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Sample records for adult day care

  1. Adult Day Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... care Physical therapy Recreation Respite care Socialization Supervision Transportation Medication management Back to top Center Operations Centers ... social activities. They may also help to arrange transportation to and from the center. Back to top ...

  2. Counseling Services in Adult Day Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaki, Gamal; Zaki, Sylvia

    Federal support for adult day care centers began in the United States approximately 10 years ago. To examine the counseling practices in the adult day care centers across the country and to explore how the services are affected by the staffing patterns at these centers, 135 centers completed a questionnaire. The questionnaire addressed…

  3. Adult Day Care--Extended Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Bert Kruger

    This pamphlet describes a multi-purpose day-care center for the elderly in Abilene, Texas which is intended to fill the "extended family" role of offering companionship, medical attention, and other aspects of concern to older persons in the community. The goals of the program are as follows: (1) to keep individuals out of institutions as long as…

  4. Adult Day Care and Medical and Hospital Claims.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Neena L.; Blandford, Audrey A.

    1987-01-01

    Examined effect of adult day care (ADC) on utilization of health care practitioner and inpatient hospital services. Data from three separate ADC studies revealed that, when operative for some time, ADC may result in dramatic decreases in hospital inpatient stays. Findings warrant further research. (Author/NB)

  5. 38 CFR 52.61 - General requirements for adult day health care program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... adult day health care program. 52.61 Section 52.61 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.61 General requirements for adult day health care program. Adult day health care must be...

  6. Sleep characteristics of Veterans Affairs Adult Day Health Care participants.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Jaime M; Martin, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    Addressing sleep disturbance can help to slow functional decline, delay nursing home admission, and improve overall health among older adults; however, sleep is not widely studied in high-risk older adults such as Adult Day Health Care (ADHC) participants. Sixty-eight ADHC participants were interviewed for sleep disturbance using a 28-item screening questionnaire. More than two thirds (n = 48, 70.6%) reported one or more characteristics of poor sleep, and 38% of participants met basic criteria for insomnia. Individuals with insomnia attended ADHC less frequently, reported worse sleep quality and shorter sleep duration, and were more likely to endorse trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, and waking up too early (ps < 0.001). Research is needed to better understand perceptions, predictors, and outcomes of sleep disturbance within ADHC participants. PMID:24654988

  7. Sleep characteristics of Veterans Affairs Adult Day Health Care participants.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Jaime M; Martin, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    Addressing sleep disturbance can help to slow functional decline, delay nursing home admission, and improve overall health among older adults; however, sleep is not widely studied in high-risk older adults such as Adult Day Health Care (ADHC) participants. Sixty-eight ADHC participants were interviewed for sleep disturbance using a 28-item screening questionnaire. More than two thirds (n = 48, 70.6%) reported one or more characteristics of poor sleep, and 38% of participants met basic criteria for insomnia. Individuals with insomnia attended ADHC less frequently, reported worse sleep quality and shorter sleep duration, and were more likely to endorse trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, and waking up too early (ps < 0.001). Research is needed to better understand perceptions, predictors, and outcomes of sleep disturbance within ADHC participants.

  8. 75 FR 41793 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care... Day Care Homes for the Period July 1, 2010 Through June 30, 2011 AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service...-risk afterschool care centers, and adult day care centers; the food service payment rates for meals...

  9. Adult Day Services

    MedlinePlus

    A Smart Choice Adult Day Services Comparison At-a-Glance 1 Adult Day Services Assisted Living Home Care Nursing Homes Live at home with family ... supervision Nursing care available as needed during the day Flexibility to receive care only on days when ...

  10. Use of Adult Day Care Centers: Do They Offset Utilization of Health Care Services?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iecovich, Esther; Biderman, Aya

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Based on the medical offset effect, the goal of the study was to examine the extent to which users and nonusers of adult day care centers (ADCC) differ in frequency of use of out-patient health services (visits to specialists) and in-patient health services (number of hospital admissions, length of hospitalizations, and visits to…

  11. Adult-Infant Ratios in Day Care Centers--What Evidence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollomon, John W.

    This paper investigates the evidence for adult-infant ratios in day care centers, finding that current evidence is based largely on the premise that a low number of infants per adult should result in greater interaction between the adults and the infants, and, thereby, better infant care. Support for this premise is derived from three main…

  12. 38 CFR 52.61 - General requirements for adult day health care program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false General requirements for adult day health care program. 52.61 Section 52.61 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards §...

  13. 38 CFR 52.61 - General requirements for adult day health care program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false General requirements for adult day health care program. 52.61 Section 52.61 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards §...

  14. 38 CFR 52.61 - General requirements for adult day health care program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false General requirements for adult day health care program. 52.61 Section 52.61 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards §...

  15. 38 CFR 52.61 - General requirements for adult day health care program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false General requirements for adult day health care program. 52.61 Section 52.61 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards §...

  16. Staff Morale in Day Care Centres for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mascha, Katerina

    2007-01-01

    Background: Levels of burnout, job satisfaction and intended turnover of staff working in day care centres for adults with intellectual disabilities are investigated in relation to role clarity, staff support and supervision, and coping strategies used by staff. Materials and methods: Thirty six direct-care staff of four day care centres in the UK…

  17. Adult Day Care: Its Impact on the Utilization of Other Health Care Services and on Quality of Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Neena L.; Blandford, Audrey

    The Adult Day Care Program (ADC) in the Province of Manitoba is a health and social service program providing socialization and recreation in a supportive environment to those who, without this intervention, might deteriorate in physical or mental health function. To examine the impact of adult day care on the utilization of other health care…

  18. Occupational therapy in adult day-care (position paper). American Occupational Therapy Association.

    PubMed

    1986-12-01

    Occupational therapy personnel assume central roles in adult day-care regardless of specific program emphasis. Occupational therapy focuses on health rather than illness, on what the individual can do in spite of disabilities. Several of the profession's objectives directly parallel those of adult day-care--to enable individuals to function as independently as possible despite their physical and mental limitations. To achieve this, a variety of intervention strategies are used, including remedial therapeutic activities, environmental modifications, adapted living techniques, and, when necessary, adaptation of the home environment. In this way, occupational therapy contributes significantly to the quality of life of adult day-care participants.

  19. 76 FR 44573 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care... Day Care Homes for the Period July 1, 2011 Through June 30, 2012 Correction In notice document 2011... page 43255, the table labeled ``Administrative Reimbursement Rates for Sponsoring Organizations of...

  20. 76 FR 43254 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ... REDUCED PRICE 1.46 2.85 0.44 FREE 1.76 3.25 0.89 Breakfast Lunch and Supper Snack Day Care Homes Tier I... the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act (42 U.S.C. 1753, 1759a, and 1766), section 4 of the..., 2010, at 75 FR 41793. Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) [Per meal rates in whole or...

  1. A Comparative Analysis of the Functional Disability Levels of Adult Day Care, Adult Day Health and ICF-Level Nursing Home Elderly in Hawaii.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayashida, Cullen T.

    This study compared the functional disability levels of participants in adult day centers with patients in intermediate care facilities (ICFs). A three-page questionnaire measuring demographics, social resources, physical health, mental health, and activities of daily living as assessed by the Activities of Daily Living scale and the Instrumental…

  2. On Site Training for Adult Day Care Program Aides that Meet State Certification Requirements and National Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medley, Pamilea

    This document describes a practicum that was conducted to develop a training program appropriate for adult day care program aides that would meet Oklahoma state certification requirements and national standards. The training curriculum for use in delivering onsite competency-based training to students studying to become adult day care program…

  3. Roles and functions of occupational therapy in adult day-care (position paper). American Occupational Therapy Association.

    PubMed

    1986-12-01

    Occupational therapy's long-standing involvement in adult day-care attests to the importance of the profession's role in this setting. The functional approach used by occupational therapy helps the older person overcome multiple disablements associated with aging. Intervention promotes independence, adaptation, and the maintenance of occupational performance in self-care, work, and leisure. Working collaboratively with the day-care staff, participant, and family or care giver, occupational therapy personnel use their expertise to analyze activities and facilitate problem solving. Occupational therapy personnel may also work as administrators, activity coordinators, and consultants within the adult day-care setting.

  4. Look at Me! Does the Adult Truly See and Respond to the Child in Finnish Day-Care Centres?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalliala, Marjatta

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the Kangaroo research project was to enhance the well-being of children under three years of age in Finnish day-care centres. In this experimental intervention study adults were encouraged to take a more sensitive and active role especially during "free play." In six Kangaroo groups and five control groups adults (N = 28) and children…

  5. Implications of the Adult Day Health Care Evaluation Study for program revision and research.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, S C; Chapko, M; Ehreth, J; Rothman, M L; Kelly, J R; Inui, T S

    1993-09-01

    With no additional effort to revise adult day health care (ADHC) services or the types of patients who receive them, it would appear that adding an ADHC program to a VA Medical Center would not achieve the desired objectives. The authors discuss here the advantages, disadvantages, and feasibility of 2 options for program revision. The first is to target ADHC to those types of patients who may be most likely to benefit. A targeting scheme should use the most objective criteria possible and may need to be implemented as part of a case-managed package of community-based services. The second option for program revision is to reduce the costs of ADHC services. A cost model developed as a part of the study demonstrated the effect of possible revisions, including increasing enrollment, reducing staffing costs, decreasing length of stay in ADHC, and increasing substitution of ADHC for other services. These changes differ in the level of administrative support and clinician behavior change needed for their implementation. This report then concludes with a discussion of the implications of the results for implementation of VA-ADHC versus contract ADHC, and a discussion of possible directions for future research. PMID:8361240

  6. Connecting the disconnected: adult day care for people with AIDS in New York City.

    PubMed

    Smith, M Y; Knickman, J R; Oppenheimer, L M

    1992-11-01

    Despite pressing need, the development of a continuum of long-term-care services for people with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) has been hampered by the dearth of information on the characteristics and service needs of patients eligible for such care. This article presents findings from a process evaluation of an outpatient day care program for people with AIDS in New York City. The AIDS clients were highly functional but had a diverse range of needs and problems related to housing, substance abuse, medical care, and social support. The majority of clients reported being very satisfied with the level of staff support and with the overall program. The findings of the study suggest that day care is a valuable addition to the continuum of services and that the creative dissemination of this program may improve the delivery of services to people with AIDS.

  7. Connecting the disconnected: adult day care for people with AIDS in New York City.

    PubMed

    Smith, M Y; Knickman, J R; Oppenheimer, L M

    1992-11-01

    Despite pressing need, the development of a continuum of long-term-care services for people with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) has been hampered by the dearth of information on the characteristics and service needs of patients eligible for such care. This article presents findings from a process evaluation of an outpatient day care program for people with AIDS in New York City. The AIDS clients were highly functional but had a diverse range of needs and problems related to housing, substance abuse, medical care, and social support. The majority of clients reported being very satisfied with the level of staff support and with the overall program. The findings of the study suggest that day care is a valuable addition to the continuum of services and that the creative dissemination of this program may improve the delivery of services to people with AIDS. PMID:1478553

  8. State Regulation of Medication Administration by Unlicensed Assistive Personnel in Residential Care and Adult Day Services Settings.

    PubMed

    Carder, Paula C; O'Keeffe, Janet

    2016-09-01

    Residential care settings and adult day services are two community-based care options used by older adults with chronic health conditions. Most states have regulatory provisions that allow unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP) to administer medications. The current national policy study examined state regulations to identify which states permit UAP to administer medications, as well as staffing and training requirements. Key findings include states lack clear and adequate provisions for nurse oversight of UAP who administer medications, although adult day service regulations provide a greater level of nurse oversight than residential care settings. Specifically, 32 states require residential care to hire a nurse, but only six include provisions regarding nurse availability (e.g., on-call, on-site, number of hours). In contrast, 10 of 20 states that require adult day service programs to hire a nurse provide availability provisions. Nurse oversight of UAP is an important means of assuring quality care and reducing errors; thus, state regulatory agencies might need to strengthen nurse oversight provisions. [Res Gerontol Nurs. 2016; 9(5):209-222.]. PMID:27054368

  9. Caregivers of Demented Elders: The Impact of Adult Day Care Service on Reducing Perceived Degree of Burden.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddowes, Jeannette Rickner

    The New Jersey State Department of Health, Gerontology Program, awarded grants to 32 adult day care centers statewide for the provision of specialized service for victims of Alzheimer's disease and related disorders and their caregivers. The primary goals of the programs were to reduce caregiver burden through providing social supports and to…

  10. Day Care as a Long-Term Care Service Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaki, Gamel; Zaki, Sylvia

    Day care is a growing service in the field of long-term care, increasing the options available to the impaired elderly. To study the development of adult day care centers in southeastern New England, and to identify the relationship of day care centers to the long term care network of services, the 11 day care centers in the catchment area of the…

  11. Day Care Personnel Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levi Strauss Foundation, Inc., San Francisco, CA.

    The information presented in this guide focuses on the knowledge, skills, values, and attitudes needed for effective personnel management in day care settings. Information included in this publication came from the suggestions of day care directors who participated in Training for Child Care Project workshops on administration, as well as from…

  12. Day care health risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... after going to the bathroom or changing a diaper, and then preparing food. In addition to good ... washing, important policies include: Preparing food and changing diapers in different areas Making sure day care staff ...

  13. Factors Affecting the Involvement of Day Centre Care Staff in the Delivery of Physiotherapy to Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: An Exploratory Study in One London Borough

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, M. -J.; Kitchen, S. S.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Physiotherapists for adults with intellectual disabilities often work in day centres, relying on care staff to support programmes. This study investigates factors affecting physiotherapy delivery in 4 day centres in one London borough. Materials and Method: Semi-structured interviews were carried out with day centre care staff,…

  14. Cost of VA adult day health care programs and their effect on utilization and cost of care.

    PubMed

    Ehreth, J; Chapko, M; Hedrick, S C; Savarino, J E

    1993-09-01

    The VA-ADHC Evaluation included a detailed assessment of the cost of the VA-ADHC programs and an evaluation of their effect on patients' utilization and costs of other health care services. Although each VA-ADHC program had little variation in its program costs over the 3 years of the study, there were large variations between the programs in total costs, their costs per patient day, and in some cost components. The 3 most important factors in determining the level of program costs were: the way patients were transported to and from ADHC, the availability of space to house the program, and the staff-to-patient ratio. The total cost of health care for patients randomly assigned to VA-ADHC was significantly (15.5%) higher than those assigned to customary care. Although ADHC care did substitute for certain other forms of care (i.e., home care and clinic visits), there was not enough of a substitution effect to offset the additional costs of ADHC services.

  15. Day Care: Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Florence P.; And Others

    This collection of 12 short, bilingual papers on nutrition and preschool children is part of a series of papers on various aspects of day care published by the Canadian Department of Health and Welfare. Each paper is presented in both English and French. Topics dealt with include an overview of children's nutritional needs; development of…

  16. The Ecology of Infant Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elardo, Richard

    This paper explores some of the attributed of quality day care programs for infants, age 0 to 30 months. High-quality interactions with adults result in positive developmental outcomes for infants. Adults involved in day care should focus on providing an environment of stimulating experiences, which help infants to develop satisfactorily. Other…

  17. 7 CFR 226.19a - Adult day care center provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... participating in the Program must serve one or more of the following meal types—breakfast, lunch, supper, and... enrollment of each adult participant including information used to determine eligibility for free and reduced... records of time of service meal counts by type (breakfast, lunch, supper, and snacks) served to...

  18. 7 CFR 226.19a - Adult day care center provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... participating in the Program must serve one or more of the following meal types—breakfast, lunch, supper, and... enrollment of each adult participant including information used to determine eligibility for free and reduced... records of time of service meal counts by type (breakfast, lunch, supper, and snacks) served to...

  19. 7 CFR 226.19a - Adult day care center provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... participating in the Program must serve one or more of the following meal types—breakfast, lunch, supper, and... enrollment of each adult participant including information used to determine eligibility for free and reduced... records of time of service meal counts by type (breakfast, lunch, supper, and snacks) served to...

  20. 7 CFR 226.19a - Adult day care center provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... participating in the Program must serve one or more of the following meal types—breakfast, lunch, supper, and... enrollment of each adult participant including information used to determine eligibility for free and reduced... records of time of service meal counts by type (breakfast, lunch, supper, and snacks) served to...

  1. 7 CFR 226.19a - Adult day care center provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... participating in the Program must serve one or more of the following meal types—breakfast, lunch, supper, and... enrollment of each adult participant including information used to determine eligibility for free and reduced... records of time of service meal counts by type (breakfast, lunch, supper, and snacks) served to...

  2. Family Day Care Training Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakatsu, Gail

    California's Family Day Care Training Program was designed to recruit and train in 7 weeks, Lao, Vietnamese, and Chinese refugees to establish their own state-licensed, family day care homes. Topics in the program's curriculum include an introduction to family day care, state licenses for family day care, state licensing requirements for family…

  3. QuickStats: Percentages* of Residential Care Communities and Adult Day Services Centers That Provided(†) Selected Services - United States, 2014.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, a greater percentage of residential care communities than adult day service centers provided five of seven selected services. The majority of residential care communities provided pharmacy services (82%); followed by transportation for social activities (79%); physical, occupational, or speech therapy (69%); hospice (62%); skilled nursing (59%); and mental health services (52%). Fewer than half provided social work services (48%). The majority of adult day services centers provided transportation for social activities (69%); skilled nursing (66%); and social work (52%). %). Fewer than half provided physical, occupational, or speech therapy (49%). One third or less provided mental health (33%), pharmacy (27%), and hospice services (12%). PMID:27607333

  4. Family Day Care Provider Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Office of Children and Family Services, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Family day care providers are responsible for creating a high-quality program where children have opportunities to grow, learn and thrive. Part of providing high-quality child care includes complying with the family day care regulations from the New York State Office of Children and Family Services (OCFS). This Handbook will help day care…

  5. Perspectives on Infant Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elardo, Richard, E.; Pagan, Betty, Ed.

    These proceedings of the first annual SACUS workshop on infant day care contain the papers presented at the conference, plus an appendix--Developmental Objectives for Infants and Toddlers. The papers are: "Infant Day Care--Fads, Facts, and Fancies" by Bettye M. Caldwell; "Family Day Care""A Broad Perspective" by Malcolm S. Host; "Getting…

  6. The Association Between Sleep and Physical Function Among Older Veterans in an Adult Day Health Care Program

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yeonsu; Dzierzewski, Joseph; Fung, Constance H.; Rodriguez, Juan C.; Jouldjian, Stella; Mitchell, Michael; Josephson, Karen R.; Alessi, Cathy A.; Martin, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To examine whether sleep disturbance is associated with poor physical function in older veterans in an adult day health care (ADHC) program. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. SETTING One ADHC program in a Veterans Affairs Ambulatory Care Center. PARTICIPANTS Older veterans (N = 50) who were enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of a sleep intervention program and provided complete baseline data. MEASUREMENTS Participant characteristics (e.g., age, depression, relationship to caregiver, pain, comorbidity) were collected using appropriate questionnaires. Physical function was measured using the total score of activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental ADLs (IADLs) from the Older Americans Resources and Services Multidimensional Functional Assessment Questionnaire. Sleep was assessed subjectively (by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Insomnia Severity Index) and objectively (by wrist actigraphy). RESULTS As expected, participants required substantial assistance with ADLs and IADLs. A regression model showed that participant characteristics (i.e., marital status, use of sleep medication, comorbidity, and posttraumatic stress disorder) and living arrangement (i.e., living with a spouse and/or others) were significantly associated with poor physical function. Poorer objective sleep (i.e., total sleep time, total numbers of awakenings, and total wake time) was significantly associated with poor physical function, accounting for a significant proportion of the variance above and beyond participant characteristics. CONCLUSION Objective measures of nighttime sleep disturbance were associated with poor physical function among older veterans in an ADHC program. Further research is needed to determine whether interventions to improve sleep will delay functional decline in this vulnerable population. PMID:26200520

  7. eHealth Technology Competencies for Health Professionals Working in Home Care to Support Older Adults to Age in Place: Outcomes of a Two-Day Collaborative Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Ansam; Woolrych, Ryan D; Sixsmith, Andrew; Kearns, William D

    2013-01-01

    Background The demand for care is increasing, whereas in the near future the number of people working in professional care will not match with the demand for care. eHealth technology can help to meet the growing demand for care. Despite the apparent positive effects of eHealth technology, there are still barriers to technology adoption related to the absence of a composite set of knowledge and skills among health care professionals regarding the use of eHealth technology. Objective The objective of this paper is to discuss the competencies required by health care professionals working in home care, with eHealth technologies such as remote telecare and ambient assisted living (AAL), mobile health, and fall detection systems. Methods A two-day collaborative workshop was undertaken with academics across multiple disciplines with experience in working on funded research regarding the application and development of technologies to support older people. Results The findings revealed that health care professionals working in home care require a subset of composite skills as well as technology-specific competencies to develop the necessary aptitude in eHealth care. This paper argues that eHealth care technology skills must be instilled in health care professionals to ensure that technologies become integral components of future care delivery, especially to support older adults to age in place. Educating health care professionals with the necessary skill training in eHealth care will improve service delivery and optimise the eHealth care potential to reduce costs by improving efficiency. Moreover, embedding eHealth care competencies within training and education for health care professionals ensures that the benefits of new technologies are realized by casting them in the context of the larger system of care. These care improvements will potentially support the independent living of older persons at home. Conclusions This paper describes the health care professionals

  8. Day Care Infection Control Protocol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seattle-King County Dept. of Public Health, Seattle, WA.

    This day care infection control manual was assembled to provide technical guidance for the prevention and control of communicable diseases to child day care facilities in Seattle and King County, Washington. For each disease, the manual provides background information, public health control recommendations, and letters that can be used to…

  9. Day Care for America's Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaCrosse, E. Robert

    High quality day care is a pressing social need for the 1970's. Factors responsible for the strong interest in day care include pressures for welfare reform, the growing number of women in the labor force, minority pressures for equal opportunities, and research findings stressing the importance of development during the early years of a child's…

  10. Good References on Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Bureau (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    This annotated bibliography, with about 70 entries, deals with many facets of day care programs. Citations are divided by the following subjects: day care guides and standards, environmental standards, education and child development, social services, health and nutrition, training of staff, parent involvement, administration and coordination, and…

  11. Families, Day Care, and Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Marian

    Stress in relationship to preschool children, day care environments, and the parents of children in day care is examined in this conference paper. Some events that may cause stress in individuals and the defense mechanisms associated with stressful experiences are indicated. Guidelines are provided for identifying children under stress and for…

  12. Child Day Care Health Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fookson, Maxine; And Others

    Developed to meet Washington State Day Care Minimum Licensing Requirements, guidelines in this handbook concern 10 health topics. Discussion focuses on (1) preventing illness in day care settings; (2) illnesses, their treatment, ways to limit their spread, and what caregivers can do when they have a sick child at their center; (3) caregivers'…

  13. Day Care: Facilities and Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Sheila; And Others

    This collection of 4 bilingual papers on facilities and equipment in day care centers is part of a series of papers on various aspects of day care published by the Canadian Department of Health and Welfare. Each paper is presented in both English and French. Paper I, concerning space and equipment in the playground, consists of short lists of…

  14. Day Care: Resources for Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grotberg, Edith H., Ed.

    The question of federal day care programs on a mass scale oriented toward influencing family life is discussed, and a number of issues concerning the behavioral and social effects of such a system are raised. This document is divided into six parts. Part I discusses the following: day care settings--social, cultural, and anthropological…

  15. Day Care Center Enrichment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West Virginia State Dept. of Welfare, Charleston.

    This guide to a West Virginia Department of Welfare project for upgrading the quality of day care centers throughout the state presents samples of the forms used in the program, accompanied by a brief description of the program's format, requirements and procedures. The Day Care Center Enrichment Program provides a monetary incentive for…

  16. Starting a Day Care Center: The Day Care Center Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Checkett, Donald

    Designed to be of help to individuals and groups seeking to establish a day care center in the metropolitan St. Louis area, this manual calls attention to important and basic information which must be taken into account if planning is to produce tangible results. Following a brief section defining commonly used terms referring to organized…

  17. Infant Nurseries and Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Children's Centre, Paris (France).

    In four brief pamphlets, background information concerning aspects of the provision of day care services for infants and young children is directed to (1) policy makers, (2) mass media specialists, (3) academic level workers and professionals, and (4) nurses, midwives, social workers, teachers, and parents. Topics discussed include child…

  18. Infectious Diseases in Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sleator, Esther K.

    Discussed in this publication are infectious illnesses for which children attending day care appear to be at special risk. Also covered are the common cold, some infectious disease problems receiving media attention, and some other annoying but not serious diseases, such as head lice, pinworms, and contagious skin conditions. Causes,…

  19. State Plan for Child Day Care [Virginia].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gravett, Marty; And Others

    Virginia's first state plan for child day care begins with 14 sections covering several aspects of child care. Section I reviews child care history and trends. Sections II, III, IV, and V argue, respectively, that child day care is important to government, business, families, and children. Elements of a comprehensive child day care delivery system…

  20. Optimizing Infant Development: Strategies for Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambliss, Catherine

    This guide for infant day care providers examines the importance of early experience for brain development and strategies for providing optimal infant care. The introduction discusses the current devaluation of day care and idealization of maternal care and identifies benefits of quality day care experience for intellectual development, sleep…

  1. Iowa Family Day Care Handbook. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinsky, Dorothy; And Others

    The Iowa Family Day Care Handbook is designed as an aid for persons entering the business of providing home day care as well as for those persons already in the field. Topics include advantages and disadvantages of family day care for children, parents and providers; getting started in family day care; and a list and description of records that…

  2. Family Day Care Training Curriculum (Lao).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakatsu, Gail

    California's Family Day Care Training Program was designed to recruit and train, in 7 weeks, Lao, Vietnamese, and Chinese refugees to establish their own state-licensed, family day care homes. Topics in the program's curriculum include an introduction to family day care, state licenses for family day care, state licensing requirements for family…

  3. Mediating effect of Adult Day Health Care (ADHC) and family network on Quality of Life among low-income older Korean immigrants.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bum Jung

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the direct and indirect effects of Adult Day Health Care (ADHC) and family network on Quality of Life (QOL) for low-income older Korean immigrants in Los Angeles County, CA. A cross-sectional survey of low-income older Korean immigrants who use ADHC programs was conducted. Self-reported measures included sociocultural characteristics, acculturation, cognitive function, family network, utilization of ADHC, and QOL. The study found that for QOL, two variables had only direct effects: years in ADHC and acculturation. Family network was directly associated with QOL and indirectly associated with it through the variable "years in ADHC." Our findings indicate that a strong family network is positively associated with more years of attendance in ADHC, and with higher QOL scores. Thus, policy makers and practitioners should be aware of the positive association among social networks, attendance in ADHC, and higher QOL among low-income older Korean immigrants.

  4. Group Family Day Care Provider Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Office of Children and Family Services, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Group family day care providers need to create high-quality programs where children have opportunities to grow, learn and thrive. Part of providing high-quality child care includes complying with the group family day care regulations from the New York State Office of Children and Family Services (OCFS). This Handbook will help day care providers:…

  5. Day Care Hopping: Stabilizing Day Care Options for Low-Income Mothers through Subsidies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drentea, Patricia; Durham, Suzanne; Mwaria, Mercie; Norman, Emily; Xi, Juan

    2004-01-01

    We examined how to allocate a subsidy to low-income women that would stabilize children in day care at a Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA). The subsidy is to alleviate day care hopping (i.e. when parents move from day care to day care) leaving unpaid tuitions at each place. Day care hopping is really a survival strategy for the working…

  6. Family Day Care Provider Support Services Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galblum, Trudi W.; Boyer-Shesol, Cathy

    This directory profiles numerous organizational support services for family day care providers in the Kansas City metropolitan area. The first chapter, on operating a family day care home, concerns licensing and registration, the processes of starting and marketing a day care business, zoning and municipal regulation, and substitute providers. The…

  7. Dental Care Every Day: A Caregiver's Guide

    MedlinePlus

    ... Every Day: A Caregiver's Guide Dental Care Every Day: A Caregiver's Guide Main Content Getting Started Three ... regularly. Back to Top Step 1. Brush Every Day Angle the brush at the gumline and brush ...

  8. How to Start a Day Care Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day Care and Child Development Council of America, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This publication describes the necessary steps a day care planner should follow from his or her initial thoughts of starting a day care center through to opening the door to care for children. The following steps are suggested: (1) consult appropriate offices to obtain licensing regulations, and zoning codes, as well as information on major…

  9. Day Care Center Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antill, Francis, Ed.; And Others

    Content, materials, and teaching suggestions are provided for trainable retarded children in the following areas: self care skills; motor skills and coordination; communication; socialization; vocational training; safety; health; and intellectual stimulation. Eleven supplements give additional information on toilet training, a perceptual survey…

  10. Sanitation Practices for Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison.

    Specifically designed to assist child care food service personnel in providing wholesome food in a safe and sanitary manner, this sanitation guide interprets and expands on Chapter HSS 55 of the Wisconsin Department of Health and Social Services' code for licensing activities. Following a brief introduction, chapters 2 through 7 focus on…

  11. [Day care, the day care patient and his partner].

    PubMed

    van Woerkom, E M

    1981-02-01

    The aim of this contribution is to examine what the consequences are of an admission to a psychogeriatric dayhospital for a patient and his partner. In the first place attention has been payed to some complicating factors: on the one side the organization and function of daycare among other institutions, on the other side, at greater length, the direct care to a patient and his partner. Then, an account has been given of a pilotstudy regarding the experience of a patient and his partner in case of an admission to a psychogeriatric dayhospital. By way of literature research, information from family- and patient-meetings and Grid-data, it has been found that it is significant to involve the family in an over-all treatment, in the first place because family can give relevant supplying information; in the second place because an admission can be problematic to such an extent that a partner needs support too. Besides, the carrying-capacity of the family is of crucial importance in case of a daycare-situation. It was further put that more research has to be done into the psychological processes of an admission.

  12. From Teacher to Day Care Center Director!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Viteri, Jorge Saenz

    This paper addresses the roles and responsibilities of a day care center director, based on the author's personal experience as an interim director during his junior year at college and a survey of other directors. The paper aims to provide insight into the reality of being a day care center director, particularly the acquisition of knowledge,…

  13. Discourses of Professionalism in Family Day Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Kay; Davis, Elise; Williamson, Lara; Harrison, Linda J.; Sims, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Family day care in Australia is currently undergoing rapid "professionalisation" within a national reform agenda that seeks to raise and standardise early childhood service quality. Included within this reform is a requirement that all family day care workers obtain formal qualifications and that workers are referred to as…

  14. What Is Quality Family Day Care?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasegawa, Pam, Comp.

    This position paper describes several aspects of ideal family day care. The importance of a mother substitute and a "home away from home" in which both preschool and school-age children are free to be themselves is emphasized. The key to an optimal relationship between the natural and day care parents is mutual cooperation, friendship and…

  15. The Educational Day Care Consultation Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Melinda; Valenstein, Thelma

    A research and training program for family day care mothers at the University of Michigan involves both group meetings and individual home consultations by educational consultants, trained community para-professionals. The program is directed toward low income and working class licensed day care mothers and is conducted by the School of Education.…

  16. Reminiscences and Thoughts about Montessori Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Margaret E.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a combination day care/Montessori school in London during World War II to illustrate how Montessori principles of order, care, and respect can exist through the environment and throughout the day. Suggests a family-like situation for non- classroom time, discussing meals as social occasions, the importance of grooming, playtime, the use…

  17. Day Care Dilemma. Austin: A Community Responds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Dale B.

    1987-01-01

    The community of Austin, Texas has several programs for after school day care for students with disabilities, including: Extend-A-Care, where nondisabled peers participate in play and care activities with disabled children; summer camps for autistic children sponsored by the Parks and Recreation Department; and summer camps operated by the Easter…

  18. Southeast Asian Family Day Care Resource Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Union of Pan Asian Communities, San Diego, CA.

    A companion publication to California's Family Day Care Training Curriculum, this resource manual is designed to help others replicate the child care provider training project and establish a child care network. The manual consists of seven sections. The first section provides an introduction. The second summarizes experiences of the agency that…

  19. Oral health status and treatment needs of children and young adults attending a day centre for individuals with special health care needs

    PubMed Central

    Oredugba, Folakemi A; Akindayomi, Yinka

    2008-01-01

    Background The oral health condition of individuals with special health care needs have been reported in literature to be influenced by various sociodemographic factors, including living conditions and severity of impairment. This study was carried out to determine the oral health status and treatment needs of children and young adults attending a day institution for those with special needs. Methods This study was carried out as part of an oral health screening program organized by the institution and consent was obtained from parents and guardians before the screening. All information was supplied by the parents during the screening using a questionnaire completed by the dentist. Oral examination was carried out on all consenting subjects in attendance on the days of screening in the school clinic with parents and teachers in attendance, using standard World Health Organisation oral health indices to assess dental caries, oral hygiene status, malocclusion and other oral health parameters. Results Fifty-four subjects aged 3–26 years (mean 12.28 ± 6.82 years) and comprising 72.2% males and 27.8% females participated in the study. Over 90% were from parents of high and middle level educational background. Thirty-six (66.7%) were caries free, with a mean dmft score of 0.7 ± 1.77 and mean DMFT score of 0.4 ± 1.44 with no significant difference across gender (p = 0.5) and parents' educational status (p = 0.43). The mean OHI-S of the total population in this study was 1.36 ± 0.16. Females had a mean score of 0.88 ± 1.10 while males had a mean score of 1.55 ± 1.24 with no significant difference (p = 0.6). Twenty-five (46.3%) had good oral hygiene, 17 (31.5%) had fair oral hygiene and 12 (22.2%) had poor oral hygiene, with no significant difference across gender (p = 1.11) and age groups (p = 0.07). Fifteen (27.8%) had gingivitis with no significant difference across age groups (p = 0.17). Forty-five (83.3%) had Angle's class I malocclusion, 6(11.1%) class II and

  20. Predicting the Outcome of Psychogeriatric Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilleard, C. J.

    1985-01-01

    Examined caregivers' problems, strain, relationship with their dependent, and attitudes toward day care in determining the outcome placements of psychogeriatric day hospital patients. Examined features contributing to the demented elderly's continued attendance at the day hospital in order to determine implications for such services. (Author/NRB)

  1. The Duke of York Day Care Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, J.; Trieger, S.

    Progress of the children involved in a Canadian day care project is reported, focusing on the day-to-day interaction of the children and any changes in their overt behavior patterns. Particular emphasis is on the adjustment of the inner-city youth to the problems produced by the cultural and economic deprivation of their environment. A brief…

  2. Health in Day Care: A Guide for Day Care Providers in Massachusetts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendrick, Abby Shapiro, Ed.; Messenger, Katherine P., Ed.

    This reference manual and resource guide describes high standards for health policies and day care procedures that reflect current research and recommendations of experts. Chapters 1 and 2, which concern day care's role in health, cover health education in day care and the basics relating to policies, providers, and records. Chapters 3-5 concern…

  3. Day Care: Gold Coin or Brass Check?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenstein, Sidney

    1972-01-01

    Because a national day care program will probably be instituted soon, the major issues should be debated before policies are set. Thus some program models are analyzed and then related to the needs of various consumer groups. (Author)

  4. The Finnish Day Care System and the Needs of Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huttunen, Eeva; Tamminen, Merja

    The Finnish family and day care, the child behavior and growth environment, and the development of day care are discussed in this paper. The Finnish family and day care is discussed in relation to policies regarding the Finnish family, the Finnish day care system, the basis of Finnish day care education, and ecological views in day care education.…

  5. Environmental Criteria: MR Preschool Day Care Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waligura, Randolph L.; And Others

    Contributions of the physical environment to the learning process and environmental needs of preschool children are evaluated. Guidelines for the planning and design of preschool day care facilities, especially for mentally retarded and other children with developmental disabilities, are established. The current status and trends in day care…

  6. Money for Day Care Programs in Connecticut.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffin, Fai; Jacob, Stacie

    This pamphlet describes what Title IV-A funding is, who is eligible for it, what Connecticut agencies administer it, and what some of the problems are. This information should prove invaluable to community groups who want to establish new day care programs, as the Federal government is willing to pay for 75 percent of the total cost of day care…

  7. Bite Injuries at a Day Care Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomons, Hope C.; Elardo, Richard

    1989-01-01

    Reviews the incidence of bites among reported accidents to children in a university day care center over a 42-month period in an effort to examine the ways in which bites varied by age, sex, body part injured, cause of injury, season, and time of day. (BB)

  8. Diabetes and Adult Day Health Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dabelko, Holly I.; DeCoster, Vaughn A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide a profile of individuals with diabetes who receive services in adult day centers. This exploratory study uses an administrative data set (N = 280) from five programs in central Ohio to examine four areas: demographics, health and mental health, financial and social resources, and disenrollment status. Older…

  9. The Process of Adult Day Service Use*

    PubMed Central

    Gaugler, Joseph E.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine why and how families and older adults utilize adult day services. The current study included three months of participant observation in one rural and one suburban adult day service program in an upper-Midwestern region of the United States as well as semi-structured interviews with 14 family members of clients and 12 staff members from these programs. Several key constructs emerged that organized the multiple sources of qualitative data including programmatic philosophy, positioning, and environment of ADS; clients’ and family members’ reasons for use; the process of ADS use by families and clients; and pathways to family/client psychosocial and client functional outcomes. A number of inter-related themes emerged within each construct. The constructs identified and their potential associations among each other were used to expand upon and refine prior conceptualizations of ADS to frame future clinical and research efforts. PMID:24239404

  10. Integrating Behavioral Psychology Services into Adult Day Programming for Individuals with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBlanc, Linda A.

    2010-01-01

    Many individuals with dementia and problem behavior are served in nursing home settings long before health issues necessitate constant medical care. Alternative community-based adult day health care programs allow individuals with dementia to remain in their home with their families at a substantially reduced cost; however, many adult day programs…

  11. Health: A Key Factor in the Evaluation of Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bollin, Gail G.

    Research has inadequately examined why health has become a problem in the day care setting. Health regulations for day care have not been researched in the day care setting per se but have been imposed on day care by the medical community working from a hospital model. Day care research has presumed that having antecedent health regulations in…

  12. The Day Care Center Diarrhea Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickering, Larry K.

    1986-01-01

    Prevention and control of diarrhea in day care settings depends on: maintenance of hygienic standards; disease surveillance; adhering to a policy for exclusion of children with diarrhea; and education of staff. When diarrhea afflicts several children, isolating together can stop the spread of disease without interrupting normal operation. (KH)

  13. Emotional Exhaustion in Day-Care Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Løvgren, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Although childcare workers have the second-worst occupation for work-related health problems and the number of professional day-care centers is growing throughout Europe, few studies have examined these workers' emotional well-being. This study investigates the effect of position, competence, work role, role clarity, and work tasks on emotional…

  14. Paraprofessional Social Workers in Day Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterman, Phylis Johnson

    1977-01-01

    Describes an 8-week, inservice, college-level course for paraprofessional social workers employed in day care centers. Bi-weekly classes, supplemented by on-site observation and consultation, covered child development, attitudes, systems, resources, roles and practice skills. Opportunities were also provided to test roles and techniques on the…

  15. Day Care: Gold Coin or Brass Check.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenstein, Sidney

    On the assumption that there will be a national program of day care for preschool children, the author presents the major issues involved. An attempt is made to bring together some figures on current need and available facilities, to examine policy considerations in the implementation of programs, to present some difficulties in providing adequate…

  16. Health and Safety in Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sells, Clifford J.; Paeth, Susan

    1987-01-01

    Basic health and day care policies and procedures should be implemented and closely monitored with the help of a health consultant, particularly in terms of respiratory tract, enteric, skin, invasive bacterial, and multiple system infections; Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome; vaccine preventable diseases; and general safety procedures.…

  17. The "Effects" of Infant Day Care Reconsidered.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belsky, Jay

    Evidence concerning the developmental correlates of nonmaternal care in the first year of life are examined with respect to infant-mother attachment and subsequent social development. Even though the evidence is not without its inconsistencies, a circumstantial case, consistent with attachment theory, can be made that extensive infant day care…

  18. Child Day Care Center Licensing Study, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    An update of information first compiled by the Children's Foundation in 1991 and updated in 1993, this 1994 day care licensing study presents the results of a survey of the regulatory offices of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. Following a summary of results in question-answer format, the entries for…

  19. Child Day Care Center Licensing Study, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This study contains the results of a nationwide survey concerning day care regulations and licensing procedures throughout the United States. The regulatory offices of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands were surveyed. The listings, which are arranged according to location, provide the address and telephone…

  20. Child Day Care Guidelines: A Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Health and Mental Hygiene, Baltimore.

    This document is a collection of 21 newsletters, produced by the Maryland State Department of Health and Mental Hygiene between 1964 and 1972, which cover a wide variety of activities and issues involved in day care for children, aged 2-5. The following topics are included: outdoor play, art, music, block building, science, eating, trips,…

  1. The Family Day Care Providers' Legal Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treadwell, Lujuana Wolfe

    Designed specifically for family day care providers in Alameda County, California, this handbook provides legal and business advice thought to be useful as well to providers throughout the United States. A wide range of legal and business issues is covered in 15 brief chapters. Advice is offered on provider-parent contracts, planning for accidents…

  2. Simplified Recipes for Day Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asmussen, Patricia D.

    The spiral-bound collection of 156 simplified recipes is designed to help those who prepare food for groups of children at day care centers. The recipes provide for 25 child-size servings to meet the nutritional needs and appetites of children from 2 to 6 years of age. The first section gives general information on ladle and scoop sizes, weights…

  3. Day Care: Children with Special Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buhler, Diane; And Others

    This collection of 7 bilingual papers on children with special needs is part of a series of papers on various aspects of day care published by the Canadian Department of Health and Welfare. Each paper is presented in both English and French. Paper I is a 2-page description of the nutrition program in a kindergarten for the trainable mentally…

  4. Federal Funds for Day Care Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Women's Bureau (DOL), Washington, DC.

    This pamphlet outlines programs to date of Federal agencies that provide funds for day care projects. Developed by the Women's Bureau of the U.S. Department of Labor, these programs are federally funded by seven agencies: (1) Department of Agriculture, (2) Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, (3) Department of Housing and Urban…

  5. Day Care Legal Handbook: Legal Aspects of Organizing and Operating Day Care Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aikman, William F.

    This guide for providers of day care services presents information on business regulations and other legal considerations affecting for-profit and not-for-profit day care programs. Three basic topics covered are: (1) choosing the type of organization (sole proprietorship, partnership or corporation), (2) forming the organization, and (3) operating…

  6. Proposed HEW Day Care Requirements. Regulatory Analysis Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Health , Education, and Welfare, Washington., DC. Office of the Secretary.

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide decision makers with a careful comparison of alternate regulatory approaches and requirements for federal day care programs. The proposed day care regulations and this analysis cover about one-fifth of federal funding for day care and an even smaller segment of the total day care market. Proposed…

  7. Family Day Care and the School-Age Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seltzer, Michelle Seligson

    This paper provides portions of a workshop discussion at the Wheelock Conference on School-Age Child Care concerning the role of family day care for school-age children. The workshop participants included family day care providers affiliated with the day care system in the Greater Boston area, administrators of a family day care system which also…

  8. Contemporary Day Care: Does It Meet Either Educational or Family Needs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blum, Marian

    Center-based day care, at its current level of funding, is meeting neither adult nor child needs. Parents, especially working mothers, need child care that is reliable, flexible, professional, and affordable, but day care is rarely flexible, has few accommodations for emergencies, and is often not satisfactory for the maximum development of…

  9. A Study of Day Care Costs: Their Impact on Day Care Center Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    REAP Associates, Washington, DC.

    This study analyzes the effects of costs on day care center quality for a total of 13 high cost ($40-50 per week for each child) and low cost ($20-30 per week) day care centers in three New York counties. A mail survey questionnaire (included in Appendix) was used to gather data on program operations, core services, and budget expenditures.…

  10. Better Baby Care: A Book for Family Day Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Margaret; Tate, Costella

    A resource for child caregivers providing family day care for infants and toddlers, this book is designed to provide information and suggestions in a format that is easy to follow, and in language that is easy to read. Chapter 1 gives tips on "baby-proofing" the home, as well as ideas for toys, equipment, and how to integrate a baby into the…

  11. Caring: Information for Family Day-Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Berkeley. Cooperative Extension Service.

    This series of leaflets provides information for family day care providers on nine topics. Age differences and developmental stages are emphasized. The first topic concerns ways to help young children get along with others. Self-esteem is emphasized, and methods for helping children develop self-esteem are listed. The second leaflet discusses…

  12. Child Caregivers' Contingent Responsiveness Behaviors during Interactions with Toddlers within Three Day Care Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhyner, Paula M.; Guenther, Katie L.; Pizur-Barnekow, Kris; Cashin, Susan E.; Chavie, Amy L.

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly, children spend much of their day in the care of adults other than their parents, such as child care providers. Consequently, it is important to analyze nonparental adults' use of strategies suggested to foster language development, such as contingent responsiveness, during interactions with young children. This study examined…

  13. Health of Children in Day Care: Public Health Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Dept. of Health and Environment, Topeka.

    Profiles are provided for innovative public health activities that focus on the health of children in day care. All are considered to be models worthy of replication. Profiles depict (1) child care in Arizona; (2) child day care licensing in Connecticut; (3) safeguarding children in day care in Kansas; (4) paired state and local inspection in…

  14. Family Day Care: An Option for Rural Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, Nancy; Perreault, Joe

    This publication examines the establishment of family day care systems, particularly with regard to rural communities. After an introduction outlining the positive aspects of family day care, information is presented on (1) the Child Care Food Program, (2) the organization of training programs for family day care providers and establishment of a…

  15. The Effects on Children of the Organization and the Design of the Day Care Physical Environment: Appropriateness of the Federal Inter-Agency Day Care Requirements. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruvant, Charito; And Others

    This paper presents a discussion of the impact of the physical design of day care settings on children and adults. Specifically addressed is the question of how the location and design of the facility, the arrangement of indoor and outdoor space, and the organization of the furniture and materials affect the behavior of the adults and children who…

  16. Generations: A Co-Located Intergenerational Day Care Program. Replication Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Christopher R.; And Others

    This manual describes the procedures for planning and implementing a co-located or shared-site intergenerational day care program, based on the experiences of the Generations program in Columbus, Ohio. Part 1 of the manual defines co-located or shared site programs, provides a rationale for providing co-located child day care and adult day…

  17. Day Care in Caracas: A Day Care Homes Program Evaluation Report. Volume I: Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Ruesta, Maria Carlota; de Vidal, Amalia Barrios

    This document provides a summary of a formative evaluation research project concerning the neighborhood day care homes program in Caracas, Venezuela. The evaluation included nine lines of study: (1) an assessment of sociodemographic conditions of Venezuelan preschool age children, legal and employment status of Venezuelan women, and general social…

  18. Income Tax Deductions for Family Day Care Homes. Southeastern Day Care Bulletin No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galambos, Eva C.

    Women who provide day care in their own homes augment their modest earnings in some cases if they take afvantage of deductions permitted under the Internal Revenue regulations concerning use of private homes for business purposes. Where combined family income is at a level where income tax is payable, it may be profitable to calculate all…

  19. Vouchers for Day Care of Children: Evaluating a Program Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Michael D.

    1989-01-01

    Examined effects of a pilot voucher program on the price, supply, and quality of day care. Findings offered no conclusive evidence concerning expected benefits. Discusses vouchers' potential for easing the day care crisis. (RJC)

  20. Evaluation Study of Day-Care Centers in Israel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korazim, Malka; Trachtenberg, Silvia

    In recent years, day-care centers for the elderly have been playing an increasingly important role in the community service system for the elderly in Israel. ESHEL, one of the leading agencies in developing day-care services in Israel initiated a comprehensive evaluation study of day-care centers to identify variations among different types of…

  1. An International Perspective on Regulated Family Day Care Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Elise; Freeman, Ramona; Doherty, Gillian; Karlsson, Malene; Everiss, Liz; Couch, Jane; Foote, Lyn; Murray, Patricia; Modigliani, Kathy; Owen, Sue; Griffin, Sue; Friendly, Martha; McDonald, Grace; Bohanna, India; Corr, Lara; Smyth, Lisa; Morkeseth, Elisabeth Ianke; Morreaunet, Sissel; Ogi, Mari; Fukukawa, Sumi; Hinke-Rahnau, Jutta

    2012-01-01

    Despite emerging evidence of the contributors to high-quality family day care, a comprehensive comparison of international family day care systems has not been undertaken. The aim of this paper is to compare regulated family day care (FDC) in Australia, Canada, England and Wales, Germany, Ireland, Japan, Norway, New Zealand, Sweden, and the USA,…

  2. Costs of Day Care. Volume 1. Final Report: Part IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talcott, Frederick W.; Hedrick, James L.

    Results of a study of the costs of providing day care services are presented. The sections of the report are as follows: 1. Introduction; 2. Issues in Day Care Cost Analysis--use of cost information, cost structure, classification of day care types, organizational level to be addressed, total vs. per-child costs, economies of scale, diversity of…

  3. Day Care in Scandinavia: Denmark, Sweden and Norway.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esbensen, Steen B.

    Day care programs in the Scandinavian countries have been viewed as exemplary models to transfer to Canada and the United States. This publication, which provides an overview of day care in Denmark, Sweden and Norway, discusses conditions, facts, and programs contributing to the widespread acclaim. It is pointed out that day care in Denmark is an…

  4. A Comparative Analysis of Day Care Licensing Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Head Start Research and Evaluation Center.

    This report focuses on the major similarities and differences of three sets of day care licensing standards (model, state, and federal) in order to provide an information base for isolating the problems, concerns, and issues involved in day care licensing. Sets of standards compared are: (1) "OCD Guides for Day Care Licensing," 1973 (model); (2)…

  5. Illusion and Reality in Community Research on Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, William; Kahn, Nasim

    This paper outlines the design and outcomes of an investigation comparing a day care program and home-rearing of infants and preschool children and discusses at length some issues involved in day care research. The study proposed to develop and evaluate a program at a Toronto municipal day care center which accepted infants, and compare the…

  6. A Comparison of Group and Family Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floody, Dale R.; Weiberg, Jeanne

    Group and family day care settings were compared with respect to 16 child, teacher, and environmental variables. A total of 25 children, ranging in age from 3 to 5 years, served as representatives of group day care; 16 children, also ranging from 3 to 5 years in age, served as representatives of family day care. Child variables of interest were…

  7. Day Care and the CDA; 1974: A Position Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Development Associate Consortium, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This position paper summarizes the views of the 12-member Day Care Task Force to the Child Development Associate (CDA) Consortium, following a series of colloquies held by the task force on topics related to staff training and assessment in the day care field. Topics covered are: (1) definition of day care for children, (2) specific competencies…

  8. Family Day Care Handbook. Fifth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellm, Dan

    The California Child Care Initiative is a collaborative program with the objective of increasing the supply of licensed quality child care in the state to better meet demand. This handbook provides family child care providers with guidance in implementing and maintaining a family daycare operation. The handbook provides articles, sample forms and…

  9. Who Are the Clients?: Goal Displacement in an Adult Care Center for Elders with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramson, Corey M.

    2009-01-01

    This ethnographic study of "goal displacement" in an adult day care center explains how and why certain goals come to surpass others in the organizational practices of elder day care settings. Adult day care is often oriented towards providing family caregivers with respite rather than attempting to directly improve the lives of the elders…

  10. Day Care for School-Agers: A Program for School-Agers, Parents, and Day Care Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Gayle, Comp.

    Activities for school age day care programs are presented in detail in this guide for children, parents, and day care staff. The guide consists of 14 illustrated booklets that provide activity instructions and some background information. Topics are: (1) functions of school age day care; (2) quiet and active games and materials; (3) toys and play…

  11. Group and Family Day Care: A Comparative Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prescott, Elizabeth

    The point is made that studies of day-care use consistently confirm that the most common form of day care is in-home day care by a relative or another person. Group care as it now functions is most practical for a mother who works regular daytime hours and lives within manageable commuting distance of a center. The yearly costs per child reported…

  12. Family Day Care Services: Our Great-Grandmothers' Quilt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arruda, Joan

    2009-01-01

    This article features Family Day Care Services, one of the largest nonprofit providers of licensed home and centre-based child care programs in the Greater Toronto Area with 400 staff serving more than 4,000 children and their families. Family Day Care Services is also the lead agency for five Ontario Early Years Centres which are family…

  13. State Day Care Assistance Program. First Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Community and Regional Affairs, Juneau.

    This annual report of the recently established Alaska Day Care Assistance Program describes the system of state subsidies instituted to encourage local government participation in the delivery of day care services. Established to aid low-income families in providing for adequate child care, the program is administered by the state Department of…

  14. Social-Emotional Effects of Day Care. Final Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippman, Marcia Z.; Grote, Barbara H.

    This study compared the effects of group day care, family day care, and full parental care on such aspects of children's social-emotional adjustment as curiosity, attachment, self-concept, sex role, achievement motivation, impulse control, cooperation, and sharing. Initial differences between groups were controlled by matching on race, sex, number…

  15. A Survey of State Day Care Licensing Requirements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day Care and Child Development Council of America, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Following a discussion of what day care licensing isn't and what it is, a study of day care licensing is presented. The study's objectives were to: describe licensing requirements, state licensing procedures, and licensing steps required of applicants in each of the 50 states; identify those factors that facilitate or inhibit the day care…

  16. Child Day Care Center Licensing Study, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    The 1997 Child Care Center Licensing Study contains an update of information compiled in 1991 by the Children's Foundation. The data was obtained from the central regulatory office of each of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. The study is organized in alphabetical order by states and territories. The…

  17. Rural and Urban Differences in Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Glenn William

    This study investigates rural and urban differences in the need for and use of child care services. The research reported here consists of a secondary analysis of data collected in needs assessment questionnaires administered in four areas: rural Dane County, Wisconsin; urban Stoughton, Wisconsin; urban Madison, Wisconsin; and a five-county area…

  18. Care of adults with developmental disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Balogh, Robert; Wood, Jessica; Lunsky, Yona; Isaacs, Barry; Ouellette-Kuntz, Hélène; Sullivan, William

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the effects of an interdisciplinary, guideline-based continuing education course on measures related to the care of adults with developmental disabilities (DD). Design Before-and-after study with a control group. Setting Ontario. Participants Forty-seven primary care providers (physicians, registered nurses, and nurse practitioners). Intervention Participants either only received reference material about primary care of people with DD (control group) or participated in a continuing education course on primary care of people with DD in addition to receiving the reference material (intervention group). Main outcome measures Participants reported on 5 key measures related to care of adults with DD: frequency of using guidelines, frequency of performing periodic health examinations, frequency of assessing patients who present with behaviour changes, level of comfort while caring for adults with DD, and knowledge of primary care related to adults with DD. Results Over time, the intervention group showed significant increases in 4 of the 5 key measures of care compared with the control group: the frequency of guideline use (P < .001), frequency of assessment of patients’ behaviour change (P = .03), comfort level in caring for people with DD (P = .01), and knowledge of primary care related to adults with DD (P = .01). Conclusion A continuing education course on primary care of adults with DD is a useful interdisciplinary model to train health professionals who provide primary care services to these patients. PMID:26380855

  19. Stockholm's Day-Care Centres: 1974-1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsson, Nils-Olof; Sellebjerg, Asa

    The intention of this lavishly illustrated brochure is to show how a decade of expansion in day care services in Stockholm was organized and to depict the different types of centers built between 1974 and 1984 in response to a municipal directive to meet the huge need for day care services by building new centers. Introductory material provides a…

  20. Successful Strategies for Recruiting Family Day Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, Tom; Roach, Megan

    The purpose of this handbook is to show how communities can initiate a successful recruitment campaign for family day care providers. In 11 chapters, discussion focuses on (1) the need for recruitment; (2) the recruitment process; (3) determining day care need; (4) conducting provider surveys; (5) incentive programs; (6) training classes; (7)…

  1. Children's Medications: A Guide for Schools and Day Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Richard D.; Nahata, Milap C.

    Noting the lack of reference sources available on the use of medications in schools and day care centers, this book was created to help school and day care center personnel become more aware of the medicine being given to children at home and at school. Using detailed medication charts, the book answers questions about how to administer medicines…

  2. Cost Analysis in Day Care and Head Start

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedger, Jean E.

    1974-01-01

    Development of precise and usable information on the financial operations of day care centers has been hampered by a lack of definition of types of programs and units of service, and confusion in comparing prices and costs. This article reports on the testing of a system of financial reporting and cost analysis, applied to 29 day care centers and…

  3. JDC Handbook for Teachers in Day Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Joint Distribution Committee, Geneva (Switzerland).

    This guide for teachers in day care centers offers discussions (both philosophical and practical) about the needs and behaviors of preschool children, makes suggestions for teacher guidance throughout the daily program activities and routines, and defines a suitable nurturing and educational day care center environment. Directed to the teacher,…

  4. School's Out! Group Day Care for the School Age Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prescott, Elizabeth; Milich, Cynthia

    This report on group day care is designed to: (1) examine the kinds of group programs for school-age children which exist in Los Angeles County, (2) describe the conditions necessary for program operation, and (3) consider the issue of quality as it relates to community expansion of day care services for children of school age. The report is…

  5. CTEPP-OH DATA CHILD DAY CARE CENTER WEEKLY MENUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains information on the weekly day care menus for CTEPP-OH. The day care centers provided menus up to three months prior to field sampling.

    The Children’s Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Pollutant (CTEPP) study was one of the larg...

  6. Minimum Standards Required for Licensing of Day Care Family Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Human Services, Little Rock. Div. of Social Services.

    State licensing requirements for day care family homes in Arkansas are collected in this publication. Contents focus on the licensing authority, definition of a family day care home and application requirements, administration, personnel, program and activities, discipline and guidance, records, food service and nutrition, building and grounds,…

  7. Day Care for Children in Denmark, Norway and Sweden.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leira, Arnlaug

    Based on information gathered in 1986, this report describes day care in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. The focus of the report is on structural aspects of day care, including provision, management and finances, and questions concerning supply, demand, and distribution. Part I provides an introduction to the report and discusses the Scandinavian…

  8. CTEPP NC DATA CHILD DAY CARE CENTER WEEKLY MENUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains information on the weekly day care menus. The day care centers provided menus up to three months prior to field sampling.

    The Children’s Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Pollutant (CTEPP) study was one of the largest aggregate...

  9. Common Day Care Safety Renovations: Descriptions, Explanations and Cost Estimates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spack, Stan

    This booklet explains some of the day care safety features specified by the new Massachusetts State Building Code (January 1, 1975) which must be met before a new day care center can be licensed. The safety features described are those which most often require renovation to meet the building code standards. Best estimates of the costs involved in…

  10. Family Day Care: Current Research for Informed Public Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Donald L., Ed.; Pence, Alan R., Ed.

    This book presents reviews and analyses from a variety of disciplinary perspectives that place American and Canadian family day care in a historical, demographic, social, and economic context. The 15 chapters are: (1) "Family Day Care: Issues and Information Needs" (Donald Peters and Alan Pence); (2) "Historical Perspectives on Familial and…

  11. Aspects of Quality in Greek Day Care Centres.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melhuish, Edward C.; Petrogiannis, Konstantinos

    1996-01-01

    Evaluates the quality of the caregiving environment for young infants in day care centers in Athens (Greece) using three global measures: ITERS, PROFILE, and CCFS. Reveals a great similarity among the three measures. Reports a generally low quality for day care, lower than for other countries with similar research. (DSK)

  12. Kansas Adult Care Home Aide Curriculum. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fornelli, Linda K.; Bartel, Myrna J.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use by instructors whose responsibility it is to prepare persons to provide basic direct care for residents living in adult care homes. Addressed in the individual units of part I (which contains information to be covered in the first 40 hours of training) are the following topics: working in an adult care…

  13. Day Care Training in Alabama: A Follow-Up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddowes, E. Anne; Martin, Kathleen

    This study reports information gathered from 82 of the 1,056 child care workers who participated in the Alabama Statewide Day Care Training Project, the first comprehensive training program for child care providers in the state. The project sponsored training workshops in four regions of the state and included correspondence study as an option.…

  14. Day Care Enrichment Resources: A Training Guide. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Health and Human Resources, Baton Rouge. Div. of Evaluation and Services.

    The guidelines offered for child care providers in this training manual are intended to insure quality care in day care centers that meet the on-going daily needs of children--nutrition, health, social, intellectual and physical development. The manual begins by individually addressing by age (infants and toddlers, two-year-olds, three- and…

  15. 25 CFR 20.331 - What is Adult Care Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is Adult Care Assistance? 20.331 Section 20.331... SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Adult Care Assistance § 20.331 What is Adult Care Assistance? Adult care assistance provides non-medical care for eligible adult Indians who: (a) Have needs...

  16. Young adult palliative care: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jennifer K; Fasciano, Karen

    2015-02-01

    Young adulthood is a time of immense growth and possibilities. As a result, it is also a time when serious illness can have profound effects. This review examines the current data pertinent to young adult palliative care and discusses the challenges and opportunities where palliative medicine can enhance the care provided to this growing and vulnerable population. From the data, 2 primary themes emerged (1) ongoing young adult development not only generates unique biologic disease burdens and clinical treatment options but also requires frequent assessment and promotion and (2) binary health care systems often leave young adults without access to developmentally appropriate health care. Given its interdisciplinary approach, palliative care is uniquely poised to address the challenges known to caring for the seriously ill young adult. PMID:24198063

  17. A Case for Day Care in Chicago: A Study of Families Using Not-for-Profit Day Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syler, Murrell; Kemper, Patti Gregory

    This report is based on a survey undertaken by the Mayor's Office in Chicago to ascertain the effects of proposed HEW regulations for Title IV-A funds on the eligibility of families now using day care services in Chicago. The survey attempted to: (1) obtain actual profiles of the families currently using non-profit day care centers, (2) establish…

  18. The Day Care Neighbor Service: A Handbook for the Organization and Operation of a New Approach to Family Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Alice H.; Watson, Eunice L.

    The Day Care Neighbor Service makes it possible to provide social service at the neighborhood level where working mothers, without benefit of any social agency, make private and informal day care arrangements with neighborhood sitters. It makes use of a social work consultant to find the key individual in each neighborhood who is already…

  19. Stability in Center Day Care: Relations with Children's Well-Being and Problem Behavior in Day Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Schipper, J. Clasien; Van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Tavecchio, Louis W. C.

    2004-01-01

    Mothers and primary professional caregivers of 186 children, aged 6-30 months, participated in this study in which a new measure for daily stability in center day care was developed, describing staffing, grouping, and program features. Relative contributions of infants' daily experiences of care stability, quality of care, and mother's daily…

  20. Cortisol Levels and Children's Orientation in Day Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reunamo, Jyrki; Sajaniemi, Nina; Suhonen, Eira; Kontu, Elina

    2012-01-01

    Children's stress in day care is related to the stressful qualities of the environment and to children's orientations in that environment. The study involved 55 children in five day centres in Finland. Baseline saliva samples for measuring cortisol (stress) levels were collected five times during the day. Children were interviewed to measure their…

  1. Day Care Doesn't Encourage Weight Gain in Kids

    MedlinePlus

    ... suggested there may be an increased risk of obesity for children in day care. But a new analysis reveals ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Obesity in Children Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Child ...

  2. Medicare, health care reform, and older adults.

    PubMed

    McCracken, Ann L

    2010-12-01

    Nurses will play a key role in health care reform, educating and engaging consumers, providing input into and monitoring implementation, and assisting organizations with transition to new policies. As the largest group of professional health care providers, nurses must be key players in the actualization of health care reform. This article addresses how The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 will affect the solvency of Medicare, what older adults will gain, effects on quality and effectiveness of care, cost reduction, changes in taxes, and the key provisions of special interest to nurses.

  3. Social Development of Infants and Toddlers in Japanese Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shigaki, Irene S.

    To examine children's patterns of social interaction in group care, the activities and verbal behavior of 50 preschool children attending 5 Japanese day care centers in metropolitan Tokyo were observed and recorded during a total of 20 minutes of free play for each child. Participants were equally dispersed across five age categories each…

  4. Guidelines for Establishing a Family Day Care System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newsome, Barbara; And Others

    Written as a basic guide, this report of the Community Coordinated Child Care Committee of Dane County, Wisconsin, aims to assist people interested in establishing family day care systems in their own communities. Practical information is provided on the prime factors that should be taken into account in selecting the ideal physical location and…

  5. A Behavioral Approach to Training Day Care Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivy, Jonathan W.; Schreck, Kimberly A.

    2008-01-01

    Day care workers are not only responsible for meeting the needs of the children they care for but creating an enriched and friendly environment as well. Few daycare centers require any specific inservice training for their staff members. When provided, training typically occurs as a didactic workshop. For this study a multiple baseline design…

  6. Norway's Day-Care Initiative: A Municipal Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemeth, Beate; Lokken, Gisle

    2012-01-01

    Norway is gearing up to provide places in day care centres for all children aged between one and six and the need for more facilities has therefore increased substantially in recent years. In Tromso, the municipality has become closely involved in child-care pedagogics and architecture; a design competition it launched has brought rewarding…

  7. Food Buying Guide for Family Day Care Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food and Nutrition Service (USDA), Chicago, IL. Midwest Regional Office.

    Offered in this guide are facts enabling family day care providers in Michigan to serve meals meeting meal pattern requirements of the state's Child Care Food Program. Adapted from the "Food Buying Guide for Child Nutrition Programs," contents are based on the latest Federal regulations and meal pattern requirements, current food production and…

  8. Differential Day Care Placement Project. Final Narrative Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock. Div. of Federal Programs.

    This report presents the findings of surveys conducted in Arkansas to diagnose children's day care needs as directed by parents in the community. Representative samples of approximately 100 parents of preschool children in each of three communities (Fort Smith, Hot Springs, and Texarkana) were interviewed as to the kinds of child care arrangements…

  9. Classification Decisions within Levels of Psychogeriatric Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frenkel, Eleanor R.; And Others

    Geriatric day care which provides a continuum of care for the frail elderly is a relatively new type of service program, and client classification decisions are central to its implementation. Data on staff decision-making were obtained from clinical staff (N=7) of a state psychiatric center geriatric unit which offers programs at three levels of…

  10. Views on Pre-School Education and Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rambusch, Nancy McCormick

    There is a clear need in our country today for early education programs aimed at accelerating the cognitive development of disadvantaged children. Another need is for centers to care for the children of working mothers. Our traditional nursery schools have deemphasized early cognitive development while day care programs have been focused on…

  11. Transition from Pediatric to Adult OI Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... what OI is and the medical and life style issues involved. • Being comfortable speaking directly to doctors ... the adult years especially if there is good communication between the center and the hometown primary care ...

  12. Primary care of adults with developmental disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, William F.; Berg, Joseph M.; Bradley, Elspeth; Cheetham, Tom; Denton, Richard; Heng, John; Hennen, Brian; Joyce, David; Kelly, Maureen; Korossy, Marika; Lunsky, Yona; McMillan, Shirley

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To update the 2006 Canadian guidelines for primary care of adults with developmental disabilities (DD) and to make practical recommendations based on current knowledge to address the particular health issues of adults with DD. Quality of evidence Knowledgeable health care providers participating in a colloquium and a subsequent working group discussed and agreed on revisions to the 2006 guidelines based on a comprehensive review of publications, feedback gained from users of the guidelines, and personal clinical experiences. Most of the available evidence in this area of care is from expert opinion or published consensus statements (level III). Main message Adults with DD have complex health issues, many of them differing from those of the general population. Good primary care identifies the particular health issues faced by adults with DD to improve their quality of life, to improve their access to health care, and to prevent suffering, morbidity, and premature death. These guidelines synthesize general, physical, behavioural, and mental health issues of adults with DD that primary care providers should be aware of, and they present recommendations for screening and management based on current knowledge that practitioners can apply. Because of interacting biologic, psychoaffective, and social factors that contribute to the health and well-being of adults with DD, these guidelines emphasize involving caregivers, adapting procedures when appropriate, and seeking input from a range of health professionals when available. Ethical care is also emphasized. The guidelines are formulated within an ethical framework that pays attention to issues such as informed consent and the assessment of health benefits in relation to risks of harm. Conclusion Implementation of the guidelines proposed here would improve the health of adults with DD and would minimize disparities in health and health care between adults with DD and those in the general population

  13. An instrument assessing patient satisfaction with day care in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Patient satisfaction is an important indicator of quality of care in hospitals. Reliable and valid instruments to measure clinical and outpatient satisfaction already exist. Recently hospitals have increasingly provided day care, i.e., admitting patients for one day without an overnight stay. This article describes the adaption of the ‘Core questionnaire for the assessment of Patient Satisfaction’ (COPS) for general Day care (COPS-D), and the subsequent validation of the COPS-D. Methods The clinical COPS was supplemented with items to cover two new dimensions: Pre-admission visit and Operation Room. It was sent to a sample of day care patients of five general Dutch hospitals to investigate dimensionality, acceptability, reliability, construct and external validity. Construct validity was established by correlating the dimensions of the COPS-D with patients’ overall satisfaction. Results The COPS-D was returned by 3802 patients (response 46%). Factor analysis confirmed its’ structure: Pre-intake visit, Admission, Operation room, Nursing care, Medical care, Information, Autonomy and Discharge and aftercare (extraction communality 0.63-0.90). The internal consistency of the eight dimensions was good (α = 0.82-0.90); the item internal consistency corrected for overlap was satisfactory (>0.40); all inter-item correlations were higher than 0.45 but not too high (<0.90). The construct validity of all dimensions was good (r from 0.52-0.62, p < 0.01). The Information dimension had the strongest correlation with overall day care satisfaction. Conclusions The COPS-D is a reliable and valid instrument for measuring satisfaction with day care. It complements the model of measuring patient satisfaction with clinical and outpatient care given in hospitals. It also fulfils the conditions made while developing the clinical and outpatient COPS: a short, core instrument to screen patient satisfaction. PMID:22624677

  14. Parent Involvement in Day Care: Its Impact on Staff and Classroom Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Sylvia

    In this large scale study, the extent of parent involvement in preschool day care and its impact on staff and on classroom environments in child-centered and adult-centered situations were assessed. Subjects were 15 directors, 30 teachers, 524 children in 30 classrooms. Interview schedules and a classroom observation scale were the two instruments…

  15. DAY-CARE REHABILITATION CENTER FOR EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED ADOLESCENTS. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CRAWFORD, HUGH A.; VAN DUYNE, WILLIAM V.

    IN THIS FIVE YEAR DEMONSTRATION PROJECT, EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED ADULTS AND ADOLESCENTS RECEIVED TREATMENT AT A DAY CARE REHABILITATION CENTER SPONSORED BY THE RHODE ISLAND DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION (DVR) LOCATED IN A PRIVATE PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL (BUTLER HOSPITAL). THE MAJOR TREATMENT GOALS WERE PRESERVATION AND RESTORATION OF…

  16. The Day Care Experience of Minority Families in Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nergaard, Trude Brita

    2009-01-01

    This article evaluates the results of a Norwegian trial scheme involving free half-day day care for all four and five-year-olds in a district of Oslo with a large immigrant population. Although the scheme applied to all children in this age group, the target group was children whose parents came from non-Western countries. The evaluation, which is…

  17. Family Day Care Check-In Program: After-School Care for Children Aged 10-14. [Introduction and Guide to Operation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Linda B., Ed.

    The Family Day Care Check-In Program is designed to offer working parents convenient, affordable after school care for their children aged 10 to 14. It provides children with flexible supervision by caring, trained adults and gives them opportunities to grow into responsible, independent teens by planning and participating in activities on their…

  18. Exploring Parental Preferences: Care or Education: What Do Greek Parents Aspire from Day Care Centres?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rentzou, Konstantina

    2013-01-01

    Early childhood education and care is a multifaceted institution. Based on children's age, a number of different settings operate, which have usually two distinct aims. Kindergartens provide mainly education whereas day care centres provide care. Yet, in recent years, the need to establish programmes which provide both education and care to…

  19. Home iv antibiotic therapy through a medical day care unit.

    PubMed

    Gourdeau, M; Deschênes, L; Caron, M; Desmarais, M

    1993-05-01

    An out-patient parenteral antibiotic therapy program provided through a medical day care unit was evaluated in a tertiary care hospital. From July 11, 1988 to December 31, 1990, 122 patients were treated either on site at the unit or at home with self-administered intravenous antibiotics. In all, 142 courses of parenteral antibiotics (mostly cephalosporins and clindamycin) were given for a total of 124 infections, mostly bone and soft tissue infections (67 of 124, 54%). The duration of out-patient therapy ranged from two to 62 days with a mean duration of 9.4 days if treated at the unit, or 13.2 days in the home care model (1476 patient-days). Vein access was peripheral and catheters remained functional for an average of 4.9 days (range 0.5 to 22 days). Only two patients experienced adverse drug reactions that necessitated modification of treatment. One other case was readmitted to the hospital for surgical debridement. The average cost per patient-day was $66 compared with $375 for in-hospital therapy. This program proved to be safe, efficient, and cost-effective.

  20. Home iv antibiotic therapy through a medical day care unit

    PubMed Central

    Gourdeau, Marie; Deschênes, Louise; Caron, Martine; Desmarais, Marc

    1993-01-01

    An out-patient parenteral antibiotic therapy program provided through a medical day care unit was evaluated in a tertiary care hospital. From July 11, 1988 to December 31, 1990, 122 patients were treated either on site at the unit or at home with self-administered intravenous antibiotics. In all, 142 courses of parenteral antibiotics (mostly cephalosporins and clindamycin) were given for a total of 124 infections, mostly bone and soft tissue infections (67 of 124, 54%). The duration of out-patient therapy ranged from two to 62 days with a mean duration of 9.4 days if treated at the unit, or 13.2 days in the home care model (1476 patient-days). Vein access was peripheral and catheters remained functional for an average of 4.9 days (range 0.5 to 22 days). Only two patients experienced adverse drug reactions that necessitated modification of treatment. One other case was readmitted to the hospital for surgical debridement. The average cost per patient-day was $66 compared with $375 for in-hospital therapy. This program proved to be safe, efficient, and cost-effective. PMID:22346440

  1. 76 FR 34541 - Child and Adult Care Food Program Improving Management and Program Integrity

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-13

    ... these two interim rules by family day care home sponsors and providers. This rule clarifies or modifies... improve Program management and integrity in the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP), at 67 FR 43447... designed to evaluate implementation of the new regulatory requirements by family day care home sponsors...

  2. Ethical and practical challenges raised by an adult day program's caregiver satisfaction survey.

    PubMed

    Madeo, Anica; Feld, Sheila; Spencer, Beth

    2008-01-01

    A consumer satisfaction survey was completed by 21 caregivers to persons with dementia, who participated in Silver Club, a person-centered Adult Day Service program. Two themes emerged: caregivers expressed high program satisfaction based on joint benefits to members and caregivers, and they desired more information about the nature of the members' daily participation. These findings raised two important issues for program staff. First, Adult Day Service programs are often referred to and marketed as providing caregiver respite. This approach does not acknowledge caregivers' interest in programs that meet the needs of their loved ones, and may lead to reluctance to use programs that only stress the value of respite. Second, caregivers' desires for detailed feedback about members' program participation raise ethical and practical challenges within person-centered models of care. Collecting feedback from both participants and their caregivers can help monitor and improve services provided by person-centered Adult Day Service programs.

  3. Requiring formal training in preventive health practices for child day care providers.

    PubMed Central

    Bassoff, B Z; Willis, W O

    1991-01-01

    The study was a test of the feasibility of mandating training in preventive health practices for child day care providers in California. Three approaches were taken to determining the feasibility of mandatory training. They were (a) to identify persons and groups with the capability to provide training, (b) to identify systems and networks for communication and collaboration on health issues related to day care at the local level, and (c) to determine the child day care providers' concerns, needs, and future interests regarding child health. Information was collected on relevant courses offered by universities, colleges, and adult education programs; on training offered by child health authorities; and on formal curriculums offered by local and national sources. Day care center and family day care home providers were surveyed to determine their knowledge of child health issues, their concerns, and their future needs. The providers surveyed cared for a total of 14,340 children. Information on local networks was obtained from the surveys, from interviews, and from a special task force that had been set up to advise the State legislature. Study results supported the conclusion that a coordinated system of State-wide training was feasible, given the existing networks of training and educational resources, the number of day care providers who had already been motivated to seek some training in child health practices, and the almost unanimous interest among day care providers in obtaining training. Mandating training in child health for day care providers will require a commitment in the form of new legislation outlining basic requirements and allocating funding. The implementation and costs of such a mandate at the State and local level are discussed. PMID:1910186

  4. Recovering activity and illusion: the nephrology day care unit.

    PubMed

    Remón Rodríguez, C; Quirós Ganga, P L; González-Outón, J; del Castillo Gámez, R; García Herrera, A L; Sánchez Márquez, M G

    2011-01-01

    Day Care Units are an alternative to hospital care that improves more efficiency. The Nephrology, by its technical characteristics, would be benefit greatly from further development of this care modality. The objectives of this study are to present the process we have developed the Nephrology Day Care Unit in the Puerto Real University Hospital (Cádiz, Spain). For this project we followed the Deming Management Method of Quality improvement, selecting opportunities, analyzing causes, select interventions, implement and monitor results. The intervention plan includes the following points: 1) Define the place of the Day Care Unit in the organization of our Clinical Department of Nephrology, 2) Define the Manual of organization, 3) Define the structural and equipment resources, 4) Define the Catalogue of services and procedures, 5) Standards of Care Processes. Protocols and Clinical Pathways; and 6) Information and Registration System. In the first 8 months we have been performed nearly 2000 procedures, which corresponds to an average of about 10 procedures per day, and essentially related to Hemodialysis in critical or acute patients, the Interventional Nephrology, the Clinical Nephrology and Peritoneal Dialysis. The development of the Nephrology Day Care Units can help to increase our autonomy, our presence in Hospitals, recover the progressive loss of clinical activity (diagnostic and therapeutic skills) in the past to the benefit of other Specialties. It also contributes to: Promote and develop the Diagnostic and Interventional Nephrology; improve the clinical management of patients with Primary Health Level, promote the Health Education and Investigation, collaborate in the Resources Management, and finally, to make more attractive and exciting our Specialty, both for nephrologists to training specialists. PMID:21959721

  5. Diaper type and fecal contamination in child day care.

    PubMed

    Holaday, B; Waugh, G; Moukaddem, V E; West, J; Harshman, S

    1995-01-01

    In this study, modern all-in-one, front closure, reusable cloth diapers were compared with single-use, disposable paper diapers for their effect on fecal contamination in the child day care environment. Four licensed child day care centers were surveyed from which 1722 bacterial samples were cultured. The frequency of isolation of fecal organisms ranged from a low of 12% of the total bacterial isolates at a center using cloth diapers to a high of 46% and 45%, respectively, obtained at a center using first paper and then cloth diapers. Diaper type, cloth versus paper, when the method of application and the handling are made comparable, showed no significant difference in the frequency or the intensity of fecal contamination in child day care centers, as measured in the play/sleep area, the diaper change area, or on the hands of the care givers and children. Future studies to control microbial contamination in child day care centers should focus on effective ways of reducing contamination of sink faucets, hands of the caregivers, and hands of the children. PMID:7769542

  6. Why carers use adult day respite: a mixed method case study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We need to improve our understanding of the complex interactions between family carers’ emotional relationships with care-recipients and carers use of support services. This study assessed carer’s expectations and perceptions of adult day respite services and their commitment to using services. Methods A mixed-method case study approach was used with psychological contract providing a conceptual framework. Data collection was situated within an organisational case study, and the total population of carers from the organisation’s day respite service were approached. Fifty respondents provided quantitative and qualitative data through an interview survey. The conceptual framework was expanded to include Maslow’s hierarchy of needs during analysis. Results Carers prioritised benefits for and experiences of care-recipients when making day respite decisions. Respondents had high levels of trust in the service and perceived that the major benefits for care-recipients were around social interaction and meaningful activity with resultant improved well-being. Carers wanted day respite experiences to include all levels of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs from the provision of physiological care and safety through to the higher levels of belongingness, love and esteem. Conclusion The study suggests carers need to trust that care-recipients will have quality experiences at day respite. This study was intended as a preliminary stage for further research and while not generalizable it does highlight key considerations in carers’ use of day respite services. PMID:24906239

  7. Describing the sublanguage of wound care in an adult ICU.

    PubMed

    Danielsson-Ojala, Riitta; Lundgren-Laine, Heljä; Salanterä, Sanna

    2012-01-01

    Comprehensive wound documentation is an important tool in evaluating and planning patient care. The sublanguage used in ICUs may affect negatively to the wound care and thus to the healing process. We made a quantitative content analysis of nursing documentation of cardiac surgery adult patients (n=60) who had stayed over four days in the ICU. The sublanguage used in nursing documentation of wounds and ulcers in the ICU was unstructured with many words of colloquial language, misspellings and abbreviations. The documentation did not cover all aspects of proper wound care. The information technology could be helpful for nurses to document right things with plain language. PMID:22874364

  8. Educational and Growth Needs of Children in Day Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Dorothea

    1970-01-01

    A general look at day care from a developmental viewpoint. Stresses need to mold the preschool experience to the child's natural growth stages and to integrate the worlds of home and nursery school. This paper was presented at the CWLA Eastern Regional Conference at Philadelphia in 1968. (MH)

  9. Growing Healthy Bodies: Nutrition Education for Day Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viebrock, Margaret A.; Berry, Holly

    This booklet discusses the important role that day care providers can play in ensuring that children eat healthy snacks and meals and learn good eating habits. Section one of the booklet examines snack foods, discusses the difference between nutritious and less-nutritious snacks, and recommends snack foods appropriate for different age groups.…

  10. 7 CFR 226.18 - Day care home provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... children enrolled in the day care home, through collection of free and reduced price applications and/or... home, to collect applications and determine the eligibility of enrolled children for free or reduced..., lunch, supper, and snack. Reimbursement may not be claimed for more than two meals and one snack, or...

  11. 7 CFR 226.18 - Day care home provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... children enrolled in the day care home, through collection of free and reduced price applications and/or... home, to collect applications and determine the eligibility of enrolled children for free or reduced..., lunch, supper, and snack. Reimbursement may not be claimed for more than two meals and one snack, or...

  12. 7 CFR 226.18 - Day care home provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... children enrolled in the day care home, through collection of free and reduced price applications and/or... home, to collect applications and determine the eligibility of enrolled children for free or reduced..., lunch, supper, and snack. Reimbursement may not be claimed for more than two meals and one snack, or...

  13. 7 CFR 226.18 - Day care home provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... children enrolled in the day care home, through collection of free and reduced price applications and/or... home, to collect applications and determine the eligibility of enrolled children for free or reduced..., lunch, supper, and snack. Reimbursement may not be claimed for more than two meals and one snack, or...

  14. 7 CFR 226.18 - Day care home provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... children enrolled in the day care home, through collection of free and reduced price applications and/or... home, to collect applications and determine the eligibility of enrolled children for free or reduced..., lunch, supper, and snack. Reimbursement may not be claimed for more than two meals and one snack, or...

  15. Increasing Day Care Staff Members' Interactions during Caregiving Routines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venn, Martha L.; Wolery, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Four paraprofessional staff members in a mainstreamed day care program were trained to engage in positive interactive behaviors during diaper changing. Results indicated that staff increased frequency of game playing and other interactive behaviors during diapering, but increases were not generalized to feeding routines. (Author/JDD)

  16. The Burn-Out Syndrome in the Day Care Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maslach, Christina; Pines, Ayala

    1977-01-01

    Results of a study of personal job-stress factors among day care center personnel focus on impact of staff-child ratio, working hours, time out, staff meetings and program structure. Recommended institutional changes for prevention of staff "burn-out" involve reduction in amount of direct staff-child contact, development of social-professional…

  17. Health in Day Care: A Manual for Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deitch, Selma R., Ed.

    Addressed especially to community pediatricians, but also useful to other health workers, this manual discusses aspects of day care that require a physician's attention. Chapter I historically traces the positive effect of a nurturing environment upon the development of the infant and child, covering the period from the early 1900s to the present.…

  18. Transition from Long Day Care to Kindergarten: Continuity or Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barblett, Lennie; Barratt-Pugh, Caroline; Kilgallon, Pam; Maloney, Carmel

    2011-01-01

    Transition practices that ensure continuity between early childhood settings have been shown to be important in assisting children's short-term and long-term growth and development (Vogler, Cravello & Woodhead, 2008). In Western Australia many young children move from and between long day care (LDC) settings to kindergarten. In that state,…

  19. Cultural Support Workers and Long Day Care Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Melinda G.; Knowles, Meg; Grieshaber, Susan

    2011-01-01

    In Australia, eligible long day care services may apply for support at the state level to assist with the transition of children from culturally or linguistically diverse backgrounds into childcare settings. For staff in childcare services, this support comes in the form of a cultural support worker (CSW). The primary role of a CSW is to build…

  20. History of the Federal Interagency Day Care Requirements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Sara Pope

    This paper is a synthesis of available documents, surviving files and personal interviews pertaining to the history of the Federal Interagency Day Care Requirements (FIDCR). The general outlines of what took place, the principal issues and viewpoints involved and the interplay among these issues are described. Also included are: accounts of the…

  1. Learning Characteristics of Title XX Day Care Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinnison, Lloyd R.; And Others

    A study was conducted of 55 preschool children attending Title XX day care centers in Amarillo, Texas, to investigate the cognitive, language, fine motor, and socioemotional development of the children. Results indicated that the students were below the 50th percentile for their age group norms on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test Revised, the…

  2. Family Day Care: How to Provide it in Your Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squibb, Betsy

    Tips, recommendations, ideas, and background information are offered to providers of family day care. After a brief discussion of licensing and registration and a listing of learning activities for young children at home, additional learning activities and materials are described that are considered appropriate for infants, toddlers, preschool…

  3. Day Care as an Instrument of Political and Social Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwimmer, Barbara

    Day care is an entity unto itself whose values and goals have neigher been proclaimed nor supported. Unless it examines and declares its theoretical base reflecting planning in response to what it views as its purpose and mission, it will continue to be treated as a marginal, residual institution and user capriciously as a political and social…

  4. The Ecology of Day Care: Building a Model for an Integrated System of Care and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddad, Lenira

    In the past few years, the care and education dimensions of day care have occupied a prominent place in scientific and political debate in Brazil and internationally. This study used an ecological perspective to examine the interconnections surrounding the dimensions of early care and childhood education and the forces that promote or restrain…

  5. Corporations and Child Care: Profit-Making Day Care, Workplace Day Care, and a Look at the Alternatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avrin, Cookie; And Others

    This report presents a critical look at the ways profit-making child care centers treat the problems of racism and sexism, handle parent and community involvement, and provide care for children. Quantifiable factors in child care which have been found to bear a relationship to quality, warmth and flexibility are evaluated (staff/child ratios,…

  6. Technical Appendices to the National Day Care Study: Background Materials. Final Report of the National Day Care Study. Volume IV-A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruopp, Richard; And Others

    This final report of the National Day Care Study (NDCS), Volume IV-A, contains three papers that help to set a context for interpreting overall study results. "Research Issues in Day Care, A Focused Review of the Literature" focuses on effects of group care and regulatable characteristics of the day care environment. The second paper, "Case…

  7. Spotlight on Day Care. Proceedings of the National Conference on Day Care Services (Washington, D.C., May 13-15, 1965).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Bureau (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    The proceedings of the National Conference on Day Care Services are reported. Addresses before general sessions were: (1)"The Nation Looks at Day Care Services" by Hubert H. Humphrey; (2) "Spotlight on Day Care" by Ellen Winston; (3) "Education and Welfare: Allies Against Poverty" by Francis Keppel; (4) "Twenty Percent of the Nation" by Julius B.…

  8. The Organization of Group Care Environments: The Infant Day Care Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cataldo, Michael F.; Risley, Todd R.

    In designing group day care for infants, special attention has been given to efficient care practices, so that all the children's health needs can be met and so that the staff will have ample time to interact with the children. One efficient method is to assign each staff member the responsibility of a particular area rather than a particular…

  9. A Measure of the Child Care Ecology: Day Care Program Compliance with State Regulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiene, Richard

    Between July 1978 and June 1980 a program evaluation was undertaken in Pennsylvania in order to measure compliance with state day care licensing regulations. The evaluation involved approximately 1000 licensed/approved child care centers and 50,000 children. Statistical data indicate that by the period April to June 1980 the statewide compliance…

  10. Solving the Puzzle of Child Care: Report of the Cuyahoga County Child Day Care Planning Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Day Care Planning Project, Cleveland, OH.

    This report describes the Child Day Care Planning Project, which was developed by private and public representatives to meet the needs for child care in Cuyahoga County, Ohio. The project consisted of five major components. The first component, the Data Project, documented the needs and resources of the community. The second component, the Quality…

  11. 25 CFR 20.331 - What is Adult Care Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true What is Adult Care Assistance? 20.331 Section 20.331 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Adult Care Assistance § 20.331 What is Adult Care...

  12. 25 CFR 20.331 - What is Adult Care Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What is Adult Care Assistance? 20.331 Section 20.331 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Adult Care Assistance § 20.331 What is Adult Care...

  13. 25 CFR 20.331 - What is Adult Care Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What is Adult Care Assistance? 20.331 Section 20.331 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Adult Care Assistance § 20.331 What is Adult Care...

  14. 25 CFR 20.331 - What is Adult Care Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What is Adult Care Assistance? 20.331 Section 20.331 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Adult Care Assistance § 20.331 What is Adult Care...

  15. Family Day Care as Observed in Licensed Homes in Montgomery County, Maryland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rebecca Blundell

    A questionnaire was administered to 19 licensed day-care mothers in Montgomery County, Maryland. This report presents what was found in observations of the family day care homes, and points out the relative merits and disadvantages of family day care and group day care. The sections of the report are: I. Introduction; II. The Needs of Children;…

  16. Training day care staff to facilitate children's language.

    PubMed

    Girolametto, Luigi; Weitzman, Elaine; Greenberg, Janice

    2003-08-01

    This exploratory study investigated the outcome of in-service training on language facilitation strategies of child care providers in day care centers. Sixteen caregivers were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. Caregivers were taught to be responsive to children's initiations, engage children in interactions, model simplified language, and encourage peer interactions. At posttest, the experimental group waited for children to initiate, engaged them in turn-taking, used face to face interaction, and included uninvolved children more frequently than the control group. In turn, children in the experimental group talked more, produced more combinations, and talked to peers more often than the control group. The results support the viability of this training model in early childhood education settings and suggest directions for future research. PMID:12971819

  17. How many steps/day are enough? for adults

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Physical activity guidelines from around the world are typically expressed in terms of frequency, duration, and intensity parameters. Objective monitoring using pedometers and accelerometers offers a new opportunity to measure and communicate physical activity in terms of steps/day. Various step-based versions or translations of physical activity guidelines are emerging, reflecting public interest in such guidance. However, there appears to be a wide discrepancy in the exact values that are being communicated. It makes sense that step-based recommendations should be harmonious with existing evidence-based public health guidelines that recognize that "some physical activity is better than none" while maintaining a focus on time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Thus, the purpose of this review was to update our existing knowledge of "How many steps/day are enough?", and to inform step-based recommendations consistent with current physical activity guidelines. Normative data indicate that healthy adults typically take between 4,000 and 18,000 steps/day, and that 10,000 steps/day is reasonable for this population, although there are notable "low active populations." Interventions demonstrate incremental increases on the order of 2,000-2,500 steps/day. The results of seven different controlled studies demonstrate that there is a strong relationship between cadence and intensity. Further, despite some inter-individual variation, 100 steps/minute represents a reasonable floor value indicative of moderate intensity walking. Multiplying this cadence by 30 minutes (i.e., typical of a daily recommendation) produces a minimum of 3,000 steps that is best used as a heuristic (i.e., guiding) value, but these steps must be taken over and above habitual activity levels to be a true expression of free-living steps/day that also includes recommendations for minimal amounts of time in MVPA. Computed steps/day translations of time in MVPA that also include

  18. Children, Food, and Family Day Care: A Manual for Sponsorship of the Child Care Food Program in Licensed Family Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Konski, Gerry, Ed.

    This manual provides detailed information on how local non-profit organizations can sponsor licensed family day care homes for participation in the federally funded Child Care Food Program. This program subsidizes the provision of nutritious meals to children who are not in school. The introductory section of the manual answers basic questions…

  19. QuickStats: Percentage of Adult Day Services Center Participants, by Selected Diagnoses

    MedlinePlus

    ... MMWR ) MMWR Share Compartir QuickStats: Percentage of Adult Day Services Center Participants,* by Selected Diagnoses † — National Study ... which is the estimated number of enrolled adult day services center participants in the United States on ...

  20. Patterns of fecal coliform contamination in day-care centers.

    PubMed

    Holaday, B; Pantell, R; Lewis, C; Gilliss, C L

    1990-12-01

    During a six-month period, on four separate occasions, six licensed day-care centers had cultures taken from environmental surfaces as well as the hands of children and teachers. Fecal coliforms were recovered from 64 (9.5%) of the 675 surfaces sampled. Recovery rate was not influenced by a center's socioeconomic status, time of year, or presence of children who were not toilet trained. Recovery rates did differ significantly in different areas, with the kitchen showing a relatively high recovery rate (19%), and toys and toilets showing remarkably low rates (2% and 4%). Centers with formal hand-washing procedures had lower recovery rates than those without such practices. We also demonstrated a high recovery rate from hands of staff (16%); 6% of children had positive cultures. Contamination of hands and classroom objects is a potential source for the transmission of enteric diseases for children in day-care centers. A program directed at reducing contamination would be important in preventing the spread of diarrheal illness. PMID:2270220

  1. Employed mothers and family day-care substitute caregivers: a comparative analysis of infant care.

    PubMed

    Stith, S M; Davis, A J

    1984-08-01

    Despite dramatic increases in recent decades in the number of employed mothers with children under 3 years of age and the greater utilization of nonmaternal child-care services (particularly unregulated family day care), little is known about the nature and quality of care provided to these infants by their employed mothers and substitute caregivers. This study was conducted to provide a comparative assessment of maternal and nonmaternal infant caregiving practices in own-home and unregulated family day-care homes, respectively. 30 caregivers (10 employed mothers, 10 substitute caregivers, and 10 nonemployed mothers) were observed in interaction with 5-6-month-old infants using Yarrow, Rubenstein, and Pedersen's Home Environment and Mother-Infant Interaction scales. While no differences were observed in the caregiving of employed and nonemployed mothers, both of these groups exceeded the sitters in socially mediated stimulation, contingent responsiveness, positive affect, and overall level and variety of social stimulation. In addition, employed mothers provided more tactile-kinesthetic, visual, and auditory stimulation to their infants than did the substitute caregivers. However, no differences were found between the infants reared in the home and day-care settings in Bayley Mental and Psychomotor developmental abilities. Evidence implicated group size (total number of children) in the quality of caregiving in family day-care homes. The impact of daily separations and qualitatively different caregiving experiences on infants is discussed.

  2. Evaluation of a social interaction coaching program in an integrated day-care setting.

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, J M; Gardner, N; Kaiser, A; Riley, A

    1993-01-01

    We used a multiple baseline design across teachers (with a reversal phase for 1 teacher) to evaluate the direct and indirect effects of a structured coaching procedure on the teaching behaviors of 3 day-care teachers. Structured coaching preceding daily caregiver routines resulted in (a) substantial increases in adult delivery of behavioral support of social interaction during group activities with 2- and 4-year-old children and (b) marked collateral increases in positive interactions of socially withdrawn children. Long-term maintenance effects were demonstrated by both the teachers and target children, and social validity measures indicated that the teachers rated coaching very positively on several dimensions. The results are discussed in relation to in-service training of day-care staff, the concept of coaching as a setting event, and the dissemination of teaching technology related to social interaction of young children. PMID:8331018

  3. Access Barriers to Prenatal Care in Emerging Adult Latinas.

    PubMed

    Torres, Rosamar

    2016-03-01

    Despite efforts to improve access to prenatal care, emerging adult Latinas in the United States continue to enter care late in their pregnancies and/or underutilize these services. Since little is known about emerging adult Latinas and their prenatal care experiences, the purpose of this study was to identify actual and perceived prenatal care barriers in a sample of 54 emerging adult Latinas between 18 and 21 years of age. More than 95% of the sample experienced personal and institutional barriers when attempting to access prenatal care. Results from this study lend support for policy changes for time away from school or work to attend prenatal care and for group prenatal care.

  4. Identifying reasons for delays in acute hospitals using the Day-of-Care Survey method.

    PubMed

    Reid, Erica; King, Andrew; Mathieson, Alex; Woodcock, Thomas; Watkin, Simon W

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes a new tool called 'Day-of-Care Survey', developed to assess inpatient delays in acute hospitals. Using literature review, iterative testing and feedback from professional groups, a national multidisciplinary team developed the survey criteria and methodology. Review teams working in pairs visited wards and used case records and bedside charts to assess the patient's status against severity of illness and service intensity criteria. Patients who did not meet the survey criteria for acute care were identified and delays were categorised. From March 2012 to December 2013, nine acute hospitals across Scotland, Australia and England were surveyed. A total of 3,846 adult general inpatient beds (excluding intensive care and maternity) were reviewed. There were 145 empty beds at the time of surveys across the nine sites, with 270 definite discharges planned on the day of the survey. The total number of patients not meeting criteria for acute care was 798/3,431 (23%, range 18-28%). Six factors accounted for 61% (490/798) of the reasons why patients not meeting acute care criteria remained in hospital. This survey gives important insights into the challenges of managing inpatient flow using system level information as a method to target interventions designed to address delay. PMID:25824060

  5. Identifying reasons for delays in acute hospitals using the Day-of-Care Survey method.

    PubMed

    Reid, Erica; King, Andrew; Mathieson, Alex; Woodcock, Thomas; Watkin, Simon W

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes a new tool called 'Day-of-Care Survey', developed to assess inpatient delays in acute hospitals. Using literature review, iterative testing and feedback from professional groups, a national multidisciplinary team developed the survey criteria and methodology. Review teams working in pairs visited wards and used case records and bedside charts to assess the patient's status against severity of illness and service intensity criteria. Patients who did not meet the survey criteria for acute care were identified and delays were categorised. From March 2012 to December 2013, nine acute hospitals across Scotland, Australia and England were surveyed. A total of 3,846 adult general inpatient beds (excluding intensive care and maternity) were reviewed. There were 145 empty beds at the time of surveys across the nine sites, with 270 definite discharges planned on the day of the survey. The total number of patients not meeting criteria for acute care was 798/3,431 (23%, range 18-28%). Six factors accounted for 61% (490/798) of the reasons why patients not meeting acute care criteria remained in hospital. This survey gives important insights into the challenges of managing inpatient flow using system level information as a method to target interventions designed to address delay.

  6. Costs of Day Care: Proceedings of a Workshop. Volume 2: Appendix. Final Report: Part IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute for Interdisciplinary Studies, Minneapolis, Minn.

    The 12 presentations and discussions of a two-day conference on the cost of day care, held in May 1971 and attended by experts on the costs, economics, and financial aspects of day care, are provided in this report. The presentations are as follows: "Techniques of Analyzing Costs and Cost-Benefit Ratios for Day Care" by Delroy Cornick; "Strategy…

  7. Social Care in Adult Education: Resisting a Marketplace Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taber, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a research study about the experiences of adult educators in which the stories of three of the participants were central in exploring the issue of social care in adult education. It proposes that the adult educators with a social care orientation in this study acknowledge the importance of, and work to provide for, human…

  8. Gene Test Might One Day Gauge Alzheimer's Risk in Younger Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_159737.html Gene Test Might One Day Gauge Alzheimer's Risk in Younger Adults But doctors ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A gene test may one day be able to predict the risk for Alzheimer's ...

  9. The Rise in Cortisol in Family Day Care: Associations with Aspects of Care Quality, Child Behavior, and Child Sex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunnar, Megan R.; Kryzer, Erin; Van Ryzin, Mark J.; Phillips, Deborah A.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the increase in salivary cortisol from midmorning to midafternoon in 151 children (3.0-4.5 years) in full-time home-based day care. Compared to cortisol levels at home, increases were noted in the majority of children (63%) at day care, with 40% classified as a stress response. Observations at day care revealed that intrusive,…

  10. A Study in Child Care (Case Study from Volume II-B): "Someplace Secure." Day Care Programs Reprint Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Kristine

    The Neighborhood Centers Day Care Association (NCDCA) is a private, nonprofit corporation which for 18 years has provided day care services to low income and welfare families in the Houston area. More than 1,100 children are presently being served. There are eight centers and about 180 day homes which are used to supplement the care available at…

  11. Effects and Costs of Day Care and Homemaker Services for the Chronically Ill: A Randomized Experiment. Research Summary Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissert, W. G.; And Others

    The effects of adult day care and homemaker services on a Medicare-eligible population were examined, and the impacts of those services on institutionalization and Medicare costs was assessed. Differences between experimental and control groups in health outcomes were also compared, and patients were identified for whom the new services might…

  12. Wives and Daughters: The Differential Role of Day Care Use in the Nursing Home Placement of Cognitively Impaired Family Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Soyeon; Zarit, Steven H.; Chiriboga, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To expand knowledge concerning the significance of kin relationships in caregiving, this study assessed predictors of the timing of institutionalization for persons with dementia. The focus was on whether use of adult day care by wives and daughters holds the same implications for placement. Design and Methods: Guided by a caregiving…

  13. Prognostic Patterns in Self-Report, Relative Report, and Professional Evaluation Measures for Hospitalized and Day-Care Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sappington, A. A.; Michaux, Mary H.

    1975-01-01

    This study attempted to determine differences between patients who relapse and those who do not in both hospital and day-care settings. Subjects were 142 adult psychiatric patients. Three groups of measures were used: one based on professional evaluation, one based on self-report, and one based on relative report. (Author)

  14. Employed Mothers and Family Day-Care Substitute Caregivers: A Comparative Analysis of Infant Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stith, Sandra M.; Davis, Albert J.

    1984-01-01

    Provides a comparative assessment of maternal and nonmaternal infant caregiving practices in own-home and unregulated family day-care homes, respectively. A total of 30 caregivers (10 employed mothers, 10 substitute caregivers, and 10 nonemployed mothers) were observed in interaction with five- to six-month-old infants. (Author/RH)

  15. Palliative care - what the final days are like

    MedlinePlus

    End of life - final days; Hospice - final days ... serious illnesses or who are in the final days of life. ... do symptoms change for patients in the last days and hours of life? In: Goldstein NE, Morrison ...

  16. A Study in Child Care (Case Study from Volume II-A): "A Rolls-Royce of Day Care." Day Care Programs Reprint Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Farrell, Brigid

    The Amalgamated Day Care Center is an independent trust established through a collective bargaining agreement between the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America, AFL-CIO, and the employers of the garment industry. The free center, open from 6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., is located near the Chicago garment industries to minimize transportation problems…

  17. Casting a Blind Eye: Regulation of Family Day Care in New York State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norlander, Karen

    A study of the legal and regulatory barriers to the expansion of family day care in New York State was made. Research for the study consisted of a two-part survey of members of the New York State Child Care Coordinating Council and the New York City Family Day Care Task Force; interviews with public officials, child care advocates, and child care…

  18. A Self-Help Organization of Family Day Care Mothers as a Means of Quality Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sale, June Solnit

    Recognizing that licensing or certification have not been an effective method of supervising or insuring quality of family day care, the largest form of out-of-home, non-relative care of children, this paper describes an alternative way of building more developmental care into family day care homes. The growth and progress of WATCH (Women…

  19. What's Wrong with Day Care: Freeing Parents To Raise Their Own Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Charles

    Federal and state tax laws and most private programs give funding to all parents who put their children in day care but give nothing to parents who cut back on their work hours to care for their own children. Challenging the conventional wisdom about child care, this book argues that Americans have wrongly embraced day care and devalued work that…

  20. A Comparative Study of the Impact of Day Care Experiences on Mathematics Performance of Selected Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clay, Jether, M.

    This study compares the mathematics performance of pupils who received no day care experiences with those who received mathematics instruction in a structured day care setting, and those exposed to incidentical learning in day care centers. Eighty-six first, second, third, and fourth grade students who had completed four years in a Title I program…

  1. CTEPP DATA COLLECTION FORM 05: CHILD DAY CARE CENTER PRE-MONITORING QUESTIONNAIRE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data collection form is used to identify the potential sources of pollutants at the day care center. The day care teacher is asked questions related to the age of their day care building; age and frequency of cleaning carpets or rugs; types of heating and air conditioning de...

  2. More than Motherhood: Reasons for Becoming a Family Day Care Provider

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armenia, Amy B.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines motivations for entering family day care work as they relate to responsibilities of motherhood and the prominence of these motivations for the women providing day care within and across groups of workers. Using data from a large-scale representative survey of family day care workers in Illinois, the author examines the range…

  3. CTEPP-OH DATA COLLECTED ON FORM 05: CHILD DAY CARE CENTER PRE-MONITORING QUESTIONNAIRE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains data for CTEPP-OH concerning the potential sources of pollutants at the day care center including the chemicals that have been applied in the past at the day care center by staff members or by commercial contractors. The day care teacher was asked questions...

  4. Australian Family Day Care Educators: A Snapshot of Their Qualifications, Training and Perceived Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Lara; Davis, Elise; Priest, Naomi; Harrison, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Although the family day care workforce has changed over the past decade in response to evolving childcare regulations and accreditation requirements, there is little research on family day care educators in Australia. The aim of this study was to describe characteristics of Australian family day care educators, including their…

  5. Training Child Day Care Personnel: Development and Evaluation of a Model In-Service Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haulman, C. A.; And Others

    This report details the development and evaluation of a model program for inservice training of full-time child day care personnel. Based on a survey of licensed day care centers in Virginia, the program involved 100 participants, ranging from day care aides through center directors. The 10-week training element was presented three successive…

  6. CTEPP NC DATA COLLECTED ON FORM 05: CHILD DAY CARE CENTER PRE-MONITORING QUESTIONNAIRE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains data concerning the potential sources of pollutants at the day care center including the chemicals that have been applied in the past at the day care center by staff members or by commercial contractors. The day care teacher was asked questions related to t...

  7. Risk factors for gastroenteritis in child day care.

    PubMed

    Enserink, R; Mughini-Gras, L; Duizer, E; Kortbeek, T; Van Pelt, W

    2015-10-01

    The child day-care centre (DCC) is often considered as one risk factor for gastroenteritis (GE) rather than a complex setting in which the interplay of many factors may influence the epidemiology of GE. This study aimed to identify DCC-level risk factors for GE and major enteropathogen occurrence. A dynamic network of 100 and 43 DCCs participated in a syndromic and microbiological surveillance during 2010-2013. The weekly incidence of GE events and weekly prevalence of five major enteropathogens (rotavirus, norovirus, astrovirus, Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium hominis/parvum) were modelled per DCC using mixed-effects negative binomial/Poisson regression models. Sixteen hundred children were surveyed up to 3 years, during which 1829 GE episodes were reported and 5197 faecal samples were analysed. Identified risk factors were: large DCC capacity, crowding, having animals, nappy changing areas, sandpits, paddling pools, cleaning potties in normal sinks, cleaning vomit with paper towels (but without cleaner), mixing of staff between child groups, and staff members with multiple daily duties. Protective factors were: disinfecting fomites with chlorine, cleaning vomit with paper towels (and cleaner), daily cleaning of bed linen/toys, cohorting and exclusion policies for ill children and staff. Targeting these factors may reduce the burden of DCC-related GE. PMID:25592679

  8. Integration and continuity of Care in health care network models for frail older adults.

    PubMed

    Veras, Renato Peixoto; Caldas, Célia Pereira; Motta, Luciana Branco da; Lima, Kenio Costa de; Siqueira, Ricardo Carreño; Rodrigues, Renata Teixeira da Silva Vendas; Santos, Luciana Maria Alves Martins; Guerra, Ana Carolina Lima Cavaletti

    2014-04-01

    A detailed review was conducted of the literature on models evaluating the effectiveness of integrated and coordinated care networks for the older population. The search made use of the following bibliographic databases: Pubmed, The Cochrane Library, LILACS, Web of Science, Scopus and SciELO. Twelve articles on five different models were included for discussion. Analysis of the literature showed that the services provided were based on primary care, including services within the home. Service users relied on the integration of primary and hospital care, day centers and in-home and social services. Care plans and case management were key elements in care continuity. This approach was shown to be effective in the studies, reducing the need for hospital care, which resulted in savings for the system. There was reduced prevalence of functional loss and improved satisfaction and quality of life on the part of service users and their families. The analysis reinforced the need for change in the approach to health care for older adults and the integration and coordination of services is an efficient way of initiating this change.

  9. Integration and continuity of Care in health care network models for frail older adults

    PubMed Central

    Veras, Renato Peixoto; Caldas, Célia Pereira; da Motta, Luciana Branco; de Lima, Kenio Costa; Siqueira, Ricardo Carreño; Rodrigues, Renata Teixeira da Silva Vendas; Santos, Luciana Maria Alves Martins; Guerra, Ana Carolina Lima Cavaletti

    2014-01-01

    A detailed review was conducted of the literature on models evaluating the effectiveness of integrated and coordinated care networks for the older population. The search made use of the following bibliographic databases: Pubmed, The Cochrane Library, LILACS, Web of Science, Scopus and SciELO. Twelve articles on five different models were included for discussion. Analysis of the literature showed that the services provided were based on primary care, including services within the home. Service users relied on the integration of primary and hospital care, day centers and in-home and social services. Care plans and case management were key elements in care continuity. This approach was shown to be effective in the studies, reducing the need for hospital care, which resulted in savings for the system. There was reduced prevalence of functional loss and improved satisfaction and quality of life on the part of service users and their families. The analysis reinforced the need for change in the approach to health care for older adults and the integration and coordination of services is an efficient way of initiating this change. PMID:24897058

  10. Associations between Depressive Symptoms and 30-day Hospital Readmission among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Berges, Ivonne M.; Amr, Sania; Abraham, Danielle S.; Cannon, Dawn L.; Ostir, Glenn V.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hospital readmissions are common and costly. Our goal was to determine the association between depressive symptoms and readmission within 30 days following hospital discharge in older adults. Methods We analyzed data from a study of 789 persons aged 65 years or older admitted to a 20-bed acute care for elders (ACE) hospital unit from May 2009 to July 2011. Depressive symptoms were recorded within 24-hours of admission to the hospital unit, using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies -Depression (CES-D) Scale. The primary outcome was readmission to hospital within 30 days of discharge. Results The mean age was 77 years; 66% were female, 72% were White, and 59% were unmarried. On average, older patients reported 2.6 comorbid conditions. Sixteen percent were classified with high depressive symptoms (CES-D ≥ 16). The readmission rate within 30 days was 15%. Older patients with high depressive symptoms had more than 1.6 times the odds (OR 1.66; 95% CI: 1.01-2.74) of being readmitted within 30-days, as compared to those with low depressive symptoms (CES-D < 16), after adjustment for age, race/ethnicity, sex, marital status and comorbid conditions. Conclusion High depressive symptoms increased the risk of hospital readmission within 30 days of discharge after adjusting for relevant covariates. In-hospital screening for depressive symptoms may identify older persons at risk for recurrent hospital admissions. PMID:27134802

  11. Effects of Group Day Care in the First Two Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarz, J. Conrad

    Because many children in Bermuda receive substitute care while their mothers work, several comparative studies were made of effects of maternal and nonmaternal care on children's development. Findings of an initial investigation indicated that 2-year-old children who had been in group-center care differed unfavorably from children in other forms…

  12. A Comparison of Helping, Sharing, Comforting, Honesty, and Civic Awareness for Home Care, Day Care, and Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Ann M. Berghout; And Others

    In a study designed to determine whether experience in day care or preschool affects children's knowledge and enactment of prosocial behaviors, 59 children in day care, preschool, and home care were pre- and post-tested concerning: (1) their understanding of helping, sharing, comforting, honesty, and civic awareness; (2) their definitions of…

  13. Factors associated with acute respiratory illness in day care children.

    PubMed

    Hatakka, Katja; Piirainen, Laura; Pohjavuori, Sara; Poussa, Tuija; Savilahti, Erkki; Korpela, Riitta

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between child characteristics, parental and environmental factors and the occurrence of acute respiratory illness (ARI) and acute otitis media (AOM) among Finnish children attending day care centres (DCCs). The study was a cross-sectional questionnaire of 594 children aged 1-6 y from 18 DCCs in Helsinki, Finland. Recurrent (> or =4 diseases/y) ARI was present in 44% of the 1-3-y-olds and 23% of the 4-6-y-olds, and recurrent AOM in 15% and 2.5%, respectively. Parent atopic disease (odds ratio (OR) 1.53, p = 0.033), mother's academic education (OR 1.77, p = 0.008) and a medium length of DCC attendance compared to a short period (OR 1.67, p = 0.049) increased, while furry pets (OR 0.44, p = 0.003) and older child age (OR 0.38, p < 0.001) reduced the risk of recurrent ARI. Recurrent ARI (OR 3.96, p = 0.008), mother's academic education (OR 5.02, p = 0.003), and a medium length of DCC attendance compared to a short period (OR 3.34, p = 0.044) increased, while partial breastfeeding > or =6 months (OR 0.20, p = 0.002) and older child age (OR 0.05, p < 0.001) reduced the risk of recurrent AOM. Parental and environmental factors had a significant impact on recurrent ARI and AOM episodes in children attending DCCs. These risk factors should be considered in future studies intending to reduce DCC infections.

  14. Supporting Nutrition in Early Care and Education Settings: The Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Samuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Child care centers, Head Start programs, and family child care providers serving young children--as well as after school programs and homeless shelters that reach older children, adults, and families--are supported in providing healthy meals and snacks by reimbursements through the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). Administered by the…

  15. Up Close and Personal: Theorising Care Work in Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Vaughn M.

    2016-01-01

    How do we account for the close personal bonds and deeply caring relationships forged by educators with learners in many adult educational encounters? The literature is relatively silent on the emotional and relational basis to adult educator work. This is a serious silence, given the stressful nature of adult education in developing contexts such…

  16. Community-Based Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Community-Based Care Basic Facts & Information A variety of ... Adult Day Care Adult day care is a community-based option that has become more common. It ...

  17. Familism and Health Care Provision to Hispanic Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Savage, Brittany; Foli, Karen J; Edwards, Nancy E; Abrahamson, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    The Hispanic older adult population's rapid growth calls for an awareness of values that can affect the rendering and receipt of care. Familism, or familismo, a traditional Hispanic value, places importance of family over the self and can potentially affect health care perceptions and practices for Hispanic older adults. The current article discusses familism, which is upheld by some Hispanic older adults, and the potential for underuse of health care services. The traditional feminine role, marianismo, and masculine role, machismo, are considered, as well as implications for how decision making may be made by family members rather than the patient. Clinical implications for the provision of health care to Hispanic older adults are provided, along with the importance of considering acculturation and ethnic heterogeneity. Health care management strategies that reflect recognition and respect of familism, yet emphasize optimization of adherence and self-care, are described.

  18. Dignity in Practice: Day-to-Day Life in Intensive Care Units in Western Europe.

    PubMed

    Koksvik, Gitte H

    2015-01-01

    Dignity is a key concept in contemporary health care ethics, but the practical meaning of dignity in care remains unclear. In this article, I show that in practice, different and possibly conflicting notions of what dignity means are engaged simultaneously in the care of critical patients. The empirical data is based on ethnographic fieldwork conducted in three separate intensive care units in three European countries, Spain, Norway, and France, in the spring of 2014. Four weeks were spent at each site. Using participant observations and semi-structured interviews with 24 intensive care unit staff, I illustrate how the ideal of patient dignity is carried out in practice in the daily life of these units.

  19. [Quality of care in adult resuscitation unit].

    PubMed

    Romero Cabrera, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    Nowadays the quality of care has become a key piece in medical assistance. Apart from doing things correctly we should have an objective knowledge of the opinion of the user That opinion could be known thanks to the analysis of the perceived quality care from the patient. From October to December of 2008 a descriptive, transversal and retrospective research has been developed in a resuscitation unit at a third level hospital of the Community of Madrid. This research has been for all the registrations to the service, through the Servqhos questionnaire. The aims of the research were to evaluate the quality perceived at the resuscitation unit; to know the profile of the patient treated and to identify the possible improvements and problems as well. The patients were anonymous and they presented themselves voluntary 19 of 42 registrations in total answered the questionnaire with a rate of reply of 45%. The average age registered were 57 years old with an average of stay of 11 days. The most prevalent pathologies were neoplasias and polytraumatisms. According to the quality perceived by the unity there has not been any relationship among gender study level, labor activity marital status and previous hospital stay. At the area of information to the patient there have been some deficiencies as well as some discrimination from the attending staff. Noise is valuated negatively by the patients. Further to the professionalism, is valuated positively at all the social classes. The global quality perceived of the unity were very good from the patient. PMID:25551917

  20. [Day care and female employment in Mexico: descriptive evidence and policy considerations].

    PubMed

    Knaul, F; Parker, S

    1996-01-01

    "This paper analyzes the supply and organization of public day care in Mexico and presents a series of considerations as to the formulation of future policy. The research concentrates on the evolution of public policies to provide day care to working women in the formal sector through the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS). Data on the evolution of female labor force participation, changes in family structure, the supply of day care and patterns of child care arrangements, suggest that access to formal facilities falls short of demand.... Innovative policies for the reorganization and expansion of the provision of day care are presently under consideration." (EXCERPT) PMID:12321406

  1. An Evaluation of Health and Safety Hazards in Family Based Day Care Homes in Philadelphia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Hernando; Haynes, Sonia; Michael, Karen; Burstyn, Igor; Jandhyala, Malica; Palermo, Peter

    2011-01-01

    In Pennsylvania, Family Day Care Homes (FDCH) are private residences used to care for up to six children in a 24 h period. These homes are often times the most affordable alternative to day care centers parents have in low-income communities. The aims of this study were to evaluate FDCH providers' knowledge of hazards and their understanding of…

  2. Opening Your Door to Children: How To Start a Family Day Care Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modigliani, Kathy; And Others

    This handbook describes family day care with the aim of helping interested persons determine whether or not the occupation of child care provider is appropriate for them. Part 1 focuses on factors to consider in deciding to start a family day care business and cites problems experienced by practicing caregivers. Part 2 deals with relations between…

  3. Family Day Care: Children Growing and Learning in a Home Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spence, Helen P.; Adams, Patricia N.

    Compiled as a result of Massachusetts Bay Community College's Family Day Care Training Program, this handbook includes suggestions, quotations, and information provided by program completers. First, the handbook defines family day care as the care of one to six children, including the provider's own, in a private residence during all or part of…

  4. Validity of a Self-Administered 3-Day Physical Activity Recall in Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Jennifer L.; Dinger, Mary K.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Most physical activity recall questionnaires assess activity over a 7-day period. However, questionnaires have been validated in adolescents and adults using shorter recall timeframes. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the validity of a self-administered 3-day physical activity recall instrument (3DR) in young adults.…

  5. Geriatric simulation: practicing management and leadership in care of the older adult.

    PubMed

    Miller, Sally; Overstreet, Maria

    2015-06-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, patients age 65 and older account for 43% of hospital days. The complexity of caring for older adults affords nursing students opportunities to assess, prioritize, intervene, advocate, and experience being a member of an interdisciplinary health care team. However, these multifaceted hospital experiences are not consistently available for all students. Nursing clinical simulation (NCS) can augment or replace specific clinical hours and provide clinically relevant experiences to practice management and leadership skills while caring for older adults. This article describes a geriatric management and leadership NCS.

  6. 38 CFR 59.160 - Adult day health care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Rehabilitation rooms or an area for individual and group treatments for occupational therapy, physical therapy... two staff, and barrier free. (8) Adequate storage space. There should be space to store arts and...). Physical therapy 5 (per participant). Office, if required 120 Occupational therapy 5 (per...

  7. 38 CFR 59.160 - Adult day health care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Rehabilitation rooms or an area for individual and group treatments for occupational therapy, physical therapy... two staff, and barrier free. (8) Adequate storage space. There should be space to store arts and...). Physical therapy 5 (per participant). Office, if required 120 Occupational therapy 5 (per...

  8. 38 CFR 59.160 - Adult day health care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Rehabilitation rooms or an area for individual and group treatments for occupational therapy, physical therapy... two staff, and barrier free. (8) Adequate storage space. There should be space to store arts and...). Physical therapy 5 (per participant). Office, if required 120 Occupational therapy 5 (per...

  9. 38 CFR 59.160 - Adult day health care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Rehabilitation rooms or an area for individual and group treatments for occupational therapy, physical therapy... two staff, and barrier free. (8) Adequate storage space. There should be space to store arts and...). Physical therapy 5 (per participant). Office, if required 120 Occupational therapy 5 (per...

  10. 38 CFR 59.160 - Adult day health care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Rehabilitation rooms or an area for individual and group treatments for occupational therapy, physical therapy... two staff, and barrier free. (8) Adequate storage space. There should be space to store arts and...). Physical therapy 5 (per participant). Office, if required 120 Occupational therapy 5 (per...

  11. Older Adults' Reports of Formal Care Hours and Administrative Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Steven M.; Brassard, Andrea B.; Simone, Bridget; Stern, Yaakov

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Personal assistance care is a Medicaid benefit in New York, but few data are available on its prevalence and contribution to home care. We examined these issues in a New York City sample by assessing older adults' reports of weekly home care hours and Medicaid billing records. Design and Methods: With help from New York City's Human…

  12. Hepatitis and the Need for Adequate Standards in Federally Supported Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Richard J.

    1980-01-01

    This article examines findings in three epidemiological studies of day care centers and concludes that higher standards of care can reduce the incidence of hepatitis among parents and staff. (Author/DB)

  13. Day-to-day care: the interplay of CNAs' views of residents & nursing home environments.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Lucy Takesue; Wallhagen, Margaret I

    2008-11-01

    This qualitative study identified certified nursing assistants' (CNAs') perspectives of nursing home residents and how these perspectives translate into care practices. Data included observations of and interviews with 27 CNAs in three dissimilar nursing homes. All participants were people of color, and all but 3 were immigrants. CNAs constructed three views of residents: as fictive kin, as a commodity, and as an autonomous person. Although individual CNAs held one primary view of residents in general, select residents were viewed from an alternative perspective, resulting in variations in care practices. These findings suggest that such distinctions, in tandem with structural, organizational, and cultural differences in nursing homes, present opportunities for nursing leadership to affect the visible, everyday practice of nursing CNAs. To target interventions, further research is needed on how CNAs come to differentially view residents and how these differences influence CNAs' care relationships with residents. PMID:19024427

  14. Industry and Day Care II. Proceedings of the National Conference on Industry and Day Care (2nd, March, 1972, Chicago, Illinois).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schatz, Eunice, Ed.; Flaum, Thea K., Ed.

    The Second National Conference on Industry and Day Care, sponsored by Urban Research Corporation in 1970, brought together representatives of industry, community agencies, and early childhood specialists to discuss mutual concerns and explore the role that industry might play in the development of child care services. The report lists 17 ways in…

  15. The Day Care Challenge: The Unmet Needs of Mothers and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keyserling, Mary Dublin

    An overview of the present shortage of day care facilities in the United States is presented in this speech. Statistics cited on the number of working mothers with children under the age of 6 and the number of day care licensed homes and centers show that the shortage of licensed day care facilities is much more acute than it was five years ago.…

  16. Guidelines for Migrant Infant and Toddler Day Care Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birckmayer, Jennifer; Willis, Anne

    Constant, unpredictable change is a condition of daily life for children of migrant workers; this factor affects much of the care that should be given them. Predictability in the child's daily experience with the same basic routines, toys, bed, and caretakers helps stabilize his world and allows him to build up experiences and make sense of them.…

  17. Work Rewards, Job Satisfaction and Accreditation in Long Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, M. F.

    1997-01-01

    Surveyed Australian child-care workers on job satisfaction. Found that although 80% indicated satisfaction with their job, 40% said they frequently thought of quitting. Found a past and projected turnover rate of about 30%; although workers' qualifications and skills base have increased significantly in the past decade, the accreditation process…

  18. Preschool Education and Day Care for Swedish Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Jeanne

    A comprehensive study of the types of care provided for Swedish children is presented. The point is made that the three major frameworks which support the Swedish philosophy of early childhood education are those of Arnold Gesell, Jean Piaget, and Erik H. Erikson. From all three sources, preschool teachers learn the concept of epigenesis, the…

  19. Michigan Day Care Provider Training Project, Year One: An Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Melissa G.; And Others

    A Title XX funded statewide training program offering 20 hours of instruction for 1,662 licensed center and home child care providers who served Title XX eligible children in Michigan was evaluated at the end of its first year of operation. The first three chapters of this evaluation report discuss (1) the history, philosophy, and goals of the…

  20. All in a Day's Work: Primary Teachers "Performing" and "Caring"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrester, Gillian

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the current nature of primary teachers' work, which is explored in terms of "performing" and "caring" activities. It considers how the education policies of successive Governments in the UK, particularly for England, have given rise to a "performance culture" in primary schools which emphasises targets, testing and tables…

  1. Active Learning in a Family Day Care Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCartney, Susan

    Practical tips for improving the quality of child care are offered in this guide. It presents early childhood research findings in everyday language and suggests ways to apply these findings with active learning experiences for children. Developmentally appropriate, holistic activities are presented for key areas. The first five parts of the book…

  2. 'Have a nice day': consumerism, compassion and health care.

    PubMed

    Sturgeon, David

    Plans to implement a quality measurement framework that will rate nurses according to the level of care and compassion they demonstrate have been proposed and discussed in a number of Department of Health documents. From September 2010 degree-level nursing students in Wales will receive regular feedback on their communication skills and whether they are exhibiting sufficient levels of compassion. This article examines the reasons why there have been such moves by both politicians and health professionals to demonstrate, in quantifiable terms, that they are able to measure something that is frequently contextual and subject to individual interpretation. It explores how these moves have been influenced by the disclosure of unacceptable standards of care by the Patients Association report and the enquiry into Mid-Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust. It also discusses how the adoption of targets to evaluate care and compassion seems to reflect a market-driven and bureaucratic approach to health care that has resulted in a system in which measurability and outcome are considered the most important indicator of quality.

  3. Factors affecting burnout when caring for older adults needing long-term care services in Korea.

    PubMed

    Won, Seojin; Song, Inuk

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to address factors related to caregiver burnout as a result of caring for an older adult with a chronic disease. Characteristics of care recipients and caregivers as well as social support were included to identify the relationships with caregiver burnout. The analysis was based on a sample of 334 older adults and their caregivers in Korea. The logistic regression results indicated that the period of being in need of another's help among care-recipients, co-residence, caregivers' health condition, previous care experience, and caregivers' free time were correlated with the caregivers' future caregiving. Interestingly, the more experience caregivers had in caring for older adults, the more willing they were to provide care in the future. Thus, the discussion focuses on services for those who are new to providing care for older adults because they tend to have less coping skills.

  4. A Study in Child Care (Case Study from Volume II-A): "They Understand." Day Care Programs Reprint Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Farrell, Brigid

    This day care center, operated by Syracuse University and serving 100 children (birth to 3-year-old), admits only one child per family. The child must be the first or second child in a family where both parents have high school education or less and earn less than $5,000 per year. The program philosophy maintains that quality day care must carry…

  5. 25 CFR 20.332 - Who can receive Adult Care Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? 20.332 Section 20... AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Adult Care Assistance § 20.332 Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? An adult Indian is eligible to receive adult care assistance under this part if...

  6. Home Health Care With Telemonitoring Improves Health Status for Older Adults with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Madigan, Elizabeth; Schmotzer, Brian J.; Struk, Cynthia J.; DiCarlo, Christina M.; Kikano, George; Piña, Ileana L.; Boxer, Rebecca S.

    2014-01-01

    Home telemonitoring can augment home health care services during a patient's transition from hospital to home. Home health care agencies commonly use telemonitors for patients with heart failure although studies have shown mixed results in the use of telemonitors to reduce rehospitalizations. This randomized trial investigated if older patients with heart failure admitted to home health care following a hospitalization would have a reduction in rehospitalizations and improved health status if they received telemonitoring. Patients were followed up to 180 days post-discharge from home health care services. Results showed no difference in the time to rehospitalizations or emergency visits between those who received a telemonitoring vs. usual care. Older heart failure patients who received telemonitoring had better health status by home health care discharge than those who received usual care. Therefore for older adults with heart failure telemonitoring may be important adjunct to home health care services to improve health status. PMID:23438509

  7. Factors Affecting Burnout when Caring for Older Adults Needing Long Term Care Services in Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Won, Seojin; Song, Inuk

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to address factors related to caregiver burnout as a result of caring for an older adult with a chronic disease. Characteristics of care recipients and caregivers as well as social support were included to identify the relationships with caregiver burnout. The analysis was based on a sample of 334 older adults and…

  8. Foster Care Experiences and Educational Outcomes of Young Adults Formerly Placed in Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havalchak, Anne; White, Catherine Roller; O'Brien, Kirk; Pecora, Peter J.; Sepulveda, Martin

    2009-01-01

    This study contributes to the body of research on the educational outcomes of young adults who were formerly placed in foster care. Telephone interviews were conducted with 359 young adults (a 54.6% response rate). Participants must have been served for at least one year by one private foster care agency in one of its twenty-two offices. Results…

  9. Dental care among young adults with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Kancherla, Vijaya; Van Naarden Braun, Kim; Yeargin-Allsopp, Marshalyn

    2013-05-01

    Dental care among young adults with intellectual disability (ID) is poorly documented and largely unmet. By using population-based data from the Metropolitan Atlanta Developmental Disabilities Follow-Up Study, we assessed factors associated with at least one or two dental visits per year among young adults with and without ID. Significantly fewer young adults with ID (45%) visited a dentist at least once per year, compared with those without ID (58%). ID severity and the presence of co-occurring developmental disabilities predicted dental care use. Sociodemographics, daily functioning, societal participation, dental services, and dental health factors were examined as predictors of dental care frequency. Our findings can help focus efforts toward improving the frequency of dental care visits among young adults with ID.

  10. Keep Your Mouth Healthy: Oral Care for Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Keep Your Mouth Healthy Oral Care for Older Adults Oral health ... decay. You can take steps to keep your mouth healthy throughout your lifetime. And if you’re ...

  11. Diarrhea - what to ask your health care provider - adult

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your health care provider about diarrhea - adult; Loose stools - what to ask your health ... medicines, vitamins, herbs, or supplements I take cause diarrhea? Should I stop taking any of them? What ...

  12. Dental Care among Young Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kancherla, Vijaya; Van Naarden Braun, Kim; Yeargin-Allsopp, Marshalyn

    2013-01-01

    Dental care among young adults with intellectual disability (ID) is poorly documented and largely unmet. By using population-based data from the Metropolitan Atlanta Developmental Disabilities Follow-Up Study, we assessed factors associated with at least one or two dental visits per year among young adults with and without ID. Significantly fewer…

  13. Optimizing Health Care for Adults with Spina Bifida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Thomas S.

    2010-01-01

    Survival into adulthood for individuals with spina bifida has significantly improved over the last 40 years with the majority of patients now living as adults. Despite this growing population of adult patients who have increased medical needs compared to the general population, including spina bifida (SB)-specific care, age-related secondary…

  14. [Trazodone versus flunitrazepam in premedication in day-care surgery].

    PubMed

    Bonazzi, M; Riva, A; Marsicano, M; Prampolini, F; Speranza, R; Andriolli, A; Laveneziana, D

    1994-03-01

    A prospective single-blind study was conducted to compare flunitrazepam vs trazodone in the premedication of patients undergoing day-case surgery for termination of pregnancy, with particular regard to the degree of preoperative sedation, intraoperative analgesia and postoperative recovery. 86 patients were randomly allocated to receive orally 45 minutes before the surgical procedure either flunitrazepam 2 mg (group F) or trazodone 50 mg (group T). In both groups anaesthesia was achieved by i.v. fentanyl 2.5 micrograms/kg and ketamina 250 micrograms/kg. Patients in group F showed a deeper degree of preoperative sedation. There were no significant differences in intraoperative analgesia and in the immediate arousal time. In the postoperative period, the incidences of emetic symptoms and dizziness were similar in both groups; the incidence of drowsiness was significantly higher in group F at 120 minutes but not at 180 minutes of observation. Psychomotor performance was assessed preoperatively two days before the surgical procedure and 60, 120 and 180 minutes after surgery, using the Toulouse-Pieron test and the reaction time to a luminous stimulus with the aid of a computerized analogic tachystoscope (Neurometer). Trazodone allowed a more rapid recovery of psychomotor performance and it can represent a valid alternative to the use of benzodiazepines in the premedication of day-case surgical patients.

  15. Penn State/OCYF Day Care Project: Final Report of a Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kontos, Susan; Fiene, Richard

    In Pennsylvania compliance with state health and safety regulations for day care center licensing is monitored by administering the Child Development Program Evaluation (CDPE). This pilot study attempted to discover key indicators of day care center quality other than those measured on the CDPE and also to find out about the relationships between…

  16. Training Family Day Care Providers to Work with Special Needs Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Sylvia N.; Meisels, Samuel J.

    1987-01-01

    Post-training assessment of family day care providers (N=13), who participated in Family Day Care Project training sessions and biweekly on-site consultations and then mainstreamed young handicapped children (N=27) into their homes, demonstrated an overall significant positive change in knowledge and attitudes toward disabilities and improved day…

  17. Day Care as a Social Service Strategy: 1890 to 1946. A Substantive Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Wendy

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the social work profession on day care delivery from 1890 to 1946, and to relate the outcomes of the investigation to some contemporary social policy issues. The first chapter discusses day care during the Progressive Era (1890 to 1918) while the second chapter explores the…

  18. Public School Center vs. Family Home Day Care: Single Parents' Reasons for Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothschild, Maria Stupp

    This study investigates the reasons single parents in San Diego had for choosing either a public day care center or a licensed day care home for their children. A sample of 30 single parents with children in school district administered children's centers was drawn and matched by a similarly geographically distributed sample of 23 parents with…

  19. Not Babies Anymore: Young Children's Narrative Identities in Finnish Day Care Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puroila, Anna-Maija; Estola, Eila

    2014-01-01

    With the aim of deepening understanding of young children's identity construction, the study explores small stories produced in a Finnish day care center context. Small stories are understood as identity-constituting social practices that occur and recur in day care settings. Taking ideas on narrative ethnography as starting point, research…

  20. Fighting for a Better World: Teaching in an Inner-City Day Care Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Judith Y.

    Based on a participant-observer's 14-month experience in the day care setting, this paper describes the curriculum implementation in an inner-city day care center--called "Banza" for purposes of this paper--in which both students and teachers come from working class or poor, African American, Caribbean, or Latino families. Through its monthly…

  1. When Risk Becomes Invisible in the Everyday Life of Day Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villumsen, Anne Marie; Kristensen, Ole Steen

    2016-01-01

    Both the identification of children at risk in day care and multidisciplinary collaboration with other professions have a political focus. This study was designed as an organizational field study and attempts to establish a coherent practice of multidisciplinary collaboration between day care and social services. This article focuses on the…

  2. Children's Physical Activity in Day Care and Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reunamo, Jyrki; Hakala, Liisa; Saros, Leila; Lehto, Satu; Kyhälä, Anna-Liisa; Valtonen, Juha

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the dynamics of physical activity (PA) in day care and preschool. The participants were 823 Finnish 1-7-year-old children from 50 day care centres and preschools. The research methods were systematic observation, evaluation of children's skills and interviews with children. Altogether 18,366…

  3. Canadian Parents' Knowledge and Satisfaction Regarding Their Child's Day-Care Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Nina; Jacobs, Ellen; Vukelich, Goranka; Recchia, Holly

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine parental selection criteria and satisfaction with day care, knowledge about centre philosophy, teacher education and quality of the day-care environment. Parents ("n" = 261) and educators ("n" = 94) in 44 non-profit centres in three Canadian cities participated. Parent knowledge was assessed by phone…

  4. What I'm Really Looking For: Family Day Care from the Parent's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Grace Hui-Chen

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe parents' experiences in sending their children to non-regulated family day care. Noticeably absent were studies about non-regulated family day care culture as well as parental experiences. Phenomenology, the study of human experiences, was the methodology used to identify the meaning behind parents' search…

  5. Professionalism--A Breeding Ground for Struggle. The Example of the Finnish Day-Care Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinos, Jarmo

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the Finnish day-care centre out of a neo-Weberian-Bourdieuan frame of reference. The leading idea is that the day-care centre field is continuously shaping as a result of both inner struggles and struggles with other fields. The state, the education system, and trade unions act as the dealers of professional playing cards.…

  6. Day Care Homes: A Pennsylvania Profile. Center for Human Services Development Report No. 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Donald L.

    This report presents a preliminary profile of home day care in Pennsylvania. Information was gathered through extensive questionnaires and home observations which occurred during site visits to a geographically-representative sample of 162 licensed or approved day care homes. In the profile, comparisons are made between 146 homes which are…

  7. A Study of New York Day Care Worker Salaries and Benefits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinsser, Caroline

    Compensation of day care workers in the State of New York was investigated in a study involving 451 day care centers, Head Start programs, and nursery schools representing 4,844 employees. Data for New York City and the rest of New York were analyzed separately. In New York State, head teachers earned an average of $5.33 per hour and classroom…

  8. The Appropriateness of the Federal Interagency Day Care Requirements. Report of Findings and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Washington, DC. Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation.

    This report presents an evaluation of the Federal Interagency Day Care Requirements (FIDCR) conducted by the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. The evaluation focuses on the appropriateness of the requirements for federally supported day care programs authorized by Title XX of the Social Security Act. The first chapter of the report…

  9. Pediatric Language Laboratory--A Day Care Center Program During 1977-78.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodson, Susan; And Others

    The document describes the Pediatric Language Laboratory, a day care center which provides day care and therapeutic services to 20 mild to moderate communicatively delayed children, 1 to 4 years old. Initial sections address program philosophy; program components (diagnostics, remedial services, typical services, parent education, and community…

  10. Day Care: Guide to Reading. (Garde De Jour: Guide Du Lecteur).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of National Health and Welfare, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This bibliography contains references to books, articles, project reports, pamphlets, and conference papers (a few written in French) chosen for their easy availability and divided into sections on various topics pertinent to day care services: (1) organization and administration, funding and costing, need for day care; (2) parent involvement,…

  11. The Good-Bye Window: A Year in the Life of a Day-Care Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Harriet N.

    Started 25 years ago by a group of parents in Madison, Wisconsin, the Red Caboose is one of the oldest independent day-care centers in the United States. This book recounts observations of the activities at the center for 1 year, exploring what makes a good day care center successful and what obstacles a center is up against. Interspersed among…

  12. Development of a minor illness inventory for children in day care centers.

    PubMed Central

    Lakin, J A; Anselmo, S; Solomons, H C

    1976-01-01

    A Minor Illness Inventory has been developed for use in systematic investigations of the nature and incidence of minor illness of pre-kindergarten aged children in day care centers. Other researchers are invited to use the authors' Inventory to conduct investigations of some of the important problems associated with health and day care of young children. PMID:1275127

  13. Recursos/Resources: A Bibliography of Spanish-Language Family Day Care Training Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Child Care Resource and Referral Network, San Francisco.

    This bibliography provides descriptions and contact information regarding resources produced by American and Canadian family day care training projects and other educational organizations for agencies working with Spanish-speaking family day care providers. Included are resources in the following areas: (1) "Recruitment Resources"; (2) "Family Day…

  14. Theme with Variations: Social Policy, Community Care and Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavender, Peter

    1990-01-01

    Changes in British social policy regarding community health care has implications for local education agency (LEA) providers of adult continuing education. LEAs will either have a role in providing staff training and other learning opportunities, will be forced to provide cheaper forms of community care, or will be ignored altogether. (SK)

  15. Evaluation of the Child Care Class for Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallegos, Sandra

    In 1986, the Ability Based on Older Dependable Experience (ABODE) Program was developed at De Anza College to train older adults to serve as a temporary source of child care on an emergency basis. The program was sponsored by Tandem Computers, Incorporated, out of a desire to provide better employee benefits with respect to child care. The program…

  16. Khoa Trinh Huan Luyen Giu Tre Ban Ngay Tai Gia (Family Day Care Training Curriculum--Vietnamese).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakatsu, Gail

    California's Family Day Care Training Program was designed to recruit and train, in 7 weeks, Lao, Vietnamese, and Chinese refugees to establish their own state-licensed, family day care homes. Topics in the program's curriculum include an introduction to family day care, state licenses and licensing requirements for family day care, licensing…

  17. [Social health care for older adults in Peru].

    PubMed

    Casas-Vasquez, Paola; Apaza-Pino, Rossana; Del Canto Y Dorador, Juan; Chávez-Jimeno, Helver

    2016-06-01

    Demographic and epidemiological changes have led to restructuring of the local and global health systems, changes that focus on broader coverage in which importance is given to an individual's physical well-being as well as social welfare in an effort to ensure healthy aging. In this review, the current social health care approach is analyzed from the different institutions that care for older populations and the changes that have resulted from boarding and caring for older adults. PMID:27656937

  18. Day care surgery in a metropolitan government hospital setting--Indian scenario.

    PubMed

    Dorairajan, Natarajan; Andappan, Anandi; Arun, B; Siddharth, Dorairajan; Meena, M

    2010-01-01

    Day care surgery has generated a lot of interest, among both surgeons and the common people. This study aims to explore the management and advantages, including the cost benefits and cost effectiveness, of day care surgery in a government hospital setting. A prospective, single-center, single-unit study was carried out over 1 year from August 2006 to January 2008. The total number of patients studied was 327. Surgeries for hernia, hydrocele, fibroadenoma, fissure in ano, and phimosis were included. Patients were admitted on the day of surgery and were discharged the same day or evening. Patients were analyzed with respect to failure to discharge, wound infection, duration of stay in the ward, cost benefits, cost effectiveness, and postoperative pain. A total of 157 patients were treated for hernia, 61 for hydrocele, 52 for fibroadenoma, 34 for fissure in ano, and 23 for phimosis. Day care surgery is a fast growing and well accepted way of providing care to patients. Most of the patients studied had a favorable impression of the day care surgical procedure compared with inpatient care. In a country like India, in spite of problems of financial constraints and insufficient grants for health care, we are able to enjoy all the advantages of day care surgery, even in a government hospital setting.

  19. Day care percutaneous renal surgery--is this viable?

    PubMed

    Chong, W L; Murali, S; Sahabudin, R M; Khairullah, A

    2002-03-01

    Pros and cons of Percutaneous Nephrolithotripsy (PCNL) versus Extracorporeal Shockwave Lithotripsy (ESWL) have often been highlighted when one discusses on the management of renal stones. An oft quoted point is that PCNL entails a prolonged hospital stay whereas ESWL sessions are day surgical in nature. However, PCNL has superior stone clearance rate as compared to ESWL especially for lower pole stones. In addition, PCNL is more suitable for large bulk stones and when ancillary procedures are required e.g. endopyelotomy. The first 50 cases of successful tubeless PCNL were reported by Bellman et al in 1997. The remarkable recovery of patients in their series encouraged them to employ this technique as their technique of choice for the majority of their cases. A similar technique was employed on endopyelotomy by Liang et al and they concluded that this was a safe, less morbid and effective technique. We report our first case of tubeless PCNL.

  20. The Effects of Infant Day Care: How Mothers Feel about Separation from Their Young Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rolfe, Sharne A.; Lloyd-Smith, Janice I.

    A study was made of how Australian mothers feel about having their children in day care, with particular emphasis on mothers' feelings about separation from their children. A total of 10 mothers and 1 father participated in the pilot study. All but 1 parent had a child in day care at least 3 days per week. The children, who were between 4 and 22…

  1. Remediating minimal progress on teaching programs by adults with severe disabilities in a congregate day setting.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Marsha B; Reid, Dennis H; Towery, Donna; England, Peggy; Darden, Michaela

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated a modified teaching approach for improving the performance of adults with severe disabilities who were making minimal progress on teaching programs in a congregate day setting. An approach for enhancing progress was developed for implementation within the ongoing routine of the adult day setting using resources indigenous to the setting. The teaching approach, based on early intensive teaching programs, involved increasing teaching trials, adding another consequence to the reinforcement component, and reducing distractions. Improved progress accompanied the approach with each of 4 participating adults. Measures of happiness and problem behavior showed no detrimental effect on quality of life. Advantages and disadvantages of the teaching approach are discussed regarding implications for practitioners.

  2. The role of chiropractic care in older adults

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    There are a rising number of older adults; in the US alone nearly 20% of the population will be 65 or older by 2030. Chiropractic is one of the most frequently utilized types of complementary and alternative care by older adults, used by an estimated 5% of older adults in the U.S. annually. Chiropractic care involves many different types of interventions, including preventive strategies. This commentary by experts in the field of geriatrics, discusses the evidence for the use of spinal manipulative therapy, acupuncture, nutritional counseling and fall prevention strategies as delivered by doctors of chiropractic. Given the utilization of chiropractic services by the older adult, it is imperative that providers be familiar with the evidence for and the prudent use of different management strategies for older adults. PMID:22348431

  3. Care of Adult Refugees with Chronic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Genji; Ahrenholz, Nicole Chow; Haider, Mahri Z

    2015-09-01

    Refugees share a common experience of displacement from their country of origin, migration, and resettlement in an unfamiliar country. More than 17 million people have fled their home countries due to war, generalized violence, and persecution. US primary care physicians must care for their immediate and long-term medical needs. Challenges include (1) language and cultural barriers, (2) high rates of mental health disorders, (3) higher prevalence of latent infections, and (4) different explanatory models for chronic diseases. This article discusses management strategies for common challenges that arise in the primary care of refugees. PMID:26320045

  4. Care of Adult Refugees with Chronic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Genji; Ahrenholz, Nicole Chow; Haider, Mahri Z

    2015-09-01

    Refugees share a common experience of displacement from their country of origin, migration, and resettlement in an unfamiliar country. More than 17 million people have fled their home countries due to war, generalized violence, and persecution. US primary care physicians must care for their immediate and long-term medical needs. Challenges include (1) language and cultural barriers, (2) high rates of mental health disorders, (3) higher prevalence of latent infections, and (4) different explanatory models for chronic diseases. This article discusses management strategies for common challenges that arise in the primary care of refugees.

  5. 25 CFR 20.335 - What is the payment standard for Adult Care Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What is the payment standard for Adult Care Assistance... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Adult Care Assistance § 20.335 What is the payment standard for Adult Care Assistance? The approved payment for adult care assistance...

  6. 25 CFR 20.333 - How do I apply for Adult Care Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How do I apply for Adult Care Assistance? 20.333 Section... ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Adult Care Assistance § 20.333 How do I apply for Adult Care Assistance? To apply for adult care assistance, you or someone acting on your behalf...

  7. 25 CFR 20.335 - What is the payment standard for Adult Care Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is the payment standard for Adult Care Assistance... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Adult Care Assistance § 20.335 What is the payment standard for Adult Care Assistance? The approved payment for adult care assistance...

  8. The impact of informal caregivers on depressive symptoms among older adults receiving formal home health care.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eunhee; Lee, Nam-Ju; Kim, Eun-Young; Strumpf, Neville E

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the association between presence and types of informal caregivers and the presence of depressive symptoms among older adults receiving formal home health care (HHC). A secondary analysis of data was conducted using a computerized patient care database, the Outcome and Assessment Information Set. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine the data of 8448 patients aged 65 years or older who had been admitted to an HHC agency from acute care hospitals between January 1, 2002 and June 30, 2002. The outcome variable was the presence of depressive symptoms. The primary predictor variable was the presence and types of informal caregivers. Covariates included demographic variables, health status, length of time enrolled in formal HHC, patient living arrangements, and the frequency and types of care received from informal caregivers. A lower percentage of older adults receiving care from both informal caregivers and a formal HHC agency (13.3%) had depressive symptoms than older adults receiving only formal HHC (14.9%) at the end of a 60-day episode in formal HHC. Older adults without an informal caregiver were more likely to experience depressive symptoms than those with an informal caregiver after a 60-day episode in HHC (odds ratio = 1.229, 95% confidence interval = 1.027-1.471). There was no significant association between the types of informal caregivers and the presence of depressive symptoms.

  9. Preventive Care Recommendations for Adults with MS

    MedlinePlus

    Preventive Care Recommendations THE BASIC FACTS MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS The Three Most Common Eye Disorders Carlos Healey, diagnosed in 2001 in Multiple Sclerosis Medical checklist: Recommendations: Dates of last & next test ...

  10. Measuring Physical Activity with Pedometers in Older Adults with Intellectual Disability: Reactivity and Number of Days

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilgenkamp, Thessa; Van Wijck, Ruud; Evenhuis, Heleen

    2012-01-01

    The minimum number of days of pedometer monitoring needed to estimate valid average weekly step counts and reactivity was investigated for older adults with intellectual disability. Participants (N = 268) with borderline to severe intellectual disability ages 50 years and older were instructed to wear a pedometer for 14 days. The outcome measure…

  11. Family planning education as an integral part of day care services in Korea.

    PubMed

    Sung, K T

    1978-04-01

    The Integrated Day Care Program (IDCP) in Korea provices family planning classes as an integral part of comprehensive day care services for low-income families. The program was initiated by CARE in 1973, with support from the Korean government, and has received important inputs from national family planning agencies. A review of the first two years' accomplishments shows that mothers participating in the IDCP knew more about, were more favorable toward, and were more likely to practice family planning than mothers using day care centers that were not a part of the program. Findings also demonstrate the potential for program expansion: the substantial numbers of friends and relatives brought by mothers to the classes, and the number of IDCP and non-IDCP mothers indicating a willingness to use family planning clinic services in the day care setting. PMID:663990

  12. Comparison of motor and cognitive performance of children attending public and private day care centers

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Mariana M.; Corsi, Carolina; Marques, Luisa A. P.; Rocha, Nelci A. C. F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Given that environmental factors, such as the school environment, can influence child development, more attention should be paid to the development of children attending day care centers. Objective Todetermine whether there are differences in the gross motor, fine motor, or cognitive performances of children between 1 and3 years-old of similar socioeconomic status attending public and private day care centers full time. Method Participants were divided into 2 groups, 1 of children attending public day care centers (69 children) and another of children attending private day care centers (47 children). All children were healthy and regularly attended day care full time for over 4 months. To assess cognitive, gross and fine motor performance, the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development III was used. The Mann-Whitney test was used for comparative analyses between groups of children between 13 and 24 months, 25 and 41 months, and 13 and 41 months. Results Children in public day care centers exhibited lower scores on the cognitive development scale beginning at 13 months old. The fine and gross motor performance scores were lower in children over the age of 25 months attending public centers. Maternal education was not related to the performance of children in either group. Conclusion The scores of cognitive performance as well as fine and gross motor performance of children of similar socioeconomic status who attend public day care centers are lower than children attending private daycare centers. PMID:24346293

  13. Otitis media in childhood. Sociomedical aspects with special reference to day-care conditions.

    PubMed

    Vinther, B; Brahe Pedersen, C; Elbrønd, O

    1984-02-01

    To assess the effect of day-care conditions on the occurrence of middle ear infection, 681 children, aged 3-4 yr, were investigated. The investigation comprised an interview with one of the parents, a case history was taken, and a physical examination including tympanometry. At that time 76% of the children had been in day-care away from their homes and half of these were younger than 6 months old. The two groups of children, those in day-care and those looked after at home, were comparable with respect to sex, housing conditions, parents' social status and smoking habits. An increased occurrence of otitis media was found among children in day-care Measurements of middle ear pressure revealed a significantly larger number of children with flat curves (secretory otitis) and thus poorer hearing among those in day-care than those at home. Among the children in day-care there was also a significantly larger number with a history of adenoidectomy than among those looked after at home. These differences could not be explained by sex, housing conditions, social status or parents' smoking habits. It is concluded that the apparently greater occurrence of middle ear infection among children in day-care, compared to those looked after at home is due to an increased risk of contamination from children of their own age.

  14. Time-of-Day-Dependent Enhancement of Adult Neurogenesis in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Fukada, Yoshitaka

    2008-01-01

    Background Adult neurogenesis occurs in specific regions of the mammalian brain such as the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. In the neurogenic region, neural progenitor cells continuously divide and give birth to new neurons. Although biological properties of neurons and glia in the hippocampus have been demonstrated to fluctuate depending on specific times of the day, it is unclear if neural progenitors and neurogenesis in the adult brain are temporally controlled within the day. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we demonstrate that in the dentate gyrus of the adult mouse hippocampus, the number of M-phase cells shows a day/night variation throughout the day, with a significant increase during the nighttime. The M-phase cell number is constant throughout the day in the subventricular zone of the forebrain, another site of adult neurogenesis, indicating the daily rhythm of progenitor mitosis is region-specific. Importantly, the nighttime enhancement of hippocampal progenitor mitosis is accompanied by a nighttime increase of newborn neurons. Conclusions/Significance These results indicate that neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus occurs in a time-of-day-dependent fashion, which may dictate daily modifications of dentate gyrus physiology. PMID:19048107

  15. Health care professionals' understanding and day-to-day practice of patient empowerment in diabetes; time to pause for thought?

    PubMed

    Asimakopoulou, K; Newton, P; Sinclair, A J; Scambler, S

    2012-02-01

    This exploratory study examines what Health Care Professionals (HCPs) working with diabetes patients, understand by the term 'empowerment', their attitudes towards it and whether they believe they practise in ways consistent with empowerment principles. A small sample of diabetes HCPs (N=13), from National Health Service (NHS) hospital, walk-in and General Practitioner (GP) clinics in South-East England, was interviewed. In-depth semi-structured interviews established attitudes towards and use of empowerment in day-to-day practice. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. There was no clear specific understanding of what empowerment is and what it involves, although there was broad reporting of factors around education and informed choices. Disagreement was evident about the level of freedom patients should have in making choices - from leading them to the 'right' choice to an acceptance that they may have the right to choose not to be empowered. No consensus emerged on what is successful empowerment and how it is measured. The resistance of some patients to the process of empowerment in its original definition of active partnership in care, was seen as problematic by HCPs. Although empowerment is a popular concept in theory, its practical, clinical implementation day to day, can be problematic. PMID:22036297

  16. Transmission of Giardia lamblia from a day care center to the community.

    PubMed Central

    Polis, M A; Tuazon, C U; Alling, D W; Talmanis, E

    1986-01-01

    An outbreak of giardiasis was investigated in one urban day care center; another day care center was selected as a control. In the study day care center, 35 per cent of the children were infected. Infection was spread to at least one household contact of 47 per cent of the infected children. The data suggest person-to-person transmission of giardiasis and the need for measures to prevent its dissemination. Early recognition and treatment of Giardia lamblia infections in children may be indicated. PMID:3740341

  17. Children with Special Needs in Family Day Care Homes: A Handbook of Approaches and Activities for Family Day Care Home Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Brosse, Beatrice

    Practical information and sample teaching activities for child caregivers who work with young developmentally disabled children in family day care settings are provided in this manual. Each chapter shares a typical experience a caregiver may have with a particular child. Chapter 1 focuses on getting to know a new child, initial expectations, and…

  18. Advances in the Care of Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Viviane G; Kussman, Barry D

    2015-09-01

    The significant decline in mortality among children and adolescents with congenital heart disease (CHD) is associated with an increasing prevalence of CHD in adults, particularly those with moderate to severe defects. As a significant percentage of adolescents and young adults are lost to follow-up in the transition from pediatric to adult care, they may present for elective procedures with substantial CHD-associated morbidity. In addition to the specific cardiac defect, the procedures performed, and the current pathophysiological status, several factors should be considered when managing the adult with CHD. These include the type of setting (adult vs pediatric institution); surgeon (pediatric vs adult cardiac surgeon); coexisting diseases associated with CHD, such as coronary artery disease, hepatic dysfunction, renal dysfunction, cerebrovascular accidents, myopathy, and coagulation disorders; acquired diseases of aging; pregnancy; and psychosocial functioning. The current status of the management of common and important congenital cardiac defects is also described. PMID:25542866

  19. Integrating Adolescents and Young Adults into Adult-Centered Care for IBD.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Itishree; Holl, Jane L; Hanauer, Stephen; Keefer, Laurie

    2016-05-01

    Planned healthcare transition, initiated in pediatric care, is a gradual process aimed at fostering the adolescent patient's disease knowledge and skills with the ultimate objective of preparing patients and families for adult-centered care. The process is critical in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) where there is an increased risk of non-adherence, hospitalizations, and emergency department use as young adult patients graduate from pediatric to adult-centered care. While evidence for healthcare transition in IBD is mounting, important gaps remain in the understanding of this process from the perspective of the adult gastroenterologist. This paper summarizes what is known about healthcare transition in IBD and explores the unanswered questions-a conceptual and methodological framework for transition interventions, relevant outcomes that define successful transition, and key stakeholder perspectives. For the adult gastroenterologist managing the young adult patient population, this paper presents the paradigm of "care integration"-a process of ongoing, multi-modality support for the patient, initiated in the adult care setting, with the goal of improving self-management skills and active participation in medical decision-making.

  20. Transition to Adult-Oriented Health Care: Perspectives of Youth and Adults with Complex Physical Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Nancy L.; Barden, Wendy S.; Mills, Wendy A.; Burke, Tricia A.; Law, Mary; Boydell, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The transition to adulthood is extremely difficult for individuals with disabilities. We sought to explore the specific issue of transition to adult-oriented health care in a Canadian context. Methods: We conducted semi-structured individual interviews with 15 youth and 15 adults with cerebral palsy, spina bifida, and acquired brain…

  1. Transition to Adult-Oriented Health Care: Perspectives of Youth and Adults with Complex Physical Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorter, Jan Willem

    2009-01-01

    In their qualitative study, Young and colleagues (2009) found that youth and adults with cerebral palsy (CP), spina bifida, and acquired brain injuries of childhood in the province of Ontario, Canada, perceive or have perceived their transfer from pediatric to adult-oriented health care services as a struggle. Although publications on transition…

  2. Dental Care Every Day: A Caregiver's Guide. Practical Oral Care for People with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), 2009

    2009-01-01

    Taking care of someone with a developmental disability requires patience and skill. As a caregiver, you know this as well as anyone does. You also know how challenging it is to help that person with dental care. It takes planning, time, and the ability to manage physical, mental, and behavioral problems. Dental care isn't always easy, but you can…

  3. Are Healthier Older Adults Choosing Managed Care?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Gail A.; Morrisey, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: We attempt to determine whether older workers and early retirees avoid managed care plans and to explore whether health plan choices are linked to the health status of workers or their spouses. Design and Methods: We use the responses of those born between 1931 and 1941 to the 1994 and 1998 waves of the Health and Retirement Survey. We…

  4. Later life care planning conversations for older adults and families.

    PubMed

    Stolee, Paul; Zaza, Christine; Sharratt, Michael T

    2014-09-01

    While most older adults have thought about their future care needs, few have discussed their preferences with family members. We interviewed older persons (24), adult children (24), health professionals (23), and representatives of stakeholder associations (3) to understand their views and experiences on later life care (LLC) planning conversations, in terms of (a) their respective roles, and (b) barriers and facilitators that should be taken into account when having these conversations. Roles described included that of information user (older persons), information seeker (family members), and information provider (health care providers). The study identified practical and emotional considerations relevant to LLC planning conversations. This study found strong support for planning for LLC before the need arises, as well as important potential benefits for older adults, family members, and health professionals. There is interest in, and need for, resources to guide families in LLC planning. PMID:24652903

  5. How many steps/day are enough? For older adults and special populations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Older adults and special populations (living with disability and/or chronic illness that may limit mobility and/or physical endurance) can benefit from practicing a more physically active lifestyle, typically by increasing ambulatory activity. Step counting devices (accelerometers and pedometers) offer an opportunity to monitor daily ambulatory activity; however, an appropriate translation of public health guidelines in terms of steps/day is unknown. Therefore this review was conducted to translate public health recommendations in terms of steps/day. Normative data indicates that 1) healthy older adults average 2,000-9,000 steps/day, and 2) special populations average 1,200-8,800 steps/day. Pedometer-based interventions in older adults and special populations elicit a weighted increase of approximately 775 steps/day (or an effect size of 0.26) and 2,215 steps/day (or an effect size of 0.67), respectively. There is no evidence to inform a moderate intensity cadence (i.e., steps/minute) in older adults at this time. However, using the adult cadence of 100 steps/minute to demark the lower end of an absolutely-defined moderate intensity (i.e., 3 METs), and multiplying this by 30 minutes produces a reasonable heuristic (i.e., guiding) value of 3,000 steps. However, this cadence may be unattainable in some frail/diseased populations. Regardless, to truly translate public health guidelines, these steps should be taken over and above activities performed in the course of daily living, be of at least moderate intensity accumulated in minimally 10 minute bouts, and add up to at least 150 minutes over the week. Considering a daily background of 5,000 steps/day (which may actually be too high for some older adults and/or special populations), a computed translation approximates 8,000 steps on days that include a target of achieving 30 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and approximately 7,100 steps/day if averaged over a week. Measured directly and

  6. Primary care for adults on the autism spectrum.

    PubMed

    Nicolaidis, Christina; Kripke, Clarissa Calliope; Raymaker, Dora

    2014-09-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is defined by differences in social communication and restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities. Skills and challenges can change depending on environmental stimuli, supports, and stressors. Quality of life can be improved by the use of accommodations, assistive technologies, therapies to improve adaptive function or communication, caregiver training, acceptance, access, and inclusion. This article focuses on the identification of ASD in adults, referrals for services, the recognition of associated conditions, strategies and accommodations to facilitate effective primary care services, and ethical issues related to caring for autistic adults.

  7. Adolescent and young adult cancer: principles of care

    PubMed Central

    Ramphal, R.; Aubin, S.; Czaykowski, P.; De Pauw, S.; Johnson, A.; McKillop, S.; Szwajcer, D.; Wilkins, K.; Rogers, P.

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults (ayas) with cancer in active treatment face a number of barriers to optimal care. In the present article, we focus on the 3 critical domains of care for ayas—medical, psychosocial, and research—and how changes to the system could overcome barriers. We summarize the current literature, outline recommended principles of care, raise awareness of barriers to optimal care, and suggest specific changes to the system to overcome those barriers in the Canadian context. Many of the recommendations can nevertheless be applied universally. These recommendations are endorsed by the Canadian Task Force on Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer and build on outcomes from two international workshops held by that group. PMID:27330350

  8. KSC volunteers help paint Baxley Manor as part of Days of Caring '99

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    KSC volunteers for Days of Caring '99 unfold protective materials before getting ready to paint at Baxley Manor, an apartment building for senior citizens on Merritt Island. Coordinated by the KSC Community Relations Council, Days of Caring provides an opportunity for employees to volunteer their services in projects such as painting, planting flowers, reading to school children, and more. Organizations accepting volunteers include The Embers, Yellow Umbrella, Serene Harbor, Domestic Violence Program, the YMCA of Brevard County, and others.

  9. KSC volunteers help paint Baxley Manor as part of Days of Caring '99

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    KSC volunteers with Days of Caring '99 share tasks while getting ready to paint at Baxley Manor, an apartment building for senior citizens on Merritt Island. Coordinated by the KSC Community Relations Council, Days of Caring provides an opportunity for employees to volunteer their services in projects such as painting, planting flowers, reading to school children, and more. Organizations accepting volunteers include The Embers, Yellow Umbrella, Serene Harbor, Domestic Violence Program, the YMCA of Brevard County, and others.

  10. KSC volunteers help paint Baxley Manor as part of Days of Caring '99

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Volunteers for Days of Caring '99 set up the paint trays for painting at Baxley Manor, an apartment building for senior citizens on Merritt Island. Coordinated by the KSC Community Relations Council, Days of Caring provides an opportunity for employees to volunteer their services in projects such as painting, planting flowers, reading to school children, and more. Organizations accepting volunteers include The Embers, Yellow Umbrella, Serene Harbor, Domestic Violence Program, the YMCA of Brevard County, and others.

  11. KSC volunteers help paint Baxley Manor as part of Days of Caring '99

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A volunteer for Days of Caring '99 prepares a light fixture before painting the walls in the hallway at Baxley Manor, an apartment building for senior citizens on Merritt Island. Coordinated by the KSC Community Relations Council, Days of Caring provides an opportunity for employees to volunteer their services in projects such as painting, planting flowers, reading to school children, and more. Organizations accepting volunteers include The Embers, Yellow Umbrella, Serene Harbor, Domestic Violence Program, the YMCA of Brevard County, and others.

  12. Research and Demonstration Program of Day Care Services for M.I.T. Employees. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arterton, Janet Bond

    A survey of day care needs of M.I.T. employees, its resulting information, and a description of the pilot program of day care services undertaken by M.I.T. are included in this report. A survey was administered to all 4,650 Institute employees in April, 1970, and enjoyed a 35% rate of response. The compiled data supports the conclusion that a…

  13. Contemporary perioperative management of adult familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome).

    PubMed

    Milne, Andrew; Mon, Wint Yu; Down, James; Obichere, Austin; Ackland, Gareth L

    2015-05-01

    Familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome) is a rare multisystem disorder associated with an excess risk of perioperative morbidity and mortality. Because life expectancy is limited, few reports consider the perioperative management of familial dysautonomia in adults with advanced disease and end-organ dysfunction. Here, we report on the management of an adult patient with familial dysautonomia, highlighting recent developments in perioperative technology and pharmacology of special relevance to this challenging population.

  14. Information-Seeking in Family Day Care: Access, Quality and Personal Cost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corr, L.; Davis, E.; Cook, K.; Mackinnon, A.; Sims, M.; Herrman, H.

    2014-01-01

    Family day-care (FDC) educators work autonomously to provide care and education for children of mixed ages, backgrounds and abilities. To meet the demands and opportunities of their work and regulatory requirements, educators need access to context-relevant and high quality information. No previous research has examined how and where these workers…

  15. Measuring Therapeutic Alliance with Children in Residential Treatment and Therapeutic Day Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roest, Jesse; van der Helm, Peer; Strijbosch, Eefje; van Brandenburg, Mariëtte; Stams, Geert Jan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the construct validity and reliability of a therapeutic alliance measure (Children's Alliance Questionnaire [CAQ]) for children with psychosocial and/or behavioral problems, receiving therapeutic residential care or day care in the Netherlands. Methods: Confirmatory factor analysis of a one-factor model ''therapeutic…

  16. Family Day Care in Australia: A Systematic Review of Research (1996-2010)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohanna, India; Davis, Elise; Corr, Lara; Priest, Naomi; Tan, Huong

    2012-01-01

    Family Day Care (FDC) is a distinctive form of child care chosen by many Australian families. However, there appears to be little empirical research on FDC conducted in Australia. The aim of this study was to systematically review the recent published literature on FDC research in Australia, assess its quality, and identify pertinent topics for…

  17. Educator Talk in Long Day Care Nurseries: How Context Shapes Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torr, Jane; Pham, Lien

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the quality and characteristics of the language used by childcare staff when interacting with infants in non-parental group care settings. This qualitative study analysed the manner in which staff used language when interacting with ten children aged between 9 and 20 months in four different long day care centres in Sydney,…

  18. Alternative Federal Day Care Strategies for the 1970's. (Excerpts from the Final Report).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Sheldon P.

    This report discusses federal government support of day care services. Two alternatives are presented: (1) services designed, regulated and funded by a central agency, and (2) services provided through a free market industry in which decisions about regulations and care would be made by consumers, with only minimal central regulation. The market…

  19. Thriving Children, Striving Families: A Blueprint for Streamlined Delivery of Child Day Care Collaboration Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassler, Elissa J.; And Others

    Upcoming federal and state changes in welfare and social services will have a profound effect on the delivery of early childhood care and education in Illinois. In October, 1995, the Day Care Action Council of Illinois convened a meeting of early childhood experts and advocates. From this retreat, a vision for a new system of the delivery of child…

  20. Transfer to Adult Care--Experiences of Young Adults with Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Asp, Ann; Bratt, Ewa-Lena; Bramhagen, Ann-Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    More than 90% of children born with congenital heart disease survive into adulthood due to successes of cardiac surgery and medical management. Interviews with 16 young adults with congenital heart disease to explore their experiences of transfer from pediatric to adult care were performed. The analysis identified five themes; Feeling secure during the transfer process, Experiencing trust in the care, Expecting to be involved, Assuming responsibility for one's health is a process and Lack of knowledge leads to uncertainty. In conclusion; a structured and gradual transfer process was necessary to enable the informants to shoulder the responsibility for self-care.

  1. Enhancing Disaster Management: Development of a Spatial Database of Day Care Centers in the USA

    DOE PAGES

    Singh, Nagendra; Tuttle, Mark A.; Bhaduri, Budhendra L.

    2015-07-30

    Children under the age of five constitute around 7% of the total U.S. population and represent a segment of the population, which is totally dependent on others for day-to-day activities. A significant proportion of this population spends time in some form of day care arrangement while their parents are away from home. Accounting for those children during emergencies is of high priority, which requires a broad understanding of the locations of such day care centers. As concentrations of at risk population, the spatial location of day care centers is critical for any type of emergency preparedness and response (EPR). However,more » until recently, the U.S. emergency preparedness and response community did not have access to a comprehensive spatial database of day care centers at the national scale. This paper describes an approach for the development of the first comprehensive spatial database of day care center locations throughout the USA utilizing a variety of data harvesting techniques to integrate information from widely disparate data sources followed by geolocating for spatial precision. In the context of disaster management, such spatially refined demographic databases hold tremendous potential for improving high resolution population distribution and dynamics models and databases.« less

  2. Enhancing Disaster Management: Development of a Spatial Database of Day Care Centers in the USA

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Nagendra; Tuttle, Mark A.; Bhaduri, Budhendra L.

    2015-07-30

    Children under the age of five constitute around 7% of the total U.S. population and represent a segment of the population, which is totally dependent on others for day-to-day activities. A significant proportion of this population spends time in some form of day care arrangement while their parents are away from home. Accounting for those children during emergencies is of high priority, which requires a broad understanding of the locations of such day care centers. As concentrations of at risk population, the spatial location of day care centers is critical for any type of emergency preparedness and response (EPR). However, until recently, the U.S. emergency preparedness and response community did not have access to a comprehensive spatial database of day care centers at the national scale. This paper describes an approach for the development of the first comprehensive spatial database of day care center locations throughout the USA utilizing a variety of data harvesting techniques to integrate information from widely disparate data sources followed by geolocating for spatial precision. In the context of disaster management, such spatially refined demographic databases hold tremendous potential for improving high resolution population distribution and dynamics models and databases.

  3. Intake of protein, calcium and sodium in public child day care centers

    PubMed Central

    Longo-Silva, Giovana; Toloni, Maysa Helena de A.; de Menezes, Risia Cristina E.; Temteo, Tatiane Leocádio; Oliveira, Maria Alice A.; Asakura, Leiko; Costa, Emília Chagas; Taddei, José Augusto de A. C.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess calcium, protein and sodium intake, of children that attend public day-care centers and to compare it with the recommended one. METHODS: Cross-sectional descriptive study in seven public day care centers of São Paulo city, Southeast Brazil, which enrolled 366 children between 12 and 36 months of age. The data collection occurred between September and December 2010. Each day care center was evaluated for three non-consecutive days, totaling 42 days and 210 meals. Dietary intake was assessed by a direct food weighing method. For the nutritional calculation, DietWin(r) Profissional 2.0 was used, and the adequacy was calculated according to the recommendations of the National School Feeding Program for energy, protein, calcium and sodium. The calcium/protein relation was also calculated, as well as calcium density (mg/1,000kcal). RESULTS: The energy (406.4kcal), protein (18.2g) and calcium (207.6mg) consumption did not reach the recommended values ​​in all the evaluated day care centers. Sodium intake exceeded up to three times the recommendation. The calcium/protein ratio of 11.7mg/g was less than the adequate one (20mg/g). CONCLUSIONS: There was inadequacy of calcium, protein and sodium dietary intake, in children attending public day-care centers. PMID:25119750

  4. Intravenous fish oil in adult intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Heller, Axel R

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids contained in fish oils have shown efficacy in the treatment of chronic and acute inflammatory diseases due to their pleiotropic effects on inflammatory cell signalling pathways. In a variety of experimental and clinical studies, omega-3 fatty acids attenuated hyperinflammatory conditions and induced faster recovery. This chapter will shed light on the effects of intravenous fish oil in adult intensive care unit (ICU) patients and will discuss clinical data and recent meta-analyses on the topic. While significant beneficial effects on infection rates and the lengths of ICU and hospital stays have concordantly been identified in three recent meta-analyses on non-ICU surgical patients, the level of evidence is not so clear for critically ill patients. Three meta-analyses published in 2012 or 2013 explored data on the ICU population. Although the present data suggest the consideration of enteral nutrition enriched with fish oil, borage oil and antioxidants in mild to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, only one of the three meta-analyses found a trend (p = 0.08) of lower mortality in ICU patients receiving intravenous omega-3 fatty acids. Two of the meta-analyses indicated a significantly shorter hospital stay (5.17-9.49 days), and one meta-analysis found a significant reduction in ICU days (1.92). As a result of these effects, cost savings were postulated. Unlike in surgical patients, the effects of fish oil on infection rates were not found to be statistically significant in ICU patients, and dose-effect relationships were not established for any cohort. Thus, obvious positive secondary outcome effects with intravenous fish oil have not yet been shown to transfer to lower mortality in critically ill patients. There is a need for adequately powered, well-planned and well-conducted randomized trials to give clear recommendations on the individual utility and dosage of intravenous omega-3 fatty acids in critical illness. PMID:25471809

  5. Early Education and Care, and Reconceptualizing Play. Advances in Early Education and Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reifel, Stuart, Ed.; Brown, Mac H., Ed.

    Providing a forum for current thought about the field of early education and care, this book reviews efforts worldwide to educate young children. The book examines child care quality, presents a cultural feminist perspective on caregiving, discusses curricular issues, and considers the role of play in early childhood practice. The chapters are:…

  6. Cortisol Response to Physical Activity in African American Toddlers Attending Full-Time Day Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Sarah J.; Rudisill, Mary E.; Gladden, L. Bruce

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine African American toddlers' cortisol response to acute physical play activity within a full-time subsidized day care environment. Saliva samples were taken from participants (N = 22, ages 26-45.5 months) before and after physical play and control play conditions at the same time of day. Actiheart[TM]monitors…

  7. CTEPP-OH DATA COLLECTED ON FORM 01: RECRUITMENT SURVEY FOR DAY CARE CENTER SAMPLE SUBJECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains data for CTEPP-OH concerning the eligiblity of preschool children who attended day care during the day and were recruited them into the study.

    The Children’s Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Pollutant (CTEPP) study was one of...

  8. Day Hospital and Residential Addiction Treatment: Randomized and Nonrandomized Managed Care Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witbrodt, Jane; Bond, Jason; Kaskutas, Lee Ann; Weisner, Constance; Jaeger, Gary; Pating, David; Moore, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Male and female managed care clients randomized to day hospital (n=154) or community residential treatment (n=139) were compared on substance use outcomes at 6 and 12 months. To address possible bias in naturalistic studies, outcomes were also examined for clients who self-selected day hospital (n=321) and for clients excluded from randomization…

  9. Scenes from Day Care: How Teachers Teach and What Children Learn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platt, Elizabeth Balliett

    This book describes the results of film study of every day events in day care. It focuses on teacher and child behavior as they interact at meals, naps, and play, and proposes that minute examination of what actually happens to children in specific situations is necessary to identify the kinds of positive behaviors caregivers want to build on, as…

  10. CTEPP NC DATA COLLECTED ON FORM 01: RECRUITMENT SURVEY FOR DAY CARE CENTER SAMPLE SUBJECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains data concerning the eligiblity of preschool children who attended day care during the day and were recruited them into the study.

    The Children’s Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Pollutant (CTEPP) study was one of the largest ...

  11. Sex Differences in Young Children's Responses to an Infant: An Observation Within a Day Care Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Phyllis W.

    A sample of 43 boys and 43 girls (aged 32 to 63 months) was observed during interactions with a 13-month-old infant in a structured situation in a day care center. Attendance in an area surrounding an empty playpen, and behaviors in that area, were recorded on four preliminary days to adapt children to observers and measure baseline behavior; on…

  12. CTEPP DATA COLLECTION FORM 01: RECRUITMENT SURVEY FOR DAY CARE CENTER SAMPLE SUBJECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data collection form is used to identify eligible preschool children who attend day care during the day and recruit them into the study.

    The Children's Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Pollutant (CTEPP) study was one of the largest aggregate ex...

  13. Santa Clara County Day Care Treatment Center for Delinquents. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lampkin, Ann C.; Taylor, Gary G.

    The day care center is a location where youngsters go during the day for school and group or individual counseling, while continuing to live at home. Juveniles remain in the formalized education and treatment program for approximately four months. Then they graduate into eight months of aftercare. Evaluation measures included recidivism,…

  14. Food Assistance: Efforts To Control Fraud and Abuse in the Child and Adult Care Food Program Should Be Strengthened. United States General Accounting Office Report to Congressional Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Robert E.

    The Child and Adult Care Food Program provides over $1.5 billion in benefits annually to children and adults in day care. In order to address the longstanding problems of fraud and abuse present in the program, state agencies have been charged with the responsibility for implementing Food and Nutrition Service's (FNS) regulations to prevent and…

  15. Safety and outcomes of day care based coronary angioplasty – First report from India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vivek Raj; Jayaraman, Balachander; Satheesh, Santhosh; Ananthakrishna Pillai, Ajith

    2015-01-01

    Background The concept of day care based coronary angioplasty might be frugal especially in countries like India where epidemic of coronary disease is enduring and healthcare delivery systems are limited. Published literature addressing the feasibility and safety of day care percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) is lacking from our country. Objectives To study the safety and outcomes in stable cardiac patients undergoing day care coronary angioplasty. Methods A single centre nonrandomized active controlled trial of patients undergoing elective transradial coronary angioplasty and same day discharge after triaging was compared with a conventional arm of hospital overnight stay. Results Fifty six patients with stable coronary artery disease underwent day care angioplasty. There were no major immediate adverse cardiac and cerebral events noted in the first 24 h. The procedural result followed by a 6-h observation period allowed adequate triage of patients to same-day discharge or to extended clinical observation. Apart from one possible stent thrombosis on day 3 in the treatment arm where the patent received fibrinolytic treatment in a local hospital, there were no major adverse cardiac or cerebral vascular events in the study group. The six month clinical follow up in the day care procedure group was also unevenful for any major adverse cardiac events. Conclusion The study albeit small shows the feasibility and safety of day care PCI in the Indian scenario. It did not lead to additional complications compared with overnight stay. Triage of patients for an extended observation period can be performed adequately on the basis of clinical and procedural criteria. PMID:26071288

  16. How much will we pay to increase steps per day? Examining the cost-effectiveness of a pedometer-based lifestyle program in primary care.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S T; Lier, D A; Soprovich, A; Mundt, C; Johnson, J A

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the Healthy Eating and Active Living for Diabetes (HEALD) intervention was effective for increasing daily steps. Here, we consider the cost-effectiveness of the HEALD intervention implemented in primary care. HEALD was a pedometer-based program for adults with type-2 diabetes in Alberta, Canada completed between January 2010 and September 2012. The main outcome was the change in pedometer-determined steps/day compared to usual care. We estimated total costs per participant for HEALD, and total costs of health care utilization through linkage with administrative health databases. An incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was estimated with regression models for differences in costs and effects between study groups. The HEALD intervention cost $340 per participant over the 6-month follow-up. The difference in total costs (intervention plus health care utilization) was $102 greater per HEALD participant compared to usual care. The intervention group increased their physical activity by 918 steps/day [95% CI 116, 1666] compared to usual care. The resulting ICER was $111 per 1000 steps/day, less than an estimated cost-effectiveness threshold. Increasing daily steps through an Exercise Specialist-led group program in primary care may be a cost-effective approach towards improving daily physical activity among adults with type-2 diabetes. Alternative delivery strategies may be considered to improve the affordability of this model for primary care. PMID:26844131

  17. The effect of exercise intervention on frail elderly in need of care: half-day program in a senior day-care service facility specializing in functional training

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Ryota; Miura, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the long-term effect of a half-day exercise intervention program on health-related quality of life, life function, and physical function in frail elderly in need of care. The program was conducted at a senior day-care facility specializing in functional training. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects included 41 elderly in need of care who had visited the service facility for at least 1 year. Physical function and life function were evaluated at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. Quality of life was evaluated with the Short Form-36 at baseline and 12 months. [Results] Improvements in balance, walking speed and endurance, complex performance abilities, self-efficacy during the activities, and the level and sphere of activity were observed at 6 months and maintained up to 12 months. Moreover, improvements in agility, activities of daily living, life function, and quality of life were also observed at 12 months. Improvements in muscle strength, walking ability, self-efficacy over an action, and activities of daily living were related to the improvement in quality of life. [Conclusion] The use of individualized exercise programs developed by physiotherapists led to improvements in activities of daily living and quality of life among elderly in need of care. PMID:27512243

  18. Burns ITU admissions: length of stay in specific levels of care for adult and paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Maan, Zeshaan N; Frew, Quentin; Din, Asmat H; Unluer, Zeynep; Smailes, Sarah; Philp, Bruce; El-Muttardi, Naguib; Dziewulski, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Prediction of total length of stay (LOS) for burns patients based on the total burn surface area (TBSA) is well accepted. Total LOS is a poor measure of resource consumption. Our aim was to determine the LOS in specific levels of care to better inform resource allocation. We performed a retrospective review of LOS in intensive treatment unit (ITU), burns high dependency unit (HDU) and burns low dependency unit (LDU) for all patients requiring ITU admission in a regional burns service from 2003 to 2011. During this period, our unit has admitted 1312 paediatric and 1445 adult patients to our Burns ITU. In both groups, ITU comprised 20% of the total LOS (mean 0.23±0.02 [adult] and 0.22±0.02 [paediatric] days per %burn). In adults, 33% of LOS was in HDU (0.52±0.06 days per %burn) and 48% (0.68±0.06 days per %burn) in LDU, while in children, 15% of LOS was in HDU (0.19±0.03 days per %burn) and 65% in LDU (0.70±0.06 days per %burn). When considering Burns ITU admissions, resource allocation ought to be planned according to expected LOS in specific levels of care rather than total LOS. The largest proportion of stay is in low dependency, likely due to social issues.

  19. Impact of Adult Day Services on Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Femia, Elia E.; Zarit, Steven H.; Stephens, Mary Ann Parris; Greene, Rick

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored whether adult day service (ADS) use was associated with reductions in behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) in individuals with dementia. Design and Methods: We used a quasi-experimental design to compare a group of 133 persons with dementia (PWDs) who initially enrolled in an ADS program to a…

  20. Caring for independent lives: geographies of caring for young adults with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Power, Andrew

    2008-09-01

    This paper engages with the emerging disciplinary clash between 'care' and 'independence' within disability studies by examining the geography of home care for young adults with intellectual disabilities. The care system as a whole is viewed as central to disablist structures within disability studies (see Thomas, C. (2007). Sociologies of disability and illness: Contested ideas in disability studies and medical sociology. Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan.). However, despite the theorisation of dependency as being in antipathy to the goals of the disability movement, caregiving at home still continues to dominate community care. The paper attempts to address how family carers are 'caught-in-the-middle' between their 'duty' to care and at the same time, perpetuating dependency; the reality being that parents have to deal with issues of being overprotective and confronting various social assumptions about disability. It examines the narratives from 25 family caregivers in Ireland who provide personal assistance to young adults with intellectual disabilities. PMID:18573581

  1. Primary Care Endocrinology in the Adult Woman.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Celeste C; Zeytinoglu, Meltem

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus, thyroid disorders, and osteoporosis are endocrine conditions affecting a significant proportion of women presenting to the obstetrician-gynecologist. Obstetrician-gynecologists are often the first health-care providers that young women see in adulthood, and thus, have a critical opportunity to identify women at risk for gestational and overt diabetes and manage the condition in those who have developed it. The obstetrician-gynecologist should be aware of the appropriate therapeutic options and treatment goals (eg, hemoglobin A1c) for women with diabetes. Thyroid disorders often present with menstrual irregularities or infertility, can affect pregnancy outcomes, and contribute to cardiovascular and bone disorders as women age. Finally, osteoporosis and low bone mineral density affect a substantial proportion of older women and some younger women with risk factors for secondary osteoporosis. The morbidity and mortality of osteoporotic fractures is substantial. There are many lifestyle interventions and therapeutic options available for these conditions, and the gynecologist plays a key role in optimizing risk factor assessment, screening, and providing treatment when appropriate.

  2. The provision of adult intensive care in Northern Ireland with reference to the role of high dependency care.

    PubMed

    Morrow, B C; Lavery, G G; Blackwood, B M; Ball, I M; McLeod, H N; Fee, J P

    1996-05-01

    In 1991 an audit of Intensive Care Services was carried out by the Northern Ireland Intensive Care Group. In conjunction with this regional overview, all patients in the Regional Intensive Care Unit, (RICU) in the Royal Victoria Hospital were assessed daily, over a 10 month period in 1990-91 and classified as conforming to either intensive care or high dependency status. These data were then used to compare adult intensive care service in Northern Ireland with recent national and international recommendations on intensive care. Ten units in Northern Ireland were surveyed. In regard to national or international guidelines, all ten were deficient to some degree. Four units had significant deficiencies; small patient numbers, lack of 'dedicated' 24 hr medical cover and or deficiencies in the provision of appropriate monitoring and or equipment. There was a large diversity in casemix among the ten units surveyed which suggested differing admission criteria. The bed occupancy of RICU was 100%. Refused admissions constituted a further 13% of unresourced workload. The lack of physically separate, dedicated high dependency unit facilities meant that 26% of bed days were devoted to HDU care (usually for "improved" intensive care unit patients not yet ready for discharge to a general ward. Achieving nationally recommended intensive care standards (on a regional basis) is probably only possible if a number of the smaller intensive care units are redesignated as high dependency units, and patients requiring intensive care are concentrated in a smaller number of larger ICUs. This will increase the frequency of interhospital transfer of critically ill patients.

  3. Understanding Cortisol Reactivity across the Day at Child Care: The Potential Buffering Role of Secure Attachments to Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badanes, Lisa S.; Dmitrieva, Julia; Watamura, Sarah Enos

    2012-01-01

    Full-day center-based child care has been repeatedly associated with rising cortisol across the child care day. This study addressed the potential buffering role of attachment to mothers and lead teachers in 110 preschoolers while at child care. Using multi-level modeling and controlling for a number of child, family, and child care factors,…

  4. The First Annual Health Promotion in Day Care Conference (Washington, D.C., April 7, 1984). Conference Proceedings Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammonds, Karl E.; Brathwaite, Rudolph L.

    Conducted to disseminate information about health care issues in the day care environment, the First Annual Health Promotion in Day Care Conference was attended by approximately 200 health care providers, parents, and advocates in the metropolitan Washington, D.C. area. Health needs of the total child were addressed, and practical recommendations…

  5. Do Welfare States Raise Welfare(d) Kids? Day-Care Institutions and Inequality in the Danish Welfare State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringsmose, Charlotte; Winther-Lindqvist, Ditte Alexandra; Allerup, Peter

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing focus on early-childhood education quality globally, reflecting a growing political awareness that education starts earlier than primary school, and that high quality in day-care influence children's learning and development. In Denmark, almost all children attend day-care, and day-care institutions are considered part…

  6. As the Twig Is Bent: A Review of Research on the Consequences of Day Care with Implications for Caregiving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Charles W.

    The purpose of this paper is to synthesize and summarize the basic conclusions of literature concerning the effects of day care on infants and young children. The first section of the document briefly indicates limitations of day care research. The second section offers research-based generalizations concerning the effects of day care on…

  7. Hospitalization of older adults due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Aline Pinto; Montilla, Dalia Elena Romero; de Almeida, Wanessa da Silva; de Andrade, Carla Lourenço Tavares

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the temporal evolution of the hospitalization of older adults due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions according to their structure, magnitude and causes. METHODS Cross-sectional study based on data from the Hospital Information System of the Brazilian Unified Health System and from the Primary Care Information System, referring to people aged 60 to 74 years living in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Souhteastern Brazil. The proportion and rate of hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions were calculated, both the global rate and, according to diagnoses, the most prevalent ones. The coverage of the Family Health Strategy and the number of medical consultations attended by older adults in primary care were estimated. To analyze the indicators’ impact on hospitalizations, a linear correlation test was used. RESULTS We found an intense reduction in hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions for all causes and age groups. Heart failure, cerebrovascular diseases and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases concentrated 50.0% of the hospitalizations. Adults older than 69 years had a higher risk of hospitalization due to one of these causes. We observed a higher risk of hospitalization among men. A negative correlation was found between the hospitalizations and the indicators of access to primary care. CONCLUSIONS Primary healthcare in the state of Rio de Janeiro has been significantly impacting the hospital morbidity of the older population. Studies of hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions can aid the identification of the main causes that are sensitive to the intervention of the health services, in order to indicate which actions are more effective to reduce hospitalizations and to increase the population’s quality of life. PMID:25372173

  8. Adaptations of young adult rat cortical bone to 14 days of spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vailas, A. C.; Vanderby, R., Jr.; Martinez, D. A.; Ashman, R. B.; Ulm, M. J.; Grindeland, R. E.; Durnova, G. N.; Kaplanskii, A.

    1992-01-01

    To determine whether mature humeral cortical bone would be modified significantly by an acute exposure to weightlessness, adult rats (110 days old) were subjected to 14 days of microgravity on the COSMOS 2044 biosatellite. There were no significant changes in peak force, stiffness, energy to failure, and displacement at failure in the flight rats compared with ground-based controls. Concentrations and contents of hydroxyproline, calcium, and mature stable hydroxylysylpyridinoline and lysylpyridinoline collagen cross-links remained unchanged after spaceflight. Bone lengths, cortical and endosteal areas, and regionl thicknesses showed no significant differences between flight animals and ground controls. The findings suggest that responsiveness of cortical bone to microgravity is less pronounced in adult rats than in previous spaceflight experiments in which young growing animals were used. It is hypothesized that 14 days of spaceflight may not be sufficient to impact the biochemical and biomechanical properties of cortical bone in the mature rat skeleton.

  9. Role of Physical Therapists in Reducing Hospital Readmissions: Optimizing Outcomes for Older Adults During Care Transitions From Hospital to Community.

    PubMed

    Falvey, Jason R; Burke, Robert E; Malone, Daniel; Ridgeway, Kyle J; McManus, Beth M; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E

    2016-08-01

    Hospital readmissions in older adult populations are an emerging quality indicator for acute care hospitals. Recent evidence has linked functional decline during and after hospitalization with an elevated risk of hospital readmission. However, models of care that have been developed to reduce hospital readmission rates do not adequately address functional deficits. Physical therapists, as experts in optimizing physical function, have a strong opportunity to contribute meaningfully to care transition models and demonstrate the value of physical therapy interventions in reducing readmissions. Thus, the purposes of this perspective article are: (1) to describe the need for physical therapist input during care transitions for older adults and (2) to outline strategies for expanding physical therapy participation in care transitions for older adults, with an overall goal of reducing avoidable 30-day hospital readmissions. PMID:26939601

  10. Role of Physical Therapists in Reducing Hospital Readmissions: Optimizing Outcomes for Older Adults During Care Transitions From Hospital to Community.

    PubMed

    Falvey, Jason R; Burke, Robert E; Malone, Daniel; Ridgeway, Kyle J; McManus, Beth M; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E

    2016-08-01

    Hospital readmissions in older adult populations are an emerging quality indicator for acute care hospitals. Recent evidence has linked functional decline during and after hospitalization with an elevated risk of hospital readmission. However, models of care that have been developed to reduce hospital readmission rates do not adequately address functional deficits. Physical therapists, as experts in optimizing physical function, have a strong opportunity to contribute meaningfully to care transition models and demonstrate the value of physical therapy interventions in reducing readmissions. Thus, the purposes of this perspective article are: (1) to describe the need for physical therapist input during care transitions for older adults and (2) to outline strategies for expanding physical therapy participation in care transitions for older adults, with an overall goal of reducing avoidable 30-day hospital readmissions.

  11. Epilepsy: addressing the transition from pediatric to adult care

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Seetha; Iyer, Anand

    2016-01-01

    Adolescence is a period of rapid change, both physical and psychosocial for any young person. It can be challenging when they have ongoing health problems and when their care needs to be transitioned to the adult health care system. Transition should be a planned process of addressing the medical and associated comorbid conditions from pediatric to adult care in a coordinated manner. In most cases, the young person and their family are well known to the pediatrics services and have built a relationship based on trust and often friendship over many years. Understandably, there is significant apprehension about moving from this familiar setting to the unknown adult services. Apart from having a sound knowledge of specific childhood epileptic conditions and associated comorbid disorders, it is important that both the pediatric and adult epilepsy teams are motivated to provide a successful and safe transition for these patients. It is essential that transition is seen as a continual process and not as a single event, and good preparation is the key to its success. It is also important that general practitioners are closely engaged to ensure successful transition. An overview of how to effectively address transition in epilepsy, different models of transition, transition of relevant epilepsies, and their management is discussed. PMID:27390536

  12. Epilepsy: addressing the transition from pediatric to adult care.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Seetha; Iyer, Anand

    2016-01-01

    Adolescence is a period of rapid change, both physical and psychosocial for any young person. It can be challenging when they have ongoing health problems and when their care needs to be transitioned to the adult health care system. Transition should be a planned process of addressing the medical and associated comorbid conditions from pediatric to adult care in a coordinated manner. In most cases, the young person and their family are well known to the pediatrics services and have built a relationship based on trust and often friendship over many years. Understandably, there is significant apprehension about moving from this familiar setting to the unknown adult services. Apart from having a sound knowledge of specific childhood epileptic conditions and associated comorbid disorders, it is important that both the pediatric and adult epilepsy teams are motivated to provide a successful and safe transition for these patients. It is essential that transition is seen as a continual process and not as a single event, and good preparation is the key to its success. It is also important that general practitioners are closely engaged to ensure successful transition. An overview of how to effectively address transition in epilepsy, different models of transition, transition of relevant epilepsies, and their management is discussed. PMID:27390536

  13. Older adults experiences of rehabilitation in acute health care.

    PubMed

    Atwal, Anita; Tattersall, Kirsty; Murphy, Susana; Davenport, Neil; Craik, Christine; Caldwell, Kay; McIntyre, Anne

    2007-09-01

    Rehabilitation is a key component of nursing and allied healthcare professionals' roles in most health and social care settings. This paper reports on stage 2 of an action research project to ascertain older adult's experience of rehabilitation. Twenty postdischarge interviews were conducted and the interview transcripts were analysed using thematic content analysis. All older adults discharged from an acute older acute rehabilitation ward to their own homes in the community were eligible to participate. The only exclusion criterion was older adults who were thought to be unable to give consent to participate by the nurse in charge and the researcher. Whilst 92 older adults were eligible to participate in this research study, only 20 were interviewed. The findings from this study suggest that older adults valued communication with health professionals but were aware of their time constraints that hindered communication. This study suggests that both nurses and allied health professionals are not actively providing rehabilitative services to promote health and well-being, which contradicts the focus of active ageing. Furthermore, there was evidence of unmet needs on discharge, and older adults unable to recall the professions that were involved in their interventions and the rationale for therapy input. It is suggested that further research is needed to explore the effectiveness of allied health rehabilitation in the acute setting. This study highlights the need for further research into older adults' perceptions of the rehabilitation process in the acute setting.

  14. The impact of providing dental services to frail older adults: perceptions of elders in adult day health centers.

    PubMed

    Walker, Ryan J; Kiyak, H Asuman

    2007-01-01

    Very little is known about the oral health of, and access to, dental services among frail elders who live in the community and use an adult day health center (ADHC) for respite care. This pilot study evaluated the perceived oral health quality of life (OHQOL) of elders who used a mobile dental program in urban, suburban, and rural ADHC settings. Pre- and post-treatment interviews were conducted to evaluate OHQOL using the Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI). ADHC records were used to obtain demographic, medical history and medication data. Following initial dental examinations and consent, dental treatment was provided at each ADHC. Of the 138 elders screened at three ADHCs, pre- and post-treatment data were obtained on 76 subjects following their treatment (mean four months later). The group's members were mostly female (64.5%) and Caucasian (71.6%). Their mean age was 76.8 (+/- 9.8), with an average of 12.4 teeth (34.2% edentulous); 67.7% were on Medicaid. On average they had 5.5 chronic diseases, hypertension being the most common (67.19%); 44.8% had a neurological disorder or dementia. GOHAI scores were generally high both pre- and post-treatment, reflecting high physical and psychosocial OHQOL and low levels of worry. GOHAI scores were correlated with chronic diseases; the more chronic diseases an individual had, the lower his or her total score pre- and post-treatment (r=-.24, r=-.26 respectively, p<.04). The more dental treatment needs an elder had, the lower his or her GOHAI (r=-.23, p<.05). Elders with more teeth reported higher GOHAI pre- and post-treatment (r=.36, r=.37 respectively, p<.002). Paired t-tests comparing pre- and post-treatment GOHAI scores revealed significant improvements in overall GOHAI (p<.001), and on two dimensions: physical (p<.005) and psychosocial (p<.002). The findings support the importance of providing on-site access to dental services in order to maintain the general OHQOL of frail elders, more specifically in the

  15. Goodness-of-Fit in Center Day Care: Relations of Temperament, Stability, and Quality of Care with the Child's Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Schipper, J. Clasien; Tavecchio, Louis W. C.; Van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Van Zeijl, Jantien

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the concept of "goodness-of-fit" between the child's temperament and the environment, introduced by Thomas and Chess [Temperament and Development, Brunner/Mazel, New York, 1977], is applied within the setting of center day care. Mothers and primary professional caregivers of 186 children, aged 6-30 months, participated in this…

  16. A Study in Child Care (Case Study from Volume II-A): "Tacos and Tulips." Day Care Programs Reprint Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Farrell, Brigid

    The Holland Day Care Center in Michigan serves a diverse community of Anglo children of Dutch ancestry and children of former migrant workers of Chicano, Black, Puerto Rican and Cuban origins who have settled in the area. Located in two churches which are about three blocks apart, the program divides children by ability and age into five…

  17. Self-care in adults with asthma: how they cope.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, S; Suominen, T; Lauri, S

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out how well adult asthma patients in Finland cope with self-care in three areas of asthma treatment. The areas of physical, psychological and social asthma treatment were examined. Associations between demographic background data and self-care were also studied. Data (n = 130) for the study were collected using a questionnaire specially developed for this study. A deductive perspective was employed in data analysis. Respondents showed fairly good competence in self-care in all three areas of asthma treatment. However, up to 30% of the asthma patients had pets and 16% were smokers. Extra stress was reduced by exercise and positive thinking. Humour was also important in helping most of the respondents cope mentally. Social support played a significant part in fighting the sense of powerlessness which is caused by asthma. According to the results, women coped better than men in the social area of self-care. PMID:11261136

  18. Transitions from Pediatric to Adult Care: Programs and Resources.

    PubMed

    Schlucter, Juliette; Dokken, Deborah; Ahmann, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    This third article in a series on the critical issue of the transition from pediatric to adult care for young adults with complex chronic conditions offers resources, including information about exemplary programs, to pediatric nurses. Three hospital-based programs are highlighted, four key Internet resources are identified, and five relevant articles are annotated. This information can support pediatric nurses in considering transition support options for individual teens and their families as well as in developing resources and designing programs in their own settings.

  19. Day Care Deception: What the Child Care Establishment Isn't Telling Us.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Brian C.

    Over the last generation, parents have felt more and more intimidated by child care "experts" and have increasingly surrendered their role as the primary educators of their children. On the premise that theories of development, often colored by ideological positions on the family and its function in society, should take a back seat to the…

  20. Family Policy and Practice in Early Child Care. Advances in Early Education and Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reifel, Stuart, Ed.; Dunst, Carl J., Ed.; Wolery, Mark, Ed.

    Family issues are an abiding concern for members of the profession of early education, and debate regarding government policies about families and child care continues to be timely. This volume provides a foundation for understanding programs, families, and the current social context, as well as particular areas of concern for families and child…

  1. Respiratory Virus Detection and Clinical Diagnosis in Children Attending Day Care

    PubMed Central

    Moe, Nina; Pedersen, Bård; Nordbø, Svein Arne; Skanke, Lars Høsøien; Krokstad, Sidsel; Smyrnaios, Anastasios; Døllner, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Background Respiratory viruses often have been studied in children with respiratory tract infection (RTI), but less knowledge exists about viruses in asymptomatic children. We have studied the occurrence of a broad panel of respiratory viruses in apparently healthy children attending day care, taking into account the influence of possible confounding factors, such as age, clinical signs of respiratory tract infection (RTI), location (day-care section) and season. Methods We have studied 161 children in two day-care centers, each with separate sections for younger and older children, during four autumn and winter visits over a two-year period. A total of 355 clinical examinations were performed, and 343 nasopharyngeal samples (NPS) were analyzed by semi-quantitative, real-time, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests for 19 respiratory pathogens. Result Forty-three percent of all NPS were PCR-positive for ≥ 1 of 13 virus species, with high species variation during visits. Rhinovirus 26% (88/343 NPS), enterovirus 12% (40/343) and parechovirus 9% (30/343) were detected in every visit, and the rates varied in relation to age, day-care section and season. Ten other viruses were detected in ≤ 3% of the NPS. Generally, viruses occurred together in the NPS. In 24% (79/331) of the clinical examinations with available NPS, the children had clear signs of RTI, while in 41% (135/331) they had mild signs, and in 35% (117/331) the children had no signs of RTI. Moreover, viruses were found in 70% (55/79) of children with clear signs of RTI, in 41% (55/135) with mild signs and in 30% (35/117) without any signs of RTI (p < 0.001). Conclusions Positive PCR tests for respiratory viruses, particularly picornaviruses, were frequently detected in apparently healthy children attending day care. Virus detection rates were related to age, presence of clinical signs of RTI, location in day care and season. PMID:27433803

  2. Effects of Fourteen-Day Bed Rest on Trunk Stabilizing Functions in Aging Adults

    PubMed Central

    Sarabon, Nejc; Rosker, Jernej

    2015-01-01

    Bed rest has been shown to have detrimental effects on structural and functional characteristics of the trunk muscles, possibly affecting trunk and spinal stability. This is especially important in populations such as aging adults with often altered trunk stabilizing functions. This study examined the effects of a fourteen-day bed rest on anticipatory postural adjustments and postural reflex responses of the abdominal wall and back muscles in sixteen adult men. Postural activation of trunk muscles was measured using voluntary quick arm movement and sudden arm loading paradigm. Measurements were conducted prior to the bed rest, immediately after, and fourteen days after the bed rest. Immediately after the bed rest, latencies of anticipatory postural adjustments showed significant shortening, especially for the obliquus internus and externus muscles. After a fourteen-day recuperation period, anticipatory postural adjustments reached a near to complete recovery. On the contrary, reactive response latencies increased from pre-bed-rest to both post-bed-rest measurement sessions. Results indicate an important effect of bed rest on stabilizing functions of the trunk muscles in elderly adults. Moreover, there proved to be a significant deterioration of postural reactive responses that outlasted the 14-day post-bed-rest rehabilitation. PMID:26601104

  3. Impact of a 2-Day Critical Care Ultrasound Course during Fellowship Training: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Vi Am; Giri, Paresh C.; Rathinavel, Inimai; Nguyen, Emilie; Hecht, David; Dorotta, Ihab; Nguyen, H. Bryant; Chrissian, Ara A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Despite the increasing utilization of point-of-care critical care ultrasonography (CCUS), standards establishing competency for its use are lacking. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a 2-day CCUS course implementation on ultrasound-naïve critical care medicine (CCM) fellows. Methods. Prospective evaluation of the impact of a two-day CCUS course on eight CCM fellows' attitudes, proficiency, and use of CCUS. Ultrasound competency on multiple organ systems was assessed including abdominal, pulmonary, vascular, and cardiac systems. Subjects served as self-controls and were assessed just prior to, within 1 week after, and 3 months after the course. Results. There was a significant improvement in CCM fellows' written test scores, image acquisition ability, and pathologic image interpretation 1 week after the course and it was retained 3 months after the course. Fellows also had self-reported increased confidence and usage of CCUS applications after the course. Conclusions. Implementation of a 2-day critical care ultrasound course covering general CCUS and basic critical care echocardiography using a combination of didactics, live models, and ultrasound simulators is effective in improving critical care fellows' proficiency and confidence with ultrasound use in both the short- and long-term settings. PMID:26346694

  4. KSC volunteers help Meals on Wheels as part of Days of Caring '99

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    KSC volunteers at Miracle City Mall, Titusville, help unload containers for Meals on Wheels delivery as part of their '99 Days of Caring participation. The volunteers will also help deliver the meals. Coordinated by the KSC Community Relations Council, Days of Caring provides an opportunity for employees to volunteer their services in projects such as painting, planting flowers, reading to school children, and more. Organizations accepting volunteers include The Embers, Yellow Umbrella, Serene Harbor, Domestic Violence Program, the YMCA of Brevard County, and others.

  5. Air quality during the winter in Québec day-care centers.

    PubMed Central

    Daneault, S; Beausoleil, M; Messing, K

    1992-01-01

    Over 90% of 91 day care centers in greater Montréal, Québec exceeded 1000 ppm of CO2 during January through April 1989. Four variables were independent positive predictors of CO2 levels: the density of children in the center; presence of electric heating; absence of a ventilation system; and building age. High levels of CO2 are associated with respiratory tract and other symptoms. Clear standards and inspection policies should be established for day care center air quality. PMID:1536362

  6. The Integration of Adult Acute Care Surgeons into Pediatric Surgical Care Models Supplements the Workforce without Compromising Quality of Care.

    PubMed

    Judhan, Rudy J; Silhy, Raquel; Statler, Kristen; Khan, Mija; Dyer, Benjamin; Thompson, Stephanie; Richmond, Bryan

    2015-09-01

    Acute care of children remains a challenge due to a shortage of pediatric surgeons, particularly in rural areas. In our institutional norm, all cases in patients age six and older are managed by dedicated general surgeons. The provision of care to these children by these surgeons alleviates the impact of such shortages. We conducted a five-year retrospective analysis of all acute care pediatric surgical cases performed in patients aged 6 to 17 years by a dedicated group of adult general surgeons in a rural tertiary care hospital. Demographics, procedure, complications, outcomes, length of stay, and time of consultation/operation were obtained via chart review. Elective, trauma related, or procedures performed by a pediatric surgeon were excluded. Descriptive statistics are reported. A total of 397 cases were performed by six dedicated general surgeons during the study period. Mean age was 11.5 ± 3.1 years. In all, 100 (25.2%) were transferred from outlying facilities and 52.6 per cent of consultations/operations occurred at night (7P-7A), of which 33.2 per cent occurred during late night hours (11P-7A). On weekends, 34.0 per cent occurred. Appendectomy was the most commonly performed operation (n = 357,89.9%), of which 311 were laparoscopic (87.1%). Others included incision/drainage (4.5%), laparoscopic cholecystectomy (2.0%), bowel resection (1.5%), incarcerated hernia (0.5%), small bowel obstruction (0.5%), intra-abdominal abscess drainage (0.3%), resection of intussusception (0.3%), Graham patch (0.3%), and resection omental torsion (0.3%). Median length of stay was two days. Complications occurred in 23 patients (5.8%), of which 22(5.5%) were the result of the disease process. These results parallel those published by pediatric surgeons in this age group and for the diagnoses treated. Models integrating dedicated general surgeons into pediatric call rotations can be designed such that quality of pediatric care is maintained while providing relief to an

  7. The Integration of Adult Acute Care Surgeons into Pediatric Surgical Care Models Supplements the Workforce without Compromising Quality of Care.

    PubMed

    Judhan, Rudy J; Silhy, Raquel; Statler, Kristen; Khan, Mija; Dyer, Benjamin; Thompson, Stephanie; Richmond, Bryan

    2015-09-01

    Acute care of children remains a challenge due to a shortage of pediatric surgeons, particularly in rural areas. In our institutional norm, all cases in patients age six and older are managed by dedicated general surgeons. The provision of care to these children by these surgeons alleviates the impact of such shortages. We conducted a five-year retrospective analysis of all acute care pediatric surgical cases performed in patients aged 6 to 17 years by a dedicated group of adult general surgeons in a rural tertiary care hospital. Demographics, procedure, complications, outcomes, length of stay, and time of consultation/operation were obtained via chart review. Elective, trauma related, or procedures performed by a pediatric surgeon were excluded. Descriptive statistics are reported. A total of 397 cases were performed by six dedicated general surgeons during the study period. Mean age was 11.5 ± 3.1 years. In all, 100 (25.2%) were transferred from outlying facilities and 52.6 per cent of consultations/operations occurred at night (7P-7A), of which 33.2 per cent occurred during late night hours (11P-7A). On weekends, 34.0 per cent occurred. Appendectomy was the most commonly performed operation (n = 357,89.9%), of which 311 were laparoscopic (87.1%). Others included incision/drainage (4.5%), laparoscopic cholecystectomy (2.0%), bowel resection (1.5%), incarcerated hernia (0.5%), small bowel obstruction (0.5%), intra-abdominal abscess drainage (0.3%), resection of intussusception (0.3%), Graham patch (0.3%), and resection omental torsion (0.3%). Median length of stay was two days. Complications occurred in 23 patients (5.8%), of which 22(5.5%) were the result of the disease process. These results parallel those published by pediatric surgeons in this age group and for the diagnoses treated. Models integrating dedicated general surgeons into pediatric call rotations can be designed such that quality of pediatric care is maintained while providing relief to an

  8. Critical care management of severe traumatic brain injury in adults

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major medical and socio-economic problem, and is the leading cause of death in children and young adults. The critical care management of severe TBI is largely derived from the "Guidelines for the Management of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury" that have been published by the Brain Trauma Foundation. The main objectives are prevention and treatment of intracranial hypertension and secondary brain insults, preservation of cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), and optimization of cerebral oxygenation. In this review, the critical care management of severe TBI will be discussed with focus on monitoring, avoidance and minimization of secondary brain insults, and optimization of cerebral oxygenation and CPP. PMID:22304785

  9. The Impact of Caring for Adults with Intellectual Disability on the Quality of Life of Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoong, A.; Koritsas, S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Because of an increase in life expectancy and de-institutionalisation, many adults with intellectual disability (ID) live with and are cared for by their parents throughout their adult lives. Because of caring demands, the quality of life (QOL) of parents may be affected. The study explored the impact of caring for an adult with ID on…

  10. The experience of caring for an adult child with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Tuck, I; du Mont, P; Evans, G; Shupe, J

    1997-06-01

    The experience of caring for an adult child with schizophrenia was explored using phenomenological methodology. Nine parents who were the primary caretakers of an adult child with schizophrenia participated in qualitative interviews. The resulting transcripts were analyzed to discover the structure of the lived experience. The study revealed that the diagnosis of schizophrenia in a child is experienced by the parent as a destructive force that interrupts and radically transforms the normative family life trajectory. This grief-filled experience involves both the loss of an imagined, idealized child and a transformation of the physically present child into a needy stranger. Implications are discussed and applied to community-based, family-centered mental health care. Importantly, the revealed dissatisfaction with initial mental health evaluations suggests that modification of current practices could produce significant benefits.

  11. Fetal programming of adult disease: implications for prenatal care.

    PubMed

    Lau, Christopher; Rogers, John M; Desai, Mina; Ross, Michael G

    2011-04-01

    The obesity epidemic, including a marked increase in the prevalence of obesity among pregnant women, represents a critical public health problem in the United States and throughout the world. Over the past two decades, it has been increasingly recognized that the risk of adult health disorders, particularly metabolic syndrome, can be markedly influenced by prenatal and infant environmental exposures (ie, developmental programming). Low birth weight, together with infant catch-up growth, is associated with a significant risk of adult obesity and cardiovascular disease, as well as adverse effects on pulmonary, renal, and cerebral function. Conversely, exposure to maternal obesity or high birth weight also represents an increased risk for childhood and adult obesity. In addition, fetal exposure to select chemicals (eg, phytoestrogens) or environmental pollutants (eg, tobacco smoke) may affect the predisposition to adult disease. Animal models have confirmed human epidemiologic findings and provided insight into putative programming mechanisms, including altered organ development, cellular signaling responses, and epigenetic modifications (ie, control of gene expression without modification of DNA sequence). Prenatal care is transitioning to incorporate goals of optimizing maternal, fetal, and neonatal health to prevent or reduce adult-onset diseases. Guidelines regarding optimal pregnancy nutrition and weight gain, management of low- and high-fetal-weight pregnancies, use of maternal glucocorticoids, and newborn feeding strategies, among others, have yet to fully integrate long-term consequences on adult health.

  12. Changes in Young Adult Primary Care Under the Affordable Care Act

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Carol A.; French, Benjamin; Rubin, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to describe changes in young adults’ routine care and usual sources of care (USCs), according to provider specialty, after implementation of extended dependent coverage under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in 2010. Methods. We used Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data from 2006 to 2012 to examine young adults’ receipt of routine care in the preceding year, identification of a USC, and USC provider specialties (pediatrics, family medicine, internal medicine, and obstetrics and gynecology). Results. The percentage of young adults who sought routine care increased from 42.4% in 2006 to 49.5% in 2012 (P < .001). The percentage identifying a USC remained stable at approximately 60%. Among young adults with a USC, there was a trend between 2006 and 2012 toward increasing percentages with pediatric (7.6% vs 9.1%) and family medicine (75.9% vs 80.9%) providers and declining percentages with internal medicine (11.5% vs 7.6%) and obstetrics and gynecology (5.0% vs 2.5%) providers. Conclusions. Efforts under the ACA to increase health insurance coverage had favorable effects on young adults’ use of routine care. Monitoring routine care use and USC choices in this group can inform primary care workforce needs and graduate medical education priorities across specialties. PMID:26447914

  13. Clinical care of adult Turner syndrome--new aspects.

    PubMed

    Trolle, Christian; Mortensen, Kristian Havmand; Hjerrild, Britta E; Cleemann, Line; Gravholt, Claus H

    2012-05-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is characterized by numerous medical challenges during adolescence and adulthood. Puberty has to be induced in most cases, and female sex hormone replacement therapy (HRT) should continue during adult years. These issues are normally dealt with by the paediatrician, but once a TS female enters adulthood it is less clear who should be the primary care giver. Morbidity and mortality is increased, especially due to the risk of dissection of the aorta and other cardiovascular diseases, as well as the risk of type 2 diabetes, hypertension, osteoporosis, thyroid disease and other diseases. The proper dose of HRT with female sex steroids has not been established, and, likewise, benefits and/or drawbacks from HRT have not been thoroughly evaluated. The transition period from paediatric to adult care seems to be especially vulnerable and the proper framework for transition has not yet been established. Likewise, no framework is in place for continuous follow-up during adult years in many countries. Today, most treatment recommendations are based on expert opinion and are unfortunately not evidence based, although more areas, such as growth hormone and oxandrolone treatment for increasing height, are becoming well founded. Osteoporosis, diabetes, both type 1 and 2, hypothyroidism, obesity and a host of other endocrine diseases and conditions are seen more frequently in TS. Prevention, intervention and proper treatment is only just being recognized. Hypertension is frequent and can be a forerunner of cardiovascular disease. The description of adult life with TS has been broadened and medical, social and psychological aspects are being added at a compelling pace. Proper care during adulthood should be studied and a framework for care should be in place, since most morbidity potentially is amenable to intervention. In summary, TS is a condition associated with a number of diseases and conditions which need the attention of a multi-disciplinary team during

  14. Assisting the Adult Receiving Inhalation and Intravenous Therapy. Care of the Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anoka-Hennepin Area Vocational Technical Inst., MN.

    These two units for students in a practical nursing program provide supplemental instruction in caring for adult patients receiving inhalation and intravenous therapy. Unit titles are The Administration of Intermittent Positive Pressure Breathing (IPPB RX) and Intravenous Therapy of Fluids and Blood. Each unit contains the following: objectives,…

  15. Long-term (30 days) toxicity of NiO nanoparticles for adult zebrafish Danio rerio

    PubMed Central

    Kovrižnych, Jevgenij A.; Zeljenková, Dagmar; Rollerová, Eva; Szabová, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Nickel oxide in the form of nanoparticles (NiO NPs) is extensively used in different industrial branches. In a test on adult zebrafish, the acute toxicity of NiO NPs was shown to be low, however longlasting contact with this compound can lead to its accumulation in the tissues and to increased toxicity. In this work we determined the 30-day toxicity of NiO NPs using a static test for zebrafish Danio rerio. We found the 30-day LC50 value to be 45.0 mg/L, LC100 (minimum concentration causing 100% mortality) was 100.0 mg/L, and LC0 (maximum concentration causing no mortality) was 6.25 mg/L for adult individuals of zebrafish. Considering a broad use of Ni in the industry, NiO NPs chronic toxicity may have a negative impact on the population of aquatic organisms and on food web dynamics in aquatic systems. PMID:26038672

  16. The Link between Professional Caregiving and Childrens Rights in the Family Day Care Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clyde, Margaret

    The growth of family day care is assessed from a personal viewpoint. Observations on trends since the United Nations Declaration of the Rights of the Child and the International Year of the Child are offered. A review of historical, moral, and legal perspectives on children's rights covers views on childhood during the middle ages and into the…

  17. Pedagogy in the Nursery: Establishing Practitioner Partnerships in High-Quality Long Day Care Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macfarlane, Kym; Noble, Karen; Cartmel, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    One of the most significant societal changes over the past few decades has been the growing number of women in the paid work force. As a direct result of this sociological phenomenon, childcare centres have been providing long day care for vastly increasing numbers of very young children. The speed of this change has created a societal dilemma…

  18. Women's Reflections on Choosing Quality Long Day Care in a Regional Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Nonie

    2008-01-01

    This article qualitatively explores women's experiences of choosing quality long day care in a regional community. The study complements recent quantitative research on the quality implications of increased for-profit childcare provision. It also adds to our understanding of current childcare policy by focusing on the experiences of women in a…

  19. The Challenge of Day Care in the Seventies: One Agency's Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenfeld, Harry; Schwimmer, Barbara

    The Jewish Board of Guardians, in collaboration with the Agency for Child Development, developed a program to respond to the complex mental health concerns of children in day care, their families and the communities in which they live. The program includes on-site consultation, staff development sessions and paraprofessional training. In this…

  20. Prevention of Fatherhood Disorders--Accompanying Early Father-Child Interaction in Day-Care Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamour, Martine; Letronnier, Paulette

    2003-01-01

    Over the last fifteen years, increasing numbers of fathers have been attending medical or day-care centers for young children, traditionally "reserved" for mothers and babies. Thus the professionals who work there are able to take an active part in the "co-construction of the fathers" by accompanying their emerging fatherhood. The…

  1. Parent Involvement in Day Care: Its Impact on Staff and Classroom Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Sylvia

    1977-01-01

    A large-scale study of the extent of parent involvement on boards in preschool day care indicates that intensity of involvement, rather than the number of parents involved, is the key factor. The impact of parent involvement on staff and classroom environment also is examined. (MS)

  2. A Community Day Care Programme for Psychiatric Patients: The Role of Occupational Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pradad, Akanksha; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This paper examines the need for and role of occupational therapy in the organization and functioning of a community day care center for psychiatric patients in India. The occupational therapy program involves client evaluation, determination of therapeutic activities, physical exercise, recreational activities, group sessions, family involvement,…

  3. Control of a Non-foodborne Outbreak of Salmonellosis: Day Care in Isolation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chorba, Terence, L.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    In this study of a salmonellosis outbreak at a day care center an analysis of five variables revealed that the disease was transferred person to person or by a continuing common source. Successful preventive measures included instruction in proper handwashing and diaper changing procedures and isolation of the infected children. (VM)

  4. Getting Down to Business: Day Care Center, Module 23. [Student Manual]. Entrepreneurship Training Components.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingi, Marcella

    This module on owning and operating a day care center is one of 36 in a series on entrepreneurship. The introduction tells the student what topics will be covered and suggests other modules to read in related occupations. Each unit includes student goals, a case study, and a discussion of the unit subject matter. Learning activities are divided…

  5. Malaysia's First Day Care Center for Children with Disabilities: Future Needs in Research in Early Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhagwanji, Yash

    This paper describes the development and implementation of the first private nonprofit day care program serving children with disabilities in Malaysia. Preliminary information describes Malaysia's economic, ethnic, and cultural situation. The naturalistic inquiry approach used to prepare this report, involving interviews and observations, is then…

  6. Dagliga Separationer och Tidig Daghemsstart (Daily Separations and Early Entry into Day Care).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harsman, Ingrid

    The purpose of this thesis [Swedish language with English abstract and summary] was to study the reactions of infants when they started attending day care centers and to elucidate the process of adjustment. The theoretical perspective employed is the J. Bowlby/M. Ainsworth attachment theory. U. Bronfenbrenner's ecological theory of human…

  7. C. P. A. Youth Motivation through Day Care Demonstration. Final Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, Audrey; McWhorter, Schelysture

    The Real Experiences for Alternatives in Living Program (REAL) employs three components in an attempt to alter positively the lives of inner-city male youths and to provide indigenous role models within a day care setting to school-age children enrolled therein. These components are informal and formal on-the-job inservice training in child…

  8. One- to Three-Year-Old Children's Experience of Subjective Wellbeing in Day Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seland, Monica; Sandseter, Ellen Beate Hansen; Bratterud, Åse

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study on which this paper is based was to explore in which situations and contexts Norwegian 1-3-year-olds experience subjective wellbeing in day care. The data in this study was collected through qualitative phenomenological observations of 18 children, and an inductive process of analysis was conducted. The results show that…

  9. Having, Loving, and Being: Children's Narrated Well-Being in Finnish Day Care Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puroila, Anna-Maija; Estola, Eila; Syrjala, Leena

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to answer the following question: what do children tell about their well-being in Finnish day care centres? The theoretical and methodological framework of this study is based on a narrative approach. The research material was collected by participating in the everyday life of three groups of children and listening to…

  10. Does Santa Exist? Children's Everyday Narratives as Dynamic Meeting Places in a Day Care Centre Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puroila, Anna-Maija; Estola, Eila; Syrjala, Leena

    2012-01-01

    The article attempts to answer the question: What is the nature of children's everyday narratives in a day care centre context? The theoretical framework of this study is based on a narrative approach. The research material was gathered through applying the methodology of narrative ethnography. The article is based on observational material…

  11. Teachers' Perceptions of Their Personal Early Childhood Special Education Competence in Day Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holst, Teija K.; Pihlaja, Paivi M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine and compare kindergarten and special kindergarten teachers' perceptions of their own competence in early childhood special education (ECSE) in Finnish day care. This comparison is based on the kindergarten teachers' and special kindergarten teachers' self-evaluation. Teachers evaluated their theoretical and…

  12. Children's Attachment Relationships with Day Care Caregivers: Associations with Positive Caregiving and the Child's Temperament

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Schipper, J. Clasien; Tavecchio, Louis W. C.; Van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, children's attachment relationships with their professional caregivers in center day care were observed for 48 children. We explored whether more positive caregiving was associated with a more secure attachment relationship and whether this association was stronger for more temperamentally irritable children compared to less…

  13. Hearing Parents' and Carers' Voices: Experiences of Accessing Quality Long Day Care in Northern Regional Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Nonie; Tinning, Beth

    2012-01-01

    This article explores parents' and carers' experiences of accessing quality long day care in northern regional Australia. The data was gathered in 2009, after the collapse of ABC Developmental Learning Centres (herein referred to as ABC Learning) and before the implementation of the "National Quality Framework," and provides a snapshot of…

  14. Regulations for Child Day Care Centers Operated by Religious Bodies or Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Social Services, Columbia.

    As set forth in this manual, the regulations for child day care centers operated by religious bodies or groups constitute the minimum requirements to be met and maintained by each such facility in South Carolina. Regulation 114-5-20 sets out definitions and procedures for preapplication consultation, original registration, inspection, and…

  15. CTEPP DATA COLLECTION FORM 03:HOUSE/BUILDING CHARACTERISTICS OBSERVATION SURVEY FOR THE DAY CARE CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data collection form is used to document the physical characteristics of the day care center and identify and inventory possible sources of pollutants.

    The Children's Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Pollutant (CTEPP) study was one of the large...

  16. 7 CFR 226.12 - Administrative payments to sponsoring organizations for day care homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Administrative payments to sponsoring organizations for day care homes. 226.12 Section 226.12 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS CHILD AND...

  17. Menu Planning, Food Consumption, and Sanitation Practices in Day Care Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuratko, Connye N.; Martin, Ruth E.; Lan, William Y.; Chappell, James A.; Ahmad, Mahassen

    2000-01-01

    In 102 day care centers, data were collected on nutritional content of menus, compliance with guidelines, children's food consumption, and safety/sanitation. Although menus exceeded recommended daily allowances, quantities of food were below recommendations. No menu components were consumed by more than 65% of children. Sanitation problems were…

  18. Demographic Data for Special Needs Children in Title XX Day Care. Report No. 7698.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asano, Mildred

    Presented are demographic data for handicapped children in the Philadelphia area who might be eligible for federally funded (Title XX) day care services. The report consists of data tables and narrative sections for the following information: estimated number of handicapped children within catchment areas (CA's); estimated median income level of…

  19. A Public Review in Federal Region VI of the Federal Interagency Day Care Requirements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Human Development (DHEW), Dallas, TX. Region 6.

    The basic objective of this investigation was to conduct an input-review of the 1968, 1972 and Title XX Federal Interagency Day Care Requirements (FIDCR) and to make inferences gleaned from the results as these relate to appropriate revisions. Respondents from a number of states were asked to review and comment on each requirement. The document…

  20. Children's Well-Being in Day Care Centres: An Exploratory Empirical Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayr, Toni; Ulich, Michaela

    1999-01-01

    Used educators' ratings to describe preschool children's well-being in day care centers. Identified 11 independent dimensions of well-being: empathic, prosocial behavior; social initiative and vitality; self-assertiveness, openness; pleasure in exploring; coping with stress; positive self-defense; pleasure in sensory experiences;…

  1. A Comparison of Three Levels of Structure of Educational Programs in Family Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Norman; And Others

    This research project evaluated and compared three educational programs of high, medium, and low structure in family day care settings for a period of 10 months, to determine their impact on cognitive and social development in 60 children aged 2 1/2 to 4 years. The high-structure program followed the Bereiter-Engelmann approach, the…

  2. Federal Interagency Day Care Requirements, Pursuant to Sec. 522 (D) of the Economic Opportunity Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Washington, DC.

    This document defines federal interagency requirements which day care programs must meet if they are receiving funds under any of the following programs: Title IV (parts A and B) of the Social Security Act; Title I, Title II, Title III (Part B), and Title V (Part B) of the Economic Opportunity Act; the Manpower Development and Training Act; and…

  3. Opening Our Doors: Taking Public Library Service to Preschool and Day-Care Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Sally

    The Opening Our Doors Project of the Pioneer Library System of Norman, Oklahoma takes public library service to preschool and day care facilities by means of learning kits housed in tote bags. The sturdy, zippered tote bags are full of books, games, toys, learning folders, and so forth. There is a tote bag for each of 75 different topics. Topics…

  4. Providers' Role Perceptions and the Design and Delivery of Family Day Care Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gramley, Mary-Curtis

    The present paper, part of a larger study of family day care, examines providers' perceptions of themselves in relation to their work roles. Perceptions of self as mother, as teacher, and as business owner/operator are analyzed within a theoretial framework including the constructs of self-concept and role conflict. Participants, 10 family day…

  5. Public School Aggression among Children with Varying Day-Care Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskins, Ron

    1985-01-01

    Fifty-nine children with varying amounts and types of day-care experience were followed over their first 2 or 3 years of public schooling. Schoolteachers rated aggressiveness of several types and in several situations and supplied information about managing the children, their use of conflict-avoiding strategies, and other associated skills and…

  6. A Curriculum Guide for Inservice Education of Group Day Care and Nursery School Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thielges, Iva; Andersen, Rose

    This curriculum guide outlines 10 inservice training courses for group day care and nursery school personnel. Each course outline presents a list of learning experiences and related resources from which the instructor can choose to meet the needs of his/her students. Materials are designed to meet the Minnesota Department of Public Welfare…

  7. 7 CFR 226.12 - Administrative payments to sponsoring organizations for day care homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administrative payments to sponsoring organizations for day care homes. 226.12 Section 226.12 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS CHILD AND...

  8. Casting a Blind Eye: Regulation of Family Day Care in New York State. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norlander, Karen

    A study of the legal and regulatory barriers to the expansion of family day care in New York State identified the following as primary barriers: a fragmented licensing system, multiple agency regulation, attempted regulation by municipalities through exclusionary zoning, and widespread provider noncompliance and lack of enforcement of the…

  9. Standards, Regulation and Development of School-Age Day Care and "Open Door" Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrie, Pat

    1996-01-01

    Describes research on "open door" play and day care services for school-age children, which provided data on standards of such services when they became subject to registration and inspection under Children Act 1989. Identifies shortcomings in material resources and practice. Uses case studies to describes problems of local authorities in carrying…

  10. Day Care Room Transitions for Toddlers: Recommendations for a Supportive Physical Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberger, Nanci

    1996-01-01

    Discusses ways physical setting facilitates room transitions for toddlers in day care centers. Recommends specific physical features that support the transition process, including visual access to the next room, flexible access to one's former room, shared space, familiar materials and structures, and enriched cozy areas. Toddlers need to take in…

  11. A Training Program in Infant Education for Paraprofessional Staff of Day Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segner, Leslie; Patterson, Charlotte

    As part of an early child care program for migrant children in Colorado, 2-day workshops were held to train migrant women--mostly Spanish-speaking Mexican Americans--as teachers and aides for 25 infant education centers operated in public schools throughout the summer of 1969. Major goals were 1) to change attitudes toward the importance of…

  12. A REPORT ON HEALTH AND DAY CARE SERVICES FOR CHILDREN OF MIGRANT WORKERS, KANSAS - 1963.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Dept. of Health, Topeka.

    THE SPREAD OF HEALTH AND DAY CARE SERVICES FOR MIGRANT CHILDREN IN KANSAS IN 1963 WAS DESCRIBED. IN ADDITION TO A GENERAL TREATMENT OF THE SUBJECT, PROGRAMS IN EACH COUNTY WERE DESCRIBED SEPARATELY BECAUSE OF LOCAL VARIATION, ALTHOUGH THEY WERE ALL VERY SIMILAR. MONEY WAS APPROPRIATED BY THE KANSAS LEGISLATURE IN 1963 TO THE KANSAS STATE…

  13. Thin Blue Lines and Red Crosses: Signposts to Quality in Family Day Care?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Jayne

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores some of the findings of a study focussing on constructions of family day care from the perspectives of caregivers/educators and coordinators as they engaged in a quality review process using a recently developed resource--The Quality Journey/He haerenga whai hua (2000). The paper positions quality review as a part of a…

  14. Evaluation of employees in public day care centers knowledge about breastfeeding and complementary feeding

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Joelânia Pires de O.; Prudente, Amanda Moura; Silva, Dyene Aparecida; Pereira, Leandro Alves; Rinaldi, Ana Elisa M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the knowledge of public day care centers employees about breastfeeding and complementary feeding. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 15 public day care centers randomly selected in the city of Uberlandia, Southeast Brazil. A questionnaire applied to school principals, teachers, educators and general services assistants (GSA) included demographic and socioeconomic variables and questions about knowledge on breastfeeding, complementary feeding besides employees' perceptions about these subjects. Kruskal-Wallis with multiple comparison and chi-square tests were used to compare variables by professional category. RESULTS: 304 employees participated in the study. The highest percentages of correct answers were noted for questions about exclusive breastfeeding: definition - 97% (n=296) and duration - 65% (n=199). Regarding complementary feeding, 61% (n=187) correctly answered about the appropriate age to introduce it, with a lower percentage for meat (56%; n=170) and sugar (16%; n=50). Concerning employees' perceptions, 9% (n=29) believed that there is weak breast milk, 79% (n=241) and 51% (n=157) reported the negative influence of bottle feeding and pacifier use on breastfeeding. Among the interviewed subjects, 77% (n=234) answered that they had a positive influence on the quality of the food given to the children. There were no differences in the answers according to professional category, except for the negative influence of pacifiers on breastfeeding. CONCLUSIONS: Employees of public day care centers knew more about breastfeeding than about complementary feeding. Educational activities about breastfeeding and complementary feeding are necessary for day care centers employees. PMID:24473953

  15. Socioeconomic Considerations and Shared-Care Models of Cancer Care for Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Dale, William; Chow, Selina; Sajid, Saleha

    2016-02-01

    Older adults with cancer require a geriatrics approach to treatment. Such an approach targets appropriate treatments based on physiologic, not chronologic, age. Patients older than 65 years of age constitute the largest group of patients with cancer, making them the most expensive group of patients with cancer, especially with the advent of expensive new treatments with minimal impact on overall survival. Geriatric assessment, combined with targeted inventions, can optimize the value propositions in caring for older patients with cancer. Over the past 20 years, geriatric oncology care models have emerged applying these care principles in clinical practice.

  16. Socioeconomic Considerations and Shared-Care Models of Cancer Care for Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Dale, William; Chow, Selina; Sajid, Saleha

    2016-02-01

    Older adults with cancer require a geriatrics approach to treatment. Such an approach targets appropriate treatments based on physiologic, not chronologic, age. Patients older than 65 years of age constitute the largest group of patients with cancer, making them the most expensive group of patients with cancer, especially with the advent of expensive new treatments with minimal impact on overall survival. Geriatric assessment, combined with targeted inventions, can optimize the value propositions in caring for older patients with cancer. Over the past 20 years, geriatric oncology care models have emerged applying these care principles in clinical practice. PMID:26614859

  17. Virtual Visits in Home Health Care for Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Husebø, Anne Marie Lunde

    2014-01-01

    Background. This review identifies the content of virtual visits in community nursing services to older adults and explores the manner in which service users and the nurses use virtual visits. Design. An integrative literature review. Method. Data collection comprised a literature search in three databases: Cinahl, Medline, and PubMed. In addition, a manual search of reference lists and expert consultation were performed. A total of 12 articles met the inclusion criteria. The articles were reviewed in terms of study characteristics, service content and utilization, and patient and health care provider experience. Results. Our review shows that in most studies the service is delivered on a daily basis and in combination with in-person visits. The findings suggest that older home-dwelling patients can benefit from virtual visits in terms of enhanced social inclusion and medication compliance. Service users and their nurses found virtual visits satisfactory and suitable for care delivery in home care to the elderly. Evidence for cost-saving benefits of virtual visits was not found. Conclusions. The findings can inform the planning of virtual visits in home health care as a complementary service to in-person visits, in order to meet the increasingly complex needs of older adults living at home. PMID:25506616

  18. A new approach to eliciting patients' preferences for palliative day care: the choice experiment method.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Hannah-Rose; Normand, Charles E; Higginson, Irene J; Goodwin, Danielle M

    2005-05-01

    Palliative day care (PDC) provides individualized care to meet patients' needs and preferences and has posed problems for economic evaluation. Current methods are limited in their ability to capture relevant outcomes. The choice experiment elicits preferences for multiple aspects of care rather than a single outcome. A choice experiment was undertaken at four centers in England. A random effects probit model was used. Interaction terms relating to patient and service characteristics were explored. Seventy-nine patients participated. All characteristics of PDC except bathing and hairdressing were significant (P < 0.001). Access to specialist therapies was three times as important as medical support and twice as important as staying all day. Interaction terms were not significant, except for age and preference for specialist therapies, although the sample may not have been adequate to detect differences. Choice experiments provided useful insights by quantifying preferences for services, providing an alternative to cost-effectiveness analysis. PMID:15904746

  19. Early mobilization in the critical care unit: A review of adult and pediatric literature.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Saoirse; Ball, Ian; Cepinskas, Gediminas; Choong, Karen; Doherty, Timothy J; Ellis, Christopher G; Martin, Claudio M; Mele, Tina S; Sharpe, Michael; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Fraser, Douglas D

    2015-08-01

    Early mobilization of critically ill patients is beneficial, suggesting that it should be incorporated into daily clinical practice. Early passive, active, and combined progressive mobilizations can be safely initiated in intensive care units (ICUs). Adult patients receiving early mobilization have fewer ventilator-dependent days, shorter ICU and hospital stays, and better functional outcomes. Pediatric ICU data are limited, but recent studies also suggest that early mobilization is achievable without increasing patient risk. In this review, we provide a current and comprehensive appraisal of ICU mobilization techniques in both adult and pediatric critically ill patients. Contraindications and perceived barriers to early mobilization, including cost and health care provider views, are identified. Methods of overcoming barriers to early mobilization and enhancing sustainability of mobilization programs are discussed. Optimization of patient outcomes will require further studies on mobilization timing and intensity, particularly within specific ICU populations.

  20. Is Personality Associated with Health Care Use by Older Adults?

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Bruce; Veazie, Peter J; Chapman, Benjamin P; Manning, Willard G; Duberstein, Paul R

    2013-01-01

    Context The patterns of health care utilization in the United States pose well-established challenges for public policy. Although economic and sociological research has resulted in considerable knowledge about what influences the use of health services, the psychological literature in this area is underdeveloped. Importantly, it is not known whether personality traits are associated with older adults’ use of acute and long-term care services. Methods Data were collected from 1,074 community-dwelling seniors participating in a Medicare demonstration. First they completed a self-report questionnaire measuring the “Big Five” personality traits: Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness to Experience, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness. During the next two years, the participants maintained daily journals of their use of health care services. We used regression models based on the Andersen behavioral model of health care utilization to test for associations. Findings Our hypothesis that higher Neuroticism would be associated with greater health care use was confirmed for three services—probability of any emergency department (ED) use, likelihood of any custodial nursing home use, and more skilled nursing facility (SNF) days for SNF users—but was disconfirmed for hospital days for those hospitalized. Higher Openness to Experience was associated with a greater likelihood of custodial home care use, and higher Agreeableness and lower Conscientiousness with a higher probability of custodial nursing home use. For users, lower Openness was associated with more ED visits and SNF days, and lower Conscientiousness with more ED visits. For many traits with significant associations, the predicted use was 16 to 30 percent greater for people high (low) versus low (high) in specific traits. Conclusions Personality traits are associated with Medicare beneficiaries’ use of many expensive health care services, findings that have implications for health services research and

  1. Cuidado de ninos con necesidades especiales en el hogar: Manual de referencia para las personas que cuidan ninos en sus hogares (Children with Special Needs in Family Day Care Homes: A Handbook for Family Day Care Home Providers).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Brosse, Beatrice

    The Spanish translation of this guide offers information to Spanish-speaking family day care providers who desire to expand their knowledge of early childhood development in order to work with infants and young children with special needs in their day care settings. The first of four chapters answers common questions and concerns of day care…

  2. [Relationship between child day-care attendance and acute infectious disease. A systematic review].

    PubMed

    Ochoa Sangrador, Carlos; Barajas Sánchez, M Verisima; Muñoz Martín, Beatriz

    2007-01-01

    Child day-care attendance is considered to be an acute early childhood disease risk factor, the studies available however not affording the possibility of fully quantifying this risk. A systematic review of clinical trials and cohort studies was conducted, in which the effects child day-care attendance had on the health of young children based on the Cochrane Collaboration, PubMed and Spanish Medical Index databases, without any time or language-related limits, were analyzed and rounded out with analyses of referenced works and an additional EMBASE search. The methodological quality was evaluated by means of personalized criteria. Pooling measures (relative risks, incidence density ratios and weighted mean differences) were calculated with their confidence intervals, assuming random effects models. A significant increase was found to exist of a risk consistent over time and among different social and geographical environments. Considering the most methodologically-stringent studies with adjusted effect estimates, child day-care attendance was related to an increased risk of upper respiratory tract infection (RR=1,88), acute otitis media (RR=1,58), otitis media with fluid draining (RR=2,43), lower respiratory tract infections (overall RR=210; acute pneumonia RR=1.70; broncholitis RR=1,80; bronchitis RR=2,10) and gastroenteritis (RR=1,40). Child day-care attendance could be responsible for 33%-50% of the episodes of respiratory infection and gastroenteritis among the exposed population. In conclusion, it can be said that the risk for childhood health attributable to the child day-care attendance is discreet but of high-impact. This information has some major implications for research, clinical practice, healthcare authorities and society as a whole.

  3. Syllabus Outline on Child Care for Day Care Teachers at Family Life Teacher Training Centre in Somalia. African Studies in Curriculum Development and Evaluation No. 103.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Mumina M.

    Five day care centers in Mogadiscio, the capital city of Somalia, were studied to (1) identify problems encountered in teaching a course in child care; (2) observe teaching methods and assess their effectiveness; (3) ascertain reasons for the lack of preservice training for day care teachers; and (4) develop a new syllabus for a course in child…

  4. Fundamental reform of payment for adult primary care: comprehensive payment for comprehensive care.

    PubMed

    Goroll, Allan H; Berenson, Robert A; Schoenbaum, Stephen C; Gardner, Laurence B

    2007-03-01

    Primary care is essential to the effective and efficient functioning of health care delivery systems, yet there is an impending crisis in the field due in part to a dysfunctional payment system. We present a fundamentally new model of payment for primary care, replacing encounter-based imbursement with comprehensive payment for comprehensive care. Unlike former iterations of primary care capitation (which simply bundled inadequate fee-for-service payments), our comprehensive payment model represents new investment in adult primary care, with substantial increases in payment over current levels. The comprehensive payment is directed to practices to include support for the modern systems and teams essential to the delivery of comprehensive, coordinated care. Income to primary physicians is increased commensurate with the high level of responsibility expected. To ensure optimal allocation of resources and the rewarding of desired outcomes, the comprehensive payment is needs/risk-adjusted and performance-based. Our model establishes a new social contract with the primary care community, substantially increasing payment in return for achieving important societal health system goals, including improved accessibility, quality, safety, and efficiency. Attainment of these goals should help offset and justify the costs of the investment. Field tests of this and other new models of payment for primary care are urgently needed. PMID:17356977

  5. Threading the cloak: palliative care education for care providers of adolescents and young adults with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Lori; Weaver, Meaghann Shaw; Bell, Cynthia J; Sansom-Daly, Ursula M

    2015-01-01

    Medical providers are trained to investigate, diagnose, and treat cancer. Their primary goal is to maximize the chances of curing the patient, with less training provided on palliative care concepts and the unique developmental needs inherent in this population. Early, systematic integration of palliative care into standard oncology practice represents a valuable, imperative approach to improving the overall cancer experience for adolescents and young adults (AYAs). The importance of competent, confident, and compassionate providers for AYAs warrants the development of effective educational strategies for teaching AYA palliative care. Just as palliative care should be integrated early in the disease trajectory of AYA patients, palliative care training should be integrated early in professional development of trainees. As the AYA age spectrum represents sequential transitions through developmental stages, trainees experience changes in their learning needs during their progression through sequential phases of training. This article reviews unique epidemiologic, developmental, and psychosocial factors that make the provision of palliative care especially challenging in AYAs. A conceptual framework is provided for AYA palliative care education. Critical instructional strategies including experiential learning, group didactic opportunity, shared learning among care disciplines, bereaved family members as educators, and online learning are reviewed. Educational issues for provider training are addressed from the perspective of the trainer, trainee, and AYA. Goals and objectives for an AYA palliative care cancer rotation are presented. Guidance is also provided on ways to support an AYA's quality of life as end of life nears. PMID:25750863

  6. The 14-day repeated dose liver micronucleus test with methapyrilene hydrochloride using young adult rats.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kenji; Ochi, Akimu; Koda, Akira; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Doi, Takaaki

    2015-03-01

    The repeated dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay using young adult rats has the potential to detect genotoxic hepatocarcinogens that can be integrated into a general toxicity study. The assay methods were thoroughly validated by 19 Japanese facilities. Methapyrilene hydrochloride (MP), known to be a non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogen, was examined in the present study. MP was dosed orally at 10, 30 and 100mg/kg/day to 6-week-old male Crl:CD (SD) rats daily for 14 days. Treatment with MP resulted in an increase in micronucleated hepatocytes (MNHEPs) with a dosage of only 100mg/kg/day. At this dose level, cytotoxicity followed by regenerative cell growth was noted in the liver. These findings suggest that MP may induce clastogenic effects indirectly on the liver or hepatotoxicity of MP followed by regeneration may cause increase in spontaneous incidence of MNHEPs.

  7. The Ethical Imperative to Move to a Seven-Day Care Model.

    PubMed

    Bell, Anthony; McDonald, Fiona; Hobson, Tania

    2016-06-01

    Whilst the nature of human illness is not determined by time of day or day of week, we currently structure health service delivery around a five-day delivery model. At least one country is endeavouring to develop a systems-based approach to planning a transition from five- to seven-day healthcare delivery models, and some services are independently instituting program reorganization to achieve these ends as research, amongst other things, highlights increased mortality and morbidity for weekend and after-hours admissions to hospitals. In this article, we argue that this issue does not merely raise instrumental concerns but also opens up a normative ethical dimension, recognizing that clinical ethical dilemmas are impacted on and created by systems of care. Using health policy ethics, we critically examine whether our health services, as currently structured, are at odds with ethical obligations for patient care and broader collective goals associated with the provision of publicly funded health services. We conclude by arguing that a critical health policy ethics perspective applying relevant ethical values and principles needs to be included when considering whether and how to transition from five-day to seven-day models for health delivery. PMID:26883659

  8. Tackling 30-Day, All-Cause Readmissions with a Patient-Centered Transitional Care Bundle.

    PubMed

    Rice, Yvonne B; Barnes, Carol Ann; Rastogi, Rahul; Hillstrom, Tami J; Steinkeler, Cara N

    2016-02-01

    In 2008, Kaiser Permanente Northwest identified the transition from hospital to home as a pivotal quality improvement opportunity and used multiple patient-centered data collection methods to identify unmet needs contributing to preventable readmissions. A transitional care bundle that crosses care settings and organizational functions was developed to meet needs expressed by patients. It comprises 5 elements: risk stratification, a specialized phone number for discharged patients, timely postdischarge follow-up, standardized patient discharge instructions and same-day discharge summaries, and pharmacist-supported medication reconciliation. The transitional care bundle has been in place for 6 years. Readmission rates decreased from 12.1% to 10.6%, Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems scores for the discharge instruction composite moved from below the 50(th) to above the 90(th) national percentile, average time to the first postdischarge appointment decreased from 9.7 days to 5.3 days, and error rates on the discharge medication list decreased from 57% to 21% (P<.0001 for all). The program, which continues to evolve to address sustainability challenges and organizational initiatives, suggests the potential of a multicomponent, patient-centered care bundle to address the complex, interrelated drivers of preventable readmissions. PMID:25919315

  9. Disabled adults in adult care facilities facing disasters in New York City: an aggregate assessment.

    PubMed

    Maja-Schultz, Theresa; Swain, Bara

    2012-01-01

    Disabled adults who reside in adult care facilities (ACFs) are an at-risk population in the event of an emergency or disaster. This aggregate requires housing in congregate residential settings due to frailty, function, and/or cognitive impairments. All senior residents need long-term assistance to maintain maximum independence, including 24-hr on-site monitoring, case management, and personal care services such as eating, toileting, transferring, bathing, and dressing. Twenty-five percent of this special population of older adults has psychiatric disabilities and nonmental health comorbidities (Caron et al, 2008). Through a literature search, the challenges and risks of this aggregate in the event of a naturally occurring or manmade emergency, including epidemiological and environmental risks, are identified. Evidence-based literature reveals that the foundation of an effective emergency response and recovery is planning and preparation. Lessons learned from past disasters in the United States have brought attention to the needs of disabled and chronically ill older adults. Developing partnerships, improving communication systems, identifying emergency shelters for disabled adults, and empowering ACF residents and staff through education are recommended with the universal goal of reducing injury, preventing or controlling illness, and saving lives. An innovative educational program utilizing Hybrid Modality is outlined in this article including planning, coalition building, and the use of mapping systems as tools and strategies to improve outcomes. Resources such as local, state, and federal agencies; consumer groups; and trade associations are referenced for accessibility. PMID:22826922

  10. Assessment and determinants of airborne bacterial and fungal concentrations in different indoor environments: Homes, child day-care centres, primary schools and elderly care centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madureira, Joana; Paciência, Inês; Rufo, João Cavaleiro; Pereira, Cristiana; Teixeira, João Paulo; de Oliveira Fernandes, Eduardo

    2015-05-01

    Until now the influence of risk factors resulting from exposure to biological agents in indoor air has been far less studied than outdoor pollution; therefore the uncertainty of health risks, and how to effectively prevent these, remains. This study aimed (i) to quantify airborne cultivable bacterial and fungal concentrations in four different types of indoor environment as well as to identify the recovered fungi; (ii) to assess the impact of outdoor bacterial and fungal concentrations on indoor air; (iii) to investigate the influence of carbon dioxide (CO2), temperature and relative humidity on bacterial and fungal concentrations; and (iv) to estimate bacterial and fungal dose rate for children (3-5 years old and 8-10 years old) in comparison with the elderly. Air samples were collected in 68 homes, 9 child day-care centres, 20 primary schools and 22 elderly care centres, in a total of 264 rooms with a microbiological air sampler and using tryptic soy agar and malt extract agar culture media for bacteria and fungi growth, respectively. For each building, one outdoor representative location were identified and simultaneously studied. The results showed that child day-care centres were the indoor microenvironment with the highest median bacterial and fungal concentrations (3870 CFU/m3 and 415 CFU/m3, respectively), whereas the lowest median concentrations were observed in elderly care centres (222 CFU/m3 and 180 CFU/m3, respectively). Indoor bacterial concentrations were significantly higher than outdoor concentrations (p < 0.05); whereas the indoor/outdoor ratios for the obtained fungal concentrations were approximately around the unit. Indoor CO2 levels were associated with the bacterial concentration, probably due to occupancy and insufficient ventilation. Penicillium and Cladosporium were the most frequently occurring fungi. Children's had two times higher dose rate to biological pollutants when compared to adult individuals. Thus, due to children

  11. Increasing Steps/Day Predicts Improvement in Physical Function and Pain Interference in Adults with Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Kaleth, Anthony S.; Slaven, James E.; Ang, Dennis C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the concurrent and predictive associations between the number of steps taken per day (steps/day) and clinical outcomes in patients with fibromyalgia (FM). Methods 199 adults with FM [mean age = 46.1 yr; 95% females] enrolled in a randomized clinical trial wore a hip-mounted accelerometer for 1 week and completed self-report measures of physical function [Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire-Physical Impairment (FIQ-PI), SF-36 physical component score (SF-36 PCS)], pain intensity and interference (Brief Pain Inventory; BPI), and depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-8; PHQ-8) as part of their baseline and follow-up assessments. Associations of steps/day with self-report clinical measures were evaluated from baseline to week 12 using multivariate regression models adjusted for demographic and baseline covariates. Results Study participants were primarily sedentary, averaging 4,019 ± 1,530 steps/day. Our findings demonstrate a linear relationship between the change in steps/day and improvement in health outcomes for FM. Incremental increases on the order of 1,000 steps/day were significantly associated with (and predictive of) improvements in FIQ-PI, SF-36 PCS, BPI pain interference, and PHQ-8 (all p<0.05). Although higher step counts were associated with lower FIQ and BPI pain intensity scores, these were not statistically significant. Conclusion Step counts is an easily obtained and understood objective measure of daily physical activity. An exercise prescription that includes recommendations to gradually accumulate at least 5,000 additional steps/day may result in clinically significant improvements in outcomes relevant to patients with FM. Future studies are needed to elucidate the dose-response relationship between steps/day and patient outcomes in FM. PMID:25049001

  12. Short- and long-day responses in the pre-adult developmental duration of two species of Camponotus ants.

    PubMed

    Lone, Shahnaz Rahman; Ilangovan, Vinodh; Murugan, Madhuvika; Sharma, Vijay Kumar

    2011-03-01

    We assessed the effect of different day/night lengths on the pre-adult developmental time of two species of Camponotus ants that normally develop in dark underground nests. We assayed larval (egg-to-pupal formation), pupal (pupal formation-to-adult emergence), and pre-adult (egg-to-adult emergence) durations in these ants under three different light/dark (LD) cycles of 12:12 h, 10:14 h, and 14:10 h. We observed that the pre-adult development time of ants under these day lengths was significantly different. Although both species developed fastest under 12:12 h LD, when asymmetric LD cycles were compared, night-active species (Camponotus compressus) developed faster under short days (10:14 h) and day-active species (C. paria) developed faster under long days (14:10 h). This day/night-length-mediated difference in pre-adult developmental duration was mostly due to modulation of larval duration; however, in day-active species it was also via altered pupal duration. These results thus indicate that the two species of Camponotus ants respond differently to short and long days, suggesting that seasonal timers regulate pre-adult development time in tropical ant species living in dark underground nests.

  13. Optimism and Planning for Future Care Needs among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Sörensen, Silvia; Hirsch, Jameson K.; Lyness, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with an increase in need for assistance. Preparation for future care (PFC) is related to improved coping ability as well as better mental and physical health outcomes among older adults. We examined the association of optimism with components of PFC among older adults. We also explored race differences in the relationship between optimism and PFC. In Study 1, multiple regression showed that optimism was positively related to concrete planning. In Study 2, optimism was related to gathering information. An exploratory analysis combining the samples yielded a race interaction: For Whites higher optimism, but for Blacks lower optimism was associated with more planning. High optimism may be a barrier to future planning in certain social and cultural contexts. PMID:26045699

  14. Nurses' and care workers' attitudes toward death and caring for dying older adults in Japan.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Miho; Braun, Kathryn

    2010-12-01

    Registered nurses (RNs) and care workers (CWs) have important roles in providing end-of-life care to older adults, but little is known about the attitudes of RNs and CWs in Japan. In this study, 464 RNs and CWs working in facilities in Japan were asked to complete a self-administered questionnaire that included the Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale, Form B, Japanese version (FATCOD-Form B-J) and the Death Attitude Profile (DAP), Japanese version. A total of 388 (83.6%) questionnaires were returned, and 367 (79.1%) were fully completed. The final sample included 190 RNs and 177 CWs. Multiple regression analysis showed that better attitudes toward caring for the dying were positively associated with seminar attendance and negatively associated with fear of death.

  15. [Self-care and the asthmatic adult: systematization of nursing care].

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Estela Maria Leite Meirelles; da Nóbrega, Maria Miriam Lima; de Lima, Luciane Soares

    2002-01-01

    This research aims at the systematization of nursing assistance under Orem's nursing theory of self-care deficit. In order to conduct this study, the convergent approach was used through the performance of the nursing processes in an adult with asthma. Interviews, physical examinations, observations, data record, observation of nursing assistance in policlinics along with home visits were the techniques used to gather data. After the observation of the nursing assistance, self-care deficits were identified and a new assistance plan and objectives were established, as well as a system and methods of support. The assistance plan was performed through the implementation of nursing assistance, prioritizing educational support. Based on the results, it was concluded that the application of the nursing processes through Orem's self-care referential is feasible and necessary for the engagement of clients and their family in self-care.

  16. Transition of care from paediatric to adult services in haematology

    PubMed Central

    Bolton‐Maggs, Paula H B

    2007-01-01

    The need for adequate preparation for transition for young people with health care needs who require long term follow‐up in the adult sector has long been recognised and is a required part of the national service framework for children. The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health and the Royal College of Nursing have endorsed this need for improvement in services for adolescents. In 2006 the Department of Health launched guidelines with a wealth of recommendations. Despite these initiatives only slow progress has been made (usually by enthusiasts) and much work is needed to develop good programmes in many specialties, including non‐malignant haematology. PMID:17715443

  17. Care of the adult patient with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ross, Whitney Trotter; Olsen, Martin

    2014-11-01

    Individuals with Down syndrome have an increased risk for many conditions, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, infections, and osteoporosis, and endocrine, neurological, orthopedic, auditory, and ophthalmic disorders. They also are at increased risk for abuse and human rights violations and receive fewer screenings and interventions than the population without Down syndrome. In this literature review, the most common health conditions associated with Down syndrome are examined, along with the topics of sexual abuse, menstrual hygiene, contraception, and human rights. Clinical guidelines for this population are summarized in an effort to assist practicing physicians in improving their provision of health care to the adult patient with Down syndrome.

  18. Emerging Technologies for Pediatric and Adult Trauma Care

    PubMed Central

    Moulton, Steven L.; Haley-Andrews, Stephanie; Mulligan, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of the Review Current EMS protocols rely on provider directed care for evaluation, management and triage of injured patients from the field to a trauma center. New methods to quickly diagnose, support and coordinate the movement of trauma patients from the field to the most appropriate trauma center are in development. These methods will enhance trauma care and promote trauma system development. Recent Findings Recent advances in machine learning, statistical methods, device integration and wireless communication are giving rise to new methods for vital sign data analysis and a new generation of transport monitors. These monitors will collect and synchronize exponentially growing amounts of vital sign data with electronic patient care information. The application of advanced statistical methods to these complex clinical data sets has the potential to reveal many important physiological relationships and treatment effects. Summary Several emerging technologies are converging to yield a new generation of smart sensors and tightly integrated transport monitors. These technologies will assist pre-hospital providers in quickly identifying and triaging the most severely injured children and adults to the most appropriate trauma centers. They will enable the development of real-time clinical support systems of increasing complexity, able to provide timelier, more cost-effective, autonomous care. PMID:20407375

  19. Levels of maternal care in dogs affect adult offspring temperament

    PubMed Central

    Foyer, Pernilla; Wilsson, Erik; Jensen, Per

    2016-01-01

    Dog puppies are born in a state of large neural immaturity; therefore, the nervous system is sensitive to environmental influences early in life. In primates and rodents, early experiences, such as maternal care, have been shown to have profound and lasting effects on the later behaviour and physiology of offspring. We hypothesised that this would also be the case for dogs with important implications for the breeding of working dogs. In the present study, variation in the mother-offspring interactions of German Shepherd dogs within the Swedish breeding program for military working dogs was studied by video recording 22 mothers with their litters during the first three weeks postpartum. The aim was to classify mothers with respect to their level of maternal care and to investigate the effect of this care on pup behaviour in a standardised temperament test carried out at approximately 18 months of age. The results show that females differed consistently in their level of maternal care, which significantly affected the adult behaviour of the offspring, mainly with respect to behaviours classified as Physical and Social Engagement, as well as Aggression. Taking maternal quality into account in breeding programs may therefore improve the process of selecting working dogs. PMID:26758076

  20. Levels of maternal care in dogs affect adult offspring temperament.

    PubMed

    Foyer, Pernilla; Wilsson, Erik; Jensen, Per

    2016-01-01

    Dog puppies are born in a state of large neural immaturity; therefore, the nervous system is sensitive to environmental influences early in life. In primates and rodents, early experiences, such as maternal care, have been shown to have profound and lasting effects on the later behaviour and physiology of offspring. We hypothesised that this would also be the case for dogs with important implications for the breeding of working dogs. In the present study, variation in the mother-offspring interactions of German Shepherd dogs within the Swedish breeding program for military working dogs was studied by video recording 22 mothers with their litters during the first three weeks postpartum. The aim was to classify mothers with respect to their level of maternal care and to investigate the effect of this care on pup behaviour in a standardised temperament test carried out at approximately 18 months of age. The results show that females differed consistently in their level of maternal care, which significantly affected the adult behaviour of the offspring, mainly with respect to behaviours classified as Physical and Social Engagement, as well as Aggression. Taking maternal quality into account in breeding programs may therefore improve the process of selecting working dogs. PMID:26758076

  1. Primary Care for the Older Adult Patient: Common Geriatric Issues and Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Katherine; Shi, Sandra; Kiraly, Carmela

    2016-06-01

    Older adults are the fastest growing segment of the US population and the majority of older adults are women. Primary care for the older adult patient requires a wide variety of skills, reflecting the complexity and heterogeneity of this patient population. Individualizing care through consideration of patients' goals, medical conditions, and prognosis is paramount. Quality care for the older adult patient requires familiarity with common geriatric syndromes, such as dementia, falls, and polypharmacy. In addition, developing the knowledge and communication skills necessary for complex care and end-of-life care planning is essential.

  2. Educators' working conditions in a day care centre on ownership of a non-profit organization

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Working conditions of nursery school teachers have not been scrutinized thoroughly in scientific research. Only a few studies have so far examined work-load and strain in this profession. Preferably, subjective perceptions should be corroborated by data that can be quantified more objectively and accurately. The aim of the present observational field study was to evaluate pedagogical staffs' workflow. Methods In 2009 eleven educators in a day care centre were observed throughout three complete workdays. A total of 250 working hours were recorded. Results An educators' workday lasted on average 07:46:59 h (SD = 01:01:10 h). Within this time span, an average of 02:20:46 h (30.14%, SD = 00:28:07 h) were spent on caring, 01:44:18 h on playing (22.33%, SD = 00:54:12 h), 00:49:37 h on educational work (10.62%, SD = 00:40:09), and only 00:05:38 h on individual child contact (1.21%, SD = 00:04:58 h). Conclusion For the first time, educators' workflow in day care centres was studied in real time. Some of the educators' self-reported problems were corroborated. The results of this study form a basis upon which further investigations can be built and measures can be developed for an overall improvement of child care. PMID:22192358

  3. Healthy incentive scheme in the Irish full-day-care pre-school setting.

    PubMed

    Johnston Molloy, Charlotte; Kearney, John; Hayes, Nóirín; Slattery, Corina Glennon; Corish, Clare

    2014-02-01

    A pre-school offering a full-day-care service provides for children aged 0-5 years for more than 4 h/d. Researchers have called for studies that will provide an understanding of nutrition and physical activity practices in this setting. Obesity prevention in pre-schools, through the development of healthy associations with food and health-related practices, has been advocated. While guidelines for the promotion of best nutrition and health-related practice in the early years' setting exist in a number of jurisdictions, associated regulations have been noted to be poor, with the environment of the child-care facility mainly evaluated for safety. Much cross-sectional research outlines poor nutrition and physical activity practice in this setting. However, there are few published environmental and policy-level interventions targeting the child-care provider with, to our knowledge, no evidence of such interventions in Ireland. The aim of the present paper is to review international guidelines and recommendations relating to health promotion best practice in the pre-school setting: service and resource provision; food service and food availability; and the role and involvement of parents in pre-schools. Intervention programmes and assessment tools available to measure such practice are outlined; and insight is provided into an intervention scheme, formulated from available best practice, that was introduced into the Irish full-day-care pre-school setting.

  4. Survival and detection of rotaviruses on environmental surfaces in day care centers.

    PubMed Central

    Keswick, B H; Pickering, L K; DuPont, H L; Woodward, W E

    1983-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that children in day care centers commonly experience diarrhea due to rotavirus, giardia, and bacterial pathogens. Multiple agents frequently coexist, and the environment is heavily contaminated with enteric bacteria during outbreaks. A study of environmental surface contamination with rotavirus was performed during three non-outbreak periods. Of 25 samples collected from environmental surfaces and teachers hands at a day care center, 4 (16%) were positive for rotavirus antigen when a fluorescence assay was used. We also examined the survival of two animal viruses, rotavirus SA-11 and poliovirus type 1, and bacteriophage 12 on similar environmental surfaces in a laboratory. Poliovirus type 1 and bacteriophage f2 were more resistant to drying than rotavirus SA-11 and could be recovered after a 90-min exposure on a dry surface. Rotavirus SA-11 could be detected for 30 min. All three viruses survived longer when they were suspended in fecal material than when they were suspended in distilled water. These data suggest that several agents, including rotavirus, can remain viable on contaminated surfaces long enough to be transmitted to susceptible children. This finding helps explain why rotavirus shows a mode of spread like that of parasitic and bacterial agents within day care center settings. PMID:6314896

  5. Oral health and dental care of elderly adults dependent on care.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Willy; Schimmel, Martin; Müller, Frauke

    2015-01-01

    The increase in life expectancy in Switzerland is posing new challenges, as more and more people are becoming dependent on care, both at home and in long-term care facilities. The dental profession must deal with patients retaining their own teeth until later in life with an increased incidence and severity of caries and periodontal diseases. The association between general and oral health is becoming important, particularly in older people with medical conditions. Aspiration pneumonia can develop as a result of pathogenic bacteria descending from the oral cavity to the bronchoalveolar system, which presents a frequent, potentially life-threatening danger. By adapting care and treatment concepts, the masticatory ability can be preserved or restored, which in turn helps preventing malnutrition. Other aims include preventing infections as well as maintaining subjective well-being and an attractive dental appearance. Care standards should be defined for the provision of oral-health related dentistry for the vulnerable population of the care-dependent adults. These should be implemented by an interdisciplinary care team composed of nursing personnel, long-term care facility managers, Spitex staff, physicians, dentists as well as dental assistants and hygienists. PMID:26169068

  6. 7 CFR 240.4 - Cash in lieu of donated foods for nonresidential child and adult care institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and adult care institutions. 240.4 Section 240.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... LIEU OF DONATED FOODS § 240.4 Cash in lieu of donated foods for nonresidential child and adult care... or adult care institutions participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program. FNS shall pay...

  7. 7 CFR 240.4 - Cash in lieu of donated foods for nonresidential child and adult care institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and adult care institutions. 240.4 Section 240.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... LIEU OF DONATED FOODS § 240.4 Cash in lieu of donated foods for nonresidential child and adult care... or adult care institutions participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program. FNS shall pay...

  8. 7 CFR 240.4 - Cash in lieu of donated foods for nonresidential child and adult care institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... and adult care institutions. 240.4 Section 240.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... LIEU OF DONATED FOODS § 240.4 Cash in lieu of donated foods for nonresidential child and adult care... or adult care institutions participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program. FNS shall pay...

  9. 7 CFR 240.4 - Cash in lieu of donated foods for nonresidential child and adult care institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and adult care institutions. 240.4 Section 240.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... LIEU OF DONATED FOODS § 240.4 Cash in lieu of donated foods for nonresidential child and adult care... or adult care institutions participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program. FNS shall pay...

  10. Brief Report: The Medical Care of Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders--Identifying the Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruder, Mary Beth; Kerins, Gerard; Mazzarella, Cynthia; Sims, Jessica; Stein, Neil

    2012-01-01

    There is a lack of information concerning adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), especially with regards to their access to health care. A paper and electronic survey was sent to 1,580 primary care physicians in Connecticut. 346 respondents returned a survey and provided care to adults with an ASD. This physician survey provides data on…

  11. Mothers' and Fathers' Roles in Caring for an Adult Child with an Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowbotham, Michelle; Carroll, Annemaree; Cuskelly, Monica

    2011-01-01

    To date, there have been few studies of mothers' and fathers' roles in caring for their adult children with intellectual disabilities. The present study investigated the care-giving roles of mother and father couples caring for their adult offspring with an intellectual disability, their psychological health, and the demands and satisfaction of…

  12. 7 CFR 250.61 - Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... agencies and child care and adult care institutions must also adhere to Federal regulations in 7 CFR part... foods in NSLP, also apply to CACFP. However, in accordance with 7 CFR part 226, a child care or adult... lunches and suppers are those meeting the nutritional standards established in 7 CFR part 226. The...

  13. 7 CFR 250.61 - Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... agencies and child care and adult care institutions must also adhere to Federal regulations in 7 CFR part... foods in NSLP, also apply to CACFP. However, in accordance with 7 CFR part 226, a child care or adult... lunches and suppers are those meeting the nutritional standards established in 7 CFR part 226. The...

  14. 7 CFR 250.61 - Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... agencies and child care and adult care institutions must also adhere to Federal regulations in 7 CFR part... foods in NSLP, also apply to CACFP. However, in accordance with 7 CFR part 226, a child care or adult... lunches and suppers are those meeting the nutritional standards established in 7 CFR part 226. The...

  15. 7 CFR 250.61 - Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... agencies and child care and adult care institutions must also adhere to Federal regulations in 7 CFR part... foods in NSLP, also apply to CACFP. However, in accordance with 7 CFR part 226, a child care or adult... lunches and suppers are those meeting the nutritional standards established in 7 CFR part 226. The...

  16. Learning the 'SMART' way... results from a pilot study evaluating an interprofessional acute care study day.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Robin

    2011-01-01

    A significant number of patients requiring critical care are now being managed outside of critical care facilities. There is evidence that staff looking after these patients lack the necessary knowledge and skills to care for them safely, and that effective pre-registration education can play a significant role in addressing these shortfalls in nurses' knowledge and skills. A team from Sheffield Hallam University, in collaboration with the University of Sheffield, developed a pilot one day interprofessional acute illness programme which was called SMART® (Student Management of Acute illness - Recognition and Treatment). To evaluate the pilot programme, 16 student doctors and 72 student nurses were recruited. A pre- and post-course questionnaire based on the Featherstone et al. (2005) evaluation of ALERT was used to ascertain the students' general level of knowledge of the deteriorating patient, their experiences of and confidence in caring for an acutely unwell patient, and their level of comfort with interprofessional working. The results from the pilot study indicate that the students' levels of knowledge, their levels of confidence and their comfort with interprofessional working all rose after undertaking the programme. The pilot study has a number of implications for the future teaching and learning of acute care clinical skills, within a theoretically based curriculum.

  17. Neonatal family care for 24 hours per day: effects on maternal confidence and breast-feeding.

    PubMed

    Wataker, Heidi; Meberg, Alf; Nestaas, Eirik

    2012-01-01

    In family care (FC) program for neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), parents are encouraged to reside together with their infant for 24 hours a day to actively be involved in the care. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of FC on maternal confidence and breast-feeding. Maternal confidence and rate of breast-feeding were assessed in 31 mothers offered FC that included special family rooms in the NICU, and in 30 mothers from a comparable NICU providing traditional care without such facilities. One week prior to hospital discharge, mothers in the FC group felt better informed regarding nursing issues and had more confidence in interpretation of the infants regarding feeding issues and in caregiving without staff attendance (P < .05). They also reported a higher level of empowerment (P < .05). Three months after discharge, the mothers in the FC group had a higher self-reported skill level for interpretation of the infant's signals and knowledge about breast-feeding (P < .05). Despite similar rate of breast-feeding at discharge, more infants in the FC group were breastfed 3 months after discharge (P < .05). An FC program in the NICU promoted better maternal confidence during the hospital stay and 3 months after discharge compared with traditional care.

  18. Environmental and ventilation assessment in Child Day Care Centers in Porto: the ENVIRH Project.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Ana; Aelenei, Daniel; Papoila, Ana Luísa; Carreiro-Martins, Pedro; Aguiar, Lívia; Pereira, Cristiana; Neves, Paula; Azevedo, Susana; Cano, Manuela; Proença, Carmo; Viegas, João; Silva, Susana; Mendes, Diana; Neuparth, Nuno; Teixeira, João Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Children attending day care centers (CDCC) have been reported to be more prone to infectious diseases when compared with those cared for at home, and are exposed to conditions that may increase the risk of allergies and asthma. Several studies revealed that consequences of poor ventilation conditions include high levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) and many other indoor pollutants commonly detected in schools. Nine child day care centers were selected randomly to participate in this study. Fifty-two classrooms were assessed for chemical, biological, physical, and allergen parameters in spring and winter seasons in these nine CDCC located in Porto, Portugal. Outdoor measurements were also conducted for comparison. Our results indicated that (i) particulate matter (PM10) median levels were above the national reference levels, both by classroom type and by season; (ii) TVOC kindergarten peak values may raise some concern; (iii) CO2 was present at high median and maximum levels during spring and winter assessment in both nurseries and kindergartens classrooms; (iv) total bacteria concentrations were 57- and 52-fold higher in the nursery and kindergarten than outdoors, respectively, for the spring season; (v) winter and spring median predicted mean vote (PMV) indices were between "neutral" (0) and "slightly cool" (≤ -1) in the thermal sensation scale for comfort situations (-2 to 2) for both types of classrooms; (vi) there were significant differences for both PMV and predicted percentage of dissatisfied (PPD) indices by season; and (vii) CO2, total bacteria, and gram-negative bacteria were associated with low airflow rates. These data will help to evaluate the effectiveness of current building operation practices in child day care centers regarding indoor air quality and respiratory health.

  19. The Affordable Care Act, Accountable Care Organizations, and Mental Health Care for Older Adults: Implications and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Stephen J.; Gill, Lydia; Naslund, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) represents the most significant legislative change in the United States health care system in nearly half a century. Key elements of the ACA include reforms aimed at addressing high-cost, complex, vulnerable patient populations. Older adults with mental health disorders are a rapidly growing segment of the population and are among the most challenging subgroups within health care, and they account for a disproportionate amount of costs. What does the ACA mean for geriatric mental health? We address this question by highlighting opportunities for reaching older adults with mental health disorders by leveraging the diverse elements of the ACA. We describe nine relevant initiatives: (1) accountable care organizations, (2) patient-centered medical homes, (3) Medicaid-financed specialty health homes, (4) hospital readmission and health care transitions initiatives, (5) Medicare annual wellness visit, (6) quality standards and associated incentives, (7) support for health information technology and telehealth, (8) Independence at Home and 1915(i) State Plan Home and Community-Based Services program, and (9) Medicare-Medicaid Coordination Office, Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation, and the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute. We also consider potential challenges to full implementation of the ACA and discuss novel solutions for advancing geriatric mental health in the context of projected workforce shortages and the opportunities afforded by the ACA. PMID:25811340

  20. The Affordable Care Act, Accountable Care Organizations, and Mental Health Care for Older Adults: Implications and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Stephen J; Gill, Lydia; Naslund, John A

    2015-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) represents the most significant legislative change in the United States health care system in nearly half a century. Key elements of the ACA include reforms aimed at addressing high-cost, complex, vulnerable patient populations. Older adults with mental health disorders are a rapidly growing segment of the population and are among the most challenging subgroups within health care, and they account for a disproportionate amount of costs. What does the ACA mean for geriatric mental health? We address this question by highlighting opportunities for reaching older adults with mental health disorders by leveraging the diverse elements of the ACA. We describe nine relevant initiatives: (1) accountable care organizations, (2) patient-centered medical homes, (3) Medicaid-financed specialty health homes, (4) hospital readmission and health care transitions initiatives, (5) Medicare annual wellness visit, (6) quality standards and associated incentives, (7) support for health information technology and telehealth, (8) Independence at Home and 1915(i) State Plan Home and Community-Based Services program, and (9) Medicare-Medicaid Coordination Office, Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation, and the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute. We also consider potential challenges to full implementation of the ACA and discuss novel solutions for advancing geriatric mental health in the context of projected workforce shortages and the opportunities afforded by the ACA.