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Sample records for adult celiac patients

  1. Long-term consumption of oats in adult celiac disease patients.

    PubMed

    Kaukinen, Katri; Collin, Pekka; Huhtala, Heini; Mäki, Markku

    2013-11-01

    Many celiac disease patients tolerate oats, but limited data are available on its long-term consumption. This was evaluated in the present study, focusing on small-bowel mucosal histology and gastrointestinal symptoms in celiac adults maintaining a strict gluten-free diet with or without oats. Altogether 106 long-term treated celiac adults were enrolled for this cross-sectional follow-up study. Daily consumption of oats and fiber was assessed, and small-bowel mucosal morphology and densities of CD3+, αβ+ and γσ+ intraepithelial lymphocytes determined. Gastrointestinal symptoms were assessed by a validated Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale questionnaire. Seventy (66%) out of the 106 treated celiac disease patients had consumed a median of 20 g of oats (range 1-100 g) per day for up to eight years; all consumed oat products bought from general stores. Daily intake and long-term consumption of oats did not result in small-bowel mucosal villous damage, inflammation, or gastrointestinal symptoms. Oat-consumers had a significantly higher daily intake of fiber than those who did not use oats. Two thirds of celiac disease patients preferred to use oats in their daily diet. Even long-term ingestion of oats had no harmful effects.

  2. Prevalence of celiac disease in adult patients with refractory functional dyspepsia: Value of routine duodenal biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Giangreco, Emiliano; D’agate, Cinzia; Barbera, Carmelo; Puzzo, Lidia; Aprile, Giuseppe; Naso, Pietro; Bonanno, Giacomo; Russo, Francesco Paolo; Nicoletti, Alessandra; Incarbone, Salvatore; Trama, Giuseppe; Russo, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence of celiac disease (CD) in adult patients referred to an open access gastroenterology clinic in the south of Italy and submitted to esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy (EGD) for evaluation of refractory functional dyspepsia. METHODS: Seven hundred and twenty six consecutive dyspeptic patients (282 male, 444 female; mean age 39.6 years, range 18-75 years) with unexplained prolonged dyspepsia were prospectively enrolled. Duodenal biopsies were taken and processed by standard staining. Histological evaluation was carried out according to the Marsh-Oberhuber criteria. RESULTS: The endoscopic findings were: normal in 61.2%, peptic lesions in 20.5%, malignancies in 0.5%, miscellaneous in 16.7%. CD was endoscopically diagnosed in 8 patients (1.1%), histologically in 15 patients (2%). The endoscopic features alone showed a sensitivity of 34.8% and specificity of 100%, with a positive predictive value (PPV) of 100% and a negative predictive value (NPP) of 97.9%. CONCLUSION: This prospective study showed that CD has a high prevalence (1:48) in adult dyspeptic patients and suggests the routine use of duodenal biopsy in this type of patient undergoing EGD. PMID:19058330

  3. Metagenomics Reveals Dysbiosis and a Potentially Pathogenic N. flavescens Strain in Duodenum of Adult Celiac Patients

    PubMed Central

    D'Argenio, Valeria; Casaburi, Giorgio; Precone, Vincenza; Pagliuca, Chiara; Colicchio, Roberta; Sarnataro, Daniela; Discepolo, Valentina; Kim, Sangman M; Russo, Ilaria; Del Vecchio Blanco, Giovanna; Horner, David S; Chiara, Matteo; Pesole, Graziano; Salvatore, Paola; Monteleone, Giovanni; Ciacci, Carolina; Caporaso, Gregory J; Jabrì, Bana; Salvatore, Francesco; Sacchetti, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Celiac disease (CD)-associated duodenal dysbiosis has not yet been clearly defined, and the mechanisms by which CD-associated dysbiosis could concur to CD development or exacerbation are unknown. In this study, we analyzed the duodenal microbiome of CD patients. METHODS: The microbiome was evaluated in duodenal biopsy samples of 20 adult patients with active CD, 6 CD patients on a gluten-free diet, and 15 controls by DNA sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA libraries. Bacterial species were cultured, isolated and identified by mass spectrometry. Isolated bacterial species were used to infect CaCo-2 cells, and to stimulate normal duodenal explants and cultured human and murine dendritic cells (DCs). Inflammatory markers and cytokines were evaluated by immunofluorescence and ELISA, respectively. RESULTS: Proteobacteria was the most abundant and Firmicutes and Actinobacteria the least abundant phyla in the microbiome profiles of active CD patients. Members of the Neisseria genus (Betaproteobacteria class) were significantly more abundant in active CD patients than in the other two groups (P=0.03). Neisseria flavescens (CD-Nf) was the most abundant Neisseria species in active CD duodenum. Whole-genome sequencing of CD-Nf and control-Nf showed genetic diversity of the iron acquisition systems and of some hemoglobin-related genes. CD-Nf was able to escape the lysosomal compartment in CaCo-2 cells and to induce an inflammatory response in DCs and in ex-vivo mucosal explants. CONCLUSIONS: Marked dysbiosis and an abundance of a peculiar CD-Nf strain characterize the duodenal microbiome in active CD patients thus suggesting that the CD-associated microbiota could contribute to the many inflammatory signals in this disorder. PMID:27045926

  4. [Adult Celiac Disease].

    PubMed

    Many, Natalie; Biedermann, Luc

    2016-07-01

    Celiac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathy in genetically predisposed individuals, triggered by gluten ingestion. Clinical manifestations include intestinal and extraintestinal symptoms. Affected individuals may also be completely asymptomatic. Nevertheless, an early diagnosis is essential in order to prevent long-term complications. Diagnostic approach involves serologic testing for tissue transglutaminase antibodies followed by duodenal biopsy in case of seropositivity. Until now, the only available treatment consists of a strict glute-free diet. Newer therapeutic strategies are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. PMID:27381303

  5. [Adult Celiac Disease].

    PubMed

    Many, Natalie; Biedermann, Luc

    2016-07-01

    Celiac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathy in genetically predisposed individuals, triggered by gluten ingestion. Clinical manifestations include intestinal and extraintestinal symptoms. Affected individuals may also be completely asymptomatic. Nevertheless, an early diagnosis is essential in order to prevent long-term complications. Diagnostic approach involves serologic testing for tissue transglutaminase antibodies followed by duodenal biopsy in case of seropositivity. Until now, the only available treatment consists of a strict glute-free diet. Newer therapeutic strategies are currently being evaluated in clinical trials.

  6. Adult Celiac Disease and Its Malignant Complications

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Adult celiac disease is a chronic intestinal disorder that has been estimated to affect up to 1-2% of the population in some nations. Awareness of the disease has increased, but still it remains markedly underdiagnosed. Celiac disease is a pathologically defined condition with several characteristic clinical scenarios that should lead the clinician to suspect its presence. Critical to diagnosis is a documented responsiveness to a gluten-free diet. After diagnosis and treatment, symptoms and biopsy-proven changes may recur and appear refractory to a gluten-free diet. Recurrent symptoms are most often due to poor diet compliance, a ubiquitous and unrecognized gluten source, an initially incorrect diagnosis, or an associated disease or complication of celiac disease. Some patients with persistent symptoms and biopsy-proven changes may not have celiac disease at all, instead suffering from a sprue-like intestinal disease, so-called unclassified sprue, which is a specific entity that does not appear to respond to a gluten-free diet. Some of these patients eventually prove to have an underlying malignant cause, particularly lymphoma. The risk of developing lymphoma and other malignancies is increased in celiac disease, especially if initially diagnosed in the elderly, or late in the clinical course of the disease. However, recent studies suggest that the risk of gastric and colon cancer is low. This has led to the hypothesis that untreated celiac disease may be protective, possibly due to impaired absorption and more rapid excretion of fat or fat-soluble agents, including hydrocarbons and other putative cocarcinogens, which are implicated in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. PMID:20431755

  7. Acute abdomen in adult Celiac disease: an intestinal intussusception case.

    PubMed

    Makay, Ozer; Kazimi, Mircelal; Doğanavşargil, Başak; Osmanoğlu, Necla; Yilmaz, Mustafa

    2007-06-01

    It is well known that half of the cases admitted to hospital emergency services complain of abdominal pain and that nearly half of these cases are diagnosed with nonspecific abdominal pain. The population of patients with celiac sprue is rarely encountered at the emergency room. Although acute abdominal pain is rarely seen in adult celiac sprue, it should be added to the differential diagnosis. It should also be remembered that acute abdominal pain in these patients could be originating from perforation, intussusceptions and/or intestinal lymphoma. Herein we report a case of adult celiac sprue where successful surgical exploration was carried out because of entero-enteral intussusception. PMID:17602358

  8. Potential Celiac Patients: A Model of Celiac Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sperandeo, Maria Pia; Tosco, Antonella; Izzo, Valentina; Tucci, Francesca; Troncone, Riccardo; Auricchio, Renata; Romanos, Jihane; Trynka, Gosia; Auricchio, Salvatore; Jabri, Bana; Greco, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aim Potential celiacs have the ‘celiac type’ HLA, positive anti-transglutaminase antibodies but no damage at small intestinal mucosa. Only a minority of them develops mucosal lesion. More than 40 genes were associated to Celiac Disease (CD) but we still do not know how those pathways transform a genetically predisposed individual into an affected person. The aim of the study is to explore the genetic features of Potential CD individuals. Methods 127 ‘potential’ CD patients entered the study because of positive anti-tissue transglutaminase and no mucosal lesions; about 30% of those followed for four years become frankly celiac. They were genotyped for 13 polymorphisms of ‘candidate genes’ and compared to controls and celiacs. Moreover, 60 biopsy specimens were used for expression studies. Results Potential CD bear a lighter HLA-related risk, compared to celiac (χ2 = 48.42; p value = 1×10−8). They share most of the polymorphisms of the celiacs, but the frequency of c-REL* G allele was suggestive for a difference compared to celiac (χ2 = 5.42; p value = 0.02). One marker of the KIAA1109/IL-2/IL-21 candidate region differentiated potentials from celiac (rs4374642: χ2 = 7.17, p value = 0.01). The expression of IL-21 was completely suppressed in potentials compared to celiacs (p value = 0.02) and to controls (p value = 0.02), in contrast IL-2, KIAA1109 and c-REL expression were over-expressed. Conclusions Potential CD show genetic features slightly different from celiacs. Genetic and expression markers help to differentiate this condition. Potential CD is a precious biological model of the pathways leading to the small intestinal mucosal damage in genetically predisposed individuals. PMID:21760890

  9. Prevalence of Eating Disorders in Adults with Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Passananti, V.; Siniscalchi, M.; Zingone, F.; Bucci, C.; Tortora, R.; Iovino, P.; Ciacci, C.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Symptoms of celiac disease negatively impact social activities and emotional state. Aim was to investigate the prevalence of altered eating behaviour in celiac patients. Methods. Celiac patients and controls completed a dietary interview and the Binge Eating Staircases, Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2), Eating Attitudes Test, Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale, State Trait Anxiety Inventory Forma Y (STAI-Y1 and STAI-Y2), and Symptom Check List (SCL-90). Results. One hundred celiac adults and 100 controls were not statistically different for gender, age, and physical activity. STAI-Y1 and STAI-Y2, Somatization, Interpersonal, Sensitivity, and Anxiety scores of the SLC-90 were higher in CD patients than controls. EDI-2 was different in pulse thinness, social insecurity, perfectionism, inadequacy, ascetisms, and interpersonal diffidence between CD and HC women, whilst only in interceptive awareness between CD and HC men. A higher EAT-26 score was associated with the CD group dependently with gastrointestinal symptoms. The EAT26 demonstrated association between indices of diet-related disorders in both CD and the feminine gender after controlling for anxiety and depression. Conclusion. CD itself and not gastrointestinal related symptoms or psychological factors may contribute pathological eating behavior in celiac adults. Eating disorders appear to be more frequent in young celiac women than in CD men and in HC. PMID:24369457

  10. Preventing complications in celiac disease: our experience with managing adult celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Mulder, C J; Wierdsma, N J; Berkenpas, M; Jacobs, M A J M; Bouma, G

    2015-06-01

    Celiac disease is, as we know it, rather than being a rare and incurable disease until the 1950's, both quite common in screening studies and readily treatable. Three conditions are triggered by gluten consumption: celiac disease, the skin rash dermatitis herpetiformis and gluten ataxia. We describe our follow up for out clinic management, as evidence based data about such an approach are lacking in current literature. No food, beverages or medications containing any amount of gluten can be taken. Compliance is often difficult especially when patients are asymptomatic. We control a cohort, in daily practice, of over 700 adult patients. The majority of patients manage the diet without any problems. We describe our follow up in general, for serology, laboratory and histology. Forty percent of our newly diagnosed celiac patients do have a BMI over 25 kg/m(2). An appropriate attitude for this problem is lacking. The problem of slowly weaning off Dapsone over 5-10 years in DH is recognized. The bone density is checked in all newly diagnosed celiac patients. We control, if necessary, by telephone and lab controls done in local cities and see our patients only every two years face-to-face for follow up. The main question is if the adherence to a GFD, quality of life and prevention of complications is improved by visiting a dedicated celiac clinic. We hope to standardize this attitude on evidence data in the years to come.

  11. Age-related differences in celiac disease: Specific characteristics of adult presentation

    PubMed Central

    Vivas, Santiago; Vaquero, Luis; Rodríguez-Martín, Laura; Caminero, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease may appear both in early childhood and in elderly subjects. Current knowledge of the disease has revealed some differences associated to the age of presentation. Furthermore, monitoring and prognosis of celiac subjects can vary depending on the pediatric or adult stage. The main objective of this review is to provide guidance for the adult diagnostic and follow-up processes, which must be tailored specifically for adults and be different from pediatric patients. PMID:26558154

  12. Celiac symptoms in patients with fibromyalgia: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    García-Leiva, Juan Miguel; Carrasco, Jorge Luis Ordóñez; Slim, Mahmoud; Calandre, Elena P

    2015-03-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain syndrome associated with numerous somatic symptoms including gastrointestinal manifestations of nonspecific nature. Celiac disease and nongluten sensitivity frequently evolve in adults with gastrointestinal and extraintestinal symptoms similar to those found among patients with fibromyalgia. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the presence of celiac-type symptoms among patients with fibromyalgia in comparison with healthy subjects and with those experienced by adult celiac patients and subjects with gluten sensitivity. A list of typical celiac-type symptoms was developed, comparing the frequency of presentation of these symptoms between patients with fibromyalgia (N = 178) and healthy subjects (N = 131), in addition to those of celiac patients and gluten-sensitive patients reported in the literature. The frequency of presentation of every celiac-type symptom, excepting anemia, was significantly higher among patients with fibromyalgia compared to controls (p < 0.0001). Regarding the existing data in the literature, the prevalence of fatigue, depression, cognitive symptoms and cutaneous lesions predominated among patients with fibromyalgia, whereas the prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms was higher among patients with fibromyalgia compared to gluten-sensitive patients and was similar among patients with fibromyalgia and celiac disease patient. The symptomatological similarity of both pathologies, especially gastrointestinal symptoms, suggests that at least a subgroup of patients with fibromyalgia could experience subclinical celiac disease or nonceliac gluten intolerance.

  13. Celiac symptoms in patients with fibromyalgia: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    García-Leiva, Juan Miguel; Carrasco, Jorge Luis Ordóñez; Slim, Mahmoud; Calandre, Elena P

    2015-03-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain syndrome associated with numerous somatic symptoms including gastrointestinal manifestations of nonspecific nature. Celiac disease and nongluten sensitivity frequently evolve in adults with gastrointestinal and extraintestinal symptoms similar to those found among patients with fibromyalgia. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the presence of celiac-type symptoms among patients with fibromyalgia in comparison with healthy subjects and with those experienced by adult celiac patients and subjects with gluten sensitivity. A list of typical celiac-type symptoms was developed, comparing the frequency of presentation of these symptoms between patients with fibromyalgia (N = 178) and healthy subjects (N = 131), in addition to those of celiac patients and gluten-sensitive patients reported in the literature. The frequency of presentation of every celiac-type symptom, excepting anemia, was significantly higher among patients with fibromyalgia compared to controls (p < 0.0001). Regarding the existing data in the literature, the prevalence of fatigue, depression, cognitive symptoms and cutaneous lesions predominated among patients with fibromyalgia, whereas the prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms was higher among patients with fibromyalgia compared to gluten-sensitive patients and was similar among patients with fibromyalgia and celiac disease patient. The symptomatological similarity of both pathologies, especially gastrointestinal symptoms, suggests that at least a subgroup of patients with fibromyalgia could experience subclinical celiac disease or nonceliac gluten intolerance. PMID:25119831

  14. Selected luminal mucosal complications of adult celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hugh J

    2009-01-01

    Celiac disease is a gluten-dependent intestinal disorder that appears to be associated with several clinical conditions. Some involve the luminal mucosa of the stomach and intestinal tract and may, occasionally, complicate the course of celiac disease. Collagenous colitis has been associated with celiac disease and may lead to chronic diarrhea. Conversely, some of these clinical disorders that involve the luminal mucosa of the stomach and intestine may represent the initial clinical presentation of celiac disease. These disorders should be considered in patients with celiac disease who develop recurrent or refractory symptoms despite adherence to a strict gluten-free diet. Detection of collagenous disorders that affect the luminal mucosa of the stomach or intestinal tract may result in recognition of underlying celiac disease. PMID:21694821

  15. Bone and mineral metabolism in adult celiac disease

    SciTech Connect

    Caraceni, M.P.; Molteni, N.; Bardella, M.T.; Ortolani, S.; Nogara, A.; Bianchi, P.A.

    1988-03-01

    Bone mineral density (/sup 125/I photon absorptiometry) was lower in 20 untreated adult celiac patients than in sex- and age-matched controls (p less than 0.001), and plasma alkaline phosphatase, parathyroid hormone, urinary hydroxyproline/creatinine levels were higher than normal (p less than 0.05, less than 0.001, less than 0.05, respectively). Gluten-free diet was started, and the patients were divided randomly into two treatment groups, one which received oral 25-hydroxyvitamin D 50 micrograms/day and one which did not. After 12 months' treatment, bone turnover markers showed a decrease, which did not reach statistical significance, and bone mineral density did not show significant modifications compared with base line in either group. It was found that a gluten-free diet followed for 1 yr can prevent further bone loss, but no significant differences were detected between the two groups.

  16. Symptomatic Secondary Selective IgM Immunodeficiency in Adult Man with Undiagnosed Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Magen, Eli; Feldman, Viktor; Joseph, Mishal; Israel, Hadari

    2012-01-01

    Selective IgM immunodeficiency (SIgMID) is a heterogeneous disorder with no known genetic background and may occur as a primary or a secondary condition. Celiac disease has been reported in association with several humeral immunodeficiencies, including isolated severe selective IgA deficiency, panhypogammaglobulinemia, and isolated combined IgA and IgM deficiency. There are only few reported cases of pediatric and adult patients with SIgMID and celiac disease. In this paper, we describe an adult patient with a symptomatic secondary SIgMID associated with undiagnosed celiac disease, with a resolution of clinical symptoms of immunodeficiency and serum IgM normalization following a gluten-free diet. PMID:25374731

  17. Foods for patients with celiac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    As a general rule patients with celiac disease must avoid five cereals--wheat rye, triticale, barley and oats. Very sensitive individuals must also avoid two products of these cereals--malt and hydrolyzed vegetable protein. Some less sensitive individuals may be able to tolerate barley and oats in small quantities. All other foods are acceptable, including the cereals corn, rice, buckwheat, millet and sorghum, as well as malt-flavored breakfast cereals. Wine, spirits, beer and ale are also acceptable unless otherwise contraindicated. Monosodium glutamate, other food additives and pharmaceutical preparations are also acceptable. The ingredients of prepackaged processed foods are listed on the labels. Patients with celiac disease must examine labels to ensure that they avoid the harmful cereals. With appropriate precautions they need not be concerned about eating away from home. PMID:7139445

  18. HLA genotyping in pediatric celiac disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Stanković, Biljana; Radlović, Nedeljko; Leković, Zoran; Ristić, Dragana; Radlović, Vladimir; Nikčević, Gordana; Kotur, Nikola; Vučićević, Ksenija; Kostić, Tatjana; Pavlović, Sonja; Zukić, Branka

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disease in the small intestine triggered by gluten uptake that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals. HLA-DQ2 protein encoded by HLA-DQA1*05 and DQB1*02 alleles is found in 90-95% of CD patients. All of the remaining patients carry HLA-DQ8 protein encoded by HLA-DQA1*03 and DQB1*03:02 alleles. Specific HLA-DQ genotypes define different risk for CD incidence. Presence of susceptible HLA-DQ genotypes does not predict certain disease development, but their absence makes CD very unlikely, close to 100%. Here we presented for the first time the distribution of HLA-DQ genotypes in the group of pediatric celiac patients from the University Children’s Hospital, Belgrade, Serbia and estimated risk for CD development that these genotypes confer. Seventy three celiac disease patients and 62 healthy individuals underwent genotyping for DQA1, DQB1 alleles and DRB1 allele. 94.5% of patients carried alleles that encode DQ2 protein variant and 2.7% carried alleles that encode DQ8 protein variant. Two patients carried single DQB1*02 allele. No patients were negative for all the alleles predisposing to CD. The highest HLA-DQ genotype risk for CD development was found in group of patients homozygous for DQ2.5 haplotype, followed by the group of heterozygous carriers of DQ2.5 haplotype in combination with DQB1*02 allele within the other haplotype. The lowest risk was observed in carriers of a single copy of DQB1*02 or DQA1*05 allele or other non-predisposing alleles. HLA genotyping, more informative than serological testing commonly used, proved to be a useful diagnostic tool for excluding CD development. PMID:25172978

  19. Hemoptysis in patients of celiac disease with disproportionately severe anemia: tip of the iceberg?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic Pulmonary Hemosiderosis (IPH) is characterized by the triad of iron deficiency anemia, pulmonary infiltrates and haemoptysis with no recognizable cause. Since the first description of its association with Celiac Disease (CD) by Lane and Hamilton in 1971, only a few isolated cases have been reported in literature. Although it has been considered an uncommon association of two disease entities, recent reports indicate that prevalence of celiac disease is as high as one percent. Further, individually both celiac disease and IPH are known to present as refractory anemia only. We are reporting a young adult with Lane Hamilton Syndrome, who realized that he was having significant gastrointestinal complaints only when they disappeared on gluten free diet (GFD). This case report reiterates the fact that celiac disease should be considered in all patients of IPH because of the therapeutic implications. Further on review of literature, we believe that covert hemoptysis may be responsible for disproportionately severe anemia in patients of celiac disease. Thus, prevalence of this association may be more than currently believed. Further research in this regard may improve our understanding of pathogenesis of celiac disease. PMID:23514358

  20. The concentration of serum zinc in celiac patients compared to healthy subjects in Tehran

    PubMed Central

    Fathi, Fariba; Ektefa, Fatemeh; Tafazzoli, Mohsen; Rostami, Kamran; Fathi, Mohsen; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa; Oskouie, Afsaneh Arefi; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    Aim This study evaluated serum levels of zinc in patient with CD compare to healthy subjects. Background Celiac disease (CD) is characterized by small intestinal malabsorption of nutrients as a consequence of ingestion of wheat gluten. Zinc is an essential trace element that it has vital biological functions. Patients and methods Sera of 30 celiac cases and 30 healthy normal cohorts as control group were obtained. Atomic absorption spectrophotometer was employed for estimating serum zinc level. Results Zinc concentrations in patients diagnosed with CD were significantly lower than healthy subjects (75.97±12 compared with 92.83±18, P-value < 0.0001). Conclusion The result of this study shows that serum zinc concentration is decreased in celiac patients compare to healthy controls. Serum zinc may thus be a marker of CD in adults presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms. PMID:24834251

  1. Patients with Celiac Disease Are Not Followed Adequately

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Margot L.; Rubio-Tapia, Alberto; Lahr, Brian D.; Larson, Joseph J.; Van Dyke, Carol T.; Murray, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims Adherence to a gluten-free diet is the only effective treatment for celiac disease. It has been recommended that patients be followed, make regular visits to the clinic, and undergo serologic analysis for markers of celiac disease, although a follow-up procedure has not been standardized. We determined how many patients with celiac disease are actually followed. Methods We collected data on 122 patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease, diagnosed between 1996 and 2006 in Olmsted County, Minnesota (70% women, median age of 42 years) for whom complete medical records and verification of residency were available. We determined the frequency at which patients received follow-up examinations, from 6 months to 5 years after diagnosis. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate event rates at 1 and 5 year(s). Patients were classified according to categories of follow-up procedures recommended by the American Gastroenterology Association (AGA). Results We estimated that by 1 and 5 year(s) after diagnosis with celiac disease, 41.0% and 88.7% of the patients had follow-up visits, 33.6% and 79.8% were assessed for compliance with a gluten-free diet, 3.3% and 15.8% met with a registered dietitian, 2.5% and 18.1% had an additional intestinal biopsy, and 22.1% and 65.6% received serologic testing for markers of celiac disease. Among 113 patients (93%) who were followed for more than 4 years, only 35% received follow-up analyses that were consistent with AGA recommendations. Conclusions Patients with celiac disease are not followed consistently. Follow-up examinations are often inadequate and do not follow AGA recommendations. Improving follow-up strategies for patients with celiac disease could improve management of this disease. PMID:22610009

  2. Salivary Ceruloplasmin Ferroxidase & Oxidase Activities in Celiac Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Hathama R.; Ghadhban, Jasim M.; Abudal Kadhum, Zahraa I.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate salivary ferroxidase ceruloplasmin activities in celiac patients with different histopathological severity. This study included 75 celiac patients with different mean age (18.68 ± 11.13) year, who had positive screen for celiac antibodies, and who had gastrointestinal symptoms. In order to simplify the comparison with the healthy control group, celiac patients were divided into two groups according to their histopathological severity: severe (marsh IIIa, b, c) & less severe (marsh 0, I). All these patients have been evaluating for salivary ceruloplasmin (Cp) concentration and Cp ferroxidase activities. To confirm the presence of the enzymatic activity of this protein, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was carried out and then stained for Cp ferroxidase, as well as for Cp oxidase activity. Furthermore, the concentrations of salivary total protein, albumin, and globulin were measured in the studied groups. A significant increase (p<0.05) in salivary concentration of ceruloplasmin was found in all above mentioned patients groups in comparison to that of the control group, except for total villous atrophy (marsh IIIc) patients subgroup. Salivary Cp ferroxidase activity revealed statistically significant decrease among the patient groups as well as between them and the control group. The result of salivary total protein and globulin showed presence a significant increase (p<0.05) in comparison to that of the control group. Meanwhile albumin levels was found to increase non-significantly (p=0.186). PMID:23675269

  3. Celiac territory ischemic syndrome in a patient on chronic hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Ori, Y; Korzets, A; Neyman, H; Herman, M; Baytner, S; Gafter, U; Atar, E

    2007-10-01

    Mesenteric ischemia among chronic dialysis patients is usually of the nonocclusive type. Chronic occlusive mesenteric ischemia has been reported rarely in the dialysis population. The subset of"celiac-territory ischemic syndrome" has not been described in dialysis. The current report involves a 66-year-old female on chronic dialysis for 11 years. She experienced abdominal pain following sessions of hemodialysis, that later became more pronounced after eating. Abdominal angiography showed heavily calcified aorta, celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery (SMA), with a 50% narrowing of the celiac and superior mesenteric arteries. During the following 9 months the symptoms worsened and weight loss set in. She was admitted with an episode of upper abdominal pain. Acalculous cholecystitis was found, along with multiple gastric and duodenal erosions including the second part, with an antral ulcer and multiple duodenal bulb ulcers. Repeated abdominal angiography showed progression of the stenotic lesions with significant narrowing of both the celiac trunk and the SMA. A stent was placed in the SMA. Following the procedure, the patient noted marked symptomatic improvement. On follow-up gastroduodenoscopy, all ischemic ulcers had healed completely. Serum albumin rose from a nadir of 31 to 40 g/l, and an extremely elevated c-reactive protein of 205,000 microg/l returned to normal (8,000 microg/l). The diagnosis of chronic occlusive mesenteric ischemia should be suspected among dialysis patients with post-prandial pain and weight loss in the face of calcified vessels. Predominant celiac territory ischemic syndrome presents as gastric and duodenal erosions and ulcers with or without acalculous cholecystitis. PMID:17969495

  4. [Asymptomatic celiac disease in patient with chronic acalculous cholecystitis].

    PubMed

    Parfenov, A I; Dolgasheva, G M; Krums, L M; Bystrovskaia, E V; Sabel'nikova, E A; Gudkova, R B; Vorob'eva, N N; Lishchinskaia, A A

    2011-01-01

    We described a patient 40 years old, admitted to the clinic with periodic attacks of pain in the right upper quadrant. With ultrasound it was confirmed chronic acalculous cholecystitis, and at endoscopy and multiple biopsies revealed atrophy of the mucosa of the duodenum (DM), corresponding to celiac disease (stage III in the Marsh classification). Titer of antibodies to gliadin (AGA) and tissue transglutaminase (AtTG) were higher: 60 and 110 units/ml, respectively, at a rate of 10 units/ml. The patient was assigned a lifetime adherence to a gluten-free diet, serologic test and a control endoscopy with biopsy at 6 months. The important role of the doctor-endoscopist in the diagnosis of latent forms of celiac disease. The significance of DM atrophy in the pathogenesis of patients with chronic cholecystitis. PMID:21695960

  5. Non-dietary forms of treatment for adult celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2013-01-01

    At present, treatment for celiac disease includes a strict gluten-free diet. Compliance, however, is difficult and gluten-free food products are costly, and, sometimes very inconvenient. A number of potential alternative measures have been proposed to either replace or supplement gluten-free diet therapy. In the past, non-dietary forms of treatment were used (e.g., corticosteroids) by some clinicians, often to supplement a gluten-free diet in patients that appeared to be poorly responsive to a gluten-free diet. Some of new and novel non-dietary measures have already advanced to a clinical trial phase. There are still some difficulties even if initial studies suggest a particularly exciting and novel form of non-dietary treatment. In particular, precise monitoring of the response to these agents will become critical. Symptom or laboratory improvement may be important, but it will be critical to ensure that ongoing inflammatory change and mucosal injury are not present. Therapeutic trials will be made more difficult because there is already an effective treatment regimen. PMID:24199026

  6. Problems and Challenges to Adaptation of Gluten Free Diet by Indian Patients with Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rajpoot, Preeti; Makharia, Govind K.

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease is emerging in India and has become a public health problem. Almost 6–8 million Indians are estimated to have celiac disease. While there is a large pool of patients with celiac disease in India, until now, only a fraction of them have been diagnosed. With increasing awareness about celiac disease amongst health care providers and the general population, a massive increase in the number of patients with celiac disease is expected now and in the subsequent decade in India. While the number of patients with celiac disease is increasing, the country’s preparedness towards the emerging epidemic of this disease is minimal. There are a number of issues, which requires urgent attention. Some of the key issues include increased awareness amongst health care professionals and the general public about the disease and its management, team-based management of patients with celiac disease, proper counseling and supervision of patients, training of dietitians in the management of patients with celiac disease, industrial production of reliable and affordable gluten-free food, and food labeling for gluten contents. PMID:24288026

  7. Resolution of metabolic syndrome after following a gluten free diet in an adult woman diagnosed with celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    García-Manzanares, Álvaro; Lucendo, Alfredo J; González-Castillo, Sonia; Moreno-Fernández, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    Adult celiac disease (CD) presents with very diverse symptoms that are clearly different from those typically seen in pediatric patients, including ferropenic anemia, dyspepsia, endocrine alterations and elevated transaminase concentration. We present the case of a 51-year-old overweight woman with altered basal blood glucose, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia and persisting elevated transaminase levels, who showed all the symptoms for a diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. Because she presented iron deficiency anemia, she was referred to the gastroenterology department and subsequently diagnosed with celiac disease after duodenal biopsies and detection of a compatible HLA haplotype. Gluten-free diet (GFD) was prescribed and after 6 mo the patient showed resolution of laboratory abnormalities (including recovering anemia and iron reserves, normalization of altered lipid and liver function parameters and decrease of glucose blood levels). No changes in weight or waist circumference were observed and no significant changes in diet were documented apart from the GFD. The present case study is the first reported description of an association between CD and metabolic syndrome, and invites investigation of the metabolic changes induced by gluten in celiac patients. PMID:21860836

  8. Isolation and culture of fibroblasts from endoscopic duodenal biopsies of celiac patients

    PubMed Central

    Roncoroni, Leda; Elli, Luca; Doneda, Luisa; Piodi, Luca; Ciulla, Michele M; Paliotti, Roberta; Bardella, Maria Teresa

    2009-01-01

    Background Fibroblasts are actually considered pivotal in inflammation and tissue remodelling process and for these reasons they are involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders such as celiac disease. Investigations to define the role of fibroblasts in celiac diseases are obstructed by the absence of specific models. Our objective is to isolate and culture primary fibroblasts from endoscopic duodenal biopsies of celiac and non-celiac subjects, to analyze their growth patterns and the morphometric characteristics. Methods 60 duodenal bioptic specimens from 20 celiac patients and 114 from 38 non-celiac subjects were mechanically chopped and enzymatically digested in order to obtain primary cell cultures. Growth patterns, karyotype (Q-banding analysis), expression of typing proteins (fibroblast surface protein and cytokeratin 20) and morphometric parameters (diameters and their ratio, perimeter, area and perimeter/area ratio at computerised image analysis) were investigated on cultured cells. Results Primary cells were successfully cultured in 78% of the collected duodenal biopsies. Cultured cells, expressing the fibroblast surface protein, were negative for cytokeratine 20 and maintained a normal kariotype. Cells grew slowly without differences between the celiac and the non celiac group. Morphometric analysis of celiac fibroblasts revealed significantly increased dimensions, with a preserved diameters ratio, and a reduced perimeter/area ratio. Conclusion For the first time this study demonstrates the feasibility of culturing primary fibroblast cell from endoscopic duodenal biopsies in celiac and non-celiac subjects, opening a new window of opportunity in studies intended to establish the role of fibroblasts as a possible partaker in the pathogenesis of the celiac mucosal damage. PMID:19497109

  9. The surface-associated proteins of wheat starch granules: suitability of wheat starch for celiac patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat starch is used to make baked products for celiac patients in several European countries, but is avoided in the US because of uncertainty about the amounts of associated grain storage (gluten) proteins. People with celiac disease (CD) must avoid wheat, rye and barley proteins and products that...

  10. Prevalence of celiac disease in patients with severe food allergy.

    PubMed

    Pillon, R; Ziberna, F; Badina, L; Ventura, A; Longo, G; Quaglia, S; De Leo, L; Vatta, S; Martelossi, S; Patano, G; Not, T; Berti, I

    2015-10-01

    The association between food allergy and celiac disease (CD) is still to be clarified. We screened for CD 319 patients with severe food allergy (IgE > 85 kU/l against food proteins and a history of severe allergic reactions) who underwent specific food oral immunotherapy (OIT), together with 128 children with mild allergy who recovered without OIT, and compared the prevalence data with our historical data regarding healthy schoolchildren. Sixteen patients (5%) with severe allergy and one (0.8%) with mild allergy tested positive for both genetic and serological CD markers, while the prevalence among the schoolchildren was 1%. Intestinal biopsies were obtained in 13/16 patients with severe allergy and in the one with mild allergy, confirming the diagnosis of CD. Sufferers from severe food allergy seem to be at a fivefold increased risk of CD. Our findings suggest that routine screening for CD should be recommended in patients with severe food allergy.

  11. An Italian prospective multicenter survey on patients suspected of having non-celiac gluten sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is still an undefined syndrome with several unsettled issues despite the increasing awareness of its existence. We carried out a prospective survey on NCGS in Italian centers for the diagnosis of gluten-related disorders, with the aim of defining the clinical picture of this new syndrome and to establish roughly its prevalence compared with celiac disease. Methods From November 2012 to October 2013, 38 Italian centers (27 adult gastroenterology, 5 internal medicine, 4 pediatrics, and 2 allergy) participated in this prospective survey. A questionnaire was used in order to allow uniform and accurate collection of clinical, biochemical, and instrumental data. Results In total, 486 patients with suspected NCGS were identified in this 1-year period. The female/male ratio was 5.4 to 1, and the mean age was 38 years (range 3–81). The clinical picture was characterized by combined gastrointestinal (abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea and/or constipation, nausea, epigastric pain, gastroesophageal reflux, aphthous stomatitis) and systemic manifestations (tiredness, headache, fibromyalgia-like joint/muscle pain, leg or arm numbness, 'foggy mind,' dermatitis or skin rash, depression, anxiety, and anemia). In the large majority of patients, the time lapse between gluten ingestion and the appearance of symptoms varied from a few hours to 1 day. The most frequent associated disorders were irritable bowel syndrome (47%), food intolerance (35%) and IgE-mediated allergy (22%). An associated autoimmune disease was detected in 14% of cases. Regarding family history, 18% of our patients had a relative with celiac disease, but no correlation was found between NCGS and positivity for HLA-DQ2/-DQ8. IgG anti-gliadin antibodies were detected in 25% of the patients tested. Only a proportion of patients underwent duodenal biopsy; for those that did, the biopsies showed normal intestinal mucosa (69%) or mild increase in intraepithelial

  12. Celiac Disease and Overweight in Children: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Diamanti, Antonella; Capriati, Teresa; Basso, Maria Sole; Panetta, Fabio; Di Ciommo Laurora, Vincenzo Maria; Bellucci, Francesca; Cristofori, Fernanda; Francavilla, Ruggiero

    2014-01-01

    The clinical presentation of celiac disease in children is very variable and differs with age. The prevalence of atypical presentations of celiac disease has increased over the past 2 decades. Several studies in adults and children with celiac disease indicate that obesity/overweight at disease onset is not unusual. In addition, there is a trend towards the development of overweight/obesity in celiac patients who strictly comply with a gluten-free diet. However, the pathogenesis and clinical implications of the coexistence of classic malabsorption (e.g., celiac disease) and overweight/obesity remain unclear. This review investigated the causes and main clinical factors associated with overweight/obesity at the diagnosis of celiac disease and clarified whether gluten withdrawal affects the current trends of the nutritional status of celiac disease patients. PMID:24451308

  13. Altered Esophageal Mucosal Structure in Patients with Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pinto-Sánchez, María Inés; Nachman, Fabio D.; Fuxman, Claudia; Iantorno, Guido; Hwang, Hui Jer; Ditaranto, Andrés; Costa, Florencia; Longarini, Gabriela; Wang, Xuan Yu; Huang, Xianxi; Vázquez, Horacio; Moreno, María L.; Niveloni, Sonia; Bercik, Premysl; Smecuol, Edgardo; Mazure, Roberto; Bilder, Claudio; Mauriño, Eduardo C.; Verdu, Elena F.; Bai, Julio C.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim. Reflux symptoms (RS) are common in patients with celiac disease (CD), a chronic enteropathy that affects primarily the small intestine. We evaluated mucosal integrity and motility of the lower esophagus as mechanisms contributing to RS generation in patients with CD. Methods. We enrolled newly diagnosed CD patients with and without RS, nonceliac patients with classical reflux disease (GERD), and controls (without RS). Endoscopic biopsies from the distal esophagus were assessed for dilated intercellular space (DIS) by light microscopy and electron microscopy. Tight junction (TJ) mRNA proteins expression for zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and claudin-2 and claudin-3 (CLDN-2; CLDN-3) was determined using qRT-PCR. Results. DIS scores were higher in patients with active CD than in controls, but similar to GERD patients. The altered DIS was found even in CD patients without RS and normalized after one year of a gluten-free diet. CD patients with and without RS had lower expression of ZO-1 than controls. The expression of CLDN-2 and CLDN-3 was similar in CD and GERD patients. Conclusions. Our study shows that patients with active CD have altered esophageal mucosal integrity, independently of the presence of RS. The altered expression of ZO-1 may underlie loss of TJ integrity in the esophageal mucosa and may contribute to RS generation. PMID:27446827

  14. Altered Esophageal Mucosal Structure in Patients with Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Sánchez, María Inés; Nachman, Fabio D; Fuxman, Claudia; Iantorno, Guido; Hwang, Hui Jer; Ditaranto, Andrés; Costa, Florencia; Longarini, Gabriela; Wang, Xuan Yu; Huang, Xianxi; Vázquez, Horacio; Moreno, María L; Niveloni, Sonia; Bercik, Premysl; Smecuol, Edgardo; Mazure, Roberto; Bilder, Claudio; Mauriño, Eduardo C; Verdu, Elena F; Bai, Julio C

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim. Reflux symptoms (RS) are common in patients with celiac disease (CD), a chronic enteropathy that affects primarily the small intestine. We evaluated mucosal integrity and motility of the lower esophagus as mechanisms contributing to RS generation in patients with CD. Methods. We enrolled newly diagnosed CD patients with and without RS, nonceliac patients with classical reflux disease (GERD), and controls (without RS). Endoscopic biopsies from the distal esophagus were assessed for dilated intercellular space (DIS) by light microscopy and electron microscopy. Tight junction (TJ) mRNA proteins expression for zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and claudin-2 and claudin-3 (CLDN-2; CLDN-3) was determined using qRT-PCR. Results. DIS scores were higher in patients with active CD than in controls, but similar to GERD patients. The altered DIS was found even in CD patients without RS and normalized after one year of a gluten-free diet. CD patients with and without RS had lower expression of ZO-1 than controls. The expression of CLDN-2 and CLDN-3 was similar in CD and GERD patients. Conclusions. Our study shows that patients with active CD have altered esophageal mucosal integrity, independently of the presence of RS. The altered expression of ZO-1 may underlie loss of TJ integrity in the esophageal mucosa and may contribute to RS generation. PMID:27446827

  15. Clinical Utility of Serologic Testing for Celiac Disease in Asymptomatic Patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this evidence-based analysis was to evaluate the clinical utility of serologic testing for celiac disease in asymptomatic individuals presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated in this report. The clinical utility was based on the effects of a gluten-free diet (GFD) on outcomes specific to each of these conditions. The prevalence of celiac disease in asymptomatic individuals and one of these non-gastrointestinal conditions was also evaluated. Clinical Need and Target Population Celiac Disease Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease characterized by a chronic inflammatory state of the proximal small bowel mucosa accompanied by structural and functional changes. Technology Under Evaluation Serologic Tests for Celiac Disease There are a number of serologic tests for celiac disease available. Serologic tests are automated with the exception of the anti-endomysial antibody test, which is more time-consuming and operator-dependent than the other tests. Research Questions What is the prevalence of asymptomatic celiac disease in patients presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated? What is the effect of the gluten-free diet on condition-specific outcomes in patients with asymptomatic celiac disease presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated? What is the clinical utility of serologic testing for celiac disease in asymptomatic patients presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated? The clinical utility was defined as the impact of the GFD on disease specific outcomes. What is the risk of all-cause mortality and lymphoma in individuals with asymptomatic celiac disease? What is the budget impact of serologic testing for celiac disease in asymptomatic subjects presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated? Research Methods Study Population The study population consisted of individuals with newly diagnosed celiac

  16. Spectrum of malabsorption syndrome among adults & factors differentiating celiac disease & tropical malabsorption

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, Uday C.; Mehrotra, Mansi; Kumar, Sunil; Ghoshal, Ujjala; Krishnani, Narendra; Misra, Asha; Aggarwal, Rakesh; Choudhuri, Gourdas

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Aetiology of malabsorption syndrome (MAS) differs in tropical and temperate countries over time; clinical and laboratory parameters may differentiate between various causes. This study was undertaken to investigate the spectrum of MAS among Indian adults and to find out the features that may help to differentiate between TM and celiac disease. Methods: Causes of MAS, and factors differentiating tropical malabsorption (TM) from celiac disease (CD) were determined in 275 patients. Results: Using standard criteria, causes in 275 patients [age 37.5+13.2 yr, 170, (61.5%) male] were, TM 101 (37%), CD 53 (19%), small intestinal bacterial overgrowth 28 (10%), AIDS 15 (5.4%), giardiasis 13 (5%), hypogammaglobulinemia 12 (4%), intestinal tuberculosis 7 (2.5%), strongyloidiasis 6 (2%), immunoproliferative small intestinal disease 5 (2%), Crohn's disease 6 (2%), amyloidosis 4 (1.5%), intestinal lymphangiectasia 3 (1%) and unknown 22 (8%). On univariate analysis, patients with CD were younger than TM (30.6+12 vs. 39.3+12.6 yr, P<0.001), had lower body weight (41.3+11.8 vs. 49.9+11.2 kg, P<0.001), longer diarrhoea duration (median 36 inter-quartile range 17.8-120 vs. 24-months, 8-48, P<0.01), lower stool frequency (6/day, 5-8 vs. 8, 5-10, P<0.05), lower haemoglobin (9.4+3.2 vs. 10.4+2.7 g/dl, P<0.05), higher platelet count (2,58,000, range 1,35,500-3,23,500 vs. 1,60,000, 1,26,000-2,58,000/mm3, P<0.05), and more often had hepatomegaly (9/53, 17% vs. 4/101, 4%, P<0.01), and subtotal or partial villous atrophy (36/50, 72% vs. 28/87, 32%, P<0.001). Younger age (<35 yr), longer diarrhoea duration, higher platelet count and villous atrophy were significant on multivariate analysis. Interpretation & conclusions: TM and CD are common causes of MAS among Indian adults. Younger age (<35 yr), longer diarrhoea duration, higher platelet count and villous atrophy were found to be associated with CD. PMID:23041739

  17. Fatal Streptococcus pneumoniae Sepsis in a Patient With Celiac Disease-Associated Hyposplenism

    PubMed Central

    Ouseph, Madhu M.; Simons, Malorie; Treaba, Diana O.; Yakirevich, Evgeny; Green, Peter H.; Bhagat, Govind; Moss, Steven F.

    2016-01-01

    We present a 59-year-old male with poorly controlled celiac disease (CD) and fatal Streptococcus pneumoniae sepsis, describe the morphologic findings, and stress the need for monitoring splenic function and pneumococcal vaccination in these patients. PMID:27761478

  18. A distinctive 'microbial signature' in celiac pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Celiac Disease (CD) is an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine in which dietary gluten ingestion leads to a chronic enteropathy. Recently, scientific evidence suggested a potential role of gut microbiota in CD. To have a snapshot of dominant duodenal microbiota we analyzed the mucosa-associated microbiota of 20 children with CD, before and after a gluten-free diet (GFD) regimen, and of 10 controls. Total DNA was extracted from duodenal biopsies and amplification products of 16S ribosomal DNA were compared by temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE). TTGE profiles were analyzed by statistical multivariate analysis. Results The average number of bands in TTGE profiles was significantly higher (P < 0.0001) in active (n.b. 16.7 ± 0.7) and inactive states (n.b. 13.2 ± 0.8) than in controls (n.b. 3.7 ± 1.3). Mean interindividual similarity index was 54.9% ± 14.9% for active disease, 55.6% ± 15.7% for remission state and 21.8% ± 30.16% for controls. Similarity index between celiac children before and after GFD treatment was 63.9% ± 15.8%. Differences in microbiota biodiversity were among active and remission state (P = 0.000224) and amid active CD and controls (P < 0.001). Bacteroides vulgatus and Escherichia coli were detected more often in CD patients than in controls (P < 0.0001). Conclusions Overall, the results highlighted a peculiar microbial TTGE profile and a significant higher biodiversity in CD pediatric patients' duodenal mucosa. The possible pathophysiological role of these microbial differences needs further characterization. PMID:20565734

  19. Autoantibodies against MHC class I polypeptide-related sequence A are associated with increased risk of concomitant autoimmune diseases in celiac patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Overexpression of autologous proteins can lead to the formation of autoantibodies and autoimmune diseases. MHC class I polypeptide-related sequence A (MICA) is highly expressed in the enterocytes of patients with celiac disease, which arises in response to gluten. The aim of this study was to investigate anti-MICA antibody formation in patients with celiac disease and its association with other autoimmune processes. Methods We tested serum samples from 383 patients with celiac disease, obtained before they took up a gluten-free diet, 428 patients with diverse autoimmune diseases, and 200 controls for anti-MICA antibodies. All samples were also tested for anti-endomysium and anti-transglutaminase antibodies. Results Antibodies against MICA were detected in samples from 41.7% of patients with celiac disease but in only 3.5% of those from controls (P <0.0001) and 8.2% from patients with autoimmune disease (P <0.0001). These antibodies disappeared after the instauration of a gluten-free diet. Anti-MICA antibodies were significantly prevalent in younger patients (P <0.01). Fifty-eight patients with celiac disease (15.1%) presented a concomitant autoimmune disease. Anti-MICA-positive patients had a higher risk of autoimmune disease than MICA antibody-negative patients (P <0.0001; odds ratio = 6.11). The risk was even higher when we also controlled for age (odds ratio = 11.69). Finally, we found that the associated risk of developing additional autoimmune diseases was 16 and 10 times as high in pediatric patients and adults with anti-MICA, respectively, as in those without. Conclusions The development of anti-MICA antibodies could be related to a gluten-containing diet, and seems to be involved in the development of autoimmune diseases in patients with celiac disease, especially younger ones. PMID:24565339

  20. Celiac disease prevalence in Brazilian dilated cardiomyopathy patients.

    PubMed

    De Bem, Ricardo Schmit T; Da Ro Sa Utiyama, Shirley Ramos; Nisihara, Renato Mitsunori; Fortunato, Jerônimo Antônio; Tondo, Josué Augusto; Carmes, Eliane Ribeiro; Souza, Raquel Almada E; Pisani, Julio César; Amarante, Heda Maria Barska Dos Santos

    2006-05-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a permanent condition of gluten intolerance and a number of autoimmune diseases have been associated with it. In the past few years, a relation between CD and dilated cardiomyopathy (CM) was described in Europe and United States. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of CD among south Brazilian precardiac transplant patients with advanced CM. A total of 74 patients on a list for heart transplantation were evaluated for the presence CD. The presence of anti-endomisial antibody (IgA-EmA) was determined by indirect immunofluorescence and for the anti-transglutaminase antibody (IgA anti-h-tTG) by ELISA. Serologically positive patients were submitted to upper endoscopy with intestinal biopsy. Two individuals (2.63%) were positive for IgA-EmA and 5 (6.75%) for IgA anti-h-tTG; 1 (1.35%) had both tests positive. Histologic confirmation of CD occurred only in the IgA-EmA positive patients. In conclusion, data from the present study allows recommend the screening for CD in patients with CM using IgA-EmA test as the method of choice. PMID:16758314

  1. Increased Mercury Levels in Patients with Celiac Disease following a Gluten-Free Regimen

    PubMed Central

    Elli, Luca; Rossi, Valentina; Conte, Dario; Ronchi, Anna; Tomba, Carolina; Passoni, Manuela; Bardella, Maria Teresa; Roncoroni, Leda; Guzzi, Gianpaolo

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim. Although mercury is involved in several immunological diseases, nothing is known about its implication in celiac disease. Our aim was to evaluate blood and urinary levels of mercury in celiac patients. Methods. We prospectively enrolled 30 celiac patients (20 treated with normal duodenal mucosa and 10 untreated with duodenal atrophy) and 20 healthy controls from the same geographic area. Blood and urinary mercury concentrations were measured by means of flow injection inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Enrolled patients underwent dental chart for amalgam fillings and completed a food-frequency questionnaire to evaluate diet and fish intake. Results. Mercury blood/urinary levels were 2.4 ± 2.3/1.0 ± 1.4, 10.2 ± 6.7/2.2 ± 3.0 and 3.7 ± 2.7/1.3 ± 1.2 in untreated CD, treated CD, and healthy controls, respectively. Resulting mercury levels were significantly higher in celiac patients following a gluten-free diet. No differences were found regarding fish intake and number of amalgam fillings. No demographic or clinical data were significantly associated with mercury levels in biologic samples. Conclusion. Data demonstrate a fourfold increase of mercury blood levels in celiac patients following a gluten-free diet. Further studies are needed to clarify its role in celiac mechanism. PMID:25802516

  2. Celiac Disease Presenting as Profound Diarrhea and Weight Loss – A Celiac Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Bul, Vadim; Sleesman, Brett; Boulay, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 46 Final Diagnosis: Celiac crisis Symptoms: Abdominal pain • chronic diarrhea • lightheadedness • weakness • weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Celiac disease is a hypersensitivity enteropathy that can have various presentations in adults. Rarely, patients can present with severe lab abnormalities, dehydration and weight loss caused by celiac disease – a celiac crisis. Case Report: A 46-year-old male with a past medical history significant for diabetes mellitus, type 2 (DM2) and recently treated Bell’s Palsy presented to the emergency room complaining of weakness, diarrhea and lightheadedness. On presentation, the patient had a systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 60 mm Hg and a lactic acidosis with pH of 7.28. Infectious etiologies of diarrhea were ruled out. The patient had an EGD which showed erythema of the duodenal bulb. Serum anti-gliadin and anti-TTG IgA were both elevated suggesting Celiac disease. Biopsies showed histopathology consistent with celiac disease. The patient’s diarrhea resolved after initiation of a gluten free diet. He gained 25 kilograms after discharge and did not require further hospitalizations for diarrhea. Conclusions: Celiac crisis is a very rare presentation of celiac disease in adults but nonetheless should be considered in patients with marked metabolic derangements in the setting of osmotic diarrhea. Treatment consists of a gluten free diet and may require management with steroids and total parenteral nutrition (TPN). PMID:27492679

  3. Support for patients with celiac disease: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Card, Tim; Ciclitira, Paul J; Swift, Gillian L; Nasr, Ikram; Sanders, David S; Ciacci, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) is a lifelong disorder. Patients are at increased risk of complications and comorbidity. Objectives We conducted a review of the literature on patient support and information in CD and aim to issue recommendations about patient information with regards to CD. Methods Data source: We searched PubMed for English-language articles published between 1900 and June 2014, containing terms related to costs, economics of CD, or education and CD. Study selection: Papers deemed relevant by any of the participating authors were included in the study. Data synthesis: No quantitative synthesis of data was performed. Instead we formulated a consensus view of the information that should be offered to all patients with CD. Results There are few randomized clinical trials examining the effect of patient support in CD. Patients and their families receive information from many sources. It is important that health care personnel guide the patient through the plethora of facts and comments on the Internet. An understanding of CD is likely to improve dietary adherence. Patients should be educated about current knowledge about risk factors for CD, as well as the increased risk of complications. Patients should also be advised to avoid other health hazards, such as smoking. Many patients are eager to learn about future non-dietary treatments of CD. This review also comments on novel therapies but it is important to stress that no such treatment is available at present. Conclusion Based on mostly observational data, we suggest that patient support and information should be an integral part of the management of CD, and is likely to affect the outcome of CD. PMID:25922674

  4. Risk of Thyroid Cancer in a Nationwide Cohort of Patients with Biopsy-Verified Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lebwohl, Benjamin; Kämpe, Olle; Murray, Joseph A.; Green, Peter H.; Ekbom, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Background In earlier studies based on selected populations, the relative risk for thyroid cancer in celiac disease has varied between 0.6 and 22.5. We aimed to test this relationship in a population-based setting. Methods We collected small intestinal biopsy report data performed in 1969–2008 from all 28 Swedish pathology departments. 29,074 individuals with celiac disease (villous atrophy; Marsh histopathology stage III) were matched for sex, age, calendar year, and county to 144,440 reference individuals from the Swedish general population. Through Cox regression, we then estimated hazard ratios (HRs) and confidence intervals (CIs) for any thyroid cancer and papillary thyroid cancer (defined according to relevant pathology codes in the Swedish Cancer Register) in patients with celiac disease. Results During follow-up, any thyroid cancer developed in seven patients with celiac disease (expected=12) and papillary thyroid cancer developed in five patients (expected=7). Celiac disease was not associated with an increased risk of any thyroid cancer (HR 0.6 [CI 0.3–1.3]) or of papillary thyroid cancer (HR 0.7 [CI 0.3–1.8]). All cases of thyroid cancer in celiac disease occurred in female patients. Risk estimates were similar before and after the year 2000 and independent of age at celiac diagnosis (≤24 years vs. ≥25 years). Conclusions We conclude that, in the Swedish population, there is no increased risk of thyroid cancer in patients with celiac disease. This differs from what has been reported in smaller studies in Italy and the United States. PMID:23281890

  5. Increased Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Patients with Unexplained Infertility in the United States: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Lebwohl, Benjamin; Wang, Jeffrey; Lee, Susie K.; Murray, Joseph A.; Sauer, Mark V.; Green, Peter H. R.

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder which can present with a variety of non-gastrointestinal manifestations. In women, it may manifest with an assortment of gynecologic or obstetric disorders. Some reports have linked female infertility with undiagnosed celiac disease. Though there are a number of studies from Europe and the Middle East, only two prior American studies have examined the prevalence of “silent” celiac disease in a female infertility population. We prospectively performed serologic screening for celiac disease in 188 infertile women (ages 25–39). While we did not demonstrate an increased prevalence of celiac disease in our overall infertile female population, we were able to detect a significantly increased prevalence (5.9%) of undiagnosed celiac disease among women presenting with unexplained infertility (n=51). Our findings suggest the importance of screening infertile female patients, particularly those with unexplained infertility, for celiac disease. PMID:21682114

  6. Serologic celiac disease in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Tavakkoli, Hamid; Haghdani, Saeid; Adilipour, Haiedeh; Daghaghzadeh, Hamed; Minakari, Mohammad; Adibi, Peyman; Ahmadi, Khalil; Emami, Mohammah Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is an association of celiac disease (CD) with several gastrointestinal illnesses. We aimed to determine the prevalence of CD in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to evaluate the value of the routine serological tests for CD in these patients. Materials and Methods: patients with IBD underwent screening test for CD. The screening test was based on IgA anti-tTG antibody evaluated by ELISA method and IgA EMA (endomysial antibody) measured by the indirect immunofluorescence method. Fisher exact and chi-square and t tests were used for data analysis. Results: the study was conducted on 100 patients, with a mean age of 34.74 ± 12.03 (SD) years. The mean simplified Crohn's disease activity index was 90 ± 17 (SE) and the mean colitis activity index was 3.46± 0.96 (SE). Seventeen patients (17%) had IgA anti-tTG antibody levels above the cutoff point (> 20). Thirty-two patients were positive for IgA EMA. IgA EMA was positive in nine IgA anti-tTG positive patients (three patients with Crohn's Disease and six ones with ulcerative colitis). Then, the prevalence of serologic CD was 9% that was higher than that of general population. A significant correlation was found between the results of IgA EMA and those of IgA anti-tTG (P=0.001) whereas Fisher exact test revealed significant difference between frequency distribution of positive and negative results of IgA EMA and IgA anti-tTG in patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease (P=0). Conclusion: the prevalence of serologic CD in general population in Iran has been reported to be 0.6–0.96%. Then, its prevalence in our sample size was about ten times more than that in general population. PMID:23264789

  7. Frequency of Celiac Disease in Patients With Increased Intestinal Gas (Flatulence).

    PubMed

    Masoodi, Mohsen; Mokhtare, Marjan; Agah, Shahram; Sina, Mohammad; Soltani-Kermanshahi, Mojtaba

    2015-10-26

    Excessive flatulence which impairs social performance in patients is one of the common reasons for referrals to gastroenterology clinics. Celiac Disease is a rare but important cause of increased intestinal gas (bloating) and if not diagnosed, patients face complications such as malabsorption, anemia, osteoporosis and even intestinal lymphoma. This study aimed to determine the frequency of Celiac Disease in patients with excessive flatulence.One hundred and fifty patients with a chief complaint of experiencing flatulence more than 15 times a day and lasting for three months were referred to the gastroenterology clinic of Rasoul-e-Akram Teaching Hospital. Serological tests for Celiac Disease, Anti TTG Ab (IgA-IgG) were requested and the patients with positive tests underwent upper GI endoscopy. Biopsies of the second part of the duodenum were then sent to the laboratory.From one hundred and thirty patients who completed the study, 92 (70.7%) were female. Mean age of the patients was 32 ± 13 years. Anti TTG Ab was found in 5 patients (3.85%). Only 2 patients (1.5%) had a documented positive pathology for Celiac Disease.According to the results of this study and other studies, we conclude that Celiac Disease is an uncommon etiology for excessive flatulence but it is of importance to investigate it in excessive flatulence patients.

  8. Classification of videocapsule endoscopy image patterns: comparative analysis between patients with celiac disease and normal individuals

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Quantitative disease markers were developed to assess videocapsule images acquired from celiac disease patients with villous atrophy, and from control patients. Method Capsule endoscopy videoclip images (576 × 576 pixels) were acquired at 2/second frame rate (11 celiacs, 10 controls) at regions: 1. bulb, 2. duodenum, 3. jejunum, 4. ileum and 5. distal ileum. Each of 200 images per videoclip (= 100s) were subdivided into 10 × 10 pixel subimages for which mean grayscale brightness level and its standard deviation (texture) were calculated. Pooled subimage values were grouped into low, intermediate, and high texture bands, and mean brightness, texture, and number of subimages in each band (nine features in all) were used for quantifying regions 1-5, and to determine the three best features for threshold and incremental learning classification. Classifiers were developed using 6 celiac and 5 control patients' data as exemplars, and tested on 5 celiacs and 5 controls. Results Pooled from all regions, the threshold classifier had 80% sensitivity and 96% specificity and the incremental classifier had 88% sensitivity and 80% specificity for predicting celiac versus control videoclips in the test set. Trends of increasing texture from regions 1 to 5 occurred in the low and high texture bands in celiacs, and the number of subimages in the low texture band diminished (r2 > 0.5). No trends occurred in controls. Conclusions Celiac videocapsule images have textural properties that vary linearly along the small intestine. Quantitative markers can assist in screening for celiac disease and localize extent and degree of pathology throughout the small intestine. PMID:20815911

  9. Managing the pediatric patient with celiac disease: a multidisciplinary approach

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, Daniela Migliarese; Wu, Jessica; Mager, Diana R; Turner, Justine M

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune reaction to gluten, leading to intestinal inflammation, villous atrophy, and malabsorption. It is the most common autoimmune gastrointestinal disorder, with an increasing prevalence. A life-long gluten-free diet (GFD) is an effective treatment to alleviate symptoms, normalize autoantibodies, and heal the intestinal mucosa in patients with CD. Poorly controlled CD poses a significant concern for ongoing malabsorption, growth restriction, and the long-term concern of intestinal lymphoma. Achieving GFD compliance and long-term disease control poses a challenge, with adolescents at particular risk for high rates of noncompliance. Attention has turned toward innovative management strategies to improve adherence and achieve better disease control. One such strategy is the development of multidisciplinary clinic approach, and CD is a complex life-long disease state that would benefit from a multifaceted team approach as recognized by multiple national and international bodies, including the National Institutes of Health. Utilizing the combined efforts of the pediatric gastroenterologist, registered dietitian, registered nurse, and primary care provider (general practitioner or general pediatrician) in a CD multidisciplinary clinic model will be of benefit for patients and families in optimizing diagnosis, provision of GFD teaching, and long-term adherence to a GFD. This paper discusses the benefits and proposed structure for multidisciplinary care in improving management of CD. PMID:27785047

  10. Assessment of Aortic Elasticity in Patients with Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Çekin, Ayhan Hilmi; Arslan, Şakir; Çağırcı, Göksel; Küçükseymen, Selçuk; Çay, Serkan; Harmandar, Ferda Akbay; Yeşil, Bayram

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic autoimmune disorder induced by dietary gluten intake by individuals who are genetically sensitive. Many studies report an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases in such patients. The aim of this study is to assess aortic elasticity properties in patients with CD that may be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Subjects and Methods Eighty-one patients diagnosed with CD by antibody test and biopsy and 63 healthy volunteers were included in this prospective study. Electrocardiographic and echocardiographic examinations were performed. Results The CD group did not have any differences in the conventional echocardiographic parameters compared to the healthy individuals. However, patients in the CD group had an increased aortic stiffness beta index (4.3±2.3 vs. 3.6±1.6, p=0.010), increased pressure strain elastic modulus (33.6±17.0 kPa vs. 28.5±16.7 kPa, p=0.037), decreased aortic distensibility (7.0±3.0×10-6 cm2/dyn vs. 8.2±3.6×10-6 cm2/dyn, p=0.037), and similar aortic strain (17.9±7.7 vs. 16.0±5.5, p=0.070) compared to the control group. Patients with CD were found to have an elevated neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio compared to the control group (2.54±0.63 vs. 2.24±0.63, p=0.012). However, gluten-free diet and neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio were not found to be associated with aortic elasticity. Conclusion Patients with CD had increased aortic stiffness and decreased aortic distensibility. Gluten-free diet enabled the patients with CD to have a reduction in the inflammatory parameters whereas the absence of a significant difference in the elastic properties of the aorta may suggest that the risk of cardiovascular disease persists in this patient group despite a gluten-free diet. PMID:27014355

  11. Celiac Disease Presenting as Profound Diarrhea and Weight Loss - A Celiac Crisis.

    PubMed

    Bul, Vadim; Sleesman, Brett; Boulay, Brian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Celiac disease is a hypersensitivity enteropathy that can have various presentations in adults. Rarely, patients can present with severe lab abnormalities, dehydration and weight loss caused by celiac disease - a celiac crisis. CASE REPORT A 46-year-old male with a past medical history significant for diabetes mellitus, type 2 (DM2) and recently treated Bell's Palsy presented to the emergency room complaining of weakness, diarrhea and lightheadedness. On presentation, the patient had a systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 60 mm Hg and a lactic acidosis with pH of 7.28. Infectious etiologies of diarrhea were ruled out. The patient had an EGD which showed erythema of the duodenal bulb. Serum anti-gliadin and anti-TTG IgA were both elevated suggesting Celiac disease. Biopsies showed histopathology consistent with celiac disease. The patient's diarrhea resolved after initiation of a gluten free diet. He gained 25 kilograms after discharge and did not require further hospitalizations for diarrhea. CONCLUSIONS Celiac crisis is a very rare presentation of celiac disease in adults but nonetheless should be considered in patients with marked metabolic derangements in the setting of osmotic diarrhea. Treatment consists of a gluten free diet and may require management with steroids and total parenteral nutrition (TPN). PMID:27492679

  12. Celiac Disease Presenting as Profound Diarrhea and Weight Loss - A Celiac Crisis.

    PubMed

    Bul, Vadim; Sleesman, Brett; Boulay, Brian

    2016-08-05

    BACKGROUND Celiac disease is a hypersensitivity enteropathy that can have various presentations in adults. Rarely, patients can present with severe lab abnormalities, dehydration and weight loss caused by celiac disease - a celiac crisis. CASE REPORT A 46-year-old male with a past medical history significant for diabetes mellitus, type 2 (DM2) and recently treated Bell's Palsy presented to the emergency room complaining of weakness, diarrhea and lightheadedness. On presentation, the patient had a systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 60 mm Hg and a lactic acidosis with pH of 7.28. Infectious etiologies of diarrhea were ruled out. The patient had an EGD which showed erythema of the duodenal bulb. Serum anti-gliadin and anti-TTG IgA were both elevated suggesting Celiac disease. Biopsies showed histopathology consistent with celiac disease. The patient's diarrhea resolved after initiation of a gluten free diet. He gained 25 kilograms after discharge and did not require further hospitalizations for diarrhea. CONCLUSIONS Celiac crisis is a very rare presentation of celiac disease in adults but nonetheless should be considered in patients with marked metabolic derangements in the setting of osmotic diarrhea. Treatment consists of a gluten free diet and may require management with steroids and total parenteral nutrition (TPN).

  13. Vitamin and Mineral Deficiencies Are Highly Prevalent in Newly Diagnosed Celiac Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wierdsma, Nicolette J.; van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren, Marian A. E.; Berkenpas, Marijke; Mulder, Chris J. J.; van Bodegraven, Ad A.

    2013-01-01

    Malabsorption, weight loss and vitamin/mineral-deficiencies characterize classical celiac disease (CD). This study aimed to assess the nutritional and vitamin/mineral status of current “early diagnosed” untreated adult CD-patients in the Netherlands. Newly diagnosed adult CD-patients were included (n = 80, 42.8 ± 15.1 years) and a comparable sample of 24 healthy Dutch subjects was added to compare vitamin concentrations. Nutritional status and serum concentrations of folic acid, vitamin A, B6, B12, and (25-hydroxy) D, zinc, haemoglobin (Hb) and ferritin were determined (before prescribing gluten free diet). Almost all CD-patients (87%) had at least one value below the lower limit of reference. Specifically, for vitamin A, 7.5% of patients showed deficient levels, for vitamin B6 14.5%, folic acid 20%, and vitamin B12 19%. Likewise, zinc deficiency was observed in 67% of the CD-patients, 46% had decreased iron storage, and 32% had anaemia. Overall, 17% were malnourished (>10% undesired weight loss), 22% of the women were underweight (Body Mass Index (BMI) < 18.5), and 29% of the patients were overweight (BMI > 25). Vitamin deficiencies were barely seen in healthy controls, with the exception of vitamin B12. Vitamin/mineral deficiencies were counter-intuitively not associated with a (higher) grade of histological intestinal damage or (impaired) nutritional status. In conclusion, vitamin/mineral deficiencies are still common in newly “early diagnosed” CD-patients, even though the prevalence of obesity at initial diagnosis is rising. Extensive nutritional assessments seem warranted to guide nutritional advices and follow-up in CD treatment. PMID:24084055

  14. [Bone mineral density in patients with celiac disease and medical treatment of the disorder].

    PubMed

    Albulova, E A; Drozdov, V N; Parfenov, A I

    2011-01-01

    The article presents the results of a bone mineral density study in patients with glutensensitive celiac disease. Was discussed problem of malabsorption syndrome with clinical and pathogenetic point of view, which can lead to bone loss due to malabsorption of calcium and vitamin D for celiac disease. Also was take into account the effect of inflammatory cytokines and hormones on calcium regulating processes of bone remodeling. The role of adherence to a gluten-free diet in the formation of bone loss. The article is illustrated with three tables, one figure and two schedules. PMID:21695949

  15. Seroprevalence of celiac disease among United Arab Emirates healthy adult nationals: A gender disparity

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Zeid, Yousif A; Jasem, Waheeba S; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Green, Peter H; ElGhazali, Gehad

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine celiac disease (CD) prevalence and associated manifestations or risk factors in healthy adult Emiratis. METHODS: It is a cross-sectional prospective study, recruiting 1197 (573 women and 624 men) healthy Emiratis between September 2007 and April 2008 among those who went to Al Ain Hospital to undertake the prenuptial examination. Test for anti-tissue transglutaminase (tTG) IgA antibodies was used for CD diagnosis. Subjects with positive results in the anti tTG antibodies assay were also tested for anti-endomysial (EMA) IgA antibodies. A structured interview was used to collect basic demographic and clinical recall data including: information on name, contact address, age, gender, education status, previous diagnosis of CD, diagnosis of CD in 1st degree relatives and history of “chronic diarrhea, anemia, headache, hepatitis, diabetes, tumor, and thyroid disorder”. RESULTS: Fourteen blood samples (1.17%; 14/1197) were seropositive for CD. The latent CD seropositive patients were 13 women and 1 man and therefore the seroprevalence of CD was 1:86 (14/1197) for adult Emiratis: 1:44 (13/573) for women and 1:624 for men. Binary logistic regression revealed that history of chronic anemia (crude OR = 7.09; 95%CI: 2.32-21.61; P = 0.003) and being a woman (OR = 14.46; 95%CI: 1.89-110.91; P = 0.001) were associated with CD seropositivity. Whereas, the thyroid disorder showed a positive association with CD seropositivity that approach statistical significance (OR = 11.30; 95%CI: 1.32-96.95; P = 0.09) and therefore was included in the multiple logistic regression analysis, which showed that CD seropositivity is independently associated only with history of chronic anemia (OR = 4.58; 95%CI: 1.45-14.48; P = 0.01) and being a woman person (OR = 10.47; 95%CI: 1.33-82.14; P = 0.026). CONCLUSION: Compared to men the CD seroprevalence among women was remarkably higher. The CD association with women and chronic anemia is of importance from a public health

  16. Evidence Against Routine Testing of Patients with Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders for Celiac Disease: A Population-based Study

    PubMed Central

    Choung, Rok Seon; Rubio-Tapia, Alberto; Lahr, Brian D.; Kyle, Robert A.; Camilleri, Michael J.; Locke, G. Richard; Talley, Nicholas J.; Murray, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Celiac disease has been linked to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)-like symptoms in outpatient clinics. Guidelines recommend that all patients with IBS-like symptoms undergo serologic testing for celiac disease, but there is controversy over whether celiac disease is more prevalent in populations with IBS-like symptoms. We aimed to determine whether positive results from serologic tests for celiac disease are associated with IBS and other functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) in a large US White population. Methods Validated, self-report bowel disease questionnaires (BDQs) were sent to randomly selected cohorts of Olmsted County, Minnesota, residents. In separate protocols, serum samples were collected from more than 47,000 Olmsted County residents without a prior diagnosis of celiac disease; we performed serologic tests for celiac disease on stored serum samples from residents who completed the BDQ. Logistic regression was used to test for the association between serologic markers of celiac disease (positive vs negative) and individual FGIDs. Results A total of 3202 subjects completed the BDQ and had serum available for testing. IBS was identified in 13.6% of these subjects (95% confidence interval [CI], 12.4%–14.8%), and any gastrointestinal symptom occurred in 55.2% (95% CI, 53.5%−56.9%). The prevalence of celiac disease by based on serologic markers was 1.0% (95% CI, 0.7%–1.4%). IBS was less prevalent in patients with celiac disease (3%) than patients without celiac disease (14%), though the difference was not statistically significant (odds ratio=0.2; 95% CI, 0.03−1.5). Abdominal pain, constipation, weight loss, and dyspepsia were the most frequent symptom groups in subjects who were seropositive for celiac disease, but none of the gastrointestinal symptoms or disorders was significantly associated with celiac disease serology. Conclusions Symptoms indicative of FGIDs and sero-positive celiac disease are relatively common in a

  17. Patient Perception of Treatment Burden is High in Celiac Disease Compared to Other Common Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Sveta; Akbari, Mona; Vanga, Rohini; Kelly, Ciaran P.; Hansen, Joshua; Theethira, Thimmaiah; Tariq, Sohaib; Dennis, Melinda; Leffler, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The only treatment for celiac disease (CD) is life-long adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD). Noncompliance is associated with signs and symptoms of celiac disease, yet long-term adherence rates are poor. It is not known how the burden of the GFD compares to other medical treatments, and there are limited data on the socio-economic factors influencing treatment adherence. In this study we compared treatment burden and health state in CD compared with other chronic illnesses and evaluated the relationship between treatment burden and adherence. Methods A survey was mailed to participants with: CD, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), hypertension (HTN), diabetes mellitus (DM), congestive heart failure (CHF), and end stage renal disease on dialysis (ESRD). Surveys included demographic information and visual analog scales measuring treatment burden, importance of treatment, disease-specific and overall health status. Results We collected surveys from 341 celiac and 368 non-celiac participants. Celiac participants reported high treatment burden, greater than participants with GERD or HTN and comparable to ESRD. Conversely, patients with CD reported the highest health state of all groups. Factors associated with high treatment burden in CD included poor adherence, concern regarding food cost, eating outside the home, higher income, lack of college education and time limitations in preparing food. Poor adherence in CD was associated with increased symptoms, income, and low perceived importance of treatment. Discussion Participants with CD have high treatment burden but also excellent overall health status in comparison with other chronic medical conditions. The significant burden of dietary therapy for celiac disease argues for the need for safe adjuvant treatment as well as interventions designed to lower the perceived burden of the GFD. PMID:24980880

  18. Local communication among mucosal immune cells in patients with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    van Bergen, Jeroen; Mulder, Chris J; Mearin, M Luisa; Koning, Frits

    2015-05-01

    In patients with celiac disease, gluten consumption causes inflammation of the duodenum, and, to a lesser extent, the proximal jejunum. Immune-dominant gluten peptides are modified by the enzyme TG2, leading to their high-affinity binding to HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 molecules, present in people with a predisposition to celiac disease. Gluten peptide-loaded HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 molecules are recognized by highly conserved receptors on CD4(+) T cells in the lamina propria. B cells specific for TG2 and modified gluten peptides are also abundant in the lamina propria of patients with celiac disease. In the epithelium, interleukin-15 activates intraepithelial lymphocytes that promote destruction of epithelial cells. However, it is not clear how the immune responses in the lamina propria and the epithelium, separated by a basement membrane, are linked. We review the immune processes that occur in the lamina propria and their potential effects on epithelial pathology in celiac disease.

  19. [Connective tissue dysplasia in patients with celiac desease as a problem of violation of adaptation reserve islands of the body].

    PubMed

    Tkachenko, E; Oreshko, L S; Soloveva, E A; Shabanova, A A; Zhuravleva, M S

    2015-01-01

    Clinically significant dysplasia of connective tissue in patients with celiac disease is often responsible for various visceral disorders. Different disturbances of motor and evacuation functions are often determined in this patients (gastroesophageal reflux, duodenogastral reflux, spastic and hyperkinetic dyskinesia). The clinical course of the celiac disease, associated with connective tissue dysplasia, is characterized by asthenovegetative syndrome, reduced tolerance to physical activity, general weakness, fatigue and emotional instability. These data should be considered in choosing a treatment. PMID:25993866

  20. Is compliance with gluten-free diet sufficient? Diet composition of celiac patients.

    PubMed

    Balamtekin, Necati; Aksoy, Çiğdem; Baysoy, Gökhan; Uslu, Nuray; Demir, Hülya; Köksal, Gülden; Saltık-Temizel, İnci Nur; Özen, Hasan; Gürakan, Figen; Yüce, Aysel

    2015-01-01

    This study was planned to investigate the amount and content of foods consumed by child patients with celiac disease on a long-term gluten-free diet. Children aged 3-18 years who were diagnosed with celiac disease according to ESPGHAN criteria and were compliant to the gluten-free diet for at least one year were included. Age and gender matched healthy children were included as the control group. Food consumption records including the amount and content of the foods consumed for a total of three days were obtained. Once the records had been completed on the food consumption form, quantity analysis was again performed by the same dietician. Energy and other nutritional elements taken in through foodstuffs consumed by the patient and control groups were calculated using the Nutrition Data System for Research Package; these results were shown as mean ± standard deviation (x ±SD) and the values compared. The study consisted of 28 patients with a mean age of 10.3 ± 4.6 and 25 healthy controls with a mean age of 9.5 ± 3.4. Average age at diagnosis in the patient group was 6.7 ± 4.3 and mean duration of gluten-free diet was 4.0 ± 3.3 years. Children with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet had significantly lower daily energy intake levels compared to the healthy controls (p<0.05). The proportional fat consumption was significantly higher in the patient group compared to the controls (p<0.05). Moreover, proportional carbohydrate and protein, vitamin E and vitamin B1, and microelements such as magnesium, phosphorus and zinc consumptions were significantly lower in celiac group with respect to v-control group. Solely determining compliance to the gluten free diet might be inadequate in the follow-up of children with celiac disease, adequacy of the nutritional content in terms of macro and micronutrients of celiac disease patients is also important.

  1. Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... having celiac disease? Yes, you can have gluten sensitivity without the immune system attack on the small ... gluten causes in celiac disease. Symptoms of gluten sensitivity are generally milder than those seen in celiac ...

  2. Bone Mass and Mineral Metabolism Alterations in Adult Celiac Disease: Pathophysiology and Clinical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Di Stefano, Michele; Mengoli, Caterina; Bergonzi, Manuela; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Osteoporosis affects many patients with celiac disease (CD), representing the consequence of calcium malabsorption and persistent activation of mucosal inflammation. A slight increase of fracture risk is evident in this condition, particularly in those with overt malabsorption and in postmenopausal state. The adoption of a correct gluten-free diet (GFD) improves bone derangement, but is not able to normalize bone mass in all the patients. Biomarkers effective in the prediction of bone response to gluten-free diet are not yet available and the indications of guidelines are still imperfect and debated. In this review, the pathophysiology of bone loss is correlated to clinical aspects, defining an alternative proposal of management for this condition. PMID:24284619

  3. Detection of Active Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Duodenal Mucosa of Patients With Refractory Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Perfetti, Vittorio; Baldanti, Fausto; Lenti, Marco Vincenzo; Vanoli, Alessandro; Biagi, Federico; Gatti, Marta; Riboni, Roberta; Dallera, Elena; Paulli, Marco; Pedrazzoli, Paolo; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2016-08-01

    Refractory celiac disease is characterized by mucosal damage in patients with celiac disease despite a gluten-free diet. Little is known about the mechanisms that cause persistent intestinal inflammation in these patients. We performed a case-control study of 17 consecutive patients diagnosed with refractory celiac disease from 2001 through 2014 (median age, 51 y; 10 women) and 24 patients with uncomplicated celiac disease (controls) to determine whether refractory disease is associated with infection by lymphotropic oncogenic viruses. We performed real-time PCR analyses of duodenal biopsy samples from all patients to detect Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human herpesvirus-8, and human T-cell lymphotropic virus-I, -II, or -III. We used in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analyses to identify infected cells and viral proteins. We did not detect human herpesvirus-8 or human T-cell lymphotropic viruses in any of the biopsy specimens. However, 12 of 17 (70.5%) biopsy specimens from patients with refractory celiac disease were positive for EBV, compared with 4 of 24 (16.6%) biopsy specimens from controls (P < .001). EBV was detected in inflammatory cells and enterocytes. An analysis of latency- and replication-associated proteins confirmed active infection. Further studies are needed to determine whether EBV infection contributes to the pathogenesis of refractory celiac disease and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma.

  4. Different Gene Expression Signatures in Children and Adults with Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    López-Palacios, N.; Bodas, A.; Dema, B.; Fernández-Arquero, M.; González-Pérez, B.; Salazar, I.; Núñez, C.

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is developed after gluten ingestion in genetically susceptible individuals. It can appear at any time in life, but some differences are commonly observed between individuals with onset early in life or in adulthood. We aimed to investigate the molecular basis underlying those differences. We collected 19 duodenal biopsies of children and adults with CD and compared the expression of 38 selected genes between each other and with the observed in 13 non-CD controls matched by age. A Bayesian methodology was used to analyze the differences of gene expression between groups. We found seven genes with a similarly altered expression in children and adults with CD when compared to controls (C2orf74, CCR6, FASLG, JAK2, IL23A, TAGAP and UBE2L3). Differences were observed in 13 genes: six genes being altered only in adults (IL1RL1, CD28, STAT3, TMEM187, VAMP3 and ZFP36L1) and two only in children (TNFSF18 and ICOSLG); and four genes showing a significantly higher alteration in adults (CCR4, IL6, IL18RAP and PLEK) and one in children (C1orf106). This is the first extensive study comparing gene expression in children and adults with CD. Differences in the expression level of several genes were found between groups, being notorious the higher alteration observed in adults. Further research is needed to evaluate the possible genetic influence underlying these changes and the specific functional consequences of the reported differences. PMID:26859134

  5. Celiac Disease Autoimmunity in Patients with Autoimmune Diabetes and Thyroid Disease among Chinese Population.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhiyuan; Zou, Jing; Zhao, Lingling; Cheng, Yan; Cai, Hanqing; Li, Mo; Liu, Edwin; Yu, Liping; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity or tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (TGA) amongst patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) in the Chinese population remains unknown. This study examined the rate of celiac disease autoimmunity amongst patients with T1D and AITD in the Chinese population. The study included 178 patients with type 1 diabetes and 119 with AITD where 36 had both T1D and AITD, classified as autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 variant (APS3v). The study also included 145 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), 97 patients with non-autoimmune thyroid disease (NAITD), and 102 healthy controls. Serum islet autoantibodies, thyroid autoantibodies and TGA were measured by radioimmunoassay. TGA positivity was found in 22% of patients with either type 1 diabetes or AITD, much higher than that in patients with T2D (3.4%; p< 0.0001) or NAITD (3.1%; P < 0.0001) or healthy controls (1%; p<0.0001). The patients with APS3v having both T1D and AITD were 36% positive for TGA, significantly higher than patients with T1D alone (p = 0.040) or with AITD alone (p = 0.017). T1D and AITD were found to have a 20% and 30% frequency of overlap respectively at diagnosis. In conclusion, TGA positivity was high in the Chinese population having existing T1D and/or AITD, and even higher when both diseases were present. Routine TGA screening in patients with T1D or AITD will be important to early identify celiac disease autoimmunity for better clinical care of patients. PMID:27427767

  6. Celiac Disease Autoimmunity in Patients with Autoimmune Diabetes and Thyroid Disease among Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhiyuan; Zou, Jing; Zhao, Lingling; Cheng, Yan; Cai, Hanqing; Li, Mo; Liu, Edwin; Yu, Liping; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity or tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (TGA) amongst patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) in the Chinese population remains unknown. This study examined the rate of celiac disease autoimmunity amongst patients with T1D and AITD in the Chinese population. The study included 178 patients with type 1 diabetes and 119 with AITD where 36 had both T1D and AITD, classified as autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 variant (APS3v). The study also included 145 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), 97 patients with non-autoimmune thyroid disease (NAITD), and 102 healthy controls. Serum islet autoantibodies, thyroid autoantibodies and TGA were measured by radioimmunoassay. TGA positivity was found in 22% of patients with either type 1 diabetes or AITD, much higher than that in patients with T2D (3.4%; p< 0.0001) or NAITD (3.1%; P < 0.0001) or healthy controls (1%; p<0.0001). The patients with APS3v having both T1D and AITD were 36% positive for TGA, significantly higher than patients with T1D alone (p = 0.040) or with AITD alone (p = 0.017). T1D and AITD were found to have a 20% and 30% frequency of overlap respectively at diagnosis. In conclusion, TGA positivity was high in the Chinese population having existing T1D and/or AITD, and even higher when both diseases were present. Routine TGA screening in patients with T1D or AITD will be important to early identify celiac disease autoimmunity for better clinical care of patients. PMID:27427767

  7. Role of Gluten Intake at the Time of Hepatitis B Virus Vaccination in the Immune Response of Celiac Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zingone, F.; Capone, P.; Tortora, R.; Rispo, A.; Morisco, F.; Caporaso, N.; Imperatore, N.; De Stefano, G.; Iovino, P.

    2013-01-01

    Some reports have demonstrated an inadequate response to hepatitis B vaccination in patients affected by celiac disease. The aim of our study was to evaluate hepatitis B vaccination response in relation to gluten exposure status in patients with celiac disease. To measure the gluten exposure status at the time of vaccination, we considered three groups: group A (exposed to gluten), including patients vaccinated as 12-year-old adolescents (the celiac disease diagnosis was established after vaccination); group B (not exposed to gluten), including patients vaccinated as 12-year-old adolescents on a gluten-free diet at the time of vaccination; and group C (infants), including patients vaccinated at birth. The response of celiac patients to hepatitis B vaccination was compared to that of healthy subjects, i.e., those in the control group (group D). This study included 163 celiac patients (group A, 57 patients; group B, 46 patients; and group C, 60 patients) and 48 controls (group D). An inadequate response to hepatitis B immunization was present in 43.9% of patients in group A, 34.8% of patients in group B, 58.3% of patients in group C, and 8.3% of patients in group D (group A versus group D, P < 0.001; group B versus group D, P = 0.002; group C versus group D, P = 0.001) (no significant difference for group A versus group B and group A versus group C was evident). Our data suggest that gluten exposure does not influence the response to hepatitis B immunization and that the human leukocyte antigen probably plays the main immunological role in poor responses to hepatitis B-vaccinated celiac patients. PMID:23446217

  8. MR-guided Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Ablation: An Evaluation of Effect and Injection Spread Pattern in Cancer Patients with Celiac Tumor Infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Akural, Etem; Ojala, Risto O.; Jaervimaeki, Voitto; Kariniemi, Juho; Tervonen, Osmo A.; Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto

    2013-04-15

    ObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, the initial accuracy, and the effects of the MR-guided neurolytic celiac plexus ablation as a method to treat cancer-induced chronic abdominal pain. Thirteen celiac plexus ablations were performed for 12 patients. A 0.23-T open MRI scanner with optical navigation was used for procedural guidance. As an adjunct to the MR-guided needle positioning, the needle location was confirmed with saline injection and consequent MR imaging (STIR sequence). The spread of the ablative injection material (alcohol-lidocaine mix) was observed by repeating this sequence after the therapeutic injection. Pain scores from seven patients (eight ablations) were used to assess the therapy effect. MR guidance allowed adequate needle positioning and visualization of injection material in all cases. The rest pain scores significantly decreased from 4 (median) at baseline to 1 (median) at 2 weeks (p < 0.05). Average and worst pain experienced during the past week were significantly lower at the 2-week time point compared with the baseline (p < 0.05). However, the intervention did not result in reduction of opioid use at 2 weeks.MR guidance is an accurate and safe method for celiac plexus ablation with positive therapeutic effect.

  9. The Gluten-Free Diet: Testing Alternative Cereals Tolerated by Celiac Patients

    PubMed Central

    Comino, Isabel; de Lourdes Moreno, María; Real, Ana; Rodríguez-Herrera, Alfonso; Barro, Francisco; Sousa, Carolina

    2013-01-01

    A strict gluten-free diet (GFD) is the only currently available therapeutic treatment for patients with celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine associated with a permanent intolerance to gluten proteins. The complete elimination of gluten proteins contained in cereals from the diet is the key to celiac disease management. However, this generates numerous social and economic repercussions due to the ubiquity of gluten in foods. The research presented in this review focuses on the current status of alternative cereals and pseudocereals and their derivatives obtained by natural selection, breeding programs and transgenic or enzymatic technology, potential tolerated by celiac people. Finally, we describe several strategies for detoxification of dietary gluten. These included enzymatic cleavage of gliadin fragment by Prolyl endopeptidases (PEPs) from different organisms, degradation of toxic peptides by germinating cereal enzymes and transamidation of cereal flours. This information can be used to search for and develop cereals with the baking and nutritional qualities of toxic cereals, but which do not exacerbate this condition. PMID:24152755

  10. The gluten-free diet: testing alternative cereals tolerated by celiac patients.

    PubMed

    Comino, Isabel; Moreno, María de Lourdes; Real, Ana; Rodríguez-Herrera, Alfonso; Barro, Francisco; Sousa, Carolina

    2013-10-01

    A strict gluten-free diet (GFD) is the only currently available therapeutic treatment for patients with celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine associated with a permanent intolerance to gluten proteins. The complete elimination of gluten proteins contained in cereals from the diet is the key to celiac disease management. However, this generates numerous social and economic repercussions due to the ubiquity of gluten in foods. The research presented in this review focuses on the current status of alternative cereals and pseudocereals and their derivatives obtained by natural selection, breeding programs and transgenic or enzymatic technology, potential tolerated by celiac people. Finally, we describe several strategies for detoxification of dietary gluten. These included enzymatic cleavage of gliadin fragment by Prolyl endopeptidases (PEPs) from different organisms, degradation of toxic peptides by germinating cereal enzymes and transamidation of cereal flours. This information can be used to search for and develop cereals with the baking and nutritional qualities of toxic cereals, but which do not exacerbate this condition. PMID:24152755

  11. Celiac Disease: Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Greg; Feighery, Conleth F

    2015-01-01

    Historically the diagnosis of celiac disease has relied upon clinical, serological, and histological evidence. In recent years the use of sensitive serological methods has meant an increase in the diagnosis of celiac disease. The heterogeneous nature of the disorder presents a challenge in the study and diagnosis of the disease with patients varying from subclinical or latent disease to patients with overt symptoms. Furthermore the related gluten-sensitive disease dermatitis herpetiformis, while distinct in some respects, shares clinical and serological features with celiac disease. Here we summarize current best practice for the diagnosis of celiac disease and briefly discuss newer approaches. The advent of next-generation assays for diagnosis and newer clinical protocols may result in more sensitive screening and ultimately the possible replacement of the intestinal biopsy as the gold standard for celiac disease diagnosis.

  12. Celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Rivera, E; Assiri, A; Guandalini, S

    2013-10-01

    Celiac disease, with a prevalence around 1% of the general population, is the most common genetically-induced food intolerance in the world. Triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically predisposed individuals, this enteropathy may appear at any age, and is characterized by a wide variety of clinical signs and symptoms. Among them, gastrointestinal presentations include chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight loss or failure to thrive in children; but extra-intestinal manifestations are also common, and actually appear to be on the rise. They include a large variety of ailments, such as dermatitis Herpetiformis, anemia, short stature, osteoporosis, arthritis, neurologic problems, unexplained elevation of transaminases, and even female infertility. For the clinician interested in oral diseases, celiac disease can lead to delayed tooth eruption, dental enamel hypoplasia, recurrent oral aphthae. Diagnosing celiac disease requires therefore a high degree of suspicion followed by a very sensitive screening test: serum levels of the autoantibody anti-tissue transglutaminase. A positive subject will then be confirmed by an intestinal biopsy, and will then be put on a strict gluten-free diet, that in most cases will bring a marked improvement of symptoms. Newer forms of treatment which in the future will probably be available to the non-responsive patients are currently being actively pursued. PMID:23496382

  13. Approach to diagnosing celiac disease in patients with low bone mineral density or fragility fractures

    PubMed Central

    Rios, Lorena P.; Khan, Aliya; Sultan, Muhammad; McAssey, Karen; Fouda, Mona A.; Armstrong, David

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To provide clinicians with an update on the diagnosis of celiac disease (CD) and to make recommendations on the indications to screen for CD in patients presenting with low bone mineral density (BMD) or fragility fractures. Quality of evidence A multidisciplinary task force developed clinically relevant questions related to the diagnosis of CD as the basis for a literature search of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL databases (January 2000 to January 2009) using the key words celiac disease, osteoporosis, osteopenia, low bone mass, and fracture. The existing literature consists of level I and II studies. Main message The estimated prevalence of asymptomatic CD is 2% to 3% in individuals with low BMD. Routine screening for CD is not justified in patients with low BMD. However, targeted screening for CD is recommended for patients who have T-scores of −1.0 or less at the spine or hip, or a history of fragility fractures in association with any CD-related symptoms or conditions; family history of CD; or low urinary calcium levels, vitamin D insufficiency, and raised parathyroid hormone levels despite adequate intake of calcium and vitamin D. Celiac disease testing should be performed while the subject is consuming a gluten-containing diet; initial screening should be performed with human recombinant immunoglobulin (Ig) A tissue transglutaminase or other IgA tissue transglutaminase assays, in association with IgA endomysial antibody immunofluorescence. Duodenal biopsy is necessary to confirm the diagnosis of CD. Human leukocyte antigen typing might assist in confirming or ruling out the diagnosis of CD in cases where serology and histology are discordant. Definitive diagnosis is based on clinical, serologic, and histologic features, combined with a positive response to a gluten-free diet. Conclusion Current evidence does not support routine screening for CD in all patients with low BMD. A targeted case-finding approach is appropriate for patients

  14. Effect of a Gluten-Free Diet on Cortical Excitability in Adults with Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bella, Rita; Lanza, Giuseppe; Cantone, Mariagiovanna; Giuffrida, Salvatore; Puglisi, Valentina; Vinciguerra, Luisa; Pennisi, Manuela; Ricceri, Riccardo; D’Agate, Carmela Cinzia; Malaguarnera, Giulia; Ferri, Raffaele; Pennisi, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Introduction An imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory synaptic excitability was observed in de novo patients with celiac disease (CD) in a previous study with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS), suggesting a subclinical involvement of GABAergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in asymptomatic patients. The aim of this investigation was to monitor the eventual changes in the same cohort of patients, evaluated after a period of gluten-free diet. Methods Patients were re-evaluated after a median period of 16 months during which an adequate gluten-free diet was maintained. Clinical, cognitive and neuropsychiatric assessment was repeated, as well as cortical excitability by means of single- and paired-pulse TMS from the first dorsal interosseous muscle of the dominant hand. Results Compared to baseline, patients showed a significant decrease of the median resting motor threshold (from 35% to 33%, p<0.01). The other single-pulse (cortical silent period, motor evoked potentials latency and amplitude, central motor conduction time) and paired-pulse TMS measures (intracortical inhibition and intracortical facilitation) did not change significantly after the follow-up period. Antibodies were still present in 7 subjects. Discussion In patients under a gluten-free diet, a global increase of cortical excitability was observed, suggesting a glutamate-mediated functional reorganization compensating for disease progression. We hypothesize that glutamate receptor activation, probably triggered by CD-related immune system dysregulation, might result in a long-lasting motor cortex hyperexcitability with increased excitatory post-synaptic potentials, probably related to phenomena of long-term plasticity. The impact of the gluten-free diet on subclinical neurological abnormalities needs to be further explored. PMID:26053324

  15. Multiplex assays to diagnose celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Lochman, Ivo; Martis, Peter; Burlingame, Rufus W; Lochmanová, Alexandra

    2007-08-01

    Patients with celiac disease are sensitive to the gluten fractions of wheat. Symptoms include gastrointestinal problems and a failure to thrive in children, but may range from headaches to general malaise in adults. Thus, it is difficult to diagnose celiac disease by symptoms alone. The standard diagnostic criteria include the presence of the characteristic anti-gliadin or anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (anti-tTG) in serum, flattened mucosa on intestinal biopsy, and improved symptoms on a gluten-free diet. Because of the ease of use of the tTG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) compared to endomysial by indirect immunofluorescence assay, there has been much more screening for celiac disease in recent years. This increased screening showed that celiac disease was more prevalent than previously believed. We compared a new multiplex assay that includes a novel form of deamidated gliadin and recombinant human tTG as the antigens to other assays using standard antigens. In addition, the new assay detects the presence of selective IgA deficiency, which shows a 10-fold increase in prevalence in patients with celiac disease compared to the general population. The combination of sensitivity and specificity of the new multiplex assay was equal or better than those for standard assays. Thus the performance, ease of use, and ability to measure three clinically important parameters in a single test make the new multiplex assay a viable alternative to standard assays in a clinical lab.

  16. Celiac Disease Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Leffler, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease is one of the most prevalent autoimmune gastrointestinal disorders but as the case of Ms. J illustrates, diagnosis is often delayed or missed. Based on serology studies, the prevalence of celiac disease in many populations is estimated to be approximately 1% and has been increasing steadily over the last 50 years. Evaluation for celiac disease is generally straightforward, and uses commonly available serologic tests, however the signs and symptoms of celiac disease are nonspecific and highly heterogeneous making diagnosis difficult. While celiac disease is often considered a mild disorder treatable with simple dietary changes, in reality celiac disease imparts considerable risks including reduced bone mineral density, impaired quality of life, and increased overall mortality. In addition, the gluten free diet is highly burdensome and can profoundly affect patients and their families. For these reasons, care of individuals with celiac disease requires prompt diagnosis and ongoing multidisciplinary management. PMID:21990301

  17. Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... small intestine. People with celiac disease cannot eat gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye. ... Disease Doctors treat celiac disease by prescribing a gluten-free diet. Symptoms significantly improve for most people ...

  18. Celiac disease in subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus: a prevalence study in western Sicily (Italy).

    PubMed

    Greco, Domenico; Pisciotta, Maria; Gambina, Francesco; Maggio, Filippo

    2013-02-01

    The association between celiac disease and type 1 diabetes mellitus is well known. Up to now, celiac disease prevalence in children and adults with type 1 diabetes in Sicily has not been reported. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus who come from a defined geographical area in western Sicily and to investigate the clinical features of these subjects. The records of 492 consecutive patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus referred in a period of 5 years were analyzed. During the period of the survey, out of 492 patients with type 1 diabetes, 22 (4.5 %) had a previous diagnosis of celiac disease. There were 14 females and 8 males; these patients showed a mean age of 13 years at diabetes onset. Diagnosis of celiac disease was often simultaneous or subsequent to that of diabetes. Autoimmune thyroiditis was coexisting in 8 patients (36 %). Our data confirm, in a Sicilian population, the not unusual association between celiac disease and type 1 diabetes, although prevalence rate is lower than in others Italian studies. Autoimmune thyroiditis is present with high prevalence in these patients. Celiac disease diagnosis often followed onset of type 1 diabetes, particularly in female subjects with a young age at diabetes onset; therefore, in these subjects, an active search for the presence of celiac disease is warranted for many years after appearance of diabetes.

  19. Celiac disease in subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus: a prevalence study in western Sicily (Italy).

    PubMed

    Greco, Domenico; Pisciotta, Maria; Gambina, Francesco; Maggio, Filippo

    2013-02-01

    The association between celiac disease and type 1 diabetes mellitus is well known. Up to now, celiac disease prevalence in children and adults with type 1 diabetes in Sicily has not been reported. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus who come from a defined geographical area in western Sicily and to investigate the clinical features of these subjects. The records of 492 consecutive patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus referred in a period of 5 years were analyzed. During the period of the survey, out of 492 patients with type 1 diabetes, 22 (4.5 %) had a previous diagnosis of celiac disease. There were 14 females and 8 males; these patients showed a mean age of 13 years at diabetes onset. Diagnosis of celiac disease was often simultaneous or subsequent to that of diabetes. Autoimmune thyroiditis was coexisting in 8 patients (36 %). Our data confirm, in a Sicilian population, the not unusual association between celiac disease and type 1 diabetes, although prevalence rate is lower than in others Italian studies. Autoimmune thyroiditis is present with high prevalence in these patients. Celiac disease diagnosis often followed onset of type 1 diabetes, particularly in female subjects with a young age at diabetes onset; therefore, in these subjects, an active search for the presence of celiac disease is warranted for many years after appearance of diabetes. PMID:22707396

  20. Maize prolamins could induce a gluten-like cellular immune response in some celiac disease patients.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Sánchez, Juan P; Cabrera-Chávez, Francisco; de la Barca, Ana M Calderón

    2013-10-21

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune-mediated enteropathy triggered by dietary gluten in genetically prone individuals. The current treatment for CD is a strict lifelong gluten-free diet. However, in some CD patients following a strict gluten-free diet, the symptoms do not remit. These cases may be refractory CD or due to gluten contamination; however, the lack of response could be related to other dietary ingredients, such as maize, which is one of the most common alternatives to wheat used in the gluten-free diet. In some CD patients, as a rare event, peptides from maize prolamins could induce a celiac-like immune response by similar or alternative pathogenic mechanisms to those used by wheat gluten peptides. This is supported by several shared features between wheat and maize prolamins and by some experimental results. Given that gluten peptides induce an immune response of the intestinal mucosa both in vivo and in vitro, peptides from maize prolamins could also be tested to determine whether they also induce a cellular immune response. Hypothetically, maize prolamins could be harmful for a very limited subgroup of CD patients, especially those that are non-responsive, and if it is confirmed, they should follow, in addition to a gluten-free, a maize-free diet.

  1. Maize Prolamins Could Induce a Gluten-Like Cellular Immune Response in Some Celiac Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Sánchez, Juan P.; Cabrera-Chávez, Francisco; Calderón de la Barca, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune-mediated enteropathy triggered by dietary gluten in genetically prone individuals. The current treatment for CD is a strict lifelong gluten-free diet. However, in some CD patients following a strict gluten-free diet, the symptoms do not remit. These cases may be refractory CD or due to gluten contamination; however, the lack of response could be related to other dietary ingredients, such as maize, which is one of the most common alternatives to wheat used in the gluten-free diet. In some CD patients, as a rare event, peptides from maize prolamins could induce a celiac-like immune response by similar or alternative pathogenic mechanisms to those used by wheat gluten peptides. This is supported by several shared features between wheat and maize prolamins and by some experimental results. Given that gluten peptides induce an immune response of the intestinal mucosa both in vivo and in vitro, peptides from maize prolamins could also be tested to determine whether they also induce a cellular immune response. Hypothetically, maize prolamins could be harmful for a very limited subgroup of CD patients, especially those that are non-responsive, and if it is confirmed, they should follow, in addition to a gluten-free, a maize-free diet. PMID:24152750

  2. New strategies for diagnosis and management of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Westerberg, Dyanne P; Gill, James M; Dave, Bhavin; DiPrinzio, Marie J; Quisel, Anna; Foy, Andrew

    2006-03-01

    Celiac disease is a gastrointestinal disorder characterized by inflammation, leading to injury to the mucosal lining of the small intestine. The inflammation occurs when gliadin, a protein found in such gluten-containing foods as wheat, rye, and barley, is ingested by genetically susceptible individuals. The mucosal damage and subsequent malabsorption of nutrients leads to various complications. Researchers estimate that more than 2 million people in the United States have celiac disease-a prevalence that is greater than was previously believed. Approximately 60,000 Americans are diagnosed annually with celiac disease. Until recently, diagnosis has been complicated by the fact that the indicators of celiac disease are nonspecific. However, because of the development of new, easy-to-administer serology tests, diagnosis has become much less complicated. After conducting a review of the literature, the authors recommend a serologic testing sequence for diagnosis of celiac disease and urge that adults and children with an assortment of symptoms be tested for this disease. Common signs and symptoms of celiac disease include anemia, arthralgia, fatigue, infertility, neuropathy, and weight loss, in addition to such gastrointestinal symptomatology as abdominal pain, anorexia, bloating, constipation, and diarrhea. The only treatment for patients with celiac disease remains a gluten-free diet.

  3. Suggestions for automatic quantitation of endoscopic image analysis to improve detection of small intestinal pathology in celiac disease patients.

    PubMed

    Ciaccio, Edward J; Bhagat, Govind; Lewis, Suzanne K; Green, Peter H

    2015-10-01

    Although many groups have attempted to develop an automated computerized method to detect pathology of the small intestinal mucosa caused by celiac disease, the efforts have thus far failed. This is due in part to the occult presence of the disease. When pathological evidence of celiac disease exists in the small bowel it is visually often patchy and subtle. Due to presence of extraneous substances such as air bubbles and opaque fluids, the use of computerized automation methods have only been partially successful in detecting the hallmarks of the disease in the small intestine-villous atrophy, fissuring, and a mottled appearance. By using a variety of computerized techniques and assigning a weight or vote to each technique, it is possible to improve the detection of abnormal regions which are indicative of celiac disease, and of treatment progress in diagnosed patients. Herein a paradigm is suggested for improving the efficacy of automated methods for measuring celiac disease manifestation in the small intestinal mucosa. The suggestions are applicable to both standard and videocapsule endoscopic imaging, since both methods could potentially benefit from computerized quantitation to improve celiac disease diagnosis.

  4. [Serological tests for celiac disease in Moroccan patients with type 1 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Bourhanbour, Asmaa Drissi; Ouadghiri, Sanae; Benseffaj, Nadia; Essakalli, Malika

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disease frequently associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D). The prevalence of CD in patients with T1D varies from 3 to 6%. The clinical manifestation of CD in patients with T1D is classified as asymptomatic in about half of cases. Our study aims to determine the frequency of anti-tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (IgA-tTG) and anti-gliadin antibodies (AGA) in patients with type 1 diabetes in order to early recommend jejunal biopsy and establish a gluten-free diet before the onset of clinical signs and complications of celiac disease. Subjects included in this study were patients with T1D and untreated CD who showed no signs of this disease. The detection of IgG tTG, IgG IgA and IgG AAG was performed using Luminex technology. We enrolled 31 patients. The study involved 16 men and 15 women. IgA AAG were positive in 4(13%) patients and IgG were positive in 7(22,5%) patients. IgA tTG were positive in 3(10%) patients and IgG was positive in one (3%) patient. In our study the association of diabetes type 1 with biomarkers of CD is not uncommon hence the importance of systematic screening for type 1 diabetes. The diagnosis of this atypical and silent CD form is important given the risk of serious complications such as malabsorption and gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:27642442

  5. Exposure assessment to mycotoxins in gluten-free diet for celiac patients.

    PubMed

    Brera, C; Debegnach, F; De Santis, B; Di Ianni, S; Gregori, E; Neuhold, S; Valitutti, F

    2014-07-01

    Mycotoxins are low molecular weight secondary metabolites produced by certain strains of filamentous fungi such as Aspergillus, Penicillium and Fusarium, which attack crops in the field, and grow on foods also during storage under favorable conditions of temperature and humidity. Foods mainly contributing to the intake of mycotoxins with diet are cereals, maize being the most risky commodity due to the potential co-occurrence of more than one mycotoxin, this can be of particular concern especially for vulnerable group of population such as celiac patients that show increased maize-based products consumption. In this study the exposure of celiac patients to fumonisins (FBs) and zearalenone (ZON) has been assessed. The higher exposures, for all the matrices and for both the selected mycotoxins, were for children age group. The lower and upper bound exposure ranged between 348-582 ng/kg bw/day for FBs and 22-83 ng/kg bw/day for ZON; these values result well below the TDI for the selected mycotoxins, representing the 17-29% and 9-33% of the TDI set for FBs and ZON, respectively. Even considering the worst scenario the exposure values reported for children were lower, namely 1385 ng/kg bw/day for FBs and 237 ng/kg bw/day for ZON, than the corresponding toxicological thresholds. PMID:24694905

  6. Exposure assessment to mycotoxins in gluten-free diet for celiac patients.

    PubMed

    Brera, C; Debegnach, F; De Santis, B; Di Ianni, S; Gregori, E; Neuhold, S; Valitutti, F

    2014-07-01

    Mycotoxins are low molecular weight secondary metabolites produced by certain strains of filamentous fungi such as Aspergillus, Penicillium and Fusarium, which attack crops in the field, and grow on foods also during storage under favorable conditions of temperature and humidity. Foods mainly contributing to the intake of mycotoxins with diet are cereals, maize being the most risky commodity due to the potential co-occurrence of more than one mycotoxin, this can be of particular concern especially for vulnerable group of population such as celiac patients that show increased maize-based products consumption. In this study the exposure of celiac patients to fumonisins (FBs) and zearalenone (ZON) has been assessed. The higher exposures, for all the matrices and for both the selected mycotoxins, were for children age group. The lower and upper bound exposure ranged between 348-582 ng/kg bw/day for FBs and 22-83 ng/kg bw/day for ZON; these values result well below the TDI for the selected mycotoxins, representing the 17-29% and 9-33% of the TDI set for FBs and ZON, respectively. Even considering the worst scenario the exposure values reported for children were lower, namely 1385 ng/kg bw/day for FBs and 237 ng/kg bw/day for ZON, than the corresponding toxicological thresholds.

  7. Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Celiac Disease Patients on a Long-Term Gluten-Free Diet.

    PubMed

    Laurikka, Pilvi; Salmi, Teea; Collin, Pekka; Huhtala, Heini; Mäki, Markku; Kaukinen, Katri; Kurppa, Kalle

    2016-01-01

    Experience suggests that many celiac patients suffer from persistent symptoms despite a long-term gluten-free diet (GFD). We investigated the prevalence and severity of these symptoms in patients with variable duration of GFD. Altogether, 856 patients were classified into untreated (n = 128), short-term GFD (1-2 years, n = 93) and long-term GFD (≥3 years, n = 635) groups. Analyses were made of clinical and histological data and dietary adherence. Symptoms were evaluated by the validated GSRS questionnaire. One-hundred-sixty healthy subjects comprised the control group. Further, the severity of symptoms was compared with that in peptic ulcer, reflux disease, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Altogether, 93% of the short-term and 94% of the long-term treated patients had a strict GFD and recovered mucosa. Untreated patients had more diarrhea, indigestion and abdominal pain than those on GFD and controls. There were no differences in symptoms between the short- and long-term GFD groups, but both yielded poorer GSRS total score than controls (p = 0.03 and p = 0.05, respectively). Furthermore, patients treated 1-2 years had more diarrhea (p = 0.03) and those treated >10 years more reflux (p = 0.04) than controls. Long-term treated celiac patients showed relatively mild symptoms compared with other gastrointestinal diseases. Based on our results, good response to GFD sustained in long-term follow-up, but not all patients reach the level of healthy individuals. PMID:27428994

  8. Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Celiac Disease Patients on a Long-Term Gluten-Free Diet

    PubMed Central

    Laurikka, Pilvi; Salmi, Teea; Collin, Pekka; Huhtala, Heini; Mäki, Markku; Kaukinen, Katri; Kurppa, Kalle

    2016-01-01

    Experience suggests that many celiac patients suffer from persistent symptoms despite a long-term gluten-free diet (GFD). We investigated the prevalence and severity of these symptoms in patients with variable duration of GFD. Altogether, 856 patients were classified into untreated (n = 128), short-term GFD (1–2 years, n = 93) and long-term GFD (≥3 years, n = 635) groups. Analyses were made of clinical and histological data and dietary adherence. Symptoms were evaluated by the validated GSRS questionnaire. One-hundred-sixty healthy subjects comprised the control group. Further, the severity of symptoms was compared with that in peptic ulcer, reflux disease, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Altogether, 93% of the short-term and 94% of the long-term treated patients had a strict GFD and recovered mucosa. Untreated patients had more diarrhea, indigestion and abdominal pain than those on GFD and controls. There were no differences in symptoms between the short- and long-term GFD groups, but both yielded poorer GSRS total score than controls (p = 0.03 and p = 0.05, respectively). Furthermore, patients treated 1–2 years had more diarrhea (p = 0.03) and those treated >10 years more reflux (p = 0.04) than controls. Long-term treated celiac patients showed relatively mild symptoms compared with other gastrointestinal diseases. Based on our results, good response to GFD sustained in long-term follow-up, but not all patients reach the level of healthy individuals. PMID:27428994

  9. Hematologic manifestations of celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R.; Litzow, Mark R.; Murray, Joseph A.

    2007-01-01

    Celiac disease is a common systemic disorder that can have multiple hematologic manifestations. Patients with celiac disease may present to hematologists for evaluation of various hematologic problems prior to receiving a diagnosis of celiac disease. Anemia secondary to malabsorption of iron, folic acid, and/or vitamin B12 is a common complication of celiac disease and many patients have anemia at the time of diagnosis. Celiac disease may also be associated with thrombocytosis, thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, venous thromboembolism, hyposplenism, and IgA deficiency. Patients with celiac disease are at increased risk of being diagnosed with lymphoma, especially of the T-cell type. The risk is highest for enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma (ETL) and B-cell lymphoma of the gut, but extraintestinal lymphomas can also be seen. ETL is an aggressive disease with poor prognosis, but strict adherence to a gluten-free diet may prevent its occurrence. PMID:16973955

  10. Celiac disease in a child with ulcerative colitis: a possible genetic association.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Sam X; Raizner, Aileen; Phatak, Uma P; Cho, Judy H; Pashankar, Dinesh S

    2013-02-01

    Celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease including ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease are both immune-mediated enteropathies. It is rare for both celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease to occur together in an individual patient. This association has been reported in adults, however, very rarely in children. Here, we report an unusual case of an 8-year-old child with a history of anemia and failure to thrive who presented with bloody diarrhea. His evaluation showed anemia, elevated inflammatory markers, and positive celiac antibodies. Endoscopic evaluation revealed partial duodenal villous atrophy and pancolitis. He was diagnosed with celiac disease and UC and responded well to a gluten-free diet and steroid/mesalamine therapy. The patient's genetic testing revealed markers showing susceptibility for both celiac disease and UC. It is important to be aware of this association as both conditions can present with similar clinical features, however, require different therapeutic approaches.

  11. Barriers impeding serologic screening for celiac disease in clinically high-prevalence populations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Celiac disease is present in ~1% of the general population in the United States and Europe. Despite the availability of inexpensive serologic screening tests, ~85% of individuals with celiac disease remain undiagnosed and there is an average delay in diagnosis of symptomatic individuals with celiac disease that ranges from ~5.8-11 years. This delay is often attributed to the use of a case-based approach for detection rather than general population screening for celiac disease, and deficiencies at the level of health care professionals. This study aimed to assess if patient-centered barriers have a role in impeding serologic screening for celiac disease in individuals from populations that are clinically at an increased risk for celiac disease. Methods 119 adults meeting study inclusion criteria for being at a higher risk for celiac disease were recruited from the general population. Participants completed a survey/questionnaire at the William K. Warren Medical Research Center for Celiac Disease that addressed demographic information, celiac disease related symptoms (gastrointestinal and extraintestinal), family history, co-morbid diseases and conditions associated with celiac disease, and patient-centered barriers to screening for celiac disease. All participants underwent serologic screening for celiac disease using the IgA tissue transglutaminase antibody (IgA tTG) and, if positive, testing for IgA anti-endomysial antibody (IgA EMA) as a confirmatory test. Results Two barriers to serologic testing were significant across the participant pool. These were participants not knowing they were at risk for celiac disease before learning of the study, and participants not knowing where to get tested for celiac disease. Among participants with incomes less than $25,000/year and those less than the median age, not having a doctor to order the test was a significant barrier, and this strongly correlated with not having health insurance. Symptoms and co

  12. Genome Sequence of Kocuria palustris Strain CD07_3 Isolated from the Duodenal Mucosa of a Celiac Disease Patient

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Ramesan Girish; Kaur, Gurwinder; Kochhar, Rakesh; Dhawan, Devinder Kumar

    2016-01-01

    We report here the 2.8-Mb genome of Kocuria palustris strain CD07_3 isolated from the duodenal mucosa of a celiac disease (CD) patient. The genome of the bacterium consists of specific virulence factor genes and antibiotic resistance genes that depict its pathogenic potential. PMID:27125478

  13. Magneto immunosensor for gliadin detection in gluten-free foodstuff: towards food safety for celiac patients.

    PubMed

    Laube, T; Kergaravat, S V; Fabiano, S N; Hernández, S R; Alegret, S; Pividori, M I

    2011-09-15

    Gliadin is a constituent of the cereal protein gluten, responsible for the intolerance generated in celiac disease. Its detection is of high interest for food safety of celiac patients, since the only treatment known until now is a lifelong avoidance of this protein in the diet. Therefore, it is essential to have an easy and reliable method of analysis to control the contents in gluten-free foods. An electrochemical magneto immunosensor for the quantification of gliadin or small gliadin fragments in natural or pretreated food samples is described for the first time and compared to a novel magneto-ELISA system based on optical detection. The immunological reaction was performed on magnetic beads as solid support by the oriented covalent immobilization, of the protein gliadin on tosyl-activated beads. Direct, as well as indirect competitive immunoassays were optimized, achieving the best analytical performance with the direct competitive format. Excellent detection limits (in the order of μg L(-1)) were achieved, according to the legislation for gluten-free products. The matrix effect, as well as the performance of the assays was successfully evaluated using spiked gluten-free foodstuffs (skimmed milk and beer), obtaining excellent recovery values in the results.

  14. [Celiac disease and malocclusion].

    PubMed

    Bilello, Giuseppa; Ciulla, Claudia; Caradonna, Carola

    2010-04-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease, caused by a permanent intolerance to gluten, that occurs in genetically predisposed individuals. It causes enteropathy. In these individuals a prolonged exposure to gluten increases the risk of developing other pathologies, which may affect both developing dentition and oral mucosa. Clinical presentations are various and atypical. Celiac patients may have enamel hypoplasia, higher prevalence of dental caries, delayed eruption of teeth and lower jaw growth. These factors predispose to malocclusion. PMID:20540401

  15. Ophthalmologic manifestations of celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Thiago Gonçalves dos Santos; Costa, Ana Luiza Fontes de Azevedo; Oyamada, Maria Kiyoko; Schor, Paulo; Sipahi, Aytan Miranda

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that affects the small intestine of genetically predisposed individuals. Ophthalmic manifestations are within the extra-intestinal manifestations, and can be divided into those of autoimmune disorders or those due to absorptive disabilities. This article reviewed the ophthalmologic manifestation of celiac disease. Ophthalmic symptoms are rare, but should be investigated in patients with celiac disease and taken into consideration as the first systemic manifestation. PMID:26949627

  16. Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Tapia, Alberto; Murray, Joseph A

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review To summarize recent advances in celiac disease (CD) published between August 2008 and July 2009. Recent findings CD affects ~1% of most populations but remains largely unrecognized. In the last year, work has shown that the prevalence of CD has increased dramatically, not simply due to increased detection. Also, undiagnosed CD may be associated with increased mortality. Significant progress has been made in understanding how gliadin peptides can cross the intestinal border and access the immune system. New genetic loci and candidate genes that may contribute to the risk of CD and its overlap with type 1 diabetes mellitus have been identified. New deamidated gliadin peptides antibodies have better diagnostic accuracy over native gliadin-based tests. The inclusion of duodenal bulb biopsy specimens may increase the rate of CD detection. The spectrum of CD likely includes a minority of patients with mild enteropathy. A practical 7-item instrument may facilitate standardized evaluation of gluten-free diet adherence. Finally, refractory CD, whilst rare, is associated with a poor prognosis. Summary Celiac disease is a global health problem that requires a multidisciplinary and increasingly cooperative multinational research effort. PMID:20040864

  17. Normal or defective immune response to Hepatitis B vaccine in patients with diabetes and celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Zanoni, Giovanna; Contreas, Giovanna; Valletta, Enrico; Gabrielli, Oretta; Mengoli, Carlo; Veneri, Dino

    2014-01-01

    A defective production of protective levels of antibodies to Hepatitis B (HB) vaccine is reported to occur in 4–10% of healthy subjects and a correlation with the presence of specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules, including DQ2, which also confers genetic predisposition to celiac disease (CD) and type I diabetes mellitus (T1DM), has been suggested. The aim of this study was to analyze the serological response to HB vaccine and measles-containing vaccines in 69 diabetic patients (T1DM), 42 patients with celiac disease (CD) and 79 healthy control subjects (CT). The median interval between the third dose of HB vaccine and serum collection was 6.8, 3.5, and 4.7 years for T1DM, CD and CT groups, respectively. 50/69 (72%) T1DM patients, 32/42 (76%) CD patients and 61/79 (77%) CT subjects showed protective anti-HBs antibodies after vaccination, with no statistically significant difference. On the contrary, a lower statistically significant difference was found in the mean HBsAb level of T1DM subjects when compared with the other two groups. No correlation between HLA DQ2 expression in T1DM and vaccine response was detected. The comparison of serological response to measles after vaccination also showed no statistically significant differences in the three groups. Contrasting results between these data and those reported in the literature might be due to differences in the time intervals between vaccination and testing. Prospective studies in pathological and healthy groups with the same age at HBV vaccination and with the same time interval for blood sample collection to determine antibody titers are necessary in order to provide more conclusive data. PMID:25483516

  18. Normal or defective immune response to Hepatitis B vaccine in patients with diabetes and celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Zanoni, Giovanna; Contreas, Giovanna; Valletta, Enrico; Gabrielli, Oretta; Mengoli, Carlo; Veneri, Dino

    2015-01-01

    A defective production of protective levels of antibodies to Hepatitis B (HB) vaccine is reported to occur in 4-10% of healthy subjects and a correlation with the presence of specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules, including DQ2, which also confers genetic predisposition to celiac disease (CD) and type I diabetes mellitus (T1DM), has been suggested.   The aim of this study was to analyze the serological response to HB vaccine and measles-containing vaccines in 69 diabetic patients (T1DM), 42 patients with celiac disease (CD) and 79 healthy control subjects (CT). The median interval between the third dose of HB vaccine and serum collection was 6.8, 3.5, and 4.7 years for T1DM, CD and CT groups, respectively. 50/69 (72%) T1DM patients, 32/42 (76%) CD patients and 61/79 (77%) CT subjects showed protective anti-HBs antibodies after vaccination, with no statistically significant difference. On the contrary, a lower statistically significant difference was found in the mean HBsAb level of T1DM subjects when compared with the other two groups. No correlation between HLA DQ2 expression in T1DM and vaccine response was detected. The comparison of serological response to measles after vaccination also showed no statistically significant differences in the three groups. Contrasting results between these data and those reported in the literature might be due to differences in the time intervals between vaccination and testing. Prospective studies in pathological and healthy groups with the same age at HBV vaccination and with the same time interval for blood sample collection to determine antibody titers are necessary in order to provide more conclusive data.

  19. Coexistence of Celiac and Crohn's Disease in a Patient Presenting with Chronic Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Lail, Ghulamullah; Tasneem, Abbas Ali; Butt, Muhammed Osama; Luck, Nasir Hassan; Laeq, Syed Mudassir; Abbas, Zaigham; Mubarak, Muhammed

    2016-06-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is one of the most common causes of malabsorption. It is an immune-mediated disease manifested by diarrhea, steatorrhea, flatulence, and weight loss, caused by ingestion of gluten containing diets. The disease has typical small intestinal biopsy features of villous atrophy, crypt hyperplasia, and intense inflammation of the mucosal layer. The disease is rarely associated with Crohn's disease (CRD). Studies on the impact of CD on the natural history of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have shown that the natural course of CRD is not influenced by coexistent CD. We report a case of 54-year female who presented with diarrhea and weight loss. On initial evaluation, CD was diagnosed, and responded to gluten-free diet (GFD). Later on, she developed joint pains and her diarrhea recurred. Further evaluation revealed coexistence of CRD. The treatment of CRD was also initiated and this led to marked improvement in the symptoms of the patient. PMID:27353997

  20. Risk of Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy in 29 000 Patients With Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Emilsson, Louise; Andersson, Bert; Elfström, Peter; Green, Peter H.R.; Ludvigsson, Jonas F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a rare disease of largely unknown origin. Previous studies have suggested an increased prevalence of celiac disease (CD) in patients with DCM. These studies, however, were based on a maximum of 5 patients with both CD and DCM. In the present large Swedish population-based cohort study, we examined the risk of idiopathic DCM in patients with CD determined by small-intestinal histopathology. Methods and Results From 2006 to 2008, we collected duodenal/jejunal biopsy data on CD (equal to villous atrophy, Marsh stage 3, n=29 071 unique individuals) from (all) 28 pathology departments in Sweden. These individuals were compared with 144 429 reference individuals matched for age, sex, calendar year, and county. Data on DCM were obtained through the National Patient Register and confirmed by patient charts and echocardiography data. During follow-up, 17 patients with CD and 52 reference individuals developed idiopathic DCM. Thus, patients with CD were at an increased risk of idiopathic DCM (hazard ratio, 1.73; 95% confidence interval, 1.00 to 3.00), although the risk estimate failed to attain statistical significance (P=0.052). Conclusion This nationwide study found a moderately but not statistically significantly increased risk of idiopathic DCM in patients with biopsy-verified CD. (J Am Heart Assoc. 2012;1:e001594 doi: 10.1161/JAHA.112.001594.) PMID:23130142

  1. Robust spectral analysis of videocapsule images acquired from celiac disease patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dominant frequency (DF) analysis of videocapsule endoscopy images is a new method to detect small intestinal periodicities that may result from mechanical rhythms such as peristalsis. Longer periodicity is related to greater image texture at areas of villous atrophy in celiac disease. However, extraneous features and spatiotemporal phase shift may mask DF rhythms. Method The robustness of Fourier and ensemble averaging spectral analysis to compute DF was tested. Videocapsule images from the distal duodenum of 11 celiac patients (frame rate 2/s and pixel resolution 576 × 576) were analyzed. For patients 1, 2, ... 11, respectively, a total of 10, 11, ..., 20 sequential images were extracted from a randomly selected time epoch. Each image sequence was artificially repeated to 200 frames, simulating periodicities of 0.2, 0.18, ..., 0.1Hz, respectively. Random white noise at four different levels, spatiotemporal phase shift, and frames with air bubbles were added. Power spectra were constructed pixel-wise over 200 frames, and an average spectrum was computed from the 576 × 576 individual spectra. The largest spectral peak in the average spectrum was the estimated DF. Error was defined as the absolute difference between actual DF and estimated DF. Results For Fourier analysis, the mean absolute error between estimated and actual DF was 0.032 ± 0.052Hz. Error increased with greater degree of random noise imposed. In contrast, all ensemble average estimates precisely predicted the simulated DF. Conclusions The ensemble average DF estimate of videocapsule images with simulated periodicity is robust to noise and spatiotemporal phase shift as compared with Fourier analysis. Accurate estimation of DF eliminates the need to impose complex masking, extraction, and/or corrective preprocessing measures. PMID:21906318

  2. Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial: Gluten versus Placebo Rechallenge in Patients with Lymphocytic Enteritis and Suspected Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Anna; Ibarra, Montserrat; Temiño, Rocío; Salas, Antonio; Esteve, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background The role of gluten as a trigger of symptoms in non-coeliac gluten sensitivity has been questioned. Aim To demonstrate that gluten is the trigger of symptoms in a subgroup of patients fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for non-coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), which presented with lymphocytic enteritis, positive celiac genetics and negative celiac serology. Methods Double-blind randomized clinical trial of gluten vs placebo rechallenge. Inclusion criteria: >18 years of age, HLA-DQ2/8+, negative coeliac serology and gluten-dependent lymphocytic enteritis, and GI symptoms, with clinical and histological remission at inclusion. Eighteen patients were randomised: 11 gluten (20 g/day) and 7 placebo. Clinical symptoms, quality of life (GIQLI), and presence of gamma/delta+ cells and transglutaminase deposits were evaluated. Results 91% of patients had clinical relapse during gluten challenge versus 28.5% after placebo (p = 0.01). Clinical scores and GIQLI worsened after gluten but not after placebo (p<0.01). The presence of coeliac tissue markers at baseline biopsy on a gluten-free diet allowed classifying 9 out of the 18 (50%) patients as having probable ‘coeliac lite’ disease. Conclusion This proof-of-concept study indicates that gluten is the trigger of symptoms in a subgroup of patients fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for NCGS. They were characterized by positive celiac genetics, lymphocytic enteritis, and clinical and histological remission after a gluten-free diet. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02472704 PMID:27392045

  3. Life Events and the Onset of Celiac Disease from a Patient’s Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ciacci, Carolina; Siniscalchi, Monica; Bucci, Cristina; Zingone, Fabiana; Morra, Ivonne; Iovino, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Stressful events have been investigated in various immune-mediated diseases but not in celiac disease. Our aim was to examine the relationship of stressful events assessed by the standardized interview of Paykel with the diagnosis of celiac disease in comparison to patients, with a diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease used as the control group. Adults with celiac disease (n = 186) reported more frequent and more severe life events in the years prior to the diagnosis than control patients (n = 96) (67.2% vs. 37.5%, p < 0.001, mean Paykel score 11.5 vs. 13.4, p = 0.001, respectively). Findings were not significantly different between celiac disease and control patients for the time lapse between the event and the diagnosis (mean 5.5 vs. 5.7 months). Pregnancy was defined as a negative event by 20.3% of celiac women, but never by control women. Findings were confirmed when analyses were repeated in the subgroup of patients of both groups with diagnosis made within one year of onset of symptoms. Data indicate that, before diagnosis, the number of stressful events in celiac disease was more frequent although less severe than in the control group suggesting that life events may favor the clinical appearance of celiac disease or accelerate its diagnosis. PMID:23989754

  4. Allele and haplotype frequencies for HLA-DQ in Iranian celiac disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Romanos, Jihane; Rostami, Kamran; Ganji, Azita; Ehsani-Ardakani, Mohammad Javad; Bakhshipour, Ali-Reza; Zojaji, Homayoun; Mohebbi, Seyed Reza; Zali, Mohammad-Reza; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the distribution of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2 and -DQ8 in Iranian celiac disease (CD) patients and compare them to healthy Iranian controls. METHODS: To predict the HLA-DQA1 and -DQB1 genes, we used six previously reported HLA-tagging single nucleotide polymorphism to determine HLA genotypes in 59 Iranian patients with ‘biopsy-confirmed’ CD and in 151 healthy Iranian individuals. To test the transferability of the method, 50 cases and controls were also typed using a commercial kit that identifies individual carriers of DQ2, DQ7 and DQ8 alleles. RESULTS: In this pilot study 97% of CD cases (n = 57) and 58% of controls (n = 87) were carriers of HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8 heterodimers, either in the homozygous or heterozygous state. The HLA-DQ pattern of these 57 CD patients: heterozygous DQ2.2 (n = 14) and homozygous DQ2.2 (n = 1), heterozygous DQ2.5 (n = 33) and homozygous DQ2.5 (n = 8), heterozygous DQ8 (n = 13) and homozygous DQ8 (n = 2). Two CD patients were negative for both DQ2 and DQ8 (3%). CONCLUSION: The prevalence of DQ8 in our CD population was higher than that reported in other populations (25.4%). As reported in other populations, our results underline the primary importance of HLA-DQ alleles in the Iranian population’s susceptibility to CD. PMID:24876751

  5. [Update on celiac disease].

    PubMed

    Moscoso J, Felipe; Quera P, Rodrigo

    2016-02-01

    The prevalence of Celiac disease in the general population is approximately 1% and remains undiagnosed in a significant proportion of individuals. Its clinical presentation includes the classical malabsorption syndrome, unspecific and extra-intestinal manifestations, and silent celiac disease. The serologic diagnosis has an elevated sensitivity and specificity and, at least in adult population, it must be confirmed by biopsy in every case. Diagnosis in subjects already on gluten free diet includes HLA typing and gluten challenge with posterior serologic and histologic evaluation. The core of the treatment is the gluten free diet, which must be supervised by an expert nutritionist. Monitoring must be performed with serology beginning at 3-6 months, and with histology two years after the diagnosis, unless the clinical response is poor. Poor disease control is associated with complications such as lymphoma and small bowel adenocarcinoma. In the future, it is likely that new pharmacologic therapies will be available for the management of celiac disease. PMID:27092676

  6. High Frequency of Haplotype HLA-DQ7 in Celiac Disease Patients from South Italy: Retrospective Evaluation of 5,535 Subjects at Risk of Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tinto, Nadia; Cola, Arturo; Piscopo, Chiara; Capuano, Marina; Galatola, Martina; Greco, Luigi; Sacchetti, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) has a strong genetic component mainly due to HLA DQ2/DQ8 encoding genes. However, a minority of CD patients are DQ2/DQ8-negative. To address this issue, we retrospectively characterized HLA haplotypes in 5,535 subjects at risk of CD (either relatives of CD patients or subjects with CD-like symptoms) referred to our center during a 10-year period. Methods We identified loci DQA1/DQB1/DRB1 by sequence-specific oligonucleotide-PCR and sequence-specific primer-PCR; anti-transglutaminase IgA/IgG and anti-endomysium IgA by ELISA and indirect immunofluorescence, respectively. Results We diagnosed CD in 666/5,535 individuals, 4.2% of whom were DQ2/DQ8-negative. Interestingly, DQ7 was one of the most abundant haplotypes in all CD patients and significantly more frequent in DQ2/DQ8-negative (38%) than in DQ2/DQ8-positive CD patients (24%) (p<0.05). Conclusion Our data lend support to the concept that DQ7 represents an additive or independent CD risk haplotype with respect to DQ2/DQ8 haplotypes but this finding should be verified in other large CD populations. PMID:26398634

  7. The prevalence of abnormal celiac antibodies and celiac disease in patients with suspected irritable bowel syndrome: a prospective multi-center US study

    PubMed Central

    Cash, Brooks D.; Rubenstein, Joel H.; Young, Patrick E.; Gentry, Andrew; Nojkov, Borko; Lee, Dong; Andrews, A. Hirsohi; Dobhan, Richard; Chey, William D.

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims Guidelines recommend that patients with symptoms of non-constipated inflammatory bowel syndrome (NC-IBS) undergo testing for celiac disease (CD). We evaluated the prevalence of CD antibodies and biopsy confirmed CD among patients with NC-IBS in a large US population. Methods In a study conducted at 4 sites, from 2003 to 2008, we compared data from 492 patients with symptoms of NC-IBS to 458 asymptomatic individuals who underwent colonoscopy examinations for cancer screening or polyp surveillance (controls). All participants provided blood samples for specific and non-specific CD-associated antibodies. Additionally, patients with IBS were analyzed for complete blood cell counts, metabolic factors, erythrocyte sedimentation rates, and levels of C-reactive protein and thyroid-stimulating hormone. Any subjects found to have CD-associated antibodies were offered esophagogastroduodenoscopy and duodenal biopsy analysis. Results Of patients with NC-IBS, 7.3% had abnormal results in tests for CD-associated antibodies, compared to 4.8% of controls (adjusted odds ratio=1.49; 95% confidence interval, 0.76–2.90. P=.25). Within the NC-IBS group, 6.51% had antibodies against gliadin, 1.22% against tissue transglutaminase, and 0.61% against endomysium (P>.05 vs controls for all antibodies tested). CD was confirmed in 0.41% of patients in the NC-IBS group and 0.44% of controls (P>0.99). Conclusions Although CD-associated antibodies are relatively common, the prevalence of CD among patients with NC-IBS is similar to that among controls in a large US population. These findings challenge recommendations to routinely screen patients with NC-IBS for CD. More than 7% of patients with NC-IBS had CD-associated antibodies, indicating that gluten sensitivity might mediate IBS symptoms; further studies are needed. PMID:21762658

  8. Oral Signs and HLA-DQB1∗02 Haplotypes in the Celiac Paediatric Patient: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Erriu, M.; Abbate, G. M.; Pili, F. M. G.; Novara, F.; Orrù, G.; Montaldo, C.; Piras, V.; Levrini, L.

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) diagnosis can be extremely challenging in the case of atypical patterns. In this context, oral signs seem to play a decisive role in arousing suspicion of these forms of the disease. At the same time, the different expressions of the HLA-DQB1∗02 allele apparently seem to facilitate the interpretation of signs and highlighted symptoms. The aim of this work was to verify whether it is possible to identify a correlation between the development of oral signs and different DQ2 haplotypes in celiac pediatric patients. 44 celiac patients with a medium age of 9.9 were studied. Oral examinations were performed in order to identify recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) and dental enamel defects (DED). The diagnosis of DED resulted as being related to allele expression (P value = 0.042) while it was impossible to find a similar correlation with RAS. When both oral signs were considered, there was an increase in correlation with HLA-DQB1∗02 expression (P value = 0.018). The obtained results identified both the fundamental role that dentists can play in early diagnosis of CD, as well as the possible role of HLA haplotype analysis in arousing suspicion of atypical forms of the disease. PMID:24198965

  9. Decreased Risk of Celiac Disease in Patients With Helicobacter pylori Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Lebwohl, Benjamin; Blaser, Martin J.; Ludvigsson, Jonas F.; Green, Peter H. R.; Rundle, Andrew; Sonnenberg, Amnon; Genta, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) has increased in recent decades without a clear explanation. The “hygiene hypothesis” theorizes that decreased exposure to bacterial antigens may trigger autoimmunity. We aimed to determine whether Helicobacter pylori infection and CD were associated among patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. We performed a cross-sectional study of patients who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy with submission of gastric and duodenal biopsies to Miraca Life Sciences, Inc. (Irving, Texas), a US commercial pathology laboratory, during a 4.5-year period (January 2008–June 2012). We compared the prevalence of H. pylori in CD patients with that in persons without CD. We performed multiple logistic regression analysis, adjusting odds ratios for patient age, gender, and racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic factors. Among 136,179 patients, a total of 2,689 (2.0%) had CD. H. pylori prevalence was significantly lower in patients with CD (4.4%) than in those without CD (8.8%; P < 0.0001). After adjustment for the above covariates, this inverse relationship remained strong (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.48, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.40, 0.58). The relationships were similar in men (unadjusted OR = 0.51, 95% CI: 0.38, 0.69) and women (unadjusted OR = 0.46, 95% CI: 0.36, 0.58) and in all age groups. We conclude that H. pylori presence and CD are inversely associated, a relationship that persists after adjustment for socioeconomic factors. Future studies should address whether H. pylori modulates immune responses to ingested gluten. PMID:24124196

  10. Serologic evaluation of celiac disease in patients with beta thalassemia major and control

    PubMed Central

    Shahramian, Iraj; Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Haghighat, Mahmood; Noori, Noor Mohammad; Teimouri, Ali Reza; Sharafi, Elham; Kalili, Manijeh

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study reports evaluated prevalence of CD in patients with Beta-thalassemia major. Background: Celiac Disease (CD) is an autoimmune disorder triggered by ingestion of gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. Patients and methods: In this case-control study in a period of 3 years, which was performed on 620 children in two groups of Beta-thalassemia major patients (n=200) and control (n=420), serum tissue transglutamianse (tTG) IgA levels were measured. The two groups were compared together in terms of tTG IgA levels, and p<0.05 was considered significant. Results: The means of serum tTG IgA levels in patients with Beta-thalassemia major and control groups were 28.81±68.44 and 6.94±6.68 U/mL, respectively. There was a significant difference in favor of the case group (p=0.000). Body mass index in the two case and control groups had a significant difference (t=3.859, p=0.001). Belonging to each group will change the probability of having less than 20 in tTG IgA (odds=0.285) and it means that belonging to the control group has a protective role. There is only a significant association in the case of all population (r=0.102, p=0.011). Body mass index in the two case and control groups had a significant difference (t=3.859, p=0.001). Conclusion: Probability of CD should be considered since the prevalence of CD is high in patients with and Beta-thalassemia major. Patients with thalassemia major are recommended for screening for CD. PMID:25926941

  11. Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... immune disease in which people can't eat gluten because it will damage their small intestine. If you have celiac disease and eat foods with gluten, your immune system responds by damaging the small ...

  12. Excitability of the Motor Cortex in De Novo Patients with Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pennisi, Giovanni; Lanza, Giuseppe; Giuffrida, Salvatore; Vinciguerra, Luisa; Puglisi, Valentina; Cantone, Mariagiovanna; Pennisi, Manuela; D'Agate, Carmela Cinzia; Naso, Pietro; Aprile, Giuseppe; Malaguarnera, Giulia; Ferri, Raffaele; Bella, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Celiac disease (CD) may initially present as a neurological disorder or may be complicated by neurological changes. To date, neurophysiological studies aiming to an objective evaluation of the potential central nervous system involvement in CD are lacking. Objective To assess the profile of cortical excitability to Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) in a group of de novo CD patients. Materials and methods Twenty CD patients underwent a screening for cognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms by means of the Mini Mental State Examination and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders, respectively. Instrumental exams, including electroencephalography and brain computed tomography, were also performed. Cortico-spinal excitability was assessed by means of single and paired-pulse TMS using the first dorsal interosseus muscle of the dominant hand. TMS measures consisted of resting motor threshold, motor evoked potentials, cortical silent period (CSP), intracortical inhibition (ICI) and facilitation (ICF). None of the CD was on gluten-free diet. A group of 20 age-matched healthy controls was used for comparisons. Results CD showed a significantly shorter CSP (78.0 vs 125.0 ms, p<0.025), a reduced ICI (0.3 vs 0.2, p<0.045) and an enhanced ICF (1.1 vs 0.7, p<0.042) compared to controls. A dysthymic disorder was identified in five patients. The effect size between dysthymic and non-dysthymic CD patients indicated a low probability of interference with the CSP (Cohen's d -0.414), ICI (-0.278) and ICF (-0.292) measurements. Conclusion A pattern of cortical excitability characterized by “disinhibition” and “hyperfacilitation” was found in CD patients. Immune system dysregulation might play a central role in triggering changes of the motor cortex excitability. PMID:25062250

  13. Celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Green, Peter H R; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Greywoode, Ruby

    2015-05-01

    This review will focus on the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of celiac disease (CD). Given an increasing awareness of gluten-related disorders, medical professionals of all varieties are encountering patients with a diagnosis of CD or who are thought to have food intolerance to gluten. The prevalence of CD among the general population is estimated to be 1% in Western nations, and there is growing evidence for underdiagnosis of the disease, especially in non-Western nations that were traditionally believed to be unaffected. The development of serologic markers specific to CD has revolutionized the ability both to diagnose and monitor patients with the disease. Additionally, understanding of the clinical presentations of CD has undergone a major shift over the past half century. Although it is well understood that CD develops in genetically predisposed subjects exposed to gluten, the extent of other environmental factors in the pathogenesis of the disease is an area of continued research. Currently, the main therapeutic intervention for CD is a gluten-free diet; however, novel nondietary agents are under active investigation. Future areas of research should also help us understand the relationship of CD to other gluten-related disorders.

  14. Determination of B-Cell Epitopes in Patients with Celiac Disease: Peptide Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Choung, Rok Seon; Marietta, Eric V.; Van Dyke, Carol T.; Brantner, Tricia L.; Rajasekaran, John; Pasricha, Pankaj J.; Wang, Tianhao; Bei, Kang; Krishna, Karthik; Krishnamurthy, Hari K.; Snyder, Melissa R.; Jayaraman, Vasanth; Murray, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Most antibodies recognize conformational or discontinuous epitopes that have a specific 3-dimensional shape; however, determination of discontinuous B-cell epitopes is a major challenge in bioscience. Moreover, the current methods for identifying peptide epitopes often involve laborious, high-cost peptide screening programs. Here, we present a novel microarray method for identifying discontinuous B-cell epitopes in celiac disease (CD) by using a silicon-based peptide array and computational methods. Methods Using a novel silicon-based microarray platform with a multi-pillar chip, overlapping 12-mer peptide sequences of all native and deamidated gliadins, which are known to trigger CD, were synthesized in situ and used to identify peptide epitopes. Results Using a computational algorithm that considered disease specificity of peptide sequences, 2 distinct epitope sets were identified. Further, by combining the most discriminative 3-mer gliadin sequences with randomly interpolated3- or 6-mer peptide sequences, novel discontinuous epitopes were identified and further optimized to maximize disease discrimination. The final discontinuous epitope sets were tested in a confirmatory cohort of CD patients and controls, yielding 99% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Conclusions These novel sets of epitopes derived from gliadin have a high degree of accuracy in differentiating CD from controls, compared with standard serologic tests. The method of ultra-high-density peptide microarray described here would be broadly useful to develop high-fidelity diagnostic tests and explore pathogenesis. PMID:26824466

  15. Recommendations to quantify villous atrophy in video capsule endoscopy images of celiac disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Ciaccio, Edward J; Bhagat, Govind; Lewis, Suzanne K; Green, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    AIM To quantify the presence of villous atrophy in endoscopic images for improved automation. METHODS There are two main categories of quantitative descriptors helpful to detect villous atrophy: (1) Statistical and (2) Syntactic. Statistical descriptors measure the small intestinal substrate in endoscope-acquired images based on mathematical methods. Texture is the most commonly used statistical descriptor to quantify villous atrophy. Syntactic descriptors comprise a syntax, or set of rules, for analyzing and parsing the substrate into a set of objects with boundaries. The syntax is designed to identify and distinguish three-dimensional structures based on their shape. RESULTS The variance texture statistical descriptor is useful to describe the average variability in image gray level representing villous atrophy, but does not determine the range in variability and the spatial relationships between regions. Improved textural descriptors will incorporate these factors, so that areas with variability gradients and regions that are orientation dependent can be distinguished. The protrusion syntactic descriptor is useful to detect three-dimensional architectural components, but is limited to identifying objects of a certain shape. Improvement in this descriptor will require incorporating flexibility to the prototypical template, so that protrusions of any shape can be detected, measured, and distinguished. CONCLUSION Improved quantitative descriptors of villous atrophy are being developed, which will be useful in detecting subtle, varying patterns of villous atrophy in the small intestinal mucosa of suspected and known celiac disease patients. PMID:27803772

  16. Celiac Disease Facts and Figures

    MedlinePlus

    ... When a person who has celiac disease consumes gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye and barley, ... than 40- folds. Source: Duration of exposure to gluten and risk for autoimmune disorders in patients with ...

  17. Esophageal manifestations of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Lucendo, A J

    2011-09-01

    Celiac disease (CD) may often be associated with various motor disorders affecting the different segments of the digestive tract, including the esophagus. Although it has not been universally reported, some available evidences indicate that pediatric and adult celiac patients could manifest a higher frequency of esophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease-related symptoms compared to nonceliac patients. In addition, several published studies have consistently shown the efficacy of a gluten-free diet in rapidly controlling esophageal symptoms and in preventing their recurrence. Since the participation of gluten in the esophageal symptoms of CD seems clear, its intimate mechanisms have yet to be elucidated, and several hypothesis have been proposed, including the specific immune alterations characterizing CD, the reduction in nutrient absorption determining the arrival of intact gluten to distal gastrointestinal segments, and various dysregulations in the function of gastrointestinal hormones and peptides. Recent studies have suggested the existence of a possible relationship between CD and eosinophilic esophagitis, which should be more deeply investigated.

  18. Increased density of tolerogenic dendritic cells in the small bowel mucosa of celiac patients

    PubMed Central

    Vorobjova, Tamara; Uibo, Oivi; Heilman, Kaire; Uibo, Raivo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the densities of dendritic cells (DCs) and FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and their interrelations in the small bowel mucosa in untreated celiac disease (CD) patients with and without type 1 diabetes (T1D). METHODS: Seventy-four patients (45 female, 29 male, mean age 11.1 ± 6.8 years) who underwent small bowel biopsy were studied. CD without T1D was diagnosed in 18 patients, and CD with T1D was diagnosed in 15 patients. Normal small bowel mucosa was found in two T1D patients. Thirty-nine patients (mean age 12.8 ± 4.9 years) with other diagnoses (functional dyspepsia, duodenal ulcer, erosive gastritis, etc.) formed the control group. All CD patients had partial or subtotal villous atrophy according to the Marsh classification: Marsh grade IIIa in 9, grade IIIb in 21 and grade IIIc in 3 cases. Thirty-nine patients without CD and 2 with T1D had normal small bowel mucosa (Marsh grade 0). The densities of CD11c+, IDO+, CD103+, Langerin (CD207+) DCs and FOXP3+ Tregs were investigated by immunohistochemistry (on paraffin-embedded specimens) and immunofluorescence (on cryostat sections) methods using a combination of mono- and double-staining. Sixty-six serum samples were tested for IgA-tissue transglutaminase (tTG) using a fully automated EliA™ Celikey® IgA assay (Pharmacia Diagnostics, Freiburg, Germany). RESULTS: The density of CD11c+ DCs was significantly increased in CD patients compared with patients with normal mucosa (21.67 ± 2.49 vs 13.58 ± 1.51, P = 0.007). The numbers of FOXP3+ cells were significantly higher in CD patients (10.66 ± 1.50 vs 1.92 ± 0.37, P = 0.0002) and in patients with CD and coexisting T1D (8.11 ± 1.64 vs 1.92 ± 0.37, P = 0.002) compared with patients with normal mucosa. The density of FOXP3+ cells significantly correlated with the histological grade of atrophic changes in the small bowel mucosa according to the March classification (r = 0.62; P < 0.0001) and with levels of IgA antibody (r = 0.55; P < 0

  19. Coexistence of Celiac Disease and Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simila, Seppo; Kokkonen, Jourma

    1990-01-01

    Three Finnish patients with Down syndrome and celiac disease are described. The incidence of celiac disease among patients with Down syndrome was calculated to be 20 times greater than in children without Down syndrome, indicating that it should be kept in mind when patients suffer from recurrent diarrhea and/or delayed puberty. (Author/JDD)

  20. Celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Lebwohl, Benjamin; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is a multisystem immune based disorder that is triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The prevalence of celiac disease has risen in recent decades and is currently about 1% in most Western populations. The reason for this rise is unknown, although environmental factors related to the hygiene hypothesis are suspected. The pathophysiology of celiac disease involves both the innate and adaptive immune response to dietary gluten. Clinical features are diverse and include gastrointestinal symptoms, metabolic bone disease, infertility, and many other manifestations. Although a gluten-free diet is effective in most patients, this diet can be burdensome and can limit quality of life; consequently, non-dietary therapies are at various stages of development. This review also covers non-celiac gluten sensitivity. The pathophysiology of this clinical phenotype is poorly understood, but it is a cause of increasing interest in gluten-free diets in the general population. PMID:26438584

  1. Celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lebwohl, Benjamin; Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Green, Peter H R

    2015-10-05

    Celiac disease is a multisystem immune based disorder that is triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The prevalence of celiac disease has risen in recent decades and is currently about 1% in most Western populations. The reason for this rise is unknown, although environmental factors related to the hygiene hypothesis are suspected. The pathophysiology of celiac disease involves both the innate and adaptive immune response to dietary gluten. Clinical features are diverse and include gastrointestinal symptoms, metabolic bone disease, infertility, and many other manifestations. Although a gluten-free diet is effective in most patients, this diet can be burdensome and can limit quality of life; consequently, non-dietary therapies are at various stages of development. This review also covers non-celiac gluten sensitivity. The pathophysiology of this clinical phenotype is poorly understood, but it is a cause of increasing interest in gluten-free diets in the general population.

  2. Bone and Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Zanchetta, María Belén; Longobardi, Vanesa; Bai, Julio César

    2016-04-01

    More than 50% of untreated patients with celiac disease (CD) have bone loss detected by bone densitometry (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry:DXA). Moreover, patients with CD are more likely to have osteoporosis and fragility fractures, especially of the distal radius. Although still controversial, we recommend DXA screening in all celiac disease patients, particularly in those with symptomatic CD at diagnosis and in those who present risk factors for fracture such as older age, menopausal status, previous fracture history, and familial hip fracture history. Bone microarchitecture, especially the trabecular network, may be deteriorated, explaining the higher fracture risk in these patients. Adequate calcium and vitamin D supplementation are also recommended to optimize bone recovery, especially during the first years of gluten free diet (GFD). If higher fracture risk persists after 1 or 2 years of GFD, specific osteoactive treatment may be necessary to improve bone health.

  3. Celiac disease in children.

    PubMed

    Garnier-Lengliné, Hélène; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Ruemmele, Frank M

    2015-10-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune enteropathy, triggered by ingestion of gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. Since the use of anti-transglutaminase and anti-endomysium antibodies in the early 1990s, two main groups of clinical presentation can be identified: patients with a symptomatic form of the disease, and patients with a pauci (a)-symptomatic form detected during the work-up of another autoimmune disease or due to a family history of celiac disease. The prevalence of both forms of the disease is currently estimated between 1/100 and 1/400. Classical form of the disease is characterized by occurrence of diarrhoea, failure to thrive, and abdominal bloating in young infants in the months following gluten introduction. Serological tests show high level of anti-transglutaminase and anti-endomysium antibodies. Until recently, the diagnosis required duodenal biopsies that show villous atrophy. HLA genotype can help for diagnosis: the absence of the HLA-DQ2 or DQ8 alleles has a high negative predictive value. European guidelines recently proposed to reconsider the need for systematic endoscopy in typical symptomatic forms with high level of anti-transglutaminase and positive anti-endomysium. These recommendations are being assessed now. Currently, the gluten-free diet remains the only effective treatment for celiac disease. Children with celiac disease have to exclude from their diet all products containing wheat, barley and rye. Gluten-free diet causes clinical remission within a few weeks, but normalization of the small bowel mucosa and negativity of anti-transglutaminase antibodies are obtained in several months or even years. Gluten-free diet is useful to obtain clinical assessment, but also to prevent long-term complications of celiac disease, mainly osteoporosis, other autoimmune diseases, decreased fertility and cancers. PMID:26186878

  4. Celiac disease in children.

    PubMed

    Garnier-Lengliné, Hélène; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Ruemmele, Frank M

    2015-10-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune enteropathy, triggered by ingestion of gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. Since the use of anti-transglutaminase and anti-endomysium antibodies in the early 1990s, two main groups of clinical presentation can be identified: patients with a symptomatic form of the disease, and patients with a pauci (a)-symptomatic form detected during the work-up of another autoimmune disease or due to a family history of celiac disease. The prevalence of both forms of the disease is currently estimated between 1/100 and 1/400. Classical form of the disease is characterized by occurrence of diarrhoea, failure to thrive, and abdominal bloating in young infants in the months following gluten introduction. Serological tests show high level of anti-transglutaminase and anti-endomysium antibodies. Until recently, the diagnosis required duodenal biopsies that show villous atrophy. HLA genotype can help for diagnosis: the absence of the HLA-DQ2 or DQ8 alleles has a high negative predictive value. European guidelines recently proposed to reconsider the need for systematic endoscopy in typical symptomatic forms with high level of anti-transglutaminase and positive anti-endomysium. These recommendations are being assessed now. Currently, the gluten-free diet remains the only effective treatment for celiac disease. Children with celiac disease have to exclude from their diet all products containing wheat, barley and rye. Gluten-free diet causes clinical remission within a few weeks, but normalization of the small bowel mucosa and negativity of anti-transglutaminase antibodies are obtained in several months or even years. Gluten-free diet is useful to obtain clinical assessment, but also to prevent long-term complications of celiac disease, mainly osteoporosis, other autoimmune diseases, decreased fertility and cancers.

  5. Family recognition of celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Bąk-Romaniszyn, Leokadia

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease is a permanent intolerance to gluten that leads to small-bowel mucosal villous atrophy during autoimmune processes in genetically predisposed individuals. At present the diagnosis of celiac disease is based on characteristic clinical symptoms, the results of serological investigations (tissue transglutaminase ten times the upper limit of normal, presence of antiendomysial antibodies – EMA) and positive results of genetic examinations. The aim of this study is to present a medical history of a family in which the mother and younger son were diagnosed with celiac disease (confirmed by genotype examination). Before the genetic examination, the father and the elder son were also suspected of suffering from this disease (they were on gluten-free diets). The authors emphasize the usefulness of HLA-DQ2/DQ8 determination in first-degree relatives of celiac patients. PMID:24868289

  6. Cereal-Based Gluten-Free Food: How to Reconcile Nutritional and Technological Properties of Wheat Proteins with Safety for Celiac Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lamacchia, Carmela; Camarca, Alessandra; Picascia, Stefania; Di Luccia, Aldo; Gianfrani, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The gluten-free diet is, to date, the only efficacious treatment for patients with Celiac Disease. In recent years, the impressive rise of Celiac Disease incidence, dramatically prompted changes in the dietary habit of an increasingly large population, with a rise in demand of gluten-free products. The formulation of gluten-free bakery products presents a formidable challenge to cereal technologists. As wheat gluten contributes to the formation of a strong protein network, that confers visco-elasticity to the dough and allows the wheat flour to be processed into a wide range of products, the preparation of cereal-based gluten-free products is a somehow difficult process. This review focuses on nutritional and technological quality of products made with gluten-free cereals available on the market. The possibility of using flour from naturally low toxic ancient wheat species or detoxified wheat for the diet of celiacs is also discussed. PMID:24481131

  7. Cereal-based gluten-free food: how to reconcile nutritional and technological properties of wheat proteins with safety for celiac disease patients.

    PubMed

    Lamacchia, Carmela; Camarca, Alessandra; Picascia, Stefania; Di Luccia, Aldo; Gianfrani, Carmen

    2014-01-29

    The gluten-free diet is, to date, the only efficacious treatment for patients with Celiac Disease. In recent years, the impressive rise of Celiac Disease incidence, dramatically prompted changes in the dietary habit of an increasingly large population, with a rise in demand of gluten-free products. The formulation of gluten-free bakery products presents a formidable challenge to cereal technologists. As wheat gluten contributes to the formation of a strong protein network, that confers visco-elasticity to the dough and allows the wheat flour to be processed into a wide range of products, the preparation of cereal-based gluten-free products is a somehow difficult process. This review focuses on nutritional and technological quality of products made with gluten-free cereals available on the market. The possibility of using flour from naturally low toxic ancient wheat species or detoxified wheat for the diet of celiacs is also discussed.

  8. Gut Microbiota and Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Marasco, Giovanni; Di Biase, Anna Rita; Schiumerini, Ramona; Eusebi, Leonardo Henry; Iughetti, Lorenzo; Ravaioli, Federico; Scaioli, Eleonora; Colecchia, Antonio; Festi, Davide

    2016-06-01

    Recent evidence regarding celiac disease has increasingly shown the role of innate immunity in triggering the immune response by stimulating the adaptive immune response and by mucosal damage. The interaction between the gut microbiota and the mucosal wall is mediated by the same receptors which can activate innate immunity. Thus, changes in gut microbiota may lead to activation of this inflammatory pathway. This paper is a review of the current knowledge regarding the relationship between celiac disease and gut microbiota. In fact, patients with celiac disease have a reduction in beneficial species and an increase in those potentially pathogenic as compared to healthy subjects. This dysbiosis is reduced, but might still remain, after a gluten-free diet. Thus, gut microbiota could play a significant role in the pathogenesis of celiac disease, as described by studies which link dysbiosis with the inflammatory milieu in celiac patients. The use of probiotics seems to reduce the inflammatory response and restore a normal proportion of beneficial bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract. Additional evidence is needed in order to better understand the role of gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of celiac disease, and the clinical impact and therapeutic use of probiotics in this setting.

  9. Responses of peripheral blood mononucleated cells from non-celiac gluten sensitive patients to various cereal sources.

    PubMed

    Valerii, Maria Chiara; Ricci, Chiara; Spisni, Enzo; Di Silvestro, Raffaella; De Fazio, Luigia; Cavazza, Elena; Lanzini, Alberto; Campieri, Massimo; Dalpiaz, Alessandro; Pavan, Barbara; Volta, Umberto; Dinelli, Giovanni

    2015-06-01

    Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is still an undefined syndrome whose triggering mechanisms remain unsettled. This study aimed to clarify how cultured peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMC) obtained from NCGS patients responded to contact with wheat proteins. Results demonstrated that wheat protein induced an overactivation of the proinflammatory chemokine CXCL10 in PBMC from NCGS patients, and that the overactivation level depends on the cereal source from which proteins are obtained. CXCL10 is able to decrease the transepithelial resistance of monolayers of normal colonocytes (NCM 460) by diminishing the mRNA expression of cadherin-1 (CDH1) and tight junction protein 2 (TJP2), two primary components of the tight junction strands. Thus, CXCL10 overactivation is one of the mechanisms triggered by wheat proteins in PBMC obtained from NCGS patients. This mechanism is activated to a greater extent by proteins from modern with respect to those extracted from ancient wheat genotypes.

  10. Spontaneous dissection of celiac trunk with concurrent splenic artery dissection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seo In; Kim, Jin Joo; Yang, Hyuk Jun; Lee, Keun

    2015-01-01

    Isolated spontaneous dissection of the celiac trunk is rarely diagnosed in acute abdominal pain. We present two cases of celiac trunk and splenic artery dissection with splenic infarction. Patients were successfully managed and stabilized by medical treatment. Isolated celiac trunk dissection can be fatal, therefore providers should be careful not to overlook this entity. PMID:27752606

  11. The present and the future in the diagnosis and management of celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Natalia E.; Theethira, Thimmaiah G.; Leffler, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune enteropathy caused by gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. In celiac disease, adaptive and innate immune activation results in intestinal damage and a wide range of clinical manifestations. In the past, celiac disease was thought to result in signs and symptoms solely related to the gastrointestinal tract. Now, more than half of the adult population presents with extra-intestinal manifestations that can also be expected to improve on a gluten-free diet. For this reason, it is recommended that physicians have a low threshold of suspicion for celiac disease. Current knowledge of the immune pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease has served as a catalyst for the development of novel diagnostic tools and therapeutics. Over the years, highly sensitive and specific serological assays, in addition to genetic markers, have been found to target specific steps in the cascade pathway of celiac disease. Also the advent of the gluten challenge has enabled experts to design diagnostic algorithms and monitor clinical responses in clinical trials. The gluten challenge has provided substantial benefit in the advance of novel therapeutics as an adjuvant treatment to the gluten free diet. Generally, a strict gluten-free diet is highly burdensome to patients and can be limited in its efficacy. Alternative therapies—including gluten modification, modulation of intestinal permeability and immune response—could be central to the future treatment of celiac disease. PMID:25326000

  12. Bovine milk caseins and transglutaminase-treated cereal prolamins are differentially recognized by IgA of celiac disease patients according to their age.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Chávez, Francisco; Rouzaud-Sández, Ofelia; Sotelo-Cruz, Norberto; Calderón de la Barca, Ana M

    2009-05-13

    The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) has increased worldwide, which could be related to some dietary proteins in infant regimens and/or new food processes, affecting CD-predisposed infants and older children or adults differentially. IgA reactivity to human and bovine caseins, as well as yogurt caseins and prolamins from wheat or maize breads, microbial transglutaminase (mTG)-treated or not, was evaluated in three patient groups: G1, <2 years old; G2, approximately 3 years old; and G3 >8 years old. Human caseins were not recognized by IgA, whereas IgA reactivity of G2 and G3 was higher to bovine milk caseins. Immunoreactivity of G1 to yogurt caseins was lower and comparable to controls, with no effects due to mTG treatment. However, mTG treatment increased reactivity of G3 to wheat and maize prolamins. IgA immunoreactivity of CD patients to caseins and mTG-treated or not prolamins was age-dependent, which could reflect a differential manifestation of the effects of such proteins on the intestinal barrier.

  13. Interest in medical therapy for celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Tennyson, Christina A.; Simpson, Suzanne; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Lewis, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: A gluten-free diet is the treatment for celiac disease, but pharmaceutical agents are being developed. The level of interest amongst patients in using a medication to treat celiac disease is unknown. This study examined the level of interest amongst patients in medication to treat celiac disease. Methods: A questionnaire was distributed to celiac disease patients and data were collected on demographics, presentation, and interest in medication. Three validated celiac disease-specific instruments were incorporated: Celiac Disease Associated Quality of Life, the Celiac Symptom Index, and the Celiac Dietary Adherence Test. Results: Responses were received from 365 individuals with biopsy-proven celiac disease. Respondents were 78% (n = 276) female, 48% (n = 170) over 50 years of age, and experienced a classical (diarrhea predominant) presentation in 44% (n = 154). Of the 339 individuals answering the question regarding use of a medication to treat celiac disease, 66% were interested. Interest was greatest in older individuals (71% >50 years of age versus 60% <50 years of age, p = 0.0415), men (78% men versus 62% women, p = 0.0083), frequent restaurant customers (76% versus 58%, p = 0.0006), those dissatisfied with their weight (73% versus 51%, p = 0.0003) and those concerned with the cost of a gluten-free diet (77% versus 64%, p = 0.0176). Length of time since diagnosis, education, presentation, and symptoms with gluten exposure did not demonstrate any effect. Interest in medication was associated with a worse quality of life (CD-QOL 69.4 versus 80.1, p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Most individuals with celiac disease are interested in using a medication. Interest was highest among men, older individuals, frequent restaurant customers, individuals dissatisfied with their weight or concerned with the cost of a gluten-free diet, and those with a worse quality of life. PMID:24003336

  14. [Frequency of celiac disease and irritable bowel syndrome coexistance and its influence on the disease course].

    PubMed

    Zwolińska-Wcisło, Małgorzata; Galicka-Latała, Danuta; Rozpondek, Piotr; Rudnicka-Sosin, Lucyna; Mach, Tomasz

    2009-01-01

    Celiac disease is increasingly recognized autoimmune enteropathy caused by a permanent gluten intolerance. Gluten is the main storage protein of wheat, in genetically predisposed individuals. Celiac disease risk in first degree relatives is about 10%. Diarrhea and changes of bowel movement, observed as well in celiac disease as in IBS, may lead to misdiagnosis of IBS basing on the Rome criteria or may be associated with coexistence of both diseases. The aim of the study was to assess the celiac disease prevalence in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. The study group comprised 200 patients (120 women and 80 men) aged 18-78 years (mean: 46.7 years) with diarrhoeal form of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), according to the Rome criteria II. At the beginning and after a three month period anti tissue transglutaminase antibodies (IgA tTG) were estimated. Gastroscopy with biopsy where performed in those with IgA tTG titre above 1/200. 40 patients were immunologically positive and 14 of them have histopathologically proven celiac disease. In the group of patients with detected celiac disease, gluten free diet was applied besides the treatment with trimebutin or mebewerin, recommended for IBS. After 6 months the decrease of IgA tTG titre in the serum was observed. In 5 of these patients IgA tTG level was negative. It was associated with the significant decrease of clinical symptoms, such as diarrhea and flatulence. The remaining symptoms, such as abdominal pain, feeling of incomplete defecation demanded continuation of IBS treatment. With regard to often atypical celiac disease symptoms--adult active searching should be performed to differentiate from irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:19689036

  15. Monitoring of gluten-free diet compliance in celiac patients by assessment of gliadin 33-mer equivalent epitopes in feces123

    PubMed Central

    Comino, Isabel; Real, Ana; Vivas, Santiago; Síglez, Miguel Ángel; Caminero, Alberto; Nistal, Esther; Casqueiro, Javier; Rodríguez-Herrera, Alfonso; Cebolla, Ángel

    2012-01-01

    Background: Certain immunotoxic peptides from gluten are resistant to gastrointestinal digestion and can interact with celiac-patient factors to trigger an immunologic response. A gluten-free diet (GFD) is the only effective treatment for celiac disease (CD), and its compliance should be monitored to avoid cumulative damage. However, practical methods to monitor diet compliance and to detect the origin of an outbreak of celiac clinical symptoms are not available. Objective: We assessed the capacity to determine the gluten ingestion and monitor GFD compliance in celiac patients by the detection of gluten and gliadin 33-mer equivalent peptidic epitopes (33EPs) in human feces. Design: Fecal samples were obtained from healthy subjects, celiac patients, and subjects with other intestinal pathologies with different diet conditions. Gluten and 33EPs were analyzed by using immunochromatography and competitive ELISA with a highly sensitive antigliadin 33-mer monoclonal antibody. Results: The resistance of a significant part of 33EPs to gastrointestinal digestion was shown in vitro and in vivo. We were able to detect gluten peptides in feces of healthy individuals after consumption of a normal gluten-containing diet, after consumption of a GFD combined with controlled ingestion of a fixed amount of gluten, and after ingestion of <100 mg gluten/d. These methods also allowed us to detect GFD infringement in CD patients. Conclusions: Gluten-derived peptides could be sensitively detected in human feces in positive correlation with the amount of gluten intake. These techniques may serve to show GFD compliance or infringement and be used in clinical research in strategies to eliminate gluten immunotoxic peptides during digestion. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01478867. PMID:22258271

  16. Celiac Disease in Patients Fulfilling the Rome III Criteria for Irritable Bowel Syndrome Attending Gastroenterology Department of A Tertiary Care Hospital in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, M K; Chakraborty, R; Gope, S; Rahman, M A; Miah, A R; Raihan, A S; Sarkar, S; Paul, B K; Ferdousi, K R

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic gastrointestinal disorder that substantially affects patients' quality of life and is associated with a considerable drain of health-care resources and economic burden. But some IBS patients may have celiac disease that could be treated by gluten-free diet which will subsequently improve their quality of life. This study was done to see the prevalence of celiac disease among the IBS patients fulfilling Rome III criteria. The present cross-sectional study was conducted in the Department of Gastroenterology at BSMMU, Dhaka from July 2010 to September 2011. A total of 107 patients aged ranging between 16-60 years clinically labeled as IBS and fulfilled Rome III criteria were included as study sample. The test statistics used to analyze the data were descriptive statistics. The mean age of the patients was 31.5±10.3 years and male to female ratio was roughly 6:1. The mean duration of IBS was 32.0±2.1 months. All of the patients had abdominal discomfort or pain in the preceding 6 months and had a history of loose (mushy) or watery stool, 99.1% had pain or discomfort relieved with defaecation. The prevalence of diarrhoea was found in 78.5% and mixed 21.5% of the patients. About 5% of the patients had raised ESR and majority (86.9%) of the patients had normal level of hemoglobin. Ten (9%) of 107 patients were found positive for anti-t TG (IgA). These findings suggest that an around one-tenth of IBS especially diarrhoea predominant patients may have celiac disease who will respond to simple gluten-free diet thus minimizing the morbidity and mortality. So, all clinically diagnosed IBS patients especially diarrhoea predominant cases should be suggested for the screening for celiac disease. PMID:26931258

  17. Celiac Disease in Patients Fulfilling the Rome III Criteria for Irritable Bowel Syndrome Attending Gastroenterology Department of A Tertiary Care Hospital in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, M K; Chakraborty, R; Gope, S; Rahman, M A; Miah, A R; Raihan, A S; Sarkar, S; Paul, B K; Ferdousi, K R

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic gastrointestinal disorder that substantially affects patients' quality of life and is associated with a considerable drain of health-care resources and economic burden. But some IBS patients may have celiac disease that could be treated by gluten-free diet which will subsequently improve their quality of life. This study was done to see the prevalence of celiac disease among the IBS patients fulfilling Rome III criteria. The present cross-sectional study was conducted in the Department of Gastroenterology at BSMMU, Dhaka from July 2010 to September 2011. A total of 107 patients aged ranging between 16-60 years clinically labeled as IBS and fulfilled Rome III criteria were included as study sample. The test statistics used to analyze the data were descriptive statistics. The mean age of the patients was 31.5±10.3 years and male to female ratio was roughly 6:1. The mean duration of IBS was 32.0±2.1 months. All of the patients had abdominal discomfort or pain in the preceding 6 months and had a history of loose (mushy) or watery stool, 99.1% had pain or discomfort relieved with defaecation. The prevalence of diarrhoea was found in 78.5% and mixed 21.5% of the patients. About 5% of the patients had raised ESR and majority (86.9%) of the patients had normal level of hemoglobin. Ten (9%) of 107 patients were found positive for anti-t TG (IgA). These findings suggest that an around one-tenth of IBS especially diarrhoea predominant patients may have celiac disease who will respond to simple gluten-free diet thus minimizing the morbidity and mortality. So, all clinically diagnosed IBS patients especially diarrhoea predominant cases should be suggested for the screening for celiac disease.

  18. An unusual case of hypercalcemia in a patient of concomitant hypoparathyroidism and celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Somani, Shrikant; Kotwal, Narendra; Upreti, Vimal

    2016-01-01

    Milk alkali syndrome has shown resurgence with increase in use of (prescription or non prescription) calcium supplements. Cases of iatrogenic vitamin D intoxication has also increased due to increasing use of high doses of injectable vitamin D formulations by physicians, surgeons, orthopaedicians, gynecologists and other specialties inadvertently. Here, we present an unusual case of a 17-year-old boy who presented with iatrogenic hypercalcemia as a result of combination of milk alkali syndrome with vitamin D intoxication despite being a case of hypoparathyroidism and concomitantly suffering from celiac disease. PMID:27252747

  19. An unusual case of hypercalcemia in a patient of concomitant hypoparathyroidism and celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Somani, Shrikant; Kotwal, Narendra; Upreti, Vimal

    2016-01-01

    Summary Milk alkali syndrome has shown resurgence with increase in use of (prescription or non prescription) calcium supplements. Cases of iatrogenic vitamin D intoxication has also increased due to increasing use of high doses of injectable vitamin D formulations by physicians, surgeons, orthopaedicians, gynecologists and other specialties inadvertently. Here, we present an unusual case of a 17-year-old boy who presented with iatrogenic hypercalcemia as a result of combination of milk alkali syndrome with vitamin D intoxication despite being a case of hypoparathyroidism and concomitantly suffering from celiac disease. PMID:27252747

  20. Patients With Celiac Disease and B-Cell Lymphoma Have a Better Prognosis Than Those With T-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R.; Rubio–Tapia, Alberto; Ristow, Kay M.; Habermann, Thomas M.; Murray, Joseph A.; Inwards, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Celiac disease (CD) is associated with an increased risk of lymphoma. However, relatively few studies have assessed the outcome of patients diagnosed with both CD and lymphoma. We evaluated the temporal association between lymphoma and CD, along with clinical presentation, response to therapy, and prognosis. Methods Patients diagnosed with both CD and lymphoma were identified retrospectively in a tertiary referral center. Clinical characteristics and survival were analyzed. Results Sixty-three patients (36 men) were identified who had been diagnosed with lymphoma and CD. Thirty-six (57%) were diagnosed with CD before they were diagnosed with lymphoma. The most common histologic entity was diffuse, large, B-cell lymphoma, which affected 18 (29%) patients. Complete information for staging was available in 59 patients; 24 (38%) had stage IV disease. Only chemotherapy or only radiation therapy was used for 43 (68%) and 11 (17%) patients, respectively. The 5- and 10-year cumulative survival rates for the entire cohort were 58% and 39%, respectively. Survival of patients with T-cell lymphoma was shorter than for all other lymphomas (119.4 vs 22.8 mo; P = .02). Conclusions CD is associated with B- and T-cell lymphomas. Patients with B-cell lymphomas had a better prognosis than those with T-cell lymphoma. Therapy is unsatisfactory for enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma. PMID:20851210

  1. Efficient chemo-enzymatic gluten detoxification: reducing toxic epitopes for celiac patients improving functional properties.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Miguel; Nunes, Fernando M; Guedes, Sofia; Domingues, Pedro; Silva, Amélia M; Carrillo, Jose Maria; Rodriguez-Quijano, Marta; Branlard, Gérard; Igrejas, Gilberto

    2015-12-22

    Protein engineering of gluten, the exogenous effector in celiac disease, seeking its detoxification by selective chemical modification of toxic epitopes is a very attractive strategy and promising technology when compared to pharmacological treatment or genetic engineering of wheat. Here we present a simple and efficient chemo-enzymatic methodology that decreases celiac disease toxic epitopes of gluten proteins improving its technological value through microbial transglutaminase-mediated transamidation of glutamine with n-butylamine under reducing conditions. First, we found that using low concentrations of amine-nucleophile under non-reducing conditions, the decrease in toxic epitopes is mainly due to transglutaminase-mediated cross-linking. Second, using high amine nucleophile concentrations protein cross-linking is substantially reduced. Third, reducing conditions increase 7-fold the transamidation reaction further decreasing toxic epitopes amount. Fourth, using n-butylamine improves gluten hydrophobicity that strengthens the gluten network. These results open the possibility of tailoring gluten for producing hypoallergenic flours while still taking advantage of the unique viscoelastic properties of gluten.

  2. Efficient chemo-enzymatic gluten detoxification: reducing toxic epitopes for celiac patients improving functional properties

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Miguel; Nunes, Fernando M.; Guedes, Sofia; Domingues, Pedro; Silva, Amélia M.; Carrillo, Jose Maria; Rodriguez-Quijano, Marta; Branlard, Gérard; Igrejas, Gilberto

    2015-01-01

    Protein engineering of gluten, the exogenous effector in celiac disease, seeking its detoxification by selective chemical modification of toxic epitopes is a very attractive strategy and promising technology when compared to pharmacological treatment or genetic engineering of wheat. Here we present a simple and efficient chemo-enzymatic methodology that decreases celiac disease toxic epitopes of gluten proteins improving its technological value through microbial transglutaminase-mediated transamidation of glutamine with n-butylamine under reducing conditions. First, we found that using low concentrations of amine-nucleophile under non-reducing conditions, the decrease in toxic epitopes is mainly due to transglutaminase-mediated cross-linking. Second, using high amine nucleophile concentrations protein cross-linking is substantially reduced. Third, reducing conditions increase 7-fold the transamidation reaction further decreasing toxic epitopes amount. Fourth, using n-butylamine improves gluten hydrophobicity that strengthens the gluten network. These results open the possibility of tailoring gluten for producing hypoallergenic flours while still taking advantage of the unique viscoelastic properties of gluten. PMID:26691232

  3. Lymphadenopathy in celiac disease: computed tomographic observations

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Bayless, T.M.; Fishman, E.K.; Siegelman, S.S.

    1984-06-01

    Lymphadenopathy in patients with celiac disease is generally viewed with alarm due to the association between celiac disease and intestinal lymphoma. Four patients with celiac disease are described in whom significant mesenteric and paraaortic adenopathy was demonstrated by computed tomogrophy (CT). The subsequent clinical course of these patients revealed no evidence of lymphoma. In two patients with longstanding celiac disease and recent relapse, exploratory laparotomy revealed reactive hyperplasia in the enlarged glands; in one patient this was associated with intestinal ulceration, and in the other no underlying pathology was found. Follow-up CT scans in both these patients demonstrated regression of the findings with clinical improvement. In the other two patients, CT was performed as part of the initial evaluation.

  4. Celiac Injury Due to Arcuate Ligament: An Endovascular Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zini, Chiara Corona, Mario Boatta, Emanuele Wlderk, Andrea Salvatori, Filippo Maria Fanelli, Fabrizio

    2013-06-15

    Celiac trunk injures are rare events, with high mortality rates and difficult management. Endovascular treatment may be considered to avoid bleeding. We report a case of severe bleeding in a 37-year-old man resulting from celiac trunk stretching after a motorcycle crash. Because direct celiac trunk catheterization was not possible, a retrograde catheterization of the common hepatic artery was performed via the superior mesenteric artery. Two vascular plugs (type IV) were released, and the exclusion of the celiac trunk origin was completed with the deployment of an aortic cuff. The patient's clinical condition immediately improved, and after 6 months' follow-up, imaging confirmed the complete exclusion of the celiac trunk.

  5. Immune response to Hepatitis B vaccine in patients with celiac disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Opri, R; Veneri, D; Mengoli, C; Zanoni, G

    2015-01-01

    It is debated whether patients with celiac disease (CD) have non-protective antibody responses to HBV vaccination more frequently than non-affected subjects. To perform a literature review and meta-analysis on protective response to HBV vaccination in CD patients. RCTs and observational controlled studies were eligible. Outcome of interest was an anti-HBs (HBsAb) titer ≥10 IU/L after last vaccine dose. Comparative index was rate ratio (RR). Heterogeneity between studies was addressed and funnel plots were analyzed. Meta-regression models were applied to investigate effect size due to study-specific variables. Twelve retrospective studies on a total of 1,447 participants and 4 prospective studies on 184 subjects were selected. The RR was 0.732 (95% C.I.: 0.664-0.808) and 0.777 (95% C.I.: 0.629-0.960) in the prospective and retrospective studies, respectively. The I2, indicating heterogeneity, was 51.1% in retrospective, 39.8% in prospective studies. Non-protective antibody responses occurred more frequently in patients than controls. Due to limitations in the available studies, additional trials to evaluate post-vaccination HBsAb titer in CD patients are needed. PMID:26378476

  6. The Spectrum of Differences between Childhood and Adulthood Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Kruzliak, Peter; Cangemi, Giuseppina C.; Pohanka, Miroslav; Betti, Elena; Lauret, Eugenia; Rodrigo, Luis

    2015-01-01

    An old saying states that ‘’children are not little adults” and this certainly holds true for celiac disease, as there are many peculiar aspects regarding its epidemiology, diagnosis, clinical presentations, associated diseases, and response to treatment in pediatric compared to adult populations, to such an extent that it merits a description of its own. In fact, contrary to the past when it was thought that celiac disease was a disorder predominantly affecting childhood and characterized by a malabsorption syndrome, nowadays it is well recognized that it affects also adult and elderly people with an impressive variability of clinical presentation. In general, the clinical guidelines for diagnosis recommend starting with specific serologic testing in all suspected subjects, including those suffering from extraintestinal related conditions, and performing upper endoscopy with appropriate biopsy sampling of duodenal mucosa in case of positivity. The latter may be omitted in young patients showing high titers of anti-transglutaminase antibodies. The subsequent management of a celiac patient differs substantially depending on the age at diagnosis and should be based on the important consideration that this is a lifelong condition. PMID:26506381

  7. Clinical impact of a gluten-free diet on health-related quality of life in seven fibromyalgia syndrome patients with associated celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disorder, characterized by the presence of gastrointestinal and multisystem symptoms, which occasionally mimic those of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS). To assess the effectiveness of a Gluten-Free Diet (GFD) in seven adult female screening-detected CD subjects, categorized as severe IBS and FMS patients. Methods All subjects showed villous atrophy in duodenal biopsies, were HLA-DQ2/DQ8-positive, and fulfilled the Rome III and ACR 1990 criteria respectively for IBS and FMS classification. GFD effectiveness was assessed at baseline and after 1 year, examining the score changes in the Tender Points (TPs) test, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), Visual Analogue Scales (VAS) for gastrointestinal complaints, pain and tiredness, drug prescriptions and tissue-Trans-Glutaminase (tTG) serum levels. Results At baseline, all patients had poor Quality of Life and VAS scores, a high number of TPs and drug prescriptions, and increased tTG levels. After 1 year of GFD, all outcome measures significantly improved, with a decrease of 51-60% in TPs, FIQ, HAQ, and VAS scales, and in the number of prescribed drugs, accompanied by an increase of 48-60% in SF-36 Physical and Mental Component Summary scores, and a decrease of tTG to normal values. Conclusion Results of this pilot study show that the adherence to a GFD by CD-related IBS/FMS patients can simultaneously improve CD and IBS/FMS symptoms, and indicate the merit of further research on a larger cohort. PMID:24209578

  8. Celiac disease - sprue

    MedlinePlus

    Sprue; Nontropical sprue; Gluten intolerance; Gluten-sensitive enteropathy; Gluten-free diet celiac disease ... When people with celiac disease eat foods with gluten, their immune system reacts by damaging the villi. ...

  9. Treatment of Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mission Statement Press Releases 2015 CSA Youth Ambassador PEER Grants Awarded Bountiful Pantry DNI Group, LLC Earth ... for Celiac Disease International Symposium Celiac Disease 2013 Peer Review Research Application History of Gluten Induced Diseases ...

  10. Tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 gene polymorphism association with susceptibility to celiac disease in Italian patients.

    PubMed

    de Albuquerque Maranhão, R M; Martins Esteves, F A; Crovella, S; Segat, L; Eleutério Souza, P R

    2015-12-09

    The aim of this research was to study polymorphisms in the genes encoding cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in patients with celiac disease (CD) antigens DQ2 (DQ2-positive) or DQ8 (DQ8-positive). We compared the results with healthy controls to determine whether any of the polymorphisms have a role in susceptibility to CD. A case-control of 192 patients with CD (96 DQ2-positive and 96 DQ8-positive) and 96 healthy controls from northeast Italy were included in the study. Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was carried out using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Significant differences for the TNF-α(-308 G>A) polymorphism were observed when we compared the flowing groups: DQ2-positive with controls [odds ratio (OR) = 0.45, P = 0.0002]; DQ8-positive with controls (OR = 3.55, P < 0.0001); and DQ2-positive with DQ8-positive (OR = 0.12, P < 0.0001). We did not observe a statistically significant association between IL-6 (-174 G>C) polymorphism and CD (P > 0.05). Our results suggest that TNF-α(-308 G>A) polymorphism may play a role in susceptibility to CD in Italian patients.

  11. Clinical Utility of Serologic Testing for Celiac Disease in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    on a GFD. Since IgA measurement is the standard for the serologic celiac disease tests, false negatives may occur in IgA-deficient individuals. Incidence and Prevalence of Celiac Disease The incidence and prevalence of celiac disease in the general population and in subjects with symptoms consistent with or at higher risk of celiac disease based on systematic reviews published in 2004 and 2009 are summarized below. Incidence of Celiac Disease in the General Population Adults or mixed population: 1 to 17/100,000/year Children: 2 to 51/100,000/year In one of the studies, a stratified analysis showed that there was a higher incidence of celiac disease in younger children compared to older children, i.e., 51 cases/100,000/year in 0 to 2 year-olds, 33/100,000/year in 2 to 5 year-olds, and 10/100,000/year in children 5 to 15 years old. Prevalence of Celiac Disease in the General Population The prevalence of celiac disease reported in population-based studies identified in the 2004 systematic review varied between 0.14% and 1.87% (median: 0.47%, interquartile range: 0.25%, 0.71%). According to the authors of the review, the prevalence did not vary by age group, i.e., adults and children. Prevalence of Celiac Disease in High Risk Subjects Type 1 diabetes (adults and children): 1 to 11% Autoimmune thyroid disease: 2.9 to 3.3% First degree relatives of patients with celiac disease: 2 to 20% Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Subjects with Symptoms Consistent with the Disease The prevalence of celiac disease in subjects with symptoms consistent with the disease varied widely among studies, i.e., 1.5% to 50% in adult studies, and 1.1% to 17% in pediatric studies. Differences in prevalence may be related to the referral pattern as the authors of a systematic review noted that the prevalence tended to be higher in studies whose population originated from tertiary referral centres compared to general practice. Research Questions What is the sensitivity and specificity of serologic

  12. Sourdough bread made from wheat and nontoxic flours and started with selected lactobacilli is tolerated in celiac sprue patients.

    PubMed

    Di Cagno, Raffaella; De Angelis, Maria; Auricchio, Salvatore; Greco, Luigi; Clarke, Charmaine; De Vincenzi, Massimo; Giovannini, Claudio; D'Archivio, Massimo; Landolfo, Francesca; Parrilli, Giampaolo; Minervini, Fabio; Arendt, Elke; Gobbetti, Marco

    2004-02-01

    This work was aimed at producing a sourdough bread that is tolerated by celiac sprue (CS) patients. Selected sourdough lactobacilli had specialized peptidases capable of hydrolyzing Pro-rich peptides, including the 33-mer peptide, the most potent inducer of gut-derived human T-cell lines in CS patients. This epitope, the most important in CS, was hydrolyzed completely after treatment with cells and their cytoplasmic extracts (CE). A sourdough made from a mixture of wheat (30%) and nontoxic oat, millet, and buckwheat flours was started with lactobacilli. After 24 h of fermentation, wheat gliadins and low-molecular-mass, alcohol-soluble polypeptides were hydrolyzed almost totally. Proteins were extracted from sourdough and used to produce a peptic-tryptic digest for in vitro agglutination tests on K 562(S) subclone cells of human origin. The minimal agglutinating activity was ca. 250 times higher than that of doughs chemically acidified or started with baker's yeast. Two types of bread, containing ca. 2 g of gluten, were produced with baker's yeast or lactobacilli and CE and used for an in vivo double-blind acute challenge of CS patients. Thirteen of the 17 patients showed a marked alteration of intestinal permeability after ingestion of baker's yeast bread. When fed the sourdough bread, the same 13 patients had values for excreted rhamnose and lactulose that did not differ significantly from the baseline values. The other 4 of the 17 CS patients did not respond to gluten after ingesting the baker's yeast or sourdough bread. These results showed that a bread biotechnology that uses selected lactobacilli, nontoxic flours, and a long fermentation time is a novel tool for decreasing the level of gluten intolerance in humans.

  13. Replication of GWAS Coding SNPs Implicates MMEL1 as a Potential Susceptibility Locus among Saudi Arabian Celiac Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Saadah, Omar I.; Shaik, Noor Ahmad; Banaganapalli, Babajan; Salama, Mohammed A.; Al-Harthi, Sameer E.; Wang, Jun; Shawoosh, Harbi A.; Alghamdi, Sharifa A.; Bin-Taleb, Yagoub Y.; Alhussaini, Bakr H.; Elango, Ramu; Al-Aama, Jumana Y.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD), a gluten intolerance disorder, was implicated to have 57 genetic susceptibility loci for Europeans but not for culturally and geographically distinct ethnic populations like Saudi Arabian CD patients. Therefore, we genotyped Saudi CD patients and healthy controls for three polymorphisms, that is, Phe196Ser in IRAK1, Trp262Arg in SH2B3, and Met518Thr in MMEL1 genes. Single locus analysis identified that carriers of the 518 Thr/Thr (MMEL1) genotype conferred a 1.6-fold increased disease risk compared to the noncarriers (OR = 2.6; 95% CI: 1.22–5.54; P < 0.01). This significance persisted even under allelic (OR = 1.55; 95% CI: 1.05–2.28; P = 0.02) and additive (OR = 0.35; 95% CI: 0.17–0.71; P = 0.03) genetic models. However, frequencies for Trp262Arg (SH2B3) and Phe196Ser (IRAK1) polymorphisms were not significantly different between patients and controls. The overall best MDR model included Met518Thr and Trp262Arg polymorphisms, with a maximal testing accuracy of 64.1% and a maximal cross-validation consistency of 10 out of 10 (P = 0.0156). Allelic distribution of the 518 Thr/Thr polymorphism in MMEL1 primarily suggests its independent and synergistic contribution towards CD susceptibility among Saudi patients. Lack of significant association of IRAK and SH2B3 gene polymorphisms in Saudi patients but their association in European groups suggests the genetic heterogeneity of CD. PMID:26843707

  14. Essential Amino Acids in the Gluten-Free Diet and Serum in Relation to Depression in Patients with Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    van Hees, Nathalie J. M.; Giltay, Erik J.; Tielemans, Susanne M. A. J.; Geleijnse, Johanna M.; Puvill, Thomas; Janssen, Nadine; van der Does, Willem

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Celiac disease (CD) is associated with an increased risk of major depressive disorder, possibly due to deficiencies in micronutrients in the gluten-free diet. We aimed to investigate whether essential amino acids (i.e., the precursors of serotonin, dopamine and other neurotransmitters) are depleted in the diet and serum of CD patients with major depressive disorder. Methods In a cross-sectional study we assessed dietary intake of amino acids and serum levels of amino acids, in 77 CD patients on a gluten-free diet and in 33 healthy controls. Major depressive disorder was assessed with structured interviews (using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview Plus). Dietary intake was assessed using a 203-item food frequency questionnaire. Results Participants had a mean age of 55 years and 74% were women. The intake of vegetable protein was significantly lower in CD patients than in healthy controls (mean difference of 7.8 g/d; 95% CI: 4.7–10.8), as were serum concentrations of tyrosine, phenylalanine and tryptophan (all p < 0.005). However, within the CD patient group, the presence of major depressive disorder (n = 42) was not associated with intake or serum levels of essential amino acids. Conclusions Patients with CD on a long-term gluten-free diet, with good adherence, consume significantly less vegetable protein than controls, and their serum levels of several essential amino acids were also lower. Despite its potential adverse effect, intake and serum levels of essential amino acids were not related to major depression. PMID:25884227

  15. Serological markers of enterocyte damage and apoptosis in patients with celiac disease, autoimmune diabetes mellitus and diabetes mellitus type 2.

    PubMed

    Hoffmanová, I; Sánchez, D; Hábová, V; Anděl, M; Tučková, L; Tlaskalová-Hogenová, H

    2015-01-01

    Impairment of mucosal barrier integrity of small intestine might be causative in immune-mediated gastrointestinal diseases. We tested the markers of epithelial apoptosis - cytokeratin 18 caspase-cleaved fragment (cCK-18), and enterocyte damage - intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP) and soluble CD14 (sCD14) in sera of patients with untreated celiac disease (CLD), those on gluten-free diet (CLD-GFD), patients with autoimmune diabetes mellitus (T1D), T1D with insulitis (T1D/INS), and diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2D). We found elevated levels of cCK-18 (P<0.001), I-FABP (P<0.01) and sCD14 (P<0.05) in CLD when compared to healthy controls. However, the levels of cCK-18 (P<0.01) and I-FABP (P<0.01) in CLD-GFD were higher when compared with controls. Interestingly, elevated levels of cCK-18 and I-FABP were found in T2D and T1D (P<0.001), and T1D/INS (P<0.01, P<0.001). Twenty-two out of 43 CLD patients were seropositive for cCK-18, 19/43 for I-FABP and 11/43 for sCD14; 9/30 of T2D patients were positive for cCK-18 and 5/20 of T1D/INS for sCD14, while in controls only 3/41 were positive for cCK-18, 3/41 for I-FABP and 1/41 for sCD14. We documented for the first time seropositivity for sCD14 in CLD and potential usefulness of serum cCK-18 and I-FABP as markers of gut damage in CLD, CLD-GFD, and diabetes.

  16. Treatment of both native and deamidated gluten peptides with an endo-peptidase from Aspergillus niger prevents stimulation of gut-derived gluten-reactive T cells from either children or adults with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Toft-Hansen, Henrik; Rasmussen, Karina S; Staal, Anne; Roggen, Erwin L; Sollid, Ludvig M; Lillevang, Søren T; Barington, Torben; Husby, Steffen

    2014-08-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is characterized by an inappropriate immunological reaction against gluten driven by gluten-specific CD4+ T cells. We screened 25 proteases and tested 10 for their potential to degrade gluten in vitro. Five proteases were further tested for their ability to prevent the proliferative response by a gluten-specific CD4+ T cell clone and seven gluten-reactive T cell lines to protease-digested gluten peptides. A proline-specific endo-peptidase from Aspergillus niger (AnP2) was particularly efficient at diminishing proliferation after stimulation with cleaved antigen, and could completely block the response against both native and deamidated gluten peptides. We found that AnP2 was efficient down to a 1:64 protease:substrate ratio (w:w). When AnP2 was tested in assays using seven gluten-reactive T cell lines from individual CD patients (three adults and four children), the response to gluten was diminished in all cases. Our study indicates a therapeutic benefit of AnP2 to CD patients.

  17. Fecal Gluten Peptides Reveal Limitations of Serological Tests and Food Questionnaires for Monitoring Gluten-Free Diet in Celiac Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Comino, Isabel; Fernández-Bañares, Fernando; Esteve, María; Ortigosa, Luís; Castillejo, Gemma; Fambuena, Blanca; Ribes-Koninckx, Carmen; Sierra, Carlos; Rodríguez-Herrera, Alfonso; Salazar, José Carlos; Caunedo, Ángel; Marugán-Miguelsanz, J M; Garrote, José Antonio; Vivas, Santiago; lo Iacono, Oreste; Nuñez, Alejandro; Vaquero, Luis; Vegas, Ana María; Crespo, Laura; Fernández-Salazar, Luis; Arranz, Eduardo; Jiménez-García, Victoria Alejandra; Antonio Montes-Cano, Marco; Espín, Beatriz; Galera, Ana; Valverde, Justo; Girón, Francisco José; Bolonio, Miguel; Millán, Antonio; Cerezo, Francesc Martínez; Guajardo, César; Alberto, José Ramón; Rosinach, Mercé; Segura, Verónica; León, Francisco; Marinich, Jorge; Muñoz-Suano, Alba; Romero-Gómez, Manuel; Cebolla, Ángel; Sousa, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Treatment for celiac disease (CD) is a lifelong strict gluten-free diet (GFD). Patients should be followed-up with dietary interviews and serology as CD markers to ensure adherence to the diet. However, none of these methods offer an accurate measure of dietary compliance. Our aim was to evaluate the measurement of gluten immunogenic peptides (GIP) in stools as a marker of GFD adherence in CD patients and compare it with traditional methods of GFD monitoring. Methods: We performed a prospective, nonrandomized, multicenter study including 188 CD patients on GFD and 84 healthy controls. Subjects were given a dietary questionnaire and fecal GIP quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Serological anti-tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG) IgA and anti-deamidated gliadin peptide (anti-DGP) IgA antibodies were measured simultaneously. Results: Of the 188 celiac patients, 56 (29.8%) had detectable GIP levels in stools. There was significant association between age and GIP in stools that revealed increasing dietary transgressions with advancing age (39.2% in subjects ≥13 years old) and with gender in certain age groups (60% in men ≥13 years old). No association was found between fecal GIP and dietary questionnaire or anti-tTG antibodies. However, association was detected between GIP and anti-DGP antibodies, although 46 of the 53 GIP stool-positive patients were negative for anti-DGP. Conclusions: Detection of gluten peptides in stools reveals limitations of traditional methods for monitoring GFD in celiac patients. The GIP ELISA enables direct and quantitative assessment of gluten exposure early after ingestion and could aid in the diagnosis and clinical management of nonresponsive CD and refractory CD. Trial registration number NCT02711397. PMID:27644734

  18. Long-term fracture risk in patients with celiac disease: a population-based study in Olmsted County, Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Jafri, Mohammed R; Nordstrom, Charles W; Murray, Joseph A; Van Dyke, Carol T; Dierkhising, Ross A; Zinsmeister, Alan R; Melton, Lee J

    2008-04-01

    Celiac disease is associated with decreased bone density, but there are conflicting data regarding fracture risk. We determined the fracture incidence relative to matched controls in a population-based cohort with celiac disease before and after diagnosis. Olmsted County residents with celiac disease (n = 83) diagnosed between 1950 and 2002 were compared with 166 gender and age matched controls. Fracture histories were ascertained from each subject's medical records. Celiac disease is linked to an increased fracture risk before and after diagnosis. Before the index date, cases had a fracture rate twice that of controls (CI: 1.0-3.9, P = 0.045) and 2.5-fold greater after the index date (CI: 1.1-5.6, P = 0.026). Appendicular and axial fractures were 2.5 (CI: 0.9-6.5) and 3.2 times more likely (CI: 1.0-10.5) after the index date. These observations support a rationale for earlier detection of celiac disease, and active management of bone disease before bone effects have occurred, to reduce the persistent risk of fractures.

  19. Long-term fracture risk in patients with celiac disease: a population-based study in Olmsted County, Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Jafri, Mohammed R; Nordstrom, Charles W; Murray, Joseph A; Van Dyke, Carol T; Dierkhising, Ross A; Zinsmeister, Alan R; Melton, Lee J

    2008-04-01

    Celiac disease is associated with decreased bone density, but there are conflicting data regarding fracture risk. We determined the fracture incidence relative to matched controls in a population-based cohort with celiac disease before and after diagnosis. Olmsted County residents with celiac disease (n = 83) diagnosed between 1950 and 2002 were compared with 166 gender and age matched controls. Fracture histories were ascertained from each subject's medical records. Celiac disease is linked to an increased fracture risk before and after diagnosis. Before the index date, cases had a fracture rate twice that of controls (CI: 1.0-3.9, P = 0.045) and 2.5-fold greater after the index date (CI: 1.1-5.6, P = 0.026). Appendicular and axial fractures were 2.5 (CI: 0.9-6.5) and 3.2 times more likely (CI: 1.0-10.5) after the index date. These observations support a rationale for earlier detection of celiac disease, and active management of bone disease before bone effects have occurred, to reduce the persistent risk of fractures. PMID:17934823

  20. Teaching the adult ostomy patient.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, H S

    2001-01-01

    Ostomy education is based on principles of adult learning, including assessment of the learners' readiness, ability, and need to learn. Such teaching incorporates specific strategies designed to promote cognitive, affective, and psychomotor learning and strategies to overcome potential cultural barriers. In addition, modifications may be included to meet the needs of aged or disabled patients who have cognitive deficits or low literacy skills. Finally, ostomy education must include an evaluation of its effectiveness. This article reviews general guidelines for planning, implementing, and evaluating patient education for adult patients with ostomies.

  1. Risk factors in familial forms of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2010-04-21

    Celiac disease has been reported in up to 2% of some European populations. A similar risk has been identified in the America and Australia where immigration of Europeans has occurred. Moreover, an increasing number of celiac disease patients are being identified in many Asian countries, including China and India. Finally, celiac disease has also been detected in Asian immigrants and their descendants to other countries, such as Canada. Within these so-called "general" celiac populations, however, there are specific high risk groups that have an even higher prevalence of celiac disease. Indeed, the single most important risk factor for celiac disease is having a first-degree relative with already-defined celiac disease, particularly a sibling. A rate up to 20% or more has been noted. Risk is even greater if a specific family has 2 siblings affected, particularly if a male carries the human leukocyte antigen-DQ2. Both structural changes in the small bowel architecture occur along with functional changes in permeability, even in asymptomatic first-degree relatives. Even if celiac disease is not evident, the risk of other autoimmune disorders seems significantly increased in first-degree relatives as well as intestinal lymphoma. Identification of celiac disease is important since recent long-term studies have shown that the mortality of celiac disease is increased, if it is unrecognized and untreated.

  2. [The relationship between celiac disease (CD) and dental problems].

    PubMed

    Perez-Davidi, M

    2011-10-01

    With a prevalence of 1% in western populations, Celiac disease (CD) is one of the most common inflammatory disorders of the small intestine. CD is often assumed to have its onset in childhood, but it has recently been suggested that adults can also develop CD. Clinical manifestations vary according to age group: infants and young children present with diarrhea, abdominal distention, and failure to thrive, whereas adults that develop CD not only present with diarrhea, but also with silent manifestations such as anemia, osteoporosis, or neurological symptoms. In the small intestine of celiac disease patients, dietary wheat gluten and similar proteins in barley and rye trigger an inflammatory response. While strict adherence to a gluten-free diet induces full recovery in most patients, a small percentage of patients fail to recover. In a subset of these refractory celiac disease patients, an (aberrant) oligoclonal intraepithelial lymphocyte population develops into overt lymphoma. Celiac disease is strongly associated with HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8, as both genotypes predispose for disease development. mmunohistochemistry of the small intestine of patients shows villous atrophy, crypt hyperplasia, and elevated levels of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs). The only therapy until now is a gluten-free diet, which will normalize the clinical and histological manifestations and allows the patients to live an otherwise normal life. part of the symptoms are oral manifestations as dental enamel defects, aphthous ulcers and Atrophic Glossitis. The prevalence of caries in CD patiens is law as compared to the healthy population and in some cases the normal eruption sequence of the teeth was damaged. Part of the undiagnosed CD patients are among our patients and the enamel defects they present are misdiagnosed as tetracycline pigmentation or white spot lesions it is the practitioners responsibility to add CD as a possible cause to the findings and refer the patient to further

  3. [Celiac plexus block: value of x-ray computed guidance].

    PubMed

    Ducable, G; Menguy, E; Jouini, S; Moisan, Y; Genevois, A; Lestrat, J P; Winckler, C

    1991-01-01

    Celiac plexus block is a good alternative of pain treatment in upper abdominal pain. Neurolysis of the celiac plexus by the percutaneous posterior route used CT guidance in 8 patients. Pain relief was obtained in 5 of 7 patients (70 per cent); no complication occurred. PMID:1759698

  4. Cost-Effectiveness of Universal Serological Screening to Prevent Non-Traumatic Hip and Vertebral Fractures in Patients with Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Park, KT; Tsai, Raymond; Wang, Louise; Khavari, Nasim; Bachrach, Laura; Bass, Dorsey

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Patients with asymptomatic or poorly managed celiac disease can experience bone loss, placing them at risk for hip and vertebral fractures. We analyzed the cost-effectiveness of universal serologic screening (USS) vs symptomatic at-risk screening (SAS) strategies for celiac disease, given the risk of non-traumatic hip and vertebral fractures if untreated or undiagnosed. Method We developed a lifetime Markov model of the screening strategies, each with male or female cohorts of 1000 patients, 12 years old when screening began. We screened serum samples for levels of immunoglobulin A (IgA), compared with tissue transglutaminase and total IgA, and findings were confirmed by mucosal biopsy. Transition probabilities and quality of life estimates were obtained from the literature. We used generalizable cost estimates and Medicare reimbursement rates, and ran deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Result For men, the average life-time costs were $8532 and $8472 for USS and SAS strategies, respectively, corresponding to average quality adjusted life years (QALY) gains of 25.511 and 25.515. Similarly, for women, costs were $11,383 and $11,328 for USS and SAS strategies, corresponding to QALY gains of 25.74 and 25.75. Compared to the current standard of care (SAS), USS produced higher average lifetime costs and lower quality of life for each sex. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses showed that the model was robust to realistic changes in all the variables, making USS cost ineffective, based on these outcomes. Conclusion USS and SAS are similar in lifetime costs and quality of life, although the current SAS strategy was overall more cost effective in preventing bone loss and fractures among patients with undiagnosed or subclinical disease. Based on best available supportive evidence, it is more cost effective to maintain the standard celiac screening practices, although future robust population-based evidence in other health

  5. Increased Risk of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in 29,000 Patients with Biopsy-verified Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    LUDVIGSSON, JONAS F.; RUBIO-TAPIA, ALBERTO; CHOWDHARY, VAIDEHI; MURRAY, JOSEPH A.; SIMARD, JULIA F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate a possible association between celiac disease (CD) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Case series have indicated a possible association, but population-based studies are lacking. Methods We compared the risk of SLE in 29,048 individuals with biopsy-verified CD (villous atrophy, Marsh 3) from Sweden’s 28 pathology departments with that in 144,352 matched individuals from the general population identified through the Swedish Total Population Register. SLE was defined as having at least 2 records of SLE in the Swedish Patient Register. We used Cox regression to estimate hazard ratios (HR) for SLE. Results During followup, 54 individuals with CD had an incident SLE. This corresponded to an HR of 3.49 (95% CI 2.48–4.90), with an absolute risk of 17/100,000 person-years and an excess risk of 12/100,000. Beyond 5 years of followup, the HR for SLE was 2.54 (95% CI 1.57–4.10). While SLE was predominantly female, we found similar risk estimates in men and women. When we restricted our outcome to individuals who also had a dispensation for a medication used in SLE, the HR was 2.43 (95% CI 1.22–4.87). The HR for having 2 records of SLE diagnoses, out of which at least 1 had occurred in a department of rheumatology, nephrology/dialysis, internal medicine, or pediatrics, was 2.87 (95% CI 1.97–4.17). Conclusion Individuals with CD were at a 3-fold increased risk of SLE compared to the general population. Although this excess risk remained more than 5 years after CD diagnosis, absolute risks were low. PMID:22859356

  6. Different levels of humoral immunoreactivity to different wheat cultivars gliadin are present in patients with celiac disease and in patients with multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Konic-Ristic, Aleksandra; Dodig, Dejan; Krstic, Radmilo; Jelic, Svetislav; Stankovic, Ivan; Ninkovic, Aleksandra; Radic, Jelena; Besu, Irina; Bonaci-Nikolic, Branka; Jojic, Njegica; Djordjevic, Milica; Popovic, Dragan; Juranic, Zorica

    2009-01-01

    Background Immunity to food antigens (gliadin, cow's milk proteins) is in the centre of the attention of modern medicine focused on the prevention of diseases, prevention which is based on the use of appropriate restriction diet. Detection of the enhanced levels of the immune reactions to antigen(s) present in food is from this point of view of great importance because there are reports that some of health disturbances, like celiac disease (CD) and some premalignant conditions, like monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), were vanished after the appropriate restriction diets. It is well known that gliadin is toxic to small bowel mucosa of relatively small population of genetically predisposed individuals, who under this toxic action develop celiac disease (CD). As the quantity of immunogenic gliadin could vary between different wheat species, the first aim of this work was to determine the percentage of immunogenic gliadin in ten bread wheat cultivars and in three commercially grown durum wheat cultivars. The second part of the study was initiated by results of previous publication, reporting that sera of some of multiple myeloma (MM) patients showed the presence of elevated levels of anti-gliadin IgA, without the enhanced levels of anti-gliadin IgG antibodies, determined with commercial ELISA test. It was designed to assess is it possible to reveal is there any hidden, especially anti-gliadin IgG immunoreactivity, in serum of mentioned group of patients. For this purpose we tested MM patients sera, as well as celiac disease (CD) patients sera for the immunoreaction with the native gliadin isolated from wheat species used for bread and pasta making in corresponding geographic region. Results Gliadin was isolated from wheat flour by two step 60% ehanolic extraction. Its content was determined by commercial R5 Mendez Elisa using PWG gliadin as the standard. Results obtained showed that immunogenic gliadin content varies between 50.4 and 65.4 mg

  7. Treatment of a Traumatic Celiac Trunk Detachment by Bridging with a Stent Graft

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, In Young; Chung, Hwan Hoon Lee, Seung Hwa Cho, Sung Bum Kim, Yun Hwan Seo, Bo Kyoung Seo, Hyung-Seok

    2012-04-15

    Traumatic detachment of the celiac trunk from the abdominal aorta is a rare clinical situation, and proper treatment options have not been established. We report a patient with traumatic separation of the celiac trunk treated by bridging with a covered stent between the celiac trunk and abdominal aorta.

  8. Celiac disease presenting as the Paterson-Brown Kelly (Plummer-Vinson) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dickey, W; McConnell, B

    1999-02-01

    We describe two patients with Paterson-Brown Kelly (Plummer-Vinson) syndrome whose iron deficiency anemia was due to celiac disease. They presented with dysphagia 13 and 9 yr, respectively, before celiac disease was diagnosed. Neither had gastrointestinal symptoms suggestive of malabsorption. Celiac disease is a recognized cause of chronic iron deficiency and should be considered as an etiological factor for sideropenic dysphagia.

  9. Diagnosis of gluten related disorders: Celiac disease, wheat allergy and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Elli, Luca; Branchi, Federica; Tomba, Carolina; Villalta, Danilo; Norsa, Lorenzo; Ferretti, Francesca; Roncoroni, Leda; Bardella, Maria Teresa

    2015-06-21

    Cereal crops and cereal consumption have had a vital role in Mankind's history. In the recent years gluten ingestion has been linked with a range of clinical disorders. Gluten-related disorders have gradually emerged as an epidemiologically relevant phenomenon with an estimated global prevalence around 5%. Celiac disease, wheat allergy and non-celiac gluten sensitivity represent different gluten-related disorders. Similar clinical manifestations can be observed in these disorders, yet there are peculiar pathogenetic pathways involved in their development. Celiac disease and wheat allergy have been extensively studied, while non-celiac gluten sensitivity is a relatively novel clinical entity, believed to be closely related to other gastrointestinal functional syndromes. The diagnosis of celiac disease and wheat allergy is based on a combination of findings from the patient's clinical history and specific tests, including serology and duodenal biopsies in case of celiac disease, or laboratory and functional assays for wheat allergy. On the other hand, non-celiac gluten sensitivity is still mainly a diagnosis of exclusion, in the absence of clear-cut diagnostic criteria. A multimodal pragmatic approach combining findings from the clinical history, symptoms, serological and histological tests is required in order to reach an accurate diagnosis. A thorough knowledge of the differences and overlap in clinical presentation among gluten-related disorders, and between them and other gastrointestinal disorders, will help clinicians in the process of differential diagnosis.

  10. Diagnosis of gluten related disorders: Celiac disease, wheat allergy and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Elli, Luca; Branchi, Federica; Tomba, Carolina; Villalta, Danilo; Norsa, Lorenzo; Ferretti, Francesca; Roncoroni, Leda; Bardella, Maria Teresa

    2015-06-21

    Cereal crops and cereal consumption have had a vital role in Mankind's history. In the recent years gluten ingestion has been linked with a range of clinical disorders. Gluten-related disorders have gradually emerged as an epidemiologically relevant phenomenon with an estimated global prevalence around 5%. Celiac disease, wheat allergy and non-celiac gluten sensitivity represent different gluten-related disorders. Similar clinical manifestations can be observed in these disorders, yet there are peculiar pathogenetic pathways involved in their development. Celiac disease and wheat allergy have been extensively studied, while non-celiac gluten sensitivity is a relatively novel clinical entity, believed to be closely related to other gastrointestinal functional syndromes. The diagnosis of celiac disease and wheat allergy is based on a combination of findings from the patient's clinical history and specific tests, including serology and duodenal biopsies in case of celiac disease, or laboratory and functional assays for wheat allergy. On the other hand, non-celiac gluten sensitivity is still mainly a diagnosis of exclusion, in the absence of clear-cut diagnostic criteria. A multimodal pragmatic approach combining findings from the clinical history, symptoms, serological and histological tests is required in order to reach an accurate diagnosis. A thorough knowledge of the differences and overlap in clinical presentation among gluten-related disorders, and between them and other gastrointestinal disorders, will help clinicians in the process of differential diagnosis. PMID:26109797

  11. Synthetic peptides reproducing tissue transglutaminase-gliadin complex neo-epitopes as probes for antibody detection in celiac disease patients' sera.

    PubMed

    Di Pisa, Margherita; Pascarella, Simona; Scrima, Mario; Sabatino, Giuseppina; Real-Fernández, Feliciana; Chelli, Mario; Renzi, Daniela; Calabrò, Antonio; D'Ursi, Anna Maria; Papini, Anna Maria; Rovero, Paolo

    2015-02-12

    Celiac disease (CD) patients usually present high levels of circulating IgA antibodies directed to different antigens, in particular tissue transglutaminase (tTG), gliadin (Glia), and endomysium. A series of synthetic peptide constructs containing cross-linked tTG and Glia deamidated peptides have been synthesized. Peptides were tested in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays against celiac disease patients' sera versus normal blood donors, and their conformational features were evaluated by molecular modeling techniques. Four peptides were recognized as epitopes by autoantibodies (IgG class) circulating in CD patients' sera before gluten-free diet. The peptide II, containing Ac-tTG(553-564)-NH2 sequence cross-linked with deamidated Ac-α2-Glia(63-71)-NH2, was able to identify specific disease antibodies with a sensitivity of 50% and a specificity of 94.4%. Structural conformations of the linear fragments Ac-tTG(553-564)-NH2 and Ac-α2-Glia(63-71)-NH2 and the corresponding cross-linked peptide II were calculated by molecular modeling. Results showed that cross-linking is determinant to assume conformations, which are not accessible to the linear fragments. PMID:25588142

  12. Celiac Disease Prevalence in the Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome in the Ilam Province; A Cross Sectional Study from Western Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoodi, Alireza; Jafarihaydarlo, Ali; Yasemi, Masood; Peyman, Hadi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Many studies have shown that the prevalence of celiac disease (CD) is increasing in the patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), but the present evidences are controversy and all of the researches don’t suggest evaluation of the patients with IBS for the CD. Materials and Methods: In the cross-sectional study, 1000 patients that affected by IBS with the predominant feature of diarrhea who referred to the gastroenterology clinic were evaluated during 2009-2012 years. Blood samples were taken from the patients for ELISA of IgA tissue transglutaminase (TTG) Ab. Then biopsy was taken from the second part of duodenum of all of patients by endoscopy and the sample was referred to pathologist for histopathology evaluation in order to confirm diagnosis. Results: About half of the patients with IBS were women (50.3%) and the mean age ± Standard deviation of the men and women was 29.59±11.41 and 28.42±11.73, respectively. The mean titer of TTG IgA Ab in the women and men affected by IBS was 5.25±17.77 and 7.22±25.4, respectively. Seventy six cases (7.6%) that affected by IBS had high serum level of Ab titer (TTG IgA.Ab≥10) that including 41 women and 35 men. In the patients with high serum level of Ab titer, 57 cases (75%) were affected by celiac disease (based on histopathology report). Therefore, the prevalence of CD was 5.7% among patients with IBS. Conclusion: In the current study the incidence of CD was evaluated 5.7 cases per each 100 people with IBS. It’s suggested that all of the patients with diarrhea predominant IBS and high serum level of TTG IgA Ab must be examined for evaluation of CD. PMID:25653962

  13. An impending rupture of a celiac artery aneurysm in a patient with Behçet's disease -- extra-anatomic aorto-common hepatic artery bypass: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hideaki; Umezawa, Hisaki; Goshima, Masakazu; Hattori, Tsutomu; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Negishi, Nanao; Oinuma, Toshinori; Sugitani, Masahiko; Nemoto, Norimichi

    2008-01-01

    A celiac artery aneurysm associated with Behçet's disease is extremely rare. We herein present the case of successful surgical treatment for an impending rupture of a large celiac artery aneurysm with a wide proximal neck in a patient associated with Behçet's disease. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a procedure involving extra-anatomic aorto-common hepatic artery (CHA) bypass through the retroperitoneal space implanting a 6-mm expanded polytetrafluoroethylene graft. An 18-month postoperative magnetic resonance angiography scan showed a good patency of the aorto-CHA graft without an anastomotic pseudoaneurysm in a closure of aorta and anastomoses.

  14. [Gluten as food additive in The Netherlands: cheese forbidden for celiac patients?].

    PubMed

    Friederich, P; Mulder, C J; Mearin, M L; Beerling, G; Schalekamp, G

    1997-02-22

    A new coating for cheese, to be introduced in May, consists entirely of natural degradable components. The coating is based on wheat gluten. This increase in the amount of gluten in the Dutch diet may lead to overt coeliac disease in people with a subclinical form of it, and will limit the dietary choices of patients already suffering from the disease.

  15. Elderly Onset Celiac Disease: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Cappello, Maria; Morreale, Gaetano C.; Licata, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Celiac sprue is a chronic disease, which usually occurs in children and young adults. However, it can develop in any age group, and the prevalence is increasing even in the elderly population. The atypical patterns of clinical presentation in this age group sometimes can cause a delay in diagnosis. Given the lower sensitivity and specificity of serological tests in the aged population, clinical suspect often arises in the presence of complications (autoimmune disorders, fractures, and finally, malignancy) and must be supported by endoscopic and imaging tools. In this review, we highlight the incidence and prevalence of celiac disease in the elderly, the patterns of clinical presentation, diagnosis, and the most frequent complications, with the aim of increasing awareness and reducing the diagnostic delay of celiac disease even in the elderly population. PMID:27486350

  16. Elderly Onset Celiac Disease: A Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    Cappello, Maria; Morreale, Gaetano C; Licata, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Celiac sprue is a chronic disease, which usually occurs in children and young adults. However, it can develop in any age group, and the prevalence is increasing even in the elderly population. The atypical patterns of clinical presentation in this age group sometimes can cause a delay in diagnosis. Given the lower sensitivity and specificity of serological tests in the aged population, clinical suspect often arises in the presence of complications (autoimmune disorders, fractures, and finally, malignancy) and must be supported by endoscopic and imaging tools. In this review, we highlight the incidence and prevalence of celiac disease in the elderly, the patterns of clinical presentation, diagnosis, and the most frequent complications, with the aim of increasing awareness and reducing the diagnostic delay of celiac disease even in the elderly population. PMID:27486350

  17. Burden of celiac disease in the Mediterranean area

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Luigi; Timpone, Laura; Abkari, Abdelhak; Abu-Zekry, Mona; Attard, Thomas; Bouguerrà, Faouzi; Cullufi, Paskal; Kansu, Aydan; Micetic-Turk, Dusanka; Mišak, Zrinjka; Roma, Eleftheria; Shamir, Raanan; Terzic, Selma

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To estimate the burden of undiagnosed celiac disease (CD) in the Mediterranean area in terms of morbidity, mortality and health cost. METHODS: For statistics regarding the population of each country in the Mediterranean area, we accessed authoritative international sources (World Bank, World Health Organization and United Nations). The prevalence of CD was obtained for most countries from published reports. An overall prevalence rate of 1% cases/total population was finally estimated to represent the frequency of the disease in the area, since none of the available confidence intervals of the reported rates significantly excluded this rate. The distribution of symptoms and complications was obtained from reliable reports in the same cohort. A standardized mortality rate of 1.8 was obtained from recent reports. Crude health cost was estimated for the years between symptoms and diagnosis for adults and children, and was standardized for purchasing power parity to account for the different economic profiles amongst Mediterranean countries. RESULTS: In the next 10 years, the Mediterranean area will have about half a billion inhabitants, of which 120 million will be children. The projected number of CD diagnoses in 2020 is 5 million cases (1 million celiac children), with a relative increase of 11% compared to 2010. Based on the 2010 rate, there will be about 550 000 symptomatic adults and about 240 000 sick children: 85% of the symptomatic patients will suffer from gastrointestinal complaints, 40% are likely to have anemia, 30% will likely have osteopenia, 20% of children will have short stature, and 10% will have abnormal liver enzymes. The estimated standardized medical costs for symptomatic celiac patients during the delay between symptom onset and diagnosis (mean 6 years for adults, 2 years for children) will be about €4 billion (€387 million for children) over the next 10 years. A delay in diagnosis is expected to increase mortality: about 600 000

  18. Role of oats in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Comino, Isabel; Moreno, María de Lourdes; Sousa, Carolina

    2015-11-01

    A gluten-free diet is currently the only effective means of treating individuals with celiac disease. Such a diet enables celiac patients to control their symptoms and avoid various complications associated with this condition. However, while the quality of gluten-free foods has significantly improved during recent decades, maintenance of a gluten-free diet does not necessarily ensure adequate nutritional intake. Because oats are an important source of proteins, lipids, vitamins, minerals, and fibre, their inclusion in a gluten-free diet might improve the nutritional status of a celiac patient. Although oats are included in the list of gluten-free ingredients specified in European regulations, their safety when consumed by celiac patients remains debatable. Some studies claim that pure oats are safe for most celiac people, and contamination with other cereal sources is the main problem facing people with this disease. However, it is necessary to consider that oats include many varieties, containing various amino acid sequences and showing different immunoreactivities associated with toxic prolamins. As a result, several studies have shown that the immunogenicity of oats varies depending on the cultivar consumed. Thus, it is essential to thoroughly study the variety of oats used in a food ingredient before including it in a gluten-free diet.

  19. Role of oats in celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Comino, Isabel; Moreno, María de Lourdes; Sousa, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    A gluten-free diet is currently the only effective means of treating individuals with celiac disease. Such a diet enables celiac patients to control their symptoms and avoid various complications associated with this condition. However, while the quality of gluten-free foods has significantly improved during recent decades, maintenance of a gluten-free diet does not necessarily ensure adequate nutritional intake. Because oats are an important source of proteins, lipids, vitamins, minerals, and fibre, their inclusion in a gluten-free diet might improve the nutritional status of a celiac patient. Although oats are included in the list of gluten-free ingredients specified in European regulations, their safety when consumed by celiac patients remains debatable. Some studies claim that pure oats are safe for most celiac people, and contamination with other cereal sources is the main problem facing people with this disease. However, it is necessary to consider that oats include many varieties, containing various amino acid sequences and showing different immunoreactivities associated with toxic prolamins. As a result, several studies have shown that the immunogenicity of oats varies depending on the cultivar consumed. Thus, it is essential to thoroughly study the variety of oats used in a food ingredient before including it in a gluten-free diet. PMID:26557006

  20. Pancreatic developmental defect evaluated by celiac artery angiography in a patient with MODY5.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Naoko; Tsurumi, Masashi; Asai, Kuniya; Shimuzu, Wataru; Watanabe, Atsushi; Ogata, Makiko; Takizawa, Miho; Ide, Risa; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Saito, Kayoko

    2016-01-01

    The hepatocyte nuclear factor 1β gene (HNF1B) is responsible for maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 5 (MODY5), which is characterized by early-onset diabetes mellitus and urogenital malformations. HNF1B is expressed during visceral endoderm formation. We identified a disruption of the great pancreatic artery in a patient with MODY5 with no pancreatic body or tail. Our finding supports the significance of HNF1B in the development of the pancreas. PMID:27468355

  1. Pancreatic developmental defect evaluated by celiac artery angiography in a patient with MODY5

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Naoko; Tsurumi, Masashi; Asai, Kuniya; Shimuzu, Wataru; Watanabe, Atsushi; Ogata, Makiko; Takizawa, Miho; Ide, Risa; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Saito, Kayoko

    2016-01-01

    The hepatocyte nuclear factor 1β gene (HNF1B) is responsible for maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 5 (MODY5), which is characterized by early-onset diabetes mellitus and urogenital malformations. HNF1B is expressed during visceral endoderm formation. We identified a disruption of the great pancreatic artery in a patient with MODY5 with no pancreatic body or tail. Our finding supports the significance of HNF1B in the development of the pancreas. PMID:27468355

  2. Analysis of Body Composition and Food Habits of Spanish Celiac Women

    PubMed Central

    Churruca, Itziar; Miranda, Jonatan; Lasa, Arrate; Bustamante, María Á.; Larretxi, Idoia; Simon, Edurne

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present work was both to analyze composition of Spanish celiac women and to study the food habits and gluten-free diet of these celiac patients, in order to determine whether they achieve a balanced and healthy diet as well as to highlight nutritional qualitative and/or quantitative differences. 54 adult celiac women (34 ± 13 years) took part in the six-month study. Height, weight and body composition were measured. An analysis of energy consumption and of the macronutrient distribution of their diet was carried out. Their fulfillment of micronutrient intake recommendations was verified. Participants showed a Body Mass Index of 21.6 ± 2.4 kg/m2. Energy Intake was slightly lower than the Dietary Reference Intakes. Excessive protein apart from over-consumption of fat was observed. More than three quarters of participants consumed meat in excess. Carbohydrate consumption along with that of fiber was below recommended levels. Vitamin D, iron, and iodine had a low percentage of recommendation compliance. In general, participants followed the recommendations of dairy products and fruit intake whereas vegetable consumption was not enough for the vast majority. We conclude that although the diet of celiac women does not differ much from the diet of general population, some considerations, such as reducing fat and protein consumption and increasing fiber intake, must be taken into account. PMID:26184289

  3. Latest In vitro and in vivo models of celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Stoven, Samantha; Murray, Joseph A.; Marietta, Eric V.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Currently, the only treatment for celiac disease is a gluten free diet, and there is an increased desire for alternative therapies. In vitro and in vivo models of celiac disease have been generated in order to better understand the pathogenesis of celiac disease, and this review will discuss these models as well as the testing of alternative therapies using these models. Areas Covered The research discussed describes the different in vitro and in vivo models of celiac disease that currently exist and how they have contributed to our understanding of how gluten can stimulate both innate and adaptive immune responses in celiac patients. We also provide a summary on the alternative therapies that have been tested with these models and discuss whether subsequent clinical trials were done based on these tests done with these models of celiac disease. Expert Opinion Only a few of the alternative therapies that have been tested with animal models have gone on to clinical trials; however, those that did go on to clinical trial have provided promising results from a safety standpoint. Further trials are required to determine if some of these therapies may serve as an effective adjunct to a gluten free diet to alleviate the adverse affects associated with accidental gluten exposure. A “magic-bullet” approach may not be the answer to celiac disease, but possibly a future cocktail of these different therapeutics may allow celiac patients to consume an unrestricted diet. PMID:23293929

  4. Ratio of spleen diameter to red blood cell distribution width: a novel indicator for celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Balaban, Daniel Vasile; Popp, Alina; Lungu, Andrei Marian; Costache, Raluca Simona; Anca, Ioana Alina; Jinga, Mariana

    2015-04-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is currently considerably underdiagnosed, setting the need for developing tools to select patients with probability of CD, who warrant further testing. Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) has been shown in previous studies to be a sensitive predictor for CD, but it lacks specificity. Splenic hypotrophy is also noted frequently in celiac patients. Our aim was to evaluate if spleen diameter to RDW ratio can be used as an indicator for CD. We evaluated 15 newly diagnosed CD patients, 52 patients with inflammatory bowel disease, and 35 patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We evaluated the differences in spleen diameter, RDW, and their ratio among the four groups. Two-thirds of the CD patients had elevated RDW, compared to 9% in the IBS group. A small spleen was seen in 80% of the celiacs, compared to 21.9% in the ulcerative colitis group, 10% in the Crohn disease group, and 9% in the IBS group. A spleen diameter to RDW ratio under 6 had a sensitivity of 73.3% and specificity of 88.5% in predicting CD, with an AUROC of 0.737. Spleen diameter to RDW ratio is a simple, widely available score, which can be used to select adult patients with probability of CD. PMID:25881851

  5. Prevalence of Serum Celiac Antibodies in a Multiracial Asian Population-A First Study in the Young Asian Adult Population of Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Theresa Wan-Chen; Chan, Weng-Kai; Leow, Alex Hwong-Ruey; Azmi, Ahmad Najib; Loke, Mun-Fai; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Goh, Khean-Lee

    2015-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated disorder induced by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible persons. The prevalence of CD in Malaysia is unknown. We aim to determine the seroprevalence of CD antibodies and also investigate the correlation between H. pylori infection and CD in the young and healthy multiracial Malaysian population. Methods Healthy young adult volunteers between the ages of 18–30 years were consecutively recruited from June 2012 to May 2014 at the University of Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC), Kuala Lumpur. Serum samples from all the participants were tested for anti-gliadin antibody immunoglobulin A/immunoglobulin G (IgA/IgG) and anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody (tTG) IgA/IgG. Samples positive for both anti-gliadin and anti-tTG were further validated for anti-human endomysial IgA antibodies (EmA). Serological diagnosis of CD was made when anti-gliadin, anti-tTG and anti-EmA were positive. Results 562 qualified participants with mean age 24 ± 2.4 years old were recruited into our study. CD was found in 7 participants where most of them were asymptomatic and unaware of their CD status. The median of anti-gliadin and anti-tTG IgA/IgG value was 38.2 U/ml (interquartile range, 28.3–60.4 U/ml) and 49.2 U/ml (interquartile range, 41.1–65.9 U/ml), respectively. Seroprevalence of CD antibodies was 1.9% (6 out of 324) in female while only 0.4% (1 out of 238) in male. Seroprevalence among Malay was 0.8% (2 of 236), Chinese was 1.7% (3 of 177) and Indian was 1.3% (2 of 149). Overall, seroprevalence of CD antibodies in healthy asymptomatic adults in the Malaysian population was 1.25% (95% CI, 0.78%-1.72%). No significant relationship was discovered between CD and H. pylori infection. Conclusions The seroprevalence of CD antibodies in healthy young adults in the Malaysian population was 1.25% (1 in 100). CD is underdiagnosed and it could be a much greater problem in Malaysia than previously thought. PMID:25799401

  6. Quantitative image analysis of celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Ciaccio, Edward J; Bhagat, Govind; Lewis, Suzanne K; Green, Peter H

    2015-01-01

    We outline the use of quantitative techniques that are currently used for analysis of celiac disease. Image processing techniques can be useful to statistically analyze the pixular data of endoscopic images that is acquired with standard or videocapsule endoscopy. It is shown how current techniques have evolved to become more useful for gastroenterologists who seek to understand celiac disease and to screen for it in suspected patients. New directions for focus in the development of methodology for diagnosis and treatment of this disease are suggested. It is evident that there are yet broad areas where there is potential to expand the use of quantitative techniques for improved analysis in suspected or known celiac disease patients. PMID:25759524

  7. Quantitative image analysis of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Ciaccio, Edward J; Bhagat, Govind; Lewis, Suzanne K; Green, Peter H

    2015-03-01

    We outline the use of quantitative techniques that are currently used for analysis of celiac disease. Image processing techniques can be useful to statistically analyze the pixular data of endoscopic images that is acquired with standard or videocapsule endoscopy. It is shown how current techniques have evolved to become more useful for gastroenterologists who seek to understand celiac disease and to screen for it in suspected patients. New directions for focus in the development of methodology for diagnosis and treatment of this disease are suggested. It is evident that there are yet broad areas where there is potential to expand the use of quantitative techniques for improved analysis in suspected or known celiac disease patients.

  8. Burning Tongue as Initial Presentation of Celiac Disease in an Elderly Woman: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Andrea; Zamulko, Alla

    2016-06-01

    There are few reports in the literature where celiac disease presents with tongue manifestations, although atypical presentations of celiac disease are not uncommon. This case report highlights an atypical presentation of celiac disease in an elderly female. Our patient presented to clinic with complaints of a burning tongue for the past two years as well as occasional loose stools and fatigue. Work-up revealed iron deficiency anemia, zinc deficiency and an abnormal celiac panel. Complete symptom improvement was noted by 10 weeks into the initiation of a gluten free diet. Celiac disease can present at any age and should be considered as a differential in findings of malabsorption and gastrointestinal symptoms.

  9. Celiac disease: how complicated can it get?

    PubMed

    Tjon, Jennifer May-Ling; van Bergen, Jeroen; Koning, Frits

    2010-10-01

    In the small intestine of celiac disease patients, dietary wheat gluten and similar proteins in barley and rye trigger an inflammatory response. While strict adherence to a gluten-free diet induces full recovery in most patients, a small percentage of patients fail to recover. In a subset of these refractory celiac disease patients, an (aberrant) oligoclonal intraepithelial lymphocyte population develops into overt lymphoma. Celiac disease is strongly associated with HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8, as both genotypes predispose for disease development. This association can be explained by the fact that gluten peptides can be presented in HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 molecules on antigen presenting cells. Gluten-specific CD4(+) T cells in the lamina propria respond to these peptides, and this likely enhances cytotoxicity of intraepithelial lymphocytes against the intestinal epithelium. We propose a threshold model for the development of celiac disease, in which the efficiency of gluten presentation to CD4(+) T cells determines the likelihood of developing celiac disease and its complications. Key factors that influence the efficiency of gluten presentation include: (1) the level of gluten intake, (2) the enzyme tissue transglutaminase 2 which modifies gluten into high affinity binding peptides for HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8, (3) the HLA-DQ type, as HLA-DQ2 binds a wider range of gluten peptides than HLA-DQ8, (4) the gene dose of HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8, and finally,(5) additional genetic polymorphisms that may influence T cell reactivity. This threshold model might also help to understand the development of refractory celiac disease and lymphoma.

  10. Celiac disease - nutritional considerations

    MedlinePlus

    Gluten-free diet; Gluten sensitive enteropathy - diet; Celiac sprue - diet ... To follow a gluten-free diet means, you need to avoid all foods, drinks, and medicines made with gluten. This means not eating ...

  11. Symptoms of Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... before they can generate an autoimmune response to gluten and have their blood tested. 3.Any individual ... act in unpredictable ways. Some people can eat gluten for fifty years and then develop celiac disease, ...

  12. Celiac Disease Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... the complications a person may experience, such as malnutrition , malabsorption , and the involvement of other organs. Tests ... someone has signs and symptoms suggesting celiac disease, malnutrition , and/or malabsorption . The symptoms are often nonspecific ...

  13. Pediatric Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sprue Association/USA Gluten Intoloerance Group of North America NASPGHAN Foundation Supporters Educational support for the NASPGHAN ... NASPGHAN) Celiac Disease Eosinophilic Esophagitis Pediatric IBD Nutrition & Obesity Reflux & GERD Research & Grants Our Supporters Site Map © ...

  14. Celiac Disease in Women with Hip Fractures

    PubMed Central

    LeBoff, Meryl S.; Cobb, Haley; Gao, Lisa Y.; Hawkes, William; Yu-Yahiro, Janet; Kolatkar, Nikheel S.; Magaziner, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Objective Celiac disease is associated with decreased bone density, however, the risk of fractures in celiac disease patients is unclear. We compared the prevalence of celiac disease between a group of women with hip fractures and a group of women undergoing elective joint replacement surgery and the association between celiac disease and vitamin D levels. Methods Two hundred eight community dwelling and postmenopausal women were recruited from Boston, MA (n=81) and Baltimore, MD (n=127). We measured tissue transglutaminase IgA by ELISA to diagnose celiac disease and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels by radioimmunoassay in both women with hip fractures (n=157) and the control group (n=51), all of whom were from Boston. Subjects were excluded if they took any medications or had medical conditions that might affect bone. Results Median serum 25(OH)D levels were significantly lower (p< 0.0001) in the hip fracture cohorts compared to the elective joint replacement cohort (14.1 ng/ml vs. 21.3 ng/ml, respectively). There were no differences in the percentage of subjects with a positive tissue transglutaminase in the women with hip fractures versus the control group (1.91% vs. 1.61%, respectively). Conclusion Vitamin D levels are markedly reduced in women with hip fractures, however hip fracture patients did not show a higher percentage of positive tissue transglutaminase levels compared with controls. These data suggest that routine testing for celiac disease among hip fracture patients may not prove useful, although larger prospective studies among hip fracture subjects are needed. PMID:23732553

  15. Prominent gastroduodenal artery: Endosonographic sign of celiac artery stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Gonen, Can; Sürmelioğlu, Ali; Tilki, Metin; Kiliçoğlu, Gamze

    2016-01-01

    Celiac artery (CA) stenosis is a relatively common finding in patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). In the presence of CA stenosis, arterial blood supply to the celiac territory is usually sustained from the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) through well-developed collaterals. In this paper, the authors report endosonographically identified prominent gastroduodenal artery as the sign of CA stenosis for the first time. Uncovering previously unidentified vascular abnormality, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has improved patient management. The patient had uneventful collateral preserving PD. PMID:27803908

  16. Oral enzyme therapy for celiac sprue

    PubMed Central

    Bethune, Michael T; Khosla, Chaitan

    2012-01-01

    Celiac sprue is an inflammatory disease of the small intestine caused by dietary gluten and treated by adherence to a lifelong gluten-free diet. The recent identification of immunodominant gluten peptides, the discovery of their cogent properties, and the elucidation of the mechanisms by which they engender immunopathology in genetically-susceptible individuals have advanced our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of this complex disease, enabling the rational design of new therapeutic strategies. The most clinically advanced of these is oral enzyme therapy, in which enzymes capable of proteolyzing gluten (i.e. glutenases) are delivered to the alimentary tract of a celiac sprue patient to detoxify ingested gluten in situ. In this chapter, we discuss the key challenges for discovery and preclinical development of oral enzyme therapies for celiac sprue. Methods for lead identification, assay development, gram-scale production and formulation, and lead optimization for next-generation proteases are described and critically assessed. PMID:22208988

  17. Intestinal permeability to (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA in children with Crohn's disease and celiac disease

    SciTech Connect

    Turck, D.; Ythier, H.; Maquet, E.; Deveaux, M.; Marchandise, X.; Farriaux, J.P.; Fontaine, G.

    1987-07-01

    (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA was used as a probe molecule to assess intestinal permeability in 7 healthy control adults, 11 control children, 17 children with Crohn's disease, and 6 children with untreated celiac disease. After subjects fasted overnight, 75 kBq/kg (= 2 microCi/kg) /sup 51/Cr-labeled EDTA was given by mouth; 24-h urinary excretion of (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA was measured and expressed as a percentage of the total oral dose. Mean and SD were as follows: control adults 1.47 +/- 0.62, control children 1.59 +/- 0.55, and patients with Crohn's disease or celiac disease 5.35 +/- 1.94. The difference between control children and patients was statistically significant (p less than 0.001). These results show that intestinal permeability to (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA is increased among children with active or inactive Crohn's disease affecting small bowel only or small bowel and colon, and with untreated celiac disease. The (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA permeability test could facilitate the decision to perform more extensive investigations in children suspected of small bowel disease who have atypical or poor clinical and biological symptomatology.

  18. Pulmonary embolism following celiac plexus block and neurolysis

    PubMed Central

    Raizada, Miles S.; Kelly, Seth M.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of acute pain in chronic disease requires the physician to choose from an arsenal of pain management techniques tailored to the individual patient. Celiac plexus block and neurolysis are commonly employed for the management of chronic abdominal pain, especially in debilitating conditions such as cancer or chronic pancreatitis. The procedure is safe, well tolerated, and produces few complications. We present a case of pulmonary embolism following a celiac plexus block and neurolysis procedure. Further study is required to determine if celiac plexus ablation, alone or in combination with other risk factors, may contribute to increased risk for pulmonary embolism in patients seeking treatment for chronic upper abdominal pain conditions. PMID:27365890

  19. Review and practice guidelines for celiac disease in 2014.

    PubMed

    Nadhem, Omar N; Azeez, Ghassan; Smalligan, Roger D; Urban, Steven

    2015-04-01

    Celiac disease, or gluten-sensitive enteropathy, is defined as a state of heightened immunologic responsiveness to ingested gluten (from wheat, barley, or rye) in genetically susceptible individuals. Ingestion of the offending proteins leads to inflammation and intestinal mucosal damage, which may result in a spectrum of gastrointestinal symptoms, nutritional abnormalities, and systemic complications ranging from anemia and osteoporosis to secondary autoimmunity and malignancy. The genetic influence in the pathogenesis of celiac disease is indicated by its familial occurrence. Celiac disease does not develop unless a person has alleles that encode for human leukocyte antigen DQ2 or DQ8 proteins. The clinical picture of celiac disease has changed considerably during the past 30 years. Diarrhea, which was the presenting symptom in > 90% of celiac disease patients before 1981, is now the chief complaint in < 40%. In contrast, the increased frequency of atypical celiac disease presentations, including anemia and bone disease, is revealed by the widespread availability of serologic testing. An association between celiac disease and autoimmune disorders, such as type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid disease, and Sjögren's syndrome, has been well documented. The tissue transglutaminase immunoglobulin antibody and the endomysial immunoglobulin antibody are the most sensitive and specific serologic tests, respectively, for identifying individuals who need to undergo an intestinal biopsy. If the suspicion of celiac disease is high, intestinal biopsy should be pursued even if serologic tests are negative. The gold standard for the diagnosis of celiac disease is a small bowel biopsy showing villous atrophy. The treatment for celiac disease is lifelong adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD). Despite the proven benefits of the GFD, it can be exceedingly difficult to completely avoid gluten-containing foods, and adherence to a GFD is estimated to be only 45% to 80%.

  20. Extended HLA-D region haplotype associated with celiac disease

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, M.D.; Smith, J.R.; Austin, R.K.; Kelleher, D.; Nepom, G.T.; Volk, B.; Kagnoff, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    Celiac disease has one of the strongest associations with HLA (human leukocyte antigen) class II markers of the known HLA-linked diseases. This association is primarily with the class II serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2. The authors previously described a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) characterized by the presence of a 4.0-kilobase Rsa I fragment derived from an HLA class II ..beta..-chain gene, which distinguishes the class II HLA haplotype of celiac disease patients from those of many serologically matched controls. They now report the isolation of this ..beta..-chain gene from a bacteriophage genomic library constructed from the DNA of a celiac disease patient. Based on restriction mapping and differential hybridization with class II cDNA and oligonucleotide probes, this gene was identified as one encoding an HLA-DP ..beta..-chain. This celiac disease-associated HLA-DP ..beta..-chain gene was flanked by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..-chain genes and, therefore, was probably in its normal chromosomal location. The HLA-DP..cap alpha..-chain genes of celiac disease patients also were studied by RFLP analysis. Celiac disease is associated with a subset of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 haplotypes characterized by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-chain gene RFLPs. Within the celiac-disease patient population, the joint segregation of these HLA-DP genes with those encoding the serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2 indicates: (i) that the class II HLA haplotype associated with celiac disease is extended throughout the entire HLA-D region, and (ii) that celiac-disease susceptibility genes may reside as far centromeric on this haplotype as the HLA-DP subregion.

  1. Folate Insufficiency Due to Celiac Disease in a 49-Year-Old Woman of Southeast Asian-Indian Ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Datta Mitra, Ananya; Gupta, Asha; Jialal, Ishwarlal

    2016-08-01

    The clinical presentation of celiac disease has evolved from chronic diarrhea and malnutrition to mild nutrient insufficiencies. Recently diagnosed adults with celiac disease should be assessed for micronutrient deficiencies because early institution of a gluten-free diet (GFD) prevents morbidity and reduces the incidence of gastrointestinal malignant neoplasms and osteoporosis. In this report, we present the case of a 49-year-old woman of Southeast Asian-Indian descent living in the United States who had folate insufficiency, as manifested by low serum and red blood cell (RBC) folate levels. Further investigation, including serologic testing and intestinal biopsy, confirmed a diagnosis of celiac disease and other nutrient deficiencies. Managing the condition of this patient with folate supplements and implementation of a recommended GFD reversed the folate insufficiency. In conclusion, when serum and/or RBC levels are low in a person of Southeast Asian-Indian descent living in a country with folate fortification of the grain supply, such as the United States, the medical team needs to look for an organic cause, as in our patient, to diagnose and manage celiac disease early and, hopefully, forestall complications. PMID:27406144

  2. Evaluation of HLA-DQ2/DQ8 genotype in patients with celiac disease hospitalised in 2012 at the Department of Paediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Bąk-Romaniszyn, Leokadia; Cywińska-Bernas, Agnieszka; Zeman, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Celiac disease (CD) is a permanent intolerance to gluten that occurs in genetically predisposed individuals and leads to small intestinal mucosa damage. According to ESPGHAN guidelines from 2012, CD can be diagnosed in a patient with characteristic clinical symptoms, in whom, anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (> 10 times the upper limit) are found, endomysial antibodies (EMA) is confirmed and a positive genetic test is obtained. In these conditions no small-bowel biopsies are required. Aim Evaluation of the presence of HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 haplotypes in children with previously diagnosed CD, hospitalised in 2012 at the Department of Paediatrics and Immunology and/or the Gastroenterological Outpatient Clinic, and their relatives. Material and methods Blood samples of 22 subjects, including 9 children with CD diagnosed on the basis of clinical symptoms, serological investigations and small-intestine biopsy, 7 diagnosed on the basis of clinical symptoms and serological investigations, 2 with the suspicion of CD on the basis of clinical symptoms and 4 relatives of a child with CD. Methods: HLA-DQ2/DQ8 test, automatic evaluation by EUROArrayScan. Results The presence of HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8 genotype was confirmed in 16 children with CD diagnosed on the basis of clinical symptoms and serological tests with/without intestinal biopsy, in 2 with the suspicion of CD and in 1 relative of a celiac child. Conclusions The evaluation of HLA-DQ2/DQ8 haplotype confirms the genetic predisposition to CD in subjects with the disease diagnosed previously on the basis of clinical symptoms, serological tests or intestinal biopsy. Genetic testing is particularly indicated for the diagnosis of CD in infants consuming gluten for a short time and in small amounts. PMID:24868296

  3. Mucosal tissue transglutaminase expression in celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Villanacci, Vincenzo; Not, Tarcisio; Sblattero, Daniele; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Chirdo, Fernando; Galletti, Anna; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Tissue transglutaminase (tTG) plays an important role in celiac disease pathogenesis and antibodies to tTG are a diagnostic marker of gluten-sensitive enteropathy. The aim of this study was to investigate the localization of tTG in the duodenal mucosa in control tissues and in different histological stages of celiac disease by using a commercial and a novel set of anti-tTG monoclonal antibodies, to see whether this assessment can be useful for diagnostic purpose. The distribution of tTG was firstly evaluated in 18 untreated celiac patients by using a commercial monoclonal antibody (CUB7402) against tissue transglutaminase enzyme and directed against the loop-core region of the enzyme. Thereafter, in further 30 untreated celiac patients we employed three newly characterized anti-tTG monoclonal antibodies produced against recombinant human-tTG. The epitopes recognized are located in three distinct domains of the protein corresponding to the core, C1 and C2 protein structure. Eleven age- and sex-matched patients with chronic duodenitis acted as controls. All subjects underwent upper endoscopy to obtain biopsy samples from the duodenum. Overall, we found that (i) tTG is equally expressed in CD at different stages of disease; (ii) tTG is expressed, at similar level, in CD and controls with duodenitis. Assessment of tTG level in biopsy samples by immunohistochemical methods is not useful in the clinical diagnostic work-up of CD. PMID:18373732

  4. Comparative Evaluation of Retrocrural versus Transaortic Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block for Pain Relief in Patients with Upper Abdominal Malignancy: A Retrospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Tewari, Saipriya; Agarwal, Anil; Dhiraaj, Sanjay; Gautam, Sujeet K; Khuba, Sandeep; Madabushi, Rajashree; Shamshery, Chetna; Kumar, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare retrocrural versus transaortic techniques for neurolytic celiac plexus block (NCPB) in patients suffering from upper abdominal malignancy. Methods: In this retrospective observational study between October 2013 and April 2015, 64 patients with inoperable upper abdominal malignancy received fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous NCPB in our institute. Their case files were reviewed and the patients were divided into two groups depending on the technique used to perform NCPB: retrocrural (Group R; n = 36) versus transaortic (Group T; n = 28). The primary outcome measure was pain as assessed with a numeric rating scale (NRS) from 0 to 10; the secondary outcome measures were morphine consumption per day (M), quality of life (QOL) as assessed by comparing the percent of positive responses in each group, and complications if any. These were noted and analyzed prior to intervention and then on day 1, weeks 1, 2, 3, and months 1, 2, 3, 6 following NCPB. Results: Patients in Group R had significantly reduced NRS pain scores at week 1, 2, 3, month 1 and 2 as compared to Group T (P < 0.05). Morphine consumption also reduced significantly in Group R at day 1, week 1, 2, and 3 (P < 0.05). QOL was found to be comparable between the groups, and no major complications were noted. Conclusion: Retrocrural NCPB provides superior pain relief along with a reduction in morphine consumption as compared to transaortic NCPB in patients with pain due to upper abdominal malignancy. PMID:27559259

  5. Persistent Intraepithelial Lymphocytosis in Celiac Patients Adhering to Gluten-Free Diet Is Not Abolished Despite a Gluten Contamination Elimination Diet.

    PubMed

    Zanini, Barbara; Marullo, Monica; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Salemme, Marianna; Lanzarotto, Francesco; Ricci, Chiara; Lanzini, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The gluten-free diet (GFD) is the only validated treatment for celiac disease (CD), but despite strict adherence, complete mucosal recovery is rarely obtained. The aim of our study was to assess whether complete restitutio ad integrum could be achieved by adopting a restrictive diet (Gluten Contamination Elimination Diet, GCED) or may depend on time of exposure to GFD. Two cohorts of CD patients, with persisting Marsh II/Grade A lesion at duodenal biopsy after 12-18 months of GFD (early control) were identified. Patients in Cohort A were re-biopsied after a three-month GCED (GCED control) and patients in Cohort B were re-biopsied after a minimum of two years on a standard GFD subsequent to early control (late control). Ten patients in Cohort A and 19 in Cohort B completed the study protocol. There was no change in the classification of duodenal biopsies in both cohorts. The number of intraepithelial lymphocytes, TCRγδ+ (T-Cell Receptor gamma delta) T cell and eosinophils significantly decreased at GCED control (Cohort A) and at late control (Cohort B), compared to early control. Duodenal intraepithelial lymphocytosis persisting in CD patients during GFD is not eliminated by a GCED and is independent of the length of GFD. [NCT 02711696]. PMID:27571100

  6. Persistent Intraepithelial Lymphocytosis in Celiac Patients Adhering to Gluten-Free Diet Is Not Abolished Despite a Gluten Contamination Elimination Diet

    PubMed Central

    Zanini, Barbara; Marullo, Monica; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Salemme, Marianna; Lanzarotto, Francesco; Ricci, Chiara; Lanzini, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The gluten-free diet (GFD) is the only validated treatment for celiac disease (CD), but despite strict adherence, complete mucosal recovery is rarely obtained. The aim of our study was to assess whether complete restitutio ad integrum could be achieved by adopting a restrictive diet (Gluten Contamination Elimination Diet, GCED) or may depend on time of exposure to GFD. Two cohorts of CD patients, with persisting Marsh II/Grade A lesion at duodenal biopsy after 12–18 months of GFD (early control) were identified. Patients in Cohort A were re-biopsied after a three-month GCED (GCED control) and patients in Cohort B were re-biopsied after a minimum of two years on a standard GFD subsequent to early control (late control). Ten patients in Cohort A and 19 in Cohort B completed the study protocol. There was no change in the classification of duodenal biopsies in both cohorts. The number of intraepithelial lymphocytes, TCRγδ+ (T-Cell Receptor gamma delta) T cell and eosinophils significantly decreased at GCED control (Cohort A) and at late control (Cohort B), compared to early control. Duodenal intraepithelial lymphocytosis persisting in CD patients during GFD is not eliminated by a GCED and is independent of the length of GFD. [NCT 02711696] PMID:27571100

  7. Association between celiac disease and chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Casella, Giovanni; Viganò, Davide; Romano Settanni, Carlo; Morelli, Olivia; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Baldini, Vittorio; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease is characterized by a gluten-induced damage of the small bowel in sensitive individuals that may cause malabsorption. Non-intestinal inflammatory diseases may trigger immunologic gluten intolerance in susceptible people and the HCV virus may be considered as a suitable candidate. Interferon therapy could precipitate symptom onset in subjects with silent celiac disease. In fact, symptoms such as diarrhea, anemia, and weight loss may occur during interferon therapy and are associated with serological positivity of anti-tranglutaminase antibodies. To date, considering the available literature data, it is very difficult to support a firm association between HCV chronic hepatitis and celiac disease. Thus, such a serological screening in HCV patients before starting interferon therapy should not be recommended. However, serology for celiac disease must be considered in patients who develop diarrhea and/or weight loss during such therapy. PMID:27458507

  8. Association between celiac disease and chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Casella, Giovanni; Viganò, Davide; Romano Settanni, Carlo; Morelli, Olivia; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Baldini, Vittorio; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease is characterized by a gluten-induced damage of the small bowel in sensitive individuals that may cause malabsorption. Non-intestinal inflammatory diseases may trigger immunologic gluten intolerance in susceptible people and the HCV virus may be considered as a suitable candidate. Interferon therapy could precipitate symptom onset in subjects with silent celiac disease. In fact, symptoms such as diarrhea, anemia, and weight loss may occur during interferon therapy and are associated with serological positivity of anti-tranglutaminase antibodies. To date, considering the available literature data, it is very difficult to support a firm association between HCV chronic hepatitis and celiac disease. Thus, such a serological screening in HCV patients before starting interferon therapy should not be recommended. However, serology for celiac disease must be considered in patients who develop diarrhea and/or weight loss during such therapy. PMID:27458507

  9. A Prospective Randomized Double Blind Placebo Controlled Trial on the Efficacy of Ethanol Celiac Plexus Neurolysis in Patients with Operable Pancreatic and Periampullary Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lavu, Harish; Lengel, Harry B; Sell, Naomi M; Baiocco, Joseph A; Kennedy, Eugene P; Yeo, Theresa P; Burrell, Sherry A; Winter, Jordan M; Hegarty, Sarah; Leiby, Benjamin E.; Yeo, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    Background Ethanol celiac plexus neurolysis (ECPN) has been shown to be effective in reducing cancer-related pain in patients with locally advanced pancreatic and periampullary adenocarcinoma (PPA). This study examined its efficacy in patients undergoing PPA resection. Study Design 485 patients participated in this prospective, randomized, double blind placebo controlled trial. Patients were stratified by preoperative pain and disease resectability. They received either ECPN (50% ethanol) or 0.9% normal saline placebo control. The primary endpoint was short and long-term pain and secondary endpoints included postoperative morbidity, QOL and overall survival. Results Data from 467 patients were analyzed. The primary endpoint, the percentage of PPA patients experiencing a worsening of pain compared to preoperative baseline for resectable patients, was not different between the ethanol and saline groups in either the resectable/pain stratum (22% vs 18%, RR 1.23 (0.34, 4.46)), or the resectable/no pain stratum (37% vs 34%, RR 1.10 (0.67, 1.81)). On multivariable analysis of resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) patients, there was a significant reduction in pain in the resectable/pain group, suggesting that surgical resection of the malignancy alone (independent of ECPN) decrements pain to a significant degree. Conclusions In this study, we have demonstrated a significant reduction in pain following surgical resection of PPA. However the addition of ECPN did not synergize to result in a further reduction in pain, and in fact its effect may have been masked by surgical resection. Given this, we cannot recommend the use of ECPN to mitigate cancer related pain in resectable PPA patients. PMID:25667135

  10. Mucosal Healing and the Risk of Ischemic Heart Disease or Atrial Fibrillation in Patients with Celiac Disease; A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Lebwohl, Benjamin; Emilsson, Louise; Fröbert, Ole; Einstein, Andrew J.; Green, Peter H. R.; Ludvigsson, Jonas F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with celiac disease (CD), characterized histologically by villous atrophy (VA) of the small intestine, have an increased risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD) and atrial fibrillation (AF), risks that persist for years after commencing the gluten-free diet. It is unknown whether persistent VA on follow-up biopsy, rather than mucosal healing, affects the risk of IHD or AF. Methods We identified patients with histologic evidence of CD diagnosed at all 28 pathology departments in Sweden. Among patients who underwent a follow-up small intestinal biopsy, we compared patients with persistent VA to those who showed histologic improvement, with regard to the development of IHD (angina pectoris or myocardial infarction) or AF. Results Among patients with CD and a follow-up biopsy (n = 7,440), the median age at follow-up biopsy was 25 years, with 1,063 (14%) patients who were ≥60 years at the time of follow-up biopsy. Some 196 patients developed IHD and 205 patients developed AF. After adjusting for age, gender, duration of CD, calendar period, and educational attainment, there was no significant effect of persistent VA on IHD (adjusted HR 0.97; 95%CI 0.73–1.30). Adjusting for diabetes had a negligible effect (adjusted HR 0.98; 95%CI 0.73–1.31). There was no significant association between persistent VA and the risk of AF (adjusted HR 0.98; 95%CI 0.74–1.30). Conclusions In this population-based study of patients with CD, persistent VA on follow-up biopsy was not associated with an increased risk of IHD or AF. Failed mucosal healing does not influence the risk of these cardiac events. PMID:25635403

  11. Diet and psoriasis, part II: celiac disease and role of a gluten-free diet.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Bhavnit K; Millsop, Jillian W; Debbaneh, Maya; Koo, John; Linos, Eleni; Liao, Wilson

    2014-08-01

    Patients with psoriasis have been shown to have a higher prevalence of other autoimmune diseases including celiac disease, a condition marked by sensitivity to dietary gluten. A number of studies suggest that psoriasis and celiac disease share common genetic and inflammatory pathways. Here we review the epidemiologic association between psoriasis and celiac disease and perform a meta-analysis to determine whether patients with psoriasis more frequently harbor serologic markers of celiac disease. We also examine whether a gluten-free diet can improve psoriatic skin disease.

  12. Firing of an Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator: An Unusual Presentation of Celiac Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Jeffry; Liu, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Celiac crisis, an atypical presentation of celiac disease, is characterized by acute diarrhea and severe metabolic derangements. This diagnosis is often missed in the differential of acute diarrheal illness. Our patient is a 69-year-old man who presented with ICD firing and was found to have profound metabolic derangements. Further evaluation revealed undiagnosed celiac disease and his symptoms resolved with a gluten-free diet. Celiac crisis should be considered in all patients presenting with acute diarrhea, metabolic acidosis, and severe electrolyte abnormalities as management can be life-saving. PMID:27761475

  13. Non responsive celiac disease due to coexisting hereditary fructose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Bharadia, Lalit; Shivpuri, Deepak

    2012-04-01

    Celiac disease is associated with several genetic disorders, but its association with hereditary fructose intolerance is rare. Hereditary fructose intolerance is a rare autosomal recessive disease of fructose metabolism presenting as vomiting after intake of fructose. An association between these two distinct genetic gastrointestinal disorders is important as treatment failure of celiac disease calls for careful evaluation for hereditary fructose intolerance. We report a patient with an association of these two disorders.

  14. Dental and Oral Considerations in Pediatric Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Karlin, Sara; Karlin, Ellen; Meiller, Timothy; Bashirelahi, Nasir

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is the world's most common genetic food intolerance disorder. Children with celiac disease cannot tolerate gluten, a storage protein in wheat, rye, and barley. The first recognizable symptom in children is often an oral manifestation, rather than the typical gastrointestinal symptoms. The purpose of this paper is to review the oral and dental manifestations of CD to help pediatric dentists identify and refer atypically symptomatic patients to their pediatricians. PMID:27620516

  15. MicroRNA-449a Overexpression, Reduced NOTCH1 Signals and Scarce Goblet Cells Characterize the Small Intestine of Celiac Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tinto, Nadia; Montanaro, Donatella; Capobianco, Valentina; Izzo, Valentina; Tucci, Francesca; Troncone, Giancarlo; Greco, Luigi; Sacchetti, Lucia

    2011-01-01

    MiRNAs play a relevant role in regulating gene expression in a variety of physiological and pathological conditions including autoimmune disorders. MiRNAs are also important in the differentiation and function of the mouse intestinal epithelium. Our study was aimed to look for miRNA-based modulation of gene expression in celiac small intestine, and particularly for genes involved in cell intestinal differentiation/proliferation mechanisms. A cohort of 40 children (20 with active CD, 9 on a gluten-free diet (GFD), and 11 controls), were recruited at the Paediatrics Department (University of Naples Federico II). The expression of 365 human miRNAs was quantified by TaqMan low-density arrays. We used bioinformatics to predict putative target genes of miRNAs and to select biological pathways. The presence of NOTCH1, HES1, KLF4, MUC-2, Ki67 and beta-catenin proteins in the small intestine of CD and control children was tested by immunohistochemistry. The expression of about 20% of the miRNAs tested differed between CD and control children. We found that high miR-449a levels targeted and reduced both NOTCH1 and KLF4 in HEK-293 cells. NOTCH1, KLF4 signals and the number of goblet cells were lower in small intestine of children with active CD and in those on a GFD than in controls, whereas more nuclear beta-catenin staining, as a sign of the WNT pathway activation, and more Ki67 staining, as sign of proliferation, were present in crypts from CD patients than in controls. In conclusion we first demonstrate a miRNA mediated gene regulation in small intestine of CD patients. We also highlighted a reduced NOTCH1 pathway in our patients, irrespective of whether the disease was active or not. We suggest that NOTCH pathway could be constitutively altered in the celiac small intestine and could drive the increased proliferation and the decreased differentiation of intestinal cells towards the secretory goblet cell lineage. PMID:22194996

  16. New and Developing Therapies for Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Suzanne K.; Green, Peter H. R.

    2009-01-01

    The treatment for celiac disease, a removal of gluten in the diet, is safe and effective for the vast majority of patients. There is a large body of evidence that the diagnosis and treatment of those with celiac disease ensures considerable health benefits. Although a gluten-free diet is the principal treatment for celiac disease, it is relatively expensive, inconvenient and difficult to adhere to. For these reasons, there is interest in developing alternative therapies. Emerging research for the treatment of celiac disease has focused on three areas: to decrease gluten exposure, to modify intestinal permeability and to modulate immune activation. Therapies developed thus far consist of enzymes designed to digest gluten and the use of inhibitors of paracellular permeability to decrease the migration of gluten peptides into the lamina propria. Other potential therapeutic maneuvers include the binding of gluten by polymers, the use of tissue transglutaminase (TTG) inhibitors and DQ2 or DQ8 blockers, or modulation of cytokine production. While all represent new and exciting therapies, an ideal therapy should have virtually no side effects similar to a gluten-free diet. A pharmaceutical agent may be used on an intermittent basis, such as following occasional gluten exposure or on a chronic basis to mitigate the effects of potential inadvertent ingestion of gluten. PMID:21180558

  17. Thermoablation of Liver Metastases: Efficacy of Temporary Celiac Plexus Block

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, A.N. Schaefer, M.; Werk, M.; Pech, M.; Wieners, G.; Cho, C.; Ricke, J.

    2005-05-15

    Purpose. To determine the efficacy of celiac plexus block during thermoablation of liver metastases. Methods. Fifty-five consecutive patients underwent thermoablation therapy of liver tumors by laser-induced thermotherapy. Twenty-nine patients received a temporary celiac plexus block, 26 patients acted as control group. In both groups fentanyl and midazolam were administered intravenously upon request of the patient. The duration of the intervention, consumption of opiates, and individual pain sensations were documented. Results. No complications resulting from the celiac plexus block were recorded. Celiac plexus block significantly reduced the amount of pain medication used during thermoablation therapy of liver tumors (with block, 2.45 {mu}g fentanyl per kg body weight; without block, 3.58 {mu}g fentanyl per kg body weight, p < 0.05; midazolam consumption was not reduced) in patients with metastases {<=}5 mm from the liver capsule. For metastases farther away from the capsule no significant differences in opiate consumption were seen. Celiac plexus block reduced the time for thermoablation significantly (178 min versus 147 min, p < 0.05) no matter how far the metastases were from the liver capsule. Average time needed to set the block was 12 min (range 9-15 min); additional costs for the block were marginal. As expected (as pain medications were given according to individual patients' needs) pain indices did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusion. In patients with liver metastases {<=}5 mm from the liver capsule, celiac plexus block reduces the amount of opiates necessary, simplifying patient monitoring. In addition celiac plexus block reduces intervention time, with positive effects on overall workflow for all patients.

  18. Influence of religiosity on the quality of life and on pain intensity in chronic pancreatitis patients after neurolytic celiac plexus block: case-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Basiński, Andrzej; Stefaniak, Tomasz; Stadnyk, Magdalena; Sheikh, Arfan; Vingerhoets, Ad J J M

    2013-03-01

    The quality of life in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) is reduced due to their suffering of high levels of pain. It has been presented that quality of life can also be linked to religiosity and/or spirituality. The aim of this study is to assess the influence of religious practices on the quality of life and on the subjective level of pain in CP patients. Ninety-two patients (37 women and 55 men) with chronic pancreatitis were treated invasively for pain with neurolytic celiac plexus block (NCPB). The religiosity of the patients was recorded and served as a dichotomizer. Group 1 was for patients who claimed to have no contact with the church or to have very sporadic contact (N = 35 patients). Group 2 was for patients who claimed to have deep faith and were regular participants at church activities (N = 57 patients). Visual analogue scale was used to assess pain, while the quality of life was measured by using QLQ C-30 questionnaire adapted for chronic pancreatitis patients in Polish population. The patients were assessed prior to the pain-relieving intervention and subsequently 2 and 8 weeks after it. The intensity of pain was reduced in both groups significantly after performing the NCPB. Patients who declared a deep faith reported higher level of pain on the VAS scale prior to intervention than non-religious patients. Quality of life in both groups of patients significantly improved after NCPB. Following NCPB, global quality of life in patients who declared higher religiosity/church attendance was significantly higher (79.88) than for those patients who have no contact or sporadic contact with the church (44.21, P < 0.05). NCPB resulted in significant reduction of pain and increase in quality of life in both groups of patients with CP. Nevertheless, in the group declaring higher religiosity/church attendance, reported pain was higher, but, despite that, quality of life better. It may be concluded that religious practices might serve as an additional

  19. Collagenous gastritis associated with lymphocytic gastritis and celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Stancu, M; De Petris, G; Palumbo, T P; Lev, R

    2001-12-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare disorder, with only 8 cases reported in the literature, 2 in children and 6 in adults. We report an additional case of collagenous gastritis in a 42-year-old man with celiac disease. A thickened (>10 microm) subepithelial collagen band with entrapped capillaries, fibroblasts, and inflammatory cells was seen in the stomach, associated with lymphocytic gastritis. The duodenal mucosa showed severe villous atrophy but no subepithelial collagen deposition. No evidence of lymphocytic or collagenous colitis was found in the colon. The patient became symptom-free on a gluten exclusion diet and showed partial improvement of histopathologic findings after 3 months. Collagenous gastritis is a rare disease, but a wider recognition of its histopathologic features and clinical associations may bring more cases to light and provide additional clues in determining its etiology and pathogenesis. PMID:11735694

  20. Celiac disease: an immune dysregulation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Levy, Joseph; Bernstein, Leora; Silber, Nicole

    2014-12-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic immune-mediated condition that develops in genetically predisposed individuals. It is characterized by the presence of circulating auto-antibodies in addition to an enteropathy and at times, other extra-intestinal manifestations triggered by exposure to the gliadin fraction of gluten, a family of proteins found in wheat, barley, and rye. There seems to be a rise in reported adverse reactions to gluten, an entity currently termed non-celiac gluten (or perhaps more accurately, wheat) sensitivity, where neither the enteropathy nor the auto-antibodies are present. Celiac disease has protean extra-intestinal manifestations, and an accurate diagnosis should be sought in people suffering from seemingly unrelated complaints, such as fatigue, anorexia, delayed puberty, short stature, decreased bone density, unusual skin rashes, unexplained iron deficiency, and infertility. The presence of an enteropathy, in conjunction with the positive serology, is considered the diagnostic gold standard for making the diagnosis of celiac disease. It is important to stress that the elimination of gluten, even in asymptomatic patients, brings about health benefits, particularly in relation to bone health, as well as a decrease in the incidence of small bowel malignancy, especially lymphoma. Better understanding of the pathophysiology of celiac disease and the molecular mechanisms involved in antigen recognition and processing has provided the impetus for the development of pharmacologic agents that might block the recognition of gluten and its conversion to a toxic antigenic target. Inhibition of tight junction dysregulation could also prevent or minimize the damage triggered by gluten. Work on genetically modified wheat cultivars has progressed, and the possibility of a vaccine to block the immune mediated trigger is being actively investigated. Education and guidance by a knowledgeable nutritionist or registered dietitian can go a long way in minimizing the

  1. [Peritoneal dialysis in a patient with right hemiparesis, lupus nephritis, significant insufficiency of arteries of aortic arch and celiac disease: case report].

    PubMed

    Altabas, Karmela; Crne, Natasa; Franjić, Björn Dario; Pavlović, Drasko; Josipović, Josipa

    2012-10-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is a method of choice in patients in whom there are difficulties concerning creation of AV fistula. A 38-year old female patient came to our hospital because of a need of making an AV fistula. She had end-stage renal insufficiency of unknown origin. She had a right hemiparesis with a contracture of the right fist and epilepsy because of the stroke she suffered in 1993. After doing the diagnostics, we have found that patient had lupus nephritis, occlusion of brachiocephalic trunk, right and left common carotid artery and left subclavian artery. We also diagnosed celiac disease and a significant anemia. It was not possible to form an AV fistula, as it was not possible to do an assisted PD. Because of the right hemiparesis and contracture of the right fist, the possibility of performing PD independently was questionable. Despite the handicap, the patient had strong motivation and she managed to master the technique of PD independently. Even though it was estimated that she had a high risk score for applying anesthesia (ASA IV), the insertion of the peritoneal catheter went without complications. Because of the comorbidity, especially because of the significant stenosis and occlusions of the arteries of aortic arch, the kidney transplantation will not be performed. In the last fifteen months, the patient is performing PD independently, without any infectious complications, she is feeling well and is satisfied with the quality of her life. The consequences of the renal insufficiency are under control, systemic lupus erythematosus is, with a low dose of corticosteroids, in a steady state, malnutrition is corrected, but there is still hypoalbuminemia noted.

  2. Ingestion of oats and barley in patients with celiac disease mobilizes cross-reactive T cells activated by avenin peptides and immuno-dominant hordein peptides.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Melinda Y; Tye-Din, Jason A; Stewart, Jessica A; Schmitz, Frederike; Dudek, Nadine L; Hanchapola, Iresha; Purcell, Anthony W; Anderson, Robert P

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a common CD4(+) T cell mediated enteropathy driven by gluten in wheat, rye, and barley. Whilst clinical feeding studies generally support the safety of oats ingestion in CD, the avenin protein from oats can stimulate intestinal gluten-reactive T cells isolated from some CD patients in vitro. Our objective was to establish whether ingestion of oats or other grains toxic in CD stimulate an avenin-specific T cell response in vivo. We fed participants a meal of oats (100 g/day over 3 days) to measure the in vivo polyclonal avenin-specific T cell responses to peptides contained within comprehensive avenin peptide libraries in 73 HLA-DQ2.5(+) CD patients. Grain cross-reactivity was investigated using oral challenge with wheat, barley, and rye. Avenin-specific responses were observed in 6/73 HLA-DQ2.5(+) CD patients (8%), against four closely related peptides. Oral barley challenge efficiently induced cross-reactive avenin/hordein-specific T cells in most CD patients, whereas wheat or rye challenge did not. In vitro, immunogenic avenin peptides were susceptible to digestive endopeptidases and showed weak HLA-DQ2.5 binding stability. Our findings indicate that CD patients possess T cells capable of responding to immuno-dominant hordein epitopes and homologous avenin peptides ex vivo, but the frequency and consistency of these T cells in blood is substantially higher after oral challenge with barley compared to oats. The low rates of T cell activation after a substantial oats challenge (100 g/d) suggests that doses of oats commonly consumed are insufficient to cause clinical relapse, and supports the safety of oats demonstrated in long-term feeding studies.

  3. Pattern of thyroid, celiac, and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide autoantibodies coexistence with type 1 diabetes mellitus in patients from Southwestern Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hakami, Ahmed M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the seroprevalence of coexisting autoantibodies among type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) patients, and to look for possible correlations with age at diagnosis, diabetes duration, and glycemic control. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study conducted at Aseer Central Hospital, Abha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from March 2013 to June 2014. A total of 202 T1DM patients were screened for serum anti-thyroglobulin (TG), anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO), anti-tissue transglutaminase (aTTG), anti-endomysial (EMA), and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibodies along with glycated hemoglobin, and biometric data. Results: From the 202 T1DM patients (96 males, and 106 females) (mean age: 11.3 years), 33 (16.3%) were positive for thyroid autoantibodies. Specifically, 19 (9.4%) were positive for TG and 25 (12.8%) were positive for TPO, and 11 were double positive. There were 21 (10.4%) patients that showed a double positive for both aTTG-IgA and EMA, and only one case of T1DM was positive for anti-CCP. No significant correlations were noticed between the presence of autoantibodies and the age at diagnosis, diabetes duration, body mass index, and glycemic control. Conclusion: The prevalence of thyroid and celiac disease autoantibodies is high among T1DM patients, while anti-CCP remains low and might be weakly associated with T1DM in the southwestern region of Saudi Arabia. No significant correlation between the age at T1DM diagnosis, duration, and glycemic control, and the presence of autoantibodies was found. PMID:27052281

  4. [Non-celiac gluten sensitivity].

    PubMed

    Hoffmanová, Iva; Sánchez, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Non-celiac gluten sensitivity has recently been recognized by the scientific community as a part of gluten-related disorders, and is defined as a condition with gastrointestinal and/or extra-intestinal symptoms triggered by gluten ingestion in the absence of celiac disease and wheat allergy. Currently, there is no specific serological marker and non-celiac gluten sensitivity remains a diagnosis of exclusion: testing for celiac disease and wheat allergy must be negative, symptoms must improve with a gluten-free diet, and diagnosis must be confirmed by the gluten challenge. In this article, we discuss current knowledge of pathophysiology, clinical and epidemilogical spectrum, diagnosis, and treatment of NCGS.

  5. Effective Identification of Low-Gliadin Wheat Lines by Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS): Implications for the Development and Analysis of Foodstuffs Suitable for Celiac Patients

    PubMed Central

    García-Molina, María Dolores; García-Olmo, Juan; Barro, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Scope The aim of this work was to assess the ability of Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) to distinguish wheat lines with low gliadin content, obtained by RNA interference (RNAi), from non-transgenic wheat lines. The discriminant analysis was performed using both whole grain and flour. The transgenic sample set included 409 samples for whole grain sorting and 414 samples for flour experiments, while the non-transgenic set consisted of 126 and 156 samples for whole grain and flour, respectively. Methods and Results Samples were scanned using a Foss-NIR Systems 6500 System II instrument. Discrimination models were developed using the entire spectral range (400–2500 nm) and ranges of 400–780 nm, 800–1098 nm and 1100–2500 nm, followed by analysis of means of partial least square (PLS). Two external validations were made, using samples from the years 2013 and 2014 and a minimum of 99% of the flour samples and 96% of the whole grain samples were classified correctly. Conclusions The results demonstrate the ability of NIRS to successfully discriminate between wheat samples with low-gliadin content and wild types. These findings are important for the development and analysis of foodstuff for celiac disease (CD) patients to achieve better dietary composition and a reduction in disease incidence. PMID:27018786

  6. Diagnosis of Adult Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nick, Jerry A; Nichols, David P

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) is being made with increasing frequency in adults. Patients with CF diagnosed in adulthood typically present with respiratory complaints, and often have recurrent or chronic airway infection. At the time of initial presentation individuals may appear to have clinical manifestation limited to a single organ, but with subclinical involvement of the respiratory tract. Adult-diagnosed patients have a good response to CF center care, and newly available cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor-modulating therapies are promising for the treatment of residual function mutation, thus increasing the importance of the diagnosis in adults with unexplained bronchiectasis.

  7. A study of Italian pediatric celiac disease patients confirms that the primary HLA association is to the DQ(alpha 1*0501, beta 1*0201) heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Mazzilli, M C; Ferrante, P; Mariani, P; Martone, E; Petronzelli, F; Triglione, P; Bonamico, M

    1992-02-01

    Celiac disease (CD) has been recently reported to be primarily associated with the DQ(alpha 1*0501, beta 1*0201) heterodimer encoded in cis on DR3 haplotype and in trans in DR5,7 heterozygous individuals. The high incidence of DR5,7 heterozygotes, reflecting the high frequency of the DR5 allele in Italy, makes the analysis of the Italian CD patients critical. Polymerase chain reaction-amplified DNA from 50 CD patients and 50 controls, serologically typed for DR and DQw antigens, was hybridized with five DQA1-specific oligonucleotide probes detecting DQA1*0101 + 0102 + 0103, DQA1*0201, DQA1*0301 + 0302, DQA1*0401 + 0501 + 0601, and DQA1*0501 and a DQB1-sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe recognizing DQB1*0201 allele. As expected by the DR-DQ disequilibria, DQA1*0201 [62% in patients versus 26% in controls, relative risk (RR) = 5] and DQA1*0501 (96% versus 56%, RR = 19) show positive association with the disease. Of CD patients, 92% (50% DR3 and 42% DR5,7) compared to 18% of the controls carry both DQA1*0501 and DQB1*0201 alleles, so that the combination confers an RR of 52, higher than both the risks of the single alleles (DQA1*0501 RR = 19, DQB1*0201 RR = 30), confirming the primary role of the dimer in determining genetic predisposition to CD both in DR3 and in DR5,7 subjects. PMID:1563982

  8. High prevalence of celiac disease in Italian general population.

    PubMed

    Volta, U; Bellentani, S; Bianchi, F B; Brandi, G; De Franceschi, L; Miglioli, L; Granito, A; Balli, F; Tiribelli, C

    2001-07-01

    The worldwide increase of celiac disease prompted us to assess its prevalence in the Italian general population. The 3483 inhabitants of Campogalliano were tested for immunoglobulin A anti-endomysial antibodies. Twenty subjects showed antibody positivity and duodenal biopsy detected typical mucosal lesions of celiac disease in 17 of them; the remaining three cases had a normal villous architecture, but the finding of increased gamma/delta intraepithelial lymphocytes in all and the heterodimer DQA1*0501, DQB1*0201 in two of them was consistent with potential celiac disease. Only one patient had an overt malabsorption syndrome, characterized by diarrhea, weight loss, and severe weakness. In eight subjects atypical symptoms of celiac disease, such as dyspepsia and depression, were present, whereas the remaining subjects were silent. Celiac disease was more frequent in younger age groups. Our cross-sectional design study demonstrates that celiac disease prevalence in the Italian general population is 4.9 per 1000 (95% CI 2.8-7.8), increasing up to 5.7 per 1000 (95% CI 3.5-8.8) with the inclusion of potential cases. PMID:11478502

  9. Therapeutic approaches for celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Plugis, Nicholas M.; Khosla, Chaitan

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is a common, lifelong autoimmune disorder for which dietary control is the only accepted form of therapy. A strict gluten-free diet is burdensome to patients and can be limited in efficacy, indicating there is an unmet need for novel therapeutic approaches to supplement or supplant dietary therapy. Many molecular events required for disease pathogenesis have been recently characterized and inspire most current and emerging drug-discovery efforts. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) confirm the importance of human leukocyte antigen genes in our pathogenic model and identify a number of new risk loci in this complex disease. Here, we review the status of both emerging and potential therapeutic strategies in the context of disease pathophysiology. We conclude with a discussion of how genes identified during GWAS and follow-up studies that enhance susceptibility may offer insight into developing novel therapies. PMID:26060114

  10. Pure Oats as Part of the Canadian Gluten-Free Diet in Celiac Disease: The Need to Revisit the Issue.

    PubMed

    de Souza, M Cristina P; Deschênes, Marie-Eve; Laurencelle, Suzanne; Godet, Patrick; Roy, Claude C; Djilali-Saiah, Idriss

    2016-01-01

    The question about recommending pure, noncontaminated oats as part of the gluten-free diet of patients with celiac disease remains controversial. This might be due to gluten cross contamination and to the possible immunogenicity of some oat cultivars. In view of this controversy, a review of the scientific literature was conducted to highlight the latest findings published between 2008 and 2014 to examine the current knowledge on oats safety and celiac disease in Europe and North America. Results showed that regular oats consumed in Canada are largely contaminated. Overall, the consumption of pure oats has been generally considered to be safe for adults and children. However, it appears that some oat cultivars may trigger an immune response in sensitive individuals. Therefore, further long-term studies on the impact of consumption of oats identifying the cultivar(s) constitute an important step forward for drawing final recommendations. Furthermore, a closer and more accurate monitoring of the dietary intake of noncontaminated oats would be paramount to better determine what its actual contribution in the gluten-free diet of adults and children with celiac disease are in order to draw sound recommendations on the safety of pure oats as part of the gluten-free diet.

  11. Pure Oats as Part of the Canadian Gluten-Free Diet in Celiac Disease: The Need to Revisit the Issue

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, M. Cristina P.; Deschênes, Marie-Eve; Laurencelle, Suzanne; Godet, Patrick; Roy, Claude C.; Djilali-Saiah, Idriss

    2016-01-01

    The question about recommending pure, noncontaminated oats as part of the gluten-free diet of patients with celiac disease remains controversial. This might be due to gluten cross contamination and to the possible immunogenicity of some oat cultivars. In view of this controversy, a review of the scientific literature was conducted to highlight the latest findings published between 2008 and 2014 to examine the current knowledge on oats safety and celiac disease in Europe and North America. Results showed that regular oats consumed in Canada are largely contaminated. Overall, the consumption of pure oats has been generally considered to be safe for adults and children. However, it appears that some oat cultivars may trigger an immune response in sensitive individuals. Therefore, further long-term studies on the impact of consumption of oats identifying the cultivar(s) constitute an important step forward for drawing final recommendations. Furthermore, a closer and more accurate monitoring of the dietary intake of noncontaminated oats would be paramount to better determine what its actual contribution in the gluten-free diet of adults and children with celiac disease are in order to draw sound recommendations on the safety of pure oats as part of the gluten-free diet. PMID:27446824

  12. Pure Oats as Part of the Canadian Gluten-Free Diet in Celiac Disease: The Need to Revisit the Issue.

    PubMed

    de Souza, M Cristina P; Deschênes, Marie-Eve; Laurencelle, Suzanne; Godet, Patrick; Roy, Claude C; Djilali-Saiah, Idriss

    2016-01-01

    The question about recommending pure, noncontaminated oats as part of the gluten-free diet of patients with celiac disease remains controversial. This might be due to gluten cross contamination and to the possible immunogenicity of some oat cultivars. In view of this controversy, a review of the scientific literature was conducted to highlight the latest findings published between 2008 and 2014 to examine the current knowledge on oats safety and celiac disease in Europe and North America. Results showed that regular oats consumed in Canada are largely contaminated. Overall, the consumption of pure oats has been generally considered to be safe for adults and children. However, it appears that some oat cultivars may trigger an immune response in sensitive individuals. Therefore, further long-term studies on the impact of consumption of oats identifying the cultivar(s) constitute an important step forward for drawing final recommendations. Furthermore, a closer and more accurate monitoring of the dietary intake of noncontaminated oats would be paramount to better determine what its actual contribution in the gluten-free diet of adults and children with celiac disease are in order to draw sound recommendations on the safety of pure oats as part of the gluten-free diet. PMID:27446824

  13. Celiac Disease and Autoimmune-Associated Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lauret, Eugenia; Rodrigo, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is frequently accompanied by a variety of extradigestive manifestations, thus making it a systemic disease rather than a disease limited to the gastrointestinal tract. This is primarily explained by the fact that CD belongs to the group of autoimmune diseases. The only one with a known etiology is related to a permanent intolerance to gluten. Remarkable breakthroughs have been achieved in the last decades, due to a greater interest in the diagnosis of atypical and asymptomatic patients, which are more frequent in adults. The known presence of several associated diseases provides guidance in the search of oligosymptomatic cases as well as studies performed in relatives of patients with CD. The causes for the onset and manifestation of associated diseases are diverse; some share a similar genetic base, like type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D); others share pathogenic mechanisms, and yet, others are of unknown nature. General practitioners and other specialists must remember that CD may debut with extraintestinal manifestations, and associated illnesses may appear both at the time of diagnosis and throughout the evolution of the disease. The implementation of a gluten-free diet (GFD) improves the overall clinical course and influences the evolution of the associated diseases. In some cases, such as iron deficiency anemia, the GFD contributes to its disappearance. In other disorders, like T1D, this allows a better control of the disease. In several other complications and/or associated diseases, an adequate adherence to a GFD may slow down their evolution, especially if implemented during an early stage. PMID:23984314

  14. Improved technique for CT-guided celiac ganglia block

    SciTech Connect

    Haaga, J.R.; Kori, S.H.; Eastwood, D.W.; Borowski, G.P.

    1984-06-01

    Celiac nerve blocks have been performed without radiologic guidance, but recently several groups have reported computed tomography (CT)-guided techniques. The authors present a new technique of CT-guided celiac nerve block using an 18 gauge Teflon catheter, which permits a test block dose and permanent alcohol block with one procedure. The results of this new technique were very encouraging. Of nine cancer patients who had the test block, seven had good pain relief; these same patients had good pain control with the permanent block. Of six patients with pancreatitis, six had good pain relief from the test block, and three had some long-term relief from the permanent block.

  15. HLA-G and susceptibility to develop celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Catamo, Eulalia; Zupin, Luisa; Segat, Ludovica; Celsi, Fulvio; Crovella, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    The Human Leukocyte Antigen-G has immunomodulatory function and its expression has been associated with several diseases. In our study we analyzed HLA-G polymorphisms in order to evaluate their possible association with susceptibility to celiac disease development. A total of 420 celiac patients and 509 controls were genotyped for HLA-G polymorphisms. We sequenced 800bp upstream the ATG codon (5' upstream regulatory region) and the whole 3' untranslated region of the HLA-G gene, whereas the ΔC deletion at exon 3 was detected by RFLP-PCR. Five polymorphisms (namely -477 C>G, -369 C>A, 14bp del/ins, 3187 A>G, 3196 C>G) and one haplotype (TCGGTACGAAITCCCGAG) were significantly more frequent in celiac patients than controls and associated with increased disease susceptibility. The 14bp I/I, 3187 G/G, 3196 G/G genotypes and TCGGTACGAAITCCCGAG haplotype, were still significantly associated with increased disease susceptibility (and in addition also the 3003 C/C genotype) when the analysis was restricted to patients and controls presenting the DQ2.5 or DQ8 HLA-DQ celiac disease risk haplotypes. Our findings indicate an association between HLA-G gene polymorphisms and susceptibility to celiac disease development, suggesting that HLA-G molecule is possibly involved in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  16. Microscopic Colitis (Lymphocytic and Collagenous), Eosinophilic Colitis, and Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, M. Sophia; Alimi, Yewande

    2015-01-01

    Multiple tests are needed to diagnose a patient with noninfectious diarrhea. Some patients will be mistakenly labeled as diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) because of nonspecific computed tomographic scans and grossly normal endoscopic findings. It is crucial to understand other less common pathologies to avoid these instances of misdiagnosis. This article focuses on microscopic colitis (MC), eosinophilic colitis (EC), and celiac disease. MC is an inflammatory condition of the colon that presents with two subtypes, only to be differentiated by histology. EC is a rare chronic inflammatory process. Depending on the extent of the disease, it can present with mild diarrhea, malabsorption, or at its worst, cause obstruction and perforation. Celiac disease affects the small bowel, but interestingly can present similarly to colitis. Both MC and EC respond to oral budesonide. Patients with celiac disease improve on gluten-free diets. These treatments are distinctly different from typical IBS-D care plans. PMID:26034409

  17. Celiac axis stenosis as a rare but critical condition treated with pancreatoduodenectomy: report of 2 cases

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyeong Min; Lee, Eung Chang; Lee, In Joon; Han, Sung-Sik; Kim, Hyun Boem; Kim, Seoung Hoon; Lee, Soon-ae; Park, Sang-Jae

    2016-01-01

    We describe 2 cases of patients with loss of hepatic arterial flow during surgery for pancreatic head cancer due to celiac stenosis caused by median arcuate ligament compression. The first case underwent pylorus-resecting pancreatoduodenectomy for pancreatic head cancer. After resection of the gastroduodenal artery, flow in the common hepatic artery disappeared, and celiac axis stenosis was identified. Interventional stent insertion was attempted, however, it failed due to the acute angle of the celiac orifice (os). This problem was resolved by arterial reconstruction. The second case underwent pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy for pancreatic head cancer and the same phenomenon occurred during the procedure. Interventional stent insertion was also tried; in this patient, however, it failed due to the acute angle of the celiac os. The problem was resolved by changing a femoral approach to a brachial approach, and the stent was inserted into the celiac os successfully.

  18. Celiac axis stenosis as a rare but critical condition treated with pancreatoduodenectomy: report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyeong Min; Lee, Seung Duk; Lee, Eung Chang; Lee, In Joon; Han, Sung-Sik; Kim, Hyun Boem; Kim, Seoung Hoon; Lee, Soon-Ae; Park, Sang-Jae

    2016-09-01

    We describe 2 cases of patients with loss of hepatic arterial flow during surgery for pancreatic head cancer due to celiac stenosis caused by median arcuate ligament compression. The first case underwent pylorus-resecting pancreatoduodenectomy for pancreatic head cancer. After resection of the gastroduodenal artery, flow in the common hepatic artery disappeared, and celiac axis stenosis was identified. Interventional stent insertion was attempted, however, it failed due to the acute angle of the celiac orifice (os). This problem was resolved by arterial reconstruction. The second case underwent pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy for pancreatic head cancer and the same phenomenon occurred during the procedure. Interventional stent insertion was also tried; in this patient, however, it failed due to the acute angle of the celiac os. The problem was resolved by changing a femoral approach to a brachial approach, and the stent was inserted into the celiac os successfully. PMID:27617257

  19. Celiac disease causing severe osteomalacia: an association still present in Morocco!

    PubMed

    Tahiri, Latifa; Azzouzi, Hamida; Squalli, Ghita; Abourazzak, Fatimazahra; Harzy, Taoufik

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD), a malabsorption syndrome caused by hypersensitivity to gliadin fraction of gluten. CD can manifest with classic symptoms; however, significant myopathy and multiple fractures are rarely the predominant presentation of untreated celiac disease. Osteomalacia complicating celiac disease had become more and more rare. We describe here a case of osteomalacia secondary to a longstanding untreated celiac disease. This patient complained about progressive bone and muscular pain, weakness, fractures and skeletal deformities. Radiological and laboratory findings were all in favor of severe osteomalacia. Improvement of patient's weakness and laboratory abnormalities was obvious after treatment with gluten free diet, vitamin D, calcium and iron. This case affirms that chronic untreated celiac disease, can lead to an important bone loss and irreversible complications like skeletal deformities.

  20. Celiac axis stenosis as a rare but critical condition treated with pancreatoduodenectomy: report of 2 cases

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyeong Min; Lee, Eung Chang; Lee, In Joon; Han, Sung-Sik; Kim, Hyun Boem; Kim, Seoung Hoon; Lee, Soon-ae; Park, Sang-Jae

    2016-01-01

    We describe 2 cases of patients with loss of hepatic arterial flow during surgery for pancreatic head cancer due to celiac stenosis caused by median arcuate ligament compression. The first case underwent pylorus-resecting pancreatoduodenectomy for pancreatic head cancer. After resection of the gastroduodenal artery, flow in the common hepatic artery disappeared, and celiac axis stenosis was identified. Interventional stent insertion was attempted, however, it failed due to the acute angle of the celiac orifice (os). This problem was resolved by arterial reconstruction. The second case underwent pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy for pancreatic head cancer and the same phenomenon occurred during the procedure. Interventional stent insertion was also tried; in this patient, however, it failed due to the acute angle of the celiac os. The problem was resolved by changing a femoral approach to a brachial approach, and the stent was inserted into the celiac os successfully. PMID:27617257

  1. AMERICAN COLLEGE OF GASTROENTEROLOGY CLINICAL GUIDELINE: DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF CELIAC DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Tapia, Alberto; Hill, Ivor D; Kelly, Ciarán P; Calderwood, Audrey H; Murray, Joseph A

    2013-01-01

    This guideline presents recommendations for the diagnosis and management of patients with celiac disease. Celiac disease is an immune-based reaction to dietary gluten (storage protein for wheat, barley and rye) that primarily affects the small intestine in those with a genetic predisposition and resolves with exclusion of gluten from the diet. There has been a substantial increase in the prevalence of celiac disease over the last 50 years and an increase in the rate of diagnosis in the last 10 years. Celiac disease can present with many symptoms, including typical gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g. diarrhea, steatorrhea, weight loss, bloating, flatulence, abdominal pain) and also non-gastrointestinal abnormalities (e.g. abnormal liver function tests, iron deficiency anemia, bone disease, skin disorders, and many other protean manifestations). Indeed, many individuals with celiac disease may have no symptoms at all. Celiac disease is usually detected by serologic testing of celiac-specific antibodies. The diagnosis is confirmed by duodenal mucosal biopsies. Both serology and biopsy should be performed on a gluten-containing diet. The treatment for celiac disease is primarily a gluten-free diet (GFD), which requires significant patient education, motivation, and follow-up. Non-responsive celiac disease occurs frequently, particularly in those diagnosed in adulthood. Persistent or recurring symptoms should lead to a review of the patient’s original diagnosis to exclude alternative diagnoses, a review of the GFD to ensure there is no obvious gluten contamination, and serologic testing to confirm adherence with the GFD. In addition, evaluation for disorders associated with celiac disease that could cause persistent symptoms, such as microscopic colitis, pancreatic exocrine dysfunction, and complications of celiac disease, such as enteropathy-associated lymphoma or refractory celiac disease, should be entertained. Newer therapeutic modalities are being studied in clinical

  2. Intestinal stem cells and celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Piscaglia, Anna Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells (SCs) are the key to tissue genesis and regeneration. Given their central role in homeostasis, dysfunctions of the SC compartment play a pivotal role in the development of cancers, degenerative disorders, chronic inflammatory pathologies and organ failure. The gastrointestinal tract is constantly exposed to harsh mechanical and chemical conditions and most of the epithelial cells are replaced every 3 to 5 d. According to the so-called Unitarian hypothesis, this renewal is driven by a common intestinal stem cell (ISC) residing within the crypt base at the origin of the crypt-to-villus hierarchical migratory pattern. Celiac disease (CD) can be defined as a chronic immune-mediated disease that is triggered and maintained by dietary proteins (gluten) in genetically predisposed individuals. Many advances have been achieved over the last years in understanding of the pathogenic interactions among genetic, immunological and environmental factors in CD, with a particular emphasis on intestinal barrier and gut microbiota. Conversely, little is known about ISC modulation and deregulation in active celiac disease and upon a gluten-free diet. Nonetheless, bone marrow-derived SC transplantation has become an option for celiac patients with complicated or refractory disease. This manuscript summarizes the “state of the art” regarding CD and ISCs, their niche and potential role in the development and treatment of the disease. PMID:24772248

  3. Remission of severe aphthous stomatitis of celiac disease with etanercept

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease is a common autoimmune disease triggered by gluten-containing foods (wheat, barley and rye) in genetically predisposed individuals. We present a patient with celiac disease complicated by severe aphthous stomatitis resulting in impairing swallowing, chewing and speaking. This led to weight loss, psychosocial problems as well as inability to perform her work. A variety of topical and systemic medications used resulted in either no improvement or only partial alleviation of the patient’s symptoms. After informed consent, etanercept was initiated and resulted in complete remission of aphthous stomatitis, decrease in arthralgia and fatigue and considerable improvement in her quality of life. The use of newer biological agents for selected and severe manifestations of celiac disease may lead to improved morbidity in these patients, but more studies are needed to determine long-term efficacy as well as safety of these drugs in the mucosal and/or systemic complications of this disease. PMID:24365222

  4. Celiac disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Guandalini, Stefano; Assiri, Asaad

    2014-03-01

    Triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically predisposed individuals, celiac disease is the most common genetically based food intolerance in the world, with a prevalence among approximately 1% of the general population. This enteropathy may appear at any age and is characterized by a wide variety of clinical signs and symptoms that go well beyond the gastrointestinal tract. In young children, gastrointestinal presentations are common and include chronic diarrhea, failure to thrive, and abdominal distention; however, extraintestinal manifestations are becoming increasingly more common. They include numerous conditions such as dermatitis herpetiformis, anemia, dental enamel hypoplasia, recurrent oral aphthae, short stature, osteoporosis, arthritis, neurologic problems, unexplained elevation of transaminase levels, and female infertility. Therefore, diagnosing celiac disease requires a high degree of suspicion, followed by correct screening and a confirmatory test with an intestinal biopsy. After diagnosis, a strict gluten-free diet must be followed, which in most cases will bring a marked improvement of symptoms. However, there are important compliance and quality-of-life problems, especially in adolescents. PMID:24395055

  5. Endocrine manifestations in celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune small intestinal mucosal disorder that often presents with diarrhea, malabsorption and weight loss. Often, one or more associated endocrine disorders may be associated with CD. For this review, methods involved an extensive review of published English-language materials. In children and adolescents, prospective studies have demonstrated a significant relationship to insulin-dependent or type 1 diabetes, whereas in adults, autoimmune forms of thyroid disease, particularly hypothyroidism, may commonly co-exist. In some with CD, multiple glandular endocrinopathies may also occur and complicate the initial presentation of the intestinal disease. In others presenting with an apparent isolated endocrine disorder, serological screening for underlying subclinical CD may prove to be positive, particularly if type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid or other autoimmune endocrine diseases, such as Addison’s disease are first detected. A number of reports have also recorded hypoparathyroidism or hypopituitarism or ovarian failure in CD and these may be improved with a strict gluten-free diet. PMID:27784959

  6. Burning Tongue as Initial Presentation of Celiac Disease in an Elderly Woman: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Andrea; Zamulko, Alla

    2016-06-01

    There are few reports in the literature where celiac disease presents with tongue manifestations, although atypical presentations of celiac disease are not uncommon. This case report highlights an atypical presentation of celiac disease in an elderly female. Our patient presented to clinic with complaints of a burning tongue for the past two years as well as occasional loose stools and fatigue. Work-up revealed iron deficiency anemia, zinc deficiency and an abnormal celiac panel. Complete symptom improvement was noted by 10 weeks into the initiation of a gluten free diet. Celiac disease can present at any age and should be considered as a differential in findings of malabsorption and gastrointestinal symptoms. PMID:27443108

  7. Epilepsy, occipital calcifications, and oligosymptomatic celiac disease in childhood.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Hugo A; De Rosa, Susana; Ruggieri, Victor; de Dávila, María T G; Fejerman, Natalio

    2002-11-01

    The association of epilepsy, occipital calcifications, and celiac disease has been recognized as a distinct syndrome. The objective of this study was to present the clinical, electrophysiologic, and neuroradiologic features in a series of patients with this syndrome. Thirty-two patients with the constellation of epilepsy, occipital calcifications, and celiac disease were identified in our epilepsy clinic. The mean age was 11 years and the mean length of follow-up was 7.4 years. The 1990 criteria of the European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition were used to diagnose celiac disease. The Kruskal-Wallis statistics test was employed with a signficance of P < .05. Thirty-one patients had partial seizures, 21 of them with symptoms related to the occipital lobe. In most patients, the epilepsy was controlled or the seizures were sporadic. Three developed severe epilepsy. Occipital calcifications were present in all cases. Computed tomography in 7 patients showed hypodense areas in the white matter around calcifications, which decreased or disappeared after a period of gluten-free diet in 3 patients. A favorable outcome of epilepsy was detected in patients with the earliest dietary therapy. This study presents the largest series of children with this syndrome outside Italy. White-matter hypodensities surrounding calcifications are rarely reported. A prompt diagnosis of celiac disease might improve the evolution of the epilepsy and may improve cognitive status. PMID:12585717

  8. Is the Prevalence of Celiac Disease Higher than the General Population in Inflammatory Bowel Diseaese?

    PubMed Central

    Jandaghi, Elahe; Hojatnia, Mona; Vahedi, Homayoon; Shahbaz-Khani, Bijan; Kolahdoozan, Shadi; Ansari, Reza

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND In some studies inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and celiac disease were considered to be associated and some belive that this association may influence the prognosis of IBD. However, there is a cosiderable controversy regarding this association. Therefore ,we aimed to assess the association of these two common digestive diseases and evaluate the complications of this association. METHODS In this comparative study, 200 patients with ulceritive colitis (UC) and 206 patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) were evaluated for celiac disease using relevant diagnostic tests and pathologic studies. Total IgA, IgA tissue transgulaminase antibody and specific IgA anti endomysial antibody were asseyed. In cases of IgA deficiency, total IgG and IgG tissue TG and IgG anti endomyseal Ab were measured. Patients with increased specific IgA and IgG antibodies for celiac disease, underwent endoscopy and 4 standard samples were obtained. Our results were compared with the results of the prevalence study of celiac disease in the general population. Data were analyzed using analytic and descriptive statistics at a significance level of 5%. RESULTS Among the studied patients, 1 patient with UC had elevated IgA anti tTG antibody and IgA anti-endomysial antibody who underwent endoscopy and celiac was confirmed on pathology. Hence, of the 200 patientswith UC, the diagnosis of celiac disease was confirmed in 1 patient (1:200) with no significant difference with the prevalence of celiac disease in the general population (1:166). However, none of our patients with Crohn’s disease had celiac disease (0:206). CONCLUSION We found no significant difference in the prevalence of celiac disease between patients with UC and the general population. Since most of our participants had a mild level of Crohn’s activation, none of those with Crohn’s disease had celiac disease. Complications of IBD including sclerosing cholangitis, may be more common in patients with concurrent celiac disease

  9. Is the Prevalence of Celiac Disease Higher than the General Population in Inflammatory Bowel Diseaese?

    PubMed

    Jandaghi, Elahe; Hojatnia, Mona; Vahedi, Homayoon; Shahbaz-Khani, Bijan; Kolahdoozan, Shadi; Ansari, Reza

    2015-04-01

    BACKGROUND In some studies inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and celiac disease were considered to be associated and some belive that this association may influence the prognosis of IBD. However, there is a cosiderable controversy regarding this association. Therefore ,we aimed to assess the association of these two common digestive diseases and evaluate the complications of this association. METHODS In this comparative study, 200 patients with ulceritive colitis (UC) and 206 patients with Crohn's disease (CD) were evaluated for celiac disease using relevant diagnostic tests and pathologic studies. Total IgA, IgA tissue transgulaminase antibody and specific IgA anti endomysial antibody were asseyed. In cases of IgA deficiency, total IgG and IgG tissue TG and IgG anti endomyseal Ab were measured. Patients with increased specific IgA and IgG antibodies for celiac disease, underwent endoscopy and 4 standard samples were obtained. Our results were compared with the results of the prevalence study of celiac disease in the general population. Data were analyzed using analytic and descriptive statistics at a significance level of 5%. RESULTS Among the studied patients, 1 patient with UC had elevated IgA anti tTG antibody and IgA anti-endomysial antibody who underwent endoscopy and celiac was confirmed on pathology. Hence, of the 200 patientswith UC, the diagnosis of celiac disease was confirmed in 1 patient (1:200) with no significant difference with the prevalence of celiac disease in the general population (1:166). However, none of our patients with Crohn's disease had celiac disease (0:206). CONCLUSION We found no significant difference in the prevalence of celiac disease between patients with UC and the general population. Since most of our participants had a mild level of Crohn's activation, none of those with Crohn's disease had celiac disease. Complications of IBD including sclerosing cholangitis, may be more common in patients with concurrent celiac disease

  10. Celiac Disease and Cystic Fibrosis: Challenges to Differential Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Alessandra Teixeira Pessoa; Figueirêdo, Manuella Machado; Aguiar, Ana Paula de B; Almeida, Carolina de Godoy; Mendes, Patrícia S A; Souza, Edna Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis and celiac disease were considered a single clinical entity for many years. Differentiation between the diseases occurred some time in the 1930s of the 20th Century. Both diseases may present the intestinal malabsorption syndrome and similar clinical manifestations that contribute to difficulties with clinical distinction. We describe a report of two patients with initial diagnosis of cystic fibrosis, who were subsequently diagnosed with celiac disease. These case reports emphasize the possibility of false positivity being shown in the sweat test in CD, which may result in delayed diagnosis and inadequate management of this disease. PMID:27552792

  11. Screening for celiac disease in Down’s syndrome patients revealed cases of subtotal villous atrophy without typical for celiFac disease HLA-DQ and tissue transglutaminase antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Uibo, Oivi; Teesalu, Kaupo; Metsküla, Kaja; Reimand, Tiia; Saat, Riste; Sillat, Tarvo; Reimand, Koit; Talvik, Tiina; Uibo, Raivo

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence of celiac disease (CD) as well as CD marker antibodies and susceptibility HLA-DQ haplotypes in 134 karyotyped Down’s syndrome (DS) patients. METHODS: Immunoglobulin A (IgA) and G (IgG) type anti-gliadin antibodies (AGA), IgA type anti-tissue transglutaminase (tTG) antibodies (anti-tTG) with antigen of guinea pig and human source were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and endomysium antibodies (EMA) by indirect immunofluoresence test. HLA-DQA1*0501/DQB1*0201 (DQ2) was revealed by polymerase chain reaction. Celiac disease was diagnosed by revised ESPGHAN criteria. RESULTS: 41 % of DS patients had AGA, 6.0 % IgA anti-tTG with guinea pig antigen, and 3.0 % IgA EMA (all positive for anti-tTG with human tTG). Subtotal villous atrophy was found in 5 out of 9 DS patients who had agreed to small bowel biopsy. One of them had DQA1*0501/DQB1*0201 and anti-tTG and EMA i.e. typical for CD markers (this case also fulfilled the ESPGHAN diagnostic criteria), but other four lacked these markers. Three non-biopsied DS patients had also most probably CD because DQA1*0501/DQB1*0201 and IgA anti-tTG (EMA) were detected. Thus, the prevalence of CD among our DS patients population is 3.0 % (95 % of confidence interval [CI]: 0.1-5.9 %). CONCLUSION: We confirm the increased frequency of CD among DS patients. In addition, we have revealed a subgroup of patients with subtotal villous atrophy but without characteristic for CD immunological and genetic markers. Whether these cases represent CD (with atypical immunopathogenesis) or some other immune enteropathy, requires further investigations. PMID:16552815

  12. Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Turkish Children with Idiopathic Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Işikay, Sedat; Hizli, Şamil; Yilmaz, Kutluhan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study has examined the prevalence of celiac disease in Turkish children with idiopathic epilepsy. Methods: Children with idiopathic epilepsy were screened for celiac disease using the IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody and compared with the healthy control group in order to find the association of celiac disease (CD) with idiopathic epilepsy. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and small intestinal biopsies were offered to all antibody-positive patients. Findings : A total of 214 children with the diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy and 166 healthy children as control group were studied. Of the patients recruited, 55.1% had generalized epilepsy, and 44.9% had partial epilepsy. In 33 patients with partial epilepsy, electroclinical features were consistent with a diagnosis of childhood partial epilepsy with occipital paroxysms (CPEO). Two of 33 patients with CPEO had positive IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies in serology. Pathological examination of small intestinal biopsy specimens showed total villous atrophy in both of them. The prevalence of celiac disease among children with idiopathic epilepsy and CPEO was 0.9% and 6%, respectively. Conclusion: The results of the present study revealed that prevalence of CD is increased in children with epilepsy. On the other hand, as high as 6% prevalence of CD among patients with CPEO found in this study should be kept in mind and the clinicians should be aware of this association. PMID:25562021

  13. Celiac Disease: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... intestine. People with celiac disease can’t eat gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley ... lip balms. When people with celiac disease eat gluten—even a tiny amount—their body’s immune system ...

  14. Is Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity Real?

    MedlinePlus

    ... celiac wheat sensitivity based on the antibodies and biomarkers found in this study. In addition, doctors may ... by gastroenterologists, Tennyson said. "There have been no biomarkers available to diagnose non-celiac gluten sensitivity and ...

  15. Screening for Celiac Disease in a North American Population: Sequential Serology and Gastrointestinal Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Kent D.; Rashtak, Shahrooz; Lahr, Brian D.; Melton, L Joseph; Krause, Patricia K.; Maggi, Kristine; Talley, Nicholas J.; Murray, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    Background The prevalence of diagnosed celiac disease is less than 1 in 2,000 in the United States, but screening studies undertaken in European and other populations have revealed a much higher prevalence. Objectives To determine the prevalence of celiac disease and the utility of screening in the general adult population of a geographically isolated area. Methods Serum tissue transglutaminase antibodies (tTG-IgA) were measured in volunteer health care participants aged 18 years and over at Annual Casper, Wyoming Blue Envelope Health Fair Blood Draw. Subjects with positive tTG-IgA tests had their endomysial IgA antibodies checked. Double positives were offered endoscopy with small bowel biopsy. All subjects completed a short GI symptom questionnaire. Results 3850 residents of the Natrona County had serologic evaluation for celiac disease, 34 of whom tested positive for both tTG and EMA IgA. Excluding three individuals with previous diagnosis of celiac disease, the overall prevalence of celiac serology positive in this community sample was 0.8%. All 31 subjects were offered a small bowel biopsy. Seventeen of the 18 biopsied subjects (94%) had at least partial villous atrophy. Symptoms that were reported by the fair attendees did not predict positivity. Conclusions Screening for celiac disease was widely accepted in this preventative healthcare setting. Undiagnosed celiac disease affects 1 in 126 individuals in this Wyoming community. Most were asymptomatic or had atypical presentations. Serologic testing can readily detect this disease in a general population. PMID:21364545

  16. Galactosylation of serum IgA1 O-glycans in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Lindfors, Katri; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Novak, Jan; Collin, Pekka; Saavalainen, Päivi; Koskinen, Lotta L E; Mäki, Markku; Kaukinen, Katri

    2011-02-01

    In celiac disease, gluten ingestion provokes small-bowel mucosal injury and production of IgA autoantibodies against transglutaminase 2 (TG2). It has been suggested that in celiac patients IgA could mediate the transepithelial passage of gluten peptides in a mechanism involving the transferrin receptor. As IgA1 with galactose-deficient O-linked glycans has elevated affinity for the transferrin receptor, we assessed whether total serum IgA1 and IgA1 anti-TG2 autoantibodies in celiac patients are aberrantly glycosylated. We report that males with celiac disease have higher total serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 than non-celiac males. Furthermore, O-glycans of the disease-specific TG2 IgA1 autoantibodies in celiac patients exhibited elevated galactose deficiency. A gluten-free diet had no effect on the total serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1, whereas the amount of galactose-deficient anti-TG2 IgA1 decreased. Thus, the undergalactosylated IgA1 molecules are not pathognomonic for celiac disease, but galactose deficiency in IgA1 could be an aggravating factor.

  17. The role of infectious mediators and gut microbiome in the pathogenesis of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Rostami Nejad, Mohammad; Ishaq, Sauid; Al Dulaimi, David; Zali, Mohammad Reza; Rostami, Kamran

    2015-04-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune disorder that is associated with gluten sensitivity in people who are genetically predisposed. In celiac disease, food containing gluten mounts inflammatory response that results in villous atrophy in small bowel and increased permeability. This disorder is not only related to complications in the small bowel, but also has association with manifestations outside the GI tract. Small bowel mucosal immunity, exposed to infectious agents, is affected by CD; therefore, it is likely that patients with untreated celiac disease are more susceptible to infectious diseases. It is possible that sensitivity to gluten increases in patients infected with infectious diseases, and consequently infection may trigger CD in susceptible individuals. It is likely that, due to reduced immunity following the loss of intestinal villi, viral, bacterial, and parasitic infections develop faster in celiac disease patients and systemic complication occur more frequently. In addition, increased permeability, changing the microbiota following the chronic inflammation of the small intestine and abnormal immunological reactions are associated with celiac disease. PubMed, Medline, Google scholar, SID, and Magiran were searched for full text articles published between 1999 and 2014 in Persian and English. The associated keywords were used, and papers, which described particularly the impact of infectious agents on celiac disease, were selected. In this review, we have focused on the role of infectious agents and gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of celiac disease.

  18. Celiac disease: is it really possible to overcome duodenal biopsy?

    PubMed

    Grande, Elisabetta; Ferranti, Silvia; Gaggiano, Carla; Di Virgilio, Nicola; Vascotto, Marina

    2016-05-06

    We report the case of a two-year-five-month-old child who underwent screening for celiac disease due to strong familiarity. During the first observation body weight and height were at 25th and 50th centile for gender and age. Physical examination did not reveal any sign of disease. Blood tests showed increased transaminases levels and antibodies research showed: tTG IgA: 100 UI/ml, tTG IgG: 36,6 UI/ml, EMA IgA: positive. HLA study revealed homozygous allelic combination DRB1*07;DQA102:01; DQB1* 02:02 with presence of a double copy of beta chain in the composition of the  DQ2 heterodymer. Biopsy with histological examination did find neither mucosal alteration  nor lymphocytic infiltrates (Marsh 0). During follow up with free diet the patient remained asymptomatic and all antibody titers decreased up to normalization. According to ESPGHAN guidelines the finding of hypertransaminasemia as sign of celiac hepatic inflammation, a more than 10-fold increase of tTG IgA and a high-risk HLA would permit diagnosis of celiac disease but histological examination done due to mismatch between paucity of clinical sings and a "multiple risk combination" excluded it, allowing diagnosis of potential celiac disease.  We believe that this case is interesting because of its being in contrast with current literature data that suggest a linear relationship between antibodies levels and histological damage with tTG IgA at the upper reference range in case of potential celiac disease. According to guidelines we could have avoided intestinal biopsy but we would have considered as celiac a patient who is maybe just potentially affected.

  19. Ab Interno Trabeculectomy in the Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    SooHoo, Jeffrey R.; Seibold, Leonard K.; Kahook, Malik Y.

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a potentially blinding disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The mainstay of treatment is lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP) through the use of medications, laser and/or incisional surgery. The trabecular meshwork (TM) is thought to be the site of significant resistance to aqueous outflow in open angle glaucoma. Theoretically, an incision through TM or TM removal should decrease this resistance and lead to a significant reduction in IOP. This approach, commonly referred to as goniotomy or trabeculotomy, has been validated in the pediatric population and has been associated with long-term IOP control. In adults, however, removal of TM tissue has been historically associated with more limited and short-lived success. More recent evidence, reveals that even adult patients may benefit significantly from removal of diseased TM tissue and can lead to a significant reduction in IOP that is long-lasting and safe. In this review, we discuss current evidence and techniques for ab interno trabeculectomy using various devices in the adult patient. PMID:25624670

  20. Ab interno trabeculectomy in the adult patient.

    PubMed

    SooHoo, Jeffrey R; Seibold, Leonard K; Kahook, Malik Y

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a potentially blinding disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The mainstay of treatment is lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP) through the use of medications, laser and/or incisional surgery. The trabecular meshwork (TM) is thought to be the site of significant resistance to aqueous outflow in open angle glaucoma. Theoretically, an incision through TM or TM removal should decrease this resistance and lead to a significant reduction in IOP. This approach, commonly referred to as goniotomy or trabeculotomy, has been validated in the pediatric population and has been associated with long-term IOP control. In adults, however, removal of TM tissue has been historically associated with more limited and short-lived success. More recent evidence, reveals that even adult patients may benefit significantly from removal of diseased TM tissue and can lead to a significant reduction in IOP that is long-lasting and safe. In this review, we discuss current evidence and techniques for ab interno trabeculectomy using various devices in the adult patient.

  1. A morphometric study of the celiac trunk and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Venieratos, Dionysios; Panagouli, Eleni; Lolis, Evangelos; Tsaraklis, Athanasios; Skandalakis, Panagiotis

    2013-09-01

    The anatomy of the celiac trunk and its branches was examined in 77 adult human cadavers of Caucasian (Hellenic) origin. The celiac trunk followed the normal pattern, namely trifurcation to the common hepatic, splenic, and left gastric arteries, in 90.9% of the dissections (70/77). Two different types of trifurcation were observed: (a) a true tripod when the celiac trunk ended in a complete trifurcation (74.0%, 57/77) and (b) a false tripod when the three arteries did not have a common origin (16.9%, 13/77). Such a clear predominance of the true tripod is not reported elsewhere. Anatomic variations were found in 9.1% (7/77). Bifurcation of the celiac trunk into splenic and left gastric artery (splenogastric trunk) was observed in one specimen (1.3%), whereas the common hepatic artery emerged directly from the aorta. Absence of the celiac trunk was also found in two individuals (2.6%). The celiac trunk presented additional branches (lumbar and inferior phrenic arteries) in 5.2% (4/77). The median level of origin of the celiac trunk was at the upper third of L1 (22.7% to 17/75). The total length of the celiac trunk ranged from 1.1 to 5.0 cm, whereas the mean length was 2.8 cm (standard deviation = 0.80 cm, standard error of mean = 0.09 cm) irrespective of the existence of variations. The mean length of the celiac arteries which formed a false tripod was found to be larger than those of the arteries which formed a true tripod but only a weak statistically significant difference was established (P = 0.073).

  2. Aortic, celiac axis, and superior mesenteric artery thrombosis associated with sigmoid colon adenocarcinoma and hypercoagulable state.

    PubMed

    Serck, Luke C; Cogbill, Thomas H

    2009-01-01

    A patient with sigmoid colon adenocarcinoma and hypercoagulable state developed acute visceral ischemia secondary to thrombus involving the suprarenal aorta, celiac axis and superior mesenteric artery. A large, laminated fibrin thrombus was removed via supraceliac aortotomy. Attempts to clear thrombus from branches of the celiac axis and superior mesenteric artery by open and catheter-based techniques were of limited success. Extensive visceral infarction ensued and the patient died.

  3. Motility alterations in celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Sanchez, Maria Ines; Bercik, Premysl; Verdu, Elena F

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of gut motility is complex and involves neuromuscular, immune and environmental mechanisms. It is well established that patients with celiac disease (CD) often display gut dysmotility. Studies have shown the presence of disturbed esophageal motility, altered gastric emptying, and dysmotility of the small intestine, gallbladder and colon in untreated CD. Most of these motor abnormalities resolve after a strict gluten-free diet, suggesting that mechanisms related to the inflammatory condition and disease process are responsible for the motor dysfunction. Motility abnormalities are also a hallmark of functional bowel disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), where it has been proposed as underlying mechanism for symptom generation (diarrhea, constipation, bloating). Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is a poorly defined entity, mostly self-diagnosed, that presents clinically with IBS symptoms in the absence of specific celiac markers. Patients with NCGS are believed to react symptomatically to wheat components, and some studies have proposed the presence of low-grade inflammation in these patients. There is little information regarding the functional characterization of these patients before and after a gluten-free diet. A study suggested the presence of altered gastrointestinal transit in NCGS patients who also have a high prevalence of nonspecific anti-gliadin antibodies. Results of an ongoing clinical study in NCGS patients with positive anti-gliadin antibodies before and after a gluten-free diet will be discussed. Elucidating the mechanisms for symptom generation in NCGS patients is important to find new therapeutic alternatives to the burden of imposing a strict gluten-free diet in patients who do not have CD.

  4. Motility alterations in celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Sanchez, Maria Ines; Bercik, Premysl; Verdu, Elena F

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of gut motility is complex and involves neuromuscular, immune and environmental mechanisms. It is well established that patients with celiac disease (CD) often display gut dysmotility. Studies have shown the presence of disturbed esophageal motility, altered gastric emptying, and dysmotility of the small intestine, gallbladder and colon in untreated CD. Most of these motor abnormalities resolve after a strict gluten-free diet, suggesting that mechanisms related to the inflammatory condition and disease process are responsible for the motor dysfunction. Motility abnormalities are also a hallmark of functional bowel disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), where it has been proposed as underlying mechanism for symptom generation (diarrhea, constipation, bloating). Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is a poorly defined entity, mostly self-diagnosed, that presents clinically with IBS symptoms in the absence of specific celiac markers. Patients with NCGS are believed to react symptomatically to wheat components, and some studies have proposed the presence of low-grade inflammation in these patients. There is little information regarding the functional characterization of these patients before and after a gluten-free diet. A study suggested the presence of altered gastrointestinal transit in NCGS patients who also have a high prevalence of nonspecific anti-gliadin antibodies. Results of an ongoing clinical study in NCGS patients with positive anti-gliadin antibodies before and after a gluten-free diet will be discussed. Elucidating the mechanisms for symptom generation in NCGS patients is important to find new therapeutic alternatives to the burden of imposing a strict gluten-free diet in patients who do not have CD. PMID:25925923

  5. Celiac artery disease and fatal rupture of a hepatic artery aneurysm in the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nat, Amritpal; George, Tanya; Mak, Gregory; Sharma, Amit; Nat, Amitpal; Lebel, Robert

    2014-04-01

    Isolated visceral arteriopathies of the celiac and hepatic artery are rare. We present a case of a Caucasian man who presented with abdominal pain and was found to have a spontaneous celiac artery dissection. Genetic analysis revealed a mutation consistent with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV. The patient died 2 months later from a spontaneous rupture of his hepatic artery. PMID:24688192

  6. Mycotic Aneurysm of the Celiac Trunk: From Early CT Sign to Rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Serafino, Gianpiero Vroegindeweij, Dammis; Boks, Simone; Harst, Erwin van der

    2005-06-15

    We present a case of the rapid development and rupture of a mycotic celiac trunk aneurysm. Initiallyon multislice computed tomography (ms-CT) there was a normal celiac trunk with minimal haziness of the surrounding fat. Only 2 weeks later the patient went into hypovolemic shock due to a ruptured celiac aneurysm. Although aneurysms of the visceral arteries are rare, they are of major clinical importance as they carry a life-threatening risk of rupture. This case illustrates the use of ms-CT in detecting and evaluating visceral aneurysms, in order to prevent emergency operation.

  7. Study of HLA-DQA1 alleles in celiac children.

    PubMed

    Nieto, A; Blanco Quirós, A; Arranz, E; Alonso Franch, M; Garrote, J A; Calvo, C

    1995-01-01

    The familial incidence of celiac disease (CD) confirms its genetic basis, although acquired factors are also involved. Many authors have reported a linkage between celiac disease and HLA antigens, but there are differences which depend on geographical areas, and nowadays the study must be done at the genetic level. Thirty-eight celiac children and 52 normal controls were included in this study. All individuals were chosen from the Castilla and Leon area. We used the reverse ¿dot block¿ technique, using sequence-specific oligonucleotide DNA probes (Cetus, USA) to determine the HLA-DQA1 alleles in DNA samples previously amplified by PCR (polymerase chain reaction). The different frequency of alleles in patients and controls was assessed by 3 statistical tests: chi square (chi(2)), relative risk (RR) and etiologic fraction (EF). A very high frequency of DQA1*0201 (chi(2):p <0.0001) and DQA1*0501 (chi(2): p <0.0001) alleles was observed in patients; all but one (97%) had the DQA1*0501 allele vs. 40% of controls (RR: 37.00; EF: 0.955). The DQA1*0201 allele also had a high prevalence in celiacs (58%)(RR: 1.375: EF:0.438). The DQA1*01 allele was only found in 10.5% of patients compared to 79% of controls (chi(2): p <0.0001) and the DQA1*03 allele was also decreased in celiacs. There was only one celiac girl without the DQA1*0501 allele. She had no other clinical or serological differences, as compared to the other patients. In the study of allele subtypes, among the DQA1*01 allele, 50% of patients were positive for DQA1*101 and the remaining 50% had DQA1*0102, but none of the individuals were positive for DQA1*0103. Among normal controls, 32 individuals (61.5%) expressed the DQA1*0102 subtype, 15 (28.9%) the DQA1*0101 subtype and 5 (9.6%) the DQA1*0103 subtype. All positive cases for DQA1-*05 belong to the DQA1* 0501 subtype, in both celiac and control groups. There were 10 possible combinations of HLA-DQA1 genes, but we found a very unequal distribution in both celiacs

  8. What is Celiac Disease? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Celiac Disease What is Celiac Disease? Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table of Contents Celiac ... people choose the right foods. How common is celiac disease? Celiac disease affects people in all parts of ...

  9. Distal Pancreatectomy With En Bloc Resection of the Celiac Trunk for Extended Pancreatic Tumor Disease: An Interdisciplinary Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Denecke, Timm; Andreou, Andreas; Podrabsky, Petr; Grieser, Christian; Warnick, Peter; Bahra, Marcus; Klein, Fritz; Hamm, Bernd; Neuhaus, Peter; Glanemann, Matthias

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: Infiltration of the celiac trunk by adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic body has been considered a contraindication for surgical treatment, thus resulting in a very poor prognosis. The concept of distal pancreatectomy with resection of the celiac trunk offers a curative treatment option but implies the risk of relevant hepatic or gastric ischemia. We describe initial experiences in a small series of patients with left celiacopancreatectomy with or without angiographic preconditioning of arterial blood flow to the stomach and the liver. Materials and Methods: Between January 2007 and October 2009, six patients underwent simultaneous resection of the celiac trunk for adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic body involving the celiac axis. In four of these cases, angiographic occlusion of the celiac trunk before surgery was performed to enhance collateral flow from the gastroduodenal artery. Radiologic and surgical procedures, findings, and outcome were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Complete tumor removal (R0) succeeded in two patients, whereas four patients underwent R1-tumor resection. After surgery, one of the two patients without angiographic preparation experienced an ischemic stomach perforation 1 week after surgery. The other patient died from severe bleeding from an ischemic gastric ulcer. Of the four patients with celiac trunk embolization, none presented ischemic complications after surgery. Mean survival was 371 days. Conclusion: In this small series, ischemic complications after celiacopancreatectomy occurred only in those patients who did not receive preoperative celiac trunk embolization.

  10. Carboplatin dosing for adult Japanese patients.

    PubMed

    Ando, Yuichi; Shimokata, Tomoya; Yasuda, Yoshinari; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2014-02-01

    Carboplatin is a platinum-based anticancer drug that has been long used to treat many types of solid cancer. Because the clearance of carboplatin strongly correlates with the glomerular filtration rate (GFR), its dosage is calculated with the Calvert formula on the basis of the patient's GFR to achieve the target area under the plasma drug concentration-time curve (AUC) for each patient. However, many lines of evidence from previous clinical studies should be interpreted with caution because different methods were used to estimate drug clearance and derive the dosage of carboplatin. There is a particularly high risk of carboplatin overdosing when the dosage is determined on the basis of standardized serum creatinine values. When deciding the dose of carboplatin for adult Japanese patients, preferred methods to assess renal function instead of directly measuring GFR include (1) 24-h urinary collection-based creatinine clearance adjusted by adding 0.2 mg/dl to the serum creatinine concentration measured by standardized methods, and (2) equation-based GFR (eGFR) with a back calculation to units of ml/min per subject. Given the limitations of serum creatinine-based GFR estimations, the GFR or creatinine clearance should be directly measured in each patient whenever possible. To ensure patient safety and facilitate a medical-team approach, the single most appropriate method available at each institute or medical team should be consistently used to calculate the dose of carboplatin with the Calvert formula.

  11. Atlantoaxial Rotatory Fixation in Adults Patient

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Sei Woong; Moon, Seung Myung; Choi, Sun Kil

    2009-01-01

    Atlantoaxial rotatory fixation (AARF) in adult is a rare disorder that occurs followed by a trauma. The patients were presented with painful torticollis and a typical 'cock robin' position of the head. The clinical diagnosis is generally difficult and often made in the late stage. In some cases, an irreducible or chronic fixation develops. We reported a case of AARF in adult patient which was treated by immobilization with conservative treatment. A 25-year-old female was presented with a posterior neck pain and limitation of motion of cervical spine after a traffic accident. She had no neurological deficit but suffered from severe defect on the scalp and multiple thoracic compression fractures. Plain radiographs demonstrated torticollis, lateral shift of odontoid process to one side and widening of one side of C1-C2 joint space. Immobilization with a Holter traction were performed and analgesics and muscle relaxants were given. Posterior neck pain and limitation of the cervical spine's motion were resolved. Plain cervical radiographs taken at one month after the injury showed that torticollis disappeared and the dens were in the midline position. The authors reported a case of type I post-traumatic AARF that was successfully treated by immobilization alone. PMID:19444353

  12. Diagnostic yield of endoscopic markers for celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Balaban, DV; Popp, A; Vasilescu, F; Haidautu, D; Purcarea, RM; Jinga, M

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: In the setting of open access endoscopy, the recognition of suggestive endoscopic features in the duodenum can select patients with probability of celiac disease (CD). This could add to the current efforts to increase the diagnostic rate of this disease. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of these markers for CD in an adult population undergoing endoscopy, without a prior serological testing. Methods and Results: Over a period of 3 years, between June 2012 and 2015, all the patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and presented one or more of the endoscopic markers consistent with CD, or those suspected for CD, irrespective of the presence of these markers, were included. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were calculated for these markers in CD diagnosis. Among the 182 patients, 56.04% were females, with a mean age of 47.6 ± 13.9 years. 20/182 (10.99%) had a final diagnosis of CD. The presence of any endoscopic marker had a high sensitivity (95%) and a negative predictive value (98.41%). Bulb atrophy and reduced folds in the descending duodenum had a low diagnostic accuracy, while scalloping, mosaic pattern and fissures were highly specific for CD (98.77%, 99.38% and 98.77%) and their presence greatly increased the probability of CD, with a positive likelihood ratio of 24.3, 24.3 and 12.15, respectively. Discussions: A wide set of endoscopic markers, including the duodenal bulb, were evaluated in this study. Our results showed that the endoscopy with a careful examination of the duodenum is a sensitive indicator for CD. Abbreviations: CD = celiac disease, GI = gastrointestinal, VA = villous atrophy, NSAID = nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, Sn = sensitivity, Sp = specificity, PPV = positive predictive value, NPV = negative predictive value, AUC = area under the curve, ROC = receiver operating characteristics, WLE = white light endoscopy, NBI = narrow band imaging, t

  13. Prevalence of celiac disease in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) is a common systemic disease related to a permanent intolerance to gluten and is often associated with different autoimmune and neurological diseases. Its mean prevalence in the general population is 1-2% worldwide. Our aim was to study the prevalence of celiac disease in a prospective series of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients and their first-degree relatives. Methods We analyzed the prevalence of serological, histological and genetic CD markers in a series of 72 MS patients and in their 126 first-degree relatives, compared to 123 healthy controls. Results Tissue IgA-anti-transglutaminase-2 antibodies were positive in 7 MS patients (10%), compared to 3 healthy controls (2.4%) (p < 0.05). OR: 5.33 (CI-95%: 1.074-26.425). No differences were found in HLA-DQ2 markers between MS patients (29%) and controls (26%) (NS). We detected mild or moderate villous atrophy (Marsh III type) in duodenal biopsies, in 8 MS patients (11.1%). We also found a high proportion of CD among first-degree relatives: 23/126 (32%). Several associated diseases were detected, mainly dermatitis 41 (57%) and iron deficiency anemia in 28 (39%) MS patients. We also found in them, an increased frequency of circulating auto-antibodies such as anti-TPO in 19 (26%), ANA in 11 (15%) and AMA in 2 (3%). Conclusions We have found an increased prevalence of CD in 8 of the 72 MS patients (11.1%) and also in their first-degree relatives (23/126 [32%]). Therefore, increased efforts aimed at the early detection and dietary treatment of CD, among antibody-positive MS patients, are advisable. PMID:21385364

  14. Genetic variants associated with celiac disease and the risk for coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Henning; Willenborg, Christina; Schlesinger, Sabrina; Ferrario, Paola G; König, Inke R; Erdmann, Jeanette; Samani, Nilesh J; Lieb, Wolfgang; Schunkert, Heribert

    2015-10-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that patients with celiac disease are at increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). Genetic-epidemiological analyses identified many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with celiac disease. If there is a causal relation between celiac disease and CAD, one might expect that risk alleles primarily associated with celiac disease also increase the risk of CAD. In this study we identified from literature 41 SNPs that have been previously described to be genome-wide associated with celiac disease (p < 5 × 10(-08)). These SNPs were evaluated for their association with CAD in the Coronary ARtery DIsease Genome-wide Replication and Meta-analysis (CARDIoGRAM) dataset, a meta-analysis comprising genome-wide SNP association data from 22,233 CAD cases and 64,762 controls. 24 out of 41 (58.5 %) risk alleles for celiac disease displayed a positive association with CAD (CAD-OR range 1.001-1.081). The remaining risk alleles for celiac disease (n = 16) revealed CAD-ORs of ≤1.0 (range 0.951-1.0). The proportion of CAD associated alleles was greater but did not differ significantly from the proportion of 50 % expected by chance (p = 0.069). One SNP (rs653178 at the SH2B3/ATXN2 locus) displayed study-wise statistically significant association with CAD with directionality consistent effects on celiac disease and CAD. However, the effect of this locus is most likely driven by pleiotropic effects on multiple other diseases. In conclusion, this genetically based approach provided no convincing evidence that SNPs associated with celiac disease contribute to the risk of CAD. Hence, common non-genetic factors may play a more important role explaining the coincidence of these two complex disease conditions.

  15. An Unusual Case of Stent Migration After Celiac Trunk Endovascular Revascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Negri, Silvia; Ferraro, Stefania; Piffaretti, Gabriele Rivolta, Nicola; Bossi, Matteo; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Castelli, Patrizio

    2012-08-15

    A 61-year-old woman underwent celiac trunk stenting to treat abdominal angina. Three months later, she was readmitted for recurrent symptoms. Computed tomography control revealed the migration of the stent into the splenic artery. No sign of vessel injury or end-organ ischemia was detected. Repeat stenting of the celiac trunk was performed; the postoperative course was uneventful. 12 months later, the patient was asymptomatic with the second stent in its correct position, and she was asymptomatic for mesenteric ischemia.

  16. Frequency of Celiac Disease In Children With Chronic Functional Constipation in Shiraz-Iran.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Ehsaei, Zahra; Honar, Naser; Javaherizadeh, Hazhir

    2015-07-01

    BACKGROUND Celiac disease is an autoimmune mediated small intestine inflammation which occurs due to hypersensitivity reaction to gluten and related proteins in diet in genetically predisposed individuals. Prevalence of celiac among the population is about 0.5 - 1 % in most countries. Frequency of celiac disease in children is the subject of a few research. In this study, we aim to determine the frequency of celiac disease in patients presenting with functional constipation. METHODS This cross-sectional study was conducted on children referring to Imam Reza Clinic, affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences during one year starting from 2011, March 20. One hundred and one children 2-18 years of age with constipation for more than 2 months according to ROME III criteria. The entire participants underwent serologic studies of Total IgA and IgA TTG. Serum IgG TTG was measured in cases with reported values of Total IgA below the lowest normal limits. Moreover, endoscopic biopsy of the small intestine was also performed for patients with positive serology. RESULTS Of all the 101 studied participants, only four individuals (3.96 %) had positive test results for IgA TTG ( potential celiac disease). one of these patients refused to do endoscopy and endoscopic small intestine biopsy was performed for 3 patients. Two of them had normal pathology and one of them(0.99 %) was confirmed for celiac disease. CONCLUSION The frequency of celiac disease in children with chronic constipation is slightly higher than general population but without significant difference( 0.99% VS 0.6% ; p=0.64). So the screening serologic test for celiac disease is not recommended in children with chronic constipation.

  17. Magneto immunofluorescence assay for diagnosis of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Kergaravat, Silvina V; Beltramino, Luis; Garnero, Nidia; Trotta, Liliana; Wagener, Marta; Fabiano, Silvia N; Pividori, Maria Isabel; Hernandez, Silvia R

    2013-10-10

    A magneto immunofluorescence assay for the detection of anti-transglutaminase antibodies (ATG2) in celiac disease was developed. The ATG2 were recognized by transglutaminase enzyme immobilized on the magnetic beads and then the immunological reaction was revealed by antibodies labeled with peroxidase. The fluorescent response of the enzymatic reaction with o-phenylenediamine and H2O2 as substrates was correlated with anti-transglutaminase titer, showing EC50 and LOD values of 1:11,600 and 1:74,500 of antibody titers, respectively. A total number of 29 sera samples from clinically confirmed cases of celiac disease and 19 negative control samples were tested by the novel magneto immunofluorescence assay. The data were submitted to the receiver-operating characteristic plot (ROC) analysis which indicated that 8.1 U was the most effective cut-off value to discriminate correctly between celiac and non-celiac patients. The immunofluorescence assay exhibited a sensitivity of 96.6%, a specificity of 89.5% and an efficiency 93.8% compared with the commercial optical ELISA kit. PMID:24070488

  18. The spectrum of celiac disease: epidemiology, clinical aspects and treatment.

    PubMed

    Tack, Greetje J; Verbeek, Wieke H M; Schreurs, Marco W J; Mulder, Chris J J

    2010-04-01

    Celiac disease is a gluten-sensitive enteropathy that affects people of all ages worldwide. This disease has emerged as a major health-care problem, as advances in diagnostic and screening methods have revealed its global prevalence. Environmental factors such as gluten introduction at childhood, infectious agents and socioeconomic features, as well as the presence of HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8 haplotypes or genetic variations in several non-HLA genes contribute to the development of celiac disease. Growing insight into the variable clinical and histopathological presentation features of this disease has opened new perspectives for future research. A strict life-long gluten-free diet is the only safe and efficient available treatment, yet it results in a social burden. Alternative treatment modalities focus on modification of dietary components, enzymatic degradation of gluten, inhibition of intestinal permeability and modulation of the immune response. A small group of patients with celiac disease (2-5%), however, fail to improve clinically and histologically upon elimination of dietary gluten. This complication is referred to as refractory celiac disease, and imposes a serious risk of developing a virtually lethal enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma.

  19. Magneto immunofluorescence assay for diagnosis of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Kergaravat, Silvina V; Beltramino, Luis; Garnero, Nidia; Trotta, Liliana; Wagener, Marta; Fabiano, Silvia N; Pividori, Maria Isabel; Hernandez, Silvia R

    2013-10-10

    A magneto immunofluorescence assay for the detection of anti-transglutaminase antibodies (ATG2) in celiac disease was developed. The ATG2 were recognized by transglutaminase enzyme immobilized on the magnetic beads and then the immunological reaction was revealed by antibodies labeled with peroxidase. The fluorescent response of the enzymatic reaction with o-phenylenediamine and H2O2 as substrates was correlated with anti-transglutaminase titer, showing EC50 and LOD values of 1:11,600 and 1:74,500 of antibody titers, respectively. A total number of 29 sera samples from clinically confirmed cases of celiac disease and 19 negative control samples were tested by the novel magneto immunofluorescence assay. The data were submitted to the receiver-operating characteristic plot (ROC) analysis which indicated that 8.1 U was the most effective cut-off value to discriminate correctly between celiac and non-celiac patients. The immunofluorescence assay exhibited a sensitivity of 96.6%, a specificity of 89.5% and an efficiency 93.8% compared with the commercial optical ELISA kit.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: celiac disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... It appears likely that other contributors, such as environmental factors and changes in other genes, also influence the development of ... ME. Celiac disease: a model disease for gene-environment interaction. Cell Mol Immunol. 2011 Mar;8(2):93-5. doi: ... 2015 Published : September 8, 2016 The resources on this site should not be ...

  1. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Oats: A Canadian Position Based on a Literature Review.

    PubMed

    La Vieille, Sébastien; Pulido, Olga M; Abbott, Michael; Koerner, Terence B; Godefroy, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the latest scientific data related to the safety of uncontaminated oats (<20 ppm of gluten) in the diet of individuals with celiac disease (CD). It updates the previous Health Canada position posted on the Health Canada website in 2007 and a related paper published in 2009. It considers a number of recent studies published between January 2008 and January 2015. While recognizing that a few people with celiac disease seem to be clinically intolerant to oats, this review concludes that oats uncontaminated by gluten-containing cereals (wheat, rye, and barley) can be safely ingested by most patients with celiac disease and that there is no conclusive evidence that the consumption of uncontaminated or specially produced oats containing no greater than 20 ppm gluten by patients with celiac disease should be limited to a specific daily amount. However, individuals with CD should observe a stabilization phase before introducing uncontaminated oats to the gluten-free diet (GFD). Oats uncontaminated with gluten should only be introduced after all symptoms of celiac disease have resolved and the individual has been on a GFD for a minimum of 6 months. Long-term regular medical follow-up of these patients is recommended but this is no different recommendation to celiac individuals on a GFD without oats.

  2. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Oats: A Canadian Position Based on a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    La Vieille, Sébastien; Pulido, Olga M.; Abbott, Michael; Koerner, Terence B.; Godefroy, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the latest scientific data related to the safety of uncontaminated oats (<20 ppm of gluten) in the diet of individuals with celiac disease (CD). It updates the previous Health Canada position posted on the Health Canada website in 2007 and a related paper published in 2009. It considers a number of recent studies published between January 2008 and January 2015. While recognizing that a few people with celiac disease seem to be clinically intolerant to oats, this review concludes that oats uncontaminated by gluten-containing cereals (wheat, rye, and barley) can be safely ingested by most patients with celiac disease and that there is no conclusive evidence that the consumption of uncontaminated or specially produced oats containing no greater than 20 ppm gluten by patients with celiac disease should be limited to a specific daily amount. However, individuals with CD should observe a stabilization phase before introducing uncontaminated oats to the gluten-free diet (GFD). Oats uncontaminated with gluten should only be introduced after all symptoms of celiac disease have resolved and the individual has been on a GFD for a minimum of 6 months. Long-term regular medical follow-up of these patients is recommended but this is no different recommendation to celiac individuals on a GFD without oats. PMID:27446825

  3. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Oats: A Canadian Position Based on a Literature Review.

    PubMed

    La Vieille, Sébastien; Pulido, Olga M; Abbott, Michael; Koerner, Terence B; Godefroy, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the latest scientific data related to the safety of uncontaminated oats (<20 ppm of gluten) in the diet of individuals with celiac disease (CD). It updates the previous Health Canada position posted on the Health Canada website in 2007 and a related paper published in 2009. It considers a number of recent studies published between January 2008 and January 2015. While recognizing that a few people with celiac disease seem to be clinically intolerant to oats, this review concludes that oats uncontaminated by gluten-containing cereals (wheat, rye, and barley) can be safely ingested by most patients with celiac disease and that there is no conclusive evidence that the consumption of uncontaminated or specially produced oats containing no greater than 20 ppm gluten by patients with celiac disease should be limited to a specific daily amount. However, individuals with CD should observe a stabilization phase before introducing uncontaminated oats to the gluten-free diet (GFD). Oats uncontaminated with gluten should only be introduced after all symptoms of celiac disease have resolved and the individual has been on a GFD for a minimum of 6 months. Long-term regular medical follow-up of these patients is recommended but this is no different recommendation to celiac individuals on a GFD without oats. PMID:27446825

  4. Transition of gastroenterological patients from paediatric to adult care: A position statement by the Italian Societies of Gastroenterology.

    PubMed

    Elli, Luca; Maieron, Roberto; Martelossi, Stefano; Guariso, Graziella; Buscarini, Elisabetta; Conte, Dario; di Giulio, Emilio; Staiano, Annamaria; Barp, Jacopo; Bassotti, Gabrio; Bianco, Maria Antonia; Buri, Luigi; Carrara, Maurizio; Ghidini, Benedetta; Giannini, Olivia; Knafelz, Daniela; Miele, Erasmo; Peralta, Sergio; Riccio, Elisabetta; Tomba, Carolina; Zilli, Maurizio; Guadagnini, Tiziana

    2015-09-01

    In 2013, four Italian Gastroenterological Societies (the Italian Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, the Italian Society of Hospital Gastroenterologists and Endoscopists, the Italian Society of Endoscopy, and the Italian Society of Gastroenterology) formed a joint panel of experts with the aim of preparing an official statement on transition medicine in Gastroenterology. The transition of adolescents from paediatric to adult care is a crucial moment in managing chronic diseases such as celiac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, liver disease and liver transplantation. Improved medical treatment and availability of new drugs and surgical techniques have improved the prognosis of many paediatric disorders, prolonging survival, thus making the transition to adulthood possible and necessary. An inappropriate transition or the incomplete transmission of data from the paediatrician to the adult Gastroenterologist can dramatically decrease compliance to treatment and prognosis of a young patient, particularly in the case of severe disorders. For these reasons, the Italian gastroenterological societies decided to develop an official shared transition protocol. The resulting document discusses the factors influencing the transition process and highlights the main points to accomplish to optimize compliance and prognosis of gastroenterological patients during the difficult transition from childhood to adolescence and adulthood.

  5. Association between celiac disease and primary lactase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Basso, M S; Luciano, R; Ferretti, F; Muraca, M; Panetta, F; Bracci, F; Ottino, S; Diamanti, A

    2012-12-01

    Primary lactase deficiency (PLD) is a common inherited condition caused by a reduced activity of lactase. Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms C/T(-13910) and G/A(-22018) upstream of the lactase gene are associated with lactase nonpersistence. In celiac disease (CD) patients, lactose intolerance could be due to secondary lactase deficiency and to PLD. The aim of this study were to evaluate the association of PLD and CD using genetic test, and to define the prevalence of PLD in celiac subjects compared with a control population. A total of 188 controls and 92 biopsy-proven CD patients were included in the study. More than 70% of all subjects were found homozygous for the polymorphisms. Differences in the prevalence of PLD were not found between CD patients and controls.In conclusions, the hereditary lactase deficiency is frequent in Italian CD children as in control population.

  6. Serendipity in Refractory Celiac Disease: Full Recovery of Duodenal Villi and Clinical Symptoms after Fecal Microbiota Transfer.

    PubMed

    van Beurden, Yvette H; van Gils, Tom; van Gils, Nienke A; Kassam, Zain; Mulder, Chris J J; Aparicio-Pagés, Nieves

    2016-09-01

    Treatment of refractory celiac disease type II (RCD II) and preventing the development of an enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma in these patients is still difficult. In this case report, we describe a patient with RCD II who received fecal microbiota transfer as treatment for a recurrent Clostridium difficile infection, and remarkably showed a full recovery of duodenal villi and disappearance of celiac symptoms. This case suggests that altering the gut microbiota may hold promise in improving the clinical and histological consequences of celiac disease and/or RCD II. PMID:27689204

  7. [Non-celiac disease non-wheat allergy wheat sensitivity].

    PubMed

    Zopf, Yurdagül; Dieterich, Walburga

    2015-11-01

    Non-celiac non-wheat allergy wheat sensitivity is regarded as discrete glutensensitivity diagnosed after the exclusion of celiac disease and wheat allergy. Due to the absence of reliable biomarkers no exact prevalence rates are known and estimations range between 0,5-6 %. Soon after ingestion of wheat, patients complain of intestinal symptoms mainly bloating, abdominal pain, diarrhea or nausea which improve fast under glutenfree diet. Often extraintestinal manifestation as tiredness, muscle or joint pain, headache and depression are reported. Actually, there are no serological markers and no intestinal mucosal damage was found in patients. The underlying mechanism of the disease is completely unknown and beside of gluten other wheat proteins as well as amylase-trypsin-inhibitor or short chain sugars are discussed as triggers. In addition, the involvement of the intestinal microbiome in pathology of glutensensitivity must be considered.

  8. [Non-celiac disease non-wheat allergy wheat sensitivity].

    PubMed

    Zopf, Yurdagül; Dieterich, Walburga

    2015-11-01

    Non-celiac non-wheat allergy wheat sensitivity is regarded as discrete glutensensitivity diagnosed after the exclusion of celiac disease and wheat allergy. Due to the absence of reliable biomarkers no exact prevalence rates are known and estimations range between 0,5-6 %. Soon after ingestion of wheat, patients complain of intestinal symptoms mainly bloating, abdominal pain, diarrhea or nausea which improve fast under glutenfree diet. Often extraintestinal manifestation as tiredness, muscle or joint pain, headache and depression are reported. Actually, there are no serological markers and no intestinal mucosal damage was found in patients. The underlying mechanism of the disease is completely unknown and beside of gluten other wheat proteins as well as amylase-trypsin-inhibitor or short chain sugars are discussed as triggers. In addition, the involvement of the intestinal microbiome in pathology of glutensensitivity must be considered. PMID:26536646

  9. Glyphosate, pathways to modern diseases II: Celiac sprue and gluten intolerance.

    PubMed

    Samsel, Anthony; Seneff, Stephanie

    2013-12-01

    Celiac disease, and, more generally, gluten intolerance, is a growing problem worldwide, but especially in North America and Europe, where an estimated 5% of the population now suffers from it. Symptoms include nausea, diarrhea, skin rashes, macrocytic anemia and depression. It is a multifactorial disease associated with numerous nutritional deficiencies as well as reproductive issues and increased risk to thyroid disease, kidney failure and cancer. Here, we propose that glyphosate, the active ingredient in the herbicide, Roundup(®), is the most important causal factor in this epidemic. Fish exposed to glyphosate develop digestive problems that are reminiscent of celiac disease. Celiac disease is associated with imbalances in gut bacteria that can be fully explained by the known effects of glyphosate on gut bacteria. Characteristics of celiac disease point to impairment in many cytochrome P450 enzymes, which are involved with detoxifying environmental toxins, activating vitamin D3, catabolizing vitamin A, and maintaining bile acid production and sulfate supplies to the gut. Glyphosate is known to inhibit cytochrome P450 enzymes. Deficiencies in iron, cobalt, molybdenum, copper and other rare metals associated with celiac disease can be attributed to glyphosate's strong ability to chelate these elements. Deficiencies in tryptophan, tyrosine, methionine and selenomethionine associated with celiac disease match glyphosate's known depletion of these amino acids. Celiac disease patients have an increased risk to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, which has also been implicated in glyphosate exposure. Reproductive issues associated with celiac disease, such as infertility, miscarriages, and birth defects, can also be explained by glyphosate. Glyphosate residues in wheat and other crops are likely increasing recently due to the growing practice of crop desiccation just prior to the harvest. We argue that the practice of "ripening" sugar cane with glyphosate may explain the recent

  10. Glyphosate, pathways to modern diseases II: Celiac sprue and gluten intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Samsel, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease, and, more generally, gluten intolerance, is a growing problem worldwide, but especially in North America and Europe, where an estimated 5% of the population now suffers from it. Symptoms include nausea, diarrhea, skin rashes, macrocytic anemia and depression. It is a multifactorial disease associated with numerous nutritional deficiencies as well as reproductive issues and increased risk to thyroid disease, kidney failure and cancer. Here, we propose that glyphosate, the active ingredient in the herbicide, Roundup®, is the most important causal factor in this epidemic. Fish exposed to glyphosate develop digestive problems that are reminiscent of celiac disease. Celiac disease is associated with imbalances in gut bacteria that can be fully explained by the known effects of glyphosate on gut bacteria. Characteristics of celiac disease point to impairment in many cytochrome P450 enzymes, which are involved with detoxifying environmental toxins, activating vitamin D3, catabolizing vitamin A, and maintaining bile acid production and sulfate supplies to the gut. Glyphosate is known to inhibit cytochrome P450 enzymes. Deficiencies in iron, cobalt, molybdenum, copper and other rare metals associated with celiac disease can be attributed to glyphosate's strong ability to chelate these elements. Deficiencies in tryptophan, tyrosine, methionine and selenomethionine associated with celiac disease match glyphosate's known depletion of these amino acids. Celiac disease patients have an increased risk to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, which has also been implicated in glyphosate exposure. Reproductive issues associated with celiac disease, such as infertility, miscarriages, and birth defects, can also be explained by glyphosate. Glyphosate residues in wheat and other crops are likely increasing recently due to the growing practice of crop desiccation just prior to the harvest. We argue that the practice of “ripening” sugar cane with glyphosate may explain the recent

  11. [T lymphocyte populations of the intestinal mucosa in celiac disease in children. Immunohistochemical study].

    PubMed

    Olives, J P; Voigt, J J; al Saati, T; Nonnenmacher, L; Brousset, P; Delsol, G; Ghisolfi, J

    1990-01-01

    In order to study the distribution of lymphocyte subpopulations in a pathologic intestinal mucosa, the authors, instead of using the classic method by counting the number of lymphocytes, present an original method permitting the exploitation of quantified data from labelled surface cells by texture analyser coupled with a computerized system. We investigated 25 children presenting with chronic diarrhea and villous atrophy and 5 control subjects. Fifteen of the 25 children had celiac disease (10 active with total villous atrophy and 5, celiac disease in remission with healing mucosa), 5 cow's milk protein intolerance with total or partial villous atrophy and 5, chronic diarrhea with partial villous atrophy. Immunohistochemical study with monoclonal antibodies was carried out on frozen sections using a three-step immunoperoxidase technique. Compared with the 5 controls, patients with food intolerance (celiac disease and cow's milk protein intolerance) showed a significant increase of T suppressor lymphocytes (p less than 0.01 and p less than 0.05) in the epithelium, whereas there were more T helper lymphocytes in the lamina propria (p less than 0.05 and p less than 0.01). Non-treated celiac disease was distinguished from treated celiac disease by a marked increase in intra-epithelial T cytotoxic-suppressors. These results suggest that T cytotoxic-suppressors may be the mediators of the lesions observed in celiac disease. PMID:2179007

  12. Celiac disease in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Celiac Disease (CD) occurs in patients with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) ranging the prevalence of 4.4-11.1% versus 0.5% of the general population. The mechanism of association of these two diseases involves a shared genetic background: HLA genotype DR3-DQ2 and DR4-DQ8 are strongly associated with T1D, DR3-DQ2 with CD. The classical severe presentation of CD rarely occurs in T1D patients, but more often patients have few/mild symptoms of CD or are completely asymptomatic (silent CD). In fact diagnosis of CD is regularly performed by means of the screening in T1D patients. The effects of gluten-free diet (GFD) on the growth and T1D metabolic control in CD/T1D patient are controversial. Regarding of the GFD composition, there is a debate on the higher glycaemic index of gluten-free foods respect to gluten-containing foods; furthermore GFD could be poorer of fibers and richer of fat. The adherence to GFD by children with CD-T1D has been reported generally below 50%, lower respect to the 73% of CD patients, a lower compliance being more frequent among asymptomatic patients. The more severe problems of GFD adherence usually occur during adolescence when in GFD non compliant subjects the lowest quality of life is reported. A psychological and educational support should be provided for these patients. PMID:22449104

  13. Epidemiology of Celiac Disease in Iran: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Rostami Nejad, M; Rostami, K; Emami, MH; Zali, MR; Malekzadeh, R

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) was traditionally believed to be a chronic enteropathy, almost exclusively affecting people of European origin. Celiac disease is the permanent intolerance to dietary gluten, the major protein component of wheat. The availability of new, simple, very sensitive and specific serological tests has shown that CD is as common in Middle Eastern countries as in Europe, Australia and New Zealand where the major dietary staple is wheat. A high prevalence of CD has been found in Iran, in both the general population and the at-risk groups, i.e. patients with type 1 diabetes or irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In developing countries, serological testing in at risk groups is necessary for early identification of celiac patients. Clinical studies show that presentation with non-specific symptoms or a lack of symptoms is as common in the Middle East as in Europe. Wheat is a major component of the Iranian diet and exposure to wheat proteins induces some degree of immune tolerance, leading to milder symptoms that may be mistaken with other GI disorders. The implementation of gluten free diet (GFD) is a major challenge for both patients and clinicians in Iran, especially since commercial gluten-free products are not available in this area. PMID:25197526

  14. [Bacterial parotitis in an immunocompromised patient in adult ICU].

    PubMed

    Vassal, O; Bernet, C; Wallet, F; Friggeri, A; Piriou, V

    2013-09-01

    Bacterial parotitis is a common childhood disease with a favorable outcome. Staphylococcus aureus is the most frequently involved pathogen. Clinical presentation in adult patients can be misleading, Onset occurs in patients with multiple comorbidities, making diagnosis difficult--particularly in ICU. Different pathogens are found in adults with worse outcomes observed. We report here the case of a critically ill patient and discuss diagnosis and management of bacterial parotitis.

  15. RICE BREAD FOR PEOPLE WITH CELIAC DISEASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This technical bulletin was written to describe new process to make whole rice bread (WRB) for Celiacs, a disease caused by proteins found in wheat, barley and rye. The rice is free of these proteins and hence an ideal grain to develop foods for Celiacs. Absence of these proteins, however make it ...

  16. The Prevalence of the Celiac Disease Among Urban Bedouin Population in Israel

    PubMed Central

    Inna, Rudoy; Andrew, Korobeinikov; Hanna, Shalev; Ilia, Volkov

    2012-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) is a common, but often under-diagnosed condition with possible serious complications. CD, having a prevalence of about 1% is more common than once thought. Only limited research is available comparing differences between adults and children. A comprehensive Medline search was conducted. No data was found concerning the prevalence of CD among the adult Bedouin population. Methods The research is retrospective and descriptive. The objective of our research was to determine the prevalence of the CD within adult and child Bedouin populations in urban Israel. A report of all of diagnosed CD patients extracted from the medical computerized information system (“Clicks”). Results In our sample we found the prevalence was 0.51% in children and 0.12% in adults. Conclusion In our opinion, one of reasons for the low prevalence level in the Bedouin community might be that typical CD symptoms are less prominent in Bedouin communities than in other communities. But no doubt hypo-diagnosis does exist. We suppose more advanced research about the nature and typical clinical manifestations of CD within the Bedouin population need to be investigated. Medical personnel working within the Bedouin community needs information concerning CD and the characteristics of diagnosis and treatment in the Bedouin community. The Bedouin community itself needs more information concerning CD and the importance of treatment, which could also improve early diagnosis and compliance.

  17. Enteroscopy and radiology for the management of celiac disease complications: Time for a pragmatic roadmap.

    PubMed

    Branchi, Federica; Locatelli, Martina; Tomba, Carolina; Conte, Dario; Ferretti, Francesca; Elli, Luca

    2016-06-01

    Celiac disease is the most common autoimmune enteropathy in Western countries, and is usually associated with a good response to the gluten free diet and an excellent prognosis. However, a minority of patients develop complications of the disease, such as refractory celiac disease, ulcerative jejunoileitis and neoplastic complications such as adenocarcinoma of the small bowel and enteropathy associated T cell lymphoma. Neoplastic complications described in association with celiac disease have a high mortality rate, due to their aggressive behavior and to the usual advanced stage at the time of diagnosis. In recent years, the detection of small bowel lesions has dramatically improved thank to the availability of highly performing radiologic and endoscopic techniques. The diagnostic delay of malignant complications in patients with celiac disease may be improved by establishing a pragmatic flowchart for the identification and follow up of "at risk" patients. We performed a comprehensive review of the articles published on this issue in order to promote a roadmap to be applied when facing with celiac patients with suspected small bowel complications.

  18. Quantification of peptides causing celiac disease in historical and modern hard red spring wheat cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Celiac disease (CD) is prevalent in 0.5 to 1.26% of adolescents and adults. The disease develops in genetically susceptible individuals as a result of ingestion of gluten forming proteins found in cereals such as, wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), rye (Secale cereale L.) and barley (Hordeum sativum L.)...

  19. Non-functioning Aortocaval Paraganglioma Masquerading as Celiac Lymphnodal Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Gulavani, Nikhil; Rodrigues, Gabriel; Prabhu, Raghunath; Kamath, Ganesh; Rai, Lavanya; Rao, Lakshmi

    2014-02-01

    An extra-adrenal paraganglioma is a rare tumour derived from chromaffin cells of sympathetic ganglia. This report documents a rare case of a non-functional aortocaval paraganglioma in a 24-year-old woman with persistent abdominal pain. Computed tomography revealed a solid mass, measuring 2.5x3cms, localized between the celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery in aortocaval location along with right ovarian cystic mass. A clinical diagnosis of malignant ovarian tumour with celiac nodal metastasis was made. Excision and pathological analysis of both revealed an aortocaval extra-adrenal paraganglioma and benign ovarian cyst. On serial follow-up the patient was in a good health, asymptomatic and without evidence of tumour recurrence. This case emphasizes the necessity of including extra-adrenal paraganglioma in the differential diagnosis and management of retroperitoneal tumours, despite its rarity.

  20. Evidence for the Presence of Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity in Patients with Functional Gastrointestinal Symptoms: Results from a Multicenter Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Gluten Challenge.

    PubMed

    Elli, Luca; Tomba, Carolina; Branchi, Federica; Roncoroni, Leda; Lombardo, Vincenza; Bardella, Maria Teresa; Ferretti, Francesca; Conte, Dario; Valiante, Flavio; Fini, Lucia; Forti, Edoardo; Cannizzaro, Renato; Maiero, Stefania; Londoni, Claudio; Lauri, Adriano; Fornaciari, Giovanni; Lenoci, Nicoletta; Spagnuolo, Rocco; Basilisco, Guido; Somalvico, Francesco; Borgatta, Bruno; Leandro, Gioacchino; Segato, Sergio; Barisani, Donatella; Morreale, Gaetano; Buscarini, Elisabetta

    2016-02-08

    Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is characterized by the onset of symptoms after eating gluten-containing food. We aimed to single out NCGS subjects among subjects with functional gastrointestinal symptoms. Patients were enrolled in a multicenter double-blind placebo-controlled trial with crossover. Symptoms and quality of life were evaluated by means of 10-cm VAS and SF36. Iron parameters, transaminases and C reactive protein (CRP) were evaluated. After a three-week-long gluten-free diet (GFD), responsive patients were randomly assigned to gluten intake (5.6 g/day) or placebo for seven days, followed by crossover. The primary endpoint was the worsening of symptoms (VAS increase ≥3 cm) during gluten ingestion compared to placebo. One hundred and forty patients were enrolled and 134 (17 males, mean age 39.1 ± 11.7 years, BMI 22.4 ± 3.8) completed the first period. A total of 101 subjects (10 males, mean age 39.3 ± 11.0 years, BMI 22.3 ± 4.0) reported a symptomatic improvement (VAS score 2.3 ± 1.2 vs. 6.5 ± 2.2 before and after GFD, p = 0.001). 98 patients underwent the gluten challenge and 28 (all females, mean age 38.9 ± 12.7 years, BMI 22.0 ± 2.9) reported a symptomatic relapse and deterioration of quality of life. No parameters were found to be statistically associated with positivity to the challenge. However, 14 patients responded to the placebo ingestion. Taking into account this finding, about 14% of patients responding to gluten withdrawal showed a symptomatic relapse during the gluten challenge. This group is suspected to have NCGS.

  1. Evidence for the Presence of Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity in Patients with Functional Gastrointestinal Symptoms: Results from a Multicenter Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Gluten Challenge.

    PubMed

    Elli, Luca; Tomba, Carolina; Branchi, Federica; Roncoroni, Leda; Lombardo, Vincenza; Bardella, Maria Teresa; Ferretti, Francesca; Conte, Dario; Valiante, Flavio; Fini, Lucia; Forti, Edoardo; Cannizzaro, Renato; Maiero, Stefania; Londoni, Claudio; Lauri, Adriano; Fornaciari, Giovanni; Lenoci, Nicoletta; Spagnuolo, Rocco; Basilisco, Guido; Somalvico, Francesco; Borgatta, Bruno; Leandro, Gioacchino; Segato, Sergio; Barisani, Donatella; Morreale, Gaetano; Buscarini, Elisabetta

    2016-02-01

    Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is characterized by the onset of symptoms after eating gluten-containing food. We aimed to single out NCGS subjects among subjects with functional gastrointestinal symptoms. Patients were enrolled in a multicenter double-blind placebo-controlled trial with crossover. Symptoms and quality of life were evaluated by means of 10-cm VAS and SF36. Iron parameters, transaminases and C reactive protein (CRP) were evaluated. After a three-week-long gluten-free diet (GFD), responsive patients were randomly assigned to gluten intake (5.6 g/day) or placebo for seven days, followed by crossover. The primary endpoint was the worsening of symptoms (VAS increase ≥3 cm) during gluten ingestion compared to placebo. One hundred and forty patients were enrolled and 134 (17 males, mean age 39.1 ± 11.7 years, BMI 22.4 ± 3.8) completed the first period. A total of 101 subjects (10 males, mean age 39.3 ± 11.0 years, BMI 22.3 ± 4.0) reported a symptomatic improvement (VAS score 2.3 ± 1.2 vs. 6.5 ± 2.2 before and after GFD, p = 0.001). 98 patients underwent the gluten challenge and 28 (all females, mean age 38.9 ± 12.7 years, BMI 22.0 ± 2.9) reported a symptomatic relapse and deterioration of quality of life. No parameters were found to be statistically associated with positivity to the challenge. However, 14 patients responded to the placebo ingestion. Taking into account this finding, about 14% of patients responding to gluten withdrawal showed a symptomatic relapse during the gluten challenge. This group is suspected to have NCGS. PMID:26867199

  2. Evidence for the Presence of Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity in Patients with Functional Gastrointestinal Symptoms: Results from a Multicenter Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Gluten Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Elli, Luca; Tomba, Carolina; Branchi, Federica; Roncoroni, Leda; Lombardo, Vincenza; Bardella, Maria Teresa; Ferretti, Francesca; Conte, Dario; Valiante, Flavio; Fini, Lucia; Forti, Edoardo; Cannizzaro, Renato; Maiero, Stefania; Londoni, Claudio; Lauri, Adriano; Fornaciari, Giovanni; Lenoci, Nicoletta; Spagnuolo, Rocco; Basilisco, Guido; Somalvico, Francesco; Borgatta, Bruno; Leandro, Gioacchino; Segato, Sergio; Barisani, Donatella; Morreale, Gaetano; Buscarini, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is characterized by the onset of symptoms after eating gluten-containing food. We aimed to single out NCGS subjects among subjects with functional gastrointestinal symptoms. Patients were enrolled in a multicenter double-blind placebo-controlled trial with crossover. Symptoms and quality of life were evaluated by means of 10-cm VAS and SF36. Iron parameters, transaminases and C reactive protein (CRP) were evaluated. After a three-week-long gluten-free diet (GFD), responsive patients were randomly assigned to gluten intake (5.6 g/day) or placebo for seven days, followed by crossover. The primary endpoint was the worsening of symptoms (VAS increase ≥3 cm) during gluten ingestion compared to placebo. One hundred and forty patients were enrolled and 134 (17 males, mean age 39.1 ± 11.7 years, BMI 22.4 ± 3.8) completed the first period. A total of 101 subjects (10 males, mean age 39.3 ± 11.0 years, BMI 22.3 ± 4.0) reported a symptomatic improvement (VAS score 2.3 ± 1.2 vs. 6.5 ± 2.2 before and after GFD, p = 0.001). 98 patients underwent the gluten challenge and 28 (all females, mean age 38.9 ± 12.7 years, BMI 22.0 ± 2.9) reported a symptomatic relapse and deterioration of quality of life. No parameters were found to be statistically associated with positivity to the challenge. However, 14 patients responded to the placebo ingestion. Taking into account this finding, about 14% of patients responding to gluten withdrawal showed a symptomatic relapse during the gluten challenge. This group is suspected to have NCGS. PMID:26867199

  3. An extended HLA-D region haplotype associated with celiac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Howell, M D; Smith, J R; Austin, R K; Kelleher, D; Nepom, G T; Volk, B; Kagnoff, M F

    1988-01-01

    Celiac disease has one of the strongest associations with HLA (human leukocyte antigen) class II markers of the known HLA-linked diseases. This association is primarily with the class II serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2. We previously described a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) characterized by the presence of a 4.0-kilobase Rsa I fragment derived from an HLA class II beta-chain gene, which distinguishes the class II HLA haplotype of celiac disease patients from those of many serologically matched controls. We now report the isolation of this beta-chain gene from a bacteriophage genomic library constructed from the DNA of a celiac disease patient. Based on restriction mapping and differential hybridization with class II cDNA and oligonucleotide probes, this gene was identified as one encoding an HLA-DP beta chain. This celiac disease-associated HLA-DP beta-chain gene was flanked by HLA-DP alpha-chain genes and, therefore, was probably in its normal chromosomal location. The HLA-DP alpha-chain genes of celiac disease patients also were studied by RFLP analysis; 84% of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 patients had a 16-kb Xba I fragment that was present in only 36% of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 controls. Moreover, 79% of these patients had both alpha- and beta-chain polymorphisms in contrast to 27% of controls. Thus, celiac disease is associated with a subset of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 haplotypes characterized by HLA-DP alpha- and beta-chain gene RFLPs. Within the celiac-disease patient population, the joint segregation of these HLA-DP genes with those encoding the serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2 indicates: (i) that the class II HLA haplotype associated with celiac disease is extended throughout the entire HLA-D region, and (ii) that celiac-disease susceptibility genes may reside as far centromeric on this haplotype as the HLA-DP subregion. Images PMID:2893373

  4. Non-celiac wheat sensitivity: differential diagnosis, triggers and implications.

    PubMed

    Schuppan, Detlef; Pickert, Geethanjali; Ashfaq-Khan, Muhammad; Zevallos, Victor

    2015-06-01

    Non allergy-non-celiac wheat sensitivity (NCWS) has become a common and often overrated diagnosis. Skepticism mainly relates to patients with prominent intestinal symptoms in the absence of general or intestinal signs of inflammation. There is consensus that the major wheat sensitivities, celiac disease and wheat allergy, have to be ruled out which may be difficult for wheat allergy. The non-inflammatory intolerances to carbohydrates, mainly lactose and FODMAPs (fermentable oligi-, di-, monosaccharides and polyols), which cause bloating or diarrhoea, can usually be excluded clinically or by simple tests. Recent studies and experimental data strongly indicate that NCWS exists in a substantial proportion of the population, that it is an innate immune reaction to wheat and that patients often present with extraintestinal symptoms, such as worsening of an underlying inflammatory disease in clear association with wheat consumption. Wheat amylase-trypsin inhibitors (ATIs) have been identified as the most likely triggers of NCWS. They are highly protease resistant and activate the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) complex in monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells of the intestinal mucosa. Non-gluten containing cereals or staples display no or little TLR4 stimulating activity. Wheat ATIs are a family of up to 17 similar proteins of molecular weights around 15 kD and represent 2-4% of the wheat protein. With oral ingestion they costimulate antigen presenting cells and promote T cell activation in celiac disease, but also in other immune-mediated diseases within and outside the GI tract.

  5. Diagnosis and classification of celiac disease and gluten sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Tonutti, Elio; Bizzaro, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease is a complex disorder, the development of which is controlled by a combination of genetic (HLA alleles) and environmental (gluten ingestion) factors. New diagnostic guidelines developed by ESPGHAN emphasize the crucial role of serological tests in the diagnostic process of symptomatic subjects, and of the detection of HLA DQ2/DQ8 alleles in defining a diagnosis in asymptomatic subjects belonging to at-risk groups. The serological diagnosis of CD is based on the detection of class IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG) and anti-endomysial antibodies. In patients with IgA deficiency, anti-tTG or anti-deamidated gliadin peptide antibody assays of the IgG class are used. When anti-tTG antibody levels are very high, antibody specificity is absolute and CD can be diagnosed without performing a duodenum biopsy. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity is a gluten reaction in which both allergic and autoimmune mechanisms have been ruled out. Diagnostic criteria include the presence of symptoms similar to those of celiac or allergic patients; negative allergological tests and absence of anti-tTG and EMA antibodies; normal duodenal histology; evidence of disappearance of the symptoms with a gluten-free diet; relapse of the symptoms when gluten is reintroduced.

  6. Current and Emerging Therapy for Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Makharia, Govind K.

    2014-01-01

    At present, strict and lifelong gluten-free diet is the only effective treatment for celiac disease. Even small amounts of gluten (50 mg/day) can be immunogenic; therefore all food and food items and drugs that contain gluten and its derivatives must be eliminated completely from the diet. While prescribing gluten-free diet is easy; the key to the success is the dietary counseling by a nutrition specialist and maintenance of adherence to GFD by the patient. In recent times, a number of targets to halt the process of immunological injury have been explored to find out alternative treatment for celiac disease. These targets include exploration of ancient wheat if they are less immunogenic, intra-luminal digestion of gluten using prolylendopeptidases, pretreatment of whole gluten with bacterial-derived peptidase before ingestion; prevention of passage of immunogenic peptides through the tight junctions such as zonulin antagonists, Blocking of HLA-DQ2 to prevent binding of immunogenic peptides, inhibition of transglutaminase 2, immune-modulation, and induction of tolerance to gluten using gluten tolerizing vaccines, use of gluten-sequestering polymers, use of anti-inflammatory drugs (glucocorticoids, budesonides) and anti-cytokines such as anti TNF-α, and anti-interleukin-15. While many of these targets are still in the pre-clinical phase, some of them including zonulin antagonist and endopeptidases have already reached phase II and phase III clinical trials. Furthermore, while these targets appear very exciting; they at best are likely to be used as adjunctive therapy rather than a complete replacement for gluten-free diet. PMID:25705619

  7. Physical and psychosocial challenges in adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    duTreil, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Numerous challenges confront adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors, including difficulty in controlling bleeding episodes, deterioration of joints, arthritic pain, physical disability, emotional turmoil, and social issues. High-intensity treatment regimens often used in the treatment of patients with inhibitors also impose significant scheduling, economic, and emotional demands on patients and their families or primary caregivers. A comprehensive multidisciplinary assessment of the physical, emotional, and social status of adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors is essential for the development of treatment strategies that can be individualized to address the complex needs of these patients. PMID:25093002

  8. A Difficult and Rare Diagnosis of Autoimmune Enteropathy in a Patient Affected by Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Depince-Berger, Anne; Cremilieux, Clara; Rinaudo-Gaujous, Melanie; Genin, Christian; de Freminville, Benedicte; Lambert, Claude; Bruneau, J; Paul, Stephane

    2016-07-01

    Patients with Down syndrome are more susceptible to autoimmune pathologies, in particular endocrine or digestive diseases such as celiac disease. Autoimmune enteropathy is another form of digestive autoimmune disease, non-gluten-dependant, more often diagnosed in male neonates with immunodysregulation and polyendocrinopathy such as the Immunodysregulation, Polyendocrinopathy, Enteropathy, X-linked syndrome. It also exists in the adult, but this pathology is less known and therefore frequently under-diagnosed. Clinical manifestations are similar to celiac disease, but not improved after a gluten-free diet. Autoimmune enteropathy is frequently associated with other autoimmune diseases, such as thyroiditis, myasthenia gravis, lupus or immune deficiencies, as Common Variable Immunodeficiency. Pathological analysis of intestinal biopsies can frequently distinguish autoimmune enteropathy and celiac disease. Autoimmune enteropathy usually has an important lymphoplasmacytic infiltration of the mucosa and a lack of intraepithelial lymphocytes in the gastrointestinal mucosal surface, while celiac disease usually has a polymorph infiltration of the mucosa and an important intraepithelial lymphocytes infiltration. Nevertheless, the two pathological patterns may overlap. Here we report the first case of a patient with Down syndrome associated to autoimmune enteropathy (initially diagnosed as celiac disease), chronic pancreatitis and cutaneous lupus erythematosus. Even if autoimmune pathologies are much more common in patients with Down syndrome, we would like to report on this rare and original association found in our patient.

  9. Approximate Quantification in Young, Healthy Older Adults', and Alzheimer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandini, Delphine; Lemaire, Patrick; Michel, Bernard Francois

    2009-01-01

    Forty young adults, 40 healthy older adults, and 39 probable AD patients were asked to estimate small (e.g., 25) and large (e.g., 60) collections of dots in a choice condition and in two no-choice conditions. Participants could choose between benchmark and anchoring strategies on each collection of dots in the choice condition and were required to…

  10. Celiac disease in children with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Ress, Krista; Annus, Triine; Putnik, Urve; Luts, Katrin; Uibo, Raivo; Uibo, Oivi

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine with highly variable clinical presentation and frequently associated with various immune-mediated diseases. Among these immune-mediated diseases, atopy has been found frequently in individuals with CD. We aimed to study the prevalence of CD in Estonian children with atopic dermatitis (AD), a common multifactorial chronic inflammatory skin disease. We recruited 351 consecutive children with active AD (mean age 5.8 yrs, 57.6% boys) at Tallinn Children's Hospital, Estonia. Sera of all patients were tested for total serum immunoglobulin (Ig) A, for IgA- and IgG-type autoantibodies to tissue transglutaminase (IgA-anti-TG2, IgG-anti-TG2) and to deamidated gliadin peptides (IgA-anti-DGP, IgG-anti-DGP). The diagnosis of CD was confirmed histologically by small intestine biopsy according to the European Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition diagnostic criteria. IgA deficiency was detected in nine patients with AD (2.6%), none of whom had IgG-anti-TG2 or IgG-anti-DGP seropositivity. IgA-anti-TG2 positivity was found in 4 (1.1%), IgG-anti-TG2 positivity in 2 (0.6%), IgA-anti-DGP positivity in 11 (3.1%), and IgG-anti-DGP in 10 (2.8%) patients. Celiac disease was confirmed in five (1.4%) patients with AD (95% confidence interval 0.46, 3.32) and all were histologically characterized as Marsh IIIa-IIIc stages and two presented with silent CD. In AD patients, CD prevalence was more than four times as high as in previously studied randomly selected schoolchildren in Estonia. Two patients with AD diagnosed with CD had no symptoms indicative of CD, in spite of extensive histologic changes in the small intestine mucosa. Therefore our study emphasizes the need for evaluating the cost-effectiveness of screening individuals with AD for CD in time to prevent long-term complications. PMID:24831884

  11. TAP-Stenting Technique for Bifurcation Stenosis of Celiac Artery

    PubMed Central

    Colkesen, Yucel; Seker, Taner; Kuloglu, Osman; Çayli, Murat

    2015-01-01

    We report a clinical course of a patient who developed severe ischemic liver injury and total occlusion of the celiac artery (CA). A 40-year-old man presented with abdominal pain. Computed tomography indicated total occlusion of the CA. Laboratory data demonstrated markedly elevated hepatic enzymes. An exploratory laparotomy was not necessitated due to absence of peritonism. The patient was successfully treated by endovascular recanalization of the CA occlusion via transcatheter balloon angioplasty and TAP-stenting (T-stenting and small protrusion) technique. Endovascular intervention in patients solely with liver failure appears practicable and early treatment is advised. PMID:25815240

  12. Influence of celiac axis lymph nodes in the definitive treatment of esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Frizzell, Bart; Sinha, Debajyoti; Williams, Todd; Reed, Carolyn E; Sherman, Carol A; Turrisi, Andrew

    2003-06-01

    The management of patients with cancer of the distal thoracic esophagus is often made difficult by the presence of disease in the celiac axis lymph nodes. We investigated the outcome of such patients treated for cure in an attempt to better define the best treatment. The charts of all patients with esophageal cancer treated at the Department of Radiation Oncology at the Medical University of South Carolina between 1990 and 1998 were reviewed. Three groups of patients were analyzed: NoMo, N1Mo, and patients with positive celiac axis lymph nodes (M1a). Among 217 patients, 56 patients received radiotherapy with intent to cure, along with surgery, chemotherapy, or some combination of these modalities. Of these, 14 had disease of the distal esophagus with the celiac axis as their only site of distant disease. Comparison of survival curves in the three analyzed groups revealed no statistically significant differences in terms of overall survival (p = 0.3458 by the log-rank test) or disease-free survival (p = 0.5509 by the log-rank test). Patients with positive celiac axis lymph nodes as their only site of "M1" disease experienced a 2-year survival rate similar to "Mo" patients when treated with curative intent. PMID:12796587

  13. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity: Time for sifting the grain.

    PubMed

    Elli, Luca; Roncoroni, Leda; Bardella, Maria Teresa

    2015-07-21

    In the last few years, a new nomenclature has been proposed for the disease induced by the ingestion of gluten, a protein present in wheat, rice, barley and oats. Besides celiac disease and wheat allergy, the most studied forms of gluten-related disorders characterized by an evident immune mechanism (autoimmune in celiac disease and IgE-mediated in wheat allergy), a new entity has been included, apparently not driven by an aberrant immune response: the non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). NCGS is characterized by a heterogeneous clinical picture with intestinal and extraintestinal symptoms arising after gluten ingestion and rapidly improving after its withdrawal from the diet. The pathogenesis of NCGS is largely unknown, but a mixture of factors such as the stimulation of the innate immune system, the direct cytotoxic effects of gluten, and probably the synergy with other wheat molecules, are clues for the complicated puzzle. In addition, the diagnostic procedures still remain problematic due to the absence of efficient diagnostic markers; thus, diagnosis is based upon the symptomatic response to a gluten-free diet and the recurrence of symptoms after gluten reintroduction with the possibility of an important involvement of a placebo effect. The temporary withdrawal of gluten seems a reasonable therapy, but the timing of gluten reintroduction and the correct patient management approach are have not yet been determined.

  14. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity: Time for sifting the grain

    PubMed Central

    Elli, Luca; Roncoroni, Leda; Bardella, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years, a new nomenclature has been proposed for the disease induced by the ingestion of gluten, a protein present in wheat, rice, barley and oats. Besides celiac disease and wheat allergy, the most studied forms of gluten-related disorders characterized by an evident immune mechanism (autoimmune in celiac disease and IgE-mediated in wheat allergy), a new entity has been included, apparently not driven by an aberrant immune response: the non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). NCGS is characterized by a heterogeneous clinical picture with intestinal and extraintestinal symptoms arising after gluten ingestion and rapidly improving after its withdrawal from the diet. The pathogenesis of NCGS is largely unknown, but a mixture of factors such as the stimulation of the innate immune system, the direct cytotoxic effects of gluten, and probably the synergy with other wheat molecules, are clues for the complicated puzzle. In addition, the diagnostic procedures still remain problematic due to the absence of efficient diagnostic markers; thus, diagnosis is based upon the symptomatic response to a gluten-free diet and the recurrence of symptoms after gluten reintroduction with the possibility of an important involvement of a placebo effect. The temporary withdrawal of gluten seems a reasonable therapy, but the timing of gluten reintroduction and the correct patient management approach are have not yet been determined. PMID:26217073

  15. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity: Time for sifting the grain.

    PubMed

    Elli, Luca; Roncoroni, Leda; Bardella, Maria Teresa

    2015-07-21

    In the last few years, a new nomenclature has been proposed for the disease induced by the ingestion of gluten, a protein present in wheat, rice, barley and oats. Besides celiac disease and wheat allergy, the most studied forms of gluten-related disorders characterized by an evident immune mechanism (autoimmune in celiac disease and IgE-mediated in wheat allergy), a new entity has been included, apparently not driven by an aberrant immune response: the non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). NCGS is characterized by a heterogeneous clinical picture with intestinal and extraintestinal symptoms arising after gluten ingestion and rapidly improving after its withdrawal from the diet. The pathogenesis of NCGS is largely unknown, but a mixture of factors such as the stimulation of the innate immune system, the direct cytotoxic effects of gluten, and probably the synergy with other wheat molecules, are clues for the complicated puzzle. In addition, the diagnostic procedures still remain problematic due to the absence of efficient diagnostic markers; thus, diagnosis is based upon the symptomatic response to a gluten-free diet and the recurrence of symptoms after gluten reintroduction with the possibility of an important involvement of a placebo effect. The temporary withdrawal of gluten seems a reasonable therapy, but the timing of gluten reintroduction and the correct patient management approach are have not yet been determined. PMID:26217073

  16. Is Celiac Disease an Etiological Factor in Children with Nonsyndromic Intellectual Disability?

    PubMed

    Sezer, Taner; Balcı, Oya; Özçay, Figen; Bayraktar, Nilufer; Alehan, Füsun

    2016-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in children and adolescents with nonsyndromic intellectual disability, we investigated serum levels of tissue transglutaminase antibody and total IgA from 232 children with nonsyndromic intellectual disability and in a healthy control group of 239 children. Study participants who were positive for tissue transglutaminase antibody underwent a duodenal biopsy. A total of 3 patients in the nonsyndromic intellectual disability group (5.45%) and 1 in the control group (0.41%) had positive serum tissue transglutaminase antibody (P > .05). Duodenal biopsy confirmed celiac disease in only 1 patient who had nonsyndromic intellectual disability. In this present study, children with nonsyndromic intellectual disability did not exhibit a higher celiac disease prevalence rate compared with healthy controls. Therefore, we suggest that screening test for celiac disease should not be necessary as a part of the management of mild and moderate nonsyndromic intellectual disability. However, cases of severe nonsyndromic intellectual disability could be examined for celiac disease. PMID:26078418

  17. Subclinical Celiac Disease and Crystal-Induced Kidney Disease Following Kidney Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Capolongo, Giovanna; Abul-Ezz, Sameh; Moe, Orson W.; Sakhaee, Khashayar

    2015-01-01

    Decreased kidney function from kidney deposition of calcium oxalate has been previously described in inflammatory bowel disease as well as following jejuno-ileal and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgeries. Although celiac disease is the most prevalent bowel abnormality associated with intestinal malabsorption, its relationship to high kidney oxalate burden and decreased kidney function has not been established. We report a case of subclinical celiac disease and hyperoxaluria that presented with loss of kidney function as a result of high oxalate load in the absence of overt diarrhea, documented intestinal fat malabsorption, and nephrolithiasis. Subclinical celiac disease is commonly overlooked and hyperoxaluria is not usually investigated in kidney patients. We propose that this entity should be suspected in patients with chronic kidney disease in which the etiology of kidney damage has not been clearly established. PMID:22739230

  18. Perinatal Risk Factors for Development of Celiac Disease in Children Based on the Prospective Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Emilsson, Louise; Magnus, Maria; Størdal, Ketil

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims There have been inconsistent reports of pre- and perinatal factors that affect risk for development of celiac disease. We assessed the association of fetal growth, birth weight, and mode of delivery with development of celiac disease within the Norwegian Mother and Child (MoBa) cohort study. Methods The MoBa cohort contains pregnancy information on 95,200 women and data on their 114,500 children, collected in Norway from 1999 through 2008; it is linked to the Medical Birth Registry. Women and children with celiac disease were identified from the National Patient Register and from women's responses to MoBa questionnaires. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) for celiac disease using a multivariable logistic regression model, adjusting for maternal celiac disease, sex of children, and children's age (model 1); in a second model, we adjusted for age of gluten introduction and duration of breastfeeding (model 2). Results We identified 650 children with celiac disease and 107,828 controls in the MoBa database. We found no association between birth weight or height with celiac disease (born small for gestational age was not associated). Celiac disease was not associated with mode of delivery (Cesarean section, model 1: OR=0.84; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.65–1.09 and model 2: OR=0.83; 95% CI, 0.63−1.09). Maternal celiac disease, adjusted for age and sex of the children (OR=12.45; 95% CI, 8.29−18.71) and type 1 diabetes (model I: OR=2.58; 95% CI, 1.19−5.53 and model 2: OR=2.61; 95% CI, 1.14−5.98) were associated with development of celiac disease in children, whereas maternal type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes were not. Conclusion Based on analysis of the Norwegian MoBa cohort, development of celiac disease in children is significantly associated with sex of the child, maternal celiac disease and type 1 diabetes, but not with intrauterine growth. PMID:25459557

  19. [Irritable bowel syndrome, celiac disease and gluten].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Montoro, Miguel

    2014-08-01

    For many years irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and celiac disease (CD) have been considered 2 completely separate entities, with CD being clearly related to a permanent gluten intolerance and IBS having no relation with gluten ingestion. However IBS and CD symptoms may be indistinguishable, especially when diarrhea, bloating or abdominal pain predominate. In the last decade several studies have shown that the separation between CD and IBS is not so clear. Thus, some patients who have been diagnosed of IBS suffer in fact from CD. In addition, it seems that there is a group of patients who, without having CD, suffer gluten intolerance that cause them digestive symptoms similar to those of IBS. Gluten sensitivity is defined as the spectrum of morphological, immunological and functional abnormalities that respond to a gluten-free diet. This concept includes histological, immunological and clinical manifestations in the absence of evident morphological abnormalities. Therefore, it is mandatory to establish in a scientific way in which patients a gluten-free diet will be beneficial as well as when this is not justified.

  20. Immune response to hepatitis B virus vaccine in celiac subjects at diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Filippelli, Martina; Garozzo, Maria Teresa; Capizzi, Antonino; Spina, Massimo; Manti, Sara; Tardino, Lucia; Salpietro, Carmelo; Leonardi, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine response and correlation with human leukocyte antigens (HLA) and/or gluten intake in celiac patients at diagnosis. METHODS Fifty-one patients affected by celiac disease, diagnosed at the Department of Pediatrics of the University of Catania (Italy), were recruited. All patients were tested at admission for immunization against HBV, according to findings from analysis of quantitative HBV surface antibody (anti-HBs). The anti-HBs titer was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Following the international standards, subjects with antibody titer < 10 IU/L were defined as non-responders. The prevalence of responders and non-responders among celiac subjects and the distribution of immunization for age were examined. In addition, the prevalence of responders and non-responders was assessed for correlation to HLA and clinical features at diagnosis of celiac disease. RESULTS The entire study population was divided into three groups according to age: 24 patients aged between 0 to 5.5 years (48.9%, group A); 16 aged between 5.5 and 9.5 years (30.61%, group B); 9 aged between 9.5 and 17 years (18.75%, group C). Comparison of the percentage of responders and non-responders between the youngest and the oldest age group showed no significant difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). With regard to the HLA haplotype, comparison of the distribution of vaccination response showed no statistically significant difference between the different genotypes (homozygosity for the HLADQ2 haplotype compared with HLADQ2/DQ8 heterozygosity or other haplotypes; P > 0.05). Moreover, distribution of the responders according to clinical features of celiac disease showed no statistically significant differences (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION This prospective study confirmed the lower percentage of response to HBV vaccine in celiac subjects. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear and further studies are needed. PMID:27660678

  1. Immune response to hepatitis B virus vaccine in celiac subjects at diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Filippelli, Martina; Garozzo, Maria Teresa; Capizzi, Antonino; Spina, Massimo; Manti, Sara; Tardino, Lucia; Salpietro, Carmelo; Leonardi, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine response and correlation with human leukocyte antigens (HLA) and/or gluten intake in celiac patients at diagnosis. METHODS Fifty-one patients affected by celiac disease, diagnosed at the Department of Pediatrics of the University of Catania (Italy), were recruited. All patients were tested at admission for immunization against HBV, according to findings from analysis of quantitative HBV surface antibody (anti-HBs). The anti-HBs titer was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Following the international standards, subjects with antibody titer < 10 IU/L were defined as non-responders. The prevalence of responders and non-responders among celiac subjects and the distribution of immunization for age were examined. In addition, the prevalence of responders and non-responders was assessed for correlation to HLA and clinical features at diagnosis of celiac disease. RESULTS The entire study population was divided into three groups according to age: 24 patients aged between 0 to 5.5 years (48.9%, group A); 16 aged between 5.5 and 9.5 years (30.61%, group B); 9 aged between 9.5 and 17 years (18.75%, group C). Comparison of the percentage of responders and non-responders between the youngest and the oldest age group showed no significant difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). With regard to the HLA haplotype, comparison of the distribution of vaccination response showed no statistically significant difference between the different genotypes (homozygosity for the HLADQ2 haplotype compared with HLADQ2/DQ8 heterozygosity or other haplotypes; P > 0.05). Moreover, distribution of the responders according to clinical features of celiac disease showed no statistically significant differences (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION This prospective study confirmed the lower percentage of response to HBV vaccine in celiac subjects. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear and further studies are needed.

  2. Mediastinal Tuberculosis in an Adult Patient with Cystic Fibrosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Morand, Philippe C.; Burgel, Pierre-Régis; Carlotti, Agnès; Desmazes-Dufeu, Nadine; Farhi, David; Martin, Clémence; Kanaan, Reem; Mangialavori, Luigi; Palangié, Estelle; Dusser, Daniel; Poyart, Claire; Hubert, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is rarely observed in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We report the first case of mediastinal TB, associated with leg pain and skin rash, in an adult patient with CF, and discuss factors suggestive of TB in the course of CF. PMID:21106788

  3. Celiac Disease: Four Inches and Seven Pounds...

    MedlinePlus

    ... fruit and pancakes—as long as they are gluten-free. "Stella has celiac disease," explains her mother, ... finally diagnosed Stella. She's been on a strict gluten-free diet ever since, like so many thousands ...

  4. Implementation of a polling protocol for predicting celiac disease in videocapsule analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ciaccio, Edward J; Tennyson, Christina A; Bhagat, Govind; Lewis, Suzanne K; Green, Peter H

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the presence of small intestinal villous atrophy in celiac disease patients from quantitative analysis of videocapsule image sequences. METHODS: Nine celiac patient data with biopsy-proven villous atrophy and seven control patient data lacking villous atrophy were used for analysis. Celiacs had biopsy-proven disease with scores of Marsh II-IIIC except in the case of one hemophiliac patient. At four small intestinal levels (duodenal bulb, distal duodenum, jejunum, and ileum), video clips of length 200 frames (100 s) were analyzed. Twenty-four measurements were used for image characterization. These measurements were determined by quantitatively processing the videocapsule images via techniques for texture analysis, motility estimation, volumetric reconstruction using shape-from-shading principles, and image transformation. Each automated measurement method, or automaton, was polled as to whether or not villous atrophy was present in the small intestine, indicating celiac disease. Each automaton’s vote was determined based upon an optimized parameter threshold level, with the threshold levels being determined from prior data. A prediction of villous atrophy was made if it received the majority of votes (≥ 13), while no prediction was made for tie votes (12-12). Thus each set of images was classified as being from either a celiac disease patient or from a control patient. RESULTS: Separated by intestinal level, the overall sensitivity of automata polling for predicting villous atrophy and hence celiac disease was 83.9%, while the specificity was 92.9%, and the overall accuracy of automata-based polling was 88.1%. The method of image transformation yielded the highest sensitivity at 93.8%, while the method of texture analysis using subbands had the highest specificity at 76.0%. Similar results of prediction were observed at all four small intestinal locations, but there were more tie votes at location 4 (ileum). Incorrect prediction which

  5. [Non-celiac gluten sensitivity: Another condition that responds to gluten].

    PubMed

    Navarro, Elizabeth; Araya, Magdalena

    2015-05-01

    Remission of gastrointestinal and general symptoms after gluten withdrawal has been described in some non-celiac individuals for nearly 30 years. Only recently, efforts have been made to define this entity, now referred to as "non-celiac gluten sensitivity". It includes patients that clinically respond to gluten free diet without exhibiting allergic or autoimmune features to explain such response. Wheat allergy, celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome and symptoms induced by high FODMAPs (Fermentable, Oligo-, Di-, Mono-saccharides And Polyols) consumption are the main differential diagnoses. The relationship with neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and autism has not been demonstrated, but currently it gives ground to great hope in families with affected children. Epidemiology of non-celiac gluten sensitivity is not clear. It is described as more common among women and less common in children. Genetic and immune factors, changes in intestinal microbiota and non-gluten components present in wheat grains are main factors postulated in the pathogenesis of this condition. To date, there are no specific biomarkers for non-celiac gluten sensitivity and diagnosis is reached by excluding other causes of disease. A trial with gluten-free diet and subsequent gluten challenge is the methodology most frequently used to confirm diagnosis.

  6. [Non-celiac gluten sensitivity: Another condition that responds to gluten].

    PubMed

    Navarro, Elizabeth; Araya, Magdalena

    2015-05-01

    Remission of gastrointestinal and general symptoms after gluten withdrawal has been described in some non-celiac individuals for nearly 30 years. Only recently, efforts have been made to define this entity, now referred to as "non-celiac gluten sensitivity". It includes patients that clinically respond to gluten free diet without exhibiting allergic or autoimmune features to explain such response. Wheat allergy, celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome and symptoms induced by high FODMAPs (Fermentable, Oligo-, Di-, Mono-saccharides And Polyols) consumption are the main differential diagnoses. The relationship with neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and autism has not been demonstrated, but currently it gives ground to great hope in families with affected children. Epidemiology of non-celiac gluten sensitivity is not clear. It is described as more common among women and less common in children. Genetic and immune factors, changes in intestinal microbiota and non-gluten components present in wheat grains are main factors postulated in the pathogenesis of this condition. To date, there are no specific biomarkers for non-celiac gluten sensitivity and diagnosis is reached by excluding other causes of disease. A trial with gluten-free diet and subsequent gluten challenge is the methodology most frequently used to confirm diagnosis. PMID:26203574

  7. [Lung pneumatocele in adult patient - case report].

    PubMed

    Dzian, A; Fúčela, I; Hamžík, J; Huťka, Z; Stiegler, P

    2012-12-01

    Lung pneumatoceles are characterized by a thin-walled air-filled cavity present in lung parenchyma. Mostly they are the result of acute bronchopneumonia after spontaneous drainage of altered lung parenchyma with subsequent development and progression of cavities due to ventile mechanism. This disease is more prevalent in infants and young children, it is rather rare in adults. In the present case report, videothoracoscopy resection of lung pneumatocele of the right lower lobe was performed a 43-years old man. The operation was indicated for the presence of chronic persisting and progressing pneumatocele as a preventive measure of pneumatocele complications. PMID:23448707

  8. Iron deficiency anemia in celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an important micronutrient that may be depleted in celiac disease. Iron deficiency and anemia may complicate well-established celiac disease, but may also be the presenting clinical feature in the absence of diarrhea or weight loss. If iron deficiency anemia occurs, it should be thoroughly evaluated, even if celiac disease has been defined since other superimposed causes of iron deficiency anemia may be present. Most often, impaired duodenal mucosal uptake of iron is evident since surface absorptive area in the duodenum is reduced, in large part, because celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder largely focused in the proximal small intestinal mucosa. Some studies have also suggested that blood loss may occur in celiac disease, sometimes from superimposed small intestinal disorders, including ulceration or neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma. In addition, other associated gastric or colonic disorders may be responsible for blood loss. Rarely, an immune-mediated hemolytic disorder with increased urine iron loss may occur that may respond to a gluten-free diet. Reduced expression of different regulatory proteins critical in iron uptake has also been defined in the presence and absence of anemia. Finally, other rare causes of microcytic anemia may occur in celiac disease, including a sideroblastic form of anemia reported to have responded to a gluten-free diet. PMID:26309349

  9. The widening spectrum of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Murray, J A

    1999-03-01

    Celiac disease is a permanent intolerance to ingested gluten that results in immunologically mediated inflammatory damage to the small-intestinal mucosa. Celiac disease is associated with both human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and non-HLA genes and with other immune disorders, notably juvenile diabetes and thyroid disease. The classic sprue syndrome of steatorrhea and malnutrition coupled with multiple deficiency states may be less common than more subtle and often monosymptomatic presentations of the disease. Diverse problems such as dental anomalies, short stature, osteopenic bone disease, lactose intolerance, infertility, and nonspecific abdominal pain among many others may be the only manifestations of celiac disease. The rate at which celiac disease is diagnosed depends on the level of suspicion for the disease. Although diagnosis relies on intestinal biopsy findings, serologic tests are useful as screening tools and as an adjunct to diagnosis. The treatment of celiac disease is lifelong avoidance of dietary gluten. Gluten-free diets are now readily achievable with appropriate professional instruction and community support. Both benign and malignant complications of celiac disease occur but these can often be avoided by early diagnosis and compliance with a gluten-free diet. PMID:10075317

  10. Iron deficiency anemia in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2015-08-21

    Iron is an important micronutrient that may be depleted in celiac disease. Iron deficiency and anemia may complicate well-established celiac disease, but may also be the presenting clinical feature in the absence of diarrhea or weight loss. If iron deficiency anemia occurs, it should be thoroughly evaluated, even if celiac disease has been defined since other superimposed causes of iron deficiency anemia may be present. Most often, impaired duodenal mucosal uptake of iron is evident since surface absorptive area in the duodenum is reduced, in large part, because celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder largely focused in the proximal small intestinal mucosa. Some studies have also suggested that blood loss may occur in celiac disease, sometimes from superimposed small intestinal disorders, including ulceration or neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma. In addition, other associated gastric or colonic disorders may be responsible for blood loss. Rarely, an immune-mediated hemolytic disorder with increased urine iron loss may occur that may respond to a gluten-free diet. Reduced expression of different regulatory proteins critical in iron uptake has also been defined in the presence and absence of anemia. Finally, other rare causes of microcytic anemia may occur in celiac disease, including a sideroblastic form of anemia reported to have responded to a gluten-free diet.

  11. Nutritional Intake in Adult Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Susan; Snetselaar, Linda; Hall, Beth; Stone, Roslyn A.; Kim, Sunghee; Piraino, Beth; Sevick, Mary Ann

    2013-01-01

    Background Research pertaining to the nutritional intake of hemodialysis patients is limited. Purpose Describe the nutritional quality of foods consumed by hemodialysis patients and variation by day of the week. Methods Dietary recalls were obtained from 22 hemodialysis patients and analyzed using the Nutrition Data System for Research. Results Few statistically significant differences were found by day of the week, but several dietary deficits were noted. Conclusion The data suggest poor intake of calories, protein, and several vitamins and minerals, as well as excess sodium consumption, but little variation by day of the week. Additional research is needed. PMID:25104876

  12. [Invasive candidiasis in critically ill adult patient].

    PubMed

    Tobar A, Eduardo; Silva O, Francisco; Olivares C, Roberto; Gaete G, Pablo; Luppi N, Mario

    2011-02-01

    Invasive infections by Candida strains are a relevant pathology in critically ill patients. Candida should be considered where a high risk of infection is present for a critical early diagnosis. Despite the incorporation of new drugs in the therapeutic armamentarium over the last decade, mortality remains high. The key in improving clinical outcomes of these patients are the use of early effective therapies that offer coverage against different strains of Candida: C. albicans and non-albicans. Recent international guidelines suggest empiric therapy with echinocandins in suspected invasive candidiasis in this patient population. This group of drugs adequately documented clinical efficacy and safe use in these patients. The emergence of new echinocandins could improve access to these drugs by reducing their cost.

  13. Isotretinoin Exposure and Risk of Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rashtak, Shadi; Khaleghi, Shahryar; Marietta, Eric V.; Pittelkow, Mark R.; Larson, Joseph J.; Lahr, Brian D.; Murray, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Isotretinoin (13-cis retinoic acid) is a metabolite of vitamin A and has anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory effects; however, a recent publication by DePaolo et al. demonstrated that in the presence of IL-15, retinoic acid can act as an adjuvant and promote inflammation against dietary proteins. Objective To evaluate the risk of overt and latent celiac disease (CD) among users of isotretinoin. Material and Methods Medical records of patients from 1995 to 2011 who had a mention of isotretinoin in their records (N = 8393) were searched for CD diagnosis using ICD-09CM codes. Isotretinoin exposure was compared across overt CD patients and their age- and gender-matched controls from the same pool. To evaluate the risk of latent CD with isotretinoin exposure, patients were overlapped with a community-based list of patients with waste serum samples that were tested for CD serology, excluding those with overt CD (2006–2011). Isotretinoin exposure was defined as the use of isotretinoin prior to CD diagnosis or serology. Results Of 8393 patients, 25 had a confirmed CD diagnosis. Compared to matched controls (N = 75), isotretinoin exposure was not significantly different between overt CD patients versus controls (36% versus 39%, respectively; P = 0.712). Likewise, latent CD defined as positive serology was not statistically different between isotretinoin exposed (N = 506) versus non-exposed (N = 571) groups (1.8% versus 1.4%, respectively; P = 0.474). Conclusions There was no association between isotretinoin use and risk of either overt or latent CD. PMID:26287738

  14. Long Term Follow Up of Celiac Disease—Is Atherosclerosis a Problem?

    PubMed Central

    Rybak, Anna; Cukrowska, Bożena; Socha, Jerzy; Socha, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a lifelong condition and it often involves impaired nutrition, wide spectrum of symptoms and it requires constant dietetic treatment. The impact of the gluten-free diet on patients’ nutritional status and on the other biochemical parameters is being widely investigated. In this article we looked into particular risk factors that might lead to increased prevalence of atherosclerosis in CD patients, including nutritional status, gluten-free diet, lipids profile and concomitant disease—type 1 diabetes mellitus. Here, we present the current data and research on these risk factors of atherosclerosis with respect to celiac disease. PMID:25050927

  15. Superior Mesenteric Artery Pseudoaneurysm Associated with Celiac Axis Occlusion Treated Using Endovascular Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Biswajit; Kuhan, Ganesh; Johnson, Brian; Nicholson, Anthony A.; Ettles, Duncan F.

    2006-10-15

    The case of a 30-year-old woman with a post-traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the superior mesenteric artery and associated celiac axis occlusion is presented. The patient was successfully treated with celiac artery recanalization and placement of a covered stent within the superior mesenteric artery. Follow-up at 3, 6, and 12 months and 3 years demonstrated patency of the covered stent and continued exclusion of the aneurysm. Although the long-term success of this procedure is unknown this management option should be considered where facilities are available, to reduce the increased morbidity associated with open surgical procedure.

  16. Practical fluoride and remineralization protocols for adult patients.

    PubMed

    Chan, Daniel C N; Wefel, James S; Caughman, W Frank

    2004-12-01

    There is a wealth of information on preventive measures and procedures that can be used to care for paediatric and adolescent patients. However, few studies have been conducted in adult or geriatric populations, and an understanding of preventive and non-surgical treatment regimens for these patients is lacking. Traditionally, caries incidence is high among risk groups of low income, low dental IQ and certain ethnic subgroups, but we are now witnessing a high incidence of caries among middle-income and healthy adult patients with an imbalance of protective factors and cariogenic factors. We will direct our attention to the adult population and attempt to address some of the most common questions. PMID:15736834

  17. Celiac Disease in a Predisposed Subject (HLA-DQ2.5) with Coexisting Graves' Disease.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In Kyoung; Kim, Seon Hye; Lee, Unjoo; Chin, Sang Ouk; Rhee, Sang Youl; Oh, Seungjoon; Woo, Jeong Taek; Kim, Sung Woon; Kim, Young Seol; Chon, Suk

    2015-03-27

    Celiac disease is an intestinal autoimmune disorder, triggered by ingestion of a gluten-containing diet in genetically susceptible individuals. The genetic predisposition is related to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II genes, especially HLA-DQ2-positive patients. The prevalence of celiac disease has been estimated to be ~1% in Europe and the USA, but it is rarer and/or underdiagnosed in Asia. We report a case of celiac disease in a predisposed patient, with a HLA-DQ2 heterodimer, and Graves' disease that was treated successfully with a gluten-free diet. A 47-year-old woman complained of persistent chronic diarrhea and weight loss over a 9 month period. Results of all serological tests and stool exams were negative. However, the patient was found to carry the HLA DQ2 heterodimer. Symptoms improved after a gluten-free diet was initiated. The patient has been followed and has suffered no recurrence of symptoms while on the gluten-free diet. An overall diagnosis of celiac disease was made in a genetically predisposed patient (HLA-DQ2 heterodimer) with Graves' disease.

  18. Dreaming during anaesthesia in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Kate; Skrzypek, Hannah

    2007-09-01

    Dreaming during anaesthesia is defined as any recalled experience (excluding awareness) that occurred between induction of anaesthesia and the first moment of consciousness upon emergence. Dreaming is a commonly-reported side-effect of anaesthesia. The incidence is higher in patients who are interviewed immediately after anaesthesia (approximately 22%) than in those who are interviewed later (approximately 6%). A minority of dreams, which include sensory perceptions obtained during anaesthesia, provide evidence of near-miss awareness. These patients may have risk factors for awareness and this type of dreaming may be prevented by depth of anaesthesia monitoring. Most dreaming however, occurs in younger, fitter patients, who have high home dream recall, who receive propofol-based anaesthesia and who emerge rapidly from anaesthesia. Their dreams are usually short and pleasant, are related to work, family and recreation, are not related to inadequate anaesthesia and probably occur during recovery. Dreaming is a common, fascinating, usually pleasant and harmless phenomenon.

  19. Pyridoxine deficiency in adult patients with status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Dave, Hina N; Eugene Ramsay, Richard; Khan, Fawad; Sabharwal, Vivek; Irland, Megan

    2015-11-01

    An 8-year-old girl treated at our facility for superrefractory status epilepticus was found to have a low pyridoxine level at 5 μg/L. After starting pyridoxine supplementation, improvement in the EEG for a 24-hour period was seen. We decided to look at the pyridoxine levels in adult patients admitted with status epilepticus. We reviewed the records on patients admitted to the neurological ICU for status epilepticus (SE). Eighty-one adult patients were identified with documented pyridoxine levels. For comparison purposes, we looked at pyridoxine levels in outpatients with epilepsy (n=132). Reported normal pyridoxine range is >10 ng/mL. All but six patients admitted for SE had low normal or undetectable pyridoxine levels. A selective pyridoxine deficiency was seen in 94% of patients with status epilepticus (compared to 39.4% in the outpatients) which leads us to believe that there is a relationship between status epilepticus and pyridoxine levels.

  20. [Diabetes education in adult diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Weitgasser, Raimund; Clodi, Martin; Kacerovsky-Bielesz, Gertrud; Grafinger, Peter; Lechleitner, Monika; Howorka, Kinga; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2012-12-01

    Diabetes education has gained a critical role in diabetes care. The empowerment of patients aims to actively influence the course of the disease by self-monitoring and treatment modification. Diabetes education has to be made accessible for all patients with the disease. To be able to provide a structured and validated education program adequate personal as well as space, organizational and financial background are required. Besides an increase in knowledge about the disease it has been shown that structured diabetes education is able to improve diabetes outcome measured by parameters like blood glucose, HbA1c, blood pressure and body weight in follow-up evaluations.

  1. [Diabetes education in adult diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Weitgasser, Raimund; Clodi, Martin; Cvach, Sarah; Grafinger, Peter; Lechleitner, Monika; Howorka, Kinga; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes education and self management has gained a critical role in diabetes care. Patient empowerment aims to actively influence the course of the disease by self-monitoring and treatment modification, as well as integration of diabetes in patients' daily life to achieve changes in lifestyle accordingly.Diabetes education has to be made accessible for all patients with the disease. To be able to provide a structured and validated education program adequate personal as well as space, organizational and financial background are required. Besides an increase in knowledge about the disease it has been shown that structured diabetes education is able to improve diabetes outcome measured by parameters like blood glucose, HbA1c, blood pressure and body weight in follow-up evaluations. Modern education programs emphasize the ability of patients to integrate diabetes in everyday life and stress physical activity besides healthy eating as a main component of lifestyle therapy and use interactive methods in order to increase the acceptance of personal responsibility.

  2. Clinical profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Storm, Huib; Amelink, Marijke; de Nijs, Selma B.; Eichhorn, Edwin; Reitsma, Bennie H.; Bel, Elisabeth H.D.; ten Brinke, Anneke

    2016-01-01

    Adult-onset eosinophilic asthma is increasingly recognised as a severe and difficult-to-treat subtype of asthma. In clinical practice, early recognition of patients with this asthma subtype is important because it may have treatment implications. Therefore, physicians need to know the distinct characteristics of this asthma phenotype. The objective of the present study was to determine the characteristic profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma. 130 patients with adult-onset (>18 years of age) asthma and high blood eosinophil counts (≥0.3×109 L−1) were compared with 361 adult-onset asthma patients with low (<0.3×109 L−1) blood eosinophils. Measurements included a series of clinical, functional and imaging parameters. Patients with high blood eosinophils were more often male, had less well controlled asthma and higher exacerbation rates, despite the use of higher doses of inhaled corticosteroids. They had higher levels of total IgE without more sensitisation to common inhaled allergens. In addition, these patients had worse lung function, and more often showed fixed airflow limitation, air trapping, nasal polyposis and abnormalities on sinus computed tomography scanning. Chronic rhinosinusitis, air trapping and male sex were three independent factors associated with blood eosinophilia (adjusted OR 3.8 (95% CI 1.7–8.1), 3.0 (95% CI 1.1–8.1) and 2.4 (95% CI 1.3–4.4), respectively). Patients with adult-onset asthma with elevated blood eosinophils exhibit a distinct profile, which can readily be recognised in clinical practice. PMID:27730197

  3. Shared Genetic Factors Involved in Celiac Disease, Type 2 Diabetes and Anorexia Nervosa Suggest Common Molecular Pathways for Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mostowy, Joanna; Montén, Caroline; Gudjonsdottir, Audur H.; Arnell, Henrik; Browaldh, Lars; Nilsson, Staffan; Agardh, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several genetic regions involved in immune-regulatory mechanisms to be associated with celiac disease. Previous GWAS also revealed an over-representation of genes involved in type 2 diabetes and anorexia nervosa associated with celiac disease, suggesting involvement of common metabolic pathways for development of these chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to extend these previous analyses to study the gene expression in the gut from children with active celiac disease. Material and Methods Thirty six target genes involved in type 2 diabetes and four genes associated with anorexia nervosa were investigated for gene expression in small intestinal biopsies from 144 children with celiac disease at median (range) age of 7.4 years (1.6–17.8) and from 154 disease controls at a median (range) age 11.4.years (1.4–18.3). Results A total of eleven of genes were differently expressed in celiac patients compared with disease controls of which CD36, CD38, FOXP1, SELL, PPARA, PPARG, AGT previously associated with type 2 diabetes and AKAP6, NTNG1 with anorexia nervosa remained significant after correction for multiple testing. Conclusion Shared genetic factors involved in celiac disease, type 2 diabetes and anorexia nervosa suggest common underlying molecular pathways for these diseases. PMID:27483138

  4. Inferior Pancreaticoduodenal Artery Aneurysms Associated with Occlusive Lesions of the Celiac Axis: Diagnosis, Treatment Options, Outcomes, and Review of the Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Flood, Karen Nicholson, Anthony A.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To describe the presentation, treatment, and outcomes for 14 patients with aneurysms of the inferior pancreaticoduodenal arteries associated with occlusive lesions of the celiac axis, and to review the literature for similar cases. Methods, Over a period of 12 years, 14 patients (10 women and 4 men) ranging in age from 26 to 50 (mean 46) years were demonstrated to have aneurysms of the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery origin associated with stenosis or occlusion of the celiac axis. All patients were treated by a combination of surgery and interventional radiology. Results. Outcome data collected between 3 months and 4 years (mean 2 years) demonstrated that all aneurysms remained excluded, and all 14 patients were well. The 49 case reports in the literature confirm the findings of this cohort. Conclusion. In inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm resulting from celiac occlusive disease, endovascular treatment is best achieved by stenting the celiac axis and/or embolizing the aneurysm when necessary.

  5. Profound Reversible Hypogammaglobulinemia Caused by Celiac Disease in the Absence of Protein Losing Enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Ameratunga, Rohan; Barker, Russell William; Steele, Richard Henderson; Deo, Maneka; Woon, See-Tarn; Yeong, Mee Ling; Koopmans, Wikke

    2015-08-01

    When patients with hypogammaglobulinemia are encountered, a vigorous search should be undertaken for secondary treatable causes. Here we describe the first case of a patient with severe asymptomatic hypogammaglobulinemia where the underlying cause was undiagnosed celiac disease. A strict gluten free diet resulted in resolution of her mild long-standing abdominal symptoms and correction of her hypogammaglobulinemia. There was corresponding improvement in her duodenal histology and normalisation of her celiac serology. Protein losing enteropathy was unlikely to have been the mechanism of her profound hypogammaglobulinemia, as her albumin was within the normal range and she had a normal fecal alpha 1 antitrypsin level. Application of the Ameratunga et al. (2013) diagnostic criteria was helpful in confirming this patient did not have Common Variable Immunodeficiency Disorder (CVID). Celiac disease must now be considered in the differential diagnosis of severe hypogammaglobulinemia. There should be a low threshold for undertaking celiac serology in patients with hypogammaglobulinemia, even if they have minimal symptoms attributable to gut disease.

  6. Bones of Contention: Bone Mineral Density Recovery in Celiac Disease—A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Grace-Farfaglia, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic bone disease is a frequent co-morbidity in newly diagnosed adults with celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune disorder triggered by the ingestion of dietary gluten. This systematic review of studies looked at the efficacy of the gluten-free diet, physical activity, nutrient supplementation, and bisphosphonates for low bone density treatment. Case control and cohort designs were identified from PubMed and other academic databases (from 1996 to 2015) that observed newly diagnosed adults with CD for at least one year after diet treatment using the dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan. Only 20 out of 207 studies met the inclusion criteria. Methodological quality was assessed using the Strengthening of the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement checklist. Gluten-free diet adherence resulted in partial recovery of bone density by one year in all studies, and full recovery by the fifth year. No treatment differences were observed between the gluten-free diet alone and diet plus bisphosphonates in one study. For malnourished patients, supplementation with vitamin D and calcium resulted in significant improvement. Evidence for the impact of physical activity on bone density was limited. Therapeutic strategies aimed at modifying lifestyle factors throughout the lifespan should be studied. PMID:25961322

  7. Bones of contention: bone mineral density recovery in celiac disease--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Grace-Farfaglia, Patricia

    2015-05-01

    Metabolic bone disease is a frequent co-morbidity in newly diagnosed adults with celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune disorder triggered by the ingestion of dietary gluten. This systematic review of studies looked at the efficacy of the gluten-free diet, physical activity, nutrient supplementation, and bisphosphonates for low bone density treatment. Case control and cohort designs were identified from PubMed and other academic databases (from 1996 to 2015) that observed newly diagnosed adults with CD for at least one year after diet treatment using the dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan. Only 20 out of 207 studies met the inclusion criteria. Methodological quality was assessed using the Strengthening of the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement checklist. Gluten-free diet adherence resulted in partial recovery of bone density by one year in all studies, and full recovery by the fifth year. No treatment differences were observed between the gluten-free diet alone and diet plus bisphosphonates in one study. For malnourished patients, supplementation with vitamin D and calcium resulted in significant improvement. Evidence for the impact of physical activity on bone density was limited. Therapeutic strategies aimed at modifying lifestyle factors throughout the lifespan should be studied.

  8. What Is Celiac Disease? How Do I Live with It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaska, Joan

    2007-01-01

    Celiac disease, also known as celiac sprue, is a hereditary, autoimmune disease that causes a sensitivity to gluten, which is a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. The key symptoms of celiac disease are diarrhea, constipation, gas, bloating, backaches, stomachaches, nausea, anemia, fatigue, osteoporosis, stunted growth in children, and weight…

  9. Is Dietitian Use Associated with Celiac Disease Outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Mahadev, SriHari; Simpson, Suzanne; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Lewis, Suzanne K.; Tennyson, Christina A.; Green, Peter H. R.

    2013-01-01

    A gluten-free diet (GFD) is the treatment for celiac disease (CD), but due to its complexity, dietitian referral is uniformly recommended. We surveyed patients with CD to determine if dietitian use is associated with quality of life, symptom severity, or GFD adherence. The survey utilized three validated CD-specific instruments: the CD quality of life (CD-QOL), CD symptom index (CSI) and CD adherence test (CDAT). Four hundred and thirteen patients with biopsy-proven CD were eligible for inclusion. The majority (77%) were female and mean BMI was 24.1. Over three-quarters of patients (326, 79%) had seen a dietitian, however, 161 (39%) had seen a dietitian only once. Age, sex, and education level were not associated with dietitian use; nor was BMI (24.6 vs. 24.0, p = 0.45). On multivariate analysis, adjusting for age gender, education, duration of disease, and body mass index, dietitian use was not associated with CD-QOL, CSI, or CDAT scores. Our survey did not show an association between dietitian use and symptom severity, adherence, or quality of life. Delay in diagnosis was associated with poorer outcomes. This is a preliminary study with several limitations, and further prospective analysis is needed to evaluate the benefits and cost-effectiveness of dietitian-referral in the care of celiac disease patients. PMID:23676548

  10. Peculiarities of Anxiety Score Distribution in Adult Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Blank, Mikhail; Blank, Olga; Myasnikova, Ekaterina; Denisova, Daria

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present research is to investigate and analyze possible peculiarities of the psychological state of cancer patients undergoing treatment. Scores characterizing the trait and state anxiety were acquired using the Integrative Anxiety Test from four groups: adults with no appreciable disease, pregnant women, cancer patients examined during the specific antitumor treatment, and cancer patients brought into lasting clinical remission. Statistical analysis of the testing results revealed the bimodal type of the distribution of scores. The only statistically significant exception was the distribution of the state anxiety scores in cancer patients undergoing treatment that was clearly unimodal. PMID:26176239

  11. Celiac Axis, Common Hepatic and Hepatic Artery Variants as Evidenced on MDCT Angiography in South Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction With the increase in the hepatobiliary, pancreatic surgeries and liver transplantation, being aware of the anatomic variations of the celiac axis and the hepatic arteries is of paramount importance. Aim To illustrate the normal anatomy and variants of the celiac axis and the hepatic arteries with multidetector computed tomographic (MDCT) angiography in South Indian population and determine the potential variations in the celiac axis anatomy and the hepatic arteries, thus assisting the hepatobiliary surgeon and the interventional radiologist in avoiding iatrogenic injury to the arteries. Materials and Methods Two hundred patients undergoing abdominal CT angiography from July 2014 till July 2015 were retrospectively studied for hepatic arterial and celiac axis anatomical variation. The anatomic variations in our study were correlated with other studies. Results The celiac axis (CA) and the hepatic artery (HA) variations were analysed as per criteria laid by Song et al., and Michel. Out of 15 possible CA variations, 5 types of celiac artery variations were seen in 14 patients. A normal CA was seen in 179(89.5%) patients of the 200 patients. In the remaining 7 patients, the CA anatomy was classified as ambiguous since there was separate origin of the right and left hepatic arteries from the CA with absent common hepatic artery (CHA). The CHA originated normally from the celiac axis in 94% of the cases. Variation of CHA origin was seen in 5 patients. Normal HA anatomy was seen in 114 (57%) patients. Variation in HA anatomy was seen in 86 (43%) patients. Origin of the right hepatic artery (RHA) from the hepatic artery proper was seen in 182 (91%) patients and replaced origin of RHA from the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) was seen in 18 (9%) of the cases. Accessory RHA was seen in 7(3.5%) patients. The left hepatic artery (LHA) originated from the hepatic artery proper in 186 (93%) patients and replaced origin of LHA from the left gastric artery (LGA) was

  12. Improvement with Duloxetine in an Adult ADHD Patient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tourjman, Smadar Valerie; Bilodeau, Mathieu

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common and disabling disorder among adults and is treated with stimulant and non stimulant medication. Objective: To report the case of a patient with ADHD showing good clinical response to duloxetine, a selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SSNRI). Case…

  13. A Future for Adult Educators in Patient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Jean E.

    2014-01-01

    Adult education in healthcare comes in several forms: degree and certificate programs aimed at preparing better academic and clinical educators; and community education programs aimed at wellness, rehabilitation, or learning to live with chronic diseases. Patient-centered healthcare, however, is part of something new: coordinated and transitional…

  14. Combined Endovascular Repair of a Celiac Trunk Aneurysm Using Celiac-Splenic Stent Graft and Hepatic Artery Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Giampaolo; Rivolta, Nicola; Fontana, Federico; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Mariscalco, Giovanni; Bracchi, Elena; Ferrario, Massimo

    2010-04-15

    Celiac trunk aneurysms are rare and usually asymptomatic lesions. However, treatment is generally warranted to avoid catastrophic rupture. We report a case of a 70-year-old man who sought care for a celiac trunk aneurysm close to the hepatosplenic bifurcation managed endovascularly by using a combined treatment of celiac-splenic stent-graft implantation and hepatic artery embolization.

  15. Celiac plexus block: an anatomical study and simulation using computed tomography*

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Gabriela Augusta Mateus; Lopes, Paulo Tadeu Campos; dos Santos, Ana Maria Pujol Vieira; Pozzobon, Adriane; Duarte, Rodrigo Dias; Cima, Alexandre da Silveira; Massignan, Ângela

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze anatomical variations associated with celiac plexus complex by means of computed tomography simulation, assessing the risk for organ injury as the transcrural technique is utilized. Materials and Methods One hundred eight transaxial computed tomography images of abdomen were analyzed. The aortic-vertebral, celiac trunk (CeT)-vertebral, CeT-aortic and celiac-aortic-vertebral topographical relationships were recorded. Two needle insertion pathways were drawn on each of the images, at right and left, 9 cm and 4.5 cm away from the midline. Transfixed vital organs and gender-related associations were recorded. Results Aortic-vertebral - 45.37% at left and 54.62% in the middle; CeT-vertebral - T12, 36.11%; T12-L1, 32.4%; L1, 27.77%; T11-T12, 2.77%; CeT-aortic - 53.7% at left and 46.3% in the middle; celiac-aortic-vertebral - L-l, 22.22%; M-m, 23.15%; L-m, 31.48%; M-l, 23.15%. Neither correspondence on the right side nor significant gender-related associations were observed. Conclusion Considering the wide range of abdominal anatomical variations and the characteristics of needle insertion pathways, celiac plexus block should not be standardized. Imaging should be performed prior to the procedure in order to reduce the risks for injuries or for negative outcomes to patients. Gender-related anatomical variations involved in celiac plexus block should be more deeply investigated, since few studies have addressed the subject. PMID:25741102

  16. Diagnosis of gluten related disorders: Celiac disease, wheat allergy and non-celiac gluten sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Elli, Luca; Branchi, Federica; Tomba, Carolina; Villalta, Danilo; Norsa, Lorenzo; Ferretti, Francesca; Roncoroni, Leda; Bardella, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Cereal crops and cereal consumption have had a vital role in Mankind’s history. In the recent years gluten ingestion has been linked with a range of clinical disorders. Gluten-related disorders have gradually emerged as an epidemiologically relevant phenomenon with an estimated global prevalence around 5%. Celiac disease, wheat allergy and non-celiac gluten sensitivity represent different gluten-related disorders. Similar clinical manifestations can be observed in these disorders, yet there are peculiar pathogenetic pathways involved in their development. Celiac disease and wheat allergy have been extensively studied, while non-celiac gluten sensitivity is a relatively novel clinical entity, believed to be closely related to other gastrointestinal functional syndromes. The diagnosis of celiac disease and wheat allergy is based on a combination of findings from the patient’s clinical history and specific tests, including serology and duodenal biopsies in case of celiac disease, or laboratory and functional assays for wheat allergy. On the other hand, non-celiac gluten sensitivity is still mainly a diagnosis of exclusion, in the absence of clear-cut diagnostic criteria. A multimodal pragmatic approach combining findings from the clinical history, symptoms, serological and histological tests is required in order to reach an accurate diagnosis. A thorough knowledge of the differences and overlap in clinical presentation among gluten-related disorders, and between them and other gastrointestinal disorders, will help clinicians in the process of differential diagnosis. PMID:26109797

  17. Neuropsychological profile of adult patients with nonsymptomatic occipital lobe epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Bilo, Leonilda; Santangelo, Gabriella; Improta, Ilaria; Vitale, Carmine; Meo, Roberta; Trojano, Luigi

    2013-02-01

    To explore the neuropsychological and neurobehavioral profile in adult patients affected by nonsymptomatic (cryptogenic and idiopathic) occipital lobe epilepsy (OLE), with normal intelligence, we enrolled 20 adult patients with nonsymptomatic OLE and 20 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy subjects. All participants underwent neuropsychiatric assessment scales, and standardized neuropsychological tests tapping memory, executive functions, constructional, visuospatial and visuoperceptual skills. After Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons, patients performed significantly worse than controls on several tests tapping complex visuospatial skills and frontal lobe functions. The analysis of single patients' performance revealed that a significantly higher number of OLE patients achieved age- and education-adjusted pathological scores on three tests (Benton Judgment of Line Orientation Test, Freehand Copying of Drawings Test, color-word interference task of Stroop test) with respect to controls. Patients did not differ from control subjects on neuropsychiatric aspects. The direct comparison between OLE subtypes showed that cryptogenetic OLE patients tended to achieve lower scores than idiopathic OLE patients on most tests, but no difference between the two groups was fully significant. In summary, patients with nonsymptomatic OLE can be affected by clinically relevant impairments in selected neuropsychological domains: complex visuospatial skills and executive functions. It could be speculated that frontal and visuospatial cognitive deficits might be the result of epileptic activity spreading within a neural network that includes structures far beyond the occipital lobe.

  18. Food hypersensitivity among adult patients: epidemiological and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Castillo, R; Delgado, J; Quiralte, J; Blanco, C; Carrillo, T

    1996-01-01

    Food hypersensitivity (FH) is lesser frequent among adult patients than in childhood. Foods implicated in hypersensitivity reactions vary with sociocultural and diet habits from a geographic place to other. We studied 142 adult patients sensitized to foods, among 7698 patients visited at our Outpatient Clinic. Hundred and twenty patients referred clinical symptoms after consumption of one or more foods consistently. From the latest, 107 patients (89.2%) were atopics (92 of them sensitizes to dust mites) and 54 (45%) referred atopic familiar background. Most frequent recorded symptoms were: urticaria/angioedema 84 cases (70%), oral syndrome 65 (54%), asthma 48 (37%) and anaphylaxis 33 patients (27.5%). Shellfish sensitization occurred in 50 patients, fresh fruits in 33 and nuts in 29 cases. Shrimp (48 patients), squid (33), kiwi (14), papaya (14), avocado (13) and banana (12 cases) were the most frequent causes of FH. Significant statistical association between foods and inhalants was observed for fresh fruits and latex (p < 0.001), fresh fruits and pollens (p < 0.01), and shellfish and Blatta germanica (p < 0.001). Prevalence of FH among patients at our Area is around 1.6%. Tropical fruits, as other kind of fruits, seem to share common IgE-epitopes to pollens. High prevalence of shellfish and cockroach hypersensitivity could be more easily developed by previous domestic mites sensitization.

  19. Patient-specific FDG dosimetry for adult males, adult females, and very low birth weight infants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niven, Erin

    Fluorodeoxyglucose is the most commonly used radiopharmaceutical in Positron Emission Tomography, with applications in neurology, cardiology, and oncology. Despite its routine use worldwide, the radiation absorbed dose estimates from FDG have been based primarily on data obtained from two dogs studied in 1977 and 11 adults (most likely males) studied in 1982. In addition, the dose estimates calculated for FDG have been centered on the adult male, with little or no mention of variations in the dose estimates due to sex, age, height, weight, nationality, diet, or pathological condition. Through an extensive investigation into the Medical Internal Radiation Dose schema for calculating absorbed doses, I have developed a simple patient-specific equation; this equation incorporates the parameters necessary for alterations to the mathematical values of the human model to produce an estimate more representative of the individual under consideration. I have used this method to determine the range of absorbed doses to FDG from the collection of a large quantity of biological data obtained in adult males, adult females, and very low birth weight infants. Therefore, a more accurate quantification of the dose to humans from FDG has been completed. My results show that per unit administered activity, the absorbed dose from FDG is higher for infants compared to adults, and the dose for adult women is higher than for adult men. Given an injected activity of approximately 3.7 MBq kg-1, the doses for adult men, adult women, and full-term newborns would be on the order of 5.5, 7.1, and 2.8 mSv, respectively. These absorbed doses are comparable to the doses received from other nuclear medicine procedures.

  20. Decrease in lactobacilli in the intestinal microbiota of celiac children with a gluten-free diet, and selection of potentially probiotic strains.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo Pisarello, María J; Vintiñi, Elisa O; González, Silvia N; Pagani, Florencia; Medina, Marcela S

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota would be implicated in pathology associated with celiac disease caused by an abnormal immune system reaction against gluten present in cereal grains. The objectives of this work were to detect through basic methods the changes in the composition of the most common genera of bacteria from the intestinal microbiota of symptom-free celiac disease children with a gluten-free diet compared with healthy children from Tucumán and to select lactobacilli (Lb) strains with probiotic potential from the feces of healthy children. Results demonstrated that the feces of celiac children with a gluten-free diet showed significantly lower counts of Lb (P < 0.05) compared with healthy children, while enterobacteria tended to increase in celiac children. On the basis of these results, isolation of some Lb from the feces of healthy children was carried out. Thus, 5 Lb strains were selected because of their high resistance percentages to gastrointestinal tract conditions. In addition, their autoaggregation and hydrophobicity properties were evaluated: Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LC4) showed the highest percentage of autoaggregation while Lactobacillus paracasei (LC9) showed high hydrophobicity. Based on these results, LC4 and LC9 were selected, and their use as potential probiotic strains to improve signs and symptoms associated with celiac disease is discussed. This is the first study performed in Argentina concerning the relationship between intestinal microbiota and celiac disease in celiac children with a gluten-free diet. In addition, the development of a probiotic food addressed towards celiac patients and designed with Lb isolated from the feces of healthy children from our province represents a promising alternative to improve the quality of life of celiac patients.

  1. Optimal serum phenylalanine for adult patients with phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Okano, Yoshiyuki; Nagasaka, Hironori

    2013-12-01

    High serum phenylalanine in adult patients with phenylketonuria (PKU) causes neuropsychological and psychosocial problems that can be resolved by phenylalanine-restricted diet. Therefore, PKU patients must continue to adhere to phenylalanine-restricted diet for life, although the optimal serum phenylalanine level in later life has yet to be established. The purpose of this review was to establish the optimal serum phenylalanine level in later life of PKU patients. We evaluated oxidative stress status, nitric oxide metabolism, cholesterol-derived oxysterols, vitamin D and bone status, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in adult PKU patients according to serum phenylalanine level. Oxidative stress increased markedly at serum phenylalanine of 700-800 μmol/L. Serum phenylalanine higher than 700-850 μmol/L correlated with the disturbance of nitric oxide regulatory system. Adult PKU patients had poor vitamin D status and exhibited predominance of bone resorption over bone formation. In the brain, the levels of 24S-hydroxycholesterol, a marker of brain cholesterol elimination, were low at serum phenylalanine levels exceeding 650 μmol/L. MRI studies showed high signal intensity in deep white matter on T2-weighted and FLAIR images of PKU patients with serum phenylalanine greater than 500 μmol/L, with decreased apparent diffusion coefficients. Changes in most parameters covering the entire body organs in adult PKU were almost acceptable below 700-800 μmol/L of phenylalanine level. However, the optimal serum phenylalanine level should be 500 μmol/L or less in later life for the brain to be safe.

  2. Genome search in celiac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Greco, L; Corazza, G; Babron, M C; Clot, F; Fulchignoni-Lataud, M C; Percopo, S; Zavattari, P; Bouguerra, F; Dib, C; Tosi, R; Troncone, R; Ventura, A; Mantavoni, W; Magazzù, G; Gatti, R; Lazzari, R; Giunta, A; Perri, F; Iacono, G; Cardi, E; de Virgiliis, S; Cataldo, F; De Angelis, G; Musumeci, S; Clerget-Darpoux, F

    1998-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD), a malabsorption disorder of the small intestine, results from ingestion of gluten. The HLA risk factors involved in CD are well known but do not explain the entire genetic susceptibility. To determine the localization of other genetic risk factors, a systematic screening of the genome has been undertaken. The typing information of 281 markers on 110 affected sib pairs and their parents was used to test linkage. Systematic linkage analysis was first performed on 39 pairs in which both sibs had a symptomatic form of CD. Replication of the regions of interest was then carried out on 71 pairs in which one sib had a symptomatic form and the other a silent form of CD. In addition to the HLA loci, our study suggests that a risk factor in 5qter is involved in both forms of CD (symptomatic and silent). Furthermore, a factor on 11qter possibly differentiates the two forms. In contrast, none of the regions recently published was confirmed by the present screening. PMID:9497251

  3. Effectiveness of antigliadin antibodies as a screening test for celiac disease in children

    PubMed Central

    Chartrand, L J; Agulnik, J; Vanounou, T; Russo, P A; Baehler, P; Seidman, E G

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the effectiveness of serologic antigliadin antibody (AGA) testing in predicting celiac disease in children. DESIGN: Prospective clinical assessment. SETTING: Hôpital Sainte-Justine, montreal. PATIENTS: A total of 176 children with possible celiac disease who were referred for duodenal biopsy between January 1992 and June 1995. OUTCOME MEASURES: IgA and IgG AGA titres, as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); duodenal biopsy; clinical outcome on a gluten-free diet. RESULTS: Of the 176 children 30 were found to have celiac disease according to the criteria of the European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition (ESPGAN). The sensitivity and specificity of the IgA AGA titre, as well as its positive and negative predictive values, were 80%, 92%, 67% and 96% respectively; the corresponding values for the IgG AGA titre were 83%, 79%, 45% and 96%. The respective values for IgA and IgG AGA titres combined were 93%, 71%, 43% and 98%. Only 2 of the 30 patients with celiac disease had false-negative results for both IgA and IgG AGA titres. The IgA and IgG AGA titres decreased significantly (p < 0.005) in all 11 patients after being on a gluten-free diet for at least 10 months and reached normal values in 8. CONCLUSION: AGA screening for celiac disease permits better selection of patients for duodenal biopsy and adds specificity to the histologic diagnosis. Such screening cannot replace intestinal biopsy, which remains the gold standard for diagnosis. PMID:9294391

  4. Results from Ad Hoc and Routinely Collected Data among Celiac Women with Infertility or Pregnancy Related Disorders: Italy, 2001–2011

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic autoimmune illness triggered by gluten consumption in genetically predisposed individuals. Worldwide, CD prevalence is approximately 1%. Several studies suggest a higher prevalence of undiagnosed CD in patients with infertility. We described reproductive disorders and assessed the frequency of hospital admissions for infertility among celiac women aged 15–49. We conducted two surveys enrolling a convenient sample of celiac women, residing in Apulia or in Basilicata (Italy). Moreover, we selected hospital discharge records (HDRs) of celiac women and women with an exemption for CD, and matched the lists with HDRs for reproductive disorders. In the surveys we included 91 celiac women; 61.5% of them reported menstrual cycle disorders. 47/91 reported at least one pregnancy and 70.2% of them reported problems during pregnancy. From the HDRs and the registry of exemption, we selected 4,070 women with CD; the proportion of women hospitalized for infertility was higher among celiac women than among resident women in childbearing age (1.2% versus 0.2%). Our findings highlight a higher prevalence of reproductive disorders among celiac women than in the general population suggesting that clinicians might consider testing for CD women presenting with pregnancy disorders or infertility. PMID:24895657

  5. Celiac disease in children and adolescents with Hashimoto Thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Tuhan, Hale; Işık, Sakine; Abacı, Ayhan; Şimşek, Erdem; Anık, Ahmet; Anal, Özden; Böber, Ece

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical and laboratory findings and determine the prevalence of celiac disease (CD) in children with Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT). Material and Methods: The data of a total of 80 patients with positive anti-thyroid antibodies who were aged between 6 and 17.9 years were retrospectively studied. Age, gender, complaints at the time of presentation, family history of thyroid disorders, clinical and laboratory findings were recorded. The levels of thyrotropin, free thyroxin, thyroid autoantibodies (thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies), immunoglobulin A (IgA), anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (IgA-tTG), and thyroid ultrasonography findings were enrolled. Results: Eighty patients (65 females (81.2%) and 15 males (18,8%)) were included in the study. Family history of thyroid disease was present in 38 (47.5%) patients. The most common complaints at the time of presentation were goiter (%30) and weight gain (%25). Forty three (53.8%), 23 (28.7%), and 14 (17.5%) patients presented with euthyroidism, subclinical hypothyroidism and obvious hypothyroidism. Thirty seven (46.2%) patients had goiter. IgA-tTG was found to be positive after a diagnosis of HT was made in only one patient (1.25%) and the diagnosis of CD was confirmed when intestinal biopsy of this patient revealed villus atrophy, crypt hyperplasia and increase in the intraepithelial lymphocyte count. Conclusions: In our study, it was found that the most common complaints at presentation in patients with a diagnosis of hashimoto thyroiditis included goiter, weakness and weight gain and the prevalence of celiac diseases was found to be 1.25% (1/80). This study shows that the prevalence of CD in patients with a diagnosis of HT is higher compared to the prevalence in the healthy pediatric population. PMID:27489467

  6. The Overlap between Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity: A Clinical Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Makharia, Archita; Catassi, Carlo; Makharia, Govind K

    2015-12-10

    The spectrum of gluten-related disorders has widened in recent times and includes celiac disease, non-celiac gluten sensitivity, and wheat allergy. The complex of symptoms associated with these diseases, such as diarrhea, constipation or abdominal pain may overlap for the gluten related diseases, and furthermore they can be similar to those caused by various other intestinal diseases, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The mechanisms underlying symptom generation are diverse for all these diseases. Some patients with celiac disease may remain asymptomatic or have only mild gastrointestinal symptoms and thus may qualify for the diagnosis of IBS in the general clinical practice. Similarly, the overlap of symptoms between IBS and non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) often creates a dilemma for clinicians. While the treatment of NCGS is exclusion of gluten from the diet, some, but not all, of the patients with IBS also improve on a gluten-free diet. Both IBS and NCGS are common in the general population and both can coexist with each other independently without necessarily sharing a common pathophysiological basis. Although the pathogenesis of NCGS is not well understood, it is likely to be heterogeneous with possible contributing factors such as low-grade intestinal inflammation, increased intestinal barrier function and changes in the intestinal microbiota. Innate immunity may also play a pivotal role. One possible inducer of innate immune response has recently been reported to be amylase-trypsin inhibitor, a protein present in wheat endosperm and the source of flour, along with the gluten proteins.

  7. ACG Clinical Guideline: Nutrition Therapy in the Adult Hospitalized Patient.

    PubMed

    McClave, Stephen A; DiBaise, John K; Mullin, Gerard E; Martindale, Robert G

    2016-03-01

    The value of nutrition therapy for the adult hospitalized patient is derived from the outcome benefits achieved by the delivery of early enteral feeding. Nutritional assessment should identify those patients at high nutritional risk, determined by both disease severity and nutritional status. For such patients if they are unable to maintain volitional intake, enteral access should be attained and enteral nutrition (EN) initiated within 24-48 h of admission. Orogastric or nasogastric feeding is most appropriate when starting EN, switching to post-pyloric or deep jejunal feeding only in those patients who are intolerant of gastric feeds or at high risk for aspiration. Percutaneous access should be used for those patients anticipated to require EN for >4 weeks. Patients receiving EN should be monitored for risk of aspiration, tolerance, and adequacy of feeding (determined by percent of goal calories and protein delivered). Intentional permissive underfeeding (and even trophic feeding) is appropriate temporarily for certain subsets of hospitalized patients. Although a standard polymeric formula should be used routinely in most patients, an immune-modulating formula (with arginine and fish oil) should be reserved for patients who have had major surgery in a surgical ICU setting. Adequacy of nutrition therapy is enhanced by establishing nurse-driven enteral feeding protocols, increasing delivery by volume-based or top-down feeding strategies, minimizing interruptions, and eliminating the practice of gastric residual volumes. Parenteral nutrition should be used in patients at high nutritional risk when EN is not feasible or after the first week of hospitalization if EN is not sufficient. Because of their knowledge base and skill set, the gastroenterologist endoscopist is an asset to the Nutrition Support Team and should participate in providing optimal nutrition therapy to the hospitalized adult patient.

  8. Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease: The effects of gluten free diet on metabolic control

    PubMed Central

    Scaramuzza, Andrea E; Mantegazza, Cecilia; Bosetti, Alessandra; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is associated with celiac disease, with a prevalence that varies between 0.6% and 16.4%, according to different studies. After a diagnosis of celiac disease is confirmed by small bowel biopsy, patients are advised to commence a gluten-free diet (GFD). This dietary restriction may be particularly difficult for the child with diabetes, but in Europe (and in Italy) many food stores have targeted this section of the market with better labeling of products and more availability of specific GFD products. Treatment with a GFD in symptomatic patients has been shown to improve the symptoms, signs and complications of celiac disease. However, the effects of a GFD on diabetic control are less well established. Initial reports of improved hypoglycemic control were based on children who were diagnosed with celiac disease associated with malabsorption, but there have subsequently been reports of improvement in patients with type 1 diabetes with subclinical celiac disease. There are other studies reporting no effect, improved control and an improvement of hypoglycemic episodes. Moreover, in this review we wish to focus on low glycemic index foods, often suggested in people with type 1 diabetes, since they might reduce postprandial glycemic excursion and enhance long-term glycemic control. In contrast, GFD may be rich in high glycemic index foods that can increase the risk of obesity, insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease, worsening the metabolic control of the child with diabetes. Hence, it is important to evaluate the impact of a GFD on metabolic control, growth and nutritional status in children with type 1 diabetes. PMID:23961323

  9. Search for atoxic cereals: a single blind, cross-over study on the safety of a single dose of Triticum monococcum, in patients with celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cereals of baking quality with absent or reduced toxicity are actively sought as alternative therapy to a gluten-free diet (GFD) for patients with coeliac disease (CD). Triticum monococcum, an ancient wheat, is a potential candidate having no toxicity in in-vitro and ex-vivo studies. The aim of our study was to investigate on the safety of administration of a single dose of gluten of Tm in patients with CD on GFD. Methods We performed a single blind, cross-over study involving 12 CD patients who had been on a GFD for at least 12 months, challenged on day 0, 14 and 28 with a single fixed dose of 2.5 grams of the following (random order): Tm, rice (as reference atoxic protein) and Amygluten (as reference toxic protein) dispersed in a gluten-free pudding. The primary end-point of the study was the change in intestinal permeability, as assessed by changes in the urinary lactulose/rhamnose ratio (L/R ratio) measured by High Pressure Liquid Chromatography. We also assessed the occurrence of adverse gastrointestinal events, graded for intensity and duration according to the WHO scale. Variables were expressed as mean ± SD; paired t-test and χ2 test were used as appropriate. Results The urinary L/R ratio did not change significantly upon challenge with the 3 cereals, and was 0.055 ± 0.026 for Tm Vs 0.058 ± 0.035 for rice (p = 0.6736) and Vs 0.063 ± 0.054 with Amygluten (p = 0.6071). Adverse gastrointestinal events were 8 for Tm, Vs 11 for rice (p = 0.6321) and Vs 31 for Amygluten p = 0.0016), and, in all cases events were graded as “mild” or “moderate” with TM and rice, and as “severe” or “disabling” in 4 cases during Amygluten. Conclusions No definite conclusion can be drawn on the safety of Tm, based on no change in urinary L/R because even Amygluten, a toxic wheat protein, did not cause a significant change in urinary L/R indicating low sensitivity of this methodology in studies on acute toxicity. Tm was

  10. Infective Dermatitis in an Adult Patient With HTLV-1

    PubMed Central

    Riveros, Rosalba; Medina, Raquel; Morel, Maida

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Infective dermatitis is a chronic exudative eczematous eruption presenting in human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)–infected people. It presents with relapsing erythematous, scaly, and crusted lesions affecting simultaneously the scalp, external ear, retroauricular area, eyelid, paranasal skin, neck axilla, and groin. Superimposed Staphylococcus and Streptococcus infection are common. It mainly affects children and exceptionally adults, and there are only a few published cases. The authors present the first reported case in Paraguay of an adult patient who had symptoms of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1–associated progressive tropical spastic paraparesis, and 6 years after the onset of the neurological symptoms, the patient developed infective dermatitis lesions on the skin, with frequent exacerbations since then. PMID:26588341

  11. The last two millennias echo-catastrophes are the driving forces for the potential genetic advantage mechanisms in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Aaron, Lerner

    2011-11-01

    Many human genes have adapted to the constant threat of exposure to changing environmental conditions. Balancing selection is the result of an initial stage of positive selection that favors the spread in a population of a new allele until selection opposes its fixation and balanced situation is established. It is suggested that the disadvantageous celiac patients survived the last two millennias echo-catastrophes by adapting to the extreme temperature changes and their consequences in Europe. Genetic selective diversity induced by changing environment, enabled the celiac population to survive. Such a genetic positive selection is represented by the HEF C282Y mutation of hemochromatosis, SH2B3 loci and the HLA celiac disease-associated repertoire, enabling the celiac to overcome iron deficiency anemia and micro pathogen richness, respectively. The increased incidence of those evolutionary events in the celiac patients is a recent phenomenon that occurred in the latest era of the modern human history. The present hypothesis can shed light on additional selective genetic adaptations, echo catastrophe-driven that are at the basis of autoimmune disease-affected population survival and current expansion.

  12. Organ doses to adult patients for chest CT

    SciTech Connect

    Huda, Walter; Sterzik, Alexander; Tipnis, Sameer; Schoepf, U. Joseph

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to estimate organ doses for chest CT examinations using volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) data as well as accounting for patient weight. Methods: A CT dosimetry spreadsheet (ImPACT CT patient dosimetry calculator) was used to compute organ doses for a 70 kg patient undergoing chest CT examinations, as well as volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) in a body CT dosimetry phantom at the same CT technique factors. Ratios of organ dose to CTDI{sub vol} (f{sub organ}) were generated as a function of anatomical location in the chest for the breasts, lungs, stomach, red bone marrow, liver, thyroid, liver, and thymus. Values of f{sub organ} were obtained for x-ray tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kV for 1, 4, 16, and 64 slice CT scanners from two vendors. For constant CT techniques, we computed ratios of dose in water phantoms of differing diameter. By modeling patients of different weights as equivalent water cylinders of different diameters, we generated factors that permit the estimation of the organ doses in patients weighing between 50 and 100 kg who undergo chest CT examinations relative to the corresponding organ doses received by a 70 kg adult. Results: For a 32 cm long CT scan encompassing the complete lungs, values of f{sub organ} ranged from 1.7 (thymus) to 0.3 (stomach). Organs that are directly in the x-ray beam, and are completely irradiated, generally had f{sub organ} values well above 1 (i.e., breast, lung, heart, and thymus). Organs that are not completely irradiated in a total chest CT scan generally had f{sub organ} values that are less than 1 (e.g., red bone marrow, liver, and stomach). Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV resulted in modest increases in f{sub organ} for the heart (9%) and thymus (8%), but resulted in larger increases for the breast (19%) and red bone marrow (21%). Adult patient chests have been modeled by water cylinders with diameters between

  13. Depression in adult patients with biotin responsive basal ganglia disease.

    PubMed

    Bubshait, Dalal K; Rashid, Asif; Al-Owain, Mohammed A; Sulaiman, Raashda A

    2016-01-01

    Biotin responsive basal ganglia disease (BBGD), is a potentially treatable inherited metabolic disorder which clinically presents as sub-acute encephalopathy in children. Early diagnosis and treatment of this disorder results in good clinical recovery in childhood. However, there is no report in the literature on the long term outcome of these treated patients in adult life. We report two patients with BBGD who were metabolically stable on treatment and developed depression later in life. These cases highlight the association of depression with basal ganglia disorders and demonstrate that depression is the potential long term complication of BBGD.

  14. Vaccination of Adult Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Moraes-Fontes, Maria Francisca; Antunes, Ana Margarida; Gruner, Heidi; Riso, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    In the wake of the Portuguese vaccination program 50th anniversary it seems appropriate to review vaccination in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Controversial issues as regards the association between autoimmune diseases, infections, and vaccines are discussed as well as vaccine safety and efficacy issues as regards chronic immunosuppressant (IS) drug therapy. After a brief overview of national policies, specific recommendations are made as regards vaccination for adult patients with SLE with a particular focus on current IS therapy and unmet needs. PMID:27069477

  15. [Nursing diagnosis in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    de Souza, Luccas Melo; Gorini, Maria Isabel Pinto Coelho

    2006-09-01

    This case study aimed at identifying Nursing Diagnosis (ND) in adult patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia, with the purpose of contributing to the Systematization of Nurse Care. Interviews and observation were used for data collection, in addition to Nursing Process application. During the three months of data collection, other NDs were obtained by searching the files of the 6 patients. The 32 ND found in this study were grouped according to Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Out of these 32 ND, 15 corresponded to changes in Physiological Needs, and 10 to changes in Protection and Safety Needs.

  16. Attitudes Toward Genetic Testing for Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Roy, Abhik; Pallai, Michele; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Taylor, Annette K; Green, Peter H

    2016-04-01

    HLA molecular typing for celiac disease (CD) is a genetic test with a high negative predictive value. The aim of this study is to explore knowledge of and attitudes towards genetic testing (GT). A 25-item questionnaire was developed by a multidisciplinary team and distributed to members of CD support groups across the United States. Respondents (n = 1835) were mainly female (88 %), married (76 %), and college-educated (55 %), with a median age range of 31-50 years. Those who were married (82 vs 75 %, p = 0.002), had children (82 vs 74 %, p < 0.001), and had pursued education beyond high school (81 vs 68 %, p = 0.004) were more likely to be aware of the availability of GT. On multivariable analysis, adjusting for age, sex, education, marital status, region of residence, and having children, college-education (OR 2.05, 95 % CI: 1.33-3.16) and having children (OR 1.56, 95 % CI: 1.15-2.11) remained significant predictors of GT awareness. A majority of patients with a personal or family history of CD planned GT for their children, and the most common concerns regarding GT were cost and impact on health care and/or insurance. In conclusion, awareness of GT is high among CD support group members. Efforts should be made to increase knowledge of GT in those with a lower educational level, and healthcare professionals should attempt to address concerns regarding GT cost and the impact of results on health care and insurance status.

  17. Study of inhaler technique in asthma patients: differences between pediatric and adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Manríquez, Pablo; Acuña, Ana María; Muñoz, Luis; Reyes, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Inhaler technique comprises a set of procedures for drug delivery to the respiratory system. The oral inhalation of medications is the first-line treatment for lung diseases. Using the proper inhaler technique ensures sufficient drug deposition in the distal airways, optimizing therapeutic effects and reducing side effects. The purposes of this study were to assess inhaler technique in pediatric and adult patients with asthma; to determine the most common errors in each group of patients; and to compare the results between the two groups. Methods: This was a descriptive cross-sectional study. Using a ten-step protocol, we assessed inhaler technique in 135 pediatric asthma patients and 128 adult asthma patients. Results: The most common error among the pediatric patients was failing to execute a 10-s breath-hold after inhalation, whereas the most common error among the adult patients was failing to exhale fully before using the inhaler. Conclusions: Pediatric asthma patients appear to perform most of the inhaler technique steps correctly. However, the same does not seem to be true for adult patients. PMID:26578130

  18. Electrochemical magneto immunosensor for the detection of anti-TG2 antibody in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Kergaravat, Silvina V; Beltramino, Luis; Garnero, Nidia; Trotta, Liliana; Wagener, Marta; Isabel Pividori, Maria; Hernandez, Silvia R

    2013-10-15

    An electrochemical magneto immunosensor for the detection of anti-transglutaminase antibodies (ATG2) in celiac disease was developed. The immunological reaction is performed on magnetic beads (MBs) as a solid support in which the transglutaminase enzyme (TG2) is covalently immobilized (TG2-MB) and then ATG2 were revealed by an antibody labeled with peroxidase. The electrochemical response of the enzymatic reaction with o-phenilendiamine and H₂O₂ as substrates by square wave voltammetry was correlated with the ATG2. Graphite-epoxi composite cylindrical electrodes and screen printed electrodes were used as transducers in the immunosensor. A total number of 29 sera from clinically confirmed cases of celiac disease and 19 negative control sera were tested by the electrochemical magneto immunosensor. The data were submitted to the receiver-operating characteristic plot (ROC) analysis which indicated that 16.95 units was the most effective cut-off value (COV) to discriminate correctly between celiac and non-celiac patients. Using this point for prediction, sensitivity was found to be 100%, while specificity was 84%. PMID:23685317

  19. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity: questions still to be answered despite increasing awareness.

    PubMed

    Volta, Umberto; Caio, Giacomo; Tovoli, Francesco; De Giorgio, Roberto

    2013-09-01

    Recently, the increasing number of patients worldwide who are sensitive to dietary gluten without evidence of celiac disease or wheat allergy has contributed to the identification of a new gluten-related syndrome defined as non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Our knowledge regarding this syndrome is still lacking, and many aspects of this syndrome remain unknown. Its pathogenesis is heterogeneous, with a recognized pivotal role for innate immunity; many other factors also contribute, including low-grade intestinal inflammation, increased intestinal barrier function and changes in the intestinal microbiota. Gluten and other wheat proteins, such as amylase trypsin inhibitors, are the primary triggers of this syndrome, but it has also been hypothesized that a diet rich in fermentable monosaccharides and polyols may elicit its functional gastrointestinal symptoms. The epidemiology of this condition is far from established; its prevalence in the general population is highly variable, ranging from 0.63% to 6%. From a clinical point of view, non-celiac gluten sensitivity is characterized by a wide array of gastrointestinal and extraintestinal symptoms that occur shortly after the ingestion of gluten and improve or disappear when gluten is withdrawn from the diet. These symptoms recur when gluten is reintroduced. Because diagnostic biomarkers have not yet been identified, a double-blind placebo-controlled gluten challenge is currently the diagnostic method with the highest accuracy. Future research is needed to generate more knowledge regarding non-celiac gluten sensitivity, a condition that has global acceptance but has only a few certainties and many unresolved issues.

  20. Electrochemical magneto immunosensor for the detection of anti-TG2 antibody in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Kergaravat, Silvina V; Beltramino, Luis; Garnero, Nidia; Trotta, Liliana; Wagener, Marta; Isabel Pividori, Maria; Hernandez, Silvia R

    2013-10-15

    An electrochemical magneto immunosensor for the detection of anti-transglutaminase antibodies (ATG2) in celiac disease was developed. The immunological reaction is performed on magnetic beads (MBs) as a solid support in which the transglutaminase enzyme (TG2) is covalently immobilized (TG2-MB) and then ATG2 were revealed by an antibody labeled with peroxidase. The electrochemical response of the enzymatic reaction with o-phenilendiamine and H₂O₂ as substrates by square wave voltammetry was correlated with the ATG2. Graphite-epoxi composite cylindrical electrodes and screen printed electrodes were used as transducers in the immunosensor. A total number of 29 sera from clinically confirmed cases of celiac disease and 19 negative control sera were tested by the electrochemical magneto immunosensor. The data were submitted to the receiver-operating characteristic plot (ROC) analysis which indicated that 16.95 units was the most effective cut-off value (COV) to discriminate correctly between celiac and non-celiac patients. Using this point for prediction, sensitivity was found to be 100%, while specificity was 84%.

  1. [Chronic Duodenitis and Celiac Disease: a path between the nonspecific and the early stages of Marsh].

    PubMed

    Passera, Andrea Helena; Passera, Mario Luis; Higa, Antonio Luis; Nuñez, Maria; Armando, Lucas; Barzón, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Given the advances in diagnosis for CD, some patients are detected with symptoms and signs of food intolerance, which have positive antibodies and autoantibodies for coeliac disease, whom present proximal bowel biopsies with chronic nonspecific duodenitis and are not associated with stages 0 and 1 Marsh. On the other hand, patients with bloating, abdominal pain, pondostatural delay, negative antibodies for CD, and chronic nonspecific duodenitis in whom removing cow's milk or gluten, the symptoms remit. There are also celiac patients with biopsies before diagnosis, with chronic nonspecific duodenitis. In this paper, we summarize three brothers with different degrees of chronic duodenitis, one with chronic nonspecific duodenitis, and two with histopathological sings of coeliac disease. It is an invitation to think that chronic nonspecific duodenitis in some patients may be an earlier manifestation of celiac disease.

  2. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    MedlinePlus

    ... 617-355-6058 Visit the Celiac Support Group Facebook page CSG Facebook Page Boston Children's Hospital will teach you and ... Use Public Policy © 2005-2016 All Rights Reserved Facebook Twitter YouTube LinkedIn Google+ Instagram Boston Children's Hospital ...

  3. Enzymatic Strategies to Detoxify Gluten: Implications for Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Ivana; Lepretti, Marilena; Martucciello, Stefania; Esposito, Carla

    2010-01-01

    Celiac disease is a permanent intolerance to the gliadin fraction of wheat gluten and to similar barley and rye proteins that occurs in genetically susceptible subjects. After ingestion, degraded gluten proteins reach the small intestine and trigger an inappropriate T cell-mediated immune response, which can result in intestinal mucosal inflammation and extraintestinal manifestations. To date, no pharmacological treatment is available to gluten-intolerant patients, and a strict, life-long gluten-free diet is the only safe and efficient treatment available. Inevitably, this may produce considerable psychological, emotional, and economic stress. Therefore, the scientific community is very interested in establishing alternative or adjunctive treatments. Attractive and novel forms of therapy include strategies to eliminate detrimental gluten peptides from the celiac diet so that the immunogenic effect of the gluten epitopes can be neutralized, as well as strategies to block the gluten-induced inflammatory response. In the present paper, we review recent developments in the use of enzymes as additives or as processing aids in the food biotechnology industry to detoxify gluten. PMID:21048862

  4. Onset of Celiac Disease after Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C with Interferon Based Triple Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amandeep; Zaeri, Nayere; Ho, Immanuel K.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Patients treated with interferon (IFN) based therapies may develop exacerbation of autoimmune disease. We herein present the case of a 53-year-old female patient who developed celiac disease (CD) as a result of triple therapy (interferon, ribavirin, and boceprevir) for chronic HCV. Case. 53-year-old Caucasian female with past medical history of IV drug abuse was referred for abnormal LFTs. Laboratory data showed HCV RNA of 4,515,392 IU/mL, HCV genotype 1a, with normal LFTs. She was treated with 4 weeks of pegylated interferon alfa-2a plus ribavirin, followed by triple therapy using boceprevir for a total of 28 weeks. Approximately 4 weeks after initiation of triple therapy patient developed loose nonbloody bowel movements and was also found to have anemia. Biopsies from first and second portions of the duodenum were consistent with CD. The patient was treated with a gluten-free diet. Her intestinal symptoms improved and the hemoglobin returned to normal. Conclusion. Chronic HCV patients being treated with interferon alfa can develop celiac disease during or after therapy. For patients with positive autoantibodies, all-oral-IFN-free regimens should be considered. Celiac disease should be considered in patients who develop CD-like symptoms while on and shortly after cessation of interferon alfa therapy. PMID:26664772

  5. Experimental identification of potential falls in older adult hospital patients.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Aimee; Yang, James; Pati, Debajyoti; Valipoor, Shabboo

    2016-05-01

    Patient falls within hospitals have been identified as serious but largely preventable incidents, particularly among older adult patients. Previous literature has explored intrinsic factors associated with patient falls, but literature identifying possible extrinsic or situational factors related to falls is lacking. This study seeks to identify patient motions and activities along with associated environmental design factors in a patient bathroom and clinician zone setting that may lead to falls. A motion capture experiment was conducted in a laboratory setting on 27 subjects over the age of seventy using scripted tasks and mockups of the bathroom and clinician zone of a patient room. Data were post-processed using Cortex and Visual3D software. A potential fall was characterized by a set of criteria based on the jerk of the upper body׳s center of mass (COM). Results suggest that only motion-related factors, particularly turning, pushing, pulling, and grabbing, contribute most significantly to potential falls in the patient bathroom, whereas only pushing and pulling contribute significantly in the clinician zone. Future work includes identifying and changing precise environmental design factors associated with these motions for an updated patient room and performing motion capture experiments using the new setup. PMID:26920507

  6. Clofarabine in Adult Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-04

    Solid Tumors; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, Pediatric; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, Adult; Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute, Pediatric; Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute, Adult; Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Adult

  7. [Celiac disease : Pathogenesis, clinics, epidemiology, diagnostics, therapy].

    PubMed

    Schuppan, Detlef

    2016-07-01

    Celiac disease is induced by the consumption of gluten containing cereals (wheat, spelt, barley, rye). With a prevalence of ~ 1 %, it is the most common non-infectious chronic inflammatory intestinal disease worldwide. It manifests in all age groups, either classically with abdominal pain, diarrhoea and growth failure or weight loss, more commonly with indirect consequences of malabsorption, such as anaemia and osteoporosis, or with associated autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis or dermatitis herpetiformis. The pathogenesis of celiac disease is well explored. Gluten, the cereal storage protein, is not completely digested and reaches the intestinal mucosa where it activates inflammatory T cells, which cause atrophy of the resorptive villi. This T‑cell activation requires a genetic predisposition (the molecules HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 on antigen-presenting immune cells). Moreover, the enzyme tissue transglutaminase (TG2) which is released in the mucosa increases the immunogenicity of the gluten peptides by a deamidation reaction. The test for serum antibodies to the autoantigen TG2 is one of the best diagnostic markers in medicine, which in combination with endoscopically obtained biopsies, secures the diagnosis of celiac disease. Despite these tools celiac disease is severely underdiagnosed, with 80-90 % of those affected being undetected. The untreated condition can lead to grave complications. These include the consequences of malabsorption, cancers (especially intestinal T‑cell lymphoma), and likely also the promotion of autoimmune diseases. The therapy of celiac disease, a strict gluten-free diet, is difficult to maintain and not always effective. Alternative, supporting pharmacological therapies are urgently needed and are currently in development. PMID:27273303

  8. [Celiac disease : Pathogenesis, clinics, epidemiology, diagnostics, therapy].

    PubMed

    Schuppan, Detlef

    2016-07-01

    Celiac disease is induced by the consumption of gluten containing cereals (wheat, spelt, barley, rye). With a prevalence of ~ 1 %, it is the most common non-infectious chronic inflammatory intestinal disease worldwide. It manifests in all age groups, either classically with abdominal pain, diarrhoea and growth failure or weight loss, more commonly with indirect consequences of malabsorption, such as anaemia and osteoporosis, or with associated autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis or dermatitis herpetiformis. The pathogenesis of celiac disease is well explored. Gluten, the cereal storage protein, is not completely digested and reaches the intestinal mucosa where it activates inflammatory T cells, which cause atrophy of the resorptive villi. This T‑cell activation requires a genetic predisposition (the molecules HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 on antigen-presenting immune cells). Moreover, the enzyme tissue transglutaminase (TG2) which is released in the mucosa increases the immunogenicity of the gluten peptides by a deamidation reaction. The test for serum antibodies to the autoantigen TG2 is one of the best diagnostic markers in medicine, which in combination with endoscopically obtained biopsies, secures the diagnosis of celiac disease. Despite these tools celiac disease is severely underdiagnosed, with 80-90 % of those affected being undetected. The untreated condition can lead to grave complications. These include the consequences of malabsorption, cancers (especially intestinal T‑cell lymphoma), and likely also the promotion of autoimmune diseases. The therapy of celiac disease, a strict gluten-free diet, is difficult to maintain and not always effective. Alternative, supporting pharmacological therapies are urgently needed and are currently in development.

  9. Approach to the Patient: The Adult With Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Arlt, Wiebke

    2013-01-01

    The most common form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia is steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21OHD). When the nonclassical (mild) form is included, 21OHD is the most common genetic disease in human beings. With the advent of pharmaceutical preparation of glucocorticoids starting in the 1960s and newborn screening starting in the 1990s, the majority of children with 21OHD are reaching adulthood, which has yielded a cohort of patients with, in essence, a new disease. Only recently have some data emerged from cohorts of adults with 21OHD, and in some centers, experience with the management of these patients is growing. These patients suffer from poor health, infertility, characteristic tumors in the adrenal glands and gonads, and consequences of chronic glucocorticoid therapy. Their care is fragmented and inconsistent, and many stop taking their medications out of frustration. Internal medicine residents and endocrinology fellows receive little training in their care, which further discourages their seeking medical attention. Adults with 21OHD have a different physiology from patients with Addison's disease or other androgen excess states, and their needs are different than those of young children with 21OHD. Consequently, their care requires unorthodox treatment and monitoring strategies foreign to most endocrine practitioners. Our goal for this article is to review their physiology, complications, and needs in order to develop rational and effective treatment and monitoring strategies. PMID:23837188

  10. Arrhythmias in Adult Congenital Patients With Bodily Isomerism.

    PubMed

    Loomba, Rohit S; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Gupta, Navdeep; Buelow, Matthew; Alla, Venkata; Arora, Rohit R; Anderson, Robert H

    2016-02-01

    There are an increasing number of adults with congenital heart disease, some of whom have bodily isomerism. Bodily isomerism or heterotaxy is a unique clinical entity associated with congenital malformations of the heart which further increases the risk for future cardiovascular complications. We aimed to investigate the frequency of arrhythmias in adults with bodily isomerism. We utilized the 2012 iteration of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample to identify adult inpatient admissions associated with arrhythmias in patients with isomerism. Data regarding demographics, comorbidities, and various procedures were collected and compared between those with and without isomerism. A total of 6,907,109 admissions were analyzed with a total of 861 being associated isomerism. The frequency of arrhythmias was greater in those with isomerism (20.8 vs. 15.4 %). Those with isomerism were also more five times more likely to undergo invasive electrophysiology studies. Length and cost of hospitalization for patients with arrhythmias also tended to be greater in those with isomerism. Mortality did not differ between the two groups. Arrhythmias are more prevalent in those with isomerism, with a majority of arrhythmias in isomerism being atrial. Those with isomerism and arrhythmias also tended to have greater length and cost of hospitalization.

  11. Amelogenesis imperfecta - lifelong management. Restorative management of the adult patient.

    PubMed

    Patel, M; McDonnell, S T; Iram, S; Chan, M F W-Y

    2013-11-01

    The biggest challenge restorative dentists face in rehabilitating patients with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is trying to restore aesthetics, function and occlusal stability while keeping the treatment as conservative as possible. The goals of treatment should be to prolong the life of the patient's own teeth and avoid or delay the need for extractions and subsequent replacement with conventional fixed, removable or implant retained prostheses. In order to achieve these goals a stepwise approach to treatment planning is required starting with the most conservative but aesthetically acceptable treatment. This article discusses the management of AI and presents the various treatment options available for restoring the adult patient who presents to the dentist with AI. PMID:24201615

  12. [Celiac sprue: A pictorial revision of main imaging findings].

    PubMed

    Constanza Damm, Araneda; Matías Molina, Villagra; Giancarlo Schiappacasse, Faúndez; Claudio Cortés, Arriagada

    2014-01-01

    Celiac sprue (CS) is an autoinmune desease caused by gliadin intake. The exposure to this protein produces damage of the intestinal mucosae, primarily of the duodenum and yeyunum, causing different symptoms and diverse imaging findings. The objective of this review is to show a pictorial essay of the main findings of CS and its complications in barited fluroscopy, computed tomography and magnetic resonance. We show different images of patients with certified diagnosis of CS. In summary, these imaging modalities are useful for the diagnosis and follow up of patients with CS, as well as for the detection of complications. We believe that they are useful complementary exams that aid to the existing diagnosis criteria. PMID:26753388

  13. Hypoalbuminaemia predicts outcome in adult patients with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Kempny, Aleksander; Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Alonso-Gonzalez, Rafael; Uebing, Anselm; Rafiq, Isma; Li, Wei; Swan, Lorna; Hooper, James; Donovan, Jackie; Wort, Stephen J; Gatzoulis, Michael A; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Background In patients with acquired heart failure, hypoalbuminaemia is associated with increased risk of death. The prevalence of hypoproteinaemia and hypoalbuminaemia and their relation to outcome in adult patients with congenital heart disease (ACHD) remains, however, unknown. Methods Data on patients with ACHD who underwent blood testing in our centre within the last 14 years were collected. The relation between laboratory, clinical or demographic parameters at baseline and mortality was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Results A total of 2886 patients with ACHD were included. Mean age was 33.3 years (23.6–44.7) and 50.1% patients were men. Median plasma albumin concentration was 41.0 g/L (38.0–44.0), whereas hypoalbuminaemia (<35 g/L) was present in 13.9% of patients. The prevalence of hypoalbuminaemia was significantly higher in patients with great complexity ACHD (18.2%) compared with patients with moderate (11.3%) or simple ACHD lesions (12.1%, p<0.001). During a median follow-up of 5.7 years (3.3–9.6), 327 (11.3%) patients died. On univariable Cox regression analysis, hypoalbuminaemia was a strong predictor of outcome (HR 3.37, 95% CI 2.67 to 4.25, p<0.0001). On multivariable Cox regression, after adjusting for age, sodium and creatinine concentration, liver dysfunction, functional class and disease complexity, hypoalbuminaemia remained a significant predictor of death. Conclusions Hypoalbuminaemia is common in patients with ACHD and is associated with a threefold increased risk of risk of death. Hypoalbuminaemia, therefore, should be included in risk-stratification algorithms as it may assist management decisions and timing of interventions in the growing ACHD population. PMID:25736048

  14. Cancer in first-degree relatives of people with celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Emilsson, Louise; Murray, Joseph A.; Leffler, Daniel A.; Ludvigsson, Jonas F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Celiac disease (CD) has been linked to cancer, especially lymphoproliferative malignancy (LPM). Earlier research has shown that first-degree relatives (FDRs) to individuals with CD are at increased risk of autoimmunity including CD, but data on their risk of cancer are scarce and contradictory. We aimed to assess whether Swedish FDRs to individuals with CD are at increased risk of cancer. Methods: Individuals with CD (identified through biopsy reports equal to Marsh grade III) were matched on sex, age, county, and calendar year with up to 5 control individuals. All FDRs (father, mother, sibling, offspring) of CD individuals (“celiac FDRs”: n = 109,391) and controls (n = 548,465) were identified through Swedish healthcare registries. Through Cox regression, we calculated hazard ratios (HRs) for cancer incidence (all cancer, breast cancer, gastrointestinal cancer, and LPM). Results: During follow-up, celiac FDRs experienced 10,750 unique cancers as opposed to 54,686 in-control FDRs. Celiac FDRs were at a slightly lower risk of any cancer (HR 0.97, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.95–0.99), partially due to the lower risk of breast cancer (HR 0.92, 95% CI 0.87–0.98). The relative risks of LPM (HR 0.99, 95% CI 0.91–1.08) and gastrointestinal cancer (HR 0.98, 95%CI 0.93–1.03) were both close to 1. As opposed to earlier research, we found no excess risk of LPM in siblings to individuals with CD (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.81–1.19). Conclusion: Celiac FDRs are not at increased risk of cancer, including LPM, arguing that shared genetics is unlikely to explain previous reports of an excess risk of LPM in patients with CD. PMID:27512889

  15. Clinical and immunological relevance of anti-neuronal antibodies in celiac disease with neurological manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Caio, Giacomo; Giorgio, Roberto De; Venturi, Alessandro; Giancola, Fiorella; Latorre, Rocco; Boschetti, Elisa; Serra, Mauro; Ruggeri, Eugenio; Volta, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To assess anti-neuronal antibodies (NA) prevalence and their correlation with neurological disorders and bowel habits in celiac disease (CD) patients. Background: Neurological manifestations are estimated to occur in about 10% of celiac disease patients and NA to central nervous system (CNS) and enteric nervous system (ENS) are found in a significant proportion of them. Little is known about the clinical and immunological features in CD patients with neurological manifestations. Patients and methods: NA to CNS and ENS were investigated in 106 CD patients and in 60 controls with autoimmune disorders by indirect immunofluorescence on rat / primate cerebellar cortex and intestinal (small and large bowel) sections. Results: IgG NA to CNS (titer 1:50 - 1:400) were positive in 23 celiacs (21%), being more frequently detected in those with neurological disorders that in those without neurological dysfunction (49% vs. 8%, P< 0.0001). Of the 26 celiacs (24%) with IgG NA to ENS, 11 out of 12 with an antibody titer > 1:200 had severe constipation. Only one patient with cerebellar ataxia and intestinal sub-occlusion was positive for NA to CNS and ENS. NA to CNS and ENS were found in 7% and 5% of controls, respectively. Conclusion: In CD the positivity of NA to CNS can be regarded as a marker of neurological manifestations. High titer NA to ENS are associated with severe constipation. The demonstration of NA to CNS and ENS suggests an immune-mediated pathogenesis leading to central neural impairment as well as gut dysfunction (hence constipation), respectively. PMID:25926940

  16. Updates in vaccination: Recommendations for adult inflammatory bowel disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Chaudrey, Khadija; Salvaggio, Michelle; Ahmed, Aftab; Mahmood, Sultan; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-01-01

    Treatment regimens for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) incorporate the use of a variety of immunosuppressive agents that increase the risk of infections. Prevention of many of these infections can be achieved by the timely and judicious use of vaccinations. IBD patients tend to be under-immunized. Some of the contributing factors are lack of awareness regarding the significance of vaccinating IBD patients, misperception about safety of vaccinations in immunocompromised patients, ambiguity about the perceived role of the gastroenterologist in contrast to the primary care physician and unavailability of vaccination guidelines focused on IBD population. In general, immunocompetent IBD patients can be vaccinated using standard vaccination recommendations. However there are special considerations for IBD patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy, IBD travelers and pregnant women with IBD. This review discusses current vaccination recommendations with updates for adult IBD patients. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2013 vaccination guidelines with 2014 updates and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommendations have been highlighted as a primary source of recommendations. PMID:25805924

  17. Competencies for the Nurse Practitioner Working with Adult Urology Patients.

    PubMed

    Quallich, Susanne A; Bumpus, Sherry M; Lajiness, Shelley

    2015-01-01

    The role of the nurse practitioner (NP) has expanded into specialty domains. This document proposes 24 competencies specific to the urology NP, which are also consistent with the recommendations of National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties (NONPF) and compliment the American Urologic Association (AUA) 2014 white paper on the incorporation of advanced practice providers in urology practices. It describes three levels of practice and experience progression for the urology NP working with adult patients, independent of specific clinical setting. These urology-specific competencies supplement and complement the core competencies and population-focused competencies of generalist nurse practitioners.

  18. Pediatric Patient Blood Management Programs: Not Just Transfusing Little Adults.

    PubMed

    Goel, Ruchika; Cushing, Melissa M; Tobian, Aaron A R

    2016-10-01

    Red blood cell transfusions are a common life-saving intervention for neonates and children with anemia, but transfusion decisions, indications, and doses in neonates and children are different from those of adults. Patient blood management (PBM) programs are designed to assist clinicians with appropriately transfusing patients. Although PBM programs are well recognized and appreciated in the adult setting, they are quite far from standard of care in the pediatric patient population. Adult PBM standards cannot be uniformly applied to children, and there currently is significant variation in transfusion practices. Because transfusing unnecessarily can expose children to increased risk without benefit, it is important to design PBM programs to standardize transfusion decisions. This article assesses the key elements necessary for a successful pediatric PBM program, systematically explores various possible pediatric specific blood conservation strategies and the current available literature supporting them, and outlines the gaps in the evidence suggesting need for further/improved research. Pediatric PBM programs are critically important initiatives that not only involve a cooperative effort between pediatric surgery, anesthesia, perfusion, critical care, and transfusion medicine services but also need operational support from administration, clinical leadership, finance, and the hospital information technology personnel. These programs also expand the scope for high-quality collaborative research. A key component of pediatric PBM programs is monitoring pediatric blood utilization and assessing adherence to transfusion guidelines. Data suggest that restrictive transfusion strategies should be used for neonates and children similar to adults, but further research is needed to assess the best oxygenation requirements, hemoglobin threshold, and transfusion strategy for patients with active bleeding, hemodynamic instability, unstable cardiac disease, and cyanotic cardiac

  19. Salmonella typhimurium meningitis in an adult patient with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Swe, K Swe; Nagel, G; Van der Westhuizen, M; Hoosen, A A

    2008-01-01

    Salmonella meningitis is an unusual complication of Salmonella sepsis and occurs mainly in children. A rare case of Salmonella typhimurium meningitis occurring in an adult HIV positive man who presented with a history of fever and diarrhoea is reported. On examination he was dehydrated, and had oral thrush, weakness of lower limbs and neck stiffness. A septic diagnostic screen was performed and he was commenced on empiric intravenous cefotaxime therapy for meningitis. S typhimurium was cultured from cerebrospinal fluid and blood culture specimens. It was non-lactose fermenting, oxidase negative, H(2)S positive and motile. Cefotaxime was continued for 14 days and the patient responded without neurological sequelae. PMID:17158637

  20. Care of the adult patient with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ross, Whitney Trotter; Olsen, Martin

    2014-11-01

    Individuals with Down syndrome have an increased risk for many conditions, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, infections, and osteoporosis, and endocrine, neurological, orthopedic, auditory, and ophthalmic disorders. They also are at increased risk for abuse and human rights violations and receive fewer screenings and interventions than the population without Down syndrome. In this literature review, the most common health conditions associated with Down syndrome are examined, along with the topics of sexual abuse, menstrual hygiene, contraception, and human rights. Clinical guidelines for this population are summarized in an effort to assist practicing physicians in improving their provision of health care to the adult patient with Down syndrome.

  1. Pediatric Patient Blood Management Programs: Not Just Transfusing Little Adults.

    PubMed

    Goel, Ruchika; Cushing, Melissa M; Tobian, Aaron A R

    2016-10-01

    Red blood cell transfusions are a common life-saving intervention for neonates and children with anemia, but transfusion decisions, indications, and doses in neonates and children are different from those of adults. Patient blood management (PBM) programs are designed to assist clinicians with appropriately transfusing patients. Although PBM programs are well recognized and appreciated in the adult setting, they are quite far from standard of care in the pediatric patient population. Adult PBM standards cannot be uniformly applied to children, and there currently is significant variation in transfusion practices. Because transfusing unnecessarily can expose children to increased risk without benefit, it is important to design PBM programs to standardize transfusion decisions. This article assesses the key elements necessary for a successful pediatric PBM program, systematically explores various possible pediatric specific blood conservation strategies and the current available literature supporting them, and outlines the gaps in the evidence suggesting need for further/improved research. Pediatric PBM programs are critically important initiatives that not only involve a cooperative effort between pediatric surgery, anesthesia, perfusion, critical care, and transfusion medicine services but also need operational support from administration, clinical leadership, finance, and the hospital information technology personnel. These programs also expand the scope for high-quality collaborative research. A key component of pediatric PBM programs is monitoring pediatric blood utilization and assessing adherence to transfusion guidelines. Data suggest that restrictive transfusion strategies should be used for neonates and children similar to adults, but further research is needed to assess the best oxygenation requirements, hemoglobin threshold, and transfusion strategy for patients with active bleeding, hemodynamic instability, unstable cardiac disease, and cyanotic cardiac

  2. Factors affecting ventriculoperitoneal shunt survival in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Farid; Rehman, Abdul; Shamim, Muhammad S.; Bari, Muhammad E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt insertion remains the mainstay of treatment for hydrocephalus despite a high rate of complications. The predictors of shunt malfunction have been studied mostly in pediatric patients. In this study, we report our 11-year experience with VP shunts in adult patients with hydrocephalus. We also assess the various factors affecting shunt survival in a developing country setting. Methods: A retrospective chart analysis was conducted for all adult patients who had undergone shunt placement between the years 2001 and 2011. Kaplan–Meier curves were used to determine the duration from shunt placement to first malfunction and log-rank (Cox–Mantel) tests were used to determine the factors affecting shunt survival. Results: A total of 227 patients aged 18–85 years (mean: 45.8 years) were included in the study. The top four etiologies of hydrocephalus included post-cranial surgery (23.3%), brain tumor or cyst (22.9%), normal pressure hydrocephalus (15%), and intracranial hemorrhage (13.7%). The overall incidence of shunt malfunction was 15.4% with the median time to first shunt failure being 120 days. Etiology of hydrocephalus (P = 0.030) had a significant association with the development of shunt malfunction. Early shunt failure was associated with age (P < 0.001), duration of hospital stay (P < 0.001), Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score less than 13 (P = 0.010), excision of brain tumors (P = 0.008), and placement of extra-ventricular drains (P = 0.033). Conclusions: Patients with increased age, prolonged hospital stay, GCS score of less than 13, extra-ventricular drains in situ, or excision of brain tumors were more likely to experience early shunt malfunction. PMID:25722930

  3. A comprehensive Fabry-related pain questionnaire for adult patients.

    PubMed

    Üçeyler, Nurcan; Magg, Barbara; Thomas, Phillip; Wiedmann, Silke; Heuschmann, Peter; Sommer, Claudia

    2014-11-01

    Pain may be the earliest symptom in Fabry disease and presents with a distinct phenotype including triggerable pain attacks, evoked pain, pain crises, and chronic pain. Current pain questionnaires do not reflect the special phenotype of Fabry disease-associated pain, which hampers its systematic evaluation as the basis of correct diagnosis and effective treatment. A questionnaire specifically designed to assess Fabry disease-associated pain is thus urgently needed. At the Würzburg Fabry Center for Interdisciplinary Therapy (FAZIT), Germany, we developed and validated the first face-to-face Fabry Pain Questionnaire (FPQ) for adult patients. The initial version of the FPQ was tested in a pilot study with 20 consecutive Fabry disease patients. The performance of the revised FPQ was assessed in a first (n=56) and second (n=20) validation phase in consecutive Fabry disease patients. For this, patients were interviewed at baseline and 2 weeks later. We determined the test-retest reliability and validity of the FPQ in comparison to data obtained with the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory. The FPQ contains 15 questions on the 4 pain phenotypes of Fabry disease (pain attacks, pain crises, evoked pain, chronic pain) in childhood and adulthood, on pain development during life with and without enzyme replacement therapy, and on everyday life impairment due to pain. This first disease-specific questionnaire is a valuable tool for baseline and follow-up assessment of pain in Fabry disease patients and may guide treatment in this distinct pain phenotype.

  4. Drugs in oral surgery. Brief guidelines for adult patients.

    PubMed

    Grassi, R F; Pappalardo, S; De Benedittis, M; Petruzzi, M; Giannetti, L; Cappello, V; Baglio, O A

    2004-06-01

    Drugs administrable in oral surgery for adult patients are antiseptics-antibiotics, antiinflammatory-analgesics and sedative-hypnotics. Such drugs can be administered before, during or after oral surgery. Sedative-hypnotics can be administered before or during oral surgery in order to control the patient's anxiety. Anti-inflammatory-analgesics, on the other hand, can be administered before or after oral surgery to lower edema and pain. For this purpose, FANS are the most commonly used drugs but, in more traumatic oral surgery, the administration of a single pre-surgery dose of corticosteroids is suitable. As regards, antibiotics have to be given from 15 min to 1 h before oral surgery and continued or otherwise for 24-48 h depending on the dosage. post-surgery infection onset, in fact, is higher within 3 h after oral surgery.

  5. Coil Embolization of Pancreaticoduodenal Artery Aneurysms Associated with Celiac Artery Stenosis: Report of Three Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osamu Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Kawanaka, Kohichi; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2007-06-15

    Aneurysms of the pancreaticoduodenal artery are rare. Degeneration of pancreaticoduodenal arcade vessels due to these aneurysms is associated with celiac artery stenosis or occlusion. Untreated lesions enlarge progressively and may rupture spontaneously. As the location of aneurysms of pancreaticoduodenal arcade vessels renders their surgical extirpation a challenge, we examined whether endovascular techniques offer a treatment alternative. We report on 3 patients with aneurysms of the pancreaticoduodenal arcade vessels and concomitant celiac artery stenosis/occlusion due to compression by the median arcuate ligament or chronic pancreatitis. All patients were treated by percutaneous coil embolization of the aneurysm. The aneurysmal sac was successfully excluded and the native circulation was preserved. Endovascular surgery can be used to treat these aneurysms safely and permits retention of the native circulation.

  6. Intravenous fish oil in adult intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Heller, Axel R

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids contained in fish oils have shown efficacy in the treatment of chronic and acute inflammatory diseases due to their pleiotropic effects on inflammatory cell signalling pathways. In a variety of experimental and clinical studies, omega-3 fatty acids attenuated hyperinflammatory conditions and induced faster recovery. This chapter will shed light on the effects of intravenous fish oil in adult intensive care unit (ICU) patients and will discuss clinical data and recent meta-analyses on the topic. While significant beneficial effects on infection rates and the lengths of ICU and hospital stays have concordantly been identified in three recent meta-analyses on non-ICU surgical patients, the level of evidence is not so clear for critically ill patients. Three meta-analyses published in 2012 or 2013 explored data on the ICU population. Although the present data suggest the consideration of enteral nutrition enriched with fish oil, borage oil and antioxidants in mild to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, only one of the three meta-analyses found a trend (p = 0.08) of lower mortality in ICU patients receiving intravenous omega-3 fatty acids. Two of the meta-analyses indicated a significantly shorter hospital stay (5.17-9.49 days), and one meta-analysis found a significant reduction in ICU days (1.92). As a result of these effects, cost savings were postulated. Unlike in surgical patients, the effects of fish oil on infection rates were not found to be statistically significant in ICU patients, and dose-effect relationships were not established for any cohort. Thus, obvious positive secondary outcome effects with intravenous fish oil have not yet been shown to transfer to lower mortality in critically ill patients. There is a need for adequately powered, well-planned and well-conducted randomized trials to give clear recommendations on the individual utility and dosage of intravenous omega-3 fatty acids in critical illness. PMID:25471809

  7. The metabolic consequences of thyroxine replacement in adult hypopituitary patients.

    PubMed

    Filipsson Nyström, Helena; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Kourides, Ione; Popovic, Vera; Koltowska-Häggström, Maria; Jonsson, Björn; Johannsson, Gudmundur

    2012-12-01

    The metabolic consequences of thyroxine replacement in patients with central hypothyroidism (CH) need to be evaluated. The aim was to examine the outcome of thyroxine replacement in CH. Adult hypopituitary patients (n = 1595) with and without CH from KIMS (Pfizer International Metabolic Database) were studied before and after 2 years of GH replacement. CH patients (CH, n = 1080) were compared with TSH sufficient patients (TSHsuff n = 515) as one group and divided by thyroxine dose/kg/day into tertiles (CHlow-mid-high). Anthropometry, fasting glucose, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c), blood pressure, lipids, IGF-I SDS, quality of life and morbidity were studied. Analyses were standardized for gender, age, number and types of pituitary insufficiencies, stimulated GH peak, age at GH deficiency onset, aetiologies and, when appropriate, for weight and GH dose. At baseline, TSHsuff patients did not differ from CH or CHmid in any outcome. CHlow (≤ 1.18 μg thyroxine/kg/day) had increased weight, BMI and larger waist circumference (WC), CHhigh (≥ 1.58 μg thyroxine/kg/day) had lower weight, BMI, WC and IGF-I than TSHsuff and compared to their predicted weights, BMIs and WCs. For every 0.1 μg/kg/day increase of thyroxine dose, body weight decreased 1.0 kg, BMI 0.3 kg/m(2), and WC 0.65 cm. The GH sensitivity of the CH group was higher (0.76 ± 0.56 SDS/mg GH) than that of TSHsuff patients (0.58 ± 0.64 SDS/mg GH), P < 0.001. The middle thyroxine dose (1.19-1.57 μg/kg/day) seems to be the most physiological. This is equivalent to 70, 100, 125 μg thyroxine/day for hypopituitary patients of 50, 70 or 90 kg weight, respectively.

  8. Gender and Racial Disparities in Duodenal Biopsy to Evaluate For Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lebwohl, Benjamin; Tennyson, Christina A.; Holub, Jennifer L.; Lieberman, David A.; Neugut, Alfred I.; Green, Peter H.R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) is common but under-diagnosed in the United States. Serological screening studies indicate that, although CD occurs at the same frequency in both genders, women are diagnosed more frequently than men (2:1). CD is less frequently diagnosed among black patients, though the seroprevalence in this group is not known. Objective to measure the rates of duodenal biopsy during esophagogastroeduodenoscopy (EGD) for symptoms consistent with CD. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Clinical Outcomes Research Initiative National Endoscopy Database, spanning the years 2004–2009. Patients Adults undergoing EGD for the indication of diarrhea, anemia, iron deficiency, or weight loss, in which the endoscopic appearance of the upper gastrointestinal tract was normal. Main outcome measurement performance of duodenal biopsy. Results Of 13,091 individuals (58% females, 9% blacks) who met the inclusion criteria, duodenal biopsy was performed in 43%, 45% of females and 39% of males (p<0.0001). Blacks underwent duodenal biopsy in 28% of EGD’s, compared to 44% for whites (p<0.0001). On multivariate analysis, male gender (OR 0.81 95%CI 0.75–0.88), older age (OR for ≥70 compared to 20–49 0.51 95%CI 0.46–0.57), and black race (OR 0.55 95%CI 0.48–0.64) were associated with decreased odds of duodenal biopsy. Limitations Lack of histopathologic correlation with CD prevalence. Conclusions In this multi-region endoscopy database spanning 2004–2009, rates of duodenal biopsy increased modestly over time, but overall remain low in patients with possible clinical indications for biopsy. Non-performance of duodenal biopsy during endoscopy may be contributing to the under-diagnosis of CD in the United States. PMID:22732871

  9. Bone Mineral Density at Diagnosis of Celiac Disease and after 1 Year of Gluten-Free Diet

    PubMed Central

    Pantaleoni, Stefano; Luchino, Massimo; Adriani, Alessandro; Pellicano, Rinaldo; Stradella, Davide; Ribaldone, Davide Giuseppe; Sapone, Nicoletta; Isaia, Gian Carlo; Di Stefano, Marco; Astegiano, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Atypical or silent celiac disease may go undiagnosed for many years and can frequently lead to loss of bone mineral density, with evolution to osteopenia or osteoporosis. The prevalence of the latter conditions, in case of new diagnosis of celiac disease, has been evaluated in many studies but, due to the variability of epidemiologic data and patient features, the results are contradictory. The aim of this study was to evaluate bone mineral density by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in 175 consecutive celiac patients at time of diagnosis (169 per-protocol, 23 males, 146 females; average age 38.9 years). Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was repeated after 1 year of gluten-free diet in those with T-score value <−1 at diagnosis. Stratification of patients according to sex and age showed a higher prevalence of low bone mineral density in men older than 30 years and in women of all ages. A 1-year gluten-free diet led to a significant improvement in lumbar spine and femoral neck mean T-score value. We propose that dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry should be performed at diagnosis of celiac disease in all women and in male aged >30 years, taking into account each risk factor in single patients. PMID:25379519

  10. [Compression stenosis of the celiac trunk as 1 of the causes of ischemic disease of the digestive organs].

    PubMed

    Potashov, L V; Ignashov, A M; Morozov, V P; Sedov, V M

    1980-02-01

    Experience in the treatment of 218 patients with compression stenosis of the celiac trunk is generalized. The clinical symptoms and the angiographic semiotics of the disease are described in detail. Active surgical tactics is substantiated and the results of operations are studied.

  11. MICA∗078: A novel allele identified in a Moroccan individual affected by celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Piancatelli, Daniela; Oumhani, Khadija; Benelbarhdadi, Imane; Del Beato, Tiziana; Colanardi, Alessia; Sebastiani, Pierluigi; Tessitore, Alessandra; El Aouad, Rajae; Essaid, Abdellah

    2015-06-01

    A novel MICA allele, MICA(∗)078, has been identified during HLA/MICA high resolution typing of Moroccan patients with celiac disease. MICA(∗)078 shows an uncommon variation at a highly conserved nucleotide position (nt 493, G → A), resulting in one amino acid change at codon 142 (V → I) of MICA gene (compared to MICA(∗)002:01), located in the α2-domain, in which V142 is the common residue.

  12. Celiac disease treatment: gluten-free diet and beyond.

    PubMed

    Mäki, Markku

    2014-07-01

    The basis for celiac disease (CD) treatment is a strict lifelong gluten-free diet. On the diet, the small intestinal mucosal injury heals and gluten-induced symptoms and signs disappear. The mucosal healing is a prerequisite for sustaining health and is also obtained with a diet containing oats and trace amounts of gluten, industrially purified wheat starch-based gluten-free products. The small intestinal mucosa does not heal in noncompliant people, nor when a patient is inadvertently ingesting gluten. Development of adjunctive or alternative therapies is on its way. There are several novel treatment pipelines within academy and industry. Examples are the ideas of using glutenases as a drug to degrade the ingested gluten, polymers to bind and sequester the gluten to the feces, and also vaccine development for an immunotherapy to induce tolerance towards gluten. Clinical drug trials are to be foreseen in CD, soon also in children.

  13. IL23R in the Swedish, Finnish, Hungarian and Italian populations: association with IBD and psoriasis, and linkage to celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Koskinen, Lotta LE; Dukes, Emma; Kainu, Kati; Suomela, Sari; Lappalainen, Maarit; Ziberna, Fabiana; Korponay-Szabo, Ilma R; Kurppa, Kalle; Kaukinen, Katri; Ádány, Róza; Pocsai, Zsuzsa; Széles, György; Färkkilä, Martti; Turunen, Ulla; Halme, Leena; Paavola-Sakki, Paulina; Not, Tarcisio; Vatta, Serena; Ventura, Alessandro; Löfberg, Robert; Torkvist, Leif; Bresso, Francesca; Halfvarson, Jonas; Mäki, Markku; Kontula, Kimmo; Saarialho-Kere, Ulpu; Kere, Juha; D'Amato, Mauro; Saavalainen, Päivi

    2009-01-01

    Background Association of the interleukin-23 receptor (IL23R) with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been confirmed in several populations. IL23R also associates with psoriasis, suggesting that the gene may be an important candidate for many chronic inflammatory diseases. Methods We studied association of single-nucleotide variants in IL23R with IBD in Swedish patients, in both Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) subsets. The same genetic variants were also studied in Finnish patients with psoriasis or celiac disease, and in Hungarian and Italian patients with celiac disease. Results Association of IL23R with IBD was replicated in our Swedish patients, and linkage and association of the IL23R region with psoriasis was found in the Finnish population. The IL23R region was also linked to celiac disease in Finnish families, but no association of IL23R variants with celiac disease was found in the Finnish, Hungarian or Italian samples. Conclusion Our study is the first to demonstrate association of IL23R with CD and UC in Swedish patients with IBD. It is also the first study to report linkage and association of the IL23R region with psoriasis in the Finnish population. Importantly, this is the first report of linkage of the IL23R region to celiac disease, a chronic inflammatory condition in which IL23R has not been previously implicated. PMID:19175939

  14. Markers of Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity in Children with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Nga M.; Green, Peter H. R.; Taylor, Annette K.; Hellberg, Dan; Ajamian, Mary; Tan, Caroline Z.; Kosofsky, Barry E.; Higgins, Joseph J.; Rajadhyaksha, Anjali M.; Alaedini, Armin

    2013-01-01

    Objective Gastrointestinal symptoms are a common feature in children with autism, drawing attention to a potential association with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity. However, studies to date regarding the immune response to gluten in autism and its association with celiac disease have been inconsistent. The aim of this study was to assess immune reactivity to gluten in pediatric patients diagnosed with autism according to strict criteria and to evaluate the potential link between autism and celiac disease. Methods Study participants included children (with or without gastrointestinal symptoms) diagnosed with autism according to both the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) and the Autism Diagnostic Interview, Revised (ADI-R) (n = 37), their unaffected siblings (n = 27), and age-matched healthy controls (n = 76). Serum specimens were tested for antibodies to native gliadin, deamidated gliadin, and transglutaminase 2 (TG2). Affected children were genotyped for celiac disease associated HLA-DQ2 and -DQ8 alleles. Results Children with autism had significantly higher levels of IgG antibody to gliadin compared with unrelated healthy controls (p<0.01). The IgG levels were also higher compared to the unaffected siblings, but did not reach statistical significance. The IgG anti-gliadin antibody response was significantly greater in the autistic children with gastrointestinal symptoms in comparison to those without them (p<0.01). There was no difference in IgA response to gliadin across groups. The levels of celiac disease-specific serologic markers, i.e., antibodies to deamidated gliadin and TG2, did not differ between patients and controls. An association between increased anti-gliadin antibody and presence of HLA-DQ2 and/or -DQ8 was not observed. Conclusions A subset of children with autism displays increased immune reactivity to gluten, the mechanism of which appears to be distinct from that in celiac disease. The increased anti-gliadin antibody

  15. Cervical column morphology in adult patients with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Sonnesen, Liselotte; Petri, Niels; Kjaer, Inger; Svanholt, Palle

    2008-10-01

    Cervical column morphology was examined in adult patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and compared with the cervical morphology of an adult control group with neutral occlusion, normal craniofacial morphology, and no history of sleep apnoea. The sleep apnoea group consisted of 91 patients, 16 females aged 29-59 years (mean 49.4 years) and 75 males aged 27-65 years (mean 49.0 years). All patients were diagnosed with OSA by overnight polysomnography. The control group consisted of 21 subjects, 15 females aged 23-40 years (mean 29.2 years) and 6 males aged 25-44 years (mean 32.8 years). From each individual, a visual assessment of the cervical column was performed on the radiograph. Differences in the cervical column morphology, between the genders and the groups were assessed by Fisher's exact test and the effect of age by logistic regression analysis. In the OSA group, 46.2 per cent had fusion anomalies of the cervical column and 5.5 per cent a posterior arch deficiency. Fusion anomalies occurred in 26.4 per cent as fusions between two cervical vertebrae. Block fusions occurred in 12.1 per cent and occipitalization in 14.3 per cent. A posterior arch deficiency occurred in 2.2 per cent as a partial cleft of C1 and in 3.3 per cent as dehiscence of C3 and C4. No statistical gender differences were found in the occurrence of morphological characteristics of the cervical column. The fusion anomalies of the cervical column occurred significantly more often in the OSA group. The results indicate that the morphological deviations of the upper cervical vertebrae play a role in the phenotypical subdivision and diagnosis of OSA.

  16. Celiac Disease--What Parents and Caregivers Should Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, Alicia

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease is a genetic autoimmune disorder characterized by a heightened sensitivity to gluten, the protein in wheat, barley and rye. The disease is more common than most people think, affecting approximately 3 million in the United States, about 1 in 100. One of the most notable things about celiac disease is that up to 97 percent of…

  17. [Variations of the celiac trunk branches in the fetus].

    PubMed

    Bordei, P; Antohe, D S

    2002-09-01

    The study was performed on 60 human foetuses, aged between 4 to 9 months, using as methods dissection and plastic and contrast substances injection. We studied the celiac trunk in what concerns the division into its terminal branches, insisting on the possible morphological variations, some rare collateral branches starting from the common arterial trunk, the dimensional relations between the branches at their origin and the level of the celiac trunk origin from the aorta, in relation with the vertebral column, the diaphragmatic passage of the aorta and with the superior mesenteric artery. We also assessed the dimensional relations (calibers at origin) between the branches of the celiac trunk. Ass possible variations of the division of the celiac trunk, we assessed: gastro-hepatic trunk, with the splenic artery directly from the aorta or from the hepatic artery; gastro-splenic trunk, with the hepatic artery originating from the aorta; hepato-splenic trunk, with origin of the left gastric artery either directly from the aorta or from the hepatic artery. Rare variations: celiaco-mesenteric trunk; two arterial trunks, hepato-splenic and hepato-gastric; separate aortic origin for all three "classic" branches of the celiac trunk; two hepatic arteries, one from the celiac trunk and the other from the aorta or superior mesenteric artery; celiac trunk that divides into several terminal branches; one or two suprarenal arteries originating from the celiac trunk. PMID:12572348

  18. Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Children with Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zahmatkeshan, Mozhgan; Fallahpoor, Mahsa; Amoozgar, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of celiac disease (CD) in the patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Simultaneous presentation of these two diseases has been recently reported in some studies; however, few researches have been done on children. The sooner CD is diagnosed, the better the prognosis will be, especially in the patients with a chronic disease like DCM. Methods: In this study, 82 cases were screened for CD by measuring the level of anti-body against transglutaminase (anti tTG). These cases included 41 patients with DCM labeled according to clinical evaluation and echocardiography and 41 healthy children who had been referred for routine checkup. All the patients were between 1 and 18 years old. The expired patients and those with previous diagnosis of CD were excluded from the study. Besides, the patients with positive antibody results underwent intestinal biopsy to match the serology findings with histopathology of CD in the intestine. Finally, the data were analyzed by the SPSS statistical software (v. 16) and through t-test and Pearson correlation coefficient. Findings: According to the findings, 1/41 (2.5%) DCM cases had positive tTG antibody level and negative intestinal biopsy which is classified as potential CD in the children with DCM. In addition, 7/41 (17%) patients had borderline anti body level. A direct correlation was observed between age and anti tTG level. Conclusion: It is beneficial to assess CD in DCM children with unknown cause. PMID:25793066

  19. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity and rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Isasi, Carlos; Tejerina, Eva; Morán, Luz M

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune systemic disease having among its clinical manifestations frequent symptoms common to rheumatologic diseases such as musculoskeletal pain, asthenia, and cognitive fatigue. It is associated with other autoimmune diseases like Sjögren disease. It is a well-characterized disease with specific diagnostic tests. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity is an emerging entity with symptoms similar to celiac disease, but without specific diagnostic tests. The concept of non-celiac gluten sensitivity and its diagnostic problems are reviewed, and the hypothesis of its association with fibromyalgia, spondyloarthritis, and autoimmune conditions is proposed. Clinical observations supporting the hypothesis are described, highlighting the benefit of treating non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

  20. Attachment and Parenting in Adult Patients with Anxiety Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Picardi, Angelo; Caroppo, Emanuele; Fabi, Elisa; Proietti, Serena; Gennaro, Giancarlo Di; Meldolesi, Giulio Nicolò; Martinotti, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Background: The literature suggests that dysfunctional parenting and insecure attachment may increase risk of anxiety-related psychopathology. This study aimed at testing the association between anxiety disorders, attachment insecurity and dysfunctional parenting while controlling for factors usually not controlled for in previous studies, such as gender, age, and being ill. Methods: A sample of 32 non-psychotic inpatients with SCID-I diagnosis of an anxiety disorder, either alone or in comorbidity, was compared with two age- and sex-matched control groups consisting of 32 non-clinical participants and 32 in-patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. Study measures included the Experience in Close Relationships questionnaire (ECR) and the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI). Results: The patients with anxiety disorders scored significantly higher on attachment-related anxiety and avoidance than patients with drug-resistant epilepsy and non-clinical participants. These findings were independent of comorbidity for mood disorders. ECR scores did not differ among diagnostic subgroups (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, other anxiety disorders). Patients with anxiety disorders scored significantly lower on PBI mother’s care and borderline significantly lower on PBI father's care than patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. Conclusions: Although limitations such as the relatively small sample size and the cross-sectional nature suggest caution in interpreting these findings, they are consistent with the few previous adult studies performed on this topic and corroborate Bowlby's seminal hypothesis of a link between negative attachment-related experiences, attachment insecurity, and clinical anxiety. Attachment theory provides a useful theoretical framework for integrating research findings from several fields concerning the development of anxiety disorders and for planning therapeutic interventions. PMID:24155770

  1. Severe Acquired Toxoplasmosis in Immunocompetent Adult Patients in French Guiana

    PubMed Central

    Carme, B.; Bissuel, F.; Ajzenberg, D.; Bouyne, R.; Aznar, C.; Demar, M.; Bichat, S.; Louvel, D.; Bourbigot, A. M.; Peneau, C.; Neron, P.; Dardé, M. L.

    2002-01-01

    The most common presentation of symptomatic postnatally acquired toxoplasmosis in immunocompetent patients is painless cervical adenopathy. Acute visceral manifestations are associated in rare cases. We report 16 cases of severe primary toxoplasmosis diagnosed in French Guiana during a 6.5-year period. All of the subjects were immunocompetent adults hospitalized with clinical presentations consisting of a marked, nonspecific infectious syndrome accompanied by an altered general status with at least one visceral localization, mainly pulmonary involvement (14 cases). Acute toxoplasmosis was diagnosed according to the results of serological tests suggestive of recent primary infection and the absence of an alternative etiology. Recovery was rapid following specific antitoxoplasmosis treatment. Thirteen of the 16 patients had consumed game in the 2 weeks before the onset of the symptoms, and in eight cases the game was considered to have been undercooked. Toxoplasma strains, which were virulent in mice, were isolated from three patients. Microsatellite analysis showed that all of these isolates exhibited an atypical multilocus genotype, with one allele found only for isolates of this region. PMID:12409371

  2. Inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease: Overlaps and differences

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Virginia; Dieli-Crimi, Romina; López-Palacios, Natalia; Bodas, Andrés; Medrano, Luz María; Núñez, Concepción

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings demonstrate the common genetic basis for many immune-mediated diseases, and consequently, the partially shared pathogenesis. We collected these findings and reviewed the extension of these overlaps to other disease characteristics. Two autoimmune diseases were selected that also share the specific target organ, the bowel. The etiology and immunopathogenesis of both conditions characterized by chronic intestinal inflammation, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and celiac disease (CeD), are not completely understood. Both are complex diseases with genetics and environment contributing to dysregulation of innate and adaptive immune responses, leading to chronic inflammation and disease. CeD constitutes a particular disease because the main environmental and genetic triggers are largely known. IBD comprises two main clinical forms, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, which most likely involve a complex interplay between some components of the commensal microbiota and other environmental factors in their origin. These multifactorial diseases encompass a broad spectrum of clinical phenotypes and ages of onset, although the clinical presentation often differs depending on childhood or adult onset, with greater heterogeneity commonly observed in adults. PMID:24803796

  3. Humidification during mechanical ventilation in the adult patient.

    PubMed

    Al Ashry, Haitham S; Modrykamien, Ariel M

    2014-01-01

    Humidification of inhaled gases has been standard of care in mechanical ventilation for a long period of time. More than a century ago, a variety of reports described important airway damage by applying dry gases during artificial ventilation. Consequently, respiratory care providers have been utilizing external humidifiers to compensate for the lack of natural humidification mechanisms when the upper airway is bypassed. Particularly, active and passive humidification devices have rapidly evolved. Sophisticated systems composed of reservoirs, wires, heating devices, and other elements have become part of our usual armamentarium in the intensive care unit. Therefore, basic knowledge of the mechanisms of action of each of these devices, as well as their advantages and disadvantages, becomes a necessity for the respiratory care and intensive care practitioner. In this paper, we review current methods of airway humidification during invasive mechanical ventilation of adult patients. We describe a variety of devices and describe the eventual applications according to specific clinical conditions.

  4. Humidification during Mechanical Ventilation in the Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    Al Ashry, Haitham S.; Modrykamien, Ariel M.

    2014-01-01

    Humidification of inhaled gases has been standard of care in mechanical ventilation for a long period of time. More than a century ago, a variety of reports described important airway damage by applying dry gases during artificial ventilation. Consequently, respiratory care providers have been utilizing external humidifiers to compensate for the lack of natural humidification mechanisms when the upper airway is bypassed. Particularly, active and passive humidification devices have rapidly evolved. Sophisticated systems composed of reservoirs, wires, heating devices, and other elements have become part of our usual armamentarium in the intensive care unit. Therefore, basic knowledge of the mechanisms of action of each of these devices, as well as their advantages and disadvantages, becomes a necessity for the respiratory care and intensive care practitioner. In this paper, we review current methods of airway humidification during invasive mechanical ventilation of adult patients. We describe a variety of devices and describe the eventual applications according to specific clinical conditions. PMID:25089275

  5. The Role of Gluten in Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Serena, Gloria; Camhi, Stephanie; Sturgeon, Craig; Yan, Shu; Fasano, Alessio

    2015-08-26

    Celiac disease (CD) and type 1 diabetes (T1D) are autoimmune conditions in which dietary gluten has been proven or suggested to play a pathogenic role. In CD; gluten is established as the instigator of autoimmunity; the autoimmune process is halted by removing gluten from the diet; which allows for resolution of celiac autoimmune enteropathy and subsequent normalization of serological markers of the disease. However; an analogous causative agent has not yet been identified for T1D. Nevertheless; the role of dietary gluten in development of T1D and the potentially beneficial effect of removing gluten from the diet of patients with T1D are still debated. In this review; we discuss the comorbid occurrence of CD and T1D and explore current evidences for the specific role of gluten in both conditions; specifically focusing on current evidence on the effect of gluten on the immune system and the gut microbiota.

  6. Non-celiac gluten hypersensitivity: What is all the fuss about?

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) has been introduced recently as a potentially common disease on the basis of studies of patients with claimed reactivity to gluten but without the characteristics of celiac disease (CD). CD is characterized by antibody reactivity toward the autoantigen transglutaminase 2, characteristic histological abnormalities of the small intestine, and an almost obligatory genetic haplotype (HLA-DQ2 or DQ8). The diagnosis of NCGS is based largely on the clinical suspicion of hyper-reactivity to gluten and the absence of the characteristics of CD. Few published studies have used double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges (DBPCFCs) for the diagnosis of NCGS, and none in children. Innate immune reactivity to amylase trypsin inhibitors has been suggested as the pathogenic principle in NCGS, but confirmatory evidence is lacking. Also, further clinical studies including DBPCFCs are needed. PMID:26097727

  7. The Role of Gluten in Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Serena, Gloria; Camhi, Stephanie; Sturgeon, Craig; Yan, Shu; Fasano, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) and type 1 diabetes (T1D) are autoimmune conditions in which dietary gluten has been proven or suggested to play a pathogenic role. In CD; gluten is established as the instigator of autoimmunity; the autoimmune process is halted by removing gluten from the diet; which allows for resolution of celiac autoimmune enteropathy and subsequent normalization of serological markers of the disease. However; an analogous causative agent has not yet been identified for T1D. Nevertheless; the role of dietary gluten in development of T1D and the potentially beneficial effect of removing gluten from the diet of patients with T1D are still debated. In this review; we discuss the comorbid occurrence of CD and T1D and explore current evidences for the specific role of gluten in both conditions; specifically focusing on current evidence on the effect of gluten on the immune system and the gut microbiota. PMID:26343710

  8. Primary Care for the Older Adult Patient: Common Geriatric Issues and Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Katherine; Shi, Sandra; Kiraly, Carmela

    2016-06-01

    Older adults are the fastest growing segment of the US population and the majority of older adults are women. Primary care for the older adult patient requires a wide variety of skills, reflecting the complexity and heterogeneity of this patient population. Individualizing care through consideration of patients' goals, medical conditions, and prognosis is paramount. Quality care for the older adult patient requires familiarity with common geriatric syndromes, such as dementia, falls, and polypharmacy. In addition, developing the knowledge and communication skills necessary for complex care and end-of-life care planning is essential.

  9. [Comparison of serum trace element spectrum of liver cancer patients and healthy adults].

    PubMed

    Yin, D Z

    1990-05-01

    The contents of 15 trace elements in the sera of 30 liver cancer patients and 30 healthy adults were assayed by ICP-AES method. The data obtained were analysed by routine statistical tests, multi-variate discrimination analysis, multi-variate stepwise regression analysis and non-linear mapping algorithm. The results showed that the contents of copper, vanadium, cadmium, stannum, cobalt, nickel in liver cancer patients were significantly higher than those in healthy adults. The serum trace element spectrum of liver cancer patients was different from that of healthy adults. Hence, the liver cancer patients could be differentiated from healthy adults by serum trace element spectrum. PMID:2249593

  10. Adult patients with Fontan circulation: What we know and how to manage adults with Fontan circulation?

    PubMed

    Ohuchi, Hideo

    2016-09-01

    Most of patients after the Fontan operation can reach their adulthood, however, the management strategy for this complex pathophysiology has not been yet established. In general, elevated central venous pressure (CVP) and low cardiac output (CO) due to impaired ventricular preload characterize the Fontan circulation and the ideal hemodynamics could be a combination of a lower CVP with a higher CO. Thus, preserved functional systemic ventricle with low pulmonary artery resistance is thought to be crucial for better long-term outcome. However, on the other hand, because of the unique hemodynamics, these patients have significantly higher incidence of complications, sequelae, and even mortality. The major complications are supraventricular arrhythmias, heart failure, and Fontan-related problems, including protein-losing enteropathy and pulmonary arteriovenous fistulae, both of which are refractory to the treatments, and most of these "Fontan inconveniences" increase as patients age. In addition, one of the recent emerging problems is Fontan-associated liver disease that includes liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Furthermore, women with Fontan circulation also reach childbearing age and there have been increasing numbers of reports showing a high incidence of pregnancy-associated complications. All these problems may be a part of "Fontan inconveniences" because most of the current Fontan patients are still "young" i.e. in their twenties or thirties and it may be not surprising that more new Fontan-associated pathophysiology emerges as patients age. Recent evidence reminds us of the concept that adult Fontan pathophysiology is not just a cardiovascular disease, rather, a multiorgan disease with many interactions between cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular organs. Therefore, a multidisciplinary approach is mandatory to take care of and anticipate the better long-term outcome. PMID:27134136

  11. [Non-celiac gluten sensitivity: a critical review of current evidence].

    PubMed

    Molina-Infante, Javier; Santolaria, Santos; Montoro, Miguel; Esteve, María; Fernández-Bañares, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is an emerging disorder characterized by intestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms related to the ingestion of gluten-containing food in non-celiac patients. Its prevalence has been estimated to be six to ten-times higher than that of celiac disease (CD). A gluten-free diet is the most widely recommended therapy, but the causative agent remains unknown and there are no consensus diagnostic criteria. Recent studies on NCGS have included patients with possibly overlooked minor CD and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome without self-reported gluten intolerance, but showing a response to a gluten-free diet. Furthermore, FODMAPs (Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides And Polyols) have recently been postulated as the culprit component for NCGS in wheat, instead of gluten. This review updates evidence on the pathophysiology of NCGS and the efficacy of different dietary interventions in its treatment, stressing the need for proper screening for CD before a diagnosis of NCGS is made.

  12. [Non-celiac gluten sensitivity: a critical review of current evidence].

    PubMed

    Molina-Infante, Javier; Santolaria, Santos; Montoro, Miguel; Esteve, María; Fernández-Bañares, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is an emerging disorder characterized by intestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms related to the ingestion of gluten-containing food in non-celiac patients. Its prevalence has been estimated to be six to ten-times higher than that of celiac disease (CD). A gluten-free diet is the most widely recommended therapy, but the causative agent remains unknown and there are no consensus diagnostic criteria. Recent studies on NCGS have included patients with possibly overlooked minor CD and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome without self-reported gluten intolerance, but showing a response to a gluten-free diet. Furthermore, FODMAPs (Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides And Polyols) have recently been postulated as the culprit component for NCGS in wheat, instead of gluten. This review updates evidence on the pathophysiology of NCGS and the efficacy of different dietary interventions in its treatment, stressing the need for proper screening for CD before a diagnosis of NCGS is made. PMID:24667093

  13. Specific Nongluten Proteins of Wheat Are Novel Target Antigens in Celiac Disease Humoral Response

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    While the antigenic specificity and pathogenic relevance of immunologic reactivity to gluten in celiac disease have been extensively researched, the immune response to nongluten proteins of wheat has not been characterized. We aimed to investigate the level and molecular specificity of antibody response to wheat nongluten proteins in celiac disease. Serum samples from patients and controls were screened for IgG and IgA antibody reactivity to a nongluten protein extract from the wheat cultivar Triticum aestivum Butte 86. Antibodies were further analyzed for reactivity to specific nongluten proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. Immunoreactive molecules were identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Compared with healthy controls, patients exhibited significantly higher levels of antibody reactivity to nongluten proteins. The main immunoreactive nongluten antibody target proteins were identified as serpins, purinins, α-amylase/protease inhibitors, globulins, and farinins. Assessment of reactivity toward purified recombinant proteins further confirmed the presence of antibody response to specific antigens. The results demonstrate that, in addition to the well-recognized immune reaction to gluten, celiac disease is associated with a robust humoral response directed at a specific subset of the nongluten proteins of wheat. PMID:25329597

  14. Ages of celiac disease: From changing environment to improved diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Tommasini, Alberto; Not, Tarcisio; Ventura, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    From the time of Gee’s landmark writings, the recent history of celiac disease (CD) can be divided into many ages, each driven by a diagnostic advance and a deeper knowledge of disease pathogenesis. At the same time, these advances were paralleled by the identification of new clinical patterns associated with CD and by a continuous redefinition of the prevalence of the disease in population. In the beginning, CD was considered a chronic indigestion, even if the causative food was not known; later, the disease was proven to depend on an intolerance to wheat gliadin, leading to typical mucosal changes in the gut and to a malabsorption syndrome. This knowledge led to curing the disease with a gluten-free diet. After the identification of antibodies to gluten (AGA) in the serum of patients and the identification of gluten-specific lymphocytes in the mucosa, CD was described as an immune disorder, resembling a chronic “gluten infection”. The use of serological testing for AGA allowed identification of the higher prevalence of this disorder, revealing atypical patterns of presentation. More recently, the characterization of autoantibodies to endomysium and to transglutaminase shifted the attention to a complex autoimmune pathogenesis and to the increased risk of developing autoimmune disorders in untreated CD. New diagnostic assays, based on molecular technologies, will introduce new changes, with the promise of better defining the spectrum of gluten reactivity and the real burden of gluten related-disorders in the population. Herein, we describe the different periods of CD experience, and further developments for the next celiac age will be proposed. PMID:21990947

  15. Population Pharmacokinetics of Benznidazole in Adult Patients with Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aldasoro, E.; Guerrero, L.; Posada, E.; Serret, N.; Mejía, T.; Urbina, J. A.; Gascón, J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to build a population pharmacokinetic (popPK) model to characterize benznidazole (BNZ) pharmacokinetics in adults with chronic Chagas disease. This study was a prospective, open-label, single-center clinical trial approved by the local ethics committee. Patients received BNZ at 2.5 mg/kg of body weight/12 h (Abarax, Elea Laboratory, Argentina) for 60 days. Plasma BNZ samples were taken several times during the study and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV-visible detection (HPLC-UV). The popPK analysis was done with NONMEMv.7.3. Demographic and biological data were tested as covariates. Intraindividual, interoccasion, and residual variabilities were modeled. Internal and external validations were completed to assess the robustness of the model. Later on, simulations were performed to generate BNZ concentration-time course profiles for different dosage regimens. A total of 358 plasma BNZ concentrations from 39 patients were included in the analysis. A one-compartment PK model characterized by clearance (CL/F) and the apparent volume of distribution (V/F), with first-order absorption (Ka) and elimination, adequately described the data (CL/F, 1.73 liters/h; V/F, 89.6 liters; and Ka, 1.15 h−1). No covariates were found to be significant for CL/F and V/F. Internal and external validations of the final model showed adequate results. Data from simulations revealed that a dose of 2.5 mg/kg/12 h might lead to overexposure in most patients. A lower dose (2.5 mg/kg/24 h) was able to achieve trough BNZ plasma concentrations within the accepted therapeutic range of 3 to 6 mg/liter. In summary, we developed a population PK model for BNZ in adults with chronic Chagas disease. Dosing simulations showed that a BNZ dose of 2.5 mg/kg/24 h will adequately keep BNZ trough plasma concentrations within the recommended target range for the majority of patients. (This study has been registered at EudraCT under number 2011

  16. Dietary compliance in Iranian children and adolescents with celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Taghdir, Maryam; Honar, Naser; Mazloomi, Seyed Mohammad; Sepandi, Mojtaba; Ashourpour, Mahkameh; Salehi, Musa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Celiac disease (CD) is caused due to intake of gluten, a protein component in wheat, barley, and rye. The only treatment currently available for CD is strict lifetime adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD) which is a diet that excludes wheat, barley, and rye. There is limited information on barriers to following a GFD. The present study aimed to investigate the compliance with a GFD, barriers to compliance, and the impact of compliance on the quality of life (QOL) in Iranian children and adolescents suffering from CD. Methods In this cross-sectional study, a total of 65 known cases of CD (both males and females), diagnosed in Namazi Hospital, a large referral center in south of Iran, selected by census were studied in 2014. Dietary compliance was assessed using a questionnaire. A disease-specific QOL questionnaire for children with CD (the celiac disease DUX [CDDUX]) was used. Comparisons between categorical variables were performed using chi-square test. Results Sixty-five patients, 38 females (58.5%) and 27 (41.5%) males, were surveyed. Mean (± standard deviation [SD]) age of the respondents was 11.3 (±3.8) years. Dietary compliance was reported by 35 (53.8%) patients. The mean (± SD) CDDUX score was higher in dietary-compliant patients (33.5 [±19.4] vs 26.7 [±13.6], respectively, P=0.23). The score of CDDUX in parents of patients in dietary-compliant group was more than the noncompliant patients (28.1 [±13.5] vs 22.1 [±14], respectively, P=0.1). Barriers to noncompliance were poor or unavailability (100%), high cost (96.9%), insufficient labeling (84.6%), poor palatability (76.9%), and no information (69.23%). Conclusion Approximately half of the patients with CD reported dietary compliance. Poor or unavailability was found to be the most important barrier contributing to noncompliance. The QOL was better in compliant patients. Proposed strategies to improve compliance are greater availability of gluten-free products, better food labeling, and

  17. The Overlap between Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity: A Clinical Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Makharia, Archita; Catassi, Carlo; Makharia, Govind K

    2015-12-01

    The spectrum of gluten-related disorders has widened in recent times and includes celiac disease, non-celiac gluten sensitivity, and wheat allergy. The complex of symptoms associated with these diseases, such as diarrhea, constipation or abdominal pain may overlap for the gluten related diseases, and furthermore they can be similar to those caused by various other intestinal diseases, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The mechanisms underlying symptom generation are diverse for all these diseases. Some patients with celiac disease may remain asymptomatic or have only mild gastrointestinal symptoms and thus may qualify for the diagnosis of IBS in the general clinical practice. Similarly, the overlap of symptoms between IBS and non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) often creates a dilemma for clinicians. While the treatment of NCGS is exclusion of gluten from the diet, some, but not all, of the patients with IBS also improve on a gluten-free diet. Both IBS and NCGS are common in the general population and both can coexist with each other independently without necessarily sharing a common pathophysiological basis. Although the pathogenesis of NCGS is not well understood, it is likely to be heterogeneous with possible contributing factors such as low-grade intestinal inflammation, increased intestinal barrier function and changes in the intestinal microbiota. Innate immunity may also play a pivotal role. One possible inducer of innate immune response has recently been reported to be amylase-trypsin inhibitor, a protein present in wheat endosperm and the source of flour, along with the gluten proteins. PMID:26690475

  18. Sensorineural hearing loss and celiac disease: A coincidental finding

    PubMed Central

    Volta, Umberto; Ferri, Gian Gaetano; De Giorgio, Roberto; Fabbri, Angela; Parisi, Claudia; Sciajno, Laura; Castellari, Alessandra; Fiorini, Erica; Piscaglia, Maria; Barbara, Giovanni; Granito, Alessandro; Pirodda, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Celiac disease (CD) can be associated with a variety of extraintestinal manifestations, including neurological diseases. A new neurological correlation has been found between CD and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). OBJECTIVE To verify the association between SNHL and CD, and to establish whether the neurological hearing impairment in CD is related to nonorgan-specific and antineuronal antibodies, as well as the presence of autoimmune disorders. METHODS A sample of 59 consecutive biopsy- and serologically proven CD patients were studied. Among CD patients, 11 were newly diagnosed and 48 were on a gluten-free diet. Hearing function was assessed by audiometric analysis in all CD patients as well as in 59 age- and sex-matched controls. Patients were tested for a panel of immune markers including nonorgan-specific autoantibodies and antineuronal antibodies. RESULTS SNHL was detected in five CD patients (8.5%) and in two controls (3.4%). In one patient, the SNHL was bilateral, whereas the remaining four had a monolateral impairment. The prevalence of SNHL was not significantly different between CD patients and controls. At least one of the antibodies tested for was positive in two of the five CD patients with SNHL and in 12 of the 54 CD patients without SNHL. Antineuronal antibodies to central nervous system antigens were consistently negative in the five CD patients with SNHL. Only one of the five CD patients with SNHL had Hashimoto thyroiditis. CONCLUSIONS SNHL and CD occur coincidentally. Hearing function should be assessed only in CD patients with clinical signs of hearing deficiency. PMID:19668795

  19. Metabolic aspects of adult patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Abenavoli, Ludovico; Milic, Natasa; Di Renzo, Laura; Preveden, Tomislav; Medić-Stojanoska, Milica; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2016-08-21

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major cause of chronic liver disease and it encompasses a spectrum from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, or cirrhosis. The mechanisms involved in the occurrence of NAFLD and its progression are probably due to a metabolic profile expressed within the context of a genetic predisposition and is associated with a higher energy intake. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic alterations associated with an increased risk for the development of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. NAFLD patients have more than one feature of the MS, and now they are considered the hepatic components of the MS. Several scientific advances in understanding the association between NAFLD and MS have identified insulin resistance (IR) as the key aspect in the pathophysiology of both diseases. In the multi parallel hits theory of NAFLD pathogenesis, IR was described to be central in the predisposition of hepatocytes to be susceptible to other multiple pathogenetic factors. The recent knowledge gained from these advances can be applied clinically in the prevention and management of NAFLD and its associated metabolic changes. The present review analyses the current literature and highlights the new evidence on the metabolic aspects in the adult patients with NAFLD. PMID:27610012

  20. Metabolic aspects of adult patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Abenavoli, Ludovico; Milic, Natasa; Di Renzo, Laura; Preveden, Tomislav; Medić-Stojanoska, Milica; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major cause of chronic liver disease and it encompasses a spectrum from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, or cirrhosis. The mechanisms involved in the occurrence of NAFLD and its progression are probably due to a metabolic profile expressed within the context of a genetic predisposition and is associated with a higher energy intake. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic alterations associated with an increased risk for the development of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. NAFLD patients have more than one feature of the MS, and now they are considered the hepatic components of the MS. Several scientific advances in understanding the association between NAFLD and MS have identified insulin resistance (IR) as the key aspect in the pathophysiology of both diseases. In the multi parallel hits theory of NAFLD pathogenesis, IR was described to be central in the predisposition of hepatocytes to be susceptible to other multiple pathogenetic factors. The recent knowledge gained from these advances can be applied clinically in the prevention and management of NAFLD and its associated metabolic changes. The present review analyses the current literature and highlights the new evidence on the metabolic aspects in the adult patients with NAFLD. PMID:27610012

  1. Relationship between perceived sleep and polysomnography in older adult patients

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos Silva, Mayra; Bazzana, Caroline Moreira; de Souza, Altay Lino; Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Tufik, Sergio; Lucchesi, Lígia M.; Lopes, Guiomar Silva

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Aging is a multifactorial process that elicits changes in the duration and quality of sleep. Polysomnography is considered to be the standard examination for the analysis of sleep and consists of the simultaneous recording of selected physiological variables during sleep. Objective The objective of this study was to use polysomnography to compare sleep reported by senior citizens. Methods We selected 40 patients, both male and female, with ages ranging from 64 to 89 years from the Center for the Study of Aging at the Federal University of São Paulo. Patients answered questions about sleep on the Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment and underwent polysomnography. Results The results were compared, and agreement between perceived sleep and polysomnography was found in several areas. There was an association between difficulty sleeping and sleep onset latency (p=0.015), waking up at night with sleep onset latency (p=0.005), total sleep time with daytime sleepiness (0.005) and snoring (0.027), sleep efficiency with sleepiness (0.004), snoring (0.033) and pause in breathing (p=0.024), awakenings with snoring (p=0.012) and sleep apnea with pauses in breathing (p=0.001). Conclusion These results suggest that the older adult population have a good perception of their sleep. The questionnaires aimed at this population should be used as an alternative to polysomnography. PMID:26483948

  2. Metabolic aspects of adult patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Abenavoli, Ludovico; Milic, Natasa; Di Renzo, Laura; Preveden, Tomislav; Medić-Stojanoska, Milica; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major cause of chronic liver disease and it encompasses a spectrum from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, or cirrhosis. The mechanisms involved in the occurrence of NAFLD and its progression are probably due to a metabolic profile expressed within the context of a genetic predisposition and is associated with a higher energy intake. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic alterations associated with an increased risk for the development of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. NAFLD patients have more than one feature of the MS, and now they are considered the hepatic components of the MS. Several scientific advances in understanding the association between NAFLD and MS have identified insulin resistance (IR) as the key aspect in the pathophysiology of both diseases. In the multi parallel hits theory of NAFLD pathogenesis, IR was described to be central in the predisposition of hepatocytes to be susceptible to other multiple pathogenetic factors. The recent knowledge gained from these advances can be applied clinically in the prevention and management of NAFLD and its associated metabolic changes. The present review analyses the current literature and highlights the new evidence on the metabolic aspects in the adult patients with NAFLD.

  3. Using Adult Learning Concepts To Assist Patients in Completing Advance Directives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Rose Mary

    2000-01-01

    Advance directives that enable individuals to control their health care are underused due to lack of patient knowledge. Nurses can teach patients about them using adult learning principles, transformation theory, and skills for learning how to learn. (SK)

  4. [Vaccinations in patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases--EULAR recommendations for pediatric and adult patients].

    PubMed

    Müller-Ladner, Claudia; Müller-Ladner, Ulf

    2012-10-01

    Since patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases are prone to infectious complications--on one hand due to the rheumatic disease itself, on the other hand due to the immunosuppressive therapy--vaccination is an essential tool to prevent these infectious complications. Although there exist several recommendations for the vaccination of immunocompromised patients, many questions still remain for the distinct clinical situations of patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases. In addition, there are several questions concerning the safety and efficacy of various vaccinations, especially with regard to live-attenuated vaccines. Therefore, EULAR (European League Against Rheumatism) assembled two expert panels to clarify as much of these clinical problems as possible. After extensive literature review and evidence grading, the expert panels published recommendations for the vaccination of adult and pediatric patients, which are outlined in this review article.

  5. Cystic Fibrosis below the Diaphragm: Abdominal Findings in Adult Patients.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Lisa P; McEvoy, Sinead H; Ni Mhurchu, Elaine; Gibney, Robert G; McMahon, Colm J; Heffernan, Eric J; Malone, Dermot E

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common lethal autosomal recessive disease in the white population. Mutation of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator gene on chromosome 7 results in production of abnormally viscous mucus and secretions in the lungs of patients with CF. A similar pathologic process occurs in the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, and hepatobiliary system. Inspissated mucus causes luminal obstruction and resultant clinical and radiologic complications associated with the disease process. Pancreatic involvement can result in exocrine and endocrine insufficiency, pancreatic atrophy, fatty replacement, or lipomatous pseudohypertrophy. Acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic calcification, cysts, and cystosis also occur. Hepatic manifestations include hepatic steatosis, focal biliary and multilobular cirrhosis, and portal hypertension. Biliary complications include cholelithiasis, microgallbladder, and sclerosing cholangitis. The entire digestive tract can be involved. Distal ileal obstruction syndrome, intussusception, appendicitis, chronic constipation, colonic wall thickening, fibrosing colonopathy, pneumatosis intestinalis, gastroesophageal reflux, and peptic ulcer disease have been described. Renal manifestations include nephrolithiasis and secondary amyloidosis. The educational objectives of this review are to reveal the abdominal manifestations of CF to facilitate focused analysis of cross-sectional imaging in adult patients. Life expectancy in patients with CF continues to improve because of a combination of aggressive antibiotic treatment, improved emphasis on nutrition and physiotherapy, and development of promising new CF transmembrane conductance regulator modulators. As lung function and survival improve, extrapulmonary conditions, including hepatic and gastrointestinal malignancy, will be an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality. Awareness of the expected abdominal manifestations of CF may assist radiologists in identifying

  6. Generating Transgenic Mouse Models for Studying Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Ju, Josephine M; Marietta, Eric V; Murray, Joseph A

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief overview of current animal models for studying celiac disease, with a focus on generating HLA transgenic mouse models. Human Leukocyte Antigen class II molecules have been a particular target for transgenic mice due to their tight association with celiac disease, and a number of murine models have been developed which had the endogenous MHC class II genes replaced with insertions of disease susceptible HLA class II alleles DQ2 or DQ8. Additionally, transgenic mice that overexpress interleukin-15 (IL-15), a key player in the inflammatory cascade that leads to celiac disease, have also been generated to model a state of chronic inflammation. To explore the contribution of specific bacteria in gluten-sensitive enteropathy, the nude mouse and rat models have been studied in germ-free facilities. These reductionist mouse models allow us to address single factors thought to have crucial roles in celiac disease. No single model has incorporated all of the multiple factors that make up celiac disease. Rather, these mouse models can allow the functional interrogation of specific components of the many stages of, and contributions to, the pathogenic mechanisms that will lead to gluten-dependent enteropathy. Overall, the tools for animal studies in celiac disease are many and varied, and provide ample space for further creativity as well as to characterize the complete and complex pathogenesis of celiac disease.

  7. Risks of suicidality in adult patients with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Hamed, Sherifa A; Elserogy, Yaser BE; Abdou, Madleen A; Abdellah, Mostafa M

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence and risks of suicidality in a group of patients with epilepsy. METHODS: Included were 200 adult patients and 100 matched healthy subjects. The clinical interview using The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th edition), Beck Depression Inventory (2nd edition) (BDI-II), Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A), Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised Rating Scale testings were used for diagnosis and assessment of severity of psychiatric symptoms. Blood concentrations of serotonin, catecholamines and dopamine were also measured. RESULTS: Suicidality was reported in 35% (compared to 9% for controls), of them 80%, 72.86%, 55.71% and 52.9% had depression, anxiety, obsession and aggression respectively. Patients with suicidality had higher scores of BDI-II (P = 0.0001), HAM-A (P = 0.0001), and Y-BOCS (P = 0.037) and lower scores of psychotic (P = 0.0001) and extroversion (P = 0.025) personality traits. Regardless the presence or absence of suicidality, patients with epilepsy had low serotonin (P = 0.006), noradrenaline (P = 0.019) and adrenaline (P = 0.0001) levels. With suicidality, significant correlations were identified between: (1) age and scores of BDI-II (r = 0.235, P = 0.0001) and HAM-A (r = 0.241, P = 0.046); (2) age at onset and concentrations of noradrenaline (r = -0.502, P = 0.024); (3) duration of illness and scores of BDI-II (r = 0.247, P = 0.041), Y-BOCS (r = 0.270, P = 0.025) and neurotic personality trait (r = -0.284, P = 0.018); and (4) doses of antiepileptic drugs and scores of psychotic personality traits (r = -0.495, P = 0.006 for carbamazepine; r = -0.508, P = 0.0001 for valproate). CONCLUSION: This is the first study which systematically estimated the prevalence and risks of suicidality in a homogenous group of patients with epilepsy. This study emphasizes the importance of epilepsy itself as a risk for suicidality and not its treatment. PMID

  8. Rasch Measurement in the Assessment of Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adult Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prieto, Luis; Roset, Montse; Badia, Xavier

    2001-01-01

    Tested the metric properties of a Spanish version of the Assessment of Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adults (AGHDA) questionnaire through Rasch analysis with a sample of 356 adult patients in Spain. Results suggest that the Spanish AGHDA could be a useful complement of the clinical evaluation of growth hormone deficiency patients at group and…

  9. Warming up Improves Speech Production in Patients with Adult Onset Myotonic Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Swart, B.J.M.; van Engelen, B.G.M.; Maassen, B.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to study whether warming up decreases myotonia (muscle stiffness) during speech production or causes adverse effects due to fatigue or exhaustion caused by intensive speech activity in patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy. Thirty patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy (MD) and ten healthy controls…

  10. Aptamer binding to celiac disease-triggering hydrophobic proteins: a sensitive gluten detection approach.

    PubMed

    Amaya-González, Sonia; de-Los-Santos-Álvarez, Noemí; Miranda-Ordieres, Arturo J; Lobo-Castañón, M Jesús

    2014-03-01

    Celiac disease represents a significant public health problem in large parts of the world. A major hurdle in the effective management of the disease by celiac sufferers is the sensitivity of the current available methods for assessing gluten contents in food. In response, we report a highly sensitive approach for gluten analysis using aptamers as specific receptors. Gliadins, a fraction of gluten proteins, are the main constituent responsible for triggering the disease. However, they are highly hydrophobic and large molecules, regarded as difficult targets for in vitro evolution of aptamers without nucleobase modification. We describe the successful selection of aptamers for these water insoluble prolamins that was achieved choosing the immunodominant apolar peptide from α2-gliadin as a target for selection. All aptamers evolved are able to bind the target in its native environment within the natural protein. The best nonprotein receptor is the basis for an electrochemical competitive enzyme-linked assay on magnetic particles, which allows the measurement of as low as 0.5 ppb of gliadin standard (0.5 ppm of gluten). Reference immunoassay for detecting the same target has a limit of detection of 3 ppm, 6 times less sensitive than this method. Importantly, it also displays high specificity, detecting the other three prolamins toxic for celiac patients and not showing cross-reactivity to nontoxic proteins such as maize, soya, and rice. These features make the proposed method a valuable tool for gluten detection in foods.

  11. Rheumatoid arthritis-celiac disease relationship: joints get that gut feeling.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Aaron; Matthias, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and celiac disease (CD) belong to the autoimmune disease family. Despite being separate entities they share multiple aspects. Epidemiologically they share comparable incidence environmental influences, associated antibodies and a recent incidental surge. They differ in their HLA pre-dispositions and specific predictive and diagnostic biomarkers. At the clinical level, celiac disease exhibits extra-intestinal rheumatic manifestations and RA gastrointestinal ones. Small bowel pathology exists in rheumatic patients. A trend towards responsiveness to a gluten free diet has been observed, ameliorating celiac rheumatic manifestations, whereas dietary interventions for rheumatoid arthritis remain controversial. Pathophysiologically, both diseases are mediated by endogenous enzymes in the target organs. The infectious, dysbiotic and increased intestinal permeability theories, as drivers of the autoimmune cascade, apply to both diseases. Contrary to their specific HLA pre-disposition, the diseases share multiple non-HLA loci. Those genes are crucial for activation and regulation of adaptive and innate immunity. Recently, light was shed on the interaction between host genetics and microbiota composition in relation to CD and RA susceptibility, connecting bugs and us and autoimmunity. A better understanding of the above mentioned similarities in the gut-joint inter-relationship, may elucidate additional facets in the mosaic of autoimmunity, relating CD to RA.

  12. Duodenal-mucosal bacteria associated with celiac disease in children.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Ester; Donat, Ester; Ribes-Koninckx, Carmen; Fernández-Murga, Maria Leonor; Sanz, Yolanda

    2013-09-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by the ingestion of cereal gluten proteins. This disorder is associated with imbalances in the gut microbiota composition that could be involved in the pathogenesis of CD. The aim of this study was to characterize the composition and diversity of the cultivable duodenal mucosa-associated bacteria of CD patients and control children. Duodenal biopsy specimens from patients with active disease on a gluten-containing diet (n = 32), patients with nonactive disease after adherence to a gluten-free diet (n = 17), and controls (n = 8) were homogenized and plated on plate count agar, Wilkins-Chalgren agar, brain heart agar, or yeast, Casitone, and fatty acid agar. The isolates were identified by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Renyi diversity profiles showed the highest diversity values for active CD patients, followed by nonactive CD patients and control individuals. Members of the phylum Proteobacteria were more abundant in patients with active CD than in the other child groups, while those of the phylum Firmicutes were less abundant. Members of the families Enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcaceae, particularly the species Klebsiella oxytoca, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Staphylococcus pasteuri, were more abundant in patients with active disease than in controls. In contrast, members of the family Streptococcaceae were less abundant in patients with active CD than in controls. Furthermore, isolates of the Streptococcus anginosus and Streptococcus mutans groups were more abundant in controls than in both CD patient groups, regardless of inflammatory status. The findings indicated that the disease is associated with the overgrowth of possible pathobionts that exclude symbionts or commensals that are characteristic of the healthy small intestinal microbiota. PMID:23835180

  13. Antibiotic prophylaxis against infective endocarditis in adult and child patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-Fouzan, Afnan F.; Al-Shinaiber, Rafif M.; Al-Baijan, Refal S.; Al-Balawi, Mohammed M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate dentists’ knowledge regarding the prevention of infective endocarditis in Saudi Arabia and their implementation of the 2007 American Heart Association guidelines. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, in March 2014, 801 dentists who practice in different regions of Saudi Arabia completed a questionnaire regarding the need for antibiotic prophylaxis for specific cardiac conditions and specific dental procedures, prophylaxis regimens in adults and children, and recommendations for patients on chronic antibiotics, and in dental emergencies. The data were analyzed using one-way analyses of variance (ANOVAs) and independent t-tests, and a p-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The total knowledge level regarding antibiotic prophylaxis among all participants was 52.2%, with a significant difference between dentists who graduated before and after 2007. Comparing the level of knowledge among different dental specialists, surgeons and periodontists had the highest level of knowledge regarding the use of antibiotic prophylaxis. Amoxicillin was prescribed as the drug of choice by 63.9% of the participants. Conclusion: This study emphasized the need for continuous education and for formal inclusion of the guidelines in the students’ curriculum, as well as for strategic placement of the guidelines in locations throughout dental clinics. PMID:25935175

  14. Celiac Trunk Embolization, as a Means of Elongating Short Distal Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Necks, Prior to Endovascular Aortic Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Belenky, Alexander; Haddad, Menashe; Idov, Igor; Knizhnik, Michael; Litvin, Sergey; Bachar, Gil N.; Atar, Eli

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to report our experience in elongating short distal necks of descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (DTAAs) by coil embolization of the celiac trunk prior to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). During 6 years seven patients (five men and two women; mean age, 74) who had DTAAs with short distal necks unsuitable for conventional EVAR, and well patent superior and inferior mesenteric arteries based on CT, were treated in one session with EVAR after the celiac trunk was coil embolized to elongate the neck. All patients were followed by CT every 3 months in the first year and every 6 months thereafter. Technical success was achieved in all patients, and no early or late ischemic complications were noted. No procedural complications occurred and good aneurysm sealing was obtained in all patients. Three endoleaks were identified after 3 months (one patient) and 6 months (two patients); all were treated successfully with insertion of an additional stent-graft. In patients with DTAAs who are candidates for EVAR but have short aneurysm distal necks, celiac trunk embolization-only if the superior and inferior mesenteric arteries are patent-is a good and safe way to elongate the neck and enable EVAR.

  15. Endoscopic evaluation of celiac disease severity and its correlation with histopathological aspects of the duodenal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Bonatto, Mauro W.; Kotze, Luiz; Orlandoski, Marcia; Tsuchyia, Ricardo; de Carvalho, Carlos A.; Lima, Doryane; Kurachi, Gustavo; Orso, Ivan R.B.; Kotze, Lorete

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic systemic autoimmune disorder affecting genetically predisposed individuals, triggered and maintained by the ingestion of gluten. Triggered and maintained by the ingestion of gluten, celiac disease is a chronic systemic autoimmune disorder affecting genetically predisposed individuals. Persistent related inflammation of the duodenal mucosa causes atrophy architecture detectable on esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and histopathology. We investigated the association between endoscopic features and histopathological findings (Marsh) for duodenal mucosa in celiac disease patients and propose an endoscopic classification of severity. Patients and methods: Between January 2000 and March 2010, an electronic database containing 34,540 EDGs of patients aged > 14 years was searched for cases of CD. Out of 109 cases, 85 met the inclusion criteria: conventional EGD combined with chromoendoscopy, zoom and biopsy. EGD types 0, I and II corresponds to Marsh grades 0, 1 and 2, respectively, while EGD type III corresponds to Marsh grade 3 and 4. Results: Five patients (5.8 %) were EGD I but not Marsh grade 1; 25 patients (29.4 %) were EGD II, 4 of whom (16 %) were classified as Marsh grade 2; and 55 patients (64.7 %) were EGD III, 51 (92.7 %) of whom were classified as Marsh grades 3 and 4. The Spearman correlation coefficient (r = 0.33) revealed a significant association between the methods (P = 0.002). Conclusions: Changes in the duodenal mucosa detected on EGD were significantly and positively associated with histopathologic findings. The use of chromoendoscopy in addition to conventional EGD enhances changes in the duodenal mucosa and permits diagnosis of CD, even in routine examinations. The proposed endoscopic classification is practical and easily reproducible and provides valuable information regarding disease extension. PMID:27556094

  16. Discerning the Role of Bacteroides fragilis in Celiac Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, E.; Laparra, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is associated with intestinal dysbiosis, which can theoretically lead to dysfunctions in host-microbe interactions and contribute to the disease. In the present study, possible differences in Bacteroides spp. and their pathogenic features between CD patients and controls were investigated. Bacteroides clones (n = 274) were isolated, identified, and screened for the presence of the virulence genes (bft and mpII) coding for metalloproteases. The proteolytic activity of selected Bacteroides fragilis strains was evaluated by zymography and, after gastrointestinal digestion of gliadin, by high-pressure liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/tandem mass spectrometry. The effects of B. fragilis strains on Caco-2 cell culture permeability and inflammatory response to digested gliadin were determined. B. fragilis was more frequently identified in CD patients than in healthy controls, in contrast to Bacteroides ovatus. B. fragilis clones carrying virulence genes coding for metalloproteases were more abundant in CD patients than in controls. B. fragilis strains, representing the isolated clones and carrying metalloprotease genes, showed gelatinase activity and exerted the strongest adverse effects on the integrity of the Caco-2 cell monolayer. All B. fragilis strains also showed gliadin-hydrolyzing activity, and some of them generated immunogenic peptides that preserved or increased inflammatory cytokine production (tumor necrosis factor alpha) and showed increased ability to permeate through Caco-2 cell cultures. These findings suggest that increased abundance of B. fragilis strains with metalloprotease activities could play a role in CD pathogenesis, although further in vivo studies are required to support this hypothesis. PMID:22773639

  17. Celiac disease prevalence in epileptic children from Serbia.

    PubMed

    Djurić, Zlatko; Nagorni, Aleksandar; Jocić-Jakubi, Bosa; Dimić, Milena; Novak, Martin; Milićević, Radovan; Radenković, Goran

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a genetically determined autoimmune enteropathy, induced by gluten ingestion. To date, different prevalences of CD in children with epilepsy have been reported. The aim of this study was to determine CD prevalence in our patients with epilepsy, using anti-tissue transglutaminase (tTG) antibodies as a screening test. One hundred twenty-five children (72 girls, 53 boys; age range: 2-18 years, mean age: 10.51 +/- 3.53) with idiopathic epilepsy from South East Serbia were tested for immunoglobulin (IgA) tTG antibodies. All positive patients were offered endoscopic small bowel biopsy. Biopsies were examined histopathologically in order to confirm the CD diagnosis. The control group consisted of 150 healthy children. Three patients with epilepsy were positive for IgA tTG antibodies. In all of them, small bowel biopsy was performed, and only one was proven to have CD by histopathology (Marsh IIIa grade). The prevalence of biopsy-proven CD in children with epilepsy was not significantly higher in the study group compared to controls (0.8% vs.0.6%, p > 0.05). The results of this study indicate that children with idiopathic epilepsy from our region should not be routinely tested for CD. PMID:23094534

  18. Dyspepsia and celiac disease: Prevalence, diagnostic tools and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Petrarca, Laura; Nenna, Raffaella; Mastrogiorgio, Gerarda; Florio, Matteo; Brighi, Manuela; Pontone, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of dyspepsia is up to 40% in population-based study. Functional dyspepsia is an exclusion diagnosis and it is classified as a chronic abdominal pain-related functional disorder, characterized by the presence of persistent or recurrent pain or discomfort centered in the upper abdomen, neither relief by defecation, nor association with the onset of a change in stool frequency or form. Celiac disease (CD) is a common autoimmune enteropathy, with a prevalence around 1% in the general population. Its diagnosis includes a serological screening and an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with multiple biopsies. Gluten-free diet is the only effective treatment. CD diagnosis is often delayed in asymptomatic patients or in individuals with less clinical gastrointestinal symptoms. Several studies performed coeliac disease screening in patients with symptoms suggestive of dyspepsia, showing a biopsy-proved prevalence that ranged from 0.5% to 2%. The typical endoscopic markers of villous atrophy are not sufficiently sensitive, so some endoscopic techniques, such as “water immersion” and confocal endomicroscopy were proposed to improve the diagnostic sensitivity and target biopsies. A recent meta-analysis estimated that the prevalence of CD was higher in patients with dyspepsia, but not in a statistically significant way. However this assumption should be confirmed further larger studies. PMID:25332916

  19. Dyspepsia and celiac disease: Prevalence, diagnostic tools and therapy.

    PubMed

    Petrarca, Laura; Nenna, Raffaella; Mastrogiorgio, Gerarda; Florio, Matteo; Brighi, Manuela; Pontone, Stefano

    2014-09-26

    The prevalence of dyspepsia is up to 40% in population-based study. Functional dyspepsia is an exclusion diagnosis and it is classified as a chronic abdominal pain-related functional disorder, characterized by the presence of persistent or recurrent pain or discomfort centered in the upper abdomen, neither relief by defecation, nor association with the onset of a change in stool frequency or form. Celiac disease (CD) is a common autoimmune enteropathy, with a prevalence around 1% in the general population. Its diagnosis includes a serological screening and an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with multiple biopsies. Gluten-free diet is the only effective treatment. CD diagnosis is often delayed in asymptomatic patients or in individuals with less clinical gastrointestinal symptoms. Several studies performed coeliac disease screening in patients with symptoms suggestive of dyspepsia, showing a biopsy-proved prevalence that ranged from 0.5% to 2%. The typical endoscopic markers of villous atrophy are not sufficiently sensitive, so some endoscopic techniques, such as "water immersion" and confocal endomicroscopy were proposed to improve the diagnostic sensitivity and target biopsies. A recent meta-analysis estimated that the prevalence of CD was higher in patients with dyspepsia, but not in a statistically significant way. However this assumption should be confirmed further larger studies. PMID:25332916

  20. Humoral Immunity Links Candida albicans Infection and Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fradin, Chantal; Salleron, Julia; Damiens, Sébastien; Moragues, Maria Dolores; Souplet, Vianney; Jouault, Thierry; Robert, Raymond; Dubucquoi, Sylvain; Sendid, Boualem; Colombel, Jean Fréderic; Poulain, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objective The protein Hwp1, expressed on the pathogenic phase of Candida albicans, presents sequence analogy with the gluten protein gliadin and is also a substrate for transglutaminase. This had led to the suggestion that C. albicans infection (CI) may be a triggering factor for Celiac disease (CeD) onset. We investigated cross-immune reactivity between CeD and CI. Methods Serum IgG levels against recombinant Hwp1 and serological markers of CeD were measured in 87 CeD patients, 41 CI patients, and 98 healthy controls (HC). IgA and IgG were also measured in 20 individuals from each of these groups using microchips sensitized with 38 peptides designed from the N-terminal of Hwp1. Results CI and CeD patients had higher levels of anti-Hwp1 (p=0.0005 and p=0.004) and anti-gliadin (p=0.002 and p=0.0009) antibodies than HC but there was no significant difference between CeD and CI patients. CeD and CI patients had higher levels of anti-transglutaminase IgA than HC (p=0.0001 and p=0.0039). During CI, the increase in anti-Hwp1 paralleled the increase in anti-gliadin antibodies. Microchip analysis showed that CeD patients were more reactive against some Hwp1 peptides than CI patients, and that some deamidated peptides were more reactive than their native analogs. Binding of IgG from CeD patients to Hwp1 peptides was inhibited by γIII gliadin peptides. Conclusions Humoral cross-reactivity between Hwp1 and gliadin was observed during CeD and CI. Increased reactivity to Hwp1 deamidated peptide suggests that transglutaminase is involved in this interplay. These results support the hypothesis that CI may trigger CeD onset in genetically-susceptible individuals. PMID:25793717

  1. The Relationship between Spontaneous Multi-Vessel Coronary Artery Dissection and Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Çağırcı, Göksel; Üreyen, Çağın Mustafa; Kuş, Görkem; Küçükseymen, Selçuk; Arslan, Şakir

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy involving the small intestines. Genetic and environmental risk factors as well as autoimmunity have been linked to its etiology. Studies have shown that coronary artery disease, autoimmune myocarditis, arrhythmias and premature atherosclerosis are more prevalent in individuals with CD compared to individuals without the disease. In this case report a young male patient with CD presented with acute myocardial infarction with spontaneous coronary artery dissections of two vessels. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of spontaneous multi-vessel coronary artery dissection in a patient with CD. PMID:26023313

  2. Long-Term Blood Pressure Control Effect of Celiac Plexus Block with Botulinum Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Hyun; Lim, Dae Hwan; Lee, Ju Ho; Chang, Kiyuk; Koo, Jung Min; Park, Hue Jung

    2016-01-01

    Celiac plexus block (CPB) is one of the main treatment options for patients resistant to conventional antihypertensive drugs. We present a case of resistant hypertension (RHTN) that was treated with CPB using botulinum toxin. An 18-year-old male patient with RHTN, who suffered from persistent hypertension even after combination therapy and a renal denervation procedure, was referred to our pain center for CPB. CPB using botulinum toxin following the use of only local anesthetics resulted in control of systolic blood pressure (BP) at ~150 mmHg for at least three months. PMID:26907344

  3. Assessing of Celiac Disease and Nonceliac Gluten Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Ontiveros, N.; Hardy, M. Y.; Cabrera-Chavez, F.

    2015-01-01

    The publication of papers on the topic of gluten related disorders has substantially increased over the last few years. This has motivated healthcare professionals to pay attention not only to celiac disease and wheat allergy but also to a condition termed nonceliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). Until now this condition has been diagnosed clinically on the basis of exclusion criteria and clinical response to gluten withdrawal. In addition, recent research in this field has shown that other food components distinct from gluten are implicated in NCGS cases, thereby changing our general understanding of NCGS diagnosis in either individuals on gluten containing diets or those already following a gluten-free diet with no proper diagnostic work-up of celiac disease. With this in mind, the assessment of NCGS will require extensive knowledge of celiac disease manifestations and the laboratory tests commonly performed during diagnosis of celiac disease. PMID:26064097

  4. Occupational Outcome in Adult ADHD: Impact of Symptom Profile, Comorbid Psychiatric Problems, and Treatment--A Cross-Sectional Study of 414 Clinically Diagnosed Adult ADHD Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halmoy, Anne; Fasmer, Ole Bernt; Gillberg, Christopher; Haavik, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effects of symptom profile, comorbid psychiatric problems, and treatment on occupational outcome in adult ADHD patients. Method: Adult ADHD patients (N = 414) responded to questionnaires rating past and present symptoms of ADHD, comorbid conditions, treatment history, and work status. Results: Of the patients, 24%…

  5. Celiac disease in children: is it a problem in Kuwait?

    PubMed Central

    Al-Qabandi, Wafa’a; Buhamrah, Eman; Al-Abdulrazzaq, Dalia; Hamadi, Khaled; Al Refaee, Fawaz

    2015-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the small intestine triggered by gluten ingestion. The objective of this study is to describe our experience with CD children in Kuwait. Methods The records of children with CD seen in the pediatric gastroenterology unit between February 1998 and December 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were referred because of symptoms or positive CD antibody screening of a high-risk group (type 1 diabetes and Down syndrome). Results Forty-seven patients were diagnosed: 53% were symptomatic and 47% were identified by screening. The median age at diagnosis was 66 (range 7–189) months. All cases were biopsy-proven except one. The symptomatic patients were significantly younger than those identified following screening (P<0.004). In the whole group, 66% were females and 77% were Kuwaitis; 9% had a positive family history of CD. The estimated cumulative incidence was 6.9/105. The median duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 8.5 (range 2–54) months. Failure to thrive was the most common presenting complaint (72%) followed by diarrhea (64%) and abdominal distension (56%). Atypical manifestations were seen in 60% of patients. Underweight and short stature were confirmed in 19% and 17% of patients, respectively. Overweight and obesity were detected in 14% and 6%, respectively. CD serology was based on a combination of antiendomysial and antigliadin antibodies. The median follow up was 24 (range 12–144) months. All patients were commenced on a gluten free diet, but good compliance was only achieved in 78%. Conclusion The low frequency of childhood CD in Kuwait could probably be attributed to either an underestimation of the atypical presentations or failure of proper screening. Also, adherence to a gluten free diet is a major problem in our population. PMID:25565879

  6. Psychological Dimensions of Celiac Disease in India.

    PubMed

    Vohra, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    An epidemic of celiac disease is being witnessed in India as well as several other parts of the world. Awareness is important for early diagnosis and treatment so as to avoid long-term morbidity as well as irreversible complications. However, the key for resolution of the disease is good compliance to a gluten-free diet. Unfortunately, the current scenario in India is that either gluten free foods are not easily available or are expensive and often not tested. This is especially true in schools and colleges and smaller towns. In addition, the stigma attached to gluten-free food makes it socially undesirable, and this is made worse by the lack of knowledge among peers, family members, advisors, and even health care providers. We need to make a strong pitch to overcome the confusion regarding the disease as well as the diet to avoid psychological and medical complications. PMID:27335528

  7. Psychological Dimensions of Celiac Disease in India

    PubMed Central

    Vohra, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    An epidemic of celiac disease is being witnessed in India as well as several other parts of the world. Awareness is important for early diagnosis and treatment so as to avoid long-term morbidity as well as irreversible complications. However, the key for resolution of the disease is good compliance to a gluten-free diet. Unfortunately, the current scenario in India is that either gluten free foods are not easily available or are expensive and often not tested. This is especially true in schools and colleges and smaller towns. In addition, the stigma attached to gluten-free food makes it socially undesirable, and this is made worse by the lack of knowledge among peers, family members, advisors, and even health care providers. We need to make a strong pitch to overcome the confusion regarding the disease as well as the diet to avoid psychological and medical complications. PMID:27335528

  8. Intestinal Microbiota and Probiotics in Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Grzeskowiak, Lukasz Marcin; de Sales Teixeira, Tatiana Fiche; Gouveia Peluzio, Maria do Carmo

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Celiac disease (CD) is a common chronic autoimmune enteropathy caused by gluten intake. To date, the only therapy for CD is the complete exclusion of dietary sources of grains and any food containing gluten. It has been hypothesized that the intestinal microbiota is somehow involved in CD. For this reason, probiotics are appearing as an interesting adjuvant in the dietetic management of CD. This review aims to discuss the characteristics of the microbiota in CD subjects and the use of probiotics as a novel therapy for CD. Comparisons between children with CD and controls show that their microbiota profiles differ; the former have fewer lactobacilli and bifidobacteria. Specific probiotics have been found to digest or alter gluten polypeptides. It has also been demonstrated that some bacterial species belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium exert protective properties on epithelial cells from damage caused by gliadin. PMID:24982318

  9. Histopathological Characteristics of Distal Middle Cerebral Artery in Adult and Pediatric Patients with Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    TAKAGI, Yasushi; HERMANTO, Yulius; TAKAHASHI, Jun C; FUNAKI, Takeshi; KIKUCHI, Takayuki; MINEHARU, Yohei; YOSHIDA, Kazumichi; MIYAMOTO, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a unique progressive steno-occlusive disease of the distal ends of bilateral internal arteries and their proximal branches. The difference in clinical symptoms between adult and children MMD patients has been well recognized. In this study, we sought to investigate the phenomenon through histopathological study. Fifty-one patients underwent surgical procedures for treatment of standard indications of MMD at Kyoto University Hospital. Fifty-nine specimens of MCA were obtained from MMD patients during the surgical procedures. Five MCA samples were also obtained in the same way from control patients. The samples were analyzed by histopathological methods. In this study, MCA specimens from MMD patients had significantly thinner media and thicker intima than control specimens. In subsequent analysis, adult (≥ 20 years) patients had thicker intima of MCA compared to pediatric (< 20 years) patients. There is no difference in internal elastic lamina pathology between adult and pediatric patients. Our results indicated that the pathological feature of MMD in tunica media occurs in both adult and pediatric patients. However, the MMD feature in tunica intima of MCA is more prominent in adult patients. Further analysis from MCA specimens and other researches are necessary to elucidate the pathophysiology of MMD. PMID:27087193

  10. Adjuvant Therapies and Patient and Tumor Characteristics Associated With Survival of Adult Patients With Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Andrew R.; Sabolch, Aaron; Jolly, Shruti; Miller, Barbra S.; Hammer, Gary D.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Adrenocortical carcinoma is a rare malignant endocrine neoplasia. Studies regarding outcome and prognostic factors rely on fairly small studies. Here we summarize the experience with patients with a diagnosis of adrenocortical carcinoma from a large tertiary referral center. Objective: The objective of the study was to identify prognostic factors in patients with adrenocortical carcinoma and evaluate adjuvant treatment strategies. Design: Patient data were collected in a retrospective single-center study. Epidemiological, patient, and tumor characteristics were analyzed for prognostic factors regarding overall and recurrence-free survival in Cox regression models (multivariable and univariable). Results: Three hundred ninety-one adult patients with the diagnosis of adrenocortical carcinoma were identified. Median overall survival was 35.2 months. Cortisol production [hazard ratio (HR) 1.4, HR 1.5], tumor stage (HR stage 3 of 2.1 and 2.1, HR stage 4 of 4.8), and tumor grade (HR 2.4 and 2.0) were identified as negative prognostic factors (HR for death, HR for recurrence). Mitotane therapy increases recurrence-free survival, an effect that was significantly further improved by adjuvant radiation therapy but did not impact overall survival. Patients with open adrenalectomy had improved overall survival. Conclusions: This study increases the evidence for adverse risk factors (cortisol production, high tumor stage, and high tumor grade) and suggests the following therapy approach: adrenocortical carcinoma patients should be treated with open adrenalectomy. Adjuvant therapy, particularly mitotane therapy in conjunction with radiation, should be considered to delay tumor recurrence. PMID:24302750

  11. The relation between celiac disease, nonceliac gluten sensitivity and irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Hatlebakk, Jan Gunnar; Gilja, Odd Helge; Hausken, Trygve

    2015-09-07

    Wheat products make a substantial contribution to the dietary intake of many people worldwide. Despite the many beneficial aspects of consuming wheat products, it is also responsible for several diseases such as celiac disease (CD), wheat allergy, and nonceliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). CD and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients have similar gastrointestinal symptoms, which can result in CD patients being misdiagnosed as having IBS. Therefore, CD should be excluded in IBS patients. A considerable proportion of CD patients suffer from IBS symptoms despite adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD). The inflammation caused by gluten intake may not completely subside in some CD patients. It is not clear that gluten triggers the symptoms in NCGS, but there is compelling evidence that carbohydrates (fructans and galactans) in wheat does. It is likely that NCGS patients are a group of self-diagnosed IBS patients who self-treat by adhering to a GFD.

  12. The relation between celiac disease, nonceliac gluten sensitivity and irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Hatlebakk, Jan Gunnar; Gilja, Odd Helge; Hausken, Trygve

    2015-01-01

    Wheat products make a substantial contribution to the dietary intake of many people worldwide. Despite the many beneficial aspects of consuming wheat products, it is also responsible for several diseases such as celiac disease (CD), wheat allergy, and nonceliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). CD and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients have similar gastrointestinal symptoms, which can result in CD patients being misdiagnosed as having IBS. Therefore, CD should be excluded in IBS patients. A considerable proportion of CD patients suffer from IBS symptoms despite adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD). The inflammation caused by gluten intake may not completely subside in some CD patients. It is not clear that gluten triggers the symptoms in NCGS, but there is compelling evidence that carbohydrates (fructans and galactans) in wheat does. It is likely that NCGS patients are a group of self-diagnosed IBS patients who self-treat by adhering to a GFD. PMID:26345589

  13. Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM): A Quick Reading Test for Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Peggy W.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes a reading recognition test called Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM) that is designed to identify low literacy levels in patients. Notes that information thus obtained is useful in directing patient-physician communications and in promoting patient understanding of commonly used oral and written medical information. (SR)

  14. Reduced Capacity in a Dichotic Memory Test for Adult Patients with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dige, Niels; Maahr, Eija; Backenroth-Ohsako, Gunnel

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether a dichotic memory test would reveal deficits in short-term working-memory recall and long-term memory recall in a group of adult patients with ADHD. Methods: A dichotic memory test with ipsilateral backward speech distraction in an adult ADHD group (n = 69) and a control group (n = 66) is used to compare performance…

  15. Comparing illness presentation, treatment and functioning between patients with adolescent- and adult-onset psychosis.

    PubMed

    Hui, Christy Lai-Ming; Li, Adrienne Wing-Yee; Leung, Chung-Ming; Chang, Wing-Chung; Chan, Sherry Kit-Wa; Lee, Edwin Ho-Ming; Chen, Eric Yu-Hai

    2014-12-30

    Studies have shown that early- and adult-onset schizophrenia patients differ in pre-morbid traits, illness presentation, psychopathology, and prognosis. We aimed to compare adult-onset patients (age range 26-55 years) with an adolescent-onset cohort (15-25 years) in demographics, illness presentation and functioning at baseline. Participants were from two territory-wide early intervention services for adolescent-onset (n=671) and adult-onset psychosis patients (n=360) in Hong Kong. The adolescent-onset cohort had their initial psychotic episode from 2001-2003; retrospective data collection was done through systematic case note review. The adult-onset cohort was recruited for a larger interventional study from 2009-2011; information was collected via face-to-face interviews. Adult-onset psychosis was significantly associated with more females, more smokers, more non-local birth, more full-time employment, better functioning, poorer medication adherence, more psychiatric hospitalization and fewer with schizophrenia than adolescent-onset psychosis (mean age: 20.4). The effect sizes were small, except for medication adherence where a robust effect was found. No group difference in DUP was found. The finding that adult-onset patients had better functioning challenges the view that adolescent- and adult-onset psychoses share a similar prognostic trajectory. Implications for adapting intervention processes for adolescent- and adult-onset psychosis are discussed.

  16. Exploring anthropometric and laboratory differences in children of varying ethnicities with celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Rajani, Seema; Alzaben, Abeer; Shirton, Leanne; Persad, Rabindranath; Huynh, Hien Q; Mager, Diana R; Turner, Justine M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Celiac disease (CD) is a common autoimmune disorder with an increasing prevalence, including in ethnic minorities. OBJECTIVE: To report the frequency of CD diagnosis in ethnic minorities presenting to a Canadian pediatric celiac clinic and to determine whether ethnic differences exist at diagnosis or follow-up. METHODS: Patients with biopsy-proven CD diagnosed at a multidisciplinary celiac clinic between 2008 and 2011 were identified through the clinic database. Data at referral, and six-month and 12-month follow-ups were collected. These included demographics, self-reported ethnicity, symptoms, anthropometrics and laboratory investigations, including serum immunoglobulin antitissue transglutaminase (aTTG). RESULTS: A total of 272 patients were identified; 80% (n=218) were Caucasian (group 1) and 20% (n=54) were other ethnicities. South Asians (group 2) comprised 81% (n=44) of the minority population. No differences in age or sex were found between the two groups. Group 1 patients presented more often with gastrointestinal symptoms (71% versus 43%; P<0.001), while patients in group 2 presented more often with growth concerns (21% versus 68%; P<0.001). At diagnosis, serum aTTG level was consistently lower in group 1 compared with group 2 (367 IU/mL versus 834 IU/mL; P=0.030). Both groups reported symptom improvement at six months and one year. At the end of one year, aTTG level was more likely to be normal in group 1 compared with group 2 (64% versus 29%; P<0.001). CONCLUSION: Although they represent a minority group, South Asian children comprised a significant proportion of CD patients presenting to a Canadian celiac clinic. South Asian children were more likely to present with growth concerns, which has important implications for timely diagnosis in this population. In addition, the apparent delay in normalization of aTTG levels suggests that careful follow-up and culturally focused education supports should be developed for South Asian children with

  17. Symptoms and socio-economic impact of ependymoma on adult patients: results of the Adult Ependymoma Outcomes Project 2.

    PubMed

    Walbert, Tobias; Mendoza, Tito R; Vera-Bolaños, Elizabeth; Acquaye, Alvina; Gilbert, Mark R; Armstrong, Terri S

    2015-01-01

    Ependymoma is a rare central nervous system tumor of adults. Reports of patient symptoms, interference patterns and costs encountered by patients and families are limited. Adult ependymoma patients completed the online Ependymoma Outcomes Questionnaire II. The survey assesses disease and functional status as well as socio-economic factors. Descriptive statistics were used to report disease characteristics as well as economic and social impact. Independent samples t test was used to test if differences exist between high- and low-income groups in terms of symptom severity. Correlations were calculated between symptoms and cost estimates. 86 international patients participated (male = 50 %). The economic analysis focused on 78 respondents from the US. 48 % were employed and 55 % earned ≥$60,000. Tumors were located in the brain (44 %), spine (44 %) or both (12 %). Spine patients compared to brain patients reported significantly worse pain (4.4 versus 2.2, p < .003), numbness (5.3 versus 2.2, p < .001), fatigue (5.1 versus 3.6, p < .03), changes in bowel patterns (3.8 versus 1.4, p < .003) and weakness (4.2 versus 2.1, p < .006). Brain patients compared with spine patients had increased lack of appetite (.4 versus 2, p < .014). Patients with lower income (≤$59,999) had more problems concentrating (p < .024) and worse cognitive module severity scores (p < .024). Estimated average monthly out-of-pocket spending was $168 for medical co-pays and $59 for prescription medication. Patients with ependymoma are highly affected by their symptoms. Spinal patients report higher severity of symptoms. Patients in the lower income group report significantly higher severity of cognitive symptoms independent of disease site.

  18. Symptoms and socio-economic impact of ependymoma on adult patients: results of the Adult Ependymoma Outcomes Project 2.

    PubMed

    Walbert, Tobias; Mendoza, Tito R; Vera-Bolaños, Elizabeth; Acquaye, Alvina; Gilbert, Mark R; Armstrong, Terri S

    2015-01-01

    Ependymoma is a rare central nervous system tumor of adults. Reports of patient symptoms, interference patterns and costs encountered by patients and families are limited. Adult ependymoma patients completed the online Ependymoma Outcomes Questionnaire II. The survey assesses disease and functional status as well as socio-economic factors. Descriptive statistics were used to report disease characteristics as well as economic and social impact. Independent samples t test was used to test if differences exist between high- and low-income groups in terms of symptom severity. Correlations were calculated between symptoms and cost estimates. 86 international patients participated (male = 50 %). The economic analysis focused on 78 respondents from the US. 48 % were employed and 55 % earned ≥$60,000. Tumors were located in the brain (44 %), spine (44 %) or both (12 %). Spine patients compared to brain patients reported significantly worse pain (4.4 versus 2.2, p < .003), numbness (5.3 versus 2.2, p < .001), fatigue (5.1 versus 3.6, p < .03), changes in bowel patterns (3.8 versus 1.4, p < .003) and weakness (4.2 versus 2.1, p < .006). Brain patients compared with spine patients had increased lack of appetite (.4 versus 2, p < .014). Patients with lower income (≤$59,999) had more problems concentrating (p < .024) and worse cognitive module severity scores (p < .024). Estimated average monthly out-of-pocket spending was $168 for medical co-pays and $59 for prescription medication. Patients with ependymoma are highly affected by their symptoms. Spinal patients report higher severity of symptoms. Patients in the lower income group report significantly higher severity of cognitive symptoms independent of disease site. PMID:25359395

  19. Motivation of adult female patients seeking orthodontic treatment: an application of Q-methodology

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xia; Cai, Jiaxin; Lin, Beibei; Yao, Linjie; Lin, Feiou

    2015-01-01

    Background Motivation is the impetus for patients to seek orthodontic treatment, affecting adherence, treatment outcomes, and satisfaction. The aim of this study was to assess the motivation of adult female patients seeking orthodontic treatment, and classify the patients according to their motivations. Methods This study used Q-methodology as the main tool. Q-samples were collected and categorized (35 items). Forty-two adult female patients were interviewed before treatment as the P-sample, and their responses were categorized into the Q-methodology grid. Participants were asked to rank-order a set of 35 statements (Q-sample) from “agree most” to “disagree most” (Q-sorting). The finished Q-grids were analyzed using PQ method 2.35. Results Four main factors were identified based on how adult female patients ranked statements: factor 1, patients who focus on their self-perception of their appearance; factor 2, patients who are concerned about the esthetics and function of their teeth; factor 3, patients who are easily influenced by others; factor 4, patients who want to improve their confidence and avoid negative thoughts caused by their teeth. The remaining patients who had other views did not match any of the above four groups. Conclusion The motivations of adult female patients seeking orthodontic treatment are complex. This study found that most adult female patients fell into one of four typical factor groups. Our findings may improve the adherence of adult female patients by developing a more ideal treatment program. PMID:25709410

  20. Does Celiac Disease Influence Survival in Sepsis? A Nationwide Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Röckert Tjernberg, Anna; Bonnedahl, Jonas; Ludvigsson, Jonas F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Individuals with celiac disease (CD) are at increased risk of sepsis. The aim of this study was to examine whether CD influences survival in sepsis of bacterial origin. Methods Nationwide longitudinal registry-based study. Through data on small intestinal biopsies from Sweden’s 28 pathology departments, we identified 29,096 individuals with CD (villous atrophy, Marsh stage III). Each individual with CD was matched with five population-based controls. Among these, 5,470 had a record of sepsis according to the Swedish Patient Register (1,432 celiac individuals and 4,038 controls). Finally we retrieved data on mortality in sepsis patients through the Swedish Cause of Death Registry. Results CD was associated with a 19% increase in overall mortality after sepsis (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.09–1.29), with the highest relative risk occurring in children (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 1.62; 95%CI = 0.67–3.91). However, aHR for death from sepsis was lower (aHR = 1.10) and failed to reach statistical significance (95%CI = 0.72–1.69). CD did not influence survival within 28 days after sepsis (aHR = 0.98; 95%CI = 0.80–1.19). Conclusions Although individuals with CD seem to be at an increased risk of overall death after sepsis, that excess risk does not differ from the general excess mortality previously seen in celiac patients in Sweden. CD as such does not seem to influence short-term or sepsis-specific survival in individuals with sepsis and therefore is not an independent risk factor for poor prognosis in sepsis. PMID:27124735

  1. Increased production of interleukin-21, but not interleukin-17A, in the small intestine characterizes pediatric celiac disease.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, M A; Lindenbergh-Kortleve, D J; Raatgeep, H C; de Ruiter, L F; de Krijger, R R; Groeneweg, M; Escher, J C; Samsom, J N

    2013-11-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is caused by inflammatory CD4(+) T-cell responses to dietary gluten. It is unclear whether interleukin (IL)-21 and IL-17A contribute to CD onset and lesion severity; therefore, we investigated IL-21 and IL-17A expression in biopsies from pediatric CD patients with different histopathological scores. High numbers of IL-21-producing cells were observed in pediatric CD lesions, even Marsh 1-2 lesions, whereas increased numbers of IL-17 secreting cells were not observed. Intraepithelial lymphocytes, CD4(+) T cells and also neutrophils secreted IL-21. Flow cytometry of lamina propria cells revealed a large population of IL-21- and interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-secreting CD3(+) T cells that did not secrete IL-17A. Adult CD patient biopsies also contained high numbers of IL-21-positive cells; however, enhanced numbers of IL-17-positive cells were observed in a small subgroup of patients with severe lesions. As duodenal tissue damage increases contact with microbe-associated molecular patterns, we hypothesized that microbial sensing by Toll-like receptors (TLRs) modulates T cell-derived cytokine secretion. Costimulation with TLR3 ligands during polyclonal T-cell activation significantly increased IL-21 secretion, whereas TLR2 ligands selectively enhanced IL-17A. These results demonstrate that an IL-17A-independent increase in IL-21 production by CD4(+) T cells is characteristic of pediatric CD. We hypothesize that incidental IL-17 secretion is caused by tissue damage rather than gluten-specific responses.

  2. Tetany caused by chronic diarrhea in a child with celiac disease: A case report.

    PubMed

    Hurtado-Valenzuela, Jaime Gabriel; Sotelo-Cruz, Norberto; López-Cervantes, Guillermo; de la Barca, Ana María Calderón

    2008-09-23

    There is no awareness about celiac disease (CD) in Mexico. A 2.9 year old mestizo boy was admitted to a Mexican hospital with muscle cramps and fine tremors. He suffered chronic diarrhea, abdominal distention, hypotrophic limbs, stunting and wasting, and presented hypocalcemia, anemia and high titers of serological markers. Diagnosis of CD was confirmed by a duodenal biopsy. After replacement of calcium and a gluten-free diet, the symptoms resolved within 6 weeks. After 2-months, serum analyses, anthropometric data as well as antibodies titers were normal after 4 years. CD screening tests are needed in chronic diarrhea for any ethnicity patients.

  3. Tetany caused by chronic diarrhea in a child with celiac disease: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Hurtado-Valenzuela, Jaime Gabriel; Sotelo-Cruz, Norberto; López-Cervantes, Guillermo; de la Barca, Ana María Calderón

    2008-01-01

    There is no awareness about celiac disease (CD) in Mexico. A 2.9 year old mestizo boy was admitted to a Mexican hospital with muscle cramps and fine tremors. He suffered chronic diarrhea, abdominal distention, hypotrophic limbs, stunting and wasting, and presented hypocalcemia, anemia and high titers of serological markers. Diagnosis of CD was confirmed by a duodenal biopsy. After replacement of calcium and a gluten-free diet, the symptoms resolved within 6 weeks. After 2-months, serum analyses, anthropometric data as well as antibodies titers were normal after 4 years. CD screening tests are needed in chronic diarrhea for any ethnicity patients. PMID:18811963

  4. Celiac disease diagnosis and gluten-free food analytical control.

    PubMed

    da Silva Neves, Marta Maria Pereira; González-Garcia, Maria Begoña; Nouws, Hendrikus Petrus Antonius; Delerue-Matos, Cristina; Santos-Silva, Alice; Costa-García, Agustín

    2010-07-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune enteropathy, characterized by an inappropriate T-cell-mediated immune response to the ingestion of certain dietary cereal proteins in genetically susceptible individuals. This disorder presents environmental, genetic, and immunological components. CD presents a prevalence of up to 1% in populations of European ancestry, yet a high percentage of cases remain underdiagnosed. The diagnosis and treatment should be made early since untreated disease causes growth retardation and atypical symptoms, like infertility or neurological disorders. The diagnostic criteria for CD, which requires endoscopy with small bowel biopsy, have been changing over the last few decades, especially due to the advent of serological tests with higher sensitivity and specificity. The use of serological markers can be very useful to rule out clinical suspicious cases and also to help monitor the patients, after adherence to a gluten-free diet. Since the current treatment consists of a life-long gluten-free diet, which leads to significant clinical and histological improvement, the standardization of an assay to assess in an unequivocal way gluten in gluten-free foodstuff is of major importance.

  5. Chronic abdominal pain secondary to mesenteric panniculitis treated successfully with endoscopic ultrasonography-guided celiac plexus block: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Alhazzani, Waleed; Al-Shamsi, Humaid O; Greenwald, Eric; Radhi, Jasim; Tse, Frances

    2015-01-01

    Mesenteric panniculitis is a chronic illness that is characterized by fibrosing inflammation of the mesenteries that can lead to intractable abdominal pain. Pain control is a crucial component of the management plan. Most patients will improve with oral corticosteroids treatment, however, some patients will require a trial of other immunosuppressive agents, and a minority of patients will continue to have refractory disease. Endoscopic ultrasound guided celiac plexus block is used frequently to control abdominal pain in patients with pancreatic pathology. To our knowledge there are no case reports describing its use in mesenteric panniculitis patients with refractory abdominal pain. PMID:25992196

  6. Optimizing Management of Patients with Adult T Cell Leukemia-Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Yared, Jean A.; Kimball, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    Adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma is a rare disease with a high mortality rate, and is challenging for the clinician. Early allogeneic stem cell transplant can confer durable remission. As novel therapeutic agents become available to treat T cell malignancies, it is increasingly important that medical oncologists, hematologists, and hematopathologists recognize and accurately diagnose adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma. There is no uniform standard of treatment of adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma, and clinical trials remain critical to improving outcomes. Here we present one management approach based on the recent advances in treatment for adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma patients. PMID:26610571