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Sample records for adult diaphorina citri

  1. Relationships between adult abdominal color and reproductive potential in Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), a vector of huanglongbing (citrus greening disease), exhibits three more or less distinct abdominal colors in the adult stage: gray/brown, blue/green, and orange/yellow. A previous report showed that—relative to blue/green individuals—gray/brown indi...

  2. Movement of Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae) adults between huanglongbing-affected and healthy citrus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae), is a vector transmitting the pathogen of citrus huanglongbing (HLB, also called yellow shoot disease or citrus greening disease). A typical symptom of citrus HLB is leaf yellowing. ACP adults behaved differently on HLB-affe...

  3. Observations on the entomopathogenic fungus Hirsutella citriformis attacking adult Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllid) in a managed citrus grove

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A two-year field study was conducted in an orange grove (0.7 ha) in Florida to characterize the phenology of the entomopathogen Hirsutella citriformis Speare infecting adults of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama. On the average over the two-year study, 23 percent of adults observed...

  4. An assessment of yellow sticky card traps as indicators of the relative abundance of adult Diaphorina citri in citrus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yellow sticky card traps were assessed as a tool for estimating infestation levels of adult Diaphorina citri, an important pest of citrus. Weekly trapping was conducted in young and mature trees with traps deployed directly in trees, one trap per tree. In addition, a comparison was made between one ...

  5. FK506-binding protein from adult Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We successfully identified a new member of the FK-binding proteins from the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae). FK-binding proteins (FKBP) function in many critical pathways needed for psyllid survival. The full length mRNA transcript provides us a new genetic target for ...

  6. Effects of freezes on survival of Diaphorina citri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus in Florida is occasionally subjected to freezing temperatures. No information was available on the effect of freezing temperatures on mortality of Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) in Florida. Studies were therefore initiated to assess mortality rates of D. citri eggs, nymphs and adults...

  7. Within-orchard edge effects of the azimuth of the sun on Diaphorina citri adults in mature orchards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) has been considered the most devastating disease of citrus. The bacterium and vector associated with HLB in Florida are ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ and Diaphorina citri (Asian citrus psyllid), respectively. D. citri is positively phototropic, and higher populations have b...

  8. A COMPARISON OF TRAPS AND TAP SAMPLING FOR MONITORING ADULT ASIAN CITRUS PSYLLID, DIAPHORINA CITRI KUWAYMA (HOMOPTERA: PSYLLIDAE), IN CITRUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, was first found in Florida during June 1998 and subsequently spread throughout the state's citrus-growing regions. D. citri vectors the bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, responsible for citrus greening disease (huanglongbing). Citrus g...

  9. Disrupting mating behavior of Diaphorina citri (Liviidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Severe economic damage from citrus greening disease, caused by ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ bacteria, has stimulated development of methods to reduce mating and reproduction in populations of its insect vector, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae). Male D. citri find mating partners by walk...

  10. Behavioral plasticity in Diaphorina citri feeding on different citrus tissues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian Citrus Psyllid (Diaphorina citri) is a vector of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), a phloem-limited bacterial pathogen of citrus. While psyllid nymphs are obligate feeders on young flush leaves, adults can be found on leaves of any age. To understand risk of transmission of CLas, i...

  11. Novel reovirus in Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We discovered a psyllid-infecting Reovirus that we are now examining as a potential biological control agent of the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) to reduce huanglongbing disease (HLB) of citrus, a devastating bacterial disease of citrus transmitted by the psyllid. Previously, a psyllid-inf...

  12. Asian citrus psyllid genome (Diaphorina citri, Hemiptera)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Psyllid genome is a scientific breakthrough in that it opens the psyllid genetic blueprint to investigations of all questions ranging from taxonomic origins to the understanding of developmental biology, to the acquisition and transmission of pathogens. The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri...

  13. Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) infection and dissemination of the entomopathogenic fungus Isaria fumosorosea (Hypocreales: Cordycipitaceae)under laboratory conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A method was developed to increase efficacy and reduce grower costs when using the biological control fungal agent Paecilomyces fumosoroseus blastospores (Deuteromycotina: Hyphomycetes) to infect adult Asian citrus psyllids, Diaphorina citri (Psyllidae: Hemiptera). We analyzed the efficacy of this ‘...

  14. Postharvest quarantine treatments for Diaphorina citri on infested curry leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies were conducted to evaluate treatments that reduce survival and attachment of Diaphorina citri nymphs on infested curry leaves (Bergera koenigii). Decontamination of curry leaves infested with D. citri in relation to disinfectant (none or Pro-San), temperature (0, 40, and 50°C), and treatment...

  15. Temporal response and attraction of Diaphorina citri to visual stimuli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As the vector of the global disease of citrus greening or huanglongbing, Asian citrus pysllids, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera; Liviidae) are the greatest threat to the worldwide citrus industry. Critical to management of D. citri and huanglongbing, is optimization of surveillance methodologie...

  16. Population ecology and phenology of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) in two Florida citrus groves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies were conducted during 2005 and 2006 to assess population densities and phenology of the psyllid Diaphorina citri Kuwayama in citrus within east central Florida. Young, irrigated grapefruit and mature, non-irrigated orange trees were sampled weekly for eggs, nymphs and adults on flush shoots;...

  17. Endosymbiotic microbiota of Asian Citrus Psyllid (Diaphorina citri)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The causes of huanglongbing may be induced by more than one microbial agent. Thus, we examined the microbial community in the Asian citrus psyllid (AsCP) (Diaphorina citri, Hemiptera: Psyllidae). Citrus greening is one of the most severe diseases of citrus in Asia and Africa and is caused by an uncu...

  18. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The first complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequence of Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), from Guangzhou, China is presented. The circular mitogenome is 14,996 bp in length with an A+T content of 74.5%, and contains 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 tRNA genes ...

  19. Asian citrus psyllid genome (Diaphorina citri, Hemiptera)-Update 2013

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The psyllid genome is a scientific breakthrough that opens the psyllid genetic blueprint to investigations of all questions ranging from taxonomic origins to the understanding of developmental biology, to the acquisition and transmission of pathogens. The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemi...

  20. Vibrational communication between the sexes in Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined the substrate-borne vibrational signals used in communication between the sexes in Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), a vector of huanglongbing (an economically devastating disease of citrus), in an anechoic chamber and an olfactometer. Males and females both primarily pro...

  1. Biology, history and world status of Diaphorina citri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, is an important pest of citrus because it transmits phloem-limited bacteria (Candidatus Liberibacter spp.) responsible for citrus greening disease (huanglongbing), considered the world’s most serious disease of citrus. The psyllid has slowly spre...

  2. Establishment of Asian citrus psllid (Diaphorina citri) primary cultures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new cell line was developed from the Asian citrus psyllid (AsCP), Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), as a novel approach to culture the bacteria associated with huanglongbing disease (HLB), also known as citrus greening disease. Methods to culture the phloem-inhabiting bacterium Candidatus L...

  3. Biology, history and world status of Diaphorina citri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, is an important pest of citrus because it transmits phloem-limited bacteria (Candidatus Liberibacter spp.) responsible for citrus greening disease (huanglongbing), considered by some to be the world’s most serious disease of citrus. The psyllid ha...

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of the Largest Known Flavi-Like Virus, Diaphorina citri flavi-like virus, a Novel Virus of the Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Emilyn E; Nerva, Luca; Nigg, Jared C; Falk, Bryce W; Nouri, Shahideh

    2016-01-01

    A novel flavi-like virus tentatively named Diaphorina citri flavi-like virus (DcFLV) was identified in field populations of Diaphorina citri through small RNA and transcriptome sequencing followed by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. We report here the complete nucleotide sequence and genome organization of DcFLV, the largest flavi-like virus identified to date. PMID:27609921

  5. Behavioral, Ultrastructural and Chemical Studies on the Honeydew and Waxy Secretions by Nymphs and Adults of the Asian Citrus Psyllid Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae)

    PubMed Central

    Ammar, El-Desouky; Alessandro, Rocco; Shatters Jr, Robert G.; Hall, David G.

    2013-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) is the primary vector of the bacterium causing citrus huanglongbing (citrus greening), the most serious disease of citrus worldwide. Psyllids and other hemipterans produce large amounts of honeydew, which has been used previously as an indicator of phloem sap composition and insect feeding or metabolism. Behavioral, ultrastructural and chemical studies on ACP, its honeydew and waxy secretions showed important differences between nymphs, males and females, and suggested some mechanisms by which the psyllids, especially nymphs and adult females, can minimize their contamination with honeydew excretions. The anal opening in ACP, near the posterior end of the abdomen, is on the ventral side in nymphs and on the dorsal side in adult males and females. Video recordings showed that adult males produce clear sticky droplets of honeydew gently deposited behind their body on the leaf surface, whereas adult females produce whitish honeydew pellets powerfully propelled away from the female body, probably to get their excretions away from eggs and newly hatched nymphs. ACP nymphs produce long ribbons or tubes of honeydew that frequently stay attached to the exuviae after molting, or drop when feeding on the lower side of citrus leaves. Furthermore, honeydew excretions of both nymphs and adult females are covered with a thin layer of whitish waxy material ultrastructurally composed of a convoluted network of long fine filaments or ribbons. This material is extruded from intricate arrays of wax pores in the circumanal ring (around the anus) that is found in nymphs and females but not in males of ACP or other psyllid species. Infrared microscopy and mass spectroscopy revealed that, in addition to various sugars, honeydew excretions of ACP nymphs and females are covered with a thin layer of wax similar in profile to ester waxes. PMID:23762268

  6. First record of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) in Ecuador infesting urban citrus and orange jasmine trees.

    PubMed

    Cornejo, J F; Chica, E J

    2014-01-01

    Adults and nymphs of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), were collected in the Guayaquil, Samborondón, and Durán cantons in coastal Ecuador. Psyllids were found in high numbers in citrus (Citrus spp., Sapindales: Rutaceae) and orange jasmine (Murraya exotica [L.] Jack, Sapindales: Rutaceae) trees within the Guayaquil-Samborondon-Duran conurbation; however, none was found during scoutings in the main citrus producing areas in coastal Ecuador. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of D. citri in Ecuador and the Pacific coastal plain of South America. PMID:25527601

  7. Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera:Liviidae) abundance in Puerto Rico declines with elevation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diaphorina citri is the primary vector of Hunglongbing disease, the most devastating disease of citrus. Diaphorina citri populations in Puerto Rico were monitored with yellow sticky traps on citrus trees at different elevations, ranging from 10 to 880 m above sea level. Trapping was conducted in Mar...

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of a Putative Densovirus of the Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri

    PubMed Central

    Nigg, Jared C.; Nouri, Shahideh

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of a putative densovirus of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri. Diaphorina citri densovirus (DcDNV) was originally identified through metagenomics, and here, we obtained the complete nucleotide sequence using PCR-based approaches. Phylogenetic analysis places DcDNV between viruses of the Ambidensovirus and Iteradensovirus genera. PMID:27469948

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of a Putative Densovirus of the Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri.

    PubMed

    Nigg, Jared C; Nouri, Shahideh; Falk, Bryce W

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of a putative densovirus of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Diaphorina citri densovirus (DcDNV) was originally identified through metagenomics, and here, we obtained the complete nucleotide sequence using PCR-based approaches. Phylogenetic analysis places DcDNV between viruses of the Ambidensovirus and Iteradensovirus genera. PMID:27469948

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Diaphorina citri-associated C virus, a Novel Putative RNA Virus of the Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Shahideh; Salem, Nidà; Falk, Bryce W

    2016-01-01

    We present here the complete nucleotide sequence and genome organization of a novel putative RNA virus identified in field populations of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, through sequencing of the transcriptome followed by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). We tentatively named this virus Diaphorina citri-associated C virus (DcACV). DcACV is an unclassified positive-sense RNA virus. PMID:27445370

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Diaphorina citri-associated C virus, a Novel Putative RNA Virus of the Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Shahideh; Salem, Nidà

    2016-01-01

    We present here the complete nucleotide sequence and genome organization of a novel putative RNA virus identified in field populations of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, through sequencing of the transcriptome followed by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). We tentatively named this virus Diaphorina citri-associated C virus (DcACV). DcACV is an unclassified positive-sense RNA virus. PMID:27445370

  12. Inter-Population Variability of Endosymbiont Densities in the Asian Citrus Psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama).

    PubMed

    Chu, Chia-Ching; Gill, Torrence A; Hoffmann, Mark; Pelz-Stelinski, Kirsten S

    2016-05-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama) is an insect pest capable of transmitting Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), the causal agent of citrus greening in North America. D. citri also harbors three endosymbionts, Wolbachia, Candidatus Carsonella ruddii, and Candidatus Profftella armatura, which may influence D. citri physiology and fitness. Although genomic researches on these bacteria have been conducted, much remains unclear regarding their ecology and inter-population variability in D. citri. The present work examined the densities of each endosymbiont in adult D. citri sampled from different populations using quantitative PCR. Under field conditions, the densities of all three endosymbionts positively correlated with each other, and they are associated with D. citri gender and locality. In addition, the infection density of CLas also varied across populations. Although an analysis pooling D. citri from different populations showed that CLas-infected individuals tended to have lower endosymbiont densities compared to uninfected individuals, the difference was not significant when the population was included as a factor in the analysis, suggesting that other population-specific factors may have stronger effects on endosymbiont densities. To determine whether there is a genetic basis to the density differences, endosymbiont densities between aged CLas-negative females of two D. citri populations reared under standardized laboratory conditions were compared. Results suggested that inter-population variability in Wolbachia infection density is associated with the genotypes of the endosymbiont or the host. Findings from this work could facilitate understanding of D. citri-bacterial associations that may benefit the development of approaches for managing citrus greening, such as prevention of CLas transmission. PMID:26846216

  13. Young citrus leaves decrease dispersal distance of Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To manage citrus Huanglongbing, understanding factors that affect dispersal behavior of Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae), is required to answer questions related to disease epidemiology and to improve management tactics. Currently, little is known about cues medi...

  14. Daily timing of and age at mating in Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The psyllid Diaphorina citri Kuwayama vectors a bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, in Florida which is responsible for citrus greening disease (huanglongbing), one of the most serious diseases of citrus. Despite the great economic importance of D. citri to citrus production, little is kno...

  15. Multimodal cues drive host-plant assessment in Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) transmits the causal agent of Huanglongbing, a devastating disease of citrus trees. In this study, we measured behavioral responses of D. citri to combinations of visual, olfactory, and gustatory stimuli in test arenas. Stimuli were presented to the psyllids ...

  16. Insecticidal suppression of Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae) vector of huanglongbing pathogens.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Jawwad A; Kostyk, Barry C; Stansly, Philip A

    2014-01-01

    Diaphorina citri vectors pathogens that cause 'huanglongbing' or citrus greening disease which poses a serious threat to citrus production worldwide. Vector suppression is critical to reduce disease spread. Efficacy is a main concern when choosing an insecticide. Insecticidal treatments of 49 products or 44 active ingredients (a.i) labeled or experimental were field tested between 2005-2013 as foliar sprays (250 treatments, 39 a.i) or soil applications (47 treatments, 9 a.i) to control D. citri in citrus. A combined effect of nymphal and adult suppression in response to sprays of 23 insecticides representing 9 modes of action (MoA) groups and 3 unknown MoA provided more than 90% reduction of adult D. citri over 24-68 days. Observable effects on nymphs were generally of shorter duration due to rapid maturation of flush. However, reduction of 76-100% nymphs or adults over 99-296 days was seen on young trees receiving drenches of the neonicotinoids imidacloprid, thiamethoxam or clothianidin (MoA 4A) and a novel anthranilic diamide, cyantraniliprole (MoA 28). Effective products identified for foliar sprays to control D. citri provide sufficient MoA groups for rotation to delay evolution of insecticide resistance by D. citri and other pests. However, cyantraniliprole is now the only available alternative for rotation with neonicotinoids in soil application to young trees. Sprays of up to eight of the most effective insecticides could be rotated over a year without repetition of any MoA and little or no recourse to neonicotinoids or cyantraniliprole, so important for protection of young trees. Other considerations effecting decisions of what and when to spray include prevalence of huanglongbing, pest pressure, pre-harvest intervals, overall budget, equipment availability, and conservation of beneficial arthropods. Examples of spray programs utilizing broad-spectrum and relatively selective insecticides are provided to improve vector management and may vary depending on

  17. The Influence of Learning on Host Plant Preference in a Significant Phytopathogen Vector, Diaphorina citri

    PubMed Central

    Stockton, Dara G.; Martini, Xavier; Patt, Joseph M.; Stelinski, Lukasz L.

    2016-01-01

    Although specialist herbivorous insects are guided by innate responses to host plant cues, host plant preference may be influenced by experience and is not dictated by instinct alone. The effect of learning on host plant preference was examined in the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri; vector of the causal agent of citrus greening disease or huanglongbing. We investigated: a) whether development on specific host plant species influenced host plant preference in mature D. citri; and b) the extent of associative learning in D. citri in the form of simple and compound conditioning. Learning was measured by cue selection in a 2-choice behavioral assay and compared to naïve controls. Our results showed that learned responses in D. citri are complex and diverse. The developmental host plant species influenced adult host plant preference, with female psyllids preferring the species on which they were reared. However, such preferences were subject to change with the introduction of an alternative host plant within 24–48 hrs, indicating a large degree of experience-dependent response plasticity. Additionally, learning occurred for multiple sensory modalities where novel olfactory and visual environmental cues were associated with the host plant. However, males and females displayed differing discriminatory abilities. In compound conditioning tasks, males exhibited recognition of a compound stimulus alone while females were capable of learning the individual components. These findings suggest D. citri are dynamic animals that demonstrate host plant preference based on developmental and adult experience and can learn to recognize olfactory and visual host plant stimuli in ways that may be sex specific. These experience-based associations are likely used by adults to locate and select suitable host plants for feeding and reproduction and may suggest the need for more tailored lures and traps, which reflect region-specific cultivars or predominate Rutaceae in the area

  18. The Influence of Learning on Host Plant Preference in a Significant Phytopathogen Vector, Diaphorina citri.

    PubMed

    Stockton, Dara G; Martini, Xavier; Patt, Joseph M; Stelinski, Lukasz L

    2016-01-01

    Although specialist herbivorous insects are guided by innate responses to host plant cues, host plant preference may be influenced by experience and is not dictated by instinct alone. The effect of learning on host plant preference was examined in the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri; vector of the causal agent of citrus greening disease or huanglongbing. We investigated: a) whether development on specific host plant species influenced host plant preference in mature D. citri; and b) the extent of associative learning in D. citri in the form of simple and compound conditioning. Learning was measured by cue selection in a 2-choice behavioral assay and compared to naïve controls. Our results showed that learned responses in D. citri are complex and diverse. The developmental host plant species influenced adult host plant preference, with female psyllids preferring the species on which they were reared. However, such preferences were subject to change with the introduction of an alternative host plant within 24-48 hrs, indicating a large degree of experience-dependent response plasticity. Additionally, learning occurred for multiple sensory modalities where novel olfactory and visual environmental cues were associated with the host plant. However, males and females displayed differing discriminatory abilities. In compound conditioning tasks, males exhibited recognition of a compound stimulus alone while females were capable of learning the individual components. These findings suggest D. citri are dynamic animals that demonstrate host plant preference based on developmental and adult experience and can learn to recognize olfactory and visual host plant stimuli in ways that may be sex specific. These experience-based associations are likely used by adults to locate and select suitable host plants for feeding and reproduction and may suggest the need for more tailored lures and traps, which reflect region-specific cultivars or predominate Rutaceae in the area

  19. Coccinellid predators do not track populations of the Asian citrus phyllid (Diaphorina citri) in citrus in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yellow sticky cards were used to survey populations of Diaphorina citri, the vector of Huanglongbing, the most devastating bacterial disease of citrus worldwide. The numbers of coccinellids, potential predators of Diaphorina citri, were also surveyed. Citrus surveyed included a variety of species (V...

  20. Survey of endosymbionts in the Diaphorina citri metegenome and assembly of a Wolbachia wDi draft genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diaphorina citri, the Asian citrus psyllid,(Hemiptera) is the insect vector of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, the presumed cause of citrus greening disease, known as huanglongbing. Sequencing of the Diaphorina citri metagenome has been initiated to gain better understanding of the biology of D. ...

  1. Cloning and expressing a highly functional and substrate specific farnesoic acid o-methyltransferase from the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, transmits a phloem-limited bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus that causes citrus greening disease. Because juvenile hormone (JH) plays an important role in adult and nymphal development, we studied the final steps in juvenile hormone biosynthesis...

  2. Biology of the Huanglongbing vector Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae) on different host plants.

    PubMed

    Alves, G R; Diniz, A J F; Parra, J R P

    2014-04-01

    Although many studies have been conducted on the development and reproductive potential of Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, 1908 (Hemiptera: Liviidae) in different host species, few have evaluated these parameters on different varieties of the same host species. This study evaluated the influence of five commercial varieties of citrus (Citrus spp. L.)--Hamlin, Natal, Pêra, Ponkan, and Valencia-and orange jasmine [Murraya exotica (L.) Jack] on the development of D. citri. Survival rates for the egg stage were highest on orange jasmine (85.7%) and on Valencia (83.3%). The lowest viability of the nymphal stage was also observed on Hamlin, averaging 57.4%. Values for total viability ranged from 65.9 to 32.6%, and were highest on Valencia. The longest egg-adult development time was on Natal, with a mean of 18.4 d; the shortest total development time was on orange jasmine, with a mean of 17.3 d. Based on the fertility life table, the net reproductive rate (Ro) of D. citri was 2.5 times higher when reared on Valencia than on Hamlin. The other parameters (duration of each generation [T], finite rate of increase [lambda], and innate capacity to increase in number [r(m)]) also demonstrated that Valencia is best suited to this insect. The results obtained for the biological parameters and the fertility life table indicate that Valencia and orange jasmine were the most suitable hosts, whereas Hamlin was least suitable for the development of D. citri. These results provide information for the installation of new citrus groves, especially in the choice of varieties to be planted and the location of different varieties within the groves, with a view toward the management of Huanglongbing or HLB. PMID:24772551

  3. Detection and characterization of a novel reovirus in the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We successfully used a genomics approach to discover viral pathogens in the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae). These psyllids are vectors of the devastating disease, Huanglongbing, now affecting citrus in the USA, and world wide. Discovery of viral pathogens of psyllids m...

  4. Host-choice behavior of Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) under laboratory conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, is the vector of huanglongbing (HLB), considered to be the most devastating disease of citrus worldwide. Knowledge of the ACP’s host-plant finding behavior aids in our understanding of the epidemiology of HLB and in designing experiments to ...

  5. Effect of plant barriers and citrus leaf age on dispersal of Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Studies designed to measure dispersal capacity of Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae) are needed to provide epidemiological knowledge necessary to improve management of citrus Huanglongbing. In the present study, a mark-release-recapture technique was used to investigate whet...

  6. Chemical and behavioral analysis of the cuticular hydrocarbons from Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is the most destructive disease of citrus worldwide. Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), is the vector of the phloem-inhabiting bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, which is presumed to cause HLB. Laboratory and field studies were cond...

  7. Behavioral evidence for a female-produced sex attractant in Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) is an important world-wide pest of citrus. It vectors three phloem-restricted bacteria in the genus Candidatus Liberibacter that cause huanglongbing (citrus greening disease). Studies were conducted to examine the behavioral responses of male and fema...

  8. Midgut gene expression in Asian citrus psyllid (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) Diaphorina citri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We produced a gene expression dataset from the midgut tissues of the Asian citrus psyllid (AsCP), Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae). The AsCP is the primary vector of the bacterium associated with a devastating citrus disease known as huanglongbing (HLB). The occurrence and spread of the AsCP ...

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" from Diaphorina citri in Guangdong, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, F; Zheng, Z; Deng, X; Cen, Y; Liang, G; Chen, J

    2015-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" strain YCPsy from an Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) in Guangdong, China, is reported here. The YCPsy strain has a genome size of 1,233,647 bp, 36.5% G+C content, 1,171 open reading frames (ORFs), and 53 RNAs. PMID:26543132

  10. Internal extracellular bacteria of Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), the Asian citus psyllid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Internal bacteria were isolated and cultured from the Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae), the insect which transmits the plant-infecting bacteria, Candidatus Liberibacter, known to infect and kill citrus trees, known as citrus greening disease. The bacteria from Di...

  11. Draft genome sequence of “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” from Diaphorina citri in Guangdong, China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The draft genome sequence of “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” strain YCPsy from an Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) in Guangdong of China is reported. The YCPsy strain has a genome size of 1,233,647 bp, 36.5% G+C content, 1,171 open reading frames (ORFs), and 53 RNAs....

  12. Repellency of Selected Psidium guajava cultivars to the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Asiatic huanglongbing (HLB)(also known as citrus greening disease) is the most devastating disease of citrus worldwide. It is caused by a bacterium ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ and transmitted by the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri. Considerable research has been conducted toward...

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” from Diaphorina citri in Guangdong, China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, F.; Zheng, Z.; Cen, Y.; Liang, G.

    2015-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” strain YCPsy from an Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) in Guangdong, China, is reported here. The YCPsy strain has a genome size of 1,233,647 bp, 36.5% G+C content, 1,171 open reading frames (ORFs), and 53 RNAs. PMID:26543132

  14. Correlation of an electrical penetration graph waveform with walking by Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electrical penetration graph (EPG) monitoring is being used to study how feeding behavior of the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama) changes in response to insecticides, in an effort to improve the efficacy of widespread insecticide treatments against the insect in Florida citrus....

  15. Gender differences and effect of photophase on Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama) feeding behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), thought to be primarily a phloem-feeding insect, transmits the presumptive pathogen for Huanglongbing, ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’. Because this bacterium is restricted to the phloem and bacterial transmission is the res...

  16. Gene expression in midgut tissues of Diaphorina citri: Application to biology and vector control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We produced a gene expression dataset from the midgut tissues of the Asian citrus psyllid (AsCP), Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae). The AsCP is the primary vector associated with the spread of a devastating citrus trees disease, huanglongbing (HLB). The occurrence and spread of the AsCP and H...

  17. Responses of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) to conspecific vibrational signals and synthetic mimics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mate-seeking in Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, a vector of the economically damaging huanglongbing citrus disease, typically includes male-female duetting behaviors. First, the male calls by beating its wings at ca. 170-250 Hz, producing vibrations that are transmitted along the host tree branches to th...

  18. Dispersion patterns and sampling plans for Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) in citrus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The abundance and spatial dispersion of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, were studied in thirty-four grapefruit (Citrus × paradisi) and six sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) orchards from March to August 2006 when the pest is more abundant in southern Texas. Although flush shoot inf...

  19. An improved method of DNA extraction from Diaphorina citri for HLB detection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a devastating disease of citrus that is transmitted by two citrus psyllids. Diaphorina citri transmits Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) and Ca. L. americanus (Lam), and Trioza erytreae transmits Ca. L. africanus (Laf). Ca. Liberibacter species can be detected in DNA ex...

  20. The influence of learning on host plant preference in a significant phytopathogen vector, Diaphorina citri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although specialist herbivorous insects are guided by innate responses to host plant cues, host plant preference may be influenced by experience and is not dictated by instinct alone. The effect of learning on host plant preference was examined in the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, vector ...

  1. Importance of multiple mating to female reproductive output in Diaphorina citri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluate the importance of multiple mating to female reproductive output in Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) by grouping individual females with one or three males for 24 h (short duration) or two weeks (long duration) and examining oviposition over 18-19 days. For the short durat...

  2. Flight activity of Diaphorina citri in and around a citrus grove

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to assess flight activity by Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) in and around a Florida citrus grove. Yellow sticky card traps were deployed within citrus trees and on 3 meter poles scattered within the grove near trees and at various distanc...

  3. Recapture rate of diaphorina citri kuwayama (hemiptera: psyllidae) marked with fluorescent dust in dispersal studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge on the dispersal capacity of the insect vector Diaphorina citri Kuwayama is necessary to answer questions related to Huanglongbing epidemiology and improve current management strategies for the disease. The objectives of this field study were to determine the recapture rate and distance o...

  4. Antifeedant and lethal effects of the fungi Isaria fumosorosea on the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An insect-infecting fungal pathogen increases mortality of Asian citrus psyllids (Diaphorina citri,Hemiptera:Psyllidae). The entomopathogenic fungi(Isaria fumosorosea [Ifr])sold as the product PFR 97™ was shown to be effective at killing and reducing feeding of the Asian citrus psyllid. The psyllid ...

  5. Differences in Stylet Sheath Occurrence and the Fibrous Ring (Sclerenchyma) between xCitroncirus Plants Relatively Resistant or Susceptible to Adults of the Asian Citrus Psyllid Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae)

    PubMed Central

    Ammar, El-Desouky; Richardson, Matthew L.; Abdo, Zaid; Hall, David G.; Shatters, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP, Diaphorina citri, Hemiptera: Liviidae), is the principal vector of the phloem-limited bacteria strongly associated with huanglongbing (HLB), the world’s most serious disease of citrus. Host plant resistance may provide an environmentally safe and sustainable method of controlling ACP and/or HLB. Two xCitroncirus accessions (hybrids of Poncirus trifoliata and Citrus spp.), that are relatively resistant (UN-3881) or relatively susceptible (Troyer-1459) to ACP adults with regard to adult longevity, were compared in relation to ACP feeding behavior and some structural features of the leaf midrib. The settling (putative feeding/probing) sites of ACP adults on various parts of the leaf were not influenced primarily by plant accession. However, fewer ACP stylet sheaths were found in the midrib and fewer stylet sheath termini reached the vascular bundle (phloem and/or xylem) in UN-3881 compared to Troyer-1459 plants. Furthermore, in midribs of UN-3881 leaves the fibrous ring (sclerenchyma) around the phloem was significantly wider (thicker) compared to that in midribs of Troyer-1459 leaves. Our data indicate that feeding and/or probing by ACP adults into the vascular bundle is less frequent in the more resistant (UN-3881) than in the more susceptible (Troyer-1459) accessions. Our results also suggest that the thickness of the fibrous ring may be a barrier to stylet penetration into the vascular bundle, which is important for successful ACP feeding on the phloem and for transmitting HLB-associated bacteria. These results may help in the development of citrus plants resistant to ACP, which in turn could halt or slow the spread of the HLB-associated bacteria by this vector. PMID:25343712

  6. Differences in stylet sheath occurrence and the fibrous ring (sclerenchyma) between xCitroncirus plants relatively resistant or susceptible to adults of the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae).

    PubMed

    Ammar, El-Desouky; Richardson, Matthew L; Abdo, Zaid; Hall, David G; Shatters, Robert G

    2014-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP, Diaphorina citri, Hemiptera: Liviidae), is the principal vector of the phloem-limited bacteria strongly associated with huanglongbing (HLB), the world's most serious disease of citrus. Host plant resistance may provide an environmentally safe and sustainable method of controlling ACP and/or HLB. Two xCitroncirus accessions (hybrids of Poncirus trifoliata and Citrus spp.), that are relatively resistant (UN-3881) or relatively susceptible (Troyer-1459) to ACP adults with regard to adult longevity, were compared in relation to ACP feeding behavior and some structural features of the leaf midrib. The settling (putative feeding/probing) sites of ACP adults on various parts of the leaf were not influenced primarily by plant accession. However, fewer ACP stylet sheaths were found in the midrib and fewer stylet sheath termini reached the vascular bundle (phloem and/or xylem) in UN-3881 compared to Troyer-1459 plants. Furthermore, in midribs of UN-3881 leaves the fibrous ring (sclerenchyma) around the phloem was significantly wider (thicker) compared to that in midribs of Troyer-1459 leaves. Our data indicate that feeding and/or probing by ACP adults into the vascular bundle is less frequent in the more resistant (UN-3881) than in the more susceptible (Troyer-1459) accessions. Our results also suggest that the thickness of the fibrous ring may be a barrier to stylet penetration into the vascular bundle, which is important for successful ACP feeding on the phloem and for transmitting HLB-associated bacteria. These results may help in the development of citrus plants resistant to ACP, which in turn could halt or slow the spread of the HLB-associated bacteria by this vector. PMID:25343712

  7. Insecticidal Suppression of Asian Citrus Psyllid Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae) Vector of Huanglongbing Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Jawwad A.; Kostyk, Barry C.; Stansly, Philip A.

    2014-01-01

    Diaphorina citri vectors pathogens that cause ‘huanglongbing’ or citrus greening disease which poses a serious threat to citrus production worldwide. Vector suppression is critical to reduce disease spread. Efficacy is a main concern when choosing an insecticide. Insecticidal treatments of 49 products or 44 active ingredients (a.i) labeled or experimental were field tested between 2005–2013 as foliar sprays (250 treatments, 39 a.i) or soil applications (47 treatments, 9 a.i) to control D. citri in citrus. A combined effect of nymphal and adult suppression in response to sprays of 23 insecticides representing 9 modes of action (MoA) groups and 3 unknown MoA provided more than 90% reduction of adult D. citri over 24–68 days. Observable effects on nymphs were generally of shorter duration due to rapid maturation of flush. However, reduction of 76–100% nymphs or adults over 99–296 days was seen on young trees receiving drenches of the neonicotinoids imidacloprid, thiamethoxam or clothianidin (MoA 4A) and a novel anthranilic diamide, cyantraniliprole (MoA 28). Effective products identified for foliar sprays to control D. citri provide sufficient MoA groups for rotation to delay evolution of insecticide resistance by D. citri and other pests. However, cyantraniliprole is now the only available alternative for rotation with neonicotinoids in soil application to young trees. Sprays of up to eight of the most effective insecticides could be rotated over a year without repetition of any MoA and little or no recourse to neonicotinoids or cyantraniliprole, so important for protection of young trees. Other considerations effecting decisions of what and when to spray include prevalence of huanglongbing, pest pressure, pre-harvest intervals, overall budget, equipment availability, and conservation of beneficial arthropods. Examples of spray programs utilizing broad-spectrum and relatively selective insecticides are provided to improve vector management and may vary

  8. Endosymbiont hunting in the metagenome of Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) (7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Saha, Surya [Cornell University

    2013-02-12

    Surya Saha on "Endosymbiont hunting in the metagenome of Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri)" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  9. Endosymbiont hunting in the metagenome of Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) (7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Surya

    2012-06-01

    Surya Saha on "Endosymbiont hunting in the metagenome of Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri)" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  10. Better Together: Association With ‘Candidatus Liberibacter Asiaticus’ Increases the Reproductive Fitness of Its Insect Vector, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae)

    PubMed Central

    Pelz-Stelinski, K. S.; Killiny, N.

    2016-01-01

    The duration of the evolutionary association between a pathogen and vector can be inferred based on the strength of their mutualistic interactions. A well-adapted pathogen is likely to confer some benefit or, at a minimum, exhibit low pathogenicity toward its host vector. Coevolution of the two toward a mutually beneficial association appears to have occurred between the citrus greening disease pathogen, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las), and its insect vector, the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Kuwayama). To better understand the dynamics facilitating transmission, we evaluated the effects of Las infection on the fitness of its vector. Diaphorina citri harboring Las were more fecund than their uninfected counterparts; however, their nymphal development rate and adult survival were comparatively reduced. The finite rate of population increase and net reproductive rate were both greater among Las-infected D. citri as compared with uninfected counterparts, indicating that overall population fitness of infected psyllids was improved given the greater number of offspring produced. Previous reports of transovarial transmission, in conjunction with increased fecundity and population growth rates of Las-positive D. citri found in the current investigation, suggest a long evolutionary relationship between pathogen and vector. The survival of Las-infected adult D. citri was lower compared with uninfected D. citri, which suggests that there may be a fitness trade-off in response to Las infection. A beneficial effect of a plant pathogen on vector fitness may indicate that the pathogen developed a relationship with the insect before secondarily moving to plants. PMID:27418697

  11. Repellent Activity of Botanical Oils against Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae).

    PubMed

    Kuhns, Emily H; Martini, Xavier; Hoyte, Angel; Stelinski, Lukasz L

    2016-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, is the insect vector of the pathogen causing huanglongbing. We selected three botanical oils to evaluate behavioral activity against D. citri. In laboratory olfactometer assays, fir oil was repellent to D. citri females, while litsea and citronella oils elicited no response from D. citri females. In choice settling experiments, D. citri settled almost completely on control plants rather than on plants treated with fir oil at a 9.5 mg/day release rate. Therefore, we conducted field trials to determine if fir oil reduced D. citri densities in citrus groves. We found no repellency of D. citri from sweet orange resets that were treated with fir oil dispensers releasing 10.4 g/day/tree as compared with control plots. However, we found a two-week decrease in populations of D. citri as compared with controls when the deployment rate of these dispensers was doubled. Our results suggest that treatment of citrus with fir oil may have limited activity as a stand-alone management tool for D. citri and would require integration with other management practices. PMID:27429006

  12. Incidence of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) and its parasitoid Tamarixia radiata (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) in Florida citrus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, vectors the bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, one of the causal organisms of the devastating citrus disease “huanglongbing” or citrus greening. In the United States, D. citri was first discovered in Florida, in 1998. Tamarixia radiata Waterston, was imported fro...

  13. Effects of a particle film on biology and behavior of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) and its infestations in citrus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies were conducted to investigate the effects of a kaolin-based hydrophilic particle film, Surround WP, on the biology and behavior of the psyllid Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, and to assess population densities of D. citri in citrus subjected to monthly applications of Surround WP. Laboratory inve...

  14. Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae) responses to microcontroller-buzzer communication signals of potential use in vibration traps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monitoring of Diaphorina citri Kuwayama populations is an important component of efforts to reduce damage caused by huanglongbing, a devastating disease it vectors in citrus groves. Currently, D. citri is monitored primarily by unbaited sticky traps or visual inspection of trees. A potentially more ...

  15. Botanicals, selective insecticides, and predators to control Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae) in citrus orchards.

    PubMed

    Khan, Azhar A; Afzal, Muhammad; Qureshi, Jawwad A; Khan, Arif M; Raza, Abubakar M

    2014-12-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) Diaphorina citri Kuwayama vectors pathogens that cause huanglongbing (HLB) or citrus greening devastating and economically important disease present in most citrus growing regions. Young citrus shoots are required for psyllid reproduction and development. During winter citrus trees produce little or no new growth. Overwintering adults reproduce in spring on newly emerging shoots also attractive to other pests and beneficial insects. Botanicals and relatively selective insecticides could help to conserve beneficial insects and reduce pest resistance to insecticides. Sprays of Azadirachtin (Neem), Tropane (Datura), Spirotetramat, Spinetoram, and broad-spectrum Imidacloprid were evaluated to control ACP in spring and summer on 10-year-old "Kinow" Citrus reticulata Blanco trees producing new growth. Psyllid populations were high averaging 5-9 nymphs or adults per sample before treatment application. Nymphs or adults were significantly reduced to 0.5-1.5 per sample in all treatments for 3 weeks, average 61%-83% reduction. No significant reduction in ladybeetles Adalia bipunctata, Aneglei scardoni, Cheilomenes sexmaculata, and Coccinella septempunctata was observed. Syrphids, spiders and green lacewings were reduced in treated trees except with Tropane. Studies are warranted to assess impact of these predators on ACP and interaction with insecticides. Observed reduction in ACP populations may not be enough considering its reproductive potential and role in the spread of HLB. Follow-up sprays may be required to achieve additional suppression using rotations of different insecticides. PMID:25205398

  16. Whole-Genome Sequence of “Candidatus Profftella armatura” from Diaphorina citri in Guangdong, China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, F.; Deng, X.; Huang, J.; Cen, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The genome of “Candidatus Profftella armatura” strain YCPA from Diaphorina citri in Guangdong, China, was sequenced. The strain has a chromosome of 457,565 bp, 24.3% G+C content, 364 predicted open reading frames (ORFs), and 38 RNAs, and a plasmid, pYCPA54, of 5,458 bp with 23.9% G+C content and 5 ORFs. PMID:26543117

  17. Whole-Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Profftella armatura" from Diaphorina citri in Guangdong, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, F; Deng, X; Liang, G; Huang, J; Cen, Y; Chen, J

    2015-01-01

    The genome of "Candidatus Profftella armatura" strain YCPA from Diaphorina citri in Guangdong, China, was sequenced. The strain has a chromosome of 457,565 bp, 24.3% G+C content, 364 predicted open reading frames (ORFs), and 38 RNAs, and a plasmid, pYCPA54, of 5,458 bp with 23.9% G+C content and 5 ORFs. PMID:26543117

  18. Temporal progression of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' infection in citrus and acquisition efficiency by Diaphorina citri.

    PubMed

    Coletta-Filho, Helvecio D; Daugherty, Matthew P; Ferreira, Cléderson; Lopes, João R S

    2014-04-01

    Over the last decade, the plant disease huanglongbing (HLB) has emerged as a primary threat to citrus production worldwide. HLB is associated with infection by phloem-limited bacteria ('Candidatus Liberibacter' spp.) that are transmitted by the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri. Transmission efficiency varies with vector-related aspects (e.g., developmental stage and feeding periods) but there is no information on the effects of host-pathogen interactions. Here, acquisition efficiency of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' by D. citri was evaluated in relation to temporal progression of infection and pathogen titer in citrus. We graft inoculated sweet orange trees with 'Ca. L. asiaticus'; then, at different times after inoculation, we inspected plants for HLB symptoms, measured bacterial infection levels (i.e., titer or concentration) in plants, and measured acquisition by psyllid adults that were confined on the trees. Plant infection levels increased rapidly over time, saturating at uniformly high levels (≈10(8) copy number of 16S ribosomal DNA/g of plant tissue) near 200 days after inoculation-the same time at which all infected trees first showed disease symptoms. Pathogen acquisition by vectors was positively associated with plant infection level and time since inoculation, with acquisition occurring as early as the first measurement, at 60 days after inoculation. These results suggest that there is ample potential for psyllids to acquire the pathogen from trees during the asymptomatic phase of infection. If so, this could limit the effectiveness of tree rouging as a disease management tool and would likely explain the rapid spread observed for this disease in the field. PMID:24620723

  19. Resistance of Citrus and Related Genera to Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae).

    PubMed

    Borgoni, P C; Vendramim, J D; Lourencão, A L; Machado, M A

    2014-10-01

    The present study was developed to evaluate the resistance of the following genotypes of Citrus and related genera to this pest: 'Pera,' 'Natal', and 'Washington Navel' oranges (Citrus sinensis), 'Marsh Seedless' grapefruit (Citrus paradisi), hardy orange 'Rubidoux' (Poncirus trifoliata), kumquat (Fortunella margarita Swingle), citrumelo 'Swingle' (C. paradisi x P. trifoliata), and citrange 'Troyer' (P. trifoliata x C. sinensis). The experiments were performed in greenhouses with plants grafted onto 'Rangpur' lime (Citrus limonia) and placed individually in voile cages. The preference for oviposition in a no-choice test, and the effect of genotype were evaluated. The egg-adult cycle was monitored to determine the effect of genotype on the biology of the insect. Poncirus 'Rubidoux' was the least preferred genotype for oviposition; reduced number of eggs was also found to occur on citrange 'Troyer', and 'Marsh Seedless' was the genotype with the most eggs. No significant variation in the duration of the embryonic period was observed; however, a difference in the viability of eggs was found, with the lowest egg viabilities on 'Swingle.' Kumquat and 'Marsh Seedless' genotypes were correlated with increased durations of the nymphal phase, however, there was no difference in the survival of this phase. Fecundity of females on 'Troyer', 'Swingle', and kumquat was reduced. Considering all of the evaluated parameters, it was concluded that cultivars of sweet orange are the most susceptible genotypes to Diaphorina citri. Regarding oviposition, P. trifoliata 'Rubidoux' showed resistance of the antixenosis type. PMID:27193957

  20. Characterization of a Recombinant Cathepsin B-Like Cysteine Peptidase from Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae): A Putative Target for Control of Citrus Huanglongbing.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Taíse Fernanda da Silva; Schneider, Vanessa Karine; Kishi, Luciano Takeshi; Carmona, Adriana Karaoglanovic; Alves, Marcio Fernando Madureira; Belasque-Júnior, Jose; Rosa, José César; Hunter, Wayne Brian; Henrique-Silva, Flávio; Soares-Costa, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Huanglonbing (HLB) is one of the most destructive disease affecting citrus plants. The causal agent is associated with the phloem-limited bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) and the psyllid Diaphorina citri, vector of disease, that transmits the bacterium associated with HLB. The control of disease can be achieved by suppressing either the bacterium or the vector. Among the control strategies for HLB disease, one of the widely used consists in controlling the enzymes of the disease vector, Diaphorina citri. The insect Diaphorina citri belongs to the order Hemiptera, which frequently have cysteine peptidases in the gut. The importance of this class of enzymes led us to search for enzymes in the D. citri transcriptome for the establishment of alternatives strategies for HLB control. In this study, we reported the identification and characterization of a cathepsin B-like cysteine peptidase from D. citri (DCcathB). DCcathB was recombinantly expressed in Pichia pastoris, presenting a molecular mass of approximately 50 kDa. The enzyme hydrolyzed the fluorogenic substrate Z-F-R-AMC (Km = 23.5 μM) and the selective substrate for cathepsin B, Z-R-R-AMC (Km = 6.13 μM). The recombinant enzyme was inhibited by the cysteine protease inhibitors E64 (IC50 = 0.014 μM) and CaneCPI-4 (Ki = 0.05 nM) and by the selective cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074 (IC50 = 0.095 nM). RT-qPCR analysis revealed that the expression of the DCcathB in nymph and adult was approximately 9-fold greater than in egg. Moreover, the expression of this enzyme in the gut was 175-fold and 3333-fold higher than in the remaining tissues and in the head, respectively, suggesting that DCcathB can be a target for HLB control. PMID:26717484

  1. Characterization of a Recombinant Cathepsin B-Like Cysteine Peptidase from Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae): A Putative Target for Control of Citrus Huanglongbing

    PubMed Central

    Kishi, Luciano Takeshi; Carmona, Adriana Karaoglanovic; Alves, Marcio Fernando Madureira; Belasque-Júnior, Jose; Rosa, José César; Hunter, Wayne Brian; Henrique-Silva, Flávio; Soares-Costa, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Huanglonbing (HLB) is one of the most destructive disease affecting citrus plants. The causal agent is associated with the phloem-limited bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) and the psyllid Diaphorina citri, vector of disease, that transmits the bacterium associated with HLB. The control of disease can be achieved by suppressing either the bacterium or the vector. Among the control strategies for HLB disease, one of the widely used consists in controlling the enzymes of the disease vector, Diaphorina citri. The insect Diaphorina citri belongs to the order Hemiptera, which frequently have cysteine peptidases in the gut. The importance of this class of enzymes led us to search for enzymes in the D. citri transcriptome for the establishment of alternatives strategies for HLB control. In this study, we reported the identification and characterization of a cathepsin B-like cysteine peptidase from D. citri (DCcathB). DCcathB was recombinantly expressed in Pichia pastoris, presenting a molecular mass of approximately 50 kDa. The enzyme hydrolyzed the fluorogenic substrate Z-F-R-AMC (Km = 23.5 μM) and the selective substrate for cathepsin B, Z-R-R-AMC (Km = 6.13 μM). The recombinant enzyme was inhibited by the cysteine protease inhibitors E64 (IC50 = 0.014 μM) and CaneCPI-4 (Ki = 0.05 nM) and by the selective cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074 (IC50 = 0.095 nM). RT-qPCR analysis revealed that the expression of the DCcathB in nymph and adult was approximately 9-fold greater than in egg. Moreover, the expression of this enzyme in the gut was 175-fold and 3333-fold higher than in the remaining tissues and in the head, respectively, suggesting that DCcathB can be a target for HLB control. PMID:26717484

  2. Citrus tristeza virus-based RNAi in citrus plants induces gene silencing in Diaphorina citri, a phloem-sap sucking insect vector of citrus greening disease (Huanglongbing).

    PubMed

    Hajeri, Subhas; Killiny, Nabil; El-Mohtar, Choaa; Dawson, William O; Gowda, Siddarame

    2014-04-20

    A transient expression vector based on Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is unusually stable. Because of its stability it is being considered for use in the field to control Huanglongbing (HLB), which is caused by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) and vectored by Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri. In the absence of effective control strategies for CLas, emphasis has been on control of D. citri. Coincident cohabitation in phloem tissue by CLas, D. citri and CTV was exploited to develop a novel method to mitigate HLB through RNA interference (RNAi). Since CTV has three RNA silencing suppressors, it was not known if CTV-based vector could induce RNAi in citrus. Yet, expression of sequences targeting citrus phytoene desaturase gene by CTV-RNAi resulted in photo-bleaching phenotype. CTV-RNAi vector, engineered with truncated abnormal wing disc (Awd) gene of D. citri, induced altered Awd expression when silencing triggers ingested by feeding D. citri nymphs. Decreased Awd in nymphs resulted in malformed-wing phenotype in adults and increased adult mortality. This impaired ability of D. citri to fly would potentially limit the successful vectoring of CLas bacteria between citrus trees in the grove. CTV-RNAi vector would be relevant for fast-track screening of candidate sequences for RNAi-mediated pest control. PMID:24572372

  3. Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae) Vector Competence for the Citrus Greening Pathogen 'Candidatus Liberibacter Asiaticus'.

    PubMed

    Tabachnick, Walter J

    2015-06-01

    Characterizing the vector competence of Diaphorina citri Kuwayama for 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus,' the pathogen causing citrus greening, is essential for understanding the epidemiology of this disease that is threatening the U.S. citrus industry. Vector competence studies have been difficult because of the biology of D. citri, the inability to culture the pathogen, and the available diagnostic methods used to detect the bacteria in plant and insect tissues. The methods employed in many studies of D. citri vector competence may have overestimated amounts of live 'Ca. L. asiaticus' in both plant and insect tissues, and it is possible that the amounts of phloem ingested by psyllids may not contain sufficient detectable pathogen using current diagnostic methods. As a result of the difficulty in characterizing D. citri vector competence, the several daunting challenges for providing D. citri that are unable to inoculate 'Ca. L. asiaticus', as a novel method to control greening are discussed. Suggestions to overcome some of these challenges are provided. PMID:26470202

  4. Chemical and behavioral analysis of the cuticular hydrocarbons from Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri.

    PubMed

    Mann, Rajinder S; Rouseff, Russell L; Smoot, Jack; Rao, Nandikeswara; Meyer, Wendy L; Lapointe, Stephen L; Robbins, Paul S; Cha, Dong; Linn, Charles E; Webster, Francis X; Tiwari, Siddharth; Stelinski, Lukasz L

    2013-06-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is the most destructive disease of citrus worldwide. The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), is the vector of the phloem-inhabiting bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, which is presumed to cause HLB in Florida citrus. Laboratory and field studies were conducted to examine the behavioral responses of male and female D. citri to their cuticular extracts. In olfactometer assays, more male D. citri were attracted to one, five, or 10 female cuticular extract equivalent units than blank controls. The results were confirmed in field studies in which clear or yellow traps baited with 10 female cuticular extract equivalent units attracted proportionately more males than clear traps baited with male cuticular extract or unbaited traps. Analyses of cuticular constituents of male and female D. citri revealed differences between the sexes in chemical composition of their cuticular extracts. Laboratory bioassays with synthetic chemicals identified from cuticular extracts indicated that dodecanoic acid attracted more males than clean air. Traps baited with dodecanoic acid did not increase total catch of D. citri as compared with blank traps at the dosages tested; however, the sex ratio of psyllid catch was male biased on traps baited with the highest lure loading dosage tested (10.0 mg). PMID:23955888

  5. Double-Stranded RNA Uptake through Topical Application, Mediates Silencing of Five CYP4 Genes and Suppresses Insecticide Resistance in Diaphorina citri

    PubMed Central

    Killiny, Nabil; Hajeri, Subhas; Tiwari, Siddharth; Gowda, Siddarame; Stelinski, Lukasz L.

    2014-01-01

    Silencing of genes through RNA interference (RNAi) in insects has gained momentum during the past few years. RNAi has been used to cause insect mortality, inhibit insect growth, increase insecticide susceptibility, and prevent the development of insecticide resistance. We investigated the efficacy of topically applied dsRNA to induce RNAi for five Cytochrome P450 genes family 4 (CYP4) in Diaphorina citri. We previously reported that these CYP4 genes are associated with the development of insecticide resistance in D. citri. We targeted five CYP4 genes that share a consensus sequence with one dsRNA construct. Quantitative PCR confirmed suppressed expression of the five CYP4 genes as a result of dsRNA topically applied to the thoracic region of D. citri when compared to the expression levels in a control group. Western blot analysis indicated a reduced signal of cytochrome P450 proteins (45 kDa) in adult D. citri treated with the dsRNA. In addition, oxidase activity and insecticide resistance were reduced for D. citri treated with dsRNA that targeted specific CYP4 genes. Mortality was significantly higher in adults treated with dsRNA than in adults treated with water. Our results indicate that topically applied dsRNA can penetrate the cuticle of D. citri and induce RNAi. These results broaden the scope of RNAi as a mechanism to manage pests by targeting a broad range of genes. The results also support the application of RNAi as a viable tool to overcome insecticide resistance development in D. citri populations. However, further research is needed to develop grower-friendly delivery systems for the application of dsRNA under field conditions. Considering the high specificity of dsRNA, this tool can also be used for management of D. citri by targeting physiologically critical genes involved in growth and development. PMID:25330026

  6. Double-stranded RNA uptake through topical application, mediates silencing of five CYP4 genes and suppresses insecticide resistance in Diaphorina citri.

    PubMed

    Killiny, Nabil; Hajeri, Subhas; Tiwari, Siddharth; Gowda, Siddarame; Stelinski, Lukasz L

    2014-01-01

    Silencing of genes through RNA interference (RNAi) in insects has gained momentum during the past few years. RNAi has been used to cause insect mortality, inhibit insect growth, increase insecticide susceptibility, and prevent the development of insecticide resistance. We investigated the efficacy of topically applied dsRNA to induce RNAi for five Cytochrome P450 genes family 4 (CYP4) in Diaphorina citri. We previously reported that these CYP4 genes are associated with the development of insecticide resistance in D. citri. We targeted five CYP4 genes that share a consensus sequence with one dsRNA construct. Quantitative PCR confirmed suppressed expression of the five CYP4 genes as a result of dsRNA topically applied to the thoracic region of D. citri when compared to the expression levels in a control group. Western blot analysis indicated a reduced signal of cytochrome P450 proteins (45 kDa) in adult D. citri treated with the dsRNA. In addition, oxidase activity and insecticide resistance were reduced for D. citri treated with dsRNA that targeted specific CYP4 genes. Mortality was significantly higher in adults treated with dsRNA than in adults treated with water. Our results indicate that topically applied dsRNA can penetrate the cuticle of D. citri and induce RNAi. These results broaden the scope of RNAi as a mechanism to manage pests by targeting a broad range of genes. The results also support the application of RNAi as a viable tool to overcome insecticide resistance development in D. citri populations. However, further research is needed to develop grower-friendly delivery systems for the application of dsRNA under field conditions. Considering the high specificity of dsRNA, this tool can also be used for management of D. citri by targeting physiologically critical genes involved in growth and development. PMID:25330026

  7. Antennal and Abdominal Transcriptomes Reveal Chemosensory Genes in the Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhongzhen; Zhang, He; Bin, Shuying; Chen, Lei; Han, Qunxin; Lin, Jintian

    2016-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri is the principal vector of the highly destructive citrus disease called Huanglongbing (HLB) or citrus greening, which is a major threat to citrus cultivation worldwide. More effective pest control strategies against this pest entail the identification of potential chemosensory proteins that could be used in the development of attractants or repellents. However, the molecular basis of olfaction in the Asian citrus psyllid is not completely understood. Therefore, we performed this study to analyze the antennal and abdominal transcriptome of the Asian citrus psyllid. We identified a large number of transcripts belonging to nine chemoreception-related gene families and compared their expression in male and female adult antennae and terminal abdomen. In total, 9 odorant binding proteins (OBPs), 12 chemosensory proteins (CSPs), 46 odorant receptors (ORs), 20 gustatory receptors (GRs), 35 ionotropic receptors (IRs), 4 sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs) and 4 different gene families encoding odorant-degrading enzymes (ODEs): 80 cytochrome P450s (CYPs), 12 esterase (ESTs), and 5 aldehyde dehydrogenases (ADE) were annotated in the D. citri antennal and abdominal transcriptomes. Our results revealed that a large proportion of chemosensory genes exhibited no distinct differences in their expression patterns in the antennae and terminal abdominal tissues. Notably, RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data and quantitative real time-PCR (qPCR) analyses showed that 4 DictOBPs, 4 DictCSPs, 4 DictIRs, 1 DictSNMP, and 2 DictCYPs were upregulated in the antennae relative to that in terminal abdominal tissues. Furthermore, 2 DictOBPs (DictOBP8 and DictOBP9), 2 DictCSPs (DictOBP8 and DictOBP12), 4 DictIRs (DictIR3, DictIR6, DictIR10, and DictIR35), and 1 DictCYP (DictCYP57) were expressed at higher levels in the male antennae than in the female antennae. Our study provides the first insights into the molecular basis of chemoreception in this insect

  8. Antennal and Abdominal Transcriptomes Reveal Chemosensory Genes in the Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhongzhen; Zhang, He; Bin, Shuying; Chen, Lei; Han, Qunxin; Lin, Jintian

    2016-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri is the principal vector of the highly destructive citrus disease called Huanglongbing (HLB) or citrus greening, which is a major threat to citrus cultivation worldwide. More effective pest control strategies against this pest entail the identification of potential chemosensory proteins that could be used in the development of attractants or repellents. However, the molecular basis of olfaction in the Asian citrus psyllid is not completely understood. Therefore, we performed this study to analyze the antennal and abdominal transcriptome of the Asian citrus psyllid. We identified a large number of transcripts belonging to nine chemoreception-related gene families and compared their expression in male and female adult antennae and terminal abdomen. In total, 9 odorant binding proteins (OBPs), 12 chemosensory proteins (CSPs), 46 odorant receptors (ORs), 20 gustatory receptors (GRs), 35 ionotropic receptors (IRs), 4 sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs) and 4 different gene families encoding odorant-degrading enzymes (ODEs): 80 cytochrome P450s (CYPs), 12 esterase (ESTs), and 5 aldehyde dehydrogenases (ADE) were annotated in the D. citri antennal and abdominal transcriptomes. Our results revealed that a large proportion of chemosensory genes exhibited no distinct differences in their expression patterns in the antennae and terminal abdominal tissues. Notably, RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data and quantitative real time-PCR (qPCR) analyses showed that 4 DictOBPs, 4 DictCSPs, 4 DictIRs, 1 DictSNMP, and 2 DictCYPs were upregulated in the antennae relative to that in terminal abdominal tissues. Furthermore, 2 DictOBPs (DictOBP8 and DictOBP9), 2 DictCSPs (DictOBP8 and DictOBP12), 4 DictIRs (DictIR3, DictIR6, DictIR10, and DictIR35), and 1 DictCYP (DictCYP57) were expressed at higher levels in the male antennae than in the female antennae. Our study provides the first insights into the molecular basis of chemoreception in this insect

  9. Morphometric comparisons of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae) populations from Iran, USA and Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Lashkari, Mohammadreza; Hentz, Matthew G.

    2015-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae), vector of citrus greening disease pathogen, Huanglongbing (HLB), is considered the most serious pest of citrus in the world. Prior molecular based studies have hypothesized a link between the D. citri in Iran and the USA (Florida). The purpose of this study was to collect morphometric data from D. citri populations from Iran (mtCOI haplotype-1), Florida (mtCOI haplotype-1), and Pakistan (mtCOI haplotype-6), to determine whether different mtCOI haplotypes have a relationship to a specific morphometric variation. 240 samples from 6 ACP populations (Iran—Jiroft, Chabahar; Florida—Ft. Pierce, Palm Beach Gardens, Port St. Lucie; and Pakistan—Punjab) were collected for comparison. Measurements of 20 morphological characters were selected, measured and analysed using ANOVA and MANOVA. The results indicate differences among the 6 ACP populations (Wilks’ lambda = 0.0376, F = 7.29, P < 0.0001). The body length (BL), circumanal ring length (CL), antenna length (AL), forewing length (WL) and Rs vein length of forewing (RL) were the most important characters separating the populations. The cluster analysis showed that the Iran and Florida populations are distinct from each other but separate from the Pakistan population. Thus, three subgroups can be morphologically discriminated within D. citri species in this study, (1) Iran, (2) USA (Florida) and (3) Pakistan population. Morphometric comparisons provided further resolution to the mtCOI haplotypes and distinguished the Florida and Iranian populations. PMID:26038715

  10. The Genetic Structure of an Invasive Pest, the Asian Citrus Psyllid Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae)

    PubMed Central

    Guidolin, Aline S.; Fresia, Pablo; Cônsoli, Fernando L.

    2014-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri is currently the major threat to the citrus industry as it is the vector of Candidatus Liberibacter, the causal agent of huanglongbing disease (HLB). D. citri is native to Asia and now colonizes the Americas. Although it has been known in some countries for a long time, invasion routes remain undetermined. There are no efficient control methods for the HLB despite the intensive management tools currently in use. We investigated the genetic variability and structure of populations of D. citri to aid in the decision making processes toward sustainable management of this species/disease. We employed different methods to quantify and compare the genetic diversity and structure of D. citri populations among 36 localities in Brazil, using an almost complete sequence of the cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene. Our analyses led to the identification of two geographically and genetically structured groups. The indices of molecular diversity pointed to a recent population expansion, and we discuss the role of multiple invasion events in this scenario. We also argue that such genetic diversity and population structure may have implications for the best management strategies to be adopted for controlling this psyllid and/or the disease it vectors in Brazil. PMID:25545788

  11. The genetic structure of an invasive pest, the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae).

    PubMed

    Guidolin, Aline S; Fresia, Pablo; Cônsoli, Fernando L

    2014-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri is currently the major threat to the citrus industry as it is the vector of Candidatus Liberibacter, the causal agent of huanglongbing disease (HLB). D. citri is native to Asia and now colonizes the Americas. Although it has been known in some countries for a long time, invasion routes remain undetermined. There are no efficient control methods for the HLB despite the intensive management tools currently in use. We investigated the genetic variability and structure of populations of D. citri to aid in the decision making processes toward sustainable management of this species/disease. We employed different methods to quantify and compare the genetic diversity and structure of D. citri populations among 36 localities in Brazil, using an almost complete sequence of the cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene. Our analyses led to the identification of two geographically and genetically structured groups. The indices of molecular diversity pointed to a recent population expansion, and we discuss the role of multiple invasion events in this scenario. We also argue that such genetic diversity and population structure may have implications for the best management strategies to be adopted for controlling this psyllid and/or the disease it vectors in Brazil. PMID:25545788

  12. Morphometric comparisons of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae) populations from Iran, USA and Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Lashkari, Mohammadreza; Hentz, Matthew G; Boykin, Laura M

    2015-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae), vector of citrus greening disease pathogen, Huanglongbing (HLB), is considered the most serious pest of citrus in the world. Prior molecular based studies have hypothesized a link between the D. citri in Iran and the USA (Florida). The purpose of this study was to collect morphometric data from D. citri populations from Iran (mtCOI haplotype-1), Florida (mtCOI haplotype-1), and Pakistan (mtCOI haplotype-6), to determine whether different mtCOI haplotypes have a relationship to a specific morphometric variation. 240 samples from 6 ACP populations (Iran-Jiroft, Chabahar; Florida-Ft. Pierce, Palm Beach Gardens, Port St. Lucie; and Pakistan-Punjab) were collected for comparison. Measurements of 20 morphological characters were selected, measured and analysed using ANOVA and MANOVA. The results indicate differences among the 6 ACP populations (Wilks' lambda = 0.0376, F = 7.29, P < 0.0001). The body length (BL), circumanal ring length (CL), antenna length (AL), forewing length (WL) and Rs vein length of forewing (RL) were the most important characters separating the populations. The cluster analysis showed that the Iran and Florida populations are distinct from each other but separate from the Pakistan population. Thus, three subgroups can be morphologically discriminated within D. citri species in this study, (1) Iran, (2) USA (Florida) and (3) Pakistan population. Morphometric comparisons provided further resolution to the mtCOI haplotypes and distinguished the Florida and Iranian populations. PMID:26038715

  13. Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae) Abundance in Puerto Rico Declines with Elevation.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, David A; Hall, David G; Goenaga, Ricardo

    2015-02-01

    Diaphorina citri Kuwayama is the primary vector of Huanglongbing, the most devastating disease of citrus. D. citri populations in Puerto Rico were monitored with yellow sticky traps on citrus trees or other psyllid host plants at different elevations, ranging from 10 to 880 m above sea level. Trapping was conducted in March through May of 2013 and 2014 when psyllid populations usually are highest. Population levels of D. citri, based on the trapping data, varied among the sites, and there was a strong trend in both years for decreasing psyllid abundance with increased elevation based on the number of psyllids captured on traps and the proportion of trees shown to be infested. No psyllids were collected at an elevation of >600 m. Reduced populations at higher elevations could be a consequence of differences in temperature, air pressure, oxygen levels, ultraviolet light, or other factors alone or in combination. We discuss our results as they pertain to management of D. citri and Huanglongbing. PMID:26470127

  14. Effects on Asian Citrus Psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama) feeding behavior of fenpropathrin and chlorpyrifos within 24 hours of application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Huanglongbing (HLB), also known as citrus greening disease, is one of the most destructive diseases affecting citrus production. The phloem-limited bacterium associated with HLB is transmitted by the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae). One component of HLB managem...

  15. Twelve polymorphic microsatellite loci from the Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, the vector for citrus greening disease Huanglongbing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twelve polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed from microsatellite-enriched DNA libraries and mined from an EST library of Diaphorina citri, the vector of the devastating citrus greening disease (Huanglongbing). Analysis of 288 individuals from Florida, Texas, and Brazil showed allelic di...

  16. Temperature studies with the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama: cold hardiness and temperature thresholds for oviposition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to obtain information on the cold hardiness of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), and to assess upper and lower temperature thresholds for oviposition. The psyllid is an important pest in citrus because it transmits the bacterial pathoge...

  17. Effects of atmospheric pressure trends on calling, mate-seeking, and phototaxis of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insects and other animals sometimes modify behavior in response to changes in atmospheric pressure, an environmental cue that can provide warning of potentially injurious windy and rainy weather. To determine if Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae) calling, mate-seeking, and phototaxis behaviors w...

  18. Toxicity of insecticidal soaps to the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) and two of its natural enemies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insecticidal soaps (hereafter “soaps”) are labeled for use by homeowners and also can be used in citrus grown for the organic market. Soaps control some insect pests and therefore might be an alternative to conventional pesticides for control of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (...

  19. Detection of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus in Diaphorina citri and its importance in the management of Citrus Huanglongbing in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus huanglongbing (HLB or citrus greening) is a highly destructive disease that has been spreading in both Florida and Brazil. Its psyllid vector, Diaphorina citri, has spread to Texas and Mexico thus threatening the future of citrus production elsewhere in North America. Even though, sensitive d...

  20. Effects of the residual activity of foliar-applied insecticides on Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) feeding behavior.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus greening disease, also known as Huanglongbing (HLB), is associated with a phloem-limited bacterium that is transmitted by Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama. Application of insecticides to reduce psyllid populations is one of the primary methods used for HLB management. However,...

  1. Antennal and behavioral response of the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama) to degradation products of citrus volatiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae) vectors the bacterial causal pathogen of the deadly citrus disease, Huanglongbing (citrus greening) which is a major threat to citrus industry worldwide. We studied antennal and behavioral responses to principal components of head...

  2. Incidence of invasive Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) and its introduced parasitoid Tamarixia radiata (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) in Florida citrus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) vectors the bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, one of the causal organisms of Huanglongbing or citrus greening, a devastating disease of citrus. A eulophid parasitoid, Tamarixia radiata Waterson, was imported ...

  3. Lethal and Sublethal Impacts of Acaricides on Tamarixia radiata (Hemiptera: Eulophidae), an Important Ectoparasitoid of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae).

    PubMed

    Lira, A C S; Zanardi, O Z; Beloti, V H; Bordini, G P; Yamamoto, P T; Parra, J R P; Carvalho, G A

    2015-10-01

    The use of synthetic acaricides for management of pest mites may alter the efficacy of the ectoparasitoid Tamarixia radiata (Waterston) in biological control of Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, the vector of the bacteria associated with huanglongbing (HLB) in citrus orchards. We evaluated the toxicity of 16 acaricides that are recommended for the control of citrus-pest mites to T. radiata. Acrinathrin, bifenthrin, carbosulfan, and fenpropathrin caused high acute toxicity and were considered harmful (mortality >77%) to T. radiata. Abamectin, diflubenzuron, etoxazole, fenbutatin oxide, fenpyroximate, flufenoxuron, hexythiazox, propargite, spirodiclofen, and sulfur caused low acute toxicity and affected the parasitism rate and emergence rate of adults (F1 generation), and were considered slightly harmful to T. radiata. Dicofol and pyridaben did not affect the survival and action of the ectoparasitoid, and were considered harmless. In addition to its acute toxicity, carbosulfan caused mortality higher than 25% for >30 d after application, and was considered persistent. Acrinathrin, bifenthrin, fenpropathrin, fenpyroximate, propargite, and sulfur caused mortalities over 25% until 24 d after application and were considered moderately persistent; abamectin was slightly persistent, and fenbutatin oxide was short lived. Our results suggest that most acaricides used to control pest mites in citrus affect the density and efficacy of T. radiata in the biological control of D. citri. However, further evaluations are needed in order to determine the effect of these products on this ectoparasitoid under field conditions. PMID:26453716

  4. Living on the Edges: Spatial Niche Occupation of Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae), in Citrus Groves.

    PubMed

    Sétamou, Mamoudou; Bartels, David W

    2015-01-01

    The spatial niche occupation of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, 1908, was evaluated to determine its field colonization and food resource exploitation strategies in citrus groves. Mature grapefruit and sweet orange groves were surveyed as part of an area-wide program in 2009-2010 to determine D. citri population densities and between-tree distribution. In both cultivars, significantly more psyllids were found on perimeter trees throughout the study period suggesting a strong edge effect in D. citri distribution in the groves. D. citri densities and infestation levels gradually declined from the edge to the center of grove. Higher numbers of D. citri were recorded on trees located on the east and south sides of the groves than those on the west and north sides. Citrus groves located at the outer edge of the study with at least one side non-surrounded to other citrus groves harbored significantly more D. citri than groves located within the block cluster and entirely surrounded by other groves. In detailed field studies during 2012, infestation of D. citri started from border trees in the grove where possibly one generation is completed before inner trees become infested. In addition, psyllid densities decreased significantly with increasing distance from the grove edge. Using the selection index, D citri exhibited a strong niche occupation preference for border trees. PMID:26193111

  5. Living on the Edges: Spatial Niche Occupation of Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae), in Citrus Groves

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The spatial niche occupation of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, 1908, was evaluated to determine its field colonization and food resource exploitation strategies in citrus groves. Mature grapefruit and sweet orange groves were surveyed as part of an area-wide program in 2009–2010 to determine D. citri population densities and between-tree distribution. In both cultivars, significantly more psyllids were found on perimeter trees throughout the study period suggesting a strong edge effect in D. citri distribution in the groves. D. citri densities and infestation levels gradually declined from the edge to the center of grove. Higher numbers of D. citri were recorded on trees located on the east and south sides of the groves than those on the west and north sides. Citrus groves located at the outer edge of the study with at least one side non-surrounded to other citrus groves harbored significantly more D. citri than groves located within the block cluster and entirely surrounded by other groves. In detailed field studies during 2012, infestation of D. citri started from border trees in the grove where possibly one generation is completed before inner trees become infested. In addition, psyllid densities decreased significantly with increasing distance from the grove edge. Using the selection index, D citri exhibited a strong niche occupation preference for border trees. PMID:26193111

  6. Overview of worldwide diversity of Diaphorina citri Kuwayama mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 haplotypes: two Old World lineages and a New World invasion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We utilized a Bayesian phylogenetic technique to resolve global relationships of Diaphorina citri populations. This is the first global phylogenetic study of D. citri. New mitochondrial primers were designed from an EST library and an 821 base pair region of the COI was amplified and sequenced. The ...

  7. Incidence of huanglongbing-associated ‘Candidatus Liberibacter Asiaticus’ in Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) collected from plants for sale in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, was reported for the first time in Florida in June 1998, and huanglongbing (HLB, citrus greening), vectored by D. citri, was detected in Florida for the first time in Aug 2005. In Florida, the only known HLB pathogen is ‘Candidatus Liberibacter as...

  8. Internal extracellular bacteria of Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), the Asian citrus psyllid.

    PubMed

    Kolora, Lakshmi D; Powell, Christopher M; Hunter, W; Bextine, B; Lauzon, C R

    2015-05-01

    The Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), is an invasive insect pest that transmits Candidatus Liberibacter spp. This insect/pathogen system was first identified in North America in the early 2000's and has become the top threat to the citrus industry. Limited options for management of this problem exist; therefore, innovative pest management strategies are being developed. In this study, we describe the first step toward a paratransgenic approach (also referred to symbiotic control) for control of the insect vector or the pathogen. Culturable bacteria from the gut of Asian Citrus Psyllids were identified using standard culture techniques followed by sequencing of the cultured microorganisms. Further, 454 pyrosequencing of the gut was performed to audit bacterial presence in order to begin to identify any relationship between psyllid symbionts and C. Liberibacter spp. PMID:25645736

  9. Diverse Array of New Viral Sequences Identified in Worldwide Populations of the Asian Citrus Psyllid (Diaphorina citri) Using Viral Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Shahideh; Salem, Nidá; Nigg, Jared C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, is the natural vector of the causal agent of Huanglongbing (HLB), or citrus greening disease. Together; HLB and D. citri represent a major threat to world citrus production. As there is no cure for HLB, insect vector management is considered one strategy to help control the disease, and D. citri viruses might be useful. In this study, we used a metagenomic approach to analyze viral sequences associated with the global population of D. citri. By sequencing small RNAs and the transcriptome coupled with bioinformatics analysis, we showed that the virus-like sequences of D. citri are diverse. We identified novel viral sequences belonging to the picornavirus superfamily, the Reoviridae, Parvoviridae, and Bunyaviridae families, and an unclassified positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus. Moreover, a Wolbachia prophage-related sequence was identified. This is the first comprehensive survey to assess the viral community from worldwide populations of an agricultural insect pest. Our results provide valuable information on new putative viruses, some of which may have the potential to be used as biocontrol agents. IMPORTANCE Insects have the most species of all animals, and are hosts to, and vectors of, a great variety of known and unknown viruses. Some of these most likely have the potential to be important fundamental and/or practical resources. In this study, we used high-throughput next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology and bioinformatics analysis to identify putative viruses associated with Diaphorina citri, the Asian citrus psyllid. D. citri is the vector of the bacterium causing Huanglongbing (HLB), currently the most serious threat to citrus worldwide. Here, we report several novel viral sequences associated with D. citri. PMID:26676774

  10. Insecticide sprays, natural enemy assemblages and predation on Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae).

    PubMed

    Monzo, C; Qureshi, J A; Stansly, P A

    2014-10-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri Kuwayama is considered a key citrus pest due to its role as vector of 'huanglongbing' (HLB) or citrus greening, probably the most economically damaging disease of citrus. Insecticidal control of the vector is still considered a cornerstone of HLB management to prevent infection and to reduce reinoculation of infected trees. The severity of HLB has driven implementation of intensive insecticide programs against ACP with unknown side effects on beneficial arthropod fauna in citrus agroecosystems. We evaluated effects of calendar sprays directed against this pest on natural enemy assemblages and used exclusion to estimate mortality they imposed on ACP populations in citrus groves. Predator exclusion techniques were used on nascent colonies of D. citri in replicated large untreated and sprayed plots of citrus during the four major flushing periods over 2 years. Population of spiders, arboreal ants and ladybeetles were independently assessed. Monthly sprays of recommended insecticides for control of ACP, adversely affected natural enemy populations resulting in reduced predation on ACP immature stages, especially during the critical late winter/early spring flush. Consequently, projected growth rates of the ACP population were greatest where natural enemies had been adversely affected by insecticides. Whereas, this result does not obviate the need for insecticidal control of ACP, it does indicate that even a selective regimen of sprays can impose as yet undetermined costs in terms of reduced biological control of this and probably other citrus pests. PMID:24830653

  11. Survey of Endosymbionts in the Diaphorina citri Metagenome and Assembly of a Wolbachia wDi Draft Genome

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Surya; Hunter, Wayne B.; Reese, Justin; Morgan, J. Kent; Marutani-Hert, Mizuri; Huang, Hong; Lindeberg, Magdalen

    2012-01-01

    Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), the Asian citrus psyllid, is the insect vector of Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus, the causal agent of citrus greening disease. Sequencing of the D. citri metagenome has been initiated to gain better understanding of the biology of this organism and the potential roles of its bacterial endosymbionts. To corroborate candidate endosymbionts previously identified by rDNA amplification, raw reads from the D. citri metagenome sequence were mapped to reference genome sequences. Results of the read mapping provided the most support for Wolbachia and an enteric bacterium most similar to Salmonella. Wolbachia-derived reads were extracted using the complete genome sequences for four Wolbachia strains. Reads were assembled into a draft genome sequence, and the annotation assessed for the presence of features potentially involved in host interaction. Genome alignment with the complete sequences reveals membership of Wolbachia wDi in supergroup B, further supported by phylogenetic analysis of FtsZ. FtsZ and Wsp phylogenies additionally indicate that the Wolbachia strain in the Florida D. citri isolate falls into a sub-clade of supergroup B, distinct from Wolbachia present in Chinese D. citri isolates, supporting the hypothesis that the D. citri introduced into Florida did not originate from China. PMID:23166822

  12. Effect of UV-Blocking Plastic Films on Take-Off and Host Plant Finding Ability of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae).

    PubMed

    Miranda, M P; Dos Santos, F L; Felippe, M R; Moreno, A; Fereres, A

    2015-02-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae), is a major pest of citrus worldwide due to its ability to transmit the bacteria associated with huanglongbing. Vision, behavior, and performance of insect pests can be manipulated by using ultraviolet (UV)-blocking materials. Thus, the aim of our study was to evaluate how UV-blocking plastic films may affect the take-off and host plant finding ability of D. citri. To assess the effect of a UV-deficient environment on take-off, adult psyllids were released from a vial inside a screenhouse covered by a UV-blocking or standard (control) film and the number of insects remaining on each vial under each treatment was counted at different time intervals. Moreover, to assess the ability of D. citri to find citrus plants under a UV-deficient environment, two independent no-choice host plant finding assays with different plant arrangements were conducted. In each treatment, the number of psyllids per plant at different time intervals was counted. Both D. citri take-off and host plant finding ability was clearly disrupted under a UV-deficient environment. The number of psyllids remaining in the vials was significantly higher under UV-blocking than standard film in all periods recorded. Furthermore, psyllids were present in significantly higher number on citrus plants under standard film than under UV-blocking film in all of the periods assessed and experiments conducted. Our results showed that UV-blocking materials could become a valuable strategy for integrated management of D. citri and huanglongbing in citrus grown in enclosed environments. PMID:26470126

  13. Impact of different temperatures on survival and energy metabolism in the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama.

    PubMed

    El-Shesheny, Ibrahim; Hijaz, Faraj; El-Hawary, Ibrahim; Mesbah, Ibrahim; Killiny, Nabil

    2016-02-01

    Temperature influences the life history and metabolic parameters of insects. Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri is a tropical and subtropical pest. ACP invaded new regions around the world and threatened the citrus industry as a vector for Huanglongbing (HLB) disease. ACP is widely distributed and can survive high (up to 45 °C) and low temperatures (as low as -6 °C). The precise mechanism of temperature tolerance in ACP is poorly understood. We investigated adult survival, cellular energy balance, gene expression, and nucleotide and sugar-nucleotide changes under the effect of different temperature regimes (0 °C to 45 °C with 5 °C intervals). The optimum temperatures for survival were 20 and 25 °C. Low temperatures of 0 °C and 5 °C caused 50% mortality after 2 and 4 days respectively, while one day at high temperature (40 °C and 45 °C) caused more than 95% mortality. The lowest quantity of ATP (3.69 ± 1.6 ng/insect) and the maximum ATPase enzyme activities (57.43 ± 7.6 μU/insect) were observed at 25 °C. Correlation between ATP quantities and ATPase activity was negative. Gene expression of hsp 70, V-type proton ATPase catalytic subunit A and ATP synthase α subunit matched these results. Twenty-four nucleotides and sugar-nucleotides were quantified using HPLC in ACP adults maintained at low, high, and optimum temperatures. The nucleotide profiles were different among treatments. The ratios between AMP:ATP and ADP:ATP were significantly decreased and positively correlated to adults survival, whereas the adenylate energy charge was increased in response to low and high temperatures. Exploring energy metabolic regulation in relation with adult survival might help in understanding the physiological basis of how ACP tolerates newly invaded regions. PMID:26603556

  14. Geographic Distribution of Habitat, Development, and Population Growth Rates of the Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri, in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    López-Collado, José; Isabel López-Arroyo, J.; Robles-García, Pedro L.; Márquez-Santos, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), is an introduced pest in Mexico and a vector of huanglongbing, a lethal citrus disease. Estimations of the habitat distribution and population growth rates of D. citri are required to establish regional and areawide management strategies and can be used as a pest risk analysis tools. In this study, the habitat distribution of D. citri in Mexico was computed with MaxEnt, an inductive, machine-learning program that uses bioclimatic layers and point location data. Geographic distributions of development and population growth rates were determined by fitting a temperature-dependent, nonlinear model and projecting the rates over the target area, using the annual mean temperature as the predictor variable. The results showed that the most suitable regions for habitat of D. citri comprise the Gulf of Mexico states, Yucatán Peninsula, and areas scattered throughout the Pacific coastal states. Less suitable areas occurred in northern and central states. The most important predictor variables were related to temperature. Development and growth rates had a distribution wider than habitat, reaching some of the northern states of México. Habitat, development, and population growth rates were correlated to each other and with the citrus producing area. These relationships indicated that citrus producing states are within the most suitable regions for the occurrence, development, and population growth of D. citri, therefore increasing the risk of huanglongbing dispersion. PMID:24735280

  15. Odorants for Surveillance and Control of the Asian Citrus Psyllid (Diaphorina citri)

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho-Abreu, Iliano V.; Forster, Lisa; Guda, Tom; Ray, Anandasankar

    2014-01-01

    Background The Asian Citrus Psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri, can transmit the bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter while feeding on citrus flush shoots. This bacterium causes Huanglongbing (HLB), a major disease of citrus cultivation worldwide necessitating the development of new tools for ACP surveillance and control. The olfactory system of ACP is sensitive to variety of odorants released by citrus plants and offers an opportunity to develop new attractants and repellents. Results In this study, we performed single-unit electrophysiology to identify odorants that are strong activators, inhibitors, and prolonged activators of ACP odorant receptor neurons (ORNs). We identified a suite of odorants that activated the ORNs with high specificity and sensitivity, which may be useful in eliciting behavior such as attraction. In separate experiments, we also identified odorants that evoked prolonged ORN responses and antagonistic odorants able to suppress neuronal responses to activators, both of which can be useful in lowering attraction to hosts. In field trials, we tested the electrophysiologically identified activating odorants and identified a 3-odor blend that enhances trap catches by ∼230%. Conclusion These findings provide a set of odorants that can be used to develop affordable and safe odor-based surveillance and masking strategies for this dangerous pest insect. PMID:25347318

  16. Exposure to Guava Affects Citrus Olfactory Cues and Attractiveness to Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae).

    PubMed

    Barman, Jagadish Chandra; Campbell, Stuart A; Zeng, Xinnian

    2016-06-01

    Intercropping can reduce agricultural pest incidence, and represents an important sustainable alternative to conventional pest control methods. Understanding the ecological mechanisms for intercropping could help optimize its use, particularly in tropical systems which present a large number of intercropping possibilities. Citrus is threatened worldwide by greening disease (huanglongbing, HLB) vectored by the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae). Control of HLB and citrus psyllid can be partially achieved through intercropping with guava, Psidium guajava L., but the mechanisms remain unclear. We tested the hypothesis that guava olfactory cues affect psyllid behavior by altering the attractiveness of citrus through plant-plant interactions. In choice and no-choice cage experiments, psyllid settlement was reduced on citrus shoots that had been exposed to guava shoot odors for at least 2 h. In Y-tube olfactometer experiments, psyllids oriented to odors of unexposed, compared with guava-exposed, citrus shoots. These behavioral results indicate that a mechanism for the success of guava intercropping for sustainable, ecological disease management may be the indirect effect of guava on citrus attractiveness. PMID:27247354

  17. Species clarification of Isaria isolates used as biocontrol agents against Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae) in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Gallou, Adrien; Serna-Domínguez, María G; Berlanga-Padilla, Angélica M; Ayala-Zermeño, Miguel A; Mellín-Rosas, Marco A; Montesinos-Matías, Roberto; Arredondo-Bernal, Hugo C

    2016-03-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi belonging to the genus Isaria (Hypocreales: Cordycipitaceae) are promising candidates for microbial control of insect pests. Currently, the Mexican government is developing a biological control program based on extensive application of Isaria isolates against Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae), a vector of citrus huanglongbing disease. Previous research identified three promising Isaria isolates (CHE-CNRCB 303, 305, and 307; tentatively identified as Isaria fumosorosea) from Mexico. The goal of this work was to obtain a complete morphological and molecular characterization of these isolates. Comparative analysis of morphology established that the isolates showed similar characteristics to Isaria javanica. Multi-gene analysis confirmed the morphological identification by including the three isolates within the I. javanica clade. Additionally, this work demonstrated the misidentifications of three other Isaria isolates (CHE-CNRCB 310 and 324: I. javanica, formerly I. fumosorosea; CHE-CNRCB 393: I. fumosorosea, formerly Isaria farinosa), underlying the need for a full and correct characterization of an isolate before developing a biological control program. Finally, the inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) genotyping method revealed that the CHE-CNRCB 303, 305, and 307 isolates belong to three different genotypes. This result indicates that ISSR markers could be used as a tool to monitor their presence in field conditions. PMID:26895870

  18. Detection of citrus huanglongbing-associated ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ in citrus and Diaphorina citri in Pakistan, season variability, and implications for disease management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the detection of the huanglongbing (HLB)-associated bacterium ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ from both plants and insects in Pakistan and the seasonal variability in the numbers of ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’-positive psyllid vector, Diaphorina citri. Our studies showed that ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’...

  19. RNAi-based strategy for Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) Control: A method to reduce the spread of citrus greening disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus greening disease is a serious bacterial disease of citrus worldwide and is vectored by the Asian citrus pysllid (Diaphorina Citri). The only effective control strategy includes vigorous control of the psyllid, primarily through heavy reliance on pesticides. As a more sustainable and environm...

  20. Targeting juvenile hormone metabolic genes in the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama) as a strategy to reduce the spread of citrus greening disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), is a devastating citrus pest due to its transmission of a phloem-limited bacterial pathogen, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, that causes citrus greening. Psyllid control is a major part of effective greening disease management, and our r...

  1. Use of the entomopathogenic fungi Metarhizium anisopliae, Cordyceps bassiana and Isaria fumosorosea to control Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psylidae) in Persian lime under field conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), is a destructive insect pest in the citriculture, because it is an efficient vector of the proteobacteria, ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las), ‘Ca. L. Africanus’ (Laf), and ‘Ca. L. Americanus’ (Lam). These bacteria c...

  2. The roles of olfactory cues, visual cues, and mating status in orientation of Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) to four different host plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) is an important worldwide pest of citrus that vectors three phloem-restricted bacteria in the genus Candidatus Liberibacter, the causative agents of huanglongbing (citrus greening disease). We examined the behavioral responses of mated and unmated D. ...

  3. Characterization of a recombinant Cathepsin B-Like cysteine peptidase from Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae): A putative target control of citrus huanglongbing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is one of the most destructive disease affecting citrus plants. The causal agent is associated with the phloem-limited bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) spread by the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae). Among the control strategies for H...

  4. A rapid field detection system for citrus huanglongbing associated ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ from the psyllid vector, diaphorina citri kuwayama and its implications in disease management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the development of an affordable detection kit for the detection of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las) from the psyllid vector, Diaphorina citri, which can provide real time test results in the field or field laboratory within 30-40 minutes without the need for expensive laboratory ...

  5. Nested PCR is essential for the detection of extremely low titer of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus from citrus and its vector psyllid Diaphorina citri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus huanglongbing (HLB), transmitted by the psyllids Diaphorina citri and Trioza erytreae, is one of the most devastating diseases of citrus worldwide. The disease is associated with three different species of Candidatus Liberibacter: Ca. L. asiaticus (Las), Ca. L. americanus and Ca. L. africanu...

  6. Ultrastructure and development of the new stylets inside pre-molting first instar nymphs of the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ultrastructure and development of new stylets was studied in pre-molting first instar nymph of Diaphorina citri. Two oval-shaped masses of cuboidal hypodermal cells, located in the cephalic region, had long extensions that ended with developing pairs of mandibular and maxillary stylets, apparent...

  7. Detection and relative titer of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus in the salivary glands and alimentary canal of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) vector of citrus Huanglongbing disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus has been strongly implicated as the causative agent of huanglongbing (HLB), or citrus greening, which is currently the most devastating citrus disease worldwide. In the Americas and Asia, HLB is transmitted by the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri in a persisten...

  8. Localization of Candidatus liberibacter asiaticus associated with huanglongbing disease in various organs of its insect vector Diaphorina citri using FISH and Q-PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) has been associated with huanglongbing (HLB), or citrus greening, which is currently the most devastating citrus disease in many areas of the world. HLB is transmitted in Florida by the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera, Psyllidae) in a persiste...

  9. Ultrastructure of the salivary glands and bacteria-like structures in the gut and other organs of the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae), vector of huanglongbing disease bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP, Diaphorina citri, Hemiptera, Liviidae) is the principal vector of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las), the bacterium associated with huanglongbing (HLB) or citrus greening, currently the most serious citrus disease worldwide. Liberibacter asiaticus is transmitted i...

  10. Innate and Conditioned Responses to Chemosensory and Visual Cues in Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae), Vector of Huanglongbing Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Patt, Joseph M; Stockton, Dara; Meikle, William G; Sétamou, Mamoudou; Mafra-Neto, Agenor; Adamczyk, John J

    2014-01-01

    Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) transmits Huanglongbing, a devastating disease that threatens citrus trees worldwide. A better understanding of the psyllid's host-plant selection process may lead to the development of more efficient means of monitoring it and predicting its movements. Since behavioral adaptations, such as associative learning, may facilitate recognition of suitable host-plants, we examined whether adult D. citri could be conditioned to visual and chemosensory stimuli from host and non-host-plant sources. Response was measured as the frequency of salivary sheaths, the residue of psyllid probing activity, in a line of emulsified wax on the surface of a test arena. The psyllids displayed both appetitive and aversive conditioning to two different chemosensory stimuli. They could also be conditioned to recognize a blue-colored probing substrate and their response to neutral visual cues was enhanced by chemosensory stimuli. Conditioned psyllids were sensitive to the proportion of chemosensory components present in binary mixtures. Naïve psyllids displayed strong to moderate innate biases to several of the test compounds. While innate responses are probably the psyllid's primary behavioral mechanism for selecting host-plants, conditioning may enhance its ability to select host-plants during seasonal transitions and dispersal. PMID:26462949

  11. Innate and Conditioned Responses to Chemosensory and Visual Cues in Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae), Vector of Huanglongbing Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Patt, Joseph M.; Stockton, Dara; Meikle, William G.; Sétamou, Mamoudou; Mafra-Neto, Agenor; Adamczyk, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) transmits Huanglongbing, a devastating disease that threatens citrus trees worldwide. A better understanding of the psyllid’s host-plant selection process may lead to the development of more efficient means of monitoring it and predicting its movements. Since behavioral adaptations, such as associative learning, may facilitate recognition of suitable host-plants, we examined whether adult D. citri could be conditioned to visual and chemosensory stimuli from host and non-host-plant sources. Response was measured as the frequency of salivary sheaths, the residue of psyllid probing activity, in a line of emulsified wax on the surface of a test arena. The psyllids displayed both appetitive and aversive conditioning to two different chemosensory stimuli. They could also be conditioned to recognize a blue-colored probing substrate and their response to neutral visual cues was enhanced by chemosensory stimuli. Conditioned psyllids were sensitive to the proportion of chemosensory components present in binary mixtures. Naïve psyllids displayed strong to moderate innate biases to several of the test compounds. While innate responses are probably the psyllid’s primary behavioral mechanism for selecting host-plants, conditioning may enhance its ability to select host-plants during seasonal transitions and dispersal. PMID:26462949

  12. Cloning and expressing a highly functional and substrate specific farnesoic acid o-methyltransferase from the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama).

    PubMed

    Van Ekert, Evelien; Shatters, Robert G; Rougé, Pierre; Powell, Charles A; Smagghe, Guy; Borovsky, Dov

    2015-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, transmits a phloem-limited bacterium, Candidatus 'Liberibacter' asiaticus that causes citrus greening disease. Because juvenile hormone (JH) plays an important role in adult and nymphal development, we studied the final steps in JH biosynthesis in D. citri. A putative JH acid methyltransferase ortholog gene (jmtD) and its cognate cDNA were identified by searching D. citri genome database. Expression analysis shows expression in all life stages. In adults, it is expressed in the head-thorax, (containing the corpora allata), and the abdomen (containing ovaries and male accessory glands). A 3D protein model identified the catalytic groove with catalytically active amino acids and the S-adenosyl methionine (SAM)-binding loop. The cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli cells and the purified enzyme showed high preference for farnesoic acid (FA) and homoFA (kcat of 0.752 × 10(-3) and 0.217 × 10(-3) s(-1), respectively) as compared to JH acid I (JHA I) (cis/trans/cis; 2Z, 6E, 10cis), JHA III (2E, 6E, 10cis), and JHA I (trans/cis/cis; 2E, 2Z, 10cis) (kcat of 0.081 × 10(-3), 0.013 × 10(-3), and 0.003 × 10(-3) s(-1), respectively). This suggests that this ortholog is a DcFA-o-methyl transferase gene (fmtD), not a jmtD, and that JH biosynthesis in D. citri proceeds from FA to JH III through methyl farnesoate (MF). DcFA-o-MT does not require Ca(2+), Mg(2+) or Zn(2+), however, Zn(2+) (1 mM) completely inhibits the enzyme probably by binding H115 at the active groove. This represents the first purified FA-o-MT from Hemiptera with preferred biological activity for FA and not JHA. PMID:25893162

  13. Cloning and expressing a highly functional and substrate specific farnesoic acid o-methyltransferase from the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama)

    PubMed Central

    Van Ekert, Evelien; Shatters, Robert G.; Rougé, Pierre; Powell, Charles A.; Smagghe, Guy; Borovsky, Dov

    2015-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, transmits a phloem-limited bacterium, Candidatus ‘Liberibacter’ asiaticus that causes citrus greening disease. Because juvenile hormone (JH) plays an important role in adult and nymphal development, we studied the final steps in JH biosynthesis in D. citri. A putative JH acid methyltransferase ortholog gene (jmtD) and its cognate cDNA were identified by searching D. citri genome database. Expression analysis shows expression in all life stages. In adults, it is expressed in the head-thorax, (containing the corpora allata), and the abdomen (containing ovaries and male accessory glands). A 3D protein model identified the catalytic groove with catalytically active amino acids and the S-adenosyl methionine (SAM)-binding loop. The cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli cells and the purified enzyme showed high preference for farnesoic acid (FA) and homoFA (kcat of 0.752 × 10−3 and 0.217 × 10−3 s−1, respectively) as compared to JH acid I (JHA I) (cis/trans/cis; 2Z, 6E, 10cis), JHA III (2E, 6E, 10cis), and JHA I (trans/cis/cis; 2E, 2Z, 10cis) (kcat of 0.081 × 10−3, 0.013 × 10−3, and 0.003 × 10−3 s−1, respectively). This suggests that this ortholog is a DcFA-o-methyl transferase gene (fmtD), not a jmtD, and that JH biosynthesis in D. citri proceeds from FA to JH III through methyl farnesoate (MF). DcFA-o-MT does not require Ca2+, Mg2+ or Zn2+, however, Zn2+ (1 mM) completely inhibits the enzyme probably by binding H115 at the active groove. This represents the first purified FA-o-MT from Hemiptera with preferred biological activity for FA and not JHA. PMID:25893162

  14. Stylet morphometrics and citrus leaf vein structure in relation to feeding behavior of the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri, vector of citrus huanglongbing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Ammar, El-Desouky; Hall, David G; Shatters, Robert G

    2013-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), is the primary vector of the phloem-limited bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (LAS) associated with huanglongbing (HLB, citrus greening), considered the world's most serious disease of citrus. Stylet morphometrics of ACP nymphs and adults were studied in relation to citrus vein structure and to their putative (histologically verified) feeding sites on Valencia orange leaves. ACP nymphs preferred to settle and feed on the lower (abaxial) side of young leaves either on secondary veins or on the sides of the midrib, whereas adults preferred to settle and feed on the upper (adaxial) or lower secondary veins of young or old leaves. Early instar nymphs can reach and probe the phloem probably because the distance to the phloem is considerably shorter in younger than in mature leaves, and is shorter from the sides of the midrib compared to that from the center. Additionally, the thick-walled 'fibrous ring' (sclerenchyma) around the phloem, which may act as a barrier to ACP stylet penetration into the phloem, is more prominent in older than in younger leaves and in the center than on the sides of the midrib. The majority (80-90%) of the salivary sheath termini produced by ACP nymphs and adults that reached a vascular bundle were associated with the phloem, whereas only 10-20% were associated with xylem vessels. Ultrastructural studies on ACP stylets and LAS-infected leaves suggested that the width of the maxillary food canal in first instar nymphs is wide enough for LAS bacteria to traverse during food ingestion (and LAS acquisition). However, the width of the maxillary salivary canal in these nymphs may not be wide enough to accommodate LAS bacteria during salivation (and LAS inoculation) into host plants. This may explain the inability of early instar nymphs to transmit LAS/HLB in earlier reports. PMID:23555830

  15. Unreliable pesticide control of the vector psyllid Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) for the reduction of microorganism disease transmission.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Katsuya; Miyazi, Kastuhiko; Matsuhira, Kunihiko; Yasuda, Keiji; Sadoyama, Yasutsune; Do, Hong Tuan; Doan, Van Bang

    2010-07-01

    Systemic insecticides and application methods were examined for the control of the vector psyllid of citrus greening disease, Diaphorina citri, on grown king mandarin trees in an orchard in southern Vietnam from May 2007 to September 2008. Leaf spraying of imidacloprid, thiamethoxam, and clothianidin attained about 50 % to 70 % mortality of the psyllid for one month after the application and showed decreased efficacy thereafter. Imidacloprid was more effective than the other two insecticides, but the efficacy on grown trees was still much lower than that following application to young seedlings. Trunk injection of these insecticides accomplished similar mortality, about 50 %, and the efficacy of the insecticides continued for one month. An adjuvant was used with the goal of protecting the insecticide applied on leaves from precipitation, and mineral oil was used for the same reason, as well as its potential to control the psyllid. Neither the adjuvant nor the mineral oil played an evident role in the increase of insecticide efficacy or longevity. Application of systemic insecticides at even 50 times the dose described above did not show an apparent increase in psyllid mortality. The insecticides commonly used for the control of the psyllid were not as effective on this insect on grown trees as we had expected they would be. PMID:20512737

  16. Host Range Testing of Diaphorencyrtus aligarhensis (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) for Use in Classical Biological Control of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae) in California.

    PubMed

    Bistline-East, Allison; Pandey, Raju; Kececi, Mehmet; Hoddle, Mark S

    2015-06-01

    Host range tests for Diaphorencyrtus aligarhensis (Shafee, Alam, & Agarwal) (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), an endoparasitoid of Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae), sourced from Punjab Pakistan, were conducted in quarantine at the University of California, Riverside, CA. Seven nontarget psyllid species representing four psyllid families were exposed to mated D. aligarhensis females in four different treatment types: 1) short sequential no-choice treatments, 2) prolonged sequential no-choice treatments, 3) prolonged no-choice static treatments, and 4) choice treatments. Selection of nontarget psyllid species was based on phylogenetic proximity to D. citri, likelihood of being encountered by D. aligarhensis in the prospective release areas in California, and psyllid species in biological control of invasive weeds. D. aligarhensis exhibited high host affinity to D. citri, and only parasitized one nontarget species, the pestiferous potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Sulc), at low levels (<14%). Based on the results of this study, we conclude that D. aligarhensis has a narrow host range and exhibits a high level of host specificity, as it shows a significant attack preference for the target pest, D. citri. Results presented here suggest D. aligarhensis poses minimal risk to nontarget psyllid species in California. PMID:26470214

  17. Impacts of Horticultural Mineral Oils and Two Insecticide Practices on Population Fluctuation of Diaphorina citri and Spread of Huanglongbing in a Citrus Orchard in Sarawak

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Stephen Chan Teck; Abang, Fatimah; Beattie, Andrew; Kueh, Roland Jui Heng; Wong, Sing King

    2012-01-01

    Aspects of the incidence and spread of the citrus disease huanglongbing (HLB) in relation to the vector Diaphorina citri population fluctuation were studied from January 1999 to December 2001 seasons in a 0.8 ha citrus orchard at Jemukan (1° 33′N, 110° 41′E), Southwest Sarawak in Malaysia. In relation to insecticide and horticultural mineral oils (HMOs) use, levels of HLB infection rose quite rapidly over the next 3 years in the unsprayed control and less rapidly in the other treatments such as imidacloprid, nC24HMO, and triazophos/cypermethrin/chlorpyrifos. Levels of HLB as determined by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) were 42.2%, 9.4%, 11.4%, and 22.7%, respectively. The effects of nC24HMO and conventional pesticides on the citrus psyllid population and parasitoids in citrus orchard were also determined. PMID:22629178

  18. Impacts of horticultural mineral oils and two insecticide practices on population fluctuation of Diaphorina citri and spread of Huanglongbing in a citrus orchard in Sarawak.

    PubMed

    Leong, Stephen Chan Teck; Abang, Fatimah; Beattie, Andrew; Kueh, Roland Jui Heng; Wong, Sing King

    2012-01-01

    Aspects of the incidence and spread of the citrus disease huanglongbing (HLB) in relation to the vector Diaphorina citri population fluctuation were studied from January 1999 to December 2001 seasons in a 0.8 ha citrus orchard at Jemukan (1° 33'N, 110° 41'E), Southwest Sarawak in Malaysia. In relation to insecticide and horticultural mineral oils (HMOs) use, levels of HLB infection rose quite rapidly over the next 3 years in the unsprayed control and less rapidly in the other treatments such as imidacloprid, nC24HMO, and triazophos/cypermethrin/chlorpyrifos. Levels of HLB as determined by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) were 42.2%, 9.4%, 11.4%, and 22.7%, respectively. The effects of nC(24)HMO and conventional pesticides on the citrus psyllid population and parasitoids in citrus orchard were also determined. PMID:22629178

  19. Essential Oil Variation from Twenty Two Genotypes of Citrus in Brazil-Chemometric Approach and Repellency Against Diaphorina citri Kuwayama.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Moacir Dos Santos; Ribeiro, Leandro do Prado; Borgoni, Paulo Cesar; Silva, Maria Fátima das Graças Fernandes da; Forim, Moacir Rossi; Fernandes, João Batista; Vieira, Paulo Cezar; Vendramin, José Djair; Machado, Marcos Antônio

    2016-01-01

    The chemical composition of volatile oils from 22 genotypes of Citrus and related genera was poorly differentiated, but chemometric techniques have clarified the relationships between the 22 genotypes, and allowed us to understand their resistance to D. citri. The most convincing similarities include the synthesis of (Z)-β-ocimene and (E)-caryophyllene for all 11 genotypes of group A. Genotypes of group B are not uniformly characterized by essential oil compounds. When stimulated with odor sources of 22 genotypes in a Y-tube olfactometer D. citri preferentially entered the arm containing the volatile oils of Murraya paniculata, confirming orange jasmine as its best host. C. reticulata × C. sinensis was the least preferred genotype, and is characterized by the presence of phytol, (Z)-β-ocimene, and β-elemene, which were not found in the most preferred genotype. We speculate that these three compounds may act as a repellent, making these oils less attractive to D. citri. PMID:27338332

  20. Nested-quantitative PCR approach with improved sensitivity for the detection of low titer levels of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus in the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama.

    PubMed

    Coy, M R; Hoffmann, M; Kingdom Gibbard, H N; Kuhns, E H; Pelz-Stelinski, K S; Stelinski, L L

    2014-07-01

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) is a phloem-limited bacterium transmitted by the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, and the presumptive causal agent of citrus greening disease. The current method of detection for CLas within plant and insect samples is by a presence/absence qPCR assay using the CLas 16S rDNA gene target. Although qPCR is highly sensitive, low bacterial titers or suboptimal qPCR conditions can result in false-negatives. Using a nested qPCR assay, we determined the false-negative rate of the 16S presence/absence qPCR assay was greater than 50%. Studies to determine the performance parameters of the qPCR assays for CLas 16S and Wingless (Wg), the D. citri endogenous gene, using plasmid and psyllid DNA, revealed suboptimal and variable performance of the 16S assay in psyllid samples. Average efficiencies and sensitivity limits of the plasmid assays were 99.0% and 2.7 copies of template for Wg, respectively, and 98.5% and 2.2-22.1 copies for 16S, respectively. Variability in efficiency was significantly greater in psyllid samples for both gene targets compared to the corresponding plasmid assays, and efficiencies as low as 76% were obtained for 16S. A secondary structure analysis revealed the formation of two stem-loop structures that block the forward and probe binding sites in the 16S template, which could hinder amplification. In summary, our results suggest that suboptimal qPCR efficiency is not uncommon for the 16S presence/absence qPCR assay, which combined with lowCLas titers in some samples, could contribute significantly to the under-reporting of CLas infection in psyllid and plant samples. PMID:24769405

  1. Daily and seasonal patterns in abdomen color in Diaphoria citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, a psyllid vector of huanglongbing (citrus greening disease), exhibits three more or less distinct abdomen colors in the adult psyllid: gray/brown, blue/green, and orange/yellow. We explored the daily (in individuals in the laboratory) and seasonal (in a field population) p...

  2. Detection of citrus huanglongbing-associated 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' in citrus and Diaphorina citri in Pakistan, seasonal variability, and implications for disease management.

    PubMed

    Razi, Muhammad F; Keremane, Manjunath L; Ramadugu, Chandrika; Roose, Mikeal; Khan, Iqrar A; Lee, Richard F

    2014-03-01

    We report the detection of the huanglongbing (HLB)-associated bacterium 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' from both plants and insects in Pakistan and the seasonal variability in the numbers of 'Ca. L. asiaticus'-positive psyllid vector, Diaphorina citri. Our studies showed that 'Ca. L. asiaticus' was detectable from trees in areas with maximum temperatures reaching nearly 50°C (average maximum of 42°C). However, the bacterium was present at very low levels in psyllids both in summer (June to August) and autumn (September to November) in contrast to reports from Florida, where the bacterium was detectable at very high levels during October to November. We hypothesize that hot summer temperatures in Pakistan may interfere with acquisition and replication of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' in psyllids and may lead to dead or non transmissible 'Ca. L. asiaticus' in plants. Psyllid counts were very low in both summer and winter, showed a population peak ('Ca. L. asiaticus'-positive vectors) in spring, and showed a larger peak ('Ca. L. asiaticus'-free psyllids) in autumn. Natural thermotherapy during hot summers and a low vector population during environmental extremes may have played a major role in long-term survival of the citrus industry in Pakistan. These results may be useful in developing management strategies for U.S. citrus industries in Texas and California. PMID:24134720

  3. Infection Density Dynamics of the Citrus Greening Bacterium "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" in Field Populations of the Psyllid Diaphorina citri and Its Relevance to the Efficiency of Pathogen Transmission to Citrus Plants.

    PubMed

    Ukuda-Hosokawa, Rie; Sadoyama, Yasutsune; Kishaba, Misaki; Kuriwada, Takashi; Anbutsu, Hisashi; Fukatsu, Takema

    2015-06-01

    Huanglongbing, or citrus greening, is a devastating disease of citrus plants recently spreading worldwide, which is caused by an uncultivable bacterial pathogen, "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus," and vectored by a phloem-sucking insect, Diaphorina citri. We investigated the infection density dynamics of "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus" in field populations of D. citri with experiments using field-collected insects to address how "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus" infection density in the vector insect is relevant to pathogen transmission to citrus plants. Of 500 insects continuously collected from "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus"-infected citrus trees with pathological symptoms in the spring and autumn of 2009, 497 (99.4%) were "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus" positive. The infections were systemic across head-thorax and abdomen, ranging from 10(3) to 10(7) bacteria per insect. In spring, the infection densities were low in March, at ∼ 10(3) bacteria per insect, increasing up to 10(6) to 10(7) bacteria per insect in April and May, and decreasing to 10(5) to 10(6) bacteria per insect in late May, whereas the infection densities were constantly ∼ 10(6) to 10(7) bacteria per insect in autumn. Statistical analysis suggested that several factors, such as insect sex, host trees, and collection dates, may be correlated with "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus" infection densities in field D. citri populations. Inoculation experiments with citrus seedlings using field-collected "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus"-infected insects suggested that (i) "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus"-transmitting insects tend to exhibit higher infection densities than do nontransmitting insects, (ii) a threshold level (∼ 10(6) bacteria per insect) of "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus" density in D. citri is required for successful transmission to citrus plants, and (iii) D. citri attaining the threshold infection level transmits "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus" to citrus plants in a stochastic manner. These findings provide

  4. Infection Density Dynamics of the Citrus Greening Bacterium “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” in Field Populations of the Psyllid Diaphorina citri and Its Relevance to the Efficiency of Pathogen Transmission to Citrus Plants

    PubMed Central

    Ukuda-Hosokawa, Rie; Sadoyama, Yasutsune; Kishaba, Misaki; Kuriwada, Takashi; Anbutsu, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    Huanglongbing, or citrus greening, is a devastating disease of citrus plants recently spreading worldwide, which is caused by an uncultivable bacterial pathogen, “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus,” and vectored by a phloem-sucking insect, Diaphorina citri. We investigated the infection density dynamics of “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” in field populations of D. citri with experiments using field-collected insects to address how “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” infection density in the vector insect is relevant to pathogen transmission to citrus plants. Of 500 insects continuously collected from “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus”-infected citrus trees with pathological symptoms in the spring and autumn of 2009, 497 (99.4%) were “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” positive. The infections were systemic across head-thorax and abdomen, ranging from 103 to 107 bacteria per insect. In spring, the infection densities were low in March, at ∼103 bacteria per insect, increasing up to 106 to 107 bacteria per insect in April and May, and decreasing to 105 to 106 bacteria per insect in late May, whereas the infection densities were constantly ∼106 to 107 bacteria per insect in autumn. Statistical analysis suggested that several factors, such as insect sex, host trees, and collection dates, may be correlated with “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” infection densities in field D. citri populations. Inoculation experiments with citrus seedlings using field-collected “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus”-infected insects suggested that (i) “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus”-transmitting insects tend to exhibit higher infection densities than do nontransmitting insects, (ii) a threshold level (∼106 bacteria per insect) of “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” density in D. citri is required for successful transmission to citrus plants, and (iii) D. citri attaining the threshold infection level transmits “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” to citrus plants in a stochastic manner. These

  5. Research toward an artifical diet for adult Asian Citrus Psyllid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research progress is reported on an artificial diet for adult Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae). The primary objective was to develop a system for screening antimicrobial peptides and other potential toxic proteins for activity against adults. The base diet was a...

  6. Psyllid biology: expressed genes in adult Asian citrus psyllids, Diaphorina citri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    These results advance the field of psyllid research by identifying genes and their proteins which function in: physiology, feeding, disease transmission, and the development of insecticide resistance. This was accomplished by using the molecular approach of a large-scale 5' end sequencing project of...

  7. Reovirus-like sequences isolated from adult Asian citrus psyllid, (Hemiptera: Psyllidae: Diaphorina citri)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Though wide spread in nature, this is the first report of a Fijivirus from North America and which was detected in a new virus host species, the Asian citrus psyllid. Few viruses have ever been reported from psyllids. We discovered an insect infecting virus in field collected Asian citrus psyllids i...

  8. Reovirus-like sequences isolated from adult Asian citrus psyllid, (Hemiptera: Psyllidae: Diaphorina citri)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Though wide spread in nature, this is the first report of a fijiviruses from North America detected in a new virus host species, the Asian citrus psyllid. Few viruses have ever been reported from psyllids. We discovered an insect infecting virus in field collected Asian citrus psyllids in Florida. T...

  9. Characterization of the Relative Abundance of the Citrus Pathogen Ca. Liberibacter Asiaticus in the Microbiome of Its Insect Vector, Diaphorina citri, using High Throughput 16S rRNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Fagen, Jennie R; Giongo, Adriana; Brown, Christopher T; Davis-Richardson, Austin G; Gano, Kelsey A; Triplett, Eric W

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between the causal agent of Huanglongbing (HLB), Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus(Las), and the naturally occurring endosymbiotic community of its insect vector, the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri, was studied. Variation was observed in the titer of Las within an ACP population feeding on the same material. The cause of this disparity is unknown, and has implications for Las transmission and the spread of HLB. This study utilizes culture independent methods to establish the relationship between the ACP’s microbial community and Las acquisition. DNA from 21 psyllids was amplified using universal 16S rRNA primers with Illumina adaptor regions and a sample-specific 7- base identifier. These amplicons were then batch-sequenced on the Illumina platform. The resulting sequences were separated by the identifier, and compared to known sequences in a 16S rRNA database. The microbial communities of each psyllid were compared to determine whether a correlation exists between the ACP’s endosymbionts and level of Las acquisition. ACPs were dominated by the same four bacterialgenera regardless of the abundance of Ca.Liberibacter. A combination of qPCR and Illumina sequencing was used to establish an infection gradient among the sampled ACPs. The Ca. Liberibacter titer within the insect was found to have a strong negative relationship with an endosymbiont residing in the syncytium of the mycetocyte and a positive relationship with Wolbachia. These correlations have implications in the acquisition of Las by the ACP as well as the activities of Las within this vector. PMID:22529882

  10. A comparison of traps and stem tap sampling for monitoring adult Asian citrus psyllid (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), in citrus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies were conducted at two different field sites to compare yellow sticky card traps, blue sticky card traps, Multi-Lure traps, and CC traps (red, blue, black, white, yellow, and green) for monitoring adult Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama,in citrus. The Multi-Lure trap is useful f...

  11. Retracted stylets in nymphs of the Asian citrus psyllid are held externally against the clypeus by a special paired organ not found in the adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Differences in ultrastructure of the mouthparts in nymphs and adults of the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera, Psyllidae), vector of the bacterium associated with citrus huanglongbing disease, were studied using scanning electron microscopy. The number of sensilla on the labial tip in...

  12. Compatibility of Isaria fumosorosea (Hypocreales: Cordycipitaceae) Blastospores with Agricultural Chemicals Used for Management of the Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae).

    PubMed

    Avery, Pasco B; Pick, David A; Aristizábal, Luis F; Kerrigan, James; Powell, Charles A; Rogers, Michael E; Arthurs, Steven P

    2013-01-01

    Biorational insecticides are being increasingly emphasized for inclusion in integrated pest management programs for invasive insects. The entomopathogenic fungus, Isaria fumosorosea, can be used to help manage the Asian citrus psyllid with minimal impact on beneficial arthropods, but its effectiveness may be compromised by agrochemicals used to control concurrent arthropod pests and diseases. We evaluated the compatibility of I. fumosorosea blastospores with a range of spray oils and copper-based fungicides registered for use in citrus groves. Results of laboratory and greenhouse tests showed a range of responses of the fungus to the different materials, including compatibility and incompatibility. Overall, I. fumosorosea growth in vitro was reduced least by petroleum-based materials and most by botanical oils and borax, and some of the copper-based fungicides, suggesting that tank mixing of I. fumosorosea with these latter products should be avoided. However, equivalent negative effects of test materials on fungal pathogenicity were not always observed in tests with adult psyllids. We hypothesize that some oils enhanced adherence of blastospores to the insect cuticle, overcoming negative impacts on germination. Our data show that care should be taken in selecting appropriate agrochemicals for tank-mixing with commercial formulations of entomopathogenic fungi for management of citrus pests. The prospects of using I. fumosorosea for managing the invasive Asian citrus psyllid and other citrus pests are discussed. PMID:26462531

  13. Compatibility of Isaria fumosorosea (Hypocreales: Cordycipitaceae) Blastospores with Agricultural Chemicals Used for Management of the Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae)

    PubMed Central

    Avery, Pasco B.; Pick, David A.; Aristizábal, Luis F.; Kerrigan, James; Powell, Charles A.; Rogers, Michael E.; Arthurs, Steven P.

    2013-01-01

    Biorational insecticides are being increasingly emphasized for inclusion in integrated pest management programs for invasive insects. The entomopathogenic fungus, Isaria fumosorosea, can be used to help manage the Asian citrus psyllid with minimal impact on beneficial arthropods, but its effectiveness may be compromised by agrochemicals used to control concurrent arthropod pests and diseases. We evaluated the compatibility of I. fumosorosea blastospores with a range of spray oils and copper-based fungicides registered for use in citrus groves. Results of laboratory and greenhouse tests showed a range of responses of the fungus to the different materials, including compatibility and incompatibility. Overall, I. fumosorosea growth in vitro was reduced least by petroleum-based materials and most by botanical oils and borax, and some of the copper-based fungicides, suggesting that tank mixing of I. fumosorosea with these latter products should be avoided. However, equivalent negative effects of test materials on fungal pathogenicity were not always observed in tests with adult psyllids. We hypothesize that some oils enhanced adherence of blastospores to the insect cuticle, overcoming negative impacts on germination. Our data show that care should be taken in selecting appropriate agrochemicals for tank-mixing with commercial formulations of entomopathogenic fungi for management of citrus pests. The prospects of using I. fumosorosea for managing the invasive Asian citrus psyllid and other citrus pests are discussed. PMID:26462531

  14. Identification of Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases in Diaphornia citri, an economically important psyllid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty P450’s in the CYP monooxygenases were identified in the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae). The psyllid is responsible for the transmission of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, the causative agent of huanglongbing ( HLB), also known as citrus greening dise...

  15. Antibacterial Activity of Alkyl Gallates against Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri

    PubMed Central

    Silva, I. C.; Regasini, L. O.; Petrônio, M. S.; Silva, D. H. S.; Bolzani, V. S.; Belasque, J.; Sacramento, L. V. S.

    2013-01-01

    The plant-pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri is the causal agent of Asiatic citrus canker, a serious disease that affects all the cultivars of citrus in subtropical citrus-producing areas worldwide. There is no curative treatment for citrus canker; thus, the eradication of infected plants constitutes the only effective control of the spread of X. citri subsp. citri. Since the eradication program in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, is under threat, there is a clear risk of X. citri subsp. citri becoming endemic in the main orange-producing area in the world. Here we evaluated the potential use of alkyl gallates to prevent X. citri subsp. citri growth. These esters displayed a potent anti-X. citri subsp. citri activity similar to that of kanamycin (positive control), as evaluated by the resazurin microtiter assay (REMA). The treatment of X. citri subsp. citri cells with these compounds induced altered cell morphology, and investigations of the possible intracellular targets using X. citri subsp. citri strains labeled for the septum and centromere pointed to a common target involved in chromosome segregation and cell division. Finally, the artificial inoculation of citrus with X. citri subsp. citri cells pretreated with alkyl gallates showed that the bacterium loses the ability to colonize its host, which indicates the potential of these esters to protect citrus plants against X. citri subsp. citri infection. PMID:23104804

  16. Attraction of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae) to colored light

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The most devasting disease of citrus, huanglongbing (HLB), is spread by the insect vector the Asian Citrus Psyllid (ACP). Although ACP are known to respond to visual cues, previous studies have not documented the specific wavelengths of light attractive to ACP. The objectives of this study were to...

  17. Gene expression in Asian citrus psyllid adults feeding from Florida citrus: Application to biology and vector control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We used a genomics approach to identify some of the genetic basis of D. citri biology, identifying in particular genes associated with feeding, reproduction, pathology, and insecticide resistance. The Asian citrus psyllid (AsCP), Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), is a highly competent vector ...

  18. Acquisition, Replication and Inoculation of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus following Various Acquisition Periods on Huanglongbing-Infected Citrus by Nymphs and Adults of the Asian Citrus Psyllid

    PubMed Central

    Ammar, El-Desouky; Ramos, John E.; Hall, David G.; Dawson, William O.; Shatters, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae), is the primary vector of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) implicated as causative agent of citrus huanglongbing (citrus greening), currently the most serious citrus disease worldwide. Las is transmitted by D. citri in a persistent-circulative manner, but the question of replication of this bacterium in its psyllid vector has not been resolved. Thus, we studied the effects of the acquisition access period (AAP) by nymphs and adults of D. citri on Las acquisition, multiplication and inoculation/transmission. D. citri nymphs or adults (previously non-exposed to Las) were caged on Las-infected citrus plants for an AAP of 1, 7 or 14 days. These ‘Las-exposed’ psyllids were then transferred weekly to healthy citrus or orange jasmine plants, and sampled via quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis 1–42 days post-first access to diseased plants (padp); all tested nymphs became adults 7–14 days padp. Our results indicate that following 1 or 7 day AAP as nymphs 49–59% of Las-exposed psyllids became Las-infected (qPCR-positive), whereas only 8–29% of the psyllids were infected following 1–14 day AAP as adults. Q-PCR analysis also indicated that Las titer in the Las-exposed psyllids (relative to that of the psyllid S20 ribosomal protein gene) was: 1) significantly higher, and increasing at a faster rate, following Las acquisition as nymphs compared to that following Las acquisition as adults; 2) higher as post-acquisition time of psyllids on healthy plants increased reaching a peak at 14–28 days padp for nymphs and 21–35 days padp for adults, with Las titer decreasing or fluctuating after that; 3) higher with longer AAP on infected plants, especially with acquisition as adults. Our results strongly suggest that Las multiplies in both nymphs and adults of D. citri but attains much higher levels in a shorter period of time post-acquisition when acquired by nymphs than when

  19. Acquisition, Replication and Inoculation of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus following Various Acquisition Periods on Huanglongbing-Infected Citrus by Nymphs and Adults of the Asian Citrus Psyllid.

    PubMed

    Ammar, El-Desouky; Ramos, John E; Hall, David G; Dawson, William O; Shatters, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae), is the primary vector of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) implicated as causative agent of citrus huanglongbing (citrus greening), currently the most serious citrus disease worldwide. Las is transmitted by D. citri in a persistent-circulative manner, but the question of replication of this bacterium in its psyllid vector has not been resolved. Thus, we studied the effects of the acquisition access period (AAP) by nymphs and adults of D. citri on Las acquisition, multiplication and inoculation/transmission. D. citri nymphs or adults (previously non-exposed to Las) were caged on Las-infected citrus plants for an AAP of 1, 7 or 14 days. These 'Las-exposed' psyllids were then transferred weekly to healthy citrus or orange jasmine plants, and sampled via quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis 1-42 days post-first access to diseased plants (padp); all tested nymphs became adults 7-14 days padp. Our results indicate that following 1 or 7 day AAP as nymphs 49-59% of Las-exposed psyllids became Las-infected (qPCR-positive), whereas only 8-29% of the psyllids were infected following 1-14 day AAP as adults. Q-PCR analysis also indicated that Las titer in the Las-exposed psyllids (relative to that of the psyllid S20 ribosomal protein gene) was: 1) significantly higher, and increasing at a faster rate, following Las acquisition as nymphs compared to that following Las acquisition as adults; 2) higher as post-acquisition time of psyllids on healthy plants increased reaching a peak at 14-28 days padp for nymphs and 21-35 days padp for adults, with Las titer decreasing or fluctuating after that; 3) higher with longer AAP on infected plants, especially with acquisition as adults. Our results strongly suggest that Las multiplies in both nymphs and adults of D. citri but attains much higher levels in a shorter period of time post-acquisition when acquired by nymphs than when acquired by adults

  20. Expressed Genes in Asian Citrus Psyllid adults feeding on citrus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We created and described the first genetic data set from the Asian citrus psyllid, AsCP, Diaphorina citri, Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae). The AsCP spread the plant-infecting bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, which is associated with the citrus disease Huanglongbing, HLB, known as Citru...

  1. The jumping plant-louse Diaphorina teucrii sp. nov. (Hemiptera, Liviidae) associated with Teucrium (Lamiaceae) and its parasitoid Tamarixia dorchinae sp. nov. (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae) from the Negev desert, Israel.

    PubMed

    Burckhardt, Daniel; Yefremova, Zoya; Yegorenkova, Ekaterina

    2015-01-01

    Adults and immatures of Diaphorina teucrii sp. nov. (Hemiptera, Liviidae, Euphyllurinae) and adults of Tamarixia dorchinae sp. nov. (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae, Tetrastichinae) from Israel are described, diagnosed and illustrated. D. teucrii sp. nov. develops on Teucrium capitatum (Lamiaceae), representing a family which was previously not recorded as a psyllid host from Israel, and is parasitised by Tamarixia dorchinae sp. nov. Identification keys are provided for the Diaphorina and Tamarixia species occurring in Israel. PMID:25781261

  2. Ontogenic variation in citrus flush shoots and its relation with host plant finding and acceptance by Asian citrus psyllid (Hemiptera: Psyllidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) is a destructive insect mainly because it vectors the bacterial pathogens that cause the deadly and incurable citrus greening disease. Diaphorina citri adult females lay eggs and immature development occurs exclusively on new flush sh...

  3. Probing behaviors of adult Asian citrus psyllid (Hemiptera: Psyllidae)are not appreciably affected by soil application of field-rate aldicarb to citrus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2005, Huanglongbing disease (HLB), also known as citrus greening, was discovered in Florida. The presumptive causal agent of this disease is the phloem-limited bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las), which is transmitted by the Asian citrus psyllid,Diaphorina citri Kuwayama. Following ...

  4. A comparison of sticky traps for monitoring Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Six types of sticky card traps differing in color and trapping adhesive were evaluated for monitoring Asian citrus psyllid in citrus in the United States (Florida and Texas). Spectral reflectance measurements were taken to categorize the color (wavelength) spectrum of each trap. Three of the traps (...

  5. An evaluation of different plant genotypes for rearing Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psylloidea)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) is the vector of bacteria responsible for a serious citrus disease known as huanglongbing (also known as citrus greening disease). Many research endeavors on ACP are dependent on a steady supply of ACP, which can be facilitated using a laboratory or greenhouse colony m...

  6. Whole genome sequence of “Candidatus Profftella armatura” from Diaphorina citri in Guangdong, China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genome of “Candidatus Profftella armatura” strain YCPA, a symbiont of Asian citrus psyllid, from Guangdong, China, was sequenced. The strain chromosome was 457,565 bp with 24.3% G+C content, 364 predicted open reading frames (ORFs), and 38 RNA genes. The strain also contains a 5,458 bp plasmid, ...

  7. Screening Citrus germplasm for tolerance to HLB and Diaphorina citri--progress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article summarizes a project that is being funded in part by the California Citrus Research Board. In a previous field trial, 87 genotypes of citrus were planted in the field in Florida and the different genotypes were evaluated for tolerance to Asian citrus psyllid, citrus leaf miner, and hua...

  8. Antibiosis and antixenosis resistance of Poncirus and Citrus x Poncirus germplasm to Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid, which is a worldwide pest that spreads citrus greening disease, may best be controlled by finding varieties of citrus that are resistant to the psyllid. We tested trifoliate citrus and trifoliate hybrids for resistance to the psyllid. Trifoliates were nearly all resistant,...

  9. Metagenomic analysis of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus in naturally populated psyllids (Diaphorina citri) using BAC libraries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) is the most prevalent species of three species of Ca. Liberibacter causing citrus huanglongbing (HLB) in the world. The Las genome sequence published in 2009 was obtained from a single Las-infected psyllid using metagenomic approach. Studies of genetic divers...

  10. Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri type IV Pilus is required for twitching motility, biofilm development, and adherence.

    PubMed

    Dunger, German; Guzzo, Cristiane R; Andrade, Maxuel O; Jones, Jeffrey B; Farah, Chuck S

    2014-10-01

    Bacterial type IV pili (T4P) are long, flexible surface filaments that consist of helical polymers of mostly pilin subunits. Cycles of polymerization, attachment, and depolymerization mediate several pilus-dependent bacterial behaviors, including twitching motility, surface adhesion, pathogenicity, natural transformation, escape from immune system defense mechanisms, and biofilm formation. The Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri strain 306 genome codes for a large set of genes involved in T4P biogenesis and regulation and includes several pilin homologs. We show that X. citri subsp. citri can exhibit twitching motility in a manner similar to that observed in other bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Xylella fastidiosa and that this motility is abolished in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri knockout strains in the genes coding for the major pilin subunit PilAXAC3241, the ATPases PilBXAC3239 and PilTXAC2924, and the T4P biogenesis regulators PilZXAC1133 and FimXXAC2398. Microscopy analyses were performed to compare patterns of bacterial migration in the wild-type and knockout strains and we observed that the formation of mushroom-like structures in X. citri subsp. citri biofilm requires a functional T4P. Finally, infection of X. citri subsp. citri cells by the bacteriophage (ΦXacm4-11 is T4P dependent. The results of this study improve our understanding of how T4P influence Xanthomonas motility, biofilm formation, and susceptibility to phage infection. PMID:25180689

  11. Foliar application of biofilm formation-inhibiting compounds enhances control of citrus canker caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinyun; Wang, Nian

    2014-02-01

    Citrus canker caused by the bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri is an economically important disease of citrus worldwide. Biofilm formation plays an important role in early infection of X. citri subsp. citri on host leaves. In this study, we assessed the hypothesis that small molecules inhibiting biofilm formation reduce X. citri subsp. citri infection and enhance the control of citrus canker disease. D-leucine and 3-indolylacetonitrile (IAN) were found to prevent biofilm formation by X. citri subsp. citri on different abiotic surfaces and host leaves at a concentration lower than the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis indicated that IAN repressed expression of chemotaxis/motility-related genes in X. citri subsp. citri. In laboratory experiments, planktonic and biofilm cells of X. citri subsp. citri treated with D-leucine and IAN, either alone or in combination, were more susceptible to copper (CuSO4) than those untreated. In greenhouse assays, D-leucine and IAN applied alone or combined with copper reduced both the number of canker lesions and bacterial populations of X. citri subsp. citri on citrus host leaves. This study provides the basis for the use of foliar-applied biofilm inhibitors for the control of citrus canker alone or combined with copper-based bactericides. PMID:23901828

  12. A comparison of the bioassay test and culture to detect Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus canker (caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri [Xcc]) can cause yield loss of susceptible citrus and result in trade restrictions of fresh fruit. For both regulatory purposes and epidemiological studies, accurate detection and quantification of viable inoculum is critical. Two accepted meth...

  13. Predisposition of citrus foliage to infection with Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus canker (caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, Xcc) is a serious disease of susceptible citrus in Florida and other citrus-growing areas of the world. The effect of leaf preconditioning as a route for entry of the bacteria is poorly characterized. A series of experiments were designed to i...

  14. Predisposition of citrus foliage to infection with Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus canker (caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, Xcc) is a serious disease of susceptible citrus in Florida and other citrus-growing areas of the world. The specific effects of predisposing factors for bacterial penetration of leaves are poorly characterized. Experiments were designed to inv...

  15. Resistance of sweet orange Pera (Citrus sinensis) genotypes to Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri under field conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus canker control is based on protection measures and eradication of plants infected with Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri. Although these measures show satisfactory results, the use of resistant genotypes is an important alternative for citrus canker control. The aim of this study was to evaluate...

  16. Novel delivery of the fungi Paecilomyces formosoroseus (Deuteromycotina: Hyphomycetes) for managing the Asian citrus psyllid (Psyllidae: Hemiptera)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A method was developed to increase efficacy and reduce grower costs when using the biological control fungal agent Paecilomyces fumosoroseus blastospores (Deuteromycotina: Hyphomycetes) to infect adult Asian citrus psyllids, Diaphorina citri (Psyllidae: Hemiptera). We analyzed the efficacy of this A...

  17. Toxicity of pesticides to Tamarixia radiata, a parasitoid of the Asian citrus psyllid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sixteen pesticides including two fungicides were evaluated for toxicity to adult Tamarixia radiata (Waterston) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), a parasitoid of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae). Percentage mortality data were evaluated to generally assess IPM-com...

  18. Novel delivery of the fungi Paecilomyces formosoroseus (Deuteromycotina: Hyphomycetes) for managing the Asian citrus psyllid (Psyllidae: Hemiptera)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A method was developed to increase efficacy and reduce grower costs when using the biological control fungal agent Paecilomyces fumosoroseus blastospores (Deuteromycotina: Hyphomycetes) to infect adult Asian citrus psyllids, Diaphorina citri (Psyllidae: Hemiptera). We analyzed the efficacy of this ‘...

  19. Sensitive detection of Spiroplasma citri by targeting prophage sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spiroplasma citri is a phloem limited and nutritionally fastidious wall-less bacterium causing citrus stubborn disease (CSD) in California. An important step in CSD management is early detection of S. citri. Because isolation of S. citri is technically demanding and time consuming, current detection...

  20. Fortunella margarita Transcriptional Reprogramming Triggered by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Citrus canker disease caused by the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) has become endemic in areas where high temperature, rain, humidity, and windy conditions provide a favourable environment for the dissemination of the bacterium. Xcc is pathogenic on many commercial citrus varieties but appears to elicit an incompatible reaction on the citrus relative Fortunella margarita Swing (kumquat), in the form of a very distinct delayed necrotic response. We have developed subtractive libraries enriched in sequences expressed in kumquat leaves during both early and late stages of the disease. The isolated differentially expressed transcripts were subsequently sequenced. Our results demonstrate how the use of microarray expression profiling can help assign roles to previously uncharacterized genes and elucidate plant pathogenesis-response related mechanisms. This can be considered to be a case study in a citrus relative where high throughput technologies were utilized to understand defence mechanisms in Fortunella and citrus at the molecular level. Results cDNAs from sequenced kumquat libraries (ESTs) made from subtracted RNA populations, healthy vs. infected, were used to make this microarray. Of 2054 selected genes on a customized array, 317 were differentially expressed (P < 0.05) in Xcc challenged kumquat plants compared to mock-inoculated ones. This study identified components of the incompatible interaction such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and programmed cell death (PCD). Common defence mechanisms and a number of resistance genes were also identified. In addition, there were a considerable number of differentially regulated genes that had no homologues in the databases. This could be an indication of either a specialized set of genes employed by kumquat in response to canker disease or new defence mechanisms in citrus. Conclusion Functional categorization of kumquat Xcc-responsive genes revealed an enhanced defence

  1. Potential of South African entomopathogenic nematodes (Heterorhabditidae and Steinernematidae) for control of the citrus mealybug, Planococcus citri (Pseudococcidae).

    PubMed

    van Niekerk, Sonnica; Malan, Antoinette P

    2012-10-01

    Planococcus citri, the citrus mealybug, is the most important species of mealybug known to infest citrus in South Africa. Various laboratory bioassays were conducted to determine the potential of entomopathogenic nematodes to control P. citri. Adult female P. citri were screened for susceptibility to six indigenous nematode species. P. citri was found to be most susceptible to Steinernema yirgalemense and Heterorhabditis zealandica, causing 97% and 91% mortality, respectively. The development of nematodes after infecting adult female P. citri showed both H. zealandica and S. yirgalemense were able to complete their life cycles inside the host. Further bioassays illustrated a linear relationship between mealybug mortality and the concentration of nematodes applied, with the highest level of control using a concentration of 80 infective juveniles (IJs)/insect. As nematodes would be used as an above-ground application to control P. citri in citrus orchards, available water is a major limiting factor. Insecticidal activity proved to be dependent on the available surface moisture after nematode application. The water activity (a(w)) bioassay indicated that S. yirgalemense to be two times more tolerant to lower levels of free water, with a(w50)=0.96 and a(w90)=0.99, compared to H. zealandica with a(w50)=0.98 and a(w)90=1.0. After application, nematodes have a limited time frame in which to locate and infect hosts, as the level of available free water gradually decreases, as trees dry out. S. yirgalemense proved able to locate and infect P. citri quicker than H. zealandica. Nematode activity was not significantly affected when exposed to 15°C, 20°C and 25°C. IJs were able to infect P. citri at an exposure time as short as half an hour. Results also showed that the first 2-4h post application is the most decisive time for establishing successful infection of mealybugs. This is the first report on the potential use of nematodes for the control of P. citri. PMID:22884676

  2. Identification of an Extracellular Endoglucanase That Is Required for Full Virulence in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dongling; Zhuo, Tao; Fan, Xiaojing; Zou, Huasong

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri causes citrus canker disease, which is characterized by the formation of water-soaked lesions, white or yellow spongy pustules and brown corky canker. In this work, we report the contribution of extracellular endoglucanase to canker development during infection. The ectopic expression of nine putative cellulases in Escherichia coli indicated that two endoglucanases, BglC3 and EngXCA, show carboxymethyl cellulase activity. Both bglC3 and engXCA genes were transcribed in X. citri subsp. citri, however, only BglC3 protein was detected outside the cell in western blot analysis. The deletion of bglC3 gene resulted in complete loss of extracellular carboxymethyl cellulase activity and delayed the onset of canker symptoms in both infiltration- and wound-inoculation assays. When growing in plant tissue, the cell density of bglC3 mutant was lower than that of the wild type. Our data demonstrated that BglC3 is an extracellular endoglucanase required for the full virulence of X. citri subsp. citri. PMID:26950296

  3. Comparison of potato and asian citrus psyllid adult and nymph transcriptomes identified vector transcripts with potential involvement in circulative, propagative liberibacter transmission.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Tonja W; Vyas, Meenal; He, Ruifeng; Nelson, William; Cicero, Joseph M; Willer, Mark; Kim, Ryan; Kramer, Robin; May, Greg A; Crow, John A; Soderlund, Carol A; Gang, David R; Brown, Judith K

    2014-01-01

    The potato psyllid (PoP) Bactericera cockerelli (Sulc) and Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) Diaphorina citri Kuwayama are the insect vectors of the fastidious plant pathogen, Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum (CLso) and Ca. L. asiaticus (CLas), respectively. CLso causes Zebra chip disease of potato and vein-greening in solanaceous species, whereas, CLas causes citrus greening disease. The reliance on insecticides for vector management to reduce pathogen transmission has increased interest in alternative approaches, including RNA interference to abate expression of genes essential for psyllid-mediated Ca. Liberibacter transmission. To identify genes with significantly altered expression at different life stages and conditions of CLso/CLas infection, cDNA libraries were constructed for CLso-infected and -uninfected PoP adults and nymphal instars. Illumina sequencing produced 199,081,451 reads that were assembled into 82,224 unique transcripts. PoP and the analogous transcripts from ACP adult and nymphs reported elsewhere were annotated, organized into functional gene groups using the Gene Ontology classification system, and analyzed for differential in silico expression. Expression profiles revealed vector life stage differences and differential gene expression associated with Liberibacter infection of the psyllid host, including invasion, immune system modulation, nutrition, and development. PMID:25436509

  4. Comparison of Potato and Asian Citrus Psyllid Adult and Nymph Transcriptomes Identified Vector Transcripts with Potential Involvement in Circulative, Propagative Liberibacter Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Tonja W.; Vyas, Meenal; He, Ruifeng; Nelson, William; Cicero, Joseph M.; Willer, Mark; Kim, Ryan; Kramer, Robin; May, Greg A.; Crow, John A.; Soderlund, Carol A.; Gang, David R.; Brown, Judith K.

    2014-01-01

    The potato psyllid (PoP) Bactericera cockerelli (Sulc) and Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) Diaphorina citri Kuwayama are the insect vectors of the fastidious plant pathogen, Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum (CLso) and Ca. L. asiaticus (CLas), respectively. CLso causes Zebra chip disease of potato and vein-greening in solanaceous species, whereas, CLas causes citrus greening disease. The reliance on insecticides for vector management to reduce pathogen transmission has increased interest in alternative approaches, including RNA interference to abate expression of genes essential for psyllid-mediated Ca. Liberibacter transmission. To identify genes with significantly altered expression at different life stages and conditions of CLso/CLas infection, cDNA libraries were constructed for CLso-infected and -uninfected PoP adults and nymphal instars. Illumina sequencing produced 199,081,451 reads that were assembled into 82,224 unique transcripts. PoP and the analogous transcripts from ACP adult and nymphs reported elsewhere were annotated, organized into functional gene groups using the Gene Ontology classification system, and analyzed for differential in silico expression. Expression profiles revealed vector life stage differences and differential gene expression associated with Liberibacter infection of the psyllid host, including invasion, immune system modulation, nutrition, and development. PMID:25436509

  5. Use of carnauba based carrier for copper sprays reduces infection by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri and Diaporthe citri in Florida commercial grapefruit groves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Asiatic citrus canker caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc), a bacterial disease of citrus, was first documented on Florida citrus in the early 1900’s. At that time the disease was managed, only to return in the 1980’s and 90’s and to finally remain uncontrolled in 2004. Xcc is most active ...

  6. Molecular Effects of Irradiation (Cobalt-60) on the Control of Panonychus citri (Acari: Tetranychidae)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ke; Luo, Lingyan; Chen, Xieting; Hu, Meiying; Hu, Qiongbo; Gong, Liang; Weng, Qunfang

    2015-01-01

    The effective dose of irradiation to control pest mites in quarantine has been studied extensively, but the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of the irradiation on mites are largely unknown. In this study, exposure to 400 Gy of γ rays had significant (p < 0.05) effects on the adult survival, fecundity and egg viability of Panonychus citri. The irradiation caused the degradation of the DNA of P. citri adults and damaged the plasma membrane system of the egg, which led to condensed nucleoli and gathered yolk. Additionally, the transcriptomes and gene expression profiles between irradiated and non-irradiated mites were compared, and three digital gene expression libraries were assembled and analyzed. The differentially expressed genes were putatively involved in apoptosis, cell death and the cell cycle. Finally, the expression profiles of some related genes were studied using quantitative real-time PCR. Our study provides valuable information on the changes in the transcriptome of irradiated P. citri, which will facilitate a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that cause the sterility induced by irradiation. PMID:26569230

  7. Molecular Effects of Irradiation (Cobalt-60) on the Control of Panonychus citri (Acari: Tetranychidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke; Luo, Lingyan; Chen, Xieting; Hu, Meiying; Hu, Qiongbo; Gong, Liang; Weng, Qunfang

    2015-01-01

    The effective dose of irradiation to control pest mites in quarantine has been studied extensively, but the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of the irradiation on mites are largely unknown. In this study, exposure to 400 Gy of γ rays had significant (p < 0.05) effects on the adult survival, fecundity and egg viability of Panonychus citri. The irradiation caused the degradation of the DNA of P. citri adults and damaged the plasma membrane system of the egg, which led to condensed nucleoli and gathered yolk. Additionally, the transcriptomes and gene expression profiles between irradiated and non-irradiated mites were compared, and three digital gene expression libraries were assembled and analyzed. The differentially expressed genes were putatively involved in apoptosis, cell death and the cell cycle. Finally, the expression profiles of some related genes were studied using quantitative real-time PCR. Our study provides valuable information on the changes in the transcriptome of irradiated P. citri, which will facilitate a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that cause the sterility induced by irradiation. PMID:26569230

  8. Studies of in aere formed stylet sheath from the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri, Hemiptera: Psyllidae) and other phytophagous Hemiptera

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stylet sheath formation is a common feature among phytophagous hemipterans. These sheaths are considered essential to promote a successful feeding event of these piercing-sucking insects. The stylet sheath composition is unknown and it is suggested that it forms through interactions with external (h...

  9. Asian citrus psyllids and shade: Survival of Diaphorina citri on Murraya exotica foliage exposed to different levels of light

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using shade cloths of different densities, potted individuals of Murraya exotica (Rutaceae) were exposed to levels of photosynthetic radiation (PAR) varying from 48 µmol photons per meter2 per second to 1562 µmol photons per meter2 per second (average of three readings taken at noon during condition...

  10. Detection of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus associated with huanglongbing disease in the salivary glands and alimentary canal of Diaphorina citri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) has been strongly implicated as the causative agent of huanglongbing (HLB), or citrus greening, which is the most devastating citrus disease in Florida and other parts of the world. HLB is transmitted in a persistent manner by psyllid vectors and in the US and...

  11. Quantitative Detection of Spiroplasma Citri by Real Time PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a need to develop an accurate and rapid method to detect Spiroplasma citri, the causal agent of citrus stubborn disease for use in epidemiology studies. Quantitative real-time PCR was developed for detection of S. citri. Two sets of primers based on sequences from the P58 putative adhesin ...

  12. Transmission of Spiroplasma citri to Carrots by Circulifer tenellus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spiroplasma citri is a wall-less bacterium that causes citrus stubborn disease (CSD) and brittle root in horseradish. Recently, carrot purple disease was reported in Washington State, and attributed to S. citri, but the mechanisms of transmission and fulfillment of Koch’s postulates were not complet...

  13. Expression of Xylella fastidiosa RpfF in citrus disrupts signaling in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri and thereby its virulence.

    PubMed

    Caserta, R; Picchi, S C; Takita, M A; Tomaz, J P; Pereira, W E L; Machado, M A; Ionescu, M; Lindow, S; De Souza, A A

    2014-11-01

    Xylella fastidiosa and Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, that cause citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC) and citrus canker diseases, respectively, utilize diffusible signal factor (DSF) for quorum sensing. DSF, produced by RpfF, are similar fatty acids in both organisms, although a different set of genes is regulated by DSF in each species. Because of this similarity, Xylella fastidiosa DSF might be recognized and affect the biology of Xanthomonas citri. Therefore, transgenic Citrus sinensis and Carrizo citrange plants overexpressing the Xylella fastidiosa rpfF were inoculated with Xanthomonas citri and changes in symptoms of citrus canker were observed. X. citri biofilms formed only at wound sites on transgenic leaves and were thicker; however, bacteria were unable to break through the tissue and form pustules elsewhere. Although abundant growth of X. citri occurred at wound sites on inoculated transgenic leaves, little growth was observed on unwounded tissue. Genes in the DFS-responsive core in X. citri were downregulated in bacteria isolated from transgenic leaves. DSF-dependent expression of engA was suppressed in cells exposed to xylem sap from transgenic plants. Thus, altered symptom development appears to be due to reduced expression of virulence genes because of the presence of antagonists of DSF signaling in X. citri in rpfF-expressing plants. PMID:25099341

  14. Bismerthiazol inhibits Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri growth and induces differential expression of citrus defense-related genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus canker, caused by Xanthomonas citri ssp. citri (Xcc), is a serious disease and causes substantial economic losses to the citrus industry worldwide. The bactericide, bismerthiazol, has been widely used to control rice bacterial blight (Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae). In this paper, we demonstr...

  15. Dispersal of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri bacteria downwind from harvested, infected fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus canker (Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri , Xac) is a bacterial disease that severely damages citrus crops. Its recent introduction to Florida has created difficulties with international and domestic trade and movement of citrus material. This study examined the potential dispersal of bacteri...

  16. New replacement name for Chrysotus infirmus Wei, Zhang & Zhou, 2014 (Diptera, Dolichopodidae, Diaphorinae)

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zheng-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chrysotus weii Zhou, nom. n., the new replacement name is proposed for the species Chrysotus infirmus Wei, Zhang & Zhou, 2014 (Diptera: Brachycera: Dolichopodidae: Diaphorinae), which was preoccupied by Chrysotus infirmus Parent, 1933. PMID:27551236

  17. Identification and characterization of biofilm formation-defective mutants of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri.

    PubMed

    Malamud, Florencia; Homem, Rafael Augusto; Conforte, Valeria Paola; Yaryura, Pablo Marcelo; Castagnaro, Atilio Pedro; Marano, María Rosa; do Amaral, Alexandre Morais; Vojnov, Adrián Alberto

    2013-09-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) develops a biofilm structure both in vitro and in vivo. Despite all the progress achieved by studies regarding biofilm formation, many of its mechanisms remain poorly understood. This work focuses on the identification of new genes involved in biofilm formation and how they are related to motility, virulence and chemotaxis in Xcc. A Tn5 library of approximately 6000 Xcc (strain 306) mutants was generated and screened to search for biofilm formation defective strains. We identified 23 genes not previously associated with biofilm formation. The analysis of the 23 mutants not only revealed the involvement of new genes in biofilm formation, but also reinforced the importance of exopolysaccharide production, motility and cell surface structures in this process. This collection of biofilm-defective mutants underscores the multifactorial genetic programme underlying the establishment of biofilm in Xcc. PMID:23813675

  18. Foraging on and consumption of two species of papaya pest mites, Tetranychus kanzawai and Panonychus citri (Acari: Tetranychidae), by Mallada basalis (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ling Lan; Nechols, James R; Margolies, David C; Campbell, James F; Yang, Ping Shih; Chen, Chien Chung; Lu, Chiu Tung

    2009-06-01

    Tetranychus kanzawai Kishida and Panonychus citri (McGregor) are two major acarine pests of the principal papaya variety in Taiwan, and they often co-occur in the same papaya screenhouses. This study measured prey acceptability, foraging schedule, short-term consumption rate, and handling time of larvae of a domesticated line of the green lacewing, Mallada basalis (Walker), in no-choice tests with different life stages of these two mite pests. After a period of prey deprivation, all three larval instars of M. basalis exhibited a high rate of acceptance of all life stages of both T. kanzawai and P. citri. In 2-h trials, second- and third-instar predators foraged actively most of the time, whereas first instars spent approximately 40% of the time at rest. Consumption increased and prey handling time decreased as predator life stage advanced and prey stage decreased. Third-instar lacewings consumed an average of 311.4 T. kanzawai eggs (handling time: 6.7 s/egg) and 68.2 adults (handling time: 58.8 s/adult), whereas first instars consumed 19.6 eggs (handling time: 23.6 s/egg) and 4.0 adults (handling time: 633.4 s/adult). M. basalis generally consumed more P. citri than T. kanzawai. Except for prey eggs, handling times of T. kanzawai were generally longer than those of P. citri by all M. basalis instars. Handling times were shorter, and consumption were greater, at the higher P. citri density than at the lower one, whereas there were generally no significant differences in prey acceptability and foraging time between those two densities. This study suggests that M. basalis larvae may have high potential for augmentative biological control of mites on papayas. PMID:19508780

  19. Identification of seven novel virulence genes from Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri by Tn5-based random mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Song, Xue; Guo, Jing; Ma, Wen-xiu; Ji, Zhi-yuan; Zou, Li-fang; Chen, Gong-you; Zou, Hua-song

    2015-05-01

    To identify novel virulence genes, a mutant library of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri 29-1 was produced using EZ-Tn5 transposon and the mutants were inoculated into susceptible grapefruit. Forty mutants with altered virulence phenotypes were identified. Nine of the mutants showed a complete loss of citrus canker induction, and the other 31 mutants resulted in attenuated canker symptoms. Southern blot analysis revealed that each of the mutants carried a single copy of Tn5. The flanking sequence was identified by plasmid rescue and 18 different ORFs were identified in the genome sequence. Of these 18 ORFs, seven had not been previously associated with the virulence of X. citri subsp. citri and were therefore confirmed by complementation analysis. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the seven genes were upregulated when the bacteria were grown in citrus plants, suggesting that the expression of these genes was essential for canker development. PMID:25935304

  20. Asian Citrus Psyllid Expression Profiles Suggest Candidatus Liberibacter Asiaticus-Mediated Alteration of Adult Nutrition and Metabolism, and of Nymphal Development and Immunity.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Meenal; Fisher, Tonja W; He, Ruifeng; Nelson, William; Yin, Guohua; Cicero, Joseph M; Willer, Mark; Kim, Ryan; Kramer, Robin; May, Greg A; Crow, John A; Soderlund, Carol A; Gang, David R; Brown, Judith K

    2015-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) is the insect vector of the fastidious bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), the causal agent of citrus greening disease, or Huanglongbing (HLB). The widespread invasiveness of the psyllid vector and HLB in citrus trees worldwide has underscored the need for non-traditional approaches to manage the disease. One tenable solution is through the deployment of RNA interference technology to silence protein-protein interactions essential for ACP-mediated CLas invasion and transmission. To identify psyllid interactor-bacterial effector combinations associated with psyllid-CLas interactions, cDNA libraries were constructed from CLas-infected and CLas-free ACP adults and nymphs, and analyzed for differential expression. Library assemblies comprised 24,039,255 reads and yielded 45,976 consensus contigs. They were annotated (UniProt), classified using Gene Ontology, and subjected to in silico expression analyses using the Transcriptome Computational Workbench (TCW) (http://www.sohomoptera.org/ACPPoP/). Functional-biological pathway interpretations were carried out using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes databases. Differentially expressed contigs in adults and/or nymphs represented genes and/or metabolic/pathogenesis pathways involved in adhesion, biofilm formation, development-related, immunity, nutrition, stress, and virulence. Notably, contigs involved in gene silencing and transposon-related responses were documented in a psyllid for the first time. This is the first comparative transcriptomic analysis of ACP adults and nymphs infected and uninfected with CLas. The results provide key initial insights into host-parasite interactions involving CLas effectors that contribute to invasion-virulence, and to host nutritional exploitation and immune-related responses that appear to be essential for successful ACP-mediated circulative, propagative CLas transmission. PMID

  1. Asian Citrus Psyllid Expression Profiles Suggest Candidatus Liberibacter Asiaticus-Mediated Alteration of Adult Nutrition and Metabolism, and of Nymphal Development and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    He, Ruifeng; Nelson, William; Yin, Guohua; Cicero, Joseph M.; Willer, Mark; Kim, Ryan; Kramer, Robin; May, Greg A.; Crow, John A.; Soderlund, Carol A.; Gang, David R.; Brown, Judith K.

    2015-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) is the insect vector of the fastidious bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), the causal agent of citrus greening disease, or Huanglongbing (HLB). The widespread invasiveness of the psyllid vector and HLB in citrus trees worldwide has underscored the need for non-traditional approaches to manage the disease. One tenable solution is through the deployment of RNA interference technology to silence protein-protein interactions essential for ACP-mediated CLas invasion and transmission. To identify psyllid interactor-bacterial effector combinations associated with psyllid-CLas interactions, cDNA libraries were constructed from CLas-infected and CLas-free ACP adults and nymphs, and analyzed for differential expression. Library assemblies comprised 24,039,255 reads and yielded 45,976 consensus contigs. They were annotated (UniProt), classified using Gene Ontology, and subjected to in silico expression analyses using the Transcriptome Computational Workbench (TCW) (http://www.sohomoptera.org/ACPPoP/). Functional-biological pathway interpretations were carried out using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes databases. Differentially expressed contigs in adults and/or nymphs represented genes and/or metabolic/pathogenesis pathways involved in adhesion, biofilm formation, development-related, immunity, nutrition, stress, and virulence. Notably, contigs involved in gene silencing and transposon-related responses were documented in a psyllid for the first time. This is the first comparative transcriptomic analysis of ACP adults and nymphs infected and uninfected with CLas. The results provide key initial insights into host-parasite interactions involving CLas effectors that contribute to invasion-virulence, and to host nutritional exploitation and immune-related responses that appear to be essential for successful ACP-mediated circulative, propagative CLas transmission. PMID

  2. PCR-based Detection of Spiroplasma Citri Associated with Citrus Stubborn Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improvements in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of Spiroplasma citri, the causal agent of citrus stubborn disease, made PCR more reliable than culturing for S. citri detection. Primer sequences from the P89 putative adhesin gene, which is present on a plasmid as well as in the S. citri gen...

  3. Genetic variation of Spiroplasma citri populations in California revealed by two genomic loci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus stubborn disease (CSD), known to be present in California since 1915, was confirmed to be caused by Spiroplasma citri in 1972. Hosts of S. citri include citrus and a wide range of annual weeds, ornamentals and crops such as carrots and sesame. Genetic variation of S. citri in California was e...

  4. PCR-based Detection of Spiroplasma citri Associated with Citrus Stubborn Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PCR detection of Spiroplasma citri, the causal agent of citrus stubborn disease, was improved using primers based on sequences of the P89 adhesin gene and the P58 putative adhesin multigene of S. citri. PCR was compared with isolation by culturing for detection of S. citri in two 20 A citrus orchar...

  5. A MLVA genotyping scheme for global surveillance of the citrus pathogen Xanthomonas citri pv. citri suggests a worldwide geographical expansion of a single genetic lineage.

    PubMed

    Pruvost, Olivier; Magne, Maxime; Boyer, Karine; Leduc, Alice; Tourterel, Christophe; Drevet, Christine; Ravigné, Virginie; Gagnevin, Lionel; Guérin, Fabien; Chiroleu, Frédéric; Koebnik, Ralf; Verdier, Valérie; Vernière, Christian

    2014-01-01

    MultiLocus Variable number of tandem repeat Analysis (MLVA) has been extensively used to examine epidemiological and evolutionary issues on monomorphic human pathogenic bacteria, but not on bacterial plant pathogens of agricultural importance albeit such tools would improve our understanding of their epidemiology, as well as of the history of epidemics on a global scale. Xanthomonas citri pv. citri is a quarantine organism in several countries and a major threat for the citrus industry worldwide. We screened the genomes of Xanthomonas citri pv. citri strain IAPAR 306 and of phylogenetically related xanthomonads for tandem repeats. From these in silico data, an optimized MLVA scheme was developed to assess the global diversity of this monomorphic bacterium. Thirty-one minisatellite loci (MLVA-31) were selected to assess the genetic structure of 129 strains representative of the worldwide pathological and genetic diversity of X. citri pv. citri. Based on Discriminant Analysis of Principal Components (DAPC), four pathotype-specific clusters were defined. DAPC cluster 1 comprised strains that were implicated in the major geographical expansion of X. citri pv. citri during the 20th century. A subset of 12 loci (MLVA-12) resolved 89% of the total diversity and matched the genetic structure revealed by MLVA-31. MLVA-12 is proposed for routine epidemiological identification of X. citri pv. citri, whereas MLVA-31 is proposed for phylogenetic and population genetics studies. MLVA-31 represents an opportunity for international X. citri pv. citri genotyping and data sharing. The MLVA-31 data generated in this study was deposited in the Xanthomonas citri genotyping database (http://www.biopred.net/MLVA/). PMID:24897119

  6. A MLVA Genotyping Scheme for Global Surveillance of the Citrus Pathogen Xanthomonas citri pv. citri Suggests a Worldwide Geographical Expansion of a Single Genetic Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Karine; Leduc, Alice; Tourterel, Christophe; Drevet, Christine; Ravigné, Virginie; Gagnevin, Lionel; Guérin, Fabien; Chiroleu, Frédéric; Koebnik, Ralf; Verdier, Valérie; Vernière, Christian

    2014-01-01

    MultiLocus Variable number of tandem repeat Analysis (MLVA) has been extensively used to examine epidemiological and evolutionary issues on monomorphic human pathogenic bacteria, but not on bacterial plant pathogens of agricultural importance albeit such tools would improve our understanding of their epidemiology, as well as of the history of epidemics on a global scale. Xanthomonas citri pv. citri is a quarantine organism in several countries and a major threat for the citrus industry worldwide. We screened the genomes of Xanthomonas citri pv. citri strain IAPAR 306 and of phylogenetically related xanthomonads for tandem repeats. From these in silico data, an optimized MLVA scheme was developed to assess the global diversity of this monomorphic bacterium. Thirty-one minisatellite loci (MLVA-31) were selected to assess the genetic structure of 129 strains representative of the worldwide pathological and genetic diversity of X. citri pv. citri. Based on Discriminant Analysis of Principal Components (DAPC), four pathotype-specific clusters were defined. DAPC cluster 1 comprised strains that were implicated in the major geographical expansion of X. citri pv. citri during the 20th century. A subset of 12 loci (MLVA-12) resolved 89% of the total diversity and matched the genetic structure revealed by MLVA-31. MLVA-12 is proposed for routine epidemiological identification of X. citri pv. citri, whereas MLVA-31 is proposed for phylogenetic and population genetics studies. MLVA-31 represents an opportunity for international X. citri pv. citri genotyping and data sharing. The MLVA-31 data generated in this study was deposited in the Xanthomonas citri genotyping database (http://www.biopred.net/MLVA/). PMID:24897119

  7. Temperature stress promotes cell division arrest in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri.

    PubMed

    Sumares, Júlia A P; Morão, Luana Galvão; Martins, Paula M M; Martins, Daniela A B; Gomes, Eleni; Belasque, José; Ferreira, Henrique

    2016-04-01

    Citrus canker is an economically important disease that affects orange production in some of the most important producing areas around the world. It represents a great threat to the Brazilian and North American citriculture, particularly to the states of São Paulo and Florida, which together correspond to the biggest orange juice producers in the world. The etiological agent of this disease is the Gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc), which grows optimally in laboratory cultures at ~30°C. To investigate how temperatures differing from 30°C influence the development of Xcc, we subjected the bacterium to thermal stresses, and afterward scored its recovery capability. In addition, we analyzed cell morphology and some markers of essential cellular processes that could indicate the extent of the heat-induced damage. We found that the exposure of Xcc to 37°C for a period of 6 h led to a cell cycle arrest at the division stage. Thermal stress might have also interfered with the DNA replication and/or the chromosome segregation apparatuses, since cells displayed an increased number of sister origins side-by-side within rods. Additionally, Xcc treated at 37°C was still able to induce citrus canker symptoms, showing that thermal stress did not affect the ability of Xcc to colonize the host citrus. At 40-42°C, Xcc lost viability and became unable to induce disease symptoms in citrus. Our results provide evidence about essential cellular mechanisms perturbed by temperature, and can be potentially explored as a new method for Xanthomonas citri synchronization in cell cycle studies, as well as for the sanitation of plant material. PMID:26663580

  8. A protein expression system for tandem affinity purification in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Giordanni C; Martins, Paula M M; Martins, Daniela A B; Gomes, Eleni; Ferreira, Henrique

    2016-01-01

    Citrus canker, caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xac), is one of the most devastating diseases to affect citrus crops. There is no treatment for citrus canker; effective control against the spread of Xac is usually achieved by the elimination of affected plants along with that of asymptomatic neighbors. An in depth understanding of the pathogen is the keystone for understanding of the disease; to this effect we are committed to the development of strategies to ease the study of Xac. Genome sequencing and annotation of Xac revealed that ∼37% of the genome is composed of hypothetical ORFs. To start a systematic characterization of novel factors encoded by Xac, we constructed integrative-vectors for protein expression specific to this bacterium. The vectors allow for the production of TAP-tagged proteins in Xac under the regulation of the xylose promoter. In this study, we show that a TAP-expression vector, integrated into the amy locus of Xac, does not compromise its virulence. Furthermore, our results also demonstrate that the polypeptide TAP can be overproduced in Xac and purified from the soluble phase of cell extracts. Our results substantiate the use of our vectors for protein expression in Xac thus contributing a novel tool for the characterization of proteins and protein complexes generated by this bacterium in vivo. PMID:26991273

  9. treA Codifies for a Trehalase with Involvement in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Alexandrino, André Vessoni; Goto, Leandro Seiji; Novo-Mansur, Maria Teresa Marques

    2016-01-01

    Citrus canker, caused by the bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc), is a severe disease of citrus. Xcc presents broad spectrum of citrus hosts including economically important species whereas X. fuscans subsp. aurantifolii-type C (XauC) causes a milder disease and only infects Citrus aurantifolia. Trehalase catalyzes hydrolysis of the disaccharide trehalose, a sugar that has been reported to be related to Xcc pathogenicity. We expressed the recombinant gene product and assessed Xcc trehalase structural and kinetics data. The recombinant protein presented 42.7% of secondary structures in α-helix and 13% in β-sheets, no quaternary structure in solution, and Michaelis-Menten constant (KM) of 0.077 mM and Vmax 55.308 μMol glucose.min-1.mg protein-1 for trehalose. A Xcc mutant strain (XccΔtreA) was produced by gene deletion from Xcc genome. Enzymatic activity of trehalase was determined in Xcc, XauC and XccΔtreA cellular lysates, showing the highest values for XauC in in vitro infective condition and no activity for XccΔtreA. Finally, leaves of Citrus aurantifolia infected with XccΔtreA showed much more drenching and necrosis than those infected by wild type Xcc. We concluded that trehalase contributes to alleviate bacterial virulence and that inability for trehalose hydrolysis may promote higher Xcc infectivity. PMID:27611974

  10. Bioactive Organocopper Compound from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Inhibits the Growth of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Admilton G.; Spago, Flavia R.; Simionato, Ane S.; Navarro, Miguel O. P.; da Silva, Caroline S.; Barazetti, André R.; Cely, Martha V. T.; Tischer, Cesar A.; San Martin, Juca A. B.; de Jesus Andrade, Célia G. T.; Novello, Cláudio R.; Mello, João C. P.; Andrade, Galdino

    2016-01-01

    Citrus canker is a very destructive disease of citrus species. The challenge is to find new compounds that show strong antibiotic activity and low toxicity to plants and the environment. The objectives of the present study were (1) to extract, purify and evaluate the secondary metabolites with antibiotic activity produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa LV strain in vitro against Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (strain 306), (2) to determine the potential of semi-purified secondary metabolites in foliar application to control citrus canker under greenhouse conditions, and (3) to identify antibiotic activity in orange leaf mesophyll infected with strain 306, by electron microscopy. Two pure bioactive compounds were isolated, an organocopper antibiotic compound (OAC) and phenazine-1-carboxamide. Phenazine-1-carboxamide did not show any antibiotic activity under the experimental conditions used in this study. The OAC showed a high level of antibiotic activity with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.12 μg mL-1. In greenhouse tests for control of citrus canker in orange trees, the semi-purified fraction F3d reduced lesion formation by about 97%. The concentration used was 500 times lower than that for the recommended commercial copper-based product. Electron microscopy showed that F3d altered the exopolysaccharide matrix and caused cell lysis of the pathogen inside the citrus canker lesions. These results suggest that secondary metabolites produced by inducing P. aeruginosa LV strain have a high potential to be used as a bioproduct to control citrus canker. PMID:26903992

  11. Epidemiology of Spiroplasma citri in the Old World.

    PubMed

    Bove, J M; Fos, A; Lallemand, J

    1987-06-01

    Epidemics of citrus stubborn disease (CSD) have been known in the Mediterranean citrus-growing areas as early as 1928. One such outbreak of stubborn disease occurred around 1980 in newly established citrus nurseries on the Syrian coast. Natural transmission of Spiroplasma citri could be shown to be involved. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and culture of S. citri were used to detect the presence of S. citri in leafhoppers. Over 50 leafhopper species were submitted to these analyses, not only in Syria but also in Morocco and France (Corsica) from 1978 to 1985. Neoaliturus (Circulifer) haematoceps was the only species found to harbor the spiroplasma in Morocco, Syria and France (Corsica). Leafhoppers of this species were collected in Corsica, raised in Bordeaux and shown to be vectors of S. citri. The search for N. haematoceps in nature has revealed that Salsola kali (Chenopodiacae) is a favored host plant of this leafhopper. This plant has a wide geographical distribution. In Iran, for instance, it is well known, and grows close to sugar beet and citrus-growing areas. In such areas, sugar beet is known to be infected by curly top virus, and citrus by CSD. N. haematoceps is a vector of both of these diseases. N. tenellus, the vector of S. citri in the USA, is present in the Mediterranean area, but in view of its paucity it does not seem to be a major vector there. In Iran, even though less abundant than N. haematoceps, it could play a role in S. citri transmission. PMID:3312105

  12. Characterization of the Asian Citrus Psyllid Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Reese, Justin; Christenson, Matthew K.; Leng, Nan; Saha, Surya; Cantarel, Brandi; Lindeberg, Magdalen; Tamborindeguy, Cecilia; MacCarthy, Justin; Weaver, Daniel; Trease, Andrew J.; Ready, Steven V.; Davis, Vincent M.; McCormick, Courtney; Haudenschild, Christian; Han, Shunsheng; Johnson, Shannon L.; Shelby, Kent S.; Huang, Hong; Bextine, Blake R.; Shatters, Robert G.; Hall, David G.; Davis, Paul H.; Hunter, Wayne B.

    2014-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) is a vector for the causative agents of Huanglongbing, which threatens citrus production worldwide. This study reports and discusses the first D. citri transcriptomes, encompassing the three main life stages of D. citri, egg, nymph and adult. The transcriptomes were annotated using Gene Ontology (GO) and insecticide-related genes within each life stage were identified to aid the development of future D. citri insecticides. Transcriptome assemblies and other sequence data are available for download at the International Asian Citrus Psyllid Genome Consortium website [http://psyllid.org/download] and at NCBI [http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject/29447]. PMID:24511328

  13. Temporal Transcription Profiling of Sweet Orange in Response to PthA4-Mediated Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Infection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yang; Duan, Shuo; Zhang, Yunzeng; Shantharaj, Deepak; Jones, Jeffrey B; Wang, Nian

    2016-05-01

    Citrus canker, caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, is a devastating disease of most commercial citrus varieties. In our previous study, we analyzed the transcriptional response of 'Valencia' sweet orange to X. citri subsp. citri wild-type and pthA4 mutant infection at 48 h postinoculation (hpi). Using microarray analysis, two PthA4 targets, CsLOB1 and CsSWEET1, were identified. We have shown that PthA4 binds to the effector binding element (EBE) of CsLOB1 and activates gene expression of this susceptibility gene. However, how PthA4 modulates host genes at different stages of infection remains to be determined. In this study, we compared the transcriptional profiles between citrus leaf tissue inoculated with Xcc306 and those inoculated with a pthA4-deletion mutant strain (Xcc306∆pthA4) at 6, 48, and 120 hpi. At both 48 and 120 hpi, the PthA4-mediated infection significantly upregulated expression of a variety of genes involved in cell-wall degradation and modification, DNA packaging, G-protein, protein synthesis, sucrose metabolism, and cell division functions, while the downregulated genes were mainly enriched in photosynthesis, transport, secondary metabolism, cytochrome P450, and various plant defense-associated mechanisms. To validate microarray results, gene expression of 26 genes representing genes associated with cell-wall-associated, immunity system, and carbohydrate metabolism was confirmed using quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Expression patterns of these genes at 48 and 120 hpi were consistent with the microarray results. We also identified putative EBE for PthA4 (EBEPthA4) in the promoter regions of multiple genes upregulated by PthA4, to which PthA4 might bind directly to control their gene expression. Our study provided a dynamic picture of citrus genes regulated by PthA4 during the X. citri subsp. citri infection of citrus leaves at different stages. This study will be useful in further understanding the virulence

  14. SCREENING CITRUS GERMPLASM FOR RESISTANCE TO XANTHOMONAS ANONOPODIS PV. CITRI

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus bacterial canker (causal agent Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac)) is a serious threat to the citrus industry. Currently there are no effective means to control citrus canker. Our objective was to determine the resistance of selected Citrus species, citrus hybrids, and citrus relatives to...

  15. Genome Sequence of Xanthomonas citri pv. mangiferaeindicae Strain LMG 941

    PubMed Central

    Midha, Samriti; Ranjan, Manish; Sharma, Vikas; Pinnaka, Anil Kumar

    2012-01-01

    We report the 5.1-Mb genome sequence of Xanthomonas citri pv. mangiferaeindicae strain LMG 941, the causal agent of bacterial black spot in mango. Apart from evolutionary studies, the draft genome will be a valuable resource for the epidemiological studies and quarantine of this phytopathogen. PMID:22582385

  16. Functional Characterization of a LOV-Histidine Kinase Photoreceptor from Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri.

    PubMed

    Kraiselburd, Ivana; Gutt, Alexander; Losi, Aba; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Orellano, Elena G

    2015-01-01

    The blue-light (BL) absorbing protein Xcc-LOV from Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri is composed of a LOV-domain, a histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator. Spectroscopic characterization of Xcc-LOV identified intermediates and kinetics of the protein's photocycle. Measurements of steady state and time-resolved fluorescence allowed determination of quantum yields for triplet (ΦT  = 0.68 ± 0.03) and photoproduct formation (Φ390  = 0.46 ± 0.05). The lifetime for triplet decay was determined as τT  = 2.4-2.8 μs. Fluorescence of tryptophan and tyrosine residues was unchanged upon light-to-dark conversion, emphasizing the absence of significant conformational changes. Photochemistry was blocked upon cysteine C76 (C76S) mutation, causing a seven-fold longer lifetime of the triplet state (τT  = 16-18.5 μs). Optoacoustic spectroscopy yielded the energy content of the triplet state. Interestingly, Xcc-LOV did not undergo the volume contraction reported for other LOV domains within the observation time window, although the back-conversion into the dark state was accompanied by a volume expansion. A radioactivity-based enzyme function assay revealed a larger HK activity in the lit than in the dark state. The C76S mutant showed a still lower enzyme function, indicating the dark state activity being corrupted by a remaining portion of the long-lived lit state. PMID:26172037

  17. Non-Host Defense Response in a Novel Arabidopsis-Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Pathosystem

    PubMed Central

    An, Chuanfu; Mou, Zhonglin

    2012-01-01

    Citrus canker, caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc), is one of the most destructive diseases of citrus. Progress of breeding citrus canker-resistant varieties is modest due to limited resistant germplasm resources and lack of candidate genes for genetic manipulation. The objective of this study is to establish a novel heterologous pathosystem between Xcc and the well-established model plant Arabidopsis thaliana for defense mechanism dissection and resistance gene identification. Our results indicate that Xcc bacteria neither grow nor decline in Arabidopsis, but induce multiple defense responses including callose deposition, reactive oxygen species and salicylic aicd (SA) production, and defense gene expression, indicating that Xcc activates non-host resistance in Arabidopsis. Moreover, Xcc-induced defense gene expression is suppressed or attenuated in several well-characterized SA signaling mutants including eds1, pad4, eds5, sid2, and npr1. Interestingly, resistance to Xcc is compromised only in eds1, pad4, and eds5, but not in sid2 and npr1. However, combining sid2 and npr1 in the sid2npr1 double mutant compromises resistance to Xcc, suggesting genetic interactions likely exist between SID2 and NPR1 in the non-host resistance against Xcc in Arabidopsis. These results demonstrate that the SA signaling pathway plays a critical role in regulating non-host defense against Xcc in Arabidopsis and suggest that the SA signaling pathway genes may hold great potential for breeding citrus canker-resistant varieties through modern gene transfer technology. PMID:22299054

  18. Short distance dispersal of splashed bacteria of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri from canker-infected grapefruit tree canopies in turbulent wind

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus canker (Xanthomonas citri subsp citri [Xcc]) can result in yield loss and market restrictions. The pathogen is dispersed in rain splash and spread is promoted by wind. The goal of this study was to gain some insight into the behavior of the downwind plume of Xcc from ~1.5 m-tall canker-affect...

  19. The epidemiological significance of post-packinghouse survival of Xanthomonas citri ssp. citri for dissemination of Asiatic citrus canker via infected fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The risk of introduction of Xanthomonas citri spp. citri (Xcc) to new, unaffected citrus producing areas is a major concern for those citrus industries attempting to remain free of citrus canker. Citrus fruit, as a potential pathway for Xcc to enter and become established in these areas, is assumed...

  20. The effect of wind on dispersal of splash-borne Xanthomonas citri subsp citri at different heights and distances downwind of canker-infected grapefruit trees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Xanthomonas citri subsp citri (Xcc), which causes citrus canker, is a major pathogen of grapefruit and other canker-susceptible citrus species and cultivars grown in Florida and elsewhere. It is dispersed by rain splash, and wind promotes the dispersal of the pathogen. The aim of this study was to e...

  1. Processes involved in the dispersal of Xanthomonas citri pv. citri from canker-infectd citrus canopies, and in the infection of citrus foliage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus canker (Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, Xcc) is now considered endemic in Florida, and epidemics result in yield loss and market penalties both in Florida, and elsewhere where the pathogen occurs, and susceptible citrus is cultivated. The bacterium is dispersed in rain splash, and storms wit...

  2. Processess involved in the dispersal of Xanthomonas citri pv. citri from canker-infected citrus canopies, and in the infection of citrus foliage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus canker (Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, Xcc) is now considered endemic in Florida, and epidemics result in yield loss and market penalties both in Florida and elsewhere, where the pathogen occurs and susceptible citrus is cultivated. The bacterium is dispersed in rain splash, and storms with...

  3. Wind speed effects on the quantity of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri dispersed downwind from canopies of grapefruit trees infected with citrus canker

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The epidemic of citrus canker (Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, Xcc) in Florida continues to expand since termination of the eradication program in 2006. Storms are known to be associated with disease spread, but little information exists on the interaction of fundamental physical and biological proc...

  4. Bismerthiazol Inhibits Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Growth and Induces Differential Expression of Citrus Defense-Related Genes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoyue; Armstrong, Cheryl M; Zhou, Mingguo; Duan, Yongping

    2016-07-01

    Citrus canker, caused by Xanthomonas citri ssp. citri, is a serious disease that causes substantial economic losses to the citrus industry worldwide. The bactericide bismerthiazol has been used to control rice bacterial blight (X. oryzae pv. oryzae). In this paper, we demonstrate that bismerthiazol can effectively control citrus canker by both inhibiting the growth of X. citri ssp. citri and triggering the plant's host defense response through the expression of several pathogenesis-related genes (PR1, PR2, CHI, and RpRd1) and the nonexpresser of PR genes (NPR1, NPR2, and NPR3) in 'Duncan' grapefruit, especially at early treatment times. In addition, we found that bismerthiazol induced the expression of the marker genes CitCHS and CitCHI in the flavonoid pathway and the PAL1 (phenylalanine ammonia lyase 1) gene in the salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis pathway at different time points. Moreover, bismerthiazol also induced the expression of the priming defense-associated gene AZI1. Taken together, these results indicate that the induction of the defense response in 'Duncan' grapefruit by bismerthiazol may involve the SA signaling pathway and the priming defense and that bismerthiazol may serve as an alternative to copper bactericides for the control of citrus canker. PMID:26882850

  5. Xylan utilization regulon in Xanthomonas citri pv. citri Strain 306: gene expression and utilization of oligoxylosides.

    PubMed

    Chow, V; Shantharaj, D; Guo, Y; Nong, G; Minsavage, G V; Jones, J B; Preston, J F

    2015-03-01

    Xanthomonas citri pv. citri strain 306 (Xcc306), a causative agent of citrus canker, produces endoxylanases that catalyze the depolymerization of cell wall-associated xylans. In the sequenced genomes of all plant-pathogenic xanthomonads, genes encoding xylanolytic enzymes are clustered in three adjacent operons. In Xcc306, these consecutive operons contain genes encoding the glycoside hydrolase family 10 (GH10) endoxylanases Xyn10A and Xyn10C, the agu67 gene, encoding a GH67 α-glucuronidase (Agu67), the xyn43E gene, encoding a putative GH43 α-l-arabinofuranosidase, and the xyn43F gene, encoding a putative β-xylosidase. Recombinant Xyn10A and Xyn10C convert polymeric 4-O-methylglucuronoxylan (MeGXn) to oligoxylosides methylglucuronoxylotriose (MeGX3), xylotriose (X3), and xylobiose (X2). Xcc306 completely utilizes MeGXn predigested with Xyn10A or Xyn10C but shows little utilization of MeGXn. Xcc306 with a deletion in the gene encoding α-glucuronidase (Xcc306 Δagu67) will not utilize MeGX3 for growth, demonstrating the role of Agu67 in the complete utilization of GH10-digested MeGXn. Preferential growth on oligoxylosides compared to growth on polymeric MeGXn indicates that GH10 xylanases, either secreted by Xcc306 in planta or produced by the plant host, generate oligoxylosides that are processed by Xyn10 xylanases and Agu67 residing in the periplasm. Coordinate induction by oligoxylosides of xyn10, agu67, cirA, the tonB receptor, and other genes within these three operons indicates that they constitute a regulon that is responsive to the oligoxylosides generated by the action of Xcc306 GH10 xylanases on MeGXn. The combined expression of genes in this regulon may allow scavenging of oligoxylosides derived from cell wall deconstruction, thereby contributing to the tissue colonization and/or survival of Xcc306 and, ultimately, to plant disease. PMID:25595763

  6. Unravelling potential virulence factor candidates in Xanthomonas citri. subsp. citri by secretome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ferro, Jesus A.; Soares, Marcia R.R.; Laia, Marcelo L.; de Oliveira, Julio C.F.; Ferro, Maria Ines T.

    2016-01-01

    Citrus canker is a major disease affecting citrus production in Brazil. It’s mainly caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri strain 306 pathotype A (Xac). We analysed the differential expression of proteins secreted by wild type Xac and an asymptomatic mutant for hrpB4 (ΔhrpB4) grown in Nutrient Broth (NB) and a medium mimicking growth conditions in the plant (XAM1). This allowed the identification of 55 secreted proteins, of which 37 were secreted by both strains when cultured in XAM1. In this secreted protein repertoire, the following stand out: Virk, Polyphosphate-selective porin, Cellulase, Endoglucanase, Histone-like protein, Ribosomal proteins, five hypothetical proteins expressed only in the wild type strain, Lytic murein transglycosylase, Lipoprotein, Leucyl-tRNA synthetase, Co-chaperonin, Toluene tolerance, C-type cytochrome biogenesis membrane protein, Aminopeptidase and two hypothetical proteins expressed only in the ΔhrpB4 mutant. Furthermore, Peptidoglycan-associated outer membrane protein, Regulator of pathogenicity factor, Outer membrane proteins, Endopolygalacturonase, Chorismate mutase, Peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase and seven hypothetical proteins were detected in both strains, suggesting that there was no relationship with the secretion mediated by the type III secretory system, which is not functional in the mutant strain. Also worth mentioning is the Elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), expressed only the wild type strain, and Type IV pilus assembly protein, Flagellin (FliC) and Flagellar hook-associated protein, identified in the wild-type strain secretome when grown only in NB. Noteworthy, that FliC, EF-Tu are classically characterized as PAMPs (Pathogen-associated molecular patterns), responsible for a PAMP-triggered immunity response. Therefore, our results highlight proteins potentially involved with the virulence. Overall, we conclude that the use of secretome data is a valuable approach that may bring more knowledge of the biology of

  7. Improved real-time PCR diagnosis of citrus stubborn disease by targeting prophage genes of Spiroplasma citri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spiroplasma citri is a phloem-limited bacterium causing citrus stubborn disease (CSD). Isolation and culturing of S. citri is difficult and time consuming. Current detection methods use polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays with primers developed from sequences of S. citri house-keeping genes. In c...

  8. Citrus Stubborn Severity is Associated with Spiroplasma Citri Titer but Not with Bacterial Genotype.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impact of citrus stubborn disease (CSD), caused by Spiroplasma citri, on citrus production is associated with symptom severity of infected citrus trees. To assess whether symptom severity was associated with spiroplasma titer in the plant, 58 S. citri strains were cultivated from severely and mi...

  9. Effects of postharvest treatments on recovery of Xanthomonas citrisubsp. citri from infected grapefruit leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies were conducted to evaluate treatments to reduce recovery of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) in infected grapefruit leaves. To investigate effects of temperature (0, 10, 40, and 50°C), disinfectant (none or Pro-San), and treatment duration (0, 2, 10, and 20 min) on recovery of Xcc in vit...

  10. First report of citrus canker caused by Xanthomonas citri in Somalia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Xanthomonas citri, causal agent of citrus canker, has been reported in several countries in Africa, but not Somalia. During 2006 and 2007, hyperplasia-type lesions, often surrounded by a water-soaked margin and yellow halo, typical of citrus canker caused by X. citri, were found on 8-10 year-old gr...

  11. Comparison of Droplet Digital PCR and Quantitative PCR Assays for Quantitative Detection of Xanthomonas citri Subsp. citri.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yun; Xia, Qingyan; Yin, Youping; Wang, Zhongkang

    2016-01-01

    Droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) is a novel molecular biology technique providing absolute quantification of target nucleic acids without the need for an external calibrator. Despite its emerging applications in medical diagnosis, there are few reports of its use for the detection of plant pathogens. This work was designed to assess the diagnosis potential of the ddPCR for absolute quantitative detection of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, a quarantine plant pathogenic bacterium that causes citrus bacterial canker in susceptible Citrus species. We transferred an established quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for citrus bacterial canker diagnosis directly to the ddPCR format and compared the performance of the two methods. The qPCR assay has a broader dynamic range compared to the ddPCR assay and the ddPCR assay has a significantly higher degree of sensitivity compared to the qPCR assay. The influence of PCR inhibitors can be reduced considerably in the ddPCR assay because the collection of end-point fluorescent signals and the counting of binomial events (positive or negative droplets) are associated with a Poisson algorithm. The ddPCR assay also shows lower coefficient of variation compared to the qPCR assay especially in low target concentration. The linear association of the measurements by ddPCR and qPCR assays is strong (Pearson correlation = 0.8633; P<0.001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis indicates the ddPCR methodology is a more robust approach for diagnosis of citrus bacterial canker. In summary, the results demonstrated that the ddPCR assay has the potential for the quantitative detection of X. citri subsp. citri with high precision and accuracy as compared with the results from qPCR assay. Further studies are required to evaluate and validate the value of ddPCR technology in the diagnosis of plant disease and quarantine applications. PMID:27427975

  12. Comparison of Droplet Digital PCR and Quantitative PCR Assays for Quantitative Detection of Xanthomonas citri Subsp. citri

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Youping; Wang, Zhongkang

    2016-01-01

    Droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) is a novel molecular biology technique providing absolute quantification of target nucleic acids without the need for an external calibrator. Despite its emerging applications in medical diagnosis, there are few reports of its use for the detection of plant pathogens. This work was designed to assess the diagnosis potential of the ddPCR for absolute quantitative detection of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, a quarantine plant pathogenic bacterium that causes citrus bacterial canker in susceptible Citrus species. We transferred an established quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for citrus bacterial canker diagnosis directly to the ddPCR format and compared the performance of the two methods. The qPCR assay has a broader dynamic range compared to the ddPCR assay and the ddPCR assay has a significantly higher degree of sensitivity compared to the qPCR assay. The influence of PCR inhibitors can be reduced considerably in the ddPCR assay because the collection of end-point fluorescent signals and the counting of binomial events (positive or negative droplets) are associated with a Poisson algorithm. The ddPCR assay also shows lower coefficient of variation compared to the qPCR assay especially in low target concentration. The linear association of the measurements by ddPCR and qPCR assays is strong (Pearson correlation = 0.8633; P<0.001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis indicates the ddPCR methodology is a more robust approach for diagnosis of citrus bacterial canker. In summary, the results demonstrated that the ddPCR assay has the potential for the quantitative detection of X. citri subsp. citri with high precision and accuracy as compared with the results from qPCR assay. Further studies are required to evaluate and validate the value of ddPCR technology in the diagnosis of plant disease and quarantine applications. PMID:27427975

  13. Herbivory by the insect diaphorina citri induces greater change in citrus plant volatile profile than does infection by the bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus

    PubMed Central

    Hijaz, Faraj; El-Shesheny, Ibrahim; Killiny, Nabil

    2013-01-01

    The volatile organic compound (VOC) profile in plant leaves often changes after biotic and abiotic stresses. Monitoring changes in VOCs in plant leaves could provide valuable information about multitrophic interactions. In the current study, we investigated the effect of Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) infestation, citrus greening pathogen (Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus [CLas]) infection, and simultaneous attack by ACP and CLas on the VOC content of citrus leaves. Leaf volatiles were extracted using hexane and analyzed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Although ACP is a phloem-sucking insect that causes minimal damage to plant tissues, the relative amount of 21 out of the 27 VOCs increased 2- to 10-fold in ACP-infested plants. The relative amount of d-limonene, β-phelandrene, citronellal, and undecanal were increased 4- to 20- fold in CLas-infected plants. A principle component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (CA) showed that VOC patterns of ACP-infested and CLas-infected plants were different from each other and were also different from the controls, while the VOC pattern of double-attacked plants was more like that of the controls than that of ACP-infested or CLas-infected plants. VOC amounts from leaves were compromised when plants were attacked by ACP and CLas. The results of this study showed that a simple direct extraction of citrus leaf volatiles could be successfully used to discriminate between healthy and CLas-infected plants. Information about the effects of insect and pathogen attack on the VOC content profile of plants might contribute to a better understanding of biotic stress. PMID:23857364

  14. Biological control of Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) in Florida by the parasitoid Tamarixia radiata in urban plantings of orange jasmine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid is an important invasive citrus pest in the United States because it vectors a bacterium responsible for a devastating disease of citrus known as huanglongbing. A parasitoid of the psyllid, Tamarixia radiata (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), was imported from Southeast Asia and re...

  15. Association of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’, the causal agent of citrus huanglongbing in Murraya paniculata and Diaphorina citri in Thailand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Orange jasmine, Murraya paniculata, is a preferred alternative host for the Asian citrus psyllid, the primary vector of citrus Huanglongbing (HLB) disease caused by ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las). M. paniculata plant samples and psyllids on the Murraya plants from ten diverse geographical...

  16. Diversity of the citrus HLB bacterium, ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’, in psyllids (Diaphorina citri) collected from Murraya paniculata and citrus spp. in Thailand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las) is a phloem inhabiting bacterium that causes huanglongbing disease (HLB), also known as citrus greening associated with three species of a-Proteobacteria in the genus ‘Candidatus Liberibacter sp’. Prophage is an important genetic element of bacterial genomes...

  17. Sticky trap and stem-tap sampling protocols for the Asian citrus psyllid (Hemiptera: Psyllidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sampling statistics were obtained to develop a sampling protocol for estimating numbers of adult Diaphorina citri in citrus using two different sampling methods: yellow sticky traps and stem–tap samples. A 4.0 ha block of mature orange trees was stratified into ten 0.4 ha strata and sampled using...

  18. Discovery of a viral pathogen in the Asian citrus psyllid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We used a Metagenomics approach and discovered an insect-infecting virus in adult Asian citrus psyllids in Florida. Though wide spread in nature, this is the first report of a Fijivirus in North America. The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) is a small insect tha...

  19. Greenhouse investigations on the effect of guava on infestations of Asian citrus psyllid in grapefruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reports from Vietnam indicate interplanting guava with citrus dramatically reduces infestations of Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri). We therefore conducted greenhouse studies to assess the effect of different guava cultivars on adult psyllids. The effects of cotton and tomato were also evalu...

  20. Synthetic substrate-borne vibrational signals that elicit Asian citrus psyllid communicatory and search responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian Citrus Psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, vectors a harmful bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, that causes huanglongbing, an economically devastating disease of citrus. Adult male and female ACP transmit vibratory communication signals over 10-50-cm distances within their...

  1. A new detached-leaf assay method to test the inoculativity of psyllids with Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus associated with huanglongbing disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nymphs of the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri can acquire Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (LAS) from huanglongbing (HLB)-infected plants, and both nymphs and adults can transmit HLB to healthy citrus. Normally, however, the proportion of LAS-infected psyllid individuals, based on PCR assays,...

  2. Exposure to Diflubenzuron Results in an Up-Regulation of a Chitin Synthase 1 Gene in Citrus Red Mite, Panonychus citri (Acari: Tetranychidae)

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Wen-Kai; Ding, Tian-Bo; Niu, Jin-Zhi; Liao, Chong-Yu; Zhong, Rui; Yang, Wen-Jia; Liu, Bin; Dou, Wei; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Chitin synthase synthesizes chitin, which is critical for the arthropod exoskeleton. In this study, we cloned the cDNA sequences of a chitin synthase 1 gene, PcCHS1, in the citrus red mite, Panonychus citri (McGregor), which is one of the most economically important pests of citrus worldwide. The full-length cDNA of PcCHS1 contains an open reading frame of 4605 bp of nucleotides, which encodes a protein of 1535 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 175.0 kDa. A phylogenetic analysis showed that PcCHS1 was most closely related to CHS1 from Tetranychus urticae. During P. citri development, PcCHS1 was constantly expressed in all stages but highly expressed in the egg stage (114.8-fold higher than in the adult). When larvae were exposed to diflubenzuron (DFB) for 6 h, the mite had a significantly high mortality rate, and the mRNA expression levels of PcCHS1 were significantly enhanced. These results indicate a promising use of DFB to control P. citri, by possibly acting as an inhibitor in chitin synthesis as indicated by the up-regulation of PcCHS1 after exposure to DFB. PMID:24590130

  3. Exposure to diflubenzuron results in an up-regulation of a chitin synthase 1 gene in citrus red mite, Panonychus citri (Acari: Tetranychidae).

    PubMed

    Xia, Wen-Kai; Ding, Tian-Bo; Niu, Jin-Zhi; Liao, Chong-Yu; Zhong, Rui; Yang, Wen-Jia; Liu, Bin; Dou, Wei; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Chitin synthase synthesizes chitin, which is critical for the arthropod exoskeleton. In this study, we cloned the cDNA sequences of a chitin synthase 1 gene, PcCHS1, in the citrus red mite, Panonychus citri (McGregor), which is one of the most economically important pests of citrus worldwide. The full-length cDNA of PcCHS1 contains an open reading frame of 4605 bp of nucleotides, which encodes a protein of 1535 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 175.0 kDa. A phylogenetic analysis showed that PcCHS1 was most closely related to CHS1 from Tetranychus urticae. During P. citri development, PcCHS1 was constantly expressed in all stages but highly expressed in the egg stage (114.8-fold higher than in the adult). When larvae were exposed to diflubenzuron (DFB) for 6 h, the mite had a significantly high mortality rate, and the mRNA expression levels of PcCHS1 were significantly enhanced. These results indicate a promising use of DFB to control P. citri, by possibly acting as an inhibitor in chitin synthesis as indicated by the up-regulation of PcCHS1 after exposure to DFB. PMID:24590130

  4. Identification of Xanthomonas citri ssp. citri host specificity genes in a heterologous expression host.

    PubMed

    Rybak, Myrian; Minsavage, Gerald V; Stall, Robert E; Jones, Jeffrey B

    2009-03-01

    We provide the first conclusive evidence that Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri Asiatic strain (Xac-A) and, in particular, Xac-A(w), a unique citrus canker A strain isolated from Key lime in Wellington, Florida, induces a hypersensitive reaction (HR) in grapefruit leaves. Using the heterologous tomato pathogen X. perforans, as a recipient of the Xac-A(w) genomic library, we identified a 1599-bp open reading frame responsible for HR in grapefruit, but not Key lime, and designated it avrGf1. Xac-A(w)DeltaavrGf1 produced typical, although visibly reduced, citrus canker symptoms (i.e. raised pustules) in grapefruit and typical canker symptoms in Key lime. We also determined that the X. perforans transconjugant carrying an Xac-A(w) hrpG elicited HR in grapefruit and Key lime leaves, and that xopA in X. perforans was partly responsible for HR. Xac-A transconjugants carrying the X. perforans xopA were reduced in ability to grow in grapefruit leaves relative to wild-type Xac-A. The X. perforans xopA appears to be a host-limiting factor. An avrBs3 homologue, which contained 18.5 repeats and induced HR in tomato, was designated avrTaw. This gene, when expressed in a pustule-minus Xac-A(w), did not complement pustule formation; however, pthA(w), a functional pthA homologue, complemented the mutant strain to produce typical pustules in Key lime, but markedly reduced pustules in grapefruit. Both avrBs3 homologues, when expressed in a typical Xac-A strain, resulted in typical citrus canker pustules in grapefruit, indicating that neither homologue suppressed pustule size in grapefruit. Xac-A(w) contains other unidentified factors that suppress development in grapefruit. PMID:19236573

  5. Presence of Extracellular DNA during Biofilm Formation by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Strains with Different Host Range.

    PubMed

    Sena-Vélez, Marta; Redondo, Cristina; Graham, James H; Cubero, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) A strain causes citrus bacterial canker, a serious leaf, fruit and stem spotting disease of several Citrus species. X. alfalfae subsp. citrumelonis (Xac) is the cause of citrus bacterial spot, a minor disease of citrus nursery plants and X. campestris pv. campestris (Xc) is a systemic pathogen that causes black rot of cabbage. Xanthomonas spp. form biofilms in planta that facilitate the host infection process. Herein, the role of extracellular DNA (eDNA) was evaluated in the formation and stabilization of the biofilm matrix at different stages of biofilm development. Fluorescence and light microscopy, as well as DNAse treatments, were used to determine the presence of eDNA in biofilms and bacterial cultures. DNAse treatments of Xcc strains and Xac reduced biofilm formation at the initial stage of development, as well as disrupted preformed biofilm. By comparison, no significant effect of the DNAse was detected for biofilm formation by Xc. DNAse effects on biofilm formation or disruption varied among Xcc strains and Xanthomonas species which suggest different roles for eDNA. Variation in the structure of fibers containing eDNA in biofilms, bacterial cultures, and in twitching motility was also visualized by microscopy. The proposed roles for eDNA are as an adhesin in the early stages of biofilm formation, as an structural component of mature bacterial aggregates, and twitching motility structures. PMID:27248687

  6. HrpM is involved in glucan biosynthesis, biofilm formation and pathogenicity in Xanthomonas citri ssp. citri.

    PubMed

    Malamud, Florencia; Conforte, Valeria P; Rigano, Luciano A; Castagnaro, Atilio P; Marano, María Rosa; Morais do Amaral, Alexandre; Vojnov, Adrian A

    2012-12-01

    Xanthomonas citri ssp. citri (Xcc) is the causal agent of citrus canker. This bacterium develops a characteristic biofilm on both biotic and abiotic surfaces. A biofilm-deficient mutant was identified in a screening of a transposon mutagenesis library of the Xcc 306 strain constructed using the commercial Tn5 transposon EZ-Tn5 Tnp Transposome (Epicentre). Sequence analysis of a mutant obtained in the screening revealed that a single copy of the EZ-Tn5 was inserted at position 446 of hrpM, a gene encoding a putative enzyme involved in glucan synthesis. We demonstrate for the first time that the product encoded by the hrpM gene is involved in β-1,2-glucan synthesis in Xcc. A mutation in hrpM resulted in no disease symptoms after 4 weeks of inoculation in lemon and grapefruit plants. The mutant also showed reduced ability to swim in soft agar and decreased resistance to H(2)O(2) in comparison with the wild-type strain. All defective phenotypes were restored to wild-type levels by complementation with the plasmid pBBR1-MCS containing an intact copy of the hrpM gene and its promoter. These results indicate that the hrpM gene contributes to Xcc growth and adaptation in its host plant. PMID:22738424

  7. Different Transcriptional Response to Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri between Kumquat and Sweet Orange with Contrasting Canker Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xing-Zheng; Gong, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Yue-Xin; Wang, Yin; Liu, Ji-Hong

    2012-01-01

    Citrus canker disease caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) is one of the most devastating biotic stresses affecting the citrus industry. Meiwa kumquat (Fortunella crassifolia) is canker-resistant, while Newhall navel orange (Citrus sinensis Osbeck) is canker-sensitive. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the differences in responses to Xcc, transcriptomic profiles of these two genotypes following Xcc attack were compared by using the Affymetrix citrus genome GeneChip. A total of 794 and 1324 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified as canker-responsive genes in Meiwa and Newhall, respectively. Of these, 230 genes were expressed in common between both genotypes, while 564 and 1094 genes were only significantly expressed in either Meiwa or Newhall. Gene ontology (GO) annotation and Singular Enrichment Analysis (SEA) of the DEGs showed that genes related to the cell wall and polysaccharide metabolism were induced for basic defense in both Meiwa and Newhall, such as chitinase, glucanase and thaumatin-like protein. Moreover, apart from inducing basic defense, Meiwa showed specially upregulated expression of several genes involved in the response to biotic stimulus, defense response, and cation binding as comparing with Newhall. And in Newhall, abundant photosynthesis-related genes were significantly down-regulated, which may be in order to ensure the basic defense. This study revealed different molecular responses to canker disease in Meiwa and Newhall, affording insight into the response to canker and providing valuable information for the identification of potential genes for engineering canker tolerance in the future. PMID:22848606

  8. Mapping and validation of Xanthomonas citri subsp citri genes regulated by putative plant-inducible promoter box (PIP-box).

    PubMed

    Carvalho, F M S; Oliveira, J C F; Laia, M L; Jacob, T R; Ferreira, R M; Ferro, M I T; Tezza, R I D; Zingaretti, S M; Silva, C F; Ferro, J A

    2016-01-01

    Citrus canker, caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp citri (Xac), is a major disease affecting citriculture worldwide, because of the susceptibility of the host and the lack of efficient control methods. Previous studies have reported that some genes of phytopathogenic bacteria possess a consensus nucleotide sequence (TTCGC...N15...TTCGC) designated the "plant-inducible-promoter box" (PIP box) located in the promoter region, which is responsible for activating the expression of pathogenicity and virulence factors when the pathogen is in contact with the host plant. In this study, we mapped and investigated the expression of 104 Xac genes associated with the PIP box sequences using a macroarray analysis. Xac gene expression was observed during in vitro (Xac grown for 12 or 20 h in XAM1 induction medium) or in vivo (bacteria grown in orange leaves for 3 to 5 days) infection conditions. Xac grown in non-induction NB liquid medium was used as the control. cDNA was isolated from bacteria grown under the different conditions and hybridized to the macroarray, and 32 genes differentially expressed during the infection period (in vitro or in vivo induction) were identified. The macroarray results were validated for some of the genes through semi-quantitative RT-PCR, and the functionality of the PIP box-containing promoter was demonstrated by activating b-glucuronidase reporter gene activity by the PIP box-containing promoter region during Xac-citrus host interaction. PMID:27173329

  9. Chemical features of Pericarpium Citri Reticulatae and Pericarpium Citri Reticulatae Viride revealed by GC-MS metabolomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Yi, Lunzhao; Dong, Naiping; Liu, Shao; Yi, Zhibiao; Zhang, Yi

    2015-11-01

    This paper introduces a detailed method to apply metabolic profiles conducting on tangerine peels (Citrus reticulata 'Dahongpao') at three maturity stages from July to December. Principal component analysis not only demonstrated the metabolic footprints of tangerine peels during ripening but also revealed the compounds (D-limonene and linalool) that mostly contributed to it. Furthermore, some other characteristic compounds were screened to further reveal the chemical features of Pericarpium Citri Reticulatae (PCR) and Pericarpium Citri Reticulatae Viride (PCRV). In particular, compounds such as 4-carene (r = -0.94), 3-carene (r = -0.91), β-pinene (r = -0.85) and γ-terpinene (r = -0.87) were screened as major components for the pungent smell of PCRV. Geranyl acetate (r = 0.81), farnesyl acetate (r = 0.87) and three alcohols (6-hepten-1-ol, 3-methyl-1-hexanol, 1-octanol) may lead to the pleasant odour of PCR. We therefore propose that the metabolomics analysis focusing on ripening process will be an effective strategy for quality control of closely related herbal medicines. PMID:25976810

  10. Effect of X-irradiation on Citrus Canker Pathogen Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri of Satsuma Mandarin Fruits

    PubMed Central

    Song, Min-A; Park, Jae Sin; Kim, Ki Deok; Jeun, Yong Chull

    2015-01-01

    Citrus canker caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) is one of the most important bacterial diseases of citrus. Because citrus canker is not found in many countries including European Union and Australia, Xcc is strictly regulated in order to prevent its spread. In this study, the effects of X-irradiation on Xcc growth either in the suspension or on the surface of citrus fruits were investigated. The suspension containing 1×107 cfu/ml of Xcc was irradiated with different absorbed doses of X-irradiation ranging from 50 to 400 Gy. The results showed that Xcc was fully dead at 400 Gy of X-irradiation. To determine the effect of X-irradiation on quarantine, the Xcc-inoculated citrus fruits were irradiated with different X-ray doses at which Xcc was completely inhibited by an irradiation dose of 250 Gy. The D10 value for Xcc on citrus fruits was found to be 97 Gy, indicating the possibility of direct application on citrus quarantine without any side sterilizer. Beside, presence of Xcc on the surface of asymptomatic citrus fruits obtained from citrus canker-infected orchards was noted. It indicated that the exporting citrus fruits need any treatment so that Xcc on the citrus fruits should be completely eliminated. Based on these results, ionizing radiation can be considered as an alternative method of eradicating Xcc for export of citrus fruits. PMID:26672670

  11. Presence of Extracellular DNA during Biofilm Formation by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Strains with Different Host Range

    PubMed Central

    Sena-Vélez, Marta; Redondo, Cristina; Graham, James H.; Cubero, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) A strain causes citrus bacterial canker, a serious leaf, fruit and stem spotting disease of several Citrus species. X. alfalfae subsp. citrumelonis (Xac) is the cause of citrus bacterial spot, a minor disease of citrus nursery plants and X. campestris pv. campestris (Xc) is a systemic pathogen that causes black rot of cabbage. Xanthomonas spp. form biofilms in planta that facilitate the host infection process. Herein, the role of extracellular DNA (eDNA) was evaluated in the formation and stabilization of the biofilm matrix at different stages of biofilm development. Fluorescence and light microscopy, as well as DNAse treatments, were used to determine the presence of eDNA in biofilms and bacterial cultures. DNAse treatments of Xcc strains and Xac reduced biofilm formation at the initial stage of development, as well as disrupted preformed biofilm. By comparison, no significant effect of the DNAse was detected for biofilm formation by Xc. DNAse effects on biofilm formation or disruption varied among Xcc strains and Xanthomonas species which suggest different roles for eDNA. Variation in the structure of fibers containing eDNA in biofilms, bacterial cultures, and in twitching motility was also visualized by microscopy. The proposed roles for eDNA are as an adhesin in the early stages of biofilm formation, as an structural component of mature bacterial aggregates, and twitching motility structures. PMID:27248687

  12. Biofilm formation, epiphytic fitness, and canker development in Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Rigano, Luciano A; Siciliano, Florencia; Enrique, Ramón; Sendín, Lorena; Filippone, Paula; Torres, Pablo S; Qüesta, Julia; Dow, J Maxwell; Castagnaro, Atilio P; Vojnov, Adrián A; Marano, María Rosa

    2007-10-01

    The phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri is responsible for the canker disease affecting citrus plants throughout the world. Here, we have evaluated the role of bacterial attachment and biofilm formation in leaf colonization during canker development on lemon leaves. Crystal violet staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis of X. axonopodis pv. citri strains expressing the green fluorescent protein were used to evaluate attachment and biofilm formation on abiotic and biotic (leaf) surfaces. Wild-type X. axonopodis pv. citri attached to and formed a complex, structured biofilm on glass in minimal medium containing glucose. Similar attachment and structured biofilm formation also were seen on lemon leaves. An X. axonopodis pv. citri gumB mutant strain, defective in production of the extracellular polysaccharide xanthan, did not form a structured biofilm on either abiotic or biotic surfaces. In addition, the X. axonopodis pv. citri gumB showed reduced growth and survival on leaf surfaces and reduced disease symptoms. These findings suggest an important role for formation of biofilms in the epiphytic survival of X. axonopodis pv. citri prior to development of canker disease. PMID:17918624

  13. The LOV Protein of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Plays a Significant Role in the Counteraction of Plant Immune Responses during Citrus Canker

    PubMed Central

    Kraiselburd, Ivana; Daurelio, Lucas D.; Tondo, María Laura; Merelo, Paz; Cortadi, Adriana A.; Talón, Manuel; Tadeo, Francisco R.; Orellano, Elena G.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogens interaction with a host plant starts a set of immune responses that result in complex changes in gene expression and plant physiology. Light is an important modulator of plant defense response and recent studies have evidenced the novel influence of this environmental stimulus in the virulence of several bacterial pathogens. Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri is the bacterium responsible for citrus canker disease, which affects most citrus cultivars. The ability of this bacterium to colonize host plants is influenced by bacterial blue-light sensing through a LOV-domain protein and disease symptoms are considerably altered upon deletion of this protein. In this work we aimed to unravel the role of this photoreceptor during the bacterial counteraction of plant immune responses leading to citrus canker development. We performed a transcriptomic analysis in Citrus sinensis leaves inoculated with the wild type X. citri subsp. citri and with a mutant strain lacking the LOV protein by a cDNA microarray and evaluated the differentially regulated genes corresponding to specific biological processes. A down-regulation of photosynthesis-related genes (together with a corresponding decrease in photosynthesis rates) was observed upon bacterial infection, this effect being more pronounced in plants infected with the lov-mutant bacterial strain. Infection with this strain was also accompanied with the up-regulation of several secondary metabolism- and defense response-related genes. Moreover, we found that relevant plant physiological alterations triggered by pathogen attack such as cell wall fortification and tissue disruption were amplified during the lov-mutant strain infection. These results suggest the participation of the LOV-domain protein from X. citri subsp. citri in the bacterial counteraction of host plant defense response, contributing in this way to disease development. PMID:24260514

  14. Comparative genomic and transcriptome analyses of pathotypes of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri provide insights into mechanisms of bacterial virulence and host range

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Citrus bacterial canker is a disease that has severe economic impact on citrus industries worldwide and is caused by a few species and pathotypes of Xanthomonas. X. citri subsp. citri strain 306 (XccA306) is a type A (Asiatic) strain with a wide host range, whereas its variant X. citri subsp. citri strain Aw12879 (Xcaw12879, Wellington strain) is restricted to Mexican lime. Results To characterize the mechanism for the differences in host range of XccA and Xcaw, the genome of Xcaw12879 that was completed recently was compared with XccA306 genome. Effectors xopAF and avrGf1 are present in Xcaw12879, but were absent in XccA306. AvrGf1 was shown previously for Xcaw to cause hypersensitive response in Duncan grapefruit. Mutation analysis of xopAF indicates that the gene contributes to Xcaw growth in Mexican lime but does not contribute to the limited host range of Xcaw. RNA-Seq analysis was conducted to compare the expression profiles of Xcaw12879 and XccA306 in Nutrient Broth (NB) medium and XVM2 medium, which induces hrp gene expression. Two hundred ninety two and 281 genes showed differential expression in XVM2 compared to in NB for XccA306 and Xcaw12879, respectively. Twenty-five type 3 secretion system genes were up-regulated in XVM2 for both XccA and Xcaw. Among the 4,370 common genes of Xcaw12879 compared to XccA306, 603 genes in NB and 450 genes in XVM2 conditions were differentially regulated. Xcaw12879 showed higher protease activity than XccA306 whereas Xcaw12879 showed lower pectate lyase activity in comparison to XccA306. Conclusions Comparative genomic analysis of XccA306 and Xcaw12879 identified strain specific genes. Our study indicated that AvrGf1 contributes to the host range limitation of Xcaw12879 whereas XopAF contributes to virulence. Transcriptome analyses of XccA306 and Xcaw12879 presented insights into the expression of the two closely related strains of X. citri subsp. citri. Virulence genes including genes encoding T3SS components

  15. Seasonal Movement Patterns and Long-Range Dispersal of Asian Citrus Psyllid in Florida Citrus.

    PubMed

    Lewis-Rosenblum, Hannah; Martini, Xavier; Tiwari, Siddharth; Stelinski, Lukasz L

    2015-02-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, is the vector of the bacterial pathogen, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, which is the causal agent of huanglongbing (HLB) in the United States. Both short-range and long-range dispersal of D. citri adults affect the spread of HLB; however, little is known about the long-range dispersal capabilities of D. citri in the field or the seasonality of flight behavior. In the present study, an in situ protein marking technique was used to determine the dispersal of D. citri by trapping marked adults under natural field conditions. D. citri movement from abandoned citrus groves to adjacent managed citrus groves was greatest during the spring and summer months and decreased significantly during the colder months (September-March). D. citri were able to traverse potential geographic barriers such as roads and fallow fields. In an experiment conducted to determine long-range dispersal capacity in the absence of severe weather events, D. citri were able to disperse at least 2 km within 12 d. Wind direction was not correlated with the number of marked psyllids captured, indicating substantial flight capability by D. citri. Finally, the number of marked psyllids captured increased with the density of emerging young leaves on surrounding trees. The results confirm that abandoned citrus groves in Florida serve as reservoirs for D. citri, which can disperse across long distances despite geographical barriers. PMID:26470097

  16. Interaction network and mass spectrometry data of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri surface proteins from differential proteomic analysis of infectious and non-infectious cells.

    PubMed

    Carnielli, Carolina Moretto; Artier, Juliana; Franco de Oliveira, Julio Cezar; Novo-Mansur, Maria Teresa Marques

    2016-09-01

    Here we provide the mass-spectrometry and in silico interaction network dataset of proteins identified on our research article on surface proteomic analysis from Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (XAC) cells grown in vivo (infectious) and in vitro (non-infectious, control) by 2D-DIGE approach. Fluorescence labeling of proteins were performed on intact cells followed by cellular lysis and labeled spots from 2D gel differing in abundance between the two conditions (ANOVA, p-value<0.05) were analyzed by a nano-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry Q-Tof Ultima API mass spectrometer (MicroMass/Waters) (LC-ESI-MS/MS). This article contains raw data of proteins detected in the 79 spots analyzed by LC-ESI-MS/MS approach and also an enrichment analysis on the resulting protein-protein interaction network performed with the Integrated Interactome System (IIS) platform and Cytoscape software. The data are supplementary to our original research article, "Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri surface proteome by 2D-DIGE: ferric enterobactin receptor and other outer membrane proteins potentially involved in citric host interaction" (Carnielli et al., 2016) [1], and raw data are available via Peptide Atlas (ftp://PASS00850:ZJ7425v@ftp.peptideatlas.org/). PMID:27595129

  17. Transmission of different strains of Spiroplasma citri to carrot and citrus by Circulifer tenellus Baker (Hemiptera:Cicadellidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carrot purple leaf disease (CPLD) was associated with the presence of Spiroplasma citri in 2006 in the state of Washington, USA (Lee et al. 2006). The objectives of this work were to (1) confirm S. citri as the causal agent of CPLD by fulfilling Koch’s postulates, (2) to determine whether carrot str...

  18. Characterization of the recA gene regions of Spiroplasma citri and Spiroplasma melliferum.

    PubMed Central

    Marais, A; Bove, J M; Renaudin, J

    1996-01-01

    In previous studies (A. Marais, J. M. Bove, and J. Renaudin, J. Bacteriol. 178:862-870, 1996), we have shown that the recA gene of Spiroplasma citri R8A2 was restricted to the first 390 nucleotides of the N-terminal part. PCR amplification and sequencing studies of five additional strains of S. citri have revealed that these strains had the same organization at the recA region as the R8A2 strain. In contrast to S. citri, Spiroplasma melliferum was found to contain a full-length recA gene. However, in all five S. melliferum strains tested, a TAA stop codon was found within the N-terminal region of the recA reading frame. Our results suggest that S. melliferum, as well as S. citri, is RecA deficient. In agreement with the recA mutant genotype of S. citri and S. melliferum, we have shown that these organisms are highly sensitive to UV irradiation. PMID:8955327

  19. Mode of action of metabolites from Bacillus sp. strain IBA 33 on Geotrichum citri-aurantii arthroconidia.

    PubMed

    Gordillo, María Antonieta; Navarro, Antonio R; Maldonado, María Cristina

    2015-11-01

    Geotrichum citri-aurantii is a postharvest phytopathogenic fungus of lemons. We studied the mode of action of antifungal metabolites from Bacillus sp. strain IBA 33 on arthroconidia of G. citri-aurantii. These metabolites are lipopeptides belonging to the iturin family. Membrane permeabilization of G. citri-aurantii was analyzed and mitochondrial respiratory rate was evaluated. Disturbance of the plasma membrane promotes the leakage of many cellular components into the surrounding media, and mitochondrial membrane disorganization promotes the inhibition of the respiratory rate. Our findings provide insights into the ability of lipopeptides to suppress plant fungal pathogens and their possible agronomical applications. PMID:26394707

  20. The Amino Acid Arginine 210 of the Response Regulator HrpG of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Is Required for HrpG Function in Virulence.

    PubMed

    Ficarra, Florencia A; Garofalo, Cecilia G; Gottig, Natalia; Ottado, Jorgelina

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri colonizes its hosts through the trafficking of effector proteins to the plant cell by the type III protein secretion system. In X. citri subsp. citri, as in other plant pathogens, the hrp cluster encodes the type III protein secretion system and is regulated by the transcription factors HrpG and HrpX. HrpG belongs to the OmpR family's response regulator of EnvZ/OmpR two-component signal transduction system. Here, we show that the arginine 210 residue is crucial for the transcriptional activity of HrpG revealed by the absence of disease in host plants and hypersensitive response in non-host plants when a strain carrying this point mutation is used in plant infiltration assays. Also, this strain showed decreased expression levels of hrp genes in bacteria grown in culture or when they were recovered from citrus leaves. Moreover, we show for the first time that HrpG binds to both hrpX and its own promoter, and the change of the arginine 210 by a cysteine does not prevent the binding to both promoters. Nevertheless, in vitro hrpX transcription was observed only with HrpG whereas no transcription was detected with the R210C mutant. HrpG was able to interact with itself as well as with the mutant R210C suggesting that it functions as a dimer. The mutant protein R210C showed altered protease sensitivity, suggesting that Arg210 is essential for protein active conformation and thus for transcriptional activity. Our results indicate that arginine 210 in HrpG, as it may occur with this conserved residue in other members of this family of response regulators, is not required for DNA binding whereas is essential for hrp genes transcription and therefore for pathogenicity and HR induction. PMID:25961560

  1. The Amino Acid Arginine 210 of the Response Regulator HrpG of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Is Required for HrpG Function in Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Gottig, Natalia; Ottado, Jorgelina

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri colonizes its hosts through the trafficking of effector proteins to the plant cell by the type III protein secretion system. In X. citri subsp. citri, as in other plant pathogens, the hrp cluster encodes the type III protein secretion system and is regulated by the transcription factors HrpG and HrpX. HrpG belongs to the OmpR family’s response regulator of EnvZ/OmpR two-component signal transduction system. Here, we show that the arginine 210 residue is crucial for the transcriptional activity of HrpG revealed by the absence of disease in host plants and hypersensitive response in non-host plants when a strain carrying this point mutation is used in plant infiltration assays. Also, this strain showed decreased expression levels of hrp genes in bacteria grown in culture or when they were recovered from citrus leaves. Moreover, we show for the first time that HrpG binds to both hrpX and its own promoter, and the change of the arginine 210 by a cysteine does not prevent the binding to both promoters. Nevertheless, in vitro hrpX transcription was observed only with HrpG whereas no transcription was detected with the R210C mutant. HrpG was able to interact with itself as well as with the mutant R210C suggesting that it functions as a dimer. The mutant protein R210C showed altered protease sensitivity, suggesting that Arg210 is essential for protein active conformation and thus for transcriptional activity. Our results indicate that arginine 210 in HrpG, as it may occur with this conserved residue in other members of this family of response regulators, is not required for DNA binding whereas is essential for hrp genes transcription and therefore for pathogenicity and HR induction. PMID:25961560

  2. Reduced susceptibility to Xanthomonas citri in transgenic citrus expressing the FLS2 receptor from Nicotiana benthamiana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Overexpression of plant pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) by genetic engineering provides a novel approach to enhance plant immunity and broad-spectrum disease resistance. The citrus canker disease associated with Xanthomonas citri is one of the important diseases damaging citrus production world...

  3. Genetic Diversity of Spiroplasma citri strains from Different Regions, Hosts, and Isolation Dates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spiroplasma citri, a phloem-limited, leafhopper-transmitted pathogen, causes citrus stubborn disease (CSD). Losses due to CSD in California orchards has grown over the past decade. To investigate the possibility of introduction or emergence of a new spiroplasma strain, a study of genetic diversity ...

  4. Isolation and characterization of Aschersonia placenta from citrus orchards and its pathogenicity towards Dialeurodes citri (Ashmead).

    PubMed

    Wang, Pingping; Song, Xuhong; Zhang, Hongyu

    2013-02-01

    For selecting potential biological agents to control Dialeurodes citri, a major insect pest in China's citrus orchards, 75 native Aschersonia isolates were selected from infected whiteflies in citrus orchards and were evaluated for virulence to third instar nymphs of D. citri at a concentration of 1 × 10(6)conidia/ml. The mortality rates of D. citri varied from 0% to 72.70%. Among the 75 Aschersonia isolates, three (HB10, HB12 and ZJ9) were the most virulent and pathogenic to D. citri and caused more than 69% mortality. The 50% lethal concentration (LC(50)) values of them were 1.86 × 10(6), 3.40 × 10(6) and 6.81 × 10(6)conidia/ml, respectively. The three isolates also produced conidia abundantly on potato dextrose agar medium (3.95 × 10(6), 6.19 × 10(6) and 7.34 × 10(6)conidia/cm(2), respectively). They were identified to be Aschersonia placenta based on their morphological analysis. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these three highly virulent Aschersonia isolates belong to a strongly supported clade that includes two other A. placenta isolates obtained from Vietnam and Thailand. In summary, these results indicate the possibility of developing the three most virulent A. placenta isolates as microbiological control agents against citrus whitefly. PMID:23160084

  5. Molecular Detection of Spiroplasma Citri Associated with Stubborn Disease in Citrus Orchards in Syria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spiroplasma citri, a phloem-limited pathogen, causes citrus stubborn disease (CSD) and can be transmitted from plant to plant by several species of phloem-feeding leafhoppers. CSD is an important disorder in certain warm and arid citrus-growing areas, and its agent has been recorded from several Med...

  6. Influence of temperature and humidity on survival of Penicillium digitatum and Geotrichum citri-aurantii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Longevity of conidia of Penicillium digitatum and arthrospores of Geotrichum citri-aurantii, cause of green mold and sour rot of citrus, respectively, was determined. Conidia of P. digitatum were exposed to ambient summer conditions in central California or to conditions of controlled temperature an...

  7. Reduced Susceptibility to Xanthomonas citri in Transgenic Citrus Expressing the FLS2 Receptor From Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Hao, Guixia; Pitino, Marco; Duan, Yongping; Stover, Ed

    2016-02-01

    Overexpression of plant pattern-recognition receptors by genetic engineering provides a novel approach to enhance plant immunity and broad-spectrum disease resistance. Citrus canker disease associated with Xanthomonas citri is one of the most important diseases damaging citrus production worldwide. In this study, we cloned the FLS2 gene from Nicotiana benthamiana cDNA and inserted it into the binary vector pBinPlus/ARS to transform Hamlin sweet orange and Carrizo citrange. Transgene presence was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gene expression of NbFLS2 was compared by reverse transcription quantitative PCR. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in response to flg22Xcc was detected in transgenic Hamlin but not in nontransformed controls. Low or no ROS production was detected from nontransformed Hamlin seedlings challenged with flg22Xcc. Transgenic plants highly expressing NbFLS2 were selected and were evaluated for resistance to canker incited by X. citri 3213. Our results showed that the integration and expression of the NbFLS2 gene in citrus can increase canker resistance and defense-associated gene expression when challenged with X. citri. These results suggest that canker-susceptible Citrus genotypes lack strong basal defense induced by X. citri flagellin and the resistance of these genotypes can be enhanced by transgenic expression of the flagellin receptor from a resistant species. PMID:26554734

  8. DISEASE DEVELOPMENT AND SYMPTOM EXPRESSION OF XANTHOMONAS AXONOPODIS PV. CITRI IN VARIOUS CITRUS PLANT TISSUES.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experimental inoculations of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) in different tissues of Tahiti lime and Pineapple sweet orange were conducted monthly under natural conditions in Réunion Island. The interactions between a set of environmental and epidemic variables associated with disease express...

  9. Citrus stubborn symptom severity and Spiroplasma citri location within the tress canopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The severity of symptoms of citrus stubborn disease (CSD) within an orchard can range from mild to severe, but whether factors other than pathogen titer or duration of infection impact severity is not known. We tested the hypothesis that the canopy distribution of the pathogen, Spiroplasma citri, i...

  10. Plant lectin-like antibacterial proteins from phytopathogens Pseudomonas syringae and Xanthomonas citri.

    PubMed

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; Li, Wen; Proost, Paul; Loris, Remy; De Mot, René

    2012-08-01

    The genomes of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae 642 and Xanthomonas citri pv. malvacearum LMG 761 each carry a putative homologue of the plant lectin-like bacteriocin (llpA) genes previously identified in the rhizosphere isolate Pseudomonas putida BW11M1 and the biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5. The respective purified recombinant proteins, LlpAPss642 and LlpAXcm761 , display genus-specific antibacterial activity across species boundaries. The inhibitory spectrum of the P. syringae bacteriocin overlaps partially with those of the P. putida and P. fluorescens LlpAs. Notably, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri str. 306 secretes a protein identical to LlpAXcm761 . The functional characterization of LlpA proteins from two different phytopathogenic γ-proteobacterial species expands the lectin-like bacteriocin family beyond the Pseudomonas genus and suggests its involvement in competition among closely related plant-associated bacteria with different lifestyles. PMID:23760822

  11. Adjuvants to improve aerial control of the citrus mealybug Planococcus citri (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) using entomopathogenic nematodes.

    PubMed

    van Niekerk, S; Malan, A P

    2015-03-01

    The citrus mealybug, Planococcus citri, is a highly destructive pest of citrus, occurring only in the aerial parts of plants. Humidity will be one of the key factors to consider when using entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN) as biological control agents. Different adjuvants can be added to suspensions of EPNs, to improve control as a foliar application. An aqueous suspension containing Heterorhabditis zealandica and 0.3% Zeba® significantly increased P. citri mortality by 22% at 80% relative humidity (RH) with a temperature cycle starting at 22°C for 14 h and 11°C for 11 h. The same polymer formulation was tested for Steinernema yirgalemense and mortality of P. citri increased by 21% at 60% RH and by 27% at 80% RH. The addition of Nu-Film-P® and Zeba® to H. zealandica suspensions did not significantly retard application run-off on citrus leaves. The combination of Nu-Film-P® and Zeba®, however, was able to significantly retard sedimentation, increasing the average number of nematodes deposited on 2-cm2 leaf discs by 10 nematodes. In an aqueous suspension, nematodes settle rapidly to the bottom, resulting in an uneven distribution of nematodes. Xanthan gum, at a concentration of 0.2%, was highly effective at retarding sedimentation, with 72% of the initial nematode number still in suspension after 1 h. Zeba®, at a concentration of 0.3%, despite not being as effective as Xanthan gum, nevertheless still retarded sedimentation significantly. This is the first report of the potential of Nu-Film-P® and Zeba® to improve EPN performance against P. citri when used above ground in citrus orchards. PMID:25652668

  12. Invasion of insect cells by Spiroplasma citri involves spiralin relocalization and lectin/glycoconjugate-type interactions.

    PubMed

    Duret, Sybille; Batailler, Brigitte; Dubrana, Marie-Pierre; Saillard, Colette; Renaudin, Joël; Béven, Laure; Arricau-Bouvery, Nathalie

    2014-07-01

    Spiroplamas are helical, cell wall-less bacteria belonging to the Class Mollicutes, a group of microorganisms phylogenetically related to low G+C, Gram-positive bacteria. Spiroplasma species are all found associated with arthropods and a few, including Spiroplasma citri are pathogenic to plant. Thus S. citri has the ability to colonize cells of two very distinct hosts, the plant and the insect vector. While spiroplasmal factors involved in transmission by the leafhopper Circulifer haematoceps have been identified, their specific contribution to invasion of insect cells is poorly understood. In this study we provide evidence that the lipoprotein spiralin plays a major role in the very early step of cell invasion. Confocal laser scanning immunomicroscopy revealed a relocalization of spiralin at the contact zone of adhering spiroplasmas. The implication of a role for spiralin in adhesion to insect cells was further supported by adhesion assays showing that a spiralin-less mutant was impaired in adhesion and that recombinant spiralin triggered adhesion of latex beads. We also showed that cytochalasin D induced changes in the surface-exposed glycoconjugates, as inferred from the lectin binding patterns, and specifically improved adhesion of S. citri wild-type but not of the spiralin-less mutant. These results indicate that cytochalasin D exposes insect cell receptors of spiralin that are masked in untreated cells. In addition, competitive adhesion assays with lectins strongly suggest spiralin to exhibit glycoconjugate binding properties similar to that of the Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA) lectin. PMID:24438161

  13. Formic and acetic acids in degradation products of plant volatiles elicit olfactory and behavorial responses from an insect vector

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae) vectors the bacterial pathogen presumed to be the etiological agent of citrus greening disease, Huanglongbing (HLB), a major threat to citrus industry worldwide. We studied antennal and behavioral responses of Diaphorina citri...

  14. The relevance of Murraya paniculata and related species as potential hosts and inoculum reservoirs of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, causal agent of Huanglongbing (HLB)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Huanglongbing (HLB), considered the most serious insect-vectored bacterial disease of citrus, is transmitted in nature by the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri and the African citrus psyllid Trioza erytreae. Diaphorina citri was discovered in southern Florida in 1998 and the HLB disease in 2005...

  15. Gene response to stress in the Asian citrus psyllid (Hemiptera: Psyllidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcriptional responses of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, under three stress factors were investigated: physical wounding, heat stress, and exposure to low doses of the insecticide imidacloprid. The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, is a vector of the phloem-inhabiting bacterium...

  16. XbmR, a new transcription factor involved in the regulation of chemotaxis, biofilm formation and virulence in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri.

    PubMed

    Yaryura, Pablo M; Conforte, Valeria P; Malamud, Florencia; Roeschlin, Roxana; de Pino, Verónica; Castagnaro, Atilio P; McCarthy, Yvonne; Dow, J Maxwell; Marano, María R; Vojnov, Adrián A

    2015-11-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) is the causal agent of citrus canker. Biofilm formation on citrus leaves plays an important role in epiphytic survival of Xcc. Biofilm formation is affected by transposon insertion in XAC3733, which encodes a transcriptional activator of the NtrC family, not linked to a gene encoding a sensor protein, thus could be considered as an 'orphan' regulator whose function is poorly understood in Xanthomonas spp. Here we show that mutation of XAC3733 (named xbmR) resulted in impaired structural development of the Xcc biofilm, loss of chemotaxis and reduced virulence in grapefruit plants. All defective phenotypes were restored to wild-type levels by the introduction of PA2567 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which encodes a phosphodiesterase active in the degradation of cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP). A knockout of xbmR led to a substantial downregulation of fliA that encodes a σ(28) transcription factor, as well as fliC and XAC0350 which are potential member of the σ(28) regulon. XAC0350 encodes an HD-GYP domain c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase. These findings suggest that XbmR is a key regulator of flagellar-dependent motility and chemotaxis exerting its action through a regulatory pathway that involves FliA and c-di-GMP. PMID:25346091

  17. Bridgehead invasion of a monomorphic plant pathogenic bacterium: Xanthomonas citri pv. citri, an emerging citrus pathogen in Mali and Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Leduc, A; Traoré, Y N; Boyer, K; Magne, M; Grygiel, P; Juhasz, C C; Boyer, C; Guerin, F; Wonni, I; Ouedraogo, L; Vernière, C; Ravigné, V; Pruvost, O

    2015-11-01

    Molecular epidemiology studies further our understanding of migrations of phytopathogenic bacteria, the major determining factor in their emergence. Asiatic citrus canker, caused by Xanthomonas citri pv. citri, was recently reported in Mali and Burkina Faso, a region remote from other contaminated areas. To identify the origin and pathways of these emergences, we used two sets of markers, minisatellites and microsatellites, for investigating different evolutionary scales. Minisatellite typing suggested the introduction of two groups of strains in Mali (DAPC 1 and DAPC 2), consistent with microsatellite typing. DAPC 2 was restricted to Bamako district, whereas DAPC 1 strains were found much more invasive. The latter strains formed a major clonal complex based on microsatellite data with the primary and secondary founders detected in commercial citrus nurseries and orchards. This suggests that human activities played a major role in the spread of DAPC 1 strains via the movement of contaminated propagative material, further supported by the frequent lack of differentiation between populations from geographically distant nurseries and orchards. Approximate Bayesian Computation analyses supported the hypothesis that strains from Burkina Faso resulted from a bridgehead invasion from Mali. Multi-locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis and Approximate Bayesian Computation are useful for understanding invasion routes and pathways of monomorphic bacterial pathogens. PMID:25866121

  18. Expression Patterns of Genes Involved in the Defense and Stress Response of Spiroplasma citri Infected Madagascar Periwinkle Catharanthus roseus

    PubMed Central

    Nejat, Naghmeh; Vadamalai, Ganesan; Dickinson, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Madagascar periwinkle is an ornamental and a medicinal plant, and is also an indicator plant that is highly susceptible to phytoplasma and spiroplasma infections from different crops. Periwinkle lethal yellows, caused by Spiroplasma citri, is one of the most devastating diseases of periwinkle. The response of plants to S. citri infection is very little known at the transcriptome level. In this study, quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) was used to investigate the expression levels of four selected genes involved in defense and stress responses in naturally and experimentally Spiroplasma citri infected periwinkles. Strictosidine β-glucosidase involved in terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) biosynthesis pathway showed significant upregulation in experimentally and naturally infected periwinkles. The transcript level of extensin increased in leaves of periwinkles experimentally infected by S. citri in comparison to healthy ones. A similar level of heat shock protein 90 and metallothionein expression was observed in healthy, naturally and experimentally spiroplasma-diseased periwinkles. Overexpression of Strictosidine β-glucosidase demonstrates the potential utility of this gene as a host biomarker to increase the fidelity of S. citri detection and can also be used in breeding programs to develop stable disease-resistance varieties. PMID:22408455

  19. Structural and Physiological Analyses of the Alkanesulphonate-Binding Protein (SsuA) of the Citrus Pathogen Xanthomonas citri

    PubMed Central

    Tófoli de Araújo, Fabiano; Bolanos-Garcia, Victor M.; Pereira, Cristiane T.; Sanches, Mario; Oshiro, Elisa E.; Ferreira, Rita C. C.; Chigardze, Dimitri Y.; Barbosa, João Alexandre Gonçalves; de Souza Ferreira, Luís Carlos; Benedetti, Celso E.; Blundell, Tom L.; Balan, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Background The uptake of sulphur-containing compounds plays a pivotal role in the physiology of bacteria that live in aerobic soils where organosulfur compounds such as sulphonates and sulphate esters represent more than 95% of the available sulphur. Until now, no information has been available on the uptake of sulphonates by bacterial plant pathogens, particularly those of the Xanthomonas genus, which encompasses several pathogenic species. In the present study, we characterised the alkanesulphonate uptake system (Ssu) of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri 306 strain (X. citri), the etiological agent of citrus canker. Methodology/Principal Findings A single operon-like gene cluster (ssuEDACB) that encodes both the sulphur uptake system and enzymes involved in desulphurisation was detected in the genomes of X. citri and of the closely related species. We characterised X. citri SsuA protein, a periplasmic alkanesulphonate-binding protein that, together with SsuC and SsuB, defines the alkanesulphonate uptake system. The crystal structure of SsuA bound to MOPS, MES and HEPES, which is herein described for the first time, provides evidence for the importance of a conserved dipole in sulphate group coordination, identifies specific amino acids interacting with the sulphate group and shows the presence of a rather large binding pocket that explains the rather wide range of molecules recognised by the protein. Isolation of an isogenic ssuA-knockout derivative of the X. citri 306 strain showed that disruption of alkanesulphonate uptake affects both xanthan gum production and generation of canker lesions in sweet orange leaves. Conclusions/Significance The present study unravels unique structural and functional features of the X. citri SsuA protein and provides the first experimental evidence that an ABC uptake system affects the virulence of this phytopathogen. PMID:24282519

  20. Involvement of Three Esterase Genes from Panonychus citri (McGregor) in Fenpropathrin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiao-Min; Liao, Chong-Yu; Lu, Xue-Ping; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Jin-Jun; Dou, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The citrus red mite, Panonychus citri (McGregor), is a major citrus pest with a worldwide distribution and an extensive record of pesticide resistance. However, the underlying molecular mechanism associated with fenpropathrin resistance in this species have not yet been reported. In this study, synergist triphenyl phosphate (TPP) dramatically increased the toxicity of fenpropathrin, suggesting involvement of carboxylesterases (CarEs) in the metabolic detoxification of this insecticide. The subsequent spatiotemporal expression pattern analysis of PcE1, PcE7 and PcE9 showed that three CarEs genes were all over-expressed after insecticide exposure and higher transcripts levels were observed in different field resistant strains of P. citri. Heterologous expression combined with 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetra-zolium bromide (MTT) cytotoxicity assay in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells revealed that PcE1-, PcE7- or PcE9-expressing cells showed significantly higher cytoprotective capability than parental Sf9 cells against fenpropathrin, demonstrating that PcEs probably detoxify fenpropathrin. Moreover, gene silencing through the method of leaf-mediated dsRNA feeding followed by insecticide bioassay increased the mortalities of fenpropathrin-treated mites by 31% (PcE1), 27% (PcE7) and 22% (PcE9), respectively, after individual PcE gene dsRNA treatment. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that PcE1, PcE7 and PcE9 are functional genes mediated in fenpropathrin resistance in P. citri and enrich molecular understanding of CarEs during the resistance development of the mite. PMID:27548163

  1. Involvement of Three Esterase Genes from Panonychus citri (McGregor) in Fenpropathrin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiao-Min; Liao, Chong-Yu; Lu, Xue-Ping; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Jin-Jun; Dou, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The citrus red mite, Panonychus citri (McGregor), is a major citrus pest with a worldwide distribution and an extensive record of pesticide resistance. However, the underlying molecular mechanism associated with fenpropathrin resistance in this species have not yet been reported. In this study, synergist triphenyl phosphate (TPP) dramatically increased the toxicity of fenpropathrin, suggesting involvement of carboxylesterases (CarEs) in the metabolic detoxification of this insecticide. The subsequent spatiotemporal expression pattern analysis of PcE1, PcE7 and PcE9 showed that three CarEs genes were all over-expressed after insecticide exposure and higher transcripts levels were observed in different field resistant strains of P. citri. Heterologous expression combined with 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetra-zolium bromide (MTT) cytotoxicity assay in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells revealed that PcE1-, PcE7- or PcE9-expressing cells showed significantly higher cytoprotective capability than parental Sf9 cells against fenpropathrin, demonstrating that PcEs probably detoxify fenpropathrin. Moreover, gene silencing through the method of leaf-mediated dsRNA feeding followed by insecticide bioassay increased the mortalities of fenpropathrin-treated mites by 31% (PcE1), 27% (PcE7) and 22% (PcE9), respectively, after individual PcE gene dsRNA treatment. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that PcE1, PcE7 and PcE9 are functional genes mediated in fenpropathrin resistance in P. citri and enrich molecular understanding of CarEs during the resistance development of the mite. PMID:27548163

  2. A survey of FLS2 genes from multiple citrus species identifies candidates for enhancing disease resistance to Xanthomonas citri ssp. citri.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qingchun; Febres, Vicente J; Jones, Jeffrey B; Moore, Gloria A

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs)-triggered immunity (PTI) is an important component of plant innate immunity. In a previous study, we showed that the PAMP flg22 from Xanthomonas citri ssp. citri (Xflg22), the causal agent of citrus canker, induced PTI in citrus, which correlated with the observed levels of canker resistance. Here, we identified and sequenced two bacterial flagellin/flg22 receptors (FLS2-1 and FLS2-2) from 'Duncan' grapefruit (Citrus paradisi, CpFLS2-1 and CpFLS2-2) and 'Sun Chu Sha' mandarin (C. reticulata, CrFLS2-1 and CrFLS2-2). We were able to isolate only one FLS2 from 'Nagami' kumquat (Fortunella margarita, FmFLS2-1) and gene flanking sequences suggest a rearrangement event that resulted in the deletion of FLS2-2 from the genome. Phylogenetic analysis, gene structure and presence of critical amino acid domains all indicate we identified the true FLS2 genes in citrus. FLS2-2 was more transcriptionally responsive to Xflg22 than FLS2-1, with induced expression levels higher in canker-resistant citrus than in susceptible ones. Interestingly, 'Nagami' kumquat showed the highest FLS2-1 steady-state expression levels, although it was not induced by Xflg22. We selected FmFLS2-1, CrFLS2-2 and CpFLS2-2 to further evaluate their capacity to enhance bacterial resistance using Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression assays. Both FmFLS2-1 and CrFLS2-2, the two proteins from canker-resistant species, conferred stronger Xflg22 responses and reduced canker symptoms in leaves of the susceptible grapefruit genotype. These two citrus genes will be useful resources to enhance PTI and achieve resistance against canker and possibly other bacterial pathogens in susceptible citrus types. PMID:27222722

  3. Comparative proteomic analysis reveals that T3SS, Tfp, and xanthan gum are key factors in initial stages of Citrus sinensis infection by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri.

    PubMed

    Facincani, Agda P; Moreira, Leandro M; Soares, Márcia R; Ferreira, Cristiano B; Ferreira, Rafael M; Ferro, Maria I T; Ferro, Jesus A; Gozzo, Fabio C; de Oliveira, Julio C F

    2014-03-01

    The bacteria Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xac) is the causal agent of citrus canker. The disease symptoms are characterized by localized host cell hyperplasia followed by tissue necrosis at the infected area. An arsenal of bacterial pathogenicity- and virulence-related proteins is expressed to ensure a successful infection process. At the post-genomic stage of Xac, we used a proteomic approach to analyze the proteins that are displayed differentially over time when the pathogen attacks the host plant. Protein extracts were prepared from infectious Xac grown in inducing medium (XAM1) for 24 h or from host citrus plants for 3 or 5 days after infection, detached times to evaluate the adaptation and virulence of the pathogen. The protein extracts were proteolyzed, and the peptides derived from tryptic digestion were investigated using liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Changes in the protein expression profile were compared with the Xac genome and the proteome recently described under non-infectious conditions. An analysis of the proteome of Xac under infectious conditions revealed proteins directly involved in virulence such as the type III secretion system (T3SS) and effector proteins (T3SS-e), the type IV pilus (Tfp), and xanthan gum biosynthesis. Moreover, four new mutants related to proteins detected in the proteome and with different functions exhibited reduced virulence relative to the wild-type proteins. The results of the proteome analysis of infectious Xac define the processes of adaptation to the host and demonstrate the induction of the virulence factors of Xac involved in plant-pathogen interactions. PMID:24676796

  4. The dual nature of trehalose in citrus canker disease: a virulence factor for Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri and a trigger for plant defence responses.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Ainelén; Zimaro, Tamara; Garavaglia, Betiana S; Ficarra, Florencia A; Thomas, Ludivine; Marondedze, Claudius; Feil, Regina; Lunn, John E; Gehring, Chris; Ottado, Jorgelina; Gottig, Natalia

    2015-05-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) is a bacterial pathogen that causes citrus canker in susceptible Citrus spp. The Xcc genome contains genes encoding enzymes from three separate pathways of trehalose biosynthesis. Expression of genes encoding trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (otsA) and trehalose phosphatase (otsB) was highly induced during canker development, suggesting that the two-step pathway of trehalose biosynthesis via trehalose-6-phosphate has a function in pathogenesis. This pathway was eliminated from the bacterium by deletion of the otsA gene. The resulting XccΔotsA mutant produced less trehalose than the wild-type strain, was less resistant to salt and oxidative stresses, and was less able to colonize plant tissues. Gene expression and proteomic analyses of infected leaves showed that infection with XccΔotsA triggered only weak defence responses in the plant compared with infection with Xcc, and had less impact on the host plant's metabolism than the wild-type strain. These results suggested that trehalose of bacterial origin, synthesized via the otsA-otsB pathway, in Xcc, plays a role in modifying the host plant's metabolism to its own advantage but is also perceived by the plant as a sign of pathogen attack. Thus, trehalose biosynthesis has both positive and negative consequences for Xcc. On the one hand, it enables this bacterial pathogen to survive in the inhospitable environment of the leaf surface before infection and exploit the host plant's resources after infection, but on the other hand, it is a tell-tale sign of the pathogen's presence that triggers the plant to defend itself against infection. PMID:25770587

  5. Responsiveness of different citrus genotypes to the Xanthomonas citri ssp. citri-derived pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) flg22 correlates with resistance to citrus canker.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qingchun; Febres, Vicente J; Jones, Jeffrey B; Moore, Gloria A

    2015-06-01

    The bacterial agent of citrus canker disease (Xanthomonas citri ssp. citri, Xcc) has caused tremendous economic losses to the citrus industry around the world. Pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI) is important to plant immunity. In this study, we compared the defence responses of citrus canker-resistant and citrus canker-susceptible genotypes to the Xcc-derived PAMP flg22 (Xflg22) by analysing the expression of 20 citrus defence-associated genes. We showed that, in the most resistant genotype, 'Nagami' kumquat, there was significant induction of several defence genes (EDS1, NDR1, PBS1, RAR1, SGT1, PAL1, NPR2 and NPR3) as early as 6 h and up to 72 h after Xflg22 treatment. At the other end of the spectrum, highly susceptible 'Duncan' grapefruit showed no induction of the same defence genes, even 120 h after treatment. Citrus genotypes with partial levels of resistance showed intermediate levels of transcriptional reprogramming that correlated with their resistance level. Xflg22 also triggered a rapid oxidative burst in all genotypes which was higher and accompanied by the induction of PTI marker genes (WRKY22 and GST1) only in the more resistant genotypes. Pretreatment with Xflg22 prior to Xcc inoculation inhibited bacterial growth in kumquat, but not in grapefruit. A flagellin-deficient Xcc strain (XccΔfliC) showed greater growth increase relative to wild-type Xcc in kumquat than in grapefruit. Taken together, our results indicate that Xflg22 initiates strong PTI in canker-resistant genotypes, but not in susceptible ones, and that a robust induction of PTI is an important component of citrus resistance to canker. PMID:25231217

  6. Levels of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus and Xanthomonas citri in diverse citrus genotypes and relevance to potential transmission from pollinations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The diseases huanglongbing (HLB, associated with Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, CLas) and Asian citrus canker (ACC, caused by Xanthomonas citri, Xcc) are widespread in Florida and many other citrus-growing areas, presenting unprecedented challenges for citrus breeding. Since HLB and ACC weaken ...

  7. Development and reproduction of Panonychus citri (Prostigmata: Tetranychidae) on different species and varieties of citrus plants.

    PubMed

    Zanardi, Odimar Zanuzo; Bordini, Gabriela Pavan; Franco, Aline Aparecida; de Morais, Matheus Rovere; Yamamoto, Pedro Takao

    2015-12-01

    The species and varieties of citrus plants that are currently grown can favor the population growth of the citrus red mite Panonychus citri (McGregor) (Prostigmata: Tetranychidae) and alter the pest management programs in citrus groves. In this study we evaluated, in the laboratory, the development and reproduction of P. citri and estimated its life table parameters when reared on four varieties of Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck (Valencia, Pera, Natal, and Hamlin), one variety of Citrus reticulata Blanco (Ponkan) and one variety of Citrus limon (L.) Burm. (Sicilian). The incubation period and egg viability were not affected by the host plant. However, the development and survival of the immature stage were significantly lower on Hamlin orange than on Valencia, Pera and Natal oranges, Ponkan mandarin and Sicilian lemon. The fecundity and oviposition period of females were lower on Hamlin orange than on the other hosts. Mites reared on Valencia orange and Sicilian lemon had a higher net reproductive rate (R 0 ), intrinsic growth rate (r) and finite rate of increase (λ), and a shorter interval between generations (T) than on Pera, Natal and Hamlin oranges and Ponkan mandarin. On the other hand, mites reared on Hamlin orange had the lowest R 0 , r and λ and the highest T among the hosts. Based on the results obtained we recommend that for Valencia orange and Sicilian lemon, the mite monitoring programs should be more intense to detect the initial infestation of pest, avoiding the damage in plants and the increase in production costs. PMID:26459376

  8. The relationship between PthA expression and the pathogenicity of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Huang, Long; Liu, Liping; Li, Dazhi; Dai, Suming; Deng, Ziniu

    2014-02-01

    Citrus canker disease, caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri, affects almost all citrus species and cultivars and hascaused severe damage to the citrus industry worldwide. PthA is considered the main pathogenesis effector of the pathogen. This research aimed to temporally and spatially analyze the expression of the PthA protein of the bactrium during its culture, and then try to understand the relationship between the PthA expression levels and the pathogenicity. The relationship between the expression of PthA and the pathogenicity of X. axonopodis pv. citri was fully investigated by using SDS-PAGE, Western blot, ELISA and field inoculation, It was found that bacteria cultured for 36 h had the highest expression of PthA and showed the most virulent pathogenicity. The conservation duration of the pathogen isolates influenced their PthA expression and the pathogenicity, and negative relationship between the duration and the expression of PthA and pathogenicity. When the stored pathogen bacteria were cultured in liquid LB medium, they were able to regain activated, showing higher PthA expression level and enhanced pathogenicity, even though the activity was inferior, in terms of both PthA expression and pathogenicity, than the freshly isolated ones. Seven isolates from different citrus orchards displayed almost identical protein expression profiles. It could conclude that the expressions of PthA was positively related to pathogenicity. PMID:24385299

  9. A LOV protein modulates the physiological attributes of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri relevant for host plant colonization.

    PubMed

    Kraiselburd, Ivana; Alet, Analía I; Tondo, María Laura; Petrocelli, Silvana; Daurelio, Lucas D; Monzón, Jesica; Ruiz, Oscar A; Losi, Aba; Orellano, Elena G

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that an appropriate light environment is required for the establishment of efficient vegetal resistance responses in several plant-pathogen interactions. The photoreceptors implicated in such responses are mainly those belonging to the phytochrome family. Data obtained from bacterial genome sequences revealed the presence of photosensory proteins of the BLUF (Blue Light sensing Using FAD), LOV (Light, Oxygen, Voltage) and phytochrome families with no known functions. Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri is a Gram-negative bacterium responsible for citrus canker. The in silico analysis of the X. axonopodis pv. citri genome sequence revealed the presence of a gene encoding a putative LOV photoreceptor, in addition to two genes encoding BLUF proteins. This suggests that blue light sensing could play a role in X. axonopodis pv. citri physiology. We obtained the recombinant Xac-LOV protein by expression in Escherichia coli and performed a spectroscopic analysis of the purified protein, which demonstrated that it has a canonical LOV photochemistry. We also constructed a mutant strain of X. axonopodis pv. citri lacking the LOV protein and found that the loss of this protein altered bacterial motility, exopolysaccharide production and biofilm formation. Moreover, we observed that the adhesion of the mutant strain to abiotic and biotic surfaces was significantly diminished compared to the wild-type. Finally, inoculation of orange (Citrus sinensis) leaves with the mutant strain of X. axonopodis pv. citri resulted in marked differences in the development of symptoms in plant tissues relative to the wild-type, suggesting a role for the Xac-LOV protein in the pathogenic process. Altogether, these results suggest the novel involvement of a photosensory system in the regulation of physiological attributes of a phytopathogenic bacterium. A functional blue light receptor in Xanthomonas spp. has been described for the first time, showing an important

  10. A novel two-component response regulator links rpf with biofilm formation and virulence of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tzu-Pi; Lu, Kuan-Min; Chen, Yu-Hsuan

    2013-01-01

    Citrus bacterial canker caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri is a serious disease that impacts citrus production worldwide, and X. axonopodis pv. citri is listed as a quarantine pest in certain countries. Biofilm formation is important for the successful development of a pathogenic relationship between various bacteria and their host(s). To understand the mechanisms of biofilm formation by X. axonopodis pv. citri strain XW19, the strain was subjected to transposon mutagenesis. One mutant with a mutation in a two-component response regulator gene that was deficient in biofilm formation on a polystyrene microplate was selected for further study. The protein was designated as BfdR for biofilm formation defective regulator. BfdR from strain XW19 shares 100% amino acid sequence identity with XAC1284 of X. axonopodis pv. citri strain 306 and 30-100% identity with two-component response regulators in various pathogens and environmental microorganisms. The bfdR mutant strain exhibited significantly decreased biofilm formation on the leaf surfaces of Mexican lime compared with the wild type strain. The bfdR mutant was also compromised in its ability to cause canker lesions. The wild-type phenotype was restored by providing pbfdR in trans in the bfdR mutant. Our data indicated that BfdR did not regulate the production of virulence-related extracellular enzymes including amylase, lipase, protease, and lecithinase or the expression of hrpG, rfbC, and katE; however, BfdR controlled the expression of rpfF in XVM2 medium, which mimics cytoplasmic fluids in planta. In conclusion, biofilm formation on leaf surfaces of citrus is important for canker development in X. axonopodis pv. citri XW19. The process is controlled by the two-component response regulator BfdR via regulation of rpfF, which is required for the biosynthesis of a diffusible signal factor. PMID:23626857

  11. A LOV Protein Modulates the Physiological Attributes of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri Relevant for Host Plant Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Kraiselburd, Ivana; Alet, Analía I.; Tondo, María Laura; Petrocelli, Silvana; Daurelio, Lucas D.; Monzón, Jesica; Ruiz, Oscar A.; Losi, Aba; Orellano, Elena G.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that an appropriate light environment is required for the establishment of efficient vegetal resistance responses in several plant-pathogen interactions. The photoreceptors implicated in such responses are mainly those belonging to the phytochrome family. Data obtained from bacterial genome sequences revealed the presence of photosensory proteins of the BLUF (Blue Light sensing Using FAD), LOV (Light, Oxygen, Voltage) and phytochrome families with no known functions. Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri is a Gram-negative bacterium responsible for citrus canker. The in silico analysis of the X. axonopodis pv. citri genome sequence revealed the presence of a gene encoding a putative LOV photoreceptor, in addition to two genes encoding BLUF proteins. This suggests that blue light sensing could play a role in X. axonopodis pv. citri physiology. We obtained the recombinant Xac-LOV protein by expression in Escherichia coli and performed a spectroscopic analysis of the purified protein, which demonstrated that it has a canonical LOV photochemistry. We also constructed a mutant strain of X. axonopodis pv. citri lacking the LOV protein and found that the loss of this protein altered bacterial motility, exopolysaccharide production and biofilm formation. Moreover, we observed that the adhesion of the mutant strain to abiotic and biotic surfaces was significantly diminished compared to the wild-type. Finally, inoculation of orange (Citrus sinensis) leaves with the mutant strain of X. axonopodis pv. citri resulted in marked differences in the development of symptoms in plant tissues relative to the wild-type, suggesting a role for the Xac-LOV protein in the pathogenic process. Altogether, these results suggest the novel involvement of a photosensory system in the regulation of physiological attributes of a phytopathogenic bacterium. A functional blue light receptor in Xanthomonas spp. has been described for the first time, showing an important

  12. Responses of the Asian citrus psyllid to volatiles emitted by the flushing shoots of its rutaceous host plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) vectors Candidatus Liberibacter spp., the putative causal agents of Huanglongbing. D. citri reproduces and develops only on the flushing shoots of its rutaceous host plants. Here we examined whether D. citri is attracted to volatiles emitted by the ...

  13. Molecular genetic studies confirm that populations of Tamarixia radiata (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) from Texas and Florida area a single species: natural enemies of the Asian citrus psylild

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tamarixia radiata (Waterston) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) is a natural enemy of the Asian citrus pysllid [Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae]). D. citri is an important economic world-wide pest of citrus that recently invaded Texas, among several other states in the U. S. D. citri vecto...

  14. KatG, the Bifunctional Catalase of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, Responds to Hydrogen Peroxide and Contributes to Epiphytic Survival on Citrus Leaves.

    PubMed

    Tondo, María Laura; Delprato, María Laura; Kraiselburd, Ivana; Fernández Zenoff, María Verónica; Farías, María Eugenia; Orellano, Elena G

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) is the bacterium responsible for citrus canker. This bacterium is exposed to reactive oxygen species (ROS) at different points during its life cycle, including those normally produced by aerobic respiration or upon exposition to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Moreover, ROS are key components of the host immune response. Among enzymatic ROS-detoxifying mechanisms, catalases eliminate H2O2, avoiding the potential damage caused by this specie. Xcc genome includes four catalase genes. In this work, we studied the physiological role of KatG, the only bifunctional catalase of Xcc, through the construction and characterization of a modified strain (XcckatG), carrying an insertional mutation in the katG gene. First, we evaluated the involvement of KatG in the bacterial adaptive response to H2O2. XcckatG cultures exhibited lower catalase activity than those of the wild-type strain, and this activity was not induced upon treatment with sub-lethal doses of H2O2. Moreover, the KatG-deficient mutant exhibited decreased tolerance to H2O2 toxicity compared to wild-type cells and accumulated high intracellular levels of peroxides upon exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of H2O2. To further study the role of KatG in Xcc physiology, we evaluated bacterial survival upon exposure to UV-A or UV-B radiation. In both conditions, XcckatG showed a high mortality in comparison to Xcc wild-type. Finally, we studied the development of bacterial biofilms. While structured biofilms were observed for the Xcc wild-type, the development of these structures was impaired for XcckatG. Based on these results, we demonstrated that KatG is responsible for Xcc adaptive response to H2O2 and a key component of the bacterial response to oxidative stress. Moreover, this enzyme plays an important role during Xcc epiphytic survival, being essential for biofilm formation and UV resistance. PMID:26990197

  15. The gpsX gene encoding a glycosyltransferase is important for polysaccharide production and required for full virulence in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xac) causes citrus canker, one of the most destructive diseases of citrus worldwide. In our previous work, a transposon mutant of Xac strain 306 with an insertion in the XAC3110 locus was isolated in a screening that aimed at identifying genes related to biofilm formation. The XAC3110 locus was named as bdp24 for biofilm-defective phenotype and the mutant was observed to be affected in extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis and cell motility. In this study, we further characterized the bdp24 (XAC3110) gene (designated as gpsX) using genetic complementation assays and expanded the knowledge about the function of the gpsX gene in Xac pathogenesis by investigating the roles of gpsX in EPS and LPS production, cell motility, biofilm formation on host leaves, stress tolerance, growth in planta, and host virulence of the citrus canker bacterium. Results The gpsX gene encodes a putative glycosyltransferase, which is highly conserved in the sequenced strains of Xanthomonas. Mutation of gpsX resulted in a significant reduction of the amount of EPS and loss of two LPS bands visualized on sodium dodecylsulphate- polyacrylamide gels. Biofilm assays revealed that the gpsX mutation affected biofilm formation by Xac on abiotic and biotic surfaces. The gpsX mutant showed delayed bacterial growth and caused reduced development of disease symptoms in susceptible citrus leaves. The gpsX mutant was more sensitive than the wild-type strain to various stresses, including the H2O2 oxidative stress. The mutant also showed attenuated ability in cell motility but not in flagellar formation. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR assays indicated that mutation of gpsX did not affect the expression of virulence genes such as pthA in Xac strain 306. The affected phenotypes of the gpsX mutant could be complemented to wild-type levels by the intact gpsX gene. Conclusions Taken together

  16. A survey of FLS2 genes from multiple citrus species identifies candidates for enhancing disease resistance to Xanthomonas citri ssp. citri.

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qingchun; Febres, Vicente J; Jones, Jeffrey B; Moore, Gloria A

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs)-triggered immunity (PTI) is an important component of plant innate immunity. In a previous study, we showed that the PAMP flg22 from Xanthomonas citri ssp. citri (Xflg22), the causal agent of citrus canker, induced PTI in citrus, which correlated with the observed levels of canker resistance. Here, we identified and sequenced two bacterial flagellin/flg22 receptors (FLS2-1 and FLS2-2) from ‘Duncan’ grapefruit (Citrus paradisi, CpFLS2-1 and CpFLS2-2) and ‘Sun Chu Sha’ mandarin (C. reticulata, CrFLS2-1 and CrFLS2-2). We were able to isolate only one FLS2 from ‘Nagami’ kumquat (Fortunella margarita, FmFLS2-1) and gene flanking sequences suggest a rearrangement event that resulted in the deletion of FLS2-2 from the genome. Phylogenetic analysis, gene structure and presence of critical amino acid domains all indicate we identified the true FLS2 genes in citrus. FLS2-2 was more transcriptionally responsive to Xflg22 than FLS2-1, with induced expression levels higher in canker-resistant citrus than in susceptible ones. Interestingly, ‘Nagami’ kumquat showed the highest FLS2-1 steady-state expression levels, although it was not induced by Xflg22. We selected FmFLS2-1, CrFLS2-2 and CpFLS2-2 to further evaluate their capacity to enhance bacterial resistance using Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression assays. Both FmFLS2-1 and CrFLS2-2, the two proteins from canker-resistant species, conferred stronger Xflg22 responses and reduced canker symptoms in leaves of the susceptible grapefruit genotype. These two citrus genes will be useful resources to enhance PTI and achieve resistance against canker and possibly other bacterial pathogens in susceptible citrus types. PMID:27222722

  17. KatG, the Bifunctional Catalase of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, Responds to Hydrogen Peroxide and Contributes to Epiphytic Survival on Citrus Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Tondo, María Laura; Delprato, María Laura; Kraiselburd, Ivana; Fernández Zenoff, María Verónica; Farías, María Eugenia; Orellano, Elena G.

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) is the bacterium responsible for citrus canker. This bacterium is exposed to reactive oxygen species (ROS) at different points during its life cycle, including those normally produced by aerobic respiration or upon exposition to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Moreover, ROS are key components of the host immune response. Among enzymatic ROS-detoxifying mechanisms, catalases eliminate H2O2, avoiding the potential damage caused by this specie. Xcc genome includes four catalase genes. In this work, we studied the physiological role of KatG, the only bifunctional catalase of Xcc, through the construction and characterization of a modified strain (XcckatG), carrying an insertional mutation in the katG gene. First, we evaluated the involvement of KatG in the bacterial adaptive response to H2O2. XcckatG cultures exhibited lower catalase activity than those of the wild-type strain, and this activity was not induced upon treatment with sub-lethal doses of H2O2. Moreover, the KatG-deficient mutant exhibited decreased tolerance to H2O2 toxicity compared to wild-type cells and accumulated high intracellular levels of peroxides upon exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of H2O2. To further study the role of KatG in Xcc physiology, we evaluated bacterial survival upon exposure to UV-A or UV-B radiation. In both conditions, XcckatG showed a high mortality in comparison to Xcc wild-type. Finally, we studied the development of bacterial biofilms. While structured biofilms were observed for the Xcc wild-type, the development of these structures was impaired for XcckatG. Based on these results, we demonstrated that KatG is responsible for Xcc adaptive response to H2O2 and a key component of the bacterial response to oxidative stress. Moreover, this enzyme plays an important role during Xcc epiphytic survival, being essential for biofilm formation and UV resistance. PMID:26990197

  18. Structural insights on two hypothetical secretion chaperones from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Fattori, Juliana; Prando, Alessandra; Assis, Leandro H P; Aparicio, Ricardo; Tasic, Ljubica

    2011-06-01

    Several Gram-negative bacterial pathogens have developed type III secretion systems (T3SSs) to deliver virulence proteins directly into eukaryotic cells in a process essential for many diseases. The type III secretion processes require customized chaperones with high specificity for binding partners, thus providing the secretion to occur. Due to the very low sequence similarities among secretion chaperones, annotation and discrimination of a great majority of them is extremely difficult and a task with low scores even if genes are encountered that codify for small (<20 kDa) proteins with low pI and a tendency to dimerise. Concerning about this, herein, we present structural features on two hypothetical T3SSs chaperones belonging to plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri and suggest how low resolution models based on Small Angle X-ray Scattering patterns can provide new structural insights that could be very helpful in their analysis and posterior classification. PMID:21626158

  19. Glutamate transport and xanthan gum production in the plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Robert; Nishidomi, Sabrina; Nepomuceno, Roberto; Oshiro, Elisa; de Cassia Café Ferreira, Rita

    2013-11-01

    L-glutamate plays a central role in nitrogen metabolism in all living organisms. In the genus Xanthomonas, the nitrogen nutrition is an important factor involved in the xanthan gum production, an important exopolysaccharide with various industrial and biotechnological applications. In this report, we demonstrate that the use of L-glutamate by the phytopathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri as a nitrogen source in defined medium significantly increases the production of xanthan gum. This increase is dependent on the L-glutamate concentration. In addition, we have also characterized a glutamate transport system that is dependent on a proton gradient and on ATP and is modulated by amino acids that are structurally related to glutamate. This is the first biochemical characterization of an energy substrate transport system observed in a bacterial phytopathogen with a broad economic and industrial impact due to xanthan gum production. PMID:23719672

  20. Structural Analysis and Involvement in Plant Innate Immunity of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri Lipopolysaccharide*

    PubMed Central

    Casabuono, Adriana; Petrocelli, Silvana; Ottado, Jorgelina; Orellano, Elena G.; Couto, Alicia S.

    2011-01-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) causes citrus canker, provoking defoliation and premature fruit drop with concomitant economical damage. In plant pathogenic bacteria, lipopolysaccharides are important virulence factors, and they are being increasingly recognized as major pathogen-associated molecular patterns for plants. In general, three domains are recognized in a lipopolysaccharide: the hydrophobic lipid A, the hydrophilic O-antigen polysaccharide, and the core oligosaccharide, connecting lipid A and O-antigen. In this work, we have determined the structure of purified lipopolysaccharides obtained from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri wild type and a mutant of the O-antigen ABC transporter encoded by the wzt gene. High pH anion exchange chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrum analysis were performed, enabling determination of the structure not only of the released oligosaccharides and lipid A moieties but also the intact lipopolysaccharides. The results demonstrate that Xac wild type and Xacwzt LPSs are composed mainly of a penta- or tetra-acylated diglucosamine backbone attached to either two pyrophosphorylethanolamine groups or to one pyrophosphorylethanolamine group and one phosphorylethanolamine group. The core region consists of a branched oligosaccharide formed by Kdo2Hex6GalA3Fuc3NAcRha4 and two phosphate groups. As expected, the presence of a rhamnose homo-oligosaccharide as O-antigen was determined only in the Xac wild type lipopolysaccharide. In addition, we have examined how lipopolysaccharides from Xac function in the pathogenesis process. We analyzed the response of the different lipopolysaccharides during the stomata aperture closure cycle, the callose deposition, the expression of defense-related genes, and reactive oxygen species production in citrus leaves, suggesting a functional role of the O-antigen from Xac lipopolysaccharides in the basal response. PMID:21596742

  1. Structural analysis and involvement in plant innate immunity of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Casabuono, Adriana; Petrocelli, Silvana; Ottado, Jorgelina; Orellano, Elena G; Couto, Alicia S

    2011-07-22

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) causes citrus canker, provoking defoliation and premature fruit drop with concomitant economical damage. In plant pathogenic bacteria, lipopolysaccharides are important virulence factors, and they are being increasingly recognized as major pathogen-associated molecular patterns for plants. In general, three domains are recognized in a lipopolysaccharide: the hydrophobic lipid A, the hydrophilic O-antigen polysaccharide, and the core oligosaccharide, connecting lipid A and O-antigen. In this work, we have determined the structure of purified lipopolysaccharides obtained from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri wild type and a mutant of the O-antigen ABC transporter encoded by the wzt gene. High pH anion exchange chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrum analysis were performed, enabling determination of the structure not only of the released oligosaccharides and lipid A moieties but also the intact lipopolysaccharides. The results demonstrate that Xac wild type and Xacwzt LPSs are composed mainly of a penta- or tetra-acylated diglucosamine backbone attached to either two pyrophosphorylethanolamine groups or to one pyrophosphorylethanolamine group and one phosphorylethanolamine group. The core region consists of a branched oligosaccharide formed by Kdo₂Hex₆GalA₃Fuc3NAcRha₄ and two phosphate groups. As expected, the presence of a rhamnose homo-oligosaccharide as O-antigen was determined only in the Xac wild type lipopolysaccharide. In addition, we have examined how lipopolysaccharides from Xac function in the pathogenesis process. We analyzed the response of the different lipopolysaccharides during the stomata aperture closure cycle, the callose deposition, the expression of defense-related genes, and reactive oxygen species production in citrus leaves, suggesting a functional role of the O-antigen from Xac lipopolysaccharides in the basal response. PMID:21596742

  2. Chemotactic signal transduction and phosphate metabolism as adaptive strategies during citrus canker induction by Xanthomonas citri.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Leandro Marcio; Facincani, Agda Paula; Ferreira, Cristiano Barbalho; Ferreira, Rafael Marine; Ferro, Maria Inês Tiraboshi; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar; de Oliveira, Julio Cezar Franco; Ferro, Jesus Aparecido; Soares, Márcia Regina

    2015-03-01

    The genome of Xanthomonas citri subsp. Citri strain 306 pathotype A (Xac) was completely sequenced more than 10 years; to date, few studies involving functional genomics Xac and its host compatible have been developed, specially related to adaptive events that allow the survival of Xac within the plant. Proteomic analysis of Xac showed that the processes of chemotactic signal transduction and phosphate metabolism are key adaptive strategies during the interaction of a pathogenic bacterium with its plant host. The results also indicate the importance of a group of proteins that may not be directly related to the classical virulence factors, but that are likely fundamental to the success of the initial stages of the infection, such as methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (Mcp) and phosphate specific transport (Pst). Furthermore, the analysis of the mutant of the gene pstB which codifies to an ABC phosphate transporter subunit revealed a complete absence of citrus canker symptoms when inoculated in compatible hosts. We also conducted an in silico analysis which established the possible network of genes regulated by two-component systems PhoPQ and PhoBR (related to phosphate metabolism), and possible transcriptional factor binding site (TFBS) motifs of regulatory proteins PhoB and PhoP, detaching high degree of conservation of PhoB TFBS in 84 genes of Xac genome. This is the first time that chemotaxis signal transduction and phosphate metabolism were therefore indicated to be fundamental to the process of colonization of plant tissue during the induction of disease associated with Xanthomonas genus bacteria. PMID:25403594

  3. Crystal structure of the FAD-containing ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Tondo, María Laura; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A; Medina, Milagros; Orellano, Elena G; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta

    2013-01-01

    We have solved the structure of ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductase, FPR, from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri, responsible for citrus canker, at a resolution of 1.5 Å. This structure reveals differences in the mobility of specific loops when compared to other FPRs, probably unrelated to the hydride transfer process, which contributes to explaining the structural and functional divergence between the subclass I FPRs. Interactions of the C-terminus of the enzyme with the phosphoadenosine of the cofactor FAD limit its mobility, thus affecting the entrance of nicotinamide into the active site. This structure opens the possibility of rationally designing drugs against the X. axonopodis pv. citri phytopathogen. PMID:23984418

  4. Mutation in the xpsD gene of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri affects cellulose degradation and virulence

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri, the causal agent of citrus canker, is a major threat to the citrus industry worldwide. Although this is a leaf spot pathogen, it bears genes highly related to degradation of plant cell walls, which are typically found in plant pathogens that cause symptoms of tissue maceration. Little is known on Xac capacity to cause disease and hydrolyze cellulose. We investigated the contribution of various open reading frames on degradation of a cellulose compound by means of a global mutational assay to selectively screen for a defect in carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase) secretion in X. axonopodis pv. citri. Screening on CMC agar revealed one mutant clone defective in extracellular glycanase activity, out of nearly 3,000 clones. The insertion was located in the xpsD gene, a component of the type II secretion system (T2SS) showing an influence in the ability of Xac to colonize tissues and hydrolyze cellulose. In summary, these data show for the first time, that X. axonopodis pv. citri is capable of hydrolyzing cellulose in a T2SS-dependent process. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the ability to degrade cellulose contributes to the infection process as a whole. PMID:21637619

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the phosphate-binding protein PhoX from Xanthomonas citri.

    PubMed

    Pegos, Vanessa R; Medrano, Francisco Javier; Balan, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (X. citri) is an important bacterium that causes citrus canker disease in plants in Brazil and around the world, leading to significant economic losses. Determination of the physiology and mechanisms of pathogenesis of this bacterium is an important step in the development of strategies for its containment. Phosphate is an essential ion in all microrganisms owing its importance during the synthesis of macromolecules and in gene and protein regulation. Interestingly, X. citri has been identified to present two periplasmic binding proteins that have not been further characterized: PstS, from an ATP-binding cassette for high-affinity uptake and transport of phosphate, and PhoX, which is encoded by an operon that also contains a putative porin for the transport of phosphate. Here, the expression, purification and crystallization of the phosphate-binding protein PhoX and X-ray data collection at 3.0 Å resolution are described. Biochemical, biophysical and structural data for this protein will be helpful in the elucidation of its function in phosphate uptake and the physiology of the bacterium. PMID:25484207

  6. All Five Host-Range Variants of Xanthomonas citri Carry One pthA Homolog With 17.5 Repeats That Determines Pathogenicity on Citrus, but None Determine Host-Range Variation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus canker disease is caused by five groups of Xanthomonas citri strains that are distinguished primarily by host range: three from Asia (A, A*, and Aw) and two that form a phylogenetically distinct clade and originated in South America (B and C). Every X. citri strain carries multiple DNA fragme...

  7. The Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri flagellum is required for mature biofilm and canker development.

    PubMed

    Malamud, Florencia; Torres, Pablo S; Roeschlin, Roxana; Rigano, Luciano A; Enrique, Ramón; Bonomi, Hernán R; Castagnaro, Atilio P; Marano, María Rosa; Vojnov, Adrián A

    2011-03-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) is the causative agent of citrus canker. This bacterium develops a characteristic biofilm on both biotic and abiotic surfaces. To evaluate the participation of the single flagellum of Xac in biofilm formation, mutants in the fliC (flagellin) and the flgE (hook) genes were generated. Swimming motility, assessed on 0.25 % agar plates, was markedly reduced in fliC and flgE mutants. However, the fliC and flgE mutants exhibited a flagellar-independent surface translocation on 0.5 % agar plates. Mutation of either the rpfF or the rpfC gene, which both encode proteins involved in cell-cell signalling mediated by diffusible signal factor (DSF), led to a reduction in both flagellar-dependent and flagellar-independent surface translocation, indicating a regulatory role for DSF in both types of motility. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of biofilms produced in static culture demonstrated that the flagellum is also involved in the formation of mushroom-shaped structures and water channels, and in the dispersion of biofilms. The presence of the flagellum was required for mature biofilm development on lemon leaf surfaces. The absence of flagellin produced a slight reduction in Xac pathogenicity and this reduction was more severe when the complete flagellum structure was absent. PMID:21109564

  8. Genomic insights into the evolutionary origin of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri and its ecological relatives.

    PubMed

    Midha, Samriti; Patil, Prabhu B

    2014-10-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) is the causal agent of citrus bacterial canker (CBC) and is a serious problem worldwide. Like CBC, several important diseases in other fruits, such as mango, pomegranate, and grape, are also caused by Xanthomonas pathovars that display remarkable specificity toward their hosts. While citrus and mango diseases were documented more than 100 years ago, the pomegranate and grape diseases have been known only since the 1950s and 1970s, respectively. Interestingly, diseases caused by all these pathovars were noted first in India. Our genome-based phylogenetic studies suggest that these diverse pathogens belong to a single species and these pathovars may be just a group of rapidly evolving strains. Furthermore, the recently reported pathovars, such as those infecting grape and pomegranate, form independent clonal lineages, while the citrus and mango pathovars that have been known for a long time form one clonal lineage. Such an understanding of their phylogenomic relationship has further allowed us to understand major and unique variations in the lineages that give rise to these pathovars. Whole-genome sequencing studies including ecological relatives from their putative country of origin has allowed us to understand the evolutionary history of Xac and other pathovars that infect fruits. PMID:25085494

  9. The GC/MS Analysis of Volatile Components Extracted by Different Methods from Exocarpium Citri Grandis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhisheng; Liu, Qundi; Liang, Zhikun; Zhao, Mingqian; Yu, Xiaoxue; Yang, Depo; Xu, Xinjun

    2013-01-01

    Volatile components from Exocarpium Citri Grandis (ECG) were, respectively, extracted by three methods, that is, steam distillation (SD), headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME), and solvent extraction (SE). A total of 81 compounds were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry including 77 (SD), 56 (HS-SPME), and 48 (SE) compounds, respectively. Despite of the extraction method, terpenes (39.98~57.81%) were the main volatile components of ECG, mainly germacrene-D, limonene, 2,6,8,10,14-hexadecapentaene, 2,6,11,15-tetramethyl-, (E,E,E)-, and trans-caryophyllene. Comparison was made among the three methods in terms of extraction profile and property. SD relatively gave an entire profile of volatile in ECG by long-time extraction; SE enabled the analysis of low volatility and high molecular weight compounds but lost some volatiles components; HS-SPME generated satisfactory extraction efficiency and gave similar results to those of SD at analytical level when consuming less sample amount, shorter extraction time, and simpler procedure. Although SD and SE were treated as traditionally preparative extractive techniques for volatiles in both small batches and large scale, HS-SPME coupled with GC/MS could be useful and appropriative for the rapid extraction and qualitative analysis of volatile components from medicinal plants at analytical level. PMID:24349825

  10. Genomic Insights into the Evolutionary Origin of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri and Its Ecological Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Midha, Samriti

    2014-01-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) is the causal agent of citrus bacterial canker (CBC) and is a serious problem worldwide. Like CBC, several important diseases in other fruits, such as mango, pomegranate, and grape, are also caused by Xanthomonas pathovars that display remarkable specificity toward their hosts. While citrus and mango diseases were documented more than 100 years ago, the pomegranate and grape diseases have been known only since the 1950s and 1970s, respectively. Interestingly, diseases caused by all these pathovars were noted first in India. Our genome-based phylogenetic studies suggest that these diverse pathogens belong to a single species and these pathovars may be just a group of rapidly evolving strains. Furthermore, the recently reported pathovars, such as those infecting grape and pomegranate, form independent clonal lineages, while the citrus and mango pathovars that have been known for a long time form one clonal lineage. Such an understanding of their phylogenomic relationship has further allowed us to understand major and unique variations in the lineages that give rise to these pathovars. Whole-genome sequencing studies including ecological relatives from their putative country of origin has allowed us to understand the evolutionary history of Xac and other pathovars that infect fruits. PMID:25085494

  11. Comparative anaylsis of Asian citrus psyllid and potato psyllid antennae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The comparative investigation of the morphological basis for olfactory reception in the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) and the potato/tomato psyllid (Bactericera cockerelli (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) was performed using scanning electron microscopy to elucidate the antennal sensory arrays being...

  12. Characterization of Bacteriophages Cp1 and Cp2, the Strain-Typing Agents for Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Abdelmonim Ali; Ogawa, Megumi; Kawasaki, Takeru; Fujie, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    The strains of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri, the causative agent of citrus canker, are historically classified based on bacteriophage (phage) sensitivity. Nearly all X. axonopodis pv. citri strains isolated from different regions in Japan are lysed by either phage Cp1 or Cp2; Cp1-sensitive (Cp1s) strains have been observed to be resistant to Cp2 (Cp2r) and vice versa. In this study, genomic and molecular characterization was performed for the typing agents Cp1 and Cp2. Morphologically, Cp1 belongs to the Siphoviridae. Genomic analysis revealed that its genome comprises 43,870-bp double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), with 10-bp 3′-extruding cohesive ends, and contains 48 open reading frames. The genomic organization was similar to that of Xanthomonas phage phiL7, but it lacked a group I intron in the DNA polymerase gene. Cp2 resembles morphologically Escherichia coli T7-like phages of Podoviridae. The 42,963-bp linear dsDNA genome of Cp2 contained terminal repeats. The Cp2 genomic sequence has 40 open reading frames, many of which did not show detectable homologs in the current databases. By proteomic analysis, a gene cluster encoding structural proteins corresponding to the class III module of T7-like phages was identified on the Cp2 genome. Therefore, Cp1 and Cp2 were found to belong to completely different virus groups. In addition, we found that Cp1 and Cp2 use different molecules on the host cell surface as phage receptors and that host selection of X. axonopodis pv. citri strains by Cp1 and Cp2 is not determined at the initial stage by binding to receptors. PMID:24123743

  13. Characterization of bacteriophages Cp1 and Cp2, the strain-typing agents for Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Abdelmonim Ali; Ogawa, Megumi; Kawasaki, Takeru; Fujie, Makoto; Yamada, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The strains of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri, the causative agent of citrus canker, are historically classified based on bacteriophage (phage) sensitivity. Nearly all X. axonopodis pv. citri strains isolated from different regions in Japan are lysed by either phage Cp1 or Cp2; Cp1-sensitive (Cp1(s)) strains have been observed to be resistant to Cp2 (Cp2(r)) and vice versa. In this study, genomic and molecular characterization was performed for the typing agents Cp1 and Cp2. Morphologically, Cp1 belongs to the Siphoviridae. Genomic analysis revealed that its genome comprises 43,870-bp double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), with 10-bp 3'-extruding cohesive ends, and contains 48 open reading frames. The genomic organization was similar to that of Xanthomonas phage phiL7, but it lacked a group I intron in the DNA polymerase gene. Cp2 resembles morphologically Escherichia coli T7-like phages of Podoviridae. The 42,963-bp linear dsDNA genome of Cp2 contained terminal repeats. The Cp2 genomic sequence has 40 open reading frames, many of which did not show detectable homologs in the current databases. By proteomic analysis, a gene cluster encoding structural proteins corresponding to the class III module of T7-like phages was identified on the Cp2 genome. Therefore, Cp1 and Cp2 were found to belong to completely different virus groups. In addition, we found that Cp1 and Cp2 use different molecules on the host cell surface as phage receptors and that host selection of X. axonopodis pv. citri strains by Cp1 and Cp2 is not determined at the initial stage by binding to receptors. PMID:24123743

  14. A pthA Homolog from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri Responsible for Host-Specific Suppression of Virulence▿

    PubMed Central

    Shiotani, Hiroshi; Fujikawa, Takashi; Ishihara, Hiromichi; Tsuyumu, Sinji; Ozaki, Katsumi

    2007-01-01

    Strains of the plant-pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri are differentiated into two groups with respect to aggressiveness (normal and weak) on Citrus grandis cultivars but not on other Citrus species such as Citrus sinensis. Random mutagenesis using the transposon Tn5 in X. axonopodis pv. citri strain KC21, which showed weak aggressiveness on a C. grandis cultivar, was used to isolate mutant KC21T46, which regained a normal level of aggressiveness on the cultivar. The gene inactivated by the transposon, hssB3.0, was shown to be responsible for the suppression of virulence on C. grandis. Sequence analysis revealed it to be a new member of the pthA homologs, which was almost identical in sequence to the other homologs except for the number of tandem repeats in the central region of the gene. hssB3.0 appears to be a chimera of other pthA homologs, pB3.1 and pB3.7, and could have been generated by recombination between these two genes. Importantly, in X. axonopodis pv. citri, hssB3.0 was found in all of the tested isolates belonging to the weakly aggressive group but not in the isolates of the normally aggressive group. Isolation of the virulence-deficient mutant KC21T14 from KC21, in which the pathogenicity gene pthA-KC21 was disrupted, showed that hssB3.0 induces a defense response on the host but partially interrupts canker development elicited by the pathogenicity gene in this bacterium. PMID:17293422

  15. Multiplexed lateral flow microarray assay for detection of citrus pathogens Xylella fastidiosa and Xanthomonas axonopodis pv citri

    DOEpatents

    Cary; R. Bruce; Stubben, Christopher J.

    2011-03-22

    The invention provides highly sensitive and specific assays for the major citrus pathogens Xylella fastidiosa and Xanthomonas axonopodis, including a field deployable multiplexed assay capable of rapidly assaying for both pathogens simultaneously. The assays are directed at particular gene targets derived from pathogenic strains that specifically cause the major citrus diseases of citrus variegated chlorosis (Xylella fastidiosa 9a5c) and citrus canker (Xanthomonas axonopodis pv citri). The citrus pathogen assays of the invention offer femtomole sensitivity, excellent linear dynamic range, and rapid and specific detection.

  16. Structural-functional characterization and physiological significance of ferredoxin-NADP reductase from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Tondo, María Laura; Musumeci, Matías A; Delprato, María Laura; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A; Orellano, Elena G

    2011-01-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri is a phytopathogen bacterium that causes severe citrus canker disease. Similar to other phytopathogens, after infection by this bacterium, plants trigger a defense mechanism that produces reactive oxygen species. Ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductases (FNRs) are redox flavoenzymes that participate in several metabolic functions, including the response to reactive oxygen species. Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri has a gene (fpr) that encodes for a FNR (Xac-FNR) that belongs to the subclass I bacterial FNRs. The aim of this work was to search for the physiological role of this enzyme and to characterize its structural and functional properties. The functionality of Xac-FNR was tested by cross-complementation of a FNR knockout Escherichia coli strain, which exhibit high susceptibility to agents that produce an abnormal accumulation of (•)O(2)(-). Xac-FNR was able to substitute for the FNR in E. coli in its antioxidant role. The expression of fpr in X. axonopodis pv. citri was assessed using semiquantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. A 2.2-fold induction was observed in the presence of the superoxide-generating agents methyl viologen and 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone. Structural and functional studies showed that Xac-FNR displayed different functional features from other subclass I bacterial FNRs. Our analyses suggest that these differences may be due to the unusual carboxy-terminal region. We propose a further classification of subclass I bacterial FNRs, which is useful to determine the nature of their ferredoxin redox partners. Using sequence analysis, we identified a ferredoxin (XAC1762) as a potential substrate of Xac-FNR. The purified ferredoxin protein displayed the typical broad UV-visible spectrum of [4Fe-4S] clusters and was able to function as substrate of Xac-FNR in the cytochrome c reductase activity. Our results suggest that Xac-FNR is involved in the oxidative stress response of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri and

  17. Characterization of three linalool synthase genes from Citrus unshiu Marc. and analysis of linalool-mediated resistance against Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri and Penicilium italicum in citrus leaves and fruits.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Takehiko; Endo, Tomoko; Fujii, Hiroshi; Rodríguez, Ana; Peña, Leandro; Omura, Mitsuo

    2014-12-01

    Three cDNA clones from Satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marc.) were isolated and expressed in Escherichia coli. CuSTS3-1 and CuSTS3-2 encode linalool synthases and CuSTS4 encodes a nerolidol/linalool synthase. Transcripts of CuSTS3-1, CuSTS3-2 and CuSTS4 were abundant in young fruit at 60 days after flowering (DAF), flowers and leaves, respectively. Treatments with Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (XCC), the causal agent of citrus canker and Penicillium italicum (PI), the cause of post-harvest fruit decay, and wounding up-regulated CuSTS3-1 in fruit and mainly CuSTS4 in leaves. Linalool, citral, geraniol and citronellol showed strong antibacterial and antifungal activities against XCC and PI in vitro, while most other mono-and sesquiterpenes, including limonene and gamma-terpinene, did not. Linalool, used at levels similar to those present in resistant Ponkan mandarin (Citrus reticulata Blanco) leaves, was able to inhibit growth of XCC in vitro. Compared to other five citrus types, linalool accumulated at extraordinarily high levels in Ponkan mandarin leaves and was released at high amounts from their leaves, while it was hardly detectable in the most susceptible species, indicating that linalool biosynthesis and accumulation might be involved in plant defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens and be associated with field resistance to citrus canker. PMID:25443842

  18. Amplification of DNA of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri from historic citrus canker herbarium specimens.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenbin; Brlansky, Ronald H; Hartung, John S

    2006-05-01

    Herbaria are important resources for the study of the origins and dispersal of plant pathogens, particularly bacterial plant pathogens that incite local lesions in which large numbers of pathogen genomes are concentrated. Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac), the causal agent of citrus bacterial canker disease, is a notable example of such a pathogen. The appearance of novel strains of the pathogen in Florida and elsewhere make it increasingly important to understand the relationships among strains of this pathogen. USDA-ARS at Beltsville, Maryland maintains approximately 700 herbarium specimens with citrus canker disease lesions up to 90 years old, originally collected from all over the world, and so is an important resource for phytogeographic studies of this bacterium. Unfortunately, DNA in herbarium specimens is degraded and may contain high levels of inhibitors of PCR. In this study, we compared a total of 23 DNA isolation techniques in combination with 31 novel primer pairs in order to develop an efficient protocol for the analysis of Xac DNA in herbarium specimens. We identified the most reliable extraction method, identified in terms of successful amplification by our panel of 31 primer pairs. We also identified the most robust primer pairs, identified as successful in the largest number of extracts prepared by different methods. We amplified Xac genomic sequences up to 542 bp long from herbarium samples up to 89 years old. Primers varied in effectiveness, with some primer pairs amplifying Xac DNA from a 1/10,000 dilution of extract from a single lesion from a citrus canker herbarium specimen. Our methodology will be useful to identify pathogens and perform molecular analyses of bacterial and possibly fungal genomes from herbarium specimens. PMID:16099061

  19. Contribution of a harpin protein from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri to pathogen virulence.

    PubMed

    Sgro, Germán G; Ficarra, Florencia A; Dunger, Germán; Scarpeci, Telma E; Valle, Estela M; Cortadi, Adriana; Orellano, Elena G; Gottig, Natalia; Ottado, Jorgelina

    2012-12-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac), the bacterium that causes citrus canker, contains a gene in the hrp [for hypersensitive response (HR) and pathogenicity] cluster that encodes a harpin protein called Hpa1. Hpa1 produced HR in the nonhost plants tobacco, pepper and Arabidopsis, whereas, in the host plant citrus, it elicited a weak defence response with no visible phenotype. Co-infiltrations of Xac with or without the recombinant Hpa1 protein in citrus leaves produced a larger number of cankers in the presence of the protein. To characterize the effect of Hpa1 during the disease, an XacΔhpa1 mutant was constructed, and infiltration of this mutant caused a smaller number of cankers. In addition, the lack of Hpa1 hindered bacterial aggregation both in solution and in planta. Analysis of citrus leaves infiltrated with Hpa1 revealed alterations in mesophyll morphology caused by the presence of cavitations and crystal idioblasts, suggesting the binding of the harpin to plant membranes and the elicitation of signalling cascades. Overall, these results suggest that, even though Hpa1 elicits the defence response in nonhost plants and, to a lesser extent, in host plants, its main roles in citrus canker are to alter leaf mesophyll structure and to aggregate bacterial cells, and thus increase virulence and pathogen fitness. We expressed the N-terminal and C-terminal regions and found that, although both regions elicited HR in nonhost plants, only the N-terminal region showed increased virulence and bacterial aggregation, supporting the role of this region of the protein as the main active domain. PMID:22788999

  20. Foraging on and consumption of two species of papaya pest mites, Tetranychus kanzawai and Panonychus citri (Acari: tetranychidae) by Mallada basalis (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tetranychus kanzawai Kishida and Panonychus citri (McGregor) are two major acarine pests of the principal papaya variety in Taiwan, and they often co-occur in the same papaya screenhouses. This study measured prey acceptability, foraging schedule, short-term consumption rate, and handling time of la...

  1. The solution structure of the outer membrane lipoprotein OmlA from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri reveals a protein fold implicated in protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Vanini, Marina Marques Teixeira; Spisni, Alberto; Sforça, Maurício Luis; Pertinhez, Thelma Aguiar; Benedetti, Celso Eduardo

    2008-06-01

    The outer membrane lipoprotein A (OmlA) belongs to a family of bacterial small lipoproteins widely distributed across the beta and gamma proteobacteria. Although the role of numerous bacterial lipoproteins is known, the biological function of OmlA remains elusive. We found that in the citrus canker pathogen, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (X. citri), OmlA is coregulated with the ferric uptake regulator (Fur) and their expression is enhanced when X. citri is grown on citrus leaves, suggesting that these proteins are involved in plant-pathogen interaction. To gain insights into the function of OmlA, its conformational and dynamic features were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance. The protein has highly flexible N- and C- termini and a structurally well defined core composed of three beta-strands and two small alpha-helices, which pack against each other forming a two-layer alpha/beta scaffold. This protein fold resembles the domains of the beta-lactamase inhibitory protein BLIP, involved in protein-protein binding. In conclusion, the structure of OmlA does suggest that this protein may be implicated in protein-protein interactions required during X. citri infection. PMID:18186471

  2. Functional analysis of a chitinase gene during the larval-nymph transition in Panonychus citri by RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wen-Kai; Shen, Xiao-Min; Ding, Tian-Bo; Niu, Jin-Zhi; Zhong, Rui; Liao, Chong-Yu; Feng, Ying-Cai; Dou, Wei; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2016-09-01

    Chitinases are hydrolytic enzymes that are required for chitin degradation and reconstruction in arthropods. In this study, we report a cDNA sequence encoding a putative chitinase (PcCht1) from the citrus red mite, Panonychus citri. The PcCht1 (564 aa) possessed a signal peptide, a conserver domain, and a chitin-binding domain. Structural and phylogenetic analyses found that PcCht1 had high sequence similarity to chitinases in Tetranychus urticae. Real-time quantitative PCR analyses showed that the transcript levels of PcCht1 peaked periodically in larval and nymph stages. Moreover, significant increase of PcCht1 transcript level in the larvae was observed upon the exposure of diflubenzuron. In contrast, exposures of the larvae to diflubenzuron resulted in the decreased chitin content. Furthermore, through a feeding-based RNA interference approach, we were able to reduce the PcCht1 transcript level by 59.7 % in the larvae, and consequently the treated larvae showed a very low molting rate compared with the control. Our results expanded the understanding of the important role of PcCht1 in the growth and development of P. citri. PMID:27388447

  3. Crystallization, data collection and phasing of the molybdate-binding protein of the phytopathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri

    SciTech Connect

    Santacruz, C. P.; Balan, A.; Ferreira, L. C. S.; Barbosa, J. A. R. G.

    2006-03-01

    The molybdate-binding protein (ModA) from X. axonopodis pv. citri was crystallized with sodium molybdate in the presence of PEG or sulfate. The crystal diffracted to a maximum resolution of 1.7 Å and belongs to the orthorhombic space group C222{sub 1,} with unit-cell parameters a = 68.15, b = 172.14, c = 112.04 Å. Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri ModA protein is the ABC periplasmic binding component responsible for the capture of molybdate. The protein was crystallized with sodium molybdate using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method in the presence of PEG or sulfate. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 1.7 Å using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group C222{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 68.15, b = 172.14, c = 112.04 Å. The crystal structure was solved by molecular-replacement methods and structure refinement is in progress.

  4. GENE EXPRESSION IN THE ASIAN CITRUS PSYLLID: VECTOR OF CITRUS GREENING (HEMIPTERA: PSYLLIDAE)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Production of a unigene set identified the putative functions of over 500 transcripts from the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae). D. citri is the primary vector of Huanglongbing, HLB, which is a severe plant pathogenic bacterium that causes severe economic losses...

  5. Asian Citrus Psyllid, Genetic Basis of Immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We used a genomics approach to identify some of the genetic bases of D. citri immunity, identifying in particular genes associated with environmental and biological stresses. Only a few insecticides are being used to manage the Asian citrus psyllid (AsCP), Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), to...

  6. Murraya paniculata (orange jasmine), a host and possible inoculum reservoir for Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, causal agent of Huanglongbing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Huanglongbing (HLB), considered the most serious vectored-pathogen of citrus, is transmitted in nature by the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri and the African citrus psyllid Trioza erytreae. In 1999, D. citri was discovered in southern Florida and has become established in FL and TX. Huanglon...

  7. Metabolic Interplay between the Asian citrus psyllid and its Profftella symbiont: An Achilles’ heel of the citrus greening insect vector

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (CLas), the bacterial pathogen associated with citrus greening disease, is transmitted by Diaphorina citri, the Asian citrus psyllid. Interactions among D. citri and its microbial endosymbionts, including ‘Candidatus Profftella armatura’, are likely to impact tra...

  8. Localized autoinoculation and dissemination of Isaria fumosorosea for control of the Asian citrus psyllid in South Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, vectors the causal organism of citrus greening disease. Integrated strategies are needed to control D. citri in south Texas. Control approaches involving entomopathogenic fungi may be useful on ornamental and abandoned citrus and other rutaceous...

  9. The complete mitochondrial genome of the citrus red mite Panonychus citri (Acari: Tetranychidae): high genome rearrangement and extremely truncated tRNAs

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The family Tetranychidae (Chelicerata: Acari) includes ~1200 species, many of which are of agronomic importance. To date, mitochondrial genomes of only two Tetranychidae species have been sequenced, and it has been found that these two mitochondrial genomes are characterized by many unusual features in genome organization and structure such as gene order and nucleotide frequency. The scarcity of available sequence data has greatly impeded evolutionary studies in Acari (mites and ticks). Information on Tetranychidae mitochondrial genomes is quite important for phylogenetic evaluation and population genetics, as well as the molecular evolution of functional genes such as acaricide-resistance genes. In this study, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of Panonychus citri (Family Tetranychidae), a worldwide citrus pest, and provide a comparison to other Acari. Results The mitochondrial genome of P. citri is a typical circular molecule of 13,077 bp, and contains the complete set of 37 genes that are usually found in metazoans. This is the smallest mitochondrial genome within all sequenced Acari and other Chelicerata, primarily due to the significant size reduction of protein coding genes (PCGs), a large rRNA gene, and the A + T-rich region. The mitochondrial gene order for P. citri is the same as those for P. ulmi and Tetranychus urticae, but distinctly different from other Acari by a series of gene translocations and/or inversions. The majority of the P. citri mitochondrial genome has a high A + T content (85.28%), which is also reflected by AT-rich codons being used more frequently, but exhibits a positive GC-skew (0.03). The Acari mitochondrial nad1 exhibits a faster amino acid substitution rate than other genes, and the variation of nucleotide substitution patterns of PCGs is significantly correlated with the G + C content. Most tRNA genes of P. citri are extremely truncated and atypical (44-65, 54.1 ± 4.1 bp), lacking either the T- or D-arm, as

  10. Biocontrol ability and putative mode of action of yeasts against Geotrichum citri-aurantii in citrus fruit.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, Luriany Pompeo; Cunha, Tatiane da; da Silva, Aline Caroline; Kupper, Katia Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Sour rot is a major postharvest disease of citrus fruit and is caused by the fungal pathogen Geotrichum citri-aurantii. A lack of chemicals certified for the control of this disease has led to the consideration of alternative methods and strategies, such as the use of yeasts as biocontrol agents. The purpose of the present study was to test the ability of yeasts isolated from leaves, flowers, fruit, and soil, and six Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolates to control citrus sour rot, to assess the mechanisms of action of the yeast isolates that were demonstrated to be effective for biocontrol, and to identify the most effective yeast isolates for the biocontrol of G. citri-aurantii. In in vivo assays, three yeast isolates (ACBL-23, ACBL-44, and ACBL-77) showed a potential for controlling sour rot in citrus fruits, both preventatively and curatively. Most of the eight yeast isolates that were assessed for a mechanism of action did not produce antifungal compounds in an amount sufficient to inhibit the growth of the pathogen. Additionally, nutrient competition among the yeast strains was not found to be a biocontrol strategy. Instead, killer activity and hydrolytic enzyme production were identified as the major mechanisms involved in the biocontrol activity of the yeasts. Isolates ACBL-23, ACBL-44, and ACBL-77, which controlled sour rot most effectively, were identified as Rhodotorula minuta, Candida azyma, and Aureobasidium pullulans, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the potential of C. azyma as a biological control agent against a postharvest pathogen and its ability to produce a killer toxin. PMID:27296964

  11. Diel periodicity of pheromone release by females of Planococcus citri and Planococcus ficus and the temporal flight activity of their conspecific males

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levi-Zada, Anat; Fefer, Daniela; David, Maayan; Eliyahu, Miriam; Franco, José Carlos; Protasov, Alex; Dunkelblum, Ezra; Mendel, Zvi

    2014-08-01

    The diel periodicity of sex pheromone release was monitored in two mealybug species, Planococcus citri and Planococcus ficus (Hemiptera; Pseudococcidae), using sequential SPME/GCMS analysis. A maximal release of 2 ng/h pheromone by 9-12-day-old P. citri females occurred 1-2 h before the beginning of photophase. The highest release of pheromone by P. ficus females was 1-2 ng/2 h of 10-20-day-old females, approximately 2 h after the beginning of photophase. Mating resulted in termination of the pheromone release in both mealybug species. The temporal flight activity of the males was monitored in rearing chambers using pheromone baited delta traps. Males of both P. citri and P. ficus displayed the same flight pattern and began flying at 06:00 hours when the light was turned on, reaching a peak during the first and second hour of the photophase. Our results suggest that other biparental mealybug species display also diel periodicities of maximal pheromone release and response. Direct evaluation of the diel periodicity of the pheromone release by the automatic sequential analysis is convenient and will be very helpful in optimizing the airborne collection and identification of other unknown mealybug pheromones and to study the calling behavior of females. Considering this behavior pattern may help to develop more effective pheromone-based management strategies against mealybugs.

  12. Induced Release of a Plant-Defense Volatile ‘Deceptively’ Attracts Insect Vectors to Plants Infected with a Bacterial Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Rajinder S.; Ali, Jared G.; Hermann, Sara L.; Tiwari, Siddharth; Pelz-Stelinski, Kirsten S.; Alborn, Hans T.; Stelinski, Lukasz L.

    2012-01-01

    Transmission of plant pathogens by insect vectors is a complex biological process involving interactions between the plant, insect, and pathogen. Pathogen-induced plant responses can include changes in volatile and nonvolatile secondary metabolites as well as major plant nutrients. Experiments were conducted to understand how a plant pathogenic bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las), affects host preference behavior of its psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama) vector. D. citri were attracted to volatiles from pathogen-infected plants more than to those from non-infected counterparts. Las-infected plants were more attractive to D. citri adults than non-infected plants initially; however after feeding, psyllids subsequently dispersed to non-infected rather than infected plants as their preferred settling point. Experiments with Las-infected and non-infected plants under complete darkness yielded similar results to those recorded under light. The behavior of psyllids in response to infected versus non-infected plants was not influenced by whether or not they were carriers of the pathogen. Quantification of volatile release from non-infected and infected plants supported the hypothesis that odorants mediate psyllid preference. Significantly more methyl salicylate, yet less methyl anthranilate and D-limonene, was released by infected than non-infected plants. Methyl salicylate was attractive to psyllids, while methyl anthranilate did not affect their behavior. Feeding on citrus by D. citri adults also induced release of methyl salicylate, suggesting that it may be a cue revealing location of conspecifics on host plants. Infected plants were characterized by lower levels of nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, zinc, and iron, as well as, higher levels of potassium and boron than non-infected plants. Collectively, our results suggest that host selection behavior of D. citri may be modified by bacterial infection of plants, which alters release of specific headspace

  13. Sexual Transmission of a Plant Pathogenic Bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, between Conspecific Insect Vectors during Mating

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Rajinder S.; Pelz-Stelinski, Kirsten; Hermann, Sara L.; Tiwari, Siddharth; Stelinski, Lukasz L.

    2011-01-01

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus is a fastidious, phloem-inhabiting, gram-negative bacterium transmitted by Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae). The bacterium is the presumed causal agent of huanglongbing (HLB), one of the most destructive and economically important diseases of citrus. We investigated whether Las is transmitted between infected and uninfected D. citri adults during courtship. Our results indicate that Las was sexually transmitted from Las-infected male D. citri to uninfected females at a low rate (<4%) during mating. Sexual transmission was not observed following mating of infected females and uninfected males or among adult pairs of the same sex. Las was detected in genitalia of both sexes and also in eggs of infected females. A latent period of 7 days or more was required to detect the bacterium in recipient females. Rod shaped as well as spherical structures resembling Las were observed in ovaries of Las-infected females with transmission electron microscopy, but were absent in ovaries from uninfected D. citri females. The size of the rod shaped structures varied from 0.39 to 0.67 µm in length and 0.19 to 0.39 µm in width. The spherical structures measured from 0.61 to 0.80 µm in diameter. This investigation provides convincing evidence that a plant pathogenic bacterium is sexually transmitted from male to female insects during courtship and established evidence that bacteria persist in reproductive organs. Moreover, these findings provide an alternative sexually horizontal mechanism for the spread of Las within populations of D. citri, even in the absence of infected host trees. PMID:22216209

  14. Antioxidant responses of citrus red mite, Panonychus citri (McGregor) (Acari: Tetranychidae), exposed to thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Hong; Huang, Hai; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2010-12-01

    Relatively low or high temperatures are responsible for a variety of physiological stress responses in insects and mites. Induced thermal stress was recently associated with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, which caused oxidative damage. In this study, we examined the time-related effect of the relatively low (0, 5, 10, and 15 °C) or high (32, 35, 38, and 41 °C) temperatures on the activities of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), peroxidases (POX), and glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and the total antioxidant capacity (TEAC) of the citrus red mite, Panonychus citri (McGregor). The malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration, as a marker of lipid peroxidation in organisms, was also measured in the citrus red mite under thermal stress conditions. Results showed that SOD and GST activities were significantly increased and play an important role in the process of antioxidant response to thermal stress. Lipid peroxidation levels increased significantly (P<0.001) and changed in a time-dependent manner. CAT and POX activity, as well as TEAC, did not vary significantly and play a minor role to remove the ROS generation. These results suggest that thermal stress leads to oxidative stress and antioxidant enzymes play an important role in reducing oxidative damage in the citrus red mite. PMID:20709071

  15. Analysis of three Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri effector proteins in pathogenicity and their interactions with host plant proteins.

    PubMed

    Dunger, Germán; Garofalo, Cecilia G; Gottig, Natalia; Garavaglia, Betiana S; Rosa, María C Pereda; Farah, Chuck S; Orellano, Elena G; Ottado, Jorgelina

    2012-10-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri, the bacterium responsible for citrus canker, uses effector proteins secreted by a type III protein secretion system to colonize its hosts. Among the putative effector proteins identified for this bacterium, we focused on the analysis of the roles of AvrXacE1, AvrXacE2 and Xac3090 in pathogenicity and their interactions with host plant proteins. Bacterial deletion mutants in avrXacE1, avrXacE2 and xac3090 were constructed and evaluated in pathogenicity assays. The avrXacE1 and avrXacE2 mutants presented lesions with larger necrotic areas relative to the wild-type strain when infiltrated in citrus leaves. Yeast two-hybrid studies were used to identify several plant proteins likely to interact with AvrXacE1, AvrXacE2 and Xac3090. We also assessed the localization of these effector proteins fused to green fluorescent protein in the plant cell, and observed that they co-localized to the subcellular spaces in which the plant proteins with which they interacted were predicted to be confined. Our results suggest that, although AvrXacE1 localizes to the plant cell nucleus, where it interacts with transcription factors and DNA-binding proteins, AvrXacE2 appears to be involved in lesion-stimulating disease 1-mediated cell death, and Xac3090 is directed to the chloroplast where its function remains to be clarified. PMID:22435635

  16. Construction of EGFP-labeling system for visualizing the infection process of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri in planta.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Ping; Deng, Zi-Niu; Qu, Jin-Wang; Yan, Jia-Wen; Catara, Vittoria; Li, Da-Zhi; Long, Gui-You; Li, Na

    2012-09-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) is the causal agent of citrus bacterial canker, an economically important disease to world citrus industry. To monitor the infection process of Xac in different citrus plants, the enhanced green florescent protein (EGFP) visualizing system was constructed to visualize the propagation and localization in planta. First, the wild-type Xac was isolated from the diseased leaves of susceptible 'Bingtang' sweet orange, and then the isolated Xac was labeled with EGFP by triparental mating. After PCR identification, the growth kinetics and pathogenicity of the transformants were analyzed in comparison with the wild-type Xac. The EGFP-labeled bacteria were inoculated by spraying on the surface and infiltration in the mesophyll of 'Bingtang' sweet orange leaves. The bacterial cell multiplication and diffusion processes were observed directly under confocal laser scanning microscope at different intervals after inoculation. The results indicated that the EGFP-labeled Xac releasing clear green fluorescence light under fluorescent microscope showed the infection process and had the same pathogenicity as the wild type to citrus. Consequently, the labeled Xac demonstrated the ability as an efficient tool to monitor the pathogen infection. PMID:22674174

  17. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of YaeQ (XAC2396) from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri

    SciTech Connect

    Guzzo, Cristiane R.; Nagem, Ronaldo A. P.; Galvão-Botton, Leonor M. P.; Guimarães, Beatriz G.; Medrano, Francisco J.; Barbosa, João A. R. G.; Farah, Chuck S.

    2005-05-01

    The first crystallographic study of a member of the YaeQ family of proteins, which are conserved in a small group of Gram-negative bacteria, most of which are animal or plant pathogens, is reported. Diffraction data were collected to 1.9 Å resolution and an interpretable electron-density map was obtained. Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri YaeQ (XAC2396) is a member of a family of bacterial proteins conserved in several Gram-negative pathogens. Here, the cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of the 182-residue (20.6 kDa) YaeQ protein are described. Recombinant YaeQ containing selenomethionine was crystallized in space group P2{sub 1} and crystals diffracted to 1.9 Å resolution at a synchrotron source. The unit-cell parameters are a = 39.75, b = 91.88, c = 48.03 Å, β = 108.37°. The calculated Matthews coefficient suggests the presence of two YaeQ molecules in the asymmetric unit. Initial experimental phases were calculated by the multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion technique and an interpretable electron-density map was obtained.

  18. Effect of Cyantraniliprole, a Novel Insecticide, on the Inoculation of Candidatus Liberibacter Asiaticus Associated with Citrus Huanglongbing by the Asian Citrus Psyllid (Hemiptera: Liviidae).

    PubMed

    Ammar, El-Desouky; Hall, David G; Alvarez, Juan M

    2015-04-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama) is the principal vector of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (CLas) associated with huanglongbing (HLB), the most serious citrus disease worldwide. New control measures including pesticides are urgently needed to combat HLB, especially to protect young or newly planted citrus trees from CLas-inoculation by vector psyllids. Here, we tested CLas-inoculation by D. citri adults (CLas-exposed, reared on infected plants) by feeding them for 7 d on excised healthy citrus leaves with dry residues of cyantraniliprole (Exirel), a novel insecticide, in comparison with fenpropathrin (Danitol 2.4EC), an insecticide commonly used against D. citri. Fewer adults settled (putatively feeding or probing) on leaves treated with cyantraniliprole than those treated with fenpropathrin or water controls. Also, psyllid adults died at a slower rate on leaves treated with cyantraniliprole than those treated with fenpropathrin, although the final cumulative mortality did not differ between the two treatments. In quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction tests, 59.0-65.3% of the CLas-exposed psyllid adults were proven to be CLas-positive. Inoculation rates of CLas (using 10 adults per leaf) into untreated healthy citrus leaves (47.5-85%) were significantly higher than rates into leaves treated with cyantraniliprole or fenpropathrin (2.5-12.5%). Reduced inoculation rates to leaves treated with cyantraniliprole probably occurred as a result of reduced feeding or probing by D. citri. The excised leaf assay method, which took only a few weeks compared with up to a year or longer using whole plants, can be an effective tool for testing the effect of new pesticides or other treatments in reducing CLas inoculation or transmission by psyllid vectors. PMID:26470150

  19. The CERTO and CITRIS Instruments for Radio Scintillation and Electron Density Tomography from the C/NOFS, COSMIC, NPSAT1 and STPSAT1 Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Siefring, C. L.

    2004-05-01

    A new constellation of radio beacon and radio beacon receivers will be providing global measurements of radio scintillations and total electron content (TEC) for near real time measurements of the ionosphere. This constellation is comprised of the NRL Coherent Electromagnetic Radio Tomography (CERTO) beacons on the Communications/Navigation Forecast Outage System (C/NOFS) satellite, the six Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) satellites, and the Naval Postgraduate (NPSAT1) Satellite. These satellites will be launched in the time period of 2004 through 2006. The CERTO beacons operating at 150.012, 400.032, and 1066.752 MHz will be transmitting to ground receivers located in chains to acquire TEC data for computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT). In addition, in early 2006 a five frequency receiver will be placed in low earth orbit with the United States Air Force Space Test Program (STPSAT1) satellite. This CITRIS receiver will use radio beacon transmissions from the French DORIS network of ground beacons at 401.25 and 2036.25 MHz and space-based beacons at 150, 400 and 1067 MHz to measure the earth's ionosphere. On board tracking software will lock onto Doppler shifted frequencies to determine total electron content (TEC) and scintillation parameters. The STPSAT1 will be launched along with a companion satellite (NPSAT1) which carries the CERTO radio beacon and a Langmuir probe. All of the CERTO beacons as well as the ionospheric sensors on STPSAT1 and NPSAT1 are being constructed at the Naval Research Laboratory. The data obtained using the CITRIS instrument will provide a global description of the ionosphere from orbits with inclinations ranging from 15 degrees to 70 degrees and altitudes from 375 to 800 km. The tandem operations of the CITRIS and CERTO instruments will provide the fully low-earth-orbit based occultation measurements of the ionosphere. All of the data will be available for rapid assimilation

  20. Deuterium-Labeled Precursor Feeding Reveals a New pABA-Containing Meroterpenoid from the Mango Pathogen Xanthomonas citri pv. mangiferaeindicae.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Hesham; Petras, Daniel; Mainz, Andi; Kerwat, Dennis; Nalbantsoy, Ayse; Erzurumlu, Yalcin; Süssmuth, Roderich D

    2016-06-24

    A new para-aminobenzoic-acid-containing natural product from the mango pathogenic organism Xanthomonas citri pv. mangiferaeindicae is described. By means of stable isotope precursor feeding combined with nontargeted LC-MS/MS, the generated spectra were clustered and visualized in a molecular network. This led to the identification of a new member of the meroterpenoids, termed xanthomonic acid, which is composed of an isoprenylated para-aminobenzoic acid. In vitro cytotoxicity assays demonstrated activity of xanthomonic acid against several human cancer cell lines by induction of autophagy. PMID:27232656

  1. Analysis of Transcriptome Differences between Resistant and Susceptible Strains of the Citrus Red Mite Panonychus citri (Acari: Tetranychidae)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bin; Jiang, Gaofei; Zhang, Yunfei; Li, Junli; Li, Xiaojiao; Yue, Jiansu; Chen, Fei; Liu, Haoqiang; Li, Hongjun; Zhu, Shiping; Wang, Jinjun; Ran, Chun

    2011-01-01

    Background The citrus red mite is a worldwide citrus pest and a common sensitizing allergen of asthma and rhinitis. It has developed strong resistance to many registered acaricides, However, the molecular mechanisms of resistance remain unknown. we therefore used next generation sequencing technology to investigate the global transcriptomes between resistant strains and susceptible strains. Results We obtained 34,159, 30,466 and 32,217 unigenes by assembling the SS reads, RS reads and SS&RS reads respectively. There are total 17,581 annotated unigenes from SS&RS reads by BLAST searching databases of nr, the Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) with an E-value ≤ 1e-5, in which 7,075 unigenes were annotated in the COG database, 12, 712 unigenes were found in the KEGG database and 3,812 unigenes were assigned to Gene ontology (GO). Moreover, 2,701 unigenes were judged to be the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) based on the uniquely mapped reads. There are 219 pathways in all annotated unigenes and 198 pathways in DEGs that mapped to the KEGG database. We identified 211 metabolism genes and target genes related to general insecticide resistance such as P450 and Cytochrome b, and further compared their differences between RS and SS. Meanwhile, we identified 105 and 194 genes related to growth and reproduction, respectively, based on the mode of action of Hexythiazox. After further analyses, we found variation in sequences but not in gene expression related to mite growth and reproduction between different strains. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first comparative transcriptome study to discover candidate genes involved in phytophagous mite resistance. This study identified differential unigenes related to general pesticide resistance and organism growth and reproduction in P. citri. The assembled, annotated transcriptomes provide a valuable genomic resource for further understanding the molecular basis

  2. Genome-wide mutagenesis of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri reveals novel genetic determinants and regulation mechanisms of biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinyun; Wang, Nian

    2011-01-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) causes citrus canker disease, a major threat to citrus production worldwide. Accumulating evidence suggests that the formation of biofilms on citrus leaves plays an important role in the epiphytic survival of this pathogen prior to the development of canker disease. However, the process of Xac biofilm formation is poorly understood. Here, we report a genome-scale study of Xac biofilm formation in which we identified 92 genes, including 33 novel genes involved in biofilm formation and 7 previously characterized genes, colR, fhaB, fliC, galU, gumD, wxacO, and rbfC, known to be important for Xac biofilm formation. In addition, 52 other genes with defined or putative functions in biofilm formation were identified, even though they had not previously reported been to be associated with biofilm formation. The 92 genes were isolated from 292 biofilm-defective mutants following a screen of a transposon insertion library containing 22,000 Xac strain 306 mutants. Further analyses indicated that 16 of the novel genes are involved in the production of extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) and/or lipopolysaccharide (LPS), 7 genes are involved in signaling and regulatory pathways, and 5 genes have unknown roles in biofilm formation. Furthermore, two novel genes, XAC0482, encoding a haloacid dehalogenase-like phosphatase, and XAC0494 (designated as rbfS), encoding a two-component sensor protein, were confirmed to be biofilm-related genes through complementation assays. Our data demonstrate that the formation of mature biofilm requires EPS, LPS, both flagellum-dependent and flagellum-independent cell motility, secreted proteins and extracellular DNA. Additionally, multiple signaling pathways are involved in Xac biofilm formation. This work is the first report on a genome-wide scale of the genetic processes of biofilm formation in plant pathogenic bacteria. The report provides significant new information about the genetic determinants and

  3. Modifications of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri lipopolysaccharide affect the basal response and the virulence process during citrus canker.

    PubMed

    Petrocelli, Silvana; Tondo, María Laura; Daurelio, Lucas D; Orellano, Elena G

    2012-01-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) is the phytopathogen responsible for citrus canker, one of the most devastating citrus diseases in the world. A broad range of pathogens is recognized by plants through so-called pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), which are highly conserved fragments of pathogenic molecules. In plant pathogenic bacteria, lipopolisaccharyde (LPS) is considered a virulence factor and it is being recognized as a PAMP. The study of the participation of Xac LPS in citrus canker establishment could help to understand the molecular bases of this disease. In the present work we investigated the role of Xac LPS in bacterial virulence and in basal defense during the interaction with host and non host plants. We analyzed physiological features of Xac mutants in LPS biosynthesis genes (wzt and rfb303) and the effect of these mutations on the interaction with orange and tobacco plants. Xac mutants showed an increased sensitivity to external stresses and differences in bacterial motilities, in vivo and in vitro adhesion and biofilm formation. Changes in the expression levels of the LPS biosynthesis genes were observed in a medium that mimics the plant environment. Xacwzt exhibited reduced virulence in host plants compared to Xac wild-type and Xacrfb303. However, both mutant strains produced a lower increase in the expression levels of host plant defense-related genes respect to the parental strain. In addition, Xac LPS mutants were not able to generate HR during the incompatible interaction with tobacco plants. Our findings indicate that the structural modifications of Xac LPS impinge on other physiological attributes and lead to a reduction in bacterial virulence. On the other hand, Xac LPS has a role in the activation of basal defense in host and non host plants. PMID:22792211

  4. Expression, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of SufE (XAC2355) from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri

    SciTech Connect

    Guzzo, Cristiane R.; Silva, Lucicleide R.; Galvão-Botton, Leonor M. P.; Barbosa, João A. R. G.; Farah, Chuck S.

    2006-03-01

    Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and data collection are reported for a member of the SufE family of proteins involved in the biosynthesis of Fe–S clusters in prokaryotes. Diffraction data were collected to 1.9 Å resolution and an interpretable electron-density map has been obtained by molecular replacement. Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) SufE (XAC2355) is a member of a family of bacterial proteins that are conserved in several pathogens and phytopathogens. The Escherichia coli suf operon is involved in iron–sulfur cluster biosynthesis under iron-limitation and stress conditions. It has recently been demonstrated that SufE and SufS form a novel two-component cysteine desulfarase in which SufS catalyses the conversion of l-cysteine to l-alanine, forming a protein-bound persulfide intermediate. The S atom is then transferred to SufE, from which it is subsequently transferred to target molecules or reduced to sulfide in solution. Here, the cloning, expression, crystallization and phase determination of Xac SufE crystals are described. Recombinant SufE was crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and diffracted to 1.9 Å resolution at a synchrotron source. The unit-cell parameters are a = 45.837, b = 58.507, c = 98.951 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. The calculated Matthews coefficient indicated the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit. Phasing was performed by molecular-replacement using E. coli SufE as a model (PDB code 1mzg) and an interpretable map was obtained.

  5. [Rapid Identification of Epicarpium Citri Grandis via Infrared Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Spectrum Imaging Technology Combined with Neural Network].

    PubMed

    Pan, Sha-sha; Huang, Fu-rong; Xiao, Chi; Xian, Rui-yi; Ma, Zhi-guo

    2015-10-01

    To explore rapid reliable methods for detection of Epicarpium citri grandis (ECG), the experiment using Fourier Transform Attenuated Total Reflection Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR/ATR) and Fluorescence Spectrum Imaging Technology combined with Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) Neural Network pattern recognition, for the identification of ECG, and the two methods are compared. Infrared spectra and fluorescence spectral images of 118 samples, 81 ECG and 37 other kinds of ECG, are collected. According to the differences in tspectrum, the spectra data in the 550-1 800 cm(-1) wavenumber range and 400-720 nm wavelength are regarded as the study objects of discriminant analysis. Then principal component analysis (PCA) is applied to reduce the dimension of spectroscopic data of ECG and MLP Neural Network is used in combination to classify them. During the experiment were compared the effects of different methods of data preprocessing on the model: multiplicative scatter correction (MSC), standard normal variable correction (SNV), first-order derivative(FD), second-order derivative(SD) and Savitzky-Golay (SG). The results showed that: after the infrared spectra data via the Savitzky-Golay (SG) pretreatment through the MLP Neural Network with the hidden layer function as sigmoid, we can get the best discrimination of ECG, the correct percent of training set and testing set are both 100%. Using fluorescence spectral imaging technology, corrected by the multiple scattering (MSC) results in the pretreatment is the most ideal. After data preprocessing, the three layers of the MLP Neural Network of the hidden layer function as sigmoid function can get 100% correct percent of training set and 96.7% correct percent of testing set. It was shown that the FTIR/ATR and fluorescent spectral imaging technology combined with MLP Neural Network can be used for the identification study of ECG and has the advantages of rapid, reliable effect. PMID:26904814

  6. Modifications of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri Lipopolysaccharide Affect the Basal Response and the Virulence Process during Citrus Canker

    PubMed Central

    Petrocelli, Silvana; Tondo, María Laura; Daurelio, Lucas D.; Orellano, Elena G.

    2012-01-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) is the phytopathogen responsible for citrus canker, one of the most devastating citrus diseases in the world. A broad range of pathogens is recognized by plants through so-called pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), which are highly conserved fragments of pathogenic molecules. In plant pathogenic bacteria, lipopolisaccharyde (LPS) is considered a virulence factor and it is being recognized as a PAMP. The study of the participation of Xac LPS in citrus canker establishment could help to understand the molecular bases of this disease. In the present work we investigated the role of Xac LPS in bacterial virulence and in basal defense during the interaction with host and non host plants. We analyzed physiological features of Xac mutants in LPS biosynthesis genes (wzt and rfb303) and the effect of these mutations on the interaction with orange and tobacco plants. Xac mutants showed an increased sensitivity to external stresses and differences in bacterial motilities, in vivo and in vitro adhesion and biofilm formation. Changes in the expression levels of the LPS biosynthesis genes were observed in a medium that mimics the plant environment. Xacwzt exhibited reduced virulence in host plants compared to Xac wild-type and Xacrfb303. However, both mutant strains produced a lower increase in the expression levels of host plant defense-related genes respect to the parental strain. In addition, Xac LPS mutants were not able to generate HR during the incompatible interaction with tobacco plants. Our findings indicate that the structural modifications of Xac LPS impinge on other physiological attributes and lead to a reduction in bacterial virulence. On the other hand, Xac LPS has a role in the activation of basal defense in host and non host plants. PMID:22792211

  7. Assessment of Prey Preference by the Generalist Predator, Mallada basalis (Walker), When Offered Two Species of Spider Mites, Tetranychus kanzawai Kishida and Panonychus citri (McGregor) on Papaya

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated potential prey preference of the generalist predator Mallada basalis (Walker) when offered two mites, Tetranychus kanzawai Kishida and Panonychus citri (McGregor), both important pests on papaya. Laboratory choice tests revealed that none of the three larval instars of M. basalis sho...

  8. Characterization and functional analysis of a novel glutathione S-transferase gene potentially associated with the abamectin resistance in Panonychus citri (McGregor).

    PubMed

    Liao, Chong-Yu; Xia, Wen-Kai; Feng, Ying-Cai; Li, Gang; Liu, Hai; Dou, Wei; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2016-09-01

    The citrus red mite, Panonychus citri (McGregor), a major citrus pest distributed worldwide, has been found to be resistant to various insecticides and acaricides used in China. However, the molecular mechanisms associated with the abamectin resistance in this species have not yet been reported. In this study, results showed over-expression of a novel glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) gene (PcGSTm5) in abamectin-resistant P. citri. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the transcripts of PcGSTm5 were also significantly up-regulated after exposure to abamectin and the maximum mRNA expression level at nymphal stage. The recombinant protein of PcGSTm5-pET-28a produced by Escherichia coli showed a pronounced activity toward the conjugates of 1-chloro-2,4 dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and glutathione (GSH). The kinetics of CDNB and GSH and its optimal pH and thermal stability were also determined. Reverse genetic study through a new method of leaf-mediated dsRNA feeding further support a link between the expression of PcGSTm5 and abamectin resistance. However, no direct evidence was found in metabolism or inhibition assays to confirm the hypothesis that PcGSTm5 can metabolize abamectin. Finally, it is here speculated that PcGSTm5 may play a role in abamectin detoxification through other pathway such as the antioxidant protection. PMID:27521916

  9. Resistance of Spiroplasma citri Lines to the Virus SVTS2 Is Associated with Integration of Viral DNA Sequences into Host Chromosomal and Extrachromosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Y.; Melcher, U.; Davis, R. E.; Fletcher, J.

    1995-01-01

    Spiroplasmavirus SVTS2, isolated from Spiroplasma melliferum TS2, produces plaques when inoculated onto lawns of Spiroplasma citri M200H, a derivative of the type strain Maroc R8A2. S. citri strains MR2 and MR3, originally selected as colonies growing within plaques on a lawn of M200H inoculated with SVTS2, were resistant to SVTS2. Genomic DNA fingerprints and electrophoretic protein profiles of M200H, MR2, and MR3 were similar, but three proteins present in M200H were missing or significantly reduced in both resistant lines. None of these three polypeptides reacted with antiserum against S. citri membrane proteins, indicating that they probably are not surface-located virus receptors. Electroporation with SVTS2 DNA produced 1.5 x 10(sup5) transfectants per (mu)g of DNA in M200H but none in MR2 or MR3, suggesting that resistance may result from inhibition of viral replication. The digestion patterns of the extrachromosomal double-stranded (ds) DNA of these lines were similar. Three TaqI fragments of MR2 extrachromosomal DNA that were not present in M200H extrachromosomal DNA hybridized strongly to an SVTS2 probe, and two of these fragments plus an additional one hybridized with the MR3 extrachromosomal DNA, indicating that a fragment of SVTS2 DNA was present in the extrachromosomal ds DNA of MR2 and MR3 but not of M200H. When the restricted genomes of all three lines were probed with SVTS2 DNA, strong hybridization to two EcoRI fragments of chromosomal MR2 and MR3 DNA but not M200H DNA indicated that SVTS2 DNA had integrated into the genomes of MR2 and MR3 but not of M200H. When MR3 extrachromosomal ds DNA containing a 2.1-kb SVTS2 DNA fragment was transfected into M200H, the transformed spiroplasmas were resistant to SVTS2. These results suggest that SVTS2 DNA fragments, possibly integrated into the chromosomal or extrachromosomal DNA of a previously susceptible spiroplasma, may function as viral incompatibility elements, providing resistance to superinfection by

  10. Adult Compacts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    This bulletin focuses on adult compacts, three-way agreements among employers, potential employees, and trainers to provide the right kind of quality training to meet the employers' requirements. Part 1 is an executive summary of a report of the Adult Compacts Project, which studied three adult compacts in Birmingham and Loughborough, England, and…

  11. Xanthan Gum Removal for 1H-NMR Analysis of the Intracellular Metabolome of the Bacteria Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri 306.

    PubMed

    Pegos, Vanessa R; Canevarolo, Rafael R; Sampaio, Aline P; Balan, Andrea; Zeri, Ana C M

    2014-01-01

    Xanthomonas is a genus of phytopathogenic bacteria, which produces a slimy, polysaccharide matrix known as xanthan gum, which involves, protects and helps the bacteria during host colonization. Although broadly used as a stabilizer and thickener in the cosmetic and food industries, xanthan gum can be a troubling artifact in molecular investigations due to its rheological properties. In particular, a cross-reaction between reference compounds and the xanthan gum could compromise metabolic quantification by NMR spectroscopy. Aiming at an efficient gum extraction protocol, for a 1H-NMR-based metabolic profiling study of Xanthomonas, we tested four different interventions on the broadly used methanol-chloroform extraction protocol for the intracellular metabolic contents observation. Lower limits for bacterial pellet volumes for extraction were also probed, and a strategy is illustrated with an initial analysis of X. citri's metabolism by 1H-NMR spectroscopy. PMID:24957023

  12. Biological and life table parameters of Typhlodromus laurentii and Iphiseius degenerans (Acari, Phytoseiidae) fed on Panonychus citri and pollen of Oxalis pes-caprae under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Tsolakis, Haralabos; Principato, Dennj; Jordà Palomero, Raoul; Lombardo, Alberto

    2016-10-01

    Typhlodromus laurentii and Iphiseius degenerans are two generalist phytoseiid mites, broadly spread in the Mediterranean area, especially in citrus orchards. In the present work we report results on various biological and life table parameters of the two phytoseiids, fed on pollen of Oxalis pes-caprae and various stages of the tetranychid Panonychus citri. Iphiseius degenerans had the shortest post embryonic development (6.53 days), the highest oviposition rate (1.83 eggs/female/day) and the shortest mean time between eggs laid (0.55 day) on Oxalis pollen, whereas the two food types did not influence these parameters in T. laurentii. However, Oxalis pollen showed a positive effect on the survivorship of the latter phytoseiid, with a median life time (LT50) of 44.51 days, which was two times longer than that registered on prey with the same phytoseiid, and on both food types with I. degenerans. This latter species had a better performance on the pollen (rm = 0.243, λ = 1.275, Ro = 22.88, DT = 2.85) than on prey (rm = 0.182, λ = 1.199, Ro = 17.43, DT = 3.81). On the other hand, the pollen influenced the net reproductive rate (25.43 females/female) of T. laurentii positively but showed the same effect as the prey on the other demographic parameters. Our results improve knowledge on the feeding behaviour of the above mentioned phytoseiids on two food sources that could represent the main possibility to maintain a consistent population of these predators during winter. Moreover, both phytoseiids were shown to be good biocontrol candidates of P. citri populations. PMID:27497592

  13. All five host-range variants of Xanthomonas citri carry one pthA homolog with 17.5 repeats that determines pathogenicity on citrus, but none determine host-range variation.

    PubMed

    Al-Saadi, Abdulwahid; Reddy, Joseph D; Duan, Yong P; Brunings, Asha M; Yuan, Qiaoping; Gabriel, Dean W

    2007-08-01

    Citrus canker disease is caused by five groups of Xanthomonas citri strains that are distinguished primarily by host range: three from Asia (A, A*, and A(w)) and two that form a phylogenetically distinct clade and originated in South America (B and C). Every X. citri strain carries multiple DNA fragments that hybridize with pthA, which is essential for the pathogenicity of wide-host-range X. citri group A strain 3213. DNA fragments that hybridized with pthA were cloned from a representative strain from all five groups. Each strain carried one and only one pthA homolog that functionally complemented a knockout mutation of pthA in 3213. Every complementing homolog was of identical size to pthA and carried 17.5 nearly identical, direct tandem repeats, including three new genes from narrow-host-range groups C (pthC), A(w) (pthAW), and A* (pthA*). Every noncomplementing paralog was of a different size; one of these was sequenced from group A* (pthA*-2) and was found to have an intact promoter and full-length reading frame but with 15.5 repeats. None of the complementing homologs nor any of the noncomplementing paralogs conferred avirulence to 3213 on grapefruit or suppressed avirulence of a group A* strain on grapefruit. A knockout mutation of pthC in a group C strain resulted in loss of pathogenicity on lime, but the strain was unaffected in ability to elicit an HR on grapefruit. This pthC- mutant was fully complemented by pthA, pthB, or pthC. Analysis of the predicted amino-acid sequences of all functional pthA homologs and nonfunctional paralogs indicated that the specific sequence of the 17th repeat may be essential for pathogenicity of X. citri on citrus. PMID:17722697

  14. Urinary tract infection - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Bladder infection - adults; UTI - adults; Cystitis - bacterial - adults; Pyelonephritis - adults; Kidney infection - adults ... to the hospital if you: Are an older adult Have kidney stones or changes in the anatomy ...

  15. Effect of yeast cell product (CitriStim) supplementation on turkey performance and intestinal immune cell parameters during an experimental lipopolysaccharide injection.

    PubMed

    Shanmugasundaram, Revathi; Sifri, Mamduh; Jeyabalan, Ramesh; Selvaraj, Ramesh K

    2014-11-01

    An experiment was conducted to identify the effect of whole yeast cell product supplementation in turkeys following an experimental inflammatory challenge. A total of 105 one-day-old turkey tom poults were fed basal diets supplemented with 0, 0.1, and 0.2% whole yeast cell product (CitriStim, ADM, Quincy, IL). At 6 wk of age and 16 wk of age, turkeys were injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) at 0 or 0.25 mg/kg of BW in a 3 × 2 factorial arrangement. BW gain (P = 0.31) and feed conversion ratio (P = 0.53; 3.13, 2.94, and 2.98 for the 0, 0.10, and 0.20% CitriStim treatments, respectively) at 15 wk of age were not significantly affected by the treatment diets. Yeast cell wall product supplementation had no effect on growth in control-injected turkeys but decreased growth in LPS-injected turkeys (yeast × LPS, P < 0.05). Splenic macrophages from birds fed whole yeast cell product and injected with LPS produced higher (P < 0.01) nitric oxide than the control group injected with LPS at both 6 and 16 wk of age. At 6 and 16 wk of age, birds injected with LPS (P < 0.01; P < 0.01) and supplemented with whole yeast cell product (P = 0.05; P = 0.10) showed increased IL-1 mRNA amounts in cecal tonsils. In birds not injected with LPS, whole yeast cell supplementation increased regulatory T cell percentage and IL-10 mRNA amounts, whereas in birds injected with LPS, whole yeast cell supplementation decreased IL-10 mRNA amounts at both 6 (P < 0.01) and 16 wk (P = 0.01) of age in cecal tonsils. Whole yeast cell product supplementation increased Lactobacillus (P < 0.01 and P = 0.01) and Bifidobacteria (P < 0.01 and P = 0.01) population at 6 and 16 wk of age. In conclusion, the effect of feeding whole yeast cell product on turkeys was dependent on the inflammatory status of the bird. PMID:25239535

  16. Adult Strabismus

    MedlinePlus

    ... will likely improve the double vision and depth perception. Also, strabismus affects adults in emotional, social, and ... muscle surgery is usually not severe. Headache, pulling sensation with eye movement and foreign body sensation in ...

  17. P450's identification in two economically important psyllids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama and the potato psyllid Bactericera cockerelli (Sulc) are important vectors which spread bacterial agents causing Huanglongbing of citrus and Zebra Chip of Potato, respectively. These two diseases and vectors are recent invasive pests which continue...

  18. Transmission efficiency of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus and progression of Huanglongbing disease in graft- and psyllid-inoculated citrus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) is a phloem-limited bacterium associated with Huanglongbing (HLB), one of the most destructive diseases of citrus in Florida and other citrus-producing countries. Natural transmission of Las occurs by the psyllid vector Diaphorina citri, but transmission can a...

  19. Trailers transporting oranges to processing plants move Asian citrus psyllids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Huanglongbing (citrus greening) is one of the most serious of citrus diseases. Movement of the disease occurs as a result of natural vector-borne infection and by movement of plant material. We demonstrate here that Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (vector of citrus greening pathogens) can be transported i...

  20. Emerging psyllid genomics: Applications to reduce plant disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, and the potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli, both transmit bacterial pathogens that destroy important food crops, potato, tomato, citrus, and others. The International psyllid genome consortium (being led by the authors) has developed a research team to...

  1. Broad sprectrum potential of Isaria fumosorosea on insect pests of citrus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Use of entomopathogenic fungi, Isaria fumosorosea, Ifr, =Paecilomyces fumosoroseus, successfully increased insect pest mortality. Spraying the Ifr containing product, PFR97 TM, on citrus seedlings was used to screen efficacy for the management of Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri; glassy-winge...

  2. Acoustic signals in the courtship of male and female Asian citrus psyllids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, was discovered in Broward County, Florida in 1998, and has since spread through most of the state. It is an important vector of Huanglongbing, an economically devastating disease of citrus; consequently, researchers and regulators are trying to d...

  3. Comparative analysis of Asian citrus psyllid and Potato psyllid antennae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The comparative investigation of the morphological basis for olfactory reception in two psyllid species, Diaphorina citri (the Asian citrus psyllid), and Bacterocera cockerelli (the potato/tomato psyllid) (both species Hemiptera:Psyllidae) was performed using scanning electron microscopy to elucidat...

  4. Complete Genome sequence of citrus huanglongbing bacterium, ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ obtained through metagenomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus huanglongbing (HLB) is the most destructive disease of citrus worldwide. It is spread by the citrus psyllids (Diaphorina citri and Trioza erytreae), and is associated with low-titer, phloem-limited infections by any of the three uncultured species of a-Proteobacteria: 'Candidatus Liberibact...

  5. HUANGLONGBING, CITRUS GREENING: PREPARING FOR THE FUTURE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Huanglongbing (HLB), more commonly known as citrus greening disease, was found in Florida in August 2005; Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, the Asian citrus psyllid and insect vector of HLB, was found in Florida in 1998. Since the initial discovery, the presence of HLB has been confirmed by polymerase cha...

  6. Orchard and nursery dynamics of the effect of interplanting citrus with guava for Huanglongbing, vector, and disease management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae), is an important pest of citrus in the United States of America primarily because it vectors ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’, the bacterium putatively responsible for Asiatic huanglongbing (HLB). Asiatic HLB is con...

  7. Effects of soil-applied imidacloprid on Asian citrus psyllid (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) feeding behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama is one of the most important pests of citrus due to its status as a vector of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, the bacterium associated with huanglongbing (HLB) disease. The use of insecticides for vector control is the primary method of managing...

  8. Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus is present in orange jasmine and Asian citrus psyllid reared from jasmine at low titers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Orange jasmine, Murraya paniculata, is a common horticultural plant in Florida, and an alternate host of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama. Orange jasmine has also been reported to harbor the bacteria Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, the causal agent of huanglongbing disease. We ...

  9. Two separate introductions of Asian citrus psyllid populations found in the American continents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A phylogeographic analysis inferred from the partial mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene (433 bp) was performed with 22 populations (n=132) of Diaphorina citri collected in the Americas and one in the Pacific. Eight populations (n=46) from four countries in South America, 14 (n=76) from...

  10. Asian citrus psyllid - biology and seasonal ecology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The seasonal ecology of Diaphorina citri was investigated in a non-irrigated citrus grove of mature orange trees beginning January 2005 in east central Florida. No insecticides were applied during the study. Predators including lady beetles, lacewings and syrphid flies were observed during the stud...

  11. Investigations of the feasibility for managing the Asian citrus pysllid using Isaria fumosorosea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid (AsCP), Diaphorina citri, transmits one of the most devastating diseases of citrus, the plant pathogenic bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, which is strongly associated with the occurrence of huanglongbing (HLB), also known as citrus greening disease. In Florida, g...

  12. Population levels of Asian Citrus Psyllid in Florida, Texas and Puerto Rico as indicated by yellow sticky traps deployed in citrus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to compare population levels of Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) in Florida, Texas and Puerto Rico. Four grove locations were studied in Florida, one location near each of the following cities: Leesburg, Vero Beach, Fort Pierce, and Immoka...

  13. Providing assistance in development and evaluation of psyllid management programs for east coast citrus growers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We identified the most serious problems, associated with the management of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, which is the main vector spreading Huanglongbing in Florida citrus along the East Coast. Increasing insecticide use has concerns of development of insecticide resistance along with ...

  14. Abundance of Asian citrus psyllid on yellow sticky traps in Florida, Puerto Rico, and Texas citrus groves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to obtain information on population dynamics of Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), in some managed citrus groves in Florida, Texas and Puerto Rico using yellow sticky traps deployed directly in trees. Four groves were studied in Florida (th...

  15. Development of SSR Markers for Detection, Genotyping, and Genetic Diversity Assessment of “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus”

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Huanglongbing, previously known as citrus greening, is a destructive disease of citrus. The causative pathogen is believed to be a phloem-restricted bacteria, “Candidatus Liberibacter” which is naturally transmitted by the citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri in Asia and America, and Trioza erytreae in ...

  16. 7 CFR 301.76-1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Citrus Greening and Asian Citrus Psyllid § 301.76-1... psyllid. The insect known as Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama) in any stage of development... conditions, a regulated article can be moved safely from an area quarantined for Asian citrus psyllid...

  17. Transmission and Propagation of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ by Grafting with Individual Citrus Leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a chronic, progressive decline disease in citrus associated with systemic infection by the bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas). Transmission in the field is by the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri, Kuwayama. Experimental propagation of CLas is done c...

  18. Ultrastructure of the salivary glands, alimentary canal and bacteria-like organisms in the Asian citrus psyllid, vector of citrus huanglongbing-disease bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several psyllids (Hemiptera: Psylloidea) are known as vectors of some economically important viral and bacterial plant pathogens. The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP, Diaphorina citri, Hemiptera, Liviidae) is the principal vector of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las), the putative bacterial causal ...

  19. A phagostimulant blend for T1 the Asian citrus psyllid (Hemiptera: Liviidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemical cues that condition orientation by the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae), are of great interest because it is the primary vector of the causal pathogen of citrus greening disease. Previous work in our lab identified a blend of formic and acetic acids as s...

  20. Factors affecting transmission rates of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' by Asian citrus psyllid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri, is an important pest because it transmits a bacterium ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (CLas) responsible for a serious disease of citrus known as Asiatic huanglongbing (citrus greening disease). USDA-ARS researchers recently established a program...

  1. Degradation products of citrus volatile organic compounds (VOCs) acting as phagostimulants that increase probing behavior of Asian citrus psyllid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatile phytochemicals play a role in orientation by phytophagous insects. We studied antennal and behavioral responses of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, vector of the citrus greening disease pathogen. Little or no response to citrus leaf volatiles was detected by electroanten...

  2. Evaluating citrus germplasm for huanglongbing (HLB) resistance: USDA-ARS Inoculation Program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri, is an important pest because it vectors bacteria responsible for a serious disease of citrus known as huanglongbing (citrus greening disease). USDA-ARS researchers recently established a program for screening citrus germplasm for resistance to the di...

  3. Quantitative distribution of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus in the aerial parts of the field grown HLB-infected citrus trees in Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayanna, one of the vectors for citrus greening disease or Huanglongbing (HLB) has been present in Texas for over a decade, but the detection of the disease is recent. HLB has been confirmed in only two adjacent commercial citrus groves of grapefruit and...

  4. Improved real-time PCR detection of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus from citrus and psyllid hosts by targeting the intragenic tandem repeats of its prophage genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) is the most prevalent species of Liberibacter associated with citrus huanglongbing (HLB) worldwide. Residing in phloem sieve cells of host plants and vectored by the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri), this fastidious bacterium lives as a pathogen or sym...

  5. PROCENTAJE DE PSILIDOS PORTADORES DE Canidatus Liberibacter asiaticus Y SU RELACION CON LA INCIDENCIA DE HLB EN CINCO HUERTAS COMERCIALES DE LIMON MEXICANO {Citrus aurantifolia (Christm) Swingle} EN EL ESTADO DE COLIMA MEXICO

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Asian citrus psyllids (Diaphorina citri) were individually analyzed by qPCR to detect Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas). The psyllids were collected in Mexican lime (Citrus aurantifolia) trees in five commercial orchards in Tecomán and Manzanillo, Colima with severe symptoms of classical mott...

  6. Development of the international psyllid genome consortium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two of the most important emerging agricultural diseases in the USA are transmitted by two different insect species of psyllids from the Family Psyllidae. The Asian Citrus Psyllid (Diaphorina citri) is the principal vector of the intercellular, plant-pathogenic bacterium Liberibacter which cause Hua...

  7. Two founding events identified in Asian citrus psyllid populations collected in the Americas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A phylogeographic analysis inferred from the partial mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene (COI) (433-bp) was performed with 22 populations (n=121) of Diaphorina citri collected in the Americas. Eight populations (n=46) from four countries in South America and 14 populations (n=75) from f...

  8. Evaluation of low-volume sprayers used in asian citrus Psyllid control applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kumayama, Sternorrhyncha: Psyllidae) is a detrimental pest to citrus crops when it serves as a vector of the pathogen that causes greening (huanglongbing, or HLB). Transmission of this disease causes mottling, chlorosis, dieback and reductions in both frui...

  9. Asian citrus psyllid viral pathogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A newly discovered viral pathogen of Asian citrus psyllid, AsCP, Diaphorina citri, Kuwayama (Psyllidae: Hemiptera) was classified as a Reoviridae. This virus may serve as a biological control agent for AsCP. The AsCP is an efficient vector of the plant-infecting bacterium (Candidatus Liberibacter as...

  10. Resistance of poncirus and citrus x poncirus germplasm to the Asian citrus psyllid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, has spread to citrus growing regions nearly worldwide and transmits phloem-limited bacteria (Candidatus Liberibacter spp.) that are putatively responsible for citrus greening disease. Host plant resistance may provide the most effective cont...

  11. Huanglongbing and psyllid cell cultures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We successfully established cell cultures of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Psyllidae: Hemiptera), DcHH-1. The cell culture also supported growth of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. This bacterial pathogen is associated with Huanglongbing, known as citrus greening disease. Research on...

  12. Reproductive biology and behavior of the Asian citrus psyllid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A review of research conducted during 2006-2008 on the reproductive biology and behavior of the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) will be presented. Information to be discussed will include daily patterns of mating; frequency of mating; pre-mating and pre-oviposition intervals; daily and seaso...

  13. The phloem-sap feeding mealybug (Ferrisia virgata) carries 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' populations without transmitting disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) is the primary causal agent of huanglongbing (HLB), the most devastating disease of citrus worldwide. Currently the known insect vectors of the HLB-associated bacteria are three species of psyllids, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Sternorrhyncha: Psyllidae), Trio...

  14. 7 CFR 301.76-1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Citrus Greening and Asian Citrus Psyllid § 301.76-1... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service of the United States Department of Agriculture. Asian citrus psyllid. The insect known as Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama) in any stage of...

  15. 7 CFR 301.76-1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Citrus Greening and Asian Citrus Psyllid § 301.76-1... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service of the United States Department of Agriculture. Asian citrus psyllid. The insect known as Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama) in any stage of...

  16. 7 CFR 301.76-1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Citrus Greening and Asian Citrus Psyllid § 301.76-1... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service of the United States Department of Agriculture. Asian citrus psyllid. The insect known as Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama) in any stage of...

  17. Increased infestation of Asian citrus psyllids on cold treated sour orange seedlings: Its possible relation to biochemical changes in leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold-stressed sour orange seedling (Citrus aurantium L.) attracted significantly more Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama) during 5h and 24h recovery periods compared to control plants in choice test experiment. Cold stressed plants were held/ placed at 6 ± 1°C for 6 days and then ...

  18. Interference by western flower thrips in rearing Asian citrus psyllid: damage to host plants and facultative predation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, is an important pest of citrus primarily because it vectors a bacterium responsible for a serious citrus disease known as huanglongbing (HLB) (also known as citrus greening disease). Researchers seeking solutions to HLB often depend on labor...

  19. Viability of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ prolonged by addition of citrus juice to culture medium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Huanglongbing, or citrus greening disease, is associated with infection by the phloem-limited bacterium ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (LAS). Infection with LAS, vectored by the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri), is incurable; therefore, knowledge regarding LAS biology and pathogenesis is...

  20. Efficacy of area-wide inoculum reduction and vector control on temporal progress of huanglongbing in Young Sweet orange plantings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Huanglongbing (HLB), caused by Candidatus Liberibacter spp. and transmitted by the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri (ACP), is an important threat to citrus industries worldwide, causing significant yield loss. The current recommended strategies to manage HLB are to: (i) eliminate HLB symptomat...

  1. Effect of Cyantraniliprole, a novel insecticide, on the inoculation of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus associated with citrus huanglongbing by the Asian citrus psyllid (Hemiptera: Liviidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama) is the principal vector of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (LAS) associated with huanglongbing (HLB), the most serious citrus disease worldwide. New research tools and control measures are urgently needed to combat HLB, and protecting newly plan...

  2. Visualization of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ cells in citrus seed coats with fluorescence in situ hybridization and transmission electron microscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ is bacterium implicated as the causal agent of the economically damaging disease of citrus called huanglongbing (HLB). The bacterium is spread by movement of infected citrus propagation material and by the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama. Seed tr...

  3. Colonization of seeds of citrus rootstock varieties by ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a disease of citrus associated with a systemic infection by the a-proteobacterium ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’. Infection of an individual tree can occur via psyllids (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama) carrying the bacterium or if the tree is propagated from infected budwood. Seed ...

  4. Nested-PCR Detection and Sequence Confirmation of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus from Murraya paniculata in Guangdong, China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Murraya paniculata (jasmine orange) is a popular ornamental plant and is a preferred host for Asian citrus psyllids, Diaphorina citri (Kuwayana), the primary vector of Candidatus Liberibacter spp. that causes citrus Huanglongbing (HLB). However, the presence of Ca. L. species in M. paniculata remain...

  5. Incidence of Huanglongbing in Psyllids Under Natural Conditions in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) was first reported in Florida in August 2005. The disease is spread by a psyllid vector, Diaphorina citri, which has been present in Florida since 1998. HLB is a very difficult disease to manage because of lack of early diagnostic methods. PCR diagnostic methods are efficient onl...

  6. Changes in free amino acids and polyamine levels in Satsuma leaves in response to Asian citrus psyllid infestation and water stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of biotic and abiotic stresses on changes in amino acids and polyamine levels in Satsuma orange (Citrus unshiu; cultivar Owari) leaves were investigated. Asian citrus psyllids (Diaphorina citri (Kuwayama) (ACP) infestation was used to induce biotic stress while a water deficit was impos...

  7. Lack of Evidence of Transmission of 'Candidatus' Liberibacter Asiaticus Through Citrus Seed Taken From Affected Fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus huanglongbing disease, putatively caused by the associated bacterium Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus is the greatest threat to the world citrus industry today. The bacterium is spread locally and regionally by the citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, and can also be disseminated by grafting...

  8. Characterization of the Asian citrus psyllid transcriptome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama) and other psyllids are important agricultural pests that cause extensive economic damage by feeding and as vectors of plant pathogens. No psyllid genomes have been characterized, and little is known about the composition of psyllid genomes or the ...

  9. Asian citrus psyllid, genetic basis of immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We successfully used a genomics approach to determine some of the genes which function in immunity, stress, and insecticide resistance in the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae). These psyllids are vectors of the devastating disease, Huanglongbing, now affecting citrus in F...

  10. Evaluation of management programs for protecting young citrus plantings from huanglongbing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Asiatic huanglongbing (HLB) is a devastating disease of citrus associated in North America with the bacterium ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (LAS) vectored by the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri Kuwayama. ACP management is considered a vital component of a program aimed at reducing...

  11. Diurnal patterns in flight activity and effects of light on host finding behavior of the Asian citrus psyllid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), is an invasive pest of citrus in the United States. The psyllid feeds and reproduces primarily on new flush growth of citrus and other rutaceous plants. Because it vectors the bacterial causal agents of the deadly citrus green...

  12. Obstructive sleep apnea - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - obstructive - adults; Apnea - obstructive sleep apnea syndrome - adults; Sleep-disordered breathing - adults; OSA - adults ... the upper airway for obstructive sleep apnea in adults. Sleep . 2010;33:1408-1413. PMID: 21061864 www. ...

  13. Anti-inflammatory effects of Radix Gentianae Macrophyllae (Qinjiao), Rhizoma Coptidis (Huanglian) and Citri Unshiu Pericarpium (Wenzhou migan) in animal models

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung Soo; Rhee, Hae In; Park, Eun Kyung; Jung, Kiwon; Jeon, Hyo Jin; Kim, Ji-Hong; Yoo, Hunseung; Han, Chang-Kyun; Cho, Yong-Baik; Ryu, Chun Jeih; Yang, Hyung In; Yoo, Myung Chul

    2008-01-01

    Background KHU14, an ethanolic extract of Radix Gentianae Macrophyllae (Qinjiao), Rhizoma Coptidis (Huanglian) and Citri Unshiu Pericarpium (Wenzhou migan) was tested for its anti-inflammatory effects. Methods Three out of 20 herbs were found to have anti-inflammatory effects. The formulation of these herbs, i.e. KHU14 was tested for croton oil-induced ear edema, carrageenan-induced paw edema, acetic acid-induced capillary permeability, cotton pellet and delayed type hypersensitivity. Results KHU14 exhibited anti-inflammatory effects in animal models of acute and chronic inflammation. The anti-inflammatory activity of KHU14 observed was comparable to that of celecoxib. KHU14 inhibited the production of NO and PGE2 in LPS/IFN-gamma-stimulated peritoneal macrophages, and reduced edema and the amount of infiltrated cells in animal models. Conclusion KHU14 exhibited anti-inflammatory effects as demonstrated in typical immunological tests for anti-inflammation in vitro and in vivo. PMID:18761750

  14. Organization and nucleotide sequences of the Spiroplasma citri genes for ribosomal protein S2, elongation factor Ts, spiralin, phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, and an unidentified protein.

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, C; Saillard, C; Bové, J M

    1990-01-01

    The gene for spiralin, the major membrane protein of the helical mollicute Spiroplasma citri, was cloned in Escherichia coli as a 5-kilobase-pair (kbp) DNA fragment. The complete nucleotide sequence of the 5.0-kbp spiroplasmal DNA fragment was determined (GenBank accession no. M31161). The spiralin gene was identified by the size and amino acid composition of its translational product. Besides the spiralin gene, the spiroplasmal DNA fragment was found to contain five additional open reading frames (ORFs). The translational products of four of these ORFs were identified by their amino acid sequence homologies with known proteins: ribosomal protein S2, elongation factor Ts, phosphofructokinase, and pyruvate kinase, respectively encoded by the genes rpsB, tsf, pfk, and pyk. The product of the fifth ORF remains to be identified and was named protein X (X gene). The order of the above genes was tsf--X--spiralin gene--pfk--pyk. These genes were transcribed in one direction, while the gene for ribosomal protein S2 (rpsB) was transcribed in the opposite direction. Images PMID:2139649

  15. The filamentous phage XacF1 causes loss of virulence in Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri, the causative agent of citrus canker disease

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Abdelmonim Ali; Askora, Ahmed; Kawasaki, Takeru; Fujie, Makoto; Yamada, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, filamentous phage XacF1, which can infect Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) strains, was isolated and characterized. Electron microscopy showed that XacF1 is a member of the family Inoviridae and is about 600 nm long. The genome of XacF1 is 7325 nucleotides in size, containing 13 predicted open reading frames (ORFs), some of which showed significant homology to Ff-like phage proteins such as ORF1 (pII), ORF2 (pV), ORF6 (pIII), and ORF8 (pVI). XacF1 showed a relatively wide host range, infecting seven out of 11 strains tested in this study. Frequently, XacF1 was found to be integrated into the genome of Xac strains. This integration occurred at the host dif site (attB) and was mediated by the host XerC/D recombination system. The attP sequence was identical to that of Xanthomonas phage Cf1c. Interestingly, infection by XacF1 phage caused several physiological changes to the bacterial host cells, including lower levels of extracellular polysaccharide production, reduced motility, slower growth rate, and a dramatic reduction in virulence. In particular, the reduction in virulence suggested possible utilization of XacF1 as a biological control agent against citrus canker disease. PMID:25071734

  16. The filamentous phage XacF1 causes loss of virulence in Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri, the causative agent of citrus canker disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Abdelmonim Ali; Askora, Ahmed; Kawasaki, Takeru; Fujie, Makoto; Yamada, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, filamentous phage XacF1, which can infect Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) strains, was isolated and characterized. Electron microscopy showed that XacF1 is a member of the family Inoviridae and is about 600 nm long. The genome of XacF1 is 7325 nucleotides in size, containing 13 predicted open reading frames (ORFs), some of which showed significant homology to Ff-like phage proteins such as ORF1 (pII), ORF2 (pV), ORF6 (pIII), and ORF8 (pVI). XacF1 showed a relatively wide host range, infecting seven out of 11 strains tested in this study. Frequently, XacF1 was found to be integrated into the genome of Xac strains. This integration occurred at the host dif site (attB) and was mediated by the host XerC/D recombination system. The attP sequence was identical to that of Xanthomonas phage Cf1c. Interestingly, infection by XacF1 phage caused several physiological changes to the bacterial host cells, including lower levels of extracellular polysaccharide production, reduced motility, slower growth rate, and a dramatic reduction in virulence. In particular, the reduction in virulence suggested possible utilization of XacF1 as a biological control agent against citrus canker disease. PMID:25071734

  17. Adult Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, John M.

    In its broadest context, play can be interpreted as any pleasurable use of discretionary time. Playfulness is an intrinsic feature of being human, and should be viewed in the light of a total lifestyle, not as an occurrence in an isolated time of life. Adult play appears to be an indefinable and controversial concept. A holistic approach should be…

  18. CPR: Adult

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Refresher Center Home FIRST AID, CPR and AED LIFEGUARDING Refresher Putting It All Together: CPR—Adult (2:03) Refresher videos only utilize this player QUICK LINKS Home RedCross.org Purchase Course Materials Shop Our Store ...

  19. Wolbachia infection density in populations of the Asian citrus psyllid (Hemiptera: Liviidae).

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, M; Coy, M R; Kingdom Gibbard, H N; Pelz-Stelinski, K S

    2014-10-01

    The symbiotic relationships between bacteria of the genus Wolbachia (order Rickettsiales) and their arthropod hosts are diverse and can range from mutualism to parasitism. Whereas effects of Wolbachia on host biology are well investigated, little is known about diversity and abundance of Wolbachia in their natural hosts. The phloem-feeding Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Kuwayama) (Hemiptera: Liviidae), is naturally infected with Wolbachia (wDi). In the current study, we calculated the within-host density of Wolbachia in Florida D. citri populations using quantitative polymerase chain reaction for detection of the Wolbachia outer surface protein gene, wsp. Gene quantities were normalized to the D. citri wingless gene (Wg) to estimate Wolbachia abundance in individual D. citri. Using this method, significant geographic differences in Wolbachia densities were detected among Florida D. citri populations, with higher infection levels occurring in male versus female hosts. PMID:25259690

  20. ADULT EDUCATION OF MIGRANT ADULTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BEAL, CATHERINE; AND OTHERS

    UNITS ON MIGRANT ADULT EDUCATION, AND A UNIT ON ORGANIZING INFORMAL GROUPS OF MIGRANT WOMEN TO DISCUSS MAINTAINING AND IMPROVING THEIR TEMPORARY HOMES, ARE PRESENTED. THE GOALS OF THE UNIT ON EDUCATION FOR MIGRANT MEN ARE ECONOMIC INDEPENDENCE, BETTER HEALTH AND WELL-BEING, AND BETTER HANDLING OF RESPONSIBILITIES. THE MAIN DIVISIONS OF THE…

  1. [Adult twins].

    PubMed

    Charlemaine, Christiane

    2006-12-31

    This paper explores the deep roots of closeness that twins share in their youngest age and their effect on their destiny at the adult age. Psychologists believe the bond between twins begins in utero and develops throughout the twins' lives. The four patterns of twinship described show that the twin bond is determined by the quality of parenting that twins receive in their infancy and early childhood. Common problems of adult twins bring about difficulties to adapt in a non-twin world. The nature versus nurture controversy has taken on new life focusing on inter-twin differences and the importance of parent-child interaction as fundamental to the growth and development of personality. PMID:17352324

  2. Obstructive sleep apnea - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - obstructive - adults; Apnea - obstructive sleep apnea syndrome - adults; Sleep-disordered breathing - adults; OSA - adults ... When you sleep, all of the muscles in your body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep your ...

  3. A TALE of Transposition: Tn3-Like Transposons Play a Major Role in the Spread of Pathogenicity Determinants of Xanthomonas citri and Other Xanthomonads

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Rafael Marini; de Oliveira, Amanda Carolina P.; Moreira, Leandro M.; Belasque, José; Gourbeyre, Edith; Siguier, Patricia; Ferro, Maria Inês T.; Ferro, Jesus A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Members of the genus Xanthomonas are among the most important phytopathogens. A key feature of Xanthomonas pathogenesis is the translocation of type III secretion system (T3SS) effector proteins (T3SEs) into the plant target cells via a T3SS. Several T3SEs and a murein lytic transglycosylase gene (mlt, required for citrus canker symptoms) are found associated with three transposition-related genes in Xanthomonas citri plasmid pXAC64. These are flanked by short inverted repeats (IRs). The region was identified as a transposon, TnXax1, with typical Tn3 family features, including a transposase and two recombination genes. Two 14-bp palindromic sequences within a 193-bp potential resolution site occur between the recombination genes. Additional derivatives carrying different T3SEs and other passenger genes occur in different Xanthomonas species. The T3SEs include transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs). Certain TALEs are flanked by the same IRs as found in TnXax1 to form mobile insertion cassettes (MICs), suggesting that they may be transmitted horizontally. A significant number of MICs carrying other passenger genes (including a number of TALE genes) were also identified, flanked by the same TnXax1 IRs and delimited by 5-bp target site duplications. We conclude that a large fraction of T3SEs, including individual TALEs and potential pathogenicity determinants, have spread by transposition and that TnXax1, which exhibits all of the essential characteristics of a functional transposon, may be involved in driving MIC transposition. We also propose that TALE genes may diversify by fork slippage during the replicative Tn3 family transposition. These mechanisms may play a crucial role in the emergence of Xanthomonas pathogenicity. PMID:25691597

  4. A plant natriuretic peptide-like molecule of the pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri causes rapid changes in the proteome of its citrus host

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plant natriuretic peptides (PNPs) belong to a novel class of peptidic signaling molecules that share some structural similarity to the N-terminal domain of expansins and affect physiological processes such as water and ion homeostasis at nano-molar concentrations. The citrus pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri possesses a PNP-like peptide (XacPNP) uniquely present in this bacteria. Previously we observed that the expression of XacPNP is induced upon infection and that lesions produced in leaves infected with a XacPNP deletion mutant were more necrotic and lead to earlier bacterial cell death, suggesting that the plant-like bacterial PNP enables the plant pathogen to modify host responses in order to create conditions favorable to its own survival. Results Here we measured chlorophyll fluorescence parameters and water potential of citrus leaves infiltrated with recombinant purified XacPNP and demonstrate that the peptide improves the physiological conditions of the tissue. Importantly, the proteomic analysis revealed that these responses are mirrored by rapid changes in the host proteome that include the up-regulation of Rubisco activase, ATP synthase CF1 α subunit, maturase K, and α- and β-tubulin. Conclusions We demonstrate that XacPNP induces changes in host photosynthesis at the level of protein expression and in photosynthetic efficiency in particular. Our findings suggest that the biotrophic pathogen can use the plant-like hormone to modulate the host cellular environment and in particular host metabolism and that such modulations weaken host defence. PMID:20302677

  5. Rapid screening and identification of compounds with DNA-binding activity from Folium Citri Reticulatae using on-line HPLC-DAD-MS(n) coupled with a post column fluorescence detection system.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qingrong; Zhang, Cangman; Lin, Zongtao; Sun, Hongyang; Liang, Yi; Jiang, Haixiu; Song, Zhiling; Wang, Hong; Chen, Shizhong

    2016-02-01

    To study the interactions between natural compounds and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), a method has been established combining a high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector-multi-stage mass spectrometer with a fluorescence detector (HPLC-DAD-MS(n)-FLD). The FLD was used to monitor fluorescence intensity of the ethidium bromide-DNA (EB-DNA) complex when a compound separated by HPLC was introduced. This novel method was used to simultaneously obtain the HPLC fingerprint, UV spectra, MS(n) fragments and DNA-binding activity profile of various components in Folium Citri Reticulatae. As a result, 35 compounds were identified, of which 25 were found in the extract of Folium Citri Reticulatae for the first time, and 33 compounds showed DNA-binding activities, with the most active being feruloylhexaric and p-coumaroylhexaric acids. In addition, the precision, stability and reproducibility of this method were validated by two positive controls, quercetin and hesperidin. This new on-line method is accurate, precise and reliable for further high-throughput screening of DNA-binding compounds from food samples and other complex matrices. PMID:26304344

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of XAC1151, a small heat-shock protein from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri belonging to the α-crystallin family

    SciTech Connect

    Hilario, Eduardo; Teixeira, Elaine Cristina; Pedroso, Gisele Audrei; Bertolini, Maria Célia; Medrano, Francisco Javier

    2006-05-01

    XAC1151, a small heat-shock protein from X. axonopodis pv. citri belonging to the α-crystallin family, was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method in the presence of ammonium phosphate. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.65 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The hspA gene (XAC1151) from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri encodes a protein of 158 amino acids that belongs to the small heat-shock protein (sHSP) family of proteins. These proteins function as molecular chaperones by preventing protein aggregation. The protein was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method in the presence of ammonium phosphate. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.65 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystal belongs to the rhombohedral space group R3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 128.7, c = 55.3 Å. The crystal structure was solved by molecular-replacement methods. Structure refinement is in progress.

  7. Adult Development and Learning of Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson, Donald N., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    This summary of adult development covers a wide range of authors. Adult development is one way of understanding how the internal and external changes in our lives have an impact on learning. Of particular importance in this work are the developmental issues of older adults. I present various theories of adult development such as linear and…

  8. Adults Need Vaccines, Too!

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Adult Vaccinations Adults Need Vaccines, Too! Past Issues / Summer 2015 Table of Contents ... of the millions of adults not receiving the vaccines you need? What vaccines do you need? All ...

  9. Adult Still's disease

    MedlinePlus

    Still's disease - adult; AOSD ... than 1 out of 100,000 people develop adult-onset Still's disease each year. It affects women more often than men. The cause of adult Still's disease is unknown. No risk factors for ...

  10. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  11. Panic Disorder among Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hyperactivity Disorder Among Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among ...

  12. Bipolar Disorder Among Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hyperactivity Disorder Among Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among ...

  13. Major Depression Among Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hyperactivity Disorder Among Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among ...

  14. Lethal and Sublethal Effects of Insecticides Used on Citrus, on the Ectoparasitoid Tamarixia radiata.

    PubMed

    Beloti, Vitor Hugo; Alves, Gustavo Rodrigues; Araújo, Diogo Feliciano Dias; Picoli, Mateus Manara; Moral, Rafael de Andrade; Demétrio, Clarice Garcia Borges; Yamamoto, Pedro Takao

    2015-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a disease associated with the bacteria "Candidatus Liberibacter spp." and has been devastating citrus orchards around the world. Its management involves control of the insect vector, the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri Kuwayama. However, the indiscriminate use of chemicals has caused pest outbreaks and eliminated the natural enemies of the vector, such as the parasitoid Tamarixia radiata (Waterston), the main agent for biological control of D. citri. This study assessed the lethal and sublethal effects of insecticides recommended for integrated production of citrus on the parasitoid T. radiata. When adult parasitoids were exposed to residues of 25 insecticides, 20% of them, i.e., gamma-cyhalothrin, etofenprox, azadirachtin, tebufenozide and pyriproxyfen, were considered as harmless (Class 1), 12% as slightly harmful (Class 2), 12% as moderately harmful (Class 3) and 56% as harmful (Class 4), according to the classification proposed by the IOBC/WPRS. Afterward, 14 insecticides (5 harmless and 9 harmful) were sprayed on the parasitoid pupae. Of the 14 insecticides tested, only the organophosphates dimethoate and chlorpyrifos affected the parasitoid emergence. The effects of insecticides on the parasitism capacity of adults exposed to residues of azadirachtin, etofenprox, gamma-cyhalothrin, pyriproxyfen and tebufenozide (harmless) were also evaluated. Tebufenozide and gamma-cyhalothrin affected the parasitism of the F0 generation, but did not affect the emergence of the F1 and F2 generations. Therefore, for an effective IPM program, selective insecticides or harmful pesticides to adult parasitoids could be used in the field, provided that the adults do not occur naturally and the chemical applications do not coincide with parasitoid releases. PMID:26132327

  15. Lethal and Sublethal Effects of Insecticides Used on Citrus, on the Ectoparasitoid Tamarixia radiata

    PubMed Central

    Beloti, Vitor Hugo; Alves, Gustavo Rodrigues; Araújo, Diogo Feliciano Dias; Picoli, Mateus Manara; Moral, Rafael de Andrade; Demétrio, Clarice Garcia Borges; Yamamoto, Pedro Takao

    2015-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a disease associated with the bacteria “Candidatus Liberibacter spp.” and has been devastating citrus orchards around the world. Its management involves control of the insect vector, the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri Kuwayama. However, the indiscriminate use of chemicals has caused pest outbreaks and eliminated the natural enemies of the vector, such as the parasitoid Tamarixia radiata (Waterston), the main agent for biological control of D. citri. This study assessed the lethal and sublethal effects of insecticides recommended for integrated production of citrus on the parasitoid T. radiata. When adult parasitoids were exposed to residues of 25 insecticides, 20% of them, i.e., gamma-cyhalothrin, etofenprox, azadirachtin, tebufenozide and pyriproxyfen, were considered as harmless (Class 1), 12% as slightly harmful (Class 2), 12% as moderately harmful (Class 3) and 56% as harmful (Class 4), according to the classification proposed by the IOBC/WPRS. Afterward, 14 insecticides (5 harmless and 9 harmful) were sprayed on the parasitoid pupae. Of the 14 insecticides tested, only the organophosphates dimethoate and chlorpyrifos affected the parasitoid emergence. The effects of insecticides on the parasitism capacity of adults exposed to residues of azadirachtin, etofenprox, gamma-cyhalothrin, pyriproxyfen and tebufenozide (harmless) were also evaluated. Tebufenozide and gamma-cyhalothrin affected the parasitism of the F0 generation, but did not affect the emergence of the F1 and F2 generations. Therefore, for an effective IPM program, selective insecticides or harmful pesticides to adult parasitoids could be used in the field, provided that the adults do not occur naturally and the chemical applications do not coincide with parasitoid releases. PMID:26132327

  16. Arizona Adult Education Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Adult education standards are the cornerstone for quality teaching, quality learning, and quality lives. The Arizona Adult Education Standards Initiative (Standards Initiative) represents a proactive effort by Arizona's adult education community to ensure rigor and consistency in program content and student outcomes for adult learners throughout…

  17. Adult Cancers in Adolescents and Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Laurence, Valérie; Marples, Maria; Stark, Daniel P

    2016-01-01

    The pattern of cancer seen in young people changes with increasing age, transitioning from childhood- to adult-type cancer in adolescence and the third decade. The risk factors, presentation and biology of cancer in young adults differ from those in the older adult population. Factors of particular significance in adolescents and young adults (AYAs) include genetic predisposition to adult-type cancer, diagnostic uncertainty, long-term morbidity and considerations of fertility. New systemic therapies are being introduced that can prolong life and even increase the chance of cure, but the impact on AYAs is uncertain, as these patients are often under-represented in clinical trials. Here, we discuss the management of AYAs with 3 of the most common cancers affecting adults, when they emerge in the AYA populations, and therefore are currently met by medical oncologists - breast cancer, colorectal cancer and melanoma. PMID:27595357

  18. Patient Eye Examinations - Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Examinations, Adults Patient Eye Examinations, Children Refractive Errors Scientists in the Laboratory Visual Acuity Testing Patient Eye Examinations, Adults × Warning message Automatic fallback to the cURL connection method kicked in to handle the request. Result code ...

  19. Immunization Schedules for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACIP Vaccination Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Immunization Schedules for Adults in Easy-to-read Formats ... previous immunizations. View or Print a Schedule Recommended Immunizations for Adults (19 Years and Older) by Age ...

  20. Adult Congenital Heart Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... survivable, manageable, yet in the routine years between infancy and adulthood, sometimes forgettable. The Adult Congenital Heart ... understand the continuum of the disease from its infancy. The Adult Congential Heart Association brings together valuable ...

  1. Adult Congenital Heart Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... to ACHA Search The futures of adults with congenital heart disease made brighter by their pasts Get Involved 2016 ... conference theme is "The Changing Landscape of Adult Congenital Heart Disease." Join Us Help us improve the quality of ...

  2. Depression in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stickle, Fred; Onedera, Jill D.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to address selected aspects of depression in older adults. Specifically, symptoms, risk factors, diagnosis, and interventions for depression in older adults are reviewed.

  3. Adult Learning: A Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Peter, Ed.

    This book on adult learning is divided into six sections. Section 1, Cognitive Processes, includes the following chapters: "Cognitive Processes: Contemporary Paradigms of Learning" (Jack Mezirow); "Information Processing, Memory, Age and Adult Learning" (Gillian Boulton-Lewis); "Adult Learners' Metacognitive Behaviour in Higher Education" (Barry…

  4. Aspects of Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandrasekhar, Rajkumari

    This book presents an overview of and prescription for adult education in India. Following an introduction to the problem of illiteracy in India, the book's 14 chapters cover a broad spectrum of adult education issues. Topics discussed include adult education and national development; roles of voluntary organizations, universities, colleges, and…

  5. Dimensions of Adult Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Griff, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This broad introduction to adult and postcompulsory education offers an overview of the field for students, adult educators and workplace trainers. The book establishes an analytical framework to emphasize the nature of learning and agency of learners; examines the core knowledge and skills that adult educators need; discusses policy, research and…

  6. Kids Who Outwit Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seita, John R.; Brendtro, Larry K.

    Kids who distrust adults are highly skilled at hiding their real nature and resisting change. Most adults shun such youths or get mired in conflict with them. Punitive get tough practices as well as traditional flaw-fixing treatment are reactive strategies that often drive these youths further from adult bonds and reinforce oppositional and…

  7. Adult Learners in Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Janette, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Theories on adult development and learning and some of the Ontario universities' programs and services for the adult learner are examined, and Athabasca University, Alberta's answer to the British Open University, is described. Peter O'Donnell discusses adult learners' needs and explains how Athabasca University serves this specific type of…

  8. Adult Competency Education Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Occupational and Adult Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Adult Education.

    A compilation of brief descriptions of 20 current resources for Adult Performance Level (APL) and Adult Competency Education (ACE) programs, this guide was developed for adult and secondary education administrators, teachers, and program developers who are beginning or are already involved with APL/ACE programs. Each citation contains information…

  9. Adult Competency Education Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Occupational and Adult Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Adult Education.

    A compilation of abstracts of 120 current Adult Performance Level (APL) and Adult Competency Education (ACE) federally supported projects being conducted in 34 States and the District of Columbia, this project profile was developed for adult and secondary education administrators, teachers, and program developers who are beginning or are currently…

  10. Adult Education in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miser, Rifat; Ural, Ozana; Ünlühisarýklý, Özlem

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the situation and practices of adult education in Turkey in terms of (a) participants, (b) providers, and (c) program areas. The data were derived from published statistical data and one-to-one interaction with adult education providers when such data are unavailable. Turkey has a long tradition of adult education with…

  11. Navajo Adult Basic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navajo Community Coll., Tsaile, AZ.

    The objectives of this Special Experimental Demonstration Project in Adult Basic Education for the Navajo were: (1) to raise the educational and social level of Navajo adult students who are unable to read, write, and speak English; (2) to assist the Navajo adult students to take advantage of occupational and vocational training programs; (3) to…

  12. The Adult Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belsky, Janet

    The 14 chapters of this textbook chronicle adult development from youth through old age, emphasizing both research and interviews with adults at various stages in their lives. Topics covered include the following: (1) the academic field of adult development; (2) theories and research methods; (3) aging and disease prevention; (4) sexuality and…

  13. Adult Numeracy Core Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steeds, Andrew, Ed.

    Designed primarily for adult literacy teachers and tutors, this curriculum describes the content of what should be taught in numeracy programs in order to meet the individual needs of adults through the selection and teaching of skills appropriate to those adults' needs. An introduction describes national standards and qualifications, learners,…

  14. Adults and GNVQs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettitt, Aidan

    1996-01-01

    This document is intended for further education colleges in the United Kingdom wishing to extend their General National Vocational Qualification (GNVQ) provision to adults, extend their adult students' options for accreditation, or review the suitability of different qualification routes for adults. It presents information about the development of…

  15. Canadian Adult Basic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooke, W. Michael, Comp.

    "Trends," a publication of the Canadian Association for Adult Education, is a collection of abstracts on selected subjects affecting adult education; this issue is on adult basic education (ABE). It covers teachers and teacher training, psychological factors relating to the ABE teacher and students, manuals for teachers, instructional materials,…

  16. Adult Survival Skills Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsko, Gregory M.

    The purpose of this instrument is to supplement data from the Adult Basic Learning Examination in assessing the functional level of adults in daily situations. It may also be used as a teaching tool for adults requesting tutoring in specific concepts and skills presented in the instrument. This instrument is an informal assessment instrument and…

  17. Adults Role in Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notar, Charles E.; Padgett, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Do adults play a role in bullying? Do parents, teachers, school staff, and community adult leaders influence bullying behavior in children and teenagers? This article will focus on research regarding all adults who have almost daily contact with children and teens and their part in how bullying is identified, addressed, and prevented. This article…

  18. Adult Learning Assumptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskas, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine Knowles' theory of andragogy and his six assumptions of how adults learn while providing evidence to support two of his assumptions based on the theory of andragogy. As no single theory explains how adults learn, it can best be assumed that adults learn through the accumulation of formal and informal…

  19. Adult Education in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokkos, Alexios

    2008-01-01

    The central aim of this article is to analyse the current situation of adult education in Greece. The article focuses on the following points: (a) the degree of participation in programmes of continuing professional training and general adult education courses, (b) the quality and the outcomes of the adult education provision in Greece, and (c)…

  20. An Adult ESL Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Literacy Resource Center, Columbia.

    This curriculum framework for adult literacy was written by 21 South Carolina adult English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) instructors, as submitted to the South Carolina Literacy Resource Center. It is based on current theories in the fields of adult education and second language acquisition and is designed to be flexible so that it may be adapted to…

  1. A specific interdomain interaction preserves the structural and binding properties of the ModA protein from the phytopathogen Xanthomonas citri domain interaction and transport in ModA.

    PubMed

    Santacruz-Perez, Carolina; Pegos, Vanessa Rodrigues; Honorato, Rodrigo V; Verli, Hugo; Lindahl, Erik; Barbosa, João Alexandre Ribeiro Gonçalves; Balan, Andrea

    2013-11-01

    The periplasmic-binding proteins in ATP-binding cassette systems (ABC Transporters) are responsible for the capture and delivery of ligands to their specific transporters, triggering a series of ATP-driven conformational changes that leads to the transport of the ligand. Structurally consisting of two lobes, the proteins change conformation after interaction with the ligand. The structure of the molybdate-binding protein (ModA) from Xanthomonas citri, bound to molybdate, was previously solved by our group and an interdomain interaction, mediated by a salt bridge between K127 and D59, apparently supports the binding properties and keeps the domains closed. To determinate the importance of this interaction, we built two ModA mutants, K127S and D59A, and analysed their functional and structural properties. Based on a set of spectroscopic experiments, crystallisation trials, structure determination and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we showed that the salt bridge is essential to maintain the structure and binding properties. Additionally, the MD simulations revealed that this mutant adopted a more compact structure that packed down the ligand-binding pocket. From the closed bound to open structure, the positioning of the helices forming the dipole and the salt bridge are essential to induce an intermediate state. PMID:24035743

  2. Phenology of Asian citrus psyllid (Hemiptera: Liviidae) and associated parasitoids on two species of Citrus, kinnow mandarin and sweet orange, in Punjab Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shouket Zaman; Arif, Muhammad Jalal; Hoddle, Christina D; Hoddle, Mark S

    2014-10-01

    The population phenology of Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, was monitored weekly for 110 wk on two species of Citrus, kinnow mandarin and sweet orange, at two different research sites in Faisalabad, Punjab Pakistan. Citrus flush growth patterns were monitored and natural enemy surveys were conducted weekly. Flush patterns were similar for kinnow and sweet orange. However, flush on sweet orange was consistently more heavily infested with Asian citrus psyllid than kinnow flush; densities of Asian citrus psyllid eggs, nymphs, and adults were higher on sweet orange when compared with kinnow. When measured in terms of mean cumulative insect or Asian citrus psyllid days, eggs, nymphs, and adults were significantly higher on sweet orange than kinnow. Two parasitoids were recorded attacking Asian citrus psyllid nymphs, Tamarixia radiata (Waterston) and Diaphorencyrtus aligarhensis (Shafee, Alam and Agarwal). The dominant parasitoid species attacking Asian citrus psyllid nymphs on kinnow and sweet orange was T. radiata, with parasitism averaging 26%. D. aligarhensis parasitism averaged 17%. Generalist predators such as coccinellids and chrysopids were collected infrequently and were likely not important natural enemies at these study sites. Immature spiders, in particular, salticids and yellow sac spiders, were common and may be important predators of all Asian citrus psyllid life stages. Low year round Asian citrus psyllid densities on kinnow and possibly high summer temperatures, may, in part, contribute to the success of this cultivar in Punjab where Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, the putative causative agent of huanglongbing, a debilitating citrus disease, is widespread and vectored by Asian citrus psyllid. PMID:25198345

  3. Safeguarding vulnerable adults.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard

    Nurses have a professional duty to safeguard vulnerable adults from abuse under the provisions of the Nursing and Midwifery Council's (NMC) revised Code (2015). With adult abuse continuing to increase, all members of the nursing team are well placed to identify and take action to safeguard the vulnerable. This article sets out how the Care Act 2014 seeks to improve the safeguarding of vulnerable adults and the role of nurses in that process. PMID:26153813

  4. Alternative Programming for Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flint, Thomas A.; Frey, Ruth

    2003-01-01

    The Council for Adult and Experiential Learning is currently cataloguing alternative programming features that are most effective with adult students in a best practices inventory organized around a framework of high-level descriptive principles of effectiveness. This chapter identifies a few interesting features from a quick survey of this…

  5. Adult Education in Germany.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huddleston, John

    This study is limited essentially to adult education in West Germany, although the historical sections include references to earlier experiences and experiments in areas now Russian-occupied. The terms "adult edcuation" and "workers' education" are clarified. Both are presented as separate movements. Brief reference is made to political, social,…

  6. Adult Learning Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    Adult Learners' Week--which is supported by the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills and the European Social Fund, amongst a raft of other organisations--is all about raising demand for learning. At its core, the campaign is about encouraging under-represented groups--including low-skilled, unemployed and low-paid adults and those…

  7. Teachers of Adults Will...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pankowski, Mary L.

    1975-01-01

    The article lists the 12 competencies of adult education teachers that are considered essential to assist adults in achieving instructional goals and objectives. Following the listing a brief justification and examples of ways to evaluate teacher competencies are discussed. (Author/BP)

  8. Recruiting Adult Education Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning Resources Network, Manhattan, KS.

    This document is the first nationwide compilation of successful recruiting techniques for students in adult basic education, literacy, General Educational Development classes, and adult high school degree programs. Information for the publication was gathered from a literature search and other sources, especially "Reaching the Least Educated," a…

  9. Counseling Adult Adoptees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corder, Kate

    2012-01-01

    This review presents various resources about working with adult adoptees in order to inform counselors in their practice. Topics covered include basics of adoption, including types of adoption and adoption statistics; possible issues adult adoptees may face; and suggestions and implications for counselors. The article addresses some of the serious…

  10. Adult Education and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinzen, Heribert, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document contains 19 papers on adult education and development worldwide. The following papers are included: "Editorial" (Heribert Hinzen); "Lifelong Learning in Europe: Moving towards EFA (Dakar Framework for Action on Education for All) Goals and the CONFINTEA V Agenda" (Sofia Conference on Adult Education); "Poverty and Schooling in the…

  11. Adult Day Services

    MedlinePlus

    A Smart Choice Adult Day Services Comparison At-a-Glance 1 Adult Day Services Assisted Living Home Care Nursing Homes Live at home with family ... supervision Nursing care available as needed during the day Flexibility to receive care only on days when ...

  12. Today's Adult Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Who are the adult students in career and technical education (CTE) today? There is not one simple answer to that question. Some are young with little life experience, while others are returning to the workforce and learning new skills to reinvent themselves. Whatever the case, educating adult students is an integral part of ACTE's mission, and the…

  13. Adult Learning and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubenson, Kjell, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    As individuals and societies try to respond to fundamental economic and social transformation, the field of adult learning and education is rapidly getting increased attention and new topics for research on adult learning have emerged. This collection of articles from the International Encyclopedia of Education 3e offers practitioners and…

  14. Dialogue and Adult Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarule, Jill Mattuck

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of the role of language and dialogue in adult learning looks at dialogue as epistemology and at talk as learning. It is proposed that the challenge in teaching and retaining adult learners is to create dialogue-rich classrooms, including many external speech opportunities, small-group discussion, and group projects. (MSE)

  15. Libraries and Adult Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josey, E. J., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Of the 13 essays presented in this special issue on libraries and adult education, 8 focus on programs and services from the public library for adult learners. These essays provide information on: (1) an Education Information Centers Program (EIC) designed to complement employment skills training provided under the Comprehensive Employment and…

  16. Adult Education in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, Radu

    2006-01-01

    Ever since the first ideas of national independence appeared in Finland, adult education has played an essential role in shaping the destiny of the Finns. With a history of almost 130 years, during which it has continuously increased in quality and quantity, the Finnish adult education system has ensured that Finland stays among the most…

  17. Adult Education Regional Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Chancellor's Office, 2015

    2015-01-01

    For more than one hundred and fifty years, until 2008, California was an undisputed national leader in its commitment to adult education. The state's investment in adult learners topped $750 million, a sum greater than the combined total of every other state in the nation. However, for the past several years recession and fiscal crisis have left…

  18. Adult Education in Cohesion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubenson, Kjell

    2003-01-01

    International Adult Literacy Survey data show the average adult education participation in Nordic countries is 14% higher than in other industrialized nations. Public support for participation of the disadvantaged, an active labor market policy, and popular education are key characteristics. (Contains 37 references.) (Author/JOW)

  19. Young Adult Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sewell, Ernestine P., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    The major articles in this journal issue deal with various aspects of young adult literature. Specific topics covered in the articles are (1) questions worth asking students about young adult novels, (2) the five major functions of adolescent literature in high school literature programs, (3) Southwestern literature for adolescents, (4) teaching…

  20. Adult Vocational Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Labour, Copenhagen (Denmark).

    Danish adult vocational training activities take the form of specifically targeted initial and continued training for employed and unemployed adults. Planning, development, and adaptation of vocational training programs (AMU programs) are characterized by tripartite cooperation among public authorities and organizations of employers and employees.…

  1. Adult Counseling Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrone, Phil; Davis, Sandy A.

    In order to determine the specific counseling needs of the adult learner, staff of the Adult Counseling Project began by conducting a literature search pertaining to the problems of returning students and those considering a return to school. The review revealed that little is known about the educational and vocational needs of the returning…

  2. Toward Transpersonal Adult Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boucouvalas, Marcie

    2016-01-01

    As a foundation for discussing transpersonal adult development, the author traces her trajectory, involvement in, and contribution to the modern transpersonal movement and her introduction of it to the adult learning literature, beginning during the early 1980s. Highlighted are the transpersonal domain and a differentiation between transpersonal…

  3. Adult Vocational Teacher Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hole, F. Marvin

    As part of a larger study to investigate the backgrounds and professional inservice needs of part-time adult vocational teachers in Pennsylvania, research was conducted to identify and assess adult vocational teacher competencies. Following a literature review, a survey instrument was devised which listed thirty-four competencies (basically…

  4. Adult Tech Prep.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaad, Donna

    For over 2 years, Blak Hawk College (Illinois) has provided high school equivalency (GED) candidates and recipients, older returning students, and underprepared high school graduates with a Tech Prep curriculum to give them the skills to make the transition from adult basic education to college or work. The Adult Tech Prep (ATP) core curriculum…

  5. Financing of Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, David

    2007-01-01

    The 2008 EFA Global Monitoring Report recognises adult literacy as the most neglected of the EFA goals. It is neglected most obviously in respect of the financial allocations made by governments and donors. This shortage of financing creates a dangerous situation in which adult educators seek to convince politicians to invest, based on false…

  6. Authenticity in Adult Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashton, Sam

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the relationship between authenticity and adult learning and prompted by some studies in which adult "authentic learning" is a central concept. The implication revealed by them is that real-worldness of learning contexts, learning content and learning tasks is perceived as conferring authenticity on learning. Here,…

  7. Gender Dysphoria in Adults.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Kenneth J; Lawrence, Anne A; Kreukels, Baudewijntje P C

    2016-03-28

    Gender dysphoria (GD), a term that denotes persistent discomfort with one's biologic sex or assigned gender, replaced the diagnosis of gender identity disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders in 2013. Subtypes of GD in adults, defined by sexual orientation and age of onset, have been described; these display different developmental trajectories and prognoses. Prevalence studies conclude that fewer than 1 in 10,000 adult natal males and 1 in 30,000 adult natal females experience GD, but such estimates vary widely. GD in adults is associated with an elevated prevalence of comorbid psychopathology, especially mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and suicidality. Causal mechanisms in GD are incompletely understood, but genetic, neurodevelopmental, and psychosocial factors probably all contribute. Treatment of GD in adults, although largely standardized, is likely to evolve in response to the increasing diversity of persons seeking treatment, demands for greater client autonomy, and improved understanding of the benefits and limitations of current treatment modalities. PMID:26788901

  8. Adult Education in the Seventies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indian Adult Education Association, New Delhi.

    The proceedings of the 24th All India Adult Education Conference highlight two symposia, "Adult Education and Urban Development" and "Adult Education and Green Revolution." Commission Reports on the two symposia are given. (DB)

  9. Young Adult Smoking Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Pamela M.; Neilands, Torsten B.; Glantz, Stanton A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Young adults have the highest smoking rate of any age group in the U.S., and new strategies to decrease young adult smoking are needed. The objective of the current study was to identify psychographic and demographic factors associated with current smoking and quitting behaviors among young adults. Methods Attitudes, social groups, and self-descriptors, including supporting action against the tobacco industry, advertising receptivity, depression, alcohol use, and other factors associated with smoking were tested for associations with smoking behaviors in a 2005 cross-sectional survey of 1528 young adults (aged 18–25 years) from a web-enabled panel. Analyses were conducted in 2007. Results Being older was associated with current smoking, whereas having some higher education and being African American or Hispanic were negatively associated with smoking. Supporting action against the tobacco industry was negatively associated with smoking (AOR=0.34 [95% CI=0.22, 0.52]). Perceived usefulness of smoking, exposure to smokers, increased perceived smoking prevalence, receptivity to tobacco advertising, binge drinking, and exposure to tobacco advertising in bars and clubs were associated with smoking. Supporting action against the tobacco industry was associated with intentions to quit smoking (AOR= 4.43 [95% CI=2.18, 8.60]). Conclusions Young adults are vulnerable to tobacco-industry advertising. Media campaigns that denormalize the tobacco industry and appeal to young adults appear to be a powerful intervention to decrease young adult smoking. PMID:19269128

  10. Depression in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Fiske, Amy; Wetherell, Julie Loebach; Gatz, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Depression is less prevalent among older adults than among younger adults but can have serious consequences. Over half of cases represent a first onset in later life. Although suicide rates in the elderly are declining, they are still higher than in younger adults and more closely associated with depression. Depressed older adults are less likely to endorse affective symptoms and more likely to display cognitive changes, somatic symptoms, and loss of interest than are younger adults. Risk factors leading to the development of late life depression likely comprise complex interactions among genetic vulnerabilities, cognitive diathesis, age-associated neurobiological changes, and stressful events. Insomnia is an often overlooked risk factor for late life depression. We suggest that a common pathway to depression in older adults, regardless of which predisposing risks are most prominent, may be curtailment of daily activities. Accompanying self-critical thinking may exacerbate and maintain a depressed state. Offsetting the increasing prevalence of certain risk factors in late life are age-related increases in psychological resilience. Other protective factors include higher education and socioeconomic status, engagement in valued activities, and religious or spiritual involvement. Treatments including behavioral therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, cognitive bibliotherapy, problem-solving therapy, brief psychodynamic therapy, and life review/reminiscence therapy are effective but too infrequently used with older adults. Preventive interventions including education for individuals with chronic illness, behavioral activation, cognitive restructuring, problem-solving skills training, group support, and life review have also received support. PMID:19327033

  11. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder among Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hyperactivity Disorder Among Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among ...

  12. Brainstem Glioma in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jethro; Western, Stephen; Kesari, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Brainstem gliomas are not nearly as common in adults as they are in children. They are likely the final common consequence not of a single disease process but of several. They can be difficult to diagnose, and are challenging to treat. Clinical studies of this diagnosis are few and generally small. Because of these factors, our understanding of the biology of adult brainstem glioma is incomplete. However, the knowledge base is growing and progress is being made. In this article, we review the current state of knowledge for brainstem glioma in adults and identify key areas for which additional information is required. PMID:27556016

  13. Older Adults and Drinking

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Rethinking Drinking Older Adults and Drinking Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table of Contents Generally, ... liver problems, osteoporosis, memory problems, and mood disorders. Drinking and Medications Many medications, such as the ones ...

  14. The Colonial Adult Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Huey B.

    1975-01-01

    The adult evening schools of colonial America served a mixed clientele and provided instruction in a variety of subjects. Although most historians have described evening schoolmasters as incompetent frauds, research indicates that such descriptions are generally unjust and unfounded. (NHM)

  15. Motivation and Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, J. Rodney

    1982-01-01

    The author reviews theories of human motivation: Lewin's force field analysis, Skinner's operant reinforcement theory, and Maslow's hierarchy of needs. He then extracts the implications of these theories for adult learning. SK)

  16. CPR - adult - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100219.htm CPR - adult - series To use the sharing features on ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics CPR A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  17. Mosquito, adult (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This illustration shows an adult southern house mosquito. This mosquito feeds on blood and is the carrier of many diseases, such as encephalitis, West Nile, dengue fever, yellow fever, and others. ( ...

  18. About BMI for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs About Adult BMI Language: ... Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Language: English Español (Spanish) ...

  19. Pneumonia - adults - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000017.htm Pneumonia in adults - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You have pneumonia, which is an infection in your lungs. In ...

  20. Adult Neurogenesis in Fish.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Julia; Brand, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Teleost fish have a remarkable neurogenic and regenerative capacity in the adult throughout the rostrocaudal axis of the brain. The distribution of proliferation zones shows a remarkable conservation, even in distantly related teleost species, suggesting a common teleost ground plan of proliferation zones. There are different progenitor populations in the neurogenic niches-progenitors positive for radial glial markers (dorsal telencephalon, hypothalamus) and progenitors with neuroepithelial-like characteristics (ventral telencephalon, optic tectum, cerebellum). Definition of these progenitors has allowed studying their role in normal growth of the adult brain, but also when challenged following a lesion. From these studies, important roles have emerged for intrinsic mechanisms and extrinsic signals controlling the activation of adult neurogenesis that enable regeneration of the adult brain to occur, opening up new perspectives on rekindling regeneration also in the context of the mammalian brain. PMID:26747664