Science.gov

Sample records for adult day centers

  1. QuickStats: Percentage of Adult Day Services Center Participants, by Selected Diagnoses

    MedlinePlus

    ... MMWR ) MMWR Share Compartir QuickStats: Percentage of Adult Day Services Center Participants,* by Selected Diagnoses † — National Study ... which is the estimated number of enrolled adult day services center participants in the United States on ...

  2. 7 CFR 226.19a - Adult day care center provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... participating in the Program must serve one or more of the following meal types—breakfast, lunch, supper, and... agreement between the center and school. The center shall maintain responsibility for all Program... document compliance with such requirements. (7) An adult day care center may obtain meals from a...

  3. 7 CFR 226.19a - Adult day care center provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... participating in the Program must serve one or more of the following meal types—breakfast, lunch, supper, and... agreement between the center and school. The center shall maintain responsibility for all Program... document compliance with such requirements. (7) An adult day care center may obtain meals from a...

  4. 7 CFR 226.19a - Adult day care center provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... participating in the Program must serve one or more of the following meal types—breakfast, lunch, supper, and... agreement between the center and school. The center shall maintain responsibility for all Program... document compliance with such requirements. (7) An adult day care center may obtain meals from a...

  5. Spousal caregiving when the adult day services center is closed.

    PubMed

    Campell, D D; Travis, S S

    1999-08-01

    Of those spousal caregivers who identified a time when they most needed assistance, morning or afternoon time periods appeared to be most problematic. Spousal caregivers who reported receiving respite time on the weekends identified adult children as the informal support person most often available. However, more than half of the caregivers reported having no respite time during the weekend. Differences in the ways spousal caregivers spent their respite time on the weekends, if available, varied by gender, length of tenure as a caregiver, and age. PMID:10461273

  6. 7 CFR 226.19a - Adult day care center provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS CHILD AND ADULT CARE FOOD PROGRAM Operational Provisions... requirements set forth in this part. (8) Adult day care centers shall collect and maintain documentation of the... require key operational staff, as defined by the State agency, to attend Program training prior to...

  7. 7 CFR 226.19a - Adult day care center provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS CHILD AND ADULT CARE FOOD PROGRAM Operational Provisions... requirements set forth in this part. (8) Adult day care centers shall collect and maintain documentation of the... require key operational staff, as defined by the State agency, to attend Program training prior to...

  8. Social and Environmental Infantilization of Aged Persons: Observations in Two Adult Day Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salari, Sonia Miner; Rich, Melinda

    2001-01-01

    Examines the social environments, staff behavior and social interaction of 72 elderly clients in adult day care centers, using qualitative research techniques. When the staff and environment were more infantilizing, provided less autonomy and fewer opportunities for privacy regulation, clients had lower social interaction with peers. In contrast,…

  9. Use of Adult Day Care Centers: Do They Offset Utilization of Health Care Services?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iecovich, Esther; Biderman, Aya

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Based on the medical offset effect, the goal of the study was to examine the extent to which users and nonusers of adult day care centers (ADCC) differ in frequency of use of out-patient health services (visits to specialists) and in-patient health services (number of hospital admissions, length of hospitalizations, and visits to…

  10. Adult Day Health Center Participation and Health-Related Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Eva M.; Sands, Laura P.; Weiss, Sara; Dowling, Glenna; Covinsky, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the association between Adult Day Health Center (ADHC) participation and health-related quality of life. Design and Methods: Case-controlled prospective study utilizing the Medical Outcomes Survey Form 36 (SF-36) to compare newly enrolled participants from 16 ADHC programs with comparable…

  11. Use of adult day care service centers in an ethnically diverse sample of older adults.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ellen L; Friedemann, Marie-Luise; Mauro, Ana C

    2014-03-01

    Our nation is aging and unprepared to meet the needs of community-dwelling seniors and their caregivers. This study explored the perceived need for and use of adult day care services (ADS) in a low-income population. A random sample of 537 patient-caregiver dyads were recruited in home care agencies, and separate in-home surveys were conducted. Patients and caregivers were primarily women and 50.2% were of Hispanic origin. Although half (n = 267/537, 49.7%) of the caregivers had a perceived need for using ADS, only 19.1% of these caregivers used these services, mostly in the context of severe patient cognitive impairment. There were no racial or ethnic differences among ADS users and nonusers. The overall low use of ADS in a growing ethnically diverse senior population with a perceived need for services warrants further investigation and action as states seek to decrease nursing home placement and find solutions for our looming caregiving crisis. PMID:24652954

  12. Adult Day Services

    MedlinePlus

    A Smart Choice Adult Day Services Comparison At-a-Glance 1 Adult Day Services Assisted Living Home Care Nursing Homes Live at home with family ... supervision Nursing care available as needed during the day Flexibility to receive care only on days when ...

  13. A day-centered approach to modeling cortisol: Diurnal cortisol profiles and their associations among U.S. adults

    PubMed Central

    Dmitrieva, Natalia O.; Almeida, David M.; Dmitrieva, Julia; Loken, Eric; Pieper, Carl F.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Diurnal cortisol is a marker of HPA-axis activity that may be one of the biological mechanisms linking stressors to age-related health declines. The current study identified day-centered profiles of diurnal cortisol among 1,101 adults living in the United States. Participants took part in up to four consecutive days of salivary cortisol collection, assessed at waking, 30 minutes post-waking, before lunch, and before bedtime. Growth Mixture Modeling with latent time basis was used to estimate common within-day trajectories of diurnal cortisol among 2,894 cortisol days. The 3-class solution provided the best model fit, showing that the majority of study days (73%) were characterized by a Normative cortisol pattern, with a robust cortisol awakening response (CAR), a steep negative diurnal slope, coupled with low awakening and bedtime levels. Relative to this profile, diurnal cortisol on the remainder of days appeared either Elevated throughout the day (20% of days) or Flattened (7% of days). Relative to the Normative trajectory, the Elevated trajectory was distinguished by a higher morning cortisol level, whereas the Flattened trajectory was characterized by a high bedtime level, with weaker CAR and diurnal slope parameters. Relative to the Normative profile, Elevated profile membership was associated with older age and cigarette smoking. Greater likelihood of the Flattened cortisol pattern was observed among participants who were older, male, smoked cigarettes, used medications that are known to affect cortisol output, and reported poorer health. The current study demonstrates the value of a day-centered Growth Mixture Modeling approach to the study of diurnal cortisol, showing that deviations from the classic robust rhythm of diurnal cortisol are associated with older age, male sex, use of medications previously shown to affect cortisol levels, poorer health behaviors, and poorer self-reported health. PMID:23770247

  14. QuickStats: Percentages* of Residential Care Communities and Adult Day Services Centers That Provided(†) Selected Services - United States, 2014.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, a greater percentage of residential care communities than adult day service centers provided five of seven selected services. The majority of residential care communities provided pharmacy services (82%); followed by transportation for social activities (79%); physical, occupational, or speech therapy (69%); hospice (62%); skilled nursing (59%); and mental health services (52%). Fewer than half provided social work services (48%). The majority of adult day services centers provided transportation for social activities (69%); skilled nursing (66%); and social work (52%). %). Fewer than half provided physical, occupational, or speech therapy (49%). One third or less provided mental health (33%), pharmacy (27%), and hospice services (12%). PMID:27607333

  15. Adult Day Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... care Physical therapy Recreation Respite care Socialization Supervision Transportation Medication management Back to top Center Operations Centers ... social activities. They may also help to arrange transportation to and from the center. Back to top ...

  16. Day Care Center Enrichment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West Virginia State Dept. of Welfare, Charleston.

    This guide to a West Virginia Department of Welfare project for upgrading the quality of day care centers throughout the state presents samples of the forms used in the program, accompanied by a brief description of the program's format, requirements and procedures. The Day Care Center Enrichment Program provides a monetary incentive for…

  17. Diabetes and Adult Day Health Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dabelko, Holly I.; DeCoster, Vaughn A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide a profile of individuals with diabetes who receive services in adult day centers. This exploratory study uses an administrative data set (N = 280) from five programs in central Ohio to examine four areas: demographics, health and mental health, financial and social resources, and disenrollment status. Older…

  18. From Teacher to Day Care Center Director!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Viteri, Jorge Saenz

    This paper addresses the roles and responsibilities of a day care center director, based on the author's personal experience as an interim director during his junior year at college and a survey of other directors. The paper aims to provide insight into the reality of being a day care center director, particularly the acquisition of knowledge,…

  19. Urban Schools: Day Camps or Custodial Centers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haberman, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Many urban schools should be called cafeterias, recreation centers, or community centers, because more time is spent eating, playing, and socializing than on teaching and learning. "Schools" are day camps with compliant attendees or custodial centers with involuntarily managed inmates. Teacher effectiveness turns solely on classroom-management…

  20. Facilities and Equpment for Day Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Sheila D.

    This guide provides assistance in selecting and designing the day care center's building and grounds and in planning and arranging the center's playroom. In regard to the building and grounds, discussion considers program and support service functions, highly desirable features of buildings and grounds, playroom space, outdoor space, and…

  1. Stennis Space Center celebrates Diversity Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Kendall Mitchell of the Naval Oceanographic Office (right) learns about the culture of Bolivia from Narda Inchausty, president of the Foreign Born Wives Association in Slidell, La., during 2009 Diversity Day events at NASA's John Stennis Space Center. Stennis hosted Diversity Day activities for employees on Oct. 7. The day's events included cultural and agency exhibits, diversity-related performances, a trivia contest and a classic car and motorcycle show. It also featured the first-ever sitewide Stennis Employee Showcase.

  2. Stennis Space Center observes Disability Awareness Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Members of STARC, a non-profit organization in Slidell, La., that seeks to help people with disabilities lead meaningful, productive lives, pose with their appreciation awards during Disability Awareness Day at Stennis Space Center on Oct. 15. The group members received appreciation awards for their dedicated service to the rocket engine testing facility. Disability Awareness Day was hosted by the Stennis Diversity Council and included guest speakers from several area agencies.

  3. Simplified Recipes for Day Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asmussen, Patricia D.

    The spiral-bound collection of 156 simplified recipes is designed to help those who prepare food for groups of children at day care centers. The recipes provide for 25 child-size servings to meet the nutritional needs and appetites of children from 2 to 6 years of age. The first section gives general information on ladle and scoop sizes, weights…

  4. Adult Day Care for Alzheimer's Patients and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sands, Dan; Suzuki, Thelma

    1983-01-01

    Harbor Area Adult Day Care Center has operated for two years with a primary purpose of providing respite care to families caring for a relative with Alzheimer's disease or related disorders. The rationale, history, program, staffing, funding, and experience for the first two years of the project are provided. (Author/RC)

  5. Adult Day Care--Extended Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Bert Kruger

    This pamphlet describes a multi-purpose day-care center for the elderly in Abilene, Texas which is intended to fill the "extended family" role of offering companionship, medical attention, and other aspects of concern to older persons in the community. The goals of the program are as follows: (1) to keep individuals out of institutions as long as…

  6. Adult day care: promoting quality of life for the elderly.

    PubMed

    Hunter, S

    1992-02-01

    1. Adult day care allows elderly clients to continue to be a part of their family. The program promotes maintenance of joint mobility, challenges the mind, and allows the client to be a productive part of the community. 2. As director of an adult day care center, it is the RN's responsibility to ensure quality of care for all clients. This includes providing inservice education, establishing quality assurance monitoring, and individualizing care plans for each client. 3. For appropriate placement in day care, the client must be oriented, cooperative, and able to comprehend communication. Physical endurance must allow the client to remain out of bed during the day, and the staff must be able to manage physical handicaps. PMID:1538082

  7. 38 CFR 59.160 - Adult day health care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Adult day health care... (CONTINUED) GRANTS TO STATES FOR CONSTRUCTION OR ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.160 Adult day health care requirements. As a condition for receiving a grant and grant funds under this part for an adult day health...

  8. 38 CFR 59.160 - Adult day health care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adult day health care... (CONTINUED) GRANTS TO STATES FOR CONSTRUCTION OR ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.160 Adult day health care requirements. As a condition for receiving a grant and grant funds under this part for an adult day health...

  9. Child Day Care Center Licensing Study, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This study updates 1991 information from the Children's Foundation. It contains results of a survey of the regulatory offices of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. The information is intended for use by center directors and staff, child advocates, the media, state and local regulatory offices, students,…

  10. Child Day Care Center Licensing Study, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    The 1997 Child Care Center Licensing Study contains an update of information compiled in 1991 by the Children's Foundation. The data was obtained from the central regulatory office of each of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. The study is organized in alphabetical order by states and territories. The…

  11. Child Day Care Center Licensing Study, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    An update of information first compiled by the Children's Foundation in 1991 and updated in 1993, this 1994 day care licensing study presents the results of a survey of the regulatory offices of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. Following a summary of results in question-answer format, the entries for…

  12. Child Day Care Center Licensing Study, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This study contains the results of a nationwide survey concerning day care regulations and licensing procedures throughout the United States. The regulatory offices of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands were surveyed. The listings, which are arranged according to location, provide the address and telephone…

  13. The Day Care Center Diarrhea Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickering, Larry K.

    1986-01-01

    Prevention and control of diarrhea in day care settings depends on: maintenance of hygienic standards; disease surveillance; adhering to a policy for exclusion of children with diarrhea; and education of staff. When diarrhea afflicts several children, isolating together can stop the spread of disease without interrupting normal operation. (KH)

  14. 78 FR 45176 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care... Day Care Homes for the Period July 1, 2013 Through June 30, 2014 AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service...-risk afterschool care centers, and adult day care centers; the food service payment rates for meals...

  15. Children's Medications: A Guide for Schools and Day Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Richard D.; Nahata, Milap C.

    Noting the lack of reference sources available on the use of medications in schools and day care centers, this book was created to help school and day care center personnel become more aware of the medicine being given to children at home and at school. Using detailed medication charts, the book answers questions about how to administer medicines…

  16. JDC Handbook for Teachers in Day Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Joint Distribution Committee, Geneva (Switzerland).

    This guide for teachers in day care centers offers discussions (both philosophical and practical) about the needs and behaviors of preschool children, makes suggestions for teacher guidance throughout the daily program activities and routines, and defines a suitable nurturing and educational day care center environment. Directed to the teacher,…

  17. 38 CFR 59.160 - Adult day health care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adult day health care requirements. 59.160 Section 59.160 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) GRANTS TO STATES FOR CONSTRUCTION OR ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.160 Adult day health care requirements. As a condition...

  18. 38 CFR 59.160 - Adult day health care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adult day health care requirements. 59.160 Section 59.160 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) GRANTS TO STATES FOR CONSTRUCTION OR ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.160 Adult day health care requirements. As a condition...

  19. 38 CFR 59.160 - Adult day health care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adult day health care requirements. 59.160 Section 59.160 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) GRANTS TO STATES FOR CONSTRUCTION OR ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.160 Adult day health care requirements. As a condition...

  20. Establishing Adult Learning Centers in Community Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Univ., Austin. Bureau of Industrial and Business Training.

    The document serves two purposes: to describe the planning process, staffing, materials, organization, and results of the Austin (Texas) Learning Center-Library Pilot Project; and to provide guidance to those who wish to develop similar programs and adult learning centers in their communities. The report describes the Austin experience, together…

  1. Comprehensive Adult Learning and Counseling Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laramie County Community Coll., Cheyenne, WY.

    The activities of an adult learning and counseling center are discussed. The project undertaken by the center is located in a model cities area. The following information is given: schedule background of personnel, summary of recruitment activities, student composition, curriculum design, sample counseling plan, advisory council composition, and a…

  2. CTEPP-OH DATA CHILD DAY CARE CENTER WEEKLY MENUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains information on the weekly day care menus for CTEPP-OH. The day care centers provided menus up to three months prior to field sampling.

    The Children’s Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Pollutant (CTEPP) study was one of the larg...

  3. CTEPP NC DATA CHILD DAY CARE CENTER WEEKLY MENUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains information on the weekly day care menus. The day care centers provided menus up to three months prior to field sampling.

    The Children’s Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Pollutant (CTEPP) study was one of the largest aggregate...

  4. A Study of Day Care Costs: Their Impact on Day Care Center Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    REAP Associates, Washington, DC.

    This study analyzes the effects of costs on day care center quality for a total of 13 high cost ($40-50 per week for each child) and low cost ($20-30 per week) day care centers in three New York counties. A mail survey questionnaire (included in Appendix) was used to gather data on program operations, core services, and budget expenditures.…

  5. DAY-CARE REHABILITATION CENTER FOR EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED ADOLESCENTS. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CRAWFORD, HUGH A.; VAN DUYNE, WILLIAM V.

    IN THIS FIVE YEAR DEMONSTRATION PROJECT, EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED ADULTS AND ADOLESCENTS RECEIVED TREATMENT AT A DAY CARE REHABILITATION CENTER SPONSORED BY THE RHODE ISLAND DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION (DVR) LOCATED IN A PRIVATE PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL (BUTLER HOSPITAL). THE MAJOR TREATMENT GOALS WERE PRESERVATION AND RESTORATION OF…

  6. Who Are the Clients?: Goal Displacement in an Adult Care Center for Elders with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramson, Corey M.

    2009-01-01

    This ethnographic study of "goal displacement" in an adult day care center explains how and why certain goals come to surpass others in the organizational practices of elder day care settings. Adult day care is often oriented towards providing family caregivers with respite rather than attempting to directly improve the lives of the elders…

  7. MULTIMEDIA CONCENTRATIONS OF PAH IN SEVERAL DAY CARE CENTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were measured in nine day care centers in the spring of 1997. Indoor and outdoor air, food and beverages, indoor dust, and outdoor play area soil were sampled. The mean sums of 20 target PAH concentrations were 265 and 199 ng...

  8. 75 FR 41793 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ..., 2009, at 74 FR 34295. Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Lunch and Centers Breakfast supper \\1... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care... Day Care Homes for the Period July 1, 2010 Through June 30, 2011 AGENCY: Food and Nutrition...

  9. Stennis Space Center observes 2009 Energy Awareness Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Stennis Space Center employees Maria Etheridge (l to r), Linda Sauland Maurice Prevost visit a Coast Electric Power Association display featuring energy-efficient light bulbs during 2009 Energy Awareness Day activities on Oct. 20. The exhibit was one of several energy-efficiency and energy-awareness displays on-site for employees to visit. Vendors included Mississippi Power Company, Coast Electric Power Association, Mississippi Development Authority - Energy Division,Jacobs FOSC Environmental, Southern Energy Technologies, and Siemens Building Technologies.

  10. Adult Day Care and Medical and Hospital Claims.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Neena L.; Blandford, Audrey A.

    1987-01-01

    Examined effect of adult day care (ADC) on utilization of health care practitioner and inpatient hospital services. Data from three separate ADC studies revealed that, when operative for some time, ADC may result in dramatic decreases in hospital inpatient stays. Findings warrant further research. (Author/NB)

  11. Sleep characteristics of Veterans Affairs Adult Day Health Care participants.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Jaime M; Martin, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    Addressing sleep disturbance can help to slow functional decline, delay nursing home admission, and improve overall health among older adults; however, sleep is not widely studied in high-risk older adults such as Adult Day Health Care (ADHC) participants. Sixty-eight ADHC participants were interviewed for sleep disturbance using a 28-item screening questionnaire. More than two thirds (n = 48, 70.6%) reported one or more characteristics of poor sleep, and 38% of participants met basic criteria for insomnia. Individuals with insomnia attended ADHC less frequently, reported worse sleep quality and shorter sleep duration, and were more likely to endorse trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, and waking up too early (ps < 0.001). Research is needed to better understand perceptions, predictors, and outcomes of sleep disturbance within ADHC participants. PMID:24654988

  12. Within-day and between-day Reproducibility of Baroreflex Sensitivity in Healthy Adult Males.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, L J; De Ste Croix, M; James, D V B

    2016-06-01

    Within-day and between-day reproducibility of supine and tilt baroreflex sensitivity were investigated utilising sequence and spectral indices in 46 healthy adult males employing 3 repeat measures; baseline, +60 min and +24 h. Reproducibility was assessed via the 95% limits of agreement and by the technical error of the measurement. For spectral parameters, the limits of agreement indicated same day was marginally better than between-day reproducibility. For sequence parameters, between-day had marginally better agreement than same-day reproducibility. Tilt markedly improved reproducibility across all outcome measures. Precision expressed by the technical error of the measurement for all spectral outcomes was good in both supine and tilt baroreflex sensitivity (<6%). Precision was lower, but acceptable, for sequence baroreflex sensitivity outcomes in both positions (<11%). Baroreflex sensitivity transfer gain provided the best agreement and reproducibility during supine and tilt conditions. These findings suggest time and spectral techniques may be employed to assess within-day and between-day baroreflex sensitivity changes in healthy individuals. The inclusion of a tilt manoeuvre may improve the reproducibility of the outcome measure, which may aid in the detection of modest baroreflex sensitivity changes in studies employing limited sample sizes. PMID:26928916

  13. Day-to-day Variability in Nap Duration Predicts Medical Morbidity in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Dautovich, Natalie D.; Kay, Daniel B.; Perlis, Michael L.; Dzierzewski, Joseph M.; Rowe, Meredeth A.; McCrae, Christina S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objectives for the present study were to: 1) examine within-person variability of nap duration and 2) assess how variability in nap duration is related to the number of health conditions in a sample of older adults. For highly variable behaviors such as sleep, it is important to consider fluctuations within the person instead of solely comparing averages of behaviors across persons. Methods Data were drawn from a previous study examining sleep in 103 community-dwelling older adults. Subjective estimates of napping behavior were obtained from sleep diaries and objective estimates of napping behavior were obtained using actigraphy. Both measures were collected for 14 consecutive days. The sampled data were aggregated in terms of: 1) average daily time spent napping and 2) average within-person fluctuations in daily nap duration. The health measure consisted of the number of self-reported health conditions. Results Both the objective and subjective measures revealed that there was considerable day-to-day fluctuation in nap duration and that variability in nap duration, not mean duration, uniquely predicted the number of health conditions, [b=.03, b*=.26, t(100)= 2.71, p = .01]. Conclusions Duration of napping in the elderly is a highly variable behavior, fluctuating as much within- as between-person. Further, variability in nap duration from day-to-day is predictive of greater medical morbidity, suggesting that clinicians should assess for inconsistencies in nap behavior in addition to duration, frequency, and timing. PMID:22369491

  14. 38 CFR 52.61 - General requirements for adult day health care program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... adult day health care program. 52.61 Section 52.61 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.61 General requirements for adult day health care program. Adult day health care must be...

  15. 38 CFR 52.61 - General requirements for adult day health care program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... adult day health care program. 52.61 Section 52.61 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.61 General requirements for adult day health care program. Adult day health care must be...

  16. 38 CFR 52.61 - General requirements for adult day health care program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... adult day health care program. 52.61 Section 52.61 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.61 General requirements for adult day health care program. Adult day health care must be...

  17. 38 CFR 52.61 - General requirements for adult day health care program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... adult day health care program. 52.61 Section 52.61 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.61 General requirements for adult day health care program. Adult day health care must be...

  18. Engaging Adults in Literacy Programs at Neighborhood Networks Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Housing and Urban Development, Washington, DC.

    This publication is designed to help Neighborhood Networks centers create programs that meet the goals of adult literacy learners. (The centers provide residents of federally assisted or insured properties with training in economic self-sufficiency.) Chapter 1 highlights the special characteristics of adult learners--the challenges they face and…

  19. Adult Skills Training Center: Feasibility Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skalski, John M.; Baratta, Anthony N.

    A 4-phase project, this study was conducted to determine the feasibility of a bilingual vocational skill training program for out-of-school youth and adults of the Perth Amboy Hispanic community. Sampled were 494 out-of-school youth and adults in the area. Findings include: (1) There is a significant need for an adult vocational skills training…

  20. Gene Test Might One Day Gauge Alzheimer's Risk in Younger Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159737.html Gene Test Might One Day Gauge Alzheimer's Risk in Younger Adults But doctors say the ... day be able to predict the risk for Alzheimer's disease in young adults, a new study suggests. ...

  1. The Good-Bye Window: A Year in the Life of a Day-Care Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Harriet N.

    Started 25 years ago by a group of parents in Madison, Wisconsin, the Red Caboose is one of the oldest independent day-care centers in the United States. This book recounts observations of the activities at the center for 1 year, exploring what makes a good day care center successful and what obstacles a center is up against. Interspersed among…

  2. Risk of diarrheal disease in Ecuadorian day-care centers.

    PubMed

    Sempértegui, F; Estrellá, B; Egas, J; Carrión, P; Yerovi, L; Díaz, S; Lascano, M; Aranha, R; Ortiz, W; Zabala, A

    1995-07-01

    To determine the risk for diarrheal disease (DD) in day-care centers (DCC) for children residing in a poor urban slum area of Quito, Ecuador, compared with that for children from the same environment but cared for in their own residential home (RH), a prospective age-, sex- and locale-controlled study of DD was conducted, including 115 children in DCC and 115 in RH, ages 12 to 42 months. The overall incidence of DD was 46/1000 child weeks. Diarrhea was more common in DCC than in RH (relative risk (RR), 1.75; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.38 to 2.22; P < 0.001). Poor hygienic practices were more prevalent in DCC than in RH. The use of reused water for child handwashing before eating and for washing raw vegetables was associated with a higher risk of DD in DCC than in RH (RR = 4.08, CI 2.93 to 5.67, P < 0.001; RR = 3.90, CI 2.79 to 5.44, P < 0.001, respectively). These two practices were risk factors in the DCC (RR = 2.74, CI 2.08 to 3.68, P < 0.001; RR = 2.05, CI 1.55 to 2.71, P < 0.001, respectively) when compared with their absence in the same DCC. Shigella (RR = 3.58, CI 1.19 to 10.78, P < 0.02), Aeromonas (RR = 10.47, CI 1.35 to 81.05, P < 0.01), rotavirus (RR = 2.86, CI 1.87 to 4.39, P < 0.001) and Giardia (RR = 1.59, CI 1.00 to 2.59, P < 0.05) were more common in DCC than in RH. More than two-fifths of the Shigella and Aeromonas isolates were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7567291

  3. Gene Test Might One Day Gauge Alzheimer's Risk in Younger Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_159737.html Gene Test Might One Day Gauge Alzheimer's Risk in Younger Adults But doctors ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A gene test may one day be able to predict the risk for Alzheimer's ...

  4. CTEPP-OH DATA COLLECTED ON FORM 05: CHILD DAY CARE CENTER PRE-MONITORING QUESTIONNAIRE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains data for CTEPP-OH concerning the potential sources of pollutants at the day care center including the chemicals that have been applied in the past at the day care center by staff members or by commercial contractors. The day care teacher was asked questions...

  5. CTEPP NC DATA COLLECTED ON FORM 05: CHILD DAY CARE CENTER PRE-MONITORING QUESTIONNAIRE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains data concerning the potential sources of pollutants at the day care center including the chemicals that have been applied in the past at the day care center by staff members or by commercial contractors. The day care teacher was asked questions related to t...

  6. An Ounce of Prevention: An Administrative Guide for Day Care Center Directors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Norma; Hall, Don

    One of three training manuals developed for day care center staff, this administrative guide was written to assist day care center directors in developing policies and procedures aimed at improving all aspects of the day care program, and thus reducing the risk of child abuse. Four chapters focus on (1) selection of staff, including recruiting,…

  7. 38 CFR 52.61 - General requirements for adult day health care program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General requirements for adult day health care program. 52.61 Section 52.61 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.61 General requirements for adult...

  8. Adult Basic Learning in an Activity Center: A Demonstration Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metropolitan Adult Education Program, San Jose, CA.

    Escuela Amistad, an activity center in San Jose, California, is now operating at capacity, five months after its origin. Average daily attendance has been 125 adult students, 18-65, most of whom are females of Mexican-American background. Activities and services provided by the center are: instruction in English as a second language, home…

  9. The Adult Literacy League and the Center for Adult Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooks, William Michael; Nelson, Floride

    Since its foundation in 1968, the Adult Literacy League of Orlando, Florida, has dedicated itself to eradicating the educational handicaps of more than 2,575 local residents. The League, which in 1975 became part of the Open Campus of Valencia Community College (VCC), offers two courses: (1) a Literacy Tutor Training Workshop, a 10-hour program to…

  10. Senior Centers

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... something many older adults would like to do as long as they can. Senior centers, adult day care, transportation, ... adults who live independently can go to find a variety of social and recreational activities. [Karen Albers] ...

  11. Stability in Center Day Care: Relations with Children's Well-Being and Problem Behavior in Day Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Schipper, J. Clasien; Van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Tavecchio, Louis W. C.

    2004-01-01

    Mothers and primary professional caregivers of 186 children, aged 6-30 months, participated in this study in which a new measure for daily stability in center day care was developed, describing staffing, grouping, and program features. Relative contributions of infants' daily experiences of care stability, quality of care, and mother's daily…

  12. Public School Center vs. Family Home Day Care: Single Parents' Reasons for Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothschild, Maria Stupp

    This study investigates the reasons single parents in San Diego had for choosing either a public day care center or a licensed day care home for their children. A sample of 30 single parents with children in school district administered children's centers was drawn and matched by a similarly geographically distributed sample of 23 parents with…

  13. Comparison of motor and cognitive performance of children attending public and private day care centers

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Mariana M.; Corsi, Carolina; Marques, Luisa A. P.; Rocha, Nelci A. C. F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Given that environmental factors, such as the school environment, can influence child development, more attention should be paid to the development of children attending day care centers. Objective Todetermine whether there are differences in the gross motor, fine motor, or cognitive performances of children between 1 and3 years-old of similar socioeconomic status attending public and private day care centers full time. Method Participants were divided into 2 groups, 1 of children attending public day care centers (69 children) and another of children attending private day care centers (47 children). All children were healthy and regularly attended day care full time for over 4 months. To assess cognitive, gross and fine motor performance, the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development III was used. The Mann-Whitney test was used for comparative analyses between groups of children between 13 and 24 months, 25 and 41 months, and 13 and 41 months. Results Children in public day care centers exhibited lower scores on the cognitive development scale beginning at 13 months old. The fine and gross motor performance scores were lower in children over the age of 25 months attending public centers. Maternal education was not related to the performance of children in either group. Conclusion The scores of cognitive performance as well as fine and gross motor performance of children of similar socioeconomic status who attend public day care centers are lower than children attending private daycare centers. PMID:24346293

  14. Integrating Behavioral Psychology Services into Adult Day Programming for Individuals with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBlanc, Linda A.

    2010-01-01

    Many individuals with dementia and problem behavior are served in nursing home settings long before health issues necessitate constant medical care. Alternative community-based adult day health care programs allow individuals with dementia to remain in their home with their families at a substantially reduced cost; however, many adult day programs…

  15. Validity of a Self-Administered 3-Day Physical Activity Recall in Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Jennifer L.; Dinger, Mary K.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Most physical activity recall questionnaires assess activity over a 7-day period. However, questionnaires have been validated in adolescents and adults using shorter recall timeframes. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the validity of a self-administered 3-day physical activity recall instrument (3DR) in young adults.…

  16. CTEPP DATA COLLECTION FORM 05: CHILD DAY CARE CENTER PRE-MONITORING QUESTIONNAIRE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data collection form is used to identify the potential sources of pollutants at the day care center. The day care teacher is asked questions related to the age of their day care building; age and frequency of cleaning carpets or rugs; types of heating and air conditioning de...

  17. Associations between Relationship Status and Day-to-Day Health Behaviors and Weight among Diverse Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Berge, Jerica M.; Bauer, Katherine W.; MacLehose, Rich; Eisenberg, Marla E.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Previous research has shown strong positive associations between physical and psychological health outcomes and being in a committed relationship, such as marriage, however little research has investigated whether being in a committed relationship is protective for day-to-day health behaviors such as dietary patterns and physical activity. The main aim of this paper is to examine associations between relationship status and day-to-day health behaviors (e.g. dietary intake, physical activity) and weight status among a diverse cohort of young adults. Methods This cross-sectional study utilized data from Project EAT-III, a 10-year longitudinal population-based study (n = 1853) of Midwest young adults. Young adult participants had an average age of 25.3, and were 45% male and 55% female. Participants were socio economically and racially/ethnically diverse, including 48.4% white, 18.6% African American, 5.9% Hispanic, 19.6% Asian, 3.3% Native American, and 4.2% mixed or other race/ethnicity. Results Results indicated that married men were more likely to be overweight/obese (BMI ≥ 25) compared to single/casually dating and committed dating/engaged men. Married women were more likely to eat breakfast ≥ 5 times per week compared to women in other relationship categories. No differences were observed in young adults’ other health behaviors by relationship status. There were no significant interactions by race/ethnicity. Discussion Relationship status seems largely unrelated to young adults’ participation in physical activity and dietary behaviors. However, findings suggest that being married may be a risk factor for overweight/obesity in young adult men and may be a protective factor for other health-related behaviors associated with overweight/obesity such as eating breakfast for young adult women. PMID:24417654

  18. The Adult Learner in the Writing Center: Teaching Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalister, Rose Ann

    A writing center course designed for adult learners offers features that will work in either a credit or a noncredit course. The classroom provides an informal setting and contains a variety of workbooks and audio visual materials, indexed for easy student reference. Sample paragraphs and essays illustrating different composition formats are kept…

  19. Neurobehavioral Performance in Young Adults Living on a 28-h Day for 6 Weeks

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung H.; Wang, Wei; Silva, Edward J.; Chang, Anne-Marie; Scheuermaier, Karine D.; Cain, Sean W.; Duffy, Jeanne F.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Performance on many cognitive tasks varies with time awake and with circadian phase, and the forced desynchrony (FD) protocol can be used to separate these influences on performance. Some performance tasks show practice effects, whereas the Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT) has been reported not to show such effects. We aimed to compare performance on the PVT and on an addition test (ADD) across a 6-week FD study, to determine whether practice effects were present and to analyze the circadian and wake-dependent modulation of the 2 measures. Design and Setting: A 47-day FD study conducted at the Brigham and Women's Hospital General Clinical Research Center. Participants: Eleven healthy adults (mean age: 24.4 years, 2 women). Measurements and Results: For 2 baseline days and across 6 weeks of FD, we gave a test battery (ADD, PVT, self-rating of effort and performance) every 2 hours. During FD, there was a significant (P < 0.0001) improvement in ADD performance (more correct calculations completed), whereas PVT performance (mean reaction time, fastest 10% reaction times, lapses) significantly (P < 0.0001) declined week by week. Subjective ratings of PVT performance indicated that subjects felt their performance improved across the study (P < 0.0001), but their rating of whether they could have performed better with greater effort did not change across the study (P > 0.05). Conclusions: The decline in PVT performance suggests a cumulative effect of sleep loss across the 6-week study. Subjects did not accurately detect their declining PVT performance, and a motivational factor could not explain this decline. Citation: Lee JH; Wang W; Silva EJ; Chang AM; Scheuermaier KD; Cain SW; Duffy JF. Neurobehavioral performance in young adults living on a 28-h day for 6 weeks. SLEEP 2009;32(7):905-913. PMID:19639753

  20. Sun-Earth Day WEBCAST - NASA TV; Host Paul Mortfield, Astronomer Stanford Solar Center and visiting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Sun-Earth Day WEBCAST - NASA TV; Host Paul Mortfield, Astronomer Stanford Solar Center and visiting students from San Francisco Bay Area Schools Documentation Technology Branch Video communications van (code-JIT)

  1. Space Day 2002; Directors Breakfast @ NASA Ames Visitors Center for student Winners of Santa Clara

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Space Day 2002; Directors Breakfast @ NASA Ames Visitors Center for student Winners of Santa Clara Valley Science & Engineering Fair and San Francisco Bay Aera Science Fair (Students are addressed by Bob Rosen, Ames Associate Director for Aerospace Programs)

  2. Intake of protein, calcium and sodium in public child day care centers

    PubMed Central

    Longo-Silva, Giovana; Toloni, Maysa Helena de A.; de Menezes, Risia Cristina E.; Temteo, Tatiane Leocádio; Oliveira, Maria Alice A.; Asakura, Leiko; Costa, Emília Chagas; Taddei, José Augusto de A. C.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess calcium, protein and sodium intake, of children that attend public day-care centers and to compare it with the recommended one. METHODS: Cross-sectional descriptive study in seven public day care centers of São Paulo city, Southeast Brazil, which enrolled 366 children between 12 and 36 months of age. The data collection occurred between September and December 2010. Each day care center was evaluated for three non-consecutive days, totaling 42 days and 210 meals. Dietary intake was assessed by a direct food weighing method. For the nutritional calculation, DietWin(r) Profissional 2.0 was used, and the adequacy was calculated according to the recommendations of the National School Feeding Program for energy, protein, calcium and sodium. The calcium/protein relation was also calculated, as well as calcium density (mg/1,000kcal). RESULTS: The energy (406.4kcal), protein (18.2g) and calcium (207.6mg) consumption did not reach the recommended values ​​in all the evaluated day care centers. Sodium intake exceeded up to three times the recommendation. The calcium/protein ratio of 11.7mg/g was less than the adequate one (20mg/g). CONCLUSIONS: There was inadequacy of calcium, protein and sodium dietary intake, in children attending public day-care centers. PMID:25119750

  3. Factors Related to Depression among Higher Income Mothers with Young Children in Day Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Jay

    1994-01-01

    Examined the association between maternal depression, maternal separation anxiety, social support, and maternal involvement in the day-care center among 54 upper-income mothers and their infants. Found that higher levels of maternal involvement in day care were associated with lower levels of maternal depression. (MDM)

  4. Not Babies Anymore: Young Children's Narrative Identities in Finnish Day Care Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puroila, Anna-Maija; Estola, Eila

    2014-01-01

    With the aim of deepening understanding of young children's identity construction, the study explores small stories produced in a Finnish day care center context. Small stories are understood as identity-constituting social practices that occur and recur in day care settings. Taking ideas on narrative ethnography as starting point, research…

  5. Pediatric Language Laboratory--A Day Care Center Program During 1977-78.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodson, Susan; And Others

    The document describes the Pediatric Language Laboratory, a day care center which provides day care and therapeutic services to 20 mild to moderate communicatively delayed children, 1 to 4 years old. Initial sections address program philosophy; program components (diagnostics, remedial services, typical services, parent education, and community…

  6. The Infant Center: A Complete Guide to Organizing and Managing Infant Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert-Jackson, Emily; And Others

    This book is a guide to organizing and managing an infant day care center. Part I includes two chapters: About Infant Day Care; and Arranging Space for Babies. Part II discusses being a caregiver and includes chapters on play; feeding; diapering; sleep; receiving/departing; and handling emergencies and illnesses. Part III focuses on the role of…

  7. The Relationship Between Nurse Staffing and 30-Day Readmission for Adults With Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Giuliano, Karen K.; Danesh, Valerie; Funk, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to better understand the relationship between nurse staffing and 30-day excess readmission ratios for patients with heart failure in the top US adult cardiology and heart surgery hospitals. BACKGROUND Heart failure is the most common cause of hospitalization for patients older than 65 years and is the most frequent diagnosis associated with 30-day hospital readmission in the United States. METHODS A secondary data analysis was conducted using nurse staffing data from 661 cardiology and heart surgery hospitals from the 2013 US News & World Report “Best Hospitals” survey. These data were combined with excess readmission ratios from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Hospital Compare database from 2013. An independent-samples t test was used to compare staffing (low/high) and excess hospital readmissions rates. RESULTS A significant difference (P = .021) was found between the low nurse staffing group (n = 358) and the high nurse staffing group (n = 303). Hospitals with a lower nurse staffing index had a significantly higher excess readmission rate. CONCLUSION These data provide further support to the body of research showing a positive relationship between nurse staffing and positive outcomes. PMID:26579974

  8. Enhancing Disaster Management: Development of a Spatial Database of Day Care Centers in the USA

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Singh, Nagendra; Tuttle, Mark A.; Bhaduri, Budhendra L.

    2015-07-30

    Children under the age of five constitute around 7% of the total U.S. population and represent a segment of the population, which is totally dependent on others for day-to-day activities. A significant proportion of this population spends time in some form of day care arrangement while their parents are away from home. Accounting for those children during emergencies is of high priority, which requires a broad understanding of the locations of such day care centers. As concentrations of at risk population, the spatial location of day care centers is critical for any type of emergency preparedness and response (EPR). However,more » until recently, the U.S. emergency preparedness and response community did not have access to a comprehensive spatial database of day care centers at the national scale. This paper describes an approach for the development of the first comprehensive spatial database of day care center locations throughout the USA utilizing a variety of data harvesting techniques to integrate information from widely disparate data sources followed by geolocating for spatial precision. In the context of disaster management, such spatially refined demographic databases hold tremendous potential for improving high resolution population distribution and dynamics models and databases.« less

  9. Enhancing Disaster Management: Development of a Spatial Database of Day Care Centers in the USA

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Nagendra; Tuttle, Mark A.; Bhaduri, Budhendra L.

    2015-07-30

    Children under the age of five constitute around 7% of the total U.S. population and represent a segment of the population, which is totally dependent on others for day-to-day activities. A significant proportion of this population spends time in some form of day care arrangement while their parents are away from home. Accounting for those children during emergencies is of high priority, which requires a broad understanding of the locations of such day care centers. As concentrations of at risk population, the spatial location of day care centers is critical for any type of emergency preparedness and response (EPR). However, until recently, the U.S. emergency preparedness and response community did not have access to a comprehensive spatial database of day care centers at the national scale. This paper describes an approach for the development of the first comprehensive spatial database of day care center locations throughout the USA utilizing a variety of data harvesting techniques to integrate information from widely disparate data sources followed by geolocating for spatial precision. In the context of disaster management, such spatially refined demographic databases hold tremendous potential for improving high resolution population distribution and dynamics models and databases.

  10. Integrating Adolescents and Young Adults into Adult-Centered Care for IBD.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Itishree; Holl, Jane L; Hanauer, Stephen; Keefer, Laurie

    2016-05-01

    Planned healthcare transition, initiated in pediatric care, is a gradual process aimed at fostering the adolescent patient's disease knowledge and skills with the ultimate objective of preparing patients and families for adult-centered care. The process is critical in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) where there is an increased risk of non-adherence, hospitalizations, and emergency department use as young adult patients graduate from pediatric to adult-centered care. While evidence for healthcare transition in IBD is mounting, important gaps remain in the understanding of this process from the perspective of the adult gastroenterologist. This paper summarizes what is known about healthcare transition in IBD and explores the unanswered questions-a conceptual and methodological framework for transition interventions, relevant outcomes that define successful transition, and key stakeholder perspectives. For the adult gastroenterologist managing the young adult patient population, this paper presents the paradigm of "care integration"-a process of ongoing, multi-modality support for the patient, initiated in the adult care setting, with the goal of improving self-management skills and active participation in medical decision-making. PMID:27086002

  11. Staff Morale in Day Care Centres for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mascha, Katerina

    2007-01-01

    Background: Levels of burnout, job satisfaction and intended turnover of staff working in day care centres for adults with intellectual disabilities are investigated in relation to role clarity, staff support and supervision, and coping strategies used by staff. Materials and methods: Thirty six direct-care staff of four day care centres in the UK…

  12. Measuring Physical Activity with Pedometers in Older Adults with Intellectual Disability: Reactivity and Number of Days

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilgenkamp, Thessa; Van Wijck, Ruud; Evenhuis, Heleen

    2012-01-01

    The minimum number of days of pedometer monitoring needed to estimate valid average weekly step counts and reactivity was investigated for older adults with intellectual disability. Participants (N = 268) with borderline to severe intellectual disability ages 50 years and older were instructed to wear a pedometer for 14 days. The outcome measure…

  13. Child Nutrition Programs: Child and Adult Care Food Program. Family Day Care Home Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

    This handbook details requirements for family day care homes in Oklahoma for providing child nutrition through the Child and Adult Care Food Program. The handbook includes contact information for state consultants. The basic responsibilities for sponsors of family day care home child nutrition programs are outlined, and the sponsoring organization…

  14. Factors influencing occupational engagement in day centers for people with psychiatric disabilities.

    PubMed

    Tjörnstrand, Carina; Bejerholm, Ulrika; Eklund, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Occupational engagement is a vital factor in people's lives since it has been shown to be important for health and well-being. Community-based day centers (DCs), both meeting place-oriented and work-oriented ones, are common service alternatives in many western countries for enabling engagement in productive and leisure occupations among people with psychiatric disabilities. Little is, however, known about factors influencing occupational engagement in such settings. We aimed to investigate how factors pertaining to day center attendance, socio-demographics, motivation, clinical and self-related characteristics were related to how day center attendees rated their occupational engagement in productive occupations. These variables were assessed among day center attendees in meeting place-oriented (n = 39) and work-oriented (n = 54) DCs in Sweden through questionnaires and interviews. Logistic regression models showed that (1) less general psychopathology and more time spent on day center occupations were indicators of belonging to the group with a high level of occupational engagement according to a median cut; (2) higher perceived self-mastery was the only important factor with respect to ratings of occupational engagement above the third quartile. The models may be seen as creating a stepwise indication on which factors are important for reaching a medium level of occupational engagement (less severe general psychopathology and time spent at the day center) and for reaching a still higher level (a high level self-mastery), respectively, of occupational engagement. The findings may also be discussed in relation to different levels of engagement in a recovery process. PMID:25062905

  15. Measuring physical activity with pedometers in older adults with intellectual disability: reactivity and number of days.

    PubMed

    Hilgenkamp, Thessa; Van Wijck, Ruud; Evenhuis, Heleen

    2012-08-01

    The minimum number of days of pedometer monitoring needed to estimate valid average weekly step counts and reactivity was investigated for older adults with intellectual disability. Participants (N  =  268) with borderline to severe intellectual disability ages 50 years and older were instructed to wear a pedometer for 14 days. The outcome measure was steps per day. Reactivity was investigated with repeated measures analysis of variance, and monitoring frame was assessed by comparing combinations of days with average weekly step counts (with intraclass correlation coefficients [ICCs] and regression analyses). No reactivity was present. Any combination of 4 days resulted in ICCs of 0.96 or higher and 90% of explained variance. The study concludes that any 4 days of wearing a pedometer is sufficient to validly measure physical activity in older adults with intellectual disability. PMID:22861135

  16. Center Director Bridges opens Super Safety and Health Day at KSC.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Center Director Roy Bridges opens the second Super Safety and Health Day at Kennedy Space Center, an entire day when most normal work activities are suspended to allow personnel to attend safety- and health-related activities. The theme, 'Safety and Health Go Hand in Hand,' emphasized KSC's commitment to place the safety and health of the public, astronauts, employees and space- related resources first and foremost. Events included a keynote address, a panel session about related issues, vendor exhibits, and safety training in work groups. The keynote address and panel session were also broadcast internally over NASA television.

  17. Training unemployed women for adult day care in Izmir, Turkey: a program evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Shereen; Oğlak, Sema

    2014-01-01

    The proportion of older people in Turkey is increasing steadily with a subsequent growth of long-term care (LTC) needs. There is a scarcity of formal care provisions for residential and particularly nonresidential settings. Thus, formal caregiving is not meeting LTC needs nor attracting workers as a labor option. The authors examine the hypothesis that LTC may offer work opportunities for women unfamiliar with caregiving as an occupation, and also examine the need and acceptance of different types of LTC beyond residential care. The authors evaluate an innovative project introducing these two elements to 76 women in İzmir, Turkey, using an analysis framework that incorporates factors related to applications and progression; management assessment; trainees' self-assessment reflecting on their views on aging; and older people's perception of the experience and its impact on their well-being. Trainees reported a major positive shift in their attitudes toward working in LTC and toward the aging process. Users reported discovering a new dimension to care, which directly affected their quality of life. Overall, this community-based initiative appeared effective in enhancing the awareness of the concept of adult day centers providing a social model of care, and appears promising in addressing the growing need for formal LTC in Turkey. PMID:23701487

  18. How many steps/day are enough? For older adults and special populations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Older adults and special populations (living with disability and/or chronic illness that may limit mobility and/or physical endurance) can benefit from practicing a more physically active lifestyle, typically by increasing ambulatory activity. Step counting devices (accelerometers and pedometers) offer an opportunity to monitor daily ambulatory activity; however, an appropriate translation of public health guidelines in terms of steps/day is unknown. Therefore this review was conducted to translate public health recommendations in terms of steps/day. Normative data indicates that 1) healthy older adults average 2,000-9,000 steps/day, and 2) special populations average 1,200-8,800 steps/day. Pedometer-based interventions in older adults and special populations elicit a weighted increase of approximately 775 steps/day (or an effect size of 0.26) and 2,215 steps/day (or an effect size of 0.67), respectively. There is no evidence to inform a moderate intensity cadence (i.e., steps/minute) in older adults at this time. However, using the adult cadence of 100 steps/minute to demark the lower end of an absolutely-defined moderate intensity (i.e., 3 METs), and multiplying this by 30 minutes produces a reasonable heuristic (i.e., guiding) value of 3,000 steps. However, this cadence may be unattainable in some frail/diseased populations. Regardless, to truly translate public health guidelines, these steps should be taken over and above activities performed in the course of daily living, be of at least moderate intensity accumulated in minimally 10 minute bouts, and add up to at least 150 minutes over the week. Considering a daily background of 5,000 steps/day (which may actually be too high for some older adults and/or special populations), a computed translation approximates 8,000 steps on days that include a target of achieving 30 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and approximately 7,100 steps/day if averaged over a week. Measured directly and

  19. Getting Down to Business: Day Care Center, Module 23. [Student Manual]. Entrepreneurship Training Components.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingi, Marcella

    This module on owning and operating a day care center is one of 36 in a series on entrepreneurship. The introduction tells the student what topics will be covered and suggests other modules to read in related occupations. Each unit includes student goals, a case study, and a discussion of the unit subject matter. Learning activities are divided…

  20. Curriculum and Assessment Policies and Practices in a Day Treatment Center in North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrell, Kimberly Ann

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative single case study was to describe current instructional policies and practices in a one-day treatment center in North Carolina for students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). The following research questions guided the study: (1) What are the curriculum policies, practices, and philosophies of day…

  1. Prevention of Fatherhood Disorders--Accompanying Early Father-Child Interaction in Day-Care Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamour, Martine; Letronnier, Paulette

    2003-01-01

    Over the last fifteen years, increasing numbers of fathers have been attending medical or day-care centers for young children, traditionally "reserved" for mothers and babies. Thus the professionals who work there are able to take an active part in the "co-construction of the fathers" by accompanying their emerging fatherhood. The…

  2. CTEPP DATA COLLECTION FORM 03:HOUSE/BUILDING CHARACTERISTICS OBSERVATION SURVEY FOR THE DAY CARE CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data collection form is used to document the physical characteristics of the day care center and identify and inventory possible sources of pollutants.

    The Children's Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Pollutant (CTEPP) study was one of the large...

  3. Evaluation of employees in public day care centers knowledge about breastfeeding and complementary feeding

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Joelânia Pires de O.; Prudente, Amanda Moura; Silva, Dyene Aparecida; Pereira, Leandro Alves; Rinaldi, Ana Elisa M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the knowledge of public day care centers employees about breastfeeding and complementary feeding. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 15 public day care centers randomly selected in the city of Uberlandia, Southeast Brazil. A questionnaire applied to school principals, teachers, educators and general services assistants (GSA) included demographic and socioeconomic variables and questions about knowledge on breastfeeding, complementary feeding besides employees' perceptions about these subjects. Kruskal-Wallis with multiple comparison and chi-square tests were used to compare variables by professional category. RESULTS: 304 employees participated in the study. The highest percentages of correct answers were noted for questions about exclusive breastfeeding: definition - 97% (n=296) and duration - 65% (n=199). Regarding complementary feeding, 61% (n=187) correctly answered about the appropriate age to introduce it, with a lower percentage for meat (56%; n=170) and sugar (16%; n=50). Concerning employees' perceptions, 9% (n=29) believed that there is weak breast milk, 79% (n=241) and 51% (n=157) reported the negative influence of bottle feeding and pacifier use on breastfeeding. Among the interviewed subjects, 77% (n=234) answered that they had a positive influence on the quality of the food given to the children. There were no differences in the answers according to professional category, except for the negative influence of pacifiers on breastfeeding. CONCLUSIONS: Employees of public day care centers knew more about breastfeeding than about complementary feeding. Educational activities about breastfeeding and complementary feeding are necessary for day care centers employees. PMID:24473953

  4. Estimating Criminal Justice System Costs and Cost-Savings Benefits of Day Reporting Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craddock, Amy

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports on the net cost-savings benefits (loss) to the criminal justice system of one rural and one urban day reporting center, both of which serve high risk/high need probationers. It also discusses issues of conducting criminal justice system cost studies of community corrections programs. The average DRC participant in the rural…

  5. Regulations for Child Day Care Centers Operated by Religious Bodies or Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Social Services, Columbia.

    As set forth in this manual, the regulations for child day care centers operated by religious bodies or groups constitute the minimum requirements to be met and maintained by each such facility in South Carolina. Regulation 114-5-20 sets out definitions and procedures for preapplication consultation, original registration, inspection, and…

  6. Developing an Active Media Center in a Jewish Day School K-8 through Creative Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Rhona

    The practicum described in this report was designed to create a dynamic, functional media center with an interdisciplinary library skills program for students in kindergarten to grade 8 in a private Jewish day school in a residential neighborhood in a southeast coastal city enrolling 300 students. An additional goal was to use volunteers to…

  7. Confirmed adult dengue deaths in Singapore: 5-year multi-center retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dengue re-emerges in Singapore despite decades of effective vector control; the infection predominantly afflicts adults. Severe dengue not fulfilling dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) criteria according to World Health Organization (WHO) 1997 guideline was increasingly reported. A new WHO 2009 guideline emphasized warning signs and a wider range of severe dengue manifestations. We aim to evaluate the utility of these two guidelines in confirmed adult dengue fatalities. Methods We conducted a multi-center retrospective chart review of all confirmed adult dengue deaths in Singapore from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2008. Results Of 28 adult dengue deaths, median age was 59 years. Male gender comprised 67.9% and co-morbidities existed in 75%. From illness onset, patients presented for admission at a median of 4 days and death occurred at a median of 12 days. Intensive care admission was required in 71.4%. Probable dengue was diagnosed in 32.1% by WHO 1997 criteria and 78.6% by WHO 2009. The earliest warning sign was persistent vomiting at a median of 1.5 days. Hematocrit change ≥20% concurrent with platelet count <20 × 10^9/L was associated with the shortest interval to death at a median of 3 days. Only 35.7% of death cases fulfilled DHF criteria by WHO 1997 versus severe dengue in 100.0% by WHO 2009 criteria. Deaths were due to shock and organ failure. Acute renal impairment occurred in 71.4%, impaired consciousness 57.1% and severe hepatitis 53.6%. Conclusions In our adult fatal dengue cohort, WHO 2009 criteria had higher sensitivity in diagnosing probable dengue and severe dengue compared with WHO 1997. As warning signs, persistent vomiting occurred early and hematocrit change ≥20% concurrent with platelet count <20 × 10^9/L preceded death most closely. PMID:21569427

  8. Impact of Adult Day Services on Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Femia, Elia E.; Zarit, Steven H.; Stephens, Mary Ann Parris; Greene, Rick

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored whether adult day service (ADS) use was associated with reductions in behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) in individuals with dementia. Design and Methods: We used a quasi-experimental design to compare a group of 133 persons with dementia (PWDs) who initially enrolled in an ADS program to a…

  9. Skylab 2 crew during 'open house' press day at Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    These three men are the crewmen for the first manned Skylab mission. They are astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander, standing left; scientist-astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin, seated; and Astronaut Paul J. Weitz, pilot. They were photographed and interviewed during an 'open house' press day in the realistic atmosphere of the Multiple Docking Adapter (MDA) trainer in the Mission Simulation and Training Facility at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC). The control and display panel for the Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) is at right.

  10. Survival and detection of rotaviruses on environmental surfaces in day care centers.

    PubMed Central

    Keswick, B H; Pickering, L K; DuPont, H L; Woodward, W E

    1983-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that children in day care centers commonly experience diarrhea due to rotavirus, giardia, and bacterial pathogens. Multiple agents frequently coexist, and the environment is heavily contaminated with enteric bacteria during outbreaks. A study of environmental surface contamination with rotavirus was performed during three non-outbreak periods. Of 25 samples collected from environmental surfaces and teachers hands at a day care center, 4 (16%) were positive for rotavirus antigen when a fluorescence assay was used. We also examined the survival of two animal viruses, rotavirus SA-11 and poliovirus type 1, and bacteriophage 12 on similar environmental surfaces in a laboratory. Poliovirus type 1 and bacteriophage f2 were more resistant to drying than rotavirus SA-11 and could be recovered after a 90-min exposure on a dry surface. Rotavirus SA-11 could be detected for 30 min. All three viruses survived longer when they were suspended in fecal material than when they were suspended in distilled water. These data suggest that several agents, including rotavirus, can remain viable on contaminated surfaces long enough to be transmitted to susceptible children. This finding helps explain why rotavirus shows a mode of spread like that of parasitic and bacterial agents within day care center settings. PMID:6314896

  11. Adaptations of young adult rat cortical bone to 14 days of spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vailas, A. C.; Vanderby, R., Jr.; Martinez, D. A.; Ashman, R. B.; Ulm, M. J.; Grindeland, R. E.; Durnova, G. N.; Kaplanskii, A.

    1992-01-01

    To determine whether mature humeral cortical bone would be modified significantly by an acute exposure to weightlessness, adult rats (110 days old) were subjected to 14 days of microgravity on the COSMOS 2044 biosatellite. There were no significant changes in peak force, stiffness, energy to failure, and displacement at failure in the flight rats compared with ground-based controls. Concentrations and contents of hydroxyproline, calcium, and mature stable hydroxylysylpyridinoline and lysylpyridinoline collagen cross-links remained unchanged after spaceflight. Bone lengths, cortical and endosteal areas, and regionl thicknesses showed no significant differences between flight animals and ground controls. The findings suggest that responsiveness of cortical bone to microgravity is less pronounced in adult rats than in previous spaceflight experiments in which young growing animals were used. It is hypothesized that 14 days of spaceflight may not be sufficient to impact the biochemical and biomechanical properties of cortical bone in the mature rat skeleton.

  12. Management of a Trichophyton tonsurans outbreak in a day-care center.

    PubMed

    Gray, Robert M; Champagne, Caroline; Waghorn, David; Ong, Eugene; Grabczynska, Sophie A; Morris, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Trichophyton tonsurans is the leading cause of tinea capitis in the United Kingdom (UK) as well as causing tinea corporis. This organism has been linked to several outbreaks in the UK and abroad, and such outbreaks may be prolonged since T. tonsurans can be difficult to control. There remains an incomplete consensus in the literature on the optimal management of such outbreaks of this infection. Following notification that a child with T. tonsurans was identified at a day-care center in the UK, initial investigations identified nine cases of fungal infection involving children and staff over the previous 7 months. We report on the management of an outbreak of T. tonsurans tinea capitis and tinea corporis among children and staff in a day-care center. An outbreak control team with representatives from dermatology, microbiology, day-care center management, and the Health Protection Agency initiated case ascertainment by scalp inspection and brushing of all children and staff at the nursery. Two complete rounds of screening were required before the outbreak was declared over. Infection control measures included antifungal shampoo use, exclusion of identified cases for a short period, removal of shared items from the center, and enhanced decontamination of fomites. The outbreak, which lasted longer than 12 months, involved 12 children and 7 staff members. Of these, 12 cases were confirmed by positive fungal culture. T. tonsurans is difficult to manage, especially in childcare settings, but case ascertainment, appropriate treatment with oral agents, and sustained infection control measures can be effective in controlling such outbreaks. PMID:25257708

  13. Effects of Fourteen-Day Bed Rest on Trunk Stabilizing Functions in Aging Adults

    PubMed Central

    Sarabon, Nejc; Rosker, Jernej

    2015-01-01

    Bed rest has been shown to have detrimental effects on structural and functional characteristics of the trunk muscles, possibly affecting trunk and spinal stability. This is especially important in populations such as aging adults with often altered trunk stabilizing functions. This study examined the effects of a fourteen-day bed rest on anticipatory postural adjustments and postural reflex responses of the abdominal wall and back muscles in sixteen adult men. Postural activation of trunk muscles was measured using voluntary quick arm movement and sudden arm loading paradigm. Measurements were conducted prior to the bed rest, immediately after, and fourteen days after the bed rest. Immediately after the bed rest, latencies of anticipatory postural adjustments showed significant shortening, especially for the obliquus internus and externus muscles. After a fourteen-day recuperation period, anticipatory postural adjustments reached a near to complete recovery. On the contrary, reactive response latencies increased from pre-bed-rest to both post-bed-rest measurement sessions. Results indicate an important effect of bed rest on stabilizing functions of the trunk muscles in elderly adults. Moreover, there proved to be a significant deterioration of postural reactive responses that outlasted the 14-day post-bed-rest rehabilitation. PMID:26601104

  14. Tackling 30-Day, All-Cause Readmissions with a Patient-Centered Transitional Care Bundle.

    PubMed

    Rice, Yvonne B; Barnes, Carol Ann; Rastogi, Rahul; Hillstrom, Tami J; Steinkeler, Cara N

    2016-02-01

    In 2008, Kaiser Permanente Northwest identified the transition from hospital to home as a pivotal quality improvement opportunity and used multiple patient-centered data collection methods to identify unmet needs contributing to preventable readmissions. A transitional care bundle that crosses care settings and organizational functions was developed to meet needs expressed by patients. It comprises 5 elements: risk stratification, a specialized phone number for discharged patients, timely postdischarge follow-up, standardized patient discharge instructions and same-day discharge summaries, and pharmacist-supported medication reconciliation. The transitional care bundle has been in place for 6 years. Readmission rates decreased from 12.1% to 10.6%, Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems scores for the discharge instruction composite moved from below the 50(th) to above the 90(th) national percentile, average time to the first postdischarge appointment decreased from 9.7 days to 5.3 days, and error rates on the discharge medication list decreased from 57% to 21% (P<.0001 for all). The program, which continues to evolve to address sustainability challenges and organizational initiatives, suggests the potential of a multicomponent, patient-centered care bundle to address the complex, interrelated drivers of preventable readmissions. PMID:25919315

  15. Long-term (30 days) toxicity of NiO nanoparticles for adult zebrafish Danio rerio

    PubMed Central

    Kovrižnych, Jevgenij A.; Zeljenková, Dagmar; Rollerová, Eva; Szabová, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Nickel oxide in the form of nanoparticles (NiO NPs) is extensively used in different industrial branches. In a test on adult zebrafish, the acute toxicity of NiO NPs was shown to be low, however longlasting contact with this compound can lead to its accumulation in the tissues and to increased toxicity. In this work we determined the 30-day toxicity of NiO NPs using a static test for zebrafish Danio rerio. We found the 30-day LC50 value to be 45.0 mg/L, LC100 (minimum concentration causing 100% mortality) was 100.0 mg/L, and LC0 (maximum concentration causing no mortality) was 6.25 mg/L for adult individuals of zebrafish. Considering a broad use of Ni in the industry, NiO NPs chronic toxicity may have a negative impact on the population of aquatic organisms and on food web dynamics in aquatic systems. PMID:26038672

  16. Environmental and ventilation assessment in Child Day Care Centers in Porto: the ENVIRH Project.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Ana; Aelenei, Daniel; Papoila, Ana Luísa; Carreiro-Martins, Pedro; Aguiar, Lívia; Pereira, Cristiana; Neves, Paula; Azevedo, Susana; Cano, Manuela; Proença, Carmo; Viegas, João; Silva, Susana; Mendes, Diana; Neuparth, Nuno; Teixeira, João Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Children attending day care centers (CDCC) have been reported to be more prone to infectious diseases when compared with those cared for at home, and are exposed to conditions that may increase the risk of allergies and asthma. Several studies revealed that consequences of poor ventilation conditions include high levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) and many other indoor pollutants commonly detected in schools. Nine child day care centers were selected randomly to participate in this study. Fifty-two classrooms were assessed for chemical, biological, physical, and allergen parameters in spring and winter seasons in these nine CDCC located in Porto, Portugal. Outdoor measurements were also conducted for comparison. Our results indicated that (i) particulate matter (PM10) median levels were above the national reference levels, both by classroom type and by season; (ii) TVOC kindergarten peak values may raise some concern; (iii) CO2 was present at high median and maximum levels during spring and winter assessment in both nurseries and kindergartens classrooms; (iv) total bacteria concentrations were 57- and 52-fold higher in the nursery and kindergarten than outdoors, respectively, for the spring season; (v) winter and spring median predicted mean vote (PMV) indices were between "neutral" (0) and "slightly cool" (≤ -1) in the thermal sensation scale for comfort situations (-2 to 2) for both types of classrooms; (vi) there were significant differences for both PMV and predicted percentage of dissatisfied (PPD) indices by season; and (vii) CO2, total bacteria, and gram-negative bacteria were associated with low airflow rates. These data will help to evaluate the effectiveness of current building operation practices in child day care centers regarding indoor air quality and respiratory health. PMID:25072725

  17. Learning at the Center: A Proposal for Dynamic Assessment in a Combined University and Community Adult Learning Center Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prins, Lisa; Pauchulo, Ana Laura; Brooke, Auralia; Corrigan, Joe

    2015-01-01

    We ask the reader to consider a proposal for cooperative renewal in the evaluation of a course (OurU) offered in partnership between a university and community-based adult learning center. This proposal's aim is to enhance adult learners' ability to evaluate their learning experiences, with the goal of adopting more learner-directed content into…

  18. The KLH Experience: An Evaluative Report of Day Care in Action at the KLH Child Development Center Cambridge, Massachusetts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Joseph R.; Jordan, John W.

    This report concludes a two part study of the KLH Child Development Center covering July 1969-June 1970. The history and background of this industry-based, experimental day care center are presented along with the nature and reasons for its change from an industry-related center identified with one work community to a private community center…

  19. Adult Day Care: Its Impact on the Utilization of Other Health Care Services and on Quality of Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Neena L.; Blandford, Audrey

    The Adult Day Care Program (ADC) in the Province of Manitoba is a health and social service program providing socialization and recreation in a supportive environment to those who, without this intervention, might deteriorate in physical or mental health function. To examine the impact of adult day care on the utilization of other health care…

  20. 76 FR 43254 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ..., 2010, at 75 FR 41793. Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) [Per meal rates in whole or fractions... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care... Day Care Homes for the Period July 1, 2011 Through June 30, 2012 AGENCY: Food and Nutrition...

  1. Consumption of industrialized food by infants attending child day care centers

    PubMed Central

    Toloni, Maysa Helena de A.; Longo-Silva, Giovana; Konstantyner, Tulio; Taddei, José Augusto de A. C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify the age of introduction of petit suisse cheese and instant noodles in the diet of infants attending nurseries of public day care centers and to compare the nutritional composition of these foods with the healthy recommended diet (breast milk and salt meal) for this age, in order to estimate nutritional errors. Methods: Cross-sectional study of 366 children (from nine to 36 months old) who attended day care centers, whose mothers were interviewed about the age of introduction of those foods. The means of the nutrients indicated on the labels of the most consumed brands were considered. For the calculation of the percent composition of breast milk and salt meal, Tables of Food Composition were used. To assess the nutritional adequacy, we used the Dietary Reference Intakes by age group. The percentage of adequacy evaluation of the petit suisse cheese and the instant noodles nutritional compositions was made by comparing them with those of the human milk and the salt meal, respectively. Results: The petit suisse cheese and the instant noodles were consumed by 89.6 and 65.3% of the children in the first year of life. The percentages of adequacy for carbohydrates were more than twice and the percentages for sodium were 20 times higher than those found in the recommended foods. Conclusions: Both industrialized products are inappropriate for infants, emphasizing the need for adoption of norms that can inform health professionals, educators and parents about the risks of consumption. PMID:24676188

  2. The 14-day repeated dose liver micronucleus test with methapyrilene hydrochloride using young adult rats.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kenji; Ochi, Akimu; Koda, Akira; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Doi, Takaaki

    2015-03-01

    The repeated dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay using young adult rats has the potential to detect genotoxic hepatocarcinogens that can be integrated into a general toxicity study. The assay methods were thoroughly validated by 19 Japanese facilities. Methapyrilene hydrochloride (MP), known to be a non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogen, was examined in the present study. MP was dosed orally at 10, 30 and 100mg/kg/day to 6-week-old male Crl:CD (SD) rats daily for 14 days. Treatment with MP resulted in an increase in micronucleated hepatocytes (MNHEPs) with a dosage of only 100mg/kg/day. At this dose level, cytotoxicity followed by regenerative cell growth was noted in the liver. These findings suggest that MP may induce clastogenic effects indirectly on the liver or hepatotoxicity of MP followed by regeneration may cause increase in spontaneous incidence of MNHEPs. PMID:24768639

  3. The Fact Book: Report for the Florida School District Adult and Technical Centers, 2015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The principal purpose of the report for the "Florida School District Adult and Technical Centers" is to provide timely, accurate, and comparative information about the Florida School District Adult and Technical Centers System. This report is intended for use by people who are interested in data relevant to education in the School…

  4. The Fact Book: Report for the Florida School District Adult and Technical Centers, 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The principal purpose of the report for the "Florida School District Adult and Technical Centers" is to provide timely, accurate, and comparative information about the Florida School District Adult and Technical Centers System. This report is intended for use by people who are interested in data relevant to education in the School…

  5. The Fact Book: Report for the Florida School District Adult and Technical Centers, 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Department of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The principal purpose of the report for the "Florida School District Adult and Technical Centers" is to provide timely, accurate, and comparative information about the Florida School District Adult and Technical Centers System. This report is intended for use by people who are interested in data relevant to education in the School…

  6. Why carers use adult day respite: a mixed method case study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We need to improve our understanding of the complex interactions between family carers’ emotional relationships with care-recipients and carers use of support services. This study assessed carer’s expectations and perceptions of adult day respite services and their commitment to using services. Methods A mixed-method case study approach was used with psychological contract providing a conceptual framework. Data collection was situated within an organisational case study, and the total population of carers from the organisation’s day respite service were approached. Fifty respondents provided quantitative and qualitative data through an interview survey. The conceptual framework was expanded to include Maslow’s hierarchy of needs during analysis. Results Carers prioritised benefits for and experiences of care-recipients when making day respite decisions. Respondents had high levels of trust in the service and perceived that the major benefits for care-recipients were around social interaction and meaningful activity with resultant improved well-being. Carers wanted day respite experiences to include all levels of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs from the provision of physiological care and safety through to the higher levels of belongingness, love and esteem. Conclusion The study suggests carers need to trust that care-recipients will have quality experiences at day respite. This study was intended as a preliminary stage for further research and while not generalizable it does highlight key considerations in carers’ use of day respite services. PMID:24906239

  7. Continuous Flow Device Support in Children Using the HeartWare HVAD: 1,000 Days of Lessons Learned From a Single Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Joshua; Epstein, Deirdre; Baltagi, Sirine; Mehegan, Mary E; Simpson, Kathleen E; Canter, Charles E; Silvestry, Scott; Eghtesady, Pirooz; Boston, Umar S

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide a single center experience with a continuous flow device in adolescents with end-stage heart failure. A retrospective single center analysis of patients aged 18 years or younger implanted with HVAD (HeartWare Inc, Framingham, MA) between October 2012 and March 2014 was performed. Demographics, preimplant and postimplant clinical data, survival, and adverse events (AEs) were recorded. A matched group of adults based on diagnosis, body surface area (BSA), and time period were used for outcome comparisons. Six adolescents with dilated cardiomyopathy were implanted with the HVAD. Median age and BSA were 13.4 years and 1.45 m2, respectively. All were Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support (INTERMACS) profile-1 or profile-2. Median days on device were 108 with total patient-days on device of 1,017. Four adolescents were discharged home on device all in New York Heart Association 1. Five underwent transplantation with 100% survival. There were 18 AEs with one AE per 170 days on device. Compared with the adult cohort (n = 5), there was no difference in 1 year survival (p = 0.32). HVAD support in adolescents is highly successful as a bridge to transplantation. It provides early rehabilitation and improvement in quality of life. Morbidity is not negligible but appears comparable with that seen in adults. PMID:25967955

  8. My personal experiences at the BEST Medical Center: A day in the clinic-the afternoon.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Philip R; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2016-01-01

    Dr. Ida Lystic is a gastroenterologist who recently began her new faculty position at the BEST (Byron Edwards and Samuel Thompson) Medical Center. After completing her MD degree at the prestigious Harvey Medical School (recently renamed the Harvey Provider School), she did her internal medicine residency and fellowship training at the OTHER (Owen T. Henry and Eugene Rutherford) Medical Center. Her morning in gastroenterology clinic was highlighted by: (1) being reprimanded by the clinic nurse manager for a patient who not only arrived early, before clinic had opened, but also neglected to schedule the anesthesiologist for his colonoscopy; (2) the continued challenges of LEGEND (also known as Lengthy and Excessively Graded Evaluation and Nomenclature for Diagnosis by her colleagues), the new electronic medical record system after the BEST discarded the SIMPLE (Succinct Input Making Patient's Lives Electronic) system; (3) a nurse's interruption of an office visit-once the egg timer on the examination room door ran out-because she had exceeded the allocated time for the appointment; and (4) her chairman's unanticipated arrival in the clinic to visit with the clinic nurse manager. In addition to seeing her patients, Dr. Lystic's afternoon is occupied by attending a LOST (Laboratory OverSight and Testing) Committee meeting and a visit from a wayfinding and signage specialist to depersonalize the doorpost plaques of the examination rooms. Her day ends with a demeaning email from her chairman regarding the poor results of the most recent patient satisfaction survey and being personally held accountable to develop solutions to improve not only her performance but also that of the clinic. Although Dr. Ida Lystic and the gastroenterology clinic at "the BEST Medical Center" are creations of the authors' imagination, the majority of the anecdotes mentioned in this essay are based on individual patients and their physicians, clinics in medical centers and their administration

  9. Ventilation in day care centers and sick leave among nursery children.

    PubMed

    Kolarik, B; Andersen, Z Jovanovic; Ibfelt, T; Engelund, E Hoj; Møller, E; Bräuner, E Vaclavik

    2016-04-01

    Several studies have reported poor indoor air quality (IAQ) in day care centers (DCCs), and other studies have shown that children attending them have an increased risk of respiratory and gastrointestinal infections. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is an association between ventilation in DCCs and sick leave among nursery children. Data on child sick leave within an 11-week period were obtained for 635 children attending 20 DCCs. Ventilation measurements included three proxies of ventilation: air exchange rate (ACR) measured with the decay method, ACR measured by the perfluorocarbon tracer gas (PFT) method, and CO2 concentration measured over a 1-week period. All but two DCCs had balanced mechanical ventilation system, which could explain the low CO2 levels measured. The mean concentration of CO2 was 643 ppm, exceeding 1000 ppm in only one DCC. A statistically significant inverse relationship between the number of sick days and ACR measured with the decay method was found for crude and adjusted analysis, with a 12% decrease in number of sick days per hour increase in ACR measured with the decay method. This study suggests a relationship between sick leave among nursery children and ventilation in DCCs, as measured with the decay method. PMID:25789698

  10. Helpful Hints in Teaching Adult Basic Education for the Mid-Alabama Adult and Vocational Education Demonstration and Training Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, James E.; Sparks, Peggy F.

    Designed for use with "A Curriculum Guide for the Mid-Alabama Adult and Vocational Education Demonstration Center," this booklet contains material intended for graduate students and administrators who are engaged in the preparation, teaching, and/or who are conducting research in Adult Basic Education. The document is divided into three sections.…

  11. Thirty-Day Postoperative Death Rate at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Calland, J. Forrest; Adams, Reid B.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; O’Connor, Matthew J.; Chandrasekhara, Vinay; Guerlain, Stephanie; Jones, Rayford Scott

    2002-01-01

    Objective To improve understanding of perioperative deaths at an academic medical center. Summary Background Data Because published data have typically focused on specific patient populations, diagnoses, or procedures, there are few data regarding surgical deaths and complications in institutional or regional studies. Specifically, surgical adverse events and errors are generally not studied comprehensively. This limits the overall understanding of complications and deaths. Methods Data from all operations performed in the main operating suite of the University of Virginia Health Sciences Center from January 1 to June 30, 1999, were compared with state death records to gain a dataset of patients dying within 30 days of surgery. All clinical records from patients who died were screened for adverse events and subsequently reviewed by three surgeons who identified adverse events and errors and performed comparisons with survivors. Results One hundred nineteen deaths followed 7,379 operations performed on 6,296 patients, yielding a patient death rate of 1.9%. Patients dying within 30 days of surgery were older and had higher American Society of Anesthesiologists scores. Of 119 deaths, 86 (72.3%) were attributable to the patient’s primary disease. Twenty-three patient deaths (19.3% of all deaths, 0.37% of all patients) could not be attributed to the patient’s primary disease and thus were suspicious for an adverse event (AE) as the cause of the death. Of the 23 deaths suspicious for AE, 15 (12.6% of all deaths, and 65.2% of AE deaths) followed an error in care and thus were classified as potentially preventable, affecting 0.24% of the study population. Conclusions Overall, the 30-day postoperative death rate was low in the total surgical population at an academic medical center. Errors and AEs were associated with 12.6% and 19.3% of deaths, respectively. Retrospective review inadequately characterized the nature of AEs and failed to determine causality. Prospective

  12. Increasing Steps/Day Predicts Improvement in Physical Function and Pain Interference in Adults with Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Kaleth, Anthony S.; Slaven, James E.; Ang, Dennis C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the concurrent and predictive associations between the number of steps taken per day (steps/day) and clinical outcomes in patients with fibromyalgia (FM). Methods 199 adults with FM [mean age = 46.1 yr; 95% females] enrolled in a randomized clinical trial wore a hip-mounted accelerometer for 1 week and completed self-report measures of physical function [Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire-Physical Impairment (FIQ-PI), SF-36 physical component score (SF-36 PCS)], pain intensity and interference (Brief Pain Inventory; BPI), and depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-8; PHQ-8) as part of their baseline and follow-up assessments. Associations of steps/day with self-report clinical measures were evaluated from baseline to week 12 using multivariate regression models adjusted for demographic and baseline covariates. Results Study participants were primarily sedentary, averaging 4,019 ± 1,530 steps/day. Our findings demonstrate a linear relationship between the change in steps/day and improvement in health outcomes for FM. Incremental increases on the order of 1,000 steps/day were significantly associated with (and predictive of) improvements in FIQ-PI, SF-36 PCS, BPI pain interference, and PHQ-8 (all p<0.05). Although higher step counts were associated with lower FIQ and BPI pain intensity scores, these were not statistically significant. Conclusion Step counts is an easily obtained and understood objective measure of daily physical activity. An exercise prescription that includes recommendations to gradually accumulate at least 5,000 additional steps/day may result in clinically significant improvements in outcomes relevant to patients with FM. Future studies are needed to elucidate the dose-response relationship between steps/day and patient outcomes in FM. PMID:25049001

  13. Ninety-day readmissions after degenerative cervical spine surgery: A single-center administrative database study

    PubMed Central

    Akamnonu, Chibuikem; Goldstein, Jeffrey A.; Errico, Thomas J.; Bendo, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Unplanned hospital readmissions result in significant clinical and financial burdens to patients and the healthcare system. Readmission rates and causes have been investigated using large administrative databases which have certain limitations in data reporting and coding. The objective of this study was to provide a description of 90 day post-discharge readmissions following surgery for common degenerative cervical spine pathologies at a large-volume tertiary hospital. The study also compared the readmission rates of patients who underwent anterior- and posterior-approach procedures. Methods The administrative records from a single-center, high-volume tertiary institution were queried using ICD-9 codes for common cervical pathology over a three year period to determine the rate and causes of readmissions within the 90 days following the index surgery. Results A total of 768 patients underwent degenerative cervical spine surgery during the three year study period. Within 90 days of discharge, 24 (3.13%) patients were readmitted; 16 (2.06%) readmissions were planned for lumbar surgery; 8 (1.04%) readmissions were unplanned. 640 patients underwent procedures involving an anterior approach and 128 patients underwent procedures involving a posterior approach. There were 14 (2.17%) planned readmissions in the anterior group and 2 (1.5%) in the posterior group. The unplanned readmission rate was 0.63% (4 patients) and 3.13% (4 patients) in the anterior and posterior groups, respectively. (p=0.0343). Conclusion The 90 day post-discharge unplanned readmission rate that followed elective degenerative cervical spine surgery was 1.04%. The unplanned readmission rate associated with posterior-approach procedures (3.13%) was significantly higher than that of anterior-approach procedures (0.63%). Level of evidence: IV PMID:26114088

  14. From Leningrad to the day-care center. The ubiquitous Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed Central

    Shandera, W. X.

    1990-01-01

    Giardiasis is recognized as a worldwide public health problem. Seroprevalence data from both the developing and developed world show high rates of carriage in populations at risk for fecal-oral transmission, such as children in day-care centers. Outbreak investigation has expanded our understanding of reservoirs for Giardia lamblia and of the routes of transmission. Various host factors have been associated with infection. The pathogenesis of giardial infections is being elucidated, in particular the role of lectin activation in producing disease. Three standard chemotherapeutic agents are available in the United States. The institution of community-wide prevention measures is equally important. Current areas of investigation including antigenic composition and enzymatic variants should result in effective forms of immunotherapy, while more effective forms of chemoprophylaxis could assist in eradicating the pathogen from institutional settings. PMID:2219872

  15. Helen Keller Centers for Deaf-Blind Youth and Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Annals of the Deaf, 2003

    2003-01-01

    This listing provides directory information for the national Helen Keller Center and its 10 regional offices. The centers provide extensive evaluative and rehabilitation services to people who are deaf and blind. (CR)

  16. Older Adults with Dementia Are Sedentary for Most of the Day

    PubMed Central

    Volkers, Karin M.; Blankevoort, Christiaan G.; Scherder, Erik J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Self-reported data suggest that older adults with dementia are inactive. The purpose of the present study was to objectively assess the physical activity (PA) levels of community-dwelling and institutionalized ambulatory patients with dementia, and to compare with the PA levels of cognitive healthy older adults. Methods We used actigraphy to assess the PA levels in institutionalized (n = 83, age: 83.0 ± 7.6, Mini-Mental-State Examination (MMSE): 15.5 ± 6.5) and community-dwelling dementia patients (n = 37, age: 77.3 ± 5.6, MMSE-score: 20.8 ± 4.8), and healthy older adults (n = 26, age: 79.5 ± 5.6, MMSE-score: 28.2 ± 1.6). We characterized PA levels based on the raw data and classified <100 counts/min as sedentary behavior. Results Institutionalized dementia patients had the lowest daily PA levels (1.69 ± 1.33 counts/day), spent 72.1% of the day sedentary, and were most active between 8:00 and 9:00 am. Institutionalized vs. community-dwelling dementia patients had 23.5% lower daily PA levels (difference M = 0.52, p = .004) and spent 9.3% longer in sedentariness (difference M = 1.47, p = .032). Community-dwelling dementia patients spent 66.0% of the day sedentary and were most active between 9:00 to 10:00 am with a second peak between 14:00 to 15:00. Community-dwelling dementia patients vs healthy older adults’ daily PA levels and sedentary time were 21.6% lower and 8.9% longer, respectively (difference M = 0.61, p = .007; difference M = 1.29, p = .078). Conclusions Institutionalized and community-dwelling dementia patients are sedentary for most of the day and the little PA they perform is of lower intensity compared to their healthy peers. Their highest PA peak is when they get out of bed in the morning. In addition, it seems that institutionalized living is associated with lower PA levels in dementia patients. These are the first results that objectively characterize institutionalized as well as community-dwelling dementia patients’ PA levels

  17. Guidelines for Observation and Assessment: An Approach to Evaluating the Learning Environment of a Day Care Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattick, Ilse; Perkins, Frances J.

    This guide is designed to assist in evaluating the learning environment of a day care center through observation. For the purposes of this guide, various aspects of the day care program are divided into categories, which in turn are divided into issues (essentials for which data can be obtained by observation. Categories and issues are as follows:…

  18. Home-Type Activities at the Day Care Center. (Tipos De Actividades Del Hogar En El Centro De Cuidado Diario.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aaronson, May; Moberg, Patricia E.

    This paper argues that home activities comprise a valuable unplanned curriculum and that many of these activities can be transferred to the day care center. It is suggested that these activities foster a closer relationship between child and caregiver and bridge the gap between familiar home environment and novel day care setting. Home activities…

  19. Cytomegalovirus infection in children with Down syndrome in a day-care center in Brazil.

    PubMed

    do Canto, C L; Granato, C F; Garcez, E; Villas Boas, L S; Fink, M C; Estevam, M P; Pannuti, C S

    2000-01-01

    This study evaluates the transmission of CMV infection in 120 children aged 1 to 15 years with Down syndrome who attended a day-care center for handicapped children in São Paulo, Brazil. A blood sample was obtained from each children at the beginning of the study for detection of IgG and IgM cytomegalovirus (CMV) antibodies by an immunofluorescence assay. Samples of saliva and urine were obtained every 3 months from the children with CMV antibodies to detect shedding of the virus by culture in human foreskin fibroblasts, by detection of pp65 CMV-antigen and by a nested PCR assay. The prevalence of anti CMV-IgG antibodies was 76.6% (92/120), and IgM anti-CMV antibodies were detected in 13% (12/92) of the seropositive children. During the first viral evaluation, CMV was detected in the urine and/or saliva in 39/90 (43.3%) of the seropositive children. In the second and third evaluations, CMV was detected in 41/89 (46%) and in 35/89 (39.3%) children, respectively. Detection of CMV was shown both in urine and saliva in 28/39 (71.8%), 19/41(46.3%) and 20/35 (57.1%) of the children excreting the virus, respectively. Additionally, in 3(3/4)9 (67.4%) of the excreters CMV could be demonstrated in urine or saliva in at least two out of the three virological evaluations carried out sequentially in a six month period. Of the 28 initially seronegative children, 26 were re-examined for anti-CMV IgG antibodies about 18 months after the negative sample; seroconversion was found in 10/26 (38.5%). Taking all 536 samples of urine or saliva examined by virus culture and pp65 antigen detection during the study into account, 159 (29.6%) were positive by virus culture and 59 (11%) gave a positive result with the pp65 assay. These data demonstrate the high prevalence of CMV shedding and the high risk of CMV infection in children with Down syndrome attending a day-care center for mentally handicapped patients. The virus culture was more sensitive than the pp65 CMV antigen assay for CMV

  20. Look at Me! Does the Adult Truly See and Respond to the Child in Finnish Day-Care Centres?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalliala, Marjatta

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the Kangaroo research project was to enhance the well-being of children under three years of age in Finnish day-care centres. In this experimental intervention study adults were encouraged to take a more sensitive and active role especially during "free play." In six Kangaroo groups and five control groups adults (N = 28) and children…

  1. Treatment Attrition of Probationers With Mental Illness From an Enhanced Day Reporting Center.

    PubMed

    Carr, W Amory; Cassidy, James J

    2016-05-01

    Treatment completion is an important outcome for both mental health and criminal justice agencies tasked with managing offenders with mental illness in the community. Previous research has shown that greater degrees of criminogenic risk factors (e.g., specific criminal history variables) predict treatment non-completion among legally mandated populations. However, most studies were conducted with offenders without mental illness. In this study, demographic (e.g., age, gender), clinical (e.g., psychiatric diagnosis), and criminogenic risk factors (measured using the Level of Service Inventory-Revised [LSI-R]) were compared by treatment completion status using 167 probationers with mental illness treated at an enhanced day reporting center. Bivariate and multivariate (i.e., forward entry logistic regression) analyses revealed that while the LSI-R total score was unrelated to treatment completion, higher scores on the LSI-R Alcohol and Drug use subscale (odds ratio [OR] = 1.25, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.01, 1.54]) and older age (OR = 1.04, 95% CI = [1.00, 1.09]) were significantly predictive of non-completion. PMID:25432936

  2. Effect of seven days of spaceflight on hindlimb muscle protein, RNA and DNA in adult rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, J. M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of seven days of spaceflight on skeletal muscle (soleus, gastrocnemius, EDL) content of protein, RNA and DNA were determined in adult rats. Whereas total protein contents were reduced in parallel with muscle weights, myofibrillar protein appeared to be more affected. There were no significant changes in absolute DNA contents, but a significant (P less than 0.05) increase in DNA concentration (microgram/milligram) in soleus muscles from flight rats. Absolute RNA contents were significantly (P less than 0.025) decreased in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles of flight rats, with RNA concentrations reduced 15-30 percent. These results agree with previous ground-based observations on the suspended rat with unloaded hindlimbs and support continued use of this model.

  3. Motivation and the Adult New Reader: Becoming Literate at the Bob Steele Reading Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demetrion, George

    A study examined the sources of motivation of adults participating in the adult literacy program at the Bob Steele Reading Center (BSRC) in Hartford, Connecticut. The "life cycle" approach used to explore motivation throughout the stages of the literacy learning process included brief case studies focusing on the importance of socioemotional…

  4. Adult Career Counseling Center. Fifteenth Annual Report, September 1997-June 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Jane

    The Adult Career Counseling Center (ACCC) at Oakland University provides career exploration and planning opportunities to community adults at no cost; trains faculty, staff, and students in the use of computer-assisted career guidance programs; and supports research efforts for a better understanding of career development resources. Clients…

  5. 76 FR 44573 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service Payment Rates, and Administrative Reimbursement Rates for Sponsoring Organizations of Day Care Homes for the Period July 1,...

  6. Centering Marxist-Feminist Theory in Adult Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Using feminist extensions of Marxist theory, this article argues that a Marxist-feminist theory of adult learning offers a significant contribution to feminist pedagogical debates concerning the nature of experience and learning. From this theoretical perspective, the individual and the social are understood to exist in a mutually determining…

  7. Person-Centered Planning with Youth and Adults Who Have Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Impact, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This feature issue of "Impact" focuses on person-centered planning with youth and adults who have developmental disabilities. Featured articles include: (1) "Centering on People: A Quiet Revolution" (Judith A. Snow); (2) "Look-and Understand-before You Leap" (Brian Abery and Marijo McBride), which describes the basic principles and values…

  8. A regional burn center's response to a disaster: September 11, 2001, and the days beyond.

    PubMed

    Yurt, Roger W; Bessey, Palmer Q; Bauer, Gregory J; Dembicki, Robert; Laznick, Hope; Alden, Nicole; Rabbits, Angela

    2005-01-01

    This report reviews the response of a regional burn center to the disaster that occurred in New York City at the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001. In addition, it assesses that response in the context of other medical institutions in the region. There were facilities in the region that had 120 burn care beds; only two-thirds of the burn-injured patients who required hospital admission were admitted to designated burn centers, and only 28% of burn-injured victims initially were triaged to regional burn centers. The care rendered at this center was made possible by a "disaster-ready" facility and supplementation of personnel from the resources provided by The National Disaster Medical System. The patient outcomes at this center exceeded that as predicted by logistic regression analysis. PMID:15756112

  9. Liberal Adult Education Adapts to the Technological Society: Case Study of West Germany's Adult Education Centers (Volkshochschulen).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Robert A.

    The report, based on a six-month study as a participant-observer, discusses developments now under way in West Germany's Adult Education Centers movement. The article offers a comparative approach that takes account of trends in Europe and North America. It puts these developments into a philosophical framework, noting that Germany may provide a…

  10. Standards for Day Care Centers for Infants and Children Under 3 Years of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Academy of Pediatrics, Evanston, IL.

    The Committee on Infant and Preschool Child of the American Academy of Pediatrics has developed basic standards for quality day care for children under 3 years of age. The availability of day care provides a mother with the choice of group day care as one of the means of providing for her children. Options should include full-time or part-time day…

  11. An Evaluation of the Observer Effect on Treatment Integrity in a Day Treatment Center for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Monica R.; Burke, Raymond V.; Allen, Keith D.

    2013-01-01

    Treatment integrity is an important concern in treatment centers but is often overlooked. Performance feedback is a well-established approach to improving treatment integrity, but is underused and undervalued. One way to increase its value to treatment centers may be to expose unrealized benefits on the observer who collects the performance…

  12. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR DAY CARE CENTER SAMPLE SUBJECTS RECRUITMENT (SOP-1.11)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The CTEPP subject recruitment procedures for the daycare center component are described in the SOP. There are two stages in this phase of CTEPP subject recruitment. The objective of the first stage is to enroll daycare centers for the study. Six target counties in each state ar...

  13. Geriatric education centers address medication issues affecting older adults.

    PubMed Central

    Kahl, A; Blandford, D H; Krueger, K; Zwick, D I

    1992-01-01

    Serious problems have been identified in the prescribing of medications for elderly patients and use of prescription and nonprescription drugs by older persons. Overuse, underuse, and inappropriate use of drugs by the elderly have been widely documented, and the harmful consequences have been described. This paper reviews information concerning the need for action to improve health professionals' knowledge and skills with respect to drugs and the elderly and activities being undertaken by geriatric education centers (GECs) to enhance these capacities. Grant support for the centers from the Health Resources and Services Administration, a Public Health Service component agency, began in 1983. In fiscal year 1992 there are 31 centers operating in 26 States. The centers are multi-institutional and conduct four types of educational activities. These include review of pharmacological issues for multidisciplinary groups, specialized training for pharmacists, discipline-specific programs focusing on medication issues, and activities aimed at educating the public. Examples of the GECs' educational activities are given. PMID:1738807

  14. CTEPP DATA COLLECTION FORM 10 (PERIODS 1-3): DAY CARE CENTER CHILD ACTIVITY DIARY AND FOOD SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data collection form collects information on the child's activities at the day care center over the 48-hr monitoring period. The diary is divided into three time periods over the 48-monitoring interval. The Food Survey collects information on the frequency and types of frui...

  15. CTEPP-OH DATA COLLECTED ON FORM 03:HOUSE/BUILDING CHARACTERISTICS OBSERVATION SURVEY FOR THE DAY CARE CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains data concerning the physical characteristics of the day care center and identified possible sources of pollutants for CTEPP-OH.

    The Children’s Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Pollutant (CTEPP) study was one of the largest agg...

  16. Effects of Experimentally Imposed Noise on Task Performance of Black Children Attending Day Care Centers Near Elevated Subway Trains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hambrick-Dixon, Priscilla Janet

    1986-01-01

    Investigates whether an experimentally imposed 80dB (A) noise affected psychomotor, serial memory words and pictures, incidental memory, visual recall, paired associates, perceptual learning, and coding performance of five-year-old Black children attending day care centers near and far from elevated subways. (HOD)

  17. Here's How We Set Up a Staff-Run Day-Care Center for Our Own Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ancell, Allen; Haugen, Merry

    1986-01-01

    School systems can set up staff-run day care centers for their own children, deriving planning ideas from the many corporations that perceive meeting employees' child-care needs as an asset. Planning involves employee child-care scheduling, cost estimates, and program development. (CJH)

  18. Goodness-of-Fit in Center Day Care: Relations of Temperament, Stability, and Quality of Care with the Child's Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Schipper, J. Clasien; Tavecchio, Louis W. C.; Van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Van Zeijl, Jantien

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the concept of "goodness-of-fit" between the child's temperament and the environment, introduced by Thomas and Chess [Temperament and Development, Brunner/Mazel, New York, 1977], is applied within the setting of center day care. Mothers and primary professional caregivers of 186 children, aged 6-30 months, participated in this…

  19. Media-Educational Habitus of Future Educators in the Context of Education in Day-Care Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedrichs-Liesenkötter, Henrike

    2015-01-01

    This research explores these questions: (1) How are the forms of media-educational habitus of future educators shaped? (2) What conditions influence whether or not media education is done in day-care centers? The qualitative study consists of six semi-structured interviews with media education teachers in educator training, four focus group…

  20. CTEPP NC DATA COLLECTED ON FORM 03:HOUSE/BUILDING CHARACTERISTICS OBSERVATION SURVEY FOR THE DAY CARE CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains data concerning the physical characteristics of the day care center and identified possible sources of pollutants.

    The Children’s Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Pollutant (CTEPP) study was one of the largest aggregate exposu...

  1. CTEPP NC DATA COLLECTED ON FORM 10 (PERIODS 1-3): DAY CARE CENTER CHILD ACTIVITY DIARY AND FOOD SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains data concerning the child’s activities at the day care center over the 48-h monitoring period. The diary was divided into three time periods over the 48-h monitoring interval. The Food Survey collected information on the frequency and types of fruits, veget...

  2. CTEPP DATA COLLECTION FORM 01: RECRUITMENT SURVEY FOR DAY CARE CENTER SAMPLE SUBJECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data collection form is used to identify eligible preschool children who attend day care during the day and recruit them into the study.

    The Children's Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Pollutant (CTEPP) study was one of the largest aggregate ex...

  3. CTEPP-OH DATA COLLECTED ON FORM 01: RECRUITMENT SURVEY FOR DAY CARE CENTER SAMPLE SUBJECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains data for CTEPP-OH concerning the eligiblity of preschool children who attended day care during the day and were recruited them into the study.

    The Children’s Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Pollutant (CTEPP) study was one of...

  4. CTEPP NC DATA COLLECTED ON FORM 01: RECRUITMENT SURVEY FOR DAY CARE CENTER SAMPLE SUBJECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains data concerning the eligiblity of preschool children who attended day care during the day and were recruited them into the study.

    The Children’s Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Pollutant (CTEPP) study was one of the largest ...

  5. Cytomegalovirus Reactivation in Adult Recipients of Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation: a Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rawi, Omar; Abdel-Rahman, Fawzi; Al-Najjar, Rula; Abu-Jazar, Husam; Salam, Mourad; Saad, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation and infection are well-recognized complications after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Only a few studies have addressed CMV reactivation after autologous SCT (ASCT). Methods We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 210 adult patients who underwent ASCT for lymphoma or multiple myeloma (MM) at a single center from January 1st, 2007 until December 31st, 2012. All patients were monitored weekly with CMV antigenemia test till day 42 after transplantation, and for 2 months after last positive test in those who had any positive CMV antigenemia test before day 42. Results Thirty-seven (17.6%) patients had CMV reactivation; 23 patients had lymphoma while 14 had MM as the underlying disease. There was no difference in the rate of CMV reactivation between lymphoma and MM patients (20% versus 14.7%, P = 0.32). The majority of the patients were treated with ganciclovir/valganciclovir, all patients had their reactivation resolved with therapy, and none developed symptomatic CMV infection. None of the patients who died within 100 days of transplantation had CMV reactivation. Log-rank test showed that CMV reactivation had no effect on the overall survival of patients (P values, 0.29). Conclusion In our cohort, CMV reactivation rate after ASCT was 17.6%. There was no difference in reactivation rates between lymphoma and MM patients. With the use of preemptive therapy, symptomatic CMV infection was not documented in any patient in our cohort. CMV reactivation had no impact on patients’ survival post ASCT. PMID:26401238

  6. The Joliet Junior College Center for Adult Basic Education and Literacy's "Families about Success": Intergenerational Programming That Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irby, Terry R.; And Others

    Joliet Junior College's Center for Adult Basic Education and Literacy (CABEL) is responsible for providing adult basic education and support services for adults whose skills in reading and mathematics are below the 12th grade level. Its offerings include instruction in Adult Basic Education (ABE), General Educational Development (GED), English as…

  7. The Five-Day Week: An Alternate Model in Residential Treatment Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Astrachan, Myrtle

    1975-01-01

    Presents a model which provides residential treatment on a five-day basis for latency-age children. Family therapy, shared parenting, and psychotherapeautic education are combined in this model. (Author/ED)

  8. Task Specific Frequencies of Neck Motion Measured in Healthy Young Adults over a 5 Day Period

    PubMed Central

    Cobian, Daniel G.; Sterling, Andrew C.; Anderson, Paul A.; Heiderscheit, Bryan C.

    2010-01-01

    Study Design Observational cohort design. Objective To quantify the frequencies and magnitudes of neck motion during daily activities in healthy subjects. Summary of Background Data Previous studies have measured the maximum excursions during re-created ADLs in lab settings, but there is a lack of information available on frequencies and excursions of neck motion with ADLs in non-artificial settings. Methods Ten healthy young adults were fitted with a portable motion measurement device that recorded movement about each primary axis. Participants were instructed to wear the unit continuously over a 5-day period and record their daily activities with corresponding times. After the collection period, subjects' activity logs were analyzed and data were partitioned into five categories which provided the most primary representation of ADLs: athletics, work, travel, sleep, and miscellaneous. Each category was further divided into increasingly specific activities (e.g. running and walking). Frequency of motions within 5° increments was determined and an hourly rate was calculated for each activity. Median motion about each axis for each activity was also determined. Results The total number of movements per hour for all axes, regardless of amplitude, was highest during athletic activity and lowest during sleeping. The majority of movements (92% of athletic activity, 90% of work) required less than 25° of lateral bending, while greater range of movement requirements were observed for flexion-extension and axial rotation. The median range of motion along all axes was highest for athletic activity and lowest for sleeping. Conclusions The results of this study provide a baseline of the frequency and magnitude of neck motion during normal ADLs for the specified population. These findings can assist physicians and physical therapists in determining the extent of disability and identifying activities that will likely be problematic for patients with limited cervical motion

  9. Meal Replacement Beverage Twice a Day in Overweight and Obese Adults (MDRC2012-001).

    PubMed

    Frestedt, Joy L; Young, Lindsay R; Bell, Margie

    2012-11-01

    This open label, single arm, prospective, interventional, weight loss trial evaluated a meal replacement beverage (Right Size(®) Smoothie) used to replace breakfast and lunch each day for 12 weeks (7 clinic visits) as part of a calorie-restricted diet in overweight and obese adults. A total of 155 individuals were screened, 55 enrolled and 28 completed this 12 week study. Subjects were obese (mean weight: 206 pounds and BMI: 32.7 kg/m(2)) and the mean age was 40 years including 42 (76.4%) female and 13 (23.6%) male volunteers. The modified Intent to Treat and Completer groups lost an average of 10.6 and 13.8 pounds and reduced their average BMI by 1.7 and 2.2 kg/m(2) respectively during this 12 week trial. The Per Protocol group lost 15.2 pounds and 2.4 kg/m(2) and the Optimal Weight Loss group lost 18.5 pounds and 2.9 kg/m(2). Using the Satiety Labeled Intensity Magnitude scale (SLIM) questionnaire, subjects reported feeling relatively hungry before they consumed the beverage, then feeling relatively full 15 minutes following the beverage with the sensation of some fullness lasting more than 2 hours and then feeling relatively hungry again at 3 hours after consuming the beverage. Study subjects reported significant improvements in physical functioning, general health, vitality and mental health as well as increased cognitive restraint of eating, reduced disinhibition and reduced hunger during the trial. The study beverages were well tolerated and no Serious Adverse Events (SAE) reported. This study suggests the study beverage aids in weight loss by helping to curb hunger during a reduced calorie diet program. PMID:23236298

  10. School Library Media Center Day. May 5, 1976. Material Resource File.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dow, Teri Goodall; And Others

    This compilation of ideas for promoting school library media centers and for increasing the public's awareness of their multi-media educational resources could be adapted to various types of libraries as well as to classroom use. Included are: (1) public relations suggestions, (2) bulletin board, display, and poster instructions, (3) lesson plans,…

  11. The Prescribed Pediatric Center: A Medical Day Treatment Program for Children with Complex Medical Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruppert, Elizabeth S.; Karst, Thomas O.; Brogan, Mark G.

    1998-01-01

    The Prescribed Pediatric Center (Toledo, Ohio) is a community-based, multidisciplinary program for infants and children with chronic, complex medical conditions. This article describes program beginnings; the planning process; and the program's growth, development, and components. Initial program evaluation indicates positive effects on some…

  12. Growing up Active: A Study into Physical Activity in Long Day Care Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashmore, Aaron W.; Jones, Sandra C.

    2008-01-01

    The child care center is an ideal setting in which to implement strategies to promote physical activity and healthy weight, but there is a paucity of empirical evidence on factors that influence physical activity in these settings. The current study gathered initial qualitative data to explore these factors. Child care workers from five long day…

  13. Procedures for Developing Policy for Nursery Schools and Day Care Centers: Educational Policy Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noonan, Roberta L.

    This investigation of educational policy for child care facilities identifies 18 areas of school operation that would benefit from written policy statements and suggests 6 procedures to use in formulating policy. Interviews with 6 child care center directors, a review of the literature, and a review of federal and state standards for child care,…

  14. Health Consultation & Resource Needs of Pre-Schools and Child Day Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Silvana F.

    This study describes the state of health education programs and practices in child care centers in Rhode Island. The foci of the study were: (1) planned group health education activities; (2) staff ability to teach health topics; (3) availability of resources regarding health topics; (4) barriers to providing health instruction; (5) parental…

  15. The E.C.E.R.S. as a Base for Research and Development of Quality in Day Care Centers in Sweden.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogefelt, Anette Daversjo

    This paper describes the Skovde Project to be implemented in day care centers in Skovde, Sweden. The purpose of this project is to identify the current quality of care in day care centers and to examine the impact of upcoming decentralized organization of the centers and a more flexible child care levy system on the effectiveness of resource use…

  16. Recruiting Older Adults into a Physical Activity Promotion Program: "Active Living Every Day" Offered in a Naturally Occurring Retirement Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildebrand, Mary; Neufeld, Peggy

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This article explores recruitment strategies based on the transtheoretical model (TTM) with older adults living in a naturally occurring retirement community (NORC) to encourage enrollment in a physical activity promotion program, "Active Living Every Day" (ALED). Reasons for participation or nonparticipation are identified. Design and…

  17. Prevalence of Behavior Disorder and Disturbance to Family and Staff in a Sample of Adult Day Health Care Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teresi, Jeanne A.; Holmes, Douglas; Dichter, Elizabeth; Koren, Mary Jane; Ramirez, Mildred; Fairchild, Susan

    1997-01-01

    Reports on the prevalence of behavior disorders in a sample of residents (N=360) in adult day health care programs. Findings indicate relatively high rates of behavior disorders. Most prevalent were the affective disorders (seeking reassurance, depression, crying) and verbal-vocal agitation. Differences between formal and informal caregivers'…

  18. [Public health in child day care centers and kindergarten in former East Germany].

    PubMed

    Fiedler, K

    1991-06-01

    In the GDR there existed a dense net of créches (children from birth to three years) and day nurseries (children from 3 to 6 years). Building and equipment of these institutions was determined by central regulations. For example a net area of 2.5 m2 was provided for each child in a day nursery and 5 m2 for a child in a créche. Furthermore, there are well established regulations for the control of health of the children, times for sleep, measures in case of infectious diseases and for cleaning and disinfection. PMID:1833697

  19. "One Day I Will Make It": A Study of Adult Student Persistence in Library Literacy Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Kristin E.; Cuban, Sondra; Comings, John P.

    2005-01-01

    Although research indicates that adults with low literacy skills need 100 to 150 hours of instruction to advance one grade level, adults in literacy programs participate in instruction for an average of only 70 hours per year. The Wallace Foundation launched the Literacy in Libraries Across America (LILAA) initiative in 1996 to help library-based…

  20. Malaysia's First Day Care Center for Children with Disabilities: Future Needs in Research in Early Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhagwanji, Yash

    This paper describes the development and implementation of the first private nonprofit day care program serving children with disabilities in Malaysia. Preliminary information describes Malaysia's economic, ethnic, and cultural situation. The naturalistic inquiry approach used to prepare this report, involving interviews and observations, is then…

  1. The Organization of Group Care Environments: The Infant Day Care Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cataldo, Michael F.; Risley, Todd R.

    In designing group day care for infants, special attention has been given to efficient care practices, so that all the children's health needs can be met and so that the staff will have ample time to interact with the children. One efficient method is to assign each staff member the responsibility of a particular area rather than a particular…

  2. Toddlers' Bids and Teachers' Responses in Title XX Day Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice S.; Wittmer, Donna S.

    Part of a larger investigation of teacher-child-peer interactions among two- and three-year-old children in day care, this microanalytic study of toddler-initiated bids (attempts to communicate with caregivers) and teacher responses depicts in detail toddler-caregiver interaction. Subjects for the study were 25 males and 25 females between the…

  3. The Association Between Sleep and Physical Function Among Older Veterans in an Adult Day Health Care Program

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yeonsu; Dzierzewski, Joseph; Fung, Constance H.; Rodriguez, Juan C.; Jouldjian, Stella; Mitchell, Michael; Josephson, Karen R.; Alessi, Cathy A.; Martin, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To examine whether sleep disturbance is associated with poor physical function in older veterans in an adult day health care (ADHC) program. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. SETTING One ADHC program in a Veterans Affairs Ambulatory Care Center. PARTICIPANTS Older veterans (N = 50) who were enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of a sleep intervention program and provided complete baseline data. MEASUREMENTS Participant characteristics (e.g., age, depression, relationship to caregiver, pain, comorbidity) were collected using appropriate questionnaires. Physical function was measured using the total score of activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental ADLs (IADLs) from the Older Americans Resources and Services Multidimensional Functional Assessment Questionnaire. Sleep was assessed subjectively (by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Insomnia Severity Index) and objectively (by wrist actigraphy). RESULTS As expected, participants required substantial assistance with ADLs and IADLs. A regression model showed that participant characteristics (i.e., marital status, use of sleep medication, comorbidity, and posttraumatic stress disorder) and living arrangement (i.e., living with a spouse and/or others) were significantly associated with poor physical function. Poorer objective sleep (i.e., total sleep time, total numbers of awakenings, and total wake time) was significantly associated with poor physical function, accounting for a significant proportion of the variance above and beyond participant characteristics. CONCLUSION Objective measures of nighttime sleep disturbance were associated with poor physical function among older veterans in an ADHC program. Further research is needed to determine whether interventions to improve sleep will delay functional decline in this vulnerable population. PMID:26200520

  4. Review of Adult Learning and Literacy, Volume 6. Connecting Research, Policy and Practice: A Project of the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comings, John, Ed.; Garner, Barbara, Ed.; Smith, Cristine, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Review of Adult Learning and Literacy: Connecting Research, Policy, and Practice, Volume 6," is the newest volume in a series of annual publications of the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy (NCSALL) that address major issues, the latest research, and the best practices in the field of adult literacy and learning. Each…

  5. Review of Adult Learning and Literacy, Volume 5. Connecting Research, Policy, and Practice: A Project of the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comings, John, Ed.; Garner, Barbara, Ed.; Smith, Cristine, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "The Review of Adult Learning and Literacy: Connecting Research, Policy, and Practice, Volume 5" is a volume in a series of annual publications of the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy (NCSALL) that address major issues, the latest research, and the best practices in the field of adult literacy and learning. Each…

  6. Review of Adult Learning and Literacy, Volume 4. Connecting Research, Policy, and Practice: A Project of the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comings, John, Ed.; Garner, Barbara, Ed.; Smith, Cristine, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "The Review of Adult Learning and Literacy: Connecting Research Policy, and Practice, Volume 4" is an addition to a series of annual publications of the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy (NCSALL) that address major issues, the latest research, and the best practices in the field of adult literacy and learning. "Volume 4"…

  7. A Telephone Support Program for Adult Day Center Caregivers: Early Indications of Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gendron, Tracey; Pelco, Lynn E.; Pryor, Jennifer; Barsness, Sonya; Seward, Lynne

    2013-01-01

    The Virginia Commonwealth University/A Grace Place Caregiver Telephone Support Pilot Program was developed as a service-learning experience for graduate students to address the need for family caregiver support services. The Telephone Support Program was developed by the Virginia Commonwealth University Department of Gerontology, in collaboration…

  8. Bacillus cereus food poisoning associated with fried rice at two child day care centers--Virginia, 1993.

    PubMed

    1994-03-18

    Bacillus cereus, an infectious cause of foodborne illness, accounted for 2% of outbreaks with confirmed etiology that were reported to CDC during 1973-1987 (1). On July 21, 1993, the Lord Fairfax (Virginia) Health District received reports of acute gastrointestinal illness that occurred among children and staff at two jointly owned child day care centers following a catered lunch. This report summarizes the investigation of this outbreak. PMID:8121375

  9. Role of basiliximab in the prevention of acute cellular rejection in adult to adult living-related liver transplantation: a single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Gruttadauria, S; Mandalà, L; Biondo, D; Spampinato, M; Lamonaca, V; Volpes, R; Vizzini, G; Marsh, JW; Marcos, A; Gridelli, B

    2007-01-01

    We report our single center experience with the use of basiliximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody directed against the alpha chain of the interleukin-2 (IL-2) receptor (CD25), in combination with a steroid- and tacrolimus-based regimen in adult to adult living-related liver transplantation (ALRLT). Sixty consecutive ALRLTs were analyzed. All patients received two 20-mg doses of basiliximab (days 0 and 4 after transplantation) followed by tacrolimus (0.15 mg/kg/day; 10–15 ng/mL target trough levels) and a dose regimen of steroids (starting with 20 mg iv, switched to po as soon as the patient was able to eat, and weaned off within 1–2 months). Follow-up ranged from 6 to 1699.4 days after transplantation (mean 517.5 days, SD ± 413.4; median 424 days). Of the recipients, 95% remained rejection-free during follow-up, with an actuarial rejection-free probability of 96.61% within 3 months. Three patients had episodes of biopsy-proven acute cellular rejection (ACR). Actuarial patient and graft survival rates at 3 years were 82.09% and 75.61%. Six patients (10%) experienced sepsis. There was no evidence of cytomegalovirus infections or side-effects related to the basiliximab. We found zero de novo malignancy, although we observed 5 patients with metastatic spread of their primary malignancy during the follow-up. Basiliximab in association with tacrolimus and steroids is effective in reducing episodes of ACR and increasing ACR-free survival after ALRLT. PMID:19707350

  10. My personal experiences at the BEST Medical Center: A day in the clinic-the morning.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Philip R; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2016-01-01

    Dr. Ida Lystic is a gastroenterologist who trained at the OTHER (Owen T. Henry and Eugene Rutherford) Medical Center, after having completed her MD degree at the prestigious Harvey Medical School (recently renamed the Harvey Provider School). She accepted a faculty position at the BEST (Byron Edwards and Samuel Thompson) Medical Center. Dr. Lystic shares her experiences on a typical morning in gastroenterology clinic. Although her clinic start date was delayed by 2 months after becoming sick following a mandatory flu shot and having to complete more than 70 hours of compliance training modules, she is now familiar with the BEST system. Clinic scheduling priorities include ensuring that the staff can eat lunch together and depart at 5:00 pm. It is a continual challenge to find time to complete the electronic medical record after BEST changed from the SIMPLE (Succinct Input Making Patients Lives Electronic) system to LEGEND (referred to as Lengthy and Excessively Graded Evaluation and Nomenclature for Diagnosis by her colleagues). To maintain clinic punctuality, a compliance spreadsheet is e-mailed monthly to the Wait Time Committee. Their most recent corrective action plan for tardy physicians included placing egg timers on the doors and having nurses interrupt visits that exceed the allotted time. Administrative decisions have resulted in downsizing personnel. Patients are required to schedule their own tests and procedures and follow-up appointments-causing low patient satisfaction scores; however, the money saved lead to a large year-end bonus for the vice president of BEST Efficiency, who holds "providers" accountable for the poor patient experience. Although Dr. Ida Lystic and the gastroenterology clinic at "the BEST Medical Center" are creations of the authors' imagination, the majority of the anecdotes are based on actual events. PMID:27265082

  11. Adult Career Counseling Center Twenty-Third Annual Report, September 2005-June 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taber, Brian

    2006-01-01

    This annual report covers the background and recent accomplishments of the Adult Career Counseling Center (ACCC) at Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan. The following 12 topics are covered: (1) recent developments and history of the ACCC; (2) mission of the ACCC; (3) description of the ACCC; (4) the advising process; (5) ACCC coordination with…

  12. America Needs a New National Research and Development Center Focused on Adult Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comings, John

    2007-01-01

    Since 1991, the U.S. has had a national research and development (R&D) center focused on programs that help adults to improve their language, literacy, and numeracy skills; to acquire a General Educational Development (GED) or other high school certification; and to transition into postsecondary education or training. For the first five years,…

  13. Without Speaking, Youth Enters Adult Work Scene, Copes with Autism a Day at a Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Patti

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the story of Chad Roberts of Canton, Georgia, who is proving himself a promising employee day by day. He works several jobs in increments of up to 90 minutes. Some days, he completes bulk mailings at a law firm. On others, he's at local restaurants stocking the wait staff stations with supplies. The community-based vocational…

  14. Client-centered home modifications improve daily activity performance of older adults

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Susan; Landsbaum, Amanda; Palmer, Janice; Somerville, Emily K.; Morris, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Remaining at home is a high priority for many older adults, but the capacity to “age in place” often is threatened by environmental barriers. Purpose To describe a client-centered occupational therapy, home modification intervention program and examine the impact of the intervention on daily activity performance over time. Methods Using a competence-environmental press framework, a client-centered home modification program for older adults was implemented. In this quasi-experimental, single group prospective study, participants’ subjective ratings of daily activity performance were evaluated before and after the intervention (baseline/post/post). Findings After home modification, participants’ perception of their daily activity performance at home improved significantly and was maintained 2 years post-modification. Implications Home modification may benefit older adults attempting to age in place. PMID:19757729

  15. Reliability and validity of center of pressure measures for balance assessment in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen; Liang, Yan-Yi; Wang, Lei; Sheng, Jing; Ma, Shao-Jun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to assess the reliability and validity of center of pressure-based parameters for balance assessment. [Subjects and Methods] Two hundred and forty older adults were evaluated using a force platform and the Berg Balance Scale at 1-week intervals. The intra-class correlation coefficient and the Pearson correlation coefficient were used to test reliability and validity respectively. [Results] The reliability of the 12 selected center of pressure measures was satisfactory (intra-class correlation coefficient = 0.75–0.99) and the validity between the parameters and the Berg Balance Scale was moderate to good (r = −0.62 to −0.88). [Conclusion] Center of pressure-based parameters are reliable and valid measures in older adults. PMID:27190484

  16. The First Five Years: National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy, 1996-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy, Boston, MA.

    Since its establishment in 1996, the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy (NCSALL) has actively conducted and disseminated research to help build effective, cost- efficient adult education and literacy programs for adults who have low literacy and math skills, limited English skills, and/or no high school diploma. Funded as…

  17. Comparison of older adults' steps per day using NL-1000 pedometer and two GT3X+ accelerometer filters.

    PubMed

    Barreira, Tiago V; Brouillette, Robert M; Foil, Heather C; Keller, Jeffrey N; Tudor-Locke, Catrine

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the steps/d derived from the ActiGraph GT3X+ using the manufacturer's default filter (DF) and low-frequency-extension filter (LFX) with those from the NL-1000 pedometer in an older adult sample. Fifteen older adults (61-82 yr) wore a GT3X+ (24 hr/day) and an NL-1000 (waking hours) for 7 d. Day was the unit of analysis (n = 86 valid days) comparing (a) GT3X+ DF and NL-1000 steps/d and (b) GT3X+ LFX and NL-1000 steps/d. DF was highly correlated with NL-1000 (r = .80), but there was a significant mean difference (-769 steps/d). LFX and NL-1000 were highly correlated (r = .90), but there also was a significant mean difference (8,140 steps/d). Percent difference and absolute percent difference between DF and NL-1000 were -7.4% and 16.0%, respectively, and for LFX and NL-1000 both were 121.9%. Regardless of filter used, GT3X+ did not provide comparable pedometer estimates of steps/d in this older adult sample. PMID:23170752

  18. MAINTENANCE OF TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION BY PURIFIED ADULT RAT LEYDIG CELLS FOR THREE DAYS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using a preparation of highly purified, adult rat Leydig cells and conditions of culture which we found to optimize testosterone production during 24 h, we sought to maintain optimal testosterone production for 3 d. eydig cells cultured on Cytodex 3 beads at 19% O2 in Dulbecco's ...

  19. [Significance of playroom area for morbidity in day care centers in Copenhagen].

    PubMed

    Rindel, A K; Christensen, M; Kronborg, D; Jensen, S T

    1997-10-13

    Absence due to illness among children in 24 daycare centres in Copenhagen was registered during two periods of one year each with a five year interval. The results from the first period have been reported earlier. In each period, the physical, environmental, hygienic and social conditions of the institutions were assessed, and the playroom area per child was registered. The total number of children increased from 855 in the first period to 921 in the second because 13 of the 24 institutions had increased their capacity in the intervening period. On average, the playroom area per child decreased with 0.27 square metre per child in the 13 institutions with an increased number of children. All children were less than three years of age. Absence due to sickness constituted 7.6% of the days during which the institutions were open. For the second period, where the childrens age had been exactly registered, the effect of age on absence due to sickness was found to be statistically significant. The direction of the effect was a decrease in illness with increasing age. However, due to a high correlation between age and time attending the institution, the effect of age could not be separated from the similar effect of length of time that the child had attended the institution. It was found that sickness will decrease with 7.8% per month that the age of the child and time attending the institution is increased. A statistically significant connection was found between the playroom area per child and absence due to sickness after correction for the influence of age in a multivariate analysis. In conclusion, the sickness will decrease with 10.8% per square metre the playroom area per child is increased. PMID:9381590

  20. Thirty-Day Outcome Following Carotid Artery Stenting: A 10-Year Experience from a Single Center

    SciTech Connect

    Karkos, Christos D. Karamanos, Dimitrios G.; Papazoglou, Konstantinos O.; Demiropoulos, Filippos P.; Papadimitriou, Dimitrios N.; Gerassimidis, Thomas S.

    2010-02-15

    We aimed to present our experience with carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) and to document how the technique evolved over the last decade (1997-2007). A retrospective study of 333 patients (259 men; median age, 69 years) who underwent 336 CAS procedures. Of these, 118 (35%) patients were symptomatic and 164 (49%) lesions involved the left carotid bifurcation. The first 163 patients received a balloon-expandable stent, whereas the remaining 173 received a self-expandable one. Cerebral protection devices were used in the last 84 (25%) procedures. Access was via the femoral artery in all but six cases, in which direct puncture of the common carotid was necessary. The left common carotid originated from the innominate artery in 18 cases (5%). Conversion to open endarterectomy was necessary in two patients due to inability to remove the filter. Perioperative neurological events included stroke in 6 patients (1.8%), transient ischemic attack in 15 (4.5%), and hyperperfusion syndrome in 10 (3.0%). Three patients died during the first 30 days. As a result, the mortality and the combined stroke/death rate were 0.9 and 2.4%, respectively, with no differences between symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. Bradycardia was noted in 48 patients (14%), and hypotension in 45 (13%). Univariate analysis identified hypertension (P = 0.03), hyperlipidemia (P = 0.02), and current or ex-smoking (P = 0.02) as significant risk factors for death/stroke. On multivariate analysis using logistic regression, only hyperlipidemia [odds ratio (OR), 53.90; 95% confidence interval (CI), 4.19-693.47; P = 0.002] and current or ex-smoking (OR, 63.84; 95% CI,: 4.80-848.68; P = 0.001) remained statistically significant. In conclusion, CAS can be performed safely and effectively, with acceptable mortality, stroke/death, and cardiovascular complication rates. Although technological advances (stent design, cerebral protection devices), perioperative pharmacological management, and increasing experience

  1. Effective learner-centered strategies for teaching adults: using visual media to engage the adult learner.

    PubMed

    Myers, Dennis R; Sykes, Catherine; Myers, Scott

    2008-01-01

    This article offers practical guidance for educators as they prepare specialists to enhance the lives and communities of older persons through the strategic use of visual media in age-related courses. Advantages and disadvantages of this learning innovation are provided as well as seven approaches for enriching instruction. Resources are included for locating effective visual media, matching course content with video resources, determining fair use of copyrighted media, and inserting video clips into PowerPoint presentations. Strategies for accessing assistive services for implementing visual media in the classroom are also addressed. This article promotes the use of visual media for the purpose of enriching gerontological and geriatrics instruction for the adult learner. PMID:19042502

  2. Exercise of linguistic control by speakers in an adult day treatment program.

    PubMed

    Domingo, R A; Barrow, M B; Amato, J

    1998-08-01

    Ability of adults with mental retardation to exhibit linguistic "control" in informal settings within peer and staff dyads was evaluated. Results revealed that they produced significantly more utterances with staff than with peers in informal settings. However, they did not exhibit significant amounts of directives or questions, the two types of verbal control bids studied. Staff members used significantly more directives and questions as bids for control in non-peer settings than did the speakers with mental retardation in comparable peer interactions. Findings are consistent with observations of "learned helplessness" or prompt reliance within the population of persons with mental retardation. Results suggest that both staff members and adults with mental retardation have preconceived ideas on how to conduct themselves in daily interactions. PMID:9713185

  3. Marijuana use motives: concurrent relations to frequency of past 30-day use and anxiety sensitivity among young adult marijuana smokers.

    PubMed

    Bonn-Miller, Marcel O; Zvolensky, Michael J; Bernstein, Amit

    2007-01-01

    The present investigation examined two theoretically relevant aspects of marijuana motives using the Marijuana Motives Measure (MMM) [Simons, J., Correia, C. J., Carey, K. B., & Borsari, B. E. (1998). Validating a five-factor marijuana motives measure: Relations with use, problems, and alcohol motives. Journal of Counseling Psychology 45, 265-273] among 141 (78 female) young adults (M(age)=20.17, S.D.=3.34). The first objective was to evaluate the incremental validity of marijuana motives in relation to frequency of past 30-day use after controlling for the theoretically relevant factors of the number of years using marijuana (lifetime), current levels of alcohol, as well as tobacco smoking use. As expected, coping, enhancement, social, and expansion motives each were uniquely and significantly associated with past 30-day marijuana use over and above the covariates; conformity motives were not a significant predictor. A second aim was to explore whether coping, but no other marijuana motive, was related to the emotional vulnerability individual difference factor of anxiety sensitivity (fear of anxiety). As hypothesized, after controlling for number of years using marijuana (lifetime), past 30-day marijuana use, current levels of alcohol consumption, and cigarettes smoked per day, anxiety sensitivity was incrementally and uniquely related to coping motives for marijuana use, but not other motives. These results are discussed in relation to the clinical implications of better understanding the role of motivation for marijuana use among emotionally vulnerable young adults. PMID:16647822

  4. Sports Facilities, Shopping Centers or Homes: What Locations are Important for Adults' Physical Activity? A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Marijke; Ettema, Dick; Pierik, Frank; Dijst, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Physical activity (PA) is influenced by the built environment. However, little is known about the types of built environment where adults spend their time, and at what levels of PA they engage in those environments. Understanding the effect of the built environment on PA requires insight into PA behavior at different types of locations (e.g., home, work, shopping centers, and sports facilities). Therefore, this study describes where adults aged 45-65 years were active with moderate-to-vigorous intensity (MVPA), and examines associations of socio-demographic factors and neighborhood with MVPA at these locations. Participants' (N = 308) PA was measured for seven days using accelerometers and GPS-devices. Adults spent most minutes of MVPA at home and work. Highest MVPA-ratios of total time spent at a location were achieved in sports facilities and during transport. Neighborhood characteristics and socio-demographic factors such as work status, health status and household structure, had significant effects on MVPA at various locations and on total MVPA. Understanding PA behavior at various locations may provide insights that allow professionals in different domains (e.g., health, landscaping, urban planning) to develop strategies to stimulate PA. PMID:26959041

  5. Introduction of soft drinks and processed juice in the diet of infants attending public day care centers

    PubMed Central

    Longo-Silva, Giovana; Toloni, Maysa Helena de Aguiar; de Menezes, Risia Cristina Egito; Asakura, Leiko; Oliveira, Maria Alice Araújo; Taddei, José Augusto de Aguiar Carrazedo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Identifying at what age infants enrolled in public day care centers are introduced to soft drinks and industrialized juice, as well as comparing the nutritional composition of these goods with natural fruit juice. METHODS: A cross-sectional study with the mothers of 636 children (aged 0 to 36 months) from nurseries of day care centers, who were asked questions about the age of feeding introduction. This study evaluated the proximate composition of soft drinks and artificial juice, comparing them with those of natural fruit juice regarding energy, sugar, fiber, vitamin C, and sodium values. The chemical composition of fruit juice was obtained by consulting the Table of Food Composition and, for industrialized drinks, the average nutritional information on the labels of the five most consumed product brands. RESULTS: The artificial drinks were consumed before the first year of life by more than half of the children studied, however, approximately 10% consumed them before the age of 6 months. With regard to the comparison among the drinks, artificial fruit juice beverages and soft drinks proved to contain from nine to 13 times higher amounts of sodium, and 15 times less vitamin C than natural juices. CONCLUSIONS: The introduction of soft drinks and industrialized juice in the diet of infants was inopportune and premature.. When compared to natural fruit juice, these have inferior nutritional composition, which suggests the urgent need for measures based on strategies for food and nutrition education in order to promote awareness and the maintenance of healthy eating habits. PMID:25662561

  6. The combined effect of sleep and time of day on emotion decoding from dynamic visual cues in older adults.

    PubMed

    Tsokanaki, Paraskevi; Moraitou, Despina; Papantoniou, Georgia

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that night sleep is a decisive factor for the effective functioning of the human body and mind. In addition to the role of sleep, older adults report that they are "morning types" and that their cognitive and emotional abilities seem to be at a higher level in the morning hours. In this vein, this study is aimed at examining the effect of sleep combined with the "time of day" condition on a specific ability that is crucial for interpersonal communication, namely, emotion recognition, in older adults. Specifically, the study compared older adults' performance in decoding emotions from ecologically valid, dynamic visual cues, in two conditions: "early in the morning and after night sleep", and "in the afternoon and after many hours since night sleep". An emotion recognition task was administered twice to 37 community-dwelling older adults. The results showed a statistically significant higher performance in the morning in decoding all emotions presented, compared to the afternoon condition. Pleasant surprise, sadness, and anxiety were revealed as the most difficult emotions to be recognized in the afternoon condition. PMID:27621639

  7. Postnatal day 2 to 11 constitutes a 5-HT-sensitive period impacting adult mPFC function.

    PubMed

    Rebello, Tahilia J; Yu, Qinghui; Goodfellow, Nathalie M; Caffrey Cagliostro, Martha K; Teissier, Anne; Morelli, Emanuela; Demireva, Elena Y; Chemiakine, Alexei; Rosoklija, Gorazd B; Dwork, Andrew J; Lambe, Evelyn K; Gingrich, Jay A; Ansorge, Mark S

    2014-09-10

    Early-life serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] signaling modulates brain development, which impacts adult behavior, but 5-HT-sensitive periods, neural substrates, and behavioral consequences remain poorly understood. Here we identify the period ranging from postnatal day 2 (P2) to P11 as 5-HT sensitive, with 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) blockade increasing anxiety- and depression-like behavior, and impairing fear extinction learning and memory in adult mice. Concomitantly, P2-P11 5-HTT blockade causes dendritic hypotrophy and reduced excitability of infralimbic (IL) cortex pyramidal neurons that normally promote fear extinction. By contrast, the neighboring prelimbic (PL) pyramidal neurons, which normally inhibit fear extinction, become more excitable. Excitotoxic IL but not PL lesions in adult control mice reproduce the anxiety-related phenotypes. These findings suggest that increased 5-HT signaling during P2-P11 alters adult mPFC function to increase anxiety and impair fear extinction, and imply a differential role for IL and PL neurons in regulating affective behaviors. Together, our results support a developmental mechanism for the etiology and pathophysiology of affective disorders and fear-related behaviors. PMID:25209278

  8. Postnatal Day 2 to 11 Constitutes a 5-HT-Sensitive Period Impacting Adult mPFC Function

    PubMed Central

    Rebello, Tahilia J.; Yu, Qinghui; Goodfellow, Nathalie M.; Caffrey Cagliostro, Martha K.; Teissier, Anne; Morelli, Emanuela; Demireva, Elena Y.; Chemiakine, Alexei; Rosoklija, Gorazd B.; Dwork, Andrew J.; Lambe, Evelyn K.; Ansorge, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Early-life serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] signaling modulates brain development, which impacts adult behavior, but 5-HT-sensitive periods, neural substrates, and behavioral consequences remain poorly understood. Here we identify the period ranging from postnatal day 2 (P2) to P11 as 5-HT sensitive, with 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) blockade increasing anxiety- and depression-like behavior, and impairing fear extinction learning and memory in adult mice. Concomitantly, P2–P11 5-HTT blockade causes dendritic hypotrophy and reduced excitability of infralimbic (IL) cortex pyramidal neurons that normally promote fear extinction. By contrast, the neighboring prelimbic (PL) pyramidal neurons, which normally inhibit fear extinction, become more excitable. Excitotoxic IL but not PL lesions in adult control mice reproduce the anxiety-related phenotypes. These findings suggest that increased 5-HT signaling during P2–P11 alters adult mPFC function to increase anxiety and impair fear extinction, and imply a differential role for IL and PL neurons in regulating affective behaviors. Together, our results support a developmental mechanism for the etiology and pathophysiology of affective disorders and fear-related behaviors. PMID:25209278

  9. Evaluating the Functional Utility of Congregate Day Treatment Activities for Adults with Severe Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Dennis H.; Parsons, Marsha B.; Green, Carolyn W.

    2001-01-01

    Observations in 100 congregated community and institutional day-program sites for individuals with severe disabilities indicated that approximately half of consumer time was spent in purposeful activity, 75 percent of which was age-appropriate. In 20 percent of the sites most activity was age-inappropriate. Recommended program evaluation and…

  10. Detection and Molecular Characterization of Giardia duodenalis in Children Attending Day Care Centers in Majadahonda, Madrid, Central Spain

    PubMed Central

    Mateo, Marta; Mateo, María; Montoya, Ana; Bailo, Begoña; Saugar, José M.; Aguilera, María; Fuentes, Isabel; Carmena, David

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Infections by the protozoan enteroparasites Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp are a major cause of morbidity in children attending day care facilities in developed countries. In this cross-sectional study, we aimed to estimate the occurrence and genotype frequencies of these pathogens in children attending day care centers in Majadahonda, Central Spain. To do so, single stool samples were obtained from 90 children and tested for the presence of G duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp by conventional microscopy and immunochromatography. Positive results by these techniques were subsequently confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy. G duodenalis-positive samples were subjected to molecular characterization studies by multilocus sequence-based genotyping of the glutamate dehydrogenase and β-giardin genes of the parasite. G duodenalis assemblages were confirmed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses and sequencing. A socioepidemiological questionnaire was used to identify variables potentially associated with giardiasis/cryptosporidiosis in the population of children under investigation. Overall, G duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp were detected in 15.5% and 3.3% of stool samples, respectively. Giardiasis and cryptosporidiosis were found in 3/3 and 2/3 day care centers, respectively, affecting mainly infants aged 13 to 24 months. A total of 8 G duodenalis isolates were confirmed as subassemblage BIV, all of them belonging to asymptomatic children. Attempts to genotype Cryptosporidium isolates failed. None of the variables considered could be associated with higher risk of infection with giardiasis or cryptosporidiosis. These results clearly indicate that asymptomatic infections with G duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp are frequent in <3-year-old children in Central Spain. PMID:25275524

  11. THIRTY-DAY HOSPITAL READMISSION RATE AMONG ADULTS LIVING WITH HIV

    PubMed Central

    BERRY, Stephen A.; FLEISHMAN, John A.; YEHIA, Baligh R.; KORTHUIS, P. Todd; AGWU, Allison L.; MOORE, Richard D.; GEBO, Kelly A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Thirty-day hospital readmission rate is receiving increasing attention as a quality of care indicator. The objective of this study was to determine readmission rates and to identify factors associated with readmission among persons living with HIV. Design Prospective multicenter observational cohort. Setting Nine U.S. HIV clinics affiliated through the HIV Research Network. Subjects Patients engaged in HIV care during 2005–2010. Main outcome measure(s) Readmission rate was defined as the proportion of hospitalizations followed by a readmission within 30 days. Factors in multivariate analyses included diagnostic categories, patient demographic and clinical characteristics, and having an outpatient follow-up visit. Results Among 11,651 total index hospitalizations, the 30-day readmission rate was 19.3%. AIDS defining illnesses (ADI, 9.6% of index hospitalizations) and non-AIDS defining infections (26.4% of index hospitalizations) had readmission rates of 26.2% and 16.6%, respectively. Factors independently associated with readmission included lower CD4 count (AOR 1.80 [1.53, 2.11] for CD4 <50 vs. ≥351 cells/μl), longer length of stay (1.77 [1.53, 2.04] for ≥9 days vs. 1–3 days), and several diagnostic categories including ADI. Having an outpatient follow-up clinic visit was not associated with lower readmission risk (AHR 0.98 [0.88, 1.08]). Conclusions The 19.3% readmission rate exceeds the 13.2% rate reported for the general population of 18–64 year-olds. HIV providers may use the 19.3% rate as a basis of comparison. Policymakers may consider the impact of HIV when estimating expected readmissions for a hospital or region. Preventing or recovering from severe immune dysfunction may be the most important factor to reducing readmissions. PMID:23612008

  12. Traumatic Brain Injury among Older Adults at Level I and II Trauma Centers

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbert, Jeffrey P.; Whyte, John; Corrigan, John D.; Faul, Mark; Harrison-Felix, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Individuals 65 years of age and over have the highest rates of traumatic brain injury (TBI)-related hospitalizations and deaths, and older adults (defined variably across studies) have particularly poor outcomes after TBI. The factors predicting these outcomes remain poorly understood, and age-specific care guidelines for TBI do not exist. This study provides an overview of TBI in older adults using data from the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) gathered between 2007 and 2010, evaluates age group-specific trends in rates of TBI over time using U.S. Census data, and examines whether routinely collected information is able to predict hospital discharge status among older adults with TBI in the NTDB. Results showed a 20–25% increase in trauma center admissions for TBI among the oldest age groups (those >=75 years), relative to the general population, between 2007 and 2010. Older adults (>=65 years) with TBI tended to be white females who have incurred an injury from a fall resulting in a “severe” Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score of the head. Older adults had more in-hospital procedures, such as neuroimaging and neurosurgery, tended to experience longer hospital stays, and were more likely to require continued medical care than younger adults. Older age, injury severity, and hypotension increased the odds of in-hospital death. The public health burden of TBI among older adults will likely increase as the Baby Boom generation ages. Improved primary and secondary prevention of TBI in this cohort is needed. PMID:23962046

  13. Connecting the disconnected: adult day care for people with AIDS in New York City.

    PubMed

    Smith, M Y; Knickman, J R; Oppenheimer, L M

    1992-11-01

    Despite pressing need, the development of a continuum of long-term-care services for people with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) has been hampered by the dearth of information on the characteristics and service needs of patients eligible for such care. This article presents findings from a process evaluation of an outpatient day care program for people with AIDS in New York City. The AIDS clients were highly functional but had a diverse range of needs and problems related to housing, substance abuse, medical care, and social support. The majority of clients reported being very satisfied with the level of staff support and with the overall program. The findings of the study suggest that day care is a valuable addition to the continuum of services and that the creative dissemination of this program may improve the delivery of services to people with AIDS. PMID:1478553

  14. Specific allogeneic unresponsiveness in the adult host: present-day experimental models

    SciTech Connect

    Rapaport, F.T.; Bachvaroff, R.J.; Cronkite, E.; Chanana, A.; Sato, T.; Asari, H.; Waltzer, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    As part of a long-term intensive effort to apply the induction of adult allogensic unresponsiveness to the transplantation problem, two techniques to control the variability in the persistence of immunologically competent postthymic cells iin the treated host and/or the inoculum of autologous marrow returned to the host after irradiation are described. The first consisted of exposing the peripheral blood of prospective recipients to a 5-week course of extra-corporeal irradiation (ECIB), the other of exposing the stored autologous marrow scheduled to repopulate a given recipient to methyl-prednisolone (MPd) and DNase prior to renifusion into the recipient. Serial analysis of bone marrow cell samples at various intervals before and after treatment was undertaken. The significance of the disappearance of a particular population of nonnuclear cells from the samples, and the association of such disappearance with increased success in the induction of allogeneic unresponsiveness is discussed. (ACR)

  15. An Idiographic Examination of Day-to-Day Patterns of Substance Use Craving, Negative Affect, and Tobacco Use among Young Adults in Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Yao; Wiebe, Richard P.; Cleveland, H. Harrington; Molenaar, Peter C. M.; Harris, Kitty S.

    2013-01-01

    Psychological constructs, such as negative affect and substance use cravings that closely predict relapse, show substantial intraindividual day-to-day variability. This intraindividual variability of relevant psychological states combined with the "one day at a time" nature of sustained abstinence warrant a day-to-day investigation of substance…

  16. The implementation and the cultural adjustment of functional family therapy in a Dutch psychiatric day-treatment center.

    PubMed

    Breuk, Rene E; Sexton, Thomas L; van Dam, Astrid; Disse, Claudia; Doreleijers, Theo A H; Slot, Wim N; Rowland, Marcy K

    2006-10-01

    Because of the increasing severity of adolescent problem behavior, evidence-based practices are becoming of interest as an alternative to traditional treatment with the behavior problems of adolescents in juvenile justice settings. Despite interest in evidence-based practices, questions exist regarding whether or not evidence-based intervention models can be successfully transported to cultures other than those in which they were developed. This article describes the transportation process of an American evidence-based family therapy (Functional Family Therapy [FFT]) into the service delivery system of a psychiatric day treatment center for juvenile delinquents in Amsterdam. The characteristics of FFT that make it cross-culturally sensitive are discussed. Results from the changes in service delivery suggest FFT can be successfully implemented in international settings with adjustments to make the model fit the culture(s) of The Netherlands without changing the model of FFT itself. PMID:17120523

  17. 7 CFR 226.11 - Program payments for centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS CHILD AND ADULT CARE FOOD PROGRAM Payment Provisions § 226.11 Program... approved child care centers, at-risk afterschool care centers, adult day care centers, emergency shelters, and outside-school-hours care centers. A State agency may develop a policy under which centers...

  18. Factors Affecting the Involvement of Day Centre Care Staff in the Delivery of Physiotherapy to Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: An Exploratory Study in One London Borough

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, M. -J.; Kitchen, S. S.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Physiotherapists for adults with intellectual disabilities often work in day centres, relying on care staff to support programmes. This study investigates factors affecting physiotherapy delivery in 4 day centres in one London borough. Materials and Method: Semi-structured interviews were carried out with day centre care staff,…

  19. Time Spent Walking and Risk of Diabetes in Japanese Adults: The Japan Public Health Center-Based Prospective Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Kabeya, Yusuke; Goto, Atsushi; Kato, Masayuki; Matsushita, Yumi; Takahashi, Yoshihiko; Isogawa, Akihiro; Inoue, Manami; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Kadowaki, Takashi; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background The association between time spent walking and risk of diabetes was investigated in a Japanese population-based cohort. Methods Data from the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Diabetes cohort were analyzed. The surveys of diabetes were performed at baseline and at the 5-year follow-up. Time spent walking per day was assessed using a self-reported questionnaire (<30 minutes, 30 minutes to <1 hour, 1 to <2 hours, or ≥2 hours). A cross-sectional analysis was performed among 26 488 adults in the baseline survey. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between time spent walking and the presence of unrecognized diabetes. We then performed a longitudinal analysis that was restricted to 11 101 non-diabetic adults who participated in both the baseline and 5-year surveys. The association between time spent walking and the incidence of diabetes during the 5 years was examined. Results In the cross-sectional analysis, 1058 participants had unrecognized diabetes. Those with time spent walking of <30 minutes per day had increased odds of having diabetes in relation to those with time spent walking of ≥2 hours (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.23; 95% CI, 1.02–1.48). In the longitudinal analysis, 612 participants developed diabetes during the 5 years of follow-up. However, a significant association between time spent walking and the incidence of diabetes was not observed. Conclusions Increased risk of diabetes was implied in those with time spent walking of <30 minutes per day, although the longitudinal analysis failed to show a significant result. PMID:26725285

  20. Donor Safety in Adult-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation: A Single-Center Experience of 356 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Haipeng; Yang, Jiayin; Yan, Lunan

    2016-01-01

    Background As an important means to tackle the worldwide shortage of liver grafts, adult-adult living donor liver transplantation (A-ALDLT) is the most massive operation a healthy person could undergo, so donor safety is of prime importance. However, most previous research focused on recipients, while complications in donors have not been fully described or investigated. Material/Methods To investigate donor safety in terms of postoperative complications, the clinical data of 356 A-ALDLT donors in our center from January 2002 to September 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. These patients were divided into a pre-2008 group (before January 2008) and a post-2008 group (after January 2008). Donor safety was evaluated with regard to the type, frequency, and severity of postoperative complications. Results There were no donor deaths in our center during this period. The overall complication rate was 23.0% (82/356). The proportion of Clavien I, II, III, and IV complications was 51.2% (42/82), 25.6% (21/82), 22.0% (18/82), and 1.2% (1/82), respectively. In all the donors, the incidence of Clavien I, II, III, and IV complications was 11.8% (42/356), 5.9% (21/356), 5.1% (18/356), and 0.3% (1/356), respectively. The overall complication rate in the post-2008 group was significantly lower than that in the pre-2008 group (18.1% (41/227) vs. 32.6% (42/129), P<0.01). Biliary complications were the most common, with an incidence of 8.4% (30/356). Conclusions The risk to A-ALDLT donors is controllable and acceptable with improvement in preoperative assessment and liver surgery. PMID:27178367

  1. Donor Safety in Adult-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation: A Single-Center Experience of 356 Cases.

    PubMed

    Meng, Haipeng; Yang, Jiayin; Yan, Lunan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND As an important means to tackle the worldwide shortage of liver grafts, adult-adult living donor liver transplantation (A-ALDLT) is the most massive operation a healthy person could undergo, so donor safety is of prime importance. However, most previous research focused on recipients, while complications in donors have not been fully described or investigated. MATERIAL AND METHODS To investigate donor safety in terms of postoperative complications, the clinical data of 356 A-ALDLT donors in our center from January 2002 to September 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. These patients were divided into a pre-2008 group (before January 2008) and a post-2008 group (after January 2008). Donor safety was evaluated with regard to the type, frequency, and severity of postoperative complications. RESULTS There were no donor deaths in our center during this period. The overall complication rate was 23.0% (82/356). The proportion of Clavien I, II, III, and IV complications was 51.2% (42/82), 25.6% (21/82), 22.0% (18/82), and 1.2% (1/82), respectively. In all the donors, the incidence of Clavien I, II, III, and IV complications was 11.8% (42/356), 5.9% (21/356), 5.1% (18/356), and 0.3% (1/356), respectively. The overall complication rate in the post-2008 group was significantly lower than that in the pre-2008 group (18.1% (41/227) vs. 32.6% (42/129), P<0.01). Biliary complications were the most common, with an incidence of 8.4% (30/356). CONCLUSIONS The risk to A-ALDLT donors is controllable and acceptable with improvement in preoperative assessment and liver surgery. PMID:27178367

  2. Adult Education for Social Change: From Center Stage to the Wings and Back Again. Information Series No. 365.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaney, Tom

    To what extent was social change on center stage during adult education's formative years? Whose vision embraced social change and whose did not? What factors led to the decline of social action as a goal of adult education, and what factors suggest renewed interest in social goals? This paper examines these questions, beginning in the 1920s with…

  3. Reducing the use of seclusion and restraint in psychiatric emergency and adult inpatient services- improving patient-centered care.

    PubMed

    Wale, Joyce B; Belkin, Gary S; Moon, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The reduction of seclusion and restraint (S/R) use has been given national priority by the US government, The Joint Commission, and patient advocacy groups. It is associated with high rates of patient and staff injuries and is a coercive and potentially traumatizing intervention. The New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC) is the largest municipal health care system in the country, with 11 HHC facilities operating psychiatric emergency services and inpatient psychiatric services. HHC operates 1117 adult inpatient psychiatric beds with an average length of stay of 22.2 days that generated over 19,000 discharges in 2009. In 2009, there were over 36,000 psychiatric emergency services visits. HHC's Office of Behavioral Health provides strategic leadership, planning, and support for the operations and quality objectives of these services. In January 2007, the corporate office initiated the Seclusion and Restraint Reduction Initiative, with a sequenced, intensive series of interventions and strategies to help focus the behavioral health leadership and staff on the need for continued culture change toward a more patient-centered and safe system of psychiatric emergency and adult inpatient care. From 2007 to 2009, there was a substantial decline in HHC's overall rate of S/R incidents in inpatient units. The more substantial impact was in the reduced overall time spent in S/R; the reduced frequency of use of S/R; and the reduced likelihood of patient injury from S/R use. PMID:21841927

  4. Should we brush twice a day? Determinants of dental health among young adults in Finland.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Lien; Häkkinen, Unto; Knuuttila, Matti; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta

    2008-02-01

    We explore the determinants of dental ill-health as measured by the occurrence of caries. A recursive bivariate probit model that was derived from health production and demand theory is employed to model caries, while taking account of dental care use. The data are from a follow-up questionnaire used in a longitudinal study of the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort, with respondents aged 31 (n = 5020). The factors controlled for relate to family background and health behavior during their youth, current socioecononomic variables and dental health stock. The total effects on the occurrence of caries of the explanatory variables are computed. Among females, factors increasing caries are body mass index and intake of alcohol, sugar and soft drinks, and those reducing caries are birth weight and adolescent school achievement. Among males, caries is positively related to the metropolitan residence and negatively related to education and healthy diet. Smoking increases caries, whereas dental care use, regular dental attendance and brushing teeth at least twice a day decrease caries. To promote oral health, attention should focus on policies to improve dental health education and to reduce the impacts of common risk factors. PMID:17645280

  5. Neurobehavioral Toxicity of a Repeated Exposure (14 Days) to the Airborne Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Fluorene in Adult Wistar Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Peiffer, Julie; Cosnier, Frédéric; Grova, Nathalie; Nunge, Hervé; Salquèbre, Guillaume; Decret, Marie-Josèphe; Cossec, Benoît; Rychen, Guido; Appenzeller, Brice M. R.; Schroeder, Henri

    2013-01-01

    Fluorene is one of the most abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in air and may contribute to the neurobehavioral alterations induced by the environmental exposure of humans to PAHs. Since no data are available on fluorene neurotoxicity, this study was conducted in adult rats to assess the behavioral toxicity of repeated fluorene inhalation exposure. Male rats (n = 18/group) were exposed nose-only to 1.5 or 150 ppb of fluorene 6 hours/day for 14 consecutive days, whereas the control animals were exposed to non-contaminated air. At the end of the exposure, animals were tested for activity and anxiety in an open-field and in an elevated-plus maze, for short-term memory in a Y-maze, and for spatial learning in an eight-arm maze. The results showed that the locomotor activity and the learning performances of the animals were unaffected by fluorene. In parallel, the fluorene-exposed rats showed a lower level of anxiety than controls in the open-field, but not in the elevated-plus maze, which is probably due to a possible difference in the aversive feature of the two mazes. In the same animals, increasing blood and brain levels of fluorene monohydroxylated metabolites (especially the 2-OH fluorene) were detected at both concentrations (1.5 and 150 ppb), demonstrating the exposure of the animals to the pollutant and showing the ability of this compound to be metabolized and to reach the cerebral compartment. The present study highlights the possibility for a 14-day fluorene exposure to induce some specific anxiety-related behavioral disturbances, and argues in favor of the susceptibility of the adult brain when exposed to volatile fluorene. PMID:23977039

  6. Tear Lacritin Levels by Age, Sex, and Time of Day in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Kyle; Gandia, Natasha C.; Wilburn, Jennifer K.; Bower, Kraig S.; Sia, Rose K.; Ryan, Denise S.; Deaton, Michael L.; Still, Katherine M.; Vassilev, Veronica C.; Laurie, Gordon W.; McKown, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Several small proteomic studies suggest that the prosecretory tear protein lacritin may be selectively downregulated in dry eye syndrome and in blepharitis, yet little information is available about normal baseline levels. This study assessed lacritin levels in tears from healthy individuals and addressed whether they differ according to sex, age, or time of day. Methods. Rabbit antibodies against lacritin N-terminal peptide EDASSDSTGADPAQEAGTS (Pep Lac N-Term) were generated and characterized against human recombinant lacritin and N-65 truncation mutant. Basal tears were collected from 66 healthy individuals ranging in age from 18 to 52 years, and at four times during one 24-hour period from 34 other individuals. Lacritin levels were then analyzed by ELISA and Western blotting. Results. Anti-Pep Lac N-Term bound lacritin, but not truncation mutant N-65 that lacks the N-terminal antigenic site. Tear lacritin levels followed a normal distribution with a mean of 4.2 ± 1.17 ng/100 ng total tear protein. Levels differed little by age or sex, and decreased slightly between 4 and 8 hours in a 24-hour cycle. Tear-blocking effects were minimal, as suggested by spiking of tears with recombinant lacritin. Conclusions. Anti-Pep Lac N-Term–detectable lacritin comprises ∼4.2 ng/100 ng total tear protein in healthy individuals, with no significant differences between males and females or among individuals between 18 and 52 years old. Levels decrease slightly in the late afternoon. These findings provide a baseline for future immunodiagnostic studies of lacritin in dry eye and other ocular diseases. PMID:22918641

  7. Improving Medication Knowledge among Older Adults with Heart Failure: A Patient-Centered Approach to Instruction Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Daniel G.; Weiner, Michael; Young, James; Steinley, Douglas; Deer, Melissa; Murray, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated whether patient-centered instructions for chronic heart failure medications increase comprehension and memory for medication information in older adults diagnosed with chronic heart failure. Design and Methods: Patient-centered instructions for familiar and unfamiliar medications were compared with instructions for the…

  8. Patient Vertical Centering and Correlation with Radiation Output in Adult Abdominopelvic CT.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Phillip M

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a significant effect, independent of patient size, of patient vertical centering on the current-modulated CT scanner radiation output in adult abdominopelvic CT. A phantom was used to evaluate calculation of vertical positioning and effective diameter at five different table heights. In addition, 656 consecutive contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic scans using the same protocol and automatic tube current modulation settings on a Philips Brilliance 64 MDCT scanner were retrospectively evaluated. The vertical position of the patient center of mass and the average effective diameter of the scanned patient were computed using the reconstructed images. The average volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) for each scan was recorded. The mean patient center of mass y coordinate ranged from -3.7 to 6.7 cm (mean ± SD, 2.8 ± 1.2 cm), indicating that patients were on average positioned slightly below the scanner isocenter. There was a slight tendency for smaller patients to be mis-centered lower than larger patients. Average CTDIvol closely fit a quadratic regression curve with respect to mean effective diameter. However, the value of the regression coefficient relating CTDIvol to the patient's vertical position was nearly zero, indicating only a very slight increase in CTDIvol with patient mis-centering for the scanner used in this study. The techniques used here may be useful both for automated evaluation of proper patient positioning in CT and for estimating the radiation dose effects of patient mis-centering for any CT scanner. PMID:26810981

  9. A Description of Room Arrangement, Design, and Appearance in Title IV-A Day Care Centers in Philadelphia, 1974-1975. Report No. 7733.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silber, Theodore J.

    This report describes the room arrangement, design, and appearance of 152 Title IV-A Day Care centers in Philadelphia. A series of 27 items on a section of the Daily Care, In-Room Observation Guide was used to provide an overall description of rooms in day care and to identify differences in features for different types of programs. Data were…

  10. Computerized spatial navigation training during 14 days of bed rest in healthy older adult men: Effect on gait performance.

    PubMed

    Marusic, Uros; Kavcic, Voyko; Giordani, Bruno; Gerževič, Mitja; Meeusen, Romain; Pišot, Rado

    2015-06-01

    Prolonged physical inactivity or bed rest (BR) due to illness or other factors can result in significant declines in physical health and even cognitive functions. Based on random selection, 7 healthy older adult men received computerized spatial navigation training, while 8 served as active controls during 14-day BR. Greater post-BR declines were seen in normal and complex (dual-task) walking for the control as compared to intervention group, suggesting that computerized spatial navigation training can successfully moderate detrimental BR effects. Findings underline the generalization of cognitive-based intervention to the motor domain and potentially support their use to supplement BR interventions (e.g., exercise and nutrition). PMID:25938245

  11. PARCS: A Safety Net Community-Based Fitness Center for Low-Income Adults

    PubMed Central

    Keith, NiCole; de Groot, Mary; Mi, Deming; Alexander, Kisha; Kaiser, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Background Physical activity (PA) and fitness are critical to maintaining health and avoiding chronic disease. Limited access to fitness facilities in low-income urban areas has been identified as a contributor to low PA participation and poor fitness. Objectives This research describes community-based fitness centers established for adults living in low-income, urban communities and characterizes a sample of its members. Methods The community identified a need for physical fitness opportunities to improve residents’ health. Three community high schools were host sites. Resources were combined to renovate and staff facilities, acquire equipment, and refer patients to exercise. The study sample included 170 members ≥ age 18yr who completed demographic, exercise self-efficacy, and quality of life surveys and a fitness evaluation. Neighborhood-level U.S. Census data were obtained for comparison. Results The community-based fitness centers resulted from university, public school, and hospital partnerships offering safe, accessible, and affordable exercise opportunities. The study sample mean BMI was 35 ± 7.6 (Class II obesity), mean age was 50yr ± 12.5, 66% were black, 72% were female, 66% completed some college or greater, and 71% had an annual household income < $25K and supported 2.2 dependents. Participants had moderate confidence for exercise participation and low fitness levels. When compared to census data, participants were representative of their communities. Conclusion This observational study reveals a need for affordable fitness centers for low-income adults. We demonstrate a model where communities and organizations strategically leverage resources to address disparities in physical fitness and health. PMID:27346764

  12. Adult sports-related traumatic brain injury in United States trauma centers.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Ethan A; Yue, John K; Burke, John F; Chan, Andrew K; Dhall, Sanjay S; Berger, Mitchel S; Manley, Geoffrey T; Tarapore, Phiroz E

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Sports-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an important public health concern estimated to affect 300,000 to 3.8 million people annually in the United States. Although injuries to professional athletes dominate the media, this group represents only a small proportion of the overall population. Here, the authors characterize the demographics of sports-related TBI in adults from a community-based trauma population and identify predictors of prolonged hospitalization and increased morbidity and mortality rates. METHODS Utilizing the National Sample Program of the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB), the authors retrospectively analyzed sports-related TBI data from adults (age ≥ 18 years) across 5 sporting categories-fall or interpersonal contact (FIC), roller sports, skiing/snowboarding, equestrian sports, and aquatic sports. Multivariable regression analysis was used to identify predictors of prolonged hospital length of stay (LOS), medical complications, inpatient mortality rates, and hospital discharge disposition. Statistical significance was assessed at α < 0.05, and the Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons was applied for each outcome analysis. RESULTS From 2003 to 2012, in total, 4788 adult sports-related TBIs were documented in the NTDB, which represented 18,310 incidents nationally. Equestrian sports were the greatest contributors to sports-related TBI (45.2%). Mild TBI represented nearly 86% of injuries overall. Mean (± SEM) LOSs in the hospital or intensive care unit (ICU) were 4.25 ± 0.09 days and 1.60 ± 0.06 days, respectively. The mortality rate was 3.0% across all patients, but was statistically higher in TBI from roller sports (4.1%) and aquatic sports (7.7%). Age, hypotension on admission to the emergency department (ED), and the severity of head and extracranial injuries were statistically significant predictors of prolonged hospital and ICU LOSs, medical complications, failure to discharge to home, and death. Traumatic

  13. Alternate day fasting impacts the brain insulin-signaling pathway of young adult male C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianghua; E, Lezi; Wang, Wenfang; Frontera, Jennifer; Zhu, Hao; Wang, Wen-Tung; Lee, Phil; Choi, In Young; Brooks, William M; Burns, Jeffrey M; Aires, Daniel; Swerdlow, Russell H

    2011-04-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) has recognized health benefits that may extend to brain. We examined how DR affects bioenergetics-relevant enzymes and signaling pathways in the brains of C57BL/6 mice. Five-month-old male mice were placed in ad libitum or one of two repeated fasting and refeeding (RFR) groups, an alternate day (intermittent fed; IF) or alternate day plus antioxidants (blueberry, pomegranate, and green tea extracts) (IF + AO) fed group. During the 24-h fast blood glucose levels initially fell but stabilized within 6 h of starting the fast, thus avoiding frank hypoglycemia. DR in general appeared to enhance insulin sensitivity. After six weeks brain AKT and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta phosphorylation were lower in the RFR mice, suggesting RFR reduced brain insulin-signaling pathway activity. Pathways that mediate mitochondrial biogenesis were not activated; AMP kinase phosphorylation, silent information regulator 2 phosphorylation, peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1 alpha levels, and cytochrome oxidase subunit 4 levels did not change. ATP levels also did not decline, which suggests the RFR protocols did not directly impact brain bioenergetics. Antioxidant supplementation did not affect the brain parameters we evaluated. Our data indicate in young adult male C57BL/6 mice, RFR primarily affects brain energy metabolism by reducing brain insulin signaling, which potentially results indirectly as a consequence of reduced peripheral insulin production. PMID:21244426

  14. Alternate Day Fasting Impacts the Brain Insulin Signaling Pathway of Young Adult Male C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jianghua; Lezi, E; Wang, WenFang; Frontera, Jennifer; Zhu, Hao; Wang, Wen-Tung; Lee, Sang-Pil; Choi, In Young; Brooks, William M.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Aires, Daniel; Swerdlow, Russell H.

    2011-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) has recognized health benefits that may extend to brain. We examined how DR affects bioenergetics-relevant enzymes and signaling pathways in the brains of C57BL/6 mice. Five month-old male mice were placed in ad libitum (AL) or one of two repeated fasting and refeeding (RFR) groups, an alternate day (intermittent fed; IF) or alternate day plus antioxidants (blueberry, pomegranate, and green tea extracts) (IF+AO) fed group. During the 24 hour fast blood glucose levels initially fell but stabilized within 6 hours of starting the fast, thus avoiding frank hypoglycemia. DR in general appeared to enhance insulin sensitivity. After six weeks brain AKT and GSK3β phosphorylation were lower in the RFR mice, suggesting RFR reduced brain insulin signaling pathway activity. Pathways that mediate mitochondrial biogenesis were not activated; AMPK phosphorylation, SIRT1 phosphorylation, PGC1a levels, and COX4 levels did not change. ATP levels also did not decline, which suggests the RFR protocols did not directly impact brain bioenergetics. Antioxidant supplementation did not affect the brain parameters we evaluated. Our data indicate in young adult male C57BL/6 mice, RFR primarily affects brain energy metabolism by reducing brain insulin signaling, which potentially results indirectly as a consequence of reduced peripheral insulin production. PMID:21244426

  15. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Streptococcus pneumoniae strains colonizing children attending day-care centers in Norway.

    PubMed

    Vestrheim, Didrik F; Høiby, E Arne; Aaberge, Ingeborg S; Caugant, Dominique A

    2008-08-01

    A cross-sectional study of nasopharyngeal colonization with Streptococcus pneumoniae was performed among 573 children attending 29 day-care centers (DCCs) in Norway prior to the start of mass vaccination with the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7). A sensitive sampling method was employed, including transport in an enrichment broth and serotyping of pneumococci directly from the broth, in addition to traditional single-colony isolation from blood agar plates. The prevalence of carriage was high, peaking at 88.7% in 2-year-olds. More than one serotype was isolated from 12.7% of the carriers. Of 509 isolates obtained, 227 (44.6%) belonged to the PCV-7 serotypes. Penicillin nonsusceptibility was rare (1.8% of the isolates). Nonsusceptibility to erythromycin (5.9%), clindamycin (2.0%), and tetracycline (5.5%) was associated with PCV-7 serotypes (P < 0.001). Multilocus sequence typing was performed on the whole strain collection, revealing 102 sequence types (STs), of which 31 (30.4%) were novel. Eleven isolates (2.2%) belonged to the England(14)-9 clone, and 19 isolates (3.7%) belonged to, or were single-locus variants of, the Portugal(19F)-21 clone. The pneumococcal populations within the DCCs were composed of a majority of isolates with STs shared between the DCCs and a minority of isolates with STs unique for each DCC. The highest numbers of different STs, including novel STs, were found within the most frequent serotypes. Our study indicates that carriage of S. pneumoniae is highly prevalent among children in Norwegian DCCs, with a genetically diverse pneumococcal population consisting of unique microepidemic DCC populations. PMID:18524970

  16. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization of Streptococcus pneumoniae Strains Colonizing Children Attending Day-Care Centers in Norway▿

    PubMed Central

    Vestrheim, Didrik F.; Høiby, E. Arne; Aaberge, Ingeborg S.; Caugant, Dominique A.

    2008-01-01

    A cross-sectional study of nasopharyngeal colonization with Streptococcus pneumoniae was performed among 573 children attending 29 day-care centers (DCCs) in Norway prior to the start of mass vaccination with the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7). A sensitive sampling method was employed, including transport in an enrichment broth and serotyping of pneumococci directly from the broth, in addition to traditional single-colony isolation from blood agar plates. The prevalence of carriage was high, peaking at 88.7% in 2-year-olds. More than one serotype was isolated from 12.7% of the carriers. Of 509 isolates obtained, 227 (44.6%) belonged to the PCV-7 serotypes. Penicillin nonsusceptibility was rare (1.8% of the isolates). Nonsusceptibility to erythromycin (5.9%), clindamycin (2.0%), and tetracycline (5.5%) was associated with PCV-7 serotypes (P < 0.001). Multilocus sequence typing was performed on the whole strain collection, revealing 102 sequence types (STs), of which 31 (30.4%) were novel. Eleven isolates (2.2%) belonged to the England14-9 clone, and 19 isolates (3.7%) belonged to, or were single-locus variants of, the Portugal19F-21 clone. The pneumococcal populations within the DCCs were composed of a majority of isolates with STs shared between the DCCs and a minority of isolates with STs unique for each DCC. The highest numbers of different STs, including novel STs, were found within the most frequent serotypes. Our study indicates that carriage of S. pneumoniae is highly prevalent among children in Norwegian DCCs, with a genetically diverse pneumococcal population consisting of unique microepidemic DCC populations. PMID:18524970

  17. Reactogenicity profile of tetanus-diphtheria (adult-type) vaccine: results of a naturalistic study performed at an adult vaccination center.

    PubMed

    Vilella, A; Dal-Ré, R; Simó, D; García-Corbeira, P; Diego, P; Bayas, J M

    2000-11-01

    A prospective observational naturalistic study was conducted at a vaccination center to assess the reactogenicity of tetanus-diphtheria (adult-type) (Td) vaccine. In 1 year, 3072 adult subjects were invited to participate, of whom 1977 (62% women, mean age [+/- SD]: 39 [+/- 14.5] years [range: 18-85 years]) actively did so. A follow-up diary card was provided to all subjects to record all local and general symptoms experienced during the following 4 days after vaccination. Of the study population (n = 1977), 280 received a second Td dose, and 30 received a third dose: the total number of diary cards collected was 2287. Td was always administered (i.m. route) in the left arm. The study population was grouped by age: 52%, 41%, and 7% were ages 18 to 35, 36 to 65, and > 65 years, respectively, most of them being travelers to developing countries. Close to two-thirds of subjects received up to nine different vaccines (mainly hepatitis B, hepatitis A, and typhoid) in addition to Td. Adverse reactions were classified as mild, moderate, and severe. Overall, 50% of subjects reported some type of adverse reaction. Pain, discomfort with arm movement, swelling, malaise, and fever (axillary temperature > or = 38 degrees C) were recorded in 43%, 14%, 3.8%, 5.1%, and 1.7% of all diary cards, respectively. Local and general reactions were considered as mild by almost two-thirds of vaccinees and lasted < or = 48 hours in about three-fourths of them. The incidence of moderate plus severe local reactions was significantly (p < 0.01) more commonly reported in the 18- to 35-year-old group than in the 36- to 65-year-old group. No statistically significant differences were observed when comparing the incidence of general adverse reactions of those receiving Td alone with those receiving additional vaccines or when comparing the duration and intensity by age groups. Only 5.2% of subjects required analgesic/antipyretic treatment. In conclusion, this study shows that Td vaccine is

  18. Construction of brain atlases based on a multi-center MRI dataset of 2020 Chinese adults.

    PubMed

    Liang, Peipeng; Shi, Lin; Chen, Nan; Luo, Yishan; Wang, Xing; Liu, Kai; Mok, Vincent C T; Chu, Winnie C W; Wang, Defeng; Li, Kuncheng

    2015-01-01

    Despite the known morphological differences (e.g., brain shape and size) in the brains of populations of different origins (e.g., age and race), the Chinese brain atlas is less studied. In the current study, we developed a statistical brain atlas based on a multi-center high quality magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dataset of 2020 Chinese adults (18-76 years old). We constructed 12 Chinese brain atlas from the age 20 year to the age 75 at a 5 years interval. New Chinese brain standard space, coordinates, and brain area labels were further defined. The new Chinese brain atlas was validated in brain registration and segmentation. It was found that, as contrast to the MNI152 template, the proposed Chinese atlas showed higher accuracy in hippocampus segmentation and relatively smaller shape deformations during registration. These results indicate that a population-specific time varying brain atlas may be more appropriate for studies involving Chinese populations. PMID:26678304

  19. Implementation of Patient-Centered Medical Homes in Adult Primary Care Practices.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jeffrey A; Markovitz, Amanda R; Paustian, Michael L; Wise, Christopher G; El Reda, Darline K; Green, Lee A; Fetters, Michael D

    2015-08-01

    There has been relatively little empirical evidence about the effects of patient-centered medical home (PCMH) implementation on patient-related outcomes and costs. Using a longitudinal design and a large study group of 2,218 Michigan adult primary care practices, our study examined the following research questions: Is the level of, and change in, implementation of PCMH associated with medical surgical cost, preventive services utilization, and quality of care in the following year? Results indicated that both level and amount of change in practice implementation of PCMH are independently and positively associated with measures of quality of care and use of preventive services, after controlling for a variety of practice, patient cohort, and practice environmental characteristics. Results also indicate that lower overall medical and surgical costs are associated with higher levels of PCMH implementation, although change in PCMH implementation did not achieve statistical significance. PMID:25861803

  20. Factors Associated with Achievement in Adult Basic Education (Evaluation of Adult Basic Education in the Quitman County Center for Learning and Educational Development).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shegog, Bedeliah; And Others

    The document describes the methods, procedures, and results of the evaluation of the Quitman County Project, an adult basic education demonstration program with 147 participants in four learning centers in Mississippi. Data were collected by means of site visits, observation, interviews and standardized achievement tests. In terms of student…

  1. Testing a Family-centered Intervention to Promote Functional and Cognitive Recovery in Hospitalized Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Boltz, Marie; Resnick, Barbara; Chippendale, Tracy; Galvin, James

    2016-01-01

    A comparative trial using repeated measures design evaluated the feasibility and outcomes of the Family-centered Function-focused Care (Fam-FFC) intervention intended to promote functional recovery in the hospitalized older adult. A three component intervention (1) environmental assessment/ modification, 2) staff education, 3) family/patient education and partnership in care planning with post-acute follow-up) was implemented by a family-centered resource nurse and a facility champion. Control units were exposed to function-focused care education only. Ninety-seven dyads of medical patients age 65 and older and family caregivers (FCGs) were recruited from three medical units of a community teaching hospital. The majority of patients were female (53%); white (89%), married (51%) or widowed (40%), with a mean age of 80.8 (± 7.5). The majority of FCGs were married (78%) daughters (34%), followed by female spouses/partners (31%), in the age range of 46–65 (38%). Outcomes for patients included: functional outcomes (ADL and walking performance, gait, balance), and delirium severity and duration. FCG outcomes included preparedness for caregiving, anxiety, depression, role strain, and mutuality. The intervention group demonstrated less severity and duration of delirium, and better ADL and walking performance, but not gait/balance as compared to the control group. FCG who participated in Fam-FFC showed a significant increase in preparedness for caregiving, less anxiety and less depression from admission to two months post-discharge, but no significant differences in strain and mutuality, as compared to FCG in the control group. Fam-FFC is feasible and has the potential to improve outcomes for hospitalized older adults and family caregivers. PMID:25481973

  2. Using the NIATx Model to Implement User-Centered Design of Technology for Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, David H; Maus, Adam; Judkins, Julianne; Dinauer, Susan; Isham, Andrew; Johnson, Roberta; Landucci, Gina; Atwood, Amy K

    2016-01-01

    What models can effectively guide the creation of eHealth and mHealth technologies? This paper describes the use of the NIATx model as a framework for the user-centered design of a new technology for older adults. The NIATx model is a simple framework of process improvement based on the following principles derived from an analysis of decades of research from various industries about why some projects fail and others succeed: (1) Understand and involve the customer; (2) fix key problems; (3) pick an influential change leader; (4) get ideas from outside the field; (5) use rapid-cycle testing. This paper describes the use of these principles in technology development, the strengths and challenges of using this approach in this context, and lessons learned from the process. Overall, the NIATx model enabled us to produce a user-focused technology that the anecdotal evidence available so far suggests is engaging and useful to older adults. The first and fourth principles were especially important in developing the technology; the fourth proved the most challenging to use. PMID:27025985

  3. Using the NIATx Model to Implement User-Centered Design of Technology for Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Maus, Adam; Judkins, Julianne; Dinauer, Susan; Isham, Andrew; Johnson, Roberta; Landucci, Gina; Atwood, Amy K

    2016-01-01

    What models can effectively guide the creation of eHealth and mHealth technologies? This paper describes the use of the NIATx model as a framework for the user-centered design of a new technology for older adults. The NIATx model is a simple framework of process improvement based on the following principles derived from an analysis of decades of research from various industries about why some projects fail and others succeed: (1) Understand and involve the customer; (2) fix key problems; (3) pick an influential change leader; (4) get ideas from outside the field; (5) use rapid-cycle testing. This paper describes the use of these principles in technology development, the strengths and challenges of using this approach in this context, and lessons learned from the process. Overall, the NIATx model enabled us to produce a user-focused technology that the anecdotal evidence available so far suggests is engaging and useful to older adults. The first and fourth principles were especially important in developing the technology; the fourth proved the most challenging to use. PMID:27025985

  4. Recovery from sports-related concussion: Days to return to neurocognitive baseline in adolescents versus young adults

    PubMed Central

    Zuckerman, Scott L.; Lee, Young M.; Odom, Mitchell J.; Solomon, Gary S.; Forbes, Jonathan A.; Sills, Allen K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Sports-related concussions (SRC) among high school and collegiate athletes represent a significant public health concern. The Concussion in Sport Group (CIS) recommended greater caution regarding return to play with children and adolescents. We hypothesized that younger athletes would take longer to return to neurocognitive baseline than older athletes after a SRC. Methods: Two hundred adolescent and young adult athletes who suffered a SRC were included in our clinical research cohort. Of the total participants, 100 were assigned to the 13-16 year age group and 100 to the 18-22 year age group and were matched on the number of prior concussions. Each participant completed baseline and postconcussion neurocognitive testing using the Immediate Post-Concussion assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) test battery. Return to baseline was defined operationally as post-concussion neurocognitive and symptom scores being equivalent to baseline using reliable change index (RCI) criteria. For each group, the average number of days to return to cognitive and symptom baseline were calculated. Independent sample t-tests were used to compare the mean number of days to return to baseline. Results: Significant differences were found for days to return to baseline between 13-16 year olds and 18-22 year olds in three out of four neurocognitive measures and on the total symptom score. The average number of days to return to baseline was greater for 13-16 year olds than for 18-22 year olds on the following variables: Verbal memory (7.2 vs. 4.7, P = 0.001), visual memory (7.1 vs. 4.7, P = 0.002), reaction time (7.2 vs. 5.1 P = 0.01), and postconcussion symptom scale (8.1 vs. 6.1, P = 0.026). In both groups, greater than 90% of athletes returned to neurocognitive and symptom baseline within 1 month. Conclusions: Our results in this clinical research study show that in SRC, athletes 13-16 years old take longer to return to their neurocognitive and symptom baselines than

  5. Angioplasty or Stenting in Adult Coarctation of the Aorta? A Retrospective Single Center Analysis Over a Decade

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, Sumaira Thomas, Steven M.; Cleveland, Trevor J.; Gaines, Peter A.

    2003-08-15

    For over 11 years, endovascular treatment by angioplasty (PTA) alone or stenting of adult coarctation at a single center was evaluated. We retrospectively reviewed 28 consecutive patients (31 interventions), median age 25 years, treated between 1991 and 2002, 20 of whom had native coarctation. Thirteen patients had PTA alone (16 procedures) (10 'kissing balloon' angioplasty comprising 12 interventions, and 3 single balloon angioplasty comprising 4 interventions) and 15 patients were stented(15 procedures), including 6 secondary and 9 primary stents. There were no procedural or 30-day complications. For the whole group, the median follow-up was 6.6 years (range 1-10 years). In the PTA group, median follow-up was 9 years (range 3-10) and in the stenting group it was 3 years (range 1-5). There were 9 restenoses in the PTA group (6 after 'kissing balloons' and 3 after single balloon) comprising 56% of the angioplasties (9/16 procedures). There was 1 restenosis in the stenting group diagnosed at computed tomography (CT). The patient was clinically well. For the whole group there were significant reductions in systolic blood pressure (BP) (p 0.0003), diastolic BP (p = 0.004) and number of drugs per patient (p = 0.045) at latest follow-up post-treatment. Five patients discontinued therapy.Analysis of the groups revealed that the reduction of systolic and diastolic BP and number of drugs did not reach statistical significance in the PTA group but were significant in the stent group. The endovascular management of adult coarctation is safe. Stents may be more effective than PTA alone but longer-term follow-up of stents is required.

  6. Genomic Comparisons and Shiga Toxin Production among Escherichia coli O157:H7 Isolates from a Day Care Center Outbreak and Sporadic Cases in Southeastern Wisconsin

    PubMed Central

    Gouveia, S.; Proctor, M. E.; Lee, M.-S.; Luchansky, J. B.; Kaspar, C. W.

    1998-01-01

    Contour-clamped homogeneous electric field pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (CHEF-PFGE) was used to compare Wisconsin isolates of Escherichia coli O157:H7, including 39 isolates from a 1994 day care center outbreak, 28 isolates from 18 individuals from the surrounding geographic area with sporadic cases occurring during the 3 months before the outbreak, and 3 isolates, collected in 1995, from patients with hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) who were from eastern Wisconsin counties other than those inhabited by the day care center and sporadic-case individuals. The technique of CHEF-PFGE using XbaI identified seven highly related restriction endonuclease digestion profiles (REDPs) (93 to 98% similarity) among the 39 day care center isolates and nine XbaI REDPs (63 to 93% similarity) among the 28 isolates from sporadic-case individuals, including REDP 33, which was exhibited by both day care and sporadic-case isolates. PFGE analyses of sequential E. coli O157:H7 isolates from symptomatic day care center attendees revealed that the REDPs of 25 isolates from eight patients were indistinguishable whereas the REDPs of 2 of 6 isolates from two patients differed slightly (93 to 95% similarity). The REDPs of the three isolates from 1995 HUS patients were 78 to 83% similar, with REDP 26 being exhibited by one HUS-associated isolate and an isolate from one day care attendee who did not develop HUS. The genes for both Shiga toxins I and II (stx1 and stx2, respectively) were detected in all but one isolate (sporadic case), and Shiga toxin production by the day care center isolates was not significantly different from that of the other isolates, including the three HUS-associated isolates. Analyses of E. coli O157:H7 isolates from both the day care center outbreak and sporadic cases by CHEF-PFGE permitted us to define the REDP variability of an outbreak and geographic region and demonstrated that the day care center outbreak and a HUS case in 1995 were caused by E. coli O157:H7

  7. Knowledge Management in Cardiac Surgery: The Second Tehran Heart Center Adult Cardiac Surgery Database Report

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Kyomars; Karimi, Abbasali; Abbasi, Seyed Hesameddin; Ahmadi, Seyed Hossein; Davoodi, Saeed; Babamahmoodi, Abdolreza; Movahedi, Namdar; Salehiomran, Abbas; Shirzad, Mahmood; Bina, Peyvand

    2012-01-01

    Background: The Adult Cardiac Surgery Databank (ACSD) of Tehran Heart Center was established in 2002 with a view to providing clinical prediction rules for outcomes of cardiac procedures, developing risk score systems, and devising clinical guidelines. This is a general analysis of the collected data. Methods: All the patients referred to Tehran Heart Center for any kind of heart surgery between 2002 and 2008 were included, and their demographic, medical, clinical, operative, and postoperative data were gathered. This report presents general information as well as in-hospital mortality rates regarding all the cardiac procedures performed in the above time period. Results: There were 24959 procedures performed: 19663 (78.8%) isolated coronary artery bypass grafting surgeries (CABGs); 1492 (6.0%) isolated valve surgeries; 1437 (5.8%) CABGs concomitant with other procedures; 832 (3.3%) CABGs combined with valve surgeries; 722 (2.9%) valve surgeries concomitant with other procedures; 545 (2.2%) surgeries other than CABG or valve surgery; and 267 (1.1%) CABGs concomitant with valve and other types of surgery. The overall mortality was 205 (1.04%), with the lowest mortality rate (0.47%) in the isolated CABGs and the highest (4.49%) in the CABGs concomitant with valve surgeries and other types of surgery. Meanwhile, the overall mortality rate was higher in the female patients than in the males (1.90% vs. 0.74%, respectively). Conclusion: Isolated CABG was the most prevalent procedure at our center with the lowest mortality rate. However, the overall mortality was more prevalent in our female patients. This database can serve as a platform for the participation of the other countries in the region in the creation of a regional ACSD. PMID:23304179

  8. Methamphetamine exposure from postnatal day 11 to 20 causes impairments in both behavioral strategies and spatial learning in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael T; Vorhees, Charles V; Boon, Francis; Saber, Andrea J; Cain, Donald P

    2002-12-27

    Spatial learning and memory deficits in a water maze have been observed in adult animals exposed to a regimen of 4 daily doses of d-methamphetamine (MA) at 2 h intervals from postnatal day 11 to 20. An interpretational issue for these long-term effects of MA is whether they are truly spatial deficits or are secondary to alterations in sensorimotor systems. In this experiment, we evaluated the effects of a pretraining procedure shown to minimize the influence of drug-induced sensorimotor deficits. Animals within a litter were treated with MA or saline. Animals were either pretrained for nonspatial task requirements in the water maze (i.e., swimming and platform climbing) or were nai;ve to the task. Animals that received the pretraining did better than the nai;ve animals. The nai;ve MA animals performed worse than the nai;ve control animals as previously observed. By contrast, no difference in search time was noted between pretrained MA- and SAL-treated animals during the acquisition phase of testing. When the platform was relocated in a novel position, spatial learning was impaired for MA animals, regardless of pretraining. No increase in the number of platform nonrecognition events (swimovers, deflections, or jump-offs) occurred among pretrained or nai;ve groups compared to controls. These data suggest that sensorimotor deficits do not account for the spatial learning and memory deficits in animals exposed neonatally to MA. PMID:12470867

  9. Cell proliferation and apoptosis in optic nerve and brain integration centers of adult trout Oncorhynchus mykiss after optic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Pushchina, Evgeniya V.; Shukla, Sachin; Varaksin, Anatoly A.; Obukhov, Dmitry K.

    2016-01-01

    Fishes have remarkable ability to effectively rebuild the structure of nerve cells and nerve fibers after central nervous system injury. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In order to address this issue, we investigated the proliferation and apoptosis of cells in contralateral and ipsilateral optic nerves, after stab wound injury to the eye of an adult trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Heterogenous population of proliferating cells was investigated at 1 week after injury. TUNEL labeling gave a qualitative and quantitative assessment of apoptosis in the cells of optic nerve of trout 2 days after injury. After optic nerve injury, apoptotic response was investigated, and mass patterns of cell migration were found. The maximal concentration of apoptotic bodies was detected in the areas of mass clumps of cells. It is probably indicative of massive cell death in the area of high phagocytic activity of macrophages/microglia. At 1 week after optic nerve injury, we observed nerve cell proliferation in the trout brain integration centers: the cerebellum and the optic tectum. In the optic tectum, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-immunopositive radial glia-like cells were identified. Proliferative activity of nerve cells was detected in the dorsal proliferative (matrix) area of the cerebellum and in parenchymal cells of the molecular and granular layers whereas local clusters of undifferentiated cells which formed neurogenic niches were observed in both the optic tectum and cerebellum after optic nerve injury. In vitro analysis of brain cells of trout showed that suspension cells compared with monolayer cells retain higher proliferative activity, as evidenced by PCNA immunolabeling. Phase contrast observation showed mitosis in individual cells and the formation of neurospheres which gradually increased during 1–4 days of culture. The present findings suggest that trout can be used as a novel model for studying neuronal regeneration. PMID:27212918

  10. Cell proliferation and apoptosis in optic nerve and brain integration centers of adult trout Oncorhynchus mykiss after optic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Pushchina, Evgeniya V; Shukla, Sachin; Varaksin, Anatoly A; Obukhov, Dmitry K

    2016-04-01

    Fishes have remarkable ability to effectively rebuild the structure of nerve cells and nerve fibers after central nervous system injury. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In order to address this issue, we investigated the proliferation and apoptosis of cells in contralateral and ipsilateral optic nerves, after stab wound injury to the eye of an adult trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Heterogenous population of proliferating cells was investigated at 1 week after injury. TUNEL labeling gave a qualitative and quantitative assessment of apoptosis in the cells of optic nerve of trout 2 days after injury. After optic nerve injury, apoptotic response was investigated, and mass patterns of cell migration were found. The maximal concentration of apoptotic bodies was detected in the areas of mass clumps of cells. It is probably indicative of massive cell death in the area of high phagocytic activity of macrophages/microglia. At 1 week after optic nerve injury, we observed nerve cell proliferation in the trout brain integration centers: the cerebellum and the optic tectum. In the optic tectum, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-immunopositive radial glia-like cells were identified. Proliferative activity of nerve cells was detected in the dorsal proliferative (matrix) area of the cerebellum and in parenchymal cells of the molecular and granular layers whereas local clusters of undifferentiated cells which formed neurogenic niches were observed in both the optic tectum and cerebellum after optic nerve injury. In vitro analysis of brain cells of trout showed that suspension cells compared with monolayer cells retain higher proliferative activity, as evidenced by PCNA immunolabeling. Phase contrast observation showed mitosis in individual cells and the formation of neurospheres which gradually increased during 1-4 days of culture. The present findings suggest that trout can be used as a novel model for studying neuronal regeneration. PMID:27212918

  11. Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merro, John; And Others

    Interviews on the quality of day care in the United States are presented in this transcript of a program broadcast in the National Public Radio weekly series, "Options in Education." Writers, day care center personnel and others describe and evaluate the current situation. Federal legislation concerning children is examined, and researchers…

  12. CTEPP-OH DATA COLLECTED ON FORM 10 (PERIODS 1-3): DAY CARE CENTER CHILD ACTIVITY DIARY AND FOOD SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains data for CTEPP-OH concerning the child’s activities at the day care center over the 48-h monitoring period. The diary was divided into three time periods over the 48-h monitoring interval. The Food Survey collected information on the frequency and types of ...

  13. How a Young Child Learns How to Take Part in Mealtimes in a Japanese Day-Care Center: A Longitudinal Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishiguro, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    This research is a longitudinal, ethnographic study that focuses on mealtimes with one boy from 9 to 78 months of age in a day-care center in Japan. It looks at routine interactions between a child, his nursery teachers, and the environment, which is a shared and mutually available communicative space between participants in collaboration. The aim…

  14. Persons with Mild or Moderate Alzheimer's Disease Use a Basic Orientation Technology to Travel to Different Rooms within a Day Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Perilli, Viviana; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Bosco, Andrea; De Caro, Maria Fara; Cassano, Germana; Pinto, Katia; Minervini, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed whether three patients with Alzheimer's disease could learn to use a basic orientation technology to reach different rooms within a day center. At each travel instance, the technology provided verbal messages (cues) from the room to reach. For the first two patients, the messages were presented at intervals of about 15 s. For…

  15. Identification and Analysis of Learning Preferences of Mentally Ill Adults in Rehabilitative Psychosocial Therapy at the Anderson Mental Health Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Michael K.

    A study identified and analyzed the learning preferences of 17 seriously and chronically mentally ill adults participating in the rehabilitative psychosocial therapy program at the Toxaway Church Site of the Anderson Mental Health Center. Staff perceived as boring and unfocused the traditional treatment approach that relied mainly upon…

  16. Efficacy of a Web-Based, Center-Based or Combined Physical Activity Intervention among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mouton, Alexandre; Cloes, Marc

    2015-01-01

    With more social support and environment-centered interventions being recommended in web-based interventions, this study examined the efficacy of three intervention conditions aimed at promoting physical activity (PA) in older adults. The efficacy analyses included the self-reported PA level, stage of change for PA and awareness about PA among…

  17. Creating and Maintaining a Wellness Environment in Child Care Centers Participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lofton, Kristi L.; Carr, Deborah H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: This study identifies issues associated with creating and maintaining a wellness environment in child care centers (CCCs) participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). Methods: Structured interviews and focus groups were conducted with CCC professionals and state agency personnel to develop a survey to assess…

  18. A New Measure for Assessing Executive Function across a Wide Age Range: Children and Adults Find "Happy-Sad" More Difficult than "Day-Night"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagattuta, Kristin Hansen; Sayfan, Liat; Monsour, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Two experiments examined 4- to 11-year-olds' and adults' performance (N = 350) on two variants of a Stroop-like card task: the "day-night task" (say "day" when shown a moon and "night" when shown a sun) and a new "happy-sad task" (say "happy" for a sad face and "sad" for a happy face). Experiment 1 featured colored cartoon drawings. In Experiment…

  19. Profile of adult and pediatric neurocysticercosis cases observed in five Southern European centers.

    PubMed

    Zammarchi, Lorenzo; Angheben, Andrea; Gobbi, Federico; Zavarise, Giorgio; Requena-Mendez, Ana; Marchese, Valentina; Montagnani, Carlotta; Galli, Luisa; Bisoffi, Zeno; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Muñoz, Jose

    2016-08-01

    In Europe the management of neurocysticercosis (NCC) is challenging because health care providers are unaware of this condition, thus leading to diagnostic delay and mismanagement. The aim of this study is to retrospectively review the cases of NCC observed in five centers located in Florence, Negrar (Italy) and Barcelona (Spain). A total of 81 subjects with NCC were evaluated in the period 1980-2013. By applying the Del Brutto's criteria 39 cases (48.1 %) were classified as definitive cases, 31 (38.8 %) as probable cases and 11 (13.6 %) did not satisfy the diagnostic criteria. Continent of origin was known for 80 subjects. Latin America and Asia were the most frequent continents of origin (n = 37; 46.3 % and n = 22; 27.5 %) followed by Europe (n = 14; 17.5 %) and Africa (n = 7; 8.8 %). Compared with adults, paediatric patients were more likely to have eosinophilia, to have other parasitic infections, to be asymptomatic, to not be treated with antiepileptic drugs or analgesic and to heal. The study shows that there are some hurdles in the management of NCC in Europe. A not negligible portion of patients diagnosed at reference centers do not fully satisfy Del Brutto's diagnostic criteria. The higher portion of asymptomatic subjects found among the paediatric group is probably related to an ongoing serological screening among adopted children coming from endemic regions. The value of such a serological screening should be better assessed by a further cost-effective analysis. PMID:27193586

  20. Comparison of GT3X accelerometer and Yamax pedometer steps/day in a free-living sample of overweight and obese adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to compare steps/day detected by the YAMAX SW-200 pedometer versus the Actigraph GT3X accelerometer in free-living adults. Daily YAMAX and GT3X steps were collected from a sample of 23 overweight and obese participants (78% female; age = 52.6 +/- 8.4 yr.; BMI = 31.0 +/-...

  1. Geophysical variables and behavior: CIII. Days with sudden infant deaths and cardiac arrhythmias in adults share a factor with PC1 geomagnetic pulsations: implications for pursuing mechanism.

    PubMed

    Persinger, M A; O'Connor, R P

    2001-06-01

    If geomagnetic-mediated stimuli trigger many sudden infant deaths, then the days in which they and hospital admissions for cardiac arrhythmias for adults occur should share a similar source of variance. Factor analyses of the days in which a sudden infant death occurred in Ontario or adults were admitted for one of eight categories of cardiac crisis in the Sudbury (Ontario) Region for the year 1984 supported the hypothesis. This factor, with which infant deaths and adult cardiac arrhythmias each shared about 40% of their variance, also shared about 40% of the variance with a factor with which about 35% of the variance in daily occurrence of geomagnetic pulsations (0.2 Hz to 5 Hz) was associated. These results are consistent with the important role of geomagnetic variables in the occurrence of transient electrical anomalies in brain function rather than cardiac blood flow. PMID:11453188

  2. Factors affecting center of pressure in older adults: the Framingham Foot Study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although aberrant foot movement during gait has been associated with adverse outcomes in the lower extremities in clinical patients, few studies have analyzed population differences in foot function. The purpose of this study was to assess demographic differences in foot function in a large population-based study of community-dwelling adults. Methods Participants in this study were from the Framingham Foot Study. Walking data were collected from both feet using a Tekscan Matscan pressure mat. Foot function was characterized using the center of pressure excursion index (CPEI). T-tests were used to assess differences between population subsets based on sex, and in men and women separately, age, body mass index (BMI), physical activity and in women, past high heel use. Results There were 2111 participants included in this analysis. Significant differences in CPEI were noted by sex (p< 0.0001), by age in women (p = 0.04), and by past high heel use in women (p = 0.04). Conclusions Foot function during gait was affected by sex, as well as by age and shoe-wear in women, but not by BMI or physical activity. Future work will evaluate possible relations between CPEI and outcomes such as falls, sarcopenia, and lower extremity function. PMID:23657058

  3. Adult Basic Education Project: Career Centers Program: Division of Extension and Continuing Education: University of Puerto Rico: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puerto Rico Univ., Rio Piedras. Div. of Extension and Continuing Education.

    The demonstration project, running from June 1971 to June 1974, sought to reduce the educational and occupational disadvantages of Puerto Rican unemployed and underemployed adults. The program served 1,241 participants, ranging in age from 16 to 60 and in grade level from zero to approximately twelfth grade. Average attendance was 24 days, on a…

  4. Adult Career Counseling Center Eighteenth Annual Report, September 2000-June 2001. Computer-Assisted Career Guidance Systems and Career Counseling Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Jane; Flatter, Brian; Helms, Catherine; Neik, Reetu; Quinn, Kelly

    During its 18 years of service, the Adult Career Counseling Center (ACCC) at Oakland University in Oakland, California, has provided career exploration and planning opportunities to more than 11,000 community adults at no charge. The following were among ACCC's activities in 2000-2001: (1) assisted clients in using the DISCOVER for Adults and…

  5. Professional Caretakers as Attachment Figures in Day Care Centers for Children with Intellectual Disability and Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Schipper, J. Clasien; Stolk, Joop; Schuengel, Carlo

    2006-01-01

    Do children with intellectual disabilities (ID) show attachment behavior towards their professional caretaker? Five children, varying in chronological age, developmental age and DSM-diagnosis, were observed in a day care setting. Their attachment behavior was described by means of the Attachment Q-sort. Attachment behavior varied within and…

  6. Use of a nationwide call center for Ebola response and monitoring during a 3-day house-to-house campaign - Sierra Leone, September 2014.

    PubMed

    Miller, Leigh Ann; Stanger, Emily; Senesi, Reynold Gb; DeLuca, Nick; Dietz, Patricia; Hausman, Leslie; Kilmarx, Peter H; Mermin, Jonathan

    2015-01-16

    During May 23, 2014-January 10, 2015, Sierra Leone reported 7,777 confirmed cases of Ebola virus disease (Ebola). In response to the epidemic, on August 5, Sierra Leone's Emergency Operations Center established a toll-free, nationwide Ebola call center. The purpose of the call center is to encourage public reporting of possible Ebola cases and deaths to public health officials and to provide health education about Ebola to callers. This information also functions as an "alert" system for public health officials and supports surveillance efforts for the response. National call center dispatchers call district-level response teams composed of surveillance officers and burial teams to inform them of reported deaths and possible Ebola cases. Members of these response teams investigate cases and conduct follow-up actions such as transporting ill persons to Ebola treatment units or providing safe, dignified medical burials as resources permit. The call center continues to operate. This report describes calls received during a 3-day national campaign and reports the results of an assessment of the call center operation during the campaign. PMID:25590683

  7. 3‐day treatment with azithromycin 1.5% eye drops versus 7‐day treatment with tobramycin 0.3% for purulent bacterial conjunctivitis: multicentre, randomised and controlled trial in adults and children

    PubMed Central

    Cochereau, Isabelle; Meddeb‐Ouertani, Amel; Khairallah, Moncef; Amraoui, Abdelouahed; Zaghloul, Khalid; Pop, Mihai; Delval, Laurent; Pouliquen, Pascale; Tandon, Radhika; Garg, Prashant; Goldschmidt, Pablo; Bourcier, Tristan

    2007-01-01

    Aim To compare the efficacy and safety of Azyter, azithromycin 1.5% eye drops, for 3 days with tobramycin 0.3% for 7 days to treat purulent bacterial conjunctivitis. Methods This was a multicentre, randomised, investigator‐masked study including 1043 children and adults with purulent bacterial conjunctivitis. Patients received either azithromycin 1.5% twice‐daily for 3 days or tobramycin 0.3%, 1 drop every two hours for 2 days, then four times daily for 5 days. Clinical signs were evaluated and cultures obtained at D0, D3 and D9 (where D refers to “day”). Primary variable was the clinical cure at the Test‐of‐Cure (TOC)‐visit (D9±1), for patients with D0‐positive cultures. The cure was defined as: bulbar conjunctival injection and discharge scores of 0. Results Among 471 patients with D0‐positivity in the per protocol set, 87.8% of the azithromycin 1.5% group and 89.4% of the tobramycin group were clinically cured at the TOC‐visit. Azithromycin was non‐inferior to tobramycin for clinical and bacteriological cure. Clinical cure was significantly higher with azithromycin 1.5% at D3. The safety profile of azithromycin was satisfactory with a good patient and investigator's acceptability. Conclusions Azithromycin 1.5% for 3 days was as effective and as safe as tobramycin for 7 days. Furthermore, more azithromycin than tobramycin patients presented an early clinical cure at Day 3. Due to its twice daily dosing regimen for 3 days, azithromycin represents a step forward in the management of purulent bacterial conjunctivitis, especially in children. PMID:17050578

  8. Adult medulloblastoma, from spongioblastoma cerebelli to the present day: a review of treatment and the integration of molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Shonka, Nicole; Brandes, Alba; De Groot, John F

    2012-11-01

    Although they represent the most common malignant brain tumor in the pediatric population, medulloblastomas are rare in adults, with an incidence of 0.5 per million. With only one exception, all of the prospective clinical trials in this disease have been done in the pediatric population, and therefore therapy for adult medulloblastoma has been either extrapolated from the pediatric literature or based on retrospective reviews. A growing body of literature underscores the genetic similarities between adult and pediatric disease, which may allow tailored therapy directed towards specific molecular pathways and may have an impact on clinical outcomes. Here we present the history, staging system, and treatment of medulloblastoma, reviewing the prognostic value and clinical application of molecular subtyping while highlighting the differences between adult and pediatric disease. PMID:23330353

  9. De-hospitalization of the pediatric day surgery by means of a freestanding surgery center: pilot study in the lazio region

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Day surgery should take place in appropriate organizational settings. In the presence of high volumes, the organizational models of the Lazio Region are represented by either Day Surgery Units within continuous-cycle hospitals or day-cycle Day Surgery Centers. This pilot study presents the regional volumes provided in 2010 and the additional volumes that could be provided based on the best performance criterion with a view to suggesting the setting up of a regional Freestanding Center of Pediatric Day Surgery. Methods This is an observational retrospective study. The activity volumes have been assessed by means of a DRG (Diagnosis Related Group)-specific indicator that measures the ratio of outpatients to the total number of treated patients (freestanding indicator, FI). The included DRGs had an FI exceeding the 3rd quartile present in at least a health-care facility and a volume exceeding 0.5% of the total patients of the pediatric surgery and urology facilities of the Lazio Region. The relevant data have been provided by the Public Health Agency and relate to 2010. The best performance FI has been used to calculate the theoretical volume of transferability of the remaining facilities into freestanding surgery centers. Patients under six months of age and DRGs common to other disciplines have been excluded. The Chi Square test has been used to compare the FI of the health-care facilities and the FI of the places of origin of the patients. Results The DRG provided in 2010 amounted to a total of 5768 belonging to 121 types of procedures. The application of the criteria of inclusion have led to the selection of seven final DRG categories of minor surgery amounting to 3522 cases. Out of this total number, there were 2828 outpatients and 694 inpatients. The recourse of the best performance determines a potential transfer of 497 cases. The total outpatient volume is 57%. The Chi Square test has pointed to a statistically significant difference of the

  10. A Description of Title IV-A Infant and Toddler Day Care, 1974-1975: Adult-Child Interactions and Care Room Activities. Report No. 7641.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silbermann, David

    This report is concerned with the development and use of the Infant/Toddler Interaction and Activity Profile in 13 day care centers in Philadelphia. The Profile and its development are described and methods of data collection and analysis are explained briefly. Findings are reported in four major areas: (1) basic data characteristics, offering a…

  11. Saving the Sun for a Rainy Day (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema

    Bullock, R. Morris (Director, Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis); CME Staff

    2011-11-02

    'Saving the Sun for a Rainy Day' was submitted by the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis (CME) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. CME, an EFRC directed by R. Morris Bullock at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is a partnership of scientists from four institutions: PNNL (lead), Pensylvania State University, University of Washington, and the University of Wyoming. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis is 'to understand, design and develop molecular electrocatalysts for solar fuel production and use.' Research topics are: catalysis (water), electrocatalysis, bio-inspired, electrical energy storage, fuel cells, hydrogen (fuel), matter by design, novel materials synthesis, and charge transport.

  12. Increasing Practitioners Knowledge of Participation Among Elderly Adults in Senior Center Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Jan; Bisbee, Carol; Porter, Russell; Flanders, Joanne

    2004-01-01

    The research reported in this paper attempted to identify predictors of senior center participation and to ascertain why there has been a decline in the number of individuals participating at senior centers in recent years. The research reports the results of a survey conducted among senior center participants in an 11-county area in the Nortex…

  13. Increasing Practitioners' Knowledge of Participation among Elderly Adults in Senior Center Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Jan; Bisbee, Carol; Porter, Russell; Flanders, Joanne

    2004-01-01

    The research reported in this paper attempted to identify predictors of senior center participation and to ascertain why there has been a decline in the number of individuals participating at senior centers in recent years. The research reports the results of a survey conducted among senior center participants in an 11-county area in the Nortex…

  14. The National Hartford Center of Gerontological Nursing Excellence: An Evolution of a Nursing Initiative to Improve Care of Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Harden, J Taylor; Watman, Rachael A

    2015-06-01

    , which has become paramount as Hartford Foundation funding ends in 2016. Despite the auspicious beginnings of the National Hartford Center, system change has been slow. There remains a strong need to continue to grow the field of gerontological nursing and aging sciences. We are working diligently to drive health system reform, and develop and support gerontological nursing leaders and members of the National Hartford Center as exemplars for innovation in care of older adults. The contributing authors of this supplement are from member schools of the National Hartford Center or are current or past program Scholars or Fellows. Herein these authors showcase innovation for older adults through their research that addresses an array of diseases and conditions affecting human systems, embedded in a variety of environments, including in-home care, subsidized housing communities, nursing homes, assisted living facilities, memory care units, and rural community environs. PMID:26055770

  15. Reported energy intake by weight status, day and estimated energy requirement among adults: NHANES 2003-2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To describe energy intake reporting by gender, weight status, and interview sequence and to compare reported intakes to the Estimated Energy Requirement at different levels of physical activity. Methods: Energy intake was self-reported by 24-hour recall on two occasions (day 1 and day 2)...

  16. A Curriculum Guide for the Mid-Alabama Adult and Vocational Education Demonstration Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, James E.; Sparks, Peggy F.

    An adult basic education curriculum is presented, designed to raise the competencies of adults in the basic areas of oral and written communications, arithmetic, social sciences, occupational planning (including development of occupational concepts and attitudes) and development of self. Basic area skills and activities are presented in three…

  17. The Adult Student. Research Findings from the Wisconsin Assessment Center. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Green Bay. Assessment Center.

    Since 1980, 10 separate studies were conducted to investigate issues related to adult students at the University of Wisconsin (UW). The first of these research efforts was a cohort study that revealed more similarities than differences among the adult students enrolled at UW and their nonenrolled cohorts. Based on a study entitled the Trigger…

  18. IMS/Satellite Situation Center report: Orbit plots and bar charts for Prognoz 4, days 1-91 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Orbit plots for the Prognoz 4 satellite for the time period January to March 1976 are given. This satellite was identified as a possible important contributor to the International Magnetospheric Study project. The orbits were based on an element epoch of December 26, 1975, 3h 8min and 17s. In view of the low perigee of this satellite, the Satellite Situation Center (SSC) considered that the effect of atmospheric drag precludes orbit predictions for the length of time normally used by the SSC for high-altitude satellites. Consequently, orbit data are shown for the first 3 months of 1976 only. The orbit generated for this report was based on the earlier epoch, and it positions the satellite within 30s of the ascending node at the later epoch. Therefore, within the accuracy of the plots shown in this report, the orbit used was regarded as an achieved orbit. The orbit information is displayed graphically in four ways: bar charts, geocentric solar ecliptic plots, boundary plots, and solar magnetic latitude versus local time plots. The most concise presentation is the bar charts. The bar charts give the crude three-dimensional position of the satellite for each magnetospheric region.

  19. Antioxidant vitamins status in children and young adults undergoing dialysis: A single center study

    PubMed Central

    Naseri, M.; Shahri, H. Motaghi Moghadam; Horri, M.; Rasoli, Z.; Salemian, F.; Jahanshahi, S.; Moeenolroayaa, G.; Pourhasan, M.

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin E and C are well-known antioxidant vitamins. Oxidative stress is common in chronic kidney diseases. We evaluated 43 dialysis subjects prospectively in a cross-sectional survey. Serum vitamin E concentration was checked in all subjects; 37 cases underwent blood sampling for measurement of serum vitamin C. The enrolled subjects consisted of 12 (27.9%) peritoneal dialysis (PD) and 25 (58.1%) hemodialysis (HD) patients. Six (13.9%) patients were switched from PD to HD or vice versa. Serum concentration of vitamin E was normal, low and high in 9 (20.9%), 31 (72%) and 3 (7.1%) patients, respectively. There were no significant differences regarding age, gender, modality and duration of dialysis, and characteristics of dialysis sessions, mean serum blood urea nitrogen, and albumin levels between vitamin E deficient cases with those with normal serum vitamin E concentration (P > 0.05 for all). The serum vitamin C levels were low in 5 (13.5%) and normal in 32 (86.5%) patients. vitamin C deficiency was more prevalent in HD versus continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients (P = 0.128). Mean serum vitamin C concentration was higher in patients who were supplemented by vitamin C compared with those who didn’t receive the vitamin supplement (P = 0.043). Vitamin E deficiency was a prevalent finding and supplementary vitamin C 30–60 mg/day was sufficient to prevent deficiency. Regular assessments of serum vitamin E level may be needed in dialysis centers. PMID:26199471

  20. The relationship between burnout and coping in adult and young offender center correctional officers: an exploratory investigation.

    PubMed

    Gould, Drew D; Watson, Shelley L; Price, Stephanie R; Valliant, Paul M

    2013-02-01

    High levels of occupational stress and burnout are costly for correctional services and their employees. Correctional officers report high levels of burnout, absenteeism, turnover, and poor physical health. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of burnout and the coping mechanisms used to buffer the effects of burnout within correctional centers. In the current study, 208 correctional officers from adult and young offender centers completed an online survey measuring burnout and coping strategies. Results from the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) and the Brief Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced (COPE) Scale indicated that even though correctional center officers mostly used adaptive coping strategies, they still reported high levels of burnout. The results of this study suggest that there are variables other than coping strategies, such as gender and length of experience, that lead to the level of burnout as observed in correctional officers. PMID:22924799

  1. [The role of a day care center for sick children in the convalescent stage to enable female medical practitioners to successfully continue their careers].

    PubMed

    Kizuki, Noyuri

    2013-11-01

    From my experience of child rearing difficulties, when I decided to start a private practice, I planned to have a day care center for sick children in the convalescent stage in the same building to help working mothers, especially those employed in the provision of critical medical services to the community. Financial support was obtained from the city where the clinic exists, and the facility was built that satisfied the requirements of this purpose. I believe that the female surgeons are an especially important personnel resource of Japan's medical services, because surgeons are decreasing in number these days. However, sometimes, qualified medical practitioners, such as surgeons, have to give up their careers because of the difficulty of raising children and working at the same time, especially when their children become ill. The number of these types of day care centers should be increasing, along with necessary support systems to be established immediately, so that female professionals, most particularly in medical facilities, can continue successful careers. PMID:24358733

  2. Effect of energy repletion on dynamic aspects of protein metabolism of malnourished adolescent and young adult patients with cystic fibrosis during the first 12 days of treatment.

    PubMed

    Pencharz, P; Hill, R; Archibald, E

    1986-01-01

    The short-term effect of nutritional rehabilitation on whole body protein metabolism of six malnourished (energy depleted) adolescent and young adult cystic fibrosis (CF) patients was examined during the first 12 days of treatment. Refeeding was accomplished using continuous nasogastric administration of an elemental diet. Intakes were 1.65 SD 0.3 g protein/kg/day and 85.3 SD 19.2 kcal/kg/day. Turnover measurements were carried out on four occasions, during the control period on a normal diet and days 4, 8, and 12 on the elemental diet. In response to refeeding, whole body amino nitrogen flux (Q) fell consistently over the study (p less than 0.05). Protein synthesis (S) and breakdown (B) also fell but their values did not reach statistical significance. On the other hand, there was a prompt increase in ratios S/Q and B/Q in response to tube feeding discernible on days 4 and 8 (p less than 0.05), but which returned to baseline by day 12. We conclude that malnourished CF patients who are still eating well have increased rates of protein turnover. There is a prompt response of protein metabolism to energy repletion with a progressive decline in rates during the first 12 days of treatment. PMID:3755167

  3. Person-Centered Care for Older Adults with Chronic Conditions and Functional Impairment: A Systematic Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Alexis Coulourides; Wilber, Kathleen; Mosqueda, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Person-centered care (PCC) shifts focus away from the traditional biomedical model in favor of embracing personal choice and autonomy for people receiving health services. It has become an important avenue for improving primary care, and older adults remain a priority target for PCC because they are more likely to have complex care needs than younger individuals. Nevertheless, despite a growing body of evidence regarding its use, PCC still lacks an agreed-upon definition. A literature review was conducted to explore extant scholarship on PCC for older adults, assess corresponding definitions of PCC, and identify important elements of quality PCC. Nearly 3,000 articles published between 1990 and 2014 were identified. Excluding search results outside the parameters of this study, the final review comprised 132 nonduplicate sources focused on patient-centered care or PCC in older adults. Fifteen descriptions of PCC were identified, addressing 17 central principles or values. The six most-prominent domains of PCC were holistic or whole-person care, respect and value, choice, dignity, self-determination, and purposeful living. The body of evidence reviewed suggests that PCC is an important area of growing interest. Although multiple definitions and elements of PCC abound-with many commonalities and some overlap-the field would benefit from a consensus definition and list of essential elements to clarify how to operationalize a PCC approach to health care and services for older adults. This work guided the development of a separate American Geriatrics Society expert panel statement presenting a standardized definition and a list of PCC elements for older adults with chronic conditions or functional impairment. PMID:26626408

  4. Evaluation of personnel blood pressure and its risk factors in university affiliated medical centers: Iran’s Health Day 2013

    PubMed Central

    Saberi Isfeedvajani, Mohsen; Karimi Zarchi, Ali Akbar; Musavi Heris, Abbas; Sajjadi, Fatema; Tavana, Ali Mehrabi

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypertension is a risk factor for life threatening diseases such as cerebrovascular accidents, coronary artery diseases, congestive heart failure and chronic renal failure. The prevalence of non-communicable diseases such as hypertension and diabetes including obesity has increased over the past few years in Iran. The first step for modification of cardiovascular diseases in a defined population is to assess the prevalence of their risk factors. This study was conduceted to assess personnel blood pressure and its risk factors in one of the medical universities of Tehran in the Health Day of 2013. Methods: This cross sectional study was performed from May 19, 2013 to May 24, 2013 (I.R. of Iran’s Health Weak) in one of the medical universities of Tehran. Participants completed voluntarily a researcher-made questionnaire which composed of demographic characteristics and variables about risk factors and preventive factors of cardiovascular diseases such as smoking, history of diabetes, history of hypertension, physical exercise status and so on. Blood pressure was measured by mercury sphygmomanometer and weight and height were measured by a ground analogue scale. Results: Of 195 persons participated in this study, 180 persons (92.3%) were male. The mean age of participants was 33.75 (±9.87) yr. The mean of systolic and diastolic blood pressure was 114.44 (±8.67) mmHg and 73.06 (±8.45) mmHg, respectively. The prevalence of overweight, obesity, prehypertension and hypertension was 41.7%, 17.8%, 40.4% and 11.7% respectively. Only 8 persons (5.6%) were cigarette smokers. Conclusion: Despite the low prevalence of hypertension in our samples, the high prevalence of prehypertension and overweight need great attention. Interventions like life style modification could be effective in prevention of hypertension. PMID:25250277

  5. The combined effect of sleep and time of day on emotion decoding from dynamic visual cues in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Tsokanaki, Paraskevi; Moraitou, Despina; Papantoniou, Georgia

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that night sleep is a decisive factor for the effective functioning of the human body and mind. In addition to the role of sleep, older adults report that they are “morning types” and that their cognitive and emotional abilities seem to be at a higher level in the morning hours. In this vein, this study is aimed at examining the effect of sleep combined with the “time of day” condition on a specific ability that is crucial for interpersonal communication, namely, emotion recognition, in older adults. Specifically, the study compared older adults’ performance in decoding emotions from ecologically valid, dynamic visual cues, in two conditions: “early in the morning and after night sleep”, and “in the afternoon and after many hours since night sleep”. An emotion recognition task was administered twice to 37 community-dwelling older adults. The results showed a statistically significant higher performance in the morning in decoding all emotions presented, compared to the afternoon condition. Pleasant surprise, sadness, and anxiety were revealed as the most difficult emotions to be recognized in the afternoon condition. PMID:27621639

  6. Reduction of psycho-spiritual distress of an elderly with advanced congestive heart failure by life review interview in a palliative care day center

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kwok-Ying; Lau, Vikki Wai-Kee; Cheung, Ka-Chi; Chang, Richard Shek-Kwan; Chan, Man-Lui

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Major depression is common in patients hospitalized with congestive heart failure and is independently associated with increased re-hospitalization and mortality. Methods: Hereby, we report the treatment for an elderly congestive heart failure patient with frequent emergency department visits having major depression and hopelessness. Results: Treatment outcomes measured showed that depressed scores of psychosocial needs were reduced with life review interview therapy in a palliative care day center. Conclusion: We hypothesize that multidisciplinary team’s approach to treatment was important for this case. PMID:27621805

  7. Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (RAMP): use of a small group reading activity run by persons with dementia in adult day health care and long-term care settings.

    PubMed

    Skrajner, Michael J; Camp, Cameron J

    2007-01-01

    Six persons in the early to middle stages of dementia ("leaders") were trained in Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (RAMP) to lead a reading activity for 22 persons with more advanced dementia ("participants") in an adult day health center (ADHC) and a special care unit (SCU) in a skilled nursing facility. Researchers assessed the leaders' abilities to learn and follow the procedures of leading a group, as well as their satisfaction with their roles. In addition, participants' engagement and affect were measured, both during standard activities programming and during client-led activities. Results of this study suggest that persons with dementia can indeed successfully lead small group activities, if several important prerequisites are met. Furthermore, the engagement and affect of participants was more positive in client-led activities than in standard activities programming. PMID:17533999

  8. Treating Adult Asthma Exacerbations With a 2-Day Course of Dexamethasone in the Emergency Department: New Protocols to Improve Compliance.

    PubMed

    Evans, Dian Dowling; Clinton Shedd, Glenn

    2016-01-01

    The Research to Practice column is intended to improve the research critique skills of the advanced practice registered nurse and emergency nurse (RN) and to assist with the translation of research into practice. For each column, a topic and a research study are selected. The stage is set with a case presentation. The research article is then reviewed and critiqued, and the findings are discussed in relation to the case presented. In the current column, we examine the findings of from their article, titled "Two Days of Dexamethasone Versus 5 Days of Prednisone in the Treatment of Acute Asthma: A Randomized Controlled Trial." PMID:27482988

  9. In vitro activity of orally administered antimicrobial agents against Haemophilus influenzae recovered from children monitored longitudinally in a group day-care center.

    PubMed

    George, M J; Kitch, B; Henderson, F W; Gilligan, P H

    1991-10-01

    To determine whether the prevalence of resistance to commonly used oral antimicrobial agents varied over time, we compared the in vitro susceptibilities of 217 strains of Haemophilus influenzae recovered from nasopharyngeal secretions of children in a day-care center studied longitudinally between 1979 and 1987. The overall rate of beta-lactamase production in these strains was 18%, with rates of 57% in type b isolates (n = 21) and 14% in non-type b isolates (n = 196). The percentages of isolates for which MICs were less than or equal to 1.0 micrograms/ml for amoxicillin alone, amoxicillin in combination with clavulanic acid, and cefuroxime alone were 82, 92, and 93%, respectively. The percentage of strains for which cefaclor MICs were less than or equal to 1.0 micrograms/ml was only 0.5%. Isolates for which chloramphenicol MICs were greater than 2.0 micrograms/ml or for which trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole MICs were greater than 0.5/9.5 micrograms/ml were uncommon: 1 and less than 1%, respectively. High concentrations of erythromycin alone and in combination with sulfisoxazole were required to inhibit the majority of test strains; there was no evidence of erythromycin-sulfisoxazole synergy. In vitro susceptibility to commonly used oral antimicrobial agents remained at a constant level when H. influenzae isolates collected from children in a day-care center during 1979 through 1983 were compared with strains collected during 1984 through 1987. PMID:1759814

  10. Adult Career Counseling Center Nineteenth Annual Report, September 2001-June 2002. Computer-Assisted Career Guidance Systems and Career Counseling Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Jane; Anderson, Mary; Flatter, Brian; Harvey, Jennifer; McCarthy, Kelly; Yousif, Newjen

    The year 2001-02 marks the Adult Career Counseling Center's (ACCC's) nineteenth year of service, during which career advisors saw 102 community clients for over 300 hours of counseling. ACCC provides advising services at no charge for adults who are seeking guidance with career-related issues, including career exploration and planning. The…

  11. Final Report of the Evaluation of the Summer Program for Mentally Retarded Young Adults--Occupational Training Centers. Summer 1970. ESEA Title I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nalven, Fredric; Oliver, Adela

    The 1970 Summer Program for Mentally Retarded Young Adults Occupational Training Centers program, funded under Title I of the 1965 Elementary Secondary Education Act, was designed to serve the summer educational, prevocational, and social needs of approximately 170 retarded adolescents and young adults. The general objectives of the project were…

  12. The Public Health Perspective in Health Promotion and Disability Prevention for Older Adults: The Role of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennessy, Catherine Hagan; Buchner, David M.; Jordan, Joanne M.; Leveille, Suzanne G.; Shefer, Abigail M.; Stevens, Judy A.

    2001-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention works with public health agencies and other organizations to address chronic disease prevention and risk reduction in older adults. Efforts in the areas of physical activity, osteoarthritis, and chronic illness self-management are described. Other activities include older adult immunization programs…

  13. Immunosuppression in Early Postnatal Days Induces Persistent and Allergen-Specific Immune Tolerance to Asthma in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Zhang, Jin; Lu, Yong; Wang, Libo

    2015-01-01

    Bronchial asthma is a chronic airway inflammatory condition with high morbidity, and effective treatments for asthma are limited. Allergen-specific immunotherapy can only induce peripheral immune tolerance and is not sustainable. Exploring new therapeutic strategies is of great clinical importance. Recombinant adenovirus (rAdV) was used as a vector to make cells expressing cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen-4-immunoglobulin (CTLA4Ig) a soluble CTLA4 immunoglobulin fusion protein. Dendritic cells (DCs) were modified using the rAdVs together with allergens. Then these modified DCs were transplanted to mice before allergen sensitization. The persistence and specificity of immune tolerance were evaluated in mice challenged with asthma allergens at 3 and 7 months. DCs modified by CTLA4Ig showed increased IL-10 secretion, decreased IL-12 secretion, and T cell stimulation in vitro. Mice treated with these DCs in the early neonatal period developed tolerance against the allergens that were used to induce asthma in the adult stage. Asthma symptoms, lung damage, airway reactivity, and inflammatory response all improved. Humoral immunity indices showed that this therapeutic strategy strongly suppressed mice immune responses and was maintained for as long as 7 months. Furthermore, allergen cross-sensitization and challenge experiments demonstrated that this immune tolerance was allergen-specific. Treatment with CTLA4Ig modified DCs in the early neonatal period, inducing persistent and allergen-specific immune tolerance to asthma in adult mice. Our results suggest that it may be possible to develop a vaccine for asthma. PMID:25860995

  14. Immunosuppression in early postnatal days induces persistent and allergen-specific immune tolerance to asthma in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Zhang, Jin; Lu, Yong; Wang, Libo

    2015-01-01

    Bronchial asthma is a chronic airway inflammatory condition with high morbidity, and effective treatments for asthma are limited. Allergen-specific immunotherapy can only induce peripheral immune tolerance and is not sustainable. Exploring new therapeutic strategies is of great clinical importance. Recombinant adenovirus (rAdV) was used as a vector to make cells expressing cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen-4-immunoglobulin (CTLA4Ig) a soluble CTLA4 immunoglobulin fusion protein. Dendritic cells (DCs) were modified using the rAdVs together with allergens. Then these modified DCs were transplanted to mice before allergen sensitization. The persistence and specificity of immune tolerance were evaluated in mice challenged with asthma allergens at 3 and 7 months. DCs modified by CTLA4Ig showed increased IL-10 secretion, decreased IL-12 secretion, and T cell stimulation in vitro. Mice treated with these DCs in the early neonatal period developed tolerance against the allergens that were used to induce asthma in the adult stage. Asthma symptoms, lung damage, airway reactivity, and inflammatory response all improved. Humoral immunity indices showed that this therapeutic strategy strongly suppressed mice immune responses and was maintained for as long as 7 months. Furthermore, allergen cross-sensitization and challenge experiments demonstrated that this immune tolerance was allergen-specific. Treatment with CTLA4Ig modified DCs in the early neonatal period, inducing persistent and allergen-specific immune tolerance to asthma in adult mice. Our results suggest that it may be possible to develop a vaccine for asthma. PMID:25860995

  15. A patient - centered approach to addressing physical activity in older adults: motivational interviewing.

    PubMed

    Letourneau, Katherine; Goodman, Janice H

    2014-11-01

    Regular physical activity reduces the burden of chronic diseases in older adults, but the majority of this population is relatively sedentary. Individuals considering a change in behavior, such as increasing exercise, often experience a mental state of ambivalence, which can lead to inaction. Ambivalence is resistant to traditional counseling methods used in medical settings, such as patient education. Motivational interviewing (MI) is a conversational style that has been shown to help overcome ambivalence by guiding patients to voice their personal reasons for change. Nurse practitioners are uniquely positioned to use MI with older adults to address ambivalence toward increasing physical activity. PMID:25199152

  16. Fourteen days of bed rest induces a decline in satellite cell content and robust atrophy of skeletal muscle fibers in middle-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Arentson-Lantz, Emily J; English, Kirk L; Paddon-Jones, Douglas; Fry, Christopher S

    2016-04-15

    Bed rest, a ground-based spaceflight analog, induces robust atrophy of skeletal muscle, an effect that is exacerbated with increasing age. We examined the effect of 14 days of bed rest on skeletal muscle satellite cell content and fiber type atrophy in middle-aged adults, an understudied age demographic with few overt signs of muscle aging that is representative of astronauts who perform long-duration spaceflight. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis of healthy middle-aged adults [n= 7 (4 male, 3 female); age: 51 ± 1 yr] before (Pre-BR) and after (Post-BR) 14 days of bed rest. Immunohistochemical analyses were used to quantify myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoform expression, cross-sectional area (CSA), satellite cell and myonuclear content, and capillary density. Peak oxygen consumption, knee extensor strength, and body composition were also measured Pre-BR and Post-BR. Post-BR MyHC type 2a fiber percentage was reduced, and mean CSA decreased in all fiber types (-24 ± 5%;P< 0.05). Satellite cell content was also reduced Post-BR (-39 ± 9%;P< 0.05), and the change in satellite cell content was significantly correlated with the change in mean fiber CSA (r(2)= 0.60;P< 0.05). A decline in capillary density was observed Post-BR (-23 ± 6%;P< 0.05), and Post-BR capillary content was significantly associated with Post-BR peak aerobic capacity (r(2)= 0.59;P< 0.05). A subtle decline in myonuclear content occurred during bed rest (-5 ± 1%;P< 0.05). The rapid maladaptation of skeletal muscle to 14 days of mechanical unloading in middle-aged adults emphasizes the need for robust countermeasures to preserve muscle function in astronauts. PMID:26796754

  17. Adult Basic Education Learning Center 310 Project Evaluation Report, July 1979-June 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri State Dept. of Corrections, Jefferson City.

    A research project was conducted at five Missouri correctional facilities to demonstrate the components that lead to a successful educational project. Objectives included using Adult Performance Level (APL) materials; establishing an inmate classification and referral system; and disseminating this information nationwide among correctional…

  18. Inservice Training for Staffs of Group Homes and Work Activity Centers Serving Developmentally Disabled Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gage, Mary Ann; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Results for three years of inservice training provided to managers and direct care personnel employed in community, residential, and vocational programs for developmentally disabled/mentally retarded and adults are reported. It is concluded that training was successful, since 1,015 of 1,080 training objectives were completed by trainees at…

  19. The Role of Community College Adult and Continuing Education in Iowa's Workforce Development Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Dept. of Education, Des Moines.

    The members of the Iowa Association of Adult and Continuing Education Deans and Directors believe that Iowa's community colleges are well positioned to provide the high quality, cost-effective, work force training required to prepare a skilled work force for Iowa for the 21st century. Iowa's community colleges are the logical providers of work…

  20. Older Adults With Intellectual Disability in Residential Care Centers in Israel: Health Status and Service Utilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrick, Joav; Davidson, Philip W.; Morad, Mohammed; Janicki, Matthew P.; Wexler, Orren; Henderson, C. Michael

    2004-01-01

    To determine their health status, we studied 2,282 Israeli adults with intellectual disability who were at least 40 years of age and lived in residential care. Results showed that age is a significant factor in health status. The frequency of different disease categories (e.g., cardiovascular disease, cancer, and sensory impairments) increased…

  1. Satellite Centers: A Non-Threatening, Personalized Environment for Adult, Part-Time Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Cindy

    1988-01-01

    The Alamo Community College District in San Antonio, Texas, developed and implemented a support system for serving adult students at off-campus sites. This overview provides a framework for other colleges and universities who are planning outreach sites and activities. (JOW)

  2. Assessing long-term health and cost outcomes of patient-centered medical homes serving adults with poor diabetes control.

    PubMed

    Pagán, José A; Carlson, Erin K

    2013-10-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is an integrated primary care delivery model particularly suited for patients with poor diabetes control. Although PCMH models targeting adults with diabetes have shown some early success, little is known about the long-term benefits of medical homes in terms of health and cost outcomes. The performance of a PCMH model in adults with poor diabetes control was assessed using simulated controlled trial data obtained from the Archimedes model of disease progression and health care utilization. Using the Cardio-Metabolic Risk data set, we compared health and cost outcomes over a 20-year period between adults with poor diabetes control (HbA1c >9%) receiving standard care and these same adults receiving care under a PCMH model with a 49% HbA1c intervention improvement rate at a per-beneficiary per-month care management cost of $20 per month. The results suggest that the PCMH model has the potential to not only reduce the proportion of the population with bilateral blindness, foot amputations, and myocardial infarctions-and the mortality rate-but it can also do so in a cost-effective manner ($7898 per quality-adjusted life year). The PCMH model is cost saving for the population 50 to 64 years old and it is particularly cost-effective for men ($883 per quality-adjusted life year). Moreover, these effects are relatively large for adults 30 to 49 years old (lower bilateral blindness and death rates), women (lower foot amputation and death rates), and men (lower bilateral blindness and myocardial infarction rates). The PCMH model has potential long-term benefits to both patients with poor diabetes control as well as health care systems and providers willing to invest in this health care delivery approach. PMID:23799676

  3. Comparison between a center of mass and a foot pressure sensor system for measuring gait parameters in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Park, Gunoh; Woo, Youngkeun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between an accelerometer system and a foot pressure sensor system for measuring gait characteristics during walking in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-five healthy participants with no neurological, musculoskeletal, or cardiopulmonary disorders volunteered for this study. Gait characteristics were measured while participants walked freely along a 10-m walkway using two different measurement systems simultaneously. The first analysis system was based on center of mass using a wireless tri-axial accelerometer and the second system was a foot pressure sensor system. [Results] There was a significant and high correlation between the two systems with respect to gait velocity and cadence. The stride length as a percentage of the stride height measured with the center of mass system was significantly and highly correlated with stride length and stride velocity that was measured with the foot pressure system. Furthermore, stride length from the center of mass system was significantly and highly correlated with stride length and stride velocity from the foot pressure system. [Conclusion] A gait analysis based on a center of mass system is a valid method to assess the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions in a clinical setting. PMID:26644674

  4. Development of a Mobility Training Program for Young Adult Trainable Mentally Handicapped Clients at the Ray Graham Training Center. Maxi II Practicum Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Ellen M.

    Provided is a practicum report on a travel training program initiated at the Ray Graham Training Center (Chicago, Illinois) for 40 trainable mentally handicapped young adults. The center is described in terms of the geographic area and clients served, staff roles, parent role, and curriculum. It is noted that a prime impetus for the development of…

  5. Validation of Using Fitness Center Attendance Electronic Records to Assess the Frequency of Moderate/Vigorous Leisure-Time Physical Activity among Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amireault, Steve; Godin, Gaston

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide three construct validity evidence for using fitness center attendance electronic records to objectively assess the frequency of leisure-time physical activity among adults. One hundred members of a fitness center (45 women and 55 men; aged 18 to 64 years) completed a self-report leisure-time physical…

  6. Intoxication with Bourbon versus Vodka: Effects on Hangover, Sleep and Next-Day Neurocognitive Performance in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Rohsenow, Damaris J.; Howland, Jonathan; Arnedt, J. Todd; Almeida, Alissa B.; Greece, Jacey; Minsky, Sara; Kempler, Carrie S.; Sales, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Background This study assessed the effects of heavy drinking with high or low congener beverages on next-day neurocognitive performance, and the extent to which these effects were mediated by alcohol-related sleep disturbance or alcoholic beverage congeners, and correlated with the intensity of hangover. Methods Healthy heavy drinkers age 21–33 (n = 95) participated in two drinking nights after an acclimatization night. They drank to a mean of 0.11 g% BrAC on vodka or bourbon one night with matched placebo the other night, randomized for type and order. Polysomnography recordings were made overnight; self-report and neurocognitive measures were assessed the next morning. Results After alcohol, people had more hangover and more decrements in tests requiring both sustained attention and speed. Hangover correlated with poorer performance on these measures. Alcohol decreased sleep efficiency and REM sleep, and increased wake time and next-day sleepiness. Alcohol effects on sleep correlated with hangover but did not mediate the effects on performance. No effect of beverage congeners was found except on hangover severity, with people feeling worse after bourbon. Virtually no sex differences appeared. Conclusions Since drinking to this level affects complex cognitive abilities, safety could be affected, with implications for driving and for safety sensitive occupations. Congener content affects only how people feel the next day so does not increase risk. The sleep disrupting effects of alcohol did not account for the impaired performance so other mechanisms of effect need to be sought. Since hangover symptoms correlate with impaired performance, these might be contributing to the impairment. PMID:20028364

  7. Interactions of time of day and sleep with between-session habituation and extinction memory in young adult males

    PubMed Central

    Pace-Schott, Edward F.; Tracy, Lauren E.; Rubin, Zoe; Mollica, Adrian G.; Ellenbogen, Jeffrey M.; Bianchi, Matt T.; Milad, Mohammed R.; Pitman, Roger K.; Orr, Scott P.

    2014-01-01

    Within-session habituation and extinction learning co-occur as do subsequent consolidation of habituation (i.e., between-session habituation) and extinction memory. We sought to determine if, as we predicted: (1) between-session habituation is greater across a night of sleep vs. a day awake; (2) time-of-day accounts for differences; (3) between-session habituation predicts consolidation of extinction memory; (4) sleep predicts between-session habituation and/or extinction memory. Participants (N=28) completed 4–5 sessions alternating between mornings and evenings over 3 successive days (2 nights) with session 1 in either the morning (N=13) or evening (N=15). Twelve participants underwent laboratory polysomnography. During 4 sessions, participants completed a loud-tone habituation protocol while skin-conductance response (SCR), blink-startle electromyography (EMG), heart-rate acceleration (HRA) and deceleration (HRD) were recorded. For sessions 1 and 2, between-session habituation of EMG, SCR and HRD was greater across sleep. SCR and HRD were generally lower in the morning. Between-session habituation of SCR for sessions 1 and 2 was positively related to intervening (first night) slow wave sleep. In the evening before night 2, participants also underwent fear conditioning and extinction learning phases of a second protocol. Extinction recall was tested the following morning. Extinction recall was predicted only by between-session habituation of SCR across the same night (second night) and by intervening REM. We conclude that: 1) sleep augments between-session habituation, as does morning testing; 2) extinction recall is predicted by concurrent between-session habituation; and 3) both phenomena may be influenced by sleep. PMID:24481663

  8. Interactions of time of day and sleep with between-session habituation and extinction memory in young adult males.

    PubMed

    Pace-Schott, Edward F; Tracy, Lauren E; Rubin, Zoe; Mollica, Adrian G; Ellenbogen, Jeffrey M; Bianchi, Matt T; Milad, Mohammed R; Pitman, Roger K; Orr, Scott P

    2014-05-01

    Within-session habituation and extinction learning co-occur as do subsequent consolidation of habituation (i.e., between-session habituation) and extinction memory. We sought to determine whether, as we predicted: (1) between-session habituation is greater across a night of sleep versus a day awake; (2) time-of-day accounts for differences; (3) between-session habituation predicts consolidation of extinction memory; (4) sleep predicts between-session habituation and/or extinction memory. Participants (N = 28) completed 4-5 sessions alternating between mornings and evenings over 3 successive days (2 nights) with session 1 in either the morning (N = 13) or evening (N = 15). Twelve participants underwent laboratory polysomnography. During 4 sessions, participants completed a loud-tone habituation protocol, while skin conductance response (SCR), blink startle electromyography (EMG), heart-rate acceleration and heart-rate deceleration (HRD) were recorded. For sessions 1 and 2, between-session habituation of EMG, SCR and HRD was greater across sleep. SCR and HRD were generally lower in the morning. Between-session habituation of SCR for sessions 1 and 2 was positively related to intervening (first night) slow wave sleep. In the evening before night 2, participants also underwent fear conditioning and extinction learning phases of a second protocol. Extinction recall was tested the following morning. Extinction recall was predicted only by between-session habituation of SCR across the same night (second night) and by intervening REM. We conclude that: (1) sleep augments between-session habituation, as does morning testing; (2) extinction recall is predicted by concurrent between-session habituation; and (3) both phenomena may be influenced by sleep. PMID:24481663

  9. Factors Associated With Daily Consumption of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Among Adult Patients at Four Federally Qualified Health Centers, Bronx, New York, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Arthur E.; Wylie-Rosett, Judith; Selwyn, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) is associated with cardiovascular disease risk factors. This study examined the relationships between SSB consumption and demographic, health behavior, health service, and health condition characteristics of adult patients of a network of federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) in a low-income, urban setting. Methods Validated, standardized self-reported health behavior questions were incorporated into the electronic health record (EHR) and asked of patients yearly, at 4 FQHCs. We conducted cross-sectional analysis of EHR data collected in 2013 from 12,214 adult patients by using logistic regression. Results Forty percent of adult patients consumed 1 or more SSBs daily. The adjusted odds ratios indicated that patients who consumed more than 1 SSB daily were more likely to be aged 18 to 29 years versus age 70 or older, current smokers versus never smoking, eating no servings of fruits and/or vegetables daily or 1 to 4 servings daily versus 5 or more servings daily, and not walking or biking more than 10 blocks in the past 30 days. Patients consuming 1 or more servings of SSBs daily were less likely to speak Spanish than English, be women than men, be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes versus no diabetes, and be diagnosed with hypertension versus no hypertension. Conclusion SSB consumption differed by certain demographic characteristics, health behaviors, and health conditions. Recording SSB intake and other health behaviors data in the EHR could help clinicians in identifying and counseling patients to promote health behavior changes. Future studies should investigate how EHR data on patient health behavior can be used to improve the health of patients and communities. PMID:25569695

  10. Difference in Postural Control during Quiet Standing between Young Children and Adults: Assessment with Center of Mass Acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Oba, Naoko; Sasagawa, Shun; Yamamoto, Akio; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2015-01-01

    The development of upright postural control has often been investigated using time series of center of foot pressure (COP), which is proportional to the ankle joint torque (i.e., the motor output of a single joint). However, the center of body mass acceleration (COMacc), which can reflect joint motions throughout the body as well as multi-joint coordination, is useful for the assessment of the postural control strategy at the whole-body level. The purpose of the present study was to investigate children’s postural control during quiet standing by using the COMacc. Ten healthy children and 15 healthy young adults were instructed to stand upright quietly on a force platform with their eyes open or closed. The COMacc as well as the COP in the anterior–posterior direction was obtained from ground reaction force measurement. We found that both the COMacc and COP could clearly distinguish the difference between age groups and visual conditions. We also found that the sway frequency of COMacc in children was higher than that in adults, for which differences in biomechanical and/or neural factors between age groups may be responsible. Our results imply that the COMacc can be an alternative force platform measure for assessing developmental changes in upright postural control. PMID:26447883

  11. Significant Improvements in the Practice Patterns of Adult Related Donor Care in US Transplantation Centers.

    PubMed

    Anthias, Chloe; Shaw, Bronwen E; Kiefer, Deidre M; Liesveld, Jane L; Yared, Jean; Kamble, Rammurti T; D'Souza, Anita; Hematti, Peiman; Seftel, Matthew D; Norkin, Maxim; DeFilipp, Zachariah; Kasow, Kimberly A; Abidi, Muneer H; Savani, Bipin N; Shah, Nirali N; Anderlini, Paolo; Diaz, Miguel A; Malone, Adriana K; Halter, Joerg P; Lazarus, Hillard M; Logan, Brent R; Switzer, Galen E; Pulsipher, Michael A; Confer, Dennis L; O'Donnell, Paul V

    2016-03-01

    Recent investigations have found a higher incidence of adverse events associated with hematopoietic cell donation in related donors (RDs) who have morbidities that if present in an unrelated donor (UD) would preclude donation. In the UD setting, regulatory standards ensure independent assessment of donors, one of several crucial measures to safeguard donor health and safety. A survey conducted by the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) Donor Health and Safety Working Committee in 2007 reported a potential conflict of interest in >70% of US centers, where physicians had simultaneous responsibility for RDs and their recipients. Consequently, several international organizations have endeavored to improve practice through regulations and consensus recommendations. We hypothesized that the changes in the 2012 Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy and the Joint Accreditation Committee-International Society for Cellular Therapy and European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation standards resulting from the CIBMTR study would have significantly impacted practice. Accordingly, we conducted a follow-up survey of US transplantation centers to assess practice changes since 2007, and to investigate additional areas where RD care was predicted to differ from UD care. A total of 73 centers (53%), performing 79% of RD transplantations in the United States, responded. Significant improvements were observed since the earlier survey; 62% centers now ensure separation of RD and recipient care (P < .0001). This study identifies several areas where RD management does not meet international donor care standards, however. Particular concerns include counseling and assessment of donors before HLA typing, with 61% centers first disclosing donor HLA results to an individual other than the donor, the use of unlicensed mobilization agents, and the absence of long-term donor follow-up. Recommendations for improvement are made. PMID

  12. Innovative Strategies Designed to Improve Adult Pneumococcal Immunizations in Safety Net Patient-Centered Medical Homes.

    PubMed

    Park, Nina J; Sklaroff, Laura Myerchin; Gross-Schulman, Sandra; Hoang, Khathy; Tran, Helen; Campa, David; Scheib, Geoffrey; Guterman, Jeffrey J

    2016-08-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a principal cause of serious illness, including bacteremia, meningitis, and pneumonia, worldwide. Pneumococcal immunization is proven to reduce morbidity and mortality in high-risk adult and elderly populations. Current pneumococcal vaccination practices are suboptimal in part because of recommendation complexity, the high cost of provider-driven immunization interventions, and outreach methods that are not patient-centric. These barriers are amplified within the safety net. This paper identifies efforts by the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services to increase pneumococcal immunization rates for adult indigent patient populations. A 4-part approach will be used to increase vaccination rates: (1) protocol driven care, (2) staff education, (3) electronic identification of eligible patients, and (4) automated patient outreach and scheduling. The proposed analytics plan and potential for scalability are described. (Population Health Management 2016;19:240-247). PMID:26824148

  13. Cardiovascular Impact of Eating Disorders in Adults: A Single Center Experience and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Sardar, Muhammad Rizwan; Greway, Andrea; DeAngelis, Michael; Tysko, Erin O'Malley; Lehmann, Shawn; Wohlstetter, Melinda; Patel, Riti

    2015-01-01

    Eating disorders have multiple medical sequelae, including potentially life-threatening cardiovascular complications. This article describes our cardiology practice experience of treating adults with eating disorders in the outpatient setting and documents baseline cardiac findings in this complex patient population. We describe our findings in patients across the spectrum of eating disorders; past studies have generally focused on anorexia only. This article also includes a review of the current literature on cardiovascular complications associated with disordered eating. PMID:27326349

  14. Effect of Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Genes (CHRN) on Longitudinal Cigarettes per Day in Adolescents and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Few studies have sought to identify specific genetic markers associated with cigarettes per day (CPD) during adolescence and young adulthood, the period of greatest vulnerability for the development of nicotine dependence. Methods: We used a longitudinal design to investigate the effect of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (CHRN) subunit genes on CPD from 15 to 21 years of age in young smokers of European descent (N = 439, 59% female). The number of CPD typically smoked during the previous 30 days was self-reported. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from CHRN genes were genotyped using DNA extracted from saliva samples collected at the 5-year assessment. Mixed-model analyses of SNP effects were computed across age at the time of assessment using log-transformed CPD as the phenotype. Data from the 1000 Genomes Project were used to clarify the architecture of CHRN genes to inform SNP selection and interpretation of results. Results: CPD was associated with a CHRNB3A6 region tagged by rs2304297, with CHRNA5A3B4 haplotype C (tagged by rs569207), and with the CHRNA2 SNP rs2271920, ps < .004. The reliability of single-SNP associations was supported by the correspondence between a more extensive set of SNP signals and the underlying genetic architecture. The 3 signals identified in this study appear to make independent contributions to CPD, and their combined effect accounts for 5.5% of the variance in log-transformed CPD. Conclusions: Level of CPD during adolescence and young adulthood is associated with CHRNB3A6, CHRNA5A3B4, and CHRNA2. PMID:23943838

  15. Estimation of Trans Fatty Acid Intake in Japanese Adults Using 16-Day Diet Records Based on a Food Composition Database Developed for the Japanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Mai; Sasaki, Satoshi; Murakami, Kentaro; Takahashi, Yoshiko; Okubo, Hitomi; Hirota, Naoko; Notsu, Akiko; Todoriki, Hidemi; Miura, Ayako; Fukui, Mitsuru; Date, Chigusa

    2010-01-01

    Background The Standard Tables of Food Composition in Japan do not include information on trans fatty acids. Previous studies estimating trans fatty acid intake among Japanese have limitations regarding the databases utilized and diet assessment methodologies. We developed a comprehensive database of trans fatty acid food composition, and used this database to estimate intake among a Japanese population. Methods The database was developed using analytic values from the literature and nutrient analysis software encompassing foods in the US, as well as values estimated from recipes or nutrient compositions. We collected 16-day diet records from 225 adults aged 30 to 69 years living in 4 areas of Japan. Trans fatty acid intake was estimated based on the database and the 16-day diet records. Results Mean total fat and trans fatty acid intake was 56.9 g/day (27.7% total energy) and 1.7 g/day (0.8% total energy), respectively, for women and 66.8 g/day (25.5% total energy) and 1.7 g/day (0.7% total energy) for men. Trans fatty acid intake accounted for greater than 1% of total energy intake, which is the maximum recommended according to the World Health Organization, in 24.4% of women and 5.7% of men, and was particularly high among women living in urban areas and those aged 30–49 years. The largest contributors to trans fatty acid intake were confectionaries in women and fats and oils in men. Conclusions Although mean trans fatty acid intake was below the maximum recommended intake of the World Health Organization, intake among subgroups was of concern. Further public health efforts to reduce trans fatty acid intake should be encouraged. PMID:20037259

  16. Adventures in Assessment: Learner-Centered Approaches to Assessment and Evaluation in Adult Literacy, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cora, Marie, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This journal presents the following articles: "Introduction: Volume 14--Examining Performance" (Marie Cora) "Fair Assessment Practices: Giving Students Equitable Opportunities to Demonstrate Learning" (Linda Suskie); "Assessing Oral Communication at the Community Learning Center Development of the OPT (Oral Proficiency Test)" (JoAnne Hartel and…

  17. The Development and Testing of a Typology of Adult Education Programs in University Residential Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buskey, John H.

    This study was designed to develop and field test a typology of framework providing for the systematic description, definition, and classification of activities in university continuing education centers. Basic questions pertained to whether such a typology could be developed, and whether other investigators and practitioners could use the…

  18. Intermittent (every-other-day) drinking induces rapid escalation of ethanol intake and preference in adolescent and adult C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Melendez, Roberto I.

    2010-01-01

    Background Using adult C57BL/6J (B6) mice, we previously developed a procedure that causes a progressive increase in ethanol intake and preference (i.e., alcohol escalation effect) following weekly (intermittent) access to ethanol (Melendez et al. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 30, 2006). A limitation of this procedure is that it requires many weeks of testing, which limits its use to study ethanol escalation (i.e., binge-like drinking) during adolescence. Previous studies have shown that intermittent every-other-day (EOD) access to ethanol is sufficient to induce ethanol escalation in rats. The objective of this study was to verify if EOD access is sufficient to induce escalated levels of ethanol intake and preference in adult and adolescent B6 mice. Methods Male B6 mice received free-choice 24 hr access to 15% ethanol and water on an EOD or daily basis for 2 weeks. Food and water was available at all times. Using adult mice, Experiment 1 characterized the induction of ethanol escalation following EOD access at 6 (i.e., drinking in the dark) and 24 hr intervals, whereas Experiment 2 determined if daily drinking reverses escalation induced by EOD drinking. Experiment 3 compared ethanol-drinking capacity following daily versus EOD drinking in adolescent (P30–45) and adult (P70–85) mice. Results Experiment 1 revealed that EOD drinking leads to a significant (nearly two-fold) increase in ethanol intake and preference over mice given daily access. Experiment 2 demonstrated that EOD-elicited escalation is blocked and subsequently reversed following daily drinking. Experiment 3 revealed that ethanol drinking was greater in adolescent mice compared to adults following daily drinking and EOD (escalated) drinking. Although the escalated levels of ethanol intake were greater in adolescent mice, the rate or onset of escalation was comparable between both age groups. Conclusions This study is the first to demonstrate that EOD drinking leads to escalation of ethanol intake and

  19. Localized Resectable Genitourinary Sarcoma in Adult Korean Patients: Experiences at a Single Center

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung Yong; Moon, Kyung Chul; Cheong, Min Su; Kwak, Cheol; Kim, Hyeon Hoe

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis of localized resectable genitourinary sarcomas in adults. Materials and Methods Between September, 1996 and November, 2008, 18 consecutive cases of adults (12 men and 6 women; median age 48.8 years) who were treated for primary genitourinary sarcomas were identified. The following variables were analyzed: patient age, gender, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, primary organ, tumor histology, size, necrosis, Fédération Nationale des Centres de Lutte Contre le Cancer (FNCLCC) grade, and surgical margin positivity. Recurrence-free survival and disease-specific survival were the study end-points. Results The most common presenting symptom was a palpable mass (six cases, 33.3%), the most common site was the kidney (six cases, 33.3%), and the most common histological subtype was leiomyosarcoma (eight patients, 44.4%). Complete resection with negative surgical margins was achieved in 13 patients (72.2%). The median follow-up period was 49.9 months (range 6.4 to 147.6). The recurrence-free survival rates at 1, 3, and 5 years were 81.6%, 66.5%, and 66.5%, respectively. Recurrence-free survival only associated significantly with ASA score (p=0.018). The disease-specific survival rate at 1, 3, and 5 years was 88.9%, 76.2%, and 67.7%, respectively. Disease-specific survival was associated significantly only with FNCLCC grade (p=0.042). Conclusion Although genitourinary sarcomas in adults are a rare group of tumors with a poor prognosis, some patients may have a favorable prognosis. Our findings suggest that FNCLCC grade is the most important prognostic factor for these patients. PMID:21786440

  20. Water Intake in a Sample of Greek Adults Evaluated with the Water Balance Questionnaire (WBQ) and a Seven-Day Diary.

    PubMed

    Athanasatou, Adelais; Malisova, Olga; Kandyliari, Aikaterini; Kapsokefalou, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Awareness on the importance of hydration in health has created an unequivocal need to enrich knowledge on water intake of the general population and on the contribution of beverages to total water intake. We evaluated in the past water intake in a sample of Greek adults using two approaches. In study A, volunteers completed the Water Balance Questionnaire (WBQ), a food frequency questionnaire, designed to evaluate water intake (n = 1092; 48.1% males; 43 ± 18 years). In study B, a different population of volunteers recorded water, beverage, and food intake in seven-day diaries (n = 178; 51.1% males; 37 ± 12 years). Herein, data were reanalyzed with the objective to reveal the contribution of beverages in total water intake with these different methodologies. Beverage recording was grouped in the following categories: Hot beverages; milk; fruit and vegetable juices; caloric soft drinks; diet soft drinks; alcoholic drinks; other beverages; and water. Total water intake and water intake from beverages was 3254 (SE 43) mL/day and 2551 (SE 39) mL/day in study A; and 2349 (SE 59) mL/day and 1832 (SE 56) mL/day in study B. In both studies water had the highest contribution to total water intake, approximately 50% of total water intake, followed by hot beverages (10% of total water intake) and milk (5% of total water intake). These two approaches contribute information on water intake in Greece and highlight the contribution of different beverages; moreover, they point out differences in results obtained from different methodologies attributed to limitations in their use. PMID:27626443

  1. Anxiety sensitivity in relation to quit day dropout among adult daily smokers recruited to participate in a self-guided cessation attempt.

    PubMed

    Langdon, Kirsten J; Farris, Samantha G; Hogan, Julianna B D; Grover, Kristin W; Zvolensky, Michael J

    2016-07-01

    Anxiety sensitivity (AS; fear of anxiety and internal sensations) has been implicated in a variety of aspects of smoking, including difficulties achieving and maintaining abstinence during tobacco cessation. However, research has yet to evaluate whether AS impacts premature termination of initiating a quit attempt. Therefore, the aim of the present investigation was to explore the extent to which AS was associated with tobacco cessation dropout, as indexed by attendance on the scheduled quit day visit. Participants included 84 adult daily cigarette smokers (61.7% male; Mage=34.6years, SD=13.9), who were recruited to participate in a self-guided quit attempt (an attempt to quit smoking without professional or pharmacological aid). Results indicated that after controlling for the effects of participant sex, race, current (past month) psychological disorder, cigarettes smoked per day, number of years as a regular smoker, and pre-quit levels of motivation to quit, AS significantly predicted increased odds of study dropout prior to attending the scheduled quit day. These findings suggest that AS may be a mechanism involved with challenges in the initiation of quitting. PMID:26896560

  2. Evolution of anterior segment reconstruction after live donor adult liver transplantation: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Pomposelli, James J; Akoad, Mohamed; Khwaja, Khalid; Lewis, W D; Cheah, Yee L; Verbesey, Jennifer; Jenkins, Roger L; Pomfret, Elizabeth A

    2012-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding the best method for venous outflow reconstruction after live donor liver transplantation using right lobe grafts. Some authors advocate routine inclusion of the middle hepatic vein with the graft, whereas others favor a more selective approach. In this report, we examine the evolution of our decision making and technique of selective anterior venous segment reconstruction during live donor adult liver transplantation performed in 226 recipients. We have developed a simplified back-bench procedure using sequential-composite anastomosis using various vascular conduits with syndactylization to the right hepatic vein creating a single large-outflow anastomosis in the recipient. Conduits used include iliac artery or vein allograft, recanalized umbilical vein, cryopreserved iliac artery allograft, and 6-mm synthetic expanded polytetrafluoroethylene vascular graft. This technique can be performed quickly, safely, and under cold storage conditions and results in excellent outcome while minimizing donor risk. PMID:21980936

  3. Body Image in Young Gender Dysphoric Adults: A European Multi-Center Study.

    PubMed

    Becker, Inga; Nieder, Timo O; Cerwenka, Susanne; Briken, Peer; Kreukels, Baudewijntje P C; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; Cuypere, GrietDe; Haraldsen, Ira R Hebold; Richter-Appelt, Hertha

    2016-04-01

    The alteration of sex-specific body features and the establishment of a satisfactory body image are known to be particularly relevant for individuals with Gender Dysphoria (GD). The aim of the study was to first develop new scales and examine the psychometric properties of the Hamburg Body Drawing Scale (Appelt & Strauß 1988). For the second part of this study, the satisfaction with different body features in young GD adults before cross-sex treatment were compared to female and male controls. Data collection took place within the context of the European Network for the Investigation of Gender Incongruence (ENIGI) including 135 female-to-male (FtMs) and 115 male-to-female (MtFs) young GD adults and 235 female and 379 male age-adjusted controls. The five female and six male body feature subscales revealed good internal consistency. The ENIGI sample reported less satisfaction with overall appearance (d = 0.30) and with all of their body features than controls, but no subgroup differences for sexual orientation (FtM and MtF) and Age of Onset (FtM) were found. Body dissatisfaction was higher with regard to sex-specific body features (largest effect sizes of d = 3.21 for Genitalia in FtMs and d = 2.85 for Androgen-responsive features and genitalia in MtFs) than with those that appeared less related to the natal sex (d = 0.64 for Facial features in FtMs and d = 0.59 for Body shape in MtFs). Not only medical body modifying interventions, but also psychosocial guidance with regard to body image might be helpful for GD individuals before transitioning. PMID:25836027

  4. Day to Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurecki, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    A clean, healthy and safe school provides students, faculty and staff with an environment conducive to learning and working. However, budget and staff reductions can lead to substandard cleaning practices and unsanitary conditions. Some school facility managers have been making the switch to a day-schedule to reduce security and energy costs, and…

  5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Expert Panel Meetings on Prevention and Treatment of Anthrax in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hendricks, Katherine A.; Wright, Mary E.; Shadomy, Sean V.; Bradley, John S.; Morrow, Meredith G.; Pavia, Andy T.; Rubinstein, Ethan; Holty, Jon-Erik C.; Messonnier, Nancy E.; Smith, Theresa L.; Pesik, Nicki; Treadwell, Tracee A.

    2014-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention convened panels of anthrax experts to review and update guidelines for anthrax postexposure prophylaxis and treatment. The panels included civilian and military anthrax experts and clinicians with experience treating anthrax patients. Specialties represented included internal medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics, infectious disease, emergency medicine, critical care, pulmonology, hematology, and nephrology. Panelists discussed recent patients with systemic anthrax; reviews of published, unpublished, and proprietary data regarding antimicrobial drugs and anthrax antitoxins; and critical care measures of potential benefit to patients with anthrax. This article updates antimicrobial postexposure prophylaxis and antimicrobial and antitoxin treatment options and describes potentially beneficial critical care measures for persons with anthrax, including clinical procedures for infected nonpregnant adults. Changes from previous guidelines include an expanded discussion of critical care and clinical procedures and additional antimicrobial choices, including preferred antimicrobial drug treatment for possible anthrax meningitis. PMID:24447897

  6. Training for Change. A Training Pack To Support Adults with Learning Disabilities To Become Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Adult Continuing Education, Leicester (England).

    This training package consists of a print training guide to accompany an audiotape and videotape. It is designed to support adults with learning disabilities in their efforts to become trainers. Adult learners who complete the training package as part of a further education college, adult education center, day center, or self-advocacy group…

  7. Presentation, Management, and Outcome of Thyroglossal Duct Cysts in Adult and Pediatric Populations: A 14-Year Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Al-Thani, Hassan; El-Menyar, Ayman; Sulaiti, Maryam Al; El-Mabrok, Jamela; Hajaji, Khairi; Elgohary, Hesham; Asim, Mohammad; Taha, Ibrahim; Tabeb, Abdelhakem

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A thyroglossal duct cyst (TDC) is a frequent congenital midline anomaly of the neck that usually manifests during the first decade of life. We aimed to describe the presentation, management, and outcome of TDC in pediatric and adult cases. Methods A retrospective observational analysis was conducted for all patients diagnosed and treated for TDC between 2000 and 2014 in a single center in Qatar. Data included patients’ demographics, presentations, preoperative investigations, anesthesia type, histopathological findings, surgical management, recurrences, and complications. Results We identified 102 patients, of which 57% were males. The mean age of patients was 20.2±15.6 years. A bimodal distribution of TDC has been observed, which peaked between the ages of 6–13 years and at ≥19 years. The preoperative evaluation mainly includes ultrasonography (66%), thyroid function test (44%), and fine-needle aspiration cytology (10%). The median size of the cyst was 25 (2–60) mm. Patients mainly presented with an asymptomatic midline neck mass at or below the hyoid bone (82%), followed by fistula (9%), infection (2%), and dysphagia (2%). Eighty-nine cases were identified preoperatively as TDC. The histopathological findings confirmed TDC with hyoid bone in 61 cases, and TDC alone in 38 cases. Eighty patients underwent the Sistrunk procedure while excision of TDC alone was observed in 18 cases. Five cases of recurrent disease were also treated. Adults had a greater median cyst size (30 (9–60) vs. 22 (2–55) mm; p = 0.005) and required prolonged operation time (69 (1–169) vs. 32.5 (1–140) mins; 
p = 0.004) compared to the pediatric group. Conclusion The occurrence of TDC shows a bimodal age distribution. Preoperative evaluation and time for surgery vary whereas clinical presentations, surgical management, and postoperative outcomes are comparable among adult and pediatric groups. Ultrasonography is the preferred diagnostic modality, and the Sistrunk

  8. Center of pressure control for balance maintenance during lateral waist-pull perturbations in older adults.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Masahiro; Bair, Woei-Nan; Rogers, Mark W

    2015-04-13

    When balance is disturbed, location of the center of pressure (COP) contributes to a person's ability to recover from a perturbation. This study investigated COP control prior to first step lift-off (FSLO) during lateral perturbations in older non-fallers and fallers. 38 non-fallers and 16 fallers received lateral waist-pulls at 5 different intensities. Crossover stepping responses at the intensity level where the largest number of subjects responded with crossover steps were analyzed. Whole-body center of mass (COM) and COP positions in the medio-lateral (ML) direction with respect to the base of support (BOS), and COP velocity were calculated. An inverted pendulum model was used to define the BOS stability boundary at FSLO, which was also adjusted using the COP position at FSLO (functional boundary). No significant differences were found in the COP velocities between fallers and non-fallers (p>.093). However, the COP positions for fallers were located significantly more medial at FSLO (p≤.01), resulting in a significantly reduced functional boundary. Although the stability margins, measures of stability based on the BOS, were significantly larger than zero for fallers (p≤.004), they were not significantly different from zero for the functional boundary, i.e., reaching the functional stability limit. Fallers had reduced functional limits of stability in the ML direction, which would predispose them to more precarious stability conditions than non-fallers. This could be a cause for taking more steps than non-fallers for balance recovery as we observed. The functional boundary estimation may be a more sensitive marker of balance instability than the BOS boundary. PMID:25728580

  9. CENTER OF PRESSURE CONTROL FOR BALANCE MAINTENANCE DURING LATERAL WAIST-PULL PERTURBATIONS IN OLDER ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Masahiro; Bair, Woei-Nan; Rogers, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    When balance is disturbed, location of the center of pressure (COP) contributes to a person’s ability to recover from a perturbation. This study investigated COP control prior to first step lift-off (FSLO) during lateral perturbations in older non-fallers and fallers. 38 Non-Fallers and 16 Fallers received lateral waist-pulls at 5 different intensities. Crossover stepping responses at the intensity level where the largest number of subjects responded with crossover steps were analyzed. Whole-body center of mass (COM) and COP positions in the medio-lateral (ML) direction with respect to the base of support (BOS), and COP velocity were calculated. An inverted pendulum model was used to define the BOS stability boundary at FSLO, which was also adjusted using the COP position at FSLO (functional boundary). No significant differences were found in the COP velocities between Fallers and Non-Fallers (p>.093). However, the COP positions for Fallers were located significantly more medial at FSLO (p≤.01), resulting in a significantly reduced functional boundary. Although the stability margins, measures of stability based on the BOS, were significantly larger than zero for Fallers (p≤.004), they were not significantly different from zero for the functional boundary, i.e., reaching the functional stability limit. Fallers had reduced functional limits of stability in the ML direction, which would predispose them to more precarious stability conditions than Non-Fallers. This could be a cause for taking more steps than Non-Fallers for balance recovery as we observed. The functional boundary estimation may be a more sensitive marker of balance instability than the BOS boundary. PMID:25728580

  10. Device closure in adults with atrial septal defect in Shiraz, a single center registry

    PubMed Central

    Ostovan, Mohammad Ali; Kojuri, Javad; Dehghani, Pooyan; Razazi, Vida; Moarref, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Successful closure of atrial septal defect (ASD) improves patients’ functional class and exercise capacity. In this study we evaluate the safety and feasibility of percutaneous device closure of ASDs. Methods: Two hundred fifty six patients with significant ASD according to our criteria were enrolled. The patients were treated using nitinol wire mesh transcatheter devices. Complications were followed for a median of 2.5 years. Results: Success rate was 98.4% with 3 unsuccessful cases and a mean hospital stay of 1.007 ± 0.0004 days. Complication rate was 7.42%. Size of the right ventricle (RV) annulus was significantly decreased 24 hours after intervention (P = 0.005). Conclusion: The present report demonstrates that transcatheter closure of ASD is safe and effective. PMID:27069566

  11. The Role of Aging and Disability Resource Centers in Serving Adults Aging with Intellectual Disabilities and Their Families: Findings from Seven States.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Caitlin E; Putman, Michelle; Kramer, John; Mutchler, Jan E

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) are living to experience old age. The purpose of this project was to assess the activities of aging and disability resource centers (ADRCs) as they seek to serve older adults with intellectual disabilities and their family caregivers. Data come from 21 in-depth qualitative interviews with ADRC staff in seven states. Results of this qualitative analysis indicate that ADRCs are not focusing explicitly on adults aging with I/DD and their family caregivers, but meeting the needs of this population is a future goal of ADRCs. Challenges related to accessing and providing information and referral services for adults aging with I/DD were described and highlight existing unmet needs of this population. Supporting adults who simultaneously require aging and disability services requires true coordination of aging and disability service systems. PMID:26548867

  12. Creditable Foods Guide for Child Care Centers on the Child Care Food Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Health, Denver.

    This manual provides information on creditable and noncreditable foods in child care centers, before-and-after-school centers, family day care homes, and adult day care centers. Creditable foods are foods that may be counted toward meeting the requirements for a reimbursable meal. Foods are determined to be creditable according to guidelines…

  13. Management of traumatic cataract in adults at a reference center in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Serna-Ojeda, Juan Carlos; Cordova-Cervantes, Jorge; Lopez-Salas, Miriam; Abdala-Figuerola, Alberto Carlos; Jimenez-Corona, Aida; Matiz-Moreno, Humberto; Chavez-Mondragon, Eduardo

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the clinical presentation, mode of injury, surgical, and postoperative outcomes in adult patients with traumatic cataract. This is a clinical, observational, and retrospective study with review of records of patients in the period 2010-2012. Eighty patients were included, of whom 67 (83.75 %) were male. The mean age at presentation was 46 years (range 18-82 years). Sixty-four patients (80 %) had a closed-globe blunt ocular trauma and 16 (20 %) had an open-globe penetrating trauma. Seventy-seven (96.25 %) patients underwent phacoemulsification; 13.7 % (n = 11) required placement of capsular tension rings and 22.5 % (n = 18) automated anterior vitrectomy. In 53 % of the cases the intraocular lens (IOL) was placed in the capsular bag. Forty-seven patients (58.75 %) achieved a best-corrected visual acuity of 20/40 or better. In 57 (71.25 %) the final refraction was obtained, with a mean spherical equivalent of -0.56D (range -3.50D to +2.00 D). The improvement in visual acuity was significantly higher when the IOL was placed in the capsular bag compared to when it was placed in the sulcus (average difference of 0.667, p = 0.001). The most common mechanism of trauma is closed globe. Phacoemulsification was the procedure most common performed, with the IOL placed most commonly in the capsular bag. The final best-corrected visual acuity in most patients was 20/40 or better. Placing the IOL in the capsular bag represented an improvement in visual acuity compared to placement in the sulcus. PMID:25028216

  14. Management of Adult Syphilis: Key Questions to Inform the 2015 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Sexually Transmitted Diseases Treatment Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Khalil G

    2015-12-15

    A panel of experts generated 8 "key questions" in the management of adult syphilis. A systematic literature review was conducted and tables of evidence were constructed to answer these important questions. Penicillin is the drug of choice to treat syphilis. Doxycycline to treat early and late latent syphilis is an acceptable alternate option if penicillin cannot be used. There is no added benefit to enhanced antimicrobial therapy when treating human immunodeficiency virus-infected persons with syphilis. If a patient misses a dose of penicillin in a course of weekly therapy for late syphilis, clinical experience suggests that an interval of 10-14 days between doses might be acceptable before restarting the sequence of injections. Pharmacologic considerations suggest that an interval of 7-9 days between doses, if feasible, may be more optimal. Missed doses are not acceptable for pregnant women. A cerebrospinal fluid examination to diagnose neurosyphilis is recommended in persons diagnosed with tertiary syphilis (eg, cardiovascular syphilis or late benign syphilis), persons with neurological signs or symptoms consistent with neurosyphilis, and asymptomatic persons whose serological titers do not decline appropriately following recommended therapy and in whom reinfection is ruled out. Infection and reinfection rates, particularly among men who have sex with men, are high. Frequent serological screening of this population appears to be the most cost-efficient intervention. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention continues to recommend the use of the traditional rapid plasma reagin-based screening algorithm. The positive predictive value for syphilis associated with an isolated unconfirmed reactive treponemal chemiluminescence assay or enzyme immunoassay is low if the epidemiological risk and clinical probability for syphilis are low. Among pregnant women with serodiscordant serologies (positive treponemal tests and a negative nontreponemal test), the risk of

  15. Creating an Effective Educational Environment for Adult Learners: A Qualitative, Multi-Case Study of Off-Campus Center Administrator's Use of Invitational Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKnight, Carolyn P.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative, multi-case study was designed to examine off-campus centers and their administrators in creating an effective learning environment for adult learners. Serving as the conceptual framework, invitational leadership theory is a holistic approach which nurtures the belief that everyone is intrinsically motivated and it is the leaders'…

  16. EVALUATION OF THE ADULT LEARNING CENTER OF ELIZABETHPORT BY STAFF AND PARTICIPANTS, OPERATIONS FROM 2/26/68 - 4/30/68.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TATUM, WILLIAM; CHASNOFF, ROBERT

    ACTIVITIES, FACILITIES, AND PROGRAMED READING MATERIALS AT THE ADULT LEARNING CENTER OF ELIZABETHPORT (ELIZABETH, NEW JERSEY) WERE EVALUATED IN 1968 BY STAFF MEMBERS AND PARTICIPANTS. STAFF OPINIONS DIFFERED AS TO THE MOST SUCCESSFUL MATERIALS, AND REASONS GIVEN FOR SUCCESS VARIED BETWEEN INTEREST LEVEL, SIZE OF PRINT AND LENGTH OF STORIES, THE…

  17. Adult Career Counseling Center, Fourteenth Annual Report, September 1996-June 1997. Computer-Assisted Career Guidance Systems and Career Counseling Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Jane; Schultz, Kim; Wruck, Helen

    In 1996-97, the Adult Career Counseling Center (ACCC) at Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan, enhanced its operation by doing the following: implementing a new computer system to network various software packages; creating and implementing a computerized system to maintain ACCC client records and usage statistics; developing an ACCC policy…

  18. Outcomes of Surgical Repair for Persistent Truncus Arteriosus from Neonates to Adults: A Single Center's Experience

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiuming; Gao, Huawei; Hua, Zhongdong; Yang, Keming; Yan, Jun; Zhang, Hao; Ma, Kai; Zhang, Sen; Qi, Lei; Li, Shoujun

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to report our experiences with surgical repair in patients of all ages with persistent truncus arteriosus. Methods From July 2004 to July 2014, 50 consecutive patients with persistent truncus arteriosus who underwent anatomical repair were included in the retrospective review. Median follow-up time was 3.4 years (range, 3 months to 10 years). Results Fifty patients underwent anatomical repair at a median age of 19.6 months (range, 20 days to 19.1 years). Thirty patients (60%) were older than one year. The preoperative pulmonary vascular resistance and mean pulmonary artery pressure were 4.1±2.1 (range, 0.1 to 8.9) units.m2 and 64.3±17.9 (range, 38 to 101) mmHg, respectively. Significant truncal valve regurgitation was presented in 14 (28%) patients. Hospital death occurred in 3 patients, two due to pulmonary hypertensive crisis and the other due to pneumonia. Three late deaths occurred at 3, 4 and 11 months after surgery. The actuarial survival rates were 87.7% and 87.7% at 1 year and 5 years, respectively. Multivariate analysis identified significant preoperative truncal valve regurgitation was a risk factor for overall mortality (odds ratio, 7.584; 95%CI: 1.335–43.092; p = 0.022). Two patients required reoperation of truncal valve replacement. One patient underwent reintervention for conduit replacement. Freedom from reoperation at 5 years was 92.9%. At latest examination, there was one patient with moderate-to-severe truncal valve regurgitation and four with moderate. Three patients had residual pulmonary artery hypertension. All survivors were in New York Heart Association class I-II. Conclusions Complete repair of persistent truncus arteriosus can be achieved with a relatively low mortality and acceptable early- and mid-term results, even in cases with late presentation. Significant preoperative truncal valve regurgitation remains a risk factor for overall mortality. The long-term outcomes warrant further follow-up. PMID:26752522

  19. Association of interatrial septal abnormalities with cardiac impulse conduction disorders in adult patients: experience from a tertiary center in Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    Bakalli, Aurora; Pllana, Ejup; Koçinaj, Dardan; Bekteshi, Tefik; Dragusha, Gani; Gashi, Masar; Musliu, Nebih; Gashi, Zaim

    2011-01-01

    Interatrial septal disorders, which include: atrial septal defect, patent foramen ovale and atrial septal aneurysm, are frequent congenital anomalies found in adult patients. Early detection of these anomalies is important to prevent their hemodynamic and/or thromboembolic consequences. The aims of this study were: to assess the association between impulse conduction disorders and anomalies of interatrial septum; to determine the prevalence of different types of interatrial septum abnormalities; to assess anatomic, hemodynamic, and clinical consequences of interatrial septal pathologies. Fifty-three adult patients with impulse conduction disorders and patients without ECG changes but with signs of interatrial septal abnormalities, who were referred to our center for echocardiography, were included in a prospective transesophageal echocardiography study. Interatrial septal anomalies were detected in around 85% of the examined patients. Patent foramen ovale was encountered in 32% of the patients, and in combination with atrial septal aneurysm in an additional 11.3% of cases. Atrial septal aneurysm and atrial septal defect were diagnosed with equal frequency in 20.7% of our study population. Impulse conduction disorders were significantly more suggestive of interatrial septal anomalies than clinical signs and symptoms observed in our patients (84.91% vs 30.19%, P=0.002). Right bundle branch block was the most frequent impulse conduction disorder, found in 41 (77.36%) cases. We conclude that interatrial septal anomalies are highly associated with impulse conduction disorders, particularly with right bundle branch block. Impulse conduction disorders are more indicative of interatrial septal abnormalities in earlier stages than can be understood from the patient’s clinical condition. PMID:21977304

  20. Association of interatrial septal abnormalities with cardiac impulse conduction disorders in adult patients: experience from a tertiary center in Kosovo.

    PubMed

    Bakalli, Aurora; Pllana, Ejup; Koçinaj, Dardan; Bekteshi, Tefik; Dragusha, Gani; Gashi, Masar; Musliu, Nebih; Gashi, Zaim

    2011-01-01

    INTERATRIAL SEPTAL DISORDERS, WHICH INCLUDE: atrial septal defect, patent foramen ovale and atrial septal aneurysm, are frequent congenital anomalies found in adult patients. Early detection of these anomalies is important to prevent their hemodynamic and/or thromboembolic consequences. The aims of this study were: to assess the association between impulse conduction disorders and anomalies of interatrial septum; to determine the prevalence of different types of interatrial septum abnormalities; to assess anatomic, hemodynamic, and clinical consequences of interatrial septal pathologies. Fifty-three adult patients with impulse conduction disorders and patients without ECG changes but with signs of interatrial septal abnormalities, who were referred to our center for echocardiography, were included in a prospective transesophageal echocardiography study. Interatrial septal anomalies were detected in around 85% of the examined patients. Patent foramen ovale was encountered in 32% of the patients, and in combination with atrial septal aneurysm in an additional 11.3% of cases. Atrial septal aneurysm and atrial septal defect were diagnosed with equal frequency in 20.7% of our study population. Impulse conduction disorders were significantly more suggestive of interatrial septal anomalies than clinical signs and symptoms observed in our patients (84.91% vs 30.19%, P=0.002). Right bundle branch block was the most frequent impulse conduction disorder, found in 41 (77.36%) cases. We conclude that interatrial septal anomalies are highly associated with impulse conduction disorders, particularly with right bundle branch block. Impulse conduction disorders are more indicative of interatrial septal abnormalities in earlier stages than can be understood from the patient's clinical condition. PMID:21977304

  1. Segmentation of center brains and optic lobes in 3D confocal images of adult fruit fly brains.

    PubMed

    Lam, Shing Chun Benny; Ruan, Zongcai; Zhao, Ting; Long, Fuhui; Jenett, Arnim; Simpson, Julie; Myers, Eugene W; Peng, Hanchuan

    2010-02-01

    Automatic alignment (registration) of 3D images of adult fruit fly brains is often influenced by the significant displacement of the relative locations of the two optic lobes (OLs) and the center brain (CB). In one of our ongoing efforts to produce a better image alignment pipeline of adult fruit fly brains, we consider separating CB and OLs and align them independently. This paper reports our automatic method to segregate CB and OLs, in particular under conditions where the signal to noise ratio (SNR) is low, the variation of the image intensity is big, and the relative displacement of OLs and CB is substantial. We design an algorithm to find a minimum-cost 3D surface in a 3D image stack to best separate an OL (of one side, either left or right) from CB. This surface is defined as an aggregation of the respective minimum-cost curves detected in each individual 2D image slice. Each curve is defined by a list of control points that best segregate OL and CB. To obtain the locations of these control points, we derive an energy function that includes an image energy term defined by local pixel intensities and two internal energy terms that constrain the curve's smoothness and length. Gradient descent method is used to optimize this energy function. To improve both the speed and robustness of the method, for each stack, the locations of optimized control points in a slice are taken as the initialization prior for the next slice. We have tested this approach on simulated and real 3D fly brain image stacks and demonstrated that this method can reasonably segregate OLs from CBs despite the aforementioned difficulties. PMID:19698789

  2. Epidemiology of viral infections and evaluation of the potential benefit of OM-85 BV on the virologic status of children attending day-care centers.

    PubMed

    Aymard, M; Chomel, J J; Allard, J P; Thouvenot, D; Honegger, D; Floret, D; Boissel, J P; Collet, J P; Dürr, F; Gillet, J

    1994-01-01

    Viral investigations were performed during 4 winter seasons (88/89, 89/90, 92/93, 93/94) in children attending day-care centers (DCCs) in the Rhône Département in eastern France. Over the total observation period of 4 winter seasons, 780 children were screened with a nasal swab for the presence of viruses. Of those, 230 (29.5%) had a positive viral culture. The viruses identified were respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza A and B virus, parainfluenza virus, coronavirus, rhinovirus, adenovirus and enterovirus. During that time, 83 epidemic events in 47 DCC were recorded. A particular virus was judged to be causally related to an epidemic if the identical virus was isolated in > or = 3 children during the same outbreak of respiratory diseases. Thus, in 51 cases (61.4%) of all epidemics, the following viruses were responsible for an epidemic: RSV (n = 23), coronavirus (n = 10) (only during the season of 1993-1994), influenza A virus (n = 6), rhinovirus (n = 4), enterovirus (n = 4), adenovirus (n = 3) and parainfluenza virus (n = 1). Except for the somewhat surprising accumulation of coronavirus epidemics during the winter of 1993-1994, there were only minor seasonal variations from one year to another. As expected, RSV accounted for about one third of all respiratory tract infections in children attending DCCs and was therefore the most important single causative agent. These results are compared with data from children who did not attend a DCC and were cared for in a private practice.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7800968

  3. Diet as a Risk Factor for Pneumococcal Carriage and Otitis Media: A Cross-Sectional Study among Children in Day Care Centers

    PubMed Central

    Tapiainen, Terhi; Paalanne, Niko; Arkkola, Tuula; Renko, Marjo; Pokka, Tytti; Kaijalainen, Tarja; Uhari, Matti

    2014-01-01

    Background Pharyngeal bacteria are exposed to different sugar conditions depending on the diet of the child. We hypothesized that dietary factors such as daily intake of carbohydrates could be associated with pneumococcal carriage and the occurrence of otitis media in children. Methods Our study design was a cross-sectional study among 1006 children attending child day care centers. Parents filled in a food frequency questionnaire. Oropharyngeal swabs were collected from each child. The primary outcome was the occurrence of pneumococcal carriage and the secondary outcome the number of acute otitis media episodes during life. Principal component analysis was used to group dietary intake into nine factors. The models were adjusted for age, gender of the child and educational level of the mother. Results The dietary factor which included high consumption of sweet pastries and jam was associated with an increased risk of pneumococcal carriage (OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.36, P-value 0.04). The factor including frequent consumption of fruit and berries was associated with a decreased risk of acute otitis (regression coefficient −0.51, 95% CI −0.98 to −0.03, P = 0.04). A high intake of consumption of sweets and snacks (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.80, P = 0.03) was associated with an increased risk of caries. Conclusions Diet was associated with a risk of pneumococcal carriage and the occurrence of otitis media. Diet may thus be a modifiable risk factor for the occurrence of acute otitis media. PMID:24599395

  4. Basic Education and the Adult Migrant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradtmueller, Weldon; Ulmer, Curtis

    A program of adult academic education and prevocational training for unemployed adult migrant and seasonal workers in central and south Florida is described. Classes were held at nine centers 5 days a week for a total of 420 hours of instruction, and a stipend was awarded to participants. The results of tests that sought the educational…

  5. Valentine's Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02174 Valentine's Day

    This isolated mesa [lower left center of the image] has an almost heart-shaped margin. Happy Valentine's Day from Mars.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 29.4N, Longitude 79.1E. 18 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  6. Cortisol Patterns at Home and Child Care: Afternoon Differences and Evening Recovery in Children Attending Very High Quality Full-Day Center-Based Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watamura, Sarah E.; Kryzer, Erin M.; Robertson, Steven S.

    2008-01-01

    Previous work has found that many young children show different patterns of production of the hormone cortisol, which is sensitive to stress and challenge, on days when they are at child care compared with days when they are at home. At home, preschool age children typically show a decreasing pattern of cortisol production across the day which is…

  7. Paths of Effects from Preschool to Adult Well-Being: A Confirmatory Analysis of the Child-Parent Center Program

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Arthur J.; Ou, Suh-Ruu

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the contribution of five hypotheses to the estimated effects of preschool in the Child-Parent Centers on occupational prestige, felony arrest, and depressive symptoms in adulthood in the Chicago Longitudinal Study. An alternative-intervention, quasi-experimental design included over 1,400 low-income participants (93% of whom were black) who attended preschool for 1–2 years or the usual early educational intervention and were traced to age 24. LISREL analysis of five hypotheses (cognitive advantage, family support, school support, motivational advantage, and social adjustment) indicated that while each individually accounted for part of the estimated direct effect of preschool on adult well-being, the best-fitting model across outcomes included indicators of all five hypotheses. The full model completely accounted for the direct effect of preschool on occupational prestige and official felony arrest, and 79% on depression symptoms. Key mediators included cognitive skills at school entry, school quality in the elementary grades, juvenile arrest, and school completion. The identified processes may help establish, strengthen, and sustain effects in other programs and settings. PMID:21410923

  8. A Client-Centered Community Engagement Project: Improving the Health and Wellness of Older Adults in an Assisted Living Facility.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne-Rice, Madeleine; Chopp, Kayla; Evans, Lisa; Ho, Vanessa; Hsiung, Wan Ping; Simon, Marian Alexandra; Wu, Kaiyu; Donnelly, Tam Truong

    2016-08-01

    Central to nursing practice is the promotion of health and wellness practices. Drawing on the Community as Partner Model, nursing process, Nursing Interventions Classification, and Logic Model, second-year nursing students collaborated with staff and residents of an assisted living facility to promote health and wellness in the older adult population. Windshield surveys, resident surveys, key informant interviews, and focus group interviews were conducted to gain insight into the perceptions and experiences of staff and residents. The majority of residents indicated they were satisfied with life at the facility and their needs have been adequately met. Strengths and areas for improvement were identified in several aspects, including the facility atmosphere and location, quality of staff and health care services, recreational and dietary services, and social support networks. By partnering with community key stakeholders, valuing all different perspectives, and connecting theory to practice, a successful client-centered community clinical project was demonstrated. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(8), 44-51.]. PMID:27263539

  9. Five-day, low-level laser therapy for sports-related lower extremity periostitis in adult men: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheng-Chiang; Ku, Chih-Hung; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Hu, Yu-An; Shyu, Jia-Fwu; Chang, Shin-Tsu

    2014-07-01

    Periostitis in the lower leg caused by overexercise is a universal problem in athletes and runners. The purpose of this study was to observe the functional improvement of the lower limbs upon rehabilitation low-level laser therapy (LLLT). All medical data were gathered from enrolled adults with sports-related lower leg pain. A total of 54 patients underwent triple-phase bone scans using skeletal nuclear scintigraphy, which confirmed periostitis in their lower limbs. The patients were then randomly divided into two groups: one group received laser therapy (N = 29) and the other group (N = 25) received an equivalent placebo treatment (a drug or physical therapy). Treatment protocol commenced with rehabilitation intervention and LLLT was performed three times daily for 5 days at a dosage of 1.4 J/cm(2). A Likert-type pain scale was used to evaluate the severity of pain. Balance function, including postural stability testing (PST) and limits of stability (LOS), was also performed to evaluate the function outcome. Patients experienced a significant improvement in pain by day 2 or day 5 after starting LLLT, but here was no significant difference in pain scale between the measurements before (baseline) and after LLLT. Comparing the PST, the group differences of dynamic vs. static testings ranged from -18.54 to -50.22 (compared 12, 8, 4, 3, 2, 1 to 0, all p < 0.0001), and the PST after LLLT were 3.73 units (p = 0.0258) lower than those of before LLLT. Comparing the LOS, the group differences of dynamic vs. static testing were similar to those in PST, and the relationship between LOS and groups only varied with the direction control during dynamic testing in direction at backward/right vs. right (p < 0.0001). LLLT had a positive effect on proprioception in patients with lower limb periostitis. Larger, better controlled studies are needed to determine what specific effects LLLT has on the function of proprioception. PMID:24622816

  10. Differences in Epidemiological and Molecular Characteristics of Nasal Colonization with Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA-MRSA) in Children from a University Hospital and Day Care Centers

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Erika A.; Correa, Margarita M.; Ospina, Sigifredo; Atehortúa, Santiago L.; Jiménez, J. Natalia

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical significance of Staphylococcus aureus colonization has been demonstrated in hospital settings; however, studies in the community have shown contrasting results regarding the relevance of colonization in infection by community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). In Colombia there are few studies on S. aureus colonization. The aim of this study was to determine the molecular and epidemiological characteristics of nasal colonization by S. aureus (MSSA-MRSA) in children from a university hospital and day care centers (DCCs) of Medellin, Colombia. Methods An observational cross-sectional study was conducted in 400 children (200 in each setting), aged 0 months to 5 years, during 2011. Samples were collected from each nostril and epidemiological information was obtained from the parents. Genotypic analysis included spa typing, PFGE, MLST, SCCmec typing, detection of genes for virulence factors and agr groups. Results Frequency of S. aureus colonization was 39.8% (n = 159) (hospital 44.5% and DCCs 35.0%) and by MRSA, 5.3% (n = 21) (hospital 7.0% and DCCs 3.5%). Most S. aureus colonized children were older than two years (p = 0.005), the majority of them boys (59.1%), shared a bedroom with a large number of people (p = 0.028), with history of β-Lactamase inhibitors usage (p = 0.020). MSSA strains presented the greatest genotypic diversity with 15 clonal complexes (CC). MRSA isolates presented 6 CC, most of them (47.6%) belonged to CC8-SCCmec IVc and were genetically related to previously reported infectious MRSA strains. Conclusion Differences in epidemiological and molecular characteristics between populations may be useful for the understanding of S. aureus nasal colonization dynamics and for the design of strategies to prevent S. aureus infection and dissemination. The finding of colonizing MRSA with similar molecular characteristics of those causing infection demonstrates the dissemination capacity of S. aureus and the risk of infection

  11. Comparison of outcomes after two standards-of-care reduced-intensity conditioning regimens and two different graft sources for allogeneic stem cell transplantation in adults with hematologic diseases: a single-center analysis.

    PubMed

    Le Bourgeois, Amandine; Mohr, Catherine; Guillaume, Thierry; Delaunay, Jacques; Malard, Florent; Loirat, Marion; Peterlin, Pierre; Blin, Nicolas; Dubruille, Viviane; Mahe, Beatrice; Gastinne, Thomas; Le Gouill, Steven; Moreau, Philippe; Mohty, Mohamad; Planche, Lucie; Lode, Laurence; Bene, Marie-Christine; Chevallier, Patrice

    2013-06-01

    Recent advances in allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) have included the advent of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens to decrease the toxicity of myeloablative allo-SCT and the use of double umbilical cord blood (dUCB) units as a graft source in adults lacking a suitable donor. The FB2A2 regimen (fludarabine 30 mg/kg/day for 5-6 days + i.v. busulfan 3.6 mg/kg/day for 2 days + rabbit antithymocyte globulin 2.5 mg/kg/day for 2 days) supported by peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) and the TCF regimen (fludarabine 200 mg/m² for 5 days + cyclophosphamide 50 mg/kg for 1 day + low-dose [2 Gy] total body irradiation) supported by dUCB units are currently the most widely used RIC regimens in many centers and could be considered standard of care in adults eligible for an RIC allo-SCT. Here we compared, retrospectively, the outcomes of adults patients who received the FB2A2-PBSC RIC regimen (n = 52; median age, 59 years; median follow-up, 19 months) and those who received the dUCB-TCF RIC regimen (n = 39; median age, 56 years; median follow-up, 20 months) for allo-SCT between January 2007 and November 2010. There were no significant between-group differences in patient and disease characteristics. Cumulative incidences of engraftment, acute grade II-IV and chronic graft-versus-host disease were similar in the 2 groups. The median time to platelet recovery, incidence of early death (before day +100), and 2-year nonrelapse mortality were significantly higher in the dUCB-TCF group (38 days versus 0 days [P <.0001]; 20.5% versus 4% [P = .05], and 26.5% versus 6% [P = .02], respectively). The groups did not differ in terms of 2-year overall survival (62% for FB2A2-PBSC versus 61% for dUCB-TCF), disease-free survival (59% versus 50.5%), or relapse incidence (35.5% versus 23%). In multivariate analysis, the presence of a lymphoid disorder was associated with a significantly higher 2-year overall survival (hazard ratio, 0.42; 95% confidence interval, 0

  12. RESIDENTIAL ADULT EDUCATION CENTRES IN CANADA, A DIRECTORY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Association for Adult Education, Toronto (Ontario).

    CANADIAN RESIDENTIAL ADULT EDUCATION CENTERS ARE LISTED BY PROVINCE, WITH INFORMATION GIVEN ON THE CENTER NAME, ADDRESS, CONTACT OFFICE, SPONSORING ORGANIZATION, NUMBER ACCOMMODATED, USER DAYS IN 1965, TYPES OF PROGRAMS OFFERED, AND GENERAL COMMENTS. PROGRAMS TAILORED TO NEEDS CHARACTERIZE CANADIAN CENTERS. IT IS EXPECTED THAT AS PROVINCIAL…

  13. eHealth Technology Competencies for Health Professionals Working in Home Care to Support Older Adults to Age in Place: Outcomes of a Two-Day Collaborative Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Ansam; Woolrych, Ryan D; Sixsmith, Andrew; Kearns, William D

    2013-01-01

    Background The demand for care is increasing, whereas in the near future the number of people working in professional care will not match with the demand for care. eHealth technology can help to meet the growing demand for care. Despite the apparent positive effects of eHealth technology, there are still barriers to technology adoption related to the absence of a composite set of knowledge and skills among health care professionals regarding the use of eHealth technology. Objective The objective of this paper is to discuss the competencies required by health care professionals working in home care, with eHealth technologies such as remote telecare and ambient assisted living (AAL), mobile health, and fall detection systems. Methods A two-day collaborative workshop was undertaken with academics across multiple disciplines with experience in working on funded research regarding the application and development of technologies to support older people. Results The findings revealed that health care professionals working in home care require a subset of composite skills as well as technology-specific competencies to develop the necessary aptitude in eHealth care. This paper argues that eHealth care technology skills must be instilled in health care professionals to ensure that technologies become integral components of future care delivery, especially to support older adults to age in place. Educating health care professionals with the necessary skill training in eHealth care will improve service delivery and optimise the eHealth care potential to reduce costs by improving efficiency. Moreover, embedding eHealth care competencies within training and education for health care professionals ensures that the benefits of new technologies are realized by casting them in the context of the larger system of care. These care improvements will potentially support the independent living of older persons at home. Conclusions This paper describes the health care professionals

  14. Circumcision with “no-flip Shang Ring” and “Dorsal Slit” methods for adult males: a single-centered, prospective, clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Jun-Hao; Liu, Liang-Ren; Wei, Qiang; Xue, Wen-Ben; Song, Tu-Run; Yan, Shi-Bing; Yang, Lu; Han, Ping; Zhu, Yu-Chun

    2016-01-01

    This paper was aimed to compare the clinical effectiveness and safety of adult male circumcision using the Shang Ring™ (SR) with the no-flip technique compared with Dorsal Slit (DS) surgical method. A single-centered, prospective study was conducted at the West China Hospital, where patients were circumcised using the no-flip SR (n = 408) or the DS (n = 94) procedure. The adverse events (AEs) and satisfaction were recorded for both groups, and ring-removal time and percentage of delayed removals were recorded for the SR group. Finally, complete follow-up data were collected for 76.1% of patients (SR: n = 306; DS: n = 76). The average ring-removal time for the SR group was 17.62 ± 6.30 days. The operation time (P < 0.001), pain scores during the procedure (P < 0.001) and at 24 h postoperatively (P < 0.001), bleeding (P = 0.001), infection (P = 0.034), and satisfaction with penile appearance (P < 0.001) in the SR group were superior to those in the DS group. After two postoperative weeks, the percentage of patients with edema in the SR group (P = 0.029) was higher but no differences were found at 4 weeks (P = 0.185) between the two groups. In conclusions, the no-flip SR method was found to be superior to the DS method for its short operation time (<5 min), involving less pain, bleeding, infection, and resulting in a satisfactory appearance. However, the time for recovery from edema took longer, and patients may wear device for 2–3 weeks after the procedure. PMID:26585694

  15. Circumcision with "no-flip Shang Ring" and "Dorsal Slit" methods for adult males: a single-centered, prospective, clinical study.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jun-Hao; Liu, Liang-Ren; Wei, Qiang; Xue, Wen-Ben; Song, Tu-Run; Yan, Shi-Bing; Yang, Lu; Han, Ping; Zhu, Yu-Chun

    2016-01-01

    This paper was aimed to compare the clinical effectiveness and safety of adult male circumcision using the Shang Ring™ (SR) with the no-flip technique compared with Dorsal Slit (DS) surgical method. A single-centered, prospective study was conducted at the West China Hospital, where patients were circumcised using the no-flip SR (n = 408) or the DS (n = 94) procedure. The adverse events (AEs) and satisfaction were recorded for both groups, and ring-removal time and percentage of delayed removals were recorded for the SR group. Finally, complete follow-up data were collected for 76.1% of patients (SR: n = 306; DS: n = 76). The average ring-removal time for the SR group was 17.62 ± 6.30 days. The operation time (P < 0.001), pain scores during the procedure (P < 0.001) and at 24 h postoperatively (P < 0.001), bleeding (P = 0.001), infection (P = 0.034), and satisfaction with penile appearance (P < 0.001) in the SR group were superior to those in the DS group. After two postoperative weeks, the percentage of patients with edema in the SR group (P = 0.029) was higher but no differences were found at 4 weeks (P = 0.185) between the two groups. In conclusions, the no-flip SR method was found to be superior to the DS method for its short operation time (<5 min), involving less pain, bleeding, infection, and resulting in a satisfactory appearance. However, the time for recovery from edema took longer, and patients may wear device for 2-3 weeks after the procedure. PMID:26585694

  16. Children Under the Umbrella: A Report on a Project to Develop and Demonstrate the Mechanisms Involved in Operating as a Sponsoring Organization for Nutrition Services in Day Care Centers in Louisville and Jefferson County, Kentucky.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Lois J.; And Others

    This program was developed by Community Coordinated Child Care (4-C) of Louisville and Jefferson County, Kentucky, to improve nutritional services to 2,146 infants and preschool children enrolled in fifteen area day care centers, by developing the role of a sponsoring organization and by developing standards of expectations for other sponsoring…

  17. Achieving the salt intake target of 6 g/day in the current food supply in free-living adults using two dietary education strategies.

    PubMed

    Ireland, Dani-Maree; Clifton, Peter M; Keogh, Jennifer B

    2010-05-01

    There are national targets for salt intake of 6 g salt/day in Australia and the United States. Despite this, there is limited knowledge about the effectiveness of dietary education in reducing salt intake to this level. The objective of this study was to investigate whether dietary education enabled a reduction in salt consumption. In an 8-week parallel study, 49 healthy free-living adults were recruited from the Adelaide community by newspaper advertisement. In a randomized parallel design, participants received dietary education to choose foods identified by either Australia's National Heart Foundation Tick symbol or by the Food Standards Australia and New Zealand's low-salt guideline of 120 mg sodium/100 g food. Sodium excretion was assessed by 24-hour urinary sodium collections at baseline and weeks 4 and 8. Participants' experiences of following the education strategies were recorded by self-administered questionnaire. These data were collected between August and October 2008. Forty-three participants completed the study. After 8 weeks, urinary sodium excretion decreased from 121+/-50 to 106+/-47 mmol/24 hours (7.3+/-3.0 to 6.4+/-2.8 g salt/24 hours) in the Tick group and from 132+/-44 to 98+/-50 mmol/24 hours (7.9+/-2.6 to 6.0+/-3.0 g salt/24 hours) in the Food Standards Australia New Zealand group (P<0.05, with no between-group difference). Barriers to salt reduction were limited variety and food choice, difficulty when eating out, and increased time associated with identifying foods. In conclusion, dietary sodium reduction is possible among free-living individuals who received dietary advice. PMID:20430138

  18. Potential prescription patterns and errors in elderly adult patients attending public primary health care centers in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    Corona-Rojo, José Antonio; Altagracia-Martínez, Marina; Kravzov-Jinich, Jaime; Vázquez-Cervantes, Laura; Pérez-Montoya, Edilberto; Rubio-Poo, Consuelo

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Six out of every 10 elderly persons live in developing countries. Objective To analyze and assess the drug prescription patterns and errors in elderly outpatients attending public health care centers in Mexico City, Mexico. Materials and methods A descriptive and retrospective study was conducted in 2007. Fourteen hundred prescriptions were analyzed. Prescriptions of ambulatory adults aged >70 years who were residents of Mexico City for at least two years were included. Prescription errors were divided into two groups: (1) administrative and legal, and (2) pharmacotherapeutic. In group 2, we analyzed drug dose strength, administration route, frequency of drug administration, treatment length, potential drug–drug interactions, and contraindications. Variables were classified as correct or incorrect based on clinical literature. Variables for each drug were dichotomized as correct (0) or incorrect (1). A Prescription Index (PI) was calculated by considering each drug on the prescription. SPSS statistical software was used to process the collected data (95% confidence interval; p <0.05). Results The drug prescription pattern in elderly outpatients shows that 12 drugs account for 70.72% (2880) of prescribed drugs. The most prescribed drugs presented potential pharmacotherapeutic errors (as defined in the present study). Acetylsalicylic acid–captopril was the most common potential interaction (not clinically assessed). Potential prescription error was high (53% of total prescriptions). Most of the prescription errors were due to omissions of dosage, administration route, and length of treatment and may potentially cause harm to the elderly outpatients. Conclusions A high number of potential prescription errors were found, mainly due to omissions. The drug prescription pattern of the study population is mainly constituted by 12 drugs. The results indicate that prescription quality depends on the number of prescribed drugs per prescription (p < 0

  19. Descriptive Epidemiology of Traumatic Injuries in 18890 Adults: a 5-Year-Study in a Tertiary Trauma Center in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mehrpour, Saeed Reza; Nabian, Mohammad Hossein; Oryadi Zanjani, Leila; Foroughmand-Araabi, Mohammad-Hadi; Shahryar Kamrani, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Basic epidemiological data can provide estimates when discussing disease burden and in the planning and provision of healthcare strategies. There is little quantitative information in the literature regarding prevalence of traumatic injuries from developing countries. Objectives: The aim of the current preliminary study was to reveal the prevalence and age and gender distribution of various traumatic injuries in a tertiary referral orthopedic hospital in Iran. Patients and Methods: In a prospective descriptive study, all traumatic injured patients attending the Orthopedic Trauma Unit of our center in a five year period were included. Demographic details, the cause of injury, injury classification and treatment were recorded. For each of the five-year age groups and each gender we calculated the numbers with fractures, dislocations, soft tissue injuries, ligamentous injuries and lacerations and derived average age and gender-specific prevalence as well as seasonal variations. Results: A total of 18890 adults were admitted, 13870 (73.4%) males and 5020 (26.6%) females. There were 8204 (43.4%) fractures. The male fracture age distribution curve was unimodal and there was a detectable bimodal pattern in females. Under 65 years males are 3 times more likely to sustain a fracture than females which decreases to equal risk over the age of 65. The most common fracture site was distal radius/ulna (13.8%), followed by tibial diaphysis (8.8%), proximal femur (7.8%), finger phalanges (6.4%), metacarpals (6%) and metatarsals (5.9%). There were seasonal variations in fracture incidence with peaks in February, March and October. The least number of fractures occurred in June. Conclusions: The risk of traumatic injuries is higher among specific age groups with different patterns emerging for men and women. Thus, the descriptive epidemiology will provide useful information for treatment or injury prevention strategies, resource allocation, and training priorities. PMID

  20. Career Day 2012

    NASA Video Gallery

    More than 200 high school juniors and seniors with interests in science, technology, engineering and math met one-on-one with professionals at NASA's Langley Research Center during Career Day 2012,...

  1. Child Care Services and the NYS Uniform Fire Prevention and Building Code: A Building Code Examination of Child Day Care Services Which Are Regulated by the NYS Department of Social Services with Particular Attention to Day Care Centers and the Role of the Local Authority Having Jurisdiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Div. of Code Enforcement and Administration, Albany.

    This course manual details the Uniform Fire Prevention and Building Code of New York State and how it affects child care services, particularly day care centers. The sections of the manual, each detailing a part of the code, are: (1) Introduction, Scope, Registration, and Definitions and Facilities Regulated by the New York Department of Social…

  2. Merging person-centered care with translational research to improve the lives of older adults: creating community-based nursing research networks.

    PubMed

    Hill, Nikki L; Penrod, Janice; Milone-Nuzzo, Paula

    2014-10-01

    Translational research is a leading trend in science with the aim of bridging the research-practice gap to significantly speed the implementation of effective interventions in clinical practice. Integrating the values and preferences of older adults and their families into this process is critical to the success of translational research. Engaging communities in meaningful research is an important part of advancing translational science in which older adults are partners in developing solutions to the health needs of individuals within communities. The current article describes one approach to developing an infrastructure (i.e., community-based nursing research network) to support patient-centered care within translational research. Nurses are uniquely poised and prepared to assume leadership roles in community-based research networks to support a true collaboration among stakeholders that prizes the voices of older adults and integrates them into practice efforts. PMID:25275784

  3. Merging Person-Centered Care with Translational Research to Improve the Lives of Older Adults: Creating Community Based Nursing Research Networks

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Nikki L.; Penrod, Janice; Milone-Nuzzo, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Translational research is a leading trend in science with the aim of bridging the research-practice gap in order to significantly speed the implementation of effective interventions in clinical practice. Integrating the values and preferences of older adults and their families in this process is critical to the success of translational research. Engaging communities in meaningful research is an important part of advancing translational science in which the older adult is a partner in developing solutions to the health needs of individuals within communities. This article describes one approach to developing an infrastructure to support patient-centered care within translational research, establishing a Community Based Nursing Research Network. Nurses throughout our communities are uniquely poised and prepared to assume leadership roles in community based research networks in order to support a true collaboration among stakeholders which prizes the voices of our older adults and integrates them into practice efforts. PMID:25275784

  4. Autoimmune cytopenias after umbilical cord blood transplantation in adults with hematological malignancies: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Sanz, J; Arango, M; Carpio, N; Montesinos, P; Moscardó, F; Martín, G; López, F; Jarque, I; Lorenzo, I; de la Rubia, J; Solves, P; Boluda, B; Salazar, C; Cañigral, C; Sanz, M A; Sanz, G F

    2014-08-01

    We describe incidence, clinical features, serological data, response to therapy and outcome of autoimmune cytopenias (ACs), including autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and autoimmune thrombocytopenia (AIT) in a series of 281 consecutive adults with hematological malignancies that received single-unit umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) at a single institution. AIHA was diagnosed in 15 patients at a median time of 181 days (range, 25-543), 12 of them had cold antibodies (IgM). The 3-year cumulative incidence (CI) of AIHA was 5.4% (CI 95% 2.7-8.1). Concomitant infections at the time of AIHA were present in 10 patients. Five out of nine patients that received corticosteroids achieved either a PR or a CR, whereas six out of eight patients that received rituximab responded. Four patients developed AIT giving a 3-year CI of 1.4% (CI 95% 0-2.8), concomitant infections were present in three of them. Multivariable analysis showed that development of chronic GVHD (relative risk (RR) 4; 95% CI 1.1-13.7; P=0.03) and diagnosis of CML (RR 4.3; 95% CI 1.5-12.7; P=0.008) were associated with an increased risk of AC. In conclusion, AIHA and AIT are relevant and clinically significant complications in UCBT recipients, especially among those that develop chronic GVHD. Response to therapy is sub-optimal, and rituximab should be considered as a therapeutic option, in this setting were most patients had cold AIHA and a serological profile similar to that seen in cold agglutinin disease. PMID:24887383

  5. Contemporary Day Care: Does It Meet Either Educational or Family Needs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blum, Marian

    Center-based day care, at its current level of funding, is meeting neither adult nor child needs. Parents, especially working mothers, need child care that is reliable, flexible, professional, and affordable, but day care is rarely flexible, has few accommodations for emergencies, and is often not satisfactory for the maximum development of…

  6. Adventures in Cooking: A Collection of Recipes for Use in Nursery Schools, Day Care Centers, Head Start Programs, Kindergartens, and Primary Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Florence P.

    This is a collection of recipes which children involved in early childhood education centers can prepare for their own consumption. The recipes were contributed by teachers in such schools based on their own successful experiences in using cooking as a learning experience for children to incorporate and integrate a number of intellectual tasks,…

  7. Skills Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canter, Patricia; And Others

    The services of the Living Skills Center for the Visually Handicapped, a habilitative service for blind young adults, are described. It is explained that the Center houses its participants in their own apartments in a large complex and has served over 70 young people in 4 years. The evaluation section describes such assessment instruments as an…

  8. Day of the Dead

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dann, Tammy; Murphy, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Foreign Language in Elementary School (FLES) teachers in the West Des Moines schools incorporate the Day of the Dead into the fourth grade curriculum each year. The teachers discuss the Day of the Dead celebration at the Art Center, and many ask for volunteers from fourth grade to participate in the event. Student presentations include a wide…

  9. Children's cancer centers

    MedlinePlus

    Pediatric cancer center; Pediatric oncology center; Comprehensive cancer center ... Treating childhood cancer is not the same as treating adult cancer. The cancers are different. So are the treatments and the ...

  10. Kindergarten: All Day Every Day?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oelerich, Marjorie L.

    This paper reports findings that all-day every-day educational programs have positive effects on kindergarten children. Also included is a Minnesota Association for Childhood Education (MACE) position paper which advocates the provision of full-day kindergarten programs and details seven criteria that a quality full-day program must meet. Efforts…

  11. The Development of a Prototype Infant, Preschool and Child Day Care Center in Metropolitan Toronto. Year I Progress Report: Program Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, William; And Others

    The project reported on is designed to develop a model program of infant and child day care in a municipal setting. The development of the program is discussed under the following topics: (1) physical caregiving routines; (2) guided learning through play; (3) supervising children in free play; (4) staff guidance and communication: inservice…

  12. Vitamin and Mineral Supplements Have a Nutritionally Significant Impact on Micronutrient Intakes of Older Adults Attending Senior Centers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Older adults frequently report use of vitamin and mineral (VM) supplements, though the impact of supplements on dietary adequacy remains largely unknown. Despite possible improvements in dietary intake, concern remains over potential excessive nutrient consumption from VM supplement us...

  13. Psychometric Limitations of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale for Assessing Depressive Symptoms among Adults with HIV/AIDS: A Rasch Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kottorp, Anders; Lee, Kathryn A.

    2016-01-01

    The Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D) scale is a widely used measure of depressive symptoms, but its psychometric properties have not been adequately evaluated among adults with HIV/AIDS. This study used an item response theory approach (Rasch analysis) to evaluate the CES-D's validity and reliability in relation to key demographic and clinical variables in adults with HIV/AIDS. A convenience sample of 347 adults with HIV/AIDS (231 males, 93 females, and 23 transgenders; age range 22–77 years) completed the CES-D. A Rasch model application was used to analyze the CES-D's rating scale functioning, internal scale validity, person-response validity, person-separation validity, internal consistency, differential item functioning (DIF), and differential test functioning. CES-D scores were generally high and associated with several demographic and clinical variables. The CES-D distinguished 3 distinct levels of depression and had acceptable internal consistency but lacked unidimensionality, five items demonstrated poor fit to the model, 15% of the respondents demonstrated poor fit, and eight items demonstrated DIF related to gender, race, or AIDS diagnosis. Removal of misfitting items resulted in minimal improvement in the CES-D's substantive and structural validity. CES-D scores should be interpreted with caution in adults with HIV/AIDS, particularly when comparing scores across gender and racial groups. PMID:27042347

  14. Psychometric Limitations of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale for Assessing Depressive Symptoms among Adults with HIV/AIDS: A Rasch Analysis.

    PubMed

    Gay, Caryl L; Kottorp, Anders; Lerdal, Anners; Lee, Kathryn A

    2016-01-01

    The Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D) scale is a widely used measure of depressive symptoms, but its psychometric properties have not been adequately evaluated among adults with HIV/AIDS. This study used an item response theory approach (Rasch analysis) to evaluate the CES-D's validity and reliability in relation to key demographic and clinical variables in adults with HIV/AIDS. A convenience sample of 347 adults with HIV/AIDS (231 males, 93 females, and 23 transgenders; age range 22-77 years) completed the CES-D. A Rasch model application was used to analyze the CES-D's rating scale functioning, internal scale validity, person-response validity, person-separation validity, internal consistency, differential item functioning (DIF), and differential test functioning. CES-D scores were generally high and associated with several demographic and clinical variables. The CES-D distinguished 3 distinct levels of depression and had acceptable internal consistency but lacked unidimensionality, five items demonstrated poor fit to the model, 15% of the respondents demonstrated poor fit, and eight items demonstrated DIF related to gender, race, or AIDS diagnosis. Removal of misfitting items resulted in minimal improvement in the CES-D's substantive and structural validity. CES-D scores should be interpreted with caution in adults with HIV/AIDS, particularly when comparing scores across gender and racial groups. PMID:27042347

  15. Effect of Day of the Week of Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty on Length of Stay at a University-Based Teaching Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Rathi, Pranav; Coleman, Sheldon; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Giordani, Mauro; Pereira, Gavin; Di Cesare, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Length of hospital stay (LHS) after primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) constitutes a critical outcome measure, as prolonged LHS implies increased resource expenditure. Investigations have highlighted factors that affect LHS after THA. These factors include advanced age, medical comorbidities, obesity, intraoperative time, anesthesia technique, surgical site infection, and incision length. We retrospectively analyzed the effect of day of the week of primary THA on LHS. We reviewed the surgery and patient factors of 273 consecutive patients who underwent THA at our institution, a tertiary-care teaching hospital. There was a 15% increase in LHS for patients who underwent THA on Thursday versus Monday when controlling for other covariates that can affect LHS. Other statistically significant variables associated with increased LHS included American Society of Anesthesiologists grade, transfusion requirements, and post-operative complications. The day of the week of THA may be an independent variable affecting LHS. Institutions with reduced weekend resources may want to perform THA earlier in the week to try to reduce LHS. PMID:25490016

  16. Family Day Care Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community Coordinated Child Care (4-C) in Dane County, Inc., Madison, WI.

    This handbook provides both general and specific information on child development and child care to help adults who are providing child care in their homes. Information is presented in six sections which describe: (1) the family day care system, the occupation of caregiver, and the development of relationships; (2) development of a health program,…

  17. 2010 Stennis Day of Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Rich Delgado, commanding officer of the Fleet Survey Team located at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center, visits with Kertrina Watson Lewis, executive director of the HandsOn volunteer organization in New Orleans, during Day of Service activities Jan. 12. The Day of Service was part of the annual Martin Luther King Jr. Day observance at Stennis. During the day, Mississippi and Louisiana organizations visited the center to encourage employees to register and serve as volunteers for various community activities.

  18. 2010 Stennis Day of Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Employees at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center visit exhibits of volunteer organizations during their observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day with a Day of Service on Jan. 12. During the day, Mississippi and Louisiana organizations visited the center to encourage employees to register and serve as volunteers for various community activities. The day's focus was emphasized again and again - great things can happen when individuals work together toward a common goal.

  19. Influence of depression, catastrophizing, anxiety, and resilience on postoperative pain at the first day after otolaryngological surgery: A prospective single center cohort observational study.

    PubMed

    Suffeda, Alexander; Meissner, Winfried; Rosendahl, Jenny; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2016-07-01

    The aim was to assess the association between objectified preoperative psychological factors and postoperative pain at the first day after otolaryngological surgery in accordance with other predictors of postoperative pain. Eighty-two (82) patients (59% male, median age 56 years) were included between January and May 2015. The psychological assessment the day before surgery included the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), pain catastrophizing scale (PCS), State-Trait Operation Anxiety (STOA) inventory, and the resilience scale (RS-13). On first postoperative day, patients were rated their pain using the questionnaires of the German-wide project Quality Improvement in Postoperative Pain Treatment (QUIPS) including a numeric rating scale (NRS, 0-10) for determination of patient's maximal pain. QUIPS allowed standardized assessment of patients' characteristics, pain parameters, and outcome. The influence of preoperative and postoperative parameters on patients' maximal postoperative pain was estimated by univariate and multivariate statistical analysis. The mean maximal pain was 3.2 ± 2.9. In univariate analysis, higher PHQ-9 score more than 4 (P = 0.010), higher STOA trait anxiety (P = 0.044), and higher STOA total score (P = 0.043) were associated to more postoperative pain. In multivariate analysis higher PHQ-9 score remained an independent predictor for severe pain (beta = 0.302; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.054-0.473; P = 0.014). When all parameters were included into multivariate analysis, 2 of all somatic, psychological, and treatment factors were associated with severe maximal pain: more depression (PHQ-9; beta = 0.256; 95% CI: 0.042-0.404; P = 0.017), and use of opioids in the recovery room (beta = 0.371; 95% CI: 0.108-0.481; P = 0.002). Otolaryngological surgery covers the spectrum from low to severe postoperative pain and is therefore a good model for pain management studies. A set of somatic and psychological parameters seems to allow the

  20. Dinosaur Day!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakamura, Sandra; Baptiste, H. Prentice

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how they capitalized on their first-grade students' love of dinosaurs by hosting a fun-filled Dinosaur Day in their classroom. On Dinosaur Day, students rotated through four dinosaur-related learning stations that integrated science content with art, language arts, math, and history in a fun and time-efficient…

  1. CEMI Days

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-01

    CEMI Days are an important channel of engagement between DOE and the manufacturing industry to identify challenges and opportunities for increasing U.S. manufacturing competitiveness. CEMI Days that are held at manufacturing companies’ facilities can include tours of R&D operations or other points of interest determined by the host company.

  2. Complications of chemoport in children with cancer: Experience of 54,100 catheter days from a tertiary cancer center of Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Aparna, S.; Ramesh, S.; Appaji, L.; Srivatsa, Kavitha; Shankar, Gowri; Jadhav, Vinay; Babu, Narendra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chemoport is an essential part of the management of children with cancer and provides long-term venous access. There are few studies from resource poor countries reporting complications of chemoport. Aims: This study was aimed at describing the complications of chemoport in patients with cancer. Materials and Methods: This retrospective observational study analyzed 200 patients <15 years of age who underwent chemoport insertion. The medical records of these patients were reviewed for the patient characteristics, diagnosis, nature of port use, port-related complications and their management. Results: A total of 209 ports were implanted in 200 patients and 24 ports were removed due to port-related complications. There were 122 boys and 78 girls whose ages ranged from 4 months to 13 years (median age 2.5 years). About72% of patients were <2 years old. The cumulative duration of catheterization was 54,100 days. Of 209 ports, there were 36 complications that led to the removal of 21 ports. Port-related infection was the most common infection observed in our study (0.66/1000 catheter days and 11.9%). Mechanical complications were seen in 9 patients. Venous thrombosis and skin necrosis occurred in one patient each. Conclusions: Use of chemoport is safe and is a boon for children with cancer in developing countries with incidence of complications similar to Western countries. Although use of chemoport is associated with complications, they are easily managed. With stringent catheter care by trained personnel, some complications can be prevented. PMID:26942147

  3. In-Service Training for Staffs of Group Homes and Work Activity Centers Serving Developmentally Disabled Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gage, Mary Ann; Fredericks, H. D. Bud; Johnson-Dorn, Nancy; Lindley-Southard, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Results are reported for 3 years of in-service training provided to managers and direct care personnel employed in community, residential, and vocational programs for developmentally disabled adults. The data demonstrate the efficacy of the training model in that 1015 (97%) of 1080 training objectives attempted were completed by the trainees at…

  4. A Demonstration of the Interrelating of Library and Basic Education Services For Disadvantaged Adults. Final Report, West Virginia Model Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacVicar, Phyllis

    The West Virginia project has, in the past year, tried to establish definitive areas of mutual responsibility and to develop specific objectives towards coordinating public libraries and Adult Basic Education (ABE). Specific objectives designed to coordinate services included community agency referral, selection of materials, identification of the…

  5. Challenging Conventional Wisdom: Building an Adult-Centered Degree Completion Program at a Traditional University's Satellite Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkinson Norton, Susan; Pickus, Keith

    2011-01-01

    This essay will discuss the creation of adult-learner degree programs at Wichita State University's satellite campuses with a particular focus on how such programs complement the mission of a traditional urban-serving research institution. It will assess the decision-making process that led to the transformation of satellite campuses into…

  6. Policy Changes in Medicare Home Health Care: Challenges to Providing Family-Centered, Community-Based Care for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davitt, Joan K.

    2009-01-01

    The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 (BBA) established new reimbursement systems in the Medicare home health fee-for-service benefit. Reimbursements were reduced to 1993 levels and per-beneficiary capitated limits were introduced for the first time. This article analyzes the impact of these changes on chronically ill older adults and their families.…

  7. Career Day

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's 2013 Career Days was a joint collaboration between NASA Langley and the Newport News Shipbuilding where 600 high school students from Virginia took on two design challenges -- designing a ca...

  8. Umbilical cord blood transplantation for adults using tacrolimus with two-day very-short-term methotrexate for graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Saito, Bungo; Hattori, Norimichi; Yamamoto, Kohei; Arai, Nana; Kawaguchi, Yukiko; Fujiwara, Shun; Kabasawa, Nobuyuki; Tsukamoto, Hiroyuki; Uto, Yui; Ariizumi, Hirotsugu; Yanagisawa, Kouji; Nakamaki, Tsuyoshi

    2016-08-01

    Cord blood transplantation (CBT) is an alternative approach to allogeneic stem cell transplantation. However, CBT is associated with issues including pre-engraftment immune reaction (PIR), engraftment syndrome (ES), and graft failure (GF). Tacrolimus (TAC) and short-term methotrexate (sMTX: days 1, 3, 6, and/or 11) are used for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis during CBT; however, sMTX does not accelerate neutrophil engraftment. Therefore, we hypothesized that lower doses of sMTX [very-short-term MTX (vsMTX): 10 and 7mg/m(2) on days 1 and 3, respectively] with TAC reduce the risk of GF without increasing post-transplantation immune reactions during CBT. We retrospectively analyzed 40 patients who received TAC with vsMTX for GVHD prophylaxis. PIR and ES developed in 4 patients. The cumulative incidence of neutrophil engraft at day 60 was 92.5%. No cases of primary graft failure were noted. The cumulative incidence of grades II-III GVHD was 48.1% at day 100, and the cumulative 100-day incidence of nonrelapse mortality was 12.5%. This study suggests that TAC with vsMTX reduces the risk of PIR and ES during CBT and stimulates neutrophil engraftment, but may be associated with slightly higher aGVHD compared with calcineurin inhibitor and sMTX. Therefore, we recommend vsMTX plus TAC as an option for GVHD prophylaxis during CBT. PMID:27376545

  9. Stennis Day Camper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Sara Beth Casey, 5, proudly displays her artwork, 'Planets.' Sara Beth created the art as a student of Stennis Day Camp, a free camp for Stennis Space Center employees' children whose schools have not resumed since Hurricane Katrina hit the region on Aug. 29. The camp has registered nearly 200 children and averages 100 children each day. The camp will continue until all schools are back in session.

  10. A pilot study assessing the impact of a learner-centered adult asthma self-management program on psychological outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tousman, Stuart; Zeitz, Howard; Taylor, Linda D

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of the research was to determine if an adult asthma self-management program could significantly improve psychological outcomes for participants. Small groups of adults met for 2 hours for 7 consecutive weeks. Intervention techniques included interactive discussions, problem solving, social support, and a behavior modification procedure. The behavior modification procedure consisted of homework assignments in which participants were asked to self-monitor and record asthma-specific behaviors (peak expiratory flow monitoring, avoidance/removal of asthma triggers, and controller medication adherence) and general lifestyle behaviors (drinking water, washing hands, and exercising). Paired sample t tests indicated statistically significant improvements for the outcomes of quality of life, depression, and self-efficacy. Significant increases were found in knowledge and behaviors, such as peak-flow monitoring and frequency of daily exercise. These results provide initial evidence that our program was effective, although the small sample size and lack of control group indicate the need for further research. PMID:19933878

  11. Recurrent 3-day cycles of water deprivation for over a month depress mating behaviour but not semen characteristics of adult rams.

    PubMed

    Khnissi, S; Lassoued, N; Rekik, M; Ben Salem, H

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of water deprivation (WD) on reproductive traits of rams. Ten mature rams were used and allocated to two groups balanced for body weight. Control (C) rams had free access to drinking water, while water-restricted rams (WD) were deprived from water for 3 consecutive days and early on the morning of day 4, they had ad libitum access to water for 24 h, similar to C animals. The experiment lasted 32 days, that is eight 4-day cycles of water deprivation and subsequent watering. Feed and water intake were significantly affected by water deprivation; in comparison with C rams, WD rams reduced their feed intake by 18%. During the watering day of the deprivation cycle, WD rams consumed more water than C rams on the same day (11.8 (SD = 3.37) and 8.4 (SD = 1.92) l respectively; p < 0.05). Glucose, total protein and creatinine were increased as a result of water deprivation. However, testosterone levels were lowered as a result of water deprivation and average values were 10.9 and 6.2 (SEM 1.23) ng/ml for C and WD rams respectively (p < 0.05). Semen traits were less affected by treatment; WD rams consistently had superior sperm concentrations than C animals; and statistical significances were reached in cycles 5 and 8 of water deprivation. Several mating behaviour traits were modified as a result of water deprivation. When compared to controls, WD rams had a more prolonged time to first mount attempt (p < 0.001), their frequency of mount attempts decreased [6.8 vs. 5.2 (SEM 0.1); p < 0.001] and their flehmen reaction intensity was negatively affected (p < 0.05). Water deprivation may have practical implications reducing the libido and therefore the serving capacity of rams under field conditions. PMID:25916259

  12. Paths of Effects from Preschool to Adult Well-Being: A Confirmatory Analysis of the Child-Parent Center Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Arthur J.; Ou, Suh-Ruu

    2011-01-01

    The current study investigated the contribution of 5 hypotheses to the estimated effects of preschool in the Child-Parent Centers on occupational prestige, felony arrest, and depressive symptoms in adulthood in the Chicago Longitudinal Study. An alternative-intervention, quasi-experimental design included over 1,400 low-income participants (93% of…

  13. Cohesion to the Group and Its Association with Attendance and Early Treatment Response in an Adult Day-Hospital Program for Eating Disorders: A Preliminary Clinical Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crino, Natalie; Djokvucic, Ivana

    2010-01-01

    Treatment outcome studies demonstrate that day-hospital programs are effective in the treatment of eating disorders. Few descriptions are available on the specifics of treatment, particularly the process of therapy. The group therapy modality is thought to provide important therapeutic benefits. The present study aimed to examine the association…

  14. Comparison of a Full Food-Frequency Questionnaire with the Three-Day Unweighted Food Records in Young Polish Adult Women: Implications for Dietary Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Kowalkowska, Joanna; Slowinska, Malgorzata A.; Slowinski, Dariusz; Dlugosz, Anna; Niedzwiedzka, Ewa; Wadolowska, Lidia

    2013-01-01

    The food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and the food record (FR) are among the most common methods used in dietary research. It is important to know that is it possible to use both methods simultaneously in dietary assessment and prepare a single, comprehensive interpretation. The aim of this study was to compare the energy and nutritional value of diets, determined by the FFQ and by the three-day food records of young women. The study involved 84 female students aged 21–26 years (mean of 22.2 ± 0.8 years). Completing the FFQ was preceded by obtaining unweighted food records covering three consecutive days. Energy and nutritional value of diets was assessed for both methods (FFQ-crude, FR-crude). Data obtained for FFQ-crude were adjusted with beta-coefficient equaling 0.5915 (FFQ-adjusted) and regression analysis (FFQ-regressive). The FFQ-adjusted was calculated as FR-crude/FFQ-crude ratio of mean daily energy intake. FFQ-regressive was calculated for energy and each nutrient separately using regression equation, including FFQ-crude and FR-crude as covariates. For FR-crude and FFQ-crude the energy value of diets was standardized to 2000 kcal (FR-standardized, FFQ-standardized). Methods of statistical comparison included a dependent samples t-test, a chi-square test, and the Bland-Altman method. The mean energy intake in FFQ-crude was significantly higher than FR-crude (2740.5 kcal vs. 1621.0 kcal, respectively). For FR-standardized and FFQ-standardized, significance differences were found in the mean intake of 18 out of 31 nutrients, for FR-crude and FFQ-adjusted in 13 out of 31 nutrients and FR-crude and FFQ-regressive in 11 out of 31 nutrients. The Bland-Altman method showed an overestimation of energy and nutrient intake by FFQ-crude in comparison to FR-crude, e.g., total protein was overestimated by 34.7 g/day (95% Confidence Interval, CI: −29.6, 99.0 g/day) and fat by 48.6 g/day (95% CI: −36.4, 133.6 g/day). After regressive transformation of FFQ, the

  15. Sun-Earth Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Michael Sandras, a member of the Pontchartrain Astronomical Society, explains his solar telescope to students of Second Street in Bay St. Louis, Hancock County and Nicholson elementary schools in StenniSphere's Millennium Hall on April 10. The students participated in several hands-on activities at Stennis Space Center's Sun-Earth Day celebration.

  16. Inspire Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohach, Barbara M.; Meade, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    The authors collaborated on hosting a "Spring Inspire Day." planned and delivered by preservice elementary teachers as a social studies/science methods project. Projects that have authentic application opportunities can make learning meaningful for prospective teachers as well as elementary students. With the impetus for an integrated…

  17. Intrinsic religiousness and spirituality as predictors of mental health and positive psychological functioning in Latter-Day Saint adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Peter W; Allen, G E Kawika; Fischer, Lane; Richards, P Scott; Morgan, David T; Potts, Richard W

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the relationships between religiousness and spirituality and various indicators of mental health and positive psychosocial functioning in three separate samples of college students. A total of 898 students at Brigham Young University participated in the three studies. The students ranged in age from 17 to 26 years old, with the average age of 20.9 across all three samples. Our results indicate that intrinsic religiousness, spiritual maturity, and self-transcendence were significantly predictive of better mental health and positive functioning, including lower levels of depression, anxiety, and obsessive-compulsiveness, and higher levels of global self-esteem, identity integration, moral self-approval, and meaning in life. Intrinsic religiousness was not predictive of shame, perfectionism, and eating disorder symptoms. These findings are consistent with many prior studies that have found religiousness and spirituality to be positively associated with better mental health and positive psychosocial functioning in adolescents and young adults. PMID:25854319

  18. Surgical management of intradural spinal cord tumors in children and young adults: A single-center experience with 50 patients

    PubMed Central

    Özkan, Neriman; Jabbarli, Ramazan; Wrede, Karsten Henning; Sariaslan, Zeynep; Stein, Klaus Peter; Dammann, Philipp; Ringelstein, Adrian; Sure, Ulrich; Sandalcioglu, Erol Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intradural spinal cord tumors (IDSCTs) in children and young adults are rare diseases. This present study is aimed to demonstrate our experience with a large series of children and young adults with IDSCT. Methods: A total of 50 patients aged <20 years with IDSCT treated in our department between 1990 and 2010 were included in the study. Clinical, histological, and radiological findings, treatment strategies, and clinical outcome were retrospectively assessed. Depending on the relation to the spinal cord, IDSCT were dichotomized into intramedullary SCT (IMSCT) and extramedullary SCT (EMSCT). The functional outcome was evaluated with the Frankel score assessing the longest available follow-up period. Results: Mean age was 10.3 years (range 6 months–19 years). IDSCT surgery was performed in 44 patients (88%). A common first symptom in patients with EMSCT was neck and back pain (41%), whereas monoparesis of arms (43%) were often seen in patients with IMSCT. The main duration of the symptoms was longer in patients with IMSCT. The postoperative functional outcome was generally comparable to the preoperative functional condition, while better for EMSCT (P < 0.01). The functional outcome at last follow-up correlated significantly with the preoperative Frankel score (P < 0.002). Conclusion: Due to the mostly mild impact of the surgery on the functional outcome, the surgical treatment of IDSCT in children and young patients can be uniquely advocated. PMID:26713174

  19. Successful treatment of small-for-size syndrome in adult-to-adult living-related liver transplantation: single center series.

    PubMed

    Gruttadauria, Salvatore; Mandala', Lucio; Miraglia, Roberto; Caruso, Settimo; Minervini, Marta Ida; Biondo, Domenico; Volpes, Riccardo; Vizzini, Giovanni; Marsh, J Wallis; Luca, Angelo; Marcos, Amadeo; Gridelli, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    The portal hyperperfusion, or small-for-size syndrome (SFSS), is a widely recognized clinical complication that may occur after segmental liver transplantation. Several surgical strategies have been proposed to reduce portal blood inflow and portal pressure after partial liver transplantation. In particular, splenic artery ligation and splenectomy have been used without a firm hemodynamic basis for these procedures. Our group recently demonstrated that, in patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension, the occlusion of the splenic artery causes a significant reduction in the portal pressure gradient, which is directly related to the spleen volume and indirectly related to the liver volume. This concept is at the center of our strategy for performing early splenic artery embolization (SAE) for the treatment of SFSS after living-related liver transplantation (LRLT). Six patients developed small-for-size syndrome, defined as: onset within the first week after LRLT of progressive hyperbilirubinemia without mechanical cause; marked cholestasis; centrilobular sinusoidal dilatation and hepatocyte atrophy at liver biopsy; and refractory ascites in the absence of vascular complications. All six patients who underwent SAE rapidly improved their clinical condition, with an evident decrease in the value of bilirubin in the serum, in the production of ascites, and improvement in condition of pancytopenia. Coagulopathy expressed by the international normalized ratio value (INR) was not a reliable early marker of SFSS in this series; in fact a slight improvement in the result of this test was already present immediately after LRLT and before SAE. Because splenic flow clearly contributes to portal hyperperfusion, an early SAE can relieve the partial graft from the deleterious effect of this portal overflow. PMID:17988271

  20. Multicenter Study of Decitabine Administered Daily for 5 Days Every 4 Weeks to Adults With Myelodysplastic Syndromes: The Alternative Dosing for Outpatient Treatment (ADOPT) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Steensma, David P.; Baer, Maria R.; Slack, James L.; Buckstein, Rena; Godley, Lucy A.; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Albitar, Maher; Larsen, Julie S.; Arora, Sujata; Cullen, Michael T.; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Decitabine, a DNA-targeted hypomethylating agent, is approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for treatment of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) on a schedule of 15 mg/m2 administered via intravenous (IV) infusion every 8 hours for 3 days. This study assessed the efficacy and safety of an alternative dosing regimen administered on an outpatient basis in academic and community-based practices. Patients and Methods Patients were treated with decitabine 20 mg/m2 by IV infusion daily for 5 consecutive days every 4 weeks. Eligible patients were ≥ 18 years of age and had MDS (de novo or secondary) of any French-American-British (FAB) subtype and an International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) score ≥ 0.5. The primary end point was the overall response rate (ORR) by International Working Group (IWG 2006) criteria; secondary end points included cytogenetic responses, hematologic improvement (HI), response duration, survival, and safety. Results Ninety-nine patients were enrolled; the ORR was 32% (17 complete responses [CR] plus 15 marrow CRs [mCRs]), and the overall improvement rate was 51%, which included 18% HI. Similar response rates were observed in all FAB subtypes and IPSS risk categories. Among patients who improved, 82% demonstrated responses by the end of cycle 2. Among 33 patients assessable for a cytogenetic response, 17 (52%) experienced cytogenetic CR (n = 11) or partial response (n = 6). Conclusion Decitabine given on a 5-day schedule provided meaningful clinical benefit for patients with MDS, with more than half demonstrating improvement. This suggests that decitabine can be administered in an outpatient setting with comparable efficacy and safety to the United States Food and Drug Administration–approved inpatient regimen. PMID:19528372

  1. National Trails Day. Project SEED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Mark

    This paper describes how a school district in Maine implemented an outdoor education program centered around National Trails Day (a day of awareness of outdoor recreational areas in the United States). The program combined classroom learning with an all-day hike on the Appalachian Trail by 240 seventh-grade students. Numerous teachers, school…

  2. Individual Information-Centered Approach for Handling Physical Activity Missing Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Minsoo; Rowe, David A.; Barreira, Tiago V.; Robinson, Terrance S.; Mahar, Matthew T.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate individual information (II)-centered methods for handling missing data, using data samples of 118 middle-aged adults and 91 older adults equipped with Yamax SW-200 pedometers and Actigraph accelerometers for 7 days. We used a semisimulation approach to create six data sets: three physical activity outcome…

  3. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health as a Framework for Providing Patient- and Family-Centered Audiological Care for Older Adults and Their Significant Others.

    PubMed

    Grenness, Caitlin; Meyer, Carly; Scarinci, Nerina; Ekberg, Katie; Hickson, Louise

    2016-08-01

    Hearing impairment is highly prevalent in the older population, and it impacts communication and quality of life for both the people with the hearing difficulties and their significant others. In this article, typical audiological assessment and management of an older adult is contrasted with a best practice approach wherein the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framework is applied. The aim of the comparison is to demonstrate how the ICF expands our focus: rather than merely focusing on impairment, we also consider the activities, participation, and contextual factors for both the person with the hearing impairment and his or her family. A case example of an older patient and her spouse is provided, and their shared experience of the patient's hearing impairment is mapped onto the ICF framework. Family-centered hearing care is recommended for individualizing care and improving outcomes for older patients and their families. PMID:27489398

  4. Spread patterns and effectiveness for surgery after ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block in adult day-case patients scheduled for umbilical hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Manassero, Alberto; Bossolasco, Matteo; Meineri, Maurizio; Ugues, Susanna; Liarou, Chrysoula; Bertolaccini, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: We conducted a prospective study to examine the local anesthetic (LA) spread and the effectiveness for surgical anesthesia of ultrasound (US)-guided rectus sheath block (RSB) in adult patients undergoing umbilical hernia repair. Material and Methods: Thirty patients received at T-10 level a bilateral US-guided injection of 20 mL levobupivacaine 0.375% + epinephrine 5 μg/mL behind the rectus muscle to detach it from its sheath. Anesthetic spread into the rectus sheath was evaluated ultrasonographically at T-9 and T-11 levels and scored from 0 to 4. The RSB was defined effective for surgical anesthesia if it was able to guarantee an anesthetic level sufficient for surgery without any mepivacaine supplementation. Results: Overall, the block was effective for surgical anesthesia in 53.3% of patients (95% confidence interval, ±17.8). In the remaining patients, anesthesia supplementation was needed at cutaneous incision, whereas manipulation of the muscle and fascial planes was painless. No patients required general anesthesia. LA spreads as advocated (to T-9 and to T-11 bilaterally = spread score 4) in 8/30 patients (26.6%); in these cases, the block was 75% effective for surgery. The anesthetic spread was most negatively influenced by increased body mass index. Postoperative analgesia was excellent in 97% of patients. Conclusion: Use of RSB as an anesthetic management of umbilical herniorrhaphy is recommended only with anesthetic supplementation at the incision site. PMID:26330714

  5. Child Day Care Center Licensing Study, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    The information contained in this report was compiled by The Children's Foundation in fall 1995 and reflects data provided by the regulatory offices in the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. The study is organized in alphabetical order of the states and territories. The requirements, regulations, and policies…

  6. Translocations activating IRF4 identify a subtype of germinal center-derived B-cell lymphoma affecting predominantly children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Salaverria, Itziar; Philipp, Claudia; Oschlies, Ilske; Kohler, Christian W; Kreuz, Markus; Szczepanowski, Monika; Burkhardt, Birgit; Trautmann, Heiko; Gesk, Stefan; Andrusiewicz, Miroslaw; Berger, Hilmar; Fey, Miriam; Harder, Lana; Hasenclever, Dirk; Hummel, Michael; Loeffler, Markus; Mahn, Friederike; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Pellissery, Shoji; Pott, Christiane; Pfreundschuh, Michael; Reiter, Alfred; Richter, Julia; Rosolowski, Maciej; Schwaenen, Carsten; Stein, Harald; Trümper, Lorenz; Wessendorf, Swen; Spang, Rainer; Küppers, Ralf; Klapper, Wolfram; Siebert, Reiner

    2011-07-01

    The prognosis of germinal center-derived B-cell (GCB) lymphomas, including follicular lymphoma and diffuse large-B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), strongly depends on age. Children have a more favorable outcome than adults. It is not known whether this is because of differences in host characteristics, treatment protocols, or tumor biology, including the presence of chromosomal alterations. By screening for novel IGH translocation partners in pediatric and adult lymphomas, we identified chromosomal translocations juxtaposing the IRF4 oncogene next to one of the immunoglobulin (IG) loci as a novel recurrent aberration in mature B-cell lymphoma. FISH revealed 20 of 427 lymphomas to carry an IG/IRF4-fusion. Those were predominantly GCB-type DLBCL or follicular lymphoma grade 3, shared strong expression of IRF4/MUM1 and BCL6, and lacked PRDM1/BLIMP1 expression and t(14;18)/BCL2 breaks. BCL6 aberrations were common. The gene expression profile of IG/IRF4-positive lymphomas differed from other subtypes of DLBCL. A classifier for IG/IRF4 positivity containing 27 genes allowed accurate prediction. IG/IRF4 positivity was associated with young age and a favorable outcome. Our results suggest IRF4 translocations to be primary alterations in a molecularly defined subset of GCB-derived lymphomas. The probability for this subtype of lymphoma significantly decreases with age, suggesting that diversity in tumor biology might contribute to the age-dependent differences in prognosis of lymphoma. PMID:21487109

  7. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study assessing the efficacy and tolerability of desvenlafaxine 10 and 50 mg/day in adult outpatients with major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In an effort to establish the lowest effective dose of desvenlafaxine (administered as desvenlafaxine succinate), we assessed the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of 10- and 50-mg/day desvenlafaxine vs placebo for the treatment of major depressive disorder. Methods Adult outpatients with DSM-IV–defined major depressive disorder and a 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D17) total score ≥20 were randomly assigned to receive placebo or desvenlafaxine (10 or 50 mg/day) after a 6- to 14-day single-blind placebo lead-in period in an 8-week, phase 3, fixed-dose trial. The primary efficacy measure was change from baseline in the HAM-D17 score analyzed using analysis of covariance. Efficacy analyses were conducted with the intent-to-treat population, using the last observation carried forward. Results The intent-to-treat population included 673 patients. Change from baseline to final evaluation in adjusted HAM-D17 total scores was not significantly different comparing desvenlafaxine 10 mg/day (-9.28) and desvenlafaxine 50 mg/day (-8.92) with placebo (-8.42). There were no differences among treatment groups in the rates of treatment response or remission. Discontinuations due to adverse events occurred in 1.8%, 0.9%, and 1.8% of patients in the placebo and desvenlafaxine 10- and 50-mg/day groups, respectively. Overall rates of treatment-emergent adverse events with both doses were similar to placebo. Conclusions Both doses of desvenlafaxine failed to separate from placebo. However, in a companion study reported separately, desvenlafaxine 50 mg, but not 25 mg, separated from placebo. Taken together, these studies suggest that 50 mg is the minimum effective dose of desvenlafaxine for the treatment of major depressive disorder. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT00863798 http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00863798?term=00863798&rank=1. PMID:23517291

  8. Stennis hosts Gulf Pine Council's NASA Brownie Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Tori Williams, of Brownie Girl Scout Troop 313, builds her own `stomp rocket' with the help of adult chaperone Pamela Cottrell. The two, of Gulfport, participated in NASA Brownie Day on Oct. 13 at Stennis Space Center. They were among nearly 200 members of Brownie Girl Scout Troops within the Gulf Pines Council who took part in the day of educational activities at SSC. Brownie Day used NASA curriculum support materials to teach about the sun and its significance in our solar system. In addition to building and launching their own model rockets, the girls toured the center's portable Starlab planetarium; viewed demonstrations about living and working in space; played games of `Moon Phasers' that teach about the rotation of the moon around the earth; made bracelets with ultraviolet-sensitive beads; and other activities that celebrated Earth's very own star. They also toured StenniSphere and were able to earn their Earth and Sky and Space Explorer `Try-Its.'

  9. Youth Field Day Planning Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Natural Resources, Madison.

    Youth field days expose children to outdoor activities, land use ethics, and habitat conservation and encourage adults to be mentors in these areas. A typical youth field day could have programs in archery, fishing, boating, shooting, or safety. The event requires a diverse steering committee that usually includes sporting clubs and state…

  10. Adult sickle cell disease epidemiology and the potential role of a multidisciplinary comprehensive care center in a city with low prevalence.

    PubMed

    Binding, Andrew; Valentine, Karen; Poon, Man-Chiu; Sayani, Farzana A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the characteristics of the sickle cell disease population in a city of low prevalence and compare them to those reported in the literature. We performed a retrospective cross-sectional study of all sickle cell disease patients seen in the Calgary Health Region, Calgary, Alberta, Canada from 2006 to 2010. Data on clinical endpoints including emergency department (ED) visits, hospital admissions, transfusions, as well as laboratory parameters were collected. A total of 37 adult sickle cell disease patients were identified. Over 5 years, they were represented by a total of 49.2 ED presentations/year, 29.2 (59.0%) of these requiring admission. Eighty-three percent of these presentations were for acute pain episodes. We concluded that the number of ED visits, hospital admissions and several other parameters in our cohort were similar to those in other centers of higher prevalence. This suggests that guidelines representing regions of high prevalence may be applicable to smaller centers, where patients experience similar clinical outcomes. PMID:25222043

  11. Hydrology day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel-Seytoux, H. J.

    Registration for the Hydrology Day sponsored by the Front Range Branch of AGU on April 23 at Colorado State University in Fort Collins, Colorado, totaled 121 participants, of whom 61 were students.Thirty-one individuals joined the Front Range Branch. Three students from Colorado State University won the awards for best paper in their category: Thomas W. Anzia (Sr.), ‘A Comprehensive Table of Standard Deviates for Confidence Limits on Extreme Events’ Victor Nazareth (M.S.), ‘Aquifer Properties from Single-Hole Aquifer Tests’ and Roy W. Koch (Ph.D.), ‘A Physically Based Derivation of the Distribution of Excess Precipitation.’ Judges for the awards were Dr. Bittinger, Resource Consultants, Fort Collins; George Leavesley and Daniel Bauer, USGS, Water Resources Division, Denver; Scott Tucker, Executive Director, Denver Urban Drainage and Flood Control District; Charles Brendecke, Department of Civil Engineering, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder.

  12. Treatment for Positive Urine Cultures in Hospitalized Adults: A Survey of Prevalence and Risk Factors in 3 Medical Centers.

    PubMed

    Grein, Jonathan D; Kahn, Katherine L; Eells, Samantha J; Choi, Seong K; Go-Wheeler, Marianne; Hossain, Tanzib; Riva, Maya Y; Nguyen, Megan H; Rekha Murthy, A; Miller, Loren G

    2016-03-01

    BACKGROUND Antibiotic treatment for asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) is prevalent but often contrary to published guidelines. OBJECTIVE To evaluate risk factors for treatment of ASB. DESIGN Retrospective observational study. SETTING A tertiary academic hospital, county hospital, and community hospital. PATIENTS Hospitalized adults with bacteriuria. METHODS Patients without documented symptoms of urinary tract infection per Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) criteria were classified as ASB. We examined ASB treatment risk factors as well as broad-spectrum antibiotic usage and quantified diagnostic concordance between IDSA and National Healthcare Safety Network criteria. RESULTS Among 300 patients with bacteriuria, ASB was present in 71% by IDSA criteria. By National Healthcare Safety Network criteria, 71% of patients had ASB; within-patient diagnostic concordance with IDSA was moderate (kappa, 0.52). After excluding those given antibiotics for nonurinary indications, antibiotics were given to 38% (62/164) with ASB. Factors significantly associated with ASB treatment were elevated urine white cell count (65 vs 24 white blood cells per high-powered field, P<.01), hospital identity (hospital C vs A, odds ratio, 0.34 [95% CI, 0.14-0.80], P =.01), presence of leukocyte esterase (5.48 [2.35-12.79], P<.01), presence of nitrites (2.45 [1.11-5.41], P=.03), and Escherichia coli on culture (2.4 [1.2-4.7], P=.01). Of patients treated for ASB, broad-spectrum antibiotics were used in 84%. CONCLUSIONS ASB treatment was prevalent across settings and contributed to broad-spectrum antibiotic use. Associating abnormal urinalysis results with the need for antibiotic treatment regardless of symptoms may drive unnecessary antibiotic use. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2016;37(3):319-326. PMID:26607408

  13. Detecting depression in Chinese adults with mild dementia: findings with two versions of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Sheung-Tak; Chan, Alfred C M

    2008-05-30

    This study investigates the extent to which the diagnostic performance of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D; both 20- and 10-item versions) varies with cognitive status, and whether the same threshold can be applied regardless of cognitive status. Three hundred and ninety-six persons aged 60+ referred for psychiatric assessment were broken down into four groups depending on age (<70 and >or=70) and dementia status (mild vs. none). All were independently interviewed using the CES-D before their first evaluation by a psychiatrist. Receiver operating characteristic curves showed that both versions of the CES-D produced essentially identical results, regardless of age and dementia status. Both versions were more or less robust to the effect of mild dementia but were vulnerable to the effect of age itself. Furthermore, the optimal threshold for the 20-item version varied somewhat across the different age-dementia groups, and no clear-cut threshold existed in old-old persons with dementia. On the contrary, the same threshold of 12 can be adopted for the 10-item version, regardless of age and dementia status. Compared with the full 20-item scale, the 10-item version has the added advantage of an identical threshold across age and cognitive status. PMID:18346793

  14. Sun-Earth Day, 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Mitzi L.; Mortfield, P.; Hathaway, D. H.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To promote awareness of the Sun-Earth connection, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, in collaboration with the Stanford SOLAR Center, sponsored a one-day Sun-Earth Day event on April 27, 2001. Although "celebrated" on only one day, teachers and students from across the nation, prepared for over a month in advance. Workshops were held in March to train teachers. Students performed experiments, results of which were shared through video clips and an internet web cast. Our poster includes highlights from student experiments (grades 2 - 12), lessons learned from the teacher workshops and the event itself, and plans for Sun-Earth Day 2002.

  15. Employability Skills Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweetwater Union High School District, Chula Vista, CA.

    The Employability Skills Center (ESC) of the Division of Adult and Continuing Education (DACE) of the Sweetwater Union High School District (California) was created out of a need to help adult students develop the basic skills that are required for success in their chosen vocational programs but not taught in regular adult basic education classes.…

  16. Incidence, etiology, and outcome of primary graft dysfunction in adult heart transplant recipients: a single-center experience in Japan.

    PubMed

    Seguchi, Osamu; Fujita, Tomoyuki; Murata, Yoshihiro; Sunami, Haruki; Sato, Takuma; Watanabe, Takuya; Nakajima, Seiko; Kuroda, Kensuke; Hisamatsu, Eriko; Sato, Takamasa; Yanase, Masanobu; Hata, Hiroki; Wada, Kyoichi; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Kobayashi, Junjiro; Nakatani, Takeshi

    2016-04-01

    Donor and recipient characteristics, as well as donor-recipient matching, affect clinical outcomes after heart transplantation (HTx). This study aimed to clarify how donor and recipient characteristics affect the clinical course after HTx. The medical records of all the patients who underwent HTx at the National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center from 1999 to 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Sixty-one patients (48 males) underwent HTx. Six recipients (9.8 %) developed primary graft dysfunction (PGD) determined by criteria recently established at a consensus conference. Development of PGD was associated with high-dose inotropic support for the donor heart and a history of stroke in the recipient (p = 0.04 and p = 0.002, respectively). Recipients with PGD had higher right atrial pressure (RAP) and lower cardiac output (CO) compared with those without PGD at 6 months after HTx (RAP, 6.8 ± 3.6 vs. 2.8 ± 2.2 mmHg, p < 0.001; CO, 4.6 ± 0.8 l vs. 5.8 ± 1.2 l/min, p = 0.02). With respect to survival, patients with PGD had a 5-year survival rate equivalent to those without PGD (83.3 vs. 93.3 %, p = 0.23). High-dose inotropic support for the donor heart and a history of stroke in the recipient are significant predictive factors for the development of PGD. However, recipients with PGD demonstrate mid-term survival comparable to those without PGD. PMID:25682298

  17. 34 CFR 300.11 - Day; business day; school day.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... included in the designation of business day, as in § 300.148(d)(1)(ii)). (c)(1) School day means any day... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Day; business day; school day. 300.11 Section 300.11... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.11 Day; business day; school day....

  18. 34 CFR 300.11 - Day; business day; school day.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... included in the designation of business day, as in § 300.148(d)(1)(ii)). (c)(1) School day means any day... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Day; business day; school day. 300.11 Section 300.11... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.11 Day; business day; school day....

  19. 34 CFR 300.11 - Day; business day; school day.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... included in the designation of business day, as in § 300.148(d)(1)(ii)). (c)(1) School day means any day... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Day; business day; school day. 300.11 Section 300.11... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.11 Day; business day; school day....

  20. 34 CFR 300.11 - Day; business day; school day.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... included in the designation of business day, as in § 300.148(d)(1)(ii)). (c)(1) School day means any day... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Day; business day; school day. 300.11 Section 300.11... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.11 Day; business day; school day....

  1. 34 CFR 300.11 - Day; business day; school day.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... included in the designation of business day, as in § 300.148(d)(1)(ii)). (c)(1) School day means any day... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Day; business day; school day. 300.11 Section 300.11... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.11 Day; business day; school day....

  2. Program ACTIVE II: Design and Methods for a Multi-Center Community-Based Depression Treatment for Rural and Urban Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, Mary; Shubrook, Jay; Schwartz, Frank; Hornsby, W. Guyton; Pillay, Yegan; Saha, Chandan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Depression affects one in four adults with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and is associated with worsened diabetes complications, increased health care costs and early mortality. Rural and low-income urban areas, including the Appalachian region, represent an epicenter of the T2DM epidemic. Program ACTIVE II is a comparative effectiveness treatment trial designed to test whether a combination of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and community-based exercise (EXER) will offer greater improvements in diabetes and depression outcomes compared to individual treatment approaches and usual care (UC). The secondary aims are to assess changes in cardiovascular risk factors across groups and to conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis of predicted incidence of cardiovascular complications across groups. Methods The study is a 2-by-2 factorial randomized controlled trial consisting of 4 treatment groups: CBT alone, EXER alone, combination of CBT and EXER, and UC. Adults with T2DM for > 1 year and who meet DSM-IVTR criteria for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) are eligible to participate at two rural Appalachian sites (southeastern Ohio and West Virginia) and one urban site (Indianapolis). This type II behavioral translation study uses a community-engaged research (CEnR) approach by incorporating community fitness centers and mental health practices as interventionists. Conclusions This is the first study to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of combined CBT and exercise in the treatment of depression using community-based intervention delivery. This approach may serve as a national model for expanding depression treatment for patients with T2DM.

  3. Laboratory-confirmed HIV and sexually transmitted infection seropositivity and risk behavior among sexually active transgender patients at an adolescent and young adult urban community health center.

    PubMed

    Reisner, Sari L; Vetters, Ralph; White, Jaclyn M; Cohen, Elijah L; LeClerc, M; Zaslow, Shayne; Wolfrum, Sarah; Mimiaga, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    The sexual health of transgender adolescents and young adults who present for health care in urban community health centers is understudied. A retrospective review of electronic health record (EHR) data was conducted from 180 transgender patients aged 12-29 years seen for one or more health-care visits between 2001 and 2010 at an urban community health center serving youth in Boston, MA. Analyses were restricted to 145 sexually active transgender youth (87.3% of the sample). Laboratory-confirmed HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) seroprevalence, demographics, sexual risk behavior, and structural and psychosocial risk indicators were extracted from the EHR. Analyses were descriptively focused for HIV and STIs. Stratified multivariable logistic regression models were fit for male-to-female (MTF) and female-to-male (FTM) patients separately to examine factors associated with any unprotected anal and/or vaginal sex (UAVS). The mean age was 20.0 (SD=2.9); 21.7% people of color, 46.9% white (non-Hispanic), 21.4% race/ethnicity unknown; 43.4% MTF, and 56.6% FTM; and 68.3% were on cross-sex hormones. Prevalence of STIs: 4.8% HIV, 2.8% herpes simplex virus, 2.8% syphilis, 2.1% chlamydia, 2.1% gonorrhea, 2.8% hepatitis C, 1.4% human papilloma virus. Only gonorrhea prevalence significantly differed by gender identity (MTF 2.1% vs. 0.0% FTM; p=0.046). Nearly half (47.6%) of the sample engaged in UAVS (52.4% MTF, 43.9% FTM, p=0.311). FTM more frequently had a primary sex partner compared to MTF (48.8% vs. 25.4%; p=0.004); MTF more frequently had a casual sex partner than FTM (69.8% vs. 42.7% p=0.001). In multivariable models, MTF youth who were younger in age, white non-Hispanic, and reported a primary sex partner had increased odds of UAVS; whereas, FTM youth reporting a casual sex partner and current alcohol use had increased odds of UAVS (all p<0.05). Factors associated with sexual risk differ for MTF and FTM youth. Partner type appears pivotal to understanding

  4. Laboratory-confirmed HIV and sexually transmitted infection seropositivity and risk behavior among sexually active transgender patients at an adolescent and young adult urban community health center

    PubMed Central

    Reisner, Sari L.; Vetters, Ralph; White, Jaclyn M.; Cohen, Elijah L.; LeClerc, M.; Zaslow, Shayne; Wolfrum, Sarah; Mimiaga, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    The sexual health of transgender adolescents and young adults who present for health care in urban community health centers is understudied. A retrospective review of electronic health record (EHR) data was conducted from 180 transgender patients aged 12–29 years seen for one or more health-care visits between 2001 and 2010 at an urban community health center serving youth in Boston, MA. Analyses were restricted to 145 sexually active transgender youth (87.3% of the sample). Laboratory-confirmed HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) seroprevalence, demographics, sexual risk behavior, and structural and psychosocial risk indicators were extracted from the EHR. Analyses were descriptively focused for HIV and STIs. Stratified multivariable logistic regression models were fit for male-to-female (MTF) and female-to-male (FTM) patients separately to examine factors associated with any unprotected anal and/or vaginal sex (UAVS). The mean age was 20.0 (SD = 2.9); 21.7% people of color, 46.9% white (non-Hispanic), 21.4% race/ethnicity unknown; 43.4% MTF, and 56.6% FTM; and 68.3% were on cross-sex hormones. Prevalence of STIs: 4.8% HIV, 2.8% herpes simplex virus, 2.8% syphilis, 2.1% chlamydia, 2.1% gonorrhea, 2.8% hepatitis C, 1.4% human papilloma virus. Only gonorrhea prevalence significantly differed by gender identity (MTF 2.1% vs. 0.0% FTM; p = 0.046). Nearly half (47.6%) of the sample engaged in UAVS (52.4% MTF, 43.9% FTM, p = 0.311). FTM more frequently had a primary sex partner compared to MTF (48.8% vs. 25.4%; p = 0.004); MTF more frequently had a casual sex partner than FTM (69.8% vs. 42.7% p = 0.001). In multivariable models, MTF youth who were younger in age, white non-Hispanic, and reported a primary sex partner had increased odds of UAVS; whereas, FTM youth reporting a casual sex partner and current alcohol use had increased odds of UAVS (all p < 0.05). Factors associated with sexual risk differ for MTF and FTM youth. Partner type appears pivotal to

  5. Delayed transfer of care from NHS secondary care to primary care in England: its determinants, effect on hospital bed days, prevalence of acute medical conditions and deaths during delay, in older adults aged 65 years and over

    PubMed Central

    Jasinarachchi, Krishantha H; Ibrahim, Ibrahim R; Keegan, Breffni C; Mathialagan, Rajaratnam; McGourty, John C; Phillips, James RN; Myint, Phyo K

    2009-01-01

    Background The delay in discharge or transfer of care back to the community following an acute admission to the hospital in older adults has long been a recognized challenge in the UK. We examined the determinants and outcomes of delayed transfer of care in older adults. Methods A prospective observational study was conducted in a district general hospital with a catchment population of 250,000 in England, UK. Those >= 65 years admitted to two care of the elderly wards during February 2007 were identified and prospectively followed-up till their discharge. Data was presented descriptively. Results 36.7% (58/158) of patients had a delay in transfer of care. They tended to be older, had poorer pre-morbid mobility, and were more likely to be confused at the time of admission. Compared to the 2003 National Audit Report, a significantly higher percentage (29.3%vs.17%) awaited therapist assessments or (27.6%vs.9%) domiciliary care, with a lower percentage (< 1%vs.14%) awaiting further NHS care. Of 18 in-patient deaths, five occurred during the delay. Seven patients developed medical conditions during the delay making them unfit for discharge. The number of extra bed days attributable to delayed discharges in this study was 682 (mean = 4.8) days. Conclusion Awaiting therapy and domiciliary care input were significant contributing factors in delayed transfer of care. Similar local assessments could provide valuable information in identifying areas for improvement. Based on available current evidence, efficacy driven changes to the organisation and provision of support, for example rapid response delayed discharge services at the time of "fit to discharge" may help to improve the situation. PMID:19161614

  6. The Ecology of Infant Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elardo, Richard

    This paper explores some of the attributed of quality day care programs for infants, age 0 to 30 months. High-quality interactions with adults result in positive developmental outcomes for infants. Adults involved in day care should focus on providing an environment of stimulating experiences, which help infants to develop satisfactorily. Other…

  7. Defibrotide for Treatment of Severe Veno-Occlusive Disease in Pediatrics and Adults: An Exploratory Analysis Using Data from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research.

    PubMed

    Strouse, Christopher; Richardson, Paul; Prentice, Grant; Korman, Sandra; Hume, Robin; Nejadnik, Bijan; Horowitz, Mary M; Saber, Wael

    2016-07-01

    Veno-occlusive disease (VOD) is an early and serious complication of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) that is associated with inferior survival, particularly when it is complicated by multiorgan failure (severe VOD). We evaluated the efficacy of defibrotide in the treatment of severe VOD using observational data from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR). Eight thousand three hundred forty-one patients treated by HCT between 2008 and 2011 were identified from the CIBMTR clinical database; 3.2% met criteria for VOD and 1.2% met criteria for severe VOD. Patients with a diagnosis of VOD as reported to the CIBMTR by their transplanting centers, who had no prior history of cirrhosis, and who had a maximum total bilirubin level > 2.0 mg/dL by day +100 post-HCT were selected for study. Severe VOD was defined as VOD occurring in the setting of renal impairment requiring dialysis or any noninfectious pulmonary abnormality. Patients with severe VOD were divided into 2 groups for analysis: those treated with defibrotide (n = 41) and those not treated with defibrotide (n = 55). Patients in the nondefibrotide group were older, were more likely to be male, were more likely to have a history of previous fungal infection, and had a higher proportion of clinically significant pre-existing disease or organ impairment. Survival rate at day +100 was 39% (95% CI, 24.8% to 54.3%) in patients receiving defibrotide and 30.9% (95% CI, 19.5% to 43.6%) in those not receiving defibrotide. Resolution rate of VOD at day +100 was 51% in the defibrotide group and 29% in the nondefibrotide group (difference, 22.1%; 95% CI, 2.6% to 42%). The results of our study are consistent with previously reported experiences with defibrotide, confirm the poor outcome of this syndrome, and suggest defibrotide is effective in the treatment of severe VOD. PMID:27108694

  8. Patterns of practice and survival in a retrospective analysis of 1722 adult astrocytoma patients treated between 1985 and 2001 in 12 Italian radiation oncology centers

    SciTech Connect

    Magrini, Stefano Maria . E-mail: magrini@med.unibs.it; Ricardi, Umberto; Santoni, Riccardo; Krengli, Marco; Lupattelli, Marco; Cafaro, Ines; Scoccianti, Silvia; Menichelli, Claudia; Bertoni, Filippo; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Buglione, Michela; Pirtoli, Luigi

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: To analyze the patterns of practice and survival in a series of 1722 adult astrocytoma patients treated in 12 Italian radiotherapy centers. Methods and Materials: A total of 1722 patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy (90% World Health Organization [WHO] Grade 3-4, 62% male, 44% aged >60 years, 25% with severe neurologic deficits, 44% after gross total resection, 52% with high-dose radiotherapy, and 16% with chemotherapy). Variations in the clinical-therapeutic features in three subsequent periods (1985 through 2001) were evaluated, along with overall survival for the different subgroups. Results: The proportion of women, of older patients, of those with worse neurologic performance status (NPS), with WHO Grade 4, and with smaller tumors increased with time, as did the proportion of those treated with radical surgery, hypofractionated radiotherapy, and more sophisticated radiotherapy techniques, after staging procedures progressively became more accurate. The main prognostic factors for overall survival were age, sex, neurologic performance status, WHO grade, extent of surgery, and radiation dose. Conclusions: Recently, broader selection criteria for radiotherapy were adopted, together with simpler techniques, smaller total doses, and larger fraction sizes for the worse prognostic categories. Younger, fit patients are treated more aggressively, more often in association with chemotherapy. Survival did not change over time. The accurate evaluation of neurologic status is therefore of utmost importance before the best treatment option for the individual patient is chosen.

  9. Radiographic Determination of Hip Rotation Center and Femoral Offset in Japanese Adults: A Preliminary Investigation toward the Preoperative Implications in Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Takamatsu, Taichiro; Shishido, Takaaki; Takahashi, Yasuhito; Masaoka, Toshinori; Tateiwa, Toshiyuki; Kubo, Kosuke; Endo, Kenji; Aoki, Masaya; Yamamoto, Kengo

    2015-01-01

    The values of hip rotation center (HRC) and femoral offset (FO) evaluated according to Caucasian anatomical landmarks have been regarded as a useful reference also for Japanese patients in total hip arthroplasty (THA). In a strict sense, however, since there can be racial differences among their anatomical morphologies, it is clinically important to reconsider those parameters for the Japanese. In the present study, in order to investigate correlations among hip and pelvic morphometric parameters, frontal radiographs were taken from 98 Japanese adults (60 males and 38 females) without acetabular dysplasia and arthropathy in the standing position. Their mean age was 62.0 ± 16.7 years. The horizontal position of HRC was significantly correlated with the pelvic width in both genders (P = 0.0026 and 0.0010 for the males and the females, resp.). The vertical position of HRC was significantly correlated with the teardrop-sacroiliac distance in the males (P = 0.0003) and with the pelvic cavity height in the females (P = 0.0067). However, in both genders, there were no correlations among FO and the other parameters analyzed in this study. Our present findings might contribute to theoretical implications of an appropriate HRC position for Japanese OA patients in THA. PMID:26576428

  10. Radiographic Determination of Hip Rotation Center and Femoral Offset in Japanese Adults: A Preliminary Investigation toward the Preoperative Implications in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Takamatsu, Taichiro; Shishido, Takaaki; Takahashi, Yasuhito; Masaoka, Toshinori; Tateiwa, Toshiyuki; Kubo, Kosuke; Endo, Kenji; Aoki, Masaya; Yamamoto, Kengo

    2015-01-01

    The values of hip rotation center (HRC) and femoral offset (FO) evaluated according to Caucasian anatomical landmarks have been regarded as a useful reference also for Japanese patients in total hip arthroplasty (THA). In a strict sense, however, since there can be racial differences among their anatomical morphologies, it is clinically important to reconsider those parameters for the Japanese. In the present study, in order to investigate correlations among hip and pelvic morphometric parameters, frontal radiographs were taken from 98 Japanese adults (60 males and 38 females) without acetabular dysplasia and arthropathy in the standing position. Their mean age was 62.0 ± 16.7 years. The horizontal position of HRC was significantly correlated with the pelvic width in both genders (P = 0.0026 and 0.0010 for the males and the females, resp.). The vertical position of HRC was significantly correlated with the teardrop-sacroiliac distance in the males (P = 0.0003) and with the pelvic cavity height in the females (P = 0.0067). However, in both genders, there were no correlations among FO and the other parameters analyzed in this study. Our present findings might contribute to theoretical implications of an appropriate HRC position for Japanese OA patients in THA. PMID:26576428

  11. A visit to the intensive cares unit: a family-centered culture change to facilitate pediatric visitation in an adult intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Julie Boyer; Piazza, Julie

    2012-01-01

    To guide family adjustment, an effort was made to facilitate pediatric visitation in an adult intensive care unit (ICU). Goals were to improve customer satisfaction and to raise staff comfort level with child visitation. After implementing an open visitation policy, concerns around pediatric visitation in the ICU remained. Fears centered on risks to both patient and child. Literature was reviewed before a book was written entitled A Visit to the ICU. It contained information about what a child visiting the ICU would see, hear, and feel when visiting a loved one. The book provided reassurance for caregivers and children, informing them about what to expect when visiting. The goal of the book was to provide caregivers with a framework for age-appropriate education. Staff education was provided on developmental stages, including a child's understandings of illness and death. Nursing interventions were reviewed and resources provided. A survey demonstrated that the book increased staff comfort level with children visiting the unit, was a positive tool for patients and families, and eased fears among children while helping to facilitate coping mechanisms. The article will describe the practice change of pediatric visitation in an ICU and how it could be applied to other critical care settings. PMID:22157497

  12. The day of your surgery - adult

    MedlinePlus

    ... your surgery. Answer any of your questions. Bring paper and pen to write down notes. Ask about your surgery, recovery, and pain management. Find out about insurance and payment for your surgery ... papers and consent forms for surgery and anesthesia. Bring ...

  13. The day of your surgery - adult

    MedlinePlus

    ... your surgery. Answer any of your questions. Bring paper and pen to write down notes. Ask about ... and anesthesia. You will need to sign admission papers and consent forms for surgery and anesthesia. Bring ...

  14. Efficacy and safety of vortioxetine (Lu AA21004), 15 and 20 mg/day: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, duloxetine-referenced study in the acute treatment of adult patients with major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Loft, Henrik; Olsen, Christina Kurre

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the efficacy, tolerability and safety of vortioxetine versus placebo in adults with recurrent major depressive disorder. This double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study included 608 patients [Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score≥26 and Clinical Global Impression – Severity score≥4]. Patients were randomly assigned (1 : 1 : 1 : 1) to vortioxetine 15 mg/day, vortioxetine 20 mg/day, duloxetine 60 mg/day or placebo. The primary efficacy endpoint was change from baseline in MADRS total score at week 8 (mixed model for repeated measurements). Key secondary endpoints were: MADRS responders; Clinical Global Impression – Improvement scale score; MADRS total score in patients with baseline Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale ≥20; remission (MADRS≤10); and Sheehan Disability Scale total score at week 8. On the primary efficacy endpoint, both vortioxetine doses were statistically significantly superior to placebo, with a mean difference to placebo (n=158) of −5.5 (vortioxetine 15 mg, P<0.0001, n=149) and −7.1 MADRS points (vortioxetine 20 mg, P<0.0001, n=151). Duloxetine (n=146) separated from placebo, thus validating the study. In all key secondary analyses, both vortioxetine doses were statistically significantly superior to placebo. Vortioxetine treatment was well tolerated; common adverse events (incidence≥5%) were nausea, headache, diarrhea, dry mouth and dizziness. No clinically relevant changes were seen in clinical safety laboratory values, weight, ECG or vital signs parameters. Vortioxetine was efficacious and well tolerated in the treatment of patients with major depressive disorder. PMID:24257717

  15. Efficacy and safety of vortioxetine (Lu AA21004), 15 and 20 mg/day: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, duloxetine-referenced study in the acute treatment of adult patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Boulenger, Jean-Philippe; Loft, Henrik; Olsen, Christina Kurre

    2014-05-01

    This study assessed the efficacy, tolerability and safety of vortioxetine versus placebo in adults with recurrent major depressive disorder. This double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study included 608 patients [Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score ≥ 26 and Clinical Global Impression - Severity score ≥ 4]. Patients were randomly assigned (1 : 1 : 1 : 1) to vortioxetine 15 mg/day, vortioxetine 20 mg/day, duloxetine 60 mg/day or placebo. The primary efficacy endpoint was change from baseline in MADRS total score at week 8 (mixed model for repeated measurements). Key secondary endpoints were: MADRS responders; Clinical Global Impression - Improvement scale score; MADRS total score in patients with baseline Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale ≥ 20; remission (MADRS ≤ 10); and Sheehan Disability Scale total score at week 8. On the primary efficacy endpoint, both vortioxetine doses were statistically significantly superior to placebo, with a mean difference to placebo (n = 158) of -5.5 (vortioxetine 15 mg, P < 0.0001, n = 149) and -7.1 MADRS points (vortioxetine 20 mg, P < 0.0001, n = 151). Duloxetine (n = 146) separated from placebo, thus validating the study. In all key secondary analyses, both vortioxetine doses were statistically significantly superior to placebo. Vortioxetine treatment was well tolerated; common adverse events (incidence ≥ 5%) were nausea, headache, diarrhea, dry mouth and dizziness. No clinically relevant changes were seen in clinical safety laboratory values, weight, ECG or vital signs parameters. Vortioxetine was efficacious and well tolerated in the treatment of patients with major depressive disorder. PMID:24257717

  16. A Clinical Scoring Algorithm for Determination of the Risk of Tuberculosis in HIV-Infected Adults: A Cohort Study Performed at Ethiopian Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Balcha, T. T.; Skogmar, S.; Sturegård, E.; Schön, T.; Winqvist, N.; Reepalu, A.; Jemal, Z. H.; Tibesso, G.; Björk, J.; Björkman, P.

    2014-01-01

    Background  The World Health Organization (WHO) tuberculosis (TB) symptom screening instrument (WHO-TB) can identify human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals at low risk of tuberculosis (TB); however, many patients report WHO-TB symptoms and require further TB investigations. We hypothesized that further clinical scoring could classify subjects with a positive WHO-TB screening result (WHO-TB+) for the likelihood of TB. Methods  HIV-infected adults eligible to initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART) were recruited and prospectively followed at 5 Ethiopian health centers. Irrespective of symptoms, all participants underwent sputum bacteriological testing for TB. Symptoms, physical findings, hemoglobin, and CD4 cell count results were compared between subjects with and those without bacteriologically confirmed TB. Variables associated with TB in WHO-TB+ individuals were used to construct a scoring algorithm with multiple logistic regression analysis. Results  Among 812 participants, 137 (16.9%) had TB. One hundred fifty-nine persons (20%) had a negative WHO-TB screen, 10 of whom had TB (negative predictive value [NPV], 94% [95% confidence interval {CI}, 90%–97.5%]). For WHO-TB+ subjects, the following variables were independently associated with TB, and were assigned 1 point each in the clinical scoring algorithm: cough, Karnofsky score ≤80, mid-upper arm circumference <20 cm, lymphadenopathy, and hemoglobin <10 g/dL. Among subjects with 0–1 points, 20 of 255 had TB (NPV, 92% [95% CI, 89%–95%]), vs 19 of 34 participants with ≥4 points (positive predictive value, 56% [95% CI, 39%–73%]). The use of WHO-TB alone identified 159 of 784 (20%) with a low risk of TB, vs 414 of 784 (53%) using WHO-TB followed by clinical scoring (P< .001). The difference in proportions of confirmed TB in these subsets was nonsignificant (6.3% vs 7.2%; P= .69). Conclusions  Clinical scoring can further classify HIV-infected adults with positive WHO-TB screen to

  17. Santa Monica Children's Centers, Santa Monica, California: Low-Cost Day Care Facilities for Children of Working Mothers Made Available Through the Cooperation of the California State Government and Local School District. Model Programs--Childhood Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Institutes for Research in the Behavioral Sciences, Palo Alto, CA.

    Two of the four Santa Monica Children's Centers are nursery schools for children aged 3 to 5; the other two centers serve as extended care facilities for children of school age. All centers are concerned with meeting the physical, intellectual, and emotional needs of children on a long-term basis and stress a program offering a variety of play…

  18. Lack of effect of nucleus accumbens dopamine D1 receptor blockade on consumption during the first two days of operant self-administration of sweetened ethanol in adult Long-Evans rats

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, James M.; Gonzales, Rueben A.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying ethanol self-administration are not fully understood; however, it is clear that ethanol self-administration stimulates nucleus accumbens dopamine release in well trained animals. During operant sweetened ethanol self-administration behavior, an adaptation in the nucleus accumbens dopamine system occurs between the first and second exposure paralleling a dramatic increase in sweetened ethanol intake, which suggests a single exposure to sweetened ethanol may be sufficient to learn the association between sweetened ethanol cues and its reinforcing properties. In the present experiment, we test the effects of blockade of nucleus accumbens dopamine D1 receptors on operant sweetened ethanol self-administration behavior during the first two days of exposure. Adult male Long-Evans rats were first trained to self-administer 10% sucrose (10S) across six days in an appetitive and consummatory operant model (appetitive interval: 10 min pre-drinking wait period and a lever response requirement of 4; consummatory interval: 20 min access to the drinking solution). After training on 10S, the drinking solution was switched to 10% sucrose plus 10% ethanol (10S10E); control rats remained drinking 10S throughout the experiment. Bilateral nucleus accumbens microinjections of the dopamine D1 antagonist, SCH-23390 (0, 1.0, or 3.0 μg/side), immediately preceded the first two sessions of drinking 10S10E. Results show that blocking nucleus accumbens dopamine D1 receptors has little or no influence on consumption during the first two days of exposure to the sweetened ethanol solution or maintenance of sucrose only drinking. Furthermore, the high dose of SCH-23390, 3.0 μg/side, reduced open field locomotor activity. In conclusion, we found no evidence to suggest that nucleus accumbens D1 receptor activation is involved in consumption of a sweetened ethanol solution during the first two days of exposure or maintenance of sucrose drinking, but rather D1 receptors

  19. Management of Adult Chronic Immune Thrombocytopenia in Japan: Patient and Hematologist Perspectives from a Multi-center Cross-sectional Questionnaire Survey.

    PubMed

    Tsukune, Yutaka; Komatsu, Norio

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to explore the perspective of hematologists and their patients regarding the management of adult chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Methods This was a multi-center, questionnaire-based, cross-sectional study conducted between 2012 and 2013 throughout Japan. Patients Hematologists, members of the Japanese Society of Hematology in 171 institutions, and their patients were invited to participate in this study. The hematologists were mainly asked about their treatment strategies, while patients were asked about their opinion of the applied treatments, treatment effect, impact on their quality of life (QOL), and treatment satisfaction. Results Questionnaires from 204 hematologists and 213 patients were collected. One hundred sixty hematologists (78.4%) started treatment based on the patient's platelet count. Corticosteroids were considered to be the most effective treatment (44.1%). Forty-six percent of hematologists responded that treatment would be started after the platelet count fell below 20×10(9)/L with bleeding symptoms, compared to 62.9% for patients with no bleeding symptoms. A platelet count of 50×10(9)/L or lower was acceptable for 94.0% of hematologists and 66.8% of patients. Fatigue was most frequently experienced by patients (44.6%). Patients also experienced psychological symptoms (feeling of anxiety or depressive mood: 29.1%, labyrinthitis: 23.5%). While 70.6% of hematologists assumed that the patient QOL was impaired to a moderate to substantial degree, the QOL was impaired in 34.3% of patients. Conclusion A substantial gap which exists between hematologists and their patients highlights a need for better understanding of potential conflicts for establishing effective strategies for ITP management. PMID:27580537

  20. Image free-viewing as intrinsically-motivated exploration: estimating the learnability of center-of-gaze image samples in infants and adults

    PubMed Central

    Schlesinger, Matthew; Amso, Dima

    2013-01-01

    We propose that free viewing of natural images in human infants can be understood and analyzed as the product of intrinsically-motivated visual exploration. We examined this idea by first generating five sets of center-of-gaze (COG) image samples, which were derived by presenting a series of natural images to groups of both real observers (i.e., 9-month-olds and adults) and artificial observers (i.e., an image-saliency model, an image-entropy model, and a random-gaze model). In order to assess the sequential learnability of the COG samples, we paired each group of samples with a simple recurrent network, which was trained to reproduce the corresponding sequence of COG samples. We then asked whether an intrinsically-motivated artificial agent would learn to identify the most successful network. In Simulation 1, the agent was rewarded for selecting the observer group and network with the lowest prediction errors, while in Simulation 2 the agent was rewarded for selecting the observer group and network with the largest rate of improvement. Our prediction was that if visual exploration in infants is intrinsically-motivated—and more specifically, the goal of exploration is to learn to produce sequentially-predictable gaze patterns—then the agent would show a preference for the COG samples produced by the infants over the other four observer groups. The results from both simulations supported our prediction. We conclude by highlighting the implications of our approach for understanding visual development in infants, and discussing how the model can be elaborated and improved. PMID:24198801

  1. Employment and Post-Secondary Educational Activities for Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders during the Transition to Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Julie Lounds; Seltzer, Marsha Mailick

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the post-high school educational and occupational activities for 66 young adults with autism spectrum disorders who had recently exited the secondary school system. Analyses indicated low rates of employment in the community, with the majority of young adults (56%) spending time in sheltered workshops or day activity centers.…

  2. CPR: Adult

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Refresher Center Home FIRST AID, CPR and AED LIFEGUARDING Refresher Putting It All Together: CPR—Adult (2:03) Refresher videos only utilize this player QUICK LINKS Home RedCross.org Purchase Course Materials Shop Our Store ...

  3. Correlates and Economic and Clinical Outcomes of an Adult IV to PO Antimicrobial Conversion Program at an Academic Medical Center in Midwest United States.

    PubMed

    Sallach-Ruma, Rory; Nieman, Jennifer; Sankaranarayanan, Jayashri; Reardon, Tom

    2015-06-01

    The study objectives were to evaluate the correlates and outcomes of a parenteral (IV) to oral (PO) antimicrobial conversion program at a Midwest US Academic Medical Center with the hypothesis that it will be associated with reduced drug costs. Patient-level data (n = 237; sex, race, admission source, admission status, admission severity, risk of mortality [relative expected, admission], and early death) were extracted from the Clinical Data Base/Resource Manager. Medication-level, drug-encounter data (n = 317; antibiotic/dose/route/frequency/duration, conversion status, 10-day IV/PO switch-eligibility criteria) were extracted from patient's hospital medical records. Univariate analyses using chi-square or Fisher's exact test for categorical variables and Wilcoxon rank-sum test for continuous variables showed patients not converted (n = 149) versus converted (n = 88) at some point from IV to PO were more likely to be of white race and had higher risk of relative expected mortality. By applying the unit drug cost (derived from 2010 Thomson Reuters RED BOOK(TM)) and labor costs for IV/PO administration, both per dose, the overall 1-month drug cost-saving estimates in 2010 in US dollars were US$5242 from converting and US$8805 savings missed from not converting 518 and 1387 switch-eligible antibiotic doses, respectively. Despite sample-size limitations, this study demonstrated correlates and missed opportunities to convert antimicrobials from IV to PO, which warrants providers' attention. PMID:24399573

  4. An Adult ESL Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Literacy Resource Center, Columbia.

    This curriculum framework for adult literacy was written by 21 South Carolina adult English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) instructors, as submitted to the South Carolina Literacy Resource Center. It is based on current theories in the fields of adult education and second language acquisition and is designed to be flexible so that it may be adapted to…

  5. Career Counseling for ABE Students. An Analysis of Work Done by Career Counselors in the Southeastern Connecticut Adult Basic Education Program through Project LEARN, Regional Education Services Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atherton, Margaret Snow

    This booklet offers suggestions for setting up a career counseling program for adults enrolled in adult basic education programs. Chapter l indicates points that should be considered in setting up a career counseling process, including site selection, publicity, and availability of career counseling in both group and individual sessions. One…

  6. Non-myeloablative Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Adults with Relapsed and Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma: A Single Center Analysis in the Rituximab Era

    PubMed Central

    Mussetti, Alberto; Devlin, Sean M.; Castro-Malaspina, Hugo R; Barker, Juliet N.; Giralt, Sergio A.; Zelenetz, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Relapsed and refractory (rel/ref) mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) portends a dismal prognosis. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) represents the only potentially curative therapy in this setting. We analyzed survival outcomes of 29 recipients of non-myeloablative allo-HSCT for rel/ref MCL, and studied possible prognostic factors in this setting. The cumulative incidence of disease progression and non-relapse mortality at 3 years were 28% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 13-46%) and 29% (95%CI: 13-47%), respectively. The cumulative incidence of grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) at days +100 and +180 were 34% (95%CI: 18-52%) and 45% (95%CI: 26-62%), respectively. With a median follow-up in survivors of 53 (range 24-83) months, the 3-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 54% (95%CI: 38-76%) and 41% (95%CI: 26-64%), respectively. In vivo T-cell depletion with alemtuzumab (n=6) was associated with inferior 3-year PFS (0% vs. 51%, p=0.007) and OS (17% vs. 64%, p=0.014). Conversely, a second line international prognostic index (sIPI) at transplantation equal to 0 (no risk factors) was associated with an improved 3-year PFS (52% vs. 22%, p=0.020) and OS (71% vs. 22%, p=0.006) compared to sIPI ≥1. Performing an allo-HSCT before 2007 was associated with a decreased 3-year OS (25% vs. 76%, p=0.015) but not with a significantly inferior PFS (17% vs. 59%, p=0.058). In this single center series, we report encouraging results with allo-HSCT for patients with rel/ref MCL. High alemtuzumab doses should probably be avoided in this context. PMID:26146802

  7. Day Care Management. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourque, Janet

    A curriculum was developed and a pilot project was conducted to train 20 day care center directors at Lake Washington Vocational Technical Institute. This document summarizes the curriculum development project and provides the curriculum that was developed. The report contains a summary and outline of the course, a skills assessment, pretests and…

  8. Fruit Every Day Might Help Your Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... suggests. Adults who ate fresh fruit, such as apples and oranges, every day had about a one- ... The most commonly eaten fruits in China are apples, pears and oranges, Li said. America's favorite fresh ...

  9. Mental Health Treatment Barriers among Racial/Ethnic Minority versus White Young Adults 6 Months after Intake at a College Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, Regina; Soffer, Ariella; Polanco-Roman, Lillian; Wheeler, Alyssa; Moore, Alyssa

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study examined mental health treatment barriers following intake at a counseling center among racially/ethnically diverse college students. Methods: College students (N = 122) seen for intake at a college counseling center in 2012-2013 completed self-reports of depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation, and mental health treatment…

  10. When Every Day Is Professional Development Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tienken, Christopher H.; Stonaker, Lew

    2007-01-01

    In the Monroe Township (New Jersey) Public Schools, teachers' learning occurs daily, not just on one day in October and February. Central office and school-level administrators foster job-embedded teacher growth. Every day is a professional development day in the district, but that has not always been so. How did the district become a system with…

  11. Growing Up: Not an Easy Transition—Perspectives of Patients and Parents regarding Transfer from a Pediatric Liver Transplant Center to Adult Care

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Sona; Luetkemeyer, Shannon; Romero, Rene; Gupta, Nitika Arora

    2015-01-01

    The transition from pediatric to adult care is a critical time when children with chronic illness sustain high morbidity and mortality. Transition services need to be focused on the adolescents' needs, which may differ from those perceived by healthcare providers. In this study, a survey of 31 patients with chronic liver disease and/or liver transplant who were “transferred” to adult services within the last 3 years was conducted. Patients were asked about their current health status and their perceptions of the overall transfer process. The mean age at transfer was 19.81 (18–21) years. Almost half the patients (47%) were not seen at the adult facility until 2–6 months after leaving the Children's hospital and 20% were not seen until 6–12 months. About 20% had their first contact with adult services through an emergency room visit. About 19% reported being out of medication during transition. Of the transplanted patients, 19% were being evaluated for a retransplant. The majority (82%) felt that an increased emphasis on promoting independence and “letting go” both by parents and by pediatric care providers was critical in their transition to independence and adult care services. This study provides thought-provoking insights, which are critical in designing the ideal transition program for children with chronic diseases. PMID:26682071

  12. Moving Toward Implementation of Person-Centered Care for Older Adults in Community-Based Medical and Social Service Settings: "You Only Get Things Done When Working in Concert with Clients".

    PubMed

    Coulourides Kogan, Alexis; Wilber, Kathleen; Mosqueda, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Specialized, fragmented acute care is not aligned optimally to serve older adults. Person-centered care (PCC) has emerged as an evidence-based solution that involves enlisting patients as partners in treatment planning. Although several efforts have captured person-centered voices in outpatient care, more information is needed at the organizational and provider level to better understand the feasibility, challenges, and effect of PCC in community-based and social services settings. To assess themes and emerging trends, researchers conducted telephone interviews with leaders at nine organizations providing PCC for older adults. Questions were focused on the legacy of PCC services, whether and how PCC was connected to better quality care, and what tools were used for measuring PCC. Three themes on PCC for older adults emerged. (1) Each organization ascribed to a unique definition and operational structure for PCC. (2) Despite these differences, all organizations specified a strong commitment to PCC. Most noted financial resources and staffing as challenges and opportunities affecting feasibility. (3) Terms such as "patient-centered" care and other PCC synonyms may warrant greater clarification, because ideological differences set these classifications apart. Results from this analysis indicate the lack of a single, established definition for PCC. As interest in and support for PCC mounts, organizations in outpatient medical and community-based settings clearly have undertaken individual efforts to interpret what PCC is and how to provide it. Interview responses reflect this inconsistency, highlighting how staff and financing in particular can bolster or burden the PCC paradigm and what a consensus definition could do for the field. PMID:26626544

  13. From Policy to Practice: Implementation of Water Policies in Child Care Centers in Connecticut

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, Ann E.; Henderson, Kathryn E.; Schwartz, Marlene B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Child care policies may contribute to healthy beverage consumption patterns. This study documented availability and accessibility of water and correspondence with state and federal policy and accreditation standards in child care centers. Design: One-day observations were conducted in a random sample of 40 Child and Adult Care Food…

  14. How Many Days Are Enough? A Study of 365 Days of Pedometer Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Minsoo; Bassett, David R.; Barreira, Tiago V.; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Ainsworth, Barbara; Reis, Jared P.; Strath, Scott; Swartz, Ann

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the number of days of pedometer monitoring necessary to achieve reliable and valid estimates of a 1-year average of step counts in adults based on either consecutive days (CD) or random days (RD) of data collection. Twenty-three participants (16 women; M age = 38 years, SD = 9.9) wore a Yamax SW 200 pedometer…

  15. Employment Opportunties, Job Satisfaction, and Migration among Young Adults from Nonmetropolitan Washington. College of Agriculture Research Center, Washington State University, Bulletin 873.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Donald A.; Price, Dorothy Z.

    A study evaluated career attainment and job satisfaction of young adults from nonmetropolitan Washington and identified factors influencing them. Results were based on data collected in a 1973 mail survey of members of high school classes graduating in 1965 and 1966. Career attainment was measured by occupation, earnings, place of work, and…

  16. Schoolwide Literacy Days.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polder, Darlene D.

    2000-01-01

    Describes 10 "literacy day" activities that one California elementary school has used successfully schoolwide, typically one such day per month, to make reading fun and purposeful, while developing a sense of community. Includes: spread-a-quilt day; teacher exchange day; turn off the TV; Dr. Seuss day; community readers; schoolwide poets; original…

  17. Adult daycare: an entrepreneurial opportunity for nursing.

    PubMed

    Fettig, E R; Riegel, D R

    1998-01-01

    By the year 2000 13% of the general U.S. population will be made up of those over 65. Many states are seeking cost-effective ways to provide structure and some assistance for these individuals to help keep them in their own homes and out of institutions. The National Institute on Adult Daycare (NIAD) defines adult daycare as "a community-based program designed to meet the needs of minimally impaired adults through an individualized plan of care for part of a 24-hour day." Between 1980 and 1990 the number of centers grew from 1,200 to 3,000; by the year 2000, NIAD estimates that there will be a need for 10,000 adult daycare centers. The authors advise interested nurse entrepreneurs to consider the potential for establishing and running such centers and provide a roadmap for developing a business plan. A careful market analysis in your selected community should be the first step in the process of developing a workable business plan. PMID:9748984

  18. First Day of Life

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy The First Day of Life KidsHealth > For Parents > The First Day ... continue What Your Baby Does on the First Day Many parents are surprised to see how alert ...

  19. Tethered Test of Morpheus -- Innovation Day

    NASA Video Gallery

    Another tethered test of the Morpheus vertical test bed. This flight was on Innovation Day at Johnson Space Center. We had around 300 onlookers during this test. This test looked better than yester...

  20. [The role of the pharmacist in dispensing medication in Adult Psychosocial Care Centers in the city of São Paulo, Capital of the State of São Paulo, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Zanella, Carolina Gomes; Aguiar, Patricia Melo; Storpirtis, Sílvia

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of the pharmacist in dispensing medication by conducting cross-sectional exploratory-descriptive research in eight Adult Psychosocial Care Centers (CAPS) in São Paulo. The pharmacists responsible for each of the dispensing units studied filled out a semi-structured questionnaire about the service provided. Two Adult CAPS units were selected from each of the North, South, Eastand West regions of São Paulo. The central region has no Adult CAPS, and was therefore not included in the study. Most of the respondents were aged between 35 and 40 years and were predominantly female. It was found that half of the respondents performed only 25% of dispensations and few conducted an analysis of all prescriptions before dispensing medication. All respondents contacted the prescriber if any medication-related problems a rose. However, few pharmaceutical interventions were commonly performed. Furthermore, one respondent indicated that all his/her functions in the pharmacy could be delegated to another professional. These findings reveal the pressing need for actions that ensure the ongoing training of pharmacists to enable them to be clinically prepared to deal with patients with mental disorders. PMID:25715126

  1. International Booklet of Recipes and Stories. Final Report, July 1, 1991 to June 30, 1992 [and] Community Cookbook [and] Adult Enrichment Center International Cookbook, 1989-90.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fayette County Community Action Agency, Inc., Uniontown, PA.

    Utilizing 1991-92 Pennsylvania Department of Education Section 353 Special Demonstration Project Funding, the Fayette County Community Action Agency, Inc. Education Center conducted a cookbook and stories project. It was designed to encourage English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) students to maintain their cultural heritage while learning about that…

  2. Increasing Retention of Adult Learners in Telecourses through the Incorporation of Learning-Centered Instructional Strategies and the Use of Multiple Modalities for Content Delivery and Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Lin M.

    A project was undertaken to increase retention in a health education telecourse by incorporating a competency-based orientation to distance learning and learner-centered instructional strategies into the telecourse, and by using multiple media for content delivery and interaction. A general orientation to distance learning was developed that…

  3. Family Day Care Associations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bookman, Robert

    This paper presents information on the organization and accomplishments of Family Day Care Associations, organized groups of individuals who provide day care services in their own homes. Although primarily based on experiences of day care mothers in New York State, the paper presents information relevant to day care providers in any area.…

  4. Physical Activity during the School Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castelli, Darla M.; Ward, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    In response to concerns that children are physically inactive, a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention committee developed school-based implementation strategies centered on the components of a Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program (CSPAP), composed of the physical education program, physical activity during the school day, staff…

  5. Libraries and Adult Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josey, E. J., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Of the 13 essays presented in this special issue on libraries and adult education, 8 focus on programs and services from the public library for adult learners. These essays provide information on: (1) an Education Information Centers Program (EIC) designed to complement employment skills training provided under the Comprehensive Employment and…

  6. TRAINING FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING, A COMMUNITY PROGRAM FOR SEVERELY RETARDED ADULTS. A THREE YEAR REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TOBIAS, JACK

    AN OCCUPATIONAL DAY CENTER FOR MENTALLY RETARDED ADULTS WAS ESTABLISHED TO PROVIDE COMMUNITY SERVICES FOR RETARDED PERSONS WHO LIVE AT HOME AND, ALTHOUGH BEYOND SCHOOL AGE, ARE UNABLE TO PARTICIPATE IN SHELTERED WORKSHOP ACTIVITIES. THE STAFF INCLUDES A DIRECTOR, A SOCIAL WORKER, FIVE INSTRUCTORS, A TRAINING SUPERVISOR, AN OFFICE WORKER, AND A…

  7. Training Effects on Older Adults in Information and Communication Technologies Considering Psychosocial Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferreira, Sónia; Torres, Ana; Mealha, Óscar; Veloso, Ana

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this study is to contribute knowledge about the impact of the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) on the self-concept, mood, and quality of life of institutionalized older adults in retirement homes and day care centers (Portuguese institutions). It also studies the influence of independent variables such as…

  8. PENNSYLVANIA MIGRANT DAY CARE PROGRAM AND PARTICIPATING AGENCIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NAYLOR, NAOMI L.

    A DESCRIPTION OF A MIGRANT DAY CARE PROGRAM WAS GIVEN. A TOTAL OF 180 PRESCHOOL AND SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN WERE ENROLLED IN SIX DAY CARE CENTERS. SOME FINANCIAL AID, EQUIPMENT, MATERIALS, AND ADVISORY HELP WERE GIVEN TO TWO OTHER CENTERS ENROLLING 40 MORE CHILDREN. FUNDS FOR THE OPERATION OF THE CENTERS WERE FEDERAL FUNDS, ALLOCATED TO PROVIDE…

  9. Sack Racers at Day of Play

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    From left, Mallory Doody, 5, Natalie Cambre, 3, Madison Doody, 7, and Anna Cambre, 6, get ready to compete in a sack race. The children were participants in Nickelodeon's Worldwide Day of Play celebration at Stennis Space Center (SSC) on Oct. 1. The Worldwide Day of Play is sponsored annually by Nickelodeon television network to encourage children to be physically active.

  10. Take Our Children to Work Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Hundreds of children participated in the annual Take Our Children to Work Day at Stennis Space Center on July 29. During the day, children of Stennis employees received a tour of facilities and took part in various activities, including demonstrations in cryogenics and robotics.

  11. Day Care Services: Industry's Involvement. Bulletin 296.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besner, Arthur

    This bulletin provides an overview of the need for services for the children of working mothers. Topics discussed include historical developments in industry day care programs, alternative roles for industry involvement, costs of operating day care centers, and income tax allowances. Also given are examples of unique programs which suggest various…

  12. Adult Development and Adult Beginning Reading Behaviors: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumacher, Sally

    An ethnographic study investigated four adult beginning reading (ABR) classes in several adult learning centers in order to determine the effect of an adult's age and developmental phase on his or her behavior and attitudes in the learning-to-read process. For 9 months, a four-member research team conducted on-site observations, compiled extensive…

  13. Every Day Is National Lab Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Glen

    2010-01-01

    President Barack Obama recently issued a call for increased hands-on learning in U.S. schools in an address at the National Academy of Sciences. Obama concluded that the future of the United States depends on one's ability to encourage young people to "create, and build, and invent." In this article, the author discusses National Lab Day (NLD)…

  14. Riley-Day syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Riley-Day syndrome is an inherited disorder that affects nerves throughout the body. ... Riley-Day syndrome is passed down through families (inherited). A person must inherit a copy of the defective gene ...

  15. Riley-Day syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001387.htm Riley-Day syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Riley-Day syndrome is an inherited disorder that affects nerves ...

  16. Visitors Center activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    More than 2,000 children and adults from Mississippi, Louisiana and Alabama recently build a 12-foot tall Space Shuttle made entirely from tiny LEGO bricks at the John C. Stennis Space Center Visitors Center in South Mississippi. The shuttle was part of an exhibit titled 'Travel in Space' World Show which depicts the history of flight and space travel from the Wright brothers to future generations of space vehicles. For more information concerning hours of operation or Visitors Center educational programs, call 1-800-237-1821 in Mississippi and Louisiana or (601) 688-2370.

  17. 34 CFR 413.4 - How does the Secretary designate a National Center or Centers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL CENTER OR CENTERS FOR RESEARCH IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION General § 413.4 How does the Secretary designate a National Center or... designating the National Center or Centers for Research in Vocational Education, the Secretary may support—...

  18. 34 CFR 413.4 - How does the Secretary designate a National Center or Centers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL CENTER OR CENTERS FOR RESEARCH IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION General § 413.4 How does the Secretary designate a National Center or... designating the National Center or Centers for Research in Vocational Education, the Secretary may support—...

  19. 34 CFR 413.4 - How does the Secretary designate a National Center or Centers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL CENTER OR CENTERS FOR RESEARCH IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION General § 413.4 How does the Secretary designate a National Center or... designating the National Center or Centers for Research in Vocational Education, the Secretary may support—...

  20. 34 CFR 413.4 - How does the Secretary designate a National Center or Centers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL CENTER OR CENTERS FOR RESEARCH IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION General § 413.4 How does the Secretary designate a National Center or... designating the National Center or Centers for Research in Vocational Education, the Secretary may support—...

  1. 34 CFR 413.4 - How does the Secretary designate a National Center or Centers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL CENTER OR CENTERS FOR RESEARCH IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION General § 413.4 How does the Secretary designate a National Center or... designating the National Center or Centers for Research in Vocational Education, the Secretary may support—...

  2. Growing degree day calculator

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Degree-day benchmarks indicate discrete biological events in the development of insect pests. For the Sparganothis fruitworm, we have isolated all key development events and linked them to degree-day accumulations. These degree-day accumulations can greatly improve treatment timings for cranberry IP...

  3. Every Day Is Mathematical

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barger, Rita H.; Jarrah, Adeeb M.

    2012-01-01

    March 14 is special because it is Pi Day. Mathematics is celebrated on that day because the date, 3-14, replicates the first three digits of pi. Pi-related songs, websites, trivia facts, and more are at the fingertips of interested teachers and students. Less celebrated, but still fairly well known, is National Metric Day, which falls on October…

  4. STS-90 Day 14 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    On this fourteenth day of the STS-90 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Richard A. Searfoss, Pilot Scott D. Altman, and Mission Specialists Richard M. Linnehan, Dafydd Rhys Williams and Kathryn P. Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay C. Buckey and James A. Pawelczyk focus on the efforts of Neurolab's Neuronal Plasticity Team to better understand how the adult nervous system adapts to the new environment of space. Columbia's science crew -- Mission Specialists Rick Linnehan and Dave Williams and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey and Jim Pawelczyk -- perform the second and final in-flight dissections of the adult male rats on board. The crew euthanizes and dissects nine rats and remove the vestibular or balance organs of the inner ear; the cerebellum, the part of the brain critical for maintaining balance and for processing information from the limbs so they can be moved smoothly; and the cerebrum, one part of which controls automatic functions such as body temperature regulation and the body's internal clock, and the cortical region that controls cognitive functions such as thinking. The first dissection, which was performed on the second day of the flight, went extremely well, according to Neurolab scientists.

  5. NASA Dryden Hosts Take Your Children to Work Day

    NASA Video Gallery

    About 150 youngsters joined their parents at the Dryden Flight Research Center recently during the center's Take Your Children to Work Day. The children toured shops and hangars, checked out aircra...

  6. NASA Space Day in Mississippi - House of Representatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Astronaut Michael Foale (center) and Stennis Space Center officials met with Mississippi House of Representatives Gulf Coast delegation, including Speaker William 'Billy' McCoy (far right), during NASA Space Day in Mississippi on January 30.

  7. A Mobile/Web App for Long Distance Caregivers of Older Adults: Functional Requirements and Design Implications from a User Centered Design Process

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Steven S.; Gorman, Paul N.; Jimison, Holly B.

    2014-01-01

    Recent trends of population aging and globalization have required an increasing number of individuals to act as long distance caregivers (LDCs) to aging family members. Information technology solutions may ease the burden placed on LDCs by providing remote monitoring, easier access to information and enhanced communication. While some technology tools have been introduced, the information and technology needs of LDCs in particular are not well understood. Consequently, a needs assessment was performed by using video conferencing software to conduct semi-structured interviews with 10 LDCs. Interviews were enriched through the use of stimulus materials that included the demonstration of a prototype LDC health management web/mobile app. Responses were recorded, transcribed and then analyzed. Subjects indicated that information regarding medication regimens and adherence, calendaring, and cognitive health were most needed. Participants also described needs for video calling, activity data regarding sleep and physical exercise, asynchronous communication, photo sharing, journaling, access to online health resources, real-time monitoring, an overall summary of health, and feedback/suggestions to help them improve as caregivers. In addition, all respondents estimated their usage of a LDC health management website would be at least once per week, with half indicating a desire to access the website from a smartphone. These findings are being used to inform the design of a LDC health management website to promote the meaningful involvement of distant family members in the care of older adults. PMID:25954469

  8. A mobile/web app for long distance caregivers of older adults: functional requirements and design implications from a user centered design process.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Steven S; Gorman, Paul N; Jimison, Holly B

    2014-01-01

    Recent trends of population aging and globalization have required an increasing number of individuals to act as long distance caregivers (LDCs) to aging family members. Information technology solutions may ease the burden placed on LDCs by providing remote monitoring, easier access to information and enhanced communication. While some technology tools have been introduced, the information and technology needs of LDCs in particular are not well understood. Consequently, a needs assessment was performed by using video conferencing software to conduct semi-structured interviews with 10 LDCs. Interviews were enriched through the use of stimulus materials that included the demonstration of a prototype LDC health management web/mobile app. Responses were recorded, transcribed and then analyzed. Subjects indicated that information regarding medication regimens and adherence, calendaring, and cognitive health were most needed. Participants also described needs for video calling, activity data regarding sleep and physical exercise, asynchronous communication, photo sharing, journaling, access to online health resources, real-time monitoring, an overall summary of health, and feedback/suggestions to help them improve as caregivers. In addition, all respondents estimated their usage of a LDC health management website would be at least once per week, with half indicating a desire to access the website from a smartphone. These findings are being used to inform the design of a LDC health management website to promote the meaningful involvement of distant family members in the care of older adults. PMID:25954469

  9. AAS 227: Day 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 3 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Henry Norris Russell Lecture: Viewing the Universe with Infrared Eyes: The Spitzer Space Telescope (by Erika Nesvold)The Henry Norris Russell Award is the highest honor given by the AAS, for a lifetime of eminence in astronomy research. This years award went to Giovanni Fazio of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Fazio became a leader in gamma ray astronomy before switching mid-career to the study of infrared astronomy, and he gave his award lecture on the latter subject, specifically on the Spitzer Space Telescope, one of the most successful infrared telescopes of all time.Artists rendering of the Spitzer space telescope. [NASA/JPL-Caltech]Spitzer has been operating for more than twelve years, and has resulted in over six thousand papers in refereed journals in that time. The telescope sits in an Earth-trailing orbit around the Sun, and is now farther from the Earth (1.4 AU) than the Earth is from the Sun. Fazio gave the audience a fascinating overview of the science done by Spitzer over more than a decade. One of the most productive areas of research for Spitzer is the study of exoplanets, which hadnt even been discovered when the Spitzer Telescope was first conceived. Spitzers high sensitivity and ability to observe exoplanets over

  10. AAS 227: Day 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 3 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Henry Norris Russell Lecture: Viewing the Universe with Infrared Eyes: The Spitzer Space Telescope (by Erika Nesvold)The Henry Norris Russell Award is the highest honor given by the AAS, for a lifetime of eminence in astronomy research. This years award went to Giovanni Fazio of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Fazio became a leader in gamma ray astronomy before switching mid-career to the study of infrared astronomy, and he gave his award lecture on the latter subject, specifically on the Spitzer Space Telescope, one of the most successful infrared telescopes of all time.Artists rendering of the Spitzer space telescope. [NASA/JPL-Caltech]Spitzer has been operating for more than twelve years, and has resulted in over six thousand papers in refereed journals in that time. The telescope sits in an Earth-trailing orbit around the Sun, and is now farther from the Earth (1.4 AU) than the Earth is from the Sun. Fazio gave the audience a fascinating overview of the science done by Spitzer over more than a decade. One of the most productive areas of research for Spitzer is the study of exoplanets, which hadnt even been discovered when the Spitzer Telescope was first conceived. Spitzers high sensitivity and ability to observe exoplanets over

  11. AAS 227: Day 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 2 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Plenary Session: Black Hole Physics with the Event Horizon Telescope (by Susanna Kohler)If anyone needed motivation to wake up early this morning, they got it in the form of Feryal Ozel (University of Arizona) enthralling us all with exciting pictures, videos, and words about black holes and the Event Horizon Telescope. Ozel spoke to a packed room (at 8:30am!) about where the project currently stands, and where its heading in the future.The EHT has pretty much the coolest goal ever: actually image the event horizons of black holes in our universe. The problem is that the largest black hole we can look at (Sgr A*, in the center of our galaxy) has an event horizon size of 50 as. For this kind of resolution roughly equivalent to trying to image a DVD on the Moon! wed need an Earth-sized telescope. EHT has solved this problem by linking telescopes around the world, creating one giant, mm-wavelength effective telescope with a baseline the size of Earth.Besides producing awesome images, the EHT will be able to test properties of black-hole spacetime, the no-hair theorem, and general relativity (GR) in new regimes.Ozel walked us through some of the theory prep work we need to do now in order to get the most science out of the EHT, including devising new

  12. Performance of Multiple Risk Assessment Tools to Predict Mortality for Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome with Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Therapy: An External Validation Study Based on Chinese Single-center Data

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lei; Li, Tong; Xu, Lei; Hu, Xiao-Min; Duan, Da-Wei; Li, Zhi-Bo; Gao, Xin-Jing; Li, Jun; Wu, Peng; Liu, Ying-Wu; Wang, Song; Lang, Yu-Heng

    2016-01-01

    Background: There has been no external validation of survival prediction models for severe adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) therapy in China. The aim of study was to compare the performance of multiple models recently developed for patients with ARDS undergoing ECMO based on Chinese single-center data. Methods: A retrospective case study was performed, including twenty-three severe ARDS patients who received ECMO from January 2009 to July 2015. The PRESERVE (Predicting death for severe ARDS on VV-ECMO), ECMOnet, Respiratory Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Survival Prediction (RESP) score, a center-specific model developed for inter-hospital transfers receiving ECMO, and the classical risk-prediction scores of Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) were calculated. In-hospital and six-month mortality were regarded as the endpoints and model performance was evaluated by comparing the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results: The RESP and APACHE II scores showed excellent discriminate performance in predicting survival with AUC of 0.835 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.659–1.010, P = 0.007) and 0.762 (95% CI, 0.558–0.965, P = 0.035), respectively. The optimal cutoff values were risk class 3.5 for RESP and 35.5 for APACHE II score, and both showed 70.0% sensitivity and 84.6% specificity. The excellent performance of these models was also evident for the pneumonia etiological subgroup, for which the SOFA score was also shown to be predictive, with an AUC of 0.790 (95% CI, 0.571–1.009, P = 0.038). However, the ECMOnet and the score developed for externally retrieved ECMO patients failed to demonstrate significant discriminate power for the overall cohort. The PRESERVE model was unable to be evaluated fully since only one patient died six months postdischarge. Conclusions: The RESP, APCHAE II, and SOFA scorings

  13. Accuracy of Functional and Predictive Methods to Calculate the Hip Joint Center in Young Non-pathologic Asymptomatic Adults with Dual Fluoroscopy as a Reference Standard.

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, Niccolo M; Kutschke, Michael J; Atkins, Penny R; Foreman, K Bo; Kapron, Ashley L; Anderson, Andrew E

    2016-07-01

    Predictions from biomechanical models of gait may be sensitive to joint center locations. Most often, the hip joint center (HJC) is derived from locations of reflective markers adhered to the skin. Here, predictive techniques use regression equations of pelvic anatomy to estimate the HJC, whereas functional methods track motion of markers placed at the pelvis and femur during a coordinated motion. Skin motion artifact may introduce errors in the estimate of HJC for both techniques. Quantifying the accuracy of these methods is an area of open investigation. In this study, we used dual fluoroscopy (DF) (a dynamic X-ray imaging technique) and three-dimensional reconstructions from computed tomography images, to measure HJC locations in vivo. Using dual fluoroscopy as the reference standard, we then assessed the accuracy of three predictive and two functional methods. Eleven non-pathologic subjects were imaged with DF and reflective skin marker motion capture. Additionally, DF-based solutions generated virtual markers placed on bony landmarks, which were input to the predictive and functional methods to determine if estimates of the HJC improved. Using skin markers, functional methods had better mean agreement with the HJC measured by DF (11.0 ± 3.3 mm) than predictive methods (18.1 ± 9.5 mm); estimates from functional and predictive methods improved when using the DF-based solutions (1.3 ± 0.9 and 17.5 ± 8.6 mm, respectively). The Harrington method was the best predictive technique using both skin markers (13.2 ± 6.5 mm) and DF-based solutions (10.6 ± 2.5 mm). The two functional methods had similar accuracy using skin makers (11.1 ± 3.6 and 10.8 ± 3.2 mm) and DF-based solutions (1.2 ± 0.8 and 1.4 ± 1.0 mm). Overall, functional methods were superior to predictive methods for HJC estimation. However, the improvements observed when using the DF-based solutions suggest that skin motion artifact is a large source of error for the

  14. Relationship Dynamics and Sexual Risk Reduction Strategies Among Heterosexual Young Adults: A Qualitative Study of Sexually Transmitted Infection Clinic Attendees at an Urban Chicago Health Center.

    PubMed

    Hotton, Anna L; French, Audrey L; Hosek, Sybil G; Kendrick, Sabrina R; Lemos, Diana; Brothers, Jennifer; Kincaid, Stacey L; Mehta, Supriya D

    2015-12-01

    Few studies have examined risk-reduction alternatives to consistent condom use for HIV prevention among heterosexual young adults. We used qualitative methodology to explore risk reduction strategies and contextual factors influencing attempts to reduce risk in an urban, high morbidity sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinic. Focus groups were conducted October-December 2014 with heterosexually identified men (n = 13) and women (n = 20) aged 18-29 seeking STI screening at an urban clinic. Groups were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed for thematic content using Atlas.ti software. Quantitative information included sociodemographics, HIV/STI testing history, and 6-month sexual behaviors. Among 33 predominantly African-American participants with a median age of 22, risk-reduction strategies included monogamy agreements, selective condom use with casual and high-risk partners, and frequent HIV/STI testing, though testing was commonly used as a post-hoc reassurance after risk exposure. Many men and women used implicit risk assessment strategies due to mistrust or difficulty communicating. Concurrency was common but rarely discussed within partnerships. Despite attempts to reduce risk, monogamy agreements were often poorly adhered to and not openly discussed. Alcohol and substance use frequently interfered with safer sexual decisions. Participants were aware of HIV/STI risk and commonly practiced risk-reduction strategies, but acknowledged faulty assumptions and poor adherence. This work provides insights into risk-reduction approaches that are already used and may be strengthened as part of effective HIV/STI prevention interventions. PMID:26588197

  15. Higher Serum Ferritin Levels Correlate with an Increased Risk of Cutaneous Morbidity in Adult Patients with β-Thalassemia: A Single-Center Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Skandalis, Konstantinos; Vlachos, Christoforos; Pliakou, Xanthi; Gaitanis, Georgios; Kapsali, Eleni; Bassukas, Ioannis D

    2016-01-01

    Disturbed iron homeostasis characterizes β-thalassemia and increases its morbidity. Our aim was to retrospectively associate β-thalassemia disease characteristics with treatment-requiring skin conditions. The files of adult β-thalassemia (including sickle β-thalassemia) patients were screened over a 10-year period for treatment-requiring skin disease episodes and their correlation with hematologic diagnoses and epidemiological and serological characteristics. Seventy-eight patients were identified, and 7 (9%) developed at least one relevant episode including cutaneous small-vessel vasculitis (CSVV), urticaria, and leg ulcers. Average ferritin serum level correlated significantly with development of a dermatosis (2,034 ± 799 μg/l in cases vs. 920 ± 907 μg/l in the overall population; p = 0.001, ANOVA). This difference relied exclusively on the high ferritin levels observed in patients with 'generalized' dermatoses (urticaria and CSVV: 3,860 ± 1,220 μg/l) as opposed to values within the normal range in the case of 'localized' ones (leg ulcers: 662 ± 167 μg/l). The employed iron chelation treatment influenced ferritin levels (p = 0.002, Kruskal-Wallis test) since chelation with a single agent seems to increase the risk of a skin disease (p = 0.013, likelihood ratio method). Conclusively, serum ferritin can be evaluated as risk factor for generalized dermatoses, but not for leg ulcers, in patients with the β-thalassemia genotype. This risk can be efficiently controlled with adequate chelation. PMID:26509267

  16. One Year of Preschool or Two – Is It Important for Adult Outcomes? Results from the Chicago Longitudinal Study of the Child-Parent Centers

    PubMed Central

    Arteaga, Irma; Humpage, Sarah; Reynolds, Arthur J.; Temple, Judy A.

    2015-01-01

    Until the last year, public funding for preschool education had been growing rapidly over a decade with most state programs providing one year of preschool for four year olds. Fewer three year olds are enrolled in preschool. To investigate the importance of enrollment duration, this study is the first to estimate long-term dosage effects of years of preschool. We use data from a cohort of 1,500 students in the Chicago Longitudinal Study who enrolled in the Chicago Public Schools in the mid-1980s. Many of these students participated in a high-quality preschool program called Child-Parent Centers (CPC) for one or two years. To address selection with multiple treatments, we employ inverse propensity score weighting. Relative to children who attended one year of CPC preschool, the two-year group is significantly less likely to receive special education or be abused or neglected or to commit crimes. The findings provide support for the long-term benefits of greater exposure to preschool. PMID:26823640

  17. NASA (Career Day)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    The presentation was developed for speakers to user for outreach. It provides information about Kennedy Space Center programs, launch services, the International Space Station, and the technological challenges of life in space.

  18. Popular Chat Day Q & A

    MedlinePlus

    ... Day / Popular Chat Day Q & A Popular Chat Day Q & A Print Read students’ most popular questions ... Cool Order Free Materials National Drugs & Alcohol Chat Day Chat Day Participant FAQs Popular Chat Day Q & ...

  19. A Focus on Literacy in Home Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cress, Susan W.

    Although about 15 percent of young children are cared for in a home day care setting, there is little information available on literacy experiences provided for children in home day care. This study examined literacy environments in home day care centers in St. Joseph County, Indiana. Sixty-one family day care providers responded to a mail survey…

  20. My Lucky Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olvey, Maura

    2010-01-01

    Teaching based on problem solving brings challenges for the teacher, primarily that of finding problems with multiple access points that accommodate all students. This article narrates the author's lucky day as she discovers the Four fours problem which impacted her passion for teaching math. The day she presented the Four fours problem to her…