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Sample records for adult diabetes patients

  1. [Diabetes education in adult diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Weitgasser, Raimund; Clodi, Martin; Kacerovsky-Bielesz, Gertrud; Grafinger, Peter; Lechleitner, Monika; Howorka, Kinga; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2012-12-01

    Diabetes education has gained a critical role in diabetes care. The empowerment of patients aims to actively influence the course of the disease by self-monitoring and treatment modification. Diabetes education has to be made accessible for all patients with the disease. To be able to provide a structured and validated education program adequate personal as well as space, organizational and financial background are required. Besides an increase in knowledge about the disease it has been shown that structured diabetes education is able to improve diabetes outcome measured by parameters like blood glucose, HbA1c, blood pressure and body weight in follow-up evaluations.

  2. [Diabetes education in adult diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Weitgasser, Raimund; Clodi, Martin; Cvach, Sarah; Grafinger, Peter; Lechleitner, Monika; Howorka, Kinga; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes education and self management has gained a critical role in diabetes care. Patient empowerment aims to actively influence the course of the disease by self-monitoring and treatment modification, as well as integration of diabetes in patients' daily life to achieve changes in lifestyle accordingly.Diabetes education has to be made accessible for all patients with the disease. To be able to provide a structured and validated education program adequate personal as well as space, organizational and financial background are required. Besides an increase in knowledge about the disease it has been shown that structured diabetes education is able to improve diabetes outcome measured by parameters like blood glucose, HbA1c, blood pressure and body weight in follow-up evaluations. Modern education programs emphasize the ability of patients to integrate diabetes in everyday life and stress physical activity besides healthy eating as a main component of lifestyle therapy and use interactive methods in order to increase the acceptance of personal responsibility.

  3. Common reasons for hospitalization among adult patients with diabetes in a private medical college in Kathmandu.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, P; Pathak, U N; Subedi, N

    2012-12-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is one of the important non communicable disease affecting the adult populations around the world. Incidence of diabetes increasing in South Asia. Nepal is also experiencing increasing in diabetes disease burden. Diabetes mellitus is one of the important causes of hospital admission in the western world. In this study we evaluated the causes of hospital admission amongst diabetic population. Most common cause is of diagnosis is some forms of infections commonest (20%) being urinary tract infections. Ten out of total 69 patients had septicemia. Six patients out of 69 had sputum positive pulmonary tuberculosis only one patient presented with metabolic complications of diabetes i.e. diabetic ketoacidosis. Coronary artery disease with heart failure was present in 14 patients. Five patients had diabetic nephropathy and 3 had retinopathy. This shows that infections is the major cause of hospital admission for diabetics followed by heart failure. Tuberculosis is important diagnosis in person with diabetes. This study shows more female patients get admitted and amongst admitted patents glycemic control is poor. This signify that women had more complications than male counter parts. PMID:24579542

  4. Screening for coeliac disease in adult patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: myths, facts and controversy.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Sjoerd F; Tushuizen, Maarten E; von Blomberg, Boudewina M E; Bontkes, Hetty J; Mulder, Chris J; Simsek, Suat

    2016-01-01

    This review aims at summarizing the present knowledge on the clinical consequences of concomitant coeliac disease (CD) in adult patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The cause of the increased prevalence of CD in T1DM patients is a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Current screening guidelines for CD in adult T1DM patients are not uniform. Based on the current evidence of effects of CD on bone mineral density, diabetic complications, quality of life, morbidity and mortality in patients with T1DM, we advise periodic screening for CD in adult T1DM patients to prevent delay in CD diagnosis and subsequent CD and/or T1DM related complications. PMID:27478507

  5. A latent autoimmune diabetes in adults patient manifesting severe musculoskeletal complications.

    PubMed

    Yang, In-Ho; Lee, Sun Hee; Chin, Sang Ouk; Chon, Suk

    2014-11-01

    Patients with diabetes have many different kinds of complications involving multiple organs, but those involving the musculoskeletal system are relatively uncommon. Diabetic muscle infarction (DMI) is a rare, painful, and potentially serious condition in patients with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus. A 35-year-old man diagnosed with type 2 diabetes eight years ago, visited with severe muscle pain in the right anteromedial thigh without any event of trauma. He had been treated with metformin, but his glycemic control was very poor with a glycated hemoglobin of 14.5%. Evaluation of his painful thigh lesion did not reveal any evidence of infection or vasculitis, but the magnetic resonance imaging and bone scan showed findings of DMI at vastus medialis muscle and an insufficiency fracture at the right medial tibial condyle. He was diagnosed with retinopathy, neuropathy and microalbuminuria but not macrovascular complications. We also diagnosed his diabetes as latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) based on his low C-peptide level, positive anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibody and early onset diabetes. Instead of antibiotics, bed rest, analgesics and strict blood glucose control with multiple daily insulin injections led to symptom improvement. This is an unusual case of a young man with LADA experiencing severe musculoskeletal complication of DMI and insufficiency fracture. If a poorly controlled diabetic patient appears to have unaccounted soft tissue pain, musculoskeletal complications such as DMI associated with hyperglycemia should be considered.

  6. Acute post-disaster medical needs of patients with diabetes: emergency department use in New York City by diabetic adults after Hurricane Sandy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, David C; Gupta, Vibha K; Carr, Brendan G; Malik, Sidrah; Ferguson, Brandy; Wall, Stephen P; Smith, Silas W; Goldfrank, Lewis R

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the acute impact of disasters on diabetic patients, we performed a geospatial analysis of emergency department (ED) use by New York City diabetic adults in the week after Hurricane Sandy. Research design and methods Using an all-payer claims database, we retrospectively analyzed the demographics, insurance status, and medical comorbidities of post-disaster ED patients with diabetes who lived in the most geographically vulnerable areas. We compared the patterns of ED use among diabetic adults in the first week after Hurricane Sandy's landfall to utilization before the disaster in 2012. Results In the highest level evacuation zone in New York City, postdisaster increases in ED visits for a primary or secondary diagnosis of diabetes were attributable to a significantly higher proportion of Medicare patients. Emergency visits for a primary diagnosis of diabetes had an increased frequency of certain comorbidities, including hypertension, recent procedure, and chronic skin ulcers. Patients with a history of diabetes visited EDs in increased numbers after Hurricane Sandy for a primary diagnosis of myocardial infarction, prescription refills, drug dependence, dialysis, among other conditions. Conclusions We found that diabetic adults aged 65 years and older are especially at risk for requiring postdisaster emergency care compared to other vulnerable populations. Our findings also suggest that there is a need to support diabetic adults particularly in the week after a disaster by ensuring access to medications, aftercare for patients who had a recent procedure, and optimize their cardiovascular health to reduce the risk of heart attacks. PMID:27547418

  7. Screening adult tuberculosis patients for diabetes mellitus in Ebeye, Republic of the Marshall Islands.

    PubMed

    Nasa, J N; Brostrom, R; Ram, S; Kumar, A M V; Seremai, J; Hauma, M; Paul, I A; Langidrik, J R

    2014-06-21

    A retrospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate the screening of adult TB patients for diabetes (DM) using glycated haemoglobin (HbA1C) in Ebeye, Republic of the Marshall Islands. Of 62 patients registered between July 2010 and December 2012, 28 (45%) had DM. The only significant difference in baseline characteristics between those with and those without DM was higher age in those with DM. Two-month sputum smears and cultures were also not different between the two groups. Despite the limited sample size, this study shows that screening TB patients for DM in Ebeye is feasible and worthwhile and that it should be continued.

  8. Screening adult tuberculosis patients for diabetes mellitus in Ebeye, Republic of the Marshall Islands

    PubMed Central

    Brostrom, R.; Ram, S.; Kumar, A. M. V.; Seremai, J.; Hauma, M.; Paul, I. A.; Langidrik, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    A retrospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate the screening of adult TB patients for diabetes (DM) using glycated haemoglobin (HbA1C) in Ebeye, Republic of the Marshall Islands. Of 62 patients registered between July 2010 and December 2012, 28 (45%) had DM. The only significant difference in baseline characteristics between those with and those without DM was higher age in those with DM. Two-month sputum smears and cultures were also not different between the two groups. Despite the limited sample size, this study shows that screening TB patients for DM in Ebeye is feasible and worthwhile and that it should be continued. PMID:26477288

  9. [Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults].

    PubMed

    Maioli, M; Puddu, L; Pes, G M

    2006-01-01

    Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is a disorder with onset after age 30, insulin independence for at least 6 months after diagnosis, and the presence of circulating pancreatic islet autoantibodies. The prevalence of LADA varies substantially across ethnic groups and ranges approximately from 1% to 10% among patients with type 2 diabetes. In this review we discuss the nomenclature, diagnostic criteria, immunologic and genetic markers, metabolic alterations and therapy of this form of diabetes.

  10. Patient perspectives on peer support for adults with type 1 diabetes: a need for diabetes-specific social capital

    PubMed Central

    Joensen, Lene E; Filges, Tine; Willaing, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Aim To explore the function of peer support from the perspective of adults with type 1 diabetes in Denmark. Methods The study population consisted of 20 adults with type 1 diabetes. The sample was diverse in relation to educational background, age, sex, and cohabitation status. Inspired by action research, several methods and perspectives on peer support were explored and tested. Workshops and group and individual interviews were performed. Systematic text condensation was used to analyze data, supplemented with theory-based interpretive analysis. Results Adults with type 1 diabetes found peer support highly relevant to reduce a burdensome feeling of diabetes-specific loneliness. Peer support showed potential to create diabetes-specific social capital not only by creating reciprocal social support between peers but also, more importantly, by creating space for genuine trust and a feeling of communality. There was a widespread feeling of the pervasive impact of diabetes on daily life and thus the relevance of discussing all aspects of life. However, participants perceived peer support as particularly relevant in relation to big changes in life, for example, in family life, at work, or through treatment events such as getting an insulin pump. Conclusion Peer support programs focusing on creating and establishing diabetes-specific social capital using participatory approaches seem highly relevant among adults with type 1 diabetes. Content, methods, and effects of peer support need further exploration in collaboration with adults with type 1 diabetes. PMID:27536076

  11. Socioeconomic status and glycemic control in adult patients with type 2 diabetes: a mediation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Houle, Janie; Lauzier-Jobin, François; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Meunier, Sophie; Coulombe, Simon; Côté, José; Lespérance, François; Chiasson, Jean-Louis; Bherer, Louis; Lambert, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to examine the contribution of health behaviors (self-management and coping), quality of care, and individual characteristics (depressive symptoms, self-efficacy, illness representations) as mediators in the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and glycemic control. Methods A sample of 295 adult patients with type 2 diabetes was recruited at the end of a diabetes education course. Glycemic control was evaluated through glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Living in poverty and education level were used as indicators of SES. Results Bootstrapping analysis showed that the significant effects of poverty and education level on HbA1c were mediated by avoidance coping and depressive symptoms. The representation that diabetes is unpredictable significantly mediated the relationship between living in poverty and HbA1c, while healthy diet mediated the relationship between education level and HbA1c. Conclusions To improve glycemic control among patients with low SES, professionals should regularly screen for depression, offering treatment when needed, and pay attention to patients' illness representations and coping strategies for handling stress related to their chronic disease. They should also support patients in improving their self-management skills for a healthy diet. PMID:27239316

  12. Frequency of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults in Asian patients diagnosed as type 2 diabetes in Birmingham, United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Tica, Valeria; Hanif, M Wasim; Andersson, Annika; Valsamakis, G; Barnett, A H; Kumar, Sudesh; Sanjeevi, C B

    2003-11-01

    The aims of our study were to measure autoantibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase and autoantibodies to protein tyrosine phosphatase in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, patients with impaired glucose tolerance, and healthy controls of Asian origin from Birmingham, United Kingdom. According to our findings, 27% (9/33) of patients initially diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus carry autoantibodies to GAD65.

  13. The effect of genetic counseling for adult offspring of patients with type 2 diabetes on attitudes toward diabetes and its heredity: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Nishigaki, M; Tokunaga-Nakawatase, Y; Nishida, J; Kazuma, K

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of diabetes genetic counseling on attitudes toward diabetes and its heredity in relatives of type 2 diabetes patients. This study was an unmasked, randomized controlled trial at a medical check-up center in Japan. Subjects in this study are healthy adults between 30 and 60 years of age who have a family history of type 2 diabetes in their first degree relatives. Participants in the intervention group received a brief genetic counseling session for approximately 10 min. Genetic counseling was structured based on the Health Belief Model. Both intervention and control groups received a booklet for general diabetes prevention. Risk perception and recognition of diabetes, and attitude towards its prevention were measured at baseline, 1 week and 1 year after genetic counseling. Participants who received genetic counseling showed significantly higher recognition about their sense of control over diabetes onset than control group both at 1 week and 1 year after the session. On the other hand, anxiety about diabetes did not change significantly. The findings show that genetic counseling for diabetes at a medical check center helped adults with diabetes family history understand they are able to exert control over the onset of their disease through lifestyle modification.

  14. Sarcopenia, Frailty, and Diabetes in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Populations are aging and the prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing tremendously. The number of older people with diabetes is increasing unexpectedly. Aging and diabetes are both risk factors for functional disability. Thus, increasing numbers of frail or disabled older patients with diabetes will increase both direct and indirect health-related costs. Diabetes has been reported as an important risk factor of developing physical disability in older adults. Older people with diabetes have lower muscle mass and weaker muscle strength. In addition, muscle quality is poorer in diabetic patients. Sarcopenia and frailty have a common soil and may share a similar pathway for multiple pathologic processes in older people. Sarcopenia is thought to be an intermediate step in the development of frailty in patients with diabetes. Thus, early detection of sarcopenia and frailty in older adults with diabetes should be routine clinical practice to prevent frailty or to intervene earlier in frail patients. PMID:27098509

  15. Identification of Risk Factors Affecting Impaired Fasting Glucose and Diabetes in Adult Patients from Northeast China

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yutian; Han, Weiqing; Wang, Yuhan; Zhang, Yue; Wu, Shili; Zhang, Huiping; Jiang, Lingling; Wang, Rui; Zhang, Peng; Yu, Yaqin; Li, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Besides genetic factors, the occurrence of diabetes is influenced by lifestyles and environmental factors as well as trace elements in diet materials. Subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) have an increased risk of developing diabetes mellitus (DM). This study aimed to explore risk factors affecting IFG and diabetes in patients from Northeast China. Methods: A population-based, cross-sectional survey of chronic diseases and related risk factors was conducted in Jilin Province of Northeast China. All adult residents, aged 18–79, were invited to participate in this survey using the method of multistage stratified random cluster sampling. One hundred thirty-four patients with IFG or DM and 391 healthy control subjects were recruited. We compared demographic factors, body size measurements, healthy-related behaviors, and hair metallic element contents between IFG/diabetes patients and healthy individuals. Results: IFG/diabetes patients had a greater weight, waist, hip, and body mass index (BMI) than control subjects. Significant differences in the content of zinc (Zn), potassium (K), copper (Ca), and sodium (Na) as well as Cu/Zn ratios between IFG or DM patients and control subjects (p < 0.05) were also observed. Hair Cu, selenium (Se), and Na contents were positively correlated with blood glucose levels (Cu: rs = 0.135, p = 0.002; Se: rs = 0.110, p = 0.012; Na: rs = 0.091, p = 0.038). Polytomous logistic regression adjusting for age, sex, family history of diabetes and BMI, showed that subjects with high BMI were more likely to develop IFG and DM (IFG: OR = 1.15, OR 95% CI = 1.02–1.29; DM: OR = 1.15, OR 95% CI = 1.01–1.33). Moreover, rarely or never eating fruits was a risk factor for DM (OR = 5.46, OR 95% CI = 1.87–15.98) but not for IFG (OR = 1.70, OR 95% CI = 0.72–4.02). Subjects with abdominal obesity or DM history were more susceptible to DM (abdominal obesity: OR = 2.99, OR 95% CI = 1.07–8.37; DM history: OR = 2.69, OR 95% CI = 1

  16. Relationship of tooth mortality and implant treatment in Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in Korean adults

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hyun-Yub; Kim, Yong-Gun; Jin, Myoung-Uk

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to to analyze the effect of Type 2 diabetes on tooth mortality, implant treatment and prosthetic status. MATERIALS AND METHODS 275 Type 2 diabetics and 300 non-diabetics, aged 40-80 years were selected for analysis. The assessment of number of teeth, missing teeth, fixed prostheses (bridge pontics), implants using panoramic radiographs and dental records were carried out. RESULTS Diabetes mellitus (DM) patients had a higher number of missing teeth (P<.05) and placed implants (P=.074), age (P<.05), male gender percentage (P=.042), smoker percentage (P<.05) than non-DM patients. In univariate analysis, the patients in older group showed significantly higher number of tooth loss rate at the first dental examination than the patients in younger group. Tooth loss rate of smokers did not show higher value than that of non-smokers. When multiple variables including DM, age, smoking, gender were considered together, diabetics and older group patients showed significantly higher tooth loss rate at the first dental examination than non-diabetics and younger group patients, respectively. Smokers and male group did not show a significant difference than non-smokers and female group, respectively. CONCLUSION Tooth mortality and implant treatment rate were significantly higher in the DM group as indicated by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Old age groups showed significantly higher odds ratios and tooth loss rate. As diabetics showed the higher tooth loss rate than non-diabetics, diabetics also had more implant restorations than non-diabetics. PMID:23508020

  17. A Qualitative Study of Confusing Experiences among Japanese Adult Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nishio, Ikuko; Chujo, Masami; Kataoka, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background In this study, we investigated the powerlessness of patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D), and described the structure of powerlessness that these individuals experienced. In order for patients to recover from this state, we recommend that they take steps to regain their power. Methods Fifteen Japanese adults with T1D participated in this study. Data were collected from all subjects between July 2013 and March 2014 via in-depth semi-structured interviews. Qualitative data analysis was conducted according to a grounded theory approach. Finally, the core category was identified, which allowed us to build a new powerlessness structure for T1D. Results The results suggested a core category, ‘Wandering a tangled path,’ comprising four categories, eight subcategories, and twenty-six concepts. These four categories were as follows: ‘being burdened by T1D,’ ‘suffering from insulin-related troubles,’ ‘being unable to cope with difficulties in self-management,’ and ‘facing social prejudice.’ In the state of powerlessness, negative emotional experiences snowballed, with patients feeling more and more depressed until they ultimately reached ‘rock bottom.’ Conclusion We found that as negative emotional experiences related to powerlessness increased, negative feelings intensified until the patients reached rock bottom. Powerlessness is like ‘wandering a tangled path,’ a state in which T1D patients struggle to cope with reality on their own when faced with both internal and external events. ‘Wandering a tangled path’ is at the core of powerlessness. A primary characteristic of the structure of powerlessness is suffering from confusing experiences. To help patients cope with T1D without being crushed by powerlessness, nurses must pay attention to signs of powerlessness. Powerlessness is not just an emotional state, but a combination of feelings, perceptions, and thoughts; therefore, it is important to comprehensively understand patients

  18. Assessing long-term health and cost outcomes of patient-centered medical homes serving adults with poor diabetes control.

    PubMed

    Pagán, José A; Carlson, Erin K

    2013-10-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is an integrated primary care delivery model particularly suited for patients with poor diabetes control. Although PCMH models targeting adults with diabetes have shown some early success, little is known about the long-term benefits of medical homes in terms of health and cost outcomes. The performance of a PCMH model in adults with poor diabetes control was assessed using simulated controlled trial data obtained from the Archimedes model of disease progression and health care utilization. Using the Cardio-Metabolic Risk data set, we compared health and cost outcomes over a 20-year period between adults with poor diabetes control (HbA1c >9%) receiving standard care and these same adults receiving care under a PCMH model with a 49% HbA1c intervention improvement rate at a per-beneficiary per-month care management cost of $20 per month. The results suggest that the PCMH model has the potential to not only reduce the proportion of the population with bilateral blindness, foot amputations, and myocardial infarctions-and the mortality rate-but it can also do so in a cost-effective manner ($7898 per quality-adjusted life year). The PCMH model is cost saving for the population 50 to 64 years old and it is particularly cost-effective for men ($883 per quality-adjusted life year). Moreover, these effects are relatively large for adults 30 to 49 years old (lower bilateral blindness and death rates), women (lower foot amputation and death rates), and men (lower bilateral blindness and myocardial infarction rates). The PCMH model has potential long-term benefits to both patients with poor diabetes control as well as health care systems and providers willing to invest in this health care delivery approach. PMID:23799676

  19. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease in diabetic adult out-patients in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mpondo, Bonaventura C T; Neilson, Eric; Ernest, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Despite the increasing number of patients with Diabetes Mellitus in sub-Saharan Africa, the magnitude of chronic kidney disease among diabetics has not been well established. A study done by Janmohamed et al. found chronic kidney disease in 83.7 % of diabetics which is relatively higher than the prevalence reported elsewhere. However this study was conducted in schistosoma endemic area along the shores of Lake Victoria. Schistosomiasis has been reported to cause a range of renal diseases. Interpretation of these findings should therefore take into account the possibility of schistosomiasis as a possible confounder. PMID:27391318

  20. Word-stem priming and recognition in type 2 diabetes mellitus, Alzheimer's disease patients and healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    Redondo, María Teresa; Beltrán-Brotóns, José Luís; Reales, José Manuel; Ballesteros, Soledad

    2015-11-01

    The present study investigated (a) whether the pattern of performance on implicit and explicit memory of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) is more similar to those of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or to cognitively normal older adults and (b) whether glycosylated hemoglobin levels (a measure of glucose regulation) are related to performance on the two memory tasks, implicit word-stem completion and "old-new" recognition. The procedures of both memory tasks included encoding and memory test phases separated by a short delay. Three groups of participants (healthy older adults, DM2 patients and AD patients) completed medical and psychological assessments and performed both memory tasks on a computer. The results of the word-stem completion task showed similar implicit memory in the three groups. By contrast, explicit recognition of the three groups differed. Implicit memory was not affected by either normal or pathological aging, but explicit memory deteriorated in the two groups of patients, especially in AD patients, showing a severe impairment compared to the cognitively healthy older adults. Importantly, glycosylated hemoglobin levels were not related to performance on either implicit or explicit memory tasks. These findings revealed a clear dissociation between explicit and implicit memory tasks in normal and pathological aging. Neuropsychologists and clinicians working with TM2 patients should be aware that the decline of voluntary, long-term explicit memory could have a negative impact on their treatment management. By contrast, the intact implicit memory of the two clinical groups could be used in rehabilitation.

  1. Inflammatory Cytokine Profile Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Adult Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-Hermosillo, Aldo; Molina-Ayala, Mario; Ramírez-Rentería, Claudia; Vargas, Guadalupe; Gonzalez, Baldomero; Isibasi, Armando; Archundia-Riveros, Irma; Mendoza, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare the serum concentration of IL-6, IL-10, TNF, IL-8, resistin, and adiponectin in type 1 diabetic patients with and without metabolic syndrome and to determine the cut-off point of the estimated glucose disposal rate that accurately differentiated these groups. Design. We conducted a cross-sectional evaluation of all patients in our type 1 diabetes clinic from January 2012 to January 2013. Patients were considered to have metabolic syndrome when they fulfilled the joint statement criteria and were evaluated for clinical, biochemical, and immunological features. Methods. We determined serum IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF with flow cytometry and adiponectin and resistin concentrations with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in patients with and without metabolic syndrome. We also compared estimated glucose disposal rate between groups. Results. We tested 140 patients. Forty-four percent fulfilled the metabolic syndrome criteria (n = 61), 54% had central obesity, 30% had hypertriglyceridemia, 29% had hypoalphalipoproteinemia, and 19% had hypertension. We observed that resistin concentrations were higher in patients with MS. Conclusion. We found a high prevalence of MS in Mexican patients with T1D. The increased level of resistin may be related to the increased fat mass and could be involved in the development of insulin resistance. PMID:26273680

  2. Latent autoimmune diabetes of the adult: current knowledge and uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Laugesen, E; Østergaard, J A; Leslie, R D G

    2015-01-01

    Patients with adult-onset autoimmune diabetes have less Human Leucocyte Antigen (HLA)-associated genetic risk and fewer diabetes-associated autoantibodies compared with patients with childhood-onset Type 1 diabetes. Metabolic changes at diagnosis reflect a broad clinical phenotype ranging from diabetic ketoacidosis to mild non-insulin-requiring diabetes, also known as latent autoimmune diabetes of the adult (LADA). This latter phenotype is the most prevalent form of adult-onset autoimmune diabetes and probably the most prevalent form of autoimmune diabetes in general. Although LADA is associated with the same genetic and immunological features as childhood-onset Type 1 diabetes, it also shares some genetic features with Type 2 diabetes, which raises the question of genetic heterogeneity predisposing to this form of the disease. The potential value of screening patients with adult-onset diabetes for diabetes-associated autoantibodies to identify those with LADA is emphasized by their lack of clinically distinct features, their different natural history compared with Type 2 diabetes and their potential need for a dedicated management strategy. The fact that, in some studies, patients with LADA show worse glucose control than patients with Type 2 diabetes, highlights the need for further therapeutic studies. Challenges regarding classification, epidemiology, genetics, metabolism, immunology, clinical presentation and treatment of LADA were discussed at a 2014 workshop arranged by the Danish Diabetes Academy. The presentations and discussions are summarized in this review, which sets out the current ideas and controversies surrounding this form of diabetes. What’s new? Latent autoimmune diabetes of the adult (LADA) is an autoimmune diabetes defined by adult-onset, presence of diabetes associated autoantibodies, and no insulin treatment requirement for a period after diagnosis. Immunologically, glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 autoantibodies are by far the most

  3. Social consequences of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus are limited: a population-based comparison of young adult patients vs healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Ingberg, C M; Palmér, M; Aman, J; Larsson, S

    1996-08-01

    In a population-based study, the social situation of 91 young adult patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus (IDDM) since childhood was compared to that of an age- and sex-matched group of 189 healthy persons. Their mean age was 37.2 years, duration of diabetes 28.7 years and severe complications were present in 13 of the 91 patients. A nearly 10-fold increased mortality rate was found in diabetic patients, mainly due to diabetic nephropathy and trauma, including suicide. The employment rate was lower in diabetic patients (71% vs 85%, p < 0.05); the need for welfare benefits was greater (15% vs 3%, p < 0.01). These differences were mainly the consequence of diabetic late complications. Education, housing conditions, life style, civil state, alcohol and smoking habits were similar in both groups. Confidence in the future was slightly less in diabetic patients (p < 0.05). In conclusion, besides an increased mortality rate, the present study has shown no serious social consequences in adult Type 1 diabetic patients without severe late complications, as compared to matched controls. Our results indicate that IDDM affects social life only to a limited extent, in the absence of severe vascular complications.

  4. Vaccinations for Adults with Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    Vaccinations for Adults with Diabetes The table below shows which vaccinations you should have to protect your health if ... sure you and your healthcare provider keep your vaccinations up to date. Vaccine Do you need it? ...

  5. Barrier Factors to the Completion of Diabetes Education in Korean Diabetic Adult Patients: Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys 2007-2012

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Tae; Jung, Se Young; Oh, Seung-Min; Jeong, Su-Min; Choi, Yoon-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes is a disease with high social burdens and is expected to increase gradually. A long-term management is essential for the treatment of diabetes, requiring patient self-cares. Diabetes education is important for such self-cares, but it does not sufficiently take place. In addition, little studies have been conducted on the barriers to the completion of diabetes education. This study, thus, aimed to analyze the factors related to the completion of diabetes education and investigate its barriers. Methods Of 50,405 respondents to the fourth and fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a total of 3,820 were selected for the analysis, excluding those aged 29 or younger and those with missing values. The completion of diabetes education was set as a dependent variable and an analysis was made on the factors that affect the dependent variable. A multivariable logistic regression was employed for the analysis. Results Lower educational level was associated with less diabetes education, and the degree of diabetes education was lower in the group with male, the group that didn't have a family history or was not aware of a family history, the group that was not currently aware of diabetes and the group without a spouse. There was no difference in the completion of diabetes education by underlying diseases, family income level, age, residing area, economic activity status, insurance coverage, smoking, and drinking. Conclusion Diabetes education is of importance for the treatment and management of diabetes. Currently, however, diabetes education is not sufficiently carried out in Korea. The completion rate of diabetes education was low in male, patients without or not knowing a family history, patients who were not currently aware of their diabetes, patients without a spouse, and patients with low educational level. Therefore, encouraging these patients to take the education will be a more effective approach to increase the completion rate

  6. Word-stem priming and recognition in type 2 diabetes mellitus, Alzheimer's disease patients and healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    Redondo, María Teresa; Beltrán-Brotóns, José Luís; Reales, José Manuel; Ballesteros, Soledad

    2015-11-01

    The present study investigated (a) whether the pattern of performance on implicit and explicit memory of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) is more similar to those of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or to cognitively normal older adults and (b) whether glycosylated hemoglobin levels (a measure of glucose regulation) are related to performance on the two memory tasks, implicit word-stem completion and "old-new" recognition. The procedures of both memory tasks included encoding and memory test phases separated by a short delay. Three groups of participants (healthy older adults, DM2 patients and AD patients) completed medical and psychological assessments and performed both memory tasks on a computer. The results of the word-stem completion task showed similar implicit memory in the three groups. By contrast, explicit recognition of the three groups differed. Implicit memory was not affected by either normal or pathological aging, but explicit memory deteriorated in the two groups of patients, especially in AD patients, showing a severe impairment compared to the cognitively healthy older adults. Importantly, glycosylated hemoglobin levels were not related to performance on either implicit or explicit memory tasks. These findings revealed a clear dissociation between explicit and implicit memory tasks in normal and pathological aging. Neuropsychologists and clinicians working with TM2 patients should be aware that the decline of voluntary, long-term explicit memory could have a negative impact on their treatment management. By contrast, the intact implicit memory of the two clinical groups could be used in rehabilitation. PMID:26253308

  7. One-year adherence to oral antihyperglycemic medication and risk prediction of patient outcomes for adults with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Carola A.; Rapold, Roland; Brüngger, Beat; Reich, Oliver; Rosemann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Medication adherence is essential in preventing adverse intermediate outcomes, but little is known on hard outcomes. The aims of this study were to determine the 1-year adherence to oral antihyperglycemic drugs (OADs) and to predict the risk of subsequent health outcomes among (non)adherent patients with diabetes. Using a large Swiss healthcare claims database from 2011 to 2014, we identified all patients aged ≥18 years with diabetes and treated with at least 1 OAD prescription. Adherence to OADs was measured as the proportion of days covered (PDC) over 1 year and subdivided into 2 categories: adherent (PDC ≥ 80%), nonadherent (PDC < 80%). We estimated the relative risk of hospitalization and mortality at follow-up using multivariate Cox proportional hazard models. Based on a sample of 26,713 patients, adherence to OADs was quite low: 42% of the patients achieved a PDC of ≥80% during the 1-year observation period. A 7% reduction in the hospitalization risk and a 10% reduction in the risk of mortality could be observed in adherent patients compared to nonadherent patients (hazard ratio [HR], 0.93 [95% CI, 0.89–0.97]; HR, 0.90 [95% CI, 0.82–0.99]). Subgroup analysis showed that an intensified diabetes therapy had no significant influence on the risk of both outcomes in adherent patients. Poor medication adherence increases the risk of subsequent hospitalizations and premature mortality in patient with diabetes, regardless of disease severity and comorbidities. This emphasizes the need for an earlier identification of patients with poor medication adherence. The awareness of physicians and patients regarding the importance of adherence in diabetes treatment should be increased. PMID:27368004

  8. Psychological Conditions in Adults With Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, Mary; Golden, Sherita Hill; Wagner, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 (T1D) and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) represent a demanding set of biopsychosocial challenges for patients and their families, whether the age of disease onset occurs in childhood, adolescence, or adulthood. Psychological conditions, defined as syndromes, disorders, and diabetes-specific psychological issues affect a larger proportion of individuals with T1D and T2D compared to the general population. In this review, we summarize the prevalence, impact and psychological treatments associated with the primary categories of psychological conditions that affect adults with T1D and T2D: depressive symptoms and syndromes, anxiety disorders, eating behaviors and disorders and serious mental illness. The implications of the literature for psychologists are discussed, and priorities for future research to advance the science of psychological conditions for adults with T1D and T2D are identified. PMID:27690484

  9. [Analysis of characteristics of using traditional Chinese and western medicine on type 1 diabetes adult patients based on electronic medical records].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Hong; Xie, Yan-Ming; Yang, Wei; Wang, Yong-Yan; Yi, Dan-Hui; Zhuang, Yan

    2014-09-01

    To understand the kinds and the characteristics of combination of traditional Chinese medicines and western medicines using on adults with type 1 diabetes in general hospitals,This research brings into 4 602 hospitalized adult patients with type 1 diabetes from hospital information system (HIS) of 13 third class A hospitals. These research objects were hospitalized in December 2003-July 2011. The research analyzes the operating frequency and associated usage of western medicines and traditional Chinese medicines by the method of frequency statistics and association rules. Through the analysis, the research says that in the clinical treatment of adult patients with type 1 diabetes, the western medicine used most frequently is insulin, a total of 1 539 cases, accounted for 8.47%; the traditional Chinese medicine used most frequently is oral agents of pseudo-ginseng, a total of 183 cases, accounting for 6.25%; the combinations of Chinese and western medicines commonly used include Huoxue Huayu Tongmai Shuluo decoction + vasodilator, support degree is 45.93%, followed by Huoxue Huayu Tongmai Shuluo decoction + vasodilator + hypoglycemic drugs, support degree is 45.50%; Huoxue Huayu Tongmai Shuluo decoction + vasodilator + nutritional agent, support degree is 36.29%.

  10. Treating young adults with type 2 diabetes or monogenic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Owen, Katharine R

    2016-06-01

    It is increasingly recognised that diabetes in young adults has a wide differential diagnosis. There are many monogenic causes, including monogenic beta-cell dysfunction, mitochondrial diabetes and severe insulin resistance. Type 2 diabetes in the young is becoming more prevalent, particularly after adolescence. It's important to understand the clinical features and diagnostic tools available to classify the different forms of young adult diabetes. Classic type 1 diabetes is characterised by positive β-cell antibodies and absence of endogenous insulin secretion. Young type 2 diabetes is accompanied by metabolic syndrome with obesity, hypertension and dyslipidaemia. Monogenic β-cell dysfunction is characterised by non-autoimmune, C-peptide positive diabetes with a strong family history, while mitochondrial diabetes features deafness and other neurological involvement. Severe insulin resistance involves a young-onset metabolic syndrome often with a disproportionately low BMI. A suspected diagnosis of monogenic diabetes is confirmed with genetic testing, which is widely available in specialist centres across the world. Treatment of young adult diabetes is similarly diverse. Mutations in the transcription factors HNF1A and HNF4A and in the β-cell potassium ATP channel components cause diabetes which responds to low dose and high dose sulfonylurea agents, respectively, while glucokinase mutations require no treatment. Monogenic insulin resistance and young-onset type 2 diabetes are both challenging to treat, but first line management involves insulin sensitisers and aggressive management of cardiovascular risk. Outcomes are poor in young-onset type 2 diabetes compared to both older onset type 2 and type 1 diabetes diagnosed at a similar age. The evidence base for treatments in monogenic and young-onset type 2 diabetes relies on studies of moderate quality at best and largely on extrapolation from work conducted in older type 2 diabetes subjects. Better quality

  11. Diabetic patients: Psychological aspects.

    PubMed

    Adili, Fatemeh; Larijani, Bagher; Haghighatpanah, Mohammadreza

    2006-11-01

    This study was undertaken to consider the psychological aspect of diabetes with regard to improving clinical outcomes. The review was limited to literature reports on the causes, solutions, and treatments of some common psychological problems known to complicate diabetes management. A literature search was undertaken using Pub-Med, CINAHL, Proquest, Elsevier, Blackwell Synergy, Ovid, Ebsco, Rose net, and Google websites, including studies published in English journals between 1995 and 2006. Therefore about 88 articles were selected based on the inclusion criteria. In earlier studies, relatively little empirical research was found to substantiate the effect of psychological counseling in complicated diabetes. The greatest deficits were seen in areas of mental health, self-esteem parent impact, and family cohesion. There were some different factors, which influence the psychological aspect of diabetic patients, such as age, gender, place of living, familial and social support, motivation, energy, life satisfaction, and lifestyle. There are various types of solutions for coping with the psychological problems in diabetic clients. The most essential solution lies in educating the patients and healthcare providers on the subject. Before initiating each educational intervention, a thorough assessment would be crucial. Treatment plans may benefit from cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), behavior family therapy, improving family communication, problem-solving skills, and providing motivation for diabetic patients. Moreover, it seems that the close collaboration between diabetologists and psychologists would be fruitful.

  12. [Treatment of elderly diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Rušavý, Zdeněk; Žourek, Michal

    2015-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes has become a pandemic disease over the past 50 years. Its incidence increases the most rapidly in the senior population, i.e. among people older than 65. In a number of countries 1/4 of the people with diabetes are now older than 65 years. Geriatrics now examines numerous differences regarding the senior patients, which often lead to somewhat different therapeutic procedures as compared to the treatment of other adult patients. This paper aims to show some different aspects of the treatment of an elderly patient with diabetes. The intensity of diabetes treatment in the elderly is mainly defined by the incidence of symptoms caused by diabetic decompensation which negatively affect quality of life and are likely to increase mortality. The treatment goals expressed by HbA1c, fasting and post-prandial glycemia, should be set individually based on age, initial HbA1c, present comorbidities and the level of frailty of an elderly patient. An effort to reduce weight regarding people at an older age is probably inappropriate and maybe even harmful, while physical activity reduces mortality and slows muscle catabolism at every age. Ideal is normal walking for 20-30 minutes a day. Except for "very fit elders" without renal insufficiency, the sulfonylurea treatment is unsuitable and perhaps even harmful. It significantly increases the incidence of different types of hypoglycemia and very likely overall mortality as well. The basis of diabetes treatment for the elderly is the effort to perform any regular exercise. In regard to medication treatment it is recommended to choose metformin or gliptin following the rule "start low, go slow", i.e. start with low medication doses and increase them at a slow pace. The main goal of the treatment is to maintain the good quality of life as long as possible, without symptoms associated with hyperglycemia with minimizing the risk of hypoglycemia development. PMID:25894262

  13. [Management of diabetes in elderly cardiac patients].

    PubMed

    Raccah, D

    2006-11-01

    In 1998, data from the Assurance Maladie (national health insurance) showed that 11.2% of people over 65 years old, and thus corresponding to the World Health Organisation's definition of being elderly, were diabetic. More recently the Entred trial, a national sample representative of diabetics, clarified the characteristics, the state of health and the medical management of diabetes in patients aged over 65 years. Among the randomly selected 10,000 adults in this study, 5350 subjects (54% of the Entred population) were over 65 years old. Other studies indicate that more than a million subjects aged over 65 years are diabetic and that 25% of diabetics are aged over 75 years. The growing proportion of elderly people in the French population, plus the improvement in the detection and the better management of diabetes are bound to contribute to a further increase in the prevalence of diabetes in elderly subjects.

  14. Family interventions to improve diabetes outcomes for adults

    PubMed Central

    Baig, Arshiya A.; Benitez, Amanda; Quinn, Michael T.; Burnet, Deborah L.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes self-care is a critical aspect of disease management for adults with diabetes. Since family members can play a vital role in a patient’s disease management, involving them in self-care interventions may positively influence patients’ diabetes outcomes. We systematically reviewed family-based interventions for adults with diabetes published from 1994 to 2014 and assessed their impact on patients’ diabetes outcomes and the extent of family involvement. We found 26 studies describing family-based diabetes interventions for adults. Interventions were conducted across a range of patient populations and settings. The degree of family involvement varied across studies. We found evidence for improvement in patients’ self-efficacy, perceived social support, diabetes knowledge, and diabetes self-care across the studies. Owing to the heterogeneity of the study designs, types of interventions, reporting of outcomes, and family involvement, it is difficult to determine how family participation in diabetes interventions may affect patients’ clinical outcomes. Future studies should clearly describe the role of family in the intervention, assess quality and extent of family participation, and compare patient outcomes with and without family involvement. PMID:26250784

  15. Comatose and noncomatose adult diabetic ketoacidosis patients at the University Teaching Hospital, Zambia: Clinical profiles, risk factors, and mortality outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kakusa, Mwanja; Kamanga, Brown; Ngalamika, Owen; Nyirenda, Soka

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is one of the commonly encountered diabetes mellitus emergencies. Aim: This study aimed at describing the clinical profiles and hospitalization outcomes of DKA patients at the University Teaching Hospital (UTH) in Lusaka, Zambia and to investigate the role of coma on mortality outcome. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional analytical study of hospitalized DKA patients at UTH. The data collected included clinical presentation, precipitating factors, laboratory profiles, complications, and hospitalization outcomes. Primary outcome measured was all-cause in-hospital mortality. Results: The median age was 40 years. Treatment noncompliance was the single highest identified risk factor for development of DKA, followed by new detection of diabetes, then infections. Comatose patients were significantly younger, had lower baseline blood pressure readings, and higher baseline respiratory rates compared to noncomatose patients. In addition, comatose patients had higher baseline admission random blood glucose readings. Their baseline sodium and chloride levels were also higher. The prevalences of hypokalemia, hypernatremia, and hyperchloremia were also higher among comatose patients compared to noncomatose patients. Development of aspiration during admission with DKA, pneumonia at baseline, development of renal failure, and altered mental status were associated with an increased risk of mortality. Development of renal failure was independently predictive of mortality. Conclusion: The mortality rate from DKA hospitalizations is high at UTH. Treatment noncompliance is the single highest identifiable precipitant of DKA. Aspiration, development of renal failure, altered sensorium, and pneumonia at baseline are associated with an increased risk of mortality. Development of renal failure during admission is predictive of mortality. PMID:27042416

  16. A systematic review of qualitative research on the contributory factors leading to medicine-related problems from the perspectives of adult patients with cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Al Hamid, A; Ghaleb, M; Aljadhey, H; Aslanpour, Z

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To synthesise contributing factors leading to medicine-related problems (MRPs) in adult patients with cardiovascular diseases and/or diabetes mellitus from their perspectives. Design A systematic literature review of qualitative studies regarding the contributory factors leading to MRPs, medication errors and non-adherence, followed by a thematic synthesis of the studies. Data sources We screened Pubmed, EMBASE, ISI Web of Knowledge, PsycInfo, International Pharmaceutical Abstract and PsycExtra for qualitative studies (interviews, focus groups and questionnaires of a qualitative nature). Review methods Thematic synthesis was achieved by coding and developing themes from the findings of qualitative studies. Results The synthesis yielded 21 studies that satisfied the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Three themes emerged that involved contributing factors to MRPs: patient-related factors including socioeconomic factors (beliefs, feeling victimised, history of the condition, lack of finance, lack of motivation and low self-esteem) and lifestyle factors (diet, lack of exercise/time to see the doctor, obesity, smoking and stress), medicine-related factors (belief in natural remedies, fear of medicine, lack of belief in medicines, lack of knowledge, non-adherence and polypharmacy) and condition-related factors (lack of knowledge/understanding, fear of condition and its complications, and lack of control). Conclusions MRPs represent a major health threat, especially among adult patients with cardiovascular diseases and/or diabetes mellitus. The patients’ perspectives uncovered hidden factors that could cause and/or contribute to MRPs in these groups of patients. PMID:25239295

  17. Knowledge of diabetes mellitus among diabetic and non-diabetic patients in Klinik Kesihatan Seremban.

    PubMed

    Ding, C H; Teng, C L; Koh, C N

    2006-10-01

    The Malaysian Ministry of Health has undertaken various campaigns on healthy lifestyle and health promotion over the years. The impact of these campaigns has been mixed and not well documented. This cross-sectional study evaluated the knowledge level of patients with and without diabetes in a large urban polyclinic using a 41-item questionnaire. One hundred and forty-nine adults (83 with diabetes, 66 without diabetes) participated in this study. Patients with diabetes had higher overall knowledge scores than those without diabetes (81.8% vs 64.0%, p < 0.001). While the overall knowledge of patients without diabetes appeared to be acceptable, several areas of knowledge deficiency were identified in this group--areas that should be filled by the on-going health promotion activities. PMID:17243515

  18. Motives for regular physical activity in women and men: a qualitative study in French adults with type 2 diabetes, belonging to a patients' association.

    PubMed

    Ferrand, Claude; Perrin, Claire; Nasarre, Sandra

    2008-09-01

    Patients' associations are an integral but often overlooked component of the French healthcare system dominated by the medical profession. Very few patients' associations exist to enable patients to self-manage into physical activity programmes. The aim of this qualitative study was to examine perceived motives for regular physical activity in male and female individuals, with type 2 diabetes involved in one French patients' association, called 'Move for Health'. Twenty-three adults (14 women and 9 men) with type 2 diabetes ranging in age from 35 to 78 volunteered to participate. The participants undertook regular physical activities autonomously with some medico-sporting educators' help. Results showed that participants reported intrinsic motives such as enjoyment, interest, fun, stimulation and highlighted gender differences. Female participants were more likely than male participants to emphasise the importance of emotional support obtained from the group meetings, and the pleasure of doing something together, and male participants emphasised the knowledge acquisition and skill development for disease control. Moreover, female participants indicated the importance of the sense of well-being and the positive body image related to regular physical activity, and male participants underlined the strength of the relationship between physical activity and health-promoting behaviours. This study provides insights into how gender motives are related to the interest and usefulness of physical activities in the management of diabetes. Findings lend support to the setting up of this type of patients' association in the French healthcare system and underline its contribution to self-determination and the behaviour change process in people with diabetes.

  19. [Nutrition for diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Schindler, Karin; Brix, Johanna; Dämon, Sabine; Hoppichler, Friedrich; Kruschitz, Renate; Toplak, Hermann; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Evidence demonstrates that medical diabetes treatment has to be accompanied by lifestyle modifications. Structured nutrition interventions and increased physical activity will help patients to normalise, respectively maintain their body weight. The main target of a diabetes therapy is aimed at achieving normal or nearly normal blood glucose levels. Reaching this goal may be facilitated by the following nutritional patterns: Using mainly carbohydrates from vegetables, whole grains, legumes and fruits, Restriction of mono- and disaccharides are often important factors in normalising body weight and blood glucose, Reduction of dietary fat could be indicated. However, the primary goal is the limitation of saturated fatty acids which to high percentage are consumed with animal products. There is not sufficient evidence to recommend a dietary protein consumption of more than 20% of energy intake. Individuals with diabetes should be aware of the importance of acquiring daily vitamin and mineral requirements. Natural food sources should be preferred. PMID:27052240

  20. Utility of the waist-to-height ratio, waist circumference and body mass index in the screening of metabolic syndrome in adult patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    -to-height ratio indexes are useful to predict the presence of metabolic syndrome in adult patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. PMID:24594198

  1. Hospitalisation Resulting from Medicine-Related Problems in Adult Patients with Cardiovascular Diseases and Diabetes in the United Kingdom and Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al Hamid, Abdullah; Aslanpour, Zoe; Aljadhey, Hisham; Ghaleb, Maisoon

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and diabetes (DM) are two interrelated conditions that have a heavy morbidity and mortality burden worldwide. Patients with the two conditions usually take multiple medicines and thus are more susceptible to medicine-related problems (MRPs). MRPs can occur at any stage of the treatment process and in many cases can lead to unplanned hospitalisations. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of hospitalisation resulting from MRPs in adult patients with CVDs and/or DM and to identify the main causes, risk factors, and medicine classes involved. A retrospective study included 300 adult patients from two hospitals, one in the United Kingdom and one in Saudi Arabia. To identify MRPs, medical records were reviewed for demographic data, clinical data, laboratory assay, and prescription records. A total of 197 (65.7%) patients had MRPs, of which less than 10% were severe. The main problems were lack of treatment effectiveness and adverse drug reactions. Moreover, polypharmacy and patient non-adherence were the main risk factors contributing to MRPs. The main medicine classes associated with MRPs were insulin and antihypertensive medicines. Further research should address the pharmaceutical care processes employed in treating CVDs and DM, and to empower patients/healthcare providers in tackling MRPs. PMID:27171100

  2. Adult Stem Cells and Diabetes Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ilgun, Handenur; Kim, Joseph William; Luo, LuGuang

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization estimates that diabetes will be the fourth most prevalent disease by 2050. Developing a new therapy for diabetes is a challenge for researchers and clinicians in field. Many medications are being used for treatment of diabetes however with no conclusive and effective results therefore alternative therapies are required. Stem cell therapy is a promising tool for diabetes therapy, and it has involved embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells, and pluripotent stem cells. In this review, we focus on adult stem cells, especial human bone marrow stem cells (BM) for diabetes therapy, its history, and current development. We discuss prospects for future diabetes therapy such as induced pluripotent stem cells which have popularity in stem cell research area. PMID:27123495

  3. A psychometric evaluation of adult patients with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus: prevalence of psychological dysfunction and relationship to demographic variables, metabolic control and complications.

    PubMed

    Winocour, P H; Main, C J; Medlicott, G; Anderson, D C

    1990-08-01

    The relationship between psychosocial traits and glycaemic control and complications was examined in 130 adults (83 men, 47 women) with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Abnormal depression ratings were observed in more women (19.1%) than men (12.0%), p less than 0.01, whilst obsessive symptoms were recorded more frequently in men (41.0 v 21.3%, p less than 0.01). Abnormal anxiety ratings were present in roughly 8-13% of men and women, although a notably low feeling of insecurity rating was observed more frequently in men (56.5%) than in women (38.3% of cases), p less than 0.05. Psychological scores were related to age, employment status and social class, but not to duration of diabetes or glycaemic control. The anxiety, depression and obsessive ratings correlated with one another (rs range 0.24-0.62, all p less than 0.001). Higher anxiety and depression ratings or overt psychological dysfunction was recorded in patients with neuropathic symptoms and signs, impotence, macrovascular disease or proliferative retinopathy. It is concluded that the presence of diabetic complications and adverse social circumstances are more relevant to psychological status than glycaemic control. PMID:2132190

  4. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in type 2 diabetes among Hispanic adults.

    PubMed

    Watson, Amanda L; Hu, Jie; Chiu, Norman H L

    2015-05-01

    In this pilot study, we explore the genetic variation that may relate to type 2 diabetes (T2D) among Hispanic adults. The genotypes of 36 Hispanic adults were analyzed by using the Cardio-Metabochip. The goal is to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated to T2D among Hispanic adults. A total of 26 SNPs were identified to be associated with T2D among Hispanic adults. None of these SNPs have been reported for T2D. By using the principle components analysis to analyze the genotype of 26 SNPs in 36 samples, the samples obtained from diabetic patients could be distinguished from the control samples. The findings support genetic involvement in T2D among Hispanic adults.

  5. Rheumatic manifestations in diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Serban, AL; Udrea, GF

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM), a worldwide high prevalence disease, is associated with a large variety of rheumatic manifestations. For most of these affections, pathophysiologic correlations are not well established. Some of them, such as diabetic cheiroarthropathy, neuropathic arthritis, diabetic amyotrophy, diabetic muscle infraction, are considered intrinsic complications of DM. For others, like diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis or reflex sympathetic dystrophy, DM is considered a predisposing condition. In most cases, these affections cause pain and disability, affecting the quality of life of diabetic patients, but once correctly diagnosed, they often respond to the treatment, that generally requires a multidisciplinary team. This article reviews some epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of these conditions. PMID:23049626

  6. Heart Health Tests for Diabetes Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tools & Resources Stroke More Heart Health Tests for Diabetes Patients Updated:Dec 3,2015 If you have ... angiograms . This content was last reviewed August 2015. Diabetes • Home • About Diabetes • Why Diabetes Matters • Understand Your ...

  7. Should There be Concern About Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults? Current Evidence and Controversies.

    PubMed

    Østergaard, Jakob Appel; Laugesen, Esben; Leslie, R David

    2016-09-01

    Autoimmune diabetes has a heterogeneous phenotype. Although often considered a condition starting in childhood, a substantial proportion of type 1 diabetes presents in adult life. This holds important implications for our understanding of the factors that modify the rate of progression through the disease prodrome to clinical diabetes and for our management of the disease. When autoimmune diabetes develops in adulthood, insulin treatment is often not required at the time of diagnosis, and this autoimmune non-insulin requiring diabetes is generally termed latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA). Patients with LADA are generally leaner, younger at diabetes onset; have a greater reduction in C-peptide; and have a greater likelihood of insulin treatment as compared with patients with type 2 diabetes. The LADA subset of patients with adult-onset autoimmune diabetes has highlighted many shortcomings in the classification of diabetes and invokes the case for more personalized data analysis in line with the move towards precision medicine. Perhaps most importantly, the issues highlight our persistent failure to engage with the heterogeneity within the most common form of autoimmune diabetes, that is adult-onset type 1 diabetes, both insulin-dependent and initially non-insulin requiring (LADA). This review discusses characteristics of autoimmune diabetes and specifically aims to illustrate the heterogeneity of the disease. PMID:27457237

  8. Effect of Metformin Glycinate on Glycated Hemoglobin A1c Concentration and Insulin Sensitivity in Drug-Naive Adult Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Abundis, Esperanza; Robles-Cervantes, José A.; Ramos-Zavala, Maria G.; Barrera-Durán, Carmelita; González-Canudas, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Aim This study evaluated the effect of metformin glycinate on glycated hemoglobin A1c (A1C) concentration and insulin sensitivity in drug-naive adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Subjects and Methods A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was carried out in 20 patients with drug-naive T2DM. Ten subjects received metformin glycinate (1,050.6 mg) once daily during the first month and force-titrated twice daily during the second month. Ten additional patients received placebo as the control group. Before and after the intervention, metabolic profile including A1C and insulin sensitivity (euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp technique) was estimated. Results A1C concentrations decreased significantly with metformin glycinate administration (8.0±0.7% vs. 7.1±0.9%, P=0.008) before and after the intervention, respectively. There were significant differences in changes from baseline of A1C between groups (0.0±0.7% vs. −1.0±0.5% for placebo and metformin glycinate groups, respectively; P=0.004). A reduction of ≥1% in A1C levels was reached in 60.0% of patients with metformin glycinate administration (P=0.02). Insulin sensitivity was not modified by the intervention. Conclusions Administration of metformin glycinate during a 2-month period showed a greater decrease in A1C concentrations than placebo in a selected group of drug-naive adult patients with T2DM. PMID:22974412

  9. Diabetes mellitus in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Alves, Crésio de Aragão Dantas; Aguiar, Renata Arruti; Alves, Ana Cláudia S; Santana, Maria Angélica

    2007-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) is the principal extra-pulmonary complication of cystic fibrosis, occurring in 15-30% of adult cystic fibrosis patients. The number of cystic fibrosis patients who develop diabetes is increasing in parallel with increases in life expectancy. The aim of this study was to review the physiopathology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of CFRD. A bibliographic search of the Medline and Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature databases was made. Articles were selected from among those published in the last twenty years. Insulin deficiency, caused by reduced beta-cell mass, is the main etiologic mechanism, although insulin resistance also plays a role. Presenting features of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, CFRD typically affects individuals of approximately 20 years of age. It can also be accompanied by fasting, non-fasting or intermittent hyperglycemia. Glucose intolerance is associated with worsening of nutritional status, increased morbidity, decreased survival and reduced pulmonary function. Microvascular complications are always present, although macrovascular complications are rarely seen. An oral glucose tolerance test is recommended annually for patients > or = 10 years of age and for any patients presenting unexplained weight loss or symptoms of diabetes. Patients hospitalized with severe diseases should also be screened. If fasting hyperglycemia persists for more than 48 h, insulin therapy is recommended. Insulin administration remains the treatment of choice for diabetes and fasting hyperglycemia. Calories should not be restricted, and patients with CFRD should be managed by a multidisciplinary team. PMID:17724542

  10. Self-Care Behaviors and Glycemic Control in Low-Income Adults in México With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus May Have Implications for Patients of Mexican Heritage Living in the United States.

    PubMed

    Compeán Ortiz, Lidia G; Del Ángel Pérez, Beatriz; Reséndiz González, Eunice; Piñones Martínez, Socorro; González Quirarte, Nora H; Berry, Diane C

    2016-04-01

    This study examined self-care behaviors and their relationship to glycemic control in low-income Mexican adults with type 2 diabetes in Southeastern Tamaulipas, México. A total of 135 patients were enrolled from 17 community health centers. The most frequent self-care behavior was medication management (80%), and the least frequent self-care behavior was self blood glucose monitoring (7%). All the patients demonstrated poor glycemic control, with glycated hemoglobin > 7%. Self-care behaviors were associated with fasting blood glucose (rs = .223, p = .005). Medication management was influenced by cognitive performance, F(1, 130) = 4.49, p = .036, and depression, F(1, 130) = 8.22, p = .005. Dietary behaviors were influenced by previous diabetes education, F(1, 130) = 6.73, p = .011. These findings indicate that education and cognitive behavioral interventions in Spanish for Mexican adults with type 2 diabetes are urgently needed.

  11. Managing diabetes in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Sam M; Fan, Stanley L; Yaqoob, M Magdi; Chowdhury, Tahseen A

    2012-03-01

    Burgeoning levels of diabetes are a major concern for dialysis services, as diabetes is now the most common cause of end-stage renal disease in most developed nations. With the rapid rise in diabetes prevalence in developing countries, the burden of end stage renal failure due to diabetes is also expected to rise in such countries. Diabetic patients on dialysis have a high burden of morbidity and mortality, particularly from cardiovascular disease, and a higher societal and economic cost compared to non-diabetic subjects on dialysis. Tight glycaemic and blood pressure control in diabetic patients has an important impact in reducing risk of progression to end stage renal disease. The evidence for improving glycaemic control in patients on dialysis having an impact on mortality or morbidity is sparse. Indeed, many factors make improving glycaemic control in patients on dialysis very challenging, including therapeutic difficulties with hypoglycaemic agents, monitoring difficulties, dialysis strategies that exacerbate hyperglycaemia or hypoglycaemia, and possibly a degree of therapeutic nihilism or inertia on the part of clinical diabetologists and nephrologists. Standard drug therapy for hyperglycaemia (eg, metformin) is clearly not possible in patients on dialysis. Thus, sulphonylureas and insulin have been the mainstay of treatment. Newer therapies for hyperglycaemia, such as gliptins and glucagon-like peptide-1 analogues have become available, but until recently, renal failure has precluded their use. Newer gliptins, however, are now licensed for use in 'severe renal failure', although they have yet to be trialled in dialysis patients. Diabetic patients on dialysis have special needs, as they have a much greater burden of complications (cardiac, retinal and foot). They may be best managed in a multidisciplinary diabetic-renal clinic setting, using the skills of diabetologists, nephrologists, clinical nurse specialists in nephrology and diabetes, along with

  12. Diabetes and Adult Day Health Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dabelko, Holly I.; DeCoster, Vaughn A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide a profile of individuals with diabetes who receive services in adult day centers. This exploratory study uses an administrative data set (N = 280) from five programs in central Ohio to examine four areas: demographics, health and mental health, financial and social resources, and disenrollment status. Older…

  13. Gallbladder function in diabetic patients

    SciTech Connect

    Shreiner, D.P.; Sarva, R.P.; Van Thiel, D.; Yingvorapant, N.

    1986-03-01

    Gallbladder emptying and filling was studied in eight diabetic and six normal control patients. None of the patients had gallstones. Cholescintigraphy was performed using (/sup 99m/Tc)disofenin, and gallbladder emptying was studied using a 45-min i.v. infusion of the octapeptide of cholecystokinin (OP-CCK) 20 ng/kg X hr. The peak filling rate was greater in diabetic than in normal subjects; however, emptying of the gallbladder in response to OP-CCK was significantly less in the diabetic subjects (51.6 +/- 10.4% compared with 77.2 +/- 4.9%). When the diabetic group was subdivided into obese and nonobese diabetics, the obese diabetics had a much lower percentage of emptying than the nonobese diabetics (30.0 +/- 10.4% compared with 73.1 +/- 9.3%). These findings suggest that obese diabetics may have impaired emptying of the gallbladder even in the absence of gallstones. The more rapid rate of gallbladder filling in obesity may indicate hypotonicity of the gallbladder. The combination of these abnormalities may predispose the obese diabetic to the development of gallstones.

  14. [Vascular access in diabetic patients. Are these patients "difficult"?].

    PubMed

    Gołębiowski, Tomasz; Weyde, Wacław; Kusztal, Mariusz; Porażko, Tomasz; Augustyniak-Bartosik, Hanna; Madziarska, Katarzyna; Krajewska, Magdalena; Koniński, Przemysław; Sydor, Antoni; Letachowicz, Krzysztof; Klinger, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Diabetics with stage V chronic kidney disease (CKD) on hemodialysis (HD) are considered as "difficult patients", because of problems with creation of the vascular access. There is controversy regarding the results and recommendations for preparation of the vascular access in these patients. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the results of creating different types of arteriovenous fistula (AVFs) in consecutive series of patients starting dialysis treatment. The analysis was performed in 741 patients (385 females and 356 males), average age 61.4±7 years, who started dialysis treatment in our department between January 2005 and December 2012. Native AVFs were created in all patients. No patients received an AVF requiring synthetic graft material. The number of patients with diabetic nephropathy was 166 (22.4%). Among them, 30 (18%) had type 1 diabetes and 136 (82%) type 2. In this group the occurrence of calcification in the forearm artery was estimated on the basis of physical examination, Allan's test, Doppler ultrasound and forearm X-ray. In a subgroup of patients with atherosclerotic changes in the arterial system the frequency of failed AVFs was analyzed. These results were compared with the group without diabetes. The number of procedures necessary for successfu AVF creation and type of access was counted in both groups. The assessment of the procedure frequency and AVF location in diabetic and in non-diabetic patients was made by χ² test with Yates correction. In the group of 166 patients with diabetes, in 100 cases (60%) atherosclerotic changes in forearm arteries were observed. In a subgroup of 30 patients with type 1 diabetes atherosclerosis was observed in 17 adults (57%). In this subgroup creation of a suitable forearm AVF in the first procedure in 9 patients was possible and in the other 8 cases the atherosclerotic changes necessitated repeated procedures and were an important obstacle to create the AVF. In the subgroup of 136

  15. Cardiovascular and Renal Outcomes of Renin–Angiotensin System Blockade in Adult Patients with Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review with Network Meta-Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Catalá-López, Ferrán; Macías Saint-Gerons, Diego; González-Bermejo, Diana; Rosano, Giuseppe M.; Davis, Barry R.; Ridao, Manuel; Zaragoza, Abel; Montero-Corominas, Dolores; Tobías, Aurelio; de la Fuente-Honrubia, César; Tabarés-Seisdedos, Rafael; Hutton, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background Medications aimed at inhibiting the renin–angiotensin system (RAS) have been used extensively for preventing cardiovascular and renal complications in patients with diabetes, but data that compare their clinical effectiveness are limited. We aimed to compare the effects of classes of RAS blockers on cardiovascular and renal outcomes in adults with diabetes. Methods and Findings Eligible trials were identified by electronic searches in PubMed/MEDLINE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (1 January 2004 to 17 July 2014). Interventions of interest were angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and direct renin (DR) inhibitors. The primary endpoints were cardiovascular mortality, myocardial infarction, and stroke—singly and as a composite endpoint, major cardiovascular outcome—and end-stage renal disease [ESRD], doubling of serum creatinine, and all-cause mortality—singly and as a composite endpoint, progression of renal disease. Secondary endpoints were angina pectoris and hospitalization for heart failure. In all, 71 trials (103,120 participants), with a total of 14 different regimens, were pooled using network meta-analyses. When compared with ACE inhibitor, no other RAS blocker used in monotherapy and/or combination was associated with a significant reduction in major cardiovascular outcomes: ARB (odds ratio [OR] 1.02; 95% credible interval [CrI] 0.90–1.18), ACE inhibitor plus ARB (0.97; 95% CrI 0.79–1.19), DR inhibitor plus ACE inhibitor (1.32; 95% CrI 0.96–1.81), and DR inhibitor plus ARB (1.00; 95% CrI 0.73–1.38). For the risk of progression of renal disease, no significant differences were detected between ACE inhibitor and each of the remaining therapies: ARB (OR 1.10; 95% CrI 0.90–1.40), ACE inhibitor plus ARB (0.97; 95% CrI 0.72–1.29), DR inhibitor plus ACE inhibitor (0.99; 95% CrI 0.65–1.57), and DR inhibitor plus ARB (1.18; 95% CrI 0.78–1.84). No significant

  16. Homocysteine Serum Levels in Diabetic Patients with Non Proliferative, Proliferative and without Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gagliano, Caterina; Giordano, Maria; Vacante, Marco; Caraci, Filippo; Drago, Filippo; Avitabile, Teresio; Motta, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Homocysteine has been associated with extracellular matrix changes. The diabetic retinopathy is a neurovascular complication of diabetes mellitus and it is the leading cause of vision loss among working adults worldwide. In this study, we evaluate the role of homocysteine in diabetic retinopathy analyzing the plasma levels of homocysteine in 63 diabetic type 2 patients with nonproliferative retinopathy (NPDR), 62 patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), 50 healthy subjects used as control group, and 75 randomly selected patients. PMID:24877066

  17. Homocysteine serum levels in diabetic patients with non proliferative, proliferative and without retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Malaguarnera, Giulia; Gagliano, Caterina; Giordano, Maria; Salomone, Salvatore; Vacante, Marco; Bucolo, Claudio; Caraci, Filippo; Reibaldi, Michele; Drago, Filippo; Avitabile, Teresio; Motta, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Homocysteine has been associated with extracellular matrix changes. The diabetic retinopathy is a neurovascular complication of diabetes mellitus and it is the leading cause of vision loss among working adults worldwide. In this study, we evaluate the role of homocysteine in diabetic retinopathy analyzing the plasma levels of homocysteine in 63 diabetic type 2 patients with nonproliferative retinopathy (NPDR), 62 patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), 50 healthy subjects used as control group, and 75 randomly selected patients. PMID:24877066

  18. Pancreas transplantation in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Pozza, G; Di Carlo, V

    1989-01-01

    After a brief historical background on pancreas transplantation in the treatment of diabetes mellitus, this review deals with the major surgical, pharmacological and functional aspects of this approach. In the Authors' opinion pancreas transplantation should be proposed only when the end-stage renal failure (ESRF), due to diabetic nephropathy, needs kidney transplantation. By using injection of polymers (mainly neoprene) into the pancreatic ducts, or urinary diversion of pancreatic juice and appropriate immunosuppressive therapy (cyclosporin, corticosteroids and azathioprine), dramatic advantages have been achieved in the last years, so that a satisfactory segmental or total pancreas graft survival on one hand, and the early graft rejection recognition on the other have been presently obtained. A prompt and good functional activity of pancreas graft has also been demonstrated by the Authors in successfully transplanted patients. As far as chronic diabetic complications are concerned, no conclusive results have been reported up to now; it is noteworthy, however, that pancreas transplantation may preserve the transplanted kidney from a relapse of diabetic nephropathy. The combined pancreas-kidney transplantation may actually be considered as a correct solution to the problem of diabetic patients with ESRF. Moreover, careful selection of patients, appropriate surgical technique and experienced immunosuppressive treatment are the major prerequisites to achieve a satisfactory improvement of diabetic status in addition to that of renal failure.

  19. Renal Biopsy in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Espinel, Eugenia; Agraz, Irene; Ibernon, Meritxell; Ramos, Natalia; Fort, Joan; Serón, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The majority of diabetic patients with renal involvement are not biopsied. Studies evaluating histological findings in renal biopsies performed in diabetic patients have shown that approximately one third of the cases will show pure diabetic nephropathy, one third a non-diabetic condition and another third will show diabetic nephropathy with a superimposed disease. Early diagnosis of treatable non-diabetic diseases in diabetic patients is important to ameliorate renal prognosis. The publication of the International Consensus Document for the classification of type 1 and type 2 diabetes has provided common criteria for the classification of diabetic nephropathy and its utility to stratify risk for renal failure has already been demonstrated in different retrospective studies. The availability of new drugs with the potential to modify the natural history of diabetic nephropathy has raised the question whether renal biopsies may allow a better design of clinical trials aimed to delay the progression of chronic kidney disease in diabetic patients. PMID:26239461

  20. Association of diabetes-related distress, depression, medication adherence, and health-related quality of life with glycated hemoglobin, blood pressure, and lipids in adult patients with type 2 diabetes: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Boon-How; Sherina, Mohd-Sidik; Hassan, Noor-Hasliza

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the associations of diabetes-related distress (DRD), depressive symptoms, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and medication adherence with glycemia, blood pressure (BP), and lipid biomarkers in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). This cross-sectional study was conducted in three Malaysian public health clinics in 2012–2013, recruited adult patients (aged ≥30 years) with T2D who had been diagnosed for more than one year, were on active follow-up, and had recent blood test results. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to identify significant associated factors for glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) BP, and lipids. The response rate was 93.1% (700/752). The majority were females (52.8%), Malay (52.4%), and married (78.7%). DRD correlated with systolic BP (r= −0.16); depressive symptoms correlated with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r=0.12) and total cholesterol (r=0.13); medication adherence correlated with HbA1c (r= −0.14) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r= −0.11); and HRQoL correlated with casual blood glucose (r= −0.11), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r= −0.13), and total cholesterol (r= −0.08). Multivariable analyses showed that HRQoL was significantly associated with casual blood glucose (adjusted B= −0.06, P=0.024); DRD was associated with systolic BP (adjusted B= −0.08, P=0.066); depressive symptoms were associated with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (adjusted B=0.02, P=0.061), and medication adherence was associated with HbA1c (adjusted B= −0.11, P=0.082) and total cholesterol (adjusted B= −0.06, P=0.086). There were significant and distinctive associations of DRD, depressive symptoms, HRQoL, and medication adherence with glycemia, BP, and lipid biomarkers. Unexpected beneficial therapeutic effects of DRD on BP require further study. A multidisciplinary approach may be needed for risk management in adults with T2D at the primary care level. PMID:25995640

  1. Feasibility of Interactive Resistance Chair in Older Adults with Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Joseph; Cisse, Pape; Jeong, In Cheol

    2015-01-01

    An interactive resistance chair (RC) exercise system has been designed to support patients at home in following their individualized strengthening exercise plan. The aim of this study was (1) to introduce a computer-assisted home-based resistance exercise for older adults and (2) to demonstrate feasibility of the proposed system in older adults with diabetes. The RC exercise system was well accepted by older adults with diabetes regardless of education level, race or gender. The post-task questionnaires demonstrated ease of system use and satisfaction with the system. The attitudinal survey results showed positive seniors' attitudes towards the RC exercise system. The system usability (SUS) scale score was 94.0±5.76 demonstrating high acceptance of the RC exercise system. From the qualitative interviews, individualized feedback yielded important system upgrade solutions that can be useful in tailoring patient needs, values and preferences specific for seniors with diabetes. Further research is warranted to assess impact of RC exercise system in home setting with a larger sample size in a randomized trial. PMID:26152953

  2. Diabetes Resources for Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Griffin Rodgers, Director of the NIDDK Clinical Trials Current research studies and how you can volunteer Community Outreach and Health Fairs Science-based information and tips for planning an outreach effort or community event For Health Care Professionals Patient and provider resources ...

  3. [Intelligent footwear for diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Pataky, Zoltan; Grivon, Daniel; Civet, Yoan; Perriard, Yves

    2016-01-20

    The incidence of diabetic foot ulcerations and lower extremity amputations remains very high and inacceptable. The high risk of ulceration and consequent amputation is strongly related to difficulties to obtain foot off-loading, particularly on long term. Due to the complexity of their utilization, the available foot off-loading devices are underused both by health care providers and patients with very low therapeutic adherence. This article summarizes the foot off-loading in diabetic patients and describes the concept of intelligent footwear we developed, based on continuous measurements and permanent and automatic adaptations of the shoe insole's rigidity.

  4. Diabetic striatopathy in a patient with hemiballism.

    PubMed

    Özgür, Anıl; Esen, Kaan; Kaleağası, Hakan; Yılmaz, Arda; Kara, Engin

    2015-06-01

    Diabetic striatopathy is a rare and life-threatening manifestation of diabetes mellitus. The disease commonly affects individuals of Asian descent, females, and the elderly. Patients usually present with hemiballism-hemichorea caused by nonketotic hyperglycemia. Hemiballism-hemichorea is defined as involuntary continuous random appearing movement involving one side of the body. This movement disorder may develop secondary to stroke, diabetic striatopathy, neoplasm, infection, Wilson's disease, and thyrotoxicosis. Despite being rare, prompt recognition of a hyperglycemia-induced hemiballism-hemichorea is essential because the symptoms are reversible with correction of hyperglycemia. Diagnosis is possible based on blood analysis and neuroimaging findings. Laboratory tests reveal raised blood glucose and hemoglobin A1C levels which indicate poorly controlled diabetes. Neuroimaging provides suggestive findings of diabetic striatopathy which are hyperattenuation on computed tomography and hyperintensity on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the basal ganglia. In this case report, our aim is to present neuroimaging findings in an adult man with sudden onset of hemiballism associated with nonketotic hyperglycemia.

  5. Nutrition Considerations for the Growing Population of Older Adults With Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    In Brief The growing older adult population and its higher incidence of diabetes are creating demands on health care providers to address the special needs of these patients. Because nutrition is essential to the proper treatment and self-management of diabetes, clinicians must develop and adopt various strategies to address some of the common nutritional, lifestyle, and self-management barriers that older adults face. Nutrition assessments of older adults with diabetes should be comprehensive, with attention to each patient’s unique nutritional needs. Constructing a realistic nutrition care plan is essential for success. This article addresses some of the key nutrition-related aspects of diabetes self-care in older adults with diabetes. PMID:26246753

  6. Eye Conditions in Older Adults: Diabetic Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Scott; Iroku-Malize, Tochi

    2016-06-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is related to neovascularization of the retina stimulated by an elevated blood glucose level. This can lead to macular edema, vascular hemorrhage, retinal detachment, and neovascular glaucoma. Diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of blindness in the United States, and is estimated to affect between 28% and 40% of patients older than 40 years. Significant visual deficit from diabetic retinopathy can lead to social isolation of older individuals by limiting driving, the ability to leave the home or remain in the home safely, and the ability to watch television or read. Primary and secondary prevention includes adequate control of A1c levels. Screening is important for early detection of ocular damage and intervention. Retinal benefits of therapy may predict cardiovascular benefits over a longer period. PMID:27348530

  7. [Caries status in diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Albrecht, M; Bánóczy, J; Dinya, E; Tamás, G

    1991-09-01

    Clinical dental examination of 1600 diabetics (815 type 1 insulin dependent and 761 type 2 non-insulin dependent patients) has been performed according to the WHD criteria. According to examination results higher DMF mean value, less uncared of teeth with caries (D) and, in the age group of 19 years and above 30 years, more edentulousness has been found than with healthy individuals. The number of filled and crowded teeth (F) below the age of 35 years in diabetics (p 0.0001), above 45 years in the control group (p 0.0001) was higher. Concerning cared of teeth there was no deviation in the number of filled teeth between diabetic and healthy individuals whereas the number of crown covered teeth was higher with diabetics. (p 0.01). As to the distribution of individuals with healthy teeth and toothless ones it was found characteristic that while among diabetic individuals but 1%, in the control 1.4% possessed retained healthy teeth. The number of completely toothless individuals was higher (11.83%) with diabetics than with healthy individuals (2.25%).

  8. Diabetes Causation Beliefs Among Spanish-Speaking Patients

    PubMed Central

    Concha, Jeannie Belinda; Mayer, Sallie D.; Mezuk, Briana R.; Avula, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to explore how the inquiry of cultural diabetes causation beliefs can improve Hispanic/Latino patient self-management. Methods Two semistructured focus groups were conducted with 13 Hispanic/Latinos adults diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Prior to taking part in the group discussion, participants completed a demographic survey and the Illness Perception Questionnaire–Revised. Results The top 5 diabetes causation items endorsed by participants per the questionnaire included stress or worry, behavior, hereditary, diet/eating habits, and family problems/worries. The qualitative analysis revealed stress as a recurring theme for a cause of diabetes. Work stress was specifically identified as a contributor to unhealthy eating and diabetes. Most participants were aware of and believed in susto and referred to it as coraje (anger). Participants believed that asking patients about their diabetes causation beliefs and emotional status can help health professionals (1) better understand the patient and (2) identify and prioritize diabetes treatments. Participants also indicated that the role of doctors is important and the encouragement that they give to patients is clinically and spiritually valued. Conclusions Stress was identified as a cause of diabetes in addition to unhealthy diets and heredity. Asking patients about diabetes causation beliefs and emotional status may help prioritize treatment and management goals. PMID:26568376

  9. Falls and Balance Impairments in Older Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: Thinking Beyond Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hewston, Patricia; Deshpande, Nandini

    2016-02-01

    Older adults with type 2 diabetes have significantly higher incidence of falls than those without type 2 diabetes. The devastating consequences of falls include declines in mobility, activity avoidance, institutionalization and mortality. One of the most commonly identified risk factors associated with falls is impaired balance. Balance impairments and subsequent increased fall risk in older adults with type 2 diabetes are most commonly associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Consequently, DPN has been the central focus of falls prevention research and interventions for older adults with type 2 diabetes. However, isolated studies have identified adults with type 2 diabetes without overt complications of DPN to also be at increased fall risk. It is known that the ability to maintain balance is a complex skill that requires the integration of multiple sensorimotor and cognitive processes. Emerging evidence suggests that diabetes-related subtle declines in sensory functions (somatosensory, visual and vestibular), metabolic muscle function and executive functions may also contribute to increased fall risk in older adults with type 2 diabetes. Knowledge of these type 2 diabetes-related sensorimotor and cognitive deficits may help to broaden approaches to falls prevention in older adults with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, the purpose of this mini review is to describe the impact of type 2 diabetes on sensorimotor and cognitive systems that may contribute to increased fall risk in older adults with type 2 diabetes.

  10. Evaluation of the Effects of Cornus mas L. Fruit Extract on Glycemic Control and Insulin Level in Type 2 Diabetic Adult Patients: A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Rasool; Gorji, Abdollah; Asgary, Sedigheh; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Siavash, Mansour

    2015-01-01

    Background. The plant Cornus mas L. (cornelian cherry) is traditionally used as an antidiabetic supplement; however, there is no related clinical trial. In this study, we evaluated the effects of the fruit extract of this plant on biomarkers of glycemic control in adult patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods. Sixty patients with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to two groups to receive either the extract or placebo capsules (2 capsules twice daily) for 6 weeks. Each drug capsule contained 150 mg of anthocyanins. Fasting plasma levels of glucose, insulin, HgbA1C, and triglyceride as well as 2-hour postprandial glucose level (2Hpp) were measured before and after the intervention and finally the mean values were compared between groups. Results. After 6 weeks of intervention, significant increase in insulin level (1.13 ± 1.90 versus -0.643 ± 1.82, P < 0.05) as well as decrease in HgbA1C (-0.24 ± 0.429 versus 0.023 ± 0.225, P < 0.05) and TG (-23.66 ± 55.40 versus 2.83 ± 15.71, P < 0.05) levels was observed in drug group compared to placebo. Conclusion. Daily consumption of the fruit extract of Cornus mas L. improves glycemic control by increasing insulin level and reduces TG serum level in type 2 diabetic adult patients. PMID:26508984

  11. Evaluation of the Effects of Cornus mas L. Fruit Extract on Glycemic Control and Insulin Level in Type 2 Diabetic Adult Patients: A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Rasool; Gorji, Abdollah; Asgary, Sedigheh; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Siavash, Mansour

    2015-01-01

    Background. The plant Cornus mas L. (cornelian cherry) is traditionally used as an antidiabetic supplement; however, there is no related clinical trial. In this study, we evaluated the effects of the fruit extract of this plant on biomarkers of glycemic control in adult patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods. Sixty patients with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to two groups to receive either the extract or placebo capsules (2 capsules twice daily) for 6 weeks. Each drug capsule contained 150 mg of anthocyanins. Fasting plasma levels of glucose, insulin, HgbA1C, and triglyceride as well as 2-hour postprandial glucose level (2Hpp) were measured before and after the intervention and finally the mean values were compared between groups. Results. After 6 weeks of intervention, significant increase in insulin level (1.13 ± 1.90 versus −0.643 ± 1.82, P < 0.05) as well as decrease in HgbA1C (−0.24 ± 0.429 versus 0.023 ± 0.225, P < 0.05) and TG (−23.66 ± 55.40 versus 2.83 ± 15.71, P < 0.05) levels was observed in drug group compared to placebo. Conclusion. Daily consumption of the fruit extract of Cornus mas L. improves glycemic control by increasing insulin level and reduces TG serum level in type 2 diabetic adult patients. PMID:26508984

  12. Disordered eating behaviors in type 1 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Larrañaga, Alejandra; Docet, María F; García-Mayor, Ricardo V

    2011-01-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus are at high risk for disordered eating behaviors (DEB). Due to the fact that type 1 diabetes mellitus is one of the most common chronic illnesses of childhood and adolescence, the coexistence of eating disorders (ED) and diabetes often affects adolescents and young adults. Since weight management during this state of development can be especially difficult for those with type 1 diabetes, some diabetics may restrict or omit insulin, a condition known as diabulimia, as a form of weight control. It has been clearly shown that ED in type 1 diabetics are associated with impaired metabolic control, more frequent episodes of ketoacidosis and an earlier than expected onset of diabetes-related microvascular complications, particularly retinopathy. The management of these conditions requires a multidisciplinary team formed by an endocrinologist/diabetologist, a nurse educator, a nutritionist, a psychologist and, frequently, a psychiatrist. The treatment of type 1 diabetes patients with DEB and ED should have the following components: diabetes treatment, nutritional management and psychological therapy. A high index of suspicion of the presence of an eating disturbance, particularly among those patients with persistent poor metabolic control, repeated episodes of ketoacidosis and/or weight and shape concerns are recommended in the initial stage of diabetes treatment, especially in young women. Given the extent of the problem and the severe medical risk associated with it, more clinical and technological research aimed to improve its treatment is critical to the future health of this at-risk population. PMID:22087355

  13. Diabetic ketoacidosis in adults: clinical and laboratory features.

    PubMed

    Gómez Díaz, R A; Rivera Moscoso, R; Ramos Rodríguez, R; Reza Albarrán, A; Gómez-Pérez, F J; Rull, J

    1996-01-01

    In this retrospective study, we report the clinical and biochemical features of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in adult patients who were managed at the Instituto Nacional de la Nutrición during a 6.5 year period. There were 98 episodes in 46 patients: 22 females (48%) and 24 males (52%). Six patients (13%) had four or more episodes of DKA. Thirty five percent of the events occurred in patients with IDDM; 48% in "late onset" NIDDM: 9% in "early onset" and 9% in classical NIDDM. Infections as the precipitating factor in 41% of episodes of DKA were the initial manifestation of diabetes. We compared our results with those from other reported series, finding no differences among them. The mean anion gap in our series was 30.4. Main complications identified were hypokalemia in five cases, hypoglycemia in four cases, hypernatremia in four cases, and acute pulmonary edema, ventricular fibrillation, neurological deficit and coma in one case each. There were three deaths (6.5%) in the whole group. To our knowledge, this is the largest series on adult patients with DKA reported in our country in the last decade. The obtained results may help evaluate prospectively the impact of different diagnostic and therapeutic strategies in the management of DKA.

  14. Eating disorders in young adults with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus: a controlled study.

    PubMed Central

    Fairburn, C G; Peveler, R C; Davies, B; Mann, J I; Mayou, R A

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the prevalence of clinical eating disorders and lesser degrees of disturbed eating in young adults with insulin dependent diabetes and a matched sample of non-diabetic female controls. DESIGN--Cross sectional survey of eating habits and attitudes in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects. SETTING--Outpatient clinic catering for young adults with diabetes; community sample of non-diabetic women drawn from the lists of two general practices. SUBJECTS--100 patients with insulin dependent diabetes (54 women and 46 men) aged 17-25 and 67 non-diabetic women of the same age. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Eating habits and eating disorder psychopathology were assessed by standardised research interview adapted for the assessment of patients with diabetes (eating disorder examination). Glycaemic control was assessed by glycated haemoglobin assay. RESULTS--In both non-diabetic and diabetic women disturbed eating was common, and in diabetic women the degree of disturbance was related to control of glycaemia. Twenty of the diabetic women (37%) had omitted or underused insulin to influence their weight. This behaviour was not restricted to those with a clinical eating disorder. None of the men showed any features of eating disorders, and none had misused insulin to influence their weight. CONCLUSIONS--There was no evidence that clinical eating disorders are more prevalent in young women with diabetes than in non-diabetic women. Nevertheless, disturbed eating is common and is associated with poor control of glycaemia, and the misuse of insulin to influence body weight is also common in young women with diabetes. PMID:1781827

  15. Musculoskeletal manifestations in diabetic patients at a tertiary center

    PubMed Central

    Attar, Suzan M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Diabetes mellitus is a major public health problem worldwide. Most diabetic patients will develop functional disabilities due to multiple factors, including musculoskeletal (MSK) manifestations. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of MSK in diabetic patients and to examine the possible predictors for its development. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study from June 1, 2010, to June 30, 2011, to evaluate MSK manifestations in adult diabetic patients at an outpatient clinic of King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Baseline variables were examined to determine predictors for the development of MSK complications. Analyses were carried out using the Statistical Package for Social sciences. Results We included 252 diabetic patients; 45 (17.9%) had MSK manifestations. Of these 45 patients, 41 (91.1%) had type 2 diabetes. The most common manifestations were carpal tunnel syndrome (n=17, 6.7%), shoulder adhesive capsulitis (n=17, 6.7%), and diabetic amyotrophy (n=12, 4.8%). A significant association was found between the development of MSK manifestations and manual labor, overweight, and vascular complications. On logistic regression analysis, the presence of vascular complications in general (B-coefficient=1.27, odds ratio=3.57, P<0.05, 95% confidence interval=1.31–9.78), and retinopathy in particular (B-coefficient=1.17, odds ratio=3.21, P<0.05, 95% confidence interval=1.47–7.02) can predict the development of MSK manifestations in about 82% of the cases. Conclusion Musculoskeletal manifestations are under recognized in adult diabetic patients, occurring in 18% of the cases. Physicians should consider examining the periarticular region of the joints in the hands and shoulders whenever a diabetic patient presents with MSK symptoms. PMID:23115579

  16. Regenerative medicine using adult neural stem cells: the potential for diabetes therapy and other pharmaceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Tomoko; Asashima, Makoto

    2012-06-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs), which are responsible for continuous neurogenesis during the adult stage, are present in human adults. The typical neurogenic regions are the hippocampus and the subventricular zone; recent studies have revealed that NSCs also exist in the olfactory bulb. Olfactory bulb-derived neural stem cells (OB NSCs) have the potential to be used in therapeutic applications and can be easily harvested without harm to the patient. Through the combined influence of extrinsic cues and innate programming, adult neurogenesis is a finely regulated process occurring in a specialized cellular environment, a niche. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms of adult NSCs and their cellular niche is not only important to understand the physiological roles of neurogenesis in adulthood, but also to provide the knowledge necessary for developing new therapeutic applications using adult NSCs in other organs with similar regulatory environments. Diabetes is a devastating disease affecting more than 200 million people worldwide. Numerous diabetic patients suffer increased symptom severity after the onset, involving complications such as retinopathy and nephropathy. Therefore, the development of treatments for fundamental diabetes is important. The utilization of autologous cells from patients with diabetes may address challenges regarding the compatibility of donor tissues as well as provide the means to naturally and safely restore function, reducing future risks while also providing a long-term cure. Here, we review recent findings regarding the use of adult OB NSCs as a potential diabetes cure, and discuss the potential of OB NSC-based pharmaceutical applications for neuronal diseases and mental disorders.

  17. Monitoring neurodegeneration in diabetes using adult neural stem cells derived from the olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Neurons have the intrinsic capacity to produce insulin, similar to pancreatic cells. Adult neural stem cells (NSCs), which give rise to functional neurons, can be established and cultured not only by intracerebral collection, which requires difficult surgery, but also by collection from the olfactory bulb (OB), which is relatively easy. Adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus (HPC) is significantly decreased in diabetes patients. As a result, learning and memory functions, for which the HPC is responsible, decrease. Methods In the present study, we compared the effect of diabetes on neurogenesis and insulin expression in adult NSCs. Adult NSCs were derived from the HPC or OB of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Comparative gene-expression analyses were carried out by using extracted tissues and established adult NSC cultures from the HPC or OB in diabetic rats. Results Diabetes progression influenced important genes that were required for insulin expression in both OB- and HPC-derived cells. Additionally, we found that the expression levels of several genes, such as voltage-gated sodium channels, glutamate transporters, and glutamate receptors, were significantly different in OB and HPC cells collected from diabetic rats. Conclusions By using identified diabetes-response genes, OB NSCs from diabetes patients can be used during diabetes progression to monitor processes that cause neurodegeneration in the central nervous system (CNS). Because hippocampal NSCs and OB NSCs exhibited similar gene-expression profiles during diabetes progression, OB NSCs, which are more easily collected and established than HPC NSCs, may potentially be used for screening of effective drugs for neurodegenerative disorders that cause malignant damage to CNS functions. PMID:23673084

  18. Trends of hospitalizations, fatality rate and costs for acute myocardial infarction among Spanish diabetic adults, 2001-2006

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is one of the more frequent reasons diabetic patients are admitted to hospital, and there are reports that the long-term prognosis after an AMI is much worse in these patients than in non-diabetic patients. This study aims to compare hospital admissions and costs in Spanish diabetic and non-diabetic subjects due to AMI during the period 2001-2006. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of 6 years of national hospitalization data associated with diabetes using the Minimum Basic Data Set. National hospitalization rates were calculated for AMI among diabetic and non-diabetic adults. Fatality rates, mean hospital stay and direct medical costs related to hospitalization were analyzed. Costs were calculated using Diagnosis-Related Groups for AMI in diabetics and non-diabetics patients. Results During the study period, a total of 307,099 patients with AMI were admitted to Spanish hospitals. Diabetic patients made up 29.6% of the total. The estimated incidence due to AMI in diabetics increased from 54.7 cases per 100,000 in 2001 to 64.1 in 2006. Diabetic patients had significantly higher mortality than nondiabetic patients after adjusting for age, gender, and year (OR 1.11 [95% CI, 1.08-1.14]). The cost among diabetic patients increased by 21.3% from 2001 to 2006. Conclusions Diabetic patients have higher rates of hospital admission and fatality rates during the hospitalization after an AMI than nondiabetic patients. Diabetic adults who have suffered an AMI have a greater than expected increase in direct hospital costs over the period 2001-2006. PMID:20205960

  19. [Progress in treating diabetes mellitus with adult stem cells].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lixin; Teng, Chunbo; An, Tiezhu

    2008-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic diseases, mainly including type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Treatment for type 1 and part of type 2 often involves regular insulin injection. However, this treatment neither precisely controls the blood sugar levels, nor prevents the diabetes complications. Transplantation of islets of Langerhans offers an attractive strategy for diabetes therapies, but its wide application has been limited by donor shortage and immunological rejection after transplantation. Stem cells with strong proliferation capacity and multipotential may be potential cell sources in diabetes therapies. For this, adult stem cells are interesting because of absence of teratoma formation and ethnical problems. Adult pancreatic stem cells (PSCs) really exist and could produce insulin-secreting cells both under the condition of pancreatic injury and in vitro culture, but lack of effective markers to enrich PSCs hampers the studies of exploring the expanding and differentiating conditions in vitro. Some other adult stem cells, such as hepatic stem cells, marrow stem cells or intestine stem cells, were also suggested to transdifferentiate into insulin-producing cells under special culture conditions in vitro or by genetic modifications. Moreover, transplanting these adult stem cells-derived insulin-secreting cells into the diabetic mouse could cure diabetes. Thus, adult stem cells would supply the abundant beta-cell sources for cell replacement therapy of diabetes. PMID:18464596

  20. [Progress in treating diabetes mellitus with adult stem cells].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lixin; Teng, Chunbo; An, Tiezhu

    2008-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic diseases, mainly including type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Treatment for type 1 and part of type 2 often involves regular insulin injection. However, this treatment neither precisely controls the blood sugar levels, nor prevents the diabetes complications. Transplantation of islets of Langerhans offers an attractive strategy for diabetes therapies, but its wide application has been limited by donor shortage and immunological rejection after transplantation. Stem cells with strong proliferation capacity and multipotential may be potential cell sources in diabetes therapies. For this, adult stem cells are interesting because of absence of teratoma formation and ethnical problems. Adult pancreatic stem cells (PSCs) really exist and could produce insulin-secreting cells both under the condition of pancreatic injury and in vitro culture, but lack of effective markers to enrich PSCs hampers the studies of exploring the expanding and differentiating conditions in vitro. Some other adult stem cells, such as hepatic stem cells, marrow stem cells or intestine stem cells, were also suggested to transdifferentiate into insulin-producing cells under special culture conditions in vitro or by genetic modifications. Moreover, transplanting these adult stem cells-derived insulin-secreting cells into the diabetic mouse could cure diabetes. Thus, adult stem cells would supply the abundant beta-cell sources for cell replacement therapy of diabetes.

  1. Movement disorders in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jagota, Priya; Bhidayasiri, Roongroj; Lang, Anthony E

    2012-03-15

    Movement disorders are not infrequent in patients with diabetes mellitus. These may occur on the basis of both central and peripheral nervous system dysfunction and can be secondary to severe hyperglycemia, complications of diabetes or its treatment and less often to diseases in which both diabetes and a movement disorder are primary manifestations of the same underlying disease. We present a typical case of a severe movement disorder complicating diabetes as a springboard to review the spectrum of disorders associated with this condition.

  2. [Orthopaedic neurological diseases in patient with diabetes].

    PubMed

    Natsume, Tadahiro; Hirata, Hitoshi

    2014-02-01

    Individuals with diabetes are at a greater risk for microvascular complications, such as retinopathy, neuropathy, and nephropathy, than are individuals without diabetes. Diabetic neuropathies are complex heterogeneous disorders that include both focal neuropathies and diffuse polyneuropathy. Entrapment neuropathy is an example of a focal neuropathy, while distal symmetric polyneuropathy is the most common type of diffuse polyneuropathy. Entrapment neuropathies are highly prevalent in the diabetic population, but they develop insidiously and progressively, making it difficult to determine their true prevalence. Entrapment neuropathies are suspected to be a more common complication of diabetes than is polyneuropathy. For example, carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS)-one of the most common entrapment neuropathies encountered in patients with diabetes-results from median nerve compression, and has been shown to occur three times more frequently in a diabetic population than in a normal healthy population. Entrapment neuropathies should be actively screened for in patients showing the signs and symptoms of neuropathy, because such patients may require surgical treatment.

  3. Older Adult Self-Efficacy Study of Mobile Phone Diabetes Management.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Charlene C; Khokhar, Bilal; Weed, Kelly; Barr, Erik; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate participant self-efficacy and use of a mobile phone diabetes health intervention for older adults during a 4-week period. Participants included seven adults (mean age, 70.3 years) with type 2 diabetes cared for by community-based primary care physicians. Participants entered blood glucose data into a mobile phone and personalized patient Internet Web portal. Based on blood glucose values, participants received automatic messages and educational information to self-manage their diabetes. Study measures included prior mobile phone/Internet use, the Stanford Self-Efficacy for Diabetes Scale, the Stanford Energy/Fatigue Scale, the Short Form-36, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (depression), the Patient Reported Diabetes Symptom Scale, the Diabetes Stages of Change measure, and a summary of mobile system use. Participants had high self-efficacy and high readiness and confidence in their ability to monitor changes to control their diabetes. Participants demonstrated ability to use the mobile intervention and communicate with diabetes educators.

  4. Ketosis-onset diabetes in Tunisian adults: immunological markers and beta-cell function.

    PubMed

    Harzallah, F; Ben Brahim, A; Laadhar, L; Feki, M; Zitouni, M; Makni, S; Kaabachi, N; Slimane, H

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study in Tunisia was to classify ketosis-onset diabetes in adult patients. All patients aged > 30 years without known diabetes, presenting with ketosis and admitted to our department were studied. Patients with secondary or gestational diabetes and those on corticoid therapy or with coinciding infection were excluded. The data included clinical characteristics, immunological markers and beta-cell function. Of the 63 patients, islet-cell antibodies were present in 27.0%, glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies in 25.4% and thyrosin phosphatase antibodies in 19.0%. Beta-cell functional reserve was preserved in 54.0%. Our results confirm that patients with ketosis-onset diabetes mellitus in adulthood are a heterogeneous group. PMID:20214161

  5. Supporting patients with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Anne

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition that is mediated by genetic, immunologic and environmental factors. Its prevalence is further complicated by increasing obesity levels, and this can make diagnosis complicated. Health professionals play a key role in enablement and optimising person-centred care approaches to educate and augment the essential skills required for successful self-management of this lifelong condition. This article reflects on the physiology and aetiology of type 1 diabetes and prevalence and considers recent guidance from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence for adults with type 1 diabetes (NG17) and for children and young people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes (NG18).

  6. Annual Psychological Screening in Youth and Young Adults with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    KLEMENČIČ, Simona; de WIT, Maartje; RUTAR, Miha; BATTELINO, Tadej; BRATINA, Nataša

    2015-01-01

    Aim Youth and young adults with type 1 diabetes are at a great risk for developing depression and diabetes specific distress, therefore, systematic psychological screening is recommended. Routine psychological screening was implemented in Slovene diabetes clinic for children, adolescents and young adults in 2012. One-year results are presented. Methods Adolescents and young adults (N = 159, aged 11 – 25 years), attending the obligatory yearly educational outpatient visit at University Children’s Hospital, Ljubljana, Slovenia, were examined using questionnaires measuring depression (depression scale from Slovene version of Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children) and diabetes distress (Diabetes Distress Screening Scale). Six additional items were included to assess the fear of hypoglycemia and family support. Socio-demographic and diabetes-related data were collected. Questionnaires were analyzed by a psychologist, and the patients that scored above cut-off point were invited to an individual psychological assessment. Results Of the sample, 1.3 % reached the threshold for elevated depressive symptoms, and 32.7 % reported significant diabetes distress. The need for psychological support from a specialist was expressed by 5.0 %. There were statistically significant associations between all psychological variables; moreover, better glycemic control was associated with lower diabetes distress and better family support. Nine patients (5.7 %) started with psychological treatment according to the referrals after screening. Conclusions The results after one year of psychological screening in Slovene type 1 diabetes population displayed small rates of depression and a large proportion of diabetes distress. Only a small percentage of patients attended the offered individual psychological assessment.

  7. Effects of aspartame on diabetic rats and diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Shigeta, H; Yoshida, T; Nakai, M; Mori, H; Kano, Y; Nishioka, H; Kajiyama, S; Kitagawa, Y; Kanatsuna, T; Kondo, M

    1985-10-01

    The effects of aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) on plasma glucose and insulin levels were investigated in diabetic rats and patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. The oral administration of 0.45 mg aspartame per 100g body weight, which is equivalent to 150 mg of glucose in sweetness, to streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats had no effect on the plasma glucose or insulin levels. Also, 225 mg oral aspartame loading, which is equivalent to 75 g of glucose in sweetness, to patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus did not increase plasma glucose or insulin levels, although 75 g of oral glucose loading increased plasma glucose and insulin levels in diabetic patients as expected. Aspartame ingestion for three days at a dose of 24-48 mg per day and the intake of snacks flavored with 240 mg of aspartame also did not increase fasting plasma glucose levels. These results suggest that acute administration of aspartame has no influence on plasma glucose or insulin levels in diabetic rats and patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

  8. A Family-Based Diabetes Intervention for Hispanic Adults and Their Family Members

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Debra; McCoy, Thomas; Amirehsani, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Aims The purpose of this quasi-experimental one group longitudinal study is to examine the effects of a family-based intervention program on diabetes self-management behaviors, HbA1c, other biomarkers, psychosocial factors and health-related quality of life in Hispanics with diabetes. Methods Adult patients with diabetes (n = 36) and family members (n = 37) were recruited from a community clinic in rural central North Carolina. Patients and family members attended an 8-week culturally tailored diabetes educational program taught in Spanish. Data was collected pre and post intervention for both patients and family members, with an additional data collection for patients 1 month post intervention. Results Most patients and family members were female and almost all were immigrants. HbA1c dropped by 0.41% on average among patients from pre-intervention to 1 month post intervention. Patients showed significant improvements in systolic blood pressure, diabetes self-efficacy diabetes knowledge, and physical and mental components of health-related quality of life. Higher levels of intake of healthy foods and performance of blood sugar tests and foot inspections were reported. Family members significantly lowered BMI and improved diabetes knowledge from pre- to immediate post-intervention. No significant changes in levels of physical activity were found among patients with diabetes or family members. Conclusions Findings suggest that including family members in educational interventions may provide emotional and psychological support to patients with diabetes, help to develop healthy family behaviors, and promote diabetes self-management. PMID:24248832

  9. Diabetes knowledge in young adults: associations with hemoglobin A1C.

    PubMed

    Beck, Joni K; Zhang, Ying; Shay, Christina M; Muhamedagic, Cynthia A; Sternlof, Steven A; Ding, Kai; Short, Megan M; Dvorak, Justin D; Lane, James T

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify associations between hemoglobin A1C (A1C) and diabetes knowledge score using an assessment tool developed to evaluate the level of diabetes knowledge in young adults with Type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and their parent/primary caregiver. Seventy-five participants with T1DM, ages 15-22 years, completed questionnaires. Two 25-item questionnaires were developed: one for patient and one for caregiver. Linear regression quantified associations between correct items on the tools and participant A1C and demographic characteristics. Mean age of participants was 16.7 ± 1.7 years, diabetes duration 5.9 ± 4.2 years, 46.7% male, 74.7% Caucasian, 69.3% on multiple daily injections, and 30.7% on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy; 78.7% of parents/caregivers completed the questionnaire. A significant interaction was observed between patient and caregiver scores with A1C by diabetes duration. Among patients with diabetes <6 years, higher patient and caregiver scores were associated with lower A1C (-0.25 ± 0.11, p = .03 and -0.59 ± 0.19, p = .005, respectively) accounting for age, gender, race, therapy, and insurance. Neither patient nor caregiver score was associated with A1C in patients with diabetes duration ≥6 years. Better performance on a diabetes knowledge assessment (for both patient and the caregiver) was found to be associated with more favorable levels of glycemic control among young adults with diabetes <6 years. Additional evaluation of these questionnaires and novel interventions to enhance knowledge in this population are needed.

  10. Coronary Artery Revascularization in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Page Coronary Artery Revascularization in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus David H. Fitchett , Milan Gupta , Michael E. ... with exertion), heart attack, and possibly sudden death. Diabetes and Coronary Artery Disease Patients with diabetes mellitus ...

  11. Medication Oversupply in Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Carolyn T.; Johnson, Heather; Dopp, Anna Legreid; Thorpe, Joshua M.; Ronk, Katie; Everett, Christine M.; Palta, Mari; Mott, David A.; Chewning, Betty; Schleiden, Loren; Smith, Maureen A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies in integrated health systems suggest that patients often accumulate oversupplies of prescribed medications, which is associated with higher costs and hospitalization risk. However, predictors of oversupply are poorly understood, with no studies in Medicare Part D. Objective The aim of this study was to describe prevalence and predictors of oversupply of antidiabetic, antihypertensive, and antihyperlipidemic medications in adults with diabetes managed by a large, multidisciplinary, academic physician group and enrolled in Medicare Part D or a local private health plan. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study. Electronic health record data were linked to medical and pharmacy claims and enrollment data from Medicare and a local private payer for 2006-2008 to construct a patient-quarter dataset for patients managed by the physician group. Patients’ quarterly refill adherence was calculated using ReComp, a continuous, multiple-interval measure of medication acquisition (CMA), and categorized as <0.80 = Undersupply, 0.80-1.20 = Appropriate Supply, >1.20 = Oversupply. We examined associations of baseline and time-varying predisposing, enabling, and medical need factors to quarterly supply using multinomial logistic regression. Results The sample included 2,519 adults with diabetes. Relative to patients with private insurance, higher odds of oversupply were observed in patients aged <65 in Medicare (OR=3.36, 95% CI=1.61-6.99), patients 65+ in Medicare (OR=2.51, 95% CI=1.37-4.60), patients <65 in Medicare/Medicaid (OR=4.55, 95% CI=2.33-8.92), and patients 65+ in Medicare/Medicaid (OR=5.73, 95% CI=2.89-11.33). Other factors associated with higher odds of oversupply included any 90-day refills during the quarter, psychotic disorder diagnosis, and moderate versus tight glycemic control. Conclusions Oversupply was less prevalent than in previous studies of integrated systems, but Medicare Part D enrollees had greater odds of oversupply than privately

  12. Vaccination of patients with diabetes mellitus--a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Mad'ar, Rastislav; Benesová, Dagmar; Brandejská, Dana; Cermáková, Miriam; Dvorková, Alena; Gazárková, Olga; Jakubalová, Silvana; Kochová, Ilona; Lastovicková, Jana; Nebáznivá, Dagmar; Orolinová, Marta; Polomis, Karel; Rehka, Václav; Sattranová, Ludmila; Schejbalová, Miriam; Slámová, Alena; Skalleová, Deanna; Sevcíková, Hana; Tkadlecová, Hana; Tmejová, Marta; Trmal, Josef; Turková, Dagmar

    2011-06-01

    402 subjects with diabetes mellitus have been vaccinated of the total of 34,000 vaccinees immunized during the study period of 9 and half months. Altogether 229 diabetic patients (56.97%) have been vaccinated'against tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) and 74 (18.4%) against viral hepatitis (41 types A+B, 30 type A, 3 type B). The average age in four most commonly administered vaccines (FSME IMMUN 0.5 ML, Twinrix Adult, Typhim Vi, and Havrix 1440) was 65, 52, 56, and 54 years, respectively. Live attenuated vaccines have been given to 6 patients with diabetes (1.49%)--- 5 travellers to endemic countries received the yellow fever vaccine Stamaril (1 female, 4 male) and one male patient varicella vaccine Varilrix. Among the least common vaccines in diabetic patients were those against invasive pneumococcal and meningococcal infections. Not a single unexpected side effect has been observed following the vaccination procedure in any diabetic patient. Based on the results of this retrospective study we can conclude that vaccination in diabetic patients is free of any ri-k- provided that there are no other contraindications, e.g. allergy to vaccine components or severe acute febrile illness. In the case of unstable glycaemia and significantly impaired immune system due to diabetes mellitus, vaccination with live attenuated vaccines should be carefully considered and measured against the risks of exposure to each and every specific infectious agent. There is no reason to be afraid of vaccination in diabetic patients provided that general contraindications are respected. On the contrary, this risk group can benefit from vaccination more remarkably since it may have some life-saving potential.

  13. Managing type 2 diabetes in Black patients.

    PubMed

    Akindana, Adeola; Ogunedo, Chioma

    2015-09-13

    Despite many novel treatments available for managing type 2 diabetes mellitus, Black patients continue to disproportionately suffer complications associated with poor glycemic control. This article describes a comprehensive approach to managing diabetes mellitus in these patients while addressing cultural nuances that may be barriers to positive outcomes. PMID:26259037

  14. Trends in cigarette smoking among Spanish diabetic adults, 1987-2009.

    PubMed

    Lopez-de-Andres, Ana; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Hernández-Barrera, Valentin; Gil-de-Miguel, Angel; Jiménez-Trujillo, Ma Isabel; Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar

    2012-10-01

    We examine trends in cigarette smoking in adults with and without diabetes in Spain. Among diabetic men, prevalence of smoking was lower in 2009 (20.7%) than in 1987 (34.6%); however among diabetic women, the prevalence significantly increased. Prevalence of smoking in diabetic adults was lower than for those without diabetes. PMID:22770999

  15. Missed opportunities for Hepatitis B vaccination among diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Ozisik, Lale; Tanriover, Mine Durusu; Calik Basaran, Nursel; Oz, S Gul; Unal, Serhat

    2015-01-01

    Many infectious diseases in adults can be prevented by a ‘life-long vaccination strategy’. Hepatitis B disease burden was shown to be higher in diabetic patients. American Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends to vaccinate diabetic patients against hepatitis B since 2011. In this study, we aimed to determine hepatitis B virus serology status to determine the rates of diabetic patients who have indications for hepatitis B vaccination. The electronic database of the hospital was searched to identify adult patients aged above 18 years and with hemoglobin A1C levels of 6.5% or above, who have been seen at General Medicine Outpatient Clinics of a university hospital during a 3-year period. A total of 5187 patients were included in the study. After exclusion of patients with an incomplete serological panel, 1358 patients were included for further analyses. Twenty-nine percent of the patients had indication for hepatitis B vaccination, whereas only 8% were vaccinated. This study showed that nearly one third of patients who had hepatitis B serological data had an indication for hepatitis B vaccination and this is a clear reflection of the need to keep a lifelong vaccination log and inquire vaccination data. PMID:26366628

  16. [Lifestyle of elderly patients with diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Yuki; Yamada, Yuichiro

    2013-11-01

    In elderly people, glucose tolerance is deteriorated and the incidence of diabetes mellitus is increased, due to decreased muscle mass and physical activity, declining pancreatic beta cell function, and other factors. Diabetes mellitus is an important risk factor for arteriosclerosis development in the elderly. Precise diagnosis and adequate treatment are necessary to prevent cerebrovascular and ischemic heart diseases. Elderly patients with diabetes mellitus are characteristically afflicted with more complications, impaired activities of daily living, cognitive function decline, and family environment problems, as compared with young and middle-aged diabetics. Therefore, tailor-made rather than uniform therapy becomes important. Lifestyle modification is the basis of diabetes treatment. Herein, we describe "prevention and management" of diabetes mellitus, focusing on the lifestyles of elderly diabetics.

  17. Enterococcus gallinarum endocarditis in a diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Ortu, Massimiliano; Gabrielli, Eugenia; Caramma, Ilaria; Rossotti, Roberto; Gambirasio, Maria; Gervasoni, Cristina

    2008-07-01

    Recent studies pointed out the increasing rate of infective endocarditis (IE) in diabetic patients. As diabetes mellitus (DM) prevalence is expected to increase in the coming years, infective endocarditis could be more frequently reported in these patients. We here describe a rare case of Enterococcus gallinarum endocarditis developing on normal native heart valve in an elderly diabetic woman. Therapeutic options were restricted due to resistance factors of the microorganism, limited guidance in the medical literature, and the patient's history and underlying condition. Despite these challenges, adequate antibiotic therapy led to the patient's recovery. PMID:18457897

  18. Childhood obesity affects adult metabolic syndrome and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yajun; Hou, Dongqing; Zhao, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Liang; Hu, Yuehua; Liu, Junting; Cheng, Hong; Yang, Ping; Shan, Xinying; Yan, Yinkun; Cruickshank, J Kennedy; Mi, Jie

    2015-09-01

    We seek to observe the association between childhood obesity by different measures and adult obesity, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and diabetes. Thousand two hundred and nine subjects from "Beijing Blood Pressure Cohort Study" were followed 22.9 ± 0.5 years in average from childhood to adulthood. We defined childhood obesity using body mass index (BMI) or left subscapular skinfold (LSSF), and adult obesity as BMI ≥ 28 kg/m(2). MetS was defined according to the joint statement of International Diabetes Federation and American Heart Association with modified waist circumference (≥ 90/85 cm for men/women). Diabetes was defined as fasting plasma glucose ≥ 7.0 mmol/L or blood glucose 2 h after oral glucose tolerance test ≥ 11.1 mmol/L or currently using blood glucose-lowering agents. Multiple linear and logistic regression models were used to assess the association. The incidence of adult obesity was 13.4, 60.0, 48.3, and 65.1 % for children without obesity, having obesity by BMI only, by LSSF only, and by both, respectively. Compared to children without obesity, children obese by LSSF only or by both had higher risk of diabetes. After controlling for adult obesity, childhood obesity predicted independently long-term risks of diabetes (odds ratio 2.8, 95 % confidence interval 1.2-6.3) or abdominal obesity (2.7, 1.6-4.7) other than MetS as a whole (1.2, 0.6-2.4). Childhood obesity predicts long-term risk of adult diabetes, and the effect is independent of adult obesity. LSSF is better than BMI in predicting adult diabetes.

  19. Self-management of diabetes in children and young adults using technology and smartphone applications.

    PubMed

    Sheehy, Siobhan; Cohen, Georgia; Owen, Katharine R

    2014-01-01

    Treatment compliance and adherence are often a challenge in patients with type 1 diabetes, particularly for adolescent and young adult patients. With the availability of the internet and smart phone applications (apps) there is a hope that such technology could provide a means to encourage treatment adherence in this group of patients. This review focuses on whether telemedicine and smartphone technology in diabetes can influence self-management in young people with diabetes. A large number of smartphone apps are targeted at people with diabetes, but a limited number of well designed evaluation studies have been performed. As our review shows, the evidence base for efficacy of most of these applications is minimal and improvement in hard outcomes such as HbA1c and complication development is largely lacking. PMID:25311195

  20. Self-management of diabetes in children and young adults using technology and smartphone applications.

    PubMed

    Sheehy, Siobhan; Cohen, Georgia; Owen, Katharine R

    2014-01-01

    Treatment compliance and adherence are often a challenge in patients with type 1 diabetes, particularly for adolescent and young adult patients. With the availability of the internet and smart phone applications (apps) there is a hope that such technology could provide a means to encourage treatment adherence in this group of patients. This review focuses on whether telemedicine and smartphone technology in diabetes can influence self-management in young people with diabetes. A large number of smartphone apps are targeted at people with diabetes, but a limited number of well designed evaluation studies have been performed. As our review shows, the evidence base for efficacy of most of these applications is minimal and improvement in hard outcomes such as HbA1c and complication development is largely lacking.

  1. Everyday Living with Diabetes Described by Family Members of Adult People with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Paavilainen, Eija; Åstedt-Kurki, Päivi

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore family members' experiences of everyday life in families with adult people living with type 1 diabetes. The grounded theory method was used to gather and analyse data from the interviews of nineteen family members. Six concepts describing the family members' views on everyday living with diabetes were generated on the basis of the data. Everyday life with diabetes is described as being intertwined with hypoglycemia. Becoming acquainted with diabetes takes place little by little. Being involved in the management and watching self-management from the sidelines are concepts describing family members' participation in the daily management of diabetes. The family members are also integrating diabetes into everyday life. Living on an emotional roller-coaster tells about the thoughts and feelings that family members experience. Family members of adult people with diabetes are involved in the management of the diabetes in many ways and experience many concerns. The family members' point of view is important to take into consideration when developing education for adults with diabetes. PMID:24455251

  2. Everyday living with diabetes described by family members of adult people with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rintala, Tuula-Maria; Paavilainen, Eija; Astedt-Kurki, Päivi

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore family members' experiences of everyday life in families with adult people living with type 1 diabetes. The grounded theory method was used to gather and analyse data from the interviews of nineteen family members. Six concepts describing the family members' views on everyday living with diabetes were generated on the basis of the data. Everyday life with diabetes is described as being intertwined with hypoglycemia. Becoming acquainted with diabetes takes place little by little. Being involved in the management and watching self-management from the sidelines are concepts describing family members' participation in the daily management of diabetes. The family members are also integrating diabetes into everyday life. Living on an emotional roller-coaster tells about the thoughts and feelings that family members experience. Family members of adult people with diabetes are involved in the management of the diabetes in many ways and experience many concerns. The family members' point of view is important to take into consideration when developing education for adults with diabetes. PMID:24455251

  3. Teaching the adult ostomy patient.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, H S

    2001-01-01

    Ostomy education is based on principles of adult learning, including assessment of the learners' readiness, ability, and need to learn. Such teaching incorporates specific strategies designed to promote cognitive, affective, and psychomotor learning and strategies to overcome potential cultural barriers. In addition, modifications may be included to meet the needs of aged or disabled patients who have cognitive deficits or low literacy skills. Finally, ostomy education must include an evaluation of its effectiveness. This article reviews general guidelines for planning, implementing, and evaluating patient education for adult patients with ostomies.

  4. Type 2 Diabetes Widespread in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... be able to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by cutting calories and increasing your physical activity to lose a modest amount of weight. A major study of people with pre-diabetes showed that lifestyle changes leading to a 5- ...

  5. Association of Periodontitis With Urinary Albumin Excretion in Korean Adults With Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyungdo; Nam, Ga Eun; Kim, Do Hoon; Park, Jun-Beom; Ko, Youngkyung; Roh, Yong Kyun; Cho, Kyung Hwan; Park, Yong Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Albuminuria and periodontitis are both commonly associated with systemic inflammation. However, the association between urinary albumin excretion (UAE) and periodontitis in patients with type 2 diabetes has not been fully investigated. This study aimed to investigate the association between UAE and periodontitis in Korean adults with type 2 diabetes. This study performed a cross-sectional analysis and used hierarchical multivariable logistic regression analysis models. Data from the 2012 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were analyzed. A total of 547 patients, with type 2 diabetes without renal impairment, were included in this study. UAE was assessed using the urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR). A community periodontal index greater than or equal to code 3 was used to define periodontitis. The risk of periodontitis tended to increase as UACR increased even after adjustment for potential confounders (P for trend in the odds ratios = 0.05 in model 1; 0.02 in model 2; and 0.01 in model 3). In a subgroup analysis, the prevalence of periodontitis was significantly higher in the patients with albuminuria (UACR >30 mg/g) than in those without albuminuria among patients younger than 65 years (P = 0.03), those with newly diagnosed diabetes (P = 0.04), or those without obesity (P = .04). UAE was positively associated with the risk of periodontitis in Korean adults with type 2 diabetes. In the patients who were younger, were newly diagnosed with diabetes, or had normal body mass index, individuals with albuminuria were more likely to have a higher prevalence of periodontitis. Early identification of periodontitis may be helpful in Korean diabetic adults with increased UAE. PMID:26496329

  6. Bed occupancy by diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Moffitt, P; Fowler, J; Eather, G

    1979-03-24

    The Royal Newcastle Hospital Diabetic Education and Stabilization Centre was instituted primarily to improve diabetics' understanding of their disease and its everyday management. Simultaneously with a five-day education course, stabilization if insulin-dependent diabetics was undertaken on an outpatient basis. In order to disseminate diabetic education as widely as possible, trained nurses from near and far were included in each course. It is believed that these nurses will be able to offer good advice to diabetics who have no other source of reliable information. By actively attempting to reduce hospital bed occupancy by diabetics there has been a reduction of 1400 bed days per year. It is recommended that similar centres be instituted throughout Australia.

  7. Perioperative management of the diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Stewart A

    2007-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a significant global public health problem and is a major source of morbidity and mortality in the world today. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is the predominant form of diabetes worldwide and represents approximately 90% of all cases. There is an epidemic of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the world today in both developed and developing countries. Globally, it is expected that the number of people with diabetes will increase from the current 150 million to 220 million by the year 2010 and to 300 million by the year 2025. In addition, there has been an alarming increase in the incidence of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents. It is therefore increasingly likely that diabetic patients will appear for dental and oral maxillofacial surgical treatment in both the office and ambulatory surgery clinic setting. Surgical stress often produces hyperglycemia in the perioperative period. Hyperglycemia has been shown to cause a significant increase in perioperative morbidity and mortality. It is the general consensus that strict glycemic control is beneficial and should be achieved for diabetic patients in the perioperative period. Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative management protocols for improved perioperative glycemic control of both type 1 and type 2 diabetics are presented.

  8. Glycemic control and diabetes management in hospitalized patients in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The importance of tight blood glucose control among outpatients with diabetes mellitus is well established, however, the management of diabetes in the hospital setting is generally considered secondary in importance. This study sought to assess glycemic control and diabetes management in adult patients admitted to hospitals in Brazil. Methods A cross-sectional and nationwide survey was conducted from July 2010 to January 2012. Eligible cases were 18 years of age or older, had a diagnosis of diabetes and a hospitalization length of stay ≥72 hours. Socio-demographic information, hospitalization details, and data on diabetes diagnosis, management and treatment were collected for all patients by chart review. Information on all blood glucose (BG) readings for a maximum of 20 consecutive days of hospitalization was recorded for each patient. Results Overall, 2,399 patients were surveyed in 24 hospitals located in 13 cities from all five Brazilian regions. The prevalence of patients presenting hyperglycemic (BG >180 mg/dL) or hypoglycemic (BG <70 mg/dL) events was 89.4% and 30.9% in patients in general wards, and 88.2% and 27.7% in those in Intensive Care Units (ICUs), respectively. In addition, a BG measure >180 mg/dL was recorded in two-thirds of the patient-days. A high proportion of patients were treated with sliding-scale insulin regimen alone in the general wards (52.0%) and in the ICUs (69.2%), and only 35.7% and 3.9% received appropriate insulin therapy in general wards (basal + bolus insulin) and in ICUs (continuous IV insulin), respectively. Conclusions Inpatient glycemic control and diabetes management needs improvement. Opportunities to improve care in Brazilian hospitals include expanded use of intravenous insulin and subcutaneous basal-bolus insulin protocols, avoiding use of sliding-scale insulin alone, increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring, and institution wide quality improvement efforts targeting both physician and nursing

  9. Management of hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state in adults with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Scott, A R

    2015-06-01

    Hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state (HHS) is a medical emergency, which differs from diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and requires a different approach. The present article summarizes the recent guidance on HHS that has been produced by the Joint British Diabetes Societies for Inpatient Care, available in full at http://www.diabetologists-abcd.org.uk/JBDS/JBDS_IP_HHS_Adults.pdf. HHS has a higher mortality rate than DKA and may be complicated by myocardial infarction, stroke, seizures, cerebral oedema and central pontine myelinolysis and there is some evidence that rapid changes in osmolality during treatment may be the precipitant of central pontine myelinolysis. Whilst DKA presents within hours of onset, HHS comes on over many days, and the dehydration and metabolic disturbances are more extreme. The key points in these HHS guidelines include: (1) monitoring of the response to treatment: (i) measure or calculate the serum osmolality regularly to monitor the response to treatment and (ii) aim to reduce osmolality by 3-8 mOsm/kg/h; (2) fluid and insulin administration: (i) use i.v. 0.9% sodium chloride solution as the principal fluid to restore circulating volume and reverse dehydration, (ii) fluid replacement alone will cause a fall in blood glucose (BG) level, (iii) withhold insulin until the BG level is no longer falling with i.v. fluids alone (unless ketonaemic), (iv) an initial rise in sodium level is expected and is not itself an indication for hypotonic fluids and (v) early use of insulin (before fluids) may be detrimental; and (3) delivery of care: (i) The diabetes specialist team should be involved as soon as possible and (ii) patients should be nursed in areas where staff are experienced in the management of HHS.

  10. Pilot study using mobile health to coordinate the diabetic patient, diabetologist, and ophthalmologist.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Irena; Drexler, Andrew; Stanton, Annette L; Kageyama, Jennie; Ngo, Elaine; Straatsma, Bradley R

    2014-07-01

    In the United States, more than 25 million adults have diabetes, 40% of diabetics have diabetic retinopathy, and diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in people 20 to 74 years of age. Clinical trials have shown that strict control of blood glucose level and other risk factors delays diabetic retinopathy onset, progression, and vision loss. Patients with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes mellitus, access to an Apple iPhone or iPad, and no psychological or medical condition that would interfere with the study participated in a nonrandomized clinical trial using SightBook™, a free mobile app that enables self-measurement of visual function and creates a password-protected web account for each patient. Sixty patients enrolled in the clinical trial over a 6 month period. Twenty-six participants were men and 34 were women, with ages from 23 to 72 years (mean 45 ± 15) and diabetes duration of 1.5 to 50 years (mean 15.5 ± 11.5). Thirty-nine (65%) patients reported Type 1 diabetes and 21 (35%) patients reported Type 2 diabetes. Every patient established a personal web account on SightBook and invited participation of treating physicians; 51 (85%) patients completed the validated self-reported outcome assessments. Diabetologist examinations of 49 (82%) patients demonstrated systolic hypertension (≥140 mgHg) in 20% and hemoglobin A1c ≥ 7.0% in 56%. Ophthalmology examinations of 45 patients showed visual acuity in the worse-seeing eye of < 20/40 in 18% and diabetic retinopathy in 42% of patients. This clinical trial used a mobile health app to incorporate diabetic patient self-measurement of vision and coordinate the diabetic patient, diabetologist, and ophthalmologist for control of diabetes and diabetic retinopathy risk factors.

  11. Pilot Study Using Mobile Health to Coordinate the Diabetic Patient, Diabetologist, and Ophthalmologist

    PubMed Central

    Drexler, Andrew; Stanton, Annette L.; Kageyama, Jennie; Ngo, Elaine; Straatsma, Bradley R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In the United States, more than 25 million adults have diabetes, 40% of diabetics have diabetic retinopathy, and diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in people 20 to 74 years of age. Clinical trials have shown that strict control of blood glucose level and other risk factors delays diabetic retinopathy onset, progression, and vision loss. Methods: Patients with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes mellitus, access to an Apple iPhone or iPad, and no psychological or medical condition that would interfere with the study participated in a nonrandomized clinical trial using SightBook™, a free mobile app that enables self-measurement of visual function and creates a password-protected web account for each patient. Results: Sixty patients enrolled in the clinical trial over a 6 month period. Twenty-six participants were men and 34 were women, with ages from 23 to 72 years (mean 45 ± 15) and diabetes duration of 1.5 to 50 years (mean 15.5 ± 11.5). Thirty-nine (65%) patients reported Type 1 diabetes and 21 (35%) patients reported Type 2 diabetes. Every patient established a personal web account on SightBook and invited participation of treating physicians; 51 (85%) patients completed the validated self-reported outcome assessments. Diabetologist examinations of 49 (82%) patients demonstrated systolic hypertension (≥140 mgHg) in 20% and hemoglobin A1c ≥ 7.0% in 56%. Ophthalmology examinations of 45 patients showed visual acuity in the worse-seeing eye of < 20/40 in 18% and diabetic retinopathy in 42% of patients. Conclusions: This clinical trial used a mobile health app to incorporate diabetic patient self-measurement of vision and coordinate the diabetic patient, diabetologist, and ophthalmologist for control of diabetes and diabetic retinopathy risk factors. PMID:24876413

  12. Pilot study using mobile health to coordinate the diabetic patient, diabetologist, and ophthalmologist.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Irena; Drexler, Andrew; Stanton, Annette L; Kageyama, Jennie; Ngo, Elaine; Straatsma, Bradley R

    2014-07-01

    In the United States, more than 25 million adults have diabetes, 40% of diabetics have diabetic retinopathy, and diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in people 20 to 74 years of age. Clinical trials have shown that strict control of blood glucose level and other risk factors delays diabetic retinopathy onset, progression, and vision loss. Patients with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes mellitus, access to an Apple iPhone or iPad, and no psychological or medical condition that would interfere with the study participated in a nonrandomized clinical trial using SightBook™, a free mobile app that enables self-measurement of visual function and creates a password-protected web account for each patient. Sixty patients enrolled in the clinical trial over a 6 month period. Twenty-six participants were men and 34 were women, with ages from 23 to 72 years (mean 45 ± 15) and diabetes duration of 1.5 to 50 years (mean 15.5 ± 11.5). Thirty-nine (65%) patients reported Type 1 diabetes and 21 (35%) patients reported Type 2 diabetes. Every patient established a personal web account on SightBook and invited participation of treating physicians; 51 (85%) patients completed the validated self-reported outcome assessments. Diabetologist examinations of 49 (82%) patients demonstrated systolic hypertension (≥140 mgHg) in 20% and hemoglobin A1c ≥ 7.0% in 56%. Ophthalmology examinations of 45 patients showed visual acuity in the worse-seeing eye of < 20/40 in 18% and diabetic retinopathy in 42% of patients. This clinical trial used a mobile health app to incorporate diabetic patient self-measurement of vision and coordinate the diabetic patient, diabetologist, and ophthalmologist for control of diabetes and diabetic retinopathy risk factors. PMID:24876413

  13. Resolution of Type 2 Diabetes Following Bariatric Surgery: Implications for Adults and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Nandagopal, Radha; Brown, Rebecca J.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Bariatric surgery is now widely reported to ameliorate or resolve type 2 diabetes mellitus in adults. Some clinical investigators even suggest its use as an early therapeutic intervention for type 2 diabetes in patients not meeting standard criteria for bariatric surgery. However, little is known about the exact mechanisms explaining the metabolic consequences, and much active investigation is underway to identify hormonal changes leading to diabetes resolution. This review includes a detailed description of various bariatric surgical procedures, including the latest less-invasive techniques, and a summary of current data providing insight into the short- and long-term metabolic effects. We outline current hypotheses regarding the mechanisms by which these surgical procedures affect diabetes and report on morbidity and mortality. Finally, we discuss the available data on bariatric surgery in adolescent patients, including special considerations in this potentially vulnerable population. PMID:20615109

  14. Vietnamese diabetic patients and their physicians

    PubMed Central

    Mull, Dorothy S; Nguyen, Nghia; Mull, J Dennis

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To describe the cultural context of type 2 diabetes mellitus among Vietnamese immigrants in the United States, including people's ideas about cause and proper treatment; and to suggest ways in which better control of the disease can be achieved in this population. Design The method was ethnographic. A native speaker used a structured interview guide to talk with 38 Vietnamese patients, and family members of 2 other patients, being treated for type 2 diabetes. In addition, 8 Vietnamese health providers—5 physicians, 2 nurses, and an herbalist—were interviewed. Setting A low-income area of southern California populated by a large number of Vietnamese. Participants Forty patients being treated for type 2 diabetes and 8 health practitioners. Results Three quarters of the patients had not achieved good control of their diabetes. Ideas about the cause and proper treatment of the disease were culturally shaped. Many patients used eastern (herbal) medicine and described a strong aversion to insulin injections. Patients stopped taking their oral medications when using eastern medicine, and a quarter lowered their dose whenever they felt “out of balance.” Almost two thirds had used traditional home remedies for diabetes. Two had received nonstandard medical care from neighborhood physicians trained in Viet Nam; 1 of these patients died during the study. Conclusion The Vietnamese community and physicians serving that community need culturally appropriate education about type 2 diabetes and modern therapy for the disease. PMID:11694472

  15. Cardiovascular Autonomic Dysfunction Predicts Diabetic Foot Ulcers in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Without Diabetic Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jae-Seung; Cha, Seon-Ah; Lim, Tae-Seok; Lee, Eun-Young; Song, Ki-Ho; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Yoo, Ki-Dong; Kim, Joon-Sung; Park, Yong-Moon; Ko, Seung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the factors that might influence the development of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) in type 2 diabetes patients without diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN). From January 2000 to December 2005, a total of 595 patients who had type 2 diabetes without DPN between the ages of 25 and 75 years, and had no prior history of DFUs were consecutively enrolled in the study. A cardiovascular autonomic function test was performed to diagnose cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) using heart rate variability parameters. The median follow-up time was 13.3 years. Among the 449 (75.4%) patients who completed the follow-up evaluation, 22 (4.9%) patients developed new ulcers, and 6 (1.3%) patients underwent the procedure for lower extremity amputations. The patients in the DFUs group had a longer duration of diabetes, higher baseline HbA1c levels, higher rates of nephropathy, and CAN. A Cox hazard regression analysis results revealed that the development of DFUs was significantly associated with the presence of CAN (normal vs definite CAN; HR, 4.45; 95% confidence interval, 1.29–15.33) after adjusting for possible confounding factors. The development of DFUs was independently associated with CAN in patients with type 2 diabetes without DPN. We suggested the importance of CAN as a predictor of DFUs even in the patients without DPN, and the need to pay attention to patients with definite CAN and type 2 diabetes. PMID:27015188

  16. Falls risk in older adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vinik, Aaron I; Vinik, Etta J; Colberg, Sheri R; Morrison, Steven

    2015-02-01

    Falls are a major health issue for older adults, especially for those who develop type 2 diabetes who must contend with age-related declines in balance, muscle strength, and walking ability. They must also contend with health-related issues specific to the disease process. Given the general association between these variables and falls, being able to identify which measures negatively impact on balance in older diabetic persons is a critical step. Moreover, designing specific interventions to target these physiologic functions underlying balance and gait control will produce the greatest benefit for reducing falls in older persons with diabetes.

  17. Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in an Adult Male Presenting with Central Diabetes Insipidus and Diabetes Mellitus: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yeun Seoung; Lim, Jung Soo; Kwon, Woocheol; Jung, Soon-Hee; Park, Il Hwan; Lee, Myoung Kyu; Lee, Won Yeon; Yong, Suk Joong; Lee, Seok Jeong; Jung, Ye-Ryung; Choi, Jiwon; Choi, Ji Sun; Jeong, Joon Taek; Yoo, Jin Sae

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis is an uncommon diffuse cystic lung disease in adults. In rare cases, it can involve extrapulmonary organs and lead to endocrine abnormalities such as central diabetes insipidus. A 42-year-old man presented with polyphagia and polydipsia, as well as a dry cough and dyspnea on exertion. Magnetic resonance imaging of the hypothalamic-pituitary system failed to show the posterior pituitary, which is a typical finding in patients with central diabetes insipidus. This condition was confirmed by a water deprivation test, and the patient was also found to have type 2 diabetes mellitus. Computed tomographic scanning of the lungs revealed multiple, irregularly shaped cystic lesions and small nodules bilaterally, with sparing of the costophrenic angles. Lung biopsy through video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery revealed pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis. On a follow-up visit, only 1 year after the patient had quit smoking, clinical and radiological improvement was significant. Here, we report an uncommon case of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis that simultaneously presented with diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus. PMID:26508947

  18. Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in an Adult Male Presenting with Central Diabetes Insipidus and Diabetes Mellitus: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yeun Seoung; Lim, Jung Soo; Kwon, Woocheol; Jung, Soon-Hee; Park, Il Hwan; Lee, Myoung Kyu; Lee, Won Yeon; Yong, Suk Joong; Lee, Seok Jeong; Jung, Ye-Ryung; Choi, Jiwon; Choi, Ji Sun; Jeong, Joon Taek; Yoo, Jin Sae; Kim, Sang-Ha

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis is an uncommon diffuse cystic lung disease in adults. In rare cases, it can involve extrapulmonary organs and lead to endocrine abnormalities such as central diabetes insipidus. A 42-year-old man presented with polyphagia and polydipsia, as well as a dry cough and dyspnea on exertion. Magnetic resonance imaging of the hypothalamic-pituitary system failed to show the posterior pituitary, which is a typical finding in patients with central diabetes insipidus. This condition was confirmed by a water deprivation test, and the patient was also found to have type 2 diabetes mellitus. Computed tomographic scanning of the lungs revealed multiple, irregularly shaped cystic lesions and small nodules bilaterally, with sparing of the costophrenic angles. Lung biopsy through video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery revealed pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis. On a follow-up visit, only 1 year after the patient had quit smoking, clinical and radiological improvement was significant. Here, we report an uncommon case of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis that simultaneously presented with diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus.

  19. [Cognitive functions impairment in diabetes mellitus patient].

    PubMed

    Prikryl, R

    2007-01-01

    An increased research interest in the relation between diabetes mellitus and dementia or deterioration of cognitive functions has been recently noticed. The relatively rich scientific literature in this topic shows that diabetes mellitus itself can cause an impairment of cognitive functions regardless patient's age or the fact whether he has type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus. Type 1 diabetes mellitus leads to a psychomotor retardation while type 2 diabetes mellitus tends to be associated with impaired storage of new information. The exact mechanism through which diabetes impairs cognition has not been explained sufficiently yet, but several hypothetical mechanisms which might explain the relation between diabetes and impaired cognition have been proposed. To explain the etiopathogenetic mechanisms underlying the relation between diabetes and dementia, further research, especially research focused on process clinical-imaging studies or clinical-pathological studies is necessary. As far as clinical practice is concerned, it is important to bear in mind that prevention, timely diagnosis and optimum treatment of diabetes may help to reduce incidence of dementia or cognitive functions' impairment.

  20. [Perioperative management of diabetic patient].

    PubMed

    Carles, Michel; Raucoules-Aimé, Marc

    2011-06-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is rising and diabetics may soon represent more than 5% of the world population. The type 2 diabetes is a major independent risk factor for coronary artery disease. The screening for silent myocardial ischemia (IMS) must be systematic. The autonomic dysfunction and the cardiac microcirculatory disorders are at risk of hypotension and hypothermia during anesthesia. After 10 years of diabetes duration the incidence of perioperative complications and of difficult intubation are increased. The neurological deficits related to anesthesia are associated with general anesthesia in 85% of cases. Particular care will be provided during the surgical procedure to avoid skin, muscular and neurologic cuts. In most cases, the regional anesthesia will be preferred to general anesthesia. To avoid hypoglycemia, blood glucose concentration less than 11 mmol.L(-1)(2g.L(-1)) seems a reasonable target during and after surgery.

  1. Who Treats Patients with Diabetes and Compensated Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Barritt IV, A. Sidney; Weinberger, Morris; Paul, John E.; Fried, Bruce; Trogdon, Justin G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasingly, patients with multiple chronic conditions are being managed in patient-centered medical homes (PCMH) that coordinate primary and specialty care. However, little is known about the types of providers treating complex patients with diabetes and compensated cirrhosis. Objective We examined the mix of physician specialties who see patients dually-diagnosed with diabetes and compensated cirrhosis. Design Retrospective cross-sectional study using 2000–2013 MarketScan® Commercial Claims and Encounters and Medicare Supplemental Databases. Patients We identified 22,516 adults (≥ 18 years) dually-diagnosed with diabetes and compensated cirrhosis. Patients with decompensated cirrhosis, HIV/AIDS, or liver transplantation prior to dual diagnosis were excluded. Main Measures Physician mix categories: patients were assigned to one of four physician mix categories: primary care physicians (PCP) with no gastroenterologists (GI) or endocrinologists (ENDO); GI/ENDO with no PCP; PCP and GI/ENDO; and neither PCP nor GI/ENDO. Health care utilization: annual physician visits and health care expenditures were assessed by four physician mix categories. Key Results Throughout the 14 years of study, 92% of patients visited PCPs (54% with GI/ENDO and 39% with no GI/ENDO). The percentage who visited PCPs without GI/ENDO decreased 22% (from 63% to 49%), while patients who also visited GI/ENDO increased 71% (from 25% to 42%). Conclusions This is the first large nationally representative study to document the types of physicians seen by patients dually-diagnosed with diabetes and cirrhosis. A large proportion of these complex patients only visited PCPs, but there was a trend toward greater specialty care. The trend toward co-management by both PCPs and GI/ENDOs suggests that PCMH initiatives will be important for these complex patients. Documenting patterns of primary and specialty care is the first step toward improved care coordination. PMID:27783702

  2. Managing coeliac disease in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Leonard, M M; Cureton, P A; Fasano, A

    2015-01-01

    The association between coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes has long been established. The combination of genetic susceptibility along with a potential role for gluten in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity makes defining gluten's role in type 1 diabetes extremely important. Evidence supporting the role of a gluten-free diet to improve complications associated with type 1 diabetes is not robust. However there is evidence to support improved growth, bone density and potentially the prevention of additional autoimmune diseases in patients with coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes. The gluten free diet is expensive and challenging to adhere to in people already on a modified diet. Early identification of those who have coeliac disease and would benefit from a gluten-free diet is of utmost importance to prevent complications associated with type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease.

  3. Treating the elderly diabetic patient: special considerations

    PubMed Central

    Kezerle, Louise; Shalev, Leah; Barski, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is rising in the >65 year-old group. The challenge of defining the goals of therapy arises from the heterogeneity of the aging process and the sparse clinical data in this patient population. In light of these challenges, the clinician should be aware of the pitfalls of caring for the older diabetic patient and prioritize an individualized treatment plan to ensure an optimal glycemic control, without placing the patient at unnecessary risk. We present a review of the current guidelines and literature that deal specifically with the treatment of the older diabetic patient in order to establish the principles of treatment in this age group and help the clinician make decisions regarding the care of these patients. PMID:25210468

  4. Diabetes reduces the cognitive function with the decrease of the visual perception and visual motor integration in male older adults.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hyo-Soon; Kim, Eunhwi; Suh, Soon-Rim; Kim, Mi-Han; Kim, Hong

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of diabetes on cognitive decline between the diabetes and non- diabetes patients and identified the associations between diabetes and cognitive function, visual perception (VP), and visual motor integration (VMI). Sixty elderly men (67.10± 1.65 yr) with and without diabetes (n= 30 in each group) who were surveyed by interview and questionnaire in South Korea were enrolled in this study. The score of Mini-Mental State Examination of Korean version (MMSE-KC), Motor-free Visual Perception Test-Vertical Format (MVPT-V), and Visual-Motor Integration 3rd Revision (VMI-3R) were assessed in all of the participants to evaluate cognitive function, VP, and VMI in each. The score of MMSE-KC in the diabetic group was significantly lower than that of the non-diabetes group (P< 0.01). Participants in the diabetes group also had lower MVPT-V and VMI-3R scores than those in the non-diabetes group (P< 0.01, respectively). Especially, the scores of figure-ground and visual memory among the subcategories of MVPT-V were significantly lower in the diabetes group than in the non-diabetes group (P< 0.01). These findings indicate that the decline in cognitive function in individuals with diabetes may be greater than that in non-diabetics. In addition, the cognitive decline in older adults with diabetes might be associated with the decrease of VP and VMI. In conclusion, we propose that VP and VMI will be helpful to monitor the change of cognitive function in older adults with diabetes as part of the routine management of diabetes-induced cognitive declines. PMID:24282807

  5. [Cardiovascular risk factors in young adults with arterial hypertension and/or diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Moreira, Thereza Maria Magalhães; Gomes, Emiliana Bezerra; dos Santos, Jênifa Cavalcante

    2010-12-01

    In this study we aimed to investigate the risk factors associated with arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus in young adults assisted in six Family Health Units (UBASF), of Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil. This is a descriptive and documental study, based on the records of the Care Program to Arterial Hypertension and Diabetes Mellitus (HIPERDIA). The sample was composed of 60 records, including hypertensive, diabetics and patients with the two diagnoses. The results showed prevalence of young female adults (78%). Regarding the risk factors, arterial hypertension (n=45), family history (n=33), overweight (n=33) and sedentary lifestyle (n=27) stood out. Regarding the cardiovascular risk stratification, most presented Medium additional risk for cardiovascular disease. We concluded that the individualized evaluation of risk factors supports an action addressed for possible events, being necessary investments in prevention and also in training and maintenance of the HIPERDIA system.

  6. Diabetes Literacy: Health and Adult Literacy Practitioners in Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes pedagogy in a series of "diabetes literacy" programs involving culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities. The programs were jointly delivered in local community sites, including neighbourhood centres and public housing halls, by qualified nutritionists from a public health service and adult literacy teachers…

  7. Physical Activity among Rural Older Adults with Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arcury, Thomas A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Bell, Ronny A.; Smith, Shannon L.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Wetmore-Arkader, Lindsay K.; Quandt, Sara A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This analysis describes physical activity levels and factors associated with physical activity in an ethnically diverse (African American, Native American, white) sample of rural older adults with diabetes. Method: Data were collected using a population-based, cross-sectional stratified random sample survey of 701 community-dwelling…

  8. Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Diabetic Nephropathy: Development and Progression.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Chi-Juei; Hsieh, Yi-Ting; Yang, Chung-May; Yang, Chang-Hao; Lin, Cheng-Li; Wang, I-Jong

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of current study aims to investigate the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN) in a nationwide population-based cohort in Taiwan. Newly diagnosed DN patients and age- and sex-matched controls were identified from the Taiwanese Longitudinal Health Insurance Database from 2000 to 2010. We studied the effects of age, sex, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN), and medications on the development of nonproliferative DR (NPDR), proliferative DR (PDR), and diabetic macular edema (DME) in patients with DN. Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were used to estimate the adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of the development of DR. Our results show that the adjusted HRs of NPDR and PDR were 5.01 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 4.68-5.37) and 9.7 (95% CI = 8.15-11.5), respectively, in patients with DN as compared with patients in the non-DN cohort. At 5-year follow-up, patients with DN showed an increased HR of NPDR progression to PDR (HR = 2.26, 95% CI = 1.68-3.03), and the major comorbidities were hypertension (HR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.10-1.38 with NPDR; HR = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.02-1.72 with PDR) and DPN (HR = 2.03, 95% CI = 1.72-2.41 in NPDR; HR = 2.95, 95% CI = 2.16-4.03 in PDR). Dyslipidemia increased the HR of developing NPDR but not PDR or DME. Moreover, DN did not significantly affect DME development (HR = 1.47, 95% CI = 0.87-2.48) or progression (HR = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.11-1.20). We concluded that DN was an independent risk factor for DR development and progression; however, DN did not markedly affect DME development in this study, and the potential association between these disorders requires further investigation. PMID:27564383

  9. Preventing amputation in adults with diabetes: identifying the risks.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Eleanor

    2015-06-01

    Good management of diabetes can reduce the risk of complications of the disease. When not well managed, diabetes is associated with the complications of heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease and amputations. Diabetes can reduce the blood supply to the feet and cause a loss of feeling. As a result, foot injuries do not heal well and the person may not realise that their foot is sore or injured. Damage to the foot may lead to the development of foot ulcers, which if left untreated may result in amputation of the limb. Preventive care is a priority, but when complications occur the next step is to halt progression. Therefore, effective foot care and timely treatment of foot ulcers are important in preserving foot function and mobility, and preventing amputation in adults with diabetes.

  10. Preventing amputation in adults with diabetes: identifying the risks.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Eleanor

    2015-06-01

    Good management of diabetes can reduce the risk of complications of the disease. When not well managed, diabetes is associated with the complications of heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease and amputations. Diabetes can reduce the blood supply to the feet and cause a loss of feeling. As a result, foot injuries do not heal well and the person may not realise that their foot is sore or injured. Damage to the foot may lead to the development of foot ulcers, which if left untreated may result in amputation of the limb. Preventive care is a priority, but when complications occur the next step is to halt progression. Therefore, effective foot care and timely treatment of foot ulcers are important in preserving foot function and mobility, and preventing amputation in adults with diabetes. PMID:26036406

  11. Patterns of Complementary Therapy Use for Symptom Management for Older Rural Adults with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Neiberg, Rebecca; Altizer, Kathryn P.; Lang, Wei; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Studies on complementary therapy use among adults with diabetes are limited by crude use measures and lack of specificity of use for treating diabetes. Data are from a study including baseline and repeated 3-day assessments of complementary therapy use among rural African American and White older (age ≥64) adults (n=71). Most commonly used complementary therapies for diabetes at baseline included prayer (88.7%), food/beverages (50.7%), herbs (11.3%) and home remedies (9.9%). In repeated measures (1131 interviews), prayer was used on 57.2% of days, followed by food/beverages (12.7%), herbs (3.4%) and home remedies (2.7%). 56.3% who reported praying did so on ≥5 reporting periods; other complementary therapy use was sporadic. These data show, with the exception of prayer and food/beverages, limited complementary therapy use for diabetes treatment among rural older adults, and less inconsistent use patterns of most complementary therapies. Further research is needed to understand the motivations and patterns of complementary therapy use for diabetes patients. PMID:24244893

  12. Text messaging intervention for teens and young adults with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, Jessica T; Cousineau, Tara; Franko, Debra L; Schultz, Alan T; Trant, Meredith; Rodgers, Rachel; Laffel, Lori M B

    2014-09-01

    Adolescents and young adults use text messaging as their primary mode of communication, thus providing an opportunity to use this mode of communication for mobile health (mHealth) interventions. Youth with diabetes are an important group for these mHealth initiatives, as diabetes management requires an enormous amount of daily effort and this population has difficulty achieving optimal diabetes management. Goal setting and self-efficacy are 2 factors in the management of diabetes. We examined the feasibility of a healthy lifestyle text messaging program targeting self-efficacy and goal setting among adolescents and young adults with diabetes. Participants, ages 16-21, were assigned to either a text messaging group, which received daily motivational messages about nutrition and physical activity, or a control group, which received paper-based information about healthy lifestyle. Both groups set goals for nutrition and physical activity and completed a measure of self-efficacy. Participants' mean age was 18.7 ± 1.6 years old, with diabetes duration of 10.0 ± 4.6 years, and A1c of 8.7 ± 1.7%. The text messaging intervention was rated highly and proved to be acceptable to participants. Self-efficacy, glycemic control, and body mass index did not change over the course of the short, 1-month pilot study. Positive, daily, motivational text messages may be effective in increasing motivation for small goal changes in the areas of nutrition and physical activity. These interventions may be used in the future in youth with diabetes to improve diabetes care. Utilizing more targeted text messages is an area for future research. PMID:25172879

  13. [Insulin treatment in elder patients with diabetes].

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Tomoya; Namba, Mitsuyoshi

    2006-01-01

    Diabetes is a highly expanding health problem in Japan, especially for older people. The prevalence of glucose intolerance and diabetes increases with age. A postprandial hyperglycemia is the primary clinical manifestation. In older diabetic patients, atherosclerotic complications (macroangiopathies), as well as microangiopathies, are significant problems, threatening their quality of life. Though insulin therapy requires some special considerations, insulin is indicated for any patients with a poor glycemic control with oral agents. Single or multiple dose (s) of insulin injection therapy is selected for each patient to prevent symptomatic hyperglycemia, or to achieve near-normal glycemic control. Also, to maintain the quality of life for these older patients, hypoglycemia, as well as hyperglycemia, should be avoided. Newly developed insulin analogue (s) may be more appropriate for preventing hypoglycemia. Another method of prevention and treatment of hypoglycemia are discussed in this article.

  14. Self–reported diabetes education among Chinese middle–aged and older adults with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hanzhang; Luo, Jianfeng; Wu, Bei

    2016-01-01

    Background To compare self–reported diabetes education among Chinese middle–aged and older adults with diabetes in three population groups: urban residents, migrants in urban settings, and rural residents. Methods We used data from the 2011 China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study. The sample included 993 participants age 45 and older who reported having diabetes diagnosed from a health professional. We performed multilevel regressions performed to examine the associations between characteristics and different aspects of diabetes education received. Findings Our study shows that 20.24% of the participants received no diabetes education at all. Among those who received information, 46.82% of respondents with diabetes received weight control advice from a health care provider, 90.97% received advice on exercise, 60.37% received diet advice, 35.12% were spoken to smoking control, and only 17.89% of persons were informed of foot care. After controlling socioeconomic factors, life style, number of comorbidities and community factors, we found that compared with migrant population and rural residents, urban residents were more likely to receive diabetes education on diet. Urban residents were also more likely to obtain diabetes education and more aspects of diabetes education comparison with migrants and rural residents. Conclusions Our study suggests diabetes education is a serious concern in China, and a significant proportion of the participants did not receive advice on smoking control and foot care. Rural residents and migrants from rural areas received much less diabetes education compared with urban residents. Efforts to improve diabetes educations are urgently needed in China.

  15. Assessment of Potential Herb-Drug Interactions among Nigerian Adults with Type-2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ezuruike, Udoamaka; Prieto, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that patients with diabetes do not rely only on prescription drugs for their disease management. The use of herbal medicines is one of the self-management practices adopted by these patients, often without the knowledge of their healthcare practitioners. This study assessed the potential for pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions (HDIs) amongst Nigerian adult diabetic patients. This was done through a literature analysis of the pharmacokinetic profile of their herbal medicines and prescription drugs, based on information obtained from 112 patients with type-2 diabetes attending two secondary health care facilities in Nigeria. Fifty percent of the informants used herbal medicines alongside their prescription drugs. Worryingly, 60% of the patients taking herbal medicines did not know their identity, thus increasing the risk of unidentified HDIs. By comparing the pharmacokinetic profile of eight identified herbs taken by the patients for the management of diabetes against those of the prescription drugs, several scenarios of potential HDIs were identified and their clinical relevance is discussed. The lack of clinical predictors points toward cultural factors as the influence for herb use, making it more difficult to identify these patients and in turn monitor potential HDIs. In identifying these possible interactions, we have highlighted the need for healthcare professionals to promote a proactive monitoring of patients' use of herbal medicines. PMID:27559312

  16. Assessment of Potential Herb-Drug Interactions among Nigerian Adults with Type-2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ezuruike, Udoamaka; Prieto, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that patients with diabetes do not rely only on prescription drugs for their disease management. The use of herbal medicines is one of the self-management practices adopted by these patients, often without the knowledge of their healthcare practitioners. This study assessed the potential for pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions (HDIs) amongst Nigerian adult diabetic patients. This was done through a literature analysis of the pharmacokinetic profile of their herbal medicines and prescription drugs, based on information obtained from 112 patients with type-2 diabetes attending two secondary health care facilities in Nigeria. Fifty percent of the informants used herbal medicines alongside their prescription drugs. Worryingly, 60% of the patients taking herbal medicines did not know their identity, thus increasing the risk of unidentified HDIs. By comparing the pharmacokinetic profile of eight identified herbs taken by the patients for the management of diabetes against those of the prescription drugs, several scenarios of potential HDIs were identified and their clinical relevance is discussed. The lack of clinical predictors points toward cultural factors as the influence for herb use, making it more difficult to identify these patients and in turn monitor potential HDIs. In identifying these possible interactions, we have highlighted the need for healthcare professionals to promote a proactive monitoring of patients' use of herbal medicines. PMID:27559312

  17. Exenatide Treatment for 6 Months Improves Insulin Sensitivity in Adults With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Gayatri; Alattar, May; Brown, Rebecca J.; Quon, Michael J.; Harlan, David M.; Rother, Kristina I.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Exenatide treatment improves glycemia in adults with type 2 diabetes and has been shown to reduce postprandial hyperglycemia in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. We studied the effects of exenatide on glucose homeostasis in adults with long-standing type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Fourteen patients with type 1 diabetes participated in a crossover study of 6 months' duration on exenatide (10 μg four times a day) and 6 months off exenatide. We assessed changes in fasting and postprandial blood glucose and changes in insulin sensitivity before and after each study period. RESULTS High-dose exenatide therapy reduced postprandial blood glucose but was associated with higher fasting glucose concentrations without net changes in hemoglobin A1c. Exenatide increased insulin sensitivity beyond the effects expected as a result of weight reduction. CONCLUSIONS Exenatide is a promising adjunctive agent to insulin therapy because of its beneficial effects on postprandial blood glucose and insulin sensitivity in patients with type 1 diabetes. PMID:24194508

  18. Factors Influencing Self-Management in Chinese Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaoping; Liu, Tingting; Yuan, Xiaojing; Ge, Song; Yang, Jing; Li, Changwei; Sun, Wenjie

    2015-09-10

    Diabetes is a major public health problem in China. Diabetes self-management is critical for patients to achieved better health outcomes, however, previous studies have shown suboptimal diabetes self-management performance. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to identify factors associated with diabetes self-management in Chinese adults. The results showed that confrontation, resignation, overall health beliefs, perceived susceptibility, perceived barriers, and self-efficacy were factors associated with overall diabetes self-management performance and six aspects of diabetes self-management behaviors. There is some limited evidence to suggest that provider-patient communication, married individuals, higher educational level, and higher household income level may also be linked to better diabetes self-management practice. Having healthcare insurance and utilizing chronic illness resources generally appeared to have a favorable effect on diabetes self-management performance. In addition, there were a number of factors for which the evidence is too limited to be able to ascertain its strength of association with diabetes self-management practice. The findings of this review suggest that diabetes self-management behaviors are affected by a wide range of personal and environmental factors, which allow health care providers to develop theory-based strategies to improve diabetes-self-management behaviors in this population.

  19. Factors Influencing Self-Management in Chinese Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiaoping; Liu, Tingting; Yuan, Xiaojing; Ge, Song; Yang, Jing; Li, Changwei; Sun, Wenjie

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a major public health problem in China. Diabetes self-management is critical for patients to achieved better health outcomes, however, previous studies have shown suboptimal diabetes self-management performance. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to identify factors associated with diabetes self-management in Chinese adults. The results showed that confrontation, resignation, overall health beliefs, perceived susceptibility, perceived barriers, and self-efficacy were factors associated with overall diabetes self-management performance and six aspects of diabetes self-management behaviors. There is some limited evidence to suggest that provider-patient communication, married individuals, higher educational level, and higher household income level may also be linked to better diabetes self-management practice. Having healthcare insurance and utilizing chronic illness resources generally appeared to have a favorable effect on diabetes self-management performance. In addition, there were a number of factors for which the evidence is too limited to be able to ascertain its strength of association with diabetes self-management practice. The findings of this review suggest that diabetes self-management behaviors are affected by a wide range of personal and environmental factors, which allow health care providers to develop theory-based strategies to improve diabetes-self-management behaviors in this population. PMID:26378555

  20. Immune-Modulating Therapy for Rheumatologic Disease: Implications for Patients with Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pilla, Scott J; Quan, Amy Q; Germain-Lee, Emily L; Hellmann, David B; Mathioudakis, Nestoras N

    2016-10-01

    Immune modulators used to treat rheumatologic disease have diverse endocrine effects in patients with diabetes. Providers should be aware of these effects given that diabetes and rheumatologic disease overlap in prevalence and cardiovascular morbidity. In patients with type 1 diabetes, clinical trials have demonstrated that immune modulators used early in the disease can improve pancreatic function, though their efficacy in adults with longstanding autoimmune diabetes is unknown. In patients with type 2 diabetes, hydroxychloroquine is an effective antihyperglycemic and may be preferred for rheumatologic use in patients with difficult glycemic control. In patients without diabetes, hydroxychloroquine and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors have been found to decrease diabetes incidence in observational studies. Additionally, dapsone and sulfasalazine alter erythrocyte survival resulting in inaccurate HbA1c values. These multifaceted effects of immune modulators create a need for coordinated care between providers treating patients with diabetes to individualize medication selection and prevent hypoglycemic events. More research is needed to determine the long-term outcomes of immune modulators in patients with diabetes. PMID:27525682

  1. Muscle Weakness Thresholds for Prediction of Diabetes in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Mark D.; Zhang, Peng; Choksi, Palak; Markides, Kyriakos S.; Al Snih, Soham

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the known links between weakness and early mortality, what remains to be fully understood is the extent to which strength preservation is associated with protection from cardiometabolic diseases such as diabetes. Purpose The purposes of this study were to determine the association between muscle strength and diabetes among adults, and to identify age- and sex-specific thresholds of low strength for detection of risk. Methods A population-representative sample of 4,066 individuals, aged 20–85 years, was included from the combined 2011–2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey datasets. Strength was assessed using a hand-held dynamometer, and the single largest reading from either hand was normalized to body mass. A logistic regression model was used to assess the association between normalized grip strength and risk of diabetes, as determined by hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels (≥6.5% [≥48 mmol/mol]), while controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, anthropometric measures, and television viewing time. Results For every 0.05 decrement in normalized strength, there was a 1.26 times increased adjusted odds for diabetes in men and women. Women were at lower odds of having diabetes (OR: 0.49; 95% CI: 0.29–0.82), whereas age, waist circumference and lower income were inversely associated. Optimal sex- and age-specific weakness thresholds to detect diabetes were 0.56, 0.50, and 0.45 for men, and 0.42, 0.38, and 0.33 for women, for ages 20–39 years, 40–59 years, and 60–80 years. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance We present thresholds of strength that can be incorporated into a clinical setting for identifying adults that are at risk for developing diabetes, and that might benefit from lifestyle interventions to reduce risk. PMID:26744337

  2. Lifestyle and cardiometabolic risk in adults with type 1 diabetes: a review.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Catherine; Brazeau, Anne-Sophie; Gingras, Véronique; Desjardins, Katherine; Strychar, Irene; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi

    2014-02-01

    Over the past decades, there has been a major upward shift in the prevalence of cardiometabolic risk (CMR) factors (central obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension and dyslipidemia) in patients with type 1 diabetes, which could have either an additive or a synergistic effect on risk for cardiovascular disease. These metabolic changes are occurring in parallel to the worldwide obesity epidemic and the widespread use of intensive insulin therapy. Poor lifestyle habits (poor diet quality, sedentary behaviours and smoking) are known to be driving factors for increased CMR factors in the general population. The objective of this review is to explore the lifestyle habits of adults with type 1 diabetes and its potential association with CMR factors. Evidence suggests that adherence to dietary guidelines is low in subjects with type 1 diabetes with a high prevalence of patients consuming an atherogenic diet. Sedentary habits are also more prevalent than in the general population, possibly because of the additional contribution of exercise-induced hypoglycemic fear. Moreover, the prevalence of smokers is still significant in the population with type 1 diabetes. All of these behaviours could trigger a cascade of metabolic anomalies that may contribute to increased CMR factors in patients with type 1 diabetes. The intensification of insulin treatment leading to new daily challenges (e.g. carbohydrates counting, increase of hypoglycemia) could contribute to the adoption of poor lifestyle habits. Preventive measures, such as identification of patients at high risk and promotion of lifestyle changes, should be encouraged. The most appropriate therapeutic measures remain to be established.

  3. Empowerment, motivation, and medical adherence (EMMA): the feasibility of a program for patient-centered consultations to support medication adherence and blood glucose control in adults with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Varming, Annemarie Reinhardt; Hansen, Ulla Møller; Andrésdóttir, Gudbjörg; Husted, Gitte Reventlov; Willaing, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To explore the feasibility of a research-based program for patient-centered consultations to improve medical adherence and blood glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients and methods The patient-centered empowerment, motivation, and medical adherence (EMMA) consultation program consisted of three individual consultations and one phone call with a single health care professional (HCP). Nineteen patients with type 2 diabetes completed the feasibility study. Feasibility was assessed by a questionnaire-based interview with patients 2 months after the final consultation and interviews with HCPs. Patient participation was measured by 10-second event coding based on digital recordings and observations of the consultations. Results HCPs reported that EMMA supported patient-centered consultations by facilitating dialogue, reflection, and patient activity. Patients reported that they experienced valuable learning during the consultations, felt understood, and listened to and felt a trusting relationship with HCPs. Consultations became more person-specific, which helped patients and HCPs to discover inadequate diabetes self-management through shared decision-making. Compared with routine consultations, HCPs talked less and patients talked more. Seven of ten dialogue tools were used by all patients. It was difficult to complete the EMMA consultations within the scheduled time. Conclusion The EMMA program was feasible, usable, and acceptable to patients and HCPs. The use of tools elicited patients’ perspectives and facilitated patient participation and shared decision-making. PMID:26366060

  4. Diabetic patient education: determinants of success.

    PubMed

    Day, J L

    2000-01-01

    Education/empowerment is critical if successful self-management is to be achieved. All professional patient interactions have a learning component. Clinical outcomes in diabetes are as dependent on psycho-social factors or learned behaviour as on metabolic state or therapeutic interventions. These factors include targets set, self-management skills, influence of living with diabetes, emotional factors, role of other people, perceived benefits and barriers, feelings of self-efficacy, weight concern and diet barrier. Training in learning processes and factors governing behaviour are essential for all those involved in delivery of patient care. Educational programmes should recognise the wide range of learning strategies used by different people.

  5. Prevalence of diabetes mellitus in patients with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Dreval, A V; Trigolosova, I V; Misnikova, I V; Kovalyova, Y A; Tishenina, R S; Barsukov, I A; Vinogradova, A V; Wolffenbuttel, B H R

    2014-01-01

    Early carbohydrate metabolism disorders (ECMDs) and diabetes mellitus (DM) are frequently associated with acromegaly. We aimed to assess the prevalence of ECMDs in patients with acromegaly and to compare the results with those in adults without acromegaly using two population-based epidemiologic surveys. We evaluated 97 patients with acromegaly in several phases of their disease (mean age, 56 years and estimated duration of acromegaly, 12.5 years). An oral glucose tolerance test was done in those not yet diagnosed with DM to reveal asymptomatic DM or ECMDs (impaired glucose tolerance+impaired fasting glucose). Comparisons were made between patients with acromegaly and participants from the general adult population (n=435) and an adult population with multiple type 2 diabetes risk factors (n=314), matched for gender, age and BMI. DM was diagnosed in 51 patients with acromegaly (52.5%) and 14.3% of the general population (P<0.001). The prevalence of ECMDs was also higher in patients with acromegaly than in the general population and in the high-risk group; only 22% of patients with acromegaly were normoglycaemic. The prevalence of newly diagnosed ECMDs or DM was 1.3-1.5 times higher in patients with acromegaly compared with the high-risk group. Patients with acromegaly having ECMDs or DM were older, more obese and had longer disease duration and higher IGF1 levels (Z-score). Logistic regression showed that the severity of glucose derangement was predicted by age, BMI and IGF1 levels. In patients with acromegaly, the prevalence of DM and ECMDs considerably exceeds that of the general population and of a high-risk group, and development of DM depends on age, BMI and IGF1 levels.

  6. Frequency of Fish Intake and Diabetes among Adult Indians

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Sutapa; Millett, Christopher; Subramanian, S. V.; Ebrahim, Shah

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Recent studies have shown that the choice of foods plays a role in diabetes prevention. However, little empirical evidence on this association exists in developing countries. We aimed to examine the association between frequency of fish intake and self-reported diabetes status among adult men and women in India. Methods: Analysis of cross-sectional data from participants in India's third National Family Health Survey conducted during 2005–2006 was performed. Associations between fish intake, determined by frequency of consumption (daily, weekly, occasionally, and never), and self-reported diabetes were estimated using multivariable-adjusted models in 99,574 women, 56,742 men, and 39,257 couples aged 20–49 years after adjusting for frequency of consumption of other food items, body mass index (BMI) status, tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, watching television, age, education, living standard of the household, and place of residence. Results: After adjustment for other dietary, lifestyle, and socioeconomic and demographic characteristics, odds of diabetes were 2 times higher (odds ratio [OR]: 2.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.59–2.57; p < 0.0001) among those who reported consuming fish daily compared to those who never consumed fish. Weekly fish intake was also associated with a higher odds of having diabetes (OR: 1.55; 95% CI, 1.25–1.93; p < 0.0001). The adjusted effect of daily fish intake on diabetes was greater among men (OR: 2.46; 95% CI, 1.66–3.65) than among women (OR: 1.72; 95% CI, 1.26–2.33). In cross-spousal sensitivity analysis, the odds of a husband having diabetes was also associated with wife's daily/weekly consumption of fish (OR: 1.36; 95% CI, 0.92–2.01) and the odds of a wife having diabetes was also associated with husband's daily/weekly consumption of fish (OR: 1.21; 95% CI, 0.87–1.68). Conclusions: In a large nationally representative sample of adult men and women in India, daily or weekly fish intake was

  7. Pupillary Light Reflexes are Associated with Autonomic Dysfunction in Bolivian Diabetics But Not Chagas Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Halperin, Anthony; Pajuelo, Monica; Tornheim, Jeffrey A; Vu, Nancy; Carnero, Andrés M; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Ferrufino, Lisbeth; Camacho, Marilyn; Justiniano, Juan; Colanzi, Rony; Bowman, Natalie M; Morris, Tiffany; MacDougall, Hamish; Bern, Caryn; Moore, Steven T; Gilman, Robert H

    2016-06-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is common in Chagas disease and diabetes. Patients with either condition complicated by cardiac autonomic dysfunction face increased mortality, but no clinical predictors of autonomic dysfunction exist. Pupillary light reflexes (PLRs) may identify such patients early, allowing for intensified treatment. To evaluate the significance of PLRs, adults were recruited from the outpatient endocrine, cardiology, and surgical clinics at a Bolivian teaching hospital. After testing for Chagas disease and diabetes, participants completed conventional autonomic testing (CAT) evaluating their cardiovascular responses to Valsalva, deep breathing, and orthostatic changes. PLRs were measured using specially designed goggles, then CAT and PLRs were compared as measures of autonomic dysfunction. This study analyzed 163 adults, including 96 with Chagas disease, 35 patients with diabetes, and 32 controls. PLRs were not significantly different between Chagas disease patients and controls. Patients with diabetes had longer latency to onset of pupil constriction, slower maximum constriction velocities, and smaller orthostatic ratios than nonpatients with diabetes. PLRs correlated poorly with CAT results. A PLR-based clinical risk score demonstrated a 2.27-fold increased likelihood of diabetes complicated by autonomic dysfunction compared with the combination of blood tests, CAT, and PLRs (sensitivity 87.9%, specificity 61.3%). PLRs represent a promising tool for evaluating subclinical neuropathy in patients with diabetes without symptomatic autonomic dysfunction. Pupillometry does not have a role in the evaluation of Chagas disease patients. PMID:27044564

  8. Pupillary Light Reflexes are Associated with Autonomic Dysfunction in Bolivian Diabetics But Not Chagas Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Halperin, Anthony; Pajuelo, Monica; Tornheim, Jeffrey A; Vu, Nancy; Carnero, Andrés M; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Ferrufino, Lisbeth; Camacho, Marilyn; Justiniano, Juan; Colanzi, Rony; Bowman, Natalie M; Morris, Tiffany; MacDougall, Hamish; Bern, Caryn; Moore, Steven T; Gilman, Robert H

    2016-06-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is common in Chagas disease and diabetes. Patients with either condition complicated by cardiac autonomic dysfunction face increased mortality, but no clinical predictors of autonomic dysfunction exist. Pupillary light reflexes (PLRs) may identify such patients early, allowing for intensified treatment. To evaluate the significance of PLRs, adults were recruited from the outpatient endocrine, cardiology, and surgical clinics at a Bolivian teaching hospital. After testing for Chagas disease and diabetes, participants completed conventional autonomic testing (CAT) evaluating their cardiovascular responses to Valsalva, deep breathing, and orthostatic changes. PLRs were measured using specially designed goggles, then CAT and PLRs were compared as measures of autonomic dysfunction. This study analyzed 163 adults, including 96 with Chagas disease, 35 patients with diabetes, and 32 controls. PLRs were not significantly different between Chagas disease patients and controls. Patients with diabetes had longer latency to onset of pupil constriction, slower maximum constriction velocities, and smaller orthostatic ratios than nonpatients with diabetes. PLRs correlated poorly with CAT results. A PLR-based clinical risk score demonstrated a 2.27-fold increased likelihood of diabetes complicated by autonomic dysfunction compared with the combination of blood tests, CAT, and PLRs (sensitivity 87.9%, specificity 61.3%). PLRs represent a promising tool for evaluating subclinical neuropathy in patients with diabetes without symptomatic autonomic dysfunction. Pupillometry does not have a role in the evaluation of Chagas disease patients.

  9. [Cardiovascular disease prevention in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus according to the recent statement from the American Heart Association/American Diabetes Association].

    PubMed

    Avogaro, Angelo

    2016-03-01

    There is a clear epidemiologic association between glycemic control and cardiovascular disease. There is strong evidence of a microvascular benefit by lowering glycated hemoglobin <7% while acknowledging lack of proven macrovascular benefits. It is therefore relevant, in all diabetic patients, to control all major cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. These risk factors, easily measurable, account for 90% of acute myocardial infarction. In this review, the update on prevention of cardiovascular disease in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus from the American Heart Association and the American Diabetes Association is discussed and commented.

  10. Empowered Diabetes Management: Life Coaching and Pharmacist Counseling for Employed Adults with Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nishita, Christy; Cardazone, Gina; Uehara, Denise Lea; Tom, Tammy

    2013-01-01

    The Hawai'i Demonstration to Maintain Independence and Employment was a randomized controlled trial examining the effect of a participant-driven, multicomponent intervention on 190 employed adults with diabetes, 36% of whom were Asian and 35% of whom were Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander. A no treatment concurrent control group was used,…

  11. Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Diabetic Nephropathy: Development and Progression

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, Chi-Juei; Hsieh, Yi-Ting; Yang, Chung-May; Yang, Chang-Hao; Lin, Cheng-Li

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of current study aims to investigate the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN) in a nationwide population-based cohort in Taiwan. Newly diagnosed DN patients and age- and sex-matched controls were identified from the Taiwanese Longitudinal Health Insurance Database from 2000 to 2010. We studied the effects of age, sex, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN), and medications on the development of nonproliferative DR (NPDR), proliferative DR (PDR), and diabetic macular edema (DME) in patients with DN. Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were used to estimate the adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of the development of DR. Our results show that the adjusted HRs of NPDR and PDR were 5.01 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 4.68–5.37) and 9.7 (95% CI = 8.15–11.5), respectively, in patients with DN as compared with patients in the non-DN cohort. At 5-year follow-up, patients with DN showed an increased HR of NPDR progression to PDR (HR = 2.26, 95% CI = 1.68–3.03), and the major comorbidities were hypertension (HR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.10–1.38 with NPDR; HR = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.02–1.72 with PDR) and DPN (HR = 2.03, 95% CI = 1.72–2.41 in NPDR; HR = 2.95, 95% CI = 2.16–4.03 in PDR). Dyslipidemia increased the HR of developing NPDR but not PDR or DME. Moreover, DN did not significantly affect DME development (HR = 1.47, 95% CI = 0.87–2.48) or progression (HR = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.11–1.20). We concluded that DN was an independent risk factor for DR development and progression; however, DN did not markedly affect DME development in this study, and the potential association between these disorders requires further investigation. PMID:27564383

  12. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    PubMed Central

    Nsiah, Kwabena; Shang, V Owusua; Boateng, K Agyenim; Mensah, FO

    2015-01-01

    Background: The diabetic condition is influenced by several factors, some of which can accelerate the disease's progression to various complications that aggravate the morbidity. Aims: This study aimed at determining the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its individual components and the most critical predictive risk factors of MetS in type 2 diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study involved 150 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and was conducted at the Diabetes Centre of the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Kumasi, the Ashanti Region of Ghana, from February, 2013 to April, 2013. The study involved the use of a questionnaire to obtain some information on the diabetics, undertaking anthropometric measurements, as well as collecting blood samples for the measurement of some biochemical parameters; fasting blood glucose and lipid profile. MetS was defined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Results: The prevalence of MetS was 58% in the studied Ghanaian population. Hypertension was the commonest risk factor (60%), followed by central obesity (48.67%) and dyslipidemia (37%). Female type 2 diabetics had a higher prevalence of MetS, and carried more components than their male counterparts. Regression analysis showed three factors; femininity, high body mass index and low educational status were the most critical predictive risk factors of MetS, according to this study. Conclusion: With hypertension being the commonest component, future cardiovascular disease prevention strategies should focus attention on its management and prevention, through education. PMID:26097823

  13. Primary Infrainguinal Subintimal Angioplasty in Diabetic Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Bargellini, Irene Petruzzi, Pasquale; Scatena, Alessia; Cioni, Roberto; Cicorelli, Antonio; Vignali, Claudio; Rizzo, Loredana; Piaggesi, Alberto; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2008-07-15

    The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate technical and clinical results of infrainguinal subintimal angioplasty in a series of diabetic patients with limb-threatening ischemia. From July 2003 to December 2007, 60 consecutive diabetic patients (M/F = 41/19; mean age, 69.4 {+-} 9.4 years) with Fontaine stage IV critical limb ischemia, not suitable for surgical recanalization, underwent primary infrainguinal subintimal angioplasty. The technical success, perioperative morbidity and mortality, and clinical success (defined by ulcer healing) were evaluated. Kaplan-Meier life-table analysis was obtained for cumulative clinical success, limb salvage, and survival rates. The procedure was technically successful in 55 of 60 (91.7%) patients; in 5 cases we were not able to achieve a reentry. Periprocedural mortality was 5% (3 patients); three patients (5%) required major amputation periprocedurally. Mean follow-up was 23 months (range, 0-48 months). On an intention-to-treat basis, the limb salvage rate was 93.3% (56/60 patients); ulcer healing was observed in 45 of 60 (75%) patients and it was significantly (p < 0.05) associated with serum creatinine and HbA1c levels, diabetes duration, and infrapopliteal recanalization. One- and three-year cumulative survival rates were 91.5% and 83.1%, respectively; serum creatinine levels, patient age, and clinical success were significant predictors of survival. In conclusion, infrainguinal primary subintimal angioplasty is a safe and effective treatment in diabetic patients with limb-threatening ischemia not suitable for surgical recanalization. This procedure is aimed to create a 'temporary bypass' that facilitates ulcer healing.

  14. Why do young adults with Type 1 diabetes find it difficult to manage diabetes in the workplace?

    PubMed

    Balfe, Myles; Brugha, Ruairi; Smith, Diarmuid; Sreenan, Seamus; Doyle, Frank; Conroy, Ronan

    2014-03-01

    This article explores how and why workplace environments impact diabetes management for adults people with Type 1 diabetes, 23-30 years of age. Interviews were conducted with 35 young adults, 29 women and 6 men. The majority of these interviewees worked in sectors such as banking, technology and administration. Young adults found it difficult to manage diabetes in the workplace for two main reasons: work-related time pressures and the non-routine nature of interviewees' work and working environment. Young adults also found it difficult to get the time to exercise both inside and outside of work. Young adults with Type 1 diabetes need to be provided with the tools and technologies that they need to manage diabetes in modern flexible workplaces.

  15. From the Cover: Cell-replacement therapy for diabetes: Generating functional insulin-producing tissue from adult human liver cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapir, Tamar; Shternhall, Keren; Meivar-Levy, Irit; Blumenfeld, Tamar; Cohen, Hamutal; Skutelsky, Ehud; Eventov-Friedman, Smadar; Barshack, Iris; Goldberg, Iris; Pri-Chen, Sarah; Ben-Dor, Lya; Polak-Charcon, Sylvie; Karasik, Avraham; Shimon, Ilan; Mor, Eytan; Ferber, Sarah

    2005-05-01

    Shortage in tissue availability from cadaver donors and the need for life-long immunosuppression severely restrict the large-scale application of cell-replacement therapy for diabetic patients. This study suggests the potential use of adult human liver as alternate tissue for autologous beta-cell-replacement therapy. By using pancreatic and duodenal homeobox gene 1 (PDX-1) and soluble factors, we induced a comprehensive developmental shift of adult human liver cells into functional insulin-producing cells. PDX-1-treated human liver cells express insulin, store it in defined granules, and secrete the hormone in a glucose-regulated manner. When transplanted under the renal capsule of diabetic, immunodeficient mice, the cells ameliorated hyperglycemia for prolonged periods of time. Inducing developmental redirection of adult liver offers the potential of a cell-replacement therapy for diabetics by allowing the patient to be the donor of his own insulin-producing tissue. pancreas | transdifferentiation

  16. Altered regulatory T cell phenotype in latent autoimmune diabetes of the adults (LADA).

    PubMed

    Radenkovic, M; Silver, C; Arvastsson, J; Lynch, K; Lernmark, Å; Harris, R A; Agardh, C-D; Cilio, C M

    2016-10-01

    Latent autoimmune diabetes of the adults (LADA) accounts for up to 12% of all patients with diabetes. Initially the disease resembles type 2 diabetes (T2D); however, the typical presence of β cell autoantibodies indicates an autoimmune basis of LADA. While dysfunctional regulatory T cells (Tregs ) have been implicated in autoimmune diabetes, these cells have been scarcely studied in LADA. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency and phenotype of circulating Tregs in LADA patients early during disease progression. Flow cytometric analysis was performed on whole blood and peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients diagnosed with LADA prior to insulin deficiency (n = 39) and from healthy volunteers (n = 20). Overall, we found the frequency and activation status of peripheral putative Tregs to be altered in LADA patients compared to healthy controls. While total T cells and CD4(+) T cells expressing high levels of CD25 (CD4(+) CD25(hi) ) were unchanged, the frequency and total numbers of CD4(+) T cells expressing an intermediate level of CD25 (CD4(+) CD25(int) ) were decreased in LADA patients. Interestingly, the expression of the Treg -specific marker forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3), as well as the activation and memory makers CD69, cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4), CCR4 and CD45RO were increased in CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells of the patients. Our data depict phenotypical changes in T cells of LADA patients that may reflect a derangement in peripheral immune regulation contributing to the slow process leading to insulin-dependent diabetes in these patients.

  17. Altered regulatory T cell phenotype in latent autoimmune diabetes of the adults (LADA).

    PubMed

    Radenkovic, M; Silver, C; Arvastsson, J; Lynch, K; Lernmark, Å; Harris, R A; Agardh, C-D; Cilio, C M

    2016-10-01

    Latent autoimmune diabetes of the adults (LADA) accounts for up to 12% of all patients with diabetes. Initially the disease resembles type 2 diabetes (T2D); however, the typical presence of β cell autoantibodies indicates an autoimmune basis of LADA. While dysfunctional regulatory T cells (Tregs ) have been implicated in autoimmune diabetes, these cells have been scarcely studied in LADA. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency and phenotype of circulating Tregs in LADA patients early during disease progression. Flow cytometric analysis was performed on whole blood and peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients diagnosed with LADA prior to insulin deficiency (n = 39) and from healthy volunteers (n = 20). Overall, we found the frequency and activation status of peripheral putative Tregs to be altered in LADA patients compared to healthy controls. While total T cells and CD4(+) T cells expressing high levels of CD25 (CD4(+) CD25(hi) ) were unchanged, the frequency and total numbers of CD4(+) T cells expressing an intermediate level of CD25 (CD4(+) CD25(int) ) were decreased in LADA patients. Interestingly, the expression of the Treg -specific marker forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3), as well as the activation and memory makers CD69, cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4), CCR4 and CD45RO were increased in CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells of the patients. Our data depict phenotypical changes in T cells of LADA patients that may reflect a derangement in peripheral immune regulation contributing to the slow process leading to insulin-dependent diabetes in these patients. PMID:27357431

  18. Diabetes insipidus in a quadriplegic patient.

    PubMed

    Farrell, C A; Staas, W E

    1986-02-01

    An incomplete quadriplegic patient underwent investigation for production of copious amounts of dilute urine. Serum osmolality, electrolytes, BUN, glucose, and serum antidiuretic hormone (ADH) were recorded, as well as urinary osmolality, electrolytes, glucose, and pH. In response to subcutaneous vasopressin during the dehydration test, the patient's urinary osmolality increased by 12%, from 620 mOsm/l to 695 mOsm/l. A definitive diagnosis of partial central diabetes insipidus was made. Physicians involved in the care of patients with spinal cord injuries should be aware of the method of evaluating polyuric conditions, particularly while the patient is undergoing catheterization. PMID:3954565

  19. Psychosocial interventions for the diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Harvey, John N

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes usually requires substantial life-long self-management by the patient. Psychological factors and the patient's health beliefs are important determinants of self-care behavior. Education has a modest influence on generating better self-care, but psychologically based interventions are clearly more effective. This review gives an overview of these interventions with some discussion of their basis in psychological theory. Some labels such as cognitive behavioral therapy and family therapy include a wide range of approaches. Randomized trials have generally produced improvement in measures of psychological well-being, but improved glycemic control has been more elusive. The influence on behavior can be very dependent on the individual therapist. Only a few trials have managed to sustain improvement in glycosylated hemoglobin beyond a year. Not all patients are prepared to engage and accept these forms of therapeutic intervention. We are still some way from moving psychological management from the trial situation into the diabetic clinic.

  20. Diabetes insipidus in a patient with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Paulose, K P; Padmakumar, N

    2002-09-01

    The association of Diabetes Mellitus (DM) and Diabetes Insipidus (DI) without any congenital defects is very rare and we report here a case of type 2 diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) whose blood sugar was controlled by insulin, developing central diabetes insipidus 2 years later, which could be successively controlled by synthetic vasopressin.

  1. Impact of a diabetes disease management program on diabetes control and patient quality of life.

    PubMed

    Rasekaba, Tshepo Mokuedi; Graco, Marnie; Risteski, Chrissie; Jasper, Andrea; Berlowitz, David J; Hawthorne, Graeme; Hutchinson, Anastasia

    2012-02-01

    The worldwide burden of diabetes is projected to be 5.4% of the adult population by the year 2025. Diabetes is associated with multiple medical complications that both decrease health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) and contribute to earlier mortality. There is growing evidence for the effectiveness of multidisciplinary disease management programs that incorporate self-management principles in improving patients' long-term outcomes. The aim of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of this approach in improving: (1) glycemic control measured by HbA1c, and (2) HR-QOL measured by the Assessment of Quality of Life (AQOL), at enrollment and at 12-months follow-up. Between 2004 and 2008, a total of 967 patients were enrolled in the program; 545 (56%) of these patients had HbA1c data available at baseline and at 12 months. Mean HbA1c at enrollment was 8.6% (SD 1.9) versus 7.3% (SD 1.2) at 12 months (P<0.001). Overall, 68% of patients experienced improvements in HbA1c. At enrollment, patients reported "fair" HR-QOL, which was significantly lower than age-adjusted population norms who reported "good" HR-QOL. At 12 months, 251 (64%) patients had improved HR-QOL, 27 (7%) had no change, and 114 (29%) deteriorated. Mean utility scores improved by 0.11 (P<0.001), which is almost twice the minimum clinically important difference for the AQOL. This study confirms that a multidisciplinary disease management program for patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes can improve both glycemic control and HR-QOL.

  2. The Effects of Intensive Nutrition Education on Late Middle-Aged Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ye; Xu, Meihong; Fan, Rui; Ma, Xiaotao; Gu, Jiaojiao; Cai, Xiaxia; Liu, Rui; Chen, Qihe; Ren, Jinwei; Mao, Ruixue; Bao, Lei; Zhang, Zhaofeng; Wang, Junbo; Li, Yong

    2016-01-01

    no statistical significance between groups. Conclusions: Intensive nutrition education has significant effects on blood glucose control in late middle-aged adults with type 2 diabetes. Intensive education can cultivate good diet habits and increase physical activity, which are important for diabetes patients in the short and long terms. These findings may contribute to improving education methodology and nutrition therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27618080

  3. The Factors Associated With Disease Mismanagement in Young Patients with Type 1 Diabetes: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Selda; Kelleci, Meral; Satman, Ilhan

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this qualitative study on young adults with type 1 diabetes was to determine the factors associated with mismanagement of diabetes. Methods In this qualitative study, a descriptive phenomenological and psychological method was followed. Purposeful sampling method was used in this study. 28 young adults aged 18-25 with type 1 diabetes (16 females, 12 males) with HbA1c levels >6.5% were interviewed in-depth. Each interview lasted 40-45 minutes. The recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim, examined line-by-line and coded using open coding techniques and managed by QSR NVivo 7. During the research period, Guba ve Lincolln criteria were used to ensure the accuracy and precision of the study findings. Results The study identified seven themes which affect the diabetes management of the patients. These themes were negative emotions about the disease, difficulties arising from living condition, difficulties arising from the treatment treatment process, lack of social support, not solution oriented coping methods, concerns about the future and issues of developing knowledge and attitude regarding diabetes management. Conclusion There are multiple factors affecting the management of diabetes in young adults with type 1 diabetes. Diabetes has a biopsychosocial impact on young adults’ lives, developing a negative attitude toward their future and that of their family. PMID:26005688

  4. Podiatrist care and outcomes for patients with diabetes and foot ulcer.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Teresa B; Driver, Vickie R; Wrobel, James S; Christina, James R; Bagalman, Erin; DeFrancis, Roy; Garoufalis, Matthew G; Carls, Ginger S; Gatwood, Justin

    2014-12-01

    We examined whether outcomes of care (amputation and hospitalisation) among patients with diabetes and foot ulcer differ between those who received pre-ulcer care from podiatrists and those who did not. Adult patients with diabetes and a diagnosis of a diabetic foot ulcer were found in the MarketScan Databases, 2005-2008. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard models estimated the hazard of amputation and hospitalisation. Logistic regression estimated the likelihood of these events. Propensity score weighting and regression adjustment were used to adjust for potentially different characteristics of patients who did and did not receive podiatric care. The sample included 27 545 patients aged greater than 65+ years (Medicare-eligible patients with employer-sponsored supplemental insurance) and 20 208 patients aged lesser than 65 years (non Medicare-eligible commercially insured patients). Care by podiatrists in the year prior to a diabetic foot ulcer was associated with a lower hazard of lower extremity amputation, major amputation and hospitalisations in both non Medicare-eligible commercially insured and Medicare-eligible patient populations. Systematic differences between patients with diabetes and foot ulcer, receiving and not receiving care from podiatrists were also observed; specifically, patients with diabetes receiving care from podiatrists tend to be older and sicker.

  5. Transitions in Care from the Hospital to Home for Patients With Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hirschman, Karen B.; Bixby, M. Brian

    2014-01-01

    In Brief Diabetes is a common coexisting chronic condition among older adults that can complicate a hospitalization and transition back to the community. The Transitional Care Model, which offers a set of time-limited, hospital-to-home services coordinated by a master's-prepared advanced practice nurse, is one option that could improve outcomes for patients with diabetes. A descriptive case study is presented. PMID:26246779

  6. Transitions in Care from the Hospital to Home for Patients With Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hirschman, Karen B; Bixby, M Brian

    2014-08-01

    In Brief Diabetes is a common coexisting chronic condition among older adults that can complicate a hospitalization and transition back to the community. The Transitional Care Model, which offers a set of time-limited, hospital-to-home services coordinated by a master's-prepared advanced practice nurse, is one option that could improve outcomes for patients with diabetes. A descriptive case study is presented.

  7. Relationship between blood pressure reverse dipping and type 2 diabetes in hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lu; Yan, Bin; Gao, Ya; Su, Dan; Peng, Liyuan; Jiao, Yang; Wang, Yuhuan; Han, Donggang; Wang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggested that nocturnal variations of blood pressure (BP) were closely related to type 2 diabetes. However, little information has been revealed about the relationship between reverse-dipper pattern of BP and type 2 diabetes. In this cross-sectional study, BP variations of 531 hypertensive patients were evaluated with ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM). Diagnosis of diabetes in Chinese adults was made according to diabetes diagnostic criteria of 2015. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the relationships between type 2 diabetes and ABPM results. In the study, patients with reverse-dipper pattern (32.3%) had the highest prevalence of type 2 diabetes compared with dippers (21.4%) and nondippers (23.3%). After multivariate logistic regression, reverse-dipper BP pattern (OR 2.067, P = 0.024) and nondipper BP pattern (OR 1.637, P = 0.039) were found to be correlated with type 2 diabetes compared with dipper pattern. The results of our study also suggested that type 2 diabetes might contribute to the reverse-dipper pattern of BP (OR 1.691, P = 0.023). In addition, fasting glucose was negatively correlated with the decline rate of nocturnal SBP (r = -0.095, P = 0.029). Reverse-dipper pattern of BP in ABPM may be independently associated with type 2 diabetes in patients with hypertension. PMID:27109832

  8. Care of Patients with Diabetic Foot Disease in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Busaidi, Ibrahim S.; Abdulhadi, Nadia N.; Coppell, Kirsten J.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major public health challenge and causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Diabetic foot disease is one of the most debilitating and costly complications of diabetes. While simple preventative foot care measures can reduce the risk of lower limb ulcerations and subsequent amputations by up to 85%, they are not always implemented. In Oman, foot care for patients with diabetes is mainly provided in primary and secondary care settings. Among all lower limb amputations performed in public hospitals in Oman between 2002–2013, 47.3% were performed on patients with diabetes. The quality of foot care among patients with diabetes in Oman has not been evaluated and unidentified gaps in care may exist. This article highlights challenges in the provision of adequate foot care to Omani patients with diabetes. It concludes with suggested strategies for an integrated national diabetic foot care programme in Oman. PMID:27606104

  9. Care of Patients with Diabetic Foot Disease in Oman.

    PubMed

    Al-Busaidi, Ibrahim S; Abdulhadi, Nadia N; Coppell, Kirsten J

    2016-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major public health challenge and causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Diabetic foot disease is one of the most debilitating and costly complications of diabetes. While simple preventative foot care measures can reduce the risk of lower limb ulcerations and subsequent amputations by up to 85%, they are not always implemented. In Oman, foot care for patients with diabetes is mainly provided in primary and secondary care settings. Among all lower limb amputations performed in public hospitals in Oman between 2002-2013, 47.3% were performed on patients with diabetes. The quality of foot care among patients with diabetes in Oman has not been evaluated and unidentified gaps in care may exist. This article highlights challenges in the provision of adequate foot care to Omani patients with diabetes. It concludes with suggested strategies for an integrated national diabetic foot care programme in Oman. PMID:27606104

  10. Care of Patients with Diabetic Foot Disease in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Busaidi, Ibrahim S.; Abdulhadi, Nadia N.; Coppell, Kirsten J.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major public health challenge and causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Diabetic foot disease is one of the most debilitating and costly complications of diabetes. While simple preventative foot care measures can reduce the risk of lower limb ulcerations and subsequent amputations by up to 85%, they are not always implemented. In Oman, foot care for patients with diabetes is mainly provided in primary and secondary care settings. Among all lower limb amputations performed in public hospitals in Oman between 2002–2013, 47.3% were performed on patients with diabetes. The quality of foot care among patients with diabetes in Oman has not been evaluated and unidentified gaps in care may exist. This article highlights challenges in the provision of adequate foot care to Omani patients with diabetes. It concludes with suggested strategies for an integrated national diabetic foot care programme in Oman.

  11. Renal outcomes of bariatric surgery in obese adults with diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Rao, Bhavana B; Bhattacharya, Abhik; Agrawal, Varun

    2014-08-01

    Obesity is a pandemic with several significant adverse health outcomes. Chronic kidney disease has been an overlooked consequence of obesity. Among diabetics, obesity is known to amplify the risk for kidney disease. Although bariatric surgery promises significant and sustained weight reduction with favorable impact on metabolic parameters such as glycemic control, hypertension and dyslipidemia, its impact on the renal complications of diabetes is poorly understood. This paper aims to comprehensively evaluate the evidence in the published literature on the impact of bariatric surgery on renal outcomes in obese adults with diabetic kidney disease. While many observational studies have demonstrated significant reduction in proteinuria after bariatric surgery, there is paucity of data regarding changes in renal filtration function such as doubling of serum creatinine or progression to end stage kidney disease. No randomized controlled trials comparing medical vs. surgical therapy in obese adults with diabetic kidney disease exist, hence assessing the metabolic benefits vs. the surgical risks is important before recommending bariatric surgery to this growing patient population. Future studies require a collaborative effort between bariatric surgeons and nephrologists to measure long-term effects of bariatric surgery on renal outcomes incorporating evolving markers of kidney injury to advance this field.

  12. Psychosocial interventions for the diabetic patient

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, John N

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes usually requires substantial life-long self-management by the patient. Psychological factors and the patient’s health beliefs are important determinants of self-care behavior. Education has a modest influence on generating better self-care, but psychologically based interventions are clearly more effective. This review gives an overview of these interventions with some discussion of their basis in psychological theory. Some labels such as cognitive behavioral therapy and family therapy include a wide range of approaches. Randomized trials have generally produced improvement in measures of psychological well-being, but improved glycemic control has been more elusive. The influence on behavior can be very dependent on the individual therapist. Only a few trials have managed to sustain improvement in glycosylated hemoglobin beyond a year. Not all patients are prepared to engage and accept these forms of therapeutic intervention. We are still some way from moving psychological management from the trial situation into the diabetic clinic. PMID:25657590

  13. A cohort study of diabetic patients and diabetic foot ulceration patients in China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yufeng; Wang, Xuemei; Xia, Lei; Fu, Xiaobing; Xu, Zhangrong; Ran, Xingwu; Yan, Li; Li, Qiu; Mo, Zhaohui; Yan, Zhaoli; Ji, Qiuhe; Li, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    To determine the annual incidence and clinically relevant risk factors for foot ulceration in a large cohort study of diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) patients and diabetes mellitus (DM) patients in China. To investigate a cohort of 1,333 patients comprising 452 DFU patients and 881 DM patients, who underwent foot screening, physical examination, and laboratory tests in eight hospitals. The patients were assessed at baseline in terms of their demographic information, medical and social history, peripheral neuropathy disease (PND) screening, periphery artery disease (PAD) screening, assessment of nutritional status, and diabetic control. One year later, the patients were followed up to determine the incidence of new foot ulcers, amputation, and mortality. By univariate analysis, statistically significant differences were found in age, location, gender, living alone (yes/no), occupation, smoking, hypertension, PND, PAD, nephropathy, retinopathy, cataracts, duration of diabetes, Glycosylated hemoglobin A (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose level, postprandial blood glucose level, insulin level, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, cholesterol, triglyeride, high density lipoprotein (HDL), serum albumin, white blood cell, and body mass index. A binary logistic regression model was used to examine which of these risk factors were independent risk factors for foot ulceration. A total of 687 (51.5%) of the 1,333 patients were followed up for an average of 12 months; there were 458 DM patients and 229 DFU patients. A total of 46 patients died during the follow-up period; 13 were DM patients, and 33 were DFU patients. Of the 641 patients, 445 (69.4%) patients were DM patients, and 196 (30.6%) were DFU patients. At follow-up, 36/445 DM patients (8.1%), and 62/196 DFU patients (31.6%), developed new ulcers; 10/196 DFU patients underwent an amputation. The annual incidence of ulceration for DM patients and amputation for DFU patients were 8.1 and 5.1%, respectively. The annual mortality of

  14. Barriers to diabetes management: patient and provider factors.

    PubMed

    Nam, Soohyun; Chesla, Catherine; Stotts, Nancy A; Kroon, Lisa; Janson, Susan L

    2011-07-01

    Despite significant advances in diagnosis and treatment, the persistence of inadequate metabolic control continues. Poor glycemic control may be reflected by both the failure of diabetes self-management by patients as well as inadequate intervention strategies by clinicians. The purpose of this systematic review is to summarize existing knowledge regarding various barriers of diabetes management from the perspectives of both patients and clinicians. A search of PubMed, CINAHL, ERIC, and PsycINFO identified 1454 articles in English published between 1990 and 2009, addressing type 2 diabetes, patient's barriers, clinician's barriers, and self-management. Patients' adherence, attitude, beliefs, and knowledge about diabetes may affect diabetes self-management. Culture and language capabilities influence the patient's health beliefs, attitudes, health literacy, thereby affecting diabetes self-management. Other influential factors include the patient's financial resources, co-morbidities, and social support. Clinician's attitude, beliefs and knowledge about diabetes also influence diabetes management. Clinicians may further influence the patient's perception through effective communication skills and by having a well-integrated health care system. Identifying barriers to diabetes management is necessary to improve the quality of diabetes care, including the improvement of metabolic control, and diabetes self-management. Further research that considers these barriers is necessary for developing interventions for individuals with type 2 diabetes.

  15. Screening for tuberculosis and LTBI in diabetes patients, Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia.

    PubMed

    Defang, R R; Brostrom, R; Ram, S; Johnson, E; Perman, P S

    2014-06-21

    A retrospective cohort study was performed in Pohnpei, a small Pacific Island, to evaluate the feasibility and results of screening adult diabetes (DM) patients for tuberculosis (TB) and latent tuberculous infection (LTBI) using a symptom screen, tuberculin skin testing and chest radiography. Of 79 patients, 65 (82%) completed screening. Two (3%) patients with active TB and 16 (25%) with LTBI were referred for anti-tuberculosis treatment and isoniazid preventive therapy, respectively. It is feasible and worthwhile to screen diabetes patients for TB, but a number of changes are needed to improve both the screening process and the diagnostic yield.

  16. Diabetes-Related Distress, Depression and Distress-Depression among Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Boon-How; Vos, Rimke; Mohd-Sidik, Sherina; Rutten, Guy E. H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) brings about an increasing psychosocial problem in adult patients. Prevalence data on and associated factors of diabetes related distress (DRD) and depression have been lacking in Asia. This study aimed to examine the prevalence of DRD and depression, and their associated factors in Asian adult T2DM patients. This study was conducted in three public health clinics measuring DRD (Diabetes Distress Scale, DDS), and depression (Patient Health Questionnaire, PHQ). Patients who were at least 30 years of age, had T2DM for more than one year, with regular follow-up and recent laboratory results (< 3 months) were consecutively recruited. Associations between DRD, depression and the combination DRD-depression with demographic and clinical characteristics were analysed using generalized linear models. From 752 invited people, 700 participated (mean age 56.9 years, 52.8% female, 52.9% Malay, 79.1% married). Prevalence of DRD and depression were 49.2% and 41.7%, respectively. Distress and depression were correlated, spearman’s r = 0.50. Patients with higher DRD were younger (OR 0.995, 95% CI 0.996 to 0.991), Chinese (OR 1.2, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.29), attending Dengkil health clinic (OR 1.1, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.22) and had higher scores on the PHQ (OR 1.1, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.06). Depression was less likely in the unmarried compared to divorced/separately living and those attending Dengkil health clinic, but more likely in patients with microvascular complications (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.73) and higher DDS (OR 1.03, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.03). For the combination of DRD and depression, unemployment (OR 4.7, 95% CI 1.02 to 21.20) had positive association, whereas those under medical care at the Salak health clinics (OR 0.28, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.63), and those with a blood pressure > 130/80 mmHg (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.32 to 0.89) were less likely to experience both DRD and depression. DRD and depression were common and correlated in Asian adults with T2DM at primary

  17. Diabetes-Related Distress, Depression and Distress-Depression among Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Chew, Boon-How; Vos, Rimke; Mohd-Sidik, Sherina; Rutten, Guy E H M

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) brings about an increasing psychosocial problem in adult patients. Prevalence data on and associated factors of diabetes related distress (DRD) and depression have been lacking in Asia. This study aimed to examine the prevalence of DRD and depression, and their associated factors in Asian adult T2DM patients. This study was conducted in three public health clinics measuring DRD (Diabetes Distress Scale, DDS), and depression (Patient Health Questionnaire, PHQ). Patients who were at least 30 years of age, had T2DM for more than one year, with regular follow-up and recent laboratory results (< 3 months) were consecutively recruited. Associations between DRD, depression and the combination DRD-depression with demographic and clinical characteristics were analysed using generalized linear models. From 752 invited people, 700 participated (mean age 56.9 years, 52.8% female, 52.9% Malay, 79.1% married). Prevalence of DRD and depression were 49.2% and 41.7%, respectively. Distress and depression were correlated, spearman's r = 0.50. Patients with higher DRD were younger (OR 0.995, 95% CI 0.996 to 0.991), Chinese (OR 1.2, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.29), attending Dengkil health clinic (OR 1.1, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.22) and had higher scores on the PHQ (OR 1.1, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.06). Depression was less likely in the unmarried compared to divorced/separately living and those attending Dengkil health clinic, but more likely in patients with microvascular complications (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.73) and higher DDS (OR 1.03, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.03). For the combination of DRD and depression, unemployment (OR 4.7, 95% CI 1.02 to 21.20) had positive association, whereas those under medical care at the Salak health clinics (OR 0.28, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.63), and those with a blood pressure > 130/80 mmHg (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.32 to 0.89) were less likely to experience both DRD and depression. DRD and depression were common and correlated in Asian adults with T2DM at primary

  18. Diabetes Stories: Use of Patient Narratives of Diabetes to Teach Patient-Centered Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumagai, Arno K.; Murphy, Elizabeth A.; Ross, Paula T.

    2009-01-01

    A critical component to instituting compassionate, patient-centered diabetes care is the training of health care providers. Our institution developed the Family Centered Experience (FCE), a comprehensive 2-year preclinical program based on longitudinal conversations with patients about living with chronic illness. The goal of the FCE is to explore…

  19. Association of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class 1 Chain-Related Gene A Dimorphism with Type 1 Diabetes and Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults in the Algerian Population

    PubMed Central

    Belanteur, Khadidja; Amroun, Habiba; Benyahia, Amel; Heniche, Amel; Azzouz, Malha; Mimouni, Safia; Gervais, Thibaud; Latinne, Dominique; Boudiba, Aissa; Attal, Nabila; Abbadi, Mohamed Cherif

    2012-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA-129) dimorphism was investigated in 73 autoimmune diabetes patients (type 1 diabetes and latent autoimmune diabetes in adults) and 75 controls from Algeria. Only MICA-129 Val allele and MICA-129 Val/Val genotype frequencies were higher among patients than in the control group. Statistical analysis of the estimated extended HLA-DR-DQ-MICA haplotypes shown that individual effects of MICA alleles on HLA-DQ2-DR3-MICA-129 Val/Val and HLA-DQ8-DR4-MICA-129 Val/Val haplotypes were significantly higher in patients than in the control groups. These preliminary data might suggest a relevant role of MICA-129 Val/Val single nucleotide polymorphism (weak/weak binders of NKG2D receptor) in the pathogenesis of T1D and LADA. PMID:22323559

  20. The Influence of Smoking on Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Kuan-Jen; Lee, Jen-Jyh; Chien, Shun-Tien; Suk, Chi-Won; Chiang, Chen-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Background Both smoking and diabetes can increase the risk and influence the manifestations and outcomes of tuberculosis (TB). It is not clear whether the influence of smoking on pulmonary TB differs between non-diabetic and diabetic patients. Herein, we assessed the manifestations and outcomes of TB in relation to smoking in both diabetic and non-diabetic TB patients. Methodology/Principal Findings All diabetic culture-positive pulmonary TB patients notified from 2005–2010 at three teaching hospitals in Taiwan were enrolled. A culture-positive pulmonary TB patient without DM who was notified to the health authority immediately prior to each diabetic TB patient was selected for comparison. The 972 patients in this study cohort included 365 (37.6%) non-diabetic non-smokers, 149 (15.3%) non-diabetic smokers, 284 (29.2%) diabetic non-smokers, and 174 (17.9%) diabetic smokers. The adjusted relative risk of a pretreatment positive smear for a smoker compared with a non-smoker was 2.19 (95% CI 1.38–3.47) in non-diabetic patients and 2.23 (95% CI 1.29–3.87) in diabetic culture-positive pulmonary TB patients. The adjusted relative risk for a positive smear among diabetic smokers was 5.61 (95% CI 3.35–9.41) compared with non-diabetic non-smokers. Smoking was significantly associated with an increased frequency of bilateral lung parenchyma involvement (AdjOR 1.84, 95% CI 1.16–2.93), far-advanced pulmonary TB (AdjOR 1.91, 95% CI 1.04–3.50), cavitary lesions (AdjOR 2.03, 95% CI 1.29–3.20), and unfavorable outcomes of TB (AdjOR 2.35, 95% CI 1.02–5.41) in non-diabetic patients. However, smoking was not associated with cavitary lung parenchyma lesions regarding the location, number or size of the cavity in diabetic TB patients. Conclusions/Significance Smoking and diabetes have joint effects on a pretreatment positive smear. Diabetic smokers had more than a 5-fold increased risk of a pretreatment positive smear than did non-diabetic non-smokers, indicating

  1. Comparison of physician practice patterns for older adults compared to NHANES diabetes cohort on oral/other therapy.

    PubMed

    Shaya, Fadia T; Chirikov, Viktor V; Bron, Morgan; Howard, DeLeonardo; Foster, Clyde; Yan, Xia; Khanna, Niharika; Warrington, Verlyn O

    2013-02-01

    The American Diabetes Association and European Association for the Study of Diabetes issued a new patient-centered approach for the management of hyperglycemia in patients with Type 2 diabetes. With a focus on older adults and the elderly, the authors explored the alignment of elements of the suggested framework with patients' reports of receiving combination or monotherapy using US national survey data (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001-2010) and a physician survey. Combination therapy was positively associated with age (range: 1.56-1.63; p = 0.04-0.07), obesity (odds ratio [OR]: 1.40; p = 0.01), HbA(1c) ≥7.0 (OR: 2.00; p < 0.01), number of years of living with diabetes (OR: 1.02 per year; p = 0.01) and hyperlipidemia (OR: 1.36; p = 0.02). An interaction term between years of living with diabetes and comorbidities >1 pointed to a trend of those with comorbidities >1 to be less probable to report combination therapy (OR: 0.98; p = 0.07) per additional year of diabetes history. Results suggest that sicker, older patients might benefit from more aggressive therapy, in the context of diabetes prevalence, this is expected to continue rising in that population.

  2. Improving Depression Care in Patients with Diabetes and Multiple Complications

    PubMed Central

    Kinder, Leslie S; Katon, Wayne J; Ludman, Evette; Russo, Joan; Simon, Greg; Lin, Elizabeth HB; Ciechanowski, Paul; Von Korff, Michael; Young, Bessie

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Depression is common in patients with diabetes, but it is often inadequately treated within primary care. Competing clinical demands and treatment resistance may make it especially difficult to improve depressive symptoms in patients with diabetes who have multiple complications. OBJECTIVE To determine whether a collaborative care intervention for depression would be as effective in patients with diabetes who had 2 or more complications as in patients with diabetes who had fewer complications. DESIGN The Pathways Study was a randomized control trial comparing collaborative care case management for depression and usual primary care. This secondary analysis compared outcomes in patients with 2 or more complications to patients with fewer complications. PATIENTS Three hundred and twenty-nine patients with diabetes and comorbid depression were recruited through primary care clinics of a large prepaid health plan. MEASUREMENTS Depression was assessed at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months with the 20-item depression scale from the Hopkins Symptom Checklist. Diabetes complications were determined from automated patient records. RESULTS The Pathways collaborative care intervention was significantly more successful at reducing depressive symptoms than usual primary care in patients with diabetes who had 2 or more complications. Patients with fewer than 2 complications experienced similar reductions in depressive symptoms in both intervention and usual care. CONCLUSION Patients with depression and diabetes who have multiple complications may benefit most from collaborative care for depression. These findings suggest that with appropriate intervention depression can be successfully treated in patients with diabetes who have the highest severity of medical problems. PMID:16836628

  3. Do health literacy and patient empowerment affect self-care behaviour? A survey study among Turkish patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Eyüboğlu, Ezgi; Schulz, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to assess the impact of health literacy and patient empowerment on diabetes self-care behaviour in patients in metropolitan Turkish diabetes centres. The conceptual background is provided by the psychological health empowerment model, which holds that health literacy without patient empowerment comes down to wasting health resources, while empowerment without health literacy can lead to dangerous or suboptimal health behaviour. Design, setting and participants A cross-sectional study was conducted with 167 patients over the age of 18 from one of two diabetes clinics in a major Turkish City. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to eligible outpatients who had an appointment in one of the clinics. Health literacy was measured by a newly translated Turkish version of the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (S-TOFHLA) and the Chew self-report scale. Patient empowerment was measured by a 12-item scale based on Spreitzer's conceptualisation of psychological empowerment in the workplace. Self-care behaviour was measured by the Self-care behaviours were measured by the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities Measure (SDSCA). Level of diabetes knowledge was measured by Diabetes Knowledge Test. Results Two subscales of empowerment, impact and self-determination, predicted self-reported frequency of self-care behaviours. Neither health literacy nor diabetes knowledge had an effect on self-care behaviours. Conclusions Health literacy might be more effective in clinical decisions while empowerment might exert a stronger influence on habitual health behaviours. PMID:26975936

  4. [Sick day management in elderly patients with diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Susumu

    2013-11-01

    A bad cold, the flu or a serious illness can make blood glucose too high in elderly person with diabetes. Gastrointestinal illnesses may cause hypoglycemia for individuals treated with insulin, sulfonylureas or glitinides. When the persons with diabetes discontinue insulin or diabetes medications because of appetite loss and reduced food intake, they may fall into diabetic crises, such as ketoacidosis, or hyperosmolar hyperglycemic syndrome. The elderly patients need to take extra precautions on sick days to avoid diabetic crises or hypoglycemia. Key principles of sick day management are (1) maintaining hydration and carbohydrate intake, (2) monitoring blood glucose and ketone levels, (3) adjusting diabetes medications according to carbohydrate intake, blood glucose and ketone levels. In Japan, the numbers of frail elderly diabetic patients is markedly increased, effective and efficient sick day management for frail elderly diabetic patients is requested.

  5. Depression and All-Cause Mortality Among Persons With Diabetes: Are Older Adults at Higher Risk? - Results from the Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD) Study

    PubMed Central

    Kimbro, Lindsay B.; Mangione, Carol M.; Steers, W. Neil; Duru, O. Kenrik; McEwen, Laura; Karter, Andrew; Ettner, Susan L.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives Several studies have found that depression leads to an increased risk of mortality among patients with diabetes. Our goal is to compare the strength of the association between depression and mortality between the elderly and non-elderly population. Design A survival analysis conducted in a longitudinal cohort study of persons with diabetes to test the association of depression and mortality among Medicare-aged and non-Medicare aged persons. Setting Managed care. Participants 3341 persons aged 18 and over with diabetes who participated in the wave 2 survey of the Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD) study. Measurements The primary outcome was mortality risk, which was measured as days until death using linked data from the National Death Index. Depression was measured using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ8). Results After controlling for age, gender, race/ethnicity, income, and other comorbidities, mortality risk among depressed persons with diabetes was 49% higher than among non-depressed persons with diabetes. However, our results varied by age. After controlling for the same variables, mortality risk among persons over the age 65 years and older with depression was 78% greater than among elderly persons without depression. For the less than 65-year-old cohort, the effect of depression on mortality was smaller and not statistically significant. Conclusion This analysis suggests that the effect of depression on mortality among persons with diabetes is most significant for older adults. Because there is evidence in the literature that treatment of depression in the elderly can lead to lower mortality, our results may suggest that older adults with diabetes should be considered a high priority population for depression screening and treatment. PMID:24823259

  6. Redesigning an intensive insulin service for patients with type 1 diabetes: a patient consultation exercise

    PubMed Central

    Ozcan, Seyda; Rogers, Helen; Choudhary, Pratik; Amiel, Stephanie A; Cox, Alison; Forbes, Angus

    2013-01-01

    Context Providing effective support for patients in using insulin effectively is essential for good diabetes care. For that support to be effective it must reflect and attend to the needs of patients. Purpose To explore the perspectives of adult type 1 diabetes patients on their current diabetes care in order to generate ideas for creating a new patient centered intensive insulin clinic. Methods A multi-method approach was used, comprising: an observational exercise of current clinical care; three focus groups (n = 17); and a survey of service users (n = 419) to test the ideas generated from the observational exercise and focus groups (rating 1 to 5 in terms of importance). The ideas generated by the multi-method approach were organized thematically and mapped onto the Chronic Care Model (CCM). Results The themes and preferences for service redesign in relation to CCM components were: health care organization, there was an interest in having enhanced systems for sharing clinical information; self-management support, patients would like more flexible and easy to access resources and more help with diabetes technology and psychosocial support; delivery system design and clinical information systems, the need for greater integration of care and better use of clinic time; productive relationships, participants would like more continuity; access to health professionals, patient involvement and care planning. The findings from the patient survey indicate high preferences for most of the areas for service enhancement identified in the focus groups and observational exercise. Clinical feedback and professional continuity (median = 5, interquartile range = 1) were the most highly rated. Conclusion The patient consultation process had generated important ideas on how the clinical team and service can improve the care provided. Key areas for service development were: a stronger emphasis of collaborative care planning; improved patient choice in the use of health technology

  7. Lifestyle and cardiometabolic risk in adults with type 1 diabetes: a review.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Catherine; Brazeau, Anne-Sophie; Gingras, Véronique; Desjardins, Katherine; Strychar, Irene; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi

    2014-02-01

    Over the past decades, there has been a major upward shift in the prevalence of cardiometabolic risk (CMR) factors (central obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension and dyslipidemia) in patients with type 1 diabetes, which could have either an additive or a synergistic effect on risk for cardiovascular disease. These metabolic changes are occurring in parallel to the worldwide obesity epidemic and the widespread use of intensive insulin therapy. Poor lifestyle habits (poor diet quality, sedentary behaviours and smoking) are known to be driving factors for increased CMR factors in the general population. The objective of this review is to explore the lifestyle habits of adults with type 1 diabetes and its potential association with CMR factors. Evidence suggests that adherence to dietary guidelines is low in subjects with type 1 diabetes with a high prevalence of patients consuming an atherogenic diet. Sedentary habits are also more prevalent than in the general population, possibly because of the additional contribution of exercise-induced hypoglycemic fear. Moreover, the prevalence of smokers is still significant in the population with type 1 diabetes. All of these behaviours could trigger a cascade of metabolic anomalies that may contribute to increased CMR factors in patients with type 1 diabetes. The intensification of insulin treatment leading to new daily challenges (e.g. carbohydrates counting, increase of hypoglycemia) could contribute to the adoption of poor lifestyle habits. Preventive measures, such as identification of patients at high risk and promotion of lifestyle changes, should be encouraged. The most appropriate therapeutic measures remain to be established. PMID:24485215

  8. Targeted recruitment of adults with type 2 diabetes for a physical activity intervention.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Elizabeth J; Niles, Barbara L; Mori, DeAnna L

    2015-05-01

    Recruiting sufficient numbers of participants for physical activity trials for individuals with diabetes can be difficult because there are often many behavioral demands for participants, and inclusion and exclusion criteria can be extensive. This study examined the recruitment strategies used for a randomized, controlled trial designed to investigate the efficacy of an automated telephone intervention to promote physical activity in adults with type 2 diabetes in an urban Veterans Administration health care system. Traditional recruitment approaches of posting flyers and obtaining referrals from clinicians did not yield sufficient numbers of interested patients. Using the electronic medical record system to identify patients with uncontrolled diabetes allowed staff to send targeted mailings to participants, and 77% of participants were recruited using this method. The targeted mailing approach elicited a positive response rate of 12% (328 of 2,764 potential participants identified) and appeared to produce a more representative and appropriate sample than other recruitment methods used. Lessons learned in this study may be helpful to researchers in future trials who attempt to recruit participants with diabetes for physical activity protocols. PMID:25987808

  9. Reduced Heart Rate Variability Predicts Progression of Coronary Artery Calcification in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes and Controls Without Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Ticiana C.; Ehrlich, James; Hunter, Cortney M.; Kinney, Gregory L.; Rewers, Marian

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Aim Reduced heart rate variability (HRV) is a manifestation of cardiac autonomic neuropathy, a known complication of type 1 diabetes (T1D). We evaluated whether HRV predicted coronary artery calcium (CAC) progression. Methods Subjects between 19 and 56 years of age with T1D or those without diabetes from the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study underwent supine deep breathing 12-lead electrocardiograms. The SD of consecutive RR intervals was used as a measure of HRV. CAC was measured at two visits 6.0 ± 0.5 years apart. Progression of CAC was defined as an increase in square root transformed CAC volume of ≥2.5 mm3, excluding patients who had cardiovascular events during follow-up. Results Reduced HRV was associated with older age, higher hemoglobin A1c, elevated albuminuria, CAC volume at baseline, and increased fibrinogen. Higher HRV at baseline was associated with lower likelihood CAC progression (odds ratio = 0.71, 95% confidence interval 0.56–0.90, P = 0.005), and the adjustment for known cardiovascular risk factors did not change this strong association, including adjustment for inflammatory markers. Conclusions Reduced HRV predicted progression of CAC in adults with and without T1D. This association further supports the participation of autonomic neuropathy in the atherosclerosis process. PMID:21128843

  10. Predictors of the antibody response to influenza vaccination in older adults with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    McElhaney, Janet E; Garneau, Hugo; Camous, Xavier; Dupuis, Gilles; Pawelec, Graham; Baehl, Sarra; Tessier, Daniel; Frost, Eric H; Frasca, Daniela; Larbi, Anis; Fulop, Tamas

    2015-01-01

    Objective Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is one of the most prevalent chronic inflammatory diseases of the elderly. Its development is related to the alteration of the immune system with aging characterized by immunosenescence and inflamm-aging. In turn, T2DM also alters the immune response. As a consequence, older people with T2DM are more susceptible to influenza and to its complications as compared with healthy controls. Vaccination against influenza has shown poor efficacy in the older population and even less efficacy in patients with diabetes. We studied here the antibody response to vaccination in healthy and diabetic elderly participants. Research design and methods In 2 groups of elderly participants (healthy N=119 and T2DM N=102), we measured the immunogenicity of influenza vaccine by hemagglutination inhibition assays. We assessed several blood and functional parameters as potential predictors of the vaccine efficacy. Results We found no difference between antibody responses in diabetic elderly compared with healthy elderly. Among the biological and functional determinants, the cytomegalovirus (CMV) serostatus played a more prominent role in determining the magnitude of response. We concluded that in addition to age and diabetic status, immunological history such as CMV status should be taken into account. None of the other biological or functional parameters studied could be reliably linked to the vaccine antibody response in older adults who are not frail including those with well-controlled diabetes. Conclusions Our data strongly suggest that influenza vaccine should be administered to elderly patients with T2DM; however, the immune determinants of the antibody response to influenza vaccination should be further investigated. PMID:26504526

  11. Primary and Specialty Medical Care Among Ethnically Diverse, Older Rural Adults With Type 2 Diabetes: The ELDER Diabetes Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Smith, Shannon L.; Skelly, Anne H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Residents in rural communities in the United States, especially ethnic minority group members, have limited access to primary and specialty health care that is critical for diabetes management. This study examines primary and specialty medical care utilization among a rural, ethnically diverse, older adult population with diabetes.…

  12. Primary and Specialty Medical Care among Ethnically Diverse, Older Rural Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: The ELDER Diabetes Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Smith, Shannon L.; Skelly, Anne H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Residents in rural communities in the United States, especially ethnic minority group members, have limited access to primary and specialty health care that is critical for diabetes management. This study examines primary and specialty medical care utilization among a rural, ethnically diverse, older adult population with diabetes.…

  13. Physical Activity Among Rural Older Adults With Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Snively, Beverly M.; Bell, Ronny A.; Smith, Shannon L.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Wetmore-Arkader, Lindsay K.; Quandt, Sara A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose This analysis describes physical activity levels and factors associated with physical activity in an ethnically diverse (African American, Native American, white) sample of rural older adults with diabetes. Method Data were collected using a population-based, cross-sectional stratified random sample survey of 701 community-dwelling elders with diabetes completed in 2 rural North Carolina counties. Outcome measures were as follows: first, physical activity in the past year, and second, days physically active in the prior week (0-7). Potential correlates included personal and health characteristics and were evaluated for statistical significance using logistic regression models. Findings About half (52.5%) of the participants stated that they had engaged in physical activity in the past year. Among those, 42.5% stated that they had no days with at least 30 minutes of continuous physical activity in the prior week, while 21.5% reported daily physical activity. Common activities were walking and housework. Correlates of physical activity in the past year and days active in the prior week included measures of physical health and mobility. Conclusions Physical activity in this ethnically diverse sample of rural elders with diabetes is limited. Effort must be invested to increase physical activity in these groups. PMID:16606429

  14. Association of dietary sodium intake with atherogenesis in experimental diabetes and with cardiovascular disease in patients with Type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tikellis, Chris; Pickering, Raelene J; Tsorotes, Despina; Harjutsalo, Valma; Thorn, Lena; Ahola, Aila; Wadén, Johan; Tolonen, Nina; Saraheimo, Markku; Gordin, Daniel; Forsblom, Carol; Groop, Per-Henrik; Cooper, Mark E; Moran, John; Thomas, Merlin C

    2013-05-01

    It is recommended that individuals with diabetes restrict their dietary sodium intake. However, although salt intake is correlated with BP (blood pressure), it also partly determines the activation state of the RAAS (renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system), a key mediator of diabetes-associated atherosclerosis. apoE KO (apolipoprotein E knockout) mice were allocated for the induction of diabetes with streptozotocin or citrate buffer (controls) and further randomized to isocaloric diets containing 0.05%, 0.3% or 3.1% sodium with or without the ACEi [ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme) inhibitor] perindopril. After 6 weeks of study, plaque accumulation was quantified and markers of atherogenesis were assessed using RT-PCR (reverse transcription-PCR) and ELISA. The association of sodium intake and adverse cardiovascular and mortality outcomes were explored in 2648 adults with Type 1 diabetes without prior CVD (cardiovascular disease) from the FinnDiane study. A 0.05% sodium diet was associated with increased plaque accumulation in diabetic apoE KO mice, associated with activation of the RAAS. By contrast, a diet containing 3.1% sodium suppressed atherogenesis associated with suppression of the RAAS, with an efficacy comparable with ACE inhibition. In adults with Type 1 diabetes, low sodium intake was also associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality and new-onset cardiovascular events. However, high sodium intake was also associated with adverse outcomes, leading to a J-shaped relationship overall. Although BP lowering is an important goal for the management of diabetes, off-target actions to activate the RAAS may contribute to an observed lack of protection from cardiovascular complications in patients with Type 1 diabetes with low sodium intake.

  15. Serum Uric Acid and Hypertension in Adults: a Paradoxical Relationship in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, Petter; Wadwa, R. Paul; Sirota, Jeffrey C.; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; McFann, Kimberly; Rewers, Marian; Rivard, Christopher J.; Jalal, Diana; Chonchol, Michel B.; Johnson, Richard J.; Maahs, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Adults with type 1 diabetes have lower serum uric acid levels compared to non-diabetic adults. Little is known about the relationship between serum uric acid and blood pressure in type 1 diabetes and whether it differs from the positive relationship found in non-diabetic adults. We assessed the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships over 6-years between serum uric acid and blood pressure in adults with (35±9 years, n=393) and without (38±9 years n=685) T1D in the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study. In non-diabetic adults, serum uric acid was associated with systolic blood pressure in multivariable-models adjusted for cardiovascular risk-factors. In adults with type 1 diabetes, a negative association was observed between serum uric acid and systolic blood pressure after multivariable-adjustments. A positive association was observed between serum uric acid and systolic blood pressure in non-diabetic adults. In contrast, an inverse relationship was demonstrated after multivariable-adjustments in type 1 diabetes. PMID:24667019

  16. Older adults' beliefs about the timeline of type 2 diabetes and adherence to dietary regimens.

    PubMed

    Hemphill, Rachel C; Stephens, Mary Ann Parris; Rook, Karen S; Franks, Melissa M; Salem, James K

    2013-01-01

    The common-sense model posits that behavioural coping with illness is shaped by a complex combination of individuals' abstract and concrete beliefs about their illness. We investigated this theoretical assumption in a study of 116 older adults diagnosed with type 2 diabetes who completed in-person interviews at baseline and six and 12 months later. Specifically, we examined (1) the interaction of patients' abstract and concrete beliefs about the timeline of their diabetes as a predictor of change in adherence to a healthy diet and (2) whether these interactive effects differ among male and female patients. Abstract timeline beliefs were conceptualised as those pertaining to disease duration; concrete timeline beliefs were conceptualised as those pertaining to variability of disease symptoms (i.e. symptoms are stable versus fluctuating). As predicted, duration beliefs were positively associated with improvement in adherence among patients who viewed disease symptoms as stable, but not among those who viewed symptoms as variable. When gender was considered, these interactive effects were observed among male (but not female) patients. Findings revealed that the behavioural effects of men's abstract knowledge about their diabetes were conditioned by their concrete representations of the disease, suggesting a bottom-up process of influence with implications for intervention.

  17. Fluorometric determination of acid proteinase activity in Candida albicans strains from diabetic patients with vulvovaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Zuhal; Kilic, Nedret; Kalkanci, Ayse

    2011-09-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis is one of the most frequent disorders in obstetrics and gynaecology. Approximately three-quarters of all adult women experience at least one episode of vulvovaginal candidiasis during their life span. Diabetes mellitus (DM) increases the rate of vaginal colonisation and infection with Candida species. The secreted acid proteinase might be especially relevant in the pathogenesis of vulvovaginal candidiasis. The aim of this study was to determine the acid proteinase activity in the samples of Candida albicans from diabetic patients with vulvovaginal candidiasis by a fluorometric method. Vaginal swabs were taken from 33 women (aged between 22 and 57 years) having symptoms of vaginitis. Patients were divided into three groups: control group, controlled diabetic group and uncontrolled diabetic group. The proteinase activity in the culture supernatants was determined by a modified fluorometric method. Acid proteinase activities were significantly increased in the uncontrolled diabetic group in comparison with both the control group and the controlled diabetic group (P < 0.05). Acid proteinase may play an important role in C. albicans pathogenesis in diabetic patients. Improving glucose control may reduce the risk of Candida colonisation and potentially symptomatic infection, among women with diabetes and hence may be useful even for weaker enzyme activity measurements.

  18. What is important for you? A qualitative interview study of living with diabetes and experiences of diabetes care to establish a basis for a tailored Patient-Reported Outcome Measure for the Swedish National Diabetes Register

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Unn-Britt; Gudbjörnsdottir, Soffia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives There is a growing emphasis on the perspective of individuals living with diabetes and the need for a more person-centred diabetes care. At present, the Swedish National Diabetes Register (NDR) lacks patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) based on the perspective of the patient. As a basis for a new PROM, the aim of this study was to describe important aspects in life for adult individuals with diabetes. Design Semistructured qualitative interviews analysed using content analysis. Setting Hospital-based outpatient clinics and primary healthcare clinics in Sweden. Participants 29 adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) (n=15) and type 2 DM (n=14). Inclusion criteria: Swedish adults (≥18 years) living with type 1 DM or type 2 DM (duration ≥5 years) able to describe their situation in Swedish. Purposive sampling generated heterogeneous characteristics. Results To live a good life with diabetes is demanding for the individual, but experienced barriers can be eased by support from others in the personal sphere, and by professional support from diabetes care. Diabetes care was a crucial resource to nurture the individual's ability and knowledge to manage diabetes, and to facilitate life with diabetes by supplying support, guidance, medical treatment and technical devices tailored to individual needs. The analysis resulted in the overarching theme ‘To live a good life with diabetes’ constituting the two main categories ‘How I feel and how things are going with my diabetes’ and ‘Support from diabetes care in managing diabetes’ including five different categories. Conclusions Common aspects were identified including the experience of living with diabetes and support from diabetes care. These will be used to establish a basis for a tailored PROM for the NDR. PMID:27013595

  19. Prediabetes in California: Nearly Half of California Adults on Path to Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Babey, Susan H; Wolstein, Joelle; Diamant, Allison L; Goldstein, Harold

    2016-03-01

    In California, more than 13 million adults (46 percent of all adults in the state) are estimated to have prediabetes or undiagnosed diabetes. An additional 2.5 million adults have diagnosed diabetes. Altogether, 15.5 million adults (55 percent of all California adults) have prediabetes or diabetes. Although rates of prediabetes increase with age, rates are also high among young adults, with one-third of those ages 18-39 having prediabetes. In addition, rates of prediabetes are disproportionately high among young adults of color, with more than one-third of Latino, Pacific Islander, American Indian, African-American, and multiracial Californians ages 18-39 estimated to have prediabetes. Policy efforts should focus on reducing the burden of prediabetes and diabetes through support for prevention and treatment. PMID:27197309

  20. Clinical Characteristics of Young Type 2 Diabetes Patients with Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wenjia; Cai, Xiaoling; Han, Xueyao; Ji, Linong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing rapidly in the young population. The clinical characteristics and risk factors for young type 2 diabetes patients with atherosclerosis are not fully explicated. The aim of the present study was to investigate various clinical and biochemical characteristics of young type 2 diabetic patients with atherosclerosis. Design and Methods This was a cross-sectional study. The study involved 2199 hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes. The young patients were classified into the atherosclerotic group or the non-atherosclerotic group, and we also enrolled an older group with peripheral atherosclerosis disease and an age of at least 45 years. Comparisons were made between the different groups to investigate the cardiovascular and metabolic risk profiles of young type 2 diabetes patients with atherosclerosis. We also used logistic regression models to assess the atherosclerosis risk factors for young patients. Results Compared to older type 2 diabetes patients with atherosclerosis, young patients with atherosclerosis had more deleterious profiles of weight and hyperlipidemia. Only age and diabetes duration were found to be significant independent risk factors for atherosclerosis in young patients. The ratio of the presence of atherosclerosis in the lower extremity arteries alone was significantly higher in young patients than older patients (26.4% vs. 14.0%, P = 0.000). Conclusion Young type 2 diabetes patients with atherosclerosis have more adverse cardiovascular risk profiles and inadequate control of these risk factors. Lower extremity examination is of high importance in young patients. PMID:27391819

  1. Psychological Adjustment and Neuropsychological Performance in Diabetic Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skenazy, Judy A.; Bigler, Erin D.

    1985-01-01

    Compared diabetic (N=39) with nondiabetic chronic illness patients (N=20) and healthy controls (N=24). The chronic illness and the diabetic groups had significant elevations on the Hypochondriasis, Depression, and Hysteria scales of the Feschingbauer Abbreviated MMPI. For diabetics, results demonstrated a negligible effect of poor adjustment on…

  2. Signal Detection Analysis of Factors Associated with Diabetes among Semirural Mexican American Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanni, K. D.; Ahn, D. A.; Winkleby, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Signal detection analysis was used to evaluate a combination of sociodemographic, acculturation, mental health, health care, and chronic disease risk factors potentially associated with diabetes in a sample of 4,505 semirural Mexican American adults. Overall, 8.9% of adults had been diagnosed with diabetes. The analysis resulted in 12 mutually…

  3. Diabetes Mellitus and Its Correlates in an Iranian Adult Population

    PubMed Central

    Kamangar, Farin; Poutschi, Hossein; Islami, Farhad; Abnet, Christian C.; Freedman, Neal D.; Taylor, Philip R.; Pharoah, Paul; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul J.; Dawsey, Sanford M.; Malekzadeh, Reza; Etemadi, Arash

    2011-01-01

    The rising epidemic of diabetes imposes a substantial economic burden on the Middle East. Using baseline data from a population based cohort study, we aimed to identify the correlates of diabetes mellitus (DM) in a mainly rural population from Iran. Between 2004 and 2007, 50044 adults between 30 and 87 years old from Golestan Province located in Northeast Iran were enrolled in the Golestan Cohort Study. Demographic and health-related information was collected using questionnaires. Individuals' body sizes at ages 15 and 30 were assessed by validated pictograms ranging from 1 (very lean) to 7 in men and 9 in women. DM diagnosis was based on the self-report of a physician's diagnosis. The accuracy of self-reported DM was evaluated in a subcohort of 3811 individuals using fasting plasma glucose level and medical records. Poisson regression with robust variance estimator was used to estimate prevalence ratios (PR's). The prevalence of self-reported DM standardized to the national and world population was 5.7% and 6.2%, respectively. Self-reported DM had 61.5% sensitivity and 97.6% specificity. Socioeconomic status was inversely associated with DM prevalence. Green tea and opium consumption increased the prevalence of DM. Obesity at all ages and extreme leanness in childhood increased diabetes prevalence. Being obese throughout life doubled DM prevalence in women (PR: 2.1; 95% CI: 1.8, 2.4). These findings emphasize the importance of improving DM awareness, improving general living conditions, and early lifestyle modifications in diabetes prevention. PMID:22053206

  4. Learning Difficulties of Diabetic Patients: A Survey of Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnet, Caroline; Gagnayre, Remi; d'Ivernois, Jean-Francois

    1998-01-01

    Surveys 85 health care professionals on the learning difficulties of diabetic patients. Results show that educators find it easy to teach techniques: patients master procedures well and make few mistakes. In contrast, diabetic patients seem to have problems learning skills, such as insulin dose adjustment, that require complex problem-solving.…

  5. [Changes in cognitive function in patients with diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Szémán, Barbara; Nagy, Géza; Varga, Tímea; Veres-Székely, Anna; Sasvári, Mária; Fitala, Dávid; Szollosi, Adrienn; Katonai, Rózsa; Kotyuk, Eszter; Somogyi, Anikó

    2012-03-01

    Patients with diabetes are approximately 1.5 times more likely to experience cognitive decline than individuals without diabetes mellitus. Most of the data suggest that patients with diabetes have reduced performance in numerous domains of cognitive function. In patients with type 1 diabetes, specific and global deficits involving speed of psychomotor efficiency, information processing, mental flexibility, attention, and visual perception seem to be present, while in patients with type 2 diabetes an increase in memory deficits, a reduction in psychomotor speed, and reduced frontal lobe (executive) functions have been found. The complex pathophysiology of changes in the central nervous system in diabetes has not yet been fully elucidated. It is important to consider the patient's age at the onset of diabetes, the glycemic control status, and the presence of diabetic complications. Neurological consequences of diabetes appear parallel to those observed in the aging brain. Neuroimaging studies highlight several structural cerebral changes, cortical and subcortical atrophy, beside increased leukoaraiosis that occurs in association with diabetes. There is supporting evidence from many hypotheses to explain the pathophysiology of cognitive decline associated with diabetes. The main hypotheses pointing to the potential, implied mechanisms involve hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, microvascular disease, insulin resistance, hyperinsulinism, hyperphosphorylation of tau protein, and amyloid-β deposition.

  6. Depression in diabetic patients attending University of Gondar Hospital Diabetic Clinic, Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Birhanu, Anteneh Messele; Alemu, Fekadu Mazengia; Ashenafie, Tesfaye Demeke; Balcha, Shitaye Alemu; Dachew, Berihun Assefa

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus, frequently associated with comorbid depression, contributes to the double burden of individual patients and community. Depression remains undiagnosed in as many as 50%–75% of diabetes cases. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and associated factors of depression among diabetic patients attending the University of Gondar Hospital Diabetic Clinic, Northwest Ethiopia. Methods An institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted from March to May 2014 among 422 sampled diabetic patients attending the University of Gondar Hospital Diabetic Clinic. The participants were selected using systematic random sampling. Data were collected by face-to-face interview using a standardized and pretested questionnaire linked with patient record review. Depression was assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Data were entered to EPI INFO version 7 and analyzed by SPSS version 20 software. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with depression. Results A total of 415 diabetic patients participated in the study with a response rate of 98.3%. The prevalence of depression among diabetic patients was found to be 15.4% (95% confidence interval (CI): 11.7–19.2). Only religion (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] =2.65 and 95% CI: 1.1–6.0) and duration of diabetes (AOR =0.27 and 95% CI: 0.07–0.92) were the factors associated with depression among diabetic patients. Conclusion The prevalence of depression was low as compared to other similar studies elsewhere. Disease (diabetes) duration of 10 years and above and being a Muslim religion follower (as compared to Christian) were the factors significantly associated with depression. Early screening of depression and treating depression as a routine component of diabetes care are recommended. Further research with a large sample size, wider geographical coverage, and segregation of type of diabetes mellitus is recommended. PMID:27274296

  7. Diabetes Remission after Nonsurgical Intensive Lifestyle Intervention in Obese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mottalib, Adham; Sakr, Mahmoud; Shehabeldin, Mohamed; Hamdy, Osama

    2015-01-01

    Partial or complete remission from type 2 diabetes was recently observed after bariatric surgeries. Limited data is available about the possibility of inducing diabetes remission through intensive weight reduction. We retrospectively evaluated diabetes remissions after one year of the Weight Achievement and Intensive Treatment (Why WAIT) program, a 12-week intensive program for diabetes weight management in real-world clinical practice. Among 120 obese patients with type 2 diabetes who completed the program, 88 patients returned for follow-up at one year. Nineteen patients (21.6%) had major improvement in their glycemic control, defined as achieving an A1C <6.5% after one year. Four patients (4.5%) achieved either partial or complete diabetes remission defined as A1C <6.5% and <5.7%, respectively, on no antihyperglycemic medications for one year; 2 achieved partial remission (2.3%) and 2 achieved complete remission (2.3%). At the time of intervention, patients who achieved diabetes remission had shorter diabetes duration (<5 years) and lower A1C (<8%) and were treated with fewer than 2 oral medications. They achieved a weight reduction of >7% after 12 weeks. These results indicate that a subset of obese patients with type 2 diabetes is appropriate for intensive lifestyle intervention with the aim of inducing diabetes remission. PMID:26114120

  8. Do Perceptions of Empowerment Affect Glycemic Control and Self-Care Among Adults with Type 2 Diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Melba Sheila; Karkada, Subrahmanya Nairy; Hanrahan, Nancy P.; Venkatesaperumal, Ramesh; Amirtharaj, Anandhi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Arab adult with T2DM is understudied with less known facts about the perception of empowerment and its relationship with self-care and glycemic control. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which perception of empowerment by Arab adults living with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) was associated with better glycemic control and self-care management. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was led among 300 Arab adults living in Oman with T2DM in an outpatient diabetes clinic. The Diabetes Empowerment Scale (DES), glycosylated haemaglobin (HbA1c) and Body mass index was assessed. The DES was found to be valid and reliable for the population. ANOVA, Regression analysis, and Structural equation modeling was used for analysis. Results: The composite score and three subscales of DES were a significant and strong predictor of good glycemic control among Omani adults with T2DM (p<0.001). Age, education, duration of DM, prior DM education program and medications were significantly associated with DES. Conclusion: Diabetes nurse educators engaged in the care of adults with T2DM should assess self-empowerment and tailor interventions to increase empowerment for better glycemic control. Patient empowerment plays an essential role in maintaining self-care behaviours and HbA1c. PMID:26156908

  9. Traumatic injuries in patients with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    El-Menyar, Ayman; Mekkodathil, Ahammed; Al-Thani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with increased in-hospital morbidity and mortality in patients sustained traumatic injuries. Identification of risk factors of traumatic injuries that lead to hospital admissions and death in DM patients is crucial to set effective preventive strategies. We aimed to conduct a traditional narrative literature review to describe the role of hypoglycemia as a risk factor of driving and fall-related traumatic injuries. DM poses significant burden as a risk factor and predictor of worse outcomes in traumatic injuries. Although there is no consensus on the impact and clear hazards of hyperglycemia in comparison to the hypoglycemia, both extremes of DM need to be carefully addressed and taken into consideration for proper management. Moreover, physicians, patients, and concerned authorities should be aware of all these potential hazards to share and establish the right management plans. PMID:27162438

  10. Traumatic injuries in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    El-Menyar, Ayman; Mekkodathil, Ahammed; Al-Thani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with increased in-hospital morbidity and mortality in patients sustained traumatic injuries. Identification of risk factors of traumatic injuries that lead to hospital admissions and death in DM patients is crucial to set effective preventive strategies. We aimed to conduct a traditional narrative literature review to describe the role of hypoglycemia as a risk factor of driving and fall-related traumatic injuries. DM poses significant burden as a risk factor and predictor of worse outcomes in traumatic injuries. Although there is no consensus on the impact and clear hazards of hyperglycemia in comparison to the hypoglycemia, both extremes of DM need to be carefully addressed and taken into consideration for proper management. Moreover, physicians, patients, and concerned authorities should be aware of all these potential hazards to share and establish the right management plans. PMID:27162438

  11. Chronic Disease Management: A Residency-Led Intervention to Improve Outcomes in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fellner, Angela N.; Pettit, Ryan C.; Sorscher, Jonathan; Stephens, Lorraine; Drake, Betsy; Welling, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    Background When quality improvement processes are integrated into resident education, many opportunities are created for improved outcomes in patient care. For Bethesda Family Medicine (BFM), integrating quality improvement into resident education is paramount in fulfilling the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Practice-Based Learning and Improvement core competency requirements. Methods A resident-developed diabetes management treatment protocol that targeted 11 evidence-based measures recommended for successful diabetes management was implemented within the BFM residency and all physician practices under its parent healthcare system. This study compares diabetes management at BFM and at 2 other family medicine practices at timepoints before and after protocol implementation. We measured hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and systolic blood pressure (SBP) in adult diabetics and compared patient outcomes for these measures for the first and third quarters of 2009 and 2010. Results In BFM patients, HbA1c, LDL, and SBP levels decreased, but only HbA1c improvement persisted long term. For the comparison groups, in general levels were lower than those of BFM patients but not significantly so after the first measurement period. Conclusions A resident-led treatment protocol can improve HbA1c outcomes among residents' diabetic patients. Periodic educational interventions can enhance residents' focus on diabetes management. Residents in graduate medical education can initiate treatment protocols to improve patient care in a large healthcare system. PMID:23267258

  12. Outcome of renal replacement treatment in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, M A; Briggs, J D; Junor, B J

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare the outcome of renal replacement treatment in patients with diabetes mellitus and in non-diabetic patients with end stage renal failure. DESIGN--Retrospective comparison of cases and matched controls. SETTING--Renal unit, Western Infirmary, Glasgow, providing both dialysis and renal transplantation. PATIENTS--82 Diabetic patients starting renal replacement treatment between 1979 and 1988, compared with 82 matched non-diabetic controls with renal failure and 39 different matched controls undergoing renal transplantation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Patient characteristics, history of smoking, prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy and myocardial ischaemia at start of renal replacement treatment; survival of patients with renal replacement treatment and of patients and allografts with renal transplantation. RESULTS--The overall survival of the diabetic patients during the treatment was 83%, 59%, and 50% at one, three, and five years. Survival was significantly poorer in the diabetic patients than the controls (p less than 0.001). Particularly adverse features for outcome at the start of treatment were increasing age (p less than 0.01) and current cigarette smoking (relative risk (95% confidence interval) 2.28 (0.93 to 4.84), p less than 0.05). Deaths were mainly from cardiac and vascular causes. The incidence of peritonitis in patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis was the same in diabetic patients and controls (49% in each group remained free of peritonitis after one year), and the survival of renal allografts was not significantly worse in diabetic patients (p less than 0.5). CONCLUSIONS--Renal replacement treatment may give good results in diabetic patients, although the outlook remains less favourable than for non-diabetic patients because of coexistent, progressive vascular disease, which is more severe in older patients. PMID:2207427

  13. Prognostic Value of Admission Blood Glucose in Diabetic and Non-diabetic Patients with Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shichao; Pan, Yuesong; Zhao, Xingquan; Liu, Liping; Li, Hao; He, Yan; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun; Guo, Li

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to validate prognostic value of elevated admission blood glucose (ABG) for clinical outcomes in diabetic and non-diabetic patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in a representative large cohort. Data of ICH patients with onset time ≤24 h were derived from the China National Stroke Registry. Clinical outcomes included 3-month poor outcome (death or dependency) and death. Logistic regression was performed for the association between ABG and clinical outcomes, both in the entire cohort and in patients with and without diabetes mellitus. 2951 ICH patients were enrolled, including 267 (9.0%) diabetics. In the entire cohort, there was a trend to increased risk of poor outcome with increasing ABG levels (adjusted OR 1.09; 95% CI, 1.04-1.15; P < 0.001). The risk of poor outcome was significantly greatest for the highest quartile (≥7.53 mmol/L) of ABG (adjusted OR 1.54; 95% CI, 1.17-2.03; p = 0.002, P for trend 0.004). We got similar association in non-diabetics but not in diabetics. Elevated ABG confers a higher risk of poor outcome in non-diabetics than diabetics with similar glucose level. Elevated ABG is an independent predictor of 3-month poor outcome in ICH patients, the prognostic value of which is greater in non-diabetics than diabetics with similar glucose level. PMID:27562114

  14. Prognostic Value of Admission Blood Glucose in Diabetic and Non-diabetic Patients with Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shichao; Pan, Yuesong; Zhao, Xingquan; Liu, Liping; Li, Hao; He, Yan; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun; Guo, Li

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to validate prognostic value of elevated admission blood glucose (ABG) for clinical outcomes in diabetic and non-diabetic patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in a representative large cohort. Data of ICH patients with onset time ≤24 h were derived from the China National Stroke Registry. Clinical outcomes included 3-month poor outcome (death or dependency) and death. Logistic regression was performed for the association between ABG and clinical outcomes, both in the entire cohort and in patients with and without diabetes mellitus. 2951 ICH patients were enrolled, including 267 (9.0%) diabetics. In the entire cohort, there was a trend to increased risk of poor outcome with increasing ABG levels (adjusted OR 1.09; 95% CI, 1.04–1.15; P < 0.001). The risk of poor outcome was significantly greatest for the highest quartile (≥7.53 mmol/L) of ABG (adjusted OR 1.54; 95% CI, 1.17–2.03; p = 0.002, P for trend 0.004). We got similar association in non-diabetics but not in diabetics. Elevated ABG confers a higher risk of poor outcome in non-diabetics than diabetics with similar glucose level. Elevated ABG is an independent predictor of 3-month poor outcome in ICH patients, the prognostic value of which is greater in non-diabetics than diabetics with similar glucose level. PMID:27562114

  15. Trends in Hypertension Prevalence, Awareness, Treatment and Control in an Adult Type 2 Diabetes Spanish Population between 2003 and 2009

    PubMed Central

    de Burgos-Lunar, Carmen; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Salinero-Fort, Miguel A.; Gómez-Campelo, Paloma; Gil, Ángel; Abánades-Herranz, Juan C.; Cárdenas-Valladolid, Juan; del Cura-González, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    In patients with type 2 diabetes, the prevalence of hypertension is higher than in non-diabetic subjects. Despite the high cardiovascular risk involving hypertension in these patients, its prevalence and control are not well known. The aims of this study were: to estimate the hypertension prevalence, awareness, treatment and control in Spanish adults with type 2 diabetes attended in Primary Care; and to analyse its time trend from 2003 to 2009. A serial cross-sectional study from 2003 to 2009 was performed in 21 Primary Care Centres in Madrid. The study population comprised all patients with diagnosed type 2 diabetes in their computerised medical history. Overall annual prevalence during the period 2003–2009 was calculated from and according to sex and age groups. Linear trend tests, regression lines and coefficients of determination were used. In 2003 89.78% (CI 87.92–91.64) of patients with type 2 diabetes suffered hypertension and 94.76% (CI: 92.85–96.67) in 2009. This percentage was greater for women and for patients over 65 years old. 30% of patients suffered previously undiagnosed hypertension in 2003 and 23.1% in 2009. 97% of diagnosed patients received pharmacological treatment and 28.79% reached the blood pressure objective in 2009. The average number of antihypertensive drugs taken was 2.72 in 2003 and 3.27 in 2009. Only 5.2% of patients with type 2 diabetes show blood pressure levels below 130/80 mmHg. Although significant improvements have been achieved in the diagnosis and control of hypertension in people with type 2 diabetes, these continue to remain far from optimum. PMID:24475171

  16. [Treatment of diabetic macular oedema in a type 1 diabetes patient--mistakes in interdisciplinary collaboration].

    PubMed

    Veith, M

    2013-03-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a significant microvascular complication of diabetes. High quality interdisciplinary collaboration is an important aspect ofa successful DR therapy. A case ofa 41-year-old diabetic is presented below, who has been in our care for almost four years. His Diabetes ID card only contains his current glycaemia values. Although the patient had been regularly given a report for his diabetologist with a request for additional information, we have only obtained one value of glycated haemoglobin through the course of the patient's dispensarisation. For this reason, and the non-stabilisation of DR, we have recommended that the patient starts to see a different diabetologist.

  17. Current trends in the monitoring and treatment of diabetic retinopathy in young adults.

    PubMed

    Raczyńska, Dorota; Zorena, Katarzyna; Urban, Beata; Zalewski, Dominik; Skorek, Andrzej; Malukiewicz, Grażyna; Sikorski, Bartosz L

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in young adults have significantly improved in recent years. Research methods have widened significantly, for example, by introducing spectral optical tomography of the eye. Invasive diagnostics, for example, fluorescein angiography, are done less frequently. The early introduction of an insulin pump to improve the administration of insulin is likely to delay the development of diabetic retinopathy, which is particularly important for young patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The first years of diabetes occurring during childhood and youth are the most appropriate to introduce proper therapeutic intervention before any irreversible changes in the eyes appear. The treatment of DR includes increased metabolic control, laserotherapy, pharmacological treatment (antiangiogenic and anti-inflammatory treatment, enzymatic vitreolysis, and intravitreal injections), and surgery. This paper summarizes the up-to-date developments in the diagnostics and treatment of DR. In the literature search, authors used online databases, PubMed, and clinitrials.gov and browsed through individual ophthalmology journals, books, and leading pharmaceutical company websites. PMID:24688225

  18. Personality and illness adaptation in adults with type 1 diabetes: the intervening role of illness coping and perceptions.

    PubMed

    Rassart, Jessica; Luyckx, Koen; Klimstra, Theo A; Moons, Philip; Groven, Chris; Weets, Ilse

    2014-03-01

    Inspired by the common sense model, the present cross-sectional study examined illness perceptions and coping as intervening mechanisms in the relationship between Big Five personality traits and illness adaptation in adults with Type 1 diabetes. A total of 368 individuals with Type 1 diabetes (18-35 years old) completed questionnaires on personality, diabetes-related problems, illness perceptions, and illness coping. First, Neuroticism, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness predicted patients' illness adaptation, above and beyond the effects of sex, age, and illness duration. Second, illness coping was found to be an important mediating mechanism in the relationship between the Big Five and illness adaptation. Finally, perceived consequences and perceived personal control partially mediated the relationship between the Big Five and illness coping. These findings underscore the importance of examining patients' personality to shed light on their daily functioning and, hence, call for tailored intervention programs which take into account the personality of the individual patient.

  19. Regulatory focus and adherence to self-care behaviors among adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Avraham, Rinat; Van Dijk, Dina; Simon-Tuval, Tzahit

    2016-09-01

    The aims of this study were, first, to test the association between regulatory focus of adults with type 2 diabetes and their adherence to two types of self-care behaviors - lifestyle change (e.g. physical activity and diet) and medical care regimens (blood-glucose monitoring, foot care and medication usage). Second, to explore whether a fit between the message framing and patients' regulatory focus would improve their intentions to adhere specifically when the type of behavior fits the patients' regulatory focus as well. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 130 adults with type 2 diabetes who were hospitalized in an academic medical center. The patients completed a set of questionnaires that included their diabetes self-care activities, regulatory focus, self-esteem and demographic, socioeconomic and clinical data. In addition, participants were exposed to either a gain-framed or a loss-framed message, and were then asked to indicate their intention to improve adherence to self-care behaviors. A multivariable linear regression model revealed that promoters reported higher adherence to lifestyle change behaviors than preventers did (B = .60, p = .028). However, no effect of regulatory focus on adherence to medical care regimens was found (B = .46, p = .114). In addition, preventers reported higher intentions to adhere to medical care behaviors when the message framing was congruent with prevention focus (B = 1.16, p = .023). However, promoters did not report higher intentions to adhere to lifestyle behaviors when the message framing was congruent with promotion focus (B = -.16, p = .765). These findings justify the need to develop tailor-made interventions that are adjusted to both patients' regulatory focus and type of health behavior. PMID:26576471

  20. Dental implant survival in diabetic patients; review and recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Rajendra Kumar; Gupta, Deepesh Kumar; Singh, Amit Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Rising population of diabetic individuals across the world has become a big concern to the society. The persistent hyperglycemia may affect each and every tissue and consequently results in morbidity and eventually mortality in diabetic patients. A direct negative response of diabetes has been observed on oral tissues with few contradictions however, little are known about effect of diabetes on dental implant treatment and the consequent results. Many studies concerned with osteointegration and prognosis of dental implant in diabetic patients have been conducted and published since 1994. These studies have been critically reviewed to understand the impact of diabetes on the success of dental implant and the factors to improve osseointegration and consequently survival of dental implant in diabetic patients. Theoretical literatures and studies in diabetic animals substantiate high failure rate of implants but most of clinical studies indicated statistically insignificant failure of dental implants even in moderately uncontrolled diabetic patients. Success of dental implant in well and fairly controlled diabetic patients with proper treatment planning, prophylactic remedies and adequate postsurgical maintenance appears as good as normal individuals. PMID:24665167

  1. Is the Physical Functioning of Older Adults with Diabetes Associated with the Processes and Outcomes of Care? Evidence from Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Pearl G.; McEwen, Laura N.; Waitzfelder, Beth; Subramanian, Usha; Karter, Andrew J.; Mangione, Carol M.; Herman, William H.

    2013-01-01

    Aims To examine the relationship between physical function limitations and diabetes self-management, processes of care, and intermediate outcomes in adults ≥65 years of age with type 2 diabetes. Methods We studied 1,796 participants 65 years of age and older in managed care health plans enrolled in Translating Research into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD). Physical functioning was assessed at baseline with the Physical Component Summary of the Short Form-12 (SF-12) Health Survey. Diabetes self-management was assessed with follow-up surveys, and processes of care (eye exams, urine microalbumin testing, foot exams, etc.) and intermediate health outcomes (HbA1c, blood pressure, LDL-c) were assessed with medical chart reviews. Multivariate regression models were constructed to examine the associations between physical function limitations and outcomes. Results Frequency of eye exams (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.49 - 0.99) was the only process of care that was worse for participants with physical function limitations (n=573) compared to those without limitations (n=618). Neither self-management nor intermediate outcomes differed by whether patients had or did not have physical function limitations. Conclusion Limitations in physical functioning as assessed by the SF-12 were not associated with substantial difference in diabetes care in adults ≥65 years of age enrolled in managed care health plans. PMID:22268866

  2. Assessment of Macular Function Using the SKILL Card in Adults With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Dhamdhere, Kavita P.; Schneck, Marilyn E.; Bearse, Marcus A.; Lam, Wendy; Barez, Shirin; Adams, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the impact of reduced contrast and reduced luminance on visual acuity (VA) using the Smith–Kettlewell Institute Low Luminance (SKILL) Card in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods. We studied adults aged 27 to 65 years, 32 with T2DM and no retinopathy (NoRet group), 22 with T2DM and nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR group), and 38 healthy control subjects. Monocular high-contrast (SKILL light) and low-contrast, low-luminance (SKILL dark) near visual acuities were tested. The SKILL score was calculated as the difference between dark chart and light chart acuities and was corrected for age. Contrast sensitivity (CS) was also measured. Subject group differences were examined using ANOVA and Tukey honestly significant difference test. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to assess the ability of the SKILL Card and CS to discriminate the subject groups. Results. The SKILL score and CS were significantly worse in both diabetes groups compared with the controls (P < 0.01). SKILL scores in the NPDR group were poorest (highest) and significantly worse than those in the NoRet group (P < 0.05). SKILL scores discriminated NPDR and NoRet patients from the controls with high accuracy (99% and 88%, respectively), which was significantly (P < 0.03) better than CS (78% and 74%, respectively). Conclusions. The SKILL Card demonstrated vision function changes in diabetes even in the absence of clinically evident retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy led to a further increase in the SKILL score, while high-contrast VA remained unchanged. PMID:24825104

  3. [Superficial mycoses: comparative study between type 2 diabetic patients and a non-diabetic control group].

    PubMed

    García-Humbría, Leila; Richard-Yegres, Nicole; Pérez-Blanco, Maigualida; Yegres, Francisco; Mendoza, Mireya; Acosta, Arnaldo; Hernández, Rosaura; Zárraga, Eluz

    2005-03-01

    Superficial mycoses are considered to affect more frequently patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM-2), specially onychomycosis and Tinea pedis. The purpose of this study was to compare the dermatophytoses, candidiasis and Pitiriasis versicolor frequency between 40 patients with DM-2 and 40 healthy persons of either sex, 40 years old or more. Clinical, metabolic, mycologic and inmunologic studies against Candida albicans, were carried out. Both diabetics 75% (30/40) and controls 65% (26/40) presented a high frequency of superficial mycoses (no significant difference p = 0.329). Pitiriasis versicolor was not detected in diabetic patients. They presented Tinea unguium, concomitant with Tinea pedis, with a higher frequency. The predominant dermatophyte was Trichophyton rubrum 18/23 (78%) in diabetics and 8/16 (50%) in non diabetics. Candida was isolated as commensal from oral mucous: 23/40 (58%) in diabetics and 21/40 (52%) in non diabetics (serotipo A was the more frequent), and from onychomycosis: 11/40 (28%) in diabetics and 12/40 (30%) in non diabetics. The immunological response was the same in both groups: celular 100%, humoral 20%. No statistical correlation among superficial mycoses, blood glucose level, glycosylated hemoglobin values or the time suffering the disease was observed. The high susceptibility to dermatophytes and Candida sp. infection showed to be associated with age and no with the diabetic type 2 condition in those patients.

  4. Sleep in Adolescents and Young Adults with Type 1 Diabetes: Associations with Diabetes Management and Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Jaser, Sarah S.; Ellis, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe sleep in adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes and explore the association between sleep disturbances, diabetes management and glycemic control. Methods Adolescents with type 1 diabetes (n = 159, mean age = 16.4, 43% female, 69% white, mean A1C = 9.3%) completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index to assess sleep quantity and quality and sleep disturbances. Frequency of blood glucose monitoring (meter downloads) was used as a measure of diabetes management. Results Average sleep duration was 7.4 hours, below the recommended duration for this age. Adolescents using insulin pumps reported fewer sleep disturbances and longer sleep duration than those on injections, and older adolescents reported less sleep than younger adolescents. Poorer sleep duration was related to poorer diabetes management and better self-reported sleep quality was associated with better glycemic control for males but not for females. Conclusions Assessing for and treating sleep disturbances in adolescents may improve diabetes management. PMID:27081578

  5. Mucormycosis in a Diabetic Ketoacidosis Patient: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Biradar, Siddanagouda; Patil, Shivraj N; Kadeli, Deepak

    2016-05-01

    Mucormycosis is the name given to several different diseases caused by fungi of the order mucorales. It is commonly seen in patients with decreased immunity like patients with chronic renal failure, organ transplantation, neutropenia and most commonly in those with poorly controlled diabetes. We present a case of 55-year-old diabetic man who presented with headache and fever diagnosed with pulmonary and maxillary sinus mucormycosis presenting as diabetic ketoacidosis. PMID:27437278

  6. Diabetes-related quality of life and the demands and burdens of diabetes care among emerging adults with type 1 diabetes in the year after high school graduation.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Kathleen M; Weaver, Michael T; Slaven, James E; Fortenberry, J Dennis; DiMeglio, Linda A

    2014-10-01

    The roles of glycemic control, diabetes management, diabetes care responsibility, living independently of parents, and time since high school graduation in predicting diabetes-related quality of life (DQOL) were examined in 184 emerging adults with type 1 diabetes. Data were collected at graduation and 1 year later. Analyses controlling for selected covariates were completed using generalized linear mixed models. Better diabetes management was associated with more positive responses on all four dimensions of DQOL. Impact and worry of DQOL were greater in the presence of depressive symptoms, and life satisfaction was lower. DQOL life satisfaction was lower in those living independently of parents. Young women reported poorer diabetes-related health status than did young men. Time since graduation was not linked to DQOL. Further research is needed on ways to improve DQOL in conjunction with diabetes management and on ways that families can support DQOL when youth live independently.

  7. Predictors of Diet-Induced Weight Loss in Overweight Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, Monique T.; Verhoeven, Adrie J. M.; van Wietmarschen, Herman; Boessen, Ruud; Pellis, Linette P.; van t Spijker, Adriaan; Timman, Reinier; Ozcan, Behiye; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Aims A very low calorie diet improves the metabolic regulation of obesity related type 2 diabetes, but not for all patients, which leads to frustration in patients and professionals alike. The aim of this study was to develop a prediction model of diet-induced weight loss in type 2 diabetes. Methods 192 patients with type 2 diabetes and BMI>27 kg/m2 from the outpatient diabetes clinic of the Erasmus Medical Center underwent an 8-week very low calorie diet. Baseline demographic, psychological and physiological parameters were measured and the C-index was calculated of the model with the largest explained variance of relative weight loss using backward linear regression analysis. The model was internally validated using bootstrapping techniques. Results Weight loss after the diet was 7.8±4.6 kg (95%CI 7.2–8.5; p<0.001) and was independently associated with the baseline variables fasting glucose (B = -0.33 (95%CI -0.49, -0.18), p = 0.001), anxiety (HADS; B = -0.22 (95%CI -0.34, -0.11), p = 0.001), numb feeling in extremities (B = 1.86 (95%CI 0.85, 2.87), p = 0.002), insulin dose (B = 0.01 (95%CI 0.00, 0.02), p = 0.014) and waist-to-hip ratio (B = 6.79 (95%CI 2.10, 11.78), p = 0.003). This model explained 25% of the variance in weight loss. The C-index of this model to predict successful (≥5%) weight loss was 0.74 (95%CI 0.67–0.82), with a sensitivity of 0.93 (95% CI 0.89–0.97) and specificity of 0.29 (95% CI 0.16–0.42). When only the obese T2D patients (BMI≥30 kg/m2; n = 181) were considered, age also contributed to the model (B = 0.06 (95%CI 0.02, 0.11), p = 0.008), whereas waist-to-hip ratio did not. Conclusions Diet-induced weight loss in overweight adults with T2D was predicted by five baseline parameters, which were predominantly diabetes related. However, failure seems difficult to predict. We propose to test this prediction model in future prospective diet intervention studies in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27494531

  8. What are patient factors associated with the quality of diabetes care?: results from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recently there has been a growing interest in healthcare quality control in Korea. We examined the association between patient factors and quality indicators of diabetic care among Korean adults with diabetes. Methods We obtained a sample of 335 adults aged 20 or older diagnosed with diabetes from the 2005 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Patient factors were divided into two categories: socioeconomic position and health-related factors. Quality indicators for diabetes care were defined as receiving preventive care services for diabetes complications (e.g., fundus examination, microalbuminuria examination, diabetes education) and diabetes-related clinical outcomes (e.g., HbA1c, blood pressure, LDL-cholesterol). We performed multiple logistic regression analyses for each quality indicator. Results We found that people with lower education levels or shorter duration of diabetes illness were less likely to receive preventive care services for diabetes complications. Women or people with longer duration of diabetes were less likely to reach the glycemic target. Obese diabetic patients were less likely to accomplish adequate control of blood pressure and LDL-cholesterol. Conclusions Several factors of patients with diabetes, such as education level, duration of illness, gender, and obesity grade are associated with the quality of diabetes care. These findings can help inform policy makers about subpopulations at risk in developing a public health strategy in the future. PMID:22913274

  9. Diabetes and cardiovascular disease in older adults: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Halter, Jeffrey B; Musi, Nicolas; McFarland Horne, Frances; Crandall, Jill P; Goldberg, Andrew; Harkless, Lawrence; Hazzard, William R; Huang, Elbert S; Kirkman, M Sue; Plutzky, Jorge; Schmader, Kenneth E; Zieman, Susan; High, Kevin P

    2014-08-01

    The prevalence of diabetes increases with age, driven in part by an absolute increase in incidence among adults aged 65 years and older. Individuals with diabetes are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease, and age strongly predicts cardiovascular complications. Inflammation and oxidative stress appear to play some role in the mechanisms underlying aging, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and other complications of diabetes. However, the mechanisms underlying the age-associated increase in risk for diabetes and diabetes-related cardiovascular disease remain poorly understood. Moreover, because of the heterogeneity of the older population, a lack of understanding of the biology of aging, and inadequate study of the effects of treatments on traditional complications and geriatric conditions associated with diabetes, no consensus exists on the optimal interventions for older diabetic adults. The Association of Specialty Professors, along with the National Institute on Aging, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, and the American Diabetes Association, held a workshop, summarized in this Perspective, to discuss current knowledge regarding diabetes and cardiovascular disease in older adults, identify gaps, and propose questions to guide future research.

  10. Diagnosis of Adult Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nick, Jerry A; Nichols, David P

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) is being made with increasing frequency in adults. Patients with CF diagnosed in adulthood typically present with respiratory complaints, and often have recurrent or chronic airway infection. At the time of initial presentation individuals may appear to have clinical manifestation limited to a single organ, but with subclinical involvement of the respiratory tract. Adult-diagnosed patients have a good response to CF center care, and newly available cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor-modulating therapies are promising for the treatment of residual function mutation, thus increasing the importance of the diagnosis in adults with unexplained bronchiectasis.

  11. Markers of Antioxidant Defense in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gawlik, K.; Naskalski, J. W.; Fedak, D.; Pawlica-Gosiewska, D.; Grudzień, U.; Dumnicka, P.; Małecki, M. T.; Solnica, B.

    2016-01-01

    Aims. Diabetes is considered a state of increased oxidative stress. This study evaluates blood concentrations of selected markers of antioxidant defense in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods. The study included 80 type 2 diabetes patients and 79 apparently healthy controls. Measured markers included ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP), reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT) and uric acid serum, and plasma and/or hemolysate levels. Results. FRAP, uric acid, CRP, and GGT levels were significantly higher in patients with diabetes. Plasma and hemolysate GR was significantly higher whereas GPx activity was significantly lower in patients with diabetes. There were no significant differences in antioxidant defense markers between patients with and without chronic diabetes complications. Fasting serum glucose correlated with plasma GPx, plasma and hemolysate GR, FRAP, and serum GGT, and HbA1c correlated with serum GGT. Only FRAP and serum uric acid were significantly higher in obese (BMI > 30 kg/m2) patients with diabetes than in nonobese patients. Conclusions. Some components of antioxidant defense such as GR, uric acid, and GGT are increased in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, the whole system cannot compensate for an enhanced production of ROS as reflected by the trend toward decreased erythrocytes GSH. PMID:26640613

  12. Stress echocardiography for risk assessment of diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Baur, L.H.B.; Graal, M.

    2004-01-01

    Coronary artery disease in patients suffering from diabetes mellitus will become an increasing problem in the future. Because diabetic patients benefit from treatment of symptomatic but also asymptomatic coronary artery disease, early diagnosis is warranted. The diagnostic techniques used to detect ischaemia, with a focus on stress echocardiography, are described. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:25696265

  13. Difficulties of Diabetic Patients in Learning about Their Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnet, Caroline; Gagnayre, Remi; d'Ivernois, Jean Francois

    2001-01-01

    Examines the difficulties experienced by diabetic patients in learning about their illness. Diabetic people (N=138) were questioned by means of a closed answer questionnaire. Results reveal that patients easily acquired manual skills, yet numerous learning difficulties were associated with the skills required to solve problems and make decisions,…

  14. Diabetic Foot Syndrome as a Possible Cardiovascular Marker in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Maida, Carlo; Pinto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcerations have been extensively reported as vascular complications of diabetes mellitus associated with a high degree of morbidity and mortality; in fact, some authors showed a higher prevalence of major, previous and new-onset, cardiovascular, and cerebrovascular events in diabetic patients with foot ulcers than in those without these complications. This is consistent with the fact that in diabetes there is a complex interplay of several variables with inflammatory metabolic disorders and their effect on the cardiovascular system that could explain previous reports of high morbidity and mortality rates in diabetic patients with amputations. Involvement of inflammatory markers such as IL-6 plasma levels and resistin in diabetic subjects confirmed the pathogenetic issue of the “adipovascular” axis that may contribute to cardiovascular risk in patients with type 2 diabetes. In patients with diabetic foot, this “adipovascular axis” expression in lower plasma levels of adiponectin and higher plasma levels of IL-6 could be linked to foot ulcers pathogenesis by microvascular and inflammatory mechanisms. The purpose of this review is to focus on the immune inflammatory features of DFS and its possible role as a marker of cardiovascular risk in diabetes patients. PMID:25883983

  15. Serum uric acid and insulin sensitivity in adolescents and adults with and without type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, Petter; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; McFann, Kimberly; Wadwa, R. Paul; Rewers, Marian; Rivard, Christopher J.; Jalal, Diana; Chonchol, Michel B.; Johnson, Richard J.; Maahs, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Hypothesis Decreased insulin sensitivity (IS) exists in type 1 diabetes. Serum uric acid (SUA), whose concentration is related to renal clearance, predicts vascular complications in type 1 diabetes. SUA is also inversely associated with IS in non-diabetics, but has not been examined in type 1 diabetes. We hypothesized SUA would be associated with reduced IS in adolescents and adults with type 1 diabetes. Methods The cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of SUA with IS was investigated in 254 adolescents with type 1 diabetes and 70 without in the Determinants of Macrovascular Disease in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Study, and in 471 adults with type 1 diabetes and 571 without in the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 diabetes (CACTI) study. Results SUA was lower in subjects with type 1 diabetes (p<0.0001), but still remained inversely associated with IS after multivariable adjustments- in adolescents (β±SE: −1.99±0.62, p=0.001, R2=2%) and adults (β±SE:−0.91±0.33, p=0.006, R2=6%) with type 1 diabetes, though less strongly than in non-diabetic controls (adolescents: β±SE: −2.70±1.19, p=0.03, R2=15%, adults: β±SE:−5.99±0.75, p<0.0001, R2=39%). Conclusion We demonstrated a significantly weaker relationship between SUA and reduced IS in subjects with type 1 diabetes than non-diabetic controls. PMID:24461546

  16. Overlap of genetic susceptibility to type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and latent autoimmune diabetes in adults.

    PubMed

    Basile, Kevin J; Guy, Vanessa C; Schwartz, Stanley; Grant, Struan F A

    2014-01-01

    Despite the notion that there is a degree of commonality to the biological etiology of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D), the lack of overlap in the genetic factors underpinning each of them suggests very distinct mechanisms. A disorder considered to be at the "intersection" of these two diseases is "latent autoimmune diabetes in adults" (LADA). Interestingly, genetic signals from both T1D and T2D are also seen in LADA, including the key HLA and transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) loci, but the magnitudes of these effects are more complex than just pointing to LADA as being a simple admixture of T1D and T2D. We review the current status of the understanding of the genetics of LADA and place it in the context of what is known about the genetics of its better-studied "cousins," T1D and T2D, especially with respect to the myriad of discoveries made over the last decade through genome-wide association studies.

  17. Cost Implications to Health Care Payers of Improving Glucose Management among Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nuckols, Teryl K; McGlynn, Elizabeth A; Adams, John; Lai, Julie; Go, Myong-Hyun; Keesey, Joan; Aledort, Julia E

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the cost implications to payers of improving glucose management among adults with type 2 diabetes. Data Source/Study Setting Medical-record data from the Community Quality Index (CQI) study (1996–2002), pharmaceutical claims from four Massachusetts health plans (2004–2006), Medicare Fee Schedule (2009), published literature. Study Design Probability tree depicting glucose management over 1 year. Data Collection/Extraction Methods We determined how frequently CQI study subjects received recommended care processes and attained Health Care Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) treatment goals, estimated utilization of visits and medications associated with recommended care, assigned costs based on utilization, and then modeled how hospitalization rates, costs, and goal attainment would change if all recommended care was provided. Principal Findings Relative to current care, improved glucose management would cost U.S.$327 (U.S.$192–711 in sensitivity analyses) more per person with diabetes annually, largely due to antihyperglycemic medications. Cost-effectiveness to payers, defined as incremental annual cost per patient newly attaining any one of three HEDIS goals, would be U.S.$1,128; including glycemic crises reduces this to U.S.$555–1,021. Conclusions The cost of improving glucose management appears modest relative to diabetes-related health care expenditures. The incremental cost per patient newly attaining HEDIS goals enables payers to consider costs as well as outcomes that are linked to future profitability. PMID:21457256

  18. Fanconi's syndrome and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in an adult treated with ifosfamide.

    PubMed

    Ingemi, Amanda I; Bota, Vasile M; Peguero, Anyeri; Charpentier, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Fanconi's syndrome is a serious condition characterized by type II proximal renal tubular dysfunction, with urinary loss of glucose, amino acids, phosphate, bicarbonate, and potassium. Ifosfamide-induced Fanconi's syndrome is reported in about 1.4-5% of children being treated for solid tumors, yet only a few cases have been reported in adults. We describe a 54-year-old man who came to the hospital with symptoms of neutropenic fever 4 days after his fourth cycle of ifosfamide and doxorubicin treatment for recurrent sarcoma with metastases to the lung. During admission, he was noted to have severe renal tubular dysfunction; ifosfamide-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and Fanconi's syndrome were suspected. He received supportive therapy that resulted in incomplete resolution of signs and symptoms. The patient was discharged after a 5-day hospital stay when his white blood cell count increased from 0.1-2.5 × 10(3) /mm(3) and his fever had resolved. Use of the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale indicated a probable relationship (score of 7) between the patient's development of diabetes insipidus and Fanconi's syndrome and his use of ifosfamide. This dual diagnosis of diabetes insipidus and Fanconi's syndrome in an adult makes this case unusual, as well as therapeutically challenging. We conducted a review of the existing literature regarding ifosfamide-induced Fanconi's syndrome and describe the proposed mechanisms and therapeutic options. This case suggests that patients treated with ifosfamide should be monitored closely for renal function to identify, and perhaps prevent, these rare adverse events. Preliminary animal models show promise for adding N-acetylcysteine to ifosfamide treatment, but more research is necessary before using this drug as a therapeutic option.

  19. Diabetes Drug Victoza Might Not Help Advanced Heart Failure Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Diabetes Drug Victoza Might Not Help Advanced Heart Failure Patients Study participants may have been too sick ... to improve heart function in patients with advanced heart failure, a new study finds. The theory for this ...

  20. Profile of diabetic ketoacidosis in a predominantly African American urban patient population.

    PubMed

    Seyoum, Berhane; Berhanu, Paulos

    2007-01-01

    The occurrence of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a serious but largely preventable acute complication of diabetes mellitus, has been declining in recent years. However, empiric observations indicate that DKA continues to have a major effect on ethnic minority patients in inner-city settings. In this study, we conducted a retrospective analysis of five-year hospital admission data for DKA at a single inner-city hospital that serves a largely uninsured adult African American population. A computer-assisted search of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes for DKA revealed 847 admissions for confirmed DKA in 630 patients. Of these, 592 (94%) were African Americans, 22 (3.5%) were Whites, and 16 (2.5%) were Hispanics. The mean age was 43.4 +/- .4 years. Five hundred seventy-one (90.6%) of the patients had type 1 diabetes, and 59 (9.4%) had type 2 diabetes. One hundred forty-five patients (23%) were newly diagnosed with diabetes. Ninety-four (14.9%) of the patients had multiple admissions, ranging from 2 to 23 admissions per patient during the five-year period, while the remaining 391 (62.1%) patients were single admissions. Half of the patients (52%) did not have health insurance. Major precipitating factors for DKA included discontinuation of insulin, infection, and other medical illness in 501 (59.1%), 136 (16.1%), and 30 (3.5%) of the admissions, respectively. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that DKA continues to have a major effect in urban African American patients with diabetes. Therefore, multiple targeted interventions are needed in this population to improve diabetes care and thereby decrease the frequency of DKA.

  1. Association Between Overactive Bladder and Polyneuropathy in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic metabolic disorder that often leads to complications. We aimed to correlate two complications of DM, polyneuropathy and hyperactive bladder syndrome, using noninvasive measures, such as screening tests. Methods We included 80 female and 40 male type 2 diabetic patients in this prospective study. Diabetic polyneuropathy evaluations were conducted using the Douleur Neuropathique 4 Questions (DN4), and overactive bladder (OAB) evaluations were performed using the Overactive Bladder Questionnaire (OAB-V8). The patients were also evaluated for retinopathy and nephropathy. The diabetic male and female patients with or without OAB were chosen and compared for microvascular complications (polyneuropathy, retinopathy, and nephropathy). Results There were no significant correlations between OAB and retinopathy as well as between OAB and nephropathy among diabetic patients (female patients, P>0.05; male patients, P>0.05). However, the patients with OAB were significantly more likely to develop polyneuropathy (female patients, P<0.05; male patients, P<0.05). Conclusions In diabetic patients, OAB and diabetic peripheral neuropathy are significantly correlated. These correlations were demonstrated using short, understandable, valid, and reliable disease-specific tests without invasive measures. Using these screening tests, both neurologists and urologists can easily diagnose these complications. PMID:27706007

  2. Diabetes and insurance: a survey of patient experience.

    PubMed

    Frier, B M; Sullivan, F M; Stewart, E J

    1984-07-01

    A survey of 186 diabetic patients examined their collective experience of life and motor insurance. Some form of life insurance policy had been obtained by 150 patients, with a combined total of 204 policies, 107 of which had been agreed before the diagnosis of diabetes. Most patients had declared diabetes to the insurer but 12 patients had been refused acceptance. Only 15 patients sought alternative quotations. The premium had been loaded by 10-40% for 36 patients because of diabetes, and 48 required a medical report. Of 147 diabetic drivers, 95 (65%) had declared diabetes either to the Licensing authority, or to the motor insurer, but only 62 (42%) had informed both. Fourteen patients had been refused motor insurance cover by individual companies, and 36 patients were aware of having had their premium increased, but only 16 patients had sought alternative quotations. Major differences in attitude with regard to diabetes as a risk factor for insurance are evident, and patients should be advised to approach several companies when seeking insurance cover.

  3. Recreational drug abuse in patients hospitalized for diabetic ketosis or diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Isidro, María L; Jorge, Segundo

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the association between recreational drug use and diabetic ketosis (DK) and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in our area. Retrospective examination of records from a 1,450 bed urban teaching hospital in Spain. All adult admissions for DK or DKA from January 1, 2005, to December 31, 2009 in our hospital were included. Demographic, exploratory (blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate), and analytical data (glucose, urea, creatinine, corrected Na(+), K(+), pH, HCO3(-) and HbA1c) at admittance were recorded. In 152 patients, 253 episodes of DK or DKA occurred. Screening for drug use was performed in 40.3% of the events; 20.6% of the episodes (n = 52) were shown to be substance abuse. Cocaine, followed by cannabis and alcohol, was the most frequently involved drug. Poly-substance abuse occurred in 67.3% of them. Comorbidities were present in 11.5 and 39.8% of the cases shown and not shown to be related to drug use (P = 0.00). Seventy percent of the patients who were at least once shown to have consumed drugs, and 15.9% of those who were never shown to have done so, were admitted more than once (P = 0.00). The frequency of recent drug misuse in patients presenting with DK or DKA was high. Substance abuse screening was frequently neglected. Adverse profile, most significantly in readmission to hospital, was found in the patients with positive drug findings. History taking in this context should routinely include questions on substance abuse, and toxicology screening may be worthwhile, particularly in those with the history of frequent readmissions. PMID:21136122

  4. Recreational drug abuse in patients hospitalized for diabetic ketosis or diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Isidro, María L; Jorge, Segundo

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the association between recreational drug use and diabetic ketosis (DK) and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in our area. Retrospective examination of records from a 1,450 bed urban teaching hospital in Spain. All adult admissions for DK or DKA from January 1, 2005, to December 31, 2009 in our hospital were included. Demographic, exploratory (blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate), and analytical data (glucose, urea, creatinine, corrected Na(+), K(+), pH, HCO3(-) and HbA1c) at admittance were recorded. In 152 patients, 253 episodes of DK or DKA occurred. Screening for drug use was performed in 40.3% of the events; 20.6% of the episodes (n = 52) were shown to be substance abuse. Cocaine, followed by cannabis and alcohol, was the most frequently involved drug. Poly-substance abuse occurred in 67.3% of them. Comorbidities were present in 11.5 and 39.8% of the cases shown and not shown to be related to drug use (P = 0.00). Seventy percent of the patients who were at least once shown to have consumed drugs, and 15.9% of those who were never shown to have done so, were admitted more than once (P = 0.00). The frequency of recent drug misuse in patients presenting with DK or DKA was high. Substance abuse screening was frequently neglected. Adverse profile, most significantly in readmission to hospital, was found in the patients with positive drug findings. History taking in this context should routinely include questions on substance abuse, and toxicology screening may be worthwhile, particularly in those with the history of frequent readmissions.

  5. Prognostic significance of diabetes in patients with cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, G; Marchesini, G; Zoli, M; Bugianesi, E; Fabbri, A; Pisi, E

    1994-07-01

    Alterations in carbohydrate metabolism are frequently observed in cirrhosis, and approximately 15% to 30% of patients have overt diabetes. In a retrospective and prospective study in cirrhosis, we analyzed the prognostic significance of diabetes, which was defined as the presence of hyperglycemia and overt glycosuria that in most cases required dietary restrictions or active treatment. The clinical records of all patients with cirrhosis admitted to our department for the period 1980 to 1985 were reviewed in 1985 and 1986, and surviving patients were prospectively followed up until December 1991. Final status could be obtained in 354 (98 with diabetes) of 382 eligible patients; 110 were alive at the end of follow-up. Prognostic factors were identified by Kaplan-Meier analysis, followed by Cox's stepwise regression. The model identified, in sequence, albumin, ascites, age, encephalopathy, bilirubin, diabetes, and platelets as prognostic factors. The larger mortality rate in patients with diabetes was not due to complications of diabetes but to an increased risk of hepatocellular failure. Diabetes was no longer a risk factor as a covariate in a subgroup of 271 patients when varices were added but was again significant when patients who died of gastrointestinal bleeding were excluded. The presence of diabetes, clinically detectable and often requiring adequate treatment, is a risk factor for long-term survival in cirrhosis.

  6. Evaluating health-related quality of life in type 1 diabetes: a systematic literature review of utilities for adults with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Smith-Palmer, Jayne; Bae, Jay P; Boye, Kristina S; Norrbacka, Kirsi; Hunt, Barnaby; Valentine, William J

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Type 1 diabetes is a chronic condition associated with micro- and macrovascular complications that have a notable impact on health-related quality of life, the magnitude of which can be quantified via the use of utility values. The aim of this review was to conduct a systematic literature review to identify and compare published health state utility values for adults with type 1 diabetes both, with and without diabetes-related complications. Methods Literature searches of the PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were performed to identify English language studies on adults with type 1 diabetes, published from 2000 onward, reporting utility values for patients with or without diabetes-related complications or assessing the impact of changes in HbA1c or body mass index on quality of life. For inclusion, studies were required to report utilities elicited using validated methods. Results A total of 20 studies were included in the final review that included utility values elicited using the EuroQuol five dimensions questionnaire (n=9), 15D questionnaire (n=2), Quality of Well-Being scale (n=4), time trade-off (n=3), and standard gamble (n=2) methods. For patients with no complications, reported utility values ranged from 0.90 to 0.98. Complications including stroke (reported disutility range, −0.105 to −0.291), neuropathy (range, −0.055 to −0.358), and blindness (range, −0.132 to −0.208) were associated with the largest decrements in utility values. The magnitude of utility values and utility decrements was influenced by the assessment method used. Conclusion Complications lead to impaired health-related quality of life in patients with type 1 diabetes, the magnitude of which is influenced by the method used to determine utilities. There is currently a lack of utility data for certain complications of type 1 diabetes, meaning that many economic evaluations have relied on a combination of type 1 and type 2 diabetes utilities

  7. Diabetic retinopathy and the associated risk factors in diabetes type 2 patients in Abha, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Razia A.; Khalil, Shamsun N.; Al-Qahtani, Mohammad A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the proportion and grades of retinopathy and its risk factors in diabetes type 2 patients. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 401 type 2 diabetic patients. A questionnaire and checklist were used to collect the data. Retinopathy was diagnosed and graded by fundus photographs and slit lamp examination. The duration of diabetes, age of patients, age at onset of diabetes, body mass index, hemoglobin A1c level, blood pressure, and complications were noted. Results: The mean age of male and female patients was 54.93 and 54.25 years; 57.6% were males. The mean age of onset and mean duration of diabetes were 43.91 and 13.4 years, respectively. The proportion of retinopathy was 36.4%. Grades of retinopathy were: Mild 57.5%, moderate 19.9%, severe nonproliferative 11%, and proliferative retinopathy 11.6%; 7.2% of patients had maculopathy. Retinopathy was significantly associated with older age, younger age at onset, longer duration of disease, poorly controlled blood sugar, hypertension, insulin use; the presence of neuropathy and nephropathy appeared as a significant risk. Younger age at onset, longer duration, and insulin use appeared as the strongest predictors for diabetic retinopathy. Conclusions: More than a third (36.4%) of the diabetic patients attending a diabetic center had retinopathy. The control of the risk factors may reduce both prevalence and consequences of retinopathy. PMID:26929725

  8. Pulmonary function in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sreeja, C K; Samuel, Elizabeth; Kesavachandran, C; Shashidhar, Shankar

    2003-01-01

    The present study was carried out to assess the lung functions in oral medicated and insulin administered patients with normal controls. 20 subjects were selected as the study group for oral medication (Group I), 20 subjects were selected as the study group for insulin treatment (Group II) and 40 subjects were selected as normal controls. Age group of Group I and Group II were 51.25 +/- 6.28 and 50.8 +/- 6.56 respectively and controls were age and height matched. Seventeen patients of Group I were undergoing treatment for the last 10-20 years and 20 patients in Group II were undergoing treatment for the last 30 years. Only male subjects were selected for the study. Lung function test were carried out with Spirometer (Vitallograph Compact II). A significant reduction in forced expiratory volume/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC%) was observed in oral pills used subjects and insulin administered subjects as compared to controls. Significant decrease in forced expiratory flow rate (FEF25-75%) in group I subjects was also observed as compared to controls. Forced mid flow time (FMFT) showed a significant increase in group II in comparison to controls. These changes clearly show the expiratory flow rates are reduced both in orally medicated and insulin administered patients. Increase in FMFT in group I may be due to the reduced respiratory ability to carry out the FVC test along with the side effects of oral medication for diabetes mellitus. PMID:12708129

  9. Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults in the United Arab Emirates: Clinical Features and Factors Related to Insulin-Requirement

    PubMed Central

    Maddaloni, Ernesto; Lessan, Nader; Al Tikriti, Alia; Buzzetti, Raffaella; Pozzilli, Paolo; Barakat, Maha T.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To describe and to characterize clinical features of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) compared to type 1 and type 2 diabetes in the UAE. Methods In this cross-sectional study a dataset including 18,101 subjects with adult-onset (>30 years) diabetes was accessed. 17,072 subjects fulfilled the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Data about anthropometrics, demographics, autoantibodies to Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase (GADA) and to Islet Antigen 2 (anti-IA2), HbA1c, cholesterol and blood pressure were extracted. LADA was diagnosed according to GADA and/or anti-IA2 positivity and time to insulin therapy. Results 437 (2.6%) patients were identified as LADA and 34 (0.2%) as classical type 1 diabetes in adults. Mean age at diagnosis, BMI, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure and HbA1c significantly differed between, LADA, type 2 and type 1 diabetes, LADA showing halfway features between type 2 and type 1 diabetes. A decreasing trend for age at diagnosis and waist circumference was found among LADA subjects when subdivided by positivity for anti-IA2, GADA or for both antibodies (p=0.013 and p=0.011 for trend, respectively). There was a gradual downward trend in autoantibody titre in LADA subjects requiring insulin within the first year from diagnosis to subjects not requiring insulin after 10 years of follow-up (p<0.001). Conclusions This is the first study describing the clinical features of LADA in the UAE, which appear to be different from both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, we showed that the clinical phenotype of LADA is dependent on different patterns of antibody positivity, influencing the time to insulin requirement. PMID:26252955

  10. Candidemia in patients with diabetes mellitus: epidemiology and predictors of mortality.

    PubMed

    Bader, Mazen S; Lai, Sue Min; Kumar, Vinutha; Hinthorn, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Candidemia is the fourth most frequent nosocomial bloodstream infection in the US. The clinical characteristics and outcome of candidemia in adult patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) have not been reported in the literature. The objective of the study was to determine the epidemiology and determinants of mortality in diabetic patients with candidemia. A retrospective cohort study among diabetic patients with candidemia was carried out at 2 medical centers. The primary outcome was death from any cause after the onset of candidemia until discharge from the hospital. A stepwise logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the predictors of mortality. From June 1995 to June 2003, 87 patients with both DM and candidemia were studied. Candida albicans was the most common (48/87, 55%) and Candida glabrata the second most common isolate of candidemia (18/87, 21%). Overall hospital mortality was 39% (34/87). Logistic regression analysis identified 3 independent determinants of death; Apache II score > or =23 (OR 8.3, 95% CI{2.7, 25.4}, p =0.0002), nosocomial candidemia (OR 10.2, 95% CI{1.1, 97.9}, p = 0.04), and mechanical ventilation (OR 3.6, 95% CI{1.1, 11.2}, p = 0.03). The study demonstrates the emergence of non-albicans species of Candida as major causes of candidemia among diabetic patients. The severity of illness reflected by Apache II was the most significant predictor of mortality among diabetic patients with candidemia.

  11. Outcomes of a community-based lifestyle programme for adults with diabetes or pre-diabetes.

    PubMed

    Higgs, Chris; Skinner, Margot; Hale, Leigh

    2016-06-01

    INTRODUCTION Diabetes, a long-term condition increasing in prevalence, requires ongoing healthcare management. Exercise alongside lifestyle education and support is effective for diabetes management. AIM To investigate clinical outcomes and acceptability of a community-based lifestyle programme for adults with diabetes/prediabetes at programme completion and 3-month follow-up. METHODS The 12-week community programme included twice-weekly sessions of self-management education and exercise, supervised by a physiotherapist, physiotherapy students and a nurse. Clinical outcomes assessed were cardiorespiratory fitness, waist circumference, exercise behaviour and self-efficacy. A standardised evaluation form was used to assess programme acceptability. RESULTS Clinically significant improvements were found from baseline (n = 36) to programme completion (n = 25) and 3-months follow-up (n = 20) for the six minute walk test (87 m (95%CI 65-109; p ≤ 0.01), 60 m (95%CI 21-100; p ≤ 0.01)), waist circumference (-3 cm (95%CI -6 to -1), -3 cm (95%CI -6 to 1)), exercise behaviour (aerobic exercise 53 min/week (95%CI 26 to 81; p ≤ 0.01), 71 min/week (95%CI 25 to 118; p ≤ 0.01)) and self-efficacy (0.7 (95%CI -0.2 to 1.6), 0.8 (95%CI 0.04 to 1.5)). Good programme acceptability was demonstrated by themes suggesting a culturally supportive, motivating, friendly, informative atmosphere within the programme. The attrition rate was 30% but there were no adverse medical events related to the programme. DISCUSSION The programme was safe and culturally acceptable and outcomes demonstrated clinical benefit to participants. The attrition rate was largely due to medical reasons unrelated to the programme. This model of a community-based lifestyle programme has the potential to be reproduced in other regions and in adults with similar long-term conditions. KEYWORDS Diabetes Mellitus Type II; Prediabetic state; Co-morbidity; Exercise; Self-management.

  12. Outcomes of a community-based lifestyle programme for adults with diabetes or pre-diabetes.

    PubMed

    Higgs, Chris; Skinner, Margot; Hale, Leigh

    2016-06-01

    INTRODUCTION Diabetes, a long-term condition increasing in prevalence, requires ongoing healthcare management. Exercise alongside lifestyle education and support is effective for diabetes management. AIM To investigate clinical outcomes and acceptability of a community-based lifestyle programme for adults with diabetes/prediabetes at programme completion and 3-month follow-up. METHODS The 12-week community programme included twice-weekly sessions of self-management education and exercise, supervised by a physiotherapist, physiotherapy students and a nurse. Clinical outcomes assessed were cardiorespiratory fitness, waist circumference, exercise behaviour and self-efficacy. A standardised evaluation form was used to assess programme acceptability. RESULTS Clinically significant improvements were found from baseline (n = 36) to programme completion (n = 25) and 3-months follow-up (n = 20) for the six minute walk test (87 m (95%CI 65-109; p ≤ 0.01), 60 m (95%CI 21-100; p ≤ 0.01)), waist circumference (-3 cm (95%CI -6 to -1), -3 cm (95%CI -6 to 1)), exercise behaviour (aerobic exercise 53 min/week (95%CI 26 to 81; p ≤ 0.01), 71 min/week (95%CI 25 to 118; p ≤ 0.01)) and self-efficacy (0.7 (95%CI -0.2 to 1.6), 0.8 (95%CI 0.04 to 1.5)). Good programme acceptability was demonstrated by themes suggesting a culturally supportive, motivating, friendly, informative atmosphere within the programme. The attrition rate was 30% but there were no adverse medical events related to the programme. DISCUSSION The programme was safe and culturally acceptable and outcomes demonstrated clinical benefit to participants. The attrition rate was largely due to medical reasons unrelated to the programme. This model of a community-based lifestyle programme has the potential to be reproduced in other regions and in adults with similar long-term conditions. KEYWORDS Diabetes Mellitus Type II; Prediabetic state; Co-morbidity; Exercise; Self-management. PMID:27477555

  13. Effect of hope therapy on the hope of diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Ghazavi, Zahra; Khaledi-Sardashti, Firouz; Kajbaf, Mohamad Bagher; Esmaielzadeh, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hope is the most important factor in diabetic patients’ life. The level of hope may be changing among these individuals as a result of chronic nature of diabetes and its complications. When the level of hope increases among these patients, they can resist against physical and psychological complications of diabetes more, accept the treatment better, enjoy life more, and adapt with their situations more efficiently. This study aimed to define the efficacy of hope therapy on hope among diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: This was a quasi-experimental study conducted on 38 diabetic patients referring to Sedigheh Tahereh Research and Treatment Center affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in Iran in 2012. The subjects were selected based on the goals and inclusion criteria of the study and then were randomly assigned to study and control groups. Herth Hope Index (HHI) was completed by both groups before, after, and 1 month after intervention. In the study group, 120-min sessions of hope therapy were held twice a week for 4 weeks. Descriptive and inferential statistical tests were adopted to analyze the data through SPSS version 12. Results: Comparison of the results showed that hope therapy significantly increased hope in diabetic patients after intervention in the study group compared to control (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The results showed that hope therapy increased hope among diabetic patients. This method is suggested to be conducted for diabetic patients. PMID:25709694

  14. Skin and nail mycoses in patients with diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Papini, M; Cicoletti, M; Fabrizi, V; Landucci, P

    2013-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects all socioeconomic and age groups and its incidence is rapidly increasing worldwide. The diabetic foot complication represents one of the most complex and serious complications in these patients. Fungal infections can also contribute to the severity of the diabetic foot. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of foot skin and toenail mycosis in a group of 75 patients with diabetic foot complication and in a matched control group. Diabetic patients showed onychomycosis in 53.3% and foot skin mycosis in 46.7% of the cases, with a prevalence of both fungal infections significantly higher than that observed in the control group. At least one type of these fungal infections was present in 69.3% of diabetic subjects with a highly significant difference compared to control group (P<0.001). Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton interdigitale were the most common species responsible of both nail and skin infections. Candida spp, Fusarium spp, Aspergillus spp and other moulds. were found in about 1/3 onychomycosis. Previous toe amputation was significantly associated with both skin and nail mycosis. The present study confirms that both tinea pedis and onychomycosis have a high prevalence in subjects suffering from diabetic foot complication, and that the problem of fungal infections of the foot in diabetic subjects is still highly underestimated. Consequently, there is an important clinical rationale for careful mycological examination of diabetic foot and an adequate treatment tailored for each individual patient according to the fungal species involved.

  15. Medical Nutrition Therapy in Hospitalized Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gosmanov, Aidar R.

    2013-01-01

    Medical nutrition therapy (MNT) plays an important role in management of hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients with diabetes mellitus. The goals of inpatient MNT are to optimize glycemic control, to provide adequate calories to meet metabolic demands, and to create a discharge plan for follow-up care. All patients with and without diabetes should undergo nutrition assessment on admission with subsequent implementation of physiologically sound caloric support. The use of a consistent carbohydrate diabetes meal-planning system has been shown to be effective in facilitating glycemic control in hospitalized patients with diabetes. This system is based on the total amount of carbohydrate offered rather than on specific calorie content at each meal, which facilitates matching the prandial insulin dose to the amount of carbohydrate consumed. In this article, we discuss general guidelines for the implementation of appropriate MNT in hospitalized patients with diabetes. PMID:21997598

  16. Management of type 2 diabetes: evolving strategies for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nyenwe, Ebenezer A.; Jerkins, Terri W.; Umpierrez, Guillermo E.; Kitabchi, Abbas E.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes continues to increase at an alarming rate around the world, with even more people being affected by prediabetes. Although the pathogenesis and long-term complications of type 2 diabetes are fairly well known, its treatment has remained challenging, with only half of the patients achieving the recommended hemoglobin A1c target. This narrative review explores the pathogenetic rationale for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, with the view of fostering better understanding of the evolving treatment modalities. The diagnostic criteria including the role of hemoglobin A1c in the diagnosis of diabetes are discussed. Due attention is given to the different therapeutic maneuvers and their utility in the management of the diabetic patient. The evidence supporting the role of exercise, medical nutrition therapy, glucose monitoring, and antiobesity measures including pharmacotherapy and bariatric surgery is discussed. The controversial subject of optimum glycemic control in hospitalized and ambulatory patients is discussed in detail. An update of the available pharmacologic options for the management of type 2 diabetes is provided with particular emphasis on newer and emerging modalities. Special attention has been given to the initiation of insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes, with explanation of the pathophysiologic basis for insulin therapy in the ambulatory diabetic patient. A review of the evidence supporting the efficacy of the different preventive measures is also provided. PMID:21134520

  17. Nrf2 and Redox Status in Prediabetic and Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Osorio, Angélica S.; Picazo, Alejandra; González-Reyes, Susana; Barrera-Oviedo, Diana; Rodríguez-Arellano, Martha E.; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2014-01-01

    The redox status associated with nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) was evaluated in prediabetic and diabetic subjects. Total antioxidant status (TAS) in plasma and erythrocytes, glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) content and activity of antioxidant enzymes were measured as redox status markers in 259 controls, 111 prediabetics and 186 diabetic type 2 subjects. Nrf2 was measured in nuclear extract fractions from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Nrf2 levels were lower in prediabetic and diabetic patients. TAS, GSH and activity of glutamate cysteine ligase were lower in diabetic subjects. An increase of MDA and superoxide dismutase activity was found in diabetic subjects. These results suggest that low levels of Nrf2 are involved in the development of oxidative stress and redox status disbalance in diabetic patients. PMID:25383674

  18. Relations of Behavioral Autonomy to Health Outcomes Among Emerging Adults With and Without Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Kerry A.; Becker, Dorothy; Escobar, Oscar; Siminerio, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the relation of behavioral autonomy to psychological, behavioral, and physical health among emerging adults with and without type 1 diabetes. Methods High school seniors with (n = 118) and without type 1 diabetes (n = 122) completed online questionnaires for three consecutive years. Behavioral autonomy, psychological health, risk behaviors, and diabetes outcomes were assessed. Regression analyses were conducted to predict Time 2 and 3 outcomes, controlling for Time 1 outcomes. Results There were no group differences in behavioral autonomy. Behavioral autonomy predicted better psychological health but only for emerging adults without diabetes. Behavioral autonomy was related to increased risk behavior for both groups. Behavioral autonomy was unrelated to self-care but predicted better glycemic control for females. Conclusions Behavioral autonomy may be beneficial for psychological health, but is related to increased risk behavior. The implications of behavioral autonomy for emerging adults with type 1 diabetes require careful consideration. PMID:25157070

  19. Diabetes Reduces the Rate of Sputum Culture Conversion in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Salindri, Argita D; Kipiani, Maia; Kempker, Russell R; Gandhi, Neel R; Darchia, Lasha; Tukvadze, Nestani; Blumberg, Henry M; Magee, Matthew J

    2016-09-01

    Background.  Diabetes is a risk factor for active tuberculosis (TB), but little is known about the relationship between diabetes and multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB. We aimed to assess risk factors for primary MDR TB, including diabetes, and determine whether diabetes reduced the rate of sputum culture conversion among patients with MDR TB. Methods.  From 2011 to 2014, we conducted a cohort study at the National Center for Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases in Tbilisi, Georgia. Adult (≥35 years) patients with primary TB were eligible. Multidrug-resistant TB was defined as resistance to at least rifampicin and isoniazid. Patients with capillary glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) ≥ 6.5% or previous diagnosis were defined to have diabetes. Polytomous regression was used to estimate the association of patient characteristics with drug resistance. Cox regression was used to compare rates of sputum culture conversion in patients with and without diabetes. Results.  Among 318 patients with TB, 268 had drug-susceptibility test (DST) results. Among patients with DST results, 19.4% (52 of 268) had primary MDR TB and 13.4% (36 of 268) had diabetes. In multivariable analyses, diabetes (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00-6.31) and lower socioeconomic status (aOR, 3.51; 95% CI, 1.56-8.20) were associated with primary MDR TB. Among patients with primary MDR TB, 44 (84.6%) converted sputum cultures to negative. The rate of sputum culture conversion was lower among patients with diabetes (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 0.34; 95% CI, .13-.87) and among smokers (aHR, 0.16; 95% CI, .04-.61). Conclusions.  We found diabetes was associated with an increased risk of primary MDR TB; both diabetes and smoking were associated with a longer time to sputum culture conversion.

  20. Diabetes Reduces the Rate of Sputum Culture Conversion in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Salindri, Argita D; Kipiani, Maia; Kempker, Russell R; Gandhi, Neel R; Darchia, Lasha; Tukvadze, Nestani; Blumberg, Henry M; Magee, Matthew J

    2016-09-01

    Background.  Diabetes is a risk factor for active tuberculosis (TB), but little is known about the relationship between diabetes and multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB. We aimed to assess risk factors for primary MDR TB, including diabetes, and determine whether diabetes reduced the rate of sputum culture conversion among patients with MDR TB. Methods.  From 2011 to 2014, we conducted a cohort study at the National Center for Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases in Tbilisi, Georgia. Adult (≥35 years) patients with primary TB were eligible. Multidrug-resistant TB was defined as resistance to at least rifampicin and isoniazid. Patients with capillary glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) ≥ 6.5% or previous diagnosis were defined to have diabetes. Polytomous regression was used to estimate the association of patient characteristics with drug resistance. Cox regression was used to compare rates of sputum culture conversion in patients with and without diabetes. Results.  Among 318 patients with TB, 268 had drug-susceptibility test (DST) results. Among patients with DST results, 19.4% (52 of 268) had primary MDR TB and 13.4% (36 of 268) had diabetes. In multivariable analyses, diabetes (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00-6.31) and lower socioeconomic status (aOR, 3.51; 95% CI, 1.56-8.20) were associated with primary MDR TB. Among patients with primary MDR TB, 44 (84.6%) converted sputum cultures to negative. The rate of sputum culture conversion was lower among patients with diabetes (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 0.34; 95% CI, .13-.87) and among smokers (aHR, 0.16; 95% CI, .04-.61). Conclusions.  We found diabetes was associated with an increased risk of primary MDR TB; both diabetes and smoking were associated with a longer time to sputum culture conversion. PMID:27419188

  1. Diabetes Reduces the Rate of Sputum Culture Conversion in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Salindri, Argita D.; Kipiani, Maia; Kempker, Russell R.; Gandhi, Neel R.; Darchia, Lasha; Tukvadze, Nestani; Blumberg, Henry M.; Magee, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Diabetes is a risk factor for active tuberculosis (TB), but little is known about the relationship between diabetes and multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB. We aimed to assess risk factors for primary MDR TB, including diabetes, and determine whether diabetes reduced the rate of sputum culture conversion among patients with MDR TB. Methods. From 2011 to 2014, we conducted a cohort study at the National Center for Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases in Tbilisi, Georgia. Adult (≥35 years) patients with primary TB were eligible. Multidrug-resistant TB was defined as resistance to at least rifampicin and isoniazid. Patients with capillary glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) ≥ 6.5% or previous diagnosis were defined to have diabetes. Polytomous regression was used to estimate the association of patient characteristics with drug resistance. Cox regression was used to compare rates of sputum culture conversion in patients with and without diabetes. Results. Among 318 patients with TB, 268 had drug-susceptibility test (DST) results. Among patients with DST results, 19.4% (52 of 268) had primary MDR TB and 13.4% (36 of 268) had diabetes. In multivariable analyses, diabetes (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00–6.31) and lower socioeconomic status (aOR, 3.51; 95% CI, 1.56–8.20) were associated with primary MDR TB. Among patients with primary MDR TB, 44 (84.6%) converted sputum cultures to negative. The rate of sputum culture conversion was lower among patients with diabetes (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 0.34; 95% CI, .13–.87) and among smokers (aHR, 0.16; 95% CI, .04–.61). Conclusions. We found diabetes was associated with an increased risk of primary MDR TB; both diabetes and smoking were associated with a longer time to sputum culture conversion. PMID:27419188

  2. “Vitamin D supplementation and bone health in adults with diabetic nephropathy: the protocol for a randomized controlled trial”

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Suboptimal vitamin D status is highly prevalent in Northern communities, particularly in those patients with chronic diseases such as diabetes and chronic renal disease. Emerging literature suggests that adherence to daily vitamin D supplementation may be an important factor influencing vitamin D status and overall bone health, but compliance with therapies for bone health is a major challenge. It is unknown what level of vitamin D supplementation will ameliorate or improve suboptimal vitamin D status in patients with diabetic nephropathy or contribute to improved bone health, particularly for those living in northern climates. Methods/Design The study purpose was to examine two different strategies of vitamin D3 supplementation; daily dosing of 2000 IU per day verses monthly dosing of 40,000 IU per month on markers of vitamin D status, bone health and to examine whether adherence, quality of life and patient satisfaction with the supplementation strategy differs between the two vitamin D strategies in adults diagnosed with diabetic nephropathy. Discussion The need for RCTs assessing higher doses of vitamin D3 supplementation at varying frequencies of administration and its impact on bone health in adults with diabetes and chronic kidney disease are needed. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01476501. PMID:25115438

  3. Serum uric acid and hypertension in adults: a paradoxical relationship in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bjornstad, Petter; Paul Wadwa, R; Sirota, Jeffrey C; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; McFann, Kimberly; Rewers, Marian; Rivard, Christopher J; Jalal, Diana; Chonchol, Michel B; Johnson, Richard J; Maahs, David M

    2014-04-01

    Adults with type 1 diabetes have lower serum uric acid levels compared with nondiabetic adults. Little is known about the relationship between serum uric acid and blood pressure in type 1 diabetes and whether it differs from the positive relationship found in nondiabetic adults. The authors assessed the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships over 6 years between serum uric acid and blood pressure in adults with (35±9 years [n=393]) and without (38±9 years [n=685]) type 1 diabetes in the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study. In nondiabetic adults, serum uric acid was associated with systolic blood pressure in multivariable models adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors. In adults with type 1 diabetes, a negative association was observed between serum uric acid and systolic blood pressure after multivariable adjustments. A positive association was observed between serum uric acid and systolic blood pressure in nondiabetic adults. In contrast, an inverse relationship was demonstrated after multivariable adjustments in type 1 diabetes. PMID:24667019

  4. Serious mental illness and acute hospital readmission in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Jennifer S; Hirshon, Jon Mark; Goldberg, Richard; Langenberg, Patricia; Day, Hannah R; Morgan, Daniel J; Comer, Angela C; Harris, Anthony D; Furuno, Jon P

    2012-01-01

    Patients with serious mental illness (SMI), particularly those with other chronic illnesses, may be vulnerable to unplanned hospital readmission. The authors hypothesized that SMI would be associated with increased 30-day hospital readmission in a cohort of adult patients with comorbid diabetes admitted to a tertiary care facility from 2005 to 2009. SMI was defined by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, discharge diagnosis codes for schizophrenia, schizoaffective, bipolar, manic, or major depressive disorders, or other psychosis. The primary outcome was 30-day readmission to the index hospital. Among 26 878 eligible admissions, the prevalence of SMI was 6% and the incidence of 30-day hospital admission was 16%. Among patients aged <35 years, SMI was significantly associated with decreased odds of 30-day hospital readmission (odds ratio [OR] = 0.39; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.17, 0.91). However, among patients ≥35 years, SMI was not significantly associated with 30-day hospital readmission (OR = 1.11; 95% CI = 0.86, 1.42). SMI may not be associated with increased odds of 30-day hospital readmission in this population.

  5. Serious mental illness and acute hospital readmission in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Jennifer S; Hirshon, Jon Mark; Goldberg, Richard; Langenberg, Patricia; Day, Hannah R; Morgan, Daniel J; Comer, Angela C; Harris, Anthony D; Furuno, Jon P

    2012-01-01

    Patients with serious mental illness (SMI), particularly those with other chronic illnesses, may be vulnerable to unplanned hospital readmission. The authors hypothesized that SMI would be associated with increased 30-day hospital readmission in a cohort of adult patients with comorbid diabetes admitted to a tertiary care facility from 2005 to 2009. SMI was defined by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, discharge diagnosis codes for schizophrenia, schizoaffective, bipolar, manic, or major depressive disorders, or other psychosis. The primary outcome was 30-day readmission to the index hospital. Among 26 878 eligible admissions, the prevalence of SMI was 6% and the incidence of 30-day hospital admission was 16%. Among patients aged <35 years, SMI was significantly associated with decreased odds of 30-day hospital readmission (odds ratio [OR] = 0.39; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.17, 0.91). However, among patients ≥35 years, SMI was not significantly associated with 30-day hospital readmission (OR = 1.11; 95% CI = 0.86, 1.42). SMI may not be associated with increased odds of 30-day hospital readmission in this population. PMID:22539798

  6. Assessment of Diabetic Polyneuropathy and Plantar Pressure in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus in Prevention of Diabetic Foot

    PubMed Central

    Skopljak, Amira; Sukalo, Aziz; Batic-Mujanovic, Olivera; Muftic, Mirsad; Tiric-Campara, Merita; Zunic, Lejla

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Risk assessment for development foot ulcer in diabetics is a key aspect in any plan and program for prevention of non-traumatic amputation of lower extremities. Material and methods: In the prospective research to assessed diabetic neuropathy in diabetic patients, to determined the dynamic function of the foot (plantar pressure), by using pedobarography (Group I), and after the use of orthopedic insoles with help of pedobarography, to determined the connection between the risk factors: deformity of the foot, limited joint movements, diabetic polyneuropathy, plantar pressure in effort preventing changes in the diabetic foot. Results: Out of 1806 patients, who are registered in one Team of family medicine examined 100 patients with diabetes mellitus Type 2. The average age of subjects was 59.4, SD11.38. The average HbA1c was 7.78% SD1.58. Combining monofilament and tuning fork tests, the diagnosis of polyneuropathy have 65% of patients. Comparing Test Symptom Score individual parameters between the first and second measurement, using pedobarography, in Group I, statistically significant difference was found for all of the assessed parameters: pain, burning sensation, paresthesia and insensitivity (p<0,05). The measurements of peak pressure, both first and the second measurement, for all of the subjects in Group I(45) show values above 200kPa. That’s a level of pressure that needs to be corrected. The study finds correlation between the foot deformation, diabetic polyneuropathy and plantar pressure (p>0,05). Conclusion: A detail clinical exam of diabetic food in a family doctor office equipped with pedobarography (plantar pressure measurements), use of orthopedic insoles, significantly reduces clinical symptoms of diabetic polyneuropathy in patients with diabetes. PMID:25650237

  7. The Wired Patient: Patterns of Electronic Patient Portal Use Among Patients With Cardiac Disease or Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Jonathan P; Shah, Nirav R; Stewart, Walter F

    2015-01-01

    Background As providers develop an electronic health record–based infrastructure, patients are increasingly using Web portals to access their health information and participate electronically in the health care process. Little is known about how such portals are actually used. Objective In this paper, our goal was to describe the types and patterns of portal users in an integrated delivery system. Methods We analyzed 12 months of data from Web server log files on 2282 patients using a Web-based portal to their electronic health record (EHR). We obtained data for patients with cardiovascular disease and/or diabetes who had a Geisinger Clinic primary care provider and were registered “MyGeisinger” Web portal users. Hierarchical cluster analysis was applied to longitudinal data to profile users based on their frequency, intensity, and consistency of use. User types were characterized by basic demographic data from the EHR. Results We identified eight distinct portal user groups. The two largest groups (41.98%, 948/2258 and 24.84%, 561/2258) logged into the portal infrequently but had markedly different levels of engagement with their medical record. Other distinct groups were characterized by tracking biometric measures (10.54%, 238/2258), sending electronic messages to their provider (9.25%, 209/2258), preparing for an office visit (5.98%, 135/2258), and tracking laboratory results (4.16%, 94/2258). Conclusions There are naturally occurring groups of EHR Web portal users within a population of adult primary care patients with chronic conditions. More than half of the patient cohort exhibited distinct patterns of portal use linked to key features. These patterns of portal access and interaction provide insight into opportunities for electronic patient engagement strategies. PMID:25707036

  8. [Comprehensive geriatric assessment in older patients with diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Araki, Atsushi

    2013-11-01

    Because the prevalence of older old patients with diabetes is increasing in Japan, diabetic patients with physical or cognitive impairment are also becoming to be more prevalent in clinical practice. The comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) consists of 5 important domains: physical function (basic ADL, instrumental ADL, vision, etc.), psychological function, mental function, socio-economic conditions, and patient's preference. The functions in CGA can be used as predictors for prognosis, a tool for early diagnosis of dementia, assessment tool of patient's capacity for insulin self-injection, and outcomes of diabetes treatment. The CGA is also useful in performing a patient-centered approach to improve the physical, psychological, and mental functions as well as to individualize a treatment goal of HbA1c in elderly patients with diabetes mellitus.

  9. Contrasting patient and practitioner perspectives in type 2 diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Hunt, L M; Arar, N H; Larme, A C

    1998-12-01

    Studies of self-care behaviors in the management of type 2 diabetes often focus on patient knowledge and motivation, without considering the role of practitioner orientations. Using an exploratory descriptive design, we conducted open-ended interviews with 51 type 2 diabetes patients and 35 practitioners from clinics in San Antonio and Laredo, Texas. We found critical differences between patient and practitioner goals, evaluations, and strategies in diabetes management, especially regarding such key concepts as "control" and "taking care of self". Practitioners' perspectives are rooted in a clinical context, emphasizing technical considerations, whereas patients' perspectives exist within a life-world context and foreground practical and experiential considerations. These result in very different approaches to treatment. Practitioners, presuming failed treatment indicates uncooperativeness, try to inform and motivate patients. The patients we interviewed, however, understood and were committed to type 2 diabetes self-care, but lacked full access to behavioral options due to their poverty and limited social power. PMID:9842286

  10. Transient Tear Film Dysfunction after Cataract Surgery in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Tongsheng; Mashaghi, Alireza; Liu, Qinghuai; Hong, Jiaxu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Diabetes mellitus is an increasingly common systemic disease. Many diabetic patients seek cataract surgery for a better visual acuity. Unlike in the general population, the influence of cataract surgery on tear film function in diabetic patients remains elusive. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tear function in diabetic and nondiabetic patients following cataract surgery. Methods In this prospective, interventional case series, 174 diabetic patients without dry eye syndrome (DES) and 474 age-matched nondiabetic patients as control who underwent phacoemulsification were enrolled at two different eye centers between January 2011 and January 2013. Patients were followed up at baseline and at 7 days, 1 month, and 3 months postoperatively. Ocular symptom scores (Ocular Surface Disease Index, OSDI) and tear film function including tear film stability (tear film break-up time, TBUT), corneal epithelium integrity (corneal fluorescein staining, CFS), and tear secretion (Schirmer’s I test, SIT) were evaluated. Results In total, 83.9% of the diabetic patients (146 cases with 185 eyes) and 89.0% of the nondiabetic patients (422 cases with 463 eyes) completed all check-ups after the interventions (P = 0.095). The incidence of DES was 17.1% in the diabetic patients and 8.1% in the nondiabetic patients at 7 days after cataract surgery. In the diabetic patients, the incidence of DES remained 4.8% at 1 month postoperatively and decreased to zero at 3 months after surgery. No DES was diagnosed in nondiabetic patients at either the 1-month or 3-month follow-up. Compared with the baseline, the diabetic patients had worse symptom scores and lower TBUT values at 7 days and 1 month but not at 3 months postoperatively. In the nondiabetic patients, symptom scores and TBUT values had returned to preoperative levels at 1-month check-up. CFS scores and SIT values did not change significantly postoperatively in either group (P = 0.916 and P = 0.964, respectively

  11. An association analysis of the HLA gene region in latent autoimmune diabetes in adults

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Pathophysiological similarities between latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) and type 1 diabetes indicate an overlap in genetic susceptibility. HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 are major susceptibility genes for type 1 diabetes but studies of these genes in LADA have been limited. Our aim was to define patterns of HLA-encoded susceptibility/protection in a large, well characterised LADA cohort, and to establish association with disease and age at diagnosis. Materials and methods Patients with LADA (n=387, including 211 patients from the UK Prospective Diabetes Study) and non-diabetic control subjects (n=327) were of British/Irish European origin. The HLA-DRB1 and -DQB1 genes were genotyped by sequence-specific PCR. Results As in type 1 diabetes mellitus, DRB1*0301_DQB1*0201 (odds ratio [OR]=3.08, 95% CI 2.32–4.12, p=1.2× 10−16) and DRB1*0401_DQB1*0302 (OR=2.57, 95% CI 1.80–3.73, p=4.5×10−8) were the main susceptibility haplotypes in LADA, and DRB1*1501_DQB1*0602 was protective (OR=0.21, 95% CI 0.13–0.34, p=4.2×10−13). Differential susceptibility was conferred by DR4 subtypes: DRB1*0401 was predisposing (OR=1.79, 95% CI 1.35–2.38, p=2.7×10−5) whereas DRB1*0403 was protective (OR=0.37, 95% CI 0.13–0.97, p=0.033). The highest-risk genotypes were DRB1*0301/DRB1*0401 and DQB1*0201/DQB1*0302 (OR=5.14, 95% CI 2.68–10.69, p=1.3×10−8; and OR=6.88, 95% CI 3.54–14.68, p=1.2×10−11, respectively). These genotypes and those containing DRB1*0401 and DQB1*0302 associated with a younger age at diagnosis in LADA, whereas genotypes containing DRB1*1501 and DQB1*0602 associated with an older age at diagnosis. Conclusions/interpretation Patterns of susceptibility at the HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 loci in LADA are similar to those reported for type 1 diabetes, supporting the hypothesis that autoimmune diabetes occurring in adults is an age-related extension of the pathophysiological process presenting as childhood-onset type 1 diabetes. PMID

  12. Association of glycaemia with lipids in adults with type 1 diabetes: modification by dyslipidaemia medication

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, L. G.; Dabelea, D.; Snell-Bergeon, J. K.; Daniels, S. R.; Hamman, R. F.; Rewers, M.

    2012-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Hyperglycaemia and dyslipidaemia are common metabolic abnormalities in adults with type 1 diabetes and both increase cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. The hypothesis of this study was that change in HbA1c over 6 years would be associated with change in fasting lipids in adults with type 1 diabetes. Methods The Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes (CACTI) study examined 652 patients with type 1 diabetes (54% female); 559 and 543 had follow-up visits at 3 and 6 years. Baseline age (mean ± SD) was 37±9 years, diabetes duration 23±9 years, and HbA1c 8.0±1.3%. Use of dyslipidaemia medication was 17%, 32%, and 46% at the three visits. Separate longitudinal mixed models were fitted to examine the relationship between change in HbA1c and change in fasting total cholesterol (TC), HDL-cholesterol (HDL-c), LDL-cholesterol (LDL-c), log triacylglycerols (TG), and non-HDL-cholesterol (non- HDL-c). Because of an interaction between dyslipidaemia medication use and association of HbA1c with lipids, results were stratified by dyslipidaemia medication use. Results Among patients not using dyslipidaemia medication, a higher HbA1c was associated with significantly worse levels of the lipids TC, LDL-c, TG and non-HDL-c (per 1% change in HbA1c, TC 0.101 mmol/l, 95% CI 0.050, 0.152; LDL-c 0.103 mmol/l, 95% CI 0.058, 0.148; TG 0.052 mmol/l, 95% CI 0.024, 0.081; and non-HDL-c 0.129 mmol/l, 95% CI 0.078, 0.180) but not HDL-c (−0.20 mmol/l, 95% CI −0.047, 0.007). The associations between HbA1c and any lipid outcome among those on dyslipidaemia medication were in the same direction, but attenuated compared with persons not on medication. Conclusions/interpretation Change in HbA1c is significantly associated with change in fasting lipids, but dyslipidaemia medications may be required to optimise lipid and cardiovascular health. PMID:20820753

  13. [Antibiotic treatment in patients amputated for ischemic diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Fernández Montequín, J I; McCook Martínez, J; Lima Santana, B; Velasco Armas, N; Montalvo Diago, J; Mahía Vilas, M

    1991-01-01

    Thirty diabetic patients submitted to a major amputation were tested by humo-celullar assays (retarded hypersensibility assays). Reactive patients were subdivided into two groups: one group was treated postoperatively with antibiotics, and the other group was not treated. Both groups were homogeneous in age, hemoglobin concentrations, hematocrit, total proteins, glucemy and history of sepsis or leukocytosis. Five patients treated with antibiotics (33.3%) presented sepsis, one patient was reamputated and one patient died. Between the not treated patients, only three presented sepsis (20%) without any other complications. Authors conclude that the development of sepsis in reactive, diabetic, amputated patients is independent of antibiotic treatment. PMID:1755544

  14. Social support among African-American adults with diabetes. Part 1: Theoretical framework.

    PubMed Central

    Ford, M. E.; Tilley, B. C.; McDonald, P. E.

    1998-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects African Americans in disproportionate numbers relative to whites. Proper management of this disease is critical because of the increased morbidity and mortality associated with poor diabetes management. The role of social support in promoting diabetes management and improved glycemic control among African Americans is a little-explored area. This article, the first in a two-part series, provides a theoretical framework for examining the relationship between social support and glycemic control among African-American adults. PMID:9640907

  15. Correlation between Microalbuminuria and Hypertension in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Alia; Taj, Azeem; Amin, Muhammad Joher; Iqbal, Farrukh; Iqbal, Zafar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hypertension is commonly found in patients with Diabetic Kidney Disease (DKD). Microalbuminuria is the first clinical sign of involvement of kidneys in patients with type 2 diabetes. Uncontrolled hypertension induces a higher risk of cardiovascular events, including death, increasing proteinuria and progression to kidney disease. Objectives: To determine the correlation between microalbuminuria and hypertension and their association with other risk factors in type 2 diabetic patients. Methods: One hundred and thirteen type 2 diabetic patients attending the diabetic clinic of Shaikh Zayed Postgraduate Medical Institute, Lahore, Pakistan were screened for microalbuminuria and raised blood pressure. The study was conducted from November 2012 to June 2013. Results: Patients were divided into two groups. Group 1, those with normoalbuminuria (n=63) and Group 2, those having microalbuminuria (n=50). Group 2 patients showed higher blood pressure values as compared to Group 1. The results were statistically significant and showed poor glycemic control as a contributing risk factor. Conclusion: The study concluded that there is high frequency of hypertension among type 2 diabetics but still much higher among those having microalbuminuria. So, early recognition of renal dysfunction through detection of microalbuminuria and to start treatment without any delay will confer future protection from end stage renal disease as well as hypertension and its complications in type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:24948969

  16. What the radiologist needs to know about the diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Raptis, Athanasios E; Markakis, Konstantinos P; Mazioti, Maria C; Raptis, Sotirios A; Dimitriadis, George D

    2011-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is recognised as a major health problem. Ninety-nine percent of diabetics suffer from type 2 DM and 10% from type 1 and other types of DM. The number of diabetic patients worldwide is expected to reach 380 millions over the next 15 years. The duration of diabetes is an important factor in the pathogenesis of complications, but other factors frequently coexisting with type 2 DM, such as hypertension, obesity and dyslipidaemia, also contribute to the development of diabetic angiopathy. Microvascular complications include retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy. Macroangiopathy mainly affects coronary arteries, carotid arteries and arteries of the lower extremities. Eighty percent of deaths in the diabetic population result from cardiovascular incidents. DM is considered an equivalent of coronary heart disease (CHD). Stroke and peripheral artery disease (PAD) are other main manifestations of diabetic macroangiopathy. Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DC) represents another chronic complication that occurs independently of CHD and hypertension. The greater susceptibility of diabetic patients to infections completes the spectrum of the main consequences of DM. The serious complications of DM make it essential for physicians to be aware of the screening guidelines, allowing for earlier patient diagnosis and treatment. PMID:22347947

  17. Predictors of direct cost of diabetes care in pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study examines factors that predict elevated direct costs of pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes. Methods: A cohort of 784 children with type 1 diabetes at least 6 months postdiagnosis and managed by pediatric endocrinologists at Texas Children's Hospital were included in this study. Actual...

  18. Empowered diabetes management: life coaching and pharmacist counseling for employed adults with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Nishita, Christy; Cardazone, Gina; Uehara, Denise Lea; Tom, Tammy

    2013-10-01

    The Hawai'i Demonstration to Maintain Independence and Employment was a randomized controlled trial examining the effect of a participant-driven, multicomponent intervention on 190 employed adults with diabetes, 36% of whom were Asian and 35% of whom were Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander. A no treatment concurrent control group was used, and the treatment group was provided an intervention that paired each participant with a life coach and a pharmacist counselor with whom they worked to achieve collaboratively chosen goals. Treatment fidelity data suggest that the intervention was largely implemented as planned. Life coaches and pharmacists performed key program functions with high to moderate adherence. The quality of their adherence to the intervention model ranged from basic to above basic and below basic to above basic for life coaches and pharmacists, respectively. Results of repeated-measures analysis of covariance analyses indicate that the intervention had a significant positive effect on participants' diabetes self-efficacy, quality of life, and body mass index but not on hemoglobin A1c levels. Further analyses examining just the treatment group indicate a dosage effect, with body mass index and quality of life outcomes optimized among participants who engaged in a greater number of sessions with life coaches and pharmacists. Implications of the study findings for practice are discussed.

  19. [Nail susceptibility to fungal infection in patients with type 1 and 2 diabetes under long term poor glycaemia control].

    PubMed

    Macura, Anna B; Gasińska, Teresa; Pawlik, Bolesław; Obłoza, Aneta

    2007-01-01

    Onychomycosis is a common disorder in adults. Its prevalence increases also in diabetics. The objective of the study was: 1) evaluation of finger and toe nail susceptibility to Candida albicans and Trichophyton mentagrophytes infection in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes with long term glycaemia under poor control as compared with healthy persons, and 2) checking whether or not various aetiology of type 1 and type 2 diabetes may influence the intensity of fungal nail infection. The materials comprised finger and toe nails sampled from 26 patients with type 1 diabetes (20 females and 6 males at average age 51 +/- 10 years), 25 patients with type 2 diabetes (17 females and 8 males at average age 58 +/- 4 years). Twenty two healthy volunteers (18 females and 4 males at average age 47 +/- 14 years) served as controls. All of the diabetics (except one with type 1 diabetes and four with type 2 diabetes) had increased fasting glycaemia; moreover, all of them had poor controlled long term glycaemia because the concentration of glycated haemoglobin HbAlc exceeded 7.5%. The patients with type 1 diabetes were treated with insulin while those with type 2 diabetes with diet only (one person), with gliclazide (sixteen persons), with glimepirid (five persons), and with metformin (four persons). Enhanced fingernail susceptibility to Candida albicans infection was detected in 38.5% of the patients with type 1 diabetes, in 28% of those with type 2 diabetes, and in 22.7% of the controls. Intensive toenail infection was found in 34.6%, 20%, and 22.7% respectively. Enhanced fingernail susceptibility to Trichophyton mentagrophytes infection was found in 30.8% of the patients with type 1 diabetes, in 48% of those with type 2 diabetes, and in 4.54% of the controls while intensive toenail infection in 15.4%, 20%, and 18,2% respectively. Statistical analysis gave evidence of statistically significant higher susceptibility to infection of finger and toe nails with T. mentagrophytes

  20. Type 2 Diabetes Treatment in the Patient with Obesity.

    PubMed

    Malin, Steven K; Kashyap, Sangeeta R

    2016-09-01

    Lifestyle modification is the cornerstone treatment of type 2 diabetes in the obese patient, and is highly effective at promoting glucose regulation. However, many individuals struggle over time to maintain optimal glycemic control and/or body weight with lifestyle modification. Therefore, additional therapeutic approaches are needed. Pharmacologic interventions have shown promising results for obesity-related diabetes complications. Not surprisingly though lifestyle modification and pharmacology may become ineffective for treating diabetes over time. Bariatric surgery is considered by some, but not all, to be the most effective and durable treatment for combating obesity. In fact many patients with type 2 diabetes have normalized glucose concentrations within days postoperation. Taken together, treatment of obesity in the patient with type 2 diabetes requires a multi-faceted approach. PMID:27519130

  1. Diabetes, Dementia and Hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Meneilly, Graydon S; Tessier, Daniel M

    2016-02-01

    We are experiencing an epidemic of both diabetes and dementia among older adults in this country. The risk for dementia appears to be increased in patients with diabetes, and patients with dementia and diabetes appear to be at greater risk for severe hypoglycemia. In addition, there may be an increased risk for developing dementia by older patients with diabetes who have had episodes of severe hypoglycemia, although this issue is controversial. In this article, we review the factors that contribute to the increased risk for dementia in older adults with diabetes and outline the complex relationships between hypoglycemia and dementia.

  2. Oral health related quality of life in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Rokhsareh; Taleghani, Ferial; Farhadi, Sareh

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Diabetic patients display an increased risk of oral disorders, and oral health related quality of life (OHRQL) might affect their management and treatment modalities. The aim of the present study was to determine OHRQL and associated parameters in patients with diabetes. Materials and methods. In this study two hundred patients were recruited from the diabetes clinic in Mustafa Khomeini Hospital in Tehran, Iran. OHRQL was assessed using Oral Health Impact Profile Questionnaire (OHIP-20). Also, another questionnaire was designed which contained questions regarding participants' knowledge about oral complications of diabetes and oral health behavior. OHRQL was categorized as low and good. Data were analyzed using logistic regression at P = 0.05. Results. Of the diabetic patients assessed, 77.5% were in good and 22.5% were in low categories of OHRQL. This quality was significantly associated with age (OR = 4.03, 95% CI = 1.63-11.29), knowledge about diabetes oral complications (OR = 18.17 95% CI = 4.42-158.6), educational level (OR = 26.31 95% CI = 4.2-1080.3), referred for dental visit by physician (OR = 3.16 95% CI = 1.48-6.69), frequency of brushing (OR = 10.29 95% CI = 3.96-31.2) and length of time diagnosed with diabetes (OR = 6.21 95% CI = 2.86-13.63). Conclusion. Oral health related quality of life was not negatively affected by diabetes mellitus in the assessed sample. PMID:25587385

  3. Factors Related to Perceived Diabetes Control Are Not Related to Actual Glucose Control for Minority Patients With Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    McAndrew, Lisa M.; Horowitz, Carol R.; Lancaster, Kristie J.; Leventhal, Howard

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine variables associated with perceived diabetes control compared with an objective measure of glucose control (A1C). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Beliefs about diabetes were assessed among 334 individuals with diabetes living in a primarily low-income, minority, urban neighborhood. Regression analyses tested associations between disease beliefs and both participants' perceptions of control and actual control (A1C). RESULTS Poorer perceived diabetes control was associated with perceiving a greater impact of diabetes, greater depressive symptoms, not following a diabetic diet, A1C, and a trend toward less exercise. Variables associated with better actual control (A1C) included higher BMI, older age, and not using insulin. CONCLUSIONS Patients' perceptions of their diabetes control are informed by subjective diabetes cues (e.g., perceived impact of diabetes and adherence to a diabetic diet), which are not related to A1C. Clinicians should take into account what cues patients are using to assess their diabetes control. PMID:20067972

  4. Subclinical Inflammation and Endothelial Dysfunction in Young Patients with Diabetes: A Study from United Arab Emirates

    PubMed Central

    Aburawi, Elhadi H.; AlKaabi, Juma; Zoubeidi, Taoufik; Shehab, Abdullah; Lessan, Nader; Al Essa, Awad; Yasin, Javed; Saadi, Hussain; Souid, Abdul-Kader

    2016-01-01

    Background The impact of obesity and dyslipidemia on cardiovascular health in adolescents and young adults with diabetes is incompletely understood. This study evaluated the effects of these co-morbidities on markers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in young patients with the disease. Methods The study investigated sets of inflammatory, endothelial, and adipocyte biomarkers in 79 patients with type 1 diabetes, 55 patients with type 2 diabetes, and 47 controls. Results Mean (±SD) age was 20±6 y (median = 17, range = 12–31). Patients with diabetes had higher levels of cytoadhesive molecules (sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1, p<0.001), adiponectin (p<0.001), and haptoglobin (p = 0.023). Their heart rate variability assessment revealed lower standard deviation of beat-to-beat intervals and lower total power (p≤0.019), reflecting autonomous nervous dysfunction. Hemoglobin A1c >8.0% (estimated average blood glucose >10 mmol/L) was associated with higher adiponectin (p<0.001) and obesity was associated with lower adiponectin (p<0.001); thus, obesity damped the effect of hyperglycemia on adiponectin. Obesity was associated with higher sICAM-1 (p≤0.015), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), p<0.001. Similarly, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) <1.02 mmol/L was associated with higher sICAM-1, TNFα, IL-6, and hsCRP (p≤0.009) and lower adiponectin (p<0.001). Adiponectin correlated negatively with the inflammatory biomarkers in patients with diabetes. Conclusion Subclinical inflammation and endothelial dysfunction are common among young patients with diabetes. Poor diabetes control is associated with higher adiponectin. Obesity and dyslipidemia are associated with lower adiponectin and higher inflammatory and endothelial biomarkers. Intuitively, these predictors of cardiovascular disease are amenable to proper glycemic control, nutritional choices, and regular exercise. PMID:27459718

  5. Association Between Diabetic Macular Edema and Cardiovascular Events in Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Leveziel, Nicolas; Ragot, Stéphanie; Gand, Elise; Lichtwitz, Olivier; Halimi, Jean Michel; Gozlan, Julien; Gourdy, Pierre; Robert, Marie-Françoise; Dardari, Dured; Boissonnot, Michèle; Roussel, Ronan; Piguel, Xavier; Dupuy, Olivier; Torremocha, Florence; Saulnier, Pierre-Jean; Maréchaud, Richard; Hadjadj, Samy

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Diabetic macular edema (DME) is the main cause of visual loss associated with diabetes but any association between DME and cardiovascular events is unclear. This study aims to describe the possible association between DME and cardiovascular events in a multicenter cross-sectional study of patients with type 2 diabetes. Two thousand eight hundred seven patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited from diabetes and nephrology clinical institutional centers participating in the DIAB 2 NEPHROGENE study focusing on diabetic complications. DME (presence/absence) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) classification were based on ophthalmological report and/or on 30° color retinal photographs. DR was defined as absent, nonproliferative (background, moderate, or severe) or proliferative. Cardiovascular events were stroke, myocardial infarction, and lower limb amputation. Details regarding associations between DME and cardiovascular events were evaluated. The study included 2807 patients with type 2 diabetes, of whom 355 (12.6%) had DME. DME was significantly and independently associated with patient age, known duration of diabetes, HbA1c, systolic blood pressure, and DR stage. Only the prior history of lower limb amputation was strongly associated with DME in univariate and multivariate analyses, whereas no association was found with regard to myocardial infarction or stroke. Moreover, both major (n = 32) and minor lower limb (n = 96) amputations were similarly associated with DME, with respective odds ratio of 3.7 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.77–7.74; P = 0.0012) and of 4.29 (95% CI, 2.79–6.61; P < 0.001). DME is strongly and independently associated with lower limb amputation in type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:26287408

  6. Barriers to Eye Care Faced by Adult Hispanics with Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin-Shirley, Nora; Trusty, Sharon; Kelley, Emily; Siew-Jin, Lai Keun; Macias, Eduardo P.

    2004-01-01

    Current diabetes vision care guidelines suggest that people receive at least an annual dilated eye examination 5 years after the diagnosis of Type I diabetes and a dilated eye examination at the time of diagnosis of Type II diabetes, and at least annually thereafter. Hispanics in the United States have a three-fold greater prevalence of diabetes…

  7. Approach to the Patient with Gestational Diabetes after Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Page, Kathleen A.

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) identifies patients with a pancreatic β-cell defect. In some patients, the defect is transient or stable, but in most it is progressive, imparting a high risk of diabetes for at least a decade after the index pregnancy. The β-cell defects in GDM can result from many causes, including genetic variants typical of monogenic forms of diabetes and autoimmunity typical of evolving type 1 diabetes. No specific disease-modifying therapies are available for those patients. The majority of women with GDM have clinical characteristics indicating a risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D). Available evidence indicates that T2D can be prevented or delayed by intensive lifestyle modification and by medications, particularly those that ameliorate insulin resistance. Clinical management should include assessment of glucose tolerance in the postpartum period to detect diabetes or assess diabetes risk. Women who don't have diabetes should be advised about their risk and participate in family planning to prevent subsequent pregnancies with undiagnosed hyperglycemia. All patients should be monitored for rising glycemia indicative of progressive β-cell deterioration. We suggest a combination of fasting glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin measurements for this purpose. Monitoring should be initiated at least annually and should be intensified if glycemia is rising and/or impaired. Lifestyle modification is advised to reduce the risk for T2D. Like monitoring, lifestyle modification should be intensified for rising glycemia and/or development of impaired glucose levels. At present, there is insufficient evidence to recommend medications to prevent T2D. Close follow-up and monitoring will allow initiation of pharmacological treatment as soon as diabetes develops. Children of women with GDM are at increased risk for obesity and diabetes. They should receive education, monitoring, and lifestyle advice to minimize obesity and diabetes risk. PMID

  8. [Diabetes and alternative medicine: diabetic patients experiences with Ayur-Ved, "clinical ecology" and "cellular nutrition" methods].

    PubMed

    Vanelli, M; Chiari, G; Gugliotta, M; Capuano, C; Giacalone, T; Gruppi, L; Condò, M

    2002-04-01

    In the last two years we discovered that three of our patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (0.8%) suffered an unexpected worsening in their glycemic control due to a reduction of their insulin dosage in favour of some "alternative" diabetes treatments using herbs, vitamins, fantastic diets and trace elements prescribed by non-medical practitioners. The first patient, a 6.6 year old boy, was admitted to hospital because of a severe ketoacidosis with first degree coma as a result of his parents having reduced his insulin dosage by 77% and replacing the insulin with an ayurvedic herbal preparation (Bardana Actium Lapp). The second patient, a 10.4 year old boy, was admitted to hospital after his teachers noticed that he appeared tired, thinner and polyuric. During hospital admission for mild ketoacidosis the mother, reluctant at first, finally confessed that her son was under the care of a "clinical ecologist". Having identified several food allergies this "clinical ecologist" had placed the child on a spartan diet of bread, water and salt, and had reduced his insulin dosage by 68%. The third patient, a 21 year old male, upon transfer to the Adult Diabetic Center, reported that he had been under the care of a pranotherapist for several years. The pranotherapist had prescribed a cellular nutrition preparation (called "Madonna drops"), a meditation program and also a 50% reduction in his insulin dosage. During this period his HbAlc values had increased from 6.4% to 12%. Current orthodox diabetes treatments are considered unsatisfactory by many people and it is thus not surprising that they search for "miracle" cures. It is important, however, that hospital staff do not ridicule the patients or their parents for trying these alternative therapies. Nevertheless, it would be useful for staff to discuss in advance these "therapies" with patients, highlighting their ineffectiveness and strongly discouraging cures that call for a reduction or elimination of the insulin

  9. [Diabetes and alternative medicine: diabetic patients experiences with Ayur-Ved, "clinical ecology" and "cellular nutrition" methods].

    PubMed

    Vanelli, M; Chiari, G; Gugliotta, M; Capuano, C; Giacalone, T; Gruppi, L; Condò, M

    2002-04-01

    In the last two years we discovered that three of our patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (0.8%) suffered an unexpected worsening in their glycemic control due to a reduction of their insulin dosage in favour of some "alternative" diabetes treatments using herbs, vitamins, fantastic diets and trace elements prescribed by non-medical practitioners. The first patient, a 6.6 year old boy, was admitted to hospital because of a severe ketoacidosis with first degree coma as a result of his parents having reduced his insulin dosage by 77% and replacing the insulin with an ayurvedic herbal preparation (Bardana Actium Lapp). The second patient, a 10.4 year old boy, was admitted to hospital after his teachers noticed that he appeared tired, thinner and polyuric. During hospital admission for mild ketoacidosis the mother, reluctant at first, finally confessed that her son was under the care of a "clinical ecologist". Having identified several food allergies this "clinical ecologist" had placed the child on a spartan diet of bread, water and salt, and had reduced his insulin dosage by 68%. The third patient, a 21 year old male, upon transfer to the Adult Diabetic Center, reported that he had been under the care of a pranotherapist for several years. The pranotherapist had prescribed a cellular nutrition preparation (called "Madonna drops"), a meditation program and also a 50% reduction in his insulin dosage. During this period his HbAlc values had increased from 6.4% to 12%. Current orthodox diabetes treatments are considered unsatisfactory by many people and it is thus not surprising that they search for "miracle" cures. It is important, however, that hospital staff do not ridicule the patients or their parents for trying these alternative therapies. Nevertheless, it would be useful for staff to discuss in advance these "therapies" with patients, highlighting their ineffectiveness and strongly discouraging cures that call for a reduction or elimination of the insulin

  10. Are antiresorptive drugs effective against fractures in patients with diabetes?

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, Peter; Rejnmark, Lars; Mosekilde, Leif

    2011-03-01

    We studied whether the reduction in bone turnover by use of antiresorptive drugs is detrimental in patients with diabetes who already have low bone turnover due to hyperglycemia in a nationwide cohort study from Denmark. All users of antiresorptive drugs against osteoporosis between 1996 and 2006 (n = 103,562) were the exposed group, with three age- and gender-matched controls from the general population (n = 310,683). Patients on bisphosphonates and raloxifene had a higher risk of hip, spine, and forearm fractures. However, no difference was observed in the antifracture efficacy between patients with diabetes and nondiabetic controls or between patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Too few were users of strontium to allow analysis for this compound. The excess risk of fractures among patients treated with bisphosphonates or raloxifene compared to nonexposed controls was due to the higher a priori risk of fractures among patients treated for osteoporosis. Diabetes does not seem to affect the fracture-preventive potential of bisphosphonates or raloxifene. The low-turnover state of diabetes thus does not seem to be a hindrance to the effect of these drugs against osteoporosis. Therefore, patients with diabetes should receive treatment for osteoporosis in the same way as nondiabetic patients. PMID:21161194

  11. Determining adult type 2 diabetes-related health care needs in an indigenous population from rural Guatemala: a mixed-methods preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In Guatemala, diabetes is an emerging public health concern. Guatemala has one of the largest indigenous populations in Latin America, and this population frequently does not access the formal health care system. Therefore, knowledge about the emergence of diabetes in this population is limited. Methods Interview participants (n=23) were recruited from a convenience sample of indigenous adults with type 2 diabetes at one rural diabetes clinic in Guatemala. A structured interview was used to assess knowledge about diabetes and its complications; access to diabetes-related health care and treatment; dietary and lifestyle changes; and family and social supports for individuals living with diabetes. Interviews were supplemented with two group interviews with community leaders and health care providers. Thematic analysis was used to produce insights into diabetes knowledge, attitudes, and practices. In addition, a chart review of the clinic’s electronic medical record identified all adult patients (n=80) presenting in one calendar year for a first-time diabetic consultation. Sociodemographic and clinical variables were extracted and summarized from these records. Results Salient demographic factors in both the structured interview and chart review samples included low educational levels and high indigenous language preference. In the interview sample, major gaps in biomedical knowledge about diabetes included understanding the causes, chronicity, and long-term end-organ complications of diabetes. Medication costs, medical pluralism, and limited social supports for dietary and lifestyles changes were major practical barriers to disease management. Quantitative data from medical records review revealed high rates of poor glycemic control, overweight and obesity, and medication prescription. Conclusions This study provides a preliminary sketch of type 2 diabetes in an indigenous Guatemalan population. Combined qualitative and quantitative data point towards

  12. [Efficiency of cerebrolysin in the diabetic polyneuropathy in patients with insulin-dependency diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Bogdanov, E I; Sakovets, T G

    2011-01-01

    78 patients with clinical features of diabetic polyneuropathy have been examined. 39 patients, who took cerebrolysin, compose the basic group, 39 patients, who made up control one, took milgamma. The dynamics of clinical signs of the diabetic polyneuropathy was evaluated by difference of points in the first and the second examination with the use of scales: NSC (Neuropathy Symptoms and Change) and NDS (Neuropathy Dysfunction Score); the visual analog scale (VAS) and changes of the signs of orthostatic test. For the detection of the effectiveness of treatment was estimated dynamics of neuropathic disorders represented in patient with diabetes mellitus types I and II (with secondary insulin-dependency), witch allowed to reveal the considerable therapeutic effectiveness of cerebrolysin in treatment of diabetic polyneuropathic disorders.

  13. Dyslipidemia, kidney disease, and cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-chi; Tseng, Chin-Hsiao

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the relationship between dyslipidemia, chronic kidney disease, and cardiovascular diseases in patients with diabetes. Diabetes mellitus is associated with complications in the cardiovascular and renal system, and is increasing in prevalence worldwide. Modification of the multifactorial risk factors, in particular dyslipidemia, has been suggested to reduce the rates of diabetes-related complications. Dyslipidemia in diabetes is a condition that includes hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein levels, and increased small and dense low-density lipoprotein particles. This condition is associated with higher cardiovascular risk and mortality in diabetic patients. Current treatment guidelines focus on lowering the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level; multiple trials have confirmed the cardiovascular benefits of treatment with statins. Chronic kidney disease also contributes to dyslipidemia, and dyslipidemia in turn is related to the occurrence and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Different patterns of dyslipidemia are associated with different stages of diabetic nephropathy. Some trials have shown that treatment with statins not only decreased the risk of cardiovascular events, but also delayed the progression of diabetic nephropathy. However, studies using statins as the sole treatment of hyperlipidemia in patients on dialysis have not shown benefits with respect to cardiovascular risk. Diabetic patients with nephropathy have a higher risk of cardiovascular events than those without nephropathy. The degree of albuminuria and the reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate are also correlated with the risk of cardiovascular events. Treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers to reduce albuminuria in diabetic patients has been shown to decrease the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:24380085

  14. Ocular surface changes in type II diabetic patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yan; Zhang, Yan; Ru, Yu-Sha; Wang, Xiao-Wu; Yang, Ji-Zhong; Li, Chun-Hui; Wang, Hong-Xing; Li, Xiao-Rong; Li, Bing

    2015-01-01

    AIM To detect and analyze the changes on ocular surface and tear function in type II diabetic patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), an advanced stage of diabetic retinopathy (DR), using conventional ophthalmic tests and the high-resolution laser scanning confocal microscopy. METHODS Fifty-eight patients with type II diabetes were selected. Based on the diagnostic criteria and stage classification of DR, the patients were divided into the non-DR (NDR) group and the PDR group. Thirty-six patients with cataract but no other ocular and systemic disease were included as non-diabetic controls. All the patients were subjected to the conventional clinical tests of corneal sensitivity, Schirmer I Test, and corneal fluorescein staining. The non-invasive tear film break-up time (NIBUT) and tear interferometry were conducted by a Tearscope Plus. The morphology of corneal epithelia and nerve fibers was examined using the high-resolution confocal microscopy. RESULTS The NDR group exhibited significantly declined corneal sensitivity and Schirmer I test value, as compared to the non-diabetic controls (P< 0.001). The PDR group showed significantly reduced corneal sensitivity, Schirmer I test value, and NIBUT in comparison to the non-diabetic controls (P < 0.001). Corneal fluorescein staining revealed the progressively injured corneal epithelia in the PDR patients. Moreover, significant decrease in the corneal epithelial density and morphological abnormalities in the corneal epithelia and nerve fibers were also observed in the PDR patients. CONCLUSION Ocular surface changes, including blunted corneal sensitivity, reduced tear secretion, tear film dysfunction, progressive loss of corneal epithelia and degeneration of nerve fibers, are common in type II diabetic patients, particularly in the diabetic patients with PDR. The corneal sensitivity, fluorescein staining scores, and the density of corneal epithelial cells and nerve fibers in the diabetic patients correlate

  15. Immune dysfunction in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM).

    PubMed

    Geerlings, S E; Hoepelman, A I

    1999-12-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) have infections more often than those without DM. The course of the infections is also more complicated in this patient group. One of the possible causes of this increased prevalence of infections is defects in immunity. Besides some decreased cellular responses in vitro, no disturbances in adaptive immunity in diabetic patients have been described. Different disturbances (low complement factor 4, decreased cytokine response after stimulation) in humoral innate immunity have been described in diabetic patients. However, the clinical relevance of these findings is not clear. Concerning cellular innate immunity most studies show decreased functions (chemotaxis, phagocytosis, killing) of diabetic polymorphonuclear cells and diabetic monocytes/macrophages compared to cells of controls. In general, a better regulation of the DM leads to an improvement of these cellular functions. Furthermore, some microorganisms become more virulent in a high glucose environment. Another mechanism which can lead to the increased prevalence of infections in diabetic patients is an increased adherence of microorganisms to diabetic compared to nondiabetic cells. This has been described for Candida albicans. Possibly the carbohydrate composition of the receptor plays a role in this phenomenon.

  16. Approach to diabetes management in patients with CVD.

    PubMed

    Lathief, Sanam; Inzucchi, Silvio E

    2016-02-01

    Epidemiologic analyses have established a clear association between diabetes and macrovascular disease. Vascular dysfunction caused by metabolic abnormalities in patients with diabetes is associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and peripheral arterial disease. Patients with diabetes are at two to four fold higher CV risk as compared to non-diabetic individuals, and CVD remains the leading cause of mortality in patients with this condition. One strategy to reduce CVD burden in patients with diabetes has been to focus on controlling the major metabolic abnormality in this condition, namely hyperglycemia. However, this has not been unequivocally demonstrated to reduced CV events, in contrast to controlling other CVD risk factors linked to hyperglycemia, such as blood pressure, dyslipidemia, and platelet dysfunction. However, In contradistinction, accrued data from a number of large, randomized clinical trials in both type 1 (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) over the past 3 decades have proven that more intensive glycemic control retards the onset and progression of microvascular disease. In this review, we will summarize the key glucose-lowering CV outcomes trials in diabetes, provide an overview of the different drugs and their impact on the CV system, and describe our approach to management of the frequently encountered patient with T2DM and coronary artery disease (CAD) and/or heart failure (HF).

  17. Plasma proteome analysis of patients with type 1 diabetes with diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background As part of a clinical proteomics program focused on diabetes and its complications we are looking for new and better protein biomarkers for diabetic nephropathy. The search for new and better biomarkers for diabetic nephropathy has, with a few exceptions, previously focused on either hypothesis-driven studies or urinary based investigations. To date only two studies have investigated the proteome of blood in search for new biomarkers, and these studies were conducted in sera from patients with type 2 diabetes. This is the first reported in depth proteomic study where plasma from type 1 diabetic patients was investigated with the goal of finding improved candidate biomarkers to predict diabetic nephropathy. In order to reach lower concentration proteins in plasma a pre-fractionation step, either hexapeptide bead-based libraries or anion exchange chromatography, was performed prior to surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis. Results Proteomic analysis of plasma from a cross-sectional cohort of 123 type 1 diabetic patients previously diagnosed as normoalbuminuric, microalbuminuric or macroalbuminuric, gave rise to 290 peaks clusters of which 16 were selected as the most promising biomarker candidates based on statistical performance, including independent component analysis. Four of the peaks that were discovered have been identified as transthyretin, apolipoprotein A1, apolipoprotein C1 and cystatin C. Several yet unidentified proteins discovered by this novel approach appear to have more potential as biomarkers for diabetic nephropathy. Conclusion These results demonstrate the capacity of proteomic analysis of plasma, by confirming the presence of known biomarkers as well as revealing new biomarkers for diabetic nephropathy in plasma in type 1 diabetic patients. PMID:20205888

  18. Comparison of oral Lactobacillus and Streptococcus mutans between diabetic dialysis patients with non-diabetic dialysis patients and healthy people

    PubMed Central

    Rezazadeh, Fahimeh; Bazargani, Abdollah; Roozbeh-Shahroodi, Jamshid; Pooladi, Ali; Arasteh, Peyman; Zamani, Khosro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes is associated with higher rates of caries, on the other hand some studies have shown that renal failure can be protective against dental caries. Objectives: In this study we compared oral Lactobacillus and Streptococcus mutans between diabetic dialysis and non-diabetic dialysis patients and the normal population. Patients and Methods: During November 2014 to January 2014, 85 people that referred to our medical care center entered the study. The sample included 30 diabetic dialysis, 28 non-diabetic dialysis patients and 27 healthy people. Oral saliva samples were obtained from their tongue and oral floor for microbiological examination. Patients’ data were compared before and after dialysis. Results: The amount of Lactobacillus and S. mutans did not show a significant difference between the three groups (P=0.092 and P=0.966 for S. mutans and lactobacillus, respectively). A positive and meaningful correlation was seen between fasting blood sugar (FBS) levels and the amount of S. mutans in the diabetic dialysis group (P=0.023; r=0.413). A meaningful and positive correlation was also seen between the amount of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) after dialysis and the amount of oral S. mutans in the non-diabetic dialysis group (P=0.03; r=0.403). Conclusion: Despite the differences in the prevalence of caries that have been reported between renal failure patients and diabetic patients, we did not find any significant difference between diabetic dialysis, non-diabetic dialysis patients and the healthy population, regarding their amount of oral cariogenic bacteria. PMID:27689112

  19. Comparison of oral Lactobacillus and Streptococcus mutans between diabetic dialysis patients with non-diabetic dialysis patients and healthy people

    PubMed Central

    Rezazadeh, Fahimeh; Bazargani, Abdollah; Roozbeh-Shahroodi, Jamshid; Pooladi, Ali; Arasteh, Peyman; Zamani, Khosro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes is associated with higher rates of caries, on the other hand some studies have shown that renal failure can be protective against dental caries. Objectives: In this study we compared oral Lactobacillus and Streptococcus mutans between diabetic dialysis and non-diabetic dialysis patients and the normal population. Patients and Methods: During November 2014 to January 2014, 85 people that referred to our medical care center entered the study. The sample included 30 diabetic dialysis, 28 non-diabetic dialysis patients and 27 healthy people. Oral saliva samples were obtained from their tongue and oral floor for microbiological examination. Patients’ data were compared before and after dialysis. Results: The amount of Lactobacillus and S. mutans did not show a significant difference between the three groups (P=0.092 and P=0.966 for S. mutans and lactobacillus, respectively). A positive and meaningful correlation was seen between fasting blood sugar (FBS) levels and the amount of S. mutans in the diabetic dialysis group (P=0.023; r=0.413). A meaningful and positive correlation was also seen between the amount of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) after dialysis and the amount of oral S. mutans in the non-diabetic dialysis group (P=0.03; r=0.403). Conclusion: Despite the differences in the prevalence of caries that have been reported between renal failure patients and diabetic patients, we did not find any significant difference between diabetic dialysis, non-diabetic dialysis patients and the healthy population, regarding their amount of oral cariogenic bacteria.

  20. Sleep Restriction Decreases the Physical Activity of Adults at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bromley, Lindsay E.; Booth, John N.; Kilkus, Jennifer M.; Imperial, Jacqueline G.; Penev, Plamen D.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objective: To test the hypothesis that recurrent sleep curtailment will result in decreased physical activity in adults at risk for type 2 diabetes. Design: Two-condition 2-period randomized crossover study. Setting: University General Clinical Research Center. Participants: Eighteen healthy patients with parental history of type 2 diabetes (9 females and 9 males, age 27 yr [standard deviation 3], body mass index 23.7 [2.3] kg/m2). Interventions: Two week-long inpatient sessions with 8.5 or 5.5-hr nighttime sleep opportunity. Participants who exercised regularly (39%) could follow their usual exercise routines during both sessions. Measurements and Results: Sleep and total body movement were measured by wrist actigraphy and waist accelerometry. Subjective mood and vigor was assessed using visual analog scales. The main outcome was the comparison of total activity counts between sleep conditions. Ancillary endpoints included changes in sedentary, light, and moderate plus vigorous activity, and their association with changes in mood and vigor. Daily sleep was reduced by 2.3 hr (P < 0.001) and total activity counts were 31% lower (P = 0.020) during the 5.5-hr time-in-bed condition. This was accompanied by a 24% reduction in moderate-plus-vigorous activity time (P = 0.005) and more sedentary behavior (+21 min/day; P = 0.020). The decrease in daily activity during the 5.5-hr time-in-bed condition was seen mostly in participants who exercised regularly (-39 versus −4% in exercisers versus nonexercisers; P = 0.027). Sleep loss-related declines in physical activity correlated strongly with declines in subjective vigor (R = 0.90; P < 0.001). Conclusions: Experimental sleep restriction results in decreased amount and intensity of physical activity in adults at risk for type 2 diabetes. Citation: Bromley LE; Booth JN; Kilkus JM; Imperial JG; Penev PD. Sleep restriction decreases the physical activity of adults at risk for type 2 diabetes. SLEEP 2012

  1. Comparison of Age of Onset and Frequency of Diabetic Complications in the Very Elderly Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of type 2 diabetes in elderly people has increased dramatically in the last few decades. This study was designed to clarify the clinical characteristics of type 2 diabetes in patients aged ≥80 years according to age of onset. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 289 patients aged ≥80 years with type 2 diabetes at the outpatient diabetes clinics of Kangwon National University Hospital from September 2010 to June 2014. We divided the patients into middle-age-onset diabetes (onset before 65 years of age) and elderly-onset diabetes (onset at 65+ years of age). Results There were 141 male and 148 female patients. The patients had a mean age of 83.2±2.9 years and the mean duration of diabetes was 14.3±10.4 years. One hundred and ninety-nine patients had elderly-onset diabetes. The patients with elderly-onset diabetes had a significantly lower frequency of diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy, lower serum creatinine levels, lower glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels, and similar coronary revascularization and cerebral infarction rates compared to those with middle-age-onset diabetes. There was no frequency difference in coronary revascularization and cerebral infarction and HbA1c levels between three subgroups (<5, 5 to 15, and ≥15 years) of diabetes duration in elderly onset diabetes. However, both in the elderly onset diabetes and middle-age-onset diabetes, the cumulative incidence of retinopathy was increasing rapidly according to the duration of diabetes. Conclusion We report that individuals with elderly-onset diabetes have a lower frequency of diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy and similar cardiovascular complications compared to those with middle-age-onset diabetes. PMID:27586451

  2. Retinopathy and microalbuminuria in type II diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Manaviat, Masoud R; Afkhami, Mohammad; Shoja, Mohammad R

    2004-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for the development of retinopathy and microalbuminuria and their correlation in type II diabetic patients. Methods In this cross-sectional study 590 patients suffering from diabetis type II were examined. Fundoscopy was performed by practising ophthalmologist. The ratio of urinary albumin to creatinine was assessed by clinitek 100 (Bayer corporation–USA). HbA1C, height and weight also were measured. Results The overall prevalence of retinopathy was 39.3% (232 patients), 5.4% of which showed to be prolifrative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). The diabetic retinopathy had significant inverse correlation with body mass index (BMI) (P = 0.02). HbA1C was higher in patients with PDR (mean = 10.5%) than in patients with no signs of retinopathy (mean = 9.5%) and this difference was statistically significant (P = 0.001). The prevalence of microalbuminuria was 25.9% while 14.5% of the patients revealed to have macroalbuminuria. As expected, diabetic retinopathy and renal involvement were highly positively correlated. (P = 0.001). Conclusion Microalbuminuria is associated with diabetic retinopathy in type II diabetic patients and is a reliable marker of retinopathy. PMID:15228626

  3. Hyporeninemic hypoaldosteronism in diabetic patients with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Grande Villoria, J; Macias Nunez, J F; Miralles, J M; De Castro del Pozo, S; Tabernero Romo, J M

    1988-01-01

    Plasma renin activity, plasma aldosterone levels and renal tubular capacity to excrete hydrogen ions were studied in 13 patients suffering from diabetes mellitus with a creatinine clearance of less than 40 ml/min. The results were compared with those obtained in a control group, in a group of nondiabetic subjects with chronic renal failure (CRF) and in a group of diabetic patients without CRF. Twelve of the thirteen diabetic patients with CRF had data characteristic of hyporeninemic hypoaldosteronism associated with type IV renal tubular acidosis. On comparing the results with those of the other two groups of patients, it was observed that the manifestations of the latter two groups considered separately were different from those of the problem group, although in the diabetic patients with normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR) hyporeninism but not hypoaldosteronism was present accompanied by a lower net acid excretion (p less than 0.001) due to a lower excretion of NH4 (p less than 0.05) and titratable acid (p less than 0.001) when the patients were challenged with an NH4Cl overload. We believe that a conjunction of diabetes and renal failure is necessary for the diabetic patients with a decrease in GFR to show hyporeninemic hypoaldosteronism and type IV tubular acidosis.

  4. Phimosis with Preputial Fissures as a Predictor of Undiagnosed Type 2 Diabetes in Adults.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yun-Ching; Huang, Yao-Kuang; Chen, Chih-Shou; Shindel, Alan W; Wu, Ching-Fang; Lin, Jian-Hui; Chiu, Kuo-Hsiung; Yang, Tzu-Hsin; Shi, Chung-Sheng

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes is usually asymptomatic in its early stage. Early diagnosis may improve outcomes by enabling initiation of treatment before end organ damage has progressed. The aim of this study was to determine whether the clinical sign of phimosis with preputial fissures is predictive of type 2 diabetes in patients not previously diagnosed with diabetes. Twenty-eight patients with acquired phimosis and preputial fissures were collected prospectively. Twenty-eight controls with acquired phimosis without preputial fissures were selected. Statistically significant differences were found in body mass index, random plasma glucose, glucosuria and glycosylated haemoglobin levels, but not in age, family history of diabetes, hypertension and classical hyperglycaemic symptoms. Diabetes was confirmed in all 28 patients in the preputial fissures group, but only 2 (7.1%) patients in the non-preputial fissures group (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, phimosis with preputial fissures may be a specific sign of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. PMID:26349852

  5. Diabetes prevalence among Puerto Rican adults in New York City, NY, 2000.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Thomas A; Hosler, Akiko S; Sekhobo, Jackson P; Duffy, Thomas P; Tierney, Edward F; Engelgau, Michael M; Geiss, Linda S

    2004-03-01

    This study assessed the prevalence of diagnosed diabetes and associated characteristics among Puerto Rican adults in New York City, NY, with a random-digit-dialed telephone survey with a dual-frame sampling design. Overall, 11.3% (95% confidence interval = 8.7%, 14.0%) had diagnosed diabetes; diabetes was significantly related to age, obesity, and family history; and the prevalence was high among those with the least education. This study showed the ability to obtain critically needed diabetes information from ethnic minorities at the local level.

  6. The cross-sectional associations between sense of coherence and diabetic microvascular complications, glycaemic control, and patients' conceptions of type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sense of coherence (SOC) has been associated with various self-care behaviours in the general population. As the management of type 1 diabetes heavily relies on self-management, the SOC concept could also prove important in this population. This paper is a report of a study conducted among patients with type 1 diabetes to assess the associations between SOC and glycaemic control, microvascular complications, and patients' conceptions of their disease. Methods Altogether 1,264 adult patients (45% men, age range 18-82 years) with type 1 diabetes participated in this cross-sectional study. SOC was evaluated using a 13-item SOC questionnaire. Standardized assays were used to determine HbA1c. Nephropathy status was based on albumin excretion rate and retinal laser-treatment was used as an indication of severe retinopathy. Patients' subjective conceptions of diabetes were studied using a questionnaire. Results Higher SOC scores, reflecting stronger SOC, were associated with lower HbA1c values. Strong SOC was independently associated with reaching the HbA1c level <7.5%. Adjusting for diabetes duration, age at onset, socioeconomic status and HbA1c, weak SOC was associated with the presence of nephropathy among men, but not women. No associations were observed between SOC and severe retinopathy. Four dimensions describing patients' conceptions of HbA1c, complications, diabetes control and hypoglycaemia were formed from the diabetes questionnaire. Weak SOC was independently associated with worse subjective conceptions in the dimensions of HbA1c and hypoglycaemia. Furthermore among men, an association between weak SOC and the complications factor was observed. Conclusion Interventions to improve patients' SOC, if available, could improve patients' metabolic control and therefore also reduce the incidence of diabetic complications. PMID:21110902

  7. The Costs of Treating American Indian Adults With Diabetes Within the Indian Health Service

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Joan M.; Wilson, Charlton; Manson, Spero M.; Acton, Kelly J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the costs of treating American Indian adults with diabetes within the Indian Health Service (IHS). Methods. We extracted demographic and health service utilization data from the IHS electronic medical reporting system for 32 052 American Indian adults in central Arizona in 2004 and 2005. We derived treatment cost estimates from an IHS facility–specific cost report. We examined chronic condition prevalence, medical service utilization, and treatment costs for American Indians with and without diabetes. Results. IHS treatment costs for the 10.9% of American Indian adults with diabetes accounted for 37.0% of all adult treatment costs. Persons with diabetes accounted for nearly half of all hospital days (excluding days for obstetrical care). Hospital inpatient service costs for those with diabetes accounted for 32.2% of all costs. Conclusions. In this first study of treatment costs within the IHS, costs for American Indians with diabetes were found to consume a significant proportion of IHS resources. The findings give federal agencies and tribes critical information for resource allocation and policy formulation to reduce and eventually eliminate diabetes-related disparities between American Indians and Alaska Natives and other racial/ethnic populations. PMID:22390444

  8. Urinary biomarkers for early diabetic nephropathy in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Fiseha, Temesgen

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a serious complication of diabetes associated with increased risk of mortality, and cardiovascular and renal outcomes. Diagnostic markers to detect DN at early stage are important as early intervention can slow loss of kidney function and improve patient outcomes. Urinary biomarkers may be elevated in diabetic patients even before the appearance of microalbuminuria, and can be used as useful marker for detecting nephropathy in patients with normoalbuminuria (early DN). We reviewed some new and important urinary biomarkers, such as: Neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL), N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase (NAG), Cystatin C, alpha 1-microglobulin, immunoglobulin G or M, type IV collagen, nephrin, angiotensinogen and liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) associated with early DN in type 2 diabetic patients. Our search identified a total of 42 studies that have been published to date. Urinary levels of these biomarkers were elevated in type 2 diabetic patients compared with non-diabetic controls, including in patients who had no signs indicating nephropathy (without microalbuminuria), and showed positive correlation with albuminuria. Despite the promise of these new urinary biomarkers, further large, multicenter prospective studies are still needed to confirm their clinical utility as a screening tool for early type 2 DN in every day practice. PMID:26146561

  9. Diabetes self-care behaviours and clinical outcomes among Taiwanese patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Chung-Mei; Dwyer, Johanna T; Jacques, Paul F; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Haas, Catherine F; Weinger, Katie

    2015-01-01

    We examined the influences of patients' background characteristics on the frequency of performing five diabetes self-care behaviours that 185 Taiwanese outpatients reported. All patients had type 2 diabetes diagnosed for more than a year and attended an outpatient clinic at a large university hospital where they had received at least one dietitian-led individual nutrition education session and one nurse-led diabetes education session during the course of their care. Seventy nine percent of the patients regularly (defined as responses often or always on the questionnaire) took their medications and over half followed recommended meal plans and exercised, but fewer performed foot care (38%) or checked their blood glucose levels (20%) regularly. The associations between patients' demographics and disease-related characteristics and their performance of self-care behaviours were assessed with logistic regression. Although checking blood glucose levels and performing diabetes foot care were unrelated to any clinical outcome examined, patients who took their diabetes medications had lower hemoglobin A1c levels and fewer chronic complications than those who did not. Furthermore, patients who followed a diabetes meal plan also had lower hemoglobin A1c levels, and those who exercised regularly had healthier body mass indices (BMI) than those who did not. PMID:26420184

  10. Assessment of a Short Diabetes Knowledge Instrument for Older and Minority Adults

    PubMed Central

    Quandt, Sara A.; Ip, Edward H.; Kirk, Julienne K.; Saldana, Santiago; Chen, Shyh-Huei; Nguyen, Ha; Bell, Ronny A.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the study was to assess the performance of a short diabetes knowledge instrument (SDKI) in a large multi-ethnic sample of older adults with diabetes and to identify possible modifications to improve its ability to document diabetes knowledge. Research Design and Methods A sample of 593 African American, American Indian, and white female and male adults 60 years and older, with diabetes diagnosed at least two years prior, was recruited from eight North Carolina counties. All completed an interview that included a 16-item questionnaire to assess diabetes knowledge. A subsample of 46 completed the questionnaire a second time at a subsequent interview. Item-response analysis was used to refine the instrument to well-performing items. The instrument consisting of the remaining items was subjected to analyses to assess validity and test-retest reliability. Results Three items were removed after item-response analysis. Scores for the resulting instrument were lower among minority and older participants, as well as those with lower educational attainment and income. Scores for test-retest were highly correlated. Conclusions The SDKI (13 item questionnaire) appears to be a valid and reliable instrument to evaluate knowledge about diabetes. Assessment in a multi-ethnic sample of older adults suggests that this instrument can be used to measure diabetes knowledge in diverse populations. Further evaluation is needed to determine whether or not this instrument can detect changes in knowledge resulting from diabetes education or other interventions. PMID:24163359

  11. Carbohydrate nutrition differs by diabetes status and is associated with dyslipidemia in Boston Puerto Rican adults without diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Puerto Rican adults have a greater prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and lower HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) than the general U.S. population. Carbohydrate nutrition may play a role in this disparity. Cross-sectional analyses included data from 1219 Puerto Ricans aged 45-75 y enrolled in the Boston Puer...

  12. Liver abscesses in adult patients with and without diabetes mellitus: an analysis of the clinical characteristics, features of the causative pathogens, outcomes and predictors of fatality: a report based on a large population, retrospective study in China.

    PubMed

    Tian, L-T; Yao, K; Zhang, X-Y; Zhang, Z-D; Liang, Y-J; Yin, D-L; Lee, L; Jiang, H-C; Liu, L-X

    2012-09-01

    In China, there are four types of liver abscesses (LAs) that meet the clinical criteria. Pyogenic liver abscesses (PLAs) and amoebic liver abscesses (ALAs) are two of the most common types of abscesses, followed by fungal liver abscesses (FLAs) and hydatid secondary liver abscesses (HsLAs). Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with the development of PLAs. However, there is a lack of population-based studies that have evaluated the underlying relationship between LAs (mainly PLAs and FLAs) and DM. We conducted a retrospective study based on a large population to identify the potential differences and factors that affect the mortality of PLA patients in DM and non-DM groups. Our results revealed that the prevalence of DM is 44.3% (158/357) in PLA patients and 35.3% (18/51) in FLA patients. Compared with the non-DM patients, statistically significant differences were found in DM patients according to symptomatology, clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, microbiological characteristics, antimicrobial resistance, clinical treatments and outcomes in relation to mortality. In addition, the status of antibiotic resistance to E. coli and K. pneumoniae, which were isolated from the patient samples, is severe in the area in which the study was conducted. Regarding the treatment of PLAs, our study indicated that broad-spectrum antimicrobial therapy and drug combinations should be recommended and initiated before the pathogens are cultured and identified. In the clinic, therapies that combine percutaneous drainage with antibiotics and surgery with antibiotics are the two most useful strategies for treating an LA. These two combined treatments resulted in satisfactory cure rates. In the DM and non-DM groups, the cure rates for percutaneous drainage with antibiotics were 90.3% and 92.0%, respectively, and the cure rates for surgery with antibiotics were 93.9% and 95.2%, respectively.

  13. Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess in diabetic patients: association of glycemic control with the clinical characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess (KPLA) has been reported with increasing frequency in East Asian countries in the past 3 decades, especially in Taiwan and Korea. Diabetes is a well-known risk factor for KPLA and highly associated with septic metastatic complications from KPLA. We investigated the association of glycemic control in diabetic patients with the clinical characteristics of KPLA in Taiwan. Methods Adult diabetic patients with KPLA were identified retrospectively in a medical center from January 2007 to January 2012. Clinical characteristics were compared among patients with different levels of current hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Risk factors for metastatic infection from KPLA were analyzed. Results Patients with uncontrolled glycemia (HbA1c ≥ 7%) were significantly younger than those with controlled glycemia (HbA1c < 7%). Patients with uncontrolled glycemia had the trend to have a higher rate of gas-forming liver abscess, cryptogenic liver abscess, and metastatic infection than those with controlled glycemia. Cryptogenic liver abscess and metastatic infection were more common in the poor glycemic control group (HbA1c value >; 10%) after adjustment with age. HbA1c level and abscess < 5 cm were independent risk factors for metastatic complications from KPLA. Conclusions Glycemic control in diabetic patients played an essential role in the clinical characteristics of KPLA, especially in metastatic complications from KPLA. PMID:23363608

  14. Physiological Changes in Older Adults and Their Effect on Diabetes Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gates, Brian J.; Walker, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    In Brief Physiological changes associated with aging have the potential to affect the treatment of diabetes. However, evidence regarding treatment of diabetes in geriatric patients has been limited, especially for “oldest-old” patients. Recent research has provided greater insight into the risks and benefits of treatment, and new guidelines provide more specific information regarding treatment goals in older people with diabetes and encourage greater individualization of treatment. PMID:26246752

  15. An Analysis, Using Concept Mapping, of Diabetic Patients' Knowledge, before and after Patient Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchand, C.; d'Ivernois, J. F.; Assal, J. P.; Slama, G.; Hivon, R.

    2002-01-01

    Assesses whether concept maps used with diabetic patients could describe their cognitive structure, before and after having followed an educational program. Involves 10 diabetic patients and shows that concept maps can be a suitable technique to explore the type and organization of the patients' prior knowledge and to visualize what they have…

  16. Consumers' Perspectives on Effective Orientation and Mobility Services for Diabetic Adults Who Are Visually Impaired

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin-Shirley, Nora; Kelley, Pat; Matlock, Dwayne; Page, Anita

    2006-01-01

    The authors interviewed and videotaped diabetic adults with visual impairments about their perceptions of orientation and mobility (O&M) services that they had received. The visual impairments of these middle-aged adults ranged from totally blind to low vision. The interview questions focused on demographic information about the interviewees, the…

  17. [IMSS in Numbers: the Census of Diabetic Patients, 2004].

    PubMed

    2006-01-01

    The census of diabetic patients at the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social describes the state and level of control of biologic markers, such as glucose, BMI and blood pressure of all diabetic patients attending the family medicine units during 2004. The main results show that 2,334,340 diabetic patients visited the health units of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social with an average of 3.7 visits per year. Around 75% of the patients had their weight and height registered; 73%, their blood pressure, and only 28.8%, their glycemia level. One third of the patients (35.7%) had an unspecified diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and 91.3% had no complications reported. Of those with glycemia reported, 56.9% had a poor blood glucose control. Half of the diabetic patients were also diagnosed as hypertensive though 74% had good blood pressure control. The BMI reported that 40.4% were obese and 39.6% were overweight. All these data are important to measure the impact of different health interventions that point to a better control of diabetes at the IMSS.

  18. Updates on the Management of Diabetes in Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Connie M.; Leung, Angela M.; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Lynch, Katherine E.; Brent, Gregory A.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the U.S. and many countries globally. The role of improved glycemic control in ameliorating the exceedingly high mortality risk of diabetic dialysis patients is unclear. The treatment of diabetes in ESRD patients is challenging, given changes in glucose homeostasis, the unclear accuracy of glycemic control metrics, and the altered pharmacokinetics of glucose-lowering drugs by kidney dysfunction, the uremic milieu, and dialysis therapy. Up to one-third of diabetic dialysis patients may experience spontaneous resolution of hyperglycemia with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels <6%, a phenomenon known as “Burnt-Out Diabetes,” which remains with unclear biologic plausibility and undetermined clinical implications. Conventional methods of glycemic control assessment are confounded by the laboratory abnormalities and comorbidities associated with ESRD. Similar to more recent approaches in the general population, there is concern that glucose normalization may be harmful in ESRD patients. There is uncertainty surrounding the optimal glycemic target in this population, although recent epidemiologic data suggest that HbA1c ranges of 6% to 8%, as well as 7 to 9%, are associated with increased survival rates among diabetic dialysis patients. Lastly, many glucose-lowering drugs and their active metabolites are renally metabolized and excreted, and hence, require dose adjustment or avoidance in dialysis patients. PMID:24588802

  19. Diabetic foot risk factors in type 2 diabetes patients: a cross-sectional case control study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetic foot is a serious condition in patients with a long lasting diabetes mellitus. Diabetic foot treated improperly may lead not only to delayed ulceration healing, generalized inflammation, unnecessary surgical intervention, but also to the lower limb amputation. The aim of this study was to compare diabetic foot risk factors in population with type 2 diabetes and risk factors for diabetes in healthy subjects. Methods The study included 900 subjects: 145 with diabetic foot, 293 with type 2 diabetes without diabetic foot and 462 healthy controls matched in terms of mean age, gender structure and cardiovascular diseases absence. Study was conducted in Gastroenterology and Metabolic Diseases Department, Medical University of Warsaw, Poland. In statistical analysis a logistic regression model, U Mann-Whitney’s and t-Student test were used. Results The binomial logit models analysis showed that the risk of diabetic foot in patients with type 2 diabetes was decreased by patient’s age (odds ratio [OR] = 0.94; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.92-0.96; p = 0.00001) and hyperlipidaemia (OR = 0.54; 95% CI: 0.36-0.81; p = 0.01). In contrast, male gender (OR = 2.83; 95% CI: 1.86-4.28; p = 0.00001) diabetes duration (OR = 1.04; 95% CI: 1.03-1.06; p = 0.0003), weight (OR = 1.04; 95% CI: 1.03-1.06; p = 0.00001), height (OR = 1.08; 95% CI: 1.05-1.11; p = 0.00001) and waist circumference (OR = 1.028; 95% CI: 1.007-1.050; p = 0.006) increase the risk of diabetic foot. The onset of type 2 diabetes in healthy subjects was increased by weight (OR = 1.035; 95% CI: 1.024-1.046; p = 0.00001), WC (OR = 1.075; 95% CI: 1.055-1.096; p = 00001), hip circumference (OR = 1.03; 95% CI: 1.01-1.05; p = 0.005), overweight defined with body mass index (BMI) above 24,9 kg/m2 (OR = 2.49; 95% CI: 1.77-3.51; p = 0.00001) and hyperlipidaemia (OR = 3.53; 95% CI: 2.57-4.84; p = 0.00001). Conclusions Risk factors for Type 2 diabetes and diabetic foot are only partially common. Study proved

  20. Teriparatide in patients with osteoporosis and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Ann V; Pavo, Imre; Alam, Jahangir; Disch, Damon P; Schuster, Dara; Harris, Jennifer M; Krege, John H

    2016-10-01

    Despite evidence for higher fracture risk, clinical effects of osteoporosis treatments in type 2 diabetes (T2D) are largely unknown. Post hoc analyses of the DANCE observational study compared T2D patients and patients without diabetes to assess the effect of teriparatide, an osteoanabolic therapy on skeletal outcomes and safety. Patients included ambulatory men and women with osteoporosis receiving teriparatide 20μg/day SQ up to 24months followed by observation up to 24months. Main outcome measures included nonvertebral fracture incidence comparing 0-6months with 6+ months of teriparatide, change from baseline in BMD and back pain severity, and serious adverse events. Analyses included 4042 patients; 291 with T2D, 3751 without diabetes. Treatment exposure did not differ by group. For T2D patients, fracture incidence was 3.5 per 100 patient-years during 0-6months treatment, and 1.6 during 6months to treatment end (47% of baseline, 95% CI 12-187%); during similar periods, for patients without diabetes, fracture incidence was 3.2 and 1.8 (57% of baseline, 95% CI 39-83%). As determinants of fracture outcome during teriparatide treatment, diabetes was not a significant factor (P=0.858), treatment duration was significant (P=0.003), and the effect of duration was not significantly different between the groups (interaction P=0.792). Increases in spine and total hip BMD did not differ between groups; increase in femoral neck BMD was greater in T2D patients than in patients without diabetes (+0.34 and +0.004g/cm(2), respectively; P=0.014). Back pain severity decreased in both groups. Teriparatide was well tolerated without new safety findings. In conclusion, during teriparatide treatment, reduction in nonvertebral fracture incidence, increase in BMD, and decrease in back pain were similar in T2D and non-diabetic patients. PMID:27374026

  1. [Renal histological lesions in patients with type II diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Castellano, I; Covarsí, A; Novillo, R; Gómez-Martino, J R; Ferrando, L

    2002-01-01

    Diabetic glomerulosclerosis is the most frequent cause of renal disease in patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM), sometimes accompanied by vascular lesions. However, other glomerular pathologies are important in these patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of non-diabetic nephropathy (NDN) in selected patients with type II DM, and to identify clinical markers that may predict its presence in this population. We reviewed 20 renal biopsies performed on twenty patients with type II DM. Nine of them showed diabetic nephropathy (DN) (45%), whereas eleven showed NDN (55%): 1 IgA nephropathy, 3 vasculitis and 7 membranous nephropathy. We found no differences between the two groups with regard to sex, duration of DM, insulin therapy, glycosylated haemoglobin, proteinuria, presence of nephrotic syndrome, hypertension, serum IgA level or renal size. The NDN group had haematuria in 63.6%, whereas the patients with NDN had it in 44.4% (NS). Body mass index was higher in NDN patients (30 +/- 6.7 vs 22 +/- 2.9; p < 0.01), The same was true for creatinine clearance (82.2 +/- 51.4 ml/m vs 40.4 +/- 19.6 ml/m; p < 0.05). The age at the moment of diagnosis was higher in ND patients (67 +/- 11.2 vs 54.3 +/- 4.6; p < 0.05). The 3 patients who had diabetic retinopathy were found to have DN on renal biopsy (diagnostic specificity = 100%), although 66.7% of the patients with diabetic glomerulopathy had no retinopathy. We conclude that patients with type II DM with renal findings suggesting non-diabetic renal disease frequently it have NDN, and a renal biopsy must be performed. The presence of retinopathy has a predictive value of 100% in predicting DN, therefore its existence may make this diagnostic procedure unneccesary.

  2. Macular edema in underserved diabetic patients: Improving detection by enhancing the optical signature and data analysis techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhamami, Mastour Abdullah

    Diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema are chief causes of vision loss in working adults. Thus, retinal screening of patients with diabetes has become standard practice in some countries to prevent visual impairment and blindness from diabetic retinopathy. One goal is to improve techniques currently used to diagnose diabetic retinopathy. Another goal is to probe pathophysiological changes seen with imaging methods. Analysis was performed on a novel dataset from more than 2000 underserved adult diabetic patients, who were recruited for a screening study for diabetic eye disease. Data were collected from four county clinics at Alameda Health, Alameda County, CA. Over 90% of patients self-identified as a racial/ethnic identity other than non-Hispanic white. We investigated the prevalence and optical properties of macular edema. In the first study, a retrospective cohort study was performed to compare macular thickness in diabetic patients with and without macular edema to determine the presence of damage to the external limiting membrane or and the relation of damage to the ELM to damage to photoreceptors. In the second study, we investigated whether the information in red light better visualizes cysts in diabetic macular edema, as compared to green light. In the third study, we investigated whether the demographic and blood glucose information predict diabetic macular edema. Three logistic regression analyses were compared. In the fourth study, we examined how different outcome measures of retinal thickness vary with demographic and blood glucose measures, using a trichotomous variable for retinal thickness. The findings point strongly to large individual differences in the development of macular edema, which is difficult to diagnose with the most common methods in dark eyes. Further, while blood glucose was found to be important, there are additional differences in the potential for macular edema that are associated with ethnic group and gender.

  3. Activities of Antioxidant Scavenger Enzymes (Superoxide Dismutase and Glutathione Peroxidase) in Erythrocytes in Adult Women With and Without Type II Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Raymond; Berner, Yitshal N.

    2004-01-01

    It is widely believed that oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of type II diabetes. The present study was undertaken to examine the functioning of two antioxidant scavenger enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), in erythrocytes in a population of healthy aging adult women compared with a similar population with type II diabetes. Blood samples were examined from 42 female adult healthy subjects at different ages and from 59 female patients with type II diabetes. A significant increase in SOD activities was correlated with aging in erythrocytes of the healthy control subjects (r = .550, P = .001); however, this correlation was not found in subjects with type II diabetes (r = .250, P < .07). A trend showing a reduction in glutathione peroxidase activities was demonstrated with aging (r = −.331, P = .228); however, this trend was not found in diabetic subjects (r = .031, P < .820). The results indicate a possible imbalance in the antioxidant system in erythrocytes of aging adult women, which is even more pronounced in cases of type II diabetes. This study may indicate possible therapeutic treatment or preventive measures to limit oxidative damage and reduce complications of diabetes. PMID:15203888

  4. Prevalence of self-reported sleep duration and sleep habits in type 2 diabetes patients in South Trinidad.

    PubMed

    Ramtahal, Rishi; Khan, Claude; Maharaj-Khan, Kavita; Nallamothu, Sriram; Hinds, Avery; Dhanoo, Andrew; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh; Hill-Briggs, Felicia; Lazo, Mariana

    2015-12-01

    The present study aims to determine the prevalence of self-reported sleep duration and sleep habits and their associated factors in patients with type 2 diabetes in Trinidad. This was a cross-sectional multicenter study. There were 291 patients with type 2 diabetes studied. Sleep habits were assessed using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey sleep disorder questionnaire. Demographic, anthropometric and biochemical data were also collected. The sample had a mean age of 58.8 years; 66.7% were female. The mean BMI was 28.9 kg/m(2). The prevalence of Excessive Daytime Sleepiness (EDS) was 11.3%. The prevalence of patients with short sleep (⩽6h) was 28.5%. The prevalence of patients with poor sleep was 63.9%. Poor sleep was associated with age, intensive anti-diabetic treatment and longer duration of diabetes. Short sleep was associated with intensive anti-diabetic treatment and BMI, while EDS was associated with increased BMI. In a sample of patients with type 2 diabetes, a high prevalence of self-reported sleep duration and unhealthy sleep habits was found. There needs to be an increased awareness of sleep conditions in adults with type 2 diabetes by doctors caring for these patients.

  5. Prevalence, awareness, treatment and control of hypertension in adults with diagnosed diabetes: the Fourth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES IV).

    PubMed

    Lee, H-S; Lee, S-S; Hwang, I-Y; Park, Y-J; Yoon, S-H; Han, K; Son, J-W; Ko, S-H; Park, Y G; Yim, H W; Lee, W-C; Park, Y-M

    2013-06-01

    We evaluated the prevalence, awareness, treatment and control of hypertension in Korean adults with diagnosed diabetes using nationally representative data. Among subjects aged ≥30 years who participated in the Fourth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in 2007 and 2008, a total of 745 subjects (336 men and 409 women) with a previous diagnosis of diabetes mellitus were analyzed. The prevalence of hypertension in adults with diagnosed diabetes was 55.5%. The rates of awareness, treatment and control were 88.0, 94.2, and 30.8%, respectively. Compared with the general population, the prevalence of hypertension in adults with diagnosed diabetes was higher in all age groups in both genders. Factors independently associated with a high prevalence of hypertension included being male, increasing age, single, <9 years of education, the presence of chronic kidney disease risk, hypercholesterolemia (≥240 mg dl(-1)) and high body mass index (≥25 kg m(-2)). Regular medical screening was positively associated with hypertension control, whereas a high triglyceride level (≥150 mg dl(-1)) was inversely associated. A high prevalence and a low control rate of hypertension in adults with diagnosed diabetes suggest that stringent efforts are needed to control blood pressure in diabetic patients.

  6. ACHIEVING LIPID TARGETS IN ADULTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES--THE SANDS STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Marie; Silverman, Angela; Fleg, Jerome L.; Lee, Elisa T.; Mete, Mihriye; Weir, Matthew; Wilson, Charlton; Yeh, Fawn; Howard, Barbara V.; Howard, Wm. James

    2010-01-01

    Background Although lipid management in diabetes is standard practice, goals often are neither met nor maintained. Strategies for achieving lower targets have not been explored. The Stop Atherosclerosis in Native Diabetics Study (SANDS) randomized patients with diabetes to standard versus aggressive lipid and blood pressure goals for 36 months. Objective To report strategies used to achieve and maintain lipid goals and to report adverse events (AEs). Methods Adults with type 2 diabetes and no history of cardiovascular disease (N=499) were randomized to standard (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C]≤100 mg/dL, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [non-HDL-C]≤130 mg/dL) or aggressive (LDL-C≤70 mg/dL, non-HDL-C≤100 mg/dL) targets. An algorithm started with statin monotherapy, adding intestinally acting agents as required to reach LDL-C targets. Triglyceride [TG]-lowering agents were next used to reach non-HDL-C goals. Lipid management was performed by mid-level practitioners, with physician consultation, using point-of-care lipid determinations. Results On average, both groups achieved the LDL-C and non-HDL-C goals within 12 months and maintained them throughout the study. At 36 months, mean (SD) LDL-C and non-HDL-C were 72 (24) and 102 (29) mg/dL in the aggressive group (AGG) and 104 (20) and 138 (26) mg/dL, respectively, in the standard group (STD); systolic blood pressure targets were 115 and 130 mmHg, respectively. 68% of participants reached target LDL-C for >50% of the visits and 46% for >75% of visits. At 36 months, the AGG averaged 1.5 lipid lowering medications and the STD 1.2. Statins were used in 91% and 68% of the AGG and STD; ezetimibe by 31% and 10%; fibrates by 8% and 18%. No serious adverse events (SAEs) were observed; AEs occurred in 18% of the AGG and 14% of the STD. Conclusion Standard and aggressive lipid targets can be safely maintained in diabetic patients. Standardized algorithms, point-of-care lipid testing, and non

  7. Differential Effect of Race, Education, Gender, and Language Discrimination on Glycemic Control in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Brice Reynolds, D.; Walker, Rebekah J.; Campbell, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Discrimination has been linked to negative health outcomes, but little research has investigated different types of discrimination to determine if some have a greater impact on outcomes. We examined the differential effect of discrimination based on race, level of education, gender, and language on glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes. Patients and Methods: Six hundred two patients with type 2 diabetes from two adult primary care clinics in the southeastern United States completed validated questionnaires. Questions included perceived discrimination because of race/ethnicity, level of education, sex/gender, or language. A multiple linear regression model assessed the differential effect of each type of perceived discrimination on glycemic control while adjusting for relevant covariates, including race, site, gender, marital status, duration of diabetes, number of years in school, number of hours worked per week, income, and health status. Results: The mean age was 61.5 years, and the mean duration of diabetes was 12.3 years. Of the sample, 61.6% were men, and 64.9% were non-Hispanic black. In adjusted models, education discrimination remained significantly associated with glycemic control (β=0.47; 95% confidence interval, 0.03, 0.92). Race, gender and language discrimination were not significantly associated with poor glycemic control in either unadjusted or adjusted analyses. Conclusions: Discrimination based on education was found to be significantly associated with poor glycemic control. The findings suggest that education discrimination may be an important social determinant to consider when providing care to patients with type 2 diabetes and should be assessed separate from other types of discrimination, such as that based on race. PMID:25549154

  8. Incidence of type 1 diabetes mellitus and associated complications among children and young adults: results from Karnataka Diabetes Registry 1995-2008.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prasanna; Krishna, Pushpa; Reddy, Sanjay C; Gurappa, Mala; Aravind, S R; Munichoodappa, C

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate incidence of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) among children and young adults aged 0-25 years and to assess growth, glycaemic control, complications, risk factors and mortality associated diabetes mellitus,based on prospective registration of patients in Karnataka Diabetes Registry during the period 1995-2008. Complications were determined in subgroups serving as cohorts by screening tests and based on physicians' report. There were 1040 patients (514 boys and 526 girls) registered during the period 1995-2008. The overall incidence/prevalence of T1 DM (per 100,000 persons) was 3.8(0.32/10(5)/year) [males 3.7(0.3110(5)/year) and females 4(0.33/10(5)/year)]. On cross-sectional analysis of different cohorts, 88% (90/102) were below 50th percentile height, 95% (114/120) were <50th percentile of weight. Thirty-nine patients (10.7%) had poor glycaemic control (A1c>9%), The prevalence of different complications were as follows: Neuropathy 5.2% (12/230), retinopathy 8.4% (14/166), nephropathy 8.6% (20/230), hypertension 2.6% (6/230). Hypercholesterolaemia and hypertriglyceridaemia were found in 20.2% (24/119) and 41.7% (48/115) cases respectively and 18.1% (19/105) had low HDL. The percentage of patient with micro-albuminuria, high sensitive C-reactive protein were 29.6% (n=233) and 44.4% (20/45) respectively. Poor glycaemic control, hypertension and duration were strong consistent predictors of all complications. Twenty patients died during the period of which 10 deaths were related to diabetes. Though the incidence of diabetes in the young is low in our population compared to the western population, the burden of diabetes is high due to large population in our country. In spite of our best efforts there are still a huge gap between the standard of care and practice. Majority of type 1 diabetics are not reaching the ideal glycaemic targets.

  9. Medical advice and diabetes self-management reported by Mexican-American, Black- and White-non-Hispanic adults across the United States

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Diabetes has reached epidemic proportions in the United States, particularly among minorities, and if improperly managed can lead to medical complications and death. Healthcare providers play vital roles in communicating standards of care, which include guidance on diabetes self-management. The background of the client may play a role in the patient-provider communication process. The aim of this study was to determine the association between medical advice and diabetes self care management behaviors for a nationally representative sample of adults with diabetes. Moreover, we sought to establish whether or not race/ethnicity was a modifier for reported medical advice received and diabetes self-management behaviors. Methods We analyzed data from 654 adults aged 21 years and over with diagnosed diabetes [130 Mexican-Americans; 224 Black non-Hispanics; and, 300 White non-Hispanics] and an additional 161 with 'undiagnosed diabetes' [N = 815(171 MA, 281 BNH and 364 WNH)] who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007-2008. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate whether medical advice to engage in particular self-management behaviors (reduce fat or calories, increase physical activity or exercise, and control or lose weight) predicted actually engaging in the particular behavior and whether the impact of medical advice on engaging in the behavior differed by race/ethnicity. Additional analyses examined whether these relationships were maintained when other factors potentially related to engaging in diabetes self management such as participants' diabetes education, sociodemographics and physical characteristics were controlled. Sample weights were used to account for the complex sample design. Results Although medical advice to the patient is considered a standard of care for diabetes, approximately one-third of the sample reported not receiving dietary, weight management, or physical activity self

  10. Diabetes therapies in hemodialysis patients: Dipeptidase-4 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yuya; Hasegawa, Hitomi; Tsuji, Mayumi; Udaka, Yuko; Mihara, Masatomo; Shimizu, Tatsuo; Inoue, Michiyasu; Goto, Yoshikazu; Gotoh, Hiromichi; Inagaki, Masahiro; Oguchi, Katsuji

    2015-06-25

    Although several previous studies have been published on the effects of dipeptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors in diabetic hemodialysis (HD) patients, the findings have yet to be reviewed comprehensively. Eyesight failure caused by diabetic retinopathy and aging-related dementia make multiple daily insulin injections difficult for HD patients. Therefore, we reviewed the effects of DPP-4 inhibitors with a focus on oral antidiabetic drugs as a new treatment strategy in HD patients with diabetes. The following 7 DPP-4 inhibitors are available worldwide: sitagliptin, vildagliptin, alogliptin, linagliptin, teneligliptin, anagliptin, and saxagliptin. All of these are administered once daily with dose adjustments in HD patients. Four types of oral antidiabetic drugs can be administered for combination oral therapy with DPP-4 inhibitors, including sulfonylureas, meglitinide, thiazolidinediones, and alpha-glucosidase inhibitor. Nine studies examined the antidiabetic effects in HD patients. Treatments decreased hemoglobin A1c and glycated albumin levels by 0.3% to 1.3% and 1.7% to 4.9%, respectively. The efficacy of DPP-4 inhibitor treatment is high among HD patients, and no patients exhibited significant severe adverse effects such as hypoglycemia and liver dysfunction. DPP-4 inhibitors are key drugs in new treatment strategies for HD patients with diabetes and with limited choices for diabetes treatment.

  11. Age, race, diabetes, blood pressure, and mortality among hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Myers, Orrin B; Adams, Christopher; Rohrscheib, Mark R; Servilla, Karen S; Miskulin, Dana; Bedrick, Edward J; Zager, Philip G

    2010-11-01

    Observational studies involving hemodialysis patients suggest a U-shaped relationship between BP and mortality, but the majority of these studies followed large, heterogeneous cohorts. To examine whether age, race, and diabetes status affect the association between systolic BP (SBP; predialysis) and mortality, we studied a cohort of 16,283 incident hemodialysis patients. We constructed a series of multivariate proportional hazards models, adding age and BP to the analyses as cubic polynomial splines to model potential nonlinear relationships with mortality. Overall, low SBP associated with increased mortality, and the association was more pronounced among older patients and those with diabetes. Higher SBP associated with increased mortality among younger patients, regardless of race or diabetes status. We observed a survival advantage for black patients primarily among older patients. Diabetes associated with increased mortality mainly among older patients with low BP. In conclusion, the design of randomized clinical trials to identify optimal BP targets for patients with ESRD should take age and diabetes status into consideration.

  12. Bone and wound healing in the diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Siddhant K; Breitbart, Eric A; Berberian, Wayne S; Liporace, Frank A; Lin, Sheldon S

    2010-09-01

    Impaired soft tissue regeneration and delayed osseous healing are known complications associated with diabetes mellitus with regard to orthopedic surgery, making the management and treatment of diabetic patients undergoing foot and ankle surgery more complex and difficult. At the moment several options are available to address the known issues that complicate the clinical outcomes in these high-risk patients. Using a multifaceted approach, with close attention to intraoperative and perioperative considerations including modification of surgical technique to supplement fixation, local application of orthobiologics, tight glycemic control, administration of supplementary oxygen, and biophysical stimulation via low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and electrical bone stimulation, the impediments associated with diabetic healing can potentially be overcome, to yield improved clinical results for diabetic patients after acute or elective foot and ankle surgery.

  13. Pre and post-operative needs of patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Holt, Paula

    The incidence of diabetes is rising rapidly and individuals with the condition often have complex comorbidities, which may increase the need for surgical procedures such as amputation and cardiac, renal and eye surgery. Patients with diabetes undergoing surgery may have specific needs, particularly in relation to blood glucose control, and healthcare professionals need to be able to assess and manage these individuals to ensure optimum surgical outcomes. This article considers the potential effects of anaesthesia and surgery on blood glucose control. Diabetes-related complications, particularly signs and symptoms, and effects of these complications on patient safety during surgery are discussed. Specific pre and post-operative care of patients with type land type 2 diabetes is described, with reference to nil-by-mouth practices, blood glucose control, and post-operative infection and pain.

  14. Bone and wound healing in the diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Siddhant K; Breitbart, Eric A; Berberian, Wayne S; Liporace, Frank A; Lin, Sheldon S

    2010-09-01

    Impaired soft tissue regeneration and delayed osseous healing are known complications associated with diabetes mellitus with regard to orthopedic surgery, making the management and treatment of diabetic patients undergoing foot and ankle surgery more complex and difficult. At the moment several options are available to address the known issues that complicate the clinical outcomes in these high-risk patients. Using a multifaceted approach, with close attention to intraoperative and perioperative considerations including modification of surgical technique to supplement fixation, local application of orthobiologics, tight glycemic control, administration of supplementary oxygen, and biophysical stimulation via low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and electrical bone stimulation, the impediments associated with diabetic healing can potentially be overcome, to yield improved clinical results for diabetic patients after acute or elective foot and ankle surgery. PMID:20682414

  15. Factors associated with diet barriers in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Li; Leung, Doris Yin-ping; Sit, Janet Wing-hung; Li, Xiao-mei; Wu, Yu-ning; Yang, Miao-yan; Gao, Cui-xia; Hui, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Background The study was conducted to investigate the diet barriers perceived by patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes and examine the associations between diet barriers and sociodemographic characteristics, medical condition, and patient-centered variables. Methods Secondary subgroup analyses were conducted based on the responses of 246 adults with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes from a multicenter, cross-sectional study. Diet barriers were captured by the Diet Barriers subscale of the Personal Diabetes Questionnaire. Participants also completed validated measures of diet knowledge, empowerment level, and appraisal of diabetes. Multiple regression techniques were used for model building, with a hierarchical block design to determine the separate contribution of sociodemographic characteristics, medical condition, and patient-centered variables to diet barriers. Results Diet barriers were moderately evident (2.23±0.86) among Chinese patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes. The feeling of deprivation as a result of complying with a diet was the most recognized diet barrier (3.24±1.98), followed by “eating away from home” (2.79±1.82). Significantly higher levels of diet barriers were observed among those with lower levels of diet knowledge (β=−0.282, P<0.001) and empowerment (β=−0.190, P=0.015), and more negative appraisal (β=0.225, P=0.003). Conclusion Culturally tailored, patient-centered intervention programs that acknowledge individuals’ preferences and allow for flexibility in diet management should be launched. Interventions programs that could enhance diet knowledge, promote positive appraisal, and improve empowerment level might effectively address diet barriers perceived by patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes. PMID:26834464

  16. Older adults' fears about diabetes: using common sense models of disease to understand fear origins and implications for self-management.

    PubMed

    Quandt, Sara A; Reynolds, Teresa; Chapman, Christine; Bell, Ronny A; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Ip, Edward H; Kirk, Julienne K; Arcury, Thomas A

    2013-10-01

    This study examines older adults' fears of diabetes complications and their effects on self-management practices. Existing models of diabetes self-management posit that patients' actions are grounded in disease beliefs and experience, but there is little supporting evidence. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with a community-based sample of 74 African American, American Indian, and white older adults with diabetes. Analysis uses Leventhal's Common Sense Model of Diabetes to link fears to early experience and current self-management. Sixty-three identified fears focused on complications that could limit carrying out normal activities: amputation, blindness, low blood glucose and coma, and disease progression to insulin use and dialysis. Most focused self-management on actions to prevent specific complications, rather than on managing the disease as a whole. Early experiences focused attention on the inevitability of complications and the limited ability of patients to prevent them. Addressing older adults' fears about diabetes may improve their diabetes self-management practices.

  17. SESAM-DIABETE, an expert system for insulin-requiring diabetic patient education.

    PubMed

    Levy, M; Ferrand, P; Chirat, V

    1989-10-01

    SESAM-DIABETE is an interactive educational expert system that provides personalized advice and therapeutic recommendations for insulin-requiring diabetic patients. Because of its sophisticated explanation facilities, this system is intended to complete the more traditional educational tools for diabetic patients. It has been developed using an original essential expert system, namely SESAM, itself implemented in an upper-layer of Lisp, MBX. Its control structure uses a top-down strategy to solve a problem; i.e., it decomposes the current problem into subproblems easier to solve, this method being recursively applied to each subproblem. All information about patients is kept in a Patient Medical Record, which allows their follow-up. This system is currently available from their home for selected patients through the French telematic network TELETEL and is under clinical evaluation.

  18. SESAM-DIABETE, an expert system for insulin-requiring diabetic patient education.

    PubMed

    Levy, M; Ferrand, P; Chirat, V

    1989-10-01

    SESAM-DIABETE is an interactive educational expert system that provides personalized advice and therapeutic recommendations for insulin-requiring diabetic patients. Because of its sophisticated explanation facilities, this system is intended to complete the more traditional educational tools for diabetic patients. It has been developed using an original essential expert system, namely SESAM, itself implemented in an upper-layer of Lisp, MBX. Its control structure uses a top-down strategy to solve a problem; i.e., it decomposes the current problem into subproblems easier to solve, this method being recursively applied to each subproblem. All information about patients is kept in a Patient Medical Record, which allows their follow-up. This system is currently available from their home for selected patients through the French telematic network TELETEL and is under clinical evaluation. PMID:2776447

  19. Review of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in the diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Punjabi, Paawan; Hira, Angela; Prasad, Shanti; Wang, Xiangbing; Chokhavatia, Sita

    2015-09-01

    This article reviews the known pathophysiological mechanisms of comorbid gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in the diabetic patient, discusses therapeutic options in care, and provides an approach to its evaluation and management. We searched for review articles published in the past 10 years through a PubMed search using the filters diabetes mellitus, GERD, pathophysiology, and management. The search only yielded a handful of articles, so we independently included relevant studies from these review articles along with related citations as suggested by PubMed. We found diabetic patients are more prone to developing GERD and may present with atypical manifestations. A number of mechanisms have been proposed to elucidate the connection between these two diseases. Studies involving treatment options for comorbid disease suggest conflicting drug-drug interactions. Currently, there are no published guidelines specifically for the evaluation and management of GERD in the diabetic patient. Although there are several proposed mechanisms for the higher prevalence of GERD in the diabetic patient, this complex interrelationship requires further research. Understanding the pathophysiology will help direct diagnostic evaluation. In our review, we propose a management algorithm for GERD in the diabetic patient.

  20. A comprehensive review of urologic complications in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Arrellano-Valdez, Fernando; Urrutia-Osorio, Marta; Arroyo, Carlos; Soto-Vega, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a chronic disease characterized by hyperglycemia, as a result of abnormal insulin production, insulin function, or both. DM is associated with systemic complications, such as infections, neuropathy and angiopathy, which involve the genitourinary tract. The three most significant urologic complications include: bladder cystopathy, sexual dysfunction and urinary tract infections. Almost half of the patients with DM have bladder dysfunction or cystopathy, which can be manifested in women as hypersensitivity (in 39-61% of the diabetic women) or neurogenic bladder. In males it can be experienced as lower urinary tract symptoms (in 25% of diabetic males with a nearly twofold increased risk when seen by age groups). Additionally, an increased prostate volume affects their micturition as well as their urinary tract. Involving sexual dysfunction in women, it includes reduced libido, decreased arousal, clitoral erectile dysfunction and painful or non-sensitive intercourse; and in diabetic males it varies from low libido, ejaculatory abnormalities and erectile dysfunction. Globally, sexual disorders have a prevalence of 18-42%. Erectile dysfunction is ranked as the third most important complication of DM. Urinary tract infections are observed frequently in diabetic patients, and vary from emphysematous infections, Fournier gangrene, staghorn infected lithiasis to repetitive bacterial cystitis. The most frequent finding in diabetic women has been lower urinary tract infections. Because of the high incidence of obesity worldwide and its association with diabetes, it is very important to keep in mind the urologic complication associated with DM in patients, in order to better diagnose and treat this population.

  1. Hospitalized cardiovascular events in patients with diabetic macular edema

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Microvascular and macrovascular complications in diabetes stem from chronic hyperglycemia and are thought to have overlapping pathophysiology. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence rate of hospitalized myocardial infarctions (MI) and cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME) compared with diabetic patients without retinal diseases. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of a commercially insured population in an administrative claims database. DME subjects (n = 3519) and diabetes controls without retinal disease (n = 10557) were matched by age and gender. Healthcare claims were analyzed for the study period from 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2005. Incidence and adjusted rate ratios of hospitalized MI and CVA events were then calculated. Results The adjusted rate ratio for MI was 2.50 (95% CI: 1.83-3.41, p < 0.001) for DME versus diabetes controls. Predictors of MI events were heart disease, history of acute MI, and prior use of antiplatelet or anticoagulant drugs. The adjusted rate ratio for CVA was 1.98 (95% CI: 1.39-2.83, p < 0.001) for DME versus diabetes controls. Predictors of CVA events were cardiac arrhythmia, Charlson comorbidity scores, history of CVA, hyperlipidemia, and other cerebrovascular diseases. Conclusion Event rates of MI or CVA were higher in patients with DME than in diabetes controls. This study is one of few with sufficient sample size to accurately estimate the relationship between DME and cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:22646811

  2. Economic burden of hepatitis B infection among patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Gaurav; Klink, Andrew J.; Shenolikar, Rahul; Singer, Joseph; Eisenberg Lawrence, Debra F.; Krishnarajah, Girishanthy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite ACIP recommendation and cost-effectiveness established in those 19–59 y old diabetes patients the uptake of Hepatitis B vaccine in diabetes patients is low. There is need to highlight the impact of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in diabetes patients in terms of healthcare utilization and costs to recognize the burden of HBV in this population. This retrospective claims analysis included patients with diabetes and HBV (cases; n=1,236) and those with diabetes without HBV (controls; n=4,944), identified by ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes. Cases were matched with 4 controls using propensity score matching. Healthcare utilization and cost were compared; incremental effect of HBV infection was assessed using multivariate analysis. In the adjusted analyses, the mean number of hospitalizations (0.6 vs 0.4), outpatient service visits (34.2 vs. 20.4), and office visits (10.9 vs. 9.8) were 41%, 68%, and 11% higher, respectively, in cases vs. controls (all p<0.05). Gastroenterologist visits (0.8 vs. 0.2) and infectious disease visits (0.1 vs. 0.0) were 80% and 18% higher in subset of case and controls with these events. Cases ($39,435) incurred $16,397 incremental total costs compared with controls ($23,038). Medical ($30,968 vs. $17,765) and pharmacy costs ($8,029 vs. $5,114) were both significantly higher for cases (p < 0.0001). Healthcare utilization and costs were higher among patients with diabetes and HBV than in those with diabetes alone. These results provide evidence supporting the need for HBV vaccination among unvaccinated diabetes patients. PMID:27050021

  3. Primary and Specialty Medical Care Among Ethnically Diverse, Older Rural Adults With Type 2 Diabetes: The ELDER Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Smith, Shannon L.; Skelly, Anne H.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose Residents in rural communities in the United States, especially ethnic minority group members, have limited access to primary and specialty health care that is critical for diabetes management. This study examines primary and specialty medical care utilization among a rural, ethnically diverse, older adult population with diabetes. Methods Data were drawn from a cross-sectional face-to-face survey of randomly selected African American (n = 220), Native American (n = 181), and white (n = 297) Medicare beneficiaries ≥65 years old with diabetes in 2 rural counties in central North Carolina. Participants were asked about utilization of a primary care doctor and of specialists (nutritionist, diabetes specialist, eye doctor, bladder specialist, kidney specialist, heart specialist, foot specialist) in the past year. Findings Virtually all respondents (99.0%) reported having a primary care doctor and seeing that doctor in the past year. About 42% reported seeing a doctor for diabetes-related care. On average, participants reported seeing 2 specialists in the past year, and 54% reported seeing >1 specialist. Few reported seeing a diabetes specialist (5.7%), nutritionist (10.9%), or kidney specialist (17.5%). African Americans were more likely than others to report seeing a foot specialist (P<.01), while men were more likely than women to have seen a bladder specialist (P =.02), kidney specialist (P =.001), and heart specialist (P =.004), after adjusting for potential confounders. Predictors of the number of specialists seen include gender, education, poverty status, diabetes medication use, and self-rated health. Conclusions These data indicate low utilization of specialty diabetes care providers across ethnic groups and reflect the importance of primary care providers in diabetes care in rural areas. PMID:16092292

  4. Neuropsychological Benefits of Stationary Bike Exercise and a Cybercycle Exergame for Older Adults with Diabetes: An Exploratory Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Anderson-Hanley, Cay; Arciero, Paul J.; Westen, Sarah C.; Nimon, Joseph; Zimmerman, Earl

    2012-01-01

    Objective This quasi-experimental exploratory study investigated neuropsychological effects of exercise among older adults with diabetes mellitus (DM) compared with adults without diabetes (non-DM), and it examined the feasibility of using a stationary bike exergame as a form of exercise for older adults with and without diabetes. It is a secondary analysis that uses a small dataset from a larger randomized clinical trial (RCT) called the Cybercycle Study, which compared cognitive and physiological effects of traditional stationary cycling versus cybercycling. Methods In the RCT and the secondary analysis, older adults living in eight independent living retirement facilities in the state of New York were enrolled in the study and assigned to exercise five times per week for 45 min per session (two times per week was considered acceptable for retention in the study) by using a stationary bicycle over the course of 3 months. They were randomly assigned to use either a standard stationary bicycle or a “cybercycle” with a video screen that displayed virtual terrains, virtual tours, and racing games with virtual competitors. For this secondary analysis, participants in the RCT who had type 2 DM (n = 10) were compared with age-matched non-DM exercisers (n = 10). The relationship between exercise and executive function (i.e., Color Trials 2, Digit Span Backwards, and Stroop C tests) was examined for DM and non-DM patients. Results Older adults with and without diabetes were able to use cybercycles successfully and complete the study, so the feasibility of this form of exercise for this population was supported. However, in contrast with the larger RCT, this small subset did not demonstrate statistically significant differences in executive function between the participants who used cybercycles and those who used stationary bikes with no games or virtual content on a video screen. Therefore, the study combined the two groups and called them “exercisers” and

  5. INTESTINAL PARASITES IN DIABETIC PATIENTS IN SOHAG UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS, EGYPT.

    PubMed

    Elnadi, Nada A; Hassanien, Hassan A; Ahmad, Amal M; Abd Ellah, Asmaa K

    2015-08-01

    Intestinal parasites usually create benign diseases, though they may induce complications with high morbidity and mortality to the immunocompromised, including diabetic patients. The study detected the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in diabetic patients, comparing to non-diabetic controls and other parameters. A total of 100 fecal samples were collected from diabetic patients at the outpatient clinic of Sohag University Hospitals and another 100 from cross matched controls. The samples were examined macroscopically and microscopically by direct smear and different concentration methods then stained by Modified Ziehl-Neelsen Acid fast stain. Glycated hemoglobin (Hb Alc) was measured to detect DM controlled patients. The data were organized, tabulated, and statistically analyzed. Intestinal parasites were found in 25 (25%) cases out of 100 patients in diabetic group and 7(7%) cases out of 100 controls with high significance (P<0.001)). In the diabetic group, Giardia lamblia was detected in 22 cases (22%) and 5 (5%) among controls, Entamoeba histolytica in 7 cases (7%) and 3 (3%) among controls, Hymenolypis nana in 5 cases (5%) and 3 (3%) among controls, Entamoeba coli in 8 patients (8%), Entamoeba hartmanni in 3 cases (3%), Dientamoeba fragilis in a case (1%), Cryptosporidium parvum in 5 cases (5%) and microsporidia in 3 cases (3%). But, E. coli, E. hartmanni, D. fragilis and C. parvum nor microsporidia were detected in controls. The rate of G. lamblia in DM patients compared to controls was high significant (P<0.001). Hymenolepis nana was 5% (5 cases) in diabetic patients compared to 3% (3 cases) in controls. Residence and sex differences were not significant, while age, >10 years showed the highest prevalence (P< 0.003), type I infection rate was significantly higher than type II (P<0.001). DM control was also significantly affected the infection rates (P<0.007 in type I and P< 0.01 in type II). PMID:26485865

  6. Adipsia in a Diabetes Insipidus Patient

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Maria Conceição; Vieira, Margarida M.; Pereira, Joana Simões; Salgado, Duarte

    2015-01-01

    Central diabetes insipidus is a very common disorder after brain surgery or/trauma or even in the presence of brain inflammatory diseases. Polyuria and polydipsia are the clinical markers, but sometimes clinical situations are presenting with no thirst. These are not frequent but are life-treating conditions. Diagnosis is not easy, and for this reason some cases are treated late. We describe here a very infrequent oncological case of dangerous adipsic diabetes insipidus in a young girl who survived. PMID:26500540

  7. Adipsia in a Diabetes Insipidus Patient.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Maria Conceição; Vieira, Margarida M; Pereira, Joana Simões; Salgado, Duarte

    2015-01-01

    Central diabetes insipidus is a very common disorder after brain surgery or/trauma or even in the presence of brain inflammatory diseases. Polyuria and polydipsia are the clinical markers, but sometimes clinical situations are presenting with no thirst. These are not frequent but are life-treating conditions. Diagnosis is not easy, and for this reason some cases are treated late. We describe here a very infrequent oncological case of dangerous adipsic diabetes insipidus in a young girl who survived.

  8. Diagnosis of osteomyelitis of the foot in diabetic patients: Value of 111In-leukocyte scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Larcos, G.; Brown, M.L.; Sutton, R.T. )

    1991-09-01

    The noninvasive diagnosis of osteomyelitis of the foot in diabetic patients with currently available radiologic and radionuclide imaging techniques is often difficult. Recently, 111In-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy has been proposed as an attractive alternative. Accordingly, the authors retrospectively reviewed 51 111In-labeled leukocyte scans, 49 technetium-99m bone scans, and 49 plain radiographs obtained in 51 adults with diabetes in whom osteomyelitis of the foot was suspected. The sensitivity and specificity of these techniques were evaluated in all patients, as well as in a subgroup of 11 patients with neuroarthropathy. Results with 111In-labeled leukocyte scans were also examined in subsets of patients with soft-tissue ulcers (n = 35) and those receiving antibiotics during investigation (n = 20). Confirmation or exclusion of osteomyelitis was made surgically in 28 patients and clinically in 23. Fourteen patients had osteomyelitis. Bone scans were most sensitive (93%) but least specific (43%); plain radiographs were most specific (83%) but least sensitive (43%). 111In-labeled leukocyte scans were both sensitive (79%) and specific (78%), and remained useful in patients with neuroarthropathy, soft-tissue ulcers, and antibiotic treatment. Poor spatial resolution contributed to the false-negative and false-positive 111In-labeled leukocyte scans, suggesting that this technique should not be interpreted independent of other tests. 111In-labeled leukocyte scans are a valuable diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of pedal osteomyelitis in diabetic patients.

  9. An audit of cushioned diabetic footwear: relation to patient compliance.

    PubMed

    Chantelau, E; Haage, P

    1994-01-01

    The recurrence rate of neuropathic foot ulcers is reported in 51 diabetic patients regularly attending a diabetic foot clinic. All of the patients were provided with protective footwear reducing peak plantar pressure at the forefoot area by 50% (versus normal shoes), and were followed up for up to 4 years. Compliance with this footwear was recorded by assessing the daily time of wearing protective or normal shoes, and compliance with foot care was recorded from the entries in the patients charts. The results of this observational study demonstrate that wearing protective shoes for > 60% of the daytime significantly (p = 0.0002) reduced the ulcer relapse rate by > 50% in comparison with shorter wearing times for these shoes. In addition, patients without ulcer relapses had foot care significantly more frequently than patients with relapse (p < 0.05). It is concluded that cushioned protective footwear in association with frequent foot care is essential in the prevention of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcer recurrence.

  10. Ethnic Disparities in Glycemic Control Among Rural Older Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Quandt, Sara A.; Bell, Ronny A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Smith, Shannon L.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Wetmore, Lindsay K.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2006-01-01

    Glycemic control is a predictor of diabetes-related morbidity and mortality. However, little is known about how well older adults in rural communities, with limited access to self-care resources and specialty care practitioners, control their diabetes. Even less is known about whether minority, older, rural adults are at increased risk for poor glycemic control. We analyzed data from a cross-sectional survey of randomly selected older (≥65 years) adults with type 2 diabetes in rural North Carolina. Participants (N=693) were men and women from three ethnic groups: African American, Native American, and White. Capillary blood samples were collected for HbA1C analysis. HbA1C levels (<7%, 7%–<8%, and ≥8%) were compared across ethnic and gender groups. Two multiple logistic regression models (model 1: personal characteristics; model 2: personal and health characteristics) were used to evaluate potential predictors of HbA1C ≥7%. Overall, 36.4% had HbA1C ≥7%. Native Americans and African-American men had the highest proportion at levels of poor glycemic control (≥7%), and African-American women and White men had the lowest. In bivariate analysis, ethnicity, living arrangements, use of medications for diabetes, having a diabetes-related healthcare visit in the past year, and duration of diabetes were significantly associated with glycemic control. In multivariate analysis (model 1), being Native American, having low income without Medicaid, and being married were associated with poor glycemic control. Adding health characteristics (model 2), longer diabetes duration and diabetes medication therapy were significant predictors. These data indicate that older ethnic minorities in rural communities are at increased risk for diabetes complications and need diabetes management strategies to improve glycemic control. PMID:16259490

  11. Novel and emerging diabetes mellitus drug therapies for the type 2 diabetes patient

    PubMed Central

    Rochester, Charmaine D; Akiyode, Oluwaranti

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder of deranged fat, protein and carbohydrate metabolism resulting in hyperglycemia as a result of insulin resistance and inadequate insulin secretion. Although a wide variety of diabetes therapies is available, yet limited efficacy, adverse effects, cost, contraindications, renal dosage adjustments, inflexible dosing schedules and weight gain significantly limit their use. In addition, many patients in the United States fail to meet the therapeutic HbA1c goal of < 7% set by the American Diabetes Association. As such new and emerging diabetes therapies with different mechanisms of action hope to address some of these drawbacks to improve the patient with type 2 diabetes. This article reviews new and emerging classes, including the sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors, 11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 inhibitors, glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors; protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors, G Protein-Coupled receptor agonists and glucokinase activators. These emerging diabetes agents hold the promise of providing benefit of glucose lowering, weight reduction, low hypoglycemia risk, improve insulin sensitivity, pancreatic β cell preservation, and oral formulation availability. However, further studies are needed to evaluate their safety profile, cardiovascular effects, and efficacy durability in order to determine their role in type 2 diabetes management. PMID:24936252

  12. Identification of molecular markers related to human alveolar bone cells and pathway analysis in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Sun, X; Ren, Q H; Bai, L; Feng, Q

    2015-10-28

    Alveolar bone osteoblasts are widely used in dental and related research. They are easily affected by systemic diseases such as diabetes. However, the mechanism of diabetes-induced alveolar bone absorption remains unclear. This study systematically explored the changes in human alveolar bone cell-related gene expression and biological pathways, which may facilitate the investigation of its mechanism. Alveolar bone osteoblasts isolated from 5 male diabetics and 5 male healthy adults were cultured. Total RNA was extracted from these cells and subjected to gene microarray analysis. Differentially expressed genes were screened, and a gene interaction network was constructed. An enrichment pathway analysis was simultaneously performed on differentially expressed genes to identify the biological pathways associated with changes in the alveolar bone cells of diabetic humans. In total, we identified 147 mRNAs that were differentially expressed in diabetic alveolar bone cells (than in the normal cells; 91 upregulated and 36 downregulated mRNAs). The constructed co-expression network showed 3 pairs of significantly-expressed genes. High-enrichment pathway analysis identified 8 pathways that were affected by changes in gene expression; three of the significant pathways were related to metabolism (inositol phosphate metabolism, propanoate metabolism, and pyruvate metabolism). Here, we identified a few potential genes and biological pathways for the diagnosis and treatment of alveolar bone cells in diabetic patients.

  13. Different KIRs confer susceptibility and protection to adults with latent autoimmune diabetes in Latvian and Asian Indian populations.

    PubMed

    Shastry, Arun; Sedimbi, Saikiran K; Rajalingam, Raja; Rumba, Ingrida; Kanungo, Alok; Sanjeevi, C B

    2008-12-01

    KIRs (killer Ig-like receptors) expressed on natural killer (NK) cells are an important component of innate (and adaptive) immunity. They are either activatory or inhibitory, and certain KIRs are known to interact with specific motifs of HLA Class I molecules, which is very crucial in determining whether a cell is targeted to lysis or otherwise. Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is a slowly progressive form of autoimmune diabetes, with an adult onset (>30 years). Because autoantibodies and autoimmunity involved are involved in the etiology of LADA, KIRs might play an important role in conferring susceptibility to or protection against the disease. The purpose of this study was to identify killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes, which are associated with susceptibility to and protection against type 1 diabetes in Latvian and Asian Indian patients with LADA. KIR and HLA-C ligand genotyping was performed using PCR-SSP in LADA patients from Latvia (n= 45) with age- and sex-matched controls (n= 92) and from India (n= 86) with controls (n= 98). Results showed that in Latvian patients with LADA, KIRs 2DL1, 2DS2, and 2DS4 were associated with susceptibility and KIR 2DS5 with protection. In Asian Indian LADA patients, KIRs 2DL5 and 3DL1 were associated with susceptibility and KIRs 2DS1 and 2DS3 with protection. Stratification analyses for KIRs that bind to HLA-C1 and C2 were performed. We concluded that KIRs are important in conferring susceptibility (or protection) to adult patients with LADA in both our study populations. However the KIR genes (and their HLA-C ligands) conferring susceptibility or protection in these two populations differ, showing a role of ethnicity in disease susceptibility.

  14. The association between types of eating behaviour and dispositional mindfulness in adults with diabetes. Results from Diabetes MILES. The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Tak, Sanne R; Hendrieckx, Christel; Nefs, Giesje; Nyklíček, Ivan; Speight, Jane; Pouwer, François

    2015-04-01

    Although healthy food choices are important in the management of diabetes, making dietary adaptations is often challenging. Previous research has shown that people with type 2 diabetes are less likely to benefit from dietary advice if they tend to eat in response to emotions or external cues. Since high levels of dispositional mindfulness have been associated with greater awareness of healthy dietary practices in students and in the general population, it is relevant to study the association between dispositional mindfulness and eating behaviour in people with type 1 or 2 diabetes. We analysed data from Diabetes MILES - The Netherlands, a national observational survey in which 634 adults with type 1 or 2 diabetes completed the Dutch Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (to assess restrained, external and emotional eating behaviour) and the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire-Short Form (to assess dispositional mindfulness), in addition to other psychosocial measures. After controlling for potential confounders, including demographics, clinical variables and emotional distress, hierarchical linear regression analyses showed that higher levels of dispositional mindfulness were associated with eating behaviours that were more restrained (β = 0.10) and less external (β = -0.11) and emotional (β = -0.20). The mindfulness subscale 'acting with awareness' was the strongest predictor of both external and emotional eating behaviour, whereas for emotional eating, 'describing' and 'being non-judgemental' were also predictive. These findings suggest that there is an association between dispositional mindfulness and eating behaviour in adults with type 1 or 2 diabetes. Since mindfulness interventions increase levels of dispositional mindfulness, future studies could examine if these interventions are also effective in helping people with diabetes to reduce emotional or external eating behaviour, and to improve the quality of their diet.

  15. The association between types of eating behaviour and dispositional mindfulness in adults with diabetes. Results from Diabetes MILES. The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Tak, Sanne R; Hendrieckx, Christel; Nefs, Giesje; Nyklíček, Ivan; Speight, Jane; Pouwer, François

    2015-04-01

    Although healthy food choices are important in the management of diabetes, making dietary adaptations is often challenging. Previous research has shown that people with type 2 diabetes are less likely to benefit from dietary advice if they tend to eat in response to emotions or external cues. Since high levels of dispositional mindfulness have been associated with greater awareness of healthy dietary practices in students and in the general population, it is relevant to study the association between dispositional mindfulness and eating behaviour in people with type 1 or 2 diabetes. We analysed data from Diabetes MILES - The Netherlands, a national observational survey in which 634 adults with type 1 or 2 diabetes completed the Dutch Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (to assess restrained, external and emotional eating behaviour) and the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire-Short Form (to assess dispositional mindfulness), in addition to other psychosocial measures. After controlling for potential confounders, including demographics, clinical variables and emotional distress, hierarchical linear regression analyses showed that higher levels of dispositional mindfulness were associated with eating behaviours that were more restrained (β = 0.10) and less external (β = -0.11) and emotional (β = -0.20). The mindfulness subscale 'acting with awareness' was the strongest predictor of both external and emotional eating behaviour, whereas for emotional eating, 'describing' and 'being non-judgemental' were also predictive. These findings suggest that there is an association between dispositional mindfulness and eating behaviour in adults with type 1 or 2 diabetes. Since mindfulness interventions increase levels of dispositional mindfulness, future studies could examine if these interventions are also effective in helping people with diabetes to reduce emotional or external eating behaviour, and to improve the quality of their diet. PMID:25596042

  16. Environmental enrichment protects the retina from early diabetic damage in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Dorfman, Damián; Aranda, Marcos L; González Fleitas, María Florencia; Chianelli, Mónica S; Fernandez, Diego C; Sande, Pablo H; Rosenstein, Ruth E

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of reduced visual acuity and acquired blindness. Available treatments are not completely effective. We analyzed the effect of environmental enrichment on retinal damage induced by experimental diabetes in adult Wistar rats. Diabetes was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Three days after vehicle or streptozotocin injection, animals were housed in enriched environment or remained in a standard environment. Retinal function (electroretinogram, and oscillatory potentials), retinal morphology, blood-retinal barrier integrity, synaptophysin, astrocyte and Müller cell glial fibrillary acidic protein, vascular endothelial growth factor, tumor necrosis factor-α, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels, as well as lipid peroxidation were assessed in retina from diabetic animals housed in standard or enriched environment. Environmental enrichment preserved scotopic electroretinogram a-wave, b-wave and oscillatory potential amplitude, avoided albumin-Evan's blue leakage, prevented the decrease in retinal synaptophysin and astrocyte glial fibrillary acidic protein levels, the increase in Müller cell glial fibrillary acidic protein, vascular endothelial growth factor and tumor necrosis factor-α levels, as well as oxidative stress induced by diabetes. In addition, enriched environment prevented the decrease in retinal brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels induced by experimental diabetes. When environmental enrichment started 7 weeks after diabetes onset, retinal function was significantly preserved. These results indicate that enriched environment could attenuate the early diabetic damage in the retina from adult rats.

  17. Environmental Enrichment Protects the Retina from Early Diabetic Damage in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dorfman, Damián; Aranda, Marcos L.; González Fleitas, María Florencia; Chianelli, Mónica S.; Fernandez, Diego C.; Sande, Pablo H.; Rosenstein, Ruth E.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of reduced visual acuity and acquired blindness. Available treatments are not completely effective. We analyzed the effect of environmental enrichment on retinal damage induced by experimental diabetes in adult Wistar rats. Diabetes was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Three days after vehicle or streptozotocin injection, animals were housed in enriched environment or remained in a standard environment. Retinal function (electroretinogram, and oscillatory potentials), retinal morphology, blood-retinal barrier integrity, synaptophysin, astrocyte and Müller cell glial fibrillary acidic protein, vascular endothelial growth factor, tumor necrosis factor-α, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels, as well as lipid peroxidation were assessed in retina from diabetic animals housed in standard or enriched environment. Environmental enrichment preserved scotopic electroretinogram a-wave, b-wave and oscillatory potential amplitude, avoided albumin-Evan's blue leakage, prevented the decrease in retinal synaptophysin and astrocyte glial fibrillary acidic protein levels, the increase in Müller cell glial fibrillary acidic protein, vascular endothelial growth factor and tumor necrosis factor-α levels, as well as oxidative stress induced by diabetes. In addition, enriched environment prevented the decrease in retinal brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels induced by experimental diabetes. When environmental enrichment started 7 weeks after diabetes onset, retinal function was significantly preserved. These results indicate that enriched environment could attenuate the early diabetic damage in the retina from adult rats. PMID:25004165

  18. Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Diabetes What is Diabetes? Too Much Glucose in the Blood Diabetes means ... high, causing pre-diabetes or diabetes. Types of Diabetes There are three main kinds of diabetes: type ...

  19. Attenuated Purinergic Receptor Function in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Thaning, Pia; Bune, Laurids T.; Hellsten, Ylva; Pilegaard, Henriette; Saltin, Bengt; Rosenmeier, Jaya B.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides are involved in regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow. Diabetes induces cardiovascular dysregulation, but the extent to which the vasodilatatory capacity of nucleotides and nucleosides is affected in type 2 diabetes is unknown. The present study investigated 1) the vasodilatatory effect of ATP, uridine-triphosphate (UTP), and adenosine (ADO) and 2) the expression and distribution of P2Y2 and P2X1 receptors in skeletal muscles of diabetic subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In 10 diabetic patients and 10 age-matched control subjects, leg blood flow (LBF) was measured during intrafemoral artery infusion of ATP, UTP, and ADO, eliciting a blood flow equal to knee-extensor exercise at 12 W (∼2.6 l/min). RESULTS The vasodilatatory effect of the purinergic system was 50% lower in the diabetic group as exemplified by an LBF increase of 274 ± 37 vs. 143 ± 26 ml/μmol ATP × kg, 494 ± 80 vs. 234 ± 39 ml/μmol UTP × kg, and 14.9 ± 2.7 vs. 7.5 ± 0.6 ml/μmol ADO × kg in control and diabetic subjects, respectively, thus making the vasodilator potency as follows: UTP control subjects (100) > ATP control subjects (55) > UTP diabetic subjects (47) > ATP diabetic subjects (29) > ADO control subjects (3) > ADO diabetic subjects (1.5). The distribution and mRNA expression of receptors were similar in the two groups. CONCLUSIONS The vasodilatatory effect of the purinergic system is severely reduced in type 2 diabetic patients. The potency of nucleotides varies with the following rank order: UTP > ATP > ADO. This is not due to alterations in receptor distribution and mRNA expression, but may be due to differences in receptor sensitivity. PMID:19808895

  20. Association of Periodontitis With Urinary Albumin Excretion in Korean Adults With Diabetes: The 2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyungdo; Nam, Ga Eun; Kim, Do Hoon; Park, Jun-Beom; Ko, Youngkyung; Roh, Yong Kyun; Cho, Kyung Hwan; Park, Yong Gyu

    2015-10-01

    Albuminuria and periodontitis are both commonly associated with systemic inflammation. However, the association between urinary albumin excretion (UAE) and periodontitis in patients with type 2 diabetes has not been fully investigated. This study aimed to investigate the association between UAE and periodontitis in Korean adults with type 2 diabetes.This study performed a cross-sectional analysis and used hierarchical multivariable logistic regression analysis models. Data from the 2012 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were analyzed. A total of 547 patients, with type 2 diabetes without renal impairment, were included in this study. UAE was assessed using the urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR). A community periodontal index greater than or equal to code 3 was used to define periodontitis.The risk of periodontitis tended to increase as UACR increased even after adjustment for potential confounders (P for trend in the odds ratios = 0.05 in model 1; 0.02 in model 2; and 0.01 in model 3). In a subgroup analysis, the prevalence of periodontitis was significantly higher in the patients with albuminuria (UACR >30 mg/g) than in those without albuminuria among patients younger than 65 years (P = 0.03), those with newly diagnosed diabetes (P = 0.04), or those without obesity (P = .04).UAE was positively associated with the risk of periodontitis in Korean adults with type 2 diabetes. In the patients who were younger, were newly diagnosed with diabetes, or had normal body mass index, individuals with albuminuria were more likely to have a higher prevalence of periodontitis. Early identification of periodontitis may be helpful in Korean diabetic adults with increased UAE.

  1. Brain changes in diabetes mellitus patients with gastrointestinal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Drewes, Anne M; Søfteland, Eirik; Dimcevski, Georg; Farmer, Adam D; Brock, Christina; Frøkjær, Jens B; Krogh, Klaus; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2016-01-25

    Diabetes mellitus is a common disease and its prevalence is increasing worldwide. In various studies up to 30%-70% of patients present dysfunction and complications related to the gut. To date several clinical studies have demonstrated that autonomic nervous system neuropathy and generalized neuropathy of the central nervous system (CNS) may play a major role. This systematic review provides an overview of the neurodegenerative changes that occur as a consequence of diabetes with a focus on the CNS changes and gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction. Animal models where diabetes was induced experimentally support that the disease induces changes in CNS. Recent investigations with electroencephalography and functional brain imaging in patients with diabetes confirm these structural and functional brain changes. Encephalographic studies demonstrated that altered insular processing of sensory stimuli seems to be a key player in symptom generation. In fact one study indicated that the more GI symptoms the patients experienced, the deeper the insular electrical source was located. The electroencephalography was often used in combination with quantitative sensory testing mainly showing hyposensitivity to stimulation of GI organs. Imaging studies on patients with diabetes and GI symptoms mainly showed microstructural changes, especially in brain areas involved in visceral sensory processing. As the electrophysiological and imaging changes were associated with GI and autonomic symptoms they may represent a future therapeutic target for treating diabetics either pharmacologically or with neuromodulation.

  2. Brain changes in diabetes mellitus patients with gastrointestinal symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Drewes, Anne M; Søfteland, Eirik; Dimcevski, Georg; Farmer, Adam D; Brock, Christina; Frøkjær, Jens B; Krogh, Klaus; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common disease and its prevalence is increasing worldwide. In various studies up to 30%-70% of patients present dysfunction and complications related to the gut. To date several clinical studies have demonstrated that autonomic nervous system neuropathy and generalized neuropathy of the central nervous system (CNS) may play a major role. This systematic review provides an overview of the neurodegenerative changes that occur as a consequence of diabetes with a focus on the CNS changes and gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction. Animal models where diabetes was induced experimentally support that the disease induces changes in CNS. Recent investigations with electroencephalography and functional brain imaging in patients with diabetes confirm these structural and functional brain changes. Encephalographic studies demonstrated that altered insular processing of sensory stimuli seems to be a key player in symptom generation. In fact one study indicated that the more GI symptoms the patients experienced, the deeper the insular electrical source was located. The electroencephalography was often used in combination with quantitative sensory testing mainly showing hyposensitivity to stimulation of GI organs. Imaging studies on patients with diabetes and GI symptoms mainly showed microstructural changes, especially in brain areas involved in visceral sensory processing. As the electrophysiological and imaging changes were associated with GI and autonomic symptoms they may represent a future therapeutic target for treating diabetics either pharmacologically or with neuromodulation. PMID:26839652

  3. Higher sleep variability is associated with poorer glycaemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chontong, Sasipas; Saetung, Sunee; Reutrakul, Sirimon

    2016-08-01

    Sleep disturbances have been linked to insulin resistance and poor glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, the data are limited in type 1 diabetes. Recently, varying day-to-day sleep schedules, i.e. sleep variability, have been associated with adverse metabolic profile in healthy individuals. This study explored whether sleep variability affects glycaemic control and insulin requirement in type 1 diabetes. Forty-one adult patients with type 1 diabetes wore an actigraphy for 5 nights. Standard deviation of sleep duration, efficiency and mid-sleep time were sleep variability parameters. Sleep apnoea risk and self-reported sleep quality were assessed by the Berlin questionnaire and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Haemoglobin A1c, diabetes complications and insulin regimen were obtained from medical records. After adjusting for neuropathic symptoms, sleep apnoea risk and poor self-reported sleep quality, higher sleep variability was significantly associated with poorer glycaemic control (standard deviation of sleep duration, B = 0.100, P = 0.004; and standard deviation of mid-sleep time, B = 0.068, P = 0.04). In addition, standard deviations of sleep duration and mid-sleep time were highly correlated, suggesting that participants changed their sleep duration along with sleep timing. After adjusting for covariates, the standard deviation of sleep duration (P = 0.009) and standard deviation of mid-sleep time (P = 0.012) were associated with higher insulin requirement. In summary, higher sleep variability, which likely reflects sleep deprivation alternating with sleep compensation along with shifts in their circadian timing, was associated with poorer glycaemic control and higher insulin requirement in patients with type 1 diabetes. Increased sleep regularity may improve metabolic control in type 1 diabetes. PMID:26912272

  4. Practical Classification Guidelines for Diabetes in patients treated with insulin: a cross-sectional study of the accuracy of diabetes diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Hope, Suzy V; Wienand-Barnett, Sophie; Shepherd, Maggie; King, Sophie M; Fox, Charles; Khunti, Kamlesh; Oram, Richard A; Knight, Bea A; Hattersley, Andrew T; Jones, Angus G; Shields, Beverley M

    2016-01-01

    Background Differentiating between type 1 and type 2 diabetes is fundamental to ensuring appropriate management of patients, but can be challenging, especially when treating with insulin. The 2010 UK Practical Classification Guidelines for Diabetes were developed to help make the differentiation. Aim To assess diagnostic accuracy of the UK guidelines against ‘gold standard’ definitions of type 1 and type 2 diabetes based on measured C-peptide levels. Design and setting In total, 601 adults with insulin-treated diabetes and diabetes duration ≥5 years were recruited in Devon, Northamptonshire, and Leicestershire. Method Baseline information and home urine sample were collected. Urinary C-peptide creatinine ratio (UCPCR) measures endogenous insulin production. Gold standard type 1 diabetes was defined as continuous insulin treatment within 3 years of diagnosis and absolute insulin deficiency (UCPCR<0.2 nmol/mmol ≥5 years post-diagnosis); all others classed as having type 2 diabetes. Diagnostic performance of the clinical criteria was assessed and other criteria explored using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results UK guidelines correctly classified 86% of participants. Most misclassifications occurred in patients classed as having type 1 diabetes who had significant endogenous insulin levels (57 out of 601; 9%); most in those diagnosed ≥35 years and treated with insulin from diagnosis, where 37 out of 66 (56%) were misclassified. Time to insulin and age at diagnosis performed best in predicting long-term endogenous insulin production (ROC AUC = 0.904 and 0.871); BMI was a less strong predictor of diabetes type (AUC = 0.824). Conclusion Current UK guidelines provide a pragmatic clinical approach to classification reflecting long-term endogenous insulin production; caution is needed in older patients commencing insulin from diagnosis, where misclassification rates are increased. PMID:27080317

  5. Comparison of the effects of Korean mindfulness-based stress reduction, walking, and patient education in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hee Young; Lee, Haejung; Park, Jina

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of Korean mindfulness-based stress reduction (K-MBSR), walking, and patient education regarding diabetes mellitus (DM) on stress response, glycemic control, and vascular inflammation in patients with diabetes mellitus. A cluster randomized trial including 56 adults with diabetes mellitus (K-MBSR group = 21, walking group = 18, patient education group = 17) was conducted between 13 July and 14 September 2012. The questionnaire included the Diabetes Distress Scale and Perceived Stress Response Inventory. Fasting blood samples were used to measure levels of cortisol, blood glucose, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA). There were no statistically significant differences between the effects of K-MBSR, walking, and patient education on stress, glycemic control, or vascular inflammation. However, in the K-MBSR and walking groups, significant reductions in the levels of serum cortisol and PAI-1 were observed. A significant reduction in psychological responses to stress was observed in the walking and patient education groups. Longitudinal studies could provide better insight into the impact of K-MBSR, walking, and patient education on health outcomes in adults with diabetes mellitus.

  6. [COMBINED HONDROPROTECTION IN REHABILITATION OF PATIENTS WITH DIABETES MELLITUS WITH DIABETIC ARTHROPATHY].

    PubMed

    Orlenko, V L

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy and tolerability of combined chondroprotectors Teraflex® in patients with diabetes mellitus type 1 and 2, complicated by arthropathy were investigated. It was established, that Tera- flex® therapy positively influences on the development of diabetic arthropathy (reducing intensity of pain, increasing the range of movements and reduced volume of the affected joints, increasing the functionality of the patient). In addition, an analysis of the impact of chondroprotectors on the level of sugar among patients.It was found, that it is necessary to control blood sugar while taking chondroprotectors and if needed, increasing the dose of hypoglycohaemic drugs during this period.

  7. [COMBINED HONDROPROTECTION IN REHABILITATION OF PATIENTS WITH DIABETES MELLITUS WITH DIABETIC ARTHROPATHY].

    PubMed

    Orlenko, V L

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy and tolerability of combined chondroprotectors Teraflex® in patients with diabetes mellitus type 1 and 2, complicated by arthropathy were investigated. It was established, that Tera- flex® therapy positively influences on the development of diabetic arthropathy (reducing intensity of pain, increasing the range of movements and reduced volume of the affected joints, increasing the functionality of the patient). In addition, an analysis of the impact of chondroprotectors on the level of sugar among patients.It was found, that it is necessary to control blood sugar while taking chondroprotectors and if needed, increasing the dose of hypoglycohaemic drugs during this period. PMID:26118037

  8. Glutathione synthesis is diminished in patients with uncontrolled diabetes and restored by dietary supplementation with cysteine and glycine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sustained hyperglycemia is associated with low cellular levels of the antioxidant glutathione (GSH), which leads to tissue damage attributed to oxidative stress. We tested the hypothesis that diminished GSH in adult patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes is attributed to decreased synthesis and ...

  9. Quantitative estimation of antioxidant therapy efficiency in diabetes mellitus patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurfinkel, Youri I.; Ishunina, Angela M.; Ovsyannickov, Konstantin V.; Strokov, Igor A.

    2000-11-01

    The aim of this work was to find out to which degree Tanakan affects the microcirculation parameters and the malonic dialdehyde level as a parameter of intense lipid peroxidation in insulin-independent diabetes patients with different disease durations. We used computerized capillaroscope GY-0.04 designed by the Centre for Analysis of Substances, Russia for the non-invasive measurement of capillary blood velocity as well as the size of the perivascular zone and density of blood aggregates and lipid inclusions. The microcirculation parameters were studied in two groups of insulin-independent diabetes patients. The basic group included 58 patients (61+/-9,0 years, disease duration 14,7+/-7,8 years). The patients had late diabetic complications as retinopathy and nephrophathy, neuropathy, confirmed by clinical and tool investigation. In this group we also studied the level of serum malonic dialdehyde, as a parameter of intense lipid peroxidation. The reference group included 31 patients (57+/-1,3 years, disease duration 3,6+/-0,6 years) with minimum diabetic complication. We show that Tanakan in daily dosage 120 mg for 2 months reduces the malonic dialdehyde level in the blood serum and the erythrocyte membranes of type II diabetes patients and improves the microcirculation parameters. There are correspondences between the density of lipid inclusions as determined with computerized capillaroscopy and the lipid exchange parameters as determined using a routing blood test. Thus, noninvasive blood lipid quantification is feasible and reliable.

  10. Lifestyle risk factors for atherosclerosis in adults with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Franziska K; Maahs, David M; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; Ogden, Lorraine G; Kinney, Greg L; Rewers, Marian

    2009-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the amount of self-reported physical activity, alcohol and tobacco use in a large sample of adults with type 1 diabetes and non-diabetic subjects. A second aim is to test the hypothesis that these lifestyle risk factors are associated cross-sectionally with coronary artery calcification. In 2000-2002, the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes (CACTI) study applied validated questionnaires for smoking, alcohol and physical activity to 582 type 1 diabetes subjects and 724 non-diabetic subjects. More type 1 diabetes subjects reported current smoking than non-diabetic subjects (12.3% versus 8.6%, p=0.027). Overall, reported physical activity did not differ by diabetes status (p=0.79). More type 1 diabetes subjects reported never having consumed alcohol (10% versus 4%, p<0.0001) and those who drank consumed less alcohol (p=0.0015) than non-diabetic subjects. Physical activity and smoking were significantly associated with the presence of coronary artery calcification (adjusted OR=0.9, 95% CI: 0.8-0.996, p=0.045, and OR=1.7, CI: 1.1-2.6, p=0.03, respectively). Type 1 diabetes was independently associated with increased odds of coronary artery calcification (OR=3.5, 95% CI: 2.5-5.0, p<0.0001). Differences exist in lifestyle-related cardiovascular risk factors in men and women with type 1 diabetes compared with non-diabetic subjects in the CACTI study. PMID:20368221

  11. Improvements in Care and Reduced Self-Management Barriers Among Rural Patients With Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dettori, Nancy; Flook, Benjamin N.; Pessl, Erich; Quesenberry, Kim; Loh, Johnson; Harris, Colleen; McDowall, Janet M.; Butcher, Marcene K.; Helgerson, Steven D.; Gohdes, Dorothy; Harwell, Todd S.

    2005-01-01

    Improved preventive care and clinical outcomes among patients with diabetes can reduce complications and costs; however, diabetes care continues to be suboptimal. Few studies have described effective strategies for improving care among rural populations with diabetes. In 2000, the Park County Diabetes Project and the Montana Diabetes Control…

  12. Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis in a Patient with Cocaine Intoxication.

    PubMed

    Abu-Abed Abdin, Asma; Hamza, Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad S; Ahmed, Awab

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is characterized by elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis, hyperglycemia, and elevated ketones in urine and blood. Hyperglycemia is a key component of DKA; however, a subset of DKA patients can present with near-normal blood glucose, an entity described as "euglycemic DKA." This rare phenomenon is thought to be due to starvation and food restriction in insulin dependent diabetic patients. Cocaine abuse is considered a trigger for development of DKA. Cocaine also has anorexic effects. We describe an interesting case of euglycemic DKA in a middle-aged diabetic female presenting with elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis, with near-normal blood glucose, in the settings of noncompliance to insulin and cocaine abuse. We have postulated that cocaine abuse was implicated in the pathophysiology of euglycemic DKA in this case. This case highlights complex physiological interplay between type-1 diabetes, noncompliance to insulin, and cocaine abuse leading to DKA, with starvation physiology causing development of euglycemic DKA.

  13. Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis in a Patient with Cocaine Intoxication.

    PubMed

    Abu-Abed Abdin, Asma; Hamza, Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad S; Ahmed, Awab

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is characterized by elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis, hyperglycemia, and elevated ketones in urine and blood. Hyperglycemia is a key component of DKA; however, a subset of DKA patients can present with near-normal blood glucose, an entity described as "euglycemic DKA." This rare phenomenon is thought to be due to starvation and food restriction in insulin dependent diabetic patients. Cocaine abuse is considered a trigger for development of DKA. Cocaine also has anorexic effects. We describe an interesting case of euglycemic DKA in a middle-aged diabetic female presenting with elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis, with near-normal blood glucose, in the settings of noncompliance to insulin and cocaine abuse. We have postulated that cocaine abuse was implicated in the pathophysiology of euglycemic DKA in this case. This case highlights complex physiological interplay between type-1 diabetes, noncompliance to insulin, and cocaine abuse leading to DKA, with starvation physiology causing development of euglycemic DKA. PMID:27579186

  14. Morganella morganii-associated arthritis in a diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Meryem; Ocak, Sabahattin; Kuvandik, Guven; Aslan, Bahadir; Temiz, Muhyittin; Aslan, Ahmet

    2008-03-01

    This case report involves a 60-year-old diabetic man who developed septic arthritis as a result of the pathogen Morganella morganii. The patient had complaints of elevated body temperature, malaise, rigors and pain in the left knee, despite no history of trauma. On examination of the knee, erythema, warmth, tenderness and swelling was observed. Arthrocentesis performed on his left knee indicated the presence of straw-coloured, cloudy fluid without crystals. Bacterial identification based on biochemical and automated methods indicated the growth of M morganii. M morganii was also isolated sedimentafrom the exudate of a diabetic ulcer in the left foot, with antibiotic susceptibilities identical to those from the knee effusion. This case indicates that M morganii may be considered as a possible cause of septic arthritis in diabetic patients, especially those with diabetic foot infections.

  15. Diabetic Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy Predicts Recurrent Cardiovascular Diseases in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Seon-Ah; Yun, Jae-Seung; Lim, Tae-Seok; Min, Kyoungil; Song, Ki-Ho; Yoo, Ki-Dong; Park, Yong-Moon; Ahn, Yu-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. This study evaluated the relationship between CAN and recurrent CVD in type 2 diabetes. A total of 206 patients with type 2 diabetes who had a history of CVD within 3 years of enrollment were consecutively recruited from January 2001 to December 2009 and followed-up until December 2015. Cardiovascular autonomic function tests were performed using the following heart rate variability parameters: expiration-to-inspiration ratio, response to Valsalva maneuver and standing. We estimated the recurrence of CVD events during the follow-up period. A total of 159 (77.2%) of the 206 patients enrolled completed the follow up, and 78 (49.1%) patients had recurrent episodes of CVD, with an incidence rate of 75.6 per 1,000 patient-years. The mean age and diabetes duration were 62.5 ± 8.7 and 9.2 ± 6.9 years, respectively. Patients who developed recurrent CVD also exhibited hypertension (P = 0.004), diabetic nephropathy (P = 0.012), higher mean systolic blood pressure (P = 0.006), urinary albumin excretion (P = 0.015), and mean triglyceride level (P = 0.035) than did patients without recurrent CVD. Multivariable Cox hazard regression analysis revealed that definite CAN was significantly associated with an increased risk of recurrent CVD (hazard ratio [HR] 3.03; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.39−6.60; P = 0.005). Definite CAN was an independent predictor for recurrent CVD in patients with type 2 diabetes who had a known prior CVD event. PMID:27741306

  16. The relationship between diabetes attitudes and treatment among free clinic patients and volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Akiko; Christensen, Nancy; Nourian, Maziar M; Myers, Kyl; Saunders, AnnMarie; Solis, Silvia P; Ashby, Jeanie; Greenwood, Jessica L J; Reel, Justine J

    2014-12-01

    Free clinics provide free primary care to the under or uninsured and have been playing an important role in serving the socio-economically disadvantaged. Free clinic patients represent a group of people who experience significant barriers to receiving diabetes prevention and intervention. This study examined diabetes attitudes among free clinic patients and volunteers. English or Spanish speaking patients and volunteers (N = 384), aged 18 years or older completed a self-administered survey. Diabetic patients and volunteers shared similar levels of diabetes attitudes compared to non-diabetic patients. Among patients, ethnicity, education level, diabetes education, and family history affected diabetes attitudes. Among volunteers, diabetes education was an important factor associated with positive diabetes attitudes. Whether the volunteer is a healthcare professional or student was related only to one aspect of diabetes attitudes, seriousness of type 2 diabetes. The results, indicating free clinic diabetic patients and volunteers shared similar levels of diabetes attitudes, were positive for maintaining and developing diabetes education programs at a free clinic. Unfortunately, the average length of volunteering at this free clinic was short and student volunteers likely leave the clinic upon graduation. Future research should examine issues of volunteer retention in free clinics. Diabetes education for patients may need to be diversified according to ethnicity, family history of diabetes, and educational level. Finally, non-healthcare professional volunteers could potentially be involved in diabetes education at a free clinic.

  17. The relationship between diabetes attitudes and treatment among free clinic patients and volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Akiko; Christensen, Nancy; Nourian, Maziar M; Myers, Kyl; Saunders, AnnMarie; Solis, Silvia P; Ashby, Jeanie; Greenwood, Jessica L J; Reel, Justine J

    2014-12-01

    Free clinics provide free primary care to the under or uninsured and have been playing an important role in serving the socio-economically disadvantaged. Free clinic patients represent a group of people who experience significant barriers to receiving diabetes prevention and intervention. This study examined diabetes attitudes among free clinic patients and volunteers. English or Spanish speaking patients and volunteers (N = 384), aged 18 years or older completed a self-administered survey. Diabetic patients and volunteers shared similar levels of diabetes attitudes compared to non-diabetic patients. Among patients, ethnicity, education level, diabetes education, and family history affected diabetes attitudes. Among volunteers, diabetes education was an important factor associated with positive diabetes attitudes. Whether the volunteer is a healthcare professional or student was related only to one aspect of diabetes attitudes, seriousness of type 2 diabetes. The results, indicating free clinic diabetic patients and volunteers shared similar levels of diabetes attitudes, were positive for maintaining and developing diabetes education programs at a free clinic. Unfortunately, the average length of volunteering at this free clinic was short and student volunteers likely leave the clinic upon graduation. Future research should examine issues of volunteer retention in free clinics. Diabetes education for patients may need to be diversified according to ethnicity, family history of diabetes, and educational level. Finally, non-healthcare professional volunteers could potentially be involved in diabetes education at a free clinic. PMID:24756836

  18. An Automated Telephone Nutrition Support System for Spanish-Speaking Patients With Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Stoddard, Pamela J.; Gonzales, Elizabeth N.; Villagran-Flores, Mariana; Thomson, Joan; Bayard, Paul; Palos Lucio, Ana Gabriela; Schillinger, Dean; Bertozzi, Stefano; Gonzales, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, Spanish-speaking patients with diabetes often receive inadequate dietary counseling. Providing language and culture-concordant dietary counseling on an ongoing basis is critical to diabetes self-care. To determine if automated telephone nutrition support (ATNS) counseling could help patients improve glycemic control by duplicating a successful pilot in Mexico in a Spanish-speaking population in Oakland, California. A prospective randomized open-label trial with blinded endpoint assessment (PROBE) was performed. The participants were seventy-five adult patients with diabetes receiving care at a federally qualified health center in Oakland, California. ATNS, a computerized system that dialed patients on their phones, prompted them in Spanish to enter (via keypad) portions consumed in the prior 24 hours of various cultural-specific dietary items, and then provided dietary feedback based on proportion of high versus low glycemic index foods consumed. The control group received the same ATNS phone calls 14 weeks after enrollment. The primary outcome was hemoglobin A1c % (A1c) 12 weeks following enrollment. Participants had no significant improvement in A1c (–0.3% in the control arm, –0.1% in the intervention arm, P = .41 for any difference) or any secondary parameters. In our study, an ATNS system did not improve diabetes control in a Spanish-speaking population in Oakland. PMID:25239122

  19. An automated telephone nutrition support system for Spanish-speaking patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Raman; Stoddard, Pamela J; Gonzales, Elizabeth N; Villagran-Flores, Mariana; Thomson, Joan; Bayard, Paul; Palos Lucio, Ana Gabriela; Schillinger, Dean; Bertozzi, Stefano; Gonzales, Ralph

    2014-11-01

    In the United States, Spanish-speaking patients with diabetes often receive inadequate dietary counseling. Providing language and culture-concordant dietary counseling on an ongoing basis is critical to diabetes self-care. To determine if automated telephone nutrition support (ATNS) counseling could help patients improve glycemic control by duplicating a successful pilot in Mexico in a Spanish-speaking population in Oakland, California. A prospective randomized open-label trial with blinded endpoint assessment (PROBE) was performed. The participants were seventy-five adult patients with diabetes receiving care at a federally qualified health center in Oakland, California. ATNS, a computerized system that dialed patients on their phones, prompted them in Spanish to enter (via keypad) portions consumed in the prior 24 hours of various cultural-specific dietary items, and then provided dietary feedback based on proportion of high versus low glycemic index foods consumed. The control group received the same ATNS phone calls 14 weeks after enrollment. The primary outcome was hemoglobin A1c % (A1c) 12 weeks following enrollment. Participants had no significant improvement in A1c (-0.3% in the control arm, -0.1% in the intervention arm, P = .41 for any difference) or any secondary parameters. In our study, an ATNS system did not improve diabetes control in a Spanish-speaking population in Oakland.

  20. Plasma 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Progression to Diabetes in Patients at Risk for Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pittas, Anastassios G.; Nelson, Jason; Mitri, Joanna; Hillmann, William; Garganta, Cheryl; Nathan, David M.; Hu, Frank B.; Dawson-Hughes, Bess

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the association between vitamin D status, assessed by plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and risk of incident diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Prospective observational study with a mean follow-up of 2.7 years in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), a multicenter trial comparing different strategies for prevention of diabetes in patients with prediabetes. We assessed the association between plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D, measured repeatedly during follow-up, and incident diabetes in the combined placebo (n = 1,022) and intensive lifestyle (n = 1,017) randomized arms of the DPP. Variables measured at multiple study time points (25-hydroxyvitamin D, BMI, and physical activity) entered the analyses as time-varying “lagged” covariates, as the mean of the previous and current visits at which diabetes status was assessed. RESULTS After multivariate adjustment, including for the DPP intervention, participants in the highest tertile of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (median concentration, 30.1 ng/mL) had a hazard ratio of 0.72 (95% CI 0.56–0.90) for developing diabetes compared with participants in the lowest tertile (median concentration, 12.8 ng/mL). The association was in the same direction in placebo (0.70; 0.52–0.94) versus lifestyle arm (0.80; 0.54–1.17). CONCLUSIONS Higher plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D, assessed repeatedly, was associated with lower risk of incident diabetes in high-risk patients, after adjusting for lifestyle interventions (dietary changes, increased physical activity, and weight loss) known to decrease diabetes risk. Because of the observational nature of the study, the potential association between vitamin D and diabetes needs to be confirmed in intervention studies. PMID:22323410

  1. Patient involvement in diabetes care: experiences in nine diabetes care groups

    PubMed Central

    de Bruin, Simone R.; Struijs, Jeroen N.; Rijken, Mieke; Nijpels, Giel; Baan, Caroline A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite the expected beneficial effects on quality of care, patient involvement in diabetes care groups, which deliver a bundled paid integrated care programme for diabetes type 2, seems to be limited. The aim of this study was to gain insight into levels and methods of patient involvement, into facilitators and barriers, and into the future preferences of care groups and patient representatives. Theory and methods Semi-structured interviews were held with 10 representatives of care groups and 11 representatives of patient advocacy groups. An adapted version of Arnstein's ladder of citizen participation was used to define five levels of patient involvement. Results Patient involvement in care groups was mostly limited to informing and consulting patients. Higher levels, i.e., advising, co-producing and decision-making, were less frequently observed. Care groups and patient representatives perceived largely the same barriers and facilitators and had similar preferences regarding future themes and design of patient involvement. Conclusion Constructive collaboration between diabetes care groups and patient representatives to enhance patient involvement in the future seems viable. Several issues such as the lack of evidence for effectiveness of patient involvement, differences in viewpoints on the role and responsibilities of care groups and perceived barriers need to be addressed. PMID:27118961

  2. [Is scuba diving allowed in diabetic patients treated with insulin?].

    PubMed

    Dufaitre, L; Vialettes, B

    2000-11-01

    Scuba diving is usually prohibited in diabetic patients at risk of hypoglycemic attacks (i.e. IDDM and NIDDM treated with sulfonylureas) due to the particular severity of these episodes in a hostile environment. In fact, diabetic subjects can perform this popular leisure activity without extra-risk, provided strict requisites in aptitude, practice and environment are enforced. These limitations lead to the establishment of practical guidelines, as proposed in this paper.

  3. Kidney Transplantation in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: Long-Term Prognosis for Patients and Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyang; Cheigh, Jhoong S.

    2001-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best therapeutic choice to improve survival and quality of life in patients with end-stage diabetic nephropathy. Long-term prognosis in diabetic patients who received kidney transplants, however, has not been delineated. We, therefore, studied patient and graft survival, graft function and cause of graft failure in 78 Type I diabetic kidney transplant recipients in The Rogosin Institute/The Weill-Cornell Medical Center, New York who had functioning grafts for more than one year. The results were compared with 78 non-diabetic patients who had functioning grafts for more than one year and were matched for age, gender, donor source, time of transplantation and immunosuppressive therapy protocol. Cumulative patient survival rates for diabetic patients were significantly lower than those of non-diabetic patients (86% vs. 97% at 5 years and 74% vs. 95% at 10 years, respectively: p<0.05). The most common cause of death was cardiovascular disease. Graft survival rates for diabetic patients were also lower than that of non-diabetic patients (71% vs. 80% at 5 years and 58% vs. 72% at 10 years, respectively), but the differences did not reach statistical significance. Among the 22 failed grafts in diabetic patients, 7 (32%) were due to patient death rather than primary graft failure. If the patients who died with a functioning graft were censored, graft survival rates of diabetic patients approached those of non-diabetic patients (80% vs. 81% at 5 years and 65% vs. 73% at 10 years, respectively). Creatinine clearances in diabetic patients were lower than that in non-diabetic patients through the follow-up period, but the differences were significant only for the first few years. At no time was there a higher creatinine clearance for diabetic patients. Among the 16 patients who had transplant kidney biopsies two to seven years post-transplant, 6 showed morphological changes consistent with diabetic nephropathy. One patient lost graft function

  4. Illness Beliefs Predict Mortality in Patients with Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Vedhara, Kavita; Dawe, Karen; Miles, Jeremy N. V.; Wetherell, Mark A.; Cullum, Nicky; Dayan, Colin; Drake, Nicola; Price, Patricia; Tarlton, John; Weinman, John; Day, Andrew; Campbell, Rona; Reps, Jenna; Soria, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients’ illness beliefs have been associated with glycaemic control in diabetes and survival in other conditions. Objective We examined whether illness beliefs independently predicted survival in patients with diabetes and foot ulceration. Methods Patients (n = 169) were recruited between 2002 and 2007. Data on illness beliefs were collected at baseline. Data on survival were extracted on 1st November 2011. Number of days survived reflected the number of days from date of recruitment to 1st November 2011. Results Cox regressions examined the predictors of time to death and identified ischemia and identity beliefs (beliefs regarding symptoms associated with foot ulceration) as significant predictors of time to death. Conclusions Our data indicate that illness beliefs have a significant independent effect on survival in patients with diabetes and foot ulceration. These findings suggest that illness beliefs could improve our understanding of mortality risk in this patient group and could also be the basis for future therapeutic interventions to improve survival. PMID:27096609

  5. White matter hyperintensities in middle-aged adults with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nunley, Karen A.; Ryan, Christopher M.; Orchard, Trevor J.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Jennings, J. Richard; Ryan, John; Zgibor, Janice C.; Boudreau, Robert M.; Costacou, Tina; Maynard, John D.; Miller, Rachel G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Although microvascular complications are common in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), few studies have quantified the severity, risk factors, and implications of cerebral microvascular damage in these patients. As life expectancy in patients with T1DM increases, patients are exposed to age- and disease-related factors that may contribute to cerebral microvascular disease. Methods: Severity and volume of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) and infarcts were quantified in 97 middle-aged patients with childhood-onset T1DM (mean age and duration: 50 and 41 years, respectively) and 81 non-T1DM adults (mean age: 48 years), concurrent with cognitive and health-related measures. Results: Compared with non-T1DM participants, patients had more severe WMH (Fazekas scores 2 and 3 compared with Fazekas score 1, p < 0.0001) and slower information processing (digit symbol substitution, number correct: 65.7 ± 10.9 and 54.9 ± 13.6; pegboard, seconds: 66.0 ± 9.9 and 88.5 ± 34.2; both p < 0.0001) independent of age, education, or other factors. WMH were associated with slower information processing; adjusting for WMH attenuated the group differences in processing speed (13% for digit symbol, 11% for pegboard, both p ≤ 0.05). Among patients, prevalent neuropathies and smoking tripled the odds of high WMH burden, independent of age or disease duration. Associations between measures of blood pressure or hyperglycemia and WMH were not significant. Conclusions: Clinically relevant WMH are evident earlier among middle-aged patients with childhood-onset T1DM and are related to the slower information processing frequently observed in T1DM. Brain imaging in patients with T1DM who have cognitive difficulties, especially those with neuropathies, may help uncover cerebral microvascular damage. Longitudinal studies are warranted to fully characterize WMH development, risk factors, and long-term effects on cognition. PMID:25904692

  6. Spousal undermining of older diabetic patients' disease management.

    PubMed

    Henry, Shayna L; Rook, Karen S; Stephens, Mary A P; Franks, Melissa M

    2013-12-01

    Marriage can enhance health for individuals with a chronic disease, yet spouses may also undermine disease management. The current study investigated spousal undermining of dietary regimen in 129 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A total of 40 patients reported that their spouses tempted them with forbidden foods, and 15 reported that their spouses conveyed disregard for their diabetic diet. Spousal tempting was associated with worse dietary adherence, and spousal disregard with worse nondietary adherence. Spousal undermining is relatively rare but is associated with patients' disease management and warrants further investigation to better understand how spouses influence partners' day-to-day management of chronic diseases.

  7. The role of met-enkephalin in silent myocardial ischemia in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Parlapiano, C; Borgia, M C; Tonnarini, G; Campana, E; Giancaspro, G; Pantone, P; Giovanniello, T; Cardarelli, G; Vincentelli, G M; Alegiani, F; Negri, M

    2001-01-01

    Met-enkephalin plasma levels were evaluated in 20 cardioischemic diabetic patients. All the patients had ECG ischemic signs. Ten patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy, experienced no pain during myocarial ischemia. Met-enkephalin levels in the diabetic patients with silent myiocardial ischemia were significantly lower compared to those in the symptomatic patients. This demonstrates that the absence of myocardial ischemic pain in neuropathic diabetic patients is not accounted for by met-enkephalin action. PMID:11958273

  8. Patient Selection in Vitamin E Treatment in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Goldenstein, Hagit; Levy, Nina S.; Lipener, Yisrael T.; Levy, Andrew P.

    2013-01-01

    In diabetes there is an increase in oxidative stress due to elevated glucose levels in the plasma. High glucose promotes glycosylation of both plasma and cellular proteins which particularly affects the endothelial cell lining of the blood vessel wall and interferes with its normal function. Thus diabetes mellitus patients suffer from a higher incidence of cardiovascular complications such as atherosclerosis as compared to the non-diabetic population. Haptoglobin (Hp) is a plasma protein which binds free hemoglobin and prevents heme-iron mediated oxidation. There are three different types of Hp which differ in their antioxidant ability. Several clinical studies have shown that the Hp 2-2 genotype is associated with higher incidence of cardiovascular diseases among diabetics. Vitamin E, a low cost, easy to use antioxidant, was found to decrease the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases in Hp 2-2 diabetic patients. This review summarizes several studies which show the importance of vitamin E supplementation in a specific sub-group of patients consisting of diabetic individuals carrying the Hp 2-2 genotype. PMID:23469912

  9. Managing diabetes in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Shridhar N; Tanenberg, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Because few randomized trials have been done, little is known about appropriate glycemic control in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes mellitus. These patients are at high risk of hypoglycemia. It is prudent to monitor glucose closely, set less-stringent blood sugar goals, avoid oral antidiabetic agents, and possibly reduce insulin dosage. PMID:27055204

  10. Navigating care for Bedouin patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dunton, Shauna; Higgins, Alison; Amkraut, Jonathan; Abu-Rabia, Yones

    2016-01-01

    The Bedouin Arab population in the southern Negev region of Israel has faced health problems as a result of transitioning rapidly from a nomadic agricultural lifestyle to a more modern urban lifestyle. Like many populations around the world, the Bedouins have changed their diets and become more sedentary and this has led to a high rate of diabetes. In this case report, we examine how diabetes has affected the life of an influential man in the Bedouin community and the significance this case has in the greater context of a global rise in chronic disease. PMID:26944372

  11. Prevalence and risk factors of diabetes mellitus among adults in Jaffna District.

    PubMed

    Amarasinghe, S; Balakumar, S; Arasaratnam, V

    2015-09-01

    A cross sectional descriptive study was carried out to determine the prevalence and risk factors of diabetes mellitus among adults in Jaffna District. Multistage stratified cluster sampling technique was employed to select 544 participants. An interviewer administrated questionnaire was used. Anthropometric and blood pressure (BP) measurements were recorded and biochemical parameters were analysed. Response rate was 95.3%. Of them, 224 (43.8%) were male. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus was 16.4% (95% CI: 13.3- 19.9); in males 19.6% (95% CI: 14.6-25.4) and in females 13.9% (95% CI: 10.1-18.5). Of the diabetics, 27.4% were previously undiagnosed. In the final multivariable model, participants with family history of diabetes were 3.5 times (p<0.001) more likely and those with high waist hip ratio were 2 times (p=0.009) more likely to develop diabetes mellitus. PMID:26520866

  12. Characteristics of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in two rural, medically underserved communities.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jocelyn; Delafield, Rebecca; Davis, Jim; Mau, Marjorie K

    2013-06-01

    In the state of Hawai'i, Native Hawaiians and Filipinos suffer from increased disparities, compared to other groups, in diabetes prevalence and adverse health outcomes that are exacerbated by challenges to health care access among rural communities. To address the limited literature describing rural, underserved patients with diabetes in Hawai'i, this paper aims to characterize two rural communities that are located on Moloka'i and Lana'i in federally-designated medically underserved areas and that are served by a single Native Hawaiian health care system entitled Na Pu'uwai. Descriptive analyses examining associations between variables were performed using the baseline demographic information, clinical measures, and questionnaire responses collected from 40 adult study participants with diabetes. The data revealed that the study participants had a high prevalence of insulin use (60%); a HbA1c level greater than or equal to 9% (55%); a high-fat diet (73%); and comorbidities, including hyperlipidemia (85%), hypertension (83%), and obesity (70%). Furthermore, among the participants, the mean SF-12v2™ General Health Perceptions Score was significantly lower for participants with uncontrolled diabetes compared to those with controlled diabetes (P = .02); however, this association was not statistically significant in the multivariable regression model that adjusted for age and number of diabetes medications. Based on these results, the participants appear to belong to a high-risk group with a complicated manifestation of diabetes. This study adds to the growing body of literature demonstrating disparities in diabetes among rural, minority, and underserved communities, highlighting the need for further investigation, development, and implementation of strategies for reaching these vulnerable populations.

  13. The High Prevalence of Diabetes in a Large Cohort of Patients Drawn From Safety Net Clinics

    PubMed Central

    McBurnie, MaryAnn; Paul, Ludmilla; Potter, Jennifer E.; McCann, Sheila; Mayer, Kenneth; Melgar, Gerardo; D’Amato, Sele; DeVoe, Jennifer E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Underserved populations have been overlooked or underrepresented in research based on data from diabetes registries. We estimated diabetes prevalence using a cohort developed from the electronic health records of 3 networks of safety net clinics that provide care to underserved populations. Methods ADVANCE (Accelerating Data Value Across a National Community Health Center Network) is a partnership of the OCHIN Community Health Information Network (OCHIN), the Health Choice Network (HCN), and the Fenway Health Institute (FHI), representing 97 federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) and 744 clinic sites in 22 US states. Among 952,316 adults with a body mass index (BMI) measurement and at least 2 outpatient visits in 2012 to 2014, we calculated diabetes prevalence using outpatient diagnoses, diagnostic laboratory results, or dispenses of anti-hyperglycemic agents no more than 730 days apart. We calculated prevalence by age, sex, race, Hispanic ethnicity, and BMI class. Results The crude prevalence of diabetes was 14.4%. Men had a higher prevalence than women (16.5% vs 13.2%); diabetes prevalence increased across age categories. White patients had the lowest prevalence (11.4%) and Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders, the highest prevalence (21.9%), with prevalence ranging from 15.2% to 16.5% for other race/ethnicities. The association between BMI class and diabetes prevalence was similar across all racial/ethnic groups. Conclusion The ADVANCE diabetes cohort offers an opportunity to conduct epidemiologic and comparative effectiveness research on underserved and underrepresented individuals, who have a higher prevalence of diabetes than the general US population. PMID:27309415

  14. Fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy in type 2 diabetic patients who have no signs of diabetic retinopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, Dietrich; Deutsch, Lydia; Klemm, Matthias; Jentsch, Susanne; Hammer, Martin; Peters, Sven; Haueisen, Jens; Müller, Ulrich A.; Dawczynski, Jens

    2015-06-01

    The time-resolved autofluorescence of the eye is used for the detection of metabolic alteration in diabetic patients who have no signs of diabetic retinopathy. One eye from 37 phakic and 11 pseudophakic patients with type 2 diabetes, and one eye from 25 phakic and 23 pseudophakic healthy subjects were included in the study. After a three-exponential fit of the decay of autofluorescence, histograms of lifetimes τi, amplitudes αi, and relative contributions Qi were statistically compared between corresponding groups in two spectral channels (490diabetic patients and age-matched controls (p<0.000004). The lack of pixels with a τ2 of ˜360 ps, the increased number of pixels with τ2>450 ps, and the shift of τ3 from ˜3000 to 3700 ps in ch1 of diabetic patients when compared with healthy subjects indicate an increased production of free flavin adenine dinucleotide, accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGE), and, probably, a change from free to protein-bound reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide at the fundus. AGE also accumulated in the crystalline lens.

  15. A Patient-Held Medical Record Integrating Depression Care into Diabetes Care

    PubMed Central

    Satoh-Asahara, Noriko; Ito, Hiroto; Akashi, Tomoyuki; Yamakage, Hajime; Kotani, Kazuhiko; Nagata, Daisuke; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Depression is frequently observed in people with diabetes. The purpose of this study is to develop a tool for individuals with diabetes and depression to communicate their comorbid conditions to health-care providers. METHOD We searched the Internet to review patient-held medical records (PHRs) of patients with diabetes and examine current levels of integration of diabetes and depression care in Japan. RESULTS Eight sets of PHRs were found for people with diabetes. All PHRs included clinical follow-up of diabetes and multidisciplinary clinical pathways for diabetes care. No PHRs included depression monitoring and/or treatment. In terms of an integrated PHR for a patient comorbid with diabetes and depression, necessary components include hopes/preferences, educational information on diabetes complications and treatment, medical history, stress and coping, resources, and monitoring diabetes and depression. CONCLUSION A new PHR may be suitable for comorbid patients with diabetes and depression. PMID:27478395

  16. Biochemical changes correlated with blood thiamine and its phosphate esters levels in patients with diabetes type 1 (DMT1).

    PubMed

    Al-Daghri, Nasser M; Alharbi, Mohammed; Wani, Kaiser; Abd-Alrahman, Sherif H; Sheshah, Eman; Alokail, Majed S

    2015-01-01

    Thiamine (vitamin B1) is an essential enzyme cofactor in most organisms required at several stages of anabolic and catabolic intermediary metabolism. However, little is known on the positive effects of thiamine in diabetic type 1 (DMT1) patients. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the biochemical changes related to thiamine deficiency in patients with DMT1 outcomes among Saudi adults. We hypothesized that blood thiamine deficiency in patients with DMT1 manifestations might lead to an increase in metabolic syndrome. A total of 77 patients with DMT1 (age 35.8 ± 5.5) and 81 controls (age 45.0 ± 18.1) (total N = 158) were randomly selected from the Riyadh Cohort Study for inclusion. Saudi adults with diabetes type 1, a significant decrease in systolic (P < 0.001), and diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.008) and microalbuminuria (P = 0.02). Moreover, cholesterol, glucose and triglycerides were significantly increased (P 0.001, 0.001 and 0.008, respectively) in patients with diabetes type 1 compared to controls. On the other hand, HDL, TMP, TDP and thiamine, were significantly decreased in patients with diabetes type 1 (P 0.005, 0.002, 0.005, and 0.002), respectively. A strong association between blood thiamine level and diabetes type 1 was detected in our study population. The results confirmed the role of thiamine and thiamine phosphate esters, in preventing metabolic changes and complications of diabetes type 1. The levels of these thiamine and thiamine phosphate esters were correlated with diabetes related biomarkers including HDL, glucose, triglycerides and cholesterol, as well as microalbuminuria, LDL and urine thiamine. The results support a pivotal role of blood thiamine and its phosphate esters in preventing the biochemical changes and complications in patients with DMT1.

  17. Pathophysiology and burden of infection in patients with diabetes mellitus and peripheral vascular disease: focus on skin and soft-tissue infections.

    PubMed

    Dryden, M; Baguneid, M; Eckmann, C; Corman, S; Stephens, J; Solem, C; Li, J; Charbonneau, C; Baillon-Plot, N; Haider, S

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects 284 million adults worldwide and is increasing in prevalence. Accelerated atherosclerosis in patients with diabetes mellitus contributes an increased risk of developing cardiovascular diseases including peripheral vascular disease (PVD). Immune dysfunction, diabetic neuropathy and poor circulation in patients with diabetes mellitus, especially those with PVD, place these patients at high risk for many types of typical and atypical infections. Complicated skin and soft-tissue infections (cSSTIs) are of particular concern because skin breakdown in patients with advanced diabetes mellitus and PVD provides a portal of entry for bacteria. Patients with diabetes mellitus are more likely to be hospitalized with cSSTIs and to experience related complications than patients without diabetes mellitus. Patients with PVD requiring lower extremity bypass are also at high risk of surgical site and graft infections. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a frequent causative pathogen in cSSTIs, and may be a significant contributor to surgical site infections, especially in patients who are colonized with MRSA on hospital admission. Patients with cSSTIs and diabetes mellitus or PVD experience lower clinical success rates than patients without these comorbidities, and may also have a longer length of hospital stay and higher risk of adverse drug events. Clinicians should be vigilant in recognizing the potential for infection with multi-drug-resistant organisms, especially MRSA, in these populations and initiating therapy with appropriate antibiotics.

  18. Ab Interno Trabeculectomy in the Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    SooHoo, Jeffrey R.; Seibold, Leonard K.; Kahook, Malik Y.

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a potentially blinding disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The mainstay of treatment is lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP) through the use of medications, laser and/or incisional surgery. The trabecular meshwork (TM) is thought to be the site of significant resistance to aqueous outflow in open angle glaucoma. Theoretically, an incision through TM or TM removal should decrease this resistance and lead to a significant reduction in IOP. This approach, commonly referred to as goniotomy or trabeculotomy, has been validated in the pediatric population and has been associated with long-term IOP control. In adults, however, removal of TM tissue has been historically associated with more limited and short-lived success. More recent evidence, reveals that even adult patients may benefit significantly from removal of diseased TM tissue and can lead to a significant reduction in IOP that is long-lasting and safe. In this review, we discuss current evidence and techniques for ab interno trabeculectomy using various devices in the adult patient. PMID:25624670

  19. Ab interno trabeculectomy in the adult patient.

    PubMed

    SooHoo, Jeffrey R; Seibold, Leonard K; Kahook, Malik Y

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a potentially blinding disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The mainstay of treatment is lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP) through the use of medications, laser and/or incisional surgery. The trabecular meshwork (TM) is thought to be the site of significant resistance to aqueous outflow in open angle glaucoma. Theoretically, an incision through TM or TM removal should decrease this resistance and lead to a significant reduction in IOP. This approach, commonly referred to as goniotomy or trabeculotomy, has been validated in the pediatric population and has been associated with long-term IOP control. In adults, however, removal of TM tissue has been historically associated with more limited and short-lived success. More recent evidence, reveals that even adult patients may benefit significantly from removal of diseased TM tissue and can lead to a significant reduction in IOP that is long-lasting and safe. In this review, we discuss current evidence and techniques for ab interno trabeculectomy using various devices in the adult patient.

  20. Chlorpropamide-alcohol flushing is not useful for individual genetic counseling of diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Dreyer, M; Kühnau, J; Rüdiger, H W

    1980-09-01

    The presence or absence of chlorpropamide-alcohol flushing (CPAF) was not correlated with the classification of diabetes. Five out of twelve patients with juvenile-onset diabetes (JOD) flushed and three out of four patients with maturity-onset diabetes in young people (MODY) did not flush. Consequently, CPAF cannot be used for individual genetic counseling in diabetes mellitus. PMID:7438499

  1. Re-amputation after minor foot amputation in diabetic patients: Risk factors leading to limb loss

    PubMed Central

    Nerone, Vincent S.; Springer, Kevin D.; Atway, Said

    2014-01-01

    Burn injury in diabetic patients has been a recent topic of interest in published studies. Previous studies have shown increased complications in diabetic patients compared with nondiabetic controls who have sustained these injuries. A paucity of research has been devoted to foot-specific diabetic burn injury. We present a case series evaluating the mechanisms and complications of diabetic foot burns. PMID:23419696

  2. [Diabetics in population of patients treated by pars plana vitrectomy].

    PubMed

    Bezdésová-Bohunická, N; Skorkovská, S; Synek, S; Kanovský, R; Masková, Z; Synková, M

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate visual and anatomic outcomes following pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) for complications of diabetic retinopathy (DR), and to assess risk factors that might influence the visual outcome after successful PPV. The medical records of 35 diabetic patients of both types 1 and 2 of diabetes, who underwent vitrectomy for complications of proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) between 2004 and 2005, were analyzed retrospectively. Certain preoperative systemic and ophthalmic variables, intraoperative variables and postoperative complications with negative influence on visual outcome after PPV were recorded. The postoperative follow-up time was 6 months. The collected data as well as visual outcomes after PPV were statistically analyzed. Statistically significant visual improvement was achieved in 51.4 % of the patients; visual acuity (VA) deteriorated in 25.7% of the patients and remained unchanged in 22.9 % of the patients. Preoperative median of VA was 0.0167, changed to 0.1 postoperatively and remained stable on 0.1 level during the 6 months follow-up. VA > or = 0.1 was achieved in 60 % of the patients 6 months after PPV. Some of the followed variables associated with deteriorated or unchanged postoperative VA can be considered as risk factors of an unfavorable prognosis. Evaluated risk factors include preoperative VA worse than 0.1, presence of systemic complications of DM accompanying ocular complications, postoperative occurrence of iris neovascularization and neovascular glaucoma. In conclusion, anatomically successful PPV in diabetic patients is not always followed by an improvement of VA. The optimal timing of vitrectomy is very important not only in order to obtain good visual acuity but also to maintain good visual function for long time. We suppose that an adequate control of DM, sufficient screening for DR and timely laser intervention of DR might decrease the progression of DR and onset of sight threatening complications

  3. [Diabetics in population of patients treated by pars plana vitrectomy].

    PubMed

    Bezdésová-Bohunická, N; Skorkovská, S; Synek, S; Kanovský, R; Masková, Z; Synková, M

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate visual and anatomic outcomes following pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) for complications of diabetic retinopathy (DR), and to assess risk factors that might influence the visual outcome after successful PPV. The medical records of 35 diabetic patients of both types 1 and 2 of diabetes, who underwent vitrectomy for complications of proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) between 2004 and 2005, were analyzed retrospectively. Certain preoperative systemic and ophthalmic variables, intraoperative variables and postoperative complications with negative influence on visual outcome after PPV were recorded. The postoperative follow-up time was 6 months. The collected data as well as visual outcomes after PPV were statistically analyzed. Statistically significant visual improvement was achieved in 51.4 % of the patients; visual acuity (VA) deteriorated in 25.7% of the patients and remained unchanged in 22.9 % of the patients. Preoperative median of VA was 0.0167, changed to 0.1 postoperatively and remained stable on 0.1 level during the 6 months follow-up. VA > or = 0.1 was achieved in 60 % of the patients 6 months after PPV. Some of the followed variables associated with deteriorated or unchanged postoperative VA can be considered as risk factors of an unfavorable prognosis. Evaluated risk factors include preoperative VA worse than 0.1, presence of systemic complications of DM accompanying ocular complications, postoperative occurrence of iris neovascularization and neovascular glaucoma. In conclusion, anatomically successful PPV in diabetic patients is not always followed by an improvement of VA. The optimal timing of vitrectomy is very important not only in order to obtain good visual acuity but also to maintain good visual function for long time. We suppose that an adequate control of DM, sufficient screening for DR and timely laser intervention of DR might decrease the progression of DR and onset of sight threatening complications

  4. Euglycaemic diabetic ketoacidosis in a patient with type 2 diabetes started on empagliflozin.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Owais; Farooq, Saad; Kiran, Zareen; Islam, Najmul

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes ketoacidosis (DKA) is largely associated with type 1 diabetes and has hyperglycaemia as a cardinal feature. We discuss the case of a 42-year-old man, a patient with type 2 diabetes, who presented to the emergency room, with nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. He had recently changed his diabetes medications and started on an SGLT2 inhibitor (empagliflozin) along with metformin, pioglitazone, liraglutide and self-adjusted exogenous insulin. DKA was suspected in the wake of clinical examination and lab findings but glucose levels were below the cut-off for DKA; therefore, he was diagnosed with euglycaemic DKA. He was successfully managed with intravenous hydration and insulin infusion. We discuss the link of SGLT2 inhibitors with DKA and the pathophysiology behind euglycaemic DKA. PMID:27177938

  5. Glycemic control in non-diabetic critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Farrokhi, Farnoosh; Smiley, Dawn; Umpierrez, Guillermo E.

    2013-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is a common and costly health care problem in hospitalized patients. In hospital hyperglycemia is defined as any glucose value >7.8 mmol/l (140 mg/dl). Hyperglycemia is present in 40% of critically ill patients and in up to 80% of patients after cardiac surgery, with ~ 80% of ICU patients with hyperglycemia having no history of diabetes prior to admission. The risk of hospital complications relates to the severity of hyperglycemia, with a higher risk observed in patients without a history of diabetes compared to those with known diabetes. Improvement in glycemic control reduces hospital complications and mortality; however, the ideal glycemic target has not been determined. A target glucose level between 7.8 and 10.0 mmol/l (140 and 180 mg/dl) is recommended for the majority of ICU patients. This review aims to present updated recommendations for the inpatient management of hyperglycemia in critically ill patients with and without a history of diabetes. PMID:21925080

  6. Angina and exertional myocardial ischemia in diabetic and nondiabetic patients: assessment by exercise thallium scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Nesto, R.W.; Phillips, R.T.; Kett, K.G.; Hill, T.; Perper, E.; Young, E.; Leland, O.S. Jr.

    1988-02-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease are thought to have painless myocardial ischemia more often than patients without diabetes. We studied 50 consecutive patients with diabetes and 50 consecutive patients without diabetes, all with ischemia, on exercise thallium scintigraphy to show the reliability of angina as a marker for exertional ischemia. The two groups had similar clinical characteristics, treadmill test results, and extent of infarction and ischemia, but only 7 patients with diabetes compared with 17 patients without diabetes had angina during exertional ischemia. In diabetic patients the extent of retinopathy, nephropathy, or peripheral neuropathy was similar in patients with and without angina. Angina is an unreliable index of myocardial ischemia in diabetic patients with coronary artery disease. Given the increased cardiac morbidity and mortality in such patients, periodic objective assessments of the extent of ischemia are warranted.

  7. Guidelines for Perioperative Management of the Diabetic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Surani, Salim R.

    2015-01-01

    Management of glycemic levels in the perioperative setting is critical, especially in diabetic patients. The effects of surgical stress and anesthesia have unique effects on blood glucose levels, which should be taken into consideration to maintain optimum glycemic control. Each stage of surgery presents unique challenges in keeping glucose levels within target range. Additionally, there are special operative conditions that require distinctive glucose management protocols. Interestingly, the literature still does not report a consensus perioperative glucose management strategy for diabetic patients. We hope to outline the most important factors required in formulating a perioperative diabetic regimen, while still allowing for specific adjustments using prudent clinical judgment. Overall, through careful glycemic management in perioperative patients, we may reduce morbidity and mortality and improve surgical outcomes. PMID:26078998

  8. Health coaching in diabetes: empowering patients to self-manage.

    PubMed

    Wong-Rieger, Durhane; Rieger, Francis P

    2013-02-01

    To effectively manage diabetes mellitus, patients must adhere to treatment recommendations and healthy lifestyle behaviors, but research shows many patients do not do this. Education is effective when combined with self-management support but peer-support programs do not lead to lasting changes. Health coaching, or professional support, can be highly effective if it focuses on developing self-efficacy and skills such as goal-setting, problem-solving and managing cognitive and emotional barriers. This overview discusses the benefits of patient self-management for chronic conditions such as diabetes, core competencies for health coaching, theoretical bases and principles of health coaching interventions, delivery methods and the evidence that health coaching works for diabetes self-management.

  9. Mechanisms of hypoglycemia unawareness and implications in diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Timón, Iciar; del Cañizo-Gómez, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Hypoglycemia unawareness (HU) is defined at the onset of neuroglycopenia before the appearance of autonomic warning symptoms. It is a major limitation to achieving tight diabetes and reduced quality of life. HU occurs in approximately 40% of people with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and with less frequency in T2DM. Though the aetiology of HU is multifactorial, possible mechanisms include chronic exposure to low blood glucose, antecedent hypoglycaemia, recurrent severe hypoglycaemia and the failure of counter-regulatory hormones. Clinically it manifests as the inability to recognise impeding hypoglycaemia by symptoms, but the mechanisms and mediators remain largely unknown. Prevention and management of HU is complex, and can only be achieved by a multifactorial intervention of clinical care and structured patient education by the diabetes team. Less know regarding the impact of medications on the development or recognition of this condition in patients with diabetes. Several medications are thought to worsen or promote HU, whereas others may have an attenuating effect on the problem. This article reviews recent advances in how the brain senses and responds to hypoglycaemia, novel mechanisms by which people with insulin-treated diabetes develop HU and impaired counter-regulatory responses. The consequences that HU has on the person with diabetes and their family are also described. Finally, it examines the evidence for prevention and treatment of HU, and summarizes the effects of medications that may influence it. PMID:26185599

  10. Reticulated platelets and antiplatelet therapy response in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Mijovic, Romana; Kovacevic, Nada; Zarkov, Marija; Stosic, Zoran; Cabarkapa, Velibor; Mitic, Gorana

    2015-08-01

    Increased platelet turnover and high level of reticulated platelets are associated with low response to antiplatelet therapy in diabetes mellitus type 2. This study evaluated association between percentage of reticulated platelets (%RP) and the response to antiplatelet therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This prospective, pilot, case-control, clinical trial included 79 subjects stratified in three groups: group I included 30 patients with T2DM, group II included 34 non-diabetic patients and 15 healthy age and sex matched healthy volunteers were enrolled in control group. Platelet response to clopidogrel and aspirin was assessed by Multiplate(®) aggregometry analyzer. Individual response to dual antiplatelet therapy was estimated by the percentage of decrease in overall platelet aggregability (%DPA) obtained after antiplatelet therapy, calculated by presented formulas: %DPAadp = 100 × (1 - ADP/TRAP) and %DPAaspi = 100 × (1 - ASPI/TRAP). %RP was significantly higher in diabetics, than in non-diabetics, (3.17 ± 1.26 vs. 2.39 ± 1.56; p < 0.05). Significantly lower response to clopidogrel (31.55 ± 13.02 vs. 50.24 ± 11.38; p < 0.001) and aspirin (52.33 ± 22.67 vs. 64.31 ± 16.47; p < 0.05) therapy was observed in diabetics. %RP negatively correlated with response to clopidogrel therapy, but positively with metabolic profile indicators in diabetics (p < 0.05, all). Correlation of %RP with metabolic profile indicators and poor response to antiplatelet therapy suggest that altered metabolic profile can affect platelet turnover in T2DM leading to low responsiveness to antiplatelet therapy in these patients.

  11. Bringing patient centricity to diabetes medication access in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Glennie, Judith L; Kovacs Burns, Katharina; Oh, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Canada must become proactive in addressing type 2 diabetes. With the second highest rate of diabetes prevalence in the developed world, the number of Canadians living with diabetes will soon reach epidemic levels. Against international comparisons, Canada also performs poorly with respect to diabetes-related hospitalizations, mortality rates, and access to medications. Diabetes and its comorbidities pose a significant burden on people with diabetes (PWD) and their families, through out-of-pocket expenses for medications, devices, supplies, and the support needed to manage their illness. Rising direct and indirect costs of diabetes will become a drain on Canada’s economy and undermine the financial stability of our health care system. Canada’s approach to diabetes medication assessment and funding has created a patchwork of medication access across provinces. Access to treatments for those who rely on public programs is highly restricted compared to Canadians with private drug plans, as well in contrast with public payers in other countries. Each person living with diabetes has different needs, so a “patient-centric” approach ensures treatment focused on individual circumstances. Such tailoring is difficult to achieve, with the linear approach required by public payers. We may be undermining optimal care for PWD because of access policies that are not aligned with individualized approaches – and increasing overall health care costs in the process. The scope of Canada’s diabetes challenge demands holistic and proactive solutions. Canada needs to get out from “behind the eight ball” and get “ahead of the curve” when it comes to diabetes care. Improving access to medications is one of the tools for getting there. Canada’s “call to action” for diabetes starts with effective implementation of existing best practices. A personalized approach to medication access, to meet individual needs and optimize outcomes, is also a key enabler. PWD and

  12. Painful neuropathy in a diabetic patient resulting from lung cancer and not diabetes: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YAO, HE-BIN; CHEN, YA-NING; SHANG, JIAN; HAN, QIAO-JUN

    2015-01-01

    The current study reports the case of a 61-year-old man with diabetes who was suffering from generalized pain over the whole body and gradually progressive numbness. The patient was initially diagnosed with diabetic peripheral neuropathy and received treatment, however, the symptoms persisted. In October 2010, the patient was admitted to the Chinese People's Liberation Army Navy General Hospital (Beijing, China) for the treatment of diabetes, however, a full-body sharp pain was also described, which was relieved upon massaging the area. Causes, other than diabetes, were investigated for these symptoms. Chest computed tomography and positron emission tomography-computed tomography scans revealed a mass shadow in the right lower lobe of the lung, with multiple lymphatic metastases. Lung cancer was diagnosed with a tumor-node-metastasis stage of T1N3Mx. Following treatment of the cancer with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the patient's symptoms were significantly improved. The present study reports a rare case of a paraneoplastic neurological syndrome (PNS) that presented as painful neuropathy resulting from lung cancer, which mimicked diabetic peripheral neuropathy. PMID:26788221

  13. Predictors of major lower limb amputation among type II diabetic patients admitted for diabetic foot problems

    PubMed Central

    Yusof, Nazri Mohd; Rahman, Jamalludin Ab; Zulkifly, Ahmad Hafiz; Che-Ahmad, Aminudin; Khalid, Kamarul Ariffin; Sulong, Ahmad Fadzli; Vijayasingham, Naveen

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the most common cause of amputations in Malaysia. This study aimed to identify the predictive factors for major lower limb amputation among patients with type 2 DM (T2DM) who were admitted to a hospital, in order to reduce its likelihood. METHODS This cross-sectional study involved 218 patients with T2DM who were admitted to Hospital Tengku Ampuan Afzan, Kuantan, Malaysia, for diabetic foot problems from June 2011 to July 2012. A form was developed to document the patients’ profiles, comorbidities, complications, investigations, treatment and clinical outcomes. The predictors for major lower limb amputations were determined using univariate and stepwise logistic regression analysis. RESULTS A total of 31 patients underwent major lower limb amputations (25 transtibial, 6 transfemoral). The following factors were found to be associated with the incidence of major lower limb amputations: T2DM duration ≥ 10 years, diabetic neuropathy, diabetic nephropathy, presentation with gangrene, diabetic foot conditions of Wagner grade 4 or 5, and necrotising fasciitis. Patients who underwent major amputations had significantly lower haemoglobin and albumin levels, and higher total white blood cell counts, erythrocyte sedimentation rates, and C-reactive protein, urea and creatinine levels. However, only T2DM duration ≥ 10 years, positive bacterial culture and albumin levels were significant on stepwise logistic regression analysis. CONCLUSION T2DM duration ≥ 10 years, positive bacterial culture and low albumin levels were found to be significant predictive factors for major lower limb amputation among patients with T2DM admitted for diabetic foot problems. PMID:26668408

  14. Diabetes in Relation to Serum Levels of Polychlorinated Biphenyls and Chlorinated Pesticides in Adult Native Americans

    PubMed Central

    Codru, Neculai; Schymura, Maria J.; Negoita, Serban; Rej, Robert; Carpenter, David O.

    2007-01-01

    Background Recent research suggests that diabetes, a condition whose incidence is increasing, is associated with exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and chlorinated pesticides. Objectives We investigated the potential association between diabetes and serum levels of PCBs, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and mirex in a cross-sectional study of an adult Native-American (Mohawk) population. Methods Through a standardized questionnaire we collected demographic, medical, and lifestyle information from 352 adults, ≥30 years of age. We collected fasting serum samples that were analyzed for 101 PCB congeners, DDE, HCB, and mirex along with fasting glucose, triglycerides, and cholesterol. Participants who had fasting-glucose values > 125 mg/dL and/or who were taking antidiabetic medication were defined as persons with diabetes. We conducted logistic regression to assess the potential association between organochlorine serum levels and diabetes, while controlling for the potential confounding variables of age, body mass index (BMI), smoking, sex, and serum lipid levels. Organochlorine serum levels were categorized in tertiles, and the lowest tertile was used as the reference category. Results The prevalence of diabetes was 20.2%. The odds ratio (OR) of having diabetes for participants in the highest tertile of total PCB concentration compared with the lowest tertile was 3.9 (95% confidence interval, 1.5–10.6). The corresponding ORs for DDE and HCB were even higher. Elevated serum mirex was not associated with diabetes. After adjustment for other analytes, the OR for HCB remained significant, whereas ORs for PCBs and DDE remained elevated but not statistically significant. In contrast, after adjustment for other analytes, the OR for mirex became statistically significant and indicated an inverse association. Conclusions In this study of adult Native Americans, elevated serum PCBs, DDE, and HCB were positively associated with

  15. Prevalence and Management of Diabetes and Metabolic Risk Factors in Thai Adults

    PubMed Central

    Aekplakorn, Wichai; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Kessomboon, Pattapong; Sangthong, Rassamee; Inthawong, Rungkarn; Putwatana, Panwadee; Taneepanichskul, Surasak

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and undiagnosed and diagnosed diabetes in Thai adults in 2009 and examine the extent of changes in proportions of diagnosis, treatment, and control for blood glucose, high blood pressure, and high total cholesterol between 2004 and 2009. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Data from the multistage cross-sectional National Health Examination Survey (NHES) IV of 18,629 Thai adults aged ≥20 years conducted in 2009 were used to analyze and compare with the data from NHES III in 2004. RESULTS The prevalence of IFG and diabetes was 10.6 and 7.5%, respectively. Of all diabetes diagnoses, 35.4% were not previously diagnosed, and the proportion was higher in men than in women (47.3 vs. 23.4%, P < 0.05). Compared with those in year 2004, the proportions of individuals with diabetes and concomitant hypertension did not significantly decrease in 2009 in both sexes, but the proportions of women with diabetes who were abdominally obese or had high total cholesterol (≥5.2 mmol/L) significantly increased in 2009 by 18.0 and 23.5%, respectively (all P < 0.01). The rates of treatment and control of blood glucose, high blood pressure, and high total cholesterol were favorably improved in 2009. However, in substantial proportions of individuals with diabetes these concomitants were still controlled suboptimally. CONCLUSIONS The prevalence of diabetes and IFG remained high in Thai adults. Improvement in detection and control of diabetes and associated metabolic risk factors, particularly obesity and high serum cholesterol, are necessary. PMID:21816976

  16. Impaired Fasting Glucose in Omani Adults with no Family History of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sinani, Sawsan; Al-Shafaee, Mohammed; Al-Mamari, Ali; Woodhouse, Nicolas; El-Shafie, Omayma; Hassan, Mohammed O.; Al-Yahyaee, Said; Albarwani, Sulayma; Jaju, Deepali; Al-Hashmi, Khamis; Al-Abri, Mohammed; Rizvi, Syed; Bayoumi, Riad

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) among Omani adults with no family history (FH) of diabetes and to investigate the factors behind the risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D), while excluding a FH of diabetes. Methods: A total of 1,182 Omani adults, aged ≥40 years, visited the Family Medicine & Community Health Clinic at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Oman, on days other than the Diabetes Clinic days, from July 2010 to July 2011. The subjects were interviewed and asked if they had T2D or a FH of T2D. Results: Only 191 (16%) reported no personal history of T2D or FH of the disease. Of these, anthropometric and biochemical data was complete in 159 subjects. Of these a total of 42 (26%) had IFG according to the American Diabetes Association criteria. Body mass index, fasting insulin, haemoglobin A1C and blood pressure (BP), were significantly higher among individuals with IFG (P <0.01, P <0.05, P <0.01 and P <0.01, respectively). In addition, fasting insulin, BP and serum lipid profile were correlated with obesity indices (P <0.05). Obesity indices were strongly associated with the risk of IFG among Omanis, with waist circumference being the strongest predictor. Conclusion: Despite claiming no FH of diabetes, a large number of Omani adults in this study had a high risk of developing diabetes. This is possibly due to environmental factors and endogamy. The high prevalence of obesity combined with genetically susceptible individuals is a warning that diabetes could be a future epidemic in Oman. PMID:24790740

  17. Tedium among patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lundman, B; Asplund, K; Norberg, A

    1988-01-01

    Tedium assessment and factor analysis of psychosocial variables were performed in 158 insulin-dependent diabetic patients. High tedium scores correlated significantly (P less than 0.05) with high education, lack of self-monitoring, many reported problems concerning insulin injections, diet, strict planning of the activities of everyday life and anxiety concerning complications. There was also a significant relationship between low tedium scores and reported positive effects of the diabetes. There was a higher proportion (ns) of high tedium scores among patients in poor or good metabolic control than in those with intermediate metabolic control. PMID:3372882

  18. Prevalence and determinants of type 2 diabetes mellitus in a Greek adult population.

    PubMed

    Tsirona, Sofia; Katsaros, Fotis; Bargiota, Alexandra; Polyzos, Stergios A; Arapoglou, George; Koukoulis, George N

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasing worldwide reaching epidemic proportions. The aim of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of DM in Thessaly, a large region of Central Greece, and to extrapolate our results to the population of the entire country. A random sample of 805 adults (421 females and 384 men) living in Thessaly, aged 18-80 years, was surveyed. After completing a questionnaire about health status and a thorough physical examination, a blood sample was obtained from each participant for biochemical analysis. Participants with fasting glucose levels between 100-125 mg/dl underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). A second survey was also conducted, via telephone call-interviews, in a randomly selected sample age- and sex-stratified to the country's adult population in order to extrapolate the DM data from Thessaly to the whole country. The frequency of DM based on patient history and fasting blood glucose levels was 6.96%, comparable to that observed in the telephone-based nationwide survey (7.38%, p=0.669). However, after the OGTT an additional 3.72% of the population had undiagnosed DM, increasing DM prevalence to 10.68% (age adjusted 11.77%). The prevalence of pre-diabetes was 8.70%, with impaired fasting glucose at 5.84% and impaired glucose tolerance at 2.86%. The prevalence of DM was significantly higher in men (14.58%) than in women (7.13%, p<0.001), increased with age in both sexes and was more prevalent in hypertensive (p<0.001) and obese subjects (p=0.001) and in those living in rural areas (p=0.003). In the multiple logistic regression analysis, significant predictors of pre-diabetes and DM together were age, homeostasis model of assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), alcohol consumption and educational status, whereas those of DM alone were age, HOMA-IR and triglycerides. Extrapolating our data to the whole country, the age-adjusted prevalence of DM was estimated at 11.97% (men 13.98%, women 9

  19. [Clinical and pathophysiological features of Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and their risk factors for diabetic complication].

    PubMed

    Sone, Hirohito

    2015-12-01

    The pathophysiological backgrounds as well as clinical phenotypes of Japanese or East Asian patients with type 2 diabetes are quite different from those in Western countries. According to results of East Asian large-scale studies such as the Japan Diabetes Complications Study (JDCS), which is a representative cohort of Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes, Japanese patients had a much lower body mass index and lower incidence of coronary heart disease compared with Caucasian diabetic patients. Other differences between Japanese and Caucasian patients with type 2 diabetes could be found in risk factors such as fruit intake on retinopathy and significance of triglycerides, or the effects of moderate alcohol drinking on cardiovascular disease. These results demonstrated a necessity of ethnic group-specific risk evaluations and care of type 2 diabetes and its complications.

  20. Predicting Mortality in Patients with Diabetes Starting Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Dekkers, Olaf M.; Rotmans, Joris I.; Krediet, Raymond T.; Boeschoten, Elisabeth W.; Dekker, Friedo W.

    2014-01-01

    Background While some prediction models have been developed for diabetic populations, prediction rules for mortality in diabetic dialysis patients are still lacking. Therefore, the objective of this study was to identify predictors for 1-year mortality in diabetic dialysis patients and use these results to develop a prediction model. Methods Data were used from the Netherlands Cooperative Study on the Adequacy of Dialysis (NECOSAD), a multicenter, prospective cohort study in which incident patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) were monitored until transplantation or death. For the present analysis, patients with DM at baseline were included. A prediction algorithm for 1-year all-cause mortality was developed through multivariate logistic regression. Candidate predictors were selected based on literature and clinical expertise. The final model was constructed through backward selection. The model's predictive performance, measured by calibration and discrimination, was assessed and internally validated through bootstrapping. Results A total of 394 patients were available for statistical analysis; 82 (21%) patients died within one year after baseline (3 months after starting dialysis therapy). The final prediction model contained seven predictors; age, smoking, history of macrovascular complications, duration of diabetes mellitus, Karnofsky scale, serum albumin and hemoglobin level. Predictive performance was good, as shown by the c-statistic of 0.810. Internal validation showed a slightly lower, but still adequate performance. Sensitivity analyses showed stability of results. Conclusions A prediction model containing seven predictors has been identified in order to predict 1-year mortality for diabetic incident dialysis patients. Predictive performance of the model was good. Before implementing the model in clinical practice, for example for counseling patients regarding their prognosis, external validation is necessary. PMID:24594735

  1. Risk factors for diabetic retinopathy in northern Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhi-Peng; Ma, Jing-Xue

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the prevalence and risk factors of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in northern Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). METHODS This retrospective cross-sectional study was performed between May 2011 and April 2012. A total of 1100 patients (male/female, 483/617) were included in this study. DR was defined following the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) severity scale. All included patients accepted a comprehensive ophthalmic examination including retinal photographs. Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence interval (CI) after adjusting for age and gender. RESULTS Retinopathy was present in 307 patients with a prevalence of 27.9%. In univariate logistic analysis, presence of DR was associated with longer duration of diabetes (OR, 5.70; 95%CI, 2.91-12.56), higher concentration of fasting blood glucose (OR, 12.94; 95%CI, 2.40-67.71), higher level of glycosylated hemoglobin HbA1c (OR, 5.50; 95%CI, 3.78-11.97) and insulin treatment (OR, 6.99; 95%CI, 1.39-35.12). The lifestyle of patients with T2DM including smoking, alcohol consumption and regular exercise seemed not associated with the development of DR. CONCLUSION Our study suggests that fasting serum glucose concentration, HbA1c level, duration of diabetes and insulin treatment are potential risk factors for DR in northern Chinese patients with T2DM, while the lifestyle of included patients seems not associated with DR. PMID:27588275

  2. Predictors of Adherence to Multiple Clinical Preventive Recommendations among Adults with Diabetes in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Trujillo, Isabel; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Esteban-Hernández, Jesus; Hernández-Barrera, Valentin; Carrasco Garrido, Pilar; Salinero-Fort, Miguel A.; Cardenas-Valladolid, Juan; López-de-Andrés, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aims to describe adherence to seven clinical preventive services among Spanish adults with diabetes, to compare adherence with people without diabetes and to identify predictor of adherence to multiple practices among adults with diabetes. Design Cross-sectional study based on data obtained from the European Health Survey for Spain 2009 and the Spanish National Health Survey 2011. We analyzed those aged 40-69 years (n= 20,948). Diabetes status was self-reported. The study variables included adherence to blood pressure (BP) checkup, cholesterol measurement, influenza vaccination, dental examination, fecal occult blood test (FOBT), mammography and cytology. Independent variables included socio-demographic characteristics, variables related to health status and lifestyle factors. Results The study sample included 1,647 subjects with diabetes and 19,301 without. Over 90% had measured their BP and cholesterol in the last year, 44.4% received influenza immunization, 36.4% had a dental checkup within the year and only 8.1% underwent a FOBT. Among diabetic women 75.4% had received a mammography and 52.4% a cytology in the recommended periods. The adherence to BP and cholesterol measurements and influenza vaccination was significantly higher among those suffering diabetes and cytology and dental checkup were lower. Only 63.4% of people with diabetes had fulfilled half or more of the recommended practices. Female sex, higher educational level, being married or cohabiting, higher number of chronic conditions and number of physician visits increased the adherence to multiple preventive practices. For each unhealthy lifestyle reported the probability of having a higher adherence level decreased. Conclusions Acceptable adherence is found for BP and cholesterol checkups and mammography. Unacceptably low rates were found for influenza vaccine, dental care, cytology and FOBT. Moreover, preventive services are provided neither equitably nor efficiently so future

  3. HbA1c Variability as an Independent Risk Factor for Diabetic Retinopathy in Type 1 Diabetes: A German/Austrian Multicenter Analysis on 35,891 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Julia M.; Hammes, Hans-Peter; Rami-Merhar, Birgit; Rosenbauer, Joachim; Schütt, Morten; Siegel, Erhard; Holl, Reinhard W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to analyze the effect of HbA1c variability on the occurrence of diabetic retinopathy in type 1 diabetes patients. Patients and Methods 35,891 patients with childhood, adolescent or adult onset of type 1 diabetes from a large multicentre survey, the German/Austrian prospective documentation system (DPV), were analysed. Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine whether intra-individual HbA1c variability expressed as variation coefficient is an independent risk factor for the occurrence of diabetic retinopathy. Results Kaplan-Meier curves stratified by median HbA1c and variation coefficient revealed that retinopathy-free survival probability is lower when both median HbA1c and HbA1c variability are above the 50th percentile. Cox regression models confirmed this finding: After adjustment for age at diabetes onset, gender and median HbA1c, HbA1c variability was independently associated with the occurrence of diabetic retinopathy. Time-covariate interactions used to model non-proportionality indicated an effect decreasing with duration of diabetes for both median HbA1c and HbA1c variability. Predictive accuracy increased significantly when adding HbA1c variability to the Cox regression model. Conclusions In patients with type 1 diabetes, HbA1c variability adds to the risk of diabetic retinopathy independently of average metabolic control. PMID:24609115

  4. Trans-Palmitoleic Acid, Metabolic Risk Factors, and New-Onset Diabetes in US Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mozaffarian, Dariush; Cao, Haiming; King, Irena B.; Lemaitre, Rozenn N.; Song, Xiaoling; Siscovick, David S.; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Palmitoleic acid (cis-16:1n-7), produced by endogenous fat synthesis, has been linked to both beneficial and deleterious metabolic effects, potentially confounded by diverse determinants and tissue sources of endogenous production. Trans-palmitoleate (trans-16:1n-7) represents a distinctly exogenous source of 16:1n-7, unconfounded by endogenous synthesis or its determinants, that may be uniquely informative. Objective We investigated whether circulating trans-palmitoleate was independently related to lower metabolic risk and incident type2 diabetes. Design Prospective cohort study (1992–2006). Setting Four US communities. Patients 3,736 adults in the Cardiovascular Health Study. Measurements Plasma phospholipid fatty acids, anthropometry, blood lipids, inflammatory markers, and glucose-insulin levels were measured at baseline in 1992; and diet, 3 years earlier. In multivariable-adjusted models, we investigated how demographic, clinical, and lifestyle factors independently related to trans-palmitoleate; how trans-palmitoleate related to major metabolic risk factors; and how trans-palmitoleate related to new-onset diabetes (304 incident cases). We validated findings for metabolic risk factors in an independent cohort of 327 women. Results In multivariable-analyses, whole-fat dairy consumption was most strongly associated with higher trans-palmitoleate. Higher trans-palmitoleate was associated with slightly lower adiposity and, independently, higher high-density-lipoprotein(HDL)-cholesterol (across quintiles: +1.9%, P=0.04), lower triglycerides (−19.0%, P<0.001), lower total:HDL-cholesterol (−4.7%, P<0.001), lower C-reactive protein (−13.8%, P=0.05), and lower insulin resistance (−16.7%, P<0.001). Trans-palmitoleate was associated with substantially lower incidence of diabetes, with multivariable-hazard-ratios=0.41 (95%CI=0.27–0.64) and 0.38 (95%CI=0.24–0.62) in quintile-4 and quintile-5, versus quintile-1 (P-trend<0.001). Findings were

  5. Diabetes care quality is highly correlated with patient panel characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Steffani; O’Malley, Jean P.; Gold, Rachel; Heintzman, John; Likumahuwa, Sonja; DeVoe, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Health care reimbursement is increasingly based on quality. Little is known about how clinic-level patient characteristics affect quality performance, particularly in community health centers (CHCs). Methods Using electronic health record data for 4,019 diabetic patients from 23 CHC primary care clinics in the OCHIN practice-based research network, we calculated correlations between a clinic’s patient panel characteristics and delivery rates of diabetes preventive services in 2007. Using regression models, we estimated the proportion of clinic variability in clinics’ preventive services rates associated with the variability in the clinics’ patient panel characteristics. We also explored whether clinics’ performance rates were affected by how patient panel denominators were defined. Results Clinic rates of glycosylated hemoglobin testing, influenza immunizations, and lipid screening were positively associated with the percentage of patients with continuous health insurance coverage, and negatively associated with the percentage uninsured. Microalbumin screening rates were positively associated with the percentage of racial minorities in a clinic’s panel. Associations remained consistent with different panel denominators. Conclusions Clinic variability in delivery rates of preventive services correlates with differences in clinics’ patient panel characteristics, particularly the percentage of patients with continuous insurance coverage. Quality scores that do not account for these differences could create disincentives to diabetes care for vulnerable patients. PMID:24204063

  6. Association of Mediterranean diet and cardiorespiratory fitness with the development of pre-diabetes and diabetes: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study

    PubMed Central

    Bantle, Anne E; Chow, Lisa S; Steffen, Lyn M; Wang, Qi; Hughes, John; Durant, Nefertiti H; Ingram, Katherine H; Reis, Jared P; Schreiner, Pamela J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To better understand the association between a modified Mediterranean diet pattern in young adulthood, cardiorespiratory fitness in young adulthood, and the odds of developing pre-diabetes or diabetes by middle age. Research design and methods Participants from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study who did not have pre-diabetes or diabetes at baseline (year 0 (Y0), ages 18–30) and who had data available at the Y0 and year 25 (Y25) visits were included in this analysis (n=3358). Polytomous logistic regression models were used to assess the association between baseline dietary intake and fitness data and odds of pre-diabetes or diabetes by middle age (Y25, ages 43–55). Results At the Y25 visit, 1319 participants (39%) had pre-diabetes and 393 (12%) had diabetes. Higher baseline fitness was associated with lower odds of pre-diabetes and of diabetes at Y25. After adjustment for covariates, each SD increment in treadmill duration (181 s) was associated with lower odds for pre-diabetes (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.75 to 0.95, p=0.005) and for diabetes (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.85, p=0.0002) when compared to normal glycemia. A modified Mediterranean diet pattern was not associated with either pre-diabetes or diabetes. No interaction between cardiorespiratory fitness and dietary intake was observed, but baseline fitness remained independently associated with incident pre-diabetes and diabetes following adjustment for diet. Conclusions Higher cardiorespiratory fitness in young adulthood, but not a modified Mediterranean diet pattern, is associated with lower odds of pre-diabetes and of diabetes in middle age. Trial registration number NCT00005130.

  7. Association of Mediterranean diet and cardiorespiratory fitness with the development of pre-diabetes and diabetes: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study

    PubMed Central

    Bantle, Anne E; Chow, Lisa S; Steffen, Lyn M; Wang, Qi; Hughes, John; Durant, Nefertiti H; Ingram, Katherine H; Reis, Jared P; Schreiner, Pamela J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To better understand the association between a modified Mediterranean diet pattern in young adulthood, cardiorespiratory fitness in young adulthood, and the odds of developing pre-diabetes or diabetes by middle age. Research design and methods Participants from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study who did not have pre-diabetes or diabetes at baseline (year 0 (Y0), ages 18–30) and who had data available at the Y0 and year 25 (Y25) visits were included in this analysis (n=3358). Polytomous logistic regression models were used to assess the association between baseline dietary intake and fitness data and odds of pre-diabetes or diabetes by middle age (Y25, ages 43–55). Results At the Y25 visit, 1319 participants (39%) had pre-diabetes and 393 (12%) had diabetes. Higher baseline fitness was associated with lower odds of pre-diabetes and of diabetes at Y25. After adjustment for covariates, each SD increment in treadmill duration (181 s) was associated with lower odds for pre-diabetes (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.75 to 0.95, p=0.005) and for diabetes (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.85, p=0.0002) when compared to normal glycemia. A modified Mediterranean diet pattern was not associated with either pre-diabetes or diabetes. No interaction between cardiorespiratory fitness and dietary intake was observed, but baseline fitness remained independently associated with incident pre-diabetes and diabetes following adjustment for diet. Conclusions Higher cardiorespiratory fitness in young adulthood, but not a modified Mediterranean diet pattern, is associated with lower odds of pre-diabetes and of diabetes in middle age. Trial registration number NCT00005130. PMID:27648287

  8. Patient selection and vitamin E treatment in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Goldenstein, Hagit; Levy, Nina S; Lipener, Yisrael T; Levy, Andrew P

    2013-03-01

    In diabetes, there is an increase in oxidative stress due to elevated glucose levels in the plasma. High glucose promotes glycosylation, of both plasma and cellular proteins, which particularly affects the endothelial-cell lining of the blood vessel wall and interferes with its normal function. Thus, diabetes mellitus patients suffer from a higher incidence of cardiovascular complications such as atherosclerosis as compared with the nondiabetic population. Haptoglobin (Hp) is a plasma protein that binds free hemoglobin and prevents heme-iron mediated oxidation. There are three different types of Hp, which differ in their antioxidant ability. Several clinical studies have shown that the Hp 2-2 genotype is associated with higher incidence of cardiovascular diseases among diabetics. Vitamin E, a low-cost, easy-to-use antioxidant, was found to decrease the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases in Hp 2-2 diabetic patients. This review summarizes several studies that show the importance of vitamin E supplementation in a specific subgroup of patients, diabetic individuals carrying the Hp 2-2 genotype. PMID:23469912

  9. Oral magnesium supplementation in type II diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Solati, Mehrdad; Ouspid, Elham; Hosseini, Saeedeh; Soltani, Nepton; Keshavarz, Mansoor; Dehghani, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Magnesium is the second most abundant intracellular cation. It plays an important role in insulin homeostasis and glucose metabolism through multiple enzymatic reactions. With increasing data on magnesium deficiency in diabetic patients and epidemiological studies demonstrating magnesium deficiency as a risk factor for diabetes, it is logical to search for its possible beneficial effects on diabetes control and prevention. We aimed to determine whether oral magnesium supplementation improves metabolic control, lipid profile and blood pressure in patients with type II diabetes. Methods: Fifty four patients with type II diabetes were included in a randomized double blind placebocontrolled clinical trial.Patients received either placebo or 300 mg elemental magnesium (as magnesium sulfate -MgSo4-) daily, for 3 months. Metabolic control, lipid profile, blood pressure, magnesium status, hepatic enzymes, hemoglobin concentration, and anthropometric indices were determined in the beginning and at the end of the study. Results: Daily administration of 300 mg elemental magnesium for 3 months, significantly improved fasting blood glucose (183.9±15.43 to 125.8±6.52 vs. 196.5±28.12 to 136.5±7.94, p< 0.0001), 2-hour post prandial glucose (239.1±74.75 to 189.1±60mg/dl vs. 246.4±97.37 to 247.8±86.74mg/dl, p< 0.01), lipid profile, blood pressure and hepatic enzymes. Conclusion: Oral magnesium supplementation with proper dosage has beneficial effects on blood glucose, lipid profile, and blood pressure in patients with type II diabetes. PMID:25405132

  10. Prevalence of Urinary Tract Infection and Antimicrobial Susceptibility among Diabetic Patients with Controlled and Uncontrolled Glycemia in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    Sewify, May; Nair, Shinu; Warsame, Samia; Murad, Mohamed; Alhubail, Asma; Behbehani, Kazem; Al-Refaei, Faisal; Tiss, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic patients have higher risk of urinary tract infection (UTI). In the present study, we investigated the impact of glycemic control in diabetic patients on UTI prevalence, type of strains, and their antimicrobial drugs susceptibility. This study was conducted on urine samples from 722 adult diabetic patients from which 252 (35%) samples were positive for uropathogens. Most UTI cases occurred in the uncontrolled glycemic group (197 patients) versus 55 patients with controlled glycemia. Higher glycemic levels were measured in uncontrolled glycemia group (HbA1c = 8.3 ± 1.5 and 5.4 ± 0.4, resp., P < 0.0001). Females showed much higher prevalence of UTI than males in both glycemic groups (88.5% and 11.5%, resp., P < 0.0001). In the uncontrolled glycemia group 90.9% of the UTI cases happened at ages above 40 years and a clear correlation was obtained between patient age ranges and number of UTI cases (r = 0.94; P = 0.017), whereas in the group with controlled glycemia no trend was observed. Escherichia coli was the predominant uropathogen followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae and they were together involved in 76.2% of UTI cases. Those species were similarly present in both diabetic groups and displayed comparable antibiotic resistance pattern. These results highlight the importance of controlling glycemia in diabetic patients to reduce the UTI regardless of age and gender. PMID:26844231

  11. Markers for Risk of Type 1 Diabetes in Relatives of Alsacian Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sapin, Remi; Pinget, Michel; Belcourt, Alain

    2002-01-01

    Background: The cytotoxic T lymphocyteassociated antigen 4 gene (CTLA-4) encode the T cell receptor involved in the control of T cell proliferation and mediates T cell apoptosis. The receptor protein is a specific T lymphocyte surface antigen that is detected on cells only after antigen presentation. Thus, CTLA-4 is directly involved in both immune and autoimmune responses and may be involved in the pathogenesis of multiple T cell-mediated autoimmune disorders. There is polymorphism at position 49 in exon 1 of the CTLA-4 gene, providing an A-G exchange. Moreover, we assessed the CTLA-4 49 (Thr/Ala) polymorphism in diabetic patients and first-degree relatives as compared to control subjects. Research design and methods: Three loci (HLA-DQB1, DQA1 and CTLA-4) were analysed in 62 type 1 diabetic patients, 72 firstdegree relatives and 84 nondiabetic control subjects by means of PCR-RFLP. Results: A significant enrichment in DQB1 alleles encoding for an amino acid different from Asp in position 57 (NA) and DQA1 alleles encoding for Arg in position 52 was observed in diabetic subjects and first-degree relatives as compared to controls. The genotype and allele frequencies of these polymorphisms in type 1 diabetic patients and firstdegree relatives differed significantly from those of controls (p< 0.001 and 0.05 respectively). CTLA-49 Ala alleles frequencies were 75.8% in type 1 diabetic patients and 68.1% in first-degree relatives in comparison to 35.7% in control subjects. The Ala/Ala genotype conferred a relative risk of 18.8 (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The CTLA-4 49 Ala allele confers an increased risk of type 1 diabetes, independent of age and HLA-DQ genetic markers. PMID:11900275

  12. Mental health symptoms and patient-reported diabetes symptom burden: implications for medication regimen changes

    PubMed Central

    Sorkin, Dara H.; Billimek, John; August, Kristin J.; Ngo-Metzger, Quyen; Kaplan, Sherrie H.; Reikes, Andrew R.; Greenfield, Sheldon

    2015-01-01

    Aims. To examine the relative contribution of glycaemic control (HbA1C) and depressive symptoms on diabetes-related symptom burden (hypoglycaemia and hyperglycaemia) in order to guide medication modification. Methods. Secondary analysis of medical records data and questionnaires collected from a racially/ethnically diverse sample of adult patients with type 2 diabetes (n = 710) from seven outpatient clinics affiliated with an academic medical centre over a 1-year period as part of the Reducing Racial Disparities in Diabetes: Coached Care (R2D2C2) study. Results. Results from linear regression analysis revealed that patients with high levels of depressive symptoms had more diabetes-related symptom burden (both hypoglycaemia and hyperglycaemia) than patients with low levels of depressive symptoms (βs = 0.09–0.17, Ps < 0.02). Furthermore, results from two logistic regression analyses suggested that the odds of regimen intensification at 1-year follow-up was marginally associated with patient-reported symptoms of hypoglycaemia [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.24, 95% CI: 0.98–1.58; P = 0.08] and hyperglycaemia (aOR = 1.21, 95% CI: 1.00–1.46; P = 0.05), after controlling for patients’ HbA1C, comorbidity, insulin use and demographics. These associations, however, were diminished for patients with high self-reported hypoglycaemia and high levels of depressive symptoms, but not low depressive symptoms (interaction terms for hypoglycaemia by depressive symptoms, aOR = 0.98, 95% CI: 0.97–0.99; P = 0.03). Conclusions. Mental health symptoms are associated with higher levels of patient-reported of diabetes-related symptoms, but the association between diabetes-related symptoms and subsequent regimen modifications is diminished in patients with greater depressive symptoms. Clinicians should focus attention on identifying and treating patients’ mental health concerns in order to address the role of diabetes-related symptom burden in guiding physician medication

  13. Physical activity related information sources predict physical activity behaviors in adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Johnson, Steven T; Karunamuni, Nandini; Boule, Normand G

    2010-12-01

    Physical activity (PA) is a key management strategy for type 2 diabetes. Despite the known benefits, PA levels are low. Whether the low level of PA is related to lack of knowledge or support is not fully understood. This study was conducted to describe where and how often adults with type 2 diabetes receive and seek information related to PA and examine the relationships between the source and quality of PA information with PA behaviors. A series of questions related to the source and quality of PA information were added to a baseline survey distributed to the participants (N = 244) of the Canadian Aerobic and Resistance Training in Diabetes (CARED) study. Physicians and television were found to be the main sources of PA-related information. In our cross-sectional model, sources of PA-related information other than that from health care professionals explained 14% (p = .05) and 16% (p < .05) of the variance for aerobic-based and resistance training behaviors and 22% (p < .01) and 15% (p < .05) for these behaviors in our longitudinal model. Physical activity (PA)-related information is widely available to adults with type 2 diabetes. Neither the quantity nor the quality of the PA information provided by health care professionals predicted PA behavior. These data provide further insight into the modes with which PA can be promoted to adults with type 2 diabetes. PMID:21170787

  14. Meanings of Health for Iranian Diabetic Patients: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Moridi, Golrokh; Valiee, Sina; Nasrabadi, Alireza Nikbakht; Nasab, Golnaz Esmaeil; Khaledi, Shahnaz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Health is an exclusive and subjective phenomenon, and one of the most important situations with regard to perception of health, arises when patients suffer from a chronic disease. This study was conducted within the qualitative research framework and aimed to explore the meanings of health as perceived by a group of Iranian diabetic patients. Methods A descriptive qualitative analysis design was used. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 20 participants among diabetic patients, who were admitted to the diabetes care centre of Tohid Hospital of the Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj, Iran during a ten-month period in 2014. Interviews were transcribed and analysed through conventional content analysis. Results Based on the findings of the study, three major health-related themes emerged: 1) the syndrome of the healthy body and the happy heart (physical well-being vivacity, satisfaction, and calmness of the mind), 2) life without compulsory limitations (lack of dietary limitations, No activity limitations, lack of social limitations), and 3) exalted spirituality (satisfying self and others, trusting God, remembering God). Conclusion Health care providers should consider the meaning of health in special groups, chiefly in patients with chronic diseases. It facilitates the development of appropriate programmes to improve desirable health levels among diabetic patients. PMID:27790342

  15. Comparison of a mindful eating intervention to a diabetes self-management intervention among adults with type 2 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Miller, Carla K; Kristeller, Jean L; Headings, Amy; Nagaraja, Haikady

    2014-04-01

    Mindful eating may be an effective intervention for increasing awareness of hunger and satiety cues, improving eating regulation and dietary patterns, reducing symptoms of depression and anxiety, and promoting weight loss. Diabetes self-management education (DSME), which addresses knowledge, self-efficacy, and outcome expectations for improving food choices, also may be an effective intervention for diabetes self-care. Yet few studies have compared the impact of mindful eating to a DSME-based treatment approach on patient outcomes. Adults 35 to 65 years old with type 2 diabetes for ≥1 year not requiring insulin therapy were recruited from the community and randomly assigned to treatment group. The impact of a group-based 3-month mindful eating intervention (MB-EAT-D; n = 27) to a group-based 3-month DSME "Smart Choices" (SC) intervention (n = 25) postintervention and at 3-month follow-up was evaluated. Repeated-measures ANOVA with contrast analysis compared change in outcomes across time. There was no significant difference between groups in weight change. Significant improvement in depressive symptoms, outcome expectations, nutrition and eating-related self-efficacy, and cognitive control and disinhibition of control regarding eating behaviors occurred for both groups (all p < .0125) at 3-month follow-up. The SC group had greater increase in nutrition knowledge and self-efficacy than the MB-EAT-D group (all p < .05) at 3-month follow-up. MB-EAT-D had significant increase in mindfulness, whereas the SC group had significant increase in fruit and vegetable consumption at study end (all p < .0125). Both SC and MB-EAT-D were effective treatments for diabetes self-management. The availability of mindful eating and DSME-based approaches offers patients greater choices in meeting their self-care needs.

  16. Spousal support in diabetes self-management among Korean immigrant older adults.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sarah E; Lee, Jennifer J; Park, Jenny J; Sarkisian, Catherine A

    2015-01-01

    The authors of the current article investigated domains of spousal support among diabetic Korean older adults and their spouses. Two focus groups were conducted with diabetic participants from the greater Los Angeles Korean community, and three were conducted with their spouses. In the focus groups, participants were asked to describe the spousal support given or received for diabetes self-management. Each group comprised four to nine participants. Focus groups were audiotaped, transcribed, and translated; two independent coders identified domains of spousal support. Content analysis identified six domains: diet, exercise, emotional support, medical regimen, communication with clinicians, and information. Diet was the most frequently described domain across all groups. Gender differences were noted in domains of information, communication, and medical regimen among diabetic participants. Both diabetic and spouse participants identified individualizing spousal support and recognizing diabetes management as teamwork as important elements of successful spousal support. Spousal support education for Korean older adults may have the greatest impact by incorporating these six domains, addressing gender differences, providing tips on individualizing support, and cultivating teamwork. PMID:25420183

  17. Carboplatin dosing for adult Japanese patients.

    PubMed

    Ando, Yuichi; Shimokata, Tomoya; Yasuda, Yoshinari; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2014-02-01

    Carboplatin is a platinum-based anticancer drug that has been long used to treat many types of solid cancer. Because the clearance of carboplatin strongly correlates with the glomerular filtration rate (GFR), its dosage is calculated with the Calvert formula on the basis of the patient's GFR to achieve the target area under the plasma drug concentration-time curve (AUC) for each patient. However, many lines of evidence from previous clinical studies should be interpreted with caution because different methods were used to estimate drug clearance and derive the dosage of carboplatin. There is a particularly high risk of carboplatin overdosing when the dosage is determined on the basis of standardized serum creatinine values. When deciding the dose of carboplatin for adult Japanese patients, preferred methods to assess renal function instead of directly measuring GFR include (1) 24-h urinary collection-based creatinine clearance adjusted by adding 0.2 mg/dl to the serum creatinine concentration measured by standardized methods, and (2) equation-based GFR (eGFR) with a back calculation to units of ml/min per subject. Given the limitations of serum creatinine-based GFR estimations, the GFR or creatinine clearance should be directly measured in each patient whenever possible. To ensure patient safety and facilitate a medical-team approach, the single most appropriate method available at each institute or medical team should be consistently used to calculate the dose of carboplatin with the Calvert formula.

  18. Predictors of Diabetes Self-Management among Type 2 Diabetes Patients.

    PubMed

    Gunggu, Azylina; Thon, Chang Ching; Whye Lian, Cheah

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a public health concern in Malaysia. Treatment of diabetes is costly and can lead to complications if disease is poorly controlled. Diabetes self-management (DSM) is found to be essential for optimal glycemic control. This cross-sectional study was conducted among samples from four randomly selected diabetes clinics in Sarawak, Malaysia. The aim was to determine the predictors for DSM. Face-to-face interview using questionnaire was used to collect data. Four hundred respondents with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) were recruited. Majority of the respondents were Sarawak Bumiputra (Iban and Bidayuh, 48.6%) and female (68.6%). The mean age was 58.77 years (SD = 11.46) and approximately half of the respondents (50.6%) had T2DM for six years (SD = 4.46). The mean fasting blood glucose (FBG) was 8.06 mmol/L (SD = 2.94), with majority (76.1%) having the level higher than 6.1 mmol/L. Multiple logistic regression tests showed significant linear relationship between DSM and belief in treatment effectiveness (p = 0.001), family support (p = 0.007), and self-efficacy (p = 0.027). Health care personnel must convince patients with T2DM of the effectiveness of the treatment, empower and enhance their self-efficacy, and enlist the family support so as to ensure patients sustain their DSM efforts. PMID:27563681

  19. Predictors of Diabetes Self-Management among Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a public health concern in Malaysia. Treatment of diabetes is costly and can lead to complications if disease is poorly controlled. Diabetes self-management (DSM) is found to be essential for optimal glycemic control. This cross-sectional study was conducted among samples from four randomly selected diabetes clinics in Sarawak, Malaysia. The aim was to determine the predictors for DSM. Face-to-face interview using questionnaire was used to collect data. Four hundred respondents with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) were recruited. Majority of the respondents were Sarawak Bumiputra (Iban and Bidayuh, 48.6%) and female (68.6%). The mean age was 58.77 years (SD = 11.46) and approximately half of the respondents (50.6%) had T2DM for six years (SD = 4.46). The mean fasting blood glucose (FBG) was 8.06 mmol/L (SD = 2.94), with majority (76.1%) having the level higher than 6.1 mmol/L. Multiple logistic regression tests showed significant linear relationship between DSM and belief in treatment effectiveness (p = 0.001), family support (p = 0.007), and self-efficacy (p = 0.027). Health care personnel must convince patients with T2DM of the effectiveness of the treatment, empower and enhance their self-efficacy, and enlist the family support so as to ensure patients sustain their DSM efforts. PMID:27563681

  20. Recurrence of diabetic kidney disease in a type 1 diabetic patient after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nyumura, Izumi; Honda, Kazuho; Babazono, Tetsuya; Horita, Shigeru; Murakami, Toru; Fuchinoue, Shohei; Uchigata, Yasuko

    2015-07-01

    Post-transplant hyperglycaemia of diabetic patients may cause recurrent diabetic kidney disease (DKD) in kidney allografts. We report a patient with slowly progressive DKD with calcineurin inhibitor toxicity (CNI) toxicity after the kidney transplantation. A 28-year-old female with type 1 diabetes mellitus underwent successful kidney transplantation from her mother in April 2003, and the kidney graft survived for more than 10 years. She was treated with combined immunosuppressive therapy consisting of cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil. After transplantation, she continued to take insulin injection four times per day, but her glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) was above 10%. Protocol allograft kidney biopsies performed 5 and 10 years after transplantation revealed the recurrence of slowly progressive diabetic kidney disease. In addition, arteriolar hyalinosis partly associated with calcineurin inhibitor toxicity (CNI) was detected with progression. Post-transplant hyperglycaemia causes recurrent diabetic kidney disease (DKD) in kidney allografts, but its progression is usually slow. For long-term management, it is important to prevent the progression of the calcineurin inhibitor arteriolopathy, as well as maintain favourable glycaemic control.

  1. Patient attitudes about financial incentives for diabetes self-management: A survey

    PubMed Central

    Blondon, Katherine S

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the acceptability of incentives for behavior changes in individuals with diabetes, comparing financial incentives to self-rewards and non-financial incentives. METHODS: A national online survey of United States adults with diabetes was conducted in March 2013 (n = 153). This survey was designed for this study, with iterative testing and modifications in a pilot population. We measured the demographics of individuals, their interest in incentives, as well as the perceived challenge of diabetes self-management tasks, and expectations of incentives to improve diabetes self-management (financial, non-financial and self-rewards). Using an ordered logistic regression model, we assessed the association between a 32-point score of the perceived challenge of the self-management tasks and the three types of rewards. RESULTS: Ninety-six percent of individuals were interested in financial incentives, 60% in non-financial incentives and 72% in self-rewards. Patients were less likely to use financial incentives when they perceived the behavior to be more challenging (odds ratio of using financial incentives of 0.82 (95%CI: 0.72-0.93) for each point of the behavior score). While the effectiveness of incentives may vary according to the perceived level of challenge of each behavior, participants did not expect to need large amounts to motivate them to modify their behavior. The expected average amounts needed to motivate a 5 lb weight loss in our population and to maintain this weight change for a year was $258 (interquartile range of $10-100) and $713 (interquartile range of $25-250) for a 15 lb weight loss. The difference in mean amount estimates for 5 lb and 15 lb weight loss was significant (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Individuals with diabetes are willing to consider financial incentives to improve diabetes self-management. Future studies are needed to explore incentive programs and their effectiveness for diabetes. PMID:26069724

  2. Balneotherapy and platelet glutathione metabolism in type II diabetic patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuka, Yoshinori; Yabunaka, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Ichiro; Noro, Hiroshi; Agishi, Yuko

    1996-09-01

    Effects of balneotherapy on platelet glutathione metabolism were investigated in 12 type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetic patients. Levels of the reduced form of glutathione (GSH) on admission were well correlated with those of fasting plasma glucose (FPG; r=0.692, P<0.02). After 4 weeks of balneotherapy, the mean level of GSH showed no changes; however, in well-controlled patients (FPG <150 mg/dl), the level increased ( P<0.01) and in poorly controlled patients (FPG >150 mg/dl), the value decreased ( P<0.05). There was a negative correlation between glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activities and the levels of FPG ( r=-0.430, P<0.05). After balneotherapy, the activity increased in 5 patients, decreased in 3 patients and showed no changes (alteration within ±3%) in all the other patients. From these findings in diabetic patients we concluded: (1) platelet GSH synthesis appeared to be induced in response to oxidative stress; (2) lowered GPX activities indicated that the antioxidative defense system was impaired; and (3) platelet glutathione metabolism was partially improved by 4 weeks balneotherapy, an effect thought to be dependent on the control status of plasma glucose levels. It is suggested that balneotherapy is beneficial for patients whose platelet antioxidative defense system is damaged, such as those with diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease.

  3. Tinea pedis and onychomycosis frequency in diabetes mellitus patients and diabetic foot ulcers. A cross sectional – observational study

    PubMed Central

    Akkus, Gamze; Evran, Mehtap; Gungor, Dilek; Karakas, Mehmet; Sert, Murat; Tetiker, Tamer

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Impaired cellular immunity and reduced phagocytic function of polymorphonuclear leukocytes facilitate the development of skin fungal and bacterial infections due to uncontrolled hyperglycemia in diabetic patients. In our study, we aimed to assess onychomycosis and/or tinea pedis frequency in diabetic patients, and effects on the development of chronic complications, particularly foot ulcer. Methods: We included 227 diabetic patients in the study. Forty-three patients had diabetic foot ulcer. We screened and recorded demographic characteristics, HbA1c levels of patients, and presence of complications We examined patients dermatologically, and collected samples by scalpel from skin between toes, and from sole, toe nail, and area surrounding nails from suspected to have fungal infection. Results: Native positivity between toes was higher in men compared to women (p<0.05). We obtained significant relation between HbA1c elevation and native positivity between toes (p<0.05). Fungal infection between toes, at sole and toe nail significantly increased in patients with diabetic foot ulcer compared to patients without diabetic foot ulcer (p<0.05). Moreover, native positivity in patients with diabetic foot ulcer correlated with presence of fungal infection examination findings (p<0.05). Conclusion: Fungal infections were more frequently observed in the presence of poor glycemic control and peripheral vascular disease in diabetic patients in compliance with the literature, and the presence of fungal infection may also responsible for the development of foot ulcers. PMID:27648034

  4. Tinea pedis and onychomycosis frequency in diabetes mellitus patients and diabetic foot ulcers. A cross sectional – observational study

    PubMed Central

    Akkus, Gamze; Evran, Mehtap; Gungor, Dilek; Karakas, Mehmet; Sert, Murat; Tetiker, Tamer

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Impaired cellular immunity and reduced phagocytic function of polymorphonuclear leukocytes facilitate the development of skin fungal and bacterial infections due to uncontrolled hyperglycemia in diabetic patients. In our study, we aimed to assess onychomycosis and/or tinea pedis frequency in diabetic patients, and effects on the development of chronic complications, particularly foot ulcer. Methods: We included 227 diabetic patients in the study. Forty-three patients had diabetic foot ulcer. We screened and recorded demographic characteristics, HbA1c levels of patients, and presence of complications We examined patients dermatologically, and collected samples by scalpel from skin between toes, and from sole, toe nail, and area surrounding nails from suspected to have fungal infection. Results: Native positivity between toes was higher in men compared to women (p<0.