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Sample records for adult comorbidity evaluation-27

  1. Psychiatric comorbidity among adults with schizophrenia: a latent class analysis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jack; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2013-11-30

    Schizophrenia is a severe mental illness that often co-occurs with and can be exacerbated by other psychiatric conditions. There have not been adequate efforts to examine schizophrenia and psychiatric comorbidity beyond pairwise examination using clusters of diagnoses. This study used latent class analysis to characterize patterns of 5-year psychiatric comorbidity among a national sample of adults with schizophrenia. Baseline data from 1446 adults with schizophrenia across 57 sites in the United States were analyzed. Three latent classes were identified labeled Solely Schizophrenia, Comorbid Anxiety and Depressive Disorders with Schizophrenia, and Comorbid Addiction and Schizophrenia. Adults in the Solely Schizophrenia class had significantly better mental health than those in the two comorbid classes, but poorer illness and treatment insight than those with comorbid anxiety and depressive disorders. These results suggest that addiction and schizophrenia may represent a separate latent profile from depression, anxiety, and schizophrenia. More research is needed on how treatment can take advantage of the greater insight possessed by those with schizophrenia and comorbid anxiety and depression.

  2. Cognitive Deficits in Adults with ADHD Go beyond Comorbidity Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Katiane L.; Guimaraes-da-Silva, Paula O.; Grevet, Eugenio H.; Victor, Marcelo M.; Salgado, Carlos A. I.; Vitola, Eduardo S.; Mota, Nina R.; Fischer, Aline G.; Contini, Veronica; Picon, Felipe A.; Karam, Rafael G.; Belmonte-de-Abreu, Paulo; Rohde, Luis A.; Bau, Claiton H. D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study addresses if deficits in cognitive, attention, and inhibitory control performance in adults with ADHD are better explained by the disorder itself or by comorbid conditions. Method Adult patients with ADHD ("n" = 352) and controls ("n" = 94) were evaluated in the ADHD program of a tertiary hospital. The…

  3. Psychiatric Comorbidity in Adolescents and Young Adults with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, David S.; Tonge, Bruce J.; Brereton, Avril V.; Einfeld, Stewart L.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a study investigating rates and types of comorbid mental disorder evident in adolescents and young adults with autism. A sample of 84 young people (M = 19.5 years, SD = 4.6) with "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders," 4th Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR; American Psychiatric Association,…

  4. Emerging Comorbidities in Adult Asthma: Risks, Clinical Associations, and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Kankaanranta, Hannu; Kauppi, Paula; Tuomisto, Leena E.; Ilmarinen, Pinja

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease with many phenotypes, and age at disease onset is an important factor in separating the phenotypes. Most studies with asthma have been performed in patients being otherwise healthy. However, in real life, comorbid diseases are very common in adult patients. We review here the emerging comorbid conditions to asthma such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2), and cardiac and psychiatric diseases. Their role as risk factors for incident asthma and whether they affect clinical asthma are evaluated. Obesity, independently or as a part of metabolic syndrome, DM2, and depression are risk factors for incident asthma. In contrast, the effects of comorbidities on clinical asthma are less well-known and mostly studies are lacking. Cross-sectional studies in obese asthmatics suggest that they may have less well controlled asthma and worse lung function. However, no long-term clinical follow-up studies with these comorbidities and asthma were identified. These emerging comorbidities often occur in the same multimorbid adult patient and may have in common metabolic pathways and inflammatory or other alterations such as early life exposures, systemic inflammation, inflammasome, adipokines, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, lung mechanics, mitochondrial dysfunction, disturbed nitric oxide metabolism, and leukotrienes. PMID:27212806

  5. Differentiating Aging Among Adults With Down Syndrome and Comorbid Dementia or Psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Esbensen, Anna J; Johnson, Emily Boshkoff; Amaral, Joseph L; Tan, Christine M; Macks, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Differences were examined between three groups of adults with Down syndrome in their behavioral presentation, social life/activities, health, and support needs. We compared those with comorbid dementia, with comorbid psychopathology, and with no comorbid conditions. Adults with comorbid dementia were more likely to be older, have lower functional abilities, have worse health and more health conditions, and need more support in self-care. Adults with comorbid psychopathology were more likely to exhibit more behavior problems and to be living at home with their families. Adults with no comorbidities were most likely to be involved in community employment. Differences in behavioral presentation can help facilitate clinical diagnoses in aging in Down syndrome, and implications for differential diagnosis and service supports are discussed.

  6. Psychiatric Comorbidity in Young Adults with a Clinical Diagnosis of Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lugnegard, Tove; Hallerback, Maria Unenge; Gillberg, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    In children with autism spectrum disorders, previous studies have shown high rates of psychiatric comorbidity. To date, studies on adults have been scarce. The aim of the present study was to investigate psychiatric comorbidity in young adults with Asperger syndrome. Participants were 26 men and 28 women (mean age 27 years) with a clinical…

  7. ADHD and Comorbid Psychiatric Disorders: Adult Student Perspectives on Learning Needs and Academic Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Laura E.

    2011-01-01

    The focus of this study is to understand, from their own perspective, the learning needs of adult college students with comorbid attention deficits and psychiatric disabilities, and to identify services and practices that support their success in the college environment. Adult students with comorbid attention deficits and psychiatric disorders…

  8. Challenging Behavior and Co-Morbid Psychopathology in Adults with Intellectual Disability and Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Jane; Hemmings, Colin; Kravariti, Eugenia; Dworzynski, Katharina; Holt, Geraldine; Bouras, Nick; Tsakanikos, Elias

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between challenging behavior and co-morbid psychopathology in adults with intellectual disability (ID) and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) (N=124) as compared to adults with ID only (N=562). All participants were first time referrals to specialist mental health services and were living in community settings.…

  9. Psychiatric Comorbidity at the Time of Diagnosis in Adults With ADHD: The CAT Study.

    PubMed

    Piñeiro-Dieguez, Benjamin; Balanzá-Martínez, Vicent; García-García, Pilar; Soler-López, Begoña

    2014-01-24

    Objective: The CAT (Comorbilidad en Adultos con TDAH) study aimed to quantify and characterize the psychiatric comorbidity at the time of diagnosis of ADHD in adult outpatients. Method: Cross-sectional, multicenter, observational register of adults with ADHD diagnosed for the first time. Results: In this large sample of adult ADHD (n = 367), psychiatric comorbidities were present in 66.2% of the sample, and were more prevalent in males and in the hyperactive-impulsive and combined subtypes. The most common comorbidities were substance use disorders (39.2%), anxiety disorders (23%), and mood disorders (18.1%). In all, 88.8% patients were prescribed pharmacological treatment for ADHD (in 93.4% of cases, modified release methylphenidate capsules 50:50). Conclusion: A high proportion of psychiatric comorbidity was observed when adult outpatients received a first-time diagnosis of ADHD. The systematic registering of patients and comorbidities in clinical practice may help to better understand and manage the prognostic determinants in adult ADHD. (J. of Att. Dis. XXXX; XX(X) XX-XX).

  10. Psychiatric Comorbidity at the Time of Diagnosis in Adults With ADHD: The CAT Study.

    PubMed

    Piñeiro-Dieguez, Benjamin; Balanzá-Martínez, Vicent; García-García, Pilar; Soler-López, Begoña

    2014-01-24

    Objective: The CAT (Comorbilidad en Adultos con TDAH) study aimed to quantify and characterize the psychiatric comorbidity at the time of diagnosis of ADHD in adult outpatients. Method: Cross-sectional, multicenter, observational register of adults with ADHD diagnosed for the first time. Results: In this large sample of adult ADHD (n = 367), psychiatric comorbidities were present in 66.2% of the sample, and were more prevalent in males and in the hyperactive-impulsive and combined subtypes. The most common comorbidities were substance use disorders (39.2%), anxiety disorders (23%), and mood disorders (18.1%). In all, 88.8% patients were prescribed pharmacological treatment for ADHD (in 93.4% of cases, modified release methylphenidate capsules 50:50). Conclusion: A high proportion of psychiatric comorbidity was observed when adult outpatients received a first-time diagnosis of ADHD. The systematic registering of patients and comorbidities in clinical practice may help to better understand and manage the prognostic determinants in adult ADHD. (J. of Att. Dis. XXXX; XX(X) XX-XX). PMID:24464326

  11. Psychiatric Comorbidity and Functioning in a Clinically Referred Population of Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joshi, Gagan; Wozniak, Janet; Petty, Carter; Martelon, Mary Kate; Fried, Ronna; Bolfek, Anela; Kotte, Amelia; Stevens, Jonathan; Furtak, Stephannie L.; Bourgeois, Michelle; Caruso, Janet; Caron, Ashley; Biederman, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    To systematically examine the patterns of psychiatric comorbidity and functioning in clinically referred adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Psychiatrically referred adults with and without ASD were compared on measures assessing for psychiatric comorbidity and psychosocial functioning. Sixty-three adults with ASD participated in the…

  12. Recreational Substance Use Patterns and Co-Morbid Psychopathology in Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaplin, Eddie; Gilvarry, Catherine; Tsakanikos, Elias

    2011-01-01

    There is very limited evidence on the patterns of recreational substance use among adults with Intellectual Disabilities (ID) who have co-morbid mental health problems. In this study we collected clinical and socio-demographic information as well as data on substance use patterns for consecutive new referrals (N = 115) to specialist mental health…

  13. Psychiatric Comorbidity and Medication Use in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Tara R.; Viskochil, Joseph; Farley, Megan; Coon, Hilary; McMahon, William M.; Morgan, Jubel; Bilder, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate comorbid psychiatric disorders and psychotropic medication use among adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) ascertained as children during a 1980's statewide Utah autism prevalence study (n = 129). Seventy-three individuals (56.6%) met criteria for a current psychiatric disorder; 89…

  14. New Insights into the Comorbidity between ADHD and Major Depression in Adolescent and Young Adult Females

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biederman, Joseph; Ball, Sarah W.; Monuteaux, Michael C.; Mick, Eric; Spencer, Thomas J.; McCreary, Michelle; Cote, Michelle; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2008-01-01

    The association between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and major depression (MD) in adolescent and young adult females is evaluated. Findings indicate that MD emerging in the context of ADHD is an impairing and severe comorbidity that needs to be considered further clinically and scientifically.

  15. Psychopathology: Differences among Adults with Intellectually Disabled, Comorbid Autism Spectrum Disorders and Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kimberly R. M.; Matson, Johnny L.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to systematically examine group differences among adults with intellectual disabilities (ID), comorbid autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and epilepsy through a detailed exploration of the characteristics that these disorders present in the area of psychopathology. Previous studies indicating that individuals with ID have…

  16. Gender Differences in Co-Morbid Psychopathology and Clinical Management in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsakanikos, Elias; Underwood, Lisa; Kravariti, Eugenia; Bouras, Nick; McCarthy, Jane

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined rates of co-morbid psychopathology and clinical management/care pathways in adult females (N = 50) and males (N = 100) with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and intellectual disability (ID) living in community settings. We also compared a sub-sample (N = 60) with ASD to an age-, gender- and ID-matched control group (N =…

  17. Disparities in the prevalence of comorbidities among US adults by state Medicaid expansion status

    PubMed Central

    Akinyemiju, Tomi; Jha, Megha; Moore, Justin Xavier; Pisu, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Introduction About 92% of US older adults have at least one chronic disease or medical condition and 77% have at least two. Low-income and uninsured adults in particular experience a higher burden of comorbidities, and the Medicaid expansion provision of the Affordable Care Act was designed to improve access to healthcare in this population group. However, a significant number of US states have declined expansion. The purpose of this study is to determine the distribution of low-income and uninsured adults in expanded versus non-expanded states, and evaluate the prevalence of comorbidities in both groups. Methods Data from the 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) dataset was analyzed, and Medicaid expansion status was assessed from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services report on State Medicaid and CHIP Income Eligibility Standards. Next, age adjusted mean number of comorbidities between expanded and non-expanded states was compared, with adjustment for socio-demographic differences. Results Expanded states had a higher proportion of adults with income of at least $50,000 per year (39.6% vs. 35.5%, p < 0.01) and a lower proportion of individuals with no health insurance coverage (15.2% vs. 20.3%, p < 0.01) compared with non-expanded states. Among the uninsured, there was a higher proportion of obese (31.6% vs. 26.9%, p < 001), and higher average number of comorbidities (1.62 vs. 1.52, p < 0.01) in non-expanded states compared to expanded states. Overall, the prevalence of comorbidities was higher among BRFSS participants in states that did not expand Medicaid compared with those in expanded states. Conclusion States without Medicaid expansion have a greater proportion of poor, uninsured adults with more chronic diseases and conditions. PMID:27095325

  18. Adult ADHD and comorbid depression: A consensus-derived diagnostic algorithm for ADHD

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Diane; Kutcher, Stan; Binder, Carin; Levitt, Anthony; Fallu, Angelo; Rosenbluth, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Many patients present to their physician with depression as their primary symptom. However, depression may mask other comorbid disorders. This article presents diagnostic criteria and treatment recommendations (and monitoring) pertaining to the diagnosis of adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), which may be missed in patients who present with depressive symptoms, or major depressive disorder (MDD). Other co-occurring conditions such as anxiety, substance use, and bipolar disorder are briefly discussed. Methods: A panel of psychiatrist-clinicians with expertise in the area of child and adolescent ADHD and mood disorders, adult mood disorders, and adult ADHD was convened. A literature search for recommendations on the diagnosis and treatment of co-occurring conditions (MDD, anxiety symptoms, and substance use) with adult ADHD was performed. Based on this, and the panel’s clinical expertise, the authors developed a diagnostic algorithm and recommendations for the treatment of adult ADHD with co-occurring MDD. Results: Little information exists to assist clinicians in diagnosing ADHD co-occurring with other disorders such as MDD. A three-step process was developed by the panel to aid in the screening and diagnosis of adult ADHD. In addition, comorbid MDD, bipolar disorder, anxiety symptoms, substance use and cardiovascular concerns regarding stimulant use are discussed. Conclusion: This article provides clinicians with a clinically relevant overview of the literature on comorbid ADHD and depression and offers a clinically useful diagnostic algorithm and treatment suggestions. PMID:19557108

  19. Comorbid Social Anxiety Disorder in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maddox, Brenna B.; White, Susan W.

    2015-01-01

    Social anxiety symptoms are common among cognitively unimpaired youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Few studies have investigated the co-occurrence of social anxiety disorder (SAD) in adults with ASD, although identification may aid access to effective treatments and inform our scientific efforts to parse heterogeneity. In this preliminary…

  20. Occupational Outcome in Adult ADHD: Impact of Symptom Profile, Comorbid Psychiatric Problems, and Treatment--A Cross-Sectional Study of 414 Clinically Diagnosed Adult ADHD Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halmoy, Anne; Fasmer, Ole Bernt; Gillberg, Christopher; Haavik, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effects of symptom profile, comorbid psychiatric problems, and treatment on occupational outcome in adult ADHD patients. Method: Adult ADHD patients (N = 414) responded to questionnaires rating past and present symptoms of ADHD, comorbid conditions, treatment history, and work status. Results: Of the patients, 24%…

  1. Psychiatric comorbidity in young adults with a clinical diagnosis of Asperger syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lugnegård, Tove; Hallerbäck, Maria Unenge; Gillberg, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    In children with autism spectrum disorders, previous studies have shown high rates of psychiatric comorbidity. To date, studies on adults have been scarce. The aim of the present study was to investigate psychiatric comorbidity in young adults with Asperger syndrome. Participants were 26 men and 28 women (mean age 27 years) with a clinical diagnosis of Asperger syndrome. Psychiatric comorbidity was assessed by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders. IQ was measured using the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Third Edition. Autism spectrum diagnoses were confirmed using the DIagnostic Interview for Social and Communication Disorders. In our study group, 70% had experienced at least one episode of major depression, and 50% had suffered from recurrent depressive episodes. Anxiety disorders were seen in about 50%. Psychotic disorders and substance-induced disorders were uncommon. In conclusion, young adults with autism spectrum disorders are at high risk for mood and anxiety disorders. To identify these conditions and offer treatment, elevated vigilance is needed in clinical practice.

  2. Chronic cough in Korean adults: a literature review on common comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sung-Yoon; Kim, Gun-Woo; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Cho, Sang-Heon

    2016-01-01

    Chronic cough is a significant medical condition with high prevalence and a strong negative impact on the quality of life. Cough hypersensitivity is thought to underlie chronic cough, with several environmental and host factors interacting to cause neuronal sensitization and chronicity. Comorbid conditions affecting cough reflex pathways, such as upper airway diseases, asthma, and gastroesophageal reflux, play important roles in chronic cough. However, their prevalence may vary in patients living in different geographical regions or with different ethnicities. We conducted a literature review to examine common comorbidities in Korean adult patients with chronic cough, their clinical implications, and the issues that still need to be addressed in the development of clinical evidence of chronic cough in Korean adult patients. PMID:27803879

  3. The Neuropsychological Profile of Comorbid Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Adult ADHD.

    PubMed

    Antshel, Kevin M; Biederman, Joseph; Spencer, Thomas J; Faraone, Stephen V

    2014-02-24

    Objective: ADHD and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are often comorbid yet despite the increased comorbidity between the two disorders, to our knowledge, no data have been published regarding the neuropsychological profile of adults with comorbid ADHD and PTSD. Likewise, previous empirical studies of the neuropsychology of PTSD did not control for ADHD status. We sought to fill this gap in the literature and to assess the extent to which neuropsychological test performance predicted psychosocial functioning, and perceived quality of life. Method: Participants were 201 adults with ADHD attending an outpatient mental health clinic between 1998 and 2003 and 123 controls without ADHD. Participants completed a large battery of self-report measures and psychological tests. Diagnoses were made using data obtained from structured psychiatric interviews (i.e., Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children Epidemiologic Version). Results: Differences emerged between control participants and participants with ADHD on multiple neuropsychological tests. Across all tests, control participants outperformed participants with ADHD. Differences between the two ADHD groups emerged on seven psychological subtests including multiple Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third edition and Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test measures. These test differences did not account for self-reported quality of life differences between groups. Conclusion: The comorbidity with PTSD in adults with ADHD is associated with weaker cognitive performance on several tasks that appear related to spatial/perceptual abilities and fluency. Neuropsychological test performances may share variance with the quality of life variables yet are not mediators of the quality of life ratings. (J. of Att. Dis. XXXX; XX(X) XX-XX). PMID:24567364

  4. Comorbidities and factors associated with endoscopic surgical outcomes in adult laryngotracheal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Kocdor, Pelin; Siegel, Eric R; Suen, James Y; Richter, Gresham; Tulunay-Ugur, Ozlem E

    2016-02-01

    This study which is a retrospective chart review aims to characterize the comorbidities associated with adult laryngotracheal stenosis and evaluate the relationship of these with stenosis grade, length, surgical interventions, and surgical intervals. Patients' demographics, medical and surgical comorbidities, grade of stenosis, quantity and degree of balloon dilations, dilation intervals, open airway procedures, and tracheotomy status were recorded from 2002 to 2012, at a tertiary voice and airway center. Surgical outcomes were evaluated in relation to patient comorbidities, stenosis quality, and surgical procedures. A total of 101 patients with laryngotracheal stenosis were examined with female patients comprising 71 % of the population. Seventeen patients (16.8 %) had idiopathic stenosis. Number of balloon dilations ranged from 0 to 24 (mean = 3.3). The average time between dilations was 38.4 weeks (range = 1.14-215.8 weeks). The patients with idiopathic stenosis were found to have a lower grade (p = 0.0066). Fifty-two patients (51.5 %) received a tracheotomy at one point during their management. The 14 patients (13.9 %) who remained tracheotomy dependent had a body mass index (BMI) of >30. No statistically significant correlation was found when the patients' age, BMI and comorbidites were compared with the grade of stenosis, number of balloon dilatations needed and other surgical interventions. On the other hand, interval in between surgeries was found to be longer in patients without an intubation history, and in idiopathic SGS (p = 0.004, p = 0.015, respectively). There was no significant relationship between surgical interval and gender, BMI, length of stenosis, grade (p = 0.059, p = 0.47, p = 0.97, p = 0.36, respectively). Airway stenosis in adults is complicated by the presence of multiple comorbidities. Better understanding of the etiology could aid in the prevention of the injury before it forms.

  5. Comorbidity of Personality Disorders and Adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)--Review of Recent Findings.

    PubMed

    Matthies, Swantje; Philipsen, Alexandra

    2016-04-01

    Children suffering from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may remit until adulthood. But, more than 60-80% have persisting ADHD symptoms. ADHD as an early manifesting neurodevelopmental disorder is considered a major risk factor for the development of comorbid psychiatric disorders in later life. Particularly, personality disorders are oftentimes observed in adult patients suffering from ADHD. If ADHD and personality disorders share common etiological mechanisms and/or if ADHD as a severely impairing condition influences psychological functioning and learning and leads to unfavorable learning histories is unclear. The development of inflexible and dysfunctional beliefs on the basis of real and perceived impairments or otherness due to the core symptoms of ADHD is intuitively plausible. Such beliefs are a known cause for the development of personality disorders. But, why some personality disorders are more frequently found in ADHD patients as for example antisocial and borderline personality disorder remains subject of debate. Because of the high prevalence of ADHD and the high impact of personality disorders on daily functioning, it is important to take them into account when treating patients with ADHD. Research on the developmental trajectories leading to personality disorders in adult ADHD patients might open the door for targeted interventions to prevent impairing comorbid clinical pictures.

  6. Comorbidity of Personality Disorders and Adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)--Review of Recent Findings.

    PubMed

    Matthies, Swantje; Philipsen, Alexandra

    2016-04-01

    Children suffering from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may remit until adulthood. But, more than 60-80% have persisting ADHD symptoms. ADHD as an early manifesting neurodevelopmental disorder is considered a major risk factor for the development of comorbid psychiatric disorders in later life. Particularly, personality disorders are oftentimes observed in adult patients suffering from ADHD. If ADHD and personality disorders share common etiological mechanisms and/or if ADHD as a severely impairing condition influences psychological functioning and learning and leads to unfavorable learning histories is unclear. The development of inflexible and dysfunctional beliefs on the basis of real and perceived impairments or otherness due to the core symptoms of ADHD is intuitively plausible. Such beliefs are a known cause for the development of personality disorders. But, why some personality disorders are more frequently found in ADHD patients as for example antisocial and borderline personality disorder remains subject of debate. Because of the high prevalence of ADHD and the high impact of personality disorders on daily functioning, it is important to take them into account when treating patients with ADHD. Research on the developmental trajectories leading to personality disorders in adult ADHD patients might open the door for targeted interventions to prevent impairing comorbid clinical pictures. PMID:26893231

  7. Mental-Physical Comorbidity in Korean Adults: Results from a Nationwide General Population Survey in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Hyun; Bae, Jae Nam; Cho, Seong-Jin; Lee, Jun-Young; Kim, Byung-Soo; Cho, Maeng Je

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to estimate the prevalence of mental-physical comorbidity and health-threatening risk factors in subjects with mental disorders, and the risks of mental disorders in those with physical diseases for the last 12 months in the general Korean population. Methods Korean Epidemiologic Catchment Area study replication (KECA-R) was conducted for 6,510 adults between August 2006 and April 2007. The Korean version of Composite International Diagnostic Interview 2.1 (K-CIDI) was used in the survey. Prevalence of mental and physical disorders, and risk factors for physical health were calculated, and their associations were evaluated with adjustment for age and sex. Results Subjects with any mental disorder showed significantly higher prevalence of chronic physical conditions (adjusted odds ratio, AOR=1.5 to 2.8, p<0.001) and medical risk factors including smoking, heavy drinking, overweight, and hypertension (AOR=1.5 to 4.0, p<0.001). Of those with chronic physical conditions, 21.6% had one or more comorbid mental disorder compared with 10.5% of the subjects without chronic physical disorders (AOR=2.6, p<0.001). Contrary to expectations, depressive disorders did not show significant association with hypertension and prevalence of obesity was not influenced by presence of mental disorders. Further studies should assess these findings. Conclusion This is the first identification of significant mental-physical comorbidity in the general Korean population. Clinicians and health care officials should keep in mind of its potential adverse effects on treatment outcome and aggravated disease-related socioeconomic burden. PMID:27757127

  8. Prognostic Impact of Comorbidity in Patients with Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Megwalu, Ifeanyichukwu I.; Vlahiotis, Anna; Radwan, Mohamed; Piccirillo, Jay F.; Kibel, Adam S.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine the impact of comorbidity on survival of bladder cancer patients. Methods The population included 675 patients with newly diagnosed bladder cancer whose medical information was abstracted from a hospital cancer registry. Adult Comorbidity Evaluation-27, a validated instrument, was used to prospectively categorize comorbidity. Independent variables assessed include comorbidity, American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, grade, age, gender, and race. Outcome measure was overall survival. We analyzed the entire cohort, patients with noninvasive disease, and patients requiring cystectomy. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to assess impact of independent variables on survival. Results Median age at diagnosis for the entire cohort was 71 yr and median follow-up was 45 mo. Of 675 patients, 446 had at least one comorbid condition and 301 died during follow-up. On multivariable analysis for the entire cohort, comorbidity (p = 0.0001), AJCC stage (p = 0.0001), age (p = 0.0001), and race (p = 0.0045) significantly predicted overall survival. On subset analysis of noninvasive bladder cancer patients, comorbidity (p = 0.0001) and age (p = 0.0001) independently predicted overall survival, whereas stage, grade, race, and gender did not. On subset analysis of cystectomy patients, comorbidity (p = 0.0053), stage (p = 0.0001), and race (p = 0.0449) significantly predicted overall survival. Conclusions Comorbidity is an independent predictor of overall survival in the entire cohort of bladder cancer patients, the subset with noninvasive disease, and the subset treated with cystectomy. PMID:17997024

  9. The role of ASTN2 variants in childhood and adult ADHD, comorbid disorders and associated personality traits.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Christine M; Lempp, Thomas; Nguyen, T Trang; Jacob, Christian P; Weissflog, Lena; Romanos, Marcel; Renner, Tobias J; Walitza, Susanne; Warnke, Andreas; Rujescu, Dan; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Reif, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Previous linkage and genome wide association (GWA) studies in ADHD indicated astrotactin 2 (ASTN2) as a candidate gene for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). ASTN2 plays a key role in glial-guided neuronal migration. To investigate whether common variants in ASTN2 contribute to ADHD disorder risk, we tested 63 SNPs spanning ASTN2 for association with ADHD and specific comorbid disorders in two samples: 171 families of children with ADHD and their parents (N = 592), and an adult sample comprising 604 adult ADHD cases and 974 controls. The C-allele of rs12376789 in ASTN2 nominally increased the risk for ADHD in the trio sample (p = 0.025). This was not observed in the adult case-control sample alone, but retained in the combined sample (nominal p = 0.030). Several other SNPs showed nominally significant association with comorbid disorders, especially anxiety disorder, in the childhood and adult ADHD samples. Some ASTN2 variants were nominally associated with personality traits in the adult ADHD sample and overlapped with risk alleles for comorbid disorders in childhood. None of the findings survived correction for multiple testing, thus, results do not support a major role of common variants in ASTN2 in the pathogenesis of ADHD, its comorbid disorders or ADHD associated personality traits. PMID:27138430

  10. Compulsions in adults with mental retardation: prevalence, phenomenology, and comorbidity with stereotypy and self-injury.

    PubMed

    Bodfish, J W; Crawford, T W; Powell, S B; Parker, D E; Golden, R N; Lewis, M H

    1995-09-01

    A variety of conceptual similarities between compulsions seen in individuals with obsessive compulsive disorder and stereotypy and self-injury seen in individuals with mental retardation led us to investigate the prevalence, phenomenology, and comorbidity of compulsions in adults with severe or profound mental retardation. We developed simple assessment screening instruments for stereotypy and self-injury and used Gedye's Compulsive Behavior Checklist and found acceptable levels of reliability, stability, and validity for each instrument. Prevalences were as follows: stereotypy: 60.9%; self-injury: 46.6%; and compulsion: 40%. The occurrence of compulsions was significantly positively associated with the occurrence of stereotypy, self-injury, and stereotypy plus self-injury.

  11. Young adults with hemophilia in the U.S.: demographics, comorbidities, and health status.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Randall; Baker, Judith; Riske, Brenda; Ullman, Megan; Niu, Xiaoli; Norton, Kristi; Lou, Mimi; Nichol, Michael B

    2015-12-01

    Improvements in hemophilia care over the last several decades might lead to expectations of a near-normal quality of life for young adults with hemophilia. However, few published reports specifically examine health status indicators in this population. To remedy this knowledge gap, we examined the impact of hemophilia on physical and social functioning and quality of life among a national US cohort of 141 young men with hemophilia aged 18-34 years of age who received care at 10 geographically diverse, federally funded hemophilia treatment centers in 11 states between 2005 and 2013 and enrolled in the Hemophilia Utilization Group Studies. Indicators studied included educational achievement, employment status, insurance, health-related quality of life, and prevalence of the following comorbidities: pain, range of motion limitation, overweight/obesity, and viral status. The cohort was analyzed to compare those aged 18-24 to those aged 25-34 years. When compared to the general US adult population, this nationally representative cohort of young US adults with hemophilia experienced significant health and social burdens: more liver disease, joint damage, joint pain, and unemployment as well as lower high-school graduation rates. Nearly half were overweight or obese. Conversely, this cohort had higher levels of health insurance and equivalent mental health scores. While attention has typically focused on newborns, children, adolescents, and increasingly, on older persons with hemophilia, our findings suggest that a specific focus on young adults is warranted to determine the most effective interventions to improve health and functioning for this apparently vulnerable age group. PMID:26619192

  12. Are Sleep Onset/Maintenance Difficulties Associated with Medical or Psychiatric Comorbidities in Nondemented Community-Dwelling Older Adults?

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Molly E.; Bigal, Marcelo E.; Katz, Mindy J.; Derby, Carol A.; Lipton, Richard B.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Older adults frequently report disruptions in their ability to initiate and maintain sleep. It remains unclear whether these sleep problems are consequent to associated medical comorbidities or if they represent primary sleep disturbances that exist independent of other disorders of senescence. Herein we describe sleep characteristics and associated medical and psychiatric comorbidities among ethnically diverse nondemented older adults. Methods: The cross-sectional sample consisted of 702 participants drawn from the Einstein Aging Study (EAS), a community-based study of aging. Sleep onset/maintenance difficulties (SO/MD) were ascertained using responses from the Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale (MOS-SS). Participants also completed assessments of medical history, psychological symptoms, and medication use. Results: Participants were an average of 80 ± 5.5 years of age and had 14 ± 3.4 years of education. Older adults reported sleeping an average of 6.5 ± 1.2 h/night. Mild SO/MD was reported in 43% of participants, while moderate/severe SO/MD was reported in 12% of participants. Sleep problems were associated with measures of obesity and symptoms of depression and anxiety. SO/MD was not associated with history of common medical conditions. Use rates of insomnia medication were low (0% to 3%). Conclusions: The prevalence of SO/MD is high in the elderly community-dwelling population and is associated with common psychiatric disorders. With the exception of obesity, SO/MD is not associated with common medical disorders. Further study is necessary to disentangle the nature of the relationship between sleep disturbance and psychiatric comorbidity among older adults. Citation: Zimmerman ME; Bigal ME; Katz MJ; Derby CA; Lipton RB. Are sleep onset/maintenance difficulties associated with medical or psychiatric comorbidities in nondemented community-dwelling older adults? J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(4):363-369. PMID:23585752

  13. Lifetime medical and psychiatric comorbidity of night eating behavior in the Swedish Twin Study of Adults: Genes and Environment (STAGE).

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Jennifer D; Allison, Kelly C; Stunkard, Albert J; Bulik, Cynthia M; Thornton, Laura M; Karin Lindroos, Anna; Rasmussen, Finn

    2012-09-30

    The medical and psychosocial comorbidity of two core features of night eating syndrome (NES), evening hyperphagia (EH) and nocturnal awakening and ingestion of food (NI), was evaluated in adults enrolled in the Swedish Twin Study of Adults: Genes and Environment (STAGE) study. As part of the STAGE study, more than 20,000 participants completed assessments of their physical and mental health, which included two night eating screening questions designed to assess EH and NI. STAGE participants who completed a night eating validation interview to confirm the presence or absence of night eating and who had comorbidity data available (n=463) were compared on the lifetime prevalence of several psychiatric and medical conditions. In contrast to previous studies, night eating (EH and/or NI) was not significantly associated with lifetime history of any mental or physical health variable.

  14. Lifetime medical and psychiatric comorbidity of night eating behavior in the Swedish Twin Study of Adults: Genes and Environment (STAGE).

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Jennifer D; Allison, Kelly C; Stunkard, Albert J; Bulik, Cynthia M; Thornton, Laura M; Karin Lindroos, Anna; Rasmussen, Finn

    2012-09-30

    The medical and psychosocial comorbidity of two core features of night eating syndrome (NES), evening hyperphagia (EH) and nocturnal awakening and ingestion of food (NI), was evaluated in adults enrolled in the Swedish Twin Study of Adults: Genes and Environment (STAGE) study. As part of the STAGE study, more than 20,000 participants completed assessments of their physical and mental health, which included two night eating screening questions designed to assess EH and NI. STAGE participants who completed a night eating validation interview to confirm the presence or absence of night eating and who had comorbidity data available (n=463) were compared on the lifetime prevalence of several psychiatric and medical conditions. In contrast to previous studies, night eating (EH and/or NI) was not significantly associated with lifetime history of any mental or physical health variable. PMID:22560060

  15. Aripiprazole Improves Associated Comorbid Conditions in Addition to Tics in Adult Patients with Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gerasch, Sarah; Kanaan, Ahmad Seif; Jakubovski, Ewgeni; Müller-Vahl, Kirsten R

    2016-01-01

    Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (GTS) is characterized by motor and vocal tics, as well as associated comorbid conditions including obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), depression, and anxiety which are present in a substantial number of patients. Although randomized controlled trials including a large number of patients are still missing, aripiprazole is currently considered as a first choice drug for the treatment of tics. The aim of this study was to further investigate efficacy and safety of aripiprazole in a group of drug-free, adult patients. Specifically, we investigated the influence of aripiprazole on tic severity, comorbidities, premonitory urge (PU), and quality of life (QoL). Moreover, we were interested in the factors that influence a patient's decision in electing for-or against- pharmacological treatment. In this prospective uncontrolled open-label study, we included 44 patients and used a number of rating scales to assess tic severity, PU, comorbidities, and QoL at baseline and during treatment with aripiprazole. Eighteen out of fortyfour patients decided for undergoing treatment for their tics with aripiprazole and completed follow-up assessments after 4-6 weeks. Our major findings were (1) aripiprazole resulted in significant reduction of tics, but did not affect PU; (2) aripiprazole significantly improved OCD and showed a trend toward improvement of other comorbidities including depression, anxiety, and ADHD; (3) neither severity of tics, nor PU or QoL influenced patients' decisions for or against treatment of tics with aripiprazole; instead patients with comorbid OCD tended to decide in favor of, while patients with comorbid ADHD tended to decide against tic treatment; (4) most frequently reported adverse effects were sleeping problems; (5) patients' QoL was mostly impaired by comorbid depression. Our results suggest that aripiprazole may improve associated comorbid conditions in addition to tics

  16. Aripiprazole Improves Associated Comorbid Conditions in Addition to Tics in Adult Patients with Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gerasch, Sarah; Kanaan, Ahmad Seif; Jakubovski, Ewgeni; Müller-Vahl, Kirsten R.

    2016-01-01

    Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (GTS) is characterized by motor and vocal tics, as well as associated comorbid conditions including obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), depression, and anxiety which are present in a substantial number of patients. Although randomized controlled trials including a large number of patients are still missing, aripiprazole is currently considered as a first choice drug for the treatment of tics. The aim of this study was to further investigate efficacy and safety of aripiprazole in a group of drug-free, adult patients. Specifically, we investigated the influence of aripiprazole on tic severity, comorbidities, premonitory urge (PU), and quality of life (QoL). Moreover, we were interested in the factors that influence a patient's decision in electing for-or against- pharmacological treatment. In this prospective uncontrolled open-label study, we included 44 patients and used a number of rating scales to assess tic severity, PU, comorbidities, and QoL at baseline and during treatment with aripiprazole. Eighteen out of fortyfour patients decided for undergoing treatment for their tics with aripiprazole and completed follow-up assessments after 4–6 weeks. Our major findings were (1) aripiprazole resulted in significant reduction of tics, but did not affect PU; (2) aripiprazole significantly improved OCD and showed a trend toward improvement of other comorbidities including depression, anxiety, and ADHD; (3) neither severity of tics, nor PU or QoL influenced patients' decisions for or against treatment of tics with aripiprazole; instead patients with comorbid OCD tended to decide in favor of, while patients with comorbid ADHD tended to decide against tic treatment; (4) most frequently reported adverse effects were sleeping problems; (5) patients' QoL was mostly impaired by comorbid depression. Our results suggest that aripiprazole may improve associated comorbid conditions in addition to tics

  17. Aripiprazole Improves Associated Comorbid Conditions in Addition to Tics in Adult Patients with Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gerasch, Sarah; Kanaan, Ahmad Seif; Jakubovski, Ewgeni; Müller-Vahl, Kirsten R

    2016-01-01

    Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (GTS) is characterized by motor and vocal tics, as well as associated comorbid conditions including obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), depression, and anxiety which are present in a substantial number of patients. Although randomized controlled trials including a large number of patients are still missing, aripiprazole is currently considered as a first choice drug for the treatment of tics. The aim of this study was to further investigate efficacy and safety of aripiprazole in a group of drug-free, adult patients. Specifically, we investigated the influence of aripiprazole on tic severity, comorbidities, premonitory urge (PU), and quality of life (QoL). Moreover, we were interested in the factors that influence a patient's decision in electing for-or against- pharmacological treatment. In this prospective uncontrolled open-label study, we included 44 patients and used a number of rating scales to assess tic severity, PU, comorbidities, and QoL at baseline and during treatment with aripiprazole. Eighteen out of fortyfour patients decided for undergoing treatment for their tics with aripiprazole and completed follow-up assessments after 4-6 weeks. Our major findings were (1) aripiprazole resulted in significant reduction of tics, but did not affect PU; (2) aripiprazole significantly improved OCD and showed a trend toward improvement of other comorbidities including depression, anxiety, and ADHD; (3) neither severity of tics, nor PU or QoL influenced patients' decisions for or against treatment of tics with aripiprazole; instead patients with comorbid OCD tended to decide in favor of, while patients with comorbid ADHD tended to decide against tic treatment; (4) most frequently reported adverse effects were sleeping problems; (5) patients' QoL was mostly impaired by comorbid depression. Our results suggest that aripiprazole may improve associated comorbid conditions in addition to tics

  18. Aripiprazole Improves Associated Comorbid Conditions in Addition to Tics in Adult Patients with Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gerasch, Sarah; Kanaan, Ahmad Seif; Jakubovski, Ewgeni; Müller-Vahl, Kirsten R.

    2016-01-01

    Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (GTS) is characterized by motor and vocal tics, as well as associated comorbid conditions including obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), depression, and anxiety which are present in a substantial number of patients. Although randomized controlled trials including a large number of patients are still missing, aripiprazole is currently considered as a first choice drug for the treatment of tics. The aim of this study was to further investigate efficacy and safety of aripiprazole in a group of drug-free, adult patients. Specifically, we investigated the influence of aripiprazole on tic severity, comorbidities, premonitory urge (PU), and quality of life (QoL). Moreover, we were interested in the factors that influence a patient's decision in electing for-or against- pharmacological treatment. In this prospective uncontrolled open-label study, we included 44 patients and used a number of rating scales to assess tic severity, PU, comorbidities, and QoL at baseline and during treatment with aripiprazole. Eighteen out of fortyfour patients decided for undergoing treatment for their tics with aripiprazole and completed follow-up assessments after 4–6 weeks. Our major findings were (1) aripiprazole resulted in significant reduction of tics, but did not affect PU; (2) aripiprazole significantly improved OCD and showed a trend toward improvement of other comorbidities including depression, anxiety, and ADHD; (3) neither severity of tics, nor PU or QoL influenced patients' decisions for or against treatment of tics with aripiprazole; instead patients with comorbid OCD tended to decide in favor of, while patients with comorbid ADHD tended to decide against tic treatment; (4) most frequently reported adverse effects were sleeping problems; (5) patients' QoL was mostly impaired by comorbid depression. Our results suggest that aripiprazole may improve associated comorbid conditions in addition to tics

  19. Effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Administration on Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus Colonization in Adults with Comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Hibberd, Patricia L.; Goldin, Barry; Thorpe, Cheleste; McDermott, Laura; Snydman, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are endemic in health care settings. These organisms colonize the gastrointestinal tract and can lead to infection which is associated with increased mortality. There is no treatment for VRE colonization. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial to examine the safety and efficacy of administration of the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) for the reduction or elimination of intestinal colonization by VRE. Colonized adults were randomized to receive LGG or placebo for 14 days. Quantitative stool cultures for LGG and VRE were collected at baseline and days 7, 14, 21, 28, and 56. Day 14 stool samples from some subjects were analyzed by quantitative PCR (qPCR) for LGG. Patients were closely monitored for adverse events. Eleven subjects, of whom 5 received LGG and 6 received placebo, were analyzed. No differences in VRE colony counts were seen at any time points between groups. No decline in colony counts was seen over time in subjects who received LGG. LGG was detected by PCR in all samples tested from subjects who received LGG but was only isolated in culture from 2 of 5 subjects in the LGG group. No treatment-related adverse events were seen. We demonstrated that LGG could be administered safely to patients with comorbidities and is recoverable in some patients' stool cultures. Concomitant administration of antibiotics may have resulted in an inability to recover viable organisms from stool samples, but LGG DNA could still be detected by qPCR. LGG administration did not affect VRE colonization in this study. (This study was registered at Clinicaltrials.gov under registration no. NCT00756262.) PMID:26014940

  20. Adolescents and Adults with Autism with and without Co-morbid Psychiatric Disorders: Differences in Maternal Well-Being

    PubMed Central

    Kring, Sheilah R.; Greenberg, Jan S.; Seltzer, Marsha Mailick

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the associations between the characteristics of adolescents and adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and maternal well-being. Two groups were compared: mothers of adolescents and adults with ASD and co-morbid psychiatric disorders (n = 142) and mothers whose sons or daughters had a single diagnosis of ASD (n = 130). Individuals with co-morbid psychiatric disorders had higher levels of repetitive behaviors, asocial behavior, and unpredictability of behavior than their counterparts with ASD only. They also had poorer rated health as well as more frequent gastrointestinal problems and sleep problems. Mothers of sons and daughters with ASD and co-morbid psychiatric disorders reported higher levels of burden and a poorer quality parent-child relationship than mothers of sons and daughters with ASD only. Higher levels of asocial behavior, unpredictability of behavior, and poorer health in sons and daughters with ASD were predictive of greater burden in mothers and a poorer quality parent-child relationship. PMID:20556237

  1. Pharmacological and clinical dilemmas of prescribing in co-morbid adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and addiction

    PubMed Central

    Pérez de los Cobos, José; Siñol, Núria; Pérez, Víctor; Trujols, Joan

    2014-01-01

    The present article reviews whether available efficacy and safety data support the pharmacological treatment of adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in patients with concurrent substance use disorders (SUD). Arguments for and against treating adult ADHD with active SUD are discussed. Findings from 19 large open studies and controlled clinical trials show that the use of atomoxetine or extended-release methylphenidate formulations, together with psychological therapy, yield promising though inconclusive results about short term efficacy of these drugs in the treatment of adult ADHD in patients with SUD and no other severe mental disorders. However, the efficacy of these drugs is scant or lacking for treating concurrent SUD. No serious safety issues have been associated with these drugs in patients with co-morbid SUD-ADHD, given their low risk of abuse and favourable side effect and drug–drug interaction profile. The decision to treat adult ADHD in the context of active SUD depends on various factors, some directly related to SUD-ADHD co-morbidity (e.g. degree of diagnostic uncertainty for ADHD) and other factors related to the clinical expertise of the medical staff and availability of adequate resources (e.g. the means to monitor compliance with pharmacological treatment). Our recommendation is that clinical decisions be individualized and based on a careful analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of pharmacological treatment for ADHD on a case-by-case basis in the context of active SUD. PMID:23216449

  2. Disease control using low-dose-rate brachytherapy is unaffected by comorbid severity in oral cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, R; Shibuya, H; Hayashi, K; Toda, K; Watanabe, H; Miura, M

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome and complications of low-dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR-BT) for oral cancer according to comorbidity. Methods The records of a total of 180 patients who received LDR-BT for T1-2N0M0 oral cancers between January 2005 and December 2007 were analysed. The comorbidities of the patients were retrospectively graded according to the Adult Comorbidity Evaluation-27, and the relationships between the comorbidity grades and survival, disease control and the incidence of complications were analysed. Results The 2 year overall survival rates of patients with no comorbidity, Grade 1, Grade 2 and Grade 3 comorbidity were 87%, 85%, 76% and 65%, respectively, and the reduction in the survival rate according to comorbid severity was significant in a univariate analysis (p = 0.032) but not in a multivariate analysis including other clinical factors. Cause-specific survival, locoregional control and local control were not related to the comorbidity grade, or any other clinical factors. Grade 2 or 3 complications developed in 27% of the patients. The incidence of complications was unrelated to the comorbidity grade. Conclusion The disease control of oral cancer and the incidence of complications after LDR-BT were not related to comorbid severity. LDR-BT is a useful and safe treatment for patients regardless of the presence of severe comorbidity. PMID:21224307

  3. Comorbid Symptomology in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cervantes, Paige E.; Matson, Johnny L.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based treatment must begin with the systematic and comprehensive identification of an individual's complete clinical picture. Therefore, screening individuals with intellectual disability (ID) for comorbid disorders is imperative. Because of the frequent overlap between autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and ID, the current study explored the…

  4. Social Skills: Differences among Adults with Intellectual Disabilities, Co-Morbid Autism Spectrum Disorders and Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kimberly R. M.; Matson, Johnny L.

    2010-01-01

    Assessing social skills is one of the most complex and challenging areas to study because behavioral repertoires vary depending on an individual's culture and context. However, researchers have conclusively demonstrated that individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) have impaired social skills as well as those with co-morbid autism spectrum…

  5. Exploring the aggregation of four functional measures in a population of older adults with joint pain and comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In clinical settings, it is important for health care providers to measure different aspects of functioning in older adults with joint pain and comorbidity. Besides the use of distinct measures, it could also be attractive to have one general measure of functioning that incorporates several distinct measures, but provides one summary score to quantify overall level of functioning, for example for the identification of older adults at risk of poor functional outcome. Therefore, we selected four measures of functioning: Physical Functioning (PF), Activities of Daily Living (ADL), Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) and participation, and tested the possibility to aggregate these measures into one general measure of functioning. Methods A prospective cohort study of older adults (≥65 years) with joint pain and comorbidity provided baseline data (n = 407) consisting of PF (PF subscale, RAND-36; 10 items), ADL (KATZ index; 6 items), IADL (Lawton index; 7 items) and participation (KAP; 6 items). We tested two models with confirmatory factor analysis: first, a bifactor model with all four measures and second, a bifactor model with PF, ADL and IADL and a correlated but distinct subgroup factor for participation. Several model fit indexes and reliability coefficients, such as explained common variance (ECV) and omegas were computed for both models. Results The first model fitted the data well, but the reliability analysis indicated multidimensionality and unique information in the subgroup factor participation. The second model showed similar model fits, but better reliability; ECV = 0.67, omega-t = 0.94, low omega-s = 0.18-0.22 on the subgroup factors and high omega of 0.82 on participation, which all were in favour of the second model. Conclusions The results indicate that PF, ADL and IADL could be aggregated into one general measure of functioning, whereas participation should be considered as a distinct measure. PMID:24192234

  6. Interaction Effect between Weight Perception and Comorbidities on Weight Control Behavior in Overweight and Obese Adults: Is There a Sex Difference?

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jun Hyun; Ryu, Dong Hee; Park, Soon-Woo

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the interaction effect between body weight perception and chronic disease comorbidities on body weight control behavior in overweight/obese Korean adults. We analyzed data from 9,138 overweight/obese adults ≥20 yr of age from a nationally representative cross-sectional survey. Multiple logistic regression using an interaction model was performed to estimate the effect of chronic disease comorbidities on weight control behavior regarding weight perception. Adjusted odds ratios for weight control behavior tended to increase significantly with an increasing number of comorbidities in men regardless of weight perception (P<0.05 for trend), suggesting no interaction. Unlike women who perceived their weight accurately, women who under-perceived their weight did not show significant improvements in weight control behavior even with an increasing number of comorbidities. Thus, a significant interaction between weight perception and comorbidities was found only in women (P=0.031 for interaction). The effect of the relationship between accurate weight perception and chronic disease comorbidities on weight control behavior varied by sex. Improving awareness of body image is particularly necessary for overweight and obese women to prevent complications. PMID:26240477

  7. Subgroups of older adults with osteoarthritis based upon differing comorbid symptom presentations and potential underlying pain mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Although people with knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA) seek treatment because of pain, many of these individuals have commonly co-occurring symptoms (for example, fatigue, sleep problems, mood disorders). The purpose of this study was to characterize adults with OA by identifying subgroups with the above comorbid symptoms along with illness burden (a composite measure of somatic symptoms) to begin to examine whether subsets may have differing underlying pain mechanisms. Methods Community-living older adults with symptomatic knee and hip OA (n = 129) participated (68% with knee OA, 38% with hip OA). Hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis was used. To determine the relative contribution of each variable in a cluster, multivariate analysis of variance was used. Results We found three clusters. Cluster 1 (n = 45) had high levels of pain, fatigue, sleep problems, and mood disturbances. Cluster 2 (n = 38) had intermediate degrees of depression and fatigue, but low pain and good sleep. Cluster 3 (n = 42) had the lowest levels of pain, fatigue, and depression, but worse sleep quality than Cluster 2. Conclusions In adults with symptomatic OA, three distinct subgroups were identified. Although replication is needed, many individuals with OA had symptoms other than joint pain and some (such as those in Cluster 1) may have relatively stronger central nervous system (CNS) contributions to their symptoms. For such individuals, therapies may need to include centrally-acting components in addition to traditional peripheral approaches. PMID:21864381

  8. Using the Autism-Spectrum Quotient to Discriminate Autism Spectrum Disorder from ADHD in Adult Patients with and without Comorbid Substance Use Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sizoo, Bram B.; van den Brink, Wim; Gorissen-van Eenige, Marielle; Koeter, Maarten W.; van Wijngaarden-Cremers, Patricia J. M.; van der Gaag, Rutger Jan

    2009-01-01

    It is unknown whether the Autism-spectrum quotient (AQ) can discriminate between Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) with or without comorbid Substance Use Disorder (SUD). ANOVA's were used to analyse the mean AQ (sub)scores of 129 adults with ASD or ADHD. We applied receiver operating…

  9. Novel Psychoactive Substances in Young Adults with and without Psychiatric Comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Martinotti, Giovanni; Acciavatti, Tiziano; Signorelli, Maria Salvina; Bandini, Laura; Ciambrone, Paola; Aguglia, Andrea; Calò, Salvatore; Janiri, Luigi; di Giannantonio, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Comorbidities between psychiatric diseases and consumption of traditional substances of abuse (alcohol, cannabis, opioids, and cocaine) are common. Nevertheless, there is no data regarding the use of novel psychoactive substances (NPS) in the psychiatric population. The purpose of this multicentre survey is to investigate the consumption of a wide variety of psychoactive substances in a young psychiatric sample and in a paired sample of healthy subjects. Methods. A questionnaire has been administered, in different Italian cities, to 206 psychiatric patients aged 18 to 26 years and to a sample of 2615 healthy subjects matched for sex, gender, and living status. Results. Alcohol consumption was more frequent in the healthy young population compared to age-matched subjects suffering from mental illness (79.5% versus 70.7%; P < 0.003). Conversely, cocaine and NPS use was significantly more common in the psychiatric population (cocaine 8.7% versus 4.6%; P = 0.002) (NPS 9.8% versus 3%; P < 0.001). Conclusions. The use of novel psychoactive substances in a young psychiatric population appears to be a frequent phenomenon, probably still underestimated. Therefore, careful and constant monitoring and accurate evaluations of possible clinical effects related to their use are necessary. PMID:25133182

  10. Metabolic abnormalities in adult and geriatric major depression with and without comorbid dementia.

    PubMed

    Blank, Karen; Szarek, Bonnie L; Goethe, John W

    2010-06-01

    Metabolic abnormalities and metabolic syndrome (MetS) increasingly have been linked to depression. The authors studied examined inpatients 35 years and older with major depressive disorder (MDD) to determine the prevalence of component metabolic abnormalities and the full MetS with age, treatment, and comorbid dementia. Data analysis involved retrospective cross-sectional review from a nonprofit psychiatry inpatient service of all discharges 35 years and older with a diagnosis of MDD during a 3 year period (April 1, 2003 to March 31, 2006) (N=1718). Metabolic measures included waist circumference, lipid measurements, glucose, and hypertension diagnosis. Abnormal metabolic measures and MetS were highly prevalent in both young and old patients with MDD: one or more component was present in 87.6% of older (65-99 years old) and 79.9% of younger patients. Full MetS was present in 31.5% of older and 28.9% of younger patients (not significant, P=0.85). Metabolic abnormalities were not associated with atypical antipsychotics after controlling other variables. One-quarter (n=79, 24.9%) of older inpatients had a dementia co-diagnosis. Older patients with MDD and dementia had greater risk of elevated glucose while younger patients were more often hypertensive. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine the relationships of MDD with or without dementia with these highly prevalent abnormal metabolic measures and MetS.

  11. Behavior Problems: Differences among Intellectually Disabled Adults with Co-Morbid Autism Spectrum Disorders and Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kimberly R. M.; Matson, Johnny L.

    2010-01-01

    Behavior problems such as aggression, property destruction, stereotypy, self-injurious behavior, and other disruptive behavior are commonly observed among adults with intellectual disabilities (ID), autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and epilepsy residing at state-run facilities. However, it is unknown how these populations differ on behavior…

  12. Untreated ADHD in Adults: Are There Sex Differences in Symptoms, Comorbidity, and Impairment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Kirsten; Levander, Sten

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To analyze sex differences among adult, never-treated patients referred for central stimulant treatment of ADHD. Method: Data for 600 consecutive patients from northern Norway referred for evaluation by an expert team during 7 years were analyzed. General background information, diagnostic and social history, and symptom profiles were…

  13. Profiling Executive Dysfunction in Adults with Autism and Comorbid Learning Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Louise; Muldoon, Kevin; Hasan, Reem; O'Brien, Gregory; Stewart, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Executive dysfunction is thought to be primary to autism. We examined differences in executive function between 20 adults with autism and learning disability and 23 individuals with learning disabilities outside the autistic spectrum. All participants were matched for chronological age and full-scale IQ, and were given a battery of tasks assessing…

  14. Assessment and Differential Diagnosis of Comorbid Conditions in Adolescents and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trammell, Beth; Wilczynski, Susan M.; Dale, Brittany; Mcintosh, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Successful treatment of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is entirely contingent on an accurate diagnosis. Although many resources exist to help the clinician with differential diagnosis of children, particularly in early childhood, the resources available for evaluating adolescents and adults is far less prevalent. Clinicians often…

  15. A Placebo-Controlled Test of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Comorbid Insomnia in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rybarczyk, Bruce; Stepanski, Edward; Fogg, Louis; Lopez, Martita; Barry, Paulette; Davis, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    The present study tested cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for insomnia in older adults with osteoarthritis, coronary artery disease, or pulmonary disease. Ninety-two participants (mean age = 69 years) were randomly assigned to classroom CBT or stress management and wellness (SMW) training, which served as a placebo condition. Compared with SMW,…

  16. Keeping Older Adults with Vision Loss Safe: Chronic Conditions and Comorbidities that Influence Functional Mobility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddering, Anne T.

    2008-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss in Americans aged 60 and older. The loss of central vision from AMD can decrease visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, glare sensitivity, color discrimination, and the ability to adapt to changes in lighting conditions. Older adults with vision loss often have other chronic,…

  17. Prevalence and comorbidity of nocturnal wandering in the US adult general population

    PubMed Central

    Mahowald, M.W.; Dauvilliers, Y.; Krystal, A.D.; Léger, D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the prevalence and comorbid conditions of nocturnal wandering with abnormal state of consciousness (NW) in the American general population. Methods: Cross-sectional study conducted with a representative sample of 19,136 noninstitutionalized individuals of the US general population ≥18 years old. The Sleep-EVAL expert system administered questions on life and sleeping habits; health; and sleep, mental, and organic disorders (DSM-IV-TR; International Classification of Sleep Disorders, version 2; International Classification of Diseases–10). Results: Lifetime prevalence of NW was 29.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 28.5%–29.9%). In the previous year, NW was reported by 3.6% (3.3%–3.9%) of the sample: 1% had 2 or more episodes per month and 2.6% had between 1 and 12 episodes in the previous year. Family history of NW was reported by 30.5% of NW participants. Individuals with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (odds ratio [OR] 3.9), circadian rhythm sleep disorder (OR 3.4), insomnia disorder (OR 2.1), alcohol abuse/dependence (OR 3.5), major depressive disorder (MDD) (OR 3.5), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) (OR 3.9), or using over-the-counter sleeping pills (OR 2.5) or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants (OR 3.0) were at higher risk of frequent NW episodes (≥2 times/month). Conclusions: With a rate of 29.2%, lifetime prevalence of NW is high. SSRIs were associated with an increased risk of NW. However, these medications appear to precipitate events in individuals with a prior history of NW. Furthermore, MDD and OCD were associated with significantly greater risk of NW, and this was not due to the use of psychotropic medication. These psychiatric associations imply an increased risk due to sleep disturbance. PMID:22585435

  18. Persistent oral health problems associated with comorbidity and impaired diet quality in older adults.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Regan L; Ledikwe, Jenny Harris; Smiciklas-Wright, Helen; Mitchell, Diane C; Jensen, Gordon L

    2004-08-01

    Chewing, swallowing, and mouth pain (CSP) are identified as indicators of nutritional risk in older adults. Previous research has shown that oral health problems in community-living older rural adults were associated with increased hospitalization. The purpose of this study was to characterize older adults with self-reported persistent CSP problems at baseline and one-year follow-up. Participants were from the Geisinger Rural Aging Study, either with persistent oral problems (PCSP; n=22) or without problems (NCSP; n=125). Demographic, health, and anthropometric data were collected via home visit; diet information was assessed by five, 24-hour recalls collected over 10 months. PCSP subjects reported almost twice the number of medications (4.2 vs 2.6, respectively, P=.008) and diseases (7.0 vs 4.2, respectively, P=.001), with higher occurrence of type 2 diabetes mellitus, peptic ulcers/gastritis, and angina. PCSP participants had lower Healthy Eating Index scores (66.6 vs 70.6, respectively, P=.04), significantly lower intakes of vitamin A, and higher prevalence of inadequate intakes of vitamins B-6 and A. These results indicate that impaired intake of certain foods and nutrients is associated with persistent oral health problems. Oral status is an important component of overall health and should be monitored for intervention.

  19. Efficacy of atomoxetine in the treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in patients with common comorbidities in children, adolescents and adults: a review

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, Shari L.; Ghuman, Jaswinder K.; Ghuman, Harinder S.; Karpov, Irina; Schuster, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most commonly diagnosed mental health disorders and is associated with higher incidence of comorbid oppositional or conduct, mood, anxiety, pervasive developmental, and substance-use disorders. Comorbid mental health conditions may alter the presence of symptoms and treatment of ADHD. Atomoxetine (ATX), a nonstimulant medication for the treatment of ADHD, may be prescribed for individuals with ADHD and comorbid conditions despite some risk for certain undesirable side effects and lower effectiveness for the treatment of ADHD than stimulants. In this paper, we review studies utilizing randomized, placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) as well as within-subject designs to determine the effectiveness of ATX in the treatment of children and adults with ADHD and comorbid conditions. The current review uses an expanded methodology beyond systematic review of randomized controlled trials in order to improve generalizability of results to real-world practice. A total of 24 articles published from 2007 to 2015 were reviewed, including 14 RCTs: n = 1348 ATX, and n = 832 placebo. The majority of studies show that ATX is effective in the treatment of ADHD symptoms for individuals with ADHD and comorbid disorders. Cohen’s d effect sizes (ES) for improvement in ADHD symptoms and behaviors range from 0.47 to 2.21. The effectiveness of ATX to improve symptoms specific to comorbidity varied by type but appeared to be most effective for diminishing the presence of symptoms for those with comorbid anxiety, ES range of 0.40 to 1.51, and oppositional defiant disorder, ES range of 0.52 to 1.10. There are mixed or limited results for individuals with ADHD and comorbid substance-use disorders, autism spectrum disorders, dyslexia or reading disorder, depression, bipolar disorder, and Tourette syndrome. Results from this review suggest that ATX is effective in the treatment of some youth and adults with ADHD and comorbid disorders

  20. Severity but not comorbidities predicts response to methylphenidate in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: results from a naturalistic study.

    PubMed

    Victor, Marcelo M; Rovaris, Diego L; Salgado, Carlos A I; Silva, Katiane L; Karam, Rafael G; Vitola, Eduardo S; Picon, Felipe A; Contini, Verônica; Guimarães-da-Silva, Paula O; Blaya-Rocha, Paula; Belmonte-de-Abreu, Paulo S; Rohde, Luis A; Grevet, Eugenio H; Bau, Claiton H D

    2014-04-01

    Although the identification of reliable predictors of methylphenidate response in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is necessary to guide treatment decisions, very few data exist on this issue. Here, we assessed the predictors of clinical response to immediate-release methylphenidate hydrochloride (IR-MPH) in a naturalistic setting by analyzing the influence of demographic factors, severity, and a wide range of comorbid psychiatric disorders. Two hundred fifty adult patients with ADHD were evaluated and completed a short-term treatment with IR-MPH. Mental health diagnoses were based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, criteria through the use of standard structured interviews. The Swanson, Nolan, and Pelham Rating Scale, version 4, adapted to adults was used to assess the severity of ADHD. In the linear regression model, only higher severity of ADHD was associated to a better IR-MPH response (b = 0.770; P < 0.001). Treatment of comorbidities in a subsample (n = 62) did not modify this pattern. Our findings suggest that in clinical settings, patients with more severe ADHD symptoms have a good response to treatment independently from the presence of mild or stabilized comorbidities and their treatments. For adults with ADHD, differently from other common psychiatric disorders such as depression and anxiety, higher severity is associated with better treatment response.

  1. Adolescents and young adults with Down syndrome presenting to a medical clinic with depression: co-morbid obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Capone, George T; Aidikoff, Jenna M; Taylor, Kay; Rykiel, Natalie

    2013-09-01

    Adolescents and young adults with Down syndrome (DS) sometimes experience new-onset mood disorder and decline in adaptive skills. The clinical phenomenon is poorly characterized and its pathogenesis is not understood. The possible contribution of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) to this phenomenon has not been studied. Subjects were ascertained as a convenience sample through our clinic for persons with DS and medical or mental health concerns between 2004 and 2009. When mood symptoms were present an axis I diagnosis was made using DSM-IV-R criteria. Subjects without an axis I diagnosis served as controls. The Reiss scales for children's dual diagnosis and the aberrant behavior checklist (ABC) were completed by caretakers. Twenty-eight cases meeting criteria for major depressive episode (MDE) and nine controls without psychopathology were referred for overnight polysomnography (PSG). Functional decline was reported in 19 (68%) of cases with MDE, but none of the controls. Twenty-four (86%) cases had OSAS compared with only 4 (44%) of controls. Moderate-severe OSAS was present in 15 (54%) of cases compared to only 1 (11%) of controls. Intermittent sleep-associated hypoxia and REM sleep deficits were also more frequent in cases. Across all subjects, prior tonsillectomy was not related to the presence or absence of OSAS. Our findings suggest that OSAS may be a common co-morbidity in adolescents and younger adults with DS and depression. Recognition of this association maybe critical to understanding the pathogenesis and management of mood-related disorders, and functional decline in affected individuals.

  2. Effective Methylphenidate Treatment of an Adult Aspergers Syndrome and a Comorbid ADHD: A Clinical Investigation with fMRI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Mandy; Dillo, Wolfgang; Bessling, Svenja; Emrich, Hinderk M.; Ohlmeier, Martin D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Aspergers Syndrome can present as comorbid with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Very few cases of the assessment and treatment of this comorbidity in adulthood are described in the research literature. Method: A 26-year-old patient as suffering from ADHD in combination with Aspergers Syndrome is diagnosed. Treatment is…

  3. Comorbid Psychopathology and Stress Mediate the Relationship between Autistic Traits and Repetitive Behaviours in Adults with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García-Villamisar, D.; Rojahn, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Comorbid psychopathology and stress were considered possible mediators that may explain the relationship between some autistic traits and repetitive behaviours. The current study sought to examine the mediational effects of comorbid psychopathology, executive dysfunctions and stress in the relationship between some autistic traits and…

  4. Effect of Co-Morbid Conditions on Persistent Neuropathic Pain after Brachial Plexus Injury in Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chaudakshetrin, Pongparadee; Chotisukarat, Haruthai; Mandee, Sahatsa

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Neuropathic pain (NeuP) associated with traumatic brachial plexus injury (BPI) can be severe, persistent, and resistant to treatment. Moreover, comorbidity associated with NeuP may worsen the pain and quality of life. This study compared persistent NeuP after BPI between patients with and without co-morbid conditions (psychiatric dysfunction and other painful conditions) and tramadol usage as a second-line agent in combination with an antiepileptic and/or antidepressant during a 2-year follow-up. Methods The medical records of patients diagnosed with BPI referred to a pain center between 2006 and 2010 were reviewed for 2 years retrospectively. Data regarding patient demographics, injury and surgical profiles, characteristics of NeuP and its severity, and treatment received were compared between patients with and without manifesting co-morbid conditions. The NeuP and pain intensity assessments were based on the DN4 questionnaire and a numerical rating scale, respectively. Results Of the 45 patients studied, 24 patients presented with one of the following co-morbid conditions: myofascial pain (21%), psychiatric disorder (17%), phantom limb pain (4%), complex regional pain syndrome (21%), and insomnia (37%). Tramadol was required by 20 patients with co-morbidity and, 9 patients without co-morbidity (p<0.001). The mean pain score after 2 years was higher in patients with co-morbidity than in those without co-morbidity (p<0.05). Conclusions Persistent pain following BPI was more common in patients manifesting other painful conditions or psychiatric co-morbidity. A higher proportion of the patients in the co-morbid group required tramadol as a second-line of agent for pain relief.

  5. Value of Different Comorbidity Indices for Predicting Outcome in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wass, Maxi; Hitz, Friederike; Schaffrath, Judith; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Müller, Lutz P.

    2016-01-01

    Age is a dominant predictor of outcome in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, it is not clear to which extent comorbidities contribute to this effect. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of pretreatment comorbidities on survival of AML patients. In a single-center retrospective study 194 adult AML patients were included. The Hematopoietic cell transplantation comorbidity index (HCT-CI), the Adult Comorbidity Evaluation-27 (ACE-27) score and the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale for Geriatrics (CIRS-G) as well as data on demographics, cytogenetics, treatment and outcome were evaluated at the time of initial diagnosis by univariate and multivariate analysis. The study included 102 male and 92 female (median age 60.9 years) of which 173 (89.2%) received intensive chemotherapy. Median overall survival (OS) was 17 months. In univariate analysis, cardiovascular disease (26 vs 12 months, p = .005), severe hepatic disease (19 vs 4 months, p = .013) and renal impairment (17 vs 7 months, p = .016) was associated with inferior OS. For each index, the highest comorbidity burden was associated with reduced OS. However, in multivariate analysis only the ACE-27 score was associated with outcome. Besides ECOG ≥ 2 and poor cytogenetics only the ACE-27 score but not higher age was associated with OS in the group of patients receiving intensive therapy. Adjusted hazard ratios were 3.1, 3.5 and 4.0 for mild, moderate and severe ACE-27-assessed comorbidities, respectively (p = .012). Our study confirms that comorbidities significantly impact survival of AML patients and a pretreatment assessment of comorbidities may help to identify patients with poor outcome. PMID:27732646

  6. [Cardiopulmonary Comorbidities].

    PubMed

    Seiler, Frederik; von Hardenberg, Albrecht; Böhm, Michael; Bals, Robert; Maack, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    Cardiac and pulmonary diseases are primary causes of global morbidity and mortality. Since the prevalence of both cardiac and pulmonary diseases increases with age, cardiopulmonary comorbidities inflict especially the elderly. Due to the tight physiological connection of the heart and the lung, diseases of both organs affect each other beyond a mere coincidence. At the same time, due to the similarity of their respective symptoms, their differentiation is challenging in clinical practice and therefore, comorbidities can be easily overlooked. This article provides an overview on the characteristics of cardiopulmonary comorbidities and their specific-, but also mutual pathophysiology. PMID:26886042

  7. Obesity and Its Cardio-metabolic Co-morbidities Among Adult Nigerians in a Primary Care Clinic of a Tertiary Hospital in South-Eastern, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Iloh, Gabriel Uche Pascal; Ikwudinma, Austin Obiora; Obiegbu, Nnadozie Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background: Obesity once thought the medical problem of affluent countries now exist in Nigeria and has been described as a time bomb for the future explosion in the frequency of cardio-metabolic diseases. The most deleterious health consequences of obesity are on the cardiovascular system and associated disorder of lipid and glucose homeostasis. Aim: This study was designed to determine the magnitude of obesity and its cardio-metabolic co-morbidities among adult Nigerians in a primary care clinic of a tertiary hospital South-Eastern, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study carried out on 2391 adult Nigerians who were assessed for obesity using body mass index (BMI) criterion. 206 patients who had BMI ≥30kg/m2 were screened for cardio-metabolic co-morbidities. The data collected included basic demographic variables, weight, height, blood pressure; fasting plasma glucose and lipid profile. Results: The prevalence of obesity was 8.6%. Grade I obesity (67.5%) was the most common pattern; others included grade II obesity (23.3%) and grade III obesity (9.2%). Hypertension (42.7%) was the most common cardio-metabolic morbidity. Others included low HDL-cholesterol (22.8%), diabetes mellitus (15.1%), high triglyceride (12.6%), high total cholesterol (9.2%), and high LDL-cholesterol (6.8%). Conclusion: Obesity and its cardio-metabolic morbidities exist among the study population. Anthropometric determination of obesity and screening for its associated cardio-metabolic co-morbidities should constitute clinical targets for intervention in primary care clinics. PMID:24479038

  8. Comorbidity between Type 2 Diabetes and Depression in the Adult Population: Directions of the Association and Its Possible Pathophysiological Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Berge, Line Iden; Riise, Trond

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes and depression are regarded as comorbid conditions, and three possible directions of the association between the diseases can underlie this observation of comorbidity. First, common etiology can increase a person's risk of both diseases; second, persons with type 2 diabetes have increased prevalence or risk of future development of depression; or third, persons with depression have increased prevalence or risk of development of type 2 diabetes. This review gives an overview over possible pathophysiological mechanisms for each of the directions of the association between type 2 diabetes and depression and further discusses epigenetics as an additional, direction independent approach. We argue that unspecific pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the stress response might, at least to some extent, explain each of the directions of the association between type 2 diabetes and depression, while changes in brain structure and function among persons with diabetes and possible increased risk of development of type 2 diabetes after use of antidepressant agents could represent more disease specific mechanisms underlying the comorbidity. PMID:26457080

  9. Triple Comorbid Trajectories of Tobacco, Alcohol, and Marijuana Use as Predictors of Antisocial Personality Disorder and Generalized Anxiety Disorder Among Urban Adults

    PubMed Central

    Brook, Judith S.; Lee, Jung Yeon; Rubenstone, Elizabeth; Brook, David W.; Finch, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We modeled triple trajectories of tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use from adolescence to adulthood as predictors of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Methods. We assessed urban African American and Puerto Rican participants (n = 816) in the Harlem Longitudinal Development Study, a psychosocial investigation, at 4 time waves (mean ages = 19, 24, 29, and 32 years). We used Mplus to obtain the 3 variable trajectories of tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use from time 2 to time 5 and then conducted logistic regression analyses. Results. A 5-trajectory group model, ranging from the use of all 3 substances (23%) to a nonuse group (9%), best fit the data. Membership in the trajectory group that used all 3 substances was associated with an increased likelihood of both ASPD (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 6.83; 95% CI = 1.14, 40.74; P < .05) and GAD (AOR = 4.35; 95% CI = 1.63, 11.63; P < .001) in adulthood, as compared with the nonuse group, with control for earlier proxies of these conditions. Conclusions. Adults with comorbid tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use should be evaluated for use of other substances and for ASPD, GAD, and other psychiatric disorders. Treatment programs should address the use of all 3 substances to decrease the likelihood of comorbid psychopathology. PMID:24922120

  10. Mental Disorders and Problem Behavior in a Community Sample of Adults with Intellectual Disability: Three-Month Prevalence and Comorbidity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hove, Oddbjorn; Havik, Odd E.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of mental disorders in a Norwegian sample of adults with intellectual disability (ID) using the "Psychopathology Checklists for Adults With Intellectual Disability" (P-AID; Hove & Havik, 2008), a screening instrument adopting diagnostic criteria from the "Diagnostic Criteria for Psychiatric…

  11. Anxiety- rather than depression-like behavior is associated with adult neurogenesis in a female mouse model of higher trait anxiety- and comorbid depression-like behavior.

    PubMed

    Sah, A; Schmuckermair, C; Sartori, S B; Gaburro, S; Kandasamy, M; Irschick, R; Klimaschewski, L; Landgraf, R; Aigner, L; Singewald, N

    2012-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis has been implicated in affective disorders and the action of antidepressants (ADs) although the functional significance of this association is still unclear. The use of animal models closely mimicking human comorbid affective and anxiety disorders seen in the majority of patients should provide relevant novel information. Here, we used a unique genetic mouse model displaying higher trait anxiety (HAB) and comorbid depression-like behavior. We demonstrate that HABs have a lower rate of hippocampal neurogenesis and impaired functional integration of newly born neurons as compared with their normal anxiety/depression-like behavior (NAB) controls. In HABs, chronic treatment with the AD fluoxetine alleviated their higher depression-like behavior and protected them from relapse for 3 but not 7 weeks after discontinuation of the treatment without affecting neurogenesis. Similar to what has been observed in depressed patients, fluoxetine treatment induced anxiogenic-like effects during the early treatment phase in NABs along with a reduction in neurogenesis. On the other hand, treatment with AD drugs with a particularly strong anxiolytic component, namely the neurokinin-1-receptor-antagonist L-822 429 or tianeptine, increased the reduced rate of neurogenesis in HABs up to NAB levels. In addition, challenge-induced hypoactivation of dentate gyrus (DG) neurons in HABs was normalized by all three drugs. Overall, these data suggest that AD-like effects in a psychopathological mouse model are commonly associated with modulation of DG hypoactivity but not neurogenesis, suggesting normalization of hippocampal hypoactivity as a neurobiological marker indicating successful remission. Finally, rather than to higher depression-related behavior, neurogenesis seems to be linked to pathological anxiety. PMID:23047242

  12. Risk Factors for Tardive Dyskinesia in Adults with Intellectual Disability, Comorbid Psychopathology, and Long-Term Psychotropic Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny L.; Fodstad, Jill C.; Neal, Daniene; Dempsey, Timothy; Rivet, Tessa T.

    2010-01-01

    Psychotropic medications are commonly used as an adjunct treatment in large-scale residential care facilities for adults with developmental disabilities. While the benefits of medication are noted, there are very severe conditions that can result from long term medication use. Tardive dyskinesia (TD) manifests as a variety of involuntary,…

  13. Double-blind placebo-controlled trial of methylphenidate in the treatment of adult ADHD patients with comorbid cocaine dependence.

    PubMed

    Schubiner, Howard; Saules, Karen K; Arfken, Cynthia L; Johanson, Chris-Ellyn; Schuster, Charles R; Lockhart, Nancy; Edwards, Ann; Donlin, Judy; Pihlgren, Eric

    2002-08-01

    In this 12-week double-blind placebo-controlled trial of methylphenidate (MTP) versus placebo in 48 cocaine-dependent attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) adults, the authors sought to determine whether MTP would be safe, control ADHD symptoms, and affect cocaine use. Efficacy indexes revealed significantly greater ADHD symptom relief in the MTP group. There were no group differences in self-reported cocaine use, urinalysis results, or cocaine craving. Because of the relatively small sample size, the results are preliminary. However, we found that MTP improved subjective reports of ADHD symptoms and did not worsen cocaine use while participants were in treatment.

  14. Two weeks of predatory stress induces anxiety-like behavior with co-morbid depressive-like behavior in adult male mice.

    PubMed

    Burgado, Jillybeth; Harrell, Constance S; Eacret, Darrell; Reddy, Renuka; Barnum, Christopher J; Tansey, Malú G; Miller, Andrew H; Wang, Huichen; Neigh, Gretchen N

    2014-12-15

    Psychological stress can have devastating and lasting effects on a variety of behaviors, especially those associated with mental illnesses such as anxiety and depression. Animal models of chronic stress are frequently used to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the relationship between stress and mental health disorders and to develop improved treatment options. The current study expands upon a novel chronic stress paradigm for mice: predatory stress. The predatory stress model incorporates the natural predator-prey relationship that exists among rats and mice and allows for greater interaction between the animals, in turn increasing the extent of the stressful experience. In this study, we evaluated the behavioral effects of exposure to 15 days of predatory stress on an array of behavioral indices. Up to 2 weeks after the end of stress, adult male mice showed an increase of anxiety-like behaviors as measured by the open field and social interaction tests. Animals also expressed an increase in depressive-like behavior in the sucrose preference test. Notably, performance on the novel object recognition task, a memory test, improved after predatory stress. Taken as a whole, our results indicate that 15 exposures to this innovative predatory stress paradigm are sufficient to elicit robust anxiety-like behaviors with evidence of co-morbid depressive-like behavior, as well as changes in cognitive behavior in male mice.

  15. Medical Comorbidity of Full and Partial Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in United States Adults: Results from Wave 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Pietrzak, Robert H.; Goldstein, Risë B.; Southwick, Steven M.; Grant, Bridget F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study examined associations between lifetime trauma exposures, PTSD and partial PTSD, and past-year medical conditions in a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults. Methods Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 34,653 participants in the Wave 2 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Logistic regression analyses evaluated associations of trauma exposure, PTSD and partial PTSD with respondent-reported medical diagnoses. Results After adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics and comorbid Axis I and II disorders, respondents with full PTSD were more likely than traumatized respondents without full or partial PTSD (comparison group) to report diagnoses of diabetes mellitus, noncirrhotic liver disease, angina pectoris, tachycardia, hypercholesterolemia, other heart disease, stomach ulcer, HIV seropositivity, gastritis, and arthritis (odds ratios [ORs]=1.2-2.5). Respondents with partial PTSD were more likely than the comparison group to report past-year diagnoses of stomach ulcer, angina pectoris, tachycardia, and arthritis (ORs=1.3-1.6). Men with full and partial PTSD were more likely than controls to report diagnoses of hypertension (both ORs=1.6), and both men and women with PTSD (ORs=1.8 and 1.6, respectively), and men with partial PTSD (OR=2.0) were more likely to report gastritis. Total number of lifetime traumatic event types was associated with many assessed medical conditions (ORs=1.04-1.16), reducing the magnitudes and rendering non-significant some of the associations between PTSD status and medical conditions. Conclusions Greater lifetime trauma exposure and PTSD are associated with numerous medical conditions, many of which are stress-related and chronic, in U.S. adults. Partial PTSD is associated with intermediate odds of some of these conditions. PMID:21949429

  16. Prevalence and comorbidity of diabetes mellitus among non-institutionalized older adults in Germany - results of the national telephone health interview survey ‘German Health Update (GEDA)’ 2009

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the major public health impact of diabetes, recent population-based data regarding its prevalence and comorbidity are sparse. Methods The prevalence and comorbidity of diabetes mellitus were analyzed in a nationally representative sample (N = 9133) of the non-institutionalized German adult population aged 50 years and older. Information on physician-diagnosed diabetes and 20 other chronic health conditions was collected as part of the national telephone health interview survey ‘German Health Update (GEDA)’ 2009. Overall, 51.2% of contacted persons participated. Among persons with diabetes, diabetes severity was defined according to the type and number of diabetes-concordant conditions: no diabetes-concordant condition (grade 1); hypertension and/or hyperlipidemia only (grade 2); one comorbidity likely to represent diabetes-related micro- or macrovascular end-organ damage (grade 3); several such comorbidities (grade 4). Determinants of diabetes severity were analyzed by multivariable ordinal regression. Results The 12-month prevalence of diabetes was 13.6% with no significant difference between men and women. Persons with diabetes had a significantly higher prevalence and average number of diabetes-concordant as well as diabetes-discordant comorbidities than persons without diabetes. Among persons with diabetes, 10.2%, 46.8%, 35.6% and 7.4% were classified as having severity grade 1–4, respectively. Determinants of diabetes severity included age (cumulative odds ratio 1.05, 95% confidence interval 1.03-1.07, per year) and number of discordant comorbidities (1.40, 1.25-1.55). With respect to specific discordant comorbidities, diabetes severity was correlated to depression (2.15, 1.29-3.56), respiratory disease (2.75, 1.72-4.41), musculoskeletal disease (1.53, 1.06-2.21), and severe hearing impairment (3.00, 1.21-7.41). Conclusions Diabetes is highly prevalent in the non-institutionalized German adult population 50 years and older. Diabetes

  17. A feasibility study of a telephone-supported self-care intervention for depression among adults with a comorbid chronic physical illness in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective We assessed the feasibility and acceptability to patients of a telephone-supported self-care intervention for depression among adults aged 40 years or over with one of six targeted chronic physical illnesses and comorbid depressive symptoms in family practice settings. Methods An open, uncontrolled trial (feasibility study) was conducted among patients treated in Montreal family practices. Eligible patients were aged 40 years or over, had one or more of the targeted chronic physical illnesses for at least 6 months (arthritis, hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) and were evaluated as having at least mild depressive symptoms (a score of ≥ 5 on the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire, PHQ-9). Participants received a package of six self-care tools (information booklet, video, Internet programme, action plan, workbook and mood-monitoring tool) with telephone support by a lay coach for up to 6 months. Results In total, 63 eligible patients provided written consent and completed the baseline interview; 57 (90%) and 55 (87%) patients completed 2-month and 6-month follow-up interviews, respectively. The mean number of telephone calls made by coaches to participants was 10.5 (SD 4.0), and the average length of these calls was 10.6 minutes. At the 6-month follow-up, 83.6% of the participants reported that one or more of the tools were helpful. Clinically significant improvements were seen in depressive symptoms (as assessed by the PHQ-9) at 6 months, with an effect size of 0.88 (95% CI, 0.55, 1.14). Conclusion A telephone-supported self-care intervention for depression was feasible, was acceptable to patients, and was associated with a significant 6-month improvement in depressive symptoms. A randomised trial of this intervention is justified. PMID:24294301

  18. Social participation in older adults with joint pain and comorbidity; testing the measurement properties of the Dutch Keele Assessment of Participation

    PubMed Central

    Hermsen, Lotte A H; Terwee, Caroline B; Leone, Stephanie S; van der Zwaard, Babette; Smalbrugge, Martin; Dekker, Joost; van der Horst, Henriëtte E; Wilkie, Ross

    2013-01-01

    Objective The Keele Assessment of Participation (KAP) questionnaire measures person-perceived participation in 11 aspects of life. Participation allows fulfilment of valued life activities and social roles, which are important to older adults. Since we aimed to use the KAP in a larger Dutch cohort, we examined the measurement properties of KAP in a Dutch sample of older adults with joint pain and comorbidity. Design Cohort study. Setting A community-based sample in Amsterdam, the Netherlands and North Staffordshire, UK. Participants Participants were aged 65 years and over, had at least two chronic diseases (identified through general practice consultation) and reported joint pain on most days (questionnaire). The Dutch cohort provided baseline data (n=407), follow-up data at 6 months (n=364) and test–retest data 2 weeks after 6 months (n=122). The UK cohort provided comparable data (n=404). Outcome measures The primary outcome was person-perceived participation, as measured with the KAP. The measurement properties examined were the following: structural validity (factor analysis), internal consistency (Cronbach's α), reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients; ICC), construct validity (hypothesis testing), responsiveness (hypothesis testing and area under the curve) and cross-cultural validity (differential item functioning; DIF). Results Factor analysis revealed two domains: KAPd1: ‘participation in basic activities’ and KAPd2: ‘participation in complex activities’, with Cronbach's α of 0.74 and 0.57 and moderate test–retest reliability: ICC of 0.63 and 0.57, respectively. Further analyses of KAPd1 showed poor construct validity and responsiveness. Despite the uniform DIF in item ‘interpersonal relations’, the total KAPd1 score seemed comparable between the Dutch and UK sample. Conclusions Only KAP domain ‘participation in basic activities’ showed good internal consistency and sufficient reliability. KAPd2 lacks sufficient

  19. The mixed amphetamine salt extended release (Adderall XR, Max-XR) as an adjunctive to SSRIS or SNRIS in the treatment of adult ADHD patients with comorbid partially responsive generalized anxiety: an open-label study.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Adel

    2010-06-01

    To examine the changes in partially responsive anxiety symptoms utilizing adjunctive treatment with the mixed amphetamine salt extended release (Adderall XR, MAX-XR) in the treatment of adult ADHD patients, with comorbid refractory anxiety. Consenting adult patients (n = 32) with confirmed diagnosis of generalized anxiety (GA) and comorbid (ADHD) participated in this open-label study. All patients had significant comorbid anxiety symptoms (HAM-A > 7) and failed to respond to 8-week trials of Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) or Norepinephrine Reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). All patients were treated with the "Mixed Amphetamine salts Extended Release Adderall XR, (MAS-XR), as adjunctive to SSRIs or to SNRIs and were followed for at least 12 weeks. The primary effectiveness measure was the Clinical Global Impression severity subscale (CGI-S). Other scales included the Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAM-A), the adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS-v1.1) symptom checklist, and Sheehan's disability scale. Baseline measures prior to the treatment with MAS-XR were compared to those at 4, 8, and at 12 weeks of treatment. Monitoring for pulse, blood pressure, and weight changes was carried out at baseline and at end point. All patients completed this open-label trial. There was significant and robust resolution of symptoms of all effectiveness measures, including the symptoms of anxiety, as shown by changes from baseline in HAM-A, ASRS-v1.1, and CGI at 8 weeks. Also there was significant reduction in the disability score at 12 weeks. Patients tolerated the treatment, and there were no significant cardiovascular changes at 12 weeks. There was decrease in mean weight at 12 weeks by 2.2 kg (P < .001). Mixed amphetamine salts MAS-XR can be used in adult patients with ADHD and comorbid anxiety symptoms. Larger controlled studies are needed to support the effectiveness of mixed amphetamine salts in patients with comorbid anxiety symptoms. Treatments need to include the targeting of the

  20. Effectiveness of one-year pharmacological treatment of adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): an open-label prospective study of time in treatment, dose, side-effects and comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Fredriksen, Mats; Dahl, Alv A; Martinsen, Egil W; Klungsøyr, Ole; Haavik, Jan; Peleikis, Dawn E

    2014-12-01

    How to generalize from randomized placebo controlled trials of ADHD drug treatment in adults to 'real-world' clinical practice is intriguing. This open-labeled prospective observational study examined the effectiveness of long-term stimulant and non-stimulant medication in adult ADHD including dose, side-effects and comorbidity in a clinical setting. A specialized ADHD outpatient clinic gave previously non-medicated adults (n=250) with ADHD methylphenidate as first-line drug according to current guidelines. Patients who were non-tolerant or experiencing low efficacy were switched to amphetamine or atomoxetine. Primary outcomes were changes of ADHD-symptoms evaluated with the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS) and overall severity by the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF). Secondary outcomes were measures of mental distress, and response on the Clinical-Global-Impressions-Improvement Scale. Data at baseline and follow-ups were compared in longitudinal mixed model analyses for time on-medication, dosage, comorbidity, and side-effects. As results, 232 patients (93%) completed examination at the 12 month endpoint, and 163 (70%) remained on medication. Compared with the patients who discontinued medication, those still on medication had greater percentage reduction in ASRS-scores (median 39%, versus 13%, P<0.001) and greater improvement of GAF (median 20% versus 4%, P<0.001) and secondary outcomes. Continued medication and higher cumulated doses showed significant associations to sustained improvement. Conversely, psychiatric comorbidity and side-effects were related to lower effectiveness and more frequent termination of medication. Taken together, one-year treatment with stimulants or atomoxetine was associated with a clinically significant reduction in ADHD symptoms and mental distress, and improvement of measured function. No serious adverse events were observed.

  1. [Comorbidities with COPD].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Shu; Gon, Yasuhiro; Mizumura, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a systemic inflammatory disorder and age-related disorder associated with increased prevalence of comorbid diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, and pulmonary complications such as lung cancer. We described here the clinical significance of comorbid diseases with COPD and briefly review the mechanism in the production of comorbid diseases. PMID:27254958

  2. Cardiac comorbidity in head and neck cancer patients and its influence on cancer treatment selection and mortality: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Simeoni, Roland; Breitenstein, Kerstin; Eßer, Dirk; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2016-09-01

    Comorbidity assessment and a profound cardiac examination were implemented into pre-treatment diagnostics to analyze their influence on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) therapy selection and short-term mortality. Comorbidity was measured prospectively in 49 HNSCC patients using standard indices between 2012 and 2013. Cardiac examinations included electrocardiogram, echocardiography, and bicycle ergometry. Most patients had stage IV tumors (61 %), smoked (61 %), and showed alcohol abuse (57 %); 38 patients (78 %) received a multimodal therapy; 65 % had an adult comorbidity evaluation 27 index ≥2, 59 % a Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) ≥4, and 12 % a revised cardiac risk index (RCRI) ≥2. Additional cardiac examinations revealed moderate to severe cardiovascular pathologies in 32 % of the patients and led to recommendations for additional therapy in 4 patients (8 %) necessary only after cancer treatment. RCRI was associated with CCI and cardiac examinations (p = 0.009, p = 0.030). Chemotherapy, stroke history, and RCRI ≥2 were risk factors for early mortality within first 2 years after cancer therapy (p = 0.037; p = 0.012; p = 0.015). Although one-third of a strongly smoking and drinking patient cohort had relevant cardiac morbidity, extended unselected cardiac diagnostics had only low impact on HNSCC therapy selection. The risk of early mortality after HNSCC cancer treatment seems to be sufficiently reflected by the RCRI.

  3. Managing comorbidities in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Hillas, Georgios; Perlikos, Fotis; Tsiligianni, Ioanna; Tzanakis, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Age and smoking are common risk factors for COPD and other illnesses, often leading COPD patients to demonstrate multiple coexisting comorbidities. COPD exacerbations and comorbidities contribute to the overall severity in individual patients. Clinical trials investigating the treatment of COPD routinely exclude patients with multiple comorbidities or advanced age. Clinical practice guidelines for a specific disease do not usually address comorbidities in their recommendations. However, the management and the medical intervention in COPD patients with comorbidities need a holistic approach that is not clearly established worldwide. This holistic approach should include the specific burden of each comorbidity in the COPD severity classification scale. Further, the pharmacological and nonpharmacological management should also include optimal interventions and risk factor modifications simultaneously for all diseases. All health care specialists in COPD management need to work together with professionals specialized in the management of the other major chronic diseases in order to provide a multidisciplinary approach to COPD patients with multiple diseases. In this review, we focus on the major comorbidities that affect COPD patients. We present an overview of the problems faced, the reasons and risk factors for the most commonly encountered comorbidities, and the burden on health care costs. We also provide a rationale for approaching the therapeutic options of the COPD patient afflicted by comorbidity. PMID:25609943

  4. Cross-Country Differences in the Additive Effects of Socioeconomics, Health Behaviors and Medical Comorbidities on Disability among Older Adults with Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Assari, Shervin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Patients with heart disease experience limited activities of daily living (ADL). This is a cross-country comparison of the additive effects of Socioeconomics, health behaviors, and the number of medical comorbidities on disability among patients with heart disease. Methods: The current study used a cross-sectional design. Data came from the Research on Early Life and Aging Trends and Effects (RELATE). The current analysis utilized data on elderly individuals (age ≥60 y) from 13 countries. The outcome was any ADL limitation (i.e. bathing, dressing, using toilet, transferring, lifting heavy things, shopping, and eating meals). Socioeconomics (i.e. age, gender, education, and income), health behaviors (i.e. exercise, smoking, and drinking), and number of chronic medical conditions (i.e. hypertension, respiratory, arthritis, stroke, and diabetes) were entered into country-specific logistic regressions, considering at least one limitation in ADL as the main outcome. Results: Number of comorbid medical conditions and age were positively associated with disability in 85% of the countries. Physical activity and drinking were linked to disability in 54%and 31% of countries, respectively. Higher education and income were associated with lower disability in 31% and 23% of the countries, respectively. Female gender was associated with higher disability only in 15% of the countries. Smoking was not associated with disability, while the effects of socioeconomics, drinking, exercise, and medical comorbidities were controlled. Conclusion: Determinants of disability depend on the country; accordingly, locally designed health promotion interventions may be superior to the universal interventions for patients with heart disease. Medical comorbidities, however, should be universally diagnosed and treated. PMID:26157460

  5. Comorbidities in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Aurangabadkar, Sanjeev J

    2013-07-01

    Moderate to severe psoriasis is associated with concomitant diseases that may have a significant impact on patients. It is necessary for the treating physician to recognize these concomitant diseases, known as comorbidities, early as they influence the management options. Important comorbidities are psoriatic arthritis, metabolic syndrome, Crohn's disease, depression, and cancer. Patients with severe psoriasis may be at an increased risk for myocardial infarction and this subgroup of patients tends to have a reduced life expectancy. The presence of co-morbid diseases is associated with an increase in concomitant medication, some of which may worsen psoriasis; conversely, systemic treatment of psoriasis with certain drugs may impact the co-morbid conditions. As dermatologists are the primary health-care providers for psoriasis, adequate knowledge of comorbidities helps in choosing the appropriate therapy as well as timely intervention.

  6. Comorbidities associated with psoriasis - data from the malaysian psoriasis registry.

    PubMed

    Mazlin, M B; Chang, C C; Baba, R

    2012-10-01

    All around the world, there is growing evidence of the association between psoriasis and comorbidities which increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. This study aims to determine the prevalence of various comorbidities among adult psoriasis patients in Malaysia. A cross-sectional study was conducted among patients in the Malaysian Psoriasis Registry from January 2007 to December 2008. A total of 2,267 adult patients with psoriasis from 13 dermatology centers were included. Prevalence of various comorbidities were: hypertension 25.9%, diabetes mellitus 17.7 %, dyslipidaemia 17.8%, overweight 33.2%, obesity 20.7%, ischaemic heart disease 5.8% and cerebrovascular disease 1.4%. These comorbidities were more prevalent in patients with psoriasis of late-onset and longer duration. Active screening of these comorbidities in all adult psoriasis patients is recommended.

  7. [Comorbidities of COPD].

    PubMed

    Brinchault, G; Diot, P; Dixmier, A; Goupil, F; Guillais, P; Gut-Gobert, C; Leroyer, C; Marchand-Adam, S; Meurice, J-C; Morel, H; Person, C; Cavaillès, A

    2015-12-01

    COPD is a slowly progressive chronic respiratory disease causing an irreversible decrease in air flow. The main cause is smoking, which provokes inflammatory phenomena in the respiratory tract. COPD is a serious public health issue, causing high morbidity, mortality and disability. Related comorbidities are linked to ageing, common risk factors and genetic predispositions. A combination of comorbidities increases healthcare costs. For instance, patients with more than two comorbidities represent a quarter of all COPD sufferers but account for half the related health costs. Our review describes different comorbidities and their impact on the COPD prognosis. The comorbidities include: cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, denutrition, obesity, ageing, anemia, sleeping disorders, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, anxiety-depression and lung cancer. The prognosis worsens with one or more comorbidities. Clinicians are faced with the challenge of finding practical and appropriate ways of treating these comorbidities, and there is increasing interest in developing a global, multidisciplinary approach to management. Managing this chronic disease should be based on a holistic, patient-centred approach and smoking cessation remains the key factor in the care of COPD patients.

  8. [Comorbidities of COPD].

    PubMed

    Brinchault, G; Diot, P; Dixmier, A; Goupil, F; Guillais, P; Gut-Gobert, C; Leroyer, C; Marchand-Adam, S; Meurice, J-C; Morel, H; Person, C; Cavaillès, A

    2015-12-01

    COPD is a slowly progressive chronic respiratory disease causing an irreversible decrease in air flow. The main cause is smoking, which provokes inflammatory phenomena in the respiratory tract. COPD is a serious public health issue, causing high morbidity, mortality and disability. Related comorbidities are linked to ageing, common risk factors and genetic predispositions. A combination of comorbidities increases healthcare costs. For instance, patients with more than two comorbidities represent a quarter of all COPD sufferers but account for half the related health costs. Our review describes different comorbidities and their impact on the COPD prognosis. The comorbidities include: cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, denutrition, obesity, ageing, anemia, sleeping disorders, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, anxiety-depression and lung cancer. The prognosis worsens with one or more comorbidities. Clinicians are faced with the challenge of finding practical and appropriate ways of treating these comorbidities, and there is increasing interest in developing a global, multidisciplinary approach to management. Managing this chronic disease should be based on a holistic, patient-centred approach and smoking cessation remains the key factor in the care of COPD patients. PMID:26585876

  9. Co-Morbidity of Conditions among Prisoners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shinkfield, Alison J.; Graffam, J.; Meneilly, Sharn

    2009-01-01

    Eighty seven adult prisoners (58 males, 29 females) completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and a questionnaire on current health in order to examine both the prevalence of co-morbid conditions and the relation of depression and anxiety to ill-health and prior substance use. High prevalence rates of…

  10. Real-World Executive Functions in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Profiles of Impairment and Associations with Adaptive Functioning and Co-Morbid Anxiety and Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Gregory L.; Kenworthy, Lauren; Pugliese, Cara E.; Popal, Haroon S.; White, Emily I.; Brodsky, Emily; Martin, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Although executive functioning (EF) difficulties are well documented among children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), little is known about real-world measures of EF among adults with ASD. Therefore, this study examined parent-reported real-world EF problems among 35 adults with ASD without intellectual disability and their…

  11. Evaluation of a multidisciplinary Tier 3 weight management service for adults with morbid obesity, or obesity and comorbidities, based in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, A; Hughes, C A; Kumaravel, B; Bachmann, M O; Steel, N; Capehorn, M; Cheema, K

    2014-01-01

    A multidisciplinary Tier 3 weight management service in primary care recruited patients with a body mass index ≥40 kg·m−2, or 30 kg·m−2 with obesity-related co-morbidity to a 1-year programme. A cohort of 230 participants was recruited and evaluated using the National Obesity Observatory Standard Evaluation Framework. The primary outcome was weight loss of at least 5% of baseline weight at 12 months. Diet was assessed using the two-item food frequency questionnaire, activity using the General Practice Physical Activity questionnaire and quality of life using the EuroQol-5D-5L questionnaire. A focus group explored the participants' experiences. Baseline mean weight was 124.4 kg and mean body mass index was 44.1 kg·m−2. A total of 102 participants achieved 5% weight loss at 12 months. The mean weight loss was 10.2 kg among the 117 participants who completed the 12-month programme. Baseline observation carried forward analysis gave a mean weight loss of 5.9 kg at 12 months. Fruit and vegetable intake, activity level and quality of life all improved. The dropout rate was 14.3% at 6 months and 45.1% at 1 year. Focus group participants described high levels of satisfaction. It was possible to deliver a Tier 3 weight management service for obese patients with complex co-morbidity in a primary care setting with a full multidisciplinary team, which obtained good health outcomes compared with existing services. PMID:25825858

  12. Comorbidity of Asperger's syndrome and Bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background and objective Asperger's Syndrome (AS) is a pervasive developmental disorder that is sometimes unrecognized, especially in the adult psychiatric setting. On the other hand, in patients with an AS diagnosis, comorbid psychiatric disorders may be unrecognized in the juvenile setting. The aim of the paper is to show and discuss some troublesome and complex problems of the management of patients with AS and comorbid Bipolar Disorder (BD). Methods The paper describes three patients affected by AS and bipolar spectrum disorders. Results and conclusion Mood stabilizers and 2nd generation antipsychotics were effective in the treatment of these AS patients with comorbid BD, while the use of antidepressants was associated with worsening of the mood disorder. It is of importance to recognize both the psychiatric diagnoses in order to arrange an exhaustive therapeutic program and to define specific and realistic goals of treatment. PMID:19014623

  13. Comorbidities and Crash Involvement among Younger and Older Drivers

    PubMed Central

    Papa, Michela; Boccardi, Virginia; Prestano, Raffaele; Angellotti, Edith; Desiderio, Manuela; Marano, Luigi; Rizzo, Maria Rosaria; Paolisso, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies identified comorbidities as predictors of older driver performance and driving pattern, while the direct impact of comorbidities on road crash risk in elderly drivers is still unknown. The present study is a cross-sectional aimed at investigating the association between levels of comorbidity and crash involvement in adult and elderly drivers. 327 drivers were stratified according to age range in two groups: elderly drivers (age ≥70 years old, referred as older) and adult drivers (age <70 years old, referred as younger). Driving information was obtained through a driving questionnaire. Distance traveled was categorized into low, medium and high on the basis of kilometers driven in a year. CIRS-illness severity (IS) and CIRS-comorbidity indices (CI) in all populations were calculated. Older drivers had a significantly higher crash involvements rate (p = .045) compared with the younger group based on the number of licensed drivers. Dividing comorbidity indices into tertiles among all licensed subjects, the number of current drivers significantly decreased (p<.0001) with increasing level of comorbidity. The number of current drivers among older subjects significantly decreased with increasing comorbidity level (p = .026) while no difference among younger group was found (p = .462). Among younger drivers with increasing comorbidity level, the number of road accidents significantly increased (p = .048) and the logistic regression analysis showed that comorbidity level significantly associated with crash involvement independent of gender and driving exposure. Older subjects with high level of comorbidity are able to self-regulate driving while comorbidity burden represents a significant risk factor for crash involvements among younger drivers. PMID:24722619

  14. [Comorbidity in psoriasis].

    PubMed

    Gerdes, S; Mrowietz, U; Boehncke, W-H

    2016-06-01

    Psoriasis is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease associated with comorbidity. Many epidemiological studies have shown that psoriasis is associated with psoriatic arthritis as well as cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Furthermore, obesity and psychological diseases such as depression and anxiety disorders are linked with psoriasis and play a central role in its management. The association of psoriasis and its comorbidity can be partly explained by genetic and pathophysiological mechanisms. Approximately 40 psoriasis susceptibility loci have been described with the majority linked to the innate and adaptive immune system. In some associated diseases, such as psoriatic arthritis, an overlap of their genetic susceptibility exists. Pathophysiologically the "psoriatic march" is a model that describes the development of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases due to the presence of underlying systemic inflammation. Dermatologists are the gatekeepers to treatment for patients with psoriasis. The early detection and the management of comorbidity is part of their responsibility. Concepts for the management of psoriasis and tools to screen for psoriatic comorbidity have been developed in order to support dermatologists in daily practice. PMID:27221798

  15. Metabolic comorbidities and psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Gisondi, Paolo; Ferrazzi, Anna; Girolomoni, Giampiero

    2010-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory, immune-mediated skin disease, which affects 2%-3% of the population worldwide. Chronic plaque psoriasis is frequently associated with metabolic diseases including diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Although the causal relationship between metabolic comorbidities and psoriasis has not yet been completely proven, it appears that shared genetic links, common environmental factors and/or common inflammatory pathways may underlie the development of psoriasis and comorbidities. The presence of comorbidities has important implications in the global approach to patients with psoriasis. Traditional systemic anti-psoriatic agents could negatively affect cardio-metabolic comorbidities, and may have important interactions with drugs commonly used by psoriatic patients. In contrast, the recent findings that the risk of myocardial infarction is reduced in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who respond to anti-TNF-α therapy compared to non-responders, supports the hypothesis that the anti-inflammatory effect of TNF-α blockers might reduce the cardiovascular risk potentially also in psoriasis patients. Finally, patients with moderate to severe psoriasis should be treated promptly and effectively, and should be encouraged to drastically correct their modifiable cardiovascular risk factors, in particular obesity and smoking habit.

  16. Psoriasis: new comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Machado-Pinto, Jackson; Diniz, Michelle dos Santos; Bavoso, Nádia Couto

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with several comorbidities. A few decades ago, it was considered an exclusive skin disease but today it is considered a multisystem disease. It is believed that 73% of psoriasis patients have at least one comorbidity. Studies have demonstrated the association of psoriasis with inflammatory bowel disease, uveitis, psychiatric disorders, metabolic syndrome and its components and cardiovascular diseases. The systemic inflammatory state seems to be the common denominator for all these comorbidities. This work aims at presenting a review of the current literature on some new comorbidities that are associated with psoriasis as osteoporosis, obstructive sleep apnea and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. While there is still controversy, many studies already point to a possible bone involvement in patients with psoriasis, especially in the male group, generally less affected by osteoporosis. Psoriasis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease present some risk factors in common as obesity, smoking and physical inactivity. Besides, both diseases are associated with the metabolic syndrome. These factors could be potential confounders in the association of the two diseases. Further prospective studies with control of those potential confounders should be developed in an attempt to establish causality. Existing data in the literature suggest that there is an association between obstructive sleep apnea and psoriasis, but studies performed until now have involved few patients and had a short follow-up period. It is, therefore, premature to assert that there is indeed a correlation between these two diseases.

  17. Metabolic comorbidities and psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Gisondi, Paolo; Ferrazzi, Anna; Girolomoni, Giampiero

    2010-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory, immune-mediated skin disease, which affects 2%-3% of the population worldwide. Chronic plaque psoriasis is frequently associated with metabolic diseases including diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Although the causal relationship between metabolic comorbidities and psoriasis has not yet been completely proven, it appears that shared genetic links, common environmental factors and/or common inflammatory pathways may underlie the development of psoriasis and comorbidities. The presence of comorbidities has important implications in the global approach to patients with psoriasis. Traditional systemic anti-psoriatic agents could negatively affect cardio-metabolic comorbidities, and may have important interactions with drugs commonly used by psoriatic patients. In contrast, the recent findings that the risk of myocardial infarction is reduced in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who respond to anti-TNF-α therapy compared to non-responders, supports the hypothesis that the anti-inflammatory effect of TNF-α blockers might reduce the cardiovascular risk potentially also in psoriasis patients. Finally, patients with moderate to severe psoriasis should be treated promptly and effectively, and should be encouraged to drastically correct their modifiable cardiovascular risk factors, in particular obesity and smoking habit. PMID:21251450

  18. What Can ADHD without Comorbidity Teach Us about Comorbidity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takeda, Toshinobu; Ambrosini, Paul J.; deBerardinis, Rachel; Elia, Josephine

    2012-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric comorbidity in ADHD is frequent, impairing and poorly understood. In this report, characteristics of comorbid and comorbid-free ADHD subjects are investigated in an attempt to identify differences that could potentially advance our understanding of risk factors. In a clinically-referred ADHD cohort of 449 youths (ages 6-18), age,…

  19. Duloxetine and care management treatment of older adults with comorbid major depressive disorder and chronic low back pain: results of an open-label pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Karp, Jordan F.; Weiner, Debra K.; Dew, Mary A.; Begley, Amy; Miller, Mark D.; Reynolds, Charles F.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: In older adults, major depressive disorder (MDD) and chronic low back pain (CLBP) are common and mutually exacerbating. We predicted that duloxetine pharmacotherapy and Depression and Pain Care Management (DPCM) would result in (1) significant improvement in MDD and CLBP and (2) significant improvements in health-related quality of life, anxiety, disability, self-efficacy, and sleep quality. Design and Intervention: Twelve week open-label study using duloxetine up to 120 mg/day + DPCM. Setting: Outpatient late-life depression research clinic. Patients: Thirty community-dwelling adults >60 years old. Outcome Measures: Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and McGill Pain Questionnaire-Short Form (MPQ-SF). Results: 46.7% (n = 14) of the sample had a depression remission. All subjects who met criteria for the depression remission also had a pain response. 93.3% (n = 28) had a significant pain response. Of the subjects who met criteria for a low back pain response, 50% (n = 14) also met criteria for the depression remission. The mean time to depression remission was 7.6 (SE = 0.6) weeks. The mean time to pain response was 2.8 (SE = 0.5) weeks. There were significant improvements in mental health-related quality of life, anxiety, sleep quality, somatic complaints, and both self-efficacy for pain management and for coping with symptoms. Physical health-related quality of life, back pain-related disability, and self-efficacy for physical functioning did not improve. Conclusions: Serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors like duloxetine delivered with DPCM may be a good choice to treat these linked conditions in older adults. Treatments that target low self-efficacy for physical function and improving disability may further increase response rates. PMID:19750557

  20. Gender and other psychosocial factors as predictors of adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in adults with comorbid HIV/AIDS, psychiatric and substance-related disorder.

    PubMed

    Applebaum, Allison J; Richardson, Mark A; Brady, Stephen M; Brief, Deborah J; Keane, Terence M

    2009-02-01

    This study assessed adherence to HAART among 67 HIV-infected adults, and the degree to which gender and psychological factors-including depression, drug and alcohol use, quality of life, and medication side effects-influenced adherence. Although overall adherence was greater than rates reported in similar studies, no significant difference in adherence was observed between men and women in the present sample. Medication side effects were a significant predictor of non-adherence in the sample at large and among women in particular, while alcohol dependence was a significant predictor of non-adherence only in women. Possible explanations are explored.

  1. Comorbidity in pediatric bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Gagan; Wilens, Timothy

    2009-04-01

    The growing literature shows the pervasiveness and importance of comorbidity in youth with bipolar disorder (BPD). For instance, up to 90% of youth with BPD have been described to manifest comorbidity with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Multiple anxiety, substance use, and disruptive behavior disorders are the other most commonly reported comorbidities with BPD. Moreover, important recent data highlight the importance of obsessive-compulsive and pervasive developmental illness in the context of BPD. Data suggest that not only special developmental relationships are operant in the context of comorbidity but also that the presence of comorbid disorders with BPD results in a more severe clinical condition. Moreover, the presence of comorbidity has therapeutic implications for the treatment response for both BPD and the associated comorbid disorder. Future longitudinal studies to address the relationship and the impact of comorbid disorders on course and therapeutic response over time are required in youth with BPD. PMID:19264265

  2. Medical Comorbidities in Pediatric Headache.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Howard; Singhi, Samata; Gladstein, Jack

    2016-02-01

    Comorbid conditions frequently occur in pediatric headaches and may significantly affect their management. Comorbidities that have been associated with pediatric headaches include attention-deficit or hyperactivity disorder, autism, developmental disabilities, depression, anxiety, epilepsy, obesity, infantile colic, atopic disorders, inflammatory bowel disease, and irritable bowel syndrome. The goal of this article is to review these comorbidities associated with pediatric headache, thereby empowering child neurologists to identify common triggers and tailor management strategies that address headache and its comorbidities. PMID:27017024

  3. Psoriasis and its comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Onumah, Neh; Kircik, Leon H

    2012-05-01

    Psoriasis is a multi-systemic chronic inflammatory skin disease targeting 2% to 3% of the general population. It is a prototype of immune dysregulation mediated by TH1 proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-?, IFN-Y, IL-6, and IL-12, to name a few. Psoriasis, traditionally viewed as an inflammatory skin disorder of unknown origin, is increasingly recognized as an inflammatory skin disease with far reaching systemic effects. There is growing and emerging evidence that psoriasis patients have a higher prevalence of associated comorbid disease with cardiometabolic dysfunction and psoriatic arthritis being at the forefront. It appears that psoriatic skin disease severity portends a serious risk for development of these comorbidities. As such, patients with moderate to severe psoriatic skin disease are found to have a higher association with these extracutaneous disease manifestations.

  4. [Genetic Bases of Human Comorbidity].

    PubMed

    Puzyrev, V P

    2015-04-01

    In this review, the development of ideas focused on the phenomenon of disease combination (comorbidity) in humans is discussed. The genetic bases of the three forms of the phenomenon, comorbidity (syntropias), inverse comorbidity (dystropias), and comorbidity of Mendelian and multifactorial diseases, are analyzed. The results of personal genome-wide association studies of the genetic risk profile that may predispose an individual to cardiovascular disease continuum (CDC), including coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia (CDC syntropy), as well as the results of bioinformatic analysis of common genes and the networks of molecular interactions for two (bronchial asthma and pulmonary tuberculosis) diseases rarely found in one patient (dystropy), are presented. The importance of the diseasome and network medicine concepts in the study of comorbidity is emphasized. Promising areas in genomic studies of comorbidities for disease classification and the development of personalized medicine are designated.

  5. [Genetic Bases of Human Comorbidity].

    PubMed

    Puzyrev, V P

    2015-04-01

    In this review, the development of ideas focused on the phenomenon of disease combination (comorbidity) in humans is discussed. The genetic bases of the three forms of the phenomenon, comorbidity (syntropias), inverse comorbidity (dystropias), and comorbidity of Mendelian and multifactorial diseases, are analyzed. The results of personal genome-wide association studies of the genetic risk profile that may predispose an individual to cardiovascular disease continuum (CDC), including coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia (CDC syntropy), as well as the results of bioinformatic analysis of common genes and the networks of molecular interactions for two (bronchial asthma and pulmonary tuberculosis) diseases rarely found in one patient (dystropy), are presented. The importance of the diseasome and network medicine concepts in the study of comorbidity is emphasized. Promising areas in genomic studies of comorbidities for disease classification and the development of personalized medicine are designated. PMID:26087624

  6. Obesity: definition, comorbidities, causes, and burden.

    PubMed

    Apovian, Caroline M

    2016-06-01

    Body mass index of 30 kg/m2 or higher is used to identify individuals with obesity. In the last 3 decades, the worldwide prevalence of obesity has increased 27.5% for adults and 47.1% for children. Obesity is the result of complex relationships between genetic, socioeconomic, and cultural influences. Consumption patterns, urban development, and lifestyle habits influence the prevalence of obesity. The condition may be the result of disease or pharmacologic treatment. It may also be a risk factor for the development of comorbid conditions. Persons who are obese have less school attendance, reduced earning potential, and higher healthcare costs that may result in an economic burden on society. A review of the prevalence and economic consequences of obesity is provided. Potential causes and comorbidities associated with obesity are also discussed. PMID:27356115

  7. Metabolic comorbidities in Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ferraù, Francesco; Korbonits, Márta

    2015-10-01

    Cushing's syndrome (CS) patients have increased mortality primarily due to cardiovascular events induced by glucocorticoid (GC) excess-related severe metabolic changes. Glucose metabolism abnormalities are common in CS due to increased gluconeogenesis, disruption of insulin signalling with reduced glucose uptake and disposal of glucose and altered insulin secretion, consequent to the combination of GCs effects on liver, muscle, adipose tissue and pancreas. Dyslipidaemia is a frequent feature in CS as a result of GC-induced increased lipolysis, lipid mobilisation, liponeogenesis and adipogenesis. Protein metabolism is severely affected by GC excess via complex direct and indirect stimulation of protein breakdown and inhibition of protein synthesis, which can lead to muscle loss. CS patients show changes in body composition, with fat redistribution resulting in accumulation of central adipose tissue. Metabolic changes, altered adipokine release, GC-induced heart and vasculature abnormalities, hypertension and atherosclerosis contribute to the increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In paediatric CS patients, the interplay between GC and the GH/IGF1 axis affects growth and body composition, while in adults it further contributes to the metabolic derangement. GC excess has a myriad of deleterious effects and here we attempt to summarise the metabolic comorbidities related to CS and their management in the perspective of reducing the cardiovascular risk and mortality overall. PMID:26060052

  8. [Tinnitus and psychiatric comorbidities].

    PubMed

    Goebel, G

    2015-04-01

    Tinnitus is an auditory phantom phenomenon characterized by the sensation of sounds without objectively identifiable sound sources. To date, its causes are not well understood. The perceived severity of tinnitus correlates more closely to psychological and general health factors than to audiometric parameters. Together with limbic structures in the ventral striatum, the prefrontal cortex forms an internal "noise cancelling system", which normally helps to block out unpleasant sounds, including the tinnitus signal. If this pathway is compromised, chronic tinnitus results. Patients with chronic tinnitus show increased functional connectivity in corticolimbic pathways. Psychiatric comorbidities are common in patients who seek help for tinnitus or hyperacusis. Clinicians need valid screening tools in order to identify patients with psychiatric disorders and to tailor treatment in a multidisciplinary setting.

  9. Theory of mind in social anxiety disorder, depression, and comorbid conditions.

    PubMed

    Washburn, Dustin; Wilson, Gillian; Roes, Meighen; Rnic, Katerina; Harkness, Kate Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder is characterized by marked interpersonal impairment, particularly when presenting with comorbid major depression. However, the foundational social-cognitive skills that underlie interpersonal impairment in comorbid and non-comorbid manifestations of SAD has to date received very little empirical investigation. In a sample of 119 young adults, the current study examined differences in theory of mind (ToM), defined as the ability to decode and reason about others' mental states, across four groups: (a) non-comorbid SAD; (b) non-comorbid Lifetime MDD; (c) comorbid SAD and Lifetime MDD; and (d) healthy control. The non-comorbid SAD group was significantly less accurate at decoding mental states than the non-comorbid MDD and control groups. Further, both the comorbid and non-comorbid SAD groups made significantly more 'excessive' ToM reasoning errors than the non-comorbid MDD group, suggesting a pattern of over-mentalizing. Findings are discussed in terms of their implications for understanding the social cognitive foundations of social anxiety.

  10. Developmental Course(s) of Lifetime Cigarette Use and Panic Attack Comorbidity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Amit; Zvolensky, Michael J.; Schmidt, Norman B.; Sachs-Ericcson, Natalie

    2007-01-01

    The present investigation examined the developmental course(s) of lifetime cigarette use and panic attack comorbidity. Participants included 4,409 adults, ages 15 to 54 years of age (M[Age] = 33.1, SD = 10.7, N (females) = 2,221) from the National Comorbidity Survey (NCS). The primary objective of the present investigation was to better understand…

  11. Sustained and Focused Attention Deficits in Adult ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchetta, Natalie D. J.; Hurks, Petra P. M.; De Sonneville, Leo M. J.; Krabbendam, Lydia; Jolles, Jelle

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine the specificity of deficits in focused attention and sustained attention in adults with ADHD and to evaluate the effect of comorbidity. Method: Twenty-eight adults with ADHD without comorbidity were compared with 28 ADHD outpatients with comorbidity. Two control groups were used: 68 adults referred for ADHD but with another…

  12. Childhood Maltreatment, Emotional Dysregulation, and Psychiatric Comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Dvir, Yael; Ford, Julian D.; Hill, Michael; Frazier, Jean A.

    2014-01-01

    Affect dysregulation, defined as the impaired ability to regulate and/or tolerate negative emotional states, and has been associated with interpersonal trauma and post-traumatic stress. Affect regulation difficulties also play a role in many other psychiatric conditions, including anxiety disorders and mood disorders, specifically major depression in youth and bipolar disorder throughout the life span. Exposure to traumatic events and interpersonal trauma in childhood is associated with a wide range of psychosocial, developmental, and medical impairments in children, adolescents and adults, with emotional dysregulation being a core feature that may help to account for this heightened risk. In order to understand how the developmental effects of childhood maltreatment contribute to emotional dysregulation and psychiatric sequelae, we review emotional regulation and its developmental neurobiology, and examine the research evidence of associations between childhood traumatization, emotional dysregulation, and psychiatric co-morbidities in children, adolescents and adults. PMID:24704784

  13. Economic and Comorbidity Burden Among Moderate‐to‐Severe Psoriasis Patients with Comorbid Psoriatic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Steven R.; Shi, Lizheng; Tran, Mary Helen; Lu, Jackie

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the prevalence of comorbidities, health care utilization, and costs between moderate‐to‐severe psoriasis (PsO) patients with comorbid psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and matched controls. Methods Adults ages 18–64 years with concomitant diagnoses of PsO and PsA (PsO+PsA) were identified in the OptumHealth Reporting and Insights claims database between January 2007 and March 2012. Moderate‐to‐severe PsO was defined based on the use of at least one systemic or phototherapy during the 12‐month study period after the index date (randomly selected date after the first PsO diagnosis). Control patients without PsO and PsA were demographically matched 1:1 with PsO+PsA patients. Multivariate regressions were employed to examine PsO/PsA‐related comorbidities, medications, health care utilization, and costs between PsO+PsA patients and controls, adjusting for demographics, index year, insurance type, and non–PsO/PsA‐related comorbidities. Results Among 1,230 matched pairs of PsO+PsA patients and controls, PsO+PsA patients had significantly more PsO/PsA‐related comorbidities, with the top 3 most common in both groups being hypertension (35.8% versus 23.5%), hyperlipidemia (34.6% versus 28.5%), and diabetes mellitus (15.9% versus 10.0%). Compared with controls, PsO+PsA patients had a higher number of distinct prescriptions filled (incidence rate ratio 2.3, P < 0.05); were more likely to have inpatient admissions (odds ratio [OR] 1.6), emergency room visits (OR 1.3), and outpatient visits (OR 62.7) (all P < 0.05); and incurred significantly higher total, pharmacy, and medical costs (adjusted annual cost differences per patient $23,160, $17,696, and $5,077, respectively; all P < 0.01). Conclusion Compared with matched PsO‐ and PsA‐free controls, moderate‐to‐severe PsO patients with comorbid PsA had higher comorbidity and health care utilization and costs. PMID:25303478

  14. Psychiatric comorbidity in forensic psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Palijan, Tija Zarković; Muzinić, Lana; Radeljak, Sanja

    2009-09-01

    For the past several years a numerous studies in the field of forensic psychiatry confirmed a close relationship between violent offenders and comorbid substance abuse. The comorbid substance abuse in violent offenders was usually unrecognized and misdiagnosed. Furthermore, comorbidity in forensic psychiatry describes the co-occurrence of two or more conditions or psychiatric disorder known in the literature as dual diagnosis and defined by World Health Organization (WHO). In fact, many violent offenders have multiple psychiatric diagnoses. Recent studies have confirmed causal relationship between major psychiatric disorders and concomitant substance abuse (comorbidity) in 50-80% of forensic cases. In general, there is a high level of psychiatric comorbidity in forensic patients with prevalence of personality disorders (50-90%), mood disorders (20-60%) and psychotic disorders (15-20%) coupled with substance abuse disorders. Moreover, the high prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities could be found in mentally retarded individuals, as well as, in epileptic patients. Drugs and alcohol abuse can produce serious psychotoxic effects that may lead to extreme violent behavior and consequently to serious criminal offence such as physical assault, rape, armed robbery, attempted murder and homicide, all due to an altered brain function and generating psychotic-like symptoms. Studies have confirmed a significant statistical relevance in causal relationship between substance abuse and violent offences. In terms of forensic psychiatry, the comorbidity strongly contributes in the process of establishing psychiatric diagnosis of diminished mental capacity or insanity at the time of the offence in the course of clinical assessment and evaluation of violent offenders. Today, the primary focus of forensic psychiatry treatment services (in-patient or community) is management of the violent offenders with psychiatric comorbidity which requires a multilevel, evidence based approach to

  15. Psoriasis: classical and emerging comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Maria de Fátima Santos Paim de; Rocha, Bruno de Oliveira; Duarte, Gleison Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory systemic disease. Evidence shows an association of psoriasis with arthritis, depression, inflammatory bowel disease and cardiovascular diseases. Recently, several other comorbid conditions have been proposed as related to the chronic inflammatory status of psoriasis. The understanding of these conditions and their treatments will certainly lead to better management of the disease. The present article aims to synthesize the knowledge in the literature about the classical and emerging comorbidities related to psoriasis.

  16. Psoriasis: classical and emerging comorbidities*

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Maria de Fátima Santos Paim; Rocha, Bruno de Oliveira; Duarte, Gleison Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory systemic disease. Evidence shows an association of psoriasis with arthritis, depression, inflammatory bowel disease and cardiovascular diseases. Recently, several other comorbid conditions have been proposed as related to the chronic inflammatory status of psoriasis. The understanding of these conditions and their treatments will certainly lead to better management of the disease. The present article aims to synthesize the knowledge in the literature about the classical and emerging comorbidities related to psoriasis. PMID:25672294

  17. Patients with obesity-related comorbidities have higher disability compared with those without obesity-related comorbidities: results from a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Sirtori, Anna; Brunani, Amelia; Capodaglio, Paolo; Berselli, Maria E; Villa, Valentina; Ceriani, Francesca; Corti, Stefania; Leonardi, Matilde; Raggi, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe disability in adult obese patients with obesity-related comorbidities, and to compare it with that of patients without obesity-related comorbidities. Two groups of obese patients were administered a set of 166 International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) categories; on the basis of this set, count-based indexes were developed for each ICF component and difference between patients with and without comorbidities were assessed with independent-sample t-test and Cohen's d as a measure of effect size. ICF categories in which at least 20% of patients reported a problem were considered relevant for describing functioning of obese patients; for each of them, the risk of having obesity-related comorbidities was calculated using odds ratio and 95% confidence interval. A total of 106 inpatients were enrolled in the study: 68 ICF categories reached the 20% threshold, and 31 of them were relevant only among patients with comorbidities. The presence of obesity-related comorbidities was associated with an increased risk of bodily impairments and limitations in performing daily activities. Compared with patients without obesity-related comorbidities, those with comorbidities showed higher disability. Comorbidities contribute to obesity-related disability, and our results support the importance of early rehabilitation interventions to reduce disability.

  18. Psychiatric comorbidity in chronic epilepsy: identification, consequences, and treatment of major depression.

    PubMed

    Hermann, B P; Seidenberg, M; Bell, B

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the topic of interictal psychiatric comorbidity among adult patients with chronic epilepsy, focusing specifically on those studies that have used contemporary psychiatric nosology. Five specific issues are addressed: (a) the risk and predominant type(s) of psychiatric comorbidity in chronic epilepsy, (b) adequacy of recognition and treatment of psychiatric comorbidity, (c) the additional burdens that comorbid psychiatric disorders impose upon patients with chronic epilepsy, (d) the etiology of these disorders, and (e) strategies for treatment. Current appreciation for these issues in epilepsy is contrasted to related fields (e.g., primary care, psychiatry, and epidemiology), where considerable attention has been devoted to the identification, consequences, and treatment of psychiatric comorbidity. The issue of psychiatric comorbidity in epilepsy is reviewed with the aim of identifying a clinical and research agenda that will advance understanding of at least one important psychiatric condition associated with epilepsy-namely, major depression.

  19. Addressing psychiatric comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Woody, G E; McLellan, A T; O'Brien, C P; Luborsky, L

    1991-01-01

    Research studies indicate that addressing psychiatric comorbidity can improve treatment for selected groups of substance-abusing patients. However, the chances for implementing the necessary techniques on a large scale are compromised by the absence of professional input and guidance within programs. This is especially true in public programs, which treat some of the most disadvantaged, disturbed, and socially destructive individuals in the entire mental health system. One starting point for upgrading the level of knowledge and training of staff members who work in this large treatment system could be to develop a better and more authoritative information dissemination network. Such a system exists in medicine; physicians are expected to read appropriate journals and to guide their treatment decisions using the data contained in the journals. Standards of practice and methods for modifying current practice are within the tradition of reading new facts, studying old ones, and comparing treatment outcome under different conditions with what is actually being done. No such general system of information-gathering or -sharing exists, particularly in public treatment programs. One of the most flagrant examples of this "educational shortfall" can be found among those methadone programs that adamantly insist on prescribing no more than 30 to 35 mg/day for all patients, in spite of the overwhelming evidence that these dose levels generally are inadequate. In some cases, program directors are unaware of studies that have shown the relationship between dose and outcome. In other cases, they are aware of the studies but do not modify their practices accordingly. This example of inadequate dosing is offered as an example of one situation that could be improved by adherence to a system of authoritative and systematic information dissemination. Many issues in substance abuse treatment do not lend themselves to information dissemination as readily as that of methadone dosing

  20. Genetic comorbidities in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Nalls, Mike A.; Saad, Mohamad; Noyce, Alastair J.; Keller, Margaux F.; Schrag, Anette; Bestwick, Jonathan P.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Hernandez, Dena G.; Cookson, Mark R.; Morris, Huw R.; Williams, Nigel; Gasser, Thomas; Heutink, Peter; Wood, Nick; Hardy, John; Martinez, Maria; Singleton, Andrew B.

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) has a number of known genetic risk factors. Clinical and epidemiological studies have suggested the existence of intermediate factors that may be associated with additional risk of PD. We construct genetic risk profiles for additional epidemiological and clinical factors using known genome-wide association studies (GWAS) loci related to these specific phenotypes to estimate genetic comorbidity in a systematic review. We identify genetic risk profiles based on GWAS variants associated with schizophrenia and Crohn's disease as significantly associated with risk of PD. Conditional analyses adjusting for SNPs near loci associated with PD and schizophrenia or PD and Crohn's disease suggest that spatially overlapping loci associated with schizophrenia and PD account for most of the shared comorbidity, while variation outside of known proximal loci shared by PD and Crohn's disease accounts for their shared genetic comorbidity. We examine brain methylation and expression signatures proximal to schizophrenia and Crohn's disease loci to infer functional changes in the brain associated with the variants contributing to genetic comorbidity. We compare our results with a systematic review of epidemiological literature, while the findings are dissimilar to a degree; marginal genetic associations corroborate the directionality of associations across genetic and epidemiological data. We show a strong genetically defined level of comorbidity between PD and Crohn's disease as well as between PD and schizophrenia, with likely functional consequences of associated variants occurring in brain. PMID:24057672

  1. Impact of comorbidity on the outcome in men with advanced prostate cancer treated with docetaxel

    PubMed Central

    Zist, Andrej; Amir, Eitan; Ocana, Alberto F.; Seruga, Bostjan

    2015-01-01

    Background Men with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) may not receive docetaxel in everyday clinical practice due to comorbidities. Here we explore the impact of comorbidity on outcome in men with mCRPC treated with docetaxel in a population-based outcome study. Methods Men with mCRPC treated with docetaxel at the Institute of Oncology Ljubljana between 2005 and 2012 were eligible. Comorbidity was assessed by the age-adjusted Charlson comorbidity index (aa-CCI) and adult comorbidity evaluation (ACE-27) index. Hospital admissions due to the toxicity and deaths during treatment with docetaxel were used as a measure of tolerability. Association between comorbidity and overall survival (OS) was tested using the Cox proportional hazards analysis. Results Two hundred and eight men were treated with docetaxel. No, mild, moderate and severe comorbidity was present in 2%, 32%, 53% and 13% using aa-CCI and in 27%, 35%, 29% and 8% when assessed by ACE-27. A substantial dose reduction of docetaxel occurred more often in men with moderate or severe comorbidity as compared to those with no or mild comorbidity. At all comorbidity levels about one-third of men required hospitalization or died during treatment with docetaxel. In univariate analysis a higher level of comorbidity was not associated with worse OS (aa-CCI HR 0.99; [95% CI 0.87–1.13], p = 0.93; ACE-27: HR 0.96; [95% CI 0.79–1.17], p = 0.69). Conclusions Men with mCRPC, who have comorbidities may benefit from treatment with docetaxel. PMID:26834528

  2. Comorbidity of Migraine with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fasmer, Ole Bernt; Riise, Trond; Lund, Anders; Dilsaver, Steven C.; Hundal, Oivind; Oedegaard, Ketil J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate how often drugs used to treat migraine and ADHD are prescribed to the same patients to assess, indirectly, the comorbidity of these disorders. Method: We used data from the Norwegian prescription database for 2006, including the total Norwegian population (N = 4,640,219). Results:…

  3. Balance Treatment Ameliorates Anxiety and Increases Self-Esteem in Children with Comorbid Anxiety and Balance Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bart, Orit; Bar-Haim, Yair; Weizman, Einat; Levin, Moran; Sadeh, Avi; Mintz, Matti

    2009-01-01

    Comorbidity between balance and anxiety disorders in adult population is a well-studied clinical entity. Children might be particularly prone to develop balance-anxiety comorbidity, but surprisingly they are practically neglected in this field of research. The consequence is that children are treated for what seems to be the primary disorder…

  4. Binge Eating Disorder and Medical Comorbidities in Bariatric Surgery Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, James E.; King, Wendy C.; Pories, Walter; Wolfe, Bruce; Flum, David R.; Spaniolas, Konstatinos; Bessler, Mark; Devlin, Michael; Marcus, Marsha D.; Kalarchian, Melissa; Engel, Scott; Khandelwal, Saurobh; Yanovski, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether binge eating disorder (BED) status is associated with medical comorbidities in obese adults scheduled for bariatric surgery. Method The study utilized Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery-2 data obtained from 6 clinical centers around the United States. This is a well-phenotyped cohort of individuals who were evaluated within 30 days prior to their scheduled surgery using standardized protocols. In the cohort, 350 participants were classified as having BED and 1875 as not having BED (non-BED). Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine whether BED status was independently related to medical comorbidities. As an exploratory analysis, significance was based on nominal P-values (p<.05). Holm-adjusted P-values were also reported. Results After adjusting for age, sex, education and body mass index, BED status was independently associated with 4 of 15 comorbidities (i.e., impaired glucose levels (odds ratio [OR]=1.45 (95%CI: 1.12–1.87), high triglycerides (OR=1.28 (95%CI: 1.002–1.63) and urinary incontinence (OR=1.30 (95%CI: 1.02,1.66) all being more common among the BED sample, and severe walking limitations being less common in the BED sample (OR=0.53 (95%CI: 0.29–0.96)). With further adjustment for psychiatric/emotional health indicators, BED status was independently associated with 3 comorbidities (impaired glucose levels (OR=1.36 (95%CI: 1.04–1.79), cardiovascular disease (OR=0.50 (95%CI: 0.30–0.86) and severe walking limitations (OR=0.38 (95%CI: 0.19–0.77)). However, Holm’s adjusted P-values for all variables were greater than .05. Discussion The results suggest the possibility of a contribution of BED to risk of specific medical comorbidities in severely obese adults. PMID:25778499

  5. Asthma as a Comorbidity in Hospitalized Patients: A Potential Missed Opportunity to Intervene.

    PubMed

    Self, Timothy H; Owens, Ryan E; Mancell, Jimmie; Nahata, Milap C

    2016-06-01

    Asthma is a frequent comorbidity in hospitalized children and adults. Patients with a history of asthma may have no breathing complaints or abnormal chest exam findings to trigger care for this comorbidity during hospitalization. Consequently, this may lead to a potential missed opportunity to discuss asthma as a comorbidity and ongoing issue to ensure its optimal management at home. Our goal is to raise awareness that such patient encounters may represent opportunities for health care professionals to optimize asthma management. Despite focusing on the present illness and limited time availability, asthma care may be improved in a time-efficient manner in these patients.

  6. Comorbidity

    MedlinePlus

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  7. Comorbidity and Continuity of Psychiatric Disorders in Youth After Detention

    PubMed Central

    Abram, Karen M.; Zwecker, Naomi A.; Welty, Leah J.; Hershfield, Jennifer A.; Dulcan, Mina K.; Teplin, Linda A.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Psychiatric disorders and comorbidity are prevalent among incarcerated juveniles. To date, no large-scale study has examined the comorbidity and continuity of psychiatric disorders after youth leave detention. OBJECTIVE To determine the comorbidity and continuity of psychiatric disorders among youth 5 years after detention. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Prospective longitudinal study of a stratified random sample of 1829 youth (1172 male and 657 female; 1005 African American, 296 non-Hispanic white, 524 Hispanic, and 4 other race/ethnicity) recruited from the Cook County Juvenile Temporary Detention Center, Chicago, Illinois, between November 20, 1995, and June 14, 1998, and who received their time 2 follow-up interview between May 22, 2000, and April 3, 2004. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES At baseline, the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children Version 2.3. At follow-ups, the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children Version IV (child and young adult versions) and the Diagnostic Interview Schedule Version IV (substance use disorders and antisocial personality disorder). RESULTS Five years after detention, when participants were 14 to 24 years old, almost 27% of males and 14% of females had comorbid psychiatric disorders. Although females had significantly higher rates of comorbidity when in detention (odds ratio, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.0-1.7), males had significantly higher rates than females at follow-up (odds ratio, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.6-3.3). Substance use plus behavioral disorders was the most common comorbid profile among males, affecting 1 in 6. Participants with more disorders at baseline were more likely to have a disorder approximately 5 years after detention, even after adjusting for demographic characteristics. We found substantial continuity of disorder. However, some baseline disorders predicted alcohol and drug use disorders at follow-up. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Although prevalence rates of comorbidity decreased in youth after detention, rates

  8. Comorbidity of paraphilia and depression in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Haasen, Christian

    2010-01-25

    The comorbidity of paraphilia-related disorders and other psychiatric disorders is high, but the paraphilia-related disorder often remains untreated until patients seek help for the comorbid disorder. A case of a patient in Mexico with comorbid paraphilia and depressive disorder, who was effectively treated with antidepressive medication and psychotherapy, is reported. The effect of stigmatization of homosexuality on the access to care of persons with sexual disorders is discussed.

  9. Comorbidity of paraphilia and depression in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Haasen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The comorbidity of paraphilia-related disorders and other psychiatric disorders is high, but the paraphilia-related disorder often remains untreated until patients seek help for the comorbid disorder. A case of a patient in Mexico with comorbid paraphilia and depressive disorder, who was effectively treated with antidepressive medication and psychotherapy, is reported. The effect of stigmatization of homosexuality on the access to care of persons with sexual disorders is discussed. PMID:25478091

  10. Comorbidity of paraphilia and depression in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Haasen, Christian

    2010-01-25

    The comorbidity of paraphilia-related disorders and other psychiatric disorders is high, but the paraphilia-related disorder often remains untreated until patients seek help for the comorbid disorder. A case of a patient in Mexico with comorbid paraphilia and depressive disorder, who was effectively treated with antidepressive medication and psychotherapy, is reported. The effect of stigmatization of homosexuality on the access to care of persons with sexual disorders is discussed. PMID:25478091

  11. Gender-Based Comorbidity in Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    PubMed Central

    Ogun, Oluwaseye Ayoola; Janky, Kristen L.; Cohn, Edward S.; Büki, Bela; Lundberg, Yunxia Wang

    2014-01-01

    It has been noted that benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) may be associated with certain disorders and medical procedures. However, most studies to date were done in Europe, and epidemiological data on the United States (US) population are scarce. Gender-based information is even rarer. Furthermore, it is difficult to assess the relative prevalence of each type of association based solely on literature data, because different comorbidities were reported by various groups from different countries using different patient populations and possibly different inclusion/exclusion criteria. In this study, we surveyed and analyzed a large adult BPPV population (n = 1,360 surveyed, 227 completed, most of which were recurrent BPPV cases) from Omaha, NE, US, and its vicinity, all diagnosed at Boys Town National Research Hospital (BTNRH) over the past decade using established and consistent diagnostic criteria. In addition, we performed a retrospective analysis of patients’ diagnostic records (n = 1,377, with 1,360 adults and 17 children). The following comorbidities were found to be significantly more prevalent in the BPPV population when compared to the age- and gender-matched general population: ear/hearing problems, head injury, thyroid problems, allergies, high cholesterol, headaches, and numbness/paralysis. There were gender differences in the comorbidities. In addition, familial predisposition was fairly common among the participants. Thus, the data confirm some previously reported comorbidities, identify new ones (hearing loss, thyroid problems, high cholesterol, and numbness/paralysis), and suggest possible predisposing and triggering factors and events for BPPV. PMID:25187992

  12. Mental and Physical Comorbid Conditions and Days in Role Among Persons with Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Stang, Paul; Brandenburg, Nancy; Lane, Michael; Merikangas, Kathleen R.; Von Korff, Michael; Kessler, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Objective To estimate the prevalence of comorbidity among people with arthritis in the US adult population and to determine the role of comorbidity in accounting for the association of arthritis with days out of role. Methods Data come from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication (NCS-R), a nationally representative household survey of 9282 respondents ages 18 and older carried out in 2001–3. Arthritis was assessed by self-report in a chronic conditions checklist along with a wide range of other physical conditions. Mental and substance use disorders were ascertained with the WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). Number of days out of role was assessed for the 30 days before the interview. Results Arthritis was reported by 27.3% of respondents, 80.9% of whom also reported at least one other physical or mental disorder, including 45.6% with another chronic pain condition, 62.3% with another chronic physical condition, and 24.3% with a 12-month mental disorder. Arthritis was significantly associated with days out of role, but comorbidity explained more than half of this association. No significant interactions were found between arthritis and the other conditions in predicting days out of role. Conclusions Comorbidity is the rule rather than the exception among people with arthritis. Comorbidity accounts for most of the days out of role associated with arthritis. The societal burden of arthritis needs to be understood and managed within the context of these comorbid conditions. PMID:16449426

  13. Causes and patterns of readmissions in patients with common comorbidities: retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Lipsitz, Stuart; Bates, David W; Schnipper, Jeffrey L

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the primary diagnoses and patterns of 30 day readmissions and potentially avoidable readmissions in medical patients with each of the most common comorbidities. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Academic tertiary medical centre in Boston, 2009-10. Participants 10 731 consecutive adult discharges from a medical department. Main outcome measures Primary readmission diagnoses of readmissions within 30 days of discharge and potentially avoidable 30 day readmissions to the index hospital or two other hospitals in its network. Results Among 10 731 discharges, 2398 (22.3%) were followed by a 30 day readmission, of which 858 (8.0%) were identified as potentially avoidable. Overall, infection, neoplasm, heart failure, gastrointestinal disorder, and liver disorder were the most frequent primary diagnoses of potentially avoidable readmissions. Almost all of the top five diagnoses of potentially avoidable readmissions for each comorbidity were possible direct or indirect complications of that comorbidity. In patients with a comorbidity of heart failure, diabetes, ischemic heart disease, atrial fibrillation, or chronic kidney disease, the most common diagnosis of potentially avoidable readmission was acute heart failure. Patients with neoplasm, heart failure, and chronic kidney disease had a higher risk of potentially avoidable readmissions than did those without those comorbidities. Conclusions The five most common primary diagnoses of potentially avoidable readmissions were usually possible complications of an underlying comorbidity. Post-discharge care should focus attention not just on the primary index admission diagnosis but also on the comorbidities patients have. PMID:24342737

  14. First Described Case of Group B Streptococcus Pelvic Abscess in a Patient with No Medical Comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Tyan, Paul; Abi-Khalil, Elias; Dwarki, Karthik; Moawad, Gaby

    2016-01-01

    Background. Group B Streptococcus is an organism that commonly infects a wide range of hosts including infants in the first week of life, pregnant women, and older age adults as well as adults with underlying medical comorbidities. Case. Large pelvic abscess in a nonpregnant patient found to be caused by Group B Streptococcus was treated successfully with IR guided drainage and antibiotics. Conclusion. Though rare, GBS can still be a cause of invasive infection even in individuals who are nonpregnant and have no underlying comorbidities. Empiric antibiotic coverage for this organism should be kept in mind when treating an abscess. PMID:27529043

  15. First Described Case of Group B Streptococcus Pelvic Abscess in a Patient with No Medical Comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Dwarki, Karthik

    2016-01-01

    Background. Group B Streptococcus is an organism that commonly infects a wide range of hosts including infants in the first week of life, pregnant women, and older age adults as well as adults with underlying medical comorbidities. Case. Large pelvic abscess in a nonpregnant patient found to be caused by Group B Streptococcus was treated successfully with IR guided drainage and antibiotics. Conclusion. Though rare, GBS can still be a cause of invasive infection even in individuals who are nonpregnant and have no underlying comorbidities. Empiric antibiotic coverage for this organism should be kept in mind when treating an abscess. PMID:27529043

  16. Co-morbidities in established rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gullick, Nicola J; Scott, David L

    2011-08-01

    Co-morbid conditions are common in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Although the presence of co-morbid conditions can be assessed using standardised indexes such as the Charlson index, most clinicians prefer to simply record their presence. Some co-morbidities are causally associated with RA and many others are related to its treatment. Irrespective of their underlying pathogenesis, co-morbidities increase disability and shorten life expectancy, thereby increasing both the impact and mortality of RA. Cardiac co-morbidities are the most crucial, because of their frequency and their negative impacts on health. Treatment of cardiac risk factors and reducing RA inflammation are both critical in reducing cardiac co-morbidities. Gastrointestinal and chest co-morbidities are both also common. They are often associated with drug treatment, including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and disease-modifying drugs. Osteoporosis and its associated fracture risk are equally important and are often linked to long-term glucocorticoid treatment. The range of co-morbidities associated with RA is increasing with the recognition of new problems such as periodontal disease. Optimal medical care for RA should include an assessment of associated co-morbidities and their appropriate management. This includes risk factor modification where possible. This approach is essential to improve quality of life and reduce RA mortality. An area of genuine concern is the impact of treatment on co-morbidities. A substantial proportion is iatrogenic. As immunosuppression with conventional disease-modifying drugs and biologics has many associated risks, ranging from liver disease to chest and other infections, it is essential to balance the risks of co-morbidities against the anticipated benefits of treatment.

  17. Psychiatric Comorbidity in Alcohol Dependence.

    PubMed

    Fein, George

    2015-12-01

    We review our clinical studies of psychiatric comorbidity in short-term and long-term abstinent and in treatment naïve alcoholics (STAA, LTAA and TNA). TNA ypically have less severe alcoholism than treated abstinent samples and evidence less severe psychiatric disturbance. Lifetime psychiatric diagnoses are the norm for STAA and LTAA but not for TNA. Individuals with alcohol and drug use disorders show greater antisocial personality disturbance, but do not show differences in the mood or anxiety domains or in borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms. The studies show that alcoholics can achieve and maintain abstinence in the face of ongoing mood, anxiety, or BPD problems. By contrast, for ASPD, LTAA essentially stop current antisocial behaviors in all seven domains of antisocial behaviors. We believe that ongoing antisocial behavior is not consistent with maintaining abstinence, and that LTAA modify their antisocial behavior despite continued elevated social deviance proneness and antisocial dispositionality. Abstinent individuals without lifetime psychiatric disorders and TNA show more (subdiagnostic threshold) psychiatric symptoms and abnormal psychological measures than non-alcoholic controls in the mood, anxiety, BPD, and antisocial domains. In summary, our studies show that although LTAA have achieved multi-year abstinence, they still report significant psychological distress compared to NAC. We believe this distress may negatively affect their quality of life. This suggests the importance of developing effective care models to address comorbid mental health problems in LTAA. We also show that antisocial personality disorder symptoms decline to the levels seen in normal controls, and that excluding individuals from research with a psychiatric diagnosis does not control for subdiagnostic psychiatric differences between alcoholics and controls. PMID:26590836

  18. Treating Comorbid Anxiety and Aggression in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Karyn; Hunt, Caroline; Heriot, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention that targeted both anxious and aggressive behaviors in children with anxiety disorders and comorbid aggression by parent report. Method: The effects of a cognitive-behavioral therapy intervention targeting comorbid anxiety and aggression problems were compared…

  19. Bipolar Disorder, Bipolar Depression and Comorbid Illness.

    PubMed

    Manning, J Sloan

    2015-06-01

    There is a substantial need for the early recognition and treatment of the psychiatric and medical comorbidities of bipolar disorder in primary care. If comorbid conditions are recognized and treated, serious adverse health outcomes may be averted, including substantial morbidity and mortality. PMID:26172635

  20. Bipolar Disorder, Bipolar Depression and Comorbid Illness.

    PubMed

    Manning, J Sloan

    2015-06-01

    There is a substantial need for the early recognition and treatment of the psychiatric and medical comorbidities of bipolar disorder in primary care. If comorbid conditions are recognized and treated, serious adverse health outcomes may be averted, including substantial morbidity and mortality.

  1. Comorbidity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Negewo, Netsanet A; McDonald, Vanessa M; Gibson, Peter G

    2015-11-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) often experience comorbid conditions. The most common comorbidities that have been associated with COPD include cardiovascular diseases, lung cancer, metabolic disorder, osteoporosis, anxiety and depression, skeletal muscle dysfunction, cachexia, gastrointestinal diseases, and other respiratory conditions. Not only are comorbidities common but they also considerably influence disease prognosis and patients׳ health status, and are associated with poor clinical outcomes. However, perusal of literature indicates that little has been done so far to effectively assess, manage, and treat comorbidities in patients with COPD. The aim of this review is to comprehensively narrate the comorbid conditions that often coexist with COPD, along with their reported prevalence and their significant impacts in the disease management of COPD. A perspective on integrated disease management approaches for COPD is also discussed. PMID:26521102

  2. Epidemiological data and comorbidities of 428 patients hospitalized with erysipelas.

    PubMed

    Pereira de Godoy, José Maria; Galacini Massari, Patricia; Yoshino Rosinha, Mônica; Marinelli Brandão, Rafael; Foroni Casas, André Luís

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the epidemiological data and the main comorbidities of patients with erysipelas admitted to a tertiary hospital. All patients admitted due to erysipelas during the period from 1999 to 2008 were included in a prospective and cross-sectional study. The Fisher exact test and logistic regression were used for statistical analysis. A total of 428 individuals were hospitalized with 41 rehospitalizations; 51.17% of the patients were women, the mean age was 58.6 years. The main comorbidities were hypertension (51.6%), diabetes mellitus (41.6%), chronic venous insufficiency (36.2%), other cardiovascular diseases (33.2%) including angina, peripheral arterial insufficiency, acute myocardial infarction, and strokes, obesity (12.1%), chronic renal failure (6.8%), neoplasms (4.9%), cirrhosis (4.9%), chronic lymphedema (4.2%), and leg ulcers (2.6%). Erysipelas is a seasonal disease that affects adults and the elderly people, has a repetitive nature, and is associated with comorbidities.

  3. Twelve-month prevalence, comorbidity and correlates of mental disorders in Germany: the Mental Health Module of the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Adults (DEGS1-MH).

    PubMed

    Jacobi, Frank; Höfler, Michael; Siegert, Jens; Mack, Simon; Gerschler, Anja; Scholl, Lucie; Busch, Markus A; Hapke, Ulfert; Maske, Ulrike; Seiffert, Ingeburg; Gaebel, Wolfgang; Maier, Wolfgang; Wagner, Michael; Zielasek, Jürgen; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2014-09-01

    This paper provides up to date prevalence estimates of mental disorders in Germany derived from a national survey (German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Adults, Mental Health Module [DEGS1-MH]). A nationally representative sample (N = 5318) of the adult (18-79) population was examined by clinically trained interviewers with a modified version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (DEGS-CIDI) to assess symptoms, syndromes and diagnoses according to DSM-IV-TR (25 diagnoses covered). Of the participants 27.7% met criteria for at least one mental disorder during the past 12 months, among them 44% with more than one disorder and 22% with three or more diagnoses. Most frequent were anxiety (15.3%), mood (9.3%) and substance use disorders (5.7%). Overall rates for mental disorders were substantially higher in women (33% versus 22% in men), younger age group (18-34: 37% versus 20% in age group 65-79), when living without a partner (37% versus 26% with partnership) or with low (38%) versus high socio-economic status (22%). High degree of urbanization (> 500,000 inhabitants versus < 20,000) was associated with elevated rates of psychotic (5.2% versus 2.5%) and mood disorders (13.9% versus 7.8%). The findings confirm that almost one third of the general population is affected by mental disorders and inform about subsets in the population who are particularly affected.

  4. [Affective disorders: endocrine and metabolic comorbidities].

    PubMed

    Cermolacce, M; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Azorin, J-M

    2014-12-01

    Links between affective and endocrine-metabolic disorders are numerous and complex. In this review, we explore most frequent endocrine-metabolic comorbidities. On the one hand, these comorbidities imply numerous iatrogenic effects from antipsychotics (metabolic side-effects) or from lithium (endocrine side-effects). On the other hand, these comorbidities are also associated with affective disorders independently from medication. We will successively examine metabolic syndrome, glycemic disturbances, obesity and thyroid disorders among patients with affective disorders. Endocrinemetabolic comorbidities can be individually encountered, but can also be associated. Therefore, they substantially impact morbidity and mortality by increasing cardiovascular risk factors. Two distinct approaches give an account of processes involved in these comorbidities: common environmental factors (iatrogenic effects, lifestyle), and/or shared physiological vulnerabilities. In conclusion, we provide a synthesis of important results and recommendations related to endocrine-metabolic comorbidities in affective disorders : heavy influence on morbidity and mortality, undertreatment of somatic diseases, importance of endocrine and metabolic side effects from main mood stabilizers, impact from sex and age on the prevalence of comorbidities, influence from previous depressive episodes in bipolar disorders, and relevance of systematic screening for subclinical (biological) disturbances. PMID:25550238

  5. Alcohol Use Disorders and Depression: Protective Factors in the Development of Unique versus Comorbid Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, W. Alex; Hawkins, J. David; Kosterman, Rick; Catalano, Richard F.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines protective factors for young adult alcohol use disorders, depression, and comorbid alcohol use disorders and depression. Participants were recruited from all fifth-grade students attending 18 Seattle elementary schools. Of the 1,053 students eligible, 808 (77%) agreed to participate. Youths were surveyed when they were 10 years…

  6. Clinical Correlates of Comorbid Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Depression in Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canavera, Kristin E.; Ollendick, Thomas H.; Ehrenreich May, Jill T.; Pincus, Donna B.

    2010-01-01

    A burgeoning body of literature addresses the comorbidity of depression and OCD in adults. The purpose of this study was to extend this area of research to children and adolescents by examining the clinical correlates associated with co-occurring depressive disorders in a clinical sample of youth with OCD. Participants included children and…

  7. Behavioral Activation in the Treatment of Comorbid Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulick, Patrick S.; Naugle, Amy E.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of 10-weeks of Behavioral Activation (BA) in the treatment of comorbid Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) in four adults using a nonconcurrent multiple baseline across participants design. All participants met full "DSM-IV" criteria for both MDD and PTSD at the outset of…

  8. Face Emotion Processing in Depressed Children and Adolescents with and without Comorbid Conduct Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schepman, Karen; Taylor, Eric; Collishaw, Stephan; Fombonne, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Studies of adults with depression point to characteristic neurocognitive deficits, including differences in processing facial expressions. Few studies have examined face processing in juvenile depression, or taken account of other comorbid disorders. Three groups were compared: depressed children and adolescents with conduct disorder (n = 23),…

  9. Naming the Enemy: An Art Therapy Intervention for Children with Bipolar and Comorbid Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henley, David

    2007-01-01

    Treatment and diagnosis for the pediatric form of bipolar disorder presents a clinical challenge given the differences from its adult counterpart and the various comorbid forms that complicate presentation and developmental course. This article discusses manifestations of early onset bipolar disorder and offers a method for implementing art…

  10. Abnormal hippocampal structure and function in clinical anxiety and comorbid depression.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jiook; Greenberg, Tsafrir; Song, Inkyung; Blair Simpson, Helen; Posner, Jonathan; Mujica-Parodi, Lilianne R

    2016-05-01

    Given the high prevalence rates of comorbidity of anxiety and depressive disorders, identifying a common neural pathway to both disorders is important not only for better diagnosis and treatment, but also for a more complete conceptualization of each disease. Hippocampal abnormalities have been implicated in anxiety and depression, separately; however, it remains unknown whether these abnormalities are also implicated in their comorbidity. Here we address this question by testing 32 adults with generalized anxiety disorder (15 GAD only and 17 comorbid MDD) and 25 healthy controls (HC) using multimodal MRI (structure, diffusion and functional) and automated hippocampal segmentation. We demonstrate that (i) abnormal microstructure of the CA1 and CA2-3 is associated with GAD/MDD comorbidity and (ii) decreased anterior hippocampal reactivity in response to repetition of the threat cue is associated with GAD (with or without MDD comorbidity). In addition, mediation-structural equation modeling (SEM) reveals that our hippocampal and dimensional symptom data are best explained by a model describing a significant influence of abnormal hippocampal microstructure on both anxiety and depression-mediated through its impact on abnormal hippocampal threat processing. Collectively, our findings show a strong association between changes in hippocampal microstructure and threat processing, which together may present a common neural pathway to comorbidity of anxiety and depression.

  11. Prevalence of Comorbidity among People with Hypertension: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2013

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Juhwan; Shin, Anna; Yeom, Hyungseon; Jang, Suk-Yong; Lee, Jung Hyun; Kim, Changsoo; Suh, Il

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Joint National Committee guidelines attempt to vary treatment recommendations for patients based on considerations of their comorbidities. The aim of the present study is to estimate the age-standardized prevalence of common comorbidities among Korean hypertension patients. Subjects and Methods We analyzed the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2007 to 2013. Among the 58423 participants, 30092 adults, aged ≥30 yrs who completed a health examination and interview survey, were selected. The survey procedures were used to estimate weighted prevalence and odds ratios for 8 comorbidities, including obesity, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, and thyroid disease. Results Most chronic conditions were more prevalent in adults with hypertension than in those without hypertension. Common comorbidities were obesity (60.1%), dyslipidemia (57.6%), and impaired fasting glucose (45.1%). Hypertensive patients with two or more comorbid diseases were 42.2% and those with three or more diseases were 17.7%. The age- and sex-specific prevalence of three or more comorbid diseases among male hypertension patients was significantly higher than those patients in the 30-59 (p<0.05) age group. Conclusion Comorbidity is highly prevalent in Korean patients with hypertension. PMID:27721859

  12. Psychiatric comorbidity in women and men with eating disorders results from a large clinical database.

    PubMed

    Ulfvebrand, Sara; Birgegård, Andreas; Norring, Claes; Högdahl, Louise; von Hausswolff-Juhlin, Yvonne

    2015-12-15

    Psychiatric comorbidity is common in patients with eating disorders (ED), but prevalence estimates are heterogeneous, probably due to methodological differences between studies (population, diagnostic method, sampling procedure etc.) and a few studies include men. The aim of this study is to investigate psychiatric DSM-IV Axis I comorbidity in a large sample of adult patients, both males and females, with the whole spectrum of DSM-IV ED diagnoses. Initial presentation assessment data on 11,588 adult men and women presenting to specialist ED clinics in Sweden between 2008 and 2012 were extracted from a large clinical database. Diagnostics were based on semi-structured interviews (SCID-I) and the Structured Eating Disorder Interview (SEDI). Seventy-one percent of the patients with ED had at least one other Axis I disorder. The most common type of diagnosis was anxiety disorders (53%), where generalized anxiety disorder was the most common diagnosis. The highest levels of comorbidity were found for women with Binge Eating Disorder (BED) and men with Bulimia Nervosa (BN). Findings are consistent with previous research showing a high prevalence of psychiatric comorbidity in both men and women with ED. The small gender differences observed seem negligible compared to the general similarity in comorbidity.

  13. Distinguishing general and specific personality disorder features and implications for substance dependence comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Jahng, Seungmin; Trull, Timothy J; Wood, Phillip K; Tragesser, Sarah L; Tomko, Rachel; Grant, Julia D; Bucholz, Kathleen K; Sher, Kenneth J

    2011-08-01

    Clinical and population-based samples show high comorbidity between Substance Use Disorders (SUDs) and Axis II Personality Disorders (PDs). However, Axis II disorders are frequently comorbid with each other, and existing research has generally failed to distinguish the extent to which SUD/PD comorbidity is general or specific with respect to both specific types of PDs and specific types of SUDs. We sought to determine whether ostensibly specific comorbid substance dependence-Axis II diagnoses (e.g., alcohol use dependence and borderline personality disorder) are reflective of more pervasive or general personality pathology or whether the comorbidity is specific to individual PDs. Face-to-face interview data from Wave 1 and Wave 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions were analyzed. Participants included 34,653 adults living in households in the United States. We used hierarchical factor models to statistically partition general and specific personality disorder dimensions while simultaneously testing for specific PD-substance dependence relations. Results indicated that substance dependence-Axis II comorbidity is characterized by general (pervasive) pathology and by Cluster B PD pathology over and above the relationship to the general PD factor. Further, these relations between PD factors and substance dependence diagnoses appeared to largely account for the comorbidity among substance dependence diagnoses in the younger but not older participants. Our findings suggest that a failure to consider the general PD factor, which we interpret as reflecting interpersonal dysfunction, can lead to potential mischaracterizations of the nature of certain PD and SUD comorbidities.

  14. Impact of Comorbid Anxiety and Depressive Disorders on Treatment Response to Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Bélanger, Lynda; Harvey, Allison G.; Fortier-Brochu, Émilie; Beaulieu-Bonneau, Simon; Eidelman, Polina; Talbot, Lisa; Ivers, Hans; Hein, Kerrie; Lamy, Manon; Soehner, Adriane M.; Mérette, Chantal; Morin, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of comorbid anxiety or depressive disorders on treatment response to cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for insomnia, behavior therapy (BT), or cognitive therapy (CT). Method Participants were 188 adults (117 women; M age = 47.4 years) with chronic insomnia, including 45 also presenting a comorbid anxiety or mild to moderate depressive disorder. They were randomized to BT (n = 63), CT (n = 65), or CBT (n = 60). Outcome measures were the proportion of treatment responders (decrease of ≥ 8 points on the Insomnia Severity Index; ISI) and remissions (ISI score < 8) and depression and anxiety symptoms. Results Proportion of treatment responders and remitters in the CBT condition was not significantly different between the subgroups with and without comorbidity. However, the proportion of responders was lower in the comorbidity subgroup compared to those without comorbidity in both the BT (34.4% vs 81.6%; p=0.007) and CT (23.6% vs 57.6%; p=0.02) alone conditions, although remission rates and pre-post ISI change scores were not. Pre to post change scores on the depression (−10.6 vs −3.9; p<0.001) and anxiety measures (−9.2 vs −2.5; p=.01) were significantly greater in the comorbidity subgroup relative to the subgroup without comorbidity but only for those treated with the full CBT; no difference was found for those treated with either BT or CT alone. Conclusions The presence of a comorbid anxiety or mild to moderate depressive disorder did not reduce the efficacy of CBT for insomnia, but it did for its single BT and CT components when used alone. PMID:26963600

  15. [Comorbidities and psoriasis. Impact on clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Gerdes, S; Mrowietz, U

    2012-03-01

    Psoriasis is a genetically determined, chronic inflammatory systemic disease. Besides skin symptoms, patients with moderate to severe forms of psoriasis show an association with other diseases, referred to as comorbidities. Metabolic disorders (e.g. diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia mainly in obese patients) and cardiovascular diseases (e.g. arterial hypertension, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction and stroke) are of importance as they can increase patients' mortality. In addition, psychiatric diseases are more frequent in psoriasis patients and influence the therapeutic approach. The dermatologist in most cases is the primarily consulted physician for patients with psoriasis and therefore plays the role as a gatekeeper managing therapy. He is responsible for the early diagnosis of comorbidities and insuring their appropriate management. The anti-psoriatic treatment has to be adapted to existing comorbidities and their systemic treatments. The following article provides information on psoriatic comorbidities and their consequences for daily practice.

  16. Complete Edentulism and Comorbid Diseases: An Update.

    PubMed

    Felton, David A

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between complete edentulism, which is the terminal outcome of a multifactorial oral disease process and other comorbid diseases, was first reported in 2009. Although the relationship between edentulism and a multitude of systemic diseases was reported, none of the publications studied could determine causality of tooth loss on the incidence of any comorbid disease. Since that publication, there has been a renewed interest in this relationship, and a plethora of new articles have been published. This article will provide an update on articles published since 2008 on the relationship between edentulism and comorbid diseases, and will include the relationship between complete edentulism and such comorbid conditions as malnutrition, obesity, cardiovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis, pulmonary diseases (including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), cancer, and even mortality.

  17. Generalized anxiety disorder: A comorbid disease.

    PubMed

    Nutt, David; Argyropoulos, Spilos; Hood, Sean; Potokar, John

    2006-07-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) frequently occurs comorbidly with other conditions, including depression and somatic complaints. Comorbid GAD sufferers have increased psychologic and social impairment, request additional treatment, and have an extended course and poorer outcome than those with GAD alone; therapy should alleviate both the psychic and somatic symptoms of GAD without negatively affecting the comorbid condition. The ideal treatment would provide relief from both GAD and the comorbid condition, reducing the need for polypharmacy. Physicians need suitable tools to assist them in the detection and monitoring of GAD patients-the GADI, a new, self-rating scale, may meet this requirement. Clinical data have shown that various neurobiologic irregularities (e.g., in the GABA and serotonin systems) are associated with the development of anxiety. Prescribing physicians must take into account these abnormalities when choosing a drug. Effective diagnosis and treatment should improve patients' quality of life and their prognosis for recovery. PMID:16737802

  18. Psychiatric comorbidities of episodic and chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Buse, Dawn C; Silberstein, Stephen D; Manack, Aubrey N; Papapetropoulos, Spyros; Lipton, Richard B

    2013-08-01

    Migraine is a prevalent disabling neurological disorder associated with a wide range of medical and psychiatric comorbidities. Population- and clinic-based studies suggest that psychiatric comorbidities, particularly mood and anxiety disorders, are more common among persons with chronic migraine than among those with episodic migraine. Additional studies suggest that psychiatric comorbidities may be a risk factor for migraine chronification (i.e., progression from episodic to chronic migraine). It is important to identify and appropriately treat comorbid psychiatric conditions in persons with migraine, as these conditions may contribute to increased migraine-related disability and impact, diminished health-related quality of life, and poor treatment outcomes. Here, we review the current literature on the rates of several psychiatric comorbidities, including depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder, among persons with migraine in clinic- and population-based studies. We also review the link between physical, emotional, and substance abuse, psychiatric disorders, and migraine. Finally, we review the data on psychiatric risk factors for migraine chronification and explore theories and evidence underlying the comorbidity between migraine and these psychiatric disorders. PMID:23132299

  19. Social Anxiety Disorder and Alcohol Use Disorder Comorbidity in the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Schneier, Franklin R.; Foose, Tracy E.; Hasin, Deborah S.; Heimberg, Richard G.; Liu, Shang-Min; Grant, Bridget F.; Blanco, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the prevalence and clinical impact of comorbid Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) and Alcohol Use Disorders (AUD, i.e., alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence) in a nationally representative sample of adults in the United States. Methods Data came from a large representative sample of the United States population. Face-to-face interviews of 43,093 adults residing in households were conducted during 2001–2002. Diagnoses of mood, anxiety, alcohol and drug use disorders, and personality disorders were based on the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule—DSM-IV Version. Results Lifetime prevalence of comorbid AUD and SAD in the general population was 2.4%. SAD was associated with significantly increased rates of alcohol dependence (OR=2.8) and alcohol abuse (OR=1.2). Among respondents with alcohol dependence, SAD was associated with significantly more mood, anxiety, psychotic, and personality disorders. Among respondents with SAD, alcohol dependence and abuse were most strongly associated with more substance use disorders, pathological gambling, and antisocial personality disorders. SAD occurred before alcohol dependence in 79.7% of comorbid cases, but comorbidity status did not influence age of onset for either disorder. Comorbid SAD was associated with increased severity of alcohol dependence and abuse. Respondents with comorbid SAD and alcohol dependence or abuse reported low rates of treatment-seeking. Conclusions Comorbid lifetime AUD and SAD is a prevalent dual diagnosis, associated with substantial rates of additional comorbidity, but remaining largely untreated. Future research should clarify the etiology of this comorbid presentation to better identify effective means of intervention. PMID:20441690

  20. Assessing the Comorbidity Gap between Clinical Studies and Prevalence in Elderly Patient Populations

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhe; Charness, Neil; Bian, Jiang; Hogan, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Well-designed and well-conducted clinical studies represent gold standard approaches for generating medical evidence. However, elderly populations are systematically underrepresented in studies across major chronic medical conditions, which has hampered the generalizability (external validity) of studies to the real-world patient population. It is the norm that intervention studies often require a homogeneous cohort to test their hypotheses; therefore older adults with co-medications and comorbidities are often excluded. The purpose of this study is to assess the gap between clinical studies on comorbidities and prevalence in elderly populations derived from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and the Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II (MIMIC-II) dataset. A comorbidity gap between them was observed and reported in this work.

  1. Neuroinflammation and Comorbidity of Pain and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Kavelaars, A.; Heijnen, C. J.; Dantzer, R.

    2014-01-01

    Comorbid depression and chronic pain are highly prevalent in individuals suffering from physical illness. Here, we critically examine the possibility that inflammation is the common mediator of this comorbidity, and we explore the implications of this hypothesis. Inflammation signals the brain to induce sickness responses that include increased pain and negative affect. This is a typical and adaptive response to acute inflammation. However, chronic inflammation induces a transition from these typical sickness behaviors into depression and chronic pain. Several mechanisms can account for the high comorbidity of pain and depression that stem from the precipitating inflammation in physically ill patients. These mechanisms include direct effects of cytokines on the neuronal environment or indirect effects via downregulation of G protein–coupled receptor kinase 2, activation of the tryptophan-degrading enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase that generates neurotropic kynurenine metabolites, increased brain extracellular glutamate, and the switch of GABAergic neurotransmission from inhibition to excitation. Despite the existence of many neuroimmune candidate mechanisms for the co-occurrence of depression and chronic pain, little work has been devoted so far to critically assess their mediating role in these comorbid symptoms. Understanding neuroimmune mechanisms that underlie depression and pain comorbidity may yield effective pharmaceutical targets that can treat both conditions simultaneously beyond traditional antidepressants and analgesics. PMID:24335193

  2. Neuroinflammation and comorbidity of pain and depression.

    PubMed

    Walker, A K; Kavelaars, A; Heijnen, C J; Dantzer, R

    2014-01-01

    Comorbid depression and chronic pain are highly prevalent in individuals suffering from physical illness. Here, we critically examine the possibility that inflammation is the common mediator of this comorbidity, and we explore the implications of this hypothesis. Inflammation signals the brain to induce sickness responses that include increased pain and negative affect. This is a typical and adaptive response to acute inflammation. However, chronic inflammation induces a transition from these typical sickness behaviors into depression and chronic pain. Several mechanisms can account for the high comorbidity of pain and depression that stem from the precipitating inflammation in physically ill patients. These mechanisms include direct effects of cytokines on the neuronal environment or indirect effects via downregulation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2, activation of the tryptophan-degrading enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase that generates neurotropic kynurenine metabolites, increased brain extracellular glutamate, and the switch of GABAergic neurotransmission from inhibition to excitation. Despite the existence of many neuroimmune candidate mechanisms for the co-occurrence of depression and chronic pain, little work has been devoted so far to critically assess their mediating role in these comorbid symptoms. Understanding neuroimmune mechanisms that underlie depression and pain comorbidity may yield effective pharmaceutical targets that can treat both conditions simultaneously beyond traditional antidepressants and analgesics.

  3. Adjusting for dependent comorbidity in the calculation of healthy life expectancy

    PubMed Central

    Mathers, Colin D; Iburg, Kim M; Begg, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Background Healthy life expectancy – sometimes called health-adjusted life expectancy (HALE) – is a form of health expectancy indicator that extends measures of life expectancy to account for the distribution of health states in the population. The World Health Organization has estimated healthy life expectancy for 192 WHO Member States using information from health interview surveys and from the Global Burden of Disease Study. The latter estimates loss of health by cause, age and sex for populations. Summation of prevalent years lived with disability (PYLD) across all causes would result in overestimation of the severity of the population average health state because of comorbidity between conditions. Earlier HALE calculations made adjustments for independent comorbidity in adding PYLD across causes. This paper presents a method for adjusting for dependent comorbidity using available empirical data. Methods Data from five large national health surveys were analysed by age and sex to estimate "dependent comorbidity" factors for pairs of conditions. These factors were defined as the ratio of the prevalence of people with both conditions to the product of the two total prevalences for each of the conditions. The resulting dependent comorbidity factors were used for all Member States to adjust for dependent comorbidity in summation of PYLD across all causes and in the calculation of HALE. A sensitivity analysis was also carried out for order effects in the proposed calculation method. Results There was surprising consistency in the dependent comorbidity factors across the five surveys. The improved estimation of dependent comorbidity resulted in reductions in total PYLD per capita ranging from a few per cent in younger adult ages to around 8% in the oldest age group (80 years and over) in developed countries and up to 15% in the oldest age group in the least developed countries. The effect of the dependent comorbidity adjustment on estimated healthy life

  4. Comorbid illnesses and chest radiographic severity in African-American sarcoidosis patients.

    PubMed

    Westney, Gloria E; Habib, Sadia; Quarshie, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Sarcoidosis disease expression differs along racial/ethnic lines and black race has been cited as a poor prognostic factor. Besides genetic, healthcare, and socioeconomic factors, comorbid illnesses may influence sarcoidosis disease expression. We set out to investigate the association between comorbid illnesses and chest radiographic severity in a population of African-American sarcoidosis patients. The study was designed as a retrospective database analysis. The hospital and outpatient databases of the Grady Health System were searched to capture adult patients between November 1999 and December 2003 with the ICD-9 codes of 135 or 519.8, along with all associated secondary and tertiary diagnostic codes. Patient electronic pathology and radiographic reports were reviewed for tissue biopsies showing noncaseating granulomas and for chest radiographic Scadding stage. A total of 165 African-American patients were identified (64% female, 43 +/- 10 years old). Ninety percent (149/165) had comorbid illnesses. The most frequent chronic comorbid illnesses were hypertension (39%), diabetes mellitus (19%), anemia (19%), asthma (15%), gastroesophageal reflux disease (15%), depression (13%), and heart failure (10%). Females had increased frequency and clustering of chronic illnesses. Chest radiographic stages were more severe in patients with anemia, depression, and those less than 40 years old. Males, within each chronic illnesses category, had more severe CXR stages compared to females; however, significance was not achieved. We concluded that most adult patients with sarcoidosis have comorbid illnesses and these, in addition to gender differences, may influence sarcoidosis disease expression. Screening for comorbid illnesses should be an important aspect of sarcoidosis patient management.

  5. Managing comorbidities in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, Blair G; Ryerson, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Major risk factors for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) include older age and a history of smoking, which predispose to several pulmonary and extra-pulmonary diseases. IPF can be associated with additional comorbidities through other mechanisms as either a cause or a consequence of these diseases. We review the literature regarding the management of common pulmonary and extra-pulmonary comorbidities, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, lung cancer, pulmonary hypertension, venous thromboembolism, sleep-disordered breathing, gastroesophageal reflux disease, coronary artery disease, depression and anxiety, and deconditioning. Recent studies have provided some guidance on the management of these diseases in IPF; however, most treatment recommendations are extrapolated from studies of non-IPF patients. Additional studies are required to more accurately determine the clinical features of these comorbidities in patients with IPF and to evaluate conventional treatments and management strategies that are beneficial in non-IPF populations. PMID:26451121

  6. Asperger's syndrome: diagnosis, comorbidity and therapy.

    PubMed

    Tarazi, F I; Sahli, Z T; Pleskow, J; Mousa, S A

    2015-03-01

    Asperger's syndrome (AS), a behavioral disorder that is related to autism, is associated with abnormal social functioning and repetitive behaviors but not with a decrease in intelligence or linguistic functionality. This article reviews the clinical diagnosis of AS and discusses the comorbid disorders that may be present with AS, as well as the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of pharmacotherapies given to AS patients, as reported in preclinical and clinical studies. AS may be present with several comorbid disorders including: attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, anxiety, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, and Tourette's syndrome. The difficulty in distinguishing AS from autism results in treating the comorbid disorder symptoms, rather than treating the symptoms of AS. Accordingly, there is a great need to further understand the psychobiology of AS and its association with other disorders, which should expand the pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapeutic options and improve the quality of life for AS patients.

  7. Comorbidity - a troublesome factor in PTSD treatment.

    PubMed

    Dadić-Hero, Elizabeta; Torić, Ines; Ruzić, Klementina; Medved, Paola; Graovac, Mirjana

    2009-09-01

    Posttraumatic stress syndrome (PTSD) is a disorder which emerges after the patient has experienced one or more psychotraumatic events, which equally include neurobiological deregulation and psychological dysfunction. Comorbidity is present in more than 80% of the diagnosed cases of PTSD, which makes treatment of the primary disorder very difficult. It has been identified that PTSD can be found in comorbidity with other psychiatric disorders as well as with physical illnesses. This study presents aged 42, who has been psychiatrically treated for the past 12 years, with a diagnose of chronic PTSD and who subsequently developed depression. The patient has been treated for psoriasis for the past seven years, and two years ago, had to undergo surgery due to bladder carcinoma, followed by a radiotherapy course. Multiple comorbidity significantly makes the treatment of the primary illness very difficult and it limits the choice of pharmacotherapy in ambulatory conditions.

  8. Comorbidity of PTSD in anxiety and depressive disorders: prevalence and shared risk factors.

    PubMed

    Spinhoven, Philip; Penninx, Brenda W; van Hemert, Albert M; de Rooij, Mark; Elzinga, Bernet M

    2014-08-01

    The present study aims to assess comorbidity of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in anxiety and depressive disorders and to determine whether childhood trauma types and other putative independent risk factors for comorbid PTSD are unique to PTSD or shared with anxiety and depressive disorders. The sample of 2402 adults aged 18-65 included healthy controls, persons with a prior history of affective disorders, and persons with a current affective disorder. These individuals were assessed at baseline (T0) and 2 (T2) and 4 years (T4) later. At each wave, DSM-IV-TR based anxiety and depressive disorder, neuroticism, extraversion, and symptom severity were assessed. Childhood trauma was measured at T0 with an interview and at T4 with a questionnaire, and PTSD was measured with a standardized interview at T4. Prevalence of 5-year recency PTSD among anxiety and depressive disorders was 9.2%, and comorbidity, in particular with major depression, was high (84.4%). Comorbidity was associated with female gender, all types of childhood trauma, neuroticism, (low) extraversion, and symptom severity. Multivariable significant risk factors (i.e., female gender and child sexual and physical abuse) were shared among anxiety and depressive disorders. Our results support a shared vulnerability model for comorbidity of anxiety and depressive disorders with PTSD. Routine assessment of PTSD in patients with anxiety and depressive disorders seems warranted.

  9. Assessing comorbidity in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Visser, Martine; Marinus, Johan; van Hilten, Jacobus J; Schipper, Ruth G B; Stiggelbout, Anne M

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of an interview-based assessment of comorbidity, in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). The Cumulative Illness Rating Scale-Geriatric (CIRS-G) was completed (1) in an interview with 31 PD patients and their caregivers, and (2) by reviewing the patient's medical charts from their general practitioners. Based on the interview, all patients had some comorbidity, 84% had one or more moderate comorbid diseases. The most frequently affected organ systems were "lower gastrointestinal" and "genitourinary". The mean +/- SD total score of the interview-based (chart-based) CIRS-G was 6.9 +/- 3.8 (7.6 +/- 3.5) with a mean of 4.3 +/- 1.9 (5.0 +/- 1.9) affected organ systems and a mean of 2.1 +/- 1.7 (2.3 +/- 1.6) organ systems with at least moderate comorbidity per patient. The agreement (intraclass correlation coefficients) between the interview-based and chart-based assessments for the six summary scores ranged from 0.69 to 0.81. The agreement for the 14 organ systems ranged from 0.13 to 1.00 (weighted kappa); 12 had a K(w) above 0.40 (moderate agreement). The comorbidity summary scores had a moderate correlation with age and disability. The interview-based assessment of the CIRS-G is easy to apply and is an accurate method to assess comorbidity in patients with PD.

  10. Fatigue and Comorbidities in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fiest, Kirsten M.; Fisk, John D.; Patten, Scott B.; Tremlett, Helen; Wolfson, Christina; Warren, Sharon; McKay, Kyla A.; Berrigan, Lindsay I.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Fatigue is commonly reported by people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Comorbidity is also common in MS, but its association with the presence of fatigue or fatigue changes over time is poorly understood. Methods: Nine hundred forty-nine people with definite MS were recruited from four Canadian centers. The Fatigue Impact Scale for Daily Use and a validated comorbidity questionnaire were completed at three visits over 2 years. Participants were classified into groups with no fatigue versus any fatigue. Logistic regression was used to determine the relationship between fatigue and each comorbidity at baseline, year 1, year 2, and overall. Results: The incidence of fatigue during the study was 38.8%. The prevalence of fatigue was greater in those who were older (P = .0004), had a longer time since symptom onset (P = .005), and had greater disability (P < .0001). After adjustment, depression (odds ratio [OR], 2.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.03–3.27), irritable bowel syndrome (OR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.18–2.48), migraine (OR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.27–2.27), and anxiety (OR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.15–2.16) were independently associated with fatigue that persisted during the study. There was also an individual-level effect of depression on worsening fatigue (OR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.08–2.07). Conclusions: Comorbidity is associated with fatigue in MS. Depression is associated with fatigue and with increased risk of worsening fatigue over 2 years. However, other comorbid conditions commonly associated with MS are also associated with persistent fatigue, even after accounting for depression. Further investigation is required to understand the mechanisms by which comorbidities influence fatigue. PMID:27134583

  11. Comorbidities impacting on prognosis after lung transplant.

    PubMed

    Vaquero Barrios, José Manuel; Redel Montero, Javier; Santos Luna, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to give an overview of the clinical circumstances presenting before lung transplant that may have negative repercussions on the long and short-term prognosis of the transplant. Methods for screening and diagnosis of common comorbidities with negative impact on the prognosis of the transplant are proposed, both for pulmonary and extrapulmonary diseases, and measures aimed at correcting these factors are discussed. Coordination and information exchange between referral centers and transplant centers would allow these comorbidities to be detected and corrected, with the aim of minimizing the risks and improving the life expectancy of transplant receivers.

  12. [COMORBIDITIES IN PATIENTS WITH ONCOGYNECOLOGICAL CANCER].

    PubMed

    Tzoneva, K; Chakalova, G

    2016-01-01

    Comorbidities may directly affect the prognosis of the disease of interest or may indirectly affect the prognosis by affecting the choice of treatment. The aim of this study is to determine comorbidities in pacients with gynecological cancer. The study included 100 consecutive pacients for the period 01.01.2014-08.-5.2014 in Gynecological department of Specialized Hospital for ActivTratament in Oncology. The most common disease are arterial hipertony diabetes and obesity. In most patients, establish one or more accompanying illnesses that increase with age. PMID:27514167

  13. Comorbidity in compulsive hoarding: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Alicia; Hollander, Eric

    2004-01-01

    A 56-year-old male presented with compulsive hoarding along with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and schizotypal personality disorder. Hoarding has been described as difficult to treat both pharmacologically and behaviorally, and this patient's comorbid conditions also contributed to his overall impairment. The patient's treatment regimen of fluvoxamine, amphetamine salts, and risperidone, along with behavioral therapy, has helped with hoarding behaviors, motivation, procrastination, and increased socialization. Hoarding may be a unique subtype of obsessive-compulsive disorder with poorer prognosis and distinct neuroanatomic dysfunction. Augmentation with stimulants may provide benefits in aspects of hoarding such as procrastination, especially in patients with comorbid attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

  14. Psychiatric comorbidity in childhood and adolescence headache.

    PubMed

    Dyb, Grete; Stensland, Synne; Zwart, John-Anker

    2015-03-01

    Primary headaches among children and adolescents have a substantial impact on quality of life, daily activities, social interaction, and school performance in combination with psychopathological symptoms. The main purpose of the present paper is to summarize clinical and epidemiological evidence for psychiatric comorbidity among children and adolescents with headaches, to describe how evidence in headache research suggest different pathways involved in the development and maintenance of these comorbid conditions, and finally suggest some elements professionals may find helpful to assess the scope of complaints, related functional impairment, and potential precipitating factors in planning of more targeted treatments.

  15. Clinical Phenotypes and Comorbidity in European Sleep Apnoea Patients

    PubMed Central

    Saaresranta, Tarja; Hedner, Jan; Bonsignore, Maria R.; Riha, Renata L.; McNicholas, Walter T.; Penzel, Thomas; Anttalainen, Ulla; Kvamme, John Arthur; Pretl, Martin; Sliwinski, Pawel; Verbraecken, Johan; Grote, Ludger

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical presentation phenotypes of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and their association with comorbidity as well as impact on adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment have not been established. Methods A prospective follow-up cohort of adult patients with OSA (apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) of ≥5/h) from 17 European countries and Israel (n = 6,555) was divided into four clinical presentation phenotypes based on daytime symptoms labelled as excessive daytime sleepiness (“EDS”) and nocturnal sleep problems other than OSA (labelled as “insomnia”): 1) EDS (daytime+/nighttime-), 2) EDS/insomnia (daytime+/nighttime+), 3) non-EDS/non-insomnia (daytime-/nighttime-), 4) and insomnia (daytime-/nighttime+) phenotype. Results The EDS phenotype comprised 20.7%, the non-EDS/non-insomnia type 25.8%, the EDS/insomnia type 23.7%, and the insomnia phenotype 29.8% of the entire cohort. Thus, clinical presentation phenotypes with insomnia symptoms were dominant with 53.5%, but only 5.6% had physician diagnosed insomnia. Cardiovascular comorbidity was less prevalent in the EDS and most common in the insomnia phenotype (48.9% vs. 56.8%, p<0.001) despite more severe OSA in the EDS group (AHI 35.0±25.5/h vs. 27.9±22.5/h, p<0.001, respectively). Psychiatric comorbidity was associated with insomnia like OSA phenotypes independent of age, gender and body mass index (HR 1.5 (1.188–1.905), p<0.001). The EDS phenotype tended to associate with higher CPAP usage (22.7 min/d, p = 0.069) when controlled for age, gender, BMI and sleep apnoea severity. Conclusions Phenotypes with insomnia symptoms comprised more than half of OSA patients and were more frequently linked with comorbidity than those with EDS, despite less severe OSA. CPAP usage was slightly higher in phenotypes with EDS. PMID:27701416

  16. Psychiatric Comorbidity in Gender Dysphoric Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Vries, Annelou L. C.; Doreleijers, Theo A. H.; Steensma, Thomas D.; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study examined psychiatric comorbidity in adolescents with a gender identity disorder (GID). We focused on its relation to gender, type of GID diagnosis and eligibility for medical interventions (puberty suppression and cross-sex hormones). Methods: To ascertain DSM-IV diagnoses, the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children…

  17. Psychiatric Disorders, Comorbidity, and Suicidality in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Guilherme; Nock, Matthew K.; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Hwang, Irving; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Prior studies have reported that psychiatric disorders are among the strongest predictors of suicidal behavior (i.e., suicide ideation, plans, and attempts). However, surprisingly little is known about the independent associations between each disorder and each suicidal behavior due to a failure to account for comorbidity. Methods This study used data from a representative sample of 5,782 respondents participating in the Mexican National Comorbidity Survey (2001–2002) to examine the unique associations between psychiatric disorders and suicidality. Results A prior psychiatric disorder was present in 48.8% of those with a suicide ideation and in 65.2% of those with an attempt. Discrete-time survival models adjusting for comorbidity revealed that conduct disorder and alcohol abuse/dependence were the strongest predictors of a subsequent suicide attempt. Most disorders predicted suicidal ideation but few predicted the transition from ideation to a suicide plan or attempt. Limitations M-NCS is a household survey that excluded homeless and institutionalized people, andthe diagnostic instrument used did not include an assessment of all DSM-IV disorders which would increase the comorbidity discussed here. Conclusions These results reveal a complex pattern of associations in which diverse psychiatric disorders impact different parts of the pathway to suicide attempts. These findings will help inform clinical and public health efforts aimed at suicide prevention in Mexico and other developing countries. PMID:19926141

  18. Single-Gene Determinants of Epilepsy Comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Noebels, Jeffrey L

    2015-11-02

    Common somatic conditions are bound to occur by chance in individuals with neurological disorders as prevalent as epilepsy, but when biological links underlying the comorbidity can be uncovered, the relationship may provide clues into the origin and mechanisms of both. The expanding list of monogenic epilepsies and their associated clinical features offer a remarkable opportunity to mine the epilepsy genome for coordinate neurodevelopmental phenotypes and examine their pathogenic mechanisms. Defined single-gene-linked epilepsy syndromes identified to date include all of the most frequently cited comorbidities, such as cognitive disorders, autism, migraine, mood disorders, late-onset dementia, and even premature lethality. Gene-linked comorbidities may be aggravated by, or independent of, seizure history. Mutations in these genes establish clear biological links between abnormal neuronal synchronization and a variety of neurobehavioral disorders, and critically substantiate the definition of epilepsy as a complex spectrum disorder. Mapping the neural circuitry of epilepsy comorbidities and understanding their single-gene risk should substantially clarify this challenging aspect of clinical epilepsy management.

  19. Modafinil treatment of amphetamine abuse in adult ADHD.

    PubMed

    Mann, N; Bitsios, P

    2009-06-01

    Substance abuse is a frequent co-morbid condition of adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Treatment with conventional psychostimulants in adult ADHD with co-morbid stimulant abuse may be problematic. In this study, we report the case of a patient with adult ADHD with co-morbid amphetamine abuse who was treated successfully with the non-stimulant alertness-promoting drug modafinil. The drug resolved both the inattention/hyperactivity symptoms as well as the amphetamine abuse. Modafinil may be a suitable candidate treatment for adults with ADHD and stimulant abuse.

  20. Aging with HIV: a cross-sectional study of comorbidity prevalence and clinical characteristics across decades of life.

    PubMed

    Vance, David E; Mugavero, Michael; Willig, James; Raper, James L; Saag, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    Nurses and nurse practitioners require information on the health problems faced by aging HIV-infected adults. In this descriptive, cross-sectional study, we reviewed the electronic medical records of 1,478 adult patients seen in an HIV clinic between May 2006 and August 2007 to examine patterns of comorbidities, and immunological and clinical characteristics across each decade of life. With increasing age, patients were found to have lower HIV viral loads, more prescribed medications, and a higher prevalence of comorbid conditions, including coronary artery disease, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, hypogonadism, erectile dysfunction, diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, hepatitis C, esophageal gastric reflux disease, and renal disease. Fortunately, with increasing age, patients were also more likely to have public or private health insurance and tended to be more compliant to medical appointments. With growing interest in aging with HIV, this study highlights the vastly different comorbidity profiles across decades of life, calling into question what constitutes "older" with HIV. PMID:20471864

  1. Psychiatric Comorbidities among Female Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salbach-Andrae, Harriet; Lenz, Klaus; Simmendinger, Nicole; Klinkowski, Nora; Lehmkuhl, Ulrike; Pfeiffer, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated current comorbid Axis I diagnoses associated with Anorexia Nervosa (AN) in adolescents. The sample included 101 female adolescents treated at a psychiatric unit for primary DSM-IV diagnoses of AN. 73.3% of the AN patients were diagnosed as having a current comorbidity of at least one comorbid Axis I diagnosis, with no…

  2. Comorbidity in youth with specific phobias: Impact of comorbidity on treatment outcome and the impact of treatment on comorbid disorders.

    PubMed

    Ollendick, Thomas H; Ost, Lars-Göran; Reuterskiöld, Lena; Costa, Natalie

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was twofold. In an analysis of data from an existing randomized control trial of brief cognitive behavioral treatment on specific phobias (One-Session Treatment, OST; Ollendick et al., 2009), we examined 1) the effect of comorbid specific phobias and other anxiety disorders on treatment outcomes, and 2) the effect of treatment of the specific phobia on these co-occurring disorders. These relations were explored in 100 youth presenting with animal, natural environment, situational, and "other" types of phobia. Youth were reliably diagnosed with the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for DSM-IV: Child and Parent versions (Silverman & Albano, 1996). Clinician severity ratings at post-treatment and 6-month follow-up were examined as were parent and child treatment outcome satisfaction measures. Results indicated that the presence of comorbid phobias or anxiety disorders did not affect treatment outcomes; moreover, treatment of the targeted specific phobias led to significant reductions in the clinical severity of other co-occurring specific phobias and related anxiety disorders. These findings speak to the generalization of the effects of this time-limited treatment approach. Implications for treatment of principal and comorbid disorders are discussed, and possible mechanisms for these effects are commented upon. PMID:20573338

  3. Criminal behavior and cognitive processing in male offenders with antisocial personality disorder with and without comorbid psychopathy.

    PubMed

    Riser, Rebecca E; Kosson, David S

    2013-10-01

    Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) and psychopathy are 2 important syndromes with substantial utility in predicting antisocial behavior. Although prior studies have identified correlations between various factors and the presence of psychopathy or ASPD, most studies have focused on 1 syndrome or the other. Consequently, it is unclear whether the 2 syndromes reflect similar pathophysiologies, whether they are in fact 2 distinct syndromes, or whether the correlates of ASPD reflect its high comorbidity with psychopathy. The present study addressed this issue by examining the impact of ASPD with and without comorbid psychopathy (as assessed by the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised) on criminal offending and cognitive processing in 674 adult male inmates at a county jail in Illinois. Participants exhibited either ASPD and comorbid psychopathy, ASPD but not psychopathy, or neither ASPD nor psychopathy. Participants with and without comorbid psychopathy were characterized by more criminal behavior than controls, and inmates with ASPD and psychopathy exhibited more severe criminal behavior than those with ASPD only. In addition, inmates with ASPD and psychopathy exhibited a different pattern of cognitive task performance impairment than those with ASPD alone. Results replicate the findings of Kosson, Lorenz, and Newman (2006) and provide new evidence suggesting that men with ASPD and comorbid psychopathy are characterized by cognitive processing anomalies different from those seen in ASPD without comorbid psychopathy.

  4. Self Report Co-Morbidity and Health Related Quality of Life -- A Comparison with Record Based Co-Morbidity Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voaklander, Donald C.; Kelly, Karen D.; Jones, C. Allyson; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to compare three hospital-based measures of co-morbidity to patient self-report co-morbidity and to determine the relative proportion of outcome predicted by each of the co-morbidity measures in a population of individuals receiving major joint arthroplasty. Baseline measures using the SF-36 general health…

  5. Headache and comorbidity in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Headache is one of the most common neurological symptom reported in childhood and adolescence, leading to high levels of school absences and being associated with several comorbid conditions, particularly in neurological, psychiatric and cardiovascular systems. Neurological and psychiatric disorders, that are associated with migraine, are mainly depression, anxiety disorders, epilepsy and sleep disorders, ADHD and Tourette syndrome. It also has been shown an association with atopic disease and cardiovascular disease, especially ischemic stroke and patent foramen ovale (PFO). PMID:24063537

  6. [Comorbidity in cardiac pathology: clinical-organizational and epidemiological problems].

    PubMed

    Dimov, A S; Maksimov, N I

    2013-01-01

    Scientific (analytical) approach directs researcher to the study of nosology in isolated native view. The phenomenon under consideration- comorbidity becomes significant and to a substantial degree is able to affect all aspects of the process of medical care. This is shown in this review along such directions as frequency of overt or concealed comorbidity or real state of the problem; magnitude of intracardiac and extracardiac comorbidity; difficulties of diagnostics and treatment arising with comorbidity; problems of validity of statistical (and epidemiological) side of the matter; value of social and organizational aspects of patients care in situations when comorbidity is present. PMID:24087967

  7. Prevalence, correlates, and comorbidities of four DSM-IV specific phobia subtypes: results from the Korean Epidemiological Catchment Area study.

    PubMed

    Park, Subin; Sohn, Jee Hoon; Hong, Jin Pyo; Chang, Sung Man; Lee, Young Moon; Jeon, Hong Jin; Cho, Seong-Jin; Bae, Jae Nam; Lee, Jun Young; Son, Jung-Woo; Cho, Maeng Je

    2013-10-30

    Although several studies have detected differences in clinical features among specific phobias, there is a shortage of detailed national data on the on the DSM-IV SP subtypes, particularly in the Asian population. To examine the prevalence, demographic and other correlates, and co-morbidities of DSM-IV SP subtypes in a nationwide sample of Korean adults. We recruited 6510 participants aged 18-64 years for this study. Lay interviewers used the Composite International Diagnostic Interview to assess participants. We analyzed socio-demographics, health-related correlates and frequencies of comorbid mental disorders among participants with SP and each subtypes compared to unaffected adults. The prevalence of lifetime DSM-IV SP was 3.8%, and animal phobias were the most prevalent type of SP. Blood-injection-injury phobia was negatively associated with education, whereas situational phobia was positively associated with education. The strongest mental disorder comorbidity was associated with situational phobia; there is a higher probability of comorbid mood (OR=5.73, 95% CI=2.09-15.73), anxiety (OR=7.54, 95% CI=2.34-24.28), and somatoform disorders (OR=7.61, 95% CI=1.64-35.22) with this subtype. Blood-injection-injury phobia was highly associated with alcohol dependence (OR=9.02, 95% CI=3.54-23.02). Specific phobias are heterogeneous with respect to socio-demographic characteristics and comorbidity pattern. Implications of the usefulness of current subtype categories should continue to be investigated.

  8. Patterns of Comorbidity of Suicide Attempters: An Update.

    PubMed

    Blasco-Fontecilla, Hilario; Rodrigo-Yanguas, Maria; Giner, Lucas; Lobato-Rodriguez, Maria Jose; de Leon, Jose

    2016-10-01

    Between 10 and 20 million people attempt suicide every year worldwide, and suicide attempts represent a major economic burden. Suicide attempters suffer from high rates of comorbidity, and comorbidity is the rule in suicide re-attempters. Comorbidity complicates treatment and prognosis and causes a more protracted course. In the present narrative review, we included these patterns of comorbidity: intra-Axis I disorders, intra-Axis II disorders, Axis I with Axis II disorders, and psychiatric with physical illnesses. We also briefly reviewed the patterns of comorbidity in suicide re-attempters. We concluded that comorbidity at different levels appears to be the rule in suicide attempters, particularly in those who re-attempt. However, several issues deserve further research regarding the patterns of comorbidity in suicide attempters. PMID:27595859

  9. Psoriasis in Children and Adolescents: Diagnosis, Management and Comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Bronckers, I M G J; Paller, A S; van Geel, M J; van de Kerkhof, P C M; Seyger, M M B

    2015-10-01

    Psoriasis is a common chronic immune-mediated inflammatory skin disorder and begins in childhood in almost one-third of the cases. Although children present with the same clinical subtypes of psoriasis seen in adults, lesions may differ in distribution and morphology, and their clinical symptoms at presentation may vary from those reported by adult patients. Nevertheless, diagnosis of psoriasis is primarily based on clinical features. Pediatric psoriasis can have a profound long-term impact on the psychological health of affected children. Additionally, pediatric psoriasis has been associated with certain comorbidities, such as obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus and rheumatoid arthritis, making early diagnosis and management essential. As guidelines are lacking and most (systemic) treatments are not approved for use in children, treatment of pediatric psoriasis remains a challenge. A prospective, multicenter, international registry is needed to evaluate these treatments in a standardized manner and ultimately to develop international guidelines on pediatric psoriasis. This article reviews current concepts in pediatric psoriasis including epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, the role of topical and systemic agents and the association with other morbidities in childhood.

  10. Psoriasis in Children and Adolescents: Diagnosis, Management and Comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Bronckers, I M G J; Paller, A S; van Geel, M J; van de Kerkhof, P C M; Seyger, M M B

    2015-10-01

    Psoriasis is a common chronic immune-mediated inflammatory skin disorder and begins in childhood in almost one-third of the cases. Although children present with the same clinical subtypes of psoriasis seen in adults, lesions may differ in distribution and morphology, and their clinical symptoms at presentation may vary from those reported by adult patients. Nevertheless, diagnosis of psoriasis is primarily based on clinical features. Pediatric psoriasis can have a profound long-term impact on the psychological health of affected children. Additionally, pediatric psoriasis has been associated with certain comorbidities, such as obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus and rheumatoid arthritis, making early diagnosis and management essential. As guidelines are lacking and most (systemic) treatments are not approved for use in children, treatment of pediatric psoriasis remains a challenge. A prospective, multicenter, international registry is needed to evaluate these treatments in a standardized manner and ultimately to develop international guidelines on pediatric psoriasis. This article reviews current concepts in pediatric psoriasis including epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, the role of topical and systemic agents and the association with other morbidities in childhood. PMID:26072040

  11. Headache and anxiety-depressive disorder comorbidity: the HADAS study.

    PubMed

    Beghi, E; Allais, G; Cortelli, P; D'Amico, D; De Simone, R; d'Onofrio, F; Genco, S; Manzoni, G C; Moschiano, F; Tonini, M C; Torelli, P; Quartaroli, M; Roncolato, M; Salvi, S; Bussone, G

    2007-05-01

    Psychiatric comorbidity (prevalence and types) was tested in a naturalistic sample of adult patients with pure migraine without aura, and in two control groups of patients, one experiencing pure tension-type headache and the other combined migraine and tension-type headaches. The study population included 374 patients (158, 110 and 106) from nine Italian secondary and tertiary centres. Psychiatric comorbidity was recorded through structured interview and also screened with the Mini International Neuropsychiatry Interview (MINI). Only anxiety and depression were investigated. Psychiatric disorders were reported by 49 patients (14.6%; 10.9% of patients with migraine, 12.8% of those with tension-type headache and 21.4% of those with combined migraine and tension-type headaches). The MINI interview detected a depressive episode in 59.9% of patients with migraine, 68.3% of patients with tension-type headache and 69.6% of patients with combined migraine and tension-type headaches. Depression subtypes were significantly different across groups (p=0.03). Anxiety (mostly generalised) was reported by 18.4% of patients with migraine, 19.3% of patients with tension-type headache, and 18.4% of patients with combined migraine and tension-type headaches. The values for panic disturbance were 12.7, 5.5 and 14.2, and those for obsessive-compulsive disorders were 2.3, 1.1 and 9.4% (p=0.009). Based on these results, psychopathology of primary headache can be a reflection of the burden of the disease rather than a hallmark of a specific headache category.

  12. Cognitive behavioral therapy in persons with comorbid insomnia: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Geiger-Brown, Jeanne M; Rogers, Valerie E; Liu, Wen; Ludeman, Emilie M; Downton, Katherine D; Diaz-Abad, Montserrat

    2015-10-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is effective for treatment of primary insomnia. There has been no synthesis of studies quantifying this effect on insomnia comorbid with medical and psychiatric disorders using rigorous selection criteria. The objective of this study was to quantify the effect of CBT-I in studies including patients with medical or psychiatric disorders. Studies were identified from 1985 through February 2014 using multiple databases and bibliography searches. Inclusion was limited to randomized controlled trials of CBT-I in adult patients with insomnia diagnosed using standardized criteria, who additionally had a comorbid medical or psychiatric condition. Twenty-three studies including 1379 patients met inclusion criteria. Based on weighted mean differences, CBT-I improved subjective sleep quality post-treatment, with large treatment effects for the insomnia severity index and Pittsburgh sleep quality index. Sleep diaries showed a 20 min reduction in sleep onset latency and wake after sleep onset, 17 min improvement in total sleep time, and 9% improvement in sleep efficiency post-treatment, similar to findings of meta-analyses of CBT-I in older adults. Treatment effects were durable up to 18 mo. Results of actigraphy were similar to but of smaller magnitude than subjective measures. CBT-I is an effective, durable treatment for comorbid insomnia.

  13. Evaluation of Group Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bramham, Jessica; Young, Susan; Bickerdike, Alison; Spain, Deborah; McCartan, Denise; Xenitidis, Kiriakos

    2009-01-01

    Objective: A brief cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) group intervention was designed to treat comorbid anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem and self-efficacy in adults with ADHD. It was hypothesised that participants would gain knowledge about ADHD, experience a reduction in comorbid symptoms, and benefit from the supportive aspect of group…

  14. [Comorbidity between cocaine addiction and personality disorders].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Montalvo, J; Lorea, I

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to review the current knowledge about the comorbidity between cocaine dependence and personality disorders. Results concerning a specific profile of cocaine patients are not conclusive. The prevalence rate of personality disorders in cocaine dependents is very heterogeneous (with a mean of 66% of cases), and a great variability is observed between all the studies carried out. There is a tendency for a higher proportion of cocaine dependents to be found within the cluster B category (mainly antisocial and borderline). Lastly, implications of this kind of study for future research and clinical practice are commented upon.

  15. [Comorbidity between cocaine addiction and personality disorders].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Montalvo, J; Lorea, I

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to review the current knowledge about the comorbidity between cocaine dependence and personality disorders. Results concerning a specific profile of cocaine patients are not conclusive. The prevalence rate of personality disorders in cocaine dependents is very heterogeneous (with a mean of 66% of cases), and a great variability is observed between all the studies carried out. There is a tendency for a higher proportion of cocaine dependents to be found within the cluster B category (mainly antisocial and borderline). Lastly, implications of this kind of study for future research and clinical practice are commented upon. PMID:17898818

  16. Are children affected by epileptic neuropsychiatric comorbidities?

    PubMed

    Terra, Vera Cristina; de Paola, Luciano; Silvado, Carlos Eduardo

    2014-09-01

    Childhood-onset epilepsy is associated with psychiatric and cognitive difficulties and with poor social outcomes in adulthood. Some antiepileptic drugs adversely affect behavior in susceptible children with easy-to-control or refractory epilepsies, contributing to a high risk of psychological and psychiatric disturbance. Studies had demonstrated that patients with benign rolandic epilepsy and absence epilepsy had more aggressive behavior, depression, and anxiety disorders than control children. Psychiatric comorbidities are strongly associated with a poor long-term health-related quality of life in childhood-onset epilepsy, which suggests that comprehensive epilepsy care must include screening and long-term treatment for these conditions, even if seizures remit.

  17. Comorbid internet addiction in male clients of inpatient addiction rehabilitation centers: psychiatric symptoms and mental comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Wölfling, Klaus; Beutel, Manfred E; Koch, Andreas; Dickenhorst, Ulrike; Müller, Kai W

    2013-11-01

    Addictive Internet use has recently been proposed to be included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition. Still, little is known about its nosological features, including comorbidity with other mental disorders and disorder-specific psychopathological symptoms. To investigate whether Internet addiction (IA) is an issue in patients in addiction treatment, 1826 clients were surveyed in 15 inpatient rehabilitation centers. Male patients meeting criteria for comorbid IA (n = 71) were compared with a matched control group of male patients treated for alcohol addiction without addictive Internet use (n = 58). The SCL-90-R, the Patient Health Questionnaire, and the seven-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder were used to assess associated psychiatric symptoms and further comorbid disorders. Comorbid IA was associated with higher levels of psychosocial symptoms, especially depression, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, and interpersonal sensitivity. Moreover, the patients with IA more frequently met criteria for additional mental disorders. They display higher rates of psychiatric symptoms, especially depression, and might be in need of additional therapeutic treatment. In rehabilitation centers, a regular screening for IA is recommended to identify patients with this (non-substance-related) addiction and supply them with additional disorder-specific treatment.

  18. A case study in treating chronic comorbid obsessive-compulsive disorder and depression with behavioral activation and pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Arco, Lucius

    2015-06-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is difficult to treat, and more so when comorbid with major depressive disorder (MDD). The aim of the present case study was to examine effects of behavioral activation (BA) and pharmacotherapy with an adult with chronic comorbid OCD and MDD. BA aimed at increasing approach behaviors in life activities and decreasing avoidant and inactive behaviors. After 21 months of treatment at a community mental health clinic, OCD and MDD symptoms, including compulsive checking behaviors, were no longer at clinical levels. Symptom alleviation and psychological health improved in line with increases in activities of living such as self-care, domestic, social, and studying, and decreases in medications from a regimen of mood stabilizers and anxiolytics to a sole antidepressant. The participant was satisfied with treatment procedures and outcome. The results add to growing evidence of effective BA treatments for comorbid disorders that include depression.

  19. Management of psoriasis and its comorbidities in primary care.

    PubMed

    Aldeen, Taha; Basra, Mohammad

    Psoriasis is a common chronic disfiguring skin disease. Its management depends on the extent of disease, sites affected, comorbidities, and patient's background or lifestyle. In the UK, psoriasis treatment starts in the primary care with range of topical applications, including steroids, vitamin D analogues and coal tar. However, psoriasis is associated with physical, psychological and metabolic comorbidities which could not be improved by topical therapy. The aim of this review is to address the challenge in managing these comorbidities within primary care.

  20. ECT in dissociative identity disorder and comorbid depression.

    PubMed

    DeBattista, C; Solvason, H B; Spiegel, D

    1998-12-01

    Dissociative identity disorder (DID), previously named multiple personality disorder, is a diagnosis often complicated by comorbid major depression. We report on four cases of DID associated with severe self-destructive behavior and comorbid major depression treated with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). In three of the patients, ECT appeared to be helpful in treating the comorbid depression without adversely affecting the DID. The potential risks of using ECT in patients with DID are reviewed.

  1. Comorbidity between neurological illness and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Hesdorffer, Dale C

    2016-06-01

    Psychiatric disorders are common in many neurological disorders, including epilepsy, migraine, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and stroke. These comorbidities increase disease burden and may complicate the treatment of the combined disorders. Initial studies of the comorbidity of psychiatric and neurological disorders were cross-sectional, and time order of the associations was impossible to elucidate. More recent work has clarified time associations between psychiatric disorders and neurological disorders, particularly in epilepsy and stroke where epidemiological evidence suggests that there is a bidirectional relationship. This article takes an epidemiological approach to understanding these relationships and focuses mostly on epilepsy. Although, these relationships are understood in many neurological disorders, routine screening for psychiatric disorders in neurological disorders is infrequent, mostly due to the lack of partnerships between psychiatrists and neurologists and the paucity of neuropsychiatrists. Much more needs to be done to improve the detection and treatment of patients affected by neurological and psychiatric disorders. Understanding the scope of this overlap may inspire collaborations to improve the lives of people affected by both disorders. PMID:26898322

  2. Comorbidities among patients with cancer who do and do not develop febrile neutropenia during the first chemotherapy cycle.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyan; Luthra, Rakesh; Morrow, Phuong K; Fisher, Maxine D; Reiner, Maureen; Barron, Richard L; Langeberg, Wendy J

    2016-10-01

    Patients receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy with certain comorbidities are at increased risk of febrile neutropenia. A comprehensive evaluation of febrile neutropenia-related comorbidities across cancers is needed. This study compared comorbidity prevalence among patients with cancer who did and did not develop febrile neutropenia during the first chemotherapy cycle. This case-control study used administrative claims from adult patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma or breast, lung, colorectal, ovarian, or gastric cancer who received chemotherapy between 2007 and 2012. Each patient who developed febrile neutropenia (case) was matched with up to four patients without febrile neutropenia (controls) by cancer type, metastasis, chemotherapy regimen, age group, and sex. For each comorbidity (identified in the year before chemotherapy began), the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) for febrile neutropenia by cancer type was evaluated using conditional logistic regression models adjusted for potential confounding factors. Of 31,331 eligible patients, 672 developed febrile neutropenia in the first chemotherapy cycle. A total of 3312 febrile neutropenia cases and matched controls were analyzed. Across tumor types, comorbidity prevalence was higher in patients who developed febrile neutropenia than in those without febrile neutropenia. Among patients with breast cancer, osteoarthritis was more prevalent in patients with febrile neutropenia (aOR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.07 to 3.18). Among patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, renal disease was more prevalent in patients with febrile neutropenia (aOR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.23 to 4.11). Patients who developed febrile neutropenia in the first chemotherapy cycle presented with comorbidities more often than otherwise similar patients who did not develop febrile neutropenia. These findings warrant further investigation and support the inclusion of comorbidities into febrile neutropenia risk models.

  3. Comorbidities of Psoriasis - Exploring the Links by Network Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sundarrajan, Sudharsana; Arumugam, Mohanapriya

    2016-01-01

    Increasing epidemiological studies in patients with psoriasis report the frequent occurrence of one or more associated disorders. Psoriasis is associated with multiple comorbidities including autoimmune disease, neurological disorders, cardiometabolic diseases and inflammatory-bowel disease. An integrated system biology approach is utilized to decipher the molecular alliance of psoriasis with its comorbidities. An unbiased integrative network medicine methodology is adopted for the investigation of diseasome, biological process and pathways of five most common psoriasis associated comorbidities. A significant overlap was observed between genes acting in similar direction in psoriasis and its comorbidities proving the mandatory occurrence of either one of its comorbidities. The biological processes involved in inflammatory response and cell signaling formed a common basis between psoriasis and its associated comorbidities. The pathway analysis revealed the presence of few common pathways such as angiogenesis and few uncommon pathways which includes CCKR signaling map and gonadotrophin-realising hormone receptor pathway overlapping in all the comorbidities. The work shed light on few common genes and pathways that were previously overlooked. These fruitful targets may serve as a starting point for diagnosis and/or treatment of psoriasis comorbidities. The current research provides an evidence for the existence of shared component hypothesis between psoriasis and its comorbidities. PMID:26966903

  4. The challenge of comorbidity in clinical trials for multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Aaron; Sormani, Maria Pia; Thompson, Alan; Waubant, Emmanuelle; Trojano, Maria; O'Connor, Paul; Reingold, Stephen; Cohen, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to provide recommendations for addressing comorbidity in clinical trial design and conduct in multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: We held an international workshop, informed by a systematic review of the incidence and prevalence of comorbidity in MS and an international survey about research priorities for studying comorbidity including their relation to clinical trials in MS. Results: We recommend establishing age- and sex-specific incidence estimates for comorbidities in the MS population, including those that commonly raise concern in clinical trials of immunomodulatory agents; shifting phase III clinical trials of new therapies from explanatory to more pragmatic trials; describing comorbidity status of the enrolled population in publications reporting clinical trials; evaluating treatment response, tolerability, and safety in clinical trials according to comorbidity status; and considering comorbidity status in the design of pharmacovigilance strategies. Conclusion: Our recommendations will help address knowledge gaps regarding comorbidity that interfere with the ability to interpret safety in monitored trials and will enhance the generalizability of findings from clinical trials to “real world” settings where the MS population commonly has comorbid conditions. PMID:26888986

  5. First Evidence of Comorbidity of Problem Gambling and Other Psychiatric Problems in a Representative Urban Sample of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Carla; Dellis, Andrew; Hofmeyr, Andre; Kincaid, Harold; Ross, Don

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the extent to which problem gambling in a recent South African sample, as measured by the Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI), is comorbid with depression, anxiety and substance abuse. Data are from the 2010 South African National Urban Prevalence Study of Gambling Behavior. A representative sample of the urban adult population in South Africa (N = 3,000). Responses to the 9-item PGSI and ratings on the Beck Depression Index, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, and the World Health Organization Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Tool (WHO ASSIST). Cross tabulations and Chi square analyses along with logistic regression analyses with and without controls for socio-demographic and/or socio-economic variables were used to identify comorbidities. The prevalence of depression, anxiety, alcohol and substance use were clearly higher among the sample at risk for problem gambling. Black African racial status and living in areas characterized by migrant mining workers was associated with increased risk of problem gambling and comorbidities. There is strong evidence that findings of comorbidities between pathological gambling and depression, anxiety and substance abuse in developed countries generalize to the developing country of South Africa. Historical context, however, gives those comorbidities a unique demographic distribution. PMID:24927870

  6. Comorbidity Between Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Across the Lifespan: A Systematic and Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Abramovitch, Amitai; Dar, Reuven; Mittelman, Andrew; Wilhelm, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The concept of comorbidity between attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has been discussed for two decades. No review, however, has examined this question in light of the stark contrast in disorder-specific phenomenology and neurobiology. We review reported prevalence rates and the methodological, phenomenological, and theoretical issues concerning concomitant ADHD-OCD. Reported co-occurrence rates are highly inconsistent in the literature. Studies aimed at examining the potential for comorbidity have suffered from various methodological problems, including the existence of very few community samples, highly variable exclusionary criteria, and possible clinical misinterpretation of symptoms. Despite numerous studies suggesting an ADHD-OCD comorbidity, thus far etiological (i.e., genetic) backing has been provided only for a pediatric comorbidity. Additionally, inflated rates of ADHD-OCD co-occurrence may be mediated by the presence of tic disorders, and evidence of impaired neuronal maturational processes in pediatric OCD may lead to possibly transient phenotypical expressions that resemble ADHD symptomatology. Thus, clinicians are encouraged to consider the possibility that ADHD-like symptoms resulting from OCD-specific symptomatology may be misdiagnosed as ADHD. This suggestion may account for the lower co-occurrence rates reported in adolescents and adults and for the lack of a theoretical account for comorbidity in these age groups. Existing literature is summarized and critically reviewed, and recommendations are made for future research. PMID:26052877

  7. Gender Dysphoria in Adults.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Kenneth J; Lawrence, Anne A; Kreukels, Baudewijntje P C

    2016-01-01

    Gender dysphoria (GD), a term that denotes persistent discomfort with one's biologic sex or assigned gender, replaced the diagnosis of gender identity disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders in 2013. Subtypes of GD in adults, defined by sexual orientation and age of onset, have been described; these display different developmental trajectories and prognoses. Prevalence studies conclude that fewer than 1 in 10,000 adult natal males and 1 in 30,000 adult natal females experience GD, but such estimates vary widely. GD in adults is associated with an elevated prevalence of comorbid psychopathology, especially mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and suicidality. Causal mechanisms in GD are incompletely understood, but genetic, neurodevelopmental, and psychosocial factors probably all contribute. Treatment of GD in adults, although largely standardized, is likely to evolve in response to the increasing diversity of persons seeking treatment, demands for greater client autonomy, and improved understanding of the benefits and limitations of current treatment modalities. PMID:26788901

  8. [Integrated approach to comorbidity in patients with psoriasis.Working Group on Psoriasis-associated Comorbidities].

    PubMed

    Daudén, E; Castañeda, S; Suárez, C; García-Campayo, J; Blasco, A J; Aguilar, M D; Ferrándiz, C; Puig, L; Sánchez-Carazo, J L

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between psoriasis and associated diseases has drawn particular interest in recent years. To provide appropriate management of psoriasis from an early stage, it is necessary to include prompt diagnosis of concomitant disease and to prevent and treat any comorbidity found. Such an integrated approach also serves to ensure that the drugs used to treat associated diseases do not interfere with the management of psoriasis, and vice versa. This clinical practice guideline on the management of comorbidity in psoriasis has been drawn up to help dermatologists to achieve an integrated approach to this inflammatory disease. The guide focuses primarily on the diseases most often found in patients with psoriasis, which include psoriatic arthritis, cardiovascular disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, inflammatory bowel disease, lymphoma, skin cancer, anxiety, and depression. Cardiovascular disease is approached through the study of its major risk factors (obesity, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and metabolic syndrome). Other cardiovascular risk factors related to lifestyle, such as smoking and alcohol consumption, are also discussed. The overall aim of this guide is to provide the dermatologist with a precise, easy to-use tool for systematizing the diagnosis of comorbidity in these patients and to facilitate decisions regarding referral and treatment once associated diseases have been found. The specific objectives are as follows: a) to review the most common diseases associated with psoriasis, including the prevalence of each one and its importance to the dermatologist; b) to provide guidelines for the physical examination, diagnostic tests, and clinical criteria on which to base a preliminary diagnosis; c) to establish criteria for the appropriate referral of patients with suspected comorbidity; d) to provide information on how therapies for psoriasis may modify the course of associated diseases, and e) to provide information concerning

  9. The effect of sex and age on the comorbidity burden of OSA: an observational analysis from a large nationwide US health claims database.

    PubMed

    Mokhlesi, Babak; Ham, Sandra A; Gozal, David

    2016-04-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a highly prevalent condition but studies exploring the burden of OSA-associated comorbidities have been limited by small sample sizes with underrepresentation of women.We queried the Truven Health MarketScan Research Databases 2003-2012, which is a collection of health insurance claims for working adults and retirees with employer-sponsored health insurance. Adults with a diagnostic code for OSA with at least 12 months of follow-up from the index date of OSA diagnosis were compared to a matched random sample. Comorbidities were assessed using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition, codes. A logistic regression model was constructed to test the independent association between OSA and comorbidities.Our cohort included 1,704,905 patients with OSA and 1,704,417 matched controls. All comorbidities were significantly more prevalent in OSA patients. Type 2 diabetes and ischaemic heart disease were more prevalent in men but hypertension and depression were more prevalent in women with OSA. In contrast, the sex differences in the prevalence of congestive heart failure, arrhythmias and stroke were less pronounced. The prevalence of comorbidities increased with age but the effect of age varied based on the specific comorbidity. The divergence between OSA and controls was more pronounced after the sixth decade of life for most cardiovascular diseases (i.e.heart failure, ischaemic heart disease, stroke and arrhythmias), while depression exhibited an opposite trend. In a fully adjusted model, the odds of all comorbidities were significantly increased in OSA patients.In a large, nationally representative sample of working and retired people, OSA is strongly associated with significant comorbidities in both men and women with unique sex differences emerging. PMID:26797029

  10. Neuroanatomical Correlates of Heterotypic Comorbidity in Externalizing Male Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauder, Colin L.; Beauchaine, Theodore P.; Gatzke-Kopp, Lisa M.; Shannon, Katherine E.; Aylward, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Children and adolescents with externalizing behavior disorders including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and conduct disorder (CD) often present with symptoms of comorbid internalizing psychopathology. However, few studies have examined central nervous system correlates of such comorbidity. We evaluated interactions between…

  11. ADHD with Comorbid Disorders: Clinical Assessment and Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pliszka, Steven R.; Carlson, Caryn L.; Swanson, James M.

    This book is designed to help clinicians assess and treat children or adolescents with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder who also present other disabilities. Major comorbidities are described in depth and empirically grounded guidelines are presented for evaluation and treatment. Part 1 provides an overview of issues in comorbidity,…

  12. Comorbid Psychiatric Disorders in Arab Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amr, Mostafa; Raddad, Dahoud; El-Mehesh, Fatima; Bakr, Ashraf; Sallam, Khalid; Amin, Tarek

    2012-01-01

    The objective of our study is to estimate the prevalence of comorbid psychiatric disorders in a sample of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) recruited from three Arab countries. We also examine the relationship between comorbidity and children's cognitive functioning and gender. Children who received a diagnosis of ASD (n = 60) from a…

  13. Recommendations for observational studies of comorbidity in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Aaron; Sormani, Maria Pia; Thompson, Alan; Waubant, Emmanuelle; Trojano, Maria; O'Connor, Paul; Fiest, Kirsten; Reider, Nadia; Reingold, Stephen; Cohen, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To reach consensus about the most relevant comorbidities to study in multiple sclerosis (MS) with respect to incidence, prevalence, and effect on outcomes; review datasets that may support studies of comorbidity in MS; and identify MS outcomes that should be prioritized in such studies. Methods: We held an international workshop to meet these objectives, informed by a systematic review of the incidence and prevalence of comorbidity in MS, and an international survey regarding research priorities for comorbidity. Results: We recommend establishing age- and sex-specific incidence and prevalence estimates for 5 comorbidities (depression, anxiety, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes); evaluating the effect of 7 comorbidities (depression, anxiety, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, chronic lung disease, and autoimmune diseases) on disability, quality of life, brain atrophy and other imaging parameters, health care utilization, employment, and mortality, including age, sex, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and disease duration as potential confounders; harmonizing study designs across jurisdictions; and conducting such studies worldwide. Ultimately, clinical trials of treating comorbidity in MS are needed. Conclusion: Our recommendations will help address knowledge gaps regarding the incidence, prevalence, and effect of comorbidity on outcomes in MS. PMID:26865523

  14. Comorbidities in Preschool Children at Family Risk of Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gooch, Debbie; Hulme, Charles; Nash, Hannah M.; Snowling, Margaret J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Comorbidity among developmental disorders such as dyslexia, language impairment, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and developmental coordination disorder is common. This study explores comorbid weaknesses in preschool children at family risk of dyslexia with and without language impairment and considers the role that…

  15. Comorbidity and Risk Behaviors among Drug Users Not in Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mark E.; Brems, Christiane; Wells, Rebecca S.; Theno, Shelley A.; Fisher, Dennis G.

    2003-01-01

    In a sample of 700 drug users, 64% evidenced comorbidity (i.e., coexisting substance use and psychiatric disorders). Robust relationships between the presence of comorbidity and increased levels of risk behavior, such as needle sharing and trading sex for money, were revealed. (Contains 44 references and 2 tables.) (Author)

  16. Management of Noncardiac Comorbidities in Chronic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Chong, Vun Heng; Singh, Jagdeep; Parry, Helen; Saunders, Jocelyn; Chowdhury, Farhad; Mancini, Donna M; Lang, Chim C

    2015-10-01

    Prevalence of heart failure is increasing, especially in the elderly population. Noncardiac comorbidities complicate heart failure care and are increasingly common in elderly patients with reduced or preserved ejection fraction heart failure, owing to prolongation of patient's lives by advances in chronic heart failure (CHF) management. Common comorbidities include respiratory disease, renal dysfunction, anemia, arthritis, obesity, diabetes mellitus, cognitive dysfunction, and depression. These conditions contribute to the progression of the disease and may alter the response to treatment, partly as polypharmacy is inevitable in these patients. Cardiologists and other physicians caring for patients with CHF need to be vigilant to comorbid conditions that complicate the care of these patients. There is now more guidance on management of noncardiac comorbidities in heart failure, and this article contains a comprehensive review of the most recent updates on management of noncardiac comorbidities in CHF.

  17. Prevalence and patterns of comorbid cognitive impairment in low vision rehabilitation (LVR) for macular disease

    PubMed Central

    Whitson, Heather E.; Ansah, Deidra; Whitaker, Diane; Potter, Guy; Cousins, Scott W.; MacDonald, Heather; Pieper, Carl F.; Landerman, Lawrence; Steffens, David C.; Cohen, Harvey J.

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of comorbid cognitive impairment among older adults referred to LVR for macular disease is unknown. We performed cognitive testing on 101 adults aged 65 years or older with macular disease who were referred to The Duke LVR Clinic between September 2007 and March 2008. Scores on the telephone interview for cognitive status-modified (TICS-m) ranged from 7 to 44, with 18.8% of scores below an established cutoff for cognitive impairment (≤ 27) and an additional 27.7% of scores considered marginal (28-30). On letter fluency, 46% of participants scored at least 1 × S.D. below the mean for their age, gender, race, and education level, and 18% of participants scored at least 2 × S.D. below their demographic mean. On logical memory, 26% of participants scored at least 1 × S.D. below the mean for their age group and race and 6% scored at least 2 × S.D. below their demographic mean. High prevalence of cognitive impairment, with particular difficulty in verbal fluency and verbal memory, may compromise the success of low vision rehabilitation interventions among macular disease patients. Additional work is needed to develop strategies to maximize function in older adults with this common comorbidity. PMID:19427045

  18. [Adult Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): current issues].

    PubMed

    Bader, M; Perroud, N

    2012-09-19

    Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) has prevalence between 3 and 7% in childhood and adolescence. As high as 60% of childhood cases continue to have clinically significant symptoms of ADHD as adults. Psychiatric comorbidities are often found in ADHD subjects including, in childhood, emotional, behavior and learning disorders. Psychiatric comorbidities in adolescents and adults suffering from ADHD include mood and substance use disorders. Although may one fear giving psychostimulants to ADHD patients with comorbidities, recent studies have shown the benefits of such treatment not only in the clinical but also in the educational and socioprofessional point of views. Psychotherapeutic approaches should ideally accompany pharmacological treatments.

  19. Multiple Chronic Conditions in Older Adults with Acute Coronary Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Alfredsson, Joakim; Alexander, Karen P

    2016-05-01

    Older adults presenting with acute coronary syndromes (ACSs) often have multiple chronic conditions (MCCs). In addition to traditional cardiovascular (CV) risk factors (ie, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes), common CV comorbidities include heart failure, stroke, and atrial fibrillation, whereas prevalent non-CV comorbidities include chronic kidney disease, anemia, depression, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The presence of MCCs affects the presentation (eg, increased frequency of type 2 myocardial infarctions [MIs]), clinical course, and prognosis of ACS in older adults. In general, higher comorbidity burden increases mortality following MI, reduces utilization of ACS treatments, and increases the importance of developing individualized treatment plans. PMID:27113147

  20. Brown and Beige Adipose Tissue: Therapy for Obesity and Its Comorbidities?

    PubMed

    Mulya, Anny; Kirwan, John P

    2016-09-01

    Overweight and obesity are global health problems placing an ever-increasing demand on health care systems. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is present in significant amounts in adults. BAT has potential as a fuel for oxidation and dissipation as heat production, which makes it an attractive target for obesity therapy. BAT activation results in increased energy expenditure via thermogenesis. The role of BAT/beige adipocyte activation on whole body energy homeostasis, body weight management/regulation, and whole body glucose and lipid homeostasis remains unproven. This paper reviews knowledge on brown/beige adipocytes in energy expenditure and how it may impact obesity therapy and its comorbidities. PMID:27519133

  1. [Symptom variations in ADHD: importance of context, development and comorbidity].

    PubMed

    Purper-Ouakil, D; Wohl, M; Michel, G; Mouren, M C; Gorwood, P

    2004-01-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity (ADHD) is a common disorder in school-aged children and is associated with significant impairment in social and academic functioning. Its recognition is based on congruent information from different sources, because most ADHD children and adolescents are not completely aware of impairments caused by inattention and/or hyperactivity/impulsivity. Fluctuations in symptom expression may complicate the diagnosis: during clinical examination or tests sessions, ADHD symptoms may be less severe than usual or completely absent. This review examines variations in ADHD symptoms due to environmental context, internal state, circadian factors, development, psychiatric comorbidity and discusses their clinical relevance. Generally, ADHD symptoms are pervasive and identified in different areas of functioning. Despite their chronicity, they show a relative context-dependency. An unfamiliar environment or situation may lessen symptoms. The same happens in dual relations or in calm settings, when the child receives attention and positive reinforcement from the adult. On the contrary, the classroom situation with its high stimulation level (noise, visual distractors, large class size) is likely to reveal or accentuate instability, impulsivity and inattention. Independently from objective symptom fluctuations, the impact of ADHD symptoms, and their consequences on self-esteem may also vary with the degree of environmental mismatch. Recent research in experimental psychology also draws attention to the motivational state of ADHD children: preference for immediate gratification and delay aversion may explain why most of them show satisfactory attentional capacities in certain activities (for instance video games or TV), while showing impairment in school work or in other effortful tasks. The diagnosis of the full ADHD syndrome requires significant impact on functioning in at least two areas. Some children with "situational" ADHD are impaired either in

  2. [Symptom variations in ADHD: importance of context, development and comorbidity].

    PubMed

    Purper-Ouakil, D; Wohl, M; Michel, G; Mouren, M C; Gorwood, P

    2004-01-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity (ADHD) is a common disorder in school-aged children and is associated with significant impairment in social and academic functioning. Its recognition is based on congruent information from different sources, because most ADHD children and adolescents are not completely aware of impairments caused by inattention and/or hyperactivity/impulsivity. Fluctuations in symptom expression may complicate the diagnosis: during clinical examination or tests sessions, ADHD symptoms may be less severe than usual or completely absent. This review examines variations in ADHD symptoms due to environmental context, internal state, circadian factors, development, psychiatric comorbidity and discusses their clinical relevance. Generally, ADHD symptoms are pervasive and identified in different areas of functioning. Despite their chronicity, they show a relative context-dependency. An unfamiliar environment or situation may lessen symptoms. The same happens in dual relations or in calm settings, when the child receives attention and positive reinforcement from the adult. On the contrary, the classroom situation with its high stimulation level (noise, visual distractors, large class size) is likely to reveal or accentuate instability, impulsivity and inattention. Independently from objective symptom fluctuations, the impact of ADHD symptoms, and their consequences on self-esteem may also vary with the degree of environmental mismatch. Recent research in experimental psychology also draws attention to the motivational state of ADHD children: preference for immediate gratification and delay aversion may explain why most of them show satisfactory attentional capacities in certain activities (for instance video games or TV), while showing impairment in school work or in other effortful tasks. The diagnosis of the full ADHD syndrome requires significant impact on functioning in at least two areas. Some children with "situational" ADHD are impaired either in

  3. Validating a Patient-Reported Comorbidity Measure with Respect to Quality of Life in End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Robinski, Maxi; Strich, Franz; Mau, Wilfried; Girndt, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Medical record-derived comorbidity measures such as the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) do not predict functional limitations or quality of life (QoL) in the chronically ill. Although these shortcomings are known since the 1980s, they have been largely ignored by the international literature. Recently, QoL has received growing interest as an end-point of interventional trials in Nephrology. The aim of this study is to compare a patient-reported comorbidity measure and the CCI with respect to its validity regarding QoL. Methods The German Self-Administered Comorbidity Questionnaire (SCQ-G) was completed by 780 adult end-stage renal disease-patients recruited from 55 dialysis units throughout Germany. Acceptance was evaluated via response rates. Content validity was examined by comparing the typical comorbidity pattern in dialysis patients and the pattern retrieved from our data. Convergent validity was assessed via kappa statistics. Data was compared to the CCI. Linear associations with QoL were examined (criterion validity). Results The SCQ-G was very well accepted by dialysis patients of all ages (response rate: 99%). Content validity can be interpreted as high (corresponding comorbidity items: 73.7%). Convergent validity was rather weak (.27≤ρ≤.29) but increased when comparing only concordant items (.39≤ρ≤.43). With respect to criterion validity, the SCQ-G performed better than the CCI regarding the correlation with QoL (e.g., SF-12-physical: SCQ-G total score: ρ = -.49 vs. CCI: ρ = -.36). Conclusions The patient-reported measure proved to be more valid than the external assessment when aiming at insights on QoL. Due to the inclusion of subjective limitations, the SCQ-G is more substantial with respect to patient-centered outcomes and might be used as additional measure in clinical trials. PMID:27294867

  4. [Comorbidity -- mind and body interconnection based on the new findings].

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Gabor

    2014-12-01

    Comorbidity is a multicausal, multidimensional, multifaced phenomenon in medicine. There are many different definitions of the co-occurrence of two or more disorders, but Feinstein's is the most acceptable. Although epidemiological data show a high prevalence of comorbidity of somatic and psychiatric disorders, it is still underrecognized and undertreated. There are many unanswered questions related to comorbidity, including whether comorbidity is a valid phenomenon; whether the epidemiological results have validity; what is the linkage between somatic and psychological processes; which factors take part in the bidirectional manifestation; how do we treat the involved disorders; what is the right organization to manage the patients. The aim of the author was to review different aspects of comorbidity with the help of new knowledge. The starting point of the interpretation was the concept of identical biological substrates (pathophysiological endpoint) that generate the development of somatic and psychiatric disorders. The formation of these substrates is influenced by risk factors, which depend or not on the person (stressors vs genes). The effects of risk factors and biological substrates are parallel to each other, but one of them is a dominant agent. The author's concept ("dominance theory") is based on new discoveries of the biological mechanisms of psychiatric processes to help to understand the phenomenon of comorbidity and develop new therapies. It is very important to recognize, to diagnose and treat comorbidity because of the prevalence of excess mortality is high and the morbidity burden influences the patient' quality of life.

  5. Migraine: Clinical pattern and psychiatric comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Manjeet Singh; Gupta, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Background: Migraine is a common disorder which has psychiatric sequelae. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the clinical pattern and psychiatric comorbidity of migraine. Materials and Methods: 100 cases of migraine seen over a period of one year were analysed to know the sociodemographic characteristics, clinical pattern and psychiatric morbidity. Results: Maximum patients were between 31-40 years of age group (40%), females (78.0%), married (76%) and housewives (56.0%). Family history of migraine was present in 12% cases. Average age of onset was 22 years. Unilateral and throbbing type of headache was most common. The commonest frequency was one to two per week. Migraine without aura was commonest sub-type (80%). Generalized anxiety disorder (F41.1) was the most common psychiatric disorder (34%), followed by mixed anxiety and depressive disorder (F41.2) (18%) and depressive episode (F32) (14%). In 22% cases, no psychiatric disorder could be elicited. Conclusion: The present study confirms that majority patients with migraine had psychiatric disorders. This needs timely detection and appropriate intervention to treat and control the migraine effectively. PMID:23766573

  6. Recognizing and managing comorbidities and complications in hidradenitis suppurativa.

    PubMed

    Menter, Alan

    2014-06-01

    The list of comorbidities associated with hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is extensive, although these diseases do not necessarily share a common causality. Among the categories of comorbidities that are observed are obesity, other skin diseases, inflammatory conditions, and genetic disorders. Complications include scarring, restricted movement resulting from scarring and fibrosis in underlying tissue, conditions associated with obstructed lymph drainage, and psychosocial issues. Adverse effects on quality of life are common and may be severe, including unemployment, deterioration of family and other social relationships, and suicidal ideation. Clinical intervention for HS must include consideration and attention to these comorbidities and complications.

  7. Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Comorbidities of Hidradenitis Suppurativa.

    PubMed

    Miller, Iben Marie; McAndrew, Rachel J; Hamzavi, Iltefat

    2016-01-01

    It is challenging to estimate a true prevalence of hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) because it is underdiagnosed and misdiagnosed. Prevalences have been reported from 0.00033% to 4.1%. The incidence seems to be rising. In addition to dermatologic symptoms, HS is associated with metabolic syndrome, and increased cardiovascular risk. The majority of HS patients are smokers. Additional somatic comorbidities complicating HS include autoimmune conditions, follicular syndromes, rheumatologic conditions, and malignancies. HS patients are troubled by psychological comorbidities. When treating HS patients it is imperative not only to treat the skin symptoms, but also address the screening and treatment of possible comorbidities.

  8. Diagnosis and Treatment of Insomnia Comorbid with Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Lack, Leon; Sweetman, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Insomnia is often comorbid with obstructive sleep apnea. It reduces positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy acceptance and adherence. Comorbid patients show greater daytime impairments and poorer health outcomes. The insomnia often goes undiagnosed, undertreated, or untreated. Pharmacotherapy is not recommended for long-term treatment. Although care should be taken administering behavioral therapies to patients with elevated sleepiness, cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia (CBTi) is an effective and durable nondrug therapy that reduces symptoms and may increase the effectiveness of PAP therapy. Sleep clinics should be alert to comorbid insomnia and provide adequate diagnostic tools and clinicians with CBTi expertise. PMID:27542883

  9. Common comorbidities in women and men with epilepsy and the relationship between number of comorbidities and health plan paid costs in 2010.

    PubMed

    Wilner, A N; Sharma, B K; Soucy, A; Thompson, A; Krueger, A

    2014-03-01

    The objectives of this observational study were to determine the prevalence of the most common comorbidities in women and men with epilepsy and to demonstrate the relationship of these comorbidities to health plan paid costs. Data for 6621 members with epilepsy (52% women, 48% men) from eight commercial health plans were analyzed. The presence of comorbidities in people with epilepsy was identified by searching health insurance claims for 29 prespecified comorbidity-specific diagnosis codes. More women (50%) than men (43%) with epilepsy had one or more of the 29 comorbidities (p<0.05). The top 10 comorbidities for women and their relative prevalences were psychiatric diagnosis (16%), hypertension (12%), asthma (11%), hyperlipidemia (11%), headache (7%), diabetes (6%), urinary tract infection (5%), hypothyroidism (5%), anemia (5%), and migraine (4%). For men, the top 10 comorbidities and their relative prevalences were psychiatric diagnosis (15%), hyperlipidemia (12%), hypertension (12%), asthma (8%), diabetes (5%), headache (4%), cancer (4%), coronary artery disease (3%), anemia (3%), and gastroesophageal reflux disease (3%). Seven of the top 10 comorbidities were common to both women and men. Psychiatric diagnosis was the only comorbidity among the top five comorbidities for all age groups. The presence of one comorbidity approximately tripled the health-care cost for that member compared with the cost for members who had no comorbidities. Additional comorbidities generally further increased costs. The increase in health-care cost per member per month ($) with increase in number of comorbidities was greater for men than for women (p<0.05).

  10. Quality of life and anxiety and depressive disorder comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Norberg, Melissa M; Diefenbach, Gretchen J; Tolin, David F

    2008-12-01

    The present investigation evaluated the relations among anxiety and depressive disorder comorbidity and quality of life (QOL) by utilizing self-report measures of life satisfaction and functional disability. Participants were 94 individuals who were presented for treatment at an outpatient anxiety disorders clinic and 26 nonclinical participants. Results indicated that participants diagnosed with anxiety disorders reported lower QOL than did nonclinical participants. Anxiety disorder comorbidity did not additionally impact QOL; however, presence of a depressive disorder comorbid with an anxiety disorder did negatively impact QOL as these individuals reported significantly more functional disability and less life satisfaction than did individuals with anxiety disorders alone or those without a psychiatric diagnosis. These results highlight the negative nature of anxiety disorders and improve clarification on the role of diagnostic comorbidity on QOL among those with an anxiety disorder.

  11. Metacognitive Therapy for Comorbid Anxiety Disorders: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sverre U.; Hoffart, Asle

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to systematically evaluate a generic model of metacognitive therapy (MCT) with a highly comorbid anxiety disorder patient, that had been treated with diagnosis-specific cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) without significant effect. Traditionally, CBT has progressed within a disorder-specific approach, however, it has been suggested that this could be less optimal with highly comorbid patients. To address comorbidity, transdiagnostic treatment models have been emerging. This case study used an AB-design with repeated assessments during each therapy session and a 1-year follow-up assessment to evaluate the effectiveness of MCT. Following 8 sessions of MCT, significant decrease in anxiety and depression symptoms, as well as loss of diagnostic status was observed. Outcomes were preserved at 12 months follow up. The generic model of MCT seems promising as an approach to highly comorbid mixed anxiety depression patients. Further testing using more powered methodologies are needed. PMID:27746757

  12. Comprehensive treatment of psoriatic arthritis: managing comorbidities and extraarticular manifestations.

    PubMed

    Ogdie, Alexis; Schwartzman, Sergio; Eder, Lihi; Maharaj, Ajesh B; Zisman, Devy; Raychaudhuri, Siba P; Reddy, Soumya M; Husni, Elaine

    2014-11-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis that can lead to decreased health-related quality of life and permanent joint damage leading to functional decline. In addition to joint and skin manifestations, both psoriasis and PsA are associated with numerous comorbidities and extraarticular/cutaneous manifestations, which may influence the physician's choice of therapy. The objectives of this review are (1) to identify comorbidities in patients with PsA based on the available evidence; (2) to examine the effects of these comorbidities or extraarticular/cutaneous manifestation on the management of patients with PsA as well as the selection of therapy; and (3) to highlight research needs around comorbidities and treatment paradigms. This review is part of a treatment recommendations update initiated by the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA).

  13. [Prevalence and prognostic meaning of comorbidity in heart failure].

    PubMed

    Conde-Martel, A; Hernández-Meneses, M

    2016-05-01

    Heart failure (HF) predominantly affects elderly individuals and has a significant impact on the health systems of developed countries. Comorbidities are present in most patients with HF by acting as the cause, the consequence or a mere coincidence. In addition to their high prevalence, they have considerable relevance because they can mask symptoms, impede the diagnosis and treatment, contribute to progression and negatively influence the prognosis of HF. Most of the associated comorbidities result in a greater number of hospitalisations, poorer quality of life and increased mortality. Given that many of these comorbidities are underdiagnosed, their detection could improve the outcome and quality of life of patients with HF. This article reviews the prevalence and prognostic meaning of the most prevalent comorbidities associated with HF.

  14. Genomic Study of Cardiovascular Continuum Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Makeeva, O. A.; Sleptsov, A. A.; Kulish, E. V.; Barbarash, O. L.; Mazur, A. M.; Prokhorchuk, E. B.; Chekanov, N. N.; Stepanov, V. A.; Puzyrev, V. P.

    2015-01-01

    Comorbidity or a combination of several diseases in the same individual is a common and widely investigated phenomenon. However, the genetic background for non–random disease combinations is not fully understood. Modern technologies and approaches to genomic data analysis enable the investigation of the genetic profile of patients burdened with several diseases (polypathia, disease conglomerates) and its comparison with the profiles of patients with single diseases. An association study featuring three groups of patients with various combinations of cardiovascular disorders and a control group of relatively healthy individuals was conducted. Patients were selected as follows: presence of only one disease, ischemic heart disease (IHD); a combination of two diseases, IHD and arterial hypertension (AH); and a combination of several diseases, including IHD, AH, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and hypercholesterolemia (HC). Genotyping was performed using the “My Gene” genomic service (www.i–gene.ru). An analysis of 1,400 polymorphic genetic variants and their associations with the studied phenotypes are presented. A total of 14 polymorphic variants were associated with the phenotype “IHD only,” including those in the APOB, CD226, NKX2–5, TLR2, DPP6, KLRB1, VDR, SCARB1, NEDD4L, and SREBF2 genes, and intragenic variants rs12487066, rs7807268, rs10896449, and rs944289. A total of 13 genetic markers were associated with the “IHD and AH” phenotype, including variants in the BTNL2, EGFR, CNTNAP2, SCARB1, and HNF1A genes, and intragenic polymorphisms rs801114, rs10499194, rs13207033, rs2398162, rs6501455, and rs1160312. A total of 14 genetic variants were associated with a combination of several diseases of cardiovascular continuum (CVC), including those in the TAS2R38, SEZ6L, APOA2, KLF7, CETP, ITGA4, RAD54B, LDLR, and MTAP genes, along with intragenic variants rs1333048, rs1333049, and rs6501455. One common genetic marker was identified for the

  15. Metabolic syndrome and childhood trauma: Also comorbidity and complication in mood disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kesebir, Sermin

    2014-01-01

    Studies for prevalence and causal relationship established that addressing comorbidities of mental illnesses with medical disease will be another revolution in psychiatry. Increasing number of evidence shows that there is a bidirectional connection between mood disorders and some medical diseases. Glucocorticoid/insulin signal mechanisms and immunoenflammatory effector systems are junction points that show pathophysiology between bipolar disorder and general medical situations susceptible to stress. A subgroup of mood disorder patients are under risk of developing obesity and diabetes. Their habits and life styles, genetic predisposition and treatment options are parameters that define this subgroup. Medical disease in adults had a significant relationship to adverse life experiences in childhood. This illustrates that adverse experiences in childhood are related to adult disease by two basic etiologic mechanisms: (1) conventional risk factors that actually are compensatory behaviors, attempts at self-help through the use of agents and foods; and (2) the effects of chronic stress. PMID:25133143

  16. Comorbidity increases the risk of hospitalizations in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Lawrence; Marriott, James; Cossoy, Michael; Tennakoon, Aruni; Yu, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to evaluate the association between comorbidity and rates of hospitalization in the multiple sclerosis (MS) population as compared to a matched cohort from the general population. Methods: Using population-based administrative data from the Canadian province of Manitoba, we identified 4,875 persons with MS and a matched general population cohort of 24,533 persons. We identified all acute care hospitalizations in the period 2007–2011. Using general linear models, we evaluated the association between comorbidity status and hospitalization rates (all-cause, non-MS-related, MS-related) in the 2 populations, adjusting for age, sex, and socioeconomic status. Results: Comorbidity was common in both cohorts. Over the 5-year study period, the MS population had a 1.5-fold higher hospitalization rate (adjusted rate ratio [aRR] 1.56; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.44–1.68) than the matched population. Any comorbidity was associated with a 2-fold increased risk of non-MS-related hospitalization rates (aRR 2.21; 95% CI 1.73–2.82) in the MS population, but a nearly 4-fold increase in hospitalization rates in the matched population (aRR 3.85; 95% CI 3.40–4.35). Comorbidity was not associated with rates of hospitalization for MS-related reasons, regardless of how comorbidity status was defined. Conclusions: In the MS population, comorbidity is associated with an increased risk of all-cause hospitalizations, suggesting that the prevention and management of comorbidity may reduce hospitalizations. PMID:25540309

  17. Incorporating comorbidities into latent treatment pattern mining for clinical pathways.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhengxing; Dong, Wei; Ji, Lei; He, Chunhua; Duan, Huilong

    2016-02-01

    In healthcare organizational settings, the design of a clinical pathway (CP) is challenging since patients following a particular pathway may have not only one single first-diagnosis but also several typical comorbidities, and thus it requires different disciplines involved to put together their partial knowledge about the overall pathway. Although many data mining techniques have been proposed to discover latent treatment information for CP analysis and reconstruction from a large volume of clinical data, they are specific to extract nontrivial information about the therapy and treatment of the first-diagnosis. The influence of comorbidities on adopting essential treatments is crucial for a pathway but has seldom been explored. This study proposes to extract latent treatment patterns that characterize essential treatments for both first-diagnosis and typical comorbidities from the execution data of a pathway. In particular, we propose a generative statistical model to extract underlying treatment patterns, unveil the latent associations between diagnosis labels (including both first-diagnosis and comorbidities) and treatments, and compute the contribution of comorbidities in these patterns. The proposed model extends latent Dirichlet allocation with an additional layer for diagnosis modeling. It first generates a set of latent treatment patterns from diagnosis labels, followed by sampling treatments from each pattern. We verify the effectiveness of the proposed model on a real clinical dataset containing 12,120 patient traces, which pertain to the unstable angina CP. Three treatment patterns are discovered from data, indicating latent correlations between comorbidities and treatments in the pathway. In addition, a possible medical application in terms of treatment recommendation is provided to illustrate the potential of the proposed model. Experimental results indicate that our approach can discover not only meaningful latent treatment patterns exhibiting

  18. Comorbid Problem Gambling and Major Depression in a Community Sample.

    PubMed

    Quigley, Leanne; Yakovenko, Igor; Hodgins, David C; Dobson, Keith S; El-Guebaly, Nady; Casey, David M; Currie, Shawn R; Smith, Garry J; Williams, Robert J; Schopflocher, Don P

    2015-12-01

    Major depression is among the most common comorbid conditions in problem gambling. However, little is known about the effects of comorbid depression on problem gambling. The present study examined the prevalence of current major depression among problem gamblers (N = 105) identified from a community sample of men and women in Alberta, and examined group differences in gambling severity, escape motivation for gambling, family functioning, childhood trauma, and personality traits across problem gamblers with and without comorbid depression. The prevalence of major depression among the sample of problem gamblers was 32.4%. Compared to problem gamblers without depression (n = 71), problem gamblers with comorbid depression (n = 34) reported more severe gambling problems, greater history of childhood abuse and neglect, poorer family functioning, higher levels of neuroticism, and lower levels of extraversion, agreeableness, and conscientiousness. Furthermore, the problem gamblers with comorbid depression had greater levels of childhood abuse and neglect, worse family functioning, higher neuroticism, and lower agreeableness and conscientiousness than a comparison sample of recreational gamblers with depression (n = 160). These findings underscore the need to address comorbid depression in assessment and treatment of problem gambling and for continued research on how problem gambling is related to frequently co-occurring disorders such as depression.

  19. Co-morbidity index in rheumatoid arthritis: time to think.

    PubMed

    El Miedany, Yasser

    2015-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis patients are clinically complex, and the interplay of their disease activity together with the other associated conditions may lead to increased morbidity and mortality. The recent advances in the disease management attracted the attention to its associated co-morbidities and highlighted the need for a tool to provide clinicians and potential payers with a clinically powerful measure of the disease burden and prognosis. Predicting outcome or co-morbidity probability has been previously implemented successfully for calculating 10-year fracture probability (FRAX) as well as for predicting 1-year patient mortality using co-morbidity data obtained (Charlson index). Developing a specific rheumatoid arthritis-independent tool able to predict morbidity, mortality, cost and hospitalization would be a step forward on the way to achieve full disease remission. The co-morbidity index should be used both at baseline as well as a continuous variable in analyses. It should be implemented regularly in the clinical assessment as a confounder of outcomes. This article will review the redefined health outcomes in rheumatoid arthritis and the concept of co-morbidity index for patients with inflammatory arthritis. It will also present a proposed co-morbidity index for rheumatoid arthritis patients. PMID:26497664

  20. Prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Shyam Chand; Nanda, Satyan; Tripathi, Adarsh; Sawlani, Kamal Kumar; Gupta, Kamlesh Kumar; Himanshu, D; Verma, Ajay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Psychiatric disorders, especially anxiety and depression have been reported to have an increased prevalence in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, but there is a paucity of data from India. Aims and Objectives: Aim of our study is to study the frequency of psychiatric comorbidities in COPD patients and their correlation with severity of COPD, as per global initiative for obstructive lung disease guidelines. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in outpatient department of a tertiary care hospital (King George's Medical University). A total of 74 COPD patients were included in this study and compared with 74 controls. The diagnosis and severity of COPD were assessed by spirometry. Psychiatric comorbidities were assessed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview questionnaire. Results: The frequency of psychiatric comorbidities was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in COPD patients (28.4%) as compared to controls (2.7%). As regards to severity, the frequency was significantly increased in severe and very severe COPD. The frequency of psychiatric comorbidities in COPD patients increased significantly with the increase in duration of symptoms being present in 67% of patients with duration of symptoms more than 10 years and only 23% of patients with duration of symptoms ≤5 years. Conclusion: The frequency of psychiatric comorbidities is increased in COPD patients as compared to controls. We recommend that all patients with COPD should be screened for psychiatric comorbidity, if any. PMID:27051106

  1. Comorbidities in Neurology: Is Adenosine the Common Link?

    PubMed Central

    Boison, Detlev; Aronica, Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    Comorbidities in Neurology represent a major conceptual and therapeutic challenge. For example, temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a syndrome comprised of epileptic seizures and comorbid symptoms including memory and psychiatric impairment, depression, and sleep dysfunction. Similarly, Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) are accompanied by various degrees of memory dysfunction. Patients with AD have an increased likelihood for seizures, whereas all four conditions share certain aspects of psychosis, depression, and sleep dysfunction. This remarkable overlap suggests common pathophysiological mechanisms, which include synaptic dysfunction and synaptotoxicity, as well as glial activation and astrogliosis. Astrogliosis is linked to synapse function via the tripartite synapse, but astrocytes also control the availability of gliotransmitters and adenosine. Here we will specifically focus on the ‘adenosine hypothesis of comorbidities’ implying that astrocyte activation, via overexpression of adenosine kinase (ADK), induces a deficiency in the homeostatic tone of adenosine. We present evidence from patient-derived samples showing astrogliosis and overexpression of ADK as common pathological hallmark of epilepsy, AD, PD, and ALS. We discuss a transgenic ‘comorbidity model’, in which brain-wide overexpression of ADK and resulting adenosine deficiency produces a comorbid spectrum of seizures, altered dopaminergic function, attentional impairment, and deficits in cognitive domains and sleep regulation. We conclude that dysfunction of adenosine signaling is common in neurological conditions, that adenosine dysfunction can explain comorbid phenotypes, and that therapeutic adenosine augmentation might be effective for the treatment of comorbid symptoms in multiple neurological conditions. PMID:25979489

  2. Co-morbidity index in rheumatoid arthritis: time to think.

    PubMed

    El Miedany, Yasser

    2015-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis patients are clinically complex, and the interplay of their disease activity together with the other associated conditions may lead to increased morbidity and mortality. The recent advances in the disease management attracted the attention to its associated co-morbidities and highlighted the need for a tool to provide clinicians and potential payers with a clinically powerful measure of the disease burden and prognosis. Predicting outcome or co-morbidity probability has been previously implemented successfully for calculating 10-year fracture probability (FRAX) as well as for predicting 1-year patient mortality using co-morbidity data obtained (Charlson index). Developing a specific rheumatoid arthritis-independent tool able to predict morbidity, mortality, cost and hospitalization would be a step forward on the way to achieve full disease remission. The co-morbidity index should be used both at baseline as well as a continuous variable in analyses. It should be implemented regularly in the clinical assessment as a confounder of outcomes. This article will review the redefined health outcomes in rheumatoid arthritis and the concept of co-morbidity index for patients with inflammatory arthritis. It will also present a proposed co-morbidity index for rheumatoid arthritis patients.

  3. Psychiatric Diagnoses and Comorbidities in a Diverse, Multicity Cohort of Young Transgender Women

    PubMed Central

    Reisner, Sari L.; Biello, Katie B.; White Hughto, Jaclyn M.; Kuhns, Lisa; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Garofalo, Robert; Mimiaga, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Transgender youth, including adolescent and young adult transgender women assigned a male sex at birth who identify as girls, women, transgender women, transfemale, male-to-female, or another diverse transfeminine gender identity, represent a vulnerable population at risk for negative mental health and substance use outcomes. Diagnostic clinical interviews to assess prevalence of mental health, substance dependence, and comorbid psychiatric disorders in young transgender women remain scarce. OBJECTIVE To report the prevalence of mental health, substance dependence, and comorbid psychiatric disorders assessed via clinical diagnostic interview in a high-risk community-recruited sample of young transgender women. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Observational study reporting baseline finding from a diverse sample of 298 sexually active, young transgender women aged 16 through 29 years (mean age, 23.4 years; 49.0%black, 12.4%Latina, 25.5%white, and 13.1%other minority race/ethnicity) and enrolled in Project LifeSkills, an ongoing randomized controlled HIV prevention intervention efficacy trial in Chicago and Boston, between 2012 and 2015. EXPOSURE Transfeminine gender identity. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Age- and site-adjusted prevalence and comorbidities of mental health and substance dependence disorders assessed via the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview, including 1 or more diagnoses, 2 or more comorbid diagnoses, major depressive episode (current and lifetime), past 30-day suicidal risk (no/low risk vs moderate/high risk), past 6-month generalized anxiety disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder, and past 12-month alcohol dependence and nonalcohol psychoactive substance use dependence. RESULTS Of the 298 transgender women, 41.5%of participants had 1 or more mental health or substance dependence diagnoses; 1 in 5 (20.1%) had 2 or more comorbid psychiatric diagnoses. Prevalence of specific disorders was as follows: lifetime and current major

  4. Treating comorbid anxiety and depression: Psychosocial and pharmacological approaches

    PubMed Central

    Coplan, Jeremy D; Aaronson, Cindy J; Panthangi, Venkatesh; Kim, Younsuk

    2015-01-01

    Comorbid anxiety with depression predicts poor outcomes with a higher percentage of treatment resistance than either disorder occurring alone. Overlap of anxiety and depression complicates diagnosis and renders treatment challenging. A vital step in treatment of such comorbidity is careful and comprehensive diagnostic assessment. We attempt to explain various psychosocial and pharmacological approaches for treatment of comorbid anxiety and depression. For the psychosocial component, we focus only on generalized anxiety disorder based on the following theoretical models: (1) “the avoidance model”; (2) “the intolerance of uncertainty model”; (3) “the meta-cognitive model”; (4) “the emotion dysregulation model”; and (5) “the acceptance based model”. For depression, the following theoretical models are explicated: (1) “the cognitive model”; (2) “the behavioral activation model”; and (3) “the interpersonal model”. Integration of these approaches is suggested. The treatment of comorbid anxiety and depression necessitates specific psychopharmacological adjustments as compared to treating either condition alone. Serotonin reuptake inhibitors are considered first-line treatment in uncomplicated depression comorbid with a spectrum of anxiety disorders. Short-acting benzodiazepines (BZDs) are an important “bridging strategy” to address an acute anxiety component. In patients with comorbid substance abuse, avoidance of BZDs is recommended and we advise using an atypical antipsychotic in lieu of BZDs. For mixed anxiety and depression comorbid with bipolar disorder, we recommend augmentation of an antidepressant with either lamotrigine or an atypical agent. Combination and augmentation therapies in the treatment of comorbid conditions vis-à-vis monotherapy may be necessary for positive outcomes. Combination therapy with tricyclic antidepressants, gabapentin and selective serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (e.g., duloxetine) are

  5. Assessing the Influence of Different Comorbidities Indexes on the Outcomes of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in a Developing Country

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Gustavo Machado; Bittencourt, Henrique; Rezende, Suely Meireles

    2015-01-01

    Although the application of Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation-specific Comorbidity Index (HCT-CI) has enabled better prediction of transplant-related mortality (TRM) in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants (AHSCT), data from developing countries are scarce. This study prospectively evaluated the HCT-CI and the Adult Comorbidity Evaluation (ACE-27), in its original and in a modified version, as predictors of post-transplant complications in adults undergoing a first related or unrelated AHSCT in Brazil. Both bone marrow (BM) and peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) as graft sources were included. We analyzed the cumulative incidence of granulocyte and platelet recovery, sinusoidal obstructive syndrome, acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease, relapse and transplant-related mortality, and rates of event-free survival and overall survival. Ninety-nine patients were assessed. Median age was 38 years (18–65 years); HCT-CI ≥ 3 accounted for only 8% of cases; hematologic malignancies comprised 75.8% of the indications for AHSCT. There was no association between the HCT-CI or the original or modified ACE-27 with TRM or any other studied outcomes after AHSCT. These results show that, in the population studied, none of the comorbidity indexes seem to be associated with AHSCT outcomes. A significantly low frequency of high-risk (HCT-CI ≥ 3) in this Brazilian population might justify these results. PMID:26394228

  6. Does depression and substance abuse co-morbidity affect socioeconomic status? Evidence from a prospective study of urban African Americans.

    PubMed

    Dagher, Rada K; Green, Kerry M

    2015-01-30

    Studies have established a graded association between mental health and socioeconomic status (SES). However, scarce research has examined the impact of substance use disorders (SUD) and depression comorbidity on SES. We use data from the Woodlawn Study, a longitudinal cohort study, which recruited a cohort of first graders from Chicago starting 1966-1967 (N=1242). Analyses focus on those interviewed in young adulthood and followed up through midlife. Regression analyses adjusting for childhood confounders showed that young adults with depression and SUD comorbidity had higher likelihood of having any periods of unemployment, higher likelihood of being unemployed for 3 or more months, and lower household income in midlife than those with neither disorder. Moreover, young adults with SUD without depression had higher odds of having any periods of unemployment and higher odds of being unemployed for 3 or more months than those with neither disorder. Findings point to the possibility of social selection where depression and SUD comorbidity contributes to a downward drift in SES. Clinical interventions that integrate the treatment of SUD and depression may be more effective at reducing socioeconomic disparities among minority populations.

  7. Pentraxin-3 in hemodialysis patients: Relationship to comorbidities.

    PubMed

    El Sebai, Aziza Ahmed; El Hadidi, Eman Saleh; Abdel Al, Hala; El Sayed, Engy Yousry

    2016-01-01

    Hemodialysis (HD), despite being the most common treatment modality for endstage renal disease (ESRD), still carries a mortality rate higher than 20-50%/year resulting from various comorbidities. The aim of this study was to measure the plasma level of pentraxin-3 (PTX-3) in patients on maintenance HD and to assess its relationships to comorbidities such as malnutrition and associated comorbid diseases. This case-control study included 50 HD patients, 30 ESRD patients, and 30 healthy controls. HD patients were classified into different subgroups according to the Davies comorbidity index and malnutrition score. Plasma PTX-3 was analyzed by a sandwich ELISA technique. Plasma level of PTX-3 reached its highest levels in HD patients followed by ESRD patients as compared to healthy controls. Moreover, within the different subgroups, the highest levels and the highest odd ratio of PTX-3 were detected in the subgroups having the highest Davies comorbidity index or the highest malnutrition score as compared to the other subgroups. At a cutoff of 0.6 ng/mL, PTX-3 was able to discriminate HD patients with low Davies comorbidity index from those with both medium and high Davies comorbidity index with a diagnostic sensitivity of 92.5% and a diagnostic specificity of 70.0%. Meanwhile, the best cutoff of plasma PTX-3 for discriminating patients with mild malnutrition from severe and moderate malnutrition was 0.6 ng/mL with a diagnostic sensitivity of 90.9% and a diagnostic specificity of 41.2%. In conclusion, PTX-3 appears to be a clinically useful marker for the early identification of patients with renal failure on maintenance HD who are at substantially increased risk of morbidity. These patients may require care and aggressive follow-up in more specialized units and an early referral to a renal transplant center.

  8. Genetic and environmental influences on psychiatric comorbidity: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Cerdá, M.; Sagdeo, A.; Johnson, J.; Galea, S.

    2009-01-01

    Background The purpose of this review is to systematically appraise the peer-reviewed literature about the genetic and environmental determinants of psychiatric comorbidity, focusing on four of the most prevalent types of psychopathology: anxiety disorders, depression, conduct disorder and substance abuse. Methods We summarize existing empirical research on the relative contribution that genetic, nonshared and shared environmental factors make to the covariance between disorders, and evidence about specific genes and environmental characteristics that are associated with comorbidity. Results 94 articles met the inclusion criteria and were assessed. Genetic factors play a particularly strong role in comorbidity between major depression and generalized anxiety disorder or posttraumatic stress disorder, while the non-shared environments makes an important contribution to comorbidity in affective disorders. Genetic and non-shared environmental factors also make a moderate-to-strong contribution to the relationship between CD and SA. A range of candidate genes, such as 5HTTLPR, MAOA, and DRD1-DRD4, as well as others implicated in the central nervous system, has been implicated in psychiatric comorbidity. Pivotal social factors include childhood adversity/ life events, family and peer social connections, and socioeconomic and academic difficulties. Limitations Methodological concerns include the use of clinical case-control samples, the focus on a restricted set of individual-level environmental risk factors, and restricted follow-up times. Conclusions Given the significant mental health burden associated with comorbid disorders, population-based research on modifiable risk factors for psychiatric comorbidity is vital for the design of effective preventive and clinical interventions. PMID:20004978

  9. Retinol binding protein 4 is associated with adiposity-related co-morbidity risk factors in children

    PubMed Central

    Conroy, Rushika; Espinal, Yomery; Fennoy, Ilene; Accacha, Siham; Boucher-Berry, Claudia; Carey, Dennis E.; Close, Sharron; DeSantis, Deborah; Gupta, Rishi; Hassoun, Abeer A.; Iazzetti, Loretta; Jacques, Fabean J.; Jean, Amy M.; Michel, Lesly; Pavlovich, Katherine; Rapaport, Robert; Rosenfeld, Warren; Shamoon, Elisabeth; Shelov, Steven; Speiser, Phyllis W.; Ten, Svetlana; Rosenbaum, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objective In adults, elevated levels of retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) have been associated with biochemical markers of adiposity-related co-morbidities including insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and abdominal obesity. This study examined the relationship between RBP4 and risk factors for co-morbidities of adiposity in a population of ethnically diverse children in early- to mid-adolescence in the public school system of New York City. Materials/methods We analyzed anthropometric (body mass index, % body fat, waist circumference), metabolic (lipids, glucose), and inflammatory (TNF-α, interleukin-6, C-reactive protein, adiponectin) markers for adiposity-related co-morbidities and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in 106 school children (65 males, 41 females) 11–15 years of age (mean ± SD = 13.0 ± 0.1 years) who were enrolled in the Reduce Obesity and Diabetes (ROAD) project. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by quantitative insulin sensitivity check index. Insulin secretory capacity was measured as acute insulin response and glucose disposal index. Results Serum RBP4 was significantly correlated directly with ALT, triglycerides, and triglyceride z-score, and inversely correlated with adiponectin. Correlations with ALT and adiponectin remained significant when corrected for % body fat, age, and gender. There were significant ethnic differences in the relationship of RBP4 to ALT, glucose disposal index and adiponectin. Conclusions In early- to mid-adolescents, circulating concentrations of RBP4 are correlated with multiple risk factors for adiposity-related co-morbidities. The observation that many associations persisted when corrected for % body fat, suggests that RBP4 can be viewed as an independent marker of adiposity-related co-morbidity risk in children. PMID:22308842

  10. The Latent Structure and Comorbidity Patterns of Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Major Depression Disorder: A National Study

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Carlos; Rubio, José M.; Wall, Melanie; Secades-Villa, Roberto; Beesdo-Baum, Katja; Wang, Shuai

    2013-01-01

    Background There is controversy on whether generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) constitute the same or separate disorders. This study sought to examine the factor structure of the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria of GAD and MDD and the patterns of comorbidity associated with both disorders. Methods Data were drawn from the National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related conditions (NESARC), a representative sample of the adult general population in the United States (N=43,093). Sociodemographic and psychiatric comorbidity correlates of GAD, MDD and co-occurring GAD-MDD were obtained. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for GAD and MDD were conducted, followed by a Multiple Indicators Multiple Causes (MIMIC) model to examine the invariance of the model across several sociodemographic covariates. Results A bifactor model with one general factor underlying all the MDD and GAD diagnostic criteria and another factor with large loadings only for the GAD criteria best represented the latent structure. This model showed excellent fit indices (CFI=1.00, TLI=1.00, RMSEA <.02), and a high degree of invariance across sociodemographic covariates. The comorbidity patterns of individuals with MDD only (n=4,885), GAD only (n=947) and GAD-MDD (n=810) were clearly distinguishable. Conclusions The latent structure of the diagnostic criteria of MDD and GAD and their comorbidity patterns suggests that GAD and MDD are closely related but different nosological entities, with distinct latent structures, clinical manifestations and patterns of comorbidity. PMID:23776155

  11. Unique and related predictors of major depressive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, and their comorbidity after Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Nillni, Yael I; Nosen, Elizabeth; Williams, Patrick A; Tracy, Melissa; Coffey, Scott F; Galea, Sandro

    2013-10-01

    The current study examined demographic and psychosocial factors that predict major depressive disorder (MDD) and comorbid MDD/posttraumatic stress disorder (MDD/PTSD) diagnostic status after Hurricane Katrina, one of the deadliest and costliest hurricanes in the history of the United States. This study expanded on the findings published in the article by Galea, Tracy, Norris, and Coffey (J Trauma Stress 21:357-368, 2008), which examined the same predictors for PTSD, to better understand related and unique predictors of MDD, PTSD, and MDD/PTSD comorbidity. A total of 810 individuals representative of adult residents living in the 23 southernmost counties of Mississippi before Hurricane Katrina were interviewed. Ongoing hurricane-related stressors, low social support, and hurricane-related financial loss were common predictors of MDD, PTSD, and MDD/PTSD, whereas educational and marital status emerged as unique predictors of MDD. Implications for postdisaster relief efforts that address the risk for both MDD and PTSD are discussed.

  12. Information Processing Differences and Similarities in Adults with Dyslexia and Adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder during a Continuous Performance Test: A Study of Cortical Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dhar, Monica; Been, Pieter H.; Minderaa, Ruud B.; Althaus, Monika

    2010-01-01

    Twenty male adults with ADHD, 16 dyslexic adults, 15 comorbid adults, and 16 normal controls were compared on performance and underlying brain responses, during a cued Continuous Performance Test (O-X CPT), with the aim of discovering features of information processing differentiating between the groups. The study evaluated both cue- and…

  13. Extended-release Methylphenidate Treatment and Outcomes in Comorbid Social Anxiety Disorder and Attention-deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: 2 Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Koyuncu, Ahmet; Çelebi, Fahri; Ertekin, Erhan; Kahn, David A

    2015-05-01

    Social anxiety disorder is frequently comorbid with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, treatment recommendations are not clear in the presence of such comorbidity. A few studies in the literature have reported improvement in symptoms of both disorders with treatment specific for ADHD (ie, stimulants and atomoxetine). In this report, we present cases of 2 adults with social anxiety disorder and ADHD who were treated with methylphenidate monotherapy. Both cases responded well in terms of not only their ADHD symptoms but also the social anxiety disorder symptoms. Methylphenidate was well tolerated with no significant side effects. More studies are needed to better establish the potential of ADHD medications to be effective for comorbid social anxiety disorder symptoms.

  14. Comorbidities, Social Impact, and Quality of Life in Tourette Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eapen, Valsamma; Cavanna, Andrea E; Robertson, Mary M

    2016-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is more than having motor and vocal tics, and this review will examine the varied comorbidities as well as the social impact and quality of life (QoL) in individuals with TS. The relationship between any individual and his/her environment is complex, and this is further exaggerated in the case of a person with TS. For example, tics may play a significant role in shaping the person's experiences, perceptions, and interactions with the environment. Furthermore, associated clinical features, comorbidities, and coexisting psychopathologies may compound or alter this relationship. In this regard, the common comorbidities include attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and disruptive behaviors, obsessive compulsive disorder, and autism spectrum disorder, and coexistent problems include anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem, which can all lead to poorer psychosocial functioning and QoL. Thus, the symptoms of TS and the associated comorbid conditions may interact to result in a vicious cycle or a downward spiraling of negative experiences and poor QoL. The stigma and social maladjustment in TS and the social exclusion, bullying, and discrimination are considered to be caused in large part by misperceptions of the disorder by teachers, peers, and the wider community. Improved community and professional awareness about TS and related comorbidities and other psychopathologies as well as the provision of multidisciplinary services to meet the complex needs of this clinical population are critical. Future research to inform the risk and resilience factors for successful long-term outcomes is also warranted. PMID:27375503

  15. [Comorbidity of specific and generalized social anxiety in Spanish adolescents].

    PubMed

    Zubeidat, Ihab; Fernández-Parra, Antonio; Sierra, Juan Carlos; Salinas, José María

    2007-11-01

    The comorbidity of the social anxiety disorder, including the specific and generalized subtypes, and other psychopathological problems in adolescents is explored. For this purpose, 961 Spanish young people were evaluated (mean age = 15.63 years) by means of various self-reports that measure sociodemographical variables, competences and clinical indexes. Those with social anxiety were divided into two groups: specific and generalized. The results indicated that the adolescents with social anxiety had a higher percentage of comorbidity in the indexes that refer to anxiety and avoidance in social situations, than did the young people with other psychopathologies. The group of generalized social anxiety had a higher percentage of comorbidity than the specific social anxiety group in the majority of the clinical problems measured by the YSR/11-18 and MMPI-A. Only in eleven of the evaluated clinical indexes was the difference in comorbidity between the two groups of social anxiety significant, and the percentage of comorbidity was lower in the first group.

  16. Comorbidity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Related to disease severity?

    PubMed Central

    Echave-Sustaeta, Jose M; Comeche Casanova, Lorena; Cosio, Borja G; Soler-Cataluña, Juan Jose; Garcia-Lujan, Ricardo; Ribera, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective Several diseases commonly co-exist with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), especially in elderly patients. This study aimed to investigate whether there is an association between COPD severity and the frequency of comorbidities in stable COPD patients. Patients and methods In this multicenter, cross-sectional study, patients with spirometric diagnosis of COPD attended to by internal medicine departments throughout Spain were consecutively recruited by 225 internal medicine specialists. The severity of airflow obstruction was graded using the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) and data on demographics, smoking history, comorbidities, and dyspnea were collected. The Charlson comorbidity score was calculated. Results Eight hundred and sixty-six patients were analyzed: male 93%, mean age 69.8 (standard deviation [SD] 9.7) years and forced vital capacity in 1 second 42.1 (SD 17.7)%. Even, the mean (SD) Charlson score was 2.2 (2.2) for stage I, 2.3 (1.5) for stage II, 2.5 (1.6) for stage III, and 2.7 (1.8) for stage IV (P=0.013 between stage I and IV groups), independent predictors of Charlson score in the multivariate analysis were age, smoking history (pack-years), the hemoglobin level, and dyspnea, but not GOLD stage. Conclusion COPD patients attended to in internal medicine departments show high scores of comorbidity. However, GOLD stage was not an independent predictor of comorbidity. PMID:25429213

  17. Outcomes in Adults with Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnhill, Gena P.

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the current research literature on adult outcomes of individuals with Asperger syndrome (AS). Specific areas addressed are the characteristics associated with adulthood AS, including employment issues, comorbid mental and physical health conditions, neurological issues, possible problems with the legal system, mortality…

  18. Oppositional Defiant Disorder in Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reimherr, Frederick W.; Marchant, Barrie K.; Olsen, John L.; Wender, Paul H.; Robison, Reid J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) is the most common comorbid condition in childhood ADHD. This trial was prospectively designed to explore ODD symptoms in ADHD adults. Method: A total of 86 patients in this placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of methylphenidate transdermal system (MTS) were categorized based on the presence of ODD…

  19. A Genome-wide Association Study of Bipolar Disorder and Co-morbid Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Oedegaard, K J; Greenwood, T A; Johansson, S; Jacobsen, K K; Halmoy, A; Fasmer, O B; Akiskal, H S; Haavik, J; Kelsoe, J R

    2010-01-01

    Both migraine and Bipolar Disorder (BPAD) are complex phenotypes with significant genetic and non-genetic components. Epidemiological and clinical studies have demonstrated a high degree of co-morbidity between migraine and BPAD, and overlapping regions of linkage have been shown in numerous genome-wide linkage studies. To identify susceptibility factors for the BPAD/migraine phenotype, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 1001 cases with bipolar disorder collected through the NIMH Genetics Initiative for Bipolar Disorder and genotyped at 1M SNPs as part of the Genetic Association Information Network (GAIN). We compared BPAD patients without any headache (n=699) to BPAD patients with doctor diagnosed migraine (n=56). The strongest evidence for association was found for several SNPs in a 317 kb region encompassing the uncharacterized gene KIAA0564 (e.g. rs9566845 (OR=4.98 (95%CI: 2.6–9.48), p= 7.7 ×10−8) and rs9566867 (p= 8.2 × 10−8)). Although the level of significance was significanlty reduced when using the Fisher’s Exact test (due to the low count of cases with migraine); rs9566845 p= 1.4 ×10−5 and rs9566867 p= 1.5 × 10−5, this region remained the most prominent finding. Furthermore, marker rs9566845 was genotyped and found associated with migraine in an independent Norwegian sample of adult ADHD patients with and without co-morbid migraine (n=131 and n=324 respectively), OR=2.42 (1.18–4.97), p=0.013. This is the first GWAS examining patients with bipolar disorder and co-morbid migraine. These data suggest that genetic variants in the KIAA0564 gene region may predispose to migraine headaches in subgroups of patients with both BPAD and ADHD. PMID:20528957

  20. Predictors of comorbid personality disorders in patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia.

    PubMed

    Latas, M; Starcevic, V; Trajkovic, G; Bogojevic, G

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain predictors of comorbid personality disorders in patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDAG). Sixty consecutive outpatients with PDAG were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II Personality Disorders (SCID-II) for the purpose of diagnosing personality disorders. Logistic regressions were used to identify predictors of any comorbid personality disorder, any DSM-IV cluster A, cluster B, and cluster C personality disorder. Independent variables in these regressions were gender, age, duration of panic disorder (PD), severity of PDAG, and scores on self-report instruments that assess the patient's perception of their parents, childhood separation anxiety, and traumatic experiences. High levels of parental protection on the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI), indicating a perception of the parents as overprotective and controlling, emerged as the only statistically significant predictor of any comorbid personality disorder. This finding was attributed to the association between parental overprotection and cluster B personality disorders, particularly borderline personality disorder. The duration of PD was a significant predictor of any cluster B and any cluster C personality disorder, suggesting that some of the cluster B and cluster C personality disorders may be a consequence of the long-lasting PDAG. Any cluster B personality disorder was also associated with younger age. In conclusion, despite a generally nonspecific nature of the relationship between parental overprotection in childhood and adult psychopathology, the findings of this study suggest some specificity for the association between parental overprotection in childhood and personality disturbance in PDAG patients, particularly cluster B personality disorders. PMID:10646616

  1. Investigating asthma comorbidities: a systematic scoping review protocol

    PubMed Central

    El Ferkh, Karim; Nwaru, Bright; Griffiths, Chris; Sheikh, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Asthma is a common long-term disorder with a number of related comorbid conditions, which may affect asthma outcomes. There is a need for greater appreciation for understanding how these comorbidities interact with asthma in order to improve asthma outcomes. Objectives To systematically identify and map out key asthma comorbidities. Methods We will systematically search the following electronic databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, ISI Web of Science, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PsycINFO and Google Scholar. Additional literature will be identified by searching the reference list of identified eligible studies and by searching the repositories of international conference proceedings, including ISI Conference Proceeding Citation Index, and ZETOC (British Library). Dissemination The findings from this systematic scoping review will be reported at scientific meetings and published in a peer-reviewed journal. PMID:27558899

  2. Considering Comorbidity in Adolescents with Social Anxiety Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bonilla, Natalia; Muela-Martinez, Jose-Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder is a highly prevalent psychiatric disorder, with elevated comorbidity rates with other mental health disorders and may cause severe negative consequences. In adolescence, there is a lack of research on how comorbid disorders to social anxiety tends to form particular associations. With a large sample of adolescents with a clinical diagnosis of social anxiety disorder, data have revealed that certain disorders are more frequent and tend to dwell on concrete aggregates. Thus, it may be particularly useful and efficient for mental health providers, pediatricians and school counselors to screen for generalized anxiety disorder and specific phobia when assessing SAD in youth. Overall, findings stress the presence of comorbidity being the rule rather than the exception in adolescents with social anxiety disorder, and the need for further examination of its impact on assessment and differential diagnosis on this psychiatric disorder.

  3. Pregnancy with co-morbidities: Anesthetic aspects during operative intervention.

    PubMed

    Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Bajwa, Sukhwinder Kaur; Ghuman, Gagandeep Singh

    2013-01-01

    The presence of co-morbidities during pregnancy can pose numerous challenges to the attending anesthesiologists during operative deliveries or during the provision of labor analgesia services. The presence of cardiac diseases, endocrinological disorders, respiratory diseases, renal pathologies, hepatic dysfunction, anemia, neurological and musculoskeletal disorders, connective tissue diseases and many others not only influence the obstetric outcome, but can significantly impact the anesthetic technique. The choice of anesthesia during the pregnancy depends upon the type of surgery, the period of gestation, the site of surgery, general condition of patient and so on. Whatever, the anesthetic technique is chosen the methodology should be based on evidentially supported literature and the clinical judgment of the attending anesthesiologist. The list of co-morbid diseases is unending. However, the present review describes the common co-morbidities encountered during pregnancy and their anesthetic management during operative deliveries. PMID:25885972

  4. Psoriasis and cardiovascular comorbidities with emphasis in Asia.

    PubMed

    Chu, T W; Tsai, T F

    2012-04-01

    Psoriasis is traditionally considered a skin-specific disease with the exception of coexisting psoriatic arthritis. However, growing evidence suggests a link between psoriasis and other comorbidities. Cardiovascular comorbidity, in particular, is the focus of considerable research, due in part to the associated mortality and possible intervention. A common mechanism that may explain both psoriasis and atherosclerosis pathogenesis is of great interest and utility. The increase of Th1 and Th17 leading to chronic inflammation is thought to be a patho-denominator for both diseases. In addition, progressive adiposity and resultant metabolic syndrome are but the beginning steps in the "psoriatic march". In this article, we review the recent publications on cardiovascular risks in patients with psoriasis. We also examine the effects of psoriasis treatment, including the new biologics, on cardiovascular comorbidities. Although there is generally a lack of Asian research on this issue, we present the most recent pertinent findings from Taiwan.

  5. Psychiatric Axis I Comorbidities among Patients with Gender Dysphoria

    PubMed Central

    Hajebi, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Cooccurring psychiatric disorders influence the outcome and prognosis of gender dysphoria. The aim of this study is to assess psychiatric comorbidities in a group of patients. Methods. Eighty-three patients requesting sex reassignment surgery (SRS) were recruited and assessed through the Persian Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders (SCID-I). Results. Fifty-seven (62.7%) patients had at least one psychiatric comorbidity. Major depressive disorder (33.7%), specific phobia (20.5%), and adjustment disorder (15.7%) were the three most prevalent disorders. Conclusion. Consistent with most earlier researches, the majority of patients with gender dysphoria had psychiatric Axis I comorbidity. PMID:25180172

  6. Comprehensive therapeutic approach for patients with heart failure and comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Laiglesia, F J; Garcés-Horna, V; Formiga, F

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of heart failure increases with age and is accompanied by other diseases, which are encompassed within a «cardiometabolic phenotype». Their interrelation changes the evolution and treatment that each disease would have in isolation. Patients with heart failure and comorbidity are frail and complex. They require a comprehensive assessment (not just biomedical), which includes functional, cognitive, affective and psychosocial aspects. The overall treatment, which is not covered in the clinical practice guidelines, should adapt to each and every one of the comorbidities. Polypharmacy should be avoided as much as possible, due to its interactions and reduced adherence. Treatment needs to be optimised and adapted to the evolutionary phase of the disease and the specific needs of each patient. The complexity of the care process for patients with heart failure and comorbidities requires the coordination of healthcare providers and support from family and others involved in the patient's care.

  7. [Individual medical relevance of headaches. Comorbidities and quality of life].

    PubMed

    Haag, G

    2014-08-01

    In a multitude of cases, very frequent primary headaches lead to a clear deterioration in quality of life. Particularly in patients with chronic migraine, chronic tension headache, and cluster headache, quality of life is limited. This contradicts the preconception still encountered today that headaches are not a serious illness. Comorbidities with somatic and above all mental disorders are also very frequently observed in headache patients. In the foreground are the cardiovascular diseases of arterial hypertension, stroke, and coronary heart disease, as well as the mental disorders of depression, anxiety disorders, posttraumatic stress disorders, and sleep disorders. When such comorbidities are present, the quality of life of the sufferers is significantly reduced. Therefore, headache disorders should be taken seriously and sufferers should be provided with a consistent therapy. In cases of severe types of headache and in the presence of comorbidities, it is imperative that therapy is also prophylactic and multimodal in nature.

  8. Pregnancy with co-morbidities: Anesthetic aspects during operative intervention

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Bajwa, Sukhwinder Kaur; Ghuman, Gagandeep Singh

    2013-01-01

    The presence of co-morbidities during pregnancy can pose numerous challenges to the attending anesthesiologists during operative deliveries or during the provision of labor analgesia services. The presence of cardiac diseases, endocrinological disorders, respiratory diseases, renal pathologies, hepatic dysfunction, anemia, neurological and musculoskeletal disorders, connective tissue diseases and many others not only influence the obstetric outcome, but can significantly impact the anesthetic technique. The choice of anesthesia during the pregnancy depends upon the type of surgery, the period of gestation, the site of surgery, general condition of patient and so on. Whatever, the anesthetic technique is chosen the methodology should be based on evidentially supported literature and the clinical judgment of the attending anesthesiologist. The list of co-morbid diseases is unending. However, the present review describes the common co-morbidities encountered during pregnancy and their anesthetic management during operative deliveries. PMID:25885972

  9. Compulsive Buying Behavior: Characteristics of Comorbidity with Gambling Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Granero, Roser; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Steward, Trevor; Mestre-Bach, Gemma; Baño, Marta; del Pino-Gutiérrez, Amparo; Moragas, Laura; Aymamí, Neus; Gómez-Peña, Mónica; Mallorquí-Bagué, Núria; Tárrega, Salomé; Menchón, José M.; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Compulsive buying behavior (CBB) has begun to be recognized as a condition worthy of attention by clinicians and researchers. Studies on the commonalities between CBB and other behavioral addictions such as gambling disorder (GD) exist in the literature, but additional research is needed to assess the frequency and clinical relevance of the comorbidity of CBB and GD. The aim of the study was to estimate the point-prevalence of CBB+GD in a clinical setting. Data corresponded to n = 3221 treatment-seeking patients who met criteria for CBB or GD at a public hospital unit specialized in treating behavioral addictions. Three groups were compared: only-CBB (n = 127), only-GD (n = 3118) and comorbid CBB+GD (n = 24). Prevalence for the co-occurrence of CBB+GD was 0.75%. In the stratum of patients with GD, GD+CBB comorbidity obtained relatively low point prevalence (0.77%), while in the subsample of CBB patients the estimated prevalence of comorbid GD was relatively high (18.9%). CBB+GD comorbidity was characterized by lower prevalence of single patients, higher risk of other behavioral addictions (sex, gaming or internet), older age and age of onset. CBB+GD registered a higher proportion of women compared to only-GD (37.5 vs. 10.0%) but a higher proportion of men compared to only-CBB (62.5 vs. 24.4%). Compared to only-GD patients, the simultaneous presence of CBB+GD was associated with increased psychopathology and dysfunctional levels of harm avoidance. This study provides empirical evidence to better understand CBB, GD and their co-occurrence. Future research should help delineate the processes through which people acquire and develop this comorbidity. PMID:27199853

  10. Vascular comorbidities in the onset and progression of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tettey, Prudence; Simpson, Steve; Taylor, Bruce V; van der Mei, Ingrid A F

    2014-12-15

    Vascular comorbidities are common in the general population and are associated with adverse health outcomes. In people with multiple sclerosis (MS), an increasing amount of evidence suggests that vascular comorbidities are also common, but an association with MS risk and disability has not been conclusively established. This review aims to critically examine published data on the relationship between vascular comorbidities (including vascular risk factors) and MS. The evidence suggests an increased risk of MS in people with a high BMI during childhood or adolescence but not adulthood. People with established MS appear to have a slightly increased risk of cardiovascular disease and a greater proportion of people with MS die from cardiovascular disease, which has important implications for clinicians trying to identify risk factors for cardiovascular disease and reviewing treatment options. In relation to whether vascular comorbidities influence MS clinical disability or other aspects of the disease course, the key finding was that having type-2-diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidaemia or peripheral vascular disease at any point in the disease course may be associated with a greater progression in disability. Additionally, a negative effect of high cholesterol and triglycerides and a positive effect of higher HDL (high density lipoprotein) levels on acute inflammatory activity were observed on magnetic resonance imaging. The results of the published clinical trials of statins as an intervention in MS were however conflicting and care needs to be taken when treating people with MS with statins. Taken together, the literature seems to indicate a potential association of vascular comorbidities with MS risk and disability, but the number of prospective studies was sparse, thus precluding ascription of causality. We therefore recommend that future studies of the frequency and effects of vascular comorbidities on MS risk and disability should be prospective and objective

  11. Compulsive Buying Behavior: Characteristics of Comorbidity with Gambling Disorder.

    PubMed

    Granero, Roser; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Steward, Trevor; Mestre-Bach, Gemma; Baño, Marta; Del Pino-Gutiérrez, Amparo; Moragas, Laura; Aymamí, Neus; Gómez-Peña, Mónica; Mallorquí-Bagué, Núria; Tárrega, Salomé; Menchón, José M; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Compulsive buying behavior (CBB) has begun to be recognized as a condition worthy of attention by clinicians and researchers. Studies on the commonalities between CBB and other behavioral addictions such as gambling disorder (GD) exist in the literature, but additional research is needed to assess the frequency and clinical relevance of the comorbidity of CBB and GD. The aim of the study was to estimate the point-prevalence of CBB+GD in a clinical setting. Data corresponded to n = 3221 treatment-seeking patients who met criteria for CBB or GD at a public hospital unit specialized in treating behavioral addictions. Three groups were compared: only-CBB (n = 127), only-GD (n = 3118) and comorbid CBB+GD (n = 24). Prevalence for the co-occurrence of CBB+GD was 0.75%. In the stratum of patients with GD, GD+CBB comorbidity obtained relatively low point prevalence (0.77%), while in the subsample of CBB patients the estimated prevalence of comorbid GD was relatively high (18.9%). CBB+GD comorbidity was characterized by lower prevalence of single patients, higher risk of other behavioral addictions (sex, gaming or internet), older age and age of onset. CBB+GD registered a higher proportion of women compared to only-GD (37.5 vs. 10.0%) but a higher proportion of men compared to only-CBB (62.5 vs. 24.4%). Compared to only-GD patients, the simultaneous presence of CBB+GD was associated with increased psychopathology and dysfunctional levels of harm avoidance. This study provides empirical evidence to better understand CBB, GD and their co-occurrence. Future research should help delineate the processes through which people acquire and develop this comorbidity. PMID:27199853

  12. Comorbidities Associated with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: a Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, José Antonio; Ribeiro, Davi Knoll; Cavallini, Andre Freitas da Silva; Duarte, Caue; Freitas, Gabriel Santos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by partial or complete recurrent upper airway obstruction during sleep. OSA brings many adverse consequences, such as hypertension, obesity, diabetes mellitus, cardiac and encephalic alterations, behavioral, among others, resulting in a significant source of public health care by generating a high financial and social impact. The importance of this assessment proves to be useful, because the incidence of patients with comorbidities associated with AOS has been increasing consistently and presents significant influence in natural disease history. Objective The objective of this study is to assess major comorbidities associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and prevalence in a group of patients diagnosed clinically and polysomnographically with OSA. Methods This is a retrospective study of 100 charts from patients previously diagnosed with OSA in our service between October 2010 and January 2013. Results We evaluated 100 patients with OSA (84 men and 16 women) with a mean age of 50.05 years (range 19–75 years). The prevalence of comorbidities were hypertension (39%), obesity (34%), depression (19%), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (18%), diabetes mellitus (15%), hypercholesterolemia (10%), asthma (4%), and no comorbidities (33%). Comorbidities occurred in 56.2% patients diagnosed with mild OSA, 67.6% with moderate OSA, and 70% of patients with severe OSA. Conclusion According to the current literature data and the values obtained in our paper, we can correlate through expressive values obesity with OSA and their apnea hypopnea index (AHI) values. However, despite significant prevalence of OSA with other comorbidities, our study could not render expressive significance values able to justify their correlations. PMID:27096019

  13. Compulsive Buying Behavior: Characteristics of Comorbidity with Gambling Disorder.

    PubMed

    Granero, Roser; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Steward, Trevor; Mestre-Bach, Gemma; Baño, Marta; Del Pino-Gutiérrez, Amparo; Moragas, Laura; Aymamí, Neus; Gómez-Peña, Mónica; Mallorquí-Bagué, Núria; Tárrega, Salomé; Menchón, José M; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Compulsive buying behavior (CBB) has begun to be recognized as a condition worthy of attention by clinicians and researchers. Studies on the commonalities between CBB and other behavioral addictions such as gambling disorder (GD) exist in the literature, but additional research is needed to assess the frequency and clinical relevance of the comorbidity of CBB and GD. The aim of the study was to estimate the point-prevalence of CBB+GD in a clinical setting. Data corresponded to n = 3221 treatment-seeking patients who met criteria for CBB or GD at a public hospital unit specialized in treating behavioral addictions. Three groups were compared: only-CBB (n = 127), only-GD (n = 3118) and comorbid CBB+GD (n = 24). Prevalence for the co-occurrence of CBB+GD was 0.75%. In the stratum of patients with GD, GD+CBB comorbidity obtained relatively low point prevalence (0.77%), while in the subsample of CBB patients the estimated prevalence of comorbid GD was relatively high (18.9%). CBB+GD comorbidity was characterized by lower prevalence of single patients, higher risk of other behavioral addictions (sex, gaming or internet), older age and age of onset. CBB+GD registered a higher proportion of women compared to only-GD (37.5 vs. 10.0%) but a higher proportion of men compared to only-CBB (62.5 vs. 24.4%). Compared to only-GD patients, the simultaneous presence of CBB+GD was associated with increased psychopathology and dysfunctional levels of harm avoidance. This study provides empirical evidence to better understand CBB, GD and their co-occurrence. Future research should help delineate the processes through which people acquire and develop this comorbidity.

  14. Comorbidity of fibromyalgia and cervical myofascial pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cakit, Burcu Duyur; Taskin, Suhan; Nacir, Baris; Unlu, Irem; Genc, Hakan; Erdem, Hatice Rana

    2010-04-01

    The aims of this study are to determine the frequency of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) in patients with chronic cervical myofascial pain (CMP) and to investigate the FMS characteristics in CMP patients. Ninty-three patients with CMP and 30 age-matched healthy women were included in this study. Main outcome measures included visual analog scale (VAS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and pain pressure thresholds. CMP patients were evaluated for the existence of FMS. The severity of FMS was assessed with total myalgic score (TMS) and control point score (CPS). Most common clinical characteristics of FMS were noted. Of the 93 CMP subjects, 22 (23.6%) patients fulfilled the classification criteria for FMS. Number of tender points were higher (p=0.0), while TMS (p=0.0) and CPS (p=0.0) values were lower in comorbid CMP and FMS patients than regional CMP group. There were statistically significant differences between regional CMP patients and comorbid CMP and FMS patients regarding presence of fatigue (p=0.0) and irritable bowel syndrome (p=0.022). There was no statistically significant difference between patient groups regarding VAS values (p>0.05). BDI values of the regional CMP were significantly lower than comorbid CMP and FMS patients (p=0.011). In conclusion, we found that nearly a quarter of CMP patients were comorbid with FMS, and psychological and comorbid symptoms were more prominent in comorbid patients. We thought that, these two syndromes might be overlapping conditions and as a peripheral pain generator or inducer of central sensitisation, MPS might lead to FMS or precipitate and worsen the FMS symptoms.

  15. Impact of Comorbidities on Mortality in Patients with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kreuter, Michael; Ehlers-Tenenbaum, Svenja; Palmowski, Karin; Bruhwyler, Jacques; Oltmanns, Ute; Muley, Thomas; Heussel, Claus Peter; Warth, Arne; Kolb, Martin; Herth, Felix J. F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Comorbidities significantly influence the clinical course of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). However, their prognostic impact is not fully understood. We therefore aimed to determine the impact of comorbidities, as individual and as whole, on survival in IPF. Methods The database of a tertiary referral centre for interstitial lung diseases was reviewed for comorbidities, their treatments, their frequency and survival in IPF patients. Results 272 patients were identified of which 12% had no, 58% 1–3 and 30% 4–7 comorbidities, mainly cardiovascular, pulmonary and oncologic comorbidities. Median survival according to the frequency of comorbidities differed significantly with 66 months for patients without comorbidities, 48 months when 1–3 comorbidities were reported and 35 months when 4–7 comorbidities were prevalent (p = 0.004). A multivariate Cox proportional hazard analyses identified other cardiac diseases and lung cancer as significant predictors of death, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and diastolic dysfunction had a significant positive impact on survival. A significant impact of comorbidities associated therapies on survival was not discovered. This included the use of proton pump inhibitors at baseline, which was not associated with a survival benefit (p = 0.718). We also established a predictive tool for highly prevalent comorbidities, termed IPF comorbidome which demonstrates a new relationship of IPF and comorbidities. Conclusion Comorbidities are frequent in IPF patients. Some comorbidities, especially lung cancer, mainly influence survival in IPF, while others such as GERD may inherit a more favourable effect. Moreover, their cumulative incidence impacts survival. PMID:27023440

  16. Sleep disturbances are associated with psychotic experiences: Findings from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hans Y; Singh, Fiza; Koyanagi, Ai; Jameson, Nicole; Schiffman, Jason; DeVylder, Jordan

    2016-03-01

    Sleep disturbances have been linked to psychotic experiences in the general adult populations of multiple countries, but this association has yet to be confirmed in the United States using robust diagnostic measures. We analyzed a subsample (n=2304) of the National Comorbidity Survey Replication, and found that when compared with those who did not report any sleep problems, individuals with sleep disturbances lasting two weeks or longer over the past 12months were significantly more likely to report at least one psychotic experience during that same time frame. Specifically, difficulty falling asleep, waking up during the night, early morning awakenings, and feeling sleepy during the day were each associated with greater odds of reporting psychotic experiences over the past year after controlling for socio-demographic variables. However, only difficulty falling asleep and early morning awakenings were still significant after adjusting for DSM comorbid disorders. Reporting three or four types of sleep disturbances was especially predictive of psychotic experiences. Our findings underscore the importance of detecting and reducing sleep problems among individuals who report PE. PMID:26805412

  17. Sex-dependent Pathophysiology as Predictors of Comorbidity of Major Depressive Disorder and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tobet, SA; Handa, RJ; Goldstein, JM

    2013-01-01

    There is a strong and growing literature showing that key aspects of brain development may be critical antecedents of adult physiology and behavior, or lead to physiological and psychiatric disorders in adulthood. Many are significantly influenced by sex-dependent factors. Neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) occupy a key position in regulating homeostatic, neuroendocrine, and behavioral functions. This brain area is a critical link for our understanding of the etiology of a number of disorders with components ranging from mood, to feeding and energy balance, and autonomic nervous system regulation. Thus based on common brain circuitry, the PVN may be a critical anatomical intersection for understanding comorbidities among depression, obesity, and cardiovascular risk. Historically, the majority of approaches to brain development examine neuronal, glial, and vascular factors independently, with notably less emphasis on vascular contributions. The realization that the PVN undergoes a unique vascular developmental process places added value on discerning the cellular and molecular mechanisms that drive its late onset angiogenesis and further implications for neuronal differentiation and function. This has ramifications in humans for understanding chronic, and sometimes fatal, comorbidities that share sex-dependent biological bases in development through functional and anatomical intersections with the hypothalamus. PMID:23503726

  18. Tuberculosis comorbidity with communicable and non-communicable diseases: integrating health services and control efforts.

    PubMed

    Marais, Ben J; Lönnroth, Knut; Lawn, Stephen D; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Mwaba, Peter; Glaziou, Philippe; Bates, Matthew; Colagiuri, Ruth; Zijenah, Lynn; Swaminathan, Soumya; Memish, Ziad A; Pletschette, Michel; Hoelscher, Michael; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Hasan, Rumina; Zafar, Afia; Pantaleo, Guiseppe; Craig, Gill; Kim, Peter; Maeurer, Markus; Schito, Marco; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2013-05-01

    Recent data for the global burden of disease reflect major demographic and lifestyle changes, leading to a rise in non-communicable diseases. Most countries with high levels of tuberculosis face a large comorbidity burden from both non-communicable and communicable diseases. Traditional disease-specific approaches typically fail to recognise common features and potential synergies in integration of care, management, and control of non-communicable and communicable diseases. In resource-limited countries, the need to tackle a broader range of overlapping comorbid diseases is growing. Tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS persist as global emergencies. The lethal interaction between tuberculosis and HIV coinfection in adults, children, and pregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa exemplifies the need for well integrated approaches to disease management and control. Furthermore, links between diabetes mellitus, smoking, alcoholism, chronic lung diseases, cancer, immunosuppressive treatment, malnutrition, and tuberculosis are well recognised. Here, we focus on interactions, synergies, and challenges of integration of tuberculosis care with management strategies for non-communicable and communicable diseases without eroding the functionality of existing national programmes for tuberculosis. The need for sustained and increased funding for these initiatives is greater than ever and requires increased political and funder commitment.

  19. Insula response to unpredictable and predictable aversiveness in individuals with panic disorder and comorbid depression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Prior studies suggest that hyperactive insula responding to unpredictable aversiveness is a core feature of anxiety disorders. However, no study to date has investigated the neural correlates of unpredictable aversiveness in those with panic disorder (PD) with comorbid major depressive disorder (MDD). The aim of the current study was to examine group differences in neural responses to unpredictable and predictable aversiveness in 41 adults with either 1) current PD with comorbid MDD (PD-MDD), 2) current MDD with no lifetime diagnosis of an anxiety disorder (MDD-only), or 3) no lifetime diagnosis of psychopathology. All participants completed a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scan while viewing temporally predictable or unpredictable negative or neutral images. Findings The results indicated that individuals with PD-MDD exhibited greater bilateral insula activation to unpredictable aversiveness compared with controls and individuals with MDD-only (who did not differ). There were no group differences in insula activation to predictable aversiveness. Conclusions These findings add to a growing literature highlighting the role of the insula in the pathophysiology of anxiety disorders. PMID:25337388

  20. Bipolar disorder and co-occurring cannabis use disorders: characteristics, co-morbidities and clinical correlates.

    PubMed

    Lev-Ran, Shaul; Le Foll, Bernard; McKenzie, Kwame; George, Tony P; Rehm, Jürgen

    2013-10-30

    This study examines rates of co-morbid mental disorders and indicators of the course of illness among individuals with bipolar disorder and cannabis use disorders (CUD). Data were drawn from the National Epidemiological Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC Wave 1, 2001-2002), a nationally representative sample of adults living in the United States. Among individuals with lifetime prevalence of bipolar disorder (N=1905) rates of CUD in the past 12 months were 7.2%, compared to 1.2% in the general population. Logistic regression models adjusting for sociodemographic variables indicated that individuals with bipolar disorder and co-occurring CUD were at increased risk for nicotine dependence (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR)=3.8), alcohol (AOR=6.6) and drug (AOR=11.9) use disorders, as well as antisocial personality disorder (AOR=2.8) compared to those without CUD. Among individuals with co-occurring CUD, age of onset of bipolar disorder was significantly lower and median number of manic, hypomanic and depressive episodes per year was significantly greater compared to individuals without CUD. Co-occurring CUD is associated with significant co-morbidities and a more severe course of illness among individuals with bipolar disorder. Comprehensive evaluation of patients with bipolar disorder should include a systematic assessment of CUD.

  1. [Psychiatric comorbidities and secondary emotional difficulties in Asperger syndrome].

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Toru

    2007-03-01

    People with developmental disorders frequently have psychiatric comorbidities and problematic emotional reactions and behaviors. We commonly calls these conditions "nizi-shougai (secondary difficulties)" in Japan. But there is no clear definition of "nizi-shougai", and it is impossible to distinguish "secondary difficulties" from the problems derived from Asperger syndrome itself. In this paper, I focus on psychiatric comorbidities and emotional difficulties of Asperger syndrome. Early detection and intervention for children with developmental disorders can prevent some kind of "secondary difficulties". Treatment for Asperger syndrome should be tailored to meet individual characteristics and needs.

  2. Comorbidity psychiatric disorders in epilepsy: a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Titlic, M; Basic, S; Hajnsek, S; Lusic, I

    2009-01-01

    While reviewing the available literature, we noticed comorbidity of epilepsy and psychiatric disorders. Psychiatric disorders were observed more frequently in patients with high seizure frequency. There is significant prevalence of epilepsy comorbidity with depression, anxiety disorders, and to a lesser extent with bipolar disorders and other forms of psychosis. Suicidal risk factors, ideation and attempts in these patients as correlates of depression or as psychopathological features were associated to epileptic disease. This is confirmed by additional burden of epilepsy patients with psychic disorders (Ref. 70). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk. PMID:19408842

  3. Underdiagnosis of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Adult Patients: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Quintero, Javier; Anand, Ernie; Casillas, Marta; Upadhyaya, Himanshu P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To raise awareness of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as an underdiagnosed, undertreated, often comorbid, and debilitating condition in adults. Data Sources: PubMed was searched using combinations of keywords, including ADHD, adult, diagnosis, identify, prevalence, and comorbid, to find articles published between 1976 and 2013. Study Selection: In total, 99 articles were selected for inclusion on the basis of their relevance to the objective and importance to and representation of ADHD research, including international guidelines for adults with ADHD. Results: In a large proportion of children with ADHD, symptoms persist into adulthood. However, although adults with ADHD often experience chaotic lifestyles, with impaired educational and vocational achievement and higher risks of substance abuse and imprisonment, many remain undiagnosed and/or untreated. ADHD is usually accompanied by other psychiatric comorbidities (such as major depressive disorder, anxiety disorder, and alcohol abuse). Indeed, adults with ADHD are more likely to present to a psychiatric clinic for treatment of their comorbid disorders than for ADHD, and their ADHD symptoms are often mistaken for those of their comorbidities. Untreated ADHD in adults with psychiatric comorbidities leads to poor clinical and functional outcomes for the patient even if comorbidities are treated. Effective treatment of adults’ ADHD improves symptoms, emotional lability, and patient functioning, often leading to favorable outcomes (eg, safer driving, reduced criminality). A few medications have now been approved for use in adults with ADHD, while a multimodal approach involving psychotherapy has also shown promising results. Conclusions General psychiatrists should familiarize themselves with the symptoms of ADHD in adults in order to diagnose and manage ADHD and comorbidities appropriately in these patients. PMID:25317367

  4. Psychological factors and treatment effectiveness in resistant anxiety disorders in highly comorbid inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Ociskova, Marie; Prasko, Jan; Latalova, Klara; Kamaradova, Dana; Grambal, Ales

    2016-01-01

    Background Anxiety disorders are a group of various mental syndromes that have been related with generally poor treatment response. Several psychological factors may improve or hinder treatment effectiveness. Hope has a direct impact on the effectiveness of psychotherapy. Also, dissociation is a significant factor influencing treatment efficiency in this group of disorders. Development of self-stigma could decrease treatment effectiveness, as well as several temperamental and character traits. The aim of this study was to explore a relationship between selected psychological factors and treatment efficacy in anxiety disorders. Subjects and methods A total of 109 inpatients suffering from anxiety disorders with high frequency of comorbidity with depression and/or personality disorder were evaluated at the start of the treatment by the following scales: the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview, the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness scale, the Adult Dispositional Hope Scale, and the Temperament and Character Inventory – revised. The participants, who sought treatment for anxiety disorders, completed the following scales at the beginning and end of an inpatient-therapy program: Clinical Global Impression (objective and subjective) the Beck Depression Inventory – second edition, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, and the Dissociative Experiences Scale. The treatment consisted of 25 group sessions and five individual sessions of cognitive behavioral therapy or psychodynamic therapy in combination with pharmacotherapy. There was no randomization to the type of group-therapy program. Results Greater improvement in psychopathology, assessed by relative change in objective Clinical Global Impression score, was connected with low initial dissociation level, harm avoidance, and self-stigma, and higher amounts of hope and self-directedness. Also, individuals without a comorbid personality disorder improved considerably more than comorbid patients. According to

  5. Reinterpreting comorbidity: a model-based approach to understanding and classifying psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Robert F; Markon, Kristian E

    2006-01-01

    Comorbidity has presented a persistent puzzle for psychopathology research. We review recent literature indicating that the puzzle of comorbidity is being solved by research fitting explicit quantitative models to data on comorbidity. We present a meta-analysis of a liability spectrum model of comorbidity, in which specific mental disorders are understood as manifestations of latent liability factors that explain comorbidity by virtue of their impact on multiple disorders. Nosological, structural, etiological, and psychological aspects of this liability spectrum approach to understanding comorbidity are discussed.

  6. Late-life depression with comorbid cognitive impairment and disability: nonpharmacological interventions

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Victoria M; Kiosses, Dimitris; Ravdin, Lisa D

    2010-01-01

    Less than half of older adults with depression achieve remission with antidepressant medications, and rates of remission are even poorer for those with comorbid conditions. Psychosocial interventions have been effective in treating geriatric depression, either alone or better yet, in combination with antidepressant medications. Traditional strategies for nonpharmacological treatment of late-life depression do not specifically address the co-occurring cognitive impairment and disability that is prevalent in this population. Newer therapies are recognizing the need to simultaneously direct treatment efforts in late-life depression towards the triad of depressive symptoms, cognitive dysfunction, and functional disability that is so often found in geriatric depression, and this comprehensive approach holds promise for improved treatment outcomes. PMID:21228897

  7. Psychiatric Comorbidity among Children with Gender Identity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallien, Madeleine S.C.; Swaab, Hanna; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence and type of comorbidity in children with gender identity disorder (GID). Method: The Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children--Parent Version was used to assess psychopathology according to the DSM in two groups of children. The first group consisted of 120 Dutch children (age range 4-11 years) who were…

  8. [Association between smoking and co-morbid psychiatric disorders].

    PubMed

    Bidzan, Leszek

    2009-01-01

    Although it is well-established that there is an association between smoking and co-morbid psychiatric disorders, several issues remain unclear because most studies do not use standardized diagnostic instruments to assess psychiatric disorders and smoking. Recently three candidate genes have been reported to be associated with both cigarette smoking and various psychiatric disorders. PMID:21033415

  9. Comorbidity of Schizophrenia and Substance Abuse: Implications for Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueser, Kim T.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Reviews substance abuse disorders in schizophrenia patients, including prevalence of comorbid disorders, assessment, hypothesized mechanisms underlying abuse, and clinical effects of abuse on course of illness and cognitive functioning. Outlines principles of treatment for dual-diagnosis schizophrenia patients, noting limitations of existing…

  10. Heterogeneity in ADHD: Neuropsychological Pathways, Comorbidity and Symptom Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahlstedt, Cecilia; Thorell, Lisa B.; Bohlin, Gunilla

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate different neuropsychological impairments and comorbid behavioral problems in relation to symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), studying the independent effects of different functions as well as specific relations to symptoms of hyperactivity/impulsivity and inattention. A…

  11. Autism in Angelman Syndrome: An Exploration of Comorbidity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trillingsgaard, Anegen; Ostergaard, John R.

    2004-01-01

    The aim was to explore the comorbidity between Angelman syndrome and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Identification of autism in children with Angelman syndrome presents a diagnostic challenge. In the present study, 16 children with Angelman syndrome, all with a 15q11-13 deletion, were examined for ASDs. Thirteen children with Angelman syndrome…

  12. Comorbidities in preschool children at family risk of dyslexia

    PubMed Central

    Gooch, Debbie; Hulme, Charles; Nash, Hannah M; Snowling, Margaret J

    2015-01-01

    Background Comorbidity among developmental disorders such as dyslexia, language impairment, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and developmental coordination disorder is common. This study explores comorbid weaknesses in preschool children at family risk of dyslexia with and without language impairment and considers the role that comorbidity plays in determining children’s outcomes. Method The preschool attention, executive function and motor skills of 112 children at family risk for dyslexia, 29 of whom also met criteria for language impairment, were assessed at ages 3 ½ and 4 ½. The performance of these children was compared to the performance of children with language impairment and typically developing controls. Results Weaknesses in attention, executive function and motor skills were associated with language impairment rather than family risk status. Individual differences in language and executive function are strongly related in the preschool period and preschool motor skills predicted unique variance (4%) in early reading skills over and above children’s language ability. Conclusion Comorbidity between developmental disorders can be observed in the preschool years: children with language impairment have significant and persistent weaknesses in motor skills and executive function compared to those without language impairment. Children’s early language and motor skills are predictors of children’s later reading skills. PMID:24117483

  13. Frequency, Comorbidity, and Psychosocial Impairment of Depressive Disorders in Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essau, Cecilia A.; Conradt, Judith; Petermann, Franz

    2000-01-01

    Estimated the frequency, comorbidity, and psychosocial impairment of depressive disorders from survey of 1,035 German 12- to 17-year-olds. Found that 17.9 percent met the lifetime criteria for depressive disorders, according to DSM-IV criteria; criteria were higher in females than in males. Rates for all disorders increased with age, with…

  14. The Temporal Sequencing of Problem Gambling and Comorbid Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdsworth, Louise; Haw, John; Hing, Nerilee

    2012-01-01

    Two qualitative studies were undertaken to identify the prevalent comorbid mental disorders in treatment seeking problem gamblers and to also identify the temporal sequencing of the disorders. A forum with problem gambling counsellors and interviews with 24 mental health experts were undertaken. There was general agreement that the most commonly…

  15. Clinical features, comorbidity, and cognitive impairment in elderly bipolar patients

    PubMed Central

    Rise, Ida Vikan; Haro, Josep Maria; Gjervan, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Data specific to late-life bipolar disorder (BD) are limited. Current research is sparse and present guidelines are not adapted to this group of patients. Objectives We present a literature review on clinical characteristics, comorbidities, and cognitive impairment in patients with late-life BD. This review discusses common comorbidities that affect BD elders and how aging might affect cognition and treatment. Methods Eligible studies were identified in MedLine by the Medical Subject Headings terms “bipolar disorder” and “aged”. We only included original research reports published in English between 2012 and 2015. Results From 414 articles extracted, 16 studies were included in the review. Cardiovascular and respiratory conditions, type II diabetes, and endocrinological abnormalities were observed as highly prevalent. BD is associated with a high suicide risk. Bipolar elderly had an increased risk of dementia and performed worse on cognitive screening tests compared to age-matched controls across different levels of cognition. Despite high rates of medical comorbidity among bipolar elderly, a systematic under-recognition and undertreatment of cardiovascular disease have been suggested. Conclusion There was a high burden of physical comorbidities and cognitive impairment in late-life BD. Bipolar elderly might be under-recorded and undertreated in primary medical care, indicating that this group needs an adapted clinical assessment and specific clinical guidelines need to be established. PMID:27274256

  16. Rhythm and blues: animal models of epilepsy and depression comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Epps, S. Alisha; Weinshenker, David

    2014-01-01

    Clinical evidence shows a strong, bidirectional comorbidity between depression and epilepsy that is associated with decreased quality of life and responsivity to pharmacotherapies. At present, the neurobiological underpinnings of this comorbidity remain hazy. To complicate matters, anticonvulsant drugs can cause mood disturbances, while antidepressant drugs can lower seizure threshold, making it difficult to treat patients suffering from both depression and epilepsy. Animal models have been created to untangle the mechanisms behind the relationship between these disorders and to serve as screening tools for new therapies targeted to treat both simultaneously. These animal models are based on chemical interventions (e.g. pentylenetetrazol, kainic acid, pilocarpine), electrical stimulations (e.g. kindling, electroshock), and genetic/selective breeding paradigms (e.g. Genetically Epilepsy-Prone Rats (GEPRs), Genetic Absence Epilepsy Rat from Strasbourg (GAERS), WAG/Rij rats, Swim Lo-Active rats (SwLo)). Studies on these animal models point to some potential mechanisms that could explain epilepsy and depression comorbidity, such as various components of the dopaminergic, noradrenergic, serotonergic, and GABAergic systems, as well as key brain regions, like the amygdala and hippocampus. These models have also been used to screen possible therapies. The purpose of the present review is to highlight the importance of animal models in research on comorbid epilepsy and depression and to explore the contributions of these models to our understanding of the mechanisms and potential treatments for these disorders. PMID:22940575

  17. Comorbidity and Phenomenology of Bipolar Disorder in Children with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serrano, Eduardo; Ezpeleta, Lourdes; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the comorbidity of bipolar disorder (BPD) in children with ADHD and to study the psychopathological profile of ADHD children with and without mania. Method: A total of 100 children with ADHD were assessed with a semistructured diagnostic interview and questionnaires of mania, ADHD, and general psychopathology. Results: 8% of…

  18. Cardiometabolic comorbidities and the approach to patients with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Gisondi, P; Girolomoni, G

    2009-12-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory, immune-mediated skin disease, which may cause significant deterioration in the quality of life. Recent evidence indicates that psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis are frequently associated with cardiometabolic diseases including myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Although the causal relationship between cardiometabolic comorbidities and psoriasis has not yet been completely proven, it appears that obesity is a relevant risk factor for the development of psoriasis and metabolic syndrome. In addition, moderate to severe psoriasis itself is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and the metabolic syndrome. Some common genetic traits as well as inflammatory mechanisms may underlie the development of psoriasis and cardiometabolic comorbidities. The presence of comorbidities has important implications in the global approach to patients with psoriasis. Traditional systemic anti-psoriatic agents could negatively affect cardiometabolic comorbidities, and may have important interactions with drugs commonly used by psoriasis patients. In contrast, the recent findings that the risk of myocardial infarction is markedly reduced in rheumatoid arthritis patients who respond to anti-TNF-alpha therapy compared with non-responders supports the hypothesis that the anti-inflammatory effect of TNF-alpha blockers might potentially reduce the cardiovascular risk also in psoriasis patients. Finally, patients with moderate to severe psoriasis should be treated promptly and effectively, should also be encouraged to drastically correct their modifiable cardiovascular risk factors, in particular obesity and smoking habit. PMID:20096157

  19. Rationale for hospital-based rehabilitation in obesity with comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Capodaglio, P; Lafortuna, C; Petroni, M L; Salvadori, A; Gondoni, L; Castelnuovo, G; Brunani, A

    2013-06-01

    Severely obese patients affected by two or more chronic conditions which could mutually influence their outcome and disability can be defined as "complex" patients. The presence of multiple comorbidities often represents an obstacle for being admitted to clinical settings for the treatment of metabolic diseases. On the other hand, clinical Units with optimal standards for the treatment of pathological conditions in normal-weight patients are often structurally and technologically inadequate for the care of patients with extreme obesity. The aims of this review paper were to review the intrinsic (anthropometrics, body composition) and extrinsic (comorbidities) determinants of disability in obese patients and to provide an up-to-date definition of hospital-based multidisciplinary rehabilitation programs for severely obese patients with comorbidities. Rehabilitation of such patients require a here-and-now multidimensional, comprehensive approach, where the intensity of rehabilitative treatments depends on the disability level and severity of comorbidities and consists of the simultaneous provision of physiotherapy, diet and nutritional support, psychological counselling, adapted physical activity, specific nursing in hospitals with appropriate organizational and structural competences.

  20. Spreading of diseases through comorbidity networks across life and gender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmiel, Anna; Klimek, Peter; Thurner, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    The state of health of patients is typically not characterized by a single disease alone but by multiple (comorbid) medical conditions. These comorbidities may depend strongly on age and gender. We propose a specific phenomenological comorbidity network of human diseases that is based on medical claims data of the entire population of Austria. The network is constructed from a two-layer multiplex network, where in one layer the links represent the conditional probability for a comorbidity, and in the other the links contain the respective statistical significance. We show that the network undergoes dramatic structural changes across the lifetime of patients. Disease networks for children consist of a single, strongly interconnected cluster. During adolescence and adulthood further disease clusters emerge that are related to specific classes of diseases, such as circulatory, mental, or genitourinary disorders. For people over 65 these clusters start to merge, and highly connected hubs dominate the network. These hubs are related to hypertension, chronic ischemic heart diseases, and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases. We introduce a simple diffusion model to understand the spreading of diseases on the disease network at the population level. For the first time we are able to show that patients predominantly develop diseases that are in close network proximity to disorders that they already suffer. The model explains more than 85% of the variance of all disease incidents in the population. The presented methodology could be of importance for anticipating age-dependent disease profiles for entire populations, and for design and validation of prevention strategies.

  1. Comorbidity of Auditory Processing, Language, and Reading Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Mridula; Purdy, Suzanne C.; Kelly, Andrea S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The authors assessed comorbidity of auditory processing disorder (APD), language impairment (LI), and reading disorder (RD) in school-age children. Method: Children (N = 68) with suspected APD and nonverbal IQ standard scores of 80 or more were assessed using auditory, language, reading, attention, and memory measures. Auditory processing…

  2. Rhythm and blues: animal models of epilepsy and depression comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Epps, S Alisha; Weinshenker, David

    2013-01-15

    Clinical evidence shows a strong, bidirectional comorbidity between depression and epilepsy that is associated with decreased quality of life and responsivity to pharmacotherapies. At present, the neurobiological underpinnings of this comorbidity remain hazy. To complicate matters, anticonvulsant drugs can cause mood disturbances, while antidepressant drugs can lower seizure threshold, making it difficult to treat patients suffering from both depression and epilepsy. Animal models have been created to untangle the mechanisms behind the relationship between these disorders and to serve as screening tools for new therapies targeted to treat both simultaneously. These animal models are based on chemical interventions (e.g. pentylenetetrazol, kainic acid, pilocarpine), electrical stimulations (e.g. kindling, electroshock), and genetic/selective breeding paradigms (e.g. genetically epilepsy-prone rats (GEPRs), genetic absence epilepsy rat from Strasbourg (GAERS), WAG/Rij rats, swim lo-active rats (SwLo)). Studies on these animal models point to some potential mechanisms that could explain epilepsy and depression comorbidity, such as various components of the dopaminergic, noradrenergic, serotonergic, and GABAergic systems, as well as key brain regions, like the amygdala and hippocampus. These models have also been used to screen possible therapies. The purpose of the present review is to highlight the importance of animal models in research on comorbid epilepsy and depression and to explore the contributions of these models to our understanding of the mechanisms and potential treatments for these disorders.

  3. Comorbid Psychiatric Diagnoses in Preschoolers with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayashida, Kristen; Anderson, Bryan; Paparella, Tanya; Freeman, Stephanny F. N.; Forness, Steven R.

    2010-01-01

    Although comorbid or co-occurring psychiatric diagnoses such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, anxiety disorders, depression, and oppositional defiant or conduct disorders have been well studied in children or adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), very little research is available on preschool samples. The current study…

  4. Comorbidity in "DSM" Childhood Mental Disorders: A Functional Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cipani, Ennio

    2014-01-01

    In this article, I address the issue of comorbidity and its prevalence in the prior "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" ("DSM") classification systems. The focus on the topography or form of presenting problems as the venue for determining mental disorders is scrutinized as the possible cause. Addressing the…

  5. Psychiatric Comorbidity in Children with New Onset Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jana E.; Watson, Ryann; Sheth, Raj; Caplan, Rochelle; Koehn, Monica; Seidenberg, Michael; Hermann, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the distribution, timing, and risk factors for psychiatric comorbidity in children with recent onset epilepsy. Children aged 8 to 18 years with recent onset epilepsy (less than 1 year in duration) of idiopathic etiology (n=53) and a healthy comparison group (n=50) underwent a structured psychiatric…

  6. The effect of comorbidities on COPD assessment: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Weinreich, Ulla Møller; Thomsen, Lars Pilegaard; Bielaska, Barbara; Jensen, Vania Helbo; Vuust, Morten; Rees, Stephen Edward

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) frequently suffer from comorbidities. COPD severity may be evaluated by the Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) combined risk assessment score (GOLD score). Spirometry, body plethysmography, diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO), and high-resolution computed tomography (HR-CT) measure lung function and elucidate pulmonary pathology. This study assesses associations between GOLD score and measurements of lung function in COPD patients with and without (≤1) comorbidities. It evaluates whether the presence of comorbidities influences evaluation by GOLD score of COPD severity, and questions whether GOLD score describes morbidity rather than COPD severity. Methods In this prospective study, 106 patients with stable COPD were included. Patients treated for lung cancer were excluded. Demographics, oxygen saturation (SpO2), modified Medical Research Council Dyspnea Scale, COPD exacerbations, and comorbidities were recorded. Body plethysmography and DLCO were measured, and HR-CT performed and evaluated for emphysema and airways disease. COPD severity was stratified by the GOLD score. Correlation analyses: 1) GOLD score, 2) emphysema grade, and 3) airways disease and lung function parameters, described by: forced expiratory volume in the first second in percent of expected value (FEV1%), inspiratory capacity (IC%), total lung volume (TLC%), IC/TLC, and SpO2. Correlation analyses between subgroups and hierarchical cluster analysis were performed. Results Significant associations were found between GOLD score and both emphysema grade (correlation coefficients [cc]: −0.2, P=0.03) and lung function parameters (cc: −0.5 to −0.7, P-values all <0.001) weakened in patients with >1 comorbidity (cc: −0.4 to −0.5, P-values all 0.001). Significant differences between subgroups were found in GOLD score and both FEV1% (cc: −0.2, P=0.02) and IC/TLC (cc: −0

  7. Prevalence, correlates, psychiatric comorbidities, and suicidality in a community population with problematic Internet use.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Soo; Chang, Sung Man; Park, Jee Eun; Seong, Su Jeong; Won, Seung Hee; Cho, Maeng Je

    2016-10-30

    We examined the prevalence, correlates, and psychiatric comorbidities of community-dwelling subjects with problematic Internet use (PIU). In an epidemiological survey of mental disorders among Korean adults conducted in 2006, 6510 subjects (aged 18-64 years) completed the Korean version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview for DSM-IV psychiatric disorders; Diagnostic Interview Schedule exploring pathological gambling; Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale-Version 1.1 Screener; questionnaire for sleep disturbances; and questionnaire for suicidal ideations, plans, and attempts. Young's Internet Addiction Test was administered to 3212 individuals who had used the Internet within one month before the interviews in order to identify problematic Internet users (cutoff >39). The prevalence of PIU was 9.3% in the general population of South Korea. Being male, younger, never married, or unemployed were all associated with increased risks of PIU. Significant positive associations were observed between PIU and nicotine use disorders, alcohol use disorders, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, somatoform disorders, pathological gambling, adult type ADHD symptoms, sleep disturbances, suicide ideas and suicide plans compare to subjects without PIU, after controlling for socio-demographic variables. These findings suggest that careful evaluation and management of such psychiatric disorders is needed for individuals with PIU. PMID:27500456

  8. Prevalence, correlates, psychiatric comorbidities, and suicidality in a community population with problematic Internet use.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Soo; Chang, Sung Man; Park, Jee Eun; Seong, Su Jeong; Won, Seung Hee; Cho, Maeng Je

    2016-10-30

    We examined the prevalence, correlates, and psychiatric comorbidities of community-dwelling subjects with problematic Internet use (PIU). In an epidemiological survey of mental disorders among Korean adults conducted in 2006, 6510 subjects (aged 18-64 years) completed the Korean version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview for DSM-IV psychiatric disorders; Diagnostic Interview Schedule exploring pathological gambling; Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale-Version 1.1 Screener; questionnaire for sleep disturbances; and questionnaire for suicidal ideations, plans, and attempts. Young's Internet Addiction Test was administered to 3212 individuals who had used the Internet within one month before the interviews in order to identify problematic Internet users (cutoff >39). The prevalence of PIU was 9.3% in the general population of South Korea. Being male, younger, never married, or unemployed were all associated with increased risks of PIU. Significant positive associations were observed between PIU and nicotine use disorders, alcohol use disorders, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, somatoform disorders, pathological gambling, adult type ADHD symptoms, sleep disturbances, suicide ideas and suicide plans compare to subjects without PIU, after controlling for socio-demographic variables. These findings suggest that careful evaluation and management of such psychiatric disorders is needed for individuals with PIU.

  9. Comorbidities, Social Impact, and Quality of Life in Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Eapen, Valsamma; Cavanna, Andrea E.; Robertson, Mary M.

    2016-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is more than having motor and vocal tics, and this review will examine the varied comorbidities as well as the social impact and quality of life (QoL) in individuals with TS. The relationship between any individual and his/her environment is complex, and this is further exaggerated in the case of a person with TS. For example, tics may play a significant role in shaping the person’s experiences, perceptions, and interactions with the environment. Furthermore, associated clinical features, comorbidities, and coexisting psychopathologies may compound or alter this relationship. In this regard, the common comorbidities include attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and disruptive behaviors, obsessive compulsive disorder, and autism spectrum disorder, and coexistent problems include anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem, which can all lead to poorer psychosocial functioning and QoL. Thus, the symptoms of TS and the associated comorbid conditions may interact to result in a vicious cycle or a downward spiraling of negative experiences and poor QoL. The stigma and social maladjustment in TS and the social exclusion, bullying, and discrimination are considered to be caused in large part by misperceptions of the disorder by teachers, peers, and the wider community. Improved community and professional awareness about TS and related comorbidities and other psychopathologies as well as the provision of multidisciplinary services to meet the complex needs of this clinical population are critical. Future research to inform the risk and resilience factors for successful long-term outcomes is also warranted. PMID:27375503

  10. Panic disorder and migraine: comorbidity, mechanisms, and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Smitherman, Todd A; Kolivas, Elizabeth D; Bailey, Jennifer R

    2013-01-01

    A growing body of literature suggests that comorbid anxiety disorders are more common and more prognostically relevant among migraine sufferers than comorbid depression. Panic disorder (PD) appears to be more strongly associated with migraine than most other anxiety disorders. PD and migraine are both chronic diseases with episodic manifestations, involving significant functional impairment and shared symptoms during attacks, interictal anxiety concerning future attacks, and an absence of identifiable secondary pathology. A meta-analysis of high-quality epidemiologic study data from 1990 to 2012 indicates that the odds of PD are 3.76 times greater among individuals with migraine than those without. This association remains significant even after controlling for demographic variables and comorbid depression. Other less-rigorous community and clinical studies confirm these findings. The highest rates of PD are found among migraine with aura patients and those presenting to specialty clinics. Presence of PD is associated with greater negative impact of migraine, including more frequent attacks, increased disability, and risk for chronification and medication overuse. The mechanisms underlying this common comorbidity are poorly understood, but both pathophysiological (eg, serotonergic dysfunction, hormonal influences, dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis) and psychological (eg, interoceptive conditioning, fear of pain, anxiety sensitivity, avoidance behavior) factors are implicated. Means of assessing comorbid PD among treatment-seeking migraineurs are reviewed, including verbal screening for core PD symptoms, ruling out medical conditions with panic-like features, and administering validated self-report measures. Finally, evidence-based strategies for both pharmacologic and behavioral management are outlined. The first-line migraine prophylactics are not indicated for PD, and the selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors used to treat PD are not

  11. Effect of comorbidity on mortality in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Lawrence; Marriott, James; Cossoy, Michael; Blanchard, James; Leung, Stella; Yu, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to compare survival in the multiple sclerosis (MS) population with a matched cohort from the general population, and to evaluate the association of comorbidity with survival in both populations. Methods: Using population-based administrative data, we identified 5,797 persons with MS and 28,807 controls matched on sex, year of birth, and region. We estimated annual mortality rates. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we evaluated the association between comorbidity status and mortality, stratifying by birth cohort, and adjusting for sex, socioeconomic status, and region. We compared causes of death between populations. Results: Median survival from birth in the MS population was 75.9 years vs 83.4 years in the matched population. MS was associated with a 2-fold increased risk of death (adjusted hazard ratio 2.40; 95% confidence interval: 2.24–2.58). Several comorbidities were associated with increased hazard of death in both populations, including diabetes, ischemic heart disease, depression, anxiety, and chronic lung disease. The magnitude of the associations of mortality with chronic lung disease, diabetes, hypertension, and ischemic heart disease was lower in the MS population than the matched population. The most common causes of death in the MS population were diseases of the nervous system and diseases of the circulatory system. Mortality rates due to infectious diseases and diseases of the respiratory system were higher in the MS population. Conclusion: In the MS population, survival remained shorter than expected. Within the MS population, comorbidity was associated with increased mortality risk. However, comorbidity did not preferentially increase mortality risk in the MS population as compared with controls. PMID:26019190

  12. Comorbidity negatively influences prognosis in patients with extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Guerra-Vales, Juan-Manuel; Colina-Ruizdelgado, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To study the outcome and prognostic factors in a series of patients with extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and determine the impact of comorbidity on survival. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 68 patients with extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (perihilar, n = 37; distal, n = 31) seen at a single tertiary-care institution during the period 1999-2003 was performed. Data on presentation, management, and outcome were assessed by chart review. Pathologic confirmation was obtained in 37 cases (54.4%). Comorbidity was evaluated by using the Charlson comorbidity index (CCI). RESULTS: Mean age at diagnosis was 73.4 ± 11.5 years. Jaundice was the most common symptom presented (86.8%). Median CCI score was 1 (range, 0 to 4). Nineteen patients (27.9%) underwent tumor resection. Palliative biliary drainage was performed in 39 patients (57.4%), and 6 patients (8.8%) received only best supportive care. Tumor-free margin status (R0) was achieved in 15 cases (78.9% of resection group). Baseline serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) level was revealed to be an independent predictor of surgical treatment (P = 0.026). Overall median survival was 3.1 ± 0.9 mo, with 1- and 2-year survival rates of 21% and 7%, respectively. In the univariate analysis, tumor resection, CCI score, and serum CA 19-9 levels correlated significantly with outcome. In the multivariate analysis, only resection (HR 0.10; 95% CI, 0.02-0.51, P = 0.005) and a CCI score ≥ 2 (HR 3.36; 95% CI, 1.0-10.9, P = 0.045) were found to independently predict survival. CONCLUSION: Tumor resection and comorbidity emerged as significant prognostic variables in extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Comorbidity evaluation instruments should be applied in the clinical management of such patients. PMID:19908335

  13. Incidence of psoriasis and association with comorbidities in Italy: a 5-year observational study from a national primary care database.

    PubMed

    Vena, Gino A; Altomare, Gianfranco; Ayala, Fabio; Berardesca, Enzo; Calzavara-Pinton, Piergiacomo; Chimenti, Sergio; Giannetti, Alberto; Girolomoni, Giampiero; Lotti, Torello; Martini, Patrizia; Mazzaglia, Giampiero; Peserico, Andrea; Puglisi Guerra, Antonio; Sini, Giovanna; Cassano, Nicoletta; Cricelli, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    An observational study was conducted to estimate the incidence of psoriasis in Italy, as well as the utilization of healthcare resources and the association with selected comorbidities in psoriasis patients. The data source was the Health Search/Thales Database, containing computer-based patient records from over 900 primary care physicians (PCPs) throughout Italy. The study cohort comprised all adults receiving a first-ever diagnosis of psoriasis during the years 2001-2005. From a total sample of 511,532 individuals, the incidence of psoriasis was 2.30-3.21 cases per 1,000 person-years. Psoriatic arthritis was present in 8% of psoriasis patients. The comparison with matched controls showed that psoriasis patients were more likely to have comorbidities (e.g., chronic bronchitis, chronic ischemic heart disease, obesity and diabetes mellitus) and to undergo PCP visits and hospitalizations, and to refer for specialist visits. The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs appeared to be significantly more prevalent in patients as compared to controls. Topical therapy with corticosteroids and non-steroidal preparations accounted for 45.3% and 47.2% of all cases, respectively. Only a minority of cases used systemic immunosuppressive drugs or acitretin. The incidence rate of psoriasis in our study was particularly high and might reflect an overestimation by PCPs. Our results show the association between psoriasis and multiple comorbidities.

  14. Survey on the impact of comorbid allergic rhinitis in patients with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Valovirta, Erkka; Pawankar, Ruby

    2006-01-01

    Background Allergic rhinitis (AR) and asthma are inflammatory conditions of the airways that often occur concomitantly. This global survey was undertaken to understand patient perspectives regarding symptoms, treatments, and the impact on their well-being of comorbid AR and asthma. Methods Survey participants were adults with asthma (n = 813) and parents of children with asthma (n = 806) from four countries each in the Asia-Pacific region and Europe. Patients included in the survey also had self-reported, concomitant AR symptoms. Patients and parents were recruited by telephone interview or by direct interview. Results Most patients (73%) had pre-existing symptoms of AR when their asthma was first diagnosed. Shortness of breath (21%) was the most troublesome symptom for adults, and wheezing (17%) and coughing (17%) the most troublesome for children. Patients used different medications for treating asthma (most commonly short-acting β-agonists and inhaled corticosteroids) and for treating AR (most commonly oral antihistamines). The concomitant presence of AR and asthma disrupted the ability to get a good night's sleep (79%), to participate in leisure and sports activities (75%), to concentrate at work or school (69% of adults, 73% of children), and to enjoy social activities (57% of adults, 51% of children). Most patients (79%) reported worsening asthma symptoms when AR symptoms flared up. Many (56%) avoided the outdoors during the allergy season because of worsening asthma symptoms. Many (60%) indicated difficulty in effectively treating both conditions, and 72% were concerned about using excessive medication. In general, respondents from the Asia-Pacific region reported more disruption of activities caused by symptoms and more concerns and difficulties with medications than did those from Europe. Differences between the two regions in medication use included more common use of inhaled corticosteroids in Europe and more common use of Chinese herbal remedies in the

  15. When Comorbidity, Aging, and Complexity of Primary Care Meet: Development and Validation of the Geriatric CompleXity of Care Index

    PubMed Central

    Min, Lillian; Wenger, Neil; Walling, Anne M.; Blaum, Caroline; Cigolle, Christine; Ganz, David A.; Reuben, David; Shekelle, Paul; Roth, Carol; Kerr, Eve A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To develop and validate the Geriatric CompleXity of Care Index (GXI), a comorbidity index of medical, geriatric, and psychosocial conditions that addresses disease severity and intensity of ambulatory care for older adults with chronic conditions. Design Development phase: variable selection and rating by clinician panel. Validation phase: medical record review and secondary data analysis. Setting Assessing the Care of Vulnerable Elders-2 study. Participants Six hundred forty-four older (≥75) individuals receiving ambulatory care. Measures Development: 32 conditions categorized according to severity, resulting in 117 GXI variables. A panel of clinicians rated each GXI variable with respect to the added difficulty of providing primary care for an individual with that condition. Validation: Modified versions of previously validated comorbidity measures (simple count, Charlson, Medicare Hierarchical Condition Category), longitudinal clinical outcomes (functional decline, survival), intensity of ambulatory care (primary, specialty care visits, polypharmacy, number of eligible quality indicators (NQI)) over 1 year of care. Results The most-morbid individuals (according to quintiles of GXI) had more visits (7.0 vs 3.7 primary care, 6.2 vs 2.4 specialist), polypharmacy (14.3% vs 0% had ≥14 medications), and greater NQI (33 vs 25) than the least-morbid individuals. Of the four comorbidity measures, the GXI was the strongest predictor of primary care visits, polypharmacy, and NQI (p<.001, controlling for age, sex, function-based vulnerability). Conclusion Older adults with complex care needs, as measured by the GXI, have healthcare needs above what previously employed comorbidity measures captured. Healthcare systems could use the GXI to identify the most complex elderly adults and appropriately reimburse primary providers caring for older adults with the most complex care needs for providing additional visits and coordination of care. PMID:23581912

  16. Functional Impairments in Children with ADHD: Unique Effects of Age and Comorbid Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booster, Genery D.; DuPaul, George J.; Eiraldi, Ricardo; Power, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Children with ADHD and comorbid disorders display poorer overall functioning compared with children with ADHD alone, though little research has examined the differential impact of externalizing versus internalizing comorbidities. Method: This study examined the impact of internalizing and externalizing comorbidities on the academic and…

  17. Comorbidity among Anxiety Disorders: Implications for Treatment and DSM-IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Timothy A.; Barlow, David H.

    1992-01-01

    Considers definitional, methodological, and theoretical issues of comorbidity, then reviews data on comorbidity among anxiety disorders as well as data on comorbidity of anxiety disorders with depressive, personality, and substance use disorders. Presents treatment implications with preliminary data on effects of psychosocial treatment of panic…

  18. Comorbidity of Anxiety and Conduct Problems in Children: Implications for Clinical Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Natoshia Raishevich; Ollendick, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    Given the relative lack of research on the comorbidity of anxiety disorders (ADs) and conduct problems (oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder) in youth, we examine this comorbidity from both basic and applied perspectives. First, we review the concept of comorbidity and provide a framework for understanding issues pertaining to…

  19. Adolescent substance use disorders and comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Simkin, Deborah R

    2002-04-01

    remove barriers. This technique allows youth to be less defensive and more proactive. Monti et al. [59] have demonstrated that this technique has been useful in getting youth into treatment. Primary care physicians can use instruments that will assess the possibility of both externalizing (e.g., ADHD) and internalizing (e.g., depression and anxiety) disorders. Examples of this type of instrument are the Auchenbach child behavior checklist, teacher report form, and youth self-report form, which survey symptoms for these disorders [1]. Social anxiety disorder can be detected by asking whether the prelatency child went into new situations willingly and tended to hang back or whether the child had difficulty separating from his or her parents. Other questions to ask are whether the child tended to isolate or was fearful of speaking in front of the class. Of course, any bruising or behavior that suggests exposure to adult-related sexual acts may cause concern for physical or sexual abuse and possible PTSD. However, interest in sex earlier than expected for the age of the child may also indicate the possibility of bipolar disorder. These children have many symptoms of ADHD with a high degree of irritability and may seem boastful or grandiose. They may be "daredevils" with no fear of dangerous consequences. Referral to a specialist is necessary to evaluate these children further. Because substance use at age 14 or 15 years can be predicted by academic and social behavior at ages 7 to 9 years, early detection of poor social skills and learning difficulties is essential [43]. Learning disorders can be uncovered by asking the school to do an evaluation. However, schools having economic problems may not be able to accommodate all requests. A parent may have to pay a private provider to complete this workup because insurance companies seldom pay for educational testing. Learning disorders may go undetected because many school systems opt to use a higher deviation from the full

  20. Adolescent substance use disorders and comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Simkin, Deborah R

    2002-04-01

    remove barriers. This technique allows youth to be less defensive and more proactive. Monti et al. [59] have demonstrated that this technique has been useful in getting youth into treatment. Primary care physicians can use instruments that will assess the possibility of both externalizing (e.g., ADHD) and internalizing (e.g., depression and anxiety) disorders. Examples of this type of instrument are the Auchenbach child behavior checklist, teacher report form, and youth self-report form, which survey symptoms for these disorders [1]. Social anxiety disorder can be detected by asking whether the prelatency child went into new situations willingly and tended to hang back or whether the child had difficulty separating from his or her parents. Other questions to ask are whether the child tended to isolate or was fearful of speaking in front of the class. Of course, any bruising or behavior that suggests exposure to adult-related sexual acts may cause concern for physical or sexual abuse and possible PTSD. However, interest in sex earlier than expected for the age of the child may also indicate the possibility of bipolar disorder. These children have many symptoms of ADHD with a high degree of irritability and may seem boastful or grandiose. They may be "daredevils" with no fear of dangerous consequences. Referral to a specialist is necessary to evaluate these children further. Because substance use at age 14 or 15 years can be predicted by academic and social behavior at ages 7 to 9 years, early detection of poor social skills and learning difficulties is essential [43]. Learning disorders can be uncovered by asking the school to do an evaluation. However, schools having economic problems may not be able to accommodate all requests. A parent may have to pay a private provider to complete this workup because insurance companies seldom pay for educational testing. Learning disorders may go undetected because many school systems opt to use a higher deviation from the full

  1. The Importance of Irritability as a Symptom of Major Depressive Disorder: Results from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication

    PubMed Central

    Fava, Maurizio; Hwang, Irving; Rush, A. John; Sampson, Nancy; Walters, Ellen E.; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2010-01-01

    Irritability is a diagnostic symptom of child-adolescent but not adult major depressive disorder (MDD) in both the DSM-IV and ICD-10 systems. We explore the importance of irritability for sub-typing adult DSM-IV MDD in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication (NCS-R), a national US adult household survey. The WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) was used to assess prevalence of many DSM-IV disorders in the lifetime and in the year before interview (12-month prevalence). MDD was assessed conventionally (i.e., requiring either persistent sadness or loss of interest), but with irritability included as one of the Criterion A symptoms. We also considered the possibility that irritability might be a diagnostic symptom of adult MDD (i.e., detect cases who had neither sad mood nor loss of interest). Twelve-month MDD symptom severity was assessed with the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology and role impairment with the Sheehan Disability Scale. After excluding bipolar spectrum disorders, irritability during depressive episodes was reported by roughly half of respondents with lifetime DSM-IV MDD. Irritability in the absence of either sad mood or loss of interest, in comparison, was rare. Irritability in MDD was associated with early age-of-onset, lifetime persistence, comorbidity with anxiety and impulse-control disorders, fatigue and self-reproach during episodes, and disability. Irritability was especially common in MDD among respondents in the age range 18–44 and students. Further investigation is warranted of distinct family aggregation, risk factors, and treatment response. Consideration should also be given to including irritability as a non-diagnostic symptom of adult MDD in DSM-V and ICD-11. PMID:19274052

  2. An Adolescent Boy with Comorbid Anorexia Nervosa and Hashimoto Thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Pehlivantürk Kızılkan, Melis; Kanbur, Nuray; Akgül, Sinem; Alikaşifoğlu, Ayfer

    2016-01-01

    Low triiodothyronine syndrome is a physiological adaptation encountered in anorexia nervosa (AN) and generally improves with sufficient weight gain. However, when a primary thyroid pathology accompanies AN, both the evaluation of thyroid hormone levels and the management of the co-morbid disease become more challenging. Hashimoto thyroiditis could complicate the management of AN by causing hyper- or hypothyroidism. AN could also negatively affect the treatment of Hashimoto thyroiditis by altering body weight and metabolic rate, as well as by causing drug non-compliance. We present the case of a 15-year-old boy with comorbid AN restrictive sub-type and Hashimoto thyroiditis. In this case report, we aimed to draw attention to the challenges that could be encountered in the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of patients with AN when accompanied by Hashimoto thyroiditis. PMID:26757948

  3. Strategies to deal with comorbid physical illness in psychosis.

    PubMed

    Docherty, M; Stubbs, B; Gaughran, F

    2016-06-01

    Individuals with serious mental illnesses such as psychosis still experience higher mortality rates than the general population, decades after data have linked the gap to increased rates of physical illness, delayed diagnosis, low treatment rates and worse outcomes from treatment received. The nature of the relationship between psychosis and comorbid physical illness is complex. Multiple strategies directed at different levels of disease process, health care systems and stakeholder culture are likely required to make sustained progress in reducing the mortality gap. Evidence for strategies that effectively reduce the burden of physical co-morbidity and lead to improved health outcomes are still in their infancy but growing at a reassuringly fast rate. This editorial considers the existing evidence base and makes suggestions for the development and future direction of this urgent research agenda and how this knowledge can be implemented in clinical practice. PMID:26888363

  4. Extraskeletal symptoms and comorbidities of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis.

    PubMed

    Terzi, Rabia

    2014-09-16

    Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is a non-inflammatory disease characterized by calcification and ossification of soft tissues, mainly enthesis and spinal ligaments. The clinical presentation primarily includes spinal involvement-induced pain and range of motion. Although rare, life-threatening gastrointestinal, respiratory or neurological events or severe morbidity due to bone compression on the adjacent structures may develop. There is a limited amount of data on DISH-related events in the literature. In recent years, comorbid metabolic disorders are of great interest in patients with DISH. The early diagnosis of these conditions as well as rare entities allows an effective multidisciplinary approach for the treatment of DISH. In this article, we review extraskeletal symptoms and associated comorbidities in patients with DISH. PMID:25232544

  5. An Adolescent Boy with Comorbid Anorexia Nervosa and Hashimoto Thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Pehlivantürk Kızılkan, Melis; Kanbur, Nuray; Akgül, Sinem; Alikaşifoğlu, Ayfer

    2016-03-01

    Low triiodothyronine syndrome is a physiological adaptation encountered in anorexia nervosa (AN) and generally improves with sufficient weight gain. However, when a primary thyroid pathology accompanies AN, both the evaluation of thyroid hormone levels and the management of the co-morbid disease become more challenging. Hashimoto thyroiditis could complicate the management of AN by causing hyper- or hypothyroidism. AN could also negatively affect the treatment of Hashimoto thyroiditis by altering body weight and metabolic rate, as well as by causing drug non-compliance. We present the case of a 15-year-old boy with comorbid AN restrictive sub-type and Hashimoto thyroiditis. In this case report, we aimed to draw attention to the challenges that could be encountered in the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of patients with AN when accompanied by Hashimoto thyroiditis.

  6. Epilepsy and art: Windows into complexity and comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Schachter, Steven C

    2016-04-01

    The views of artists with epilepsy as expressed through their art provide unique opportunities to gain understanding of the experiences of living with epilepsy and related comorbidities. This paper provides a glimpse into art collected from an international group of artists with epilepsy, focusing on ictal and postictal experiences, psychiatric comorbidities, and social aspects of epilepsy. The art serves to enhance understanding among clinicians and neuroscientists of what it means to have epilepsy as well as to reduce misunderstanding and stigma among the public. It may also inspire neuroscientists to further explore the underlying neurological basis to the rich tapestries of ictal, postictal, and interictal experiences of persons with epilepsy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Epilepsy, Art, and Creativity".

  7. Management of Colorectal Cancer in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Joleen M

    2016-02-01

    Treatment for colorectal cancer should not be based on age alone. Pooled analyses from clinical trials show that fit older adults are able to tolerate treatment well with similar efficacy as younger adults. When an older adult is considered for treatment, the clinical encounter must evaluate for deficits in physical and cognitive function, and assess comorbidities, medications, and the degree of social support, all which have may affect tolerance of treatment. Based on the degree of fitness of the patient, multiple alternatives to aggressive treatment regimens and strategies exist to minimize toxicity and preserve quality of life during treatment.

  8. Psychiatric comorbidity in adolescent electronic and conventional cigarette use.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Adam M; Strong, David R; Sussman, Steve; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; Unger, Jennifer B; Barrington-Trimis, Jessica L; Audrain-McGovern, Janet

    2016-02-01

    The popularity of electronic (e-) cigarettes has greatly increased recently, particularly in adolescents. However, the extent of psychiatric comorbidity with adolescent e-cigarette use and dual use of conventional (combustible) and e-cigarettes is unknown. This study characterized psychiatric comorbidity in adolescent conventional and e-cigarette use. Ninth grade students attending high schools in Los Angeles, CA (M age = 14) completed self-report measures of conventional/e-cigarette use, emotional disorders, substance use/problems, and transdiagnostic psychiatric phenotypes consistent with the NIMH-Research Domain Criteria Initiative. Outcomes were compared by lifetime use of: (1) neither conventional nor e-cigarettes (non-use; N = 2557, 77.3%); (2) e-cigarettes only (N = 412, 12.4%); (3) conventional cigarettes only (N = 152, 4.6%); and (4) conventional and e-cigarettes (dual use; N = 189, 5.6%). In comparison to adolescents who used conventional cigarettes only, e-cigarette only users reported lower levels of internalizing syndromes (depression, generalized anxiety, panic, social phobia, and obsessive-compulsive disorder) and transdiagnostic phenotypes (i.e., distress intolerance, anxiety sensitivity, rash action during negative affect). Depression, panic disorder, and anhedonia were higher in e-cigarette only vs. non-users. For several externalizing outcomes (mania, rash action during positive affect, alcohol drug use/abuse) and anhedonia, an ordered pattern was observed, whereby comorbidity was lowest in non-users, moderate in single product users (conventional or e-cigarette), and highest in dual users. These findings: (1) raise question of whether emotionally-healthier ('lower-risk') adolescents who are not interested in conventional cigarettes are being attracted to e-cigarettes; (2) indicate that research, intervention, and policy dedicated to adolescent tobacco-psychiatric comorbidity should distinguish conventional cigarette, e-cigarette, and dual use

  9. Application of Cognitive Behavioral Therapies for Comorbid Insomnia and Depression.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Patricia

    2015-03-01

    This article provides an overview of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for insomnia and depression. Included is a discussion of how CBT for insomnia affects depression symptoms and how CBT for depression affects insomnia symptoms. The extant literature is reviewed on ways that depression/insomnia comorbidity moderates CBT response. The article concludes with an introduction to cognitive behavioral social rhythm therapy, a group therapy that integrates tenets of CBT for both disorders.

  10. Psychiatric comorbidity in adolescent electronic and conventional cigarette use.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Adam M; Strong, David R; Sussman, Steve; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; Unger, Jennifer B; Barrington-Trimis, Jessica L; Audrain-McGovern, Janet

    2016-02-01

    The popularity of electronic (e-) cigarettes has greatly increased recently, particularly in adolescents. However, the extent of psychiatric comorbidity with adolescent e-cigarette use and dual use of conventional (combustible) and e-cigarettes is unknown. This study characterized psychiatric comorbidity in adolescent conventional and e-cigarette use. Ninth grade students attending high schools in Los Angeles, CA (M age = 14) completed self-report measures of conventional/e-cigarette use, emotional disorders, substance use/problems, and transdiagnostic psychiatric phenotypes consistent with the NIMH-Research Domain Criteria Initiative. Outcomes were compared by lifetime use of: (1) neither conventional nor e-cigarettes (non-use; N = 2557, 77.3%); (2) e-cigarettes only (N = 412, 12.4%); (3) conventional cigarettes only (N = 152, 4.6%); and (4) conventional and e-cigarettes (dual use; N = 189, 5.6%). In comparison to adolescents who used conventional cigarettes only, e-cigarette only users reported lower levels of internalizing syndromes (depression, generalized anxiety, panic, social phobia, and obsessive-compulsive disorder) and transdiagnostic phenotypes (i.e., distress intolerance, anxiety sensitivity, rash action during negative affect). Depression, panic disorder, and anhedonia were higher in e-cigarette only vs. non-users. For several externalizing outcomes (mania, rash action during positive affect, alcohol drug use/abuse) and anhedonia, an ordered pattern was observed, whereby comorbidity was lowest in non-users, moderate in single product users (conventional or e-cigarette), and highest in dual users. These findings: (1) raise question of whether emotionally-healthier ('lower-risk') adolescents who are not interested in conventional cigarettes are being attracted to e-cigarettes; (2) indicate that research, intervention, and policy dedicated to adolescent tobacco-psychiatric comorbidity should distinguish conventional cigarette, e-cigarette, and dual use.

  11. Development of a Comorbidity Index for Use in Obstetric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, Brian T.; Mhyre, Jill M.; Hernandez-Diaz, Sonia; Huybrechts, Krista F.; Fischer, Michael A.; Creanga, Andreea A.; Callaghan, William M.; Gagne, Joshua J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop and validate a maternal comorbidity index to predict severe maternal morbidity, defined as the occurrence of acute maternal end-organ injury, or mortality. Methods Data were derived from the Medicaid Analytic eXtract for the years 2000 to 2007. The primary outcome was defined as the occurrence of maternal end-organ injury or death during the delivery hospitalization through 30 days postpartum. The dataset was randomly divided into a 2/3 development cohort and a 1/3 validation cohort. Using the development cohort, a logistic regression model predicting the primary outcome was created using a stepwise selection algorithm that included 24-candidate comorbid conditions and maternal age. Each of the conditions included in the final model was assigned a weight based on its beta coefficient, and these were used to calculate a maternal comorbidity index. Results The cohort included 854,823 completed pregnancies of which 9,901 (1.2%) were complicated by the primary study outcome. The derived score included 20 maternal conditions and maternal age. For each point increase in the score, the odds ratio for the primary outcome was 1.37, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.35 to 1.39. The c-statistic for this model was 0.657, 95% CI 0.647 – 0.666. The derived score performed significantly better than available comorbidity indexes in predicting maternal morbidity and mortality. Conclusion This new maternal morbidity index provides a simple measure for summarizing the burden of maternal illness for use in the conduct of epidemiologic, health services, and comparative effectiveness research. PMID:24104771

  12. Improving cardiovascular health and metabolic comorbidities in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ogdie, Alexis; Eder, Lihi

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have suggested a link between psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and comorbidities, in particular cardiovascular disease and metabolic comorbidities such as diabetes. The co-existence of these comorbidities is likely the result of systemic inflammation. In order to improve the health of patients with PsA and provide optimal care, these comorbidities must be addressed. However, little is known about how to improve metabolic and cardiovascular health in patients with PsA. In this perspective, we describe the research needs in the area of improving cardiovascular disease and metabolic comorbidities among patients with PsA. PMID:27134682

  13. How Can the Comorbidity with ADHD Aid Understanding of Language and Speech Disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Tomblin, J. Bruce; Mueller, Kathyrn L

    2014-01-01

    This paper serves to provide a background for the topic of comorbidity than extends through this issue. Comorbidity is common within developmental disorders. It is shown that there are many possible reasons for comorbidity. Some of these can be viewed as artifacts as simple as chance occurrence or because of the way that the research participants were sampled. If these artifacts are eliminated, then comorbidity can be informative with respect to possible causes of the disorders that are comorbid. Several possible etiologic models are presented along with a general framework for considering levels of causality in developmental disorders. PMID:24817779

  14. Course of illness in comorbid bipolar disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Amerio, A; Tonna, M; Odone, A; Stubbs, B; Ghaemi, S N

    2016-04-01

    Psychiatric comorbidity is extremely common. One of the most common and difficult to manage comorbid conditions is the co-occurrence of bipolar disorder (BD) and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). We updated our recent systematic review searching the electronic databases MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO to investigate course of illness in BD-OCD patients. We identified a total of 13 relevant papers which found that the majority of comorbid OCD cases appeared to be related to mood episodes. OC symptoms in comorbid patients appeared more often during depressive episodes, and comorbid BD and OCD cycled together, with OC symptoms often remitting during manic/hypomanic episodes. PMID:27025465

  15. Course of illness in comorbid bipolar disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Amerio, A; Tonna, M; Odone, A; Stubbs, B; Ghaemi, S N

    2016-04-01

    Psychiatric comorbidity is extremely common. One of the most common and difficult to manage comorbid conditions is the co-occurrence of bipolar disorder (BD) and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). We updated our recent systematic review searching the electronic databases MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO to investigate course of illness in BD-OCD patients. We identified a total of 13 relevant papers which found that the majority of comorbid OCD cases appeared to be related to mood episodes. OC symptoms in comorbid patients appeared more often during depressive episodes, and comorbid BD and OCD cycled together, with OC symptoms often remitting during manic/hypomanic episodes.

  16. Juvenile Fibromyalgia: Different from the Adult Chronic Pain Syndrome?

    PubMed

    Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; King, Christopher; Ting, Tracy V; Arnold, Lesley M

    2016-04-01

    While a majority of research has focused on adult fibromyalgia (FM), recent evidence has provided insights into the presence and impact of FM in children and adolescents. Commonly referred as juvenile fibromyalgia (JFM), youths, particularly adolescent girls, present with persistent widespread pain and cardinal symptoms observed in adult FM. A majority of youth with JFM continue to experience symptoms into adulthood, which highlights the importance of early recognition and intervention. Some differences are observed between adult and juvenile-onset FM syndrome with regard to comorbidities (e.g., joint hypermobility is common in JFM). Psychological comorbidities are common but less severe in JFM. Compared to adult FM, approved pharmacological treatments for JFM are lacking, but non-pharmacologic approaches (e.g., cognitive-behavioral therapy and exercise) show promise. A number of conceptual issues still remain including (1) directly comparing similarities and differences in symptoms and (2) identifying shared and unique mechanisms underlying FM in adults and youths. PMID:26984803

  17. Assessment of Abilities and Comorbidities in Children With Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Gabis, Lidia V; Tsubary, Netta Misgav; Leon, Odelia; Ashkenasi, Arie; Shefer, Shahar

    2015-10-01

    This study examines major comorbidities in children with severe cerebral palsy and the feasibility of psychological tests for measuring abilities in a more impaired population. Eighty psychological evaluations of children with cerebral palsy aged 1.8 to 15.4 years (mean = 5.6) were analyzed. Major comorbid disorders were correlated with severity of motor disability. More than half of the cohort were diagnosed with severe cerebral palsy according to the Gross Motor Function Classification System. Multiple subtests were combined in order to assess the intellectual level. Normal intelligence was found in 22.5%, and 41.3% had moderate or severe intellectual impairment. Epilepsy occurred in 32.5% and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in 22.5%. Intellectual disability correlated with motor ability and with epilepsy. In a logistic regression model, epilepsy and motor ability score predicted 29.9% of IQ score variance. Intellectual impairment and epilepsy are common comorbidities. Subtests from different scales should be applied and interpreted with caution.

  18. Comorbidities and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with psoriasis*

    PubMed Central

    Baeta, Isabela Guimarães Ribeiro; Bittencourt, Flávia Vasques; Gontijo, Bernardo; Goulart, Eugênio Marcos Andrade

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease and its pathogenesis involves an interaction between genetic, environmental, and immunological factors. Recent studies have suggested that the chronic inflammatory nature of psoriasis may predispose to an association with other inflammatory diseases, especially cardiovascular diseases and metabolic disorders. OBJECTIVES To describe the demographic, clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory characteristics of a sample of psoriasis patients; to assess the prevalence of cardiovascular comorbidities in this group of patients; and to identify the cardiovascular risk profile using the Framingham risk score. METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional study involving the assessment of 190 patients. Participants underwent history and physical examination. They also completed a specific questionnaire about epidemiological data, past medical history, and comorbidities. The cardiovascular risk profile was calculated using the Framingham risk score. RESULTS Patients' mean age was 51.5 ± 14 years, and the predominant clinical presentation was plaque psoriasis (78.4%). We found an increased prevalence of systemic hypertension, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and obesity. Increased waist circumference was also found in addition to a considerable prevalence of depression, smoking, and regular alcohol intake. Patients' cardiovascular risk was high according to the Framingham risk score, and 47.2% of patients had moderate or high risk of fatal and non-fatal coronary events in 10 years. CONCLUSIONS Patients had high prevalence of cardiovascular comorbidities, and high cardiovascular risk according to the Framingham risk score. Further epidemiological studies are needed in Brazil for validation of our results. PMID:25184912

  19. Psychological Co-morbidity in Children with Specific Learning Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Manoj K.; Biswas, Haritha; Padhy, Susanta Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Children under 19 years of age constitute over 40% of India's population and information about their mental health needs is a national imperative. Children with specific learning disorders (SLDs) exhibit academic difficulties disproportionate to their intellectual capacities. Prevalence of SLD ranges from 2% to 10%. Dyslexia (developmental reading disorder) is the most common type, affecting 80% of all SLD. About 30% of learning disabled children have behavioral and emotional problems, which range from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (most common) to depression, anxiety, suicide etc., to substance abuse (least common). Co-occurrence of such problems with SLD further adds to the academic difficulty. In such instances, diagnosis is difficult and tricky; improvement in academics demands comprehensive holistic treatment approach. SLD remains a large public health problem because of under-recognition, inadequate treatment and therefore merits greater effort to understand the co-morbidities, especially in the Indian population. As the literature is scarce regarding co-morbid conditions in learning disability in Indian scenario, the present study has tried to focus on Indian population. The educational concessions (recent most) given to such children by Central Board of Secondary Education, New Delhi are referred to. The issues to be addressed by the family physicians are: Low level of awareness among families and teachers, improper dissemination of accurate information about psychological problems, available help seeking avenues, need to develop service delivery models in rural and urban areas and focus on the integration of mental health and primary care keeping such co-morbidity in mind. PMID:25810984

  20. Selective mutism: a review of etiology, comorbidities, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Wong, Priscilla

    2010-03-01

    Selective mutism is a rare and multidimensional childhood disorder that typically affects children entering school age. It is characterized by the persistent failure to speak in select social settings despite possessing the ability to speak and speak comfortably in more familiar settings. Many theories attempt to explain the etiology of selective mutism.Comorbidities and treatment. Selective mutism can present a variety of comorbidities including enuresis, encopresis, obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, premorbid speech and language abnormalities, developmental delay, and Asperger's disorders. The specific manifestations and severity of these comorbidities vary based on the individual. Given the multidimensional manifestations of selective mutism, treatment options are similarly diverse. They include individual behavioral therapy, family therapy, and psychotherapy with antidepressants and anti-anxiety medications.Future directions. While studies have helped to elucidate the phenomenology of selective mutism, limitations and gaps in knowledge still persist. In particular, the literature on selective mutism consists primarily of small sample populations and case reports. Future research aims to develop an increasingly integrated, multidimensional framework for evaluating and treating children with selective mutism.

  1. Adult Books for Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Betty

    1997-01-01

    Considers the differences between young adult and adult books and maintains that teachers must be familiar with young adults' tastes for both. Suggests that traffic between these publishing divisions is a two-way street, with young adults reading adult books and adults reading young adult books. (TB)

  2. Challenges with Diagnosing and Managing Sepsis in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Clifford, Kalin M; Dy-Boarman, Eliza A; Haase, Krystal K; Maxvill, Kristen; Pass, Steven E; Alvarez, Carlos A

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis in older adults has many challenges that affect rate of septic diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring parameters. Numerous age-related changes and comorbidities contribute to increased risk of infections in older adults, but also atypical symptomatology that delays diagnosis. Due to various pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic changes in the older adult, medications are absorbed, metabolized, and eliminated at different rates as compared to younger adults, which increases risk of adverse drug reactions due to use of drug therapy needed for sepsis management. This review provides information to aid in diagnosis and offers recommendations for monitoring and treating sepsis in the older adult population.

  3. Epidemiology and clinical impact of major comorbidities in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Miranda Caroline; Wrobel, Jeremy P

    2014-01-01

    Comorbidities are frequent in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and significantly impact on patients’ quality of life, exacerbation frequency, and survival. There is increasing evidence that certain diseases occur in greater frequency amongst patients with COPD than in the general population, and that these comorbidities significantly impact on patient outcomes. Although the mechanisms are yet to be defined, many comorbidities likely result from the chronic inflammatory state that is present in COPD. Common problems in the clinical management of COPD include recognizing new comorbidities, determining the impact of comorbidities on patient symptoms, the concurrent treatment of COPD and comorbidities, and accurate prognostication. The majority of comorbidities in COPD should be treated according to usual practice, and specific COPD management is infrequently altered by the presence of comorbidities. Unfortunately, comorbidities are often under-recognized and under-treated. This review focuses on the epidemiology of ten major comorbidities in patients with COPD. Further, we emphasize the clinical impact upon prognosis and management considerations. This review will highlight the importance of comorbidity identification and management in the practice of caring for patients with COPD. PMID:25210449

  4. Comorbid conditions are associated with healthcare utilization, medical charges and mortality of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Han, Guang-Ming; Han, Xiao-Feng

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to examine the associations between comorbid conditions and healthcare utilization, medical charges, or mortality of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Nebraska state emergency department (ED) discharge, hospital discharge, and death certificate data from 2007 to 2012 were used to study the comorbid conditions of patients with RA. RA was defined using the standard International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9-CM 714 or ICD-10-CM M05, M06, and M08). There were more comorbid conditions in patients with RA than in patients without RA. Comorbid conditions were majorly related to healthcare utilization and mortality of patients with RA. In addition to injury, fracture, sprains, and strains, symptoms of cardiovascular and digestive systems, respiratory infection, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were common comorbid conditions for ED visits. In addition to joint replacement and fracture, infections, COPD and cardiovascular comorbidities were common comorbid conditions for hospitalizations. Cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and respiratory comorbidities, dementia, malignant neoplasm, and diabetes mellitus were common comorbid conditions for deaths of patients with RA. In addition, the numbers of comorbid conditions were significantly associated with the length of hospital stay and hospital charges for patients with RA. The findings in this study indicated that comorbid conditions are associated with healthcare utilization, medical charges, and mortality of patients with RA. PMID:27106546

  5. Comorbidities and Quality of Life among Breast Cancer Survivors: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Mei R.; Axelrod, Deborah; Guth, Amber A.; Cleland, Charles M.; Ryan, Caitlin E.; Weaver, Kristen R.; Qiu, Jeanna M.; Kleinman, Robin; Scagliola, Joan; Palamar, Joseph J.; Melkus, Gail D’Eramo

    2015-01-01

    Many breast cancer survivors have coexistent chronic diseases or comorbidities at the time of their cancer diagnosis. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the association of comorbidities on breast cancer survivors’ quality of life. A prospective design was used to recruit 140 women before cancer surgery, 134 women completed the study. Comorbidities were assessed using self-report and verified by medical record review and the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) before and 12-month after cancer surgery. Quality of life was evaluated using Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36 v2). Descriptive statistics, chi-square tests, t-tests, Fisher’s exact test, and correlations were performed for data analysis. A total of 28 comorbidities were identified. Among the 134 patients, 73.8% had at least one of the comorbidities, 54.7% had 2–4, and only 7.4% had 5–8. Comorbidities did not change at 12 months after surgery. Numbers of comorbidities by patients’ self-report and weighted categorization of comorbidities by CCI had a similar negative correlation with overall quality of life scores as well as domains of general health, physical functioning, bodily pain, and vitality. Comorbidities, specifically hypertension, arthritis, and diabetes, were associated with poorer quality of life in multiple domains among breast cancer survivors. Future research should consider the combined influence of comorbidity and cancer on patients’ quality of life. PMID:26132751

  6. Associations between Pathological Gambling and Psychiatric Comorbidity among Help-Seeking Populations in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Shek, Daniel T. L.; Chan, Elda M. L.; Wong, Ryan H. Y.

    2012-01-01

    Problem gambling is complex and often comorbid with other mental health problems. Unfortunately, gambling studies on comorbid psychiatric disorders among Chinese communities are extremely limited. The objectives of this study were to (a) determine the prevalence of comorbid psychiatric disorders among treatment-seeking pathological gamblers; (b) compare the demographic profiles and clinical features of pathological gamblers with and without comorbid psychiatric disorders; (c) explore the associations between pathological gambling and psychiatric disorders and their temporal relationship. Participants (N = 201) who sought gambling counseling were examined by making Axis-I diagnoses including mood disorders, schizophrenia spectrum disorders, substance use disorders, anxiety disorders, and adjustment disorder. Results showed that 63.7% of participants had lifetime comorbid psychiatric disorder. The most common comorbid psychiatric mental disorders were mood disorders, adjustment disorder, and substance use disorders. Pathological gamblers with psychiatric comorbidities were significantly more severe in psychopathology, psychosocial functioning impairment, and gambling problems than those without the disorders. PMID:22778700

  7. Rapid Amygdala Kindling Causes Motor Seizure and Comorbidity of Anxiety- and Depression-Like Behaviors in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shang-Der; Wang, Yu-Lin; Liang, Sheng-Fu; Shaw, Fu-Zen

    2016-01-01

    Amygdala kindling is a model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with convulsion. The rapid amygdala kindling has an advantage on quick development of motor seizures and for antiepileptic drugs screening. The rapid amygdala kindling causes epileptogenesis accompanied by an anxiolytic response in early isolation of rat pups or depressive behavior in immature rats. However, the effect of rapid amygdala kindling on comorbidity of anxiety- and depression-like behaviors is unexplored in adult rats with normal breeding. In the present study, 40 amygdala stimulations given within 2 days were applied in adult Wistar rats. Afterdischarge (AD) and seizure stage were recorded throughout the amygdala kindling. Anxiety-like behaviors were evaluated by the elevated plus maze (EPM) test and open field (OF) test, whereas depression-like behaviors were assessed by the forced swim (FS) and sucrose consumption (SC) tests. A tonic-clonic convulsion was provoked in the kindle group. Rapid amygdala kindling resulted in a significantly lower frequency entering an open area of either open arms of the EPM or the central zone of an OF, lower sucrose intake, and longer immobility of the FS test in the kindle group. Our results suggest that rapid amygdala kindling elicited severe motor seizures comorbid with anxiety- and depression-like behaviors. PMID:27445726

  8. Rapid Amygdala Kindling Causes Motor Seizure and Comorbidity of Anxiety- and Depression-Like Behaviors in Rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shang-Der; Wang, Yu-Lin; Liang, Sheng-Fu; Shaw, Fu-Zen

    2016-01-01

    Amygdala kindling is a model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with convulsion. The rapid amygdala kindling has an advantage on quick development of motor seizures and for antiepileptic drugs screening. The rapid amygdala kindling causes epileptogenesis accompanied by an anxiolytic response in early isolation of rat pups or depressive behavior in immature rats. However, the effect of rapid amygdala kindling on comorbidity of anxiety- and depression-like behaviors is unexplored in adult rats with normal breeding. In the present study, 40 amygdala stimulations given within 2 days were applied in adult Wistar rats. Afterdischarge (AD) and seizure stage were recorded throughout the amygdala kindling. Anxiety-like behaviors were evaluated by the elevated plus maze (EPM) test and open field (OF) test, whereas depression-like behaviors were assessed by the forced swim (FS) and sucrose consumption (SC) tests. A tonic-clonic convulsion was provoked in the kindle group. Rapid amygdala kindling resulted in a significantly lower frequency entering an open area of either open arms of the EPM or the central zone of an OF, lower sucrose intake, and longer immobility of the FS test in the kindle group. Our results suggest that rapid amygdala kindling elicited severe motor seizures comorbid with anxiety- and depression-like behaviors. PMID:27445726

  9. [Evolutionary issues in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); from risk factors to comorbidity and social and academic impact].

    PubMed

    Quintero, Javier; Loro, Mercedes; Jiménez, Belén; García Campos, Natalia

    2011-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common childhood disorders and at least one-third to one-half will continue through adolescence and adulthood. Moreover it is important the high comorbidity not only in children, but in adolescents and adults. Therefore ADHD becomes especially important when we observe it as a risk factor for the development of another psychopathology that add more complexity to the diagnosis of children and adolescents and also adults, and confers an evolutionary risk throughout the lifetime of the person who suffers from it. A correlational study with a sample of 378 patients diagnosed with ADHD in the childhood between 1988 and 2000 who had initiated treatment after been diagnosed was carried out. 88 patients were evaluated years after (2006) with ages between 18 and 33 years old. 85% of the patients in this study had had combined treatment. The data found in this study show lower comorbidity than other published studies (36.4%), as well as a lower persistence of the complete diagnosis of ADHD in the adulthood (15%). This is a treated population; the results may lead to a possible protector role of the early treatment of ADHD.

  10. Rapid Amygdala Kindling Causes Motor Seizure and Comorbidity of Anxiety- and Depression-Like Behaviors in Rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shang-Der; Wang, Yu-Lin; Liang, Sheng-Fu; Shaw, Fu-Zen

    2016-01-01

    Amygdala kindling is a model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with convulsion. The rapid amygdala kindling has an advantage on quick development of motor seizures and for antiepileptic drugs screening. The rapid amygdala kindling causes epileptogenesis accompanied by an anxiolytic response in early isolation of rat pups or depressive behavior in immature rats. However, the effect of rapid amygdala kindling on comorbidity of anxiety- and depression-like behaviors is unexplored in adult rats with normal breeding. In the present study, 40 amygdala stimulations given within 2 days were applied in adult Wistar rats. Afterdischarge (AD) and seizure stage were recorded throughout the amygdala kindling. Anxiety-like behaviors were evaluated by the elevated plus maze (EPM) test and open field (OF) test, whereas depression-like behaviors were assessed by the forced swim (FS) and sucrose consumption (SC) tests. A tonic-clonic convulsion was provoked in the kindle group. Rapid amygdala kindling resulted in a significantly lower frequency entering an open area of either open arms of the EPM or the central zone of an OF, lower sucrose intake, and longer immobility of the FS test in the kindle group. Our results suggest that rapid amygdala kindling elicited severe motor seizures comorbid with anxiety- and depression-like behaviors.

  11. Eating disorders in adults with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Gravestock, S

    2000-12-01

    There is an increasing focus on the nutrition of people with intellectual disability (ID), but less interest in the range of eating disorders (EDs) that they may exhibit and the bio-psycho-social impact of these conditions. Despite diagnostic and methodological difficulties, psychopathology and ED research studies suggest that 3-42% of institutionalized adults with ID and 1-19% of adults with ID in the community have diagnosable EDs. Weight surveys indicate that 2-35% of adults with ID are obese and 5-43% are significantly underweight, but the contribution of diagnosable EDs is unknown. Such data and case reports suggest that EDs are associated with considerable physical, behavioural, psychiatric and social comorbidity. Review papers have focused on the aetiology and treatment of pica, rumination, regurgitation, psychogenic vomiting and food faddiness/refusal. Emerging clinical issues are the development of appropriate diagnostic criteria, multimodal assessment and clinically effective treatment approaches. Key service issues include staff training to improve awareness, addressing comorbidity and access issues, and maintaining support for adults with ID and EDs, and their carers. Research should confirm the multifaceted aetiology and comorbidity of EDs. Then multicomponent assessment and treatment models for EDs can be developed and evaluated.

  12. Eating disorders in adults with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Gravestock, S

    2000-12-01

    There is an increasing focus on the nutrition of people with intellectual disability (ID), but less interest in the range of eating disorders (EDs) that they may exhibit and the bio-psycho-social impact of these conditions. Despite diagnostic and methodological difficulties, psychopathology and ED research studies suggest that 3-42% of institutionalized adults with ID and 1-19% of adults with ID in the community have diagnosable EDs. Weight surveys indicate that 2-35% of adults with ID are obese and 5-43% are significantly underweight, but the contribution of diagnosable EDs is unknown. Such data and case reports suggest that EDs are associated with considerable physical, behavioural, psychiatric and social comorbidity. Review papers have focused on the aetiology and treatment of pica, rumination, regurgitation, psychogenic vomiting and food faddiness/refusal. Emerging clinical issues are the development of appropriate diagnostic criteria, multimodal assessment and clinically effective treatment approaches. Key service issues include staff training to improve awareness, addressing comorbidity and access issues, and maintaining support for adults with ID and EDs, and their carers. Research should confirm the multifaceted aetiology and comorbidity of EDs. Then multicomponent assessment and treatment models for EDs can be developed and evaluated. PMID:11115017

  13. Comorbid Cognitive Impairment and Functional Trajectories in Low Vision Rehabilitation for Macular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Whitson, Heather E.; Ansah, Deidra; Sanders, Linda L; Whitaker, Diane; Potter, Guy G.; Cousins, Scott W.; Steffens, David C.; Landerman, Lawrence R.; Pieper, Carl F.; Cohen, Harvey Jay

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Comorbid cognitive impairment is common among visually impaired older adults. This study investigated whether baseline cognitive status predicts functional trajectories among older adults in low vision rehabilitation (LVR) for macular disease. Methods The Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status – modified (TICS-m) was administered to macular disease patients aged ≥ 65 years receiving outpatient LVR. Mixed models assessed the rate of change in instrumental activities of daily living and visual function measures over a mean follow-up of 115 days. Results Of 91 participants, 17 (18.7%) had cognitive impairment (TICS-m score ≤ 27) and 23 (25.3%) had marginal impairment (TICS-m scores 28 to 30). Controlling for age and gender, baseline cognitive status did not predict most functional outcomes. However, participants with marginal cognitive impairment experienced worse functional trajectories in ability to prepare meals (p=0.03).and activities that require distance vision (p = 0.05). Conclusion Patients with mild to moderate cognitive impairment should not be excluded from LVR, but programs should be prepared to detect and accommodate a range of cognitive ability. PMID:22526069

  14. Individual correlates of self-stigma in patients with anxiety disorders with and without comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Ociskova, Marie; Prasko, Jan; Kamaradova, Dana; Grambal, Ales; Sigmundova, Zuzana

    2015-01-01

    Background A number of psychiatric patients experience stigma connected to prejudices about mental disorders. It has been shown that stigma is most harmful when it is internalized. Most of the studies were performed on individuals either with psychoses or with mood disorders, and hence, there are almost no studies with other diagnostic categories. The goals of this research were to identify factors that are significantly related to self-stigma in patients with anxiety disorders and to suggest possible models of causality for these relationships. Methods A total of 109 patients with anxiety disorders and possible comorbid depressive or personality disorders, who were admitted to the psychotherapeutic department participated in this study. All patients completed several psychodiagnostic methods, ie, the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Scale, Temperament and Character Inventory-Revised Version, Adult Dispositional Hope Scale, Dissociative Experiences Scale, Beck Anxiety Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition, and Clinical Global Impression (also completed by the senior psychiatrist). Results The overall level of self-stigma was positively associated with a comorbid personality disorder, more severe symptomatology, more intense symptoms of anxiety and depression, and higher levels of dissociation and harm avoidance. Self-stigma was negatively related to hope, reward dependence, persistence, self-directedness, and cooperativeness. Multiple regression analysis showed that the most significant factors connected to self-stigma are harm avoidance, the intensity of depressive symptoms, and self-directedness. Two models of causality were proposed and validated. It seems that the tendency to dissociate in stress increases the probability of development of self-stigma, and this relationship is entirely mediated by avoidance of harm. Conversely, self-directedness lowers the probability of occurrence of self-stigma, and this effect is partly mediated by hope

  15. Comorbidity and pathogenic links of chronic spontaneous urticaria and systemic lupus erythematosus--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kolkhir, P; Pogorelov, D; Olisova, O; Maurer, M

    2016-02-01

    Chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) is a common mast cell-driven disease characterized by the development of wheals (hives), angioedema (AE), or both for > 6 weeks. It is thought that autoimmunity is a common cause of CSU, which is often associated with autoimmune thyroiditis, whereas the link to other autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has not been carefully explored. Here, we systematically reviewed the existing literature for information on the prevalence of CSU in SLE (and vice versa) and we examined the possible clinical and pathogenetic relationship between CSU and SLE. The prevalence of CSU and CSU-like rash in SLE was investigated by 42 independent studies and comorbidity in adult patients reportedly ranged from 0% to 21.9% and 0.4% to 27.5%, respectively (urticarial vasculitis: 0-20%). In children with SLE, CSU was reported in 0-1.2% and CSU-like rash in 4.5-12% (urticarial vasculitis: 0-2.2%). In contrast, little information is available on the prevalence of SLE in patients with CSU, and more studies are needed to determine the rate of comorbidity. Recent insights on IgG- and IgE-mediated autoreactivity suggest similarities in the pathogenesis of CSU and SLE linking inflammation and autoimmunity with the activation of the complement and coagulation system. Future studies of patients with either or both conditions could help to better define common pathomechanisms in CSU and SLE and to develop novel targeted treatment options for patients with CSU and SLE. PMID:26545308

  16. Low Physical Function in Maintenance Hemodialysis Patients is Independent of Muscle Mass and Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Robin L; LaStayo, Paul C; Ikizler, T. Alp; Wei, Guo; Giri, Ajay; Chen, Xiaorui; Morrell, Glen; Painter, Patricia; Beddhu, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Objective It is unknown whether muscle wasting accounts for impaired physical function in adults on maintenance hemodialysis (MHD). Design Observational study Setting Outpatient dialysis units and a fall clinic Subjects 108 MHD and 122 elderly non-hemodialysis (non-HD) participants Exposure variable Mid-thigh muscle area was measured by magnetic resonance imaging. Main outcome measure Physical function was measured by distance walked in six minutes (6MW). Results Compared to non-HD elderly participants, MHD participants were younger (49.2 ± 15.8 yrs vs. 75.3 ± 7.1 yrs, p<0.001) and had higher mid-thigh muscle area (106.2 ± 26.8 cm2 vs. 96.1 ± 21.1 cm2, p=0.002). However, the 6MW distance was lower in MHD participants (322.9 ± 110.4 m vs. 409.0 ± 128.3 m, p<0.001). In multiple regression analysis adjusted for demographics, comorbid conditions and mid-thigh muscle area, MHD patients walked significantly less distance (−117 m, 95% −177 to −56 m, p<0.001) than the non-HD elderly. Conclusions Even when compared to elderly non-HD participants, younger MHD participants have poorer physical function that was not explained by muscle mass or comorbid conditions. We speculate that the uremic milieu may impair muscle function independent of muscle mass. The mechanism of impaired muscle function in uremia needs to be established in future studies. PMID:25836339

  17. Impulsive Aggression as a Comorbidity of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Amann, Birgit H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This article examines the characteristics of impulsive aggression (IA) as a comorbidity in children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), focusing on its incidence, impact on ADHD outcomes, need for timely intervention, and limitations of current treatment practices. Methods: Relevant literature was retrieved with electronic searches in PubMed and PsycINFO using the search strategy of “ADHD OR attention deficit hyperactivity disorder” AND “impulsive aggression OR reactive aggression OR hostile aggression OR overt aggression” AND “pediatric OR childhood OR children OR pre-adolescent OR adolescent” with separate searches using review OR clinical trial as search limits. Key articles published before the 2007 Expert Consensus Report on IA were identified using citation analysis. Results: More than 50% of preadolescents with ADHD combined subtype reportedly display clinically significant aggression, with impulsive aggression being the predominant subtype. Impulsive aggression is strongly predictive of a highly unfavorable developmental trajectory characterized by the potential for persistent ADHD, increasing psychosocial burden, accumulating comorbidities, serious lifelong functional deficits across a broad range of domains, delinquency/criminality, and adult antisocial behavior. Impulsive aggression, which triggers peer rejection and a vicious cycle of escalating dysfunction, may be a key factor in unfavorable psychosocial outcomes attributed to ADHD. Because severe aggressive behavior does not remit in many children when treated with primary ADHD therapy (i.e., stimulants and behavioral therapy), a common practice is to add medication of a different class to specifically target aggressive behavior. Conclusions: Impulsive aggression in children and adolescents with ADHD is a serious clinical and public health problem. Although adjunctive therapy with an aggression-targeted agent is widely recommended when

  18. Measuring Treatment Outcomes in Comorbid Insomnia and Fibromyalgia: Concordance of Subjective and Objective Assessments

    PubMed Central

    Mundt, Jennifer M.; Crew, Earl C.; Krietsch, Kendra; Roth, Alicia J.; Vatthauer, Karlyn; Robinson, Michael E.; Staud, Roland; Berry, Richard B.; McCrae, Christina S.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: In insomnia, actigraphy tends to underestimate wake time compared to diaries and PSG. When chronic pain co-occurs with insomnia, sleep may be more fragmented, including more movement and arousals. However, individuals may not be consciously aware of these arousals. We examined the baseline concordance of diaries, actigraphy, and PSG as well as the ability of each assessment method to detect changes in sleep following cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I). Methods: Adults with insomnia and fibromyalgia (n = 113) were randomized to CBT-I, CBT for pain, or waitlist control. At baseline and posttreatment, participants completed one night of PSG and two weeks of diaries/actigraphy. Results: At baseline, objective measures estimated lower SOL, higher TST, and higher SE than diaries (ps < 0.05). Compared to PSG, actigraphic estimates were higher for SOL and lower for WASO (ps < 0.05). Repeated measures ANOVAs were conducted for the CBT-I group (n = 15), and significant method by time interactions indicated that the assessment methods differed in their sensitivity to detect treatment-related changes. PSG values did not change significantly for any sleep parameters. However, diaries showed improvements in SOL, WASO, and SE, and actigraphy also detected the WASO and SE improvements (ps < 0.05). Conclusions: Actigraphy was generally more concordant with PSG than with diaries, which are the recommended assessment for diagnosing insomnia. However, actigraphy showed greater sensitivity to treatment-related changes than PSG; PSG failed to detect any improvements, but actigraphy demonstrated changes in WASO and SE, which were also found with diaries. In comorbid insomnia/fibromyalgia, actigraphy may therefore have utility in measuring treatment outcomes. Citation: Mundt JM, Crew EC, Krietsch K, Roth AJ, Vatthauer K, Robinson ME, Staud R, Berry RB, McCrae CS. Measuring treatment outcomes in comorbid insomnia and fibromyalgia: concordance of subjective

  19. Distinctive and common neural underpinnings of major depression, social anxiety, and their comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, J Paul; Chen, Michael C; Waugh, Christian E; Joormann, Jutta; Gotlib, Ian H

    2015-04-01

    Assessing neural commonalities and differences among depression, anxiety and their comorbidity is critical in developing a more integrative clinical neuroscience and in evaluating currently debated categorical vs dimensional approaches to psychiatric classification. Therefore, in this study, we sought to identify patterns of anomalous neural responding to criticism and praise that are specific to and common among major depressive disorder (MDD), social anxiety disorder (SAD) and comorbid MDD-SAD. Adult females who met formal diagnostic criteria for MDD, SAD or MDD-SAD and psychiatrically healthy participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging as they listened to statements directing praise or criticism at them or at another person. MDD groups showed reduced responding to praise across a distributed cortical network, an effect potentially mediated by thalamic nuclei undergirding arousal-mediated attention. SAD groups showed heightened anterior insula and decreased default-mode network response to criticism. The MDD-SAD group uniquely showed reduced responding to praise in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. Finally, all groups with psychopathology showed heightened response to criticism in a region of the superior frontal gyrus implicated in attentional gating. The present results suggest novel neural models of anhedonia in MDD, vigilance-withdrawal behaviors in SAD, and poorer outcome in MDD-SAD. Importantly, in identifying unique and common neural substrates of MDD and SAD, these results support a formulation in which common neural components represent general risk factors for psychopathology that, due to factors that are present at illness onset, lead to distinct forms of psychopathology with unique neural signatures.

  20. Antidepressants but not antipsychotics have antiepileptogenic effects with limited effects on comorbid depressive-like behaviour in the WAG/Rij rat model of absence epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Citraro, Rita; Leo, Antonio; De Fazio, Pasquale; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Russo, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Two of the most relevant unmet needs in epilepsy are represented by the development of disease-modifying drugs able to affect epileptogenesis and/or the study of related neuropsychiatric comorbidities. No systematic study has investigated the effects of chronic treatment with antipsychotics or antidepressants on epileptogenesis. However, such drugs are known to influence seizure threshold. Experimental Approach We evaluated the effects of an early long-term treatment (ELTT; 17 weeks), started before seizure onset (P45), with fluoxetine (selective 5-HT-reuptake inhibitor), duloxetine (dual-acting 5-HT-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor), haloperidol (typical antipsychotic drug), risperidone and quetiapine (atypical antipsychotic drugs) on the development of absence seizures and comorbid depressive-like behaviour in the WAG/Rij rat model. Furthermore, we studied the effects of these drugs on established absence seizures in adult (6-month-old) rats after a chronic 7 weeks treatment. Key Results ELTT with all antipsychotics did not affect the development of seizures, whereas, both ELTT haloperidol (1 mg·kg−1 day−1) and risperidone (0.5 mg·kg−1 day−1) increased immobility time in the forced swimming test and increased absence seizures only in adult rats (7 weeks treatment). In contrast, both fluoxetine (30 mg·kg−1 day−1) and duloxetine (10–30 mg·kg−1 day−1) exhibited clear antiepileptogenic effects. Duloxetine decreased and fluoxetine increased absence seizures in adult rats. Duloxetine did not affect immobility time; fluoxetine 30 mg·kg−1 day−1 reduced immobility time while at 10 mg·kg−1 day−1 an increase was observed. Conclusions and Implications In this animal model, antipsychotics had no antiepileptogenic effects and might worsen depressive-like comorbidity, while antidepressants have potential antiepileptogenic effects even though they have limited effects on comorbid depressive-like behaviour. PMID

  1. Alternative pharmacological strategies for adult ADHD treatment: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Buoli, Massimiliano; Serati, Marta; Cahn, Wiepke

    2016-01-01

    Adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a prevalent psychiatric condition associated with high disability and frequent comorbidity. Current standard pharmacotherapy (methylphenidate and atomoxetine) improves ADHD symptoms in the short-term, but poor data were published about long-term treatment. In addition a number of patients present partial or no response to methylphenidate and atomoxetine. Research into the main database sources has been conducted to obtain an overview of alternative pharmacological approaches in adult ADHD patients. Among alternative compounds, amphetamines (mixed amphetamine salts and lisdexamfetamine) have the most robust evidence of efficacy, but they may be associated with serious side effects (e.g. psychotic symptoms or hypertension). Antidepressants, particularly those acting as noradrenaline or dopamine enhancers, have evidence of efficacy, but they should be avoided in patients with comorbid bipolar disorder. Finally metadoxine and lithium may be particularly suitable in case of comorbid alcohol misuse or bipolar disorder. PMID:26693882

  2. An Investigation of Comorbid Psychological Disorders, Sleep Problems, Gastrointestinal Symptoms and Epilepsy in Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannion, Arlene; Leader, Geraldine; Healy, Olive

    2013-01-01

    The current study investigated comorbidity in eighty-nine children and adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Ireland. Comorbidity is the presence of one or more disorders in addition to a primary disorder. The prevalence of comorbid psychological disorders, behaviours associated with comorbid psychopathology, epilepsy, gastrointestinal…

  3. Comorbidities associated with psoriasis: an experience from the Middle East.

    PubMed

    Al-Mutairi, Nawaf; Al-Farag, Shahat; Al-Mutairi, Ahmed; Al-Shiltawy, Mazen

    2010-02-01

    Recent studies suggest that psoriasis patients have higher rates of comorbidities. We sought to determine the prevalence of comorbidities and co-medications in our psoriasis patients. We conducted case-control study in 1835 patients with psoriasis vulgaris and age- and gender-matched cohort without psoriasis. Patients were examined for clinical characteristics of psoriasis, PASI scores, and data of age, sex, body mass index (BMI), smoking status, comorbidities, and co-medications were analysed for both patients and controls. We identified 1661 (92.8%) patients with mild to moderate psoriasis (PASI < 10) and 129 patient's (7.03%) with severe psoriasis (PASI > 10). Patients with psoriasis were more likely to be current smokers (51.34% vs 32.51% controls). Respective prevalence rates of risk factors in those with mild-moderate psoriasis, severe psoriasis, and controls were as follows: inflammatory arthritis (20%, 31% and 10.68%); coronary heart disease (4.1%, 8.35% and 1.42%); obesity (BM1) (32.5%, 41% and 17%); diabetes mellitus type II (37.4%, 41% and 16%); hypertension (32%, 40.3% and 11.55%); dyslipidemia (14.1%, 22.48% and 4.96%); metabolic syndrome (16%, 26.35% and 6.76%); chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (5.36%, 6.98% and 4.03%); cancer (0.3%, 1.55% and 0.16%). They had a higher odds of inflammatory arthritis, coronary heart disease, obesity, diabetes mellitus II, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and metabolic syndrome. They were receiving significantly wider varieties of drugs. Which most commonly included antidiabetic drugs, antihypertensives, and hypolipidemic drugs.

  4. Visual height intolerance and acrophobia: clinical characteristics and comorbidity patterns.

    PubMed

    Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter; Huppert, Doreen; Grill, Eva; Fitz, Werner; Brandt, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the general population lifetime and point prevalence of visual height intolerance and acrophobia, to define their clinical characteristics, and to determine their anxious and depressive comorbidities. A case-control study was conducted within a German population-based cross-sectional telephone survey. A representative sample of 2,012 individuals aged 14 and above was selected. Defined neurological conditions (migraine, Menière's disease, motion sickness), symptom pattern, age of first manifestation, precipitating height stimuli, course of illness, psychosocial impairment, and comorbidity patterns (anxiety conditions, depressive disorders according to DSM-IV-TR) for vHI and acrophobia were assessed. The lifetime prevalence of vHI was 28.5% (women 32.4%, men 24.5%). Initial attacks occurred predominantly (36%) in the second decade. A rapid generalization to other height stimuli and a chronic course of illness with at least moderate impairment were observed. A total of 22.5% of individuals with vHI experienced the intensity of panic attacks. The lifetime prevalence of acrophobia was 6.4% (women 8.6%, men 4.1%), and point prevalence was 2.0% (women 2.8%; men 1.1%). VHI and even more acrophobia were associated with high rates of comorbid anxious and depressive conditions. Migraine was both a significant predictor of later acrophobia and a significant consequence of previous acrophobia. VHI affects nearly a third of the general population; in more than 20% of these persons, vHI occasionally develops into panic attacks and in 6.4%, it escalates to acrophobia. Symptoms and degree of social impairment form a continuum of mild to seriously distressing conditions in susceptible subjects.

  5. Bipolar disorder and ADHD: comorbidity and diagnostic distinctions.

    PubMed

    Marangoni, Ciro; De Chiara, Lavinia; Faedda, Gianni L

    2015-08-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and bipolar disorder (BD) are neurodevelopmental disorders with onset in childhood and early adolescence, and common persistence in adulthood. Both disorders are often undiagnosed, misdiagnosed, and sometimes over diagnosed, leading to high rates of morbidity and disability. The differentiation of these conditions is based on their clinical features, comorbidity, psychiatric family history course of illness, and response to treatment. We review recent relevant findings and highlight epidemiological, clinical, family history, course, and treatment-response differences that can aid the differential diagnosis of these conditions in an outpatient pediatric setting. PMID:26084666

  6. Neuroplasticity Underlying the Comorbidity of Pain and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Lisa; Manders, Toby; Wang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Acute pain induces depressed mood, and chronic pain is known to cause depression. Depression, meanwhile, can also adversely affect pain behaviors ranging from symptomology to treatment response. Pain and depression independently induce long-term plasticity in the central nervous system (CNS). Comorbid conditions, however, have distinct patterns of neural activation. We performed a review of the changes in neural circuitry and molecular signaling pathways that may underlie this complex relationship between pain and depression. We also discussed some of the current and future therapies that are based on this understanding of the CNS plasticity that occurs with pain and depression. PMID:25810926

  7. Reading problems and antisocial behaviour: developmental trends in comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Maughan, B; Pickles, A; Hagell, A; Rutter, M; Yule, W

    1996-05-01

    Samples of poor and normal readers were followed through adolescence and into early adulthood to assess continuities in the comorbidity between reading difficulties and disruptive behaviour problems. Reading-disabled boys showed high rates of inattentiveness in middle childhood, but no excess of teacher-rated behaviour problems at age 14 and no elevated rates of aggression, antisocial personality disorder or officially recorded offending in early adulthood. Increased risks of juvenile offending among specifically retarded-reading boys seemed associated with poor school attendance, rather than reading difficulties per se. Reading problems were associated with some increases in disruptive behaviour in their teens in girls.

  8. Tourette Syndrome and Bipolar Disorder: Unique Problems with Pediatric Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Kavoor, Anjana Rao; Mitra, Sayantanava; Mehta, Varun S; Goyal, Nishant; Sinha, Vinod Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Tourette syndrome and bipolar disorder are frequent comorbidities in pediatric age group. They provide a clinician with certain unique challenges. While on one hand the tics mask manifestation of affective symptomatology, the latter makes it difficult to elicit tics with certainty. Data suggest that they might share genetic and neurobiological basis and this is currently an area of extensive research. These clinical and biological overlaps provide grey areas in our understanding, which not only complicates the diagnosis, but also poses problems with management. PMID:25969612

  9. Circadian Clocks as Modulators of Metabolic Comorbidity in Psychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Barandas, Rita; Landgraf, Dominic; McCarthy, Michael J; Welsh, David K

    2015-12-01

    Psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder are often accompanied by metabolic dysfunction symptoms, including obesity and diabetes. Since the circadian system controls important brain systems that regulate affective, cognitive, and metabolic functions, and neuropsychiatric and metabolic diseases are often correlated with disturbances of circadian rhythms, we hypothesize that dysregulation of circadian clocks plays a central role in metabolic comorbidity in psychiatric disorders. In this review paper, we highlight the role of circadian clocks in glucocorticoid, dopamine, and orexin/melanin-concentrating hormone systems and describe how a dysfunction of these clocks may contribute to the simultaneous development of psychiatric and metabolic symptoms. PMID:26483181

  10. Renal co-morbidity in patients with rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Renal co-morbidity is common in patients with rheumatic disease based on regular assessment of serum and urine parameters of renal function. When patients present with both arthritis and renal abnormalities the following questions have to be addressed. Is kidney disease a complication of rheumatic disease or its management, or are they both manifestations of a single systemic autoimmune disease? Is rheumatic disease a complication of kidney disease and its management? How do rheumatic disease and kidney disease affect each other even when they are unrelated? The present review provides an overview of how to address these questions in daily practice. PMID:21722341

  11. [Psychological comorbidities in patients with psychosomatic disorders of micturition].

    PubMed

    Hohenfellner, U

    2016-08-01

    Many patients with chronic urological diseases report a long-term suffering. Because of previous failure to recognize the psychosomatic diagnosis they are inefficiently treated or even suffer from complications of unsuccessful therapy attempts, which in retrospect were not indicated. The patients are desperate and put all their hopes and expectations in every new doctor, which is why they put us urologists under tremendous pressure to perform and are a challenge for our diagnostic and therapeutic expertise. Knowledge of psychological comorbidities and their effect on the urogenital tract are essential for the differential diagnostics of the urological complaints and for a purposeful therapy. PMID:27472946

  12. Challenging Behaviors in Adults with Intellectual Disability: The Effects of Race and Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horovitz, Max; Matson, Johnny L.; Hattier, Megan A.; Tureck, Kimberly; Bamburg, Jay W.

    2013-01-01

    Rates of challenging behaviors were assessed in 175 adults with intellectual disability (ID) or ID and a comorbid autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The relationship between ASD diagnosis, race, and challenging behaviors was assessed using the "Autism Spectrum Disorders-Behavior Problems for Adults (ASD-BPA)." Those with ASD and ID were found to…

  13. Young Adult Follow-Up of Hyperactive Children: Antisocial Activities and Drug Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkley, Russell A.; Fischer, Mariellen; Smallish, Lori; Fletcher, Kenneth

    2004-01-01

    Background: Hyperactive/ADHD children are believed to be a greater risk for adolescent and young adult antisocial activity and drug use/abuse, particularly that subset having comorbid conduct problems/disorder. Method: We report on the lifetime antisocial activities and illegal drug use self-reported at young adult follow-up (mean age 20-21 years;…

  14. Reframing the association and significance of co-morbidities in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Triposkiadis, Filippos; Giamouzis, Gregory; Parissis, John; Starling, Randall C; Boudoulas, Harisios; Skoularigis, John; Butler, Javed; Filippatos, Gerasimos

    2016-07-01

    Several co-existing diseases and/or conditions (co-morbidities) are present in patients with heart failure (HF), with diverse clinical relevance. Multiple mechanisms may underlie the co-existence of HF and co-morbidities, including direct causation, associated risk factors, heterogeneity, and independence. The complex inter-relationship of co-morbidities and their impact on the cardiovascular system contribute to the features of HF, both with reduced (HFrEF) and preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). The purpose of this work is to provide an overview of the contribution of major cardiac and non-cardiac co-morbidities to HF development and outcomes, in the context of both HFpEF and HFrEF. Accordingly, epidemiological evidence linking co-morbidities to HF and the effect of prevalent and incident co-morbidities on HF outcome will be reviewed. PMID:27358242

  15. Under-recognised co-morbidities in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: A review.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Kaïssa; Lee, Joyce S

    2016-08-01

    Co-morbidities in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis are common. These co-morbidities include obstructive sleep apnoea, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, pulmonary hypertension and depression. The presence of co-morbidities among patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis contributes to worse quality of life, morbidity and mortality. Despite the high prevalence of certain co-morbidities in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, the optimal screening and management of many of these conditions remains unclear. The impact of co-morbidities on this patient population is becoming more apparent. Their relevance will only increase as significant effort is being made to develop novel therapeutics that will alter the disease trajectory of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The purpose of this review is to focus on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of select co-morbidities, including obstructive sleep apnoea, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, pulmonary hypertension and depression, in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  16. Interventions for comorbid problem gambling and psychiatric disorders: Advancing a developing field of research.

    PubMed

    Dowling, N A; Merkouris, S S; Lorains, F K

    2016-07-01

    Despite significant psychiatric comorbidity in problem gambling, there is little evidence on which to base treatment recommendations for subpopulations of problem gamblers with comorbid psychiatric disorders. This mini-review draws on two separate systematic searches to identify possible interventions for comorbid problem gambling and psychiatric disorders, highlight the gaps in the currently available evidence base, and stimulate further research in this area. In this mini-review, only 21 studies that have conducted post-hoc analyses to explore the influence of psychiatric disorders or problem gambling subtypes on gambling outcomes from different types of treatment were identified. The findings of these studies suggest that most gambling treatments are not contraindicated by psychiatric disorders. Moreover, only 6 randomized studies comparing the efficacy of interventions targeted towards specific comorbidity subgroups with a control/comparison group were identified. The results of these studies provide preliminary evidence for modified dialectical behavior therapy for comorbid substance use, the addition of naltrexone to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for comorbid alcohol use problems, and the addition of N-acetylcysteine to tobacco support programs and imaginal desensitisation/motivational interviewing for comorbid nicotine dependence. They also suggest that lithium for comorbid bipolar disorder, escitalopram for comorbid anxiety disorders, and the addition of CBT to standard drug treatment for comorbid schizophrenia may be effective. Future research evaluating interventions sequenced according to disorder severity or the functional relationship between the gambling behavior and comorbid symptomatology, identifying psychiatric disorders as moderators of the efficacy of problem gambling interventions, and evaluating interventions matched to client comorbidity could advance this immature field of study. PMID:26900888

  17. Psychiatric comorbidity in children and adolescents with reading disability.

    PubMed

    Willcutt, E G; Pennington, B F

    2000-11-01

    This study investigated the association between reading disability (RD) and internalizing and externalizing psychopathology in a large community sample of twins with (N = 209) and without RD (N = 192). The primary goals were to clarify the relation between RD and comorbid psychopathology, to test for gender differences in the behavioral correlates of RD, and to test if common familial influences contributed to the association between RD and other disorders. Results indicated that individuals with RD exhibited significantly higher rates of all internalizing and externalizing disorders than individuals without RD. However, logistic regression analyses indicated that RD was not significantly associated with symptoms of aggression, delinquency, oppositional defiant disorder, or conduct disorder after controlling for the significant relation between RD and ADHD. In contrast, relations between RD and symptoms of anxiety and depression remained significant even after controlling for comorbid ADHD, suggesting that internalizing difficulties may be specifically associated with RD. Analyses of gender differences indicated that the significant relation between RD and internalizing symptoms was largely restricted to girls, whereas the association between RD and externalizing psychopathology was stronger for boys. Finally, preliminary etiological analyses suggested that common familial factors predispose both probands with RD and their non-RD siblings to exhibit externalizing behaviors, whereas elevations of internalizing symptomatology are restricted to individuals with RD.

  18. Comorbidities of obsessive and compulsive symptoms in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Karen E; Gehl, Carissa R; Marder, Karen S; Beglinger, Leigh J; Paulsen, Jane S

    2010-05-01

    Although current reports document a high rate of obsessive and compulsive symptoms (O/Cs) in Huntington's disease (HD), there have been no studies published that have made an attempt to identify comorbidities of O/Cs in HD. We examined O/Cs in 1642 individuals with a diagnosis of HD. Of those endorsing significant O/Cs (27.2%), nearly one-quarter reported obtaining treatment for obsessive compulsive disorder. Individuals with HD and O/Cs were older, had poorer functioning, and a longer duration of illness than those without O/Cs. Individuals with HD and O/Cs endorsed significantly higher psychiatric comorbidities of depression, suicidal ideation, aggression, delusions, and hallucinations. Participants with the most severe O/Cs and worse performance on the Stroop task, a measure of executive function. Clinicians should be aware that patients with HD and O/Cs might have a somewhat different clinical picture from those without, and may require a specialized treatment plan. PMID:20458194

  19. A flexible data-driven comorbidity feature extraction framework.

    PubMed

    Sideris, Costas; Pourhomayoun, Mohammad; Kalantarian, Haik; Sarrafzadeh, Majid

    2016-06-01

    Disease and symptom diagnostic codes are a valuable resource for classifying and predicting patient outcomes. In this paper, we propose a novel methodology for utilizing disease diagnostic information in a predictive machine learning framework. Our methodology relies on a novel, clustering-based feature extraction framework using disease diagnostic information. To reduce the data dimensionality, we identify disease clusters using co-occurrence statistics. We optimize the number of generated clusters in the training set and then utilize these clusters as features to predict patient severity of condition and patient readmission risk. We build our clustering and feature extraction algorithm using the 2012 National Inpatient Sample (NIS), Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) which contains 7 million hospital discharge records and ICD-9-CM codes. The proposed framework is tested on Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center Electronic Health Records (EHR) from 3041 Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) patients and the UCI 130-US diabetes dataset that includes admissions from 69,980 diabetic patients. We compare our cluster-based feature set with the commonly used comorbidity frameworks including Charlson's index, Elixhauser's comorbidities and their variations. The proposed approach was shown to have significant gains between 10.7-22.1% in predictive accuracy for CHF severity of condition prediction and 4.65-5.75% in diabetes readmission prediction. PMID:27127895

  20. Pharmacological treatment of psychiatric comorbidity in patients with refractory epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Karouni, Mohamad; Henning, Oliver; Larsson, Pål G; Johannessen, Svein I; Johannessen Landmark, Cecilie

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to describe the use of psychopharmacological drugs for the treatment of a stated or presumed psychiatric comorbid condition in patients with refractory epilepsy and discuss the clinical implications of such treatment. The study was a retrospective descriptive study in patients admitted to the National Center for Epilepsy in Norway based on medication described in medical records. The mean age was 40 years (range: 9-90), and the gender ratio was 56/44% female/male. Psychotropic drugs (antidepressants and antipsychotics) were used to a lower extent than in the general population in Norway. Drugs for ADHD were predominantly used in children. The prevalence of patients treated with psychiatric comedication was 13% (143 of 1139 patients). The patients used two to eight concomitant CNS-active drugs, which calls for the close monitoring of potential pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions and should challenge clinicians to achieve a less complex pharmacotherapy. Psychiatric comorbidity is an important concern in patients with refractory epilepsy and may be undertreated.

  1. Comorbidities of obsessive and compulsive symptoms in Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Karen E.; Gehl, Carissa R.; Marder, Karen S.; Beglinger, Leigh J.; Paulsen, Jane S.

    2011-01-01

    Although current reports document a high rate of obsessive and compulsive symptoms (O/Cs) in Huntington disease (HD), there have been no studies published that have made an attempt to identify comorbidities of O/Cs in HD. We examined O/Cs in 1,642 individuals with a diagnosis of HD. Of those endorsing significant O/Cs (27.2%), nearly one-quarter reported obtaining treatment for OCD. Individuals with HD and O/Cs were older, had poorer functioning, and a longer duration of illness than those without O/Cs. Individuals with HD and O/Cs endorsed significantly higher psychiatric comorbidities of depression, suicidal ideation, aggression, delusions and hallucinations. Participants with the most severe O/Cs had greater bradykinesia and worse performance on the Stroop task, a measure of executive function. Clinicians should be aware that patients with HD and O/Cs might have a somewhat different clinical picture from those without, and may require a specialized treatment plan. PMID:20458194

  2. Comorbidities of obsessive and compulsive symptoms in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Karen E; Gehl, Carissa R; Marder, Karen S; Beglinger, Leigh J; Paulsen, Jane S

    2010-05-01

    Although current reports document a high rate of obsessive and compulsive symptoms (O/Cs) in Huntington's disease (HD), there have been no studies published that have made an attempt to identify comorbidities of O/Cs in HD. We examined O/Cs in 1642 individuals with a diagnosis of HD. Of those endorsing significant O/Cs (27.2%), nearly one-quarter reported obtaining treatment for obsessive compulsive disorder. Individuals with HD and O/Cs were older, had poorer functioning, and a longer duration of illness than those without O/Cs. Individuals with HD and O/Cs endorsed significantly higher psychiatric comorbidities of depression, suicidal ideation, aggression, delusions, and hallucinations. Participants with the most severe O/Cs and worse performance on the Stroop task, a measure of executive function. Clinicians should be aware that patients with HD and O/Cs might have a somewhat different clinical picture from those without, and may require a specialized treatment plan.

  3. Preschool Anxiety Disorders in Pediatric Primary Care: Prevalence and Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Lauren; Angold, Adrian; Copeland, William; Costello, E. Jane; Towe-Goodman, Nissa; Egger, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Objective We sought to establish prevalence rates and detail patterns of comorbidity for generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, and social phobia, in preschool aged children. Method The Duke Preschool Anxiety Study, a screen-stratified, cross-sectional study, drew from pediatric primary-care and oversampled for children at risk for anxiety. 917 parents of preschoolers (aged 2 to 5 years) completed the Preschool Age Psychiatric Assessment. Results Generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, and social phobia are common in preschool-aged children attending pediatric primary care. Three quarters of preschoolers with an anxiety disorder only had a single anxiety disorder. Generalized anxiety disorder displayed the greatest degree of comorbidity: with separation anxiety disorder (odds ratio [OR] = 4.1, 95% CI, 2.0–8.5), social phobia (OR = 6.4, 95% CI, 3.1–13.4), disruptive behavior disorders (OR = 5.1, 95% CI, 1.6–15.8), and depression (OR = 3.7, 95% CI, 1.1–12.4). Conclusions The weakness of association between generalized anxiety disorder and depression stands in contrast to substantial associations between these 2 disorders reported in older individuals. Attenuated associations in preschool aged children could translate into clinical opportunities for targeted early interventions, aimed at modifying the developmental trajectory of anxiety disorders. PMID:24290462

  4. Anxiety and depression—Important psychological comorbidities of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Curt R.; Walsh, James R.; Yang, Ian A.; Rolls, Tricia A.; Ward, Donna L.

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety and depression are common and important comorbidities in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The pathophysiology of these psychological comorbidities in COPD is complex and possibly explained by common risk factors, response to symptomatology and biochemical alterations. The presence of anxiety and/or depression in COPD patients is associated with increased mortality, exacerbation rates, length of hospital stay, and decreased quality of life and functional status. There is currently no consensus on the most appropriate approach to screening for anxiety and depression in COPD. Treatment options include psychological [relaxation, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), self-management] and pharmacological interventions. Although there is some evidence to support these treatments in COPD, the data are limited and mainly comprised by small studies. Pulmonary rehabilitation improves anxiety and depression, and conversely these conditions impact rehabilitation completion rates. Additional high quality studies are urgently required to optimise screening and effective treatment of anxiety and depression in patients with COPD, to enhance complex chronic disease management for these patients. PMID:25478202

  5. Mental–physical co-morbidity and its relationship with disability: results from the World Mental Health Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Scott, K. M.; Von Korff, M.; Alonso, J.; Angermeyer, M. C.; Bromet, E.; Fayyad, J.; de Girolamo, G.; Demyttenaere, K.; Gasquet, I.; Gureje, O.; Haro, J. M.; He, Y.; Kessler, R. C.; Levinson, D.; Medina Mora, M. E.; Oakley Browne, M.; Ormel, J.; Posada-Villa, J.; Watanabe, M.; Williams, D.

    2009-01-01

    Background The relationship between mental and physical disorders is well established, but there is less consensus as to the nature of their joint association with disability, in part because additive and interactive models of co-morbidity have not always been clearly differentiated in prior research. Method Eighteen general population surveys were carried out among adults as part of the World Mental Health (WMH) Survey Initiative (n=42 697). DSM-IV disorders were assessed using face-to-face interviews with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI 3.0). Chronic physical conditions (arthritis, heart disease, respiratory disease, chronic back/neck pain, chronic headache, and diabetes) were ascertained using a standard checklist. Severe disability was defined as on or above the 90th percentile of the WMH version of the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS-II). Results The odds of severe disability among those with both mental disorder and each of the physical conditions (with the exception of heart disease) were significantly greater than the sum of the odds of the single conditions. The evidence for synergy was model dependent: it was observed in the additive interaction models but not in models assessing multiplicative interactions. Mental disorders were more likely to be associated with severe disability than were the chronic physical conditions. Conclusions This first cross-national study of the joint effect of mental and physical conditions on the probability of severe disability finds that co-morbidity exerts modest synergistic effects. Clinicians need to accord both mental and physical conditions equal priority, in order for co-morbidity to be adequately managed and disability reduced. PMID:18366819

  6. [Bacterial parotitis in an immunocompromised patient in adult ICU].

    PubMed

    Vassal, O; Bernet, C; Wallet, F; Friggeri, A; Piriou, V

    2013-09-01

    Bacterial parotitis is a common childhood disease with a favorable outcome. Staphylococcus aureus is the most frequently involved pathogen. Clinical presentation in adult patients can be misleading, Onset occurs in patients with multiple comorbidities, making diagnosis difficult--particularly in ICU. Different pathogens are found in adults with worse outcomes observed. We report here the case of a critically ill patient and discuss diagnosis and management of bacterial parotitis.

  7. Prevalence, Correlates, Disability, and Comorbidity of DSM-IV Borderline Personality Disorder: Results from the Wave 2 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Bridget F.; Chou, S. Patricia; Goldstein, Risë B.; Huang, Boji; Stinson, Frederick S.; Saha, Tulshi D.; Smith, Sharon M.; Dawson, Deborah A.; Pulay, Attila J.; Pickering, Roger P.; Ruan, W. June

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To present nationally representative findings on prevalence, sociodemographic correlates, disability, and comorbidity of BPD among men and women. Methods Face-to-face interviews with 34,653 adults participating in the Wave 2 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Results Prevalence of lifetime BPD was 5.9% (99% CI: 5.4–6.4). There were no differences in the rates of BPD among men (5.6%, 99% CI: 5.0–6.2) and women (6.2%, 99% CI: 5.6–6.9). BPD was more prevalent among Native American men, younger and separated/divorced/widowed adults, and those with lower incomes and education, and less prevalent among Hispanic men and women and Asian women. BPD was associated with substantial mental and physical disability, especially among women. High co-occurrence rates of mood and anxiety disorders with BPD were similar. With additional comorbidity controlled, associations with bipolar disorder and schizotypal and narcissistic PDs remained strong and significant. Associations of BPD with other specific disorders were no longer significant or were considerably weakened. Conclusions Prevalence of BPD in the general population is much greater than previously recognized, equal prevalent among men and women, and associated with considerable mental and physical disability, especially among women. Unique and common factors may differentially contribute to disorder-specific comorbidity with BPD and some of these associations appear to be sex-specific. There is a need for future epidemiologic, clinical and genetically-informed studies to identify unique and common factors that underlie disorder-specific comorbidity with BPD. Important sex differences observed in rates of and associations with BPD can inform more focused, hypothesis-driven investigations of these factors. PMID:18426259

  8. The comorbidity of substance use disorders and eating disorders in women: prevalence, etiology, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Harrop, Erin N; Marlatt, G Alan

    2010-05-01

    Substance use disorders often co-occur with eating disorders in female populations. This review addresses the prevalence and etiology of this comorbidity in women. Thirteen peer-reviewed journal articles are reviewed. Conclusions are drawn concerning prevalence rates, theory, and implications for treatment. Current research supports distinct etiologies and growth trajectories for both disorders. Thus, comorbidity presents with unique challenges, and often, worse outcomes. Though comorbidity rates are high, little research has been done concerning treatment. Given the high prevalence rates of these comorbid disorders, a specific treatment needs to be developed that targets both disorders simultaneously.

  9. Associations of multiplicity of comorbid health conditions, serious mental illness, and health care costs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungkyu; Black, Denise; Held, Mary

    2016-08-01

    Using a nationally representative U.S. sample, this study analyzed the effects of serious mental illness (SMI) and comorbid medical conditions on the cost of health care. The results of path model indicated that SMI and comorbid health conditions each increased total health care costs. Additionally, individuals with SMI were likely to have more comorbid medical conditions, which in turn, increased total health care costs. Findings raise awareness of an increased risk of medical conditions among individuals with SMI and the concern of high expenditures associated with comorbid SMI and medical conditions. PMID:27285200

  10. Cardiovascular comorbidities of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: a report from the GRAPPA 2012 annual meeting.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, April W; Gelfand, Joel M; Boehncke, Wolf-Henning; Armstrong, Ehrin J

    2013-08-01

    At the 2012 annual meeting of the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) in Stockholm, Sweden, several GRAPPA members led a panel discussion on cardiovascular (CV) comorbidities of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The panelists discussed the role of insulin resistance in the pathophysiology of psoriasis, the possible effect of tumor necrosis factor inhibitors on CV comorbidities, and the effect of 12/23 monoclonal antibodies on CV outcomes. The panelists also addressed how lessons from CV comorbidity research could be applied to other areas of comorbidity research in psoriasis and PsA and identified future research directions in this area.

  11. Excess Costs of Comorbidities in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Manuel B.; Wacker, Margarethe E.; Vogelmeier, Claus F.; Leidl, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Comorbidities are often reported in patients with COPD and may influence the cost of care. Yet, the extent by which comorbidities affect costs remains to be determined. Objectives To review, quantify and evaluate excess costs of comorbidities in COPD. Methods Using a systematic review approach, Pubmed and Embase were searched for studies analyzing excess costs of comorbidities in COPD. Resulting studies were evaluated according to study characteristics, comorbidity measurement and cost indicators. Mark-up factors were calculated for respective excess costs. Furthermore, a checklist of quality criteria was applied. Results Twelve studies were included. Nine evaluated comorbidity specific costs; three examined index-based results. Pneumonia, cardiovascular disease and diabetes were associated with the highest excess costs. The mark-up factors for respective excess costs ranged between 1.5 and 2.5 in the majority of cases. On average the factors constituted a doubling of respective costs in the comorbid case. The main cost driver, among all studies, was inpatient cost. Indirect costs were not accounted for by the majority of studies. Study heterogeneity was high. Conclusions The reviewed studies clearly show that comorbidities are associated with significant excess costs in COPD. The inclusion of comorbid costs and effects in future health economic evaluations of preventive or therapeutic COPD interventions seems highly advisable. PMID:25875204

  12. Major comorbid disease processes associated with increased incidence of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Farooqi, Salwa; Dickhout, Jeffrey G

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is commonly seen amongst critically ill and hospitalized patients. Individuals with certain co-morbid diseases have an increased risk of developing AKI. Thus, recognizing the co-morbidities that predispose patients to AKI is important in AKI prevention and treatment. Some of the most common co-morbid disease processes that increase the risk of AKI are diabetes, cancer, cardiac surgery and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). This review article identifies the increased risk of acquiring AKI with given co-morbid diseases. Furthermore, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying AKI in relation to co-morbid diseases are discussed to understand how the risk of acquiring AKI is increased. This paper reviews the effects of various co-morbid diseases including: Diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease and HIV AIDS, which all exhibit a significant increased risk of developing AKI. Amongst these co-morbid diseases, inflammation, the use of nephrotoxic agents, and hypoperfusion to the kidneys have been shown to be major pathological processes that predisposes individuals to AKI. The pathogenesis of kidney injury is complex, however, effective treatment of the co-morbid disease processes may reduce its risk. Therefore, improved management of co-morbid diseases may prevent some of the underlying pathology that contributes to the increased risk of developing AKI. PMID:26981437

  13. Prevalence and comorbidity of nocturnal wandering in the U.S. adult general population.

    PubMed

    Pressman, Mark R

    2013-01-01

    As noted by Ohayon et al., nocturnal wandering (NW) is not synonymous with sleepwalking. NW may also refer to wandering during the night due to epilepsy. Alcohol intoxication can also result in drunken behavior while awake, but this type of cognitive impairment may be undistinguishable from other forms of NW. Dementia and CNS drug effects can also result in NW. PMID:23296133

  14. Gender Dysphoria – Prevalence and Co-Morbidities in an Irish Adult Population

    PubMed Central

    Judge, Ciaran; O’Donovan, Claire; Callaghan, Grainne; Gaoatswe, Gadintshware; O’Shea, Donal

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Gender dysphoria (GD) is a condition in which there is a marked incongruence between an individual’s psychological perception of his/her sex and their biological phenotype. Gender identity disorder was officially renamed “gender dysphoria” in the DSM-V in 2013. The prevalence and demographics of GD vary according to geographical location and has not been well-documented in Ireland. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 218 patients with suspected or confirmed GD referred to our endocrine service for consideration of hormonal therapy (HT) between 2005 and early 2014. We documented their demographics, clinical characteristics, and treatment during the study period. Results: The prevalence of GD in the Irish population was 1:10,154 male-to-female (MTF) and 1:27,668 female-to-male (FTM), similar to reported figures in Western Europe. 159 of the patients were MTF and 59 were FTM, accounting for 72.9% and 27.1% of the cohort, respectively. The rate of referral has increased year-on-year, with 55 patients referred in 2013 versus 6 in 2005. Mean ages were 32.6 years (MTF) and 32.2 years (FTM). 22 of the patients were married and 41 had children, with 2 others having pregnant partners. 37.6% were referred by a psychologist, with the remainder evenly divided between GPs and psychiatric services. There were low rates of coexistent medical illness although psychiatric conditions were more prevalent, depression being a factor in 34.4% of patients. 5.9% of patients did not attend a mental health professional. 74.3% are currently on HT, and 9.17% have had gender reassignment surgery (GRS). Regret following hormonal or surgical treatment was in line with other Western European countries (1.83%). Conclusion: The incidence of diagnosis and referral of GD in Ireland is increasing. This brings with it multiple social, health, and financial implications. Clear and accessible treatment pathways supported by mental health professionals is essential. PMID:24982651

  15. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Adults: Impact, Comorbidity, Risk Factors, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sareen, Jitender

    2014-01-01

    During the last 30 years, there has been a substantial increase in the study of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Several high-profile traumatic events, such as the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, and the terrorist attacks of September 11 on the World Trade Center, have led to a greater public interest in the risk and protective factors for PTSD. In this In Review paper, I discuss some of the important advances in PTSD. The paper provides a concise review of the evolution of PTSD diagnosis in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, impact of PTSD in the community, an overview of the established risk factors for developing PTSD, and assessment and treatment. Throughout the paper, controversies and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:25565692

  16. Posttraumatic stress disorder in adults: impact, comorbidity, risk factors, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Sareen, Jitender

    2014-09-01

    During the last 30 years, there has been a substantial increase in the study of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Several high-profile traumatic events, such as the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, and the terrorist attacks of September 11 on the World Trade Center, have led to a greater public interest in the risk and protective factors for PTSD. In this In Review paper, I discuss some of the important advances in PTSD. The paper provides a concise review of the evolution of PTSD diagnosis in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, impact of PTSD in the community, an overview of the established risk factors for developing PTSD, and assessment and treatment. Throughout the paper, controversies and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:25565692

  17. Cognitive-Behavior Therapy (CBT) for Panic Disorder: Relationship of Anxiety and Depression Comorbidity with Treatment Outcome

    PubMed Central

    White, Kamila S.; Barlow, David H.; Shear, M. Katherine; Gorman, Jack M.; Woods, Scott W.

    2009-01-01

    Research evaluating the relationship of comorbidity to treatment outcome for panic disorder has produced mixed results. The current study examined the relationship of comorbid depression and anxiety to treatment outcome in a large-scale, multi-site clinical trial for cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) for panic disorder. Comorbidity was associated with more severe panic disorder symptoms, although comorbid diagnoses were not associated with treatment response. Comorbid generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) were not associated with differential improvement on a measure of panic disorder severity, although only rates of comorbid GAD were significantly lower at posttreatment. Treatment responders showed greater reductions on measures of anxiety and depressive symptoms. These data suggest that comorbid anxiety and depression are not an impediment to treatment response, and successful treatment of panic disorder is associated with reductions of comorbid anxiety and depressive symptoms. Implications for treatment specificity and conceptual understandings of comorbidity are discussed. PMID:20421906

  18. Excessive Body Weight in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Porter Starr, Kathryn N; Bales, Connie W

    2015-08-01

    The health challenges prompted by obesity in the older adult population are poorly recognized and understudied. A defined treatment of geriatric obesity is difficult to establish, as it must take into account biological heterogeneity, age-related comorbidities, and functional limitations (sarcopenia/dynapenia). This retrospective article highlights the current understanding of the optimal body mass index (BMI) in later life, addressing appropriate recommendations based on BMI category, age, and health history. The findings of randomized control trials of weight loss/maintenance interventions help one to move closer to evidence-based and appropriately individualized recommendations for body weight management in older adults.

  19. Unique and related predictors of major depressive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, and their comorbidity after Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Nillni, Yael I; Nosen, Elizabeth; Williams, Patrick A; Tracy, Melissa; Coffey, Scott F; Galea, Sandro

    2013-10-01

    The current study examined demographic and psychosocial factors that predict major depressive disorder (MDD) and comorbid MDD/posttraumatic stress disorder (MDD/PTSD) diagnostic status after Hurricane Katrina, one of the deadliest and costliest hurricanes in the history of the United States. This study expanded on the findings published in the article by Galea, Tracy, Norris, and Coffey (J Trauma Stress 21:357-368, 2008), which examined the same predictors for PTSD, to better understand related and unique predictors of MDD, PTSD, and MDD/PTSD comorbidity. A total of 810 individuals representative of adult residents living in the 23 southernmost counties of Mississippi before Hurricane Katrina were interviewed. Ongoing hurricane-related stressors, low social support, and hurricane-related financial loss were common predictors of MDD, PTSD, and MDD/PTSD, whereas educational and marital status emerged as unique predictors of MDD. Implications for postdisaster relief efforts that address the risk for both MDD and PTSD are discussed. PMID:24080670

  20. Animal hoarding: slipping into the darkness of comorbid animal and self-neglect.

    PubMed

    Nathanson, Jane N

    2009-10-01

    Substantial research and literature indicate how people and companion animals form relationships that are, for the most part, mutually beneficial. Yet there are highly dysfunctional human-animal relationships that do occur, meriting attention and remediation. One of the most perplexing and problematic human-animal relationships is encountered in cases of animal hoarding--a deviant behavior associated with extremely deleterious conditions of comorbid animal and self-neglect. Adult Protective Services workers often encounter theoretical and methodological dilemmas with these complex cases. To intervene most effectively, it becomes critical to elucidate some of the developmental factors of animal hoarding behavior and its correlation with self-neglecting behaviors in general. This article presents an in-depth diagnostic perspective as derived from the author's research and clinical experience. An analysis of the complex dynamics of the relationship between animal hoarders and their pets is presented in conjunction with accepted theories of self-neglect. With enhanced knowledge and understanding of animal hoarding, human service professionals will be better prepared to respond to these clients, evoke greater rapport and cooperation, and engage in the interdisciplinary efforts that are essential for optimal resolution. PMID:20183137

  1. CHARACTERISTICS OF BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER IN A COMMUNITY SAMPLE: COMORBIDITY, TREATMENT UTILIZATION, AND GENERAL FUNCTIONING

    PubMed Central

    Tomko, Rachel L.; Trull, Timothy J.; Wood, Phillip K.; Sher, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    This study provides estimates of the prevalence and demographic features of borderline personality disorder (BPD) in a community sample as well as BPD comorbidity rates with Axis I and II disorders. In addition, the authors provide data on general functioning and treatment seeking among individuals with BPD. Data from 34,481 participants in the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) were analyzed. Results suggest that 2.7% of adults in the United States meet diagnostic criteria for BPD, with slightly higher rates of the disorder in females, people in lower income brackets, people younger than 30, and individuals who are separated or divorced. Racial/ethnic differences were evident, with Native Americans (5.0%) and Blacks (3.5%) having significantly higher rates of the disorder, on average, and Asians having significantly lower rates (1.2%). Individuals with a BPD diagnosis were likely to have co-occurring lifetime mood disorders, anxiety disorders, substance use disorders, and other personality disorders. Specifically, 84.8% of individuals with BPD also had a lifetime anxiety disorder, 82.7% had a lifetime mood disorder/episode, and 78.2% were diagnosed with a lifetime substance use disorder. Individuals with BPD showed significant impairment in functioning and were highly likely to seek therapy or receive medication for mental health concerns. PMID:25248122

  2. Animal hoarding: slipping into the darkness of comorbid animal and self-neglect.

    PubMed

    Nathanson, Jane N

    2009-10-01

    Substantial research and literature indicate how people and companion animals form relationships that are, for the most part, mutually beneficial. Yet there are highly dysfunctional human-animal relationships that do occur, meriting attention and remediation. One of the most perplexing and problematic human-animal relationships is encountered in cases of animal hoarding--a deviant behavior associated with extremely deleterious conditions of comorbid animal and self-neglect. Adult Protective Services workers often encounter theoretical and methodological dilemmas with these complex cases. To intervene most effectively, it becomes critical to elucidate some of the developmental factors of animal hoarding behavior and its correlation with self-neglecting behaviors in general. This article presents an in-depth diagnostic perspective as derived from the author's research and clinical experience. An analysis of the complex dynamics of the relationship between animal hoarders and their pets is presented in conjunction with accepted theories of self-neglect. With enhanced knowledge and understanding of animal hoarding, human service professionals will be better prepared to respond to these clients, evoke greater rapport and cooperation, and engage in the interdisciplinary efforts that are essential for optimal resolution.

  3. The National Comorbidity Survey Adolescent Supplement (NCS-A): I. Background and Measures

    PubMed Central

    Merikangas, Kathleen R.; Avenevoli, Shelli; Costello, E. Jane; Koretz, Doreen; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2009-01-01

    Objective This paper presents an overview of the background and measures used in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication Adolescent Supplement (NCS-A). Methods The NCS-A is a national psychiatric epidemiological survey of adolescents ages 13–17. Results The NCS-A was designed to provide the first nationally representative estimates of the prevalence, correlates and patterns of service use for DSM-V mental disorders among US adolescents and to lay the groundwork for follow-up studies of risk-protective factors, consequences, and early expressions of adult mental disorders. The core NCS-A diagnostic interview, the World Health Organization (WHO) Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI), is a fully-structured research diagnostic interview designed for use by trained lay interviewers. A multi-construct, multi-method, multi-informant battery was also included to assess risk and protective factors and barriers to service use. Design limitations due to the NCS-A evolving as a supplement to an ongoing survey of mental disorders of US adults include restricted age range of youth, cross-sectional assessment, and lack of full parental/surrogate informant reports on youth mental disorders and correlates. Conclusions Despite these limitations, the NCS-A contains unparalleled information that can be used to generate national estimates of prevalence and correlates of adolescent mental disorders, risk and protective factors, patterns of service use, and barriers to receiving treatment for these disorders. The retrospective NCS-A data on the development of psychopathology can additionally complement data from longitudinal studies based on more geographically restricted samples and serve as a useful baseline for future prospective studies of the onset and progression of mental disorders in adulthood. PMID:19242382

  4. Infinite Continuous Feature Model for Psychiatric Comorbidity Analysis.

    PubMed

    Valera, Isabel; Ruiz, Francisco J R; Olmos, Pablo M; Blanco, Carlos; Perez-Cruz, Fernando

    2016-02-01

    We aim at finding the comorbidity patterns of substance abuse, mood and personality disorders using the diagnoses from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions database. To this end, we propose a novel Bayesian nonparametric latent feature model for categorical observations, based on the Indian buffet process, in which the latent variables can take values between 0 and 1. The proposed model has several interesting features for modeling psychiatric disorders. First, the latent features might be off, which allows distinguishing between the subjects who suffer a condition and those who do not. Second, the active latent features take positive values, which allows modeling the extent to which the patient has that condition. We also develop a new Markov chain Monte Carlo inference algorithm for our model that makes use of a nested expectation propagation procedure. PMID:26654208

  5. Association between opium abuse and comorbidity in diabetic men.

    PubMed

    Shiri, Rahman; Hassani, Kobra Falah; Ansari, Mostafa

    2006-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of opium abuse in diabetic men and to investigate its association with comorbidity. The study population was comprised of 312 consecutive diabetic men aged 20 years or older residing in the study area in 2005. The prevalence of self-reported opium abuse was 11.2%. Opium use was associated with low socioeconomic status, smoking, tea consumption, and a higher prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) and severe depression. The prevalence of severe depression was 22.8% among 35 men who used opium and 13.4% among 277 who did not use it. The prevalence of moderate or severe ED was 85.7% among opium users and 66.1% among non-users. The risk of ED was two times (95% CI 1.0-7.4) higher in opium users compared with nonusers.

  6. [Depression and addiction comorbidity: towards a common molecular target?].

    PubMed

    Arango-Lievano, Margarita; Kaplitt, Michael G

    2015-05-01

    The comorbidity of depression and cocaine addiction suggests shared mechanisms and anatomical pathways. Specifically, the limbic structures, such as the nucleus accumbens (NAc), play a crucial role in both disorders. P11 (S100A10) is a promising target for manipulating depression and addiction in mice. We summarized the recent genetic and viral strategies used to determine how the titration of p11 levels within the NAc affects hedonic behavior and cocaine reward learning in mice. In particular, p11 in the ChAT+ cells or DRD1+ MSN of the NAc, controls depressive-like behavior or cocaine reward, respectively. Treatments to counter maladaptation of p11 levels in the NAc could provide novel therapeutic opportunities for depression and cocaine addiction in humans.

  7. Comorbid mood, psychosis, and marijuana abuse disorders: a theoretical review.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Natascha; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2009-10-01

    There is a need to bridge the gap between the fields of addiction psychiatry and general psychiatry to effectively treat co-morbid substance abuse and psychiatric disorders. This alarming epidemic transcends communities and severely impacts healthcare worldwide, yielding poor treatment outcomes and prognoses for afflicted patients. Because substance abuse can exacerbate or trigger psychosis and mood disorders, it is important to keep these issues in the forefront when evaluating patients. To address some of the complications stemming from not enough interactions between various groups of practitioners, this review addresses the neurobehavioral effects of cannabis use and their impact on patients who suffer from psychotic or affective disorders. The hope is that this article will serve as a spring board for further discussions among practitioners who treat these patients. Greater interactions between caretakers are bound to impact the care of our patients in a very positive way.

  8. Metabolic disease network and its implication for disease comorbidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Deok-Sun; Oltvai, Zoltan; Christakis, Nicholas; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2008-03-01

    Given that most diseases are the result of the breakdown of some cellular processes, a key aim of modern medicine is to establish the relationship between disease phenotypes and the various disruptions in the underlying cellular networks. Here we show that our current understanding of the structure of the human metabolic network can provide insight into potential relationships among often distinct disease phenotypes. Using the known enzyme-disease associations, we construct a human metabolic disease network in which nodes are diseases and two diseases are linked if the enzymes associated with them catalyze adjacent metabolic reactions. We find that the more connected a disease is, the higher is its prevalence and the chance that it is associated with a high mortality. The results indicate that the cellular network-level relationships between metabolic pathways and the associated disease provide insights into disease comorbidity, with potential important consequences on disease diagnosis and prevention.

  9. Psychiatric comorbidity in pediatric patients with demyelinating disorders.

    PubMed

    Weisbrot, Deborah M; Ettinger, Alan B; Gadow, Kenneth D; Belman, Anita L; MacAllister, William S; Milazzo, Maria; Reed, Michael L; Serrano, Daniel; Krupp, Lauren B

    2010-02-01

    Little is known about psychiatric aspects of pediatric demyelinating conditions. A total of 23 youths (6-17 years) with demyelinating conditions underwent semistructured psychiatric interviews using the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children-Present and Lifetime Version. Adolescents and parents completed the Child Symptom Inventory-4 and the Youth's Inventory-4. Fears and conceptions of their neurological problems were elicited. In all, 48% (n = 11) met criteria for current psychiatric diagnoses, including 27% (n = 3) with depressive disorders and 64% (n = 7) with anxiety disorders. Fears and conceptions of the illness were severe and diverse. Depressive and anxiety disorders are common in pediatric demyelinating disease. Clinicians should therefore screen for psychiatric comorbidity symptoms as part of the routine evaluation of such patients.

  10. [An update on gout: diagnostic approach, treatment and comorbidity].

    PubMed

    Diller, Magnus; Fleck, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Muskuloskeletal ultrasound and dual-energy-CT (DECT) findings are increasingly relevant for the establishment of the diagnosis of gout, and are therefore incorporated into the novel ACR / EULAR classification criteria. Canakinumab, a monoclonal antibody directed against interleukin-1β (IL-1β) has been approved in 2013 for the treatment of acute gout and for prophylaxis of flares. In patients demonstrating an inadequate response upon treatment with allopurinol or febuxostat, combination therapy with lesinurad might reduce uric acid levels to the target of < 6 mg / dl (< 5 mg / dl in tophaceous gout). Rapid lowering of uric acid levels and effective tophi reduction can be achieved with pegloticase, which can be utilized in selected patients presenting contraindications to xanthine oxidase inhibitors and uricosuric drugs. This article summarizes current scientific aspects of diagnosis, treatment and comorbidities of gout in the context of clinical relevance. PMID:27509346

  11. [Depression and addiction comorbidity: towards a common molecular target?].

    PubMed

    Arango-Lievano, Margarita; Kaplitt, Michael G

    2015-05-01

    The comorbidity of depression and cocaine addiction suggests shared mechanisms and anatomical pathways. Specifically, the limbic structures, such as the nucleus accumbens (NAc), play a crucial role in both disorders. P11 (S100A10) is a promising target for manipulating depression and addiction in mice. We summarized the recent genetic and viral strategies used to determine how the titration of p11 levels within the NAc affects hedonic behavior and cocaine reward learning in mice. In particular, p11 in the ChAT+ cells or DRD1+ MSN of the NAc, controls depressive-like behavior or cocaine reward, respectively. Treatments to counter maladaptation of p11 levels in the NAc could provide novel therapeutic opportunities for depression and cocaine addiction in humans. PMID:26059306

  12. [Psycho-organic comorbidity of climacteric: acknowledgement of denial].

    PubMed

    Souza y Machorro, Mario

    2002-03-01

    Considering psychiatric co-morbidity of menopause within the context of a new historical and psychosocial view of woman and femininity, the recommendations of current scientific literature focused to its attention, treatment and prevention, become different from the traditional sociomedical observations. In order to reach a new more effective assistance, prevailing prejudices must be overcame to achieve an adequate updating before being really effective. That is, to be suitable to the psychosocial needs of those who suffer a physiological condition. The change in the social role of women (which requires a genuine community acceptance) is not consolidated to new favorable attitudes which is required in the general thinking in our country, in order to offer better therapeutic alternatives to women's problems and its complications. Such situation is reflected even the medical and psychological handling of cases, where women are the main protagonists. This paper offers a brief discussion of this issue and some recommendations for diffusion purposes. PMID:12017957

  13. The role of the community nurse in psoriatic comorbidities interventions.

    PubMed

    Aldridge, Annette

    2014-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic disease that affects more than the skin. It has an impact on every facet of an individual's life and is associated with numerous comorbidities, such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, psoriatic arthritis, metabolic syndrome, squamous cell carcinoma, lymphoma, depression, anxiety and other immune-related conditions, such as Crohn's disease. Obesity is inextricably linked with type 2 diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and cardiovascular disease. Hypertension and cardiovascular disease are precursors for myocardial infarction and stroke. Lifestyle choices, such as smoking, alcohol consumption, inadequate nutrition and physical exercise are behaviours that need to be addressed. With the right education from the community nurse, patients can be informed about the decisions they make and can ultimately choose to live a healthier life. PMID:24800325

  14. Profiling leucocyte subsets in tuberculosis-diabetes co-morbidity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Moideen, Kadar; Dhakshinraj, Sharmila D; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V; Nair, Dina; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Babu, Subash

    2015-10-01

    The immune system plays an important role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary tuberculosis-type 2 diabetes mellitus (PTB-DM) co-morbidity. However, the phenotypic profile of leucocyte subsets at homeostasis in individuals with active or latent tuberculosis (LTB) with coincident diabetes is not known. To characterize the influence of diabetes on leucocyte phenotypes in PTB or LTB, we examined the frequency (Fo ) of leucocyte subsets in individuals with TB with (PTB-DM) or without (PTB) diabetes; individuals with latent TB with (LTB-DM) or without (LTB) diabetes and non-TB-infected individuals with (NTB-DM) or without (NTB) diabetes. Coincident DM is characterized by significantly lower Fo of effector memory CD4(+) T cells in LTB individuals. In contrast, DM is characterized by significantly lower Fo of effector memory CD8(+) T cells and significantly higher Fo of central memory CD8(+) T cells in PTB individuals. Coincident DM resulted in significantly higher Fo of classical memory B cells in PTB and significantly higher Fo of activated memory and atypical B cells in LTB individuals. Coincident DM resulted in significantly lower Fo of classical and intermediate monocytes in PTB, LTB and NTB individuals. Finally, DM resulted in significantly lower Fo of myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells in PTB, LTB and NTB individuals. Our data reveal that coincident diabetes alters the cellular subset distribution of T cells, B cells, dendritic cells and monocytes in both individuals with active TB and those with latent TB, thus potentially impacting the pathogenesis of this co-morbid condition.

  15. Personality traits and psychiatric comorbidities in alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Donadon, M.F.; Osório, F.L.

    2015-01-01

    Non-adaptive personality traits may constitute risk factors for development of psychiatric disorders such as depression and anxiety. We aim to evaluate associations and the predictive value of personality traits among alcohol-dependent individuals, with or without psychiatric comorbidities. The convenience sample comprised two groups of males over 18 years of age: one with subjects who had an alcohol dependence diagnosis (AG, n=110), and a control group without abuse and/or alcohol dependence diagnosis (CG, n=110). The groups were assessed by means of the Structured Clinical Interview DSM-IV (SCID-IV). AG participants were recruited among outpatients from the university hospital, whereas CG participants were recruited from a primary healthcare program. Data collection was done individually with self-assessment instruments. Parametric statistics were performed, and a significance level of P=0.05 was adopted. A positive correlation was observed between openness and the length of time that alcohol has been consumed, as were significant and negative correlations between conscientiousness and both the length of time alcohol has been consumed and the number of doses. For alcoholics, extraversion emerged as a protective factor against depression development (P=0.008) and tobacco abuse (P=0.007), whereas openness worked as a protective factor against anxiety (P=0.02). The findings point to specific deficits presented by alcoholics in relation to personality traits with or without psychiatric comorbidities and to the understanding that therapeutic approaches should favor procedures and/or preventive measures that allow more refined awareness about the disorder. PMID:26628399

  16. Profiling leucocyte subsets in tuberculosis–diabetes co-morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Moideen, Kadar; Dhakshinraj, Sharmila D; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V; Nair, Dina; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Babu, Subash

    2015-01-01

    The immune system plays an important role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary tuberculosis–type 2 diabetes mellitus (PTB-DM) co-morbidity. However, the phenotypic profile of leucocyte subsets at homeostasis in individuals with active or latent tuberculosis (LTB) with coincident diabetes is not known. To characterize the influence of diabetes on leucocyte phenotypes in PTB or LTB, we examined the frequency (Fo) of leucocyte subsets in individuals with TB with (PTB-DM) or without (PTB) diabetes; individuals with latent TB with (LTB-DM) or without (LTB) diabetes and non-TB-infected individuals with (NTB-DM) or without (NTB) diabetes. Coincident DM is characterized by significantly lower Fo of effector memory CD4+ T cells in LTB individuals. In contrast, DM is characterized by significantly lower Fo of effector memory CD8+ T cells and significantly higher Fo of central memory CD8+ T cells in PTB individuals. Coincident DM resulted in significantly higher Fo of classical memory B cells in PTB and significantly higher Fo of activated memory and atypical B cells in LTB individuals. Coincident DM resulted in significantly lower Fo of classical and intermediate monocytes in PTB, LTB and NTB individuals. Finally, DM resulted in significantly lower Fo of myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells in PTB, LTB and NTB individuals. Our data reveal that coincident diabetes alters the cellular subset distribution of T cells, B cells, dendritic cells and monocytes in both individuals with active TB and those with latent TB, thus potentially impacting the pathogenesis of this co-morbid condition. PMID:26095067

  17. Tics and psychiatric comorbidity in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gadow, Kenneth D; Nolan, Edith E; Sprafkin, Joyce; Schwartz, Joseph

    2002-05-01

    This study examined comorbid psychiatric symptoms in a large, community-based sample of children and adolescents. The study sample comprised a total of 3006 school children: 413 preschool (3 to 5 years; 237 males, 176 females; mean age 4 years 2 months, SD 8 months), 1520 elementary school (5 to 12 years; 787 males, 733 females; mean age 8 years 2 months, SD 1 year 11 months), and 1073 secondary school children (12 to 18 years; 573 males, 500 females; mean age 14 years 4 months, SD 1 year 10 months), all of whom were attending regular education programs. Children were evaluated with a teacher-completed DSM-IV-referenced rating scale. The sample was divided into four groups: attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder with tics (ADHD+tics), ADHD without tics (ADHD), tics without ADHD (T), and a comparison group i.e. neither ADHD nor tics (Non). The percentage of children with tic behaviors varied with age: preschool children (22.3%), elementary school children (7.8%), and adolescents (3.4%). Tic behaviors were more common in males than females, regardless of comorbid ADHD symptoms. For many psychiatric symptoms, screening prevalence rates were highest for the ADHD groups (ADHD+tics>ADHD>T>Non). However, obsessive-compulsive and simple and social phobia symptoms were more common in the groups with tic behavior. Findings for a community-based sample show many similarities with studies of clinically referred samples suggesting that teacher-completed ratings of DSM-IV symptoms may be a useful methodology for investigating the phenomenology of tic disorders.

  18. Personality traits and psychiatric comorbidities in alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Donadon, M F; Osório, F L

    2016-01-01

    Non-adaptive personality traits may constitute risk factors for development of psychiatric disorders such as depression and anxiety. We aim to evaluate associations and the predictive value of personality traits among alcohol-dependent individuals, with or without psychiatric comorbidities. The convenience sample comprised two groups of males over 18 years of age: one with subjects who had an alcohol dependence diagnosis (AG, n=110), and a control group without abuse and/or alcohol dependence diagnosis (CG, n=110). The groups were assessed by means of the Structured Clinical Interview DSM-IV (SCID-IV). AG participants were recruited among outpatients from the university hospital, whereas CG participants were recruited from a primary healthcare program. Data collection was done individually with self-assessment instruments. Parametric statistics were performed, and a significance level of P=0.05 was adopted. A positive correlation was observed between openness and the length of time that alcohol has been consumed, as were significant and negative correlations between conscientiousness and both the length of time alcohol has been consumed and the number of doses. For alcoholics, extraversion emerged as a protective factor against depression development (P=0.008) and tobacco abuse (P=0.007), whereas openness worked as a protective factor against anxiety (P=0.02). The findings point to specific deficits presented by alcoholics in relation to personality traits with or without psychiatric comorbidities and to the understanding that therapeutic approaches should favor procedures and/or preventive measures that allow more refined awareness about the disorder. PMID:26628399

  19. Pharmacological treatment of alcohol abuse/dependence with psychiatric comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Le Fauve, Charlene E; Litten, Raye Z; Randall, Carrie L; Moak, Darlene H; Salloum, Ihsan M; Green, Alan I

    2004-02-01

    This article represents the proceedings of a symposium at the 2003 annual meeting RSA in Fort Lauderdale, FL. It was organized and cochaired by Charlene E. Le Fauve and Carrie L. Randall. The presentations were (1) Introduction, by Charlene E. Le Fauve and Raye Z. Litten; (2) Treatment of co-occurring alcohol use and anxiety disorders, by Carrie L. Randall and Sarah W. Book; (3) Pharmacological treatment of alcohol dependent patients with comorbid depression, by Darlene H. Moak; (4) Efficacy of valproate in bipolar alcoholics: a double blind, placebo-controlled study, by Ihsan M. Salloum, Jack R. Cornelius, Dennis C. Daley, Levent Kirisci, Johnathan Himmelhoch, and Michael E. Thase; (5) Alcoholism and schizophrenia: effects of antipsychotics, by Alan I. Green, Robert E. Drake, Suzannah V. Zimmet, Rael D. Strous, Melinda Salomon, and Mark Brenner; and (6) Conclusions, by Charlene E. Le Fauve; discussant, Raye Z. Litten. Alcohol-dependent individuals have exceptionally high rates of co-occurring psychiatric disorders. Although this population is more likely to seek alcoholism treatment than noncomorbid alcoholics, the prognosis for treatment is often poor, particularly among patients with more severe psychiatric illnesses. Development of effective interventions to treat this population is in the early stages of research. Although the interaction between the psychiatric condition and alcoholism is complex, progress has been made. The NIAAA has supported a number of state-of-the-art pharmacological and behavioral trials in a variety of comorbid psychiatric disorders. Some of these trials have been completed and are presented here. The symposium presented some new research findings from clinical studies with the aim of facilitating the development of treatments that improve alcohol and psychiatric outcomes among individuals with alcohol-use disorders and co-occurring psychiatric disorders. The panel focused on social anxiety disorder, depression, bipolar disorder, and

  20. [Organic and comorbid causes of depression: a first step].

    PubMed

    Campagne, D M

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of this review is to obtain a clinical orientation as to evidence-supported common «other» causes of depressive symptomatology, which predominantly are: medical issues; life events; vitamin, mineral and diet-related deficiencies; and hormones. A secondary goal was to reflect those more frequent "other" causes in a checklist for clinical use, comprising also the preferred treatment (medical/dietary, antidepressants, or psychological) resulting from the available evidence. Medline, Cochrane and main related databases were searched from 4(th) October 2010 to 27(th) April 2011, no language limits, with keywords: depression; organic; comorbid; medication; life events; hormones; vitamin; mineral; diet; disease; as well as further searches into each upcoming possibly related issue. Total studies contemplated: 3.211; total studies reviewed: 301, with criteria of relevancy; date of study or review; size and type; journal status. Data were abstracted based upon probable clinical relevancy and use. The main results obtained were evidence-supported indications as to these other causes of depressive symptomatology, that warrant early screening, attention and treatment, possibly before antidepressant or psychological therapy is started. PRELIMINARY CONCLUSION: There appears to be a clinical rationale for early checking of a number of evidence-based causes of depressive symptoms for which first-line testing is readily available. In several cases clinical treatment may be simple, and improvements in depressive symptoms rapidly obtainable. Using a pre-treatment protocol, both patients and health systems could benefit from biological and comorbid causes of depressive symptoms being established early. An enhanced response to low-cost corrective measures can decrease the risk of suicide. PMID:23544777

  1. Does psychiatric comorbidity in alcohol-dependent patients affect treatment outcome?

    PubMed

    Mann, Karl; Hintz, Thomas; Jung, Martin

    2004-06-01

    Comorbidity in alcohol research refers to the presence of alcohol dependency and another major psychiatric disorder. The existence of additional disorders may have consequences for treatment planning and success. The aims of this paper are therefore: 1) to give an overview on prevalence rates in studies with representative cohorts and hospital-based samples; 2) to report results on gender differences and 3) to determine the impact of comorbidity on treatment outcome. Comorbidity was examined with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) in N = 118 (61 male and 57 female) alcohol-dependent patients who were socially well integrated. Results show that 65% of the female patients but only 28% of the male patients had a lifetime history of additional psychiatric disorders. Significantly more phobic/anxiety disorders, mood disorders occur in female patients. One year after inpatient treatment, overall 39% had suffered a relapse. More detailed analysis revealed that 55% of the non-comorbid but only 28% of the comorbid women suffered a relapse, thus contradicting our initial hypothesis that comorbid patients have a poorer prognosis with regard to their alcohol dependence. Male comorbid (40.9%) and non-comorbid (35.3%) patients showed no significant differences regarding relapse rates.

  2. Validity of the Autism Spectrum Disorder-Comorbid for Children (ASD-CC)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny L.; LoVullo, Santino V.; Rivet, Tessa T.; Boisjoli, Jessica A.

    2009-01-01

    A limited number of studies currently exist focusing on comorbid psychopathology of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Due to the heterogeneity of ASD symptoms, communication deficits, and impairments in intellectual functioning, assessing symptoms of psychopathology is complicated. The "Autism Spectrum Disorders-Comorbidity for…

  3. Comorbid Depressive Disorders in Anxiety-Disordered Youth: Demographic, Clinical, and Family Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Kelly A.; Podell, Jennifer L.; Benjamin, Courtney L.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2010-01-01

    Research indicates that depression and anxiety are highly comorbid in youth. Little is known, however, about the clinical and family characteristics of youth with principal anxiety disorders and comorbid depressive diagnoses. The present study examined the demographic, clinical, and family characteristics of 200 anxiety-disordered children and…

  4. Altered emotion regulation capacity in social phobia as a function of comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Burklund, Lisa J; Craske, Michelle G; Taylor, Shelley E; Lieberman, Matthew D

    2015-02-01

    Social phobia (SP) has been associated with amygdala hyperreactivity to fear-relevant stimuli. However, little is known about the neural basis of SP individuals' capacity to downregulate their responses to such stimuli and how such regulation varies as a function of comorbid depression and anxiety. We completed an functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study wherein SP participants without comorbidity (n = 30), with comorbid depression (n = 18) and with comorbid anxiety (n = 19) and healthy controls (n = 15) were scanned while completing an affect labeling emotion regulation task. Individuals with SP as a whole exhibited a reversal of the pattern observed in healthy controls in that they showed upregulation of amygdala activity during affect labeling. However, subsequent analyses revealed a more complex picture based on comorbidity type. Although none of the SP subgroups showed the normative pattern of amygdala downregulation, it was those with comorbid depression specifically who showed significant upregulation. Effects could not be attributed to differences in task performance, amygdala reactivity or right ventral lateral prefrontal cortex (RVLPFC) engagement, but may stem from dysfunctional communication between amygdala and RVLPFC. Furthermore, the particularly altered emotion regulation seen in those with comorbid depression could not be fully explained by symptom severity or state anxiety. Results reveal altered emotion regulation in SP, especially when comorbid with depression.

  5. Comorbidity of Anxiety and Depression in Children and Adolescents: 20 Years After

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Colleen M.; Caporino, Nicole E.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2014-01-01

    Brady and Kendall (1992) concluded that although anxiety and depression in youth are meaningfully linked, there are important distinctions, and additional research was needed. Since then, studies of anxiety-depression comorbidity in youth have increased exponentially. Following a discussion of comorbidity, we review existing conceptual models and propose a multiple pathways model to anxiety-depression comorbidity. Pathway 1 describes youth with a diathesis for anxiety, with subsequent comorbid depression resulting from anxiety-related impairment. Pathway 2 refers to youth with a shared diathesis for anxiety and depression, who may experience both disorders simultaneously. Pathway 3 describes youth with a diathesis for depression, with subsequent comorbid anxiety resulting from depression-related impairment. Additionally, shared and stratified risk factors contribute to the development of the comorbid disorder, either by interacting with disorder-related impairment or by predicting the simultaneous development of the disorders. Our review addresses descriptive and developmental factors, gender differences, suicidality, assessments, and treatment-outcome research as they relate to comorbid anxiety and depression, and to our proposed pathways. Research since 1992 indicates that comorbidity varies depending on the specific anxiety disorder, with Pathway 1 describing youth with either social phobia or separation anxiety disorder and subsequent depression, Pathway 2 applying to youth with co-primary generalized anxiety disorder and depression, and Pathway 3 including depressed youth with subsequent social phobia. The need to test the proposed multiple pathways model and to examine (a) developmental change and (b) specific anxiety disorders is highlighted. PMID:24219155

  6. Psychiatric Comorbidity in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Comparison with Children with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Steensel, Francisca J. A.; Bogels, Susan M.; de Bruin, Esther I.

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted with the aim to identify comorbid psychiatric disorders in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) (n = 40) and to compare those comorbidity rates to those in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (n = 40). Participants were clinically referred children aged 7-18 years. DSM-IV…

  7. Cardiac Reactivity and Stimulant Use in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders with Comorbid ADHD Versus ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bink, M.; Popma, A.; Bongers, I. L.; van Boxtel, G. J. M.; Denissen, A.; van Nieuwenhuizen, Ch.

    2015-01-01

    A large number of youngsters with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) display comorbid attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms. However, previous studies are not conclusive whether psychophysiological correlates, like cardiac reactivity, are different for ASD with comorbid ADHD (ASD+) compared to ADHD. Therefore, the current study…

  8. Impact of Comorbidity on Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Response in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Merlo, Lisa J.; Larson, Michael J.; Geffken, Gary R.; Lehmkuh, Heather D.; Jacob, Marni L.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Goodman, Wayne K.

    2008-01-01

    A chronic psychiatric condition among children and adolescents of concern is obsessive-compulsive disorder, which involves comorbid conditions. The impact of a range of comorbid illnesses on cognitive-behavioral therapy response and remission rates was conducted, with results revealing a negative impact on treatment response.

  9. Comorbidity of ADHD and Substance Use Disorder (SUD): A Neuroimaging Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frodl, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: ADHD has a high comorbidity with substance use disorders (SUD). Both diseases have profound social, psychological, and economic consequences and are therefore highly relevant for health systems. The high comorbidity indicates some shared underlying neurobiological substrates. Knowing these substrates may increase the understanding of…

  10. Calibrating for Comorbidity: Clinical Decision-Making in Youth Depression and Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Brian C.; Merson, Rachel A.; Zandberg, Laurie J.; Areizaga, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Comorbidity in clinical youth populations is more the rule than the exception, yet few established guidelines exist to help practicing clinicians manage complex diagnostic profiles. The current paper reviews efforts within the treatment development literature to handle comorbidity in depressed and anxious children and adolescents, including…

  11. Transdiagnostic Treatment of Bipolar Disorder and Comorbid Anxiety with the Unified Protocol: A Clinical Replication Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellard, Kristen K.; Deckersbach, Thilo; Sylvia, Louisa G.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Barlow, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic, debilitating disorder with recurrent manic and depressive episodes. More than 75% of bipolar patients have a current or lifetime diagnosis of a comorbid anxiety disorder. Comorbid anxiety in BD is associated with greater illness severity, greater functional impairment, and poorer illness-related outcomes.…

  12. A Clinical Study of Phenomenology and Comorbidity of Paediatric Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Pavan Kumar; T., Sivakumar; Agarwal, Vivek; Sitholey, Prabhat

    2012-01-01

    Background: Considerable controversy exists regarding clinical presentation, diagnosis, and comorbidities especially with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), in paediatric Bipolar Disorder (BPD). Aims and objectives: To describe phenomenology and comorbidities of paediatric BPD. Method: 78 Subjects (6-16 years) attending child and…

  13. How Can Comorbidity with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Aid Understanding of Language and Speech Disorders?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomblin, J. Bruce; Mueller, Kathyrn L.

    2012-01-01

    This article provides a background for the topic of comorbidity of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and spoken and written language and speech disorders that extends through this issue of "Topics in Language Disorders." Comorbidity is common within developmental disorders and may be explained by many possible reasons. Some of these can be…

  14. Comorbidity of Anxiety-Depression among Australian University Students: Implications for Student Counsellors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitsika, Vicki; Sharpley, Christopher F.

    2012-01-01

    The incidence, factor structure and scale item differences in anxiety-depression comorbidity were investigated in a sample of Australian university students defined according to the presence of anxiety and/or depression. The incidence of anxiety-depression comorbidity was over 32%, about four times that for anxiety or depression alone.…

  15. Altered emotion regulation capacity in social phobia as a function of comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Craske, Michelle G.; Taylor, Shelley E.; Lieberman, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Social phobia (SP) has been associated with amygdala hyperreactivity to fear-relevant stimuli. However, little is known about the neural basis of SP individuals’ capacity to downregulate their responses to such stimuli and how such regulation varies as a function of comorbid depression and anxiety. We completed an functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study wherein SP participants without comorbidity (n = 30), with comorbid depression (n = 18) and with comorbid anxiety (n = 19) and healthy controls (n = 15) were scanned while completing an affect labeling emotion regulation task. Individuals with SP as a whole exhibited a reversal of the pattern observed in healthy controls in that they showed upregulation of amygdala activity during affect labeling. However, subsequent analyses revealed a more complex picture based on comorbidity type. Although none of the SP subgroups showed the normative pattern of amygdala downregulation, it was those with comorbid depression specifically who showed significant upregulation. Effects could not be attributed to differences in task performance, amygdala reactivity or right ventral lateral prefrontal cortex (RVLPFC) engagement, but may stem from dysfunctional communication between amygdala and RVLPFC. Furthermore, the particularly altered emotion regulation seen in those with comorbid depression could not be fully explained by symptom severity or state anxiety. Results reveal altered emotion regulation in SP, especially when comorbid with depression. PMID:24813437

  16. Patterns and Impact of Comorbidity and Multimorbidity among Community-Resident American Indian Elders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Robert; Kerby, Dave S.; Hennessy, Catherine Hagan

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to suggest a new approach to identifying patterns of comorbidity and multimorbidity. Design and Methods: A random sample of 1,039 rural community-resident American Indian elders aged 60 years and older was surveyed. Comorbidity was investigated with four standard approaches, and with cluster analysis. Results:…

  17. Atomoxetine Treatment for Pediatric Patients with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder with Comorbid Anxiety Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geller, Daniel; Donnelly, Craig; Lopez, Frank; Rubin, Richard; Newcorn, Jeffrey; Sutton, Virginia; Bakken, Rosalie; Paczkowski, Martin; Kelsey, Douglas; Sumner, Calvin

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Research suggests 25% to 35% of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have comorbid anxiety disorders. This double-blind study compared atomoxetine with placebo for treating pediatric ADHD with comorbid anxiety, as measured by the ADHD Rating Scale-IV-Parent Version: Investigator Administered and Scored…

  18. Stability of Comorbid Psychiatric Diagnosis among Youths in Treatment and Aftercare for Alcohol Use Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawke, Josephine M.; Kaminer, Yifrah; Burke, Rebecca; Burleson, Joseph A.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the stability of comorbid psychiatric diagnoses among a sample of 50 adolescents in cognitive-behaviorally-based treatment for alcohol and other substance use disorders (AOSUD). Methods: A standardized psychiatric interview was administered at baseline and 12 month later to obtain current comorbid psychiatric disorders. Chi…

  19. The Comorbidity of Conduct Problems and Depression in Childhood and Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolff, Jennifer C.; Ollendick, Thomas H.

    2006-01-01

    An extensive body of research documents the high prevalence of comorbidity among child and adolescent disorders in general and between conduct problems and depression in particular. These problems co-occur at significantly higher rates than would be expected by chance and their comorbidity may have significant implications for nosology, treatment,…

  20. Untangling Psychiatric Comorbidity in Young Children Who Experienced Single, Repeated, or Hurricane Katrina Traumatic Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheeringa, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), 70-90 % have at least one comorbid non-PTSD disorder. Objective: This study tested several hypotheses to untangle comorbidity issues. Following McMillen et al. ("Compr Psychiatry" 43(6):478-485, 2002), we hypothesized that few non-PTSD disorders would arise following…

  1. Interpersonal Psychotherapy-Adolescent Skills Training: Anxiety Outcomes and Impact of Comorbidity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jami F.; Makover, Heather B.; Cohen, Joseph R.; Mufson, Laura; Gallop, Robert J.; Benas, Jessica S.

    2012-01-01

    Given the frequent comorbidity of anxiety and depression, it is important to study the effects of depression interventions on anxiety and the impact of comorbid anxiety on depression outcomes. This article reports on pooled anxiety and depression data from two randomized trials of Interpersonal Psychotherapy-Adolescent Skills Training (IPT-AST), a…

  2. Impact of Comorbidities on Prostate Cancer Stage at Diagnosis in Florida

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Hong; Tan, Fei; Goovaerts, Pierre; Adunlin, Georges; Ali, Askal Ayalew; Gwede, Clement K.; Huang, Youjie

    2015-01-01

    To examine the association of major types of comorbidity with late-stage prostate cancer, a random sample of 11,083 men diagnosed with prostate cancer during 2002-2007 was taken from the Florida Cancer Data System. Individual-level covariates included demographics, primary insurance payer, and comorbidity following the Elixhauser Index. Socioeconomic variables were extracted from Census 2000 data and merged to the individual level data. Provider-to-case ratio at county level was alsocomputed. Multilevel logistic regression was used to assess associations between these factors and late-stage diagnosis of prostate cancer. Higher odds of late-stage diagnosis was significantly related to presence of comorbidities, being unmarried, current smoker, uninsured, and diagnosed in not-for-profit hospitals. The study reported that the presence of certain comorbidities, specifically 10 out of the 45, was associated with late-stage prostate cancer diagnosis. Eight out of 10 significant comorbid conditions were associated with greater risk of being diagnosed at late-stage prostate cancer. On the other hand, men who had chronic pulmonary disease, and solid tumor without metastasis, were less likely to be diagnosed with late-stage prostate cancer. Late-stage diagnosis was associated with comorbidity, which is often associated with increased health care utilization. The association of comorbidity with late-stage prostate cancer diagnosis suggests that individuals with significant comorbidity should be offered routine screening for prostate cancer rather than focusing only on managing symptomatic health problems. PMID:25542838

  3. Comorbidities in Chronic Pediatric Peritoneal Dialysis Patients: A Report of the International Pediatric Peritoneal Dialysis Network

    PubMed Central

    Neu, Alicia M.; Sander, Anja; Borzych-Dużałka, Dagmara; Watson, Alan R.; Vallés, Patricia G.; Ha, Il Soo; Patel, Hiren; Askenazi, David; Balasz-Chmielewska, Irena; Lauronen, Jouni; Groothoff, Jaap W.; Feber, Janusz; Schaefer, Franz; Warady, Bradley A.

    2012-01-01

    ♦ Background, Objectives, and Methods: Hospitalization and mortality rates in pediatric dialysis patients remain unacceptably high. Although studies have associated the presence of comorbidities with an increased risk for death in a relatively small number of pediatric dialysis patients, no large-scale study had set out to describe the comorbidities seen in pediatric dialysis patients or to evaluate the impact of those comorbidities on outcomes beyond the newborn period. In the present study, we evaluated the prevalence of comorbidities in a large international cohort of pediatric chronic peritoneal dialysis (CPD) patients from the International Pediatric Peritoneal Dialysis Network registry and began to assess potential associations between those comorbidities and hospitalization rates and mortality. ♦ Results: Information on comorbidities was available for 1830 patients 0 - 19 years of age at dialysis initiation. Median age at dialysis initiation was 9.1 years [interquartile range (IQR): 10.9], median follow-up for calculation of hospitalization rates was 15.2 months (range: 0.2 - 80.9 months), and total follow-up time in the registry was 2095 patient-years. At least 1 comorbidity had been reported for 602 of the patients (32.9%), with 283 (15.5%) having cognitive impairment; 230 (12.6%), motor impairment; 167 (9.1%), cardiac abnormality; 76 (4.2%), pulmonary abnormality; 212 (11.6%), ocular abnormality; and 101 (5.5%), hearing impairment. Of the 150 patients (8.2%) that had a defined syndrome, 85% had at least 1 nonrenal comorbidity, and 64% had multiple comorbidities. The presence of at least 1 comorbidity was associated with a higher hospitalization rate [hospital days per 100 observation days: 1.7 (IQR: 5.8) vs 1.2 (IQR: 3.9), p = 0.001] and decreased patient survival (4-year survival rate: 73% vs 90%, p < 0.0001). ♦ Conclusions: Nearly one third of pediatric CPD patients in a large international cohort had at least 1 comorbidity, and multiple

  4. Intermittent Explosive Disorder in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication Adolescent Supplement

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Katie A.; Green, Jennifer Greif; Hwang, Irving; Sampson, Nancy A.; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2012-01-01

    Context Epidemiologic studies of adults show that DSM-IV intermittent explosive disorder (IED) is a highly prevalent and seriously impairing disorder. Although retrospective reports in these studies suggest that IED typically begins in childhood, no previous epidemiologic research has directly examined the prevalence or correlates of IED among youth. Objective To present epidemiologic data on the prevalence and correlates of IED among US adolescents in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication Adolescent Supplement. Design United States survey of adolescent (age, 13–17 years) DSM-IV anxiety, mood, behavior, and substance disorders. Setting Dual-frame household-school samples. Participants A total of 6483 adolescents (interviews) and parents (questionnaires). Main Outcome Measures The DSM-IV disorders were assessed with the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). Results Nearly two-thirds of adolescents (63.3%) reported lifetime anger attacks that involved destroying property, threatening violence, or engaging in violence. Of these, 7.8% met DSM-IV/CIDI criteria for lifetime IED. Intermittent explosive disorder had an early age at onset (mean age, 12.0 years) and was highly persistent, as indicated by 80.1% of lifetime cases (6.2% of all respondents) meeting 12-month criteria for IED. Injuries related to IED requiring medical attention reportedly occurred 52.5 times per 100 lifetime cases. In addition, IED was significantly comorbid with a wide range of DSM-IV/CIDI mood, anxiety, and substance disorders, with 63.9% of lifetime cases meeting criteria for another such disorder. Although more than one-third (37.8%) of adolescents with 12-month IED received treatment for emotional problems in the year before the interview, only 6.5% of respondents with 12-month IED were treated specifically for anger. Conclusions Intermittent explosive disorder is a highly prevalent, persistent, and seriously impairing adolescent mental

  5. Medical Comorbidity of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in US Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Jameson, Nicole D; Sheppard, Brooke K; Lateef, Tarannum M; Vande Voort, Jennifer L; He, Jian-Ping; Merikangas, Kathleen Ries

    2016-10-01

    Understanding patterns of medical comorbidity in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may lead to better treatment of affected individuals as well as aid in etiologic study of disease. This article provides the first systematic evaluation on the medical comorbidity of ADHD in a nationally representative sample (National Comorbidity Replication Survey-Adolescent Supplement; N = 6483) using formal diagnostic criteria. Survey-weighted odds ratios adjusted for demographics, additional medical, and mental disorders were calculated for associations between ADHD and medical conditions. Models adjusted for demographics revealed significantly increased odds of allergy, asthma, enuresis, headache/migraine, and serious stomach or bowel problems. After adjusting for comorbidity, across the medical conditions, enuresis and serious stomach problems were the strongest correlates of ADHD. These findings confirm the pervasive medical comorbidity of ADHD reported in previous clinical and community-based studies. The intriguing salience of enuresis and serious stomach or bowel conditions may also provide an important clue to multisystem involvement in ADHD.

  6. A Developmental Psychopathology Perspective on ADHD and Comorbid Conditions: The Role of Emotion Regulation.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Elizabeth A; Drabick, Deborah A G

    2015-12-01

    Research investigating attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and co-occurring disorders such as oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder, anxiety, and depression has surged in popularity; however, the developmental relations between ADHD and these comorbid conditions remain poorly understood. The current paper uses a developmental psychopathology perspective to examine conditions commonly comorbid with ADHD during late childhood through adolescence. First, we present evidence for ADHD and comorbid disorders. Next, we discuss emotion regulation and its associations with ADHD. The role of parenting behaviors in the development and maintenance of emotion regulation difficulties and comorbid disorders among children with ADHD is explored. An illustrative example of emotion regulation and parenting over the course of development is provided to demonstrate bidirectional relations among these constructs. We then present an integrated conceptual model of emotion regulation as a shared risk process that may lead to different comorbid conditions among children with ADHD. Implications and directions for future research are presented.

  7. Comorbidity of LD and ADHD: implications of DSM-5 for assessment and treatment.

    PubMed

    DuPaul, George J; Gormley, Matthew J; Laracy, Seth D

    2013-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and learning disability (LD) can co-occur for a significant minority of children with each disorder. A total of 17 studies (2001-2011) examining ADHD-LD comorbidity were reviewed, revealing a higher mean comorbidity rate (45.1%) than has been obtained previously. Higher comorbidity may be the result of including students with writing disorders, not just reading and/or math disabilities. Proposed DSM-5 criteria for both disorders will likely affect comorbidity rates; however, it is unclear whether such rates will increase or decrease. Regardless of the specific impact of DSM revisions, academic skill and/or performance deficits should be assessed for students with ADHD as part of screening, comprehensive evaluation, and treatment monitoring. Comprehensive intervention services for students with comorbid ADHD and LD will require empirically supported treatment strategies that address both disorders and that are implemented across school and home settings. PMID:23144063

  8. Weight Management in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Gill, Lydia E; Bartels, Stephen J; Batsis, John A

    2015-09-01

    As the number of older adults increases rapidly, the national epidemic of obesity is also affecting our aging population. This is particularly concerning given the numerous health risks and increased costs associated with this condition. Weight management is extremely important for older adults given the risks associated with abdominal adiposity, which is a typical fat redistribution during aging, and the prevalence of comorbid conditions in this age group. However, approaches to weight loss must be considered critically given the dangers of sarcopenia (a condition that occurs when muscle mass and quality are lost), the increased risk of hip fracture with weight loss, and the association between reduced mortality and increased BMI in older adults. This overview highlights the challenges and implications of measuring adiposity in older adults and the dangers and benefits of weight loss in this population and provides an overview of the new Medicare Obesity Benefit. In addition, we provide a summary of outcomes from successful weight loss interventions for older adults and discuss implications for advancing clinical practice. PMID:26627496

  9. Phenotypes of comorbidity in OSAS patients: combining categorical principal component analysis with cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Vavougios, George D; George D, George; Pastaka, Chaido; Zarogiannis, Sotirios G; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos I

    2016-02-01

    Phenotyping obstructive sleep apnea syndrome's comorbidity has been attempted for the first time only recently. The aim of our study was to determine phenotypes of comorbidity in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients employing a data-driven approach. Data from 1472 consecutive patient records were recovered from our hospital's database. Categorical principal component analysis and two-step clustering were employed to detect distinct clusters in the data. Univariate comparisons between clusters included one-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni correction and chi-square tests. Predictors of pairwise cluster membership were determined via a binary logistic regression model. The analyses revealed six distinct clusters: A, 'healthy, reporting sleeping related symptoms'; B, 'mild obstructive sleep apnea syndrome without significant comorbidities'; C1: 'moderate obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, obesity, without significant comorbidities'; C2: 'moderate obstructive sleep apnea syndrome with severe comorbidity, obesity and the exclusive inclusion of stroke'; D1: 'severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and obesity without comorbidity and a 33.8% prevalence of hypertension'; and D2: 'severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome with severe comorbidities, along with the highest Epworth Sleepiness Scale score and highest body mass index'. Clusters differed significantly in apnea-hypopnea index, oxygen desaturation index; arousal index; age, body mass index, minimum oxygen saturation and daytime oxygen saturation (one-way analysis of variance P < 0.0001). Binary logistic regression indicated that older age, greater body mass index, lower daytime oxygen saturation and hypertension were associated independently with an increased risk of belonging in a comorbid cluster. Six distinct phenotypes of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and its comorbidities were identified. Mapping the heterogeneity of the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome may help the early identification of at

  10. Bipolar co-morbidity in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder: clinical and treatment implications.

    PubMed

    Masi, Gabriele; Perugi, Giulio; Millepiedi, Stefania; Toni, Cristina; Mucci, Maria; Pfanner, Chiara; Berloffa, Stefano; Pari, Cinzia; Akiskal, Hagop S

    2007-08-01

    This paper reports on implications of bipolar disorder (BD) co-morbidity in 120 children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) (84 males, 36 females, age 13.7 +/- 2.8 years), diagnosed using a clinical interview according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV) criteria, and naturalistically followed-up for 12 +/- 6 months. The aim of this naturalistic, retrospective study was to explore the effect of BD co-morbidity, disentangling it from other co-occurring variables, namely the co-morbidity with disruptive behavior disorders. Forty three patients (35.8%) had a bipolar co-morbidity. Compared with OCD patients without BD, they had an earlier onset of OCD, a greater severity and functional impairment, more frequent hoarding obsessions and compulsions, and a poorer response to treatments. They had a higher co-morbidity with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and oppositional-defiant disorder (ODD), and a lower co-morbidity with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Finally, they received more mood stabilizers, and 30.2% of them did not receive serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) because of pharmacological (hypo)mania. When all the OCD responders and nonresponders were compared, nonresponders (n = 42, 35%) were more severe at baseline and at end of the follow-up, had more frequently hoarding obsessions and compulsions, and had more frequent BD, ODD, and conduct disorder (CD) and less GAD and panic disorder. In the final regression model, hoarding obsessions and compulsions, co-morbidity with ODD, and CD were negative predictors of treatment outcome. This study suggests that even though bipolar co-morbidity is frequent and affects phenomenology and co-morbidity in pediatric OCD, its effect on treatment response seems prevalently accounted for by co-morbidity with disruptive behavior disorders. The significance of the hoarding subtype deserves further research on larger samples of

  11. Caregivers' Distress: Youth with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Comorbid Disorders Assessed via Telemental Health

    PubMed Central

    Violette, Heather; Stoep, Ann Vander; Grover, Sarah; Myers, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective This article evaluates the additive effects of children's comorbid conditions with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in relation to caregivers' distress, in a clinical trial conducted through telemental health (TMH). Methods The Children's ADHD Telemental Health Treatment Study (CATTS) is examining the effectiveness of treatment delivered via TMH for children with ADHD who are living in underserved communities. The CATTS trial recruited 223 children (μ=9.53±2.06 years) and their caregivers. Diagnoses of ADHD and comorbid oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and anxiety disorders (ADs) were established with the Child Behavior Checklist and the Computerized Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children. We took advantage of rich baseline data from the CATTS trial to investigate associations between caregivers' distress and children's comorbid mental health conditions. Caregivers' distress was assessed with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, Parenting Stress Index, and Caregiver Strain Questionnaire. ANOVAs were used to compare children with ADHD alone with children having one comorbid condition (ODD or ADs) and children having two comorbid conditions (ODD and ADs). Results Three quarters (75.3%) of participants met criteria for ODD and/or AD comorbid with ADHD: 24.7% had neither comorbidity; 47.5% had ODD or AD; and 27.8% had both ODD and AD comorbidities. The parents of children with multiple comorbid conditions experienced the highest levels of depression, stress, and burden of care. Conclusions The CATTS sample that was recruited from underserved communities provided evidence of additive effects of child psychiatric comorbidities with caregivers' distress, echoing earlier findings from the Multi-modal Treatment of ADHD (MTA) study that was conducted with a metropolitan sample of youth. Results indicate that caregivers' distress should be addressed in developing treatment models for children with ADHD. Clinical Trials Registry http

  12. Geriatric Syndromes in Older HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Meredith; Covinsky, Kenneth E.; Valcour, Victor; Miao, Yinghui; Madamba, Joy; Lampiris, Harry; Cenzer, Irena Stijacic; Martin, Jeffrey; Deeks, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Geriatric syndromes such as falls, frailty, and functional impairment are multifactorial conditions used to identify vulnerable older adults. Limited data exists on these conditions in older HIV-infected adults and no studies have comprehensively examined these conditions. Methods Geriatric syndromes including falls, urinary incontinence, functional impairment, frailty, sensory impairment, depression and cognitive impairment were measured in a cross-sectional study of HIV-infected adults age 50 and older who had an undetectable viral load on antiretroviral therapy (ART). We examined both HIV and non-HIV related predictors of geriatric syndromes including sociodemographics, number of co-morbidities and non-antiretroviral medications, and HIV specific variables in multivariate analyses. Results We studied 155 participants with a median age of 57 (IQR 54-62); (94%) were men. Pre-frailty (56%), difficulty with instrumental activities of daily living (46%), and cognitive impairment (47%) were the most frequent geriatric syndromes. Lower CD4 nadir (IRR 1.16, 95% CI 1.06-1.26), non-white race (IRR 1.38, 95% CI 1.10-1.74), and increasing number of comorbidities (IRR 1.09, 95%CI 1.03-1.15) were associated with increased risk of having more geriatric syndromes. Conclusions Geriatric syndromes are common in older HIV infected adults. Treatment of comorbidities and early initiation of ART may help to prevent development of these age related complications. Clinical care of older HIV-infected adults should consider incorporation of geriatric principles. PMID:26009828

  13. The pattern of physical comorbidity and the psychosocial determinants of depression: a prospective cohort study on a representative sample of family practice attendees in Slovenia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to present the patterns of physical comorbidity in depressed patients and factors strongly associated with depression in a representative sample of Slovenian family practice attendees. Methods Medical data was obtained for 911 general practice attendees. Of them, 221 (24.3%) were diagnosed as depressed. The depressive states of the subjects were evaluated using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). Physical comorbidity was assessed with a questionnaire covering the most common health problems in the Slovenian adult population. Several psycho-social factors were also analysed. Results Those variables significantly related to ICD depression were included in multivariate binary logistic regression analysis, adjusted by age, gender and education. The calculation included the chi-square, odds ratio (OR) with confidence interval (95% CI) and P-value. A P-value < 0.05 was marked as statistically significant. Conclusions There was no significant difference in the number of concurrent chronic diseases in depressed and non-depressed subjects. The risk of depression was increased by the presence of several concomitant factors. The burden of somatic co-morbidity was shown to be smaller than the impact of psychosocial determinants, which also acted as protective factors: the feeling of safety at home and the absence of problems in intimate relationships. The abuse of alcohol and drugs by a family member and current poor financial situation were strongly associated with depression. The impact of concurrent incontinence and chronic bowel disease was also important, though somewhat weaker. PMID:22942896

  14. Psychiatric Comorbidity and Cognitive Profile in Children with Narcolepsy with or without Association to the H1N1 Influenza Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Szakács, Attila; Hallböök, Tove; Tideman, Pontus; Darin, Niklas; Wentz, Elisabet

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate psychiatric comorbidity and the cognitive profile in children and adolescents with narcolepsy in western Sweden and the relationship of these problems to H1N1 vaccination. Patients: Thirty-eight patients were included in the study. Design: We performed a population-based, cross-sectional study to investigate psychiatric comorbidity using a test battery of semistructured interviews generating Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition diagnoses, including the Development and Well-Being Assessment and the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder rating scale. The Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire and the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale were used to screen for autistic traits and psychotic symptoms, respectively. The cognitive assessments were made by a clinical psychologist using the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence, Third Edition, the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Fourth Edition, or the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Fourth Edition. Measurements and Results: In the post-H1N1 vaccination (PHV) narcolepsy group (n = 31), 43% of patients had psychiatric comorbidity, 29% had attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) inattentive type, 20% had major depression, 10% had general anxiety disorder, 7% had oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), 3% had pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (i.e., atypical autism), and 3% had eating disorder not otherwise specified (anorectic type). In the non–post-H1N1 vaccination (nPHV) narcolepsy group, one of seven patients had ADHD, inattentive type and ODD. The most frequent psychiatric symptom was temper tantrums, which occurred in 94% of the patients in the PHV group and 71% of the patients in the nPHV narcolepsy group. The cognitive assessment profile was similar in both groups and showed normal results for mean full-scale IQ and perceptual speed but decreased verbal comprehension and working memory. Patients with

  15. What is the impact of different spirometric criteria on the prevalence of spirometrically defined COPD and its comorbidities? Results from the population-based KORA study

    PubMed Central

    Karrasch, Stefan; Brüske, Irene; Smith, Maia P; Thorand, Barbara; Huth, Cornelia; Ladwig, Karl-Heinz; Kronenberg, Florian; Heinrich, Joachim; Holle, Rolf; Peters, Annette; Schulz, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Background There is an ongoing debate about the appropriate spirometric criterion for airway obstruction to detect COPD. Furthermore, the association of different criteria with comorbidity prevalence and inflammatory biomarkers in advanced age is unclear. Materials and methods Spirometry was performed in a population-based study (n=2,256) covering an age range of 41–90 years. COPD was spirometrically determined either by a fixed ratio (FR) of <0.7 for forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)/forced vital capacity (FVC) or by FEV1/FVC below the lower limit of normal (LLN). Comorbidity prevalences and circulating biomarker levels (C-reactive protein [CRP], interleukin [IL]-6) were compared between subjects with or without COPD by the two criteria using logistic and multiple regression models, adjusting for sex and age. Results The prevalence of spirometrically defined COPD by FR increased with age from 10% in subjects aged <65 years to 26% in subjects aged ≥75 years. For LLN-defined COPD, it remained below 10% for all age groups. Overall, COPD diagnosis was not associated with specific comorbidities, except for a lower prevalence of obesity in both FR- and LLN-defined cases. Both CRP and IL-6 tended to be higher in cases by both criteria. Conclusion In a population-based cohort of adults up to the age of 90 years, the prevalence of spirometrically defined COPD was higher for the FR criterion than for the LLN criterion. This difference increased with age. Neither prevalences of common comorbidities nor levels of the biomarkers, CRP or IL-6, were conclusively associated with the selection of the COPD criterion. Results have to be considered in light of the predominantly mild cases of airway obstruction in the examined study population. PMID:27574413

  16. Effect of comorbid tics on a clinically meaningful response to 8-week open-label trial of fluoxetine in obsessive compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Husted, David S; Shapira, Nathan A; Murphy, Tanya K; Mann, Giselle D; Ward, Herbert E; Goodman, Wayne K

    2007-01-01

    Currently, there are limited published data evaluating the effects of tics on serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) monotherapy responses in treating obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). One retrospective case-controlled analysis of OCD patients treated with SRI monotherapy showed lesser improvement in OCD symptoms in patients with tics than those without. However, more recently there were preliminary reports of OCD subjects treated with SRI monotherapy which did not demonstrate poorer response in subjects with tics or Tourette's Syndrome (TS). The specific aim of this study was to investigate whether the presence of comorbid chronic tics affected "clinically meaningful improvement" [McDougle, C.J., Goodman, W.K., Leckman, J.F., Barr, L.C., Heninger, G.R., Price, L.H., 1993. The efficacy of fluvoxamine in obsessive-compulsive disorder: effects of comorbid chronic tic disorder. Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology 13, 354-358] of OCD in an 8-week open-label trial of fluoxetine monotherapy. Seventy-four adult subjects (13 patients with comorbid chronic tics and 61 patients without tics) with a primary DSM-IV OCD diagnosis were treated with up to 40mg fluoxetine for 8 weeks and had at least one post-baseline evaluation. The results indicate that there was a significant response by time in both fluoxetine-with-tic subjects and fluoxetine-without-tic subjects. Additionally, there were 3 (23.0%) OCD subjects with tics who had clinically meaningful improvement versus 16 (26.2%) OCD subjects without tics that demonstrated similar levels of improvement. These findings indicate that OCD patients with or without chronic tic disorders did not have a differential response to an 8-week open-label trial of fluoxetine. Limitations include the relatively low number of tic subjects and the open-label nature of the study. Additional data are needed on how comorbid tics may affect SRI treatment response in OCD.

  17. The Effect of Comorbid AD/HD and Learning Disabilities on Parent-Reported Behavioral and Academic Outcomes of Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Thomas J.; Adams, Gail

    2006-01-01

    Data from the 2001 National Household Education Survey were examined to estimate the prevalence of comorbid AD/HD and LD among school-aged children in the United States and assess how this comorbidity was associated with selected parent-reported behavioral and academic outcomes. The observed prevalence of comorbidity coincided with estimates in…

  18. The chronic obstructive pulmonary disease comorbidity spectrum in Japan differs from that in western countries.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Saeko; Betsuyaku, Tomoko

    2015-11-01

    Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) frequently suffer from various comorbidities, such as cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, depression, malnutrition, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and lung cancer. These comorbidities have a significant impact on disease severity and survival. In fact, guidelines from both the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease and the Japanese Respiratory Society recommend that physicians take comorbidities into account when they evaluate COPD severity. These guidelines also emphasize the importance of managing comorbidities alongside airway obstruction in COPD. The mechanisms by which the many COPD-related comorbidities develop are still unclear. Aging and smoking are well-established as major factors. However, systemic inflammation may also contribute to the disease process. Having developed from the classical theory to differentiate COPD patients into "pink puffers" and "blue bloaters", COPD is now generally considered as a heterogeneous condition. On this point, we have noticed that the characteristics of Japanese COPD patients tend to differ from those of Westerners. Specifically, Japanese patients tend to be older, to have lower body mass index, to suffer from emphysema-dominant lung disease, and to experience exacerbations less frequently. The comorbidity spectrum of Japanese COPD patients also seems to differ from that of Westerners. For instance, in Japanese patients, cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome are less prevalent, whereas osteoporosis and malnutrition are more frequent. In order to treat Japanese COPD patients optimally, we must pay particular attention to their unique demographics and comorbidity spectrum, which contrast with those of Western COPD patients. PMID:26521103

  19. Comorbid Personality Disorders in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Its Symptom Dimensions.

    PubMed

    Bulli, Francesco; Melli, Gabriele; Cavalletti, Veronica; Stopani, Eleonora; Carraresi, Claudia

    2016-06-01

    The current paper was aimed at: (1) investigating the comorbidity between obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and personality disorders (PDs) using an OCD sample and clinician-administered structured interviews; (2) exploring the associations of different cluster comorbid PDs with the specific symptom dimensions of OCD; (3) analyzing the variables which could play a significant role in the probability of having at least one comorbid PD, controlling for confounding variables. The SCID-II and Y-BOCS, together with a series of self-report measures of OCD, depression and anxiety symptoms were administered to a clinical sample of 159 patients with a primary diagnosis of OCD. 20.8 % of the participants suffered from at least one comorbid PD; the most common was obsessive-compulsive PD (9.4 %), followed by narcissistic PD (6.3 %). In OCD patients with comorbid cluster C PDs, the percentage of responsibility for harm, injury, or bad luck symptoms was significantly greater than other OCD symptom dimensions (p < .005). Logistic regression found some evidence supporting the association between severity of OCD symptoms and comorbid PDs. PDs are prevalent among Italian people with OCD and should be routinely assessed, as comorbidity may affect help-seeking behaviour and response to treatment.

  20. Differential stimulant response on attention in children with comorbid anxiety and oppositional defiant disorder.

    PubMed

    Goez, Helly; Back-Bennet, Odea; Zelnik, Nathanel

    2007-05-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) affects 3% to 7% of school-age children. Approximately 30% of the children with ADHD also have comorbid anxiety or oppositional defiant disorder. Methylphenidate is the drug of choice for the medical treatment of such cases. When compared with children with ADHD alone, children with comorbid anxiety or oppositional defiant disorder may show worsening of the global attention score in response to methylphenidate and not only a "reduced response," as reported in previous studies. This study included 1122 children diagnosed as ADHD, of which 174 were diagnosed with comorbid anxiety and 141 with comorbid oppositional defiant disorder. All patients performed the Test of Variables of Attention before and after methylphenidate administration. A normal distribution (Gaussian distribution) of reaction to methylphenidate, as measured by the global ADHD score in children diagnosed as pure ADHD, was found. These findings were in contrast to children with ADHD and comorbid anxiety or oppositional defiant disorder who showed a bimodal distribution and hence represent a distinct population. In both groups with comorbid disorders, there was a larger subgroup in which significant worsening of global ADHD score occurred after methylphenidate administration (P < .05). Children with ADHD and comorbid anxiety or oppositional defiant disorder might represent clinically distinct populations in which inattention is secondary to those disorders; therefore, methylphenidate may be an inappropriate treatment for such children.

  1. Comorbidity profile among patients with rheumatoid arthritis and the impact on prescriptions trend.

    PubMed

    Al-Bishri, J; Attar, Sm; Bassuni, Nawal; Al-Nofaiey, Yasser; Qutbuddeen, Hamed; Al-Harthi, Salma; Subahi, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Comorbid conditions play a pivotal role in rheumatoid arthritis management and outcomes. We estimated the percentage of comorbid illness among rheumatoid arthritis patients and explored the relationship between this comorbidity and different prescriptions. A cross-sectional study of patients with rheumatoid arthritis in three centers in Saudi Arabia was carried out. Comorbidity and antirheumatoid medication regimens prescribed were recorded on a specially designed Performa. The association between comorbidity and different drugs was analyzed. A total of 340 patients were included. The most comorbidities were hypertension 122 (35.9%), diabetes 105 (30.9%), osteoporosis 88 (25.8%), and dyslipidemia in 66 (19.4). The most common drug prescribed was prednisolone in 275 (80.8%) patients followed by methotrexate in 253 (74.4%) and biological therapy in 142 (41.5%) patients. Glucocorticoids were prescribed considerably more frequently in hypertensive and diabetic patients as well as in patients with osteoporosis and dyslipidemia. Most patients with rheumatoid arthritis suffered from comorbid diseases. PMID:23645988

  2. Personalizing Age of Cancer Screening Cessation Based on Comorbidity: Model estimates of harms and benefits

    PubMed Central

    Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris; Gulati, Roman; Mariotto, Angela B; Schechter, Clyde B; de Carvalho, Tiago M; Knudsen, Amy B; van Ravesteyn, Nicolien T; Heijnsdijk, Eveline AM; Pabiniak, Chester; van Ballegooijen, Marjolein; Rutter, Carolyn M; Kuntz, Karen M; Feuer, Eric J; Etzioni, Ruth; de Koning, Harry J; Zauber, Ann G; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S

    2014-01-01

    Background Harms and benefits of cancer screening depend on age and comorbidity, yet reliable estimates are lacking. Objective To estimate the harms and benefits of cancer screening by age and comorbidity to inform decisions about screening cessation. Design Collaborative modeling with seven well-established cancer simulation models and common data on average and comorbidity level-specific life expectancy from SEER-Medicare. Setting US population. Patients US cohorts aged 66–90 years in 2010 with average health or one of four comorbidity levels (linked to specific conditions): none, mild, moderate, or severe. Intervention Mammography, prostate-specific antigen testing, or fecal immunochemical testing. Measurements Lifetime cancer deaths prevented and life-years gained (benefits); false-positive tests and overdiagnosed cancers (harms). For each comorbidity level: the age at which harms and benefits of screening were similar to that for individuals with average health undergoing screening at age 74. Results Screening 1000 women with average life expectancy at age 74 for breast cancer resulted in 79–96 (range across models) false-positives, 0.5–0.8 overdiagnosed cancers, and 0.7–0.9 breast cancer deaths prevented. While absolute numbers of harms and benefits differed across cancer sites, the ages at which to cease screening were highly consistent across models and cancer sites when based on harm-benefit ratios comparable to screening average-health individuals at age 74. For individuals with no, mild, moderate, and severe comorbidities, screening until ages of 76, 74, 72, and 66, respectively, resulted in similar harms and benefits as for average-health individuals. Limitations Comorbidity only influenced life expectancy. Conclusion Comorbidity is an important determinant of harms and benefits of screening. Estimates of screening benefits and harms by comorbidity can inform discussions between providers and their older patients about personalizing decisions

  3. Clinical epidemiology of comorbid dysthymia and substance disorder.

    PubMed

    Westermeyer, J; Eames, S E

    1997-01-01

    The authors sought to determine the 1-year-period prevalence and demographic characteristics of comorbid substance-related disorder (SRD) and dysthymia, as well as the demographic characteristics of SRD-dysthymia patients as compared with SRD-only patients. Patients being treated at two university medical centers and abstinent less than 2 years were followed prospectively for 6 months to establish the diagnosis of dysthymia. A total of 642 patients were assessed, of whom 39 had SRD-dysthymia and 308 had SRD only. Data collection instruments included a demographic questionnaire and assessment of DSM Axis I psychiatric diagnoses. The 1-year prevalence rate was lower than noted in previous studies where there were less stringent criteria for dysthymia. The rate of dysthymia among these SRD patients closely resembled that observed in a general population study. SRD-dysthymia patients and SRD-only patients did not differ on most demographic characteristics. SRD-dysthymia is not easily detected among recovering SRD patients because of the need for lengthy observation and the absence of special demographic characteristics.

  4. [Glucose-lowering therapy in patients with cardiac comorbidities].

    PubMed

    Meier, Juris J

    2015-04-01

    The risk for cardiovascular events, congestive heart failure and cardiac arrhythmia is significantly increased in patients with diabetes. Although poor glycaemic control has been associated with an increased cardiovascular event rate, aggressive glucose-lowering strategies have failed to improve cardiovascular endpoints or mortality. Therefore, treatment-associated adverse effects, especially hypoglycaemia and weight gain, must be carefully outbalanced against the potential benefits of better glycaemic control. Furthermore, certain drug-specific aspects must be considered: Pioglitazone is contraindicated in patients with heart failure, and DPP-4 inhibitors have recently been associated with an increased heart failure rate. Heart rate may increase during treatment with GLP-1 analogues. Only with metformin a reduction in cardiovascular endpoint has been demonstrated in patients with diabetes. Insulin and sulphonylureas have yielded neutral results in the available endpoint trials. Endpoint studies with GLP-1 analogues or SGLT-2 inhibitors have not yet been completed. These various drug-specific actions in the cardiovascular system need to be born in mind for the choice of the optimal glucose-lowering strategy in patients with cardiac comorbidities. PMID:25924044

  5. Suicidal ideation in Huntington disease: The role of comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Wetzel, Heather H.; Gehl, Carissa R.; Dellefave, Lisa; Schiffman, Judith F.; Shannon, Kathleen M.; Paulsen, Jane S.

    2013-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative condition characterized by cognitive impairments, motor abnormalities, and psychiatric disturbance. An increased risk for suicide has been documented. The majority of HD research has focused on cognitive and motor features of HD; the implications of psychiatric manifestations have received less consideration. Recent studies have sought to identify the stages of HD in which patients are at increased risk to experience suicidal ideation, though no study has examined possible risk factors for suicidality. The current study examines the presence of psychiatric comorbidity and its involvement in suicidal ideation. Suicidal ideation was examined in 1,941 HD patients enrolled in the Huntington Study Group. Of those, 19% (N = 369) reported suicidal ideation. Logistic regression analyses indicated that depression/anxiety and aggression/irritability are significant predictors of suicidal ideation (p < 0.01). In a subsample with the greatest suicidal ideation, alcohol and drug abuse were also predictive. Findings suggest that suicide in HD may be more distinct as compared to suicide in the general population. It is recommended that all individuals with HD (specifically those with features of depression, aggression, substance abuse) have routine suicide assessment; further research is needed to understand the high rate of suicide in HD. PMID:21605914

  6. Neuroinflammation and comorbidities are frequently ignored factors in CNS pathology

    PubMed Central

    Sandu, Raluca Elena; Buga, Ana Maria; Uzoni, Adriana; Petcu, Eugen Bogdan; Popa-Wagner, Aurel

    2015-01-01

    Virtually all drug interventions that have been successful pre-clinically in experimental stroke have failed to prove their efficacy in a clinical setting. This could be partly explained by the complexity and heterogeneity of human diseases as well as the associated co-morbidities which may render neuroprotective drugs less efficacious in clinical practice. One aspect of crucial importance in the physiopathology of stroke which is not completely understood is neuroinflammation. At the present time, it is becoming evident that subtle, but continuous neuroinflammation can provide the ground for disorders such as cerebral small vessel disease. Moreover, advanced aging and a number of highly prevalent risk factors such as obesity, hypertension, diabetes and atherosclerosis could act as “silent contributors” promoting a chronic proinflammatory state. This could aggravate the outcome of various pathological entities and can contribute to a number of subsequent post-stroke complications such as dementia, depression and neurodegeneration creating a pathological vicious cycle. Moreover, recent data suggests that the inflammatory process might be closely linked with multiple neurodegenerative pathways related to depression. In addition, pro-inflammatory cytokines could play a central role in the pathophysiology of both depression and dementia. PMID:26604877

  7. Obesity and asthma: co-morbidity or causal relationship?

    PubMed

    van Huisstede, A; Braunstahl, G J

    2010-09-01

    There is substantial evidence that obesity and asthma are related. "Obese asthma" may be a unique phenotype of asthma, characterized by decreased lung volumes, greater symptoms for a given degree of lung function impairment, destabilization or lack of asthma control, lack of eosinophilic inflammation and a different response to controller medication. Whether this relationship between obesity and asthma is causal or represents co-morbidity due to other factors is unclear. In previous reviews concerning the relationship between obesity and asthma, five hypotheses were put forth. One of these hypotheses is that a low grade systemic inflammation caused by adipokines from the fat tissue causes or enhances bronchial inflammation. In animal models, there is an increasing amount of evidence for the role of adipokines derived from fat tissue in the relationship between obesity and asthma. The data are conflicting in humans. Since obesity is a component of the metabolic syndrome and the metabolic syndrome is also a form of systemic inflammation, it is to be expected that there is a relationship between metabolic syndrome and asthma. The few data that are available show that there is no relationship between metabolic syndrome and asthma, but there is one between the metabolic syndrome and asthma-like symptoms. Further research is needed to confirm the relationship between obesity and asthma in humans, where a rigorous approach in the diagnosis of asthma is essential.

  8. Polycystic ovary syndrome and metabolic comorbidities: therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    De Leo, V; Musacchio, M C; Palermo, V; Di Sabatino, A; Morgante, G; Petraglia, F

    2009-10-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinopathy in women and the most common cause of anovulatory infertility, affecting 5-10% of the population. Approximately 60-70% of PCOS patients are obese. Although it is well known that obesity is associated with insulin resistance, most studies have shown that impaired insulin sensitivity is present without obesity. Hyper-insulinemia associated with insulin resistance has been causally linked to all features of the syndrome, such as hyperandrogenism, reproductive disorders, acne, hirsutism and metabolic disturbances. PCOS patients often have an atherogenic lipid profile and increased incidence of cardiovascular risk factors and type 2 diabetes. It has been demonstrated that by reducing hyper-insulinemia, insulin-lowering agents might improve endocrine and reproductive abnormalities in PCOS patients, and have numerous beneficial effects on multiple cardiovascular risk factors in PCOS. Metformin is currently the preferred insulin-sensitizing drug for chronic treatment of PCOS and has been shown to improve the metabolic profile, menstrual cyclicity and fertility in women with PCOS, and is associated with weight loss. In this review the metabolic comorbidities of PCOS and their therapeutic options are discussed.

  9. Obesity, insulin resistance and comorbidities – Mechanisms of association

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Ana Valeria B.; Kolka, Cathryn M.; Kim, Stella P.; Bergman, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    Overall excess of fat, usually defined by the body mass index, is associated with metabolic (e.g. glucose intolerance, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), dyslipidemia) and non-metabolic disorders (e.g. neoplasias, polycystic ovary syndrome, non-alcoholic fat liver disease, glomerulopathy, bone fragility etc.). However, more than its total amount, the distribution of adipose tissue throughout the body is a better predictor of the risk to the development of those disorders. Fat accumulation in the abdominal area and in non-adipose tissue (ectopic fat), for example, is associated with increased risk to develop metabolic and non-metabolic derangements. On the other hand, observations suggest that individuals who present peripheral adiposity, characterized by large hip and thigh circumferences, have better glucose tolerance, reduced incidence of T2DM and of metabolic syndrome. Insulin resistance (IR) is one of the main culprits in the association between obesity, particularly visceral, and metabolic as well as non-metabolic diseases. In this review we will highlight the current pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms possibly involved in the link between increased VAT, ectopic fat, IR and comorbidities. We will also provide some insights in the identification of these abnormalities. PMID:25211442

  10. Comorbidity between post-traumatic stress disorder and major depressive disorder: alternative explanations and treatment considerations.

    PubMed

    Flory, Janine D; Yehuda, Rachel

    2015-06-01

    Approximately half of people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) also suffer from Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). The current paper examines evidence for two explanations of this comorbidity. First, that the comorbidity reflects overlapping symptoms in the two disorders. Second, that the co-occurrence of PTSD and MDD is not an artifact, but represents a trauma-related phenotype, possibly a subtype of PTSD. Support for the latter explanation is inferred from literature that examines risk and biological correlates of PTSD and MDD, including molecular processes. Treatment implications of the comorbidity are considered.

  11. Advances in epilepsy: new perspectives on new-onset epilepsy, comorbidities, and pharmacotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this brief article is to review old concepts of the significance of acute symptomatic seizures, the impact of psychiatric comorbidities on the response of pharmacologic and surgical treatments of the seizure disorder, and the importance of factoring comorbid medical comorbidities into the choice of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). In addition, this article provides an update on the latest data on the teratogenic effects of AEDs and reviews the most relevant results of a recent practice guideline on pregnancy issues in women with epilepsy. The article closes with a review of the latest advances in the therapeutic effects of first- and second-generation AEDs. PMID:21173849

  12. Comorbidity between post-traumatic stress disorder and major depressive disorder: alternative explanations and treatment considerations

    PubMed Central

    Flory, Janine D.; Yehuda, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Approximately half of people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) also suffer from Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). The current paper examines evidence for two explanations of this comorbidity. First, that the comorbidity reflects overlapping symptoms in the two disorders. Second, that the co-occurrence of PTSD and MDD is not an artifact, but represents a trauma-related phenotype, possibly a subtype of PTSD. Support for the latter explanation is inferred from literature that examines risk and biological correlates of PTSD and MDD, including molecular processes. Treatment implications of the comorbidity are considered. PMID:26246789

  13. Adult immunization

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Bharti; Chawla, Sumit; Kumar Dharma, Vijay; Jindal, Harashish; Bhatt, Bhumika

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination is recommended throughout life to prevent vaccine-preventable diseases and their sequel. The primary focus of vaccination programs has historically been directed to childhood immunizations. For adults, chronic diseases have been the primary focus of preventive and medical health care, though there has been increased emphasis on preventing infectious diseases. Adult vaccination coverage, however, remains low for most of the routinely recommended vaccines. Though adults are less susceptible to fall prey to traditional infectious agents, the probability of exposure to infectious agents has increased manifold owing to globalization and increasing travel opportunities both within and across the countries. Thus, there is an urgent need to address the problem of adult immunization. The adult immunization enterprise is more complex, encompassing a wide variety of vaccines and a very diverse target population. There is no coordinated public health infrastructure to support an adult immunization program as there is for children. Moreover, there is little coordination among adult healthcare providers in terms of vaccine provision. Substantial improvement in adult vaccination is needed to reduce the health consequences of vaccine-preventable diseases among adults. Routine assessment of adult patient vaccination needs, recommendation, and offer of needed vaccines for adults should be incorporated into routine clinical care of adults. PMID:24128707

  14. [Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and the Treatment of ADHD in Adults].

    PubMed

    Auclair, Vickie; Harvey, Philippe-Olivier; Lepage, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background The international prevalence of adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is estimated at 2.5%. ADHD is associated with serious impairment in academic, occupational, social and emotional functioning. Despite the debilitating nature of this disorder, few individuals with ADHD receive appropriate help. Further, although psychopharmacology is considered the first-line treatment of adults with ADHD, it is now recognized that medication alone may be insufficient. Thus, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a promising approach.Objectives This study aimed to review literature and investigate the efficacy of CBT, in reducing ADHD symptoms and comorbid conditions such anxiety and depression for adults with ADHD, by several studies through a meta-analysis.Methods We searched the literature from 1946 through 2015 using especially MEDLINE, EMBASE and PsycINFO. We used a random-effects model, Odds Ratios (OR) and Hedge's g.Results Data from 12 randomized controlled studies were included, totaling 575 subjects. The results showed a significant reduction in ADHD symptoms (Hedge's g = 0.95) and comorbid anxiety (Hedge's g = 0.39) and depression (Hedge's g = 0.30) for the CBT group in comparison with controls. Following the end of treatment, ADHD symptoms continue to improve, but not the comorbid conditions.Conclusion In summary, in adults with ADHD, CBT appears to be a promising treatment. PMID:27570962

  15. Asperger syndrome in India: findings from a case-series with respect to clinical profile and comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Sreedaran, Priya; Ashok, M V

    2015-01-01

    Asperger syndrome (AS) is an autism spectrum disorder with a high rate of psychiatric comorbidity. We describe the clinical profile and psychiatric comorbidity in a series of affected individuals referred to an Indian general hospital psychiatry setting. Gilliam Asperger's disorder scale was used to evaluate the clinical characteristics while Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI)-KID and MINI-PLUS were used to assess psychiatric comorbidity. The profile of subjects with AS in our case-series appears similar to that published elsewhere with high rates of psychiatric comorbidity. Mental health professionals should evaluate for psychiatric comorbidity in individuals with autism spectrum disorders.

  16. Asperger syndrome in India: findings from a case-series with respect to clinical profile and comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Sreedaran, Priya; Ashok, M V

    2015-01-01

    Asperger syndrome (AS) is an autism spectrum disorder with a high rate of psychiatric comorbidity. We describe the clinical profile and psychiatric comorbidity in a series of affected individuals referred to an Indian general hospital psychiatry setting. Gilliam Asperger's disorder scale was used to evaluate the clinical characteristics while Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI)-KID and MINI-PLUS were used to assess psychiatric comorbidity. The profile of subjects with AS in our case-series appears similar to that published elsewhere with high rates of psychiatric comorbidity. Mental health professionals should evaluate for psychiatric comorbidity in individuals with autism spectrum disorders. PMID:25969609

  17. Oxytocin for Male Subjects with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Comorbid Intellectual Disabilities: A Randomized Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Munesue, Toshio; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Miura, Yui; Takeuchi, Noriyuki; Anme, Tokie; Nanba, Eiji; Adachi, Kaori; Tsubouchi, Kiyotaka; Sai, Yoshimichi; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi; Horike, Shin-ichi; Yokoyama, Shigeru; Nakatani, Hideo; Niida, Yo; Kosaka, Hirotaka; Minabe, Yoshio; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2016-01-01

    Approximately half of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) individuals suffer from comorbid intellectual disabilities (IDs). Oxytocin (OXT) receptors are highly expressed in temporal lobe structures and are likely to play a modulatory role in excitatory/inhibitory balance, at least based on animal model findings. Thus, it is feasible that in the highly representative group of Kanner-type ASD subjects, OXT could have a beneficial effect on social communication and social interaction. The aim of this pilot study is to investigate the feasibility and adverse events, such as epilepsy, of the long-term administration of intranasal OXT for adolescent and adult ASD subjects with ID because such patients frequently have seizures. We also addressed the question on how to scale the OXT effects to the core symptoms of social deficits because of the relative difficulty in obtaining objective measurements. Twenty-nine males (aged 15–40 years old) participated in a randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled crossover study (each for 8 weeks) with OXT (16 IU/day). Except for seizures experienced by one participant, other serious adverse events did not occur. The primary and secondary outcomes measured using the Childhood Autism Rating Scale and several standard scales, respectively, revealed no difference between the OXT and placebo groups. Instead, in an exploratory analysis, the social interactions observed in the play sessions or in daily life were significantly more frequent in the initial half period in the OXT-first arm of the crossover trial. There were also significant correlations between the plasma OXT concentration and subscale scores for irritability on the Aberrant Behavior Checklist. In conclusion, this pilot study demonstrates that long-term administration of intranasal OXT is tolerable in a representative cohort of ASD individuals with ID and suggests that future multicenter trials of OXT are warranted and should include measurements of reciprocal social

  18. Comorbidity and performance status in acute myeloid leukemia patients: a nation-wide population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Østgård, L S G; Nørgaard, J M; Sengeløv, H; Severinsen, M; Friis, L S; Marcher, C W; Dufva, I H; Nørgaard, M

    2015-03-01

    As the world population ages, the comorbidity burden in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients increases. Evidence on how to integrate comorbidity measures into clinical decision-making is sparse. We determined the prognostic impact of comorbidity and World Health Organization Performance Status (PS) on achievement of complete remission and mortality in all Danish AML patients treated between 2000 and 2012 overall and stratified by age. Comorbidity was measured using a modified version of the Charlson Comorbidity Index, with separate adjustment for pre-leukemic conditions. Of 2792 patients, 1467 (52.5%) were allocated to intensive therapy. Of these patients, 76% did not have any comorbidities, 19% had one comorbid disease and 6% had two or more comorbidities. Low complete remission rates were associated with poor PS but not with comorbidity. Surprisingly, among all intensive therapy patients, presence of comorbidity was not associated with an increased short-term mortality (adjusted 90 day mortality rate (MR)=1.06 (95% confidence interval (CI)=0.76-1.48)) and, if any, only a slight increase in long-term mortality (91 day-3 year adjusted MR=1.18 (95%CI=0.97-1.44). Poor PS was strongly associated with an increased short- and long-term mortality (adjusted 90 day MR, PS⩾2=3.43 (95%CI=2.30-5.13); adjusted 91 day-3 year MR=1.35 (95%CI=1.06-1.74)). We propose that more patients with comorbidity may benefit from intensive chemotherapy.

  19. Assessing the Relationship between Physical Illness and Mental Health Service Use and Expenditures among Older Adults from Racial/Ethnic Minority Groups

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Daniel E; Cook, Benjamin; Kim, Giyeon; Reynolds, Charles F.; Alegria, Margarita; Coe-Odess, Sarah; Bartels, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The association of physical illness and mental health service use in older adults from racial/ethnic minority groups is an important area of study given the mental and physical health disparities and the low use of mental health services in this population. The purpose of this study is to describe the impact of comorbid physical illness on mental health service use and expenditures in older adults; and to evaluate disparities in mental health service use and expenditures among a racially/ethnically diverse sample of older adults with and without comorbid physical illness. Methods Data were obtained from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (years 2004–2011). The sample included 1563 whites, 519 African-Americans, and 642 Latinos and (N=2,724) aged 65+ with probable mental illness. Using two-part generalized linear models, we estimated and compared mental health service use among those with and without a comorbid physical illness. Results Mental health service use was greater for older adults with comorbid physical illness compared to those without a comorbid physical illness. Once mental health services were accessed, no differences in mental health expenditures were found. Comorbid physical illness increased the likelihood of mental health service use in older whites and Latinos. However, the presence of a comorbidity did not impact racial/ethnic disparities in mental health service use. Conclusions This study highlighted the important role of comorbid physical illness as a potential contributor to using mental health services and suggests intervention strategies to enhance engagement in mental health services by older adults from racial/ethnic minority groups. PMID:25772763

  20. Intervention effects for students with comorbid forms of learning disability: understanding the needs of nonresponders.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Lynn S; Fuchs, Douglas; Compton, Donald L

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we considered evidence from our intervention research programs on whether students with learning disability (LD) in reading and mathematics (comorbid LD) respond differently to intervention, compared to students with reading LD alone (RD) or to students with mathematics LD alone (MD). The goal was to gain insight into whether comorbid disorder represents an LD subtype distinct from RD or from MD, which requires differentiated forms of intervention. Our analysis suggested that students with comorbid LD respond differently than those with MD, depending on the nature of mathematics intervention, and may therefore represent a distinctive subtype. By contrast, students with RD appear to respond to intervention in similar ways, regardless of whether they experience RD alone or in combination with MD. Results also suggest that distinctions between comorbid and single-order LD may depend on whether LD is defined in terms of lower- versus higher-order academic skill. Recommendations for future study are provided. PMID:23232441

  1. Using a Clinical Knowledge Base to Assess Comorbidity Interrelatedness Among Patients with Multiple Chronic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zulman, Donna M.; Martins, Susana B.; Liu, Yan; Tu, Samson W.; Hoffman, Brian B.; Asch, Steven M.; Goldstein, Mary K.

    2015-01-01

    Decision support tools increasingly integrate clinical knowledge such as medication indications and contraindications with electronic health record (EHR) data to support clinical care and patient safety. The availability of this encoded information and patient data provides an opportunity to develop measures of clinical decision complexity that may be of value for quality improvement and research efforts. We investigated the feasibility of using encoded clinical knowledge and EHR data to develop a measure of comorbidity interrelatedness (the degree to which patients’ co-occurring conditions interact to generate clinical complexity). Using a common clinical scenario—decisions about blood pressure medications in patients with hypertension—we quantified comorbidity interrelatedness by calculating the number of indications and contraindications to blood pressure medications that are generated by patients’ comorbidities (e.g., diabetes, gout, depression). We examined properties of comorbidity interrelatedness using data from a decision support system for hypertension in the Veterans Affairs Health Care System. PMID:26958279

  2. Recommendations for detection of individual risk for comorbidities in patients with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Wohlrab, Johannes; Fiedler, Gabriele; Gerdes, Sascha; Nast, Alexander; Philipp, Sandra; Radtke, Marc A; Thaçi, Diamant; Koenig, Wolfgang; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Härter, Martin; Schön, Michael P

    2013-03-01

    Since the pathogenesis of psoriasis vulgaris is now understood as a T cell mediated systemic auto-immune disease, the awareness for the potential systemic implications of the chronic active inflammation has grown. By evaluation of patient registries and study data, several complexes of comorbidities could be identified in recent years, albeit not all of them being clinically relevant. Comorbidity in this context will be defined as two or more diagnostically distinguished medical conditions existing simultaneously, but without a causal link. Nevertheless, there is some strong indication for pathogenetic link between some specified comorbidities and psoriasis at molecular and immunological level. The need for an interdisciplinary assessment of the potential interrelation is obvious. In order to detect the individual risk for comorbidities in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis and to recommend the course of action, a checklist has been developed at an interdisciplinary level that is reduced to the quintessential points for the use in daily practice.

  3. Psychiatric symptoms in patients with asthma causality, comorbidity, or shared genetic etiology.

    PubMed

    Mrazek, David A

    2003-07-01

    Despite the range of diverse studies that attempt to understand the comorbidity of asthma and psychiatric diagnoses, it is still not possible to provide a reliable quantitative estimate of the increased risk for anxiety and mood disorders in children with asthma. A new hypothesis for this comorbidity has evolved, however. It is likely that the stress of having a chronic illness increases the likelihood of the development of anxiety and depressive symptoms. If this were a sufficient etiologic explanation, however, increased comorbidities of psychiatric illnesses would be found in all chronic pediatric illnesses. More precise prevalence estimates of these comorbidities require the completion of large studies that use a longitudinal design and reliable and well-validated assessment instruments. The most promising direction for future research is the definition of underlying genetic vulnerabilities that reflect autonomic regulation, may contribute to the onset of some forms of asthma, and are associated with increased risk for anxiety and mood disorders.

  4. Transdiagnostic Treatment of Bipolar Disorder and Comorbid Anxiety with the Unified Protocol: A Clinical Replication Series

    PubMed Central

    Ellard, Kristen K.; Deckersbach, Thilo; Sylvia, Louisa G.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Barlow, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic, debilitating disorder with recurrent manic and depressive episodes. Over 75% of bipolar patients have a current or lifetime diagnosis of a comorbid anxiety disorder. Comorbid anxiety in BD is associated with greater illness severity, greater functional impairment, and poorer illness-related outcomes. Effectively treating comorbid anxiety in individuals with BD has been recognized as one of the biggest unmet needs in the field of bipolar disorder. Recently, the Unified Protocol for Transdiagnostic Treatment of Emotional Disorders (UP) was developed to be applicable to the full range of anxiety and mood disorders, based upon converging evidence from genetics, cognitive and affective neuroscience, and behavioral research suggesting common, core emotion-related pathology. Here, we present a preliminary evaluation of the efficacy of the UP for the treatment of BD with comorbid anxiety, in a clinical replication series consisting of three cases. PMID:22822175

  5. Intervention Effects for Students With Comorbid Forms of Learning Disability: Understanding the Needs of Nonresponders

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Lynn S.; Fuchs, Douglas; Compton, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we considered evidence from our intervention research programs on whether students with learning disability (LD) in reading and mathematics (comorbid LD) respond differently to intervention, compared to students with reading LD alone (RD) or to students with mathematics LD alone (MD). The goal was to gain insight into whether comorbid disorder represents an LD subtype distinct from RD or from MD, which requires differentiated forms of intervention. Our analysis suggested that students with comorbid LD respond differently than those with MD, depending on the nature of mathematics intervention, and may therefore represent a distinctive subtype. By contrast, students with RD appear to respond to intervention in similar ways, regardless of whether they experience RD alone or in combination with MD. Results also suggest that distinctions between comorbid and single-order LD may depend on whether LD is defined in terms of lower- versus higher-order academic skill. Recommendations for future study are provided. PMID:23232441

  6. Difficulties in the diagnosis of heart failure in patients with comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Trullàs, J C; Casado, J; Morales-Rull, J L

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) patients present frequently comorbidities and the diagnosis of HF in this setting is a challenge. The symptoms and signs of HF may be atypical and can be simulated or disguised by co-morbidities such as respiratory disease and/or obesity. For this reasons, confirmation of the diagnosis always requires further tests. Natriuretic peptides accurately exclude cardiac dysfunction as a cause of symptoms, but the optimal cut-off levels for ruling out and ruling in HF diagnosis are influenced by different co-morbidities. Echocardiography should be performed in all patients to confirm the diagnosis of HF, except in those cases with low clinical probability and a concentration of brain natriuretic peptides below the exclusion cut-off. This review aims to provide a practical clinical approach for the diagnosis of HF in patients with comorbidity, focusing in older patients and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and/or obesity.

  7. Lifetime Prevalence, Age of Risk, and Etiology of Comorbid Psychiatric Disorders in Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hirschtritt, Matthew E.; Lee, Paul C.; Pauls, David L.; Dion, Yves; Grados, Marco A.; Illmann, Cornelia; King, Robert A.; Sandor, Paul; McMahon, William M.; Lyon, Gholson J.; Cath, Danielle C.; Kurlan, Roger; Robertson, Mary M.; Osiecki, Lisa; Scharf, Jeremiah M.; Mathews, Carol A.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Tourette syndrome (TS) is characterized by high rates of psychiatric comorbidity; however, few studies have fully characterized these comorbidities. Furthermore, most studies have included relatively few participants (<200), and none has examined the ages of highest risk for each TS-associated comorbidity or their etiologic relationship to TS. Objective To characterize the lifetime prevalence, clinical associations, ages of highest risk, and etiology of psychiatric comorbidity among individuals with TS. Design, Setting, and Participants Cross-sectional structured diagnostic interviews conducted between April 1, 1992, and December 31, 2008, of participants with TS (n = 1374) and TS-unaffected family members (n = 1142). Main Outcomes and Measures Lifetime prevalence of comorbid DSM-IV-TR disorders, their heritabilities, ages of maximal risk, and associations with symptom severity, age at onset, and parental psychiatric history. Results The lifetime prevalence of any psychiatric comorbidity among individuals with TS was 85.7%; 57.7% of the population had 2 or more psychiatric disorders. The mean (SD) number of lifetime comorbid diagnoses was 2.1 (1.6); the mean number was 0.9 (1.3) when obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were excluded, and 72.1% of the individuals met the criteria for OCD or ADHD. Other disorders, including mood, anxiety, and disruptive behavior, each occurred in approximately 30% of the participants. The age of greatest risk for the onset of most comorbid psychiatric disorders was between 4 and 10 years, with the exception of eating and substance use disorders, which began in adolescence (interquartile range, 15–19 years for both). Tourette syndrome was associated with increased risk of anxiety (odds ratio [OR], 1.4; 95% CI, 1.0–1.9; P = .04) and decreased risk of substance use disorders (OR, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.3–0.9; P = .02) independent from comorbid OCD and ADHD; however, high rates

  8. Relationship of Ferritin to Symptom Ratings Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Effect of Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Oner, Ozgur

    2011-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the relation between behavioral symptoms and hematological variables which are related with iron deficiency and anemia, ferritin, hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume (MCV), and reticulosite distribution width (RDW) in children and adolescents with pure Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) or ADHD comorbid with other psychiatric disorders. The sample consisted of 151 subjects with ADHD, 45 of these subjects had other comorbid conditions. Conners Parent (CPRS) and Teacher Rating Scales (CTRS) were obtained. Comorbid ADHD subjects had lower mean hemoglogin and MCV. In the ADHD group in general, CPRS and CTRS Total scores were significantly negatively correlated with ferritin level. When only pure ADHD subjects were taken into account, the correlations did not reach statistical signifance. Overall, these results suggested that lower ferritin level was associated with higher behavioral problems reported by both parents and teachers. Presence of comorbid conditions might increase the effect of lower iron stores on behavioral measures. PMID:18165896

  9. [Treatment-refractory OCD from the viewpoint of obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders: impact of comorbid child and adolescent psychiatric disorders].

    PubMed

    Kano, Yukiko

    2013-01-01

    ASD was reported to be about 20%. One study on the impact of comorbid ASD in adults with OCD indicated that comorbid patients had higher scores for the Autism Questionnaire (AQ) subscales of attention switching and imagination but showed little difference in OC symptoms except for the predominance of compulsion compared to patients with pure OCD. "Just right" feeling and impulse-control problems were evident in OC patients comorbid with both ASD and TS. Out of five adults with TS who underwent deep brain stimulation (DBS) because of refractory tics, four had impulse-control problems including SIB, leading to very severe physical injuries in two patients. After DBS, tics and SIB improved in all patients; however, one patient experienced their re-aggravation. To improve understanding of and treatment/support for refractory OCD, OC spectrum disorders should also be considered. PMID:24228477

  10. Chronic widespread pain: clinical comorbidities and psychological correlates.

    PubMed

    Burri, Andrea; Ogata, Soshiro; Vehof, Jelle; Williams, Frances

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have provided consistent evidence for a genetic influence on chronic widespread pain (CWP). The aim of this study was to investigate (1) the etiological structure underlying CWP by examining the covariation between CWP and psychological comorbidities and psychoaffective correlates and (2) the decomposition of the covariation into genetic and environmental components. A total of 3266 female twins (mean age 56.6 years) were subject to multivariate analyses. Using validated questionnaires to classify twins as having CWP, the prevalence of CWP was 20.8%. In the multivariate analysis, the most suitable model was the common pathway model. This model revealed 2 underlying latent variables, one common to anxiety, emotional intelligence, and emotional instability (f1) and the other common to depression and CWP (f2), the latter being highly heritable (86%). Both latent variables (f1 and f2) shared an additive genetic and a nonshared environmental factor. In addition, a second additive genetic factor loading only on f2 was found. This study reveals the structure of genetic and environmental influences of CWP and its psychoaffective correlates. The results show that the clustering of CWP and depression is due to a common, highly heritable, underlying latent trait. In addition, we found evidence that CWP, anxiety, emotional instability, and emotional intelligence are influenced by different underlying latent traits sharing the same genetic and nonshared environmental factors. This is the first study to reveal the structure and relative importance of genetic and environmental influences on complex etiological mechanisms of CWP and its correlates. PMID:25851458

  11. [Treatment response of depressive patients with comorbid problem drink].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Hiromi; Hashimoto, Eri; Tayama, Masaya; Saito, Toshikazu

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the impact of Problem Drink on depression. Forty participants with depression were divided into 2 groups: non-Problem Drinker (NPD) group (n = 22) and Problem Drinker (PD) group (n = 18) according to Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) score (NPD < 12, PD > or = 12). Depression was assessed by the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview. The effect of medication on depressive symptoms was monitored over 12 weeks using the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D). Significant improvement in HAM-D score was observed at 2 weeks in NPD patients but not until 4 weeks in PD patients. Total HAM-D scores were lower in NPD than in PD patients at the end of the treatment period. Therapeutic doses (dose of antidepressant used was equivalent to greater than 75 mg of imipramine) of antidepressants resulted in significant improvement in HAM-D scores at 2 weeks in NPD patients, but not until 8 weeks in PD patients and brought lower HAM-D scores in NPD than in PD patients at the end of the treatment period. The AUDIT score and total alcohol consumption during the study period were negatively correlated to the improvement in HAM-D score. In NPD patients, the level of education of patients in remission was higher than those by patients not in remission. In contrast, level of education of patients in remission were similar to those in PD patients not in remission. The above results suggest that co-occurrence of alcohol use disorders with depression is associated with a lower response to antidepressants which may reflect not only the result of biological alterations in the brain by chronic ethanol ingestion but also an inhibitory effect of ethanol on antidepressant action in the brain. Drinking-related cognitive dysfunction may also relate to the decreased response to treatment in the depressed patients with comorbid Problem Drinker. PMID:24427900

  12. Sleep Problems and Suicidality in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication

    PubMed Central

    Wojnar, Marcin; Ilgen, Mark A.; Wojnar, Julita; McCammon, Ryan J.; Valenstein, Marcia; Brower, Kirk J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Links between sleep problems and suicidality have been frequently described in clinical samples; however this issue has not been well-studied in the general population. Using data from a nationally representative survey, we examined the association between self-reported sleep difficulties and suicidality in the United States. Methods The WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to assess sleep problems and suicidality in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication (NCS-R). Relationships between three measures of sleep (difficulty initiating sleep, maintaining sleep, early morning awaking), and suicidal thoughts, plans, and attempts were assessed in logistic regression analyses, while controlling for demographic characteristics, 12-month diagnoses of mood, anxiety and substance use disorders, and chronic health conditions. Results In multivariate models, the presence of any of these sleep problems was significantly related to each measure of suicidality, including suicidal ideation (OR = 2.1), planning (OR = 2.6), and suicide attempt (OR = 2.5). Early morning awakening was associated with suicidal ideation (OR = 2.0), suicide planning (OR = 2.1), and suicide attempt (OR = 2.7). Difficulty initiating sleep was a significant predictor of suicidal ideation and planning (ORs: 1.9 for ideation; 2.2 for planning), while difficulty maintaining sleep during the night was a significant predictor of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts (ORs: 2.0 for ideation; 3.00 for attempt). Conclusions Among community residents, chronic sleep problems are consistently associated with greater risk for suicidality. Efforts to develop comprehensive models of suicidality should consider sleep problems as potentially independent indicators of risk. PMID:18778837

  13. Temporal variation in patterns of comorbidities in the medicare population.

    PubMed

    Sorace, James; Millman, Michael; Bounds, Mallory; Collier, Michael; Wong, Hui-Hsing; Worrall, Chris; Kelman, Jeffrey; MaCurdy, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    It is widely accepted that Medicare beneficiaries with multiple comorbidities (ie, patients with combinations of more than 1 disease) account for a disproportionate amount of mortality and expenditures. The authors previously studied this phenomenon by analyzing Medicare claims data from 2008 to determine the pattern of disease combinations (DCs) for 32,220,634 beneficiaries. Their findings indicated that 22% of these individuals mapped to a long-tailed distribution of approximately 1 million DCs. The presence of so many DCs, each populated by a small number of individuals, raises the possibility that the DC distribution varies over time. Measuring this variability is important because it indicates the rate at which the health care system must adapt to the needs of new patients. This article analyzes Medicare claims data for 3 consecutive calendar years, using 2 algorithms based on the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS)-Hierarchical Conditions Categories (HCC) claims model. These algorithms make different assumptions regarding the degree to which the CMS-HCC model could be disaggregated into its underlying International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes. The authors find that, although a large number of beneficiaries belong to a set of DCs that are nationally stable across the 3 study years, the number of DCs in this set is large (in the range of several hundred thousand). Furthermore, the small number of beneficiaries associated with the larger number of variable DCs (ie, DCs that were not constantly populated in all 3 study years) represents a disproportionally high level of expenditures and death.

  14. Comorbid Analysis of Genes Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorders Reveals Differential Evolutionary Constraints

    PubMed Central

    David, Maude M.; Enard, David; Ozturk, Alp; Daniels, Jena; Jung, Jae-Yoon; Diaz-Beltran, Leticia; Wall, Dennis. P.

    2016-01-01

    The burden of comorbidity in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is substantial. The symptoms of autism overlap with many other human conditions, reflecting common molecular pathologies suggesting that cross-disorder analysis will help prioritize autism gene candidates. Genes in the intersection between autism and related conditions may represent nonspecific indicators of dysregulation while genes unique to autism may play a more causal role. Thorough literature review allowed us to extract 125 ICD-9 codes comorbid to ASD that we mapped to 30 specific human disorders. In the present work, we performed an automated extraction of genes associated with ASD and its comorbid disorders, and found 1031 genes involved in ASD, among which 262 are involved in ASD only, with the remaining 779 involved in ASD and at least one comorbid disorder. A pathway analysis revealed 13 pathways not involved in any other comorbid disorders and therefore unique to ASD, all associated with basal cellular functions. These pathways differ from the pathways associated with both ASD and its comorbid conditions, with the latter being more specific to neural function. To determine whether the sequence of these genes have been subjected to differential evolutionary constraints, we studied long term constraints by looking into Genomic Evolutionary Rate Profiling, and showed that genes involved in several comorbid disorders seem to have undergone more purifying selection than the genes involved in ASD only. This result was corroborated by a higher dN/dS ratio for genes unique to ASD as compare to those that are shared between ASD and its comorbid disorders. Short-term evolutionary constraints showed the same trend as the pN/pS ratio indicates that genes unique to ASD were under significantly less evolutionary constraint than the genes associated with all other disorders. PMID:27414027

  15. Increased health burden associated with comorbid depression in older Brazilians with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Blay, S. L.; Fillenbaum, G.G.; Marinho, V.; Andreoli, S.B.; Gastal, F.L.

    2013-01-01

    Background The health burden associated with comorbid depression and diabetes in older community residents in middle income countries is unclear. Methods Data came from a statewide representative sample (N= 6,963, age ≥60) in Brazil. Controlled polytomous logistic regression was used to determine whether four mutually exclusive groups (all possible combinations of the presence or absence of depression and diabetes) differed in sociodemographic characteristics, social resources, health behaviors, and selected health conditions. Results While 2.37% were expected to have comorbid depression/diabetes given sample base rates (depression: 20.92% [1457/6963]; diabetes: 11.35% [790/6959]), comorbidity was present in 3.62% (52.5% beyond expectation; P<0.0001; OR = 1.58, 95% Confidence Interval 1.29–1.95). Depression without diabetes was reported by17.3%, and diabetes without depression by 7.7%. In controlled analyses, the depression group had poorer socioeconomic status and health behaviors, and a greater likelihood of vascular, respiratory, and musculoskeletal problems than the diabetes group. Vascular, respiratory, and urinary problems were exacerbated in comorbid depression/diabetes; the comorbid group was also more likely to be female and younger. Limitations cross-sectional design. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first study that explicitly reports on all four possible depression/diabetes combinations in an older representative community-resident sample, using controlled analyses to identify unique associations with sociodemographic characteristics and other health conditions. The burden of comorbid depression/diabetes in Brazil, a middle income country, appears to be comparable to that found in higher income countries. So, similarly, depression without diabetes had a greater odds of adverse sociodemographic and health conditions than diabetes without depression; comorbid depression/diabetes was more likely in women and young elderly, and the odds of

  16. Identifying comorbid depression and disruptive behavior disorders: Comparison of two approaches used in adolescent studies

    PubMed Central

    Stoep, Ann Vander; Adrian, Molly C.; Rhew, Isaac C.; McCauley, Elizabeth; Herting, Jerald R.; Kraemer, Helena C.

    2013-01-01

    Interest in commonly co-occurring depression and disruptive behavior disorders in children has yielded a small body of research that estimates the prevalence of this comorbid condition and compares children with the comorbid condition and children with depression or disruptive behavior disorders alone with respect to antecedents and outcomes. Prior studies have used one of two different approaches to measure comorbid disorders: 1) meeting criteria for two DSM or ICD diagnoses or 2) scoring .5 SD above the mean or higher on two dimensional scales. This study compares two snapshots of comorbidity taken simultaneously in the same sample with each of the measurement approaches. The Developmental Pathways Project administered structured diagnostic interviews as well as dimensional scales to a community-based sample of 521 11-12 year olds to assess depression and disruptive behavior disorders. Clinical caseness indicators of children identified as “comorbid” by each method were examined concurrently and 3-years later. Cross-classification of adolescents via the two approaches revealed low agreement. When other indicators of caseness, including functional impairment, need for services, and clinical elevations on other symptom scales were examined, adolescents identified as comorbid via dimensional scales only were similar to those who were identified as comorbid via DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. Findings suggest that when relying solely on DSM diagnostic criteria for comorbid depression and disruptive behavior disorders, many adolescents with significant impairment will be overlooked. Findings also suggest that lower dimensional scale thresholds can be set when comorbid conditions, rather than single forms of psychopathology, are being identified. PMID:22575333

  17. Simultaneous bilateral hip fractures following a simple fall in an elderly patient without predilecting comorbidities.

    PubMed

    van der Zeeuw, Frederique T; Weeda, Víola B; Vrouenraets, Bart C

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral hip fractures are rare, mostly being caused by violent forces or in patients with bone metabolism disorders. We present the case of an elderly patient who sustained simultaneous bilateral hip fractures following a simple fall without having any known predilecting comorbidities other than advanced age. Only four cases have been described of elderly patients without comorbidity with simultaneous bilateral hip fractures following low-energy traumas. This rareness potentially leads to misses of this diagnosis. PMID:27161143

  18. Comorbidity burden, healthcare resource utilization, and costs in chronic gout patients refractory to conventional urate-lowering therapy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Eric Q; Forsythe, Anna; Guérin, Annie; Yu, Andrew P; Latremouille-Viau, Dominick; Tsaneva, Magda

    2012-11-01

    Patients with chronic gout refractory to conventional urate-lowering therapy have high rates of flares and incidence of tophi, which impose a significant disease and potentially economic burden. This study examined healthcare resource use and costs stratified by disease burden. Adult patients diagnosed with gout (ICD-9-CM:274.xx) and having had ≥3 flares defined by clinical surrogates within a 12-month period were selected for the case cohort from the Thomson MarketScan databases (2003/Q3-2008/Q3). Only patients who had received allopurinol treatment and a diagnosis of tophi (ICD-9-CM:274.8x) at any time before the first flare (index date) or within 12 months postindex were included and were matched in a 1:1 ratio with control gout-free subjects. The comorbidity burden, healthcare resource use, and annual healthcare costs (2008 US$) in the 12-month postindex period were compared between both cohorts using regression models adjusted for demographic characteristic and stratified for patients with ≥6 flares. A total of 679 gout patients met the inclusion criteria for the study and had a higher prevalence of comorbidities than their matched controls. Gout cohort had a significantly higher incidence of emergency room, hospitalizations, outpatient visits, and other medical services than did their matched controls (all comparisons, uncorrected P < 0.01). After adjusting for baseline characteristics, the refractory gout cohort incurred an incremental total annual healthcare cost of $10,222 where 40% of the annual medical cost was for gout-related care compared with control cohort (P < 0.01). Patients with refractory gout have a significant economic burden compared with a gout-free population.

  19. Psychiatric comorbidity in alcoholics treated at an institution with both coerced and voluntary admission.

    PubMed

    Sallmén, B; Nilsson, L; Berglund, M

    1997-01-01

    Psychiatric comorbidity in alcoholics admitted to a rehabilitation center on either a voluntary or a coerced basis were studied. A group of 104 alcoholics (37 coerced and 35 voluntarily admitted men; and 21 coerced and ten voluntarily admitted women) with a mean age (SD) of 43 +/- 8 years were assessed by means of a Structural Clinical Interview in accordance with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM)-III-R (SCID). The interview took place a mean of 7 days after admission. The frequencies of lifetime/current axis I psychiatric comorbidity (substance use disorders excluded) were 66 and 61%, respectively. Drug dependence was present in 41 and 39%, respectively, of the cases. Thirty-seven percent had a lifetime diagnosis, and 33% a current diagnosis of affective disorders, 27 and 23%, respectively, of anxiety disorders and 20 and 13%, respectively, of non-organic psychotic disorders. In a subsample of 20 subjects, depressive symptoms were found to be stable during the course of treatment. No differences in frequency of psychiatric comorbidity were found between coerced and voluntarily admitted patients (67 and 56%, respectively) or between men and women (65 and 52%, respectively). The combination of psychiatric comorbidity and drug dependence was overrepresented among the coerced patients (50 vs 16%). It was concluded that the frequencies of psychiatric comorbidity were high in the present group. The co-occurrence of alcohol dependence, drug dependence and psychiatric comorbidity was more frequent among subjects who were coercively treated.

  20. Axis II comorbidity in borderline personality disorder is influenced by sex, age, and clinical severity.

    PubMed

    Barrachina, Judith; Pascual, Juan C; Ferrer, Marc; Soler, Joaquim; Rufat, M Jesús; Andión, Oscar; Tiana, Thais; Martín-Blanco, Ana; Casas, Miquel; Pérez, Víctor

    2011-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a severe psychiatric disorder that has a high clinical heterogeneity and frequent co-occurrence with other personality disorders (PDs). Although several studies have been performed to assess axis II comorbidity in BPD, more research is needed to clarify associated factors. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of co-occurrent axis II disorders in a large sample of patients with BPD and to investigate the influence of sex, age, and severity on this comorbidity. Data were collected from 484 patients with BPD through 2 semistructured interviews. We analyzed the frequency of axis II comorbidity and assessed differences regarding sex, age, and severity of BPD. About 74% of patients with BPD had at least 1 co-occurrent axis II disorder. The most common were paranoid, passive-aggressive, avoidant, and dependent PDs. Significant sex differences were found. Women presented more comorbidity with dependent PD, whereas men showed higher rates of comorbidity with antisocial PD. We also observed a significant positive correlation between age and the number of co-occurrent axis II disorders in women with BPD. Another finding was the positive correlation between BPD severity and the number of co-occurrent axis II disorders. These findings suggest that comorbidity with other axis II disorders and sex, age, and severity should be taken into account when developing treatment strategies and determining the prognosis of BPD.