Science.gov

Sample records for adult diffuse astrocytoma

  1. Astrocytoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Astrocytoma— These grade II astrocytomas tend to invade surrounding tissue and grow at a relatively slow pace. ... to have tentacle-like projections that grow into surrounding tissue, making them difficult to completely remove during ...

  2. Experience With Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for WHO Grade 2 Diffuse Astrocytomas

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Azusa; Mizoe, Jun-Etsu; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Kamada, Tadashi; Jingu, Keiichi; Iwadate, Yasuo; Nakazato, Youichi; Matsutani, Masao; Takakura, Kintomo

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To assess outcomes of carbon ion radiotherapy for diffuse astrocytomas in adults. Methods and Materials: Between October 1994 and February 2002, 14 patients with diffuse astrocytoma, identified as eligible for carbon ion radiotherapy, were enrolled in a phase I/II clinical trial. Carbon ion radiotherapy was administered in 24 fractions over 6 weeks. The normal tissue morbidity was monitored carefully, and the carbon ion dose was escalated from 50.4 Gy equivalent (GyE) to 55.2 GyE. Patients were divided into two groups according to their carbon ion doses: a low-dose group in which 2 patients were irradiated with 46.2 GyE and 7 patients were irradiated with 50.4 GyE, and a high-dose group in which 5 patients were irradiated with 55.2 GyE. Results: Toxicities were within acceptable limits, and none of the patients developed Grade 3 or higher acute or late reactions. The median progression-free survival (PFS) time was 18 months for the low-dose group and 91 months for the high-dose group (p = 0.0030). The median overall survival (OS) time was 28 months for the low-dose group and not reached for the high-dose group (p = 0.0208). Conclusion: High-dose group patients showed significant improvement in PFS and OS rates compared to those in the low-dose group, and both dose groups showed acceptable toxicity.

  3. IDH mutant diffuse and anaplastic astrocytomas have similar age at presentation and little difference in survival: a grading problem for WHO.

    PubMed

    Reuss, David E; Mamatjan, Yasin; Schrimpf, Daniel; Capper, David; Hovestadt, Volker; Kratz, Annekathrin; Sahm, Felix; Koelsche, Christian; Korshunov, Andrey; Olar, Adriana; Hartmann, Christian; Reijneveld, Jaap C; Wesseling, Pieter; Unterberg, Andreas; Platten, Michael; Wick, Wolfgang; Herold-Mende, Christel; Aldape, Kenneth; von Deimling, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    The WHO 2007 classification of tumors of the CNS distinguishes between diffuse astrocytoma WHO grade II (A II(WHO2007)) and anaplastic astrocytoma WHO grade III (AA III(WHO2007)). Patients with A II(WHO2007) are significantly younger and survive significantly longer than those with AA III(WHO2007). So far, classification and grading relies on morphological grounds only and does not yet take into account IDH status, a molecular marker of prognostic relevance. We here demonstrate that WHO 2007 grading performs poorly in predicting prognosis when applied to astrocytoma carrying IDH mutations. Three independent series including a total of 1360 adult diffuse astrocytic gliomas with IDH mutation containing 683 A II(IDHmut), 562 AA III(IDHmut) and 115 GBM(IDHmut) have been examined for age distribution and survival. In all three series patients with A II(IDHmut )and AA III(IDHmut) were of identical age at presentation of disease (36-37 years) and the difference in survival between grades was much less (10.9 years for A II(IDHmut), 9.3 years for AA III(IDHmut)) than that reported for A II(WHO2007) versus AA III(WHO2007). Our analyses imply that the differences in age and survival between A II(WHO2007) and AA III(WHO2007) predominantly depend on the fraction of IDH-non-mutant astrocytomas in the cohort. This data poses a substantial challenge for the current practice of astrocytoma grading and risk stratification and is likely to have far-reaching consequences on the management of patients with IDH-mutant astrocytoma.

  4. Malignant transformation of diffuse astrocytoma to glioblastoma associated with newly developed BRAF V600E mutation.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, Masayuki; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Takei, Hidehiro; Sonoda, Yukihiko; Uenohara, Hiroshi; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    A 29-year-old man presented with scintillation scotoma. MR imaging demonstrated a diffuse lesion in right parahippocampal gyrus. He underwent a biopsy, and the diagnosis was diffuse astrocytoma. Because of enlargement and new areas of gadolinium enhancement, the tumor was resected 18 months after biopsy. Histological examination revealed malignant transformation to glioblastoma with small areas of epithelioid component. He received radiation and temozolomide chemotherapy. Local recurrence was found 20 months after first resection. He underwent second resection, and the diagnosis was glioblastoma. DNA from the micro-dissected paraffin-embedded sections were analyzed for the mutation of the isocitrate dehydrogenase1 (IDH1) and IDH2 and v-RAF murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) genes. No mutations of the IDH genes were detected in any tumor specimen. In contrast, missense mutation at codon 600 in the BRAF gene (BRAF V600E) was found exclusively in the malignant areas from both resected glioblastoma specimens. We screened other genetic aberrations commonly seen in glioblastoma with multiplex ligation-dependent probe analysis. Deletion of CDKN2A and CDKN2B loci was found both in diffuse astrocytoma and glioblastoma component, but no other significant alterations were found. This case suggests that the BRAF V600E mutation may be involved in the malignant transformation to glioblastoma.

  5. Efficacy of 68Ga-DOTATOC Positron Emission Tomography (PET) CT in Children and Young Adults With Brain Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-07

    Acoustic Schwannoma; Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Meningioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Choroid Plexus Tumor; Adult Craniopharyngioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade I Meningioma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Papillary Meningioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET); Childhood Choroid Plexus Tumor; Childhood Craniopharyngioma; Childhood Ependymoblastoma; Childhood Grade I Meningioma; Childhood Grade II Meningioma; Childhood Grade III Meningioma; Childhood High-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Infratentorial Ependymoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Medulloepithelioma; Childhood Supratentorial Ependymoma; Meningeal Melanocytoma; Newly Diagnosed Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Diffuse Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Fibrillary Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Gemistocytic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Gliomatosis Cerebri; Recurrent Childhood Gliosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood

  6. Radial expansion rates and tumor growth kinetics predict malignant transformation in contrast-enhancing low-grade diffuse astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Hathout, Leith; Pope, Whitney B; Lai, Albert; Nghiemphu, Phioanh L; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Ellingson, Benjamin M

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Contrast-enhancing low-grade diffuse astrocytomas are an understudied, aggressive subtype at increased risk because of few radiographic indications of malignant transformation. In the current study, we tested whether tumor growth kinetics could identify tumors that undergo malignant transformation to higher grades. Methods Thirty patients with untreated diffuse astrocytomas (WHO II) that underwent tumor progression were enrolled. Contrast-enhancing and T2 hyperintense tumor regions were segmented and the radius of tumor at two time points leading to progression was estimated. Radial expansion rates were used to estimate proliferation and invasion rates using a biomathematical model. Results Radial expansion rates for both contrast-enhancing (p = 0.0040) and T2 hyperintense regions (p = 0.0016) were significantly higher in WHO II–IV tumors compared with nontransformers. Similarly, model estimates showed a significantly higher proliferation (p = 0.0324) and invasion rate (p = 0.0050) in WHO II–IV tumors compared with nontransformers. Conclusion Tumor growth kinetics can identify contrast-enhancing diffuse astrocytomas undergoing malignant transformation. PMID:26095141

  7. Genetic alterations related to BRAF-FGFR genes and dysregulated MAPK/ERK/mTOR signaling in adult pilocytic astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Pankaj; Kumar, Anupam; Jha, Prerana; Purkait, Suvendu; Faruq, Mohammed; Suri, Ashish; Suri, Vaishali; Sharma, Mehar C; Sarkar, Chitra

    2016-09-08

    Pilocytic astrocytomas occur rarely in adults and show aggressive tumor behavior. However, their underlying molecular-genetic events are largely uncharacterized. Hence, 59 adult pilocytic astrocytoma (APA) cases of classical histology were studied (MIB-1 LI: 1%-5%). Analysis of BRAF alterations using qRT-PCR, confirmed KIAA1549-BRAF fusion in 11 (19%) and BRAF-gain in 2 (3.4%) cases. BRAF-V600E mutation was noted in 1 (1.7%) case by sequencing. FGFR1-mutation and FGFR-TKD duplication were seen in 7/59 (11.9%) and 3/59 (5%) cases, respectively. Overall 36% of APAs harbored BRAF and/or FGFR genetic alterations. Notably, FGFR related genetic alterations were enriched in tumors of supratentorial region (8/25, 32%) as compared with other locations (P = 0.01). The difference in age of cases with FGFR1-mutation (Mean age ± SD: 37.2 ± 15 years) vs. KIAA1549-BRAF fusion (Mean age ± SD: 25.1 ± 4.1 years) was statistically significant (P = 0.03). Combined BRAF and FGFR alterations were identified in 3 (5%) cases. Notably, the cases with more than one genetic alteration were in higher age group (Mean age ± SD: 50 ± 12 years) as compared with cases with single genetic alteration (Mean age ± SD: 29 ± 10; P = 0.003). Immunopositivity of p-MAPK/p-MEK1 was found in all the cases examined. The pS6-immunoreactivity, a marker of mTOR activation was observed in 34/39 (87%) cases. Interestingly, cases with BRAF and/or FGFR related alteration showed significantly lower pS6-immunostatining (3/12; 25%) as compared with those with wild-type BRAF and/or FGFR (16/27; 59%) (P = 0.04). Further, analysis of seven IDH wild-type adult diffuse astrocytomas (DA) showed FGFR related genetic alterations in 43% cases. These and previous results suggest that APAs are genetically similar to IDH wild-type adult DAs. APAs harbor infrequent BRAF alterations but more frequent FGFR alterations as compared with pediatric cases. KIAA1549-BRAF fusion

  8. Histologically Benign, Clinically Aggressive: Progressive Non-Optic Pathway Pilocytic Astrocytomas in Adults with NF1

    PubMed Central

    Strowd, Roy E.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.; McLendon, Roger E.; Vredenburgh, James J.; Chance, Aaron B.; Jallo, George; Olivi, Alessandro; Ahn, Edward S.; Blakeley, Jaishri O.

    2016-01-01

    Although optic pathway gliomas are the most common brain tumors associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), extra-optic gliomas occur and may behave more aggressively with outcomes that differ by age. A retrospective case-control study was designed to describe the clinical course of adult NF1 patients with progressive extra-optic pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs) and compare to a pediatric cohort. Data for patients treated at the Johns Hopkins Comprehensive Neurofibromatosis Center from 2003 to 2013 were reviewed to identify cases (adults, age >18) and controls (pediatric, age <18) with clinically or radiographically progressive extra-optic PAs. Demographic, clinical, histologic, and radiographic data were collected. Three adult NF1 cases and four pediatric NF1 controls were identified. Mean age was 32.3 ± 9.5 years, 66% male (cases); 12.8±4.2 years, 100% male (controls). Symptomatic progression occurred in two-of-three adults (67%) while the majority of pediatric patients presented with isolated radiographic progression (n=3, 75%). Onset tended to be more rapid in adults (4±1 vs. 14±8.3 months, P=0.10). Subtotal resection was the treatment for all pediatric patients. Radiotherapy (n=2), chemotherapy (n=2), and targeted, biologic agents (n=2) were administered in adults. Although all pediatric patients are living, outcomes were universally poor in adults with progression to death in all (median survival 17.1 months, range 6.6–30.3). In conclusion, despite grade I histology, all three adult NF1 patients with progressive extra-optic PAs suffered an aggressive clinical course which was not seen in pediatric patients. Clinicians should be aware of this clinico-histologic discrepancy when counseling and managing adult NF1 patients with progressive extra-optic PAs. PMID:26992069

  9. Histologically benign, clinically aggressive: Progressive non-optic pathway pilocytic astrocytomas in adults with NF1.

    PubMed

    Strowd, Roy E; Rodriguez, Fausto J; McLendon, Roger E; Vredenburgh, James J; Chance, Aaron B; Jallo, George; Olivi, Alessandro; Ahn, Edward S; Blakeley, Jaishri O

    2016-06-01

    Although optic pathway gliomas are the most common brain tumors associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), extra-optic gliomas occur and may behave more aggressively with outcomes that differ by age. A retrospective case-control study was designed to describe the clinical course of adult NF1 patients with progressive extra-optic pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs) and compare to a pediatric cohort. Data for patients treated at the Johns Hopkins Comprehensive Neurofibromatosis Center from 2003 to 2013 were reviewed to identify cases (adults, age >18) and controls (pediatric, age <18) with clinically or radiographically progressive extra-optic PAs. Demographic, clinical, histologic, and radiographic data were collected. Three adult NF1 cases and four pediatric NF1 controls were identified. Mean age was 32.3 ± 9.5 years, 66% male (cases); 12.8 ± 4.2 years, 100% male (controls). Symptomatic progression occurred in two-of-three adults (67%) while the majority of pediatric patients presented with isolated radiographic progression (n = 3, 75%). Onset tended to be more rapid in adults (4 ± 1 vs. 14 ± 8.3 months, P = 0.10). Subtotal resection was the treatment for all pediatric patients. Radiotherapy (n = 2), chemotherapy (n = 2), and targeted, biologic agents (n = 2) were administered in adults. Although all pediatric patients are living, outcomes were universally poor in adults with progression to death in all (median survival 17.1 months, range 6.6-30.3). In conclusion, despite grade I histology, all three adult NF1 patients with progressive extra-optic PAs suffered an aggressive clinical course which was not seen in pediatric patients. Clinicians should be aware of this clinico-histologic discrepancy when counseling and managing adult NF1 patients with progressive extra-optic PAs. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Diffuse Spinal Leptomeningeal Spread of a Pilocytic Astrocytoma in a 3-year-old Child.

    PubMed

    Alyeldien, Ameer; Teuber-Hanselmann, Sarah; Cheko, Azad; Höll, Tanja; Scholz, Martin; Petridis, Athanasios K

    2016-03-25

    Pilocytic astrocytomas correspond to low-grade gliomas and therefore metastasize exceedingly rare. However, pilocytic astrocytomas are able to and leptomeningeal dissemination may be seen. What are the treatment options of these cases? We present a case report of a 3-year-old child with a pilocytic astrocytoma of the optic chiasm with leptomeningeal dissemination of the spinal meninges. Partial resection of the cerebral tumor has been performed. Since the leptomeningeal dissemination was seen all over the spinal meninges, the child did not undergo further surgical treatment. A wait and watch strategy were followed. Chemotherapy was initiated, if a 25% tumor growth was seen. Leptomeningeal dissemination of a pilocytic astrocytoma is seen so infrequently that no standard therapy is established. Since these metastases may occur even up to 2 decades after primary tumor resection, long-term follow-up is indicated. In case of spinal metastases, surgical treatment should be performed if feasible. Otherwise observation should be possessed and/or chemotherapy should be initiated.

  11. Diffuse Spinal Leptomeningeal Spread of a Pilocytic Astrocytoma in a 3-year-old Child

    PubMed Central

    Alyeldien, Ameer; Teuber-Hanselmann, Sarah; Cheko, Azad; Höll, Tanja; Scholz, Martin; Petridis, Athanasios K.

    2016-01-01

    Pilocytic astrocytomas correspond to low-grade gliomas and therefore metastasize exceedingly rare. However, pilocytic astrocytomas are able to and leptomeningeal dissemination may be seen. What are the treatment options of these cases? We present a case report of a 3-year-old child with a pilocytic astrocytoma of the optic chiasm with leptomeningeal dissemination of the spinal meninges. Partial resection of the cerebral tumor has been performed. Since the leptomeningeal dissemination was seen all over the spinal meninges, the child did not undergo further surgical treatment. A wait and watch strategy were followed. Chemotherapy was initiated, if a 25% tumor growth was seen. Leptomeningeal dissemination of a pilocytic astrocytoma is seen so infrequently that no standard therapy is established. Since these metastases may occur even up to 2 decades after primary tumor resection, long-term follow-up is indicated. In case of spinal metastases, surgical treatment should be performed if feasible. Otherwise observation should be possessed and/or chemotherapy should be initiated. PMID:27162602

  12. A case of an epithelioid glioblastoma with the BRAF V600E mutation colocalized with BRAF intact low-grade diffuse astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Jun-Ichiro; Nobusawa, Sumihito; Nakamura, Hideo; Yokoo, Hideaki; Ueda, Ryuta; Makino, Keishi; Yano, Shigetoshi; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi

    2016-04-01

    Epithelioid glioblastomas are one of the rarest histological variants of glioblastomas, which are not formally recognized by the World Health Organization (WHO) classification. Epithelioid glioblastomas usually occur as primary lesions, but there have been several reports of secondary epithelioid glioblastomas or epithelioid glioblastomas with pre- or co-existing lesions to date. The serine/threonine-protein kinase B-Raf (BRAF) V600E mutation has been found at a high frequency of 54% in epithelioid glioblastomas. We present a case of a 26-year-old female patient with an epithelioid glioblastoma with the BRAF V600E mutation in her right frontal lobe. In the present case, a low-grade diffuse astrocytoma component had colocalized with the epithelioid glioblastoma. The component presented prominent calcification on neuroimages as well as by histology, and low-grade diffuse astrocytoma was considered to be a precursor lesion of an epithelioid glioblastoma. However, the BRAF V600E mutation was detected only in epithelioid glioblastoma but not in low-grade diffuse astrocytoma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating a discrepancy in the BRAF V600E mutation states between epithelioid glioblastoma and colocalized low-grade astrocytoma.

  13. SU-E-J-212: MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Assessment of Tumor and Normal Brain Tissue Responses of Juvenile Pilocytic Astrocytoma Treated by Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, P; Park, P; Li, H; Zhu, X; Mahajan, A; Grosshans, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can measure molecular mobility at the cellular level, quantified by the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). DTI may also reveal axonal fiber directional information in the white matter, quantified by the fractional anisotropy (FA). Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma (JPA) is a rare brain tumor that occurs in children and young adults. Proton therapy (PT) is increasingly used in the treatment of pediatric brain tumors including JPA. However, the response of both tumors and normal tissues to PT is currently under investigation. We report tumor and normal brain tissue responses for a pediatric case of JPA treated with PT assessed using DTI. Methods: A ten year old male with JPA of the left thalamus received passive scattered PT to a dose of 50.4 Gy (RBE) in 28 fractions. Post PT, the patient has been followed up in seven years. At each follow up, MRI imaging including DTI was performed to assess response. MR images were registered to the treatment planning CT and the GTV mapped onto each MRI. The GTV contour was then mirrored to the right side of brain through the patient’s middle line to represent normal brain tissue. ADC and FA were measured within the ROIs. Results: Proton therapy can completely spare contra lateral brain while the target volume received full prescribed dose. From a series of MRI ADC images before and after PT at different follow ups, the enhancement corresponding to GTV had nearly disappeared more than 2 years after PT. Both ADC and FA demonstrate that contralateral normal brain tissue were not affect by PT and the tumor volume reverted to normal ADC and FA values. Conclusion: DTI allowed quantitative evaluation of tumor and normal brain tissue responses to PT. Further study in a larger cohort is warranted.

  14. ATRX and IDH1-R132H immunohistochemistry with subsequent copy number analysis and IDH sequencing as a basis for an "integrated" diagnostic approach for adult astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma and glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Reuss, David E; Sahm, Felix; Schrimpf, Daniel; Wiestler, Benedikt; Capper, David; Koelsche, Christian; Schweizer, Leonille; Korshunov, Andrey; Jones, David T W; Hovestadt, Volker; Mittelbronn, Michel; Schittenhelm, Jens; Herold-Mende, Christel; Unterberg, Andreas; Platten, Michael; Weller, Michael; Wick, Wolfgang; Pfister, Stefan M; von Deimling, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse gliomas are represented in the 2007 WHO classification as astrocytomas, oligoastrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas of grades II and III and glioblastomas WHO grade IV. Molecular data on these tumors have a major impact on prognosis and therapy of the patients. Consequently, the inclusion of molecular parameters in the WHO definition of brain tumors is being planned and has been forwarded as the "ISN-Haarlem" consensus. We, here, analyze markers of special interest including ATRX, IDH and 1p/19q codeletion in a series of 405 adult patients. Among the WHO 2007 classified tumors were 152 astrocytomas, 61 oligodendrogliomas, 63 oligoastrocytomas and 129 glioblastomas. Following the concepts of the "ISN-Haarlem", we rediagnosed the series to obtain "integrated" diagnoses with 155 tumors being astrocytomas, 100 oligodendrogliomas and 150 glioblastomas. In a subset of 100 diffuse gliomas from the NOA-04 trial with long-term follow-up data available, the "integrated" diagnosis had a significantly greater prognostic power for overall and progression-free survival compared to WHO 2007. Based on the "integrated" diagnoses, loss of ATRX expression was close to being mutually exclusive to 1p/19q codeletion, with only 2 of 167 ATRX-negative tumors exhibiting 1p/19q codeletion. All but 4 of 141 patients with loss of ATRX expression and diffuse glioma carried either IDH1 or IDH2 mutations. Interestingly, the majority of glioblastoma patients with loss of ATRX expression but no IDH mutations exhibited an H3F3A mutation. Further, all patients with 1p/19 codeletion carried a mutation in IDH1 or IDH2. We present an algorithm based on stepwise analysis with initial immunohistochemistry for ATRX and IDH1-R132H followed by 1p/19q analysis followed by IDH sequencing which reduces the number of molecular analyses and which has a far better association with patient outcome than WHO 2007.

  15. Suprasellar pilocytic astrocytoma in an adult with hemorrhage and leptomeningeal dissemination: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Radwa K; Budai, Caterina; Mundada, Pravin; Aljohani, Bakar; Rushing, Elisabeth J; Kollias, Spyros S

    2016-12-01

    Pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) is a low-grade tumor. It has an excellent prognosis after total resection. Leptomeningeal dissemination and hemorrhage are very rare to be associated with PA and lead to unfavorable prognosis. A 35-year-old man was diagnosed with a hemorrhagic suprasellar PA in 2006. Subsequent examination in 2007 revealed another large subdural hemorrhagic lesion in the sacral region, which proved to be PA by histopathologic assessment. Other leptomeningeal foci were discovered mainly at the craniocervical junction. The patient underwent subtotal resection and received chemotherapy with disease control for 7 years. Progression of the disseminated disease has recently occurred; however, the patient is still alive with stable disease after radiotherapy. The radiological features, management, and relevant literature are also presented. Our report heightens the awareness of PA in the adult population and the importance of close surveillance for the leptomeningeal spread, especially for sellar region tumors.

  16. The interaction of bee products with temozolomide in human diffuse astrocytoma, glioblastoma multiforme and astroglia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Borawska, Maria H; Markiewicz-Żukowska, Renata; Naliwajko, Sylwia K; Moskwa, Justyna; Bartosiuk, Emilia; Socha, Katarzyna; Surażyński, Arkadiusz; Kochanowicz, Jan; Mariak, Zenon

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the influence of extracts from Salix spp. honey (ESH), beebread (EBB), and royal jelly (ERJ) with and without temozolomide (TMZ) on cell lines derived from a patient with diffuse astrocytoma (DASC), human glioblastoma multiforme (U87MG), and normal human astroglia (SVGp12). DASC was identified by immunocytochemistry. TMZ (20 μM) in combination with ESH (30 μg/mL), EBB (50 μg/mL), and ERJ (30 μg/mL) has stronger cytotoxic activity on U87MG cells after 72 h (20.0, 26.5, and 29.3% of control, respectively) than TMZ alone (about 6% of control). An increase of the cytotoxic effect and inhibition of DNA synthesis in SVGp12 were detected after administering TMZ with the studied extracts. NF-κB p50 subunit was reduced in U87MG cells after treatment with ESH (70.9%) and ESH + TMZ (74.7%). A significant decline of MMP-9 and MMP-2 secretion in cultured U87MG was detected after incubation with EBB (42.9% and 73.0%, respectively) and EBB + TMZ (38.4% and 68.5%, respectively). In conclusion, the use of bee products may increase the cytotoxic effect of TMZ in U87MG but also in SVGp12 cell line. It is important to note that the U87MG cells were sensitive to natural bee products, although there was no influence of natural bee products on the DASC cells.

  17. Identification of high versus lower risk clinical subgroups in a group of adult patients with supratentorial anaplastic astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Decaestecker, C; Salmon, I; Camby, I; Dewitte, O; Pasteels, J L; Brotchi, J; Van Ham, P; Kiss, R

    1995-05-01

    The present work investigates whether computer-assisted techniques can contribute any significant information to the characterization of astrocytic tumor aggressiveness. Two complementary computer-assisted methods were used. The first method made use of the digital image analysis of Feulgen-stained nuclei, making it possible to compute 15 morphonuclear and 8 nuclear DNA content-related (ploidy level) parameters. The second method enabled the most discriminatory parameters to be determined. This second method is the Decision Tree technique, which forms part of the Supervised Learning Algorithms. These two techniques were applied to a series of 250 supratentorial astrocytic tumors of the adult. This series included 39 low-grade (astrocytomas, AST) and 211 high-grade (47 anaplastic astrocytomas, ANA, and 164 glioblastomas, GBM) astrocytic tumors. The results show that some AST, ANA and GBM did not fit within simple logical rules. These "complex" cases were labeled NC-AST, NC-ANA and NC-GBM because they were "non-classical" (NC) with respect to their cytological features. An analysis of survival data revealed that the patients with NC-GBM had the same survival period as patients with GBM. In sharp contrast, patients with ANA survived significantly longer than patients with NC-ANA. In fact, the patients with ANA had the same survival period as patients who died from AST, while the patients with NC-ANA had a survival period similar to those with GBM. All these data show that the computer-assisted techniques used in this study can actually provide the pathologist with significant information on the characterization of astrocytic tumor aggressiveness.

  18. Hemiparesis after Operation of Astrocytoma Grade II in Adults: Effects of Acupuncture on Sensory-Motor Behavior and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haibo; Schröder, Sven; Li, Zhifeng; Yang, Ying; Chen, Yu; Huang, Xingxian

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of acupuncture on hemiparesis and quality of life for adults with brain astrocytoma grade II, we conducted a randomized, observer-blinded clinical trial. Fifty-eight patients were randomized to standard rehabilitation (SR) therapy without acupuncture (n = 20), SR plus standard acupuncture (SA) (n = 19), and SR plus individualized acupuncture (IA) (n = 19). SA points were PC6, SP6, HT1, LU5, BL40, and ST36, while a special concept called “connecting and regulation Ren and Du” and “Jin-3-needling” served as IA. This treatment was individualized according to the clinical syndrome. The outcome was measured by the Barthel Index (BI), the Fugl-Meyer scale (FM), and the EORTC Core Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30) with the Brain Cancer Module (BCM20). IA + SR reached significantly higher BI scores than SA + SR, which reached significantly higher BI scores than SR. IA + SR was significantly superior to SA + SR and to SR at the 8th week for the scores of FM motor and sensory assessments and most QLQ-C30-BCM20 items. In conclusion, the individualized acupuncture concept of “connecting and regulating Ren and Du” combined with “Jin-3-needling” offers a promising possibility for the treatment of hemiparesis due to astrocytoma, but further evaluation is mandatory. PMID:23864900

  19. Expression and prognostic impact of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) in astrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte; Hermansen, Simon K.; Kristensen, Bjarne W.

    2017-01-01

    Astrocytomas are the most frequent primary brain tumors in adults, and despite aggressive treatment patients often experience recurrence. Survival decreases with increasing tumor grade, and especially patients with grade IV glioblastoma have poor prognosis due to the aggressive character of this tumor. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) is an extracellular matrix degrading enzyme which has been shown to play important roles in different cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression and prognostic potential of MMP-2 in astrocytomas. Tissue samples from 89 patients diagnosed with diffuse astrocytoma, anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma were stained immunohistochemically using a monoclonal MMP-2 antibody. The MMP-2 intensity in cytoplasm/membrane was quantified by a trained software-based classifier using systematic random sampling in 10% of the tumor area. We found MMP-2 expression in tumor cells and blood vessels. Measurements of MMP-2 intensity increased with tumor grade, and MMP-2 expression was found to be significantly higher in glioblastomas compared to normal brain tissue (p<0.001), diffuse astrocytomas (p<0.001) and anaplastic astrocytomas (p<0.05). MMP-2 expression was associated with shorter overall survival in patients with grade II-IV astrocytic tumors (HR 1.60; 95% CI 1.03–2.48; p = 0.036). In glioblastoma, high MMP-2 was associated with poorer prognosis in patients who survived longer than 8.5 months independent of age and gender (HR 2.27; 95% CI 1.07–4.81; p = 0.033). We found a positive correlation between MMP-2 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1), and combined MMP-2 and TIMP-1 had stronger prognostic value than MMP-2 alone also when adjusting for age and gender (HR 2.78; 95% CI 1.30–5.92; p = 0.008). These findings were validated in bioinformatics databases. In conclusion, this study indicates that MMP-2 is associated with aggressiveness in astrocytomas and may hold an unfavorable prognostic value in

  20. Patterns of practice and survival in a retrospective analysis of 1722 adult astrocytoma patients treated between 1985 and 2001 in 12 Italian radiation oncology centers

    SciTech Connect

    Magrini, Stefano Maria . E-mail: magrini@med.unibs.it; Ricardi, Umberto; Santoni, Riccardo; Krengli, Marco; Lupattelli, Marco; Cafaro, Ines; Scoccianti, Silvia; Menichelli, Claudia; Bertoni, Filippo; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Buglione, Michela; Pirtoli, Luigi

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: To analyze the patterns of practice and survival in a series of 1722 adult astrocytoma patients treated in 12 Italian radiotherapy centers. Methods and Materials: A total of 1722 patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy (90% World Health Organization [WHO] Grade 3-4, 62% male, 44% aged >60 years, 25% with severe neurologic deficits, 44% after gross total resection, 52% with high-dose radiotherapy, and 16% with chemotherapy). Variations in the clinical-therapeutic features in three subsequent periods (1985 through 2001) were evaluated, along with overall survival for the different subgroups. Results: The proportion of women, of older patients, of those with worse neurologic performance status (NPS), with WHO Grade 4, and with smaller tumors increased with time, as did the proportion of those treated with radical surgery, hypofractionated radiotherapy, and more sophisticated radiotherapy techniques, after staging procedures progressively became more accurate. The main prognostic factors for overall survival were age, sex, neurologic performance status, WHO grade, extent of surgery, and radiation dose. Conclusions: Recently, broader selection criteria for radiotherapy were adopted, together with simpler techniques, smaller total doses, and larger fraction sizes for the worse prognostic categories. Younger, fit patients are treated more aggressively, more often in association with chemotherapy. Survival did not change over time. The accurate evaluation of neurologic status is therefore of utmost importance before the best treatment option for the individual patient is chosen.

  1. Erlotinib and Temsirolimus in Treating Patients With Recurrent Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-29

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  2. Differential proteomics analysis of low- and high-grade of astrocytoma using iTRAQ quantification

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Tong; Lin, Shide; Wang, Zhongfeng; Shang, Aijia

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytoma is one of the most common types of brain tumor, which is histologically and clinically classified into four grades (I–IV): I (pilocytic astrocytoma), II (diffuse astrocytoma), III (anaplastic astrocytoma), and IV (glioblastoma multiforme). A higher grade astrocytoma represents a worse prognosis and is more aggressive. In this study, we compared the differential proteome profile of astrocytoma from grades I to IV. The protein samples from clinical specimens of grades I, II, III, and IV astrocytoma were analyzed by two-dimensional liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry and isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation and quantification. A total of 2,190 proteins were identified. Compared to grade I astrocytoma, 173 (12.4%), 304 (14%), and 462 (21.2%) proteins were aberrantly expressed in grades II, III, and IV, respectively. By bioinformatics analysis, the cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis-related pathways increase from low- to high-grade of astrocytoma. Five differentially expressed proteins were validated by Western blot. Within them, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and metalloproteinase inhibitor 1 were upregulated in glioblastoma multiforme group; whereas fibulin-2 and -5 were downregulated in grade II/III/IV astrocytoma, and the negative expression was significantly associated with advanced clinical stage. Functional analysis showed that both fibulin-2 and -5 may exert an antitumor effect by inhibiting cell proliferation, in vitro migration/invasion in glioma cells. New molecular biomarkers are likely to be used for accurate classification of astrocytoma and likely to be the target for drug development. PMID:27713642

  3. Alterations of the RRAS and ERCC1 genes at 19q13 in gemistocytic astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Takashi; Kim, Young-Ho; Oh, Ji-Eun; Satomi, Kaishi; Nonoguchi, Naosuke; Keyvani, Kathy; Pierscianek, Daniela; Sure, Ulrich; Mittelbronn, Michel; Paulus, Werner; Vital, Anne; Yokoo, Hideaki; McDonald, Kerrie; Kleihues, Paul; Nazaret, Nicolas; Barbet, Fabienne; Lachuer, Joel; Ohgaki, Hiroko

    2014-10-01

    Gemistocytic astrocytoma (World Health Organization grade II) is a rare variant of diffuse astrocytoma that is characterized by the presence of neoplastic gemistocytes and has a significantly less favorable prognosis. Other than frequent TP53 mutations (>80%), little is known about its molecular profile. Here, we show that gemistocytic astrocytomas carry a lower frequency of IDH mutations than fibrillary astrocytomas (74% vs 92%; p = 0.0255) but have profiles similar to those of fibrillary astrocytomas with respect to TERT promoter mutations (5% vs 0%), 1p/19q loss (10% vs 8%), and loss of heterozygosity 10q (10% vs 12%). Exome sequencing in 5 gemistocytic astrocytomas revealed homozygous deletion of genes at 19q13 (i.e. RRAS [related RAS viral oncogene homolog; 2 cases] and ERCC1 [excision repair cross-complementing rodent repair deficiency, complementation group 1; 1 case]). Further screening showed RRAS homozygous deletion in 7 of 42 (17%) gemistocytic astrocytomas and in 3 of 24 (13%) IDH1 mutated secondary glioblastomas. Patients with gemistocytic astrocytoma and secondary glioblastoma with an RRAS deletion tended to have shorter survival rates than those without deletion. Differential polymerase chain reaction and methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction revealed an ERCC1 homozygous deletion or promoter methylation in 10 of 42 (24%) gemistocytic astrocytomas and in 8 of 24 (33%) secondary glioblastomas. Alterations in RRAS and ERCC1 appear to be typical in gemistocytic astrocytomas and secondary glioblastomas, since they were not present in 49 fibrillary astrocytomas or 30 primary glioblastomas.

  4. Sunitinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent Malignant Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-29

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma

  5. Dissemination patterns of pilocytic astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Faria, Andréia V; Azevedo, Geovani C A; Zanardi, Verônica A; Ghizoni, Enrico; Queiroz, Luciano S

    2006-09-01

    Two patients with multifocal pilocytic astrocytoma diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and confirmed by histopathological examination are reported. They presented distinct sites and mechanisms of metastasis: to distant ventricles through the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) in patient 1 and to contralateral parenchyma, possibly through white matter tracts, in patient 2, a pathway not so far reported in pilocytic astrocytoma. Early detection of multifocal pilocytic astrocytoma by MRI may change treatment strategies and improve prognosis.

  6. Reduced TSC2 RNA and protein in sporadic astrocytomas and ependymomas.

    PubMed

    Wienecke, R; Guha, A; Maize, J C; Heideman, R L; DeClue, J E; Gutmann, D H

    1997-08-01

    Individuals affected with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) develop several benign and malignant tumors at increased frequency, including astrocytomas. Tuberin, the protein product of the tuberous sclerosis complex-2 (TSC2) tumor suppressor gene, has been shown to directly inhibit cell growth and is expressed at high levels in normal central nervous system neurons and astrocytes. To determine whether TSC2 RNA and protein are reduced in astrocytomas from individuals without tuberous sclerosis, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting analyses were performed on 49 adult astrocytomas, 10 pediatric astrocytomas, and 13 ependymomas. Eighteen of 40 (45%) high-grade (World Health Organization [WHO] grade III/IV) astrocytomas and 4 of 8 (50%) adult low-grade (WHO grade II) astrocytomas demonstrated reduced or absent TSC2 expression, including 1 giant cell astrocytoma, whereas none of the 10 pediatric low-grade astrocytomas analyzed showed a reduction in TSC2 expression. Reduced or absent tuberin was observed in 2 of 6 (33%) ependymomas analyzed. These data demonstrate, for the first time, that reduced or absent TSC2 expression may represent one of the critical genetic events associated with the development of sporadic adult, but not pediatric, astrocytomas.

  7. Use of EF5 to Measure the Oxygen Level in Tumor Cells of Patients Undergoing Surgery or Biopsy for Newly Diagnosed Supratentorial Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymoma

  8. BRAF V600E-mutated diffuse glioma in an adult patient: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuta; Takahashi-Fujigasaki, Junko; Akasaki, Yasuharu; Matsushima, Satoshi; Mori, Ryosuke; Karagiozov, Kostadin; Joki, Tatsuhiro; Ikeuchi, Satoshi; Ikegami, Masahiro; Manome, Yoshinobu; Murayama, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in genomic technology and genome-wide analysis have identified key molecular alterations that are relevant to the diagnosis and prognosis of brain tumors. Molecular information such as mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) genes or 1p/19q co-deletion status will be more actively incorporated into the histological classification of diffuse gliomas. BRAF V600E mutations are found frequently in circumscribed low-grade gliomas such as pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (PXA) and extra-cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma, or epithelioid glioblastomas (E-GBM), a rare variant of GBM. This mutation is relatively rare in other types of diffuse gliomas, especially in adult onset cases. Here, we present an adult onset case of IDH wild-type/BRAF V600E-mutated diffuse glioma, evolving from grade III to grade IV. The tumor displayed atypical exophytic growth and had unusual histological features not fully compatible with, but indicative of PXA and E-GBM. We discuss differential diagnosis of the tumor, and review previously described diffuse gliomas with the BRAF V600E mutation.

  9. Regression of grade III astrocytoma during the treatment of CML with imatinib mesylate.

    PubMed

    Jayawardena, Suriya; Sooriabalan, Danushan; Indulkar, Shalaka; Kim, Hyun Ho; Matin, Abu; Maini, Archana

    2006-01-01

    Astrocytomas are central nervous system neoplasms, which are derived predominately from astrocytes. On the basis of the histopathologic characteristics astrocytomas are graded from I to IV. The cells that demonstrate the greatest degree of anaplasia are used to determine the histologic grade of the tumor. The mean age of survival are approximately 10 years from the time of diagnosis for pilocystic astrocytomas (World Health Organization grade I), more than 5 years for patients with low-grade diffuse astrocytomas (WHO grade II), 2 to 5 years for those with anaplastic astrocytomas (WHO grade III), and less than 1 year for patients with glioblastoma (WHO grade IV). The treatment is a combination of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy depending of the grade of astrocytoma. We present a case of 31-year-old man with grade III astrocytoma with subsequent chronic myelogenous leukemia treated with imatinib mesylate as part of his chronic myelogenous leukemia treatment failing to show recurrence of the astrocytoma 10 years after standard treatment for astrocytoma.

  10. KIAA1549-BRAF fusions and IDH mutations can coexist in diffuse gliomas of adults.

    PubMed

    Badiali, Manuela; Gleize, Vincent; Paris, Sophie; Moi, Loredana; Elhouadani, Selma; Arcella, Antonietta; Morace, Roberta; Antonelli, Manila; Buttarelli, Francesca Romana; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Kim, Young-Ho; Ohgaki, Hiroko; Mokhtari, Karima; Sanson, Marc; Giangaspero, Felice

    2012-11-01

    KIAA1549-BRAF fusion gene and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutations are considered two mutually exclusive genetic events in pilocytic astrocytomas and diffuse gliomas, respectively. We investigated the presence of the KIAA1549-BRAF fusion gene in conjunction with IDH mutations and 1p/19q loss in 185 adult diffuse gliomas. Moreover BRAF(v600E) mutation was also screened. The KIAA1549-BRAF fusion gene was evaluated by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and sequencing. We found IDH mutations in 125 out 175 cases (71.4%). There were KIAA1549-BRAF fusion gene in 17 out of 180 (9.4%) cases and BRAF(v600E) in 2 out of 133 (1.5%) cases. In 11 of these 17 cases, both IDH mutations and the KIAA1549-BRAF fusion were present, as independent molecular events. Moreover, 6 of 17 cases showed co-presence of 1p/19q loss, IDH mutations and KIAA1549-BRAF fusion. Among the 17 cases with KIAA1549-BRAF fusion gene 15 (88.2%) were oligodendroglial neoplasms. Similarly, the two cases with BRAF(v600E) mutation were both oligodendroglioma and one had IDH mutations and 1p/19q co-deletion. Our results suggest that in a small fraction of diffuse gliomas, KIAA1549-BRAF fusion gene and BRAF(v600E) mutation may be responsible for deregulation of the Ras-RAF-ERK signaling pathway. Such alterations are more frequent in oligodendroglial neoplasm and may be co-present with IDH mutations and 1p/19q loss.

  11. O8.04TEMOZOLOMIDE AFTER RADIOTHERAPY IN RECURRENT “LOW-GRADE” DIFFUSE BRAINSTEM GLIOMA IN ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Botero, G.; Laigle-Donadey, F.; Mokhtari, K.; Martin-Duverneuil, N.; Delattre, J.Y.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Diffuse brainstem glioma is a rare disease in adults. Radiotherapy (RT) is frequently used as initial treatment. However, only limited data is available concerning chemotherapy efficacy at relapse after RT. Temozolomide (TMZ) is frequently used in progressive supratentorial gliomas after RT, but its efficacy in diffuse brainstem gliomas in adults has not been reported. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis including patients from our database with non-enhancing diffuse brainstem glioma (histological or MRI criteria compatible with low-grade glioma) who received TMZ at relapse after RT. Tumors localized in the pons, medulla oblongata or midbrain were analyzed excluding supratentorial or infratentorial tumors secondary infiltrating the brainstem. Clinical and radiological responses were assessed and progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) time were estimated. RESULTS: In total, 15 adult patients (median age 34 years) were selected. Histological analysis was available in 5 cases showing grade II oligodendroglioma (2 cases), grade II oligoastrocytoma (2 cases), grade II astrocytoma (1 case). Ten patients were selected by MRI criteria only. All patients received RT as initial treatment obtaining a median PFS of 34.2 months (95% CI 24.1-44.2). Median KPS at the time of relapse after RT was 80. TMZ was administered orally at 150-200mg/m2 for 5 days every 28 days at progression disease after RT. Clinical improvement after TMZ was observed in 9 cases (60%) whereas radiological assessment detected 6 partial responses. Estimated median PFS after TMZ was 9.5 months (95% CI 7.9-11) and median OS was 14.4 months (95% CI 10.5-18.2). Grade 3 thrombocytopenia was observed in 26% of cases. CONCLUSIONS: TMZ could be useful in adult patients with progressive diffuse low-grade brainstem glioma after RT failure. Further studies are warranted to detect clinical and biological markers of response to TMZ.

  12. Copy Number Profiling of Brazilian Astrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Bidinotto, Lucas Tadeu; Torrieri, Raul; Mackay, Alan; Almeida, Gisele Caravina; Viana-Pereira, Marta; Cruvinel-Carloni, Adriana; Spina, Maria Luisa; Campanella, Nathalia Cristina; Pereira de Menezes, Weder; Clara, Carlos Afonso; Becker, Aline Paixão; Jones, Chris; Reis, Rui Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Copy number alterations (CNA) are one of the driving mechanisms of glioma tumorigenesis, and are currently used as important biomarkers in the routine setting. Therefore, we performed CNA profiling of 65 astrocytomas of distinct malignant grades (WHO grade I–IV) of Brazilian origin, using array-CGH and microsatellite instability analysis (MSI), and investigated their correlation with TERT and IDH1 mutational status and clinico-pathological features. Furthermore, in silico analysis using the Oncomine database was performed to validate our findings and extend the findings to gene expression level. We found that the number of genomic alterations increases in accordance with glioma grade. In glioblastomas (GBM), the most common alterations were gene amplifications (PDGFRA, KIT, KDR, EGFR, and MET) and deletions (CDKN2A and PTEN). Log-rank analysis correlated EGFR amplification and/or chr7 gain with better survival of the patients. MSI was observed in 11% of GBMs. A total of 69% of GBMs presented TERT mutation, whereas IDH1 mutation was most frequent in diffuse (85.7%) and anaplastic (100%) astrocytomas. The combination of 1p19q deletion and TERT and IDH1 mutational status separated tumor groups that showed distinct age of diagnosis and outcome. In silico validation pointed to less explored genes that may be worthy of future investigation, such as CDK2, DMRTA1, and MTAP. Herein, using an extensive integrated analysis, we indicated potentially important genes, not extensively studied in gliomas, that could be further explored to assess their biological and clinical impact in astrocytomas. PMID:27172220

  13. Pilomyxoid astrocytoma of the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Ajani, Olufemi A; Al Sulaiti, Ghanem; Al Bozom, Issam

    2011-05-01

    Pilomyxoid astrocytomas (PMAs) are low-grade (WHO Grade II) tumors for which the imaging features are similar to pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs), but for which histological features and the clinical course differ. They are classified as a variant of PA. They have only been recently recognized, and they behave more aggressively than PAs. Most cases occur in the hypothalamic-chiasmatic area, although they may be located in any part of the neuraxis. Posterior fossa PMAs are very rare. The authors report a case of a 2-year-old girl with cerebellar PMA.

  14. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Isotretinoin in Treating Patients With Recurrent Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-20

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  15. Coexistent dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour and pilocytic astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Nasit, Jitendra G.; Shah, Payal; Zalawadia, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour (DNET) is an uncommon mixed glioneuronal tumour. DNET is classified as Grade I neoplasm in revised World Health Organization classification of tumors of the nervous system. DNET is commonly seen in the temporal lobe of children and young adults with features of pharmacoresistant complex partial seizures. Tumors arising in association with DNETs are rare. Only two cases of pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) arising in DNETs are reported. Surgical excision is the only successful management with favourable prognosis. The development of recurrence and malignancy after subtotal or even after complete excision challenges the premise of stability and highlights the importance of close clinical follow up. Here, a case of DNET with area of PA is described which helps in understanding the pathogenesis and biological behavior of DNET. PMID:27695565

  16. A Pilocytic Astrocytoma Mimicking a Clinoidal Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Christopher S.; Lehman, Norman L.; Sauvageau, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Pilocytic astrocytomas and meningiomas are benign, primary brain tumors that may involve the optic tract. Classically, the presence of a dural “tail” sign may differentiate a meningioma from other intracranial lesions. In this report, we describe a mass with the typical appearance of a clinoidal meningioma on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) but postoperatively diagnosed as a pilocytic astrocytoma. This case illustrates the rare occurrence of a pilocytic astrocytoma mimicking a meningioma on MRI. PMID:24744944

  17. Reference values for pulmonary diffusing capacity for adult native Finns.

    PubMed

    Kainu, Annette; Toikka, Jyri; Vanninen, Esko; Timonen, Kirsi L

    2017-04-01

    Measurement standards for pulmonary diffusing capacity were updated in 2005 by the ATS/ERS Task Force. However, in Finland reference values published in 1982 by Viljanen et al. have been used to date. The main aim of this study was to produce updated reference models for single-breath diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide for Finnish adults. Single-breath diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide was measured in 631 healthy non-smoking volunteers (41.5% male). Reference values for diffusing capacity (DLCO), alveolar volume (VA), diffusing capacity per unit of lung volume (DLCO/VA), and lung volumes were calculated using a linear regression model. Previously used Finnish reference values were found to produce too low predicted values, with mean predicted DLCO 111.0 and 104.4%, and DLCO/VA of 103.5 and 102.7% in males and females, respectively. With the European Coalition for Steel and Coal (ECSC) reference values there was a significant sex difference in DLCO/VA with mean predicted 105.4% in males and 92.8% in females (p < .001). New reference values for DLCO, DLCO/VA, VA, vital capacity (VC), inspiratory vital capacity (IVC), and inspiratory capacity (IC) are suggested for clinical use to replace technically outdated reference values for clinical applications.

  18. Fluorine F 18 Fluorodopa-Labeled PET Scan in Planning Surgery and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed High- or Low-Grade Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-10

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymoma

  19. Anticancer activity of glucomoringin isothiocyanate in human malignant astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Thangavelu Soundara; De Nicola, Gina Rosalinda; Iori, Renato; Rollin, Patrick; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2016-04-01

    Isothiocyanates (ITCs) released from their glucosinolate precursors have been shown to inhibit tumorigenesis and they have received significant attention as potential chemotherapeutic agents against cancer. Astrocytoma grade IV is the most frequent and most malignant primary brain tumor in adults without any curative treatment. New therapeutic drugs are therefore urgently required. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro antitumor activity of the glycosylated isothiocyanate moringin [4-(α-l-rhamnopyranosyloxy)benzyl isothiocyanate] produced from quantitative myrosinase-induced hydrolysis of glucomoringin (GMG) under neutral pH value. We have evaluated the potency of moringin on apoptosis induction and cell death in human astrocytoma grade IV CCF-STTG1 cells. Moringin showed to be effective in inducing apoptosis through p53 and Bax activation and Bcl-2 inhibition. In addition, oxidative stress related Nrf2 transcription factor and its upstream regulator CK2 alpha expressions were modulated at higher doses, which indicated the involvement of oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis induced by moringin. Moreover, significant reduction in 5S rRNA was noticed with moringin treatment. Our in vitro results demonstrated the antitumor efficacy of moringin derived from myrosinase-hydrolysis of GMG in human malignant astrocytoma cells.

  20. Practical molecular pathologic diagnosis of pilocytic astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Reis, Gerald F; Tihan, Tarik

    2015-03-01

    The pilocytic astrocytoma is predominantly a tumor of childhood and the most common type of circumscribed astrocytoma. The indolent nature of this tumor allows for prolonged survival for most patients, rendering the disease a rather "chronic" one, with potential long-term sequelae that are occasionally related to treatment. Two critical features of this tumor are its tendency to remain dormant, or involute even after subtotal resection, and the exceptional anaplastic transformation, sometimes following adjuvant therapy. The biological behavior of pilocytic astrocytoma can often be related to molecular alterations in the MAPK pathway.

  1. Differential expression of two fibroblast growth factor-receptor genes is associated with malignant progression in human astrocytomas

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, F.; Saya, H.; Bruner, J.M.; Morrison, R.S. )

    1994-01-18

    Malignant astrocytomas, which are highly invasive, vascular neoplasms, compose the majority of nervous system tumors in humans. Elevated expression of fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) in astrocytomas has implicated the FGF family of mitogens in the initiation and progression of astrocyte-derived tumors. In this study, the authors demonstrated that human astrocytomas undergo parallel changes in FGF-receptor (FGFR) expression during their progression from a benign to a malignant phenotype. FGFR type 2 (BEK) expression was abundant in normal white matter and in all low-grade astrocytomas but was not seen in malignant astrocytomas. Conversely, FGFR type 1 (FLG) expression was absent or barely detectable in normal white matter but was significantly elevated in malignant astrocytomas. Malignant astrocytomas also expressed an alternatively spliced form of FGFR-1 (FGFR-1[beta]) containing two immunoglobulin-like disulfide loops, whereas normal human adult and fetal brains expressed a receptor form (FGFR-1[alpha]) containing three immunoglobulin-like disulfide loops. Intermediate grades of astrocytic tumors exhibited a gradual loss of FGFR-2 and a shift in expression from FGFR-1[alpha] to FGFR-2 and a shift in expression from FGFR-1[alpha] to FGFR-1[beta] as they progressed from benign to malignant phenotype. These results suggest that differential expression and alternative splicing of FGFRs may be critical in the malignant progression of astrocytic tumors.

  2. Alisertib and Fractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients With Recurrent High Grade Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-19

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  3. Cystic cerebellar astrocytomas in childhood.

    PubMed

    Griffin, T W; Beaufait, D; Blasko, J C

    1979-07-01

    Thirty-nine patients with low grade cystic cerebellar astrocytomas were treated at the University of Washington and Children's Orthopedic Hospital in Seattle, Washington, between 1955 and 1977; 29 were treated with partial or complete resection alone, and 10 received radiation therapy after various types of surgical procedures. With a mean follow-up time of 7 years, the survival rate for patients who had complete resections of their primary disease was 100%. The relapse-free survival rate was 82%. The relapse-free survival rate for patients treated primarily with partial resection alone was 36%. Postoperative irradiation after partial resection for both primary and recurrent disease resulted in a relapse-free survival rate of 83%. If complete tumor excision is not possible, postoperative radiation therapy is recommended following partial resection.

  4. Frontal lobe astrocytoma following radiotherapy for medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.S.; Kushner, M.J.; Dell, S.

    1981-05-01

    A young woman had a frontal lobe astrocytoma 14 years after successful treatment of a posterior fossa medulloblastoma by surgery and whole-neuraxis irradiation. The association of these two tumors is rare, and it is unlikely that the second tumor was the result of metastasis and differentiation of residual or recurrent medulloblastoma. We review the evidence supporting this view and also the likelihood that the astrocytoma was induced by the prior radiation.

  5. Mitotic recombination of chromosome 17 in astrocytomas

    SciTech Connect

    James, C.D.; Carlbom, E.; Nordenskjold, M.; Collins, V.P.; Cavenee, W.K. )

    1989-04-01

    Allelic combinations at seven loci on human chromosome 17 defined by restriction fragment length polymorphisms were determined in tumor and normal tissues from 35 patients with gliomas. Loss of constitutional heterozygosity at one or more of these loci was observed in 8 of the 24 tumors displaying astrocytic differentiation and in the single primitive neuroectodermal tumor examined. The astrocytomas showing these losses included examples of each adult malignancy grade of the disease, including glioblastoma (malignancy grade IV), and seven of them demonstrated concurrent maintenance of heterozygosity for at least one chromosome 17 locus. Determination of allele dosage together with the genotypic data indicated that the tumor chromosomes 17 were derived by mitotic recombination in 7 of the 9 cases with shared homozygosity of the region 17p11.2-ptr in all cases. In contrast, tumors of oligodendrocytic, ependymal, or mixed cellular differentiation did not exhibit loss of alleles at any of the loci examined. These data suggest that the somatic attainment of homozygosity for loci on chromosome 17p is frequently associated with the oncogenesis of central nervous system tumors, particularly those showing solely astrocytic differentiation, and that mitotic recombination mapping is a useful approach towards the subregional localization of a locus whose rearrangement is involved in this disease.

  6. IDH1 Mutations Are Early Events in the Development of Astrocytomas and Oligodendrogliomas

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Takuya; Nobusawa, Sumihito; Kleihues, Paul; Ohgaki, Hiroko

    2009-01-01

    IDH1 encodes isocitrate dehydrogenase 1, which participates in the citric acid cycle and was recently reported to be mutated in 12% of glioblastomas. We assessed IDH1 mutations in 321 gliomas of various histological types and biological behaviors. A total of 130 IDH1 mutations was detected, and all were located at amino acid residue 132. Of these, 91% were G→A mutations (Arg→His). IDH1 mutations were frequent in low-grade diffuse astrocytomas (88%) and in secondary glioblastomas that developed through progression from low-grade diffuse or anaplastic astrocytoma (82%). Similarly, high frequencies of IDH1 mutations were found in oligodendrogliomas (79%) and oligoastrocytomas (94%). Analyses of multiple biopsies from the same patient (51 cases) showed that there were no cases in which an IDH1 mutation occurred after the acquisition of either a TP53 mutation or loss of 1p/19q, suggesting that IDH1 mutations are very early events in gliomagenesis and may affect a common glial precursor cell population. IDH1 mutations were co-present with TP53 mutations in 63% of low-grade diffuse astrocytomas and with loss of heterozygosity 1p/19q in 64% of oligodendrogliomas; they were rare in pilocytic astrocytomas (10%) and primary glioblastomas (5%) and absent in ependymomas. The frequent presence of IDH1 mutations in secondary glioblastomas and their near-complete absence in primary glioblastomas reinforce the concept that despite their histological similarities, these subtypes are genetically and clinically distinct entities. PMID:19246647

  7. Astrocytoma with involvement of medulla oblongata, spinal cord and spinal nerves in a raccoon (Procyon lotor)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neoplasms affecting the central and peripheral nervous systems of wild animals are extremely rare. Described are clinical signs, pathologic and immunohistochemical findings in an adult female raccoon (Procyon lotor) with an astrocytoma which involved brainstem, cervical spinal cord and roots of the ...

  8. Expression patterns of Wnt signaling component, secreted frizzled‑related protein 3 in astrocytoma and glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Pećina-Šlaus, Nives; Kafka, Anja; Varošanec, Ana Maria; Marković, Leon; Krsnik, Željka; Njirić, Niko; Mrak, Goran

    2016-05-01

    Secreted frizzled-related protein 3 (SFRP3) is a member of the family of soluble proteins, which modulate the Wnt signaling cascade. Novel research has identified aberrant expression of SFRPs in different types of cancer. In the present study the expression intensities and localizations of the SFRP3 protein across different histopathological grades of astrocytic brain tumors were investigated by immunohistochemistry, digital scanning and image analysis. The results demonstrated that the differences between expression levels and malignancy grades were statistically significant. Tumors were classified into four malignancy grades according to the World Health Organization guidelines. Moderate (P=0.014) and strong (P=0.028) nuclear expression levels were significantly different in pilocytic (grade I) and diffuse (grade II) astrocytomas demonstrating higher expression values, as compared with anaplastic astrocytoma (grade III) and glioblastoma (grade IV). When the sample was divided into two groups, the moderate and high cytoplasmic expression levels were observed to be significantly higher in glioblastomas than in the group comprising astrocytoma II and III. Furthermore, the results indicated that high grade tumors were associated with lower values of moderate (P=0.002) and strong (P=0.018) nuclear expression in comparison to low grade tumors. Analysis of cytoplasmic staining demonstrated that strong cytoplasmic expression was significantly higher in the astrocytoma III and IV group than in the astrocytoma I and II group (P=0.048). Furthermore, lower grade astrocytomas exhibited reduced membranous SFRP3 staining when compared with higher grade astrocytomas and this difference was statistically significant (P=0.036). The present results demonstrated that SFRP3 protein expression levels were decreased in the nucleus in higher grade astrocytoma (indicating the expected behavior of an antagonist of Wnt signaling), whereas when the SFRP3 was located in the

  9. Expression patterns of Wnt signaling component, secreted frizzled-related protein 3 in astrocytoma and glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    PEĆINA-ŠLAUS, NIVES; KAFKA, ANJA; VAROŠANEC, ANA MARIA; MARKOVIĆ, LEON; KRSNIK, ŽELJKA; NJIRIĆ, NIKO; MRAK, GORAN

    2016-01-01

    Secreted frizzled-related protein 3 (SFRP3) is a member of the family of soluble proteins, which modulate the Wnt signaling cascade. Novel research has identified aberrant expression of SFRPs in different types of cancer. In the present study the expression intensities and localizations of the SFRP3 protein across different histopathological grades of astrocytic brain tumors were investigated by immunohistochemistry, digital scanning and image analysis. The results demonstrated that the differences between expression levels and malignancy grades were statistically significant. Tumors were classified into four malignancy grades according to the World Health Organization guidelines. Moderate (P=0.014) and strong (P=0.028) nuclear expression levels were significantly different in pilocytic (grade I) and diffuse (grade II) astrocytomas demonstrating higher expression values, as compared with anaplastic astrocytoma (grade III) and glioblastoma (grade IV). When the sample was divided into two groups, the moderate and high cytoplasmic expression levels were observed to be significantly higher in glioblastomas than in the group comprising astrocytoma II and III. Furthermore, the results indicated that high grade tumors were associated with lower values of moderate (P=0.002) and strong (P=0.018) nuclear expression in comparison to low grade tumors. Analysis of cytoplasmic staining demonstrated that strong cytoplasmic expression was significantly higher in the astrocytoma III and IV group than in the astrocytoma I and II group (P=0.048). Furthermore, lower grade astrocytomas exhibited reduced membranous SFRP3 staining when compared with higher grade astrocytomas and this difference was statistically significant (P=0.036). The present results demonstrated that SFRP3 protein expression levels were decreased in the nucleus in higher grade astrocytoma (indicating the expected behavior of an antagonist of Wnt signaling), whereas when the SFRP3 was located in the cytoplasm an

  10. Spinal cord astrocytoma mimicking multifocal myelitis

    PubMed Central

    Neutel, Dulce; Teodoro, Tiago; Coelho, Miguel; Pimentel, José; Albuquerque, Luísa

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Differential diagnosis of acute/subacute intrinsic spinal cord lesions can be challenging. In addition, intramedullary neoplasms typically show gadolinium enhancement, mass effect, and cord expansion. Case report We report a patient with spinal cord and brain stem lesions resembling multifocal myelitis. Magnetic resonance imaging showed no spinal cord enlargement or gadolinium enhancing. Treatment of myelitis was undertaken without stopping the progression of the disease. Biopsy was made and led to a histological diagnosis of astrocytoma. Discussion Astrocytoma must remain as a possible diagnosis of spinal cord lesions, even without typical characteristics of neoplasms. Furthermore, biopsy should always be considered when diagnosis is uncertain. PMID:24621037

  11. Pilocytic astrocytoma of the velum interpositum.

    PubMed

    Ideguchi, M; Nishizaki, T; Harada, K; Kwak, T; Murakami, T; Ito, H

    1998-05-01

    A 72-year-old male presented with a pilocytic astrocytoma in the velum interpositum manifesting as a 5-day history of dizziness attacks and unstable gait. Computed tomography and T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium enhancement demonstrated a small, homogeneously enhanced mass in the velum interpositum. The tumor was removed subtotally, and the structure of the splenium was intact. The histological diagnosis was pilocytic astrocytoma. The MIB-1 growth fraction was 5%. The tumor may have originated from the splenium or the thalamus. The aggressive histology indicates the need for close neuroimaging follow-up.

  12. 18F-FDOPA PET/CT or PET/MRI in Measuring Tumors in Patients With Newly-Diagnosed or Recurrent Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-30

    Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Childhood High-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Diffuse Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Fibrillary Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Gemistocytic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Gliomatosis Cerebri; Recurrent Childhood Gliosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Protoplasmic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway Glioma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Untreated Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Untreated Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Diffuse Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Fibrillary Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Gemistocytic Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Gliomatosis Cerebri; Untreated Childhood Gliosarcoma; Untreated Childhood

  13. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor as an Angiogenic Marker in Malignant Astrocytoma and Oligodendroglioma: An Indian Scenario

    PubMed Central

    Vokuda, Ramya S; Srinivas, Bheemanathi Hanuman; Madhugiri, Venkatesh S

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The role of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) in angiogenesis has been extensively studied in gliomas, such as astrocytoma and oligodendrogliomas, worldwide. However, there is limited information available with regard to the Indian population. Aim To study, whether VEGF is expressed in the Indian population in a pattern similar to that in other population. Materials and Methods In this prospective study approved by the Institute Ethics Committee for Human Studies at Jawaharlal Institute of Post Graduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER) the patients operated for glioma in 2014 and 2015 (n = 60) were included. Tumours were graded as per the World Health Organization (WHO) grading system. VEGF expression in various grades was analysed using immunohistochemistry. Results Of the 60 patients included in this study, 15 were Grade II- (diffuse astrocytomas – 12; oligodendrogliomas- 3), 15 were Grade III-(anaplastic astrocytomas- 2; anaplastic oligodendrogliomas – 13) and 30 were Grade IV-glioblastomas. For VEGF antibody staining, two patients (3.33%) showed negative results and 58 patients (96%) showed positive results. VEGF positivity was 100% in Grade II and III, while it was 93.3% (28/30) in Grade IV tumours (p=0.012). Conclusion The expression of VEGF was associated with the grade of tumour, which gradually increased from Grade II to Grade IV. We conclude that VEGF-regulated angiogenesis plays an important role in tumour progression of astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas in the Indian population as observed worldwide.

  14. Bilateral Birdshot Retinochoroiditis and Retinal Astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Yun; Bell, Dugald

    2017-01-01

    Background. This case highlights the importance of recognising multiple pathologies within the eye which may not necessarily be linked. Both birdshot retinochoroiditis and astrocytoma are rare conditions. The case underlines the need for early identification and treatment of birdshot retinochoroiditis with steroids and disease modifying drugs. Astrocytoma in the absence of tuberous sclerosis is also uncommon. Case Presentation. A 36-year-old male presented with 3-month history of bilateral progressive flashing lights and floaters. He was systemically well with no significant past medical history. Fundal examination revealed retinal vasculitis and active creamy lesions in the choroid radiating from the optic nerve. In the supranasal periphery of the right eye there was a raised white, jagged lesion protruding into the vitreous. Fluorescein angiogram and indocyanine green showed marked venous vasculitis, hypofluorescence, and disc leakage in keeping with birdshot retinochoroiditis. The supranasal lesion features were in keeping with astrocytoma and this was thought to be a coincidental finding. Conclusions. Retinal astrocytoma may be present as an isolated ocular finding; however, patients must still be investigated for tuberous sclerosis which is the most common association. Birdshot retinochoroiditis typically responds well to steroid therapy, and disease modifying drugs should be considered as soon as possible. PMID:28321351

  15. Anaplastic astrocytoma mimicking herpes simplex encephalitis in 13-year old girl.

    PubMed

    Talathi, Saurabh; Gupta, Neha; Reddivalla, Naresh; Prokhorov, Sergey; Gold, Menachem

    2015-11-01

    Astrocytoma is the most common childhood brain tumor. Anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) are high grade gliomas (HGG), found very rarely in pediatric patients. AA mainly results from a dedifferentiation of a low grade astrocytoma. Clinical features of supra-tentorial tumors vary according to their anatomic location, biologic aggressiveness and age of the patient. They can be either completely asymptomatic or present with signs of raised intracranial pressure, seizures (about 40% of cases), behavior changes, speech disorders, declining school performance, or hemiparesis. There have been published adult cases of brain tumor misdiagnosed as viral encephalitis. Due to variety of clinical presentations, diagnosis of AA can be challenging. Here we report a case of a 13 year old girl who presented with clinical features suggestive of viral encephalitis, such as fever, headache, dizziness, and first seizure with postictal sleep and prolonged drowsiness. However, her brain MRI findings were consistent with long standing mass effect from the underlying intracranial contents and that coupled with her history of unusual taste led to further investigations and the diagnosis of the AA. In retrospect, this presentation could have been a temporal epileptic aura. High grade astrocytomas are particularly difficult to treat with a two-year survival rates range from 10% to 30%. The treatment is multimodal with gross total surgical resection of the tumor, followed by radiotherapy with or without nitrosourea-containing chemotherapy regimen. Recent promising results seen with the use of temozolamide in adults has not been yet demonstrated in the pediatric patients. The extent of tumor resection remains the most significant indicator of survival and early recognition of this tumor is essential. This case report emphasizes the fact that mass lesions in the temporal lobe, including high-grade astrocytoma, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of suspected herpes simplex encephalitis

  16. [Pilocytic astrocytoma of the cerebrum presenting in an elderly patient: a case report].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yuya; Tsukada, Toshiyuki; Hashimoto, Masaaki; Hayashi, Yutaka

    2011-09-01

    We report a case of pilocytic astrocytoma of the cerebrum presenting in an elderly patient. A 76-year-old man was admitted to our department due to the development of dysarthria. MRI showed a cystic mass with an enhanced small mural nodule in the left frontal lobe. At surgery, the cyst contents were aspirated, and the mural nodule was excised. Histological examination showed a pattern that is usually seen in pilocytic astrocytoma of the cerebellum, including loose and compact areas composed of pilocytic and stellate cells, a few eosinophilic granular bodies, but not Rosenthal fibers. Pilocytic astrocytoma is a common type of pediatric brain tumor that can arise within either the cerebellum or the hypothalamic/chiasmatic region, but rarely seen in the cerebral hemisphere at an advanced age. To our knowledge, only 45 cases of pilocytic astrocytoma of the cerebrum developing in an adult are reported. In those cases, the symptoms of the disease developed during the third decade of life. The onset at a most advanced age as in the present case is thought to be extremely rare.

  17. Children Are Not like Older Adults: A Diffusion Model Analysis of Developmental Changes in Speeded Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratcliff, Roger; Love, Jessica; Thompson, Clarissa A.; Opfer, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Children (n = 130; M[subscript age] = 8.51-15.68 years) and college-aged adults (n = 72; M[subscript age] = 20.50 years) completed numerosity discrimination and lexical decision tasks. Children produced longer response times (RTs) than adults. R. Ratcliff's (1978) diffusion model, which divides processing into components (e.g., quality of…

  18. Disseminating Competency-Based Adult Education through the National Diffusion Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelton, Elaine

    1980-01-01

    Defines competency-based adult education; provides a brief history of the Adult Performance Level (APL) Curriculum and Competency-Based High School Diploma program; explains the National Diffusion Network; examines how the APL staff offers training and technical assistance; and focuses on nontraditional APL program implementation. (CT)

  19. Proton Beam Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Low Grade Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-14

    Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Melanocytic Lesion; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  20. Promotion of astrocytoma cell invasion by micro RNA-22 targeting of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-2.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Yu-Ichiro; Iwatsuki, Koichi; Ishihara, Masahiro; Ohkawa, Toshika; Kinoshita, Manabu; Shinzawa, Koei; Fujimoto, Yasunori; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Diffuse astrocytomas (DAs) have a high recurrence rate due to diffuse infiltration into the brain and spinal cord. Micro RNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression by binding to complementary sequences of target messenger RNA (mRNA). It has been reported that miRNA-22 (miR-22) is involved in the invasion of some cancer cell lines. The aim of this study was to identify the biological effects of miR-22 in regard to the invasion of human DAs. METHODS The authors evaluated whether the level of miR-22 is elevated in human spinal DAs by using miRNA chips. Next, the role of miR-22 in 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells was investigated. Finally, to elucidate whether miR-22 promotes invasion by astrocytoma cells in vivo, the authors transplanted miR-22 overexpressed astrocytoma cells into mouse thoracic spinal cord. RESULTS The miR-22 significantly upregulated the invasion capacity of 1321N1 cells. Computational in silico analysis predicted that tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP2) is a target gene of miR-22. This was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, which showed that miR-22 inhibited TIMP2 mRNA and protein expression, respectively. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that miR-22 directly bound the 3'-untranslated regions of TIMP2. The authors further showed that miR-22 promoted invasiveness in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells when transplanted into mouse spinal cord. CONCLUSIONS These data suggest that miR-22 acts to regulate invasion of 1321N1 astrocytoma cells by targeting TIMP2 expression. Additional studies with more cases and cell lines are required to elucidate the findings of this study for a novel treatment target for spinal DAs.

  1. Insight from uncertainty: bootstrap-derived diffusion metrics differentially predict memory function among older adults.

    PubMed

    Vorburger, Robert S; Habeck, Christian G; Narkhede, Atul; Guzman, Vanessa A; Manly, Jennifer J; Brickman, Adam M

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging suffers from an intrinsic low signal-to-noise ratio. Bootstrap algorithms have been introduced to provide a non-parametric method to estimate the uncertainty of the measured diffusion parameters. To quantify the variability of the principal diffusion direction, bootstrap-derived metrics such as the cone of uncertainty have been proposed. However, bootstrap-derived metrics are not independent of the underlying diffusion profile. A higher mean diffusivity causes a smaller signal-to-noise ratio and, thus, increases the measurement uncertainty. Moreover, the goodness of the tensor model, which relies strongly on the complexity of the underlying diffusion profile, influences bootstrap-derived metrics as well. The presented simulations clearly depict the cone of uncertainty as a function of the underlying diffusion profile. Since the relationship of the cone of uncertainty and common diffusion parameters, such as the mean diffusivity and the fractional anisotropy, is not linear, the cone of uncertainty has a different sensitivity. In vivo analysis of the fornix reveals the cone of uncertainty to be a predictor of memory function among older adults. No significant correlation occurs with the common diffusion parameters. The present work not only demonstrates the cone of uncertainty as a function of the actual diffusion profile, but also discloses the cone of uncertainty as a sensitive predictor of memory function. Future studies should incorporate bootstrap-derived metrics to provide more comprehensive analysis.

  2. Moving toward molecular classification of diffuse gliomas in adults.

    PubMed

    Theeler, Brett J; Yung, W K Alfred; Fuller, Gregory N; De Groot, John F

    2012-10-30

    Diffuse gliomas are a heterogenous group of neoplasms traditionally classified as grades II to IV based on histologic features, and with prognosis determined mainly by histologic grade and pretreatment clinical factors. Our understanding of the molecular basis of glioma initiation, tumor progression, and treatment failure is rapidly evolving. A molecular profile of diffuse gliomas is emerging. Studies evaluating gene expression and DNA methylation profile have found multiple glioma subtypes and an association between subtype and survival. The recent discovery of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) mutations in glioma has provided reproducible prognostic biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets. Glioblastomas that exhibit CpG island hypermethylator phenotype, proneural gene expression, or IDH1 mutation identify a subset of patients with markedly improved prognosis. Accumulated evidence supports the stratification of both low-grade and anaplastic diffuse gliomas into prognostic groups using 1p/19q codeletion and IDH mutation status. A classification scheme incorporating clinical, pathologic, and molecular information may facilitate improved prognostication for patients treated in the clinic, the development of more effective clinical trials, and rational testing of targeted therapeutics.

  3. Altered myelination and axonal integrity in adults with childhood lead exposure: a diffusion tensor imaging study.

    PubMed

    Brubaker, Christopher J; Schmithorst, Vincent J; Haynes, Erin N; Dietrich, Kim N; Egelhoff, John C; Lindquist, Diana M; Lanphear, Bruce P; Cecil, Kim M

    2009-11-01

    Childhood lead exposure is associated with adverse cognitive, neurobehavioral and motor outcomes, suggesting altered brain structure and function. The purpose of this work was to assess the long-term impact of childhood lead exposure on white matter integrity in young adults. We hypothesized that childhood lead exposure would alter adult white matter architecture via deficits in axonal integrity and myelin organization. Adults (22.9+/-1.5 years, range 20.0-26.1 years) from the Cincinnati Lead Study were recruited to undergo a study employing diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The anatomic regions of association between water diffusion characteristics in white matter and mean childhood blood lead level were determined for 91 participants (52 female). Fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD), and radial diffusivity (RD) were measured on an exploratory voxel-wise basis. In adjusted analyses, mean childhood blood lead levels were associated with decreased FA throughout white matter. Regions of the corona radiata demonstrated highly significant lead-associated decreases in FA and AD and increases in MD and RD. The genu, body, and splenium of the corpus callosum demonstrated highly significant lead-associated decreases in RD, smaller and less significant decreases in MD, and small areas with increases in AD. The results of this analysis suggest multiple insults appear as distinct patterns of white matter diffusion abnormalities in the adult brain. Neurotoxic insults from the significant lead burden the participants experienced throughout childhood affect neural elements differently and may be related to the developmental stage of myelination at periods of exposure. This study indicates that childhood lead exposure is associated with a significant and persistent impact on white matter microstructure as quantified with diffusivity changes suggestive of altered myelination and axonal integrity.

  4. Task Inhibition and Response Inhibition in Older vs. Younger Adults: A Diffusion Model Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schuch, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    Differences in inhibitory ability between older (64–79 years, N = 24) and younger adults (18–26 years, N = 24) were investigated using a diffusion model analysis. Participants performed a task-switching paradigm that allows assessing n−2 task repetition costs, reflecting inhibitory control on the level of tasks, as well as n−1 response-repetition costs, reflecting inhibitory control on the level of responses. N−2 task repetition costs were of similar size in both age groups. Diffusion model analysis revealed that for both younger and older adults, drift rate parameters were smaller in the inhibition condition relative to the control condition, consistent with the idea that persisting task inhibition slows down response selection. Moreover, there was preliminary evidence for task inhibition effects in threshold separation and non-decision time in the older, but not the younger adults, suggesting that older adults might apply different strategies when dealing with persisting task inhibition. N−1 response-repetition costs in mean RT were larger in older than younger adults, but in mean error rates tended to be larger in younger than older adults. Diffusion-model analysis revealed longer non-decision times in response repetitions than response switches in both age groups, consistent with the idea that motor processes take longer in response repetitions than response switches due to persisting response inhibition of a previously executed response. The data also revealed age-related differences in overall performance: Older adults responded more slowly and more accurately than young adults, which was reflected by a higher threshold separation parameter in diffusion model analysis. Moreover, older adults showed larger non-decision times and higher variability in non-decision time than young adults, possibly reflecting slower and more variable motor processes. In contrast, overall drift rate did not differ between older and younger adults. Taken together

  5. An Achilles tendinosis masking an intramedullary astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Stappers, Jeroen; Herregods, Piet; Chappel, Rudi; Surgeloose, Didier De; Stassijns, Gaëtane

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 53-year-old male with a right Achilles tendinosis, who complains about a mild gait disorder starting after walking several kilometers. In the following months he develops neurological symptoms. MRI lumbar spine shows an intramedullary tumor at level Th12. A biopsy confirms the diagnosis of an intramedullary astrocytoma. Primary intramedullary tumors are relatively rare. Clinical presentation is often insidious. The authors want to make a point to reconsider a diagnosis in case it does not explain completely the anamnestic or clinical findings. According to the literature there is no optimal approach to the management of these tumors.

  6. Identity Diffusion as a Function of Sex-Roles in Adult Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jabury, Donald Eugene

    This study sought to demonstrate that the relative degree of adult female identity diffusion, as well as certain personality correlates, would be a function of specific sex roles and their combinations. Three groups of 32 women each were selected as married and noncareer, married and career, or unmarried and career women. They were administered a…

  7. A multi-disciplinary consensus statement concerning surgical approaches to low-grade, high-grade astrocytomas and diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas in childhood (CPN Paris 2011) using the Delphi method.

    PubMed

    Walker, David A; Liu, JoFen; Kieran, Mark; Jabado, Nada; Picton, Susan; Packer, Roger; St Rose, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Astrocytic tumors account for 42% of childhood brain tumors, arising in all anatomical regions and associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) in 15%. Anatomical site determines the degree and risk of resectability; the more complete resection, the better the survival rates. New biological markers and modern radiotherapy techniques are altering the risk assessments of clinical decisions for tumor resection and biopsy. The increasingly distinct pediatric neuro-oncology multidisciplinary team (PNMDT) is developing a distinct evidence base. A multidisciplinary consensus conference on pediatric neurosurgery was held in February 2011, where 92 invited participants reviewed evidence for clinical management of hypothalamic chiasmatic glioma (HCLGG), diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), and high-grade glioma (HGG). Twenty-seven statements were drafted and subjected to online Delphi consensus voting by participants, seeking >70% agreement from >60% of respondents; where <70% consensus occurred, the statement was modified and resubmitted for voting. Twenty-seven statements meeting consensus criteria are reported. For HCLGG, statements describing overall therapeutic purpose and indications for biopsy, observation, or treatment aimed at limiting the risk of visual damage and the need for on-going clinical trials were made. Primary surgical resection was not recommended. For DIPG, biopsy was recommended to ascertain biological characteristics to enhance understanding and targeting of treatments, especially in clinical trials. For HGG, biopsy is essential, the World Health Organization classification was recommended; selection of surgical strategy to achieve gross total resection in a single or multistep process should be discussed with the PNMDT and integrated with trials based drug strategies for adjuvant therapies.

  8. White matter alterations in adults with probable developmental coordination disorder: an MRI diffusion tensor imaging study.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jacqueline; Kashuk, Saman R; Wilson, Peter H; Thorpe, Graham; Egan, Gary F

    2017-01-18

    Movement skill difficulties in children [or developmental coordination disorder (DCD)] often persist into adulthood (in up to 70% of cases). The suggestion of white matter microstructure alterations in children with DCD raises the question of whether similar alterations are present in adults with probable DCD (pDCD). Twelve adults with pDCD and 11 adults without pDCD underwent diffusion tensor imaging. The results showed that the pDCD group had significantly lower fractional anisotropy in the corticospinal tract and superior longitudinal fasciculus and lower mean diffusivity in the internal capsule and inferior longitudinal fasciculus. This suggests reduced white matter integrity in parietofrontal and corticospinal tracts, with possible compensatory increases in white matter integrity along the visual ventral stream and front-occipital networks. These findings support recent neuroimaging studies in children with DCD and suggest persistent neurobiological alterations along white matter tracts that are known to support motor planning, cognition and their association.

  9. Radiation Therapy for Pilocytic Astrocytomas of Childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Mansur, David B.; Rubin, Joshua B.; Kidd, Elizabeth A.; King, Allison A.; Hollander, Abby S.; Smyth, Matthew D.; Limbrick, David D.; Park, T.S.; Leonard, Jeffrey R.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Though radiation therapy is generally considered the most effective treatment for unresectable pilocytic astrocytomas in children, there are few data to support this claim. To examine the efficacy of radiation therapy for pediatric pilocytic astrocytomas, we retrospectively reviewed the experience at our institution. Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients 18 years old or younger with unresectable tumors and without evidence of neurofibromatosis have been treated since 1982. Patients were treated with local radiation fields to a median dose of 54 Gy. Six patients were treated with radiosurgery to a median dose of 15.5 Gy. Five patients were treated with initial chemotherapy and irradiated after progression. Results: All patients were alive after a median follow-up of 5.0 years. However, progression-free survival was 68.7%. None of 11 infratentorial tumors progressed compared with 6 of 20 supratentorial tumors. A trend toward improved progression-free survival was seen with radiosurgery (80%) compared with external beam alone (66%), but this difference did not reach statistical significance. Eight of the 9 patients progressing after therapy did so within the irradiated volume. Conclusions: Although the survival of these children is excellent, almost one third of patients have progressive disease after definitive radiotherapy. Improvements in tumor control are needed in this patient population, and the optimal therapy has not been fully defined. Prospective trials comparing initial chemotherapy to radiation therapy are warranted.

  10. Intracellular tortuosity underlies slow cAMP diffusion in adult ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Mark; Lomas, Oliver; Jalink, Kees; Ford, Kerrie L.; Vaughan-Jones, Richard D.; Lefkimmiatis, Konstantinos; Swietach, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    Aims 3′,5′-Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signals in the heart are often confined to concentration microdomains shaped by cAMP diffusion and enzymatic degradation. While the importance of phosphodiesterases (degradative enzymes) in sculpting cAMP microdomains is well established in cardiomyocytes, less is known about cAMP diffusivity (DcAMP) and factors affecting it. Many earlier studies have reported fast diffusivity, which argues against sharply defined microdomains. Methods and results [cAMP] dynamics in the cytoplasm of adult rat ventricular myocytes were imaged using a fourth generation genetically encoded FRET-based sensor. The [cAMP]-response to the addition and removal of isoproterenol (β-adrenoceptor agonist) quantified the rates of cAMP synthesis and degradation. To obtain a read out of DcAMP, a stable [cAMP] gradient was generated using a microfluidic device which delivered agonist to one half of the myocyte only. After accounting for phosphodiesterase activity, DcAMP was calculated to be 32 µm2/s; an order of magnitude lower than in water. Diffusivity was independent of the amount of cAMP produced. Saturating cAMP-binding sites with the analogue 6-Bnz-cAMP did not accelerate DcAMP, arguing against a role of buffering in restricting cAMP mobility. cAMP diffused at a comparable rate to chemically unrelated but similar sized molecules, arguing for a common physical cause of restricted diffusivity. Lower mitochondrial density and order in neonatal cardiac myocytes allowed for faster diffusion, demonstrating the importance of mitochondria as physical barriers to cAMP mobility. Conclusion In adult cardiac myocytes, tortuosity due to physical barriers, notably mitochondria, restricts cAMP diffusion to levels that are more compatible with microdomain signalling. PMID:27089919

  11. A Diffusion Model Analysis of Adult Age Differences in Episodic and Semantic Long-Term Memory Retrieval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaniol, Julia; Madden, David J.; Voss, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Two experiments investigated adult age differences in episodic and semantic long-term memory tasks, as a test of the hypothesis of specific age-related decline in context memory. Older adults were slower and exhibited lower episodic accuracy than younger adults. Fits of the diffusion model (R. Ratcliff, 1978) revealed age-related increases in…

  12. Fast neutrons and misonidazole for malignant astrocytomas

    SciTech Connect

    Kurup, P.D.; Pajak, T.F.; Hendrickson, F.R.; Nelson, J.S.; Mansell, J.; Cohen, L.; Awschalom, M.; Rosenberg, I.; Ten Haken, R.K.

    1985-04-01

    Twenty-five patients with proven malignant supratentorial astrocytomas were entered into a Phase I/II study of misonidazole combined with neutron radiation at Fermilab Neutron Therapy Facility (NTF) between August 1979 and April 1981. The main objectives were to determine tissue tolerance in terms of acute and late effects, and to estimate tumor clearance and survival rates. The total dose was 18.0 Gy given in weekly fractions of 3.0 Gy over 39 days. Four hours before each irradiation, 2.5 gm/m/sup 2/ misonidazole was administered orally. The median survival for the whole group was 12.0 months; 25% were alive at 18 months with some neurological compromise. Acute toxicity was within tolerable limits. Details of toxicity and tissue analysis from post mortems and second craniotomy samples are presented.

  13. In vivo evaluation of optic nerve aging in adult rhesus monkey by diffusion tensor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yumei; Li, Longchuan; Preuss, Todd M.; Hu, Xiaoping; Herndon, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Aging of the optic nerve can result in reduced visual sensitivity or vision loss. Normal optic nerve aging has been investigated previously in tissue specimens but poorly explored in vivo. In the present study, the normal aging of optic nerve was evaluated by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in non-human primates. Adult female rhesus monkeys at the ages of 9 to 13 years old (young group, n=8) and 21 to 27 years old (old group, n=7) were studied using parallel-imaging-based DTI on a clinical 3T scanner. Compared to young adults, the old monkeys showed 26% lower fractional anisotropy (P<0.01), and 44% greater radial diffusivity, although the latter difference was of marginal statistical significance (P=0.058). These MRI findings are largely consistent with published results of light and electron microscopic studies of optic nerve aging in macaque monkeys, which indicate a loss of fibers and degenerative changes in myelin sheaths. PMID:24649434

  14. Ammonium-induced calcium mobilization in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hillmann, Petra; Koese, Meryem; Soehl, Kristina; Mueller, Christa E.

    2008-02-15

    High blood levels of ammonium/ammonia (NH{sub 4}{sup +}/NH{sub 3}) are associated with severe neurotoxicity as observed in hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Astrocytes are the main targets of ammonium toxicity, while neuronal cells are less vulnerable. In the present study, an astrocytoma cell line 1321N1 and a neuroblastoma glioma hybrid cell line NG108-15 were used as model systems for astrocytes and neuronal cells, respectively. Ammonium salts evoked a transient increase in intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) in astrocytoma (EC{sub 50} = 6.38 mM), but not in NG108-15 cells. The ammonium-induced increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was due to an intracellular effect of NH{sub 4}{sup +}/NH{sub 3} and was independent of extracellular calcium. Acetate completely inhibited the ammonium effect. Ammonium potently reduced calcium signaling by G{sub q} protein-coupled receptors (H{sub 1} and M3) expressed on the cells. Ammonium (5 mM) also significantly inhibited the proliferation of 1321N1 astrocytoma cells. While mRNA for the mammalian ammonium transporters RhBG and RhCG could not be detected in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells, both transporters were expressed in NG108-15 cells. RhBG and RhBC in brain may promote the excretion of NH{sub 3}/NH{sub 4}{sup +} from neuronal cells. Cellular uptake of NH{sub 4}{sup +}/NH{sub 3} was mainly by passive diffusion of NH{sub 3}. Human 1321N1 astrocytoma cells appear to be an excellent, easily accessible human model for studying HE, which can substitute animal studies, while NG108-15 cells may be useful for investigating the role of the recently discovered Rhesus family type ammonium transporters in neuronal cells. Our findings may contribute to the understanding of pathologic ammonium effects in different brain cells, and to the treatment of hyperammonemia.

  15. Diffuse Infantile Hepatic Hemangioendothelioma With Early Central Enhancement in an Adult

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Aisheng; Dong, Hui; Zuo, Changjing; He, Tianlin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Infantile hepatic hemangioendothelioma (IHH) is the most common vascular tumor of the liver in infancy. Adult with IHH is extremely rare. We presented a diffuse IHH in an adult patient with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance image (MRI) findings. A 39-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of a 2-year history of abnormal liver function tests and a 7-day history of jaundice. Physical examination revealed enlarged liver. Unenhanced abdominal CT showed enlargement of the liver with diffuse hypodensity. Enhanced CT on the arterial phase revealed multiple centrally enhanced lesions diffusely involved the enlarged liver. The enhanced areas of the lesions became larger on the portal phase and all the lesions became homogeneous enhanced on the delayed phase. These lesions showed heterogeneously hyperintense on T2-weighted image, hypointense on T1-weighted image, and early centrally enhanced on dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MRI, with complete tumor enhancement after 180 s. The patient underwent orthotopic liver transplantation. IHH type 2 was confirmed by pathology. The patient died of tumor recurrence in the liver 4 months after transplantation. Unlike the previously described imaging appearances of IHH, this case showed diffuse nodules with early central enhancement on CT and MRI. Considering the importance of the ability to differentiate IHH from other hepatic tumors, radiologists should be aware of these imaging appearances to establish knowledge of the entire spectrum of IHH. PMID:26705232

  16. Pre-irradiation chemotherapy for newly diagnosed high grade astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, N Tubiana; Genet, D; Labrousse, F; Bouillet, P; Denes, S Lavau; Martin, J; Labourey, J L; Venat, L; Clavere, P; Moreau, J J

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the response rate and toxicity of a combination of Carmustine and Cisplatin administered before radiation in patients with newly diagnosed high grade astrocytoma. A good response rate has been published with this association in primary cerebral high grade tumor. This protocol was administered in a homogeneous population of 37 adult patients with measurable tumor on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or CT scan. After biopsy or subtotal resection, the patients received BCNU 40 mg/m2/d and CODP 40 mg/m2/d, for 3 days every 28 days for 3 cycles. Evaluation was performed before each cycle. Radiation therapy began 4 weeks after completing the chemotherapy or immediately if there was evidence of tumor progression on chemotherapy. Seven out of 37 (19%) demonstrated tumor regression with a median duration to progression of 11 months. Median survival was 6 months. Myelosuppression was the predominant but manageable toxicity. This work indicated that the first chemotherapy protocol gave poor results in a homogeneous group of patients, with bad prognosis.

  17. Investigating task inhibition in children versus adults: A diffusion model analysis.

    PubMed

    Schuch, Stefanie; Konrad, Kerstin

    2017-04-01

    One can take n-2 task repetition costs as a measure of inhibition on the level of task sets. When switching back to a Task A after only one intermediate trial (ABA task sequence), Task A is thought to still be inhibited, leading to performance costs relative to task sequences where switching back to Task A is preceded by at least two intermediary trials (CBA). The current study investigated differences in inhibitory ability between children and adults by comparing n-2 task repetition costs in children (9-11years of age, N=32) and young adults (21-30years of age, N=32). The mean reaction times and error rate differences between ABA and CBA sequences did not differ between the two age groups. However, diffusion model analysis revealed that different cognitive processes contribute to the inhibition effect in the two age groups: The adults, but not the children, showed a smaller drift rate in ABA than in CBA, suggesting that persisting task inhibition is associated with slower response selection in adults. In children, non-decision time was longer in ABA than in CBA, possibly reflecting longer task preparation in ABA than in CBA. In addition, Ex-Gaussian functions were fitted to the distributions of correct reaction times. In adults, the ABA-CBA difference was reflected in the exponential parameter of the distribution; in children, the ABA-CBA difference was found in the Gaussian mu parameter. Hence, Ex-Gaussian analysis, although noisier, was generally in line with diffusion model analysis. Taken together, the data suggest that the task inhibition effect found in mean performance is mediated by different cognitive processes in children versus adults.

  18. Regional age differences in gray matter diffusivity among healthy older adults

    PubMed Central

    Salminen, Lauren E.; Conturo, Thomas E.; Laidlaw, David H.; Cabeen, Ryan P.; Akbudak, Erbil; Lane, Elizabeth M.; Heaps, Jodi M.; Bolzenius, Jacob D.; Baker, Laurie M.; Cooley, Sarah; Scott, Staci; Cagle, Lee M.; Phillips, Sarah; Paul, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with microstructural changes in brain tissue that can be visualized using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). While previous studies have established age-related changes in white matter (WM) diffusion using DTI, the impact of age on gray matter (GM) diffusion remains unclear. The present study utilized DTI metrics of mean diffusivity (MD) to identify age differences in GM/WM micro-structure in a sample of healthy older adults (N=60). A secondary aim was to determine the functional significance of whole-brain GM/WM MD on global cognitive function using the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS). Participants were divided into three age brackets (ages 50–59, 60–69, and 70+) to examine differences in MD and cognition by decade. MD was examined bilaterally in the frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital lobes for the primary analyses and an aggregate measure of whole-brain MD was used to test relationships with cognition. Significantly higher MD was observed in bilateral GM of the temporal and parietal lobes, and in right hemisphere WM of the frontal and temporal lobes of older individuals. The most robust differences in MD were between the 50–59 and 70+ age groups. Higher whole-brain GM MD was associated with poorer RBANS performance in the 60–69 age group. Results suggest that aging has a significant and differential impact on GM/WM diffusion in healthy older adults, which may explain a modest degree of cognitive variability at specific time points during older adulthood. PMID:25864197

  19. Genomic analysis of diffuse pediatric low-grade gliomas identifies recurrent oncogenic truncating rearrangements in the transcription factor MYBL1

    PubMed Central

    Ramkissoon, Lori A.; Horowitz, Peleg M.; Craig, Justin M.; Ramkissoon, Shakti H.; Rich, Benjamin E.; Schumacher, Steven E.; McKenna, Aaron; Lawrence, Michael S.; Bergthold, Guillaume; Brastianos, Priscilla K.; Tabak, Barbara; Ducar, Matthew D.; Van Hummelen, Paul; MacConaill, Laura E.; Pouissant-Young, Tina; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Taha, Hala; Mahmoud, Madeha; Bowers, Daniel C.; Margraf, Linda; Tabori, Uri; Hawkins, Cynthia; Packer, Roger J.; Hill, D. Ashley; Pomeroy, Scott L.; Eberhart, Charles G.; Dunn, Ian F.; Goumnerova, Liliana; Getz, Gad; Chan, Jennifer A.; Santagata, Sandro; Hahn, William C.; Stiles, Charles D.; Ligon, Azra H.; Kieran, Mark W.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Ligon, Keith L.

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric low-grade gliomas (PLGGs) are among the most common solid tumors in children but, apart from BRAF kinase mutations or duplications in specific subclasses, few genetic driver events are known. Diffuse PLGGs comprise a set of uncommon subtypes that exhibit invasive growth and are therefore especially challenging clinically. We performed high-resolution copy-number analysis on 44 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded diffuse PLGGs to identify recurrent alterations. Diffuse PLGGs exhibited fewer such alterations than adult low-grade gliomas, but we identified several significantly recurrent events. The most significant event, 8q13.1 gain, was observed in 28% of diffuse astrocytoma grade IIs and resulted in partial duplication of the transcription factor MYBL1 with truncation of its C-terminal negative-regulatory domain. A similar recurrent deletion-truncation breakpoint was identified in two angiocentric gliomas in the related gene v-myb avian myeloblastosis viral oncogene homolog (MYB) on 6q23.3. Whole-genome sequencing of a MYBL1-rearranged diffuse astrocytoma grade II demonstrated MYBL1 tandem duplication and few other events. Truncated MYBL1 transcripts identified in this tumor induced anchorage-independent growth in 3T3 cells and tumor formation in nude mice. Truncated transcripts were also expressed in two additional tumors with MYBL1 partial duplication. Our results define clinically relevant molecular subclasses of diffuse PLGGs and highlight a potential role for the MYB family in the biology of low-grade gliomas. PMID:23633565

  20. Transcriptional analysis of aggressiveness and heterogeneity across grades of astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunjing; Funk, Cory C; Eddy, James A; Price, Nathan D

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytoma is the most common glioma, accounting for half of all primary brain and spinal cord tumors. Late detection and the aggressive nature of high-grade astrocytomas contribute to high mortality rates. Though many studies identify candidate biomarkers using high-throughput transcriptomic profiling to stratify grades and subtypes, few have resulted in clinically actionable results. This shortcoming can be attributed, in part, to pronounced lab effects that reduce signature robustness and varied individual gene expression among patients with the same tumor. We addressed these issues by uniformly preprocessing publicly available transcriptomic data, comprising 306 tumor samples from three astrocytoma grades (Grade 2, 3, and 4) and 30 non-tumor samples (normal brain as control tissues). Utilizing Differential Rank Conservation (DIRAC), a network-based classification approach, we examined the global and individual patterns of network regulation across tumor grades. Additionally, we applied gene-based approaches to identify genes whose expression changed consistently with increasing tumor grade and evaluated their robustness across multiple studies using statistical sampling. Applying DIRAC, we observed a global trend of greater network dysregulation with increasing tumor aggressiveness. Individual networks displaying greater differences in regulation between adjacent grades play well-known roles in calcium/PKC, EGF, and transcription signaling. Interestingly, many of the 90 individual genes found to monotonically increase or decrease with astrocytoma grade are implicated in cancer-affected processes such as calcium signaling, mitochondrial metabolism, and apoptosis. The fact that specific genes monotonically increase or decrease with increasing astrocytoma grade may reflect shared oncogenic mechanisms among phenotypically similar tumors. This work presents statistically significant results that enable better characterization of different human astrocytoma grades

  1. Diffusely adherent Escherichia coli strains isolated from children and adults constitute two different populations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diffusely adherent Escherichia coli (DAEC) have been considered a diarrheagenic category of E. coli for which several potential virulence factors have been described in the last few years. Despite this, epidemiological studies involving DAEC have shown inconsistent results. In this work, two different collections of DAEC possessing Afa/Dr genes, from children and adults, were studied regarding characteristics potentially associated to virulence. Results DAEC strains were recovered in similar frequencies from diarrheic and asymptomatic children, and more frequently from adults with diarrhea (P < 0.01) than from asymptomatic adults. Association with diarrhea (P < 0.05) was found for SAT-positive strains recovered from children and for curli-positive strains recovered from adults. Mixed biofilms involving DAEC and a Citrobacter freundii strain have shown an improved ability to form biofilms in relation to the monocultures. Control strains have shown a greater diversity of Afa/Dr adhesins and higher frequencies of cellulose, TTSS, biofilm formation and induction of IL-8 secretion than strains from cases of diarrhea in children. Conclusions DAEC strains possessing Afa/Dr genes isolated from children and adults represent two different bacterial populations. DAEC strains carrying genes associated to virulence can be found as part of the normal microbiota present in asymptomatic children. PMID:23374248

  2. Corpus callosum size and diffusion tensor anisotropy in adolescents and adults with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Balevich, Emily C; Haznedar, M Mehmet; Wang, Eugene; Newmark, Randall E; Bloom, Rachel; Schneiderman, Jason S; Aronowitz, Jonathan; Tang, Cheuk Y; Chu, King-Wai; Byne, William; Buchsbaum, Monte S; Hazlett, Erin A

    2015-03-30

    The corpus callosum has been implicated as a region of dysfunctional connectivity in schizophrenia, but the association between age and callosal pathology is unclear. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) were performed on adults (n=34) and adolescents (n=17) with schizophrenia and adult (n=33) and adolescent (n=15) age- and sex-matched healthy controls. The corpus callosum was manually traced on each participant׳s MRI, and the DTI scan was co-registered to the MRI. The corpus callosum was divided into five anteroposterior segments. Area and anisotropy were calculated for each segment. Both patient groups demonstrated reduced callosal anisotropy; however, the adolescents exhibited reductions mostly in anterior regions while the reductions were more prominent in posterior regions of the adults. The adolescent patients showed greater decreases in absolute area as compared with the adult patients, particularly in the anterior segments. However, the adults showed greater reductions when area was considered relative to whole brain white matter volume. Our results suggest that the initial stages of the illness are characterized by deficiencies in frontal connections, and the chronic phase is characterized by deficits in the posterior corpus callosum; or, alternatively, adolescent-onset schizophrenia may represent a different or more severe form of the illness.

  3. miRNA regulation of Sirtuin-1 expression in human astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Sara Giovanna; Conti, Alfredo; Polito, Francesca; Tomasello, Chiara; Barresi, Valeria; La Torre, Domenico La; Cucinotta, Maria; Angileri, Flavio Filippo; Bartolotta, Marcello; Di Giorgio, Rosa Maria; Aguennouz, M'Hammed

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuins are a family of 7 histone deacetylases largely involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, survival and death. The role of sirtuins in tumorigenesis and cancer progression has been previously studied in certain cancer types. Few studies have investigated sirtuin expression in gliomas, with controversial results. The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of sirtuin-1 (Sirt-1) in diffuse astrocytoma [low grade astrocytoma (LGA)], anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and in primary glioma cell lines: PLGAC (primary LGA cells); PAAC (primary AA cells); and PGBMC (primary GBM cells). Tumor samples were obtained from patients who underwent craniotomy for microsurgical tumor resection at the Neurosurgery Unit of the University of Messina between 2011 and 2014. Sirt-1 expression was qualitatively analyzed in 30 human glial tumor samples and 5 non-neoplastic brain tissue (NBT) specimens using immunohistochemistry and western blotting techniques. Sirt-1 expression was quantitatively analyzed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). In addition, Sirt-1 expression in primary cell lines was investigated by immunoblotting and RT-qPCR. Sirt-1 expression was downregulated in gliomas compared to NBTs. Sirt-1 levels also varied among different tumor grades, with more evident downregulation in high-grade (P<0.001) than low-grade tumors (P<0.01). These data were confirmed in cell lines, with the exception of upregulation of protein level in the highest malignancy grade cell lines. The present results suggest a role for miRNA-34a, miRNA-132 and miRNA-217 in the epigenetic control of Sirt-1 during gliomagenesis and progression, and demonstrate the different implications of Sirt-1 in human tissues and cell lines. Furthermore, the present results reveal that Sirt-1 may be an intrinsic regulator of tumor progression and the regulation of Sirt-1 involves complex molecular pathways. However, the

  4. Telomerase activity in human brain tumors: astrocytoma and meningioma.

    PubMed

    Kheirollahi, Majid; Mehrazin, Masoud; Kamalian, Naser; Mohammadi-asl, Javad; Mehdipour, Parvin

    2013-05-01

    Somatic cells do not have telomerase activity but immortalized cell lines and more than 85 % of the cancer cells show telomerase activation to prevent the telomere from progressive shortening. The activation of this enzyme has been found in a variety of human tumors and tumor-derived cell lines, but only few studies on telomerase activity in human brain tumors have been reported. Here, we evaluated telomerase activity in different grades of human astrocytoma and meningioma brain tumors. In this study, assay for telomerase activity performed on 50 eligible cases consisted of 26 meningioma, 24 astrocytoma according to the standard protocols. In the brain tissues, telomerase activity was positive in 39 (65 %) of 50 patients. One sample t test showed that the telomerase activity in meningioma and astrocytoma tumors was significantly positive entirely (P < 0.001). Also, grade I of meningioma and low grades of astrocytoma (grades I and II) significantly showed telomerase activity. According to our results, we suggest that activation of telomerase is an event that starts mostly at low grades of brain including meningioma and astrocytoma tumors.

  5. Effects of dexamethasone on C6 astrocytoma radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Lordo, C.D.; Stroude, E.C.; Del Maestro, R.F.

    1989-05-01

    Brain-tumor patients often undergo radiation therapy while receiving corticosteroids for the treatment of cerebral edema. Studies have demonstrated that dexamethasone is radioprotective in a number of cell lines. The C6 astrocytoma cell line is well established in vitro and is modulated by dexamethasone treatment. It has therefore been hypothesized that dexamethasone-treated C6 astrocytoma cells would be more resistant to radiation-induced damage. The present study was carried out to assess this hypothesis using both the in vitro C6 astrocytoma monolayer and three-dimensional multicellular spheroid models. Dexamethasone was inhibitory to the C6 astrocytoma cells in the monolayer preparation, increasing their doubling time by 13%. In the spheroid cultures, dexamethasone treatment decreased the number of cells per spheroid by 46%. Dexamethasone did not affect the plating efficiency of either the cells from the monolayer experiment or those dissociated from spheroids, however, suggesting that the inhibitory effect was not tumoricidal. At a clinical concentration (1.94 x 10(-5) M), dexamethasone did not significantly influence plating efficiency of irradiated C6 astrocytoma cells in monolayer or three-dimensional spheroid cultures.

  6. The molecular biology of WHO grade I astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Marko, Nicholas F; Weil, Robert J

    2012-12-01

    World Health Organization (WHO) grade I astrocytomas include pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) and subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA). As technologies in pharmacologic neo-adjuvant therapy continue to progress and as molecular characteristics are progressively recognized as potential markers of both clinically significant tumor subtypes and response to therapy, interest in the biology of these tumors has surged. An updated review of the current knowledge of the molecular biology of these tumors is needed. We conducted a Medline search to identify published literature discussing the molecular biology of grade I astrocytomas. We then summarized this literature and discuss it in a logical framework through which the complex biology of these tumors can be clearly understood. A comprehensive review of the molecular biology of WHO grade I astrocytomas is presented. The past several years have seen rapid progress in the level of understanding of PA in particular, but the molecular literature regarding both PA and SEGA remains nebulous, ambiguous, and occasionally contradictory. In this review we provide a comprehensive discussion of the current understanding of the chromosomal, genomic, and epigenomic features of both PA and SEGA and provide a logical framework in which these data can be more readily understood.

  7. Cardiorespiratory fitness and brain diffusion tensor imaging in adults over 80 years of age.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qu; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Erickson, Kirk I; Aizenstein, Howard J; Glynn, Nancy W; Boudreau, Robert M; Newman, Anne B; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Yaffe, Kristine; Harris, Tamara; Rosano, Caterina

    2014-11-07

    A positive association between cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and white matter integrity has been consistently reported in older adults. However, it is unknown whether this association exists in adults over 80 with a range of chronic disease conditions and low physical activity participation, which can influence both CRF and brain health. This study examined whether higher CRF was associated with greater microstructural integrity of gray and white matter in areas related to memory and information processing in adults over 80 and examined moderating effects of chronic diseases and physical activity. CRF was measured as time to walk 400 m as quickly as possible with concurrent 3T diffusion tensor imaging in 164 participants (57.1% female, 40.3% black). Fractional anisotropy (FA) was computed for cingulum, uncinate and superior longitudinal fasciculi. Mean diffusivity (MD) was computed for dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, parahippocampus, and entorhinal cortex. Moderating effects were tested using hierarchical regression models. Higher CRF was associated with higher FA in cingulum and lower MD in hippocampus and entorhinal cortex (β, sex-adjusted p: -0.182, 0.019; 0.165, 0.035; and 0.220, 0.006, respectively). Hypertension attenuated the association with MD in entorhinal cortex. Moderating effects of chronic diseases and physical activity in walking and climbing stairs on these associations were not significant. The association of higher CRF with greater microstructural integrity in selected subcortical areas appears robust, even among very old adults with a range of chronic diseases. Intervention studies should investigate whether increasing CRF can preserve memory and information processing by improving microstructure and potential effects of hypertension management.

  8. Amplifying diffusion of health information in low-literate populations through adult education health literacy classes.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Ariela M; Miner, Kathleen R; Echt, Katharina V; Parker, Ruth; Cooper, Hannah L F

    2011-01-01

    Over the next decade, as literacy rates are predicted to decline, the health care sector faces increasing challenges to effective communication with low-literate groups. Considering the rising costs of health care and the forthcoming changes in the American health care system, it is imperative to find nontraditional avenues through which to impart health knowledge and functional skills. This article draws on classroom observations and qualitative interviews with 21 students and 3 teachers in an adult education health literacy class to explore the efficacy of using adult education courses to teach functional health literacy skills to low-literate populations. Data were analyzed using a combination of thematic and content analyses. Results describe the motivation of students to share information within the classroom and with friends and family outside the classroom. This article also provides several recommendations to help ensure accuracy of diffused information both within and outside of the classroom. Ultimately, this study suggests that the adult education system is in a prime position to impart functional health literacy skills to low-literate populations in the classroom. Significantly, this study demonstrates that adult education students themselves may be a powerful vehicle for health communication beyond the walls of the classroom.

  9. Applications of hybrid diffuse optics for clinical management of adults after brain injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Meeri Nam

    Information about cerebral blood flow (CBF) is valuable for clinical management of patients after severe brain injury. Unfortunately, current modalities for monitoring brain are often limited by hurdles that include high cost, low throughput, exposure to ionizing radiation, probe invasiveness, and increased risk to critically ill patients when transportation out of their room or unit is required. A further limitation of current technologies is an inability to provide continuous bedside measurements that are often desirable for unstable patients. Here we explore the clinical utility of diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) as an alternative approach for bedside CBF monitoring. DCS uses the rapid intensity fluctuations of near-infrared light to derive a continuous measure of changes in blood flow without ionizing radiation or invasive probing. Concurrently, we employ another optical technique, called diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS), to derive changes in cerebral oxyhemoglobin ( HbO2) and deoxyhemoglobin (Hb) concentrations. Our clinical studies integrate DCS with DOS into a single hybrid instrument that simultaneously monitors CBF and HbO2/Hb in the injured adult brain. The first parts of this dissertation present the motivations for monitoring blood flow in injured brain, as well as the theory underlying diffuse optics technology. The next section elaborates on details of the hybrid instrumentation. The final chapters describe four human subject studies carried out with these methods. Each of these studies investigates an aspect of the potential of the hybrid monitor in clinical applications involving adult brain. The studies include: (1) validation of DCS-measured CBF against xenon-enhanced computed tomography in brain-injured adults; (2) a study of the effects of age and gender on posture-change-induced CBF variation in healthy subjects; (3) a study of the efficacy of DCS/DOS for monitoring neurocritical care patients during various medical interventions such

  10. RO4929097, Temozolomide, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-28

    Acoustic Schwannoma; Adult Anaplastic (Malignant) Meningioma; Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Choroid Plexus Neoplasm; Adult Craniopharyngioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade I Meningioma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Papillary Meningioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Adult Primary Melanocytic Lesion of Meninges; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Malignant Adult Intracranial Hemangiopericytoma

  11. Positron Emission Tomography Using Fluorine F 18 EF5 to Find Oxygen in Tumor Cells of Patients Who Are Undergoing Surgery or Biopsy for Newly Diagnosed Brain Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Adult Choroid Plexus Tumor; Adult Craniopharyngioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade I Meningioma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Grade III Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Adult Subependymoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET); Meningeal Melanocytoma

  12. Non-random aneuploidy specifies subgroups of pilocytic astrocytoma and correlates with older age

    PubMed Central

    Khuong-Quang, Dong-Anh; Bechet, Denise; Gayden, Tenzin; Kool, Marcel; De Jay, Nicolas; Jacob, Karine; Gerges, Noha; Hutter, Barbara; Şeker-Cin, Huriye; Witt, Hendrik; Montpetit, Alexandre; Brunet, Sébastien; Lepage, Pierre; Bourret, Geneviève; Klekner, Almos; Bognár, László; Hauser, Peter; Garami, Miklós; Farmer, Jean-Pierre; Montes, Jose-Luis; Atkinson, Jeffrey; Lambert, Sally; Kwan, Tony; Korshunov, Andrey; Tabori, Uri; Collins, V. Peter; Albrecht, Steffen; Faury, Damien; Pfister, Stefan M.; Paulus, Werner; Hasselblatt, Martin; Jones, David T.W.; Jabado, Nada

    2015-01-01

    Pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) is the most common brain tumor in children but is rare in adults, and hence poorly studied in this age group. We investigated 222 PA and report increased aneuploidy in older patients. Aneuploid genomes were identified in 45% of adult compared with 17% of pediatric PA. Gains were non-random, favoring chromosomes 5, 7, 6 and 11 in order of frequency, and preferentially affecting non-cerebellar PA and tumors with BRAF V600E mutations and not with KIAA1549-BRAF fusions or FGFR1 mutations. Aneuploid PA differentially expressed genes involved in CNS development, the unfolded protein response, and regulators of genomic stability and the cell cycle (MDM2, PLK2),whose correlated programs were overexpressed specifically in aneuploid PA compared to other glial tumors. Thus, convergence of pathways affecting the cell cycle and genomic stability may favor aneuploidy in PA, possibly representing an additional molecular driver in older patients with this brain tumor. PMID:26378811

  13. Molecular Profiling Reveals Biologically Discrete Subsets and Pathways of Progression in Diffuse Glioma.

    PubMed

    Ceccarelli, Michele; Barthel, Floris P; Malta, Tathiane M; Sabedot, Thais S; Salama, Sofie R; Murray, Bradley A; Morozova, Olena; Newton, Yulia; Radenbaugh, Amie; Pagnotta, Stefano M; Anjum, Samreen; Wang, Jiguang; Manyam, Ganiraju; Zoppoli, Pietro; Ling, Shiyun; Rao, Arjun A; Grifford, Mia; Cherniack, Andrew D; Zhang, Hailei; Poisson, Laila; Carlotti, Carlos Gilberto; Tirapelli, Daniela Pretti da Cunha; Rao, Arvind; Mikkelsen, Tom; Lau, Ching C; Yung, W K Alfred; Rabadan, Raul; Huse, Jason; Brat, Daniel J; Lehman, Norman L; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Zheng, Siyuan; Hess, Kenneth; Rao, Ganesh; Meyerson, Matthew; Beroukhim, Rameen; Cooper, Lee; Akbani, Rehan; Wrensch, Margaret; Haussler, David; Aldape, Kenneth D; Laird, Peter W; Gutmann, David H; Noushmehr, Houtan; Iavarone, Antonio; Verhaak, Roel G W

    2016-01-28

    Therapy development for adult diffuse glioma is hindered by incomplete knowledge of somatic glioma driving alterations and suboptimal disease classification. We defined the complete set of genes associated with 1,122 diffuse grade II-III-IV gliomas from The Cancer Genome Atlas and used molecular profiles to improve disease classification, identify molecular correlations, and provide insights into the progression from low- to high-grade disease. Whole-genome sequencing data analysis determined that ATRX but not TERT promoter mutations are associated with increased telomere length. Recent advances in glioma classification based on IDH mutation and 1p/19q co-deletion status were recapitulated through analysis of DNA methylation profiles, which identified clinically relevant molecular subsets. A subtype of IDH mutant glioma was associated with DNA demethylation and poor outcome; a group of IDH-wild-type diffuse glioma showed molecular similarity to pilocytic astrocytoma and relatively favorable survival. Understanding of cohesive disease groups may aid improved clinical outcomes.

  14. Novel Dual-Reporter Preclinical Screen for Anti-Astrocytoma Agents Identifies Cytostatic and Cytotoxic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Hawes, Jessica J.; Nerva, John D.; Reilly, Karlyne M.

    2009-01-01

    Astrocytoma/glioblastoma is the most common malignant form of brain cancer and is often unresponsive to current pharmacological therapies and surgical interventions. Despite several potential therapeutic agents against astrocytoma and glioblastoma (1), there are currently no effective therapies for astrocytoma, creating a great need for the identification of effective anti-tumor agents. We have developed a novel dual-reporter system in Trp53/Nf1-null astrocytoma cells to simultaneously and rapidly assay cell viability and cell cycle progression as evidenced by activity of the human E2F1 promoter in vitro. The dual-reporter high-throughput assay was used to screen experimental therapeutics for activity in Trp53/Nf1-null astrocytoma. Several compounds were identified demonstrating selectivity for astrocytoma over primary astrocytes. The dual-reporter system described here may be a valuable tool for identifying potential anti-tumor treatments that specifically target astrocytoma. PMID:18664715

  15. Progesterone Induces the Growth and Infiltration of Human Astrocytoma Cells Implanted in the Cerebral Cortex of the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Germán-Castelán, Liliana; Manjarrez-Marmolejo, Joaquín; González-Arenas, Aliesha; González-Morán, María Genoveva; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Progesterone (P4) promotes cell proliferation in several types of cancer, including brain tumors such as astrocytomas, the most common and aggressive primary intracerebral neoplasm in humans. In this work, we studied the effects of P4 and its intracellular receptor antagonist, RU486, on growth and infiltration of U373 cells derived from a human astrocytoma grade III, implanted in the motor cortex of adult male rats, using two treatment schemes. In the first one, fifteen days after cells implantation, rats were daily subcutaneously treated with vehicle (propylene glycol, 160 μL), P4 (1 mg), RU486 (5 mg), or P4 + RU486 (1 mg and 5 mg, resp.) for 21 days. In the second one, treatments started 8 weeks after cells implantation and lasted for 14 days. In both schemes we found that P4 significantly increased the tumor area as compared with the rest of the treatments, whereas RU486 blocked P4 effects. All rats treated with P4 showed tumor infiltration, while 28.6% and 42.9% of the animals treated with RU486 and P4 + RU486, respectively, presented it. Our data suggest that P4 promotes growth and migration of human astrocytoma cells implanted in the motor cortex of the rat through the interaction with its intracellular receptor. PMID:24982875

  16. Differential expression of Notch family members in astrocytomas and medulloblastomas.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng; Yu, Shizhu; Jiang, Rongcai; Kang, Chunsheng; Wang, Guangxiu; Jiang, Hao; Pu, Peiyu

    2009-12-01

    Notch signaling pathway plays an integral role in determining cell fates in development. Growing evidence demonstrates that Notch signaling pathway has versatile effects in tumorigenesis depending on the tumor type, grade and stage. Notch signaling pathway is deregulated in some brain tumors. To examine the differential expression of Notch family members (Notch1, 2, 3, 4) in human astrocytomas and medulloblastomas, and to evaluate their roles in the development of both tumor types. Immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analysis were used to detect Notch1, 2, 3, 4 expression in tissue microarray and freshly resected tissue samples of normal brain, astrocytomas and medulloblastomas. Notch family members were not expressed or barely detectable in normal brain tissues. Notch1, 3, 4 were highly expressed but Notch2 was not expressed in astrocytomas. The percentage of immunopositive tumor cells and level of Notch1 expression was increased with tumor grade. In addition, overexpression of Notch2 was detected in medulloblastomas in contrast to low or no expression of Notch1, 3, 4. Differential expression of Notch1, 2, 3, 4 is detected in astrocytomas and medulloblastomas, that may be related to their different roles playing in the development of brain tumors.

  17. Diffusion abnormalities in adolescents and young adults with a history of heavy cannabis use

    PubMed Central

    Cervellione, Kelly; Cottone, John; Ardekani, Babak A.; Kumra, Sanjiv

    2012-01-01

    Background There is growing evidence that adolescence is a key period for neuronal maturation. Despite the high prevalence of marijuana use among adolescents and young adults in the United States and internationally, very little is known about its impact on the developing brain. Based on neuroimaging literature on normal brain developmental during adolescence, we hypothesized that individuals with heavy cannabis use (HCU) would have brain structure abnormalities in similar brain regions that undergo development during late adolescence, particularly the fronto-temporal connection. Method Fourteen young adult males in residential treatment for cannabis dependence and 14 age-matched healthy male control subjects were recruited. Patients had a history of HCU throughout adolescence; 5 had concurrent alcohol abuse. Subjects underwent structural and diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging. White matter integrity was compared between subject groups using voxelwise and fiber tractography analysis. Results Voxelwise and tractography analyses revealed that adolescents with HCU had reduced fractional anisotropy, increased radial diffusivity, and increased trace in the homologous areas known to be involved in ongoing development during late adolescence, particularly in the fronto-temporal connection via arcuate fasciculus. Conclusions Our results support the hypothesis that heavy cannabis use during adolescence may affect the trajectory of normal brain maturation. Due to concurrent alcohol consumption in five HCU subjects, conclusions from this study should be considered preliminary, as the DTI findings reported here may be reflective of the combination of alcohol and marijuana use. Further research in larger samples, longitudinal in nature, and controlling for alcohol consumption is needed to better understand the pathophysiology of the effect of cannabis on the developing brain. PMID:19111160

  18. Adult age differences in interference from a prospective-memory task: a diffusion model analysis.

    PubMed

    Horn, Sebastian S; Bayen, Ute J; Smith, Rebekah E

    2013-12-01

    People often slow down their ongoing activities when they must remember an intended action, known as the cost or interference effect of prospective memory (PM). Only a few studies have examined adult age differences in PM interference, and the specific reasons underlying such differences are not well understood. The authors used a model-based approach to reveal processes underlying PM interference and age differences in these processes. Older and younger adults first performed a block of an ongoing lexical decision task alone. An embedded event-based PM task was added in a second block. Simultaneously accounting for the changes in response time distributions and error rates induced by the PM task, Ratcliff's (Psychological Review 85:59-108, 1978) diffusion model was used to decompose the nonlinear combination of speed and accuracy into psychologically meaningful components. Remembering an intention not only reduced processing efficiency in both age groups, but also prolonged peripheral nondecision times and induced response cautiousness. Overall, the findings suggest that there are multiple, but qualitatively similar factors underlying PM task interference in both age groups.

  19. Yoga Therapy in Treating Patients With Malignant Brain Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-17

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Meningioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Choroid Plexus Tumor; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Papillary Meningioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET); Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  20. Gadobutrol Versus Gadopentetate Dimeglumine or Gadobenate Dimeglumine Before DCE-MRI in Diagnosing Patients With Multiple Sclerosis, Grade II-IV Glioma, or Brain Metastases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-22

    Adult Anaplastic (Malignant) Meningioma; Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Choroid Plexus Neoplasm; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Papillary Meningioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Primary Melanocytic Lesion of Meninges; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Malignant Adult Intracranial Hemangiopericytoma; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain; Multiple Sclerosis; Recurrent Adult Brain Neoplasm

  1. Immunohistochemical characterization of subependymal giant cell astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Lopes, M B; Altermatt, H J; Scheithauer, B W; Shepherd, C W; VandenBerg, S R

    1996-01-01

    Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) is the most common neoplastic process involving the brain in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). Morphologically, these tumors exhibit a wide range of cytoarchitecture with spindle and epithelioid cells resembling astrocytes, and also large, occasionally giant cells, some of which have a distinctly ganglion-like appearance. Unresolved questions regarding SEGAs center on: (a) their cytogenesis, i.e., whether they are derived from single or multiple precursors; and (b) their differentiating capacity along glial or neuronal lines. We sought to determine whether SEGAs represent truly mixed tumors or whether they consist of a single population of cells with a capacity for divergent differentiation. Twenty SEGAs were assessed for immunophenotypic features of either neuronal or glial differentiation or both. Only tumors from patients with a clinically confirmed diagnosis of TSC were included. Immunoreactivity for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and/or S-100 protein was considered indicative of a glial phenotype, whereas the presence of neuronal differentiation was assessed by staining for cytoskeletal proteins [neurofilament epitopes, class III Beta-tubulin, microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2), synaptophysin], neurosecretory substances [serotonin, cholecystokinin, Beta-endorphin, substance P, somatostatin, metenkephalin, neuropeptide Y, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), and for the 28-kDa neuron-associated calcium binding protein calbindin. Of the tumors examined, 18 exhibited both glial and neuronal epitopes, the staining pattern being variable. In 19 tumors, the constituent spindle, polygonal and giant or ganglion-like cells showed variable immunoreactivity for GFAP and S-100 proteins both within the cell body and processes. Neuron-associated cytoskeletal proteins were present in 18 cases. Class III Beta-tubulin immunoreactivity was demonstrated in 17 tumors, both within the bodies of all three

  2. Effect of cognitive rehabilitation in a case of thalamic astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Lo Buono, Viviana; Corallo, Francesco; De Cola, Maria Cristina; Chillemi, Antonino; Grugno, Rosario; Bramanti, Placido; Marino, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    We describe the effectiveness of rehabilitative training for a neuropsychological deficit following the removal and treatment of a fibrillary astrocytoma (Grade II) in a young man. The rehabilitative training was based on cognitive and motivational techniques and has been carried out for a period of 3 months (2 times per week). The results, even if limited to a single case, seem to support the idea that cognitive rehabilitation should facilitate the brain's reorganization of basic cognitive functions in the neuro-oncologic field.

  3. Expression of aquaporin8 in human astrocytomas: Correlation with pathologic grade

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Shu-juan; Wang, Ke-jian; Gan, Sheng-wei; Xu, Jin; Xu, Shi-ye; Sun, Shan-quan

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •AQP8 is mainly distributed in the cytoplasm of human astrocytoma cells. •AQP8 over-expressed in human astrocytomas, especially glioblastoma. •The up-regulation of AQP8 is related to the pathological grade of human astrocytomas. •AQP8 may contribute to the growth and proliferation of astrocytomas. -- Abstract: Aquaporin8 (AQP8), a member of the aquaporin (AQP) protein family, is weakly distributed in mammalian brains. Previous studies on AQP8 have focused mainly on the digestive and the reproductive systems. AQP8 has a pivotal role in keeping the fluid and electrolyte balance. In this study, we investigated the expression changes of AQP8 in 75 cases of human brain astrocytic tumors using immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results demonstrated that AQP8 was mainly distributed in the cytoplasm of astrocytoma cells. The expression levels and immunoreactive score of AQP8 protein and mRNA increased in low-grade astrocytomas, and further increased in high-grade astrocytomas, especially in glioblastoma. Therefore, AQP8 may contribute to the proliferation of astrocytomas, and may be a biomarker and candidate therapy target for patients with astrocytomas.

  4. Expression of neonatal Nav1.5 in human brain astrocytoma and its effect on proliferation, invasion and apoptosis of astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Xing, Deguang; Wang, Jun; Ou, Shaowu; Wang, Yunjie; Qiu, Bo; Ding, Daling; Guo, Feng; Gao, Qinghua

    2014-06-01

    In the present study, we designed and conducted a series of assays to determine the expression of voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) neonatal isoform Nav1.5 (nNav1.5) in human brain astrocytoma and its effect on the proliferation, migration, invasion and apoptosis of astrocytoma U251 cells. The results showed that nNav1.5 mRNA and protein were expressed in both human brain astrocytoma and normal brain tissues, but their expression levels in astrocytoma were significantly higher (P<0.05). In astrocytomas, nNav1.5 mRNA and protein levels were also different (P<0.05) and were correlated with pathological grades. The immunofluorescence confocal microscopy observations demonstrated that nNav1.5 protein was expressed in the nucleus, cytoplasm and membrane of the astrocytoma cells. After transfection, the small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeted to nNav1.5 significantly reduced the expression levels of SCN5A/nNav1.5 mRNA and protein by 57.2% (P<0.05) and 66.6% (P<0.05), respectively. The MTT, wound healing, Matrigel invasion and flow cytometric assays confirmed that following siRNA downregulation of the expression of the SCN5A/nNav1.5 gene, the in vitro proliferation and in vitro invasiveness of the U251 cells were significantly reduced (P<0.05 for both comparisons), and the apoptosis rate was significantly increased (P<0.05). These results revealed that nNav1.5 expression in human brain astrocytoma was upregulated, and its expression was positively correlated with the degree of malignancy. Additionally, reduced nNav1.5 expression significantly suppressed the proliferation and invasiveness of astrocytoma cells, indicating a new target in the molecular diagnosis and therapy of astrocytoma.

  5. P17.41CLINICAL MANAGEMENT AND OUTCOME OF HISTOLOGICALLY VERIFIED ADULT BRAINSTEM GLIOMAS IN SWITZERLAND: A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF 21 PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Hundsberger, T.; Tonder, M.; Andreas, H.; Brügge, D.; Roelcke, U.; Putora, P.M.; Stupp, R.; Weller, M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Because of low incidence, mixed study populations and paucity of clinical and histological data, the management of adult brainstem gliomas remains non-standardized. We here describe characteristics, treatment and outcome of patients with exclusively histologically confirmed adult brainstem gliomas. METHODS: A retrospective chart review of adults (>age 18 years) was conducted. Brainstem glioma was defined as a glial tumor located in the midbrain, pons or medulla. Characteristics, management and outcome were analyzed. RESULTS: 21 patients (17 males; median age 41 years) were diagnosed between 2004 and 2012 by biopsy (n = 15), partial (n = 4) or complete resection (n = 2). Diagnoses were glioblastoma (WHO grade IV, n = 6), anaplastic astrocytoma (WHO grade III, n = 7), diffuse astrocytoma (WHO grade II, n = 6) and pilocytic astrocytoma (WHO grade I, n = 2). Diffuse gliomas were mainly located in the pons and frequently showed MRI contrast enhancement. Endophytic growth was common (16 versus 5). Postoperative therapy in low-grade (WHO grade I/II) and high-grade gliomas (WHO grade III/IV) consisted of radiotherapy alone (3 in each group), radiochemotherapy (2 versus 6), chemotherapy alone (0 versus 2) or no postoperative therapy (3 versus 1). Median PFS (24.1 versus 5.8 months; log-rank, p = 0.009) and mOS (30.5 versus 11.5 months; log-rank, p = 0.028) was significantly better in WHO grade II than in WHO grade III/IV tumors. Second-line therapy considerably varied. CONCLUSIONS: Histologically verification of adult brainstem glioma is feasible and has an impact on postoperative treatment. Low-grade gliomas can simple be followed or treated with radiotherapy alone. Radiochemotherapy with temozolomide can safely be prescribed for high-grade gliomas without additional CNS toxicities.

  6. Nitroproteins in Human Astrocytomas Discovered by Gel Electrophoresis and Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fang; Li, Jianglin; Guo, Tianyao; Yang, Haiyan; Li, Maoyu; Sang, Shushan; Li, Xuejun; Desiderio, Dominic M; Zhan, Xianquan

    2015-12-01

    Protein tyrosine nitration is involved in the pathogenesis of highly fatal astrocytomas, a type of brain cancer. To understand the molecular mechanisms of astrocytomas and to discover new biomarkers/therapeutic targets, we sought to identify nitroproteins in human astrocytoma tissue. Anti-nitrotyrosine immunoreaction-positive proteins from a high-grade astrocytoma tissue were detected with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DGE)-based nitrotyrosine immunoblots, and identified with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Fifty-seven nitrotyrosine immunopositive protein spots were detected. A total of 870 proteins (nitrated and non-nitrated) in nitrotyrosine-immunopositive 2D gel spots were identified, and 18 nitroproteins and their 20 nitrotyrosine sites were identified with MS/MS analysis. These nitroproteins participate in multiple processes, including drug-resistance, signal transduction, cytoskeleton, transcription and translation, cell proliferation and apoptosis, immune response, phenotypic dedifferentiation, cell migration, and metastasis. Among those nitroproteins that might play a role in astrocytomas was nitro-sorcin, which is involved in drug resistance and metastasis and might play a role in the spread and treatment of an astrocytoma. Semiquantitative immune-based measurements of different sorcin expressions were found among different grades of astrocytomas relative to controls, and a semiquantitative increased nitration level in high-grade astrocytoma relative to control. Nitro-β-tubulin functions in cytoskeleton and cell migration. Semiquantitative immunoreactivity of β-tubulin showed increased expression among different grades of astrocytomas relative to controls and semiquantitatively increased nitration level in high-grade astrocytoma relative to control. Each nitroprotein was rationalized and related to the corresponding functional system to provide new insights into tyrosine nitration and its potential role in the

  7. Nitroproteins in Human Astrocytomas Discovered by Gel Electrophoresis and Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Fang; Li, Jianglin; Guo, Tianyao; Yang, Haiyan; Li, Maoyu; Sang, Shushan; Li, Xuejun; Desiderio, Dominic M.; Zhan, Xianquan

    2015-12-01

    Protein tyrosine nitration is involved in the pathogenesis of highly fatal astrocytomas, a type of brain cancer. To understand the molecular mechanisms of astrocytomas and to discover new biomarkers/therapeutic targets, we sought to identify nitroproteins in human astrocytoma tissue. Anti-nitrotyrosine immunoreaction-positive proteins from a high-grade astrocytoma tissue were detected with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DGE)-based nitrotyrosine immunoblots, and identified with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Fifty-seven nitrotyrosine immunopositive protein spots were detected. A total of 870 proteins (nitrated and non-nitrated) in nitrotyrosine-immunopositive 2D gel spots were identified, and 18 nitroproteins and their 20 nitrotyrosine sites were identified with MS/MS analysis. These nitroproteins participate in multiple processes, including drug-resistance, signal transduction, cytoskeleton, transcription and translation, cell proliferation and apoptosis, immune response, phenotypic dedifferentiation, cell migration, and metastasis. Among those nitroproteins that might play a role in astrocytomas was nitro-sorcin, which is involved in drug resistance and metastasis and might play a role in the spread and treatment of an astrocytoma. Semiquantitative immune-based measurements of different sorcin expressions were found among different grades of astrocytomas relative to controls, and a semiquantitative increased nitration level in high-grade astrocytoma relative to control. Nitro-β-tubulin functions in cytoskeleton and cell migration. Semiquantitative immunoreactivity of β-tubulin showed increased expression among different grades of astrocytomas relative to controls and semiquantitatively increased nitration level in high-grade astrocytoma relative to control. Each nitroprotein was rationalized and related to the corresponding functional system to provide new insights into tyrosine nitration and its potential role in the

  8. Progressive Gender Differences of Structural Brain Networks in Healthy Adults: A Longitudinal, Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yu; Lee, Renick; Chen, Yu; Collinson, Simon; Thakor, Nitish; Bezerianos, Anastasios; Sim, Kang

    2015-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism in the brain maturation during childhood and adolescence has been repeatedly documented, which may underlie the differences in behaviors and cognitive performance. However, our understanding of how gender modulates the development of structural connectome in healthy adults is still not entirely clear. Here we utilized graph theoretical analysis of longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging data over a five-year period to investigate the progressive gender differences of brain network topology. The brain networks of both genders showed prominent economical “small-world” architecture (high local clustering and short paths between nodes). Additional analysis revealed a more economical “small-world” architecture in females as well as a greater global efficiency in males regardless of scan time point. At the regional level, both increased and decreased efficiency were found across the cerebral cortex for both males and females, indicating a compensation mechanism of cortical network reorganization over time. Furthermore, we found that weighted clustering coefficient exhibited significant gender-time interactions, implying different development trends between males and females. Moreover, several specific brain regions (e.g., insula, superior temporal gyrus, cuneus, putamen, and parahippocampal gyrus) exhibited different development trajectories between males and females. Our findings further prove the presence of sexual dimorphism in brain structures that may underlie gender differences in behavioral and cognitive functioning. The sex-specific progress trajectories in brain connectome revealed in this work provide an important foundation to delineate the gender related pathophysiological mechanisms in various neuropsychiatric disorders, which may potentially guide the development of sex-specific treatments for these devastating brain disorders. PMID:25742013

  9. Diffuse Infantile Hepatic Hemangioendothelioma With Early Central Enhancement in an Adult: A Case Report of CT and MRI Findings.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aisheng; Dong, Hui; Zuo, Changjing; He, Tianlin

    2015-12-01

    Infantile hepatic hemangioendothelioma (IHH) is the most common vascular tumor of the liver in infancy. Adult with IHH is extremely rare. We presented a diffuse IHH in an adult patient with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance image (MRI) findings.A 39-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of a 2-year history of abnormal liver function tests and a 7-day history of jaundice. Physical examination revealed enlarged liver. Unenhanced abdominal CT showed enlargement of the liver with diffuse hypodensity. Enhanced CT on the arterial phase revealed multiple centrally enhanced lesions diffusely involved the enlarged liver. The enhanced areas of the lesions became larger on the portal phase and all the lesions became homogeneous enhanced on the delayed phase. These lesions showed heterogeneously hyperintense on T2-weighted image, hypointense on T1-weighted image, and early centrally enhanced on dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MRI, with complete tumor enhancement after 180 s. The patient underwent orthotopic liver transplantation. IHH type 2 was confirmed by pathology. The patient died of tumor recurrence in the liver 4 months after transplantation.Unlike the previously described imaging appearances of IHH, this case showed diffuse nodules with early central enhancement on CT and MRI. Considering the importance of the ability to differentiate IHH from other hepatic tumors, radiologists should be aware of these imaging appearances to establish knowledge of the entire spectrum of IHH.

  10. Outcome of Patients With Pilocytic Astrocytoma and Leptomeningeal Dissemination

    SciTech Connect

    Mazloom, Ali; Hodges, Joseph C.; Teh, Bin S.; Chintagumpala, Murali; Paulino, Arnold C.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics of patients with pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) and leptomeningeal dissemination (LMD). Methods and Materials: A PubMed search of English-language studies pertaining to PA with LMD was performed using a combination of keywords that included juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma, low-grade astrocytoma, low-grade glioma, leptomeningeal dissemination, neuraxis spread, and radiotherapy. We found 26 studies with 58 patients between 1976 and 2005 that met these criteria. Results: The median survival for PA patients with LMD was 65 months. The 1-, 2-, and 5-year overall survival (OS) rate after the diagnosis of LMD was 81.1%, 75.7%, and 55.5%. The 1-, 2-, and 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) rate after the diagnosis of LMD was 69.3%, 66.5%, and 34.6%, respectively. Age, gender, primary site location, timing of LMD presentation (synchronous vs. metachronous), and LMD location did not significantly influence OS or PFS. No statistically significant difference was found in OS or PFS between the chemotherapy and radiotherapy groups. Likewise, no difference was found in OS or PFS according to the use of craniospinal irradiation vs. less extensive RT fields. Conclusions: Approximately one-half of PA patients were alive 5 years after the diagnosis of LMD. Both chemotherapy and radiotherapy have efficacy against LMD. Although the use of craniospinal irradiation did not have an effect on PFS, the patient numbers were small and a larger number treated with craniospinal irradiation is needed to determine its efficacy.

  11. Management of Pediatric Spinal Cord Astrocytomas: Outcomes With Adjuvant Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, Zachary D.; Moningi, Shalini; Jallo, George I.; Cohen, Kenneth J.; Wharam, Moody D.; Terezakis, Stephanie A.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: Pediatric intramedullary spinal cord tumors are exceedingly rare; in the United States, 100 to 200 cases are recognized annually, of these, most are astrocytomas. The purpose of this study is to report the outcomes in pediatric patients with spinal cord astrocytomas treated at a tertiary care center. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved retrospective single-institution study was performed for pediatric patients with spinal cord astrocytomas treated at our hospital from 1990 to 2010. The patients were evaluated on the extent of resection, progression-free survival (PFS), and development of radiation-related toxicities. Kaplan-Meier curves and multivariate regression model methods were used for analysis. Results: Twenty-nine patients were included in the study, 24 with grade 1 or 2 (low-grade) tumors and 5 with grade 3 or 4 (high-grade) tumors. The median follow-up time was 55 months (range, 1-215 months) for patients with low-grade tumors and 17 months (range, 10-52 months) for those with high-grade tumors. Thirteen patients in the cohort received chemotherapy. All patients underwent at least 1 surgical resection. Twelve patients received radiation therapy to a median radiation dose of 47.5 Gy (range, 28.6-54.0 Gy). Fifteen patients with low-grade tumors and 1 patient with a high-grade tumor exhibited stable disease at the last follow-up visit. Acute toxicities of radiation therapy were low grade, whereas long-term sequelae were infrequent and manageable when they arose. All patients with low-grade tumors were alive at the last follow-up visit, compared with 1 patient with a high-grade tumor. Conclusion: Primary pediatric spinal cord astrocytomas vary widely in presentation and clinical course. Histopathologic grade remains a major prognostic factor. Patients with low-grade tumors tend to have excellent disease control and long-term survival compared to those with high-grade tumors. This experience suggests that radiation therapy

  12. The visuospatial functions in children after cerebellar low-grade astrocytoma surgery: A contribution to the pediatric neuropsychology of the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Starowicz-Filip, Anna; Chrobak, Adrian Andrzej; Milczarek, Olga; Kwiatkowski, Stanisław

    2015-12-07

    The aim of this study was to specify whether cerebellar lesions cause visuospatial impairments in children. The study sample consisted of 40 children with low-grade cerebellar astrocytoma, who underwent surgical treatment and 40 healthy controls matched with regard to age and sex. Visuospatial abilities were tested using the spatial WISC-R subtests (Block Design and Object Assembly), Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure, Benton Judgment of Line Orientation Test, PEBL Mental Rotation Task, and Benton Visual Retention Test. To exclude general diffuse intellectual dysfunction, the WISC-R Verbal Intelligence IQ, Performance IQ, and Full-Scale IQ scores were analysed. Post-surgical medical consequences were measured with the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale. Compared to controls, the cerebellar group manifested problems with mental rotation of objects, visuospatial organization, planning, and spatial construction processes which could not be explained by medical complications or general intellectual retardation. The intensity of visuospatial syndrome highly depends on cerebellar lesion side. Patients with left-sided cerebellar lesions display more severe spatial problems than those with right-sided cerebellar lesions. In conclusion, focal cerebellar lesions in children affect their visuospatial ability. The impairments profile is characterized by deficits in complex spatial processes such as visuospatial organization and mental rotation, requiring reconstruction of visual stimuli using the imagination, while elementary sensory analysis and perception as well as spatial processes requiring direct manipulation of objects are relatively better preserved. This pattern is analogous to the one previously observed in adult population and appears to be typical for cerebellar pathology in general, regardless of age.

  13. Participation and diffusion effects of a peer-intervention for HIV prevention among adults in rural Malawi.

    PubMed

    Crittenden, Kathleen S; Kaponda, Chrissie P N; Jere, Diana L; McCreary, Linda L; Norr, Kathleen F

    2015-05-01

    This paper examines whether a peer group intervention that reduced self-reported risky behaviors for rural adults in Malawi also had impacts on non-participants in the same communities. We randomly assigned two districts to the intervention and control conditions, and conducted surveys at baseline and 18 months post-intervention using unmatched independent random samples of intervention and control communities in 2003-2006. The six-session peer group intervention was offered to same-gender groups by trained volunteers. In this analysis, we divided the post-intervention sample into three exposure groups: 243 participants and 170 non-participants from the intervention district (total n = 415) and 413 control individuals. Controlling for demographics and participation, there were significant favorable diffusion effects on five partially overlapping behavioral outcomes: partner communication, ever used condoms, unprotected sex, recent HIV test, and a community HIV prevention index. Non-participants in the intervention district had more favorable outcomes on these behaviors than survey respondents in the control district. One behavioral outcome, community HIV prevention, showed both participation and diffusion effects. Participating in the intervention had a significant effect on six psychosocial outcomes: HIV knowledge (two measures), hope, condom attitudes, and self-efficacy for community HIV prevention and for safer sex; there were no diffusion effects. This pattern of results suggests that the behavioral changes promoted in the intervention spread to others in the same community, most likely through direct contact between participants and non-participants. These findings support the idea that diffusion of HIV-related behavior changes can occur for peer group interventions in communities, adding to the body of research supporting diffusion of innovations theory as a robust approach to accelerating change. If diffusion occurs, peer group intervention may be more

  14. Clinico-pathological feature of pilomyxoid astrocytomas: three case reports.

    PubMed

    Nagaishi, Masaya; Yokoo, Hideaki; Hirato, Junko; Yoshimoto, Yuhei; Nakazato, Yoichi

    2011-04-01

    Pilomyxoid astrocytoma (PMA) is a newly identified variant of pilocytic astrocytoma (PA). We report three cases of PMA with comparison to seven cases of PA in terms of their clinicopathological features. The three cases occurred at the ages of 2, 36 and 6 years, and their tumors were located in the left basal ganglia, the pineal gland, and the cerebellum, respectively. They were diagnosed PMA by surgical specimens that showed a characteristic monomorphous architecture with an angiocentric growth pattern and myxoid background. One patient developed localized relapse at 6 months after the surgery, but the other patients remained alive without tumor progression more than 5 years after treatment. In analysis of the immunohistochemical association in PMA and PA, no specific staining was found to be useful for differential diagnosis of PMA from PA. The expression of biomarkers including O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, p53, MIB-1, and EGF receptor neither distinguished PMA from PA nor correlated with outcome. But almost all PMA and PA that demonstrated prominent positivity for nestin showed a high MIB-1 labelling index (LI), and four of these five patients suffered a relapse in the early phase. These results suggest that immunohistochemical expression of nestin and MIB-1 LI may correlate with the aggressiveness of the tumor in PA and PMA.

  15. Diffusion of Technology: Frequency of Use for Younger and Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Olson, Katherine E; O'Brien, Marita A; Rogers, Wendy A; Charness, Neil

    2011-03-01

    OBJECTIVES: When we think of technology-savvy consumers, older adults are typically not the first persons that come to mind. The common misconception is that older adults do not want to use or cannot use technology. But for an increasing number of older adults, this is not true (Pew Internet and American Life Project, 2003). Older adults do use technologies similar to their younger counterparts, but perhaps at different usage rates. Previous research has identified that there may be subgroups of older adults, "Silver Surfers", whose adoption patterns mimic younger adults (Pew Internet and American Life Project, 2003). Much of the previous research on age-related differences in technology usage has only investigated usage broadly -- from a "used" or "not used" standpoint. The present study investigated age-related differences in overall usage of technologies, as well as frequency of technology usage (i.e., never, occasional, or frequent). METHODS: The data were gathered through a questionnaire from younger adults (N=430) and older adults (N=251) in three geographically separate and ethnically diverse areas of the United States. RESULTS: We found that younger adults use a greater breadth of technologies than older adults. However, age-related differences in usage and the frequency of use depend on the technology domain. CONCLUSION: This paper presents technology usage and frequency data to highlight age-related differences and similarities. The results provide insights into older and younger adults' technology-use patterns, which in turn provide a basis for expectations about knowledge differences. Designers and trainers can benefit from understanding experience and knowledge differences.

  16. The Use of Three Long Non-Coding RNAs as Potential Prognostic Indicators of Astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Feng; Wang, Qiang; Xue, Lian; Shao, Naiyuan; Wang, Rong; Deng, Danni; Wang, Suinuan; Xia, Xiwei; Yang, Yilin

    2015-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are pervasively transcribed and play a key role in tumorigenesis. The aim of the study was to determine the lncRNA expression profile in astrocytomas and to assess its potential clinical value. We performed a three-step analysis to establish the lncRNA profile for astrocytoma: a) the lncRNA expression was examined on 3 astrocytomas as well as 3 NATs (normal adjacent tissues) using the lncRNA microarray; b) the top-hits were validated in 40 astrocytomas (WHO grade II-IV) by quantitative real time-PCR (qRT-PCR); c) the hits with significant differences were re-evaluated using qRT-PCR in 90 astrocytomas. Finally, 7 lncRNAs were found to have a significantly different expression profile in astrocytoma samples compared to the NAT samples. Unsupervised clustering analysis further revealed the potential of the 7-lncRNA profile to differentiate between tumors and NAT samples. The upregulation of ENST00000545440 and NR_002809 was associated with advanced clinical stages of astrocytoma. Using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, we showed that the low expression of BC002811 or XLOC_010967, or the high expression of NR_002809 was significantly associated with poor patient survival. Moreover, Cox proportional hazard regression analysis revealed that this prognostic impact was independent of other clinicopathological factors. Our results indicate that the lncRNA profile may be a potential prognostic biomarker for the prediction of post-surgical outcomes.

  17. Expression of AT1 and AT2 angiotensin receptors in astrocytomas is associated with poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Arrieta, O; Pineda-Olvera, B; Guevara-Salazar, P; Hernández-Pedro, N; Morales-Espinosa, D; Cerón-Lizarraga, T L; González-De la Rosa, C H; Rembao, D; Segura-Pacheco, B; Sotelo, J

    2008-01-01

    Astrocytomas develop intense vascular proliferation, essential for tumour growth and invasiveness. Angiotensin II (ANGII) was initially described as a vasoconstrictor; recent studies have shown its participation in cellular proliferation, vascularisation, and apoptosis. We conducted a prospective study to evaluate the expression of ANGII receptors – AT1 and AT2 – and their relationship with prognosis. We studied 133 tumours from patients with diagnosis of astrocytoma who underwent surgery from 1997 to 2002. AT1 and AT2 were expressed in 52 and 44% of the tumours, respectively, when determined by both reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Ten per cent of low-grade astrocytomas were positive for AT1, whereas grade III and IV astrocytomas were positive in 67% (P<0.001). AT2 receptors were positive in 17% of low-grade astrocytomas and in 53% of high-grade astrocytomas (P=0.01). AT1-positive tumours showed higher cellular proliferation and vascular density. Patients with AT1-positive tumours had a lower survival rate than those with AT1-negative (P<0.001). No association to survival was found for AT2 in the multivariate analysis. Expression of AT1 and AT2 is associated with high grade of malignancy, increased cellular proliferation, and angiogenesis, and is thus related to poor prognosis. These findings suggest that ANGII receptors might be potential therapeutic targets for high-grade astrocytomas. PMID:18594540

  18. Carfilzomib, Rituximab, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-07

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma

  19. High expression of the stem cell marker nestin is an adverse prognostic factor in WHO grade II-III astrocytomas and oligoastrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Foong, Chan; Raisanen, Jack M.; Oliver, Dwight; Hiemenz, Matthew C.; Burns, Dennis K.; White, Charles L.; Whitworth, L. Anthony; Mickey, Bruce; Stegner, Martha; Habib, Amyn A.; Fink, Karen; Maher, Elizabeth A.; Bachoo, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Infiltrating astrocytomas and oligoastrocytomas of low to anaplastic grade (WHO grades II and III), in spite of being associated with a wide range of clinical outcomes, can be difficult to subclassify and grade by the current histopathologic criteria. Unlike oligodendrogliomas and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas that can be identified by the 1p/19q codeletion and the more malignant glioblastomas (WHO grade IV astrocytomas) that can be diagnosed solely based on objective features on routine hematoxylin and eosin sections, no such objective criteria exist for the subclassification of grade II-III astrocytomas and oligoastrocytomas (A+OA II-III). In this study, we evaluated the prognostic and predictive value of the stem cell marker nestin in adult A+OA II-III (n=50) using immunohistochemistry and computer-assisted analysis on tissue microarrays. In addition, the correlation between nestin mRNA level and total survival was analyzed in the NCI Rembrandt database. The results showed that high nestin expression is a strong adverse prognostic factor for total survival (p=0.0004). The strength of the correlation was comparable to but independent of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 (IDH 1/2) mutation status. Histopathological grading and subclassification did not correlate significantly with outcome, although the interpretation of this finding is limited by the fact that grade III tumors were treated more aggressively than grade II tumors. These results suggest that nestin level and IDH 1/2 mutation status are strong prognostic features in A+OA II-III and possibly more helpful for treatment planning than routine histopathological variables such as oligodendroglial component (astrocytoma vs. oligoastrocytoma) and WHO grade (grade II vs. III). PMID:24519516

  20. High expression of the stem cell marker nestin is an adverse prognostic factor in WHO grade II-III astrocytomas and oligoastrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Hu, Tianshen; Vemireddy, Vamsidhara; Foong, Chan; Raisanen, Jack M; Oliver, Dwight; Hiemenz, Matthew C; Burns, Dennis K; White, Charles L; Whitworth, L Anthony; Mickey, Bruce; Stegner, Martha; Habib, Amyn A; Fink, Karen; Maher, Elizabeth A; Bachoo, Robert M

    2014-03-01

    Infiltrating astrocytomas and oligoastrocytomas of low to anaplastic grade (WHO grades II and III), in spite of being associated with a wide range of clinical outcomes, can be difficult to subclassify and grade by the current histopathologic criteria. Unlike oligodendrogliomas and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas that can be identified by the 1p/19q codeletion and the more malignant glioblastomas (WHO grade IV astrocytomas) that can be diagnosed solely based on objective features on routine hematoxylin and eosin sections, no such objective criteria exist for the subclassification of grade II-III astrocytomas and oligoastrocytomas (A+OA II-III). In this study, we evaluated the prognostic and predictive value of the stem cell marker nestin in adult A+OA II-III (n = 50) using immunohistochemistry and computer-assisted analysis on tissue microarrays. In addition, the correlation between nestin mRNA level and total survival was analyzed in the NCI Rembrandt database. The results showed that high nestin expression is a strong adverse prognostic factor for total survival (p = 0.0004). The strength of the correlation was comparable to but independent of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 (IDH 1/2) mutation status. Histopathological grading and subclassification did not correlate significantly with outcome, although the interpretation of this finding is limited by the fact that grade III tumors were treated more aggressively than grade II tumors. These results suggest that nestin level and IDH 1/2 mutation status are strong prognostic features in A+OA II-III and possibly more helpful for treatment planning than routine histopathological variables such as oligodendroglial component (astrocytoma vs. oligoastrocytoma) and WHO grade (grade II vs. III).

  1. Complete remission of diffuse hepatocellular carcinoma in a young adult after GSP-TACE: a case report.

    PubMed

    Liu, Song; Zhang, Yuewei; Zhao, Guangsheng; Liu, Ying

    2014-09-25

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary tumor of the liver. It mostly occurs in older age groups (usually those 50 to 60 years old), and rarely in young adults. The survival rate of these young HCC patients is usually very low. The authors report a case of a 22-year old man with diffuse-type HCC who successfully achieved complete remission for 46 months after second transcatheter arterial chemoembolization using gelatin sponge particles (Eric Kang Pharmaceutical Technology Co., Ltd. Hangzhou, China) combined with pirarubicin.

  2. Diffusion of Technology: Frequency of Use for Younger and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Katherine E.; O’Brien, Marita A.; Rogers, Wendy A.; Charness, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Objectives When we think of technology-savvy consumers, older adults are typically not the first persons that come to mind. The common misconception is that older adults do not want to use or cannot use technology. But for an increasing number of older adults, this is not true (Pew Internet and American Life Project, 2003). Older adults do use technologies similar to their younger counterparts, but perhaps at different usage rates. Previous research has identified that there may be subgroups of older adults, “Silver Surfers”, whose adoption patterns mimic younger adults (Pew Internet and American Life Project, 2003). Much of the previous research on age-related differences in technology usage has only investigated usage broadly -- from a “used” or “not used” standpoint. The present study investigated age-related differences in overall usage of technologies, as well as frequency of technology usage (i.e., never, occasional, or frequent). Methods The data were gathered through a questionnaire from younger adults (N=430) and older adults (N=251) in three geographically separate and ethnically diverse areas of the United States. Results We found that younger adults use a greater breadth of technologies than older adults. However, age-related differences in usage and the frequency of use depend on the technology domain. Conclusion This paper presents technology usage and frequency data to highlight age-related differences and similarities. The results provide insights into older and younger adults’ technology-use patterns, which in turn provide a basis for expectations about knowledge differences. Designers and trainers can benefit from understanding experience and knowledge differences. PMID:22685360

  3. Ki-67 immunostaining in astrocytomas: Association with histopathological grade – A South Indian study

    PubMed Central

    Shivaprasad, Nandish Vastrad; Satish, Suchitha; Ravishankar, Sunila; Vimalambike, Manjunath Gubbi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Astrocytomas are the most common primary tumor of the central nervous system. The distinction between different tumor grades can be tested despite criteria given by the World Health Organization (WHO). Ki-67 is a potent biological marker used in grading of astrocytomas, which estimates growth of the neoplasm quantitatively and will help in predicting prognosis accurately. Objectives: The aim of this was to study the proliferative activity using Ki-67 immunostaining and to assess the relationship of Ki-67 staining with the histopathological grading of astrocytomas. Patients and Methods: Thirty cases of histologically proven astrocytomas were studied. The histopathological grade was assessed using the 2007 WHO criteria. Immunohistochemistry for Ki-67 was done on paraffin-embedded wax sections. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Thirty cases of astrocytomas studied showed a male preponderance (M:F = 1.72:1) with a mean age of 48.1 years. Of these, Grade I, (n = 1, 3.33%), Grade II, (n = 7, 23.3%), Grade III (n = 6, 20%), and Grade IV (n = 16, 53.3%) astrocytomas were analyzed. The mean Ki-67 labeling index (LI) in Grades I, II, III, and IV was 0.02, 0.81, 9.14, and 17.81, respectively. Statistically significant difference was seen in the Ki-67 LI of low-grade (Grade II) and high-grade astrocytomas (Grades III and IV). There was concordance between histopathological grading and Ki-67 LI in 27 (90%) and discordance in 3 (10%) cases. Conclusion: Ki-67 LI varies considerably in different grades of astrocytomas and considerable overlaps can be observed between them. It can be of great help in situations where there is a lack of correlation between clinical parameters and histopathological diagnosis. Determination of Ki-67 LI should constitute a part of routine investigations in patients with astrocytomas. PMID:27695229

  4. Central nervous system involvement in adult patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: Influence of rituximab

    PubMed Central

    CAO, BING; ZHOU, XIAOYAN; JI, DONGMEI; CAO, JUNNING; GUO, YE; ZHANG, QUNLING; WU, XIANGHUA; LI, JUNMIN; WANG, JIANMIN; CHEN, FANGYUAN; WANG, CHUN; ZOU, SHANHUA; HONG, XIAONAN

    2012-01-01

    CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone)-like chemotherapy, in combination with rituximab (R-CHOP-like), improves outcome in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We aimed to investigate the impact of rituximab on central nervous system (CNS) disease in adult patients. We studied 315 patients (aged 18–60 years old) from six hospitals between July 2003 and May 2008. All patients received CHOP-like (n=165) or R-CHOP-like (n=150) regimen every 3 weeks. With a median follow-up of 3.69 years, 10 patients (3.17%) developed CNS disease. The cumulative risk of CNS occurrence was not significantly different between the two treatment groups (P=0.871). We conclude that the addition of rituximab did not reduce the risk of CNS disease in adult patients with DLBCL. PMID:22970053

  5. Medium-grade astrocytoma in a cougar (Puma concolor).

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hirotaka; Leone, Angelique M; Erlacher-Reid, Claire; Gary, Joy; Kiupel, Matti; Farina, Lisa L; Abbott, Jeffrey R

    2012-12-01

    A 17-year-old, male castrated cougar (Puma concolor) was presented minimally responsive and severely depressed, with bilateral mydriasis and absent pupillary light response. On gross examination of the brain, there was a tan-to-gray, invasive mass with a central cavitation on the ventral aspect in the left cerebral hemisphere, rostral to the caudate nucleus. On histopathologic examination, the mass was composed of sheets of medium-sized, round-to-polygonal cells that were multifocally separated by islands of neuropil. Approximately 80% of the neoplastic cells showed strong cytoplasmic labeling for glial fibrillary acidic protein. These findings were consistent with a medium-grade astrocytoma. To the authors' knowledge, neoplastic disease of the central nervous system has not been previously reported in cougars.

  6. A Novel Syndrome of Generalized Lipodystrophy Associated With Pilocytic Astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Patni, Nivedita; Alves, Crésio; von Schnurbein, Julia; Wabitsch, Martin; Tannin, Grace; Rakheja, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    Context: A rare presentation of hypothalamic tumors in infants and young children is profound emaciation and generalized loss of sc adipose tissue, also known as “diencephalic syndrome.” Similar loss of sc fat can be observed in children with acquired generalized lipodystrophy or congenital generalized lipodystrophy. Precise diagnosis may be challenging early in the course of the disease, especially in the absence of metabolic abnormalities. Case Description: We report three males who presented with poor weight gain and generalized loss of sc fat at birth to 3 years of age consistent with generalized lipodystrophy, with subsequent development of pilocytic astrocytoma. Two of them had hypothalamic tumors, and one had a multicentric tumor with a large right parietal mass. Our patients are unique because the onset of lipodystrophy occurred 2.5 to 7.3 years before the diagnosis of brain tumor, and all of them gained body fat or weight after surgical removal and/or chemotherapy. One patient had hepatosplenomegaly and impaired glucose tolerance, and another patient had severe hyperglycemia and hypertriglyceridemia during the course of the disease. Two patients presented with central precocious puberty and advanced bone age at the chronological age of 6 years. Conclusions: It is likely that pilocytic astrocytoma may induce generalized lipodystrophy by paraneoplastic antiadipocyte antibody formation or by excessive hormones or cytokine secretion resulting in excess lipolysis from adipocytes. We conclude that young children presenting with idiopathic acquired generalized lipodystrophy or atypical congenital generalized lipodystrophy, with or without metabolic abnormalities, should prompt investigation for brain tumors. PMID:26252356

  7. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen, p53 and micro vessel density: Grade II vs. Grade III astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Malhan, Priya; Husain, Nuzhat; Bhalla, Shalini; Gupta, Rakesh K; Husain, Mazhar

    2010-01-01

    Histological classification and grading are prime procedures in the management of patients with astrocytoma, providing vital data for therapeutic decision making and prognostication. However, it has limitations in assessing biological tumor behavior. This can be overcome by using newer immunohistochemical techniques. This study was carried out to compare proliferative indices using proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), extent of p53 expression and micro vessel morphometric parameters in patients with low grade and anaplastic astrocytoma. Twenty-five patients, each of grade II and grade III astrocytoma were evaluated using monoclonal antibodies to PCNA, p53 protein and factor VIII related antigen. PCNA, p53-labeling indices were calculated along with micro vessel morphometric analysis using Biovis Image plus Software. Patients with grade III astrocytoma had higher PCNA and p53 labeling indices as compared with grade II astrocytoma (29.14 plus/minus 9.87% vs. 16.84 plus/minus 6.57%, p 0.001; 18.18 plus/minus 6.14% vs. 6.14 plus/minus 7.23%, p 0.001, respectively). Micro vessel percentage area of patients with grade III astrocytoma was also (4.26 plus/minus 3.70 vs. 1.05 plus/minus 0.56, p 0.001), higher along with other micro vessel morphometric parameters. Discordance between histology and one or more IHC parameters was seen in 5/25 (20%) of patients with grade III astrocytoma and 9/25 (36%) of patients with grade II disease. PCNA and p53 labeling indices were positively correlated with Pearson's correlation, p less than 0.001 for both). Increased proliferative fraction, genetic alterations and neovascularization mark biological aggressiveness in astrocytoma. Immunohistochemical evaluation scores over meet the challenge of accurate prognostication of this potentially fatal malignancy.

  8. IDH1 R132H mutation in a pilocytic astrocytoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Behling, Felix; Steinhilber, Julia; Tatagiba, Marcos; Bisdas, Sotirios; Schittenhelm, Jens

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 72-year old female with a right cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma WHO grade I with an Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) R132H mutation. The patient is recurrence-free 6 years after the initial diagnosis. Only one single case with strikingly similar clinicopathological features has been reported before. Otherwise, IDH1/2 mutations are not seen in pilocytic astrocytomas. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:26617931

  9. Assessment and prognostic significance of mitotic index using the mitosis marker phospho-histone H3 in low and intermediate-grade infiltrating astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Colman, Howard; Giannini, Caterina; Huang, Li; Gonzalez, Javier; Hess, Kenneth; Bruner, Janet; Fuller, Gregory; Langford, Lauren; Pelloski, Christopher; Aaron, Joann; Burger, Peter; Aldape, Ken

    2006-05-01

    Distinguishing between grade II and grade III diffuse astrocytomas is important both for prognosis and for treatment decision-making. However, current methods for distinguishing between grades based on proliferative potential are suboptimal, making identification of clear cutoffs difficult. In this study, we compared the results from immunohistochemical staining for phospho-histone H3 (pHH3), a specific marker of cells undergoing mitosis, with standard mitotic counts (number of mitoses/10 high-power fields) and MIB-1 labeling index values for assessing proliferative activity. We tested the relationship between pHH3 staining and tumor grade and prognosis in a retrospective series of grade II and III infiltrating astrocytomas from a single institution. The pHH3 index (per 1000 cells), MIB-1 index (per 1000 cells), and number of mitoses per 10 high-power fields were determined for each of 103 cases of grade II and III diffuse astrocytomas from patients with clinical follow-up. pHH3 staining was found to be a simple and reliable method for identifying mitotic figures, allowing a true mitotic index to be determined. The pHH3 mitotic index was significantly associated both with the standard mitotic count and with the MIB-1 index. Univariate analyses revealed that all 3 measurements of proliferation were significantly associated with survival. However, the pHH3 mitotic index accounted for a larger proportion of variability in survival than standard mitotic count or MIB-1/Ki-67 labeling index. After adjusting for age, extent of resection, and performance score, the pHH3 mitotic index remained an independent predictor of survival. Thus, pHH3 staining provides a simple and reliable method for quantifying proliferative potential and for the stratification of patients with diffuse astrocytomas into typical grade II and III groups. These results also suggest that pHH3 staining may be a useful method in other neoplasms in which accurate determination of proliferation potential

  10. The expression of moesin in astrocytoma: correlation with pathologic grade and poor clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming; Liu, Ding-Yang; Yuan, Xian-Rui; Liu, Qing; Jiang, Xin-Jun; Yuan, Dun; Huang, Jun; Li, Xue-Jun; Yang, Zhi-Quan

    2013-03-01

    Moesin, a member of the ERM family, acts as a linker between the actin cytoskeleton and the plasma membrane and plays a key role in the control of cell morphology, motility, adhesion and other processes of tumourigenesis. The expression pattern and clinical significance of moesin in astrocytoma remain unknown. In this study, we used RT-PCR to systematically investigate the expression of moesin in 49 astrocytomas of different pathological grade and 6 normal brain tissues. We found that the mRNA expression levels of moesin in astrocytomas were significantly higher in comparison with normal brain tissues. Furthermore, moesin up-regulation was correlated with pathological grade of astrocytomas. Subsequently, we tested 112 astrocytomas and 14 normal brain tissues by immunohistochemistry. Similar results were also confirmed. Univariate and multivariate survival analysis were used to determine the correlations of moesin expression with overall survival and progression-free survival. Our results showed the expression of moesin was strongly negatively correlated with the patient progression-free survival and overall survival. These results suggest moesin protein involved in the genesis and progression of astrocytomas and might be regarded as an independent predictor of poor prognosis.

  11. VRK2 identifies a subgroup of primary high-grade astrocytomas with a better prognosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Malignant astrocytomas are the most common primary brain tumors and one of the most lethal among human cancers despite optimal treatment. Therefore, the characterization of molecular alterations underlying the aggressive behavior of these tumors and the identification of new markers are thus an important step towards a better patient stratification and management. Methods and results VRK1 and VRK2 (Vaccinia-related kinase-1, -2) expression, as well as proliferation markers, were determined in a tissue microarray containing 105 primary astrocytoma biopsies. Kaplan Meier and Cox models were used to find clinical and/or molecular parameters related to overall survival. The effects of VRK protein levels on proliferation were determined in astrocytoma cell lines. High levels of both protein kinases, VRK1 or VRK2, correlated with proliferation markers, p63 or ki67. There was no correlation with p53, reflecting the disruption of the VRK-p53-DRAM autoregulatory loop as a consequence of p53 mutations. High VRK2 protein levels identified a subgroup of astrocytomas that had a significant improvement in survival. The potential effect of VRK2 was studied by analyzing the growth characteristics of astrocytoma cell lines with different EGFR/VRK2 protein ratios. Conclusion High levels of VRK2 resulted in a lower growth rate suggesting these cells are more indolent. In high-grade astrocytomas, VRK2 expression constitutes a good prognostic marker for patient survival. PMID:24079673

  12. Sulforhodamine 101 selectively labels human astrocytoma cells in an animal model of glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Georges, Joseph F; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Eschbacher, Jennifer; Nichols, Joshua; Tissot, Maya; Preul, Mark C; Feuerstein, Burt; Anderson, Trent; Spetzler, Robert F; Nakaji, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Sulforhodamine 101 (SR101) is a useful tool for immediate staining of astrocytes. We hypothesized that if the selectivity of SR101was maintained in astrocytoma cells, it could prove useful for glioma research. Cultured astrocytoma cells and acute slices from orthotopic human glioma (n=9) and lymphoma (n=6) xenografts were incubated with SR101 and imaged with confocal microscopy. A subset of slices (n=18) were counter-immunostained with glial fibrillary acidic protein and CD20 for stereological assessment of SR101 co-localization. SR101 differentiated astrocytic tumor cells from lymphoma cells. In acute slices, SR101 labeled 86.50% (±1.86; p<0.0001) of astrocytoma cells and 2.19% (±0.47; p<0.0001) of lymphoma cells. SR101-labeled astrocytoma cells had a distinct morphology when compared with in vivo astrocytes. Immediate imaging of human astrocytoma cells in vitro and in ex vivo rodent xenograft tissue labeled with SR101 can identify astrocytic tumor cells and help visualize the tumor margin. These features are useful in studying astrocytoma in the laboratory and may have clinical applications.

  13. Pre-B-cell leukemia homeobox interacting protein 1 is overexpressed in astrocytoma and promotes tumor cell growth and migration

    PubMed Central

    van Vuurden, Dannis G.; Aronica, Eleonora; Hulleman, Esther; Wedekind, Laurine E.; Biesmans, Dennis; Malekzadeh, Arjan; Bugiani, Marianna; Geerts, Dirk; Noske, David P.; Vandertop, W. Peter; Kaspers, Gertjan J.L.; Cloos, Jacqueline; Würdinger, Thomas; van der Stoop, Petra P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Glial brain tumors cause considerable mortality and morbidity in children and adults. Innovative targets for therapy are needed to improve survival and reduce long-term sequelae. The aim of this study was to find a candidate tumor-promoting protein, abundantly expressed in tumor cells but not in normal brain tissues, as a potential target for therapy. Methods In silico proteomics and genomics, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence microscopy validation were performed. RNA interference was used to ascertain the functional role of the overexpressed candidate target protein. Results In silico proteomics and genomics revealed pre-B-cell leukemia homeobox (PBX) interacting protein 1 (PBXIP1) overexpression in adult and childhood high-grade glioma and ependymoma compared with normal brain. PBXIP1 is a PBX-family interacting microtubule-binding protein with a putative role in migration and proliferation of cancer cells. Immunohistochemical studies in glial tumors validated PBXIP1 expression in astrocytoma and ependymoma but not in oligodendroglioma. RNAi-mediated PBXIP1-knockdown in glioblastoma cell lines strongly reduced proliferation and migration and induced morphological changes, indicating that PBXIP1 knockdown decreases glioma cell viability and motility through rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton. Furthermore, expression of PBXIP1 was observed in radial glia and astrocytic progenitor cells in human fetal tissues, suggesting that PBXIP1 is an astroglial progenitor cell marker during human embryonic development. Conclusion PBXIP1 is a novel protein overexpressed in astrocytoma and ependymoma, involved in tumor cell proliferation and migration, that warrants further exploration as a novel therapeutic target in these tumors. PMID:24470547

  14. Heterogeneous vascular permeability and alternative diffusion barrier in sensory circumventricular organs of adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Morita, Shoko; Furube, Eriko; Mannari, Tetsuya; Okuda, Hiroaki; Tatsumi, Kouko; Wanaka, Akio; Miyata, Seiji

    2016-02-01

    Fenestrated capillaries of the sensory circumventricular organs (CVOs), including the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, the subfornical organ and the area postrema, lack completeness of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to sense a variety of blood-derived molecules and to convey the information into other brain regions. We examine the vascular permeability of blood-derived molecules and the expression of tight-junction proteins in sensory CVOs. The present tracer assays revealed that blood-derived dextran 10 k (Dex10k) having a molecular weight (MW) of 10,000 remained in the perivascular space between the inner and outer basement membranes, but fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC; MW: 389) and Dex3k (MW: 3000) diffused into the parenchyma. The vascular permeability of FITC was higher at central subdivisions than at distal subdivisions. Neither FITC nor Dex3k diffused beyond the dense network of glial fibrillar acidic protein (GFAP)-positive astrocytes/tanycytes. The expression of tight-junction proteins such as occludin, claudin-5 and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) was undetectable at the central subdivisions of the sensory CVOs but some was expressed at the distal subdivisions. Electron microscopic observation showed that capillaries were surrounded with numerous layers of astrocyte processes and dendrites. The expression of occludin and ZO-1 was also observed as puncta on GFAP-positive astrocytes/tanycytes of the sensory CVOs. Our study thus demonstrates the heterogeneity of vascular permeability and expression of tight-junction proteins and indicates that the outer basement membrane and dense astrocyte/tanycyte connection are possible alternative mechanisms for a diffusion barrier of blood-derived molecules, instead of the BBB.

  15. Roles of the functional loss of p53 and other genes in astrocytoma tumorigenesis and progression.

    PubMed Central

    Nozaki, M.; Tada, M.; Kobayashi, H.; Zhang, C. L.; Sawamura, Y.; Abe, H.; Ishii, N.; Van Meir, E. G.

    1999-01-01

    Loss of function of the p53 tumor suppressor gene due to mutation occurs early in astrocytoma tumorigenesis in about 30-40% of cases. This is believed to confer a growth advantage to the cells, allowing them to clonally expand due to loss of the p53-controlled G1 checkpoint and apoptosis. Genetic instability due to the impaired ability of p53 to mediate DNA damage repair further facilitates the acquisition of new genetic abnormalities, leading to malignant progression of an astrocytoma into anaplastic astrocytoma. This is reflected by a high rate of p53 mutation (60-70%) in anaplastic astrocytomas. The cell cycle control gets further compromised in astrocytoma by alterations in one of the G1/S transition control genes, either loss of the p16/CDKN2 or RB genes or amplification of the cyclin D gene. The final progression process leading to glioblastoma multiforme seems to need additional genetic abnormalities in the long arm of chromosome 10; one of which is deletion and/or functional loss of the PTEN/MMAC1 gene. Glioblastomas also occur as primary (de novo) lesions in patients of older age, without p53 gene loss but with amplification of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) genes. In contrast to the secondary glioblastomas that evolve from astrocytoma cells with p53 mutations in younger patients, primary glioblastomas seem to be resistant to radiation therapy and thus show a poorer prognosis. The evaluation and design of therapeutic modalities aimed at preventing malignant progression of astrocytomas and glioblastomas should now be based on stratifying patients with astrocytic tumors according to their genetic diagnosis. PMID:11550308

  16. Relationship between CacyBP/SIP expression and prognosis in astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Wang, Chunlin; Wang, Junyu; Ge, Aiqing; Li, Yiming; Li, Weiqing; Lu, Yicheng

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of calcyclin-binding protein (also known as Siah-1-interacting protein [CacyBP/SIP]) in astrocytoma and to determine its prognostic value in overall survival of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Tissue specimens were obtained from 77 Chinese patients who had undergone surgery for astrocytoma. The expression of CacyBP/SIP was examined by immunohistochemistry. The relationship between CacyBP/SIP and proliferating cell nuclear antigen index (PCNA) expression was investigated, and the prognostic value of CacyBP/SIP expression in patients with astrocytomas was analyzed. Of 77 tumors, 49 (63.6%) were negative for CacyBP/SIP expression. Loss of CacyBP/SIP expression was significantly associated with a high histological grade and with poor survival in univariate and multivariate analyses. Cox multivariable analysis showed that loss of CacyBP/SIP expression correlated with poor prognosis in patients with astrocytomas and was an independent prognostic factor (p<0.05). The mean survival time of patients with tumors that had lost expression of CacyBP/SIP was 25.58months (95% confidence interval [CI], 15.36-25.81months), compared to a mean survival time of 36.37months (95% CI, 27.90-44.84months) for patients with CacyBP/SIP-expressing tumors. CacyBP/SIP expression was also negatively correlated with PCNA expression in astrocytoma tissue (p<0.05). Our findings suggest that CacyBP/SIP may have an important role as a negative regulator of astrocytoma development and progression, and that CacyBP/SIP might be a useful molecular marker for predicting the prognosis of astrocytoma.

  17. Endoscopic disconnection of hypothalamic astrocytoma causing gelastic epilepsy. Case report.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Seok; Lee, Yun Ho; Shim, Kyu-Won; Kim, Dong-Seok; Lee, Joon Soo; Kim, Heung Dong

    2009-08-01

    The authors report on a case of juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma (JPA) and concomitant hypothalamic hamartoma (HH) with gelastic epilepsy that was successfully treated with endoscopic disconnection. This 6-year-old girl presented with prolonged, medically intractable gelastic seizures that were often followed by generalized tonic seizures. An enhancing, low-grade hypothalamic tumor was identified on MR images obtained when she was 11 months old, but no surgical intervention was attempted at that time apart from bur hole drainage of a chronic subdural hemorrhage. In the first surgery, performed when she was 6 years of age, the authors attempted disconnection and tumor sampling; the lesion was revealed to be a JPA. A second endoscopic disconnection was performed 1 year later to improve seizure control and obtain a pathological specimen from the nonenhancing contralateral side. The pathological results after the second surgery revealed that the enhancing mass was a spontaneously regressing JPA and the contralateral nonenhancing mass was an HH. The HH was found as latent tumor and the JPA was the mass causing gelastic epilepsy. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a patient with a spontaneously regressing JPA and concomitant HH, both of which were treated by endoscopic disconnection.

  18. Model-Based Evaluation of Spontaneous Tumor Regression in Pilocytic Astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Buder, Thomas; Deutsch, Andreas; Klink, Barbara; Voss-Böhme, Anja

    2015-12-01

    Pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) is the most common brain tumor in children. This tumor is usually benign and has a good prognosis. Total resection is the treatment of choice and will cure the majority of patients. However, often only partial resection is possible due to the location of the tumor. In that case, spontaneous regression, regrowth, or progression to a more aggressive form have been observed. The dependency between the residual tumor size and spontaneous regression is not understood yet. Therefore, the prognosis is largely unpredictable and there is controversy regarding the management of patients for whom complete resection cannot be achieved. Strategies span from pure observation (wait and see) to combinations of surgery, adjuvant chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Here, we introduce a mathematical model to investigate the growth and progression behavior of PA. In particular, we propose a Markov chain model incorporating cell proliferation and death as well as mutations. Our model analysis shows that the tumor behavior after partial resection is essentially determined by a risk coefficient γ, which can be deduced from epidemiological data about PA. Our results quantitatively predict the regression probability of a partially resected benign PA given the residual tumor size and lead to the hypothesis that this dependency is linear, implying that removing any amount of tumor mass will improve prognosis. This finding stands in contrast to diffuse malignant glioma where an extent of resection threshold has been experimentally shown, below which no benefit for survival is expected. These results have important implications for future therapeutic studies in PA that should include residual tumor volume as a prognostic factor.

  19. Expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and vascular endothelial growth factor in association with neovascularization in human primary astrocytoma*

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jian-wei; Zhan, Ren-ya; Tong, Ying; Zhou, Yong-qing; Zhang, Ming

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiogenesis in primary astrocytoma. Methods: Thirty-seven primary astrocytomas and 4 astrocytic hyperplasia samples were collected and divided into three groups according to histological grade. The expression of eNOS, VEGF and factor VIII related antigen (FVIIIRAg) were assayed by immunohistochemistry. Microvascular density was assessed by FVIIIRAg immunoreactivity. The intensity of immunoreactivity was graded according to the percentage of positive tumor cells. Results: No eNOS and VEGF were expressed in the astrocytes and vascular endothelium in astrocytic hyperplasia. The expression of eNOS or VEGF was light in low-grade astrocytoma and strong in glioblastoma. eNOS expression in astrocytoma was very positively correlated with VEGF. eNOS and VEGF expression in anaplastic astrocytoma was median in contrast to the low grade astrocytoma and glioblastoma. Lower microvascular density was found in low grade astrocytoma than that in higher grade malignant ones. The expressions of eNOS and VEGF were correlated with microvascular density and tumor malignancy. Conclusion: This finding suggests that eNOS and VEGF may have cooperative effect in tumor angiogenesis and play an important role in the pathogenesis of primary astrocytoma. PMID:15973775

  20. Everolimus Treatment for an Early Infantile Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma With Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    PubMed

    Fukumura, Shinobu; Watanabe, Toshihide; Takayama, Rumiko; Minagawa, Kimio; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-01

    Subependymal giant cell astrocytomas are benign tumors often observed with tuberous sclerosis complex. These tumors are rarely diagnosed during fetal life or early infancy. Until recently, the only available treatment has been surgical resection. Current clinical research has demonstrated that everolimus can induce these tumors' regression. We report a 19-month-old boy with tuberous sclerosis complex. At 2 months of age, he presented with congenital subependymal giant cell astrocytoma that was complicated by refractory epilepsy and severe mental retardation. Treatment with everolimus was started when he was 10 months old. Three months after initiating everolimus, the tumor was significantly reduced in size, and the reduction was subsequently maintained. His seizures decreased and he showed cognitive and developmental improvement. No severe adverse events have been observed to date. Everolimus has promise as an effective alternative to surgery for subependymal giant cell astrocytomas during early infancy.

  1. Tandem duplication producing a novel oncogenic BRAF fusion gene defines the majority of pilocytic astrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Jones, David T. W.; Kocialkowski, Sylvia; Liu, Lu; Pearson, Danita M.; Bäcklund, L. Magnus; Ichimura, Koichi; Collins, V. Peter

    2008-01-01

    Brain tumours are the commonest solid tumours of childhood, and pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs) are the most common central nervous system tumour in 5-19 year-olds. Little is known about the genetic alterations underlying their development. Here we describe a tandem duplication of ∼2Mb at 7q34 occurring in 66% of pilocytic astrocytomas. This rearrangement, which was not observed in a series of 244 higher-grade astrocytomas, results in an in-frame fusion gene incorporating the kinase domain of the BRAF oncogene. We further show that the resulting fusion protein has constitutive BRAF kinase activity, and is able to transform NIH3T3 cells. This is the first report of BRAF activation through rearrangement as a frequent feature in a sporadic tumor. The frequency and specificity of this change underline its potential both as a therapeutic target and a diagnostic tool. PMID:18974108

  2. Expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors in astrocytomas: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Cléciton Braga; Gomes-Braga, Francisca das Chagas Sheyla Almeida; Costa-Silva, Danylo Rafhael; Escórcio-Dourado, Carla Solange; Borges, Umbelina Soares; Conde, Airton Mendes; da Conceição Barros-Oliveira, Maria; Sousa, Emerson Brandão; da Rocha Barros, Lorena; Martins, Luana Mota; Facina, Gil; da-Silva, Benedito Borges

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common type of primary central nervous system neoplasm. Astrocytomas are the most prevalent type of glioma and these tumors may be influenced by sex steroid hormones. A literature review for the presence of estrogen and progesterone receptors in astrocytomas was conducted in the PubMed database using the following MeSH terms: “estrogen receptor beta” OR “estrogen receptor alpha” OR “estrogen receptor antagonists” OR “progesterone receptors” OR “astrocytoma” OR “glioma” OR “glioblastoma”. Among the 111 articles identified, 13 studies met our inclusion criteria. The majority of reports showed the presence of estrogen and progesterone receptors in astrocytomas. Overall, higher tumor grades were associated with decreased estrogen receptor expression and increased progesterone receptor expression. PMID:27626480

  3. Rituximab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated High- or High-Intermediate-Risk Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma

  4. Oblimersen Sodium and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-10-11

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma

  5. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Recurrent or Unresectable Pilocytic Astrocytoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hallemeier, Christopher L.; Pollock, Bruce E.; Schomberg, Paula J.; Link, Michael J.; Brown, Paul D.; Stafford, Scott L.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To report the outcomes in patients with recurrent or unresectable pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) treated with Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of 18 patients (20 lesions) with biopsy-confirmed PA having SRS at our institution from 1992 through 2005. Results: The median patient age at SRS was 23 years (range, 4-56). Thirteen patients (72%) had undergone one or more previous surgical resections, and 10 (56%) had previously received external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT). The median SRS treatment volume was 9.1 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.7-26.7). The median tumor margin dose was 15 Gy (range, 12-20). The median follow-up was 8.0 years (range, 0.5-15). Overall survival at 1, 5, and 10 years after SRS was 94%, 71%, and 71%, respectively. Tumor progression (local solid progression, n = 4; local solid progression + distant, n = 1; distant, n = 2; cyst development/progression, n = 4) was noted in 11 patients (61%). Progression-free survival at 1, 5, and 10 years was 65%, 41%, and 17%, respectively. Prior EBRT was associated with inferior overall survival (5-year risk, 100% vs. 50%, p = 0.03) and progression-free survival (5-year risk, 71% vs. 20%, p = 0.008). Nine of 11 patients with tumor-related symptoms improved after SRS. Symptomatic edema after SRS occurred in 8 patients (44%), which resolved with short-term corticosteroid therapy in the majority of those without early disease progression. Conclusions: SRS has low permanent radiation-related morbidity and durable local tumor control, making it a meaningful treatment option for patients with recurrent or unresectable PA in whom surgery and/or EBRT has failed.

  6. Fragile X mental retardation protein promotes astrocytoma proliferation via the MEK/ERK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Hao, Zhuofang; Long, Yuesheng; Chen, Shengqiang; Su, Hang; Yuan, Zhongmin; Xu, Meng; Chen, Jingqi

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) expression and astrocytoma characteristics. Methods Pathologic grade and expressions of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), Ki67 (proliferation marker), and FMRP were determined in astrocytoma specimens from 74 patients. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was undertaken. Pathologic grade and protein levels of FMRP were determined in 24 additional patients with astrocytoma and 6 controls (cerebral trauma). In cultured U251 and U87 cell lines, the effects of FMRP knock-down on cell proliferation, AKT/mTOR/GSK-3β and MEK/ERK signaling were studied. The effects of FMRP knock-down on the volumes and weights of U251 cell-derived orthotopic tumors in mice were investigated. Results In patients, FMRP expression was increased in grade IV (5.1-fold, P<0.01) and grade III (3.2-fold, P<0.05) astrocytoma, compared with controls. FMRP and Ki67 expressions were positively correlated (R2=0.877, P<0.001). Up-regulation of FMRP was associated with poorer survival among patients with FMRP integrated optical density >30 (P<0.01). In astrocytoma cell lines, FMRP knock-down slowed proliferation (P<0.05), inhibited total MEK levels P<0.05, and reduced phosphorylation of MEK (Ser217/221) and ERK (Thr202/Tyr204) (P<0.05). In mice with orthotopic tumors, FMRP knock-down decreased FMRP and Ki67 expressions, and reduced tumor volume and weight (36.3% or 61.5% on day 15, both P<0.01). Also, phosphorylation of MEK (Ser217/221) and ERK (Thr202/Tyr204), and total MEK in xenografts were decreased in sh-FMRP xenografts compared with non-transfected ones (all P<0.05). Conclusion Enhanced FMRP expression in astrocytoma may promote proliferation through activation of MEK/ERK signaling. PMID:27683117

  7. MRI in treatment of adult gliomas.

    PubMed

    Henson, John W; Gaviani, Paola; Gonzalez, R Gilberto

    2005-03-01

    Diffuse astrocytomas of the adult cerebral hemispheres are unique among tumours in human beings in the extent to which their imaging features are related to histopathological characteristics and clinical behaviour. However, understanding is still restricted about the value of imaging features in the measurement of response and of progression in these tumours. The present approach used in clinical trials, which consists of an anatomical measurement of the enhancing tumour on MRI, has many problems, and might not be acceptable as a surrogate endpoint for survival in patients with glioblastoma who are enrolled in clinical trials. Dynamic imaging techniques, such as capillary permeability mapping, are being used in studies of new drugs that target specific molecular features of gliomas; however, the validity of these techniques has not been elucidated. Diffusion imaging can be valuable for fibre-tract mapping to assist surgical planning and might become useful in measuring early response to treatment in densely cellular tumours. Functional imaging techniques can be used to localise motor, sensory, and language-control areas before surgery. Intraoperative MRI has produced improvements in the extent of tumour resection, and molecular imaging is another technique on the horizon, which could come to have a role in clinical trials in the near future. Thus, as a rapidly expanding sphere of investigation, brain-tumour imaging is producing great excitement. The aim of these new techniques is to aid the identification of more effective treatments.

  8. Pilomyxoid astrocytoma with involvement of the sella turcica in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Alimohamadi, Maysam; Bidabadi, Mohammad Shirani; Ayan, Zahra; Ketabchi, Ebrahim; Amirjamshidi, Abbas

    2009-12-01

    Pilomyxoid astrocytoma (PMA) is a recently described tumor typically occurring in the hypothalamic-chiasmatic region of very young children. PMA is characterized by a more aggressive course than pilocytic astrocytoma and exhibits certain differing histological features. We report a PMA in an adolescent patient with visual field disturbance. Imaging studies revealed enlargement of the sella turcica due to a homogenously enhancing sellar and suprasellar mass identifiable both on CT scans and MRI. We believe that PMA may be included in the list of differential diagnoses of the lesions expanding the sella turcica.

  9. Time-resolved diffuse reflectance measurement carried out on the head of an adult at large source-detector separation.

    PubMed

    Liebert, Adam; Sawosz, Piotr; Kacprzak, Michal; Weigl, Wojciech; Botwicz, Marcin; Maniewski, Roman

    2010-01-01

    Multichannel time-resolved optical monitoring system was constructed for measurements of diffuse reflectance in optically turbid medium at very large source-detector separation up to 9 cm. The system is based on femtosecond TiSa laser and sensitive photomultiplier tube detector. The laser light of 300mW of power was delivered to the surface of the head with the use of an optical fiber. A beam expander was applied in order to distribute the laser light on a large spot which allowed to avoid energetic stimulation of the tissue. The photomultiplier tube detector was positioned directly on the surface of the medium at the distance of 9cm from the center of the source position. In this paper we report results of an in-vivo experiment carried out on the head of an adult healthy volunteer. The time-resolved system was applied during intravenous injection of an optical contrast agent (indocyanine green - ICG) and the distributions of times of flight of photons were successfully acquired showing inflow and washout of the dye to the tissue. Time-courses of the moments of distributions of times of flight of photons are presented and compared with the results obtained simultaneously at shorter source-detector separations (3 cm, 4 cm and 5 cm).

  10. Assessment of a multi-layered diffuse correlation spectroscopy method for monitoring cerebral blood flow in adults

    PubMed Central

    Verdecchia, Kyle; Diop, Mamadou; Lee, Albert; Morrison, Laura B.; Lee, Ting-Yim; St. Lawrence, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) is a promising technique for brain monitoring as it can provide a continuous signal that is directly related to cerebral blood flow (CBF); however, signal contamination from extracerebral tissue can cause flow underestimations. The goal of this study was to investigate whether a multi-layered (ML) model that accounts for light propagation through the different tissue layers could successfully separate scalp and brain flow when applied to DCS data acquired at multiple source-detector distances. The method was first validated with phantom experiments. Next, experiments were conducted in a pig model of the adult head with a mean extracerebral tissue thickness of 9.8 ± 0.4 mm. Reductions in CBF were measured by ML DCS and computed tomography perfusion for validation; excellent agreement was observed by a mean difference of 1.2 ± 4.6% (CI95%: −31.1 and 28.6) between the two modalities, which was not significantly different. PMID:27699127

  11. IDH-1R132H mutation status in diffuse glioma patients: implications for classification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng-Fei; Liu, Ning; Song, Hong-Wang; Yao, Kun; Jiang, Tao; Li, Shou-Wei; Yan, Chang-Xiang

    2016-05-24

    WHO2007 grading of diffuse gliomas in adults is well-established. However, IDH mutations make classification of gliomas according to the WHO2007 edition controversial. Here, we characterized IDH-1R132H mut status in a cohort of 670 adult patients with different WHO2007 grades of diffuse glioma. Patient characteristics, clinical data and prognoses were obtained from medical records. Patients with IDH-1R132H mut were younger and had better clinical outcomes than those without mutations. Differences in age among patients with astrocytomas of different WHO2007 grades were eliminated after patients were grouped based on IDH-1R132H status. IDH-1R132H mut was present more often in patients with lower Ki-67 and MGMT protein levels and higher mutant p53 levels. Ki-67 was also strongly associated with WHO2007 grade independently of IDH-1R132H mut status. Moreover, patients with Ki-67<30 survived longer than those with Ki-67≥30, regardless of IDH-1R132H mut status. Patients in the IDH-1R132H mut group with lower MGMT protein levels also had better clinical outcomes than those in other groups. Our results indicate that to better treat gliomas, IDH mutation status should be included when determining WHO2007 grade in glioma patients.

  12. Pneumopathie interstitielle diffuse révélant la leucémie-lymphome à cellules T de l’adulte HTLV1+

    PubMed Central

    Bouanani, Nouama; Lamchahab, Mouna

    2016-01-01

    La leucémie/lymphome à cellules T de l'adulte est une prolifération tumorale de cellules lymphoïdes T matures activées, dont l'agent étiologique est le rétrovirus humain T cell-leukemia virus type 1, ce virus entraine rarement des désordres inflammatoires bronchioloalveolaires. Nous rapportons l'observation d'un patient hospitalisé pour une pneumopathie interstitielle diffuse et dont le bilan étiologique a révélé une leucémie lymphome à cellules T de l'adulte HTLV1+. PMID:28292112

  13. Bevacizumab and Cediranib Maleate in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumor, Lymphoma, Intracranial Glioblastoma, Gliosarcoma or Anaplastic Astrocytoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-14

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV

  14. Pseudoprogression in children, adolescents and young adults with non-brainstem high grade glioma and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma.

    PubMed

    Carceller, Fernando; Fowkes, Lucy A; Khabra, Komel; Moreno, Lucas; Saran, Frank; Burford, Anna; Mackay, Alan; Jones, David T W; Hovestadt, Volker; Marshall, Lynley V; Vaidya, Sucheta; Mandeville, Henry; Jerome, Neil; Bridges, Leslie R; Laxton, Ross; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Pfister, Stefan M; Leach, Martin O; Pearson, Andrew D J; Jones, Chris; Koh, Dow-Mu; Zacharoulis, Stergios

    2016-08-01

    Pseudoprogression (PsP) is a treatment-related phenomenon which hinders response interpretation. Its prevalence and clinical impact have not been evaluated in children/adolescents. We assessed the characteristics, risk factors and prognosis of PsP in children/adolescents and young-adults diagnosed with non-brainstem high grade gliomas (HGG) and diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPG). Patients aged 1-21 years diagnosed with HGG or DIPG between 1995 and 2012 who had completed radiotherapy were eligible. PsP was assessed according to study-specific criteria and correlated with first-line treatment, molecular biomarkers and survival. Ninety-one patients (47 HGG, 44 DIPG) were evaluable. Median age: 10 years (range, 2-20). Eleven episodes of PsP were observed in 10 patients (4 HGG, 6 DIPG). Rates of PsP: 8.5 % (HGG); 13.6 % (DIPG). Two episodes of PsP were based on clinical findings alone; nine episodes had concurrent radiological changes: increased size of lesions (n = 5), new focal enhancement (n = 4). Temozolomide, MGMT methylation or H3F3A mutations were not found to be associated with increased occurrence of PsP. For HGG, 1-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 41.9 % no-PsP versus 100 % PsP (p = 0.041); differences in 1-year overall survival (OS) were not significant. For DIPG, differences in 1-year PFS and OS were not statistically significant. Hazard ratio (95 %CI) of PsP for OS was 0.551 (0.168-1.803; p = 0.325) in HGG; and 0.308 (0.107-0.882; p = 0.028) in DIPG. PsP occurred in both pediatric HGG and DIPG patients at a comparable rate to adult HGG. PsP was associated with improved 1-yr PFS in HGG patients. PsP had a protective effect upon OS in DIPG patients.

  15. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) findings in adult civilian, military, and sport-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI): a systematic critical review.

    PubMed

    Asken, Breton Michael; DeKosky, Steven T; Clugston, James R; Jaffee, Michael S; Bauer, Russell M

    2017-03-24

    This review seeks to summarize diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies that have evaluated structural changes attributed to the mechanisms of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in adult civilian, military, and athlete populations. Articles from 2002 to 2016 were retrieved from PubMed/MEDLINE, EBSCOhost, and Google Scholar, using a Boolean search string containing the following terms: "diffusion tensor imaging", "diffusion imaging", "DTI", "white matter", "concussion", "mild traumatic brain injury", "mTBI", "traumatic brain injury", and "TBI". We added studies not identified by this method that were found via manually-searched reference lists. We identified 86 eligible studies from English-language journals using, adult, human samples. Studies were evaluated based on duration between injury and DTI assessment, categorized as acute, subacute/chronic, remote mTBI, and repetitive brain trauma considerations. Since changes in brain structure after mTBI can also be affected by other co-occurring medical and demographic factors, we also briefly review DTI studies that have addressed socioeconomic status factors (SES), major depressive disorder (MDD), and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The review describes population-specific risks and the complications of clinical versus pathophysiological outcomes of mTBI. We had anticipated that the distinct population groups (civilian, military, and athlete) would require separate consideration, and various aspects of the study characteristics supported this. In general, study results suggested widespread but inconsistent differences in white matter diffusion metrics (primarily fractional anisotropy [FA], mean diffusivity [MD], radial diffusivity [RD], and axial diffusivity [AD]) following mTBI/concussion. Inspection of study designs and results revealed potential explanations for discrepant DTI findings, such as control group variability, analytic techniques, the manner in which regional differences were reported, and

  16. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-b in human astrocytoma.

    PubMed Central

    Gollmer, J. C.; Ladoux, A.; Gioanni, J.; Paquis, P.; Dubreuil, A.; Chatel, M.; Frelin, C.

    2000-01-01

    Growth of human malignant gliomas is stringently dependent on an angiogenic process that probably involves vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Expressions of mRNA coding for the different forms of VEGF were analyzed in surgical specimens from human astrocytomas. Low levels of placental growth factor (PGF) and VEGFC mRNA were observed in polymerase chain reaction, but not in Northern blot experiments. VEGF mRNA was found in some but not all grade and grade IV astrocytomas. VEGFB mRNA was observed in all tissue samples analyzed irrespective of the tumor grade. A new splice variant of VEGFB (VEGFB155) that lacks exons 5 and 6 is described. Expressions of VEGF mRNA in cultured glioblastomas cells were upregulated by hypoxia, but the sensitivity of the cells to hypoxia was reduced as compared with normal rat astrocytes. VEGF expression was depressed by dexamethasone. Expressions of VEGFB mRNA were affected neither by hypoxia nor by dexamethasone. The results indicate a coexpression of VEGF mRNA and VEGFB mRNA in human astrocytomas. Expression of VEGFB is markedly different from that of VEGF. Possible roles of VEGFB as a cofactor for hypoxia-induced angiogenesis in human astrocytomas are discussed. PMID:11303624

  17. Preliminary observations on genetic alterations in pilocytic astrocytomas associated with neurofibromatosis 1.

    PubMed Central

    Tada, Kenji; Kochi, Masato; Saya, Hideyuki; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi; Shiraishi, Shoji; Kamiryo, Takanori; Shinojima, Naoki; Ushio, Yukitaka

    2003-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominant disorder that predisposes sufferers to various forms of neoplasia. Among affected individuals, 15%-20% develop astrocytomas, especially pilocytic astrocytomas (PA), which are benign and classified as grade I by the World Health Organization. They are generally well circumscribed, and their progression is slow. NF1-associated PAs (NF1-PAs) occasionally behave as aggressive tumors. To elucidate underlying genetic events in clinically progressive NF1-PAs, we performed molecular genetic analysis on 12 PAs, including 3 NF1-PAs, for pS3, p16, and epidermal growth factor receptor genes, as well as loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on chromosome 1p, 10, 17, and 19q. None of the obvious genetic alterations typically seen in higher grade astrocytomas were found in 9 sporadic PAs. However, in 2 of 3 NF1-PAs, microsatellite analysis showed LOH10, including the PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) gene locus, despite the diagnosis of pilocytic astrocytoma;one of these also manifested homozygous deletion of the p16 gene. The other NF1-PA harbored only LOH of the NF1 gene locus (17q). Our preliminary results support the hypothesis that some NF1-PAs differ genetically from sporadic PAs. PMID:14565158

  18. Impaired tooth root development after treatment of a cerebellar astrocytoma: A case report

    SciTech Connect

    Eckles, T.A.; Kalkwarf, K.L.

    1989-10-01

    A young man, previously treated by surgical resection of a grade III cerebellar astrocytoma in combination with irradiation and chemotherapy, was found to display severe generalized root agenesis. This patient also exhibited secondary hypothyroidism and decreased levels of growth hormone. These factors are discussed in relation to their possible role in impaired root development.

  19. Spatial orientation deficit in children due to cerebellum astrocytoma pediatric tumor obtained by means of the Attentional Network Test.

    PubMed

    Quintero-Gallego, E A; Gómez, C M; Morales, M; Márquez, J

    2011-10-31

    Cerebellum astrocytomas are the most typical nervous system tumors in children. Several cognitive deficits have been previously described. These deficits are probably produced by cerebellar connection and gray matter damage. The present study examines attentional deficits in children operated on for cerebellum astrocytomas, using an attentional paradigm with theoretical and clinical bases: the Attentional Network Test (ANT). This test was designed considering the attentional network theory proposed by Posner, and its usefulness has been demonstrated in clinical settings. Children operated on for cerebellar astrocytoma showed a mild attentional deficit in the orientation network.

  20. Exposure to ELF-pulse modulated X band microwaves increases in vitro human astrocytoma cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Castejón, C; Pérez-Bruzón, R N; Llorente, M; Pes, N; Lacasa, C; Figols, T; Lahoz, M; Maestú, C; Vera-Gil, A; Del Moral, A; Azanza, M J

    2009-12-01

    Common concern about the biological effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) is increasing with the expansion of X-band microwaves (MW). The purpose of our work was to determine whether exposure to MW pulses in this range can induce toxic effects on human astrocytoma cells. Cultured astrocytoma cells (Clonetics line 1321N1) were submitted to 9.6 GHz carrier, 90% amplitude modulated by extremely low frequency (ELF)-EMF pulses inside a Gigahertz Transversal Electromagnetic Mode cell (GTEM-cell). Astrocytoma cultures were maintained inside a GTEM-incubator in standard culture conditions at 37+/-0.1 degrees C, 5% CO2, in a humidified atmosphere. Two experimental conditions were applied with field parameters respectively of: PW 100-120 ns; PRF 100-800 Hz; PRI 10-1.25 ms; power 0.34-0.60 mW; electric field strength 1.25-1.64 V/m; magnetic field peak amplitude 41.4-54.6 microOe. SAR was calculated to be 4.0 x 10-4 W/Kg. Astrocytoma samples were grown in a standard incubator. Reaching 70-80% confluence, cells were transferred to a GTEM-incubator. Experimental procedure included exposed human astrocytoma cells to MW for 15, 30, 60 min and 24 h and unexposed sham-control samples. Double blind method was applied. Our results showed that cytoskeleton proteins, cell morphology and viability were not modified. Statistically significant results showed increased cell proliferation rate under 24h MW exposure. Hsp-70 and Bcl-2 antiapoptotic proteins were observed in control and treated samples, while an increased expression of connexin 43 proteins was found in exposed samples. The implication of these results on increased proliferation is the subject of our current research.

  1. Concurrent TERT promoter and BRAF V600E mutation in epithelioid glioblastoma and concomitant low-grade astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Nozomi; Nakajima, Nozomi; Yamazaki, Tatsuya; Nagano, Takuro; Kagoshima, Kaie; Nobusawa, Sumihito; Ikota, Hayato; Yokoo, Hideaki

    2017-02-01

    Epithelioid glioblastoma (E-GBM) is a rare variant of glioblastoma (GBM), characterized by epithelioid cells with eosinophilic round cytoplasm devoid of stellate cytoplasmic processes. A number of studies have demonstrated that more than half of E-GBMs harbor a valine to glutamic acid substitution at position 600 of the serine/threonine-protein kinase BRAF (BRAF V600E). However, there are no previous reports on E-GBM with telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutation in addition to BRAF V600E mutation. Here, we report an E-GBM case in an 18-year-old man with BRAF V600E and TERT promoter mutations. The tumor composed of 80% E-GBM and 20% diffuse astrocytoma-like components, and BRAF V600E and TERT promoter mutations were detected in both. E-GBM generally arises as a primary lesion; however, a few previous cases have been demonstrated to accompany low-grade areas. Demonstration of concurrent BRAF V600E and TERT promoter mutations in low- and high-grade lesions strongly suggested their identical origin, and acquisition of each mutation may be an early event, possibly playing a pivotal role in the genesis and subsequent progression to E-GBM.

  2. Is Upregulation of Aquaporin 4-M1 Isoform Responsible for the Loss of Typical Orthogonal Arrays of Particles in Astrocytomas?

    PubMed Central

    Fallier-Becker, Petra; Nieser, Maike; Wenzel, Ulrike; Ritz, Rainer; Noell, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The astrocytic endfoot membranes of the healthy blood-brain barrier—contacting the capillary—are covered with a large number of the water channel aquaporin 4 (AQP4). They form orthogonal arrays of particles (OAPs), which consist of AQP4 isoform M1 and M23. Under pathologic conditions, AQP4 is distributed over the whole cell and no or only small OAPs are found. From cell culture experiments, it is known that cells transfected only with AQP4-M1 do not form OAPs or only small ones. We hypothesized that in astrocytomas the situation may be comparable to the in vitro experiments expecting an upregulation of AQP4-M1. Quantitative Real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) of different graded astrocytomas revealed an upregulation of both isoforms AQP4 M1 and M23 in all astrocytomas investigated. In freeze fracture replicas of low-grade malignancy astrocytomas, more OAPs than in high-grade malignancy astrocytomas were found. In vitro, cultured glioma cells did not express AQP4, whereas healthy astrocytes revealed a slight upregulation of both isoforms and only a few OAPs in freeze fracture analysis. Taken together, we found a correlation between the decrease of OAPs and increasing grade of malignancy of astrocytomas but this was not consistent with an upregulation of AQP4-M1 in relation to AQP4 M23. PMID:27483250

  3. Combination Chemo, Rituximab, and Bevacizumab in Older Patients With Stage II-IV Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-06

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma

  4. Cannabinoid and cannabinoid-like receptors in microglia, astrocytes and astrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Stella, Nephi

    2010-01-01

    CB1 and CB2 receptors are activated by a plethora of cannabinoid compounds, be they endogenously-produced, plant-derived or synthetic. These receptors are expressed by microglia, astrocytes and astrocytomas, and their activation regulates these cells’ differentiation, functions and viability. Recent studies show that glial cells also express cannabinoid-like receptors, and that their activation regulates different cell functions, but also control cell viability. This review summarizes this evidence, and discusses how selective compounds targeting cannabinoid-like receptors constitute promising therapeutics to manage neuroinflammation and eradicate malignant astrocytomas. Importantly, the selective targeting of cannabinoid-like receptors should provide therapeutic relieve without inducing the typical psychotropic effects and possible addictive properties associated with the use of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main psychotropic ingredient produced by the plant Cannabis sativa. PMID:20468046

  5. Leptomeningeal dissemination of pilocytic astrocytoma in a 17-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Jandaghi, Ali BabaeI; Bidabadi, Elham; Saadat, Seyed; Alijani, Babak; Daliri, Saeid; Reyhanian, Zoheir; Mashouf, Mehryar

    2014-01-01

    Pilocytic astrocytoma with leptomeningeal dissemination is a rare phenomenon and can be associated with obstructive hydrocephalus and an unfavorable prognosis. Herein, we report a seventeen-year-old boy with a history of ventriculo-peritoneal shunt insertion due to severe hydrocephalus who presented with progressive headache and vomiting together with ocular and cerebellar signs and symptoms. Neuroimaging confirmed the presence of multiple intracranial masses in the cerebellum and thalamus. Intracranial dissemination of tumor to the the leptomeninges was seen during neuroendoscopy. Simultaneous biopsy and endoscopic third ventriculostomy were performed and the diagnosis of low-grade pilocytic astrocytoma with leptomeningeal dissemination was made by histological examination. The patient underwent chemotherapy in combination with radiotherapy to reduce the risk of reoccurrence of the primary tumor and was followed for one year.

  6. Diffusion tensor imaging reveals adolescent binge ethanol-induced brain structural integrity alterations in adult rats that correlate with behavioral dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Vetreno, Ryan P; Yaxley, Richard; Paniagua, Beatriz; Crews, Fulton T

    2016-07-01

    Adolescence is characterized by considerable brain maturation that coincides with the development of adult behavior. Binge drinking is common during adolescence and can have deleterious effects on brain maturation because of the heightened neuroplasticity of the adolescent brain. Using an animal model of adolescent intermittent ethanol [AIE; 5.0 g/kg, intragastric, 20 percent EtOH w/v; 2 days on/2 days off from postnatal day (P)25 to P55], we assessed the adult brain structural volumes and integrity on P80 and P220 using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). While we did not observe a long-term effect of AIE on structural volumes, AIE did reduce axial diffusivity (AD) in the cerebellum, hippocampus and neocortex. Radial diffusivity (RD) was reduced in the hippocampus and neocortex of AIE-treated animals. Prior AIE treatment did not affect fractional anisotropy (FA), but did lead to long-term reductions of mean diffusivity (MD) in both the cerebellum and corpus callosum. AIE resulted in increased anxiety-like behavior and diminished object recognition memory, the latter of which was positively correlated with DTI measures. Across aging, whole brain volumes increased, as did volumes of the corpus callosum and neocortex. This was accompanied by age-associated AD reductions in the cerebellum and neocortex as well as RD and MD reductions in the cerebellum. Further, we found that FA increased in both the cerebellum and corpus callosum as rats aged from P80 to P220. Thus, both age and AIE treatment caused long-term changes to brain structural integrity that could contribute to cognitive dysfunction.

  7. Intraarterial Infusion Of Erbitux and Bevacizumab For Relapsed/Refractory Intracranial Glioma In Patients Under 22

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-12

    Glioblastoma Multiforme; Fibrillary Astrocytoma of Brain; Glioma of Brainstem; Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma; Mixed Oligodendroglioma-Astrocytoma; Brain Stem Glioma; Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

  8. [Leptomeningeal spread of an intramedullary cervical pilocytic astrocytoma: case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Jusué-Torres, I; Alcázar-Vaquerizo, L; Gómez-Angulo, J C; Navarro-Torres, R; López-Serrano, R; García-Miralles, N

    2011-10-01

    BACKGROUND. The rarest location of pilocytic astrocytoma is intramedullary. Gliomas represent up to 24 - 30% of intramedullary tumors in adulthood and are second only after ependymomas. Leptomeningeal dissemination through cerebrospinal fluid is unusual and occurs predominantly in medulloblastomas, ependymoblastomas, central neuroblastomas, ependymomas, germ cell tumors and high-grade gliomas. The majority of spinal cord gliomas reporting metastasis were anaplastic astrocytomas or glioblastomas multiforme and relatively few were low-grade gliomas. The incidence of leptomeningeal spread of low-grade tumors is rare. A rare cranial extension of brain leptomeningeal dissemination in an intramedullary pilocytic astrocytoma during adulthood is reported. CASE REPORT. A 51 year-old-man with a recurrent intramedullary mass at C5-C7 level operated 4 times with all pathological anatomy reports describing the lesion as Pilocytic Astrocytoma developed, after 15 years from the diagnosis, visual hallucinations and his level of consciousness worsened to Glasgow coma score 13/15. The MRI showed highly enhanced cranial and spinal leptomeninges and paquimeninges with a micro nodular-granulomatous aspect associated with intense affectation of basal cisterns, subarachnoid spaces and convexity of both cerebral hemispheres suggestive of leptomeningeal spread of the spinal mass. The patient expired after three days. CONCLUSION. Leptomeningeal spread is a rare phenomenon and when it happens usually doesn't change the primary tumor's behavior. In our case the aggressiveness could be explained by a potential malignization of the primary tumor that it was not documented because of the partial resections from the lasts surgeries or instead the tumor was actually a monomorphous pilomyxoid tumor.

  9. TP53 codon 72 polymorphism may predict early tumour progression in paediatric pilocytic astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Mascelli, Samantha; Nozza, Paolo; Jones, David T.W.; Colin, Carole; Pistorio, Angela; Milanaccio, Claudia; Ravegnani, Marcello; Consales, Alessandro; Witt, Olaf; Morana, Giovanni; Cama, Armando; Capra, Valeria; Biassoni, Roberto; Pfister, Stefan M.; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Garrè, Maria Luisa; Raso, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Pilocytic astrocytoma and ganglioglioma may occur in inaccessible or surgically difficult areas. In case of incomplete resection, the availability of biological predictors of tumour progression could be particularly important. To this end, an analysis of p53 codon 72 polymorphism and assessment of its role as prognostic marker were performed. The status of the p53 Arg72Pro polymorphism was evaluated by pyrosequencing method in a multicenter cohort of 170 paediatric patients. Genotype/phenotype associations were investigated either by means of bivariate or multivariate analyses. In the partially resected pilocytic astrocytomas, the Arg/Arg variant predicts early tumour progression (median survival time: 23.1 months) and is associated with poor event-free survival (p value = 0.0009). This finding remains true also in case of adjuvant therapies, with a 5-year event-free survival of 30.6% for cases with Arg/Arg variant vs. 78.7% for those with other genotypes. There is no association between ganglioglioma and the polymorphism. The assessment of Arg/Arg variant could improve the management of pilocytic astrocytoma. TP53 codon 72 analysis could distinguish low-risk cases, in which surgery could be conservative, from high-risk cases needing an aggressive surgery plan. PMID:27374106

  10. Somatic neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) inactivation characterizes NF1-associated pilocytic astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Gutmann, David H; McLellan, Michael D; Hussain, Ibrahim; Wallis, John W; Fulton, Lucinda L; Fulton, Robert S; Magrini, Vincent; Demeter, Ryan; Wylie, Todd; Kandoth, Cyriac; Leonard, Jeffrey R; Guha, Abhijit; Miller, Christopher A; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R

    2013-03-01

    Low-grade brain tumors (pilocytic astrocytomas) arising in the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) inherited cancer predisposition syndrome are hypothesized to result from a combination of germline and acquired somatic NF1 tumor suppressor gene mutations. However, genetically engineered mice (GEM) in which mono-allelic germline Nf1 gene loss is coupled with bi-allelic somatic (glial progenitor cell) Nf1 gene inactivation develop brain tumors that do not fully recapitulate the neuropathological features of the human condition. These observations raise the intriguing possibility that, while loss of neurofibromin function is necessary for NF1-associated low-grade astrocytoma development, additional genetic changes may be required for full penetrance of the human brain tumor phenotype. To identify these potential cooperating genetic mutations, we performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS) analysis of three NF1-associated pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) tumors. We found that the mechanism of somatic NF1 loss was different in each tumor (frameshift mutation, loss of heterozygosity, and methylation). In addition, tumor purity analysis revealed that these tumors had a high proportion of stromal cells, such that only 50%-60% of cells in the tumor mass exhibited somatic NF1 loss. Importantly, we identified no additional recurrent pathogenic somatic mutations, supporting a model in which neuroglial progenitor cell NF1 loss is likely sufficient for PA formation in cooperation with a proper stromal environment.

  11. MicroRNA-542-3p Suppresses Tumor Cell Invasion via Targeting AKT Pathway in Human Astrocytoma*

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Junchao; Zhao, JingJing; Zhang, Nu; Xu, Xiaonan; Li, Rong; Yi, Yang; Fang, Lishan; Zhang, Le; Li, Mengfeng; Wu, Jueheng; Zhang, Heng

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanism underlying constitutive activation of AKT signaling, which plays essential roles in astrocytoma progression, is not fully characterized. Increasing numbers of studies have reported that microRNAs are involved in the malignant behavior of astrocytoma cells via directly targeting multiple oncogenes or tumor suppressors. Here, we found that microRNA (miR)-542-3p expression was decreased in glioblastoma cell lines and astrocytoma tissues, and reduced levels of miR-542-3p expression correlated with high histopathological grades and poor prognosis of astrocytoma patients. Exogenous miR-542-3p suppressed glioblastoma cell invasion through not only targeting AKT1 itself but also directly down-regulating its two important upstream regulators, namely, integrin-linked kinase and PIK3R1. Notably, overexpressing miR-542-3p decreased AKT1 phosphorylation and directly and indirectly repressed nuclear translocation and transactivation activity of β-catenin to exert its anti-invasive effect. Furthermore, the miR-542-3p expression level negatively correlated with AKT activity as well as levels of integrin-linked kinase and PIK3R1 in human astrocytoma specimens. These findings suggest that miR-542-3p acts as a negative regulator in astrocytoma progression and that miR-542-3p down-regulation contributes to aberrant activation of AKT signaling, leaving open the possibility that miR-542-3p may be a potential therapeutic target for high grade astrocytoma. PMID:26286747

  12. Co-expression modules of NF1, PTEN and sprouty enable distinction of adult diffuse gliomas according to pathway activities of receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yang; Wu, Chenxing; Yao, Kun; Zhang, Chuanbao; Jin, Qiang; Huang, Rong; Li, Jiuyi; Sun, Yingyu; Su, Xiaodong; Jiang, Tao; Fan, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Inter-individual variability causing elevated signaling of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) may have hampered the efficacy of targeted therapies. We developed a molecular signature for clustering adult diffuse gliomas based on the extent of RTK pathway activities. Glioma gene modules co-expressed with NF1 (NF1-M), Sprouty (SPRY-M) and PTEN (PTEN-M) were identified, their signatures enabled robust clustering of adult diffuse gliomas of WHO grades II-IV from five independent data sets into two subtypes with distinct activities of RAS-RAF-MEK-MAPK cascade and PI3K-AKT pathway (named RMPAhigh and RMPAlow subtypes) in a morphology-independent manner. The RMPAhigh gliomas were associated with poor prognosis compared to the RMPAlow gliomas. The RMPAhigh and RMPAlow glioma subtypes harbored unique sets of genomic alterations in the RTK signaling-related genes. The RMPAhigh gliomas were enriched in immature vessel cells and tumor associated macrophages, and both cell types expressed high levels of pro-angiogenic RTKs including MET, VEGFR1, KDR, EPHB4 and NRP1. In gliomas with major genomic lesions unrelated to RTK pathway, high RMPA signature was associated with short survival. Thus, the RMPA signatures capture RTK activities in both glioma cells and glioma microenvironment, and RTK signaling in the glioma microenvironment contributes to glioma progression. PMID:27385209

  13. Evaluating the effects of diffused lavender in an adult day care center for patients with dementia in an effort to decrease behavioral issues: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Moorman Li, Robin; Gilbert, Brian; Orman, Anna; Aldridge, Petra; Leger-Krall, Sue; Anderson, Clare; Hincapie Castillo, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: To evaluate the effects of diffused lavender on the frequency of behavioral issues [BIs], defined as a composite of restlessness/wandering [RW], agitation [AGT], anger [ANG], and anxiety [ANX] in an adult day care center. Secondary objectives evaluate systematic differences on the frequency of BIs between age cohorts, gender, and individual behaviors. Design: Pre-post quasi-experimental study. Setting: Private nonprofit adult day care center for patients with dementia. Participants: Elderly patients older than 65 years of age with a clinical diagnosis of dementia, who require daytime monitoring. Intervention: Lavender aromatherapy twice a day for 20 min during a two-month period during active clinic days. Measurements: Behavioral issues were recorded using the behavior/intervention monthly flow record during the pre- and post-intervention periods. Results: There was no significant difference on frequency of BIs between pre-intervention and post-intervention periods (p = .06). There was a significant difference between pre-intervention and post-intervention total number of AGT occurrences (129 vs. 25; p value < .01). There was no significant difference between age cohorts for computed difference of RW, ANG, and ANX issues. There was a significant difference between age cohorts for computed difference of AGT (p value = .04) as the 70–85 age cohort showed less agitation compared to the 85–100 age cohort. Conclusion: The use of diffused lavender twice daily has shown to reduce the frequency of agitation in elderly patients with dementia, especially in the 70–85 age cohort. Though diffused lavender did not show statistical differences in the frequency of other behaviors (restlessness/wander, anger, anxiety), the study population may have been too small to find a difference. PMID:28265482

  14. Inhibition of MEK Confers Hypersensitivity to X-radiation in the context of BRAF mutation in a Model of Childhood Astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Studebaker, Adam; Bondra, Kathryn; Seum, Star; Shen, Changxian; Phelps, Doris A.; Chronowski, Christopher; Leasure, Justin; Smith, Paul D.; Kurmasheva, Raushan T.; Mo, Xiaokui; Fouladi, Maryam; Houghton, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Curative therapy for childhood glioma presents challenges when complete resection is not possible. Patients with recurrent low-grade tumors or anaplastic astrocytoma may receive radiation treatment, however, the long-term sequellae from radiation treatment can be severe. As many childhood gliomas are associated with activation of BRAF, we have explored the combination of ionizing radiation with MEK inhibition in a model of BRAF-mutant anaplastic astrocytoma. Experimental Design The regulation of TORC1 signaling by BRAF was examined in BT-40 (BRAF mutant) and BT-35 (BRAF wild type) xenografts, in a cell line derived from the BT-40 xenograft and two adult BRAF mutant glioblastoma cell lines. The effect of MEK inhibition (selumetinib), XRT (total dose10 Gy as 2 Gy daily fractions), or the combination of selumetinib and XRT was evaluated in subcutaneous BT-40 xenografts. Results Inhibition of MEK signaling by selumetinib, suppressed TORC1 signaling only in the context of the BRAF-mutant both in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of MEK signaling in BT-40 cells or in xenografts lead to a complete suppression of FANCD2 and conferred hypersensitivity to XRT in BT-40 xenografts without increasing local skin toxicity. Conclusions Selumetinib suppressed TORC1 signaling in the context of BRAF mutation. Selumetinib caused a rapid downregulation of FANCD2 and markedly potentiated the effect of XRT. These data suggest the possibility of potentiating the effect of XRT selectively in tumor cells by MEK inhibition in the context of mutant BRAF or maintaining tumor control at lower doses of XRT that would decrease long-term sequelae. PMID:25981859

  15. Vorinostat, Rituximab, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-08

    Stage II Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma

  16. S0349 Rituximab, Cyclophosphamide, Doxorubicin, Vincristine, and Prednisone With or Without Oblimersen in Treating Patients With Advanced Diffuse Large B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-04

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma

  17. The impact of concurrent temozolomide with adjuvant radiation and IDH mutation status among patients with anaplastic astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Kizilbash, Sani H; Giannini, Caterina; Voss, Jesse S; Decker, Paul A; Jenkins, Robert B; Hardie, John; Laack, Nadia N; Parney, Ian F; Uhm, Joon H; Buckner, Jan C

    2014-10-01

    This study assesses the controversial role of temozolomide (TMZ) concurrent with adjuvant radiation (RT) in patients with anaplastic astrocytoma (AA). The impact of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) status on therapy and outcomes is also examined. All adult patients diagnosed with AA from 2001 to 2011 and treated with standard doses of adjuvant RT were identified retrospectively for clinical data extraction. IDH status was determined by IDH1-R132H immunostain and sequencing for other mutations in IDH1/IDH2. Cumulative survival probabilities were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional hazards regression models were fit for univariable/multivariable analyses. 136 patients had received concurrent TMZ while 29 had not. Of these, IDH status was determined on 114 and 27 patients, respectively. On univariable analysis, improved five-year survival was independently associated with concurrent TMZ (46.2 vs. 29.3%, p = 0.02) and IDH mutation (78.9 vs. 22.0%, p < 0.001). IDH mutation was additionally associated with a greater likelihood of extensive resection possibly secondary to a more favorable tumor location. Gross total/subtotal resections also led to improved survival when compared to biopsy alone on univariable analysis. On multivariable analysis, the association with five-year survival persisted for both concurrent TMZ and IDH mutation, but not with extent of surgery. Both IDH mutation and concurrent TMZ are associated with improved five-year survival in patients with AA who are receiving adjuvant RT. Secondarily, the association between five-year survival and extent of resection is lost on multivariable analysis. This suggests a possible association between IDH mutation, tumor location and consequent resectability.

  18. Nuclear phosphorylated Y142 β-catenin accumulates in astrocytomas and glioblastomas and regulates cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Náger, Mireia; Santacana, Maria; Bhardwaj, Deepshikha; Valls, Joan; Ferrer, Isidre; Nogués, Pere; Cantí, Carles; Herreros, Judit

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a fast growing brain tumor characterized by extensive infiltration into the surrounding tissue and one of the most aggressive cancers. GBM is the most common glioma (originating from glial-derived cells) that either evolves from a low grade astrocytoma or appears de novo. Wnt/β-catenin and Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF)/c-Met signaling are hyperactive in human gliomas, where they regulate cell proliferation, migration and stem cell behavior. We previously demonstrated that β-catenin is phosphorylated at Y142 by recombinant c-Met kinase and downstream of HGF signaling in neurons. Here we studied phosphoY142 (PY142) β-catenin and dephospho S/T β-catenin (a classical Wnt transducer) in glioma biopsies, GBM cell lines and biopsy-derived glioma cell cultures. We found that PY142 β-catenin mainly localizes in the nucleus and signals through transcriptional activation in GBM cells. Tissue microarray analysis confirmed strong nuclear PY142 β-catenin immunostaining in astrocytoma and GBM biopsies. By contrast, active β-catenin showed nuclear localization only in GBM samples. Western blot analysis of tumor biopsies further indicated that PY142 and active β-catenin accumulate independently, correlating with the expression of Snail/Slug (an epithelial-mesenchymal transition marker) and Cyclin-D1 (a regulator of cell cycle progression), respectively, in high grade astrocytomas and GBMs. Moreover, GBM cells stimulated with HGF showed increasing levels of PY142 β-catenin and Snail/Slug. Importantly, the expression of mutant Y142F β-catenin decreased cell detachment and invasion induced by HGF in GBM cell lines and biopsy-derived cell cultures. Our results identify PY142 β-catenin as a nuclear β-catenin signaling form that downregulates adhesion and promotes GBM cell invasion. PMID:26654598

  19. The emerging role of m-TOR up-regulation in brain Astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Ryskalin, Larisa; Limanaqi, Fiona; Biagioni, Francesca; Frati, Alessandro; Esposito, Vincenzo; Calierno, Maria Teresa; Lenzi, Paola; Fornai, Francesco

    2017-05-01

    The present manuscript is an overview of various effects of mTOR up-regulation in astrocytoma with an emphasis on its deleterious effects on the proliferation of Glioblastoma Multiforme. The manuscript reports consistent evidence indicating the occurrence of mTOR up-regulation both in experimental and human astrocytoma. The grading of human astrocytoma is discussed in relationship with mTOR up-regulation. In the second part of the manuscript, the biochemical pathways under the influence of mTOR are translated to cell phenotypes which are generated by mTOR up-regulation and reverted by its inhibition. A special section is dedicated to the prominent role of autophagy in mediating the effects of mTOR in glioblastoma. In detail, autophagy inhibition produced by mTOR up-regulation determines the fate of cancer stem cells. On the other hand, biochemical findings disclose the remarkable effects of autophagy activators as powerful inducers of cell differentiation with a strong prevalence towards neuronal phenotypes. Thus, mTOR modulation acts on the neurobiology of glioblastoma just like it operates in vivo at the level of brain stem cell niches by altering autophagy-dependent cell differentiation. In the light of such a critical role of autophagy we analyzed the ubiquitin proteasome system. The merging between autophagy and proteasome generates a novel organelle, named autophagoproteasome which is strongly induced by mTOR inhibitors in glioblastoma cells. Remarkably, when mTOR is maximally inhibited the proteasome component selectively moves within autophagy vacuoles, thus making the proteasome activity dependent on the entry within autophagy compartment.

  20. Leksell Gamma Knife treatment for pilocytic astrocytomas: long-term results.

    PubMed

    Simonova, Gabriela; Kozubikova, Petra; Liscak, Roman; Novotny, Josef

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to evaluate long-term treatment results, radiation-related toxicity, and prognostic factors for the progression-free survival (PFS) of patients with pilocytic astrocytomas treated by means of stereotactic radiosurgery with a Leksell Gamma Knife. METHODS A total of 25 patients with pilocytic astrocytomas underwent Gamma Knife surgery during the period 1992-2002. The median target volume was 2700 mm(3) (range 205-25,000 mm(3)). The 18 patients treated with 5 daily fractions received a median minimum target dose of 25 Gy. Doses for the 2 patients treated with 10 fractions over 5 days (2 fractions delivered on the same day at least 6 hours apart) were 23 and 28 Gy. For the 5 patients treated with a single fraction, the minimum target dose ranged from 13 to 20 Gy (median 16 Gy). RESULTS Complete regression occurred in 10 patients (40%) and partial regression in 10 patients (40%). The 10-year overall survival rate was 96% and the 10-year PFS rate was 80%. Target volume appeared to be a significant prognostic factor for PFS (p = 0.037). Temporary Grade 3 toxicity appeared in 2 patients (8%), and these patients were treated with corticosteroids for 2 months. Permanent Grade 4 toxicity appeared in 2 patients (8%) and was associated with neurocognitive dysfunction. In these 2 individuals, the neurocognitive dysfunction was also felt to be in part the result of the additional therapeutic interventions (4 in one case and 6 in the other) required to achieve durable control of their tumors. CONCLUSIONS Radiosurgery represents an alternative treatment modality for small residual or recurrent volumes of pilocytic astrocytomas and provides long-term local control. Target volume appears to be the most important factor affecting PFS.

  1. Dual effects of mastoparan on intracellular free Ca2+ concentrations in human astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nakahata, N.; Ishimoto, H.; Mizuno, K.; Ohizumi, Y.; Nakanishi, H.

    1994-01-01

    1. The effect of mastoparan, a wasp venom toxin, on intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) was examined in human astrocytoma cells. Mastoparan inhibited [Ca2+]i induced by carbachol (100 microM) in a concentration-dependent manner in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, consistent with our previous results showing that mastoparan inhibits phosphoinositide hydrolysis in human astrocytoma cells. 2. In contrast, mastoparan itself increased [Ca2+]i and augmented carbachol-induced increase in the [Ca2+]i in the presence of extracellular Ca2+, suggesting that mastoparan elicited Ca2+ influx from the extracellular medium. The increase appeared to be maximum at extracellular Ca2+ concentrations of 0.1-0.2 mM. The higher concentrations of extracellular Ca2+ depressed the influx. 3. Pertussis toxin did not affect mastoparan-induced inhibition of [Ca2+]i in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, consistent with the previous results that pertussis toxin did not affect mastoparan-induced inhibition of phosphoinositide hydrolysis. 4. Pertussis toxin augmented mastoparan-induced increase in [Ca2+]i in the presence of extracellular Ca2+, suggesting that pertussis toxin substrate(s) seems to be inhibitory for Ca2+ influx induced by mastoparan. 5. Verapamil, nifedipine and diltiazem (each 10 microM), L-type Ca2+ antagonists, did not affect mastoparan-induced Ca2+ influx. However, verapamil (10 microM) slightly inhibited the increase in [Ca2+]i induced by carbachol in the presence of mastoparan. 6. The results obtained in the present study indicate that mastoparan has two opposite effects on [Ca2+]i in human astrocytoma cells and possibly has at least two sites of action. PMID:8032654

  2. Astrocytoma in an African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) suspected wobbly hedgehog syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Makoto; Miwa, Yasutsugu; Itou, Takuya; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Takeo

    2011-10-01

    A 28-month-old African hedgehog was referred to our hospital with progressive tetraparesis. On the first presentation, the hedgehog was suspected as having wobbly hedgehog syndrome (WHS) and the animal was treated with medication and rehabilitation. The animal died 22 days after onset. Pathological examination revealed that the animal was involved in astrocytoma between the medulla oblongata and the spinal cord (C1). This report indicates that a primary central nervous system tumor should be considered as one of the differential diagnoses for hedgehogs presenting with progressive paresis, together with WHS.

  3. Differential prefrontal-like deficit in children after cerebellar astrocytoma and medulloblastoma tumor

    PubMed Central

    Vaquero, Encarna; Gómez, Carlos M; Quintero, Eliana A; González-Rosa, Javier J; Márquez, Javier

    2008-01-01

    Background This study was realized thanks to the collaboration of children and adolescents who had been resected from cerebellar tumors. The medulloblastoma group (CE+, n = 7) in addition to surgery received radiation and chemotherapy. The astrocytoma group (CE, n = 13) did not receive additional treatments. Each clinical group was compared in their executive functioning with a paired control group (n = 12). The performances of the clinical groups with respect to controls were compared considering the tumor's localization (vermis or hemisphere) and the affectation (or not) of the dentate nucleus. Executive variables were correlated with the age at surgery, the time between surgery-evaluation and the resected volume. Methods The executive functioning was assessed by means of WCST, Complex Rey Figure, Controlled Oral Word Association Test (letter and animal categories), Digits span (WISC-R verbal scale) and Stroop test. These tests are very sensitive to dorsolateral PFC and/or to medial frontal cortex functions. The scores for the non-verbal Raven IQ were also obtained. Direct scores were corrected by age and transformed in standard scores using normative data. The neuropsychological evaluation was made at 3.25 (SD = 2.74) years from surgery in CE group and at 6.47 (SD = 2.77) in CE+ group. Results The Medulloblastoma group showed severe executive deficit (≤ 1.5 SD below normal mean) in all assessed tests, the most severe occurring in vermal patients. The Astrocytoma group also showed executive deficits in digits span, semantic fluency (animal category) and moderate to slight deficit in Stroop (word and colour) tests. In the astrocytoma group, the tumor's localization and dentate affectation showed different profile and level of impairment: moderate to slight for vermal and hemispheric patients respectively. The resected volume, age at surgery and the time between surgery-evaluation correlated with some neuropsychological executive variables. Conclusion Results

  4. Ollier disease with anaplastic astrocytoma: A review of the literature and a unique case

    PubMed Central

    Gajavelli, Srikanth; Nakhla, Jonathan; Nasser, Rani; Yassari, Reza; Weidenheim, Karen M.; Graber, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ollier disease is a rare, nonfamilial disorder that primary affects the long bones and cartilage of joints with multiple enchondromas. It is associated with a higher risk of central nervous system (CNS) malignancies; although the incidence is unknown. Case Description: Here, we present the case of a 55-year-old woman who developed an anaplastic astrocytoma with a known diagnosis of Ollier disease with a survival time of over 3 years. Conclusion: This report draws attention to the rarity of this disease and the paucity of information regarding CNS involvement in Ollier disease, as well as reviews the current literature. PMID:27656320

  5. Gelastic seizures and low-grade hypothalamic astrocytoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Giangennaro; Spagnoli, Diego; Sciscio, Nicola; Russo, Francesco; Villani, Roberto Matteo

    2002-04-01

    The typical, well recognized childhood epilepsy syndrome caused by hypothalamic hamartoma is characterized by early-onset, stereotyped attacks of uncontrollable laughter, frequent refractory seizures with progressive cognitive deterioration and severe behavioral problems. Here, we report a 17-year-old patient with gelastic phenomenon started in the neonatal period, later on associated with drug resistant polymorphic seizures, intellectual deficit and behavioral disorders, who improved by partial resection of an expected hypothalamic hamartoma that, in turn, resulted to be a hypothalamic low-grade astrocytoma.

  6. New world primates as a model of viral-induced astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Houff, S A; London, W T; Zu Rhein, G M; Padgett, B L; Walker, D L; Sever, J L

    1983-01-01

    Owl and squirrel monkeys are susceptible to the oncogenic effects of JCV. These species of New World monkeys can be safely inoculated intracerebrally. Care must be taken with owl monkeys since they have an inherited clotting abnormality. Incubation times for the development of tumors range from 14 to 30 months. Anorexia was the first clinical sign of tumor development. The clinical course is rapid with death within two to three days. This model provides a means for studying diagnostic, virological, immunological and therapeutic techniques which are applicable to human patients with astrocytomas.

  7. Unusual Synchronous Presentation of Maxillary Sinus Fibrosarcoma and Gemistocytic Astrocytoma with a Complication Called Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Cadir, Bilge; Karahan, Nermin; Nasir, Serdar; Aydin, M. Asim; Turkaslan, S. Suha

    2009-01-01

    Fibrosarcoma of the paranasal sinuses is extremely rare pathology and there is limited report in the literature. We report synchronous presentation of maxillary sinus fibrosarcoma and gemistocytic astrocytoma which is, to our knowledge, unique in the literature. Both tumors metastases to other organ rarely and the metastatic spread of gemistocytic astrocytoma to fibrosarcoma or vice versa have also not been reported in the literature yet. This report discusses the clinical course of the disease, outcome of the treatment approach and survival as well as an unusual occurrence of leukocytoclastic vasculitis during the course of radiotherapy in such unusual presentation. PMID:19756200

  8. Structural organization of the prefrontal white matter pathways in the adult and aging brain measured by diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Malykhin, Nikolai; Vahidy, Sana; Michielse, Stijn; Coupland, Nick; Camicioli, Richard; Seres, Peter; Carter, Rawle

    2011-11-01

    Previous diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies confirmed the vulnerability of frontal callosal fibers to normal aging. The present study extended this examination systematically to other prefrontal white matter regions. Structural magnetic resonance imaging and DTI datasets were acquired from 69 healthy subjects aged 22-84 years. The prefrontal white matter was parcellated into several anatomical sub-regions: medial and lateral orbitofrontal white matter, dorsolateral prefrontal white matter, and medial prefrontal white matter, using reliable DTI-tractography protocols. Tract-specific characteristics were calculated using Matlab. Regression models were used to determine the relationship between age and structural integrity of white matter tracts. The results of our study demonstrate regional age-related changes in the prefrontal white matter tracts of the human brain. This study was cross-sectional and therefore additional longitudinal studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  9. Automated voxel classification used with atlas-guided diffuse optical tomography for assessment of functional brain networks in young and older adults.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Cazzell, Mary; Babawale, Olajide; Liu, Hanli

    2016-10-01

    Atlas-guided diffuse optical tomography (atlas-DOT) is a computational means to image changes in cortical hemodynamic signals during human brain activities. Graph theory analysis (GTA) is a network analysis tool commonly used in functional neuroimaging to study brain networks. Atlas-DOT has not been analyzed with GTA to derive large-scale brain connectivity/networks based on near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measurements. We introduced an automated voxel classification (AVC) method that facilitated the use of GTA with atlas-DOT images by grouping unequal-sized finite element voxels into anatomically meaningful regions of interest within the human brain. The overall approach included volume segmentation, AVC, and cross-correlation. To demonstrate the usefulness of AVC, we applied reproducibility analysis to resting-state functional connectivity measurements conducted from 15 young adults in a two-week period. We also quantified and compared changes in several brain network metrics between young and older adults, which were in agreement with those reported by a previous positron emission tomography study. Overall, this study demonstrated that AVC is a useful means for facilitating integration or combination of atlas-DOT with GTA and thus for quantifying NIRS-based, voxel-wise resting-state functional brain networks.

  10. Atypical white-matter microstructure in congenitally deaf adults: A region of interest and tractography study using diffusion-tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Karns, Christina M; Stevens, Courtney; Dow, Mark W; Schorr, Emily M; Neville, Helen J

    2017-01-01

    Considerable research documents the cross-modal reorganization of auditory cortices as a consequence of congenital deafness, with remapped functions that include visual and somatosensory processing of both linguistic and nonlinguistic information. Structural changes accompany this cross-modal neuroplasticity, but precisely which specific structural changes accompany congenital and early deafness and whether there are group differences in hemispheric asymmetries remain to be established. Here, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to examine microstructural white matter changes accompanying cross-modal reorganization in 23 deaf adults who were genetically, profoundly, and congenitally deaf, having learned sign language from infancy with 26 hearing controls who participated in our previous fMRI studies of cross-modal neuroplasticity. In contrast to prior literature using a whole-brain approach, we introduce a semiautomatic method for demarcating auditory regions in which regions of interest (ROIs) are defined on the normalized white matter skeleton for all participants, projected into each participants native space, and manually constrained to anatomical boundaries. White-matter ROIs were left and right Heschl's gyrus (HG), left and right anterior superior temporal gyrus (aSTG), left and right posterior superior temporal gyrus (pSTG), as well as one tractography-defined region in the splenium of the corpus callosum connecting homologous left and right superior temporal regions (pCC). Within these regions, we measured fractional anisotropy (FA), radial diffusivity (RD), axial diffusivity (AD), and white-matter volume. Congenitally deaf adults had reduced FA and volume in white matter structures underlying bilateral HG, aSTG, pSTG, and reduced FA in pCC. In HG and pCC, this reduction in FA corresponded with increased RD, but differences in aSTG and pSTG could not be localized to alterations in RD or AD. Direct statistical tests of hemispheric asymmetries in these

  11. Detecting the Effects of Fabry Disease in the Adult Human Brain with Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Fast Bound-Pool Fraction Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Underhill, Hunter R.; Golden-Grant, Katie; Garrett, Lauren T.; Uhrich, Stefanie; Zielinski, Brandon A.; Scott, C. Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To identify quantitative MRI parameters associated with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and fast bound-pool fraction imaging (FBFI) that may detect alterations in gray matter and/or white matter in adults with Fabry disease, a lysosomal storage disorder. Materials and Methods Twelve healthy controls (mean age ± standard deviation: 48.0±12.4 years) and ten participants with Fabry disease (46.7±12.9 years) were imaged at 3.0 T. Whole-brain parametric maps of diffusion tensor metrics (apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA)) and the bound-pool fraction (f) were acquired. Mean voxel values of parametric maps from regions-of-interest within gray and white matter structures were compared between cases and controls using the independent t-test. Spearman’s rho was used to identify associations between parametric maps and age. Results Compared to controls, the left thalamus of Fabry participants had an increase in FA (0.29±0.02 vs. 0.33±0.05, respectively; p=0.030) and a trend towards an increase in ADC (0.73±00.02 vs. 0.76±0.03 μm2/s, respectively; p=0.082). The left posterior white matter demonstrated a reduction in f (10.45±0.37 vs. 9.00±1.84 %, respectively; p=0.035), an increase in ADC (0.78±0.04 vs. 0.94±0.19 μm2/s, respectively; p=0.024), and a trend towards a reduction in FA (0.42±0.07 vs. 0.36±0.08, respectively; p=0.052). Amongst all parameters, only f measured in the left posterior white matter was significantly associated with age in Fabry participants (rho= −0.71, p=0.022). Conclusions Parameters derived from DTI and FBFI detect Fabry-related changes in the adult human brain, particularly in the posterior white matter where reductions in myelin density as measured by FBFI appear age related. PMID:26018987

  12. Pleiotrophin promotes vascular abnormalization in gliomas and correlates with poor survival in patients with astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Kundu, Soumi; Feenstra, Tjerk; Li, Xiujuan; Jin, Chuan; Laaniste, Liisi; El Hassan, Tamador Elsir Abu; Ohlin, K Elisabet; Yu, Di; Olofsson, Tommie; Olsson, Anna-Karin; Pontén, Fredrik; Magnusson, Peetra U; Nilsson, Karin Forsberg; Essand, Magnus; Smits, Anja; Dieterich, Lothar C; Dimberg, Anna

    2015-12-08

    Glioblastomas are aggressive astrocytomas characterized by endothelial cell proliferation and abnormal vasculature, which can cause brain edema and increase patient morbidity. We identified the heparin-binding cytokine pleiotrophin as a driver of vascular abnormalization in glioma. Pleiotrophin abundance was greater in high-grade human astrocytomas and correlated with poor survival. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), which is a receptor that is activated by pleiotrophin, was present in mural cells associated with abnormal vessels. Orthotopically implanted gliomas formed from GL261 cells that were engineered to produce pleiotrophin showed increased microvessel density and enhanced tumor growth compared with gliomas formed from control GL261 cells. The survival of mice with pleiotrophin-producing gliomas was shorter than that of mice with gliomas that did not produce pleiotrophin. Vessels in pleiotrophin-producing gliomas were poorly perfused and abnormal, a phenotype that was associated with increased deposition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in direct proximity to the vasculature. The growth of pleiotrophin-producing GL261 gliomas was inhibited by treatment with the ALK inhibitor crizotinib, the ALK inhibitor ceritinib, or the VEGF receptor inhibitor cediranib, whereas control GL261 tumors did not respond to either inhibitor. Our findings link pleiotrophin abundance in gliomas with survival in humans and mice, and show that pleiotrophin promotes glioma progression through increased VEGF deposition and vascular abnormalization.

  13. An acid phosphatase in the plasma membranes of human astrocytoma showing marked specificity toward phosphotyrosine protein.

    PubMed

    Leis, J F; Kaplan, N O

    1982-11-01

    The plasma membrane from the human tumor astrocytoma contains an active acid phosphatase activity based on hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate. Other acid phosphatase substrates--beta-glycerophosphate, O-phosphorylcholine, and 5'-AMP--are not hydrolyzed significantly. The phosphatase activity is tartrate insensitive and is stimulated by Triton X-100 and EDTA. Of the three known phosphoamino acids, only free O-phosphotyrosine is hydrolyzed by the membrane phosphatase activity. Other acid phosphatases tested from potato, wheat germ, milk, and bovine prostate did not show this degree of specificity. The plasma membrane activity also dephosphorylated phosphotyrosine histone at a much greater rate than did the other acid phosphatases. pH profiles for free O-phosphotyrosine and phosphotyrosine histone showed a shift toward physiological pH, indicating possible physiological significance. Phosphotyrosine histone dephosphorylation activity was nearly 10 times greater than that seen for phosphoserine histone dephosphorylation, and Km values were much lower for phosphotyrosine histone dephosphorylation (0.5 microM vs. 10 microM). Fluoride and zinc significantly inhibited phosphoserine histone dephosphorylation. Vanadate, on the other hand, was a potent inhibitor of phosphotyrosine histone dephosphorylation (50% inhibition at 0.5 microM) but not of phosphoserine histone. ATP stimulated phosphotyrosine histone dephosphorylation (160-250%) but inhibited phosphoserine histone dephosphorylation (95%). These results suggest the existence of a highly specific phosphotyrosine protein phosphatase activity associated with the plasma membrane of human astrocytoma.

  14. Variation in DNA repair gene XRCC3 affects susceptibility to astrocytomas and glioblastomas.

    PubMed

    Custódio, A C; Almeida, L O; Pinto, G R; Santos, M J; Almeida, J R W; Clara, C A; Rey, J A; Casartelli, C

    2012-02-10

    The gene XRCC3 (X-ray cross complementing group 3) has the task of repairing damage that occurs when there is recombination between homologous chromosomes. Repair of recombination between homologous chromosomes plays an important role in maintaining genome integrity, although it is known that double-strand breaks are the main inducers of chromosomal aberrations. Changes in the XRCC3 protein lead to an increase in errors in chromosome segregation due to defects in centrosomes, resulting in aneuploidy and other chromosomal aberrations, such as small increases in telomeres. We examined XRCC3 Thr241Met polymorphism using PCR-RFLP in 80 astrocytoma and glioblastoma samples. The individuals of the control group (N = 100) were selected from the general population of the São Paulo State. Odds ratio and 95%CI were calculated using a logistic regression model. Patients who had the allele Met of the XRCC3 Thr241Met polymorphism had a significantly increased risk of tumor development (odds ratio = 3.13; 95% confidence interval = 1.50-6.50). There were no significant differences in overall survival of patients. We suggest that XRCC3 Thr241Met polymorphism is involved in susceptibility for developing astrocytomas and glioblastomas.

  15. Extent of resection of peritumoral diffusion tensor imaging-detected abnormality as a predictor of survival in adult glioblastoma patients.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jiun-Lin; van der Hoorn, Anouk; Larkin, Timothy J; Boonzaier, Natalie R; Matys, Tomasz; Price, Stephen J

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been shown to detect tumor invasion in glioblastoma patients and has been applied in surgical planning. However, the clinical value of the extent of resection based on DTI is unclear. Therefore, the correlation between the extent of resection of DTI abnormalities and patients' outcome was retrospectively reviewed. METHODS A review was conducted of 31 patients with newly diagnosed supratentorial glioblastoma who underwent standard 5-aminolevulinic acid-aided surgery with the aim of maximal resection of the enhancing tumor component. All patients underwent presurgical MRI, including volumetric postcontrast T1-weighted imaging, DTI, and FLAIR. Postsurgical anatomical MR images were obtained within 72 hours of resection. The diffusion tensor was split into an isotropic (p) and anisotropic (q) component. The extent of resection was measured for the abnormal area on the p, q, FLAIR, and postcontrast T1-weighted images. Data were analyzed in relation to patients' outcome using univariate and multivariate Cox regression models controlling for possible confounding factors including age, O(6)-methylguanine-DNA-methyltrans-ferase methylation status, and isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 mutation. RESULTS Complete resection of the enhanced tumor shown on the postcontrast T1-weighted images was achieved in 24 of 31 patients (77%). The mean extent of resection of the abnormal p, q, and FLAIR areas was 57%, 83%, and 59%, respectively. Increased resection of the abnormal p and q areas correlated positively with progression-free survival (p = 0.009 and p = 0.006, respectively). Additionally, a larger, residual, abnormal q volume predicted significantly shorter time to progression (p = 0.008). More extensive resection of the abnormal q and contrast-enhanced area improved overall survival (p = 0.041 and 0.050, respectively). CONCLUSIONS Longer progression-free survival and overall survival were seen in glioblastoma patients in whom more DTI

  16. Pilocytic Astrocytoma of the Optic Pathway: A Tumour Deriving from Radial Glia Cells with a Specific Gene Signature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tchoghandjian, Aurelie; Fernandez, Carla; Colin, Carole; El Ayachi, Ikbale; Voutsinos-Porche, Brigitte; Fina, Frederic; Scavarda, Didier; Piercecchi-Marti, Marie-Dominique; Intagliata, Dominique; Ouafik, L'Houcine; Fraslon-Vanhulle, Caroline; Figarella-Branger, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Pilocytic astrocytomas are WHO grade I gliomas that occur predominantly in childhood. They share features of both astroglial and oligodendroglial lineages. These tumours affect preferentially the cerebellum (benign clinical course) and the optic pathway, especially the hypothalamo-chiasmatic region (poor prognosis). Understanding the molecular…

  17. Updated therapeutic strategy for adult low-grade glioma stratified by resection and tumor subtype.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Masayuki; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Maruyama, Takashi; Iseki, Hiroshi; Ikuta, Soko; Konishi, Yoshiyuki; Saito, Taichi; Tamura, Manabu; Chernov, Michael; Watanabe, Atsushi; Okamoto, Saori; Maebayashi, Katsuya; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Okada, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    The importance of surgical resection for patients with supratentorial low-grade glioma (LGG) remains controversial. This retrospective study of patients (n = 153) treated between 2000 to 2010 at a single institution assessed whether increasing the extent of resection (EOR) was associated with improved progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Histological subtypes of World Health Organization grade II tumors were as follows: diffuse astrocytoma in 49 patients (32.0%), oligoastrocytoma in 45 patients (29.4%), and oligodendroglioma in 59 patients (38.6%). Median pre- and postoperative tumor volumes and median EOR were 29.0 cm(3) (range 0.7-162 cm(3)) and 1.7 cm(3) (range 0-135.7 cm(3)) and 95%, respectively. Five- and 10-year OS for all LGG patients were 95.1% and 85.4%, respectively. Eight-year OS for diffuse astrocytoma, oligoastrocytoma, and oligodendroglioma were 70.7%, 91.2%, and 98.3%, respectively. Five-year PFS for diffuse astrocytoma, oligoastrocytoma, and oligodendroglioma were 42.6%, 71.3%, and 62.7%, respectively. Patients were divided into two groups by EOR ≥90% and <90%, and OS and PFS were analyzed. Both OS and PFS were significantly longer in patients with ≥90% EOR. Increased EOR resulted in better PFS for diffuse astrocytoma but not for oligodendroglioma. Multivariate analysis identified age and EOR as parameters significantly associated with OS. The only parameter associated with PFS was EOR. Based on these findings, we established updated therapeutic strategies for LGG. If surgery resulted in EOR <90%, patients with astrocytoma will require second-look surgery, whereas patients with oligodendroglioma or oligoastrocytoma, which are sensitive to chemotherapy, will be treated with chemotherapy.

  18. Development of Brain Structural Connectivity between Ages 12 and 30: A 4-Tesla Diffusion Imaging Study in 439 Adolescents and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Emily L.; Jahanshad, Neda; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Hickie, Ian B.; Toga, Arthur W.; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how the brain matures in healthy individuals is critical for evaluating deviations from normal development in psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders. The brain’s anatomical networks are profoundly re-modeled between childhood and adulthood, and diffusion tractography offers unprecedented power to reconstruct these networks and neural pathways in vivo. Here we tracked changes in structural connectivity and network efficiency in 439 right-handed individuals aged 12 to 30 (211 female/126 male adults, mean age=23.6, SD=2.19; 31 female/24 male 12 year olds, mean age=12.3, SD=0.18; and 25 female/22 male 16 year olds, mean age=16.2, SD=0.37). All participants were scanned with high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) at 4 Tesla. After we performed whole brain tractography, 70 cortical gyral-based regions of interest were extracted from each participant’s co-registered anatomical scans. The degree of fiber connections between all pairs of cortical regions, or nodes, were found to create symmetric fiber density matrices, reflecting the structural brain network. From those 70×70 matrices we computed graph theory metrics characterizing structural connectivity. Several key global and nodal metrics changed across development, showing increased network integration, with some connections pruned and others strengthened. The increases and decreases in fiber density, however, were not distributed proportionally across the brain. The frontal cortex had a disproportionate number of decreases in fiber density while the temporal cortex had a disproportionate number of increases in fiber density. This large-scale analysis of the developing structural connectome offers a foundation to develop statistical criteria for aberrant brain connectivity as the human brain matures. PMID:22982357

  19. Neuroinflammation, hyperphosphorylated tau, diffuse amyloid plaques, and down-regulation of the cellular prion protein in air pollution exposed children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Kavanaugh, Michael; Block, Michelle; D'Angiulli, Amedeo; Delgado-Chávez, Ricardo; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; González-Maciel, Angelica; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Osnaya, Norma; Villarreal-Calderon, Rodolfo; Guo, Ruixin; Hua, Zhaowei; Zhu, Hongtu; Perry, George; Diaz, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Air pollution exposures have been linked to neuroinflammation and neuropathology. Autopsy samples of the frontal cortex from control (n = 8) and pollution-exposed (n = 35) children and young adults were analyzed by RT-PCR (n = 43) and microarray analysis (n = 12) for gene expression changes in oxidative stress, DNA damage signaling, NFκB signaling, inflammation, and neurodegeneration pathways. The effect of apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype on the presence of protein aggregates associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology was also explored. Exposed urbanites displayed differential (>2-fold) regulation of 134 genes. Forty percent exhibited tau hyperphosphorylation with pre-tangle material and 51% had amyloid-β (Aβ) diffuse plaques compared with 0% in controls. APOE4 carriers had greater hyperphosphorylated tau and diffuse Aβ plaques versus E3 carriers (Q = 7.82, p = 0.005). Upregulated gene network clusters included IL1, NFκB, TNF, IFN, and TLRs. A 15-fold frontal down-regulation of the prion-related protein (PrP(C)) was seen in highly exposed subjects. The down-regulation of the PrP(C) is critical given its important roles for neuroprotection, neurodegeneration, and mood disorder states. Elevation of indices of neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, down-regulation of the PrP(C) and AD-associated pathology are present in young megacity residents. The inducible regulation of gene expression suggests they are evolving different mechanisms in an attempt to cope with the constant state of inflammation and oxidative stress related to their environmental exposures. Together, these data support a role for air pollution in CNS damage and its impact upon the developing brain and the potential etiology of AD and mood disorders.

  20. Activation of mTORC1/mTORC2 signaling in pediatric low-grade glioma and pilocytic astrocytoma reveals mTOR as a therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Hütt-Cabezas, Marianne; Karajannis, Matthias A.; Zagzag, David; Shah, Smit; Horkayne-Szakaly, Iren; Rushing, Elisabeth J.; Cameron, J. Douglas; Jain, Deepali; Eberhart, Charles G.; Raabe, Eric H.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies support a role for mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway signaling, and more recently Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), in pediatric low-grade glioma (PLGG), including pilocytic astrocytoma (PA). Here we further evaluate the role of the mTORC1/mTORC2 pathway in order to better direct pharmacologic blockade in these common childhood tumors. Methods We studied 177 PLGGs and PAs using immunohistochemistry and tested the effect of mTOR blockade on 2 PLGG cell lines (Res186 and Res259) in vitro. Results Moderate (2+) to strong (3+) immunostaining was observed for pS6 in 107/177 (59%) PAs and other PLGGs, while p4EBP1 was observed in 35/115 (30%), pElF4G in 66/112 (59%), mTOR (total) in 53/113 (47%), RAPTOR (mTORC1 component) in 64/102 (63%), RICTOR (mTORC2 component) in 48/101 (48%), and pAkt (S473) in 63/103 (61%). Complete phosphatase and tensin homolog protein loss was identified in only 7/101 (7%) of cases. In PA of the optic pathways, compared with other anatomic sites, there was increased immunoreactivity for pS6, pElF4G, mTOR (total), RICTOR, and pAkt (P < .05). We also observed increased pS6 (P = .01), p4EBP1 (P = .029), and RICTOR (P = .05) in neurofibromatosis type 1 compared with sporadic tumors. Treatment of the PLGG cell lines Res186 (PA derived) and Res259 (diffuse astrocytoma derived) with the rapalog MK8669 (ridaforolimus) led to decreased mTOR pathway activation and growth. Conclusions These findings suggest that the mTOR pathway is active in PLGG but varies by clinicopathologic subtype. Additionally, our data suggest that mTORC2 is differentially active in optic pathway and neurofibromatosis type 1–associated gliomas. MTOR represents a potential therapeutic target in PLGG that merits further investigation. PMID:24203892

  1. Effects of dexamethasone and betamethasone on in vitro cultures from human astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Guner, M; Freshney, R I; Morgan, D; Freshney, M G; Thomas, D G; Graham, D I

    1977-04-01

    Cultures of human astrocytoma have been derived by collagenase digestion and are presumed, from their aneuploid karyotypes, to be predominantly neoplastic. Early passage cultures in proliferative phase have been cloned in the presence of dexamethasone and betamethasone, both commonly used in management of patients with brain tumours. These steroids raise both the cloning efficiency and the proliferative capacity of cells within each clone. Inhibition was detected only in very high steroid concentrations (25-50 microng/ml). Since these concentrations are unlikely to be attained in vivo it is concluded that anticipated physiological levels of these steroids enhance cell survival at low densities in culture. The significance of this in vivo is discussed.

  2. Effects of dexamethasone and betamethasone on in vitro cultures from human astrocytoma.

    PubMed Central

    Guner, M.; Freshney, R. I.; Morgan, D.; Freshney, M. G.; Thomas, D. G.; Graham, D. I.

    1977-01-01

    Cultures of human astrocytoma have been derived by collagenase digestion and are presumed, from their aneuploid karyotypes, to be predominantly neoplastic. Early passage cultures in proliferative phase have been cloned in the presence of dexamethasone and betamethasone, both commonly used in management of patients with brain tumours. These steroids raise both the cloning efficiency and the proliferative capacity of cells within each clone. Inhibition was detected only in very high steroid concentrations (25-50 microng/ml). Since these concentrations are unlikely to be attained in vivo it is concluded that anticipated physiological levels of these steroids enhance cell survival at low densities in culture. The significance of this in vivo is discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2(a) Fig. 2(b) PMID:869982

  3. Cerebellar Mutism Syndrome After Posterior Fossa Surgery: A Report of Two Cases of Pilocytic Astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    GÜNDÜZ, Hasan Burak; YASSA, Mustafa İlker Kuntay; OFLUOĞLU, Ali Ender; POSTALCI, Lütfü; EMEL, Erhan

    2013-01-01

    Cerebellar mutism is a type of syndrome including decreased speech, hypotonia, ataxia and emotional instability which occurs after posterior fossa surgery. It has been first reported by Rekate et al. and Yonemasu in 1985. It is well known that long tract signs and lower cranial nerve involvement are not seen with this syndrome and understanding is preserved. However, the pathophysiology of cerebellar mutism has not been well clarified yet. It is mainly seen in patients with medulloblastoma and brainstem involvement. In this report, we present two extraordinary cases of cerebellar mutism after posterior fossa surgery. They were considered extraordinary because their hystopathological analysis results yielded pilocytic astrocytoma which is out of the predefined risk factors.

  4. [Problems with flute playing: an otological problem? Case report of a peculiar cerebellar astrocytoma].

    PubMed

    Forton, G; Verlooy, J; Cras, P; Parizel, P; Van de Heyning, P

    1992-01-01

    A rare case of cerebellar astrocytoma presenting as a cerebellopontine angle tumour is discussed. A 35-year old woman noticed a bizarre twitching and fatigability of the left upper lip while playing the flute. There was also a mild hearing loss on the left side and she sometimes felt unsure of herself when walking. A thorough examination by means of speech audiometry, electronystagmography, ABR, CT-scan and MRI revealed a large, partly calcified mass occupying the cerebellopontine angle. Only the histological examination of the surgical specimen revealed the true nature of the tumour. The special characteristics of this tumour and the unusual clinical course are discussed. The importance of a good histological diagnosis is stressed.

  5. Intramedullary pilomyxoid astrocytoma with intracerebral metastasis exhibiting oligoden-droglioma-like features

    PubMed Central

    Eigenbrod, Sabina; Thon, Niklas; Jansen, Nathalie; Janssen, Hendrik; Mielke, Janina; Ruiter, Michael; la Fougère, Christian; Peraud, Aurelia; Egensperger, Rupert; Kretzschmar, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Intramedullary glioma are rare and their biological behaviour can differ from their cerebral counterparts. Pilomyxoid astrocytoma (PMA, WHO grade II), predominantly occur in the hypothalamic/chiasmatic region of infants and children. The few reported cases of pediatric intramedullary PMA displayed a particularly aggressive behavior. Here, we report a diagnostically challenging case of a five year old female patient presenting with intramedullary glioma and local tumor recurrence three years later. Twelve years after the initial manifestation, a second tumor was found intracerebrally. We performed a comprehensive histological, molecular pathological and imaging analysis of the tumors from both localizations. The results revealed a metastasizing PMA with unique histological and genetic features. Our study indicates that PMA comprise a heterogeneous group including aggressive subtypes which may not be compatible with the current classification according to WHO grade II. Furthermore, the case emphasizes the increasing relevance of molecular pathological markers complementing classic histo-logical diagnosis. PMID:22826787

  6. Laser interstitial thermal therapy for subependymal giant cell astrocytoma: technical case report.

    PubMed

    Dadey, David Y A; Kamath, Ashwin A; Leuthardt, Eric C; Smyth, Matthew D

    2016-10-01

    Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) is a rare tumor occurring almost exclusively in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex. Although open resection remains the standard therapy, complication rates remain high. To minimize morbidity, less invasive approaches, such as endoscope-assisted resection, radiosurgery, and chemotherapy with mTOR pathway inhibitors, are also used to treat these lesions. Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is a relatively new modality that is increasingly used to treat a variety of intracranial lesions. In this report, the authors describe two pediatric cases of SEGA that were treated with LITT. In both patients the lesion responded well to this treatment modality, with tumor shrinkage observed on follow-up MRI. These cases highlight the potential of LITT to serve as a viable minimally invasive therapeutic approach to the management of SEGAs in the pediatric population.

  7. P06SUPRATENTORIAL PNET IN ADULTS: MRI CAN HELP DISTINGUISH FROM GLIOBLASTOMA - DWI IS KEY

    PubMed Central

    Eralil, George; Jones, Timothy L.; Howe, Franklyn A.; Barrick, Tom R.; MacKinnon, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Extra-pineal supratentorial primitive neuro-ectodermal tumours (sPNETs) are considered rare in adults and little is known about their radiological appearances. The most clinically relevant pre-surgical differential diagnosis is glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). We present a series of patients with sPNET over a 6 year period (2008-2014), and provide an imaging update with a review of the existing literature. METHOD: Retrospective review of CT and MRI characteristics of 7 patients with histologically proven sPNETs. Comparisons were made with similarly located and histopathologically confirmed WHO Grade 4 GBMs. RESULTS: 6 of the 7 sPNETs occurred de novo. One arose within the resection bed of a WHO Grade 1 pilocytic astrocytoma. There were 4 frontal and 3 temporal lobe incidences. Mean age was 42.8yrs (range 23 - 73 yrs, median 36 yrs). On CT the solid component of the tumour was usually hyperdense. Some of the small sPNETs contained central haemorrhage, confirmed on MRI. Larger tumours were solid/cystic. On MRI the solid component of all sPNETs was T2 hypointense, showed avid enhancement and marked restricted diffusion, typical of a high grade tumour. The degree of restricted diffusion was notably greater in the sPNET group when compared to the GBM cohort. CONCLUSION: The extreme rarity of sPNETs in adults makes for difficult interpretation of existing imaging modalities. In non-histopathologically confirmed cases, imaging could be misinterpreted as high grade glioma. However, greater restricted diffusion in sPNETs may help distinguish them from GBMs. Advanced MRI techniques and correlation with spectroscopy and molecular markers will also help in the future.

  8. Mastoparan-induced phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis by phospholipase D activation in human astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, K.; Nakahata, N.; Ohizumi, Y.

    1995-01-01

    1. The effect of mastoparan on phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis was examined in 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells. Mastoparan (3-30 microM) caused an accumulation of diacylglycerol (DG) and phosphatidic acd (PA) accompanied by choline release in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. 2. In the presence of 2% n-butanol, mastoparan (3-100 microM) induced phosphatidylbutanol (PBut) accumulation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, suggesting that mastoparan activates phospholipase D (PLD). Propranolol (30-300 microM), a phosphatidate phosphohydrolase inhibitor, inhibited DG accumulation induced by mastoparan, supporting this idea. 3. Depletion of extracellular free calcium ion did not alter the effect of mastoparan on PLD activity. 4. A protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, calphostin C (1 microM), did not inhibit mastoparan-induce PLD activation but the ability of mastoparan to stimulate phospholipase D activity was decreased in the PKC down regulated cells. 5. PLD activity stimulated by mastoparan was not prevented by pretreatment of the cells with pertussis toxin (PT) or C3 ADP-ribosyltransferase. Furthermore, guanine nucleotides did not affect PLD activity stimulation by mastoparan in membrane preparations. 6. Mastoparan stimulated PLD in several cell lines such as RBL-2H3, RBL-1, HL-60, P388, endothelial cells, as well as 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells. 7. These results suggest that mastoparan induces phosphatidylcholine (PC) hydrolysis by activation of PLD, not by activation of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC); mastoparan-induced PLD activation is not mediated by G proteins. PMID:8640350

  9. Patterns of diagnostic marker assessment in adult diffuse glioma: a survey of the European Confederation of Neuropathological Societies (Euro-CNS).

    PubMed

    Woehrer, Adelheid; Kristensen, Bjarne W; Vital, Anne; Hainfellner, Johannes A

    The 2016 update of the WHO classification has introduced an integrated diagnostic approach that incorporates both tumor morphology and molecular information. This conceptual change has far-reaching implications, especially for neuropathologists who are in the forefront of translating molecular markers to routine diagnostic use. Adult diffuse glioma is a prototypic example for a group of tumors that underwent substantial regrouping, and it represents a major workload for surgical neuropathologists. Hence, we conducted a survey among members of the European Confederation of Neuropathological Societies (Euro-CNS) in order to assess 1) the extent to which molecular markers have already been incorporated in glioma diagnoses, 2) which molecular techniques are in daily use, and 3) to set a baseline for future surveys in this field. Based on 130 responses from participants across 40 nations neuropathologists uniformly rate molecular marker testing as highly relevant and already incorporate molecular information in their diagnostic assessments. At the same time however, the survey documents substantial differences in access to crucial biomarkers and molecular techniques across geographic regions and within individual countries. Concerns are raised concerning the validity of test assays with MGMT, 1p19q, and ATRX; being perceived as most problematic. Neuropathologists advocate the need for international harmonization of standards and consensus guidelines, and the majority is willing to actively engage in interlaboratory trials aiming at quality control (Figure 1).
.

  10. Mean diffusivity of globus pallidus associated with verbal creativity measured by divergent thinking and creativity-related temperaments in young healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Nouchi, Rui; Sassa, Yuko; Kotozaki, Yuka; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Iizuka, Kunio; Nakagawa, Seishu; Nagase, Tomomi; Kunitoki, Keiko; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2015-05-01

    Recent investigations revealed mean diffusivity (MD) in gray matter and white matter areas is correlated with individual cognitive differences in healthy subjects and show unique properties and sensitivity that other neuroimaging tools donot have. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the MD in the dopaminergic system is associated with individual differences in verbal creativity measured by divergent thinking (VCDT) and novelty seeking based on prior studies suggesting associations between these and dopaminergic functions. We examined this issue in a large sample of right-handed healthy young adults. We used analyses of MD and a psychological measure of VCDT, as well as personality measures of the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). Our results revealed associations between higher VCDT and lower MD in the bilateral globus pallidus. Furthermore, not only higher novelty seeking, but also lower harm avoidance, higher self-directedness, and higher self-transcendence were robustly associated with lower MD in the right globus pallidus, whereas higher persistence was associated with lower MD in the left globus pallidus. These personality variables were also associated with VCDT. The globus pallidus receives the dopaminergic input from the substantia nigra and plays a key role in motivation which is critically linked to dopamine. These results suggested the MD in the globus pallidus, underlie the association between VCDT and multiple personalities in TCI including novelty seeking.

  11. Patterns of diagnostic marker assessment in adult diffuse glioma: a survey of the European Confederation of Neuropathological Societies (Euro-CNS)

    PubMed Central

    Woehrer, Adelheid; Kristensen, Bjarne W.; Vital, Anne; Hainfellner, Johannes A.

    2017-01-01

    The 2016 update of the WHO classification has introduced an integrated diagnostic approach that incorporates both tumor morphology and molecular information. This conceptual change has far-reaching implications, especially for neuropathologists who are in the forefront of translating molecular markers to routine diagnostic use. Adult diffuse glioma is a prototypic example for a group of tumors that underwent substantial regrouping, and it represents a major workload for surgical neuropathologists. Hence, we conducted a survey among members of the European Confederation of Neuropathological Societies (Euro-CNS) in order to assess 1) the extent to which molecular markers have already been incorporated in glioma diagnoses, 2) which molecular techniques are in daily use, and 3) to set a baseline for future surveys in this field. Based on 130 responses from participants across 40 nations neuropathologists uniformly rate molecular marker testing as highly relevant and already incorporate molecular information in their diagnostic assessments. At the same time however, the survey documents substantial differences in access to crucial biomarkers and molecular techniques across geographic regions and within individual countries. Concerns are raised concerning the validity of test assays with MGMT, 1p19q, and ATRX; being perceived as most problematic. Neuropathologists advocate the need for international harmonization of standards and consensus guidelines, and the majority is willing to actively engage in interlaboratory trials aiming at quality control (Figure 1). PMID:27966427

  12. Genetics of adult glioma.

    PubMed

    Goodenberger, McKinsey L; Jenkins, Robert B

    2012-12-01

    Gliomas make up approximately 30% of all brain and central nervous system tumors and 80% of all malignant brain tumors. Despite the frequency of gliomas, the etiology of these tumors remains largely unknown. Diffuse gliomas, including astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas, belong to a single pathologic class but have very different histologies and molecular etiologies. Recent genomic studies have identified separate molecular subtypes within the glioma classification that appear to correlate with biological etiology, prognosis, and response to therapy. The discovery of these subtypes suggests that molecular genetic tests are and will be useful, beyond classical histology, for the clinical classification of gliomas. While a familial susceptibility to glioma has been identified, only a small percentage of gliomas are thought to be due to single-gene hereditary cancer syndromes. Through the use of linkage studies and genome-wide association studies, multiple germline variants have been identified that are beginning to define the genetic susceptibility to glioma.

  13. Epithelial Cell Transforming 2 and Aurora Kinase B Modulate Formation of Stress Granule-Containing Transcripts from Diverse Cellular Pathways in Astrocytoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Adrienne; Agnihotri, Sameer; Lymer, Jennifer; Chalil, Alan; Diaz, Roberto; Isik, Semra; Smith, Christian; Rutka, James T

    2016-06-01

    Stress granules are small RNA-protein granules that modify the translational landscape during cellular stress to promote survival. The RhoGTPase RhoA is implicated in the formation of RNA stress granules. Our data demonstrate that the cytokinetic proteins epithelial cell transforming 2 and Aurora kinase B (AurkB) are localized to stress granules in human astrocytoma cells. AurkB and its downstream target histone-3 are phosphorylated during arsenite-induced stress. Chemical (AZD1152-HQPA) and siRNA inhibition of AurkB results in fewer and smaller stress granules when analyzed using high-throughput fluorescent-based cellomics assays. RNA immunoprecipitation with the known stress granule aggregates TIAR and G3BP1 was performed on astrocytoma cells, and subsequent analysis revealed that astrocytoma stress granules harbor unique mRNAs for various cellular pathways, including cellular migration, metabolism, translation, and transcriptional regulation. Human astrocytoma cell stress granules contain mRNAs that are known to be involved in glioma signaling and the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. These data provide evidence that RNA stress granules are a novel form of epigenetic regulation in astrocytoma cells, which may be targetable by chemical inhibitors and enhance astrocytoma susceptibility to conventional therapy, such as radiation and chemotherapy.

  14. Contrasting distribution and seasonal dynamics of carbohydrate reserves in stem wood of adult ring-porous sessile oak and diffuse-porous beech trees.

    PubMed

    Barbaroux, C; Bréda, N

    2002-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that broad-leaved forest species with contrasting wood anatomy and hydraulic system (ring-porous versus diffuse-porous) also differ in distribution and seasonal dynamics of carbohydrate reserves in stem wood. Total nonstructural carbohydrate (TNC) reserves (starch and sugars) were measured enzymatically in the 10 youngest stem xylem rings of adult oak (Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl.) and beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) trees during an annual cycle. Radial distribution of carbohydrates was investigated according to ring age. On all dates, oak trees had twofold higher TNC concentration than beech trees (41 versus 23 mg g(DM)(-1)), with starch accounting for the high TNC concentration in oak. Seasonal dynamics of TNC concentration were significantly (P < 0.05) more pronounced in oak (20-64 mg TNC g(DM)(-1)) than in beech (17-34 mg TNC g(DM)(-1)). A marked decrease in TNC concentration was observed in oak trees during bud burst and early wood growth, whereas seasonal fluctuations in TNC concentrations in beech trees were small. The radial distribution of TNC based on ring age differed between species: TNC was restricted to the sapwood rings in oak, whereas in beech, it was distributed throughout the wood from the outermost sapwood ring to the pith. Although the high TNC concentrations in the outermost rings accounted for most of the observed seasonal pattern, all of the 10 youngest xylem rings analyzed participated in the seasonal dynamics of TNC in beech trees. The innermost sapwood rings of oak trees had low TNC concentrations. Stem growth and accumulation of carbon reserves occurred concomitantly during the first part of the season, when there was no soil water deficit. When soil water content was depleted, stem growth ceased in both species, whereas TNC accumulation was negligibly affected and continued until leaf fall. The contrasting dynamics and distribution of carbohydrate reserves in oak and beech are discussed with reference to differences

  15. Diagnostic discrepancies in malignant astrocytoma due to limited surgical resection can be overcome by IDH1 testing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Betty Y. S.; Jiang, Wen.; Beiko, Jason; Prabhu, Sujit S.; DeMonte, Franco; Gilbert, Mark R.; Sawaya, Raymond; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Cahill, Daniel P.; McCutcheon, Ian E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The accurate grading of malignant astrocytomas has significant prognostic and therapeutic implications. Traditional histopathological grading can be challenging due to regional tumor heterogeneity, especially in scenarios where small amounts of tissue are available for pathologic review. Here, we hypothesized that a critical tumor resection volume is needed for correct grading of astrocytomas by histopathology. For insufficient tissue sampling, IDH1 molecular testing can act as a complementary marker to improve diagnostic accuracy. Methods Volumetric analyses were obtained using preoperative and postoperative MRI images. Histological specimens were gathered from 403 patients with malignant astrocytoma who underwent craniotomy. IDH1 status was assessed by immunohistochemistry and sequencing. Results Patients with >20 cubic centimeters (cc) of the total tumor volume resected on MRI have higher rate of GBM diagnosis compared to <20cc (OR 2.57, 95% CI 1.6-4.06, P<0.0001). The rate of IDH1 status remained constant regardless of the tumor volume resected (OR 0.81, 95% CI 0.48-1.36, P<0.43). The rate of GBM diagnosis is 2-fold greater for individual surgical specimen >10cc than those of lower volume (OR 2.48, 95% CI 1.88-3.28, P<0.0001). Overall survival for AA patients with >20cc tumor resection on MRI is significantly better than those with <20cc tumor resected (P<0.05). No volume-dependent differences were observed in patients with GBM (P<0.4), IDH1 wild type (P<0.1) or IDH1 mutation (P<0.88). Conclusions IDH1 status should be considered when total resection volume is <20cc based on MRI analysis and for surgical specimen < 10cc to complement histopathologic diagnosis of malignant astrocytomas. In these specimens, under-diagnosis of GBM may occur when analysis is restricted to histopathology alone. PMID:24777756

  16. Sequentially Programmed Magnetic Field Therapy in the Management of Recurrent Anaplastic Astrocytoma: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Vasishta, V.G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Anaplastic astrocytomas are progressive brain tumors with a tendency to infiltrate the surrounding tissue. Recurrence is very common, with recurrent tumors being extremely refractory to existing therapies. Case Presentation: A 33-year-old woman presented with a history of an unprovoked fall, followed by seizures. An MRI scan revealed a mass in the fronto-temporo-parietal region of the brain, suggesting a primary tumor. She underwent craniotomy and surgical debulking of the tumor. The histology of the tumor tissue revealed an anaplastic astrocytoma. Follow-up MRI scans indicated the presence of a residual, rapidly progressing tumor. A 6-week course of fractionated radiation and concurrent chemotherapy with Temodar® (temozolomide capsules) did not stop tumor progression. Intervention: Due to the failure of conventional therapies in preventing rapid disease progression, the patient volunteered to undergo a 28-day course of Sequentially Programmed Magnetic Field (SPMF) therapy. Results Immediate post-therapy MRI scan showed a cessation of tumor growth, and follow-up imaging at 6, 12, 24 and 36 months revealed a gradual but steady decrease in the size of the tumor. The patient reported an alleviation of clinical symptoms and a subjective improvement in the quality of life at 6, 12, 24 and 36 months following SPMF therapy. Conclusion The remarkable improvement of this patient suggests that SPMF therapy may be a valuable option for anaplastic astrocytoma, especially in recurrent and rapidly progressing tumors. PMID:20740195

  17. Prognostic value of coexistence of abnormal expression of micro-RNA-200b and cyclic adenosine monophosphate-responsive element-binding protein 1 in human astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun-qing; Yao, Qing-he; Kuang, Yong-qin; Ma, Yuan; Yang, Li-bin; Huang, Hai-dong; Cheng, Jing-ming; Yang, Tao; Liu, En-yu; Liang, Liang; Fan, Ke-xia; Zhao, Kai; Xia, Xun; Gu, Jian-wen

    2014-10-01

    Our aim was to investigate the expression of micro-RNA-200b (miR-200b) and cAMP-responsive element-binding protein 1 (CREB-1) in astrocytoma and its efficacy for predicting outcome. Both miR-200b and CREB-1 messenger RNA expression was measured in 122 astrocytomas and 30 nonneoplastic brain specimens by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Expression of miR-200b was significantly lower in astrocytoma than in nonneoplastic brain (P < .001), whereas CREB-1 messenger RNA expression was significantly elevated in the tumors (P < .001). Both miR-200b down-regulation and CREB-1 up-regulation were significantly associated with advanced pathologic grade (P = .002 and P = .006, respectively). Low miR-200b expression correlated negatively with Karnofsky performance score (P = .03), and high CREB-1 expression correlated positively with mean tumor diameter (P = .03). By Kaplan-Meier analysis, low miR-200b, high CREB-1, and coexistence of abnormal miR-200b and CREB-1 expression (low miR-200b/high CREB-1) were predictive of shorter progression-free survival and overall survival in both grade III and grade IV astrocytoma. By multivariate analysis, only low miR-200b/high CREB-1 expression was an independent prognostic factor for poor prognosis in astrocytoma of advanced grade. Both miR-200b and CREB-1 may play important cooperative roles in the progression of human astrocytoma. The efficacy of miR-200b and CREB-1 together as a predictor of prognosis in astrocytoma patients is shown for the first time.

  18. Rapid increase in cystic volume of an anaplastic astrocytoma misdiagnosed as neurocysticercosis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-Jiang; Han, Hong-Xiu; Feng, Dong-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Reports describing a rapid increase in the cystic volume of anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) in a short time frame are rare. The present study reports the case of a 68-year-old male who was admitted to the No. 9 People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine (Shanghai, China), with a small cystic brain lesion and positive immunological testing for cysticercosis. Head magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a cystic lesion, 6 mm in diameter, in the left frontal lobe. Neurocysticercosis was suspected and the patient was treated with a clinical trial of albendazole and steroids. A period of 25 days later, the patient's condition had deteriorated, and MRI revealed a cystic lesion in the left frontal lobe; thereafter, the cystic lesion was removed and a diagnosis of AA was established. The tumor was soft, ivory white and gelatinous due to myxoid degeneration. In this case, tumor-related angiogenesis and microvascular extravasation (blood-brain barrier disruption) may have been the main cause of the rapid increase in the cystic volume in such a short time frame. The similarity of the glioma and cysticercus antigens may have been the cause of the positive reactions in the cystic fluid. The present study reports the rare occurrence of a rapid increase of cystic volume and potential diagnostic difficulties. PMID:27698865

  19. Regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the 1321N1 human astrocytoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    The binding of muscarinic agonists, partial agonists and antagonists to muscarinic receptors of 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells was studied. Binding was studied in both intact cells and cell lysates. Partial agonists and antagonists exhibited similar apparent affinities in intact cell competition binding assays with either the lipophilic radioligand ({sup 3}H)QNB or the hydrophilic radioligand ({sup 3}H)NMS. In contrast, full agonists exhibited markedly lower apparent affinities in intact cells with ({sup 3}H)QNB than with ({sup 3}H)NMS. Treatment of cells with antimycin A to deplete intracellular ATP prevented agonist-induced internalization of muscarinic receptors as assessed by sucrose density gradient assays of receptor subcellular distribution. In ATP-depleted cells, the apparent affinities of full agonists vs ({sup 3}H)QNB were markedly higher. The apparent affinities of partial agonists and of antagonists were unaffected by ATP depletion. In other studies, the effects of the protein kinase C activator phorbol 12-myristate, 13-acetate (PMA) on muscarinic receptor downregulation and internalization in 1321N1 cells were determined. PMA alone did not induce muscarinic receptor downregulation but instead decreased both the rate and final extent of downregulation induced by the agonist carbachol. The specificity of other protein kinase C activators for inhibiting carbachol-induced downregulation indicated involvement of protein kinase C. Furthermore, the protein kinase C inhibitor staurosporine prevented the inhibitory effect of PMA on downregulation. However, staurosporine did not inhibit agonist-induced downregulation.

  20. Recurrent somatic mutations in ACVR1 in pediatric midline high-grade astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Fontebasso, Adam M; Papillon-Cavanagh, Simon; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Nikbakht, Hamid; Gerges, Noha; Fiset, Pierre-Olivier; Bechet, Denise; Faury, Damien; De Jay, Nicolas; Ramkissoon, Lori A; Corcoran, Aoife; Jones, David T W; Sturm, Dominik; Johann, Pascal; Tomita, Tadanori; Goldman, Stewart; Nagib, Mahmoud; Bendel, Anne; Goumnerova, Liliana; Bowers, Daniel C; Leonard, Jeffrey R; Rubin, Joshua B; Alden, Tord; Browd, Samuel; Geyer, J Russell; Leary, Sarah; Jallo, George; Cohen, Kenneth; Gupta, Nalin; Prados, Michael D; Carret, Anne-Sophie; Ellezam, Benjamin; Crevier, Louis; Klekner, Almos; Bognar, Laszlo; Hauser, Peter; Garami, Miklos; Myseros, John; Dong, Zhifeng; Siegel, Peter M; Malkin, Hayley; Ligon, Azra H; Albrecht, Steffen; Pfister, Stefan M; Ligon, Keith L; Majewski, Jacek; Jabado, Nada; Kieran, Mark W

    2014-05-01

    Pediatric midline high-grade astrocytomas (mHGAs) are incurable with few treatment targets identified. Most tumors harbor mutations encoding p.Lys27Met in histone H3 variants. In 40 treatment-naive mHGAs, 39 analyzed by whole-exome sequencing, we find additional somatic mutations specific to tumor location. Gain-of-function mutations in ACVR1 occur in tumors of the pons in conjunction with histone H3.1 p.Lys27Met substitution, whereas FGFR1 mutations or fusions occur in thalamic tumors associated with histone H3.3 p.Lys27Met substitution. Hyperactivation of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-ACVR1 developmental pathway in mHGAs harboring ACVR1 mutations led to increased levels of phosphorylated SMAD1, SMAD5 and SMAD8 and upregulation of BMP downstream early-response genes in tumor cells. Global DNA methylation profiles were significantly associated with the p.Lys27Met alteration, regardless of the mutant histone H3 variant and irrespective of tumor location, supporting the role of this substitution in driving the epigenetic phenotype. This work considerably expands the number of potential treatment targets and further justifies pretreatment biopsy in pediatric mHGA as a means to orient therapeutic efforts in this disease.

  1. Assay of anticancer drugs in tissue culture: cell cultures of biopsies from human astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Morgan, D; Freshney, R I; Darling, J L; Thomas, D G; Celik, F

    1983-02-01

    A method has been developed for measuring the drug sensitivity of human gliomas in short-term culture, using scintillation counting or autofluorography. Cell cultures prepared from malignant astrocytomas were treated with anticancer drugs whilst in exponential growth in microtitration plates. After drug treatment and a recovery period, residual viability was measured by [3H] leucine incorporation followed by scintillation counting or by [35S] methionine incorporation and autofluorography in situ. In 5 glioma cell lines tested against 6 drugs, the microtitration method correlated well with monolayer cloning. Although replicate samples of the same tumour showed little variation in chemosensitivity, there was marked variation between the chemosensitivities of cultures derived from the tumours of different patients. However, as variability between replicates was apparent during drug exposure or shortly after, it is important to allow the assay to run as long as possible after drug removal. It is hoped that this assay may provide the basis of a method for the prediction of in vivo chemosensitivity or the screening of potential chemotherapeutic drugs.

  2. Assay of anticancer drugs in tissue culture: cell cultures of biopsies from human astrocytoma.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, D.; Freshney, R. I.; Darling, J. L.; Thomas, D. G.; Celik, F.

    1983-01-01

    A method has been developed for measuring the drug sensitivity of human gliomas in short-term culture, using scintillation counting or autofluorography. Cell cultures prepared from malignant astrocytomas were treated with anticancer drugs whilst in exponential growth in microtitration plates. After drug treatment and a recovery period, residual viability was measured by [3H] leucine incorporation followed by scintillation counting or by [35S] methionine incorporation and autofluorography in situ. In 5 glioma cell lines tested against 6 drugs, the microtitration method correlated well with monolayer cloning. Although replicate samples of the same tumour showed little variation in chemosensitivity, there was marked variation between the chemosensitivities of cultures derived from the tumours of different patients. However, as variability between replicates was apparent during drug exposure or shortly after, it is important to allow the assay to run as long as possible after drug removal. It is hoped that this assay may provide the basis of a method for the prediction of in vivo chemosensitivity or the screening of potential chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:6297528

  3. A Case of Central Precocious Puberty Due to Concomitant Hypothalamic Hamartoma and Juvenile Pilocytic Astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Çatlı, Gönül; Abacı, Ayhan; Anık, Ahmet; Güleryüz, Handan; Özer, Erdener; Öcal, İrfan; Yüceer, Nurullah; Mutafoğlu, Kamer

    2014-01-01

    Central precocious puberty (CPP) is caused by premature activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis. More than 50% of boys with CPP have an identifiable etiology. Hypothalamic hamartoma (HH), hydrocephalus, tumors, infections, congenital defects, ischemia, radiation, or injury of the brain are the most common causes of secondary CPP. In this report, we present the case of a 2 years and 9 months old male patient who had a 30x40 mm contrast-enhancing suprasellar mass and was histopathologically diagnosed with giant HH. However, since HHs are designated as non-enhancing masses, considering the possibility of an incomplete diagnosis of a glial tumor, the patient was followed up. Clinical and radiological follow-up revealed stable findings with no evidence of tumor growth until the third year after surgery when he presented with neurological deficit due to the rapid growth of the suprasellar mass. After the second surgery, histopathological examination of the biopsy specimen revealed the lesion to be a juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma (PA). The concomitance of HH and juvenile PA is very rare. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient with concomitant juvenile PA and HH who developed CPP and did not have gelastic epilepsy despite the rapidly growing giant mass. PMID:25241615

  4. H/sub 1/-histamine receptors regulate phosphoinositide hydrolysis in human astrocytoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakahata, N.; Harden, T.K.

    1986-03-05

    Activation of H/sub 1/-histamine receptors on 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells resulted in a rapid formation of the inositol phosphates (InsP), IP/sub 3/, IP/sub 2/, and IP/sub 1/. Histamine-induced mobilization of Ca/sup + +/ and stimulated of a Ca/sup + +/ calmodulin-regulated phosphodiesterase occurred concurrently with histamine-stimulated InsP formation. The K/sub 0.5/ values for histamine for activation of phosphodiesterase, mobilization of Ca/sup + +/, and stimulation of InsP formation were 3,4, and 10 ..mu..M, respectively. The K/sub i/ for histamine determined in competition binding experiments with the H/sub 1/-receptor antagonist, /sup 3/H-mepyramine, was 11 ..mu..M. As with muscarinic receptor-mediated effects in these cells, inactivation of G/sub i/ with pertussis toxin had no effect on H/sub 1/-receptor mediated responses. Both histamine and muscarinic receptor stimulation resulted in the formation of Ins 1,4,5P/sub 3/ and Ins 1,3,4P/sub 3/. In contrast to muscarinic receptor stimulation, which results in a linear accumulation of InsP for greater than 30 min, histamine-stimulated formation of InsP rapidly desensitized.

  5. Everolimus: in patients with subependymal giant cell astrocytoma associated with tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Curran, Monique P

    2012-02-01

    Everolimus is an orally administered inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Everolimus (starting dosage 3.0 mg/m(2)) was associated with a significant reduction in the volume of the largest subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) in 28 patients aged ≥3 years with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) in a phase II trial (C2485). At 6 months, 32% of patients treated with everolimus had a ≥50% reduction in the volume of their largest SEGA lesion (assessed via an independent central radiology review); 75% had a ≥30% reduction. No patients developed new lesions. During the extension phase of this trial (median duration 34 months), the reduction in SEGA volume was maintained, with no everolimus recipient requiring surgery or other therapy for SEGA or hydrocephalus. In a phase III trial (EXIST-1) in 117 patients with SEGA associated with TSC, 35% of everolimus recipients (starting dosage 4.5 mg/m(2)) versus none of the placebo recipients (p < 0.0001) had an overall response (a reduction in the sum of all target SEGA volumes of ≥50% relative to baseline, nonworsening of non-target SEGA lesions, no new SEGA lesions, and no new/worsening hydrocephalus). Everolimus was generally well tolerated in patients with SEGA associated with TSC; most drug-related adverse reactions were mild to moderate in severity.

  6. Purine and pyrimidine nucleosides preserve human astrocytoma cell adenylate energy charge under ischemic conditions.

    PubMed

    Balestri, Francesco; Giannecchini, Michela; Sgarrella, Francesco; Carta, Maria Caterina; Tozzi, Maria Grazia; Camici, Marcella

    2007-02-01

    The brain depends on both glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation for maintenance of ATP pools. Astrocytes play an integral role in brain functions providing trophic supports and energy substrates for neurons. In this paper, we report that human astrocytoma cells (ADF) undergoing ischemic conditions may use both purine and pyrimidine nucleosides as energy source to slow down cellular damage. The cells are subjected to metabolic stress conditions by exclusion of glucose and incubation with oligomycin (an inhibitor of oxidative phosphorylation). This treatment brings about a depletion of the ATP pool, with a concomitant increase in the AMP levels, which results in a significant decrease of the adenylate energy charge. The presence of purine nucleosides in the culture medium preserves the adenylate energy charge, and improves cell viability. Besides purine nucleosides, also pyrimidine nucleosides, such as uridine and, to a lesser extent, cytidine, are able to preserve the ATP pool. The determination of lactate in the incubation medium indicates that nucleosides can preserve the ATP pool through anaerobic glycolysis, thus pointing to a relevant role of the phosphorolytic cleavage of the N-glycosidic bond of nucleosides which generates, without energy expense, the phosphorylated pentose, which through the pentose phosphate pathway and glycolysis can be converted to energetic intermediates also in the absence of oxygen. In fact, ADF cells possess both purine nucleoside phosphorylase and uridine phosphorylase activities.

  7. Stereotactic interstitial brachytherapy of malignant astrocytomas with remarks on postimplantation computed tomographic appearance

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, B.K.; Heilbrun, M.P.; Sapozink, M.D.; McDonald, P.R.

    1988-09-01

    Seventeen patients were treated with stereotactically implanted high activity iodine-125 seeds, 12 patients for recurrent malignant astrocytomas (Protocol I) and 5 patients for newly diagnosed glioblastomas (Protocol II). Total radiation dosage to the recurrent tumors in Protocol I, including prior external beam irradiation, averaged 13,500 cGy. In the follow-up period of 6 to 50 months, the survival rate was 93% at 6 months, 60% at 12 months, 50% at 18 months, and 38% at 24 months after implantation. In Protocol II, brachytherapy was used as an interstitial radiation boost to the conventional treatment of newly diagnosed glioblastomas. External beam therapy and interstitial brachytherapy provided 11,000 cGy to these tumors. In the follow-up period of 15 to 27 months, there was a 100% survival at 12 months, 75% at 18 months, and 25% at 24 months after implantation. Eight of our 17 patients required reoperation for persistent or recurrent mass lesions at 6 to 15 months postimplantation; 7 were found to harbor masses of radionecrosis containing nests of anaplastic astrocytes; 1 had frank tumor recurrence. Median survival in this group of patients requiring reoperation was 18.7 months postimplantation. In a review of postimplantation computed tomographic scans, significant mass effect and crossover of hypodensity or enhancement into the corpus callosum or opposite hemisphere were found to have prognostic significance; persistent areas of contrast enhancement and excessive peritumoral hypodensity did not.

  8. Infective capacity of Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii in a human astrocytoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Olave, M C; Vargas-Zambrano, J C; Celis, A M; Castañeda, E; González, J M

    2017-03-24

    Pathogenesis of cryptococcosis in the central nervous system (CNS) is a topic of ongoing research, including the mechanisms by which this fungus invades and infects the brain. Astrocytes, the most common CNS cells, play a fundamental role in the local immune response. Astrocytes might participate in cryptococcosis either as a host or by responding to fungal antigens. To determine the infectivity of Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii and Cryptococcus gattii in a human astrocytoma cell line and the induction of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. A glioblastoma cell line was infected with C. neoformans var. grubii and C. gattii blastoconidia labelled with FUN-1 fluorescent stain. The percentage of infection and expression of HLA class I and II molecules were determined by flow cytometry. The interactions between the fungi and cells were observed by fluorescence microscopy. There was no difference between C. neoformans var. grubii and C. gattii in the percentage infection, but C. neoformans var. grubii induced higher expression of HLA class II than C. gattii. More blastoconidia were recovered from C. neoformans-infected cells than from C. gattii infected cells. Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii may have different virulence mechanisms that allow its survival in human glia-derived cells.

  9. Recurrent somatic mutations in ACVR1 in pediatric midline high-grade astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Fontebasso, Adam M.; Papillon-Cavanagh, Simon; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Nikbakht, Hamid; Gerges, Noha; Fiset, Pierre-Olivier; Bechet, Denise; Faury, Damien; De Jay, Nicolas; Ramkissoon, Lori; Corcoran, Aoife; Jones, David T W; Sturm, Dominik; Johann, Pascal; Tomita, Tadanori; Goldman, Stewart; Nagib, Mahmoud; Bendel, Anne; Goumnerova, Liliana; Bowers, Daniel C.; Leonard, Jeffrey R.; Rubin, Joshua B.; Alden, Tord; Browd, Samuel; Geyer, J. Russell; Leary, Sarah; Jallo, George; Cohen, Kenneth; Gupta, Nalin; Prados, Michael D.; Carret, Anne-Sophie; Ellezam, Benjamin; Crevier, Louis; Klekner, Almos; Bognar, Laszlo; Hauser, Peter; Garami, Miklos; Myseros, John; Dong, Zhifeng; Siegel, Peter M.; Malkin, Hayley; Ligon, Azra; Albrecht, Steffen; Pfister, Stefan M.; Ligon, Keith L.; Majewski, Jacek; Jabado, Nada; Kieran, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    Midline pediatric high-grade astrocytomas (pHGAs) are incurable with few treatment targets identified. Most tumors harbor K27M mutations on histone 3 variants. In 40 treatment-naïve midline pHGAs, 39 analyzed by whole-exome sequencing, we find additional somatic mutations specific to tumor location. Gain-of-function mutations in ACVR1 occur in tumors of the pons in conjunction with H3.1 K27M, while FGFR1 mutations/fusions occur in thalamic tumors associated with H3.3 K27M. Hyper-activation of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)/ACVR1 developmental pathway in pHGAs harbouring ACVR1 mutations led to increased phospho-SMAD1/5/8 expression and up-regulation of BMP downstream early response genes in tumour cells. Global DNA methylation profiles were significantly associated with the K27M mutation regardless of the mutant H3 variant and irrespective of tumor location, supporting its role in driving the epigenetic phenotype. This significantly expands the potential treatment targets and further justifies pre-treatment biopsy in pHGA as a means to orient therapeutic efforts in this disease. PMID:24705250

  10. Effect of brefelamide on HGF-induced survival of 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Honma, Shigeyoshi; Takasaka, Sachina; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shibuya, Takahiro; Mitazaki, Satoru; Abe, Sumiko; Yoshida, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    Malignant gliomas are characterized by their high level of resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy and new treatment options are urgently required. We previously demonstrated that brefelamide, an aromatic amide isolated from methanol extracts of cellular slime molds Dictyostelium brefeldianum and D. giganteum, had antiproliferative effects on 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells, a model of glioma. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms by which brefelamide inhibited 1321N1 and PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cell proliferation. When cells were cultured in serum-free medium, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) increased survival of 1321N1 cells but not PC12 cells. HGF receptor, c-MET, was strongly expressed in 1321N1 cells, but not in PC12 cells. Pretreatment of 1321N1 cells with brefelamide inhibited both HGF-induced cell survival and expression of c-MET. Phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and AKT was increased by HGF, but these changes were inhibited by brefelamide pretreatment. Moreover, HGF mRNA levels and secretion were reduced by brefelamide. These results suggest that brefelamide reduces survival of 1321N1 cells via multiple effects including suppression of HGF receptor expression and HGF secretion and inhibition of ERK and AKT phosphorylation.

  11. Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing in Molecular Subtyping of Lower-Grade Diffuse Gliomas: Application of the World Health Organization's 2016 Revised Criteria for Central Nervous System Tumors.

    PubMed

    Carter, Jamal H; McNulty, Samantha N; Cimino, Patrick J; Cottrell, Catherine E; Heusel, Jonathan W; Vigh-Conrad, Katinka A; Duncavage, Eric J

    2017-03-01

    The 2007 World Health Organization Classification of Tumours of the Central Nervous System classifies lower-grade gliomas [LGGs (grades II to III diffuse gliomas)] morphologically as astrocytomas or oligodendrogliomas, and tumors with unclear ambiguous morphology as oligoastrocytomas. The World Health Organization's newly released (2016) classification incorporates molecular data. A single, targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) panel was used for detecting single-nucleotide variation and copy number variation in 50 LGG cases originally classified using the 2007 criteria, including 36 oligoastrocytomas, 11 oligodendrogliomas, 2 astrocytomas, and 1 LGG not otherwise specified. NGS results were compared with those from IHC analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization to assess concordance and to categorize the tumors according to the 2016 criteria. NGS results were concordant with those from IHC analysis in all cases. In 3 cases, NGS was superior to fluorescence in situ hybridization in distinguishing segmental chromosomal losses from whole-arm deletions. The NGS approach was effective in reclassifying 36 oligoastrocytomas as 30 astrocytomas (20 IDH1/2 mutant and 10 IDH1/2 wild type) and 6 oligodendrogliomas, and 1 oligodendroglioma as an astrocytoma (IDH1/2 mutant). Here we show that a single, targeted NGS assay can serve as the sole testing modality for categorizing LGG according to the World Health Organization's 2016 diagnostic scheme. This modality affords greater accuracy and efficiency while reducing specimen tissue requirements compared with multimodal approaches.

  12. A Phase I Study of Mebendazole for the Treatment of Pediatric Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-30

    Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma; Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Glioma, Astrocytic; Optic Nerve Glioma; Pleomorphic Xanthoastrocytoma; Glioblastoma Multiforme; Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Gliosarcoma; Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma; DIPG; Low-grade Glioma; Brainstem Glioma

  13. Promoter Methylation of RASSF1A Associates to Adult Secondary Glioblastomas and Pediatric Glioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Jorge; Inda, María del Mar; Lázcoz, Paula; Zazpe, Idoya; Fan, Xing; Alfaro, Jorge; Tuñón, Teresa; Rey, Juan A.; Castresana, Javier S.

    2012-01-01

    While allelic losses and mutations of tumor suppressor genes implicated in the etiology of astrocytoma have been widely assessed, the role of epigenetics is still a matter of study. We analyzed the frequency of promoter hypermethylation by methylation-specific PCR (MSP) in five tumor suppressor genes (PTEN, MGMT, RASSF1A, p14ARF, and p16INK4A), in astrocytoma samples and cell lines. RASSF1A was the most frequently hypermethylated gene in all grades of astrocytoma samples, in cell lines, and in adult secondary GBM. It was followed by MGMT. PTEN showed a slight methylation signal in only one GBM and one pilocytic astrocytoma, and in two cell lines; while p14ARF and p16INK4A did not show any evidence of methylation in primary tumors or cell lines. In pediatric GBM, RASSF1A was again the most frequently altered gene, followed by MGMT; PTEN, p14 and p16 showed no alterations. Lack or reduced expression of RASSF1A in cell lines was correlated with the presence of methylation. RASSF1A promoter hypermethylation might be used as a diagnostic marker for secondary GBM and pediatric GBM. Promoter hypermethylation might not be an important inactivation mechanism in other genes like PTEN, p14ARF and p16INK4A, in which other alterations (mutations, homozygous deletions) are prevalent. PMID:22389839

  14. A dangerous liaison: Leptin and sPLA2-IIA join forces to induce proliferation and migration of astrocytoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Rubén; Cordova, Claudia; Gutiérrez, Beatriz; Hernández, Marita; Nieto, María L.

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma, the most aggressive type of primary brain tumour, shows worse prognosis linked to diabetes or obesity persistence. These pathologies are chronic inflammatory conditions characterized by altered profiles of inflammatory mediators, including leptin and secreted phospholipase A2-IIA (sPLA2-IIA). Both proteins, in turn, display diverse pro-cancer properties in different cell types, including astrocytes. Herein, to understand the underlying relationship between obesity and brain tumors, we investigated the effect of leptin, alone or in combination with sPLA2-IIA on astrocytoma cell functions. sPLA2-IIA induced up-regulation of leptin receptors in 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells. Leptin, as well as sPLA2-IIA, increased growth and migration in these cells, through activation/phosphorylation of key proteins of survival cascades. Leptin, at concentrations with minimal or no activating effects on astrocytoma cells, enhanced growth and migration promoted by low doses of sPLA2-IIA. sPLA2-IIA alone induced a transient phosphorylation pattern in the Src/ERK/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K/rS6 pathway through EGFR transactivation, and co-addition of leptin resulted in a sustained phosphorylation of these signaling regulators. Mechanistically, EGFR transactivation and tyrosine- and serine/threonine-protein phosphatases revealed a key role in this leptin-sPLA2-IIA cross-talk. This cooperative partnership between both proteins was also found in primary astrocytes. These findings thus indicate that the adipokine leptin, by increasing the susceptibility of cells to inflammatory mediators, could contribute to worsen the prognosis of tumoral and neurodegenerative processes, being a potential mediator of some obesity-related medical complications. PMID:28249041

  15. A dangerous liaison: Leptin and sPLA2-IIA join forces to induce proliferation and migration of astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Martín, Rubén; Cordova, Claudia; Gutiérrez, Beatriz; Hernández, Marita; Nieto, María L

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma, the most aggressive type of primary brain tumour, shows worse prognosis linked to diabetes or obesity persistence. These pathologies are chronic inflammatory conditions characterized by altered profiles of inflammatory mediators, including leptin and secreted phospholipase A2-IIA (sPLA2-IIA). Both proteins, in turn, display diverse pro-cancer properties in different cell types, including astrocytes. Herein, to understand the underlying relationship between obesity and brain tumors, we investigated the effect of leptin, alone or in combination with sPLA2-IIA on astrocytoma cell functions. sPLA2-IIA induced up-regulation of leptin receptors in 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells. Leptin, as well as sPLA2-IIA, increased growth and migration in these cells, through activation/phosphorylation of key proteins of survival cascades. Leptin, at concentrations with minimal or no activating effects on astrocytoma cells, enhanced growth and migration promoted by low doses of sPLA2-IIA. sPLA2-IIA alone induced a transient phosphorylation pattern in the Src/ERK/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K/rS6 pathway through EGFR transactivation, and co-addition of leptin resulted in a sustained phosphorylation of these signaling regulators. Mechanistically, EGFR transactivation and tyrosine- and serine/threonine-protein phosphatases revealed a key role in this leptin-sPLA2-IIA cross-talk. This cooperative partnership between both proteins was also found in primary astrocytes. These findings thus indicate that the adipokine leptin, by increasing the susceptibility of cells to inflammatory mediators, could contribute to worsen the prognosis of tumoral and neurodegenerative processes, being a potential mediator of some obesity-related medical complications.

  16. Expression of the lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) in astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Stine S; Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte; Christensen, Karina G; Kristensen, Bjarne

    2013-01-01

    Targeting of lysosomes is a novel therapeutic anti-cancer strategy for killing the otherwise apoptosis-resistant cancer cells. Such strategies are urgently needed for treatment of brain tumors, especially the glioblastoma, which is the most frequent and most malignant type. The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of lysosomes in astrocytic brain tumors focussing also on the therapy resistant tumor stem cells. Expression of the lysosomal marker LAMP-1 (lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1) was investigated by immunohistochemistry in 112 formalin fixed paraffin embedded astrocytomas and compared with tumor grade and overall patient survival. Moreover, double immunofluorescence stainings were performed with LAMP-1 and the astrocytic marker GFAP and the putative stem cell marker CD133 on ten glioblastomas. Most tumors expressed the LAMP-1 protein in the cytoplasm of the tumor cells, while the blood vessels were positive in all tumors. The percentage of LAMP-1 positive tumor cells and staining intensities increased with tumor grade but variations in tumors of the same grade were also found. No association was found between LAMP-1 expression and patient overall survival in the individual tumor grades. LAMP-1/GFAP showed pronounced co-expression and LAMP-1/CD133 was co-expressed as well suggesting that tumor cells including the proposed tumor stem cells contain lysosomes. The results suggest that high amounts of lysosomes are present in glioblastomas and in the proposed tumor stem cells. Targeting of lysosomes may be a promising novel therapeutic strategy against this highly malignant neoplasm.

  17. Coexpression of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and PDGF-receptor genes by primary human astrocytomas may contribute to their development and maintenance.

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, M; Naber, S P; Wolfe, H J; Galanopoulos, T; Hedley-Whyte, E T; Black, P M; Antoniades, H N

    1990-01-01

    The present studies investigated the expression of the two PDGF genes (c-sis/PDGF-2 and PDGF-1) and the PDGF-receptor b gene (PDGF-R) in 34 primary human astrocytomas. Northern blot analysis demonstrated the coexpression of the c-sis/PDGF-2 protooncogene and the PDGF-R gene in all astrocytomas examined. The majority of the tumors also expressed the PDGF-1 gene. There was no correlation between the expression of the two PDGF genes. Nonmalignant human brain tissue expressed the PDGF-R and PDGF-1 genes but not the c-sis/PDGF-2 protooncogene. In situ hybridization of astrocytoma tissue localized the expression of the c-sis and PDGF-R mRNA's in tumor cells. Capillary endothelial cells also expressed c-sis mRNA. In contrast, nonmalignant human brain tissue expressed only PDGF-R mRNA but not c-sis/PDGF-2 mRNA. The coexpression of a potent mitogenic growth factor protooncogene (c-sis) and its receptor gene in astrocytoma tumor cells suggests the presence of an autocrine mechanism that may contribute to the development and maintenance of astrocytomas. The expression of c-sis mRNA in tumor cells but not in nonmalignant brain cells may serve as an additional diagnostic criterion for the detection of astrocytomas in small tissue specimen using in situ hybridization for the detection of c-sis mRNA and/or immunostaining for the recognition of its protein product. Images PMID:2164040

  18. OP32A COMBINED STRATEGY FOR THE DETECTION OF BRAF FUSIONS IN PILOCYTIC ASTROCYTOMA USING RT-PCR AND FISH

    PubMed Central

    Faulkner, C.; Shaw, A.; Wragg, C.; Greenslade, M.; Haynes, H.; Williams, H.; Lowis, S.; Williams, M.; Kurian, K.M.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Pilocytic astrocytomas can show a wide morphological spectrum making definitive histological diagnosis challenging. The FISH test for KIAA1549-BRAF fusions is most commonly used, but this is difficult to interpret. We aimed to develop a real-time PCR (RT-PCR) test as a first-line screen for the three most common KIAA1549-BRAF fusion variants. METHOD: A RT-PCR method for detecting KIAA1549-BRAF fusions from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) brain tumour tissues (pilocytic astrocytoma). The three most common fusion variants are detected using this assay: exon 16 of KIAA1549 fused to exon 9 of BRAF, exon 15 of KIAA1549 fused to exon 9 of BRAF and exon 16 of KIAA1549 fused to exon 11 of BRAF fusion. GAPDH expression was used as a control. RESULTS: The RT-PCR assay was initially validated on 12 samples previously tested by FISH or RT-PCR in a different laboratory. The RT-PCR assay had a sensitivity of 89% (8/9 - one sample tested positive by FISH but negative on RT-PCR) and a specificity of 100% (2/2). The failure rate was 8.3% (1/12). Sensitivity experiments showed that the fusion can be detected when present at a least 5% of the total cDNA content. 51 Neuropathology diagnostic FFPE samples from 42 pilocytic astrocytoma patients were then tested using the BRAF fusion RT-PCR assay. The overall pick-up rate was 54% (20/37 patients) Of the positive patients (20), 55% (11/20) had the 16-9 fusion and 45% (9/20) had the 15-9 fusion. Two patients had multiple fusions (2/20 positive patients, 10%) showing the 16-9 fusion and a low-level 16-11 fusion. No patients exclusively had the 16-11 fusion. CONCLUSION: We propose RTPCR first line for fusion analysis followed by FISH, for pilocytic astrocytoma.

  19. Long survival in a child with a mutated K27M-H3.3 pilocytic astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Hochart, Audrey; Escande, Fabienne; Rocourt, Nathalie; Grill, Jacques; Koubi-Pick, Valérie; Beaujot, Juliette; Meignan, Samuel; Vinchon, Matthieu; Maurage, Claude Alain; Leblond, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    We report the first case of a child with a H3F3A K27M mutated pilocytic astrocytoma, who presented with a 10 years survival, and underwent spontaneous malignant transformation. The complex tumoral chromosomal rearrangements were consistent for genomic instability and for the histopathological features of malignant transformation into glioblastoma. H3F3A K27M mutations are rarely observed in benign neoplasms and may be associated with an adverse outcome. This mutation might not be the major driver that led to the onset of tumorigenesis, and we could consider that the associated TP53 mutation, would be required for malignant transformation. PMID:25909089

  20. Diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Hidenao

    Recent advances of magnetic resonance imaging have been described, especially stressed on the diffusion sequences. We have recently applied the diffusion sequence to functional brain imaging, and found the appropriate results. In addition to the neurosciences fields, diffusion weighted images have improved the accuracies of clinical diagnosis depending upon magnetic resonance images in stroke as well as inflammations.

  1. Increased expression of stefin B in the nucleus of T98G astrocytoma cells delays caspase activation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Tao; Turk, Vito; Turk, Boris; Kopitar-Jerala, Nataša

    2012-01-01

    Stefin B (cystatin B) is an endogenous inhibitor of cysteine proteinases localized in the nucleus and the cytosol. Loss-of-function mutations in the stefin B gene (CSTB) gene were reported in patients with Unverricht-Lundborg disease (EPM1). Our previous results showed that thymocytes isolated from stefin B-deficient mice are more sensitive to apoptosis induced by the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor staurosporin (STS) than the wild-type control cells. We have also shown that the increased expression of stefin B in the nucleus of T98G astrocytoma cells delayed cell cycle progression through the S phase. In the present study we examined if the nuclear or cytosolic functions of stefin B are responsible for the accelerated induction of apoptosis observed in the cells from stefin B-deficient mice. We have shown that the overexpression of stefin B in the nucleus, but not in the cytosol of astrocytoma T98G cells, delayed caspase-3 and -7 activation. Pretreatment of cells with the pan-caspase inhibitor z-Val-Ala-Asp(OMe)-fluoromethylketone completely inhibited caspase activation, while treatment with the inhibitor of calpains- and papain-like cathepsins (2S,3S)-trans-epoxysuccinyl-leucylamido-3-methyl-butane ethyl ester did not prevent caspase activation. We concluded that the delay of caspase activation in T98G cells overexpressing stefin B in the nucleus is independent of cathepsin inhibition. PMID:23049497

  2. Phytometabolite Dehydroleucodine Induces Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis, and DNA Damage in Human Astrocytoma Cells through p73/p53 Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Bailon-Moscoso, Natalia; González-Arévalo, Gabriela; Velásquez-Rojas, Gabriela; Malagon, Omar; Vidari, Giovanni; Zentella-Dehesa, Alejandro; Ratovitski, Edward A.; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports the idea that secondary metabolites obtained from medicinal plants (phytometabolites) may be important contributors in the development of new chemotherapeutic agents to reduce the occurrence or recurrence of cancer. Our study focused on Dehydroleucodine (DhL), a sesquiterpene found in the provinces of Loja and Zamora-Chinchipe. In this study, we showed that DhL displayed cytostatic and cytotoxic activities on the human cerebral astrocytoma D384 cell line. With lactone isolated from Gynoxys verrucosa Wedd, a medicinal plant from Ecuador, we found that DhL induced cell death in D384 cells by triggering cell cycle arrest and inducing apoptosis and DNA damage. We further found that the cell death resulted in the increased expression of CDKN1A and BAX proteins. A marked induction of the levels of total TP73 and phosphorylated TP53, TP73, and γ-H2AX proteins was observed in D384 cells exposed to DhL, but no increase in total TP53 levels was detected. Overall these studies demonstrated the marked effect of DhL on the diminished survival of human astrocytoma cells through the induced expression of TP73 and phosphorylation of TP73 and TP53, suggesting their key roles in the tumor cell response to DhL treatment. PMID:26309132

  3. Prognostic significance of an apoptotic index and apoptosis/proliferation ratio for patients with high-grade astrocytomas.

    PubMed Central

    Kuriyama, Hiroko; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; O'Fallon, Judith R.; Iturria, N.; Sebo, Thomas; Schaefer, Paul L.; Scheithauer, Bernd W.; Buckner, Jan C.; Kuriyama, Nagato; Jenkins, Robert B.; Israel, Mark A.

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the association of spontaneous apoptosis and an apoptosis/proliferation index with survival to determine the potential of such measures to serve as predictive markers for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). We examined the extent of spontaneous apoptosis in tumors from newly diagnosed patients, 75 with GBM and 21 with anaplastic astrocytoma, who were entered on treatment protocols of the North Central Cancer Treatment Group. In the group of GBM patients, those with a higher apoptotic index tended to live longer ( P = 0.04; Cox proportional hazards model including performance score, age, and extent of resection in a multivariate model). We found that the apoptotic index values for anaplastic astrocytoma patients tended to be lower than those in the GBM patients, although with small sample sizes, the result was not statistically significant ( P = 0.1). We also examined expression of the Ki-67 cell proliferation antigen immunohistochemically using the MIB-1 monoclonal antibody. Ki-67 expression did not provide additional information regarding the survival of patients with GBM. In this group of GBM patients, those patients with higher apoptotic index/proliferation ratios had a better prognosis than did those with a low ratio ( P < 0.021, same model as above). These findings suggest that both apoptosis and a cell death/cell proliferation ratio are associated with patient survival, and they may be useful for either the clinical evaluation of patients with GBM or the stratification of patients for treatment evaluation. PMID:12084348

  4. A model of a patient-derived IDH1 mutant anaplastic astrocytoma with alternative lengthening of telomeres

    PubMed Central

    Borodovsky, Alexandra; Meeker, Alan K.; Kirkness, Ewen F.; Zhao, Qi; Eberhart, Charles G.; Gallia, Gary L.; Riggins, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) have been found in the vast majority of low grade and progressive infiltrating gliomas and are characterized by the production of 2-hydroxyglutarate from α-ketoglutarate. Recent investigations of malignant gliomas have identified additional genetic and chromosomal abnormalities which cluster with IDH1 mutations into two distinct subgroups. The astrocytic subgroup was found to have frequent mutations in ATRX, TP53 and displays alternative lengthening of telomeres. The second subgroup with oligodendrocytic morphology has frequent mutations in CIC or FUBP1, and is linked to co-deletion of the 1p/19q arms. These mutations reflect the development of two distinct molecular pathways representing the majority of IDH1 mutant gliomas. Unfortunately, due to the scarcity of endogenously derived IDH1 mutant models, there is a lack of accurate models to study mechanism and develop new therapy. Here we report the generation of an endogenous IDH1 anaplastic astrocytoma in vivo model with concurrent mutations in TP53, CDKN2A and ATRX. The model has a similar phenotype and histopathology as the original patient tumor, expresses the IDH1 (R132H) mutant protein and exhibits an alternative lengthening of telomeres phenotype. The JHH-273 model is characteristic of anaplastic astrocytoma and represents a valuable tool for investigating the pathogenesis of this distinct molecular subset of gliomas and for preclinical testing of compounds targeting IDH1 mutations or alternative lengthening of telomeres. PMID:25471051

  5. Prognostic impact of the 2016 WHO classification of diffuse gliomas in the French POLA cohort.

    PubMed

    Tabouret, Emeline; Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Dehais, Caroline; Carpentier, Catherine; Ducray, François; Idbaih, Ahmed; Mokhtari, Karima; Jouvet, Anne; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Colin, Carole; Chinot, Olivier; Loiseau, Hugues; Moyal, Elisabeth; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Polivka, Marc; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuèle; Desenclos, Christine; Meyronet, David; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Figarella-Branger, Dominique

    2016-10-01

    The new WHO classification of diffuse gliomas has been refined and now includes the 1p/19q codeletion, IDH1/2 mutation, and histone H3-K27M mutation. Our objective was to assess the prognostic value of the updated 2016 WHO classification in the French POLA cohort. All cases of high-grade oligodendroglial tumors sent for central pathological review and included into the French nationwide POLA cohort were reclassified according to the updated 4th WHO classification. In total, 1041 patients were included, with a median age at diagnosis of 50.4 years (range 17.1-84.4). Based on the new histomolecular classification, diagnoses included anaplastic oligodendroglioma IDH mutant and 1p/19q-codeleted (32.5 %), anaplastic astrocytoma IDH mutant (IDH (mut)) (11.0 %), anaplastic astrocytoma IDH wild type (IDH (wt)) (5.3 %), glioblastoma IDH (mut) (17.1 %), and glioblastoma IDH (wt) (33.2 %). Ten patients presented with a diffuse midline tumor, H3 K27M mutant. The new WHO classification was prognostic for progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) (p < 0.001). We did not find prognosis differences between grades III and IV for IDH (mut) 1p/19q intact and IDH (wt) gliomas in univariate and multivariate analyses. Among anaplastic astrocytoma IDH (wt), cases with chromosome arm 7p gain and 10q loss (55 %) had shorter PFS than the others (p = 0.027). In conclusion, the new WHO histomolecular classification of diffuse gliomas presented with high prognostic value. Grading was not discriminant between grade III and IV high-grade gliomas.

  6. Immunohistochemistry on IDH 1/2, ATRX, p53 and Ki-67 substitute molecular genetic testing and predict patient prognosis in grade III adult diffuse gliomas.

    PubMed

    Takano, Shingo; Ishikawa, Eiichi; Sakamoto, Noriaki; Matsuda, Masahide; Akutsu, Hiroyoshi; Noguchi, Masayuki; Kato, Yukinari; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Matsumura, Akira

    2016-04-01

    The molecular subgrouping of diffuse gliomas was recently found to stratify patients into prognostically distinct groups better than histological classification. Among several molecular parameters, the key molecules for the subtype diagnosis of diffuse gliomas are IDH mutation, 1p/19q co-deletion, and ATRX mutation; 1p/19q co-deletion is undetectable by immunohistochemistry, but is mutually exclusive with ATRX and p53 mutation in IDH mutant gliomas. Therefore, we applied ATRX and p53 immunohistochemistry instead of 1p/19q co-deletion analysis. The prognostic value of immunohistochemical diagnosis for Grade III gliomas was subsequently investigated. Then, the same immunohistochmical diagnostic approach was expanded for the evaluation of Grade II and IV diffuse glioma prognosis. The results indicate immunohistochemical analysis including IDH1/2, ATRX, p53, and Ki-67 index is valuable for the classification of diffuse gliomas, which is useful for the evaluation of prognosis, especially Grade III gliomas and lower-grade gliomas (i.e., Grade II and III).

  7. Influence of insurance status and income in anaplastic astrocytoma: an analysis of 4325 patients.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jacob Y; Yoon, Ja Kyoung; Diaz, Aidnag Z

    2016-11-18

    To determine the impact of insurance status and income for anaplastic astrocytoma (AA). Data were extracted from the National Cancer Data Base. Chi square test, Kaplan-Meier method, and Cox regression models were employed in SPSS 22.0 (Armonk, NY: IBM Corp.) for data analyses. 4325 patients with AA diagnosed from 2004 to 2013 were identified. 2781 (64.3%) had private insurance, 925 (21.4%) Medicare, 396 (9.2%) Medicaid, and 223 (5.2%) were uninsured. Those uninsured were more likely to be Black or Hispanic versus White or Asian (p < 0.001), have lower median income (p < 0.001), less educated (p < 0.001), and not receive adjuvant chemoradiation (p < 0.001). 1651 (38.2%) had income ≥$63,000, 1204 (27.8%) $48,000-$62,999, 889 (20.5%) $38,000-$47,999, and 581 (13.4%) had income <$38,000. Those with lower income were more likely to be Black or Hispanic versus White or Asian (p < 0.001), uninsured (p < 0.001), reside in a rural area (p < 0.001), less educated (p < 0.001), and not receive adjuvant chemoradiation (p < 0.001). Those with private insurance had significantly higher overall survival (OS) than those uninsured, on Medicaid, or on Medicare (p < 0.001). Those with income ≥$63,000 had significantly higher OS than those with lower income (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, age, insurance status, income, and adjuvant therapy were independent prognostic factors for OS. Being uninsured and having income <$38,000 were independent prognostic factors for worse OS in AA. Further investigations are warranted to help determine ways to ensure adequate medical care for those who may be socially disadvantaged so that outcome can be maximized for all patients regardless of socioeconomic status.

  8. Clinical Factors for Prognosis and Treatment Guidance of Spinal Cord Astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Hida, Kazutoshi; Yano, Shunsuke; Aoyama, Takeshi; Koyanagi, Izumi; Sasamori, Toru; Hamauch, Shuji; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To obtain information useful in establishing treatment guidelines by evaluating baseline clinical features and treatment outcomes of patients with spinal cord astrocytoma (SCA). Overview of Literature The optimal management of SCA remains controversial, and there are no standard guidelines. Methods The study included 20 patients with low-grade and 13 with high-grade SCA surgically treated between 1989 and 2014. Patients were classified according to the extent of surgical resection. Survival was assessed using Kaplan–Meier plots and compared between groups by log-rank tests. Neurological status was defined by the modified McCormick scale and compared between groups by Mann–Whitney U tests. Results Surgical resection was performed for 19 of 20 low-grade (95%) and 10 of 13 high-grade (76.9%) SCA patients. Only nine patients (27.3%) underwent gross total resection, all of whom had low-grade SCA. Of all patients, 51.5% showed deteriorated neurological status compared to preoperative baseline. Median overall survival was significantly longer for low-grade SCA than that (91 months, 78% at 5 years vs. 15 months, 31% at 5 years; p=0.007). Low-grade SCA patients benefited from more aggressive resection, whereas high-grade SCA patients did not. Multivariate analysis revealed histology status (hazard ratio [HR], 0.30; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.09–0.98; p<0.05) and postoperative neurological status (HR, 0.12; CI, 0.02–0.95; p<0.05) as independent predictors of longer overall survival. Adjuvant radiotherapy had no significant impact on survival rate. However, a trend for increased survival was observed with radiation cordotomy (RCT) in high-grade SCA patients. Conclusions Aggressive resection for low-grade and RCT may prolong survival. Preservation of neurological status is an important treatment goal. Given the low incidence of SCA, establishing strong collaborative, interdisciplinary, and multi-institutional study groups

  9. Griffith diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.-T.; Nelson, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    Contoured wall diffusers are designed by using an inverse method. The prescribed wall velocity distribution(s) was taken from the high lift airfoil designed by A. A. Griffith in 1938; therefore, such diffusers are named Griffith diffusers. First the formulation of the inverse problem and the method of solution are outlined. Then the typical contour of a two-dimensional diffuser and velocity distributions across the flow channel at various stations are presented. For a Griffith diffuser to operate as it is designed, boundary layer suction is necessary. Discussion of the percentage of through-flow required to be removed for the purpose of boundary layer control is given. Finally, reference is made to the latest version of a computer program for a two-dimensional diffuser requiring only area ratio, nondimensional length and suction percentage as inputs.

  10. [Adolescent and Young Adults (AYAS) brain tumor national Web conference. On behalf of ANOCEF, GO-AJA and SFCE societies].

    PubMed

    Frappaz, Didier; Sunyach, Marie-Pierre; Le Rhun, Emilie; Blonski, Marie; Laurence, Valérie; Bonneville Levard, Alice; Loiseau, Hugues; Meyronnet, David; Callies, Arnaud; Laigle-Donadey, F; Faure Conter, Cecile

    2016-12-01

    The skills of adult versus pediatric neuro-oncologists are not completely similar though additive. Because the tumors and their protocols are different and the tolerance and expected sequelae are specific. Multidisciplinary meetings including adult and pediatric neuro-oncologists are warranted to share expertise. Since 2008, a weekly national web based conference was held in France. Any patient with the following criteria could be discussed: Adolescent and Young Adults aged between 15 and 25 years, and any adult with a pediatric type pathology, including medulloblastoma, germ cell tumors, embryonic tumors, ependymoma, pilocytic astrocytoma.

  11. PROX1 is a novel pathway-specific prognostic biomarker for high-grade astrocytomas; results from independent glioblastoma cohorts stratified by age and IDH mutation status

    PubMed Central

    Edqvist, Per-Henrik D.; Hägerstrand, Daniel; Carlson, Joseph; Lysiak, Malgorzata; Henriksson, Roger; Pontén, Fredrik; Rosell, Johan; Söderkvist, Peter; Stupp, Roger; Tchougounova, Elena; Nistér, Monica; Malmström, Annika; Smits, Anja

    2016-01-01

    PROX1 is a transcription factor with an essential role in embryonic development and determination of cell fate. In addition, PROX1 has been ascribed suppressive as well as oncogenic roles in several human cancers, including brain tumors. In this study we explored the correlation between PROX1 expression and patient survival in high-grade astrocytomas. For this purpose, we analyzed protein expression in tissue microarrays of tumor samples stratified by patient age and IDH mutation status. We initially screened 86 unselected high-grade astrocytomas, followed by 174 IDH1-R132H1 immunonegative glioblastomas derived from patients aged 60 years and older enrolled in the Nordic phase III trial of elderly patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Representing the younger population of glioblastomas, we studied 80 IDH-wildtype glioblastomas from patients aged 18-60 years. There was no correlation between PROX1 protein and survival for patients with primary glioblastomas included in these cohorts. In contrast, high expression of PROX1 protein predicted shorter survival in the group of patients with IDH-mutant anaplastic astrocytomas and secondary glioblastomas. The prognostic impact of PROX1 in IDH-mutant 1p19q non-codeleted high-grade astrocytomas, as well as the negative findings in primary glioblastomas, was corroborated by gene expression data extracted from the Cancer Genome Atlas. We conclude that PROX1 is a new prognostic biomarker for 1p19q non-codeleted high-grade astrocytomas that have progressed from pre-existing low-grade tumors and harbor IDH mutations. PMID:27626492

  12. PROX1 is a novel pathway-specific prognostic biomarker for high-grade astrocytomas; results from independent glioblastoma cohorts stratified by age and IDH mutation status.

    PubMed

    Roodakker, Kenney R; Elsir, Tamador; Edqvist, Per-Henrik D; Hägerstrand, Daniel; Carlson, Joseph; Lysiak, Malgorzata; Henriksson, Roger; Pontén, Fredrik; Rosell, Johan; Söderkvist, Peter; Stupp, Roger; Tchougounova, Elena; Nistér, Monica; Malmström, Annika; Smits, Anja

    2016-11-08

    PROX1 is a transcription factor with an essential role in embryonic development and determination of cell fate. In addition, PROX1 has been ascribed suppressive as well as oncogenic roles in several human cancers, including brain tumors. In this study we explored the correlation between PROX1 expression and patient survival in high-grade astrocytomas. For this purpose, we analyzed protein expression in tissue microarrays of tumor samples stratified by patient age and IDH mutation status. We initially screened 86 unselected high-grade astrocytomas, followed by 174 IDH1-R132H1 immunonegative glioblastomas derived from patients aged 60 years and older enrolled in the Nordic phase III trial of elderly patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Representing the younger population of glioblastomas, we studied 80 IDH-wildtype glioblastomas from patients aged 18-60 years. There was no correlation between PROX1 protein and survival for patients with primary glioblastomas included in these cohorts. In contrast, high expression of PROX1 protein predicted shorter survival in the group of patients with IDH-mutant anaplastic astrocytomas and secondary glioblastomas. The prognostic impact of PROX1 in IDH-mutant 1p19q non-codeleted high-grade astrocytomas, as well as the negative findings in primary glioblastomas, was corroborated by gene expression data extracted from the Cancer Genome Atlas. We conclude that PROX1 is a new prognostic biomarker for 1p19q non-codeleted high-grade astrocytomas that have progressed from pre-existing low-grade tumors and harbor IDH mutations.

  13. Quantitative chromatin pattern description in Feulgen-stained nuclei as a diagnostic tool to characterize the oligodendroglial and astroglial components in mixed oligo-astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Decaestecker, C; Lopes, B S; Gordower, L; Camby, I; Cras, P; Martin, J J; Kiss, R; VandenBerg, S R; Salmon, I

    1997-04-01

    The oligoastrocytoma, as a mixed glioma, represents a nosologic dilemma with respect to precisely defining the oligodendroglial and astroglial phenotypes that constitute the neoplastic cell lineages of these tumors. In this study, cell image analysis with Feulgen-stained nuclei was used to distinguish between oligodendroglial and astrocytic phenotypes in oligodendrogliomas and astrocytomas and then applied to mixed oligoastrocytomas. Quantitative features with respect to chromatin pattern (30 variables) and DNA ploidy (8 variables) were evaluated on Feulgen-stained nuclei in a series of 71 gliomas using computer-assisted microscopy. These included 32 oligodendrogliomas (OLG group: 24 grade II and 8 grade III tumors according to the WHO classification), 32 astrocytomas (AST group: 13 grade II and 19 grade III tumors), and 7 oligoastrocytomas (OLGAST group). Initially, image analysis with multivariate statistical analyses (Discriminant Analysis) could identify each glial tumor group. Highly significant statistical differences were obtained distinguishing the morphonuclear features of oligodendrogliomas from those of astrocytomas, regardless of their histological grade. When compared with the 7 mixed oligoastrocytomas under study, 5 exhibited DNA ploidy and chromatin pattern characteristics similar to grade II oligodendrogliomas, I to grade III oligodendrogliomas, and I to grade II astrocytomas. Using multifactorial statistical analyses (Discriminant Analysis combined with Principal Component Analysis). It was possible to quantify the proportion of "typical" glial cell phenotypes that compose grade II and III oligodendrogliomas and grade II and III astrocytomas in each mixed glioma. Cytometric image analysis may be an important adjunct to routine histopathology for the reproducible identification of neoplasms containing a mixture of oligodendroglial and astrocytic phenotypes.

  14. Accumulation of wild-type p53 protein in astrocytomas is not mediated by MDM2 gene amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Rubio, M.P.; Louis, D.N. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA )

    1993-05-01

    The authors have previously described ten cases of astrocytoma (three WHO grade II, four grade III and four grade IV) with seemingly contradictory results on immunohistochemical analysis of the p53 protein and molecular genetic analysis of the p53 gene. Fixed, embedded tissues from these cases were immunohistochemically positive with the PAb 1801 antibody, which supposedly implies the presence of mutant protein. These ten cases, however, did not have mutations in exons 5 through 8 of the p53 gene, the conserved regions in which almost all human mutations have been described. The authors suggested that these cases might either represent overexpression of wild-type p53 protein (since the PAb 1801 antibody reacts with both wild-type and mutant p53 protein) or mutations in less conserved regions of the gene. To investigate these possibilities further, they performed single strand conformational polymorphism analysis and DNA sequencing on p53 exons 4, 9 and 10 in the nine cases with available DNA, since rare mutations have been noted at these loci. None of the cases showed alterations, making it highly unlikely that these tumors harbor mutations in exons of the p53 gene. They also performed immunohistochemistry on frozen sections from seven available tumors, using the mutant-specific antibody PAb 240 in addition to PAb 1801. All tumors continued to show positive staining with PAb 1801, but only one tumor reacted with PAb 240. The results support the hypothesis that the accumulated p53 protein in most cases is wild-type. Because the product of the MDM2 oncogene can bind to wild-type p53 protein, and because MDM2 amplification has recently been demonstrated in human tumors, the authors evaluated MDM2 amplification in the nine astrocytomas with available DNA. Using slot blot analysis with a 96-base pair, PCR-generated probe to the first exon of the MDM2 gene, they were unable to show MDM2 gene amplification in these tumors or in other assayed astrocytomas.

  15. Olig2 labeling index is correlated with histological and molecular classifications in low-grade diffuse gliomas.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Aya; Nobusawa, Sumihito; Natsume, Atsushi; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Kim, Young-Ho; Yokoo, Hideaki; Nagaishi, Masaya; Ikota, Hayato; Nakazawa, Takuro; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Ohgaki, Hiroko; Nakazato, Yoichi

    2014-11-01

    Diagnosis of low-grade diffuse gliomas based on morphology is highly subjective and, therefore, is often difficult, with significant intra- and interobserver variability. Here, we investigated WHO grade II diffuse astrocytomas, oligoastrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas for immunohistochemical expression of Olig2, measuring its labeling index (LI), and evaluated the significance of Olig2 LI in the histological and molecular classifications. The means of Olig2 LI in glioma cells were 43.7 % in diffuse astrocytomas, 59.3 % in oligoastrocytomas and 76.1 % in oligodendrogliomas. There was a statistically significant difference between all pairs of histological types. The mean of Olig2 LI of gliomas with 1p/19q loss ± IDH1/2 mutation, the majority of them being oligodendrogliomas, was significantly higher than the means of those with TP53 mutation ± IDH1/2 mutation and IDH1/2 mutation only, the majority of which were diffuse astrocytomas (70.1 vs. 47.2 and 46.5 %, respectively). When categorized according to the classification of Jiao et al., Olig2 LI of I-CF gliomas (cases with IDH and one or more of CIC, FUBP1 or combined 1p/19q loss; mean 71.0 %) was significantly higher than that of I-A gliomas (cases with IDH and ATRX alterations; mean 45.3 %). These molecular classifications were reported to correlate well with clinical outcome. However, borderlines of Olig2 LI were broad and could not clearly distinguish genotypes in the molecular classifications. In conclusion, Olig2 LI cannot be taken as a complete surrogate marker for molecular genotype, but could possibly provide some ancillary information when molecular assay is not availabe.

  16. Demonstration of separate phosphotyrosyl- and phosphoseryl- histone phosphatase activities in the plasma membranes of a human astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Leis, J F; Knowles, A F; Kaplan, N O

    1985-06-01

    A plasma membrane preparation from a human astrocytoma contained p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP), phosphotyrosyl histone, and phosphoseryl histone hydrolysis activities. The pNPPase and phosphotyrosyl histone phosphatase activities were inhibited by vanadate, whereas the phosphoseryl histone phosphatase activity was not; the latter activity was inhibited by pyrophosphate and nucleoside di- and triphosphates. When the membranes were solubilized by Triton X-100 and the solubilized proteins were subjected to column chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex, Sepharose 6B-C1, and wheat germ agglutinin-Sepharose 4B columns, the pNPPase activity from the phosphoseryl histone phosphatase activity. The results from column chromatography also indicated that there may be multiple phosphotyrosyl and phosphoseryl protein phosphatases in the plasma membranes.

  17. Identification and characterization of estrogen receptor-related receptor alpha and gamma in human glioma and astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Gandhari, Mukesh K; Frazier, Chester R; Hartenstein, Julia S; Cloix, Jean-Francois; Bernier, Michel; Wainer, Irving W

    2010-02-05

    The purpose of this study was to examine expression and function of estrogen receptor-related receptors (ERRs) in human glioma and astrocytoma cell lines. These estrogen receptor-negative cell lines expressed ERRalpha and ERRgamma proteins to varying degree in a cell context dependent manner, with U87MG glioma cells expressing both orphan nuclear receptors. Cell proliferation assays were performed in the presence of ERR isoform-specific agonists and antagonists, and the calculated EC(50) and IC(50) values were consistent with previous reported values determined in other types of cancer cell lines. Induction of luciferase expression under the control of ERR isoform-specific promoters was also observed in these cells. These results indicate that ERRalpha and ERRgamma are differentially expressed in these tumor cell lines and likely contribute to agonist-dependent ERR transcriptional activity.

  18. Natural Triterpenic Diols Promote Apoptosis in Astrocytoma Cells through ROS-Mediated Mitochondrial Depolarization and JNK Activation

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Rubén; Ibeas, Elvira; Carvalho-Tavares, Juliana; Hernández, Marita; Ruiz-Gutierrez, Valentina; Nieto, María Luisa

    2009-01-01

    Background Triterpene alcohols and acids are multifunctional compounds widely distributed throughout the plant kingdom that exhibit a variety of beneficial health properties, being synthetic analogs of oleanolic acid under clinical evaluation as anti-tumoral therapeutic agents. However, the antineoplastic activity of two natural occuring triterpenoid alcohols extracted from olive oil, erythrodiol (an intermediate from oleanolic acid), and its isomer, uvaol, has barely been reported, particularly on brain cancer cells. Astrocytomas are among the most common and aggressive type of primary malignant tumors in the neurological system lacking effective treatments, and in this study, we addressed the effect of these two triterpenic diols on the human 1321N1 astrocytoma cell line. Principal Findings Erythrodiol and uvaol effectively affected cell proliferation, as well as cell cycle phases and induced 1321N1 cell death. Both triterpenes successfully modulated the apoptotic response, promoting nuclear condensation and fragmentation. They caused retraction and rounding of cultured cells, which lost adherence from their supports, while F-actin and vimentin filaments disappeared as an organized cytoplasmic network. At molecular level, changes in the expression of surface proteins associated with adhesion or death processes were also observed. Moreover, triterpene exposure resulted in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, and correlated with the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK). The presence of catalase reversed the triterpenic diols-induced mitochondrial depolarization, JNK activation, and apoptotic death, indicating the critical role of ROS in the action of these compounds. Conclusions Overall, we provide a significant insight into the anticarcinogenic action of erythrodiol and uvaol that may have a potential in prevention and treatment of brain tumors and other cancers. PMID:19543395

  19. The effect of guggulipid and nimesulide on MPTP-induced mediators of neuroinflammation in rat astrocytoma cells, C6.

    PubMed

    Niranjan, Rituraj; Rajasekar, N; Nath, Chandishwar; Shukla, Rakesh

    2012-12-05

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) but its mechanism is still not properly explored. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition has also been known a major neuroprotective strategy in the various 1-methyl-4-phenyl 1,2,3,6 tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) induced models of Parkinson's disease (PD) but its role in astrocytes is still not properly understood. The present study demonstrated that, guggulipid and nimesulide (preferentially selective COX-2 inhibitor) treatment of rat astrocytoma cells, C6 for 24 h significantly decreased MPTP (400 μM) induced nitrative and oxidative stress and intracellular calcium ion (Ca(2+)) level. Guggulipid and nimesulide also deactivated MPTP-induced P-p38 MAPK (Phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase) and down regulated expressions of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and CHOP (C/EBP, homologous protein 10). At transcriptional level of inflammatory cytokine genes, guggulipid and nimesulide down regulated MPTP-induced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) mRNA expressions with up regulations in interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1α (IL-1α) mRNA expressions. In addition to this, guggulipid and nimesulide inhibited translocation of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) from cytosol to nucleus. In conclusion, our findings elucidated the potential antioxidant and anti-neuroinflammatory effect of guggulipid and nimesulide in rat astrocytoma cells C6, which may suggest the use of these drugs in the management of neuroinflammation associated pathophysiology of PD.

  20. p53 protein in low-grade astrocytomas: a study with long-term follow-up.

    PubMed Central

    Iuzzolino, P.; Ghimenton, C.; Nicolato, A.; Giorgiutti, F.; Fina, P.; Doglioni, C.; Barbareschi, M.

    1994-01-01

    The immunohistochemical expression of p53 protein (p53) was examined in 52 patients out of a series of 66 patients with low-grade astrocytomas with long-term follow-up. All patients were also evaluated for several clinical and histological features, among which only preoperative Karnofsky score and the extent of surgery were statistically significant parameters to predict outcome on multivariate analysis. p53 accumulation was seen in 46.1% of patients, with a wide range of percentage of positive cells. Median survival for p53-positive and p53-negative patients was 41 and 37 months respectively. The survival curves of p53-positive and -negative patients were not statistically different. However, the curves showed a trend towards a more aggressive course in p53-positive patients beginning 3-4 years after surgery. Five years after diagnosis the survival estimate with the Kaplan-Meier method was 21.2% for patients with p53-positive tumours and 45.9% for patients with p53-negative tumours. This trend is not due to different distribution of major clinical prognostic factors (age, incomplete resection or Karnofsky status). The trend could be related to the time needed by the p53-positive clone to outgrow the rest of the p53-negative neoplastic cell population. This hypothesis is further supported by the fact that the five recurrences which were surgically removed (one anaplastic astrocytoma and four glioblastomas) derived from p53-positive tumours and were themselves intensely p53 positive. Images Figure 1 PMID:8123492

  1. MiR-181b-5p downregulates NOVA1 to suppress proliferation, migration and invasion and promote apoptosis in astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Feng; Wang, Qiang; Deng, Danni; Shao, Naiyuan; Wang, Rong; Xue, Lian; Wang, Suinuan; Xia, Xiwei; Yang, Yilin

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, short noncoding RNAs that modulate the expression of numerous genes by targeting their mRNA. Numerous abnormal miRNA expression patterns are observed in various human malignancies, and certain miRNAs can act as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. Astrocytoma, the most common neuroepithelial cancer, represents the majority of malignant brain tumors in humans. In our previous studies, we found that the downregulation of miR-181b-5p in astrocytomas is associated with a poor prognosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the functional role of miR-181b-5p and its possible target genes. miR-181b-5p was significantly downregulated in astrocytoma specimens, and the reduced expression of miR-181b-5p was inversely correlated with the clinical stage. The ectopic expression of miR-181b-5p inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion and induced apoptosis in astrocytoma cancer cells in vitro. The NOVA1 (neuro-oncological ventral antigen 1) gene was further identified as a novel direct target of miR-181b-5p. Specifically, miR-181b-5p bound directly to the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of NOVA1 and suppressed its expression. In clinical specimens, NOVA1 was overexpressed, and its protein levels were inversely correlated with miR-181b-5p expression. Furthermore, the changing level of NOVA1 was significantly associated with a poor survival outcome. Similar to restoring miR-181b-5p expression, downregulating NOVA1 inhibited cell growth, migration and invasion. Overexpression of NOVA1 reversed the inhibitory effects of miR-181b-5p. Our results indicate that miR-181b-5p is a tumor suppressor in astrocytoma that inhibits tumor progression by targeting NOVA1. These findings suggest that miR-181b-5p may serve as a novel therapeutic target for astrocytoma.

  2. Binding of NIR-conPK and NIR-6T to Astrocytomas and Microglial Cells: Evidence for a Protein Related to TSPO

    PubMed Central

    Sexton, Michelle; Woodruff, Grace; Cudaback, Eiron; Kreitzer, Faith R.; Xu, Cong; Lin, Yi Hsing; Möller, Thomas; Bai, Mingfeng; Manning, H. Charles; Bornhop, Darryl; Stella, Nephi

    2009-01-01

    PK 11195 and DAA1106 bind with high-affinity to the translocator protein (TSPO, formerly known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor). TSPO expression in glial cells increases in response to cytokines and pathological stimuli. Accordingly, [11C]-PK 11195 and [11C]-DAA1106 are recognized molecular imaging (MI) agents capable of monitoring changes in TSPO expression occurring in vivo and in response to various neuropathologies. Here we tested the pharmacological characteristics and TSPO-monitoring potential of two novel MI agents: NIR-conPK and NIR-6T. NIR-conPK is an analogue of PK 11195 conjugated to the near-infrared (NIR) emitting fluorophore: IRDye 800CW. NIR-6T is a DAA1106 analogue also conjugated to IRDye 800CW. We found that NIR-6T competed for [3H]-PK 11195 binding in astrocytoma cell homogenates with nanomolar affinity, but did not exhibit specific binding in intact astrocytoma cells in culture, indicating that NIR-6T is unlikely to constitute a useful MI agent for monitoring TSPO expression in intact cells. Conversely, we found that NIR-conPK did not compete for [3H]-PK 11195 binding in astrocytoma cell homogenate, but exhibited specific binding in intact astrocytoma cells in culture with nanomolar affinity, suggesting that NIR-conPK binds to a protein distinct, but related to, TSPO. Accordingly, treating intact astrocytoma cells and microglia in culture with cytokines led to significant changes in the amount of NIR-conPK specific binding without corresponding change in TSPO expression. Remarkably, the cytokine-induced changes in the protein targeted by NIR-conPK in intact microglia were selective, since IFN-γ (but not TNFα and TGFβ) increased the amount of NIR-conPK specific binding in these cells. Together these results suggest that NIR-conPK binds to a protein that is related to TSPO, and expressed by astrocytomas and microglia. Our results also suggest that the expression of this protein is increased by specific cytokines, and thus allows for

  3. Diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    The choice of the metallic film for the contact to a semiconductor device is discussed. One way to try to stabilize a contact is by interposing a thin film of a material that has low diffusivity for the atoms in question. This thin film application is known as a diffusion barrier. Three types of barriers can be distinguished. The stuffed barrier derives its low atomic diffusivity to impurities that concentrate along the extended defects of a polycrystalline layer. Sacrificial barriers exploit the fact that some (elemental) thin films react in a laterally uniform and reproducible fashion. Sacrificial barriers have the advantage that the point of their failure is predictable. Passive barriers are those most closely approximating an ideal barrier. The most-studied case is that of sputtered TiN films. Stuffed barriers may be viewed as passive barriers whose low diffusivity material extends along the defects of the polycrystalline host.

  4. Diffuse radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A diffuse celestial radiation which is isotropic at least on a course scale were measured from the soft X-ray region to about 150 MeV, at which energy the intensity falls below that of the galactic emission for most galactic latitudes. The spectral shape, the intensity, and the established degree of isotropy of this diffuse radiation already place severe constraints on the possible explanations for this radiation. Among the extragalactic theories, the more promising explanations of the isotropic diffuse emission appear to be radiation from exceptional galaxies from matter antimatter annihilation at the boundaries of superclusters of galaxies of matter and antimatter in baryon symmetric big bang models. Other possible sources for extragalactic diffuse gamma radiation are discussed and include normal galaxies, clusters of galaxies, primordial cosmic rays interacting with intergalactic matter, primordial black holes, and cosmic ray leakage from galaxies.

  5. Analysis of difference of association between polymorphisms in the XRCC5, RPA3 and RTEL1 genes and glioma, astrocytoma and glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Tianbo; Wang, Yuan; Li, Gang; Du, Shuli; Yang, Hua; Geng, Tingting; Hou, Peng; Gong, Yongkuan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gliomas are the most common aggressive brain tumors and have many complex pathological types. Previous reports have discovered that genetic mutations are associated with the risk of glioma. However, it is unclear whether uniform genetic mutations exist difference between glioma and its two pathological types in the Han Chinese population. Materials and methods: We evaluated 20 SNPs of 703 glioma cases (338 astrocytoma cases, 122 glioblastoma cases) and 635 controls in a Han Chinese population using χ2 test and genetic model analysis. Results: In three case-control studies, we found rs9288516 in XRCC5 gene showed a decreased risk of glioma (OR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.73-0.99; P = 0.042) and glioblastoma (OR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.52-0.92; P = 0.001) in the allele model. We identified rs414805 in RPA3 gene showed an increased risk of glioblastoma in allele model (OR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.00-1.89; P = 0.047) and dominant model (OR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.05-2.35; P = 0.027), analysis respectively. Meanwhile, rs2297440 in RTEL1 gene showed an increased risk of glioma (OR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.10-1.54; P = 0.002) and astrocytoma (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.02-1.54; P = 0.029) in the allele model. In addition, we also observed a haplotype of “GCT” in the RTEL1 gene with an increased risk of astrocytoma (P = 0.005). Conclusions: Polymorphisms in the XRCC5, RPA3 and RTEL1 genes, combinating with previous reaserches, are associated with glioma developing. However, those genes mutations may play different roles in the glioma, astrocytoma and glioblastoma, respectively. PMID:26328260

  6. Deguelins, Natural Product Modulators of NF1-Defective Astrocytoma Cell Growth Identified by High-Throughput Screening of Partially Purified Natural Product Extracts.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Curtis J; Cartner, Laura K; Wilson, Jennifer A; Fuller, Richard W; Rizzo, Anthony E; Reilly, Karlyne M; McMahon, James B; Gustafson, Kirk R

    2015-11-25

    A high-throughput screening assay for modulators of Trp53/NF1 mutant astrocytoma cell growth was adapted for use with natural product extracts and applied to a novel collection of prefractionated/partially purified extracts. Screening 68 427 samples identified active fractions from 95 unique extracts, including the terrestrial plant Millettia ichthyotona. Only three of these extracts showed activity in the crude extract form, thus demonstrating the utility of a partial purification approach for natural product screening. The NF1 screening assay was used to guide purification of active compounds from the M. ichthyotona extract, which yielded the two rotenones deguelin (1) and dehydrodeguelin (2). The deguelins have been reported to affect growth of a number of cancer cell lines. They potently inhibited growth of only one of a panel of NF1/Trp53 mutant murine astrocytoma cell lines, possibly related to epigenetic factors, but had no effect on the growth of normal astrocytes. These results suggest the potential utility of deguelins as tools for further investigating NF1 astrocytoma cell growth. These bioprobes were identified only as a result of screening partially purified natural product extracts.

  7. Noninvasive Measurement of Cerebral Blood Flow and Blood Oxygenation Using Near-Infrared and Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopies in Critically Brain-Injured Adults

    PubMed Central

    Durduran, Turgut; Frangos, Suzanne; Edlow, Brian L.; Buckley, Erin M.; Moss, Heather E.; Zhou, Chao; Yu, Guoqiang; Choe, Regine; Maloney-Wilensky, Eileen; Wolf, Ronald L.; Grady, M. Sean; Greenberg, Joel H.; Levine, Joshua M.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Detre, John A.; Kofke, W. Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Background This study assesses the utility of a hybrid optical instrument for noninvasive transcranial monitoring in the neurointensive care unit. The instrument is based on diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) for measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF), and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for measurement of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentration. DCS/NIRS measurements of CBF and oxygenation from frontal lobes are compared with concurrent xenon-enhanced computed tomography (XeCT) in patients during induced blood pressure changes and carbon dioxide arterial partial pressure variation. Methods Seven neurocritical care patients were included in the study. Relative CBF measured by DCS (rCBFDCS), and changes in oxy-hemoglobin (ΔHbO2), deoxy-hemoglobin (ΔHb), and total hemoglobin concentration (ΔTHC), measured by NIRS, were continuously monitored throughout XeCT during a baseline scan and a scan after intervention. CBF from XeCT regions-of-interest (ROIs) under the optical probes were used to calculate relative XeCT CBF (rCBFXeCT) and were then compared to rCBFDCS. Spearman’s rank coefficients were employed to test for associations between rCBFDCS and rCBFXeCT, as well as between rCBF from both modalities and NIRS parameters. Results rCBFDCS and rCBFXeCT showed good correlation (rs = 0.73, P = 0.010) across the patient cohort. Moderate correlations between rCBFDCS and ΔHbO2/ΔTHC were also observed. Both NIRS and DCS distinguished the effects of xenon inhalation on CBF, which varied among the patients. Conclusions DCS measurements of CBF and NIRS measurements of tissue blood oxygenation were successfully obtained in neurocritical care patients. The potential for DCS to provide continuous, noninvasive bedside monitoring for the purpose of CBF management and individualized care is demonstrated. PMID:19908166

  8. Atlas-guided volumetric diffuse optical tomography enhanced by generalized linear model analysis to image risk decision-making responses in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zi-Jing; Li, Lin; Cazzell, Mary; Liu, Hanli

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a variant of functional near infrared spectroscopy and has the capability of mapping or reconstructing three dimensional (3D) hemodynamic changes due to brain activity. Common methods used in DOT image analysis to define brain activation have limitations because the selection of activation period is relatively subjective. General linear model (GLM)-based analysis can overcome this limitation. In this study, we combine the atlas-guided 3D DOT image reconstruction with GLM-based analysis (i.e., voxel-wise GLM analysis) to investigate the brain activity that is associated with risk decision-making processes. Risk decision-making is an important cognitive process and thus is an essential topic in the field of neuroscience. The Balloon Analog Risk Task (BART) is a valid experimental model and has been commonly used to assess human risk-taking actions and tendencies while facing risks. We have used the BART paradigm with a blocked design to investigate brain activations in the prefrontal and frontal cortical areas during decision-making from 37 human participants (22 males and 15 females). Voxel-wise GLM analysis was performed after a human brain atlas template and a depth compensation algorithm were combined to form atlas-guided DOT images. In this work, we wish to demonstrate the excellence of using voxel-wise GLM analysis with DOT to image and study cognitive functions in response to risk decision-making. Results have shown significant hemodynamic changes in the dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) during the active-choice mode and a different activation pattern between genders; these findings correlate well with published literature in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and fNIRS studies. PMID:24619964

  9. Defusing Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dou, Remy; Hogan, DaNel; Kossover, Mark; Spuck, Timothy; Young, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion has often been taught in science courses as one of the primary ways by which molecules travel, particularly within organisms. For years, classroom teachers have used the same common demonstrations to illustrate this concept (e.g., placing drops of food coloring in a beaker of water). Most of the time, the main contributor to the motion…

  10. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  11. Evaluation of the effect of treatment on movement disorders in astrocytomas of the basal ganglia and the thalamus.

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, J K; Braus, D F; Mohadjer, M; Nobbe, F; Mundinger, F

    1993-01-01

    Twenty patients with movement disorders associated with astrocytomas (grade I-IV according to the WHO tumour classification) of the basal ganglia and the thalamus were evaluated for the effects of treatment. Five patients had more than one movement disorder when the histological diagnosis was verified by stereotactic biopsy. Twelve had tremors, eight hemidystonia, three hemichorea, and one hemichorea/ballismus, and myoclonus respectively. Ten patients died during the follow up period, and for the surviving patients follow up periods ranged from 6-21 years. The movement disorders changed over long periods of time related to therapeutic interventions. CSF shunt operations and percutaneous radiotherapy had no definite effect on the movement disorders. There was a moderate response to medical treatment in a few patients. Stereotactic aspiration of tumour cysts had a marked influence on the movement disorder in two patients, and functional stereotactic surgery abolished tumour induced tremor in one. Interstitial radiotherapy was performed in fifteen patients for treatment of the underlying neoplasm and resulted in different and variable alterations of the movement disorders. These differences may be explained by complex interactions involving structures affected primarily by the tumour, as well as by secondary functional lesions of adjacent structures. Images PMID:8410011

  12. Neutral metoclopramide sensitizes cytotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation in SCID mice xenografted with a human brain astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Hua, J; Olsson, A R; Pero, R W

    1997-12-10

    A formulation of metoclopramide (MCA) conformationally altered by neutralization of pH (nMCA, Neu-Sensamide) has been shown to have the same efficacy of enhancing the cytotoxicity of a single dose of 1 Gy radiation as acidic formulations (e.g., Primperan, Sensamide) in a human lung adenocarcinoma (H2981) xenografted into SCID mice. In the present study, 2 x 1 Gy radiation was combined with 2 x 2 mg nMCA/kg body weight injected 2 hr before radiation treatment for evaluation of radiosensitization in SCID mice xenografted with a human brain astrocytoma (T24). Given in this treatment schedule, nMCA alone at 2 mg/kg showed no cytotoxic effect on tumor growth in vivo. When combined with 2 x 1 Gy of radiation, however, the cytotoxicity was significantly increased as measured by tumor growth delay over the radiation-only-treated group. Furthermore, nMCA was absorbed into brains of mice and rats as efficiently as acidic MCA (aMCA) when analyzed 45 min after i.m. injection by high-performance liquid chromatography.

  13. Hypofractionated high-dose irradiation for the treatment of malignant astrocytomas using simultaneous integrated boost technique by IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Iuchi, Toshihiko; Hatano, Kazuo; Narita, Yuichiro; Kodama, Takashi; Yamaki, Tomohiro; Osato, Katsunobu

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the clinical significance of hypofractionated high-dose irradiation using simultaneous integrated boost technique with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of malignant astrocytomas (MAs). Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with MAs were treated by IMRT. Three layered planning target volumes (PTVs) were contoured. PTV-1 was the area of enhanced lesion with 5-mm margin; PTV-2 was the area with 15-mm margin surrounding the PTV-1; PTV-3 was the area of perifocal edema. Irradiation was performed in 8 fractions, and only the dose for PTV-1 was escalated from 48 Gy to 68 Gy while maintaining the dose for PTV-2 (40 Gy) and PTV-3 (32 Gy). The clinical outcome of IMRT was compared with 60 MA patients treated by conventional external beam irradiation (EBI). Results: The progression-free survival of patients in the IMRT group was significantly longer than that in the EBI group (p < 0.0001). No distant failure was observed in both groups. In the IMRT group, dissemination was the most frequent cause of death (70%). The overall survival of patients in the IMRT group was better than that in the EBI group (p = 0.043). Conclusions: Our regimen of IMRT contributed to the control of both the regional and infiltrating tumors, resulting in better survival of patients.

  14. Dysphasia and Phantosmia as First Presentation of Multifocal Cerebral Anaplastic Astrocytomas: Case Report and Review of the Literatures

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangyi; Wang, Yu; Liu, Shuai; Lu, Zhaohui; Wu, Huanwen; Mao, Xinxin; Cheng, Xin; Gao, Jun; Guan, Jian; Yang, Yi; Li, Yongning; Xing, Bing; Ma, Wenbin; Wang, Renzhi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Multifocal cerebral gliomas (MCGs) represent approximately 10% of gliomas and are frequently mistaken as metastases of an unknown primary cancer site. Most MCGs are glioblastomas with <4 lesions supratentorially, and are lack of typical symptoms and special detections. Through a rare MCG case, we aim to present this rarity and emphasize the need to correctly diagnose multiple intracranial lesions using a variety of diagnostic modalities to ensure that the patient receives proper treatment. We present a case of multifocal cerebral anaplastic astrocytomas with a total of 8 lesions located in the left frontal lobe and invading the lateral ventricle, presenting with dysphasia and phantosmia. The disease course, including diagnosis and treatment, is presented and analyzed in detail. The pertinent literature is reviewed regarding this uncommon entity. After an initial impression of brain metastasis from lung cancer because of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) resemblance and history of chronic bronchitis, we were able to use positron emission tomography (PET) and excisional biopsy to get the final diagnosis. After 10 months, the patient's overall condition deteriorated and succumbed to his disease. MCGs are easy to be misdiagnosed as metastatic diseases. In addition to MRI, PET adds more biochemical and molecular information and is helpful in the differentiation. Although uncommon, if multiple lesions are present in various locations in the hemispheres, MCG should be kept in mind. PMID:25997068

  15. A fraction of neurofibromin interacts with PML bodies in the nucleus of the CCF astrocytoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Godin, Fabienne; Villette, Sandrine; Vallee, Beatrice; Doudeau, Michel; Morisset-Lopez, Severine; Ardourel, Maryvonne; Hevor, Tobias; Pichon, Chantal; Benedetti, Helene

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We validate the use of specific anti-Nf1 antibodies for immunofluorescence studies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We detect Nf1 in the cytoplasm and nucleus of CCF cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate that Nf1 partially colocalizes with PML nuclear bodies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate that there is a direct interaction between a fraction of Nf1 and the PML bodies. -- Abstract: Neurofibromatosis type 1 is a common genetic disease that causes nervous system tumors, and cognitive deficits. It is due to mutations within the NF1 gene, which encodes the Nf1 protein. Nf1 has been shown to be involved in the regulation of Ras, cAMP and actin cytoskeleton dynamics. In this study, using immunofluorescence experiments, we have shown a partial nuclear localization of Nf1 in the astrocytoma cell line: CCF and we have demonstrated that Nf1 partially colocalizes with PML (promyelocytic leukemia) nuclear bodies. A direct interaction between Nf1 and the multiprotein complex has further been demonstrated using 'in situ' proximity ligation assay (PLA).

  16. Intrinsic tectal low grade astrocytomas: is surgical removal an alternative treatment? Long-term outcome of eight cases.

    PubMed

    Ramina, Ricardo; Coelho Neto, Mauricio; Fernandes, Yvens Barbosa; Borges, Guilherme; Honorato, Donizeti Cesar; Arruda, Walter Oleschko

    2005-03-01

    Low-grade gliomas arising in dorsal midbrain in children and young patients usually present few neurological symptoms and findings, and patients management is controversial. Some authors propose only clinical observation until the patient present signs of increased intracranial pressure when a shunt with or without biopsy, is inserted; others recommend radiotherapy after stereotactic or open biopsy. Microsurgical total removal of tumor may be curative. We present a retrospective analysis of eight patients (mean age 16.6 +/- 11.5 years-old) with low-grade astrocytoma of the tectal region operated on using an infratentorial/supracerebellar approach between 1981 and 2002. All patients presented hydrocephalus and had a shunt insertion before surgical resection of the lesion. The tumour could be totally resected in seven patients. In one case radical removal was not possible due to infiltrative pattern of the lesion. Postoperative radiotherapy was performed in two cases, one patient at the beginning of this series and in the case with infiltrative tumor. This patient presented progressive tumor growth and died five years after surgery. No recurrence occurred after total removal. Post-surgical follow-up time ranged from 2 1/2 to 22 1/2 years (mean 9.9 +/- 5.9 years). Radical microsurgical removal of non invasive tumors is possible without mortality or significant morbidity. It may be curative and should remain as an alternative to be discussed with the patient.

  17. Elevated levels of p-Mnk1, p-eIF4E and p-p70S6K proteins are associated with tumor recurrence and poor prognosis in astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Fan, Weibing; Wang, Weiyuan; Mao, Xinfa; Chu, Shuzhou; Feng, Juan; Xiao, Desheng; Zhou, Jianhua; Fan, Songqing

    2017-02-01

    Malignant astrocytomas are able to invade neighboring and distant areas of the normal brain. Signaling pathway alterations play important role in the development of astrocytomas. Deregulation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) by MAP kinase-interacting kinases (Mnk) on Ser-209 directly or PI3K/mTOR/S6K pathway indirectly has a critical effect on promoting cellular proliferation, malignant transformation and metastasis. We examined and analyzed the correlation between expression of p-Mnk1, p-eIF4E and p-p70S6K proteins and clinicopathological features in 103 astrocytomas and 54 non-tumorous brain tissues. The results indicated that positive percentage of overexpression of p-Mnk1 and p-eIF4E proteins in astrocytomas were significantly higher than that of in the non-tumorous brain tissues (P < 0.05). Elevated p-Mnk1 and p-eIF4E and co-overexpressed three proteins were associated with tumor recurrence (P = 0.003, P = 0.006, P = 0.007, respectively). Overexpressed p-eIF4E significantly correlated with the tumor size (P = 0.019). In addition, overexpression of p-eIF4E and three proteins common expression were related to the WHO grade of astrocytomas (P = 0.001, P = 0.044 respectively). Spearman's rank correlation test further showed that the expression of p-Mnk1 was strongly positive correlated with the expression of p-eIF4E in astrocytomas (r = 0.294, P = 0.003). Besides, overexpression of p-eIF4E and co-expression of p-Mnk1, p-eIF4E and p-p70S6K proteins were inversely correlated with overall survival rates of astrocytomas. Multivariate Cox regression analysis further identified that the elevated p-eIF4E expression, three proteins common expression were correlated with unfavorable prognosis of astrocytomas regardless of ages and WHO grades. Taken together, overexpression of p-eIF4E and co-expression of p-Mnk1, p-eIF4E and p-p70S6K proteins could be used as novel independent poor prognostic biomarkers for patients

  18. Diffusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  19. DIFFUSION PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, L.

    1963-09-01

    A high-vacuum diffusion pump is described, featuring a novel housing geometry for enhancing pumping speed. An upright, cylindrical lower housing portion is surmounted by a concentric, upright, cylindrical upper housing portion of substantially larger diameter; an uppermost nozzle, disposed concentrically within the upper portion, is adapted to eject downwardly a conical sheet of liquid outwardly to impinge upon the uppermost extremity of the interior wall of the lower portion. Preferably this nozzle is mounted upon a pedestal rising coaxially from within the lower portion and projecting up into said upper portion. (AEC)

  20. Comparative non-cholinergic neurotoxic effects of paraoxon and diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) on human neuroblastoma and astrocytoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Yongchang; Venkatraj, Jijayanagaram; Barhoumi, Rola; Pal, Ranadip; Datta, Aniruddha; Wild, James R.; Tiffany-Castiglioni, Evelyn . E-mail: ecastiglioni@cvm.tamu.edu

    2007-03-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the comparative non-cholinergic neurotoxic effects of paraoxon, which is acutely neurotoxic, and diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP), which induces OPIDN, in the human neuroblastoma SY5Y and the human astrocytoma cell line CCF-STTG1. SY5Y cells have been studied extensively as a model for OP-induced neurotoxicity, but CCF cells have not previously been studied. We conducted a preliminary human gene array assay of OP-treated SY5Y cells in order to assess at the gene level whether these cells can distinguish between OP compounds that do and do not cause OPIDN. Paraoxon and DFP induced dramatically different profiles of gene expression. Two genes were upregulated and 13 downregulated by at least 2-fold in paraoxon-treated cells. In contrast, one gene was upregulated by DFP and none was downregulated at the 2-fold threshold. This finding is consistent with current and previous observations that SY5Y cells can distinguish between OPs that do or do not induce OPIDN. We also examined gene array results for possible novel target proteins or metabolic pathways for OP neurotoxicity. Protein levels of glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78) revealed that paraoxon exposure at 3 {mu}M for 24 h significantly reduced GRP78 levels by 30% in neuroblastoma cells, whereas DFP treatment had no effect. In comparison with SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, paraoxon and DFP (3 {mu}M for 24 h) each significantly increased GRP78 levels by 23-24% in CCF astrocytoma cells. As we have previously evaluated intracellular changes in Ca{sup 2+} levels in SY5Y cells, we investigated the effects of paraoxon and DFP on cellular Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis in CCF by studying cytosolic and mitochondrial basal calcium levels. A significant decrease in the ratio of mitochondrial to cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} fluorescence was detected in CCF cultures treated for either 1 or 3 days with 1, 3, 10, or 30 {mu}M paraoxon. In contrast, treatment with DFP for 1 day had no significant effect

  1. Network analysis of microRNAs, transcription factors, target genes and host genes in human anaplastic astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    XUE, LUCHEN; XU, ZHIWEN; WANG, KUNHAO; WANG, NING; ZHANG, XIAOXU; WANG, SHANG

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the roles played by various genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) in neoplasms, including anaplastic astrocytoma (AA). However, the specific regulatory mechanisms involving these genes and miRNAs remain unclear. In the present study, associated biological factors (miRNAs, transcription factors, target genes and host genes) from existing studies of human AA were combined methodically through the interactions between genes and miRNAs, as opposed to studying one or several. Three regulatory networks, including abnormally expressed, related and global networks were constructed with the aim of identifying significant gene and miRNA pathways. Each network is composed of three associations between miRNAs targeted at genes, transcription factors (TFs) regulating miRNAs and miRNAs located on their host genes. Among these, the abnormally expressed network, which involves the pathways of previously identified abnormally expressed genes and miRNAs, partially indicated the regulatory mechanism underlying AA. The network contains numerous abnormal regulation associations when AA emerges. By modifying the abnormally expressed network factors to a normal expression pattern, the faulty regulation may be corrected and tumorigenesis of AA may be prevented. Certain specific pathways are highlighted in AA, for example PTEN which is targeted by miR-21 and miR-106b, regulates miR-25 which in turn targets TP53. PTEN and miR-21 have been observed to form feedback loops. Furthermore, by comparing and analyzing the pathway predecessors and successors of abnormally expressed genes and miRNAs in three networks, similarities and differences of regulatory pathways may be identified and proposed. In summary, the present study aids in elucidating the occurrence, mechanism, prevention and treatment of AA. These results may aid further investigation into therapeutic approaches for this disease. PMID:27347075

  2. Natural history and management of brainstem gliomas in adults. A retrospective Italian study.

    PubMed

    Salmaggi, A; Fariselli, L; Milanesi, I; Lamperti, E; Silvani, A; Bizzi, A; Maccagnano, E; Trevisan, E; Laguzzi, E; Rudà, R; Boiardi, A; Soffietti, R

    2008-02-01

    Brainstem gliomas in adults are rare tumors, with heterogeneous clinical course; only a few studies in the MRI era describe the features in consistent groups of patients. In this retrospective study, we report clinical features at onset, imaging characteristics and subsequent course in a group of 34 adult patients with either histologically proven or clinico-radiologically diagnosed brainstem gliomas followed at two centers in Northern Italy. Of the patients 18 were male, 14 female, with a median age of 31. In 21 of the patients histology was obtained and in 20 it was informative (2 pilocytic astrocytoma, 9 low-grade astrocytoma, 8 anaplastic astrocytoma and 1 glioblastoma). Contrast enhancement at MRI was present in 14 patients. In all of the 9 patients who were investigated with MR spectroscopy, the Cho/NAA ratio was elevated at diagnosis. In 8 of the patients, an initial watch and wait policy was adopted, while 24 were treated shortly after diagnosis with either radiotherapy alone [4] or radiotherapy and chemotherapy [20] (mostly temozolomide). Only minor radiological responses were observed after treatments; in a significant proportion of patients (9 out of 15) clinical improvement during therapy occurred in the context of radiologically (MRI) stable disease. Grade III or IV myelotoxicity was observed in 6 patients. After a follow-up ranging from 9 to 180 months, all but 2 patients have progressed and 14 have died (12 for disease progression, 2 for pulmonary embolism). Median overall survival time was of 59 months. Investigation of putative prognostically relevant parameters showed that a short time between disease onset and diagnosis was related to a shorter survival. Compared with literature data, our study confirms the clinical and radiological heterogeneity of adult brainstem gliomas and underscores the need for multicenter trials in order to assess the efficacy of treatments in these tumors.

  3. Decreased survival of glioma patients with astrocytoma grade IV (glioblastoma multiforme) associated with long-term use of mobile and cordless phones.

    PubMed

    Carlberg, Michael; Hardell, Lennart

    2014-10-16

    On 31 May 2011 the WHO International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) categorised radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) from mobile phones, and from other devices that emit similar non-ionising electromagnetic fields, as a Group 2B, i.e., a "possible", human carcinogen. A causal association would be strengthened if it could be shown that the use of wireless phones has an impact on the survival of glioma patients. We analysed survival of 1678 glioma patients in our 1997-2003 and 2007-2009 case-control studies. Use of wireless phones in the >20 years latency group (time since first use) yielded an increased hazard ratio (HR) = 1.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.2-2.3 for glioma. For astrocytoma grade IV (glioblastoma multiforme; n = 926) mobile phone use yielded HR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.4-2.9 and cordless phone use HR = 3.4, 95% CI = 1.04-11 in the same latency category. The hazard ratio for astrocytoma grade IV increased statistically significant per year of latency for wireless phones, HR = 1.020, 95% CI = 1.007-1.033, but not per 100 h cumulative use, HR = 1.002, 95% CI = 0.999-1.005. HR was not statistically significant increased for other types of glioma. Due to the relationship with survival the classification of IARC is strengthened and RF-EMF should be regarded as human carcinogen requiring urgent revision of current exposure guidelines.

  4. Pilocytic Midbrain Astrocytoma Presenting with Fresh Bleed after Twenty-one-years Survival Following First Surgery: A Unique Case of Longest Brainstem Glioma Survival

    PubMed Central

    Satyarthee, Guru Dutta; Sudhan, M. D.; Mehta, V. S.

    2016-01-01

    Brainstem glioma usually carries a poor prognosis and prolonged survival is very infrequent. In a detailed Pubmed, Medline search for prolonged survival, authors could got a longest survival only up to seventeen years, reported by Umehara et al, who was subjected to gamma knife therapy and got symptomatic, MRI brain reveled large tumor growth during pregnancy necessitating emergency surgery and histopathological diagnosis was pilocytic astrocytoma. Authors report an interesting case of midbrain glioma diagnosed 21 years back, who underwent gross resection in the year 1993, histopathology was pilocytic astrocytoma, WHO grade I, and received gamma knife surgery for residual subsequently and he presented with sudden onset left sided hemiplegia on the current admission. The cranial MRI imaging revealed an infarct involving right hemi midbrain, contrast MRI brain revealed no residual glioma. To the best knowledge of authors such prolonged survival is not reported with a case of brainstem glioma survived twenty- one years with non residual tumor on the last imaging study represents first case of its kind in the western literature and probably developed hemiplegia due to bleed, highlighting bleed as delayed complication following gamma knife therapy for cranial tumors PMID:28163514

  5. Predominant role of plasma membrane monoamine transporters in monoamine transport in 1321N1, a human astrocytoma-derived cell line.

    PubMed

    Naganuma, Fumito; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Nakamura, Tadaho; Iida, Tomomitsu; Harada, Ryuichi; Mohsen, Attayeb S; Miura, Yamato; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2014-05-01

    Monoamine neurotransmitters should be immediately removed from the synaptic cleft to avoid excessive neuronal activity. Recent studies have shown that astrocytes and neurons are involved in monoamine removal. However, the mechanism of monoamine transport by astrocytes is not entirely clear. We aimed to elucidate the transporters responsible for monoamine transport in 1321N1, a human astrocytoma-derived cell line. First, we confirmed that 1321N1 cells transported dopamine, serotonin, norepinephrine, and histamine in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Kinetics analysis suggested the involvement of low-affinity monoamine transporters, such as organic cation transporter (OCT) 2 and 3 and plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT). Monoamine transport in 1321N1 cells was not Na(+) /Cl(-) dependent but was inhibited by decynium-22, an inhibitor of low-affinity monoamine transporters, which supported the importance of low-affinity transporters. RT-PCR assays revealed that 1321N1 cells expressed OCT3 and PMAT but no other neurotransmitter transporters. Another human astrocytoma-derived cell line, U251MG, and primary human astrocytes also exhibited the same gene expression pattern. Gene-knockdown assays revealed that 1321N1 and primary human astrocytes could transport monoamines predominantly through PMAT and partly through OCT3. These results might indicate that PMAT and OCT3 in human astrocytes are involved in monoamine clearance.

  6. Hydrogen sulfide generation from l-cysteine in the human glioblastoma-astrocytoma U-87 MG and neuroblastoma SHSY5Y cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bronowicka-Adamska, Patrycja; Bentke, Anna; Wróbel, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is endogenously synthesized from l-cysteine in reactions catalyzed by cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS, EC 4.2.1.22) and gamma-cystathionase (CSE, EC 4.4.1.1). The role of 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (MPST, EC 2.8.1.2) in H2S generation is also considered; it could be important for tissues with low CTH activity, e.g. cells of the nervous system. The expression and activity of CBS, CTH, and MPST were detected in the human glioblastoma-astrocytoma (U-87 MG) and neuroblastoma (SHSY5Y) cell lines. In both cell lines, the expression and activity of MPST were the highest among the investigated enzymes, suggesting its possible role in the generation of H2S. The RP-HPLC method was used to determine the concentration of cystathionine and alpha-ketobutyrate, products of the CBS- and CTH-catalyzed reactions. The difference in cystathionine levels between cell homogenates treated with totally CTH-inhibiting concentrations of dl-propargylglycine and without the inhibitor was used to evaluate the activity of CBS. The higher expression and activity of CBS, CTH and MPST in the neuroblastoma cells were associated with more intensive generation of H2S in the presence of 2 mM cysteine. A threefold higher level of sulfane sulfur, a potential source of hydrogen sulfide, was detected in the astrocytoma cells in comparison to the neuroblastoma cells.

  7. Anaplastic astrocytoma: prognostic factors and survival in 4807 patients with emphasis on receipt and impact of adjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jacob Y; Diaz, Aidnag Z

    2016-09-01

    To determine the receipt and impact of adjuvant therapy on overall survival (OS) for anaplastic astrocytoma (AA). Data were extracted from the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB). Chi square test, Kaplan-Meier method, and Cox regression models were employed in SPSS 22.0 (Armonk, NY: IBM Corp.) for data analyses. 4807 patients with AA diagnosed from 2004 to 2013 who underwent surgery were identified. 3243 (67.5 %) received adjuvant chemoRT, 525 (10.9 %) adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) alone, 176 (3.7 %) adjuvant chemotherapy alone and 863 (18.0 %) received no adjuvant therapy. Patients were more likely to receive adjuvant chemoRT if they were diagnosed in 2009-2013 (p = 0.022), were ≤ 50 years (p < 0.001), were male (p = 0.043), were Asian or White race (p < 0.001), had private insurance (p < 0.001), had income ≥$38,000 (p < 0.001), or underwent total resection (p < 0.003). Those who received adjuvant chemoRT had significantly better 5-year OS than the other adjuvant treatment types (41.8 % vs. 31.2 % vs. 29.8 % vs. 27.4 %, p < 0.001). This significant 5-year OS benefit was also observed regardless of age at diagnosis. Of those undergoing adjuvant chemoRT, those receiving ≥59.4 Gy had significantly better 5-year OS than those receiving <59.4 Gy (44.4 % vs. 25.9 %, p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in OS when comparing 59.4 Gy to higher RT doses. On multivariate analysis, receipt of adjuvant chemoRT, age at diagnosis, extent of disease, and insurance status were independent prognostic factors for OS. Adjuvant chemoRT is an independent prognostic factor for improved OS in AA and concomitant chemoRT should be considered for all clinically suitable patients who have undergone surgery for the disease.

  8. Superoxide anion radical (O2(-)) degrades methylmercury to inorganic mercury in human astrocytoma cell line (CCF-STTG1).

    PubMed

    Mailloux, Ryan J; Yumvihoze, Emmanuel; Chan, Hing Man

    2015-09-05

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a global pollutant that is affecting the health of millions of people worldwide. However, the mechanism of MeHg toxicity still remains somewhat elusive and there is no treatment. It has been known for some time that MeHg can be progressively converted to inorganic mercury (iHg) in various tissues including the brain. Recent work has suggested that cleavage of the carbon-metal bond in MeHg in a biological environment is facilitated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the oxyradical species that actually mediates this process has not been identified. Here, we provide evidence that superoxide anion radical (O2(-)) can convert MeHg to iHg. The calculated second-order rate constant for the degradation of 1μM MeHg by O2(-) generated by xanthine/xanthine oxidase was calculated to be 2×10(5)M(-1)s(-1). We were also able to show that this bioconversion can proceed in intact CCF-STTG1 human astrocytoma cells exposed to paraquat (PQ), a O2(-) generating viologen. Notably, exposure of cells to increasing amounts of PQ led to a dose dependent increase in both MeHg and iHg. Indeed, a 24h exposure to 500μM PQ induced a ∼13-fold and ∼18-fold increase in intracellular MeHg and iHg respectively. These effects were inhibited by superoxide dismutase mimetic MnTBAP. In addition, we also observed that a 24h exposure to a biologically relevant concentration of MeHg (1μM) did not induce cell death, oxidative stress, or even changes in cellular O2(-) and H2O2. However, co-exposure to PQ enhanced MeHg toxicity which was associated with a robust increase in cell death and oxidative stress. Collectively our results show that O2(-) can bioconvert MeHg to iHg in vitro and in intact cells exposed to conditions that simulate high intracellular O2(-) production. In addition, we show for the first time that O2(-) mediated degradation of MeHg to iHg enhances the toxicity of MeHg by facilitating an accumulation of both MeHg and iHg in the intracellular

  9. Understanding inherited genetic risk of adult glioma – a review

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Terri; Lachance, Daniel H.; Molinaro, Annette M.; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.; Walsh, Kyle M.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Ostrom, Quinn T.; Francis, Stephen S.; Wiemels, Joseph; Jenkins, Robert B.; Wiencke, John K.; Wrensch, Margaret R.

    2016-01-01

    During the past six years, researchers have made major progress identifying common inherited genetic variation that increases risk for primary adult glioma. This paper summarizes knowledge about rare familial cancer syndromes that include adult glioma and reviews the available literature on the more recently discovered common inherited variation. Ten independent inherited variants in eight chromosomal regions have been convincingly associated with increased risk for adult glioma. Most of these variants increase relative risk of primary adult glioma by 20% to 40%, but the TP53 variant rs78378222 confers a two-fold relative risk (ie, 200%), and rs557505857 on chromosome 8 confers a six-fold relative risk of IDH-mutated astrocytomas and oligodendroglial tumors (ie, 600%). Even with a six-fold relative risk, the overall risk of developing adult glioma is too low for screening for the high-risk variant on chromosome 8. Future studies will help clarify which inherited adult glioma risk variants are associated with subtypes defined by histology and/or acquired tumor mutations. This review also provides an information sheet for primary adult glioma patients and their families. PMID:26941959

  10. Understanding inherited genetic risk of adult glioma - a review.

    PubMed

    Rice, Terri; Lachance, Daniel H; Molinaro, Annette M; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Walsh, Kyle M; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Ostrom, Quinn T; Francis, Stephen S; Wiemels, Joseph; Jenkins, Robert B; Wiencke, John K; Wrensch, Margaret R

    2016-03-01

    During the past six years, researchers have made major progress identifying common inherited genetic variation that increases risk for primary adult glioma. This paper summarizes knowledge about rare familial cancer syndromes that include adult glioma and reviews the available literature on the more recently discovered common inherited variation. Ten independent inherited variants in eight chromosomal regions have been convincingly associated with increased risk for adult glioma. Most of these variants increase relative risk of primary adult glioma by 20% to 40%, but the TP53 variant rs78378222 confers a two-fold relative risk (ie, 200%), and rs557505857 on chromosome 8 confers a six-fold relative risk of IDH-mutated astrocytomas and oligodendroglial tumors (ie, 600%). Even with a six-fold relative risk, the overall risk of developing adult glioma is too low for screening for the high-risk variant on chromosome 8. Future studies will help clarify which inherited adult glioma risk variants are associated with subtypes defined by histology and/or acquired tumor mutations. This review also provides an information sheet for primary adult glioma patients and their families.

  11. Diffusion archeology for diffusion progression history reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sefer, Emre; Kingsford, Carl

    2016-11-01

    Diffusion through graphs can be used to model many real-world processes, such as the spread of diseases, social network memes, computer viruses, or water contaminants. Often, a real-world diffusion cannot be directly observed while it is occurring - perhaps it is not noticed until some time has passed, continuous monitoring is too costly, or privacy concerns limit data access. This leads to the need to reconstruct how the present state of the diffusion came to be from partial diffusion data. Here, we tackle the problem of reconstructing a diffusion history from one or more snapshots of the diffusion state. This ability can be invaluable to learn when certain computer nodes are infected or which people are the initial disease spreaders to control future diffusions. We formulate this problem over discrete-time SEIRS-type diffusion models in terms of maximum likelihood. We design methods that are based on submodularity and a novel prize-collecting dominating-set vertex cover (PCDSVC) relaxation that can identify likely diffusion steps with some provable performance guarantees. Our methods are the first to be able to reconstruct complete diffusion histories accurately in real and simulated situations. As a special case, they can also identify the initial spreaders better than the existing methods for that problem. Our results for both meme and contaminant diffusion show that the partial diffusion data problem can be overcome with proper modeling and methods, and that hidden temporal characteristics of diffusion can be predicted from limited data.

  12. NIST Diffusion Data Center

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Diffusion Data Center (Web, free access)   The NIST Diffusion Data Center is a collection of over 14,100 international papers, theses, and government reports on diffusion published before 1980.

  13. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Cheng, Yung-Sung

    1984-08-07

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  14. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.

    1984-01-01

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  15. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS.

    PubMed

    Leonenko, Nikolai N; Meerschaert, Mark M; Sikorskii, Alla

    2013-07-15

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change.

  16. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS

    PubMed Central

    Leonenko, Nikolai N.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change. PMID:23626377

  17. Regulation of sonic hedgehog-GLI1 downstream target genes PTCH1, Cyclin D2, Plakoglobin, PAX6 and NKX2.2 and their epigenetic status in medulloblastoma and astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway is critical for cell growth and differentiation. Impairment of this pathway can result in both birth defects and cancer. Despite its importance in cancer development, the Shh pathway has not been thoroughly investigated in tumorigenesis of brain tumors. In this study, we sought to understand the regulatory roles of GLI1, the immediate downstream activator of the Shh signaling pathway on its downstream target genes PTCH1, Cyclin D2, Plakoglobin, NKX2.2 and PAX6 in medulloblastoma and astrocytic tumors. Methods We silenced GLI1 expression in medulloblastoma and astrocytic cell lines by transfection of siRNA against GLI1. Subsequently, we performed RT-PCR and quantitative real time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) to assay the expression of downstream target genes PTCH1, Cyclin D2, Plakoglobin, NKX2.2 and PAX6. We also attempted to correlate the pattern of expression of GLI1 and its regulated genes in 14 cell lines and 41 primary medulloblastoma and astrocytoma tumor samples. We also assessed the methylation status of the Cyclin D2 and PTCH1 promoters in these 14 cell lines and 58 primary tumor samples. Results Silencing expression of GLI1 resulted up-regulation of all target genes in the medulloblastoma cell line, while only PTCH1 was up-regulated in astrocytoma. We also observed methylation of the cyclin D2 promoter in a significant number of astrocytoma cell lines (63%) and primary astrocytoma tumor samples (32%), but not at all in any medulloblastoma samples. PTCH1 promoter methylation was less frequently observed than Cyclin D2 promoter methylation in astrocytomas, and not at all in medulloblastomas. Conclusions Our results demonstrate different regulatory mechanisms of Shh-GLI1 signaling. These differences vary according to the downstream target gene affected, the origin of the tissue, as well as epigenetic regulation of some of these genes. PMID:21059263

  18. Prognostic value of the extent of resection in supratentorial WHO grade II astrocytomas stratified for IDH1 mutation status: a single-center volumetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Jungk, Christine; Scherer, Moritz; Mock, Andreas; Capper, David; Radbruch, Alexander; von Deimling, Andreas; Bendszus, Martin; Herold-Mende, Christel; Unterberg, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Current evidence supports a maximized extent of resection (EOR) in low-grade gliomas (LGG), regardless of different histological subtypes and molecular markers. We therefore evaluated the prognostic impact of extensive, mainly intraoperative (i)MRI-guided surgery in low-grade astrocytomas stratified for IDH1 mutation status. Retrospective assessment of 46 consecutive cases of newly diagnosed supratentorial WHO grade II astrocytomas treated during the last decade was performed. IDH1 mutation status was obtained for all patients. Volumetric analysis of tumor volumes was performed pre-, intra-, early postoperatively and at first follow-up. Survival analysis was conducted with uni-and multivariate regression models implementing clinical parameters and continuous volumetric variables. Median EOR was 90.4 % (range 17.5-100 %) and was increased to 94.9 % (range 34.8-100 %) in iMRI-guided resections (n = 33). A greater EOR was prognostic for increased progression-free survival (HR 0.23, p = 0.031) and time to re-intervention (TTR) (HR 0.23, p = 0.03). In IDH1 mutant patients, smaller residual tumor volumes were associated with increased TTR (HR 1.01, p = 0.03). IDH1 mutation (38/46 cases) was an independent positive prognosticator for overall survival (OS) in multivariate analysis (HR 0.09, p = 0.002), while extensive surgery had limited impact upon OS. In a subgroup of patients with ≥40 % EOR (n = 39), however, initial and residual tumor volumes were prognostic for OS (HR 1.03, p = 0.005 and HR 1.08, p = 0.007, respectively), persistent to adjustment for IDH1. No association between EOR and neurologic morbidity was found. In this analysis of low-grade astrocytomas stratified for IDH1, extensive tumor resections were prognostic for progression and TTR and, in patients with ≥40 % EOR, for OS.

  19. Childhood Astrocytomas Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Signs or symptoms caused by the ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. Side effects ...

  20. Effects of La0.2Ce0.6Eu0.2F3 nanoparticles capped with polyethylene glycol on human astrocytoma cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withers, Nathan J.; Brandt, Yekaterina; Rivera, Antonio C.; Armijo, Leisha M.; Cook, Nathaniel C.; Osiński, Marek

    2012-03-01

    Lanthanide fluoride colloidal nanocrystals offer a way to improve the diagnosis and treatment of cancer through the enhanced absorption of ionizing radiation, as well as providing visible luminescence. In order to explore this possibility, cytotoxicity assays need to be performed on mammalian cells in vitro, to show minimum levels of biocompatibility for future experiments. 20% lanthanum 60% cerium and 20% europium lanthanide fluoride nanocrystals were capped with polyethylene glycol (PEG) of molecular weight 4000 and suspended in deionized water. These nanocrystals were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, muffle furnace ashing, absorbance spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Visible light microscopy and trypan blue staining was performed on the cells to assay the cytotoxicity of the nanocrystal on the human astrocytoma line U-87 MG, purchased from ATCC.

  1. Molecular classification of low-grade diffuse gliomas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Ho; Nobusawa, Sumihito; Mittelbronn, Michel; Paulus, Werner; Brokinkel, Benjamin; Keyvani, Kathy; Sure, Ulrich; Wrede, Karsten; Nakazato, Yoichi; Tanaka, Yuko; Vital, Anne; Mariani, Luigi; Stawski, Robert; Watanabe, Takuya; De Girolami, Umberto; Kleihues, Paul; Ohgaki, Hiroko

    2010-12-01

    The current World Health Organization classification recognizes three histological types of grade II low-grade diffuse glioma (diffuse astrocytoma, oligoastrocytoma, and oligodendroglioma). However, the diagnostic criteria, in particular for oligoastrocytoma, are highly subjective. The aim of our study was to establish genetic profiles for diffuse gliomas and to estimate their predictive impact. In this study, we screened 360 World Health Organization grade II gliomas for mutations in the IDH1, IDH2, and TP53 genes and for 1p/19q loss and correlated these with clinical outcome. Most tumors (86%) were characterized genetically by TP53 mutation plus IDH1/2 mutation (32%), 1p/19q loss plus IDH1/2 mutation (37%), or IDH1/2 mutation only (17%). TP53 mutations only or 1p/19q loss only was rare (2 and 3%, respectively). The median survival of patients with TP53 mutation ± IDH1/2 mutation was significantly shorter than that of patients with 1p/19q loss ± IDH1/2 mutation (51.8 months vs. 58.7 months, respectively; P = 0.0037). Multivariate analysis with adjustment for age and treatment confirmed these results (P = 0.0087) and also revealed that TP53 mutation is a significant prognostic marker for shorter survival (P = 0.0005) and 1p/19q loss for longer survival (P = 0.0002), while IDH1/2 mutations are not prognostic (P = 0.8737). The molecular classification on the basis of IDH1/2 mutation, TP53 mutation, and 1p/19q loss has power similar to histological classification and avoids the ambiguity inherent to the diagnosis of oligoastrocytoma.

  2. Guanine nucleotide-dependent, pertussis toxin-insensitive, stimulation of inositol phosphate formation by carbachol in a membrane preparation from astrocytoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hepler, J.R.; Harden, T.K.

    1986-03-05

    Formation of the inositol phosphates (InsP), InsP/sub 3/, InsP/sub 2/, and InsP/sub 1/ was increased in a concentration dependent manner (K/sub 0.5/ approx. 5 ..mu..M) by GTP..sigma..S in washed membranes prepared from /sup 3/H-inositol-prelabelled 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells. Both GTP..gamma..S and GppNHp stimulated InsP formation by 2-3 fold over control; GTP and GDP were much less efficacious and GMP had no effect. Although the muscarinic cholinergic receptor agonist carbachol had no effect in the absence of guanine nucleotide, in the presence of 10 ..mu..M GTP..gamma..S, carbachol stimulated (K/sub 0.5/ approx. 10 ..mu.. M) the formation of InsP above the level achieved with GTP..gamma..S alone. The effect of carbachol was completely blocked by atropine. The order of potency for a series of nucleotides for stimulation of InsP formation in the presence of 500 ..mu..M carbachol was GTP..gamma..S > GppNHp > GTP = GDP. Pertussis toxin, at concentrations that fully ADP-ribosylate and functionally inactivate G/sub i/, had no effect on InsP formation in the presence of GTP..gamma..S or GTP..gamma..S plus carbachol. Histamine and bradykinin also stimulated InsP formation in the presence of GTP..gamma..S in washed membranes from 1321N1 cells. These data are consistent with the idea that a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein that is not G/sub i/ is involved in receptor-mediated stimulation of InsP formation in 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells.

  3. Cytosolic phospholipase A2 is coupled to muscarinic receptors in the human astrocytoma cell line 1321N1: characterization of the transducing mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Bayon, Y; Hernandez, M; Alonso, A; Nuñez, L; Garcia-Sancho, J; Leslie, C; Sanchez Crespo, M; Nieto, M L

    1997-01-01

    The cholinergic agonist carbachol induced the release of arachidonic acid in the 1321N1 astrocytoma cell line, and this was blocked by atropine, suggesting the involvement of muscarinic receptors. To assess the mechanisms of signalling involved in the response to carbachol, a set of compounds characterized by eliciting responses through different mechanisms was tested. A combination of 4beta-phorbol 12beta-myristate 13alpha-acetate and thapsigargin, an inhibitor of endomembrane Ca2+-ATPase that induces a prolonged elevation of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, induced an optimal response, suggesting at first glance that both protein kinase C (PKC) and Ca2+ mobilization were involved in the response. This was consistent with the observation that carbachol elicited Ca2+ mobilization and PKC-dependent phosphorylation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2; phosphatide sn-2-acylhydrolase, EC 3.1.1.4) as measured by a decrease in electrophoretic mobility. Nevertheless, the release of arachidonate induced by carbachol was unaltered in media containing decreased concentrations of Ca2+ or in the presence of neomycin, a potent inhibitor of phospholipase C which blocks phosphoinositide turnover and Ca2+ mobilization. Guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate added to the cell-free homogenate induced both [3H]arachidonate release and cPLA2 translocation to the cell membrane fraction in the absence of Ca2+, thus suggesting the existence of an alternative mechanism of cPLA2 translocation dependent on G-proteins and independent of Ca2+ mobilization. From the combination of experiments utilizing biochemical and immunological tools the involvement of cPLA2 was ascertained. In summary, these data indicate the existence in the astrocytoma cell line 1321N1 of a pathway involving the cPLA2 which couples the release of arachidonate to the occupancy of receptors for a neurotransmitter, requires PKC activity and G-proteins and might operate in the absence of Ca2+ mobilization. PMID:9173894

  4. Decreased Survival of Glioma Patients with Astrocytoma Grade IV (Glioblastoma Multiforme) Associated with Long-Term Use of Mobile and Cordless Phones

    PubMed Central

    Carlberg, Michael; Hardell, Lennart

    2014-01-01

    On 31 May 2011 the WHO International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) categorised radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) from mobile phones, and from other devices that emit similar non-ionising electromagnetic fields, as a Group 2B, i.e., a “possible”, human carcinogen. A causal association would be strengthened if it could be shown that the use of wireless phones has an impact on the survival of glioma patients. We analysed survival of 1678 glioma patients in our 1997–2003 and 2007–2009 case-control studies. Use of wireless phones in the >20 years latency group (time since first use) yielded an increased hazard ratio (HR) = 1.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.2–2.3 for glioma. For astrocytoma grade IV (glioblastoma multiforme; n = 926) mobile phone use yielded HR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.4–2.9 and cordless phone use HR = 3.4, 95% CI = 1.04–11 in the same latency category. The hazard ratio for astrocytoma grade IV increased statistically significant per year of latency for wireless phones, HR = 1.020, 95% CI = 1.007–1.033, but not per 100 h cumulative use, HR = 1.002, 95% CI = 0.999–1.005. HR was not statistically significant increased for other types of glioma. Due to the relationship with survival the classification of IARC is strengthened and RF-EMF should be regarded as human carcinogen requiring urgent revision of current exposure guidelines. PMID:25325361

  5. Devic's neuromyelitis optica and Schilder's myelinoclastic diffuse sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hainfellner, J A; Schmidbauer, M; Schmutzhard, E; Maier, H; Budka, H

    1992-01-01

    An adult patient developed both Devic's neuromyelitis optica and Schilder's myelinoclastic diffuse sclerosis, suggesting that these entities represent rare topographical and aggressive variants within the spectrum of multiple sclerosis. Images PMID:1343820

  6. Microfabricated diffusion source

    DOEpatents

    Oborny, Michael C.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Manginell, Ronald P.

    2008-07-15

    A microfabricated diffusion source to provide for a controlled diffusion rate of a vapor comprises a porous reservoir formed in a substrate that can be filled with a liquid, a headspace cavity for evaporation of the vapor therein, a diffusion channel to provide a controlled diffusion of the vapor, and an outlet to release the vapor into a gas stream. The microfabricated diffusion source can provide a calibration standard for a microanalytical system. The microanalytical system with an integral diffusion source can be fabricated with microelectromechanical systems technologies.

  7. Guggulipid and nimesulide differentially regulated inflammatory genes mRNA expressions via inhibition of NF-kB and CHOP activation in LPS-stimulated rat astrocytoma cells, C6.

    PubMed

    Niranjan, Rituraj; Nath, Chandishwar; Shukla, Rakesh

    2011-07-01

    Neuroinflammation is an integral part of neurodegenerative diseases. Lipo-polysacharide (LPS) induces reactive astrogliosis, the cellular manifestation of neuroinflammation, in various models of neurological diseases, but its mechanism of action is still not properly known. The effect of guggulipid and nimesulide on LPS-induced neuroinflammatory changes is also not properly understood. This work demonstrated the mechanism of actions of guggulipid and nimesulide on inflammatory genes expressions in LPS-stimulated rat astrocytoma cells, C6. We observed that LPS (10 μg/ml) treatment of rat astrocytoma cells, C6, for 24 h significantly increased intracellular Ca(2+) ion and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-kB), C/EBP homologous protein 10 (CHOP), c-fos, and c-jun proteins. At transcriptional stage, LPS upregulated mRNA levels of cyclooxygenase-2 and IL-6 with downregulation in IL-1α, IL-1β, and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) through activating NF-kB translocation. Treatment with guggulipid reversed these LPS-induced changes in rat astrocytoma cells. Treatment with nimesulide also attenuated LPS-induced Ca(2+) ion, iNOS, NF-kB, and c-fos expressions, but does not significantly influence CHOP, c-jun protein expressions, and mRNA levels of IL-6, IL-1α, IL-1β, and mPGES-1 genes. In conclusion, our findings elucidated the molecular mechanism of neuroinflammation in response to LPS and its modulation by guggulipid and nimesulide in rat astrocytoma cells (C6), which suggest the use of these drugs in the treatment of neuroinflammation-associated disorders.

  8. Diffusion bonding aeroengine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, G. A.; Broughton, T.

    1988-10-01

    The use of diffusion bonding processes at Rolls-Royce for the manufacture of titanium-alloy aircraft engine components and structures is described. A liquid-phase diffusion bonding process called activated diffusion bonding has been developed for the manufacture of the hollow titanium wide chord fan blade. In addition, solid-state diffusion bonding is being used in the manufacture of hollow vane/blade airfoil constructions mainly in conjunction with superplastic forming and hot forming techniques.

  9. Adult infiltrating gliomas with WHO 2016 integrated diagnosis: additional prognostic roles of ATRX and TERT.

    PubMed

    Pekmezci, Melike; Rice, Terri; Molinaro, Annette M; Walsh, Kyle M; Decker, Paul A; Hansen, Helen; Sicotte, Hugues; Kollmeyer, Thomas M; McCoy, Lucie S; Sarkar, Gobinda; Perry, Arie; Giannini, Caterina; Tihan, Tarik; Berger, Mitchel S; Wiemels, Joseph L; Bracci, Paige M; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Lachance, Daniel H; Clarke, Jennifer; Taylor, Jennie W; Luks, Tracy; Wiencke, John K; Jenkins, Robert B; Wrensch, Margaret R

    2017-03-02

    The "integrated diagnosis" for infiltrating gliomas in the 2016 revised World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system requires assessment of the tumor for IDH mutations and 1p/19q codeletion. Since TERT promoter mutations and ATRX alterations have been shown to be associated with prognosis, we analyzed whether these tumor markers provide additional prognostic information within each of the five WHO 2016 categories. We used data for 1206 patients from the UCSF Adult Glioma Study, the Mayo Clinic and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) with infiltrative glioma, grades II-IV for whom tumor status for IDH, 1p/19q codeletion, ATRX, and TERT had been determined. All cases were assigned to one of 5 groups following the WHO 2016 diagnostic criteria based on their morphologic features, and IDH and 1p/19q codeletion status. These groups are: (1) Oligodendroglioma, IDH-mutant and 1p/19q-codeleted; (2) Astrocytoma, IDH-mutant; (3) Glioblastoma, IDH-mutant; (4) Glioblastoma, IDH-wildtype; and (5) Astrocytoma, IDH-wildtype. Within each group, we used univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models to assess associations of overall survival with patient age at diagnosis, grade, and ATRX alteration status and/or TERT promoter mutation status. Among Group 1 IDH-mutant 1p/19q-codeleted oligodendrogliomas, the TERT-WT group had significantly worse overall survival than the TERT-MUT group (HR: 2.72, 95% CI 1.05-7.04, p = 0.04). In both Group 2, IDH-mutant astrocytomas and Group 3, IDH-mutant glioblastomas, neither TERT mutations nor ATRX alterations were significantly associated with survival. Among Group 4, IDH-wildtype glioblastomas, ATRX alterations were associated with favorable outcomes (HR: 0.36, 95% CI 0.17-0.81, p = 0.01). Among Group 5, IDH-wildtype astrocytomas, the TERT-WT group had significantly better overall survival than the TERT-MUT group (HR: 0.48, 95% CI 0.27-0.87), p = 0.02). Thus, we present evidence that in

  10. Diffusion of tungsten hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of tungsten hexafluoride

  11. Reduce Confusion about Diffusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebrank, Mary R.

    1997-01-01

    Presents activities that allow students to explore the fundamental but poorly understood concept of diffusion by appealing to their kinesthetic senses first, then challenging their analytical skills as they try to deduce the mathematical principle involved. Presents a computer simulation of diffusion and discusses diffusion's limitations and…

  12. Diffusion Strategy Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCutcheon, James R.; Sanders, John R.

    A methodology is presented for planning and managing the spread of educational innovations. The first portion of the guide develops a theoretical framework for diffusion which summarizes and capitalizes on the latest marketing and on the latest marketing and diffusion research findings. Major stages in the diffusion paradigm discussed include…

  13. A Student Diffusion Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutzner, Mickey; Pearson, Bryan

    2017-02-01

    Diffusion is a truly interdisciplinary topic bridging all areas of STEM education. When biomolecules are not being moved through the body by fluid flow through the circulatory system or by molecular motors, diffusion is the primary mode of transport over short distances. The direction of the diffusive flow of particles is from high concentration toward low concentration.

  14. Handbook on atmospheric diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, S.R.; Briggs, G.A.; Hosker, R.P. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Basic meteorological concepts are covered as well as plume rise, source effects, and diffusion models. Chapters are included on cooling tower plumes and urban diffusion. Suggestions are given for calculating diffusion in special situations, such as for instantaneous releases over complex terrain, over long distances, and during times when chemical reactions or dry or wet deposition are important. (PSB)

  15. Radio-chemotherapy improves survival in IDH-mutant, 1p/19q non-codeleted secondary high-grade astrocytoma patients.

    PubMed

    Juratli, Tareq A; Lautenschläger, Tim; Geiger, Kathrin D; Pinzer, Thomas; Krause, Mechthild; Schackert, Gabriele; Krex, Dietmar

    2015-09-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutations are beginning to drive decisions on therapy for glioma patients. Here we sought to determine the impact of adjuvant treatment in patients with IDH-mutant, 1p/19q non-codeleted secondary high-grade astrocytoma (sHGA) WHO grades III/IV. Clinical data of 109 sHGA patients grades III/IV, in addition to IDH mutation-, 1p/19q-codeletion- and MGMT-promoter methylation status-were retrospectively analyzed. Survival analysis in relation to adjuvant treatment modalities and molecular profiling were performed. Out of 109 patients, 88 patients (80.7 %) harbored IDH mutations, 30 patients had a 1p/19q-codeletion (27.5 %) and 69 patients (63.3 %) exhibited a methylated MGMT-promoter status. At a median follow-up of 9.8 years, 62 patients (57 %) died. The postsurgical treatment included: radio-chemotherapy (RT-CT; 54.5 %), RT alone (19.3 %), and CT alone (22.7 %). The median overall survival (OS) in the entire group was 3.4 years (1.9-6.7 years). Patients who received RT-CT had a significantly longer OS compared with those who underwent RT alone (6.5 vs. 1.2 years, HR 0.35, CI 0.32-0.51, p = 0.011). In the IDH-mutant 1p/19q non-codeleted sHGA subgroup the RT-CT cohort had a significantly longer OS in comparison to the RT cohort (6.4 vs. 1.2 years, HR 2.7, CI 1.1-6.5, p = 0.022). In the stepwise multivariable Cox model for OS of all 88 IDH-mutant sHGA patients, survival was strongly associated with only one factor, namely, adjuvant RT-CT at diagnosis of a sHGA. This retrospective long-term study demonstrates that RT and CT (mostly PCV) significantly improves progression-free and overall survival in IDH-mutant secondary high-grade astrocytoma patients, regardless of 1p/19q-codeletion status.

  16. A high throughput system for the evaluation of protein kinase C inhibitors based on Elk1 transcriptional activation in human astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sharif, T R; Sharif, M

    1999-02-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) designates a family of kinases that regulate many essential functions including cell growth and differentiation. The tight regulation of PKC activity is crucial for maintaining normal cellular proliferation and excessive activity leads to abnormal or uncontrolled cell growth. Recent reports indicate that malignant glioma cell lines express 100 to 1000-fold higher PKC activity when compared to non-neoplastic astrocytes. This high activity correlates well with the proliferation of tumor cells in vitro. We recently reported on the anti-proliferative properties of selective PKC inhibitors on the growth of U-373MG human astrocytoma cell line, and their ability to block mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway activated by substance P (SP) neuropeptide receptor signaling via a PKC-dependent mechanism. Therefore, inhibiting PKC activity by selective PKC inhibitors may present a promising approach for improving astroglial brain tumor therapy. For this purpose, we constructed a high throughput model cell system to evaluate the efficacy of PKC inhibitors. This system is based on the measurement of light production in U-373MG cells stably transfected with the luciferase reporter gene whose expression depends on the transcriptional activation of GAL4-Elk1 fusion protein by enzyme components of the MAP kinase pathway and the upstream activation of PKC (PKC activation-->MAP kinases-->GAL4-Elk1 phosphorylation-->luciferase expression-->luciferase activity). In brief, we have demonstrated that the PKC activator 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-induced luciferase activity in this cell system is mediated via the MAP kinase pathway and can be blocked in the presence of MEK1 selective inhibitors (PD 098059 or U0126). We also demonstrated that TPA-induced luciferase activity in U-373MG stable clones can be blocked by PKC inhibitors (CGP 41251, Go 6976, and GF 109203X) in a concentration dependent manner. In contrast, epidermal growth factor (EGF

  17. Establishment and application of a novel patient-derived KIAA1549:BRAF-driven pediatric pilocytic astrocytoma model for preclinical drug testing.

    PubMed

    Selt, Florian; Hohloch, Juliane; Hielscher, Thomas; Sahm, Felix; Capper, David; Korshunov, Andrey; Usta, Diren; Brabetz, Sebastian; Ridinger, Johannes; Ecker, Jonas; Oehme, Ina; Gronych, Jan; Marquardt, Viktoria; Pauck, David; Bächli, Heidi; Stiles, Charles D; von Deimling, Andreas; Remke, Marc; Schuhmann, Martin U; Pfister, Stefan M; Brummer, Tilman; Jones, David T W; Witt, Olaf; Milde, Till

    2016-12-17

    Pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) is the most frequent pediatric brain tumor. Activation of the MAPK pathway is well established as the oncogenic driver of the disease. It is most frequently caused by KIAA1549:BRAF fusions, and leads to oncogene induced senescence (OIS). OIS is thought to be a major reason for growth arrest of PA cells in vitro and in vivo, preventing establishment of PA cultures. Hence, valid preclinical models are currently very limited, but preclinical testing of new compounds is urgently needed. We transduced the PA short-term culture DKFZ-BT66 derived from the PA of a 2-year old patient with a doxycycline-inducible system coding for Simian Vacuolating Virus 40 Large T Antigen (SV40-TAg). SV40-TAg inhibits TP53/CDKN1A and CDKN2A/RB1, two pathways critical for OIS induction and maintenance. DNA methylation array and KIAA1549:BRAF fusion analysis confirmed pilocytic astrocytoma identity of DKFZ-BT66 cells after establishment. Readouts were analyzed in proliferating as well as senescent states, including cell counts, viability, cell cycle analysis, expression of SV40-Tag, CDKN2A (p16), CDKN1A (p21), and TP53 (p53) protein, and gene-expression profiling. Selected MAPK inhibitors (MAPKi) including clinically available MEK inhibitors (MEKi) were tested in vitro. Expression of SV40-TAg enabled the cells to bypass OIS and to resume proliferation with a mean doubling time of 45h allowing for propagation and long-term culture. Withdrawal of doxycycline led to an immediate decrease of SV40-TAg expression, appearance of senescent morphology, upregulation of CDKI proteins and a subsequent G1 growth arrest in line with the re-induction of senescence. DKFZ-BT66 cells still underwent replicative senescence that was overcome by TERT expression. Testing of a set of MAPKi revealed differential responses in DKFZ-BT66. MEKi efficiently inhibited MAPK signaling at clinically achievable concentrations, while BRAF V600E- and RAF Type II inhibitors showed paradoxical

  18. Neoadjuvant cisplatin plus temozolomide versus standard treatment in patients with unresectable glioblastoma or anaplastic astrocytoma: a differential effect of MGMT methylation.

    PubMed

    Capdevila, Laia; Cros, Sara; Ramirez, Jose-Luis; Sanz, Carolina; Carrato, Cristina; Romeo, Margarita; Etxaniz, Olatz; Hostalot, Cristina; Massuet, Ana; Cuadra, Jose Luis; Villà, Salvador; Balañà, Carmen

    2014-03-01

    Patients with unresectable glioblastoma or anaplastic astrocytoma have a dismal prognosis. The role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to irradiation in these patients has been studied primarily in non-randomized studies. We have compared the effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy plus radiotherapy versus concomitant radiotherapy plus temozolomide in a retrospective analysis of two consecutive series of patients in whom surgery consisted of biopsy only. From 2003 to 2005, 23 patients received two cycles of temozolomide plus cisplatin followed by radiotherapy (Cohort 1), and from 2006 to 2010, 23 additional patients received concomitant radiotherapy and temozolomide followed by adjuvant temozolomide (Cohort 2). In Cohort 1, 91.3 % of patients received all planned chemotherapy cycles. Progression-free and overall survival were 3.3 and 8.5 months, respectively. In Cohort 2, progression-free and overall survival were 5.1 and 11.2 months, respectively. No differences between the two groups were observed in rate of completion of radiotherapy, progression-free or overall survival. MGMT methylation was assessed in 91.3 % of patients. In Cohort 1, patients without MGMT methylation showed a trend towards shorter progression-free survival (P = 0.09), while in Cohort 2, patients without MGMT methylation had longer progression-free survival (P = 0.04). In the overall patient population, neoadjuvant temozolomide plus cisplatin had neither a positive nor negative influence on outcome. However, our findings indicate that patients with methylated MGMT may derive greater benefit from neoadjuvant temozolomide than those with unmethylated MGMT.

  19. BRAF Fusion Analysis in Pilocytic Astrocytomas: KIAA1549-BRAF 15-9 Fusions Are More Frequent in the Midline Than Within the Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Faulkner, Claire; Ellis, Hayley Patricia; Shaw, Abigail; Penman, Catherine; Palmer, Abigail; Wragg, Christopher; Greenslade, Mark; Haynes, Harry Russell; Williams, Hannah; Lowis, Stephen; White, Paul; Williams, Maggie; Capper, David; Kurian, Kathreena Mary

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs) are increasingly tested for KIAA1549-BRAF fusions. We used reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for the 3 most common KIAA1549-BRAF fusions, together with BRAF V600E and histone H3.3 K27M analyses to identify relationships of these molecular characteristics with clinical features in a cohort of 32 PA patients. In this group, the overall BRAF fusion detection rate was 24 (75%). Ten (42%) of the 24 had the 16-9 fusion, 8 (33%) had only the 15-9 fusion, and 1 (4%) of the patients had only the 16-11 fusion. In the PAs with only the 15-9 fusion, 1 PA was in the cerebellum and 7 were centered in the midline outside of the cerebellum, that is, in the hypothalamus (n = 4), optic pathways (n = 2), and brainstem (n = 1). Tumors within the cerebellum were negatively associated with fusion 15-9. Seven (22%) of the 32 patients had tumor-related deaths and 25 of the patients (78%) were alive between 2 and 14 years after initial biopsy. Age, sex, tumor location, 16-9 fusion, and 15-9 fusion were not associated with overall survival. Thus, in this small cohort, 15-9 KIAA1549-BRAF fusion was associated with midline PAs located outside of the cerebellum; these tumors, which are generally difficult to resect, are prone to recurrence. PMID:26222501

  20. BRAF Fusion Analysis in Pilocytic Astrocytomas: KIAA1549-BRAF 15-9 Fusions Are More Frequent in the Midline Than Within the Cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Claire; Ellis, Hayley Patricia; Shaw, Abigail; Penman, Catherine; Palmer, Abigail; Wragg, Christopher; Greenslade, Mark; Haynes, Harry Russell; Williams, Hannah; Lowis, Stephen; White, Paul; Williams, Maggie; Capper, David; Kurian, Kathreena Mary

    2015-09-01

    Pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs) are increasingly tested for KIAA1549-BRAF fusions. We used reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for the 3 most common KIAA1549-BRAF fusions, together with BRAF V600E and histone H3.3 K27M analyses to identify relationships of these molecular characteristics with clinical features in a cohort of 32 PA patients. In this group, the overall BRAF fusion detection rate was 24 (75%). Ten (42%) of the 24 had the 16-9 fusion, 8 (33%) had only the 15-9 fusion, and 1 (4%) of the patients had only the 16-11 fusion. In the PAs with only the 15-9 fusion, 1 PA was in the cerebellum and 7 were centered in the midline outside of the cerebellum, that is, in the hypothalamus (n = 4), optic pathways (n = 2), and brainstem (n = 1). Tumors within the cerebellum were negatively associated with fusion 15-9. Seven (22%) of the 32 patients had tumor-related deaths and 25 of the patients (78%) were alive between 2 and 14 years after initial biopsy. Age, sex, tumor location, 16-9 fusion, and 15-9 fusion were not associated with overall survival. Thus, in this small cohort, 15-9 KIAA1549-BRAF fusion was associated with midline PAs located outside of the cerebellum; these tumors, which are generally difficult to resect, are prone to recurrence.

  1. D-1 dopaminergic and beta-adrenergic stimulation of adenylate cyclase in a clone derived from the human astrocytoma cell line G-CCM.

    PubMed

    Balmforth, A J; Ball, S G; Freshney, R I; Graham, D I; McNamee, H B; Vaughan, P F

    1986-09-01

    Clones have been isolated from the human astrocytoma cell line G-CCM. Homogenates of clone D384 contain an adenylate cyclase that is stimulated by 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethylamine (dopamine), noradrenaline, and isoprenaline with Ka apparent values of 4, 56, and 2.7 microM, respectively. The Ka apparent value for dopamine was increased by the D-1 antagonist cis-flupenthixol, 25 and 100 nM, to 23 and 190 microM, respectively, but was unaffected by propranolol (1 microM). Noradrenaline stimulation of adenylate cyclase was only partially inhibited by either propranolol (10 microM) or cis-flupenthixol (1 microM). Propranolol (10 microM), but not cis-flupenthixol (1 microM), prevented stimulation by isoprenaline. The stimulation of adenylate cyclase by dopamine and noradrenaline remained unchanged in the presence of phentolamine (1 microM) and sulpiride (1 microM). These results suggest that clone D384 contains both D-1 dopaminergic and beta-adrenergic receptors coupled to adenylate cyclase. Dopamine stimulates D384 adenylate cyclase through D-1 receptors, isoprenaline via beta-receptors, and noradrenaline through both receptors.

  2. The tachykinin peptide neurokinin B binds copper forming an unusual [CuII(NKB)2] complex and inhibits copper uptake into 1321N1 astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Russino, Debora; McDonald, Elle; Hejazi, Leila; Hanson, Graeme R; Jones, Christopher E

    2013-10-16

    Neurokinin B (NKB) is a member of the tachykinin family of neuropeptides that have neuroinflammatory, neuroimmunological, and neuroprotective functions. In a neuroprotective role, tachykinins can help protect cells against the neurotoxic processes observed in Alzheimer's disease. A change in copper homeostasis is a clear feature of Alzheimer's disease, and the dysregulation may be a contributory factor in toxicity. Copper has recently been shown to interact with neurokinin A and neuropeptide γ and can lead to generation of reactive oxygen species and peptide degradation, which suggests that copper may have a place in tachykinin function and potentially misfunction. To explore this, we have utilized a range of spectroscopic techniques to show that NKB, but not substance P, can bind Cu(II) in an unusual [Cu(II)(NKB)2] neutral complex that utilizes two N-terminal amine and two imidazole nitrogen ligands (from each molecule of NKB) and the binding substantially alters the structure of the peptide. Using 1321N1 astrocytoma cells, we show that copper can enter the cells and subsequently open plasma membrane calcium channels but when bound to neurokinin B copper ion uptake is inhibited. This data suggests a novel role for neurokinin B in protecting cells against copper-induced calcium changes and implicates the peptide in synaptic copper homeostasis.

  3. AUTOCOUNTER, an ImageJ JavaScript to analyze LC3B-GFP expression dynamics in autophagy-induced astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Fassina, L; Magenes, G; Inzaghi, A; Palumbo, S; Allavena, G; Miracco, C; Pirtoli, L; Biggiogera, M; Comincini, S

    2012-10-11

    An ImageJ JavaScript, AUTOCOUNTER, was specifically developed to monitor and measure LC3B-GFP expression in living human astrocytoma cells, namely T98G and U373-MG. Discrete intracellular GFP fluorescent spots derived from transduction of a Baculovirus replication-defective vector (BacMam LC3B-GFP), followed by microscope examinations at different times. After viral transgene expression, autophagy was induced by Rapamycin administration and assayed in ph-p70S6K/p70S6K and LC3B immunoblotting expression as well as by electron microscopy examinations. A mutated transgene, defective in LC3B lipidation, was employed as a negative control to further exclude fluorescent dots derived from protein intracellular aggregation. The ImageJ JavaScript was then employed to evaluate and score the dynamics changes of the number and area of LC3B-GFP puncta per cell in time course assays and in complex microscope examinations. In conclusion, AUTOCOUNTER enabled to quantify LC3B-GFP expression and to monitor dynamics changes in number and shapes of autophagosomal-like vesicles: it might therefore represent a suitable algorithmic tool for in vitro autophagy modulation studies.

  4. Protein Kinase C-α–Mediated Regulation of Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor–Related Protein and Urokinase Increases Astrocytoma Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Amos, Samson; Mut, Melike; diPierro, Charles G.; Carpenter, Joan E.; Xiao, Aizhen; Kohutek, Zachary A.; Redpath, Gerard T.; Zhao, Yunge; Wang, Jiahu; Shaffrey, Mark E.; Hussaini, Isa M.

    2008-01-01

    Aggressive and infiltrative invasion is one of the hallmarks of glioblastoma. Low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein (LRP) is expressed by glioblastoma, but the role of this receptor in astrocytic tumor invasion remains poorly understood. We show that activation of protein kinase C-α (PKC-α) phosphorylated and down-regulated LRP expression. Pretreatment of tumor cells with PKC inhibitors, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, PKC-α small interfering RNA (siRNA), and short hairpin RNA abrogated phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate–induced down-regulation of LRP and inhibited astrocytic tumor invasion in vitro. In xenograft glioblastoma mouse model and in vitro transmembrane invasion assay, LRP-deficient cells, which secreted high levels of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), invaded extensively the surrounding normal brain tissue, whereas the LRP-overexpressing and uPA-deficient cells did not invade into the surrounding normal brain. siRNA, targeted against uPA in LRP-deficient clones, attenuated their invasive potential. Taken together, our results strongly suggest the involvement of PKC-α/PI3K signaling pathways in the regulation of LRP-mediated astrocytoma invasion. Thus, a strategy of combining small molecule inhibitors of PKC-α and PI3K could provide a new treatment paradigm for glioblastomas. PMID:17974965

  5. Expression pattern and sub-cellular distribution of phosphoinositide specific phospholipase C enzymes after treatment with U-73122 in rat astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lo Vasco, Vincenza Rita; Fabrizi, Cinzia; Panetta, Barbara; Fumagalli, Lorenzo; Cocco, Lucio

    2010-07-01

    Phosphoinositide specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) enzymes interfere with the metabolism of inositol phospholipids (PI), molecules involved in signal transduction, a complex process depending on various components. Many evidences support the hypothesis that, in the glia, isoforms of PI-PLC family display different expression and/or sub cellular distribution under non-physiological conditions such as the rat astrocytes activation during neurodegeneration, the tumoural progression of some neoplasms and the inflammatory cascade activation after lipopolysaccharide administration, even if their role remains not completely elucidated. Treatment of a cultured established glioma cell line (C6 rat astrocytoma cell line) induces a modification in the pattern of expression and of sub cellular distribution of PI-PLCs compared to untreated cells. Special attention require PI-PLC beta3 and PI-PLC gamma2 isoforms, whose expression and sub cellular localization significantly differ after U-73122 treatment. The meaning of these modifications is unclear, also because the use of this N-aminosteroid compound remains controversial, inasmuch it has further actions which might contribute to the global effect recorded on the treated cells.

  6. A novel mutation in NF1 is associated with diverse intra-familial phenotypic variation and astrocytoma in a Chinese family.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Santasree; Dai, Yi; Liang, Shengran; Chen, Huishuang; Wang, Yanyan; Tang, Lihui; Wu, Jing; Huang, Hui

    2016-09-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a dysregulated neurocutaneous disorder, characterized by neurofibromas and café-au-lait spots. NF1 is caused by mutations in the NF1 gene, encoding neurofibromin. Here, we present a clinical molecular study of a three-generation Chinese family with NF1. The proband was a male patient who showed café-au-lait spots and multiple subcutaneous neurofibromas over the whole body, but his siblings only had regional lesions. The man's daughter presented with severe headache and vomiting. Neurological examination revealed an intracranial space occupying lesion. Surgery was undertaken and the histopathological examination showed a grade I-II astrocytoma. Next-Generation sequencing (Illumina HiSeq2500 Analyzers; Illumina, San Diego, CA, USA) and Sanger sequencing (ABI PRISM 3730 automated sequencer; Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA, USA) identified the c.227delA mutation in the NF1 gene in the man. The mutation is co-segregated with the disease phenotypes among the affected members of this family and was absent in 100 healthy controls. This novel mutation results in a frameshift (p.Asn78IlefsX7) as well as truncation of neurofibromin by formation of a premature stop codon. Our results not only extended the mutational and phenotypic spectra of the gene and the disease, but also highlight the importance of the other genetic or environmental factors in the development and severity of the disease.

  7. Hereditary Diffuse Infiltrating Retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Schedler, Katharina J E; Traine, Peter G; Lohmann, Dietmar R; Haritoglou, Christos; Metz, Klaus A; Rodrigues, Eduardo B

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is one of the most common childhood cancers. The diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma is a rare subtype of this neoplasm. The majority of cases of diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma are unilateral and occur sporadically. Herein we report on a family with three children affected by retinoblastoma, among them one girl with diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma. This girl was diagnosed at the age of 8 years with a unilateral diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma. By contrast, the two brothers became clinically apparent in the first 2 years of life with bilateral retinoblastoma. The parents were clinically unremarkable. Genetic analysis of RB1 gene was performed. The girl with diffuse infiltrating RB was found to be heterozygous for an oncogenic mutation in the RB1 gene that was also carried by both brothers and the father of the family. These results show that diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma can develop on the background of a hereditary predisposition to retinoblastoma.

  8. Gaseous diffusion system

    DOEpatents

    Garrett, George A.; Shacter, John

    1978-01-01

    1. A gaseous diffusion system comprising a plurality of diffusers connected in cascade to form a series of stages, each of said diffusers having a porous partition dividing it into a high pressure chamber and a low pressure chamber, and means for combining a portion of the enriched gas from a succeeding stage with a portion of the enriched gas from the low pressure chamber of each stage and feeding it into one extremity of the high pressure chamber thereof.

  9. Phase singularity diffusion.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaojun; Lockerman, Yitzchak; Genack, Azriel Z

    2014-06-01

    We follow the trajectories of phase singularities at nulls of intensity in the speckle pattern of waves transmitted through random media as the frequency of the incident radiation is scanned in microwave experiments and numerical simulations. Phase singularities are observed to diffuse with a linear increase of the square displacement 〈R2〉 with frequency shift. The product of the diffusion coefficient of phase singularities in the transmitted speckle pattern and the photon diffusion coefficient through the random medium is proportional to the square of the effective sample length. This provides the photon diffusion coefficient and a method for characterizing the motion of dynamic material systems.

  10. Inpainting using airy diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorduy Hernandez, Sara

    2015-09-01

    One inpainting procedure based on Airy diffusion is proposed, implemented via Maple and applied to some digital images. Airy diffusion is a partial differential equation with spatial derivatives of third order in contrast with the usual diffusion with spatial derivatives of second order. Airy diffusion generates the Airy semigroup in terms of the Airy functions which can be rewritten in terms of Bessel functions. The Airy diffusion can be used to smooth an image with the corresponding noise elimination via convolution. Also the Airy diffusion can be used to erase objects from an image. We build an algorithm using the Maple package ImageTools and such algorithm is tested using some images. Our results using Airy diffusion are compared with the similar results using standard diffusion. We observe that Airy diffusion generates powerful filters for image processing which could be incorporated in the usual packages for image processing such as ImageJ and Photoshop. Also is interesting to consider the possibility to incorporate the Airy filters as applications for smartphones and smart-glasses.

  11. Experimental study of vortex diffusers

    SciTech Connect

    Shakerin, S.; Miller, P.L.

    1995-11-01

    This report documents experimental research performed on vortex diffusers used in ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The main objectives of the research were (1) to study the flow characteristics of isothermal jets issuing from vortex diffusers, (2) to compare the vortex diffuser`s performance with that of a conventional diffuser, and (3) to prepare a report that disseminates the results to the designers of ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The researchers considered three diffusers: a conventional round ceiling diffuser and two different styles of vortex diffusers. Overall, the vortex diffusers create slightly more induction of ambient air in comparison to the conventional diffuser.

  12. Characterization of the blood brain barrier in pediatric central nervous system neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Christopher S.; Ho, Winson; Piazza, Martin G.; Ray-Chaudhury, Abhik; Zhuang, Zhengping; Heiss, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The normal blood–brain barrier (BBB) is composed of tight junctions between endothelial cells and surrounding astrocyte foot processes. Breakdown of the physiological astrocyte-endothelial cell relationship occurs in adult metastatic and primary brain tumors. However, the astrocyte-endothelial cell relationship has not been studied in pediatric tumors. Materials and Methods Utilizing specimens from cases of pilocytic astrocytoma (n = 5), medulloblastoma (n = 5), and low-grade diffuse astrocytoma (n = 1), immunofluorescence were performed using primary antibodies against CD31, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and aquaporin 4 (AQ4). Clinical, magnetic resonance imaging, operative, and histopathological findings were analyzed. Results Strongly-enhancing areas of medulloblastoma exhibited complete BBB breakdown with sparse GFAP and AQ4 staining around CD31-positive vessels. Moderately enhancing regions of pilocytic astrocytomas exhibited regions of intact BBB and vasculature surrounded by dense GFAP staining but reduced and disorganized AQ4 staining, suggesting tumor cells could not fulfill physiological BBB support. Non-enhancing low-grade diffuse astrocytoma demonstrated intact BBB with intense peri-microvasculature GFAP and AQ4 staining. AQ4 stained so strongly that AQ4 visualization alone delineated CD31-positive vessels. Conclusion Taken together, BBB breakdown in pediatric tumors corresponds to a loss of normal endothelial cell-astrocyte foot process relationships. Further development of pharmaceutical agents capitalizing on this disrupted BBB is warranted in medulloblastoma and pilocytic astrocytoma. However, BBB integrity remains a challenge in treating low-grade diffuse astrocytoma before progression toward secondary glioblastoma. PMID:27917302

  13. Anatomy of Particle Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bringuier, E.

    2009-01-01

    The paper analyses particle diffusion from a thermodynamic standpoint. The main goal of the paper is to highlight the conceptual connection between particle diffusion, which belongs to non-equilibrium statistical physics, and mechanics, which deals with particle motion, at the level of third-year university courses. We start out from the fact…

  14. Diffusion of Botulinum Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Matthew A.; Swope, David M.; Grimes, David

    2012-01-01

    Background It is generally agreed that diffusion of botulinum toxin occurs, but the extent of the spread and its clinical importance are disputed. Many factors have been suggested to play a role but which have the most clinical relevance is a subject of much discussion. Methods This review discusses the variables affecting diffusion, including protein composition and molecular size as well as injection factors (e.g., volume, dose, injection method). It also discusses data on diffusion from comparative studies in animal models and human clinical trials that illustrate differences between the available botulinum toxin products (onabotulinumtoxinA, abobotulinumtoxinA, incobotulinumtoxinA, and rimabotulinumtoxinB). Results Neither molecular weight nor the presence of complexing proteins appears to affect diffusion; however, injection volume, concentration, and dose all play roles and are modifiable. Both animal and human studies show that botulinum toxin products are not interchangeable, and that some products are associated with greater diffusion and higher rates of diffusion-related adverse events than others. Discussion Each of the botulinum toxins is a unique pharmacologic entity. A working knowledge of the different serotypes is essential to avoid unwanted diffusion-related adverse events. In addition, clinicians should be aware that the factors influencing diffusion may range from properties intrinsic to the drug to accurate muscle selection as well as dilution, volume, and dose injected. PMID:23440162

  15. Investigating Diffusion with Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jon S.; Windelborn, Augden F.

    2013-01-01

    The activities described here allow students to explore the concept of diffusion with the use of common equipment such as computers, webcams and analysis software. The procedure includes taking a series of digital pictures of a container of water with a webcam as a dye slowly diffuses. At known time points, measurements of the pixel densities…

  16. The Diffusion of Innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earabino, Gerard J.; Heyl, G. Christopher; Percorini, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    New ideas encounter obstacles on way to becoming products. Report examines process by which new ideas become products, processes, or accepted standards. Sequence of events called "the diffusion of innovation." Focuses on development of material processing in low gravity as case study in diffusion of innovation.

  17. Cosmology with matter diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Calogero, Simone; Velten, Hermano E-mail: velten@cce.ufes.br

    2013-11-01

    We construct a viable cosmological model based on velocity diffusion of matter particles. In order to ensure the conservation of the total energy-momentum tensor in the presence of diffusion, we include a cosmological scalar field φ which we identify with the dark energy component of the universe. The model is characterized by only one new degree of freedom, the diffusion parameter σ. The standard ΛCDM model can be recovered by setting σ = 0. If diffusion takes place (σ > 0) the dynamics of the matter and of the dark energy fields are coupled. We argue that the existence of a diffusion mechanism in the universe may serve as a theoretical motivation for interacting models. We constrain the background dynamics of the diffusion model with Supernovae, H(z) and BAO data. We also perform a perturbative analysis of this model in order to understand structure formation in the universe. We calculate the impact of diffusion both on the CMB spectrum, with particular attention to the integrated Sachs-Wolfe signal, and on the matter power spectrum P(k). The latter analysis places strong constraints on the magnitude of the diffusion mechanism but does not rule out the model.

  18. Polymyositis - adult

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash is a sign of a similar condition, dermatomyositis . Common symptoms include: Muscle weakness in the shoulders ... in the treatment of refractory adult and juvenile dermatomyositis and adult polymyositis: a randomized, placebo-phase trial. ...

  19. Diffusion in Coulomb crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hughto, J.; Schneider, A. S.; Horowitz, C. J.; Berry, D. K.

    2011-07-15

    Diffusion in Coulomb crystals can be important for the structure of neutron star crusts. We determine diffusion constants D from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that D for Coulomb crystals with relatively soft-core 1/r interactions may be larger than D for Lennard-Jones or other solids with harder-core interactions. Diffusion, for simulations of nearly perfect body-centered-cubic lattices, involves the exchange of ions in ringlike configurations. Here ions ''hop'' in unison without the formation of long lived vacancies. Diffusion, for imperfect crystals, involves the motion of defects. Finally, we find that diffusion, for an amorphous system rapidly quenched from Coulomb parameter {Gamma}=175 to Coulomb parameters up to {Gamma}=1750, is fast enough that the system starts to crystalize during long simulation runs. These results strongly suggest that Coulomb solids in cold white dwarf stars, and the crust of neutron stars, will be crystalline and not amorphous.

  20. Diffusion in Coulomb crystals.

    PubMed

    Hughto, J; Schneider, A S; Horowitz, C J; Berry, D K

    2011-07-01

    Diffusion in Coulomb crystals can be important for the structure of neutron star crusts. We determine diffusion constants D from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that D for Coulomb crystals with relatively soft-core 1/r interactions may be larger than D for Lennard-Jones or other solids with harder-core interactions. Diffusion, for simulations of nearly perfect body-centered-cubic lattices, involves the exchange of ions in ringlike configurations. Here ions "hop" in unison without the formation of long lived vacancies. Diffusion, for imperfect crystals, involves the motion of defects. Finally, we find that diffusion, for an amorphous system rapidly quenched from Coulomb parameter Γ=175 to Coulomb parameters up to Γ=1750, is fast enough that the system starts to crystalize during long simulation runs. These results strongly suggest that Coulomb solids in cold white dwarf stars, and the crust of neutron stars, will be crystalline and not amorphous.

  1. Combustor diffuser interaction program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Ram; Thorp, Daniel

    1986-01-01

    Advances in gas turbine engine performance are achieved by using compressor systems with high stage loading and low part count, which result in high exit Mach numbers. The diffuser and combustor systems in such engines should be optimized to reduce system pressure loss and to maximize the engine thrust-to-weight ratio and minimize length. The state-of-the-art combustor-diffuser systems do not meet these requirements. Detailed understanding of the combustor-diffuser flow field interaction is required for designing advanced gas turbine engines. An experimental study of the combustor-diffuser interaction (CDI) is being conducted to obtain data for the evaluation and improvement of analytical models applicable to a wide variety of diffuser designs. The CDI program consists of four technical phases: Literature Search; Baseline Configuration; Parametric Configurations; and Performance Configurations. Phase 2 of the program is in progress.

  2. Helium diffusion in carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amidon, W. H.; Cherniak, D. J.; Watson, E. B.; Hobbs, D.

    2013-12-01

    The abundance and large grain size of carbonate minerals make them a potentially attractive target for 4He thermochronology and 3He cosmogenic dating, although the diffusive properties of helium in carbonates remain poorly understood. This work characterizes helium diffusion in calcite and dolomite to better understand the crystal-chemical factors controlling He transport and retentivity. Slabs of cleaved natural calcite and dolomite, and polished sections of calcite cut parallel or normal to c, were implanted with 3He at 3 MeV with a dose of 5x1015/cm2. Implanted carbonates were heated in 1-atm furnaces, and 3He distributions following diffusion anneals were profiled with Nuclear Reaction Analysis using the reaction 3He(d,p)4He. For 3He transport normal to cleavage surfaces in calcite, we obtain the following Arrhenius relation over the temperature range 78-300°C: Dcalcite = 9.0x10-9exp(-55 × 6 kJ mol-1/RT) m2sec-1. Diffusion in calcite exhibits marked anisotropy, with diffusion parallel to c about two orders of magnitude slower than diffusion normal to cleavage faces. He diffusivities for transport normal to the c-axis are similar in value to those normal to cleavage surfaces. Our findings are broadly consistent with helium diffusivities from step-heating measurements of calcite by Copeland et al. (2007); these bulk degassing data may reflect varying effects of diffusional anisotropy. Helium diffusion normal to cleavage surfaces in dolomite is significantly slower than diffusion in calcite, and has a much higher activation energy for diffusion. For dolomite, we obtain the following Arrhenius relation for He diffusion over the temperature range 150-400°C: Ddolomite = 9.0x10-8exp(-92 × 9 kJ mol-1/RT) m2sec-1. The role of crystallographic structure in influencing these differences among diffusivities was evaluated using the maximum aperture approach of Cherniak and Watson (2011), in which crystallographic structures are sectioned along possible diffusion

  3. Malignant brainstem tumors in children, excluding diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas.

    PubMed

    Klimo, Paul; Nesvick, Cody L; Broniscer, Alberto; Orr, Brent A; Choudhri, Asim F

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Malignant tumors of the brainstem, excluding classic diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs), are a very rare, heterogeneous group of neoplasms that have been infrequently described in the literature. In this paper, the authors present their experiences with treating these unique cancers. METHODS A retrospective chart review was conducted to identify eligible cases over a 15-year period. All tumors involving the pons were, by consensus, felt not to be DIPGs based on their neuroimaging features. Demographic information, pathological specimens, neuroimaging characteristics, surgical and nonsurgical management plans, and survival data were gathered for analysis. RESULTS Between January 2000 and December 2014, 29 patients were identified. The mean age at diagnosis was 8.4 years (range 2 months to 25 years), and 17 (59%) patients were male. The most common presenting signs and symptoms were cranial neuropathies (n = 24; 83%), hemiparesis (n = 12; 41%), and ataxia or gait disturbance (n = 10; 34%). There were 18 glial and 11 embryonal tumors. Of the glial tumors, 5 were radiation-induced and 1 was a malignant transformation of a previously known low-grade tumor. Surgical intervention consisted of biopsy alone in 12 patients and some degree of resection in another 15 patients. Two tumors were diagnosed postmortem. The median overall survival for all patients was 196 days (range 15 to 3999 days). There are currently 5 (17%) patients who are still alive: 1 with an anaplastic astrocytoma and the remaining with embryonal tumors. CONCLUSIONS In general, malignant non-DIPG tumors of the brainstem carry a poor prognosis. However, maximal cytoreductive surgery may be an option for select patients with focal tumors. Long-term survival is possible in patients with nonmetastatic embryonal tumors after multimodal treatment, most importantly maximal resection.

  4. Thorium Diffusion in Monazite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, D. J.

    2006-05-01

    Diffusion of thorium has been characterized in synthetic monazite under dry conditions. The synthetic monazites (either pure CePO4, NdPO4, or a mixed LREE phosphate containing Ce, Nd, and Sm) were grown via a Na2CO3-MoO3 flux method. The source of diffusant for the experiments were either synthesized ThSiO4 or CaTh(PO4)2 powders. Experiments were performed by placing source and monazite in Pt capsules and annealing capsules in 1 atm furnaces for times ranging from 10 days to a few hours, at temperatures from 1400 to 1550C. The Th distributions in the monazite were profiled by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). The following Arrhenius relation was obtained for diffusion in monazite: DSm = 7.2x103 exp(-814 kJ mol-1/RT) m2sec-1 The diffusivity of Th was similar for monazites containing a single REE and the mixed LREE phosphates. Th diffusion was also similar for experiments run using the Th silicate and Ca-Th phosphate sources, suggesting that the substitutional mechanism for Th in monazite, i.e, Th+4 + Si+4 for REE+3 + P+5 with the ThSiO4 source, and Th+4 + Ca+2 for 2REE+3 with the CaTh(PO4)2 source, does not significantly affect Th diffusivities, and that Th is likely the rate-limiting species. Th diffusion in monazite is about 4 orders of magnitude slower than Pb diffusion (Cherniak et al., 2004). This contrasts with findings of Gardes et al. (2005) who determined that Pb, Th and REE diffusivities in monazite are similar. Th diffusion in zircon (Cherniak et al., 1997) is about an order of magnitude slower than in monazite, but with similar activation energy for diffusion. The smaller diffusivities in zircon may be a consequence of the larger disparity in size between Th and the Zr site in zircon as compared with Th and the REE site in monazite. Nonetheless, Th is essentially immobile in monazite with respect to exchange by volume diffusion under most geologic conditions; these findings may have implications for containment of high- level actinide

  5. Novel Proteins Regulated by mTOR in Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytomas of Patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex and New Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Tyburczy, Magdalena Ewa; Kotulska, Katarzyna; Pokarowski, Piotr; Mieczkowski, Jakub; Kucharska, Joanna; Grajkowska, Wieslawa; Roszkowski, Maciej; Jozwiak, Sergiusz; Kaminska, Bozena

    2010-01-01

    Subependymal giant cell astrocytomas (SEGAs) are rare brain tumors associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), a disease caused by mutations in TSC1 or TSC2, resulting in enhancement of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity, dysregulation of cell growth, and tumorigenesis. Signaling via mTOR plays a role in multifaceted genomic responses, but its effectors in the brain are largely unknown. Therefore, gene expression profiling on four SEGAs was performed with Affymetrix Human Genome arrays. Of the genes differentially expressed in TSC, 11 were validated by real-time PCR on independent tumor samples and 3 SEGA-derived cultures. Expression of several proteins was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. The differentially-regulated proteins were mainly involved in tumorigenesis and nervous system development. ANXA1, GPNMB, LTF, RND3, S100A11, SFRP4, and NPTX1 genes were likely to be mTOR effector genes in SEGA, as their expression was modulated by an mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, in SEGA-derived cells. Inhibition of mTOR signaling affected size of cultured SEGA cells but had no influence on their proliferation, morphology, or migration, whereas inhibition of both mTOR and extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathways led to significant alterations of these processes. For the first time, we identified genes related to the occurrence of SEGA and regulated by mTOR and demonstrated an effective modulation of SEGA growth by pharmacological inhibition of both mTOR and extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathways, which could represent a novel therapeutic approach. PMID:20133820

  6. Treatment of human astrocytoma U87 cells with silicon dioxide nanoparticles lowers their survival and alters their expression of mitochondrial and cell signaling proteins.

    PubMed

    Lai, James C K; Ananthakrishnan, Gayathri; Jandhyam, Sirisha; Dukhande, Vikas V; Bhushan, Alok; Gokhale, Mugdha; Daniels, Christopher K; Leung, Solomon W

    2010-10-05

    Recent evidence suggests silicon dioxide micro- and nanoparticles induce cytotoxic effects on lung cells. Thus, there is an increasing concern regarding their potential health hazard. Nevertheless, the putative toxicity of nanoparticles in mammalian cells has not yet been systematically investigated. We previously noted that several metallic oxide nanoparticles exert differential cytotoxic effects on human neural and nonneural cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that silicon dioxide nanoparticles induce cytotoxicity in U87 cells by lowering their survival by decreasing cell survival signaling and disturbing mitochondrial function. To investigate this hypothesis, we determined the activities of the key mitochondrial enzymes, citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase, in astrocytoma U87 cells treated with silicon dioxide nanoparticles. In addition, we studied the expression of the mitochondrial DNA-encoded proteins, cytochrome C oxidase II and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH) dehydrogenase subunit 6, and cell signaling pathway protein extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphorylated ERK in treated U87 cells. The activated form of ERK controls cell growth, differentiation, and proliferation. In parallel, we determined survival of U87 cells after treating them with various concentrations of silicon dioxide nanoparticles. Our results indicated that treatment with silicon dioxide nanoparticles induced decreases in U87 cell survival in a dose-related manner. The activities of citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase in treated U87 cells were increased, possibly due to an energetic compensation in surviving cells. However, the expression of mitochondrial DNA-encoded cytochrome C oxidase subunit II and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 and the cell signaling protein ERK and phosphorylated ERK were altered in the treated U87 cells, suggesting that silicon dioxide nanoparticles induced disruption of mitochondrial DNA-encoded protein expression, leading to

  7. Up-regulation of NG2 proteoglycan and interferon-induced transmembrane proteins 1 and 3 in mouse astrocytoma: a membrane proteomics approach.

    PubMed

    Seyfried, Nicholas T; Huysentruyt, Leanne C; Atwood, James A; Xia, Qiangwei; Seyfried, Thomas N; Orlando, Ron

    2008-05-18

    Although brain tumors are classified as if their lineage were well understood, the relationship between the molecular events that specify neural cell lineage and brain tumors remains enigmatic. Traditionally, cell surface membrane antigens have served as biomarkers that distinguish brain tumor origin and malignancy. In this study, membrane proteins were identified from a terminally differentiated mouse astrocyte (AC) and CT-2A astrocytoma (CT-2A) cell line using liquid-chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). A total of 321 and 297 protein groups with at least one unique peptide were identified in the AC and CT-2A cells. Using a label-free quantitative MS approach, 25 plasma membrane proteins in CT-2A were found significantly up- or down-regulated compared with those in AC. Three of the up-regulated proteins, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan-4 (Cspg4), interferon-induced transmembrane protein-2 (IFITM2) and -3 (IFITM3) were further validated by semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis. In addition, a third member of the IFITM family, interferon-induced transmembrane protein-1 (IFITM1) was also analyzed. Expression of Cspg4, IFITM1 and IFITM3 was significantly greater in the CT-2A cells than that in the AC cells. Interestingly, Cspg4, also known as neuronal/glial 2 (NG2) proteoglycan in human, is an oligodendrocyte progenitor marker. Therefore, our data suggest that the CT-2A tumor may be derived from NG2 glia rather than from fully differentiated astrocytes. Moreover, the CT-2A cells also express a series of interferon-induced signature proteins that may be specific to this tumor. These data highlight the utility of LC-MS/MS for the identification of brain tumor membrane biomarkers.

  8. Expression of cytokines by human astrocytomas following stimulation by C3a and C5a anaphylatoxins: specific increase in interleukin-6 mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Sayah, S; Ischenko, A M; Zhakhov, A; Bonnard, A S; Fontaine, M

    1999-06-01

    C3a and C5a anaphylatoxins are two proinflammatory peptides generated during complement activation that act through distinct Gi protein-coupled receptors named C3aR and C5aR, respectively. We have demonstrated previously that human astrocytes expressed C3aR and C5aR constitutively and were able to produce a functional complement. In this study, we examined the effect of an anaphylatoxin stimulation on cytokine expression by human astrocyte cell lines. Interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and transforming growth factor-beta mRNA expression was studied by quantitative RT-PCR. Whereas IL-1beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and transforming growth factor-beta mRNA levels remained unchanged, stimulation of astrocytoma cells (T98G, CB193, U118MG) by C3a, C5a, and peptidic C3aR and C5aR agonists induced an increase in the IL-6 mRNA level. The amount of IL-6 was markedly increased at 3 and 6 h and returned to the basal level at 9 h of stimulation. This response was specific, because pretreatment of cells with pertussis toxin or with polyclonal anti-C3aR or anti-C5aR antibodies completely blocked the IL-6 mRNA increase. The IL-6 response was also investigated at the protein level, but IL-6 protein was detected neither in cell lysates nor in supernatants of stimulated cells. The anaphylatoxin-mediated transcriptional activation of IL-6 gene suggests that C3a and C5a could play a role in priming glial cells during the inflammatory process in the brain.

  9. IDH mutations as an early and consistent marker in low-grade astrocytomas WHO grade II and their consecutive secondary high-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Juratli, Tareq A; Kirsch, Matthias; Robel, Katja; Soucek, Silke; Geiger, Kathrin; von Kummer, Rüdiger; Schackert, Gabriele; Krex, Dietmar

    2012-07-01

    This study investigated the prognostic and predictive significance of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations in low-grade astrocytomas (LGA). The presence and consistency of IDH mutations during the progression of LGA to secondary high-grade gliomas (sHGG) were detected. Samples of patients with LGA and sHGG were investigated. The genomic regions around IDH1 codon 132 and IDH2 codon 172 were PCR amplified and directly sequenced. Furthermore, the MGMT promoter status was provided using the methylation-specific PCR. Our population comprised 71 patients with a total of 45 pairs of LGA and their consecutive sHGG. Median follow-up was 9.6 years. IDH mutations were found in 36/45 LGA (80%) and their sHGG without changes in the mutation status. A total of 71 patients with LGA were analyzed according to clinical and molecular tumor-related factors: 56/71 patients (78.8%) had an IDH mutation without significant influence on the progression-free or overall survival (OS), and 22/71 (31%) of the patients received postoperative radiotherapy (RT) after diagnosis of LGA. Patients with early RT but without IDH mutations had the shortest survival. Our study shows that IDH mutation status is stable during the progression course of LGA to sHGG. The presence of IDH mutations fails to demonstrate a significant influence on survival in the multivariate analysis of LGA patients. Early RT appears to be beneficial only LGA patients with IDH-mutations.

  10. From the Cover: Vulnerability of C6 Astrocytoma Cells After Single-Compound and Joint Exposure to Type I and Type II Pyrethroid Insecticides.

    PubMed

    Romero, Delfina M; Berardino, Bruno G; Wolansky, Marcelo J; Kotler, Mónica L

    2017-01-01

    A primary mode-of-action of all pyrethroid insecticides (PYRs) is the disruption of the voltage-gated sodium channel electrophysiology in neurons of target pests and nontarget species. The neurological actions of PYRs on non-neuronal cells of the nervous system remain poorly investigated. In the present work, we used C6 astrocytoma cells to study PYR actions (0.1-50 μM) under the hypothesis that glial cells may be targeted by and vulnerable to PYRs. To this end, we characterized the effects of bifenthrin (BF), tefluthrin (TF), α-cypermethrin (α-CYP), and deltamethrin (DM) on the integrity of nuclear, mitochondrial, and lysosomal compartments. In general, 24- to 48-h exposures produced concentration-related impairment of cell viability. In single-compound, 24-h exposure experiments, effective concentration (EC)15s 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay) were computed as follows (in μM): BF, 16.1; TF, 37.3; α-CYP, 7.8; DM, 5.0. We found concentration-related damage in several C6-cell subcellular compartments (mitochondria, nuclei, and lysosomes) at ≥ 10(-1) μM levels. Last, we examined a mixture of all PYRs (ie, Σ individual EC15) using MTT assays and subcellular analyses. Our findings indicate that C6 cells are responsive to nM levels of PYRs, suggesting that astroglial susceptibility may contribute to the low-dose neurological effects caused by these insecticides. This research further suggests that C6 cells may provide relevant information as a screening platform for pesticide mixtures targeting nervous system cells by expected and unexpected toxicogenic pathways potentially contributing to clinical neurotoxicity.

  11. Knockdown of cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase II (cN-II) reveals that its activity is essential for survival in astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Careddu, Maria Giovanna; Allegrini, Simone; Pesi, Rossana; Camici, Marcella; Garcia-Gil, Mercedes; Tozzi, Maria Grazia

    2008-08-01

    IMP preferring cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase (cN-II) is an ubiquitous nucleotide hydrolysing enzyme. The enzyme is widely distributed and its amino acid sequence is highly conserved among vertebrates. Fluctuations of cN-II activity have been associated with the pathogenesis of neurological disorders. The enzyme appears to be involved in the regulation of the intracellular availability of the purine precursor IMP and also of GMP and AMP, but the contribution of this activity and of its regulation to cell metabolism and to CNS cell functions remains uncertain. To address this issue, we used a vector based short hairpin RNA (shRNA) strategy to knockdown cN-II activity in human astrocytoma cells. Our results demonstrated that 53 h after transduction, cN-II mRNA was reduced to 17.9+/-0.03% of control cells. 19 h later enzyme activity was decreased from 0.7+/-0.026 mU/mg in control ADF cells to 0.45+/-0.046 mU/mg, while cell viability (evaluated by the MTT reduction assay) decreased up to 0.59+/-0.01 (fold vs control) and caspase 3 activity increased from 136+/-5.8 pmol min(-1) mg(-1) in control cells to 639+/-37.5 pmol min(-1) mg(-1) in silenced cells, thus demonstrating that cN-II is essential for cell survival. The decrease of enzyme activity causes apoptosis of the cultured cells without altering intracellular nucleotide and nucleoside concentration or energy charge. Since cN-II is highly expressed in tumour cells, our finding offers a new possible therapeutical approach especially against primary brain tumours such as glioblastoma, and to ameliorate chemotherapy against leukemia.

  12. (-)(125I)-iodopindolol, a new highly selective radioiodinated beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist: measurement of beta-receptors on intact rat astrocytoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Barovsky, K.; Brooker, G.

    1980-01-01

    (-)-Pindolol, one of the most potent beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists, was radioiodinated using chloramine-T oxidation of carrier-free Na 125I and separated from unreacted pindolol to yield 2200 Ci/mmole (-)-(125I)-iodopindolol ((-)-(125I)-IPin). Mass and ultraviolet spectra confirmed that the iodination occurred on the indole ring, presumably at the 3 position. The binding of radiolabeled (-)-(125I)-IPin to beta-adrenergic receptors has been studied using intact C6 rat astrocytoma cells (2B subclone) grown in monolayer cultures. Binding of (-)(125IPin was saturable with time and concentration. Using 13 pM (-)-(125I)IPin, binding equilibrium was reached in 90 min at 21-22 degrees C. The reverse rate constant was 0.026 min-1 at 21/sup 0/C. Specific binding (expressed as 1 microM(-)-propranolol displaceable counts) of (-)-(125I)-IPin was 95% of total binding. Scatchard analysis of (-)-(125I)-I)Pin binding revealed approximately 4300 receptors/cell and a dissociation constant of 30 pM. This was in excellent agreement with the kinetically determined dissociation constant of 35 pM. Displacement by propranolol and isoproterenol showed that (-)-(125I)-IPin binding sites were pharmacologically and stereospecifically selective. These results indicate that (-)-(125I)-IPin, a pure (-)-stereoisomer, high specific activity radioligand, selectively binds to beta-adrenergic receptors in whole cells with a high percentage of specific binding and should therefore be useful in the study and measurement of cellular beta-adrenergic receptors.

  13. Coupling of the thrombin receptor to G12 may account for selective effects of thrombin on gene expression and DNA synthesis in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Post, G R; Collins, L R; Kennedy, E D; Moskowitz, S A; Aragay, A M; Goldstein, D; Brown, J H

    1996-01-01

    In 1321N1 astrocytoma cells, thrombin, but not carbachol, induces AP-1-mediated gene expression and DNA synthesis. To understand the divergent effects of these G protein-coupled receptor agonists on cellular responses, we examined Gq-dependent signaling events induced by thrombin receptor and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor stimulation. Thrombin and carbachol induce comparable changes in phosphoinositide and phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis, mobilization of intracellular Ca2+, diglyceride generation, and redistribution of protein kinase C; thus, activation of these Gq-signaling pathways appears to be insufficient for gene expression and mitogenesis. Thrombin increases Ras and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation to a greater extent than carbachol in 1321N1 cells. The effects of thrombin are not mediated through Gi, since ribosylation of Gi/Go proteins by pertussis toxin does not prevent thrombin-induced gene expression or thrombin-stimulated DNA synthesis. We recently reported that the pertussis toxin-insensitive G12 protein is required for thrombin-induced DNA synthesis. We demonstrate here, using transfection of receptors and G proteins in COS-7 cells, that G alpha 12 selectively couples the thrombin receptor to AP-1-mediated gene expression. This does not appear to result from increased mitogen-activated protein kinase activity but may reflect activation of a tyrosine kinase pathway. We suggest that preferential coupling of the thrombin receptor to G12 accounts for the selective ability of thrombin to stimulate Ras, mitogen-activated protein kinase, gene expression, and mitogenesis in 1321N1 cells. Images PMID:8930892

  14. Tungsten diffusion in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    De Luca, A.; Texier, M.; Burle, N.; Oison, V.; Pichaud, B.; Portavoce, A.; Grosjean, C.

    2014-01-07

    Two doses (10{sup 13} and 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2}) of tungsten (W) atoms were implanted in different Si(001) wafers in order to study W diffusion in Si. The samples were annealed or oxidized at temperatures between 776 and 960 °C. The diffusion profiles were measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry, and defect formation was studied by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. W is shown to reduce Si recrystallization after implantation and to exhibit, in the temperature range investigated, a solubility limit close to 0.15%–0.2%, which is higher than the solubility limit of usual metallic impurities in Si. W diffusion exhibits unusual linear diffusion profiles with a maximum concentration always located at the Si surface, slower kinetics than other metals in Si, and promotes vacancy accumulation close to the Si surface, with the formation of hollow cavities in the case of the higher W dose. In addition, Si self-interstitial injection during oxidation is shown to promote W-Si clustering. Taking into account these observations, a diffusion model based on the simultaneous diffusion of interstitial W atoms and W-Si atomic pairs is proposed since usual models used to model diffusion of metallic impurities and dopants in Si cannot reproduce experimental observations.

  15. Diffusion Flame Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, Viswanath R.

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion flames are commonly used for industrial burners in furnaces and flares. Oxygen/fuel burners are usually diffusion burners, primarily for safety reasons, to prevent flashback and explosion in a potentially dangerous system. Furthermore, in most fires, condensed materials pyrolyze, vaporize, and burn in air as diffusion flames. As a result of the interaction of a diffusion flame with burner or condensed-fuel surfaces, a quenched space is formed, thus leaving a diffusion flame edge, which plays an important role in flame holding in combustion systems and fire spread through condensed fuels. Despite a long history of jet diffusion flame studies, lifting/blowoff mechanisms have not yet been fully understood, compared to those of premixed flames. In this study, the structure and stability of diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels in coflowing air at normal earth gravity have been investigated experimentally and computationally. Measurements of the critical mean jet velocity (U(sub jc)) of methane, ethane, or propane at lifting or blowoff were made as a function of the coflowing air velocity (U(sub a)) using a tube burner (i.d.: 2.87 mm) (Fig. 1, left). By using a computational fluid dynamics code with 33 species and 112 elementary reaction steps, the internal chemical-kinetic structures of the stabilizing region of methane and propane flames were investigated (Fig. 1, right). A peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, is formed in the flame stabilizing region due to back-diffusion of heat and radical species against an oxygen-rich incoming flow, thus holding the trailing diffusion flame. The simulated flame base moved downstream under flow conditions close to the measured stability limit.

  16. Diffusion Flame Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, V. R.

    2006-01-01

    Diffusion flames are commonly used for industrial burners in furnaces and flares. Oxygen/fuel burners are usually diffusion burners, primarily for safety reasons, to prevent flashback and explosion in a potentially dangerous system. Furthermore, in most fires, condensed materials pyrolyze, vaporize, and burn in air as diffusion flames. As a result of the interaction of a diffusion flame with burner or condensed-fuel surfaces, a quenched space is formed, thus leaving a diffusion flame edge, which plays an important role in flame holding in combustion systems and fire spread through condensed fuels. Despite a long history of jet diffusion flame studies, lifting/blowoff mechanisms have not yet been fully understood, compared to those of premixed flames. In this study, the structure and stability of diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels in coflowing air at normal earth gravity have been investigated experimentally and computationally. Measurements of the critical mean jet velocity (U(sub jc)) of methane, ethane, or propane at lifting or blowoff were made as a function of the coflowing air velocity (U(sub a)) using a tube burner (i.d.: 2.87 mm). By using a computational fluid dynamics code with 33 species and 112 elementary reaction steps, the internal chemical-kinetic structures of the stabilizing region of methane and propane flames were investigated. A peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, is formed in the flame stabilizing region due to back-diffusion of heat and radical species against an oxygen-rich incoming flow, thus holding the trailing diffusion flame. The simulated flame base moved downstream under flow conditions close to the measured stability limit.

  17. Mastocytosis, diffuse cutaneous (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This is a picture of diffuse, cutaneous mastocytosis. Abnormal collections of cells in the skin (mast cells) produce this rash. Unlike bullous mastocytosis, rubbing will not lead to formation of blisters ( ...

  18. Factorized Diffusion Map Approximation.

    PubMed

    Amizadeh, Saeed; Valizadegan, Hamed; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion maps are among the most powerful Machine Learning tools to analyze and work with complex high-dimensional datasets. Unfortunately, the estimation of these maps from a finite sample is known to suffer from the curse of dimensionality. Motivated by other machine learning models for which the existence of structure in the underlying distribution of data can reduce the complexity of estimation, we study and show how the factorization of the underlying distribution into independent subspaces can help us to estimate diffusion maps more accurately. Building upon this result, we propose and develop an algorithm that can automatically factorize a high dimensional data space in order to minimize the error of estimation of its diffusion map, even in the case when the underlying distribution is not decomposable. Experiments on both the synthetic and real-world datasets demonstrate improved estimation performance of our method over the standard diffusion-map framework.

  19. Novel Diffusivity Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser

    2001-01-01

    A common-path interferometer (CPI) system was developed to measure the diffusivity of liquid pairs. The CPI is an optical technique that can be used to measure changes in the gradient of the refraction index of transparent materials. This system uses a shearing interferometer that shares the same optical path from a laser light source to the final imaging plane. Hence, the molecular diffusion coefficient of liquids can be determined using the physical relations between changes in the optical path length and the liquid phase properties. The data obtained with this interferometer were compared with similar results from other techniques and demonstrated that the instrument is superior in measuring the diffusivity of miscible liquids while keeping the system very compact and robust. CPI can also be used for studies in interface dynamics and other diffusion-dominated-process applications.

  20. Factorized Diffusion Map Approximation

    PubMed Central

    Amizadeh, Saeed; Valizadegan, Hamed; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion maps are among the most powerful Machine Learning tools to analyze and work with complex high-dimensional datasets. Unfortunately, the estimation of these maps from a finite sample is known to suffer from the curse of dimensionality. Motivated by other machine learning models for which the existence of structure in the underlying distribution of data can reduce the complexity of estimation, we study and show how the factorization of the underlying distribution into independent subspaces can help us to estimate diffusion maps more accurately. Building upon this result, we propose and develop an algorithm that can automatically factorize a high dimensional data space in order to minimize the error of estimation of its diffusion map, even in the case when the underlying distribution is not decomposable. Experiments on both the synthetic and real-world datasets demonstrate improved estimation performance of our method over the standard diffusion-map framework. PMID:25309676

  1. Diffusion of eccentric microswimmers.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Debajyoti; Ghosh, Pulak K; Li, Yunyun; Marchesoni, Fabio; Li, Baowen

    2016-02-21

    We model the two-dimensional diffusive dynamics of an eccentric artificial microswimmer in a highly viscous medium. We assume that the swimmer's propulsion results from an effective force applied to a center distinct from its center of mass, both centers resting on a body's axis parallel to its average self-propulsion velocity. Moreover, we allow for angular fluctuations of the velocity about the body's axis. We prove, both analytically and numerically, that the ensuing active diffusion of the swimmer is suppressed to an extent that strongly depends on the model parameters. In particular, the active diffusion constant undergoes a transition from a quadratic to a linear dependence on the self-propulsion speed, with practical consequences on the interpretation of the experimental data. Finally, we extend our model to describe the diffusion of chiral eccentric swimmers.

  2. Guide tube flow diffuser

    SciTech Connect

    Berringer, R.T.; Myron, D.L.

    1980-11-04

    A nuclear reactor upper internal guide tube has a flow diffuser integral with its bottom end. The guide tube provides guidance for control rods during their ascent or descent from the reactor core. The flow diffuser serves to divert the upward flow of reactor coolant around the outside of the guide tube thereby limiting the amount of coolant flow and turbulence within the guide tube, thus enhancing the ease of movement of the control rods.

  3. Advanced manufacturing: Technology diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Tesar, A.

    1995-12-01

    In this paper we examine how manufacturing technology diffuses rom the developers of technology across national borders to those who do not have the capability or resources to develop advanced technology on their own. None of the wide variety of technology diffusion mechanisms discussed in this paper are new, yet the opportunities to apply these mechanisms are growing. A dramatic increase in technology diffusion occurred over the last decade. The two major trends which probably drive this increase are a worldwide inclination towards ``freer`` markets and diminishing isolation. Technology is most rapidly diffusing from the US In fact, the US is supplying technology for the rest of the world. The value of the technology supplied by the US more than doubled from 1985 to 1992 (see the Introduction for details). History shows us that technology diffusion is inevitable. It is the rates at which technologies diffuse to other countries which can vary considerably. Manufacturers in these countries are increasingly able to absorb technology. Their manufacturing efficiency is expected to progress as technology becomes increasingly available and utilized.

  4. Diffusion in natural ilmenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenhouse, Iona; O'Neill, Hugh; Lister, Gordon

    2010-05-01

    Diffusion rates in natural ilmenite of composition Fe0.842+ Fe0.163+Mn0.07Mg0.01Ti 0.92O3 from the Vishnevye Mountains (Urals, Russia) have been measured at 1000° C. Experiments were carried out in a one atmosphere furnace with oxygen fugacity controlled by flow of a CO-CO2 gas mixture, over a period of four hours. The diffusant source was a synthetic ilmenite (FeTiO3) powder doped with trace amounts of Mg, Co, Ni, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Al, Cr, Ga and Y. Since, the natural ilmenite crystal contained Mn it was also possible to study diffusion of Mn from the ilmenite crystal. The experiments were analysed using the electron microprobe and scanning laser ablation ICP-MS. Diffusion profiles were measured for Al, Mg, Mn, Co, Ni, Ga, and Y. Diffusion of Cr, Hf, Zr, V, Nb and Ta was too slow to allow diffusion profiles to be accurately measured for the times and temperatures studied so far. The preliminary results show that diffusion in ilmenite is fast, with the diffusivity determined in this study on the order of 10-13 to 10-16 m2s-1. For comparison, Chakraborty (1997) found interdiffusion of Fe and Mg in olivine at 1000° C on the order of 10-17 to 10-18m2s-1 and Dieckmann (1998) found diffusivity of Fe, Mg, Co in magnetite at 1200° C to be on the order of 10-13 to 10-14 m2s-1. The order in which the diffusivity of the elements decreases is Mn > Co > Mg ≥ Ni > Al ≥ Y ≥ Ga, that is to say that Mn diffuses the fastest and Ga the slowest. Overall, this study intends to determine diffusion parameters such as frequency factor, activation energy and activation volume as a function of temperature and oxygen fugacity. This research is taking place in the context of a larger study focusing on the use of the garnet-ilmenite system as a geospeedometer. Examination of the consequences of simultaneous diffusion of multiple elements is a necessity if we are to develop an understanding of the crystal-chemical controls on diffusion (cf Spandler & O'Neill, in press). Chakraborty

  5. New Chorus Diffusion Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Richard B.; Kersten, Tobias; Glauert, Sarah A.; Meredith, Nigel P.; Boscher, Daniel; Sicard, Angelica; Maget, Vincent

    2013-04-01

    Whistler mode chorus waves play a major role in the loss and acceleration of electrons in the Earth's radiation belts. While high time resolution satellite data show that these waves are highly structured in frequency and time, at present their effects on the electron distribution can only be assessed on a global scale by using quasi-linear diffusion theory. Here we present new quasi-linear diffusion coefficients for upper and lower band chorus waves for use in global radiation belt models. Using data from DE 1 CRRES, Cluster 1, Double Star TC1 and THEMIS, we have constructed a database of wave properties and used this to construct new diffusion coefficients for L* = 1.5 to 10 in steps of 0.5, 10 latitude bins between 0o and 60o ,8 bins in MLT and 5 levels of geomagnetic activity as measured by Kp. We find that the peak frequency of lower band chorus is close to 0.2 fce, which is lower than that used in previous models. The combined upper and lower band chorus diffusion shows structure that should result in an energy dependent pitch angle anisotropy, particularly between 1 keV and 100 keV. The diffusion rates suggest that wave-particle interactions should still be very important outside geostationary orbit, out to at least L* = 8. We find significant energy diffusion near 1 keV near the loss cone, consistent with wave growth. By including the new chorus diffusion matrix into the BAS radiation belt (BRB) model we compare the effects on the evolution of the radiation belts against previous models.

  6. Diffusion Influenced Adsorption Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Miura, Toshiaki; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-27

    When the kinetics of adsorption is influenced by the diffusive flow of solutes, the solute concentration at the surface is influenced by the surface coverage of solutes, which is given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation. The diffusion equation with the boundary condition given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation leads to the nonlinear integro-differential equation for the surface coverage. In this paper, we solved the nonlinear integro-differential equation using the Grünwald-Letnikov formula developed to solve fractional kinetics. Guided by the numerical results, analytical expressions for the upper and lower bounds of the exact numerical results were obtained. The upper and lower bounds were close to the exact numerical results in the diffusion- and reaction-controlled limits, respectively. We examined the validity of the two simple analytical expressions obtained in the diffusion-controlled limit. The results were generalized to include the effect of dispersive diffusion. We also investigated the effect of molecular rearrangement of anisotropic molecules on surface coverage.

  7. Primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliosarcomatosis.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ju Hyung; Kim, Se Hoon; Kim, Eui Hyun; Kang, Seok-Gu; Chang, Jong Hee

    2015-04-01

    Primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliomatosis (PDLG) is a rare condition with a fatal outcome, characterized by diffuse infiltration of the leptomeninges by neoplastic glial cells without evidence of primary tumor in the brain or spinal cord parenchyma. In particular, PDLG histologically diagnosed as gliosarcoma is extremely rare, with only 2 cases reported to date. We report a case of primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliosarcomatosis. A 68-year-old man presented with fever, chilling, headache, and a brief episode of mental deterioration. Initial T1-weighted post-contrast brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed diffuse leptomeningeal enhancement without a definite intraparenchymal lesion. Based on clinical and imaging findings, antiviral treatment was initiated. Despite the treatment, the patient's neurologic symptoms and mental status progressively deteriorated and follow-up MRI showed rapid progression of the disease. A meningeal biopsy revealed gliosarcoma and was conclusive for the diagnosis of primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliosarcomatosis. We suggest the inclusion of PDLG in the potential differential diagnosis of patients who present with nonspecific neurologic symptoms in the presence of leptomeningeal involvement on MRI.

  8. Multidimensional diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topgaard, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Principles from multidimensional NMR spectroscopy, and in particular solid-state NMR, have recently been transferred to the field of diffusion MRI, offering non-invasive characterization of heterogeneous anisotropic materials, such as the human brain, at an unprecedented level of detail. Here we revisit the basic physics of solid-state NMR and diffusion MRI to pinpoint the origin of the somewhat unexpected analogy between the two fields, and provide an overview of current diffusion MRI acquisition protocols and data analysis methods to quantify the composition of heterogeneous materials in terms of diffusion tensor distributions with size, shape, and orientation dimensions. While the most advanced methods allow estimation of the complete multidimensional distributions, simpler methods focus on various projections onto lower-dimensional spaces as well as determination of means and variances rather than actual distributions. Even the less advanced methods provide simple and intuitive scalar parameters that are directly related to microstructural features that can be observed in optical microscopy images, e.g. average cell eccentricity, variance of cell density, and orientational order - properties that are inextricably entangled in conventional diffusion MRI. Key to disentangling all these microstructural features is MRI signal acquisition combining isotropic and directional dimensions, just as in the field of multidimensional solid-state NMR from which most of the ideas for the new methods are derived.

  9. Diffuser for wellhead isolation tool

    SciTech Connect

    Surjaatmadja, J.B.

    1981-04-21

    An improved diffuser for a wellhead isolation tool which employs a combination of angles in its bore. This improvement reduces the incidence of erosion caused by the flow of fluids through the diffuser, in both the well production tubing adjacent the end of the diffuser and in the diffuser itself.

  10. Effect of docosahexaenoic acid and furan fatty acids on cytokinesis block micronucleus cytome assay biomarkers in astrocytoma cell lines under conditions of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Chua, Ann; Thomas, Philip; Wijesundera, Chakra; Clifton, Peter; Fenech, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Fatty acids from fish such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are associated with improved brain function, whereas furan fatty acids (FFAs) also found in fish oil at low levels (1%) are thought to have antioxidant properties. Understanding their effects in astrocytes is important as these cells are responsible for maintaining healthy neurons via lipid homeostasis and distribution within the brain, and their decline with aging is a possible cause of dementia. We investigated the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of DHA and FFA using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay in in vitro cultures of U87MG (APOE ɛ3/ɛ3) and U118MG (APOE ɛ2/ɛ4) astrocytoma cell lines with and without a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 100 µM) challenge. U118MG was found to be more sensitive to the cytostatic, cytotoxic (i.e., apoptosis), and DNA damaging effects [micronuclei (MNi), nucleoplasmic bridges (NPBs), and nuclear buds (NBUDs)] of H2O2 (P < 0.01 and P < 0.001) when compared with U87MG. DHA at 100 µg/mL significantly affected cytostasis (P < 0.05) and increased DNA damage in the form of NPBs and MNi (P < 0.05) in both cell lines, whereas it decreased necrosis (P = 0.0251) in U87MG. Significant DHA-H2O2 interactions were observed for decreased necrosis (P = 0.0033) and DNA damage biomarkers (P < 0.0001) in the U87MG cell line and increased cytostasis (P < 0.0001) in the U118MG cell line. The effects of FFA also varied between the cell lines, with significant effects observed in decreased cytostasis (P = 0.0022) in the U87MG cell line, whereas increasing cytostasis (P = 0.0144) in the U118MG cell line. Overall, FFA exerted minimal effects on DNA damage biomarkers.

  11. Positron diffusion in Si

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, B.; Lynn, K.G.; Vehanen, A.; Schultz, P.J.

    1985-06-01

    Positron diffusion in Si(100) and Si(111) has been studied using a variable energy positron beam. The positron diffusion coefficient is found to be D/sub +/ = 2.7 +- 0.3 cm/sup 2//sec using a Makhov-type positron implantation profile, which is demonstrated to fit the data more reliably than the more commonly applied exponential profile. The diffusion related parameter, E/sub 0/, which results from the exponential profile, is found to be 4.2 +- 0.2 keV, significantly longer than previously reported values. A drastic reduction in E/sub 0/ is found after annealing the sample at 1300 K, showing that previously reported low values of E/sub 0/ are probably associated with the thermal history of the sample.

  12. Cesium diffusion in graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.B. III; Davis, W. Jr.; Sutton, A.L. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on diffusion of /sup 137/Cs in five types of graphite were performed. The document provides a completion of the report that was started and includes a presentation of all of the diffusion data, previously unpublished. Except for data on mass transfer of /sup 137/Cs in the Hawker-Siddeley graphite, analyses of experimental results were initiated but not completed. The mass transfer process of cesium in HS-1-1 graphite at 600 to 1000/sup 0/C in a helium atmosphere is essentially pure diffusion wherein values of (E/epsilon) and ..delta..E of the equation D/epsilon = (D/epsilon)/sub 0/ exp (-..delta..E/RT) are about 4 x 10/sup -2/ cm/sup 2//s and 30 kcal/mole, respectively.

  13. Apparatus for diffusion separation

    DOEpatents

    Nierenberg, William A.; Pontius, Rex B.

    1976-08-10

    1. The method of testing the separation efficiency of porous permeable membranes which comprises causing a stream of a gaseous mixture to flow into contact with one face of a finely porous permeable membrane under such conditions that a major fraction of the mixture diffuses through the membrane, maintaining a rectangular cross section of the gaseous stream so flowing past said membrane, continuously recirculating the gas that diffuses through said membrane and continuously withdrawing the gas that does not diffuse through said membrane and maintaining the volume of said recirculating gas constant by continuously introducing into said continuously recirculating gas stream a mass of gas equivalent to that which is continuously withdrawn from said gas stream and comparing the concentrations of the light component in the entering gas, the withdrawn gas and the recirculated gas in order to determine the efficiency of said membrane.

  14. Transverse Spin Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullin, William

    2014-05-01

    Transverse spin diffusion is a relatively new transport coefficient and a review of its history and physical basis will be presented. In NMR spin diffusion is often measured by spin echo techniques, which involve spin currents perpendicular to the direction of the magnetization, in contrast with the usual longitudinal case where the current is parallel to the magnetization. The first indication that this involved new physics was the Leggett-Rice effect (1970) in which spin waves, new spin-echo behavior, and an altered spin diffusion coefficient were predicted in liquid 3He. This effect gave the possibility of the first measurement of F1a, the parameter of the Landau Fermi-liquid theory mean-field responsible for the effect. In 1982 Lhuillier and Laloe found a transport equation very similar to the Leggett equation, but valid for highly-polarized dilute Boltzmann Bose and Fermi gases, and describing the ``identical spin rotation effect'' (ISRE), the analog of a Landau mean field. Coincidentally Bashkin and Meyerovich had also given equivalent descriptions of transport in polarized Boltzmann gases. That a mean-field effect could exists in dilute Boltzmann gases was theoretically surprising, but was confirmed experimentally. At low polarization the basic transverse diffusion constant D⊥ coincides with the longitudinal value D∥ however Meyerovich first pointed out that they could differ in highly polarized degenerate gases. Indeed detailed calculations (Jeon and Mullin) showed that, while D∥ is proportional to T-2, D⊥ approaches a constant (depending on polarization) at low T. Considerable controversy existed until experimental verification was achieved in 2004. The importance of ISRE again arose in 2008 as the basis of ``anomalous spin-state segregation'' in Duke and JILA experiments. More recently application of the ideas of transverse spin diffusion to strongly interacting Fermi gases has resulted in the observation of the diffusion constants at the quantum

  15. [Microbial diffusion and antibiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Vilain, R

    1982-01-01

    Cleaning leg ulcers depends on tissular and microbial enzymes, the production of which depends on good vascularization. When an aetiological treatment is started, the microbes ensure sufficient cleaning, leading to granulation and epidermization. Antibiotherapy is pointless. Sometimes it can be detrimental, replacing a natural growth with alien strains which cause diffusion. Very exceptionally, a short course of antibiotherapy may be necessary to cope with signs of diffusion, usually signifying a Group A streptococcal infection, with seasonal recrudescence. The Blue Pus Microbe has no special pathological significance. It merely indicates that the case has become chronic.

  16. Hydrogen diffusion in Zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingrin, Jannick; Zhang, Peipei

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen mobility in gem quality zircon single crystals from Madagascar was investigated through H-D exchange experiments. Thin slices were annealed in a horizontal furnace flushed with a gas mixture of Ar/D2(10%) under ambient pressure between 900 ° C to 1150 ° C. FTIR analyses were performed on oriented slices before and after each annealing run. H diffusion along [100] and [010] follow the same diffusion law D = D0exp[-E /RT], with log D0 = 2.24 ± 1.57 (in m2/s) and E = 374 ± 39 kJ/mol. H diffusion along [001] follows a slightly more rapid diffusion law, with log D0 = 1.11 ± 0.22 (in m2/s) and E = 334 ± 49 kJ/mol. H diffusion in zircon has much higher activation energy and slower diffusivity than other NAMs below 1150 ° C even iron-poor garnets which are known to be among the slowest (Blanchard and Ingrin, 2004; Kurka et al. 2005). During H-D exchange zircon incorporates also deuterium. This hydration reaction involves uranium reduction as it is shown from the exchange of U5+ and U4+ characteristic bands in the near infrared region during annealing. It is the first time that a hydration reaction U5+ + OH- = U4+ + O2- + 1/2H2, is experimentally reported. The kinetics of deuterium incorporation is slightly slower than hydrogen diffusion, suggesting that the reaction is limited by hydrogen mobility. Hydrogen isotopic memory of zircon is higher than other NAMs. Zircons will be moderately retentive of H signatures at mid-crustal metamorphic temperatures. At 500 ° C, a zircon with a radius of 300 μm would retain its H isotopic signature over more than a million years. However, a zircon is unable to retain this information for geologically significant times under high-grade metamorphism unless the grain size is large enough. Refrences Blanchard, M. and Ingrin, J. (2004) Hydrogen diffusion in Dora Maira pyrope. Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, 31, 593-605. Kurka, A., Blanchard, M. and Ingrin, J. (2005) Kinetics of hydrogen extraction and deuteration in

  17. Methodology and apparatus for diffuse photon mimaging

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Shechao C.; Zeng, Fanan; Zhao, Hui-Lin

    1997-12-09

    Non-invasive near infrared optical medical imaging devices for both hematoma detection in the brain and early tumor detection in the breast is achieved using image reconstruction which allows a mapping of the position dependent contrast diffusive propagation constants, which are related to the optical absorption coefficient and scattering coefficient in the tissue, at near infrared wavelengths. Spatial resolutions in the range of 5 mm for adult brain sizes and breast sizes can be achieved. The image reconstruction utilizes WKB approximation on most probable diffusion paths which has as lowest order approximation the straight line-of-sight between the plurality of sources and the plurality of detectors. The WKB approximation yields a set of linear equations in which the contrast optical absorption coefficients are the unknowns and for which signals can be generated to produce a pixel map of the contrast optical resolution of the scanned tissue.

  18. Methodology and apparatus for diffuse photon imaging

    DOEpatents

    Feng, S.C.; Zeng, F.; Zhao, H.L.

    1997-12-09

    Non-invasive near infrared optical medical imaging devices for both hematoma detection in the brain and early tumor detection in the breast is achieved using image reconstruction which allows a mapping of the position dependent contrast diffusive propagation constants, which are related to the optical absorption coefficient and scattering coefficient in the tissue, at near infrared wavelengths. Spatial resolutions in the range of 5 mm for adult brain sizes and breast sizes can be achieved. The image reconstruction utilizes WKB approximation on most probable diffusion paths which has as lowest order approximation the straight line-of-sight between the plurality of sources and the plurality of detectors. The WKB approximation yields a set of linear equations in which the contrast optical absorption coefficients are the unknowns and for which signals can be generated to produce a pixel map of the contrast optical resolution of the scanned tissue. 58 figs.

  19. Multispecies diffusion models: A study of uranyl species diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shang, Jianying; Zachara, John M.

    2011-12-01

    Rigorous numerical description of multispecies diffusion requires coupling of species, charge, and aqueous and surface complexation reactions that collectively affect diffusive fluxes. The applicability of a fully coupled diffusion model is, however, often constrained by the availability of species self-diffusion coefficients, as well as by computational complication in imposing charge conservation. In this study, several diffusion models with variable complexity in charge and species coupling were formulated and compared to describe reactive multispecies diffusion in groundwater. Diffusion of uranyl [U(VI)] species was used as an example in demonstrating the effectiveness of the models in describing multispecies diffusion. Numerical simulations found that a diffusion model with a single, common diffusion coefficient for all species was sufficient to describe multispecies U(VI) diffusion under a steady state condition of major chemical composition, but not under transient chemical conditions. Simulations revealed that for multispecies U(VI) diffusion under transient chemical conditions, a fully coupled diffusion model could be well approximated by a component-based diffusion model when the diffusion coefficient for each chemical component was properly selected. The component-based diffusion model considers the difference in diffusion coefficients between chemical components, but not between the species within each chemical component. This treatment significantly enhanced computational efficiency at the expense of minor charge conservation. The charge balance in the component-based diffusion model can be enforced, if necessary, by adding a secondary migration term resulting from model simplification. The effect of ion activity coefficient gradients on multispecies diffusion is also discussed. The diffusion models were applied to describe U(VI) diffusive mass transfer in intragranular domains in two sediments collected from U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford 300A

  20. Vorinostat and Combination Chemotherapy With Rituximab in Treating Patients With HIV-Related Diffuse Large B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Other Aggressive B-Cell Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    AIDS-Related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Plasmablastic Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Primary Effusion Lymphoma; Grade 3b Follicular Lymphoma; HIV Infection; Plasmablastic Lymphoma; Primary Effusion Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

  1. Thermal diffusivity of human serum and plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayén-Mondragón, R.; Yánez-Limón, J. M.; Palomares, P.; Sosa, M.; Bernal-Alvarado, J.

    2005-06-01

    Using a thermal lens experimental set up, the thermal diffusivity of human serum and plasma were measured. Several samples were studied and the results are reported as the average, including the standard deviation. The samples of serum and plasma were obtained in healthy adult donors from the Guanajuato State Blood Transfusion Center, Mexico; the donors were clinically tested and they were free of hepatitis, AIDS and other infectious diseases. The parameters reported were obtained using the thermal lens aberrant model with the lasers arranged in the mismatched mode.

  2. Nanocrystal diffusion doping.

    PubMed

    Vlaskin, Vladimir A; Barrows, Charles J; Erickson, Christian S; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2013-09-25

    A diffusion-based synthesis of doped colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals is demonstrated. This approach involves thermodynamically controlled addition of both impurity cations and host anions to preformed seed nanocrystals under equilibrium conditions, rather than kinetically controlled doping during growth. This chemistry allows thermodynamic crystal compositions to be prepared without sacrificing other kinetically trapped properties such as shape, size, or crystallographic phase. This doping chemistry thus shares some similarities with cation-exchange reactions, but proceeds without the loss of host cations and excels at the introduction of relatively unreactive impurity ions that have not been previously accessible using cation exchange. Specifically, we demonstrate the preparation of Cd(1-x)Mn(x)Se (0 ≤ x ≤ ∼0.2) nanocrystals with narrow size distribution, unprecedentedly high Mn(2+) content, and very large magneto-optical effects by diffusion of Mn(2+) into seed CdSe nanocrystals grown by hot injection. Controlling the solution and lattice chemical potentials of Cd(2+) and Mn(2+) allows Mn(2+) diffusion into the internal volumes of the CdSe nanocrystals with negligible Ostwald ripening, while retaining the crystallographic phase (wurtzite or zinc blende), shape anisotropy, and ensemble size uniformity of the seed nanocrystals. Experimental results for diffusion doping of other nanocrystals with other cations are also presented that indicate this method may be generalized, providing access to a variety of new doped semiconductor nanostructures not previously attainable by kinetic routes or cation exchange.

  3. Water vapor diffusion membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, F. F., Jr.; Smith, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    The program is reported, which was designed to define the membrane technology of the vapor diffusion water recovery process and to test this technology using commercially available or experimental membranes. One membrane was selected, on the basis of the defined technology, and was subjected to a 30-day demonstration trial.

  4. Osmosis and Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sack, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    OsmoBeaker is a CD-ROM designed to enhance the learning of diffusion and osmosis by presenting interactive experimentation to the student. The software provides several computer simulations that take the student through different scenarios with cells, having different concentrations of solutes in them.

  5. Diffusion in random networks

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Duan Z.; Padrino, Juan C.

    2017-06-01

    The ensemble averaging technique is applied to model mass transport by diffusion in random networks. The system consists of an ensemble of random networks, where each network is made of pockets connected by tortuous channels. Inside a channel, fluid transport is assumed to be governed by the one-dimensional diffusion equation. Mass balance leads to an integro-differential equation for the pocket mass density. The so-called dual-porosity model is found to be equivalent to the leading order approximation of the integration kernel when the diffusion time scale inside the channels is small compared to the macroscopic time scale. As a test problem,more » we consider the one-dimensional mass diffusion in a semi-infinite domain. Because of the required time to establish the linear concentration profile inside a channel, for early times the similarity variable is xt$-$1/4 rather than xt$-$1/2 as in the traditional theory. We found this early time similarity can be explained by random walk theory through the network.« less

  6. Diffusion on Cu surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimi, Majid

    1993-01-01

    Understanding surface diffusion is essential in understanding surface phenomena, such as crystal growth, thin film growth, corrosion, physisorption, and chemisorption. Because of its importance, various experimental and theoretical efforts have been directed to understand this phenomena. The Field Ion Microscope (FIM) has been the major experimental tool for studying surface diffusion. FIM have been employed by various research groups to study surface diffusion of adatoms. Because of limitations of the FIM, such studies are only limited to a few surfaces: nickel, platinum, aluminum, iridium, tungsten, and rhodium. From the theoretical standpoint, various atomistic simulations are performed to study surface diffusion. In most of these calculations the Embedded Atom Method (EAM) along with the molecular static (MS) simulation are utilized. The EAM is a semi-empirical approach for modeling the interatomic interactions. The MS simulation is a technique for minimizing the total energy of a system of particles with respect to the positions of its particles. One of the objectives of this work is to develop the EAM functions for Cu and use them in conjunction with the molecular static (MS) simulation to study diffusion of a Cu atom on a perfect as well as stepped Cu(100) surfaces. This will provide a test of the validity of the EAM functions on Cu(100) surface and near the stepped environments. In particular, we construct a terrace-ledge-kink (TLK) model and calculate the migration energies of an atom on a terrace, near a ledge site, near a kink site, and going over a descending step. We have also calculated formation energies of an atom on the bare surface, a vacancy in the surface, a stepped surface, and a stepped-kink surface. Our results are compared with the available experimental and theoretical results.

  7. Vorinostat and Radiation Therapy Followed by Maintenance Therapy With Vorinostat in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-05

    Childhood Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Untreated Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Gliosarcoma

  8. CPR: Adult

    MedlinePlus

    Refresher Center Home FIRST AID, CPR and AED LIFEGUARDING Refresher Putting It All Together: CPR—Adult (2:03) Refresher videos only utilize this player QUICK LINKS Home RedCross.org Purchase Course ...

  9. Degenerative myelopathy in an adult miniature poodle.

    PubMed

    Matthews, N S; de Lahunta, A

    1985-06-01

    Degenerative myelopathy was diagnosed at necropsy of an adult Miniature Poodle with a 33-month history of progressive pelvic limb ataxia and proprioceptive deficit. Microscopic examination of the cord revealed diffuse degenerative myelopathy. Degenerative myelopathy is usually seen in adult, large-breed dogs and progresses over a period of months. In this case, the myelopathy progressed slowly and the degree of paralysis became more extensive than usually seen.

  10. The inhibitory effect of CIL-102 on the growth of human astrocytoma cells is mediated by the generation of reactive oxygen species and induction of ERK1/2 MAPK

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Chih-Chuan; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Cheng, Ho-Chen; Wang, Ting-Chung; Sze, Chun-I

    2012-08-15

    CIL-102 (1-[4-(furo[2,3-b]quinolin-4-ylamino)phenyl]ethanone) is the major active agent of the alkaloid derivative of Camptotheca acuminata, with multiple pharmacological activities, including anticancer effects and promotion of apoptosis. The mechanism by which CIL-102 inhibits growth remains poorly understood in human astrocytoma cells. Herein, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which CIL-102 affects the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell cycle G2/M arrest in glioma cells. Treatment of U87 cells with 1.0 μM CIL-102 resulted in phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK1/2), downregulation of cell cycle-related proteins (cyclin A, cyclin B, cyclin D1, and cdk1), and phosphorylation of cdk1Tyr{sup 15} and Cdc25cSer{sup 216}. Furthermore, treatment with the ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 abolished CIL-102-induced Cdc25cSer{sup 216} expression and reversed CIL-102-inhibited cdk1 activation. In addition, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), an ROS scavenger, blocked cell cycle G2/M arrest and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Cdc25cSer{sup 216} in U87 cells. CIL-102-mediated ERK1/2 and ROS production, and cell cycle arrest were blocked by treatment with specific inhibitors. In conclusion, we have identified a novel CIL-102-inhibited proliferation in U87 cells by activating the ERK1/2 and Cdc25cSer{sup 216} cell cycle-related proteins and inducing ROS production; this might be a new mechanism in human astrocytoma cells. -- Highlights: ► We show the effects of CIL-102 on the G2/M arrest of human astrocytoma cells. ► ROS and the Ras/ERK1/2 triggering pathways are involved in the CIL-102 treatment. ► CIL-102 induces sustained activation of ERK1/2 and Cdc25c and ROS are required.

  11. Dark shadows of rumination: Finnish young adults' identity profiles, personal goals and concerns.

    PubMed

    Marttinen, Elina; Dietrich, Julia; Salmela-Aro, Katariina

    2016-02-01

    Young adults actively construct their identity by exploring and committing to opportunities through the setting of personal goals. Typically personal goal contents are related to young adults' developmental tasks but sometimes goals are self-focused. This longitudinal study explored personal goal and concern contents in relation to identity profiles among young Finns (N = 577) followed from age 23 to 25. Applying the Dimensions of Identity Development Scale, identity formation was measured at age 23. Latent Profile Analysis yielded five profiles: moderate achievement, moderate diffusion, achievement, diffused diffusion, and reconsidering achievement. Two "dark side" identity profiles, characterized by low commitment and high ruminative exploration, were identified: moderate diffusion and diffused diffusion. The moderate diffusion profile seemed to have developmental task-related personal goals and concerns. In the diffused diffusion profile, self-focused personal goals and concerns were typical and personal goals and concerns towards relationships atypical. These findings persisted over the two-year follow-up.

  12. Erbium diffusion in silicon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Yingwei; Julsgaard, B.; Petersen, M. Christian; Jensen, R. V. Skougaard; Pedersen, T. Garm; Pedersen, K.; Larsen, A. Nylandsted

    2010-10-04

    Erbium diffusion in silicon dioxide layers prepared by magnetron sputtering, chemical vapor deposition, and thermal growth has been investigated by secondary ion mass spectrometry, and diffusion coefficients have been extracted from simulations based on Fick's second law of diffusion. Erbium diffusion in magnetron sputtered silicon dioxide from buried erbium distributions has in particular been studied, and in this case a simple Arrhenius law can describe the diffusivity with an activation energy of 5.3{+-}0.1 eV. Within a factor of two, the erbium diffusion coefficients at a given temperature are identical for all investigated matrices.

  13. Diffusion, cohort change, and social patterns of smoking☆

    PubMed Central

    Pampel, Fred C.

    2011-01-01

    In noting that common explanations of smoking cannot account for both its current inverse relationship with SES and the shift over time toward greater concentration among low SES groups, this paper presents an explanation based on diffusion and status distinctions. The explanation predicts that, as cigarette diffusion proceeds and fashions change, the social determinants of smoking will shift across cohorts, such that initially positive relationships between pre-adult components of socioeconomic status and smoking in early cohorts become negative in later cohorts. Tests using historical, cohort-linked aggregate data on cigarette diffusion, and individual-level data from the General Social Surveys covering the years from 1978 to 1994 and cohorts from 1889 to 1976 largely support the predictions. In comparing older to newer cohorts, the results show correspondence between the stage of cigarette diffusion and the direction and strength of the relationships of education, parental status, urban residence, and gender with cigarette smoking. PMID:22485056

  14. Molecular genetics of adult grade II gliomas: towards a comprehensive tumor classification system.

    PubMed

    Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Bouvier, Corinne; de Paula, André Maues; Mokhtari, Karima; Colin, Carole; Loundou, Anderson; Chinot, Olivier; Metellus, Philippe

    2012-11-01

    Adult grade II low-grade gliomas (LGG) are classified according to the WHO as astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas or mixed gliomas. TP53 mutations and 1p19q codeletion are the main molecular abnormalities recorded, respectively, in astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas and in mixed gliomas. Although IDH mutations (IDH1 or IDH2) are recorded in up to 85 % of low-grade gliomas, IDH negative gliomas do occur. We have searched for p53 expression, 1p19q codeletion and IDH status (immunohistochemical detection of the common R132H IDH1 mutation and IDH direct sequencing). Internexin alpha (INA) expression previously recorded to be associated with 1p19q codeletion (1p19q+) gliomas was also analysed. Low-grade gliomas were accurately classified into four groups: group 1, IDH+/p53-/1p19q-; group 2, IDH+/p53-/1p19q+; group 3, IDH+/p53+/1p19q-; and group 4, triple negative gliomas. In contrast to the WHO classification, this molecular classification predicts overall survival on uni- and multivariate analysis (P = 0.001 and P = 0.007, respectively). Group 4 carries the worst prognosis and group 2 the best. Interestingly, p53 +/INA- expression predicts lack of 1p19q codeletion (specificity 100 %, VPP 100 %). The combined use of these three molecular markers allow for an accurate prediction of survival in LGG. These findings could significantly modify LGG classification and may represent a new tool to guide patient-tailored therapy. Moreover, immunohistochemical detection of p53, INA and mR132H IDH1 expression could represent an interesting prescreening test to be performed before 1p19q codeletion, IDH1 minor mutation and IDH2 mutation detection.

  15. Diffusion in Immiscible Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pond, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this program is to measure the diffusion coefficients for molten Pb in Zn in the immiscible liquid-phase region. Diffusion couples of pure Pb and Zn were prepared using a shear cell. These have been placed in graphite crucibles and encapsulated in stainless steel cartridges and are awaiting the next Materials Experiment Assembly (MEA) flight opportunity. In flight, one couple will be soaked for 40 minutes at 440 deg C (just above the monotectic temperature) and the second couple will be soaked for 40 minutes 820 deg C (just above the consolute temperature). After the soak both samples will be rapidly quenched by flowing He to minimize redistribution of the immiscible phases. Post flight compositional analysis will be accomplished using X-ray fluorescence in the scanning electron microscopy.

  16. Amosphous diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolawa, E.; So, F. C. T.; Nicolet, M-A.

    1986-01-01

    Amorphous W-Zr and W-N alloys were investigated as diffusion barriers in silicon metallization schemes. Data were presented showing that amorphous W-Zr crystallizes at 900 C, which is 200 C higher than amorphous W-Ni films, and that both films react with metallic overlayers at temperatures far below the crystllization temperature. Also, W-N alloys (crystalline temperature of 600 C) were successfully incorporated as a diffusion barrier in contact structures with both Al and Ag overlayers. The thermal stability of the electrical characteristics of shallow n(+)p junctions significantly improved by incorporating W-N layers in the contact system. One important fact demonstated was the critical influence of the deposition parameters during formation of these carriers.

  17. Nonlocal electrical diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Aguilar, J. F.; Escobar-Jiménez, R. F.; Olivares-Peregrino, V. H.; Benavides-Cruz, M.; Calderón-Ramón, C.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present an analysis and modeling of the electrical diffusion equation using the fractional calculus approach. This alternative representation for the current density is expressed in terms of the Caputo derivatives, the order for the space domain is 0<β≤1 and for the time domain is 0<γ≤2. We present solutions for the full fractional equation involving space and time fractional derivatives using numerical methods based on Fourier variable separation. The case with spatial fractional derivatives leads to Levy flight type phenomena, while the time fractional equation is related to sub- or super diffusion. We show that the mathematical concept of fractional derivatives can be useful to understand the behavior of semiconductors, the design of solar panels, electrochemical phenomena and the description of anomalous complex processes.

  18. Magnetic diffuse scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cable, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    The diffuse scattering of neutrons from magnetic materials provides unique and important information regarding the spatial correlations of the atoms and the spins. Such measurements have been extensively applied to magnetically ordered systems, such as the ferromagnetic binary alloys, for which the observed correlations describe the magnetic moment fluctuations associated with local environment effects. With the advent of polarization analysis, these techniques are increasingly being applied to study disordered paramagnetic systems such as the spin-glasses and the diluted magnetic semiconductors. The spin-pair correlations obtained are essential in understanding the exchange interactions of such systems. In this paper, we describe recent neutron diffuse scattering results on the atom-pair and spin-pair correlations in some of these disordered magnetic systems. 56 refs.

  19. Fractal model of anomalous diffusion.

    PubMed

    Gmachowski, Lech

    2015-12-01

    An equation of motion is derived from fractal analysis of the Brownian particle trajectory in which the asymptotic fractal dimension of the trajectory has a required value. The formula makes it possible to calculate the time dependence of the mean square displacement for both short and long periods when the molecule diffuses anomalously. The anomalous diffusion which occurs after long periods is characterized by two variables, the transport coefficient and the anomalous diffusion exponent. An explicit formula is derived for the transport coefficient, which is related to the diffusion constant, as dependent on the Brownian step time, and the anomalous diffusion exponent. The model makes it possible to deduce anomalous diffusion properties from experimental data obtained even for short time periods and to estimate the transport coefficient in systems for which the diffusion behavior has been investigated. The results were confirmed for both sub and super-diffusion.

  20. Turbo fluid machinery and diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, T.

    1984-01-01

    The general theory behind turbo devices and diffusers is explained. Problems and the state of research on basic equations of flow and experimental and measuring methods are discussed. Conventional centrifugation-type compressor and fan diffusers are considered in detail.

  1. Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baring, Matthew

    2003-04-01

    The process of diffusive acceleration of charged particles in shocked plasmas is widely invoked in astrophysics to account for the ubiquitous presence of signatures of non-thermal relativistic electrons and ions in the universe. This statistical energization mechanism, manifested in turbulent media, was first posited by Enrico Fermi in 1949 to explain the observed cosmic ray population, which exhibits an almost power-law distribution in rigidity. The absence of a momentum scale is a key characteristic of diffusive shock acceleration, and astrophysical systems generally only impose scales at the injection (low energy) and loss (high energy) ends of the particle spectrum. The existence of structure in the cosmic ray spectrum (the "knee") at around 3000 TeV has promoted contentions that there are at least two origins for cosmic rays, a galactic one supplying those up to the knee, and perhaps an extragalactic one that can explain even the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) seen at 1-300 EeV. Accounting for the UHECRs with familiar astrophysical sites of acceleration has historically proven difficult due to the need to assume high magnetic fields in order to reduce the shortest diffusive acceleration timescale, the ion gyroperiod, to meaningful values. Yet active galaxies and gamma-ray bursts remain strong and interesting candidate sources for UHECRs, turning the theoretical focus to relativistic shocks. This review summarizes properties of diffusive shock acceleration that are salient to the issue of UHECR generation. These include spectral indices, anisotropies, acceleration efficencies and timescales, as functions of the shock speed and mean field orientation, and also the degree of field turbulence. Astrophysical sites for UHECR production are also critiqued.

  2. [The diffusion of knowledge].

    PubMed

    Ramiro-H, Manuel; Cruz-A, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Between August 19 and 21, the Feria del Libro de las Ciencias de la Salud (Healthcare Book Fair) took place in the Palacio de Medicina in Mexico City. Archives of Medical Research, Revista Médica del IMSS, and Saber IMSS, three of the main instruments of knowledge diffusion of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, assisted to this book fair, which was organized by the Facultad de Medicina of UNAM.

  3. Peridynamic thermal diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Oterkus, Selda; Madenci, Erdogan; Agwai, Abigail

    2014-05-15

    This study presents the derivation of ordinary state-based peridynamic heat conduction equation based on the Lagrangian formalism. The peridynamic heat conduction parameters are related to those of the classical theory. An explicit time stepping scheme is adopted for numerical solution of various benchmark problems with known solutions. It paves the way for applying the peridynamic theory to other physical fields such as neutronic diffusion and electrical potential distribution.

  4. Double Diffusive Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Bruce; Lee, Brace

    2008-11-01

    Sour gas flares attempt to dispose of deadly H2S gas through combustion. What does not burn rises as a buoyant plume. But the gas is heavier than air at room temperature, so as the rising gas cools eventually it becomes negatively buoyant and descends back to the ground. Ultimately, our intent is to predict the concentrations of the gas at ground level in realistic atmospheric conditions. As a first step towards this goal we have performed laboratory experiments examining the structure of a steady state plume of hot and salty water that rises buoyantly near the source and descends as a fountain after it has cooled sufficiently. We call this a double-diffusive plume because its evolution is dictated by the different (turbulent) diffusivities of heat and salt. A temperature and conductivity probe measures both the salinity and temperature along the centreline of the plume. The supposed axisymmetric structure of the salinity concentration as it changes with height is determined by light-attenuation methods. To help interpret the results, a theory has been successfully adapted from the work of Bloomfield and Kerr (2000), who developed coupled equations describing the structure of fountains. Introducing a new empirical parameter for the relative rates of turbulent heat and salt diffusion, the predictions are found to agree favourably with experimental results.

  5. Solute diffusion in liquid metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, B. N.

    1973-01-01

    A gas model of diffusion in liquid metals is presented. In this model, ions of liquid metals are assumed to behave like the molecules in a dense gas. Diffusion coefficient of solute is discussed with reference to its mass, ionic size, and pair potential. The model is applied to the case of solute diffusion in liquid silver. An attempt was made to predict diffusion coefficients of solutes with reasonable accuracy.

  6. The ThermalDiffusion class

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Daniel H.

    2014-10-01

    The ThermalDiffusion class was created to simulate one-dimensional thermal diffusion across one or more material layers. Each layer is assumed to have constant conductivity K and diffusivity κ . Interface conductance between layers may be specified. Internal heating as a function of position and time is also supported. The ThermalDiffusion class is included in the SMASH package [1] as part of the PDE (Partial Differential Equation) subpackage.

  7. Molecular interactions of ErbB1 (EGFR) and integrin-β1 in astrocytoma frozen sections predict clinical outcome and correlate with Akt-mediated in vitro radioresistance

    PubMed Central

    Petrás, Miklós; Lajtos, Tamás; Friedländer, Elza; Klekner, Álmos; Pintye, Éva; Feuerstein, Burt G.; Szöllősi, János; Vereb, György

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Treatment of astrocytoma is frequently hampered by radioresistance of the tumor. In addition to overexpression of ErbB1/EGFR, functional crosstalk between receptor tyrosine kinases and cell adhesion molecules may also contribute to therapy resistance. Methods Acceptor photobleaching FRET was implemented on frozen sections of clinical astrocytoma to check the role of ErbB1–integrin-β1 interaction. U251 glioma subclones were obtained by introducing extra CHR7 material or the ErbB1 gene to test the relevance and mechanism of this interaction in vitro. Results Grade IV tumors showed higher ErbB1 and integrin-β1 expression and greater ErbB1–integrin-β1 heteroassociation than did grade II tumors. Of these, the extent of molecular association was a single determinant of tumor grade and prognosis in stepwise logistic regression. In vitro, integrin-β1 was upregulated, and radiosensitivity was diminished by ectopic ErbB1 expression. Great excess of ErbB1 provided colony forming advantage over medium excess but did not yield better radiation resistance or faster proliferation and decreased to medium level over time, whereas integrin-β1 levels remained elevated and defined the extent of radioresistance. Increased expression of ErbB1 and integrin-β1 was paralleled by decreasing ErbB1 homoassociation and increasing ErbB1–integrin-β1 heteroassociation. Microscopic two-sided FRET revealed that pixels with higher ErbB1–integrin-β1 heteroassociation exhibited lowed ErbB1 homoassociation, indicating competition for association partners among these molecules. Boosted Akt phosphorylation response to EGF accompanied this shift toward heteroassociation, and the consequentially increased radioresistance could be reverted by inhibiting PI3K. Conclusion The clinically relevant ErbB1–integrin-β1 heteroassociation may be used as a target of both predictive diagnostics and molecular therapy. PMID:23595626

  8. In vivo molecular profiling of human glioma using diffusion kurtosis imaging.

    PubMed

    Hempel, Johann-Martin; Bisdas, Sotirios; Schittenhelm, Jens; Brendle, Cornelia; Bender, Benjamin; Wassmann, Henk; Skardelly, Marco; Tabatabai, Ghazaleh; Vega, Salvador Castaneda; Ernemann, Ulrike; Klose, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the diagnostic performance of diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) for in vivo molecular profiling of human glioma. Normalized mean kurtosis (MKn) and mean diffusivity (MDn) metrics from DKI were assessed in 50 patients with histopathologically confirmed glioma. The results were compared in regard to the WHO-based histological findings and molecular characteristics leading to integrated diagnosis (Haarlem Consensus): isocitrate-dehydrogenase (IDH1/2) mutation status, alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) expression, chromosome 1p/19q loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation status. MKn was significantly lower in tumors with IDH1/2 mutation (0.43 ± 0.09) and ATRX loss of expression (0.41 ± 0.11) than in those with IDH1/2 wild type (0.57 ± 0.09, p < 0.001) and ATRX maintained expression (0.51 ± 0.10, p = 0.004), respectively. Regarding the integrated molecular diagnosis, MKn was significantly higher in primary glioblastoma (0.57 ± 0.10) than in astrocytoma (0.39 ± 0.11, p < 0.001) and oligodendroglioma (0.47 ± 0.05, p = 0.003). MK may be used to provide insight into the human glioma molecular profile regarding IDH1/2 mutation status and ATRX expression. Considering the diagnostic and prognostic significance of these molecular markers, MK appears to be a promising in vivo biomarker for glioma. The diagnostic performance of MK seems to fit more with the integrated molecular approach than the conventional histological findings of the current WHO 2007 classification.

  9. Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients With Brain Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-03-21

    Adult Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Adult Malignant Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Noninfiltrating Astrocytoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Craniopharyngioma; Adult Meningioma; Brain Metastases; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Pineal Parenchymal Tumor; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Infiltrating Astrocytoma; Mixed Gliomas; Stage IV Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor

  10. Configurational diffusion of coal macromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Guin, J.A.; Curtis, C.W.; Tarrer, A.R.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the phenomenon of hindered diffusion of coal macromolecules in idealized porous media. Tasks towards this objective include: Construct a diffusion cell with ideal pore structure for determination of diffusion coefficients, prepare and characterize ideal porous membranes, perform model compound experiments to calibrate and test diffusion apparatus and methodology, prepare and characterize coal macromolecules, and analyze data to evaluate the diffusional behavior of coal macromolecules. This report describes work on the hindered diffusion of tetraphenylporphine and asphaltene. 18 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Erlotinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent Malignant Glioma or Recurrent or Progressive Meningioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-09

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade I Meningioma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Grade III Meningioma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  12. Accelerated stochastic diffusion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbaczewski, Piotr

    1990-07-01

    We give a purely probabilistic demonstration that all effects of non-random (external, conservative) forces on the diffusion process can be encoded in the Nelson ansatz for the second Newton law. Each random path of the process together with a probabilistic weight carries a phase accumulation (complex valued) weight. Random path summation (integration) of these weights leads to the transition probability density and transition amplitude respectively between two spatial points in a given time interval. The Bohm-Vigier, Fenyes-Nelson-Guerra and Feynman descriptions of the quantum particle behaviours are in fact equivalent.

  13. Cation diffusion in titanomagnetites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragon, R.; McCallister, R. H.; Harrison, H. R.

    1984-02-01

    Interdiffusion couple experiments were performed with titanomagnetite single crystals at 1,000°C, 1,100° C and 1,200° C in various buffered atmospheres. The dependence of the interdiffusion coefficient on oxygen fugacity, composition and temperature was interpreted in terms of point defect structure. Estimates of the cation tracer diffusivities indicate that Fe migrates via a point defect mechanism, involving mixed tetrahedral-octahedral site jumps, with an activation energy of 33 Kcal/mole; whereas Ti migration is one to two orders of magnitude slower, is restricted to octahedral sites and has an activation energy of 60 Kcal/mole.

  14. Diffusion in quantum geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calcagni, Gianluca

    2012-08-01

    The change of the effective dimension of spacetime with the probed scale is a universal phenomenon shared by independent models of quantum gravity. Using tools of probability theory and multifractal geometry, we show how dimensional flow is controlled by a multiscale fractional diffusion equation, and physically interpreted as a composite stochastic process. The simplest example is a fractional telegraph process, describing quantum spacetimes with a spectral dimension equal to 2 in the ultraviolet and monotonically rising to 4 towards the infrared. The general profile of the spectral dimension of the recently introduced multifractional spaces is constructed for the first time.

  15. Diffusion in silicon isotope heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Silvestri, Hughes Howland

    2004-01-01

    The simultaneous diffusion of Si and the dopants B, P, and As has been studied by the use of a multilayer structure of isotopically enriched Si. This structure, consisting of 5 pairs of 120 nm thick natural Si and 28Si enriched layers, enables the observation of 30Si self-diffusion from the natural layers into the 28Si enriched layers, as well as dopant diffusion from an implanted source in an amorphous Si cap layer, via Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). The dopant diffusion created regions of the multilayer structure that were extrinsic at the diffusion temperatures. In these regions, the Fermi level shift due to the extrinsic condition altered the concentration and charge state of the native defects involved in the diffusion process, which affected the dopant and self-diffusion. The simultaneously recorded diffusion profiles enabled the modeling of the coupled dopant and self-diffusion. From the modeling of the simultaneous diffusion, the dopant diffusion mechanisms, the native defect charge states, and the self- and dopant diffusion coefficients can be determined. This information is necessary to enhance the physical modeling of dopant diffusion in Si. It is of particular interest to the modeling of future electronic Si devices, where the nanometer-scale features have created the need for precise physical models of atomic diffusion in Si. The modeling of the experimental profiles of simultaneous diffusion of B and Si under p-type extrinsic conditions revealed that both species are mediated by neutral and singly, positively charged Si self-interstitials. The diffusion of As and Si under extrinsic n-type conditions yielded a model consisting of the interstitialcy and vacancy mechanisms of diffusion via singly negatively charged self-interstitials and neutral vacancies. The simultaneous diffusion of P and Si has been modeled on the basis of neutral and singly negatively charged self-interstitials and neutral and singly

  16. Adult Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bischof, Ledford J.

    This volume comprehensively reviews the research on the psychology of the middle aged (ages 40-65). Topics include the concept of maturity and maturation models, the measurement and influences of adult self image; marriage and sexual patterns; intergenerational relationships between and children; vocations and avocations (work, retirement, play,…

  17. Lévy-like diffusion in eye movements during spoken-language comprehension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephen, Damian G.; Mirman, Daniel; Magnuson, James S.; Dixon, James A.

    2009-05-01

    This study explores the diffusive properties of human eye movements during a language comprehension task. In this task, adults are given auditory instructions to locate named objects on a computer screen. Although it has been convention to model visual search as standard Brownian diffusion, we find evidence that eye movements are hyperdiffusive. Specifically, we use comparisons of maximum-likelihood fit as well as standard deviation analysis and diffusion entropy analysis to show that visual search during language comprehension exhibits Lévy-like rather than Gaussian diffusion.

  18. Diffusion characteristics of pediatric pineal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Matthew T; Siddiqui, Adeel; Klimo, Paul; Boop, Frederick A

    2015-01-01

    Background Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) has been shown to be helpful in characterizing tumor cellularity, and predicting histology. Several works have evaluated this technique for pineal tumors; however studies to date have not focused on pediatric pineal tumors. Objective We evaluated the diffusion characteristics of pediatric pineal tumors to confirm if patterns seen in studies using mixed pediatric and adult populations remain valid. Materials and methods This retrospective study was performed after Institutional Review Board approval. We retrospectively evaluated all patients 18 years of age and younger with pineal tumors from a single institution where preoperative diffusion weighted imaging as well as histologic characterization was available. Results Twenty patients (13 male, 7 female) with pineal tumors were identified: seven with pineoblastoma, four with Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET), two with other pineal tumors, and seven with germ cell tumors including two germinomas, three teratomas, and one mixed germinoma-teratoma. The mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values in pineoblastoma (544 ± 65 × 10–6 mm2/s) and pineoblastoma/PNET (595 ± 144 × 10–6 mm2/s) was lower than that of the germ cell tumors (1284 ± 334 × 10–6 mm2/s; p < 0.0001 vs pineoblastoma). One highly cellular germinoma had an ADC value of 694 × 10–6 mm2/s. Conclusion ADC values can aid in differentiation of pineoblastoma/PNET from germ cell tumors in a population of children with pineal masses. PMID:25963154

  19. Cosmic Diffuse Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James M.

    1999-01-01

    The final analysis of the COMPTEL cosmic diffuse flux analysis is summarized in the accompanying figure. It shows the intensity of the cosmic diffuse flux spectrum measured jointly between the Virgo region and the South Galactic pole. This spectrum represents flux per unit solid angle over the range of 0.8 to 30 MeV. It contains the first positive measurement of the flux above 10 MeV. The spectrum merges smoothly with that measured with the EGRET instrument, starting at 30 MeV. It also merges smoothly with the latest results of the HEAO-1 measurements. However, the spectrum below is softer than the spectrum above the COMPTEL energy band. In the COMPTEL energy band there must exist a change in spectral shape as the source objects or processes change from the lower energy regime to the higher energy regime. The details of the analysis and the implications and meanings of the results are spelled out in the thesis of Dr. Cheenu Kappadath which is enclosed.

  20. The diffusion of microfinance.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Abhijit; Chandrasekhar, Arun G; Duflo, Esther; Jackson, Matthew O

    2013-07-26

    To study the impact of the choice of injection points in the diffusion of a new product in a society, we developed a model of word-of-mouth diffusion and then applied it to data on social networks and participation in a newly available microfinance loan program in 43 Indian villages. Our model allows us to distinguish information passing among neighbors from direct influence of neighbors' participation decisions, as well as information passing by participants versus nonparticipants. The model estimates suggest that participants are seven times as likely to pass information compared to informed nonparticipants, but information passed by nonparticipants still accounts for roughly one-third of eventual participation. An informed household is not more likely to participate if its informed friends participate. We then propose two new measures of how effective a given household would be as an injection point. We show that the centrality of the injection points according to these measures constitutes a strong and significant predictor of eventual village-level participation.

  1. Apparatus for diffusion separation

    DOEpatents

    Nierenberg, William A.

    1976-08-10

    1. A diffuser separator apparatus which comprises a plurality of flow channels in a single stage, each of said channels having an inlet port and an outlet port and a constant cross sectional area between said ports, at least a portion of the defining surface of each of said channels being a diffusion separation membrane, and each of said channels having a different cross sectional area, means for connecting said channels in series so that each successive channel of said series has a smaller cross sectional area than the previous channel of said series, a source of gaseous mixture, individual means for flowing said gaseous mixture to the inlet port of each of said channels, gas receiving and analyzing means, individual means for flowing gas passing from each of said outlet ports and means for flowing gas passing through said membranes to said receiving and analyzing means, and individual means for connecting the outlet port of each channel with the inlet port of the channel having the next smaller cross sectional area.

  2. Diffusing obesity myths.

    PubMed

    Ramos Salas, X; Forhan, M; Sharma, A M

    2014-06-01

    Misinformation or myths about obesity can lead to weight bias and obesity stigma. Counteracting myths with facts and evidence has been shown to be effective educational tools to increase an individuals' knowledge about a certain condition and to reduce stigma.The purpose of this study was to identify common obesity myths within the healthcare and public domains and to develop evidence-based counterarguments to diffuse them. An online search of grey literature, media and public health information sources was conducted to identify common obesity myths. A list of 10 obesity myths was developed and reviewed by obesity experts and key opinion leaders. Counterarguments were developed using current research evidence and validated by obesity experts. A survey of obesity experts and health professionals was conducted to determine the usability and potential effectiveness of the myth-fact messages to reduce weight bias. A total of 754 individuals responded to the request to complete the survey. Of those who responded, 464 (61.5%) completed the survey. All 10 obesity myths were identified to be deeply pervasive within Canadian healthcare and public domains. Although the myth-fact messages were endorsed, respondents also indicated that they would likely not be sufficient to reduce weight bias. Diffusing deeply pervasive obesity myths will require multilevel approaches.

  3. A simple flow analysis of diffuser-getter-diffuser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J. E.; Howard, D. W.

    2008-07-15

    Tritium clean-up systems typically deploy gas processing technologies between stages of palladium-silver (Pd/Ag) diffusers/permeators. The number of diffusers positioned before and after a gas clean-up process to obtain optimal system performance will vary with feed gas inert composition. A simple method to analyze optimal diffuser configuration is presented. The method assumes equilibrium across the Pd/Ag tubes and system flows are limited by diffuser vacuum pump speeds preceding or following the clean-up process. A plot of system feed as a function of inert feed gas composition for various diffuser configuration allows selection of a diffuser configuration for maximum throughput based on feed gas composition. (authors)

  4. FLOW ANALYSIS OF DIFFUSER-GETTER-DIFFUSER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J; Dave W. Howard, D

    2007-07-24

    Tritium clean-up systems typically deploy gas processing technologies between stages of palladium-silver (Pd/Ag) diffusers/permeators. The number of diffusers positioned before and after a gas clean-up process to obtain optimal system performance will vary with feed gas inert composition. A simple method to analyze optimal diffuser configuration is presented. The method assumes equilibrium across the Pd/Ag tubes and system flows are limited by diffuser vacuum pump speeds preceding or following the clean-up process. A plot of system feed as a function of inert feed gas composition for various diffuser configuration allows selection of a diffuser configuration for maximum throughput based on feed gas composition.

  5. Sucrose diffusion in aqueous solution

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion of sugar in aqueous solution is important both in nature and in technological applications, yet measurements of diffusion coefficients at low water content are scarce. We report directly measured sucrose diffusion coefficients in aqueous solution. Our technique utilises a Raman isotope tracer method to monitor the diffusion of non-deuterated and deuterated sucrose across a boundary between the two aqueous solutions. At a water activity of 0.4 (equivalent to 90 wt% sucrose) at room temperature, the diffusion coefficient of sucrose was determined to be approximately four orders of magnitude smaller than that of water in the same material. Using literature viscosity data, we show that, although inappropriate for the prediction of water diffusion, the Stokes–Einstein equation works well for predicting sucrose diffusion under the conditions studied. As well as providing information of importance to the fundamental understanding of diffusion in binary solutions, these data have technological, pharmaceutical and medical implications, for example in cryopreservation. Moreover, in the atmosphere, slow organic diffusion may have important implications for aerosol growth, chemistry and evaporation, where processes may be limited by the inability of a molecule to diffuse between the bulk and the surface of a particle. PMID:27364512

  6. Discrete or diffuse intramedullary tumor? Contrast-enhanced intraoperative ultrasound in a case of intramedullary cervicothoracic hemangioblastomas mimicking a diffuse infiltrative glioma: technical note and case report.

    PubMed

    Vetrano, Ignazio G; Prada, Francesco; Nataloni, Ilaria F; Bene, Massimiliano Del; Dimeco, Francesco; Valentini, Laura G

    2015-08-01

    Hemangioblastomas are benign, highly vascularized intramedullary lesions that may also extend into the intradural space. Surgery represents the standard therapy, with the goal of obtaining complete resection even at the risk of neurological morbidity. MRI is the gold standard for diagnosis and assessment of intramedullary tumors. Nevertheless, sometimes MRI may not accurately differentiate between different types of intramedullary tumors, in particular if they are associated with syringes or intra- and peritumoral cysts. This could subsequently affect surgical strategies. Intraoperative ultrasound (ioUS) has become in the last few years a very useful tool for use during neurosurgical procedures. Various ioUS modalities such as B-mode and Doppler have been applied during neurosurgical procedures. On the other hand, the use of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is not yet well defined and standardized in this field. We report a case of a young patient harboring a cervicothoracic intramedullary tumor, for which the preoperative neuroradiologi-cal diagnosis was in favor of a diffuse astrocytoma with nodular components whereas ioUS demonstrated 3 distinct intramedullary nodules. CEUS showed highly vascularized lesions, compatible with hemangioblastomas. These findings, particularly those obtained with CEUS, allowed better definition of the lesions for diagnosis, enhanced understanding of the physiopathological aspects, and permitted the localization of all 3 nodules, thus limiting spinal cord manipulation and allowing complete resection of the lesions, with an uneventful postoperative neurological course. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the use of intraoperative CEUS in a case of intramedullary hemangioblastoma.

  7. Characterizing non-Gaussian diffusion by using generalized diffusion tensors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunlei; Bammer, Roland; Acar, Burak; Moseley, Michael E

    2004-05-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is known to have a limited capability of resolving multiple fiber orientations within one voxel. This is mainly because the probability density function (PDF) for random spin displacement is non-Gaussian in the confining environment of biological tissues and, thus, the modeling of self-diffusion by a second-order tensor breaks down. The statistical property of a non-Gaussian diffusion process is characterized via the higher-order tensor (HOT) coefficients by reconstructing the PDF of the random spin displacement. Those HOT coefficients can be determined by combining a series of complex diffusion-weighted measurements. The signal equation for an MR diffusion experiment was investigated theoretically by generalizing Fick's law to a higher-order partial differential equation (PDE) obtained via Kramers-Moyal expansion. A relationship has been derived between the HOT coefficients of the PDE and the higher-order cumulants of the random spin displacement. Monte-Carlo simulations of diffusion in a restricted environment with different geometrical shapes were performed, and the strengths and weaknesses of both HOT and established diffusion analysis techniques were investigated. The generalized diffusion tensor formalism is capable of accurately resolving the underlying spin displacement for complex geometrical structures, of which neither conventional DTI nor diffusion-weighted imaging at high angular resolution (HARD) is capable. The HOT method helps illuminate some of the restrictions that are characteristic of these other methods. Furthermore, a direct relationship between HOT and q-space is also established.

  8. Apparent diffusion profile estimation from high angular resolution diffusion images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descoteaux, Maxime; Angelino, Elaine; Fitzgibbons, Shaun; Deriche, Rachid

    2006-03-01

    High angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) has recently been of great interest to characterize non-Gaussian diffusion process. In the white matter of the brain, this occurs when fiber bundles cross, kiss or diverge within the same voxel. One of the important goal is to better describe the apparent diffusion process in these multiple fiber regions, thus overcoming the limitations of classical diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). In this paper, we design the appropriate mathematical tools to describe noisy HARDI data. Using a meaningful modified spherical harmonics basis to capture the physical constraints of the problem, we propose a new regularization algorithm to estimate a smoother and closer diffusivity profile to the true diffusivities without noise. We exploit properties of the spherical harmonics to define a smoothing term based on the Laplace-Beltrami for functions defined on the unit sphere. An additional contribution of the paper is the derivation of the general transformation taking the spherical harmonics coefficients to the high order tensor independent elements. This allows the careful study of the state of the art high order anisotropy measures computed from either spherical harmonics or tensor coefficients. We analyze their ability to characterize the underlying diffusion process. We are able to recover voxels with isotropic, single fiber anisotropic and multiple fiber anisotropic diffusion. We test and validate the approach on diffusion profiles from synthetic data and from a biological rat phantom.

  9. ADULT EDUCATION OF MIGRANT ADULTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BEAL, CATHERINE; AND OTHERS

    UNITS ON MIGRANT ADULT EDUCATION, AND A UNIT ON ORGANIZING INFORMAL GROUPS OF MIGRANT WOMEN TO DISCUSS MAINTAINING AND IMPROVING THEIR TEMPORARY HOMES, ARE PRESENTED. THE GOALS OF THE UNIT ON EDUCATION FOR MIGRANT MEN ARE ECONOMIC INDEPENDENCE, BETTER HEALTH AND WELL-BEING, AND BETTER HANDLING OF RESPONSIBILITIES. THE MAIN DIVISIONS OF THE…

  10. Osmosis and diffusion conceptual assessment.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Kathleen M; Williams, Kathy S; Lineback, Jennifer Evarts

    2011-01-01

    Biology student mastery regarding the mechanisms of diffusion and osmosis is difficult to achieve. To monitor comprehension of these processes among students at a large public university, we developed and validated an 18-item Osmosis and Diffusion Conceptual Assessment (ODCA). This assessment includes two-tiered items, some adopted or modified from the previously published Diffusion and Osmosis Diagnostic Test (DODT) and some newly developed items. The ODCA, a validated instrument containing fewer items than the DODT and emphasizing different content areas within the realm of osmosis and diffusion, better aligns with our curriculum. Creation of the ODCA involved removal of six DODT item pairs, modification of another six DODT item pairs, and development of three new item pairs addressing basic osmosis and diffusion concepts. Responses to ODCA items testing the same concepts as the DODT were remarkably similar to responses to the DODT collected from students 15 yr earlier, suggesting that student mastery regarding the mechanisms of diffusion and osmosis remains elusive.

  11. Apoplastic Diffusion Barriers in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Lukas; Franke, Rochus Benni; Geldner, Niko; Reina-Pinto, José J.; Kunst, Ljerka

    2013-01-01

    During the development of Arabidopsis and other land plants, diffusion barriers are formed in the apoplast of specialized tissues within a variety of plant organs. While the cuticle of the epidermis is the primary diffusion barrier in the shoot, the Casparian strips and suberin lamellae of the endodermis and the periderm represent the diffusion barriers in the root. Different classes of molecules contribute to the formation of extracellular diffusion barriers in an organ- and tissue-specific manner. Cutin and wax are the major components of the cuticle, lignin forms the early Casparian strip, and suberin is deposited in the stage II endodermis and the periderm. The current status of our understanding of the relationships between the chemical structure, ultrastructure and physiological functions of plant diffusion barriers is discussed. Specific aspects of the synthesis of diffusion barrier components and protocols that can be used for the assessment of barrier function and important barrier properties are also presented. PMID:24465172

  12. Light diffusing fiber optic chamber

    DOEpatents

    Maitland, Duncan J.

    2002-01-01

    A light diffusion system for transmitting light to a target area. The light is transmitted in a direction from a proximal end to a distal end by an optical fiber. A diffusing chamber is operatively connected to the optical fiber for transmitting the light from the proximal end to the distal end and transmitting said light to said target area. A plug is operatively connected to the diffusing chamber for increasing the light that is transmitted to the target area.

  13. Dislocation Diffusion in Metallic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-08

    DATES COVERED (From - To) April 1,2007-March 31, 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dislocation Diffusion in Metallic Materials 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The goals of this project were: (1) perform a fundamental study of atomic diffusion along dislocation cores in metals and...alloys, (2) develop new methods for the calculation of dislocation diffusion coefficients as functions of temperature and chemical composition and (3

  14. Multilane driven diffusive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curatolo, A. I.; Evans, M. R.; Kafri, Y.; Tailleur, J.

    2016-03-01

    We consider networks made of parallel lanes along which particles hop according to driven diffusive dynamics. The particles also hop transversely from lane to lane, hence indirectly coupling their longitudinal dynamics. We present a general method for constructing the phase diagram of these systems which reveals that in many cases their physics reduce to that of single-lane systems. The reduction to an effective single-lane description legitimizes, for instance, the use of a single TASEP to model the hopping of molecular motors along the many tracks of a single microtubule. Then, we show how, in quasi-2D settings, new phenomena emerge due to the presence of non-zero transverse currents, leading, for instance, to strong ‘shear localization’ along the network.

  15. Fractional chemotaxis diffusion equations.

    PubMed

    Langlands, T A M; Henry, B I

    2010-05-01

    We introduce mesoscopic and macroscopic model equations of chemotaxis with anomalous subdiffusion for modeling chemically directed transport of biological organisms in changing chemical environments with diffusion hindered by traps or macromolecular crowding. The mesoscopic models are formulated using continuous time random walk equations and the macroscopic models are formulated with fractional order differential equations. Different models are proposed depending on the timing of the chemotactic forcing. Generalizations of the models to include linear reaction dynamics are also derived. Finally a Monte Carlo method for simulating anomalous subdiffusion with chemotaxis is introduced and simulation results are compared with numerical solutions of the model equations. The model equations developed here could be used to replace Keller-Segel type equations in biological systems with transport hindered by traps, macromolecular crowding or other obstacles.

  16. Panic Disorder among Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder ... Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder ...

  17. Obstructive sleep apnea - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - obstructive - adults; Apnea - obstructive sleep apnea syndrome - adults; Sleep-disordered breathing - adults; OSA - adults ... When you sleep, all of the muscles in your body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep your ...

  18. huJCAR014 CAR-T Cells in Treating Adult Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-31

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; CD19 Positive; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Transformed Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  19. Lateral Diffusion in an Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Saxton, Michael J.

    1982-01-01

    Lateral diffusion of molecules in lipid bilayer membranes can be hindered by the presence of impermeable domains of gel-phase lipid or of proteins. Effective-medium theory and percolation theory are used to evaluate the effective lateral diffusion constant as a function of the area fraction of fluid-phase lipid and the permeability of the obstructions to the diffusing species. Applications include the estimation of the minimum fraction of fluid lipid needed for bacterial growth, and the enhancement of diffusion-controlled reactions by the channeling effect of solid patches of lipid. PMID:7052153

  20. Enthalpy Diffusion in Multicomponent Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, A W

    2009-01-20

    The conclusions of this paper are: (1) Enthalpy diffusion preserves the second law. (2) Euler solvers will not produce correct temperatures in mixing regions. (3) Navier-Stokes solvers will only produce correct temperatures if q{sub d} is included. (4) Errors from neglecting enthalpy diffusion are most severe when differences in molecular weights are large. (5) In addition to temperature, enthalpy diffusion affects density, dilatation and other fields in subtle ways. (6) Reacting flow simulations that neglect the term are a dubious proposition. (7) Turbulence models for RANS and LES closures should preserve consistency between energy and species diffusion.

  1. Diffusion in Jammed Particle Packs.

    PubMed

    Bolintineanu, Dan S; Grest, Gary S; Lechman, Jeremy B; Silbert, Leonardo E

    2015-08-21

    Using random walk simulations we explore diffusive transport through monodisperse sphere packings over a range of packing fractions ϕ in the vicinity of the jamming transition at ϕ(c). Various diffusion properties are computed over several orders of magnitude in both time and packing pressure. Two well-separated regimes of normal "Fickian" diffusion, where the mean squared displacement is linear in time, are observed. The first corresponds to diffusion inside individual spheres, while the latter is the long-time bulk diffusion. The intermediate anomalous diffusion regime and the long-time value of the diffusion coefficient are both shown to be controlled by particle contacts, which in turn depend on proximity to ϕ(c). The time required to recover normal diffusion t* scales as (ϕ-ϕ(c))(-0.5) and the long-time diffusivity D(∞)∼(ϕ-ϕ(c))0.5, or D(∞)∼1/t*. It is shown that the distribution of mean first passage times associated with the escape of random walkers between neighboring particles controls both t* and D(∞) in the limit ϕ→ϕ(c).

  2. Immunohistochemical profiles of IDH1, MGMT and P53: practical significance for prognostication of patients with diffuse gliomas.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Ryosuke; Tsukamoto, Yoshihiro; Natsumeda, Manabu; Isogawa, Mizuho; Aoki, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Seiichi; Okamoto, Kouichiro; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Fujii, Yukihiko; Kakita, Akiyoshi

    2015-08-01

    Genetic and epigenetic status, including mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) and TP53 and methylation of O(6) -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), are associated with the development of various types of glioma and are useful for prognostication. Here, using routinely available histology sections from 312 patients with diffuse gliomas, we performed immunohistochemistry using antibodies specific for IDH1 mutation, MGMT methylation status, and aberrant p53 expression to evaluate the possible prognostic significance of these features. With regard to overall survival (OS), univariate analysis indicated that an IDH1-positive profile in patients with glioblastoma (GBM), anaplastic astrocytoma (AA), anaplastic oligoastrocytoma and oligodendroglioma, or a MGMT-negative profile in patients with GBM and AA were significantly associated with a favorable outcome. Multivariate analysis revealed that both profiles were independent factors influencing prognosis. The OS of patients with IDH1-positive/MGMT-negative profiles was significantly longer than that of patients with negative/negative and negative/positive profiles. A p53 profile was not an independent prognostic factor. However, for GBM/AA patients with IDH1-negative/MGMT-negative profiles, p53 overexpression was significantly associated with an unfavorable outcome. Thus, the immunohistochemical profiles of IDH1 and MGMT are of considerable significance in gliomas, and a combination of IDH1, MGMT and p53 profiles may be useful for prognostication of GBM/AA.

  3. Bafetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent High-Grade Glioma or Brain Metastases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-18

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Tumors Metastatic to Brain; Adult Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma

  4. A Pilot Feasibility Study of Oral 5-Fluorocytosine and Genetically-Modified Neural Stem Cells Expressing E.Coli Cytosine Deaminase for Treatment of Recurrent High Grade Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-02

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Grade III Glioma; Recurrent Grade IV Glioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent High Grade Glioma

  5. Proposed therapeutic strategy for adult low-grade glioma based on aggressive tumor resection.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Masayuki; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Maruyama, Takashi; Ikuta, Soko; Komori, Takashi; Maebayashi, Katsuya; Iseki, Hiroshi; Tamura, Manabu; Saito, Taiichi; Okamoto, Saori; Chernov, Mikhail; Hayashi, Motohiro; Okada, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    OBJECT There is no standard therapeutic strategy for low-grade glioma (LGG). The authors hypothesized that adjuvant therapy might not be necessary for LGG cases in which total radiological resection was achieved. Accordingly, they established a treatment strategy based on the extent of resection (EOR) and the MIB-1 index: patients with a high EOR and low MIB-1 index were observed without postoperative treatment, whereas those with a low EOR and/or high MIB-1 index received radiotherapy (RT) and/or chemotherapy. In the present retrospective study, the authors reviewed clinical data on patients with primarily diagnosed LGGs who had been treated according to the above-mentioned strategy, and they validated the treatment policy. Given their results, they will establish a new treatment strategy for LGGs stratified by EOR, histological subtype, and molecular status. METHODS One hundred fifty-three patients with diagnosed LGG who had undergone resection or biopsy at Tokyo Women's Medical University between January 2000 and August 2010 were analyzed. The patients consisted of 84 men and 69 women, all with ages ≥ 15 years. A total of 146 patients underwent surgical removal of the tumor, and 7 patients underwent biopsy. RESULTS Postoperative RT and nitrosourea-based chemotherapy were administered in 48 and 35 patients, respectively. Extent of resection was significantly associated with both overall survival (OS; p = 0.0096) and progression-free survival (PFS; p = 0.0007) in patients with diffuse astrocytoma but not in those with oligodendroglial subtypes. Chemotherapy significantly prolonged PFS, especially in patients with oligodendroglial subtypes (p = 0.0009). Patients with a mutant IDH1 gene had significantly longer OS (p = 0.034). Multivariate analysis did not identify MIB-1 index or RT as prognostic factors, but it did identify chemotherapy as a prognostic factor for PFS and EOR as a prognostic factor for OS and PFS. CONCLUSIONS The findings demonstrated that EOR was

  6. Reconstruction of scattered data in fetal diffusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Oubel, Estanislao; Koob, Mériam; Studholme, Colin; Dietemann, Jean-Louis; Rousseau, François

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for reconstructing diffusion-weighted MRI data on regular grids from scattered data. The proposed method has the advantage that no specific diffusion model needs to be assumed. Previous work assume the tensor model, but this is not suitable under certain conditions like intravoxel orientational heterogeneity (IVOH). Data reconstruction is particularly important when studying the fetal brain in utero, since registration methods applied for movement and distortion correction produce scattered data in spatial and diffusion domains. We propose the use of a groupwise registration method, and a dual spatio-angular interpolation by using radial basis functions (RBF). Leave-one-out experiments performed on adult data showed a high accuracy of the method. The application to fetal data showed an improvement in the quality of the sequences according to objective criteria based on fractional anisotropy (FA) maps, and differences in the tractography results.

  7. Reconstruction of Scattered Data in Fetal Diffusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Oubel, Estanislao; Koob, Mériam; Studholme, Colin; Dietemann, Jean-Louis; Rousseau, François

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for reconstructing diffusion-weighted MRI data on regular grids from scattered data. The proposed method has the advantage that no specific diffusion model needs to be assumed. Previous work assume the tensor model, but this is not suitable under certain conditions like intravoxel orientational heterogeneity (IVOH). Data reconstruction is particularly important when studying the fetal brain in utero, since registration methods applied for movement and distortion correction produce scattered data in spatial and diffusion domains. We propose the use of a groupwise registration method, and a dual spatio-angular interpolation by using radial basis functions (RBF). Leave-one-out experiments performed on adult data showed a high accuracy of the method. The application to fetal data showed an improvement in the quality of the sequences according to objective criteria based on fractional anisotropy (FA) maps, and differences in the tractography results. PMID:21636311

  8. HOW DOES ANGULAR RESOLUTION AFFECT DIFFUSION IMAGING MEASURES?

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Liang; Leow, Alex D.; Jahanshad, Neda; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Barysheva, Marina; Lee, Agatha D.; Toga, Arthur W.; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    A key question in diffusion imaging is how many diffusion-weighted images suffice to provide adequate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for studies of fiber integrity. Motion, physiological effects, and scan duration all affect the achievable SNR in real brain images, making theoretical studies and simulations only partially useful. We therefore scanned 50 healthy adults with 105-gradient high-angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) at 4 Tesla. From gradient image subsets of varying size (6≤N≤94) that optimized a spherical angular distribution energy, we created SNR plots (versus gradient numbers) for seven common diffusion anisotropy indices: fractional and relative anisotropy (FA, RA), mean diffusivity (MD), volume ratio (VR), geodesic anisotropy (GA), its hyperbolic tangent (tGA), and generalized fractional anisotropy (GFA). SNR, defined in a region of interest in the corpus callosum, was near-maximal with 58, 66 and 62 gradients for MD, FA and RA in respectively, and with about 55 gradients for GA and tGA. For VR and GFA, SNR increased rapidly with more gradients. SNR was optimized when the ratio of diffusion-sensitized to non-sensitized images was 9.13 for GA and tGA, 10.57 for FA, 9.17 for RA, and 26 for MD and VR. In orientation density functions modeling the HARDI signal as a continuous mixture of tensors, the diffusion profile reconstruction accuracy rose rapidly with additional gradients. These plots may help in making trade-off decisions when designing diffusion imaging protocols. PMID:19819339

  9. Spatial dynamics of a population with stage-dependent diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, F.; Coutinho, R. M.; Kraenkel, R. A.

    2015-05-01

    We explore the spatial dynamics of a population whose individuals go through life stages with very different dispersal capacities. We model it through a system of partial differential equations of the reaction-diffusion kind, with nonlinear diffusion terms that may depend on population density and on the stage. This model includes a few key biological ingredients: growth and saturation, life stage structure, small population effects, and diffusion dependent on the stage. In particular, we consider that adults exhibit two distinct classes: one highly mobile and the other less mobile but with higher fecundity rate, and the development of juveniles into one or the other depends on population density. We parametrize the model with estimated parameters of an insect species, the brown planthopper. We focus on a situation akin to an invasion of the species in a new habitat and find that the front of invasion is led by the most mobile adult class. We also show that the trade-off between dispersal and fecundity leads to invasion speed attaining its maximum at an intermediate value of the diffusion coefficient of the most mobile class.

  10. Modeling of diffuse-diffuse photon coupling via a nonscattering region: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hoon; Kim, Seunghwan; Kim, Youn Tae

    2004-06-20

    It is well established that diffusion approximation is valid for light propagation in highly scattering media, but it breaks down in nonscattering regions. The previous methods that manipulate nonscattering regions are essentially boundary-to-boundary coupling (BBC) methods through a nonscattering void region based on the radiosity theory. We present a boundary-to-interior coupling (BIC) method. BIC is based on the fact that the collimated pencil beam incident on the medium can be replaced by an isotropic point source positioned at one reduced scattering length inside the medium from an illuminated point. A similar replacement is possible for the nondiffuse lights that enter the diffuse medium through the void, and it is formulated as the BIC method. We implemented both coupling methods using the finite element method (FEM) and tested for the circle with a void gap and for a four-layer adult head model. For mean time of flight, the BIC shows better agreement with Monte Carlo (MC) simulation results than BBC. For intensity, BIC shows a comparable match with MC data compared with that of BBC. The effect of absorption of the clear layer in the adult head model was investigated. Both mean time and intensity decrease as absorption of the clear layer increases.

  11. Adult Development and Learning of Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson, Donald N., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    This summary of adult development covers a wide range of authors. Adult development is one way of understanding how the internal and external changes in our lives have an impact on learning. Of particular importance in this work are the developmental issues of older adults. I present various theories of adult development such as linear and…

  12. Selected Dissemination/Diffusion Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Marshall L.

    This analysis of selected diffusion and dissemination methods used by developer-demonstrator projects in the National Diffusion Network discusses strategies under the following headings: managing the project, developing materials, disseminating information, conducting awareness sessions, training personnel, using certified trainers, providing…

  13. Development of a Detonation Diffuser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-27

    reflection of the shock would result in a detonation that runs out of reactants when it encounters the combustion front. Rotating the reflecting surface...FEASIBILITY AND PARAMETER STUDY OF A DETONATION DIFFUSER DISSERTATION Christopher A Stevens, CTR AFIT-DS...States Government. iii AFIT-DS-ENY-14-M-05 FEASIBILITY AND PARAMETER STUDY OF A DETONATION DIFFUSER DISSTERTATION

  14. Preliminary Investigation of Supersonic Diffusers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1945-05-01

    No. L5D20 This pressure was measured with a large mercury manometer . The total ’head after diffusion can be assumed equal to the static pressure at...of the entering kinetic energy. A mercury manometer was used to measure the difference between the total heads before and after diffusion. ‘J!hesetwo

  15. Consequences of Diffusion of Innovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goss, Kevin F.

    1979-01-01

    The article traces evolution of diffusion theory; illustrates undesirable consequences in a cross-cultural setting, reviews criticisms of several scholars; considers distributional effects and unanticipated consequences for potential ameliorative impact on diffusion theory; and codifies these factors into a framework for research into consequences…

  16. Demonstrating Diffusion: Why the Confusion?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panizzon, Debra Lee

    1998-01-01

    Examines the principles of diffusion and how it may be confused with convection. Suggests that educators may be misleading students and clouding their understanding of the process. Provides two contemporary examples to explain the process of diffusion and how it differs from convection. (Author/CCM)

  17. Fractional diffusion on bounded domains

    DOE PAGES

    Defterli, Ozlem; D'Elia, Marta; Du, Qiang; ...

    2015-03-13

    We found that the mathematically correct specification of a fractional differential equation on a bounded domain requires specification of appropriate boundary conditions, or their fractional analogue. In this paper we discuss the application of nonlocal diffusion theory to specify well-posed fractional diffusion equations on bounded domains.

  18. Diffusion in jammed particle packs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolintineanu, Dan S.; Silbert, Leonardo E.; Grest, Gary S.; Lechman, Jeremy B.

    2015-03-01

    Diffusive transport in jammed particle packs is of interest for a number of applications, as well as being a potential indicator of structural properties near the jamming point. To this end, we report stochastic simulations of equilibrium diffusion through monodisperse sphere packs near the jamming point in the limit of a perfectly insulating surrounding medium. The time dependence of various diffusion properties is resolved over several orders of magnitude. Two time regimes of expected Fickian diffusion are observed, separated by an intermediate regime of anomalous diffusion. This intermediate regime grows as the particle volume fraction approaches the critical jamming transition. The diffusion behavior is fully controlled by the extent of the contacts between neighboring particles, which in turn depend on proximity to the jamming point. In particular, the mean first passage time associated with the escape of random walkers between neighboring particles is shown to control both the time to recover Fickian diffusion and the long time diffusivity. Scaling laws are established that relate these quantities to the difference between the actual and critical jamming volume fractions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA under Contract DE- AC04-94AL85000.

  19. Osmosis and Diffusion Conceptual Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Kathleen M.; Williams, Kathy S.; Lineback, Jennifer Evarts

    2011-01-01

    Biology student mastery regarding the mechanisms of diffusion and osmosis is difficult to achieve. To monitor comprehension of these processes among students at a large public university, we developed and validated an 18-item Osmosis and Diffusion Conceptual Assessment (ODCA). This assessment includes two-tiered items, some adopted or modified…

  20. The Diffusion of New Math.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ready, Patricia M.

    The life cycle of "new math" is fertile ground for the study of the diffusion of an innovation. New math arrived in 1958 to save the day for America after the Soviet Union launched Sputnik, the first successful space flight in 1957. In a period of 16 years an entire diffusion cycle was completed throughout the entire educational system…

  1. Enthalpy Diffusion in Multicomponent Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, A W

    2008-11-12

    The enthalpy diffusion flux in the multicomponent energy equation is a well known yet frequently neglected term. It accounts for energy changes, associated with compositional changes, resulting from species diffusion. Enthalpy diffusion is important in flows where significant mixing occurs between species of dissimilar molecular weight. The term plays a critical role in preventing local violations of the entropy condition. In simulations of nonpremixed combustion, omission of the enthalpy flux can lead to anomalous temperature gradients, which may cause mixing regions to exceed ignition conditions. The term can also play a role in generating acoustic noise in turbulent mixing layers. Euler solvers that rely on numerical diffusion to mix fluids cannot accurately predict the temperature in mixed regions. On the other hand, Navier-Stokes solvers that incorporate enthalpy diffusion can provide much more accurate results.

  2. Knudsen Diffusion in Silicon Nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruener, Simon; Huber, Patrick

    2008-02-01

    Measurements on helium and argon gas flow through an array of parallel, linear channels of 12 nm diameter and 200μm length in a single crystalline silicon membrane reveal a Knudsen diffusion type transport from 102 to 107 in Knudsen number Kn. The classic scaling prediction for the transport diffusion coefficient on temperature and mass of diffusing species, DHe∝T, is confirmed over a T range from 40 K to 300 K for He and for the ratio of DHe/DAr∝mAr/mHe. Deviations of the channels from a cylindrical form, resolved with electron microscopy down to subnanometer scales, quantitatively account for a reduced diffusivity as compared to Knudsen diffusion in ideal tubular channels. The membrane permeation experiments are described over 10 orders of magnitude in Kn, encompassing the transition flow regime, by the unified flow model of Beskok and Karniadakis.

  3. Diffusion of polymer gel implants.

    PubMed

    Davis, B K

    1974-08-01

    Crosslinked polyacrylamide and polyvinylpyrrolidone gels have been used to subcutaneously implant (125)I-labeled immunoglobulin, (125)I-labeled luteinizing hormone, (125)I-labeled bovine serum albumin, (125)I-labeled insulin, [(3)H]prostaglandin F(2alpha), and Na(125)I into hamsters. From the rates of absorption of the solutes, their diffusion coefficients were determined. The diffusion coefficients showed a logarithmic dependence on implant polymer concentration and solute molecular weight. Release of the solutes from gel preparations incubated 10 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.2) at 37 degrees revealed a similar relationship between solute diffusion coefficient, molecular weight, and the concentration of polymer. A general equation was derived that gives the expected diffusion coefficient of a substance in a polymer gel from its molecular weight, diffusion coefficient in solvent, and polymer concentration of the gel.

  4. Portable vapor diffusion coefficient meter

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Clifford K.

    2007-06-12

    An apparatus for measuring the effective vapor diffusion coefficient of a test vapor diffusing through a sample of porous media contained within a test chamber. A chemical sensor measures the time-varying concentration of vapor that has diffused a known distance through the porous media. A data processor contained within the apparatus compares the measured sensor data with analytical predictions of the response curve based on the transient diffusion equation using Fick's Law, iterating on the choice of an effective vapor diffusion coefficient until the difference between the predicted and measured curves is minimized. Optionally, a purge fluid can forced through the porous media, permitting the apparatus to also measure a gas-phase permeability. The apparatus can be made lightweight, self-powered, and portable for use in the field.

  5. Heat transfer, diffusion, and evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nusselt, Wilhelm

    1954-01-01

    Although it has long been known that the differential equations of the heat-transfer and diffusion processes are identical, application to technical problems has only recently been made. In 1916 it was shown that the speed of oxidation of the carbon in iron ore depends upon the speed with which the oxygen of the combustion air diffuses through the core of gas surrounding the carbon surface. The identity previously referred to was then used to calculate the amount of oxygen diffusing to the carbon surface on the basis of the heat transfer between the gas stream and the carbon surface. Then in 1921, H. Thoma reversed that procedure; he used diffusion experiments to determine heat-transfer coefficients. Recently Lohrisch has extended this work by experiment. A technically very important application of the identity of heat transfer and diffusion is that of the cooling tower, since in this case both processes occur simultaneously.

  6. Ammonia diffusion through Nalophan™ bags.

    PubMed

    Sironi, Selena; Eusebio, Lidia; Dentoni, Licinia; Capelli, Laura; Del Rosso, Renato

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the work is to verify the diffusion rate of ammonia through the Nalophan™ film that constitutes the sampling bag, considering storage times ranging from 1 to 26 h. The ammonia decay over time was evaluated using gas-chromatography for the quantification of ammonia concentration inside the bag. The research assesses the roles of both of ammonia and water concentration gradients at the polymeric film interface on the diffusion process. The results show that both the ammonia concentration gradient and, in a less pronounced way, the water concentration gradient are the main 'engines' of ammonia diffusion. Double bags seem to represent a simple solution for preventing ammonia losses during storage. Another interesting result concerns the role of the bag surface on the ammonia diffusion rate: the higher the surface/volume (S/V) ratio, the higher the ammonia diffusion rate through the polymeric film.

  7. Diffuse gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Simpson, G. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    An examination of the intensity, energy spectrum, and spatial distribution of the diffuse gamma-radiation observed by SAS-2 satellite away from the galactic plane in the energy range above 35 MeV has shown that it consists of two components. One component is generally correlated with galactic latitudes, the atomic hydrogen column density was deduced from 21 cm measurements, and the continuum radio emission, believed to be synchrotron emission. It has an energy spectrum similar to that in the plane and joins smoothly to the intense radiation from the plane. It is therefore presumed to be of galactic origin. The other component is apparently isotropic, at least on a coarse scale, and has a steep energy spectrum. No evidence is found for a cosmic ray halo surrounding the galaxy in the shape of a sphere or oblate spheroid with galactic dimensions. Constraints for a halo model with significantly larger dimensions are set on the basis of an upper limit to the gamma-ray anisotropy.

  8. Handheld Diffusion Test Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This photo shows the Handheld Diffusion Test Cell (HH-DTC) apparatus flown on the Space Shuttle. Similar cells (inside the plastic box) will be used in the Observable Protein Crystal Growth Apparatus (OPCGA) to be operated aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The principal investigator is Dr. Alex McPherson of the University of California, Irvine. Each individual cell comprises two sample chambers with a rotating center section that isolates the two from each other until the start of the experiment and after it is completed. The cells are made from optical-quality quartz glass to allow photography and interferometric observations. Each cell has a small light-emitting diode and lens to back-light the solution. In protein crystal growth experiments, a precipitating agent such as a salt solution is used to absorb and hold water but repel the protein molecules. This increases the concentration of protein until the molecules nucleate to form crystals. This cell is one of 96 that make up the experiment module portion of the OPCGA.

  9. Hydrogen diffusion fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Struthers, R.C.

    1987-08-04

    This patent describes a fuel cell comprising; an elongate case; a thin, flat separator part of non-porous, di-electric, hydrogen-permeable material between the ends of and extending transverse the case and defining anode and cathode chambers; a thin, flat anode part of non-porous, electric conductive, hydrogen-permeable metallic material in the anode chamber in flat contacting engagement with and co-extensive with the separator part; a flat, porous, catalytic cathode part in the cathode chamber in contacting engagement with the separator part; hydrogen supply means supplying hydrogen to the anode part within the anode chamber; oxidant gas supply means supplying oxidant gas to the cathode part within the cathode chamber; and, an external electric circuit connected with and between the anode and cathode parts. The anode part absorbs and is permeated by hydrogen supplied to it and diffuses the hydrogen to hydrogen ions and free electrons; the free electrons in the anode part are conducted from the anode part into the electric circuit to perform useful work. The hydrogen ions in the anode part move from the anode part through the separator part and into the cathode part. Free electrons are conducted by the electric circuit into the cathode part. The hydrogen ions, oxidant gas and free electrons in the cathode part react and generate waste, heat and water.

  10. Diffusion in membranes: Toward a two-dimensional diffusion map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toppozini, Laura; Garcia-Sakai, Victoria; Bewley, Robert; Dalgliesh, Robert; Perring, Toby; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.

    2015-01-01

    For decades, quasi-elastic neutron scattering has been the prime tool for studying molecular diffusion in membranes over relevant nanometer distances. These experiments are essential to our current understanding of molecular dynamics of lipids, proteins and membrane-active molecules. Recently, we presented experimental evidence from X-ray diffraction and quasi-elastic neutron scattering demonstrating that ethanol enhances the permeability of membranes. At the QENS 2014/WINS 2014 conference we presented a novel technique to measure diffusion across membranes employing 2-dimensional quasi-elastic neutron scattering. We present results from our preliminary analysis of an experiment on the cold neutron multi-chopper spectrometer LET at ISIS, where we studied the self-diffusion of water molecules along lipid membranes and have the possibility of studying the diffusion in membranes. By preparing highly oriented membrane stacks and aligning them horizontally in the spectrometer, our aim is to distinguish between lateral and transmembrane diffusion. Diffusion may also be measured at different locations in the membranes, such as the water layer and the hydrocarbon membrane core. With a complete analysis of the data, 2-dimensional mapping will enable us to determine diffusion channels of water and ethanol molecules to quantitatively determine nanoscale membrane permeability.

  11. Diffusive instabilities in hyperbolic reaction-diffusion equations.

    PubMed

    Zemskov, Evgeny P; Horsthemke, Werner

    2016-03-01

    We investigate two-variable reaction-diffusion systems of the hyperbolic type. A linear stability analysis is performed, and the conditions for diffusion-driven instabilities are derived. Two basic types of eigenvalues, real and complex, are described. Dispersion curves for both types of eigenvalues are plotted and their behavior is analyzed. The real case is related to the Turing instability, and the complex one corresponds to the wave instability. We emphasize the interesting feature that the wave instability in the hyperbolic equations occurs in two-variable systems, whereas in the parabolic case one needs three reaction-diffusion equations.

  12. Transdermal diffusion of xenon in vitro using diffusion cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhovsky, A.; Petrov, E.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this research was to study the diffusion rate of xenon through guinea pig skin and how viscosity of cosmetic component capryl/capric triglyceride (CCT) facilitates to deliver xenon to surface of skin patches. They were placed in Franz cell for 24 hours and diffusion rate and permeability of xenon were calculated. Thus diffusion rate was 0.031 mg/hour*cm2 and permeability was 0.003 cm/hour. Using Brookfield viscometer it was shown that viscosity of CCT decreased upon increasing xenon concentration. Obtained results can be utilized in developing of new xenon containing drugs for topical administration.

  13. Macromolecular Diffusion in Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gam, Sangah; Meth, Jeff; Zane, Steve; Winey, Karen; Clarke, Nigel; Composto, Russell

    2011-03-01

    Macromolecular diffusion in crowded systems is important in biological and engineered systems. We have studied macromolecular diffusion through a model polymer nanocomposite (PNC) containing phenyl grafted silica nanoparticles (NPs), randomly distributed in a polystyrene matrix. Over a wide range of NP loading and tracer molecular weight (M), the scaling of the diffusion coefficient with M is in excellent agreement with the entropic barrier model (EBM) previously used to describe diffusion of DNA through confined media (e.g., gels and nanopores). To investigate the effect of NP size, diffusion was measured in PNC's with silica NPs having diameters of 28 and 12 nm. The normalized diffusion coefficients (D / D0) plotted against the interparticle separation relative to probe size (i.e., ID/ 2 Rg) collapse on a master curve. Diffusion in a poly(methyl methacrylate):silica NP system was also investigated to understand how attractive interactions (i.e., enthalpy) perturb motion relative to the polystyrene and phenyl-silica NP system which is athermal. Finally, a flux-based model is proposed and compared with experimental results.

  14. Single file diffusion in microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutenberg, Andrew; Farrell, Spencer; Brown, Aidan

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the single file diffusion (SFD) of large particles entering a confined tubular geometry, such as luminal diffusion of proteins inside microtubules or flagella. While single-file effects have no effect on particle density, we report significant single-file effects for individually-tracked tracer particle motion. Both exact and approximate ordering statistics of particles entering semi-infinite tubes agree well with our stochastic simulations. Considering initially empty semi-infinite tubes, with particles entering at one end starting from an initial time t = 0 , tracked particles display super-diffusive effective exponents just after they enter the system and trends towards diffusive exponents at later times. Equivalently, if diffusive exponents are assumed the effective diffusivity is reduced at early times and enhanced at later times through a logarithmic factor logN , where N is the number of particles in the tube. When we number each particle from the first (n = 1) to the most recent (n = N), we find good scaling collapse of the effective diffusivity for all n. Techniques that track individual particles, or local groups of particles, such as photo-activation or photobleaching, will exhibit single-file effects.

  15. Cytoplasmic hydrogen ion diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed Central

    al-Baldawi, N F; Abercrombie, R F

    1992-01-01

    The apparent cytoplasmic proton diffusion coefficient was measured using pH electrodes and samples of cytoplasm extracted from the giant neuron of a marine invertebrate. By suddenly changing the pH at one surface of the sample and recording the relaxation of pH within the sample, an apparent diffusion coefficient of 1.4 +/- 0.5 x 10(-6) cm2/s (N = 7) was measured in the acidic or neutral range of pH (6.0-7.2). This value is approximately 5x lower than the diffusion coefficient of the mobile pH buffers (approximately 8 x 10(-6) cm2/s) and approximately 68x lower than the diffusion coefficient of the hydronium ion (93 x 10(-6) cm2/s). A mobile pH buffer (approximately 15% of the buffering power) and an immobile buffer (approximately 85% of the buffering power) could quantitatively account for the results at acidic or neutral pH. At alkaline pH (8.2-8.6), the apparent proton diffusion coefficient increased to 4.1 +/- 0.8 x 10(-6) cm2/s (N = 7). This larger diffusion coefficient at alkaline pH could be explained quantitatively by the enhanced buffering power of the mobile amino acids. Under the conditions of these experiments, it is unlikely that hydroxide movement influences the apparent hydrogen ion diffusion coefficient. PMID:1617134

  16. Titanium diffusion in shinbone of rats with osseointegrated implants.

    PubMed

    Grenón, Miriam S; Robledo, José; Ibáñez, Juan Carlos; Sánchez, Héctor J

    2016-11-01

    Dental implants are composed of commercially pure Ti (which is actually an alloy of titanium, and minor or trace components such as aluminium and vanadium). When the implant is inserted, its surface undergoes a number of chemical and mechanical processes, releasing particles of titanium to the medium. The metabolism of free ions of titanium is uncertain; the uptaking processes in the body are not well known, nor their toxic dose. In addition, physical properties of newly formed bone, such as diffusivity and activation energy, are scarce and rarely studied. In this study, we analysed the diffusion of titanium in the titanium-implanted shinbones of six adult male Wistar rats by spatially resolved micro x-ray fluorescence. The measurements were carried out at the microfluorescence station of the x-ray fluorescence (XRF) beamline of the Brazilian synchrotron facility LNLS (from Portuguese 'Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron'). For each sample, XRF spectra were taken by linear scanning in area near the new bone formed around the Ti implant. The scanning line shows a clear effect of titanium diffusion whereas calcium intensity presents a different behaviour. Moreover, a clear correlation among the different structures of bones is observed in the Ti and Ca intensities. The results obtained in these measurements may allow determining quantitatively the parameters of diffusion rates and other physical properties of new bone like diffusion coefficients.

  17. Fick's Insights on Liquid Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    2004-10-07

    In 1855, Adolph Fick published ''On Liquid Diffusion'', mathematically treating salt movements in liquids as a diffusion process, analogous to heat diffusion. Less recognized is the fact that Fick also provided a detailed account of the implications of salt diffusion to transport through membranes. A careful look at Fick (1855) shows that his conceptualization of molecular diffusion was more comprehensive than could be captured with the mathematical methods available to him, and therefore his expression, referred to as Fick's Law, dealt only with salt flux. He viewed salt diffusion in liquids as a binary process, with salt moving in one way and water moving in the other. Fick's analysis of the consequences of such a binary process operating in a hydrophilic pore in a membrane offers insights that are relevant to earth systems. This paper draws attention to Fick's rationale, and its implications to hydrogeological systems. Fick (1829-1901; Figure 1), a gifted scientist, published the first book on medical physics (Fick, 1858), discussing the application of optics, solid mechanics, gas diffusion, and heat budget to biological systems. Fick's paper is divisible into two parts. The first describes his experimental verification of the applicability of Fourier's equation to liquid diffusion. The second is a detailed discussion of diffusion through a membrane. Although Fick's Law specifically quantifies solute flux, Fick visualized a simultaneous movement of water and stated, ''It is evident that a volume of water equal to that of the salt passes simultaneously out of the upper stratum into the lower.'' (Fick, 1855, p.30). Fick drew upon Fourier's model purely by analogy. He assumed that concentration gradient impelled salt movement, without inquiring why concentration gradient should constitute a driving force. As for water movement, he stated intuitively, ''a force of suction comes into play on each side of the membrane, proportional to the difference of concentration

  18. ALUMINUM IMPURITY DIFFUSION IN MAGNESIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, Sarah; Warren, Andrew; Coffey, Kevin; Kulkarni, Nagraj S; Todd, Peter J; Sohn, Yong Ho; Klimov, Mikhail

    2012-01-01

    The Al impurity diffusion in polycrystalline Mg (99.9%) via depth profiling with secondary ion mass spectrometry was studied in the temperature range of 673-573K, utilizing the thin film method and thin film solution to the diffusion equation. Multiple samples were utilized and multiple profiles were obtained to determine statistically confident coefficient with maximum standard deviation of 16%. Activation energy and pre-exponential factor of Al impurity diffusion in Mg was determined as 155 kJ/mole and 3.9 x 10-3 m2/sec.

  19. Preparing Educators of Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabowski, Stanley M.; And Others

    Model programs are described for two areas of adult education--the preparation of adult educators and the training conducted by adult educators. In Chapter One, Phyllis Caldwell reviews the literature concerning the preservice training of adult educators, concentrating on the competencies of adult education administrators and teachers. In Chapter…

  20. Diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Foreman, Kenneth M.; Gilbert, Barry L.

    1984-01-01

    A diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine having means for energizing the boundary layer at several locations along the diffuser walls is improved by the addition of a short collar extending radially outward from the outlet of the diffuser.

  1. Floating-diffusion electrometer with adjustable sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tower, John R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The effective capacitance of the floating diffusion in a floating-diffusion electrometer is modified to adjust electrometer sensitivity. This is done by changing the direct potential applied to a gate electrode proximate to the floating diffusion.

  2. Improved diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Foreman, K.M.; Gilbert, B.L.

    A diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine having means for energizing the boundary layer at several locations along the diffuser walls is improved by the addition of a short collar extending radially outward from the outlet of the diffuser.

  3. Fluid diffusion in porous silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Lowell I.

    Fluid motion in porous media has received a great deal of theoretical and experimental attention due to its importance in systems as diverse as ground water aquifers, catalytic processes, and size separation schemes. Often, the motion of interest is the random thermal motion of molecules in a fluid undergoing no net flow. This diffusive motion is particularly important when the size of the pores is nearly the same as the size of the molecules. In this study, fluid diffusion is measured in several varieties of porous silica whose pore structure is determined by the process by which it is made. The samples in this study have porosities (φ, the ratio of the pore volume to the total sample volume) that vary from 0.3 to 0.75 and average pore radii that range from approximately 15 to 120 A. Determining the effect of the pore structure on the diffusion of a liquid in a porous material is complicated by the chemical interactions between the diffusing molecules and the pore surface. In this study, ions in a hydrophilic fluid are used to block the adsorption of the diffusing dye molecules to the hydroxyl groups covering the silica surface. This technique is unlike typical surface treatments of silica in that it does not permanently alter the pore geometry. In this work, fluid diffusion is measured with a transient holographic grating technique where interfering laser beams create a periodic refractive index modulation in the fluid. The diffraction of a third laser off this grating is monitored to determine how quickly the grating relaxes, thereby determining the diffusion coefficient of the molecules in the fluid. Varying the grating periodicity controls the length scale of the diffusion measurement from 1.2 to 100 μm which is much larger than the average pore sizes of the samples. Therefore, over these large scales, we measure 'normal' diffusion, where the mean squared displacement of a diffusing particle varies linearly with time. In one particular type of porous silica

  4. Geometric diffusion of quantum trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-01-01

    A quantum object can acquire a geometric phase (such as Berry phases and Aharonov–Bohm phases) when evolving along a path in a parameter space with non-trivial gauge structures. Inherent to quantum evolutions of wavepackets, quantum diffusion occurs along quantum trajectories. Here we show that quantum diffusion can also be geometric as characterized by the imaginary part of a geometric phase. The geometric quantum diffusion results from interference between different instantaneous eigenstate pathways which have different geometric phases during the adiabatic evolution. As a specific example, we study the quantum trajectories of optically excited electron-hole pairs in time-reversal symmetric insulators, driven by an elliptically polarized terahertz field. The imaginary geometric phase manifests itself as elliptical polarization in the terahertz sideband generation. The geometric quantum diffusion adds a new dimension to geometric phases and may have applications in many fields of physics, e.g., transport in topological insulators and novel electro-optical effects. PMID:26178745

  5. Diffusion methodology: time to innovate?

    PubMed

    Meyer, Gary

    2004-01-01

    Over the past 60 years, thousands of diffusion studies have been conducted in numerous disciplines of study including sociology, education, communication, marketing, and pubic health. With few exceptions, these studies have been driven by a methodological approach that has become institutionalized in diffusion research. This approach is characterized by the collection of quantitative data about one innovation gathered from adopters at a single point in time after widespread diffusion has occurred. This dominant approach is examined here in terms of both its strengths and weaknesses and with regard to its contribution to the collective base of understanding the diffusion of innovations. Alternative methodological approaches are proposed and reviewed with consideration for the means by which they may expand the knowledge base.

  6. Uphill diffusion in multicomponent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Rajamani

    2015-05-21

    Molecular diffusion is an omnipresent phenomena that is important in a wide variety of contexts in chemical, physical, and biological processes. In the majority of cases, the diffusion process can be adequately described by Fick's law that postulates a linear relationship between the flux of any species and its own concentration gradient. Most commonly, a component diffuses down the concentration gradient. The major objective of this review is to highlight a very wide variety of situations that cause the uphill transport of one constituent in the mixture. Uphill diffusion may occur in multicomponent mixtures in which the diffusion flux of any species is strongly coupled to that of its partner species. Such coupling effects often arise from strong thermodynamic non-idealities. For a quantitative description we need to use chemical potential gradients as driving forces. The transport of ionic species in aqueous solutions is coupled with its partner ions because of the electro-neutrality constraints; such constraints may accelerate or decelerate a specific ion. When uphill diffusion occurs, we observe transient overshoots during equilibration; the equilibration process follows serpentine trajectories in composition space. For mixtures of liquids, alloys, ceramics and glasses the serpentine trajectories could cause entry into meta-stable composition zones; such entry could result in phenomena such as spinodal decomposition, spontaneous emulsification, and the Ouzo effect. For distillation of multicomponent mixtures that form azeotropes, uphill diffusion may allow crossing of distillation boundaries that are normally forbidden. For mixture separations with microporous adsorbents, uphill diffusion can cause supra-equilibrium loadings to be achieved during transient uptake within crystals; this allows the possibility of over-riding adsorption equilibrium for achieving difficult separations.

  7. Boron diffusion in silicon devices

    DOEpatents

    Rohatgi, Ajeet; Kim, Dong Seop; Nakayashiki, Kenta; Rounsaville, Brian

    2010-09-07

    Disclosed are various embodiments that include a process, an arrangement, and an apparatus for boron diffusion in a wafer. In one representative embodiment, a process is provided in which a boric oxide solution is applied to a surface of the wafer. Thereafter, the wafer is subjected to a fast heat ramp-up associated with a first heating cycle that results in a release of an amount of boron for diffusion into the wafer.

  8. Effects of different cooling treatments on water diffusion, microcirculation, and water content within exercised muscles: evaluation by magnetic resonance T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted imaging.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Osamu; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Fukubayashi, Toru

    2010-09-01

    In this study, we determined the effects of different cooling treatments on exercised muscles. Seven adults underwent four post-exercise treatments (20-min ice-bag application, 60-min gel-pack application at 10 degrees C and 17 degrees C, and non-cooling treatment) with at least 1 week between treatments. Magnetic resonance diffusion- and T2-weighted images were obtained to calculate the apparent diffusion coefficients (apparent diffusion coefficient 1, which reflects intramuscular water diffusion and microcirculation, and apparent diffusion coefficient 2, which is approximately equal to the true diffusion coefficient that excludes as much of the effect of intramuscular microcirculation as possible) and the T2 values (intramuscular water content level) of the ankle dorsiflexors, respectively, before and after ankle dorsiflexion exercise and after post-exercise treatment. The T2 values increased significantly after exercise and returned to pre-exercise values after each treatment; no significant differences were observed among the four post-exercise treatments. Both apparent diffusion coefficients also increased significantly after exercise and decreased significantly after the three cooling treatments; no significant difference was detected among the three cooling treatments. Local cooling suppresses both water diffusion and microcirculation within exercised muscles. Moreover, although the treatment time was longer, adequate cooling effects could be achieved using the gel-pack applications at relatively mild cooling temperatures.

  9. Adults Need Vaccines, Too!

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Adult Vaccinations Adults Need Vaccines, Too! Past Issues / Summer 2015 Table of Contents ... of the millions of adults not receiving the vaccines you need? What vaccines do you need? All ...

  10. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  11. Adult Day Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Adult Day Care Adult Day Care Centers are designed to provide care and ... adults who need assistance or supervision during the day. Programs offer relief to family members and caregivers, ...

  12. Adult Still's disease

    MedlinePlus

    Still's disease - adult; AOSD ... than 1 out of 100,000 people develop adult-onset Still's disease each year. It affects women more often than men. The cause of adult Still's disease is unknown. No risk factors for ...

  13. Diffusion in porous crystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Rajamani

    2012-04-21

    The design and development of many separation and catalytic process technologies require a proper quantitative description of diffusion of mixtures of guest molecules within porous crystalline materials. This tutorial review presents a unified, phenomenological description of diffusion inside meso- and micro-porous structures. In meso-porous materials, with pore sizes 2 nm < d(p) < 50 nm, there is a central core region where the influence of interactions of the molecules with the pore wall is either small or negligible; meso-pore diffusion is governed by a combination of molecule-molecule and molecule-pore wall interactions. Within micro-pores, with d(p) < 2 nm, the guest molecules are always under the influence of the force field exerted with the wall and we have to reckon with the motion of adsorbed molecules, and there is no "bulk" fluid region. The characteristics and physical significance of the self-, Maxwell-Stefan, and Fick diffusivities are explained with the aid of data obtained either from experiments or molecular dynamics simulations, for a wide variety of structures with different pore sizes and topology. The influence of adsorption thermodynamics, molecular clustering, and segregation on both magnitudes and concentration dependences of the diffusivities is highlighted. In mixture diffusion, correlations in molecular hops have the effect of slowing-down the more mobile species. The need for proper modeling of correlation effects using the Maxwell-Stefan formulation is stressed with the aid of examples of membrane separations and catalytic reactors.

  14. Gibbs Ringing in Diffusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Veraart, Jelle; Fieremans, Els; Jelescu, Ileana O.; Knoll, Florian; Novikov, Dmitry S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study and reduce the effect of Gibbs ringing artifact on computed diffusion parameters. Methods We reduce the ringing by extrapolating the k-space of each diffusion weighted image beyond the measured part by selecting an adequate regularization term. We evaluate several regularization terms and tune the regularization parameter to find the best compromise between anatomical accuracy of the reconstructed image and suppression of the Gibbs artifact. Results We demonstrate empirically and analytically that the Gibbs artifact, which is typically observed near sharp edges in magnetic resonance images, has a significant impact on the quantification of diffusion model parameters, even for infinitesimal diffusion weighting. We find the second order total generalized variation to be a good choice for the penalty term to regularize the extrapolation of the k-space, as it provides a parsimonious representation of images, a practically full suppression of Gibbs ringing, and the absence of staircasing artifacts typical for total variation methods. Conclusions Regularized extrapolation of the k-space data significantly reduces truncation artifacts without compromising spatial resolution in comparison to the default option of window filtering. In particular, accuracy of estimating diffusion tensor imaging and diffusion kurtosis imaging parameters improves so much that unconstrained fits become possible. PMID:26257388

  15. Diffusion MRI in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Mekkaoui, Choukri; Reese, Timothy G.; Jackowski, Marcel P.; Bhat, Himanshu

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion MRI provides unique information on the structure, organization, and integrity of the myocardium without the need for exogenous contrast agents. Diffusion MRI in the heart, however, has proven technically challenging because of the intrinsic non‐rigid deformation during the cardiac cycle, displacement of the myocardium due to respiratory motion, signal inhomogeneity within the thorax, and short transverse relaxation times. Recently developed accelerated diffusion‐weighted MR acquisition sequences combined with advanced post‐processing techniques have improved the accuracy and efficiency of diffusion MRI in the myocardium. In this review, we describe the solutions and approaches that have been developed to enable diffusion MRI of the heart in vivo, including a dual‐gated stimulated echo approach, a velocity‐ (M 1) or an acceleration‐ (M 2) compensated pulsed gradient spin echo approach, and the use of principal component analysis filtering. The structure of the myocardium and the application of these techniques in ischemic heart disease are also briefly reviewed. The advent of clinical MR systems with stronger gradients will likely facilitate the translation of cardiac diffusion MRI into clinical use. The addition of diffusion MRI to the well‐established set of cardiovascular imaging techniques should lead to new and complementary approaches for the diagnosis and evaluation of patients with heart disease. © 2015 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26484848

  16. Young Australian adults with NF1 have poor access to health care, high complication rates, and limited disease knowledge.

    PubMed

    Oates, Emily C; Payne, Jonathan M; Foster, Sheryl L; Clarke, Nigel F; North, Kathryn N

    2013-04-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a multisystem disease associated with a lifelong risk of debilitating and potentially life-limiting complications, however many adults with NF1 have no regular health surveillance. We interviewed and examined 17 young adults with NF1 between the ages of 25 and 33. Most had not been assessed for NF1-related complications within the previous 8 years, including patients with known serious vascular complications, for example, renal artery stenosis. Acute and/or chronic pain, particularly back and plexiform-related pain were common symptoms, and despite a significant impact on quality of life, was untreated in most instances. Symptom and examination-directed imaging revealed serious complications in 41% of the cohort. These included severe spinal cord compression (two cases), a highly SUV avid lesion suggestive of malignancy (one case), and a Juvenile Pilocytic Astrocytoma in a patient without any previous NF1-related complications. Few study participants had a good understanding of NF1, its associated risks and complications, and many had not sought appropriate medical advice as questions or problems arose. NF1-related cognitive deficits in some participants, and the lack of a clear source of expert medical advice for adults with NF1 likely contributed to poor health surveillance and management in this population. Overall, these findings suggest that many Australian adults with NF1 are at risk of serious and life-threatening medical complications, but are not accessing and receiving adequate health care. Access to multidisciplinary adult clinics that specialize in NF1 may address many of the unmet health needs of young adults with NF1.

  17. Diffusion MRI: Pitfalls, literature review and future directions of research in mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Delouche, Aurélie; Attyé, Arnaud; Heck, Olivier; Grand, Sylvie; Kastler, Adrian; Lamalle, Laurent; Renard, Felix; Krainik, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a leading cause of disability in adults, many of whom report a distressing combination of physical, emotional and cognitive symptoms, collectively known as post-concussion syndrome, that persist after the injury. Significant developments in magnetic resonance diffusion imaging, involving voxel-based quantitative analysis through the measurement of fractional anisotropy or mean diffusivity, have enhanced our knowledge on the different stages of mTBI pathophysiology. Other diffusion imaging-derived techniques, including diffusion kurtosis imaging with multi-shell diffusion and high-order tractography models, have recently demonstrated their usefulness in mTBI. Our review starts by briefly outlining the physical basis of diffusion tensor imaging including the pitfalls for use in brain trauma, before discussing findings from diagnostic trials testing its usefulness in assessing brain structural changes in patients with mTBI. Use of different post-processing techniques for the diffusion imaging data, identified the corpus callosum as the most frequently injured structure in mTBI, particularly at sub-acute and chronic stages, and a crucial location for evaluating functional outcome. However, structural changes appear too subtle for identification using traditional diffusion biomarkers, thus disallowing expansion of these techniques into clinical practice. In this regard, more advanced diffusion techniques are promising in the assessment of this complex disease.