Disease in Children with Dental Enamel Defects

    PubMed Central

    El-Hodhod, Mostafa Abdel-Aziz; El-Agouza, Iman Ali; Abdel-Al, Hala; Kabil, Noha Samir; Bayomi, Khaled Abd El-Moez

    2012-01-01

    Background. Dental enamel defects (DEDs) are seen in celiac disease (CD). Aim was to detect frequency of CD among such patients. Methods. This study included 140 children with DED. They were tested for CD. Gluten-free diet (GFD) was instituted for CD patients. A cohort of 720, age and sex-matched, normal children represented a control group. Both groups were evaluated clinically. Serum calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, serum IgA, and tissue transglutaminase (tTG) IgG and IgA types were measured. Results. CD was more diagnosed in patients with DEDs (17.86%) compared to controls (0.97%) (P < 0.0001). Majority of nonceliac patients showed grade 1 DED compared to grades 1, 2, and 3 DED in CD. Five children had DED of deciduous teeth and remaining in permanent ones. After 1 year on GFD, DED improved better in CD compared to nonceliac patients. Gastrointestinal symptoms did not vary between celiac and nonceliac DED patients. Lower serum calcium significantly predicted CD in this cohort. Conclusion. CD is more prevalent among children with DED than in the general population. These DEDs might be the only manifestation of CD; therefore, screening for CD is highly recommended among those patients especially in presence of underweight and hypocalcemia. PMID:22720168

  20. Beyond moulage sign and TTG levels: the role of cross-sectional imaging in celiac sprue.

    PubMed

    Sheedy, Shannon P; Barlow, John M; Fletcher, Joel G; Smyrk, Thomas C; Scholz, Francis J; Codipilly, Don C; Al Bawardy, Badr F; Fidler, Jeff L

    2017-02-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that causes inflammation and destruction in the small intestine of genetically susceptible individuals following ingestion of gluten. Awareness of the disease has increased; however, it remains a challenge to diagnose. This review summarizes the intestinal and extraintestinal cross-sectional imaging findings of celiac disease. Small intestine fold abnormalities are the most specific imaging findings for celiac disease, whereas most other imaging findings reflect a more generalized pattern seen with malabsorptive processes. Familiarity with the imaging pattern may allow the radiologist to suggest the diagnosis in patients with atypical presentations in whom it is not clinically suspected. Earlier detection allows earlier treatment initiation and may prevent significant morbidity and mortality that can occur with delayed diagnosis. Refractory celiac disease carries the greatest risk of mortality due to associated complications, including cavitating mesenteric lymph node syndrome, ulcerative jejunoileitis, enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma, and adenocarcinoma, all of which are described and illustrated. Radiologic and endoscopic investigations are complimentary modalities in the setting of complicated celiac disease.

  1. [Non-celiac gluten sensitivity: Another condition that responds to gluten].

    PubMed

    Navarro, Elizabeth; Araya, Magdalena

    2015-05-01

    Remission of gastrointestinal and general symptoms after gluten withdrawal has been described in some non-celiac individuals for nearly 30 years. Only recently, efforts have been made to define this entity, now referred to as "non-celiac gluten sensitivity". It includes patients that clinically respond to gluten free diet without exhibiting allergic or autoimmune features to explain such response. Wheat allergy, celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome and symptoms induced by high FODMAPs (Fermentable, Oligo-, Di-, Mono-saccharides And Polyols) consumption are the main differential diagnoses. The relationship with neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and autism has not been demonstrated, but currently it gives ground to great hope in families with affected children. Epidemiology of non-celiac gluten sensitivity is not clear. It is described as more common among women and less common in children. Genetic and immune factors, changes in intestinal microbiota and non-gluten components present in wheat grains are main factors postulated in the pathogenesis of this condition. To date, there are no specific biomarkers for non-celiac gluten sensitivity and diagnosis is reached by excluding other causes of disease. A trial with gluten-free diet and subsequent gluten challenge is the methodology most frequently used to confirm diagnosis.

  2. Association of LPP and TAGAP Polymorphisms with Celiac Disease Risk: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shi-Qi; Zhang, Na; Zhou, Zi-Xing; Huang, Chui-Can; Zeng, Cheng-Li; Xiao, Di; Guo, Cong-Cong; Han, Ya-Jing; Ye, Xiao-Hong; Ye, Xing-Guang; Ou, Mei-Ling; Zhang, Bao-Huan; Liu, Yang; Zeng, Eddy Y.; Yang, Guang; Jing, Chun-Xia

    2017-01-01

    Background: Lipoma preferred partner (LPP) and T-cell activation Rho GTPase activating protein (TAGAP) polymorphisms might influence the susceptibility to celiac disease. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis by identifying relevant studies to estimate the risks of these polymorphisms on celiac disease. Methods: The PubMed, Web of Science and Embase databases were searched (up to October 2016) for LPP rs1464510 and TAGAP rs1738074 polymorphisms. Results: This meta-analysis included the same 7 studies for LPP rs1464510 and TAGAP rs1738074. The minor risk A allele at both rs1464510 and rs1738074 carried risks (odds ratios) of 1.26 (95% CI: 1.22–1.30) and 1.17 (95% CI: 1.14–1.21), respectively, which contributed to increased risks in all celiac disease patients by 10.72% and 6.59%, respectively. The estimated lambdas were 0.512 and 0.496, respectively, suggesting that a co-dominant model would be suitable for both gene effects. Conclusions: This meta-analysis provides robust estimates that polymorphisms in LPP and TAGAP genes are potential risk factors for celiac disease in European and American. Prospective studies and more genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are needed to confirm these findings, and some corresponding molecular biology experiments should be carried out to clarify the pathogenic mechanisms of celiac disease. PMID:28208589

  3. The Frequency Distribution of Celiac Autoantibodies in Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Mokhtari, Fatemeh; Panjehpour, Tayebeh; Naeini, Farahnaz Fatemi; Hosseini, Sayed Mohsen; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Matin, Marzieh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Alopecia areata (AA) is a noncicatricial (nonscarring) alopecia. The association between AA and celiac disease (CD) is debatable. Several studies declare the relationship between AA and CD as measurement of celiac autoantibodies (anti-gliadin IgA and anti-gliadin IgG), but a few studies consider anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency distribution of celiac autoantibodies (all of them) in patients with AA compared with controls. Methods: This study is a case–control study. Thirty-five patients entered in each group. Anti-gliadin IgA, anti-gliadin IgG, and anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA were tested in all patients. Samples were examined in ELISA method with binding site's kits, and the result was reported as positive/negative. Finally, the frequency distribution of autoantibodies was examined. Results: The age average did not show a significant difference between two groups (P = 0.62). In addition, there was no significant difference between the two groups based on gender (P = 0.15). The prevalence of antibody in case and control groups was 2.85% and 0%, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.31). Conclusions: There may be a relationship between CD and AA, but the absence of statistical association between AA and CD does not mean that there is no relationship between gluten and AA in certain patients. Thus, we have shown here that the biological tests to search for CD do not bring information and proof enough, and it is why we recommend another approach to disclose gluten intolerance in AA patients. PMID:27833723

  4. Gluten ataxia is better classified as non-celiac gluten sensitivity than as celiac disease: a comparative clinical study.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Luis; Hernández-Lahoz, Carlos; Lauret, Eugenia; Rodriguez-Peláez, Maria; Soucek, Miroslav; Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Kruzliak, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Gluten ataxia (GA) has customarily been considered to be the main neurological manifestation of celiac disease (CD). In recent years, the condition of non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) has been defined, which includes some patients who are not considered "true celiacs." We performed a comparative clinicopathological study of these three entities. We studied 31 GA, 48 CD and 37 NCGS patients, prospectively in the same center for a period of 7 years. The protocol study included two serological determinations for gluten sensitivity [anti-gliadin IgA and IgG (AGA) and anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA (TG) antibodies], HLA-DQ2 typing, and duodenal histological assessment. Demographics and investigative findings were compared. Females were 55 % in GA, 75 % in CD (p < 0.001), and 47 % in NCGS (N.S.). GA patients were older (59 ± 14 years) than CD (43 ± 13 years) and NCGS (41 ± 8 years) groups (p < 0.001). AGA positivity was higher in GA (100 %) than in CD (48 %) groups (p < 0.001), but similar to NCGS patients (89 %; N.S.); TG positivity was lower in GA (3.2 %) than in CD (33.3 %; p < 0.001), but similar to NCGS (2.7 %; N.S.). DQ2 (+) was lower in GA (32.2 %) than in CD (89.6 %; p < 0.001), but similar to NCGS (29.7 %; N.S.). Lymphocytic enteritis (Marsh type 1) was lower in GA (9.6 %) than in CD (66.7 %; p < 0.001), but similar to NCGS (10.8 %; N.S.). The other gluten sensitivity-related characteristics measured were different to CD patients, but very close to NCGS. We conclude that GA patients are better classified within the NCGS group, than within CD.

  5. Iron deficiency anemia in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2015-08-21

    Iron is an important micronutrient that may be depleted in celiac disease. Iron deficiency and anemia may complicate well-established celiac disease, but may also be the presenting clinical feature in the absence of diarrhea or weight loss. If iron deficiency anemia occurs, it should be thoroughly evaluated, even if celiac disease has been defined since other superimposed causes of iron deficiency anemia may be present. Most often, impaired duodenal mucosal uptake of iron is evident since surface absorptive area in the duodenum is reduced, in large part, because celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder largely focused in the proximal small intestinal mucosa. Some studies have also suggested that blood loss may occur in celiac disease, sometimes from superimposed small intestinal disorders, including ulceration or neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma. In addition, other associated gastric or colonic disorders may be responsible for blood loss. Rarely, an immune-mediated hemolytic disorder with increased urine iron loss may occur that may respond to a gluten-free diet. Reduced expression of different regulatory proteins critical in iron uptake has also been defined in the presence and absence of anemia. Finally, other rare causes of microcytic anemia may occur in celiac disease, including a sideroblastic form of anemia reported to have responded to a gluten-free diet.

  6. The widening spectrum of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Murray, J A

    1999-03-01

    Celiac disease is a permanent intolerance to ingested gluten that results in immunologically mediated inflammatory damage to the small-intestinal mucosa. Celiac disease is associated with both human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and non-HLA genes and with other immune disorders, notably juvenile diabetes and thyroid disease. The classic sprue syndrome of steatorrhea and malnutrition coupled with multiple deficiency states may be less common than more subtle and often monosymptomatic presentations of the disease. Diverse problems such as dental anomalies, short stature, osteopenic bone disease, lactose intolerance, infertility, and nonspecific abdominal pain among many others may be the only manifestations of celiac disease. The rate at which celiac disease is diagnosed depends on the level of suspicion for the disease. Although diagnosis relies on intestinal biopsy findings, serologic tests are useful as screening tools and as an adjunct to diagnosis. The treatment of celiac disease is lifelong avoidance of dietary gluten. Gluten-free diets are now readily achievable with appropriate professional instruction and community support. Both benign and malignant complications of celiac disease occur but these can often be avoided by early diagnosis and compliance with a gluten-free diet.

  7. Iron deficiency anemia in celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an important micronutrient that may be depleted in celiac disease. Iron deficiency and anemia may complicate well-established celiac disease, but may also be the presenting clinical feature in the absence of diarrhea or weight loss. If iron deficiency anemia occurs, it should be thoroughly evaluated, even if celiac disease has been defined since other superimposed causes of iron deficiency anemia may be present. Most often, impaired duodenal mucosal uptake of iron is evident since surface absorptive area in the duodenum is reduced, in large part, because celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder largely focused in the proximal small intestinal mucosa. Some studies have also suggested that blood loss may occur in celiac disease, sometimes from superimposed small intestinal disorders, including ulceration or neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma. In addition, other associated gastric or colonic disorders may be responsible for blood loss. Rarely, an immune-mediated hemolytic disorder with increased urine iron loss may occur that may respond to a gluten-free diet. Reduced expression of different regulatory proteins critical in iron uptake has also been defined in the presence and absence of anemia. Finally, other rare causes of microcytic anemia may occur in celiac disease, including a sideroblastic form of anemia reported to have responded to a gluten-free diet. PMID:26309349

  8. Celiac Disease-Associated Autoimmune Endocrinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vijay; Rajadhyaksha, Manoj; Wortsman, Jacobo

    2001-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disorder induced by gluten intake in genetically susceptible individuals. It is characterized by the presence of serum antibodies to endomysium, reticulin, gliadin, and tissue transglutaminase. The incidence of CD in various autoimmune disorders is increased 10- to 30-fold in comparison to the general population, although in many cases CD is clinically asymptomatic or silent. The identification of such cases with CD is important since it may help in the control of type I diabetes or endocrine functions in general, as well as in the prevention of long-term complications of CD, such as lymphoma. It is believed that CD may predispose an individual to other autoimmune disorders such as type I diabetes, autoimmune thyroid, and other endocrine diseases and that gluten may be a possible trigger. The onset of type I diabetes at an early age in patients with CD, compared to non-CD, and the prevention or delay in onset of diabetes by gluten-free diet in genetically predisposed individuals substantiates this antigen trigger hypothesis. Early identification of CD patients in highly susceptible population may result in the treatment of subclinical CD and improved control of associated disorders. PMID:11427410

  9. Adult-onset amenorrhea: a study of 262 patients.

    PubMed

    Reindollar, R H; Novak, M; Tho, S P; McDonough, P G

    1986-09-01

    A series of 262 patients with amenorrhea of adult onset are reported. Hypothalamic suppression followed by inappropriate positive feedback, and then hyperprolactinemia and ovarian failure are the most frequently encountered etiologies. Other etiologies are diverse and numerically less frequent. Amenorrhea after use of oral contraceptives, or postpill amenorrhea, occurred in 77 (29%) of all patients. The average age of presentation, prior menstrual history, associated morbidity, and subsequent reproductive potential of each diagnostic group are reported. Adult-onset amenorrhea has a less significant impact on future wellbeing than was reported for a similar-sized group of patients whose amenorrhea developed as a result of pubertal aberrancy.

  10. Gut-liver axis: an immune link between celiac disease and primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Volta, Umberto; Caio, Giacomo; Tovoli, Francesco; De Giorgio, Roberto

    2013-03-01

    The association between celiac disease and primary biliary cirrhosis is well established. The breakdown of gut-liver axis equilibrium plays a central role in the development of immune disorders involving the small bowel and liver. In celiac disease, immunologically active molecules generated from the cross-linking between tissue transglutaminase and food/bacterial antigens reach the liver through the portal circulation owing to the increased intestinal permeability. A molecular mimicry between bacterial antigens and the pyruvate dehydrogenase E2 component, recognized by antimitochondrial autoantibodies, may have a role in primary biliary cirrhosis pathogenesis. An aberrant intestinal T lymphocyte homing to the liver may contribute to trigger immune hepatic damage. Both celiac disease and primary biliary cirrhosis share several features, including a higher prevalence in females, autoimmune comorbidities and specific autoantibodies. Reciprocal screening for both diseases is recommended, as an early diagnosis with the appropriate treatment can improve the outcome of these patients.

  11. New aspects in celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Torres, MI; López Casado, MA; Ríos, A

    2007-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a common autoimmune disorder characterized by an immune response to ingested gluten and has a strong HLA association with HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 molecules, but human HLA-DQ risk factors do not explain the entire genetic susceptibility to gluten intolerance. CD is caused by the lack of immune tolerance (oral tolerance) to wheat gluten. In this sense, the expression of soluble HLA-G in CD is of special interest because the molecule plays an important role in the induction of immune tolerance. The enhanced expression of soluble HLA-G found in CD may be part of a mechanism to restore the gluten intolerance. In this editorial, we review recent progress in understanding CD in relation to its prevalence, diagnosis and possible mechanisms of pathogenesis. PMID:17451193

  12. [The surgical treatment of an aneurysm of the celiac trunk and hepatic artery].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Camarero, S J; Menéndez, A I; Rodero, J I; Alvarez, J L; Cermeño, B; Viana, M M

    1993-01-01

    We report a case of splenic aneurysms with double location, at the celiac trunks and at the common hepatic artery, in the same patient that was treated by a surgical procedure. We also review literature about the hepatic aneurysms at the celiac trunks, with special attention on the aspects of etiology, natural evolutions and different surgical procedures available. It is remarkable on this kind of pathology that special attention should be paid in order to avoid the simple ligature-exclusion of the aneurysm, it involves realizing an endoaneurysmorrhaphy followed by an aorto-hepatic by-pass.

  13. Superior Mesenteric Artery Pseudoaneurysm Associated with Celiac Axis Occlusion Treated Using Endovascular Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Biswajit; Kuhan, Ganesh; Johnson, Brian; Nicholson, Anthony A.; Ettles, Duncan F.

    2006-10-15

    The case of a 30-year-old woman with a post-traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the superior mesenteric artery and associated celiac axis occlusion is presented. The patient was successfully treated with celiac artery recanalization and placement of a covered stent within the superior mesenteric artery. Follow-up at 3, 6, and 12 months and 3 years demonstrated patency of the covered stent and continued exclusion of the aneurysm. Although the long-term success of this procedure is unknown this management option should be considered where facilities are available, to reduce the increased morbidity associated with open surgical procedure.

  14. [Ascending aorta-supraceliac++ aorta bypass. Correction of a case of atypical coarctation in the adult].

    PubMed

    Vaquero, F; Zorita, A; Samos, R F; Vázquez, J G; Ortega, J M; Morán, C F

    1993-01-01

    A case of atypic coarctation at the aortic arch in an adult patient is described. Coarctation was surgically treated by a retrosternal bypass from the ascendant aorta to the supra-celiac aorta. After a short prelude the clinical case is summarized. Furthermore, the etiopathogenic features of the disease, the different diagnostic methods and the multiple surgical procedures are discussed. Finally, we briefly review the literature.

  15. The Role of Celiac Disease in Severity of Liver Disorders and Effect of a Gluten Free Diet on Diseases Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Haldane, Thea; AlDulaimi, David; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Zali, Mohammad Reza; Rostami, Kamran

    2013-01-01

    Context Celiac disease (CD) is defined as a permanent intolerance to ingested gluten. The intolerance to gluten results in immune-mediated damage of small intestine mucosa manifested by villous atrophy and crypt hyperplasia. These abnormalities resolve with initiationa gluten-free diet. Evidence Acquisition PubMed, Ovid, and Google were searched for full text articles published between 1963 and 2012. The associated keywords were used, and papers described particularly the impact of celiac disease on severity of liver disorder were identified. Results Recently evidence has emerged revealingthat celiac disease not only is associated with small intestine abnormalities and malabsorption, but is also a multisystem disorder affecting other systems outside gastrointestinal tract, including musculo-skeletal, cardiovascular and nervous systems. Some correlations have been assumed between celiac and liver diseases. In particular, celiac disease is associated with changes in liver biochemistry and linked to alter the prognosis of other disorders. This review will concentrate on the effect of celiac disease and gluten-free diets on the severity of liver disorders. Conclusions Although GFD effect on the progression of CD associated liver diseases is not well defined, it seems that GFD improves liver function tests in patients with a hypertransaminasemia. PMID:24348636

  16. Shared Genetic Factors Involved in Celiac Disease, Type 2 Diabetes and Anorexia Nervosa Suggest Common Molecular Pathways for Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mostowy, Joanna; Montén, Caroline; Gudjonsdottir, Audur H.; Arnell, Henrik; Browaldh, Lars; Nilsson, Staffan; Agardh, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several genetic regions involved in immune-regulatory mechanisms to be associated with celiac disease. Previous GWAS also revealed an over-representation of genes involved in type 2 diabetes and anorexia nervosa associated with celiac disease, suggesting involvement of common metabolic pathways for development of these chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to extend these previous analyses to study the gene expression in the gut from children with active celiac disease. Material and Methods Thirty six target genes involved in type 2 diabetes and four genes associated with anorexia nervosa were investigated for gene expression in small intestinal biopsies from 144 children with celiac disease at median (range) age of 7.4 years (1.6–17.8) and from 154 disease controls at a median (range) age 11.4.years (1.4–18.3). Results A total of eleven of genes were differently expressed in celiac patients compared with disease controls of which CD36, CD38, FOXP1, SELL, PPARA, PPARG, AGT previously associated with type 2 diabetes and AKAP6, NTNG1 with anorexia nervosa remained significant after correction for multiple testing. Conclusion Shared genetic factors involved in celiac disease, type 2 diabetes and anorexia nervosa suggest common underlying molecular pathways for these diseases. PMID:27483138

  17. What Is Celiac Disease? How Do I Live with It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaska, Joan

    2007-01-01

    Celiac disease, also known as celiac sprue, is a hereditary, autoimmune disease that causes a sensitivity to gluten, which is a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. The key symptoms of celiac disease are diarrhea, constipation, gas, bloating, backaches, stomachaches, nausea, anemia, fatigue, osteoporosis, stunted growth in children, and weight…

  18. Acne in the adult female patient: a practical approach.

    PubMed

    Kamangar, Faranak; Shinkai, Kanade

    2012-10-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common reason why adult women present to dermatologists and can be a clinical challenge to treat. It may also be an important sign of an underlying endocrine disease such as Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS). Although standard acne therapies can be successfully used to treat acne in adult female patients, hormonal treatment is a safe and effective therapeutic option that may provide an opportunity to better target acne in this population, even when other systemic therapies have failed. In this article, a practical approach to the adult female patient with acne will be reviewed to enhance the dermatologist's ability to use hormonal acne therapies and to better identify and evaluate patients with acne in the setting of a possible endocrine disorder.

  19. Lifetime Increased Risk of Adult Onset Atopic Dermatitis in Adolescent and Adult Patients with Food Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hsu-Sheng; Tu, Hung-Pin; Hong, Chien-Hui; Lee, Chih-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Food allergy can result in life-threatening anaphylaxis. Atopic dermatitis (AD) causes intense itching and impaired quality of life. Previous studies have shown that patients with classical early-onset AD tend to develop food allergy and that 10% of adults with food allergies have concomitant AD. However, it is not known whether late-onset food allergy leads to adult-onset AD, a recently recognized disease entity. Using an initial cohort of one-million subjects, this study retrospectively followed-up 2851 patients with food allergy (age > 12 years) for 14 years and compared them with 11,404 matched controls. While 2.8% (81) of the 2851 food allergy patients developed AD, only 2.0% (227) of the 11,404 controls developed AD. Multivariate regression analysis showed that food allergy patients were more likely to develop AD (adjusted hazard ratio = 2.49, p < 0.0001). Controls had a 1.99% risk of developing AD, while food allergy patients had a significantly higher risk (7.18% and 3.46% for patients with ≥3 and <3 food allergy claims, respectively) of developing adult-onset AD. This is the first study to describe the chronological and dose-dependent associations between food allergy in adolescence and the development of adult-onset AD. PMID:28035995

  20. Bones of contention: bone mineral density recovery in celiac disease--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Grace-Farfaglia, Patricia

    2015-05-07

    Metabolic bone disease is a frequent co-morbidity in newly diagnosed adults with celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune disorder triggered by the ingestion of dietary gluten. This systematic review of studies looked at the efficacy of the gluten-free diet, physical activity, nutrient supplementation, and bisphosphonates for low bone density treatment. Case control and cohort designs were identified from PubMed and other academic databases (from 1996 to 2015) that observed newly diagnosed adults with CD for at least one year after diet treatment using the dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan. Only 20 out of 207 studies met the inclusion criteria. Methodological quality was assessed using the Strengthening of the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement checklist. Gluten-free diet adherence resulted in partial recovery of bone density by one year in all studies, and full recovery by the fifth year. No treatment differences were observed between the gluten-free diet alone and diet plus bisphosphonates in one study. For malnourished patients, supplementation with vitamin D and calcium resulted in significant improvement. Evidence for the impact of physical activity on bone density was limited. Therapeutic strategies aimed at modifying lifestyle factors throughout the lifespan should be studied.

  1. Bones of Contention: Bone Mineral Density Recovery in Celiac Disease—A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Grace-Farfaglia, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic bone disease is a frequent co-morbidity in newly diagnosed adults with celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune disorder triggered by the ingestion of dietary gluten. This systematic review of studies looked at the efficacy of the gluten-free diet, physical activity, nutrient supplementation, and bisphosphonates for low bone density treatment. Case control and cohort designs were identified from PubMed and other academic databases (from 1996 to 2015) that observed newly diagnosed adults with CD for at least one year after diet treatment using the dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan. Only 20 out of 207 studies met the inclusion criteria. Methodological quality was assessed using the Strengthening of the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement checklist. Gluten-free diet adherence resulted in partial recovery of bone density by one year in all studies, and full recovery by the fifth year. No treatment differences were observed between the gluten-free diet alone and diet plus bisphosphonates in one study. For malnourished patients, supplementation with vitamin D and calcium resulted in significant improvement. Evidence for the impact of physical activity on bone density was limited. Therapeutic strategies aimed at modifying lifestyle factors throughout the lifespan should be studied. PMID:25961322

  2. Inferior Pancreaticoduodenal Artery Aneurysms Associated with Occlusive Lesions of the Celiac Axis: Diagnosis, Treatment Options, Outcomes, and Review of the Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Flood, Karen Nicholson, Anthony A.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To describe the presentation, treatment, and outcomes for 14 patients with aneurysms of the inferior pancreaticoduodenal arteries associated with occlusive lesions of the celiac axis, and to review the literature for similar cases. Methods, Over a period of 12 years, 14 patients (10 women and 4 men) ranging in age from 26 to 50 (mean 46) years were demonstrated to have aneurysms of the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery origin associated with stenosis or occlusion of the celiac axis. All patients were treated by a combination of surgery and interventional radiology. Results. Outcome data collected between 3 months and 4 years (mean 2 years) demonstrated that all aneurysms remained excluded, and all 14 patients were well. The 49 case reports in the literature confirm the findings of this cohort. Conclusion. In inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm resulting from celiac occlusive disease, endovascular treatment is best achieved by stenting the celiac axis and/or embolizing the aneurysm when necessary.

  3. Profound Reversible Hypogammaglobulinemia Caused by Celiac Disease in the Absence of Protein Losing Enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Ameratunga, Rohan; Barker, Russell William; Steele, Richard Henderson; Deo, Maneka; Woon, See-Tarn; Yeong, Mee Ling; Koopmans, Wikke

    2015-08-01

    When patients with hypogammaglobulinemia are encountered, a vigorous search should be undertaken for secondary treatable causes. Here we describe the first case of a patient with severe asymptomatic hypogammaglobulinemia where the underlying cause was undiagnosed celiac disease. A strict gluten free diet resulted in resolution of her mild long-standing abdominal symptoms and correction of her hypogammaglobulinemia. There was corresponding improvement in her duodenal histology and normalisation of her celiac serology. Protein losing enteropathy was unlikely to have been the mechanism of her profound hypogammaglobulinemia, as her albumin was within the normal range and she had a normal fecal alpha 1 antitrypsin level. Application of the Ameratunga et al. (2013) diagnostic criteria was helpful in confirming this patient did not have Common Variable Immunodeficiency Disorder (CVID). Celiac disease must now be considered in the differential diagnosis of severe hypogammaglobulinemia. There should be a low threshold for undertaking celiac serology in patients with hypogammaglobulinemia, even if they have minimal symptoms attributable to gut disease.

  4. Non-dietary methods in the treatment of celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This is a selective review of the literature concerning the methods of celiac disease treatment, which can be an alternative to a gluten-free diet. The most advanced studies are devoted to the larazotide acetate (AT-1001, human zonulin inhibitor) and prolyl-endopeptidases degrading toxic gluten peptides (ALV003, AN-PEP). It is estimated that they will be registered within a few years. They will not become an alternative to the gluten-free diet but rather a supplement to it, which will enable patients to ease the nutritional restrictions. PMID:25960809

  5. Dreaming during anaesthesia in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Kate; Skrzypek, Hannah

    2007-09-01

    Dreaming during anaesthesia is defined as any recalled experience (excluding awareness) that occurred between induction of anaesthesia and the first moment of consciousness upon emergence. Dreaming is a commonly-reported side-effect of anaesthesia. The incidence is higher in patients who are interviewed immediately after anaesthesia (approximately 22%) than in those who are interviewed later (approximately 6%). A minority of dreams, which include sensory perceptions obtained during anaesthesia, provide evidence of near-miss awareness. These patients may have risk factors for awareness and this type of dreaming may be prevented by depth of anaesthesia monitoring. Most dreaming however, occurs in younger, fitter patients, who have high home dream recall, who receive propofol-based anaesthesia and who emerge rapidly from anaesthesia. Their dreams are usually short and pleasant, are related to work, family and recreation, are not related to inadequate anaesthesia and probably occur during recovery. Dreaming is a common, fascinating, usually pleasant and harmless phenomenon.

  6. The immunocompromised adult patient and surgery.

    PubMed

    Littlewood, Keith E

    2008-09-01

    The perioperative management of immunosuppressed patients remains relatively unsophisticated. Rational management involves understanding the normal immune response to injury as modified by the preexisting or imposed abnormalities that immunosuppressed patients manifest on the basis of their disease and/or treatment. Patients with cancer, infected with human immunodeficiency virus, and having had an organ transplant are extreme examples of disordered immunity and it is important to understand the effects of their diseases and treatments. In the future, however, more appropriate management will require anticipation and appreciation of frequent preoperative immunotherapy, a more complete understanding of the immunological response to anesthesia and surgery, the ability to assess immune reserve and stratify risk within the context of that profile, and a better knowledge of the immunological effect of anesthetic agents.

  7. Body Composition in Adult Patients with Thalassemia Major.

    PubMed

    Vlychou, Marianna; Alexiou, Evangelos; Thriskos, Paschalis; Fezoulidis, Ioannis; Vassiou, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess body composition in adult male and female patients with thalassemia major by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and to compare the findings with a group of healthy age-matched controls. Methods. Our study group included sixty-two patients (27 males, mean age 36 years, and 35 females, mean age 36.4 years) and fifteen age-matched healthy controls. All patients had an established diagnosis of thalassemia major and followed a regular blood transfusion scheme since childhood and chelation treatment. Fat, lean, and bone mineral density (BMD) were assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Ferritin levels and body mass index of all patients and controls were also recorded. Student t-test and Wilcoxon test were performed and statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Results. BMD and whole body lean mass are lower in both male and female adult patients compared with controls (p < 0.01 in both groups), whereas whole body fat mass was found to have no statistically significant difference compared to controls. Regional trunk fat around the abdomen was found to be lower in male patients compared to controls (p = 0.02). Conclusion. Severe bone loss and diminished lean mass are expected in adult male and female patients with thalassemia major. Fat changes seem to affect mainly male patients.

  8. Body Composition in Adult Patients with Thalassemia Major

    PubMed Central

    Alexiou, Evangelos; Thriskos, Paschalis; Fezoulidis, Ioannis; Vassiou, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess body composition in adult male and female patients with thalassemia major by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and to compare the findings with a group of healthy age-matched controls. Methods. Our study group included sixty-two patients (27 males, mean age 36 years, and 35 females, mean age 36.4 years) and fifteen age-matched healthy controls. All patients had an established diagnosis of thalassemia major and followed a regular blood transfusion scheme since childhood and chelation treatment. Fat, lean, and bone mineral density (BMD) were assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Ferritin levels and body mass index of all patients and controls were also recorded. Student t-test and Wilcoxon test were performed and statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Results. BMD and whole body lean mass are lower in both male and female adult patients compared with controls (p < 0.01 in both groups), whereas whole body fat mass was found to have no statistically significant difference compared to controls. Regional trunk fat around the abdomen was found to be lower in male patients compared to controls (p = 0.02). Conclusion. Severe bone loss and diminished lean mass are expected in adult male and female patients with thalassemia major. Fat changes seem to affect mainly male patients. PMID:27956899

  9. [Diabetes education in adult diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Weitgasser, Raimund; Clodi, Martin; Cvach, Sarah; Grafinger, Peter; Lechleitner, Monika; Howorka, Kinga; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes education and self management has gained a critical role in diabetes care. Patient empowerment aims to actively influence the course of the disease by self-monitoring and treatment modification, as well as integration of diabetes in patients' daily life to achieve changes in lifestyle accordingly.Diabetes education has to be made accessible for all patients with the disease. To be able to provide a structured and validated education program adequate personal as well as space, organizational and financial background are required. Besides an increase in knowledge about the disease it has been shown that structured diabetes education is able to improve diabetes outcome measured by parameters like blood glucose, HbA1c, blood pressure and body weight in follow-up evaluations. Modern education programs emphasize the ability of patients to integrate diabetes in everyday life and stress physical activity besides healthy eating as a main component of lifestyle therapy and use interactive methods in order to increase the acceptance of personal responsibility.

  10. Intravenous lipids in adult surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Klek, Stanislaw; Waitzberg, Dan L

    2015-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition is considered an essential element of the perioperative management of surgical patients. It is recommended in patients who require nutritional therapy but in whom the enteral route is contraindicated, not recommended or non-feasible. The new generation of lipid emulsions (LEs) based on olive and fish oils are safe and may improve clinical outcome in surgical patients. The increased provision of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in fish oil-containing LEs seems to be associated with fewer infectious complications and shorter ICU and hospital stays following major abdominal surgery. Increased provision of olive oil in the absence of fish oil may also exert beneficial effects, but a clear conclusion on this is limited due to the low number of available studies. Hence, at the moment, the evidence supports the use of n-3-polyunsaturated fatty acid-enriched LEs as a part of the parenteral nutrition regimen for selected groups of patients, such as those with major surgical trauma or those undergoing extended resections or liver transplantation.

  11. Combined Endovascular Repair of a Celiac Trunk Aneurysm Using Celiac-Splenic Stent Graft and Hepatic Artery Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Giampaolo; Rivolta, Nicola; Fontana, Federico; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Mariscalco, Giovanni; Bracchi, Elena; Ferrario, Massimo

    2010-04-15

    Celiac trunk aneurysms are rare and usually asymptomatic lesions. However, treatment is generally warranted to avoid catastrophic rupture. We report a case of a 70-year-old man who sought care for a celiac trunk aneurysm close to the hepatosplenic bifurcation managed endovascularly by using a combined treatment of celiac-splenic stent-graft implantation and hepatic artery embolization.

  12. Celiac plexus block: an anatomical study and simulation using computed tomography*

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Gabriela Augusta Mateus; Lopes, Paulo Tadeu Campos; dos Santos, Ana Maria Pujol Vieira; Pozzobon, Adriane; Duarte, Rodrigo Dias; Cima, Alexandre da Silveira; Massignan, Ângela

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze anatomical variations associated with celiac plexus complex by means of computed tomography simulation, assessing the risk for organ injury as the transcrural technique is utilized. Materials and Methods One hundred eight transaxial computed tomography images of abdomen were analyzed. The aortic-vertebral, celiac trunk (CeT)-vertebral, CeT-aortic and celiac-aortic-vertebral topographical relationships were recorded. Two needle insertion pathways were drawn on each of the images, at right and left, 9 cm and 4.5 cm away from the midline. Transfixed vital organs and gender-related associations were recorded. Results Aortic-vertebral - 45.37% at left and 54.62% in the middle; CeT-vertebral - T12, 36.11%; T12-L1, 32.4%; L1, 27.77%; T11-T12, 2.77%; CeT-aortic - 53.7% at left and 46.3% in the middle; celiac-aortic-vertebral - L-l, 22.22%; M-m, 23.15%; L-m, 31.48%; M-l, 23.15%. Neither correspondence on the right side nor significant gender-related associations were observed. Conclusion Considering the wide range of abdominal anatomical variations and the characteristics of needle insertion pathways, celiac plexus block should not be standardized. Imaging should be performed prior to the procedure in order to reduce the risks for injuries or for negative outcomes to patients. Gender-related anatomical variations involved in celiac plexus block should be more deeply investigated, since few studies have addressed the subject. PMID:25741102

  13. Clinical profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Storm, Huib; Amelink, Marijke; de Nijs, Selma B.; Eichhorn, Edwin; Reitsma, Bennie H.; Bel, Elisabeth H.D.; ten Brinke, Anneke

    2016-01-01

    Adult-onset eosinophilic asthma is increasingly recognised as a severe and difficult-to-treat subtype of asthma. In clinical practice, early recognition of patients with this asthma subtype is important because it may have treatment implications. Therefore, physicians need to know the distinct characteristics of this asthma phenotype. The objective of the present study was to determine the characteristic profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma. 130 patients with adult-onset (>18 years of age) asthma and high blood eosinophil counts (≥0.3×109 L−1) were compared with 361 adult-onset asthma patients with low (<0.3×109 L−1) blood eosinophils. Measurements included a series of clinical, functional and imaging parameters. Patients with high blood eosinophils were more often male, had less well controlled asthma and higher exacerbation rates, despite the use of higher doses of inhaled corticosteroids. They had higher levels of total IgE without more sensitisation to common inhaled allergens. In addition, these patients had worse lung function, and more often showed fixed airflow limitation, air trapping, nasal polyposis and abnormalities on sinus computed tomography scanning. Chronic rhinosinusitis, air trapping and male sex were three independent factors associated with blood eosinophilia (adjusted OR 3.8 (95% CI 1.7–8.1), 3.0 (95% CI 1.1–8.1) and 2.4 (95% CI 1.3–4.4), respectively). Patients with adult-onset asthma with elevated blood eosinophils exhibit a distinct profile, which can readily be recognised in clinical practice. PMID:27730197

  14. Clinical profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Jantina C; Storm, Huib; Amelink, Marijke; de Nijs, Selma B; Eichhorn, Edwin; Reitsma, Bennie H; Bel, Elisabeth H D; Ten Brinke, Anneke

    2016-04-01

    Adult-onset eosinophilic asthma is increasingly recognised as a severe and difficult-to-treat subtype of asthma. In clinical practice, early recognition of patients with this asthma subtype is important because it may have treatment implications. Therefore, physicians need to know the distinct characteristics of this asthma phenotype. The objective of the present study was to determine the characteristic profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma. 130 patients with adult-onset (>18 years of age) asthma and high blood eosinophil counts (≥0.3×10(9) L(-1)) were compared with 361 adult-onset asthma patients with low (<0.3×10(9) L(-1)) blood eosinophils. Measurements included a series of clinical, functional and imaging parameters. Patients with high blood eosinophils were more often male, had less well controlled asthma and higher exacerbation rates, despite the use of higher doses of inhaled corticosteroids. They had higher levels of total IgE without more sensitisation to common inhaled allergens. In addition, these patients had worse lung function, and more often showed fixed airflow limitation, air trapping, nasal polyposis and abnormalities on sinus computed tomography scanning. Chronic rhinosinusitis, air trapping and male sex were three independent factors associated with blood eosinophilia (adjusted OR 3.8 (95% CI 1.7-8.1), 3.0 (95% CI 1.1-8.1) and 2.4 (95% CI 1.3-4.4), respectively). Patients with adult-onset asthma with elevated blood eosinophils exhibit a distinct profile, which can readily be recognised in clinical practice.

  15. Morphology and Topography of the Celiac Plexus in Degu (Octodon Degus).

    PubMed

    Kuchinka, Jacek; Nowak, Elżbieta; Kuder, Tadeusz; Szczurkowski, Aleksander

    2015-11-01

    Here, we investigate the morphology and topography of the celiac plexus components in degu (Octodon degus). The study was performed using six adult individuals of both sexes. Macromorphological observations were performed using a derivative of the thiocholine method specially adapted for this study type (Gienc, 1977). The classical H&E technique was used for analysis of the cytoarchitectonic of the ganglion, and the AChE (Karnovsky and Roots, 1964) and SPG (De la Torre, 1980) techniques to observe cholinergic and adrenergic activity. The celiac plexus of degu is located on the ventral and lateral surface of the abdominal aorta, at the level where the celiac artery separates from the aorta. This structure consists of two large and two smaller aggregations of neurocytes connected with postganglionic fibers. Histochemical investigations have demonstrated the mainly cholinergic characteristic of the intraganglionic and postganglionic fibers of the celiac plexus, while the adrenergic fibers accompanied only the blood vessels and neurocytes revealed differentiation of adrenergic activity. Histological analysis revealed that neurocytes occupied about half of the cross-section area, with the nerve fibers, connective tissue, and blood vessels forming the remaining part. Ganglionic cells were oval, and usually contained a single nucleus, although two nuclei were sometimes observed.

  16. Celiac Axis, Common Hepatic and Hepatic Artery Variants as Evidenced on MDCT Angiography in South Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction With the increase in the hepatobiliary, pancreatic surgeries and liver transplantation, being aware of the anatomic variations of the celiac axis and the hepatic arteries is of paramount importance. Aim To illustrate the normal anatomy and variants of the celiac axis and the hepatic arteries with multidetector computed tomographic (MDCT) angiography in South Indian population and determine the potential variations in the celiac axis anatomy and the hepatic arteries, thus assisting the hepatobiliary surgeon and the interventional radiologist in avoiding iatrogenic injury to the arteries. Materials and Methods Two hundred patients undergoing abdominal CT angiography from July 2014 till July 2015 were retrospectively studied for hepatic arterial and celiac axis anatomical variation. The anatomic variations in our study were correlated with other studies. Results The celiac axis (CA) and the hepatic artery (HA) variations were analysed as per criteria laid by Song et al., and Michel. Out of 15 possible CA variations, 5 types of celiac artery variations were seen in 14 patients. A normal CA was seen in 179(89.5%) patients of the 200 patients. In the remaining 7 patients, the CA anatomy was classified as ambiguous since there was separate origin of the right and left hepatic arteries from the CA with absent common hepatic artery (CHA). The CHA originated normally from the celiac axis in 94% of the cases. Variation of CHA origin was seen in 5 patients. Normal HA anatomy was seen in 114 (57%) patients. Variation in HA anatomy was seen in 86 (43%) patients. Origin of the right hepatic artery (RHA) from the hepatic artery proper was seen in 182 (91%) patients and replaced origin of RHA from the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) was seen in 18 (9%) of the cases. Accessory RHA was seen in 7(3.5%) patients. The left hepatic artery (LHA) originated from the hepatic artery proper in 186 (93%) patients and replaced origin of LHA from the left gastric artery (LGA) was

  17. Movement disorders in adult patients with classical galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Agusti, Ignacio; Carecchio, Miryam; Bhatia, Kailash P; Kojovic, Maja; Parees, Isabel; Chandrashekar, Hoskote S; Footitt, Emma J; Burke, Derek; Edwards, Mark J; Lachmann, Robin H L; Murphy, Elaine

    2013-06-01

    Classical galactosemia is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism leading to toxic accumulation of galactose and derived metabolites. It presents with acute systemic complications in the newborn. Galactose restriction resolves these symptoms, but long-term complications, such as premature ovarian failure and neurological problems including motor dysfunction, may occur despite adequate treatment. The objective of the current study was to determine the frequency and phenotype of motor problems in adult patients with classical galactosemia. In this cross-sectional study, adult patients with a biochemically confirmed diagnosis of galactosemia attending our clinic were assessed with an interview and neurological examination and their notes retrospectively reviewed. Patients were classified according to the presence/absence of motor dysfunction on examination. Patients with motor dysfunction were further categorized according to the presence/absence of reported motor symptoms. Forty-seven patients were included. Thirty-one patients showed evidence of motor dysfunction including: tremor (23 patients), dystonia (23 patients), cerebellar signs (6 patients), and pyramidal signs (4 patients). Tremor and dystonia were often combined (16 patients). Thirteen patients reported motor symptoms, with 8 describing progressive worsening. Symptomatic treatment was effective in 4 of 5 patients. Nonmotor neurological features (cognitive, psychiatric, and speech disorders) and premature ovarian failure were more frequent in patients with motor dysfunction. Motor dysfunction is a common complication of classical galactosemia, with tremor and dystonia the most frequent findings. Up to one third of patients report motor symptoms and may benefit from appropriate treatment. Progressive worsening is not uncommon and may suggest ongoing brain damage in a subset of patients.

  18. Presence of DQ2.2 Associated with DQ2.5 Increases the Risk for Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Lucas Malta; Gandolfi, Lenora; Pratesi, Riccardo; Uenishi, Rosa Harumi; de Almeida, Fernanda Coutinho; Selleski, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Background. Celiac disease (CD) is a genetically determined immune-mediated disorder in which gluten immunogenic peptides are presented to CD4 T cells by HLA-DQ2.5, DQ8, DQ2.2, and their combinations. Our aim is to establish a risk gradient for celiac disease based on HLA-DQ profile in a brazilian representative population and the relevance of DQ2.2 in celiac disease development. Materials and Methods. 237 celiac patients and 237 controls (both groups with 164 females and 73 males) were included. All samples were tested for the presence of predisposing HLA-DQ alleles using the PCR-SSP method. Results were considered significant when p < 0.05. Disease risk was expressed as 1 : N for each HLA-DQ category described at this study. Results. DQ2.5 and/or DQ8 were detected in 224 celiac patients (94.5%) and 84 controls (35.4%). Eight celiac patients (3.4%) and 38 controls (16%) disclosed only DQ2.2. Even though DQ2.2 (β2/β2 or β2/x) showed a low CD risk of 1 : 251 and 1 : 550, respectively, the genotype DQ2.5/DQ2.2 (β2/β2) showed high CD risk of 1 : 10 (p < 0.0001). The disease risk gradient ranged from 1 : 3014 to 1 : 7. Conclusion. Our study allowed the determination of a risk gradient for celiac disease development in at-risk population, showing that DQ2.2 variant was relevant when associated with DQ2.5. PMID:28042478

  19. Rhabdomyosarcoma in adolescent and young adult patients: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Egas-Bejar, Daniela; Huh, Winston W

    2014-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), a malignant tumor of mesenchymal origin, is the third most common extracranial malignant solid tumor in children and adolescents. However, in adults, RMS represents <1% of all solid tumor malignancies. The embryonal and alveolar histologic variants are more commonly seen in pediatric patients, while the pleomorphic variant is rare in children and seen more often in adults. Advances in the research of the embryonal and alveolar variants have improved our understanding of certain genes and biologic pathways that are involved in RMS, but much less is known for the other variants. Multimodality therapy that includes surgery and chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy is the mainstay of treatment for RMS. Improvements in the risk stratification of the pediatric patients based on presurgical (primary tumor site, tumor size, regional lymph node involvement, presence of metastasis) and postsurgical parameters (completeness of resection or presence of residual disease or metastasis) has allowed for the treatment assignment of patients in different studies and therapeutic trials, leading to increases in 5-year survival from 25%–70% over the past 40 years. However, for adult patients, in great part due to rarity of the disease and the lack of consensus on optimal treatment, clinical outcome is still poor. Many factors have been implicated for the differing outcomes between pediatric RMS versus adult RMS, such as the lack of standardized treatment protocols for adult RMS patients and the increased prevalence of advanced presentations. Now that there are increased numbers of survivors, we can appreciate the sequelae from therapy in these patients, such as bone growth abnormalities, endocrinopathies, and infertility. Improvements in risk stratification have led to clinical trials using lower doses of chemotherapy or radiation therapy with the intention of decreasing the incidence of side effects without compromising survival outcome. PMID

  20. A Future for Adult Educators in Patient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Jean E.

    2014-01-01

    Adult education in healthcare comes in several forms: degree and certificate programs aimed at preparing better academic and clinical educators; and community education programs aimed at wellness, rehabilitation, or learning to live with chronic diseases. Patient-centered healthcare, however, is part of something new: coordinated and transitional…

  1. Improvement with Duloxetine in an Adult ADHD Patient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tourjman, Smadar Valerie; Bilodeau, Mathieu

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common and disabling disorder among adults and is treated with stimulant and non stimulant medication. Objective: To report the case of a patient with ADHD showing good clinical response to duloxetine, a selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SSNRI). Case…

  2. Patient-specific FDG dosimetry for adult males, adult females, and very low birth weight infants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niven, Erin

    Fluorodeoxyglucose is the most commonly used radiopharmaceutical in Positron Emission Tomography, with applications in neurology, cardiology, and oncology. Despite its routine use worldwide, the radiation absorbed dose estimates from FDG have been based primarily on data obtained from two dogs studied in 1977 and 11 adults (most likely males) studied in 1982. In addition, the dose estimates calculated for FDG have been centered on the adult male, with little or no mention of variations in the dose estimates due to sex, age, height, weight, nationality, diet, or pathological condition. Through an extensive investigation into the Medical Internal Radiation Dose schema for calculating absorbed doses, I have developed a simple patient-specific equation; this equation incorporates the parameters necessary for alterations to the mathematical values of the human model to produce an estimate more representative of the individual under consideration. I have used this method to determine the range of absorbed doses to FDG from the collection of a large quantity of biological data obtained in adult males, adult females, and very low birth weight infants. Therefore, a more accurate quantification of the dose to humans from FDG has been completed. My results show that per unit administered activity, the absorbed dose from FDG is higher for infants compared to adults, and the dose for adult women is higher than for adult men. Given an injected activity of approximately 3.7 MBq kg-1, the doses for adult men, adult women, and full-term newborns would be on the order of 5.5, 7.1, and 2.8 mSv, respectively. These absorbed doses are comparable to the doses received from other nuclear medicine procedures.

  3. The adaptive immune response in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Shuo-Wang; Iversen, Rasmus; Ráki, Melinda; Sollid, Ludvig M

    2012-07-01

    Compared to other human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-associated diseases such as type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis, fundamental aspects of the pathogenesis in celiac disease are relatively well understood. This is mostly because the causative antigen in celiac disease-cereal gluten proteins-is known and the culprit HLA molecules are well defined. This has facilitated the dissection of the disease-relevant CD4+ T cells interacting with the disease-associated HLA molecules. In addition, celiac disease has distinct antibody responses to gluten and the autoantigen transglutaminase 2, which give strong handles to understand all sides of the adaptive immune response leading to disease. Here we review recent developments in the understanding of the role of T cells, B cells, and antigen-presenting cells in the pathogenic immune response of this instructive disorder.

  4. Neuropsychological profile of adult patients with nonsymptomatic occipital lobe epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Bilo, Leonilda; Santangelo, Gabriella; Improta, Ilaria; Vitale, Carmine; Meo, Roberta; Trojano, Luigi

    2013-02-01

    To explore the neuropsychological and neurobehavioral profile in adult patients affected by nonsymptomatic (cryptogenic and idiopathic) occipital lobe epilepsy (OLE), with normal intelligence, we enrolled 20 adult patients with nonsymptomatic OLE and 20 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy subjects. All participants underwent neuropsychiatric assessment scales, and standardized neuropsychological tests tapping memory, executive functions, constructional, visuospatial and visuoperceptual skills. After Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons, patients performed significantly worse than controls on several tests tapping complex visuospatial skills and frontal lobe functions. The analysis of single patients' performance revealed that a significantly higher number of OLE patients achieved age- and education-adjusted pathological scores on three tests (Benton Judgment of Line Orientation Test, Freehand Copying of Drawings Test, color-word interference task of Stroop test) with respect to controls. Patients did not differ from control subjects on neuropsychiatric aspects. The direct comparison between OLE subtypes showed that cryptogenetic OLE patients tended to achieve lower scores than idiopathic OLE patients on most tests, but no difference between the two groups was fully significant. In summary, patients with nonsymptomatic OLE can be affected by clinically relevant impairments in selected neuropsychological domains: complex visuospatial skills and executive functions. It could be speculated that frontal and visuospatial cognitive deficits might be the result of epileptic activity spreading within a neural network that includes structures far beyond the occipital lobe.

  5. Food hypersensitivity among adult patients: epidemiological and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Castillo, R; Delgado, J; Quiralte, J; Blanco, C; Carrillo, T

    1996-01-01

    Food hypersensitivity (FH) is lesser frequent among adult patients than in childhood. Foods implicated in hypersensitivity reactions vary with sociocultural and diet habits from a geographic place to other. We studied 142 adult patients sensitized to foods, among 7698 patients visited at our Outpatient Clinic. Hundred and twenty patients referred clinical symptoms after consumption of one or more foods consistently. From the latest, 107 patients (89.2%) were atopics (92 of them sensitizes to dust mites) and 54 (45%) referred atopic familiar background. Most frequent recorded symptoms were: urticaria/angioedema 84 cases (70%), oral syndrome 65 (54%), asthma 48 (37%) and anaphylaxis 33 patients (27.5%). Shellfish sensitization occurred in 50 patients, fresh fruits in 33 and nuts in 29 cases. Shrimp (48 patients), squid (33), kiwi (14), papaya (14), avocado (13) and banana (12 cases) were the most frequent causes of FH. Significant statistical association between foods and inhalants was observed for fresh fruits and latex (p < 0.001), fresh fruits and pollens (p < 0.01), and shellfish and Blatta germanica (p < 0.001). Prevalence of FH among patients at our Area is around 1.6%. Tropical fruits, as other kind of fruits, seem to share common IgE-epitopes to pollens. High prevalence of shellfish and cockroach hypersensitivity could be more easily developed by previous domestic mites sensitization.

  6. Occipital lobe seizures related to clinically asymptomatic celiac disease in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Ambrosetto, G; Antonini, L; Tassinari, C A

    1992-01-01

    We report the electroclinical ictal findings of four epileptic patients with clinically asymptomatic celiac disease (CD). Celiac disease diagnosis was suspected by past history and/or computed tomography (CT) findings in all patients and confirmed by laboratory tests and jejunal biopsy. All patients had paroxysmal visual manifestations and ictal EEG discharges arising from the occipital lobe. Epilepsy evolution was favorable in two patients and severe in 2, regardless of CT evidence of occipital corticosubcortical calcifications in 2 patients. Occipital lobe seizures may be characteristic of the epilepsy related to CD, and epileptic patients with these seizures of unknown etiology should be carefully investigated for malabsorption. If past history and/or laboratory tests suggest gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction they should also undergo small intestinal biopsy even if they do not have GI tract symptoms.

  7. Genome search in celiac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Greco, L; Corazza, G; Babron, M C; Clot, F; Fulchignoni-Lataud, M C; Percopo, S; Zavattari, P; Bouguerra, F; Dib, C; Tosi, R; Troncone, R; Ventura, A; Mantavoni, W; Magazzù, G; Gatti, R; Lazzari, R; Giunta, A; Perri, F; Iacono, G; Cardi, E; de Virgiliis, S; Cataldo, F; De Angelis, G; Musumeci, S; Clerget-Darpoux, F

    1998-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD), a malabsorption disorder of the small intestine, results from ingestion of gluten. The HLA risk factors involved in CD are well known but do not explain the entire genetic susceptibility. To determine the localization of other genetic risk factors, a systematic screening of the genome has been undertaken. The typing information of 281 markers on 110 affected sib pairs and their parents was used to test linkage. Systematic linkage analysis was first performed on 39 pairs in which both sibs had a symptomatic form of CD. Replication of the regions of interest was then carried out on 71 pairs in which one sib had a symptomatic form and the other a silent form of CD. In addition to the HLA loci, our study suggests that a risk factor in 5qter is involved in both forms of CD (symptomatic and silent). Furthermore, a factor on 11qter possibly differentiates the two forms. In contrast, none of the regions recently published was confirmed by the present screening. PMID:9497251

  8. The diagnostic value of the gliadin antibody test in celiac disease in children: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Bodé, S; Weile, B; Krasilnikoff, P A; Gudmand-Høyer, E

    1993-10-01

    Serum gliadin antibodies (IgA/IgG) were determined in 191 consecutive children (median age, 2.75 years; range, 0.33-15.5 years) admitted for a small-intestinal biopsy on suspicion of celiac disease. The test was a diffusion-in-gel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DIG-ELISA). Of these 191, 14 (7.3%) appeared to have untreated celiac disease. Depending on the choice of cut-off value of the test (combined determination of IgA and IgG), the sensitivity was 86-100%, the specificity was 97-99%, and the positive/negative predictive values were 70-92% and 99-100%, respectively. No variation according to age was found. Gliadin antibodies were determined in 47 children who had well-treated celiac disease. Fourteen of these children were also investigated when challenged with gluten. Gliadin antibodies (IgA or IgG) decreased significantly in 13 of 13 cases when the patients shifted from a gluten-containing diet to a gluten-free one. During the gluten challenge, the IgG and IgA increased in 14 of 14 and 11 of 14 cases, respectively (two patients suffered from IgA deficiency). In eight patients who later appeared to be free of celiac disease, the gliadin antibodies were determined on gluten-free diet and during gluten challenge; no significant differences in gliadin antibodies were found. We conclude that this test is useful in selecting patients with symptoms suggesting celiac disease for a small-intestinal biopsy. The test seems to be of some value in monitoring the effects of a gluten-free diet and during gluten challenge.

  9. [Diagnosis and therapy of adult patients with facial asymmetry].

    PubMed

    Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Kuroda, Shingo

    2009-09-01

    The goal of orthodontic treatment is to improve the patient's life by enhancing dental and jaw functions and dentofacial esthetics [Graber TM, et al., Orthodontics current principles and techniques. 4(e) ed. St Louis: Elsevier, 2005.]. Harmonious occlusion is achieved following improvements of malocclusion via orthodontic treatment [Ehmer U and Broll P, Int J Adult Orthod Orthognath Surg 1992;7:153-159. Throckmorton GS, et al., J Prosthet Dent 1984;51:252-261.]. Perfect facial symmetry is extremely rare, and normal faces have a degree of asymmetry. Patients with dentofacial deformity more frequently have asymmetry of the face and jaws. There was a relationship between the type of malocclusion and the prevalence of asymmetry; 28% of the Class III group, but 40% to 42% of the Class I, Class II and long face groups respectively, were asymmetric [Severt TR and Proffit WR, Int J Adult Orthod Orthogn Surg 1997;12:171-176.]; therefore, facial asymmetry is a common complaint among orthodontic patients. Treatment of severe facial asymmetry in adults consists mainly of surgically repositioning the maxilla or the mandible [Bardinet E, et al., Orthod Fr 2002;73:243-315. Guyuron B, Clin Plast Surg 1989;16:795-801. Proffit WR, et al., Contemporary treatment of dentofacial deformity. 2003. St Louis: Mosby, 2003:574-644.], however, new methods, i.e. orthodontic tooth movement with implant anchorage, have recently been introduced [Costa A, et al., Int J Adult Orthod Orthognath Surg 1998;3:201-209. Creekmore TD and Eklund MK, J Clin Orthod 1983;17:266-269. Miyawaki S,et al., Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop 2003;124:373-378. Park HS, et al., J Clin Orthod 2001;35:417-422. Roberts WE, et al., Angle Orthod 1989;59:247-256.], and various treatment options can be chosen in patients with facial asymmetry. In this article, we describe the diagnosis and treatment of adult patients with facial asymmetry.

  10. The Overlap between Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity: A Clinical Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Makharia, Archita; Catassi, Carlo; Makharia, Govind K

    2015-12-10

    The spectrum of gluten-related disorders has widened in recent times and includes celiac disease, non-celiac gluten sensitivity, and wheat allergy. The complex of symptoms associated with these diseases, such as diarrhea, constipation or abdominal pain may overlap for the gluten related diseases, and furthermore they can be similar to those caused by various other intestinal diseases, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The mechanisms underlying symptom generation are diverse for all these diseases. Some patients with celiac disease may remain asymptomatic or have only mild gastrointestinal symptoms and thus may qualify for the diagnosis of IBS in the general clinical practice. Similarly, the overlap of symptoms between IBS and non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) often creates a dilemma for clinicians. While the treatment of NCGS is exclusion of gluten from the diet, some, but not all, of the patients with IBS also improve on a gluten-free diet. Both IBS and NCGS are common in the general population and both can coexist with each other independently without necessarily sharing a common pathophysiological basis. Although the pathogenesis of NCGS is not well understood, it is likely to be heterogeneous with possible contributing factors such as low-grade intestinal inflammation, increased intestinal barrier function and changes in the intestinal microbiota. Innate immunity may also play a pivotal role. One possible inducer of innate immune response has recently been reported to be amylase-trypsin inhibitor, a protein present in wheat endosperm and the source of flour, along with the gluten proteins.

  11. Treatment failure in celiac disease due to coexistent exocrine pancreatic insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Weizman, Z; Hamilton, J R; Kopelman, H R; Cleghorn, G; Durie, P R

    1987-12-01

    A 17-year-old white adolescent had a history of chronic diarrhea, delayed puberty, and growth failure. Investigations excluded cystic fibrosis, Shwachman syndrome, and endocrine causes of growth failure. Severe steatorrhea was diagnosed from fecal fat studies, and a jejunal suction biopsy showed total villus atrophy, consistent with a diagnosis of celiac disease. Following introduction of a gluten-free diet, his appetite and growth improved, but he continued to have abdominal discomfort and loose offensive bowel motions. One year later, severe steatorrhea was present. A repeat jejunal biopsy showed partial recovery of villus architecture. Serum immuno-reactive trypsinogen level was low, which was highly suggestive of exocrine pancreatic failure. Results of quantitative pancreatic stimulation test confirmed the presence of primary pancreatic insufficiency. After introduction of oral pancreatic enzyme supplements with meals, his gastrointestinal symptoms resolved and growth velocity accelerated. Previously, primary pancreatic insufficiency has only been described in elderly patients with long-standing untreated celiac disease. This case, however, emphasizes that pancreatic failure can occur with celiac disease at any age. Determination of a serum immunoreactive trypsinogen level should be considered a useful screening tool for pancreatic insufficiency in patients with celiac disease who have not responded to a gluten-free diet.

  12. [Celiac disease associated with Helicobacter pylori infection].

    PubMed

    Cârdei, E; Moraru, D; Trandafir, Laura; Bozomitu, Laura; Mihăilă, Doina

    2003-01-01

    Celiac disease, also known as gluten-sensitive enteropathy, is an autoimmune enteropathy caused by the ingestion of gluten-containing grains in susceptible subjects. The authors present a 3 years and 5 months old girl diagnosed with celiac disease at 1 year and 5 months old. Initially, the evolution after gluten-free diet was favorable. After 2 years the child presented abdominal pain and anorexia. The IgA antigliadin antibodies had normal values. The gastric biopsy found Helicobacter pylori gastritis. After treatment for Helicobacter pylori eradication the symptoms disappeared.

  13. Celiac disease in children and adolescents with Hashimoto Thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Tuhan, Hale; Işık, Sakine; Abacı, Ayhan; Şimşek, Erdem; Anık, Ahmet; Anal, Özden; Böber, Ece

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical and laboratory findings and determine the prevalence of celiac disease (CD) in children with Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT). Material and Methods: The data of a total of 80 patients with positive anti-thyroid antibodies who were aged between 6 and 17.9 years were retrospectively studied. Age, gender, complaints at the time of presentation, family history of thyroid disorders, clinical and laboratory findings were recorded. The levels of thyrotropin, free thyroxin, thyroid autoantibodies (thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies), immunoglobulin A (IgA), anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (IgA-tTG), and thyroid ultrasonography findings were enrolled. Results: Eighty patients (65 females (81.2%) and 15 males (18,8%)) were included in the study. Family history of thyroid disease was present in 38 (47.5%) patients. The most common complaints at the time of presentation were goiter (%30) and weight gain (%25). Forty three (53.8%), 23 (28.7%), and 14 (17.5%) patients presented with euthyroidism, subclinical hypothyroidism and obvious hypothyroidism. Thirty seven (46.2%) patients had goiter. IgA-tTG was found to be positive after a diagnosis of HT was made in only one patient (1.25%) and the diagnosis of CD was confirmed when intestinal biopsy of this patient revealed villus atrophy, crypt hyperplasia and increase in the intraepithelial lymphocyte count. Conclusions: In our study, it was found that the most common complaints at presentation in patients with a diagnosis of hashimoto thyroiditis included goiter, weakness and weight gain and the prevalence of celiac diseases was found to be 1.25% (1/80). This study shows that the prevalence of CD in patients with a diagnosis of HT is higher compared to the prevalence in the healthy pediatric population. PMID:27489467

  14. Pneumococci Can Persistently Colonize Adult Patients with Chronic Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Domenech, A.; Balsalobre, L.; Marti, S.; Calatayud, L.; De la Campa, A. G.; Brueggemann, A. B.; Liñares, J.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae plays an important role in causing acute exacerbations in patients with chronic respiratory disease. However, few data are available regarding pneumococcal persistence in adult patients with chronic respiratory diseases. Fifty pneumococci recovered from sputum samples (1995 to 2010) from 13 adult patients with ≥3 episodes of acute exacerbation or pneumonia, with the same serotype and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern, were studied. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) loci, penicillin-binding protein (PBP) genes (pbp2x, pbp1a, pbp2b), and the quinolone-resistant determining regions (QRDRs) of parC, parE, and gyrA were PCR amplified and sequenced. The average time between the first and last episode was 582 days (standard deviation [SD], ±362). All but two patients received multiple courses of β-lactam treatment, and all persistent strains were resistant to penicillin; however, the PBP sequences were stable over time apart from one variable nucleotide in pbp2x, observed among pneumococci isolated from three patients. In contrast, 7/11 patients treated with fluoroquinolones had fluoroquinolone-resistant pneumococci. In three patients, the initially fluoroquinolone-susceptible strain developed resistance after fluoroquinolone therapy, and in the remaining four patients, the persistent strain was fluoroquinolone resistant from the first episode. QRDR changes involved in fluoroquinolone resistance were frequently observed in persistent strains after fluoroquinolone treatment; however, the PBP sequences and MLST genotypes of these strains were stable over time. PMID:23052300

  15. Amelogenesis imperfecta - lifelong management. Restorative management of the adult patient.

    PubMed

    Patel, M; McDonnell, S T; Iram, S; Chan, M F W-Y

    2013-11-08

    The biggest challenge restorative dentists face in rehabilitating patients with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is trying to restore aesthetics, function and occlusal stability while keeping the treatment as conservative as possible. The goals of treatment should be to prolong the life of the patient's own teeth and avoid or delay the need for extractions and subsequent replacement with conventional fixed, removable or implant retained prostheses. In order to achieve these goals a stepwise approach to treatment planning is required starting with the most conservative but aesthetically acceptable treatment. This article discusses the management of AI and presents the various treatment options available for restoring the adult patient who presents to the dentist with AI.

  16. Optimal serum phenylalanine for adult patients with phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Okano, Yoshiyuki; Nagasaka, Hironori

    2013-12-01

    High serum phenylalanine in adult patients with phenylketonuria (PKU) causes neuropsychological and psychosocial problems that can be resolved by phenylalanine-restricted diet. Therefore, PKU patients must continue to adhere to phenylalanine-restricted diet for life, although the optimal serum phenylalanine level in later life has yet to be established. The purpose of this review was to establish the optimal serum phenylalanine level in later life of PKU patients. We evaluated oxidative stress status, nitric oxide metabolism, cholesterol-derived oxysterols, vitamin D and bone status, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in adult PKU patients according to serum phenylalanine level. Oxidative stress increased markedly at serum phenylalanine of 700-800 μmol/L. Serum phenylalanine higher than 700-850 μmol/L correlated with the disturbance of nitric oxide regulatory system. Adult PKU patients had poor vitamin D status and exhibited predominance of bone resorption over bone formation. In the brain, the levels of 24S-hydroxycholesterol, a marker of brain cholesterol elimination, were low at serum phenylalanine levels exceeding 650 μmol/L. MRI studies showed high signal intensity in deep white matter on T2-weighted and FLAIR images of PKU patients with serum phenylalanine greater than 500 μmol/L, with decreased apparent diffusion coefficients. Changes in most parameters covering the entire body organs in adult PKU were almost acceptable below 700-800 μmol/L of phenylalanine level. However, the optimal serum phenylalanine level should be 500 μmol/L or less in later life for the brain to be safe.

  17. Coronary Arteriovenous Fistulas in Adult Patients: Surgical Management and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Albeyoglu, Sebnem; Aldag, Mustafa; Ciloglu, Ufuk; Sargin, Murat; Oz, Tugba Kemaloglu; Kutlu, Hakan; Dagsali, Sabri

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to describe the demographic, clinical and anatomic characteristics of coronary arteriovenous fistulas in adult patients who underwent open cardiac surgery and to review surgical management and outcomes. Methods Twenty-one adult patients (12 female, 9 male; mean age: 56.1±7.9 years) who underwent surgical treatment for coronary arteriovenous fistulas were retrospectively included in this study. Coronary angiography, chest X-ray, electrocardiography and transthoracic echocardiography were preoperatively performed in all patients. Demographic and clinical data were also collected. Postoperative courses of all patients were monitored and postoperative complications were noted. Results A total of 25 coronary arteriovenous fistulas were detected in 21 patients; the fistulas originated mainly from left anterior descending artery (n=9, 42.8%). Four (19.4%) patients had bilateral fistulas originating from both left anterior descending and right coronary artery. The main drainage site of coronary arteriovenous fistulas was the pulmonary artery (n=18, 85.7%). Twelve (57.1%) patients had isolated coronary arteriovenous fistulas and 4 (19.4%), concomitant coronary artery disease. Twenty (95.3%) of all patients were symptomatic. Seventeen patients were operated on with and 4 without cardiopulmonary bypass. There was no mortality. Three patients had postoperative atrial fibrillation. One patient had pericardial effusion causing cardiac tamponade who underwent reoperation. Conclusion The decision of surgical management should be made on the size and the anatomical location of coronary arteriovenous fistulas and concomitant cardiac comorbidities. Surgical closure with ligation of coronary arteriovenous fistulas can be performed easily with on-pump or off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting, even in asymptomatic patients to prevent fistula related complications with very low risk of mortality and morbidity.

  18. Identification and in vitro reactivity of celiac immunoactive peptides in an apparent gluten-free beer.

    PubMed

    Real, Ana; Comino, Isabel; Moreno, Ma de Lourdes; López-Casado, Miguel Ángel; Lorite, Pedro; Torres, Ma Isabel; Cebolla, Ángel; Sousa, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    Gluten content from barley, rye, wheat and in certain oat varieties, must be avoid in individuals with celiac disease. In most of the Western countries, the level of gluten content in food to be considered as gluten-free products is below 20 parts per million measured by ELISA based on specific anti-gluten peptide antibody. However, in beverages or food suffering complex hydrolytic processes as beers, the relative proportion of reactive peptides for celiac patients and the analytical techniques may differ, because of the diversity of the resulting peptide populations after fermentations. A beer below 20 parts per million of gluten but yet detectable levels of gluten peptides by anti-gliadin 33-mer antibodies (G12 and A1) was analyzed. We identified and characterized the relevant peptides for either antibody recognition or immunoactivity in celiac patients. The beer was fractionated by HPLC. The relative reactivity of the different HPLC fractions to the G12/A1 antibodies correlated to the reactivity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from 14 celiac individuals. Peptides from representative fractions classified according to the relative reactivity to G12/A1 antibodies were identified by mass spectrometry. The beer peptides containing sequences with similarity to those of previously described G12 and A1 epitopes were synthesized and confirmed significant reactivity for the antibodies. The most reactive peptides for G12/A1 also confirmed the highest immunogenicity by peripheral blood mononuclear cell activation and interferon γ production from celiac patients. We concluded that preparative HPLC combined with anti-gliadin 33-mer G12/A1 antibodies were very sensitive and specific methods to analyze the relevant immunogenic peptides in hydrolyzed gluten.

  19. Identification and In Vitro Reactivity of Celiac Immunoactive Peptides in an Apparent Gluten-Free Beer

    PubMed Central

    Real, Ana; Comino, Isabel; Moreno, Mª de Lourdes; López-Casado, Miguel Ángel; Lorite, Pedro; Torres, Mª Isabel; Cebolla, Ángel; Sousa, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    Gluten content from barley, rye, wheat and in certain oat varieties, must be avoid in individuals with celiac disease. In most of the Western countries, the level of gluten content in food to be considered as gluten-free products is below 20 parts per million measured by ELISA based on specific anti-gluten peptide antibody. However, in beverages or food suffering complex hydrolytic processes as beers, the relative proportion of reactive peptides for celiac patients and the analytical techniques may differ, because of the diversity of the resulting peptide populations after fermentations. A beer below 20 parts per million of gluten but yet detectable levels of gluten peptides by anti-gliadin 33-mer antibodies (G12 and A1) was analyzed. We identified and characterized the relevant peptides for either antibody recognition or immunoactivity in celiac patients. The beer was fractionated by HPLC. The relative reactivity of the different HPLC fractions to the G12/A1 antibodies correlated to the reactivity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from 14 celiac individuals. Peptides from representative fractions classified according to the relative reactivity to G12/A1 antibodies were identified by mass spectrometry. The beer peptides containing sequences with similarity to those of previously described G12 and A1 epitopes were synthesized and confirmed significant reactivity for the antibodies. The most reactive peptides for G12/A1 also confirmed the highest immunogenicity by peripheral blood mononuclear cell activation and interferon γ production from celiac patients. We concluded that preparative HPLC combined with anti-gliadin 33-mer G12/A1 antibodies were very sensitive and specific methods to analyze the relevant immunogenic peptides in hydrolyzed gluten. PMID:24963630

  20. Unique medical issues in adult patients with mucopolysaccharidoses.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, John; Berger, Kenneth I; Borgo, Andrea; Braunlin, Elizabeth A; Burton, Barbara K; Ghotme, Kemel A; Kircher, Susanne G; Molter, David; Orchard, Paul J; Palmer, James; Pastores, Gregory M; Rapoport, David M; Wang, Raymond Y; White, Klane

    2016-10-01

    The mucopolysaccharidoses are a group of inherited metabolic diseases caused by deficiencies in enzymes involved in the sequential degradation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) leading to substrate accumulation in various tissues and organs. GAG accumulation can cause growth retardation and progressive damage to respiratory, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, nervous, gastrointestinal, auditory, and visual systems. In the past, few people with severe phenotypic mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) reached adulthood. However, better methods for diagnosis, multi-disciplinary care, and new therapies have extended lifespan, leading to an increasing number of patients surviving beyond childhood. The growing number of adult MPS patients poses significant challenges for clinicians who may not be familiar with the clinical manifestations of MPS. In addition, as new interventions have changed the natural history of these disorders, it is difficult to anticipate both the impact on life expectancy and other complications that may occur as these patients age. Because the MPS disorders are multi-organ diseases, their management requires a coordinated multi-disciplinary approach. Here we discuss the unique pattern of medical issues and multi-organ involvement in adult patients with MPS and identify the challenges that are associated with management of MPS. This review is based on information from an expert investigator meeting with MPS specialists held October 2-4, 2014 in Dublin, Ireland, as well as on current literature searches focusing on MPS and adults.

  1. Neuropsychological Assessment of Adult Patients with Shunted Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Bakar, Emel Erdogan

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study is planned to determine the neurocognitive difficulties of hydrocephalic adults. Methods The research group contained healthy adults (control group, n : 15), and hydrocephalic adults (n : 15). Hydrocephalic group consisted of patients with idiopathic aquaduct stenosis and post-meningitis hydrocephalus. All patients were followed with shunted hydrocephalus and not gone to shunt revision during last two years. They were chosen from either asymptomatic or had only minor symptoms without motor and sensorineural deficit. A neuropsychological test battery (Raven Standart Progressive Matrices, Bender-Gestalt Test, Cancellation Test, Clock Drawing Test, Facial Recognition Test, Line Orientation Test, Serial Digit Learning Test, Stroop Color Word Interference Test-TBAG Form, Verbal Fluency Test, Verbal Fluency Test, Visual-Aural Digit Span Test-B) was applied to all groups. Results Neuropsychological assessment of hydrocephalic patients demonstrated that they had poor performance on visual, semantic and working memory, visuoconstructive and frontal functions, reading, attention, motor coordination and executive function of parietal lobe which related with complex and perseverative behaviour. Eventually, these patients had significant impairment on the neurocognitive functions of their frontal, parietal and temporal lobes. On the other hand, the statistical analyses performed on demographic data showed that the aetiology of the hydrocephalus, age, sex and localization of the shunt (frontal or posterior parietal) did not affect the test results. Conclusion This prospective study showed that adult patients with hydrocephalus have serious neuropsychological problems which might be directly caused by the hydrocephalus; and these problems may cause serious adaptive difficulties in their social, cultural, behavioral and academic life. PMID:20379471

  2. Attitudes Toward Genetic Testing for Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Roy, Abhik; Pallai, Michele; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Taylor, Annette K; Green, Peter H

    2016-04-01

    HLA molecular typing for celiac disease (CD) is a genetic test with a high negative predictive value. The aim of this study is to explore knowledge of and attitudes towards genetic testing (GT). A 25-item questionnaire was developed by a multidisciplinary team and distributed to members of CD support groups across the United States. Respondents (n = 1835) were mainly female (88 %), married (76 %), and college-educated (55 %), with a median age range of 31-50 years. Those who were married (82 vs 75 %, p = 0.002), had children (82 vs 74 %, p < 0.001), and had pursued education beyond high school (81 vs 68 %, p = 0.004) were more likely to be aware of the availability of GT. On multivariable analysis, adjusting for age, sex, education, marital status, region of residence, and having children, college-education (OR 2.05, 95 % CI: 1.33-3.16) and having children (OR 1.56, 95 % CI: 1.15-2.11) remained significant predictors of GT awareness. A majority of patients with a personal or family history of CD planned GT for their children, and the most common concerns regarding GT were cost and impact on health care and/or insurance. In conclusion, awareness of GT is high among CD support group members. Efforts should be made to increase knowledge of GT in those with a lower educational level, and healthcare professionals should attempt to address concerns regarding GT cost and the impact of results on health care and insurance status.

  3. Ebstein's anomaly in adult patients over 50 years of age.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Shigeaki; Yoshitake, Kiyonobu; Matsuo, Atsutoshi; Tayama, Kei-Ichiro; Hida, Satoru; Mito, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Ebstein's anomaly (EA) is a rare congenital heart disease of the tricuspid valve, and less than 5% of patients with EA survive beyond the age of 50. We report two unoperated cases of EA in adult patients aged over 50 years. Two patients, a 70-year-old Japanese woman and a 59-year-old Chinese woman, were referred to us for tachyarrhythmias. Transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated apical displacement (>8 mm/m(2) body surface area) of the septal leaflet of the tricuspid valve from the atrioventricular ring with tricuspid regurgitation in both patients. The former suddenly expired 20 months later after suffering from repetitive supraventricular tachyarrhythmias and/or heart failure, and the latter is alive with minimal signs of heart failure 12 months after the diagnosis of EA. Although the natural history of EA is extremely variable, these two patients are exceptional in that they tolerated EA well for over 50 years without any surgical intervention.

  4. Celiac disease in the developing countries: A new and challenging public health problem

    PubMed Central

    Cataldo, Francesco; Montalto, Giuseppe

    2007-01-01

    In the past, celiac disease was believed to be a chronic enteropathy, almost exclusively affecting people of European origin. The availability of new, simple, very sensitive and specific serological tests (anti-gliadin, anti-endomysium and anti-transglutaminase antibody assays) have shown that celiac disease is common not only in Europe and in people of European ancestry but also in the developing countries where the major staple diet is wheat (Southern Asia, the Middle East, North West and East Africa, South America), both in the general population and in the groups at risk. Gluten intolerance thus appears to be a widespread public health problem and an increased level of awareness and clinical suspicion are needed in the New World where physicians must learn to recognize the variable clinical presentations (classical, atypical and silent forms) of celiac disease. In the developing countries, both serological screening in the general population and serological testing in groups at risk are necessary for an early identification of celiac patients. The gluten-free diet poses a challenging public health problem in the developing countries, especially since commercial gluten-free products are not available. PMID:17465493

  5. Electrochemical magneto immunosensor for the detection of anti-TG2 antibody in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Kergaravat, Silvina V; Beltramino, Luis; Garnero, Nidia; Trotta, Liliana; Wagener, Marta; Isabel Pividori, Maria; Hernandez, Silvia R

    2013-10-15

    An electrochemical magneto immunosensor for the detection of anti-transglutaminase antibodies (ATG2) in celiac disease was developed. The immunological reaction is performed on magnetic beads (MBs) as a solid support in which the transglutaminase enzyme (TG2) is covalently immobilized (TG2-MB) and then ATG2 were revealed by an antibody labeled with peroxidase. The electrochemical response of the enzymatic reaction with o-phenilendiamine and H₂O₂ as substrates by square wave voltammetry was correlated with the ATG2. Graphite-epoxi composite cylindrical electrodes and screen printed electrodes were used as transducers in the immunosensor. A total number of 29 sera from clinically confirmed cases of celiac disease and 19 negative control sera were tested by the electrochemical magneto immunosensor. The data were submitted to the receiver-operating characteristic plot (ROC) analysis which indicated that 16.95 units was the most effective cut-off value (COV) to discriminate correctly between celiac and non-celiac patients. Using this point for prediction, sensitivity was found to be 100%, while specificity was 84%.

  6. Lack of Serologic Evidence to Link IgA Nephropathy with Celiac Disease or Immune Reactivity to Gluten

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, Sina; Canetta, Pietro A.; Taylor, Annette K.; Arguelles-Grande, Carolina; Snyder, Holly; Green, Peter H.; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Alaedini, Armin

    2014-01-01

    IgA nephropathy is the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis worldwide. Mucosal infections and food antigens, including wheat gluten, have been proposed as potential contributing environmental factors. Increased immune reactivity to gluten and/or association with celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder triggered by ingestion of gluten, have been reported in IgA nephropathy. However, studies are inconsistent about this association. We aimed to evaluate the proposed link between IgA nephropathy and celiac disease or immune reactivity to gluten by conducting a comprehensive analysis of associated serologic markers in cohorts of well-characterized patients and controls. Study participants included patients with biopsy-proven IgA nephropathy (n = 99), unaffected controls of similar age, gender, and race (n = 96), and patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease (n = 30). All serum specimens were tested for IgG and IgA antibodies to native gliadin and deamidated gliadin, as well as IgA antibody to transglutaminase 2 (TG2). Anti-TG2 antibody-positive nephropathy patients and unaffected controls were subsequently tested for IgA anti-endomysial antibody and genotyped for celiac disease-associated HLA-DQ2 and -DQ8 alleles. In comparison to unaffected controls, there was not a statistically significant increase in IgA or IgG antibody reactivity to gliadin in individuals with IgA nephropathy. In addition, the levels of celiac disease-specific serologic markers, i.e., antibodies to deamidated gliadin and TG2, did not differ between IgA nephropathy patients and unaffected controls. Results of the additional anti-endomysial antibody testing and HLA genotyping were corroborative. The data from this case-control study do not reveal any evidence to suggest a significant role for celiac disease or immune reactivity to gluten in IgA nephropathy. PMID:24732864

  7. Bilateral Femoral Neck Fatigue Fracture due to Osteomalacia Secondary to Celiac Disease: Report of Three Cases.

    PubMed

    Selek, Ozgur; Memisoglu, Kaya; Selek, Alev

    2015-08-01

    Bilateral non traumatic femoral neck fatigue fracture is a rare condition usually occurring secondary to medical conditions such as pregnancy, pelvic irradiation, corticosteroid exposure, chronic renal failure and osteomalacia. In this report, we present three young female patients with bilateral femoral neck fracture secondary to osteomalacia. The underlying cause of osteomalacia was Celiac disease in all patients. The patients were treated with closed reduction and internal fixation with cannulated lag screws. They were free of pain and full weight bearing was achieved at three months. There were no complications, avascular necrosis and nonunion during the follow up period. In patients with bone pain, non traumatic fractures and muscle weakness, osteomalacia should be kept in mind and proper diagnostic work-up should be performed to identify the underlying cause of osteomalacia such as celiac disease.

  8. [Chronic Duodenitis and Celiac Disease: a path between the nonspecific and the early stages of Marsh].

    PubMed

    Passera, Andrea Helena; Passera, Mario Luis; Higa, Antonio Luis; Nuñez, Maria; Armando, Lucas; Barzón, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Given the advances in diagnosis for CD, some patients are detected with symptoms and signs of food intolerance, which have positive antibodies and autoantibodies for coeliac disease, whom present proximal bowel biopsies with chronic nonspecific duodenitis and are not associated with stages 0 and 1 Marsh. On the other hand, patients with bloating, abdominal pain, pondostatural delay, negative antibodies for CD, and chronic nonspecific duodenitis in whom removing cow's milk or gluten, the symptoms remit. There are also celiac patients with biopsies before diagnosis, with chronic nonspecific duodenitis. In this paper, we summarize three brothers with different degrees of chronic duodenitis, one with chronic nonspecific duodenitis, and two with histopathological sings of coeliac disease. It is an invitation to think that chronic nonspecific duodenitis in some patients may be an earlier manifestation of celiac disease.

  9. Posttranslational modification of gluten shapes TCR usage in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Shuo-Wang; Ráki, Melinda; Gunnarsen, Kristin S; Løset, Geir-Åge; Lundin, Knut E A; Sandlie, Inger; Sollid, Ludvig M

    2011-09-15

    Posttranslational modification of Ag is implicated in several autoimmune diseases. In celiac disease, a cereal gluten-induced enteropathy with several autoimmune features, T cell recognition of the gluten Ag is heavily dependent on the posttranslational conversion of Gln to Glu residues. Evidence suggests that the enhanced recognition of deamidated gluten peptides results from improved peptide binding to the MHC and TCR interaction with the peptide-MHC complex. In this study, we report that there is a biased usage of TCR Vβ6.7 chain among TCRs reactive to the immunodominant DQ2-α-II gliadin epitope. We isolated Vβ6.7 and DQ2-αII tetramer-positive CD4(+) T cells from peripheral blood of gluten-challenged celiac patients and sequenced the TCRs of a large number of single T cells. TCR sequence analysis revealed in vivo clonal expansion, convergent recombination, semipublic response, and the notable conservation of a non-germline-encoded Arg residue in the CDR3β loop. Functional testing of a prototype DQ2-α-II-reactive TCR by analysis of TCR transfectants and soluble single-chain TCRs indicate that the deamidated residue in the DQ2-α-II peptide poses constraints on the TCR structure in which the conserved Arg residue is a critical element. The findings have implications for understanding T cell responses to posttranslationally modified Ags.

  10. Gluten and celiac disease--an immunological perspective.

    PubMed

    Rallabhandi, Prasad

    2012-01-01

    Gluten, a complex protein group in wheat, rye, and barley, causes celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune enteropathy of the small intestine, in genetically susceptible individuals. CD affects about 1% of the general population and causes significant health problems. Adverse inflammatory reactions to gluten are mediated by inappropriate T-cell activation leading to severe damage of the gastrointestinal mucosa, causing atrophy of absorptive surface villi. Gluten peptides bind to the chemokine receptor, CXCR3, and induce release of zonulin, which mediates tight-junction disassembly and subsequent increase in intestinal permeability. Proinflammatory cytokine IL-15 also contributes to the pathology of CD, by driving the expansion of intra-epithelial lymphocytes that damage the epithelium and promote the onset of T-cell lymphomas. There is no cure or treatment for CD, except for avoiding dietary gluten. Current gluten thresholds for food labeling have been established based on the available analytical methods, which show variation in gluten detection and quantification. Also, the clinical heterogeneity of celiac patients poses difficulty in defining clinically acceptable gluten thresholds in gluten-free foods. Presently, there is no bioassay available to measure gluten-induced immunobiological responses. This review focuses on various aspects of CD, and the importance of gluten thresholds and reference material from an immunological perspective.

  11. Infective Dermatitis in an Adult Patient With HTLV-1

    PubMed Central

    Riveros, Rosalba; Medina, Raquel; Morel, Maida

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Infective dermatitis is a chronic exudative eczematous eruption presenting in human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)–infected people. It presents with relapsing erythematous, scaly, and crusted lesions affecting simultaneously the scalp, external ear, retroauricular area, eyelid, paranasal skin, neck axilla, and groin. Superimposed Staphylococcus and Streptococcus infection are common. It mainly affects children and exceptionally adults, and there are only a few published cases. The authors present the first reported case in Paraguay of an adult patient who had symptoms of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1–associated progressive tropical spastic paraparesis, and 6 years after the onset of the neurological symptoms, the patient developed infective dermatitis lesions on the skin, with frequent exacerbations since then. PMID:26588341

  12. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension in adult patients with congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Serino, G; Giacomazzi, F

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary Hypertension (PH) is definited by a mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAPm) >25 mmHg at rest. The Dana Point 2008 Revised Classification System represents the most recent classification system update with respect of various etiologies of PH. About 10 % of adolescents or adults with uncorrected congenital heart disease (CHD) with left-to-right shunt and high pulmonary blood flow develop Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) . Progressive vascular remodeling and increase in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) may ultimately lead to reversal of the shunt (pulmonary to systemic) causing cyanosis and determining the so-called Eisenmenger Syndrome (ES). Recent advances in the early diagnosis and medical targeted treatment of adult patients with CHD-PAH and ES can improve PAP, PVR and exercise tolerance, together with NYHA Class and survival, and may potentially reverse the vascular remodeling process in selected patients.

  13. H.pylori associated with iron deficiency anemia even in celiac disease patients; strongly evidence based but weakly reflected in practice

    PubMed Central

    Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Aldulaimi, David; Livett, Helen; Rostami, Kamran

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation can lead to malabsorption of important micronutrients such as iron. Malabsorption and nutritional deficiency can be caused by a variety of pathological and environmental factors causing a range of other symptoms commonly caused by both H. pylori infection and coeliac disease (CD). National guidelines suggest the routine taking of duodenal biopsies to exclude CD when investigating patients for iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Studies suggest that in absence of positive antibodies, IDA is rarely caused by CD. Recent British Society of Gastroenterology guidelines discourage the routine duodenal biopsies in low risk cases but despite this guidance, taking duodenal biopsies for IDA is a common practice. Many studies have reported that H. pylori infection is associated with IDA even in patients with CD. In countries with low H. pylori prevalence we still detect more H. pylori than CD standing behind IDA. Despite the strong association between IDA and H. pylori, taking biopsies to diagnose H. pylori infection is not usually a routine part of the diagnostic workup to identify the etiology of IDA. In this review we will discuss the impact of H. pylori in IDA and highlight the possible gaps in identifying the IDA etiology. PMID:26328039

  14. Modified Fontan Conversion: An Alternative Technique for Adult Patients.

    PubMed

    González-López, María-Teresa; Pita-Fernández, Ana-María; Gil-Jaurena, Juan-Miguel; Pérez-Caballero-Martínez, Ramón; Sánchez-Valenzuela, Diego; Las, Cynthia-Jahavee

    2015-07-01

    A need persists for Fontan conversion that provides alternative approaches for the individual anatomical challenges occurring in these unusual and complex adult patients. The pulmonary arteries present unique variations and the surgical technique needs to be intraoperatively addressed. We describe a technique for Fontan conversion for performing the distal anastomosis of the extracardiac conduit, allowing adequate matching to the pulmonary arteries and preserving an optimal flow into the Fontan circuit.

  15. Hypohidrosis induced by topiramate in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Karachristianou, Styliani; Papamichalis, Evangelos; Sarantopoulos, Alexandros; Boura, Panagiota; Georgiadis, George

    2013-06-01

    Hypohidrosis is an uncommon and reversible side effect of topiramate treatment, reported mainly in children. This report presents an adult patient with complex partial seizures who was treated with topiramate and developed hypohidrosis coupled with hyperthermia, related to high environmental temperature and physical exercise. Reduced sweat response was confirmed using the Neuropad test. Signs and symptoms ceased after drug discontinuation. During topiramate treatment, it is important to recognise this side effect, although the exact causal mechanism has not yet been clarified.

  16. [Celiac disease : Pathogenesis, clinics, epidemiology, diagnostics, therapy].

    PubMed

    Schuppan, Detlef

    2016-07-01

    Celiac disease is induced by the consumption of gluten containing cereals (wheat, spelt, barley, rye). With a prevalence of ~ 1 %, it is the most common non-infectious chronic inflammatory intestinal disease worldwide. It manifests in all age groups, either classically with abdominal pain, diarrhoea and growth failure or weight loss, more commonly with indirect consequences of malabsorption, such as anaemia and osteoporosis, or with associated autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis or dermatitis herpetiformis. The pathogenesis of celiac disease is well explored. Gluten, the cereal storage protein, is not completely digested and reaches the intestinal mucosa where it activates inflammatory T cells, which cause atrophy of the resorptive villi. This T‑cell activation requires a genetic predisposition (the molecules HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 on antigen-presenting immune cells). Moreover, the enzyme tissue transglutaminase (TG2) which is released in the mucosa increases the immunogenicity of the gluten peptides by a deamidation reaction. The test for serum antibodies to the autoantigen TG2 is one of the best diagnostic markers in medicine, which in combination with endoscopically obtained biopsies, secures the diagnosis of celiac disease. Despite these tools celiac disease is severely underdiagnosed, with 80-90 % of those affected being undetected. The untreated condition can lead to grave complications. These include the consequences of malabsorption, cancers (especially intestinal T‑cell lymphoma), and likely also the promotion of autoimmune diseases. The therapy of celiac disease, a strict gluten-free diet, is difficult to maintain and not always effective. Alternative, supporting pharmacological therapies are urgently needed and are currently in development.

  17. Relationship of Hemoglobin Concentration in Adult Asthmatic Patients.

    PubMed

    Nasreen, S; Nessa, A; Islam, M F; Husain, M F; Khatun, N; Wahed, F; Zannat, M R; Tajkia, T

    2016-10-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways, in which many cells and cellular elements play a role. Asthma is one of the most common diseases globally and currently affects 300 million people. The epidemic rise in anemia, asthma, and related allergic disease is a common major public health problem worldwide. Asthma and anemia associated with acute infections occur both in children and adults. This descriptive type of cross sectional study was done to find out the levels of hemoglobin concentration in adult asthmatic patients and carried out in the Department of Physiology, Mymensingh Medical College, Mymensingh, Bangladesh from July 2014 to January 2016. Fifty (50) male and 50 (fifty) female adult asthmatic patients aged 18-60 years were included in the study group. They are enrolled from the Department of Medicine, Mymensingh Medical College, Mymensingh, Bangladesh and also from locality. For comparison age matched 50 male and 50 female apparently healthy persons were also studied as control. Hemoglobin concentration was estimated by Cyanmethemoglobin method. For statistical analysis unpaired student's 't' test was used. Mean hemoglobin concentration was significantly decreased in study group in comparison to control group and the result was statistically significant (p<0.001). The study findings showed a high prevalence of anemia among asthmatic patients than non asthmatic healthy persons.

  18. Organ doses to adult patients for chest CT

    SciTech Connect

    Huda, Walter; Sterzik, Alexander; Tipnis, Sameer; Schoepf, U. Joseph

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to estimate organ doses for chest CT examinations using volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) data as well as accounting for patient weight. Methods: A CT dosimetry spreadsheet (ImPACT CT patient dosimetry calculator) was used to compute organ doses for a 70 kg patient undergoing chest CT examinations, as well as volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) in a body CT dosimetry phantom at the same CT technique factors. Ratios of organ dose to CTDI{sub vol} (f{sub organ}) were generated as a function of anatomical location in the chest for the breasts, lungs, stomach, red bone marrow, liver, thyroid, liver, and thymus. Values of f{sub organ} were obtained for x-ray tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kV for 1, 4, 16, and 64 slice CT scanners from two vendors. For constant CT techniques, we computed ratios of dose in water phantoms of differing diameter. By modeling patients of different weights as equivalent water cylinders of different diameters, we generated factors that permit the estimation of the organ doses in patients weighing between 50 and 100 kg who undergo chest CT examinations relative to the corresponding organ doses received by a 70 kg adult. Results: For a 32 cm long CT scan encompassing the complete lungs, values of f{sub organ} ranged from 1.7 (thymus) to 0.3 (stomach). Organs that are directly in the x-ray beam, and are completely irradiated, generally had f{sub organ} values well above 1 (i.e., breast, lung, heart, and thymus). Organs that are not completely irradiated in a total chest CT scan generally had f{sub organ} values that are less than 1 (e.g., red bone marrow, liver, and stomach). Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV resulted in modest increases in f{sub organ} for the heart (9%) and thymus (8%), but resulted in larger increases for the breast (19%) and red bone marrow (21%). Adult patient chests have been modeled by water cylinders with diameters between

  19. Vaccination of Adult Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Moraes-Fontes, Maria Francisca; Antunes, Ana Margarida; Gruner, Heidi; Riso, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    In the wake of the Portuguese vaccination program 50th anniversary it seems appropriate to review vaccination in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Controversial issues as regards the association between autoimmune diseases, infections, and vaccines are discussed as well as vaccine safety and efficacy issues as regards chronic immunosuppressant (IS) drug therapy. After a brief overview of national policies, specific recommendations are made as regards vaccination for adult patients with SLE with a particular focus on current IS therapy and unmet needs. PMID:27069477

  20. Stepping to stability and fall prevention in adult psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Emory, Sara L; Silva, Susan G; Christopher, Eric J; Edwards, Pamela B; Wahl, Leanne E

    2011-12-01

    Fall prevention is a major area of concern in inpatient settings. This article reports on the feasibility of implementing a daily exercise program that features line dancing to promote stability, balance, and flexibility in adult psychiatric patients and describes the impact of that program. Six hundred sixty-five patient charts drawn from before and after the practice change were reviewed. The fall rate after the introduction of line dancing was 2.8% compared with 3.2% before implementation. In a setting that treats both men and women of many ages and with varying levels of mobility, line dancing offers a viable approach to exercise in a secure setting.

  1. [The definition of the medical clown's role with adult patients].

    PubMed

    Scheyer, Rachel; Nuttman-Shwartz, Orit; Ziyoni, Herzel

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the healthcare system has grown increasingly aware of the need to develop and adopt new models and intervention methods aimed at improving patients' quality of life. As part of this perception, medical clowns have been integrated into hospitals, primarily in work with children. Recently, there have been attempts to integrate clowns into work with adult patients in emergency rooms, but this intervention method has not yet been systematically implemented and studied. This article describes and examines the definition of the medical clown's role as an intervention strategy with adult outpatients suffering from chronic and life-threatening illnesses. The study is qualitative and based on a content analysis of the documentation of the work of two medical clowns over two years. The dominant theme arising from this analysis involves the definition of the clown's role within the medical space of the hospital and includes perspectives on his integration into the hospital's multidisciplinary medical staff and his impact on the staff and on patients and their families. The findings indicate that, from the clowns' point of view, integrated medical clowns as part of the medical team, would contribute to the functioning of both patients and staff. This is in accord with additional studies conducted recently in medical centers around the world. Since this is a pioneering study, there is room to further probe and research the medical clown's contribution to assisting and improving patients' and staff's quality of life and to develop ways of increasing his integration and professionalism.

  2. Study of inhaler technique in asthma patients: differences between pediatric and adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Manríquez, Pablo; Acuña, Ana María; Muñoz, Luis; Reyes, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Inhaler technique comprises a set of procedures for drug delivery to the respiratory system. The oral inhalation of medications is the first-line treatment for lung diseases. Using the proper inhaler technique ensures sufficient drug deposition in the distal airways, optimizing therapeutic effects and reducing side effects. The purposes of this study were to assess inhaler technique in pediatric and adult patients with asthma; to determine the most common errors in each group of patients; and to compare the results between the two groups. Methods: This was a descriptive cross-sectional study. Using a ten-step protocol, we assessed inhaler technique in 135 pediatric asthma patients and 128 adult asthma patients. Results: The most common error among the pediatric patients was failing to execute a 10-s breath-hold after inhalation, whereas the most common error among the adult patients was failing to exhale fully before using the inhaler. Conclusions: Pediatric asthma patients appear to perform most of the inhaler technique steps correctly. However, the same does not seem to be true for adult patients. PMID:26578130

  3. Clofarabine in Adult Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-04

    Solid Tumors; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, Pediatric; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, Adult; Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute, Pediatric; Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute, Adult; Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Adult

  4. Celiac Disease and Myointimal Proliferation: A Possible Correlation?

    PubMed Central

    Merra, Giuseppe; Lago, Antonio Dal; Roccarina, Davide; Gasbarrini, Giovanni; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Ghirlanda, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disorder of the small bowel that occurs in genetically predisposed people of all ages, from middle infancy, and is caused by a reaction to gliadin, a gluten protein. Some patients are diagnosed with symptoms related to the decreased absorption of nutrients or with various symptoms which, although statistically linked, have no clear relationship with the malfunctioning bowel. Classic symptoms of CD include diarrhea, weight loss, and fatigue; bowel symptoms may be limited or even absent. In this article we describe the case of a young woman with CD who presents with myointimal proliferation. However multiple cases of vessel thrombosis have been reported in patients with CD. Despite the fact that no definitive relationship between these diseases could be explained, we think this association must be remembered especially in cases of young and tenuous women with these vascular abnormalities. PMID:21897789

  5. [Evolutionary study of 81 children with celiac disease].

    PubMed

    Danus, O; Larraín, F; Urbina, A M

    1979-01-01

    A review of 81 children with celiac disease over a period of 5 years is presented. These cases were seen at the Gastroenterological Unit of the Hospital de Nińos Roberto del Río, during years 1970 through 1972. 62% of the patients (50) were placed under control of their disease, the rest were studied and diagnosed only for other centers. The short term evolution was good in 48 children (96%), while the medium and long term evolution, 2 to 5 years, was good only in 56% of the patients. This evolution was in direct relationship to the fulfillment of the dietary indications. The therapeutic test was positive among the studied group. A delay was observed in 80% of the cases that lasted from 1 to 6 months. The clinical and laboratory features of the group are analyzed, and the working method is described.

  6. The epidemiology of adult Rapid Response Team patients in Australia.

    PubMed

    Jones, D

    2014-03-01

    Rapid Response Teams (RRT) are specialised teams that review deteriorating ward patients in an attempt to prevent morbidity and mortality. Most studies have assessed the effect of implementing an RRT into a hospital. There is much less literature on the characteristics and outcomes of RRT patients themselves. This article reviews the epidemiology of adult RRT patients in Australia and proposes three models of RRT syndromes. The number of RRT calls varies considerably in Australian hospitals from 1.35 to 71.3/1000 hospital admissions. Common causes of RRT calls include sepsis, atrial fibrillation, seizures and pulmonary oedema. Approximately 20% of patients to whom an RRT has responded have more than one RRT call, and up to one-third have issues around end-of-life care. Calls are least common overnight. Between 10 to 25% of patients are admitted to a critical care area after the call. The in-hospital mortality for RRT patients is approximately 25% overall but only 15% in patients without a limitation of medical therapy. RRT syndromes can be conceptually described by the trigger for the call (e.g. hypotension) or the clinical condition causing the call (e.g. sepsis). Alternatively, the RRT call can be described by the major theme of the call: "end-of-life care", "requiring critical care" and "stable enough to initially remain on the ward". Based on these themes, education strategies and quality improvement initiatives may be developed to reduce the incidence of RRT calls, further improving patient outcome.

  7. Experimental identification of potential falls in older adult hospital patients.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Aimee; Yang, James; Pati, Debajyoti; Valipoor, Shabboo

    2016-05-03

    Patient falls within hospitals have been identified as serious but largely preventable incidents, particularly among older adult patients. Previous literature has explored intrinsic factors associated with patient falls, but literature identifying possible extrinsic or situational factors related to falls is lacking. This study seeks to identify patient motions and activities along with associated environmental design factors in a patient bathroom and clinician zone setting that may lead to falls. A motion capture experiment was conducted in a laboratory setting on 27 subjects over the age of seventy using scripted tasks and mockups of the bathroom and clinician zone of a patient room. Data were post-processed using Cortex and Visual3D software. A potential fall was characterized by a set of criteria based on the jerk of the upper body׳s center of mass (COM). Results suggest that only motion-related factors, particularly turning, pushing, pulling, and grabbing, contribute most significantly to potential falls in the patient bathroom, whereas only pushing and pulling contribute significantly in the clinician zone. Future work includes identifying and changing precise environmental design factors associated with these motions for an updated patient room and performing motion capture experiments using the new setup.

  8. Celiac Disease in an Elite Female Collegiate Volleyball Athlete: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Eberman, Lindsey E; Cleary, Michelle A

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To present the case of an elite female volleyball player who complained of diarrhea and fatigue after preseason training. Background: The athlete lost 8.1 kg during the first 20 days of training, and we initially suspected an eating disorder. The sports medicine team interviewed the athlete and found she did not have psychological symptoms indicative of an eating disorder. The results of routine blood tests revealed critically high platelet counts; in conjunction with the physical findings, the athlete was referred to a gastroenterologist. Differential Diagnosis: Our initial suggestion was an eating disorder. Therefore, the differential diagnosis included anorexia athletica, anorexia nervosa, and bulimia nervosa. On referral, the differential diagnosis was anemia, gastrointestinal dysfunction, lymphoma, or bowel adenocarcinoma. Diarrhea, weight loss, and blood test results were suggestive of active celiac disease, and a duodenal biopsy specimen confirmed this diagnosis. Treatment: The athlete was treated with a gluten-free diet, which excludes wheat, barley, and rye. Dietary substitutions were incorporated to maintain adequate caloric intake. Uniqueness: The presence of active celiac disease may not be uncommon. However, elite athletes who face celiac disease present a new challenge for the athletic trainer. The athletic trainer can help guide the athlete in coping with the lifestyle changes associated with a gluten-free diet. Conclusions: One in every 200 to 400 individuals has celiac disease; many of these individuals are asymptomatic and, therefore, their conditions are undiagnosed. Undiagnosed, untreated celiac disease and patients who fail to follow the gluten-free diet increase the risk of further problems. PMID:16404459

  9. Cancer in first-degree relatives of people with celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Emilsson, Louise; Murray, Joseph A.; Leffler, Daniel A.; Ludvigsson, Jonas F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Celiac disease (CD) has been linked to cancer, especially lymphoproliferative malignancy (LPM). Earlier research has shown that first-degree relatives (FDRs) to individuals with CD are at increased risk of autoimmunity including CD, but data on their risk of cancer are scarce and contradictory. We aimed to assess whether Swedish FDRs to individuals with CD are at increased risk of cancer. Methods: Individuals with CD (identified through biopsy reports equal to Marsh grade III) were matched on sex, age, county, and calendar year with up to 5 control individuals. All FDRs (father, mother, sibling, offspring) of CD individuals (“celiac FDRs”: n = 109,391) and controls (n = 548,465) were identified through Swedish healthcare registries. Through Cox regression, we calculated hazard ratios (HRs) for cancer incidence (all cancer, breast cancer, gastrointestinal cancer, and LPM). Results: During follow-up, celiac FDRs experienced 10,750 unique cancers as opposed to 54,686 in-control FDRs. Celiac FDRs were at a slightly lower risk of any cancer (HR 0.97, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.95–0.99), partially due to the lower risk of breast cancer (HR 0.92, 95% CI 0.87–0.98). The relative risks of LPM (HR 0.99, 95% CI 0.91–1.08) and gastrointestinal cancer (HR 0.98, 95%CI 0.93–1.03) were both close to 1. As opposed to earlier research, we found no excess risk of LPM in siblings to individuals with CD (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.81–1.19). Conclusion: Celiac FDRs are not at increased risk of cancer, including LPM, arguing that shared genetics is unlikely to explain previous reports of an excess risk of LPM in patients with CD. PMID:27512889

  10. Modified ultrafiltration in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Zakkar, Mustafa; Guida, Gustavo; Angelini, Gianni D

    2015-03-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was the impact of modified ultrafiltration on adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery in terms of inflammatory and metabolic changes, blood loss and early clinical outcomes. A total of 155 papers were identified using the search as described below. Of these, six papers presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question as they reported data to reach conclusions regarding the issues of interest for this review. The author, date and country of publication, patient group, study type and weaknesses and relevant outcomes were tabulated. Modified ultrafiltration in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery seems to attenuate the levels of inflammatory molecules associated with surgery, reduces blood loss and blood transfusion and improves cardiac output, index and systemic vascular resistance. However, this was not translated in any reduction in length of stay in intensive care unit or hospital. Most studies were single-centre prospective non-blinded trials that included a small cohort of elective coronary artery bypass grafting patients, which makes it underpowered to provide unbiased evidence regarding clinical outcomes. Properly designed and conducted prospective randomized studies are required to answer whether the beneficial effect of modified ultrafiltration on systemic inflammatory molecules associated with surgery can translate with improvement in clinical outcome.

  11. Clinical and immunological relevance of anti-neuronal antibodies in celiac disease with neurological manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Caio, Giacomo; Giorgio, Roberto De; Venturi, Alessandro; Giancola, Fiorella; Latorre, Rocco; Boschetti, Elisa; Serra, Mauro; Ruggeri, Eugenio; Volta, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To assess anti-neuronal antibodies (NA) prevalence and their correlation with neurological disorders and bowel habits in celiac disease (CD) patients. Background: Neurological manifestations are estimated to occur in about 10% of celiac disease patients and NA to central nervous system (CNS) and enteric nervous system (ENS) are found in a significant proportion of them. Little is known about the clinical and immunological features in CD patients with neurological manifestations. Patients and methods: NA to CNS and ENS were investigated in 106 CD patients and in 60 controls with autoimmune disorders by indirect immunofluorescence on rat / primate cerebellar cortex and intestinal (small and large bowel) sections. Results: IgG NA to CNS (titer 1:50 - 1:400) were positive in 23 celiacs (21%), being more frequently detected in those with neurological disorders that in those without neurological dysfunction (49% vs. 8%, P< 0.0001). Of the 26 celiacs (24%) with IgG NA to ENS, 11 out of 12 with an antibody titer > 1:200 had severe constipation. Only one patient with cerebellar ataxia and intestinal sub-occlusion was positive for NA to CNS and ENS. NA to CNS and ENS were found in 7% and 5% of controls, respectively. Conclusion: In CD the positivity of NA to CNS can be regarded as a marker of neurological manifestations. High titer NA to ENS are associated with severe constipation. The demonstration of NA to CNS and ENS suggests an immune-mediated pathogenesis leading to central neural impairment as well as gut dysfunction (hence constipation), respectively. PMID:25926940

  12. Uveitis responding on gluten free diet in a girl with celiac disease and diabetes mellitus type 1.

    PubMed

    Krifa, F; Knani, L; Sakly, W; Ghedira, I; Essoussi, A S; Boukadida, J; Ben Hadj Hamida, F

    2010-01-01

    A 9-year old girl with a history of diabetes mellitus type 1, presented with visual loss of the left eye. The right eye examination was unremarkable. Slit-lamp examination revealed few small and fine keratic precipitates. We noted 2+ flare in the vitreous. There was no choroiditis, papillitis or retinal vasculitis. No aetiology was found. The patient was treated by topical and systemic corticosteroids without any improvement. Celiac disease was discovered by the presence of celiac antibodies in the work-up of joint pain and diabetes mellitus type 1. Antiendomysium antibodies and anti-transglutaminase antibodies were both positive. A small bowel biopsy confirmed celiac disease. A gluten free diet was set up and corticosteroids were tapered off. Recovery of the uveitis was obvious during gluten free diet and normalized within two months.

  13. Hybrid procedure for celiac trunk aneurysm repair via left reno-splenic bypass and stent-graft deployment.

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, Roberto; Rosati, Maria Sofia; Siani, Andrea; Chiappa, Roberto; Caselli, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Celiac trunk aneurysm is one of the rarest forms of splanchnic artery aneurysm. Conventional open vascular surgery is associated with increased rates of morbidity and mortality and can require complex vascular reconstruction.We describe the case of a 42-year-old patient with celiac trunk aneurysm whom we treated by means of a hybrid surgical-endovascular procedure. We performed a left reno-splenic bypass, after which we used a direct splenic artery approach to deploy a self-expandable 6 × 50-mm stent-graft across the splenic and hepatic arteries. One year later, the stability of the repair was confirmed.

  14. Hybrid Procedure for Celiac Trunk Aneurysm Repair via Left Reno-Splenic Bypass and Stent-Graft Deployment

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielli, Roberto; Rosati, Maria Sofia; Siani, Andrea; Chiappa, Roberto; Caselli, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Celiac trunk aneurysm is one of the rarest forms of splanchnic artery aneurysm. Conventional open vascular surgery is associated with increased rates of morbidity and mortality and can require complex vascular reconstruction. We describe the case of a 42-year-old patient with celiac trunk aneurysm whom we treated by means of a hybrid surgical-endovascular procedure. We performed a left reno-splenic bypass, after which we used a direct splenic artery approach to deploy a self-expandable 6 × 50-mm stent-graft across the splenic and hepatic arteries. One year later, the stability of the repair was confirmed. PMID:22719156

  15. Mutatis mutandis: are we diagnosing too many people with non-celiac gluten sensitivity? Multiple case report.

    PubMed

    Borghini, Raffaele; Donato, Giuseppe; Di Tola, Marco; Isonne, Claudia; Picarelli, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    We report three patients presenting with gluten-related signs and symptoms. Since villous height/crypt depth ratio, intraepithelial lymphocyte count, and serum antibody tests were not diagnostic for celiac disease (CD), a diagnosis of non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) was suggested. On the other hand, antibodies suggestive for CD surprisingly showed positive results in the duodenal biopsy organ culture of all three cases. The reported cases suggest the precious potential role that organ culture systems may play in differentiating CD from NCGS. This method should be recommended when gluten-related disorders are suspected in order to reduce the inappropriate diagnosis of NCGS.

  16. Overview of biomarkers for diagnosis and monitoring of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Brusca, Ignazio

    2015-01-01

    Among the adverse reactions caused by wheat, celiac disease (CD) is the longest studied and best-known pathology. The more recently defined non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) presents with symptoms which are often indistinguishable from CD. Diagnosis of CD is based on serologic, molecular, and bioptic testing. The IgA anti-transglutaminase (tTG) test is considered highly important, as it shows high sensitivity and specificity and its levels correlate to the degree of intestinal damage. Small bowel biopsy can be avoided in symptomatic patients with IgA anti-tTG levels above 10× the manufacturer's cut-off. Recently, tests of anti-deamidated peptides of gliadin (DGP) have replaced classic anti-native gliadin (AGA) tests. DGP assays have a considerably higher diagnostic accuracy than AGA assays, especially in the IgG class, and can replace anti-tTG tests in patients with selective IgA deficiency. The combination of IgG anti-DGP plus IgA anti-tTG assays show greater sensitivity than a single test, with very high specificity. EMA tests have great diagnostic accuracy but are not recommended by all the latest guidelines because they are observer dependent. Biopsy must still be considered the gold standard for CD diagnosis. HLA-DQ genotyping can be used to screen asymptomatic children and in cases of histology/serology disagreement. About half of NCGS patients are DQ2 positive and have IgG AGA. To diagnose NCGS, first CD and wheat allergy must be excluded; then the wheat dependence of symptoms must be verified by a gluten-free diet and subsequent gluten challenge.

  17. Celiac disease and gluten-associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Helms, Steve

    2005-09-01

    Celiac disease develops from an autoimmune response to specific dietary grains that contain gluten. Diagnosis can be made based on the classical presentation of diarrhea, fatty stools, and abdominal bloating and cramping, as well as the presence of specific serum antibodies. In addition, gluten ingestion has increasingly been found to be associated with other conditions not usually correlated with gluten intolerance. The subsequent diversity of the clinical presentation in these cases can complicate decision-making and delay treatment initiation in conditions such as ataxia, headaches, arthritis, neuropathy, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and others. This review explores the etiology and pathology of celiac disease, presents support for the relationship between gluten and other diseases, and provides effective screening and treatment protocols.

  18. Coil Embolization of Pancreaticoduodenal Artery Aneurysms Associated with Celiac Artery Stenosis: Report of Three Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osamu Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Kawanaka, Kohichi; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2007-06-15

    Aneurysms of the pancreaticoduodenal artery are rare. Degeneration of pancreaticoduodenal arcade vessels due to these aneurysms is associated with celiac artery stenosis or occlusion. Untreated lesions enlarge progressively and may rupture spontaneously. As the location of aneurysms of pancreaticoduodenal arcade vessels renders their surgical extirpation a challenge, we examined whether endovascular techniques offer a treatment alternative. We report on 3 patients with aneurysms of the pancreaticoduodenal arcade vessels and concomitant celiac artery stenosis/occlusion due to compression by the median arcuate ligament or chronic pancreatitis. All patients were treated by percutaneous coil embolization of the aneurysm. The aneurysmal sac was successfully excluded and the native circulation was preserved. Endovascular surgery can be used to treat these aneurysms safely and permits retention of the native circulation.

  19. Thyroid gland diseases in adult patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Vondra, K; Vrbikova, J; Dvorakova, K

    2005-12-01

    This review concerns the relation between most frequent thyroid gland diseases and diabetes mellitus in adult patients. Special attention is paid to autoimmune thyroiditis, Graves' disease, thyroid autoimmunity in pregnant diabetic women, and iodine metabolism. We focused on mechanisms leading to coexistence of both endocrine disorders, and on distinctions in the prevalence, diagnosis, clinical course and treatment of thyroid diseases in diabetic patients. The prevalence of thyroid diseases in diabetic patients is 2-3 times higher than in nondiabetic subjects; it raises with age, and is strongly influenced by female gender and autoimmune diabetes. Clinical relevance of thyroid diseases, especially in diabetic patients, significantly increases if it is associated with deteriorated function, which always cause a number problems with metabolic compensation of diabetes. Most serious consequences are increased frequency of hypoglycaemia in hypothyroidism and development of potentially life-threatening ketoacidosis in thyrotoxicosis. In spite of that, little attention is paid to the diagnosis of thyroid diseases in diabetics, as they are diagnosed in only about half of the patients. At the end, we provide recommendations for the thyroid disease screening and diagnosis in patients with diabetes mellitus based on our experience.

  20. Updates in vaccination: Recommendations for adult inflammatory bowel disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Chaudrey, Khadija; Salvaggio, Michelle; Ahmed, Aftab; Mahmood, Sultan; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-01-01

    Treatment regimens for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) incorporate the use of a variety of immunosuppressive agents that increase the risk of infections. Prevention of many of these infections can be achieved by the timely and judicious use of vaccinations. IBD patients tend to be under-immunized. Some of the contributing factors are lack of awareness regarding the significance of vaccinating IBD patients, misperception about safety of vaccinations in immunocompromised patients, ambiguity about the perceived role of the gastroenterologist in contrast to the primary care physician and unavailability of vaccination guidelines focused on IBD population. In general, immunocompetent IBD patients can be vaccinated using standard vaccination recommendations. However there are special considerations for IBD patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy, IBD travelers and pregnant women with IBD. This review discusses current vaccination recommendations with updates for adult IBD patients. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2013 vaccination guidelines with 2014 updates and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommendations have been highlighted as a primary source of recommendations. PMID:25805924

  1. Group B streptococcal necrotizing pneumonia in a diabetic adult patient.

    PubMed

    Pacha, Andrea; Luna Cian, Ramiro; Bonofiglio, Laura; Solari, Melisa; Strada, Virginia; Suárez, Mariana; Vigliarolo, Laura; Tersigni, Carina; Mollerach, Marta; Lopardo, Horacio

    2017-03-18

    The aim of this report is to describe a rare case of necrotizing pneumonia due to group B Streptococcus serotype III in a relatively young male adult (48 years old) suffering from diabetes. The organism was isolated from his pleural fluid and was only resistant to tetracycline. The patient first received ceftazidime (2g/8h i.v.)+clindamycin (300mg/8h) for 18 days and then he was discharged home and orally treated with amoxicillin clavulanic acid (1g/12h) for 23 days with an uneventful evolution. As in the cases of invasive infection by Streptococcus pyogenes, clindamycin could prevent streptococcal toxic shock syndrome.

  2. Is visualising ureter before pyeloplasty necessary in adult patients?

    PubMed

    Cakan, M; Yalçinkaya, F; Demirel, F; Satir, A

    2000-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to detect whether or not visualising ureter and ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) preoperatively is necessary in adult patients who have primer UPJ obstruction. Between January 1995 to June 1999, 46 renal units in 45 patients with primer UPJ obstruction were evaluated. The patients were separated into 2 groups. In group 1, intravenous pyelography (IVP) and renal scintigraphy were performed to 17 renal units preoperatively. In group 2, in addition to these methods, either retrograde pyelography (RGP) or antegrade pyelography (AGP) were performed to 29 renal units. Renal/bladder sonogram was used in patients with poor renal function in IVP or in renal scintigraphy. All the operations were performed through a flank incision. In group 2, additional information was gained for 8 (27.5%) of the renal units preoperatively. No additional information for this group found intraoperatively. In group 1, we found additional information in 4 (23.53%) of the units intraoperatively. All the pathologies in both groups were corrected intraoperatively. Double-J (D-J) stent was used in 6 (35.29%) of the units in group 1 and 8 (27.58%) of the units in group 2 intraoperatively (p > 0.05). In group 2, 4 (13.79%) preoperative complications were seen due to RGP and they were treated either medically or conservatively. In the early postoperative period, a complication observed in 1 (5.88%) of the patients in group 1 and 1 of the patients in group 2 (3.44%) (p > 0.05). The first patient was treated with inserting D-J and the latter one was treated conservatively. In the 3rd postoperative month, success rate was found to be 94.11% in group 1 and 96.55% in group 2 (p > 0.05). Additional pathologies in adult patients with primer UPJ obstruction can be corrected intraoperatively through a flank incision. Therefore, imaging of ureter and UPJ may not be necessary in these patients.

  3. Bone mineral density at diagnosis of celiac disease and after 1 year of gluten-free diet.

    PubMed

    Pantaleoni, Stefano; Luchino, Massimo; Adriani, Alessandro; Pellicano, Rinaldo; Stradella, Davide; Ribaldone, Davide Giuseppe; Sapone, Nicoletta; Isaia, Gian Carlo; Di Stefano, Marco; Astegiano, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Atypical or silent celiac disease may go undiagnosed for many years and can frequently lead to loss of bone mineral density, with evolution to osteopenia or osteoporosis. The prevalence of the latter conditions, in case of new diagnosis of celiac disease, has been evaluated in many studies but, due to the variability of epidemiologic data and patient features, the results are contradictory. The aim of this study was to evaluate bone mineral density by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in 175 consecutive celiac patients at time of diagnosis (169 per-protocol, 23 males, 146 females; average age 38.9 years). Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was repeated after 1 year of gluten-free diet in those with T-score value <-1 at diagnosis. Stratification of patients according to sex and age showed a higher prevalence of low bone mineral density in men older than 30 years and in women of all ages. A 1-year gluten-free diet led to a significant improvement in lumbar spine and femoral neck mean T-score value. We propose that dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry should be performed at diagnosis of celiac disease in all women and in male aged >30 years, taking into account each risk factor in single patients.

  4. Thickening of the celiac axis and/or superior mesenteric artery: a sign of pancreatic carcinoma on computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Megibow, A.J.; Bosniak, M.A.; Ambos, M.A.; Beranbaum, E.R.

    1981-11-01

    Of 53 patients with carcinoma of the pancreas studied by computed tomography, 20 (37.7%) had apparent thickening of either the celiac axis or superior mesenteric artery. In 6 of them, the pancreatic mass was poorly defined. The frequency of this sign, correlation with angiographic findings, and pathogenesis are discussed.

  5. Celiac disease treatment: gluten-free diet and beyond.

    PubMed

    Mäki, Markku

    2014-07-01

    The basis for celiac disease (CD) treatment is a strict lifelong gluten-free diet. On the diet, the small intestinal mucosal injury heals and gluten-induced symptoms and signs disappear. The mucosal healing is a prerequisite for sustaining health and is also obtained with a diet containing oats and trace amounts of gluten, industrially purified wheat starch-based gluten-free products. The small intestinal mucosa does not heal in noncompliant people, nor when a patient is inadvertently ingesting gluten. Development of adjunctive or alternative therapies is on its way. There are several novel treatment pipelines within academy and industry. Examples are the ideas of using glutenases as a drug to degrade the ingested gluten, polymers to bind and sequester the gluten to the feces, and also vaccine development for an immunotherapy to induce tolerance towards gluten. Clinical drug trials are to be foreseen in CD, soon also in children.

  6. Ileal function in patients with untreated adult coeliac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Silk, D B; Kumar, P J; Webb, J P; Lane, A E; Clark, M L; Dawson, A M

    1975-01-01

    A double-lumen perfusion technique has been used to investigate jejunal and ileal absorption of glucose, water, and electrolytes in a group of patients with untreated adult coeliac disease. Correct positioning of the tube was confirmed by measuring the differential jejunal and ileal handling of bicarbonate. Eight control subjects and eight patients with coeliac disease were perfused with an isotonic electrolyte solution containing 50 mM glucose and 25 mM bicarbonate. The group of coeliac patients had impaired jejunal absorption of glucose (P less than 0.001), water (P less than 0.01), sodium (P less than 0.02), and chloride (P greater than 0.05) compared with the control group. In contrast the group of coeliac patients had normal ileal glucose and water absorption and increased ileal sodium (P greater than 0.01) and chloride (P greater than 0.05) absorption compared with the controls. Evidence for ileal adaptation was found in three individual patients who had absorptive values outside 2SD of the normal mean. The results indicate that the distal small intestine in coeliac disease has the ability to adopt to the damage and loss of absorptive capacity in the proximal small intestine. PMID:1132801

  7. A comprehensive Fabry-related pain questionnaire for adult patients.

    PubMed

    Üçeyler, Nurcan; Magg, Barbara; Thomas, Phillip; Wiedmann, Silke; Heuschmann, Peter; Sommer, Claudia

    2014-11-01

    Pain may be the earliest symptom in Fabry disease and presents with a distinct phenotype including triggerable pain attacks, evoked pain, pain crises, and chronic pain. Current pain questionnaires do not reflect the special phenotype of Fabry disease-associated pain, which hampers its systematic evaluation as the basis of correct diagnosis and effective treatment. A questionnaire specifically designed to assess Fabry disease-associated pain is thus urgently needed. At the Würzburg Fabry Center for Interdisciplinary Therapy (FAZIT), Germany, we developed and validated the first face-to-face Fabry Pain Questionnaire (FPQ) for adult patients. The initial version of the FPQ was tested in a pilot study with 20 consecutive Fabry disease patients. The performance of the revised FPQ was assessed in a first (n=56) and second (n=20) validation phase in consecutive Fabry disease patients. For this, patients were interviewed at baseline and 2 weeks later. We determined the test-retest reliability and validity of the FPQ in comparison to data obtained with the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory. The FPQ contains 15 questions on the 4 pain phenotypes of Fabry disease (pain attacks, pain crises, evoked pain, chronic pain) in childhood and adulthood, on pain development during life with and without enzyme replacement therapy, and on everyday life impairment due to pain. This first disease-specific questionnaire is a valuable tool for baseline and follow-up assessment of pain in Fabry disease patients and may guide treatment in this distinct pain phenotype.

  8. Unexplained lymphadenopathies: autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in an adult patient

    PubMed Central

    Leal-Seabra, Fatima; Costa, Gonçalo Sarmento; Coelho, Henrique Pereira; Oliveira, Agripino

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterised by massive enlargement of the lymphoid organs, autoimmune cytopenias and a predisposition to develop lymphoid malignancies. The basic defect is a disturbance of the lymphocyte apoptosis, and a high number of circulating TCRab CD3+CD4−CD8− T-cells (double-negative T cells (DNT cells)). We describe a case of a 41-year-old man with fever, hepatosplenomegaly, multiple lymphadenopathy, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia and severe thrombocytopenia. Peripheral blood immunophenotyping revealed elevation of the characteristic DNT cells in 8% and high levels of interleukin 10. Histopathological analysis of lymph nodes showed lymphadenitis with paracortical hyperplasia. It was assumed as a probable diagnosis of ALPS, and the procedure was to medicate the patient with steroids. As a result, a significant clinical improvement was achieved, and he has been in remission for 2 years. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in a Portuguese adult patient. PMID:27979843

  9. Unexplained lymphadenopathies: autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Leal-Seabra, Fatima; Costa, Gonçalo Sarmento; Coelho, Henrique Pereira; Oliveira, Agripino

    2016-12-15

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterised by massive enlargement of the lymphoid organs, autoimmune cytopenias and a predisposition to develop lymphoid malignancies. The basic defect is a disturbance of the lymphocyte apoptosis, and a high number of circulating TCRab CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) T-cells (double-negative T cells (DNT cells)). We describe a case of a 41-year-old man with fever, hepatosplenomegaly, multiple lymphadenopathy, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia and severe thrombocytopenia. Peripheral blood immunophenotyping revealed elevation of the characteristic DNT cells in 8% and high levels of interleukin 10. Histopathological analysis of lymph nodes showed lymphadenitis with paracortical hyperplasia. It was assumed as a probable diagnosis of ALPS, and the procedure was to medicate the patient with steroids. As a result, a significant clinical improvement was achieved, and he has been in remission for 2 years. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in a Portuguese adult patient.

  10. Markers of Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity in Children with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Nga M.; Green, Peter H. R.; Taylor, Annette K.; Hellberg, Dan; Ajamian, Mary; Tan, Caroline Z.; Kosofsky, Barry E.; Higgins, Joseph J.; Rajadhyaksha, Anjali M.; Alaedini, Armin

    2013-01-01

    Objective Gastrointestinal symptoms are a common feature in children with autism, drawing attention to a potential association with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity. However, studies to date regarding the immune response to gluten in autism and its association with celiac disease have been inconsistent. The aim of this study was to assess immune reactivity to gluten in pediatric patients diagnosed with autism according to strict criteria and to evaluate the potential link between autism and celiac disease. Methods Study participants included children (with or without gastrointestinal symptoms) diagnosed with autism according to both the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) and the Autism Diagnostic Interview, Revised (ADI-R) (n = 37), their unaffected siblings (n = 27), and age-matched healthy controls (n = 76). Serum specimens were tested for antibodies to native gliadin, deamidated gliadin, and transglutaminase 2 (TG2). Affected children were genotyped for celiac disease associated HLA-DQ2 and -DQ8 alleles. Results Children with autism had significantly higher levels of IgG antibody to gliadin compared with unrelated healthy controls (p<0.01). The IgG levels were also higher compared to the unaffected siblings, but did not reach statistical significance. The IgG anti-gliadin antibody response was significantly greater in the autistic children with gastrointestinal symptoms in comparison to those without them (p<0.01). There was no difference in IgA response to gliadin across groups. The levels of celiac disease-specific serologic markers, i.e., antibodies to deamidated gliadin and TG2, did not differ between patients and controls. An association between increased anti-gliadin antibody and presence of HLA-DQ2 and/or -DQ8 was not observed. Conclusions A subset of children with autism displays increased immune reactivity to gluten, the mechanism of which appears to be distinct from that in celiac disease. The increased anti-gliadin antibody

  11. Recommended vaccinations for asplenic and hyposplenic adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Grazzini, Maddalena; Niccolai, Giuditta; Paolini, Diana; Varone, Ornella; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Bartalesi, Filippo; Santini, Maria Grazia; Baretti, Simonetta; Bonito, Carlo; Zini, Paola; Mechi, Maria Teresa; Niccolini, Fabrizio; Magistri, Lea; Pulci, Maria Beatrice; Bechini, Angela

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Asplenic or hyposplenic (AH) individuals are particularly vulnerable to invasive infections caused by encapsulated bacteria. Such infections have often a sudden onset and a fulminant course. Infectious diseases (IDs) incidence in AH subjects can be reduced by preventive measures such as vaccination. The aim of our work is to provide updated recommendations on prevention of infectious diseases in AH adult patients, and to supply a useful and practical tool to healthcare workers for the management of these subjects, in hospital setting and in outpatients consultation. A systematic literature review on evidence based measures for the prevention of IDs in adult AH patients was performed in 2015. Updated recommendations on available vaccines were consequently provided. Vaccinations against S. pneumoniae, N. meningitidis, H. influenzae type b and influenza virus are strongly recommended and should be administered at least 2 weeks before surgery in elective cases or at least 2 weeks after the surgical intervention in emergency cases. In subjects without evidence of immunity, 2 doses of live attenuated vaccines against measles-mumps-rubella and varicella should be administered 4–8 weeks apart from each other; a booster dose of tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis vaccine should be administered also to subjects fully vaccinated, and a 3-dose primary vaccination series is recommended in AH subjects with unknown or incomplete vaccination series (as in healthy people). Evidence based prevention data support the above recommendations to reduce the risk of infection in AH individuals. PMID:27929751

  12. Celiac Disease--What Parents and Caregivers Should Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, Alicia

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease is a genetic autoimmune disorder characterized by a heightened sensitivity to gluten, the protein in wheat, barley and rye. The disease is more common than most people think, affecting approximately 3 million in the United States, about 1 in 100. One of the most notable things about celiac disease is that up to 97 percent of…

  13. Ligand-Driven T Cell Receptor Selection in Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nishant K; Baker, Brian M

    2016-10-04

    Recognition of antigens by T cell receptors (TCRs) underlies cellular immunity. By comparing how different TCRs recognize the key antigens associated with celiac disease, Petersen et al. (2016), in this issue of Structure, show how celiac antigen properties select immunologically distinct yet structurally and physically compatible TCRs, ultimately driving autoimmunity.

  14. Celiac disease in native Indians from Brazil: A clinical and epidemiological survey

    PubMed Central

    Utiyama, Shirley Ramos da Rosa; Ribas, João Luis Coelho; Nisihara, Renato Mitsunori; Kotze, Lorete Maria da Silva; de Messias-Reason, Iara José

    2010-01-01

    Background: Celiac disease has been described in populations from around the world, with recent data emphasizing the occurrence of the disease in ethnic minorities. There are only a few studies evaluating celiac disease in native Indians. Aims: This study aimed to screen the anti-endomysial antibody (IgA-EmA) in Kaingang and Guarani Indians from southern Brazil, in order to establish a clinical serological evaluation of celiac disease in these individuals. Material and Methods: Serum samples from 321 individuals (125 male and 196 female; 4-86 years old) from Mangueirinha Indigenous Reserve, State of Parana, Brazil, and 180 non-Indigenous healthy individuals (62 male and 118 female; 2-81 years old) were analysed to the presence of anti-endomysial antibody class IgA by indirect immunofluorescence assay. Amongst the Indians, 158 were Kaingang, 98 Guarani and 65 of mixed race. Indians presenting complaints of diarrhea (N=12) were also evaluated to the IgG class of anti-endomisyal antibody. Results: None of the individuals showed positive results either to IgA or IgG anti-endomysial antibodies. Conclusions: Although the results indicate an absence of celiac disease in Kaingang and Guarani Indians, the authors call attention to the importance of following up indigenous children or adults presenting gastrointestinal complaints or other symptoms related to the disease. Consideration should be given to the genetic background of these individuals, allied to the inter ethnic marriages and the changing habits or occupational activities, that have gradually introduced diseases previously not described in indigenous populations. PMID:22624128

  15. Anomalous systemic arterial supply of pulmonary sequestration in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xiaomeng; Li, Ji; Li, Jing; Cai, Baiqiang

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study described the characteristics of the systemic arterial supply of pulmonary sequestration (PS) in an attempt to better distinguish PS from other acquired lesions. METHODS: We identified 25 patients hospitalized at the Peking Union Medical College Hospital during January 2013 to December 2015 with the assistance of medical catalogers. Twenty-three patients with a definite diagnosis of “pulmonary sequestration” clinically or pathologically were included in the study. The medical records, imaging information, and pathological data were reviewed retrospectively. The general characteristics of the patients and the features of the anomalous arteries were summarized. RESULTS: Aberrant arterial supply of PS was found in all 23 (100%) cases. Among them, twenty patients received surgery, including 14 (70%) with aberrant arterial supply found before surgery, and the other 6 (30%) found during surgery. Nineteen (82.6%) patients had a single systematic arterial supply, with a median diameter of 8 mm. More than one arterial supplies were found in four (17.4%) cases. In 21 (91.3%) cases, the anomalous systemic artery originated from the descending thoracic aorta just adjacent to the sequestrated lung which it supplied, without the presence of accompanying bronchi. In twenty (87.0%) patients who received the surgical intervention, samples of 12 (85.7%) were proved to have elastic vessel walls, out of the 14 samples in which the anomalous systemic arteries were available for analysis. CONCLUSIONS: There are no certain pathology diagnostic criteria for the diagnosis of PS. The detecting of the aberrant systematic artery and distinguishing it from the bronchial arteries corresponded to certain lung abnormalities are the keys to the accurate diagnosis of pulmonary sequestration in adult patients. We propose that the characteristic features of the anomalous arteries include: Originating from aorta and its main branches, adjacent to the sequestrated area

  16. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity and rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Isasi, Carlos; Tejerina, Eva; Morán, Luz M

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune systemic disease having among its clinical manifestations frequent symptoms common to rheumatologic diseases such as musculoskeletal pain, asthenia, and cognitive fatigue. It is associated with other autoimmune diseases like Sjögren disease. It is a well-characterized disease with specific diagnostic tests. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity is an emerging entity with symptoms similar to celiac disease, but without specific diagnostic tests. The concept of non-celiac gluten sensitivity and its diagnostic problems are reviewed, and the hypothesis of its association with fibromyalgia, spondyloarthritis, and autoimmune conditions is proposed. Clinical observations supporting the hypothesis are described, highlighting the benefit of treating non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

  17. Are Adult Patients More Tolerant of Treatment Risks Than Parents of Juvenile Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, F. Reed; Özdemir, Semra; Mansfield, Carol; Hass, Steven; Siegel, Corey A.; Sands, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding patient-specific differences in risk tolerance for new treatments that offer improved efficacy can assist in making difficult regulatory and clinical decisions for new treatments that offer both the potential for greater effectiveness in relieving disease symptoms, but also risks of disabling or fatal side effects. The aim of this study is to elicit benefit-risk trade-off preferences for hypothetical treatments with varying efficacy and risk levels using a stated-choice (SC) survey. We derive estimates of “maximum acceptable risk” (MAR) that can help decisionmakers identify welfare-enhancing alternatives. In the case of children, parent caregivers are responsible for treatment decisions and their risk tolerance may be quite different than adult patients' own tolerance for treatment-related risks. We estimated and compared the willingness of Crohn's disease (CD) patients and parents of juvenile CD patients to accept serious adverse event (SAE) risks in exchange for symptom relief. The analyzed data were from 345 patients over the age of 18 and 150 parents of children under the age of 18. The estimation results provide strong evidence that adult patients and parents of juvenile patients are willing to accept tradeoffs between treatment efficacy and risks of SAEs. Parents of juvenile CD patients are about as risk tolerant for their children as adult CD patients are for themselves for improved treatment efficacy. SC surveys provide a systematic method for eliciting preferences for benefit-risk tradeoffs. Understanding patients' own risk perceptions and their willingness to accept risks in return for treatment benefits can help inform risk management decision making. PMID:18826414

  18. Respiratory pattern in an adult population of dystrophic patients.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, M G; Romei, M; Lo Mauro, A; Marchi, E; Gandossini, S; Bonato, S; Comi, G P; Magri, F; Turconi, A C; Pedotti, A; Bresolin, N; Aliverti, A

    2011-07-15

    We studied respiratory function and Chest Wall kinematics in a large population of adult patients affected by slow course muscular dystrophies such as Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy (LGMD, n=38), Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD, n=20) and Facio-Scapulo Humeral Dystrophy (FSHD, n=30), through standard spirometry and through the Optoelectronic Plethysmography, to measure the thoraco-abdominal motion during Quiet Breathing and Slow Vital Capacity maneuvers. Within the restrictive pulmonary syndrome characterizing LGMD and FSHD, several different thoraco-abdominal patterns compared to those of healthy subjects were present in the more advanced stages of the disease. These differences were present in the seated position, during the execution of a maximal maneuver such as Slow Vital Capacity. A global respiratory (both inspiratory and expiratory) muscle involvement was more pronounced in the LGMD and FSHD than in the BMD patients, and a significant reduction of abdominal contribution in wheelchair bound patients was observed. In conclusion, OEP technique is able to reveal mild initial modifications in the respiratory muscles in FSHD and LGMD patients, which could be helpful for functional and new therapeutic strategy evaluation.

  19. Interpretation of multiple isolate urine cultures in adult male patients.

    PubMed Central

    Khalifa, M. A.; Abdoh, A. A.; Silva, F. G.; Flournoy, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    A retrospective analytical study examined the records of 220 adult males (mean age 64.9 years) to determine the relative probability that multiple urine culture isolates (MUI) represent urinary tract infection (UTI) versus contamination or colonization. Nonculture laboratory data were used to determine the likelihood of UTI. Patients were classified into three categories: group 1 (those with single isolate cultures; n = 110), group 2 (those with MUI and either symptomatic UTI or an underlying pathologic condition; n = 71) and group 3 (those with MUI and either surgically altered urinary passages or absence of UTI symptoms; n = 39). Nonculture laboratory data suggested UTI in 48.2% of patients in group 1, 46.5% in group 2, and 23.1% in group 3. Patients in groups 1 or 2 with cultures yielding isolate counts of 10(5) colony forming units/mL were 6.2 times more likely to be classified as having a UTI (by nonculture laboratory data) compared with patients having only one or more of these two criteria. This study proposes a more objective approach to interpretation of MUI cultures using the results of nonculture laboratory data, clinical profiles, and colony counts. PMID:7897687

  20. Interpretation of serological tests in the diagnosis of celiac disease: Anti-deamidated gliadin peptide antibodies revisited.

    PubMed

    Zucchini, Laure; Giusti, Delphine; Gatouillat, Grégory; Servettaz, Amélie; Tabary, Thierry; Barbe, Coralie; Pham, Bach-Nga

    2016-09-01

    Algorithms for celiac disease diagnosis provided by guidelines are based primarily on anti-tissue transglutaminase 2 (TG2) antibodies and/or anti-endomysium antibodies. The place of anti-deamidated gliadin peptide (DGP) antibodies is less well established. This study was designed to assess the clinical relevance of anti-DGP antibodies. Two thousand and twenty-six consecutive unselected patients systematically tested for anti-TG2, endomysium, gliadin, DGP antibodies and IgA dosage were investigated. The serological interpretation was assessed by analyzing the medical records of patients. From the 1984 newly investigated patients suspected of celiac disease, 10% had at least one celiac marker. Anti-TG2, anti-endomysium, anti-gliadin and anti-DGP antibodies were found in 1.1%, 0.6%, 6.8% and 4.1% of cases respectively, with different combinations. The diagnosis of celiac disease was retained in 0.45% of patients. When using the duodenal biopsies as a gold standard, analysis of the anti-DGP diagnosis performance showed that the specificity and the predictive positive value (PPV) were lower than that of the anti-TG2 assay. The combined detection of anti-TG2 and anti-DGP antibodies had a lower PPV than that of anti-TG2 and anti-endomysium antibodies (p = 0.04). When analyzing the contribution of anti-DGP antibodies as an additional marker to both anti-TG2 and anti-endomysium antibodies, the PPV of the three associated antibodies was shown to be significantly lower than the PPV of the both anti-TG2 and anti-endomysium antibodies (p = 0.04). As a conclusion, anti-DGP antibodies may not have the diagnosis value required as an additional screening test to anti-TG2 antibodies for identifying celiac disease patients in medical centers where anti-endomysium detection is available.

  1. Inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease: overlaps and differences.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Virginia; Dieli-Crimi, Romina; López-Palacios, Natalia; Bodas, Andrés; Medrano, Luz María; Núñez, Concepción

    2014-05-07

    Recent findings demonstrate the common genetic basis for many immune-mediated diseases, and consequently, the partially shared pathogenesis. We collected these findings and reviewed the extension of these overlaps to other disease characteristics. Two autoimmune diseases were selected that also share the specific target organ, the bowel. The etiology and immunopathogenesis of both conditions characterized by chronic intestinal inflammation, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and celiac disease (CeD), are not completely understood. Both are complex diseases with genetics and environment contributing to dysregulation of innate and adaptive immune responses, leading to chronic inflammation and disease. CeD constitutes a particular disease because the main environmental and genetic triggers are largely known. IBD comprises two main clinical forms, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, which most likely involve a complex interplay between some components of the commensal microbiota and other environmental factors in their origin. These multifactorial diseases encompass a broad spectrum of clinical phenotypes and ages of onset, although the clinical presentation often differs depending on childhood or adult onset, with greater heterogeneity commonly observed in adults.

  2. Inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease: Overlaps and differences

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Virginia; Dieli-Crimi, Romina; López-Palacios, Natalia; Bodas, Andrés; Medrano, Luz María; Núñez, Concepción

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings demonstrate the common genetic basis for many immune-mediated diseases, and consequently, the partially shared pathogenesis. We collected these findings and reviewed the extension of these overlaps to other disease characteristics. Two autoimmune diseases were selected that also share the specific target organ, the bowel. The etiology and immunopathogenesis of both conditions characterized by chronic intestinal inflammation, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and celiac disease (CeD), are not completely understood. Both are complex diseases with genetics and environment contributing to dysregulation of innate and adaptive immune responses, leading to chronic inflammation and disease. CeD constitutes a particular disease because the main environmental and genetic triggers are largely known. IBD comprises two main clinical forms, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, which most likely involve a complex interplay between some components of the commensal microbiota and other environmental factors in their origin. These multifactorial diseases encompass a broad spectrum of clinical phenotypes and ages of onset, although the clinical presentation often differs depending on childhood or adult onset, with greater heterogeneity commonly observed in adults. PMID:24803796

  3. The Role of Gluten in Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Serena, Gloria; Camhi, Stephanie; Sturgeon, Craig; Yan, Shu; Fasano, Alessio

    2015-08-26

    Celiac disease (CD) and type 1 diabetes (T1D) are autoimmune conditions in which dietary gluten has been proven or suggested to play a pathogenic role. In CD; gluten is established as the instigator of autoimmunity; the autoimmune process is halted by removing gluten from the diet; which allows for resolution of celiac autoimmune enteropathy and subsequent normalization of serological markers of the disease. However; an analogous causative agent has not yet been identified for T1D. Nevertheless; the role of dietary gluten in development of T1D and the potentially beneficial effect of removing gluten from the diet of patients with T1D are still debated. In this review; we discuss the comorbid occurrence of CD and T1D and explore current evidences for the specific role of gluten in both conditions; specifically focusing on current evidence on the effect of gluten on the immune system and the gut microbiota.

  4. Gluten sensitivity: problems of an emerging condition separate from celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Brown, Amy C

    2012-02-01

    Gluten sensitivity appears to be emerging as a separate condition from celiac disease, yet no clear definition or diagnosis exists. As a result, patients with gluten sensitivity experience delayed diagnosis and continuing symptoms if they consume gluten. This emerging medical problem may involve human genetics, plant genetic modifications, gluten as a food additive, environmental toxins, hormonal influences, intestinal infections and autoimmune diseases. The treatment is similar to that for celiac disease - a gluten-free diet. The use of a gluten-free diet or an elimination diet is encouraged in assisting people to determine whether or not they are gluten sensitive. It is time to not only recognize, but to treat and further research gluten sensitivity, as unconfirmed environmental factors continue to spread this problem further into the general population.

  5. Systematic review of surgical treatment techniques for adult and pediatric patients with pectus excavatum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This compares outcome measures of current pectus excavatum (PEx) treatments, namely the Nuss and Ravitch procedures, in pediatric and adult patients. Original investigations that stratified PEx patients based on current treatment and age (pediatric = 0–21; adult 17–99) were considered for inclusion. Outcome measures were: operation duration, analgesia duration, blood loss, length of stay (LOS), outcome ratings, complications, and percentage requiring reoperations. Adult implant patients (18.8%) had higher reoperation rates than adult Nuss or Ravitch patients (5.3% and 3.3% respectively). Adult Nuss patients had longer LOS (7.3 days), more strut/bar displacement (6.1%), and more epidural analgesia (3 days) than adult Ravitch patients (2.9 days, 0%, 0 days). Excluding pectus bar and strut displacements, pediatric and adult Nuss patients tended to have higher complication rates (pediatric - 38%; adult - 21%) compared to pediatric and adult Ravitch patients (12.5%; 8%). Pediatric Ravitch patients clearly had more strut displacements than adult Ravitch patients (0% and 6.4% respectively). These results suggest significantly better results in common PEx surgical repair techniques (i.e. Nuss and Ravitch) than uncommon techniques (i.e. Implants and Robicsek). The results suggest slightly better outcomes in pediatric Nuss procedure patients as compared with all other groups. We recommend that symptomatic pediatric patients with uncomplicated PEx receive the Nuss procedure. We suggest that adult patients receive the Nuss or Ravitch procedure, even though the long-term complication rates of the adult Nuss procedure require more investigation. PMID:24506826

  6. [Non-celiac gluten sensitivity: a critical review of current evidence].

    PubMed

    Molina-Infante, Javier; Santolaria, Santos; Montoro, Miguel; Esteve, María; Fernández-Bañares, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is an emerging disorder characterized by intestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms related to the ingestion of gluten-containing food in non-celiac patients. Its prevalence has been estimated to be six to ten-times higher than that of celiac disease (CD). A gluten-free diet is the most widely recommended therapy, but the causative agent remains unknown and there are no consensus diagnostic criteria. Recent studies on NCGS have included patients with possibly overlooked minor CD and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome without self-reported gluten intolerance, but showing a response to a gluten-free diet. Furthermore, FODMAPs (Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides And Polyols) have recently been postulated as the culprit component for NCGS in wheat, instead of gluten. This review updates evidence on the pathophysiology of NCGS and the efficacy of different dietary interventions in its treatment, stressing the need for proper screening for CD before a diagnosis of NCGS is made.

  7. Specific Nongluten Proteins of Wheat Are Novel Target Antigens in Celiac Disease Humoral Response

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    While the antigenic specificity and pathogenic relevance of immunologic reactivity to gluten in celiac disease have been extensively researched, the immune response to nongluten proteins of wheat has not been characterized. We aimed to investigate the level and molecular specificity of antibody response to wheat nongluten proteins in celiac disease. Serum samples from patients and controls were screened for IgG and IgA antibody reactivity to a nongluten protein extract from the wheat cultivar Triticum aestivum Butte 86. Antibodies were further analyzed for reactivity to specific nongluten proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. Immunoreactive molecules were identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Compared with healthy controls, patients exhibited significantly higher levels of antibody reactivity to nongluten proteins. The main immunoreactive nongluten antibody target proteins were identified as serpins, purinins, α-amylase/protease inhibitors, globulins, and farinins. Assessment of reactivity toward purified recombinant proteins further confirmed the presence of antibody response to specific antigens. The results demonstrate that, in addition to the well-recognized immune reaction to gluten, celiac disease is associated with a robust humoral response directed at a specific subset of the nongluten proteins of wheat. PMID:25329597

  8. Selective capture of most celiac immunogenic peptides from hydrolyzed gluten proteins.

    PubMed

    Moreno, María de Lourdes; Muñoz-Suano, Alba; López-Casado, Miguel Ángel; Torres, María Isabel; Sousa, Carolina; Cebolla, Ángel

    2016-08-15

    The available immunomethods for gluten quantitation could underestimate or overestimate the net immunoactivity of foods and beverages if the chosen analytical antibody is not specific to the relevant gluten immunogenic peptides (GIP). Accurate detection of the most active GIP is desirable to assess the potential celiac toxicity of food. We evaluated the capacity of the G12 monoclonal antibody for selectively depleting GIP in samples from two different gluteomes. Samples of hydrolyzed gliadin from wheat and a barley beer were used. The input (starting peptide digest of prolamins), the flow-through (unbound peptides), and the output (captured peptides) were analyzed by G12 and R5 competitive ELISA as well as by stimulation assays of T-cells from celiac patients. Most of the GIP were retained by the G12-agarose and represented the largest part of the immunogenicity of the gluten peptidome. G12 immunodepletion experiments with hydrolyzed gluten showed that this antibody reacted with those with the highest immunoactivity for celiac patients.

  9. Ages of celiac disease: from changing environment to improved diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Tommasini, Alberto; Not, Tarcisio; Ventura, Alessandro

    2011-08-28

    From the time of Gee's landmark writings, the recent history of celiac disease (CD) can be divided into many ages, each driven by a diagnostic advance and a deeper knowledge of disease pathogenesis. At the same time, these advances were paralleled by the identification of new clinical patterns associated with CD and by a continuous redefinition of the prevalence of the disease in population. In the beginning, CD was considered a chronic indigestion, even if the causative food was not known; later, the disease was proven to depend on an intolerance to wheat gliadin, leading to typical mucosal changes in the gut and to a malabsorption syndrome. This knowledge led to curing the disease with a gluten-free diet. After the identification of antibodies to gluten (AGA) in the serum of patients and the identification of gluten-specific lymphocytes in the mucosa, CD was described as an immune disorder, resembling a chronic "gluten infection". The use of serological testing for AGA allowed identification of the higher prevalence of this disorder, revealing atypical patterns of presentation. More recently, the characterization of autoantibodies to endomysium and to transglutaminase shifted the attention to a complex autoimmune pathogenesis and to the increased risk of developing autoimmune disorders in untreated CD. New diagnostic assays, based on molecular technologies, will introduce new changes, with the promise of better defining the spectrum of gluten reactivity and the real burden of gluten related-disorders in the population. Herein, we describe the different periods of CD experience, and further developments for the next celiac age will be proposed.

  10. Orthodontics in the adult patient, with special reference to the periodontally compromised patient.

    PubMed

    Johal, A; Ide, M

    1999-04-01

    There is increasing demand from adult patients for orthodontic treatment, either purely for aesthetics, to improve aesthetics or function following previous disease, or to facilitate the stabilization, restoration or replacement of teeth. Orthodontics may have a major role in the rehabilitation of patients suffering the effects of advanced periodontal disease, but there are a number of important factors to be considered in the management of such patients if the optimal outcome is to be obtained. This paper summarizes important aspects of treatment and the potential complications and how to avoid them.

  11. Gliadin-dependent cytokine production in a bidimensional cellular model of celiac intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Vincentini, Olimpia; Maialetti, Francesca; Gonnelli, Elena; Silano, Marco

    2015-11-01

    The downstream cascade of the inflammatory response to gliadin in celiac intestinal mucosa encompasses the early activation of the innate immunity that triggers the adaptive response. Therefore, the in vitro study of the pathogenic mechanism of celiac disease (CD) on enterocytes alone or mucosal T lymphocytes alone does not fully consider all the aspects of gliadin-dependent inflammation. Although the in vitro culture of specimens of intestinal mucosa obtained from celiac patients is the gold standard for the study of CD, this technique presents several technical challenges and the bioptic specimens are not easily available. So, in this paper, we described the gliadin-dependent cytokine production in a bidimensional cellular system, which is able to mimic both the innate and the adaptive steps of the mucosal immune response of CD. In the upper compartment, the intestinal epithelial cells are grown on a filter, and in the lower compartment, the mononuclear cells isolated from peripheral blood of celiac patients are cultured. Cells were apically exposed to the toxic gliadin peptide p31-43 for 3 h and then with the immunodominant gliadin fragment pα-9 for 21 h. The incubation with gliadin peptides resulted in increased levels of IL-15, INF-γ, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-1β, and CCL 2, 3 and 4 in the basal supernatants, with respect to cells exposed to medium alone. The p31-43-driven epithelial priming of mucosal response consists of transglutaminase (TG2)-mediated deamidation of the immunostimulatory gliadin peptides, as demonstrated by the inhibition of pα-9 activity, when the system is exposed to blocking anti-TG2 antibody.

  12. The Overlap between Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity: A Clinical Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Makharia, Archita; Catassi, Carlo; Makharia, Govind K.

    2015-01-01

    The spectrum of gluten-related disorders has widened in recent times and includes celiac disease, non-celiac gluten sensitivity, and wheat allergy. The complex of symptoms associated with these diseases, such as diarrhea, constipation or abdominal pain may overlap for the gluten related diseases, and furthermore they can be similar to those caused by various other intestinal diseases, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The mechanisms underlying symptom generation are diverse for all these diseases. Some patients with celiac disease may remain asymptomatic or have only mild gastrointestinal symptoms and thus may qualify for the diagnosis of IBS in the general clinical practice. Similarly, the overlap of symptoms between IBS and non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) often creates a dilemma for clinicians. While the treatment of NCGS is exclusion of gluten from the diet, some, but not all, of the patients with IBS also improve on a gluten-free diet. Both IBS and NCGS are common in the general population and both can coexist with each other independently without necessarily sharing a common pathophysiological basis. Although the pathogenesis of NCGS is not well understood, it is likely to be heterogeneous with possible contributing factors such as low-grade intestinal inflammation, increased intestinal barrier function and changes in the intestinal microbiota. Innate immunity may also play a pivotal role. One possible inducer of innate immune response has recently been reported to be amylase-trypsin inhibitor, a protein present in wheat endosperm and the source of flour, along with the gluten proteins. PMID:26690475

  13. Comprehensive, quantitative mapping of T cell epitopes in gluten in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Tye-Din, Jason A; Stewart, Jessica A; Dromey, James A; Beissbarth, Tim; van Heel, David A; Tatham, Arthur; Henderson, Kate; Mannering, Stuart I; Gianfrani, Carmen; Jewell, Derek P; Hill, Adrian V S; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie; Anderson, Robert P

    2010-07-21

    Celiac disease is a genetic condition that results in a debilitating immune reaction in the gut to antigens in grain. The antigenic peptides recognized by the T cells that cause this disease are incompletely defined. Our understanding of the epitopes of pathogenic CD4(+ )T cells is based primarily on responses shown by intestinal T-cells in vitro to hydrolysates or polypeptides of gluten, the causative antigen. A protease-resistant 33-amino acid peptide from wheat alpha-gliadin is the immunodominant antigen, but little is known about the spectrum of T cell epitopes in rye and barley or the hierarchy of immunodominance and consistency of recognition of T-cell epitopes in vivo. We induced polyclonal gluten-specific T cells in the peripheral blood of celiac patients by feeding them cereal and performed a comprehensive, unbiased analysis of responses to all celiac toxic prolamins, a class of plant storage protein. The peptides that stimulated T cells were the same among patients who ate the same cereal, but were different after wheat, barley and rye ingestion. Unexpectedly, a sequence from omega-gliadin (wheat) and C-hordein (barley) but not alpha-gliadin was immunodominant regardless of the grain consumed. Furthermore, T cells specific for just three peptides accounted for the majority of gluten-specific T cells, and their recognition of gluten peptides was highly redundant. Our findings show that pathogenic T cells in celiac disease show limited diversity, and therefore suggest that peptide-based therapeutics for this disease and potentially other strongly HLA-restricted immune diseases should be possible.

  14. Preference for One or Two Hearing Aids among Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Robyn M; Schwartz, Kathryn S.; Noe, Colleen M.; Alexander, Genevieve C.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Most practitioners believe that use of two hearing aids is the ideal fitting for adults with bilateral symmetrical hearing loss. However, previous research has consistently shown that a substantial proportion of these patients actually prefer to use only one hearing aid. The current study explored whether this pattern of preferences is seen with technologically advanced hearing aids. In addition, a selection of variables that were available pre-fitting were used to attempt to predict which patients will prefer one hearing aid rather than two. Design The study was designed as a 12-week field trial including structured and unstructured use of one and two hearing aids. Ninety-four subjects with mild to moderate bilaterally symmetrical hearing loss were bilaterally fit with 2005-2007 era hearing aids. Potential predictors included demographic, audiometric, auditory lifestyle, personality, and binaural processing variables. After the field trial, each subject stated his/her preference for one or two hearing aids and completed three self-report outcome questionnaires for their preferred fitting. Results Previous research was confirmed with modern technology hearing aids: after the field trial 46% of the subjects preferred to use one hearing aid rather than two. Subjects who preferred two hearing aids tended to report better real-world outcomes than those who preferred one. Subjects who reported more hearing problems in daily life, who experienced more binaural loudness summation, and whose ears were more equivalent in dichotic listening were more likely to prefer to use two hearing aids. Contrary to conventional wisdom (ideas that are generally accepted as true), audiometric hearing loss and auditory lifestyle were not predictive of aiding preference. However, the best predictive approach from these data yielded accurate predictions for only two-thirds of subjects. Conclusions Evidence-based practice calls for a conscientious melding of current evidence

  15. Dietary compliance in Iranian children and adolescents with celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Taghdir, Maryam; Honar, Naser; Mazloomi, Seyed Mohammad; Sepandi, Mojtaba; Ashourpour, Mahkameh; Salehi, Musa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Celiac disease (CD) is caused due to intake of gluten, a protein component in wheat, barley, and rye. The only treatment currently available for CD is strict lifetime adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD) which is a diet that excludes wheat, barley, and rye. There is limited information on barriers to following a GFD. The present study aimed to investigate the compliance with a GFD, barriers to compliance, and the impact of compliance on the quality of life (QOL) in Iranian children and adolescents suffering from CD. Methods In this cross-sectional study, a total of 65 known cases of CD (both males and females), diagnosed in Namazi Hospital, a large referral center in south of Iran, selected by census were studied in 2014. Dietary compliance was assessed using a questionnaire. A disease-specific QOL questionnaire for children with CD (the celiac disease DUX [CDDUX]) was used. Comparisons between categorical variables were performed using chi-square test. Results Sixty-five patients, 38 females (58.5%) and 27 (41.5%) males, were surveyed. Mean (± standard deviation [SD]) age of the respondents was 11.3 (±3.8) years. Dietary compliance was reported by 35 (53.8%) patients. The mean (± SD) CDDUX score was higher in dietary-compliant patients (33.5 [±19.4] vs 26.7 [±13.6], respectively, P=0.23). The score of CDDUX in parents of patients in dietary-compliant group was more than the noncompliant patients (28.1 [±13.5] vs 22.1 [±14], respectively, P=0.1). Barriers to noncompliance were poor or unavailability (100%), high cost (96.9%), insufficient labeling (84.6%), poor palatability (76.9%), and no information (69.23%). Conclusion Approximately half of the patients with CD reported dietary compliance. Poor or unavailability was found to be the most important barrier contributing to noncompliance. The QOL was better in compliant patients. Proposed strategies to improve compliance are greater availability of gluten-free products, better food labeling, and

  16. Scrotal tuberculosis in adult patients: a 10-year clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ing-Kit; Yang, Wen-Chou; Liu, Jien-Wei

    2007-10-01

    Twenty-nine adults (mean age, 59.9 +/- 13.5 years) with scrotal tuberculosis (TB) were retrospectively analyzed. The mean interval from emergence of symptoms suggestive of scrotal TB to diagnosis established was 142.44 +/- 227.66 days. Scrotal TB was initially suspected in only five (17.2%) patients, and infection caused by bacteria other than Mycobacterium tuberculosis (55.2%) was the leading presumptive diagnosis. Of 28 patients with chest radiographs available, 7 (25%) disclosed active pulmonary TB, and 9 (32.1%) showed a TB scar. All patients received anti-TB chemotherapy; 20 (69%) additionally underwent surgery. Pathologic examination of resected tissue at therapeutic surgery, biopsy, or polymerase chain reaction assay of urine led to rapid diagnosis of scrotal TB. Although evidence of scrotal TB was easily obtainable, the lack of alertness made clinicians avert from the appropriate diagnostic approaches and rendered a delayed diagnosis. Our report underscores the urgent need for improving clinicians' awareness of scrotal TB.

  17. Staphylococcus aureus isolated from tonsillectomized adult patients with recurrent tonsillitis.

    PubMed

    Katkowska, Marta; Garbacz, Katarzyna; Stromkowski, Józef

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus aureus strains from 118 tonsillectomized adults due to recurrent tonsillitis (RT). The study included strains isolated from the tonsillar surface prior to tonsillectomy, recovered from the tonsillar core at the time of surgery, and from the posterior throat 2-4 weeks after the procedure. Susceptibility of isolates to 19 antibiotics was tested in line with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations. Irrespective of the stage, the most commonly isolated bacteria were gram-positive cocci, and among them S. aureus. The tonsillar core was the most common site of S. aureus isolation (30.5%), followed by the tonsillar surface (10.8%) and the posterior pharynx (5.9%). This difference turned out to be statistically significant (p < 0.001). Beta-hemolytic streptococci, most often Streptococcus pyogenes (5.1%), were isolated from 2.5% to 10.2% of patients. Staphylococcal isolates were susceptible to most tested antibiotics (except from penicillin and ampicillin) and rarely showed methicillin resistance (n = 1). Staphylococcus aureus seems to be the most common pathogen isolated from patients tonsillectomized due to RT. Staphylococcal isolates associated with RT are present mostly within the tonsillar core and susceptible to most antibiotics. They are typically isolated from patients between 21 and 30 years of age. Tonsillectomy results in less frequent isolation of S. aureus strains.