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Sample records for adult cloned pig

  1. Proteomic analysis of pancreas derived from adult cloned pig

    SciTech Connect

    Chae, Jung-Il; Cho, Young Keun; Cho, Seong-Keun; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Han, Yong-Mahn; Koo, Deog-Bon Lee, Kyung-Kwang

    2008-02-08

    The potential medical applications of animal cloning include xenotransplantation, but the complex molecular cascades that control porcine organ development are not fully understood. Still, it has become apparent that organs derived from cloned pigs may be suitable for transplantation into humans. In this study, we examined the pancreas of an adult cloned pig developed through somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and Western blotting. Proteomic analysis revealed 69 differentially regulated proteins, including such apoptosis-related species as annexins, lamins, and heat shock proteins, which were unanimously upregulated in the SCNT sample. Among the downregulated proteins in SCNT pancreas were peroxiredoxins and catalase. Western blot results indicate that several antioxidant enzymes and the anti-apoptotic protein were downregulated in SCNT pancreas, whereas several caspases were upregulated. Together, these data suggest that the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the pancreas of an adult cloned pig leads to apoptosis.

  2. Phosphorylation of PrxII promotes JNK-dependent apoptosis in adult cloned pig kidney.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Young-Joo; Kim, Jumi; Lee, Dong-Seok; Shim, Jung-Hyun; Seo, Kang Seok; Chae, Jung-Il

    2014-08-01

    Organ transplantation is the most effective medical therapy for end-stage renal disease patients; however, there is a critical shortage of human donor organs. Therefore, xenotransplantation using genetically modified cloned porcine kidney is considered as a viable solution, but its fundamental therapeutic mechanism and difference from non-cloned porcine or human kidney for its clinical application is not well known. Here, we performed proteomic analysis to investigate the differentially expressed molecules in kidney tissue obtained from cloned porcine by SCNT, when compared with normal porcine kidney in same age as a control. A total of 80 protein spots were differentially expressed between cloned porcine kidney and control kidney, including apoptotic proteins, structural and anti-oxidant related proteins. Furthermore, very interestingly, the differential expression pattern of PrxII in the cloned porcine kidney was distinguishable from that in the control kidney in terms of the pI and molecular weight. Along with this, apoptotic marker proteins were up-regulated in the cloned porcine kidney. We suggested that these alterations were induced by post-translational modification such as phosphorylation in PrxII and could be mediated by JNK. With this result, we also observed that the down-regulation of JNK activity was caused by blockage of phosphorylation in PrxII T89A region. Taken together, cloned porcine kidney is more susceptible in JNK-induced apoptosis caused by PrxII phosphorylation, in oxidative stress condition. These results will be helpful in the application of cloned porcine xeno-transplants for treating end-stage renal disease patients in a clinical setting. PMID:24909612

  3. Transgene expression of green fluorescent protein and germ line transmission in cloned pigs derived from in vitro transfected adult fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, Dario; Perota, Andrea; Lagutina, Irina; Colleoni, Silvia; Duchi, Roberto; Calabrese, Fiorella; Seveso, Michela; Cozzi, Emanuele; Lazzari, Giovanna; Lucchini, Franco; Galli, Cesare

    2008-12-01

    The pig represents the xenogeneic donor of choice for future organ transplantation in humans for anatomical and physiological reasons. However, to bypass several immunological barriers, strong and stable human genes expression must occur in the pig's organs. In this study we created transgenic pigs using in vitro transfection of cultured cells combined with somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) to evaluate the ubiquitous transgene expression driven by pCAGGS vector in presence of different selectors. pCAGGS confirmed to be a very effective vector for ubiquitous transgene expression, irrespective of the selector that was used. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression observed in transfected fibroblasts was also maintained after nuclear transfer, through pre- and postimplantation development, at birth and during adulthood. Germ line transmission without silencing of the transgene was demonstrated. The ubiquitous expression of GFP was clearly confirmed in several tissues including endothelial cells, thus making it a suitable vector for the expression of multiple genes relevant to xenotransplantation where tissue specificity is not required. Finally cotransfection of green and red fluorescence protein transgenes was performed in fibroblasts and after nuclear transfer blastocysts expressing both fluorescent proteins were obtained. PMID:18823265

  4. Changes in the gut microbiota of cloned and non-cloned control pigs during development of obesity: gut microbiota during development of obesity in cloned pigs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Obesity induced by a high-caloric diet has previously been associated with changes in the gut microbiota in mice and in humans. In this study, pigs were cloned to minimize genetic and biological variation among the animals with the aim of developing a controlled metabolomic model suitable for a diet-intervention study. Cloning of pigs may be an attractive way to reduce genetic influences when investigating the effect of diet and obesity on different physiological sites. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the changes in the composition of the gut microbiota of cloned vs. non-cloned pigs during development of obesity by a high-fat/high-caloric diet. Furthermore, we investigated the association between diet-induced obesity and the relative abundance of the phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes in the fecal-microbiota. The fecal microbiota from obese cloned (n = 5) and non-cloned control pigs (n= 6) was investigated biweekly over a period of 136 days, by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and quantitative real time PCR (qPCR). Results A positive correlation was observed between body-weight at endpoint and percent body-fat in cloned (r=0.9, P<0.0001) and in non-cloned control pigs (r=0.9, P<0.0001). Shannon Weaver and principal component analysis (PCA) of the terminal restriction fragments (T-RFs) revealed no differences in the bacterial composition or variability of the fecal microbiota between the cloned pigs or between cloned and non-cloned control pigs. Body-weight correlated positively with the relative abundance of Firmicutes in both cloned (r=0.37; P<0.02) and non cloned-control pigs (r=0.45; P<0.006), and negatively with the abundance of Bacteroidetes in cloned pigs (r=−0.33, P<0.04), but not in the non-cloned control pigs. Conclusion The cloned pigs did not have reduced inter-individual variation as compared to non-cloned pigs in regard to their gut microbiota in neither the obese nor the lean state. Diet

  5. Transplantation and differentiation of donor cells in the cloned pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Arata; Tomii, Ryo; Kano, Koichiro; Nagashima, Hiroshi . E-mail: hnagas@isc.meiji.ac.jp

    2006-06-02

    The application of nuclear transfer technology is an interesting approach to investigate stem and progenitor cell transplantation therapy. If stem cells are used as a nuclear donor, donor cells can engraft into cloned animals without histocompatible problems. However, it is still uncertain whether donor cells can engraft to cloned animal and differentiate in vivo. To address this problem, we transplanted donor cells to dermal tissues of cloned pigs developed by using preadipocytes as donor cells. Preadipocytes are adipocytic progenitor which can differentiate to mature adipocytes in vitro. We showed that the donor preadipocytes were successfully transplanted into the cloned pigs without immune rejection and they differentiated into mature adipocytes in vivo 3 weeks after transplantation. In contrast, allogenic control preadipocytes, which can differentiate in vitro, did not differentiate in vivo. These results indicate that donor progenitor cells can differentiate in cloned animal.

  6. In vitro production of cloned and transgenically cloned embryos from Guangxi Huanjiang Xiang pig.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiangxing; Nie, Junyu; Quan, Shouneng; Xu, Huiyan; Yang, Xiaogan; Lu, Yangqing; Lu, Kehuan; Lu, Shengsheng

    2016-02-01

    Guangxi Huanjiang Xiang pig is a unique miniature pig strain that is originally from Huanjiang Maonan Autonomous County of Guangxi province, China, and shows great potential in agricultural and biomedical research. Although cloning and genetic modification of this pig would enhance its application value, cloning of this strain has not yet been reported. We sought to establish appropriate cloning procedures and produce transgenic embryos in Huanjiang Xiang pigs through the following methods. We isolated fibroblasts from tails of Huanjiang Xiang pig and genetically modified them using Xfect transfection. Fibroblasts, either in non-transgenic or transgenic forms, were used as donor cells for reconstructed embryos by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), and in vitro development was monitored after the reconstruction. We found no difference in blastocyst formation rate between non-transgenic and transgenic embryos (10.8% vs. 10.3%; P ≥ 0.05). In addition, we tested whether Scriptaid, a widely used histone deacetylase inhibitor, could enhance the in vitro development of Huanjiang Xiang pig cloned embryos. Treatment with 500 nM Scriptaid for 16 h post-activation significantly increased the blastocyst formation rate (26.1% vs. 10.8% for non-transgenic nuclear transfer groups with vs. without the Scriptaid treatment and 28.5% vs. 10.3% for transgenic nuclear transfer groups with vs. without the Scriptaid treatment; P < 0.05). This study provided a basis for further generation of cloned and transgenically cloned Huanjiang Xiang pigs used in agricultural and biomedical research. PMID:26559066

  7. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of pig CD138.

    PubMed

    Bae, Joonbeom; Jeong, Seonah; Lee, Ju Yeon; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Choi, Bong-Hwan; Kim, Ji-Eun; Choi, Inho; Chun, Taehoon

    2013-12-01

    CD138 (syndecan-1) interacts with various components of the extracellular matrix and associates with the actin cytoskeleton. In this study, we cloned pig CD138 cDNA and determined its complete cDNA sequence. Pig CD138 cDNA contained an open reading frame (930 bp) encoding 309 amino acids with five well conserved putative glycosaminoglycan attachment sites, a putative cleavage site for matrix metalloproteinases, and conserved motifs involved in signal transduction among mammalian species. Pig CD138 mRNA was detected in various tissues, including lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs, indicating the multicellular functions of CD138 in pigs. Western blot and flow cytometry analyses detected an approximate 35 kDa pig CD138 protein expressed on the cell surface. Further immunohistochemistry analysis revealed that CD138 expression was mainly observed in submucosa and lamina propria of the pig small intestine. Further study will be necessary to define the functional importance of CD138 during specific infectious diseases in pigs. PMID:24128845

  8. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Are an Attractive Donor Cell Type for Production of Cloned Pigs As Well As Genetically Modified Cloned Pigs by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zicong; He, Xiaoyan; Chen, Liwen; Shi, Junsong; Zhou, Rong; Xu, Weihua

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technique has been widely applied to clone pigs or to produce genetically modified pigs. Currently, this technique relies mainly on using terminally differentiated fibroblasts as donor cells. To improve cloning efficiency, only partially differentiated multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), thought to be more easily reprogrammed to a pluripotent state, have been used as nuclear donors in pig SCNT. Although in vitro–cultured embryos cloned from porcine MSCs (MSCs-embryos) were shown to have higher preimplantation developmental ability than cloned embryos reconstructed from fibroblasts (Fs-embryos), the difference in in vivo full-term developmental rate between porcine MSCs-embryos and Fs-embryos has not been investigated so far. In this study, we demonstrated that blastocyst total cell number and full-term survival abilities of MSCs-embryos were significantly higher than those of Fs-embryos cloned from the same donor pig. The enhanced developmental potential of MSCs-embryos may be associated with their nuclear donors' DNA methylation profile, because we found that the methylation level of imprinting genes and repeat sequences differed between MSCs and fibroblasts. In addition, we showed that use of transgenic porcine MSCs generated from transgene plasmid transfection as donor cells for SCNT can produce live transgenic cloned pigs. These results strongly suggest that porcine bone marrow MSCs are a desirable donor cell type for production of cloned pigs and genetically modified cloned pigs via SCNT. PMID:24033142

  9. Embryo Aggregation in Pig Improves Cloning Efficiency and Embryo Quality.

    PubMed

    Buemo, Carla Paola; Gambini, Andrés; Moro, Lucia Natalia; Hiriart, María Inés; Fernández-Martín, Rafael; Collas, Philippe; Salamone, Daniel Felipe

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the effects of the cloned embryo aggregation on in vitro embryo development and embryo quality by measuring blastocyst diameter and cell number, DNA fragmentation levels and the expression of genes associated with pluripotency, apoptosis, trophoblast and DNA methylation in the porcine. Zona-free reconstructed cloned embryos were cultured in the well of the well system, placing one (1x non aggregated group) or three (3x group) embryos per microwell. Our results showed that aggregation of three embryos increased blastocyst formation rate and blastocyst diameter of cloned pig embryos. DNA fragmentation levels in 3x aggregated cloned blastocysts were significantly decreased compared to 1x blastocysts. Levels of Oct4, Klf4, Igf2, Bax and Dnmt 1 transcripts were significantly higher in aggregated embryos, whereas Nanog levels were not affected. Transcripts of Cdx2 and Bcl-xl were essentially non-detectable. Our study suggests that embryo aggregation in the porcine may be beneficial for cloned embryo development and embryo quality, through a reduction in apoptotic levels and an improvement in cell reprogramming. PMID:26894831

  10. Embryo Aggregation in Pig Improves Cloning Efficiency and Embryo Quality

    PubMed Central

    Buemo, Carla Paola; Gambini, Andrés; Moro, Lucia Natalia; Hiriart, María Inés; Fernández-Martín, Rafael; Collas, Philippe; Salamone, Daniel Felipe

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the effects of the cloned embryo aggregation on in vitro embryo development and embryo quality by measuring blastocyst diameter and cell number, DNA fragmentation levels and the expression of genes associated with pluripotency, apoptosis, trophoblast and DNA methylation in the porcine. Zona-free reconstructed cloned embryos were cultured in the well of the well system, placing one (1x non aggregated group) or three (3x group) embryos per microwell. Our results showed that aggregation of three embryos increased blastocyst formation rate and blastocyst diameter of cloned pig embryos. DNA fragmentation levels in 3x aggregated cloned blastocysts were significantly decreased compared to 1x blastocysts. Levels of Oct4, Klf4, Igf2, Bax and Dnmt 1 transcripts were significantly higher in aggregated embryos, whereas Nanog levels were not affected. Transcripts of Cdx2 and Bcl-xl were essentially non-detectable. Our study suggests that embryo aggregation in the porcine may be beneficial for cloned embryo development and embryo quality, through a reduction in apoptotic levels and an improvement in cell reprogramming. PMID:26894831

  11. Production of Cloned Wuzhishan Miniature Pigs and Application for Alloxan Toxicity Test.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qing; Zhu, Hai-Ying; Jin, Long; Gao, Qing-Shan; Kang, Jin-Dan; Cui, Cheng-Du; Yin, Xi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Wuzhishan miniature pig is one of the four most important pig breeds in China and has many major economic characteristics. Herein, we successfully used SCNT to clone Wuzhishan miniature pig. First, ear fibroblasts were isolated from a 2-year-old female Wuzhishan miniature piglet to be used as the donor cell. Second, good-quality COCs were selected from ovaries obtained from pigs at a local slaughterhouse and cultured. Mature eggs with the first polar body and ear fibroblasts were applied SCNT. Lastly, we in total produced 12 piglets with 7 piglets surviving to adults. Next, we used these pigs to test alloxan toxicity and to build T I D diabetes type. We know that diabetes mellitus is a chronic heterogeneous metabolic disease characterized by a high blood glucose level and abnormal insulin secretion. In this study, T I D (type I diabetes) was experimentally induced in cloned Wuzhishan miniature pigs with alloxan. In brief, an intravenous injection of alloxan (group B: 170 mg/kg, n = 3) was administered to pigs weighing between 27 and 39 kg. Sterile saline was administered to control pigs (n = 3). We determined the glycometabolism related index, performed an intravenous glucose tolerance test, and carried out immunohistochemistry experiments. There were no significant differences in body weight, blood glucose, and serum insulin in all groups, before treatment. The level of blood glucose was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in group B (12.18 ± 0.70 mmol/L) than in the control (2.93 ± 0.39 mmol/L). By contrast, the level of serum insulin was lower in group B (5.641 ± 0.573 μIU/mL) than in the control (7.578 ± 0.539 μIU/mL). Histological studies by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) revealed a loss of β-cells in the pancreas from pigs treated with 170 mg/kg alloxan. Immunolocalization studies showed a decrease in insulin reactivity in this treatment group as well. To conclude, our model holds promise in future studies of diabetes drug testing and islet

  12. The effect of high-fat diet on the composition of the gut microbiota in cloned and non-cloned pigs of lean and obese phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Rebecca; Andersen, Anders Daniel; Hermann-Bank, Marie Louise; Stagsted, Jan; Boye, Mette

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of high-far-high-energy diet on cloned and non-cloned domestic pigs of both lean and obese phenotype and to evaluate if the lean cloned pigs had a lower inter-individual variation as compared with non-cloned pigs. The microbiota of colon and terminal ileum was investigated in cloned and non-cloned pigs that received a high-far-high-energy diet with either restricted or ad libitum access to feed, resulting in lean and obese phenotypes, respectively. The fecal microbiota of lean pigs was investigated by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). The intestinal microbiota of lean and obese cloned and non-cloned pigs was analyzed by quantitative real time PCR and a novel high-throughput qPCR platform (Fluidigm). Principal component analysis (PCA) of the T-RFLP profiles revealed that lean cloned and non-cloned pigs had a different overall composition of their gut microbiota. The colon of lean cloned pigs contained relatively more bacteria belonging to the phylum Firmicutes and less from the phylum Bacteroidetes than obese cloned pigs as estimated by qPCR. Fluidigm qPCR results revealed differences in specific bacterial groups in the gut microbiota of both lean and obese pigs. Our results suggest that high-far-high-energy diet is associated with changes in the gut microbiota even in the absence of obesity. Overall, the cloned pigs had a different gut microbiota from that of non-cloned pigs. To our knowledge this is the first study to investigate the gut microbiota of cloned domestic pigs of lean and obese phenotype. PMID:23974297

  13. Ovulation Statuses of Surrogate Gilts Are Associated with the Efficiency of Excellent Pig Cloning.

    PubMed

    Huan, Yanjun; Hu, Kui; Xie, Bingteng; Shi, Yongqian; Wang, Feng; Zhou, Yang; Liu, Shichao; Huang, Bo; Zhu, Jiang; Liu, Zhongfeng; He, Yilong; Li, Jingyu; Kong, Qingran; Liu, Zhonghua

    2015-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is an assisted reproductive technique that can produce multiple copies of excellent livestock. However, low cloning efficiency limits the application of SCNT. In this study, we systematically investigated the major influencing factors related to the overall cloning efficiency in pigs. Here, 13620 cloned embryos derived from excellent pigs were transferred into 79 surrogate gilts, and 119 live cloned piglets were eventually generated. During cloning, group of cloned embryos derived from excellent Landrace or Large white pigs presented no significant differences of cleavage and blastocyst rates, blastocyst cell numbers, surrogate pregnancy and delivery rates, average numbers of piglets born and alive and cloning efficiencies, and group of 101-150, 151-200 or 201-250 cloned embryos transferred per surrogate also displayed a similar developmental efficiency. When estrus stage of surrogate gilts was compared, group of embryo transfer on Day 2 of estrus showed significantly higher pregnancy rate, delivery rate, average number of piglets born, average alive piglet number or cloning efficiency than group on Day 1, Day 3, Day 4 or Day 5, respectively (P<0.05). And, in comparison with the preovulation and postovulation groups, group of surrogate gilts during periovulation displayed a significantly higher overall cloning efficiency (P<0.05). Further investigation of surrogate estrus stage and ovulation status displayed that ovulation status was the real factor underlying estrus stage to determine the overall cloning efficiency. And more, follicle puncture for preovulation, not transfer position shallowed for preovulation or deepened for postovulation, significantly improved the average number of piglets alive and cloning efficiency (P<0.05). In conclusion, our results demonstrated that ovulation status of surrogate gilts was the fundamental factor determining the overall cloning efficiency of excellent pigs, and follicle puncture, not

  14. Ovulation Statuses of Surrogate Gilts Are Associated with the Efficiency of Excellent Pig Cloning

    PubMed Central

    Huan, Yanjun; Hu, Kui; Xie, Bingteng; Shi, Yongqian; Wang, Feng; Zhou, Yang; Liu, Shichao; Huang, Bo; Zhu, Jiang; Liu, Zhongfeng; He, Yilong; Li, Jingyu; Kong, Qingran; Liu, Zhonghua

    2015-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is an assisted reproductive technique that can produce multiple copies of excellent livestock. However, low cloning efficiency limits the application of SCNT. In this study, we systematically investigated the major influencing factors related to the overall cloning efficiency in pigs. Here, 13620 cloned embryos derived from excellent pigs were transferred into 79 surrogate gilts, and 119 live cloned piglets were eventually generated. During cloning, group of cloned embryos derived from excellent Landrace or Large white pigs presented no significant differences of cleavage and blastocyst rates, blastocyst cell numbers, surrogate pregnancy and delivery rates, average numbers of piglets born and alive and cloning efficiencies, and group of 101–150, 151–200 or 201–250 cloned embryos transferred per surrogate also displayed a similar developmental efficiency. When estrus stage of surrogate gilts was compared, group of embryo transfer on Day 2 of estrus showed significantly higher pregnancy rate, delivery rate, average number of piglets born, average alive piglet number or cloning efficiency than group on Day 1, Day 3, Day 4 or Day 5, respectively (P<0.05). And, in comparison with the preovulation and postovulation groups, group of surrogate gilts during periovulation displayed a significantly higher overall cloning efficiency (P<0.05). Further investigation of surrogate estrus stage and ovulation status displayed that ovulation status was the real factor underlying estrus stage to determine the overall cloning efficiency. And more, follicle puncture for preovulation, not transfer position shallowed for preovulation or deepened for postovulation, significantly improved the average number of piglets alive and cloning efficiency (P<0.05). In conclusion, our results demonstrated that ovulation status of surrogate gilts was the fundamental factor determining the overall cloning efficiency of excellent pigs, and follicle puncture

  15. Molecular cloning and expression of the calmodulin gene from guinea pig hearts

    PubMed Central

    FENG, RUI; LIU, YAN; SUN, XUEFEI; WANG, YAN; HU, HUIYUAN; GUO, FENG; ZHAO, JINSHENG; HAO, LIYING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to isolate and characterize a complementary DNA (cDNA) clone encoding the calmodulin (CaM; GenBank accession no. FJ012165) gene from guinea pig hearts. The CaM gene was amplified from cDNA collected from guinea pig hearts and inserted into a pGEM®-T Easy vector. Subsequently, CaM nucleotide and protein sequence similarity analysis was conducted between guinea pigs and other species. In addition, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to investigate the CaM 3 expression patterns in different guinea pig tissues. Sequence analysis revealed that the CaM gene isolated from the guinea pig heart had ∼90% sequence identity with the CaM 3 genes in humans, mice and rats. Furthermore, the deduced peptide sequences of CaM 3 in the guinea pig showed 100% homology to the CaM proteins from other species. In addition, the RT-PCR results indicated that CaM 3 was widely and differentially expressed in guinea pigs. In conclusion, the current study provided valuable information with regard to the cloning and expression of CaM 3 in guinea pig hearts. These findings may be helpful for understanding the function of CaM3 and the possible role of CaM3 in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26136979

  16. Cloning Changes the Response to Obesity of Innate Immune Factors in Blood, Liver, and Adipose Tissues in Domestic Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Rødgaard, Tina; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Stagsted, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of cloned pigs as porcine obesity models reflecting obesity-associated changes in innate immune factor gene expression profiles. Liver and adipose tissue expression of 43 innate immune genes as well as serum concentrations of six immune factors were analyzed in lean and diet-induced obese cloned domestic pigs and compared to normal domestic pigs (obese and lean). The number of genes affected by obesity was lower in cloned animals than in control animals. All genes affected by obesity in adipose tissues of clones were downregulated; both upregulation and downregulation were observed in the controls. Cloning resulted in a less differentiated adipose tissue expression pattern. Finally, the serum concentrations of two acute-phase proteins (APPs), haptoglobin (HP) and orosomucoid (ORM), were increased in obese clones as compared to obese controls as well as lean clones and controls. Generally, the variation in phenotype between individual pigs was not reduced in cloned siblings as compared to normal siblings. Therefore, we conclude that cloning limits both the number of genes responding to obesity as well as the degree of tissue-differentiated gene expression, concomitantly with an increase in APP serum concentrations only seen in cloned, obese pigs. This may suggest that the APP response seen in obese, cloned pigs is a consequence of the characteristic skewed gene response to obesity in cloned pigs, as described in this work. This should be taken into consideration when using cloned animals as models for innate responses to obesity. PMID:23668862

  17. Production of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein monomeric Plum

    PubMed Central

    WATANABE, Masahito; KOBAYASHI, Mirina; NAGAYA, Masaki; MATSUNARI, Hitomi; NAKANO, Kazuaki; MAEHARA, Miki; HAYASHIDA, Gota; TAKAYANAGI, Shuko; SAKAI, Rieko; UMEYAMA, Kazuhiro; WATANABE, Nobuyuki; ONODERA, Masafumi; NAGASHIMA, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Monomeric Plum (Plum), a far-red fluorescent protein with photostability and photopermeability, is potentially suitable for in vivo imaging and detection of fluorescence in body tissues. The aim of this study was to generate transgenic cloned pigs exhibiting systemic expression of Plum using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology. Nuclear donor cells for SCNT were obtained by introducing a Plum-expression vector driven by a combination of the cytomegalovirus early enhancer and chicken beta-actin promoter into porcine fetal fibroblasts (PFFs). The cleavage and blastocyst formation rates of reconstructed SCNT embryos were 81.0% (34/42) and 78.6% (33/42), respectively. At 36–37 days of gestation, three fetuses systemically expressing Plum were obtained from one recipient to which 103 SCNT embryos were transferred (3/103, 2.9%). For generation of offspring expressing Plum, rejuvenated PFFs were established from one cloned fetus and used as nuclear donor cells. Four cloned offspring and one stillborn cloned offspring were produced from one recipient to which 117 SCNT embryos were transferred (5/117, 4.3%). All offspring exhibited high levels of Plum fluorescence in blood cells, such as lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes. In addition, the skin, heart, kidney, pancreas, liver and spleen also exhibited Plum expression. These observations demonstrated that transfer of the Plum gene did not interfere with the development of porcine SCNT embryos and resulted in the successful generation of transgenic cloned pigs that systemically expressed Plum. This is the first report of the generation and characterization of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein Plum. PMID:25739316

  18. Production of Pigs by Hand-Made Cloning Using Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenzhen; Vajta, Gábor; Xu, Ying; Luan, Jing; Lin, Mufei; Liu, Cong; Tian, Jianing; Dou, Hongwei; Li, Yong; Liu, Tianbin; Zhang, Yijie; Li, Lin; Yang, Wenxian; Bolund, Lars; Yang, Huanming; Du, Yutao

    2016-08-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) exhibited self-renewal and less differentiation, making the MSCs promising candidates for adult somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). In this article, we tried to produce genome identical pigs through hand-made cloning (HMC), with MSCs and adult skin fibroblasts as donor cells. MSCs were derived from either adipose tissue or peripheral blood (aMSCs and bMSCs, respectively). MSCs usually showed the expression pattern of CD29, CD73, CD90, and CD105 together with lack of expression of the hematopoietic markers CD34and CD45. Flow cytometry results demonstrated high expression of CD29 and CD90 in both MSC lines, while CD73, CD34, and CD45 expression were not detected. In contrary, in reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis, CD73 and CD34 were detected indicating that human antibodies CD73 and CD34 were not suitable to identify porcine cell surface markers and porcine MSC cellular surface markers of CD34 might be different from other species. MSCs also had potential to differentiate successfully into chondrocytes, osteoblasts, and adipocytes. After HMC, embryos reconstructed with aMSCs had higher blastocyst rate on day 5 and 6 than those reconstructed with bMSCs and fibroblasts (29.6% ± 1.3% and 41.1% ± 1.4% for aMSCs vs. 23.9% ± 1.2% and 35.5% ± 1.6% for bMSCs and 22.1% ± 0.9% and 33.3% ± 1.1% for fibroblasts, respectively). Live birth rate per transferred blastocyst achieved with bMSCs (1.59%) was the highest among the three groups. This article was the first report to compare the efficiency among bMSCs, aMSCs, and fibroblasts for boar cloning, which offered a realistic perspective to use the HMC technology for commercial breeding. PMID:27459584

  19. Molecular cloning, sequence characteristics, and tissue expression analysis of ECE1 gene in Tibetan pig.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Dong; Zhang, Jian; Li, Chuan-Hao; Xu, Hai-Peng; Chen, Wei; Zeng, Yong-Qing; Wang, Hui

    2015-10-25

    Low air pressure and low oxygen partial pressure at high altitude seriously affect the survival and development of human beings and animals. ECE1 is a recently discovered gene that is involved in anti-hypoxia, but the full-length cDNA sequence has not been obtained. For a better understanding of the structure and function of the ECE1 gene and to study its effect in Tibetan pig, the cDNA of the ECE1 gene from the muscle of Tibetan pig was cloned, sequenced and characterized. The ECE1 full-length cDNA sequence consists of 2262 bp coding sequence (CDS) that encodes 753 amino acids with a molecular mass of 85,449 kD, 2 bp 5'UTR and 1507 bp 3'UTR. In addition, the phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that the Tibetan pig ECE1 has a closer genetic relationship and evolution distance with the land mammals ECE1. Furthermore, analysis by qPCR showed that the ECE1 transcript is constitutively expressed in the 10 tissues tested: the liver, subcutaneous fat, kidney, muscle, stomach, heart, brain, spleen, pancreas, and lung. These results serve as a foundation for further insight into the Tibetan pig ECE1 gene. PMID:26115769

  20. Generation of heterozygous fibrillin-1 mutant cloned pigs from genome-edited foetal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Umeyama, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Kota; Watanabe, Masahito; Horiuchi, Keisuke; Nakano, Kazuaki; Kitashiro, Masateru; Matsunari, Hitomi; Kimura, Tokuhiro; Arima, Yoshimi; Sampetrean, Oltea; Nagaya, Masaki; Saito, Masahiro; Saya, Hideyuki; Kosaki, Kenjiro; Nagashima, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Morio

    2016-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is an autosomal dominant genetic disease caused by abnormal formation of the extracellular matrix with an incidence of 1 in 3, 000 to 5, 000. Patients with Marfan syndrome experience poor quality of life caused by skeletal disorders such as scoliosis, and they are at high risk of sudden death from cardiovascular impairment. Suitable animal models of MFS are essential for conquering this intractable disease. In particular, studies employing pig models will likely provide valuable information that can be extrapolated to humans because of the physiological and anatomical similarities between the two species. Here we describe the generation of heterozygous fibrillin-1 (FBN1) mutant cloned pigs (+/Glu433AsnfsX98) using genome editing and somatic cell nuclear transfer technologies. The FBN1 mutant pigs exhibited phenotypes resembling those of humans with MFS, such as scoliosis, pectus excavatum, delayed mineralization of the epiphysis and disrupted structure of elastic fibres of the aortic medial tissue. These findings indicate the value of FBN1 mutant pigs as a model for understanding the pathogenesis of MFS and for developing treatments. PMID:27074716

  1. Generation of heterozygous fibrillin-1 mutant cloned pigs from genome-edited foetal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Umeyama, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Kota; Watanabe, Masahito; Horiuchi, Keisuke; Nakano, Kazuaki; Kitashiro, Masateru; Matsunari, Hitomi; Kimura, Tokuhiro; Arima, Yoshimi; Sampetrean, Oltea; Nagaya, Masaki; Saito, Masahiro; Saya, Hideyuki; Kosaki, Kenjiro; Nagashima, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Morio

    2016-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is an autosomal dominant genetic disease caused by abnormal formation of the extracellular matrix with an incidence of 1 in 3, 000 to 5, 000. Patients with Marfan syndrome experience poor quality of life caused by skeletal disorders such as scoliosis, and they are at high risk of sudden death from cardiovascular impairment. Suitable animal models of MFS are essential for conquering this intractable disease. In particular, studies employing pig models will likely provide valuable information that can be extrapolated to humans because of the physiological and anatomical similarities between the two species. Here we describe the generation of heterozygous fibrillin-1 (FBN1) mutant cloned pigs (+/Glu433AsnfsX98) using genome editing and somatic cell nuclear transfer technologies. The FBN1 mutant pigs exhibited phenotypes resembling those of humans with MFS, such as scoliosis, pectus excavatum, delayed mineralization of the epiphysis and disrupted structure of elastic fibres of the aortic medial tissue. These findings indicate the value of FBN1 mutant pigs as a model for understanding the pathogenesis of MFS and for developing treatments. PMID:27074716

  2. [Cloning and regulation of pig estrogen related receptor β gene (ESRRB) promoter].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Yaxian; Du, Lixia; Wang, Huayan

    2015-04-01

    The estrogen related receptor family member Esrrb (Estrogen related receptor β) is a gene that expresses in the early stage of embryo and plays an important role in the core pluripotent network. Its function has been analyzed in human and mouse, although no report so far related to pig. Therefore, to explore its mechanism of transcriptional regulation and expression pattern, we cloned a 3.3 kb pig ESRRB promoter by PCR and constructed the green fluorescence protein (GFP) reporter vector pE3.3. We used these vectors to study the ESRRB expression pattern in 293T, Hela and C2C12. Sequence was analyzed for regulatory elements that share homology to known transcription factor binding sites by TFSEARCH and JASPER program. Some pluripotency related genes such as SMAD, STAT3, MYC, KLF4 and ESRRB have been found within the 3.3 kb sequence by co-transfected pig ESRRB promoter and these potential regulators. We found that ESRRB only expressed in 293T and SMAD could activate ESRRB expression obviously. To determine the core promoter region, a series of ESRRB promoter fragments with gradually truncated 5'-end were produced by PCR and inserted into pGL3-Basic vector. After transient transfection into 293T, dual luciferase assay was used to measure these promoter activities. The result suggested that the core promoter of pig ESRRB located within -25 bp to -269 bp region. These results suggest that these transcription factor binding sites and the core promoter region may be essential for transcriptional regulation of pig ESRRB gene. PMID:26380406

  3. Expression of Innate Immune Response Genes in Liver and Three Types of Adipose Tissue in Cloned Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Rødgaard, Tina; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Stagsted, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The pig has been proposed as a relevant model for human obesity-induced inflammation, and cloning may improve the applicability of this model. We tested the assumptions that cloning would reduce interindividual variation in gene expression of innate immune factors and that their expression would remain unaffected by the cloning process. We investigated the expression of 40 innate immune factors by high-throughput quantitative real-time PCR in samples from liver, abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), visceral adipose tissue (VAT), and neck SAT in cloned pigs compared to normal outbred pigs. The variation in gene expression was found to be similar for the two groups, and the expression of a small number of genes was significantly affected by cloning. In the VAT and abdominal SAT, six out of seven significantly differentially expressed genes were downregulated in the clones. In contrast, most differently expressed genes in both liver and neck SAT were upregulated (seven out of eight). Remarkably, acute phase proteins (APPs) dominated the upregulated genes in the liver, whereas APP expression was either unchanged or downregulated in abdominal SAT and VAT. The general conclusion from this work is that cloning leads to subtle changes in specific subsets of innate immune genes. Such changes, even if minor, may have phenotypic effects over time, e.g., in models of long-term inflammation related to obesity. PMID:22928970

  4. Analysis of ENPP2 in the Uterine Endometrium of Pigs Carrying Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Cloned Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Heewon; Choi, Yohan; Yu, Inkyu; Shim, Jangsoo; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Lee, Eunsong; Ka, Hakhyun

    2013-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a useful tool for animal cloning, but the efficiency of producing viable offspring by SCNT is very low. To improve this efficiency in the production of cloned pigs, it is critical to understand the interactions between uterine function and cloned embryos during implantation. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lipid mediator that plays an important role in the establishment of pregnancy in pigs; however, LPA production in the uterine endometrium of pigs carrying SCNT-cloned conceptuses has not been determined. Therefore, we investigated expression of ENPP2, an LPA-generating enzyme, in the uterine endometrium of gilts with conceptuses derived from SCNT during the implantation period. Uterine endometrial tissue and uterine flushing were obtained from gilts carrying SCNT-derived conceptuses and from gilts carrying conceptuses resulting from natural mating on d 12 of pregnancy. Our results demonstrated no difference in the level of ENPP2 mRNA expression in the uterine endometrium between gilts carrying SCNT-derived conceptuses and gilts carrying naturally-conceived conceptuses, but secretion of ENPP2 protein into the uterine lumen did decrease significantly in pigs with SCNT-derived conceptuses. These results indicate that expression and secretion of ENPP2, which are critical for appropriate LPA production and successful pregnancy, are dysregulated in the uterine endometrium of pigs carrying SCNT-derived conceptuses. PMID:25049907

  5. Production of transgenic-cloned pigs expressing large quantities of recombinant human lysozyme in milk.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dan; Liu, Shen; Shang, Shengzhe; Wu, Fangfang; Wen, Xiao; Li, Zhiyuan; Li, Yan; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Zhao, Yaofeng; Li, Qiuyan; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Human lysozyme is a natural non-specific immune factor in human milk that plays an important role in the defense of breastfed infants against pathogen infection. Although lysozyme is abundant in human milk, there is only trace quantities in pig milk. Here, we successfully generated transgenic cloned pigs with the expression vector pBAC-hLF-hLZ-Neo and their first generation hybrids (F1). The highest concentration of recombinant human lysozyme (rhLZ) with in vitro bioactivity was 2759.6 ± 265.0 mg/L in the milk of F0 sows. Compared with wild-type milk, rhLZ milk inhibited growth of Escherichia coli K88 during the exponential growth phase. Moreover, rhLZ in milk from transgenic sows was directly absorbed by the intestine of piglets with no observable anaphylactic reaction. Our strategy may provide a powerful tool for large-scale production of this important human protein in pigs to improve resistance to pathogen infection. PMID:25955256

  6. Production of Transgenic-Cloned Pigs Expressing Large Quantities of Recombinant Human Lysozyme in Milk

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Shengzhe; Wu, Fangfang; Wen, Xiao; Li, Zhiyuan; Li, Yan; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Zhao, Yaofeng; Li, Qiuyan; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Human lysozyme is a natural non-specific immune factor in human milk that plays an important role in the defense of breastfed infants against pathogen infection. Although lysozyme is abundant in human milk, there is only trace quantities in pig milk. Here, we successfully generated transgenic cloned pigs with the expression vector pBAC-hLF-hLZ-Neo and their first generation hybrids (F1). The highest concentration of recombinant human lysozyme (rhLZ) with in vitro bioactivity was 2759.6 ± 265.0 mg/L in the milk of F0 sows. Compared with wild-type milk, rhLZ milk inhibited growth of Escherichia coli K88 during the exponential growth phase. Moreover, rhLZ in milk from transgenic sows was directly absorbed by the intestine of piglets with no observable anaphylactic reaction. Our strategy may provide a powerful tool for large-scale production of this important human protein in pigs to improve resistance to pathogen infection. PMID:25955256

  7. Production of Cloned Miniature Pigs Expressing High Levels of Human Apolipoprotein(a) in Plasma.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Masayuki; Himaki, Takehiro; Ookutsu, Shoji; Mizobe, Yamato; Ogawa, Junki; Miyoshi, Kazuchika; Yabuki, Akira; Fan, Jianglin; Yoshida, Mitsutoshi

    2015-01-01

    High lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels are a major risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. However, because apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)], the unique component of Lp(a), is found only in primates and humans, the study of human Lp(a) has been hampered due to the lack of appropriate animal models. Using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) techniques, we produced transgenic miniature pigs expressing human apo(a) in the plasma. First, we placed the hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged cDNA of human apo(a) under the control of the β-actin promoter and cytomegalovirus enhancer, and then introduced this construct into kidney epithelial cells. Immunostaining of cells with anti-HA antibody allowed identification of cells stably expressing apo(a); one of the positive clones was used to provide donor cells for SCNT, yielding blastocysts that expressed apo(a). Immunohistochemical analysis of tissue sections and RT-PCR analysis of total RNA from organs of cloned piglet revealed that apo(a) is expressed in various tissues/organs including heart, liver, kidney, and intestine. More importantly, a transgenic line exhibited a high level (>400 mg/dL) of Lp(a) in plasma, and the transgenic apo(a) gene was transmitted to the offspring. Thus, we generated a human apo(a)-transgenic miniature pig that can be used as a model system to study advanced atherosclerosis related to human disease. The anatomical and physiological similarities between the swine and human cardiovascular systems will make this pig model a valuable source of information on the role of apo(a) in the formation of atherosclerosis, as well as the mechanisms underlying vascular health and disease. PMID:26147378

  8. Production of Cloned Miniature Pigs Expressing High Levels of Human Apolipoprotein(a) in Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Masayuki; Himaki, Takehiro; Ookutsu, Shoji; Mizobe, Yamato; Ogawa, Junki; Miyoshi, Kazuchika; Yabuki, Akira; Fan, Jianglin; Yoshida, Mitsutoshi

    2015-01-01

    High lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels are a major risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. However, because apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)], the unique component of Lp(a), is found only in primates and humans, the study of human Lp(a) has been hampered due to the lack of appropriate animal models. Using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) techniques, we produced transgenic miniature pigs expressing human apo(a) in the plasma. First, we placed the hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged cDNA of human apo(a) under the control of the β-actin promoter and cytomegalovirus enhancer, and then introduced this construct into kidney epithelial cells. Immunostaining of cells with anti-HA antibody allowed identification of cells stably expressing apo(a); one of the positive clones was used to provide donor cells for SCNT, yielding blastocysts that expressed apo(a). Immunohistochemical analysis of tissue sections and RT-PCR analysis of total RNA from organs of cloned piglet revealed that apo(a) is expressed in various tissues/organs including heart, liver, kidney, and intestine. More importantly, a transgenic line exhibited a high level (>400 mg/dL) of Lp(a) in plasma, and the transgenic apo(a) gene was transmitted to the offspring. Thus, we generated a human apo(a)–transgenic miniature pig that can be used as a model system to study advanced atherosclerosis related to human disease. The anatomical and physiological similarities between the swine and human cardiovascular systems will make this pig model a valuable source of information on the role of apo(a) in the formation of atherosclerosis, as well as the mechanisms underlying vascular health and disease. PMID:26147378

  9. Production of Cloned Korean Native Pig by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In-Sul; Kwon, Dae-Jin; Oh, Keun Bong; Ock, Sun-A; Chung, Hak-Jae; Cho, In-Cheol; Lee, Jeong-Woong; Im, Gi-Sun; Hwang, Seongsoo

    2015-06-01

    The Korean native pig (KNP) have been considered as animal models for animal biotechnology research because of their relatively small body size and their presumably highly inbred status due to the closed breeding program. However, little is reported about the use of KNP for animal biotechnology researches. This study was performed to establish the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) protocol for the production of swine leukocyte antigens (SLA) homotype-defined SCNT KNP. The ear fibroblast cells originated from KNP were cultured and used as donor cell. After thawing, the donor cells were cultured for 1 hour with 15 μM roscovitine prior to the nuclear transfer. The numbers of reconstructed and parthenogenetic embryos transferred were 98 ± 35.2 and 145 ± 11.2, respectively. The pregnancy and delivery rate were 3/5 (60%) and 2/5 (40%). One healthy SLA homotype-defined SCNT KNP was successfully generated. The recipient-based individual cloning efficiency ranged from 0.65 to 1.08%. Taken together, it can be postulated that the methodological establishment of the production of SLA homotype-defined cloned KNP can be applied to the generation of transgenic cloned KNP as model animals for human disease and xenotransplantation researches. PMID:27004264

  10. Production of Cloned Korean Native Pig by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, In-Sul; Kwon, Dae-Jin; Oh, Keun Bong; Ock, Sun-A; Chung, Hak-Jae; Cho, In-Cheol; Lee, Jeong-Woong; Im, Gi-Sun; Hwang, Seongsoo

    2015-01-01

    The Korean native pig (KNP) have been considered as animal models for animal biotechnology research because of their relatively small body size and their presumably highly inbred status due to the closed breeding program. However, little is reported about the use of KNP for animal biotechnology researches. This study was performed to establish the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) protocol for the production of swine leukocyte antigens (SLA) homotype-defined SCNT KNP. The ear fibroblast cells originated from KNP were cultured and used as donor cell. After thawing, the donor cells were cultured for 1 hour with 15 μM roscovitine prior to the nuclear transfer. The numbers of reconstructed and parthenogenetic embryos transferred were 98 ± 35.2 and 145 ± 11.2, respectively. The pregnancy and delivery rate were 3/5 (60%) and 2/5 (40%). One healthy SLA homotype-defined SCNT KNP was successfully generated. The recipient-based individual cloning efficiency ranged from 0.65 to 1.08%. Taken together, it can be postulated that the methodological establishment of the production of SLA homotype-defined cloned KNP can be applied to the generation of transgenic cloned KNP as model animals for human disease and xenotransplantation researches. PMID:27004264

  11. COMPLETE CDNA CLONING AND POLYMORPHISMS AT PORCINE BPI: ASSOCIATIONS WITH BACTERIAL LOAD AND IMMUNE RESPONSE TRAITS IN PIGS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bactericidal permeability-increasing (BPI) gene encodes a neutrophil protein with inhibitory/killing functions against gram-negative bacteria. We investigated BPI as a candidate gene for resistance to Salmonella cholerasuis (SC) in pigs. We cloned and sequenced a full-length BPI cDNA and iden...

  12. Differential regulation by a peroxisome proliferator of the different multifunctional proteins in guinea pig: cDNA cloning of the guinea pig D-specific multifunctional protein 2.

    PubMed Central

    Caira, F; Clémencet, M C; Cherkaoui-Malki, M; Dieuaide-Noubhani, M; Pacot, C; Van Veldhoven, P P; Latruffe, N

    1998-01-01

    After our previous report on the cloning of two cDNA species in guinea pig, both encoding the same hepatic 79 kDa multifunctional protein 1 (MFP-1) [Caira, Cherkaoui-Malki, Hoefler and Latruffe (1996) FEBS Lett. 378, 57-60], here we report the cloning of a cDNA encoding a second multifunctional peroxisomal protein (MFP-2) in guinea-pig liver. This 2356 nt cDNA encodes a protein of 735 residues (79.7 kDa) whose sequence shows 83% identity with rat MFP-2 [Dieuaide-Noubhani, Novikov, Baumgart, Vanhooren, Fransen, Goethals, Vandekerckhove, Van Veldhoven and Mannaerts (1996) Eur. J. Biochem. 240, 660-666]. In parallel, we studied the effect of ciprofibrate, a hypolipaemic agent also known as peroxisome proliferator in rodent, on the expression of MFP-1 and MFP-2 (2.6 kb) in rats and guinea pigs. By Northern blotting analysis we demonstrated that three MFP-1-related mRNA species are expressed in the guinea-pig liver. The expression of two of them (3.5 and 2.6 kb) is slightly increased by ciprofibrate, whereas the 3.0 kb MFP-1 mRNA is, unlike the rat one, strongly down-regulated in guinea pigs treated with ciprofibrate. In a similar way, the hepatic expression of the guinea-pig 2.6 kb MFP-2 mRNA is also down-regulated in guinea pigs treated with ciprofibrate. These results demonstrate (1) that in contrast with the unique 3.0 kb MFP-1 rat mRNA, at least three hepatic MFP-1-related mRNA species are co-expressed in guinea pig; and (2) that, opposed to the accepted idea of non-responsiveness of the guinea pig to ciprofibrate, this drug affects MFP-1 and MFP-2 gene expression in this species. Also, the mRNA species for acyl-CoA oxidase and thiolase, two other enzymes of the peroxisomal beta-oxidation pathway that are induced severalfold in responsive species are down-regulated in guinea pig. This paper is the first, to our knowledge, reporting the down-regulation of the expression of genes encoding enzymes involved in the peroxisomal beta-oxidation of fatty acids (MFP-1) and

  13. Growth, Reproductive Performance, Carcass Characteristics and Meat Quality in F1 and F2 Progenies of Somatic Cell-Cloned Pigs

    PubMed Central

    ADACHI, Noritaka; YAMAGUCHI, Daisuke; WATANABE, Akiyuki; MIURA, Narumi; SUNAGA, Seiji; OISHI, Hitoshi; HASHIMOTO, Michiko; OISHI, Takatsugu; IWAMOTO, Masaki; HANADA, Hirofumi; KUBO, Masanori; ONISHI, Akira

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the health and meat production of cloned sows and their progenies in order to demonstrate the application of somatic cell cloning to the pig industry. This study compared the growth, reproductive performance, carcass characteristics and meat quality of Landrace cloned sows, F1 progenies and F2 progenies. We measured their body weight, growth rate and feed conversion and performed a pathological analysis of their anatomy to detect abnormalities. Three of the five cloned pigs were used for a growth test. Cloned pigs grew normally and had characteristics similar to those of the control purebred Landrace pigs. Two cloned gilts were bred with a Landrace boar and used for a progeny test. F1 progenies had characteristics similar to those of the controls. Two of the F1 progeny gilts were bred with a Duroc or Large White boar and used for the progeny test. F2 progenies grew normally. There were no biological differences in growth, carcass characteristics and amino acid composition among cloned sows, F1 progenies, F2 progenies and conventional pigs. The cloned sows and F1 progenies showed normal reproductive performance. No specific abnormalities were observed by pathological analysis, with the exception of periarteritis in the F1 progenies. All pigs had a normal karyotype. These results demonstrate that cloned female pigs and their progenies have similar growth, reproductive performance and carcass quality characteristics and that somatic cell cloning could be a useful technique for conserving superior pig breeds in conventional meat production. PMID:24492641

  14. The transgenic cloned pig population with integrated and controllable GH expression that has higher feed efficiency and meat production.

    PubMed

    Ju, Huiming; Zhang, Jiaqing; Bai, Lijing; Mu, Yulian; Du, Yutao; Yang, Wenxian; Li, Yong; Sheng, Anzhi; Li, Kui

    2015-01-01

    Sustained expression of the GH gene has been shown to have detrimental effects on the health of animals. In the current study, transgenic founder pigs, with controllable pig growth hormone (pGH) expression, were cloned via the handmade cloning method (HMC), and pGH expression levels were examined at the cellular and organismal levels. The serum pGH levels in 3 founder male pigs were found to be significantly higher after induction with intramuscular injection of doxycycline (DOX) compared to baseline. A daily dose of DOX was administered via feed to these animals for a period of 65 to 155 days. The growth rate, feed efficiency and pGH serum concentration increased in the DOX-induced transgenic group compared with the other groups. 8 numbers of animals were euthanized and the dressing percentage, loin muscle and lean meat percentage were significantly higher in the DOX-induced F1 transgenic group compared with the other groups. In this study a large population of transgenic pigs, with integrated controllable expression of a transgene, was obtained. The transgenic pigs were healthy and normal in terms of reproductive capability. At the same time, feed efficiency was improved, production processes were accelerated and meat yield was increased. PMID:25959098

  15. Isolation and purification of islet cells from adult pigs.

    PubMed

    Qiao, A-Y; Zhang, W-H; Chen, X-J; Zhang, J; Xiao, G-H; Hu, Y-X; Tang, D-C

    2010-06-01

    We used in situ perfusion and a multiple-organ harvesting technique to collect islets from adult pig pancreata. The tissues were digested with collagenase P followed by purification in a lympholyte discontinuous gradient using a COBE2991 cell separator. The yield and purity of isolated islets were evaluated with a light microscope after dithizone (DTZ) staining. Islet function was assessed using an in vitro insulin release assay. The results showed that before purification 275,000 +/- 20,895 islet equivalents (IEQ) were obtained from 1 digested pancreas. After purification with gradient centrifugation, the islet yield was 230,350 +/- 26,679 IEQ/pancreas. Each gram of the purified pancreatic tissues yielded 2710 +/- 229 IEQ with an average purity of 50.2 +/- 2.0%. The purified islet cells responded to stimulation with high glucose concentrations (16.7 mmol/L), namely, 4.74-fold greater than the insulin secretion with exposure to the basal level of glucose (3.3 mmol/L; P < .001). These results suggested that the established isolation method can be applied to large-scale purification of fully functional islets from pig pancreata. PMID:20620533

  16. Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    Cloning describes the processes used to create an exact genetic replica of another cell, tissue or organism. ... named Dolly. There are three different types of cloning: Gene cloning, which creates copies of genes or ...

  17. Cloning, sequencing, and polymorphism analysis of novel classical MHC class I alleles in northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina).

    PubMed

    Lian, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xi-He; Dai, Zheng-Xi; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2016-04-01

    The northern pig-tailed macaque (Macaca leonina) has been confirmed to be an independent species from the pig-tailed macaque group of Old World monkey. We have previously reported that the northern pig-tailed macaques were also susceptible to HIV-1. Here, to make this animal a potential HIV/AIDS model and to discover the mechanism of virus control, we attempted to assess the role of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-restricted immune responses to HIV-1 infection, which was associated with viral replication and disease progression. As an initial step, we first cloned and characterized the classical MHC class I gene of northern pig-tailed macaques. In this study, we identified 39 MHC class I alleles including 17 MHC-A and 22 MHC-B alleles. Out of these identified alleles, 30 were novel and 9 were identical to alleles previously reported from other macaque species. The MHC-A and MHC-B loci were both duplicates as rhesus macaques and southern pig-tailed macaques. In addition, we also detected the patterns of positive selection in northern pig-tailed macaques and revealed the existence of balance selection with 20 positive selection sites in the peptide binding region. The analysis of B and F peptide binding pockets in northern and southern pig-tailed macaques and rhesus macaques suggested that they were likely to share a few common peptides to present. Thus, this study provides important MHC immunogenetics information and adds values to northern pig-tailed macaques as a promising HIV/AIDS model. PMID:26782049

  18. Experimental transfer of adult Oesophagostomum dentatum from donor to helminth naive recipient pigs: a methodological study.

    PubMed

    Bjørn, H; Roepstorff, A; Grøndahl, C; Eriksen, L; Bjerregaard, J; Nansen, P

    1995-12-01

    This study was carried out to compare potential methods of transplanting adult Oesophagostomum dentatum from experimentally infected donor pigs to helminth naive recipient pigs. The following methods were each tested in five pigs: A. Transfer of worms by stomach tube to the gastric ventricle of pigs per os pretreated with 0.5 mg/kg cisapride to increase gastrointestinal peristalsis; B. Transfer by stomach tube to the gastric ventricle of pigs per os pre-treated with cisapride (0.5 mg/kg) and omeprazol 20 mg which blocks hydrochloric acid secretion; C. Surgical transfer of worms to caecum of pigs. Worms for transplantation to pigs were obtained after slaughter of experimentally infected donor pigs and following isolation from the contents of the large intestine, using an agar gel migration technique. A mean of 1054 nematodes were transferred into each recipient pig within 2 hours. Procedures A and B resulted in establishment rates corresponding to only 0.5% and 7.6% of the transferred worms. In contrast, surgical transfer allowed 74.2% of the transplanted worms to be established. In all groups the transplanted worms migrated to the normal predilection site, i.e. the middle part of the large intestine. More female than male worms established in all groups. It was concluded from this study that surgical transfer was the most reliable of the methods tested for experimental establishment of adult O. dentatum in helminth naive pigs. PMID:8583123

  19. Analysis of nuclear reprogramming in cloned miniature pig embryos by expression of Oct-4 and Oct-4 related genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eugine; Lee, So Hyun; Kim, Sue

    2006-10-06

    Xenotransplantation is a rapidly expanding field of research and cloned miniature pigs have been considered as a model animal for it. However, the efficiency of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is extremely low, with most clones resulting in early lethality and several kinds of aberrant development. A possible explanation for the developmental failure of SCNT embryos is insufficient reprogramming of the somatic cell nucleus by the oocyte. In order to test this, we analyzed the reprogramming capacity of differentiated fibroblast cell nuclei and embryonic germ cell nuclei with Oct-4 and Oct-4 related genes (Ndp5211, Dppa2, Dppa3, and Dppa5), which are important for embryonic development, Hand1 and GATA-4, which are important for placental development, as molecular markers using RT-PCR. The Oct-4 expression level was significantly lower (P < 0.05) in cloned hatched blastocysts derived from fibroblasts and many of fibroblast-derived clones failed to reactivate at least one of the tested genes, while most of the germ cell clones and control embryos correctly expressed these genes. In conclusion, our results suggest that the reprogramming of fibroblast-derived cloned embryos is highly aberrant and this improper reprogramming could be one reason of the early lethality and post-implantation anomalies of somatic cell-derived clones.

  20. Developmental kinetics of pig embryos by parthenogenetic activation or by handmade cloning.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Li, R; Liu, Y; Villemoes, K; Purup, S; Callesen, H

    2013-10-01

    The developmental kinetics of pig embryos produced by parthenogenetic activation without (PAZF) or with (PAZI) zona pellucida or by handmade cloning (HMC) was compared by time-lapse videography. After cumulus cell removal, the matured oocytes were either left zona intact (PAZI) or were made zona free by pronase digestion (PAZF) before they were activated (PA). Other matured oocytes were used for HMC based on foetal fibroblast cells. On Day 0 (day of PA or reconstruction), the embryos were cultured for 7 days in vitro in our time-lapse system. Pictures were taken every 30 min, and afterwards, each cell cycle was identified for each embryo to be analysed. Results showed that the PA embryos (both PAZF and PAZI) had shorter first cell cycle compared with HMC (17.4. 17.8 vs 23.6 h), but had a longer time length from four cell to morula stages (57.9, 53.8 vs 44.9 h). However, at the second cell cycle, PAZF embryos needed shorter time, while PAZI embryos had similar time length as HMC embryos, and both were longer than PAZF (23.4, 24.8 vs 14.6 h). Both PAZF and PAZI embryos used similar time to reach the blastocyst stage, and this was later than HMC embryos. In addition, when all of these embryos were grouped into viable (developed to blastocysts) and non-viable (not developed to blastocysts), the only difference in the time length was observed on the first cell cycle (18.6 vs 24.5 h), but not on the later cell cycles. In conclusion, our results not only give detailed information regarding the time schedule of in vitro-handled pig embryos, but also indicate that the first cell cycle could be used as a selecting marker for embryo viability. However, to evaluate the effect of the produced techniques, the whole time schedule of the pre-implantation developmental kinetics should be observed. PMID:23617742

  1. Abcb1 in Pigs: Molecular cloning, tissues distribution, functional analysis, and its effect on pharmacokinetics of enrofloxacin

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tingting; Huang, Jinhu; Zhang, Hongyu; Dong, Lingling; Guo, Dawei; Guo, Li; He, Fang; Bhutto, Zohaib Ahmed; Wang, Liping

    2016-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is one of the best-known ATP-dependent efflux transporters, contributing to differences in pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interactions. Until now, studies on pig P-gp have been scarce. In our studies, the full-length porcine P-gp cDNA was cloned and expressed in a Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cell line. P-gp expression was then determined in tissues and its role in the pharmacokinetics of oral enrofloxacin in pigs was studied. The coding region of pig Abcb1 gene was 3,861 bp, encoding 1,286 amino acid residues (Mw = 141,966). Phylogenetic analysis indicated a close evolutionary relationship between porcine P-gp and those of cow and sheep. Pig P-gp was successfully stably overexpressed in MDCK cells and had efflux activity for rhodamine 123, a substrate of P-gp. Tissue distribution analysis indicated that P-gp was highly expressed in brain capillaries, small intestine, and liver. In MDCK-pAbcb1 cells, enrofloxacin was transported by P-gp with net efflux ratio of 2.48 and the efflux function was blocked by P-gp inhibitor verapamil. High expression of P-gp in the small intestine could modify the pharmacokinetics of orally administrated enrofloxacin by increasing the Cmax, AUC and Ka, which was demonstrated using verapamil, an inhibitor of P-gp. PMID:27572343

  2. Abcb1 in Pigs: Molecular cloning, tissues distribution, functional analysis, and its effect on pharmacokinetics of enrofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tingting; Huang, Jinhu; Zhang, Hongyu; Dong, Lingling; Guo, Dawei; Guo, Li; He, Fang; Bhutto, Zohaib Ahmed; Wang, Liping

    2016-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is one of the best-known ATP-dependent efflux transporters, contributing to differences in pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interactions. Until now, studies on pig P-gp have been scarce. In our studies, the full-length porcine P-gp cDNA was cloned and expressed in a Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cell line. P-gp expression was then determined in tissues and its role in the pharmacokinetics of oral enrofloxacin in pigs was studied. The coding region of pig Abcb1 gene was 3,861 bp, encoding 1,286 amino acid residues (Mw = 141,966). Phylogenetic analysis indicated a close evolutionary relationship between porcine P-gp and those of cow and sheep. Pig P-gp was successfully stably overexpressed in MDCK cells and had efflux activity for rhodamine 123, a substrate of P-gp. Tissue distribution analysis indicated that P-gp was highly expressed in brain capillaries, small intestine, and liver. In MDCK-pAbcb1 cells, enrofloxacin was transported by P-gp with net efflux ratio of 2.48 and the efflux function was blocked by P-gp inhibitor verapamil. High expression of P-gp in the small intestine could modify the pharmacokinetics of orally administrated enrofloxacin by increasing the Cmax, AUC and Ka, which was demonstrated using verapamil, an inhibitor of P-gp. PMID:27572343

  3. Production of viable cloned miniature pigs by aggregation of handmade cloned embryos at the 4-cell stage.

    PubMed

    Siriboon, Chawalit; Tu, Ching-Fu; Kere, Michel; Liu, Ming-Sing; Chang, Hui-Jung; Ho, Lin-Lin; Tai, Miao-En; Fang, Wen-Der; Lo, Neng-Wen; Tseng, Jung-Kai; Ju, Jyh-Cherng

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to improve the quality of handmade cloned porcine embryos by multiple embryo aggregations. Embryos derived from aggregation of three cloned embryos (3×) had a better blastocyst rate than cloned control (1×) embryos (73.6% vs 35.1%, respectively; P<0.05), but did not differ from those produced by aggregation of two cloned embryos (2×; 63.0%). Total cell numbers differed among treatments (P<0.05), with the greatest cell numbers (126) in the 3× group and the lowest (55) in the control group. The ratio of inner cell mass:total cell number was comparable in the 2× and 3× groups (25.1% vs 26.1%, respectively) and was significantly better than that in the control group (15.3%). The proportion of apoptotic cells in 2× and 3× groups was lower than that in the control group (2.7% and 2.2% vs 4.7%, respectively; P<0.05). Expression of Oct4 and Cdx2 was higher, whereas that of Bax was lower (P<0.05), in the 3× compared with non-aggregate group. Seven piglets were born to two surrogate mothers after embryo transfer of 3× aggregated blastocysts. In conclusion, aggregated embryos had greater total cell numbers and better pluripotency gene expression, with reduced expression of the pro-apoptosis gene Bax. Collectively, these improvement may be associated with the development of cloned embryos to term. PMID:23544704

  4. Effects of dietary fibers with different physicochemical properties on feeding motivation in adult female pigs.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Carol Souza; van den Borne, Joost J G C; Gerrits, Walter J J; Kemp, Bas; Bolhuis, J Elizabeth

    2012-09-10

    The satiating effects of dietary fiber may depend more on physicochemical properties of the fiber than on total fiber intake. These properties are expected to affect satiety feelings and feeding motivation due to different effects in the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of the current study was to assess the effects of fibers with varying physicochemical properties (bulkiness, viscosity and fermentability) on feeding motivation in adult female pigs. Sixteen pair-housed pigs received four diets: lignocellulose (LC), pectin (PEC), resistant starch (RS), and control (C) without fiber, in four periods in a Latin square design. Each fiber was fed at a low (L) followed by a high (H) inclusion level (7 days each). At 1h, 3h, and 7h after the morning meal, feeding motivation was assessed in an operant test, where turning a wheel yielded multiple food rewards, and in a runway test, where walking a fixed U-shaped track yielded one food reward. Pigs were observed in their home pen for 6h, using 90-s instantaneous scan sampling. In the operant test, throughout the day feeding motivation was higher for pigs on PEC compared with pigs on LC. In the runway, feeding motivation increased particularly at 1h after the meal for pigs on PEC compared with pigs on RS. Also at 7h, feeding motivation tended to decrease for pigs on RS compared with pigs fed other diets. In their home pen, pigs on PEC showed more feeder-directed behavior compared with pigs on RS. In conclusion, PEC was the least satiating fiber. LC and RS, despite a lower supply of available energy, were the most satiating fibers, possibly due to their bulky and fermentation properties, respectively. PMID:22796465

  5. Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    ... DNA Reproductive cloning, which creates copies of whole animals Therapeutic cloning, which creates embryonic stem cells. Researchers hope to use these cells to grow healthy tissue to replace injured or diseased tissues in the human body. NIH: National Human Genome Research Institute

  6. Cryptosporidium suis infection in post-weaned and adult pigs in Shaanxi province, northwestern China.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qing; Wang, Xing-Ye; Chen, Jian-Wen; Ding, Ling; Zhao, Guang-Hui

    2015-02-01

    Cryptosporidium spp., ubiquitous enteric parasitic protozoa of vertebrates, recently emerged as an important cause of economic loss and zoonosis. The present study aimed to determine the distribution and species of Cryptosporidium in post-weaned and adult pigs in Shaanxi province, northwestern China. A total of 1,337 fresh fecal samples of post-weaned and adult pigs were collected by sterile disposable gloves from 8 areas of Shaanxi province. The samples were examined by Sheather's sugar flotation technique and microscopy at × 400 magnification for Cryptosporidium infection, and the species in positive samples was further identified by PCR amplification of the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene. A total of 44 fecal samples were successfully amplified by the nested PCR of the partial SSU rRNA, with overall prevalence of 3.3%. The average prevalence of Cryptosporidium infection in each pig farms ranged from 0 to 14.4%. Species identification by sequencing of SSU rRNA gene revealed that 42 (3.1%) samples were Cryptosporidium suis and 2 (0.15%) were Cryptosporidium scrofarum. C. suis had the highest prevalence (7.5%) in growers and the lowest in breeding pigs (0.97%). C. suis was the predominant species in pre-weaned and adult pigs, while C. scrofarum infected pigs older than 3 months only. A season-related difference of C. suis was observed in this study, with the highest prevalence in autumn (5.5%) and the lowest (1.7%) in winter. The present study provided basic information for control of Cryptosporidium infection in pigs and assessment of zoonotic transmission of pigs in Shaanxi province, China. PMID:25748718

  7. Cryptosporidium suis Infection in Post-Weaned and Adult Pigs in Shaanxi Province, Northwestern China

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qing; Wang, Xing-Ye; Chen, Jian-Wen; Ding, Ling; Zhao, Guang-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium spp., ubiquitous enteric parasitic protozoa of vertebrates, recently emerged as an important cause of economic loss and zoonosis. The present study aimed to determine the distribution and species of Cryptosporidium in post-weaned and adult pigs in Shaanxi province, northwestern China. A total of 1,337 fresh fecal samples of post-weaned and adult pigs were collected by sterile disposable gloves from 8 areas of Shaanxi province. The samples were examined by Sheather’s sugar flotation technique and microscopy at×400 magnification for Cryptosporidium infection, and the species in positive samples was further identified by PCR amplification of the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene. A total of 44 fecal samples were successfully amplified by the nested PCR of the partial SSU rRNA, with overall prevalence of 3.3%. The average prevalence of Cryptosporidium infection in each pig farms ranged from 0 to 14.4%. Species identification by sequencing of SSU rRNA gene revealed that 42 (3.1%) samples were Cryptosporidium suis and 2 (0.15%) were Cryptosporidium scrofarum. C. suis had the highest prevalence (7.5%) in growers and the lowest in breeding pigs (0.97%). C. suis was the predominant species in pre-weaned and adult pigs, while C. scrofarum infected pigs older than 3 months only. A season-related difference of C. suis was observed in this study, with the highest prevalence in autumn (5.5%) and the lowest (1.7%) in winter. The present study provided basic information for control of Cryptosporidium infection in pigs and assessment of zoonotic transmission of pigs in Shaanxi province, China. PMID:25748718

  8. Cats cloned from fetal and adult somatic cells by nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Yin, X J; Lee, H S; Lee, Y H; Seo, Y I; Jeon, S J; Choi, E G; Cho, S J; Cho, S G; Min, W; Kang, S K; Hwang, W S; Kong, I K

    2005-02-01

    This work was undertaken in order to study the developmental competence of nuclear transfer (NT) into cat embryos using fetal fibroblast and adult skin fibroblast cells as donor nuclei. Oocytes were recovered by mincing the ovaries in Hepes-buffered TCM199 and selecting the cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) with compact cumulus cell mass and dark color. Homogenous ooplasm was cultured for maturation in TCM199+10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) for 12 h and used as a source of recipient cytoplast for exogenous somatic nuclei. In experiment 1, we evaluated the effect of donor cell type on the reconstruction and development of cloned embryos. Fusion, first cleavage and blastocyst developmental rate were not different between fetal fibroblasts and adult skin cells (71.2 vs 66.8; 71.0 vs 57.6; 4.0 vs 6.1% respectively; P < 0.05). In experiment 2, cloned embryos were surgically transferred into the oviducts of recipient queens. One of the seven recipient queens was delivered naturally of 2 healthy cloned cats and 1 stillborn from fetal fibroblast cells of male origin 65 days after embryo transfer. One of three recipient queens was delivered naturally of 1 healthy cloned cat from adult skin cells of female origin 65 days after embryo transfer. The cloned cats showed genotypes identical to the donor cell lines, indicating that adult somatic cells can be used for feline cloning. PMID:15695619

  9. Rescue of a genotype 4 human hepatitis E virus from cloned cDNA and characterization of intergenotypic chimeric viruses in cultured human liver cells and in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Córdoba, Laura; Feagins, Alicia R.; Opriessnig, Tanja; Cossaboom, Caitlin M.; Dryman, Barbara A.; Huang, Yao-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an important but extremely understudied human pathogen. Genotypes 1 and 2 are restricted to humans, whereas genotypes 3 and 4 are zoonotic, infecting both humans and pigs. This report describes, for the first time, the successful rescue of infectious HEV in vitro and in vivo from cloned cDNA of a genotype 4 human HEV (strain TW6196E). The complete genomic sequence of the TW6196E virus was determined and a full-length cDNA clone (pHEV-4TW) was assembled. Capped RNA transcripts from the pHEV-4TW clone were replication competent in Huh7 cells and infectious in HepG2/C3A cells. Pigs inoculated intrahepatically with capped RNA transcripts from pHEV-4TW developed an active infection, as evidenced by faecal virus shedding and seroconversion, indicating the successful rescue of infectious genotype 4 HEV and cross-species infection of pigs by a genotype 4 human HEV. To demonstrate the utility of the genotype 4 HEV infectious clone and to evaluate the potential viral determinant(s) for species tropism, four intergenotypic chimeric clones were constructed by swapping various genomic regions between genotypes 1 and 4, and genotypes 1 and 3. All four chimeric clones were replication competent in Huh7 cells, but only the two chimeras with sequences swapped between genotypes 1 and 4 human HEVs produced viruses capable of infecting HepG2/C3A cells. None of the four chimeras was able to establish a robust infection in pigs. The availability of a genotype 4 HEV infectious clone affords an opportunity to delineate the molecular mechanisms of HEV cross-species infection in the future. PMID:22837416

  10. Behavioral observations of adolescent Holstein heifers cloned from adult somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Savage, Amy F; Maull, John; Tian, X Cindy; Taneja, Maneesh; Katz, Larry; Darre, Michael; Yang, Xiangzhong

    2003-10-01

    Cloning using somatic cells offers many potential applications in biomedicine and basic research. The objective of this study was to test whether clones from the same genotype can be used as models to study the genetic influences of behavior. Specifically, several aspects of the behavior of four prepubertal heifers cloned from somatic cells of a 13-year-old Holstein cow along with age-matched control heifers were compared to determine whether juvenile clones from an aged adult behave similarly to their age-matched controls, and whether clones with identical genetic makeup exhibit any behavioral trends. Behavioral observations or behavior challenge tests were conducted to compare the following traits: vocalization, play behavior, movement frequencies, grooming, curiosity, and companion preference, as well as dominance and aggressiveness. From play behavior, movements and vocalization, we observed that these four juvenile clones of an aged genetic donor did not show behavioral indications of aging and were similar to their counterparts of comparable chronological age except that they tended to play less than controls. Behavioral trends were also observed in the clones that indicated that they exhibited higher levels of curiosity, more grooming activities and were more aggressive and dominant than controls. Furthermore, these four clones preferred each other or the donor as companions, which may indicate genetic kin recognition. PMID:12935849

  11. Molecular cloning and anti-HIV-1 activities of APOBEC3s from northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Liang; Song, Jia-Hao; Pang, Wei; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2016-07-18

    Northern pig-tailed macaques (NPMs, Macaca leonina) are susceptible to HIV-1 infection largely due to the loss of HIV-1-restricting factor TRIM5α. However, great impediments still exist in the persistent replication of HIV-1 in vivo, suggesting some viral restriction factors are reserved in this host. The APOBEC3 proteins have demonstrated a capacity to restrict HIV-1 replication, but their inhibitory effects in NPMs remain elusive. In this study, we cloned the NPM A3A-A3H genes, and determined by BLAST searching that their coding sequences (CDSs) showed 99% identity to the corresponding counterparts from rhesus and southern pig-tailed macaques. We further analyzed the anti-HIV-1 activities of the A3A-A3H genes, and found that A3G and A3F had the greatest anti-HIV-1 activity compared with that of other members. The results of this study indicate that A3G and A3F might play critical roles in limiting HIV-1 replication in NPMs in vivo. Furthermore, this research provides valuable information for the optimization of monkey models of HIV-1 infection. PMID:27469256

  12. Molecular cloning and anti-HIV-1 activities of APOBEC3s from northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina)

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, Xiao-Liang; SONG, Jia-Hao; PANG, Wei; ZHENG, Yong-Tang

    2016-01-01

    Northern pig-tailed macaques (NPMs, Macaca leonina) are susceptible to HIV-1 infection largely due to the loss of HIV-1-restricting factor TRIM5α. However, great impediments still exist in the persistent replication of HIV-1 in vivo, suggesting some viral restriction factors are reserved in this host. The APOBEC3 proteins have demonstrated a capacity to restrict HIV-1 replication, but their inhibitory effects in NPMs remain elusive. In this study, we cloned the NPM A3A-A3H genes, and determined by BLAST searching that their coding sequences (CDSs) showed 99% identity to the corresponding counterparts from rhesus and southern pig-tailed macaques. We further analyzed the anti-HIV-1 activities of the A3A-A3H genes, and found that A3G and A3F had the greatest anti-HIV-1 activity compared with that of other members. The results of this study indicate that A3G and A3F might play critical roles in limiting HIV-1 replication in NPMs in vivo. Furthermore, this research provides valuable information for the optimization of monkey models of HIV-1 infection. PMID:27469256

  13. Analysis of Gene Expression and Ultrastructure of Stifle Menisci from Juvenile and Adult Pigs.

    PubMed

    Kreinest, Michael; Reisig, Gregor; Ströbel, Philipp; Fickert, Stefan; Brade, Joachim; Wennemuth, Gunther; Lipp, Peter; Schwarz, Markus L

    2016-01-01

    The origin of the age-associated degenerative processes in meniscal tissue is poorly understood and may be related to an imbalance of anabolic and catabolic metabolism. The aim of the current study was to compare medial menisci isolated from juvenile pigs and degenerated medial menisci from adult pigs in terms of gene expression profile and ultrastructure. Medial menisci were isolated from the knee joints of juvenile and adult pigs (n = 8 for each group). Degeneration was determined histologically according to a scoring system. In addition, the gene expression profiles of 14 genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins, catabolic matrix metalloproteinases and mediators of inflammation were analyzed. Changes in the ultrastructure of the collagen network of the meniscal tissue were analyzed by using transmission electron microscopy. The histologic analysis of menisci showed significantly higher grade of degeneration in tissue isolated from adult porcine knee joints compared with menisci isolated from juvenile knee joints. In particular, destruction of the collagen network was greater in adult menisci than in juvenile menisci. Degenerated menisci showed significantly decreased gene expression of COL1A1 and increased expression of MMP2, MMP13, and IL8. The menisci from adult porcine knee joints can serve as a model for meniscal degeneration. Degenerative changes were manifested as differences in histopathology, gene expression and ultrastructure of collagen network. PMID:26884408

  14. Isozygous and selectable marker-free MSTN knockout cloned pigs generated by the combined use of CRISPR/Cas9 and Cre/LoxP.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yanzhen; Hua, Zaidong; Liu, Ximei; Hua, Wenjun; Ren, Hongyan; Xiao, Hongwei; Zhang, Liping; Li, Li; Wang, Zhirui; Laible, Götz; Wang, Yan; Dong, Faming; Zheng, Xinmin

    2016-01-01

    Predictable, clean genetic modification (GM) in livestock is important for reliable phenotyping and biosafety. Here we reported the generation of isozygous, functional myostatin (MSTN) knockout cloned pigs free of selectable marker gene (SMG) by CRISPR/Cas9 and Cre/LoxP. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated homologous recombination (HR) was exploited to knock out (KO) one allele of MSTN in pig primary cells. Cre recombinase was then used to excise the SMG with an efficiency of 82.7%. The SMG-free non-EGFP cells were isolated by flow cytometery and immediately used as donor nuclei for nuclear transfer. A total of 685 reconstructed embryos were transferred into three surrogates with one delivering two male live piglets. Molecular testing verified the mono-allelic MSTN KO and SMG deletion in these cloned pigs. Western blots showed approximately 50% decrease in MSTN and concurrent increased expression of myogenic genes in muscle. Histological examination revealed the enhanced myofiber quantity but myofiber size remained unaltered. Ultrasonic detection showed the increased longissimus muscle size and decreased backfat thickness. Precision editing of pig MSTN gene has generated isozygous, SMG-free MSTN KO cloned founders, which guaranteed a reliable route for elite livestock production and a strategy to minimize potential biological risks. PMID:27530319

  15. Isozygous and selectable marker-free MSTN knockout cloned pigs generated by the combined use of CRISPR/Cas9 and Cre/LoxP

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Yanzhen; Hua, Zaidong; Liu, Ximei; Hua, Wenjun; Ren, Hongyan; Xiao, Hongwei; Zhang, Liping; Li, Li; Wang, Zhirui; Laible, Götz; Wang, Yan; Dong, Faming; Zheng, Xinmin

    2016-01-01

    Predictable, clean genetic modification (GM) in livestock is important for reliable phenotyping and biosafety. Here we reported the generation of isozygous, functional myostatin (MSTN) knockout cloned pigs free of selectable marker gene (SMG) by CRISPR/Cas9 and Cre/LoxP. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated homologous recombination (HR) was exploited to knock out (KO) one allele of MSTN in pig primary cells. Cre recombinase was then used to excise the SMG with an efficiency of 82.7%. The SMG-free non-EGFP cells were isolated by flow cytometery and immediately used as donor nuclei for nuclear transfer. A total of 685 reconstructed embryos were transferred into three surrogates with one delivering two male live piglets. Molecular testing verified the mono-allelic MSTN KO and SMG deletion in these cloned pigs. Western blots showed approximately 50% decrease in MSTN and concurrent increased expression of myogenic genes in muscle. Histological examination revealed the enhanced myofiber quantity but myofiber size remained unaltered. Ultrasonic detection showed the increased longissimus muscle size and decreased backfat thickness. Precision editing of pig MSTN gene has generated isozygous, SMG-free MSTN KO cloned founders, which guaranteed a reliable route for elite livestock production and a strategy to minimize potential biological risks. PMID:27530319

  16. Six cloned calves produced from adult fibroblast cells after long-term culture

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Chikara; Yamakuchi, Hiroshi; Todoroki, Junichi; Mizoshita, Kazunori; Tabara, Norio; Barber, Michele; Yang, Xiangzhong

    2000-01-01

    Cloning whole animals with somatic cells as parents offers the possibility of targeted genetic manipulations in vitro such as “gene knock-out” by homologous recombination. However, such manipulation requires prolonged culture of nuclear donor cells. Previous successes in cloning have been limited to the use of cells collected either fresh or after short-term culture. Therefore, demonstration of genetic totipotency of cells after prolonged culture is pivotal to combining site-specific genetic manipulations and cloning. Here we report birth of six clones of an aged (17-year-old) Japanese Black Beef bull using ear skin fibroblast cells as nuclear donor cells after up to 3 months of in vitro culture (10–15 passages). We observed higher developmental rates for embryos derived from later passages (10 and 15) as compared with those embryos from an early passage (passage 5). The four surviving clones are now 10–12 months of age and appear normal, similar to their naturally reproduced peers. These data show that fibroblasts of aged animals remain competent for cloning, and prolonged culture does not affect the cloning competence of adult somatic donor cells. PMID:10655472

  17. Neuromedin B and Its Receptor: Gene Cloning, Tissue Distribution and Expression Levels of the Reproductive Axis in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhiyu; Su, Juan; Guo, Tingting; Jin, Mengmeng; Li, Xiang; Lei, Zhihai; Hou, Yuanlong; Li, Xiaoliang; Jia, Cuicui; Zhang, Zheng; Ahmed, Ejlal

    2016-01-01

    Neuromedin B is one member of a family of bombesin-like peptides, which performs a variety of physiological functions via their receptor (NMBR) in most mammals. However, the genes encoding NMB and NMBR and their functions especially reproduction of the pigs are currently not fully understood. To research the physiological functions of NMB, we cloned and analyzed the NMB and NMBR genes, and systematically investigated the expression levels of NMB and NMBR mRNA using relative real-time PCR and the distribution of NMBR by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Experimental results show that the sequences of the amino acid and gene of NMB and NMBR were highly conservative and homology in many species, Significantly, the relative RT-PCR results revealed that NMB was mainly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS), whereas NMBR is highly expressed in peripheral tissues and organs, such as endocrine tissues, glands and reproductive organs. The IHC results show that NMBR positive cells were widely distributed in the body, such as respiratory and circulatory system, digestive system, urogenital system, in lymphatic organs and in the endocrine system. We also systematically investigated expression levels of NMB and NMBR in the reproductive axis using relative real-time PCR. In sow estrous cycle, the hypothalamic levels of both NMB and NMBR mRAN were similar, but the expression levels of the pituitary were negatively correlated. Expression levels in the ovarian system are lowest in metestrus phases and highest in proestrus and estrus phases. In boar post-natal development stages, the hypothalamic, pituitary and testicular levels of NMB and NMBR mRNAs showed developmental changes on postnatal day 30, 60, 90 and 120. Taken together, this study provided molecular and morphological data necessary for further research of physiological function of NMB/NMBR system in the pigs. PMID:27010315

  18. Neuromedin B and Its Receptor: Gene Cloning, Tissue Distribution and Expression Levels of the Reproductive Axis in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiyu; Su, Juan; Guo, Tingting; Jin, Mengmeng; Li, Xiang; Lei, Zhihai; Hou, Yuanlong; Li, Xiaoliang; Jia, Cuicui; Zhang, Zheng; Ahmed, Ejlal

    2016-01-01

    Neuromedin B is one member of a family of bombesin-like peptides, which performs a variety of physiological functions via their receptor (NMBR) in most mammals. However, the genes encoding NMB and NMBR and their functions especially reproduction of the pigs are currently not fully understood. To research the physiological functions of NMB, we cloned and analyzed the NMB and NMBR genes, and systematically investigated the expression levels of NMB and NMBR mRNA using relative real-time PCR and the distribution of NMBR by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Experimental results show that the sequences of the amino acid and gene of NMB and NMBR were highly conservative and homology in many species, Significantly, the relative RT-PCR results revealed that NMB was mainly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS), whereas NMBR is highly expressed in peripheral tissues and organs, such as endocrine tissues, glands and reproductive organs. The IHC results show that NMBR positive cells were widely distributed in the body, such as respiratory and circulatory system, digestive system, urogenital system, in lymphatic organs and in the endocrine system. We also systematically investigated expression levels of NMB and NMBR in the reproductive axis using relative real-time PCR. In sow estrous cycle, the hypothalamic levels of both NMB and NMBR mRAN were similar, but the expression levels of the pituitary were negatively correlated. Expression levels in the ovarian system are lowest in metestrus phases and highest in proestrus and estrus phases. In boar post-natal development stages, the hypothalamic, pituitary and testicular levels of NMB and NMBR mRNAs showed developmental changes on postnatal day 30, 60, 90 and 120. Taken together, this study provided molecular and morphological data necessary for further research of physiological function of NMB/NMBR system in the pigs. PMID:27010315

  19. Production of cloned NIBS (Nippon Institute for Biological Science) and α-1, 3-galactosyltransferase knockout MGH miniature pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer using the NIBS breed as surrogates

    PubMed Central

    Shimatsu, Yoshiki; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Horii, Wataru; Hirakata, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Yuji; Waki, Shiori; Sano, Junichi; Saitoh, Toshiki; Sahara, Hisashi; Shimizu, Akira; Yazawa, Hajime; Sachs, David H.; Nunoya, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    Background Nuclear transfer (NT) technologies offer a means for producing the genetically modified pigs necessary to develop swine models for mechanistic studies of disease processes as well as to serve as organ donors for xenotransplantation. Most previous studies have used commercial pigs as surrogates. Method and Results In this study, we established a cloning technique for miniature pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) using Nippon Institute for Biological Science (NIBS) miniature pigs as surrogates. Moreover, utilizing this technique, we have successfully produced an α-1, 3-galactosyltransferase knockout (GalT-KO) miniature swine. Fibroblasts procured from a NIBS miniature pig fetus were injected into 1312 enucleated oocytes. The cloned embryos were transferred to 11 surrogates of which five successfully delivered 13 cloned offspring; the production efficiency was 1.0% (13/1312). In a second experiment, lung fibroblasts obtained from neonatal GalT-KO MGH miniature swine were used as donor cells and 1953 cloned embryos were transferred to 12 surrogates. Six cloned offspring were born from five surrogates, a production efficiency of 0.3% (6/1953). Conclusions These results demonstrate successful establishment of a miniature pig cloning technique by SCNT using NIBS miniature pigs as surrogates. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of successful production of GalT-KO miniature swine using miniature swine surrogates. This technique could help to ensure a stable supply of the cloned pigs through the use of miniature pig surrogates and could expand production in countries with limited space or in facilities with special regulations such as specific pathogen-free or good laboratory practice. PMID:23581451

  20. Molecular cloning, spatial and temporal expression analysis of CatSper genes in the Chinese Meishan pigs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Sperm ion channel proteins (CatSpers) are essential for sperm hyperactivated motility, and then penetration through the zona pellucida. The CatSper class of proteins have well been characterized in the mouse and human. However, such data for pigs are not available. In the present study, we cloned the porcine CatSper 1-4 genes, analysed their spatial expression in various organs and temporal expression in the testes from birth until sexual maturity in Meishan boars. Methods Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) was performed to clone the full length cDNAs of porcine CatSper genes and bioinformatics analysis of inferred CatSper proteins was also determined. Various organs were collected from 150 day-old pigs to characterize the spatial expression of CatSper genes by qualitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and testes from birth to 150 day-old boars were sampled to detect the temporal expression of CatSper genes by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Results The mRNA sequences of CatSper1 (2452 bp), CatSper2 (2038 bp), CatSper3 (1408 bp), and CatSper4 (1799 bp), including full length of cDNAs, 5' and 3' flanks, were obtained. The bioinformatics analysis indicated that coding regions spanning the ion transport domains were conserved for different species analyzed. Among the four CatSpers, CatSper2, 3, and 4 were more conserved across species, compared with CatSper1. In addition, six conservative trans-membrane domains, a pore forming motif, and a coiled-coil motif were also identified. The spatial analysis from different organs showed that CatSper1 was detected in both testes and hypothalamus, CatSper2 was restricted in testes only, CatSper4 was expressed in testes and rete testes; whereas CatSper3 was more ubiquitously. CatSper3 and CatSper4 transcripts were also detected in ejaculated sperm. At Days 1 and 30 of age, CatSper mRNAs exhibited only sparse expression in the testes. However, these transcripts highly expressed at Day 60

  1. Effects of dietary fibers with different fermentation characteristics on feeding motivation in adult female pigs.

    PubMed

    Souza da Silva, Carol; Bolhuis, J Elizabeth; Gerrits, Walter J J; Kemp, Bas; van den Borne, Joost J G C

    2013-02-17

    Dietary fibers can be fermented in the colon, resulting in production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and secretion of satiety-related peptides. Fermentation characteristics (fermentation kinetics and SCFA-profile) differ between fibers and could impact their satiating potential. We investigated the effects of fibers with varying fermentation characteristics on feeding motivation in adult female pigs. Sixteen pair-housed pigs received four diets in four periods in a Latin square design. Starch from a control (C) diet was exchanged, based on gross energy, for inulin (INU), guar gum (GG), or retrograded tapioca starch (RS), each at a low (L) and a high (H) inclusion level. This resulted in a decreased metabolizable energy intake when feeding fiber diets as compared with the C diet. According to in vitro fermentation measurements, INU is rapidly fermentable and yields relatively high amounts of propionate, GG is moderately rapidly fermentable and yields relatively high amounts of acetate, and RS is slowly fermentable and yields relatively high amounts of butyrate. Feeding motivation was assessed using behavioral tests at 1h, 3h and 7h after the morning meal, and home pen behavioral observations throughout the day. The number of wheel turns paid for a food reward in an operant test was unaffected by diet. Pigs on H-diets ran 25% slower for a food reward in a runway test than pigs on L-diets, and showed less spontaneous physical activity and less stereotypic behavior in the hours before the afternoon meal, reflecting increased interprandial satiety. Reduced feeding motivation with increasing inclusion level was most pronounced for RS, as pigs decreased speed in the runway test and tended to have a lower voluntary food intake in an ad libitum food intake test when fed RS-H. In conclusion, increasing levels of fermentable fibers in the diet seemed to enhance satiety in adult pigs, despite a reduction in metabolizable energy supply. RS was the most satiating fiber

  2. Molecular cloning and sequencing of mRNAs coding for minor adult globin polypeptides of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed Central

    Knöchel, W; Meyerhof, W; Hummel, S; Grundmann, U

    1983-01-01

    Globin mRNA was isolated from immature red blood cells of an adult Xenopus laevis female. mRNA/cDNA hybrids were integrated in the Pst I cleavage site of pBR 322 by G/C tailing, and cloned in Escherichia coli strain HB 101. By restriction site analysis as well as hybridization behaviour we identified two clones coding for minor adult alpha and beta globin chains. Nucleotide sequence analysis and derived amino acid sequences are presented. PMID:6298748

  3. Effects of Eszopiclone and Zolpidem on Sleep and Waking States in the Adult Guinea Pig

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Mingchu; Chase, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    Study Objective: The present study was designed to compare and contrast the effects of eszopiclone and zolpidem on the states of sleep and wakefulness in chronically instrumented, unanesthetized adult guinea pigs. Design: Adult guinea pigs were implanted with electrodes to record sleep and waking states and to perform a frequency analysis of the EEG. Eszopiclone (1 and 3 mg/kg) and zolpidem (1 and 3 mg/kg) were administered intraperitoneally. Measurements and Results: The administration of eszopiclone (1 and 3 mg/kg) resulted in a significant dose-dependent increase in NREM sleep. Zolpidem produced a significant increase in NREM sleep, but only at a dose of 3 mg/kg. The following changes in NREM and REM sleep, as well as in the power spectra, were all significant when the effects of 1 and 3 mg/kg of eszopiclone were compared with responses induced with 1 and 3 mg/kg of zolpidem, respectively: The increase in NREM sleep produced by eszopiclone was greater than that following the administration of zolpidem. The mean latency to NREM sleep following the administration of eszopiclone was significantly shorter than zolpidem. Eszopiclone significantly increased the latency to REM sleep. The mean duration of episodes of NREM sleep was increased by eszopiclone, but not by zolpidem. The EEG power increased in the delta band and decreased in the theta band during NREM sleep following the administration of eszopiclone. No significant changes occurred in any of the frequency bands analyzed following zolpidem administration. Conclusions: The differences in the effects of eszopiclone and zolpidem on sleep and waking states and the power spectra of the EEG likely reflect the fact that eszopiclone and zolpidem bind to different subunits of the GABAA receptor complex. Citation: Xi M; Chase MH. Effects of eszopiclone and zolpidem on sleep and waking states in the adult guinea pig. SLEEP 2008;31(7):1043-1051. PMID:18652100

  4. Molecular cloning and characterization of pig, cow and sheep MAdCAM-1 cDNA and the demonstration of cross-reactive epitopes amongst mammalian homologues.

    PubMed

    Tachedjian, M; Yu, M; Lew, A M; Rockman, S; Boyle, J S; Andrew, M E; Wang, L

    2006-05-01

    Full-length cDNA clones for the pig, cow and sheep mucosal addressin cellular adhesion molecule (MAdCAM)-1 homologues were isolated from Peyer's patches by a combination of reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction and 5' and 3' RACE strategies. Degenerate primers based on conserved amino acid (aa) sequences within the N-terminal immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains of the human and rodent MAdCAM-1 molecules were used for initial sequencing of the Ig-like domains. MAdCAM-1 transcripts of 1425 bp, 1525 bp and 1510 bp obtained for the pig, cow and sheep contained an open-reading frame for proteins of 390, 424 and 418 aa, respectively. The pig and ruminant MAdCAM-1 had two N-terminal Ig-like domains, a mucin-like region and a third Ig-like domain found in rodent but not human MAdCAM-1. Antibodies raised against bacterially expressed N-terminal Ig-like domains of pig, human and sheep MAdCAM-1 demonstrated the existence of cross-reactive epitopes, raising the possibility of producing monoclonal antibodies which can be used as multi-species MAdCAM-1-targeting reagent for the development of mucosal vaccines. PMID:16671951

  5. Supplemental Analysis for N-linked Sugars in Adult Pig Islets.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, H; Kawamura, T; Kashiyama, N; Matsuura, R; Sakai, R; Nakahata, K; Lo, P-C; Asada, M; Maeda, A; Goto, M; Toyoda, M; Okuyama, H; Miyagawa, S

    2016-05-01

    The pig pancreas is considered to be one of the most suitable sources of islets for clinical xenotransplantation. However, after producing α1-3galactosyltransferase knockout pigs, most of the organs of these pigs showed less antigenicity to the human body. Wild-type adult pig islets (APIs) that originally produced negligible levels of α-Gal, different from neonatal porcine islet-like cell clusters, showed a clear antigenicity to human serum. Concerning the so-called non-Gal epitopes, many studies related to glycoproteins and glycolipids are ongoing in efforts to identify them. However, our knowledge of non-Gal glycoantigens remains incomplete. In our previous study, N-glycans were isolated from APIs, and the structures of 28 of the N-glycans were detected. In this study, to identify additional structures, further analyses were performed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). N-glycans were isolated from APIs by the method described by O'Neil et al with minor modifications and LC-MS-based structural analyses were then performed. The detected N-glycan peaks in the LC-MS spectra were selected using the FLexAnalysis software program and the structures of the glycans were predicted using the GlyocoMod Tool. The API preparation contained 11 peaks and 16 structures were then nominated as containing N-linked sugars. Among them, 5 sulfated glycans were estimated, confirming the existence of sulfate structures in N-glycans in API. In addition, these data may supplement several N-glycan structures that contain two deoxyhexose units, such as fucose, to our previous report. The data herein will be helpful for future studies of antigenicity associated with API. PMID:27320609

  6. Development of Transgenic Cloned Pig Models of Skin Inflammation by DNA Transposon-Directed Ectopic Expression of Human β1 and α2 Integrin

    PubMed Central

    Staunstrup, Nicklas Heine; Madsen, Johannes; Primo, Maria Nascimento; Li, Juan; Liu, Ying; Kragh, Peter M.; Li, Rong; Schmidt, Mette; Purup, Stig; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik; Svensson, Lars; Petersen, Thomas K.; Callesen, Henrik; Bolund, Lars; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2012-01-01

    Integrins constitute a superfamily of transmembrane signaling receptors that play pivotal roles in cutaneous homeostasis by modulating cell growth and differentiation as well as inflammatory responses in the skin. Subrabasal expression of integrins α2 and/or β1 entails hyperproliferation and aberrant differentiation of keratinocytes and leads to dermal and epidermal influx of activated T-cells. The anatomical and physiological similarities between porcine and human skin make the pig a suitable model for human skin diseases. In efforts to generate a porcine model of cutaneous inflammation, we employed the Sleeping Beauty DNA transposon system for production of transgenic cloned Göttingen minipigs expressing human β1 or α2 integrin under the control of a promoter specific for subrabasal keratinocytes. Using pools of transgenic donor fibroblasts, cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer was utilized to produce reconstructed embryos that were subsequently transferred to surrogate sows. The resulting pigs were all transgenic and harbored from one to six transgene integrants. Molecular analyses on skin biopsies and cultured keratinocytes showed ectopic expression of the human integrins and localization within the keratinocyte plasma membrane. Markers of perturbed skin homeostasis, including activation of the MAPK pathway, increased expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1α, and enhanced expression of the transcription factor c-Fos, were identified in keratinocytes from β1 and α2 integrin-transgenic minipigs, suggesting the induction of a chronic inflammatory phenotype in the skin. Notably, cellular dysregulation obtained by overexpression of either β1 or α2 integrin occurred through different cellular signaling pathways. Our findings mark the creation of the first cloned pig models with molecular markers of skin inflammation. Despite the absence of an overt psoriatic phenotype, these animals may possess increased susceptibility to severe skin damage

  7. Construction of a normalized directionally cloned cDNA library from adult heart and analysis of 3040 clones by partial sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, T; Ogiwara, A; Uchiyama, I; Takagi, T; Yazaki, Y; Nakamura, Y

    1996-07-01

    Large-scale sequencing of clones from cDNA libraries derived from specific tissues is a rapid and efficient way of discovering novel genes expressed in those tissues. However, because the heart is continually contracting and relaxing, it strongly expresses muscle-contractile genes and/or mitochondrial genes, a bias that reduces the efficiency of this method. To improve the efficiency of identifying novel genes expressed in the heart, we constructed a normalized directionally cloned cDNA library from adult heart and partially sequenced 3040 clones. Comparisons of these sequence data with known DNA sequences in the database revealed that 57.1% of the clones matched human genes already known, 23.4% were identical or almost identical to human expressed sequence tags (ESTs), 14.2% bore no significant homology to any sequences in the database, and 1.2% represented repetitive sequences. The remaining 4.1% showed some homology with known genes, and Northern blot analysis of several clones in this category revealed that most of them were expressed mainly in the heart and skeletal muscle. After redundancy was excluded, the 3040 clones accounted for 1395 distinctive ESTs, 446 of which exhibited no match to any known sequence. Our results suggest that our normalized library is less redundant than standard libraries and is a useful resource for cataloging genes expressed in the heart. PMID:8661126

  8. The Complete Genome Sequences, Unique Mutational Spectra, and Developmental Potency of Adult Neurons Revealed by Cloning.

    PubMed

    Hazen, Jennifer L; Faust, Gregory G; Rodriguez, Alberto R; Ferguson, William C; Shumilina, Svetlana; Clark, Royden A; Boland, Michael J; Martin, Greg; Chubukov, Pavel; Tsunemoto, Rachel K; Torkamani, Ali; Kupriyanov, Sergey; Hall, Ira M; Baldwin, Kristin K

    2016-03-16

    Somatic mutation in neurons is linked to neurologic disease and implicated in cell-type diversification. However, the origin, extent, and patterns of genomic mutation in neurons remain unknown. We established a nuclear transfer method to clonally amplify the genomes of neurons from adult mice for whole-genome sequencing. Comprehensive mutation detection and independent validation revealed that individual neurons harbor ∼100 unique mutations from all classes but lack recurrent rearrangements. Most neurons contain at least one gene-disrupting mutation and rare (0-2) mobile element insertions. The frequency and gene bias of neuronal mutations differ from other lineages, potentially due to novel mechanisms governing postmitotic mutation. Fertile mice were cloned from several neurons, establishing the compatibility of mutated adult neuronal genomes with reprogramming to pluripotency and development. PMID:26948891

  9. Expression of recombinant human α-lactalbumin in milk of transgenic cloned pigs is sufficient to enhance intestinal growth and weight gain of suckling piglets.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jin; Li, Qiuyan; Li, Yan; Wen, Xiao; Li, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Zaihu; Zhang, Jiuming; Yu, Zhengquan; Li, Ning

    2016-06-10

    Human α-lactalbumin (HLA) has very high nutritional value and important physiological functions during the neonatal period. The peptides derived from HLA provide diverse health benefits including antimicrobial, antiviral, immune-modulating, and antihypertensive effects. Thus, it is worth investigating the effects on offspring development of increasing HLA in milk. In this study, we found that recombinant human α-lactalbumin (rHLA) exhibits efficient inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) activity in an in vitro simulated gastrointestinal digestion system. Using a BAC clone containing the complete HLA gene as a candidate vector, we generated two lines of transgenic cloned sows via somatic cell nuclear transfer that over-expressed rHLA. The average concentrations of rHLA in milk from the two lines of transgenic cloned sows were 2.24 ± 0.71 mg/ml and 2.67 ± 1.29 mg/ml. The feeding experiments revealed that rHLA represses dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) activity in vivo. Furthermore, the piglets reared by rHLA transgenic cloned sows exhibit better performance in gain of body weight and intestine growth than the control piglets reared by non-transgenic sows. Therefore, these findings indicate that rHLA could serve as a natural precursor for a DPP-IV inhibitor, and the transgenic technology that produced the over-expression of rHLA could be a useful method for pig breeders to improve lactation performance. PMID:26899869

  10. Screening of early antigen genes of adult-stage Trichinella spiralis using pig serum from different stages of early infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of this work was to identify novel, early antigens present in Trichinella spiralis. To this end, a cDNA library generated from 3-day old adult worms (Ad3) was immunologically screened using serum from a pig infected with 20,000 muscle larvae. The serum was obtained from multiple, time cours...

  11. Pancreatic Islets: Methods for Isolation and Purification of Juvenile and Adult Pig Islets.

    PubMed

    Brandhorst, Heide; Johnson, Paul R V; Brandhorst, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The current situation of organ transplantation is mainly determined by the disbalance between the number of available organs and the number of patients on the waiting list. This obvious dilemma might be solved by the transplantation of porcine organs into human patients. The metabolic similarities which exist between both species made pancreatic islets of Langerhans to that donor tissue which will be most likely transplanted in human recipients. Nevertheless, the successful isolation of significant yields of viable porcine islets is extremely difficult and requires extensive experiences in the field. This review is focussing on the technical challenges, pitfalls and particularities that are associated with the isolation of islets from juvenile and adult pigs considering donor variables that can affect porcine islet isolation outcome. PMID:27586421

  12. Potent spinal parenchymal AAV9-mediated gene delivery by subpial injection in adult rats and pigs

    PubMed Central

    Miyanohara, Atsushi; Kamizato, Kota; Juhas, Stefan; Juhasova, Jana; Navarro, Michael; Marsala, Silvia; Lukacova, Nada; Hruska-Plochan, Marian; Curtis, Erik; Gabel, Brandon; Ciacci, Joseph; Ahrens, Eric T; Kaspar, Brian K; Cleveland, Don; Marsala, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Effective in vivo use of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors to achieve gene-specific silencing or upregulation in the central nervous system has been limited by the inability to provide more than limited deep parenchymal expression in adult animals using delivery routes with the most clinical relevance (intravenous or intrathecal). Here, we demonstrate that the spinal pia membrane represents the primary barrier limiting effective AAV9 penetration into the spinal parenchyma after intrathecal AAV9 delivery. We develop a novel subpial AAV9 delivery technique and AAV9-dextran formulation. We use these in adult rats and pigs to show (i) potent spinal parenchymal transgene expression in white and gray matter including neurons, glial and endothelial cells after single bolus subpial AAV9 delivery; (ii) delivery to almost all apparent descending motor axons throughout the length of the spinal cord after cervical or thoracic subpial AAV9 injection; (iii) potent retrograde transgene expression in brain motor centers (motor cortex and brain stem); and (iv) the relative safety of this approach by defining normal neurological function for up to 6 months after AAV9 delivery. Thus, subpial delivery of AAV9 enables gene-based therapies with a wide range of potential experimental and clinical utilizations in adult animals and human patients. PMID:27462649

  13. Potent spinal parenchymal AAV9-mediated gene delivery by subpial injection in adult rats and pigs.

    PubMed

    Miyanohara, Atsushi; Kamizato, Kota; Juhas, Stefan; Juhasova, Jana; Navarro, Michael; Marsala, Silvia; Lukacova, Nada; Hruska-Plochan, Marian; Curtis, Erik; Gabel, Brandon; Ciacci, Joseph; Ahrens, Eric T; Kaspar, Brian K; Cleveland, Don; Marsala, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Effective in vivo use of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors to achieve gene-specific silencing or upregulation in the central nervous system has been limited by the inability to provide more than limited deep parenchymal expression in adult animals using delivery routes with the most clinical relevance (intravenous or intrathecal). Here, we demonstrate that the spinal pia membrane represents the primary barrier limiting effective AAV9 penetration into the spinal parenchyma after intrathecal AAV9 delivery. We develop a novel subpial AAV9 delivery technique and AAV9-dextran formulation. We use these in adult rats and pigs to show (i) potent spinal parenchymal transgene expression in white and gray matter including neurons, glial and endothelial cells after single bolus subpial AAV9 delivery; (ii) delivery to almost all apparent descending motor axons throughout the length of the spinal cord after cervical or thoracic subpial AAV9 injection; (iii) potent retrograde transgene expression in brain motor centers (motor cortex and brain stem); and (iv) the relative safety of this approach by defining normal neurological function for up to 6 months after AAV9 delivery. Thus, subpial delivery of AAV9 enables gene-based therapies with a wide range of potential experimental and clinical utilizations in adult animals and human patients. PMID:27462649

  14. Cloned Genomic DNA of Type 2 Porcine Circovirus Is Infectious When Injected Directly into the Liver and Lymph Nodes of Pigs: Characterization of Clinical Disease, Virus Distribution, and Pathologic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Fenaux, M.; Halbur, P. G.; Haqshenas, G.; Royer, R.; Thomas, P.; Nawagitgul, P.; Gill, M.; Toth, T. E.; Meng, X. J.

    2002-01-01

    Infection of animals with a molecular viral clone is critical to study the genetic determinants of viral replication and virulence in the host. Type 2 porcine circovirus (PCV2) has been incriminated as the cause of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS), an emerging disease in pigs. We report here for the first time the construction and use of an infectious molecular DNA clone of PCV2 to characterize the disease and pathologic lesions associated with PCV2 infection by direct in vivo transfection of pigs with the molecular clone. The PCV2 molecular clone was generated by ligating two copies of the complete PCV2 genome in tandem into the pBluescript SK (pSK) vector and was shown to be infectious in vitro when transfected into PK-15 cells. Forty specific-pathogen-free pigs at 4 weeks of age were randomly assigned to four groups of 10 each. Group 1 pigs served as uninoculated controls. Pigs in group 2 were each inoculated intranasally with about 1.9 × 105 50% tissue culture infective doses of a homogeneous PCV2 live virus stock derived from the molecular clone. Pigs in group 3 were each injected intrahepatically with 200 μg of the cloned PCV2 plasmid DNA, and pigs in group 4 were each injected into the superficial iliac lymph nodes with 200 μg of the cloned PCV2 plasmid DNA. Animals injected with the cloned PCV2 plasmid DNA developed infection resembling that induced by intranasal inoculation with PCV2 live virus stock. Seroconversion to PCV2-specific antibody was detected in the majority of pigs from the three inoculated groups at 35 days postinoculation (DPI). Viremia, beginning at 14 DPI and lasting 2 to 4 weeks, was detected in the majority of the pigs from all three inoculated groups. There were no remarkable clinical signs of PMWS in control or any of the inoculated pigs. Gross lesions in pigs of the three inoculated groups were similar and were characterized by systemically enlarged, tan lymph nodes and lungs that failed to collapse

  15. Transition of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma clones during clinical progression.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Sakura; Firouzi, Sanaz; López, Yosvany; Yamochi, Tadanori; Nakano, Kazumi; Uchimaru, Kaoru; Utusnomiya, Atae; Iwanaga, Masako; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2016-09-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a peripheral T-cell neoplasm caused by the transformation of HTLV-1-infected T cells. ATLL, especially its aggressive form, is known for its poor prognosis, even with intensive chemotherapy. ATLL cells are considered to be monoclonal; however, multiclonal proliferation or emergence of a new clone over time has been reported based on Southern blot analysis, although direct molecular evidence remains elusive. Furthermore, it is thought that clonal change may be a cause of early drug resistance in ATLL. To directly analyze potential clonal changes in ATLL during its clinical course, we used inverse PCR to detect integration sites in combination with a newly developed method using next-generation sequencing, and compared ATLL cell clonality at different time points. The results of inverse PCR indicated that the major clone was altered in three of 19 patients. Together with results from five patients, using this new method, we found direct evidence of clonal change occurring during the clinical course or in response to chemotherapy in ATLL. These results also highlight the importance of clonality analysis for understanding the mechanisms of ATLL development and drug resistance. PMID:27383637

  16. Immunization of guinea-pigs and cattle against adult Rhipicephalus appendiculatus ticks using semipurified nymphal homogenates and adult gut homogenate.

    PubMed Central

    Rechav, Y; Spickett, A M; Dauth, J; Tembo, S D; Clarke, F C; Heller-Haupt, A; Trinder, P K

    1992-01-01

    Guinea-pigs inoculated with crude homogenate of unfed nymphs of the tick Rhipicephalus appendiculatus and with three semipurified fractions of the homogenate obtained by gel permeation chromatography, acquired a significant degree of immunity to infestation with adults of this tick. Fraction 2 induced the highest reduction (66%) in mean weight of engorged females followed by crude homogenate and fractions 1 and 3. Calves immunized with crude homogenates of unfed nymphs, fraction 2 of nymphal homogenate, and gut homogenate of unfed females also acquired immunity against adults of R. appendiculatus. The mean weight of engorged females fed on calves inoculated with nymphal fraction 2 was the lowest of all five groups of calves on which females fed. The reduction in weight (38%) was not significantly different from that observed for females fed on calves inoculated with crude nymphal homogenate (31%) or females from third infestation of adult ticks. No differences in the weight and hatchability of egg batches produced by engorged females collected from the five groups of calves were observed. Analysis of sera collected from the five groups of calves showed that the concentration of albumin, alpha-1, alpha-2 and beta-globulins fluctuated and no significant differences between the treated groups were observed. The levels of gamma-globulin increased in treated groups including the group inoculated with adjuvant only, but unlike previous reports no increase in gamma-globulin or a correlation between the level of gamma-globulin and the degree of resistance acquired were observed in calves exposed to repeated tick infestations. However, the increase in the concentration of gamma-globulin in calves inoculated with fraction 2 or crude nymphal homogenate was higher than that observed in the other groups. PMID:1375584

  17. High-fat diet-dependent modulation of the delayed rectifier K(+) current in adult guinea pig atrial myocytes.

    PubMed

    Aromolaran, Ademuyiwa S; Colecraft, Henry M; Boutjdir, Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    Obesity is associated with hyperlipidemia, electrical remodeling of the heart, and increased risk of supraventricular arrhythmias in both male and female patients. The delayed rectifier K(+) current (IK), is an important regulator of atrial repolarization. There is a paucity of studies on the functional role of IK in response to obesity. Here, we assessed the obesity-mediated functional modulation of IK in low-fat diet (LFD), and high-fat diet (HFD) fed adult guinea pigs. Guinea pigs were randomly divided into control and obese groups fed, ad libitum, with a LFD (10 kcal% fat) or a HFD (45 kcal% fat) respectively. Action potential duration (APD), and IK were studied in atrial myocytes and IKr and IKs in HEK293 cells using whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology. HFD guinea pigs displayed a significant increase in body weight, total cholesterol and total triglycerides within 50 days. Atrial APD at 30% (APD30) and 90% (APD90) repolarization were shorter, while atrial IK density was significantly increased in HFD guinea pigs. Exposure to palmitic acid (PA) increased heterologously expressed IKr and IKs densities, while oleic acid (OA), severely reduced IKr and had no effect on IKs. The data are first to show that in obese guinea pigs abbreviated APD is due to increased IK density likely through elevations of PA. Our findings may have crucial implications for targeted treatment options for obesity-related arrhythmias. PMID:27130822

  18. Cloning of Bordetella bronchiseptica urease genes and analysis of colonization by a urease-negative mutant strain in a guinea-pig model.

    PubMed

    Monack, D M; Falkow, S

    1993-11-01

    The genes encoding urease were cloned from Bordetella bronchiseptica and the 5.2 kb of DNA essential for expression analysed in a T7 RNA polymerase transcription-translation system. At least four polypeptides with predicted molecular weights of 69,000, 26,000, 12,200 and 11,000 were found. Partial DNA sequence of the gene encoding the 69,000 Da polypeptide revealed high amino acid identity to the alpha-subunit of Proteus mirabilis urease, UreC and jack bean urease. A stable, unmarked deletion was constructed in this gene to create a urease-negative mutant of B. bronchiseptica. To assess colonization in a guinea-pig model, the urease-negative strain was inoculated with the urease-positive parental strain in a mixed infection. The urease-negative strain out competed the urease-positive strain in the trachea, lungs and caecum. We demonstrate that urease is not essential for B. bronchiseptica colonization of the guinea-pig respiratory and digestive tracts. PMID:7968532

  19. 27-Oxygenation of C27-sterols and 25-hydroxylation of vitamin D3 in kidney: cloning, structure and expression of pig kidney CYP27A.

    PubMed Central

    Postlind, H; Hosseinpour, F; Norlin, M; Wikvall, K

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the molecular cloning of a cytochrome P450 enzyme in pig kidney that catalyses the hydroxylations of vitamin D(3) (cholecalciferol) and C(27)-sterols. DNA sequence analysis of the cDNA revealed that the enzyme belongs to the CYP27 family. The first 36 amino acids have many hallmarks of a mitochondrial signal sequence. The mature pig kidney CYP27 protein contains 498 amino acids. The M(r) of the mature protein was calculated to be 56607. The structure of pig kidney CYP27, as deduced by DNA sequence analysis, shows 77-83% identity with CYP27A in rat, rabbit and human liver. Transfection of the renal CYP27A cDNA into simian COS cells resulted in the synthesis of an enzyme that catalysed the 25-hydroxylation of vitamin D(3) and the 27-hydroxylation of 5beta-cholestane-3alpha,7alpha,12alpha-triol, and the further oxidation of the product into the corresponding C(27)-acid 3alpha,7alpha,12alpha-trihydroxy-5beta-cholestanoic acid. As part of these studies, the enzymic activities of cultured human embryonic kidney cells were examined using vitamin D(3) and C(27)-sterols as substrates. The cells were found to express CYP27A mRNA and to convert the respective substrates into the same products as recombinantly expressed CYP27A, i.e. 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) and 27-oxygenated C(27)-sterols. The results of the present study describing the structure and expression of CYP27A in kidney suggest that this enzyme is involved in the renal metabolism of vitamin D(3) and that the kidney plays a role in the metabolism of cholesterol and other C(27)-sterols. PMID:10749662

  20. Immunolocalization of MAP-2 in routinely formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded guinea pig brain sections using microwave irradiation: a comparison of different combinations of antibody clones and antigen retrieval buffer solutions.

    PubMed

    Kan, Robert K; Pleva, Christina M; Hamilton, Tracey A; Petrali, John P

    2005-04-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of different microwave pretreatment methods to retrieve microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2) immunoreactivity in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded guinea pig brain sections. Brain sections, microwave pretreated in boiling sodium citrate, citric acid, Tris hydrochloride, and EDTA buffers of pH 4, 6, and 8, were labeled with four different clones of MAP-2 monoclonal antibodies. No MAP-2 immunoreactivity was observed in control sections processed without microwave pretreatment. Optimal MAP-2 immunoreactivity was observed only when MAP-2 antibody clone AP18 was used in conjunction with citric acid buffer of pH 6.0. Using this combination, brain sections from nerve agent soman-exposed guinea pigs were found to exhibit marked reduction in MAP-2 immunostaining in the hippocampus. These observations suggest that the clone of the antibody in addition to the type and pH of antigen retrieval (AR) solution are important variables to be considered for establishing an optimal AR technique. When studying counterpart antigens of species other than that to which the antibodies were originally raised, different antibody clones must be tested in combination with different microwave-assisted AR (MAR) methods. This MAR method makes it possible to conduct retrospective studies on archival guinea pig brain paraffin blocks to evaluate changes in neuronal MAP-2 expression as a consequence of chemical warfare nerve agent toxicity. PMID:15817147

  1. Nano-crystalline diamond-coated titanium dental implants - a histomorphometric study in adult domestic pigs.

    PubMed

    Metzler, Philipp; von Wilmowsky, Cornelius; Stadlinger, Bernd; Zemann, Wolfgang; Schlegel, Karl Andreas; Rosiwal, Stephan; Rupprecht, Stephan

    2013-09-01

    Promising biomaterial characteristics of diamond-coatings in biomedicine have been described in the literature. However, there is a lack of knowledge about implant osseointegration of this surface modification compared to the currently used sandblasted acid-etched Ti-Al6-V4 implants. The aim of this study was to investigate the osseointegration of microwave plasma-chemical-vapour deposition (MWP-CVD) diamond-coated Ti-Al6-V4 dental implants after healing periods of 2 and 5 months. Twenty-four MWP-CVD diamond-coated and 24 un-coated dental titanium-alloy implants (Ankylos(®)) were placed in the frontal skull of eight adult domestic pigs. To evaluate the effects of the nano-structured surfaces on bone formation, a histomorphometric analysis was performed after 2 and 5 months of implant healing. Histomorphometry analysed the bone-to-implant contact (BIC). No significant difference in BIC for the diamond-coated implants in comparison to reference implants could be observed for both healing periods. Scanning electron microscopy revealed an adequate interface between the bone and the diamond surface. No delamination or particle-dissociation due to shearing forces could be detected. In this study, diamond-coated dental titanium-alloy implants and sandblasted acid-etched implants showed a comparable degree of osseointegration. PMID:23266005

  2. Localization of chemosensitive structures in the isolated brainstem of adult guinea-pig.

    PubMed Central

    Morin-Surun, M P; Boudinot, E; Schäfer, T; Denavit-Saubié, M

    1995-01-01

    1. Central respiratory chemosensitivity has been intensively examined but some questions remain unsolved; namely, what is the nature of the stimulus (fixed acid and/or CO2) and where is the site of brainstem chemosensitivity (near the ventral medullary surface or structures deeper within the brainstem)? To examine these questions, we used the in vitro isolated brainstem of adult guinea-pig perfused independently through the basilar artery and the bath. 2. Respiratory motor output was recorded with a suction electrode from cranial hypoglossal (XII) roots. Changes in pH and CO2 in the Krebs perfusate were made by changing either the bicarbonate concentration or the PCO2 saturating the Krebs solution. 3. Changes in basilar artery perfusate consisting of (i) an acidifying increase in PCO2 (hypercapnic acidic Krebs solution), (ii) an increase in PCO2 with no change in pH (hypercapnic Krebs solution), or (iii) a decrease in pH with no change in PCO2 (acidic Krebs solution) evoked increases in respiratory frequency and a concomitant decrease in inspiratory burst amplitude. 4. Bath superfusion with hypercapnic acidic Krebs solution increased the inspiratory burst amplitude with no effect on respiratory burst frequency. 5. Bath superfusion with hypercapnic non-acidic Krebs solution increased the inspiratory burst amplitude and decreased the respiratory frequency, while normocapnic acidic Krebs solution increased the respiratory frequency with no change in burst amplitude. 6. These results show that respiratory responses to changes in CO2 and pH depend upon the sites of action. While a CO2 increase or a pH decrease affected the respiratory frequency in the deep brainstem structures (perfused through the basilar artery), CO2 respiratory chemosensitivity at the ventral surface could be differentiated from the hydrogen ion chemosensitivity. This suggests that different mechanisms mediated respiratory responses when deep versus superficial brainstem structures were stimulated

  3. Cloned cDNA to cholecystokinin mRNA predicts an identical preprocholecystokinin in pig brain and gut.

    PubMed Central

    Gubler, U; Chua, A O; Hoffman, B J; Collier, K J; Eng, J

    1984-01-01

    Molecular cloning has established the structure of preprocholecystokinin in porcine cerebral cortex and duodenal mucosa. This precursor is 114 amino acids long, is identical in brain and gut, contains all the cholecystokinin (CCK) peptides previously isolated, and has the characteristics of a prohormone. It contains a putative amino-terminal signal peptide, basic processing sites, and a carboxyl-terminal amidation signal. The CCK mRNAs from brain and gut are approximately 850 nucleotides long and differ by only a few single base changes. This analysis establishes by a strict criterion that CCK is synthesized in both brain and gut and that the different distributions of molecular forms of CCK in the two tissues are most probably a consequence of tissue-specific posttranslational events. Images PMID:6205394

  4. Prenatal genesis of layer II doublecortin expressing neurons in neonatal and young adult guinea pig cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yan; Xie, Mi-Xin; Li, Jian-Ming; Hu, Xia; Patrylo, Peter R.; Luo, Xue-Gang; Cai, Yan; Li, Zhiyuan; Yan, Xiao-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Cells expressing doublecortin (DCX+) occur at cortical layer II, predominantly over the paleocortex in mice/rats, but also across the neocortex among larger mammals. Here, we explored the time of origin of these cells in neonatal and 2-month-old guinea pigs following prenatal BrdU pulse-chasing. In the neocortex, BrdU+ cells birth-dated at embryonic day 21 (E21), E28, and E35 laminated over the cortical plate with an inside-out order. In the piriform cortex, cells generated at E21 and E28 occurred with a greater density in layer II than III. Many cells were generated at later time points until birth, occurring in the cortex without a laminar preference. DCX+ cells in the neocortex and piriform cortex partially co-colocalized with BrdU (up to 7.5%) in the newborns after pulse-chasing from E21 to E49 and in the 2 month-old animals after pulse-chasing from E28 to E60/61, with higher rates seen among the E21-E35 groups. Together, layer II DCX+ cells in neonatal and young adult guinea pigs may be produced over a wide prenatal time window, but mainly during the early phases of corticogenesis. Our data also show an earlier establishment of the basic lamination in the piriform relative to neocortical areas in guinea pigs. PMID:26321922

  5. Trichostatin A-Mediated Epigenetic Transformation of Adult Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Biases the In Vitro Developmental Capability, Quality, and Pluripotency Extent of Porcine Cloned Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Samiec, Marcin; Opiela, Jolanta; Lipiński, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The current research was conducted to explore the in vitro developmental outcome and cytological/molecular quality of porcine nuclear-transferred (NT) embryos reconstituted with adult bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ABM-MSCs) that were epigenetically transformed by treatment with nonspecific inhibitor of histone deacetylases, known as trichostatin A (TSA). The cytological quality of cloned blastocysts was assessed by estimation of the total cells number (TCN) and apoptotic index. Their molecular quality was evaluated by real-time PCR-mediated quantification of gene transcripts for pluripotency- and multipotent stemness-related markers (Oct4, Nanog, and Nestin). The morula and blastocyst formation rates of NT embryos derived from ABM-MSCs undergoing TSA treatment were significantly higher than in the TSA-unexposed group. Moreover, the NT blastocysts generated using TSA-treated ABM-MSCs exhibited significantly higher TCN and increased pluripotency extent measured with relative abundance of Oct4 and Nanog mRNAs as compared to the TSA-untreated group. Altogether, the improvements in morula/blastocyst yields and quality of cloned pig embryos seem to arise from enhanced abilities for promotion of correct epigenetic reprogramming of TSA-exposed ABM-MSC nuclei in a cytoplasm of reconstructed oocytes. To our knowledge, we are the first to report the successful production of mammalian high-quality NT blastocysts using TSA-dependent epigenomic modulation of ABM-MSCs. PMID:25866813

  6. Comparison of lidocaine and bupivacaine depression of sinoatrial nodal activity during hypoxia and acidosis in adult and neonatal guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Bosnjak, Z J; Stowe, D F; Kampine, J P

    1986-09-01

    High blood concentrations of local anesthetics are cardiotoxic. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of lidocaine and bupivacaine on the intrinsic pacemaker activity of in vitro sinoatrial nodal cells of the adult and neonatal guinea pig in the presence and absence of hypoxia and acidosis. Fifteen pairs of adult (greater than 80 days old) and neonatal (0-3 days old) hearts were isolated. Nodal tissues were suffused with Krebs-Ringer solution at 37 degrees C and exposed to increasing concentrations of either lidocaine (0.05-0.8 mM) or bupivacaine (0.01-0.4 mM). The suffusate was equilibrated either with 5% CO2, 95% O2 (pH 7.40, PO2 482 torr) or with 12% CO2, 88% N2 (pH 7.01, PO2 58 torr). Transmembrane action potentials were recorded from sinoatrial nodal cells and impulse intervals were converted to rates. We found that hypoxia and acidosis alone reduced rates in both adults and neonates, and that the reduction was additive to the effects of local anesthetics. Bupivacaine was 4-5 times more potent in decreasing rates than was lidocaine in both age groups. Lidocaine was about twice as effective in depressing neonatal rates as adult rates, and bupivacaine caused cessation of pacemaker activity in a greater percentage of nodes than did lidocaine. Our results demonstrate, in vitro, that the neonatal sinoatrial node is more sensitive to lidocaine and bupivacaine than is the adult node, that bupivacaine is more potent in depressing and stopping nodal activity, and that hypoxia and acidosis enhance pacemaker depression caused by these agents.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3740490

  7. Social learning in pig-tailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina) and adult humans (Homo sapiens) on a two-action artificial fruit.

    PubMed

    Custance, Deborah; Prato-Previde, Emanuela; Spiezio, Caterina; Rigamonti, Marco M; Poli, Marco

    2006-08-01

    An artificial fruit (AF) was used to test for social learning in pig-tailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina) and adult humans (Homo sapiens). A monkey demonstrator opened the AF, showing alternative methods to 2 groups of cage mates. Video films of the monkey demonstrations were presented to adult humans. Compared with chimpanzees and children, the macaques watched the demonstrations significantly less and in a much more sporadic manner. They also produced only very weak and transitory evidence of social learning. In contrast, the adult humans performed as one might expect of optimum imitators, even producing evidence of components of a "ratchet effect." PMID:16893268

  8. Using adult cloned trees grown under natural conditions to characterize BVOC emission variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, Ylva; Schurgers, Guy; Ekberg, Anna; Rinnan, Riikka; Holst, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOCs) are diverse chemical species produced and emitted from the vegetation as trace gases. BVOCs are commonly grouped into isoprene, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, where isoprene is mainly emitted by deciduous trees and monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes by coniferous trees. BVOCs are known to have a considerable impact on atmospheric chemistry and are precursors for secondary organic aerosol, which in turn are important for the aerosol feedback on the Earth's climate. Recently, Bäck et al. (2012) reported a high diversity of the chemical composition of emitted compounds from pine trees growing at the same stand due to genetic variation. This study here uses cloned trees growing naturally in a transect in Europe in order to exclude genetic variation and to assess emission variation between and within selected tree species grown at different climatic conditions. The International Phenological Garden (IPG) network, where cloned trees are used to monitor the long-term phenological observations of representative tree species for Europe provides a specific, cloned set of important tree species, which had been planted throughout Europe starting in 1957. This gives a unique opportunity to study the adaptation to various climatic conditions and field conditions in genetically identical plants in relation to BVOC emissions. During a field campaign in 2013 at the IPG site in Taastrup, Denmark (55°40' N, 12°18' E), seven trees were measured at three heights within the canopy. Measured trees were two English oaks (Quercus robur), one European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and four Norway spruces (Picea abies) of two provenances. For oak and one provenance of spruce, measurements were performed twice, both in June and in August in order to examine any emission pattern change with the progression of the summer. Measurements were performed using a gas-exchange cuvette of a photosynthesis system combined with BVOC adsorbent tubes, which were

  9. Chronic prenatal ethanol exposure alters expression of central and peripheral insulin signaling molecules in adult guinea pig offspring.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Christine C; Thevasundaram, Kersh; Mongillo, Daniel L; Winterborn, Andrew; Holloway, Alison C; Brien, James F; Reynolds, James N

    2014-11-01

    Maternal ethanol consumption during pregnancy can produce a range of teratogenic outcomes in offspring. The mechanism of ethanol teratogenicity is multi-faceted, but may involve alterations in insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathways. These pathways are not only important for metabolism, but are also critically involved in neuronal survival and plasticity, and they can be altered by chronic prenatal ethanol exposure (CPEE). The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that CPEE alters expression of insulin and IGF signaling molecules in the prefrontal cortex and liver of adult guinea pig offspring. Pregnant Dunkin-Hartley-strain guinea pigs received ethanol (4 g/kg maternal body weight/day) or isocaloric-sucrose/pair-feeding (nutritional control) throughout gestation. Fasting blood glucose concentration was measured in male and female offspring at postnatal day 150-200, followed by euthanasia, collection of prefrontal cortex and liver, and RNA extraction. IGF-1, IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R), IGF-2, IGF-2 receptor (IGF-2R), insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1, IRS-2, and insulin receptor (INSR) mRNA expression levels were measured in tissues using quantitative real-time PCR. The mean maternal blood ethanol concentration was 281 ± 15 mg/dL at 1 h after the second divided dose of ethanol on GD 57. CPEE resulted in increased liver weight in adult offspring, but produced no difference in fasting blood glucose concentration compared with nutritional control. In the liver, CPEE decreased mRNA expression of IGF-1, IGF-1R, and IGF-2, and increased IRS-2 mRNA expression in male offspring only compared with nutritional control. Female CPEE offspring had decreased INSR hepatic mRNA expression compared with male CPEE offspring. In the prefrontal cortex, IRS-2 mRNA expression was increased in CPEE offspring compared with nutritional control. The data demonstrate that CPEE alters both central and peripheral expression of insulin and IGF signaling

  10. Characterization of long cDNA clones from human adult spleen. II. The complete sequences of 81 cDNA clones.

    PubMed

    Jikuya, Hiroyuki; Takano, Jun; Kikuno, Reiko; Hirosawa, Makoto; Nagase, Takahiro; Nomura, Nobuo; Ohara, Osamu

    2003-02-28

    To accumulate information on the coding sequences (CDSs) of unidentified genes, we have conducted a sequencing project of human long cDNA clones. Both the end sequences of approximately 10,000 cDNA clones from two size-fractionated human spleen cDNA libraries (average sizes of 4.5 kb and 5.6 kb) were determined by single-pass sequencing to select cDNAs with unidentified sequences. We herein present the entire sequences of 81 cDNA clones, most of which were selected by two approaches based on their protein-coding potentialities in silico: Fifty-eight cDNA clones were selected as those having protein-coding potentialities at the 5'-end of single-pass sequences by applying the GeneMark analysis; and 20 cDNA clones were selected as those expected to encode proteins larger than 100 amino acid residues by analysis of the human genome sequences flanked by both the end sequences of cDNAs using the GENSCAN gene prediction program. In addition to these newly identified cDNAs, three cDNA clones were isolated by colony hybridization experiments using probes corresponding to known gene sequences since these cDNAs are likely to contain considerable amounts of new information regarding the genes already annotated. The sequence data indicated that the average sizes of the inserts and corresponding CDSs of cDNA clones analyzed here were 5.0 kb and 2.0 kb (670 amino acid residues), respectively. From the results of homology and motif searches against the public databases, functional categories of the 29 predicted gene products could be assigned; 86% of these predicted gene products (25 gene products) were classified into proteins relating to cell signaling/communication, nucleic acid management, and cell structure/motility. PMID:12693554

  11. Cloning, expression, and tissue localisation of prolactin in adult sea bream (Sparus aurata).

    PubMed

    Santos, C R; Brinca, L; Ingleton, P M; Power, D M

    1999-04-01

    A major action of prolactin (PRL) in teleost fish is the maintenance of hydromineral balance in euryhaline species in fresh water. The function of PRL in marine teleosts is less certain and unlike euryhaline teleosts, such as tilapia and salmon, there is relatively little information about protein or gene structure. Associated with studies to determine potential functions of PRL, pituitary prolactin cDNA has been cloned and sequenced from sea bream (Sparus aurata), a marine teleost. The sequence obtained spanned 1349 bp and contained an open reading frame encoding a protein of 212 amino acids composed of a putative signal peptide of 24 residues and a mature protein of 188 amino acids. N-terminal sequencing of the native protein confirmed unambiguously the cleavage site, Ala24, Val25, predicted from alignments of the sea bream PRL cDNA with that of other teleosts. The presence of only one form of PRL in sea bream was supported by identification using Northern blots of only a single transcript of 1.35 kb. Reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction techniques coupled with Southern blot analysis resulted in the detection of PRL in the pituitary but also in the intestine, liver, ovary, and testes. PMID:10094859

  12. Invasion by Neisseria meningitidis varies widely between clones and among nasopharyngeal mucosae derived from adult human hosts.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Robert; Goodwin, Linda; Stevanin, Tania M; Silcocks, Paul B; Parker, Andrew; Maiden, Martin C J; Read, Robert C

    2002-05-01

    Colonization of the human nasopharynx is a feature of some species of Neisseria, and is a prerequisite of invasive meningococcal disease. The likelihood of colonization by Neisseria meningitidis varies widely between humans, and very few develop invasive disease. Explants of nasal mucosa derived from adult patients with non-allergic nasal obstruction were infected experimentally with Neisseria spp. At intervals over 18 h incubation, washed explants were homogenized, and viable bacteria were counted. To estimate bacterial invasion of mucosa, explants were exposed to 0.25% sodium taurocholate for 30 s prior to homogenization. N. meningitidis was recovered from the mucosa and the organism invaded and replicated within the tissue, in contrast to N. lactamica and N. animalis (n=9, P<0.008). N. meningitidis isolates of clones ET-5, ET-37 and lineage III were recovered from and invaded tissue, but strains of clones A4, A:subgroup I, A:subgroup III and A:subgroup IV-1 did not invade (n=6). To measure host variation, survival of N. meningitidis within nasal mucosa of 40 different human donors was measured. Intra-class correlation of replicates was 0.97, but the coefficient of variation of recovered viable counts was 1335% after 4 h and 77% after 18 h incubation. It is concluded that the distinctive colonization and disease potential of Neisseria spp. may be partly a consequence of their ability to invade and survive within human nasopharyngeal mucosa, but that this is influenced greatly by genetic or environmental factors operating on the host mucosa. This is consistent with the unpredictable epidemiology of meningococcal disease. PMID:11988521

  13. "We Are Guinea Pigs Really": Examining the Realities of ICT-based Adult Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selwyn, Neil; Gorard, Stephen; Williams, Sara

    2002-01-01

    Interviews with 36 adult learners in information-communications technology (ICT) settings, using the concept of learning trajectories, revealed barriers to widening participation through ICT. In addition to technical shortcomings, social, economic, cultural, and political issues hinder the process, including lack of innovative instruction and…

  14. Purification and crystallization of yeast glycosylphosphatidylinositol transamidase subunit PIG-S (PIG-S71–467)

    PubMed Central

    Kamariah, Neelagandan; Eisenhaber, Frank; Adhikari, Sharmila; Eisenhaber, Birgit; Grüber, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    The transfer of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors onto eukaryotic proteins is catalyzed by the transamidase complex, which is composed of at least five subunits (PIG-K, PIG-S, PIG-T, PIG-U and GPAA1). Here, the recombinant protein PIG-S71–467 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, including residues 71–467 of the entire 534-residue protein, was cloned, expressed and purified to homogeneity. The monodisperse protein was crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method. A diffraction data set was collected to 3.2 Å resolution with 91.6% completeness. The crystals belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 106.72, b = 59.33, c = 124.3 Å, β = 114.19°, and contained two molecules in the asymmetric unit. PMID:21821889

  15. Investigation of Pharmacological Activity of Caralluma penicillata: Anti-Inflammatory Properties and Gastritis Protection against Indomethacin in Adult Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Albaser, Nabil; Ghanem, Najeeb; Shehab, Mohanad; Al-Adhal, Adnan

    2014-01-01

    Caralluma is a plant that possessing a great therapeutic potential in folk medicine in Yemen, namely, Caralluma penicillata (C. penicillata) as antiulcer. The study aims to evaluate the anti-inflammatory properties and gastritis protection activity of C. penicillata against indomethacin in adult guinea pigs. The study was divided into four parts: firstly, the optimum dose of extract as anti-inflammatory effect was determined. Secondly, the acute anti-inflammatory effect of extract were estimated. Thirdly, the repeated doses of extract against chronic inflammation was estimated. The anti-inflammatory activity of extract was compared with indomethacin as a prototype of drug against inflammation. Fourthly, the gastritis protection properties of extract with/without indomethacin were performed. The results showed that a 400 mg/kg of 10% ethanol extract produced the maximum of anti-inflammatory effect. Also, the single dose of extract was equipotent for indomethacin (10 mg/kg), but shorter in duration with regard to acute anti-inflammatory effect. In addition, the repeated doses of extract against chronic inflammation were less potent than indomethacin with regard to ulcerogenic effect. On the other hand, extract-indomethacin combination reduced the gastritis effect of indomethacin based on ulcer index and histological study.

  16. Purification and molecular cloning of aspartic proteinases from the stomach of adult Japanese fire belly newts, Cynops pyrrhogaster.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Tatsuki; Sano, Kaori; Kawaguchi, Mari; Kobayashi, Ken-Ichiro; Yasumasu, Shigeki; Inokuchi, Tomofumi

    2016-04-01

    Six aspartic proteinase precursors, a pro-cathepsin E (ProCatE) and five pepsinogens (Pgs), were purified from the stomach of adult newts (Cynops pyrrhogaster). On sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the molecular weights of the Pgs and active enzymes were 37-38 kDa and 31-34 kDa, respectively. The purified ProCatE was a dimer whose subunits were connected by a disulphide bond. cDNA cloning by polymerase chain reaction and subsequent phylogenetic analysis revealed that three of the purified Pgs were classified as PgA and the remaining two were classified as PgBC belonging to C-type Pg. Our results suggest that PgBC is one of the major constituents of acid protease in the urodele stomach. We hypothesize that PgBC is an amphibian-specific Pg that diverged during its evolutional lineage. PgBC was purified and characterized for the first time. The purified urodele pepsin A was completely inhibited by equal molar units of pepstatin A. Conversely, the urodele pepsin BC had low sensitivity to pepstatin A. In acidic condition, the activation rates of newt pepsin A and BC were similar to those of mammalian pepsin A and C1, respectively. Our results suggest that the enzymological characters that distinguish A- and C-type pepsins appear to be conserved in mammals and amphibians. PMID:26711235

  17. Impact of different sources of donor cells upon the nuclear transfer efficiency in Chinese indigenous Meishan pig.

    PubMed

    Hua, Z; Xu, G; Liu, X; Bi, Y; Xiao, H; Hua, W; Li, L; Zhang, L; Ren, H; Zheng, X

    2016-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is currently the most efficient and precise method to generate genetically tailored pig models for both agricultural and biomedical research. However, its efficiency is crucially dependent on the source of nuclear donor cells. In this study, we compared the cloning efficiency by using three lines of donor cells that are derived from fetal, newborn and adult fibroblasts of Chinese indigenous Meishan pig. We showed that cleavage rate and blastocyst formation rate of the reconstructed embryos were not significantly different between the fetal (80.7% and 15.6%) and newborn ear skin (77.5% and 12.3%) fibroblast groups (p>0.05), but in both groups these indices were significantly higher than that found in the adult ear skin (70.5% and 8.8%; p<0.05). Reconstructed embryos derived from fetal, newborn, and adult ear skin fibroblasts were transferred to four surrogates, respectively. For the fetal, newborn, and adult ear skin fibroblasts, the number of pregnancies were two (50.0%), two (50.0%), and one (25.0%), respectively, and the number of deliveries were two (50.0%), one (25.0%), and zero (0.0%), respectively. Seven and two cloned piglets were obtained from the fetal and newborn ear skin fibroblasts respectively, while no piglets were obtained from the adult ear skin fibroblasts. Two cloned piglets from the newborn ear skin fibroblasts died shortly after birth because of neonatal asphyxia caused by dystocia. The birth weights of the piglets derived from the fetal and newborn ear skin fibroblasts were 1230.5 and 1310.0 g, respectively, which were statistically insignificant (p>0.05), but both were significantly higher than that of the control groups (p<0.05). Microsatellite analyses demonstrated that the genotypes of all cloned piglets were identical to their donor cells. Therefore, cloned pigs were successfully produced using two sources of donor cells isolated from the fetal and newborn ear skin fibroblasts of Meishan piglet, and

  18. First report of Metastrongylus pudendotectus by the genetic characterization of mitochondria genome of cox1 in pigs from Tibet, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Luo, Houqiang; Zhang, Hui; Lan, Yanfang; Han, Zhaoqing; Shahzad, Muhammad; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Qiu, Gang; Huang, Shucheng; Jiang, Wenteng; Li, Jiakui

    2016-06-15

    Lungworms, a world wild distributed parasites cause serious respiratory diseases to the pigs. A high infection rate of Metastrongylus lungworms has been found in Tibetan pigs being slaughtered in different slaughter houses of Tibet autonomous region. The main aim of our study was to detect and confirm the lungworm parasite by the genetic characterization of mitochondrial cox1genome isolated from the lungs of Tibetan pig. The adult lungworms were collected from the lungs of slaughtered pigs and identification was done through morphological examinations. Total genomic DNA of the extracted worms was performed and a fragment (∼450bp) of the cox1 of mitochondrial (mt) gene was amplified. Amplicons were cloned into PGEM(®)-T Easy vector and the positive clones were sequenced from a commercial company. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis were performed by software of DNAMAN and MEGA respectively. The results revealed that the lungworms infecting the Tibetan pigs were Metastrongylus pudendotectus (M. pudendotectus). To our knowledge, this is the first report for the isolation and identification for the genetic characterization of mitochondria (mt) genome of cox1 of M. pudendotectus derived from Tibetan pigs in Tibet, China. PMID:27198783

  19. An electrophysiological study of the in vitro, perfused brain stem-cerebellum of adult guinea-pig.

    PubMed Central

    Llinás, R; Mühlethaler, M

    1988-01-01

    1. We describe here a technique which allows the long-term in vitro survival of the perfused isolated brain stem-cerebellum of adult guinea-pig. The viability of this preparation was assessed by comparing the electrophysiological properties of individual neurones and of neuronal pools to those obtained in vivo or in brain slices. The areas investigated included the cerebellar cortex, the inferior olive and the pontine nuclei. 2. Cerebellar field potential and intra- and extracellular single-cell recordings could be obtained for as long as 15 h after the preparation was initially isolated. The waveforms of field potentials recorded at various depths in the cerebellar cortex following surface folial stimulation were similar to those recorded in vivo. Extracellular recordings from single Purkinje cells following white matter stimulation demonstrated antidromic as well as mossy- and climbing fibre-mediated excitation. Stimulation of the cerebellar surface elicited orthodromic parallel fibre excitation of Purkinje cells and basket-stellate and Golgi cell inhibition. 3. Intrasomatic and intradendritic recordings from Purkinje cells reproduced all the phenomenology described earlier under in vivo conditions and in vitro slice preparations. In addition, spontaneous excitatory synaptic potentials generating simple spikes (mossy fibre-parallel fibre-mediated activity) and complex spikes (climbing fibre-mediated activity) were consistently observed. 4. Extracellular field potentials and extra- and intracellular recordings from inferior olive neurones were similar to those previously shown for the mammalian inferior olive. 5. Intracellular recordings were also obtained from pontine nuclei neurones, a major source of mossy fibre afferents to the cerebellum. Stimulation of the contralateral superior cerebellar peduncle produced antidromic invasion of these neurones whereas stimulation of the ipsilateral inferior cerebral peduncle resulted in their orthodromic activation. 6. The

  20. Cilostamide and forskolin treatment during pre-IVM improves preimplantation development of cloned embryos by influencing meiotic progression and gap junction communication in pigs.

    PubMed

    Park, Bola; Lee, Hanna; Lee, Yongjin; Elahi, Fazle; Lee, Joohyeong; Lee, Seung Tae; Park, Choon-Keun; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Lee, Eunsong

    2016-08-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of treatment with the cAMP modulators cilostamide and/or forskolin during pre-IVM culture on meiotic progression, gap junction communication, intraoocyte cAMP level and glutathione content, embryonic development after parthenogenesis, and somatic cell nuclear transfer in pigs. Cumulus-oocyte complexes were cultured for 24 hours in unsupplemented medium or media containing 20 μM cilostamide and/or 50 μM forskolin. After pre-IVM, oocytes were cultured for 41 to 44 hours in a standard IVM medium to induce oocyte maturation. When the nuclear status of oocytes was examined after pre-IVM for 24 hours, a higher (P < 0.01) proportion of oocytes treated with forskolin (85.5%) and cilostamide + forskolin (92.6%) remained at the germinal vesicle stage compared with untreated (20.6%) and cilostamide-treated oocytes (54.7%). cAMP level in pre-IVM oocytes was significantly increased by combined treatment with cilostamide + forskolin (21.38 fmol/oocyte) relative to the no pre-IVM control, no treatment, cilostamide, and forskolin groups (2.85, 1.88, 1.74, and 8.95 fmol/oocyte, respectively). Forskolin with or without cilostamide significantly maintained open-gap junction communication relative to no treatment. Blastocyst formation in parthenogenesis was significantly (P < 0.01) improved by forskolin (65.3%) relative to other treatments (28.3% to 48.1%). Supplementation of pre-IVM with dibutyryl cAMP showed similar blastocyst formation as forskolin treatment (61.1% and 61.0%, respectively). In somatic cell nuclear transfer, simultaneous treatment with cilostamide + forskolin significantly (P < 0.05) increased embryonic development to the blastocyst stage (42.9%) relative to the no pre-IVM, control, and cilostamide groups (32.3, 28.6, and 32.8%, respectively). The glutathione contents in pre-IVM oocytes were increased by no treatment, forskolin, and cilostamide + forskolin (1.38, 1.39, and 1.27 pixels

  1. An mRNA Vaccine Encoding Rabies Virus Glycoprotein Induces Protection against Lethal Infection in Mice and Correlates of Protection in Adult and Newborn Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Daniel; Petsch, Benjamin; Baumhof, Patrick; Kramps, Thomas; Stitz, Lothar

    2016-01-01

    Rabies is a zoonotic infectious disease of the central nervous system (CNS). In unvaccinated or untreated subjects, rabies virus infection causes severe neurological symptoms and is invariably fatal. Despite the long-standing existence of effective vaccines, vaccine availability remains insufficient, with high numbers of fatal infections mostly in developing countries. Nucleic acid based vaccines have proven convincingly as a new technology for the fast development of vaccines against newly emerging pathogens, diseases where no vaccine exists or for replacing already existing vaccines. We used an optimized non-replicating rabies virus glycoprotein (RABV-G) encoding messenger RNA (mRNA) to induce potent neutralizing antibodies (VN titers) in mice and domestic pigs. Functional antibody titers were followed in mice for up to one year and titers remained stable for the entire observation period in all dose groups. T cell analysis revealed the induction of both, specific CD4+ as well as CD8+ T cells by RABV-G mRNA, with the induced CD4+ T cells being higher than those induced by a licensed vaccine. Notably, RABV-G mRNA vaccinated mice were protected against lethal intracerebral challenge infection. Inhibition of viral replication by vaccination was verified by qRT-PCR. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CD4+ T cells are crucial for the generation of neutralizing antibodies. In domestic pigs we were able to induce VN titers that correlate with protection in adult and newborn pigs. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a non-replicating mRNA rabies vaccine in small and large animals and highlights the promises of mRNA vaccines for the prevention of infectious diseases. PMID:27336830

  2. An mRNA Vaccine Encoding Rabies Virus Glycoprotein Induces Protection against Lethal Infection in Mice and Correlates of Protection in Adult and Newborn Pigs.

    PubMed

    Schnee, Margit; Vogel, Annette B; Voss, Daniel; Petsch, Benjamin; Baumhof, Patrick; Kramps, Thomas; Stitz, Lothar

    2016-06-01

    Rabies is a zoonotic infectious disease of the central nervous system (CNS). In unvaccinated or untreated subjects, rabies virus infection causes severe neurological symptoms and is invariably fatal. Despite the long-standing existence of effective vaccines, vaccine availability remains insufficient, with high numbers of fatal infections mostly in developing countries. Nucleic acid based vaccines have proven convincingly as a new technology for the fast development of vaccines against newly emerging pathogens, diseases where no vaccine exists or for replacing already existing vaccines. We used an optimized non-replicating rabies virus glycoprotein (RABV-G) encoding messenger RNA (mRNA) to induce potent neutralizing antibodies (VN titers) in mice and domestic pigs. Functional antibody titers were followed in mice for up to one year and titers remained stable for the entire observation period in all dose groups. T cell analysis revealed the induction of both, specific CD4+ as well as CD8+ T cells by RABV-G mRNA, with the induced CD4+ T cells being higher than those induced by a licensed vaccine. Notably, RABV-G mRNA vaccinated mice were protected against lethal intracerebral challenge infection. Inhibition of viral replication by vaccination was verified by qRT-PCR. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CD4+ T cells are crucial for the generation of neutralizing antibodies. In domestic pigs we were able to induce VN titers that correlate with protection in adult and newborn pigs. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a non-replicating mRNA rabies vaccine in small and large animals and highlights the promises of mRNA vaccines for the prevention of infectious diseases. PMID:27336830

  3. Comparative transcriptomic analysis by RNA-seq to discern differential expression of genes in liver and muscle tissues of adult Berkshire and Jeju Native Pig.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, Simrinder Singh; Song, Ki-Duk; Ghosh, Mrinmoy; Sharma, Neelesh; Lee, Sung Jin; Kim, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Nameun; Mongre, Raj Kumar; Adhikari, Pradeep; Kim, Jin Young; Hong, Sang Pyo; Oh, Sung Jong; Jeong, Dong Kee

    2014-08-10

    RNA-seq is being rapidly adopted for the profiling of the transcriptomes in different areas of biology, especially in the studies related to gene regulation. The discovery of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between adult animals of Jeju Native Pig (JNP) and Berkshire breeds of Sus scrofa, is of particular interest for the current study. For the better understanding of the gene expression profiles of the liver and longissimus dorsi muscle, DEGs were identified via RNA-seq. Sequence reads were obtained from Illumina HiSeq2000 and mapped to the pig reference genome (Sscrofa10.2) using Tophat2. We identified 169 and 39 DEGs in the liver and muscle of JNP respectively, by comparison with Berkshire breed. Out of all identified genes, 41 genes in the liver and 9 genes in the muscle have given significant expression. Gene ontology (GO) terms of developmental process and KEGG pathway analysis showed that metabolic, immune response and protein binding were commonly enriched pathways in the two tissues. Further the heat map analysis by ArrayStar has shown the different levels of expression in JNP with respect to the Berkshire breed. The validation through real time PCR and western blotting also confirmed the differential expression of genes in both breeds. Genes pertaining to metabolic process and inflammatory and immune system are more enriched in Berkshire breed. This comparative transcriptome analysis of two tissues suggests a subset of novel marker genes which expressed differently between the JNP and Berkshire. PMID:24910116

  4. Acinetobacter and E. coli lipopolysaccharide preparations comparative mitogenicity and induction in vitro of immunoglobulin synthesis in adult and neonatal pig lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Symons, D B; Clarkson, C A

    1979-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was prepared by phenol/water extraction of bacterial membranes prepared from Acinetobacter and Escherichia coli. The mitogenicity of laboratory-prepared LPS was significantly greater than that of commercial E. coli LPS for pig, sheep, calf and rat lymphocytes, assayed as [3H]-thymidine incorporation. Mouse lymphocytes responded well to commercial LPS and no greater response was obtained with other LPS preparations. A small proportion (14%) of the Acinetobacter LPS preparations was soluble in aqueous medium, the remainder comprising membraneous fragments of variable form and size. It is suggested that the insoluble presentation of LPS to cells may contribute to the improved mitogenicity compared with wholly soluble LPS. Acinetobacter LPS preparations were used to induce synthesis and secretion in vitro of immunoglobulin by adult blood lymphocytes and pre-suckled, neonatal spleen cells of the pig. IgM was the dominant class of immunoglobulin secreted. This work thus demonstrated that virgin, unprimed B cells could be induced into immunoglobulin secretion by mitogen stimulation. PMID:391702

  5. Why Clone?

    MedlinePlus

    ... How might cloning be used in medicine? Cloning animal models of disease Much of what researchers learn about human disease comes from studying animal models such as mice. Often, animal models are ...

  6. Differential Effects of AAV.BDNF and AAV.Ntf3 in the Deafened Adult Guinea Pig Ear

    PubMed Central

    Budenz, Cameron L.; Wong, Hiu Tung; Swiderski, Donald L.; Shibata, Seiji B.; Pfingst, Bryan E.; Raphael, Yehoash

    2015-01-01

    Cochlear hair cell loss results in secondary regression of peripheral auditory fibers (PAFs) and loss of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). The performance of cochlear implants (CI) in rehabilitating hearing depends on survival of SGNs. Here we compare the effects of adeno-associated virus vectors with neurotrophin gene inserts, AAV.BDNF and AAV.Ntf3, on guinea pig ears deafened systemically (kanamycin and furosemide) or locally (neomycin). AAV.BDNF or AAV.Ntf3 was delivered to the guinea pig cochlea one week following deafening and ears were assessed morphologically 3 months later. At that time, neurotrophins levels were not significantly elevated in the cochlear fluids, even though in vitro and shorter term in vivo experiments demonstrate robust elevation of neurotrophins with these viral vectors. Nevertheless, animals receiving these vectors exhibited considerable re-growth of PAFs in the basilar membrane area. In systemically deafened animals there was a negative correlation between the presence of differentiated supporting cells and PAFs, suggesting that supporting cells influence the outcome of neurotrophin over-expression aimed at enhancing the cochlear neural substrate. Counts of SGN in Rosenthal's canal indicate that BDNF was more effective than NT-3 in preserving SGNs. The results demonstrate that a transient elevation in neurotrophin levels can sustain the cochlear neural substrate in the long term. PMID:25726967

  7. Hair Cell Regeneration after ATOH1 Gene Therapy in the Cochlea of Profoundly Deaf Adult Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Patrick J.; Wise, Andrew K.; Flynn, Brianna O.; Nayagam, Bryony A.; Richardson, Rachael T.

    2014-01-01

    The degeneration of hair cells in the mammalian cochlea results in permanent sensorineural hearing loss. This study aimed to promote the regeneration of sensory hair cells in the mature cochlea and their reconnection with auditory neurons through the introduction of ATOH1, a transcription factor known to be necessary for hair cell development, and the introduction of neurotrophic factors. Adenoviral vectors containing ATOH1 alone, or with neurotrophin-3 and brain derived neurotrophic factor were injected into the lower basal scala media of guinea pig cochleae four days post ototoxic deafening. Guinea pigs treated with ATOH1 gene therapy, alone, had a significantly greater number of cells expressing hair cell markers compared to the contralateral non-treated cochlea when examined 3 weeks post-treatment. This increase, however, did not result in a commensurate improvement in hearing thresholds, nor was there an increase in synaptic ribbons, as measured by CtBP2 puncta after ATOH1 treatment alone, or when combined with neurotrophins. However, hair cell formation and synaptogenesis after co-treatment with ATOH1 and neurotrophic factors remain inconclusive as viral transduction was reduced due to the halving of viral titres when the samples were combined. Collectively, these data suggest that, whilst ATOH1 alone can drive non-sensory cells towards an immature sensory hair cell phenotype in the mature cochlea, this does not result in functional improvements after aminoglycoside-induced deafness. PMID:25036727

  8. Spatial acquisition in the Morris water maze and hippocampal long-term potentiation in the adult guinea pig following brain growth spurt--prenatal ethanol exposure.

    PubMed

    Byrnes, M L; Richardson, D P; Brien, J F; Reynolds, J N; Dringenberg, H C

    2004-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that in the guinea pig, chronic prenatal ethanol exposure throughout gestation can result in deficits in spatial learning in the Morris water maze and impaired hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). The behavioural effects are known to be dose dependent because water maze deficits occur at a dose of 4 g ethanol/kg maternal body weight/day, but not at a dose of 3 g/kg/day, administered throughout gestation. It is possible that the gradual, progressive development of tolerance to ethanol throughout gestation limits ethanol toxicity, especially for lower doses of ethanol. The present study examined whether neurobehavioural deficits are produced by prenatal ethanol exposure at a dose of 3 g/kg/day, administered only during the brain growth spurt (BGS), a regimen designed to limit the development of ethanol tolerance. Pregnant guinea pigs [term, about gestational day (GD) 68] received oral administration of ethanol (1.5 g/kg maternal body weight/day on GD 43 and 44 and then 3 g/kg maternal body weight/day from GD 45 to 62), isocaloric-sucrose/pair-feeding, or water. Offsprings were studied between postnatal days (PD) 40 and 80. The maternal blood ethanol concentration (BEC) on GD 57 or 58, at 1 h after the daily dose, was 245+/-19 mg/dl (n=7). This BGS--prenatal ethanol exposure regimen did not affect spatial learning performance in the Morris water maze over a 7-day test period or in the LTP recorded in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Thus, even when limiting the development of ethanol tolerance seen with chronic ethanol treatment throughout gestation, ethanol exposure during the BGS does not result in deficits in the behavioural and electrophysiological measures of hippocampal integrity assessed in the present study. These data indicate that in the guinea pig, the BGS may not constitute a critical period of vulnerability for ethanol-induced deficits in spatial learning or hippocampal synaptic plasticity in young adult offspring

  9. Whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) genome project: analysis of sequenced clones from egg, instar, and adult (viruliferous and non-viruliferous) cDNA libraries

    PubMed Central

    Leshkowitz, Dena; Gazit, Shirley; Reuveni, Eli; Ghanim, Murad; Czosnek, Henryk; McKenzie, Cindy; Shatters, Robert L; Brown, Judith K

    2006-01-01

    Background The past three decades have witnessed a dramatic increase in interest in the whitefly Bemisia tabaci, owing to its nature as a taxonomically cryptic species, the damage it causes to a large number of herbaceous plants because of its specialized feeding in the phloem, and to its ability to serve as a vector of plant viruses. Among the most important plant viruses to be transmitted by B. tabaci are those in the genus Begomovirus (family, Geminiviridae). Surprisingly, little is known about the genome of this whitefly. The haploid genome size for male B. tabaci has been estimated to be approximately one billion bp by flow cytometry analysis, about five times the size of the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. The genes involved in whitefly development, in host range plasticity, and in begomovirus vector specificity and competency, are unknown. Results To address this general shortage of genomic sequence information, we have constructed three cDNA libraries from non-viruliferous whiteflies (eggs, immature instars, and adults) and two from adult insects that fed on tomato plants infected by two geminiviruses: Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) and Tomato mottle virus (ToMoV). In total, the sequence of 18,976 clones was determined. After quality control, and removal of 5,542 clones of mitochondrial origin 9,110 sequences remained which included 3,843 singletons and 1,017 contigs. Comparisons with public databases indicated that the libraries contained genes involved in cellular and developmental processes. In addition, approximately 1,000 bases aligned with the genome of the B. tabaci endosymbiotic bacterium Candidatus Portiera aleyrodidarum, originating primarily from the egg and instar libraries. Apart from the mitochondrial sequences, the longest and most abundant sequence encodes vitellogenin, which originated from whitefly adult libraries, indicating that much of the gene expression in this insect is directed toward the production of eggs. Conclusion This

  10. High-Throughput Cloning of Temperature-Sensitive Caenorhabditis elegans Mutants with Adult Syncytial Germline Membrane Architecture Defects

    PubMed Central

    Lowry, Josh; Yochem, John; Chuang, Chien-Hui; Sugioka, Kenji; Connolly, Amy A.; Bowerman, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The adult Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodite gonad consists of two mirror-symmetric U-shaped arms, with germline nuclei located peripherally in the distal regions of each arm. The nuclei are housed within membrane cubicles that are open to the center, forming a syncytium with a shared cytoplasmic core called the rachis. As the distal germline nuclei progress through meiotic prophase, they move proximally and eventually cellularize as their compartments grow in size. The development and maintenance of this complex and dynamic germline membrane architecture are relatively unexplored, and we have used a forward genetic screen to identify 20 temperature-sensitive mutations in 19 essential genes that cause defects in the germline membrane architecture. Using a combined genome-wide SNP mapping and whole genome sequencing strategy, we have identified the causal mutations in 10 of these mutants. Four of the genes we have identified are conserved, with orthologs known to be involved in membrane biology, and are required for proper development or maintenance of the adult germline membrane architecture. This work provides a starting point for further investigation of the mechanisms that control the dynamics of syncytial membrane architecture during adult oogenesis. PMID:26311651

  11. Age differences in the purr call distinguished by units in the adult guinea pig primary auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Grimsley, J.M.S.; Palmer, A.R.; Wallace, M.N.

    2015-01-01

    Many communication calls contain information about the physical characteristics of the calling animal. During maturation of the guinea pig purr call the pitch becomes lower as the fundamental frequency progressively decreases from 476 to 261 Hz on average. Neurons in the primary auditory cortex (AI) often respond strongly to the purr and we postulated that some of them are capable of distinguishing between purr calls of different pitch. Consequently four pitch-shifted versions of a single call were used as stimuli. Many units in AI (79/182) responded to the purr call either with an onset response or with multiple bursts of firing that were time-locked to the phrases of the call. All had a characteristic frequency ≤5 kHz. Both types of unit altered their firing rate in response to pitch-shifted versions of the call. Of the responsive units, 41% (32/79) had a firing rate locked to the stimulus envelope that was at least 50% higher for one version of the call than any other. Some (14/32) had a preference that could be predicted from their frequency response area while others (18/32) were not predictable. We conclude that about 18% of stimulus-driven cells at the low-frequency end of AI are very sensitive to age-related changes in the purr call. PMID:21296136

  12. A comparative study on efficiency of adult fibroblasts and amniotic fluid-derived stem cells as donor cells for production of hand-made cloned buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) embryos.

    PubMed

    Em, Sadeesh; Kataria, Meena; Shah, Fozia; Yadav, P S

    2016-08-01

    The efficiency of two cell types, namely adult fibroblasts, and amniotic fluid stem (AFS) cells as nuclear donor cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer by hand-made cloning in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) was compared. The in vitro expanded buffalo adult fibroblast cells showed a typical "S" shape growth curve with a doubling time of 40.8 h and stained positive for vimentin. The in vitro cultured undifferentiated AFS cells showed a doubling time of 33.2 h and stained positive for alkaline phosphatase, these cells were also found positive for undifferentiated embryonic stem cell markers like OCT-4, NANOG and SOX-2, which accentuate their pluripotent property. Further, when AFS cells were exposed to corresponding induction conditions, these cells differentiated into osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic lineages which was confirmed through alizaran, oil red O and alcian blue staining, respectively. Cultured adult fibroblasts and AFS cells of passages 10-15 and 8-12, respectively, were used as nuclear donors. A total of 94 embryos were reconstructed using adult fibroblast as donor cells with cleavage and blastocyst production rate of 62.8 ± 1.8 and 19.1 ± 1.5, respectively. An overall cleavage and blastocyst formation rate of 71.1 ± 1.2 and 29.9 ± 2.2 was obtained when 97 embryos were reconstructed using AFS cells as donor cells. There were no significant differences (P > 0.05) in reconstructed efficiency between the cloned embryos derived from two donor cells, whereas the results showed that there were significant differences (P < 0.05) in cleavage and blastocyst rates between the cloned embryos derived from two donor cell groups. Average total cell numbers for blastocyst generated using AFS cells (172.4 ± 5.8) was significantly (P < 0.05) higher than from adult fibroblasts (148.2 ± 6.1). This study suggests that the in vitro developmental potential of the cloned embryos derived from AFS cells were higher than that of the cloned embryos

  13. Secretory products of guinea pig epicardial fat induce insulin resistance and impair primary adult rat cardiomyocyte function

    PubMed Central

    Greulich, Sabrina; de Wiza, Daniella Herzfeld; Preilowski, Sebastian; Ding, Zhaoping; Mueller, Heidi; Langin, Dominique; Jaquet, Kornelia; Ouwens, D Margriet; Eckel, Juergen

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) has been implicated in the development of heart disease. Nonetheless, the crosstalk between factors secreted from EAT and cardiomyocytes has not been studied. Here, we examined the effect of factors secreted from EAT on contractile function and insulin signalling in primary rat cardiomocytes. EAT and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) were isolated from guinea pigs fed a high-fat (HFD) or standard diet. HFD feeding for 6 months induced glucose intolerance, and decreased fractional shortening and ejection fraction (all P < 0.05). Conditioned media (CM) generated from EAT and SAT explants were subjected to cytokine profiling using antibody arrays, or incubated with cardiomyocytes to assess the effects on insulin action and contractile function. Eleven factors were differentially secreted by EAT when compared to SAT. Furthermore, secretion of 30 factors by EAT was affected by HFD feeding. Most prominently, activin A-immunoreactivity was 6.4-fold higher in CM from HFD versus standard diet-fed animals and, 2-fold higher in EAT versus SAT. In cardiomyocytes, CM from EAT of HFD-fed animals increased SMAD2-phosphorylation, a marker for activin A-signalling, decreased sarcoplasmic-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase 2a expression, and reduced insulin-mediated phosphorylation of Akt-Ser473 versus CM from SAT and standard diet-fed animals. Finally, CM from EAT of HFD-fed animals as compared to CM from the other groups markedly reduced sarcomere shortening and cytosolic Ca2+ fluxes in cardiomyocytes. These data provide evidence for an interaction between factors secreted from EAT and cardiomyocyte function. PMID:21143387

  14. Academic Cloning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikula, John P.; Sikula, Andrew F.

    1980-01-01

    The authors define "cloning" as an integral feature of all educational systems, citing teaching practices which reward students for closely reproducing the teacher's thoughts and/or behaviors and administrative systems which tend to promote like-minded subordinates. They insist, however, that "academic cloning" is not a totally negative practice.…

  15. A high utility integrated map of the pig genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The domestic pig is being increasingly exploited as a system for modeling human disease. It also has substantial economic importance for meat-based protein production. Physical clone maps have underpinned large-scale genomic sequencing and enabled focused cloning efforts for many genome...

  16. Unique circovirus-like genome detected in pig feces.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Andrew K; Ng, Terry Fei-Fan; Lager, Kelly M; Alt, David P; Delwart, Eric L; Pogranichniy, Roman M

    2014-01-01

    Using a metagenomic approach and molecular cloning methods, we identified, cloned, and sequenced the complete genome of a novel circular DNA virus, porcine stool-associated virus (PoSCV4), from pig feces. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced replication initiator protein showed that PoSCV4 is most related to a fur seal feces-associated circular DNA virus. PMID:24723710

  17. A unique circovirus-like genome detected in pig feces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using a metagenomic approach and molecular cloning methods, we identified, cloned, and sequenced the complete genome of a novel circular DNA virus, porcine stool-associated virus (PoSCV4), from pig feces. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced replication initiator protein showed that PoSCV4 is most r...

  18. Age-related detection and molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium suis and Cryptosporidium scrofarum in pre- and post-weaned piglets and adult pigs in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yui, Takeshi; Nakajima, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Norishige; Kon, Marina; Abe, Niichiro; Matsubayashi, Makoto; Shibahara, Tomoyuki

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the distribution of Cryptosporidium in pigs in Japan by immunofluorescence staining of fecal samples and characterization of isolates by multilocus sequencing. The 344 animals sampled on eight farms included pre-weaned piglets (<1 month old; n = 55), weaned piglets (1-2 months old; n = 65), finished pigs (2-4 months old, n = 105) and of 4-6 months old (n = 67), sows (n = 36), and boars (n = 16). Average prevalence of Cryptosporidium on farms was 32.6%, ranging from 4.9 to 58.1%, decreasing with animal age (prevalences of <1 month old, 1-2 months old, 2-4 months old, 4-6 months old, sows, and boars were 27.3, 47.7, 41.9, 22.4, 11.1, 18.8%, respectively). Piglets (<1 and 1-2 months old) showing signs of diarrhea shed relatively more oocysts (5.28 in average log scale of oocysts per gram) in feces than piglets with normal or loose stools (those of 4.90). Thirty seven successful sequencing of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene among 62 examined samples revealed that all of the identified isolates were Cryptosporidium suis or Cryptosporidium scrofarum, which are generally specific to pigs, and that other species, such as zoonotic Cryptosporidium parvum, were absent. Interestingly, C. suis was frequently found in piglets younger than 2 months old, while C. scrofarum infection was more prevalent in older pigs which also showed increased prevalence of mixed C. suis and C. scrofarum infections. Sequencing of actin gene loci revealed the existence of variants of both Cryptosporidium species in pigs in Japan. Although the number of pigs examined in this study was relatively low, our results suggest that Cryptosporidium infection is widespread among pigs in Japan. In addition, the possibility of age-related specificity and pathogenicity in pig infections is also suggested. PMID:24189974

  19. Comparison of in vitro developmental competence of cloned caprine embryos using donor karyoplasts from adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells vs ear fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Kwong, P J; Nam, H Y; Wan Khadijah, W E; Kamarul, T; Abdullah, R B

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to produce cloned caprine embryos using either caprine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or ear fibroblast cells (EFCs) as donor karyoplasts. Caprine MSCs were isolated from male Boer goats of an average age of 1.5 years. To determine the pluripotency of MSCs, the cells were induced to differentiate into osteocytes, chondrocytes and adipocytes. Subsequently, MSCs were characterized through cell surface antigen profiles using specific markers, prior to their use as donor karyoplasts for nuclear transfer. No significant difference (p > 0.05) in fusion rates was observed between MSCs (87.7%) and EFCs (91.3%) used as donor karyoplasts. The cleavage rate of cloned embryos derived with MSCs (87.0%) was similar (p > 0.05) to those cloned using EFCs (84.4%). However, the in vitro development of MSCs-derived cloned embryos (25.3%) to the blastocyst stage was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than those derived with EFCs (20.6%). In conclusion, MSCs could be reprogrammed by caprine oocytes, and production of cloned caprine embryos with MSCs improved their in vitro developmental competence, but not in their fusion and cleavage rate as compared to cloning using somatic cells such as EFCs. PMID:24456113

  20. Effects of nonylphenol, 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene (p,p'-DDE), and pentachlorophenol on the adult female guinea pig reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Danzo, Benjamin J; Shappell, Heidi W; Banerjee, Arna; Hachey, David L

    2002-01-01

    The guinea pig exhibits cyclic and luteal similarities to the human, a feature not present in other small experimental animals such as rats, mice, or rabbits. Studies were undertaken to investigate the in vivo effects of three persistent environmental xenobiotics (nonylphenol, 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene [p,p'-DDE], and pentachlorophenol) on the microanatomy of the adult female guinea pig reproductive system. The effects brought about by these compounds (40 mg/kg/day) were compared to those caused by the synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES; 50 microg/kg/day). Adult female guinea pigs, intact and castrated, were treated with 14 daily subcutaneous (s.c.) doses of one of these agents. The 50% decline in the weight of the tract that occurred following castration, was prevented by administration of nonylphenol, p,p'-DDE, and DES, but not of pentachlorophenol. Nonylphenol produced weak estrogenic stimulation of the tract of intact animals and maintained a relatively normal histologic appearance in castrated animals. Focal mucinous metaplasia of the endometrium, however, was observed in both groups. Treatment of intact and castrated animals with p,p'-DDE resulted in cystic hyperplasia and mucinous metaplasia of the endometrium, hyperplasia of the cervical epithelium, estrogenic stimulation of the vagina, and dilation of the rete ovarii. Treatment of intact or castrated animals with DES resulted in effects that were qualitatively similar to those caused by p,p'-DDE. The appearance of the vaginal epithelium, however, was abnormal and the rete ovarii were less dilated. Pentachlorophenol had minimal effect on the histology of the tract of castrated or intact animals. These data support our hypothesis that some environmental toxicants can substitute for estradiol in regulating the microanatomy of the female reproductive tract. They indicate the potential of these compounds to act as endocrine disrupting agents. PMID:11934530

  1. Phylogenetic analysis of the swine leukocyte antigen - 2 gene for Korean native pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to investigate genetic distances of the SLA-2 gene, to characterize SLA-2 alleles, and to provide basic genetic information of Korean pigs. The swine leukocyte antigen - 2 (SLA-2) gene in the MHC classical region was cloned with spleen tissues from Korean native pigs ...

  2. Oxfendazole flukicidal activity in pigs.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Pedro; Terrones, Susana; Cabrera, María; Hoban, Cristian; Ceballos, Laura; Moreno, Laura; Canton, Candela; Donadeu, Meritxell; Lanusse, Carlos; Alvarez, Luis

    2014-08-01

    Although oxfendazole (OFZ) is a well know broad-spectrum benzimidazole anthelmintic, the assessment of its potential trematodicidal activity remains unexplored. OFZ administration at single high doses has been recommended to control Taenia solium cysticercus in pigs. The current study investigated the flukicidal activity obtained after a single high (30mg/kg) oral dose of OFZ in pigs harbouring a natural Fasciola hepatica infection. Sixteen (16) local ecotype pigs were randomly allocated into two (2) experimental groups of 8 animals each named as follow: Untreated control and OFZ treated, in which animals received OFZ (Synanthic(®), Merial Ltd., 9.06% suspension) orally at 30mg/kg. At seven (7) days post-treatment, all the animals were sacrificed and direct adult liver fluke counts were performed following the WAAVP guidelines. None of the animals involved in this experiment showed any adverse event during the study. OFZ treatment as a single 30mg/kg oral dose showed a 100% efficacy against F. hepatica. In conclusion, the trial described here demonstrated an excellent OFZ activity against F. hepatica in naturally infected pigs, after its administration at a single oral dose of 30mg/kg. PMID:24713198

  3. The Pig Olfactory Brain: A Primer.

    PubMed

    Brunjes, Peter C; Feldman, Sanford; Osterberg, Stephen K

    2016-06-01

    Despite the fact that pigs are reputed to have excellent olfactory abilities, few studies have examined regions of the pig brain involved in the sense of smell. The present study provides an overview of the olfactory bulb, anterior olfactory nucleus, and piriform cortex of adult pigs using several approaches. Nissl, myelin, and Golgi stains were used to produce a general overview of the organization of the regions and confocal microscopy was employed to examine 1) projection neurons, 2) GABAergic local circuit neurons that express somatostatin, parvalbumin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, or calretinin, 3) neuromodulatory fibers (cholinergic and serotonergic), and 4) glia (astrocytes and microglia). The findings revealed that pig olfactory structures are quite large, highly organized and follow the general patterns observed in mammals. PMID:26936231

  4. The Pig Olfactory Brain: A Primer

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Sanford; Osterberg, Stephen K.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that pigs are reputed to have excellent olfactory abilities, few studies have examined regions of the pig brain involved in the sense of smell. The present study provides an overview of the olfactory bulb, anterior olfactory nucleus, and piriform cortex of adult pigs using several approaches. Nissl, myelin, and Golgi stains were used to produce a general overview of the organization of the regions and confocal microscopy was employed to examine 1) projection neurons, 2) GABAergic local circuit neurons that express somatostatin, parvalbumin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, or calretinin, 3) neuromodulatory fibers (cholinergic and serotonergic), and 4) glia (astrocytes and microglia). The findings revealed that pig olfactory structures are quite large, highly organized and follow the general patterns observed in mammals. PMID:26936231

  5. An emerging zoonotic clone in the Netherlands provides clues to virulence and zoonotic potential of Streptococcus suis.

    PubMed

    Willemse, N; Howell, K J; Weinert, L A; Heuvelink, A; Pannekoek, Y; Wagenaar, J A; Smith, H E; van der Ende, A; Schultsz, C

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is a zoonotic swine pathogen and a major public health concern in Asia, where it emerged as an important cause of bacterial meningitis in adults. While associated with food-borne transmission in Asia, zoonotic S. suis infections are mainly occupational hazards elsewhere. To identify genomic differences that can explain zoonotic potential, we compared whole genomes of 98 S. suis isolates from human patients and pigs with invasive disease in the Netherlands, and validated our observations with 18 complete and publicly available sequences. Zoonotic isolates have smaller genomes than non-zoonotic isolates, but contain more virulence factors. We identified a zoonotic S. suis clone that diverged from a non-zoonotic clone by means of gene loss, a capsule switch, and acquisition of a two-component signalling system in the late 19th century, when foreign pig breeds were introduced. Our results indicate that zoonotic potential of S. suis results from gene loss, recombination and horizontal gene transfer events. PMID:27381348

  6. An emerging zoonotic clone in the Netherlands provides clues to virulence and zoonotic potential of Streptococcus suis

    PubMed Central

    Willemse, N.; Howell, K. J.; Weinert, L. A.; Heuvelink, A.; Pannekoek, Y.; Wagenaar, J. A.; Smith, H. E.; van der Ende, A.; Schultsz, C.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is a zoonotic swine pathogen and a major public health concern in Asia, where it emerged as an important cause of bacterial meningitis in adults. While associated with food-borne transmission in Asia, zoonotic S. suis infections are mainly occupational hazards elsewhere. To identify genomic differences that can explain zoonotic potential, we compared whole genomes of 98 S. suis isolates from human patients and pigs with invasive disease in the Netherlands, and validated our observations with 18 complete and publicly available sequences. Zoonotic isolates have smaller genomes than non-zoonotic isolates, but contain more virulence factors. We identified a zoonotic S. suis clone that diverged from a non-zoonotic clone by means of gene loss, a capsule switch, and acquisition of a two-component signalling system in the late 19th century, when foreign pig breeds were introduced. Our results indicate that zoonotic potential of S. suis results from gene loss, recombination and horizontal gene transfer events. PMID:27381348

  7. Keith's MAGIC: Cloning and the Cell Cycle.

    PubMed

    Wells, D N

    2013-10-01

    Abstract Professor Keith Campbell's critical contribution to the discovery that a somatic cell from an adult animal can be fully reprogrammed by oocyte factors to form a cloned individual following nuclear transfer (NT)(Wilmut et al., 1997 ) overturned a dogma concerning the reversibility of cell fate that many scientists had considered to be biologically impossible. This seminal experiment proved the totipotency of adult somatic nuclei and finally confirmed that adult cells could differentiate without irreversible changes to the genetic material. PMID:24020700

  8. The Clone Factory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoddard, Beryl

    2005-01-01

    Have humans been cloned? Is it possible? Immediate interest is sparked when students are asked these questions. In response to their curiosity, the clone factory activity was developed to help them understand the process of cloning. In this activity, students reenact the cloning process, in a very simplified simulation. After completing the…

  9. The pig X and Y Chromosomes: structure, sequence, and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Benjamin M.; Sargent, Carole A.; Churcher, Carol; Hunt, Toby; Herrero, Javier; Loveland, Jane E.; Dunn, Matt; Louzada, Sandra; Fu, Beiyuan; Chow, William; Gilbert, James; Austin-Guest, Siobhan; Beal, Kathryn; Carvalho-Silva, Denise; Cheng, William; Gordon, Daria; Grafham, Darren; Hardy, Matt; Harley, Jo; Hauser, Heidi; Howden, Philip; Howe, Kerstin; Lachani, Kim; Ellis, Peter J.I.; Kelly, Daniel; Kerry, Giselle; Kerwin, James; Ng, Bee Ling; Threadgold, Glen; Wileman, Thomas; Wood, Jonathan M.D.; Yang, Fengtang; Harrow, Jen; Affara, Nabeel A.; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We have generated an improved assembly and gene annotation of the pig X Chromosome, and a first draft assembly of the pig Y Chromosome, by sequencing BAC and fosmid clones from Duroc animals and incorporating information from optical mapping and fiber-FISH. The X Chromosome carries 1033 annotated genes, 690 of which are protein coding. Gene order closely matches that found in primates (including humans) and carnivores (including cats and dogs), which is inferred to be ancestral. Nevertheless, several protein-coding genes present on the human X Chromosome were absent from the pig, and 38 pig-specific X-chromosomal genes were annotated, 22 of which were olfactory receptors. The pig Y-specific Chromosome sequence generated here comprises 30 megabases (Mb). A 15-Mb subset of this sequence was assembled, revealing two clusters of male-specific low copy number genes, separated by an ampliconic region including the HSFY gene family, which together make up most of the short arm. Both clusters contain palindromes with high sequence identity, presumably maintained by gene conversion. Many of the ancestral X-related genes previously reported in at least one mammalian Y Chromosome are represented either as active genes or partial sequences. This sequencing project has allowed us to identify genes—both single copy and amplified—on the pig Y Chromosome, to compare the pig X and Y Chromosomes for homologous sequences, and thereby to reveal mechanisms underlying pig X and Y Chromosome evolution. PMID:26560630

  10. The pig X and Y Chromosomes: structure, sequence, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Benjamin M; Sargent, Carole A; Churcher, Carol; Hunt, Toby; Herrero, Javier; Loveland, Jane E; Dunn, Matt; Louzada, Sandra; Fu, Beiyuan; Chow, William; Gilbert, James; Austin-Guest, Siobhan; Beal, Kathryn; Carvalho-Silva, Denise; Cheng, William; Gordon, Daria; Grafham, Darren; Hardy, Matt; Harley, Jo; Hauser, Heidi; Howden, Philip; Howe, Kerstin; Lachani, Kim; Ellis, Peter J I; Kelly, Daniel; Kerry, Giselle; Kerwin, James; Ng, Bee Ling; Threadgold, Glen; Wileman, Thomas; Wood, Jonathan M D; Yang, Fengtang; Harrow, Jen; Affara, Nabeel A; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We have generated an improved assembly and gene annotation of the pig X Chromosome, and a first draft assembly of the pig Y Chromosome, by sequencing BAC and fosmid clones from Duroc animals and incorporating information from optical mapping and fiber-FISH. The X Chromosome carries 1033 annotated genes, 690 of which are protein coding. Gene order closely matches that found in primates (including humans) and carnivores (including cats and dogs), which is inferred to be ancestral. Nevertheless, several protein-coding genes present on the human X Chromosome were absent from the pig, and 38 pig-specific X-chromosomal genes were annotated, 22 of which were olfactory receptors. The pig Y-specific Chromosome sequence generated here comprises 30 megabases (Mb). A 15-Mb subset of this sequence was assembled, revealing two clusters of male-specific low copy number genes, separated by an ampliconic region including the HSFY gene family, which together make up most of the short arm. Both clusters contain palindromes with high sequence identity, presumably maintained by gene conversion. Many of the ancestral X-related genes previously reported in at least one mammalian Y Chromosome are represented either as active genes or partial sequences. This sequencing project has allowed us to identify genes--both single copy and amplified--on the pig Y Chromosome, to compare the pig X and Y Chromosomes for homologous sequences, and thereby to reveal mechanisms underlying pig X and Y Chromosome evolution. PMID:26560630

  11. Efficient Generation of Myostatin Mutations in Pigs Using the CRISPR/Cas9 System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kankan; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Xie, Zicong; Yao, Chaogang; Guo, Nannan; Li, Mengjing; Jiao, Huping; Pang, Daxin

    2015-01-01

    Genetically modified pigs are increasingly used for biomedical and agricultural applications. The efficient CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing system holds great promise for the generation of gene-targeting pigs without selection marker genes. In this study, we aimed to disrupt the porcine myostatin (MSTN) gene, which functions as a negative regulator of muscle growth. The transfection efficiency of porcine fetal fibroblasts (PFFs) was improved to facilitate the targeting of Cas9/gRNA. We also demonstrated that Cas9/gRNA can induce non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), long fragment deletions/inversions and homology-directed repair (HDR) at the MSTN locus of PFFs. Single-cell MSTN knockout colonies were used to generate cloned pigs via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), which resulted in 8 marker-gene-free cloned pigs with biallelic mutations. Some of the piglets showed obvious intermuscular grooves and enlarged tongues, which are characteristic of the double muscling (DM) phenotype. The protein level of MSTN was decreased in the mutant cloned pigs compared with the wild-type controls, and the mRNA levels of MSTN and related signaling pathway factors were also analyzed. Finally, we carefully assessed off-target mutations in the cloned pigs. The gene editing platform used in this study can efficiently generate genetically modified pigs with biological safety. PMID:26564781

  12. Generation of GGTA1 biallelic knockout pigs via zinc-finger nucleases and somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lei; Chen, HaiDe; Jong, UiMyong; Rim, CholHo; Li, WenLing; Lin, XiJuan; Zhang, Dan; Luo, Qiong; Cui, Chun; Huang, HeFeng; Zhang, Yan; Xiao, Lei; Fu, ZhiXin

    2014-02-01

    Genetically modified pigs are valuable models of human disease and donors of xenotransplanted organs. Conventional gene targeting in pig somatic cells is extremely inefficient. Zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) technology has been shown to be a powerful tool for efficiently inducing mutations in the genome. However, ZFN-mediated targeting in pigs has rarely been achieved. Here, we used ZFNs to knock out the porcine α-1, 3-galactosyl-transferase (GGTA1) gene, which generates Gal epitopes that trigger hyperacute immune rejection in pig-to-human transplantation. Primary pig fibroblasts were transfected with ZFNs targeting the coding region of GGTA1. Eighteen mono-allelic and four biallelic knockout cell clones were obtained after drug selection with efficiencies of 23.4% and 5.2%, respectively. The biallelic cells were used to produce cloned pigs via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Three GGTA1 null piglets were born, and one knockout primary fibroblast cell line was established from a cloned fetus. Gal epitopes on GGTA1 null pig cells were completely eliminated from the cell membrane. Functionally, GGTA1 knockout cells were protected from complement-mediated immune attacks when incubated with human serum. This study demonstrated that ZFN is an efficient tool in creating gene-modified pigs. GGTA1 null pigs and GGTA1 null fetal fibroblasts would benefit research and pig-to-human transplantation. PMID:24430555

  13. Who is the parent in cloning?

    PubMed

    Elster, N

    1999-01-01

    In July 1996, a sheep named Dolly was born in Scotland. What makes Dolly's birth noteworthy is that she is the result of the first successful cloning attempt using the nucleus of an adult cell. The technique that led to Dolly's birth involved transferring the nucleus of a mammary cell from an adult sheep to the enucleated egg cell of an unrelated sheep with gestation occurring in a third sheep. The possibility of applying this technique to human reproduction raised concerns worldwide with several countries moving for an immediate bans on human cloning. In the United States, President Clinton requested that the National Bioethics Advisory Commission ("NBAC"), a multidisciplinary group composed of scientists, lawyers, educators, theologians, and ethicists study the implications of cloning and issue recommendations. The Commission consulted other scientists, ethicists, theologians, lawyers, and citizens with interests in this advancing technology and concluded that, "at this time it is morally unacceptable for anyone in the public or private sector, whether in a research or clinical setting, to attempt to create a child using somatic cell nuclear transfer cloning." This Article was included in a larger work prepared at the request of, and submitted to the Commission by, law professor Lori B. Andrews. Cloning through nuclear transfer will change the way we create and define families. This Article explores how existing law relating to parentage, surrogacy, egg donation, and artificial insemination may apply in the cloning context to clarify the parent-child relationship established through cloning. PMID:12650149

  14. Expression of X-linked Genes in Deceased Neonates and Surviving Cloned Female Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Le; Jobst, Pete; Lai, Liangxue; Samuel, Melissa; Prather, Randall S.; Ayares, David; Yang, Xiangzhong; Tian, X. Cindy

    2008-01-01

    Animal cloning through somatic cell nuclear transfer is very inefficient, probably due to insufficient reprogramming of the donor nuclei, which in turn would cause the dysregulation of gene expression. X-Chromosome inactivation (XCI) is a multi-step epigenetic process utilized by mammals to achieve dosage compensation in females. Our aim was to determine if any dysregulation of X-linked genes, which would be indicative of unfaithful reprogramming of donor nuclei, was present in cloned pigs. Real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to quantify the transcript levels of five X-linked genes, XIST, TSIX, HPRT1, G6PD, ARAF1 and one autosomal gene, COL4A1 in major organs of neonatal deceased and surviving female cloned pigs and age-matched control pigs from conventional breeding. Aberrant expression level of these genes was prevalent in the neonatal deceased clones, while it was only moderate in cloned pigs that survived after birth. These results suggest a correlation between the viability of the clones and the normality of their gene expression and provide a possible explanation for the death of a large portion of cloned animals around birth. PMID:17474099

  15. Coexistence of multiple strains of porcine parvovirus 2 in pig farms.

    PubMed

    Saekhow, Prayuth; Mawatari, Takahiro; Ikeda, Hidetoshi

    2014-07-01

    The porcine parvovirus 2 (PPV2) genome was first identified in 2001 in Myanmar. Recently, the PPV2 genome has been found in several other countries. In this study, the prevalence of PPV2 in Japanese domestic pigs was investigated and found to be 58% (69/120) in healthy domestic pigs and 100% (69/69) in sick domestic pigs. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the PCR products of the VP1 gene and an almost full length PPV2 clone indicated that diverged PPV2 strains exist in Japan. Clearly distinct strains of PPV2 were detected in 7 of the 10 pig farms. PMID:24845822

  16. Large-scale sequencing based on full-length-enriched cDNA libraries in pigs: contribution to annotation of the pig genome draft sequence

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Along with the draft sequencing of the pig genome, which has been completed by an international consortium, collection of the nucleotide sequences of genes expressed in various tissues and determination of entire cDNA sequences are necessary for investigations of gene function. The sequences of expressed genes are also useful for genome annotation, which is important for isolating the genes responsible for particular traits. Results We performed a large-scale expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis in pigs by using 32 full-length-enriched cDNA libraries derived from 28 kinds of tissues and cells, including seven tissues (brain, cerebellum, colon, hypothalamus, inguinal lymph node, ovary, and spleen) derived from pigs that were cloned from a sow subjected to genome sequencing. We obtained more than 330,000 EST reads from the 5′-ends of the cDNA clones. Comparison with human and bovine gene catalogs revealed that the ESTs corresponded to at least 15,000 genes. cDNA clones representing contigs and singlets generated by assembly of the EST reads were subjected to full-length determination of inserts. We have finished sequencing 31,079 cDNA clones corresponding to more than 12,000 genes. Mapping of the sequences of these cDNA clones on the draft sequence of the pig genome has indicated that the clones are derived from about 15,000 independent loci on the pig genome. Conclusions ESTs and cDNA sequences derived from full-length-enriched libraries are valuable for annotation of the draft sequence of the pig genome. This information will also contribute to the exploration of promoter sequences on the genome and to molecular biology-based analyses in pigs. PMID:23150988

  17. Cloning the Dmrt1 and DmrtA2 genes of ayu (Plecoglossus altivelis) and mapping their expression in adult, larval, and embryonic stages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-Hua; Miao, Liang; Li, Ming-Yun; Guo, Xiao-Fei; Pan, Na; Chen, Ying-Ying; Zhao, Liang

    2014-03-01

    The Dmrt family of genes are involved in sex differentiation in different species of invertebrates, and some vertebrates including human. In this study, we cloned the full-length cDNA of ayu (Plecoglossus altivelis) Dmrt1 and DmrtA2. Sequence and phylogenetic tree analyses showed ayu Dmrt1 showed highest similarity to that of Oncorhynchus mykiss while ayu DmrtA2 is most similar to that of Oryzias latipes. Fluorescence-based quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed the Dmrt1 was predominantly expressed in the testis. At the larval stages, Dmrt1 mRNA expression level was highest during 52-64 days post hatching (dph) and at the gastrula stage during embryonic development. DmrtA2, meanwhile, was specifically expressed in the ovary and was highly expressed in the female brain tissue, but not male brain tissue. During the larval stages, DmrtA2 expression remained high before day 34, and then fluctuated while generally decreasing. During embryonic development, DmrtA2 expression increased gradually and peaked at the hatching stage. Our data suggest that ayu Dmrt1 might participate in the differentiation and maintenance of testis while DmrtA2 may play a role in ovary-differentiation and mature-ovary maintenance. DmrtA2 might also participate in brain development. PMID:24668652

  18. "The Spotty Cow Tickled the Pig with a Curly Tail": How Do Sentence Position, Preferred Argument Structure, and Referential Complexity Affect Children's and Adults' Choice of Referring Expression?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theakston, Anna L.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, 5-year-olds and adults described scenes that differed according to whether (a) the subject or object of a transitive verb represented an accessible or inaccessible referent, consistent or inconsistent with patterns of preferred argument structure, and (b) a simple noun was sufficient to uniquely identify an inaccessible referent.…

  19. CESSATION OF TRICHINELLA SPIRALIS TRANSMISSION AMONG SCAVENGING MAMMALS AFTER THE REMOVAL OF INFECTED PIGS FROM A POORLY MANAGED FARM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pigs infected with the zoonotic parasite Trichinella spiralis were detected on a farm in Maryland during an animal welfare investigation. Sera and/or tissues were collected from 49 pigs and 3 pig carcasses (7 weeks of age to adult, mixed sex). The tissues were tested for the presence of T. spiralis ...

  20. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of chymotrypsin-like serine protease from the redclaw crayfish (Cherax quadricarinatus): a possible role in the junior and adult innate immune systems.

    PubMed

    Fang, Di-An; Huang, Xian-Ming; Zhang, Zhi-Qin; Xu, Dong-Po; Zhou, Yan-Feng; Zhang, Min-Ying; Liu, Kai; Duan, Jin-Rong; Shi, Wei-Gang

    2013-06-01

    A novel chymotrypsin-like serine protease (CLSP) was isolated from the hepatopancreas of the redclaw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus (Cq-chy). The full-length cDNA of Cq-chy contains 951 nucleotides encodes a peptide of 270 amino acids. The mature peptide comprising 223 amino acids contains the conserved catalytic triad (H, D, and S). Similarity analysis showed that Cq-chy shares high identity with chymotrypsins from the fiddler crab; Uca pugilator. Cq-chy mRNA expression in C. quadricarinatus was shown to be: (a) tissue-related with the highest expression in the hepatotpancreas and widely distributed, (b) highly responsive in the hepatopancreas to White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) challenge, and (c) differently regulated in immature and adult crayfish. In this study we successfully isolated Cq-chy. Our observations indicate that Cq-chy is differently involved in the immature and adult innate immune reactions, thus suggesting a role for CLSPs in the invertebrate innate immune system. PMID:23541770

  1. Multipartite asymmetric quantum cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Iblisdir, S.; Gisin, N.; Acin, A.; Cerf, N.J.; Filip, R.; Fiurasek, J.

    2005-10-15

    We investigate the optimal distribution of quantum information over multipartite systems in asymmetric settings. We introduce cloning transformations that take N identical replicas of a pure state in any dimension as input and yield a collection of clones with nonidentical fidelities. As an example, if the clones are partitioned into a set of M{sub A} clones with fidelity F{sup A} and another set of M{sub B} clones with fidelity F{sup B}, the trade-off between these fidelities is analyzed, and particular cases of optimal N{yields}M{sub A}+M{sub B} cloning machines are exhibited. We also present an optimal 1{yields}1+1+1 cloning machine, which is an example of a tripartite fully asymmetric cloner. Finally, it is shown how these cloning machines can be optically realized.

  2. Aristotle and headless clones.

    PubMed

    Mosteller, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    Cloned organisms can be genetically altered so that they do not exhibit higher brain functioning. This form of therapeutic cloning allows for genetically identical organs and tissues to be harvested from the clone for the use of the organism that is cloned. "Spare parts" cloning promises many opportunities for future medical advances. What is the ontological and ethical status of spare parts, headless clones? This paper attempts to answer this question from the perspective of Aristotle's view of the soul. Aristotle's metaphysics as applied to his view of biological essences generates an ethic that can contribute to moral reasoning regarding the use of headless spare parts clones. The task of this paper is to show the implications that Aristotle's view of the soul, if it is true, would have on the ethics of headless, spare parts cloning. PMID:16180113

  3. WILD PIG ATTACKS ON HUMANS

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, J.

    2013-04-12

    Attacks on humans by wild pigs (Sus scrofa) have been documented since ancient times. However, studies characterizing these incidents are lacking. In an effort to better understand this phenomenon, information was collected from 412 wild pig attacks on humans. Similar to studies of large predator attacks on humans, data came from a variety of sources. The various attacks compiled occurred in seven zoogeographic realms. Most attacks occurred within the species native range, and specifically in rural areas. The occurrence was highest during the winter months and daylight hours. Most happened under non-hunting circumstances and appeared to be unprovoked. Wounded animals were the chief cause of these attacks in hunting situations. The animals involved were typically solitary, male and large in size. The fate of the wild pigs involved in these attacks varied depending upon the circumstances, however, most escaped uninjured. Most human victims were adult males traveling on foot and alone. The most frequent outcome for these victims was physical contact/mauling. The severity of resulting injuries ranged from minor to fatal. Most of the mauled victims had injuries to only one part of their bodies, with legs/feet being the most frequent body part injured. Injuries were primarily in the form of lacerations and punctures. Fatalities were typically due to blood loss. In some cases, serious infections or toxemia resulted from the injuries. Other species (i.e., pets and livestock) were also accompanying some of the humans during these attacks. The fates of these animals varied from escaping uninjured to being killed. Frequency data on both non-hunting and hunting incidents of wild pig attacks on humans at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, showed quantitatively that such incidents are rare.

  4. A comparative study on expression profile of developmentally important genes during pre-implantation stages in buffalo hand-made cloned embryos derived from adult fibroblasts and amniotic fluid derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Em, Sadeesh; Shah, Fozia; Kataria, Meena; Yadav, P S

    2016-08-01

    Abnormal gene expression in somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos due to aberrant epigenetic modifications of the donor nucleus may account for much of the observed diminished viability and developmental abnormalities. The present study compared the developmentally important gene expression pattern at 4-cell, 8- to 16-cell, morula, and blastocyst stages of buffalo nuclear transfer (NT) embryos from adult fibroblasts (AFs) and amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSCs). In vitro fertilized embryos were used as control embryos. Alterations in the expression pattern of genes implicated in transcription and pluripotency (OCT4, STAT3, NANOG), DNA methylation (DNMT1, DNMT3A), histone deacetylation (HDAC2), growth factor signaling, and imprinting (IGF2, IGF2R), apoptosis (BAX, BCL2), oxidative stress (MnSOD), metabolism (GLUT1) regulation were observed in cloned embryos. The expression of transcripts in AFSC-NT embryos more closely followed that of the in vitro fertilized embryos compared with AF-NT embryos. It is concluded that AFSCs with a relatively undifferentiated genome may serve as suitable donors which could be reprogrammed more efficiently to reactivate expression of early embryonic genes in buffalo NT. PMID:26224482

  5. Cleaning pipelines: a pigging primer

    SciTech Connect

    Kipin, P.

    1985-02-04

    The ''pig'', a cleaning device currently used to clear out pipes, is discussed here. Types of pigs are described and include styrofoam, rubber, and soft foam. The limitations to the use of pigs are discussed. Unless all valves are fully open, a pig can get stuck. Ball-type tees may cause a short pig to drop and bypass. Generally, no pig is able to traverse a one-cut miter.

  6. Increasing efficiency in production of cloned piglets.

    PubMed

    Callesen, Henrik; Liu, Ying; Pedersen, Hanne S; Li, Rong; Schmidt, Mette

    2014-12-01

    The low efficiency in obtaining piglets after production of cloned embryos was challenged in two steps-first by performing in vitro culture for 5-6 days after cloning to obtain later-stage embryos for more precise selection for transfer, and second by reducing the number of embryos transferred per recipient sow. The data set consisted of combined results from a 4-year period where cloning was performed to produce piglets that were transgenic for important human diseases. For this, different transgenes and cell types were used, and the cloning work was performed by several persons using oocytes from different pig breeds, but following a standardized and optimized protocol. Results showed that in vitro culture is possible with a relatively stable rate of transferable embryos around 41% and a pregnancy rate around 90%. Furthermore, a reduction from around 80 embryos to 40 embryos transferred per recipient was possible without changing the efficiency of around 14% (piglets born out of embryos transferred). It was concluded that this approach can increase the efficiency in obtaining piglets by means of in vitro culture and selection of high-quality embryos with subsequent transfer into more recipients. Such changes can also reduce the need for personnel, time, and material when working with this technology. PMID:25333333

  7. Conjunctival and intramuscular vaccination of pigs with a live avirulent strain of Salmonella cholerae-suis.

    PubMed

    Kramer, T T; Pardon, P; Marly, J; Bernard, S

    1987-07-01

    An avirulent mutant strain of Salmonella cholerae-suis was cloned for resistance to streptomycin and nalidixic acid. The mutant strain 33-13 also was used because of its avirulence and immunogenicity in mice. Weaned pigs were vaccinated with live strain 33-13; 5 pigs were vaccinated by conjunctivally administered 5.5 X 10(7) organisms (low dose), 5 were conjunctivally administered 5.5 X 10(9) organisms (high dose), and 5 pigs were administered 5.5 X 10(9) organisms (high dose) IM. Transient fever and transient fecal shedding of the vaccine strain developed in pigs vaccinated IM, but not in 2 groups of pigs vaccinated conjunctivally. After intratracheal administration of virulent strain 38-9, nonvaccinated control pigs (n = 9) developed persistent high fever, anorexia, bacteremia, diarrhea, and fecal shedding of strain 38-9, whereas vaccinated pigs remained afebrile and clinically normal. Nonvaccinated and uninfected sentinel pigs (n = 8) were kept in units of 2 pigs with each group of experimental pigs, and remained healthy throughout the experiment. Thirteen vaccinated and 7 nonvaccinated control pigs were killed 42 days after vaccination, and 2 vaccinated, 2 nonvaccinated, and 8 sentinel control pigs were killed 58 days after vaccination. Ten organs were evaluated by quantitative bacteriology on necropsy of all pigs for the presence of vaccine strain 33-13, and for virulent strain 38-9. Strain 33-13 was not found. Lung and liver, lesions were found in most of the nonvaccinated control pigs, with a high frequency of recovery of large numbers of strain 38-9 from the mesenteric lymph nodes, lungs, liver, and ileum.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3631689

  8. Seroprevalence of foot and mouth disease virus infection in pigs from Zuru, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Fakai, L. U.; Faleke, O. O.; Magaji, A. A.; Ibitoye, E. B.; Alkali, B. R.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study was conducted to determine the seroprevalence and distribution of foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection in pigs from Zuru, Kebbi State, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional serological surveys were conducted between May and December 2013 using the immunochromatography assay technique. Structured questionnaires were administered to households identified at pig rearing areas to obtain the population structures and some information on managemental practices. Results: A total number of 849 pigs were enumerated at 37 pigs rearing households. Tudun wada had the largest concentration of pigs (237 pigs), while Dabai has the least (38 pigs). A total of 250 blood samples were collected, of which 45 (18%) were positive; Zango has the highest seroprevalence (1.6%), while Dabai recorded the least (0.4%). Based on sex and age, the infection was higher in female (10.4%) and young pigs (11.6%) than male (7.6%) and adult pigs (6.4%), respectively. There was no significant (p>0.05) association between infection and pig rearing areas, sex, and age. Furthermore, none of the 250 pigs examined for classical FMDV lesions was positive. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that FMD is an important disease of pigs in the study areas. This result justifies the need for more attention and subsequent molecular study to identify the circulating FMDV in the area, which will help in the implementation of effective control measures. PMID:27047166

  9. Generation of α1,3-galactosyltransferase and cytidine monophospho-N-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase gene double-knockout pigs.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Shuji; Matsunari, Hitomi; Watanabe, Masahito; Nakano, Kazuaki; Umeyama, Kazuhiro; Sakai, Rieko; Takayanagi, Shuko; Takeishi, Toki; Fukuda, Tooru; Yashima, Sayaka; Maeda, Akira; Eguchi, Hiroshi; Okuyama, Hiroomi; Nagaya, Masaki; Nagashima, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are new tools for producing gene knockout (KO) animals. The current study reports produced genetically modified pigs, in which two endogenous genes were knocked out. Porcine fibroblast cell lines were derived from homozygous α1,3-galactosyltransferase (GalT) KO pigs. These cells were subjected to an additional KO for the cytidine monophospho-N-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase (CMAH) gene. A pair of ZFN-encoding mRNAs targeting exon 8 of the CMAH gene was used to generate the heterozygous CMAH KO cells, from which cloned pigs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). One of the cloned pigs obtained was re-cloned after additional KO of the remaining CMAH allele using the same ZFN-encoding mRNAs to generate GalT/CMAH-double homozygous KO pigs. On the other hand, the use of TALEN-encoding mRNAs targeting exon 7 of the CMAH gene resulted in efficient generation of homozygous CMAH KO cells. These cells were used for SCNT to produce cloned pigs homozygous for a double GalT/CMAH KO. These results demonstrate that the combination of TALEN-encoding mRNA, in vitro selection of the nuclear donor cells and SCNT provides a robust method for generating KO pigs. PMID:26227017

  10. Generation of α1,3-galactosyltransferase and cytidine monophospho-N-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase gene double-knockout pigs

    PubMed Central

    MIYAGAWA, Shuji; MATSUNARI, Hitomi; WATANABE, Masahito; NAKANO, Kazuaki; UMEYAMA, Kazuhiro; SAKAI, Rieko; TAKAYANAGI, Shuko; TAKEISHI, Toki; FUKUDA, Tooru; YASHIMA, Sayaka; MAEDA, Akira; EGUCHI, Hiroshi; OKUYAMA, Hiroomi; NAGAYA, Masaki; NAGASHIMA, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are new tools for producing gene knockout (KO) animals. The current study reports produced genetically modified pigs, in which two endogenous genes were knocked out. Porcine fibroblast cell lines were derived from homozygous α1,3-galactosyltransferase (GalT) KO pigs. These cells were subjected to an additional KO for the cytidine monophospho-N-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase (CMAH) gene. A pair of ZFN-encoding mRNAs targeting exon 8 of the CMAH gene was used to generate the heterozygous CMAH KO cells, from which cloned pigs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). One of the cloned pigs obtained was re-cloned after additional KO of the remaining CMAH allele using the same ZFN-encoding mRNAs to generate GalT/CMAH-double homozygous KO pigs. On the other hand, the use of TALEN-encoding mRNAs targeting exon 7 of the CMAH gene resulted in efficient generation of homozygous CMAH KO cells. These cells were used for SCNT to produce cloned pigs homozygous for a double GalT/CMAH KO. These results demonstrate that the combination of TALEN-encoding mRNA, in vitro selection of the nuclear donor cells and SCNT provides a robust method for generating KO pigs. PMID:26227017

  11. Pig in the Middle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Sophie

    2000-01-01

    Explores themes relating to human transition as they appear in "Charlotte's Web" and four other stories using pigs as a subject. Discusses the motifs common to all these texts that recur in the film "Babe." Considers how the cycle of life and death is ceaseless, and pigs symbolize the necessary transitions that people must all make. (NH)

  12. Cysticercosis in the pig.

    PubMed

    de Aluja, A S

    2008-01-01

    Taenia solium cysticercosis is still an important parasitosis in rural pigs in many developing countries, México among them. The main causes for the persistence of this condition are lack of hygiene in the rural communities, lack of education of the animal owners, lack of control in the trade of pigs and their meat and lack of conscientious meat inspection. The pig production systems in the marginated areas of Mexico are briefly mentioned and it is stressed that among the important reasons for the persistence of the reproductive cycle of Taenia solium is the fact that appropriate toilet facilities in village dwellings are not mandatory. The diagnostic methods of cysticercosis in the living pigs and in their meat are discussed and the degenerative stages of the larvae as well as methods to test their viability are explained. The treatment of infected pigs and their meat is discussed. Recommendations for control programmes are given. PMID:18393899

  13. Tail biting in pigs.

    PubMed

    Schrøder-Petersen, D L; Simonsen, H B

    2001-11-01

    One of the costly and welfare-reducing problems in modern pig production is tail biting. Tail biting is an abnormal behaviour, characterized by one pig's dental manipulation of another pig's tail. Tail biting can be classified into two groups: the pre-injury stage, before any wound on the tail is present, and the injury stage, where the tail is wounded and bleeding. Tail biting in the injury stage will reduce welfare of the bitten pig and the possible spread of infection is a health as well as welfare problem. The pigs that become tail biters may also suffer, because they are frustrated due to living in a stressful environment. This frustration may result in an excessive motivation for biting the tails of pen mates. This review aims to summarize recent research and theories in relation to tail biting. PMID:11681870

  14. Production of Diabetic Offspring Using Cryopreserved Epididymal Sperm by In Vitro Fertilization and Intrafallopian Insemination Techniques in Transgenic Pigs

    PubMed Central

    UMEYAMA, Kazuhiro; HONDA, Kasumi; MATSUNARI, Hitomi; NAKANO, Kazuaki; HIDAKA, Tatsuro; SEKIGUCHI, Keito; MOCHIZUKI, Hironori; TAKEUCHI, Yasuhiro; FUJIWARA, Tsukasa; WATANABE, Masahito; NAGAYA, Masaki; NAGASHIMA, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a useful technique for creating pig strains that model human diseases. However, production of numerous cloned disease model pigs by SCNT for large-scale experiments is impractical due to its complexity and inefficiency. In the present study, we aimed to establish an efficient procedure for proliferating the diabetes model pig carrying the mutant human hepatocyte nuclear factor-1α gene. A founder diabetes transgenic cloned pig was generated by SCNT and treated with insulin to allow for normal growth to maturity, at which point epididymal sperm could be collected for cryopreservation. In vitro fertilization and intrafallopian insemination using the cryopreserved epididymal sperm resulted in diabetes model transgenic offspring. These results suggest that artificial reproductive technology using cryopreserved epididymal sperm could be a practical option for proliferation of genetically modified disease model pigs. PMID:23979397

  15. Production of diabetic offspring using cryopreserved epididymal sperm by in vitro fertilization and intrafallopian insemination techniques in transgenic pigs.

    PubMed

    Umeyama, Kazuhiro; Honda, Kasumi; Matsunari, Hitomi; Nakano, Kazuaki; Hidaka, Tatsuro; Sekiguchi, Keito; Mochizuki, Hironori; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Fujiwara, Tsukasa; Watanabe, Masahito; Nagaya, Masaki; Nagashima, Hiroshi

    2013-12-17

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a useful technique for creating pig strains that model human diseases. However, production of numerous cloned disease model pigs by SCNT for large-scale experiments is impractical due to its complexity and inefficiency. In the present study, we aimed to establish an efficient procedure for proliferating the diabetes model pig carrying the mutant human hepatocyte nuclear factor-1α gene. A founder diabetes transgenic cloned pig was generated by SCNT and treated with insulin to allow for normal growth to maturity, at which point epididymal sperm could be collected for cryopreservation. In vitro fertilization and intrafallopian insemination using the cryopreserved epididymal sperm resulted in diabetes model transgenic offspring. These results suggest that artificial reproductive technology using cryopreserved epididymal sperm could be a practical option for proliferation of genetically modified disease model pigs. PMID:23979397

  16. Construction and analysis of an hn-cDNA library derived from the p-arm of pig chromosome 12.

    PubMed

    Anderson Dear, D V; Miller, J R

    1996-09-01

    Our aim is to find unidentified genes on specific pig chromosomes or chromosome fragments. Our approach has involved the construction of a heterogeneous nuclear complementary (hn-c) DNA library of the p-arm of pig Chromosome (Chr) 12, the only pig chromosome present in the pig x hamster hybrid cell line 8990. Total RNA was extracted from the cells and first-strand synthesis of hn-cDNA carried out with random and oligo dT primers. Pig hn-cDNA was isolated by amplification of first-strand synthesized hn-cDNA with primers specific for Short Interspersed Repeat Elements (SINEs) via the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Hn-cDNAs were size selected and cloned in E. coli XL-1 blue cells with PCR-Script as the vector. The library consisted of 6000 clones. Clone inserts were amplified by PCR with vector-specific primers, and randomly picked inserts greater than 600 bp were sequenced. Homology searches were carried out with the FASTA search program on the GenEmbl database. Thirty clones were sequenced, and of these three showed strong homologies to GenEmbl sequences: (1) to sheep, mouse, human, and rat mammary gland factor (MGF); (2) to MLN-50, a gene that is amplified in human familial breast cancer and is present on human Chr 17; the latter is homologous to pig chromosome 12; (3) to a family of unassigned overlapping human ESTs. Of the other sequenced clones, seven were over 80% homologous with pig SINE sequences; three were over 75% homologous to human LINE sequences; six displayed open reading frames over a mean distance equivalent to 50 amino acids, although these showed no significant similarities with sequences in the databases. Using this approach, we have been able to identify several new genes on the p-arm of pig Chr 12. This is the first report of gene isolation from a library derived from a pig chromosome fragment. PMID:8703117

  17. Cryptosporidium scrofarum n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) in domestic pigs (Sus scrofa)

    PubMed Central

    Kváč, Martin; Kestřánová, Michaela; Pinková, Martina; Květoňová, Dana; Kalinová, Jana; Wagnerová, Pavla; Kotková, Michaela; Vítovec, Jiří; Ditrich, Oleg; McEvoy, John; Stenger, Brianna; Sak, Bohumil

    2012-01-01

    We describe the morphological, biological, and molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium pig genotype II and propose the species name Cryptosporidium scrofarum n. sp. to reflect its prevalence in adult pigs worldwide. Oocysts of C. scrofarum are morphologically indistinguishable from C. parvum, measuring 4.81–5.96 µm (mean = 5.16) × 4.23–5.29 µm (mean = 4.83) with a length to width ratio of 1.07 ± 0.06 (n = 400). Oocysts of C. scrofarum obtained from a naturally infected pig were infectious for 8-week-old pigs but not 4-week-old pigs. The prepatent period in 8-week-old Cryptosporidium-naive pigs was 4–6 days and the patent period was longer than 30 days. The infection intensity of C. scrofarum in pigs was generally low, in the range 250-4000 oocysts per gram of faeces. Infected pigs showed no clinical signs of cryptosporidiosis and no pathology was detected. Cryptosporidium scrofarum was not infectious for adult SCID mice, adult BALB c mice, Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus), southern multimammate mice (Mastomys coucha), yellow-necked mice (Apodemus flavicollis), or guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus). Phylogenetic analyses based on Small subunit rRNA, actin, and heat shock protein 70 gene sequences revealed that C. scrofarum is genetically distinct from all known Cryptosporidium species. PMID:23021264

  18. Cryptosporidium scrofarum n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) in domestic pigs (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    Kváč, Martin; Kestřánová, Michaela; Pinková, Martina; Květoňová, Dana; Kalinová, Jana; Wagnerová, Pavla; Kotková, Michaela; Vítovec, Jiří; Ditrich, Oleg; McEvoy, John; Stenger, Brianna; Sak, Bohumil

    2013-01-31

    We describe the morphological, biological, and molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium pig genotype II and propose the species name Cryptosporidium scrofarum n. sp. to reflect its prevalence in adult pigs worldwide. Oocysts of C. scrofarum are morphologically indistinguishable from C. parvum, measuring 4.81-5.96 μm (mean=5.16)×4.23-5.29 μm (mean=4.83) with a length to width ratio of 1.07±0.06 (n=400). Oocysts of C. scrofarum obtained from a naturally infected pig were infectious for 8-week-old pigs but not 4-week-old pigs. The prepatent period in 8-week-old Cryptosporidium-naive pigs was 4-6 days and the patent period was longer than 30 days. The infection intensity of C. scrofarum in pigs was generally low, in the range 250-4000 oocysts per gram of feces. Infected pigs showed no clinical signs of cryptosporidiosis and no pathology was detected. Cryptosporidium scrofarum was not infectious for adult SCID mice, adult BALB/c mice, Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus), southern multimammate mice (Mastomys coucha), yellow-necked mice (Apodemus flavicollis), or guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus). Phylogenetic analyses based on small subunit rRNA, actin, and heat shock protein 70 gene sequences revealed that C. scrofarum is genetically distinct from all known Cryptosporidium species. PMID:23021264

  19. Threshold Estimation of Ultrasound-Induced Lung Hemorrhage in Adult Rabbits and Comparison of Thresholds in Mice, Rats, Rabbits and Pigs

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, William D.; Yang, Yan; Simpson, Douglas G.; Frizzell, Leon A.; Miller, Rita J.; Blue, James P.; Zachary, James F.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the threshold and superthreshold behavior of ultrasound (US)-induced lung hemorrhage in adult rabbits to gain greater understanding about species dependency. A total of 99 76 ± 7.6-d-old 2.4 ± 0.14-kg New Zealand White rabbits were used. Exposure conditions were 5.6-MHz, 10-s exposure duration, 1-kHz PRF and 1.1-μs pulse duration. The in situ (at the pleural surface) peak rarefactional pressure, pr(in situ), ranged between 1.5 and 8.4 MPa, with nine acoustic US exposure groups plus a sham exposure group. Rabbits were assigned randomly to the 10 groups, each with 10 rabbits, except for one group that had nine rabbits. Rabbits were exposed bilaterally with the order of exposure (left then right lung, or right then left lung) and acoustic pressure both randomized. Individuals involved in animal handling, exposure and lesion scoring were blinded to the exposure condition. Probit regression analysis was used to examine the dependence of the lesion occurrence on in situ peak rarefactional pressure and order of exposure (first vs. second). Likewise, lesion depth and lesion root surface area were analyzed using Gaussian tobit regression analysis. Neither probability of a lesion nor lesion size measurements was found to be statistically dependent on the order of exposure after the effect of pr(in situ) was considered. Also, a significant correlation was not detected between the two exposed lung sides on the same rabbit in either lesion occurrence or size measures. The pr(in situ) threshold estimates (in MPa) were similar to each other across occurrence (3.54 ± 0.78), depth (3.36 ± 0.73 and surface area (3.43 ± 0.77) of lesions. Using the same experimental techniques and statistical approach, great consistency of thresholds was demonstrated across three species (mouse, rat and rabbit). Further, there were no differences in the biologic mechanism of injury induced by US and US-induced lesions were similar in morphology in all

  20. Immortalization of pig fibroblast cells by transposon-mediated ectopic expression of porcine telomerase reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    He, Shan; Li, Yangyang; Chen, Yang; Zhu, Yue; Zhang, Xinyu; Xia, Xiaoli; Sun, Huaichang

    2016-08-01

    Pigs are the most economically important livestock, but pig cell lines useful for physiological studies and/or vaccine development are limited. Although several pig cell lines have been generated by oncogene transformation or human telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) immortalization, these cell lines contain viral sequences and/or antibiotic resistance genes. In this study, we established a new method for generating pig cell lines using the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-mediated ectopic expression of porcine telomerase reverse transcriptase (pTERT). The performance of the new method was confirmed by generating a pig fibroblast cell (PFC) line. After transfection of primary PFCs with the SB transposon system, one cell clone containing the pTERT expression cassette was selected by dilution cloning and passed for different generations. After passage for more than 40 generations, the cell line retained stable expression of ectopic pTERT and continuous growth potential. Further characterization showed that the cell line kept the fibroblast morphology, growth curve, population doubling time, cloning efficiency, marker gene expression pattern, cell cycle distribution and anchorage-dependent growth property of the primary cells. These data suggest that the new method established is useful for generating pig cell lines without viral sequence and antibiotic resistant gene. PMID:26341227

  1. Seasonal variation of hemato-biochemical parameters in indigenous pig: Zovawk of Mizoram

    PubMed Central

    Mayengbam, P.; Tolenkhomba, T. C.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the influence of season on erythrocyte picture, plasma enzyme and electrolyte profile of local pig of Mizoram at a different age. Materials and Methods: A volume of 2 ml of blood samples were collected from 72 Zovawk pigs of three different age groups viz. pre-weaning, grower and adult pigs reared in College of Veterinary Sciences and Animal Husbandry Selesih, Aizawl, Mizoram, India, livestock farm during summer and winter in order to find out influence of season on erythrocyte picture, enzyme and electrolyte profile. The hematological parameters were estimated by using an automatic blood analyzer. The biochemical parameters were estimated by using diagnostic kits. Results: The grower pigs had lower hemoglobin (Hb), packed cell volume (PCV), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular Hb (MCH) during summer, rainy and winter seasons (p<0.05) and lower MCH concentration (MCHC) during summer season (p<0.05). Adult pigs had lower Hb with higher total erythrocyte count in rainy season. PCV and MCV of adult pigs decreased in summer (p<0.05). Serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase activity of both the grower and adult groups increased during summer and rainy seasons (p<0.05). Zovawk pigs had higher sodium (Na) and lower potassium (K) in rainy season (p<0.05). Pre-weaning piglets had higher Na, K, calcium (Ca), and magnesium (Mg) in summer than in winter. Grower pigs had higher Na, K and Ca in summer (p<0.05). Pi of pre-weaning and grower groups was higher in winter. Adult pigs had lower alkaline phosphatase activity and Ca in summer and higher Pi and Mg in winter (p<0.05). Conclusion: Seasonal variation in some hemato-biochemical parameters of Zovawk pig were investigated. Influence of season on the hemato-biochemical profile was most evident during the grower stage, followed by adults and pre-weaning piglets. PMID:27065639

  2. Cloning, killing, and identity.

    PubMed Central

    McMahan, J

    1999-01-01

    One potentially valuable use of cloning is to provide a source of tissues or organs for transplantation. The most important objection to this use of cloning is that a human clone would be the sort of entity that it would be seriously wrong to kill. I argue that entities of the sort that you and I essentially are do not begin to exist until around the seventh month of fetal gestation. Therefore to kill a clone prior to that would not be to kill someone like you or me but would be only to prevent one of us from existing. And even after one of us begins to exist, the objections to killing it remain comparatively weak until its psychological capacities reach a certain level of maturation. These claims support the permissibility of killing a clone during the early stages of its development in order to use its organs for transplantation. PMID:10226909

  3. Production of α1,3-Galactosyltransferase–Deficient Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, Carol J.; Koike, Chihiro; Vaught, Todd D.; Boone, Jeremy; Wells, Kevin D.; Chen, Shu-Hung; Ball, Suyapa; Specht, Susan M.; Polejaeva, Irina A.; Monahan, Jeff A.; Jobst, Pete M.; Sharma, Sugandha B.; Lamborn, Ashley E.; Garst, Amy S.; Moore, Marilyn; Demetris, Anthony J.; Rudert, William A.; Bottino, Rita; Bertera, Suzanne; Trucco, Massimo; Starzl, Thomas E.; Dai, Yifan; Ayares, David L.

    2011-01-01

    The enzyme α1,3-galactosyltransferase (α1,3GT or GCTA1) synthesizes α1,3-galactose (α1,3Gal) epitopes (Galα1,3Galβ1,4GlcNAc-R), which are the major xenoantigens causing hyperacute rejection in pig-to-human xenotransplantation. Complete removal of α1,3Gal from pig organs is the critical step toward the success of xenotransplantation. We reported earlier the targeted disruption of one allele of the α1,3GT gene in cloned pigs. A selection procedure based on a bacterial toxin was used to select for cells in which the second allele of the gene was knocked out. Sequencing analysis demonstrated that knockout of the second allele of the α1,3GT gene was caused by a T-to-G single point mutation at the second base of exon 9, which resulted in inactivation of the α1,3GT protein. Four healthy α1,3GT double-knockout female piglets were produced by three consecutive rounds of cloning. The piglets carrying a point mutation in the α1,3GT gene hold significant value, as they would allow production of α1,3Gal-deficient pigs free of antibiotic-resistance genes and thus have the potential to make a safer product for human use. PMID:12493821

  4. Pig production in the Solomon Islands. I. Village pig production.

    PubMed

    de Fredrick, D F

    1977-05-01

    In 181 villages in the Solomon Islands the pig: human ratio was 1:5-8 and the annual per capita pork consumption was 4-2 kg. Some communities did not keep pigs or eat pig meat. Sows weaned an average of 5-5 piglets per year and mean liveweight at 12 months of age was 28-4 kg. Most pigs were kept on the ground but some were housed in pens over the sea and very few lived in their owner's houses. Pigs were important in the social life of the people but proportionally fewer pigs were raised than in neighbouring Pacific countries. PMID:906090

  5. Trap style influences wild pig behavior and trapping success

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, B.L.; Holtfreter, R.W.; Ditchkoff, S.S.; Grand, J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the efforts of many natural resource professionals, wild pig (Sus scrofa) populations are expanding in many areas of the world. Although many creative techniques for controlling pig populations are being explored, trapping has been and still is themost commonly usedmethod of population control formany public and private land managers. We conducted an observational study to examine the efficiency of 2 frequently used trap styles: a small, portable box-style trap and a larger, semi-permanent, corral-style trap.We used game cameras to examine patterns of trap entry by wild pigs around each style of trap, and we conducted a trapping session to compare trapping success between trap styles. Adult female and juvenile wild pigs entered both styles of trap more readily than did adult males, and adult males seemed particularly averse to entering box traps. Less than 10% of adult male visits to box traps resulted in entries, easily the least percentage of any class at any style of trap. Adult females entered corral traps approximately 2.2 times more often per visit than box traps and re-entered corral traps >2 times more frequently. Juveniles entered and reentered both box and corral traps at similar rates. Overall (all-class) entry-per-visit rates at corral traps (0.71) were nearly double that of box traps (0.37). Subsequent trapping data supported these preliminary entry data; the capture rate for corral traps was >4 times that of box traps. Our data suggest that corral traps are temporally and economically superior to box traps with respect to efficiency; that is, corral traps effectively trap more pigs per trap night at a lower cost per pig than do box traps. ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  6. Mechanical ventilation and sepsis impair protein metabolism in the diaphragm of neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) impairs diaphragmatic function and diminishes the ability to wean from ventilatory support in adult humans. In normal neonatal pigs, animals that are highly anabolic, endotoxin (LPS) infusion induces sepsis, reduces peripheral skeletal muscle protein synthesis rates, but ...

  7. MRSA CC398 in the pig production chain.

    PubMed

    Broens, E M; Graat, E A M; van der Wolf, P J; van de Giessen, A W; van Duijkeren, E; Wagenaar, J A; van Nes, A; Mevius, D J; de Jong, M C M

    2011-02-01

    In 2005, a distinct clone of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA CC398) was found in pigs and people in contact with pigs. The structure of the pig production chain in high technology pig husbandry enables pathogens to spread during animal trading, with an increasing prevalence in herds further down the chain. The objective of this study was to quantify the effect of the MRSA status of the supplying herd on the MRSA status of the receiving herd in order to gain more insight into the role of animal trading as a transmission route for MRSA CC398. Nasal samples (60-80 pigs per herd) were collected from 38 herds; in 20 herds, environmental samples were collected as well. Ten MRSA-positive herds (based on the results of nasal swabs of 10 individual pigs per herd) from a prior study were included in the data analysis. Herds were classified as MRSA positive if at least one sample tested positive. The 48 herds were part of 14 complete (40 herds) and 4 incomplete (8 herds) pig production chains. Fifty-six percent of the herds were classified as MRSA positive. MRSA-positive herds were observed at the start (breeding herds), middle (farrowing herds) and the end (finishing herds) of the pig production chain. All of the herds in 8 chains tested MRSA positive;, all of the herds in 5 chains tested MRSA negative and in the remaining 5 chains, MRSA-positive and MRSA-negative herds were detected. Seven spa types were found, which were all previously confirmed to belong to CC398. All of the isolates were susceptible to mupirocin, linezolid, rifampicin, fusidic acid and cotrimoxazole. Resistance against tetracycline, erythromycin and clindamycin was found in 100, 74 and 76% of the isolates, respectively. Seventy-nine percent of herds with a MRSA-positive supplier of pigs were MRSA positive, whereas 23% of herds with a MRSA-negative supplier were MRSA positive (OR=10.8; 95% CI: 1.5-110.1; P=0.011). The presence of entirely MRSA-positive and MRSA-negative chains and the

  8. Salmonella infection in a remote, isolated wild pig population.

    PubMed

    Ward, Michael P; Cowled, Brendan D; Galea, Francesca; Garner, M Graeme; Laffan, Shawn W; Marsh, Ian; Negus, Katherine; Sarre, Stephen D; Woolnough, Andrew P

    2013-03-23

    Although wild pig populations are known to sometimes be infected by Salmonella, the situation in Australia has received little attention and few population-based, planned studies have been conducted. Understanding the distribution of Salmonella infections within wild pig populations allows the potential hazard posed to co-grazing livestock to be assessed. We sampled a remote and isolated wild pig population in northwestern Australia. Faecal and mesenteric lymph node samples were collected from 651 wild pigs at 93 locations and cultured for Salmonella. The population sampled was typical of wild pig populations in tropical areas of Australia, and sampling occurred approximately halfway through the population's breeding season (38% of the 229 adult females were pregnant and 35% were lactating). Overall, the prevalence of Salmonella infection based on culture of 546 freshly collected faecal samples was 36.3% (95% CI 32.1-40.7%), and based on culture of mesenteric lymph nodes was 11.9% (95% CI, 9.4-15.0%). A total of 39 serovars (139 isolates) were identified--29 in faecal samples and 24 in lymph node samples--however neither Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium nor Salmonella Cholerasuis were isolated. There was a significant (p<0.0001) disagreement between faecal and lymph node samples with respect to Salmonella isolation, with isolation more likely from faecal samples. Prevalence differed between age classes, with piglets being less likely to be faecal-positive but more likely to be lymph node positive than adults. The distribution of faecal-positive pigs was spatially structured, with spatial clusters being identified. Study results suggest that this population of wild pigs is highly endemic for Salmonella, and that Salmonella is transmitted from older to younger pigs, perhaps associated with landscape features such as water features. This might have implications for infection of co-grazing livestock within this environment. PMID:23266110

  9. Statement on Human Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    ... form Search American Association for the Advancement of Science Statement on Human Cloning Print Email Tweet The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) recognizes the intense debates within our society ...

  10. Do Managers Clone Themselves?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Alma S.

    1981-01-01

    A recent questionnaire survey provides statistics on male managers' views of female managers. The author recommends that male managers break out of their cloning behavior and that the goal ought to be a plurality in management. (Author/WD)

  11. Benefits and problems with cloning animals.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, L C; Bordignon, V; Babkine, M; Fecteau, G; Keefer, C

    2000-01-01

    Animal cloning is becoming a useful technique for producing transgenic farm animals and is likely to be used to produce clones from valuable adults. Other applications will also undoubtedly be discovered in the near future, such as for preserving endangered breeds and species. Although cloning promises great advantages for commerce and research alike, its outcome is not always certain due to high pregnancy losses and high morbidity and mortality during the neonatal period. Research into the mechanisms involved in the reprogramming of the nucleus is being conducted throughout the world in an attempt to better understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in correcting these problems. Although the cause of these anomalies remains mostly unknown, similar phenotypes have been observed in calves derived through in vitro fertilization, suggesting that culture conditions are involved in these phenomena. In the meantime, veterinarians and theriogenologists have an important role to play in improving the efficiency of cloning by finding treatments to assure normal gestation to term and to develop preventative and curative care for cloned neonates. Images Figure 1. PMID:11143925

  12. A Yeast Artificial Chromosome Clone Map of the Drosophila Genome

    PubMed Central

    Cai, H.; Kiefel, P.; Yee, J.; Duncan, I.

    1994-01-01

    We describe the mapping of 979 randomly selected large yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones of Drosophila DNA by in situ hybridization to polytene chromosomes. Eight hundred and fifty-five of the clones are euchromatic and have primary hybridization sites in the banded portions of the polytene chromosomes, whereas 124 are heterochromatic and label the chromocenter. The average euchromatic clone contains about 211 kb and, at its primary site, labels eight or nine contiguous polytene bands. Thus, the extent as well as chromosomal position of each clone has been determined. By direct band counts, we estimate our clones provide about 76% coverage of the euchromatin of the major autosomes, and 63% coverage of the X. When previously reported YAC mapping data are combined with ours, euchromatic coverage is extended to about 90% for the autosomes and 82% for the X. The distribution of gap sizes in our map and the coverage achieved are in good agreement with expectations based on the assumption of random coverage, indicating that euchromatic clones are essentially randomly distributed. However, certain gaps in coverage, including the entire fourth chromosome euchromatin, may be significant. Heterochromatic sequences are underrepresented among the YAC clones by two to three fold. This may result, at least in part, from underrepresentation of heterochromatic sequences in adult DNA (the source of most of the clones analyzed), or from clone instability. PMID:8013915

  13. A divergent clade of circular single-stranded DNA viruses from pig feces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using metagenomics and molecular cloning methods, we characterized five novel small circular viral genomes from pig feces distantly related to chimpanzee and porcine stool-associated circular viruses, (ChiSCV and PoSCV1). Phylogenetic analysis placed these viruses into a new, highly divergent, clade...

  14. Cloning and characterization of porcine resistin gene.

    PubMed

    Dai, M H; Xia, T; Chen, X D; Gan, L; Feng, S Q; Qiu, H; Peng, Y; Yang, Z Q

    2006-02-01

    Resistin is a member of resistin-like molecules (RELMs) and a hormone secreted from mature adipocytes in rodents and leukocytes in human. We now report the cloning and characterization of the full-length porcine resistin cDNA and gene. Sequence analysis indicated that the pig resistin cDNA sequence had an open reading frame of 330 bp encoding a 12 kDa protein of 109 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 75.2% identity to the human resistin. The porcine resistin gene was composed of four exons and had exactly the same exon structure as the human resistin gene. The tissue distribution of porcine resistin mRNA was assessed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Resistin gene expression was the highest in porcine leukocytes and low in adipose tissue. Resistin protein could be detected in porcine serum by western blotting and it circulated in serum as dimers and trimers. We provided the first evidence that resistin was abundantly expressed in porcine leukocytes and had an expression pattern similar to that in human resistin mRNA and protein. This suggests that the pig may be a suitable animal model for studying the function of resistin in human insulin resistance. PMID:16023825

  15. A somatic cell hybrid panel for pig regional gene mapping characterized by molecular cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Yerle, M; Echard, G; Robic, A; Mairal, A; Dubut-Fontana, C; Riquet, J; Pinton, P; Milan, D; Lahbib-Mansais, Y; Gellin, J

    1996-01-01

    A panel of 27 pig x rodent somatic cell hybrids was produced and characterized cytogenetically. The first step of this study consisted of hybridizing a SINE probe to GTG-banded metaphases of each hybrid clone in order to count and identify the normal pig chromosomes and to detect rearranged ones. The second step consisted of using the DNA of each clone as a probe after pIRS-PCR (porcine interspersed repetitive sequence-polymerase chain reaction) amplification to highly enrich it in pig sequences. These probes, hybridized to normal pig metaphase chromosomes, enabled the identification of the complete porcine complement in the hybrid lines. Whole chromosomes and fragments were characterized quickly and precisely, and results were compared. In addition to this cytogenetic characterization, molecular verification was also carried out by using primers specific to six microsatellites and to one gene previously mapped to pig chromosomes. The results obtained allow us to conclude that we have produced a panel that is informative for all porcine chromosomes. This panel constitutes a highly efficient tool to establish not only assignments of genes and markers but also regional localizations on pig chromosomes. PMID:8697807

  16. [Advances in Molecular Cloning].

    PubMed

    Ashwini, M; Murugan, S B; Balamurugan, S; Sathishkumar, R

    2016-01-01

    "Molecular cloning" meaning creation of recombinant DNA molecules has impelled advancement throughout life sciences. DNA manipulation has become easy due to powerful tools showing exponential growth in applications and sophistication of recombinant DNA technology. Cloning genes has become simple what led to an explosion in the understanding of gene function by seamlessly stitching together multiple DNA fragments or by the use of swappable gene cassettes, maximizing swiftness and litheness. A novel archetype might materialize in the near future with synthetic biology techniques that will facilitate quicker assembly and iteration of DNA clones, accelerating the progress of gene therapy vectors, recombinant protein production processes and new vaccines by in vitro chemical synthesis of any in silico-specified DNA construct. The advent of innovative cloning techniques has opened the door to more refined applications such as identification and mapping of epigenetic modifications and high-throughput assembly of combinatorial libraries. In this review, we will examine the major breakthroughs in cloning techniques and their applications in various areas of biological research that have evolved mainly due to easy construction of novel expression systems. PMID:27028806

  17. Investigating the geometry of pig airways using computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansy, Hansen A.; Azad, Md Khurshidul; McMurray, Brandon; Henry, Brian; Royston, Thomas J.; Sandler, Richard H.

    2015-03-01

    Numerical modeling of sound propagation in the airways requires accurate knowledge of the airway geometry. These models are often validated using human and animal experiments. While many studies documented the geometric details of the human airways, information about the geometry of pig airways is scarcer. In addition, the morphology of animal airways can be significantly different from that of humans. The objective of this study is to measure the airway diameter, length and bifurcation angles in domestic pigs using computed tomography. After imaging the lungs of 3 pigs, segmentation software tools were used to extract the geometry of the airway lumen. The airway dimensions were then measured from the resulting 3 D models for the first 10 airway generations. Results showed that the size and morphology of the airways of different animals were similar. The measured airway dimensions were compared with those of the human airways. While the trachea diameter was found to be comparable to the adult human, the diameter, length and branching angles of other airways were noticeably different from that of humans. For example, pigs consistently had an early airway branching from the trachea that feeds the superior (top) right lung lobe proximal to the carina. This branch is absent in the human airways. These results suggested that the human geometry may not be a good approximation of the pig airways and may contribute to increasing the errors when the human airway geometric values are used in computational models of the pig chest.

  18. Extremal quantum cloning machines

    SciTech Connect

    Chiribella, G.; D'Ariano, G. M.; Perinotti, P.; Cerf, N.J.

    2005-10-15

    We investigate the problem of cloning a set of states that is invariant under the action of an irreducible group representation. We then characterize the cloners that are extremal in the convex set of group covariant cloning machines, among which one can restrict the search for optimal cloners. For a set of states that is invariant under the discrete Weyl-Heisenberg group, we show that all extremal cloners can be unitarily realized using the so-called double-Bell states, whence providing a general proof of the popular ansatz used in the literature for finding optimal cloners in a variety of settings. Our result can also be generalized to continuous-variable optimal cloning in infinite dimensions, where the covariance group is the customary Weyl-Heisenberg group of displacement000.

  19. A Simple "Pig" Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Roger W.

    2008-01-01

    Our pig game involves a series of tosses of a die with the possibility of a player's score improving with each additional toss. With each additional toss, however, there is also the chance of losing the entire score accumulated so far. Two different strategies for deciding how many tosses a player should attempt are developed and then compared in…

  20. St. Paul's Pig Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Penny Folley

    1982-01-01

    Describes a guinea pig (cavy) breeding and management program developed as part of an elementary school science curriculum. Includes comments on show competitions (sponsored by the American Rabbit Breeders Association) to measure the success of the breeding program and to enable children to experience the business world. (Author/JN)

  1. Pipeline design essential in making pigging plans

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, H.

    1998-08-01

    Pigs have gotten an unfortunate reputation for getting stuck in pipelines. As a result, for many years few pigged their pipelines and consequently, many companies are paying the price to repair or replace their corroded pipelines. It is currently considered a necessary evil to run pigs to improve pipeline efficiency and prevent corrosion. Some pipelines were not designed to run pigs and occasionally the wrong type of pig is selected to run in a particular pipeline, increasing the chances of sticking a pig. A pipeline properly designed for pigging along with proper pig selection greatly reduces chances of sticking a pig.

  2. Secure the Clones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Thomas; Kirchner, Florent; Pichardie, David

    Exchanging mutable data objects with untrusted code is a delicate matter because of the risk of creating a data space that is accessible by an attacker. Consequently, secure programming guidelines for Java stress the importance of using defensive copying before accepting or handing out references to an internal mutable object. However, implementation of a copy method (like clone()) is entirely left to the programmer. It may not provide a sufficiently deep copy of an object and is subject to overriding by a malicious sub-class. Currently no language-based mechanism supports secure object cloning. This paper proposes a type-based annotation system for defining modular copy policies for class-based object-oriented programs. A copy policy specifies the maximally allowed sharing between an object and its clone. We present a static enforcement mechanism that will guarantee that all classes fulfill their copy policy, even in the presence of overriding of copy methods, and establish the semantic correctness of the overall approach in Coq. The mechanism has been implemented and experimentally evaluated on clone methods from several Java libraries.

  3. Applications of quantum cloning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomarico, E.; Sanguinetti, B.; Sekatski, P.; Zbinden, H.; Gisin, N.

    2011-10-01

    Quantum Cloning Machines (QCMs) allow for the copying of information, within the limits imposed by quantum mechanics. These devices are particularly interesting in the high-gain regime, i.e., when one input qubit generates a state of many output qubits. In this regime, they allow for the study of certain aspects of the quantum to classical transition. The understanding of these aspects is the root of the two recent applications that we will review in this paper: the first one is the Quantum Cloning Radiometer, a device which is able to produce an absolute measure of spectral radiance. This device exploits the fact that in the quantum regime information can be copied with only finite fidelity, whereas when a state becomes macroscopic, this fidelity gradually increases to 1. Measuring the fidelity of the cloning operation then allows to precisely determine the absolute spectral radiance of the input optical source. We will then discuss whether a Quantum Cloning Machine could be used to produce a state visible by the naked human eye, and the possibility of a Bell Experiment with humans playing the role of detectors.

  4. The Cloning of America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobson, Judith E.; Dobson, Russell L.

    1981-01-01

    Proposes that the U.S. school system purports to prize human variability, but many educators are engaged in activities that seek to homogenize students. Describes these activities, including diagnosis, labeling, ability grouping, and positive reinforcement. Presents suggestions for counselors to combat sources of cloning and self-validation. (RC)

  5. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lacks, S.A.

    1991-12-31

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA and chromosomal DNA cloned by this method are disclosed. The method includes the selection of a target organism having a segment of chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned. A first DNA segment, having a first restriction enzyme site on either side. homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  6. The First Human Cloned Embryo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cibelli, Jose B.; Lanza, Robert P.; West, Michael D.; Ezzell, Carol

    2002-01-01

    Describes a process known as parthenogenesis which produces cloned, early-stage embryos and human embryos generated only from eggs. Speculates that this technology puts therapeutic cloning within reach. (DDR)

  7. Probabilistic Cloning and Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ting; Yan, Feng-Li; Wang, Zhi-Xi

    2004-06-01

    We discuss the usefulness of quantum cloning and present examples of quantum computation tasks for which the cloning offers an advantage which cannot be matched by any approach that does not resort to quantum cloning. In these quantum computations, we need to distribute quantum information contained in the states about which we have some partial information. To perform quantum computations, we use a state-dependent probabilistic quantum cloning procedure to distribute quantum information in the middle of a quantum computation.

  8. RAG1/2 knockout pigs with severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiao; Guo, Xiaogang; Fan, Nana; Song, Jun; Zhao, Bentian; Ouyang, Zhen; Liu, Zhaoming; Zhao, Yu; Yan, Quanmei; Yi, Xiaoling; Schambach, Axel; Frampton, Jon; Esteban, Miguel A; Yang, Dongshan; Yang, Huaqiang; Lai, Liangxue

    2014-08-01

    Pigs share many physiological, biochemical, and anatomical similarities with humans and have emerged as valuable large animal models for biomedical research. Considering the advantages in immune system resemblance, suitable size, and longevity for clinical practical and monitoring purpose, SCID pigs bearing dysfunctional RAG could serve as important experimental tools for regenerative medicine, allograft and xenograft transplantation, and reconstitution experiments related to the immune system. In this study, we report the generation and phenotypic characterization of RAG1 and RAG2 knockout pigs using transcription activator-like effector nucleases. Porcine fetal fibroblasts were genetically engineered using transcription activator-like effector nucleases and then used to provide donor nuclei for somatic cell nuclear transfer. We obtained 27 live cloned piglets; among these piglets, 9 were targeted with biallelic mutations in RAG1, 3 were targeted with biallelic mutations in RAG2, and 10 were targeted with a monoallelic mutation in RAG2. Piglets with biallelic mutations in either RAG1 or RAG2 exhibited hypoplasia of immune organs, failed to perform V(D)J rearrangement, and lost mature B and T cells. These immunodeficient RAG1/2 knockout pigs are promising tools for biomedical and translational research. PMID:24973446

  9. Mechanical ventilation alone, and in the presence of sepsis, impair protein metabolism in the diaphragm of neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) impairs diaphragmatic function and diminishes the ability to wean from ventilatory support in adult humans. In normal neonatal pigs, animals that are highly anabolic, endotoxin (LPS) infusion induces sepsis, reduces peripheral skeletal muscle protein synthesis rates, but ...

  10. Recombinational Cloning Using Gateway and In-Fusion Cloning Schemes

    PubMed Central

    Throop, Andrea L.; LaBaer, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    The comprehensive study of protein structure and function, or proteomics, depends on the obtainability of full-length cDNAs in species-specific expression vectors and subsequent functional analysis of the expressed protein. Recombinational cloning is a universal cloning technique based on site-specific recombination that is independent of the insert DNA sequence of interest, which differentiates this method from the classical restriction enzyme-based cloning methods. Recombinational cloning enables rapid and efficient parallel transfer of DNA inserts into multiple expression systems. This unit summarizes strategies for generating expression-ready clones using the most popular recombinational cloning technologies, including the commercially available Gateway® (Life Technologies) and In-Fusion® (Clontech) cloning technologies. PMID:25827088

  11. Overlap extension PCR cloning.

    PubMed

    Bryksin, Anton; Matsumura, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Rising demand for recombinant proteins has motivated the development of efficient and reliable cloning methods. Here we show how a beginner can clone virtually any DNA insert into a plasmid of choice without the use of restriction endonucleases or T4 DNA ligase. Chimeric primers encoding plasmid sequence at the 5' ends and insert sequence at the 3' ends are designed and synthesized. Phusion(®) DNA polymerase is utilized to amplify the desired insert by PCR. The double-stranded product is subsequently employed as a pair of mega-primers in a PCR-like reaction with circular plasmids. The original plasmids are then destroyed in restriction digests with Dpn I. The product of the overlap extension PCR is used to transform competent Escherichia coli cells. Phusion(®) DNA polymerase is used for both the amplification and fusion reactions, so both steps can be monitored and optimized in the same way. PMID:23996437

  12. Cloning of murine ferrochelatase.

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, D A; Frasier, F

    1991-01-01

    Ferrochelatase (protoheme ferro-lyase, EC 4.99.1.1) catalyzes the last step in the heme biosynthetic pathway, the chelation of ferrous iron and protoporphyrin to form heme. The activity of ferrochelatase is deficient in the inherited disease protoporphyria. In this study, murine ferrochelatase cDNAs were obtained by screening cDNA libraries with an oligonucleotide probe. The derived amino acid sequence of murine ferrochelatase has 47% identity with the recently cloned Saccharomyces cerevisiae ferrochelatase, but it is not significantly similar to other published sequences. Results of Southern blotting are consistent with a single murine ferrochelatase gene, while Northern blotting demonstrates two ferrochelatase transcripts in all tissues examined. The ferrochelatase protein and mRNAs have different relative concentrations in different tissues. The cloning of murine ferrochelatase cDNAs provides the basis for future studies on ferrochelatase gene expression and on the identification of the molecular defect in protoporphyria. Images PMID:1704134

  13. Profile of new green fluorescent protein transgenic Jinhua pigs as an imaging source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawarasaki, Tatsuo; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Hirao, Atsushi; Azuma, Sadahiro; Otake, Masayoshi; Shibata, Masatoshi; Tsuchiya, Seiko; Enosawa, Shin; Takeuchi, Koichi; Konno, Kenjiro; Hakamata, Yoji; Yoshino, Hiroyuki; Wakai, Takuya; Ookawara, Shigeo; Tanaka, Hozumi; Kobayashi, Eiji; Murakami, Takashi

    2009-09-01

    Animal imaging sources have become an indispensable material for biological sciences. Specifically, gene-encoded biological probes serve as stable and high-performance tools to visualize cellular fate in living animals. We use a somatic cell cloning technique to create new green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing Jinhua pigs with a miniature body size, and characterized the expression profile in various tissues/organs and ex vivo culture conditions. The born GFP-transgenic pig demonstrate an organ/tissue-dependent expression pattern. Strong GFP expression is observed in the skeletal muscle, pancreas, heart, and kidney. Regarding cellular levels, bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells, hepatocytes, and islet cells of the pancreas also show sufficient expression with the unique pattern. Moreover, the cloned pigs demonstrate normal growth and fertility, and the introduced GFP gene is stably transmitted to pigs in subsequent generations. The new GFP-expressing Jinhua pigs may be used as new cellular/tissue light resources for biological imaging in preclinical research fields such as tissue engineering, experimental regenerative medicine, and transplantation.

  14. Cloning-free CRISPR

    PubMed Central

    Arbab, Mandana; Srinivasan, Sharanya; Hashimoto, Tatsunori; Geijsen, Niels; Sherwood, Richard I.

    2015-01-01

    Summary We present self-cloning CRISPR/Cas9 (scCRISPR), a technology that allows for CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genomic mutation and site-specific knockin transgene creation within several hours by circumventing the need to clone a site-specific single-guide RNA (sgRNA) or knockin homology construct for each target locus. We introduce a self-cleaving palindromic sgRNA plasmid and a short double-stranded DNA sequence encoding the desired locus-specific sgRNA into target cells, allowing them to produce a locus-specific sgRNA plasmid through homologous recombination. scCRISPR enables efficient generation of gene knockouts (∼88% mutation rate) at approximately one-sixth the cost of plasmid-based sgRNA construction with only 2 hr of preparation for each targeted site. Additionally, we demonstrate efficient site-specific knockin of GFP transgenes without any plasmid cloning or genome-integrated selection cassette in mouse and human embryonic stem cells (2%–4% knockin rate) through PCR-based addition of short homology arms. scCRISPR substantially lowers the bar on mouse and human transgenesis. PMID:26527385

  15. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, Sanford A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism's chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  16. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, S.A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes. 9 figs.

  17. Comparison of Cervical Spine Anatomy in Calves, Pigs and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Sun-Ren; Xu, Hua-Zi; Wang, Yong-Li; Zhu, Qing-An; Mao, Fang-Min; Lin, Yan; Wang, Xiang-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background Context Animals are commonly used to model the human spine for in vitro and in vivo experiments. Many studies have investigated similarities and differences between animals and humans in the lumbar and thoracic vertebrae. However, a quantitative anatomic comparison of calf, pig, and human cervical spines has not been reported. Purpose To compare fundamental structural similarities and differences in vertebral bodies from the cervical spines of commonly used experimental animal models and humans. Study Design Anatomical morphometric analysis was performed on cervical vertebra specimens harvested from humans and two common large animals (i.e., calves and pigs). Methods Multiple morphometric parameters were directly measured from cervical spine specimens of twelve pigs, twelve calves and twelve human adult cadavers. The following anatomical parameters were measured: vertebral body width (VBW), vertebral body depth (VBD), vertebral body height (VBH), spinal canal width (SCW), spinal canal depth (SCD), pedicle width (PW), pedicle depth (PD), pedicle inclination (PI), dens width (DW), dens depth (DD), total vertebral width (TVW), and total vertebral depth (TVD). Results The atlantoaxial (C1–2) joint in pigs is similar to that in humans and could serve as a human substitute. The pig cervical spine is highly similar to the human cervical spine, except for two large transverse processes in the anterior regions ofC4–C6. The width and depth of the calf odontoid process were larger than those in humans. VBW and VBD of calf cervical vertebrae were larger than those in humans, but the spinal canal was smaller. Calf C7 was relatively similar to human C7, thus, it may be a good substitute. Conclusion Pig cervical vertebrae were more suitable human substitutions than calf cervical vertebrae, especially with respect to C1, C2, and C7. The biomechanical properties of nerve vascular anatomy and various segment functions in pig and calf cervical vertebrae must be

  18. Ethical issues in livestock cloning.

    PubMed

    Thompson, P B

    1999-01-01

    Although cloning may eventually become an important technology for livestock production, four ethical issues must be addressed before the practice becomes widespread. First, researchers must establish that the procedure is not detrimental to the health or well-being of affected animals. Second, animal research institutions should evaluate the net social benefits to livestock producers by weighing the benefits to producers against the opportunity cost of research capacity lost to biomedical projects. Third, scientists should consider the indirect effects of cloning research on the larger ethical issues surrounding human cloning. Finally, the market structure for products of cloned animals should protect individual choice, and should recognize that many individuals find the prospect of cloning (or consuming cloned animals) repugnant. Analysis of these four issues is complicated by spurious arguments alleging that cloning will have a negative impact on environment and genetic diversity. PMID:15719505

  19. Probabilistic cloning of equidistant states

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, O.; Roa, Luis; Delgado, A.

    2010-08-15

    We study the probabilistic cloning of equidistant states. These states are such that the inner product between them is a complex constant or its conjugate. Thereby, it is possible to study their cloning in a simple way. In particular, we are interested in the behavior of the cloning probability as a function of the phase of the overlap among the involved states. We show that for certain families of equidistant states Duan and Guo's cloning machine leads to cloning probabilities lower than the optimal unambiguous discrimination probability of equidistant states. We propose an alternative cloning machine whose cloning probability is higher than or equal to the optimal unambiguous discrimination probability for any family of equidistant states. Both machines achieve the same probability for equidistant states whose inner product is a positive real number.

  20. Oxamflatin Treatment Enhances Cloned Porcine Embryo Development and Nuclear Reprogramming*

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jiude; Zhao, Ming-Tao; Whitworth, Kristin M.; Spate, Lee D.; Walters, Eric M.; O'Gorman, Chad; Lee, Kiho; Samuel, Melissa S.; Murphy, Clifton N.; Wells, Kevin; Rivera, Rocio M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Faulty epigenetic reprogramming of somatic nuclei is thought to be the main reason for low cloning efficiency by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), such as Scriptaid, improve developmental competence of SCNT embryos in several species. Another HDACi, Oxamflatin, is about 100 times more potent than Scriptaid in the ability to inhibit nuclear-specific HDACs. The present study determined the effects of Oxamflatin treatment on embryo development, DNA methylation, and gene expression. Oxamflatin treatment enhanced blastocyst formation of SCNT embryos in vitro. Embryo transfer produced more pigs born and fewer mummies from the Oxamflatin-treated group compared to the Scriptaid-treated positive control. Oxamflatin also decreased DNA methylation of POU5F1 regulatory elements and centromeric repeat elements in day-7 blastocysts. When compared to in vitro–fertilized (IVF) embryos, the methylation status of POU5F1, NANOG, and centromeric repeat was similar in the cloned embryos, indicating these genes were successfully reprogrammed. However, compared to the lack of methylation of XIST in day-7 IVF embryos, a higher methylation level in day-7 cloned embryos was observed, implying that X chromosomes were activated in day-7 IVF blastocysts, but were not fully activated in cloned embryos, i.e., reprogramming of XIST was delayed. A time-course analysis of XIST DNA methylation on day-13, -15, -17, and -19 in vivo embryos revealed that XIST methylation initiated at about day 13 and was not completed by day 19. The methylation of the XIST gene in day-19 control cloned embryos was delayed again when compared to in vivo embryos. However, methylation of XIST in Oxamflatin-treated embryos was comparable with in vivo embryos, which further demonstrated that Oxamflatin could accelerate the delayed reprogramming of XIST gene and thus might improve cloning efficiency. PMID:25548976

  1. Ototoxic drugs: difference in sensitivity between mice and guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Poirrier, A L; Van den Ackerveken, P; Kim, T S; Vandenbosch, R; Nguyen, L; Lefebvre, P P; Malgrange, B

    2010-03-01

    The development of experimental animal models has played an invaluable role in understanding the mechanisms of neurosensory deafness and in devising effective treatments. The purpose of this study was to develop an adult mouse model of ototoxic drug-induced hearing loss and to compare the ototoxicity in the adult mouse to that in the well-described guinea pig model. Mice are a powerful model organism, especially due to the large availability of antibodies, probes and genetic mutants. In this study, mice (n=114) and guinea pigs (n=35) underwent systemic treatment with either kanamycin or cisplatin. Auditory brainstem responses showed a significant threshold shift in guinea pigs 2 weeks after the beginning of the ototoxic treatment, while there was no significant hearing impairment recorded in mice. Hair cells and neuronal loss were correlated with hearing function in both guinea pigs and mice. These results indicate that the mouse is not a good model for ototoxicity, which should be taken into consideration in all further investigations concerning ototoxicity-induced hearing loss. PMID:20015469

  2. Sarcoptic mange infestation in pigs in a hilly region of Meghalaya.

    PubMed

    Das, M; Laha, R; Devi, P; Bordoloi, R K; Naskar, S

    2010-06-01

    Skin lesions were collected from 15 adult crossbred pigs maintained at the pig farm of ICAR Research Complex for the North-Eastern Hill Region, Umiam, a hilly region of the state of Meghalaya, India. Skin scrapings of these 15 animals were examined by KOH digestion method. Presence of mites were detected in five animals which were indistinguishable from Sarcoptes scabiei var. suis. Infected pigs were treated with a single dose of Ivermectin at 200 ug/kg body weight, subcutaneously. No mites were recovered from treated pigs after a period of 10 days of post-treatment. The presence of S. scabiei var. suis in pigs from this part of the country has never been reported. This infestation has great significance because it affects the growth rate and feed conversion significantly, specially to the grower and weaned pigs. It can be concluded that S. scabiei var. suis infestation is prevalent in hilly region of Meghalaya. The pig producers are generally unaware about the severity of the problem of mite infestation, so precaution should be taken to prevent their valuable pigs from S. scabiei var. suis infestation. PMID:20041347

  3. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium infections in pigs in Aragón (northeastern Spain).

    PubMed

    Quílez, J; Sánchez-Acedo, C; Clavel, A; del Cacho, E; López-Bernad, F

    1996-12-01

    Faecal samples from 620 pigs randomly selected from 27 farms throughout Aragón were examined to determine the prevalence of Cryptosporidium infections. Detection of oocysts was performed using the ethyl-acetate stool concentration method and the modified Ziehl-Neelsen technique. Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were identified in 136 (21.9%) pigs from 21 (77.8%) farms. Infected animals ranged from 1 to 6 months old and oocysts were not detected in suckling piglets or adults. Infection rates were significantly higher in weaned, 1-2 month old piglets (59.2%) than in fattening, 2-6 month old pigs (34.3%) (P < 0.001). Cryptosporidial infections were asymptomatic in most of the pigs (90.4%) and usually of low intensity, since 92.6% of the infected pigs excreted few oocysts (0-1 oocysts per field at x 200 magnifications). Although 24.1% of weaned and 5.6% of fattening pigs infected by C. parvum had diarrhoea, it was not found to be statistically associated with infection. In fact, infection rates were higher in non-diarrhoeic than in diarrhoeic pigs, in both weaned (64.7% and 46.7%, respectively) and fattening pigs (34.3% and 33.3%). PMID:9011017

  4. Seroprevalence of Lawsonia intracellularis antibodies in intensive pig farms in China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Porcine proliferative enteropathy caused by Lawsonia intracellularis (L. intracellularis) is a major concern to the pig industry worldwide. Although 8.3 billion pigs are produced each year in China, few reports on the prevalence of L.intracellularis infection are available. The aim of the current study was to estimate the seroprevalence of L. intracellularis antibodies in intensive pig farms in China. Results A total of 1060 serum samples were collected from 14 commercial pig farms located throughout China. Animals from all age groups were sampled including pre-weaning piglets, weaners, fattening pigs, adult sows and boars. Antibodies against L. intracellularis were detected using a specific blocking ELISA. Of the 1060 serum samples, 602 were identified as positive using the ELISA test. The apparent seroprevalence of L. intracellularis seropositivity was 57% (95% CI 50 to 64%). The true prevalence (that is, prevalence corrected for the imperfect sensitivity and specificity of the testing method) was 77% (95% CI 70 to 83%). Conclusions The highest true prevalence was observed in sows and boars, suggesting that within a herd these stock classes are a reservoir for infection. The prevalence of L. intracellularis seropositivity in local breed pigs was significantly less than that in imported breeds. A higher seroprevalence was found in pigs in herds in Central and Northern China, which may correspond to the greater use of the intensive production systems in these areas. We conclude that L. intracellularis is widely prevalent in commercial pigs in China. PMID:24774304

  5. Establishment of a novel, eco-friendly transgenic pig model using porcine pancreatic amylase promoter-driven fungal cellulase transgenes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y S; Yang, C C; Hsu, C C; Hsu, J T; Wu, S C; Lin, C J; Cheng, W T K

    2015-02-01

    Competition between humans and livestock for cereal and legume grains makes it challenging to provide economical feeds to livestock animals. Recent increases in corn and soybean prices have had a significant impact on the cost of feed for pig producers. The utilization of byproducts and alternative ingredients in pig diets has the potential to reduce feed costs. Moreover, unlike ruminants, pigs have limited ability to utilize diets with high fiber content because they lack endogenous enzymes capable of breaking down nonstarch polysaccharides into simple sugars. Here, we investigated the feasibility of a transgenic strategy in which expression of the fungal cellulase transgene was driven by the porcine pancreatic amylase promoter in pigs. A 2,488 bp 5'-flanking region of the porcine pancreatic amylase gene was cloned by the genomic walking technique, and its structural features were characterized. Using GFP as a reporter, we found that this region contained promoter activity and had the potential to control heterologous gene expression. Transgenic pigs were generated by pronuclear microinjection. Founders and offspring were identified by PCR and Southern blot analyses. Cellulase mRNA and protein showed tissue-specific expression in the pancreas of F1 generation pigs. Cellulolytic enzyme activity was also identified in the pancreas of transgenic pigs. These results demonstrated the establishment of a tissue-specific promoter of the porcine pancreatic amylase gene. Transgenic pigs expressing exogenous cellulase may represent a way to increase the intake of low-cost, fiber-rich feeds. PMID:25063310

  6. [Expression analysis of green fluorescent protein in tissues and organs in α-1,3 galactosyltransferase knockout pigs].

    PubMed

    Zhifang, Li; Chong, Feng; Huili, Ji; Ningning, Shi; Xiaofeng, Song; Qinli, Zhao; Chuan, Long; Dengke, Pan; Xiaogan, Yang

    2015-12-01

    The pig is an ideal source to provide organs because its organ size and physiology are similar to humans. However, an acute rejection will ensue after pig-to-human xenotransplantation. The α-1,3 galactosyltransferase gene knockout (GTKO) pigs were generated in recent years, and could solve the problem of hyperacute rejection. But due to lack of reporting genes, the rejection status of cells and organs post pig-to-human xenotransplantation cannot be visualized. In this study, we introduced the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene driven by the CAG promoter into GTKO porcine ear fibroblasts. Then we produced transgenic pigs expressing the EGFP gene by nuclear transfer technology. Expression levels of EGFP in different tissues and organs of the cloned pig were investigated by Nightsea DFP-1 Fluorescent Protein Flashlight, fluorescence microscope and quantitative PCR assays. The results showed that the protein and transcript of EGFP were expressed in all tissues and organs of the GTKO pig, but the expression was weak in the liver and central nervous system. In conclusion, we have successfully produced the transgenic GTKO pigs expressing EGFP in all tested tissues and organs, which builds up a good basis to track transplanted cells or tissues. PMID:26704946

  7. To clone or not to clone--a Jewish perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Lipschutz, J H

    1999-01-01

    Many new reproductive methods such as artificial insemination, in vitro fertilisation, freezing of human embryos, and surrogate motherhood were at first widely condemned but are now seen in Western society as not just ethically and morally acceptable, but beneficial in that they allow otherwise infertile couples to have children. The idea of human cloning was also quickly condemned but debate is now emerging. This article examines cloning from a Jewish perspective and finds evidence to support the view that there is nothing inherently wrong with the idea of human cloning. A hypothesis is also advanced suggesting that even if a body was cloned, the brain, which is the essence of humanity, would remain unique. This author suggests that the debate should be changed from "Is cloning wrong?" to "When is cloning wrong?". PMID:10226913

  8. Exercise enclosures for guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Brown, Cyndi

    2009-11-01

    Exercise and exploration are important to the health and happiness of guinea pigs. Laboratory housing does not always provide the space necessary for such opportunities. This article presents an inexpensive, versatile option for an enclosed exercise area for the laboratory guinea pig. PMID:19847177

  9. Alpha1-adrenoceptors in the guinea pig thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Y; Koike, K

    1999-01-01

    In the present study, we tried to determine which alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes are involved in the guinea pig thoracic aorta by using in vitro functional analysis. In first, we tried to estimate the pA2 values of some key alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists (prazosin, 5-methylurapidil, WB4101, BMY7378 and tamsulosin) against responses to norepinephrine in the thoracic aorta of guinea pigs. The concentration-response curves of norepinephrine were rightward shifted by the presence of prazosin, 5 methylurapidil, WB4101, BMY7378 and tamsulosin. The pA2 values for these antagonists against norepinephrine were 7.83, 7.78, 8.20, 5.73 and 9.57, respectively. In second, we tried to compare the estimated pA2 values obtained in the present study with reported pKi and pA2 values for cloned and native alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes. In rabbit mesenteric artery, trigone, urethra, prostate and human lower urinary tract which were proposed to contain the putative alpha1L-adenoceptor, we obtained the good correlation for the pA2 values reported in these tissues with pA2 values estimated in guinea pig thoracic aorta. Moreover, regression lines were close to the line of identity. These results suggest that the alpha1-adenoceptors mediating contraction of guinea pig thoracic aorta are similar pharmacologically to the putative alpha1L-adenoceptor subtype in rabbit mesenteric artery, trigone, urethra, prostate and human lower urinary tract. As a final point, guinea pig thoracic aorta may be able to use as a tool to develop the new alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist which is therapeutically advantageous in the treatment of urinary tract obstruction (e. g., in benign prostatic hyperplasia). PMID:10733154

  10. Technology And Pregnant Pigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    One of the interesting things about aerospace spinoff is the way it keeps cropping up in uncommon applications unimaginably remote from the original technology. For example, the pig pregnancy detector. The pig pregnancy detector? City folk may be surprised to learn that there is such a thing-and wonder why. The why is because it is a sow's job to produce piglets and farmers can't afford to keep those who don't; it costs about a half-dollar a day in feed, labor and facilities, and even in small herds that's intolerable. So the barren sow must go. Until recently, the best method of determining pig pregnancy was "eyeballing," daily visual examination over a period of time. The problem with eyeballing is that pregnancy is not evident until well advanced; when there is no pregnancy, the farmer learns too late that he has been feeding a sow that won't give him a litter. Advancing technology provided an answer: the quick, easy-to-use, accurate automatic detector for early evaluation of pregnancy status. Among the most popular of these devices are Scanopreg and Scanoprobe, to whose development NASA technology contributed. Scanopreg is an ultrasonic system which detects pregnancy about 30 days after breeding, long before eyeballing can provide an answer. The companion Scanoprobe is a dual-function unit which not only determines pregnancy but also gives farmers an analysis of a hog's meat-fat ratio, an important factor in breeding. Only a short time on the market, Scanopreg and Scanoprobe have already found wide acceptance among meat producers because they rapidly repay their cost.

  11. Therapeutic cloning and reproductive liberty.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Robert

    2009-04-01

    Concern for "reproductive liberty" suggests that decisions about embryos should normally be made by the persons who would be the genetic parents of the child that would be brought into existence if the embryo were brought to term. Therapeutic cloning would involve creating and destroying an embryo, which, if brought to term, would be the offspring of the genetic parents of the person undergoing therapy. I argue that central arguments in debates about parenthood and genetics therefore suggest that therapeutic cloning would be prima facie unethical unless it occurred with the consent of the parents of the person being cloned. Alternatively, if therapeutic cloning is thought to be legitimate, this undermines the case for some uses of reproductive cloning by implying that the genetic relation it establishes between clones and DNA donors does not carry the same moral weight as it does in cases of normal reproduction. PMID:19240247

  12. The Pig--Pet, Pork or Sacrifice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Arthur

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the various roles of the pig in children's books, including E. B. White's CHARLOTTE'S WEB and Nina Bawden's PEPPERMINT PIG. Notes that, although pigs are often used as metaphors for greed, gluttony, and squalor, the portrayal of pigs in children's literature is typically positive. (MM)

  13. Self-Cloning CRISPR.

    PubMed

    Arbab, Mandana; Sherwood, Richard I

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9-gene editing has emerged as a revolutionary technology to easily modify specific genomic loci by designing complementary sgRNA sequences and introducing these into cells along with Cas9. Self-cloning CRISPR/Cas9 (scCRISPR) uses a self-cleaving palindromic sgRNA plasmid (sgPal) that recombines with short PCR-amplified site-specific sgRNA sequences within the target cell by homologous recombination to circumvent the process of sgRNA plasmid construction. Through this mechanism, scCRISPR enables gene editing within 2 hr once sgRNA oligos are available, with high efficiency equivalent to conventional sgRNA targeting: >90% gene knockout in both mouse and human embryonic stem cells and cancer cell lines. Furthermore, using PCR-based addition of short homology arms, we achieve efficient site-specific knock-in of transgenes such as GFP without traditional plasmid cloning or genome-integrated selection cassette (2% to 4% knock-in rate). The methods in this paper describe the most rapid and efficient means of CRISPR gene editing. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27532819

  14. Discharge properties of dorsal medullary inspiratory neurons in newborn pigs.

    PubMed

    Sica, A L; Donnelly, D F; Steele, A M; Gandhi, M R

    1987-04-01

    The discharges of medullary inspiratory neurons were recorded in newborn pigs. They were classified by discharge pattern; response to lung inflation; synaptic relation to phrenic motoneurons. Our results showed: these neurons have similar discharge patterns and responses to lung inflation as adult cats; most neurons do not project to phrenic motoneurons. It is suggested that our sampled population of neurons is involved in integrating pulmonary afferent inputs. PMID:3594209

  15. Therapeutic cloning: The ethical limits

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, Peter A. . E-mail: p.whittaker@lancaster.ac.uk

    2005-09-01

    A brief outline of stem cells, stem cell therapy and therapeutic cloning is given. The position of therapeutic cloning with regard to other embryonic manipulations - IVF-based reproduction, embryonic stem formation from IVF embryos and reproductive cloning - is indicated. The main ethically challenging stages in therapeutic cloning are considered to be the nuclear transfer process including the source of eggs for this and the destruction of an embryo to provide stem cells for therapeutic use. The extremely polarised nature of the debate regarding the status of an early human embryo is noted, and some potential alternative strategies for preparing immunocompatible pluripotent stem cells are indicated.

  16. Human cloning and child welfare.

    PubMed Central

    Burley, J; Harris, J

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we discuss an objection to human cloning which appeals to the welfare of the child. This objection varies according to the sort of harm it is expected the clone will suffer. The three formulations of it that we will consider are: 1. Clones will be harmed by the fearful or prejudicial attitudes people may have about or towards them (H1); 2. Clones will be harmed by the demands and expectations of parents or genotype donors (H2); 3. Clones will be harmed by their own awareness of their origins, for example the knowledge that the genetic donor is a stranger (H3). We will show why these three versions of the child welfare objection do not necessarily supply compelling reasons to ban human reproductive cloning. The claim that we will develop and defend in the course of our discussion is that even if it is the case that a cloned child will suffer harms of the type H1-H3, it is none the less permissible to conceive by cloning so long as these cloning-induced welfare deficits are not such as to blight the existence of the resultant child, whoever this may be. PMID:10226914

  17. [The pig sty].

    PubMed

    Pires, J C

    1993-11-01

    A first-page picture of the journal O Estado de S. Paulo on October, 1993, depicts 3 children playing in the ruins of a school building in Bahia. They are dressed in rags, just like the immense majority of children begotten in recent years. They are disgracefully filthy, with dishevelled hair, in the company of a pig content to share its habitat with such animalistic beings. In the inside pages of the same edition are profuse photos of other pigs dressed in suits and ties. This ostentation mocks the people and mainly the 3 children who do not attend school because the money for it has been embezzled from their pockets. Decent journalists, conscious of these piggish humans, endeavor every day to make this country a decent place to live. In the fight for a dignified and decent country, the journal Planejamento Agora, edited by ABEPF, makes an important statement with its slogan that the fight is true when the spirit is unabated. Planejamento Agora stoically battles to make every animal child alive today a human child who is wanted. The work and team of Planejamento Agora are saluted, and they are urged to continue the struggle on behalf of such children. PMID:12346085

  18. Comparison of guinea-pig, bovine and rat alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes.

    PubMed Central

    Büscher, R.; Heeks, C.; Taguchi, K.; Michel, M. C.

    1996-01-01

    1. To elucidate a possible role of species differences in the classification of alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes, we have characterized the alpha 1-adrenoceptors in guinea-pig spleen, kidney and cerebral cortex and in bovine cerebral cortex using concentration-dependent alkylation by chloroethylclonidine and competitive binding with 5-methlurapidil, methoxamine, (+)-niguldipine, noradrenaline, oxymetazoline, phentolamine, SDZ NVI-085, tamsulosin and (+)-tamsulosin. Rat liver alpha 1B-adrenoceptors were studied for comparison. Chloroethylclonidine-sensitivity and (+)-niguldipine affinity were also compared at cloned rat and bovine alpha 1a-adrenoceptors. 2. Chloroethylclonidine concentration-dependently inactivated alpha 1-adrenoceptors in all five tissues. While chloroethylclonidine inactivated almost all alpha 1-adrenoceptors in rat liver and guinea-pig kidney and brain, 20-30% of alpha 1-adrenoceptors in guinea-pig spleen and bovine brain were resistant to alkylation by 10 microM chloroethylclonidine. With regard to concentration-dependency guinea-pig kidney and brain were approximately 10 fold less sensitive than guinea-pig spleen or rat liver. 3. In rat liver, all drugs tested competed for [3H]-prazosin binding with steep and monophasic curves. Drug affinities were relatively low and resembled most closely those of cloned rat alpha 1b-adrenoceptors. 4. In guinea-pig spleen, all drugs tested competed for [3H]-prazosin binding with steep and monophasic curves. Drug affinities were relatively low and resembled most closely those of cloned rat alpha 1b-adrenoceptors. 5. In guinea-pig kidney most drugs tested competed for [3H]-prazosin binding with steep and monophasic curves and had relatively low drug affinities close to those of cloned rat alpha 1b- and alpha 1d-adrenoceptors. However, noradrenaline and tamsulosin had consistently biphasic competition curves recognizing 36-39% high and 61-64% low affinity sites. 6. In guinea-pig cerebral cortex, all drugs tested

  19. Magnetic system tracts steel bodied pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Kershaw, C.F.

    1982-06-01

    A new magnetic detection method can track and locate all types of pipeline-pigging devices - the standard swabbing, batching, and cleaning pig; online corrosion survey pigs; both dummy and live tools; and internal geometry pigs. The battery-operated detection instrument has six levels of sensitivity for varying pipeline depths, diameters, and wall thicknesses. Its operating principle involves sensing and recording the pig's characteristic magnetic signature.

  20. Field experiences with intelligent pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.N.; Duvivier, J.P.; Lefevre, D.E.; Robb, G.A.

    1996-08-01

    Oil and gas production operations use intelligent pigs for corrosion inspection of gathering systems and pipelines worldwide. The authors have been involved with intelligent pig inspections which have been conducted on over 155 different pipelines owned by one international corporation. A variety of intelligent pig vendors have been used with tools ranging from standard first generation magnetic flux leakage (MFL) to high-resolution MFL to standard and custom made ultrasonic (UT) tools. Experiences encountered during these inspections are discussed and resolutions to many of the problems are described.

  1. [The discrete horror of cloning].

    PubMed

    Guibourg, Ricardo A

    2009-01-01

    The author raises the topic of cloning after the decision of the Argentine government, which concerned for the "dignity of the human person", passed a decree of need and urgency, No. 200/97 (Annex), prohibiting cloning experiments with human beings. Therefore, considering that the topic is so terribly urgent and necessary, the author feels it is timely to consider it. PMID:19860340

  2. Animal Cloning and Food Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... from clones and their offspring out of the food chain until CVM could further evaluate the issue. back to top FDA Studies Cloning For more than five years, CVM ... evaluate the safety of food from these animals. The resulting report, called a ...

  3. CATO: The Clone Alignment Tool.

    PubMed

    Henstock, Peter V; LaPan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput cloning efforts produce large numbers of sequences that need to be aligned, edited, compared with reference sequences, and organized as files and selected clones. Different pieces of software are typically required to perform each of these tasks. We have designed a single piece of software, CATO, the Clone Alignment Tool, that allows a user to align, evaluate, edit, and select clone sequences based on comparisons to reference sequences. The input and output are designed to be compatible with standard data formats, and thus suitable for integration into a clone processing pipeline. CATO provides both sequence alignment and visualizations to facilitate the analysis of cloning experiments. The alignment algorithm matches each of the relevant candidate sequences against each reference sequence. The visualization portion displays three levels of matching: 1) a top-level summary of the top candidate sequences aligned to each reference sequence, 2) a focused alignment view with the nucleotides of matched sequences displayed against one reference sequence, and 3) a pair-wise alignment of a single reference and candidate sequence pair. Users can select the minimum matching criteria for valid clones, edit or swap reference sequences, and export the results to a summary file as part of the high-throughput cloning workflow. PMID:27459605

  4. CATO: The Clone Alignment Tool

    PubMed Central

    Henstock, Peter V.; LaPan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput cloning efforts produce large numbers of sequences that need to be aligned, edited, compared with reference sequences, and organized as files and selected clones. Different pieces of software are typically required to perform each of these tasks. We have designed a single piece of software, CATO, the Clone Alignment Tool, that allows a user to align, evaluate, edit, and select clone sequences based on comparisons to reference sequences. The input and output are designed to be compatible with standard data formats, and thus suitable for integration into a clone processing pipeline. CATO provides both sequence alignment and visualizations to facilitate the analysis of cloning experiments. The alignment algorithm matches each of the relevant candidate sequences against each reference sequence. The visualization portion displays three levels of matching: 1) a top-level summary of the top candidate sequences aligned to each reference sequence, 2) a focused alignment view with the nucleotides of matched sequences displayed against one reference sequence, and 3) a pair-wise alignment of a single reference and candidate sequence pair. Users can select the minimum matching criteria for valid clones, edit or swap reference sequences, and export the results to a summary file as part of the high-throughput cloning workflow. PMID:27459605

  5. Therapeutic cloning: promises and issues

    PubMed Central

    Kfoury, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    Advances in biotechnology necessitate both an understanding of scientific principles and ethical implications to be clinically applicable in medicine. In this regard, therapeutic cloning offers significant potential in regenerative medicine by circumventing immunorejection, and in the cure of genetic disorders when used in conjunction with gene therapy. Therapeutic cloning in the context of cell replacement therapy holds a huge potential for de novo organogenesis and the permanent treatment of Parkinson’s disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and diabetes mellitus as shown by in vivo studies. Scientific roadblocks impeding advancement in therapeutic cloning are tumorigenicity, epigenetic reprogramming, mitochondrial heteroplasmy, interspecies pathogen transfer, low oocyte availability. Therapeutic cloning is also often tied to ethical considerations concerning the source, destruction and moral status of IVF embryos based on the argument of potential. Legislative and funding issues are also addressed. Future considerations would include a distinction between therapeutic and reproductive cloning in legislative formulations. PMID:18523539

  6. GPS Tracking of Free-Ranging Pigs to Evaluate Ring Strategies for the Control of Cysticercosis/Taeniasis in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Pray, Ian W.; Swanson, Dallas J.; Ayvar, Viterbo; Muro, Claudio; Moyano, Luz M.; Gonzalez, Armando E.; Garcia, Hector H.; O’Neal, Seth E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Taenia solium, a parasitic cestode that affects humans and pigs, is the leading cause of preventable epilepsy in the developing world. T. solium eggs are released into the environment through the stool of humans infected with an adult intestinal tapeworm (a condition called taeniasis), and cause cysticercosis when ingested by pigs or other humans. A control strategy to intervene within high-risk foci in endemic communities has been proposed as an alternative to mass antihelminthic treatment. In this ring strategy, antihelminthic treatment is targeted to humans and pigs residing within a 100 meter radius of a pig heavily-infected with cysticercosis. Our aim was to describe the roaming ranges of pigs in this region, and to evaluate whether the 100 meter radius rings encompass areas where risk factors for T. solium transmission, such as open human defecation and dense pig activity, are concentrated. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we used Global Positioning System (GPS) devices to track pig roaming ranges in two rural villages of northern Peru. We selected 41 pigs from two villages to participate in a 48-hour tracking period. Additionally, we surveyed all households to record the locations of open human defecation areas. We found that pigs spent a median of 82.8% (IQR: 73.5, 94.4) of their time roaming within 100 meters of their homes. The size of home ranges varied significantly by pig age, and 93% of the total time spent interacting with open human defecation areas occurred within 100 meters of pig residences. Conclusions/Significance These results indicate that 100 meter radius rings around heavily-infected pigs adequately capture the average pig’s roaming area (i.e., home range) and represent an area where the great majority of exposure to human feces occurs. PMID:27035825

  7. Pig shipping container test sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, H.E. Jr.

    1995-01-13

    This test plan outlines testing of the integrity of the pig shipping container. It is divided into four sections: (1) drop test requirements; (2) test preparations; (3) perform drop test; and (4) post-test examination.

  8. Solanum malacoxylon toxicity to pigs.

    PubMed

    Rucksan, B E; Wells, G A; Lewis, G

    1978-08-19

    Newly weaned pigs were given Solanum malacoxylon at dose rates of 0.2 and 1.0 g per kg body-weight per week for eight weeks. The Solanum malacoxylon was given either as an aqueous extract (SM) or as an aqueous extract incubated with fresh rumen liquor (SMLR). Tubulonephrosis, dose related in severity, was evident in all treated pigs and focal calcification in kidney and lung occurred in pigs receiving the higher dose rate. There was a marked hypercalcaemia and hypophosphataemia over the trial period; the latter feature was in contrast with the hyperphosphataemia produced in sheep. Incubation of SM with rumen liquor enhanced hypophosphataemia at both dose levels in the pig but its effect on serum calcium was equivocal. PMID:695263

  9. Elodontoma in Two Guinea Pigs.

    PubMed

    Capello, Vittorio; Lennox, Angela; Ghisleni, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Elodontoma was diagnosed in two pet guinea pigs, one involving a maxillary premolar tooth and the other affecting a mandibular incisor tooth. Diagnostic imaging, including radiographs, computed tomography, and oral endoscopy was performed in order to quantify dental disease. Diagnostic imaging was also used to guide treatment of acquired dental disease, which included intraoral restoration of normal occlusal plane and tooth extraction using an extraoral approach. These are the first histologically confirmed cases of elodontoma in guinea pigs. PMID:26415388

  10. Solanum malacoxylon poisoning in pigs.

    PubMed

    Done, S H; Tokarina, C H; Dämmrich, K; Döbereiner, J

    1976-03-01

    Solanum malacoxylon was given orally to four pigs. The animals were examined clinically and subjected to post mortem examination. Macroscopic lesions were not seen with the exception of a small calcified plaque in the endocardium of one animal. Microscopic examinations revealed slight calcification of elastic fibres in the soft tissues. The pathological changes in the bones were extensive and are described in detail. The pigs showed minimal lesions at dose levels which cause considerable systemic calcification in cattle and sheep. PMID:1265362

  11. Human cloning: can it be made safe?

    PubMed

    Rhind, Susan M; Taylor, Jane E; De Sousa, Paul A; King, Tim J; McGarry, Michelle; Wilmut, Ian

    2003-11-01

    There are continued claims of attempts to clone humans using nuclear transfer, despite the serious problems that have been encountered in cloning other mammals. It is known that epigenetic and genetic mechanisms are involved in clone failure, but we still do not know exactly how. Human reproductive cloning is unethical, but the production of cells from cloned embryos could offer many potential benefits. So, can human cloning be made safe? PMID:14634633

  12. Comparison of Serum Protection Tests in Guinea-pigs and Mice for Foot-and-Mouth Disease Antibody Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Raymundo G.

    1963-01-01

    A comparison of serum protection tests carried out in guinea-pigs, young adult mice and suckling mice for evaluation of foot-and-mouth disease antibody is described in this paper. The results indicate that the test performed in young adult mice is the most accurate and consistent. The dose of serum giving the 50 per cent lesion score end-point in guinea-pigs is about 45 and 170 times larger than that giving 50 per cent protection to suckling mice and to young adult mice, respectively. PMID:17649423

  13. Seamless Ligation Cloning Extract (SLiCE) cloning method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongwei; Werling, Uwe; Edelmann, Winfried

    2014-01-01

    SLiCE (Seamless Ligation Cloning Extract) is a novel cloning method that utilizes easy to generate bacterial cell extracts to assemble multiple DNA fragments into recombinant DNA molecules in a single in vitro recombination reaction. SLiCE overcomes the sequence limitations of traditional cloning methods, facilitates seamless cloning by recombining short end homologies (15-52 bp) with or without flanking heterologous sequences and provides an effective strategy for directional subcloning of DNA fragments from bacterial artificial chromosomes or other sources. SLiCE is highly cost-effective and demonstrates the versatility as a number of standard laboratory bacterial strains can serve as sources for SLiCE extract. We established a DH10B-derived E. coli strain expressing an optimized λ prophage Red recombination system, termed PPY, which facilitates SLiCE with very high efficiencies. PMID:24395368

  14. Methylotroph cloning vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Richard S.; Allen, Larry N.

    1989-04-25

    A cloning vehicle comprising: a replication determinant effective for replicating the vehicle in a non-C.sub.1 -utilizing host and in a C.sub.1 -utilizing host; DNA effective to allow the vehicle to be mobilized from the non-C.sub.1 -utilizing host to the C.sub.1 -utilizing host; DNA providing resistance to two antibiotics to which the wild-type C.sub.1 -utilizing host is susceptible, each of the antibiotic resistance markers having a recognition site for a restriction endonuclease; a cos site; and a means for preventing replication in the C.sub.1 -utilizing host. The vehicle is used for complementation mapping as follows. DNA comprising a gene from the C.sub.1 -utilizing organism is inserted at the restriction nuclease recognition site, inactivating the antibiotic resistance marker at that site. The vehicle can then be used to form a cosmid structure to infect the non-C.sub.1 -utilizing (e.g., E. coli) host, and then conjugated with a selected C.sub.1 -utilizing mutant. Resistance to the other antibiotic by the mutant is a marker of the conjugation. Other phenotypical changes in the mutant, e.g., loss of an auxotrophic trait, is attributed to the C.sub.1 gene. The vector is also used to inactivate genes whose protein products catalyze side reactions that divert compounds from a biosynthetic pathway to a desired product, thereby producing an organism that makes the desired product in higher yields.

  15. Clone lineages of grape phylloxera differ in their performance on Vitis vinifera.

    PubMed

    Herbert, K S; Umina, P A; Mitrovski, P J; Powell, K S; Viduka, K; Hoffmann, A A

    2010-12-01

    Grape phylloxera, Daktulosphaira vitifoliae Fitch, is an important pest of grapevines (Vitis vinifera L.) (Vitaceae). The distribution and frequency of phylloxera clone lineages vary within infested regions of Australia, suggesting the introduction of separate lineages of D. vitifoliae with host associations. Virulence levels of particular phylloxera clones may vary on V. vinifera, but much of this evidence is indirect. In this study, we directly tested the performance of phylloxera clones on V. vinifera using an established excised root assay and a new glasshouse vine assessment. In the root assay, grape phylloxera clones differed in egg production and egg to adult survivorship. In the vine assay, clones differed in the number of immature and adult life stages on roots. In addition vine characteristics, including mean stem weight, root weight, leaf chlorophyll and leaf area, were affected by different phylloxera clones. The two most widespread clones displayed high levels of virulence. These results point to only some phylloxera clones being highly virulent on V. vinifera, helping to explain patterns of field damage, phylloxera distributions and continued survival and production of V. vinifera vines in some infested areas. PMID:20482931

  16. Lack of evidence of conserved lentiviral sequences in pigs with post weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Bratanich, A; Lairmore, M; Heneine, W; Konoby, C; Harding, J; West, K; Vasquez, G; Allan, G; Ellis, J

    1999-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of retroviruses in the recently described porcine postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) serum and leukocytes were screened for reverse transcriptase (RT) activity, and tissues were examined for the presence of conserved lentiviral sequences using degenerate primers in a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Serum and stimulated leukocytes from the blood and lymph nodes from pigs with PMWS, as well as from control pigs had RT activity that was detected by the sensitive Amp-RT assay. A 257-bp fragment was amplified from DNA from the blood and bone marrow of pigs with PMWS. This fragment was identical in size to conserved lentiviral sequences that were amplified from plasmids containing DNA from several lentiviruses. Cloning and sequencing of the fragment from affected pigs, however, did not reveal homology with the recognized lentiviruses. Together the results of these analyses suggest that the RT activity present in tissues from control and affected pigs is the result of endogenous retrovirus expression, and that a lentivirus is not a primary pathogen in PMWS. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:10480463

  17. Cloning of a quantum measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Bisio, Alessandro; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Perinotti, Paolo; Sedlak, Michal

    2011-10-15

    We analyze quantum algorithms for cloning of a quantum measurement. Our aim is to mimic two uses of a device performing an unknown von Neumann measurement with a single use of the device. When the unknown device has to be used before the bipartite state to be measured is available we talk about 1{yields}2 learning of the measurement, otherwise the task is called 1{yields}2 cloning of a measurement. We perform the optimization for both learning and cloning for arbitrary dimension d of the Hilbert space. For 1{yields}2 cloning we also propose a simple quantum network that achieves the optimal fidelity. The optimal fidelity for 1{yields}2 learning just slightly outperforms the estimate and prepare strategy in which one first estimates the unknown measurement and depending on the result suitably prepares the duplicate.

  18. A Clone of Your Own.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilodeau, Kirsten

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity used at the Washington Park Arboretum that helps students understand cloning through plant propagation. Students also learn how to make a pot from recycled newspapers and how to make soil that is appropriate for the plants. (DDR)

  19. Human Cloning: Let's Discuss It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taras, Loretta; Stavroulakis, Anthea M.; Ortiz, Mary T.

    1999-01-01

    Describes experiences with holding discussions on cloning at a variety of levels in undergraduate biology courses. Discusses teaching methods used and student reactions to the discussions. Contains 12 references. (WRM)

  20. Methylotroph cloning vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, R.S.; Allen, L.N.

    1989-04-25

    A cloning vehicle comprising: a replication determinant effective for replicating the vehicle in a non-C[sub 1]-utilizing host and in a C[sub 1]-utilizing host; DNA effective to allow the vehicle to be mobilized from the non-C[sub 1]-utilizing host to the C[sub 1]-utilizing host; DNA providing resistance to two antibiotics to which the wild-type C[sub 1]-utilizing host is susceptible, each of the antibiotic resistance markers having a recognition site for a restriction endonuclease; a cos site; and a means for preventing replication in the C[sub 1]-utilizing host. The vehicle is used for complementation mapping as follows. DNA comprising a gene from the C[sub 1]-utilizing organism is inserted at the restriction nuclease recognition site, inactivating the antibiotic resistance marker at that site. The vehicle can then be used to form a cosmid structure to infect the non-C[sub 1]-utilizing (e.g., E. coli) host, and then conjugated with a selected C[sub 1]-utilizing mutant. Resistance to the other antibiotic by the mutant is a marker of the conjugation. Other phenotypical changes in the mutant, e.g., loss of an auxotrophic trait, is attributed to the C[sub 1] gene. The vector is also used to inactivate genes whose protein products catalyze side reactions that divert compounds from a biosynthetic pathway to a desired product, thereby producing an organism that makes the desired product in higher yields. 3 figs.

  1. Local cloning of entangled qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhary, Sujit K.; Kunkri, Samir; Rahaman, Ramij; Roy, Anirban

    2007-11-15

    We discuss the exact cloning of orthogonal but entangled qubits under local operations and classical communication. The amount of entanglement necessary in a blank copy is obtained for various cases. Surprisingly, this amount is more than 1 ebit for certain sets of two nonmaximal but equally entangled states of two qubits. To clone any three Bell states, at least log{sub 2} 3 ebit is necessary.

  2. Differential Analysis of the Nasal Microbiome of Pig Carriers or Non-Carriers of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen; Larsen, Niels; Schønning, Kristian; Fredholm, Merete; Guardabassi, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is presently regarded as an emerging zoonotic agent due to the spread of specific methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) clones in pig farms. Studying the microbiota can be useful for the identification of bacteria that antagonize such opportunistic veterinary and zoonotic pathogen in animal carriers. The aim of this study was to determine whether the nasal microbiome of pig S. aureus carriers differs from that of non-carriers. The V3-V5 region of the 16S rRNA gene was sequenced from nasal swabs of 44 S. aureus carriers and 56 non-carriers using the 454 GS FLX titanium system. Carriers and non-carriers were selected on the basis of quantitative longitudinal data on S. aureus carriage in 600 pigs sampled at 20 Danish herds included in two previous studies in Denmark. Raw sequences were analysed with the BION meta package and the resulting abundance matrix was analysed using the DESeq2 package in R to identify operational taxonomic units (OTUs) with differential abundance between S. aureus carriers and non-carriers. Twenty OTUs were significantly associated to non-carriers, including species with known probiotic potential and antimicrobial effect such as lactic acid-producing isolates described among Leuconostoc spp. and some members of the Lachnospiraceae family, which is known for butyrate production. Further 5 OTUs were significantly associated to carriage, including known pathogenic bacteria such as Pasteurella multocida and Klebsiella spp. Our results show that the nasal microbiome of pigs that are not colonized with S. aureus harbours several species/taxa that are significantly less abundant in pig carriers, suggesting that the nasal microbiota may play a role in the individual predisposition to S. aureus nasal carriage in pigs. Further research is warranted to isolate these bacteria and assess their possible antagonistic effect on S. aureus for the pursuit of new strategies to control MRSA in pig farming. PMID:27509169

  3. Differential Analysis of the Nasal Microbiome of Pig Carriers or Non-Carriers of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen; Larsen, Niels; Schønning, Kristian; Fredholm, Merete; Guardabassi, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is presently regarded as an emerging zoonotic agent due to the spread of specific methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) clones in pig farms. Studying the microbiota can be useful for the identification of bacteria that antagonize such opportunistic veterinary and zoonotic pathogen in animal carriers. The aim of this study was to determine whether the nasal microbiome of pig S. aureus carriers differs from that of non-carriers. The V3-V5 region of the 16S rRNA gene was sequenced from nasal swabs of 44 S. aureus carriers and 56 non-carriers using the 454 GS FLX titanium system. Carriers and non-carriers were selected on the basis of quantitative longitudinal data on S. aureus carriage in 600 pigs sampled at 20 Danish herds included in two previous studies in Denmark. Raw sequences were analysed with the BION meta package and the resulting abundance matrix was analysed using the DESeq2 package in R to identify operational taxonomic units (OTUs) with differential abundance between S. aureus carriers and non-carriers. Twenty OTUs were significantly associated to non-carriers, including species with known probiotic potential and antimicrobial effect such as lactic acid-producing isolates described among Leuconostoc spp. and some members of the Lachnospiraceae family, which is known for butyrate production. Further 5 OTUs were significantly associated to carriage, including known pathogenic bacteria such as Pasteurella multocida and Klebsiella spp. Our results show that the nasal microbiome of pigs that are not colonized with S. aureus harbours several species/taxa that are significantly less abundant in pig carriers, suggesting that the nasal microbiota may play a role in the individual predisposition to S. aureus nasal carriage in pigs. Further research is warranted to isolate these bacteria and assess their possible antagonistic effect on S. aureus for the pursuit of new strategies to control MRSA in pig farming. PMID:27509169

  4. Artificial cloning of domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Keefer, Carol L

    2015-07-21

    Domestic animals can be cloned using techniques such as embryo splitting and nuclear transfer to produce genetically identical individuals. Although embryo splitting is limited to the production of only a few identical individuals, nuclear transfer of donor nuclei into recipient oocytes, whose own nuclear DNA has been removed, can result in large numbers of identical individuals. Moreover, clones can be produced using donor cells from sterile animals, such as steers and geldings, and, unlike their genetic source, these clones are fertile. In reality, due to low efficiencies and the high costs of cloning domestic species, only a limited number of identical individuals are generally produced, and these clones are primarily used as breed stock. In addition to providing a means of rescuing and propagating valuable genetics, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) research has contributed knowledge that has led to the direct reprogramming of cells (e.g., to induce pluripotent stem cells) and a better understanding of epigenetic regulation during embryonic development. In this review, I provide a broad overview of the historical development of cloning in domestic animals, of its application to the propagation of livestock and transgenic animal production, and of its scientific promise for advancing basic research. PMID:26195770

  5. Artificial cloning of domestic animals

    PubMed Central

    Keefer, Carol L.

    2015-01-01

    Domestic animals can be cloned using techniques such as embryo splitting and nuclear transfer to produce genetically identical individuals. Although embryo splitting is limited to the production of only a few identical individuals, nuclear transfer of donor nuclei into recipient oocytes, whose own nuclear DNA has been removed, can result in large numbers of identical individuals. Moreover, clones can be produced using donor cells from sterile animals, such as steers and geldings, and, unlike their genetic source, these clones are fertile. In reality, due to low efficiencies and the high costs of cloning domestic species, only a limited number of identical individuals are generally produced, and these clones are primarily used as breed stock. In addition to providing a means of rescuing and propagating valuable genetics, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) research has contributed knowledge that has led to the direct reprogramming of cells (e.g., to induce pluripotent stem cells) and a better understanding of epigenetic regulation during embryonic development. In this review, I provide a broad overview of the historical development of cloning in domestic animals, of its application to the propagation of livestock and transgenic animal production, and of its scientific promise for advancing basic research. PMID:26195770

  6. Cloning goes to the movies.

    PubMed

    Cormick, Craig

    2006-10-01

    Public attitude research conducted by Biotechnology Australia shows that one of the major sources of information on human reproductive cloning is movies. Traditionally, understanding of new and emerging technologies has come through the mass media but human cloning, being so widely addressed through the popular culture of movies, is more effectively defined by Hollywood than the news media or science media. But how well are the science and social issues of cloning portrayed in box office hits such as The Island, Multiplicity, Star Wars: Attack of the Clones and Jurassic Park? These movies have enormous reach and undoubted influence, and are therefore worth analyzing in some detail. This study looks at 33 movies made between 1971 and 2005 that address human reproductive cloning, and it categorizes the films based on their genre and potential influence. Yet rather than simply rating the quality of the science portrayed, the study compares the key messages in these movies with public attitudes towards cloning, to examine the correlations. PMID:17214211

  7. Islamic perspectives on human cloning.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Mahmoud

    2007-01-01

    The present paper seeks to assess various views from Islamic jurists relating to human cloning, which is one of the controversial topics in the recent past. Taking Islamic jurisprudence principles, such as the rule of necessity for self preservation and respect for human beings, the rule of la darar wa la dirar ('the necessity to refrain from causing harm to oneself and others') and the rule of usr wa haraj, one may indicate that if human cloning could not be prohibited, as such, it could still be opposed because it gives way to various harmful consequences, which include family disorder, chaos in the clone's family relationships, physical and mental diseases for clones and suffering of egg donors and surrogate mothers. However with due attention to the fact that the reasons behind the prohibition of abortion only restrict the destruction of human embryos in their post-implantation stages, human cloning for biomedical research and exploitation of stem cells from cloned embryos at the blastocyst stage for therapeutic purposes would be acceptable. PMID:17966502

  8. Diffuse Infiltrative Gastrointestinal Lipomatosis in a Guinea Pig (Cavia porcellus)

    PubMed Central

    Beninson, Jennifer A; Keller, Jill M; Hoenerhoff, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    An intact adult male guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) went into cardiopulmonary arrest during a surgical procedure, and efforts at resuscitation were unsuccessful. Gross examination revealed a gastric rupture along the greater curvature of the stomach, which was associated with free blood and ingesta in the abdominal cavity, and a 2-cm nodular, partially circumferential, soft-to-firm mass within the pyloric region. Histologically, the pyloric mass was composed of sheets of infiltrative adipocytes expanding the muscular wall. Similar infiltrative sheets of adipocytes were present adjacent to the rupture site and within the small intestine, cecum, and colon. These findings are consistent with diffuse infiltrative lipomatosis, an exceedingly rare condition in human and veterinary species. This report is the first description of this rare disease in guinea pigs, and the concurrent involvement of both the stomach and intestines has not been reported in any veterinary species. PMID:26473346

  9. Successful cloning of coyotes through interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer using domestic dog oocytes.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Insung; Jeong, Yeon Woo; Kim, Joung Joo; Lee, Hyo Jeong; Kang, Mina; Park, Kang Bae; Park, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yeun Wook; Kim, Woo Tae; Shin, Taeyoung; Hyun, Sang Hwan; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Hwang, Woo Suk

    2013-01-01

    Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) is an emerging assisted reproductive technology (ART) for preserving Nature's diversity. The scarcity of oocytes from some species makes utilisation of readily available oocytes inevitable. In the present study, we describe the successful cloning of coyotes (Canis latrans) through iSCNT using oocytes from domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris or dingo). Transfer of 320 interspecies-reconstructed embryos into 22 domestic dog recipients resulted in six pregnancies, from which eight viable offspring were delivered. Fusion rate and cloning efficiency during iSCNT cloning of coyotes were not significantly different from those observed during intraspecies cloning of domestic dogs. Using neonatal fibroblasts as donor cells significantly improved the cloning efficiency compared with cloning using adult fibroblast donor cells (P<0.05). The use of domestic dog oocytes in the cloning of coyotes in the present study holds promise for cloning other endangered species in the Canidae family using similar techniques. However, there are still limitations of the iSCNT technology, as demonstrated by births of morphologically abnormal coyotes and the clones' inheritance of maternal domestic dog mitochondrial DNA. PMID:23217630

  10. Postmortem findings in cloned and transgenic piglets dead before weaning.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M; Winther, K D; Secher, J O; Callesen, H

    2015-10-01

    frequent in Yucatan piglets (26.9% vs. 2.1% in LW and 5.3% in Göttingen). In conclusion, these results show that pig cloning results in a considerable loss of piglets and that many of these can be related to various malformations that all are also seen in noncloned piglets. Because approximately half of the cloned piglets still survive, even with eventual unknown minor malformations, use of pigs as models for human diseases is still realistic. However, continued efforts are needed to further reduce the level of malformations. PMID:26166169

  11. Persistence of an adverse metabolic phenotype in parenterally fed neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nutritional environment during fetal and neonatal life is a key determinant affecting the risk for adult-onset diseases, such as diabetes and obesity. We previously showed that chronic parenteral (PN) compared to enteral (EN) nutrition in neonatal pigs for two weeks leads to increased glucose in...

  12. Imperfect Cloning Operations in Algebraic Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitajima, Yuichiro

    2015-01-01

    No-cloning theorem says that there is no unitary operation that makes perfect clones of non-orthogonal quantum states. The objective of the present paper is to examine whether an imperfect cloning operation exists or not in a C*-algebraic framework. We define a universal -imperfect cloning operation which tolerates a finite loss of fidelity in the cloned state, and show that an individual system's algebra of observables is abelian if and only if there is a universal -imperfect cloning operation in the case where the loss of fidelity is less than . Therefore in this case no universal -imperfect cloning operation is possible in algebraic quantum theory.

  13. Anthelmintic effects of phytogenic feed additives in Ascaris suum inoculated pigs.

    PubMed

    van Krimpen, M M; Binnendijk, G P; Borgsteede, F H M; Gaasenbeek, C P H

    2010-03-25

    Two experiments were performed to determine the anthelmintic effect of some phytogenic feed additives on a mild infection of Ascaris suum in growing and finishing pigs. Usually, an infection of A. suum is controlled by using conventional synthetic drugs. Organic farmers, however, prefer a non-pharmaceutical approach to worm control. Therefore, phytotherapy could be an appropriate alternative. In the first experiment, a commercial available organic starter diet was supplemented with 3% of a herb mixture, adding 1% Thymus vulgaris, 1% Melissa officinalis and 1% Echinacea purpurea to the diet, or with 4% of a herb mixture, thereby adding the mentioned herbs plus 1% Camellia sinensis (black tea). A negative control group (no treatment) and a positive control group (treatment with conventional synthetic drug flubendazole) were included. In the second experiment, the anthelmintic properties against A. suum of three individual herbs, Carica papaya, Peumus boldus and Artemisia vulgaris, each in a dose of 1%, were tested. Pigs were infected with 1000 infective worm eggs each. Each experiment was performed with 32 individually housed growing pigs (8 replicates/treatment), which were monitored for 67 days. It was hypothesized that the herbs would block the cycles of the larvae, thereby preventing the development of adult worms. Therefore, phytogenic feed additives were not supplied during the whole experimental period, but only from the start until D39. Pigs were inoculated with infective worm eggs during five consecutive days (D17-D21). At D67 all pigs were dissected, whereafter livers were checked for the presence of white spots. Also numbers of worms in the small intestine were counted. In experiment 1, the numbers of worm-infected pigs were similar for both the herb supplemented (groups 3 and 4) and the unsupplemented (group 1) treatments (5-6 pigs of 8), while the treatment with flubendazole (group 2) resulted in 0 infected pigs. In experiment 2, herb addition (groups 2

  14. Local cloning of entangled states

    SciTech Connect

    Gheorghiu, Vlad; Yu Li; Cohen, Scott M.

    2010-08-15

    We investigate the conditions under which a set S of pure bipartite quantum states on a DxD system can be locally cloned deterministically by separable operations, when at least one of the states is full Schmidt rank. We allow for the possibility of cloning using a resource state that is less than maximally entangled. Our results include that: (i) all states in S must be full Schmidt rank and equally entangled under the G-concurrence measure, and (ii) the set S can be extended to a larger clonable set generated by a finite group G of order |G|=N, the number of states in the larger set. It is then shown that any local cloning apparatus is capable of cloning a number of states that divides D exactly. We provide a complete solution for two central problems in local cloning, giving necessary and sufficient conditions for (i) when a set of maximally entangled states can be locally cloned, valid for all D; and (ii) local cloning of entangled qubit states with nonvanishing entanglement. In both of these cases, we show that a maximally entangled resource is necessary and sufficient, and the states must be related to each other by local unitary 'shift' operations. These shifts are determined by the group structure, so need not be simple cyclic permutations. Assuming this shifted form and partially entangled states, then in D=3 we show that a maximally entangled resource is again necessary and sufficient, while for higher-dimensional systems, we find that the resource state must be strictly more entangled than the states in S. All of our necessary conditions for separable operations are also necessary conditions for local operations and classical communication (LOCC), since the latter is a proper subset of the former. In fact, all our results hold for LOCC, as our sufficient conditions are demonstrated for LOCC, directly.

  15. Local cloning of two product states

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Zhengfeng; Feng Yuan; Ying Mingsheng

    2005-09-15

    Local quantum operations and classical communication (LOCC) put considerable constraints on many quantum information processing tasks such as cloning and discrimination. Surprisingly, however, discrimination of any two pure states survives such constraints in some sense. We show that cloning is not that lucky; namely, probabilistic LOCC cloning of two product states is strictly less efficient than global cloning. We prove our result by giving explicitly the efficiency formula of local cloning of any two product states.

  16. Characterization of pig colonic mucins.

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, F J; Hutton, D A; Jumel, K; Pearson, J P; Harding, S E; Allen, A

    1996-01-01

    Pig colonic mucins isolated from the adherent mucus gel in the presence of proteinase inhibitors were solubilized by homogenization and the component mucins fractionated by CsC1 density-gradient centrifugation. Polymeric and reduced pig colonic mucin were both largely excluded on Sepharose CL-2B, papain-digested colonic mucin was included. The M(r) values of polymeric, reduced and digested mucins were 5.5 x 10(6), 2.1 x 10(6) and 0.6 x 10(6) respectively. This suggests that pig colonic mucin is comprised of 2-3 subunits, each subunit containing 3-4 glycosylated regions. The intrinsic viscosities of polymeric, reduced and digested mucin were 240 ml.g-1, 100 ml.g-1 and 20 ml.g-1 respectively. Polymeric pig colonic mucin comprised 16% protein per mg of glycoprotein and was rich in serine, threonine and proline (43% of total amino acids). There were approx. 150 disulphide bridges and 53 free thiol groups per mucin polymer. A seventh of the protein content was lost on reduction. This protein was particularly rich in proline and the hydrophobic amino acids. Papain-digested pig colonic mucin contained 11% protein per mg of glycoprotein and was rich in serine, threonine, glutamate and aspartate. All types of amino acids with the exception of aspartate were lost on digestion. The amino acid analysis of the proteolytically digested regions of pig colonic mucin are markedly different to the tandem repeat regions of the human mucin genes shown to be expressed in the colon. PMID:8670173

  17. Induction of systemic IFITM3 expression does not effectively control foot-and-mouth disease viral infection in transgenic pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huawei; Zheng, Haixue; Qian, Ping; Xu, Jinfang; Yang, Xi; Zhou, Rui; Chen, Huanchun; Li, Xiangmin

    2016-08-15

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals, and can cause severe economic loss. Interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM) proteins constitute a family of viral restriction factors that can inhibit the replication of several types of viruses. Our previous study showed that overexpression of swine IFITM3 (sIFITM3) impeded replication of the FMD virus (FMDV) in BHK-21 cells and mice. In this study, sIFITM3-transgenic (TG) pigs were produced by handmade cloning. Results showed that sIFITM3 was highly overexpressed in many organs of sIFITM3-TG pigs compared to wild-type pigs. After a virulent FMDV strain (O/ES/2001) was intramuscularly inoculated, the sIFITM3-TG pigs showed slightly higher susceptibility to FMDV infection than wild-type pigs. Both groups displayed comparable degrees of clinical symptoms throughout the 14-day observation period. Therefore, the induction of systemic sIFITM3 expression does not protect pigs against FMDV infection. Based on these observations, we propose that a combination of interferons and vaccines be used to control FMDV infections and subsequent FMD outbreaks. PMID:27374903

  18. Late effects of radiation on the lumbar spinal cord of guinea pigs: Re-treatment tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, K.A. ); Withers, H.R.; Chiang, Chi-Shiun )

    1993-07-15

    Using a guinea pig model of lumbar myelopathy, various factors affecting the tolerance of spinal cord to irradiation were assessed: (a) extent of initial injury; (b) time interval between priming and test doses; and (c) animal age at the time of initial radiation treatment. A 3 cm section of lumbar spinal cord of guinea pigs was irradiated with fractionated doses of 4.5 Gy gamma rays given as 9 fractions per week. Guinea pigs were primed with 9 x 4.5 Gy in 7 days which is 60% of the ED[sub 50] for a continuous course of treatment. After 28 or 40 weeks, animal were retreated with 6-14 fractions of 4.5 Gy. Animals were observed for 2 years following the priming dose and both the incidence and latency of myelopathy recorded. Young adult guinea pigs (8 wk old) showed both a decreased radiation tolerance and latency compared to old individuals (40 wk old). At 28 or 40 wk after 9 x 4.5 Gy, only about 8% of the initial injury was remembered in young adult guinea pigs. The amount of residual injury was dependent on the initial damage as a proportion of the tolerance dose. The spinal cord shows a greater capacity for long-term recovery than generally appreciated and re-treatment doses clinically prescribed may be lower than necessary. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. [Cloning and law in Hungary].

    PubMed

    Julesz, Máté

    2015-03-01

    Reproductive human cloning is prohibited in Hungary, as in many other countries. Therapeutic human cloning is not prohibited, just like in many other countries. Stem cell therapy is also allowed. Article III, paragraph (3) of the Hungarian basic law (constitution) strictly forbids total human cloning. Article 1 of the Additional Protocol to the Oviedo Convention, on the Prohibition of Cloning Human Beings (1998) stipulates that any intervention seeking to create a human being genetically identical to another human being, whether living or dead, is prohibited. In Hungary, according to Article 174 of the Criminal Code, total human cloning constitutes a crime. Article 180, paragraph (3) of the Hungarian Act on Health declares that embryos shall not be brought about for research purposes; research shall be conducted only on embryos brought about for reproductive purposes when this is authorized by the persons entitled to decide upon its disposal, or when the embryo is damaged. Article 180, paragraph (5) of the Hungarian Act on Health stipulates that multiple individuals who genetically conform to one another shall not be brought about. According to Article 181, paragraph (1) of the Hungarian Act on Health, an embryo used for research shall be kept alive for not longer than 14 days, not counting the time it was frozen for storage and the time period of research. PMID:25749537

  20. Agronomic recycling of pig slurry and pig sewage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Garrido, Melisa; Sánchez García, Pablo; Faz Cano, Ángel; Büyükkılıç Yanardag, Asuman; Yanardag, Ibrahim; Kabas, Sebla; Ángeles Múñoz García, María; María Rosales Aranda, Rosa; Segura Ruíz, Juan Carlos

    2013-04-01

    Recycling pig slurry as organic fertilizer is a convenient and suitable way of waste elimination due to its low cost and high agronomic benefits. The objectives of this two year study are focused on improving and recycling pig slurry appropriately, and monitoring the soil-plant system at the same time. The evaluation of the agronomic effectiveness of different types of pig slurry (raw, solid, treated and depurated) in different doses (170 kg N ha-1 (legislated dose), 340 and 510 kg N ha-1) is innovative because the fertilizer value of each amendment can be balanced. Furthermore environmental issues such us volatilisation, leaching and salinisation have been considered for each treatment in order to set the viability of the study and to justify the treatments applied. Electrical conductivity, Kjeldhal nitrogen, sodium and potassium are the physico-chemical parameters most influenced in soils treated with doses 340 and 510 kg N ha-1. Additionally plant samples, especially halophyte, have shown the highest major and minor nutrients contents. Finally, pig slurry application in legislated doses could be considered a useful environmental practice; however, the development of the crop will be very influenced by the type of dose and amendment selected.

  1. Organophosphorus Inhibition and Characterization of Recombinant Guinea Pig Acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Ruark, Christopher D; Chapleau, Richard R; Mahle, Deirdre A; Gearhart, Jeffery M

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) pesticides and nerve agents have been designed to inhibit the hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine by covalently binding to the active site serine of acetylcholinesterase while Alzheimer drugs and prophylactics, such as tacrine, are characterized by reversible binding. Historically, the guinea pig has been believed to be the best non-primate model for OP toxicology and medical countermeasure development because, similarly to humans, guinea pigs have low amounts of circulating OP metabolizing carboxylesterase. To explore the hypothesis that guinea pigs are the appropriate responder species for OP toxicology and medical countermeasure development, guinea pig acetylcholinesterase (gpAChE) was cloned into pENTR/D-TOPO, recombined into pT-Rex-DEST30 and expressed in Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells. Recombinant gpAChE was purified to a specific activity of 800 U/mg using size exclusion and immobilized nickel affinity chromatography, with purity confirmed by gel electrophoresis. Ellman's assay was used to enzymatically characterize gpAChE, identifying a K(M) of 154±18.7 µmol L(-1) and a k(cat) of 4.79x10(4)±5.26x10(2) /sec. Apparent gpAChE IC50's for diisopropylfluorophosphate, dicrotophos, paraoxon, and an Alzheimer's drug, tacrine, were found to be 10.1±1.98, 337±108, 1.02±0.29 and 0.30±0.01 µmol L(-1), respectively. Apparent gpAChE inhibition constants for diisopropylfluorophosphate, dicrotophos, paraoxon, and tacrine were found to be 8.40±0.60, 4.50±0.30, 0.29±0.01 and 0.42±0.07 µmol L(-1), respectively. Lineweaver-Burk plots confirmed tacrine as a mixed inhibitor and paraoxon, dicrotophos and diisopropylfluorophosphate as irreversible non-competitive inhibitors. gpAChE bimolecular rate constants for diisopropylfluorophosphate, dicrotophos and paraoxon were found to be 1.44±0.33x10(4), 1.56±0.12x10(3) and 4.57± 0.23x10(5) L µmol(-1) min(-1), respectively. Although the blood levels of OP metabolizing carboxylesterases

  2. Treating Cloned Embryos, But Not Donor Cells, with 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine Enhances the Developmental Competence of Porcine Cloned Embryos

    PubMed Central

    HUAN, Yan Jun; ZHU, Jiang; XIE, Bing Teng; WANG, Jian Yu; LIU, Shi Chao; ZHOU, Yang; KONG, Qing Ran; HE, Hong Bin; LIU, Zhong Hua

    2013-01-01

    The efficiency of cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has remained low. In most cloned embryos, epigenetic reprogramming is incomplete, and usually the genome is hypermethylated. The DNA methylation inhibitor 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) could improve the developmental competence of cow, pig, cat and human SCNT embryos in previous studies. However, the parameters of 5-aza-dC treatment among species are different, and whether 5-aza-dC could enhance the developmental competence of porcine cloned embryos has still not been well studied. Therefore, in this study, we treated porcine fetal fibroblasts (PFF) that then were used as donor nuclei for nuclear transfer or fibroblast-derived reconstructed embryos with 5-aza-dC, and the concentration- and time-dependent effects of 5-aza-dC on porcine cloned embryos were investigated by assessing pseudo-pronucleus formation, developmental potential and pluripotent gene expression of these reconstructed embryos. Our results showed that 5-aza-dC significantly reduced the DNA methylation level in PFF (0 nM vs. 10 nM vs. 25 nM vs. 50 nM, 58.70% vs. 37.37% vs. 45.43% vs. 39.53%, P<0.05), but did not improve the blastocyst rate of cloned embryos derived from these cells. Treating cloned embryos with 25 nM 5-aza-dC for 24 h significantly enhanced the blastocyst rate compared with that of the untreated group. Furthermore, treating cloned embryos, but not donor cells, significantly promoted pseudo-pronucleus formation at 4 h post activation (51% for cloned embryos treated, 34% for donor cells treated and 36% for control, respectively, P<0.05) and enhanced the expression levels of pluripotent genes (Oct4, Nanog and Sox2) up to those of in vitro fertilized embryos during embryo development. In conclusion, treating cloned embryos, but not donor cells, with 5-aza-dC enhanced the developmental competence of porcine cloned embryos by promotion of pseudo-pronucleus formation and improvement of pluripotent gene expression. PMID

  3. A Pilot Study of Uterine Artery Embolization with Tris-Acryl Gelatin Microspheres in Guinea Pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang Wenquan; Tan Guosheng; Guo Wenbo; Yang Jianyong

    2012-06-15

    Objective: This study was designed to establish guinea pigs as an animal model for uterine artery embolization (UAE) with tris-acryl gelatin microspheres (TAGM). Methods: Twenty-five female adult guinea pigs were randomly divided into two groups, including a uterine artery casting mould group (n = 10) and a UAE group (n = 15). Pelvic angiography and vascular casting mould were performed in the first group. The anatomical characters of the pelvic cavity in guinea pigs were described. In the second group, the technical feasibility of performing UAE with TAGM in guinea pigs was investigated. The histopathological slides of the uterus of guinea pigs after UAE were examined to inspect the outcomes of UAE. Results: The uterine artery springs from the internal iliac artery, ascends tortuously along the cervix, and gives off vertically 8-10 branches to the cervix uteri and uterine horns. The diameters of the trunk of the uterine artery and its first branch were 0.32 {+-} 0.027 mm and 0.14 {+-} 0.01 mm, respectively. For UAE animals, the dosages of 40-120 and 100-300 {mu}m TAGM were 0.033 {+-} 0.003 ml and 0.015 {+-} 0.002 ml, respectively. On histopathological slides, embosphere particles were found in the first branches of the uterine artery, the subserous arteries, and the intramural arteries. Inflammatory reactions in the uterus were common in guinea pigs after UAE. Local or dispersed areas of necrosis in uterus also were observed in a few guinea pigs. Conclusions: Guinea pigs are an appropriate and feasible model for UAE with TAGM.

  4. T lymphocyte lines and clones selected against synthetic myelin basic protein 82-102 peptide from Japanese multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Inobe, J; Yamamura, T; Kunishita, T; Tabira, T

    1993-07-01

    As has been indicated in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the application of synthetic peptides for the selection of T cell lines may provide new insights into the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). We report here on T cell lines/clones generated from peripheral blood of MS patients against an immunodominant myelin basic protein (MBP) peptide 82-102. This study demonstrates that the selection of T cell lines against the MBP peptide is much more efficient than against whole MBP in generating a large panel of T cell lines/clones, and therefore provides a powerful strategy for studying autoimmune T cell repertoire in individual subjects. The peptide-selected lines and clones recognized MBP 82-102, shorter peptides MBP 89-101, 89-100 and guinea pig whole MBP mainly in the context of HLA-DR, but did not cross-recognize virus-derived peptides homologous to MBP 82-102. Seven out of ten clones were found to recognize MBP 82-102 in the absence of autologous antigen presenting cells (APC), and in three of the seven clones, specificity for MBP 82-102 could be demonstrated only in the absence of APC because of their strong reactivity against autologous APC. Two-color flow cytometry revealed that the clones were heterogeneous with regard to expression of CD4 and CD8 molecules. Overall, the clones selected by the peptide were rather heterogeneous in phenotype and function compared with those selected by whole MBP. PMID:7689597

  5. Identification of Trichinella spiralis early antigens at the pre-adult and adult stages.

    PubMed

    Zocevic, Aleksandar; Mace, Pauline; Vallee, Isabelle; Blaga, Radu; Liu, Mingyuan; Lacour, Sandrine A; Boireau, Pascal

    2011-04-01

    Three expression cDNA libraries from Trichinella spiralis worms 14 h, 20 h and 48 h post-infection (p.i.) were screened with serum from pigs experimentally infected with 20,000 T. spiralis muscle larvae. Twenty-nine positive clones were isolated from the 14 h p.i. cDNA library, corresponding to 8 different genes. A putative excretory-secretory protein similar to that of T. pseudospiralis was identified. Three clones corresponded to a T. spiralis serine proteinase inhibitor known to be involved in diverse functions such as blood coagulation and modulation of inflammation. Screening of the 20 h p.i. cDNA library selected 167 positive clones representing 12 different sequences. The clone with the highest redundancy encoded a small polypeptide having no sequence identity with any known proteins from Trichinella or other organisms. Fourteen clones displayed sequence identity with the heat shock protein (HSP) 70. HSPs are produced as an adaptive response of the parasite to the hostile environment encountered in the host intestine but their mechanism of action is not yet well defined. From the 48 h p.i. T. spiralis cDNA library, 91 positive clones were identified representing 7 distinct sequences. Most of the positive clones showed high similarity with a member of a putative T. spiralis serine protease family. This result is consistent with a possible major role for serine proteases during invasive stages of Trichinella infection and host-parasite interactions. PMID:21092349

  6. Genome-wide gene expression and DNA methylation differences in abnormally cloned and normally natural mating piglets.

    PubMed

    Zou, C; Fu, Y; Li, C; Liu, H; Li, G; Li, J; Zhang, H; Wu, Y; Li, C

    2016-08-01

    Many studies have proved that DNA methylation can regulate gene expression and further affect skeletal muscle growth and development of pig, whereas the mechanisms of how DNA methylation or gene expression alteration ultimately lead to phenotypical differences between the cloned and natural mating pigs remain elusive. This study aimed to investigate genome-wide gene expression and DNA methylation differences between abnormally cloned and normally natural mating piglets and identify molecular markers related to skeletal muscle growth and development in pig. The DNA methylation and genome-wide gene expression in the two groups of piglets were analysed through methylated DNA immunoprecipitation binding high-throughput sequencing and RNA sequencing respectively. We detected 1493 differentially expressed genes between the two groups, of which 382 genes were also differentially methylated. The results of the integrative analysis between DNA methylation and gene expression revealed that the DNA methylation levels showed a significantly negative and monotonic correlation with gene expression levels around the transcription start site of genes. By contrast, no notable monotonic correlation was observed in other regions. Furthermore, we identified some interesting genes and signalling pathways (e.g. myosin, heavy chain 7 and mammalian target of rapamycin) which possibly play essential roles in skeletal muscle growth and development. The results of this study provide insights into the relationship of DNA methylation with gene expression in newborn piglets and into the mechanisms in abnormally cloned animals through somatic cell nuclear transfer. PMID:27028246

  7. Expression Profiles of IGF-1R Gene and Polymorphisms of its Regulatory Regions in Different Pig Breeds.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yunyun; Liu, Songcai; Zhang, Xin; Wu, Qingyan; Li, Siming; Fu, Haoyu; Dong, Lijie; Yu, Hao; Hao, Linlin

    2016-06-01

    Insulin like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) is a candidate gene for growth and carcass traits in regulating animal growth, metabolism and endocrine. It is widely expressed in liver, muscle, bone tissues where the IGF-1R functions as a factor that promotes cell growth. In this study, the protein expression level of IGF-1R gene in liver and muscle tissues of three periods (birth, weaning and adult) of three pig breeds (BamaXiang pigs (BM), Tibetan pigs (TM) and Junmu No.1 pigs (JM)) were tested by western blot. SNPs within the regulatory region of pig IGF-1R gene were detected using direct sequencing and then the genotypes were identified through AS-PCR approach. Results showed expression profiles of IGF-1R gene between liver and muscle tissues were different and significant differences were also found among pig breeds. In the same time, four SNPs were detected in the regulatory region of IGF-1R gene, among which the genotype frequency of three (g.-1468G > C, g.-1192 C > T and g.330,424 C > T) were significantly different among the pig breeds. BM tended to heterozygous (GC/CT) of the anterior two loci, while TM and JM preferred the other two homozygotes respectively. For the g.330,424 C > T, all pig breeds were tended to be the heterozygous. In conclusion, the SNPs with different genotype distribution among the three pig breeds may explain the gene expression difference between the different pig breeds. PMID:27229719

  8. Apparent lack of beta 3-adrenoceptors and of insulin regulation of glucose transport in brown adipose tissue of guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Himms-Hagen, J; Triandafillou, J; Begin-Heick, N; Ghorbani, M; Kates, A L

    1995-01-01

    Norepinephrine-induced thermogenesis was substantial in adipocytes from brown adipose tissue (BAT) of cold-acclimated guinea pigs but absent in adipocytes from BAT of warm-acclimated guinea pigs. There was no thermogenic response to any beta 3-adrenergic agonist (CL-316,243, ZD-7114, BRL-28410, CGP-12177). The receptor was characterized as a beta 1-adrenoceptor. Adrenergic agonists stimulated adenylate cyclase in membranes from BAT of both warm- and cold-acclimated guinea pigs also via a beta 1-adrenoceptor; beta 3-adrenergic agonists had no effect. Glucose transport by brown adipocytes from warm-acclimated guinea pigs was not stimulated by either norepinephrine or insulin. Cold acclimation induced the appearance of stimulation of glucose transport by norepinephrine in association with the appearance of a large capacity for thermogenesis, but there was little improvement in response to insulin. GLUT4 was present in membranes from BAT of both warm- and cold-acclimated guinea pigs. Insulin is known to have an antilipolytic effect on both BAT and white adipose tissue of guinea pigs. Thus there is a selective lack of insulin-regulated glucose transport that is not improved by cold acclimation. Guinea pigs may have a mutated component of the translocation mechanism for GLUT4. beta 3-Adrenoceptors appear to be absent in brown adipocytes of adult guinea pigs, as in white adipocytes of guinea pigs, yet are known to be present in the gut. Tissue-specific expression of beta 3-adrenergic receptors in guinea pigs may differ from that in rats, in which receptors are expressed in the adipose tissues and gut. PMID:7840345

  9. Chimerism in piglets developed from aggregated cloned embryos.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongye; Li, Zhanjun; Wang, Anfeng; Han, Xiaolei; Song, Yuning; Yuan, Lin; Li, Tianye; Wang, Bing; Lai, Liangxue; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Pang, Daxin

    2016-04-01

    Porcine chimeras are valuable in the study of pluripotency, embryogenesis and development. It would be meaningful to generate chimeric piglets from somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos. In this study, two cell lines expressing the fluorescent markers enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and tdTomato were used as donor cells to produce reconstructed embryos. Chimeric embryos were generated by aggregating two EGFP-cell derived embryos with two tdTomato-cell derived embryos at the 4-cell stage, and embryo transfer was performed when the aggregated embryos developed into blastocysts. Live porcine chimeras were successfully born and chimerism was observed by their skin color, gene integration, microsatellite loci composition and fluorescent protein expression. The chimeric piglets were largely composed of EGFP-expressing cells, and this phenomenon was possibly due to the hyper-methylation of the promoter of the tdTomato gene. In addition, the expression levels of tumorigenicity-related genes were altered after tdTomato transfection in bladder cancer cells. The results show that chimeric pigs can be produced by aggregating cloned embryos and that the developmental capability of the cloned embryo in the subsequent chimeric development could be affected by the growth characteristics of its donor cell. PMID:27239442

  10. Isolation and characterization of cDNA clones for human apolipoprotein A-I.

    PubMed Central

    Breslow, J L; Ross, D; McPherson, J; Williams, H; Kurnit, D; Nussbaum, A L; Karathanasis, S K; Zannis, V I

    1982-01-01

    We have isolated cDNA clones encoding human apolipoprotein (apo) A-I. Twenty putative apo A-I cDNA clones were selected by screening 10,000 clones of an adult human liver cDNA library with an oligonucleotide probe. The probe was a mixture of synthetic 14-base-long DNA oligomers constructed to correspond to the codons for apo A-I amino acids 105-109. Four of these clones were examined further and showed 600- to 800-base-pair (bp) inserts. Preliminary restriction mapping and partial DNA sequence analysis indicated that the shorter inserts were a subset of the longer DNA inserts. DNA sequence analysis of the clone with an insert of approximately equal to 600 bp, designated pAI-113, revealed that it contained a DNA sequence corresponding to apo A-I amino acids 94-243. The DNA base sequence of this clone also contained a standard termination codon, polyadenylylation signal, and poly(A) tail. Partial DNA sequence of a second clone that contained an 800-bp insert, designated pAI-107, showed that it corresponded to apo A-I amino acids 18-243 and also included the 3' untranslated region. Isolation of these cDNA clones will facilitate molecular analyses of apolipoproteins in normal and disease states. PMID:6294659

  11. Toxoplasmosis in pigs-The last 20 years

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pigs are important to the economy of many countries because they are a source of food for humans. Infected pig meat is a source of Toxoplasma gondii infection for humans and animals in many countries. This parasite also causes mortality in pigs, especially neonatal pigs. Most pigs acquire T. gondii ...

  12. Production of Transgenic Pigs with an Introduced Missense Mutation of the Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptor Type IB Gene Related to Prolificacy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xueyan; Yang, Qiang; Zhao, Kewei; Jiang, Chao; Ren, Dongren; Xu, Pan; He, Xiaofang; Liao, Rongrong; Jiang, Kai; Ma, Junwu; Xiao, Shijun; Ren, Jun; Xing, Yuyun

    2016-07-01

    In the last few decades, transgenic animal technology has witnessed an increasingly wide application in animal breeding. Reproductive traits are economically important to the pig industry. It has been shown that the bone morphogenetic protein receptor type IB (BMPR1B) A746G polymorphism is responsible for the fertility in sheep. However, this causal mutation exits exclusively in sheep and goat. In this study, we attempted to create transgenic pigs by introducing this mutation with the aim to improve reproductive traits in pigs. We successfully constructed a vector containing porcine BMPR1B coding sequence (CDS) with the mutant G allele of A746G mutation. In total, we obtained 24 cloned male piglets using handmade cloning (HMC) technique, and 12 individuals survived till maturation. A set of polymerase chain reactions indicated that 11 of 12 matured boars were transgene-positive individuals, and that the transgenic vector was most likely disrupted during cloning. Of 11 positive pigs, one (No. 11) lost a part of the terminator region but had the intact promoter and the CDS regions. cDNA sequencing showed that the introduced allele (746G) was expressed in multiple tissues of transgene-positive offspring of No.11. Western blot analysis revealed that BMPR1B protein expression in multiple tissues of transgene-positive F1 piglets was 0.5 to 2-fold higher than that in the transgene-negative siblings. The No. 11 boar showed normal litter size performance as normal pigs from the same breed. Transgene-positive F1 boars produced by No. 11 had higher semen volume, sperm concentration and total sperm per ejaculate than the negative siblings, although the differences did not reached statistical significance. Transgene-positive F1 sows had similar litter size performance to the negative siblings, and more data are needed to adequately assess the litter size performance. In conclusion, we obtained 24 cloned transgenic pigs with the modified porcine BMPR1B CDS using HMC. c

  13. Production of Transgenic Pigs with an Introduced Missense Mutation of the Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptor Type IB Gene Related to Prolificacy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xueyan; Yang, Qiang; Zhao, Kewei; Jiang, Chao; Ren, Dongren; Xu, Pan; He, Xiaofang; Liao, Rongrong; Jiang, Kai; Ma, Junwu; Xiao, Shijun; Ren, Jun; Xing, Yuyun

    2016-01-01

    In the last few decades, transgenic animal technology has witnessed an increasingly wide application in animal breeding. Reproductive traits are economically important to the pig industry. It has been shown that the bone morphogenetic protein receptor type IB (BMPR1B) A746G polymorphism is responsible for the fertility in sheep. However, this causal mutation exits exclusively in sheep and goat. In this study, we attempted to create transgenic pigs by introducing this mutation with the aim to improve reproductive traits in pigs. We successfully constructed a vector containing porcine BMPR1B coding sequence (CDS) with the mutant G allele of A746G mutation. In total, we obtained 24 cloned male piglets using handmade cloning (HMC) technique, and 12 individuals survived till maturation. A set of polymerase chain reactions indicated that 11 of 12 matured boars were transgene-positive individuals, and that the transgenic vector was most likely disrupted during cloning. Of 11 positive pigs, one (No. 11) lost a part of the terminator region but had the intact promoter and the CDS regions. cDNA sequencing showed that the introduced allele (746G) was expressed in multiple tissues of transgene-positive offspring of No.11. Western blot analysis revealed that BMPR1B protein expression in multiple tissues of transgene-positive F1 piglets was 0.5 to 2-fold higher than that in the transgene-negative siblings. The No. 11 boar showed normal litter size performance as normal pigs from the same breed. Transgene-positive F1 boars produced by No. 11 had higher semen volume, sperm concentration and total sperm per ejaculate than the negative siblings, although the differences did not reached statistical significance. Transgene-positive F1 sows had similar litter size performance to the negative siblings, and more data are needed to adequately assess the litter size performance. In conclusion, we obtained 24 cloned transgenic pigs with the modified porcine BMPR1B CDS using HMC. c

  14. A Simple Model for Learning Improvement: Weigh Pig, Feed Pig, Weigh Pig. Occasional Paper #23

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulcher, Keston H.; Good, Megan R.; Coleman, Chris M.; Smith, Kristen L.

    2014-01-01

    Assessing learning does not by itself result in increased student accomplishment, much like a pig never fattened up because it was weighed. Indeed, recent research shows that while institutions are more regularly engaging in assessment, they have little to show in the way of stronger student performance. This paper clarifies how assessment results…

  15. Quantum cloning machines and the applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Heng; Wang, Yi-Nan; Jing, Li; Yue, Jie-Dong; Shi, Han-Duo; Zhang, Yong-Liang; Mu, Liang-Zhu

    2014-11-01

    No-cloning theorem is fundamental for quantum mechanics and for quantum information science that states an unknown quantum state cannot be cloned perfectly. However, we can try to clone a quantum state approximately with the optimal fidelity, or instead, we can try to clone it perfectly with the largest probability. Thus various quantum cloning machines have been designed for different quantum information protocols. Specifically, quantum cloning machines can be designed to analyze the security of quantum key distribution protocols such as BB84 protocol, six-state protocol, B92 protocol and their generalizations. Some well-known quantum cloning machines include universal quantum cloning machine, phase-covariant cloning machine, the asymmetric quantum cloning machine and the probabilistic quantum cloning machine. In the past years, much progress has been made in studying quantum cloning machines and their applications and implementations, both theoretically and experimentally. In this review, we will give a complete description of those important developments about quantum cloning and some related topics. On the other hand, this review is self-consistent, and in particular, we try to present some detailed formulations so that further study can be taken based on those results.

  16. Healthy ageing of cloned sheep

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, K. D.; Corr, S. A.; Gutierrez, C. G.; Fisher, P. A.; Lee, J.-H.; Rathbone, A. J.; Choi, I.; Campbell, K. H. S.; Gardner, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    The health of cloned animals generated by somatic-cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been of concern since its inception; however, there are no detailed assessments of late-onset, non-communicable diseases. Here we report that SCNT has no obvious detrimental long-term health effects in a cohort of 13 cloned sheep. We perform musculoskeletal assessments, metabolic tests and blood pressure measurements in 13 aged (7–9 years old) cloned sheep, including four derived from the cell line that gave rise to Dolly. We also perform radiological examinations of all main joints, including the knees, the joint most affected by osteoarthritis in Dolly, and compare all health parameters to groups of 5-and 6-year-old sheep, and published reference ranges. Despite their advanced age, these clones are euglycaemic, insulin sensitive and normotensive. Importantly, we observe no clinical signs of degenerative joint disease apart from mild, or in one case moderate, osteoarthritis in some animals. Our study is the first to assess the long-term health outcomes of SCNT in large animals. PMID:27459299

  17. Clone Poems and the Microcomputer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irizarry, Estelle

    1989-01-01

    Describes how students can use the computer to study and create clone poems (altering original Spanish-language poems by substituting words and expressions), and how students can gain a deeper appreciation of the original poem's poetic structure and semantics. (CB)

  18. Pigs taking wing with transposons and recombinases

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Karl J; Carlson, Daniel F; Fahrenkrug, Scott C

    2007-01-01

    Swine production has been an important part of our lives since the late Mesolithic or early Neolithic periods, and ranks number one in world meat production. Pig production also contributes to high-value-added medical markets in the form of pharmaceuticals, heart valves, and surgical materials. Genetic engineering, including the addition of exogenous genetic material or manipulation of the endogenous genome, holds great promise for changing pig phenotypes for agricultural and medical applications. Although the first transgenic pigs were described in 1985, poor survival of manipulated embryos; inefficiencies in the integration, transmission, and expression of transgenes; and expensive husbandry costs have impeded the widespread application of pig genetic engineering. Sequencing of the pig genome and advances in reproductive technologies have rejuvenated efforts to apply transgenesis to swine. Pigs provide a compelling new resource for the directed production of pharmaceutical proteins and the provision of cells, vascular grafts, and organs for xenotransplantation. Additionally, given remarkable similarities in the physiology and size of people and pigs, swine will increasingly provide large animal models of human disease where rodent models are insufficient. We review the challenges facing pig transgenesis and discuss the utility of transposases and recombinases for enhancing the success and sophistication of pig genetic engineering. 'The paradise of my fancy is one where pigs have wings.' (GK Chesterton). PMID:18047690

  19. Biodegradation of pig manure by the housefly, Musca domestica: a viable ecological strategy for pig manure management.

    PubMed

    Čičková, Helena; Pastor, Berta; Kozánek, Milan; Martínez-Sánchez, Anabel; Rojo, Santos; Takáč, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The technology for biodegradation of pig manure by using houseflies in a pilot plant capable of processing 500-700 kg of pig manure per week is described. A single adult cage loaded with 25,000 pupae produced 177.7±32.0 ml of eggs in a 15-day egg-collection period. With an inoculation ratio of 0.4-1.0 ml eggs/kg of manure, the amount of eggs produced by a single cage can suffice for the biodegradation of 178-444 kg of manure. Larval development varied among four different types of pig manure (centrifuged slurry, fresh manure, manure with sawdust, manure without sawdust). Larval survival ranged from 46.9±2.1%, in manure without sawdust, to 76.8±11.9% in centrifuged slurry. Larval development took 6-11 days, depending on the manure type. Processing of 1 kg of wet manure produced 43.9-74.3 g of housefly pupae and the weight of the residue after biodegradation decreased to 0.18-0.65 kg, with marked differences among manure types. Recommendations for the operation of industrial-scale biodegradation facilities are presented and discussed. PMID:22431982

  20. Development of large intestinal attaching and effacing lesions in pigs in association with the feeding of a particular diet.

    PubMed Central

    Neef, N A; McOrist, S; Lysons, R J; Bland, A P; Miller, B G

    1994-01-01

    Hysterotomy-derived piglets were kept in gnotobiotic isolators and artificially colonized at 7 days of age with an adult bovine enteric microflora. At 3 weeks of age, the pigs were transferred to conventional experimental accommodation and weaned, either onto a solid diet that had been associated with field cases of typhlocolitis in pigs or onto a solid control diet. At necropsy at 5 weeks of age, groups of pigs fed the diet associated with field cases of typhlocolitis were found to have developed typhlocolitis. This was absent from the groups fed the control diet. The typhlocolitis was characterized by attaching and effacing lesions typical of those described following experimental inoculation of various species with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli. A nonverocytotoxic, eae probe-positive E. coli serotype O116 was isolated from pigs on the colitis-associated diet but not from any of the pigs on the control diet. Coliform bacteria attached to the colonic lesions reacted with polyclonal antiserum to E. coli O116 in an immunoperoxidase assay of histological sections of affected tissue. No reaction with this antiserum was observed in corresponding tissue sections taken from pigs on the control diet. No colon lesions were observed in germfree pigs fed either of the diets. It is postulated that proliferation and possibly expression of pathogenicity of the attaching and effacing E. coli responsible for the lesions are strongly influenced by diet. Images PMID:7927691

  1. Biodegradation of Pig Manure by the Housefly, Musca domestica: A Viable Ecological Strategy for Pig Manure Management

    PubMed Central

    Čičková, Helena; Pastor, Berta; Kozánek, Milan; Martínez-Sánchez, Anabel; Rojo, Santos; Takáč, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The technology for biodegradation of pig manure by using houseflies in a pilot plant capable of processing 500–700 kg of pig manure per week is described. A single adult cage loaded with 25,000 pupae produced 177.7±32.0 ml of eggs in a 15-day egg-collection period. With an inoculation ratio of 0.4–1.0 ml eggs/kg of manure, the amount of eggs produced by a single cage can suffice for the biodegradation of 178–444 kg of manure. Larval development varied among four different types of pig manure (centrifuged slurry, fresh manure, manure with sawdust, manure without sawdust). Larval survival ranged from 46.9±2.1%, in manure without sawdust, to 76.8±11.9% in centrifuged slurry. Larval development took 6–11 days, depending on the manure type. Processing of 1 kg of wet manure produced 43.9–74.3 g of housefly pupae and the weight of the residue after biodegradation decreased to 0.18–0.65 kg, with marked differences among manure types. Recommendations for the operation of industrial-scale biodegradation facilities are presented and discussed. PMID:22431982

  2. Development of FQ-PCR method to determine the level of ADD1 expression in fatty and lean pigs.

    PubMed

    Cui, J X; Chen, W; Zeng, Y Q

    2015-01-01

    To determine how adipocyte determination and differentiation factor 1 (ADD1), a gene involved in the determination of pork quality, is regulated in Laiwu and Large pigs, we used TaqMan fluorescence quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (FQ-PCR) to detect differential expression in the longissimus muscle of Laiwu (fatty) and Large White (lean) pigs. In this study, the ADD1 and GAPDH cDNA sequences were cloned using a T-A cloning assay, and the clone sequences were consistent with those deposited in GenBank. Thus, the target fragment was successfully recombined into the vector, and its integrity was maintained. The standard curve and regression equation were established through the optimized FQ-PCR protocol. The standard curve of porcine ADD1 and GAPDH cDNA was determined, and its linear range extension could reach seven orders of magnitudes. The results showed that this method was used to quantify ADD1 expression in the longissimus muscle of two breeds of pig, and was found to be accurate, sensitive, and convenient. These results provide information regarding porcine ADD1 mRNA expression and the mechanism of adipocyte differentiation, and this study could help in the effort to meet the demands of consumers interested in the maintenance of health and prevention of obesity. Furthermore, it could lead to new approaches in the prevention and clinical treatment of this disease. PMID:26535708

  3. Establishment of an efficient somatic cell nuclear transfer system for production of transgenic pigs.

    PubMed

    Vajta, G; Callesen, H

    2012-04-15

    Handmade cloning (HMC) is now an established procedure used in several species for somatic cell nuclear transfer, but only applied in two related laboratories for pigs. The aim of this review is to facilitate widespread application by summarizing the process of establishment and explaining the background of the incorporated special approaches. Optimized steps of traditional cloning in pigs (in vitro maturation, activation, embryo culture) were merged with those of the micromanipulation-free HMC that has been modified according to the specific needs of sensitive porcine oocytes (partial zona digestion before enucleation, two-step zona-free fusion with the somatic cell; initiation of activation with the second fusion). The zona-free approach required embryo culture to the blastocyst stage before surgical transfer of embryos to the uterine horns of recipient sows in the proper phase of an unstimulated cycle. Eventually a competitive, inexpensive and reliable alternative to traditional porcine nuclear transfer cloning techniques evolved that is also suitable to produce transgenic offspring containing various genetic modifications to establish models for several human diseases with genetic background. Further improvements and involvement of additional techniques to increase the overall efficiency and facilitate practical applications are expected in the foreseeable future. PMID:22284219

  4. Protection of guinea pigs against Leptospira interrogans serovar Lai by LipL21 DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    He, Han Jiang; Wang, Wen Yu; Wu, Zhong Dao; Lv, Zhi Yue; Li, Jun; Tan, Li Zhi

    2008-10-01

    In this study, the full lipL21 gene fragment encoding outer membrane protein LipL21 was cloned from L. interrogans serovar Lai and inserted into eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1(+). The guinea pigs were immunized with pcDNA3.1(+)-lipL21, pcDNA3.1(+) or PBS. Six weeks after the second immunization, the splenocytes were isolated to detect their proliferative ability by lymphocyte transformation experiments. In addition, microscopic agglutination test was used for quantitative detection of specific antibodies. The rest guinea pigs were challenged intraperitoneally with L. interogans sorevar Lai. Then, protective effect was evaluated on the basis of survival and histopathological lesions in the kidneys, lungs, and liver. The lipL21 gene was successfully expressed in COS-7 cells through recombinant pcDNA3.1(+)-lipL21. The titer of specific antibodies substantially increased, and the stimulation index of splenocytes increased significantly. Hence, the pcDNA3.1(+)-lipL21 could protect the immunized guinea pigs from homotypic Leptospira infection. Furthermore, no obvious pathologic changes were observed in the pcDNA3.1(+)-lipL21 immunized guinea pigs. The results showed that the protective effect with pathogenic strains of Leptospira was shared by LipL21 mediated through a plasmid vector. Consequently, these results indicated that the lipL21 DNA vaccine was a promising candidate for the prevention of leptospirosis. PMID:18954563

  5. Phase-covariant quantum cloning of qudits

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Heng; Imai, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Keiji; Wang, Xiang-Bin

    2003-02-01

    We study the phase-covariant quantum cloning machine for qudits, i.e., the input states in a d-level quantum system have complex coefficients with arbitrary phase but constant module. A cloning unitary transformation is proposed. After optimizing the fidelity between input state and single qudit reduced density operator of output state, we obtain the optimal fidelity for 1 to 2 phase-covariant quantum cloning of qudits and the corresponding cloning transformation.

  6. Probabilistic cloning of three symmetric states

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, O.; Bergou, J.; Delgado, A.

    2010-12-15

    We study the probabilistic cloning of three symmetric states. These states are defined by a single complex quantity, the inner product among them. We show that three different probabilistic cloning machines are necessary to optimally clone all possible families of three symmetric states. We also show that the optimal cloning probability of generating M copies out of one original can be cast as the quotient between the success probability of unambiguously discriminating one and M copies of symmetric states.

  7. Diversity of forensic rove beetles (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae) associated with decaying pig carcass in a forest biotope.

    PubMed

    Dekeirsschieter, Jessica; Frederick, Christine; Verheggen, Francois J; Drugmand, Didier; Haubruge, Eric

    2013-07-01

    Most forensic studies are focused on Diptera pattern colonization while neglecting Coleoptera succession. So far, little information is available on the postmortem colonization by beetles and the decomposition process they initiate under temperate biogeoclimatic countries. These beetles have, however, been referred to as being part of the entomofaunal colonization of a dead body. Forensic entomologists need increased databases detailing the distribution, ecology, and phenology of necrophagous insects, including staphylinids (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae). While pig carcasses are commonly used in forensic entomology studies to surrogate human decomposition and to investigate the entomofaunal succession, very few works have been conducted in Europe on large carcasses. Our work reports the monitoring of the presence of adult rove beetles (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae) on decaying pig carcasses in a forest biotope during four seasons (spring, summer, fall, and winter). A total of 23 genera comprising 60 species of rove beetles were collected from pig carcasses. PMID:23550535

  8. Cloning and variation of ground state intestinal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Wilson, Lane H; Zhang, Ting; Howitt, Brooke E; Farrow, Melissa A; Kern, Florian; Ning, Gang; Hong, Yue; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Chevalier, Benoit; Bertrand, Denis; Wu, Lingyan; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Sylvester, Francisco A; Hyams, Jeffrey S; Devers, Thomas; Bronson, Roderick; Lacy, D Borden; Ho, Khek Yu; Crum, Christopher P; McKeon, Frank; Xian, Wa

    2015-06-11

    Stem cells of the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, liver and other columnar epithelia collectively resist cloning in their elemental states. Here we demonstrate the cloning and propagation of highly clonogenic, 'ground state' stem cells of the human intestine and colon. We show that derived stem-cell pedigrees sustain limited copy number and sequence variation despite extensive serial passaging and display exquisitely precise, cell-autonomous commitment to epithelial differentiation consistent with their origins along the intestinal tract. This developmentally patterned and epigenetically maintained commitment of stem cells is likely to enforce the functional specificity of the adult intestinal tract. Using clonally derived colonic epithelia, we show that toxins A or B of the enteric pathogen Clostridium difficile recapitulate the salient features of pseudomembranous colitis. The stability of the epigenetic commitment programs of these stem cells, coupled with their unlimited replicative expansion and maintained clonogenicity, suggests certain advantages for their use in disease modelling and regenerative medicine. PMID:26040716

  9. Economical phase-covariant cloning of qudits

    SciTech Connect

    Buscemi, Francesco; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Macchiavello, Chiara

    2005-04-01

    We derive the optimal N{yields}M phase-covariant quantum cloning for equatorial states in dimension d with M=kd+N, k integer. The cloning maps are optimal for both global and single-qudit fidelity. The map is achieved by an 'economical' cloning machine, which works without ancilla.

  10. Local cloning of arbitrarily entangled multipartite states

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, Alastair; Ericsson, Marie

    2006-01-15

    We examine the perfect cloning of nonlocal, orthogonal states using only local operations and classical communication. We provide a complete characterisation of the states that can be cloned under these restrictions, and their relation to distinguishability. We also consider the case of catalytic cloning, which we show provides no enhancement to the set of clonable states.

  11. Clonal distribution of Streptococcus suis isolated from diseased pigs in the central region of Chile

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Bárbara; Ruiz, Álvaro; Lacouture, Sonia; Gottschalk, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    The characteristics of 29 Chilean field strains of Streptococcus suis recovered between 2007 and 2011 from pigs with clinical signs at different farms were studied. Serotyping with use of the coagglutination test revealed that all but 1 strain belonged to serotype 6; the remaining strain was serotype 22. All the serotype-6 strains were suilysin (hemolysin)-negative; in addition, they were found to be genotypically homogeneous by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR) and sensitive to ampicillin, ceftiofur, penicillin, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. The results indicate that, in contrast to what is generally observed in other countries, a single clone of S. suis was isolated from diseased pigs in the central region of Chile. PMID:26424917

  12. The economic and environmental value of genetic improvements in fattening pigs: An integrated dynamic model approach.

    PubMed

    Niemi, J K; Sevón-Aimonen, M-L; Stygar, A H; Partanen, K

    2015-08-01

    The selection of animals for improved performance affects the profitability of pig fattening and has environmental consequences. The goal of this paper was to examine how changes in genetic and market parameters impact the biophysical (feeding patterns, timing of slaughter, nitrogen excretion) and economic (return per pig space unit) results describing pig fattening in a Finnish farm. The analysis can be viewed as focusing on terminal line breeding goals. An integrated model using recursive stochastic dynamic programming and a biological pig growth model was used to estimate biophysical results and economic values. Combining these models allowed us to provide more accurate estimates for the value of genetic improvement and, thus, provide better feedback to animal breeding programs than the traditional approach, which is based on fixed management patterns. Besides the benchmark scenario, the results were simulated for 5 other scenarios. In each scenario, genotype was improved regarding daily growth potential, carcass lean meat content, or the parameters of the Gompertz growth curve (maturing rate [], adult weight of protein [α], and adult weight of lipid mass []). The change in each parameter was equal to approximately 1 SD genetic improvement (ceteris paribus). Increasing , , daily growth potential, or carcass lean meat content increased the return on pig space unit by €12.60, €7.60, €4.10, or €2.90 per year, respectively, whereas an increase in decreased the return by €3.10. The genetic improvement in and resulted in the highest decrease in nitrogen excretion calculated in total or per kilogram of carcass gain but only under the optimal feeding pattern. Simulated changes in the Gompertz growth function parameters imply greater changes in ADG and lean meat content than changes in scenarios focusing on improving ADG and lean meat content directly. The economic value of genetic improvements as well as the quantity of nitrogen excreted during the fattening

  13. Cryptosporidium parvum pig genotype II diagnosed in pigs from the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pigs may represent a source of Cryptosporidium sp. infection to humans. The objective of this study was to identify the species present in pigs from the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and verify what risks pigs represent in transmission of human cryptosporidiosis, since there is no such informati...

  14. Molecular studies on pig cryptosporidiosis in Poland.

    PubMed

    Rzeżutka, A; Kaupke, A; Kozyra, I; Pejsak, Z

    2014-01-01

    Cryptosporidium intestinal parasites have been detected in farmed pigs worldwide. Infections are usually asymptomatic with a low number of oocysts shed in pig feces. This makes the recognition of infection difficult or unsuccessful when microscopic methods are used. The aim of this study was molecular identification of Cryptosporidium species in pig herds raised in Poland with regard to the occurrence of zoonotic species. In total, 166 pig fecal samples were tested. The examined pigs were aged 1 to 20 weeks. Overall, 39 pig farms were monitored for parasite presence. The detection and identification of Cryptosporidium DNA was performed on the basis of PCR-RFLP and nucleotide sequence analysis of the amplified 18 SSU rRNA and COWP gene fragments. Infected animals were housed in 21 (53.8%) of the pig farms monitored. The presence of Cryptosporidum was confirmed in 46 (27.7%) samples of pig feces. Among positive fecal samples, 34 (29.3%) were collected from healthy animals, and 12 (24%) from diarrheic pigs. Most infected animals (42.1%) were 2 to 3 months old. The following parasite species were detected: C. scrofarum, C. suis and C. parvum. Indeed, asymptomatic infections caused by C. scrofarum were observed in the majority of the herds. Mixed infections caused by C. suis and C. scrofarum were not common; however, they were observed in 8.6% of the positive animals. C. parvum DNA was found only in one sample collected from a diarrheic pig. The application of molecular diagnostic tools allowed for detection and identification of Cryptosporidium species in pigs. The sporadic findings of C. parvum are subsequent evidence for the contribution of pigs in the transmission of cryptosporidiosis from animals to humans. PMID:25638969

  15. Catheterization of the urethra in female pigs.

    PubMed

    Musk, G C; Zwierzchoniewska, M; He, B

    2015-10-01

    Female pigs are commonly utilized as an animal model for biomedical research and require urethral catheterization. Sixteen pigs were anaesthetized for research purposes and required the placement of a urethral catheter. Post-mortem examination of the vaginas revealed the urethral opening to be consistently halfway from the mucocutaneous junction of the vulva to the cervix. A shallow diverticulum was also observed on the ventral floor of the urethral opening. To optimize conditions for success the pig should be carefully positioned supine, a vaginal speculum and light source should be used, the pig should be adequately anaesthetized, and the anatomy of the vagina should be reviewed. PMID:25977261

  16. Characterization of smallholder pig breeding practices within a rural commune of North Central Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Ieda, Nahoko; Van Bui, Quang; Nguyen, Nga Thi Duong; Lapar, Lucy; Marshall, Karen

    2015-08-01

    This case study focused on a pig production system in a rural area of North Central Vietnam, with a focus on describing household pig breeding practices and estimating herd demographic parameters, particularly on reproduction. One hundred five households undertaking small-scale piglet production were surveyed, with information gathered on 3268 individual pigs. Pig keeping contributed variably to the overall household livelihood portfolio, with female household members as the main decision makers, contributors to labor, and beneficiaries of income from the pig enterprise. All households kept between one and four young or adult sows, with 69% of these sows of a local breed type (predominantly Mong Cai), 28% a cross between a local sow and an exotic sow (predominantly Large White), and the remainder (3%) as exotic sows. Eighty-eight percent of the piglets produced were cross-bred, while 12% were local breed. No adult males were kept by the surveyed households, reflecting the common use of artificial insemination for mating purposes. The most common breeding system practiced-the keeping of Mong Cai females and production of cross-bred piglets-capitalizes on the small body size and high fecundity of the sows and the fast growth rate and leanness of the cross-bred piglets. The survey tool used, which was based on farmer recall of events over the preceding 12-month period, appeared to give reasonable results although some recall bias could be detected. This case study will serve as an entry point to planned broader scale characterization and development of pig breeding systems in North Central Vietnam. PMID:25947237

  17. Movements of wild pigs in Louisiana and Mississippi, 2011-13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartley, Stephen B.; Goatcher, Buddy L.; Sapkota, Sijan

    2015-01-01

    The prolific breeding capability, behavioral adaptation, and adverse environmental impacts of invasive wild pigs (Sus scrofa) have increased efforts towards managing their populations and understanding their movements. Currently, little is known about wild pig populations and movements in Louisiana and Mississippi. From 2011 to 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey investigated spatial and temporal movements of wild pigs in both marsh and nonmarsh physiographic regions. Twenty-one Global Positioning System satellite telemetry tracking collars were installed on adult wild pigs captured with trained dogs and released. Coordinates of their locations were recorded hourly. We collected 16,674 hourly data points including date, time, air temperature, and position during a 3-year study. Solar and lunar attributes, such as sun and moon phases and azimuth angles, were not related significantly to the movements among wild pigs. Movements were significantly correlated negatively with air temperature. Differences in movements between seasons and years were observed. On average, movements of boars were significantly greater than those of sows. Average home range, determined by using a minimum convex polygon as a proxy, was 911 hectares for boars, whereas average home range for sows was 116 hectares. Wild pigs in marsh habitat traveled lesser distances relative to those from more arid, nonmarsh habitats. Overall, results of this study indicate that wild pigs in Louisiana and Mississippi have small home ranges. These small home ranges suggest that natural movements have not been a major factor in the recent broad-scale range expansion observed in this species in the United States.

  18. Therapeutic cloning and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Koh, Chester J; Atala, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    A severe shortage of donor organs available for transplantation in the United States leaves patients suffering from diseased and injured organs with few treatment options. Scientists in the field of tissue engineering apply the principles of cell transplantation, material science, and engineering to construct biological substitutes that will restore and maintain normal function in diseased and injured tissues. Therapeutic cloning, where the nucleus from a donor cell is transferred into an enucleated oocyte in order to extract pluripotent embryonic stem cells, offers a potentially limitless source of cells for tissue engineering applications. The present chapter reviews recent advances that have occurred in therapeutic cloning and tissue engineering and describes applications of these new technologies that may offer novel therapies for patients with end-stage organ failure. PMID:15094294

  19. Choosing appropriate space allowances for slaughter pigs transported by road: a review.

    PubMed

    Warriss, P D

    1998-04-25

    In the United Kingdom pigs can spend up to 11 hours in transit to slaughter but on average travel for two to three hours. In the past, international journeys have lasted up to 40 hours and have been over 900 miles long. There is evidence that pigs, like calves and sheep, but unlike adult cattle, prefer to lie down if provided with suitable conditions, particularly bedding, on the vehicle. They will, however, sometimes stand during short journeys, possibly when excessive vibration or uncomfortable flooring, particularly a lack of sufficient bedding, cause discomfort. Current UK legislation and EU Directive 95/29/EC specify that, in general, pigs must have sufficient space to lie down during transit. Measurements of the space needed for sternal recumbency, and direct observations of pigs at different stocking densities, suggest that the minimum space required is equivalent to about 250 kg/m2 for normal slaughter pigs of 90 to 100 kg liveweight. This figure may not be appropriate for very small or very large pigs. In the UK at present, more than half of all slaughter pigs are transported at densities greater than that prescribed (235 kg/m2) in the EU Directive. At stocking densities above about 250 kg/m2 there may not be enough room available for all the pigs to lie down, leading to continual disturbance of recumbent animals by those seeking a place to rest. A stocking density of 322 kg/m2 leads to clear evidence of physical stress. During long journeys (> or = 25 hours) meat quality is reduced by high stocking densities, implying muscle glycogen depletion and possibly fatigue. Higher stocking densities are also associated with higher mortality. There is evidence of wide variations in air temperature inside transporters, particularly for international journeys. Although there are small variations within vehicles, the temperature of the air inside is closely related to the outside temperature. It has been recommended that the temperature within the vehicle should not

  20. [The identification of mouse cloned SFA DNA].

    PubMed

    Yi, Ning; Wu, Weng Qing; Ni, Zu Mei; Shi, Lu Ji

    2002-12-01

    For some basic investigation and the construction of artificial chromosomes, cloned centromeric DNAs identified on a firm ground are required. Thus, in the present work a preliminary screened clone of 13.5 kb DNA, 6# clone, form a mouse centromeric library contructed previously in our library was futher investigated by FISH and PCR. It was found that mouse 6# cloned SFA DNA, as shown by FISH is a fragment of mouse centromeric DNA. Evidence was also observed that 6# cloned SFA DNA consists of mouse minor satellite DNA and other DNA sequences. PMID:15346991

  1. Optimal quantum cloning via spin networks

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Qing; Cheng Jianhua; Wang Kelin; Du Jiangfeng

    2006-09-15

    In this paper we demonstrate that optimal 1{yields}M phase-covariant cloning quantum cloning is available via free dynamical evolution of spin networks. By properly designing the network and the couplings between spins, we show that optimal 1{yields}M phase-covariant cloning can be achieved if the initial state is prepared as a specific symmetric state. Especially, when M is an odd number, the optimal phase-covariant cloning can be achieved without ancillas. Moreover, we demonstrate that the same framework is capable for optimal 1{yields}2 universal cloning.

  2. No-cloning theorem on quantum logics

    SciTech Connect

    Miyadera, Takayuki; Imai, Hideki

    2009-10-15

    This paper discusses the no-cloning theorem in a logicoalgebraic approach. In this approach, an orthoalgebra is considered as a general structure for propositions in a physical theory. We proved that an orthoalgebra admits cloning operation if and only if it is a Boolean algebra. That is, only classical theory admits the cloning of states. If unsharp propositions are to be included in the theory, then a notion of effect algebra is considered. We proved that an atomic Archimedean effect algebra admitting cloning operation is a Boolean algebra. This paper also presents a partial result, indicating a relation between the cloning on effect algebras and hidden variables.

  3. Probabilistic cloning of three nonorthogonal states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen; Rui, Pinshu; Yang, Qun; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Ziyun

    2015-04-01

    We study the probabilistic cloning of three nonorthogonal states with equal success probabilities. For simplicity, we assume that the three states belong to a special set. Analytical form of the maximal success probability for probabilistic cloning is calculated. With the maximal success probability, we deduce the explicit form of probabilistic quantum cloning machine. In the case of cloning, we get the unambiguous form of the unitary operation. It is demonstrated that the upper bound for probabilistic quantum cloning machine in (Qiu in J Phys A 35:6931, 2002) can be reached only if the three states are equidistant.

  4. Dielectrophoretic separation of mouse melanoma clones

    PubMed Central

    Sabuncu, Ahmet C.; Liu, Jie A.; Beebe, Stephen J.; Beskok, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) is employed to differentiate clones of mouse melanoma B16F10 cells. Five clones were tested on microelectrodes. At a specific excitation frequency, clone 1 showed a different DEP response than the other four. Growth rate, melanin content, recovery from cryopreservation, and in vitro invasive studies were performed. Clone 1 is shown to have significantly different melanin content and recovery rate from cryopreservation. This paper reports the ability of DEP to differentiate between two malignant cells of the same origin. Different DEP responses of the two clones could be linked to their melanin content. PMID:20697600

  5. No-cloning theorem on quantum logics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyadera, Takayuki; Imai, Hideki

    2009-10-01

    This paper discusses the no-cloning theorem in a logicoalgebraic approach. In this approach, an orthoalgebra is considered as a general structure for propositions in a physical theory. We proved that an orthoalgebra admits cloning operation if and only if it is a Boolean algebra. That is, only classical theory admits the cloning of states. If unsharp propositions are to be included in the theory, then a notion of effect algebra is considered. We proved that an atomic Archimedean effect algebra admitting cloning operation is a Boolean algebra. This paper also presents a partial result, indicating a relation between the cloning on effect algebras and hidden variables.

  6. Establishment and Characterization of Molecular Clones of Porcine Endogenous Retroviruses Replicating on Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Czauderna, Frank; Fischer, Nicole; Boller, Klaus; Kurth, Reinhard; Tönjes, Ralf R.

    2000-01-01

    The use of pig xenografts is being considered to alleviate the shortage of allogeneic organs for transplantation. In addition to the problems overcoming immunological and physiological barriers, the existence of numerous porcine microorganisms poses the risk of initiating a xenozoonosis. Recently, different classes of type C porcine endogenous retoviruses (PERV) which are infectious for human cells in vitro have been partially described. We therefore examined whether completely intact proviruses exist that produce infectious and replication-competent virions. Several proviral PERV sequences were cloned and characterized. One molecular PERV class B clone, PERV-B(43), generated infectious particles after transfection into human 293 cells. A second clone, PERV-B(33), which was highly homologous to PERV-B(43), showed a G-to-A mutation in the first start codon (Met to Ile) of the env gene, preventing this provirus from replicating. However, a genetic recombinant, PERV-B(33)/ATG, carrying a restored env start codon, became infectious and could be serially passaged on 293 cells similar to virus clone PERV-B(43). PERV protein expression was detected 24 to 48 h posttransfection (p.t.) using cross-reacting antiserum, and reverse transcriptase activity was found at 12 to 14 days p.t. The transcriptional start and stop sites as well as the splice donor and splice acceptor sites of PERV mRNA were mapped, yielding a subgenomic env transcript of 3.1 kb. PERV-B(33) and PERV-B(43) differ in the number of copies of a 39-bp segment in the U3 region of the long terminal repeat. Strategies to identify and to specifically suppress or eliminate those proviruses from the pig genome might help in the production of PERV-free animals. PMID:10756014

  7. Natural antibodies to treponemal antigens in four strains of guinea-pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Jakubowski, A; Wicher, V; Gruhn, R; Wicher, K

    1987-01-01

    A total of 185 serum samples obtained from healthy male and female guinea-pigs of inbred strains 2 and 13 and outbred strains C4D and Hartley A were examined for natural antibodies to treponemal antigens by ELISA using Treponema pallidum (TP), T. phagedenis biotype Reiter (TR) and T. vincentii (TV) antigens and by the FTA test. The prevalence and titres of natural antibodies depended on the age and strain of guinea-pig and the treponemal antigen used. One- and 7-day-old guinea-pigs contained significantly (P less than 0.001) higher levels of natural antibodies than did animals 1 or 3-6 months old. The similar high levels of natural antibodies in newborn guinea-pigs and their mothers (12-30 months old) and the sharp drop observed at the age of 1 month suggested maternal transfer as the mechanism of acquisition. In young adults 3-6 months old, the age group most susceptible to TP infection, antibodies to TP and TR were at their lowest levels, but antibodies reacting to TV had already begun to rise. Natural antibodies were of the IgG1 and IgG2 but not of the IgM class. The highest levels of natural antibodies were in the C4D guinea-pigs; the lowest were in the Hartley A strain. Natural antibody activity was inhibited or adsorbed by TR antigens. PMID:3546103

  8. Congenital malformations caused by Stryphnodendron fissuratum (Leg. Mimosoideae) in guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus).

    PubMed

    Macedo, Josenaldo S; Rocha, Brena P; Colodel, Edson M; Freitas, Sílvio H; Dória, Renata G S; Riet-Correa, Franklin; Evêncio-Neto, Joaquim; Mendonça, Fábio S

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of Stryphnodendron fissuratum pods in guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) and test the hypothesis that this plant has teratogenic effects. Thus, sixteen guinea pigs were randomly divided into four groups of four animals each. Groups 10, 20 and 40 consisted of guinea pigs that received commercial food that contained crushed pods of S. fissuratum at concentrations of 10, 20 and 40 g/kg, respectively, during the period of organogenesis. Control group consisted of guinea pigs under the same management conditions that did not receive crushed pods of S. fissuratum in their food. In all experimental groups, the main clinical signs of poisoning consisted of anorexia, prostration, absence of vocalizations, alopecia, diarrhea, and abortions within the adult guinea pigs. Those that did not abort gave birth to weak, malnourished pups, some of which had fetal malformations. The main teratogenic changes consisted of eventration, arthrogryposis, amelia of the forelimbs, anophthalmia, microphthalmia, anotia and agnathia. The reductions in the number of offspring and the malformations observed in the experimental groups suggest that S. fissuratum affects fetal development and is teratogenic. PMID:26363291

  9. Molecular characterization and expression patterns of emerin (EMD) gene in skeletal muscle between Meishan and Large White pigs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Xiao, Xia; Wang, Linjie

    2016-03-15

    The emerin protein is a nuclear membrane protein and has important functions in muscle development, regeneration, and cell signal transduction. However, knowledge regarding emerin in the domestic animal is limited. In this study, we cloned and characterized the pig emerin (EMD) gene. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that the EMD gene was expressed at the highest level in the heart and fat at 120d. However, the fetal skeletal muscles displayed a greater abundance of EMD mRNA than that in skeletal muscles at postnatal development stages. In addition, the expression level of EMD at 60 day was significantly higher (p<0.05) in Meishan than Large White pigs. Pig EMD protein displayed the sarcolemma and perinuclear distribution in skeletal muscle sections, and there was no distribution change of EMD in skeletal muscle sections between Large White and Meishan pigs. These studies provide useful information for further research on the functions of pig EMD gene in skeletal muscle. PMID:26743124

  10. Clone DB: an integrated NCBI resource for clone-associated data.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Valerie A; Chen, Hsiu-Chuan; Clausen, Cliff; Meric, Peter A; Zhou, Zhigang; Bouk, Nathan; Husain, Nora; Maglott, Donna R; Church, Deanna M

    2013-01-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Clone DB (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/clone/) is an integrated resource providing information about and facilitating access to clones, which serve as valuable research reagents in many fields, including genome sequencing and variation analysis. Clone DB represents an expansion and replacement of the former NCBI Clone Registry and has records for genomic and cell-based libraries and clones representing more than 100 different eukaryotic taxa. Records provide details of library construction, associated sequences, map positions and information about resource distribution. Clone DB is indexed in the NCBI Entrez system and can be queried by fields that include organism, clone name, gene name and sequence identifier. Whenever possible, genomic clones are mapped to reference assemblies and their map positions provided in clone records. Clones mapping to specific genomic regions can also be searched for using the NCBI Clone Finder tool, which accepts queries based on sequence coordinates or features such as gene or transcript names. Clone DB makes reports of library, clone and placement data on its FTP site available for download. With Clone DB, users now have available to them a centralized resource that provides them with the tools they will need to make use of these important research reagents. PMID:23193260

  11. Sp8 expression in putative neural progenitor cells in guinea pig and human cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-Mei; Cai, Yan; Wang, Fang; Wu, Jun; Mo, Lin; Zhang, Feng; Patrylo, Peter R; Pan, Aihua; Ma, Chao; Fu, Jin; Yan, Xiao-Xin

    2016-09-01

    Neural stem/progenitor cells have been characterized at neurogenic sites in adult mammalian brain with various molecular markers. Here it has been demonstrated that Sp8, a transcription factor typically expressed among mature GABAergic interneurons, also labels putative neural precursors in adult guinea pig and human cerebrum. In guinea pigs, Sp8 immunoreactive (Sp8+) cells were localized largely in the superficial layers of the cortex including layer I, as well as the subventricular zone (SVZ) and subgranular zone (SGZ). Sp8+ cells at the SGZ showed little colocalization with mature and immature neuronal markers, but co-expressed neural stem cell markers including Sox2. Some layer I Sp8+ cells also co-expressed Sox2. The amount of Sp8+ cells in the dentate gyrus was maintained 2 weeks after X-ray irradiation, while that of doublecortin (DCX+) cells was greatly reduced. Mild ischemic insult caused a transient increase of Sp8+ cells in the SGZ and layer I, with the subgranular Sp8+ cells exhibited an increased colabeling for the mitotic marker Ki67 and pulse-chased bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). Sp8+ cells in the dentate gyrus showed an age-related decline in guinea pigs, in parallel with the loss of DCX+ cells in the same region. In adult humans, Sp8+ cells exhibited comparable morphological features as seen in guinea pigs, with those at the SGZ and some in cortical layer I co-expressed Sox2. Together, these results suggested that Sp8 may label putative neural progenitors in guinea pig and human cerebrum, with the labeled cells in the SGZ appeared largely not mitotically active under normal conditions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 939-955, 2016. PMID:26585436

  12. Method and a horizontal pipeline pig launching mechanism for sequentially launching pipeline pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, G.W.

    1992-08-18

    This patent describes a method for timed automatic sequential launching of serially oriented pipeline pigs from a pig launching system having a tubular pig storage and launching magazine into a gas transmission pipeline. It comprises providing a source of hydraulic fluid medium; locating a free piston within the tubular pig storage and launching magazine for motive contact with the last of the serially oriented pipeline pigs; employing gas pressure from the gas transmission pipeline for pressurizing the hydraulic fluid medium from the source; introducing the pressurized hydraulic fluid medium into the hydraulic chamber; controllably releasing the restraining of the first of the serially oriented pipeline pigs from the tubular pig storage and launching magazine.

  13. Cloning and mRNA Expression of NADH Dehydrogenase during Ochlerotatus taeniorhynchus Development and Pesticide Response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NADH dehydrogenase, the largest of the respiratory complexes, is the first enzyme of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. We have cloned and sequenced cDNA of NADH dehydrogenase gene from Ochlerotatus (Ochlerotatus) taeniorhynchus (Wiedemann) adult (GeneBank Accession number: FJ458415). The ...

  14. Size-sex variation in survival rates and abundance of pig frogs, Rana grylio, in northern Florida wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, K.V.; Nichols, J.D.; Percival, H.F.; Hines, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    During 1991-1993, we conducted capture-recapture studies on pig frogs, Rana grylio, in seven study locations in northcentral Florida. Resulting data were used to test hypotheses about variation in survival probability over different size-sex classes of pig frogs. We developed multistate capture-recapture models for the resulting data and used them to estimate survival rates and frog abundance. Tests provided strong evidence of survival differences among size-sex classes, with adult females showing the highest survival probabilities. Adult males and juvenile frogs had lower survival rates that were similar to each other. Adult females were more abundant than adult males in most locations at most sampling occasions. We recommended probabilistic capture-recapture models in general, and multistate models in particular, for robust estimation of demographic parameters in amphibian populations.

  15. An Improved System for Generation of Diploid Cloned Porcine Embryos Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Synchronized to Metaphase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunhye; Zheng, Zhong; Jeon, Yubyeol; Jin, Yong-Xun; Hwang, Seon-Ung; Cai, Lian; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Hyun, Sang-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Pigs provide outstanding models of human genetic diseases due to their striking similarities with human anatomy, physiology and genetics. Although transgenic pigs have been produced using genetically modified somatic cells and nuclear transfer (SCNT), the cloning efficiency was extremely low. Here, we report an improved method to produce diploid cloned embryos from porcine induced pluripotent stem cells (piPSCs), which were synchronized to the G2/M stage using a double blocking method with aphidicolin and nocodazole. The efficiency of this synchronization method on our piPSC lines was first tested. Then, we modified our traditional SCNT protocol to find a workable protocol. In particular, the removal of a 6DMAP treatment post-activation enhanced the extrusion rate of pseudo-second-polar bodies (p2PB) (81.3% vs. 15.8%, based on peak time, 4hpa). Moreover, an immediate activation method yielded significantly more blastocysts than delayed activation (31.3% vs. 16.0%, based on fused embryos). The immunofluorescent results confirmed the effect of the 6DMAP treatment removal, showing remarkable p2PB extrusion during a series of nuclear transfer procedures. The reconstructed embryos from metaphase piPSCs with our modified protocol demonstrated normal morphology at 2-cell, 4-cell and blastocyst stages and a high rate of normal karyotype. This study demonstrated a new and efficient way to produce viable cloned embryos from piPSCs when synchronized to the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, which may lead to opportunities to produce cloned pigs from piPSCs more efficiently. PMID:27472781

  16. An Improved System for Generation of Diploid Cloned Porcine Embryos Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Synchronized to Metaphase

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Yubyeol; Jin, Yong-Xun; Hwang, Seon-Ung; Cai, Lian; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Hyun, Sang-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Pigs provide outstanding models of human genetic diseases due to their striking similarities with human anatomy, physiology and genetics. Although transgenic pigs have been produced using genetically modified somatic cells and nuclear transfer (SCNT), the cloning efficiency was extremely low. Here, we report an improved method to produce diploid cloned embryos from porcine induced pluripotent stem cells (piPSCs), which were synchronized to the G2/M stage using a double blocking method with aphidicolin and nocodazole. The efficiency of this synchronization method on our piPSC lines was first tested. Then, we modified our traditional SCNT protocol to find a workable protocol. In particular, the removal of a 6DMAP treatment post-activation enhanced the extrusion rate of pseudo-second-polar bodies (p2PB) (81.3% vs. 15.8%, based on peak time, 4hpa). Moreover, an immediate activation method yielded significantly more blastocysts than delayed activation (31.3% vs. 16.0%, based on fused embryos). The immunofluorescent results confirmed the effect of the 6DMAP treatment removal, showing remarkable p2PB extrusion during a series of nuclear transfer procedures. The reconstructed embryos from metaphase piPSCs with our modified protocol demonstrated normal morphology at 2-cell, 4-cell and blastocyst stages and a high rate of normal karyotype. This study demonstrated a new and efficient way to produce viable cloned embryos from piPSCs when synchronized to the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, which may lead to opportunities to produce cloned pigs from piPSCs more efficiently. PMID:27472781

  17. Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    ... mammals. These twins are produced when a fertilized egg splits, creating two or more embryos that carry ... of the donor animal's somatic cell into an egg cell, or oocyte, that has had its own ...

  18. Genetically modified pig models for neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Holm, Ida E; Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Luo, Yonglun

    2016-01-01

    Increasing incidence of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease has become one of the most challenging health issues in ageing humans. One approach to combat this is to generate genetically modified animal models of neurodegenerative disorders for studying pathogenesis, prognosis, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Owing to the genetic, anatomic, physiologic, pathologic, and neurologic similarities between pigs and humans, genetically modified pig models of neurodegenerative disorders have been attractive large animal models to bridge the gap of preclinical investigations between rodents and humans. In this review, we provide a neuroanatomical overview in pigs and summarize and discuss the generation of genetically modified pig models of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's diseases, Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal muscular atrophy, and ataxia-telangiectasia. We also highlight how non-invasive bioimaging technologies such as positron emission tomography (PET), computer tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and behavioural testing have been applied to characterize neurodegenerative pig models. We further propose a multiplex genome editing and preterm recloning (MAP) approach by using the rapid growth of the ground-breaking precision genome editing technology CRISPR/Cas9 and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). With this approach, we hope to shorten the temporal requirement in generating multiple transgenic pigs, increase the survival rate of founder pigs, and generate genetically modified pigs that will more closely resemble the disease-causing mutations and recapitulate pathological features of human conditions. PMID:26446984

  19. Archaea in the intestinal tract of pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of Archaea in the intestinal tract of pigs is limited. In order to investigate archaeal community structure, samples were taken from the cecum and proximal colon of finishing pigs (24) fed diets with either corn or solvent extracted corn germ meal (CGM). Corn germ meal feeding began in w...

  20. Sweating Like a Pig: Physics or Irony?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohren, Craig F.

    2016-01-01

    In his interesting and informative book "Is That a Fact?," Joe Schwarcz avers that pigs do not sweat and the saying "sweating like a pig" originates in iron smelting. Oblong pieces of hot iron, with a fancied resemblance to a sow with piglets, cool in sand to the dew point of the surrounding air, and hence water condenses on…

  1. Blastocystis tropism in the pig intestine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blastocystis subtype 5, a subtype known to infect humans, was detected by molecular methods in the feces of 36 naturally infected market age pigs. At necropsy, 6 heavily infected pigs were selected to determine the tropism of the infection within the gastrointestinal tract. Because so little is know...

  2. Guinea Pigs: Versatile Animals for the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barman, Charles R.

    1977-01-01

    Guinea pigs are presented as versatile classroom animals. Suggestions for animal behavior and genetics studies are given. Also included is information concerning sex determination and the breeding of guinea pigs, and hints on keeping these animals in the classroom. References and illustrations complete the article. (MA)

  3. Hybrid Sequencing Approach Applied to Human Fecal Metagenomic Clone Libraries Revealed Clones with Potential Biotechnological Applications

    PubMed Central

    Džunková, Mária; D’Auria, Giuseppe; Pérez-Villarroya, David; Moya, Andrés

    2012-01-01

    Natural environments represent an incredible source of microbial genetic diversity. Discovery of novel biomolecules involves biotechnological methods that often require the design and implementation of biochemical assays to screen clone libraries. However, when an assay is applied to thousands of clones, one may eventually end up with very few positive clones which, in most of the cases, have to be “domesticated” for downstream characterization and application, and this makes screening both laborious and expensive. The negative clones, which are not considered by the selected assay, may also have biotechnological potential; however, unfortunately they would remain unexplored. Knowledge of the clone sequences provides important clues about potential biotechnological application of the clones in the library; however, the sequencing of clones one-by-one would be very time-consuming and expensive. In this study, we characterized the first metagenomic clone library from the feces of a healthy human volunteer, using a method based on 454 pyrosequencing coupled with a clone-by-clone Sanger end-sequencing. Instead of whole individual clone sequencing, we sequenced 358 clones in a pool. The medium-large insert (7–15 kb) cloning strategy allowed us to assemble these clones correctly, and to assign the clone ends to maintain the link between the position of a living clone in the library and the annotated contig from the 454 assembly. Finally, we found several open reading frames (ORFs) with previously described potential medical application. The proposed approach allows planning ad-hoc biochemical assays for the clones of interest, and the appropriate sub-cloning strategy for gene expression in suitable vectors/hosts. PMID:23082187

  4. Effects of resistant starch on behaviour, satiety-related hormones and metabolites in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Souza da Silva, C; Haenen, D; Koopmans, S J; Hooiveld, G J E J; Bosch, G; Bolhuis, J E; Kemp, B; Müller, M; Gerrits, W J J

    2014-09-01

    Resistant starch (RS) has been suggested to prolong satiety in adult pigs. The present study investigated RS-induced changes in behaviour, satiety-related hormones and metabolites in catheterized growing pigs to explore possible underlying mechanisms for RS-induced satiety. In a cross-over design with two 14-day periods, 10 pigs (initial BW: 58 kg) were assigned to two treatments comprising diets containing either 35% pregelatinized starch (PS) or 34% retrograded starch (RS). Diets were isoenergetic on gross energy. Pigs were fed at 2.8× maintenance. Postprandial plasma response of satiety-related hormones and metabolites was measured at the end of each period using frequent blood sampling. Faecal and urinary energy losses were measured at the end of each period. Behaviour was scored 24 h from video recordings using scan sampling. Energy digestibility and metabolizability were ~6% lower in RS compared with PS diet (P<0.001), and metabolizable energy (ME) intake was ~3% lower in RS-fed than in PS-fed pigs (P<0.001). RS-fed pigs showed less feeder-directed (P=0.001) and drinking (P=0.10) behaviours than PS-fed pigs throughout the day. Postprandial peripheral short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) levels were higher in RS-fed than in PS-fed pigs (P<0.001). Postprandial glucose and insulin responses were lower in RS-fed than in PS-fed pigs (P<0.001). Triglyceride levels were higher in RS-fed than in PS-fed pigs (P<0.01), and non-esterified fatty acid levels did not differ between diets (P=0.90). Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels were lower in RS-fed than in PS-fed pigs (P<0.001), and peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY) levels did not differ between diets (P=0.90). Blood serotonin levels were lower (P<0.001), whereas monoamine oxidase activity (P<0.05) and tryptophan (P<0.01) levels were higher in RS-fed than in PS-fed pigs. Despite a lower ME intake, RS seemed to prolong satiety, based on behavioural observations. Possible underlying mechanisms for RS-induced satiety include

  5. Guinea Pig Ciliary Muscle Development

    PubMed Central

    Pucker, Andrew D.; Carpenter, Ashley R.; McHugh, Kirk M.; Mutti, Donald O.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to develop a method for quantifying guinea pig ciliary muscle volume (CMV) and to determine its relationship to age and ocular biometric measurements. Methods Six albino guinea pigs eyes were collected at each of five ages (n=30 eyes). Retinoscopy and photography were used to document refractive error, eye size, and eye shape. Serial sections through the excised eyes were made and then labeled with an α-smooth muscle actin antibody. The CM was then visualized with an Olympus BX51 microscope, reconstructed with Stereo Investigator (MBF Bioscience) and analyzed using Neurolucida Explorer (MBF Bioscience). Full (using all sections) and partial (using a subset of sections) reconstruction methods were used to determine CMV. Results There was no significant difference between the full and partial volume determination methods (P = 0.86). The mean CMV of the 1, 10, 20, 30, and 90-day old eyes was 0.40 ± 0.16 mm3, 0.48 ± 0.13 mm3, 0.67 ± 0.15 mm3, 0.86 ± 0.35 mm3, and 1.09 ± 0.63 mm3, respectively. CMV was significantly correlated with log age (P = 0.001), ocular length (P = 0.003), limbal circumference (P = 0.01), and equatorial diameter (P = 0.003). It was not correlated with refractive error (P = 0.73) or eye shape (P = 0.60). Multivariate regression determined that biometric variables were not significantly associated with CMV after adjustment for age. Conclusions Three-dimensional reconstruction was an effective means of determining CMV. These data provide evidence that CM growth occurs with age in tandem with eye size in normal albino guinea pigs. Additional work is needed to determine the relationship between CMV and abnormal ocular growth. PMID:24901488

  6. Brain Mass and Encephalization Quotients in the Domestic Industrial Pig (Sus scrofa)

    PubMed Central

    Minervini, Serena; Accogli, Gianluca; Pirone, Andrea; Graïc, Jean-Marie; Cozzi, Bruno; Desantis, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    In the present study we examined the brain of fetal, newborn, and adult pigs raised for meat production. The fresh and formalin-fixed weights of the brain have been recorded and used, together with body weight, to calculate the Encephalization Quotient (EQ). The weight of the cerebellum has been used to calculate the Cerebellar Quotient (CQ). The results have been discussed together with analogue data obtained in other terrestrial Cetartiodactyla (including the domestic bovine, sheep, goat, and camel), domesticated Carnivora, Proboscidata, and Primates. Our study, based on a relatively large experimental series, corrects former observations present in the literature based on smaller samples, and emphasizes that the domestic pig has a small brain relative to its body size (EQ = 0.38 for adults), possibly due to factors linked to the necessity of meat production and improved body weight. Comparison with other terrestrial Cetartiodactyla indicates a similar trend for all domesticated species. PMID:27351807

  7. Brain Mass and Encephalization Quotients in the Domestic Industrial Pig (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    Minervini, Serena; Accogli, Gianluca; Pirone, Andrea; Graïc, Jean-Marie; Cozzi, Bruno; Desantis, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    In the present study we examined the brain of fetal, newborn, and adult pigs raised for meat production. The fresh and formalin-fixed weights of the brain have been recorded and used, together with body weight, to calculate the Encephalization Quotient (EQ). The weight of the cerebellum has been used to calculate the Cerebellar Quotient (CQ). The results have been discussed together with analogue data obtained in other terrestrial Cetartiodactyla (including the domestic bovine, sheep, goat, and camel), domesticated Carnivora, Proboscidata, and Primates. Our study, based on a relatively large experimental series, corrects former observations present in the literature based on smaller samples, and emphasizes that the domestic pig has a small brain relative to its body size (EQ = 0.38 for adults), possibly due to factors linked to the necessity of meat production and improved body weight. Comparison with other terrestrial Cetartiodactyla indicates a similar trend for all domesticated species. PMID:27351807

  8. Detectability of Plasmodium falciparum clones

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In areas of high transmission people often harbour multiple clones of Plasmodium falciparum, but even PCR-based diagnostic methods can only detect a fraction (the detectability, q) of all clones present in a host. Accurate measurements of detectability are desirable since it affects estimates of multiplicity of infection, prevalence, and frequency of breakthrough infections in clinical drug trials. Detectability can be estimated by typing repeated samples from the same host but it has been unclear what should be the time interval between the samples and how the data should be analysed. Methods A longitudinal molecular study was conducted in the Kassena-Nankana district in northern Ghana. From each of the 80 participants, four finger prick samples were collected over a period of 8 days, and tested for presence of different Merozoite Surface Protein (msp) 2 genotypes. Implications for estimating q were derived from these data by comparing the fit of statistical models of serial dependence and over-dispersion. Results The distribution of the frequencies of detection for msp2 genotypes was close to binomial if the time span between consecutive blood samples was at least 7 days. For shorter intervals the probabilities of detection were positively correlated, i.e. the shorter the interval between two blood collections, the more likely the diagnostic results matched for a particular genotype. Estimates of q were rather insensitive to the statistical model fitted. Conclusions A simple algorithm based on analysing blood samples collected 7 days apart is justified for generating robust estimates of detectability. The finding of positive correlation of detection probabilities for short time intervals argues against imperfect detection being directly linked to the 48-hour periodicity of P. falciparum. The results suggest that the detectability of a given parasite clone changes over time, at an unknown rate, but fast enough to regard blood samples taken one week

  9. Unified universal quantum cloning machine and fidelities

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yinan; Shi Handuo; Xiong Zhaoxi; Jing Li; Mu Liangzhu; Ren Xijun; Fan Heng

    2011-09-15

    We present a unified universal quantum cloning machine, which combines several different existing universal cloning machines together, including the asymmetric case. In this unified framework, the identical pure states are projected equally into each copy initially constituted by input and one half of the maximally entangled states. We show explicitly that the output states of those universal cloning machines are the same. One importance of this unified cloning machine is that the cloning procession is always the symmetric projection, which reduces dramatically the difficulties for implementation. Also, it is found that this unified cloning machine can be directly modified to the general asymmetric case. Besides the global fidelity and the single-copy fidelity, we also present all possible arbitrary-copy fidelities.

  10. Behavioral recovery induced by applied electric fields after spinal cord hemisection in guinea pig

    SciTech Connect

    Borgens, R.B.; Blight, A.R.; McGinnis, M.E.

    1987-10-16

    Applied electric fields were used to promote axonal regeneration in spinal cords of adult guinea pigs. A propriospinal intersegmental reflex (the cutaneous trunci muscle reflex) was used to test lateral tract function after hemisection of the thoracic spinal cord. An electrical field (200 microvolts per millimeter, cathode rostral) applied across the lesion led to functional recovery of the cutaneous trunci muscle reflex in 25 percent of experimental animals, whereas the functional deficit remained in control animals, which were implanted with inactive stimulators.

  11. Lanosterol influences cytoplasmic maturation of pig oocytes in vitro and improves preimplantation development of cloned embryos.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sanghoon; Jin, Jun-Xue; Khoirinaya, Candrani; Kim, Geon A; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2016-03-01

    Lanosterol is a precursor of meiosis-activating sterols in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway and induces a physiological signal that instructs the oocyte to reinitiate meiosis. In this study, we examined the effect of lanosterol on IVM of porcine oocytes, specifically on nuclear maturation, cytoplasmic maturation by investigating intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels and lipid content, embryonic development after parthenogenetic activation and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), and on gene expression in cumulus cells, oocytes, and SCNT-derived blastocysts. There was no significant difference in nuclear maturation rates between the control and treatment groups (10, 50, and 100 μM of lanosterol added to IVM culture medium). Supplementation with 50-μM lanosterol significantly increased lipid content and GSH levels and decreased reactive oxygen species levels compared with the control. In addition, oocytes treated with 50 μM of lanosterol exhibited significantly increased blastocyst formation rates and total cell numbers after parthenogenetic activation (30.3% and 63.9 vs. 21.6% and 36.5, respectively) and SCNT (18.2% and 53.7 vs. 12.6% and 37.5, respectively), when compared with the control group. Cumulus cells treated with 50 μM of lanosterol showed significantly increased 14α-demethylase, Δ14-reductase, and Δ7-reductase mRNA transcript levels. Significantly increased PPARγ, SREBF1, GPX1, and Bcl-2 and decreased Bax transcript levels were observed in mature oocytes treated with 50 μM of lanosterol compared with the control. SCNT blastocysts derived from 50-μM lanosterol-treated oocytes had significantly higher POU5F1, FGFR2, and Bcl-2 transcript levels than control SCNT-derived blastocysts. In conclusion, supplementation with 50 μM of lanosterol during IVM improves preimplantation development of SCNT embryos by elevating lipid content of oocytes, increasing GSH levels, decreasing reactive oxygen species levels, and regulating genes related to the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway in cumulus cells, to lipid metabolism and apoptosis in oocytes, and their developmental potential and apoptosis in blastocysts. PMID:26494176

  12. Mortality in pigs given PCV2 virus derived from DNA clones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The clinical presentation following infection with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) ranges from sub-clinical to one of several disease states known collectively as porcine circovirus diseases (PCVD). In 2005 a disease spread rapidly through finishing barns in the U. S. that was recognized as an acut...

  13. Mutation analysis with random DNA identifiers (MARDI) catalogs Pig-a mutations in heterogeneous pools of CD48-deficient T cells derived from DMBA-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Revollo, Javier R; Crabtree, Nathaniel M; Pearce, Mason G; Pacheco-Martinez, M Monserrat; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N

    2016-03-01

    Identification of mutations induced by xenotoxins is a common task in the field of genetic toxicology. Mutations are often detected by clonally expanding potential mutant cells and genotyping each viable clone by Sanger sequencing. Such a "clone-by-clone" approach requires significant time and effort, and sometimes is even impossible to implement. Alternative techniques for efficient mutation identification would greatly benefit both basic and regulatory genetic toxicology research. Here, we report the development of Mutation Analysis with Random DNA Identifiers (MARDI), a novel high-fidelity Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) approach that circumvents clonal expansion and directly catalogs mutations in pools of mutant cells. MARDI uses oligonucleotides carrying Random DNA Identifiers (RDIs) to tag progenitor DNA molecules before PCR amplification, enabling clustering of descendant DNA molecules and eliminating NGS- and PCR-induced sequencing artifacts. When applied to the Pig-a cDNA analysis of heterogeneous pools of CD48-deficient T cells derived from DMBA-treated rats, MARDI detected nearly all Pig-a mutations that were previously identified by conventional clone-by-clone analysis and discovered many additional ones consistent with DMBA exposure: mostly A to T transversions, with the mutated A located on the non-transcribed DNA strand. PMID:26683280

  14. Quantum cloning disturbed by thermal Davies environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dajka, Jerzy; Łuczka, Jerzy

    2016-03-01

    A network of quantum gates designed to implement universal quantum cloning machine is studied. We analyze how thermal environment coupled to auxiliary qubits, `blank paper' and `toner' required at the preparation stage of copying, modifies an output fidelity of the cloner. Thermal environment is described in terms of the Markovian Davies theory. We show that such a cloning machine is not universal any more but its output is independent of at least a part of parameters of the environment. As a case study, we consider cloning of states in a six-state cryptography's protocol. We also briefly discuss cloning of arbitrary input states.

  15. Quantum cloning disturbed by thermal Davies environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dajka, Jerzy; Łuczka, Jerzy

    2016-06-01

    A network of quantum gates designed to implement universal quantum cloning machine is studied. We analyze how thermal environment coupled to auxiliary qubits, `blank paper' and `toner' required at the preparation stage of copying, modifies an output fidelity of the cloner. Thermal environment is described in terms of the Markovian Davies theory. We show that such a cloning machine is not universal any more but its output is independent of at least a part of parameters of the environment. As a case study, we consider cloning of states in a six-state cryptography's protocol. We also briefly discuss cloning of arbitrary input states.

  16. Salmonellas on pig farms and in abattoirs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J. A.; Ghosh, A. C.; Mann, P. G.; Tee, G. H.

    1972-01-01

    Salmonella infection on two pig farms and its relation to infection in pigs at slaughter was studied. On the first farm feed ingredients were mixed on the farm, and these included fish meal which was found to be contaminated with salmonellas. The feed was pumped to pigs in liquid form. There was a high salmonella isolation rate at slaughter when the contaminated fish meal was fed in liquid feed, but it was significantly lower when no fish meal was fed to the pigs examined at slaughter. In some instances the same serotypes were found in fish meal and pig excreta on the farm and in caecal contents of the pigs at slaughter. No serotype was repeatedly isolated from any source and it appeared that the serotypes were not able to establish themselves in the pigs. It is concluded that infection found at slaughter originated on the farm where fish meal introduced and maintained infection. There was an opportunity for salmonellas to have multiplied in the liquid feed for several hours each day. On a second farm environmental conditions were similar, but feed was given in the form of ready-made pellets and nuts. Salmonellas were not isolated from the feed. At slaughter there was a significantly lower isolation rate than on the first farm. PMID:4501835

  17. Continuous odour measurement from fattening pig units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romain, Anne-Claude; Nicolas, Jacques; Cobut, Pierre; Delva, Julien; Nicks, Baudouin; Philippe, François-Xavier

    2013-10-01

    A study in experimental slatted-system fattening pig units was conducted with the aim of estimating the odour emission factor (in ou s.pig-1), which can subsequently be used in dispersion models to assess the odour annoyance zone. Dynamic olfactometry measurements carried out at different development stages of pigs showed a logical trend of the mean assessed odour emission factor with the pig mass. However, the variation within the same mass class was much larger than variation between classes. Possible causes of such variation were identified as the evolution of ventilation rate during the day and the circadian rhythm of pig. To be able to monitor continuously the daily variation of the odour, an electronic nose was used with suitable regression model calibrated against olfactometric measurements. After appropriate validation check, the electronic nose proved to be convenient, as a complementary tool to dynamic olfactometry, to record the daily variation of the odour emission factor in the pig barn. It was demonstrated that, in the controlled conditions of the experimental pens, the daily variation of the odour emission rate could be mainly attributed to the sole influence of the circadian rhythm of pig. As a consequence, determining a representative odour emission factor in a real case cannot be based on a snapshot odour sampling.

  18. Sarcoptic mange infestation in pigs: an overview.

    PubMed

    Laha, R

    2015-12-01

    Sarcoptic mange infestation in pigs is caused by Sarcoptes scabiei var. suis. It is the most common mange infestation of pigs. The parasite is distributed worldwide. Pig owners are generally concerned about the internal parasitic infections and ignored the external parasitic infestations. But the external parasitic infestation with S. scabiei var. suis has economic significance as it causes morbidity, mortality, decreased fertility and feed conversion ratio in pigs. Keeping in view of importance of S. scabies var. suis infestation in pigs, this communication discussed about the present and past research works done on S. scabies var. suis infestation in pigs, particularly its prevalence, life cycle, pathological lesions, clinical symptoms, haematobiochemical changes, diagnosis, treatment and control, to have an idea about this infestation at a glance. It has been concluded that the research work done on sarcoptic mange infestation in pigs in India is less in comparison to other countries. It may be due to its consideration as a neglected parasite or due to it's under report. Organization of awareness programs for the farmers by extension personalities or other authorities might be able to save the farmers from economic losses due to this infestation. PMID:26688620

  19. A Newly Designed Enterocutaneous Esophageal Fistula Model in the Pig.

    PubMed

    Rahmi, Gabriel; Perretta, Silvana; Pidial, Laetitia; Vanbiervliet, Geoffroy; Halvax, Peter; Legner, Andras; Lindner, Veronique; Barthet, Marc; Dallemagne, Bernard; Cellier, Christophe; Clément, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    Background Fistulas after esophagectomy are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Several endoscopic treatments have been attempted, with varying success. An experimental model that could validate new approaches such as cellular therapies is highly desirable. The aim of this study was to create a chronic esophageal enterocutaneous fistula model in order to study future experimental treatment options. Methods Eight pigs (six 35-kg young German and two 50-kg adult Yucatan pigs) were used. Through a left and right cervicotomy, under endoscopic view, 1 (group A, n = 6) or 2 (group B, n = 7) plastic catheters were introduced into the esophagus 30 cm from the dental arches bilaterally and left in place for 1 month. Radiologic and endoscopic fistula tract evaluations were performed at postoperative day (POD; 30) and at sacrifice (POD 45). Results Three fistulas were excluded from the study because of early (POD 5) dislodgment of the catheter, with complete fistula closure. At catheter removal (POD 30), the external orifice was larger in group B (5.2 ± 1.1 mm vs 2.6 ± 0.4 mm) with more severe inflammation (72% vs 33%). At POD 45, the external orifice was closed in all fistulas in group A and in 1/7 in group B. At necropsy, the fistula tract was still present in all animals. Yucatan pigs showed more complex tracts, with a high level of necrosis and substantial fibrotic infiltration. Conclusions In this article, we show a reproducible, safe, and effective technique to create an esophagocutaneous fistula model in a large experimental animal. PMID:26989046

  20. Toxoplasma gondii in Ireland: seroprevalence and novel molecular detection method in sheep, pigs, deer and chickens.

    PubMed

    Halová, D; Mulcahy, G; Rafter, P; Turčeková, L; Grant, T; de Waal, T

    2013-03-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is among the most studied parasites worldwide but there is not much information about it published in Ireland. The objectives of this study were to determine the seroprevalence of T. gondii in sheep, pigs, deer and chickens and the molecular detection of T. gondii DNA in muscle tissue. Serum samples were collected from these species at the time of slaughter at Irish abattoirs during 2007 and tested for anti-T. gondii antibodies using a commercial semi-quantitative latex agglutination test. Antibodies (titre ≥1 : 64) were found in 36% (105/292) sheep, 4.7% (15/317) pigs and 6.6% (23/348) deer. In chickens, 18% (65/364) had antibody titres, ranging between 1 : 5 and 1 : 1024. Significant (P ≤ 0.05) age-related differences in seroprevalence were found in adult sheep (58.1%) and pigs (23.1%). Significant gender differences in seroprevalence was also found in sheep with more females (43%) than males (22.4%) being positive. However, when adjusted for age through logistic regression gender was no longer significant. Seroprevalence was also evaluated on farm locations grouped to NUTS level 3, but the prevalence was too low to draw any statistical conclusions. Using a nested PCR, the presence of T. gondii DNA was detected in diaphragm samples from 3.6% (3/83) sheep, 13.0% (3/23) pig and 4.2% (3/71) deer. Meat digestion liquids from a Trichinella spp. survey in pigs were also used for the first time to detect T. gondii. Toxoplasma gondii DNA was detected in 50% (10/20) of pooled samples. This is the first in depth study of T. gondii seroprevalence in animals in Ireland and a novel method, using digestion liquid from pooled diaphragm samples, for PCR detection in pigs is described. PMID:22697578

  1. STRU-cloning: a fast, inexpensive and efficient cloning procedure applicable to both small scale and structural genomics size cloning.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Dom; Fordham-Skelton, Anthony P; Papiz, Miroslav Z

    2011-05-01

    We have developed a Single-Tube Restriction-based Ultrafiltration (STRU) cloning procedure that updates traditional ligation-dependent cloning to challenge the newer, faster and more efficient ligation-free techniques and could make it the method of choice. STRU-cloning employs centrifugal filter units with membrane of suitable cut off to remove small unwanted DNA fragments created during restriction of plasmids or PCR products. Heat inactivation, of restriction enzymes, followed by DNA ligation is then performed on the filtrate. By removing the agarose gel electrophoresis DNA purification step from the traditional protocol, which is time consuming and is known to be the cause of ligation problems, STRU-cloning becomes fast, very efficient, inexpensive and offers the highest degree of cloning flexibility by using restriction sites and can be performed in a single tube. This novel agarose gel-free cloning procedure provides benefits for both small and large scale cloning projects. Unlike traditional cloning it can be easily implemented as a fully automated process at very low costs. PMID:21052867

  2. Nuclear transfer and transgenesis in the pig.

    PubMed

    Kurome, Mayuko; Kessler, Barbara; Wuensch, Annegret; Nagashima, Hiroshi; Wolf, Eckhard

    2015-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) using genetically modified donor cells facilitates the generation of tailored pig models for biomedical research and for xenotransplantation. Up to now, SCNT is the main way to generate gene-targeted pigs, since germ line-competent pluripotent stem cells are not available for this species. In this chapter, we introduce our routine workflow for the production of genetically engineered pigs, especially focused on the genetic modification of somatic donor cells, SCNT using in vitro matured oocytes, and laparoscopic embryo transfer. PMID:25287337

  3. Positional Cloning by Linkage Disequilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Maniatis, Nikolas; Collins, Andrew; Gibson, Jane; Zhang, Weihua; Tapper, William; Morton, Newton E.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, metric linkage disequilibrium (LD) maps that assign an LD unit (LDU) location for each marker have been developed (Maniatis et al. 2002). Here we present a multiple pairwise method for positional cloning by LD within a composite likelihood framework and investigate the operating characteristics of maps in physical units (kb) and LDU for two bodies of data (Daly et al. 2001; Jeffreys et al. 2001) on which current ideas of blocks are based. False-negative indications of a disease locus (type II error) were examined by selecting one single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at a time as causal and taking its allelic count (0, 1, or 2, for the three genotypes) as a pseudophenotype, Y. By use of regression and correlation, association between every pseudophenotype and the allelic count of each SNP locus (X) was based on an adaptation of the Malecot model, which includes a parameter for location of the putative gene. By expressing locations in kb or LDU, greater power for localization was observed when the LDU map was fitted. The efficiency of the kb map, relative to the LDU map, to describe LD varied from a maximum of 0.87 to a minimum of 0.36, with a mean of 0.62. False-positive indications of a disease locus (type I error) were examined by simulating an unlinked causal SNP and the allele count was used as a pseudophenotype. The type I error was in good agreement with Wald’s likelihood theorem for both metrics and all models that were tested. Unlike tests that select only the most significant marker, haplotype, or haploset, these methods are robust to large numbers of markers in a candidate region. Contrary to predictions from tagging SNPs that retain haplotype diversity, the sample with smaller size but greater SNP density gave less error. The locations of causal SNPs were estimated with the same precision in blocks and steps, suggesting that block definition may be less useful than anticipated for mapping a causal SNP. These results provide a guide to

  4. The in vitro PIG-A gene mutation assay: glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-related genotype-to-phenotype relationship in TK6 cells.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Christopher T; Fischer, Bettina M; Armant, Olivier; Morath, Volker; Strähle, Uwe; Hartwig, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    In our previous work, we established an in vitro variant of the currently developed in vivo PIG-A assay as promising mutagenicity test system. We applied the human B-lymphoblastoid cell line TK6 for the in vitro assay development, which is based on the cellular glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) status. At least 22 genes are involved in GPI biosynthesis, leading to the complex situation that, in principle, multiple genes could induce a GPI-deficient phenotype by acquiring inactivating mutations. However, only the PIG-A gene is located on the X-chromosome, rendering PIG-A more sensitive compared to autosomal linked, GPI-relevant genes. In this work, we investigated the GPI-related genotype-to-phenotype relationship in TK6 cells. By a next-generation sequencing approach, we identified a heterozygous chromosomal deletion on chromosome 17, where the PIG-L gene is located. In the analyzed TK6 cell clones, the GPI-deficient phenotype was induced either by mutations in PIG-A, by the complete absence of PIG-A mRNA, or by deletions in the remaining functional PIG-L gene, causing loss of heterozygosity. The identified PIG-L heterozygosity could also be responsible for the increased sensitivity toward mutagenic ethyl methanesulfonate or UV-C treatments of p53-proficient TK6 compared to the TK6-related, but p53-deficient WI-L2-NS cell line. Moreover, the WI-L2-NS cell line was found to exhibit a much lower number of GPI-deficient mutant cells in the purchased cell batch, and WI-L2-NS exerted a lower spontaneous rate of GPI deficiency compared to TK6 cells. PMID:27100116

  5. Analysis of the temperature sensitivity of Japanese rubella vaccine strain TO-336.vac and its effect on immunogenicity in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Kiyoko; Ami, Yasushi; Suzaki, Yuriko; Otsuki, Noriyuki; Sakata, Masafumi; Takeda, Makoto; Mori, Yoshio

    2016-04-01

    The marker of Japanese domestic rubella vaccines is their lack of immunogenicity in guinea pigs. This has long been thought to be related to the temperature sensitivity of the viruses, but supporting evidence has not been described. In this study, we generated infectious clones of TO-336.vac, a Japanese domestic vaccine, TO-336.GMK5, the parental virus of TO-336.vac, and their mutants, and determined the molecular bases of their temperature sensitivity and immunogenicity in guinea pigs. The results revealed that Ser(1159) in the non-structural protein-coding region was responsible for the temperature sensitivity of TO-336.vac dominantly, while the structural protein-coding region affected the temperature sensitivity subordinately. The findings further suggested that the temperature sensitivity of TO-336.vac affected the antibody induction in guinea pigs after subcutaneous inoculation. PMID:26878651

  6. Creation of Functional Viruses from Non-Functional cDNA Clones Obtained from an RNA Virus Population by the Use of Ancestral Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fahnøe, Ulrik; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Dräger, Carolin; Orton, Richard J; Blome, Sandra; Höper, Dirk; Beer, Martin; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun

    2015-01-01

    RNA viruses have the highest known mutation rates. Consequently it is likely that a high proportion of individual RNA virus genomes, isolated from an infected host, will contain lethal mutations and be non-functional. This is problematic if the aim is to clone and investigate high-fitness, functional cDNAs and may also pose problems for sequence-based analysis of viral evolution. To address these challenges we have performed a study of the evolution of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) using deep sequencing and analysis of 84 full-length cDNA clones, each representing individual genomes from a moderately virulent isolate. In addition to here being used as a model for RNA viruses generally, CSFV has high socioeconomic importance and remains a threat to animal welfare and pig production. We find that the majority of the investigated genomes are non-functional and only 12% produced infectious RNA transcripts. Full length sequencing of cDNA clones and deep sequencing of the parental population identified substitutions important for the observed phenotypes. The investigated cDNA clones were furthermore used as the basis for inferring the sequence of functional viruses. Since each unique clone must necessarily be the descendant of a functional ancestor, we hypothesized that it should be possible to produce functional clones by reconstructing ancestral sequences. To test this we used phylogenetic methods to infer two ancestral sequences, which were then reconstructed as cDNA clones. Viruses rescued from the reconstructed cDNAs were tested in cell culture and pigs. Both reconstructed ancestral genomes proved functional, and displayed distinct phenotypes in vitro and in vivo. We suggest that reconstruction of ancestral viruses is a useful tool for experimental and computational investigations of virulence and viral evolution. Importantly, ancestral reconstruction can be done even on the basis of a set of sequences that all correspond to non-functional variants. PMID

  7. Creation of Functional Viruses from Non-Functional cDNA Clones Obtained from an RNA Virus Population by the Use of Ancestral Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Fahnøe, Ulrik; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Dräger, Carolin; Orton, Richard J; Blome, Sandra; Höper, Dirk; Beer, Martin; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun

    2015-01-01

    RNA viruses have the highest known mutation rates. Consequently it is likely that a high proportion of individual RNA virus genomes, isolated from an infected host, will contain lethal mutations and be non-functional. This is problematic if the aim is to clone and investigate high-fitness, functional cDNAs and may also pose problems for sequence-based analysis of viral evolution. To address these challenges we have performed a study of the evolution of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) using deep sequencing and analysis of 84 full-length cDNA clones, each representing individual genomes from a moderately virulent isolate. In addition to here being used as a model for RNA viruses generally, CSFV has high socioeconomic importance and remains a threat to animal welfare and pig production. We find that the majority of the investigated genomes are non-functional and only 12% produced infectious RNA transcripts. Full length sequencing of cDNA clones and deep sequencing of the parental population identified substitutions important for the observed phenotypes. The investigated cDNA clones were furthermore used as the basis for inferring the sequence of functional viruses. Since each unique clone must necessarily be the descendant of a functional ancestor, we hypothesized that it should be possible to produce functional clones by reconstructing ancestral sequences. To test this we used phylogenetic methods to infer two ancestral sequences, which were then reconstructed as cDNA clones. Viruses rescued from the reconstructed cDNAs were tested in cell culture and pigs. Both reconstructed ancestral genomes proved functional, and displayed distinct phenotypes in vitro and in vivo. We suggest that reconstruction of ancestral viruses is a useful tool for experimental and computational investigations of virulence and viral evolution. Importantly, ancestral reconstruction can be done even on the basis of a set of sequences that all correspond to non-functional variants. PMID

  8. Cloning genes for non-syndromal hearing impairment.

    PubMed

    Smith, R J; Van Camp, G

    1999-10-01

    Over 45 genes that cause autosomal non-syndromic hearing impairment (NSHI) have been localized and many more are predicted to exist. To clone these genes, a number of different strategies can be used. This paper focuses on four general approaches: functional cloning, positional cloning, position-dependent candidate gene cloning, and position-independent candidate gene cloning. PMID:10890140

  9. Rosa26 Locus Supports Tissue-Specific Promoter Driving Transgene Expression Specifically in Pig

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jing; Huang, Tianqing; Jiang, Dandan; Xie, Bingteng; Wu, Meiling; Wang, Jiaqiang; Song, Yuran; Wang, Ying; He, Yilong; Sun, Jialu; Hu, Kui; Guo, Runfa; Wang, Liu; Zhou, Qi; Mu, Yanshuang; Liu, Zhonghua

    2014-01-01

    Genetically modified pigs have become a popular model system in fundamental research, agricultural and biomedical applications. However, random integration often result in unstable expression of transgene and unpredictable phenotypes. The Rosa26 locus has been widely used to produce genetic modified animals with high and consistent expressing of transgene in mouse, human and rat, as it can be targeted efficiently and is not subject to gene-silencing effects. Recently, the first case of reporter gene targeting pigs in porcine Rosa26 (pRosa26) locus was reported. In the study, full sequence of pRosa26 locus was further characterized, and the pRosa26 promoter (pR26) was cloned and we evidenced that the new porcine endogenous promoter is suitable for driving transgene expression in a high and stable manner by avoiding DNA methylation. Furthermore, elongation factor 1a promoter (EF1a) -driven GFP reporter and Myostatin promoter (MyoP)-driven Follistatin (Fst) were successfully targeted into the pRosa26 locusby traditional homologous recombination (HR) strategy. EF1a showed high activity and hypomethylation at the locus. And, muscle-specific promoter MyoP was activated strictly in muscle of the pRosa26 targeted pigs, indicating Rosa26 locus supports tissue-specific promoter driving transgene expression in its own manner. The study provided further demonstration on biomedical and agricultural applications of porcine Rosa26 promoter and locus. PMID:25232950

  10. Targeted disruption of Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene in miniature pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young June; Ahn, Kwang Sung; Kim, Minjeong; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Sang-Min; Ryu, Junghyun; Ahn, Jin Seop; Heo, Soon Young; Kang, Jee Hyun; Choi, You Jung; Choi, Seong-Jun; Shim, Hosup

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • ATM gene-targeted pigs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. • A novel large animal model for ataxia telangiectasia was developed. • The new model may provide an alternative to the mouse model. - Abstract: Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a recessive autosomal disorder associated with pleiotropic phenotypes, including progressive cerebellar degeneration, gonad atrophy, and growth retardation. Even though A-T is known to be caused by the mutations in the Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene, the correlation between abnormal cellular physiology caused by ATM mutations and the multiple symptoms of A-T disease has not been clearly determined. None of the existing ATM mouse models properly reflects the extent to which neurological degeneration occurs in human. In an attempt to provide a large animal model for A-T, we produced gene-targeted pigs with mutations in the ATM gene by somatic cell nuclear transfer. The disrupted allele in the ATM gene of cloned piglets was confirmed via PCR and Southern blot analysis. The ATM gene-targeted pigs generated in the present study may provide an alternative to the current mouse model for the study of mechanisms underlying A-T disorder and for the development of new therapies.

  11. Overexpression of Porcine Beta-Defensin 2 Enhances Resistance to Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Infection in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xi; Cheng, Yu-Ting; Tan, Mei-Fang; Zhang, Hua-Wei; Liu, Wan-Quan; Zou, Geng; Zhang, Liang-Sheng; Zhang, Chun-Yan; Deng, Si-Min; Yu, Lei; Hu, Xue-Ying; Li, Lu

    2015-01-01

    To reduce the need for antibiotics in animal production, alternative approaches are needed to control infection. We hypothesized that overexpression of native defensin genes will provide food animals with enhanced resistance to bacterial infections. In this study, recombinant porcine beta-defensin 2 (PBD-2) was overexpressed in stably transfected PK-15 porcine kidney cells. PBD-2 antibacterial activities against Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, an important respiratory pathogen causing porcine contagious pleuropneumonia, were evaluated on agar plates. Transgenic pigs constitutively overexpressing PBD-2 were produced by a somatic cell cloning method, and their resistance to bacterial infection was evaluated by direct or cohabitation infection with A. pleuropneumoniae. Recombinant PBD-2 peptide that was overexpressed in the PK-15 cells showed antibacterial activity against A. pleuropneumoniae. PBD-2 was overexpressed in the heart, liver, spleen, lungs, kidneys, and jejunum of the transgenic pigs, which showed significantly lower bacterial loads in the lungs and reduced lung lesions after direct or cohabitation infection with A. pleuropneumoniae. The results demonstrate that transgenic overexpression of PBD-2 in pigs confers enhanced resistance against A. pleuropneumoniae infection. PMID:25916992

  12. [Studies on coccidiosis in guinea pigs. 2. Epizootiological survey].

    PubMed

    Muto, T; Yusa, T; Sugisaki, M; Tanaka, K; Noguchi, Y; Taguchi, K

    1985-01-01

    An epizootiological survey has been carried out on naturally occurring coccidiosis in Hartley guinea pigs (weight, 250g) purchased by the National Institute of Health, Tokyo during the period 1964 to 1982. Coccidial infections in breeding colonies of guinea pigs were observed very frequently in weaned animals but scarcely in adult and suckling animals. Oocysts of Eimeria caviae were detected in 53.8% of the 7,162 fecal samples collected from transportation boxes and coccidiosis occurred in 39% of the 1,461 dead or culled animals obtained during the routine one week quarantine period. In the period 1964 to 1971, particularly high rates of prevalence of oocysts, between 55-86%, and incidence of coccidiosis, between 55-76%, were observed. These rates were clearly reduced in the period 1972 to 1982, with a lower rate of isolation of oocysts ranging from 14-48% and les than 20% incidence of coccidiosis (except in 1981 and 1982). The monthly fluctuation of occurrence rates of oocysts and clinical coccidiosis differed over the period of study. From 1964 to 1971, the high prevalence of oocysts was consistently observed accompanied by a bimodal pattern of incidence of coccidiosis in April (85%) and October (78%). In the period 1972 to 1982, both parameters showed a single peak, for prevalence of oocysts in June (60.7%) and for incidence of coccidiosis in May (45%). Oocysts in feces disappeared in February and March and coccidiosis occurred irregularly in 1981 and 1982.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3987821

  13. [Production of porcine blastocysts expressed EGFP by handmade cloning].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Yang, Zhen-Zhen; Dou, Hong-Wei; Li, Wei-Hang; Lv, Bo; Bolund, Lars; DU, Yu-Tao; Tan, Ping-Ping; Ma, Run-Lin

    2011-05-01

    Production of transgenic animals via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been widely used worldwide. However, the application of SCNT is impeded by overall high costs and low efficiency. Here, we reported a modification of the existing technology in order to overcome some of the disadvantages associated with SCNT. Firstly, a marker gene, enhanced green fluorescent gene (EGFP), was transfected into pig fetal fibroblast cells, and was subsequently screened by fluorescent expression to ensure donor cells expressing EGFP. Porcine embryos expressing EGFP were then produced by a method called handmade cloning (HMC), a simplified method for micromanipulation. To demonstrate the concept, we collected a total of 378 fresh swine oocytes, from which 266 with the nucleus removed, obtained a total of 127 viable recombinant oocytes after fusion with EGFP-expressing cells. In vitro incubation of the 127 recombinant oocytes for approximately 144 hours resulted in successful generation of 65 viable embryos, with an average success rate of 52.1±8.3%. Compared with the traditional SCNT, the method of HMC is not only easy to operate, but also increases the rate of recombinant embryo significantly. Furthermore, the modified method no longer relies on expensive instrument like micromanipulator, facilitating the industrialization of transgenic animal production. PMID:21586400

  14. Reversibility of continuous-variable quantum cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Filip, Radim; Marek, Petr; Fiurasek, Jaromir

    2004-01-01

    We analyze a reversibility of optimal Gaussian 1{yields}2 quantum cloning of a coherent state using only local operations on the clones and classical communication between them and propose a feasible experimental test of this feature. Performing Bell-type homodyne measurement on one clone and anticlone, an arbitrary unknown input state (not only a coherent state) can be restored in the other clone by applying appropriate local unitary displacement operation. We generalize this concept to a partial reversal of the cloning using only local operations and classical communication (LOCC) and we show that this procedure converts the symmetric cloner to an asymmetric cloner. Further, we discuss a distributed LOCC reversal in optimal 1{yields}M Gaussian cloning of coherent states which transforms it to optimal 1{yields}M{sup '} cloning for M{sup '}cloning as a possible eavesdropping attack on quantum communication link, the reversibility can be utilized to improve the security of the link even after the attack.

  15. Cloning of endangered mammalian species: any progress?

    PubMed

    Loi, Pasqualino; Galli, Cesare; Ptak, Grazyna

    2007-05-01

    Attempts through somatic cell nuclear transfer to expand wild populations that have shrunk to critical numbers is a logical extension of the successful cloning of mammals. However, although the first mammal was cloned 10 years ago, nuclear reprogramming remains phenomenological, with abnormal gene expression and epigenetic deregulation being associated with the cloning process. In addition, although cloning of wild animals using host oocytes from different species has been successful, little is known about the implication of partial or total mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in cloned embryos, fetuses and offspring. Finally, there is a need for suitable foster mothers for inter-intra specific cloned embryos. Considering these issues, the limited success achieved in cloning endangered animals is not surprising. However, optimism comes from the rapid gain in the understanding of the molecular clues underlying nuclear reprogramming. If it is possible to achieve a controlled reversal of the differentiated state of a cell then it is probable that other issues that impair the cloning of endangered animals, such as the inter-intra species oocyte or womb donor, will be overcome in the medium term. PMID:17379340

  16. CLONING AND EXPRESSION OF RABBIT INTERLEUKIN-15

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to understand the inflammatory mechanisms related to rabbit interleukin-15 (RIL-15), we cloned and expressed RIL-15 cDNA gene. A cDNA encoding RIL-15 was cloned from heart mRNA by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification using hIL-15 primers. The RIL-15 cDNA co...

  17. Evaluation of heat-labile enterotoxins type IIa and type IIb in the pathogenicity of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli for neonatal pigs.

    PubMed

    Casey, Thomas A; Connell, Terry D; Holmes, Randall K; Whipp, Shannon C

    2012-09-14

    Type II heat-labile enterotoxins (LT-II) have been reported in Escherichia coli isolates from humans, animals, food and water samples. The goal here was to determine the specific roles of the antigenically distinguishable LT-IIa and LT-IIb subtypes in pathogenesis and virulence of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) which has not been previously reported. The prevalence of genes encoding for LT-II was determined by colony blot hybridization in a collection of 1648 E. coli isolates from calves and pigs with diarrhea or other diseases and from healthy animals. Only five isolates hybridized with the LT-II probe and none of these isolates contained genes for other enterotoxins or adhesins associated with porcine or bovine ETEC. Ligated intestinal loops in calves, pigs, and rabbits were used to determine the potential of purified LT-IIa and LT-IIb to cause intestinal secretion. LT-IIa and LT-IIb caused significant secretion in the intestinal loops in calves but not in the intestinal loops of rabbits or pigs. In contrast, neonatal pigs inoculated with isogenic adherent E. coli containing the cloned genes for LT-I, LT-IIa or LT-IIb developed severe watery diarrhea with weight loss that was significantly greater than pigs inoculated with the adherent, non-toxigenic parental or vector only control strains. The results demonstrate that the incidence of LT-II appeared to be very low in porcine and bovine E. coli. However, a potential role for these enterotoxins in E. coli-mediated diarrhea in animals was confirmed because purified LT-IIa and LT-IIb caused fluid secretion in bovine intestinal loops and adherent isogenic strains containing cloned genes encoding for LT-IIa or LT-IIb caused severe diarrhea in neonatal pigs. PMID:22480773

  18. "Goodbye Dolly?" The ethics of human cloning.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, J

    1997-01-01

    The ethical implications of human clones have been much alluded to, but have seldom been examined with any rigour. This paper examines the possible uses and abuses of human cloning and draws out the principal ethical dimensions, both of what might be done and its meaning. The paper examines some of the major public and official responses to cloning by authorities such as President Clinton, the World Health Organisation, the European parliament, UNESCO, and others and reveals their inadequacies as foundations for a coherent public policy on human cloning. The paper ends by defending a conception of reproductive rights of "procreative autonomy" which shows human cloning to be not inconsistent with human rights and dignity. PMID:9451604

  19. Chorioallantoic placenta defects in cloned mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wakisaka-Saito, Noriko; Kohda, Takashi . E-mail: tkhoda.epgn@tmd.ac.jp; Inoue, Kimiko; Ogonuki, Narumi; Miki, Hiromi; Hikichi, Takafusa; Mizutani, Eiji; Wakayama, Teruhiko; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko; Ogura, Atsuo; Ishino, Fumitoshi

    2006-10-13

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer technology has been applied to produce live clones successfully in several mammalian species, but the success rates are very low. In mice, about half of the nuclear transfer embryos undergo implantation, but very few survive to term. We undertook detailed histological analyses of placentas from cloned mouse embryos generated from cumulus cells at 10.5 dpc of pregnancy, by which stage most clones have terminated their development. At 10.5 dpc, the extraembryonic tissues displayed several defined histological patterns, each reflecting their stage of developmental arrest. The most notable abnormality was the poor development of the spongiotrophoblast layer of diploid cells. This is in contrast to the placental hyperplasia frequently observed in somatic clones at 12.5 dpc or later stages. A variety of structural abnormalities were also observed in the embryos. Both placental and embryonic defects likely contribute to the low success rate of the mouse clones.

  20. Infection status of pigs with Cryptosporidium parvum

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jae-Ran

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the infection status of pigs with Cryptosporidium parvum, 589 fecal samples were collected from pigs raised at farm in Chungcheongbuk-do and Chungcheongnam-do. Of the 589 pig fecal samples, 62 (10.5%) were positive for C. parvum. The area showing the highest positive rate was Dangjin-gun, Chungcheongnam-do (14.0%), and the lowest (0%) Salmi-myon, Chungcheongbuk-do. The positive rate of C. parvum in Judok-eup increased from 12.7% in the winter to 22.1% in the summer. The results of this study suggest that the pigs may be a source of human C. parvum infection. PMID:15060340

  1. Swine Influenza (Swine Flu) in Pigs

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the United States since 2005 Prevention Treatment Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Get ... Submit Button Past Newsletters Key Facts about Swine Influenza (Swine Flu) in Pigs Language: English Español ...

  2. Animal models of tuberculosis: Guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Clark, Simon; Hall, Yper; Williams, Ann

    2015-05-01

    The progression of the disease that follows infection of guinea pigs with Mycobacterium tuberculosis displays many features of human tuberculosis (TB), and the guinea pig model of TB has been used for more than 100 years as a research tool to understand and describe disease mechanisms. Changes in the bacterial burden and pathology following infection can be readily monitored and used to evaluate the impact of TB interventions. Demonstration of the protective efficacy of vaccines in the low-dose aerosol guinea pig model is an important component of the preclinical data package for novel vaccines in development, and there is a continual need to improve the model to facilitate progression of vaccines to the clinic. Development of better tools with which to dissect the immune responses of guinea pigs is a focus of current research. PMID:25524720

  3. AQUA Cloning: A Versatile and Simple Enzyme-Free Cloning Approach

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Hannes M.; Gonschorek, Patrick; Samodelov, Sophia L.; Meier, Matthias; Weber, Wilfried; Zurbriggen, Matias D.

    2015-01-01

    Assembly cloning is increasingly replacing conventional restriction enzyme and DNA-ligase-dependent cloning methods for reasons of efficiency and performance. Here, we describe AQUA (advanced quick assembly), a simple and versatile seamless assembly cloning approach. We demonstrate the applicability and versatility of AQUA Cloning in selected proof-of-principle applications including targeted insertion-, deletion- and site-directed point-mutagenesis, and combinatorial cloning. Furthermore, we show the one pot de novo assembly of multiple DNA fragments into a single circular plasmid encoding a complex light- and chemically-regulated Boolean A NIMPLY B logic operation. AQUA Cloning harnesses intrinsic in vivo processing of linear DNA fragments with short regions of homology of 16 to 32 bp mediated by Escherichia coli. It does not require any kits, enzymes or preparations of reagents and is the simplest assembly cloning protocol to date. PMID:26360249

  4. AQUA Cloning: A Versatile and Simple Enzyme-Free Cloning Approach.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Hannes M; Gonschorek, Patrick; Samodelov, Sophia L; Meier, Matthias; Weber, Wilfried; Zurbriggen, Matias D

    2015-01-01

    Assembly cloning is increasingly replacing conventional restriction enzyme and DNA-ligase-dependent cloning methods for reasons of efficiency and performance. Here, we describe AQUA (advanced quick assembly), a simple and versatile seamless assembly cloning approach. We demonstrate the applicability and versatility of AQUA Cloning in selected proof-of-principle applications including targeted insertion-, deletion- and site-directed point-mutagenesis, and combinatorial cloning. Furthermore, we show the one pot de novo assembly of multiple DNA fragments into a single circular plasmid encoding a complex light- and chemically-regulated Boolean A NIMPLY B logic operation. AQUA Cloning harnesses intrinsic in vivo processing of linear DNA fragments with short regions of homology of 16 to 32 bp mediated by Escherichia coli. It does not require any kits, enzymes or preparations of reagents and is the simplest assembly cloning protocol to date. PMID:26360249

  5. Interactome Mapping Reveals Important Pathways in Skeletal Muscle Development of Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jianhua; Huang, Tinghua; Li, Xinyun; Zhao, Shuhong

    2014-01-01

    The regulatory relationship and connectivity among genes involved in myogenesis and hypertrophy of skeletal muscle in pigs still remain large challenges. Presentation of gene interactions is a potential way to understand the mechanisms of developmental events in skeletal muscle. In this study, genome-wide transcripts and miRNA profiling was determined for Landrace pigs at four time points using microarray chips. A comprehensive method integrating gene ontology annotation and interactome network mapping was conducted to analyze the biological patterns and interaction modules of muscle development events based on differentially expressed genes and miRNAs. Our results showed that in total 484 genes and 34 miRNAs were detected for the duration from embryonic stage to adult in pigs, which composed two linear expression patterns with consensus changes. Moreover, the gene ontology analysis also disclosed that there were three typical biological events i.e., microstructure assembly of sarcomere at early embryonic stage, myofibril formation at later embryonic stage and function establishments of myoblast cells at postnatal stage. The interactome mappings of different time points also found the down-regulated trend of gene expression existed across the whole duration, which brought a possibility to introduce the myogenesis related miRNAs into the interactome regulatory networks of skeletal muscle in pigs. PMID:25431924

  6. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms and activity analysis of the promoter and enhancer of the pig lactase gene.

    PubMed

    Du, Hai-Ting; Zhu, Hong-Yan; Wang, Jia-Mei; Zhao, Wei; Tao, Xiao-Li; Ba, Cai-Feng; Tian, Yu-Min; Su, Yu-Hong

    2014-07-15

    Lactose intolerance in northern Europeans is strongly associated with a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located 14 kb upstream of the human lactase gene: -13,910 C/T. We examined whether SNPs in the 5' flanking region of the pig lactase gene are similar to those in the human gene and whether these polymorphisms play a functional role in regulating pig lactase gene expression. The 5' flanking region of the lactase gene from several different breeds of pigs was cloned and analyzed for gene regulatory activity of a luciferase reporter gene. One SNP was found in the enhancer region (-797 G/A) and two were found in the promoter region (-308G/C and -301 A/G). The promoter C-308,G-301(Pro-CG) strongly promotes the expression of the lactase gene, but the promoter G-308,A-301(Pro-GA) does not. The enhancer A-797(Enh-A) genotype for Pro-GA can significantly enhance promoter activity, but has an inhibitory effect on Pro-CG. The Enhancer G-797(Enh-G) has a significant inhibitory effect on both promoters. In conclusion, the order of effectiveness on the pig lactase gene is Enh-A+Pro-GA>Enh-A/G+Pro-CG>Enh-G+Pro-GA. PMID:24809963

  7. Sweating Like a Pig: Physics or Irony?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohren, Craig F.

    2016-03-01

    In his interesting and informative book Is That a Fact?, Joe Schwarcz avers that pigs do not sweat and the saying "sweating like a pig" originates in iron smelting. Oblong pieces of hot iron, with a fancied resemblance to a sow with piglets, cool in sand to the dew point of the surrounding air, and hence water condenses on the "pig." But this explanation, which I have seen on the Internet, lacks a few caveats. It implies that molten iron, solidifying and cooling, anywhere, anytime, accretes liquid water, as if this were a special property of cooling iron. Set aside that real pigs sweat perceptibly from their snouts; kiss a pig and verify for yourself. Pigs also sweat imperceptibly. Imperceptible (insensible) perspiration is water vapor from the skin and lungs exuded without sensible condensation. That from humans is about 1 liter/day. Sweat is 99% liquid water, NaCl the dominant solute, secreted quickly, sometimes profusely, by subcutaneous sweat glands in response to thermal stress, in contrast to the slow, continuous diffusion of water vapor through skin.

  8. Solid gel pigs for cleaning production pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, D.E.; Bohon, W.M.; Chesnut, G.R.

    1996-08-01

    Many oil fields, such as that at Kuparuk, on the North Slope of Alaska, have been built as a trunk and lateral gathering system, with many different pipeline diameters in a branched network. No launchers nor receivers were built for the Kuparuk oil production pipelines. The high cost of retrofitting launchers and receivers prompted investigation of alternative methods for cleaning the pipelines. This paper describes a novel approach to mold solid gelatin pigs in bypass lines, and to run those pigs through the production pipelines to the primary separators. The gelatin pigs would slowly melt, eliminating the need for receivers. Field and laboratory testing showed that gelatin pigs could not effectively clean the pipelines. The addition of cross linking agents could increase the mechanical integrity of the gelatin pigs, but also elevated the melting temperatures above the operating temperatures of the primary separators. As such, they were not meltable (in time), and no benefits could be obtained by the use of solid gelatin pigs for cleaning applications.

  9. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of 16S rRNA gene clones (Clone-FISH) for probe validation and screening of clone libraries.

    PubMed

    Schramm, Andreas; Fuchs, Bernhard M; Nielsen, Jeppe L; Tonolla, Mauro; Stahl, David A

    2002-11-01

    A method is presented for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of 16S rRNA gene clones targeting in vivo transcribed plasmid inserts (Clone-FISH). Several different cloning approaches and treatments to generate target-rRNA in the clones were compared. Highest signal intensities of Clone-FISH were obtained using plasmids with a T7 RNA polymerase promoter and host cells with an IPTG-inducible T7 RNA polymerase. Combined IPTG-induction and chloramphenicol treatment of those clones resulted in FISH signals up to 2.8-fold higher than signals of FISH with probe EUB338 to cells of Escherichia coli. Probe dissociation curves for three oligonucleotide probes were compared for reference cells containing native (FISH) or cloned (Clone-FISH) target sequences. Melting behaviour and calculated T(d) values were virtually identical for clones and cells, providing a format to use 16S rRNA gene clones instead of pure cultures for probe validation and optimization of hybridization conditions. The optimized Clone-FISH protocol was also used to screen an environmental clone library for insert sequences of interest. In this application format, 13 out of 82 clones examined were identified to contain sulphate-reducing bacterial rRNA genes. In summary, Clone-FISH is a simple and fast technique, compatible with a wide variety of cloning vectors and hosts, that should have general utility for probe validation and screening of clone libraries. PMID:12460279

  10. Using guinea pigs in studies relevant to asthma and COPD

    PubMed Central

    Canning, Brendan J.; Chou, Yangling

    2010-01-01

    The guinea pig has been the most commonly used small animal species in preclinical studies related to asthma and COPD. The primary advantages of the guinea pig are the similar potencies and efficacies of agonists and antagonists in human and guinea pig airways and the many similarities in physiological processes, especially airway autonomic control and the response to allergen. The primary disadvantages to using guinea pigs are the lack of transgenic methods, limited numbers of guinea pig strains for comparative studies and a prominent axon reflex that is unlikely to be present in human airways. These attributes and various models developed in guinea pigs are discussed. PMID:18462968

  11. Microbial population dynamics and changes in main nutrients during the acidification process of pig manures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongdong; Yuan, Xufeng; Guo, Peng; Suo, Yali; Wang, Xiaofen; Wang, Weidong; Cui, Zongjun

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the impact of pig manure acidification on anaerobic treatment and composition of the fecal microbial community. According to the different chemical oxygen demand (COD) in the anaerobic treatment processes, pig manure was diluted 4 times (x4), 16 times (x16), or 64 times (x64) and subjected to acidification. During the acidification process, pH, soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD), volatile fatty acids (VFAs), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) were determined along with microbial population dynamics. The pH of the three dilutions first declined, and then slowly increased. The total VFAs of x4 and x16 dilutions peaked on day 15 and 20, respectively. The content of acetic acid, propanoic acid, butanoic acid and valeric acid of the x4 dilution were 23.6, 11.4, 8.8 and 0.6 g/L respectively, and that of the x16 dilution was 5.6, 2.3, 0.9 and 0.2 g/L respectively. Only acetic acid was detected in the x64 dilution, and its level peaked on day 10. The results showed that the liquid pig manure was more suitable to enter the anaerobic methanogenic bioreactors after two weeks of acidification. During the acidification process, total P concentration increased during the first ten days, then dropped sharply, and rose again to a relatively high final concentration, while total N concentration rose initially and then declined. Based on the analysis of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and 16S rRNA gene clone library, we concluded that the acidification process reduced the number of pathogenic bacteria species in pig manure. PMID:21520820

  12. A Genetic Analysis of Taoyuan Pig and Its Phylogenetic Relationship to Eurasian Pig Breeds

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kuan-Yi; Li, Kuang-Ti; Cheng, Chun-Chun; Chen, Chia-Hsuan; Hung, Chien-Yi; Ju, Yu-Ten

    2015-01-01

    Taoyuan pig is a native Taiwan breed. According to the historical record, the breed was first introduced to Taiwan from Guangdong province, Southern China, around 1877. The breed played an important role in Taiwan’s early swine industry. It was classified as an indigenous breed in 1986. After 1987, a conserved population of Taoyuan pig was collected and reared in isolation. In this study, mitochondrial DNA sequences and 18 microsatellite markers were used to investigate maternal lineage and genetic diversity within the Taoyuan pig population. Population differentiation among Taoyuan, Asian type, and European type pig breeds was also evaluated using differentiation indices. Only one D-loop haplotype of the Taoyuan pig was found. It clustered with Lower Changjiang River Basin and Central China Type pig breeds. Based on the polymorphism of microsatellite markers, a positive fixation index value (FIS) indicates that the conserved Taoyuan population suffers from inbreeding. In addition, high FST values (>0.2105) were obtained, revealing high differentiation among these breeds. Non-metric multi-dimensional scaling showed a clear geometric structure among 7 breeds. Together these results indicate that maternally Taoyuan pig originated in the Lower Changjiang River Basin and Central China; however, since being introduced to Taiwan differentiation has occurred. In addition, Taoyuan pig has lost genetic diversity in both its mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. PMID:25656199

  13. Prevalence of the Cryptosporidium Pig Genotype II in Pigs from the Yangtze River Delta, China

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhongying; Lu, Weiyuan; Xu, Yuxin; Cao, Jianping

    2011-01-01

    Background Cryptosporidium spp. is prevalent globally, pigs are an important Cryptosporidium reservoir. In China, little data regarding rates of Cryptosporidium infections in pigs are available. The present study was therefore aimed at characterizing the distribution of Cryptosporidium species in pigs from two different cities, Shaoxing and Shanghai, from the Yangtze River delta. Methodology/Principal Findings Nested PCR to amplify the 18S rRNA locus on DNA extracted from fecal samples (n = 94) revealed the positive rate of Cryptosporidium in pigs from two cities was approximately 17.0%. The positive rates in Shanghai and Shaoxing were 14.3% and 25.0% respectively. Amplified sequences were verified by sequencing. The identified strain belonged to the C. pig genotype II using BLAST analysis in the NCBI database. Conclusion/Significance Our finding of Cryptosporidium pig genotype II in pigs in the Yangtze River delta area suggests that pig farms in this region must be considered a public health threat and proper control measures be introduced. PMID:21677776

  14. Production and Assessment of Decellularized Pig and Human Lung Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Niles, Jean; Riddle, Michael; Vargas, Gracie; Schilagard, Tuya; Ma, Liang; Edward, Kert; La Francesca, Saverio; Sakamoto, Jason; Vega, Stephanie; Ogadegbe, Marie; Mlcak, Ronald; Deyo, Donald; Woodson, Lee; McQuitty, Christopher; Lick, Scott; Beckles, Daniel; Melo, Esther; Cortiella, Joaquin

    2013-01-01

    The authors have previously shown that acellular (AC) trachea-lung scaffolds can (1) be produced from natural rat lungs, (2) retain critical components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) such as collagen-1 and elastin, and (3) be used to produce lung tissue after recellularization with murine embryonic stem cells. The aim of this study was to produce large (porcine or human) AC lung scaffolds to determine the feasibility of producing scaffolds with potential clinical applicability. We report here the first attempt to produce AC pig or human trachea-lung scaffold. Using a combination of freezing and sodium dodecyl sulfate washes, pig trachea-lungs and human trachea-lungs were decellularized. Once decellularization was complete we evaluated the structural integrity of the AC lung scaffolds using bronchoscopy, multiphoton microscopy (MPM), assessment of the ECM utilizing immunocytochemistry and evaluation of mechanics through the use of pulmonary function tests (PFTs). Immunocytochemistry indicated that there was loss of collagen type IV and laminin in the AC lung scaffold, but retention of collagen-1, elastin, and fibronectin in some regions. MPM scoring was also used to examine the AC lung scaffold ECM structure and to evaluate the amount of collagen I in normal and AC lung. MPM was used to examine the physical arrangement of collagen-1 and elastin in the pleura, distal lung, lung borders, and trachea or bronchi. MPM and bronchoscopy of trachea and lung tissues showed that no cells or cell debris remained in the AC scaffolds. PFT measurements of the trachea-lungs showed no relevant differences in peak pressure, dynamic or static compliance, and a nonrestricted flow pattern in AC compared to normal lungs. Although there were changes in content of collagen I and elastin this did not affect the mechanics of lung function as evidenced by normal PFT values. When repopulated with a variety of stem or adult cells including human adult primary alveolar epithelial type II

  15. Economical quantum cloning in any dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Durt, Thomas; Fiurasek, Jaromir; Cerf, Nicolas J.

    2005-11-15

    The possibility of cloning a d-dimensional quantum system without an ancilla is explored, extending on the economical phase-covariant cloning machine for qubits found in Phys. Rev. A 60, 2764 (1999). We prove the impossibility of constructing an economical version of the optimal universal 1{yields}2 cloning machine in any dimension. We also show, using an ansatz on the generic form of cloning machines, that the d-dimensional 1{yields}2 phase-covariant cloner, which optimally clones all balanced superpositions with arbitrary phases, can be realized economically only in dimension d=2. The used ansatz is supported by numerical evidence up to d=7. An economical phase-covariant cloner can nevertheless be constructed for d>2, albeit with a slightly lower fidelity than that of the optimal cloner requiring an ancilla. Finally, using again an ansatz on cloning machines, we show that an economical version of the 1{yields}2 Fourier-covariant cloner, which optimally clones the computational basis and its Fourier transform, is also possible only in dimension d=2.

  16. Controlled secret sharing protocol using a quantum cloning circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Satyabrata; Roy, Sovik; Chakraborty, Shantanav; Jagadish, Vinayak; Haris, M. K.; Kumar, Atul

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of controlling the success probability of a secret sharing protocol using a quantum cloning circuit. The cloning circuit is used to clone the qubits containing the encoded information and en route to the intended recipients. The success probability of the protocol depends on the cloning parameters used to clone the qubits. We also establish a relation between the concurrence of initially prepared state, entanglement of the mixed state received by the receivers after cloning scheme and the cloning parameters of cloning machine.

  17. Monitoring for Presence of Potentially Xenotic Viruses in Recipients of Pig Islet Xenotransplantation

    PubMed Central

    Garkavenko, O.; Croxson, M. C.; Irgang, M.; Karlas, A.; Denner, J.; Elliott, R. B.

    2004-01-01

    This study represents a long-term follow-up of human patients receiving pig islet xenotransplantation. Eighteen patients had been monitored for up to 9 years for potentially xenotic pig viruses: pig endogenous retrovirus, pig cytomegalovirus, pig lymphotropic herpesvirus, and pig circovirus type 2. No evidence of viral infection was found. PMID:15528741

  18. Characterization of Guinea Pig Antibody Responses to Salivary Proteins of Triatoma infestans for the Development of a Triatomine Exposure Marker

    PubMed Central

    Dorňáková, Veronika; Salazar-Sanchez, Renzo; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; Carrion-Navarro, Oscar; Levy, Michael Z.; Schaub, Günter A.; Schwarz, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Background Salivary proteins of Triatoma infestans elicit humoral immune responses in their vertebrate hosts. These immune responses indicate exposure to triatomines and thus can be a useful epidemiological tool to estimate triatomine infestation. In the present study, we analyzed antibody responses of guinea pigs to salivary antigens of different developmental stages of four T. infestans strains originating from domestic and/or peridomestic habitats in Argentina, Bolivia, Chile and Peru. We aimed to identify developmental stage- and strain-specific salivary antigens as potential markers of T. infestans exposure. Methodology and Principal Findings In SDS-PAGE analysis of salivary proteins of T. infestans the banding pattern differed between developmental stages and strains of triatomines. Phenograms constructed from the salivary profiles separated nymphal instars, especially the 5th instar, from adults. To analyze the influence of stage- and strain-specific differences in T. infestans saliva on the antibody response of guinea pigs, twenty-one guinea pigs were exposed to 5th instar nymphs and/or adults of different T. infestans strains. Western blot analyses using sera of exposed guinea pigs revealed stage- and strain-specific variations in the humoral response of animals. In total, 27 and 17 different salivary proteins reacted with guinea pig sera using IgG and IgM antibodies, respectively. Despite all variations of recognized salivary antigens, an antigen of 35 kDa reacted with sera of almost all challenged guinea pigs. Conclusion Salivary antigens are increasingly considered as an epidemiological tool to measure exposure to hematophagous arthropods, but developmental stage- and strain-specific variations in the saliva composition and the respective differences of immunogenicity are often neglected. Thus, the development of a triatomine exposure marker for surveillance studies after triatomine control campaigns requires detailed investigations. Our study resulted

  19. Histone lysine methylation exhibits a distinct distribution during spermatogenesis in pigs.

    PubMed

    An, Junhui; Qin, Jinzhou; Wan, Yi; Zhang, Yaqing; Hu, Yuan; Zhang, Chunfang; Zeng, Wenxian

    2015-12-01

    Spermatogenesis is a continual process throughout the adult life of a male, which is governed by unique transcriptional regulation and massive alterations of chromatin. Histone modification was one of the underlying epigenetic mechanisms during spermatogenesis. It has been shown that methylation of histone lysine exhibits a distinct distribution in mice during spermatogenesis and some histone lysine methylation is essential for male fertility. However, the dynamic change of methylated histone in porcine testis tissue was largely unknown. Here, we studied the dynamic modulation of three types of methylation (monomethylation, dimethylation, and trimethylation) of H3K4, H3K27, and H4K20 during spermatogenesis in pigs. The results showed that H3K4me2/3, H3K27me3, and H4K20me1/2/3 were extensively localized in adult pig testis. Interestingly, we found that undifferentiated spermatogonia contained strongly H4K20me2 and H4K20me3, but little H4K20me1, whereas the differentiated spermatogonia possessed H4K20me1 and H4K20me2 and little H4K20me3. The findings of this study help for the understanding of epigenetic modifications during spermatogenesis in pigs and provide information for further studies. PMID:26409824

  20. Pig α1-Acid Glycoprotein: Characterization and First Description in Any Species as a Negative Acute Phase Protein

    PubMed Central

    Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Miller, Ingrid; Sorensen, Nanna Skall; Soerensen, Karen Elisabeth; Skovgaard, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    The serum protein α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), also known as orosomucoid, is generally described as an archetypical positive acute phase protein. Here, porcine AGP was identified, purified and characterized from pooled pig serum. It was found to circulate as a single chain glycoprotein having an apparent molecular weight of 43 kDa by SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions, of which approximately 17 kDa were accounted for by N-bound oligosaccharides. Those data correspond well with the properties of the protein predicted from the single porcine AGP gene (ORM1, Q29014 (UniProt)), containing 5 putative glycosylation sites. A monoclonal antibody (MAb) was produced and shown to quantitatively and specifically react with all microheterogenous forms of pig AGP as analyzed by 2-D electrophoresis. This MAb was used to develop an immunoassay (ELISA) for quantification of AGP in pig serum samples. The adult serum concentrations of pig AGP were in the range of 1–3 mg/ml in a number of conventional pig breeds while it was lower in Göttingen and Ossabaw minipigs (in the 0.3 to 0.6 mg/ml range) and higher in young (2–5 days old) conventional pigs (mean: 6.6 mg/ml). Surprisingly, pig AGP was found to behave as a negative acute phase protein during a range of experimental infections and aseptic inflammation with significant decreases in serum concentration and in hepatic ORM1 expression during the acute phase response. To our knowledge this is the first description in any species of AGP being a negative acute phase protein. PMID:23844161

  1. (New hosts and vectors for genome cloning)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The main goal of our project remains the development of new bacterial hosts and vectors for the stable propagation of human DNA clones in E. coli. During the past six months of our current budget period, we have (1) continued to develop new hosts that permit the stable maintenance of unstable features of human DNA, and (2) developed a series of vectors for (a) cloning large DNA inserts, (b) assessing the frequency of human sequences that are lethal to the growth of E. coli, and (c) assessing the stability of human sequences cloned in M13 for large-scale sequencing projects.

  2. A description of smallholder pig production systems in eastern Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Edwina E C; Geong, Maria; Abdurrahman, Muktasam; Ward, Michael P; Toribio, Jenny-Ann L M L

    2015-03-01

    Pig farming is a common practice among smallholder farmers in Nusa Tenggara Timur province (NTT), eastern Indonesia. To understand their production systems a survey of smallholder pig farmers was conducted. Eighteen villages were randomly selected across West Timor, Flores and Sumba islands, and 289 pig farmers were interviewed. Information on pig management, biosecurity practices, pig movements and knowledge of pig health and disease, specifically classical swine fever was collected. The mean number of pigs per herd was 5.0 (not including piglets), and total marketable herd size (pigs≥two months of age) did not differ significantly between islands (P=0.215). Chickens (71%) and dogs (62%) were the most commonly kept animal species in addition to pigs. Pigs were mainly kept as a secondary income source (69%) and 83% of farmers owned at least one sow. Seventy-four percent (74%) of pigs were housed in a kandang (small bamboo pen) and 25% were tethered. Pig feeds were primarily locally sourced agricultural products (93%). The majority of farmers had no knowledge of classical swine fever (91%) and biosecurity practices were minimal. Forty-five percent (45%) reported to consuming a pig when it died and 74% failed to report cases of sick or dead pigs to appropriate authorities. Sixty-five percent (65%) of farmers reported that a veterinarian or animal health worker had never visited their village. Backyard slaughter was common practice (55%), with meat mainly used for home consumption (89%). Most (73%) farmers purchased pigs in order to raise the animal on their farm with 36% purchasing at least one pig within the last year. Predominantly fattener pigs (34%) were given as gifts for celebratory events, most commonly for funerals (32%), traditional ceremonies (27%) and marriages (10%). For improved productivity of this traditional low-input system, research incorporating farming training and improved knowledge on pig disease and biosecurity needs to be integrated with

  3. Pig surgery: cryptorchidectomy using an inguinal approach.

    PubMed

    Scollo, A; Martelli, P; Borri, E; Mazzoni, C

    2016-06-11

    The objective of the study was to determine whether a less-invasive surgical technique used in cryptorchid horses, dogs and cats can be used successfully to remove retained testicles in pigs on farm. In total, 284 monolateral cryptorchid pigs underwent surgery on-farm condition, during which an incision was made over the inguinal ring and the undescended testicle was located for removal via identification of the vaginal process and the embryonic gubernaculum. A traction of these structures allowed the testis to pass through the deep and the superficial rings up to its exteriorisation outside the abdominal wall through the inguinal canal. The undescended testicle was located in the abdomen in 258 cases (90.8 per cent) and in the inguinal region in the remaining 26 cases (9.1 per cent). In none of the pigs was the abdominal cavity breached or the inguinal rings enlarged. However, in 23 pigs (8.1 per cent) the gubernaculum testis was thin and it frayed and ruptured when traction was applied, requiring a recovering by inserting a finger and Kelly curved forceps into the abdomen through the inguinal ring. In two pigs (0.7 per cent), the undescended testicle was not found. All surgical procedures were completed within 6-12 minutes. Four pigs died within two days after surgery (1.4 per cent). Major intraoperative or long-term complications did not occur. Results suggested that this surgical method is highly effective and could be used as a primary surgical approach in cryptorchid pigs as it is in cryptorchid dogs, cats and horses. PMID:27053253

  4. Estimation of body composition of pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, C.L.; Cornelius, S.G.

    1984-04-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the use of deuterium oxide (D2O) for in vivo estimation of body composition of diverse types of pigs. Obese (Ob, 30) and contemporary Hampshire X Yorkshire (C, 30) types of pigs used in the study were managed and fed under typical management regimens. Indwelling catheters were placed in a jugular vein of 6 Ob and 6 C pigs at 4, 8, 12, 18 and 24 wk of age. The D2O was infused (.5 g/kg body weight) as a .9% NaCl solution into the jugular catheter. Blood samples were taken immediately before and at .25, 1, 4, 8, 12, 24 and 48 h after the D2O infusion and D2O concentration in blood water was determined. Pigs were subsequently killed by euthanasia injection. Contents of the gastrointestinal tract were removed and the empty body was then frozen and later ground and sampled for subsequent analyses. Ground body tissue samples were analyzed for water, fat, N, fat-free organic matter and ash. Pig type, age and the type X age interaction were significant sources of variation in live weight, D2O pool size and all empty body components, as well as all fat-free empty body components. Relationships between age and live weight or weight of empty body components, and between live weight, empty body weight, empty body water or D2O space and weight of empty components were highly significant but influenced, in most cases, by pig type. The results of this study suggested that, although relationships between D2O space and body component weights were highly significant, they were influenced by pig type and were little better than live weight for the estimation of body composition.

  5. Identification and properties of pathways for K+ transport in guinea-pig and rat alveolar epithelial type II cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, P J; Roberts, G C; Boyd, C A

    1994-01-01

    86Rb+ was used to study potassium uptake and efflux in type II pneumocytes freshly isolated from adult guinea-pig and rat lung. Both species exhibited a substantial ouabain-sensitive component of potassium influx. In rats, most of the ouabain-resistant influx was abolished by bumetanide and removal of extracellular chloride elicited no further effect. In contrast, only a proportion of the ouabain-insensitive uptake was inhibitable by bumetanide in guinea-pigs and this species showed an additional component of influx, which was chloride dependent and which was reduced by either the K(+)-H(+)-ATPase inhibitor, omeprazole, or by the stilbene derivative, 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulphonate (DIDS). The chloride-dependent component was also apparent in efflux experiments in guinea-pigs, but was absent in rats. Ouabain-insensitive ATPase activity was assayed in highly purified apical membranes from guinea-pig type II pneumocytes. This activity was inhibitable by omeprazole (apparent inhibition constant, Ki, was approximately 40 microM), was potassium dependent (apparent activation constant, Ka, was approximately 200 microM) and was doubled by the addition of nigericin. While potassium transport in rat type II cells is adequately accounted for by Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase and Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl- cotransport, our data suggest the additional presence of K(+)-Cl- cotransport and K(+)-H(+)-ATPase in guinea-pig type II pneumocytes. A model of how alveolar subphase acidification may occur is proposed. PMID:8046636

  6. Gene expression profiling in hepatic tissue of newly weaned pigs fed pharmacological zinc and phytase supplemented diets

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Montemayor, Michelle M; Hill, Gretchen M; Raney, Nancy E; Rilington, Valencia D; Tempelman, Robert J; Link, Jane E; Wilkinson, Christopher P; Ramos, Antonio M; Ernst, Catherine W

    2008-01-01

    Background Zinc (Zn) is an essential trace element. However, Zn bioavailability from commonly consumed plants may be reduced due to phytic acid. Zn supplementation has been used to treat diarrheal disease in children, and in the U.S. swine industry at pharmacological levels to promote growth and fecal consistency, but underlying mechanisms explaining these beneficial effects remain unknown. Moreover, adding supplemental phytase improves Zn bioavailability. Thus, we hypothesized that benefits of pharmacological Zn supplementation result from changes in gene expression that could be further affected by supplemental phytase. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of feeding newly weaned pigs dietary Zn (150, 1,000, or 2,000 mg Zn/kg) as Zn oxide with or without phytase [500 phytase units (FTU)/kg] for 14 d on hepatic gene expression. Liver RNA from pigs fed 150, 1,000, or 2,000 mg Zn/kg, or 1,000 mg Zn/kg with phytase (n = 4 per treatment) was reverse transcribed and examined using the differential display reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction technique. Liver RNA from pigs fed 150 or 2,000 mg Zn/kg (n = 4 per treatment) was also evaluated using a 70-mer oligonucleotide microarray. Results Expressed sequence tags for 61 putatively differentially expressed transcripts were cloned and sequenced. In addition, interrogation of a 13,297 element oligonucleotide microarray revealed 650 annotated transcripts (FDR ≤ 0.05) affected by pharmacological Zn supplementation. Seven transcripts exhibiting differential expression in pigs fed pharmacological Zn with sequence similarities to genes encoding GLO1, PRDX4, ACY1, ORM1, CPB2, GSTM4, and HSP70.2 were selected for confirmation. Relative hepatic GLO1 (P < 0.0007), PRDX4 (P < 0.009) and ACY1 (P < 0.01) mRNA abundances were confirmed to be greater in pigs fed 1,000 (n = 8) and 2,000 (n = 8) mg Zn/kg than in pigs fed 150 (n = 7) mg Zn/kg. Relative hepatic HSP70.2 (P < 0.002) mRNA abundance was confirmed to

  7. Human cloning and embryo research: the 2003 John J. Conley Lecture on medical ethics.

    PubMed

    George, Robert P

    2004-01-01

    The author, a member of the U.S. President's Council on Bioethics, discusses ethical issues raised by human cloning, whether for purposes of bringing babies to birth or for research purposes. He first argues that every cloned human embryo is a new, distinct, and enduring organism, belonging to the species Homo sapiens, and directing its own development toward maturity. He then distinguishes between two types of capacities belonging to individual organisms belonging to this species, an immediately exerciseable capacity and a basic natural capacity that develops over time. He argues that it is the second type of capacity that is the ground for full moral respect, and that this capacity (and its concomitant degree of respect) belongs to cloned human embryos no less than to adult human beings. He then considers and rejects counter-arguments to his position, including the suggestion that the capacity of embryos is equivalent to the capacity of somatic cells, that full human rights are afforded only to human organisms with functioning brains, that the possibility of twinning diminishes the moral status of embryos, that the fact that people do not typically mourn the loss of early embryos implies that they have a diminished moral status, that the fact that early spontaneous abortions occur frequently diminishes the moral status of embryos, and that his arguments depend upon a concept of ensoulment. He concludes that if the moral status of cloned human embryos is equivalent to that of adults, then public policy should be based upon this assumption. PMID:15180093

  8. High-Level Recombinant Human Lysozyme Expressed in Milk of Transgenic Pigs Can Inhibit the Growth of Escherichia coli in the Duodenum and Influence Intestinal Morphology of Sucking Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Dan; Li, Qiuyan; Wu, Zhibin; Shang, Shengzhe; Liu, Shen; Wen, Xiao; Li, Zhiyuan; Wu, Fangfang; Li, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Lysozyme is often used as a feed additive and acts as an antimicrobial protein that enhances immune function and defends against pathogenic bacteria in pigs. In this study, we genetically added recombinant human lysozyme (rhLZ) to sow milk by somatic cell nuclear transfer and investigated whether the presence of recombinant human lysozyme can influence intestinal microbiota and mophology in sucking pigs. We generated transgenic cloned pigs and the first-generation hybrids (F1) produced high levels of rhLZ in milk. The average concentration of rhLZ was 116.34±24.46 mg/L in the milk of F1 sows, which was 1500-fold higher than that of the native pig lysozyme. In vitro, it was demonstrated that rhLZ in milk of transgenic pigs had enzyme levels at 92,272±26,413 U/mL. In a feeding experiment, a total of 40 newborn piglets were nursed by four transgenic sows and four sibling non-transgenic sows (F1), with five piglets per gilt. The piglets were allowed to nurse for 21 days and the sow milk was the only source of nutrition for the piglets. All piglets were slaughtered on postnatal day 22. Six types of bacteria were cultured and analyzed to detect the impact of rhLZ on gut microbiota. The number of Escherichia coli in the duodenum of piglets reared by transgenic sows was significantly decreased (p<0.001) and their villus height to crypt depth ratio in the intestine were increased due to the significant decrease of crypt depth in the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum (p<0.001). Together, we successfully generated rhLZ transgenic cloned pigs and elevated lysozyme level in nuring piglets. The results of the feeding experiments demonstrated that rhLZ-enhanced milk can inhibit the growth of E. coli in the duodenum and positively influence intestinal morphology without adversely affecting weight gain or piglet growth. PMID:24586544

  9. CLoNe is a new method to target single progenitors and study their progeny in mouse and chick.

    PubMed

    García-Moreno, Fernando; Vasistha, Navneet A; Begbie, Jo; Molnár, Zoltán

    2014-04-01

    Cell lineage analysis enables us to address pivotal questions relating to: the embryonic origin of cells and sibling cell relationships in the adult body; the contribution of progenitors activated after trauma or disease; and the comparison across species in evolutionary biology. To address such fundamental questions, several techniques for clonal labelling have been developed, each with its shortcomings. Here, we report a novel method, CLoNe that is designed to work in all vertebrate species and tissues. CLoNe uses a cocktail of labelling, targeting and transposition vectors that enables targeting of specific subpopulations of progenitor types with a combination of fluorophores resulting in multifluorescence that describes multiple clones per specimen. Furthermore, transposition into the genome ensures the longevity of cell labelling. We demonstrate the robustness of this technique in mouse and chick forebrain development, and show evidence that CLoNe will be broadly applicable to study clonal relationships in different tissues and species. PMID:24644261

  10. CLoNe is a new method to target single progenitors and study their progeny in mouse and chick

    PubMed Central

    García-Moreno, Fernando; Vasistha, Navneet A.; Begbie, Jo; Molnár, Zoltán

    2014-01-01

    Cell lineage analysis enables us to address pivotal questions relating to: the embryonic origin of cells and sibling cell relationships in the adult body; the contribution of progenitors activated after trauma or disease; and the comparison across species in evolutionary biology. To address such fundamental questions, several techniques for clonal labelling have been developed, each with its shortcomings. Here, we report a novel method, CLoNe that is designed to work in all vertebrate species and tissues. CLoNe uses a cocktail of labelling, targeting and transposition vectors that enables targeting of specific subpopulations of progenitor types with a combination of fluorophores resulting in multifluorescence that describes multiple clones per specimen. Furthermore, transposition into the genome ensures the longevity of cell labelling. We demonstrate the robustness of this technique in mouse and chick forebrain development, and show evidence that CLoNe will be broadly applicable to study clonal relationships in different tissues and species. PMID:24644261

  11. Therapeutic cloning and cellular reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Ramon M; Ross, Pablo J; Cibelli, Jose B

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells are capable of differentiating into any cell-type present in an adult organism, and constitute a renewable source of tissue for regenerative therapies. The transplant of allogenic stem cells is challenging due to the risk of immune rejection. Nevertheless, somatic cell reprogramming techniques allow the generation of isogenic embryonic stem cells, genetically identical to the patient. In this chapter we will discuss the cellular reprogramming techniques in the context of regenerative therapy and the biological and technical barriers that they will need to overcome before clinical use. PMID:22457116

  12. Molecular cloning and characterization of Schistosoma japonicum aldose reductase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Wang, Jipeng; Wang, Shuqi; Xu, Bin; Liu, Xiufeng; Wang, Xiaoning; Hu, Wei

    2013-02-01

    Antioxidant defense is an essential mechanism for schistosomes to cope with damage from host immune-generated reactive oxygen species. The evaluation of the effects of aldose reductase, an important enzyme that may be involved in this system, has long been neglected. In the present study, aldose reductase of Schistosoma japonicum (SjAR) was cloned and characterized. The activity of SjAR was assessed in vitro and was suppressed by the reported inhibitor, epalrestat. RT-PCR analysis revealed that SjAR was expressed at each of the development stages analyzed with increased levels in cercariae. The results also showed that SjAR was expressed at higher levels in adult male worms than in adult female worms. Indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blot analysis indicated that the purified recombinant SjAR (rSjAR) protein displayed a significant level of antigenicity. Immunolocalization analysis revealed that SjAR was mainly distributed in the gynecophoral canal of adult male worms. BALB/c mice immunized with rSjAR induced a 32.91 % worm reduction compared to the adjuvant group (P < 0.01). Moreover, a 28.27 % reduction in egg development in the liver (P > 0.05) and a 42.75 % reduction in egg development in the fecal samples (P < 0.05) were also observed. These results suggested that SjAR may be a potential new drug target or vaccine candidate for schistosomes. PMID:23160889

  13. Pig but not Human Interferon-γ Initiates Human Cell-Mediated Rejection of Pig Tissue in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, Parvez; Murray, Allan G.; McNiff, Jennifer M.; Lorber, Marc I.; Askenase, Philip W.; Bothwell, Alfred L. M.; Pober, Jordan S.

    1997-08-01

    Split-thickness pig skin was transplanted on severe combined immunodeficient mice so that pig dermal microvessels spontaneously inosculated with mouse microvessels and functioned to perfuse the grafts. Pig endothelial cells in the healed grafts constitutively expressed class I and class II major histocompatibility complex molecules. Major histocompatibility complex molecule expression could be further increased by intradermal injection of pig interferon-γ (IFN-γ ) but not human IFN-γ or tumor necrosis factor. Grafts injected with pig IFN-γ also developed a sparse infiltrate of mouse neutrophils and eosinophils without evidence of injury. Introduction of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells into the animals by intraperitoneal inoculation resulted in sparse perivascular mononuclear cell infiltrates in the grafts confined to the pig dermis. Injection of pig skin grafts on mice that received human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with pig IFN-γ (but not human IFN-γ or heat-inactivated pig IFN-γ ) induced human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and macrophages to more extensively infiltrate the pig skin grafts and injure pig dermal microvessels. These findings suggest that human T cell-mediated rejection of xenotransplanted pig organs may be prevented if cellular sources of pig interferon (e.g., passenger lymphocytes) are eliminated from the graft.

  14. Comparison between two clones of Daphnia magna: effects of multigenerational cadmium exposure on toxicity, individual fitness, and biokinetics.

    PubMed

    Guan, Rui; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2006-03-10

    We investigated the effects of genotype (two different clones) and multigenerational Cd-exposure history on Cd toxicity, individual fitness, and biokinetics in populations of a freshwater cladoceran Daphnia magna. The adults of the tolerant (T) clone had longer mean-survival-time than the sensitive (S) clone in both control groups (without Cd-exposure) and continuous Cd-exposure groups, but the two clones showed comparable resistances to acute Cd stress in the recovery groups. The body concentration of metallothionein (MT) played a critical role in handling Cd stress, which mainly accounted for the significant difference between the two clones in terms of survival distribution. High comparability of these two clones in individual fitness parameters and biokinetics suggested that these parameters are unlikely driven by genetic variation. For each specific clone, continuous Cd-exposure inhibited the animal growth, elevated the MT induction, and increased the Cd uptake rate (ingestion rate, assimilation efficiency from dietary phase, and uptake rate from dissolved phase), all of which enhanced the weight-specific Cd accumulation in daphnids' bodies. The strong dependence of biokinetic parameters on environmental factors (e.g., food concentrations, pH, dissolved or dietary metal concentration, and metal exposure histories) rather than on genotypes implied the great potential of using biokinetics in inter-lab comparisons and environmental risk assessments. PMID:16289344

  15. Cloning and characterization of new bioluminescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szent-Gyorgyi, Christopher; Ballou, Byron T.; Dagnal, Erich; Bryan, Bruce

    1999-07-01

    Over the past two years Prolume has undertaken a comprehensive program to clone luciferases and associated 'green fluorescent proteins' (GFPs) from marine animals that use coelenterazine as the luciferin. To data we have cloned several bioluminescent proteins, including two novel copepod luciferases and two anthozoan GFPs. These four proteins have sequences that differ greatly form previously cloned analogous proteins; the sequence diversity apparently is due to independent evolutionary origins and unusual evolutionary constraints. Thus coelenterazine-based bioluminescent systems may also manifest a variety of useful properties. We discuss form this taxonomic perspective the initial biochemical and spectral characterization of our cloned proteins. Emphasis is placed on the anthozoan luciferase-GFP systems, whose efficient resonance energy transfer has elicited much current interest.

  16. Optimal cloning of mixed Gaussian states

    SciTech Connect

    Guta, Madalin; Matsumoto, Keiji

    2006-09-15

    We construct the optimal one to two cloning transformation for the family of displaced thermal equilibrium states of a harmonic oscillator, with a fixed and known temperature. The transformation is Gaussian and it is optimal with respect to the figure of merit based on the joint output state and norm distance. The proof of the result is based on the equivalence between the optimal cloning problem and that of optimal amplification of Gaussian states which is then reduced to an optimization problem for diagonal states of a quantum oscillator. A key concept in finding the optimum is that of stochastic ordering which plays a similar role in the purely classical problem of Gaussian cloning. The result is then extended to the case of n to m cloning of mixed Gaussian states.

  17. Generation of phase-covariant quantum cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Karimipour, V.; Rezakhani, A.T.

    2002-11-01

    It is known that in phase-covariant quantum cloning, the equatorial states on the Bloch sphere can be cloned with a fidelity higher than the optimal bound established for universal quantum cloning. We generalize this concept to include other states on the Bloch sphere with a definite z component of spin. It is shown that once we know the z component, we can always clone a state with a fidelity higher than the universal value and that of equatorial states. We also make a detailed study of the entanglement properties of the output copies and show that the equatorial states are the only states that give rise to a separable density matrix for the outputs.

  18. High developmental potential in vitro and in vivo of cattle embryos cloned without micromanipulators

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Lleretny; Navarrete, Felipe I.; Tovar, Heribelt; Cox, José F.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose In order to simplify cloning, a new method that does not require micromanipulators was used. We aimed to evaluate the developmental potential of two bovine cell lines upon cloning. Materials and methods In vitro matured bovine oocytes, were released from zona pellucida, enucleated, fused to foetal or adult somatic donor cells. The reconstructed embryos were reprogrammed, activated and cultured until blastocyst stage. No micromanipulators were used. Blastocyst rate and quality was scored. Some expanded (d7) blastocysts were transferred to recipient cattle and collected back at d17 to assess elongation. Results High developmental potential in vitro of cloned embryos to expanded (d7) blastocysts was achieved (52.6%). In one cell line, 65.7% of blastocysts was scored. Most blastocysts (87.4%) were graded as excellent. In vivo development to elongation (day-17) in temporary recipient cows also showed a high developmental potential (11/18 transferred blastocysts elongated). Conclusions Hand-made cloning is an efficient alternative for cloning in cattle. PMID:18205035

  19. Multiple Groups of Novel Retroviral Genomes in Pigs and Related Species

    PubMed Central

    Patience, Clive; Switzer, William M.; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Griffiths, David J.; Goward, Melanie E.; Heneine, Walid; Stoye, Jonathan P.; Weiss, Robin A.

    2001-01-01

    In view of the concern over potential infection hazards in the use of porcine tissues and organs for xenotransplantation to humans, we investigated the diversity of porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) genomes in the DNA of domestic pigs and related species. In addition to the three known envelope subgroups of infectious gamma retroviruses (PERV-A, -B, and -C), classed together here as PERV group γ1, four novel groups of gamma retrovirus (γ2 to γ5) and four novel groups of beta retrovirus (β1 to β4) genomes were detected in pig DNA using generic and specific PCR primers. PCR quantification indicated that the retroviral genome copy number in the Landrace × Duroc F1 hybrid pig ranged from 2 (β2 and γ5) to approximately 50 (γ1). The γ1, γ2, and β4 genomes were transcribed into RNA in adult kidney tissue. Apart from γ1, the retroviral genomes are not known to be infectious, and sequencing of a small number of amplified genome fragments revealed stop codons in putative open reading frames in several cases. Analysis of DNA from wild boar and other species of Old World pigs (Suidae) and New World peccaries (Tayassuidae) showed that one retrovirus group, β2, was common to all species tested, while the others were present among all Old World species but absent from New World species. The PERV-C subgroup of γ1 genomes segregated among domestic pigs and were absent from two African species (red river hog and warthog). Thus domestic swine and their phylogenetic relatives harbor multiple groups of hitherto undescribed PERV genomes. PMID:11222700

  20. Artificial insemination in pigs today.

    PubMed

    Knox, R V

    2016-01-01

    Use of artificial insemination (AI) for breeding pigs has been instrumental for facilitating global improvements in fertility, genetics, labor, and herd health. The establishment of AI centers for management of boars and production of semen has allowed for selection of boars for fertility and sperm production using in vitro and in vivo measures. Today, boars can be managed for production of 20 to 40 traditional AI doses containing 2.5 to 3.0 billion motile sperm in 75 to 100 mL of extender or 40 to 60 doses with 1.5 to 2.0 billion sperm in similar or reduced volumes for use in cervical or intrauterine AI. Regardless of the sperm dose, in liquid form, extenders are designed to sustain sperm fertility for 3 to 7 days. On farm, AI is the predominant form for commercial sow breeding and relies on manual detection of estrus with sows receiving two cervical or two intrauterine inseminations of the traditional or low sperm doses on each day detected in standing estrus. New approaches for increasing rates of genetic improvement through use of AI are aimed at methods to continue to lower the number of sperm in an AI dose and reducing the number of inseminations through use of a single, fixed-time AI after ovulation induction. Both approaches allow greater selection pressure for economically important swine traits in the sires and help extend the genetic advantages through AI on to more production farms. PMID:26253434

  1. Characterization of a Pathogenic Full-Length cDNA Clone and Transmission Model for Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Strain PC22A

    PubMed Central

    Beall, Anne; Yount, Boyd; Lin, Chun-Ming; Hou, Yixuan; Wang, Qiuhong; Saif, Linda

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is a highly pathogenic alphacoronavirus. In the United States, highly virulent PEDV strains cause between 80 and 100% mortality in suckling piglets and are rapidly transmitted between animals and farms. To study the genetic factors that regulate pathogenesis and transmission, we developed a molecular clone of PEDV strain PC22A. The infectious-clone-derived PEDV (icPEDV) replicated as efficiently as the parental virus in cell culture and in pigs, resulting in lethal disease in vivo. Importantly, recombinant PEDV was rapidly transmitted to uninoculated pigs via indirect contact, demonstrating virulence and efficient transmission while replicating phenotypes seen in the wild-type virus. Using reverse genetics, we removed open reading frame 3 (ORF3) and replaced this region with a red fluorescent protein (RFP) gene to generate icPEDV-ΔORF3-RFP. icPEDV-ΔORF3-RFP replicated efficiently in vitro and in vivo, was efficiently transmitted among pigs, and produced lethal disease outcomes. However, the diarrheic scores in icPEDV-ΔORF3-RFP-infected pigs were lower than those in wild-type-virus- or icPEDV-infected pigs, and the virus formed smaller plaques than those of PC22A. Together, these data describe the development of a robust reverse-genetics platform for identifying genetic factors that regulate pathogenic outcomes and transmission efficiency in vivo, providing key infrastructural developments for developing and evaluating the efficacy of live attenuated vaccines and therapeutics in a clinical setting. PMID:26733065

  2. Economical phase-covariant cloning with multiclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Hai; Ye, Liu

    2009-09-01

    This paper presents a very simple method to derive the explicit transformations of the optimal economical 1 to M phase-covariant cloning. The fidelity of clones reaches the theoretic bound [D'Ariano G M and Macchiavello C 2003 Phys. Rev. A 67 042306]. The derived transformations cover the previous contributions [Delgado Y, Lamata L et al., 2007 Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 150502] in which M must be odd.

  3. Cloning: eight years after Dolly.

    PubMed

    Campbell, K H S; Alberio, R; Choi, I; Fisher, P; Kelly, R D W; Lee, J-H; Maalouf, W

    2005-08-01

    It is now 8 years since the birth of Dolly, the first animal produced by nuclear transfer using a donor cell population established from an adult animal. During this time, the technique of nuclear transfer has been successfully applied to a range of mammalian species for the production of offspring using a plethora of donor cell types derived from both foetal and adult tissues. In addition, when coupled with genetic manipulation of the donor cells, transgenic offspring have been produced with a range of genetic modifications including gene knockouts and gene knockings. Despite the apparent successes of the technology, the efficiency of development to live offspring has remained low and developmental abnormalities still occur. The objectives of this paper are to review some of the successes and failures of the nuclear transfer procedure since the production of Dolly. In particular, we will review the major steps in the procedure and discuss studies from our laboratory and others which have modified the procedure in ways which may impact on development. PMID:16008756

  4. Computer tracks pigs to speed gas drying

    SciTech Connect

    Ashburner, M.

    1984-04-01

    Advanced pipeline drying techniques have been used to commission a 27-mile, 30-in. undersea natural gas pipeline in Malaysia's Luconia field. After first sending a series of torpedo-shape foam and rubber cup pigs through the line to force out some 4 million gal of seawater, a new technique combines a vacuum drying process with a sophisticated computer program to keep track of the pigs, thereby enabling the job to be completed in just 4 weeks. The program simulates pipeline conditions at the pig air/water interface under constant propelling flow conditions. The computer produces a pressure profile, calculates the overall time along the pipe, and then uses the resultant time-pressure model to interpret the actual results from the flow measurement-pressure plot for the pig's progress. The program was developed primarily to forecast the effects of changes in propelling capacity in deepwater conditions to ensure that adequate pressure capacity was available to maintain pig speeds above minimum self-cleaning velocities.

  5. A review of pig pathology in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Richard Trevor; Swai, Emmanuel

    2013-08-01

    The approximately 1.58 million pigs in Tanzania represent 3.7% of the national population of quadruped meat-producing animals. Pigs are kept mainly by small producers who own 99.5% of the national stock in units that average 3.04 animals (range 2-48). Government policy has had little practical application. African swine fever, foot-and-mouth disease and Cysticercosis are important diseases. The first two are notifiable diseases under Tanzania legislation; the last has widespread distribution and relevance as a major zoonosis. Ascariasis (Ascaris suum), hydatidosis (Echinococcus granulosus), leptospirosis (Leptospira interrogans) and thermophilic Campylobacter are other zoonoses associated with pigs. Gastrointestinal helminths and external parasites, especially Sarcoptes scabiei, are common. Risk factors associated with cysticercosis for humans working with pigs or eating their meat include the free-range or semi-confined management systems, the use of rivers or ponds as a source of water, lack of household sanitation, informal home slaughter, pork not being inspected at slaughter slabs and undercooked and barbecued meat. Pigs are a minor component of Tanzania's livestock sector but there is potential for increasing their contribution to human welfare. Prospects are enhanced by the shorter life cycle, greater number of young produced per year and the possibility of producing high-quality animal protein at a lower cost than meat produced by cattle and small ruminants. PMID:23733144

  6. Epigenetic reprogramming in mammalian species after SCNT-based cloning.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Heiner

    2016-07-01

    The birth of "Dolly," the first mammal cloned from an adult mammary epithelial cell, abolished the decades-old scientific dogma implying that a terminally differentiated cell cannot be reprogrammed into a pluripotent embryonic state. The most dramatic epigenetic reprogramming occurs in SCNT when the expression profile of a differentiated cell is abolished and a new embryo-specific expression profile, involving 10,000 to 12,000 genes, and thus, most genes of the entire genome is established, which drives embryonic and fetal development. The initial release from somatic cell epigenetic constraints is followed by establishment of post-zygotic expression patterns, X-chromosome inactivation, and adjustment of telomere length. Somatic cell nuclear transfer may be associated with a variety of pathologic changes of the fetal and placental phenotype in a proportion of cloned offspring, specifically in ruminants, that are thought to be caused by aberrant epigenetic reprogramming. Improvements in our understanding of this dramatic epigenetic reprogramming event will be instrumental in realizing the great potential of SCNT for basic research and for important agricultural and biomedical applications. Here, current knowledge on epigenetic reprogramming after use of SCNT in livestock is reviewed, with emphasis on gene-specific and global DNA methylation, imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation, and telomere length restoration in early development. PMID:27160443

  7. Characterization of potato breeding clones to determine mechanisms conferring observed resistance/tolerance to zebra chip disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A haploid tuberosum x Solanum berthaultii hybrid clone and its progeny from backcrossing to cultivated potato were screened for resistance to adult potato psyllid, the insect vector of Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum (syn. Ca. L. psyllaurous) which is associated with zebra chip (ZC) disease. Po...

  8. Tritium metabolism in young pigs after exposure of the mothers to tritium oxide during pregnancy

    SciTech Connect

    Van Bruwaene, R.; Gerber, G.B.; Kirchmann, R.; van den Hoek, J.; Vankerkom, J.

    1982-07-01

    Pregnant sows were given tritiated water at two different doses (0.517 and 1.53 mCi/liter) during pregnancy and for 43 days thereafter (a total of 120 days). Some of the young pigs were left with their mother while the others were exchanged with uncontaiminated newborn to follow tritium oxide and organic tritium in different organs with respect to (a) continuing uptake, (b) uptake from milk, and (c) loss of activity after birth. Turnnover time of tritium oxide in adult sows is almost 10 days, and that in young pigs is about 8 days. In addition, components (less than or equal to 5%) of slower turnover are present. At equilibrium, the relative specific activity (i.e., the ratio of specific activity of tritium oxide isolated either directly or after combustion or organic matter to the specific activity of tritiated water ingested) is about 0.7 for body water in adult and newborn pigs and about 0.14 for organic tritium in most tissues. It is somewhat higher (0.22) in the brain of newborns than in other tissues. Turnover time for organic tritium in young pigs is longest in brain (59 days) and slower in muscular tissues (28 days), kidney, spleen, and pancreas (22 days), and liver and intestine (17 days). From the data presented it is estimated that the contribution of organic tritium to the integral tissue dose is on the order of one-third to two-thirds of that from tritium oxide alone, except in the case of brain, where the contribution to the dose from organic tritium may equal or even exceed that from tritium oxide.

  9. Antimicrobial usage in 60 Swedish farrow-to-finish pig herds.

    PubMed

    Sjölund, Marie; Backhans, Annette; Greko, Christina; Emanuelson, Ulf; Lindberg, Ann

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify antimicrobial consumption in Swedish farrow-to-finish pig herds. Sixty herds with 100 sows or more producing more than 500 fatteners per year participated in a study where data on antimicrobial consumption over a period of one year were collected. Data on antimicrobial use were collected by substance, administration route and per age category. Antimicrobial use was measured as defined daily doses and expressed as treatment incidence (TI) per 1000 pig-days at risk. The TIs for growing pigs varied between herds, from 1.6 to 116.0 with a median of 14.3. The highest TI was recorded for suckling piglets with a median of 54.7 (range; 1.6-367.9), while the median TIs for weaners, fatteners and adults were 6.2, 2.8 and 8.4, respectively (range; 0.0-260.5; 0.0-64.9; 0.0-45.0, respectively). The within herd TIs for the different age categories were not correlated. Individual treatment, mainly consisting of injectables, was the most common form of application except for weaners for which a majority (54.8%) of the treatments were group treatments. Benzylpenicillin was the most commonly applied substance except for weaners for which oral formulations of tylosin were most common. For fatteners, group treatments constituted 8.4% of the total TI. Group treatments with oral colistin were applied to suckling piglets in five herds. Group treatments were not applied to adult pigs. The TI for weaners was significantly lower for specific pathogen-free herds. The results show that the overall antimicrobial use in Swedish farrow-to-finish pig herds varied to a great extent, and the between-herd variation indicates that there is room for improvement of pig health. Targeting suckling piglets may be most beneficial, but further studies are required to identify specific focus areas which may reduce the need for antimicrobials in this particular age group. PMID:26211838

  10. Differential effects of leucine on translation initiation factor activation and protein synthesis in skeletal muscle, renal and adipose tissues of neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In adult rats, protein synthesis in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue increases in response to pharmacological doses of leucine (Leu) administered orally. In neonatal pigs, a physiological increase in plasma leucine stimulates protein synthesis in skeletal muscle without increasing hepatic protein...

  11. Split marketing: A risk factor for Salmonella in market pigs?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine if split marketing affects Salmonella prevalence in market pigs, by comparing the Salmonella prevalence in the first group of pigs selected for slaughter (i.e., “First pull”) versus the last group of pigs selected for slaughter (i.e., “Close out”) from typical co...

  12. Absence of Chlamydia-like organisms in pigs.

    PubMed

    Van Gils, M; Aeby, S; Vanrompay, D; Greub, G

    2015-09-01

    Porcine reproductive failure, especially abortion, causes significant economic loss in the pig industry. Waddlia chondrophila and Parachlamydia acanthamoebae are potential abortigenic agents for pigs. Therefore, we investigated the presence of these two Chlamydia-like organisms in abortion-related samples originating from Belgian pig farms. All investigated samples remained negative. PMID:26137311

  13. Absence of Chlamydia-like organisms in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Van Gils, M.; Aeby, S.; Vanrompay, D.; Greub, G.

    2015-01-01

    Porcine reproductive failure, especially abortion, causes significant economic loss in the pig industry. Waddlia chondrophila and Parachlamydia acanthamoebae are potential abortigenic agents for pigs. Therefore, we investigated the presence of these two Chlamydia-like organisms in abortion-related samples originating from Belgian pig farms. All investigated samples remained negative. PMID:26137311

  14. Salmonella infection and immune response in finishing pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Finishing pigs infected with Salmonella pose significant food safety risks by carrying the pathogen into abattoirs. A study was conducted to determine the dynamic of Salmonella infection in finishing pigs, and the immunological alterations that occur in Salmonella-carrier pigs, by longitudinally com...

  15. Experimental Salmonella Enterica Infection in Market-weight Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Market pigs infected with Salmonella pose a significant food safety risk by carrying the pathogen into abattoirs. A study was conducted to determine the dynamic of Salmonella infection in market-weight pigs (220-240 lbs.). Pigs (n=24) were individually inoculated (intranasally; 108 cfu/mL) with Salm...

  16. First report of Enterocytozoon bieneusi in pigs in Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although Brazil is the world’s fourth largest producer and exporter of pork, there is no information on E. bieneusi in pigs. This study was undertaken to determine the presence of E. bieneusi in pigs in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Fecal samples were collected from 91 pigs (1- to 12-mo-old) ...

  17. Endotoxin induced uncoupling of the somatotrophic axis in nursery pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an endotoxin known to stimulate the innate immune response and stress axis in pigs. However, little is known about the effects of LPS on pig somatotrophic responses. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of an endotoxin challenge on weaned pig serum con...

  18. 9 CFR 113.38 - Guinea pig safety test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... be injected either intramuscularly or subcutaneously into each of two guinea pigs and the animals... pigs during the observation period, the serial or subserial is unsatisfactory. If unfavorable reactions... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Guinea pig safety test. 113.38...

  19. 9 CFR 113.38 - Guinea pig safety test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... be injected either intramuscularly or subcutaneously into each of two guinea pigs and the animals... pigs during the observation period, the serial or subserial is unsatisfactory. If unfavorable reactions... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Guinea pig safety test. 113.38...

  20. Adult Compacts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    This bulletin focuses on adult compacts, three-way agreements among employers, potential employees, and trainers to provide the right kind of quality training to meet the employers' requirements. Part 1 is an executive summary of a report of the Adult Compacts Project, which studied three adult compacts in Birmingham and Loughborough, England, and…

  1. Computed tomography analysis of guinea pig bone: architecture, bone thickness and dimensions throughout development

    PubMed Central

    Witkowska, Agata; Alibhai, Aziza; Hughes, Chloe; Price, Jennifer; Klisch, Karl; Sturrock, Craig J.

    2014-01-01

    The domestic guinea pig, Cavia aperea f. porcellus, belongs to the Caviidae family of rodents. It is an important species as a pet, a source of food and in medical research. Adult weight is achieved at 8–12 months and life expectancy is ∼5–6 years. Our aim was to map bone local thickness, structure and dimensions across developmental stages in the normal animal. Guinea pigs (n = 23) that had died of natural causes were collected and the bones manually extracted and cleaned. Institutional ethical permission was given under the UK Home Office guidelines and the Veterinary Surgeons Act. X-ray Micro Computed Tomography (microCT) was undertaken on the left and right scapula, humerus and femur from each animal to ascertain bone local thickness. Images were also used to undertake manual and automated bone measurements, volumes and surface areas, identify and describe nutrient, supratrochlear and supracondylar foramina. Statistical analysis between groups was carried out using ANOVA with post-hoc testing. Our data mapped a number of dimensions, and mean and maximum bone thickness of the scapula, humerus and femur in guinea pigs aged 0–1 month, 1–3 months, 3–6 months, 6 months–1 year and 1–4 years. Bone dimensions, growth rates and local bone thicknesses differed between ages and between the scapula, humerus and femur. The microCT and imaging software technology showed very distinct differences between the relative local bone thickness across the structure of the bones. Only one bone showed a singular nutrient foramen, every other bone had between 2 and 5, and every nutrient canal ran in an oblique direction. In contrast to other species, a supratrochlear foramen was observed in every humerus whereas the supracondylar foramen was always absent. Our data showed the bone local thickness, bone structure and measurements of guinea pig bones from birth to 4 years old. Importantly it showed that bone development continued after 1 year, the point at which most

  2. Cloning: Past, Present, and the Exciting Future. Breakthroughs in Bioscience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Berardino, Marie A.

    This document explores the history of cloning by focusing on Dolly the Sheep, one of the first large animal clonings. The disadvantages and advantages of transgenic clones are discussed as well as the future implications of cloning from the perspective of human health. (Contains 10 resources.) (YDS)

  3. Evolution of an Eurasian avian-like influenza virus in naïve and vaccinated pigs.

    PubMed

    Murcia, Pablo R; Hughes, Joseph; Battista, Patrizia; Lloyd, Lucy; Baillie, Gregory J; Ramirez-Gonzalez, Ricardo H; Ormond, Doug; Oliver, Karen; Elton, Debra; Mumford, Jennifer A; Caccamo, Mario; Kellam, Paul; Grenfell, Bryan T; Holmes, Edward C; Wood, James L N

    2012-01-01

    Influenza viruses are characterized by an ability to cross species boundaries and evade host immunity, sometimes with devastating consequences. The 2009 pandemic of H1N1 influenza A virus highlights the importance of pigs in influenza emergence, particularly as intermediate hosts by which avian viruses adapt to mammals before emerging in humans. Although segment reassortment has commonly been associated with influenza emergence, an expanded host-range is also likely to be associated with the accumulation of specific beneficial point mutations. To better understand the mechanisms that shape the genetic diversity of avian-like viruses in pigs, we studied the evolutionary dynamics of an Eurasian Avian-like swine influenza virus (EA-SIV) in naïve and vaccinated pigs linked by natural transmission. We analyzed multiple clones of the hemagglutinin 1 (HA1) gene derived from consecutive daily viral populations. Strikingly, we observed both transient and fixed changes in the consensus sequence along the transmission chain. Hence, the mutational spectrum of intra-host EA-SIV populations is highly dynamic and allele fixation can occur with extreme rapidity. In addition, mutations that could potentially alter host-range and antigenicity were transmitted between animals and mixed infections were commonplace, even in vaccinated pigs. Finally, we repeatedly detected distinct stop codons in virus samples from co-housed pigs, suggesting that they persisted within hosts and were transmitted among them. This implies that mutations that reduce viral fitness in one host, but which could lead to fitness benefits in a novel host, can circulate at low frequencies. PMID:22693449

  4. Molecular cloning, tissue distribution, and functional analysis of porcine Akirin2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoling; Huang, Zhiqing; Jia, Gang; Wu, Xiuqun; Wu, Caimei

    2012-04-01

    Akirin2 is a recently discovered gene that is involved in innate immune response. In this study, the porcine Akirin2 gene was cloned. The full-length coding sequence (CDS) of porcine Akirin2 consists of 612 bp and encodes 203 amino acids with a molecular mass of 22493 kD. The homology tree analysis showed that the pig Akirin2 has closer genetic relationships and distance with the known mammalian Akirin2. Real time quantitative PCR analysis showed that the porcine Akirin2 transcript was most abundant in the lung, followed by the skeletal muscle, heart, liver, fat, thymus, lymph node, small intestine, kidney, and spleen. Overexpression of porcine Akirin2 increased expression of IL-6 in porcine jejunal epithelial cell line IPEC-J2 cells. Our data suggest that porcine Akirin2 could play an important role in intestinal immune regulation. PMID:22537061

  5. Soluble pig for radioactive waste transfer lines

    SciTech Connect

    Ohl, P.C., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-02

    Flushing transfer pipe after radioactive waste transfers generates thousands of gallons of additional radioactive waste each year at the Hanford site. The use of pneumatic pigging with waste soluble pigs as a means to clear transfer piping may be an effective alternative to raw water flushes. A feasibility study was performed by a group of senior mechanical engineering students for their senior design project as part of their curriculum at Washington State University. The students divided the feasibility study into three sub-projects involving: (1) materials research, (2) delivery system design, and (3) mockup fabrication and testing. The students screened through twenty-three candidate materials and selected a thermoplastic polymer combined 50:50 wt% with sucrose to meet the established material performance criteria. The students also prepared a conceptual design of a remote pneumatic delivery system and constructed a mockup section of transfer pipe for testing the prototype pigs.

  6. Growth and skeletal development of the pig.

    PubMed

    Reiland, S

    1978-01-01

    Growth and skeletal development of the domestic pig (Swedish landrace and Yorkshire) are reported and the weight curve of males from birth to maturity included. Other parameters were tooth development and growth of certain bones. It was concluded that daily weight gain increases rapidly to an age of about 5 months. Sexual maturity is reached by both the male and female pig at about 5--6 months of age. At this time there is an inflection point on the weight curve. The period from 5--6 months to about 18 months of age is called adolescence. After 18 months of age the weight curve is flattened. The data from the domestic pigs were compared with the corresponding data of the wild European hog. It was found that the wild hog has a much slower weight gain. PMID:233594

  7. Discerning Pig Screams in Production Environments

    PubMed Central

    Vandermeulen, J.; Bahr, C.; Tullo, E.; Fontana, I.; Ott, S.; Kashiha, M.; Guarino, M.; Moons, C. P. H.; Tuyttens, F. A. M.; Niewold, T. A.; Berckmans, D.

    2015-01-01

    Pig vocalisations convey information about their current state of health and welfare. Continuously monitoring these vocalisations can provide useful information for the farmer. For instance, pig screams can indicate stressful situations. When monitoring screams, other sounds can interfere with scream detection. Therefore, identifying screams from other sounds is essential. The objective of this study was to understand which sound features define a scream. Therefore, a method to detect screams based on sound features with physical meaning and explicit rules was developed. To achieve this, 7 hours of labelled data from 24 pigs was used. The developed detection method attained 72% sensitivity, 91% specificity and 83% precision. As a result, the detection method showed that screams contain the following features discerning them from other sounds: a formant structure, adequate power, high frequency content, sufficient variability and duration. PMID:25923725

  8. Trichinella pseudospiralis in pig from Croatia.

    PubMed

    Beck, Relja; Beck, Ana; Lucinger, Snjezana; Florijancić, Tihomir; Bosković, Ivica; Marinculić, Albert

    2009-02-23

    Trichinella spiralis and Trichinella britovi are species that are frequently found in domestic pigs and various sylvatic animals in Croatia. During routine trichinoscopy, non-encapsulated larvae were detected in the muscle tissue of a domestic pig. Artificial digestion revealed a larvae burden of 602 muscle larvae per gram of tissue. Tissue section analysis confirmed the presence of non-encapsulated larvae. Multiplex PCR identified the larvae as T. pseudospiralis. This observation is consistent with the reports of a local veterinary inspector who described the presence of non-encapsulated Trichinella in four individual cases over the last 2 years. This is the first report of T. pseudospiralis in Croatia and one of very few cases of T. pseudospiralis infection described in domestic pigs. The detection of non-encapsulated larvae stresses the need for implementation of artificial digestion instead of trichinoscopy for the detection and identification of Trichinella infections. PMID:19054619

  9. Smart pigs assess reliability of corroded pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.G.; Dawson, S.J.; Brown, M.

    1995-03-01

    Pipeline operating companies are relying more and more on high-resolution, magnetic pigs to inspect onshore and offshore pipelines for corrosion. Data derived from these corrosion surveys can be used to develop a safe future operating strategy. British Gas has successfully developed and applied a realistic deterministic analysis for corroded pipelines. It involves identification and calculation of failure pressure and time to failure of corroded pipe spools with the highest risk of failure. High-resolution, intelligent pigs (smart pigs) can accurately detect, size, and locate corrosion in pipelines. Once corrosion is detected, the operator needs to known if the corrosion will affect the integrity of the pipeline and when it could fail from further corrosion growth. This information can be used to develop a pipeline de-rating schedule, implement a repair or replacement program, determine if re-inspection is necessary, and evaluate effectiveness of a corrosion inhibitor program. Such methods are described.

  10. Cloning the entanglement of a pair of quantum bits

    SciTech Connect

    Lamoureux, Louis-Philippe; Navez, Patrick; Cerf, Nicolas J.; Fiurasek, Jaromir

    2004-04-01

    It is shown that any quantum operation that perfectly clones the entanglement of all maximally entangled qubit pairs cannot preserve separability. This 'entanglement no-cloning' principle naturally suggests that some approximate cloning of entanglement is nevertheless allowed by quantum mechanics. We investigate a separability-preserving optimal cloning machine that duplicates all maximally entangled states of two qubits, resulting in 0.285 bits of entanglement per clone, while a local cloning machine only yields 0.060 bits of entanglement per clone.

  11. Lipopolysaccharides of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae bind pig hemoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Bélanger, M; Bégin, C; Jacques, M

    1995-01-01

    A previous study indicated that lipopolysaccharides (LPS) extracted from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae bind two low-molecular-mass proteins, of approximately 10 and 11 kDa, present in porcine respiratory tract secretions (M. Bélanger, D. Dubreuil, and M. Jacques, Infect. Immun. 62:868-873, 1994). In the present study, we determined the N-terminal amino acid sequences of these two proteins, which revealed high homology with the alpha and beta chains of pig hemoglobin. Some isolates of A. pleuropneumoniae were able to use hemoglobin from various animal species as well as other heme compounds as sole sources of iron for growth, while other isolates were unable to use them. Immunoelectron microscopy showed binding of pig hemoglobin at the surface of all A. pleuropneumoniae isolates as well as labeling of outer membrane blebs. We observed, using Western blotting (immunoblotting), that the lipid A-core region of LPS of all isolates was binding pig hemoglobin. Furthermore, lipid A obtained after acid hydrolysis of LPS extracted from A. pleuropneumoniae was able to bind pig hemoglobin and this binding was completely abolished by preincubation of lipid A with polymyxin B but was not inhibited by preincubation with glucosamines. Fatty acids constituting the lipid A of A. pleuropneumoniae, namely, dodecanoic acid, tetradecanoic acid, 3-hydroxytetradecanoic acid, hexadecanoic acid, and octadecanoic acid, were also binding pig hemoglobin. Our results indicate that LPS of all A. pleuropneumoniae isolates tested bind pig hemoglobin and that lipid A is involved in this binding. Our results also indicate that some A. pleuropneumoniae isolates are, in addition, able to use hemoglobin for growth. Binding of hemoglobin to LPS might represent an important means by which A. pleuropneumoniae acquires iron in vivo from hemoglobin released from erythrocytes lysed by the action of its hemolysins. PMID:7822035

  12. Farming practices and genetic characterization of Nicobari pig, an indigenous pig germplasm of Nicobar group of islands, India.

    PubMed

    De, Arun Kumar; Jeyakumar, S; Kundu, Madhu Sudan; Kundu, Anandamoy; Sunder, Jai; Ramachandran, M

    2014-04-01

    The Nicobari pig, locally known as Ha-un, is an indigenous pig germplasm located only in the Nicobar group of islands, India. The present study documents the Nicobari pig-rearing practices of the tribal farmers and genetically characterizes them using 23 FAO-recommended microsatellite markers. The study was conducted over a period of 3 years (2010-2012) in Car Nicobar, India. A total of 225 farmers were surveyed (15 farmers per village of 15 villages). Information on herd statistics, husbandry practices, and constraints faced by the farmers in pig production were collected. The pigs were reared in a free-range system. Mean pig herd size per house hold was 8.9, and main feed for pigs was coconut and some indigenous feed materials such as pandanus, bread fruit, and Nicobari alu. The main constraints faced by the farmers were lack of feed after the tsunami, different disease conditions, piglet mortality, and predator attack. The Nicobari pigs were genotyped by 23 FAO-recommended microsatellite markers. The mean observed number of alleles for all 23 loci in Nicobari pigs was 6.96 ± 0.31. The mean observed and expected heterozygosities were 0.66 ± 0.02 and 0.75 ± 0.01, respectively. It was found that the genetic diversity of this pig breed was very high compared to Large White Yorkshire and other European pig breeds. This genetic characterization of the pig breed will be helpful in their conservation effort. PMID:24595559

  13. Tests of cryogenic pigs for use in liquefied gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Hipple, D.L.; O'Neal, W.C.

    1982-09-09

    Pipeline pigs are a key element in the design of a proposed spill test facility whose purpose is to evaluate the hazards of large spills of liquefied gaseous fuels (LGFs). A long pipe will run from the LGF storage tanks to the spill point; to produce a rapid spill, the pipe will be filled with LGF and a pig will be pneumatically driven through the pipe to force out the LGF quickly and cleanly. Several pig designs were tested in a 6-inch-diameter, 420-foot-long pipe to evaluate their performance at liquid-nitrogen temperature and compare it with their performance at ambient temperature. For each test, the pig was placed in one end of the pipe and either water or liquid nitrogen was put into the pipe in front of the pig. Then pressurized drive gas, either nitrogen or helium, was admitted to the pipe behind the pig to push the pig and the fluid ahead of it out the exit nozzle. For some tests, the drive gas supply was shut off when the pig was part way through the pipe as a method of velocity control; in these cases, the pressurized gas trapped behind the pig continued to expand until it pushed the pig the remaining distance out of the pipe. The tests provided information on how the effectiveness and velocity of the pig and the flow rate of the expelled fluid changed with pressure and shutoff time of the drive gas and with temperature. The pig designs that left the least liquid during the water tests were a polyurethane foam pig and a cylindrical metal pig with flexible metal wipers. In the liquid nitrogen tests, the metal pig with wipers performed best. It removed all the liquid nitrogen and survived most of the tests well.

  14. Cardiac ganglioneuroma in a juvenile pig.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Ryoko; Joma, Ikumi; Otsubo, Koji; Matsutake, Hiroshi; Yanai, Tokuma; Sakai, Hiroki

    2016-02-01

    A cardiac mass (3 × 5 × 3 cm) was detected at the base between the right auricular wall and right vena cava of a slaughtered 6-month-old female mixed-breed pig during a meat inspection. The tumor comprised infiltrative prominent interweaving fascicles of Schwann cells with Verocay bodies. Moreover, the ganglion cells were scattered or aggregated throughout the neoplastic tissue. The ganglion and Schwann cells had neither cellular atypism nor mitosis. On the basis of the bearing site as well as the morphological and immunohistochemical features, this is the first case of a cardiac ganglioneuroma in a pig. PMID:26256406

  15. Cardiac ganglioneuroma in a juvenile pig

    PubMed Central

    INOUE, Ryoko; JOMA, Ikumi; OTSUBO, Koji; MATSUTAKE, Hiroshi; YANAI, Tokuma; SAKAI, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    A cardiac mass (3 × 5 × 3 cm) was detected at the base between the right auricular wall and right vena cava of a slaughtered 6-month-old female mixed-breed pig during a meat inspection. The tumor comprised infiltrative prominent interweaving fascicles of Schwann cells with Verocay bodies. Moreover, the ganglion cells were scattered or aggregated throughout the neoplastic tissue. The ganglion and Schwann cells had neither cellular atypism nor mitosis. On the basis of the bearing site as well as the morphological and immunohistochemical features, this is the first case of a cardiac ganglioneuroma in a pig. PMID:26256406

  16. Pigs from iron containing dusts and sludges

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, C.M.

    1995-12-31

    DK Recycling und Roheisen GmbH converts 380,000 annual tonnes of iron containing waste materials into pig iron. Zinc is the main reason that these materials are classified as waste. The materials are processed in the conventional way by making sinter which is then smelted in a blast furnace to foundry grade pig iron. The trick lies not in the unit operations which are quite standard but rather in the modifications made to the plant and operating procedures to cope with the much higher levels of tramp elements.

  17. Handmade Cloned Transgenic Sheep Rich in Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Hongwei; Chen, Lei; Chen, Longxin; Lin, Lin; Tan, Pingping; Vajta, Gabor; Gao, Jianfeng; Du, Yutao; Ma, Runlin Z.

    2013-01-01

    Technology of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been adapted worldwide to generate transgenic animals, although the traditional procedure relies largely on instrumental micromanipulation. In this study, we used the modified handmade cloning (HMC) established in cattle and pig to produce transgenic sheep with elevated levels of omega-3 (n−3) fatty acids. Codon-optimized nematode mfat-1 was inserted into a eukaryotic expression vector and was transferred into the genome of primary ovine fibroblast cells from a male Chinese merino sheep. Reverse transcriptase PCR, gas chromatography, and chromosome analyses were performed to select nuclear donor cells capable of converting omega-6 (n−6) into n−3 fatty acids. Blastocysts developed after 7 days of in vitro culture were surgically transplanted into the uterus of female ovine recipients of a local sheep breed in Xinjiang. For the HMC, approximately 8.9% (n  = 925) of reconstructed embryos developed to the blastocyst stage. Four recipients became pregnant after 53 blastocysts were transplanted into 29 naturally cycling females, and a total of 3 live transgenic lambs were produced. Detailed analyses on one of the transgenic lambs revealed a single integration of the modified nematode mfat-1 gene at sheep chromosome 5. The transgenic sheep expressed functional n−3 fatty acid desaturase, accompanied by more than 2-folds reduction of n−6/n−3 ratio in the muscle (p<0.01) and other major organs/tissues (p<0.05). To our knowledge, this is the first report of transgenic sheep produced by the HMC. Compared to the traditional SCNT method, HMC showed an equivalent efficiency but proved cheaper and easier in operation. PMID:23437077

  18. Molecular cloning, chromosomal location, and expression analysis of porcine CD14.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Gema; Pérez, Eva; Jiménez-Marín, Angeles; Mompart, Florence; Morera, Luis; Barbancho, Manuel; Llanes, Diego; Garrido, Juan J

    2007-01-01

    CD14 is a membrane-associated glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein that binds lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Gram-negative bacteria and enables LPS-dependent responses in a variety of cells. In this study a cDNA containing the porcine CD14 coding sequence has been cloned and its complete sequence determined. The amino acid sequence deduced from pig CD14 cDNA encodes a 373 amino acid polypeptide that exhibits 75%, 72%, 69%, 66%, 57% and 56% similarity to CD14 from cow, horse, human, rabbit, mouse and rat, respectively. Structural analysis showed that the porcine CD14 is a membrane glycoprotein with a GPI-anchor site and an extracellular domain containing 11 leucine-rich repeats. In addition, the LPS-binding regions identified in the human CD14 are highly conserved in the N-terminal domain of the porcine sequence. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to locate the CD14 gene on the pig chromosome 2, band q28. Expression analysis revealed that porcine CD14 transcripts were detected in all tissues and cells examined, suggesting that the expression of porcine CD14 gene is not restricted to myeloid cell lineage. Finally, we report that LPS stimulation significantly up-regulated CD14 gene expression in porcine alveolar macrophages. PMID:17169425

  19. Dynamics of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Transmission among Pigs in Northwest Bangladesh and the Potential Impact of Pig Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Salah Uddin; Salje, Henrik; Hannan, A.; Islam, Md. Atiqul; Bhuyan, A. A. Mamun; Islam, Md. Ariful; Rahman, M. Ziaur; Nahar, Nazmun; Hossain, M. Jahangir; Luby, Stephen P.; Gurley, Emily S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus infection can cause severe disease in humans, resulting in death or permanent neurologic deficits among survivors. Studies indicate that the incidence of JE is high in northwestern Bangladesh. Pigs are amplifying hosts for JE virus (JEV) and a potentially important source of virus in the environment. The objectives of this study were to describe the transmission dynamics of JEV among pigs in northwestern Bangladesh and estimate the potential impact of vaccination to reduce incidence among pigs. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a comprehensive census of pigs in three JE endemic districts and tested a sample of them for evidence of previous JEV infection. We built a compartmental model to describe JEV transmission dynamics in this region and to estimate the potential impact of pig vaccination. We identified 11,364 pigs in the study area. Previous JEV infection was identified in 30% of pigs with no spatial differences in the proportion of pigs that were seropositive across the study area. We estimated that JEV infects 20% of susceptible pigs each year and the basic reproductive number among pigs was 1.2. The model suggest that vaccinating 50% of pigs each year resulted in an estimated 82% reduction in annual incidence in pigs. Conclusions/Significance The widespread distribution of historic JEV infection in pigs suggests they may play an important role in virus transmission in this area. Future studies are required to understand the contribution of pig infections to JE risk in humans and the potential impact of pig vaccination on human disease. PMID:25255286

  20. Comparison of tetrodotoxin uptake and gene expression in the liver between juvenile and adult tiger pufferfish, Takifugu rubripes.

    PubMed

    Kiriake, Aya; Ohta, Akira; Suga, Emi; Matsumoto, Takuya; Ishizaki, Shoichiro; Nagashima, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    Marine pufferfish of the family Tetraodontidae accumulate high levels of tetrodotoxin (TTX). The profile of TTX accumulation is reported to differ between tiger pufferfish Takifugu rubripes juveniles and adults administered TTX. Adults mainly accumulate TTX in liver, while juveniles transfer TTX from the liver to the skin. In the present study, we investigated TTX uptake into liver tissue slices of T. rubripes juveniles (4-month-old) and adults (18-month-old) in an in vitro incubation experiment, and compared their differential gene expression profiles in the liver by suppression subtracted hybridization (SSH). The tissue culture experiment revealed that TTX uptake in the liver itself was indistinguishable between the juveniles and the adults. In SSH analysis, a total of 176 clones were upregulated in the juvenile liver, the majority of which comprised hemoglobin subunit alpha-2-like gene (53 clones), hemoglobin subunit beta-like gene (40 clones), and type-4 ice-structuring protein LS-12-like gene (20 clones). A total of 211 clones were upregulated in the adult liver, including serotransferrin-like gene (84 clones), fibrinogen beta chain-like gene (15 clones), and 14 kDa apolipoprotein gene (10 clones). Based on these and previous findings on genes related to TTX intoxication in pufferfish, serotransferrin-like gene, complement C3-like gene, water-temperature-acclimation-related-65 kDa-protein-like gene, and chymotrypsin elastase family member 2A-like gene appear to be involved in TTX toxification of the T. rubripes liver. PMID:26708657

  1. Feasibility tests of pipeline pigs for cryogenic pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Hipple, D.L.

    1983-07-01

    The cryogenic pig experiment reported here was designed to test the concept of using a pneumatically driven pipeline pig to force cryogenic fluid through a long, large-diameter pipe, which is one of the key features of the proposed large-scale Spill Safety Test Facility. The Spill Safety Test Facility will spill materials such as liquefied natural gas (LNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), ammonia, and other liquefied gases under controlled conditions so that atmospheric dispersion of these materials can be better understood. Three pig design concepts were tested: (1) commercially available, bullet-shaped polyurethane foam pigs, (2) close-fitting spherical metal pigs with sufficient clearance to pass through the pipe at cryogenic temperatures. Three different sizes were tested to determine the effect of a loose fit, and (3) cylindrical metal pigs with flexible wipers at each end which would maintain a seal during transit through the pipe. The most effective pigs in removing liquid from the pipe were the polyurethane foam pig and the cylindrical wiper pig. For the LN/sub 2/ tests these two pigs left no liquid in the pipe, and for the water tests they left 1% of pipe volume. The large sphere was the next best pig, leaving 2 to 3% of pipe volume during the LN/sub 2/ tests and about 3% of pipe volume during the water tests.

  2. Screening pigs for xenotransplantation: expression of porcine endogenous retroviruses in transgenic pig skin.

    PubMed

    Kimsa-Dudek, Magdalena; Strzalka-Mrozik, Barbara; Kimsa, Malgorzata W; Blecharz, Irena; Gola, Joanna; Skowronek, Bartlomiej; Janiszewski, Adrian; Lipinski, Daniel; Zeyland, Joanna; Szalata, Marlena; Slomski, Ryszard; Mazurek, Urszula

    2015-06-01

    Pigs seem to be the answer to worldwide organ donor shortage. Porcine skin may also be applied as a dressing for severe burns. Genetic modifications of donor animals enable reduction of immune response, which prolongs xenograft survival as temporary biological dressing and allows achieving resistance against xenograft rejection. The risk posed by porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) cannot be eliminated by breeding animals under specific-pathogen-free conditions and so all recipients of porcine graft will be exposed to PERVs. Therefore our study has been focused on the assessment of PERV DNA and mRNA level in skin samples of transgenic pigs generated for xenotransplantation. Porcine skin fragments were obtained from 3- to 6-month-old non-transgenic and transgenic Polish Landrace pigs. Transgenic pigs were produced by pronuclear DNA microinjection and were developed to express the human α-galactosidase and the human α-1,2-fucosyltransferase gene. The copy numbers of PERV DNA and RNA were evaluated using real-time Q-PCR and QRT-PCR. Comparative analysis of all PERV subtypes revealed that PERV-A is the main subtype of PERVs in analyzed skin samples. There was no significantly different copy number of PERV-A, PERV-B and PERV-C between non-transgenic pigs, pigs with the human α-galactosidase and pigs expressing the human α-1,2-fucosyltransferase gene, except of PERV-C DNA. It brings the conclusion, that transgenesis process exerts no influence on PERVs transinfection. That is another step forward in the development of pig skin xenografts as burn wounds dressing. PMID:25812516

  3. A QTL resource and comparison tool for pigs: PigQTLDB.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhi-Liang; Dracheva, Svetlana; Jang, Wonhee; Maglott, Donna; Bastiaansen, John; Rothschild, Max F; Reecy, James M

    2005-10-01

    During the past decade, efforts to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) in pigs have resulted in hundreds of QTL being reported for growth, meat quality, reproduction, disease resistance, and other traits. It is a challenge to locate, interpret, and compare QTL results from different studies. We have developed a pig QTL database (PigQTLdb) that integrates available pig QTL data in the public domain, thus, facilitating the use of this QTL data in future studies. We also developed a pig trait classification system to standardize names of traits and to simplify organization and searching of the trait data. These steps made it possible to compare primary data from diverse sources and methods. We used existing pig map databases and other publicly available data resources (such as PubMed) to avoid redundant developmental work. The PigQTLdb was also designed to include data representing major genes and markers associated with a large effect on economically important traits. To date, over 790 QTL from 73 publications have been curated into the database. Those QTL cover more than 300 different traits. The data have been submitted to the Entrez Gene and the Map Viewer resources at NCBI, where the information about markers was matched to marker records in NCBI's UniSTS database. Having these data in a public resource like NCBI allows regularly updated automatic matching of markers to public sequence data by e-PCR. The submitted data, and the results of these calculations, are retrievable from NCBI via Entrez Gene, Map Viewer, and UniSTS. Efforts were undertaken to improve the integrated functional genomics resources for pigs. PMID:16261421

  4. Organohalogens and their hydroxylated metabolites in the blood of pigs from an open waste dumping site in south India: association with hepatic cytochrome P450.

    PubMed

    Mizukawa, Hazuki; Nomiyama, Kei; Kunisue, Tatsuya; Watanabe, Michio X; Subramanian, Annamalai; Iwata, Hisato; Ishizuka, Mayumi; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2015-04-01

    The concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and their hydroxylated metabolites (OH-PCBs and OH-PBDEs) were measured in the blood of Eurasian wild pigs (Sus scrofa) from a municipal waste open dumping site (DS) and a reference site (RS) in South India. We showed that contamination with OH-PCBs was higher in female pigs from the DS than in all other adult pigs. The highest OH-PCB concentrations were found in piglets from the DS. Moreover, the hepatic expression levels of CYP1A and CYP2B were higher in piglets than in their dam, implying metabolism of PCBs by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes. The OH-PCB congener profiles differed according to sex and collection sites, possibly because of variations in the expression levels of phase I and phase II enzymes among individual pigs, differences in the exposure sources, and maternal transfer of parent PCBs. The hepatic CYP1A expression levels were positively correlated with the blood concentrations of 4OH-CB107, 4OH-CB162, and 4OH-CB187, implying CYP1A-dependent formation of these OH-PCBs in the pig liver. We found no significant correlations between the blood concentrations of OH-PCBs and thyroid hormones (THs); however, the thyroxin (T4) levels were lower in pigs from the DS than in pigs from the RS. Our limited dataset suggest that induced CYP enzymes accelerate the metabolism of xenobiotics and endogenous molecules in pigs. Thus, besides parental compounds, the risk of hydroxylated metabolites entering wildlife and humans living in and around municipal open waste dumping sites should be considered. PMID:25743931

  5. PIG-TO-MONKEY ISLET XENOTRANSPLANTATION USING MULTI-TRANSGENIC PIGS

    PubMed Central

    Bottino, R.; Wijkstrom, M.; van der Windt, D.J.; Hara, H.; Ezzelarab, M.; Murase, N.; Bertera, S.; He, J.; Phelps, C.; Ayares, D.; Cooper, D.K.C.; Trucco, M.

    2014-01-01

    The generation of pigs with genetic modifications has significantly advanced the field of xenotransplantation. New genetically-engineered pigs were produced on an α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene-knockout background with ubiquitous expression of human CD46 (GTKO/CD46 pigs), with islet beta cell-specific expression of human tissue factor pathway inhibitor (hTFPI) and/or human CD39 and/or porcine CTLA4-lg. Isolated islets from pigs with 3, 4, or 5 genetic modifications were transplanted intraportally into streptozotocin-diabetic, immunosuppressed cynomolgus monkeys (n=5). Immunosuppression was based on anti-CD154mAb costimulation blockade. Monitoring included features of early islet destruction, glycemia, exogenous insulin requirement, and histopathology of the islets at necropsy. Using these modified pig islets, there was evidence of reduced islet destruction in the first hours after transplantation, compared with two series of historical controls that received identical therapy but were transplanted with islets from pigs with either no or only one genetic modification. Despite encouraging effects on early islet loss, these multi-transgenic islet grafts did not demonstrate consistency in regard to long-term success, with only 2 of 5 demonstrating function beyond 5 months. PMID:25220221

  6. Experimental evidence of hepatitis A virus infection in pigs.

    PubMed

    Song, Young-Jo; Park, Woo-Jung; Park, Byung-Joo; Kwak, Sang-Woo; Kim, Yong-Hyeon; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Song, Chang-Seon; Lee, Sang-Won; Seo, Kun-Ho; Kang, Young-Sun; Park, Choi-Kyu; Song, Jae-Young; Choi, In-Soo

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is the leading cause of acute viral hepatitis worldwide, with HAV infection being restricted to humans and nonhuman primates. In this study, HAV infection status was serologically determined in domestic pigs and experimental infections of HAV were attempted to verify HAV infectivity in pigs. Antibodies specific to HAV or HAV-like agents were detected in 3.5% of serum samples collected from pigs in swine farms. When the pigs were infected intravenously with 2 × 10(5) 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50 ) of HAV, shedding of the virus in feces, viremia, and seroconversion were detected. In pigs orally infected with the same quantity of HAV, viral shedding was detected only in feces. HAV genomic RNA was detected in the liver and bile of intravenously infected pigs, but only in the bile of orally infected pigs. In further experiments, pigs were intravenously infected with 6 × 10(5) TCID50 of HAV. Shedding of HAV in feces, along with viremia and seroconversion, were confirmed in infected pigs but not in sentinel pigs. HAV genomic RNA was detected in the liver, bile, spleen, lymph node, and kidney of the infected pigs. HAV antigenomic RNA was detected in the spleen of one HAV-infected pig, suggesting HAV replication in splenic cells. Infiltration of inflammatory cells was observed in the livers of infected pigs but not in controls. This is the first experimental evidence to demonstrate that human HAV strains can infect pigs. PMID:26381440

  7. Biological characterization of liver fatty acid binding gene from miniature pig liver cDNA library.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y H; Wang, K F; Zhang, S; Fan, Y N; Guan, W J; Ma, Y H

    2015-01-01

    Liver fatty acid binding proteins (L-FABP) are a family of small, highly conserved, cytoplasmic proteins that bind to long-chain fatty acids and other hydrophobic ligands. In this study, a full-length enriched cDNA library was successfully constructed from Wuzhishan miniature pig, and then the L-FABP gene was cloned from this cDNA library and an expression vector (pEGFP-N3-L-FABP) was constructed in vitro. This vector was transfected into hepatocytes to test its function. The results of western blotting analysis demonstrated that the L-FABP gene from our full-length enriched cDNA library regulated downstream genes, including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor family in hepatocytes. This study provides a theoretical basis and experimental evidence for the application of L-FABP for the treatment of liver injury. PMID:26345909

  8. Slaughterhouse Pigs Are a Major Reservoir of Streptococcus suis Serotype 2 Capable of Causing Human Infection in Southern Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Hoa, Ngo Thi; Chieu, Tran Thi Bich; Nga, Tran Thi Thu; Dung, Nguyen Van; Campbell, James; Anh, Pham Hong; Huu Tho, Huynh; Van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Bryant, Juliet E.; Hien, Tran Tinh; Farrar, Jeremy; Schultsz, Constance

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is a pathogen of major economic significance to the swine industry and is increasingly recognized as an emerging zoonotic agent in Asia. In Vietnam, S. suis is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis in adult humans. Zoonotic transmission is most frequently associated with serotype 2 strains and occupational exposure to pigs or consumption of infected pork. To gain insight into the role of pigs for human consumption as a reservoir for zoonotic infection in southern Vietnam, we determined the prevalence and diversity of S. suis carriage in healthy slaughterhouse pigs. Nasopharyngeal tonsils were sampled from pigs at slaughterhouses serving six provinces in southern Vietnam and Ho Chi Minh City area from September 2006 to November 2007. Samples were screened by bacterial culture. Isolates of S. suis were serotyped and characterized by multi locus sequence typing (MLST) and pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Antibiotic susceptibility profiles and associated genetic resistance determinants, and the presence of putative virulence factors were determined. 41% (222/542) of pigs carried S. suis of one or multiple serotypes. 8% (45/542) carried S. suis serotype 2 which was the most common serotype found (45/317 strains, 14%). 80% of serotype 2 strains belonged to the MLST clonal complex 1,which was previously associated with meningitis cases in Vietnam and outbreaks of severe disease in China in 1998 and 2005. These strains clustered with representative strains isolated from patients with meningitis in PFGE analysis, and showed similar antimicrobial resistance and virulence factor profiles. Slaughterhouse pigs are a major reservoir of S. suis serotype 2 capable of causing human infection in southern Vietnam. Strict hygiene at processing facilities, and health education programs addressing food safety and proper handling of pork should be encouraged. PMID:21464930

  9. Plasma lipids and large bowel volatile fatty acids in pigs fed on white rice, brown rice and rice bran.

    PubMed

    Marsono, Y; Illman, R J; Clarke, J M; Trimble, R P; Topping, D L

    1993-09-01

    Adult male pigs were fed on a diet containing (% of energy) fat 25 starch 55 from white rice and providing 20 g fibre/pig d (diet WR). In two other groups rice bran was added to the diet to provide 43 g fibre/d. One group received the diet unmodified (diet RB), but in another (diet RO) heat-stabilized unrefined rice oil replaced the palm oil. In a further group brown rice replaced white rice and provided 37 g fibre/pig per d (diet BR). Plasma cholesterol concentrations were similar with diets WR, RB and BR. With diet RO the concentration was significantly lower than with diets WR and BR but was not different from diet RB. Plasma high-density-lipoprotein-cholesterol and plasma triacylglycerols were unaffected by diet. In all groups, digesta mass rose from the caecum to the proximal colon but fell in the distal colon. Diet WR gave the lowest digesta mass while diet BR gave a significantly higher mass along the large bowel length. RB- and RO-fed pigs had equal masses of digesta which were intermediate between BR- and WR-fed pigs at all sampling sites. Pools of individual and total volatile fatty acids (VFA) in the proximal large bowel were unaffected by diet. Pools of total and individual VFA in the median and distal colon were lowest with diets WR and RB and significantly higher with diet BR. In these regions of the colon pools of acetate in RO-fed pigs did not differ from those in the BR-fed group but were higher than in other groups. However, pools of propionate and butyrate with the RO diet were significantly lower than with diet BR and the same as with diets WR and RB. Portal venous VFA concentrations were unaffected by diet. The higher large bowel digesta masses and VFA with diet BR may reflect the escape of starch from the small intestine. PMID:8260477

  10. Lessons learned from the cystic fibrosis pig.

    PubMed

    Meyerholz, David K

    2016-07-01

    Deficient function in the anion channel cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator is the fundamental cause for CF. This is a monogenic condition that causes lesions in several organs including the respiratory tract, pancreas, liver, intestines, and reproductive tract. Lung disease is most notable, given it is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in people with CF. Shortly after the identification of CF transmembrane conductance regulator, CF mouse models were developed that did not show spontaneous lung disease as seen in humans, and this spurred development of additional CF animal models. Pig models were considered a leading choice for several reasons including their similarity to humans in respiratory anatomy, physiology, and in size for translational imaging. The first CF pig models were reported in 2008 and have been extremely valuable to help clarify persistent questions in the field and advance understanding of disease pathogenesis. Because CF pigs are susceptible to lung disease like humans, they have direct utility in translational research. In addition, CF pig models are useful to compare and contrast with current CF mouse models, human clinical studies, and even newer CF animal models being characterized. This "triangulation" strategy could help identify genetic differences that underlie phenotypic variations, so as to focus and accelerate translational research. PMID:27142487

  11. W5 - If Pigs Could Fly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, Trina

    2012-10-01

    Centripetal force seems to be a challenge for students and we are typically using stoppers, string, tubes and slotted masses (that always crash to the floor). But if we use a toy that reminds them of an amusement park ride, we can get the message across and have some fun. Come and see if pigs can fly!

  12. Chlamydia prevalence in Polish pig herds.

    PubMed

    Rypuła, K; Kumala, A; Płoneczka-Janeczko, K; Karuga-Kuźniewska, E; Dudek, K; Chorbiński, P

    2016-09-01

    Chlamydiae are frequently encountered intracellular Gram-negative bacteria. In pigs, these bacteria in combination with other pathogens contribute to the induction of a multi-aetiological syndrome. One of the major characteristics of Chlamydia spp. is their ability to cause prolonged, often subclinical infections. While the economic consequences of Chlamydia spp. infections in pig farms are not fully established, we know that reproductive disorders and other syndromes correlated with Chlamydia infection can lead to financial loss as a result of a reduction in pork production. Additionally, Chlamydia spp. presents a potential zoonotic hazard, therefore determining the prevalence of Chlamydia in pig populations is critical. In the present study 97 pig herds from Poland were involved. To determine the prevalence of Chlamydia PCR and CFT tests were used. In total 797 vaginal samples, 797 conjunctival samples, and 235 serum samples were collected and tested. The study took place from 2011 to 2014. We found Chlamydia spp. present in 71·2% of all tested farms. The percentage of animals testing positive on any given farm varied from 20% to 100%. PMID:27174765

  13. Feeding biofuels co-products to pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) and other co-products from the fuel ethanol industry may be included in diets fed to pigs in all phases of production. The concentration of digestible energy (DE) and metabolizable energy (ME) in DDGS and corn germ is similar to corn, but high protein dis...

  14. Methods in molecular cardiology: in silico cloning

    PubMed Central

    Passier, R.; Doevendans, P.A.

    2004-01-01

    Advancements in sequencing technology have made it possible to obtain more information about the DNA sequence, structure and the transcript products of the genome from different species. This information is collected in DNA databases. These databases contain many genes of which the functions have not yet been discovered. By using online biotechnology tools novel genes and their transcripts can be identified. The identification of novel genes using DNA database analysis is referred to as in silico cloning. In silico cloning may not only provide new information on genes and their biological function, it may also lead to identification of molecular targets for drug discovery activities. In this review we describe the process of in silico cloning and its application in biomedical research. ImagesFigure 1Figure 3 PMID:25696371

  15. Bounds for state-dependent quantum cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Han Yongjian; Zhang Yongsheng; Guo Guangcan

    2002-11-01

    Due to the no-cloning theorem, the unknown quantum state can only be cloned approximately or exactly with some probability. There are two types of cloners: universal and state-dependent cloner. The optimal universal cloner has been found and can be viewed as a special state-dependent quantum cloner that has no information about the states. In this paper, we investigate the state-dependent cloning when the state set contains more than two states. We get some bounds of the global fidelity for these processes. This method is not dependent on the number of the states contained in the state set. It is also independent of the numbers of copying.

  16. Cloning quantum entanglement in arbitrary dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Karpov, E.; Navez, P.; Cerf, N.J.

    2005-10-15

    We have found a quantum cloning machine that optimally duplicates the entanglement of a pair of d-dimensional quantum systems prepared in an arbitrary isotropic state. It maximizes the entanglement of formation contained in the two copies of any maximally entangled input state, while preserving the separability of unentangled input states. Moreover, it cannot increase the entanglement of formation of isotropic states. For large d, the entanglement of formation of each clone tends to one-half the entanglement of the input state, which corresponds to a classical behavior. Finally, we investigate a local entanglement cloner, which yields entangled clones with one-fourth the input entanglement in the large-d limit.

  17. Bac clones generated from sheared dna

    SciTech Connect

    Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Vessere, Gery M.; Shu, Chung Li; Hoskins,Roger A.; Abad, Jose P.; de Pablos, Beatriz; Villasante, Alfredo; deJong, Pieter J.

    2006-08-09

    BAC libraries generated from restriction-digested genomic DNA display representational bias and lack some sequences. To facilitate completion of genome projects, procedures have been developed to create BACs from DNA physically sheared to create fragments extending up to 200kb. The DNA fragments were repaired to create blunt ends and ligated to a new BAC vector. This approach has been tested by generating BAC libraries from Drosophila DNA, with insert lengths of 50 kb to 150 kb. The libraries lack chimeric clone problems as determined by mapping paired BAC-end sequences of one library to the D. melanogaster genome sequence. The utility of ''sheared'' libraries was demonstrated by closure of a previous clone gap and by isolation of clones from telomeric regions, which were notably absent from previous Drosophila BAC libraries.

  18. Developmental changes in endothelium-dependent pulmonary vasodilatation in pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, S. F.; Hislop, A. A.; Haworth, S. G.; Barnes, P. J.

    1992-01-01

    1. We compared in vitro endothelium-dependent vasorelaxant responses to acetylcholine (ACh) and the endothelium-independent vasodilator response to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha)-precontracted muscular pulmonary arteries (PA) from pigs aged 5 min to 2 h (neonatal), 3-10 days, 3-8 weeks and adults. 2. In the pulmonary artery (PA) rings from neonatal animals, the vasodilator response to ACh was negligible. However, responses to ACh were present in all PA rings from older animals, being greatest at 3-10 days and then decreasing with age (P less than 0.001, ANOVA). ACh (30 microM) induced a 1 +/- 1%, 92 +/- 9%, 62 +/- 5% and 51 +/- 6% reduction of the PGF2 alpha-generated tension in neonatal, 3-10 days, 3-8 weeks and adult groups, respectively. 3. The relaxant response to SNP was present in the PA rings from all age groups and increased with age (P less than 0.001, ANOVA). SNP (1 microM)-induced relaxation was 55 +/- 9%, 73 +/- 7%, 97 +/- 5% and 93 +/- 6% in neonatal, 3-10 days, 3-8 week and adult groups, respectively. 4. Removal of the vascular endothelium abolished the relaxant response to ACh but had no effect on the response to SNP in any groups. 5. NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (30 microM), a nitric oxide synthesis inhibitor, inhibited the response to ACh but not to SNP. The lipoxygenase inhibitor, nordihydroguaiaretic acid, had no significant effect on responses to ACh or SNP in any group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1 PMID:1393265

  19. Experimental joint immobilization in guinea pigs. Effects on the knee joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcondesdesouza, J. P.; Machado, F. F.; Sesso, A.; Valeri, V.

    1980-01-01

    In young and adult guinea pigs, the aftermath experimentally induced by the immobilization of the knee joint in hyperextended forced position was studied. Joint immobilization which varied from one to nine weeks was attained by plaster. Eighty knee joints were examined macro and microscopically. Findings included: (1) muscular hypotrophy and joint stiffness in all animals, directly proportional to the length of immobilization; (2) haemoarthrosis in the first week; (3) intra-articular fibrous tissue proliferation ending up with fibrous ankylosis; (4) hyaline articular cartilage erosions; (5) various degrees of destructive menisci changes. A tentative explanation of the fibrous tissue proliferation and of the cartilage changes is offered.

  20. Cloning and characterization of root-specific barley lectin

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, D.R.; Raikhel, N.V. )

    1989-09-01

    Cereal lectins are a class of biochemically and antigenically related proteins localized in a tissue-specific manner in embryos and adult plants. To study the specificity of lectin expression, a barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) embryo cDNa library was constructed and a clone (BLc3) for barley lectin was isolated. BLc3 is 972 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 212 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal peptide of 26 amino acid residues followed by a 186 amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide has 95% sequence identity to the antigenically indistinguishable wheat germ agglutinin isolectin-B (WGA-B) suggesting that BLc3 encodes barley lectin. Further evidence that BLc3 encodes barley lectin was obtained by immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translation products of BLc3 RNA transcripts and barley embryo poly(A{sup +}) RNA. In situ hybridizations with BLc3 showed that barley lectin gene expression is confined to the outermost cell layers of both embryonic and adult root tips. On Northern blots, BLc3 hybridizes to a 1.0 kilobyte mRNA in poly(A{sup +}) RNA from both embryos and root tips. We suggest, on the basis of immunoblot experiments, that barley lectin is synthesized as a glycosylated precursor and processed by removal of a portion of the carboxyl terminus including the single N-linked glycosylation site.

  1. Photonic Programmable Tele-Cloning Network

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Chen, Ming-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The concept of quantum teleportation allows an unknown quantum states to be broadcasted and processed in a distributed quantum network. The quantum information injected into the network can be diluted to distant multi-copies by quantum cloning and processed by arbitrary quantum logic gates which were programed in advance in the network quantum state. A quantum network combines simultaneously these fundamental quantum functions could lead to new intriguing applications. Here we propose a photonic programmable telecloning network based on a four-photon interferometer. The photonic network serves as quantum gate, quantum cloning and quantum teleportation and features experimental advantage of high brightness by photon recycling. PMID:27353838

  2. [MRSA clones identified in outpatient dermatology clinics].

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Shino; Ito, Teruyo; Misawa, Shigeki; Yoshiike, Takashi; Oguri, Toyoko; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2014-11-01

    To know the characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains disseminating through the Japanese community, we have determined types of Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements, Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST), and carriages of four exotoxin genes (toxic-shock syndrome toxin, Panton-Valentine Leukocidine, and exfoliative toxins a and b) using 54 MRSA strains isolated from outpatients attending dermatology clinics at the four university hospitals of Juntendo University. Ten clonal complexes and 12 SCCmec types have been identified. As a result, more than 15 MRSA clones that were defined by the combination of genotype and SCCmec type, were identified. Among them, Clonal Complex (CC) 5-type IIa SCCmec strains were the most major (16 strains). In contrast to the fact that CC5- type IIa SCCmec strains known as a hospital-associated MRSA clone in Japan carried toxic-shock syndrome toxin gene (tst), only 2 of 16 strains have been shown to carry tst. Thirty-eight (70.4%) of isolates belonged to the clones distinct from the CC5-type IIa SCCmec strains. Among them, CC8 strains were major (12 strains), which contained 9 tst-positive CC8-type IVl SCCmec clones and a CC8-type IVa SCCmec strain carrying the Panton Valentine Leukocidin gene (lukS, F-PV). Clones related to impetigo were also identified: 7 exfoliative toxin b (etb) -positive clones, CC89-type IIa SCCmec and CC89-type V SCCmec strains; and 2 exfoliative toxin a (eta) -positive CC121-type V SCCmec strains. Other clones were as follows: CC1-type IVa SCCmec, CC8-type I SCCmec, CC81-type IVg SCCmec, CC97-type IVc SCCmec, CC91-type IVa SCCmec, CC59-type IVg SCCmec, CC45-type IIn SCCmec, CC89-SCCmec nontypeable, and CC8-type IVm, novel subtype of type IV SCCmec were identified in this study. Our data showed that many novel MRSA clones have emerged in the community. PMID:25764806

  3. Photonic Programmable Tele-Cloning Network.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Chen, Ming-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The concept of quantum teleportation allows an unknown quantum states to be broadcasted and processed in a distributed quantum network. The quantum information injected into the network can be diluted to distant multi-copies by quantum cloning and processed by arbitrary quantum logic gates which were programed in advance in the network quantum state. A quantum network combines simultaneously these fundamental quantum functions could lead to new intriguing applications. Here we propose a photonic programmable telecloning network based on a four-photon interferometer. The photonic network serves as quantum gate, quantum cloning and quantum teleportation and features experimental advantage of high brightness by photon recycling. PMID:27353838

  4. Cloning of Gaussian states by linear optics

    SciTech Connect

    Olivares, Stefano; Paris, Matteo G. A.; Andersen, Ulrik L.

    2006-06-15

    We analyze in details a scheme for cloning of Gaussian states based on linear optical components and homodyne detection recently demonstrated by Andersen et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 240503 (2005)]. The input-output fidelity is evaluated for a generic (pure or mixed) Gaussian state taking into account the effect of nonunit quantum efficiency and unbalanced mode mixing. In addition, since in most quantum information protocols the covariance matrix of the set of input states is not perfectly known, we evaluate the average cloning fidelity for classes of Gaussian states with the degree of squeezing and the number of thermal photons being only partially known.

  5. Photonic Programmable Tele-Cloning Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Chen, Ming-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    The concept of quantum teleportation allows an unknown quantum states to be broadcasted and processed in a distributed quantum network. The quantum information injected into the network can be diluted to distant multi-copies by quantum cloning and processed by arbitrary quantum logic gates which were programed in advance in the network quantum state. A quantum network combines simultaneously these fundamental quantum functions could lead to new intriguing applications. Here we propose a photonic programmable telecloning network based on a four-photon interferometer. The photonic network serves as quantum gate, quantum cloning and quantum teleportation and features experimental advantage of high brightness by photon recycling.

  6. Ontogeny of nitric oxide synthase I and III protein expression and enzymatic activity in the guinea pig hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kimura, K A; Reynolds, J N; Brien, J F

    1999-09-01

    60. NOS enzymatic activity increased throughout prenatal and postnatal life, and attained highest activity in the adult. The developmental profile of NOS III protein expression was similar to that for NOS enzymatic activity. There was differential expression of NOS I protein, which was low in the GD 50 fetus and increased rapidly during fetal development to attain adult level by GD 62. These data suggest that the guinea pig is a reliable animal model in which to investigate the roles of NO in normal hippocampal development and in mediating neuronal injury in this brain region. PMID:10521566

  7. Use of electrogastrography in preclinical studies of cholinergic and anticholinergic agents in experimental pigs.

    PubMed

    Květina, J; Tachecí, I; Pavlík, M; Kopáčová, M; Rejchrt, S; Douda, T; Kuneš, M; Bureš, J

    2016-01-01

    Electrogastrography (EGG) is a non-invasive method for the assessment of gastric myoelectrical activity. Porcine EGG is comparable with human one. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of atropine and neostigmine on the EGG in experimental pigs. Adult female pigs were administrated atropine (1.5 mg i.m., n=6) and neostigmine (0.5 mg i.m., n=6) after the baseline EGG, followed by a 90-min trial recording (MMS, Enschede, the Netherlands). Running spectral analysis was used for the evaluation. The results were expressed as dominant frequency of slow waves and EGG power (areas of amplitudes). Neostigmine increased continuously the dominant frequency and decreased significantly the EGG power. Atropine did not change the dominant frequency significantly. However, atropine increased significantly the EGG power (areas of amplitudes) from basal values to the maximum at the 10-20-min interval. After that period, the areas of amplitudes decreased significantly to the lowest values at the 60-90-min interval. In conclusion, cholinergic and anticholinergic agents affect differently EGG in experimental pigs. PMID:26674291

  8. Alternative splicing and expression profile analysis of expressed sequence tags in domestic pig.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Tao, Lin; Ye, Lin; He, Ling; Zhu, Yuan-Zhong; Zhu, Yue-Dong; Zhou, Yan

    2007-02-01

    Domestic pig (Sus scrofa domestica) is one of the most important mammals to humans. Alternative splicing is a cellular mechanism in eukaryotes that greatly increases the diversity of gene products. Expression sequence tags (ESTs) have been widely used for gene discovery, expression profile analysis, and alternative splicing detection. In this study, a total of 712,905 ESTs extracted from 101 different non-normalized EST libraries of the domestic pig were analyzed. These EST libraries cover the nervous system, digestive system, immune system, and meat production related tissues from embryo, newborn, and adult pigs, making contributions to the analysis of alternative splicing variants as well as expression profiles in various stages of tissues. A modified approach was designed to cluster and assemble large EST datasets, aiming to detect alternative splicing together with EST abundance of each splicing variant. Much efforts were made to classify alternative splicing into different types and apply different filters to each type to get more reliable results. Finally, a total of 1,223 genes with average 2.8 splicing variants were detected among 16,540 unique genes. The overview of expression profiles would change when we take alternative splicing into account. PMID:17572361

  9. Anatomical study of the arterial blood supply to the thoracolumbar spinal cord in guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Mazensky, David; Danko, Jan; Petrovova, Eva; Supuka, Peter; Supukova, Anna

    2015-09-01

    Guinea pigs are frequently used as experimental models in studies of ischemic spinal cord injury. The aim of this study was to describe the arterial blood supply to the thoracolumbar spinal cord in 20 adult English self guinea pigs using the corrosion and dissection techniques. The dorsal intercostal arteries arising from the dorsal surface of the thoracic aorta were found as follows: in eight pairs in 70% of cases, in seven pairs in 20% of cases and in nine pairs in 10% of cases. Paired lumbar arteries were present as seven pairs in all the cases. The occurrence of the ventral and dorsal branches of the spinal rami observed in the thoracic and lumbar region was higher on the left than on the right. The artery of Adamkiewicz was present in 60% of cases as a single vessel and in 40% of cases as a double vessel. On the dorsal surface of the spinal cord, we found two dorsal spinal arteries in 60% of cases and three in 40% of cases. The presence of the artery of Adamkiewicz and nearly regular segmental blood supplying the thoracolumbar part of the spinal cord in all our studied animals is the reason for using guinea pigs as a simple model of ischemic damage to the thoracolumbar part of the spinal cord. PMID:24966109

  10. Intraocular Pressure, Tear Production, and Ocular Echobiometry in Guinea Pigs (Cavia porcellus).

    PubMed

    Rajaei, Seyed Mehdi; Mood, Maneli Ansari; Sadjadi, Reza; Azizi, Farzaneh

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate intraocular pressure (IOP) by means of rebound tonometry, to assess tear production by using the endodontic absorbent paper point tear test (EAPTT) and phenol red thread test (PRTT), and to determine the effects of time of day on IOP and tear production in guinea pigs. The study population comprised 24 healthy adult guinea pigs (12 male, 12 female; 48 eyes) of different breeds and ranging in age from 12 to 15 mo. IOP and tear production were measured at 3 time points (0700, 1500, and 2300) during a 24-h period. Overall values (mean ± 1 SD) were: IOP, 6.81 ± 1.41 mm Hg (range, 4.83 to 8.50); PRTT, 14.33 ± 1.35 mm (range, 12.50 to 16.83); and EAPTT, 8.54 ± 1.08 mm (range, 7.17 to 10.0 mm). In addition, ultrasound biometry was performed by using a B-mode system with linear 8-MHz transducer. This study reports reference values for IOP and tear production in guinea pigs. PMID:27423156

  11. Structure and expression of the guinea-pig alpha-lactalbumin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Laird, J E; Jack, L; Hall, L; Boulton, A P; Parker, D; Craig, R K

    1988-01-01

    The entire guinea-pig alpha-lactalbumin gene was isolated from a genomic DNA library constructed in the bacteriophage lambda L47. The complete nucleotide sequence of the gene and its immediate 5' and 3' flanking sequences were determined and compared with those of the human and rat alpha-lactalbumin genes. This demonstrates that the size, organization and sequence of the exons is highly conserved between species, and reveals the presence of the highly conserved potential regulatory 'milk box' consensus sequence [RGAAGRAAA(N)TGGACAGAAATCAA(CG)TTTCTA] between positions -140 and -110 relative to the transcriptional start point. A guinea-pig LINE repeat sequence was also present in the 5' flanking region between positions -520 and -1195. Transfection of the alpha-lactalbumin gene cloned in a bovine papilloma virus vector into the mouse C127 and human MCF-7 mammary tumour cell-lines gave rise to stable but seemingly constitutive expression of alpha-lactalbumin. Expression was from the correct transcriptional start point, resulting in the accumulation of correctly processed mRNA and the secretion of alpha-lactalbumin into the culture medium. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2845947

  12. The role of TRPM8 in the Guinea-pig bladder-cooling reflex investigated using a novel TRPM8 antagonist.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Jennifer C; Kirkup, Anthony J; Curry, John; Humphreys, Sian; O'Regan, Paul; Postlethwaite, Michael; Young, Kimberley C; Kitching, Linda; Ethell, Brian T; Winpenny, David; McMurray, Gordon

    2014-10-01

    Patients with overactive bladder often exhibit abnormal bladder contractions in response to intravesical cold saline (positive ice-water test). The molecular entity involved in cold sensation within the urinary bladder is unknown, but a potential candidate is the ion channel, transient receptor potential (melastatin)-8 (TRPM8). The objective of the present study was to investigate the role of TRPM8 in a bladder-cooling reflex evoked in anaesthetised guinea-pigs that is comparable to the positive ice-water test seen in patients. Guinea-pig TRPM8 was cloned from L6 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and expressed in HEK293 cells. Functional agonist- and cold-induced Ca2+ influx and electrophysiology assays were performed in these cells, and for comparison in HEK293 cells expressing human TRPM8, using a novel TRPM8 antagonist, the S-enantiomer of 1-phenylethyl 4-(benzyloxy)-3-methoxybenzyl (2-aminoethyl) carbamate hydrochloride (PBMC). Potency data from these assays was used to calculate intravenous infusion protocols for targeted plasma concentrations of PBMC in studies on micturition reflexes evoked by intravesical infusion of menthol or cold saline in anaesthetised guinea-pigs. Tissue expression of TRPM8 in guinea-pig bladder, urethra and in dorsal root ganglia neurones traced from the bladder was also investigated. TRPM8 mRNA and protein were detected in L6 dorsal root ganglia, bladder urothelium and smooth muscle. PBMC antagonised in vitro activation of human and guinea-pig TRPM8 and reversed menthol and cold-induced facilitation of the micturition reflex at plasma concentrations consistent with in vitro potencies. The present data suggest that the bladder-cooling reflex in the guinea-pig involves TRPM8. The potential significance of TRPM8 in bladder disease states deserves future investigation. PMID:25058909

  13. Recombinational landscape of porcine X chromosome and individual variation in female meiotic recombination associated with haplotypes of Chinese pigs

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Variations in recombination fraction (θ) among chromosomal regions, individuals and families have been observed and have an important impact on quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping studies. Such variations on porcine chromosome X (SSC-X) and on other mammalian chromosome X are rarely explored. The emerging assembly of pig sequence provides exact physical location of many markers, facilitating the study of a fine-scale recombination landscape of the pig genome by comparing a clone-based physical map to a genetic map. Using large offspring of F1 females from two large-scale resource populations (Large White ♂ × Chinese Meishan ♀, and White Duroc ♂ × Chinese Erhualian ♀), we were able to evaluate the heterogeneity in θ for a specific interval among individual F1 females. Results Alignments between the cytogenetic map, radiation hybrid (RH) map, genetic maps and clone map of SSC-X with the physical map of human chromosome X (HSA-X) are presented. The most likely order of 60 markers on SSC-X is inferred. The average recombination rate across SSC-X is of ~1.27 cM/Mb. However, almost no recombination occurred in a large region of ~31 Mb extending from the centromere to Xq21, whereas in the surrounding regions and in the Xq telomeric region a recombination rate of 2.8-3.3 cM/Mb was observed, more than twice the chromosome-wide average rate. Significant differences in θ among F1 females within each population were observed for several chromosomal intervals. The largest variation was observed in both populations in the interval UMNP71-SW1943, or more precisely in the subinterval UMNP891-UMNP93. The individual variation in θ over this subinterval was found associated with F1 females' maternal haplotypes (Chinese pig haplotypes) and independent of paternal haplotype (European pig haplotypes). The θ between UMNP891 and UMNP93 for haplotype 1122 and 4311 differed by more than fourteen-fold (10.3% vs. 0.7%). Conclusions This study reveals marked

  14. The roles of quantum correlations in quantum cloning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; xiong Wu, Shao-; Yu, Chang-shui

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we study the entanglement and quantum discord of the output modes in the unified 1 → 2 state-dependent cloning and probabilistic quantum cloning. The tripartite entanglement among the output modes and the quantum cloning machine is also considered. We find that the roles of the quantum correlations including the bipartite and tripartite entanglement and quantum discord strongly depend on the quantum cloning machines as well as the cloned state. In particular, it is found that this quantum cloning scheme can be realizable even without any quantum correlation.

  15. Whole genome comparison of donor and cloned dogs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hak-Min; Cho, Yun Sung; Kim, Hyunmin; Jho, Sungwoong; Son, Bongjun; Choi, Joung Yoon; Kim, Sangsoo; Lee, Byeong Chun; Bhak, Jong; Jang, Goo

    2013-01-01

    Cloning is a process that produces genetically identical organisms. However, the genomic degree of genetic resemblance in clones needs to be determined. In this report, the genomes of a cloned dog and its donor were compared. Compared with a human monozygotic twin, the genome of the cloned dog showed little difference from the genome of the nuclear donor dog in terms of single nucleotide variations, chromosomal instability, and telomere lengths. These findings suggest that cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer produced an almost identical genome. The whole genome sequence data of donor and cloned dogs can provide a resource for further investigations on epigenetic contributions in phenotypic differences. PMID:24141358

  16. The piggyBac-Based Gene Delivery System Can Confer Successful Production of Cloned Porcine Blastocysts with Multigene Constructs.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masahiro; Maeda, Kosuke; Koriyama, Miyu; Inada, Emi; Saitoh, Issei; Miura, Hiromi; Ohtsuka, Masato; Nakamura, Shingo; Sakurai, Takayuki; Watanabe, Satoshi; Miyoshi, Kazuchika

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of multigene constructs into single cells is important for improving the performance of domestic animals, as well as understanding basic biological processes. In particular, multigene constructs allow the engineering and integration of multiple genes related to xenotransplantation into the porcine genome. The piggyBac (PB) transposon system allows multiple genes to be stably integrated into target genomes through a single transfection event. However, to our knowledge, no attempt to introduce multiple genes into a porcine genome has been made using this system. In this study, we simultaneously introduced seven transposons into a single porcine embryonic fibroblast (PEF). PEFs were transfected with seven transposons containing genes for five drug resistance proteins and two (red and green) fluorescent proteins, together with a PB transposase expression vector, pTrans (experimental group). The above seven transposons (without pTrans) were transfected concomitantly (control group). Selection of these transfected cells in the presence of multiple selection drugs resulted in the survival of several clones derived from the experimental group, but not from the control. PCR analysis demonstrated that approximately 90% (12/13 tested) of the surviving clones possessed all of the introduced transposons. Splinkerette PCR demonstrated that the transposons were inserted through the TTAA target sites of PB. Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) using a PEF clone with multigene constructs demonstrated successful production of cloned blastocysts expressing both red and green fluorescence. These results indicate the feasibility of this PB-mediated method for simultaneous transfer of multigene constructs into the porcine cell genome, which is useful for production of cloned transgenic pigs expressing multiple transgenes. PMID:27589724

  17. Urinary tract infection - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Bladder infection - adults; UTI - adults; Cystitis - bacterial - adults; Pyelonephritis - adults; Kidney infection - adults ... to the hospital if you: Are an older adult Have kidney stones or changes in the anatomy ...

  18. Tests of cryogenic pigs for use in liquefied gas pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hipple, D. L.; Oneal, W. C.

    1982-09-01

    Pipeline pigs are a key element in the design of a proposed spill test facility whose purpose is to evaluate the hazards of large spills of liquefied gaseous fuels (LGFs). A long pipe runs from the LGF storage tanks to the spill point; to produce a rapid spill, the pipe is filled with LGF and a pig will be pneumatically driven through the pipe to force out the LGF quickly and cleanly. Several pig designs were tested in a 6 inch diameter, 420 foot long pipe to evaluate their performance at liquid-nitrogen temperature and compare it with their performance at ambient temperature. For each test, the pig was placed in one end of the pipe and either water or liquid nitrogen was put into the pipe in front of the pig. Then pressurized drive gas, either nitrogen or helium, was admitted to the pipe behind the pig to push the pig and the fluid ahead of it out the exit nozzle. For some tests, the drive gas supply was shut off when the pig was part way through the pipe as a method of velocity control; in these cases, the pressurized gas trapped behind the pig continued to expand until it pushed the pig the remaining distance out of the pipe.

  19. [Hygienic aspects of pig's head meat. 1. Obtaining and processing pigs' heads].

    PubMed

    Bijker, P G; Koolmees, P A

    1988-05-01

    Pigs's head meat is mainly obtained in specialised deboning plants and provides raw materials for the manufacture of meat products and snacks. Few data on hygiene in processing and production of pig's heads or on the bacteriological quality and tissue composition of pig's head meat have so far been published. The object of the present investigation was to supplement these data and to examine the extent to which this quality could be improved by Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP's). A total number of 11 slaughter-houses and 14 deboning plants were studied. Hygiene was assessed by two investigators on the basis of a check list. Temperatures of rooms, heads and head meat were measured. Twenty-one samples (7 x 3) were taken in each of nine deboning plants for bacteriological and histological examination. The investigations carried out in slaughter-houses showed that pig's heads were only washed in five out of eleven slaughter-houses. Cleansing and disinfection of the apparatus used in splitting the carcasses were omitted or merely carried out incidentally during slaughter. Assessment of hygiene in the deboning plants ranged from adequate to satisfactory in 13 out of 14 plants. The average aerobic colony count in Log N g-1 of pig's head meat was 6.7 +/- 0.7; this was 4.4 +/- 0.9 for counts of colony-forming units (CFU) of Enterobacteriaceae. Tonsils, mucous membranes, bone, hair and dirt were found to be present in 8, 13, 21, 39 and 9 per cent of the samples respectively. As a result of the manual cleavage of heads, relatively large bone particles (greater than 8 mm) were detected in the head meat. It is concluded that an improvement of the hygienic quality of pig's head meat can mainly be achieved by taking more care in obtaining pig's heads. PMID:3287680

  20. Molecular cloning of a putative tetrodotoxin-resistant rat heart Na+ channel isoform.

    PubMed Central

    Rogart, R B; Cribbs, L L; Muglia, L K; Kephart, D D; Kaiser, M W

    1989-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels in mammalian heart differ from those in nerve and skeletal muscle. One major difference is that tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant cardiac Na+ channels are blocked by 1-10 microM TTX, whereas TTX-sensitive nerve Na+ channels are blocked by nanomolar TTX concentrations. We constructed a cDNA library from 6-day-old rat hearts, where only low-affinity [3H]saxitoxin receptors, corresponding to TTX-resistant Na+ channels, were detected. We isolated several overlapping cDNA clones encompassing 7542 nucleotides and encoding the entire alpha subunit of a cardiac-specific Na+ channel isoform (designated rat heart I) as well as several rat brain I Na+ channel cDNA clones. The derived amino acid sequence of rat heart I was highly homologous to, but distinct from, previous Na+ channel clones. RNase protection studies showed that the corresponding mRNA species is abundant in newborn and adult rat hearts, but not detectable in brain or innervated skeletal muscle. The same mRNA species appears upon denervation of skeletal muscle, likely accounting for expression of new TTX-resistant Na+ channels. Thus, this cardiac-specific Na+ channel clone appears to encode a distinct TTX-resistant isoform and is another member of the mammalian Na+ channel multigene family, found in newborn heart and denervated skeletal muscles. Images PMID:2554302

  1. Gating mechanism of the cloned inward rectifier potassium channel from mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, K; Hiraoka, M

    1994-10-01

    The complementary DNA encoding the inward rectifier potassium channel was cloned from the adult mouse heart by using the polymerase chain reaction. The clone had the nucleotide sequence identical to that of the IRK1 gene cloned from a mouse macrophage cell line. Northern blot analysis revealed that the transcript of this gene was mainly expressed in the ventricle, where the inward rectifier K+ channel plays a predominant role in maintaining the high negative value of the resting membrane potential. The current expressed by injection of the complementary RNA of the cloned gene into Xenopus oocytes showed a marked inward rectification that depends on the driving force of K+. A region of negative slope conductance was observed in the current-voltage relationship at potentials positive to the reversal potential. When the extracellular K+ concentration was raised, the increase in outward current amplitude resulted in the "crossover" of outward current-voltage relations. The fast time-dependent increase in current amplitude was recorded upon membrane repolarization from a potential positive to the reversal potential. The kinetics of the time-dependent current was very similar to that of the intrinsic gating mechanism of the native cardiac inward rectifier K+ channel. Our results suggest the existence of the intrinsic gating mechanism, accounting for the extent of rectification in the current-voltage relationship in the expressed channel. PMID:7707353

  2. Host-Parasite Relationship of Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae and Argasidae) and Feral Pigs (Sus scrofa) in the Nhecolândia Region of the Pantanal Wetlands in Mato Grosso do Sul

    PubMed Central

    Cançado, P. H. D.; Faccini, J. L. H.; Herrera, H. M.; Tavares, L. E. R.; Mourão, G. M.; Piranda, E. M.; Paes, R. C. S.; Ribeiro, C. C. D. U.; Borghesan, T. C.; Piacenti, A. K.; Kinas, M. A.; Santos, C. C.; Ono, T. M.; Paiva, F.

    2013-01-01

    Feral pigs (S. scrofa) were introduced to the Pantanal region around 200 years ago and the population appears to be in expansion. Its eradication is considered to be impossible. The population of feral pigs in the Pantanal wetlands is currently estimated at one million. Two scientific excursions were organized. The first was conducted during the dry season, when 21 feral pigs were captured and the second was during the wet season, when 23 feral pigs were captured. Ticks were collected and the oviposition and hatching process were studied to confirm the biological success of each tick species. Three tick species were found to be feeding on feral pigs: Amblyomma cajennense, A. parvum, and Ornithodoros rostratus. During the dry season, 178 adult A. cajennense were collected, contrasting with 127 A. cajennense specimens in the wet season. This suggests that the seasonality of these ticks in the Brazilian Pantanal wetlands could be different from other regions. The results indicate that A. parvum and A. cajennense are biologically successful parasites in relation to feral pigs. A. cajennense appears to have adapted to this tick-host relationship, as well as the areas where feral pigs are abundant, and could play a role in the amplification of this tick population. PMID:27335855

  3. Comparing quantum cloning: A Fisher-information perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hongting; Luo, Shunlong; Li, Nan; Chang, Lina

    2013-10-01

    Perfect cloning of an unknown quantum state is impossible. Approximate cloning, which is optimal in various senses, has been found in many cases. Paradigmatic examples are Wootters-Zurek cloning and universal cloning. These cloning machines aim at optimal cloning of the full quantum states. However, in practice, what is important and relevant may only involve partial information in quantum states, rather than quantum states themselves. For example, signals are often encoded as parameters in quantum states, whose information content is well synthesized by quantum Fisher information. This raises the basic issue of evaluating the information transferring capability (e.g., distributing quantum Fisher information) of quantum cloning. We assess and compare Wootters-Zurek cloning and universal cloning from this perspective and show that, on average, Wootters-Zurek cloning performs better than universal cloning for the phase (as well as amplitude) parameter, although they are incomparable individually, and universal cloning has many advantages over Wootters-Zurek cloning in other contexts. Physical insights and related issues are further discussed.

  4. Genetic Crossing vs Cloning by Computer Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Subinay

    We perform Monte Carlo simulation using Penna's bit string model, and compare the process of asexual reproduction by cloning with that by genetic crossover. We find them to be comparable as regards survival of a species, and also if a natural disaster is simulated.

  5. Genetic crossing vs cloning by computer simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, S.

    1997-06-01

    We perform Monte Carlo simulation using Penna`s bit string model, and compare the process of asexual reproduction by cloning with that by genetic crossover. We find them to be comparable as regards survival of a species, and also if a natural disaster is simulated.

  6. [Placental developmental defects in cloned mammalian animals].

    PubMed

    Ao, Zheng; Liu, Dewu; Cai, Gengyuan; Wu, Zhenfang; Li, Zicong

    2016-05-01

    The cloning technique, also called somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), has been successfully established and gradually applied to various mammalian species. However, the developmental rate of SCNT mammalian embryos is very low, usually at 1% to 5%, which limits the application of SCNT. Placental developmental defects are considered as the main cause of SCNT embryo development inhibition. Almost all of SCNT-derived mammalian placentas exhibit various abnormalities, such as placental hyperplasia, vascular defects and umbilical cord malformation. Mechanistically, these abnormalities result from failure of establishment of correct epigenetic modification in the trophectoderm genome, which leads to erroneous expression of important genes for placenta development-related, particularly imprinted genes. Consequently, aberrant imprinted gene expression gives rise to placental morphologic abnormalities and functional defects, therefore decreases developmental competence of cloned embryos. Currently, although numerous methods that can improve the developmental ability of SCNT-derived embryos have been reported, most of them are unable to substantially enhance the success rate of SCNT due to failure to eliminate the placental development defects. In this review, we summarize placental abnormalities and imprinted gene expression in mammalian cloning, and propose directions for the future research aiming to improve the cloning efficiency. PMID:27232488

  7. Cloning: Learning to Replay the Genetic Tape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, David J.

    1979-01-01

    Describes how plants can be produced by cloning by using tissue culture methods to mass-produce rare native prairie plants and trying to transfer some of the genetic characteristics of native grasses into cultivated cereals. The experiment was conducted at South Dakota State University. (HM)

  8. Computerized Adaptive Testing with Item Cloning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glas, Cees A. W.; van der Linden, Wim J.

    2003-01-01

    Developed a multilevel item response (IRT) model that allows for differences between the distributions of item parameters of families of item clones. Results from simulation studies based on an item pool from the Law School Admission Test illustrate the accuracy of the item pool calibration and adaptive testing procedures based on the model. (SLD)

  9. Introduction to cloning by nuclear transplantation.

    PubMed

    Galli, Cesare; Lagutina, Irina; Lazzari, Giovanna

    2003-01-01

    Despite its long history, the cloning of animals by nuclear transplantation is going through a "renaissance" after the birth of Dolly. The amount of work and achievements obtained in the last seven years are probably greater than those obtained in half a century of research. However, the principal obstacles outlined years ago with the work on somatic cell cloning in amphybia, are all still there in mammals. The importance of somatic cell nuclear transfer is, without any doubt, beyond the scope of replicating superior animal genotypes. It is an invaluable experimental tool to address fundamental scientific issues such as nuclear potency, cell de-differentiation, chromatin structure and function, epigenetics, and genome manipulation. For these reasons the importance of cloning is not for what it can achieve but for the technical support it can provide to biomedical research and in particular to the study of epigenetics, cancer and stem cell biology, cell therapy and regenerative medicine. In this introductory paper we will summarize the intellectual and technical framework of cloning animals by nuclear transfer that still remains the only absolute way of judging the success of the procedure. Together with the achievements of the recent past we will mention the very last developments and the many questions that still remain open. Current research efforts are expected to provide some answers and certainly new questions. PMID:14733742

  10. Oct4 overexpression facilitates proliferation of porcine fibroblasts and development of cloned embryos.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su Jin; Koo, Ok Jae; Park, Hee Jung; Moon, Joon Ho; da Torre, Bego Roibas; Javaregowda, Palaksha Kanive; Kang, Jung Taek; Park, Sol Ji; Saadeldin, Islam M; Choi, Ji Yei; Lee, Byeong-Chun; Jang, Goo

    2015-10-01

    Octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct4) is a critical molecule for the self-renewal and pluripotency of embryonic stem cells. Recent reports have shown that Oct4 also controls cell-cycle progression and enhances the proliferation of various types of cells. As the high proliferation of donor fibroblasts is critical to the production of transgenic pigs, using the somatic cell nuclear transfer technique, we analysed the effect of Oct4 overexpression on the proliferation of porcine fibroblasts and embryos. Porcine endogenous Oct4 cDNA was cloned, sequenced and inserted into an expression vector. The vector was transfected into porcine fibroblasts, and a stable Oct4-overexpressed cell line was established by antibiotic selection. Oct4 expression was validated by the immunostaining of Oct4. Cell morphology was changed to sharp, and both proliferation and migration abilities were enhanced in Oct4-overexpressed cells. Real-time RT-PCR results showed that p16, Bcl2 and Myc were upregulated in Oct4-overexpressed cells. Somatic cell nuclear transfer was performed using Oct4-overexpressed cells, and the development of Oct4 embryos was compared with that of wild-type cloned embryos. The cleavage and blastocyst formation rates were improved in the Oct4 embryos. Interestingly, blastocyst formation of the Oct4 embryos was observed as early as day 5 in culture, while blastocysts were observed from day 6 in wild-type cloned embryos. In conclusion, the overexpression of Oct4 enhanced the proliferation of both porcine fibroblasts and embryos. PMID:25181424

  11. Babesia bovis clones: biochemical and enzymatic characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez Camarillo, S.D.

    1985-01-01

    Studies were undertaken to generate additional knowledge of the biochemistry of Babesia bovis. A modified in vitro culture technique used for cloning B. bovis. This technique included a low oxygen concentration atmosphere (2%, O/sub 2/, 5% CO/sub 2/, 93% N/sub 2/) and 4 mm fluid level. Cultures initiated with one infected erythrocyte were maintained until parasitemias of positive wells reached 2% parasitemia. Primary clones were obtained and from these, nine clones were recloned twice and used for subsequent studies. A procedure was developed to concentrate and separate B. bovis merozoites and infected erythrocytes by Percoll density gradients. Merozoites separated at 1.087 g/ml specific density, whereas infected erythrocytes separated at 1.121 g/ml. Viability of purified parasites was not affected. Agarose gel electrophoresis was used to identify metabolic enzyme in B. bovis and B. bigemina. The enzymes LDH, GDH, GPI and HK were detected in both species. Molecular analysis by one and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of proteins metabolically labeled with /sup 35/S-methionine indicated that two clones, derived from the same field strain, were similar but not identical to the parent. Fewer proteins were observed in the parental strain. Growth of two 60-Co irradiated B. bovis clones indicated a dose-effect relationship. Growth of parasites exposed for the longest period was initially retarded but returned to normal growth after two or three subcultures. Cultures exposed for shorter periods were unaffected with respect to the rate of growth. Analysis of electrophoretic mobility of metabolic enzyme showed a change in migration pattern.

  12. Reproductive performance in pigs reared under organic conditions compared with conventionally reared pigs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To achieve a competitive reproductive performance in organic pig farming is a major challenge for this farming practise. Practices and research data regarding conventional pig production are not always applicable to organic production, why field studies are needed to identify differences in performance between organic and conventional pig farms in order to identify areas for improvement. Results Performance data for one year was collected from 5 organic herds that had more than 30 sows in production and used a computerized recording system, and data from five nearby conventional farms with more than 30 sows and the same recording system were used as a comparison. In total data from 4697 farrowings were analyzed. In the organic pig herds, there were a higher total number of piglets born per litter (p=0.001), a higher number of piglets stillborn per litter (p<0.001), but a tendency (p<0.06) to lower number of weaned pigs per litter and longer nursing period (p<0.001) and farrowing interval (p<0.001). Conclusions The reproductive performance was lower in the organic herds and the variation in reproductive performance among the organic herds was larger than among the conventional ones, suggesting options for improvement in the organic herds. PMID:23594682

  13. IVA cloning: A single-tube universal cloning system exploiting bacterial In Vivo Assembly

    PubMed Central

    García-Nafría, Javier; Watson, Jake F.; Greger, Ingo H.

    2016-01-01

    In vivo homologous recombination holds the potential for optimal molecular cloning, however, current strategies require specialised bacterial strains or laborious protocols. Here, we exploit a recA-independent recombination pathway, present in widespread laboratory E.coli strains, to develop IVA (In Vivo Assembly) cloning. This system eliminates the need for enzymatic assembly and reduces all molecular cloning procedures to a single-tube, single-step PCR, performed in <2 hours from setup to transformation. Unlike other methods, IVA is a complete system, and offers significant advantages over alternative methods for all cloning procedures (insertions, deletions, site-directed mutagenesis and sub-cloning). Significantly, IVA allows unprecedented simplification of complex cloning procedures: five simultaneous modifications of any kind, multi-fragment assembly and library construction are performed in approximately half the time of current protocols, still in a single-step fashion. This system is efficient, seamless and sequence-independent, and requires no special kits, enzymes or proprietary bacteria, which will allow its immediate adoption by the academic and industrial molecular biology community. PMID:27264908

  14. IVA cloning: A single-tube universal cloning system exploiting bacterial In Vivo Assembly.

    PubMed

    García-Nafría, Javier; Watson, Jake F; Greger, Ingo H

    2016-01-01

    In vivo homologous recombination holds the potential for optimal molecular cloning, however, current strategies require specialised bacterial strains or laborious protocols. Here, we exploit a recA-independent recombination pathway, present in widespread laboratory E.coli strains, to develop IVA (In Vivo Assembly) cloning. This system eliminates the need for enzymatic assembly and reduces all molecular cloning procedures to a single-tube, single-step PCR, performed in <2 hours from setup to transformation. Unlike other methods, IVA is a complete system, and offers significant advantages over alternative methods for all cloning procedures (insertions, deletions, site-directed mutagenesis and sub-cloning). Significantly, IVA allows unprecedented simplification of complex cloning procedures: five simultaneous modifications of any kind, multi-fragment assembly and library construction are performed in approximately half the time of current protocols, still in a single-step fashion. This system is efficient, seamless and sequence-independent, and requires no special kits, enzymes or proprietary bacteria, which will allow its immediate adoption by the academic and industrial molecular biology community. PMID:27264908

  15. Generalization of continuous-variable quantum cloning with linear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Zehui; Guo, Juan; Gao, Jiangrui

    2006-05-01

    We propose an asymmetric quantum cloning scheme. Based on the proposal and experiment by Andersen [Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 240503 (2005)], we generalize it to two asymmetric cases: quantum cloning with asymmetry between output clones and between quadrature variables. These optical implementations also employ linear elements and homodyne detection only. Finally, we also compare the utility of symmetric and asymmetric cloning in an analysis of a squeezed-state quantum key distribution protocol and find that the asymmetric one is more advantageous.

  16. Antibacterial Activity of Recombinant Pig Intestinal Parasite Cecropin P4 Peptide Secreted from Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ki-Duk; Lee, Woon-Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Cecropins (Cec) are antibacterial peptides and their expression is induced in a pig intestinal parasite Ascaris suum by bacterial infection. To explore the usefulness of its activity as an antibiotic, CecP4 cDNA was prepared and cloned into the pPICZ B expression vector and followed by the integration into AOX1 locus in Pichia pastoris. The supernatants from cell culture were collected after methanol induction and concentrated for the test of antimicrobial activity. The recombinant P. patoris having CecP4 showed antimicrobial activity when tested against Staphyllococcus aureus in disc diffusion assay. We selected one of the CecP4 clones (CecP4-2) and performed further studies with it. The growth of recombinant P. pastoris was optimized using various concentration of methanol, and it was found that 2% methanol in the culture induced more antibacterial activity, compared to 1% methanol. We extended the test of antimicrobial activity by applying the concentrated supernatant of CecP4 culture to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and E. coli respectively. Recombinant CecP4 also showed antimicrobial activity against both Pseudomona and E. coli, suggesting the broad spectrum of its antimicrobial activity. After improvements for the scale-up, it will be feasible to use recombinant CecP4 for supplementation to the feed to control microbial infections in young animals, such as piglets. PMID:25049952

  17. Antibacterial Activity of Recombinant Pig Intestinal Parasite Cecropin P4 Peptide Secreted from Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Song, Ki-Duk; Lee, Woon-Kyu

    2014-02-01

    Cecropins (Cec) are antibacterial peptides and their expression is induced in a pig intestinal parasite Ascaris suum by bacterial infection. To explore the usefulness of its activity as an antibiotic, CecP4 cDNA was prepared and cloned into the pPICZ B expression vector and followed by the integration into AOX1 locus in Pichia pastoris. The supernatants from cell culture were collected after methanol induction and concentrated for the test of antimicrobial activity. The recombinant P. patoris having CecP4 showed antimicrobial activity when tested against Staphyllococcus aureus in disc diffusion assay. We selected one of the CecP4 clones (CecP4-2) and performed further studies with it. The growth of recombinant P. pastoris was optimized using various concentration of methanol, and it was found that 2% methanol in the culture induced more antibacterial activity, compared to 1% methanol. We extended the test of antimicrobial activity by applying the concentrated supernatant of CecP4 culture to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and E. coli respectively. Recombinant CecP4 also showed antimicrobial activity against both Pseudomona and E. coli, suggesting the broad spectrum of its antimicrobial activity. After improvements for the scale-up, it will be feasible to use recombinant CecP4 for supplementation to the feed to control microbial infections in young animals, such as piglets. PMID:25049952

  18. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV) genome

    PubMed Central

    Schleiss, Mark R; McGregor, Alistair; Choi, K Yeon; Date, Shailesh V; Cui, Xiaohong; McVoy, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    In this report we describe the genomic sequence of guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV) assembled from a tissue culture-derived bacterial artificial chromosome clone, plasmid clones of viral restriction fragments, and direct PCR sequencing of viral DNA. The GPCMV genome is 232,678 bp, excluding the terminal repeats, and has a GC content of 55%. A total of 105 open reading frames (ORFs) of > 100 amino acids with sequence and/or positional homology to other CMV ORFs were annotated. Positional and sequence homologs of human cytomegalovirus open reading frames UL23 through UL122 were identified. Homology with other cytomegaloviruses was most prominent in the central ~60% of the genome, with divergence of sequence and lack of conserved homologs at the respective genomic termini. Of interest, the GPCMV genome was found in many cases to bear stronger phylogenetic similarity to primate CMVs than to rodent CMVs. The sequence of GPCMV should facilitate vaccine and pathogenesis studies in this model of congenital CMV infection. PMID:19014498

  19. Survival of free-living Acholeplasma in aerated pig manure slurry revealed by 13C-labeled bacterial biomass probing

    PubMed Central

    Hanajima, Dai; Aoyagi, Tomo; Hori, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have been performed on microbial community succession and/or predominant taxa during the composting process; however, the ecophysiological roles of microorganisms are not well understood because microbial community structures are highly diverse and dynamic. Bacteria are the most important contributors to the organic-waste decomposition process, while decayed bacterial cells can serve as readily digested substrates for other microbial populations. In this study, we investigated the active bacterial species responsible for the assimilation of dead bacterial cells and their components in aerated pig manure slurry by using 13C-labeled bacterial biomass probing. After 3 days of forced aeration, 13C-labeled and unlabeled dead Escherichia coli cell suspensions were added to the slurry. The suspensions contained 13C-labeled and unlabeled bacterial cell components, possibly including the cell wall and membrane, as well as intracellular materials. RNA extracted from each slurry sample 2 h after addition of E. coli suspension was density-resolved by isopycnic centrifugation and analyzed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism, followed by cloning and sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. In the heavy isotopically labeled RNA fraction, the predominant 13C-assimilating population was identified as belonging to the genus Acholeplasma, which was not detected in control heavy RNA. Acholeplasma spp. have limited biosynthetic capabilities and possess a wide variety of transporters, resulting in their metabolic dependence on external carbon and energy sources. The prevalence of Acholeplasma spp. was further confirmed in aerated pig manure slurry from four different pig farms by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes; their relative abundance was ∼4.4%. Free-living Acholeplasma spp. had a competitive advantage for utilizing dead bacterial cells and their components more rapidly relative to other microbial populations, thus allowing the survival and prevalence

  20. Sequence adaptations during growth of rescued classical swine fever viruses in cell culture and within infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Hadsbjerg, Johanne; Friis, Martin B; Fahnøe, Ulrik; Nielsen, Jens; Belsham, Graham J; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun

    2016-08-30

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) causes an economically important disease of swine. Four different viruses were rescued from full-length cloned cDNAs derived from the Paderborn strain of CSFV. Three of these viruses had been modified by mutagenesis (with 7 or 8 nt changes) within stem 2 of the subdomain IIIf of the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) that directs the initiation of protein synthesis. Rescued viruses were inoculated into pigs. The rescued vPader10 virus, without modifications in the IRES, induced clinical disease in pigs that was very similar to that observed previously with the parental field strain and transmission to in-contact pigs occurred. Two sequence reversions, in the NS2 and NS5B coding regions, became dominant within the virus populations in these infected pigs. Rescued viruses, with mutant IRES elements, did not induce disease and only very limited circulation of viral RNA could be detected. However, the animals inoculated with these mutant viruses seroconverted against CSFV. Thus, these mutant viruses were highly attenuated in vivo. All 4 rescued viruses were also passaged up to 20 times in cell culture. Using full genome sequencing, the same two adaptations within each of four independent virus populations were observed that restored the coding sequence to that of the parental field strain. These adaptations occurred with different kinetics. The combination of reverse genetics and in depth, full genome sequencing provides a powerful approach to analyse virus adaptation and to identify key determinants of viral replication efficiency in cells and within host animals. PMID:27527774