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Sample records for adult donor cells

  1. Norovirus-Specific Memory T Cell Responses in Adult Human Donors

    PubMed Central

    Malm, Maria; Tamminen, Kirsi; Vesikari, Timo; Blazevic, Vesna

    2016-01-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis in people of all ages worldwide. NoV-specific serum antibodies which block the binding of NoV virus-like particles (VLPs) to the cell receptors have been thoroughly investigated. In contrast, only a few publications are available on the NoV capsid VP1 protein-specific T cell responses in humans naturally infected with the virus. Freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells of eight healthy adult human donors previously exposed to NoV were stimulated with purified VLPs derived from NoV GII.4-1999, GII.4-2012 (Sydney), and GI.3, and IFN-γ production was measured by an ELISPOT assay. In addition, 76 overlapping synthetic peptides spanning the entire 539-amino acid sequence of GII.4 VP1 were pooled into two-dimensional matrices and used to identify putative T cell epitopes. Seven of the eight subjects produced IFN-γ in response to the peptides and five subjects produced IFN-γ in response to the VLPs of the same origin. In general, stronger T cell responses were induced with the peptides in each donor compared to the VLPs. A CD8+ T cell epitope in the shell domain of the VP1 (134SPSQVTMFPHIIVDVRQL151) was identified in two subjects, both having human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A∗02:01 allele. To our knowledge, this is the first report using synthetic peptides to study NoV-specific T cell responses in human subjects and identify T cell epitopes. PMID:27752254

  2. Biological character of human adipose-derived adult stem cells and influence of donor age on cell replication in culture.

    PubMed

    Lei, Lei; Liao, WeiMing; Sheng, PuYi; Fu, Ming; He, AiShan; Huang, Gang

    2007-06-01

    To investigate the biological character of human adipose-derived adult stem cells (hADAS cells) when cultured in vitro and the relationship between hADAS cell's replication activity and the donor's age factor, and to assess the stem cells as a new source for tissue engineering. hADAS cells are isolated from human adipose tissue of different age groups (from adolescents to olds: <20 years old, 21-40 years old, 41-60 years old and >61 years old groups). The protein markers (CD29, CD34, CD44, CD45, CD49d, HLA-DR, CD106) of hADAS cells were detected by flow cytometry (FCM) to identify the stem cell, and the cell cycle was examined for P20 hADAS cells to evaluate the safety of the subculture in vitro. The generative activity of hADAS cells in different age groups was also examined by MTT method. The formula "TD = t x log2/logNt - logN0" was used to get the time doubling (TD) of the cells. The results showed that the cells kept heredity stabilization by chromosome analysis for at least 20 passages. The TD of these cells increased progressively by ageing, and the TD of the <20 years old group was lower than that of the >61 years old group (statistical analysis of variance (ANOVA), P=0.002, P<0.05). These findings suggested that a higher level of hADAS cells replication activity was found in the younger donators, and they represent novel and valuable seed cells for studies of tissue engineering.

  3. Alternative donors: cord blood for adults.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Annalisa

    2016-04-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a curative treatment for patients with hematological diseases. The probability of finding a human leukocyte antigen (HLA)- identical donor among family members is around 25% and 30% that of having a full matched unrelated donor in the registry. Patients in need may also benefit of a HLA-mismatched HSCT either from an haploidentical donors or from umbilical cord blood (UCB). Much has been learned about UCB transplant (UCBT) since the first human UCBT was performed back in 1988. Cord blood banks have been established worldwide for the collection, cryopreservation, and distribution of UCB for HSCT. Today, a global network of cord blood banks and transplant centers has been established with a large common inventory of more than 650,000 UCB units available, allowing for more than 40,000 UCBT worldwide in children and adults with severe hematological diseases. Several studies have been published on UCBT, assessing risk factors such as cell dose and HLA mismatch. Outcomes of several retrospective comparative studies showed similar results using other stem cell sources both in pediatric and adult setting. New strategies are ongoing to facilitate engraftment and reduce transplant-related mortality. In this issue, we review the current results of UCBT in adults with hematological malignancies and the clinical studies comparing UCBT with other transplant strategies. We provide guidelines for donor algorithm selection in UCBT setting.

  4. Autologous stem cell transplantation versus alternative allogeneic donor transplants in adult acute leukemias.

    PubMed

    Claude Gorin, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    The availability of alternative sources of stem cells including most recently T-replete haploidentical marrow or peripheral blood, and the increasing use of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC), renders feasible an allogeneic transplant to almost all patients with acute leukemia up to 70 years of age. Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for consolidation of complete remission (CR), however, offers in some circumstances an alternative option. Although associated with a higher relapse rate, autologous transplant benefits from a lower non-relapse mortality, the absence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and a better quality of life for long-term survivors. The recent use of intravenous busulfan (IVBU) with high-dose melphalan, better monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD), and maintenance therapy post autografting bring new interest. Few retrospective studies compared the outcome following alternative donor versus autologous transplants for remission consolidation. Genoidentical and phenoidentical allogeneic stem cell transplantations are undisputed gold standards, but there are no data showing the superiority of alternative allogeneic donor over autologous transplantation, at the time of undetectable MRD, in patients with good- and intermediate-1 risk acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1), acute promyelocytic leukemia in second complete remission (CR2), and Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). PMID:27000734

  5. Autologous stem cell transplantation versus alternative allogeneic donor transplants in adult acute leukemias.

    PubMed

    Claude Gorin, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    The availability of alternative sources of stem cells including most recently T-replete haploidentical marrow or peripheral blood, and the increasing use of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC), renders feasible an allogeneic transplant to almost all patients with acute leukemia up to 70 years of age. Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for consolidation of complete remission (CR), however, offers in some circumstances an alternative option. Although associated with a higher relapse rate, autologous transplant benefits from a lower non-relapse mortality, the absence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and a better quality of life for long-term survivors. The recent use of intravenous busulfan (IVBU) with high-dose melphalan, better monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD), and maintenance therapy post autografting bring new interest. Few retrospective studies compared the outcome following alternative donor versus autologous transplants for remission consolidation. Genoidentical and phenoidentical allogeneic stem cell transplantations are undisputed gold standards, but there are no data showing the superiority of alternative allogeneic donor over autologous transplantation, at the time of undetectable MRD, in patients with good- and intermediate-1 risk acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1), acute promyelocytic leukemia in second complete remission (CR2), and Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL).

  6. B-cell surface marker analysis for improvement of rituximab prophylaxis in ABO-incompatible adult living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Hiroto; Ohmori, Katsuyuki; Haga, Hironori; Tsuji, Hiroaki; Yurugi, Kimiko; Miyagawa-Hayashino, Aya; Oike, Fumitaka; Fukuda, Akinari; Yoshizawa, Jun; Takada, Yasutsugu; Tanaka, Koichi; Maekawa, Taira; Ozawa, Kazue; Uemoto, Shinji

    2007-04-01

    Although the effectiveness of rituximab has been reported in ABO blood group (ABO)-incompatible (ABO-I) organ transplantation, the protocol is not yet established. We studied the impact of the timing of rituximab prophylaxis and the humoral immune response of patients undergoing ABO-I living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), focusing on clinicopathological findings and the B-cell subset. From July 2003 to December 2005, 30 adult patients were treated with hepatic artery infusion (HAI) protocol without splenectomy for ABO-I LDLT. A total of 17 patients were treated only with HAI (no prophylaxis), and the other 13 were treated with rituximab prophylaxis at various times prior to transplantation. For B-cell study of the spleen, another 4 patients undergoing ABO-I LDLT both with HAI after prophylaxis and eventual splenectomy, and 3 patients with ABO-compatible LDLT with splenectomy were enrolled. The mortality of the 30 patients with HAI, without splenectomy, and with/without rituximab prophylaxis was 33% and the main cause of death was sepsis. Peripheral blood B cells were completely depleted, anti-donor blood-type antibody titer was lower, and clinical and pathological antibody-mediated rejection was not observed in patients with prophylaxis earlier than 7 days before transplantation (early prophylaxis). Early rituximab prophylaxis significantly depleted B cells and memory B cells in the spleen but not in lymph nodes. On the other hand, B cells and memory B cells increased and memory B cells became dominant during antibody-mediated rejection. In conclusion, early prophylaxis with rituximab depletes B cells, including memory B cells, in the spleen and is associated with a trend toward lower humoral rejection rates and lower peak immunoglobulin (Ig)G titers in ABO-I LDLT patients.

  7. Comparison of allogeneic stem cell transplantation from familial-mismatched/haploidentical donors and from unrelated donors in adults with high-risk acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cho, Byung-Sik; Yoon, Jae-Ho; Shin, Seung-Hwan; Yahng, Seung-Ah; Lee, Sung-Eun; Eom, Ki-Seong; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Lee, Seok; Min, Chang-Ki; Cho, Seok-Goo; Kim, Dong-Wook; Lee, Jong-Wook; Min, Woo-Sung; Park, Chong-Won; Kim, Hee-Je

    2012-10-01

    To weigh the pros and cons of familial-mismatched/haploidentical transplantation (FMT) in patients with high-risk acute myelogenous leukemia, we assessed outcomes of 23 patients who underwent FMT, using reduced-intensity conditioning with total body irradiation 800 cGy/busulfan/fludarabine/antithymocyte globulin without ex vivo T cell depletion, compared to 33 patients who underwent well-matched unrelated donor transplantation (WM-UDT) and 13 who underwent partially matched unrelated donor transplantation (PM-UDT) during the same period. The FMT patients had not only a similar pattern of engraftment and immune reconstitution as the WM-UDT and PM-UDT patients but also comparable incidences and severity of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease. The FMT patients did not experience any form of engraftment failure. However, the cumulative incidence of cytomegalovirus DNAemia was significantly higher in the FMT group compared with the other groups (P = .036). After a median follow-up of 28 months, overall survival, disease-free survival, relapse, and nonrelapse mortality were 83%, 74%, 20%, and 7%, respectively, for WM-UDT; 51%, 51%, 31%, and 18% for PM-UDT; and 66%, 64%, 26%, and 10% for FMT. This demonstrates a trend for favorable survival outcomes of WM-UDT over FMT and of FMT over PM-UDT. However, we found no significant statistical differences in survival according to donor type. These data need to be interpreted cautiously because of limited power calculations due to the small number of each donor group. This pilot study suggests the feasibility of FMT using our novel regimen with careful evaluation of CMV DNAemia compared with WM-UDT and PM-UDT. Further trials with larger numbers of patients, comparing FMT directly with transplantation with other donor types, are needed.

  8. A comparative study on efficiency of adult fibroblasts and amniotic fluid-derived stem cells as donor cells for production of hand-made cloned buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) embryos.

    PubMed

    Em, Sadeesh; Kataria, Meena; Shah, Fozia; Yadav, P S

    2016-08-01

    The efficiency of two cell types, namely adult fibroblasts, and amniotic fluid stem (AFS) cells as nuclear donor cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer by hand-made cloning in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) was compared. The in vitro expanded buffalo adult fibroblast cells showed a typical "S" shape growth curve with a doubling time of 40.8 h and stained positive for vimentin. The in vitro cultured undifferentiated AFS cells showed a doubling time of 33.2 h and stained positive for alkaline phosphatase, these cells were also found positive for undifferentiated embryonic stem cell markers like OCT-4, NANOG and SOX-2, which accentuate their pluripotent property. Further, when AFS cells were exposed to corresponding induction conditions, these cells differentiated into osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic lineages which was confirmed through alizaran, oil red O and alcian blue staining, respectively. Cultured adult fibroblasts and AFS cells of passages 10-15 and 8-12, respectively, were used as nuclear donors. A total of 94 embryos were reconstructed using adult fibroblast as donor cells with cleavage and blastocyst production rate of 62.8 ± 1.8 and 19.1 ± 1.5, respectively. An overall cleavage and blastocyst formation rate of 71.1 ± 1.2 and 29.9 ± 2.2 was obtained when 97 embryos were reconstructed using AFS cells as donor cells. There were no significant differences (P > 0.05) in reconstructed efficiency between the cloned embryos derived from two donor cells, whereas the results showed that there were significant differences (P < 0.05) in cleavage and blastocyst rates between the cloned embryos derived from two donor cell groups. Average total cell numbers for blastocyst generated using AFS cells (172.4 ± 5.8) was significantly (P < 0.05) higher than from adult fibroblasts (148.2 ± 6.1). This study suggests that the in vitro developmental potential of the cloned embryos derived from AFS cells were higher than that of the cloned embryos

  9. The Kupffer Cell Number Affects the Outcome of Living Donor Liver Transplantation from Elderly Donors

    PubMed Central

    Hidaka, Masaaki; Eguchi, Susumu; Takatsuki, Mitsuhisa; Soyama, Akihiko; Ono, Shinichiro; Adachi, Tomohiko; Natsuda, Koji; Kugiyama, Tota; Hara, Takanobu; Okada, Satomi; Imamura, Hajime; Miuma, Satoshi; Miyaaki, Hisamitsu

    2016-01-01

    Background There have been no previous reports how Kupffer cells affect the outcome of living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) with an elderly donor. The aim of this study was to elucidate the influence of Kupffer cells on LDLT. Methods A total of 161 adult recipients underwent LDLT. The graft survival, prognostic factors for survival, and graft failure after LDLT were examined between cases with a young donor (<50, n = 112) and an elderly donor (≥50, N = 49). The Kupffer cells, represented by CD68-positive cell in the graft, were examined in the young and elderly donors. Results In a multivariable analysis, a donor older than 50 years, sepsis, and diabetes mellitus were significant predictors of graft failure after LDLT. The CD68 in younger donors was significantly more expressed than that in elderly donors. The group with a less number of CD68-positive cells in the graft had a significantly poor survival in the elderly donor group and prognostic factor for graft failure. Conclusions The worse outcome of LDLT with elderly donors might be related to the lower number of Kupffer cells in the graft, which can lead to impaired recovery of the liver function and may predispose patients to infectious diseases after LDLT.

  10. Effects of Thy-1+ cell depletion on the capacity of donor lymphoid cells to induce tolerance across an entire MHC disparity in sublethally irradiated adult hosts

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, G.E.; Watts, L.M. )

    1989-08-01

    Thy-1+ cell depletion with anti-Thy-1.2 mAb and complement markedly reduced the capacity of C57BL/6J, H-2b bone marrow to establish mixed lymphoid chimerism and induce tolerance to C57BL/6J skin grafts across an entire MHC disparity in BALB/c, H-2d hosts conditioned with sublethal, fractionated 7.5 Gy total-body irradiation. In this model tolerance can be transferred to secondary irradiated BALB/c hosts only by cells of C57BL/6J donor, not host, genotype isolated from the spleens of tolerant hosts. Thy-1+ cell depletion abolished the capacity of C57BL/6J donor cells from tolerant BALB/c host spleens to transfer tolerance. The capacity of semiallogeneic BALB/c x C57BL/6J F1, H-2d/b donor BM and spleen cells to induce chimerism and tolerance to C57BL/6J skin grafts in BALB/c parental hosts was also reduced by Thy-1+ cell depletion. Thus the requirement for donor Thy-1+ cells cannot be explained simply on the basis of alloaggression. It is unlikely that the requisite Thy-1+ cells are nonspecific suppressor cells: Thy-1+ cell depletion had no effect on the slight but significant prolongation of third-party C3H/HeJ, H-2k skin grafts in irradiated BALB/c hosts injected with allogeneic C57BL/6J or semiallogeneic BALB/c x C57BL/6J F1 BM compared to irradiated controls injected with medium only. Furthermore, injections of semiallogeneic F1 spleen cells had no significant effect on the survival of the third-party grafts, although these cells were fully capable of inducing tolerance, and their capacity to induce tolerance was significantly reduced by Thy-1+ cell depletion. The requirement for a specific population of lymphoid cells, i.e. Thy-1+, remains unexplained but suggests that donor cells might play a role in the induction or maintenance of tolerance in this model other than merely providing a circulating source of donor antigens.

  11. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    MedlinePlus

    ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 359 359 Loading... ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  12. Comparison of in vitro developmental competence of cloned caprine embryos using donor karyoplasts from adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells vs ear fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Kwong, P J; Nam, H Y; Wan Khadijah, W E; Kamarul, T; Abdullah, R B

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to produce cloned caprine embryos using either caprine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or ear fibroblast cells (EFCs) as donor karyoplasts. Caprine MSCs were isolated from male Boer goats of an average age of 1.5 years. To determine the pluripotency of MSCs, the cells were induced to differentiate into osteocytes, chondrocytes and adipocytes. Subsequently, MSCs were characterized through cell surface antigen profiles using specific markers, prior to their use as donor karyoplasts for nuclear transfer. No significant difference (p > 0.05) in fusion rates was observed between MSCs (87.7%) and EFCs (91.3%) used as donor karyoplasts. The cleavage rate of cloned embryos derived with MSCs (87.0%) was similar (p > 0.05) to those cloned using EFCs (84.4%). However, the in vitro development of MSCs-derived cloned embryos (25.3%) to the blastocyst stage was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than those derived with EFCs (20.6%). In conclusion, MSCs could be reprogrammed by caprine oocytes, and production of cloned caprine embryos with MSCs improved their in vitro developmental competence, but not in their fusion and cleavage rate as compared to cloning using somatic cells such as EFCs. PMID:24456113

  13. T cell–depleted stem-cell transplantation for adults with hematologic malignancies: sustained engraftment of HLA-matched related donor grafts without the use of antithymocyte globulin

    PubMed Central

    Small, Trudy N.; Young, James W.; Kernan, Nancy A.; Castro-Malaspina, Hugo; Hsu, Katherine C.; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Collins, Nancy; Cisek, Christine; Chiu, Michelle; van den Brink, Marcel R. M.; O'Reilly, Richard J.; Papadopoulos, Esperanza B.

    2007-01-01

    Antithymocyte globulin (ATG) has been used in allogeneic stem-cell transplantation to prevent graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). Its use, however, has been associated with delayed T-cell reconstitution and prolonged susceptibility to opportunistic infections (OIs) especially in patients undergoing T cell–depleted (TCD) transplantation. Recently, a prospective trial was conducted in 52 adult patients (median age, 47 years) with various hematologic malignancies undergoing TCD transplantation from HLA-matched related donors without the use of ATG. The cytoreductive regimen consisted of hyperfractionated total body irradiation (HFTBI), thiotepa, and fludarabine. The preferred source of the graft was peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs). No additional graft rejection or GvHD prophylaxis was given. All evaluable patients engrafted without any immune-mediated graft rejections. Disease-free survival (DFS) at 3 years was 61% in all patients, and 70% in patients with standard-risk disease. Acute GvHD was limited to grade 2 in 8% and chronic GvHD in 9% of patients. Life-threatening OIs occurred in 3 of 52 patients and was fatal in 1. This study demonstrates durable engraftment with a low incidence of GvHD despite the lack of ATG, as well as the curative potential of this regimen. PMID:17717135

  14. [Living donor liver transplantation in adults].

    PubMed

    Neumann, U P; Neuhaus, P; Schmeding, M

    2010-09-01

    The worldwide shortage of adequate donor organs implies that living donor liver transplantation represents a valuable alternative to cadaveric transplantation. In addition to the complex surgical procedure the correct identification of eligible donors and recipients plays a decisive role in living donor liver transplantation. Donor safety must be of ultimate priority and overrules all other aspects involved. In contrast to the slightly receding numbers in Europe and North America, in recent years Asian programs have enjoyed constantly increasing living donor activity. The experience of the past 15 years has clearly demonstrated that technical challenges of both bile duct anastomosis and venous outflow of the graft significantly influence postoperative outcome. While short-term in-hospital morbidity remains increased compared to cadaveric transplantation, long-term survival of both graft and patient are comparable or even better than in deceased donor transplantation. Especially for patients expecting long waiting times under the MELD allocation system, living donor liver transplantation offers an excellent therapeutic alternative. Expanding the so-called "Milan criteria" for HCC patients with the option for living donor liver transplantation is currently being controversially debated.

  15. In Vitro and In Vivo Development of Horse Cloned Embryos Generated with iPSCs, Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Fetal or Adult Fibroblasts as Nuclear Donors

    PubMed Central

    Olivera, Ramiro; Moro, Lucia Natalia; Jordan, Roberto; Luzzani, Carlos; Miriuka, Santiago; Radrizzani, Martin; Donadeu, F. Xavier; Vichera, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    The demand for equine cloning as a tool to preserve high genetic value is growing worldwide; however, nuclear transfer efficiency is still very low. To address this issue, we first evaluated the effects of time from cell fusion to activation (<1h, n = 1261; 1-2h, n = 1773; 2-3h, n = 1647) on in vitro and in vivo development of equine embryos generated by cloning. Then, we evaluated the effects of using different nuclear donor cell types in two successive experiments: I) induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) vs. adult fibroblasts (AF) fused to ooplasts injected with the pluripotency-inducing genes OCT4, SOX2, MYC and KLF4, vs. AF alone as controls; II) umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (UC-MSCs) vs. fetal fibroblasts derived from an unborn cloned foetus (FF) vs. AF from the original individual. In the first experiment, both blastocyst production and pregnancy rates were higher in the 2-3h group (11.5% and 9.5%, respectively), respect to <1h (5.2% and 2%, respectively) and 1-2h (5.6% and 4.7%, respectively) groups (P<0.05). However, percentages of born foals/pregnancies were similar when intervals of 2-3h (35.2%) or 1-2h (35.7%) were used. In contrast to AF, the iPSCs did not generate any blastocyst-stage embryos. Moreover, injection of oocytes with the pluripotency-inducing genes did not improve blastocyst production nor pregnancy rates respect to AF controls. Finally, higher blastocyst production was obtained using UC-MSC (15.6%) than using FF (8.9%) or AF (9.3%), (P<0.05). Despite pregnancy rates were similar for these 3 groups (17.6%, 18.2% and 22%, respectively), viable foals (two) were obtained only by using FF. In summary, optimum blastocyst production rates can be obtained using a 2-3h interval between cell fusion and activation as well as using UC-MSCs as nuclear donors. Moreover, FF line can improve the efficiency of an inefficient AF line. Overall, 24 healthy foals were obtained from a total of 29 born foals. PMID:27732616

  16. Responses to recipient and donor B cells by genetically donor T cells from human haploidentical chimeras

    SciTech Connect

    Schiff, S.; Sampson, H.; Buckley, R.

    1986-03-01

    Following administration of haploidentical stem cells to infants with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), mature T cells of donor karyotype appear later in the recipient without causing graft-versus-host disease. To investigate the effect of the host environment on the responsiveness of these genetically donor T cells, blood B and T lymphocytes from 6 SCID recipients, their parental donors and unrelated controls were purified by double SRBC rosetting. T cells were stimulated by irradiated B cells at a 1:1 ratio in 6 day cultures. Engrafted T cells of donor karyotype gave much smaller responses to irradiated genetically recipient B cells than did fresh donor T cells. Moreover, engrafted T cells of donor karyotype from two of the three SCIDs who are longest post-transplantation responded more vigorously (14,685 and 31,623 cpm) than fresh donor T cells (5141 and 22,709 cpm) to donor B cells. These data indicate that T lymphocytes which have matured from donor stem cells in the recipient microenvironment behave differently from those that have matured in the donor.

  17. Donor Safety in Adult-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation: A Single-Center Experience of 356 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Haipeng; Yang, Jiayin; Yan, Lunan

    2016-01-01

    Background As an important means to tackle the worldwide shortage of liver grafts, adult-adult living donor liver transplantation (A-ALDLT) is the most massive operation a healthy person could undergo, so donor safety is of prime importance. However, most previous research focused on recipients, while complications in donors have not been fully described or investigated. Material/Methods To investigate donor safety in terms of postoperative complications, the clinical data of 356 A-ALDLT donors in our center from January 2002 to September 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. These patients were divided into a pre-2008 group (before January 2008) and a post-2008 group (after January 2008). Donor safety was evaluated with regard to the type, frequency, and severity of postoperative complications. Results There were no donor deaths in our center during this period. The overall complication rate was 23.0% (82/356). The proportion of Clavien I, II, III, and IV complications was 51.2% (42/82), 25.6% (21/82), 22.0% (18/82), and 1.2% (1/82), respectively. In all the donors, the incidence of Clavien I, II, III, and IV complications was 11.8% (42/356), 5.9% (21/356), 5.1% (18/356), and 0.3% (1/356), respectively. The overall complication rate in the post-2008 group was significantly lower than that in the pre-2008 group (18.1% (41/227) vs. 32.6% (42/129), P<0.01). Biliary complications were the most common, with an incidence of 8.4% (30/356). Conclusions The risk to A-ALDLT donors is controllable and acceptable with improvement in preoperative assessment and liver surgery. PMID:27178367

  18. Simulation shows that HLA-matched stem cell donors can remain unidentified in donor searches.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Jürgen; Solloch, Ute V; Giani, Anette S; Hofmann, Jan A; Schmidt, Alexander H

    2016-01-01

    The heterogeneous nature of HLA information in real-life stem cell donor registries may hamper unrelated donor searches. It is even possible that fully HLA-matched donors with incomplete HLA information are not identified. In our simulation study, we estimated the probability of these unnecessarily failed donor searches. For that purpose, we carried out donor searches in several virtual donor registries. The registries differed by size, composition with respect to HLA typing levels, and genetic diversity. When up to three virtual HLA typing requests were allowed within donor searches, the share of unnecessarily failed donor searches ranged from 1.19% to 4.13%, thus indicating that non-identification of completely HLA-matched stem cell donors is a problem of practical relevance. The following donor registry characteristics were positively correlated with the share of unnecessarily failed donor searches: large registry size, high genetic diversity, and, most strongly correlated, large fraction of registered donors with incomplete HLA typing. Increasing the number of virtual HLA typing requests within donor searches up to ten had a smaller effect. It follows that the problem of donor non-identification can be substantially reduced by complete high-resolution HLA typing of potential donors.

  19. Simulation shows that HLA-matched stem cell donors can remain unidentified in donor searches

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, Jürgen; Solloch, Ute V.; Giani, Anette S.; Hofmann, Jan A.; Schmidt, Alexander H.

    2016-01-01

    The heterogeneous nature of HLA information in real-life stem cell donor registries may hamper unrelated donor searches. It is even possible that fully HLA-matched donors with incomplete HLA information are not identified. In our simulation study, we estimated the probability of these unnecessarily failed donor searches. For that purpose, we carried out donor searches in several virtual donor registries. The registries differed by size, composition with respect to HLA typing levels, and genetic diversity. When up to three virtual HLA typing requests were allowed within donor searches, the share of unnecessarily failed donor searches ranged from 1.19% to 4.13%, thus indicating that non-identification of completely HLA-matched stem cell donors is a problem of practical relevance. The following donor registry characteristics were positively correlated with the share of unnecessarily failed donor searches: large registry size, high genetic diversity, and, most strongly correlated, large fraction of registered donors with incomplete HLA typing. Increasing the number of virtual HLA typing requests within donor searches up to ten had a smaller effect. It follows that the problem of donor non-identification can be substantially reduced by complete high-resolution HLA typing of potential donors. PMID:26876789

  20. Effects of the time interval between fusion and activation on in vitro rabbit nuclear transfer efficiency when nuclear donor cells are derived from older adults.

    PubMed

    Cervera, R P; Garcia-Ximénez, F

    2004-05-01

    Cloning older adult rabbits can serve as a model in animal breeding, biodiversity preservation and in human therapeutic cloning. To establish the required exposure time of fibroblasts from these kind of animals to reprogramming factors, in the present study three different time intervals between fusion and activation were tested (30 min, 30-ADF group; 60 min, 60-ADF group; and 90 min, 90-ADF group). Vitrified epithelial fibroblasts derived from four older adult rabbit females (D1, D2, D3 and D4) and cultured from passages 0 to 4 were used as nuclear donors. Nuclear status of reconstructed embryos was not evaluated. No differences were observed in blastocyst rate (30-ADF 21% vs 60-ADF 19% vs 90-ADF 18%). Differences in hatching rates did not reach significance (30-ADF 11% vs 60-ADF 18% vs 90-ADF 18%). However, in the 60- and 90-ADF groups, embryos reached the blastocyst stage earlier than in the 30-ADF group (day 4: 40% and 50% vs 8%; p > 0.05). Moreover, the quality of blastocysts (good vs poor) was lower in the 30-ADF group (good: 30-ADF 38% vs 60-ADF 90% vs 90-ADF 90%; p > 0.05). Overall, these results suggest an unfavourable effect of the shortest exposure time tested (30 min). Differences between specimen origins were detected (blastocyst and hatching rates: D2 (26%; 25%) and D4 (25%; 27%) vs D1 (10%; 11%) and D3 (12%; 12%)), but significance were not reached. Effect of culture passage was not detected in any parameter studied. PMID:15460108

  1. Donor T Cells After Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood

  2. Pediatric donor cell leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in AML patient from related donor.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla-Morales, Lucina; Pimentel-Gutiérrez, Helia J; Gallegos-Castorena, Sergio; Paniagua-Padilla, Jenny A; Ortega-de-la-Torre, Citlalli; Sánchez-Zubieta, Fernando; Silva-Cruz, Rocio; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; Zepeda-Moreno, Abraham; González-Ramella, Oscar; Corona-Rivera, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a male patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) initially diagnosed as M5 and with karyotype 46,XY. After induction therapy, he underwent a HLA-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and six years later he relapsed as AML M1 with an abnormal karyotype //47,XX,+10[2]/47,XX,+11[3]/48,XX,+10,+11[2]/46,XX[13]. Based on this, we tested the possibility of donor cell origin by FISH and molecular STR analysis. We found no evidence of Y chromosome presence by FISH and STR analysis consistent with the success of the allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from the female donor. FISH studies confirmed trisomies and no evidence of MLL translocation either p53 or ATM deletion. Additionally 28 fusion common leukemia transcripts were evaluated by multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay and were not rearranged. STR analysis showed a complete donor chimerism. Thus, donor cell leukemia (DCL) was concluded, being essential the use of cytological and molecular approaches. Pediatric DCL is uncommon, our patient seems to be the sixth case and additionally it presented a late donor cell leukemia appearance. Different extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms have been considered to explain this uncommon finding as well as the implications to the patient. PMID:25674158

  3. Pediatric donor cell leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in AML patient from related donor.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla-Morales, Lucina; Pimentel-Gutiérrez, Helia J; Gallegos-Castorena, Sergio; Paniagua-Padilla, Jenny A; Ortega-de-la-Torre, Citlalli; Sánchez-Zubieta, Fernando; Silva-Cruz, Rocio; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; Zepeda-Moreno, Abraham; González-Ramella, Oscar; Corona-Rivera, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a male patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) initially diagnosed as M5 and with karyotype 46,XY. After induction therapy, he underwent a HLA-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and six years later he relapsed as AML M1 with an abnormal karyotype //47,XX,+10[2]/47,XX,+11[3]/48,XX,+10,+11[2]/46,XX[13]. Based on this, we tested the possibility of donor cell origin by FISH and molecular STR analysis. We found no evidence of Y chromosome presence by FISH and STR analysis consistent with the success of the allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from the female donor. FISH studies confirmed trisomies and no evidence of MLL translocation either p53 or ATM deletion. Additionally 28 fusion common leukemia transcripts were evaluated by multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay and were not rearranged. STR analysis showed a complete donor chimerism. Thus, donor cell leukemia (DCL) was concluded, being essential the use of cytological and molecular approaches. Pediatric DCL is uncommon, our patient seems to be the sixth case and additionally it presented a late donor cell leukemia appearance. Different extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms have been considered to explain this uncommon finding as well as the implications to the patient.

  4. Remuneration of hematopoietic stem cell donors: principles and perspective of the World Marrow Donor Association.

    PubMed

    Boo, Michael; van Walraven, Suzanna M; Chapman, Jeremy; Lindberg, Brian; Schmidt, Alexander H; Shaw, Bronwen E; Switzer, Galen E; Yang, Edward; Egeland, Torstein

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a curative procedure for life-threatening hematologic diseases. Donation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from an unrelated donor, frequently residing in another country, may be the only option for 70% of those in need of unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To maximize the opportunity to find the best available donor, individual donor registries collaborate internationally. To provide homogeneity of practice among registries, the World Marrow Donor Association (WMDA) sets standards against which registries are accredited and provides guidance and regulations about unrelated donor safety and care. A basic tenet of the donor registries is that unrelated HSC donation is an altruistic act; nonpayment of donors is entrenched in the WMDA standards and in international practice. In the United States, the prohibition against remuneration of donors has recently been challenged. Here, we describe the reasons that the WMDA continues to believe that HSC donors should not be paid because of ethical concerns raised by remuneration, potential to damage the public will to act altruistically, the potential for coercion and exploitation of donors, increased risk to patients, harm to local transplantation programs and international stem cell exchange, and the possibility of benefiting some patients while disadvantaging others.

  5. Transplantation and differentiation of donor cells in the cloned pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Arata; Tomii, Ryo; Kano, Koichiro; Nagashima, Hiroshi . E-mail: hnagas@isc.meiji.ac.jp

    2006-06-02

    The application of nuclear transfer technology is an interesting approach to investigate stem and progenitor cell transplantation therapy. If stem cells are used as a nuclear donor, donor cells can engraft into cloned animals without histocompatible problems. However, it is still uncertain whether donor cells can engraft to cloned animal and differentiate in vivo. To address this problem, we transplanted donor cells to dermal tissues of cloned pigs developed by using preadipocytes as donor cells. Preadipocytes are adipocytic progenitor which can differentiate to mature adipocytes in vitro. We showed that the donor preadipocytes were successfully transplanted into the cloned pigs without immune rejection and they differentiated into mature adipocytes in vivo 3 weeks after transplantation. In contrast, allogenic control preadipocytes, which can differentiate in vitro, did not differentiate in vivo. These results indicate that donor progenitor cells can differentiate in cloned animal.

  6. Directed blood donor program decreases donor exposure for children with sickle cell disease requiring chronic transfusion.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D O; Covert, B; Lindsey, T; Edwards, V; McLaughlin, L; Theus, J; Wray, R J; Jupka, K; Baker, D; Robbins, M; DeBaun, M R

    2012-01-01

    In children with sickle cell disease (SCD), primary and secondary prevention of strokes require indefinite regular blood transfusion therapy. The risks associated with repeated transfusions include alloimmunization and increased donor exposure. The Charles Drew Program is a directed blood donor program designed to lower donor exposure, decreasing the associated complications of transfusion; however, no evidence exists demonstrating the magnitude of the benefit to the recipient. Further, the use of extended red blood cell (RBC) antigen matching for C, E, and K has been well documented in a clinical trial setting but not extensively evaluated in a standard care setting. The goal of this study is to assess the effectiveness in reducing alloimmunization when matching for C, E, and K and the magnitude of the decrease in donor exposure in a directed blood donor program. The rate of alloimmunization and reduction of donor exposure were determined during the course of 1 year in a cohort of children with SCD who received regular directed donor blood transfusions. A total of 24 recipients were in the program, 16 females and 8 males, 4 to 20 years of age. During 2008, alloimmunization was 0 percent and donor exposure was reduced by 20 percent, compared with usual care. Extended RBC antigen matching has the same benefit as in a clinical trial setting for patients with SCD receiving blood transfusion therapy. Despite significant effort, we only achieved a modest decrease in donor exposure and cannot determine the immediate benefit of a directed blood donor program.

  7. A model of donors' decision-making in adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation in Japan: having no choice.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Misao; Akabayashi, Akira; Slingsby, Brian Taylor; Kosugi, Shinji; Fujimoto, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Koichi

    2006-05-01

    This study examined the decision-making processes of donors in adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation. Twenty-two donors were interviewed using a semi-structured format. Interview contents were transcribed verbatim and analyzed qualitatively using grounded theory. A decision-making model was developed consisting of 5 stages: (1) recognition, (2) digestion, (3) decision-making, (4) reinforcement, and (5) resolution. The second and the third stages described donors' experiences of "reaching a decision"; the fourth and fifth stages described those of "facing transplantation." The central theme of this model was "having no choice," which consisted of 4 codes: (1) priority of life, (2) only LDLT, (3) for family, and (4) only me. In conclusion, this model can help health care professionals to understand the donor experience and, based on that understanding, to provide sufficient support to the donor.

  8. Effects of donor cells' sex on nuclear transfer efficiency and telomere lengths of cloned goats.

    PubMed

    Liu, H-J; Peng, H; Hu, C-C; Li, X-Y; Zhang, J-L; Zheng, Z; Zhang, W-C

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of donor cells' sex on nuclear transfer efficiency and telomere length of cloned goats from adult skin fibroblast cells. The telomere length of somatic cell cloned goats and their offspring was determined by measuring their mean terminal restriction fragment (TRF) length. The result showed that (i) reconstructed embryos with fibroblast cells from males Boer goats obtained significantly higher kids rate and rate of live kids than those of female embryos and (ii) the telomere lengths of four female cloned goats were shorter compared to their donor cells, but five male cloned goats had the same telomere length with their donor cells, mainly due to great variation existed among them. The offspring from female cloned goats had the same telomere length with their age-matched counterparts. In conclusion, the donor cells' sex had significant effects on nuclear transfer efficiency and telomere lengths of cloned goats.

  9. Effects of donor cells' sex on nuclear transfer efficiency and telomere lengths of cloned goats.

    PubMed

    Liu, H-J; Peng, H; Hu, C-C; Li, X-Y; Zhang, J-L; Zheng, Z; Zhang, W-C

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of donor cells' sex on nuclear transfer efficiency and telomere length of cloned goats from adult skin fibroblast cells. The telomere length of somatic cell cloned goats and their offspring was determined by measuring their mean terminal restriction fragment (TRF) length. The result showed that (i) reconstructed embryos with fibroblast cells from males Boer goats obtained significantly higher kids rate and rate of live kids than those of female embryos and (ii) the telomere lengths of four female cloned goats were shorter compared to their donor cells, but five male cloned goats had the same telomere length with their donor cells, mainly due to great variation existed among them. The offspring from female cloned goats had the same telomere length with their age-matched counterparts. In conclusion, the donor cells' sex had significant effects on nuclear transfer efficiency and telomere lengths of cloned goats. PMID:27558653

  10. How to select the best available related or unrelated donor of hematopoietic stem cells?

    PubMed Central

    Tiercy, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Recognition of HLA incompatibilities by the immune system represents a major barrier to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. HLA genotypically identical sibling donors are, therefore, the gold standard for transplantation purposes, but only 30% patients have such a donor. For the remaining 70% patients alternative sources of stem cells are a matched unrelated adult volunteer donor, a haploidentical donor or a cord blood unit. The definition of ‘HLA matching’ depends on the level of resolution and on which loci are tested. The development of HLA molecular typing technologies and the availability of more than 27 million donors in the international database has greatly facilitated unrelated donor searches. The gold standard is high resolution typing at the HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, and -DQB1 loci (10/10 match). Single disparities for HLA-A, -B, - C, or -DRB1 are associated with increased risk of post-transplant complications, but less so in patients with advanced disease, and in those undergoing T-cell-depleted allografting. HLA-DQB1 mismatches seem to be better tolerated and some HLA-C, -DRB1 and -DPB1 disparities are potentially less immunogenic. HLA typing by next-generation sequencing methods is likely to change matching algorithms by providing full sequence information on all HLA loci in a single step. In most European populations a 10/10 matched donor can be found for at least 50% of patients and an additional 20–30% patients may have a 9/10 matched donor. Genetic factors that help in identifying donors with less immunogenic mismatches are discussed. Haploidentical donors are increasingly used as an alternative source of stem cells for those patients lacking a matched unrelated donor. PMID:27252513

  11. Donor Natural Killer Cells After Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Advanced Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-18

    Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  12. Computer applications in the search for unrelated stem cell donors.

    PubMed

    Müller, Carlheinz R

    2002-08-01

    The majority of patients which are eligible for a blood stem cell transplantation from an allogeneic donor do not have a suitable related donor so that an efficient unrelated donor search is a prerequisite for this treatment. Currently, there are over 7 million volunteer donors in the files of 50 registries in the world and in most countries the majority of transplants are performed from a foreign donor. Evidently, computer and communication technology must play a crucial role in the complex donor search process on the national and international level. This article describes the structural elements of the donor search process and discusses major systematic and technical issues to be addressed in the development and evolution of the supporting telematic systems. The theoretical considerations are complemented by a concise overview over the current state of the art which is given by describing the scope, relevance, interconnection and technical background of three major national and international computer appliances: The German Marrow Donor Information System (GERMIS) and the European Marrow Donor Information System (EMDIS) are interoperable business-to-business e-commerce systems and Bone Marrow Donors World Wide (BMDW) is the basic international donor information desk on the web. PMID:12216954

  13. Computer applications in the search for unrelated stem cell donors.

    PubMed

    Müller, Carlheinz R

    2002-08-01

    The majority of patients which are eligible for a blood stem cell transplantation from an allogeneic donor do not have a suitable related donor so that an efficient unrelated donor search is a prerequisite for this treatment. Currently, there are over 7 million volunteer donors in the files of 50 registries in the world and in most countries the majority of transplants are performed from a foreign donor. Evidently, computer and communication technology must play a crucial role in the complex donor search process on the national and international level. This article describes the structural elements of the donor search process and discusses major systematic and technical issues to be addressed in the development and evolution of the supporting telematic systems. The theoretical considerations are complemented by a concise overview over the current state of the art which is given by describing the scope, relevance, interconnection and technical background of three major national and international computer appliances: The German Marrow Donor Information System (GERMIS) and the European Marrow Donor Information System (EMDIS) are interoperable business-to-business e-commerce systems and Bone Marrow Donors World Wide (BMDW) is the basic international donor information desk on the web.

  14. Medicine. Consent from donors for embryo and stem cell research.

    PubMed

    Lo, Bernard; Chou, Vicki; Cedars, Marcelle I; Gates, Elena; Taylor, Robert N; Wagner, Richard M; Wolf, Leslie; Yamamoto, Keith R

    2003-08-15

    As research with human embryos and embryonic stem cells proceeds, the authors of this Policy Forum argue that all donors of biological materials should give informed consent, including oocyte and sperm donors. Informed consent is particularly important because of the diverse opinions and strong emotions that surround such research. Some gamete donors who are willing to help women and couples bear children may object to the use of their genetic materials for certain types of research.

  15. Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis in healthy blood donors: an unexpectedly common finding.

    PubMed

    Shim, Youn K; Rachel, Jane M; Ghia, Paolo; Boren, Jeff; Abbasi, Fatima; Dagklis, Antonis; Venable, Geri; Kang, Jiyeon; Degheidy, Heba; Plapp, Fred V; Vogt, Robert F; Menitove, Jay E; Marti, Gerald E

    2014-02-27

    Circulating monoclonal B cells may be detected in healthy adults, a condition called monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL). MBL has also been identified in donated blood, but no systematic study of blood donors has been reported. Using sensitive and specific laboratory methods, we detected MBL in 149 (7.1%; 95% confidence interval, 6.0% to 8.3%) of 2098 unique donors ages 45 years or older in a Midwestern US regional blood center between 2010 and 2011. Most of the 149 donors had low-count MBL, including 99 chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like (66.4%), 22 atypical (14.8%), and 19 CD5(-) (12.8%) immunophenotypes. However, 5 donors (3.4%) had B-cell clonal counts above 500 cells per µL, including 3 with 1693 to 2887 cells per µL; the clone accounted for nearly all their circulating B cells. Four donors (2.7%) had 2 distinct MBL clones. Of 51 MBL samples in which immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH)V-D-J genotypes could be determined, 71% and 29% used IGHV3- and IGHV4-family genes, respectively. Sequencing revealed 82% with somatic hypermutation, whereas 18% had >98% germ-line identity, including 5 with entirely germ-line sequences. In conclusion, MBL prevalence is much higher in blood donors than previously reported, and although uncommon, the presence of high-count MBL warrants further investigations to define the biological fate of the transfused cells in recipients.

  16. Related hematopoietic cell donor care: is there a role for unrelated donor registries?

    PubMed

    Anthias, C; van Walraven, S M; Sørensen, B S; de Faveri, G N; Fechter, M; Cornish, J; Bacigalupo, A; Müller, C; Boo, M; Shaw, B E

    2015-05-01

    In almost half of allogeneic hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) transplants, a related donor (RD) is used, yet a lack of standardized guidelines means that their care is heterogeneous. Changes to regulatory standards aim to improve uniformity, but adherence to these regulations can prove logistically difficult for the transplant centers (TCs) managing RDs. Discussion has ensued around possible alternative models of related donor care and a session at the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) annual meeting in 2013 debated the question of whether a role exists for unrelated donor registries in the management of 'related' donors. In this overview, we discuss the issues raised at this debate and the pros and cons of donor registry involvement in various aspects of RD management. By examining existing models of related donor care that have been adopted by members of the World Marrow Donor Association (WMDA), we look for ways to enhance and homogenize RD care, while also enabling transplant centers to meet standards required for mandatory accreditation.

  17. BSHI Guideline: HLA matching and donor selection for haematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Little, A-M; Green, A; Harvey, J; Hemmatpour, S; Latham, K; Marsh, S G E; Poulton, K; Sage, D

    2016-10-01

    A review of the British Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics (BSHI) "Guideline for selection and HLA matching of related, adult unrelated donors and umbilical cord units for haematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation" was undertaken by a BSHI appointed writing committee. Literature searches were performed, and the data extracted were presented as recommendations according to the GRADE nomenclature. PMID:27503599

  18. Preoperative Thromboelastometry as a Predictor of Transfusion Requirements during Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fayed, Nirmeen; Mourad, Wessam; Yassen, Khaled; Görlinger, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Background The ability to predict transfusion requirements may improve perioperative bleeding management as an integral part of a patient blood management program. Therefore, the aim of our study was to evaluate preoperative thromboelastometry as a predictor of transfusion requirements for adult living donor liver transplant recipients. Methods The correlation between preoperative thromboelastometry variables in 100 adult living donor liver transplant recipients and intraoperative blood transfusion requirements was examined by univariate and multivariate linear regression analysis. Thresholds of thromboelastometric parameters for prediction of packed red blood cells (PRBCs), fresh frozen plasma (FFP), platelets, and cryoprecipitate transfusion requirements were determined with receiver operating characteristics analysis. The attending anesthetists were blinded to the preoperative thromboelastometric analysis. However, a thromboelastometry-guided transfusion algorithm with predefined trigger values was used intraoperatively. The transfusion triggers in this algorithm did not change during the study period. Results Univariate analysis confirmed significant correlations between PRBCs, FFP, platelets or cryoprecipitate transfusion requirements and most thromboelastometric variables. Backward stepwise logistic regression indicated that EXTEM coagulation time (CT), maximum clot firmness (MCF) and INTEM CT, clot formation time (CFT) and MCF are independent predictors for PRBC transfusion. EXTEM CT, CFT and FIBTEM MCF are independent predictors for FFP transfusion. Only EXTEM and INTEM MCF were independent predictors of platelet transfusion. EXTEM CFT and MCF, INTEM CT, CFT and MCF as well as FIBTEM MCF are independent predictors for cryoprecipitate transfusion. Thromboelastometry-based regression equation accounted for 63% of PRBC, 83% of FFP, 61% of cryoprecipitate, and 44% of platelet transfusion requirements. Conclusion Preoperative thromboelastometric analysis is

  19. Adoptive T-cell immunotherapy from third-party donors: characterization of donors and set up of a T-cell donor registry

    PubMed Central

    Eiz-Vesper, Britta; Maecker-Kolhoff, Britta; Blasczyk, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Infection with and reactivation of human cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and adenovirus (ADV) are frequent and severe complications in immunocompromised recipients after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) or solid organ transplantation (SOT). These serious adverse events are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Donor lymphocyte infusions (DLIs) are often used to treat both viral infections and leukemia relapses after transplantation but are associated with potentially life-threatening graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). Adoptive immunotherapy with virus-specific cytotoxic effector T cells (CTLs) derived from seropositive donors can rapidly reconstitute antiviral immunity after HSCT and organ transplantation. Therefore, it can effectively prevent the clinical manifestation of these viruses with no significant acute toxicity or increased risk of GvHD. In conditions, where patients receiving an allogeneic cord blood (CB) transplant or a transplant from a virus-seronegative donor and since donor blood is generally not available for solid organ recipients, allogeneic third party T-cell donors would offer an alternative option. Recent studies showed that during granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilization, the functional activity of antiviral memory T cells is impaired for a long period. This finding suggests that even stem cell donors may not be the best source of T cells. Under these circumstances, partially human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched virus-specific CTLs from healthy seropositive individuals may be a promising option. Therefore, frequency assessments of virus-specific memory T cells in HLA-typed healthy donors as well as in HSCT/SOT donors using a high throughput T-cell assay were performed over a period of 4 years at Hannover Medical School. This chapter will address the relevance and potential of a third-party T-cell donor registry and will discuss its clinical implication for adoptive T-cell

  20. A New Approximate Chimera Donor Cell Search Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop chimera-based full potential methodology which is compatible with overflow (Euler/Navier-Stokes) chimera flow solver and to develop a fast donor cell search algorithm that is compatible with the chimera full potential approach. Results of this work included presenting a new donor cell search algorithm suitable for use with a chimera-based full potential solver. This algorithm was found to be extremely fast and simple producing donor cells as fast as 60,000 per second.

  1. Mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in cloned cattle produced by fetal and adult cell cloning.

    PubMed

    Steinborn, R; Schinogl, P; Zakhartchenko, V; Achmann, R; Schernthaner, W; Stojkovic, M; Wolf, E; Müller, M; Brem, G

    2000-07-01

    Mammals have been cloned from adult donor cells. Here we report the first cases of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) heteroplasmy in adult mammalian clones generated from fetal and adult donor cells. The heteroplasmic clones included a healthy cattle equivalent of the sheep Dolly, for which a lack of heteroplasmy was reported.

  2. Mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in cloned cattle produced by fetal and adult cell cloning.

    PubMed

    Steinborn, R; Schinogl, P; Zakhartchenko, V; Achmann, R; Schernthaner, W; Stojkovic, M; Wolf, E; Müller, M; Brem, G

    2000-07-01

    Mammals have been cloned from adult donor cells. Here we report the first cases of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) heteroplasmy in adult mammalian clones generated from fetal and adult donor cells. The heteroplasmic clones included a healthy cattle equivalent of the sheep Dolly, for which a lack of heteroplasmy was reported. PMID:10888867

  3. An Algorithm Measuring Donor Cell-Free DNA in Plasma of Cellular and Solid Organ Transplant Recipients That Does Not Require Donor or Recipient Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Paul M. K.; Khan, Aneal; Sajid, Umair; Chang, Nicholas; Suresh, Varun; Dimnik, Leo; Lamont, Ryan E.; Parboosingh, Jillian S.; Martin, Steven R.; Pon, Richard T.; Weatherhead, Jene; Wegener, Shelly; Isaac, Debra; Greenway, Steven C.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) has significant potential in the diagnosis and monitoring of clinical conditions. However, accurately and easily distinguishing the relative proportion of DNA molecules in a mixture derived from two different sources (i.e., donor and recipient tissues after transplantation) is challenging. In human cellular transplantation, there is currently no useable method to detect in vivo engraftment, and blood-based non-invasive tests for allograft rejection in solid organ transplantation are either non-specific or absent. Elevated levels of donor cfDNA have been shown to correlate with solid organ rejection, but complex methodology limits implementation of this promising biomarker. We describe a cost-effective method to quantify donor cfDNA in recipient plasma using a panel of high-frequency single nucleotide polymorphisms, next-generation (semiconductor) sequencing, and a novel mixture model algorithm. In vitro, our method accurately and rapidly determined donor:recipient DNA admixture. For in vivo testing, donor cfDNA was serially quantified in an infant with a urea cycle disorder after receiving six daily infusions of donor liver cells. Donor cfDNA isolated from 1 to 2 ml of recipient plasma was detected as late as 24 weeks after infusion suggesting engraftment. The percentage of circulating donor cfDNA was also assessed in pediatric and adult heart transplant recipients undergoing routine endomyocardial biopsy with levels observed to be stable over time and generally measuring <1% in cases without moderate or severe cellular rejection. Unlike existing non-invasive methods used to define the proportion of donor cfDNA in solid organ transplant patients, our assay does not require sex mismatch, donor genotyping, or whole-genome sequencing and potentially has broad application to detect cellular engraftment or allograft injury after transplantation. PMID:27713880

  4. Living donor liver transplantation in an adult patient with situs inversus totalis

    PubMed Central

    Yankol, Yücel; Mecit, Nesimi; Kanmaz, Turan; Acarlı, Koray; Kalayoğlu, Münci

    2015-01-01

    Situs inversus totalis (SIT) is a rare congenital anomaly, and liver transplantation (LT) in an adult SIT patient is extremely rare. Liver transplantation in a SIT patient is also technically challenging due to reversed anatomical structures. Here we present the case of an 18-year-old female with SIT in whom left lobe living donor LT was performed. The patient suffered from cirrhosis due to autoimmune hepatitis. The recipient and donor are doing well without complications 20 months after LT. Situs inversus totalis should not be considered a contraindication for LT. If possible, use of a living donor left lobe graft for LT is more feasible than a living donor right lobe graft. It is also technically easier than using deceased donor full-size liver graft in SIT patients who require liver transplantation. PMID:26668533

  5. Thiophene dendrimer-based low donor content solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltzfus, Dani M.; Ma, Chang-Qi; Nagiri, Ravi C. R.; Clulow, Andrew J.; Bäuerle, Peter; Burn, Paul L.; Gentle, Ian R.; Meredith, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Low donor content solar cells containing polymeric and non-polymeric donors blended with fullerenes have been reported to give rise to efficient devices. In this letter, we report that a dendrimeric donor can also be used in solution-processed low donor content devices when blended with a fullerene. A third generation dendrimer containing 42 thiophene units (42T) was found to give power conversion efficiencies of up to 3.5% when blended with PC70BM in optimized devices. The best efficiency was measured with 10 mole percent (mol. %) of 42T in PC70BM and X-ray reflectometry showed that the blends were uniform. Importantly, while 42T comprised 10 mol. % of the film, it made up 31% of the film by volume. Finally, it was found that solvent annealing was required to achieve the largest open circuit voltage and highest device efficiencies.

  6. Normal development following chromatin transfer correlates with donor cell initial epigenetic state.

    PubMed

    McLean, Cameron A; Wang, Zhongde; Babu, Kavitha; Edwards, Angie; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Robl, James; Sheppard, Allan M

    2010-04-01

    If the full potential of chromatin transfer (CT) technology is to be realized for both animal production and biomedical applications it is imperative that the efficiency of the reprogramming process be improved, and the potential for deleterious development be eliminated. Generation of the first cloned animals from adult somatic cells demonstrated that development is substantially an epigenetic process (Wilmut I, Schnieke AE, McWhir J, Kind AJ, Campbell KH, 1997. Viable offspring derived from fetal and adult mammalian cells. Nature. 385(6619): 810-813.). In this study, we provide preliminary evidence that the epigenetic state of the donor cell, may be valuable in assessing potential cloning success. We have measured key indicators of cellular epigenetic state in both serially derived cell populations of the same genetic origin, but differing in epigenomic status, and in a distinct cohort of donor cell populations with diverse genetic origins and epigenomic status. Specifically, the relative abundance of particular histone modifications in donor populations prior to manipulation has been correlated with the measurable variance in reprogramming efficiencies observed following CT, as defined by the number of resulting live births and healthy progeny, and the concomitant incidence of deleterious growth measures (notably the appearance of large offspring syndrome (LOS)). Thus, we suggest that the likely outcome and relative success of cloning may be predictable based on the expression of discriminating histone marks present in the donor cell population before CT. This approach may provide the basis of a prognostic signature for the future evaluation and risk assessment of putative donor cells prior to CT, and thus increase future cloning success and alleviate the incidence of abnormal development.

  7. Neural Crest As the Source of Adult Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pierret, Chris; Spears, Kathleen; Maruniak, Joel A.; Kirk, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that adult stem cells can cross germ layer boundaries. For example, bone marrow-derived stem cells appear to differentiate into neurons and glial cells, as well as other types of cells. How can stem cells from bone marrow, pancreas, skin, or fat become neurons and glia; in other words, what molecular and cellular events direct mesodermal cells to a neural fate? Transdifferentiation, dediffereniation, and fusion of donor adult stem cells with fully differentiated host cells have been proposed to explain the plasticity of adult stem cells. Here we review the origin of select adult stem cell populations and propose a unifying hypothesis to explain adult stem cell plasticity. In addition, we outline specific experiments to test our hypothesis. We propose that peripheral, tissue-derived, or adult stem cells are all progeny of the neural crest. PMID:16646675

  8. Imaging Tolerance Induction in the Classic Medawar Neonatal Mouse Model: Active Roles of Multiple F1-Donor Cell Types.

    PubMed

    Bascom, R A; Tao, K S; Tollenaar, S L; West, L J

    2015-09-01

    The immature immune system is uniquely susceptible to tolerance induction and thus an attractive target for immunomodulation strategies for organ transplantation. Newborn mice injected with adult semi-allogeneic lymphohematopoietic cells accept transplants without immunosuppressive drugs. Early in vivo/in situ events leading to neonatal tolerance remain poorly understood. Here, we show by whole body/organ imaging that injected cells home to lymphoid organs and liver where various F1-donor cell types selectively alter neonatal immunity. In host thymus, F1-donor dendritic cells (DC) interact with developing thymocytes and regulatory T cells suggesting a role in negative selection. In spleen and lymph nodes, F1-donor regulatory T/B cells associate with host alloreactive cells and by themselves prolong cardiac allograft survival. In liver, F1-donor cells give rise to albumin-containing hepatocyte-like cells. The neonatal immune system is lymphopenic, Th-2 immunodeviated and contains immature DC, suggesting susceptibility to regulation by adult F1-donor cells. CD8a T cell inactivation greatly enhances chimerism, suggesting that variable emerging neonatal alloreactivity becomes a barrier to tolerance induction. This comprehensive qualitative imaging study systematically shows contribution of multiple in vivo processes leading simultaneously to robust tolerance. These insights into robust tolerance induction have important implications for development of strategies for clinical application. PMID:25962413

  9. Gamete Donor Consent and Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Andrew W

    2015-06-01

    There is a lack of consensus on whether the derivation and use of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) from embryos remaining after infertility treatment morally require the informed consent of third-party gamete donors who contributed to the creation of the embryos. The principal guidelines for oversight and funding of hESC research in the United States make minimal or no demands for consent from gamete donors. In this article, I consider the arguments supporting and opposing gamete donor consent for hESC research and embryo research more broadly. I argue that it is not morally permissible to use leftover embryos in research without the informed consent of gamete donors, and that we should place restrictions on the use of existing hESC lines that may have been derived without informed consent. While the standard argument for this position relies on an appeal to gamete donors' interest in controlling what happens with their genetic material, I identify shortcomings with the standard approach and seek instead to locate the deeper moral foundations for gamete donor consent in rights to bodily integrity.

  10. Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation in Adult Haematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Parmesar, Kevon; Raj, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a well-established treatment option for both hematological malignancies and nonmalignant conditions such as aplastic anemia and haemoglobinopathies. For those patients lacking a suitable matched sibling or matched unrelated donor, haploidentical donors are an alternative expedient donor pool. Historically, haploidentical transplantation led to high rates of graft rejection and GVHD. Strategies to circumvent these issues include T cell depletion and management of complications thereof or T replete transplants with GVHD prophylaxis. This review is an overview of these strategies and contemporaneous outcomes for hematological malignancies in adult haploidentical stem cell transplant recipients. PMID:27313619

  11. Child-to-Adult Liver Transplantation With Donation After Cardiac Death Donors: Three Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liangshuo; Liu, Xuemin; Zhang, Xiaogang; Yu, Liang; Sha, Huanchen; Zhou, Ying; Tian, Min; Shi, Jianhua; Wang, Wanli; Liu, Chang; Guo, Kun; Lv, Yi; Wang, Bo

    2016-02-01

    Development of organ transplantation is restricted by the discrepancy between the lack of donors and increasing number of patients. The outcome of pediatric donors transplanted into adult recipients especially with donation after circulatory death (DCD) pattern has not been well studied. The aim of this paper is to describe our experience of 3 successful DCD donor child-to-adult liver transplantations lately. Three DCD donors were separately 7, 5, and 8 years old. The ratio between donor graft weight and recipient body weight was 1.42%, 1.00%, and 1.33%, respectively. Ratio between the volume of donor liver and the expected liver volume was 0.65, 0.46, and 0.60. Splenectomy was undertaken for the second recipient according to the portal vein pressure (PVP) which was observed during the operation. Two out of 3 of the recipients suffered with acute kidney injury and got recovered after renal replacement therapy. The first recipient also went through early allograft dysfunction and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The hospital course of the third recipient was uneventful. After 1 year of follow-up visit, the first and second recipients maintain good quality of life and liver function. The third patient was followed up for 5 months until now and recovered well. DCD child-to-adult liver transplantation should only be used for comparatively matched donor and recipient. PVP should be monitored during the operation. The short-term efficacy is good, but long-term follow-up and clinical study with large sample evaluation are still needed.

  12. Child-to-Adult Liver Transplantation With Donation After Cardiac Death Donors

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Liangshuo; Liu, Xuemin; Zhang, Xiaogang; Yu, Liang; Sha, Huanchen; Zhou, Ying; Tian, Min; Shi, Jianhua; Wang, Wanli; Liu, Chang; Guo, Kun; Lv, Yi; Wang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Development of organ transplantation is restricted by the discrepancy between the lack of donors and increasing number of patients. The outcome of pediatric donors transplanted into adult recipients especially with donation after circulatory death (DCD) pattern has not been well studied. The aim of this paper is to describe our experience of 3 successful DCD donor child-to-adult liver transplantations lately. Three DCD donors were separately 7, 5, and 8 years old. The ratio between donor graft weight and recipient body weight was 1.42%, 1.00%, and 1.33%, respectively. Ratio between the volume of donor liver and the expected liver volume was 0.65, 0.46, and 0.60. Splenectomy was undertaken for the second recipient according to the portal vein pressure (PVP) which was observed during the operation. Two out of 3 of the recipients suffered with acute kidney injury and got recovered after renal replacement therapy. The first recipient also went through early allograft dysfunction and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The hospital course of the third recipient was uneventful. After 1 year of follow-up visit, the first and second recipients maintain good quality of life and liver function. The third patient was followed up for 5 months until now and recovered well. DCD child-to-adult liver transplantation should only be used for comparatively matched donor and recipient. PVP should be monitored during the operation. The short-term efficacy is good, but long-term follow-up and clinical study with large sample evaluation are still needed. PMID:26886643

  13. Fullerene derivatives as electron donor for organic photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Taojun; Wang, Xiao-Feng E-mail: ziruo@yz.yamagata-u.ac.jp; Sano, Takeshi; Kido, Junji; Hong, Ziruo E-mail: ziruo@yz.yamagata-u.ac.jp; Yang, Yang

    2013-11-11

    We demonstrated the performance of unconventional, all-fullerene-based, planar heterojunction (PHJ) organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells using fullerene derivatives indene-C{sub 60} bisadduct (ICBA) and phenyl C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester as the electron donors with fullerene C{sub 70} as the electron acceptor. Two different charge generation processes, including charge generation in the fullerene bulk and exciton dissociation at the donor-acceptor interface, have been found to exist in such all-fullerene-based PHJ cells and the contribution to the total photocurrent from each process is strongly dependent on the thickness of fullerene donor. The optimized 5 nm ICBA/40 nm C{sub 70} PHJ cell gives clear external quantum efficiency responses for the long-wavelength photons corresponding to the dissociation of strongly bound Frenkel excitons, which is hardly observed in fullerene-based single layer reference devices. This approach using fullerene as a donor material provides further possibilities for developing high performance OPV cells.

  14. Complications and mortality after adult to adult living donor liver transplantation: A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Gad, Emad Hamdy; Alsebaey, Ayman; Lotfy, Maha; Eltabbakh, Mohamed; Sherif, Ahmed Alshawadfy

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is widely performed for patients to resolve the critical shortage of organs from cadavers. Despite rapid implementation of the procedure, both complications and mortality of LDLT are annoying problems. The aim of this study was to analyze complications and mortality of patients after adult to adult LDLT (A-ALDLT) in a single center. Methods: Between April 2003 and November 2013, 167 (A-ALDLT) recipients in National Liver Institute, Egypt were included. We retrospectively analyzed complications and mortality in them. Results The overall incidence of complications was 86.2% (n = 144) and classified as biliary 43.7% (n = 73), vascular 21.6% (n = 36), Small for size syndrome (SFSS) 12.6% (n = 21), Gastrointestinal tract (GIT) 19.8% (n = 33), wound 12.6% (n = 21), chest 19.8% (n = 33), neurological 26.3% (n = 44), renal 21% (n = 35), intra abdominal collection 21.6% (n = 36), recurrent hepatitis C virus (HCV) 16.8% (n = 28), recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) 2.4% (n = 4), acute rejection 19.2% (n = 32). 65 (45.1%) of 144 complicated patients died, while 10 (43.5%) of 23 non complicated died. The incidence of whole, in hospital and late mortalities were 44.9%, 28.7% and 16.2% respectively. Conclusions: Mortality was higher among complicated cases where vascular complications and SFSS had significant effect on it so prevention and treatment of them is required for improving outcome. PMID:26005570

  15. [Kidney transplantation from paediatric cadaveric donors to adult recipients (review article)].

    PubMed

    Michalský, R

    2003-01-01

    The basic problem of all developed transplant programs is organs deficiency available for transplantation. There is an effort within last 10 years to get each organ for transplantation that it is supposed to be functional for several years. These problems also occur in the program of kidney transplantation. Apart from realizing of kidney transplantations from donors alive, which have an increasing tendency in Czech Republic (in 2001 more than 5%, in 2002 more than 10%), there is the only another possibility to get kidney grafts from non-ideal (suboptimal, marginal) donors. Both short-term and long-term results of kidney transplantation from non-ideal donors are comparable with the transplantation results from ideal donors. The kidneys from very young paediatric cadaveric donors, especially up to five years are the typical example of non-ideal graft. The article introduces the international position of the Czech Republic in organ procurement from cadaveric donors as well as in kidney transplantations. It shortly summarizes the history of kidney transplantations and at the same time it deals with realizing of kidney transplantation from paediatric cadaveric donors to adult recipients. The new division of kidney grafts from paediatric cadaveric donors into four groups according to their age is introduced. All at once the present surgical technique is described and the problems of some post-operative complications are discussed, especially the higher occurrence of primary graft non-function. The principle that kidneys from donor up to three years should be transplanted as a block to the single recipient is emphasized. In conclusion the author recommends, on the basis of his own experiences, the realizing of these transplantations.

  16. Suitability Criteria for Adult Related Donors: A Consensus Statement from the Worldwide Network for Blood and Marrow Transplantation Standing Committee on Donor Issues.

    PubMed

    Worel, Nina; Buser, Andreas; Greinix, Hildegard T; Hägglund, Hans; Navarro, Willis; Pulsipher, Michael A; Nicoloso de Faveri, Grazia; Bengtsson, Mats; Billen, Annelies; Espino, German; Fechter, Mirjam; Giudice, Valeria; Hölig, Kristina; Kanamori, Heiwa; Kodera, Yoshihisa; Leitner, Gerda; Netelenbos, Tanja; Niederwieser, Dietger; van Walraven, Suzanna M; Rocha, Vanderson; Torosian, Tigran; Vergueiro, Carmen; Weisdorf, Daniel; Yabe, Hiromasa; Halter, Jörg P

    2015-12-01

    The number of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplants performed globally each year continues to increase. Advances in HLA typing, better supportive care, and administration of reduced-intensity conditioning regimens allow treatment of older patients with older sibling donors. Pretransplant donor assessment and testing are very important processes affecting the quality and safety of donation. For unrelated HSC donors detailed recommendations for health assessment have been published, allowing donation only if they are unrestrictedly healthy. Eligibility criteria for related donors are less strict and vary significantly between centers. In situations where a family donor does not meet the suitability criteria for unrelated donors, involved physicians often struggle with the decision whether the matched relative is suitable for donation or not. On behalf of the Worldwide Network for Blood and Marrow Transplantation Standing Committee on Donor Issues, we intended to develop a consensus document with recommendations for donor workup and final clearance of family donors who would not be able to serve as unrelated donors because of their age or pre-existing diseases. This article covers different topics intending to support decision-making, with the goal of minimizing medical risk to the donor and protection of the recipient from transmissible diseases.

  17. Significant Improvements in the Practice Patterns of Adult Related Donor Care in US Transplantation Centers.

    PubMed

    Anthias, Chloe; Shaw, Bronwen E; Kiefer, Deidre M; Liesveld, Jane L; Yared, Jean; Kamble, Rammurti T; D'Souza, Anita; Hematti, Peiman; Seftel, Matthew D; Norkin, Maxim; DeFilipp, Zachariah; Kasow, Kimberly A; Abidi, Muneer H; Savani, Bipin N; Shah, Nirali N; Anderlini, Paolo; Diaz, Miguel A; Malone, Adriana K; Halter, Joerg P; Lazarus, Hillard M; Logan, Brent R; Switzer, Galen E; Pulsipher, Michael A; Confer, Dennis L; O'Donnell, Paul V

    2016-03-01

    Recent investigations have found a higher incidence of adverse events associated with hematopoietic cell donation in related donors (RDs) who have morbidities that if present in an unrelated donor (UD) would preclude donation. In the UD setting, regulatory standards ensure independent assessment of donors, one of several crucial measures to safeguard donor health and safety. A survey conducted by the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) Donor Health and Safety Working Committee in 2007 reported a potential conflict of interest in >70% of US centers, where physicians had simultaneous responsibility for RDs and their recipients. Consequently, several international organizations have endeavored to improve practice through regulations and consensus recommendations. We hypothesized that the changes in the 2012 Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy and the Joint Accreditation Committee-International Society for Cellular Therapy and European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation standards resulting from the CIBMTR study would have significantly impacted practice. Accordingly, we conducted a follow-up survey of US transplantation centers to assess practice changes since 2007, and to investigate additional areas where RD care was predicted to differ from UD care. A total of 73 centers (53%), performing 79% of RD transplantations in the United States, responded. Significant improvements were observed since the earlier survey; 62% centers now ensure separation of RD and recipient care (P < .0001). This study identifies several areas where RD management does not meet international donor care standards, however. Particular concerns include counseling and assessment of donors before HLA typing, with 61% centers first disclosing donor HLA results to an individual other than the donor, the use of unlicensed mobilization agents, and the absence of long-term donor follow-up. Recommendations for improvement are made.

  18. Informed consent and decision-making about adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation: a systematic review of empirical research.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Elisa J; Daud, Amna; Caicedo, Juan Carlos; Cameron, Kenzie A; Jay, Colleen; Fryer, Jonathan; Beauvais, Nicole; Skaro, Anton; Baker, Talia

    2011-12-27

    Adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is a complex procedure that poses serious health risks to and provides no direct health benefit for the donor. Because of this uneven risk-benefit ratio, ensuring donor autonomy through informed consent is critical. To assess the current knowledge pertaining to informed consent for LDLT, we conducted a systematic review of the empirical literature on donors' decision-making process, comprehension about risks and outcomes, and information needs for LDLT. Of the 1423 identified articles, 24 met final review criteria, representing the perspective of approximately 2789 potential and actual donors. As donors' decisions to donate often occur before evaluation, they often make uninformed decisions. The review found that 88% to 95% of donors reported understanding information clinicians disclosed about risks and benefits. However, donors reported unmet information needs, knowledge gaps regarding risks, and unanticipated complications. Few donors reported feeling pressure to donate. Most studies were limited by cultural differences, small sample sizes, inconsistent measures, and poor methodological approaches. This systematic review suggests that informed consent for LDLT is sub-optimal as donors do not adequately appreciate disclosed information during the informed consent process, despite United Network for Organ Sharing/CMS regulations requiring formal psychological evaluation of donor candidates. Interventions are needed to improve donor-clinician communication during the LDLT informed consent process such as through the use of comprehension assessment tools and e-health educational tools that leverage adult learning theory to effectively convey LDLT outcome data. PMID:22143436

  19. Deferrals of volunteer stem cell donors referred for evaluation for matched-unrelated stem cell donation.

    PubMed

    Bräuninger, S; Thorausch, K; Luxembourg, B; Schulz, M; Chow, K U; Seifried, E; Bonig, H

    2014-11-01

    To minimize donor risk and maintain public support, volunteer donor stem cell donation, whether by mobilized leukapheresis or marrow aspiration, requires careful donor eligibility assessment. Many contraindications to stem cell donation exist, yet analyses of donor deferral rates are not available. In a 36-month series encompassing 2493 potential stem cell donors, we analyzed frequencies and reasons for deferrals. All were presumed eligible by their registries because of previously submitted structured health questionnaire and formal telephone interviews. After assessment by our center's physicians, 3.3% of donors proved ineligible, but 5.6% more were eligible for only one of the collection methods. Higher deferral rates were associated with female sex, increasing age and mobilized stem cell donation vs marrow. Exclusion criteria were identified with approximately similar frequency by medical history, physical examination and laboratory testing. Reasons for deferrals almost exclusively served to protect donor safety; the rare recipient-directed safety concerns could be, and often were, overridden in agreement with the transplant center. As formal analyses have shown, with careful assessment, stem cell donation is acceptably safe, but the plethora of deferral reasons mandate that only physicians with specific experience should evaluate stem cell donors, that is, this task should not be delegated to paramedical personnel. PMID:25089595

  20. Alternative donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for mature lymphoid malignancies after reduced-intensity conditioning regimen: similar outcomes with umbilical cord blood and unrelated donor peripheral blood

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Celso Arrais; Rocha, Vanderson; Dreger, Peter; Brunstein, Claudio; Sengeloev, Henrik; Finke, Jürgen; Mohty, Mohamad; Rio, Bernard; Petersen, Eefke; Guilhot, François; Niederwieser, Dietger; Cornelissen, Jan J.; Jindra, Pavel; Nagler, Arnon; Fegueux, Nathalie; Schoemans, Hélène; Robinson, Stephen; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Gluckman, Eliane; Canals, Carmen; Sureda, Anna

    2014-01-01

    We have reported encouraging results of unrelated cord blood transplantation for patients with lymphoid malignancies. Whether those outcomes are comparable to matched unrelated donor transplants remains to be defined. We studied 645 adult patients with mature lymphoid malignancies who received an allogeneic unrelated donor transplant using umbilical cord blood (n=104) or mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (n=541) after a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen. Unrelated cord blood recipients had more refractory disease. Median follow-up time was 30 months. Neutrophil engraftment (81% vs. 97%, respectively; P<0.0001) and chronic graft-versus-host disease (26% vs. 52%; P=0.0005) were less frequent after unrelated cord blood than after matched unrelated donor, whereas no differences were observed in grade II–IV acute graft-versus-host disease (29% vs. 32%), non-relapse mortality (29% vs. 28%), and relapse or progression (28% vs. 35%) at 36 months. There were also no significant differences in 2-year progression-free survival (43% vs. 58%, respectively) and overall survival (36% vs. 51%) at 36 months. In a multivariate analysis, no differences were observed in the outcomes between the two stem cell sources except for a higher risk of neutrophil engraftment (hazard ratio=2.12; P<0.0001) and chronic graft-versus-host disease (hazard ratio 2.10; P=0.0002) after matched unrelated donor transplant. In conclusion, there was no difference in final outcomes after transplantation between umbilical cord blood and matched unrelated donor transplant. Umbilical cord blood is a valuable alternative for patients with lymphoid malignancies lacking an HLA-matched donor, being associated with lower risk of chronic graft-versus-host disease. PMID:23935024

  1. Differentiation of Donor-Derived Cells Into Microglia After Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kazuya; Kakuda, Yumiko; Munemoto, Saori; Yamazaki, Hirohito; Nozaki, Ichiro; Yamada, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies have indicated that microglia originate from immature progenitors in the yolk sac. After birth, microglial populations are maintained under normal conditions via self-renewal without the need to recruit monocyte-derived microglial precursors. Peripheral cell invasion of the brain parenchyma can only occur with disruption of the blood-brain barrier. Here, we report an autopsy case of an umbilical cord blood transplant recipient in whom cells derived from the donor blood differentiated into ramified microglia in the recipient brain parenchyma. Although the blood-brain barrier and glia limitans seemed to prevent invasion of these donor-derived cells, most of the invading donor-derived ramified cells were maintained in the cerebral cortex. This result suggests that invasion of donor-derived cells occurs through the pial membrane. PMID:26226134

  2. Dengue Seroprevalence of Healthy Adults in Singapore: Serosurvey among Blood Donors, 2009

    PubMed Central

    Low, Swee-Ling; Lam, Sally; Wong, Wing-Yan; Teo, Diana; Ng, Lee-Ching; Tan, Li-Kiang

    2015-01-01

    Routine national notifications of dengue cases typically do not reflect the true dengue situation due to large proportion of unreported cases. Serosurveys, when conducted periodically, could shed light on the true dengue infections in the population. To determine the magnitude of dengue infections of the adult population in Singapore following the outbreak in 2007, we performed a cross-sectional study on blood donor samples from December 2009 to February 2010. The residual blood of 3,995 donors (aged 16–60 years) was screened for the presence of dengue-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. The age-weighted IgG prevalence of residents was 50.8% (N = 3,627, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 49.4–52.3%). Dengue IgG prevalence increased with age, with the lowest in 16–20 years age group (16.1%) and the highest in 56–60 years age group (86.6%). Plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) on samples of young resident adults (aged 16–30 years) revealed lower prevalence of neutralizing antibodies to each serotype, ranging from 5.4% to 20.3% compared with the older age groups. The level of exposure to dengue among the young adults is relatively low despite the endemicity of the disease in Singapore. It partially explains the population’s susceptibility to explosive outbreaks and the high incidence rate among young adults. PMID:26013376

  3. Dengue seroprevalence of healthy adults in Singapore: serosurvey among blood donors, 2009.

    PubMed

    Low, Swee-Ling; Lam, Sally; Wong, Wing-Yan; Teo, Diana; Ng, Lee-Ching; Tan, Li-Kiang

    2015-07-01

    Routine national notifications of dengue cases typically do not reflect the true dengue situation due to large proportion of unreported cases. Serosurveys, when conducted periodically, could shed light on the true dengue infections in the population. To determine the magnitude of dengue infections of the adult population in Singapore following the outbreak in 2007, we performed a cross-sectional study on blood donor samples from December 2009 to February 2010. The residual blood of 3,995 donors (aged 16-60 years) was screened for the presence of dengue-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. The age-weighted IgG prevalence of residents was 50.8% (N = 3,627, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 49.4-52.3%). Dengue IgG prevalence increased with age, with the lowest in 16-20 years age group (16.1%) and the highest in 56-60 years age group (86.6%). Plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) on samples of young resident adults (aged 16-30 years) revealed lower prevalence of neutralizing antibodies to each serotype, ranging from 5.4% to 20.3% compared with the older age groups. The level of exposure to dengue among the young adults is relatively low despite the endemicity of the disease in Singapore. It partially explains the population's susceptibility to explosive outbreaks and the high incidence rate among young adults.

  4. Murine somatic cell nuclear transfer using reprogrammed donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hoin; Park, Jong Im; Roh, Sangho

    2016-01-01

    In vivo-matured mouse oocytes were enucleated, and a single murine embryonic fibroblast (control or reprogrammed by introducing extracts from murine testis tissue, which showed expression of male germ cell-specific genes) was injected into the cytoplasm of the oocytes. The rate of blastocyst development and expression levels of Oct-4, Eomes and Cdx-2 were not significantly different in both experimental groups. However, the expression levels of Nanog, Sox9 and Glut-1 were significantly increased when reprogrammed cells were used as donor nuclei. Increased expression of Nanog can be supportive of complete reprogramming of somatic cell nuclear transfer murine embryos. The present study suggested that donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes can be reconstructed and can develop into embryos with normal high expression of developmentally essential genes. PMID:26369430

  5. Donor Stem Cell Transplant or Donor White Blood Cell Infusions in Treating Patients With Hematologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-07-02

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Unusual Cancers of Childhood

  6. Application of a novel population of multipotent stem cells derived from skin fibroblasts as donor cells in bovine SCNT.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shaohui; Chen, Wuju; Liu, Xu; Xiao, Jiajia; Wang, Yanqin; Liu, Jun; Du, Yue; Wang, Yongsheng; Zhang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Undifferentiated stem cells are better donor cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), resulting in more offspring than more differentiated cells. While various stem cell populations have been confirmed to exist in the skin, progress has been restricted due to the lack of a suitable marker for their prospective isolation. To address this fundamental issue, a marker is required that could unambiguously prove the differentiation state of the donor cells. We therefore utilized magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) to separate a homogeneous population of small SSEA-4(+) cells from a heterogeneous population of bovine embryonic skin fibroblasts (BEF). SSEA-4(+) cells were 8-10 μm in diameter and positive for alkaline phosphatase (AP). The percentage of SSEA-4(+) cells within the cultured BEF population was low (2-3%). Immunocytochemistry and PCR analyses revealed that SSEA-4(+) cells expressed pluripotency-related markers, and could differentiate into cells comprising all three germ layers in vitro. They remained undifferentiated over 20 passages in suspension culture. In addition, cloned embryos derived from SSEA-4 cells showed significant differences in cleavage rate and blastocyst development when compared with those from BEF and SSEA-4(-) cells. Moreover, blastocysts derived from SSEA-4(+) cells showed a higher total cell number and lower apoptotic index as compared to BEF and SSEA-4(-) derived cells. It is well known that nuclei from pluripotent stem cells yield a higher cloning efficiency than those from adult somatic cells, however, pluripotent stem cells are relatively difficult to obtain from bovine. The SSEA-4(+) cells described in the current study provide an attractive candidate for SCNT and a promising platform for the generation of transgenic cattle.

  7. Donor MHC class II antigen is essential for induction of transplantation tolerance by bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Umemura, A; Monaco, A P; Maki, T

    2000-05-01

    Posttransplant infusion of donor bone marrow cells (BMC) induces tolerance to allografts in adult mice, dogs, nonhuman primates, and probably humans. Here we used a mouse skin allograft model and an allogeneic radiation chimera model to examine the role of MHC Ags in tolerance induction. Infusion of MHC class II Ag-deficient (CIID) BMC failed to prolong C57BL/6 (B6) skin grafts in ALS- and rapamycin-treated B10.A mice, whereas wild-type B6 or MHC class I Ag-deficient BMC induced prolongation. Removal of class II Ag-bearing cells from donor BMC markedly reduced the tolerogenic effect compared with untreated BMC, although graft survival was significantly longer in mice given depleted BMC than that in control mice given no BMC. Infusion of CIID BMC into irradiated syngeneic B6 or allogeneic B10.A mice produced normal lymphoid cell reconstitution including CD4+ T cells except for the absence of class II Ag-positive cells. However, irradiated B10.A mice reconstituted with CIID BMC rejected all B6 and a majority of CIID skin grafts despite continued maintenance of high degree chimerism. B10.A mice reconstituted with B6 BMC maintained chimerism and accepted both B6 and CIID skin grafts. Thus, expression of MHC class II Ag on BMC is essential for allograft tolerance induction and peripheral chimerism with cells deficient in class II Ag does not guarantee allograft acceptance. PMID:10779744

  8. Donor-dependent variations in hepatic differentiation from human-induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Masatoshi; Aoi, Takashi; Okita, Keisuke; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Inoue, Haruhisa; Takayama, Naoya; Endo, Hiroshi; Eto, Koji; Toguchida, Junya; Uemoto, Shinji; Yamanaka, Shinya

    2012-07-31

    Hepatocytes generated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are unprecedented resources for pharmaceuticals and cell therapy. However, the in vitro directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into mature hepatocytes remains challenging. Little attention has so far been paid to variations among hiPSC lines in terms of their hepatic differentiation. In the current study, we developed an improved hepatic differentiation protocol and compared 28 hiPSC lines originated from various somatic cells and derived using retroviruses, Sendai viruses, or episomal plasmids. This comparison indicated that the origins, but not the derivation methods, may be a major determinant of variation in hepatic differentiation. The hiPSC clones derived from peripheral blood cells consistently showed good differentiation efficiency, whereas many hiPSC clones from adult dermal fibroblasts showed poor differentiation. However, when we compared hiPSCs from peripheral blood and dermal fibroblasts from the same individuals, we found that variations in hepatic differentiation were largely attributable to donor differences, rather than to the types of the original cells. These data underscore the importance of donor differences when comparing the differentiation propensities of hiPSC clones.

  9. Role of donor lymphoid cells in the transfer of allograft tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, G.E.; Watts, L.M.

    1985-12-01

    Tolerance to murine skin allografts across a MHC disparity was induced by conditioning primary hosts with sublethal fractionated total-body irradiation (FTBI) and transfusion of allogeneic bone marrow (BM). Tolerance could be adoptively transferred to secondary hosts conditioned by FTBI with infusion of spleen cells from hosts bearing intact skin allografts greater than 60 days. Tolerance could not be transferred by tolerant host spleen (THS) preparations from which cells of the donor genotype had been deleted by cytotoxic alloantisera. Deletion of host genotype cells, however, did not diminish the capability of THS to transfer tolerance. All of the tolerizing activity of THS appeared to reside within cells of the donor genotype. Small numbers of normal donor spleen cells could induce tolerance in FTBI hosts but only at the expense of very high mortality, in contrast to the low mortality observed with tolerizing injections of allogeneic donor cells from THS or injections of normal semiallogeneic F1 hybrid spleen cells. If an active immune response is responsible for tolerance induction/transfer in this model, allogeneic donor lymphoid cells derived from BM, in contrast to donor spleen cells, must be capable of mounting this response without concomitant severe GVHD. In future experiments, cells of donor genotype can be isolated from THS and purified in sufficient numbers to compare their tolerizing efficiency vs. that of normal donor cells, detect possible suppression of normal host cell alloreactivity in vitro and identify the donor cell phenotypes involved.

  10. Adult Stem and Progenitor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraerts, Martine; Verfaillie, Catherine M.

    The discovery of adult stem cells in most adult tissues is the basis of a number of clinical studies that are carried out, with therapeutic use of hematopoietic stem cells as a prime example. Intense scientific debate is still ongoing as to whether adult stem cells may have a greater plasticity than previously thought. Although cells with some features of embryonic stem cells that, among others, express Oct4, Nanog and SSEA1 are isolated from fresh tissue, it is not clear if the greater differentiation potential is acquired during cell culture. Moreover, adult more pluripotent cells do not have all pluripotent characteristics typical for embryonic stem cells. Recently, some elegant studies were published in which adult cells could be completely reprogrammed to embryonic stem cell-like cells by overexpression of some key transcription factors for pluripotency (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc). It will be interesting for the future to investigate the exact mechanisms underlying this reprogramming and whether similar transcription factor pathways are present and/or can be activated in adult more pluripotent stem cells.

  11. Coordination between donor cell type and cell cycle stage improves nuclear cloning efficiency in cattle.

    PubMed

    Wells, D N; Laible, G; Tucker, F C; Miller, A L; Oliver, J E; Xiang, T; Forsyth, J T; Berg, M C; Cockrem, K; L'Huillier, P J; Tervit, H R; Oback, B

    2003-01-01

    Several studies have shown that both quiescent and proliferating somatic donor cells can be fully reprogrammed after nuclear transfer (NT) and result in viable offspring. So far, however, no comparative study has conclusively demonstrated the relative importance of donor cell cycle stage on nuclear cloning efficiency. Here, we compare two different types of bovine fetal fibroblasts (BFFs) that were synchronized in G(0), G(1), and different phases within G(1). We show that for non-transgenic (non-TG) fibroblasts, serum starvation into G(0) results in a significantly higher percentage of viable calves at term than synchronization in early G(1) or late G(1). For transgenic fibroblasts, however, cells selected in G(1) show significantly higher development to calves at term and higher post-natal survival to weaning than cells in G(0). This suggests that it may be necessary to coordinate donor cell type and cell cycle stage to maximize overall cloning efficiency.

  12. Evaluation of Small Molecules as Front Cell Donor Materials for High-Efficiency Tandem Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Wan, Xiangjian; Liu, Feng; Kan, Bin; Li, Miaomiao; Feng, Huanran; Zhang, Hongtao; Russell, Thomas P; Chen, Yongsheng

    2016-08-01

    Three small molecules as front cell donors for tandem cells are thoroughly evaluated and a high power conversion efficiency of 11.47% is achieved, which demonstrates that the oligomer-like small molecules offer a good choice for high-performance tandem solar cells.

  13. Evaluation of Small Molecules as Front Cell Donor Materials for High-Efficiency Tandem Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Wan, Xiangjian; Liu, Feng; Kan, Bin; Li, Miaomiao; Feng, Huanran; Zhang, Hongtao; Russell, Thomas P; Chen, Yongsheng

    2016-08-01

    Three small molecules as front cell donors for tandem cells are thoroughly evaluated and a high power conversion efficiency of 11.47% is achieved, which demonstrates that the oligomer-like small molecules offer a good choice for high-performance tandem solar cells. PMID:27214707

  14. Analysis of cell growth and gene expression of porcine adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells as nuclear donor cell.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Park, Eun Jung; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Geon A; Rhee, Sang Ho; Lim, Sang Hyun; Kang, Sung Keun; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2014-12-01

    In several laboratory animals and humans, adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASC) are of considerable interest because they are easy to harvest and can generate a huge proliferation of cells from a small quantity of fat. In this study, we investigated: (i) the expression patterns of reprogramming-related genes in porcine ASC; and (ii) whether ASC can be a suitable donor cell type for generating cloned pigs. For these experiments, ASC, adult skin fibroblasts (AF) and fetal fibroblasts (FF) were derived from a 4-year-old female miniature pig. The ASC expressed cell-surface markers characteristic of stem cells, and underwent in vitro differentiation when exposed to specific differentiation-inducing conditions. Expression of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT)1 in ASC was similar to that in AF, but the highest expression of the DNMT3B gene was observed in ASC. The expression of OCT4 was significantly higher in FF and ASC than in AF (P < 0.05), and SOX2 showed significantly higher expression in ASC than in the other two cell types (P < 0.05). After somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), the development rate of cloned embryos derived from ASC was comparable to the development of those derived using FF. Total cell numbers of blastocysts derived using ASC and FF were significantly higher than in embryos made with AF. The results demonstrated that ASC used for SCNT have a potential comparable to those of AF and FF in terms of embryo in vitro development and blastocyst formation.

  15. Dengue Seroprevalence in the French West Indies: A Prospective Study in Adult Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    L'Azou, Maïna; Jean-Marie, Janick; Bessaud, Maël; Cabié, André; Césaire, Raymond; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Courbil, Rémi; Richard, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    Using an anti-dengue immunoglobulin G (IgG) indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, seroprevalence was determined among 783 adult blood donors in the French Caribbean islands of Guadeloupe and Martinique in 2011. Overall, 93.5% [91.5; 95.1] samples were positive for dengue antibodies, 90.7% (350 of 386) in Martinique and 96.2% (382 of 397) in Guadeloupe. Only 30% of these adults recalled having had dengue disease before. Serotype-specific neutralization assays applied to a subset of IgG-positive samples indicated that a majority (77 of 96; 80%) reacted to the four serotypes. These seroprevalence findings are the first reported for Guadeloupe and Martinique and are consistent with the dengue epidemiology in these territories. PMID:25846291

  16. HLA-haploidentical bone marrow transplantation with posttransplant cyclophosphamide expands the donor pool for patients with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Ephraim J.; Luznik, Leo; Lanzkron, Sophie M.; Gamper, Christopher J.; Jones, Richard J.; Brodsky, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Allogeneic marrow transplantation can cure sickle cell disease; however, HLA-matched donors are difficult to find, and the toxicities of myeloablative conditioning are prohibitive for most adults with this disease. We developed a nonmyeloablative bone marrow transplantation platform using related, including HLA-haploidentical, donors for patients with sickle cell disease. The regimen consisted of antithymocyte globulin, fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and total body irradiation, and graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis with posttransplantation high-dose cyclophosphamide, mycophenolate mofetil, and tacrolimus or sirolimus. After screening 19 patients, we transplanted 17, 14 from HLA-haploidentical and 3 from HLA-matched related donors. Eleven patients engrafted durably. With a median follow-up of 711 days (minimal follow up 224 days), 10 patients are asymptomatic, and 6 patients are off immunosupression. Only 1 patient developed skin-only acute graft-versus-host disease that resolved without any therapy; no mortality was seen. Nonmyeloablative conditioning with posttransplantation high-dose cyclophosphamide expands the donor pool, making marrow transplantation feasible for most patients with sickle cell disease, and is associated with a low risk of complications, even with haploidentical related donors. Graft failure, 43% in haploidentical pairs, remains a major obstacle but may be acceptable in a fraction of patients if the majority can be cured without serious toxicities. PMID:22955919

  17. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant outcomes in acute myeloid leukemia: Similar outcomes regardless of donor type

    PubMed Central

    Warlick, Erica D.; de Latour, Regis Peffault; Shanley, Ryan; Robin, Marie; Bejanyan, Nelli; Xhaard, Alienor; Brunstein, Claudio; de Fontbrune, Flore Sicre; Ustun, Celalettin; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Socie, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    The use of alternative donor transplants is increasing as the transplant eligible population ages and sibling donors are less available. We evaluated the impact of donor source on transplant outcomes for adults with acute myeloid leukemia undergoing myeloablative or reduced intensity conditioning transplant. Between January 2000 and December 2010, 414 consecutive adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia in remission received myeloablative or reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic transplant from either a matched related donor (n=187), unrelated donor (n=76), or umbilical cord blood donor (n=151) at the University of Minnesota or Hôpital St. Louis in Paris. We noted similar 6 year overall survival across donor types: matched related donor 47% (95% CI, 39–54%), umbilical cord blood 36% (95% CI, 28–44%), matched unrelated donor 54% (95% CI, 40–66%), mismatched unrelated donor 51% (95% CI, 28–70%) (p=0.11). Survival differed based on conditioning intensity and age with 6 year survival of 57% (95% CI 47–65%), 39% (95% CI, 28–49%), 23% (95% CI, 6–47%), 47% (95% CI, 36–57%) and 28% (95% CI, 17–41%) for myeloablative age 18–39, myeloablative age 40+, or reduced intensity conditioning ages 18–39, 40–56, and 57–74 respectively (p< 0.01). Relapse was increased with reduced intensity conditioning and lowest in younger patients receiving myeloablative conditioning (HR 1.0 versus 2.5 or above for all RIC age cohorts), p<0.01. Transplant related mortality was similar across donor types. In summary, our data support the use of alternative donors as a graft source with MA or RIC for patients with acute myeloid leukemia when a sibling donor is unavailable. PMID:25452032

  18. Impact of different sources of donor cells upon the nuclear transfer efficiency in Chinese indigenous Meishan pig.

    PubMed

    Hua, Z; Xu, G; Liu, X; Bi, Y; Xiao, H; Hua, W; Li, L; Zhang, L; Ren, H; Zheng, X

    2016-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is currently the most efficient and precise method to generate genetically tailored pig models for both agricultural and biomedical research. However, its efficiency is crucially dependent on the source of nuclear donor cells. In this study, we compared the cloning efficiency by using three lines of donor cells that are derived from fetal, newborn and adult fibroblasts of Chinese indigenous Meishan pig. We showed that cleavage rate and blastocyst formation rate of the reconstructed embryos were not significantly different between the fetal (80.7% and 15.6%) and newborn ear skin (77.5% and 12.3%) fibroblast groups (p>0.05), but in both groups these indices were significantly higher than that found in the adult ear skin (70.5% and 8.8%; p<0.05). Reconstructed embryos derived from fetal, newborn, and adult ear skin fibroblasts were transferred to four surrogates, respectively. For the fetal, newborn, and adult ear skin fibroblasts, the number of pregnancies were two (50.0%), two (50.0%), and one (25.0%), respectively, and the number of deliveries were two (50.0%), one (25.0%), and zero (0.0%), respectively. Seven and two cloned piglets were obtained from the fetal and newborn ear skin fibroblasts respectively, while no piglets were obtained from the adult ear skin fibroblasts. Two cloned piglets from the newborn ear skin fibroblasts died shortly after birth because of neonatal asphyxia caused by dystocia. The birth weights of the piglets derived from the fetal and newborn ear skin fibroblasts were 1230.5 and 1310.0 g, respectively, which were statistically insignificant (p>0.05), but both were significantly higher than that of the control groups (p<0.05). Microsatellite analyses demonstrated that the genotypes of all cloned piglets were identical to their donor cells. Therefore, cloned pigs were successfully produced using two sources of donor cells isolated from the fetal and newborn ear skin fibroblasts of Meishan piglet, and

  19. Impact of different sources of donor cells upon the nuclear transfer efficiency in Chinese indigenous Meishan pig.

    PubMed

    Hua, Z; Xu, G; Liu, X; Bi, Y; Xiao, H; Hua, W; Li, L; Zhang, L; Ren, H; Zheng, X

    2016-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is currently the most efficient and precise method to generate genetically tailored pig models for both agricultural and biomedical research. However, its efficiency is crucially dependent on the source of nuclear donor cells. In this study, we compared the cloning efficiency by using three lines of donor cells that are derived from fetal, newborn and adult fibroblasts of Chinese indigenous Meishan pig. We showed that cleavage rate and blastocyst formation rate of the reconstructed embryos were not significantly different between the fetal (80.7% and 15.6%) and newborn ear skin (77.5% and 12.3%) fibroblast groups (p>0.05), but in both groups these indices were significantly higher than that found in the adult ear skin (70.5% and 8.8%; p<0.05). Reconstructed embryos derived from fetal, newborn, and adult ear skin fibroblasts were transferred to four surrogates, respectively. For the fetal, newborn, and adult ear skin fibroblasts, the number of pregnancies were two (50.0%), two (50.0%), and one (25.0%), respectively, and the number of deliveries were two (50.0%), one (25.0%), and zero (0.0%), respectively. Seven and two cloned piglets were obtained from the fetal and newborn ear skin fibroblasts respectively, while no piglets were obtained from the adult ear skin fibroblasts. Two cloned piglets from the newborn ear skin fibroblasts died shortly after birth because of neonatal asphyxia caused by dystocia. The birth weights of the piglets derived from the fetal and newborn ear skin fibroblasts were 1230.5 and 1310.0 g, respectively, which were statistically insignificant (p>0.05), but both were significantly higher than that of the control groups (p<0.05). Microsatellite analyses demonstrated that the genotypes of all cloned piglets were identical to their donor cells. Therefore, cloned pigs were successfully produced using two sources of donor cells isolated from the fetal and newborn ear skin fibroblasts of Meishan piglet, and

  20. Infection Rates among Acute Leukemia Patients Receiving Alternative Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ballen, Karen; Woo Ahn, Kwang; Chen, Min; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Ahmed, Ibrahim; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Antin, Joseph; Bhatt, Ami S; Boeckh, Michael; Chen, George; Dandoy, Christopher; George, Biju; Laughlin, Mary J; Lazarus, Hillard M; MacMillan, Margaret L; Margolis, David A; Marks, David I; Norkin, Maxim; Rosenthal, Joseph; Saad, Ayman; Savani, Bipin; Schouten, Harry C; Storek, Jan; Szabolcs, Paul; Ustun, Celalettin; Verneris, Michael R; Waller, Edmund K; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Williams, Kirsten M; Wingard, John R; Wirk, Baldeep; Wolfs, Tom; Young, Jo-Anne H; Auletta, Jeffrey; Komanduri, Krishna V; Lindemans, Caroline; Riches, Marcie L

    2016-09-01

    Alternative graft sources (umbilical cord blood [UCB], matched unrelated donors [MUD], or mismatched unrelated donors [MMUD]) enable patients without a matched sibling donor to receive potentially curative hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Retrospective studies demonstrate comparable outcomes among different graft sources. However, the risk and types of infections have not been compared among graft sources. Such information may influence the choice of a particular graft source. We compared the incidence of bacterial, viral, and fungal infections in 1781 adults with acute leukemia who received alternative donor HCT (UCB, n= 568; MUD, n = 930; MMUD, n = 283) between 2008 and 2011. The incidences of bacterial infection at 1 year were 72%, 59%, and 65% (P < .0001) for UCB, MUD, and MMUD, respectively. Incidences of viral infection at 1 year were 68%, 45%, and 53% (P < .0001) for UCB, MUD, and MMUD, respectively. In multivariable analysis, bacterial, fungal, and viral infections were more common after either UCB or MMUD than after MUD (P < .0001). Bacterial and viral but not fungal infections were more common after UCB than MMUD (P = .0009 and <.0001, respectively). The presence of viral infection was not associated with an increased mortality. Overall survival (OS) was comparable among UCB and MMUD patients with Karnofsky performance status (KPS) ≥ 90% but was inferior for UCB for patients with KPS < 90%. Bacterial and fungal infections were associated with poorer OS. Future strategies focusing on infection prevention and treatment are indicated to improve HCT outcomes.

  1. No differences in sheep somatic cell nuclear transfer outcomes using serum-starved or actively growing donor granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Peura, T T; Hartwich, K M; Hamilton, H M; Walker, S K

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare serum-starved and non-starved donor cells in sheep nuclear transfer with a special emphasis on cloning outcomes. Sheep oocytes, derived either in vivo or in vitro, were fused with cultured serum-starved or actively growing adult granulosa cells. Resulting blastocysts were transferred to recipients fresh or after vitrification, and subsequent pregnancies followed to term. Donor cell treatment did not significantly affect preimplantation development, pregnancy rates, fetal loss or neonate survival rates. Of 22 lambs born, ten survived the immediate perinatal period but all succumbed at various timepoints within the first few weeks of life. The results of the study suggest that the use of serum-starved cells offers no advantages or disadvantages to cloning outcomes. Neither were significant differences in outcomes observed when using either in vivo- or in vitro-derived oocytes or embryos transferred fresh or after vitrification. Yet, these results continue to highlight problems associated with somatic cell cloning as indicated by offspring mortality. It remains unclear whether the high offspring mortality in the current study was related to species, associated with the cell lines used or the result of other causes. PMID:12921702

  2. Treatment of donor cell/embryo with different approaches to improve development after nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Eiji; Wakayama, Sayaka; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2015-01-01

    The successful production of cloned animals by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a promising technology with many potential applications in basic research, medicine, and agriculture. However, the low efficiency and the difficulty of cloning are major obstacles to the widespread use of this technology. Since the first mammal cloned from an adult donor cell was born, many attempts have been made to improve animal cloning techniques, and some approaches have successfully improved its efficiency. Nuclear transfer itself is still difficult because it requires an accomplished operator with a practiced technique. Thus, it is very important to find simple and reproducible methods for improving the success rate of SCNT. In this chapter, we will review our recent protocols, which seem to be the simplest and most reliable method to date to improve development of SCNT embryos.

  3. [Progress in treating diabetes mellitus with adult stem cells].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lixin; Teng, Chunbo; An, Tiezhu

    2008-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic diseases, mainly including type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Treatment for type 1 and part of type 2 often involves regular insulin injection. However, this treatment neither precisely controls the blood sugar levels, nor prevents the diabetes complications. Transplantation of islets of Langerhans offers an attractive strategy for diabetes therapies, but its wide application has been limited by donor shortage and immunological rejection after transplantation. Stem cells with strong proliferation capacity and multipotential may be potential cell sources in diabetes therapies. For this, adult stem cells are interesting because of absence of teratoma formation and ethnical problems. Adult pancreatic stem cells (PSCs) really exist and could produce insulin-secreting cells both under the condition of pancreatic injury and in vitro culture, but lack of effective markers to enrich PSCs hampers the studies of exploring the expanding and differentiating conditions in vitro. Some other adult stem cells, such as hepatic stem cells, marrow stem cells or intestine stem cells, were also suggested to transdifferentiate into insulin-producing cells under special culture conditions in vitro or by genetic modifications. Moreover, transplanting these adult stem cells-derived insulin-secreting cells into the diabetic mouse could cure diabetes. Thus, adult stem cells would supply the abundant beta-cell sources for cell replacement therapy of diabetes. PMID:18464596

  4. [Progress in treating diabetes mellitus with adult stem cells].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lixin; Teng, Chunbo; An, Tiezhu

    2008-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic diseases, mainly including type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Treatment for type 1 and part of type 2 often involves regular insulin injection. However, this treatment neither precisely controls the blood sugar levels, nor prevents the diabetes complications. Transplantation of islets of Langerhans offers an attractive strategy for diabetes therapies, but its wide application has been limited by donor shortage and immunological rejection after transplantation. Stem cells with strong proliferation capacity and multipotential may be potential cell sources in diabetes therapies. For this, adult stem cells are interesting because of absence of teratoma formation and ethnical problems. Adult pancreatic stem cells (PSCs) really exist and could produce insulin-secreting cells both under the condition of pancreatic injury and in vitro culture, but lack of effective markers to enrich PSCs hampers the studies of exploring the expanding and differentiating conditions in vitro. Some other adult stem cells, such as hepatic stem cells, marrow stem cells or intestine stem cells, were also suggested to transdifferentiate into insulin-producing cells under special culture conditions in vitro or by genetic modifications. Moreover, transplanting these adult stem cells-derived insulin-secreting cells into the diabetic mouse could cure diabetes. Thus, adult stem cells would supply the abundant beta-cell sources for cell replacement therapy of diabetes.

  5. Rabbit somatic cell cloning: effects of donor cell type, histone acetylation status and chimeric embryo complementation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feikun; Hao, Ru; Kessler, Barbara; Brem, Gottfried; Wolf, Eckhard; Zakhartchenko, Valeri

    2007-01-01

    The epigenetic status of a donor nucleus has an important effect on the developmental potential of embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). In this study, we transferred cultured rabbit cumulus cells (RCC) and fetal fibroblasts (RFF) from genetically marked rabbits (Alicia/Basilea) into metaphase II oocytes and analyzed the levels of histone H3-lysine 9-lysine 14 acetylation (acH3K9/14) in donor cells and cloned embryos. We also assessed the correlation between the histone acetylation status of donor cells and cloned embryos and their developmental potential. To test whether alteration of the histone acetylation status affects development of cloned embryos, we treated donor cells with sodium butyrate (NaBu), a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Further, we tried to improve cloning efficiency by chimeric complementation of cloned embryos with blastomeres from in vivo fertilized or parthenogenetic embryos. The levels of acH3K9/14 were higher in RCCs than in RFFs (P<0.05). Although the type of donor cells did not affect development to blastocyst, after transfer into recipients, RCC cloned embryos induced a higher initial pregnancy rate as compared to RFF cloned embryos (40 vs 20%). However, almost all pregnancies with either type of cloned embryos were lost by the middle of gestation and only one fully developed, live RCC-derived rabbit was obtained. Treatment of RFFs with NaBu significantly increased the level of acH3K9/14 and the proportion of nuclear transfer embryos developing to blastocyst (49 vs 33% with non-treated RFF, P<0.05). The distribution of acH3K9/14 in either group of cloned embryos did not resemble that in in vivo fertilized embryos suggesting that reprogramming of this epigenetic mark is aberrant in cloned rabbit embryos and cannot be corrected by treatment of donor cells with NaBu. Aggregation of embryos cloned from NaBu-treated RFFs with blastomeres from in vivo derived embryos improved development to blastocyst, but no cloned

  6. [Donor cell leukemia (DCL): A prospective study of its identification and treatment].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Delgado, Guillermo J; Hernández-Reyes, Jesús; González-Ramírez, Mónica Patricia; Martagón-Herrera, Nora Ángela; Garcés-Eisele, Javier; Ruiz-Argüelles, Alejandro; González-Cortés, Angélica; Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J

    2015-01-01

    Donor-derived malignancies after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and after solid organ transplantation are considered as rare diseases. We have prospectively searched for donor cell leukemia in a 12-year period, in a single institution, in a group of 106 consecutive patients allografted because of leukemia. We have identified seven cases of donor cell leukemia; six were allografted because of relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia and one because of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria/aplastic anemia. These figures suggest that the real incidence of donor cell leukemia has been underestimated. The six patients with lymphoblastic donor cell leukemia were treated prospectively with a pediatric-inspired combined chemotherapy schedule designed for de novo acute leukemia. A complete response was obtained in three out of six patients with lymphoblastic donor cell leukemia. It is possible to obtain favorable responses in donor cell leukemia patients employing combined chemotherapy. The long-term donor cell leukemia survivors remain as full chimeras and have not needed a second transplant.

  7. Patterns and Predictors of Sexual Function After Liver Donation: the Adult to Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Cohort Study (A2ALL)

    PubMed Central

    DiMartini, AF.; Dew, MA.; Butt, Z.; Simpson, MA.; Ladner, DP.; Smith, AR.; Hill-Callahan, P.; Gillespie, BW.

    2015-01-01

    Although sexual functioning is an important facet of living donor quality of life, it has not received extensive evaluation in this population. Using data from the Adult-to-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Cohort Study, we examined donor sexual functioning across the donation process from the predonation evaluation to 3 months and 1 year postdonation. Donors (n=208) and a comparison group of non-donors (n=155) completed self-reported surveys with specific questions on sexual desire, satisfaction, orgasm, and (for men) erectile function. Across the three time points, donor sexual functioning was lower at the evaluation phase and 3 months postdonation than at one year postdonation. In the early recovery period, abdominal pain was associated with difficulty reaching orgasm (OR = 3.98, 95% CI 1.30–12.16), concerns over appearance with lower sexual desire (OR = 4.14, 95% CI 1.02–16.79), and not feeling back to normal was associated with dissatisfaction with sexual life (OR 3.58, 95% CI 1.43–8.99). Efforts to educate donors before the surgery and prepare them for the early recovery phase may improve recovery and reduce distress regarding sexual functioning. PMID:25779554

  8. [Effect of different choices and treatments with donor cells on reprogramming].

    PubMed

    Yao, Ya-Xin; Li, Xiang-Chen; Zhang, Yong; Qiao, Li-Min; Guan, Wei-Jun; Ma, Yue-Hui

    2008-11-01

    The donor nucleus must experienced the epigenetic modification of the process reprogramming and went back to the initial state after the donor cell was injected into the oocytes. If the reprogramming is not completed, the efficiency of cloning will be reduced. However, reprogramming of nucleus muct was not only embodied in its ability after it was transferred into the oocytes. It was different in the potential if the cell type was not identical. In addition, different treatment to the donor cells resulted in different ability and the level of reprogramming. This paper described different effects of the type, algebra, cycles, age, and species of the donor cells after nuclear transplantation on the reprogramming. An overview of the exposition and analysis through the donor cell cryopreservation, serum starvation, and different reagent treatments were discussed. PMID:19073545

  9. Plerixafor and Filgrastim For Mobilization of Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cells Before A Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-07-25

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular

  10. Impact of donor source on hematopoietic cell transplantation outcomes for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS)

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, Corey S.; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Atallah, Ehab; Rizzo, J. Douglas; Maziarz, Richard T.; Cortes, Jorge; Kalaycio, Matt E.; Horowitz, Mary M.

    2013-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) from human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matched related donor (MRD) and matched unrelated donors (MUD) produces similar survival for patients with acute myelogenous leukemia. Whether these results can be extended to patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is unknown. Therefore, analysis of post-HCT outcomes for MDS was performed. Outcomes of 701 adult MDS patients who underwent HCT between 2002 and 2006 were analyzed (MRD [n = 176], 8 of 8 HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1 allele matched MUD [n = 413], 7 of 8 MUD [ n = 112]). Median age was 53 years (range, 22-78 years). In multivariate analyses, MRD HCT recipients had similar disease free survival (DFS) and survival rates compared with 8 of 8 MUD HCT recipients (relative risk [RR] 1.13 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.91-1.42] and 1.24 [95% CI 0.98-1.56], respectively), and both MRD and 8 of 8 MUD had superior DFS (RR 1.47 [95% CI 1.10-1.96] and 1.29 [95% CI 1.00-1.66], respectively) and survival (RR 1.62 [95% CI 1.21-2.17] and 1.30 [95% CI 1.01-1.68], respectively) compared with 7 of 8 MUD HCT recipients. In patients with MDS, MRD remains the best stem cell source followed by 8 of 8 MUD. Transplantation from 7 of 8 MUD is associated with significantly poorer outcomes. PMID:23847196

  11. Donor Chimerism Early after Reduced-intensity Conditioning Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Predicts Relapse and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Koreth, John; Kim, Haesook T.; Nikiforow, Sarah; Milford, Edgar L.; Armand, Philippe; Cutler, Corey; Glotzbecker, Brett; Ho, Vincent T.; Antin, Joseph H.; Soiffer, Robert J.; Ritz, Jerome; Alyea, Edwin P.

    2015-01-01

    The impact of early donor cell chimerism on outcomes of T-replete reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is ill-defined. We evaluated day 30 (D30) and 100 (D100) total donor cell chimerism after RIC HSCT undertaken between 2002 and 2010 at our institution, excluding patients who died or relapsed before D30. When available, donor T-cell chimerism was also assessed. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS). Secondary outcomes included progression-free survival (PFS), relapse and non-relapse mortality (NRM). 688 patients with hematologic malignancies (48% myeloid; 52% lymphoid) and a median age of 57 years (range, 18-74) undergoing RIC HSCT with T-replete donor grafts (97% peripheral blood; 92% HLA-matched) and median follow-up of 58.2 months (range, 12.6-120.7) were evaluated. In multivariable analysis total donor cell and T-cell chimerism at D30 and D100 each predicted RIC HSCT outcomes, with D100 total donor cell chimerism most predictive. D100 total donor cell chimerism <90% was associated with increased relapse (HR 2.54, 95% CI 1.83-3.51, p<0.0001), impaired PFS (HR 2.01, 95% CI 1.53-2.65, p<0.0001) and worse OS (1.50, 95% CI 1.11-2.04, p=0.009), but not NRM (HR 0.76; 95% CI 0.44-2.27, p=0.33). There was no additional utility of incorporating sustained D30-D100 total donor cell chimerism, or T-cell chimerism. Low donor chimerism early after RIC HSCT is an independent risk factor for relapse and impaired survival. Donor chimerism assessment early after RIC HSCT can prognosticate for long-term outcomes and help identify high-risk patient cohorts that may benefit from additional therapeutic interventions. PMID:24907627

  12. First cloned swamp buffalo produced from adult ear fibroblast cell.

    PubMed

    Tasripoo, K; Suthikrai, W; Sophon, S; Jintana, R; Nualchuen, W; Usawang, S; Bintvihok, A; Techakumphu, M; Srisakwattana, K

    2014-07-01

    The world's first cloned swamp buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) derived from adult ear skin fibroblast has been reported. Donor fibroblast cells were produced from biopsies taken from adult male ear skin and in vitro matured oocytes obtained from a slaughterhouse were used as cytoplasts. A total of 39 blastocysts and 19 morulae fresh embryos were transferred into 12 recipient buffaloes. Progesterone assays indicated establishment of pregnancy in 10 of the 12 buffaloes (83.3%) after 45 days, with six animals still pregnant at 3 months. One recipient maintained pregnancy to term and naturally delivered a 40 kg male calf after 326 days of gestation. DNA analysis showed that the cloned calf was genetically identical to the donor cells. Genotype analyses, using 12 buffalo microsatellite markers, confirmed that the cloned calf was derived from the donor cell lines. In conclusion, the present study reports, for the first time, the establishment of pregnancy and birth of the first cloned Thai swamp buffalo derived from adult ear skin fibroblast cells.

  13. Donor-specific anti-HLA Abs and graft failure in matched unrelated donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ciurea, Stefan O.; Thall, Peter F.; Wang, Xuemei; Wang, Sa A.; Hu, Ying; Cano, Pedro; Aung, Fleur; Rondon, Gabriela; Molldrem, Jeffrey J.; Korbling, Martin; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; de Lima, Marcos; Champlin, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    Anti-HLA donor-specific Abs (DSAs) have been reported to be associated with graft failure in mismatched hematopoietic stem cell transplantation; however, their role in the development of graft failure in matched unrelated donor (MUD) transplantation remains unclear. We hypothesize that DSAs against a mismatched HLA-DPB1 locus is associated with graft failure in this setting. The presence of anti-HLA Abs before transplantation was determined prospectively in 592 MUD transplantation recipients using mixed-screen beads in a solid-phase fluorescent assay. DSA identification was performed using single-Ag beads containing the corresponding donor's HLA-mismatched Ags. Anti-HLA Abs were detected in 116 patients (19.6%), including 20 patients (3.4%) with anti-DPB1 Abs. Overall, graft failure occurred in 19 of 592 patients (3.2%), including 16 of 584 (2.7%) patients without anti-HLA Abs compared with 3 of 8 (37.5%) patients with DSA (P = .0014). In multivariate analysis, DSAs were the only factor highly associated with graft failure (P = .0001; odds ratio = 21.3). Anti-HLA allosensitization was higher overall in women than in men (30.8% vs 12.1%; P < .0001) and higher in women with 1 (P = .008) and 2 or more pregnancies (P = .0003) than in men. We conclude that the presence of anti-DPB1 DSAs is associated with graft failure in MUD hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:21967975

  14. Emerging restorative treatments for Parkinson's disease: manipulation and inducement of dopaminergic neurons from adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junpeng; Xu, Qunyuan

    2011-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disease, characterized by a selective loss of midbrain Dopaminergic (DA) neurons. To address this problem, various types of stem cells that have potential to differentiate into DA neurons are being investigated as cellular therapies for PD, including cells derived from embryonic or adult donor tissue, and embryonic stem cells. These cell sources, however, have raised certain questions with regard to ethical and rejection issues. Recent progress in adult stems has further proved that the cells derived from adult tissue could be expanded and differentiated into DA precursor cells in vitro, and cell therapy with adult stem cells could produce a clear improvement for PD models. Using adult stem cells for clinic application may not only overcome the ethical problem inherent in using human fetal tissue or embryonic stem cells, but also open the possibility for autologous transplantation. The patient-specific adult stem cell is therefore a potential and prospective candidate for PD treatment.

  15. Stem cell donation--what advice can be given to the donor?

    PubMed

    Pamphilon, Derwood; Siddiq, Samreen; Brunskill, Susan; Dorée, Carolyn; Hyde, Chris; Horowitz, Mary; Stanworth, Simon

    2009-10-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is widely used to treat patients with a range of haematological and non-haematological disorders. Both bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cell collection are associated with morbidity and, very rarely, mortality. We investigated the information that exists to adequately inform donors about the relative merits of each procedure. We carried out a systematic review analysing data from six prospective randomised controlled trials of related donors and discuss here the merits and drawbacks of this approach. Registry data mostly describes patient outcome but stem cell donor registries collect and report information on unrelated donors which could easily be extended to related donors. Further well-designed, randomised studies are required. PMID:19681886

  16. Donor Peripheral Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematolymphoid Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-16

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  17. Telomere-to-centromere ratio of bovine clones, embryos, gametes, fetal cells, and adult cells.

    PubMed

    Meerdo, Lora N; Reed, William A; White, Kenneth L

    2005-01-01

    In 1997, Dolly, the first animal cloned from an adult cell, was born. It was announced in 1999 that Dolly might be aging faster than normal because her telomeres were shorter than age-matched control sheep. Telomeres, a repeated DNA sequence located at the ends of linear chromosomes, allow for base pair loss during DNA replication. Telomere shortening acts as a "mitotic clock," leading to replicative senescence. By using whole cell lysate and slot-blot analysis, we determined the telomere-to-centromere ratio (T/C) for bovine gametes, embryos, fetal tissues (brain, heart, lung, kidney, uterus, ovary, and skin), adult donor cells, and cloned embryos. Our data indicates a consistency in T/C among the various fetal tissues. The T/C of sperm is significantly lower than in oocytes. The T/C decreases from the oocyte to the 2-8-cell stage embryo, increases dramatically at the morula stage, and decreases at the blastocyst stage. Our data shows no significant difference in T/C between cloned embryos and in vitro fertilized (IVF) embryos, but there is a significant difference between cloned embryos and adult donor cells. In conclusion, the enucleated bovine oocyte has the ability to reestablish the telomere length of adult somatic cell donor nuclei. PMID:15996118

  18. Differentiated cells are more efficient than adult stem cells for cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Sung, Li-Ying; Gao, Shaorong; Shen, Hongmei; Yu, Hui; Song, Yifang; Smith, Sadie L; Chang, Ching-Chien; Inoue, Kimiko; Kuo, Lynn; Lian, Jin; Li, Ao; Tian, X Cindy; Tuck, David P; Weissman, Sherman M; Yang, Xiangzhong; Cheng, Tao

    2006-11-01

    Since the creation of Dolly via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), more than a dozen species of mammals have been cloned using this technology. One hypothesis for the limited success of cloning via SCNT (1%-5%) is that the clones are likely to be derived from adult stem cells. Support for this hypothesis comes from the findings that the reproductive cloning efficiency for embryonic stem cells is five to ten times higher than that for somatic cells as donors and that cloned pups cannot be produced directly from cloned embryos derived from differentiated B and T cells or neuronal cells. The question remains as to whether SCNT-derived animal clones can be derived from truly differentiated somatic cells. We tested this hypothesis with mouse hematopoietic cells at different differentiation stages: hematopoietic stem cells, progenitor cells and granulocytes. We found that cloning efficiency increases over the differentiation hierarchy, and terminally differentiated postmitotic granulocytes yield cloned pups with the greatest cloning efficiency.

  19. Induction of T-cell hyporesponsiveness by intrahepatic modulation of donor antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chung, S W; Gorczynski, R M; Dziadkowiec, I; Levy, G A

    1995-01-01

    In this study, we examined the ability of varying populations of donor cells from B6 mice to induce hyporesponsiveness in T lymphocytes from C3H mice in vitro and in vivo. Small, resting B lymphocytes were inefficient stimulators of T-lymphocyte proliferation compared to splenic mononuclear cells (SMNC) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced B-cell blasts in vitro (P < 0.05). Pretreatment of SMNC with anti-B7-1 or anti-intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) monoclonal antibodies (mAb) similarly resulted in inefficient stimulation of T-cell proliferation in vitro (P < 0.05). However, in vivo, only intrahepatic, but not intravenous, injection of donor cells into C3H mice resulted in decreased T-lymphocyte proliferation in response to restimulation by alloantigen. This effect was most pronounced following intrahepatic injection of resting B lymphocytes or SMNC pretreated with anti-ICAM-1 mAb compared to uninjected or intravenously injected mice (P < 0.05). The hyporesponsiveness was associated with an increased production of interleukin-4 (IL-4) by the responder T lymphocytes and correlated with enhanced skin allograft survival. These data demonstrate that intrahepatic injection of donor-derived cells induces T-lymphocyte hyporesponsiveness. The mechanism appears to be modulated by an ICAM-1-mediated signal resulting in expansion of an IL-4-producing T-lymphocyte population. PMID:7558153

  20. Naive Donor NK Cell Repertoires Associated with Less Leukemia Relapse after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Björklund, Andreas T; Clancy, Trevor; Goodridge, Jodie P; Béziat, Vivien; Schaffer, Marie; Hovig, Eivind; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Ljungman, Per T; Malmberg, Karl-Johan

    2016-02-01

    Acute and latent human CMV cause profound changes in the NK cell repertoire, with expansion and differentiation of educated NK cells expressing self-specific inhibitory killer cell Ig-like receptors. In this study, we addressed whether such CMV-induced imprints on the donor NK cell repertoire influenced the outcome of allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Hierarchical clustering of high-resolution immunophenotyping data covering key NK cell parameters, including frequencies of CD56(bright), NKG2A(+), NKG2C(+), and CD57(+) NK cell subsets, as well as the size of the educated NK cell subset, was linked to clinical outcomes. Clusters defining naive (NKG2A(+)CD57(-)NKG2C(-)) NK cell repertoires in the donor were associated with decreased risk for relapse in recipients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome (hazard ratio [HR], 0.09; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.03-0.27; p < 0.001). Furthermore, recipients with naive repertoires at 9-12 mo after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation had increased disease-free survival (HR, 7.2; 95% CI: 1.6-33; p = 0.01) and increased overall survival (HR, 9.3; 95% CI: 1.1-77, p = 0.04). Conversely, patients with a relative increase in differentiated NK cells at 9-12 mo displayed a higher rate of late relapses (HR, 8.41; 95% CI: 6.7-11; p = 0.02), reduced disease-free survival (HR, 0.12; 95% CI: 0.12-0.74; p = 0.02), and reduced overall survival (HR, 0.07; 95% CI: 0.01-0.69; p = 0.02). Thus, our data suggest that naive donor NK cell repertoires are associated with protection against leukemia relapse after allogeneic HSCT. PMID:26746188

  1. In utero hematopoietic cell transplantation: induction of donor specific immune tolerance and postnatal transplants

    PubMed Central

    Peranteau, William H.

    2014-01-01

    In utero hematopoietic cell transplantation (IUHCT) is a non-myeloablative non-immunosuppressive transplant approach that allows for donor cell engraftment across immunologic barriers. Successful engraftment is associated with donor-specific tolerance. IUHCT has the potential to treat a large number of congenital hematologic, immunologic, and genetic diseases either by achieving high enough engraftment levels following a single IUHCT or by inducing donor specific tolerance to allow for non-toxic same-donor postnatal transplants. This review evaluates donor specific tolerance induction achieved by IUHCT. Specifically it addresses the need to achieve threshold levels of donor cell engraftment following IUHCT to consistently obtain immunologic tolerance. The mechanisms of tolerance induction including partial deletion of donor reactive host T cells by direct and indirect antigen presentation and the role of regulatory T cells in maintaining tolerance are reviewed. Finally, this review highlights the promising clinical potential of in utero tolerance induction to provide a platform on which postnatal cellular and organ transplants can be performed without myeloablative or immunosuppressive conditioning. PMID:25429269

  2. Quantitative survival model for short-term survival after adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tsunematsu, Ichiro; Ogura, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Kayoko; Koizumi, Akio; Tanigawa, Nobuhiko; Tanaka, Koichi

    2006-06-01

    Adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation (ALDLT) has been accepted as an important option for end-stage liver disease, but information regarding the risk factors remains fragmentary. We aimed to establish a predictive model for 90-day survival. In the first step, a total of 286 cases who had received primary ALDLT using a right lobe graft between 1998 and 2004 were randomly divided into 2 cohorts at a ratio of 2:1 (191 vs. 95 recipients). The larger cohort of patients was used to develop a model. The outcome was defined as 90-day survival, and a total of 39 preoperative and operative variables, including the period of surgery (1998-2001 vs. 2002-2004), were included using Cox's proportional hazard regression model. Two mismatches of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) type DR (hazard ratio [HR] = 4.45; confidence interval [CI] = 1.96-10.1), log(e)[blood loss volume] (HR = 2.43; CI = 1.64-3.60), period of surgery (1998-2001 vs. 2002-2004) (HR = 2.41; CI = 1.04-5.57), and log(e)[serum C-reactive protein or CRP] (HR = 1.64; CI = 1.13-2.38) were found to be independent risk factors. In the second step, we tried to establish a realistic survival model. In this step, we created 2 models, 1 that used all 4 variables (model 1) and 1 (model 2) in which blood loss volume was replaced with the past history of upper abdominal surgery and Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score (> or =25), both of which showed associations with blood loss volume. These models were applied to the smaller cohort of 95 patients. Receiver operating characteristic analyses demonstrated that both models showed similar significant c-statistics (0.63 and 0.62, respectively). In conclusion, model 2 can provide a rough estimation of the 90-day survival after ALDLT.

  3. Donor age negatively impacts adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cell expansion and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Human adipose tissue is an ideal autologous source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for various regenerative medicine and tissue engineering strategies. Aged patients are one of the primary target populations for many promising applications. It has long been known that advanced age is negatively correlated with an organism’s reparative and regenerative potential, but little and conflicting information is available about the effects of age on the quality of human adipose tissue derived MSCs (hAT-MSCs). Methods To study the influence of age, the expansion and in vitro differentiation potential of hAT-MSCs from young (<30 years), adult (35-50 years) and aged (>60 years) individuals were investigated. MSCs were characterized for expression of the genes p16INK4a and p21 along with measurements of population doublings (PD), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, cellular senescence and differentiation potential. Results Aged MSCs displayed senescent features when compared with cells isolated from young donors, concomitant with reduced viability and proliferation. These features were also associated with significantly reduced differentiation potential in aged MSCs compared to young MSCs. Conclusions In conclusion, advancing age negatively impacts stem cell function and such age related alterations may be detrimental for successful stem cell therapies. PMID:24397850

  4. Mechanical Stimulation in Preventing Bone Density Loss in Patients Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-07-05

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Disseminated Neuroblastoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Poor Prognosis Metastatic Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved

  5. Neurologic complications in adult living donor liver transplant patients: an underestimated factor?

    PubMed

    Saner, Fuat Hakan; Gensicke, Julia; Olde Damink, Steven W M; Pavlaković, Goran; Treckmann, Juergen; Dammann, Marc; Kaiser, Gernot M; Sotiropoulos, Georgios C; Radtke, Arnold; Koeppen, Susanne; Beckebaum, Susanne; Cicinnati, Vito; Nadalin, Silvio; Malagó, Massimo; Paul, Andreas; Broelsch, Christoph E

    2010-02-01

    Liver transplantation is the only curative treatment in patients with end-stage liver disease. Neurological complications (NC) are increasingly reported to occur in patients after cadaveric liver transplantation. This retrospective cohort study aims to evaluate the incidence and causes of NC in living donor liver transplant (LDLT) patients in our transplant center. Between August 1998 and December 2005, 121 adult LDLT patients were recruited into our study. 17% of patients experienced NC, and it occurred significantly more frequently in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis (42%) and autoimmune hepatitis (43%) as compared with patients with hepatitis B or C (9/10%, P = 0.013). The most common NC was encephalopathy (47.6%) followed by seizures (9.5%). The choice of immunosuppression by calcineurin inhibitor (Tacrolimus or Cyclosporin A) showed no significant difference in the incidence of NC (19 vs. 17%). The occurrence of NC did not influence the clinical outcome, since mortality rate, median ICU stay and length of hospital stay were similar between the two groups. Most patients who survived showed a nearly complete recovery of their NC. NCs occur in approximately 1 in 6 patients after LDLT and seem to be predominantly transient in nature, without major impact on clinical outcome. PMID:19727899

  6. Vascular complications after adult living donor liver transplantation: Evaluation with ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lin; Lu, Qiang; Luo, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) has been widely used to treat end-stage liver disease with improvement in surgical technology and the application of new immunosuppressants. Vascular complications after liver transplantation remain a major threat to the survival of recipients. LDLT recipients are more likely to develop vascular complications because of their complex vascular reconstruction and the slender vessels. Early diagnosis and treatment are critical for the survival of graft and recipients. As a non-invasive, cost-effective and non-radioactive method with bedside availability, conventional gray-scale and Doppler ultrasonography play important roles in identifying vascular complications in the early postoperative period and during the follow-up. Recently, with the detailed vascular tracing and perfusion visualization, contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has significantly improved the diagnosis of postoperative vascular complications. This review focuses on the role of conventional gray-scale ultrasound, Doppler ultrasound and CEUS for early diagnosis of vascular complications after adult LDLT. PMID:26819527

  7. [Langerhans cell histiocytosis in adults].

    PubMed

    Néel, A; Artifoni, M; Donadieu, J; Lorillon, G; Hamidou, M; Tazi, A

    2015-10-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disease characterized by the infiltration of one or more organs by Langerhans cell-like dendritic cells, most often organized in granulomas. The disease has been initially described in children. The clinical picture of LCH is highly variable. Bone, skin, pituitary gland, lung, central nervous system, lymphoid organs are the main organs involved whereas liver and intestinal tract localizations are less frequently encountered. LCH course ranges from a fulminant multisystem disease to spontaneous resolution. Several randomized controlled trials have enable pediatricians to refine the management of children with LCH. Adult LCH has some specific features and poses distinct therapeutic challenges, knowing that data on these patients are limited. Herein, we will provide an overview of current knowledge regarding adult LCH and its management. We will also discuss recent advances in the understanding of the disease, (i.e. the role of BRAF oncogene) that opens the way toward targeted therapies.

  8. [Langerhans cell histiocytosis in adults].

    PubMed

    Néel, A; Artifoni, M; Donadieu, J; Lorillon, G; Hamidou, M; Tazi, A

    2015-10-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disease characterized by the infiltration of one or more organs by Langerhans cell-like dendritic cells, most often organized in granulomas. The disease has been initially described in children. The clinical picture of LCH is highly variable. Bone, skin, pituitary gland, lung, central nervous system, lymphoid organs are the main organs involved whereas liver and intestinal tract localizations are less frequently encountered. LCH course ranges from a fulminant multisystem disease to spontaneous resolution. Several randomized controlled trials have enable pediatricians to refine the management of children with LCH. Adult LCH has some specific features and poses distinct therapeutic challenges, knowing that data on these patients are limited. Herein, we will provide an overview of current knowledge regarding adult LCH and its management. We will also discuss recent advances in the understanding of the disease, (i.e. the role of BRAF oncogene) that opens the way toward targeted therapies. PMID:26150351

  9. Adult stem cells applied to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Cuenca-López, M D; Zamora-Navas, P; García-Herrera, J M; Godino, M; López-Puertas, J M; Guerado, E; Becerra, J; Andrades, J A

    2008-01-01

    Regeneration takes place in the body at a moment or another throughout life. Bone, cartilage, and tendons (the key components of the structure and articulation in the body) have a limited capacity for self-repair and, after traumatic injury or disease, the regenerative power of adult tissue is often insufficient. When organs or tissues are irreparably damaged, they may be replaced by an artificial device or by a donor organ. However, the number of available donor organs is considerably limited. Generation of tissue-engineered replacement organs by extracting stem cells from the patient, growing them and modifying them in clinical conditions after re-introduction in the body represents an ideal source for corrective treatment. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are the multipotential progenitors that give rise to skeletal cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, muscle (skeletal and cardiac muscle), adipocytes (fat tissue) and hematopoietic (blood)-supportive stromal cells. MSCs are found in multiple connective tissues, in adult bone marrow, skeletal muscles and fat pads. The wide representation in adult tissues may be related to the existence of a circulating blood pool or that MSCs are associated to the vascular system.

  10. In Situ-Targeting of Dendritic Cells with Donor-Derived Apoptotic Cells Restrains Indirect Allorecognition and Ameliorates Allograft Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiliang; Shufesky, William J.; Montecalvo, Angela; Divito, Sherrie J.; Larregina, Adriana T.; Morelli, Adrian E.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is an atheromatous-like lesion that affects vessels of transplanted organs. It is a component of chronic rejection that conventional immuno-suppression fails to prevent, and is a major cause of graft loss. Indirect allo-recognition through T cells and allo-Abs are critical during CAV pathogenesis. We tested whether the indirect allo-response and its impact on CAV is down-regulated by in situ-delivery of donor Ags to recipient's dendritic cells (DCs) in lymphoid organs in a pro-tolerogenic fashion, through administration of donor splenocytes undergoing early apoptosis. Following systemic injection, donor apoptotic cells were internalized by splenic CD11chi CD8α+ and CD8− DCs, but not by CD11cint plasmacytoid DCs. Those DCs that phagocytosed apoptotic cells in vivo remained quiescent, resisted ex vivo-maturation, and presented allo-Ag for up to 3 days. Administration of donor apoptotic splenocytes, unlike cells alive, (i) promoted deletion, FoxP3 expression and IL-10 secretion, and decreased IFN-γ-release in indirect pathway CD4 T cells; and (ii) reduced cross-priming of anti-donor CD8 T cells in vivo. Targeting recipient's DCs with donor apoptotic cells reduced significantly CAV in a fully-mismatched aortic allograft model. The effect was donor specific, dependent on the physical characteristics of the apoptotic cells, and was associated to down-regulation of the indirect type-1 T cell allo-response and secretion of allo-Abs, when compared to recipients treated with donor cells alive or necrotic. Down-regulation of indirect allo-recognition through in situ-delivery of donor-Ag to recipient's quiescent DCs constitutes a promising strategy to prevent/ameliorate indirect allorecognition and CAV. PMID:19333400

  11. Differentiation of embryonic and adult stem cells into insulin producing cells.

    PubMed

    Zulewski, H

    2008-03-01

    Replacement of insulin producing cells represents an almost ideal treatment for patients with diabetes mellitus type 1. Transplantation of pancreatic islets of Langerhans is successful in experienced centers. The wider application of this therapy, however, is limited by the lack of donor organs. Insulin producing cells generated from stem cells represent an attractive alternative. Stem cells with the potential to differentiate into insulin producing cells include embryonic stem cells (ESC) as well as adult stem cells from various tissues including the pancreas, liver, bone marrow and adipose tissue. The use of human ESC is hampered by ethical concerns but research with human ESC may help us to decipher important steps in the differentiation process in vitro since almost all information available on pancreas development are based on animal studies. The present review summarizes the current knowledge on the development of insulin producing cells from embryonic and adult stem cells with special emphasis on pancreatic, hepatic and human mesenchymal stem cells. PMID:18427390

  12. Donor chimerism early after reduced-intensity conditioning hematopoietic stem cell transplantation predicts relapse and survival.

    PubMed

    Koreth, John; Kim, Haesook T; Nikiforow, Sarah; Milford, Edgar L; Armand, Philippe; Cutler, Corey; Glotzbecker, Brett; Ho, Vincent T; Antin, Joseph H; Soiffer, Robert J; Ritz, Jerome; Alyea, Edwin P

    2014-10-01

    The impact of early donor cell chimerism on outcomes of T cell-replete reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is ill defined. We evaluated day 30 (D30) and 100 (D100) total donor cell chimerism after RIC HSCT undertaken between 2002 and 2010 at our institution, excluding patients who died or relapsed before D30. When available, donorcell chimerism was also assessed. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS). Secondary outcomes included progression-free survival (PFS), relapse, and nonrelapse mortality (NRM). We evaluated 688 patients with hematologic malignancies (48% myeloid and 52% lymphoid) and a median age of 57 years (range, 18 to 74) undergoing RIC HSCT with T cell-replete donor grafts (97% peripheral blood; 92% HLA-matched), with a median follow-up of 58.2 months (range, 12.6 to 120.7). In multivariable analysis, total donor cell and T cell chimerism at D30 and D100 each predicted RIC HSCT outcomes, with D100 total donor cell chimerism most predictive. D100 total donor cell chimerism <90% was associated with increased relapse (hazard ratio [HR], 2.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.83 to 3.51; P < .0001), impaired PFS (HR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.53 to 2.65; P < .0001), and worse OS (HR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.11 to 2.04, P = .009), but not with NRM (HR, .76; 95% CI, .44 to 2.27; P = .33). There was no additional utility of incorporating sustained D30 to D100 total donor cell chimerism or T cell chimerism. Low donor chimerism early after RIC HSCT is an independent risk factor for relapse and impaired survival. Donor chimerism assessment early after RIC HSCT can prognosticate for long-term outcomes and help identify high-risk patient cohorts who may benefit from additional therapeutic interventions.

  13. Prevalence of Syphilis among Blood and Stem Cell Donors in Saudi Arabia: An Institutional Experience

    PubMed Central

    Elyamany, Ghaleb; Al amro, Mohamed; Pereira, Winston Costa; Alsuhaibani, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Syphilis is one of the known transfusion-transmissible infections and causes 100,000 deaths yearly, with around 90% of these deaths occurring in the developing world. Little data is available regarding the prevalence of syphilis among Saudi blood and stem cell donors. We conducted a survey on the incidence of syphilis among all blood and stem cell donors. Methods This study was conducted at the Prince Sultan Military Medical City in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia in the 10 years period data during 2006–2015. Data were analyzed about full history, physical examination, age, sex, weight, profession, marital status, number of the donations, data of last donation, having a relation who received blood transfusion, as well as the screening test results of the donated blood. We determined the seroprevalence of infection and compared by sex and other variable through frequency analysis, Chi square, Fisher, and prevalence ratios. Results Approximately 240,000 blood donors were screened and studied in the period of study. Most of the blood donors were male (98.3%) and 89% of them were citizens of Saudi Arabia. According to our findings, we estimated that, in the last 10 years, approximately 0.044% of all the blood donors were syphilis positive cases. No cases were detected as positive for syphilis among stem cell donors. Only 60 blood donors tested positive for syphilis. In addition, we studied 202 stem cell transplant donors during the same period, of which 59% were male and none texted positive for syphilis. Conclusions A concerted effort between the government, health care providers, regulatory bodies and accreditation agencies have all contributed in eliminating the risk of spreading syphilis among blood donors. PMID:27757184

  14. The Satellite Cell in Male and Female, Developing and Adult Mouse Muscle: Distinct Stem Cells for Growth and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Alice; Boldrin, Luisa; Morgan, Jennifer Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Satellite cells are myogenic cells found between the basal lamina and the sarcolemma of the muscle fibre. Satellite cells are the source of new myofibres; as such, satellite cell transplantation holds promise as a treatment for muscular dystrophies. We have investigated age and sex differences between mouse satellite cells in vitro and assessed the importance of these factors as mediators of donor cell engraftment in an in vivo model of satellite cell transplantation. We found that satellite cell numbers are increased in growing compared to adult and in male compared to female adult mice. We saw no difference in the expression of the myogenic regulatory factors between male and female mice, but distinct profiles were observed according to developmental stage. We show that, in contrast to adult mice, the majority of satellite cells from two week old mice are proliferating to facilitate myofibre growth; however a small proportion of these cells are quiescent and not contributing to this growth programme. Despite observed changes in satellite cell populations, there is no difference in engraftment efficiency either between satellite cells derived from adult or pre-weaned donor mice, male or female donor cells, or between male and female host muscle environments. We suggest there exist two distinct satellite cell populations: one for muscle growth and maintenance and one for muscle regeneration. PMID:22662253

  15. From the Cover: Cell-replacement therapy for diabetes: Generating functional insulin-producing tissue from adult human liver cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapir, Tamar; Shternhall, Keren; Meivar-Levy, Irit; Blumenfeld, Tamar; Cohen, Hamutal; Skutelsky, Ehud; Eventov-Friedman, Smadar; Barshack, Iris; Goldberg, Iris; Pri-Chen, Sarah; Ben-Dor, Lya; Polak-Charcon, Sylvie; Karasik, Avraham; Shimon, Ilan; Mor, Eytan; Ferber, Sarah

    2005-05-01

    Shortage in tissue availability from cadaver donors and the need for life-long immunosuppression severely restrict the large-scale application of cell-replacement therapy for diabetic patients. This study suggests the potential use of adult human liver as alternate tissue for autologous beta-cell-replacement therapy. By using pancreatic and duodenal homeobox gene 1 (PDX-1) and soluble factors, we induced a comprehensive developmental shift of adult human liver cells into functional insulin-producing cells. PDX-1-treated human liver cells express insulin, store it in defined granules, and secrete the hormone in a glucose-regulated manner. When transplanted under the renal capsule of diabetic, immunodeficient mice, the cells ameliorated hyperglycemia for prolonged periods of time. Inducing developmental redirection of adult liver offers the potential of a cell-replacement therapy for diabetics by allowing the patient to be the donor of his own insulin-producing tissue. pancreas | transdifferentiation

  16. Humoral and cellular CMV responses in healthy donors; identification of a frequent population of CMV-specific, CD4+ T cells in seronegative donors.

    PubMed

    Loeth, Nina; Assing, Kristian; Madsen, Hans O; Vindeløv, Lars; Buus, Soren; Stryhn, Anette

    2012-01-01

    CMV status is an important risk factor in immune compromised patients. In hematopoeitic cell transplantations (HCT), both donor and recipient are tested routinely for CMV status by serological assays; however, one might argue that it might also be of relevance to examine CMV status by cellular (i.e., T lymphocyte) assays. Here, we have analyzed the CMV status of 100 healthy blood bank donors using both serology and cellular assays. About half (56%) were found to be CMV seropositive, and they all mounted strong CD8+ and/or moderate CD4+ T cell responses ex vivo against the immunodominant CMV protein, pp65. Of the 44 seronegative donors, only five (11%) mounted ex vivo T cell responses; surprisingly, 33 (75%) mounted strong CD4+ T cell responses after a brief in vitro peptide stimulation culture. This may have significant implications for the analysis and selection of HCT donors.

  17. Mouse host unlicensed NK cells promote donor allogeneic bone marrow engraftment

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Maite; Sun, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells exist as subsets based on expression of inhibitory receptors that recognize major histocompatibility complex I (MHCI) molecules. NK cell subsets bearing MHCI binding receptors for self-MHCI have been termed as “licensed” and exhibit a higher ability to respond to stimuli. In the context of bone marrow transplantation (BMT), host licensed-NK (L-NK) cells have also been demonstrated to be responsible for the acute rejection of allogeneic and MHCI-deficient BM cells (BMCs) in mice after lethal irradiation. However, the role of recipient unlicensed-NK (U-NK) cells has not been well established with regard to allogeneic BMC resistance. After NK cell stimulation, the prior depletion of host L-NK cells resulted in a marked increase of donor engraftment compared with the untreated group. Surprisingly, this increased donor engraftment was reduced after total host NK cell depletion, indicating that U-NK cells can actually promote donor allogeneic BMC engraftment. Furthermore, direct coculture of U-NK cells with allogeneic but not syngeneic BMCs resulted in increased colony-forming unit cell growth in vitro, which was at least partially mediated by granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) production. These data demonstrate that host NK cell subsets exert markedly different roles in allogeneic BMC engraftment where host L- and U-NK cells reject or promote donor allogeneic BMC engraftment, respectively. PMID:26738538

  18. The effect of donor variation and senescence on endothelial differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Portalska, Karolina Janeczek; Groen, Nathalie; Krenning, Guido; Georgi, Nicole; Mentink, Anouk; Harmsen, Martin C; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan

    2013-11-01

    Application of autologous cells is considered for a broad range of regenerative therapies because it is not surrounded by the immunological and ethical issues of allo- or xenogenic cells. However, isolation, expansion, and application of autologous cells do suffer from variability in therapeutic efficacy due to donor to donor differences and due to prolonged culture. One important source of autologous cells is mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), which can differentiate toward endothelial-like cells, thus making them an ideal candidate as cell source for tissue vascularization. Here we screened MSCs from 20 donors for their endothelial differentiation capacity and correlated it with the gene expression profile of the whole genome in the undifferentiated state. Cells of all donors were able to form tubes on Matrigel and induced the expression of endothelial genes, although with quantitative differences. In addition, we analyzed the effect of prolonged in vitro expansion on the multipotency of human MSCs and found that endothelial differentiation is only mildly sensitive to expansion-induced loss of differentiation as compared to osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation. Our results show the robustness of the endothelial differentiation protocol and the gene expression data give insight in the differences in endothelial differentiation between donors.

  19. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult

  20. Autologous Stem Cell Transplant Recipients Tolerate Haploidentical Related-Donor Natural Killer Cell Enriched Infusions

    PubMed Central

    Klingemann, Hans; Grodman, Carrie; Cutler, Elliott; Duque, Marvin; Kadidlo, Diane; Klein, Andreas K.; Sprague, Kellie A.; Miller, Kenneth B.; Comenzo, Raymond L.; Kewalramani, Tarun; Yu, Neng; Van Etten, Richard A.; McKenna, David H.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND In the setting of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT), infusing natural killer (NK) cells from a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) mismatched donor can mediate an anti-leukemic effect. Graft versus tumor (GvT) effect following autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) may result in less disease relapse. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS We performed a phase I clinical trial to assess the safety and feasibility of infusing distantly processed donor NK enriched mononuclear cell (NK-MC) infusions from a MHC haplotype mismatched (haploidentical) donor to patients who recently underwent ASCT for a hematologic malignancy. On day 1, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MC) were obtained by steady-state leukapheresis and sent from Boston to the Production Assistance for Cellular Therapies (PACT) facility at the University of Minnesota, where immunomagnetic depletion of CD3 cells was performed on day 2. NK-MC product were then returned to Boston on day 2 for infusion on day 3. Toxicity, cellular product characteristics and logistic events were monitored. RESULTS At a median of 90 days (range, 49–191) following ASCT, thirteen patients were treated with escalating doses of NK-MC per kg from 105 to 2 ×107. Adverse effects included grade 2 rigors and muscle aches, but no grade 3 or 4 events, and no GvHD or marrow suppression. One air courier delay occurred. NK-MC products were viable with cytotoxic activity after transport. CONCLUSION CD3-depleted, MHC mismatched allogeneic NK-MC infusions can be safely and feasibly administered to patients after ASCT following distant processing and transport, justifying further development of this approach. PMID:22738379

  1. Acute GVHD is a strong predictor of full donor CD3+ T cell chimerism after reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    El-Cheikh, Jean; Vazquez, Alberto; Crocchiolo, Roberto; Furst, Sabine; Calmels, Boris; Castagna, Luca; Lemarie, Claude; Granata, Angela; Ladaique, Patrick; Oudin, Claire; Faucher, Catherine; Chabannon, Christian; Blaise, Didier

    2012-12-01

    The monitoring of chimerism is a standard procedure to assess engraftment and achievement of full donor lymphoid cells after reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) stem cell transplantation (Allo-SCT). However, there is no consensus on when and how often to monitor post-transplant chimerism. We retrospectively analyzed our experience regarding the impact of acute graft versus host disease (GVHD) for the prediction of allograft chimerism. One-hundred-and-fifteen patients transplanted between 2001 and 2010 were identified. This group included 57 females and 58 males with a median age of 50 years (range: 26-68). Patients evaluated in this study were adult patients with hematologic malignancies, who received transplants from an HLA-matched sibling donor or matched unrelated donor (MUD) at allele level so-called 10/10, and received the RIC regimen including fludarabine/busulfan and anti-thymoglobulin (ATG). Mixed T-cell chimerism was defined as between 5 and 94% recipient cells, and full chimerism was defined as the presence of more than 95% donor T-cell chimerism (TCC). Full donor TCC was achieved in 93 patients (81%) at a median of 77 days (range: 30-120) post-transplant. The cumulative incidence of Grade 2-4 GVHD in our population was 25% (95% CI 17-34). The analysis of the population of patients with acute GVHD grade ≥2 showed that at day 120 after Allo-SCT they all had a total full donor TCC. On the other hand, 78 (68%) patients without acute GVHD grade ≥2 presented with mixed chimerism (p = 0.002) on day 120 post-transplant. Interestingly, patients who received ATG 5 mg/kg obtained a higher probability of complete chimerism compared with those receiving 2.5 mg/kg (p = 0.03). In conclusion, our study demonstrates that acute GVHD was predictive of full donor TCC after RIC Allo-SCT. Therefore, our data may challenge the concept of the frequent or close monitoring of donor chimerism in some patients with ongoing acute GVHD. However, chimerism testing could represent

  2. False Positive B-Cells Crossmatch after Prior Rituximab Exposure of the Kidney Donor

    PubMed Central

    Desoutter, Judith; Apithy, Marie-Joëlle; Bartczak, Ségolène; Guillaume, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Crossmatching is essential prior to kidney transplantation to confirm compatibility between the donor and the recipient, particularly to prevent acute antibody-mediated rejection. An unexpected positive crossmatch may be obtained in recipients with an autoimmune disease or preexisting antibodies not detected by single-antigen bead array due to complement interference or who have been previously treated by desensitization protocols such as rituximab, antithymocyte globulin, or intravenous immunoglobulins. We report donor and recipient investigations that revealed unexpected positive B-cells crossmatch, probably due to donor cells, as the donor had received rituximab therapy shortly before organ harvesting, in a context of severe idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. We consequently detected unexpected Class II IgG complement-dependent cytotoxicity for all sera tested. Other laboratory investigations failed to elucidate the reasons for this recipient-related positivity. PMID:27239362

  3. Augmentation of Chimerism in Whole Organ Recipients by Simultaneous Infusion of Donor Bone Marrow Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rao, A.S.; Fontes, P.; Zeevi, A.; Trucco, M.; Dodson, F.S.; Rybka, W.B.; Shapiro, R.; Jordan, M.; Pham, S.M.; Rilo, H.L.; Seskey, T.; Todo, S.; Scantlebury, V.; Vivas, C.; Demetris, A.J.; Fung, J.J.; Starzl, T.E.

    2010-01-01

    We had previously demonstrated the persistence of donor leukocytes in the peripheral blood and tissues of long-surviving kidneyl and live2-4 recipients who had stable graft function many years after transplantation.1-6 Donor cell chimerism has since been noted by other investigators in recipients of heart,7 liver,8 kidney,9 and lungl0 transplants. In an attempt to augment chimerism, and thereby facilitate graft function, we initiated a prospective trial to enhance this phenomenon by infusing 3 × l08/kg unaltered donor bone marrow cells perioperatively into an unmodified recipient of whole organ from the same donor. Additionally, 53 recipients of whole organ alone were monitored as controls. Reported herein are the first 20 of 64 study patients and 33 of 53 control patients who are more than 120 days posttransplantation. PMID:7878975

  4. Liver graft regeneration in right lobe adult living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y-F; Huang, T-L; Chen, T-Y; Tsang, L L-C; Ou, H-Y; Yu, C-Y; Concejero, A; Wang, C-C; Wang, S-H; Lin, T-S; Liu, Y-W; Yang, C-H; Yong, C-C; Chiu, K-W; Jawan, B; Eng, H-L; Chen, C-L

    2009-06-01

    Optimal portal flow is one of the essentials in adequate liver function, graft regeneration and outcome of the graft after right lobe adult living donor liver transplantation (ALDLT). The relations among factors that cause sufficient liver graft regeneration are still unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential predisposing factors that encourage liver graft regeneration after ALDLT. The study population consisted of right lobe ALDLT recipients from Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Kaohsiung Medical Center, Taiwan. The records, preoperative images, postoperative Doppler ultrasound evaluation and computed tomography studies performed 6 months after transplant were reviewed. The volume of the graft 6 months after transplant divided by the standard liver volume was calculated as the regeneration ratio. The predisposing risk factors were compiled from statistical analyses and included age, recipient body weight, native liver disease, spleen size before transplant, patency of the hepatic venous graft, graft weight-to-recipient weight ratio (GRWR), posttransplant portal flow, vascular and biliary complications and rejection. One hundred forty-five recipients were enrolled in this study. The liver graft regeneration ratio was 91.2 +/- 12.6% (range, 58-151). The size of the spleen (p = 0.00015), total portal flow and GRWR (p = 0.005) were linearly correlated with the regeneration rate. Patency of the hepatic venous tributary reconstructed was positively correlated to graft regeneration and was statistically significant (p = 0.017). Splenic artery ligation was advantageous to promote liver regeneration in specific cases but splenectomy did not show any positive advantage. Spleen size is a major factor contributing to portal flow and may directly trigger regeneration after transplant. Control of sufficient portal flow and adequate hepatic outflow are important factors in graft regeneration.

  5. Liver repopulation and correction of metabolic liver disease by transplanted adult mouse pancreatic cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Al-Dhalimy, M; Lagasse, E; Finegold, M; Grompe, M

    2001-02-01

    The emergence of cells with hepatocellular properties in the adult pancreas has been described in several experimental models. To determine whether adult pancreas contains cells that can give rise to therapeutically useful and biochemically normal hepatocytes, we transplanted suspensions of wild-type mouse pancreatic cells into syngeneic recipients deficient in fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase and manifesting tyrosinemia. Four of 34 (12%) mutant mice analyzed were fully rescued by donor-derived cells and had normal liver function. Ten additional mice (29%) showed histological evidence of donor-derived hepatocytes in the liver. Previous work has suggested that pancreatic liver precursors reside within or close to pancreatic ducts. We therefore performed additional transplantations using either primary cell suspensions enriched for ducts or cultured ducts. Forty-four mutant mice were transplanted with cells enriched for pancreatic duct cells, but only three of the 34 (9%) recipients analyzed displayed donor-derived hepatocytes. In addition, 28 of the fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase-deficient mice were transplanted with cultured pancreatic duct cells, but no donor-derived hepatocytes were observed. Our results demonstrate for the first time that adult mouse pancreas contains hepatocyte progenitor cells capable of significant therapeutic liver reconstitution. However, contrary to previous reports, we were unable to detect these cells within the duct compartment. PMID:11159194

  6. Donor satellite cell engraftment is significantly augmented when the host niche is preserved and endogenous satellite cells are incapacitated.

    PubMed

    Boldrin, Luisa; Neal, Alice; Zammit, Peter S; Muntoni, Francesco; Morgan, Jennifer E

    2012-09-01

    Stem cell transplantation is already in clinical practice for certain genetic diseases and is a promising therapy for dystrophic muscle. We used the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy to investigate the effect of the host satellite cell niche on the contribution of donor muscle stem cells (satellite cells) to muscle regeneration. We found that incapacitation of the host satellite cells and preservation of the muscle niche promote donor satellite cell contribution to muscle regeneration and functional reconstitution of the satellite cell compartment. But, if the host niche is not promptly refilled, or is filled by competent host satellite cells, it becomes nonfunctional and donor engraftment is negligible. Application of this regimen to aged host muscles also promotes efficient regeneration from aged donor satellite cells. In contrast, if the niche is destroyed, yet host satellite cells remain proliferation-competent, donor-derived engraftment is trivial. Thus preservation of the satellite cell niche, concomitant with functional impairment of the majority of satellite cells within dystrophic human muscles, may improve the efficiency of stem cell therapy.

  7. Fludarabine Phosphate, Low-Dose Total-Body Irradiation, and Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Cyclosporine, Mycophenolate Mofetil, Donor Lymphocyte Infusion in Treating Patients With Hematopoietic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-01

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Myeloid/NK-cell Acute Leukemia; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Systemic Amyloidosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

  8. Alternative-Donor Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation with Post-Transplantation Cyclophosphamide for Nonmalignant Disorders.

    PubMed

    Klein, Orly R; Chen, Allen R; Gamper, Christopher; Loeb, David; Zambidis, Elias; Llosa, Nicolas; Huo, Jeffrey; Dezern, Amy E; Steppan, Diana; Robey, Nancy; Holuba, Mary Jo; Cooke, Kenneth R; Symons, Heather J

    2016-05-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is curative for many nonmalignant pediatric disorders, including hemoglobinopathies, bone marrow failure syndromes, and immunodeficiencies. There is great success using HLA-matched related donors for these patients; however, the use of alternative donors has been associated with increased graft failure, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and transplant-related mortality (TRM). HSCT using alternative donors with post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PT/Cy) for GVHD prophylaxis has been performed for hematologic malignancies with engraftment, GVHD, and TRM comparable with that seen with HLA-matched related donors. There are limited reports of HSCT in nonmalignant pediatric disorders other than hemoglobinopathies using alternative donors and PT/Cy. We transplanted 11 pediatric patients with life-threatening nonmalignant conditions using reduced-intensity conditioning, alternative donors, and PT/Cy alone or in combination with tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil. We observed limited GVHD, no TRM, and successful engraftment sufficient to eliminate manifestations of disease in all patients. Allogeneic HSCT using alternative donors and PT/Cy shows promise for curing nonmalignant disorders; development of prospective clinical trials to confirm these observations is warranted. PMID:26860634

  9. Red cell antigen prevalence predicted by molecular testing in ethnic groups of South Texas blood donors.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Lorena I; Smith, Linda A; Jones, Scott; Beddard, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Alloimmunization to red blood cell antigens is seen in patients receiving chronic blood transfusion. Knowing the prevalence of blood group antigens of the different ethnicities of South Texas donors can provide better management of rare blood inventory for patients in this geographical area. A total of 4369 blood donors were tested and analyzed for various antigens in the following blood group systems: ABO, Rh, Kell, Duffy, Kidd, MNS, Lutheran, Dombrock, Landsteiner-Wiener, Diego, Colton, and Scianna. Donors tested to be group 0 or A were serologically tested for the Rh (C, E, c, e) antigens. Those that tested as presumably R1R1, R2R2, or Ror were then genotyped. Donors constituted three major ethnicities: black (18.3%), Hispanic (36.3%), and Caucasian (41.1%); ethnicities comprised of Asian, American Indian, multiracial, and other accounted for the remaining donors (4.3%). The most likely common Rh phenotype for each ethnicity is as follows: black -Ror (44.4%), Hispanic -R1R1 (59.0%), and Caucasian -R1R1 (38.9%). The prevalence of Kell, Duffy, and Kidd blood group system antigens in black and Caucasian donors is comparable with published reports for the entire U.S. The black South Texas donor population had an 8.8 percent increase in prevalence of the Fy(a+b-) phenotype as compared with these published reports; the Hispanic South Texas donor population had a prevalence of 36.1 percent of the Fy(a+b-) phenotype. Regarding the Diego blood group system, the Hispanic donor population in South Texas had a prevalence of 93.5 percent for the Di(a-b+) phenotype as compared with published reports for the entire U.S. (>99.9%). The Hispanic population had a prevalence of 7.9 percent of donors testing as M-N+S-s+ as compared with 20.2 percent and 15.6 percent for black and Caucasian donors, respectively. This study helped us determine the prevalence of each of the blood group antigens in the South Texas donor population to establish and maintain adequate rare inventory of

  10. Red cell antigen prevalence predicted by molecular testing in ethnic groups of South Texas blood donors.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Lorena I; Smith, Linda A; Jones, Scott; Beddard, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Alloimmunization to red blood cell antigens is seen in patients receiving chronic blood transfusion. Knowing the prevalence of blood group antigens of the different ethnicities of South Texas donors can provide better management of rare blood inventory for patients in this geographical area. A total of 4369 blood donors were tested and analyzed for various antigens in the following blood group systems: ABO, Rh, Kell, Duffy, Kidd, MNS, Lutheran, Dombrock, Landsteiner-Wiener, Diego, Colton, and Scianna. Donors tested to be group 0 or A were serologically tested for the Rh (C, E, c, e) antigens. Those that tested as presumably R1R1, R2R2, or Ror were then genotyped. Donors constituted three major ethnicities: black (18.3%), Hispanic (36.3%), and Caucasian (41.1%); ethnicities comprised of Asian, American Indian, multiracial, and other accounted for the remaining donors (4.3%). The most likely common Rh phenotype for each ethnicity is as follows: black -Ror (44.4%), Hispanic -R1R1 (59.0%), and Caucasian -R1R1 (38.9%). The prevalence of Kell, Duffy, and Kidd blood group system antigens in black and Caucasian donors is comparable with published reports for the entire U.S. The black South Texas donor population had an 8.8 percent increase in prevalence of the Fy(a+b-) phenotype as compared with these published reports; the Hispanic South Texas donor population had a prevalence of 36.1 percent of the Fy(a+b-) phenotype. Regarding the Diego blood group system, the Hispanic donor population in South Texas had a prevalence of 93.5 percent for the Di(a-b+) phenotype as compared with published reports for the entire U.S. (>99.9%). The Hispanic population had a prevalence of 7.9 percent of donors testing as M-N+S-s+ as compared with 20.2 percent and 15.6 percent for black and Caucasian donors, respectively. This study helped us determine the prevalence of each of the blood group antigens in the South Texas donor population to establish and maintain adequate rare inventory of

  11. Large-scale gene expression profiling data of bone marrow stromal cells from osteoarthritic donors.

    PubMed

    Stiehler, Maik; Rauh, Juliane; Bünger, Cody; Jacobi, Angela; Vater, Corina; Schildberg, Theresa; Liebers, Cornelia; Günther, Klaus-Peter; Bretschneider, Henriette

    2016-09-01

    This data article contains data related to the research article entitled, "in vitro characterization of bone marrow stromal cells from osteoarthritic donors" [1]. Osteoarthritis (OA) represents the main indication for total joint arthroplasty and is one of the most frequent degenerative joint disorders. However, the exact etiology of OA remains unknown. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) can be easily isolated from bone marrow aspirates and provide an excellent source of progenitor cells. The data shows the identification of pivotal genes and pathways involved in osteoarthritis by comparing gene expression patterns of BMSCs from osteoarthritic versus healthy donors using an array-based approach.

  12. Donor-site giant cell reaction following backfill with synthetic bone material during osteochondral plug transfer.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Donald E; Hart, Joseph M; Hart, Jennifer A; Miller, Mark D

    2009-10-01

    Osteochondral defects are common in younger, active patients. Multiple strategies have been used to treat these lesions, including microfracture and osteochondral plug transfer. We describe a patient experiencing chronic knee pain and a full-thickness cartilage defect on the lateral femoral condyle. After failing conservative management and microfracture surgery, the patient underwent osteochondral autograft plug transfer, with backfilling of the donor sites using synthetic bone graft substitute. Initial recovery was uncomplicated until the patient experienced pain following a twist of the knee. Magnetic resonance imaging for the subsequent knee injury revealed poor healing at the donor sites. The donor sites were debrided, and specimens revealed a foreign body giant cell reaction. Donor-site morbidity is of primary concern during osteochondral plug transfer; however, insufficient data exist to support the use of synthetic bone graft material. Our results indicate that off-label use of synthetic bone graft substitute during a primary procedure requires further investigation.

  13. Adult stem cell plasticity: will engineered tissues be rejected?

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Te-Chao; Alison, Malcolm R; Wright, Nicholas A; Poulsom, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The dogma that adult tissue-specific stem cells remain committed to supporting only their own tissue has been challenged; a new hypothesis, that adult stem cells demonstrate plasticity in their repertoires, is being tested. This is important because it seems possible that haematopoietic stem cells, for example, could be exploited to generate and perhaps deliver cell-based therapies deep within existing nonhaematopoietic organs. Much of the evidence for plasticity derives from histological studies of tissues from patients or animals that have received grafts of cells or whole organs, from a donor bearing (or lacking) a definitive marker. Detection in the recipient of appropriately differentiated cells bearing the donor marker is indicative of a switch in phenotype of a stem cell or a member of a transit amplifying population or of a differentiated cell. In this review, we discuss evidence for these changes occurring but do not consider the molecular basis of cell commitment. In general, the extent of engraftment is low but may be increased if tissues are damaged. In model systems of liver regeneration, the repeated application of a selection pressure increases levels of engraftment considerably; how this occurs is unclear. Cell fusion plays a part in regeneration and remodelling of the liver, skeletal muscle and even regions of the brain. Genetic disease may be amenable to some forms of cell therapy, yet immune rejection will present challenges. Graft-vs.-host disease will continue to present problems, although this may be avoided if the cells were derived from the recipient or they were tolerized. Despite great expectations for cellular therapies, there are indications that attempts to replace missing proteins could be confounded simply by the development of specific immunity that rejects the new phenotype. PMID:15255965

  14. Donor colonic CD103+ dendritic cells determine the severity of acute graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Motoko; Cheong, Melody; Markey, Kate A; Gartlan, Kate H; Kuns, Rachel D; Locke, Kelly R; Lineburg, Katie E; Teal, Bianca E; Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Bunting, Mark D; Vuckovic, Slavica; Zhang, Ping; Teng, Michele W L; Varelias, Antiopi; Tey, Siok-Keen; Wockner, Leesa F; Engwerda, Christian R; Smyth, Mark J; Belz, Gabrielle T; McColl, Shaun R; MacDonald, Kelli P A; Hill, Geoffrey R

    2015-07-27

    The primacy of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in dictating the outcome of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is broadly accepted; however, the mechanisms controlling this effect are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that GVHD markedly enhances alloantigen presentation within the mesenteric lymph nodes (mLNs), mediated by donor CD103(+)CD11b(-) dendritic cells (DCs) that migrate from the colon under the influence of CCR7. Expansion and differentiation of donor T cells specifically within the mLNs is driven by profound levels of alloantigen, IL-12, and IL-6 promoted by Toll-like receptor (TLR) and receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) signals. Critically, alloantigen presentation in the mLNs imprints gut-homing integrin signatures on donor T cells, leading to their emigration into the GI tract where they mediate fulminant disease. These data identify a critical, anatomically distinct, donor DC subset that amplifies GVHD. We thus highlight multiple therapeutic targets and the ability of GVHD, once initiated by recipient antigen-presenting cells, to generate a profound, localized, and lethal feed-forward cascade of donor DC-mediated indirect alloantigen presentation and cytokine secretion within the GI tract.

  15. Donor colonic CD103+ dendritic cells determine the severity of acute graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Melody; Markey, Kate A.; Gartlan, Kate H.; Kuns, Rachel D.; Locke, Kelly R.; Lineburg, Katie E.; Teal, Bianca E.; Leveque-El mouttie, Lucie; Bunting, Mark D.; Vuckovic, Slavica; Zhang, Ping; Teng, Michele W.L.; Varelias, Antiopi; Tey, Siok-Keen; Wockner, Leesa F.; Engwerda, Christian R.; Smyth, Mark J.; Belz, Gabrielle T.; McColl, Shaun R.; MacDonald, Kelli P.A.

    2015-01-01

    The primacy of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in dictating the outcome of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is broadly accepted; however, the mechanisms controlling this effect are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that GVHD markedly enhances alloantigen presentation within the mesenteric lymph nodes (mLNs), mediated by donor CD103+CD11b− dendritic cells (DCs) that migrate from the colon under the influence of CCR7. Expansion and differentiation of donor T cells specifically within the mLNs is driven by profound levels of alloantigen, IL-12, and IL-6 promoted by Toll-like receptor (TLR) and receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) signals. Critically, alloantigen presentation in the mLNs imprints gut-homing integrin signatures on donor T cells, leading to their emigration into the GI tract where they mediate fulminant disease. These data identify a critical, anatomically distinct, donor DC subset that amplifies GVHD. We thus highlight multiple therapeutic targets and the ability of GVHD, once initiated by recipient antigen-presenting cells, to generate a profound, localized, and lethal feed-forward cascade of donor DC–mediated indirect alloantigen presentation and cytokine secretion within the GI tract. PMID:26169940

  16. Toward eliminating HLA class I expression to generate universal cells from allogeneic donors

    PubMed Central

    Torikai, Hiroki; Reik, Andreas; Soldner, Frank; Warren, Edus H.; Yuen, Carrie; Zhou, Yuanyue; Crossland, Denise L.; Huls, Helen; Littman, Nicholas; Zhang, Ziying; Tykodi, Scott S.; Kebriaei, Partow; Lee, Dean A.; Miller, Jeffrey C.; Rebar, Edward J.; Holmes, Michael C.; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Champlin, Richard E.; Gregory, Philip D.

    2013-01-01

    Long-term engraftment of allogeneic cells necessitates eluding immune-mediated rejection, which is currently achieved by matching for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) expression, immunosuppression, and/or delivery of donor-derived cells to sanctuary sites. Genetic engineering provides an alternative approach to avoid clearance of cells that are recognized as “non-self” by the recipient. To this end, we developed designer zinc finger nucleases and employed a “hit-and-run” approach to genetic editing for selective elimination of HLA expression. Electro-transfer of mRNA species coding for these engineered nucleases completely disrupted expression of HLA-A on human T cells, including CD19-specific T cells. The HLA-Aneg T-cell pools can be enriched and evade lysis by HLA-restricted cytotoxic T-cell clones. Recognition by natural killer cells of cells that had lost HLA expression was circumvented by enforced expression of nonclassical HLA molecules. Furthermore, we demonstrate that zinc finger nucleases can eliminate HLA-A expression from embryonic stem cells, which broadens the applicability of this strategy beyond infusing HLA-disparate immune cells. These findings establish that clinically appealing cell types derived from donors with disparate HLA expression can be genetically edited to evade an immune response and provide a foundation whereby cells from a single donor can be administered to multiple recipients. PMID:23741009

  17. Vaccine Therapy in Preventing Cytomegalovirus Infection in Patients With Hematological Malignancies Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cytomegalovirus Infection; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Extramedullary Plasmacytoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Isolated Plasmacytoma of Bone; Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Polycythemia Vera; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously

  18. 21 CFR 1271.85 - What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of cells and tissues? 1271.85 Section 1271.85 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Donor Eligibility § 1271.85 What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues? (a) All...

  19. 21 CFR 1271.85 - What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of cells and tissues? 1271.85 Section 1271.85 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Donor Eligibility § 1271.85 What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues? (a) All...

  20. 21 CFR 1271.85 - What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of cells and tissues? 1271.85 Section 1271.85 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Donor Eligibility § 1271.85 What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues? (a) All...

  1. 21 CFR 1271.85 - What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of cells and tissues? 1271.85 Section 1271.85 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Donor Eligibility § 1271.85 What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues? (a) All...

  2. 21 CFR 1271.85 - What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... of cells and tissues? 1271.85 Section 1271.85 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Donor Eligibility § 1271.85 What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues? (a) All...

  3. A 54-Year-Old Woman with Donor Cell Origin of Multiple Myeloma after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for the Treatment of CML

    PubMed Central

    Maestas, Erika; Jain, Shikha; Stiff, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia is a myeloproliferative disorder that may be treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). While posttransplantation relapse of disease resulting from a failure to eradicate the patient's original leukemia could occur, patients may also rarely develop a secondary malignancy or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) of donor origin termed donor cell leukemia (DCL). Cases of donor-derived acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or MDS after HSCT or solid tumor transplantation have been published. However, very few cases of donor-derived multiple myeloma (MM) exist. We describe a patient who developed a donor-derived MM following allogeneic HSCT from a sibling donor. PMID:26989529

  4. Phenotype, donor age and gender affect function of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are attractive for cell-based therapies ranging from regenerative medicine and tissue engineering to immunomodulation. However, clinical efficacy is variable and it is unclear how the phenotypes defining bone marrow (BM)-derived MSCs as well as donor characteristics affect their functional properties. Methods BM-MSCs were isolated from 53 (25 female, 28 male; age: 13 to 80 years) donors and analyzed by: (1) phenotype using flow cytometry and cell size measurement; (2) in vitro growth kinetics using population doubling time; (3) colony formation capacity and telomerase activity; and (4) function by in vitro differentiation capacity, suppression of T cell proliferation, cytokines and trophic factors secretion, and hormone and growth factor receptor expression. Additionally, expression of Oct4, Nanog, Prdm14 and SOX2 mRNA was compared to pluripotent stem cells. Results BM-MSCs from younger donors showed increased expression of MCAM, VCAM-1, ALCAM, PDGFRβ, PDL-1, Thy1 and CD71, and led to lower IL-6 production when co-cultured with activated T cells. Female BM-MSCs showed increased expression of IFN-γR1 and IL-6β, and were more potent in T cell proliferation suppression. High-clonogenic BM-MSCs were smaller, divided more rapidly and were more frequent in BM-MSC preparations from younger female donors. CD10, β1integrin, HCAM, CD71, VCAM-1, IFN-γR1, MCAM, ALCAM, LNGFR and HLA ABC were correlated to BM-MSC preparations with high clonogenic potential and expression of IFN-γR1, MCAM and HLA ABC was associated with rapid growth of BM-MSCs. The mesodermal differentiation capacity of BM-MSCs was unaffected by donor age or gender but was affected by phenotype (CD10, IFN-γR1, GD2). BM-MSCs from female and male donors expressed androgen receptor and FGFR3, and secreted VEGF-A, HGF, LIF, Angiopoietin-1, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and NGFB. HGF secretion correlated negatively to the expression of CD71, CD140b and

  5. Diarylindenotetracenes via a selective cross-coupling/C-H functionalization: electron donors for organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xingxian; Luhman, Wade A; Yagodkin, Elisey; Holmes, Russell J; Douglas, Christopher J

    2012-03-16

    A direct synthesis of new donor materials for organic photovoltaic cells is reported. Diaryindenotetracenes were synthesized utilizing a Kumada-Tamao-Corriu cross-coupling of peri-substituted tetrachlorotetracene with spontaneous indene annulation via C-H activation. Vacuum deposited planar heterojunction organic photovoltaic cells incorporating these molecules as electron donors exhibit power conversion efficiencies exceeding 1.5% with open-circuit voltages ranging from 0.7 to 1.1 V when coupled with C(60) as an electron acceptor.

  6. Neutrophils and lymphoid chimerism after adult living-related liver transplantation from a homozygous donor.

    PubMed

    Hajeer, A H; Issa, S; Alaskar, A; Abdullah, K; Awad, M; Tbakhi, A; Alabdulkareem, A

    2005-12-01

    Chimerism and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) pose significant risks to liver transplant patients. The risk of chimerism and GVHD is higher among cases of living-related liver transplant (LRLT). Donors homozygous at all HLA loci carry a higher risk for GVHD. Herein we present a case of LRLT. The recipient suffered from end-stage liver disease and received a right lobe graft from his son. After 8 months posttransplant, the patient developed profound bone marrow depression. The patient was negative for CMV, Brucella, HHV6, HHV8, HBV, HCV, and parvovirus. No skin or GI signs of GVHD were noted. The patient and donor were HLA typed by SSP. The donor was homozygous for all HLA loci while the patient shared the class II homozygosity and was class I heterozygous. Chimerism studies were prompted after noting that the neutrophil compartment of the patient was homozygous for all HLA loci. This initiated further studies of the PMN and lymphocytes by microsatellite analysis. A total 15 microsatellites were analyzed. The results suggest that the majority (75%) of the PMNs and 45% of the lymphocytes were of donor origin. The patient was treated with G-CSF; his WBC counts returned to normal. At 2.5 years posttransplant the patient had not developed GVHD, despite the large number of donor lymphocytes circulating in his bloodstream. The only complaint he had was severe arthritis, which was treated with steroids. It must be investigated whether this was the result of GVHD.

  7. Pancreatic islet cell transplantation using non-heart-beating donors (NHBDs).

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Shinichi; Tanaka, Koichi

    2005-01-01

    Recent dramatic improvements in clinical islet cell transplantation demonstrated by the Edmonton group have increased the demand for this treatment, and donor shortage could become a major problem. Utilization of marginal donors could alleviate the donor shortage, and non-heart-beating donors (NHBDs) might be good resources. The University of Pennsylvania group demonstrated that it was possible to isolate islets from NHBDs, and the group actually transplanted islets from NHBDs, for the first time. The patient became insulin-independent; however, there had been no more cases using NHBDs until our group initiated islet transplantations from NHBDs in Japan. In order to utilize NHBDs effectively, we modified the standard islet isolation method. These modifications included minimizing the warm ischemic time, the use of trypsin inhibition during isolation, carrying out density measurement before purification and the use of a less toxic islet purification solution. With these modifications we were able to transplant nine of ten islet preparations from ten NHBDs (90%), into five type-1 diabetic patients. The first transplantation was performed on April 7, 2004 (the first time in Japan), and this patient became insulin-independent after the second islet transplantation (first time in Japan). All patients showed improved glycemic control and reduced insulin requirements, without hypoglycemic events. We also performed living-donor islet transplantation, with our modified islet isolation protocol, on January 19, 2005. The improved islet isolation protocol enabled us to perform effective islet transplantations from NHBDs, and it also enabled us to perform the living-donor islet transplantation.

  8. Cord blood transplants supported by co-infusion of mobilized hematopoietic stem cells from a third-party donor.

    PubMed

    Bautista, G; Cabrera, J R; Regidor, C; Forés, R; García-Marco, J A; Ojeda, E; Sanjuán, I; Ruiz, E; Krsnik, I; Navarro, B; Gil, S; Magro, E; de Laiglesia, A; Gonzalo-Daganzo, R; Martín-Donaire, T; Rico, M; Millán, I; Fernández, M N

    2009-03-01

    This open label clinical study provides updated evaluation of the strategy of single unit cord blood transplants (CBTs) with co-infusion of third-party donor (TPD) mobilized hematopoietic stem cells (MHSC). Fifty-five adults with high-risk hematological malignancies, median age 34 years (16-60 years) and weight 70 kg (43-95 kg), received CBTs (median 2.39 x 10(7) total nucleated cell (TNC) per kg and 0.11 x 10(6) CD34+ per kg) and TPD-MHSC (median 2.4 x 10(6) CD34+ per kg and 3.2 x 10(3) CD3+ per kg). Median time to ANC and to CB-ANC >0.5 x 10(9)/l as well as to full CB-chimerism was 10, 21 and 44 days, with maximum cumulative incidences (MCI) of 0.96, 0.95 and 0.91. Median time to unsupported platelets >20 x 10(9)/l was 32 days (MCI 0.78). MCI for grades I-IV and III-IV acute GVHD (aGVHD) were 0.62 and 0.11; 12 of 41 patients (29%) who are at risk developed chronic GVHD, becoming severely extensive in three patients. Relapses occurred in seven patients (MCI=0.17). The main causes of morbi-mortality were post-engraftment infections. CMV reactivations were the most frequent, their incidence declining after the fourth month. Five-year overall survival and disease-free survival (Kaplan-Meier) were 56 % and 47% (63% and 54% for patients cell content and 0-3 HLA mismatches is feasible as a first choice option for adult patients who lack a readily available adequate adult donor. PMID:18850019

  9. Generalized Potential of Adult Neural Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Diana L.; Johansson, Clas B.; Wilbertz, Johannes; Veress, Biborka; Nilsson, Erik; Karlström, Helena; Lendahl, Urban; Frisén, Jonas

    2000-06-01

    The differentiation potential of stem cells in tissues of the adult has been thought to be limited to cell lineages present in the organ from which they were derived, but there is evidence that some stem cells may have a broader differentiation repertoire. We show here that neural stem cells from the adult mouse brain can contribute to the formation of chimeric chick and mouse embryos and give rise to cells of all germ layers. This demonstrates that an adult neural stem cell has a very broad developmental capacity and may potentially be used to generate a variety of cell types for transplantation in different diseases.

  10. Race and ethnicity influences collection of G-CSF mobilized peripheral blood progenitor cells from unrelated donors, a CIBMTR analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jack W.; Wingard, John R.; Logan, Brent R.; Chitphakdithai, Pintip; Akpek, Gorgun; Anderlini, Paolo; Artz, Andrew S.; Bredeson, Chris; Goldstein, Steven; Hale, Gregory; Hematti, Pieman; Joshi, Sarita; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; O'Donnell, Paul V.; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Savani, Bipin; Schears, Raquel M.; Shaw, Bronwen E.; Confer, Dennis L.

    2014-01-01

    Little information exists on the effect of race and ethnicity on collection of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) for allogeneic transplantation. We studied 10776 donors from the National Marrow Donor Program who underwent PBSC collection from 2006-2012. Self-reported donor race/ethnic information included Caucasian, Hispanic, Black/African American (AA), Asian/Pacific Islander (API), and Native American (NA). All donors were mobilized with subcutaneous filgrastim (G-CSF) at an approximate dose of 10 µg/kg/d for 5 days. Overall, AA donors had the highest median yields of mononuclear cells (MNC)/L and CD34+ cells/L blood processed (3.1 × 109 and 44 × 106 respectively) while Caucasians had the lowest median yields at 2.8 × 109 and 33.7 × 106 respectively. Multivariate analysis of CD34+/L mobilization yields using Caucasians as the comparator and controlling for age, gender, body mass index, and year of apheresis revealed increased yields in overweight and obese AA and API donors. In Hispanic donors, only male obese donors had higher CD34+/L mobilization yields compared to Caucasian donors. No differences in CD34+/L yields were seen between Caucasian and NA donors. Characterization of these differences may allow optimization of mobilization regimens to allow enhancement of mobilization yields without compromising donor safety. PMID:25316111

  11. Rituximab in Treating Patients Undergoing Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant for Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-23

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  12. Occurrence of Donor Cell-derived Lymphoid Blast Crisis 24 Years Following Related Bone Marrow Transplantation for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Shuhei; Doki, Noriko; Hino, Yutaro; Sakaguchi, Masahiro; Fukushima, Kazuaki; Shingai, Naoki; Hattori, Keiichiro; Watanabe, Ken; Hagino, Takeshi; Igarashi, Aiko; Najima, Yuho; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Kakihana, Kazuhiko; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Ohashi, Kazuteru

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a unique case of donor cell leukemia (DCL), as donor cell-derived lymphoid blast crisis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) was observed 24 years after related bone marrow transplantation for CML in the chronic phase. Short tandem repeat testing of the leukemic blast sample revealed full donor chimerism, strongly indicative of DCL. The original donor is healthy with a normal complete blood cell count for the past 24 years. This rare case may provide a precious opportunity to consider not only the underlying mechanism of DCL, but also the pathogenesis of CML.

  13. Immunological Outcome in Haploidentical-HSC Transplanted Patients Treated with IL-10-Anergized Donor T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bacchetta, Rosa; Lucarelli, Barbarella; Sartirana, Claudia; Gregori, Silvia; Lupo Stanghellini, Maria T.; Miqueu, Patrick; Tomiuk, Stefan; Hernandez-Fuentes, Maria; Gianolini, Monica E.; Greco, Raffaella; Bernardi, Massimo; Zappone, Elisabetta; Rossini, Silvano; Janssen, Uwe; Ambrosi, Alessandro; Salomoni, Monica; Peccatori, Jacopo; Ciceri, Fabio; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia

    2013-01-01

    T-cell therapy after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been used alone or in combination with immunosuppression to cure hematologic malignancies and to prevent disease recurrence. Here, we describe the outcome of patients with high-risk/advanced stage hematologic malignancies, who received T-cell depleted (TCD) haploidentical-HSCT (haplo-HSCT) combined with donor T lymphocytes pretreated with IL-10 (ALT-TEN trial). IL-10-anergized donor T cells (IL-10-DLI) contained T regulatory type 1 (Tr1) cells specific for the host alloantigens, limiting donor-vs.-host-reactivity, and memory T cells able to respond to pathogens. IL-10-DLI were infused in 12 patients with the goal of improving immune reconstitution after haplo-HSCT without increasing the risk of graft-versus-host-disease (GvHD). IL-10-DLI led to fast immune reconstitution in five patients. In four out of the five patients, total T-cell counts, TCR-Vβ repertoire and T-cell functions progressively normalized after IL-10-DLI. These four patients are alive, in complete disease remission and immunosuppression-free at 7.2 years (median follow-up) after haplo-HSCT. Transient GvHD was observed in the immune reconstituted (IR) patients, despite persistent host-specific hypo-responsiveness of donor T cells in vitro and enrichment of cells with Tr1-specific biomarkers in vivo. Gene-expression profiles of IR patients showed a common signature of tolerance. This study provides the first indication of the feasibility of Tr1 cell-based therapy and paves way for the use of these Tr1 cells as adjuvant treatment for malignancies and immune-mediated disorders. PMID:24550909

  14. Effects of donor fibroblast cell type and transferred cloned embryo number on the efficiency of pig cloning.

    PubMed

    Li, Zicong; Shi, Junsong; Liu, Dewu; Zhou, Rong; Zeng, Haiyu; Zhou, Xiu; Mai, Ranbiao; Zeng, Shaofen; Luo, Lvhua; Yu, Wanxian; Zhang, Shouquan; Wu, Zhenfang

    2013-02-01

    Currently, cloning efficiency in pigs is very low. Donor cell type and number of cloned embryos transferred to an individual surrogate are two major factors that affect the successful rate of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in pigs. This study aimed to compare the influence of different donor fibroblast cell types and different transferred embryo numbers on recipients' pregnancy rate and delivery rate, the average number of total clones born, clones born alive and clones born healthy per litter, and the birth rate of healthy clones (=total number of healthy cloned piglets born /total number of transferred cloned embryos). Three types of donor fibroblasts were tested in large-scale production of cloned pigs, including fetal fibroblasts (FFBs) from four genetically similar Western swine breeds of Pietrain (P), Duroc (D), Landrace (L), and Yorkshire (Y), which are referred to as P,D,LY-FFBs, adult fibroblasts (AFBs) from the same four breeds, which are designated P,D,L,Y-AFBs, and AFBs from a Chinese pig breed of Laiwu (LW), which is referred to as LW-AFBs. Within each donor fibroblast cell type group, five transferred cloned embryo number groups were tested. In each embryo number group, 150-199, 200-249, 250-299, 300-349, or 350-450 cloned embryos were transferred to each individual recipient sow. For the entire experiment, 92,005 cloned embryos were generated from nearly 115,000 matured oocytes and transferred to 328 recipients; in total, 488 cloned piglets were produced. The results showed that the mean clones born healthy per litter resulted from transfer of embryos cloned from LW-AFBs (2.53 ± 0.34) was similar with that associated with P,D,L,Y-FFBs (2.72 ± 0.29), but was significantly higher than that resulted from P,D,L,Y-AFBs (1.47 ± 0.18). Use of LW-AFBs as donor cells for SCNT resulted in a significantly higher pregnancy rate (72.00% vs. 59.30% and 48.11%) and delivery rate (60.00% vs. 45.93% and 35.85%) for cloned embryo recipients, and a

  15. Comparable Outcomes after Nonmyeloablative Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation with Unrelated and Related Donors

    PubMed Central

    Mielcarek, Marco; Storer, Barry E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Sorror, Mohamed L.; Maloney, David G.; Petersdorf, Effie; Martin, Paul J.; Storb, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    We sought to determine whether patients with hematologic malignancies treated by nonmyeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) at a single institution between December 1997 and June 2006 had worse outcomes with grafts from unrelated donors (n=184) as compared to HLA-identical related donors (n=221). The nonmyeloablative preparative regimen consisted of 2 Gy total body irradiation with (78%) or without (22%) fludarabine, and postgrafting mycophenolate mofetil and cyclosporine. After adjusting for HCT-comorbidity index, relapse risk, patient age, stem cell source, preparative regimen, prior CMV infection and sex-mismatch of donor and recipient in multivariate analysis, we found no statistically significant differences between unrelated and related HCT recipients in risks of non-relapse mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 0.98; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.6-1.6; p=0.94), relapse (HR, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.7-1.5; p=0.82), or overall mortality (HR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.7-1.4; p=0.94). Overall rates of severe acute and extensive chronic GVHD were also not significantly different between the two groups. We conclude that within the limitations of a retrospective study, these results indicate that candidates for nonmyeloablative HCT without suitable related donors may expect similar outcomes with grafts from unrelated donors. PMID:18022580

  16. Effect of different donor cells on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication and selection in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Spira, A I; Ho, D D

    1995-01-01

    We sought to determine the effects of different host cells on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in vitro. First, 17 primary viruses of various phenotypes were examined for replicative capacity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 10 healthy donors. While the range of infection was variable over a 40-fold range, it was substantially less than that previously reported (L. M. Williams and M. W. Cloyd, Virology 184:723-728, 1991). In particular, no donor cells demonstrated total resistance to HIV-1 infection. We next cocultured PBMC from an HIV-1-infected patient with stimulated PBMC from three healthy donors to determine the effect of host cells on selection for a particular HIV-1 quasispecies. By using DNA sequencing, it was found that the dominant quasispecies (AD30-15) after culture was nearly identical in the cells of different donors. Furthermore, after 6 months in vivo, the patient developed a dominant proviral population in PBMC that was most closely related to the quasispecies preferentially selected in vitro, although this quasispecies was only a minor fraction of the sequences present earlier in PBMC. In subsequent biological characterizations, it was found that AD30-15 grew much better in PBMC and macrophages than did other related quasispecies. Hence, we conclude that the primary mechanism of in vitro selection for a particular HIV-1 variant in this case is mediated by the phenotypic properties of the virus and is less dependent on host cell origin. The findings reported here have important practical implications for studies of HIV-1 replication in primary cells derived from healthy donors. PMID:7983738

  17. Charge transport and exciton dissociation in organic solar cells consisting of dipolar donors mixed with C70

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Olga L.; Liu, Xiao; Amonoo, Jojo A.; Djurovich, Peter I.; Thompson, Mark E.; Green, Peter F.; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate dipolar donor materials mixed with a C70 acceptor in an organic photovoltaic (OPV) cell. Dipolar donors that have donor-acceptor-acceptor (d-a-a') structure result in high conductivity pathways due to close coupling between neighboring molecules in the mixed films. We analyze the charge transfer properties of the dipolar donor:C70 mixtures and corresponding neat donors using a combination of time-resolved electroluminescence from intermolecular polaron pair states and conductive tip atomic force microscopy, from which we infer that dimers of the d-a-a' donors tend to form a continuous network of nanocrystalline clusters within the blends. Additional insights are provided by quantum-mechanical calculations of hole transfer coupling and hopping rates between donor molecules using nearest-neighbor donor packing motifs taken from crystal structural data. The approximation using only nearest-neighbor interactions leads to good agreement between donor hole hopping rates and the conductive properties of the donor:C70 blends. This represents a significant simplification from requiring details of the nano- and mesoscale morphologies of thin films to estimate their electronic characteristics. Using these dipolar donors, we obtain a maximum power conversion efficiency of 9.6 ±0.5 % under 1 sun, AM1.5G simulated illumination for an OPV comprised of an active layer containing a dipolar donor mixed with C70.

  18. Adult stem cells and tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Körbling, M; Estrov, Z; Champlin, R

    2003-08-01

    Recently, adult stem cells originating from bone marrow or peripheral blood have been suggested to contribute to repair and genesis of cells specific for liver, cardiac and skeletal muscle, gut, and brain tissue. The mechanism involved has been termed transdifferentiation, although other explanations including cell fusion have been postulated. Using adult stem cells to generate or repair solid organ tissue obviates the immunologic, ethical, and teratogenic issues that accompany embryonic stem cells.

  19. Differential protein expression in human corneal endothelial cells cultured from young and older donors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Cheng; Rawe, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To establish a baseline protein fingerprint of cultured human corneal endothelial cells (HCEC), to determine whether the protein profiles exhibit age-related differences, and to identify proteins differentially expressed in HCEC cultured from young and older donors. Methods Corneas were obtained from five young (<30 years old) and five older donors (>50 years old). HCEC were cultured, and protein was extracted from confluent passage 3 cells. Extracts from each age group were pooled to form two samples. Proteins were separated on two-dimensional (2-D) gels and stained with SyproRuby. Resultant images were compared to identify protein spots that were either similarly expressed or differentially expressed by at least twofold. Protein spots were then identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Results Protein spots were well resolved, and patterns were reproducible on 2-D gels using either pH 3–10 or pH 4–7 IPG strips. Two-dimensional gels prepared with pH 4–7 IPG strips were used for differential display analysis, which was reproduced on three separate pairs of gels. MALDI-TOF identified 58 proteins with similar expression; 30 proteins were expressed twofold higher in HCEC from young donors; five proteins were expressed twofold higher in cells from older donors; and 10 proteins were identified in gels from young donors that did not match in gels from older donors. Several proteins expressed at higher levels in younger donors support metabolic activity, protect against oxidative damage, or mediate protein folding or degradation. Conclusions This is the first proteomic comparison of proteins expressed in HCEC cultured from young and older donors. Although restricted to proteins with isoelectric points between pH 4.0 and pH 7.0, the data obtained represent an initial step in the investigation of molecular mechanisms that underlie physiologically important age-related differences in cultured HCEC

  20. Functional differences between neonatal and adult fibroblasts and keratinocytes: Donor age affects epithelial-mesenchymal crosstalk in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Mateu, Rosana; Živicová, Veronika; Krejčí, Eliška Drobná; Grim, Miloš; Strnad, Hynek; Vlček, Čestmír; Kolář, Michal; Lacina, Lukáš; Gál, Peter; Borský, Jiří; Smetana, Karel; Dvořánková, Barbora

    2016-01-01

    Clinical evidence suggests that healing is faster and almost scarless at an early neonatal age in comparison with that in adults. In this study, the phenotypes of neonatal and adult dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes (nestin, smooth muscle actin, keratin types 8, 14 and 19, and fibronectin) were compared. Furthermore, functional assays (proliferation, migration, scratch wound closure) including mutual epithelial-mesenchymal interactions were also performed to complete the series of experiments. Positivity for nestin and α smooth muscle actin was higher in neonatal fibroblasts (NFs) when compared with their adult counterparts (adult fibroblasts; AFs). Although the proliferation of NFs and AFs was similar, they significantly differed in their migration potential. The keratinocyte experiments revealed small, poorly differentiated cells (positive for keratins 8, 14 and 19) in primary cultures isolated from neonatal tissues. Moreover, the neonatal keratinocytes exhibited significantly faster rates of healing the experimentally induced in vitro defects in comparison with adult cells. Notably, the epithelial/mesenchymal interaction studies showed that NFs in co-culture with adult keratinocytes significantly stimulated the adult epithelial cells to acquire the phenotype of small, non-confluent cells expressing markers of poor differentiation. These results indicate the important differences between neonatal and adult cells that may be associated with improved wound healing during the early neonatal period. PMID:27513730

  1. Changes in liver and spleen volumes after living liver donation: a report from the Adult-to-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Cohort Study (A2ALL).

    PubMed

    Emond, Jean C; Fisher, Robert A; Everson, Gregory; Samstein, Benjamin; Pomposelli, James J; Zhao, Binsheng; Forney, Sarah; Olthoff, Kim M; Baker, Talia B; Gillespie, Brenda W; Merion, Robert M

    2015-02-01

    Previous reports have drawn attention to persistently decreased platelet counts among liver donors. We hypothesized an etiologic association between altered platelet counts and postdonation splenomegaly and sought to explore this relationship. This study analyzed de-identified computed tomography/magnetic resonance scans of 388 donors from 9 Adult-to-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Cohort Study centers read at a central computational image analysis laboratory. Resulting liver and spleen volumes were correlated with time-matched clinical laboratory values. Predonation liver volumes varied 2-fold in healthy subjects, even when they were normalized by the body surface area (BSA; range = 522-1887 cc/m(2) , n = 346). At month 3 (M3), postdonation liver volumes were, on average, 79% of predonation volumes [interquartile range (IQR) = 73%-86%, n = 165] and approached 88% at year 1 (Y1; IQR = 80%-93%, n = 75). The mean spleen volume before donation was 245 cc (n = 346). Spleen volumes greater than 100% of the predonation volume occurred in 92% of donors at M3 (n = 165) and in 88% at Y1 after donation (n = 75). We sought to develop a standard spleen volume (SSV) model to predict normal spleen volumes in donors before donation and found that decreased platelet counts, a younger age, a higher predonation liver volume, higher hemoglobin levels, and a higher BSA predicted a larger spleen volume (n = 344, R(2)  = 0.52). When this was applied to postdonation values, some large volumes were underpredicted by the SSV model. Models developed on the basis of the reduced sample of postdonation volumes yielded smaller underpredictions. These findings confirm previous observations of thrombocytopenia being associated with splenomegaly after donation. The results of the SSV model suggest that the biology of this phenomenon is complex. This merits further long-term mechanistic studies of liver donors with an investigation of the role of

  2. Programmed death ligand-1 expression on donor T cells drives graft-versus-host disease lethality.

    PubMed

    Saha, Asim; O'Connor, Roddy S; Thangavelu, Govindarajan; Lovitch, Scott B; Dandamudi, Durga Bhavani; Wilson, Caleph B; Vincent, Benjamin G; Tkachev, Victor; Pawlicki, Jan M; Furlan, Scott N; Kean, Leslie S; Aoyama, Kazutoshi; Taylor, Patricia A; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Foncea, Rocio; Ranganathan, Parvathi; Devine, Steven M; Burrill, Joel S; Guo, Lili; Sacristan, Catarina; Snyder, Nathaniel W; Blair, Ian A; Milone, Michael C; Dustin, Michael L; Riley, James L; Bernlohr, David A; Murphy, William J; Fife, Brian T; Munn, David H; Miller, Jeffrey S; Serody, Jonathan S; Freeman, Gordon J; Sharpe, Arlene H; Turka, Laurence A; Blazar, Bruce R

    2016-07-01

    Programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) interaction with PD-1 induces T cell exhaustion and is a therapeutic target to enhance immune responses against cancer and chronic infections. In murine bone marrow transplant models, PD-L1 expression on host target tissues reduces the incidence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). PD-L1 is also expressed on T cells; however, it is unclear whether PD-L1 on this population influences immune function. Here, we examined the effects of PD-L1 modulation of T cell function in GVHD. In patients with severe GVHD, PD-L1 expression was increased on donor T cells. Compared with mice that received WT T cells, GVHD was reduced in animals that received T cells from Pdl1-/- donors. PD-L1-deficient T cells had reduced expression of gut homing receptors, diminished production of inflammatory cytokines, and enhanced rates of apoptosis. Moreover, multiple bioenergetic pathways, including aerobic glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation, and fatty acid metabolism, were also reduced in T cells lacking PD-L1. Finally, the reduction of acute GVHD lethality in mice that received Pdl1-/- donor cells did not affect graft-versus-leukemia responses. These data demonstrate that PD-L1 selectively enhances T cell-mediated immune responses, suggesting a context-dependent function of the PD-1/PD-L1 axis, and suggest selective inhibition of PD-L1 on donor T cells as a potential strategy to prevent or ameliorate GVHD.

  3. [Cloning goat producing human lactoferrin with genetically modified donor cells selected by single or dual markers].

    PubMed

    An, Liyou; Yuan, Yuguo; Yu, Baoli; Yang, Tingjia; Cheng, Yong

    2012-12-01

    We compared the efficiency of cloning goat using human lactoferrin (hLF) with genetically modified donor cells marked by single (Neo(r)) or double (Neo(r)/GFP) markers. Single marker expression vector (pBLC14) or dual markers expression vector (pAPLM) was delivered to goat fetal fibroblasts (GFF), and then the transgenic GFF was used as donor cells to produce transgenic goats. Respectively, 58.8% (20/34) and 86.7% (26/30) resistant cell lines confirmed the transgenic integration by PCR. Moreover, pAPLM cells lines were subcultured with several passages, only 20% (6/30) cell lines was observed fluorescence from each cell during the cell passage. Somatic cell nuclear transfer using the donor cells harbouring pBLC14 or pAPLM construct, resulting in a total of 806 reconstructed embryos, a pregnancy rate at 35 d (53.8%, 39.1%) and 60 d (26.9%, 21.7%), and an offspring birth rate (1.9%, 1.4%) with 5 and 7 newborn cloned goats, respectively. Transgene was confirmed by PCR and southern-blot in all cloned offspring. There were no significant differences at the reconstructed embryo fusion rates, pregnancy rates and the birth rate (P > 0.05) between single and double markers groups. The Neo(r)/GFP double markers could improve the reliability for accurately and efficiently selecting the genetically modified donor cells. No adverse effect was observed on the efficiency of transgenic goat production by SCNT using somatic cells transfected with double (Neo(r)/GFP) markers vector.

  4. Function of donor cell centrosome in intraspecies and interspecies nuclear transfer embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Zhisheng; Zhang Gang; Meng Xiaoqian; Zhang Yanling; Chen Dayuan; Schatten, Heide; Sun Qingyuan . E-mail: sunqy1@yahoo.com

    2005-05-15

    Centrosomes, the main microtubule-organizing centers (MTOCs) in most animal cells, are important for many cellular activities such as assembly of the mitotic spindle, establishment of cell polarity, and cell movement. In nuclear transfer (NT), MTOCs that are located at the poles of the meiotic spindle are removed from the recipient oocyte, while the centrosome of the donor cell is introduced. We used mouse MII oocytes as recipients, mouse fibroblasts, rat fibroblasts, or pig granulosa cells as donor cells to construct intraspecies and interspecies nuclear transfer embryos in order to observe centrosome dynamics and functions. Three antibodies against centrin, {gamma}-tubulin, and NuMA, respectively, were used to stain the centrosome. Centrin was not detected either at the poles of transient spindles or at the poles of first mitotic spindles. {gamma}-tubulin translocated into the two poles of the transient spindles, while no accumulated {gamma}-tubulin aggregates were detected in the area adjacent to the two pseudo-pronuclei. At first mitotic metaphase, {gamma}-tubulin was translocated to the spindle poles. The distribution of {gamma}-tubulin was similar in mouse intraspecies and rat-mouse interspecies embryos. The NuMA antibody that we used can recognize porcine but not murine NuMA protein, so it was used to trace the NuMA protein of donor cell in reconstructed embryos. In the pig-mouse interspecies reconstructed embryos, NuMA concentrated between the disarrayed chromosomes soon after activation and translocated to the transient spindle poles. NuMA then immigrated into pseudo-pronuclei. After pseudo-pronuclear envelope breakdown, NuMA was located between the chromosomes and then translocated to the spindle poles of first mitotic metaphase. {gamma}-tubulin antibody microinjection resulted in spindle disorganization and retardation of the first cell division. NuMA antibody microinjection also resulted in spindle disorganization. Our findings indicate that (1) the

  5. Advances in clinical NK cell studies: Donor selection, manufacturing and quality control

    PubMed Central

    Koehl, U.; Kalberer, C.; Spanholtz, J.; Lee, D. A.; Miller, J. S.; Cooley, S.; Lowdell, M.; Uharek, L.; Klingemann, H.; Curti, A.; Leung, W.; Alici, E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Natural killer (NK) cells are increasingly used in clinical studies in order to treat patients with various malignancies. The following review summarizes platform lectures and 2013–2015 consortium meetings on manufacturing and clinical use of NK cells in Europe and United States. A broad overview of recent pre-clinical and clinical results in NK cell therapies is provided based on unstimulated, cytokine-activated, as well as genetically engineered NK cells using chimeric antigen receptors (CAR). Differences in donor selection, manufacturing and quality control of NK cells for cancer immunotherapies are described and basic recommendations are outlined for harmonization in future NK cell studies. PMID:27141397

  6. Dengue Virus Transmission by Blood Stem Cell Donor after Travel to Sri Lanka; Germany, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Punzel, Michael; Korukluoğlu, Gülay; Caglayik, Dilek Yagci; Menemenlioglu, Dilek; Bozdag, Sinem Civriz; Tekgündüz, Emre; Altuntaş, Fevzi; Campos, Renata de Mendonca; Burde, Bernd; Günther, Stephan; Tappe, Dennis; Cadar, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Three days after donation of peripheral blood stem cells to a recipient with acute myeloblastic leukemia, dengue virus was detected in the donor, who had recently traveled to Sri Lanka. Transmission to the recipient, who died 9 days after transplant, was confirmed. PMID:25062084

  7. Programmed death ligand-1 expression on donor T cells drives graft-versus-host disease lethality

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Roddy S.; Thangavelu, Govindarajan; Lovitch, Scott B.; Dandamudi, Durga Bhavani; Vincent, Benjamin G.; Tkachev, Victor; Pawlicki, Jan M.; Furlan, Scott N.; Kean, Leslie S.; Aoyama, Kazutoshi; Taylor, Patricia A.; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Foncea, Rocio; Ranganathan, Parvathi; Devine, Steven M.; Burrill, Joel S.; Guo, Lili; Sacristan, Catarina; Snyder, Nathaniel W.; Blair, Ian A.; Milone, Michael C.; Dustin, Michael L.; Riley, James L.; Bernlohr, David A.; Murphy, William J.; Fife, Brian T.; Munn, David H.; Miller, Jeffrey S.; Serody, Jonathan S.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Turka, Laurence A.

    2016-01-01

    Programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) interaction with PD-1 induces T cell exhaustion and is a therapeutic target to enhance immune responses against cancer and chronic infections. In murine bone marrow transplant models, PD-L1 expression on host target tissues reduces the incidence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). PD-L1 is also expressed on T cells; however, it is unclear whether PD-L1 on this population influences immune function. Here, we examined the effects of PD-L1 modulation of T cell function in GVHD. In patients with severe GVHD, PD-L1 expression was increased on donor T cells. Compared with mice that received WT T cells, GVHD was reduced in animals that received T cells from Pdl1–/– donors. PD-L1–deficient T cells had reduced expression of gut homing receptors, diminished production of inflammatory cytokines, and enhanced rates of apoptosis. Moreover, multiple bioenergetic pathways, including aerobic glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation, and fatty acid metabolism, were also reduced in T cells lacking PD-L1. Finally, the reduction of acute GVHD lethality in mice that received Pdl1–/– donor cells did not affect graft-versus-leukemia responses. These data demonstrate that PD-L1 selectively enhances T cell–mediated immune responses, suggesting a context-dependent function of the PD-1/PD-L1 axis, and suggest selective inhibition of PD-L1 on donor T cells as a potential strategy to prevent or ameliorate GVHD. PMID:27294527

  8. Restoration of portal flow using a pericholedochal varix in adult living donor liver transplantation for patients with total portosplenomesenteric thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Moon, Deok-Bog; Lee, Sung-Gyu; Ahn, Chul-Soo; Hwang, Shin; Kim, Ki-Hun; Ha, Tae-Yong; Song, Gi-Won; Park, Gil-Chun; Jung, Dong-Hwan; Namkoong, Jung-Man; Park, Hyung-Woo; Park, Yo-Han

    2014-05-01

    In total portosplenomesenteric thrombosis patients, cavoportal hemitransposition (CPHT) is indicated but rarely applicable for adult-to-adult (A-to-A) living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) because partial liver graft requires splanchno-portal inflow for liver graft regeneration. If intra- & peri-pancreatic collaterals draining into pericholedochal varix were present, pericholedochal varix may provide splanchnic blood flow to the transplanted liver and also relieve recipient's portal hypertension. To date, however, there is no successful report using pericholedochal varix in liver transplantation (LT). We successfully performed A-to-A LDLTs using pericholedochal varix for those 2 patients. The surgical strategies are followings: (a) dissection of hepatic hilum to isolate left hepatic artery using for arterial reconstruction of implanted right lobe graft, (b) en-mass clamping of the undissected remaining hilum if we can leave adequate length of stump from the clamping site, and then hilum is divided, (c) delay the donor hepatectomy until the feasibility of the recipient operation is confirmed. Portal flow was established between the sizable pericholedochal varix (caliber > 1cm) and graft portal vein, but the individually designed approaches were used for each patients. Currently, they have been enjoying normal life on posttransplant 92 and 44 months respectively. In conclusion, enlarged pericholedochal varix in patients with totally obliterated splanchnic veins might be an useful inflow to restore portal flow and secure good outcome in A-to-A LDLT. AASLD.

  9. Infusion of donor spleen cells and rejection in liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Scornik, J C; Lauwers, G Y; Reed, A I; Howard, R J; Dickson, R C; Rosen, C B

    2000-02-01

    Intact or inactivated donor lymphoid cells have been found to downregulate the alloimmune response in a number of experimental models. We conducted a randomized, prospective, double blind, and placebo-controlled trial to determine whether heat-treated donor spleen cells would affect early rejection after liver transplantation. Donor spleen was obtained during organ procurement for 40 patients undergoing liver transplantation. All patients were treated with cyclosporine, azathioprine and steroids. The patients were randomized after surgery to receive either heat-treated (45 degrees C for 1 h) spleen cells or placebo. Patients underwent protocol biopsies at 1 wk, 4 and 12 months, or as needed. Biopsies were reviewed in a blind fashion and scored according to the Banff consensus criteria. Randomization resulted in 19 patients in the spleen cell group and 21 in the placebo group. One-yr graft survival was 94 and 100%, respectively. Early rejection was more frequent in the spleen cell group (61 vs. 35%, p, not significant). The histopathological rejection activity index at 7 d was also higher for the patients in the spleen cell group: 39% of spleen cell treated patients had a score of 4 or higher as opposed to 5% in the placebo group (p < 0.01). The mean score was 2.9 +/- 2.8 for the spleen cell group versus 1.3 + 1.7 for the placebo group (p = 0.034). It is concluded that heat-treated donor spleen cells given within 24 h after liver transplantation were not clinically beneficial and increased the intensity of rejection in 7-d protocol liver biopsies.

  10. Progenitor cells in the adult pancreas.

    PubMed

    Holland, Andrew M; Góñez, L Jorge; Harrison, Leonard C

    2004-01-01

    The beta-cell mass in the adult pancreas possesses the ability to undergo limited regeneration following injury. Identifying the progenitor cells involved in this process and understanding the mechanisms leading to their maturation will open new avenues for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. However, despite steady advances in determining the molecular basis of early pancreatic development, the identification of pancreatic stem cells or beta-cell progenitors and the molecular mechanisms underlying beta-cell regeneration remain unclear. Recent advances in the directed differentiation of embryonic and adult stem cells has heightened interest in the possible application of stem cell therapy in the treatment of type 1 diabetes. Drawing on the expanding knowledge of pancreas development, beta-cell regeneration and stem cell research, this review focuses on progenitor cells in the adult pancreas as a potential source of beta-cells. PMID:14737742

  11. Donor-Specific Anti-HLA Antibodies in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Morin-Zorman, Sarah; Loiseau, Pascale; Taupin, Jean-Luc; Caillat-Zucman, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) is a curative treatment for a wide variety of hematological diseases. In 30% of the cases, a geno-identical donor is available. Any other situation displays some level of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) incompatibility between donor and recipient. Deleterious effects of anti-HLA immunization have long been recognized in solid organ transplant recipients. More recently, anti-HLA immunization was shown to increase the risk of primary graft failure (PGF), a severe complication of AHSCT that occurs in 3-4% of matched unrelated donor transplantation and up to 15% in cord blood transplantation and T-cell depleted haplo-identical stem cell transplantation. Rates of PGF in patients with DSA were reported to be between 24 and 83% with the highest rates in haplo-identical and cord blood transplantation recipients. This led to the recommendation of anti-HLA antibody screening to detect donor-specific antibodies (DSA) in recipients prior to AHSCT. In this review, we highlight the role of anti-HLA antibodies in AHSCT and the mechanisms that may lead to PGF in patients with DSA, and discuss current issues in the field. PMID:27570526

  12. Donor-Specific Anti-HLA Antibodies in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Morin-Zorman, Sarah; Loiseau, Pascale; Taupin, Jean-Luc; Caillat-Zucman, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) is a curative treatment for a wide variety of hematological diseases. In 30% of the cases, a geno-identical donor is available. Any other situation displays some level of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) incompatibility between donor and recipient. Deleterious effects of anti-HLA immunization have long been recognized in solid organ transplant recipients. More recently, anti-HLA immunization was shown to increase the risk of primary graft failure (PGF), a severe complication of AHSCT that occurs in 3–4% of matched unrelated donor transplantation and up to 15% in cord blood transplantation and T-cell depleted haplo-identical stem cell transplantation. Rates of PGF in patients with DSA were reported to be between 24 and 83% with the highest rates in haplo-identical and cord blood transplantation recipients. This led to the recommendation of anti-HLA antibody screening to detect donor-specific antibodies (DSA) in recipients prior to AHSCT. In this review, we highlight the role of anti-HLA antibodies in AHSCT and the mechanisms that may lead to PGF in patients with DSA, and discuss current issues in the field. PMID:27570526

  13. Fullerene C{sub 70} as a p-type donor in organic photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Taojun; Wang, Xiao-Feng E-mail: zrhong@ucla.edu Sano, Takeshi; Kido, Junji E-mail: zrhong@ucla.edu; Hong, Ziruo E-mail: zrhong@ucla.edu; Li, Gang; Yang, Yang

    2014-09-01

    Fullerenes and their derivatives have been widely used as n-type materials in organic transistor and photovoltaic devices. Though it is believed that they shall be ambipolar in nature, there have been few direct experimental proofs for that. In this work, fullerene C{sub 70}, known as an efficient acceptor, has been employed as a p-type electron donor in conjunction with 1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylene hexacarbonitrile as an electron acceptor in planar-heterojunction (PHJ) organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. High fill factors (FFs) of more than 0.70 were reliably achieved with the C{sub 70} layer even up to 100 nm thick in PHJ cells, suggesting the superior potential of fullerene C{sub 70} as the p-type donor in comparison to other conventional donor materials. The optimal efficiency of these unconventional PHJ cells was 2.83% with a short-circuit current of 5.33 mA/cm{sup 2}, an open circuit voltage of 0.72 V, and a FF of 0.74. The results in this work unveil the potential of fullerene materials as donors in OPV devices, and provide alternative approaches towards future OPV applications.

  14. Cyclic Tensile Strain Enhances Osteogenesis and Angiogenesis in Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Osteoporotic Donors

    PubMed Central

    Charoenpanich, Adisri; Wall, Michelle E.; Tucker, Charles J.; Andrews, Danica M.K.; Lalush, David S.; Dirschl, Douglas R.

    2014-01-01

    We have shown that the uniaxial cyclic tensile strain of magnitude 10% promotes and enhances osteogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) and human adipose-derived stem cells (hASC) from normal, nonosteoporotic donors. In the present study, MSC from osteoporotic donors were analyzed for changes in mRNA expression in response to 10% uniaxial tensile strain to identify potential mechanisms underlying the use of this mechanical loading paradigm for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Human MSC isolated from three female, postmenopausal osteoporotic donors were analyzed for their responses to mechanical loading using microarray analysis of over 47,000 gene probes. Human MSC were seeded in three-dimensional collagen type I constructs to mimic the organic extracellular matrix of bone and 10% uniaxial cyclic tensile strain was applied to promote osteogenesis. Seventy-nine genes were shown to be regulated within hMSC from osteoporotic donors in response to 10% cyclic tensile strain. Upregulation of six genes were further confirmed with real-time RT-PCR: jun D proto-oncogene (JUND) and plasminogen activator, urokinase receptor (PLAUR), two genes identified as potential key molecules from network analysis; phosphoinositide-3-kinase, catalytic, delta polypeptide (PIK3CD) and wingless-type MMTV integration site family, member 5B (WNT5B), two genes with known importance in bone biology; and, PDZ and LIM domain 4 (PDLIM4) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), two genes that we have previously shown are significantly regulated in hASC in response to this mechanical stimulus. Function analysis indicated that 10% cyclic tensile strain induced expression of genes associated with cell movement, cell proliferation, and tissue development, including development in musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. Our results demonstrate that hMSC from aged, osteoporotic donors are capable of enhanced osteogenic differentiation in response to 10% cyclic tensile strain

  15. Improvement of cloning efficiency in minipigs using post-thawed donor cells treated with roscovitine.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seongsoo; Oh, Keon Bong; Kwon, Dae-Jin; Ock, Sun-A; Lee, Jeong-Woong; Im, Gi-Sun; Lee, Sung-Soo; Lee, Kichoon; Park, Jin-Ki

    2013-11-01

    Massachusetts General Hospital miniature pigs (MGH minipigs) have been established for organ transplantation studies across the homozygous major histocompatibility complex, but cloning efficiency of MGH minipigs is extremely low. This study was designed to increase the productivity of MGH minipigs by nuclear transfer of post-thaw donor cells after 1 h co-incubation with roscovitine. The MGH minipig cells were genetically modified with GT KO (alpha1,3-galactosyltransferase knock-out) and hCD46 KI (human CD46 knock-in) and used as donor cells. The GT KO/hCD46 KI donor cells were cultured for either 3 days (control group) or 1 h after thawing with 15 μM roscovitine (experimental group) prior to the nuclear transfer. The relative percentage of the transgenic donor cells that entered into G0/G1 was 93.7 % (±2.54). This was different from the donor cells cultured for 1 h with the roscovitine-treated group (84.6 % ±4.6) (P < 0.05) and without roscovitine (78.6 % ±5.5) (P < 0.01), respectively. The pregnancy rate and delivery rate in the roscovitine group (8/12 and 6/8, respectively) were significantly higher (P < 0.01) than those in the control group (6/19 and 3/6, respectively). In the experimental group, 12 GT KO/hCD46 KI transgenic minipigs were successfully generated, and five minipigs among them survived for more than 6 months so far. The recipient-based individual cloning efficiency ranged from 0.74 to 2.54 %. In conclusion, gene-modified donor cells can be used for cloning of MGH minipigs if the cells are post-thawed and treated with roscovitine for 1 h prior to nuclear transfer.

  16. Effect of cell donor age on the cellular response to nanoparticle exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Rafailovich, Miriam; Mironava, Tatsiana

    As human age there are many significant changes that occur in the skin. Here we investigate how the age-dependent changes in dermal fibroblast mechanics affect cell response to the AuNPs nanoparticles. To analyze these processes we exposed cells from donors of different age groups to AuNPs of two different sizes. Our results indicate that there are significant changes in cell rigidity with age, which in turn lead to different penetration rates of AuNPs through cell membrane and overall nanoparticle toxicity. Cell proliferation results revealed that all cell groups exposed to the same concentration of AuNPs had a very similar decrease in cell proliferation and similar impact on cell morphology. However, recovery data demonstrated that the rate of recovery from the damage is much faster for neonatal cells as compared to 30- and 80-years old cell group. Therefore, we conclude that nanoparticle uptake depends on cell membrane mechanics that in turn is a function of cell donor age.

  17. Toward Additive-Free Small-Molecule Organic Solar Cells: Roles of the Donor Crystallization Pathway and Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Abdelsamie, Maged; Treat, Neil D; Zhao, Kui; McDowell, Caitlin; Burgers, Mark A; Li, Ruipeng; Smilgies, Detlef-M; Stingelin, Natalie; Bazan, Guillermo C; Amassian, Aram

    2015-12-01

    The ease with which small-molecule donors crystallize during solution processing is directly linked to the need for solvent additives. Donor molecules that get trapped in disordered (H1) or liquid crystalline (T1) mesophases require additive processing to promote crystallization, phase separation, and efficient light harvesting. A donor material (X2) that crystallizes directly from solution yields additive-free solar cells with an efficiency of 7.6%.

  18. Comparison of outcomes of hematopoietic stem cell transplant without chemotherapy conditioning using matched sibling and unrelated donors for treatment of SCID

    PubMed Central

    Dvorak, Christopher C.; Hassan, Amel; Slatter, Mary A.; Hönig, Manfred; Lankester, Arjan C.; Buckley, Rebecca H.; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Davis, Jeffrey H.; Güngör, Tayfun; Gabriel, Melissa; Bleesing, Jacob H.; Bunin, Nancy; Sedlacek, Petr; Connelly, James A.; Crawford, David F.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Pai, Sung-Yun; Hassid, Jake; Veys, Paul; Gennery, Andrew R.; Cowan, Morton J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) who have matched sibling donors (MSD) can proceed to hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) without conditioning chemotherapy. Objective To determine whether the results of HCT without chemotherapy-based conditioning from matched unrelated donors (URD), either from volunteer adults or umbilical cord blood, are comparable to those from matched sibling donors (MSD). Methods A multicenter survey of SCID transplant centers in North America, Europe, and Australia to compile retrospective data on patients who have undergone unconditioned HCT, from either URDs (n = 37) or MSDs (n = 66). Results Most patients undergoing URD HCT (92%) achieved donor T-cell engraftment, compared to 97% for MSDs, however, estimated 5-year overall and event-free survival were worse for URD recipients (71% and 60%, respectively), compared to MSD recipients (92% and 89%, respectively; P <0.01 for both). URD recipients who received pre-HCT serotherapy had similar 5-year OS (100%) to MSD recipients. The incidences of Grade II-IV acute and chronic GVHD were higher in URD (50% and 39%, respectively), compared to MSD recipients (22% and 5%, respectively; P <0.01 for both). In the surviving patients, there was no difference in T-cell reconstitution at last follow-up between the URD recipients and MSD recipients, however MSD recipients were more likely to achieve B-cell reconstitution (72% vs. 17%; P <0.001). Conclusion Unconditioned URD HCT achieves excellent rates of donor T-cell engraftment similar to MSD recipients, and reconstitution rates are adequate. However, only a minority will develop myeloid and B cell reconstitution and attention must be paid to GVHD prophylaxis. This approach may be safer in children ineligible for intense regimens to spare potential complications of chemotherapy. PMID:25109802

  19. Decline in perfluorooctanesulfonate and other polyfluoroalkyl chemicals in American Red Cross adult blood donors, 2000-2006.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Geary W; Mair, David C; Church, Timothy R; Ellefson, Mark E; Reagen, William K; Boyd, Theresa M; Herron, Ross M; Medhdizadehkashi, Zahra; Nobiletti, John B; Rios, Jorge A; Butenhoff, John L; Zobel, Larry R

    2008-07-01

    In 2000, 3M Company, the primary global manufacturer, announced a phase-out of perfluorooctanesulfonyl fluoride (POSF, C8F17SO2F)-based materials after perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS, C8F17SO3-) was reported in human populations and wildlife. The purpose of this study was to determine whether PFOS and other polyfluoroalkyl concentrations in plasma samples, collected in 2006 from six American Red Cross adult blood donor centers, have declined compared to nonpaired serum samples from the same locations in 2000-2001. For each location, 100 samples were obtained evenly distributed by age (20-69 years) and sex. Analytes measured, using tandem mass spectrometry, were PFOS, perfluorooctanoate (PFOA), perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS), perfluorobutanesulfonate (PFBS), N-methyl perfluorooctanesulfonamidoacetate (Me-PFOSA-AcOH), and N-ethyl perfluorooctanesulfonamidoacetate (Et-PFOSA-AcOH). The geometric mean plasma concentrations were for PFOS 14.5 ng/mL (95% CI 13.9-15.2), PFOA 3.4 ng/ mL (95% CI 3.3-3.6), and PFHxS 1.5 ng/mL (95% CI 1.4-1.6). The majority of PFBS, Me-PFOSA-AcOH, and Et-PFOSA-AcOH concentrations were less than the lower limit of quantitation. Age- and sex-adjusted geometric means were lower in 2006 (approximately 60% for PFOS, 25% for PFOA, and 30% for PFHxS) than those in 2000-2001. The declines for PFOS and PFHxS are consistent with their serum elimination half-lives and the time since the phase-out of POSF-based materials. The shorter serum elimination half-life for PFOA and its smaller percentage decline than PFOS suggests PFOA concentrations measured in the general population are unlikely to be solely attributed to POSF-based materials. Direct and indirect exposure sources of PFOA could include historic and ongoing electrochemical cell fluorination (ECF) of PFOA, telomer production of PFOA, fluorotelomer-based precursors, and other fluoropoly-mer production. PMID:18678038

  20. Reduction of human immunodeficiency virus-infected cells from donor blood by leukocyte filtration.

    PubMed

    Rawal, B D; Busch, M P; Endow, R; Garcia-de-Lomas, J; Perkins, H A; Schwadron, R; Vyas, G N

    1989-06-01

    Several filters for leukocyte removal were evaluated in terms of their ability to reduce the cell-associated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) load in units of blood either inoculated in vitro with lymphocytes from a chronically infected cell line or collected directly from seropositive donors. Filtration of the experimentally inoculated units of blood resulted in a 5.9 log 10 mean reduction (95% confidence interval:7.4-4.5) of tissue culture infectious units (TCIU) as assayed by end-point titration using the coculture assay. Filtration of the units of blood from anti-HIV positive donors lowered the infectivity by over 2 logs, as detected by the coculture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques. However, residual cell-associated virus was detected in the majority of experiments. Clinical studies are warranted to determine if leukocyte filtration of blood will reduce the risk of transfusion transmitted viral infections.

  1. Donor-derived stem-cells and epithelial mesenchymal transition in squamous cell carcinoma in transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Verneuil, Laurence; Leboeuf, Christophe; Bousquet, Guilhem; Brugiere, Charlotte; Elbouchtaoui, Morad; Plassa, Louis-François; Peraldi, Marie-Noelle; Lebbé, Celeste; Ratajczak, Philippe; Janin, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Background Skin squamous-cell-carcinoma (SCC), is the main complication in long-term kidney-transplant recipients, and it can include donor-derived cells. Preclinical models demonstrated the involvement of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) in the progression of skin SCC, and the role of Snail, an EMT transcription factor, in cancer stem-cell survival and expansion. Here, we studied stem-cells and EMT expression in SCCs and concomitant actinic keratoses (AK) in kidney-transplant recipients. Methods In SCC and AK in 3 female recipients of male kidney-transplants, donor-derived Y chromosome in epidermal stem cells was assessed using combined XY-FISH/CD133 immunostaining, and digital-droplet-PCR on laser-microdissected CD133 expressing epidermal cells. For EMT study, double immunostainings of CD133 with vimentin or snail and slug, electron microscopy and immunostainings of keratinocytes junctions were performed. Digital droplet PCR was used to check CDH1 (E-cadherin) expression level in laser-microdissected cells co-expressing CD133 and vimentin or snail and slug. The numbers of Y-chromosome were assessed using digital droplet PCR in laser-microdissected cells co-expressing CD133 and vimentin, or snail and slug, and in CD133 positive cells not expressing any EMT maker. Results We identified donor-derived stem-cells in basal layers and invasive areas in all skin SCCs and in concomitant AKs, but not in surrounding normal skin. The donor-derived stem-cells expressed the EMT markers, vimentin, snail and slug in SCCs but not in AKs. The expression of the EMT transcription factor, SNAI1, was higher in stem-cells when they expressed vimentin. They were located in invasive areas of SCCs. In these areas, the expressions of claudin-1 and desmoglein 1 were reduced or absent, and within the basal layer there were features of basal membrane disappearance. Donor-derived stem cells were in larger numbers in stem cells co-expressing vimentin or snail and slug than in stem cells

  2. Antibodies from donor B cells perpetuate cutaneous chronic graft-versus-host disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hua; Ni, Xiong; Deng, Ruishu; Song, Qingxiao; Young, James; Cassady, Kaniel; Zhang, Mingfeng; Forman, Stephen; Martin, Paul J.; Liu, Qifa

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous sclerosis is one of the most common clinical manifestations of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD). Donor CD4+ T and B cells play important roles in cGVHD pathogenesis, but the role of antibodies from donor B cells remains unclear. In the current studies, we generated immunoglobulin (Ig)Hµγ1 DBA/2 mice whose B cells have normal antigen-presentation and regulatory functions but cannot secrete antibodies. With a murine cGVHD model using DBA/2 donors and BALB/c recipients, we have shown that wild-type (WT) grafts induce persistent cGVHD with damage in the thymus, peripheral lymphoid organs, and skin, as well as cutaneous T helper 17 cell (Th17) infiltration. In contrast, IgHµγ1 grafts induced only transient cGVHD with little damage in the thymus or peripheral lymph organs or with little cutaneous Th17 infiltration. Injections of IgG-containing sera from cGVHD recipients given WT grafts but not IgG-deficient sera from recipients given IgHµγ1 grafts led to deposition of IgG in the thymus and skin, with resulting damage in the thymus and peripheral lymph organs, cutaneous Th17 infiltration, and perpetuation of cGVHD in recipients given IgHµγ1 grafts. These results indicate that donor B-cell antibodies augment cutaneous cGVHD in part by damaging the thymus and increasing tissue infiltration of pathogenic Th17 cells. PMID:26884373

  3. The effect of amniotic membrane stem cells as donor nucleus on gene expression in reconstructed bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Nazari, Hassan; Shirazi, Abolfazl; Shams-Esfandabadi, Naser; Afzali, Azita; Ahmadi, Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear reprogramming of a differentiated cell in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a major concern in cloning procedures. Indeed, the nucleus of the donor cell often fails to express the genes which are a prerequisite for normal early embryo development. This study was aimed to evaluate the developmental competence and the expression pattern of some reprogramming related genes in bovine cloned embryos reconstructed with amniotic membrane stem cells (AMSCs) in comparison with those reconstructed with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and adult fibroblasts (AF) as well as with in vitro fertilized (IVF) oocytes. In vitro matured abattoir-derived oocytes were considered as recipients and a hand-made cloning technique was employed for oocyte enucleation and nuclear transfer (NT) procedures. The expression pattern of genes involved in self-renewal and pluripotency (POU5F1, SOX2, NANOG), imprinting (IGF2, IGF2R), DNA methylation (DNMT1, DNMT3A), histone deacetylation (HDAC2), and apoptosis (BAX, BCL2) were evaluated in NT and IVF derived embryos. Despite the insignificant difference in cleavage rate between reconstructed and IVF oocytes, the blastocyst rate in the IVF group was higher than that of other groups. Among reconstructed oocytes, a higher blastocysts rate was observed in MSC-NT and AMSCs-NT derived embryos that were significantly higher than AF-NT derived ones. There were more similarities in the expression pattern of pluripotency and epigenetic modification genes between MSC-NT and IVF derived blastocysts compared with other groups. In conclusion, considering developmental competence, AMSCs, as alternative donors in SCNT procedure, like MSCs, were prone to have more advantage compared with AF. PMID:27389982

  4. Influence of killer immunoglobulin-like receptor/HLA ligand matching on achievement of T-cell complete donor chimerism in related donor nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sobecks, R M; Ball, E J; Askar, M; Theil, K S; Rybicki, L A; Thomas, D; Brown, S; Kalaycio, M; Andresen, S; Pohlman, B; Dean, R; Sweetenham, J; Macklis, R; Bernhard, L; Cherni, K; Copelan, E; Maciejewski, J P; Bolwell, B J

    2008-04-01

    Achievement of complete donor chimerism (CDC) after allogeneic nonmyeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (NMHSCT) is important for preventing graft rejection and for generating a graft-vs-malignancy effect. The alloreactivity of NK cells and some T-cell subsets is mediated through the interaction of their killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) with target cell HLA/KIR ligands. The influence of KIR matching on the achievement of T-cell CDC after NMHSCT has not been previously described. We analyzed 31 patients undergoing T-cell replete related donor NMHSCT following fludarabine and 200 cGy TBI. Recipient inhibitory KIR genotype and donor HLA/KIR ligand matches were used to generate an inhibitory KIR score from 1 to 4 based upon the potential number of recipient inhibitory KIRs that could be engaged with donor HLA/KIR ligands. Patients with a score of 1 were less likely to achieve T-cell CDC (P=0.016) and more likely to develop graft rejection (P=0.011) than those with scores greater than 1. Thus, patients with lower inhibitory KIR scores may have more active anti-donor immune effector cells that may reduce donor chimerism. Conversely, patients with greater inhibitory KIR scores may have less active NK cell and T-cell populations, which may make them more likely to achieve CDC.

  5. Reconstruction of damaged corneal epithelium using Venus-labeled limbal epithelial stem cells and tracking of surviving donor cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ji-Qing; Liu, Wen-Qiang; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Yi-Hua; Hua, Jin-Lian; Liu, Wei-Shuai; Dou, Zhong-Ying; Lei, An-Min

    2013-10-01

    Limbal epithelial stem cells are responsible for the self-renewal and replenishment of the corneal epithelium. Although it is possible to repair the ocular surface using limbal stem cell transplantation, the mechanisms behind this therapy are unclear. To investigate the distribution of surviving donor cells in a reconstructed corneal epithelium, we screened a Venus-labeled limbal stem cell strain in goats. Cells were cultivated on denuded human amniotic membrane for 21 days to produce Venus-labeled corneal epithelial sheets. The Venus-labeled corneal epithelial sheets were transplanted to goat models of limbal stem cell deficiency. At 3 months post-surgery, the damaged corneal epithelia were obviously improved in the transplanted group compared with the non-transplanted control, with the donor cells still residing in the reconstructed ocular surface epithelium. Using Venus as a marker, our results indicated that the location and survival of donor cells varied, depending on the corneal epithelial region. Additionally, immunofluorescent staining of the reconstructed corneal epithelium demonstrated that many P63(+) cells were unevenly distributed among basal and suprabasal epithelial layers. Our study provides a new model, and reveals some of the mechanisms involved in corneal epithelial cell regeneration research.

  6. Immune reconstitution in recipients of photodepleted HLA-identical sibling donor stem cell transplantations: T cell subset frequencies predict outcome.

    PubMed

    McIver, Zachariah A; Melenhorst, Jan J; Grim, Andrew; Naguib, Nicholas; Weber, Gerrit; Fellowes, Vicki; Khuu, Hahn; Stroncek, David S; Leitman, Susan F; Battiwalla, Minoo; Barrett, A John

    2011-12-01

    We evaluated an ex vivo photodepletion (PD) technique to selectively deplete graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) alloreacting T cells given to 24 human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling stem cell transplantation (SCT) recipients. Donor lymphocytes were activated by 72-hour exposure to irradiated in vitro expanded recipient T lymphocytes and pulsed with a TH9402 photosensitizer. Alloactivated T cells preferentially retaining the photosensitizer were eliminated by light exposure. The PD product showed an inverted CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio with greatest depletion occurring in the CD4(+) naive and central memory populations. In contrast, the CD8(+) naive and effector cells were relatively conserved, reflecting the differential extrusion of TH9402 by T cell subsets. Cytomegalovirus reactive T cells were reduced in the PD product and in recipient blood 100 days after SCT when compared with contemporaneous HLA-identical sibling donor T cell-depleted SCT recipients. Although PD SCT recipients experienced similar absolute lymphocyte counts during the first 100 days after SCT, they achieved 100% donor T cell chimerism more rapidly and had higher CD8(+) naive T cell counts early after SCT. SCT recipients of PD products with the lowest CD4 central memory content had the highest risk of developing chronic GVHD (cGVHD) (P = .04) and a poorer survival (P = .03). Although the persistence of CD8(+) naive T cells may have contributed to important antileukemia responses resulting in a relatively low relapse rate, our findings emphasize the role of donor memory T cells and CD4 cells in establishing immune competence post-SCT. Although PD is associated with excellent outcomes in the haploidentical setting, the low frequency of alloactivations in HLA-matched pairs makes the PD approach used by our group for allodepletion in HLA-matched sibling transplantations an inefficient technique. PMID:21684345

  7. Busulfan Conditioning Enhances Engraftment of Hematopoietic Donor-derived Cells in the Brain Compared With Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Fiona L; Sergijenko, Ana; Langford-Smith, Kia J; Malinowska, Marcela; Wynn, Rob F; Bigger, Brian W

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy for neurological disorders relies on transmigration of donor-derived monocytes to the brain, where they can engraft as microglia and deliver therapeutic proteins. Many mouse studies use whole-body irradiation to investigate brain transmigration pathways, but chemotherapy is generally used clinically. The current evidence for transmigration to the brain after chemotherapy is conflicting. We compared hematopoietic donor cell brain engraftment after bone marrow (BM) transplants in busulfan- or irradiation-conditioned mice. Significantly more donor-derived microglial cells engrafted posttransplant in busulfan-conditioned brain compared with the irradiated, in both the short and long term. Although total Iba-1+ microglial content was increased in irradiated brain in the short term, it was similar between groups over long-term engraftment. MCP-1, a key regulator of monocyte transmigration, showed long-term elevation in busulfan-conditioned brain, whereas irradiated brains showed long-term elevation of the proinflammatory chemokine interleukin 1α (IL-1α), with increased in situ proliferation of resident microglia, and significant increases in the relative number of amoeboid activated microglia in the brain. This has implications for the choice of conditioning regimen to promote hematopoietic cell brain engraftment and the relevance of irradiation in mouse models of transplantation. PMID:23423338

  8. Survival after T cell-depleted haploidentical stem cell transplantation is improved using the mother as donor.

    PubMed

    Stern, Martin; Ruggeri, Loredana; Mancusi, Antonella; Bernardo, Maria Ester; de Angelis, Claudia; Bucher, Christoph; Locatelli, Franco; Aversa, Franco; Velardi, Andrea

    2008-10-01

    We hypothesized that transplacental leukocyte trafficking during pregnancy, which induces long-term, stable, reciprocal microchimerism in mother and child, might influence outcome of patients with acute leukemia given parental donor haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We analyzed the outcome of 118 patients who received transplants for acute leukemia in 2 centers. Patients received highly T cell-depleted haploidentical grafts after myelo-ablative conditioning. Five-year event-free survival was better in patients who received transplants from the mother than from the father (50.6% +/- 7.6% vs 11.1% +/- 4.2%; P < .001). Better survival was the result of both reduced incidence of relapse and transplantation-related mortality. The protective effect was seen in both female and male recipients, in both lymphoid and myeloid diseases; it was more evident in patients receiving transplants in remission than in chemotherapy-resistant relapse. Incidences of rejection and acute graft-versus-host disease were not significantly influenced. Multivariate analysis confirmed donor sex in parental donor transplantation as an independent prognostic factor for survival (hazard ratio, father vs mother = 2.36; P = .003). In contrast, in a control cohort of patients who received transplants from haploidentical siblings, donor sex had no influence on outcome. Although obtained in a retrospective analysis, these data suggest that the mother of the patient should be preferred as donor for haploidentical HSCT. PMID:18492955

  9. DNA methylation and mRNA expression profiles in bovine oocytes derived from prepubertal and adult donors.

    PubMed

    Diederich, Mike; Hansmann, Tamara; Heinzmann, Julia; Barg-Kues, Brigitte; Herrmann, Doris; Aldag, Patrick; Baulain, Ulrich; Reinhard, Richard; Kues, Wilfried; Weissgerber, Christian; Haaf, Thomas; Niemann, Heiner

    2012-09-01

    The developmental capacity of oocytes from prepubertal cattle is reduced compared with their adult counterparts, and epigenetic mechanisms are thought to be involved herein. Here, we analyzed DNA methylation in three developmentally important, nonimprinted genes (SLC2A1, PRDX1, ZAR1) and two satellite sequences, i.e. 'bovine testis satellite I' (BTS) and 'Bos taurus alpha satellite I' (BTαS). In parallel, mRNA expression of the genes was determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Oocytes were retrieved from prepubertal calves and adult cows twice per week over a 3-week period by ultrasound-guided follicular aspiration after treatment with FSH and/or IGF1. Both immature and in vitro matured prepubertal and adult oocytes showed a distinct hypomethylation profile of the three genes without differences between the two types of donors. The methylation status of the BTS sequence changed according to the age and treatment while the methylation status of BTαS sequence remained largely unchanged across the different age and treatment groups. Relative transcript abundance of the selected genes was significantly different in immature and in vitro matured oocytes; only minor changes related to origin and treatment were observed. In conclusion, methylation levels of the investigated satellite sequences were high (>50%) in all groups and showed significant variation depending on the age, treatment, or in vitro maturation. To what extent this is involved in the acquisition of developmental competence of bovine oocytes needs further study. PMID:22733804

  10. CD4+ invariant natural killer T cells protect from murine GVHD lethality through expansion of donor CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Schneidawind, Dominik; Pierini, Antonio; Alvarez, Maite; Pan, Yuqiong; Baker, Jeanette; Buechele, Corina; Luong, Richard H; Meyer, Everett H; Negrin, Robert S

    2014-11-20

    Dysregulated donor T cells lead to destruction of host tissues resulting in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We investigated the impact of highly purified (>95%) donor CD4(+) invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells on GVHD in a murine model of allogeneic HCT. We found that low doses of adoptively transferred donor CD4(+) iNKT cells protect from GVHD morbidity and mortality through an expansion of donor CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). These Tregs express high levels of the Ikaros transcription factor Helios and expand from the Treg pool of the donor graft. Furthermore, CD4(+) iNKT cells preserve T-cell-mediated graft-versus-tumor effects. Our studies reveal new aspects of the cellular interplay between iNKT cells and Tregs in the context of tolerance induction after allogeneic HCT and set the stage for clinical translation. PMID:25293774

  11. Effects of Alkylthio and Alkoxy Side Chains in Polymer Donor Materials for Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chaohua; Wong, Wai-Yeung

    2016-02-01

    Side chains play a considerable role not only in improving the solubility of polymers for solution-processed device fabrication, but also in affecting the molecular packing, electron affinity and thus the device performance. In particular, electron-donating side chains show unique properties when employed to tune the electronic character of conjugated polymers in many cases. Therefore, rational electron-donating side chain engineering can improve the photovoltaic properties of the resulting polymer donors to some extent. Here, a survey of some representative examples which use electron-donating alkylthio and alkoxy side chains in conjugated organic polymers for polymer solar cell applications will be presented. It is envisioned that an analysis of the effect of such electron-donating side chains in polymer donors would contribute to a better understanding of this kind of side chain behavior in solution-processed conjugated organic polymers for polymer solar cells.

  12. Effects of Alkylthio and Alkoxy Side Chains in Polymer Donor Materials for Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chaohua; Wong, Wai-Yeung

    2016-02-01

    Side chains play a considerable role not only in improving the solubility of polymers for solution-processed device fabrication, but also in affecting the molecular packing, electron affinity and thus the device performance. In particular, electron-donating side chains show unique properties when employed to tune the electronic character of conjugated polymers in many cases. Therefore, rational electron-donating side chain engineering can improve the photovoltaic properties of the resulting polymer donors to some extent. Here, a survey of some representative examples which use electron-donating alkylthio and alkoxy side chains in conjugated organic polymers for polymer solar cell applications will be presented. It is envisioned that an analysis of the effect of such electron-donating side chains in polymer donors would contribute to a better understanding of this kind of side chain behavior in solution-processed conjugated organic polymers for polymer solar cells. PMID:26754772

  13. High internal quantum efficiency in fullerene solar cells based on crosslinked polymer donor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Png, Rui-Qi; Zhao, Li-Hong; Chua, Lay-Lay; Friend, Richard H.; Ho, Peter K. H.

    2012-12-01

    The power conversion efficiency of organic photovoltaic cells depends crucially on the morphology of their donor-acceptor heterostructure. Although tremendous progress has been made to develop new materials that better cover the solar spectrum, this heterostructure is still formed by a primitive spontaneous demixing that is rather sensitive to processing and hence difficult to realize consistently over large areas. Here we report that the desired interpenetrating heterostructure with built-in phase contiguity can be fabricated by acceptor doping into a lightly crosslinked polymer donor network. The resultant nanotemplated network is highly reproducible and resilient to phase coarsening. For the regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene):phenyl-C61-butyrate methyl ester donor-acceptor model system, we obtained 20% improvement in power conversion efficiency over conventional demixed biblend devices. We reached very high internal quantum efficiencies of up to 0.9 electron per photon at zero bias, over an unprecedentedly wide composition space. Detailed analysis of the power conversion, power absorbed and internal quantum efficiency landscapes reveals the separate contributions of optical interference and donor-acceptor morphology effects.

  14. High internal quantum efficiency in fullerene solar cells based on crosslinked polymer donor networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Png, Rui-Qi; Zhao, Li-Hong; Chua, Lay-Lay; Friend, Richard H; Ho, Peter K H

    2012-01-01

    The power conversion efficiency of organic photovoltaic cells depends crucially on the morphology of their donor-acceptor heterostructure. Although tremendous progress has been made to develop new materials that better cover the solar spectrum, this heterostructure is still formed by a primitive spontaneous demixing that is rather sensitive to processing and hence difficult to realize consistently over large areas. Here we report that the desired interpenetrating heterostructure with built-in phase contiguity can be fabricated by acceptor doping into a lightly crosslinked polymer donor network. The resultant nanotemplated network is highly reproducible and resilient to phase coarsening. For the regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene):phenyl-C(61)-butyrate methyl ester donor-acceptor model system, we obtained 20% improvement in power conversion efficiency over conventional demixed biblend devices. We reached very high internal quantum efficiencies of up to 0.9 electron per photon at zero bias, over an unprecedentedly wide composition space. Detailed analysis of the power conversion, power absorbed and internal quantum efficiency landscapes reveals the separate contributions of optical interference and donor-acceptor morphology effects.

  15. Transcript levels of several epigenome regulatory genes in bovine somatic donor cells are not correlated with their cloning efficiency.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenli; Sadeghieh, Sanaz; Abruzzese, Ronald; Uppada, Subhadra; Meredith, Justin; Ohlrichs, Charletta; Broek, Diane; Polejaeva, Irina

    2009-09-01

    Among many factors that potentially affect somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryo development is the donor cell itself. Cloning potentials of somatic donor cells vary greatly, possibly because the cells have different capacities to be reprogrammed by ooplasma. It is therefore intriguing to identify factors that regulate the reprogrammability of somatic donor cells. Gene expression analysis is a widely used tool to investigate underlying mechanisms of various phenotypes. In this study, we conducted a retrospective analysis investigating whether donor cell lines with distinct cloning efficiencies express different levels of genes involved in epigenetic reprogramming including histone deacetylase-1 (HDAC1), -2 (HDAC2); DNA methyltransferase-1 (DNMT1), -3a (DNMT3a),-3b (DNMT3b), and the bovine homolog of yeast sucrose nonfermenting-2 (SNF2L), a SWI/SNF family of ATPases. Cell samples from 12 bovine donor cell lines were collected at the time of nuclear transfer experiments and expression levels of the genes were measured using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Our results show that there are no significant differences in expression levels of these genes between donor cell lines of high and low cloning efficiency defined as live calving rates, although inverse correlations are observed between in vitro embryo developmental rates and expression levels of HDAC2 and SNF2L. We also show that selection of stable reference genes is important for relative quantification, and different batches of cells can have different gene expression patterns. In summary, we demonstrate that expression levels of these epigenome regulatory genes in bovine donor cells are not correlated with cloning potential. The experimental design and data analysis method reported here can be applied to study any genes expressed in donor cells.

  16. Efficient modification of CCR5 in primary human hematopoietic cells using a megaTAL nuclease and AAV donor template

    PubMed Central

    Sather, Blythe D.; Romano Ibarra, Guillermo S.; Sommer, Karen; Curinga, Gabrielle; Hale, Malika; Khan, Iram F.; Singh, Swati; Song, Yumei; Gwiazda, Kamila; Sahni, Jaya; Jarjour, Jordan; Astrakhan, Alexander; Wagner, Thor A.; Scharenberg, Andrew M.; Rawlings, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic mutations or engineered nucleases that disrupt the HIV co-receptor CCR5 block HIV infection of CD4+ T cells. These findings have motivated the engineering of CCR5-specific nucleases for application as HIV therapies. The efficacy of this approach relies on efficient biallelic disruption of CCR5, and the ability to efficiently target sequences that confer HIV resistance to the CCR5 locus has the potential to further improve clinical outcomes. We used RNA-based nuclease expression paired with adeno-associated virus (AAV) – mediated delivery of a CCR5-targeting donor template to achieve highly efficient targeted recombination in primary human T cells. This method consistently achieved 8 to 60% rates of homology-directed recombination into the CCR5 locus in T cells, with over 80% of cells modified with an MND-GFP expression cassette exhibiting biallelic modification. MND-GFP – modified T cells maintained a diverse repertoire and engrafted in immune-deficient mice as efficiently as unmodified cells. Using this method, we integrated sequences coding chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) into the CCR5 locus, and the resulting targeted CAR T cells exhibited antitumor or anti-HIV activity. Alternatively, we introduced the C46 HIV fusion inhibitor, generating T cell populations with high rates of biallelic CCR5 disruption paired with potential protection from HIV with CXCR4 co-receptor tropism. Finally, this protocol was applied to adult human mobilized CD34+ cells, resulting in 15 to 20% homologous gene targeting. Our results demonstrate that high-efficiency targeted integration is feasible in primary human hematopoietic cells and highlight the potential of gene editing to engineer T cell products with myriad functional properties. PMID:26424571

  17. Efficient modification of CCR5 in primary human hematopoietic cells using a megaTAL nuclease and AAV donor template.

    PubMed

    Sather, Blythe D; Romano Ibarra, Guillermo S; Sommer, Karen; Curinga, Gabrielle; Hale, Malika; Khan, Iram F; Singh, Swati; Song, Yumei; Gwiazda, Kamila; Sahni, Jaya; Jarjour, Jordan; Astrakhan, Alexander; Wagner, Thor A; Scharenberg, Andrew M; Rawlings, David J

    2015-09-30

    Genetic mutations or engineered nucleases that disrupt the HIV co-receptor CCR5 block HIV infection of CD4(+) T cells. These findings have motivated the engineering of CCR5-specific nucleases for application as HIV therapies. The efficacy of this approach relies on efficient biallelic disruption of CCR5, and the ability to efficiently target sequences that confer HIV resistance to the CCR5 locus has the potential to further improve clinical outcomes. We used RNA-based nuclease expression paired with adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated delivery of a CCR5-targeting donor template to achieve highly efficient targeted recombination in primary human T cells. This method consistently achieved 8 to 60% rates of homology-directed recombination into the CCR5 locus in T cells, with over 80% of cells modified with an MND-GFP expression cassette exhibiting biallelic modification. MND-GFP-modified T cells maintained a diverse repertoire and engrafted in immune-deficient mice as efficiently as unmodified cells. Using this method, we integrated sequences coding chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) into the CCR5 locus, and the resulting targeted CAR T cells exhibited antitumor or anti-HIV activity. Alternatively, we introduced the C46 HIV fusion inhibitor, generating T cell populations with high rates of biallelic CCR5 disruption paired with potential protection from HIV with CXCR4 co-receptor tropism. Finally, this protocol was applied to adult human mobilized CD34(+) cells, resulting in 15 to 20% homologous gene targeting. Our results demonstrate that high-efficiency targeted integration is feasible in primary human hematopoietic cells and highlight the potential of gene editing to engineer T cell products with myriad functional properties.

  18. The ratio and topology effects of benzodithiophene donor-benzooxadiazole acceptor fragments on the optoelectronic properties of donor molecules toward solar cell materials.

    PubMed

    Bibi, Shamsa; Zhang, Jingping

    2015-03-28

    A series of conjugated donor molecules (DmAnSq where m = 1-4, n = 1-7 while D = benzodithiophene, A = benzooxadiazole and S denotes ethyne spacers between D and A or D and D fragments) with various ratios of D/A fragments and topologies have been designed and investigated for OPV applications. An increase in the ratio of the acceptor fragment with respect to the donor fragment decreases the LUMO energy level and narrows the Eg for the designed molecule. More vertically (C4 and C8 substituted phenyl ring positions) bonded acceptor fragments than linearly (C2 and C6 substituted thiophene ring positions) bonded fragments result in a significant red shift in the maximum absorption wavelength. While, linearly bonded fragments lead to stronger absorption bands. Molecules with D-A-D topology exhibit more significant optical and electronic characteristics than those with D-D topology. All donor molecules (m = 2-4) of the D-A-D type show lower λh values than those of 1 donor containing (DAn) molecules. D-D type molecules show only lower λe values than DAn molecules because of the presence of a second donor fragment. The charge transfer phenomenon is shape dependent. The branched or anisotropic X, H, π, n, and square shaped molecules display higher charge transfer rates than the corresponding linear isomers due to better dimensionality. On the basis of these results, we suggest that designed donor and corresponding matched acceptor molecules have potential to act as promising candidates in solar cell devices.

  19. In vitro donor-specific hyporesponsiveness and T cell subsets in renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Bas, J; Mestre, M; Griñó, J M; Massip, E; Castelao, A M; Romeu, A; González, L; Valls, A; Buendía, E

    1993-01-01

    In order to assess the immune mechanisms triggered by an immunosuppressive regimen consisting of prophylactic antilymphocyte globulin plus low-dose cyclosporine A and steroids, we studied the short-term evolution of both, anti donor in vitro alloresponse and peripheral blood T cell subsets in 21 recipients of a cadaveric kidney allograft. Spleen cells from cadaveric donors and peripheral blood lymphocytes from the respective recipients pretransplant (pre-Tx), at three and six months posttransplant (post-Tx) were obtained to perform one-way mixed lymphocyte cultures and flow cytometry analysis of lymphocyte subsets. The results indicated the development of donor-specific mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) hyporesponsiveness as early as three months post-Tx, paralleled by a decrease in CD4+CD29+ helper-inducer cells and by an increase in CD8+CD45RA+ suppressor lymphocytes in peripheral blood. These changes were reflected in a very good clinical outcome of the patients. The present results further suggest that suppression of the immune system just before transplantation is a suitable method to induce early specific hyporesponsiveness to the allograft.

  20. Ipilimumab or Nivolumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed Hematologic Malignancies After Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-21

    Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma

  1. Using a nano-flare probe to detect RNA in live donor cells prior to somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Fu, Bo; Ren, Liang; Liu, Di; Ma, Jian-Zhang; An, Tie-Zhu; Yang, Xiu-Qin; Ma, Hong; Guo, Zhen-Hua; Zhu, Meng; Bai, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Many transgenes are silenced in mammalian cells (donor cells used for somatic cell nuclear transfer [SCNT]). Silencing correlated with a repressed chromatin structure or suppressed promoter, and it impeded the production of transgenic animals. Gene transcription studies in live cells are challenging because of the drawbacks of reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Nano-flare probes provide an effective approach to detect RNA in living cells. We used 18S RNA, a housekeeping gene, as a reference gene. This study aimed to establish a platform to detect RNA in single living donor cells using a Nano-flare probe prior to SCNT and to verify the safety and validity of the Nano-flare probe in order to provide a technical foundation for rescuing silenced transgenes in transgenic cloned embryos. We investigated cytotoxic effect of the 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe on porcine fetal fibroblasts, characterized the distribution of the 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe in living cells and investigated the effect of the 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe on the development of cloned embryos after SCNT. The cytotoxic effect of the 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe on porcine fetal fibroblasts was dose-dependent, and 18S RNA was detected using the 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe. In addition, treating donor cells with 500 pM 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe did not have adverse effects on the development of SCNT embryos at the pre-implantation stage. In conclusion, we established a preliminary platform to detect RNA in live donor cells using a Nano-flare probe prior to SCNT.

  2. Fatty acyl donor selectivity in membrane bound O-acyltransferases and communal cell fate decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Tuladhar, Rubina; Lum, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    The post-translational modification of proteins with lipid moieties confers spatial and temporal control of protein function by restricting their subcellular distribution or movement in the extracellular milieu. Yet, little is known about the significance of lipid selectivity to the activity of proteins targeted for such modifications. Membrane bound O-acyl transferases (MBOATs) are a superfamily of multipass enzymes that transfer fatty acids on to lipid or protein substrates. Three MBOATs constitute a subfamily with secreted signalling molecules for substrates, the Wnt, Hedgehog (Hh) and Ghrelin proteins. Given their important roles in adult tissue homoeostasis, all three molecules and their respective associated acyltransferases provide a framework for interrogating the role of extracellular acylation events in cell-to-cell communication. Here, we discuss how the preference for a fatty acyl donor in the Wnt acyltransferase porcupine (Porcn) and possibly in other protein lipidation enzymes may provide a means for coupling metabolic health at the single cell level to communal cell fate decision-making in complex multicellular organisms. PMID:25849923

  3. Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Types 1 and 2 Seropositivity among Blood Donors at Mbarara Regional Blood Bank, South Western Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Uchenna Tweteise, Patience; Natukunda, Bernard; Bazira, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Background. The human T-cell lymphotropic virus types 1 and 2 (HTLV 1/2) are retroviruses associated with different pathologies. HTLV-1 causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP); HTLV-2 is not clearly associated with a known clinical disease. Both viruses may be transmitted by whole blood transfusion, from mother to child predominantly through breastfeeding, and by sexual contact. Presently, none of the regional blood banks in Uganda perform routine pretransfusion screening for HTLV. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of anti-human T-cell lymphotropic virus types 1/2 (HTLV-1/2) antibodies among blood donors at Mbarara Regional Blood Bank in South Western Uganda. A cross-sectional study was conducted between June 2014 and September 2014. Methodology. Consecutive blood samples of 368 blood donors were screened for anti-HTLV-1/2 antibodies using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Samples reactive on a first HTLV-1/2 ELISA were further retested in duplicate using the same ELISA. Of the three hundred and sixty-eight blood donors (229 (62.2%) males and 139 (37.8%) females), only two male donors aged 20 and 21 years were HTLV-1/2 seropositive, representing a prevalence of 0.54%. Conclusion. HTLV-1/2 prevalence is low among blood donors at Mbarara Regional Blood Bank. Studies among other categories of people at risk for HTLV 1/2 infection should be carried out. PMID:27034840

  4. Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Types 1 and 2 Seropositivity among Blood Donors at Mbarara Regional Blood Bank, South Western Uganda.

    PubMed

    Uchenna Tweteise, Patience; Natukunda, Bernard; Bazira, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Background. The human T-cell lymphotropic virus types 1 and 2 (HTLV 1/2) are retroviruses associated with different pathologies. HTLV-1 causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP); HTLV-2 is not clearly associated with a known clinical disease. Both viruses may be transmitted by whole blood transfusion, from mother to child predominantly through breastfeeding, and by sexual contact. Presently, none of the regional blood banks in Uganda perform routine pretransfusion screening for HTLV. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of anti-human T-cell lymphotropic virus types 1/2 (HTLV-1/2) antibodies among blood donors at Mbarara Regional Blood Bank in South Western Uganda. A cross-sectional study was conducted between June 2014 and September 2014. Methodology. Consecutive blood samples of 368 blood donors were screened for anti-HTLV-1/2 antibodies using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Samples reactive on a first HTLV-1/2 ELISA were further retested in duplicate using the same ELISA. Of the three hundred and sixty-eight blood donors (229 (62.2%) males and 139 (37.8%) females), only two male donors aged 20 and 21 years were HTLV-1/2 seropositive, representing a prevalence of 0.54%. Conclusion. HTLV-1/2 prevalence is low among blood donors at Mbarara Regional Blood Bank. Studies among other categories of people at risk for HTLV 1/2 infection should be carried out.

  5. Donor Age and Corneal Endothelial Cell Loss 5 Years after Successful Corneal Transplantation: Specular Microscopy Ancillary Study Results

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether endothelial cell loss 5 years after successful corneal transplantation is related to the age of the donor. Design Multicenter, prospective, double-masked clinical trial. Participants Three hundred forty-seven subjects participating in the Cornea Donor Study who had not experienced graft failure 5 years after corneal transplantation for a moderate-risk condition (principally Fuchs’ dystrophy or pseudophakic corneal edema). Testing Specular microscopic images of donor corneas obtained before surgery and postoperatively at 6 months, 12 months, and then annually through 5 years were submitted to a central reading center to measure endothelial cell density (ECD). Main Outcome Measure Endothelial cell density at 5 years. Results At 5 years, there was a substantial decrease in ECD from baseline for all donor ages. Subjects who received a cornea from a donor 12 to 65 years old experienced a median cell loss of 69% in the study eye, resulting in a 5-year median ECD of 824 cells/mm2 (interquartile range, 613–1342), whereas subjects who received a cornea from a donor 66 to 75 years old experienced a cell loss of 75%, resulting in a median 5-year ECD of 654 cells/mm2 (interquartile range, 538–986) (P [adjusted for baseline ECD] = 0.04). Statistically, there was a weak negative association between ECD and donor age analyzed as a continuous variable (r [adjusted for baseline ECD] = −0.19; 95% confidence interval, −0.29 to −0.08). Conclusions Endothelial cell loss is substantial in the 5 years after corneal transplantation. There is a slight association between cell loss and donor age. This finding emphasizes the importance of longer-term follow-up of this cohort to determine if this relationship affects graft survival. PMID:18387408

  6. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells are an attractive donor cell type for production of cloned pigs as well as genetically modified cloned pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Li, Zicong; He, Xiaoyan; Chen, Liwen; Shi, Junsong; Zhou, Rong; Xu, Weihua; Liu, Dewu; Wu, Zhenfang

    2013-10-01

    The somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technique has been widely applied to clone pigs or to produce genetically modified pigs. Currently, this technique relies mainly on using terminally differentiated fibroblasts as donor cells. To improve cloning efficiency, only partially differentiated multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), thought to be more easily reprogrammed to a pluripotent state, have been used as nuclear donors in pig SCNT. Although in vitro-cultured embryos cloned from porcine MSCs (MSCs-embryos) were shown to have higher preimplantation developmental ability than cloned embryos reconstructed from fibroblasts (Fs-embryos), the difference in in vivo full-term developmental rate between porcine MSCs-embryos and Fs-embryos has not been investigated so far. In this study, we demonstrated that blastocyst total cell number and full-term survival abilities of MSCs-embryos were significantly higher than those of Fs-embryos cloned from the same donor pig. The enhanced developmental potential of MSCs-embryos may be associated with their nuclear donors' DNA methylation profile, because we found that the methylation level of imprinting genes and repeat sequences differed between MSCs and fibroblasts. In addition, we showed that use of transgenic porcine MSCs generated from transgene plasmid transfection as donor cells for SCNT can produce live transgenic cloned pigs. These results strongly suggest that porcine bone marrow MSCs are a desirable donor cell type for production of cloned pigs and genetically modified cloned pigs via SCNT.

  7. Conveniently synthesized isophorone dyes for high efficiency dye-sensitized solar cells: tuning photovoltaic performance by structural modification of donor group in donor-pi-acceptor system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Zhu, Weihong; Zhang, Qiong; Wu, Wenjun; Xu, Min; Ning, Zhijun; Xie, Yongshu; Tian, He

    2009-04-01

    A novel isophorone sensitizer D-3 based on a donor-pi-acceptor system has been conveniently synthesized for highly efficient dye-sensitized solar cells, resulting in a remarkable overall conversion efficiency of 7.41% (AM 1.5, 100 mW cm(-2)) with Jsc of 18.63 mA cm(-2), Voc of 634 mV and FF of 0.63.

  8. Small molecular donors for organic solar cells obtained by simple and clean synthesis.

    PubMed

    Demeter, Dora; Mohamed, Salma; Diac, Andreea; Grosu, Ion; Roncali, Jean

    2014-04-01

    A small donor-acceptor molecule is synthesized in a two-step procedure involving reaction of N,N-diphenylhydrazine on 2,5-diformylthiophene and Knoevenagel condensation. Results of UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry show that replacement of the phenyl ring bridge of a reference compound 2 by an azo group produces a slight red-shift of λmax, an enhancement of the molecular absorption coefficient, and a decrease of the energy level of the frontier orbitals. A preliminary evaluation of the potentialities of compound 1 as donor material in a basic bilayer planar heterojunction cell of 28 mm(2) active area using C60 as acceptor gave a short-circuit current density of 6.32 mA cm(-2) and a power conversion efficiency of 2.07 %.

  9. Donor Specific Anti-HLA Antibody and Risk of Graft Failure in Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kongtim, Piyanuch; Cao, Kai; Ciurea, Stefan O.

    2016-01-01

    Outcomes of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) using HLA-half matched related donors (haploidentical) have recently improved due to better control of alloreactive reactions in both graft-versus-host and host-versus-graft directions. The recognition of the role of humoral rejection in the development of primary graft failure in this setting has broadened our understanding about causes of engraftment failure in these patients, helped us better select donors for patients in need of AHSCT, and developed rational therapeutic measures for HLA sensitized patients to prevent this unfortunate event, which is usually associated with a very high mortality rate. With these recent advances the rate of graft failure in haploidentical transplantation has decreased to less than 5%. PMID:26904122

  10. Nitric oxide donor induces HSP70 accumulation in the heart and in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Malyshev IYu; Malugin, A V; Golubeva LYu; Zenina, T A; Manukhina, E B; Mikoyan, V D; Vanin, A F

    1996-08-01

    As our group has shown, the NO-synthase inhibitor L-NNA decreased 2-3 times heat shock-induced synthesis of the heat shock protein HSP70 (FEBS Lett. 370 (1995) 159-162). It was suggested that NO is involved in such induction. In the present study, it was found that (1) injection of the NO donor dinitrosyl iron complex (DNIC) into rats results in accumulation of HSP70 in the heart; (2) heat shock is accompanied by increased generation of NO (EPR assay) and HSP70 accumulation in cultured cells; (3) DNIC induces HSP70 accumulation in cultured cells not exposed to heat shock. PMID:8706919

  11. Combinatorial design of copolymer donor materials for bulk heterojunction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yongwoo; Liu, Jaikai; Quigley, Joseph J; Luo, Heng; Lin, Xi

    2014-06-24

    Seeking π-conjugated polymers with targeted optical band gaps is not only a grand scientific challenge but also in great practical need for systematically improving the performance of organic optoelectronic devices. This work presents a generic combinatorial band-gap design strategy over 780 different copolymer donor materials for bulk heterojunction solar cell applications. Predicted optical band gaps effectively cover the entire solar spectrum from infrared, to visible, to ultraviolet. Combined with empirical arguments widely acknowledged in the literature, the optimal copolymer structures are identified for both single and tandem cells with the optimal power conversion efficiencies. PMID:24835665

  12. Immunological control of adult neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis occurs only in discrete regions of adult central nervous system: the subventricular zone and the subgranular zone. These areas are populated by adult neural stem cells (aNSC) that are regulated by a number of molecules and signaling pathways, which control their cell fate choices, survival and proliferation rates. For a long time, it was believed that the immune system did not exert any control on neural proliferative niches. However, it has been observed that many pathological and inflammatory conditions significantly affect NSC niches. Even more, increasing evidence indicates that chemokines and cytokines play an important role in regulating proliferation, cell fate choices, migration and survival of NSCs under physiological conditions. Hence, the immune system is emerging is an important regulator of neurogenic niches in the adult brain, which may have clinical relevance in several brain diseases. PMID:20861925

  13. Donor CD4 T Cell Diversity Determines Virus Reactivation in Patients After HLA-Matched Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, J; Seitz, V; Balzer, H; Gary, R; Lenze, D; Moi, S; Pasemann, S; Seegebarth, A; Wurdack, M; Hennig, S; Gerbitz, A; Hummel, M

    2015-01-01

    Delayed reconstitution of the T cell compartment in recipients of allogeneic stem cell grafts is associated with an increase of reactivation of latent viruses. Thereby, the transplanted T cell repertoire appears to be one of the factors that affect T cell reconstitution. Therefore, we studied the T cell receptor beta (TCRβ) gene rearrangements of flow cytometry–sorted CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from the peripheral blood of 23 allogeneic donors before G-CSF administration and on the day of apheresis. For this purpose, TCRβ rearrangements were amplified by multiplex PCR followed by high-throughput amplicon sequencing. Overall, CD4+ T cells displayed a significantly higher TCRβ diversity compared to CD8+ T cells irrespective of G-CSF administration. In line, no significant impact of G-CSF treatment on the TCR Vβ repertoire usage was found. However, correlation of the donor T cell repertoire with clinical outcomes of the recipient revealed that a higher CD4+ TCRβ diversity after G-CSF treatment is associated with lower reactivation of cytomegalovirus and Epstein–Barr virus. By contrast, no protecting correlation was observed for CD8+ T cells. In essence, our deep TCRβ analysis identifies the importance of the CD4+ T cell compartment for the control of latent viruses after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:25873100

  14. Adult Stem Cells and Diabetes Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ilgun, Handenur; Kim, Joseph William; Luo, LuGuang

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization estimates that diabetes will be the fourth most prevalent disease by 2050. Developing a new therapy for diabetes is a challenge for researchers and clinicians in field. Many medications are being used for treatment of diabetes however with no conclusive and effective results therefore alternative therapies are required. Stem cell therapy is a promising tool for diabetes therapy, and it has involved embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells, and pluripotent stem cells. In this review, we focus on adult stem cells, especial human bone marrow stem cells (BM) for diabetes therapy, its history, and current development. We discuss prospects for future diabetes therapy such as induced pluripotent stem cells which have popularity in stem cell research area. PMID:27123495

  15. Unsymmetrical Donor-Acceptor-Acceptor-π-Donor Type Benzothiadiazole-Based Small Molecule for a Solution Processed Bulk Heterojunction Organic Solar Cell.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Prabhat; Misra, Rajneesh; Siddiqui, Shahbaz A; Sharma, Ganesh D

    2015-05-20

    A D1-A-A'-π-D2 type (D = donor; A = acceptor) unsymmetrical small molecule denoted as BTD3 containing different end group donor moieties has been designed and synthesized for use as a donor in the solution processable bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cell. The BTD3 exhibits a low HOMO-LUMO gap of 1.68 eV and deeper HOMO energy level (-5.5 eV). Its LUMO energy level (-3.65 eV) is compatible with the LUMO level of PC71BM to facilitate the electron transfer from BTD3 to PC71BM in the BHJ solar cell. The solution processed BHJ solar cell with optimized BTD3:PC71BM active layer processed with THF solvent exhibited a PCE of 3.15% with Jsc = 7.45 mA/cm(2), Voc = 0.94 V, and FF = 0.45. Moreover, the device with optimized concentration of 3 vol. % 1-chloronaphthalene (CN) additive, i.e., CN/THF, showed significant enhancement in PCE up to 4.61% (Jsc = 9.48 mA/cm(2), Voc = 0.90 V, and FF = 0.54). The improvement in the PCE has been attributed to the appropriate nanoscale phase separation morphology, balance charge transport, and enhancement in the light harvesting ability of the active layer.

  16. MicroRNA Levels as Prognostic Markers for the Differentiation Potential of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Donors.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Nicole; Taipaleenmaki, Hanna; Raiss, Christian C; Groen, Nathalie; Portalska, Karolina Janaeczek; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan; Post, Janine N; van Wijnen, Andre J; Karperien, Marcel

    2015-08-15

    The ability of human mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (hMSCs) to differentiate into various mesenchymal cell lineages makes them a promising cell source for the use in tissue repair strategies. Since the differentiation potential of hMSCs differs between donors, it is necessary to establish biomarkers for the identification of donors with high differentiation potential. In this study, we show that microRNA (miRNA) expression levels are effective for distinguishing donors with high differentiation potential from low differentiation potential. Twenty hMSC donors were initially tested for marker expression and differentiation potential. In particular, the chondrogenic differentiation potential was evaluated on the basis of histological matrix formation, mRNA expression levels of chondrogenic marker genes, and quantitative glycosaminoglycan deposition. Three donors out of twenty were identified as donors with high chondrogenic potential, whereas nine showed moderate and eight showed low chondrogenic potential. Expression profiles of miRNAs involved in chondrogenesis and cartilage homeostasis were used for the distinction between high-performance hMSCs and low-performance hMSCs. Global mRNA expression profiles of the donors before the onset of chondrogenic differentiation revealed minor differences in gene expression between low and high chondrogenic performers. However, analysis of miRNA expression during a 7-day differentiation period identified miR-210 and miR-630 as positive regulators of chondrogenesis. In contrast, miR-181 and miR-34a, which are negative regulators of chondrogenesis, were upregulated during differentiation in low-performing donors. In conclusion, profiling of hMSC donors for a specific panel of miRNAs may have a prognostic value for selecting donors with high differentiation potential to improve hMSC-based strategies for tissue regeneration.

  17. Antitumor effects of HSV-TK-engineered donor lymphocytes after allogeneic stem-cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ciceri, Fabio; Bonini, Chiara; Marktel, Sarah; Zappone, Elisabetta; Servida, Paolo; Bernardi, Massimo; Pescarollo, Alessandra; Bondanza, Attilio; Peccatori, Jacopo; Rossini, Silvano; Magnani, Zulma; Salomoni, Monica; Benati, Claudia; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Callegaro, Luciano; Corradini, Paolo; Bregni, Marco; Traversari, Catia; Bordignon, Claudio

    2007-06-01

    The extensive exploitation of the antitumor effect of donor lymphocytes infused after allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is limited by the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). To overcome this limitation, we investigated the therapeutic potential of donor lymphocytes engineered with the suicide gene thymidine kinase of herpes simplex virus (TK) in 23 patients experiencing recurrence of hematologic malignancies after allo-HSCT. Long-term follow-up of infused patients included analysis of engraftment of genetically engineered lymphocytes, in vivo assessment of antitumor effect, and control of GvHD by ganciclovir. All 17 patients evaluable for engraftment and graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) had circulating TK(+) cells detectable beginning at a median time of 18 days. Eleven patients (65%) experienced a substantial clinical benefit resulting in 6 (35%) complete remissions and 5 (29%) partial responses. The antitumor effect tightly correlated with the in vivo expansion of TK(+) cells. Seven patients received ganciclovir, resulting in elimination of TK(+) cells and effective and selective treatment of GvHD. Immunization against HSV-TK was observed in 7 patients but did not preclude an effective GvL. These data validate the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of TK(+) cells in the context of allografting and represent the basis for a broader application of this technology. PMID:17327416

  18. Birth and death of human β-cells in pancreases from cadaver donors, autopsies, surgical specimens, and islets transplanted into mice.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Francisco; Siniakowicz, Karolina; Hollister-Lock, Jennifer; Duran, Luisa; Katsuta, Hitoshi; Yamada, Takatsugu; Lei, Ji; Deng, Shaoping; Westermark, Gunilla T; Markmann, James; Bonner-Weir, Susan; Weir, Gordon C

    2014-02-01

    There is great interest in the potential of the human endocrine pancreas for regeneration by β-cell replication or neogenesis. Our aim was to explore this potential in adult human pancreases and in both islet and exocrine tissue transplanted into mice. The design was to examine pancreases obtained from cadaver donors, autopsies, and fresh surgical specimens and compare these findings with those obtained from islet and duct tissue grafted into the kidney. Islets and exocrine tissue were transplanted into normoglycemic ICR-SCID mice and studied 4 and 14 weeks later. β-Cell replication, as assessed by double staining for insulin and Ki67, was 0.22 ± 0.03% at 4 weeks and 0.13 ± 0.03% at 14 weeks. In contrast, no evidence of β-cell replication could be found in 11 cadaver donor and 10 autopsy pancreases. However, Ki67 staining of β-cells in frozen sections obtained at surgery was comparable to that found in transplanted islets. Evidence for neogenesis in transplanted pancreatic exocrine tissue was supported by finding β-cells within the duct epithelium and the presence of cells double stained for insulin and cytokeratin 19 (CK19). However, β-cells within the ducts never constituted more than 1% of the CK19-positive cells. With confocal microscopy, 7 of 12 examined cells expressed both markers, consistent with a neogeneic process. Mice with grafts containing islet or exocrine tissue were treated with various combinations of exendin-4, gastrin, and epidermal growth factor; none increased β-cell replication or stimulated neogenesis. In summary, human β-cells replicate at a low level in islets transplanted into mice and in surgical pancreatic frozen sections, but rarely in cadaver donor or autopsy pancreases. The absence of β-cell replication in many adult cadaver or autopsy pancreases could, in part, be an artifact of the postmortem state. Thus, it appears that adult human β-cells maintain a low level of turnover through replication and neogenesis.

  19. Conjunctival polyploid cells and donor-derived myofibroblasts in ocular GvHD.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, D; Stenberg, K; Hanson, C; Stenevi, U; Brune, M

    2016-05-01

    After allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT), ocular GvHD is a common complication, typical symptoms being dry eye syndrome with features of fibrosis. In this study, we have identified and quantified two cell types-myofibroblasts (MFB) and polyploid (PP) cells-in the conjunctival surface of allo-SCT patients (pts) and have explored their kinetics and association with local and systemic GvHD. Results are compared with control groups of (a) pretransplant samples from allo-SCT patients, (b) recipients of autologous transplantation (auto-SCT) and (c) healthy controls. Imprint cytologies were obtained by pressing the conjunctival surface with a sterile, non-abrasive cellulose acetate filter (Millipore). After retraction, typically a monolayer of the outermost cells of the epithelium were retrieved. MFB were identified by immunofluorescent (IF) staining for alpha-smooth muscle protein. PP cells were detected by aberrant chromosome content analyzed via X/Y-FISH (X/Y fluorescence in situ hybridization). In female pts with a male donor (MF group), donor genotype were identified by sex chromosome detection using FISH methodology. IF and FISH methods were applied in situ on the same filter, and amounts of MFB and PP cells are expressed as the percentage of all cells on the filter. In all, 70 samples from 46 pts were obtained 1-122 months after allo-SCT. The total MFB density (MFB(TOT)) was higher in allo-SCT pts compared with healthy individuals and auto-SCT pts and increased by time after transplantation (P<0.001). In MF recipients, this increase proved to be due to a significant (P<0.001) and gradual elevation of donor-derived MFB (MFB(XY)), whereas recipient-derived MFB (MFB(XX)) did not vary over time. Clinical ocular GvHD correlated with MFB(XY)/MFB(TOT) ratio (P=0.034), whereas no association between MFB(TOT) or MFB(XY) systemic GvHD was observed. In the MF group (n=25), both MFB(XY) and MFB(XX) were detected on 28 of the 37 imprints (76

  20. Lithium Carbonate in Treating Patients With Acute Intestinal Graft-Versus-Host-Disease After Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-01-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; De Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Disseminated Neuroblastoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Gastrointestinal Complications; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Poor Prognosis Metastatic Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent

  1. Adult stem-like cells in kidney

    PubMed Central

    Hishikawa, Keiichi; Takase, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Tsujimura, Taro; Nangaku, Masaomi; Takato, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent cells are promising for treatment for kidney diseases, but the protocols for derivation of kidney cell types are still controversial. Kidney tissue regeneration is well confirmed in several lower vertebrates such as fish, and the repair of nephrons after tubular damages is commonly observed after renal injury. Even in adult mammal kidney, renal progenitor cell or system is reportedly presents suggesting that adult stem-like cells in kidney can be practical clinical targets for kidney diseases. However, it is still unclear if kidney stem cells or stem-like cells exist or not. In general, stemness is defined by several factors such as self-renewal capacity, multi-lineage potency and characteristic gene expression profiles. The definite use of stemness may be obstacle to understand kidney regeneration, and here we describe the recent broad findings of kidney regeneration and the cells that contribute regeneration. PMID:25815133

  2. Adult stem-like cells in kidney.

    PubMed

    Hishikawa, Keiichi; Takase, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Tsujimura, Taro; Nangaku, Masaomi; Takato, Tsuyoshi

    2015-03-26

    Human pluripotent cells are promising for treatment for kidney diseases, but the protocols for derivation of kidney cell types are still controversial. Kidney tissue regeneration is well confirmed in several lower vertebrates such as fish, and the repair of nephrons after tubular damages is commonly observed after renal injury. Even in adult mammal kidney, renal progenitor cell or system is reportedly presents suggesting that adult stem-like cells in kidney can be practical clinical targets for kidney diseases. However, it is still unclear if kidney stem cells or stem-like cells exist or not. In general, stemness is defined by several factors such as self-renewal capacity, multi-lineage potency and characteristic gene expression profiles. The definite use of stemness may be obstacle to understand kidney regeneration, and here we describe the recent broad findings of kidney regeneration and the cells that contribute regeneration. PMID:25815133

  3. Genetically engineered donor T cells to optimize graft-versus-tumor effects across MHC barriers

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arnab; Holland, Amanda M.; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used for more than 50 years to combat hematologic malignancies. In addition to being the first stem cell therapy, transplantation has provided evidence for the potent anti-tumor effects of T cells. Facilitating T-cell-based immunity against malignancies requires a careful balancing act between generating a robust response and avoiding off-target killing of healthy tissues, which is difficult to accomplish using bulk donor T cells. To address these issues, several approaches have been developed, drawing on basic T-cell biology, to potentiate graft-versus-tumor activity while avoiding graft-versus-host disease. Current strategies for anti-tumor cell therapies include (i) selecting optimal T cells for transfer, (ii) engineering T cells to possess enhanced effector functions, and (iii) generating T-cell precursors that complete development after adoptive transfer. In this review, we assess the current state of the art in T-lineage cell therapy to treat malignancies in the context of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:24329800

  4. Treatment of porcine donor cells and reconstructed embryos with the antioxidant melatonin enhances cloning efficiency.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yun-Wei; An, Lei; Wang, Peng; Yu, Yong; Yin, Qiu-Dan; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Xin-Zhang; Qian-Zhang; Yang, Mei-Ling; Min-Guo; Wu, Zhong-Hong; Tian, Jian-Hui

    2013-05-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of melatonin during the culture of donor cells and cloned embryos on the in vitro developmental competence and quality of cloned porcine embryos. At concentrations of 10(-6 )M or 10(-8) M, melatonin significantly enhanced the proliferation of porcine fetal fibroblasts (PFFs), and the blastocyst rate was significantly increased in the 10(-10) M melatonin-treated donor cell group. Cloned embryo development was also improved in embryo culture medium that was supplemented with 10(-9) M or 10(-12) M melatonin. When both donor cells and cloned embryos were treated with melatonin, the cleavage rate and total cell number of blastocysts were not significantly affected; however, the blastocyst rate was increased significantly (20.0% versus 11.7%). TUNEL assays showed that combined melatonin treatment reduced the rate of apoptotic nuclei (3.6% versus 6.1%). Gene expression analysis of the apoptosis-related genes BAX, BCL2L1, and p53 showed that the expression of BCL2L1 was significantly elevated 2.7-fold relative to the control group, while the expression of BAX and p53 was significantly decreased by 3.7-fold and 23.2-fold, respectively. In addition, we detected the expression of two melatonin receptors (MT1 and MT2) in PFFs but not in porcine cloned embryos. We conclude that exogenous melatonin enhances the development of porcine cloned embryos and improves embryo quality by inhibiting p53-mediated apoptotic pathway. The proliferation of PFFs may be mediated by receptor binding, but the beneficial effects of melatonin on embryonic development may be receptor-independent, possibly through melatonin's ability to directly scavenge free radicals.

  5. Contribution of Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem Cells to Adult Mouse Inner Ear: Mesenchymal Cells and Fibrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Hainan; Ebihara, Yasuhiro; Schmiedt, Richard A.; Minamiguchi, Hitoshi; Zhou, Daohong; Smythe, Nancy; Liu, Liya; Ogawa, Makio; Schulte, Bradley A.

    2008-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM)-derived stem cells have shown plasticity with a capacity to differentiate into a variety of specialized cells. To test the hypothesis that some cells in the inner ear are derived from BM, we transplanted either isolated whole BM cells or clonally expanded hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) prepared from transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) into irradiated adult mice. Isolated GFP+ BM cells also were transplanted into conditioned newborn mice derived from pregnant mice injected with busulfan (which ablates HSCs in the newborns). Quantification of GFP+ cells was performed 3-20 months after transplant. GFP+ cells were found in the inner ear with all transplant conditions. They were most abundant within the spiral ligament but were also found in other locations normally occupied by fibrocytes and mesenchymal cells. No GFP+ neurons or hair cells were observed in inner ears of transplanted mice. Dual immunofluorescence assays demonstrated that most of the GFP+ cells were negative for CD45, a macrophage and hematopoietic cell marker. A portion of the GFP+ cells in the spiral ligament expressed immunoreactive Na, K-ATPase or the Na-K-Cl transporter (NKCC), proteins used as markers for specialized ion transport fibrocytes. Phenotypic studies indicated that the GFP+ cells did not arise from fusion of donor cells with endogenous cells. This study provides the first evidence for the origin of inner ear cells from BM and more specifically from HSCs. The results suggest that mesenchymal cells, including fibrocytes in the adult inner ear, may be derived continuously from HSCs. PMID:16538683

  6. Use of Matched Unrelated Donors Compared with Matched Related Donors is Associated with Lower Relapse and Superior Progression Free Survival after Reduced Intensity Conditioning Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Vincent T.; Kim, Haesook T.; Aldridge, Julie; Liney, Deborah; Kao, Grace; Armand, Philippe; Koreth, John; Cutler, Corey; Ritz, Jerome; Antin, Joseph H.; Soiffer, Robert J.; Alyea, Edwin P.

    2011-01-01

    As success of reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) relies primarily on graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) activity, increased minor HLA disparity in unrelated compared to related donors could have a significant impact on transplant outcomes. To assess whether use of unrelated donors (URD) engenders more potent GVL in RIC HSCT compared to matched related donors (MRD), we retrospectively studied 433 consecutive T-replete 6/6 HLA matched URD (n= 246) and MRD (n=187) RIC HSCT for hematologic malignancies at our institution. Diseases included: AML(127), NHL(71), CLL (68), MDS (64), HD(40), CML (25), MM(23), MPD (12), ALL(7), other leukemia (1). All received uniform fludarabine and intravenous busulfan conditioning, and GVHD prophylaxis with tacrolimus/mini-MTX or tacrolimus/sirolimus +/− mini-MTX. Unrelated donors were younger compared to MRD (median age: 33 yrs vs. 52 yrs, p<0.0001), and provided larger CD34+ products (median CD34+ cells infused: 8.7 × 106/kg vs. 7.5 × 106/kg, p=0.002). Distribution of diseases, disease risk, prior transplant, and CMV status was similar in both cohorts. Cumulative incidence of grade II–IV acute GVHD (at day+180), 2 year-chronic GVHD, and 2-year non-relapse mortality (NRM) were 20% vs. 16%, 55% vs. 50%, and 8% vs. 6% in URD and MRD, respectively (p=NS). Cumulative incidence of relapse at 2 years was lower in URD, 52% vs. 65% (p=0.005). With median follow-up of 26.5 and 35.8 months, 2-yr progression free survival (PFS) was significantly better in unrelated donor transplants, 39.5% for URD and 29% for MRD (p= 0.01). Overall survival at 2 years were 56% for URD vs. 50% for MRD (p=0.53). In multivariable analysis, URD was associated with a lower risk of relapse (HR 0.67, p =0.002) and superior PFS (HR 0.69, p=0.002). These results suggest that URD is associated with greater GVL activity than MRD, and could have practice changing impact on future donor selection in RIC HSCT. PMID:21193054

  7. Interleukin-1 alpha genotype and outcome of unrelated donor haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for chronic myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Parinda A.; Eapen, Mary; Klein, John P.; Gandham, Sharavi; Elliott, James; Zamzow, Tiffany; Combs, Michelle; Aplenc, Richard; MacMillan, Margaret L.; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Petersdorf, Effie; Davies, Stella M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1α) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that is implicated in the initiation/maintenance of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and the immune response to infection. A cytosine (C) to thymine (T) transition at position −889 is believed to influence gene transcription. A previous single institution study showed that the presence of at least one IL1A T allele in the donor was associated with improved survival after unrelated donor haematopoietic stem cell transplant and lower transplant-related mortality if the donor and recipient each possessed the IL1A T allele. The present study sought to confirm these results in a larger homogeneous population. Thus the study population included 426 patients older than 18 years with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML), transplanted in first chronic phase and receiving a total body irradiation and cyclophosphamide preparative regimen. Donor recipient pairs were categorised into four groups according to the presence or absence of an IL1A T allele in the donor and recipient. There were no significant differences in patient, donor and transplant characteristics between the groups. We did not observe an association with IL-1α genotype in donor and/or recipient and transplant-outcome. These data suggest that the outcome of unrelated donor transplant for CML is not influenced by IL-1α genotype. PMID:17391495

  8. Donor selection for natural killer cell receptor genes leads to superior survival after unrelated transplantation for acute myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Sarah; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Guethlein, Lisbeth A.; Klein, John P.; Wang, Tao; Le, Chap T.; Marsh, Steven G. E.; Geraghty, Daniel; Spellman, Stephen; Haagenson, Michael D.; Ladner, Martha; Trachtenberg, Elizabeth; Parham, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes form a diverse, immunogenetic system. Group A and B KIR haplotypes have distinctive centromeric (Cen) and telomeric (Tel) gene-content motifs. Aiming to develop a donor selection strategy to improve transplant outcome, we compared the contribution of these motifs to the clinical benefit conferred by B haplotype donors. We KIR genotyped donors from 1409 unrelated transplants for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML; n = 1086) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL; n = 323). Donor KIR genotype influenced transplantation outcome for AML but not ALL. Compared with A haplotype motifs, centromeric and telomeric B motifs both contributed to relapse protection and improved survival, but Cen-B homozygosity had the strongest independent effect. With Cen-B/B homozygous donors the cumulative incidence of relapse was 15.4% compared with 36.5% for Cen-A/A donors (relative risk of relapse 0.34; 95% confidence interval 0.2-0.57; P < .001). Overall, significantly reduced relapse was achieved with donors having 2 or more B gene-content motifs (relative risk 0.64; 95% confidence interval 0.48-0.86; P = .003) for both HLA-matched and mismatched transplants. KIR genotyping of several best HLA-matched potential unrelated donors should substantially increase the frequency of transplants by using grafts with favorable KIR gene content. Adopting this practice could result in superior disease-free survival for patients with AML. PMID:20581313

  9. Adult Stem Cell Responses to Nanostimuli

    PubMed Central

    Tsimbouri, Penelope M.

    2015-01-01

    Adult or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been found in different tissues in the body, residing in stem cell microenvironments called “stem cell niches”. They play different roles but their main activity is to maintain tissue homeostasis and repair throughout the lifetime of an organism. Their ability to differentiate into different cell types makes them an ideal tool to study tissue development and to use them in cell-based therapies. This differentiation process is subject to both internal and external forces at the nanoscale level and this response of stem cells to nanostimuli is the focus of this review. PMID:26193326

  10. Small-molecule organic solar cells with multiple-layer donor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arisawa, Kenta; Harafuji, Kenji

    2015-09-01

    Small-molecule organic solar cells (OSCs) with a multifunction three-layer donor are experimentally investigated to achieve higher power conversion efficiency. The proposed OSC has an indium tin oxide (ITO, anode)/three-layer donor/fullerene (C60, acceptor, 40 nm)/bathocuproine (BCP, cathode buffer, 10 nm)/Ag (cathode, 100 nm) structure. The three-layer donor is composed of 3-nm-thick pentacene/20-nm-thick copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/5-nm-thick aluminum phthalocyanine chloride (ClAlPc). The OSC achieves a power conversion efficiency of 1.79%, which is 1.7 times as large as that for an OSC with a single-layer donor of 20-nm-thick CuPc. Atomic force microscopy observation is carried out to clarify in detail the surface morphology at typical organic layers. The acceptor C60 is in contact not only with ClAlPc but also with CuPc due to the vertical and wall-like growth of the ClAlPc layer. The open-circuit voltage for the OSC with the ClAlPc/C60 contact is 0.56 V, compared with 0.47 V for the OSC with the CuPc/C60 contact. The thin pentacene layer is uniformly grown on the ITO and serves to achieve a high short-circuit current density Jsc by lowering the barrier height for hole transport between ITO and CuPc. Jsc for the OSC with the thin pentacene layer is 5.60 mA/cm2, compared with 4.32 mA/cm2 for the OSC without the thin pentacene layer.

  11. Effect of Donor Age on the Proportion of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Anterior Cruciate Ligaments

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Ng, Joanne; Kim, Sang-Beom; Sonn, Chung Hee; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Han, Seung-Beom

    2015-01-01

    The characteristics of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), such as proportion and multilineage potential, can be affected by donor age. However, the qualitative and quantitative features of ACL MSCs isolated from younger and older individuals have not yet been compared directly. This study assessed the phenotypic and functional differences in ACL-MSCs isolated from younger and older donors and evaluated the correlation between ACL-MSC proportion and donor age. Torn ACL remnants were harvested from 36 patients undergoing ACL reconstruction (young: 29.67 ± 10.92 years) and 33 undergoing TKA (old: 67.96 ± 5.22 years) and the proportion of their MSCs were measured. The mean proportion of MSCs was slightly higher in older ACL samples of the TKA group than of the younger ACL reconstruction group (19.69 ± 8.57% vs. 15.33 ± 7.49%, p = 0.024), but the proportions of MSCs at passages 1 and 2 were similar. MSCs from both groups possessed comparable multilineage potentiality, as they could be differentiated into adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes at similar level. No significant correlations were observed between patient age and MSC proportions at passages 0–2 or between age and MSC proportion in both the ACL reconstruction and TKA groups. Multiple linear regression analysis found no significant predictor of MSC proportion including donor age for each passage. Microarray analysis identified several genes that were differentially regulated in ACL-MSCs from old TKA patients compared to young ACL reconstruction patients. Genes of interest encode components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and may thus play a crucial role in modulating tissue homeostasis, remodeling, and repair in response to damage or disease. In conclusion, the proportion of freshly isolated ACL-MSC was higher in elderly TKA patients than in younger patients with ACL tears, but their phenotypic and multilineage potential were comparable. PMID:25729860

  12. Organic photovoltaic cells based on unconventional electron donor fullerene and electron acceptor copper hexadecafluorophthalocyanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J. L.; Sullivan, P.; Schumann, S.; Hancox, I.; Jones, T. S.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate organic discrete heterojunction photovoltaic cells based on fullerene (C60) and copper hexadecafluorophthalocyanine (F16CuPc), in which the C60 and F16CuPc act as the electron donor and the electron acceptor, respectively. The C60/F16CuPc cells fabricated with conventional and inverted architectures both exhibit comparable power conversion efficiencies. Furthermore, we show that the photocurrent in both cells is generated by a conventional exciton dissociation mechanism rather than the exciton recombination mechanism recently proposed for a similar C60/F16ZnPc system [Song et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 4554 (2010)]. These results demonstrate that new unconventional material systems are a potential way to fabricate organic photovoltaic cells with inverted as well as conventional architectures.

  13. Rapid Protein Depletion in Human Cells by Auxin-Inducible Degron Tagging with Short Homology Donors.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Toyoaki; Kiyomitsu, Tomomi; Saga, Yumiko; Kanemaki, Masato T

    2016-04-01

    Studying the role of essential proteins is dependent upon a method for rapid inactivation, in order to study the immediate phenotypic consequences. Auxin-inducible degron (AID) technology allows rapid depletion of proteins in animal cells and fungi, but its application to human cells has been limited by the difficulties of tagging endogenous proteins. We have developed a simple and scalable CRISPR/Cas-based method to tag endogenous proteins in human HCT116 and mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells by using donor constructs that harbor synthetic short homology arms. Using a combination of AID tagging with CRISPR/Cas, we have generated conditional alleles of essential nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins in HCT116 cells, which can then be depleted very rapidly after the addition of auxin to the culture medium. This approach should greatly facilitate the functional analysis of essential proteins, particularly those of previously unknown function.

  14. Highly efficient organic multi-junction solar cells with a thiophene based donor material

    SciTech Connect

    Meerheim, Rico Körner, Christian; Leo, Karl

    2014-08-11

    The efficiency of organic solar cells can be increased by serial stacked subcells even upon using the same absorber material. For the multi-junction devices presented here, we use the small molecule donor material DCV5T-Me. The subcell currents were matched by optical transfer matrix simulation, allowing an efficiency increase from 8.3% for a single junction up to 9.7% for a triple junction cell. The external quantum efficiency of the subcells, measured under appropriate light bias illumination, is spectrally shifted due to the microcavity of the complete stack, resulting in a broadband response and an increased cell current. The increase of the power conversion efficiency upon device stacking is even stronger for large area cells due to higher influence of the resistance of the indium tin oxide anode, emphasizing the advantage of multi-junction devices for large-area applications.

  15. Rapid Protein Depletion in Human Cells by Auxin-Inducible Degron Tagging with Short Homology Donors.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Toyoaki; Kiyomitsu, Tomomi; Saga, Yumiko; Kanemaki, Masato T

    2016-04-01

    Studying the role of essential proteins is dependent upon a method for rapid inactivation, in order to study the immediate phenotypic consequences. Auxin-inducible degron (AID) technology allows rapid depletion of proteins in animal cells and fungi, but its application to human cells has been limited by the difficulties of tagging endogenous proteins. We have developed a simple and scalable CRISPR/Cas-based method to tag endogenous proteins in human HCT116 and mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells by using donor constructs that harbor synthetic short homology arms. Using a combination of AID tagging with CRISPR/Cas, we have generated conditional alleles of essential nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins in HCT116 cells, which can then be depleted very rapidly after the addition of auxin to the culture medium. This approach should greatly facilitate the functional analysis of essential proteins, particularly those of previously unknown function. PMID:27052166

  16. Donor Dependent Variations in Hematopoietic Differentiation among Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Féraud, Olivier; Valogne, Yannick; Melkus, Michael W; Zhang, Yanyan; Oudrhiri, Noufissa; Haddad, Rima; Daury, Aurélie; Rocher, Corinne; Larbi, Aniya; Duquesnoy, Philippe; Divers, Dominique; Gobbo, Emilie; Brunet de la Grange, Philippe; Louache, Fawzia; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Mitjavila-Garcia, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoiesis generated from human embryonic stem cells (ES) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) are unprecedented resources for cell therapy. We compared hematopoietic differentiation potentials from ES and iPS cell lines originated from various donors and derived them using integrative and non-integrative vectors. Significant differences in differentiation toward hematopoietic lineage were observed among ES and iPS. The ability of engraftment of iPS or ES-derived cells in NOG mice varied among the lines with low levels of chimerism. iPS generated from ES cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) reproduce a similar hematopoietic outcome compared to their parental ES cell line. We were not able to identify any specific hematopoietic transcription factors that allow to distinguish between good versus poor hematopoiesis in undifferentiated ES or iPS cell lines. There is a relatively unpredictable variation in hematopoietic differentiation between ES and iPS cell lines that could not be predicted based on phenotype or gene expression of the undifferentiated cells. These results demonstrate the influence of genetic background in variation of hematopoietic potential rather than the reprogramming process.

  17. Donor Dependent Variations in Hematopoietic Differentiation among Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Féraud, Olivier; Valogne, Yannick; Melkus, Michael W.; Zhang, Yanyan; Oudrhiri, Noufissa; Haddad, Rima; Daury, Aurélie; Rocher, Corinne; Larbi, Aniya; Duquesnoy, Philippe; Divers, Dominique; Gobbo, Emilie; Brunet de la Grange, Philippe; Louache, Fawzia; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Mitjavila-Garcia, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoiesis generated from human embryonic stem cells (ES) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) are unprecedented resources for cell therapy. We compared hematopoietic differentiation potentials from ES and iPS cell lines originated from various donors and derived them using integrative and non-integrative vectors. Significant differences in differentiation toward hematopoietic lineage were observed among ES and iPS. The ability of engraftment of iPS or ES-derived cells in NOG mice varied among the lines with low levels of chimerism. iPS generated from ES cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) reproduce a similar hematopoietic outcome compared to their parental ES cell line. We were not able to identify any specific hematopoietic transcription factors that allow to distinguish between good versus poor hematopoiesis in undifferentiated ES or iPS cell lines. There is a relatively unpredictable variation in hematopoietic differentiation between ES and iPS cell lines that could not be predicted based on phenotype or gene expression of the undifferentiated cells. These results demonstrate the influence of genetic background in variation of hematopoietic potential rather than the reprogramming process. PMID:26938212

  18. Adult stem cells in neural repair: Current options, limitations and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Eric Domingos; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Marie, Suely Kazue Nagahashi; Lepski, Guilherme

    2015-03-26

    Stem cells represent a promising step for the future of regenerative medicine. As they are able to differentiate into any cell type, tissue or organ, these cells are great candidates for treatments against the worst diseases that defy doctors and researchers around the world. Stem cells can be divided into three main groups: (1) embryonic stem cells; (2) fetal stem cells; and (3) adult stem cells. In terms of their capacity for proliferation, stem cells are also classified as totipotent, pluripotent or multipotent. Adult stem cells, also known as somatic cells, are found in various regions of the adult organism, such as bone marrow, skin, eyes, viscera and brain. They can differentiate into unipotent cells of the residing tissue, generally for the purpose of repair. These cells represent an excellent choice in regenerative medicine, every patient can be a donor of adult stem cells to provide a more customized and efficient therapy against various diseases, in other words, they allow the opportunity of autologous transplantation. But in order to start clinical trials and achieve great results, we need to understand how these cells interact with the host tissue, how they can manipulate or be manipulated by the microenvironment where they will be transplanted and for how long they can maintain their multipotent state to provide a full regeneration.

  19. Adult Stem Cells and Diseases of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Boyette, Lisa B.; Tuan, Rocky S.

    2014-01-01

    Preservation of adult stem cells pools is critical for maintaining tissue homeostasis into old age. Exhaustion of adult stem cell pools as a result of deranged metabolic signaling, premature senescence as a response to oncogenic insults to the somatic genome, and other causes contribute to tissue degeneration with age. Both progeria, an extreme example of early-onset aging, and heritable longevity have provided avenues to study regulation of the aging program and its impact on adult stem cell compartments. In this review, we discuss recent findings concerning the effects of aging on stem cells, contributions of stem cells to age-related pathologies, examples of signaling pathways at work in these processes, and lessons about cellular aging gleaned from the development and refinement of cellular reprogramming technologies. We highlight emerging therapeutic approaches to manipulation of key signaling pathways corrupting or exhausting adult stem cells, as well as other approaches targeted at maintaining robust stem cell pools to extend not only lifespan but healthspan. PMID:24757526

  20. Recovery of Unrelated Donors of Peripheral Blood Stem Cells versus Recovery of Unrelated Donors of Bone Marrow: A Prespecified Analysis from the Phase III Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network Protocol 0201.

    PubMed

    Burns, Linda J; Logan, Brent R; Chitphakdithai, Pintip; Miller, John P; Drexler, Rebecca; Spellman, Stephen; Switzer, Galen E; Wingard, John R; Anasetti, Claudio; Confer, Dennis L

    2016-06-01

    We report a comparison of time to recovery, side effects, and change in blood counts from baseline to after donation from unrelated donors who participated in the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network phase III randomized, multicenter trial (0201) in which donor-recipient pairs were randomized to either peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) or bone marrow (BM) donation. Of the entire cohort, 262 donated PBSC and 264 donated BM; 372 (71%) donors were from domestic and 154 (29%) were from international centers (145 German and 9 Canadian). PBSC donors recovered in less time, with a median time to recovery of 1 week compared with 2.3 weeks for BM donors. The number of donors reporting full recovery was significantly greater for donors of PBSC than of BM at 1, 2, and 3 weeks and 3 months after donation. Multivariate analysis showed that PBSC donors were more likely to recover at any time after donation compared with BM donors (hazard ratio, 2.08; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.73 to 2.50; P < .001). Other characteristics that significantly increased the likelihood of complete recovery were being an international donor and donation in more recent years. Donors of BM were more likely to report grades 2 to 4 skeletal pain, body symptoms, and fatigue at 1 week after donation. In logistic regression analysis of domestic donors only in which toxicities at peri-collection time points (day 5 filgrastim for PBSC donors and day 2 after collection of BM donors) could be analyzed, no variable was significantly associated with grades 2 to 4 skeletal pain, including product donated (BM versus PBSC; odds ratio, 1.13; 95% CI, .74 to 1.74; P = .556). Blood counts were affected by product donated, with greater mean change from baseline to after donation for white blood cells, neutrophils, mononuclear cells, and platelets in PBSC donors whereas BM donors experienced a greater mean change in hemoglobin. This analysis provided an enhanced understanding of donor events as

  1. Recovery of Unrelated Donors of Peripheral Blood Stem Cells versus Recovery of Unrelated Donors of Bone Marrow: A Prespecified Analysis from the Phase III Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network Protocol 0201.

    PubMed

    Burns, Linda J; Logan, Brent R; Chitphakdithai, Pintip; Miller, John P; Drexler, Rebecca; Spellman, Stephen; Switzer, Galen E; Wingard, John R; Anasetti, Claudio; Confer, Dennis L

    2016-06-01

    We report a comparison of time to recovery, side effects, and change in blood counts from baseline to after donation from unrelated donors who participated in the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network phase III randomized, multicenter trial (0201) in which donor-recipient pairs were randomized to either peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) or bone marrow (BM) donation. Of the entire cohort, 262 donated PBSC and 264 donated BM; 372 (71%) donors were from domestic and 154 (29%) were from international centers (145 German and 9 Canadian). PBSC donors recovered in less time, with a median time to recovery of 1 week compared with 2.3 weeks for BM donors. The number of donors reporting full recovery was significantly greater for donors of PBSC than of BM at 1, 2, and 3 weeks and 3 months after donation. Multivariate analysis showed that PBSC donors were more likely to recover at any time after donation compared with BM donors (hazard ratio, 2.08; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.73 to 2.50; P < .001). Other characteristics that significantly increased the likelihood of complete recovery were being an international donor and donation in more recent years. Donors of BM were more likely to report grades 2 to 4 skeletal pain, body symptoms, and fatigue at 1 week after donation. In logistic regression analysis of domestic donors only in which toxicities at peri-collection time points (day 5 filgrastim for PBSC donors and day 2 after collection of BM donors) could be analyzed, no variable was significantly associated with grades 2 to 4 skeletal pain, including product donated (BM versus PBSC; odds ratio, 1.13; 95% CI, .74 to 1.74; P = .556). Blood counts were affected by product donated, with greater mean change from baseline to after donation for white blood cells, neutrophils, mononuclear cells, and platelets in PBSC donors whereas BM donors experienced a greater mean change in hemoglobin. This analysis provided an enhanced understanding of donor events as

  2. Role of donor and host cells in muscle-derived stem cell-mediated bone repair: differentiation vs. paracrine effects

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xueqin; Usas, Arvydas; Proto, Jonathan D.; Lu, Aiping; Cummins, James H.; Proctor, Alexander; Chen, Chien-Wen; Huard, Johnny

    2014-01-01

    Murine muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) have been shown capable of regenerating bone in a critical size calvarial defect model when transduced with BMP 2 or 4; however, the contribution of the donor cells and their interactions with the host cells during the bone healing process have not been fully elucidated. To address this question, C57/BL/6J mice were divided into MDSC/BMP4/GFP, MDSC/GFP, and scaffold groups. After transplanting MDSCs into the critical-size calvarial defects created in normal mice, we found that mice transplanted with BMP4GFP-transduced MDSCs healed the bone defect in 4 wk, while the control groups (MDSC-GFP and scaffold) demonstrated no bone healing. The newly formed trabecular bone displayed similar biomechanical properties as the native bone, and the donor cells directly participated in endochondral bone formation via their differentiation into chondrocytes, osteoblasts, and osteocytes via the BMP4-pSMAD5 and COX-2-PGE2 signaling pathways. In contrast to the scaffold group, the MDSC groups attracted more inflammatory cells initially and incurred faster inflammation resolution, enhanced angiogenesis, and suppressed initial immune responses in the host mice. MDSCs were shown to attract macrophages via the secretion of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 and promote endothelial cell proliferation by secreting multiple growth factors. Our findings indicated that BMP4GFP-transduced MDSCs not only regenerated bone by direct differentiation, but also positively influenced the host cells to coordinate and promote bone tissue repair through paracrine effects.—Gao, X., Usas, A., Proto, J. D., Lu, A., Cummins, J. H., Proctor, A., Chen, C.-W., Huard, J. Role of donor and host cells in muscle-derived stem cell-mediated bone repair: differentiation vs. paracrine effects. PMID:24843069

  3. Multilineage potential and proteomic profiling of human dental stem cells derived from a single donor

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, Rajreddy; Kumar, B. Mohana; Lee, Won-Jae; Jeon, Ryoung-Hoon; Jang, Si-Jung; Lee, Yeon-Mi; Park, Bong-Wook; Byun, June-Ho; Ahn, Chun-Seob; Kim, Jae-Won; Rho, Gyu-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Dental tissues provide an alternative autologous source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for regenerative medicine. In this study, we isolated human dental MSCs of follicle, pulp and papilla tissue from a single donor tooth after impacted third molar extraction by excluding the individual differences. We then compared the morphology, proliferation rate, expression of MSC-specific and pluripotency markers, and in vitro differentiation ability into osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes and functional hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). Finally, we analyzed the protein expression profiles of undifferentiated dental MSCs using 2DE coupled with MALDI-TOF-MS. Three types of dental MSCs largely shared similar morphology, proliferation potential, expression of surface markers and pluripotent transcription factors, and differentiation ability into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Upon hepatogenic induction, all MSCs were transdifferentiated into functional HLCs, and acquired hepatocyte functions by showing their ability for glycogen storage and urea production. Based on the proteome profiling results, we identified nineteen proteins either found commonly or differentially expressed among the three types of dental MSCs. In conclusion, three kinds of dental MSCs from a single donor tooth possessed largely similar cellular properties and multilineage potential. Further, these dental MSCs had similar proteomic profiles, suggesting their interchangeable applications for basic research and call therapy. - Highlights: • Isolated and characterized three types of human dental MSCs from a single donor. • MSCs of dental follicle, pulp and papilla had largely similar biological properties. • All MSCs were capable of transdifferentiating into functional hepatocyte-like cells. • 2DE proteomics with MALDI-TOF/MS identified 19 proteins in three types of MSCs. • Similar proteomic profiles suggest interchangeable applications of dental MSCs.

  4. Recipient myeloid-derived immunomodulatory cells induce PD-1 ligand-dependent donor CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cell proliferation and donor-recipient immune tolerance after murine nonmyeloablative bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, Marie; Abdelsamed, Hossam A; Seth, Aman; Ong, Taren; Vogel, Peter; Pillai, Asha B

    2013-12-01

    We showed previously that nonmyeloablative total lymphoid irradiation/rabbit anti-thymocyte serum (TLI/ATS) conditioning facilitates potent donor-recipient immune tolerance following bone marrow transplantation (BMT) across MHC barriers via recipient invariant NKT (iNKT) cell-derived IL-4-dependent expansion of donor Foxp3(+) naturally occurring regulatory T cells (nTregs). In this study, we report a more specific mechanism. Wild-type (WT) BALB/c (H-2(d)) hosts were administered TLI/ATS and BMT from WT or STAT6(-/-) C57BL/6 (H-2(b)) donors. Following STAT6(-/-) BMT, donor nTregs demonstrated no loss of proliferation in vivo, indicating that an IL-4-responsive population in the recipient, rather than the donor, drives donor nTreg proliferation. In graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) target organs, three recipient CD11b(+) cell subsets (Gr-1(high)CD11c(-), Gr-1(int)CD11c(-), and Gr-1(low)CD11c(+)) were enriched early after TLI/ATS + BMT versus total body irradiation/ATS + BMT. Gr-1(low)CD11c(+) cells induced potent H-2K(b+)CD4(+)Foxp3(+) nTreg proliferation in vitro in 72-h MLRs. Gr-1(low)CD11c(+) cells were reduced significantly in STAT6(-/-) and iNKT cell-deficient Jα18(-/-) BALB/c recipients after TLI/ATS + BMT. Depletion of CD11b(+) cells resulted in severe acute GVHD, and adoptive transfer of WT Gr-1(low)CD11c(+) cells to Jα18(-/-) BALB/c recipients of TLI/ATS + BMT restored day-6 donor Foxp3(+) nTreg proliferation and protection from CD8 effector T cell-mediated GVHD. Blockade of programmed death ligand 1 and 2, but not CD40, TGF-β signaling, arginase 1, or iNOS, inhibited nTreg proliferation in cocultures of recipient-derived Gr-1(low)CD11c(+) cells with donor nTregs. Through iNKT-dependent Th2 polarization, myeloid-derived immunomodulatory dendritic cells are expanded after nonmyeloablative TLI/ATS conditioning and allogeneic BMT, induce PD-1 ligand-dependent donor nTreg proliferation, and maintain potent graft-versus-host immune tolerance.

  5. Presence of Donor-Derived DNA in Semen Samples From Cancer Survivors Who Underwent Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-08

    Cancer Survivor; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Neuroblastoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  6. Irreversible barrier to the reprogramming of donor cells in cloning with mouse embryos and embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yukiko; Kono, Tomohiro

    2006-08-01

    Somatic cloning does not always result in ontogeny in mammals, and development is often associated with various abnormalities and embryo loss with a high frequency. This is considered to be due to aberrant gene expression resulting from epigenetic reprogramming errors. However, a fundamental question in this context is whether the developmental abnormalities reported to date are specific to somatic cloning. The aim of this study was to determine the stage of nuclear differentiation during development that leads to developmental abnormalities associated with embryo cloning. In order to address this issue, we reconstructed cloned embryos using four- and eight-cell embryos, morula embryos, inner cell mass (ICM) cells, and embryonic stem cells as donor nuclei and determined the occurrence of abnormalities such as developmental arrest and placentomegaly, which are common characteristics of all mouse somatic cell clones. The present analysis revealed that an acute decline in the full-term developmental competence of cloned embryos occurred with the use of four- and eight-cell donor nuclei (22.7% vs. 1.8%) in cases of standard embryo cloning and with morula and ICM donor nuclei (11.4% vs. 6.6%) in serial nuclear transfer. Histological observation showed abnormal differentiation and proliferation of trophoblastic giant cells in the placentae of cloned concepti derived from four-cell to ICM cell donor nuclei. Enlargement of placenta along with excessive proliferation of the spongiotrophoblast layer and glycogen cells was observed in the clones derived from morula embryos and ICM cells. These results revealed that irreversible epigenetic events had already started to occur at the four-cell stage. In addition, the expression of genes involved in placentomegaly is regulated at the blastocyst stage by irreversible epigenetic events, and it could not be reprogrammed by the fusion of nuclei with unfertilized oocytes. Hence, developmental abnormalities such as placentomegaly as

  7. Donor Atorvastatin Treatment in Preventing Severe Acute GVHD After Nonmyeloablative Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Patients With Hematological Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-28

    Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Aggressive Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  8. Psychosocial aspects of haematopoietic stem cell donation for allogeneic transplantation: how family donors cope with this experience.

    PubMed

    Munzenberger, N; Fortanier, C; Macquart-Moulin, G; Faucher, C; Novakovitch, G; Maraninchi, D; Moatti, J P; Blaise, D

    1999-01-01

    Peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) allogeneic transplantation is an innovative medical procedure which has many advantages in comparison with bone marrow (BM) transplantation, but it involves administering haematopoietic growth factors (HGFs) to donors, the long-term physiological effects of which have not yet been established. The main aim of the present study was to analyse how family PBSC donors cope when confronted with this particular risk context. In addition to data collected on the personal and social aspects of the donors' experience, questionnaires were used to measure their quality of life (pain and anxiety) before, during and after donation, and they were subsequently interviewed in depth by a psychologist. Twenty-two donors participated in this study. They did not all react to the experience of blood cell donation in the same way, in terms of their own personal feelings, attitudes towards the donation, their relationships with the other members of the family, and their awareness of the risk involved. PMID:10202783

  9. Rituximab in Preventing Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-28

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Graft Versus Host Disease; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III

  10. Performance Enhancement of Polymer Solar Cells by Using Two Polymer Donors with Complementary Absorption Spectra.

    PubMed

    Lu, Heng; Zhang, Xuejuan; Li, Cuihong; Wei, Hedi; Liu, Qian; Li, Weiwei; Bo, Zhishan

    2015-07-01

    Performance enhancement of polymer solar cells (PSCs) is achieved by expanding the absorption of the active layer of devices. To better match the spectrum of solar radiation, two polymers with different band gaps are used as the donor material to fabricate ternary polymer cells. Ternary blend PSCs exhibit an enhanced short-circuit current density and open-circuit voltage in comparison with the corresponding HD-PDFC-DTBT (HD)- and DT-PDPPTPT (DPP)-based binary polymer solar cells, respectively. Ternary PSCs show a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 6.71%, surpassing the corresponding binary PSCs. This work demonstrates that the fabrication of ternary PSCs by using two polymers with complementary absorption is an effective way to improve the device performance.

  11. Vaccine Therapy in Reducing the Frequency of Cytomegalovirus Events in Patients With Hematologic Malignancies Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-02

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Cytomegaloviral Infection; Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Cell Neoplasm; HLA-A*0201 Positive Cells Present; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Myelofibrosis; Myeloproliferative Neoplasm

  12. Donor Chimerism of B Cells and Nature Killer Cells Provides Useful Information to Predict Hematologic Relapse following Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ying; Wan, Liping; Qin, Youwen; Wang, Xiaorui; Yan, Shike; Xie, Kuangcheng; Wang, Chun

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the correlation between donor chimerism status and disease relapse following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). The chimerism of Fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) sorted CD3+T lymphocytes of 153 cases, CD56+CD16+NK lymphocytes of 153 cases and CD19+B lymphocytes of 31 cases with acute B lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) was analyzed post-transplant utilizing polymerase chain reaction amplification of short tandem repeats (PCR-STR). A total of 33 patients (33/153, 21.6%) had recurrent disease. The positive predictive values of declining donor chimerism for hematologic and isolated extramedullary relapse were 58.8% and 10% (P=0.018, Chi-Square). The positive predictive values of declining donor chimerism in BMB, BMT, BMNK and PBB for hematologic relapse were 11.6%, 0%, 0% and 0% under close monitoring in patients with B-ALL. Only the donor chimerism in BMB significantly decreased in the group with hematologic relapse as compared with the group without hematologic relapse (P=0.00, Independent-samples T test) in patients with B-ALL. The median drop of donor chimerism in PBT, BMT, PBNK and BMNK were 0%, 0%, 5.9% and 2.8% one or two weeks prior to hematologic relapse in patients with non-B-ALL. The donor chimerism in PBNK significantly decreased prior to hematologic relapse in the group with hematologic relapse as compared with the group without hematologic relapse (P=0.022, Independent-samples T test).These data suggest donor chimerism of BMB can be used to predict the occurrence of hematologic relapse in patients with B-ALL. Donor chimerism decrease in PBNK was associated with a somewhat increased risk of hematologic relapse in patients with non-B-ALL. Therefore, our results reveal a more effective path to individually predict for hematologic relapse by dynamic monitoring different cell lineages in different disease.

  13. Theoretical investigations on enhancing the performance of terminally diketopyrrolopyrrole-based small-molecular donors in organic solar cell applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaorui; Huang, Chengzhi; Shen, Wei; He, Rongxing; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP)-based small molecules with acceptor-core-acceptor (A-core-A) type as donor materials have been used successfully in organic solar cells (OSC). In this work, based on the DPP-core-DPP type molecule SM1 consisting of a DPP unit as acceptor and benzene as the core, we replaced the benzene core with more electron-withdrawing groups in SM1 and further designed four new small-molecular donors (SM2-SM5) in order to improve the electrical properties, optical absorption and performance in OSC applications. The calculated results indicate that the designed small-molecular donors SM2-SM5 exhibit better performances in comparison with SM1, such as lower highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO), narrower energy gap, larger absorption range, better electronic transfer between donor and acceptor and higher hole mobility. Moreover, the decreased HOMO levels and transition energy of small-molecular donors in OSC applications play an important role in the parameters of open-current voltage, fill factor and short-circuit current. Consequently, adjusting the electron-deficient ability of cores in DPP-core-DPP type small-molecular donors is an efficient approach that can be used to obtain high-efficiency DPP-based small-molecular donors for OSC applications. Graphical Abstract The designed small-molecules with good electronic and photophysical properties will act as a promising donor candidate for organic solar cell applications. Moreover, The decreased HOMO levels and transition energy of small-molecular donors in OSC applications play an important role in the parameters of open-current voltage, fill factor and short-circuit current.

  14. Immunostimulation by cytomegalovirus (CMV): helper T cell-dependent activation of immunoglobulin production in vitro by lymphocytes from CMV-immune donors

    SciTech Connect

    Yachie, A.; Tosato, G.; Straus, S.E.; Blaese, R.M.

    1985-08-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the cause of a number of different diseases ranging from self-limited benign infections in healthy adults to life threatening illnesses among immunocompromised hosts and newborns. Suppression of cell-mediated immunity is often found in cases of acute CMV infection, and in addition, the virus may also be a potent stimulant of lymphoid cells in vivo. The authors studied cellular proliferation and immunoglobulin (Ig) production induced by CMV to determine its effect on human lymphocytes in vitro. The CMV that was added to cultures of lymphocytes from CMV-seronegative donors failed to induce either significant cellular proliferation or Ig production. By contrast, CMV-stimulated cultures from CMV-seropositive donors induced both prominent cellular proliferation and Ig production. B cell differentiation into Ig-secreting cells required the presence of T cells, and this T cell help was sensitive to irradiation with 2000 rad and to treatment with cyclosporin A. When T cells were depleted of OKT4+ cells with monoclonal antibody and complement, the co-cultured B cells failed to produce Ig, whereas the depletion of OKT8+ cells had no effect on the Ig-secreting cell response. Inactivation of CMV before culture did not result in a reduction of either cellular proliferation or Ig production. Thus, infection of target cells is not required for in vitro lymphocyte activation by CMV. These results demonstrate that CMV is a potent activator of B cells inducing Ig production in vitro, and that this process requires the presence of virus-specific memory T cells.

  15. Preemptive donor apoptotic cell infusions induce IFN-γ-producing myeloid derived suppressor cells for cardiac allograft protection1

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Jane; Lerret, Nadine M.; Wang, Jiao-jing; Kang, Hee-Kap; Tasch, James; Zhang, Zheng; Luo, Xunrong

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that preemptive infusion of apoptotic donor splenocytes treated with the chemical cross-linker ethylcarbodiimide (ECDI-SPs) induces long-term allograft survival in full MHC-mismatched models of allogeneic islet and cardiac transplantation. The role of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in the graft protection provided by ECDI-SPs is unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that infusions of ECDI-SPs increase two populations of CD11b+ cells in the spleen that phenotypically resemble monocytic-like (CD11b+Ly6CHI) and granulocytic-like (CD11b+Gr1HI) MDSCs. Both populations suppress T cell proliferation in vitro, and traffic to the cardiac allografts in vivo to mediate their protection via inhibition of local CD8 T cell accumulation and potentially also via induction and homing of regulatory T cells. Importantly, repeated treatments with ECDI-SPs induce the CD11b+Gr1HI cells to produce a high level of IFN-γ and to exhibit an enhanced responsiveness to IFN-γ by expressing higher levels of downstream effector molecules ido and nos2. Consequently, neutralization of IFN-γ completely abolishes the suppressive capacity of this population. We conclude that donor ECDI-SPs induce the expansion of two populations of MDSCs important for allograft protection mediated in part by intrinsic IFN-γ dependent mechanisms. This form of preemptive donor apoptotic cell infusions has significant potential for the therapeutic manipulation of MDSCs for transplant tolerance induction. PMID:24808363

  16. MicroRNA-34c Expression in Donor Cells Influences the Early Development of Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Bovine Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Yongsheng; Zhang, Man; Du, Yue; Zhang, Yijun; Xing, Xupeng; Zhang, Lei; Su, JianMin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The essence of the reprogramming activity of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos is to produce normal fertilized embryos. However, reprogramming of somatic cells is not as efficient as the reprogramming of sperm. In this report, we describe the effect of an inducible, specific miR-34 microRNA expression in donor cells that enables a similar level of sperm:transgene expression on the early development of SCNT embryos. Our results showed that donor cells with doxycycline (dox)-induced miR-34c expression for the preparation of SCNT embryos resulted in altered developmental rates, histone modification (H3K9ac and H3K4me3), and extent of apoptosis. The cleavage rate and blastocyst formation of the induced nuclear transfer (NT) group were significantly increased. The immunofluorescence signal of H3K9ac in embryos in the induced NT group significantly increased in two-cell- and eight-cell-stage embryos; that of H3K4me3 increased significantly in eight-cell-stage embryos. Although significant differences in staining signals of apoptosis were not detected between groups, lower apoptosis levels were observed in the induced NT group. In conclusion, miR-34c expression induced by dox treatment enhances the developmental potential of SCNT embryos, modifies the epigenetic status, and changes blastocyst quality. PMID:25437869

  17. Effect of ageing on CMV-specific CD8 T cells from CMV seropositive healthy donors

    PubMed Central

    Pita-Lopez, María Luisa; Gayoso, Inmaculada; DelaRosa, Olga; Casado, Javier G; Alonso, Corona; Muñoz-Gomariz, Elisa; Tarazona, Raquel; Solana, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    Background Ageing is associated with changes in the immune system with substantial alterations in T-lymphocyte subsets. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is one of the factors that affect functionality of T cells and the differentiation and large expansions of CMV pp65-specific T cells have been associated with impaired responses to other immune challenges. Moreover, the presence of clonal expansions of CMV-specific T cells may shrink the available repertoire for other antigens and contribute to the increased incidence of infectious diseases in the elderly. In this study, we analyse the effect of ageing on the phenotype and frequency of CMV pp65-specific CD8 T cell subsets according to the expression of CCR7, CD45RA, CD27, CD28, CD244 and CD85j. Results Peripheral blood from HLA-A2 healthy young, middle-aged and elderly donors was analysed by multiparametric flow cytometry using the HLA-A*0201/CMV pp65495–504 (NLVPMVATV) pentamer and mAbs specific for the molecules analysed. The frequency of CMV pp65-specific CD8 T cells was increased in the elderly compared with young and middle-aged donors. The proportion of naïve cells was reduced in the elderly, whereas an age-associated increase of the CCR7null effector-memory subset, in particular those with a CD45RAdim phenotype, was observed, both in the pentamer-positive and pentamer-negative CD8 T cells. The results also showed that most CMV pp65-specific CD8 T cells in elderly individuals were CD27/CD28 negative and expressed CD85j and CD244. Conclusion The finding that the phenotype of CMV pp65-specific CD8 T cells in elderly individuals is similar to the predominant phenotype of CD8 T cells as a whole, suggests that CMV persistent infections contributes to the age-related changes observed in the CD8 T cell compartment, and that chronic stimulation by other persistent antigens also play a role in T cell immunosenescence. Differences in subset distribution in elderly individuals showing a decrease in naive and an increase in

  18. Expansion of recipient-derived antiviral T cells may influence donor chimerism after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Borchers, S; Weissinger, E M; Pabst, B; Ganzenmueller, T; Dammann, E; Luther, S; Diedrich, H; Ganser, A; Stadler, M

    2013-12-01

    Donor chimerism (DC) analysis is an important marker in the hematopoietic stem cell transplant follow-up. Here, we present evidence for a possible relationship of infectious complications and declines in DC. We analyzed the DC in patients experiencing cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation. In addition, in some patients chimerism analyses of T-cell subsets were performed. CMV-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CMV-CTL) were monitored using human leukocyte antigen-restricted multimer staining. Interestingly, CMV reactivation was accompanied by changes in DC in 11 of 67 patients transplanted. For example, DC declined in a cord blood recipient, in both total leukocytes and CD4 and CD8 T-cell subsets upon CMV reactivation. The latter was controlled after only 5 days through expanding CMV-CTL of 96% recipient origin, according to chimerism analysis of CMV-CTL (enriched beyond 50%). In another patient, transplanted after reduced-intensity conditioning from a DQB1 mismatched, CMV seronegative donor, incipient CMV reactivation was completely aborted by CMV-CTL of recipient origin. However, at the same time, mixed chimerism dropped from 51% to 0% donor type, resulting in late graft rejection. Our data indicate that chimerism analyses in subset populations lead to a better understanding of declining total leukocyte chimerism. Furthermore, recipient-derived CMV-CTL may be able to control CMV reactivation after reduced-intensity conditioning. We speculate that autologous CMV-CTL may be instrumental to overcome recurrent CMV reactivations, especially in patients transplanted from CMV-seronegative donors. In addition, the expansion of recipient-derived CMV-CTL may contribute to both, graft failure or to conversion to full DC.

  19. Ternary Blend Composed of Two Organic Donors and One Acceptor for Active Layer of High-Performance Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Won; Choi, Yoon Suk; Ahn, Hyungju; Jo, Won Ho

    2016-05-01

    Ternary blends composed of two donor absorbers with complementary absorptions provide an opportunity to enhance the short-circuit current and thus the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of organic solar cells. In addition to complementary absorption of two donors, ternary blends may exhibit favorable morphology for high-performance solar cells when one chooses properly the donor pair. For this purpose, we develop a ternary blend with two donors (diketopyrrolopyrrole-based polymer (PTDPP2T) and small molecule ((TDPP)2Ph)) and one acceptor (PC71BM). The solar cell made of a ternary blend with 10 wt % (TDPP)2Ph exhibits higher PCE of 7.49% as compared with the solar cells with binary blends, PTDPP2T:PC71BM (6.58%) and (TDPP)2Ph:PC71BM (3.21%). The higher PCE of the ternary blend solar cell is attributed mainly to complementary absorption of two donors. However, a further increase in (TDPP)2Ph content in the ternary blend (>10 wt %) decreases the PCE. The ternary blend with 10 wt % (TDPP)2Ph exhibits well-developed morphology with narrow-sized fibrils while the blend with 15 wt % (TDPP)2Ph shows phase separation with large-sized domains, demonstrating that the phase morphology and compatibility of ternary blend are important factors to achieve a high-performance solar cell made of ternary blends.

  20. Adult neural stem cells stake their ground

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Daniel A.; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    The birth of new neurons in the walls of the adult brain lateral ventricles has captured the attention of many neuroscientists for over two decades, yielding key insights into the identity and regulation of neural stem cells (NSCs). In the adult ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ), NSCs are a specialized form of astrocyte that generates several types of neurons for the olfactory bulb. Here we discuss recent findings regarding the unique organization of the V-SVZ NSCs niche, the multiple regulatory controls of neuronal production, the distinct regional identities of adult NSCs, and the epigenetic mechanisms that maintain adult neurogenesis. Understanding how V-SVZ NSCs establish and maintain lifelong neurogenesis continues to provide surprising insights into the cellular and molecular regulation of neural development. PMID:25223700

  1. Donor and recipient sex in allogeneic stem cell transplantation: what really matters

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Haesook T.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Woolfrey, Ann E.; St. Martin, Andrew; Chen, Junfang; Saber, Wael; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Armand, Philippe; Eapen, Mary

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether and how recipient-donor sex affects transplantation outcomes of 11,797 patients transplanted between 2008 and 2010. Thirty-seven percent were male recipients with male donors, 21% male recipients with female donors, 25% female recipients with male donors, and 17% female recipients with female donors. In multivariable analyses, male recipients had inferior overall survival and progression-free survival compared to females regardless of donor sex, with an 11% relative increase in the hazard of death (P<0.0001) and a 10% relative increase in the hazard of death or relapse (P<0.0001). The detrimental effect of male recipients varied by donor sex. For male recipients with male donors, there was a 12% relative increase in the subdistribution hazard of relapse compared with female recipients with male donors (P=0.0036) and male recipients with female donors (P=0.0037). For male recipients with female donors, there was a 19% relative increase in the subdistribution hazard of non-relapse mortality compared with male recipients with male donors (P<0.0001) and a 22% relative increase compared with female recipients with male donors (P=0.0003). In addition, male recipients with female donors showed a 21% relative increase in the subdistribution hazard of chronic graft-versus-host disease (P<0.0001) compared with female recipients with male donors. Donor sex had no effect on outcomes for female recipients. Transplantation of grafts from male and female donors was associated with inferior overall survival and progression-free survival in male recipients with differing patterns of failure. Recipient sex is an important prognostic factor independent of donor sex. PMID:27354023

  2. Charge Photogeneration Experiments and Theory in Aggregated Squaraine Donor Materials for Improved Organic Solar Cell Efficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Susan Demetra

    Fossil fuel consumption has a deleterious effect on humans, the economy, and the environment. Renewable energy technologies must be identified and commercialized as quickly as possible so that the transition to renewables can happen at a minimum of financial and societal cost. Organic photovoltaic cells offer an inexpensive and disruptive energy technology, if the scientific challenges of understanding charge photogeneration in a bulk heterojunction material can be overcome. At RIT, there is a strong focus on creating new materials that can both offer fundamentally important scientific results relating to quantum photophysics, and simultaneously assist in the development of strong candidates for future commercialized technology. In this presentation, the results of intensive materials characterization of a series of squaraine small molecule donors will be presented, as well as a full study of the fabrication and optimization required to achieve >4% photovoltaic cell efficiency. A relationship between the molecular structure of the squaraine and its ability to form nanoscale aggregates will be explored. Squaraine aggregation will be described as a unique optoelectronic probe of the structure of the bulk heterojunction. This relationship will then be utilized to explain changes in crystallinity that impact the overall performance of the devices. Finally, a predictive summary will be given for the future of donor material research at RIT.

  3. Adult stem cells for cardiac repair: a choice between skeletal myoblasts and bone marrow stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lei; Haider, Husnain Kh; Sim, Eugene K W

    2006-01-01

    The real promise of a stem cell-based approach for cardiac regeneration and repair lies in the promotion of myogenesis and angiogenesis at the site of the cell graft to achieve both structural and functional benefits. Despite all of the progress and promise in this field, many unanswered questions remain; the answers to these questions will provide the much-needed breakthrough to harness the real benefits of cell therapy for the heart in the clinical perspective. One of the major issues is the choice of donor cell type for transplantation. Multiple cell types with varying potentials have been assessed for their ability to repopulate the infarcted myocardium; however, only the adult stem cells, that is, skeletal myoblasts (SkM) and bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMC), have been translated from the laboratory bench to clinical use. Which of these two cell types will provide the best option for clinical application in heart cell therapy remains arguable. With results pouring in from the long-term follow-ups of previously conducted phase I clinical studies, and with the onset of phase II clinical trials involving larger population of patients, transplantation of stem cells as a sole therapy without an adjunct conventional revascularization procedure will provide a deeper insight into the effectiveness of this approach. The present article discusses the pros and cons of using SkM and BMC individually or in combination for cardiac repair, and critically analyzes the progress made with each cell type.

  4. Translational research of adult stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Gen

    2015-11-26

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) secondary to chronic coronary artery disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality world-wide. Its prevalence is increasing despite advances in medical and device therapies. Cell based therapies generating new cardiomyocytes and vessels have emerged as a promising treatment to reverse functional deterioration and prevent the progression to CHF. Functional efficacy of progenitor cells isolated from the bone marrow and the heart have been evaluated in preclinical large animal models. Furthermore, several clinical trials using autologous and allogeneic stem cells and progenitor cells have demonstrated their safety in humans yet their clinical relevance is inconclusive. This review will discuss the clinical therapeutic applications of three specific adult stem cells that have shown particularly promising regenerative effects in preclinical studies, bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell, heart derived cardiosphere-derived cell and cardiac stem cell. We will also discuss future therapeutic approaches.

  5. A Good Manufacturing Practice procedure to engineer donor virus-specific T cells into potent anti-leukemic effector cells

    PubMed Central

    van Loenen, Marleen M.; de Boer, Renate; van Liempt, Ellis; Meij, Pauline; Jedema, Inge; Falkenburg, J.H. Frederik; Heemskerk, Mirjam H.M.

    2014-01-01

    A sequential, two-step procedure in which T-cell-depleted allogeneic stem cell transplantation is followed by treatment with donor lymphocyte infusion at 6 months can significantly reduce the risk and severity of graft-versus-host disease, with postponed induction of the beneficial graft-versus-leukemia effect. However, patients with high-risk leukemia have a substantial risk of relapse early after transplantation, at a time when administration of donor lymphocytes has a high likelihood of resulting in graft-versus-host disease, disturbing a favorable balance between the graft-versus-leukemia effect and graft-versus-host disease. New therapeutic modalities are, therefore, required to allow early administration of T cells capable of exerting a graft-versus-leukemia effect without causing graft-versus-host disease. Here we describe the isolation of virus-specific T cells using Streptamer-based isolation technology and subsequent transfer of the minor histocompatibility antigen HA-1-specific T-cell receptor using retroviral vectors. Isolation of virus-specific T cells and subsequent transduction with HA-1-T-cell receptor resulted in rapid in vitro generation of highly pure, dual-specific T cells with potent anti-leukemic reactivity. Due to the short production procedure of only 10–14 days and the defined specificity of the T cells, administration of virus-specific T cells transduced with the HA-1-T-cell receptor as early as 8 weeks after allogeneic stem cell transplantation is feasible. (This clinical trial is registered at www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu as EudraCT number 2010-024625-20). PMID:24334296

  6. A Good Manufacturing Practice procedure to engineer donor virus-specific T cells into potent anti-leukemic effector cells.

    PubMed

    van Loenen, Marleen M; de Boer, Renate; van Liempt, Ellis; Meij, Pauline; Jedema, Inge; Falkenburg, J H Frederik; Heemskerk, Mirjam H M

    2014-04-01

    A sequential, two-step procedure in which T-cell-depleted allogeneic stem cell transplantation is followed by treatment with donor lymphocyte infusion at 6 months can significantly reduce the risk and severity of graft-versus-host disease, with postponed induction of the beneficial graft-versus-leukemia effect. However, patients with high-risk leukemia have a substantial risk of relapse early after transplantation, at a time when administration of donor lymphocytes has a high likelihood of resulting in graft-versus-host disease, disturbing a favorable balance between the graft-versus-leukemia effect and graft-versus-host disease. New therapeutic modalities are, therefore, required to allow early administration of T cells capable of exerting a graft-versus-leukemia effect without causing graft-versus-host disease. Here we describe the isolation of virus-specific T cells using Streptamer-based isolation technology and subsequent transfer of the minor histocompatibility antigen HA-1-specific T-cell receptor using retroviral vectors. Isolation of virus-specific T cells and subsequent transduction with HA-1-T-cell receptor resulted in rapid in vitro generation of highly pure, dual-specific T cells with potent anti-leukemic reactivity. Due to the short production procedure of only 10-14 days and the defined specificity of the T cells, administration of virus-specific T cells transduced with the HA-1-T-cell receptor as early as 8 weeks after allogeneic stem cell transplantation is feasible. (This clinical trial is registered at www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu as EudraCT number 2010-024625-20).

  7. Allosuppressor- and allohelper-T cells in acute and chronic graft-vs. -host (GVH) disease. III. Different Lyt subsets of donor T cells induce different pathological syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Rolink, A.G.; Gleichmann, E.

    1983-08-01

    Previous work from this laboratory has led to the hypothesis that the stimulatory pathological symptoms of chronic graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD) are caused by alloreactive donor T helper (TH) cells, whereas the suppressive pathological symptoms of acute GVHD are caused by alloreactive T suppressor (TS) cells of the donor. We analyzed the Lyt phenotypes of B10 donor T cells required for the induction of either acute or chronic GVHD in H-2-different (B10 X DBA/2)F1 recipients. When nonirradiated F1 mice were used as the recipients, we found unseparated B10 T cells induced only a moderate formation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-like autoantibodies, but a high percentage of lethal GVHD (LGVHD). In contrast, Lyt-1+2- donor T cells were unable to induce LGVHD in these recipients but were capable of inducing a vigorous formation of SLE-like autoantibodies and severe immune-complex glomerulonephritis. Lyt-1-2+ T cells were incapable of inducing either acute or chronic GVHD. The sensitivity and accuracy of the GVH system were increased by using irradiated F1 mice as recipients and then comparing donor-cell inocula that contained similar numbers of T lymphocytes. Donor-cell inocula were used that had been tested for their allohelper and allosuppressor effects on F1 B cells in vitro. In the irradiated F1 recipients unseparated donor T cells were superior to T cell subsets in inducing LGVHD. In contrast Lyt-1+2- T cells, but neither unseparated T cells nor Lyt-1-2+ T cells, were capable of inducing a vigorous formation of SLE-like auto-antibodies. We conclude that the stimulatory pathological symptoms of chronic GVHD are caused by Lyt-1+2- allohelper T cells. In contrast, the development of the suppressive pathological symptoms of acute GVHD appears to involve alloreactive Lyt-1+2+ T suppressor cells.

  8. The Effect of Donor Diabetes History on Graft Failure and Endothelial Cell Density Ten Years after Penetrating Keratoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lass, Jonathan H.; Riddlesworth, Tonya D.; Gal, Robin L.; Kollman, Craig; Benetz, Beth A.; Price, Francis W.; Sugar, Alan; Terry, Mark A.; Soper, Mark; Beck, Roy W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the long term effect of donor diabetes history on graft failure and endothelial cell density (ECD) after penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) in the Cornea Donor Study Design Multi-center prospective, double-masked, controlled clinical trial Participants 1090 subjects undergoing PKP for a moderate risk condition, principally Fuchs’ dystrophy or pseudophakic/aphakic corneal edema (PACE), were enrolled by 105 surgeons from 80 clinical sites in the United States. Methods Corneas from donors 12 to 75 years old were assigned by 43 eye banks to participants without respect to recipient factors. Donor and recipient diabetes status was determined from existing medical records. Images of the central endothelium were obtained preoperatively (baseline) and at intervals for ten years postoperatively and analyzed by a central image analysis reading center to determine ECD. Main Outcome Measure(s) Time to graft failure (regraft or cloudy cornea for 3 consecutive months) and ECD. Results There was no statistically significant association of donor diabetes history with 10-year graft failure, baseline ECD, 10-year ECD or ECD values longitudinally over time in unadjusted analyses nor after adjusting for donor age and other significant covariates. The 10-year graft failure rate was 23% in the 199 cases receiving a cornea from a donor with diabetes versus 26% in the 891 cases receiving a cornea from a donor without diabetes (95% confidence interval for the difference: −10% to +6%; unadjusted p = 0.60). Baseline ECD (p=0.71), 10-year ECD (p>0.99), and changes in ECD over 10 years (p=0.86) were similar comparing donor diabetes and no-diabetes groups. Conclusions and Relevance The study results do not suggest an association between donor diabetes and PKP outcome. However, the assessment of donor diabetes was imprecise and based on historical data only. The increasing frequency of diabetes in the aging population in the United States affects the donor pool, thus the

  9. Design and synthesis of molecular donors for solution-processed high-efficiency organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Jessica E; Henson, Zachary B; Welch, Gregory C; Bazan, Guillermo C

    2014-01-21

    Organic semiconductors incorporated into solar cells using a bulk heterojunction (BHJ) construction show promise as a cleaner answer to increasing energy needs throughout the world. Organic solar cells based on the BHJ architecture have steadily increased in their device performance over the past two decades, with power conversion efficiencies reaching 10%. Much of this success has come with conjugated polymer/fullerene combinations, where optimized polymer design strategies, synthetic protocols, device fabrication procedures, and characterization methods have provided significant advancements in the technology. More recently, chemists have been paying particular attention to well-defined molecular donor systems due to their ease of functionalization, amenability to standard organic purification and characterization methods, and reduced batch-to-batch variability compared to polymer counterparts. There are several critical properties for efficient small molecule donors. First, broad optical absorption needs to extend towards the near-IR region to achieve spectral overlap with the solar spectrum. Second, the low lying highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energy levels need to be between -5.2 and -5.5 eV to ensure acceptable device open circuit voltages. Third, the structures need to be relatively planar to ensure close intermolecular contacts and high charge carrier mobilities. And last, the small molecule donors need to be sufficiently soluble in organic solvents (≥10 mg/mL) to facilitate solution deposition of thin films of appropriate uniformity and thickness. Ideally, these molecules should be constructed from cost-effective, sustainable building blocks using established, high yielding reactions in as few steps as possible. The structures should also be easy to functionalize to maximize tunability for desired properties. In this Account, we present a chronological description of our thought process and design strategies used in the development of highly

  10. Features specific to retinal pigment epithelium cells derived from three-dimensional human embryonic stem cell cultures — a new donor for cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhengya; Li, Qiyou; Xu, Haiwei; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2016-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) transplantation is a particularly promising treatment of retinal degenerative diseases affecting RPE-photoreceptor complex. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) provide an abundant donor source for RPE transplantation. Herein, we studied the time-course characteristics of RPE cells derived from three-dimensional human ESCs cultures (3D-RPE). We showed that 3D-RPE cells possessed morphology, ultrastructure, gene expression profile, and functions of authentic RPE. As differentiation proceeded, 3D-RPE cells could mature gradually with decreasing proliferation but increasing functions. Besides, 3D-RPE cells could form polarized monolayer with functional tight junction and gap junction. When grafted into the subretinal space of Royal College of Surgeons rats, 3D-RPE cells were safe and efficient to rescue retinal degeneration. This study showed that 3D-RPE cells were a new donor for cell therapy of retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:27009841

  11. Effective donor cell fusion conditions for production of cloned dogs by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Park, JungEun; Oh, HyunJu; Hong, SoGun; Kim, MinJung; Kim, GeonA; Koo, OkJae; Kang, SungKeun; Jang, Goo; Lee, ByeongChun

    2011-03-01

    As shown by the birth of the first cloned dog 'Snuppy', a protocol to produce viable cloned dogs has been reported. In order to evaluate optimum fusion conditions for improving dog cloning efficiency, in vivo matured oocytes were reconstructed with adult somatic cells from a female Pekingese using different fusion conditions. Fusion with needle vs chamber methods, and with low vs high pulse strength was compared by evaluating fusion rate and in vivo development of canine cloned embryos. The fusion rates in the high voltage groups were significantly higher than in the low voltage groups regardless of fusion method (83.5 vs 66.1% for the needle fusion method, 67.4 vs 37.9% for the fusion chamber method). After embryo transfer, one each pregnancy was detected after using the needle fusion method with high and low voltage and in the chamber fusion method with high voltage, whereas no pregnancy was detected using the chamber method with low voltage. However, only the pregnancy from the needle fusion method with high voltage was maintained to term and one healthy puppy was delivered. The results of the present study demonstrated that two DC pulses of 3.8 to 4.0 kV/cm for 15 μsec using the needle fusion method were the most effective method for the production of cloned dogs under the conditions of this experiment.

  12. Development of donor cell leukemia following peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for severe aplastic anemia: A case report

    PubMed Central

    MA, HONGBING; LIU, TING

    2016-01-01

    Donor cell leukemia (DCL) is a rare complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) which occurs in ~5% of all leukemic relapses. In the English literature, >60 cases of DCL have been reported, however, only two cases of DCL following HSCT for the treatment of severe aplastic anemia (SAA) have been described to date. In the present study, the case of a 25 year-old male patient diagnosed with SAA, who underwent a peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) using cells obtained from a sibling with an identical human leukocyte antigen, is presented. The patient developed acute myeloid leukemia with an (8;21)(q22;q22) translocation and an extra copy of the chromosome 8 in donor cells 2.5 years following PBSCT, which was preceded by the development of Graves' disease 1 year following PBSCT. The leukemia achieved complete remission following 1 cycle of priming therapy, 2 cycles of consolidation chemotherapy with daunorubicin and cytarabine and maintenance therapy with interleukin-2 (IL-2). At present, the patient has discontinued IL-2 therapy, and the DCL has been in molecular remission for >3 years. The present case indicates that chemotherapy and IL-2 maintenance therapy are an effective treatment for DCL; hyperthyroidism was relieved following treatment, although hypothyroidism subsequently developed. PMID:27313707

  13. Analyses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in operational tolerance after pediatric living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Koshiba, Takaaki; Yoshizawa, Atsushi; Yonekawa, Yukihide; Masuda, Kosuke; Ito, Atsushi; Ueda, Mikiko; Mori, Takahide; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Minato, Nagahiro; Wood, Kathryn J; Tanaka, Koichi

    2004-12-01

    Operational tolerance (graft acceptance in an immunosuppression (IS)-free environment) after living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT) could occur by our elective protocol in some patients. There is, nevertheless, no reliable parameter to monitor patients who may discontinue IS without a risk of rejection. To identify such parameters, we systemically phenotyped peripheral blood mononuclear cells from operationally tolerant patients. An increase was observed in the frequency of CD4+CD25high+ cells, B cells and Vdelta1/Vdelta2 gammadeltaT-cells ratio in operationally tolerant patients (Gr-tol; n = 12), compared with those from age-matched volunteers (Gr-vol; n = 24) or patients on IS (Gr-IS; n = 19). The frequency of NK cells was decreased in Gr-tol, compared with those in Gr-IS or Gr-vol. The frequency of NKT cells was decreased after LDLT, compared with that in Gr-vol. Although the contribution of those subsets to the tolerant state remains elusive, the results may provide important clues for reliable indicators of tolerance after LDLT.

  14. Recombination activity associated with thermal donor generation in monocrystalline silicon and effect on the conversion efficiency of heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomassini, M.; Veirman, J.; Varache, R.; Letty, E.; Dubois, S.; Hu, Y.; Nielsen, Ø.

    2016-02-01

    The recombination properties of the carrier lifetime-limiting center formed during the generation of oxygen-related thermal donors (so called "old" thermal donors) in n-type Czochralski silicon were determined over a wide range of thermal donors' concentrations. The procedure involved (1) determining the various energy levels associated with dopants with the help of temperature Hall effect measurements, (2) clarifying which energy level limits the carrier lifetime by temperature lifetime spectroscopy, and (3) determining the recombination parameters of the involved defect from room-temperature carrier lifetime curves. Our results support the fact that a deep energy level in the range of 0.2-0.3 eV below the conduction band limits the carrier lifetime. The second family of thermal donors, featuring bistable properties, was tentatively identified as the corresponding defect. From the obtained experimental data, the influence of the defect on the amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cell conversion efficiency was simulated. It is observed that for extended donor generation, the carrier lifetime is reduced by orders-of-magnitude, leading to unacceptable losses in photovoltaic conversion efficiency. A key result is that even for samples with thermal donor concentrations of 1015 cm-3—often met in seed portions of commercial ingots—simulations reveal efficiency losses greater than 1% absolute for state-of-the-art cells, in agreement with recent experimental studies from our group. This result indicates to crystal growers the importance to mitigate the formation of thermal donors or to develop cost-effective processes to suppress them at the ingot/wafer scale. This is even more critical as ingot cool-down is likely to be slower for future larger ingots, thus promoting the formation of thermal donors.

  15. Improvement of transgenic cloning efficiencies by culturing recipient oocytes and donor cells with antioxidant vitamins in cattle.

    PubMed

    Wongsrikeao, Pimprapar; Nagai, Takashi; Agung, Budiyanto; Taniguchi, Masayasu; Kunishi, Miho; Suto, Shizuyo; Otoi, Takeshige

    2007-06-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate effects of antioxidants during maturation culture of recipient oocytes and/or culture of gene-transfected donor cells on the meiotic competence of recipient oocytes, and the developmental competence and quality of the reconstructed embryos after nuclear transfer (NT) in cattle. Gene-transfected donor cells had negative effects on the proportions of blastocyst formation, total cell numbers, and DNA fragmentation indices of reconstructed embryos. Supplementation of either vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol: 100 microM) or vitamin C (ascorbic acid: 100 microM) during maturation culture significantly enhanced the cytoplasmic maturation of oocytes and subsequent development of embryos reconstructed with the oocytes and gene-transfected donor cells, but did not have synergistic effects. The supplementation of vitamin E during maturation culture of recipient oocytes increased the proportions of fusion and blastocyst formation of gene-transfected NT embryos, in which the proportions were similar to those of nontransfected NT embryos. When the gene-transfected donor cells that had been cultured with 0, 50, or 100 microM of vitamin E were transferred into recipient oocytes matured with vitamin E (100 microM), 50 microM of vitamin E increased the proportion of blastocyst formation and reduced the index of DNA fragmentation of blastocysts. In conclusion, gene-transfected donor cells have negatively influenced the NT outcome. Supplementation of vitamin E during both recipient oocyte maturation and donor cell culture enhanced the blastocyst formation and efficiently blocked DNA damage in transgenic NT embryos.

  16. Combined negative effect of donor age and time in culture on the reprogramming efficiency into induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Trokovic, Ras; Weltner, Jere; Noisa, Parinya; Raivio, Taneli; Otonkoski, Timo

    2015-07-01

    Somatic cells can be reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) by the forced expression of the transcription factors OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 and c-MYC. Pluripotent reprogramming appears as a slow and inefficient process because of genetic and epigenetic barriers of somatic cells. In this report, we have extended previous observations concerning donor age and passage number of human fibroblasts as critical determinants of the efficiency of iPSC induction. Human fibroblasts from 11 different donors of variable age were reprogrammed by ectopic expression of reprogramming factors. Although all fibroblasts gave rise to iPSC colonies, the reprogramming efficiency correlated negatively and declined rapidly with increasing donor age. In addition, the late passage fibroblasts gave less reprogrammed colonies than the early passage cell counterparts, a finding associated with the cellular senescence-induced upregulation of p21. Knockdown of p21 restored iPSC generation even in long-term passaged fibroblasts of an old donor, highlighting the central role of the p53/p21 pathway in cellular senescence induced by both donor age and culture time.

  17. Identification of suitable reference genes in bone marrow stromal cells from osteoarthritic donors.

    PubMed

    Schildberg, Theresa; Rauh, Juliane; Bretschneider, Henriette; Stiehler, Maik

    2013-11-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are key cellular components for musculoskeletal tissue engineering strategies. Furthermore, recent data suggest that BMSCs are involved in the development of Osteoarthritis (OA) being a frequently occurring degenerative joint disease. Reliable reference genes for the molecular evaluation of BMSCs derived from donors exhibiting OA as a primary co-morbidity have not been reported on yet. Hence, the aim of the study was to identify reference genes suitable for comparative gene expression analyses using OA-BMSCs. Passage 1 bone marrow derived BMSCs were isolated from n=13 patients with advanced stage idiopathic hip osteoarthritis and n=15 age-matched healthy donors. The expression of 31 putative reference genes was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) using a commercially available TaqMan(®) assay. Calculating the coefficient of variation (CV), mRNA expression stability was determined and afterwards validated using geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. Importin 8 (IPO8), TATA box binding protein (TBP), and cancer susceptibility candidate 3 (CASC3) were identified as the most stable reference genes. Notably, commonly used reference genes, e.g. beta-actin (ACTB) and beta-2-microglobulin (B2M) were among the most unstable genes. For normalization of gene expression data of OA-BMSCs the combined use of IPO8, TBP, and CASC3 gene is recommended.

  18. Structure-properties relationships in triarylamine-based donor-acceptor molecules containing naphtyl groups as donor material for organic solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Salma; Demeter, Dora; Laffitte, Jean-Alex; Blanchard, Philippe; Roncali, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The effects of replacing the phenyl rings of triphenylamine (TPA) by naphtyl groups are analysed on a series of push-pull molecules containing a 2-thienyl-dicyanovinyl acceptor group. UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry show that the introduction of one or two naphtyl groups in the structure has limited effects on the optical properties and energy levels of the molecule. On the other hand, the evaluation of the compounds as donor material in bi-layer solar cells with C60 as acceptor shows that the number and mode of linkage of the naphtyl groups exert a marked influence on the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the cell. Two naphtyl groups lead to a decrease of PCE with respect to TPA, while a single naphtyl group produces opposite effects depending on the linking mode. Compared to TPA, an alpha-naphtyl group leads to a small decrease of PCE while in contrast a beta-naphtyl leads to a ~35% increase of PCE due to improved short-circuit current density (Jsc) and fill-factor. The determination of the hole-mobility of these two donors by the space-charge-limited current method shows that these effects are correlated with the higher hole-mobility of the β-naphtyl compound. PMID:25761773

  19. Risk Factors for Steroid-Refractory Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation from Matched Related or Unrelated Donors.

    PubMed

    Calmettes, Claire; Vigouroux, Stéphane; Labopin, Myriam; Tabrizi, Reza; Turlure, Pascal; Lafarge, Xavier; Marit, Gérald; Pigneux, Arnaud; Leguay, Thibaut; Bouabdallah, Krimo; Dilhuydy, Marie-Sarah; Duclos, Cédric; Mohr, Catherine; Lascaux, Axelle; Dumas, Pierre-Yves; Dimicoli-Salazar, Sophie; Saint-Lézer, Arnaud; Milpied, Noël

    2015-05-01

    We performed a retrospective study to identify pretransplantation risk factors for steroid-refractory (SR) acute graft-versus host disease (aGVHD) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation from matched donors in 630 adult patients who underwent transplantation at our center between 2000 and 2012. The cumulative incidence (CI) of SR aGVHD was 11.3% ± 2.3%. The identified independent risk factors were matched unrelated donor (hazard ratio [HR], 2.52; P = .001), female donor for male recipient (HR, 1.84; P = .023) and absence of antithymocyte globulin (HR, 2.02; P = .005). Three risk groups were defined according to the presence of these risk factors. In the whole cohort, the CI of SR aGVHD was 3.5% ± 1.7% in the low-risk group (0 risk factor, n = 115), 9.3% ± 1.6% in the intermediate-risk group (1 risk factor, n = 323), and 19.3% ± 2.9% in the high-risk group (2 or 3 risk factors, n = 192). Our study suggests that pretransplantation characteristics might help identify patients at high risk for SR aGVHD. A risk adapted first-line treatment of aGVHD could be evaluated in those patients.

  20. Alteration of the DNA methylation status of donor cells impairs the developmental competence of porcine cloned embryos

    PubMed Central

    HUAN, Yan Jun; WU, Zhan Feng; ZHANG, Ji Guang; ZHU, Jiang; XIE, Bing Teng; WANG, Jian Yu; LI, Jing Yu; XUE, Bing Hua; KONG, Qing Ran; LIU, Zhong Hua

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear reprogramming induced by somatic cell nuclear transfer is an inefficient process, and donor cell DNA methylation status is thought to be a major factor affecting cloning efficiency. Here, the role of donor cell DNA methylation status regulated by 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) or 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine-5'-triphosphate (5-methyl-dCTP) in the early development of porcine cloned embryos was investigated. Our results showed that 5-aza-dC or 5-methyl-dCTP significantly reduced or increased the global methylation levels and altered the methylation and expression levels of key genes in donor cells. However, the development of cloned embryos derived from these cells was reduced. Furthermore, disrupted pseudo-pronucleus formation and transcripts of early embryo development-related genes were observed in cloned embryos derived from these cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that alteration of the DNA methylation status of donor cells by 5-aza-dC or 5-methyl-dCTP disrupted nuclear reprogramming and impaired the developmental competence of porcine cloned embryos. PMID:26537205

  1. Results from a horizon scan on risks associated with transplantation of human organs, tissues and cells: from donor to patient.

    PubMed

    Herberts, C A; Park, M V D Z; Pot, J W G A; de Vries, C G J C A

    2015-03-01

    The successful transplantation of human materials such as organs, tissues and cells into patients does not only depend on the benefits, but also on the mitigation of risks. To gain insight into recent publications on risks associated with the process of transferring human materials from donor to recipient we performed a horizon scan by reviewing scientific literature and news websites of 2011 on this subject. We found there is ample information on how extended donor criteria, such as donor age, affect the survival rates of organs or patients. Interestingly, gender mismatch does not appear to be a major risk factor in organ rejection. Data on risks of donor tumor transmission was very scarce; however, risk categories for various tumor types have been suggested. In order to avoid rejection, a lot of research is directed towards engineering tissues from a patient's own tissues and cells. Some but not all of these developments have reached the clinic. Developments in the field of stem cell therapy are rapid. However, many hurdles are yet to be overcome before these cells can be applied on a large scale in the clinic. The processes leading to genetic abnormalities in cells differentiated from stem cells need to be identified in order to avoid transplantation of aberrant cells. New insights have been obtained on storage and preservation of human materials, a critical step for success of their clinical use. Likewise, quality management systems have been shown to improve the quality and safety of human materials used for transplantation.

  2. Autologous Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-23

    Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; T-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

  3. Mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells from allogeneic healthy donors using a new biosimilar G-CSF (Zarzio®).

    PubMed

    Antelo, María Luisa; Zabalza, Amaya; Sánchez Antón, María Piva; Zalba, Saioa; Aznar, Mariví; Mansilla, Cristina; Ramírez, Natalia; Olavarría, Eduardo

    2016-02-01

    Peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPCs) have become the major source of hematopoietic progenitor cells for allogeneic transplantation. In February 2008, Zarzio® was approved by the European Medicine Agency for PBPCs mobilization, but this authorization was not based in trials analyzing safety and efficacy for PBPCs mobilization. Since August 2011, Zarzio® has been used at our institution for PBPCs mobilization. In total 36 healthy family donors underwent PBPCs mobilization, 18 with Neupogen® and 18 with Zarzio®. Donor characteristics were equivalent between groups, and no severe adverse effects were registered in the Zarzio® group. The number of CD34 cells collected/Kg recipient body weight was 6.7 × 10(6) (3.8-11.1) in the Zarzio® group versus 8.4 × 10(6) (5.6-16.6) in the Neupogen® group (P = 0.04). We collected the minimal target cell dose (2 × 10(6) /kg) in all donors from each group and no significant differences were found in the collection of the optimal cell dose (5 × 10(6) /kg) between groups, although 3/18 (16.6%) donors that received Zarzio® failed to mobilize the optimal cell dose compared with 0% in the Neupogen® group. A total of 35 patients proceeded to transplantation (17 in the Zarzio® and 18 in the Neupogen® groups, respectively). Platelet and neutrophil median time to engraftment was comparable between the two groups. Our retrospective study supports the conclusion that Zarzio® mobilization of PBPCs in healthy donors is safe but perhaps not as effective as the reference Neupogen. However, more prospective trials are required to definitively asses the safety and efficacy of G-CSF biosimilars for PBPCs mobilization in healthy donors. PMID:26011178

  4. Improved graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival associated with bone marrow as the stem cell source in adults

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Rohtesh S.; de Latour, Regis Peffault; DeFor, Todd E; Robin, Marie; Lazaryan, Aleksandr; Xhaard, Aliénor; Bejanyan, Nelli; de Fontbrune, Flore Sicre; Arora, Mukta; Brunstein, Claudio G.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; MacMillan, Margaret L.; Socie, Gerard; Holtan, Shernan G.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that bone marrow grafts from matched sibling donors resulted in best graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival at 1-year post allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. However, pediatric patients comprised the majority of bone marrow graft recipients in that study. To better define this outcome in adults and pediatric patients at 1- and 2-years post- allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation, we pooled data from the University of Minnesota and the Hôpital Saint-Louis in Paris, France (n=1901). Graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival was defined as the absence of grade III–IV acute graft-versus-host disease, chronic graft-versus-host disease (requiring systemic therapy or extensive stage), relapse and death. In adults, bone marrow from matched sibling donors (n=123) had best graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival at 1- and 2-years, compared with peripheral blood stem cell from matched sibling donors (n=540) or other graft/donor types. In multivariate analysis, peripheral blood stem cells from matched sibling donors resulted in a 50% increased risk of events contributing to graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival at 1- and 2-years than bone marrow from matched sibling donors. With limited numbers of peripheral blood stem cell grafts in pediatric patients (n=12), graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival did not differ between bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cell graft from any donor. While not all patients have a matched sibling donor, graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival may be improved by the preferential use of bone marrow for adults with malignant diseases. Alternatively, novel graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis regimens are needed to substantially impact graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival with the use of peripheral blood stem cell. PMID:27036159

  5. Analysis of T cell responses in liver allograft recipients. Evidence for deletion of donor-specific cytotoxic T cells in the peripheral circulation.

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, J M; Marsh, J W; Susskind, B; Mohanakumar, T

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of cell-mediated lympholysis in long-term liver allograft recipients indicated that there was a donor-specific unresponsiveness that could not be reversed by the addition of rIL-2 and/or mixed lymphocyte culture supernatant or by nonspecific stimulation of the cultures with PHA. Stimulation of recipient cells with semisyngeneic cells having both donor and third-party HLA antigens failed to reveal the presence of cytotoxic T cells (CTL) specific to the donor, whereas the CTL response to third-party antigens remained normal. Removal of B lymphocytes from the responding cell population did not influence the responses. Furthermore, limiting dilution analysis showed that the liver transplant recipients did not have detectable levels of CTL precursors (CTLp) reactive to the donor antigens, whereas their CTLp to third-party antigens remained normal. Donor-specific CTLp were present before and during the early post-transplant period; these cells were eliminated from the peripheral circulation by 10 mo after transplantation. Taken together, these results indicate that there is a deletion of CTLp specific to donor MHC antigens in the peripheral circulation of long-term liver allograft recipients that may account in part for the success of liver transplantation across MHC barriers. Images PMID:8450068

  6. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult L1 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult L2 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  7. Chloroboron (III) subnaphthalocyanine as an electron donor in bulk heterojunction photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guo; Sasabe, Hisahiro; Sano, Takeshi; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Hong, Ziruo; Kido, Junji; Yang, Yang

    2013-12-01

    In this work, chloroboron (III) subnaphthalocyanine (SubNc) was used as an electron donor, combined with a [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC70BM) or fullerene C70 acceptor in bulk heterojunction photovoltaic cells. In spite of the limited solubility of SubNc in organic solvents, the solution processed device exhibited an efficiency of 4.0% under 1 sun, AM1.5G solar irradiation at room temperature, and 5.0% at 80 ° C due to the temperature-dependence of the carrier mobilities. SubNc:C70 bulk heterojunctions were also fabricated via thermal co-evaporation, demonstrating an efficiency of 4.4%. This result shows that SubNc is a promising material for photovoltaic applications via various processing techniques, such as vacuum deposition and wet coating.

  8. Peripheral-Blood Stem Cells versus Bone Marrow from Unrelated Donors

    PubMed Central

    Anasetti, Claudio; Logan, Brent R.; Lee, Stephanie J.; Waller, Edmund K.; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Wingard, John R.; Cutler, Corey S.; Westervelt, Peter; Woolfrey, Ann; Couban, Stephen; Ehninger, Gerhard; Johnston, Laura; Maziarz, Richard T.; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Porter, David L.; Mineishi, Shin; McCarty, John M.; Khan, Shakila P.; Anderlini, Paolo; Bensinger, William I.; Leitman, Susan F.; Rowley, Scott D.; Bredeson, Christopher; Carter, Shelly L.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Confer, Dennis L.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Randomized trials have shown that the transplantation of filgrastim-mobilized peripheral-blood stem cells from HLA-identical siblings accelerates engraftment but increases the risks of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), as compared with the transplantation of bone marrow. Some studies have also shown that peripheral-blood stem cells are associated with a decreased rate of relapse and improved survival among recipients with high-risk leukemia. METHODS We conducted a phase 3, multicenter, randomized trial of transplantation of peripheral-blood stem cells versus bone marrow from unrelated donors to compare 2-year survival probabilities with the use of an intention-to-treat analysis. Between March 2004 and September 2009, we enrolled 551 patients at 48 centers. Patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to peripheral-blood stem-cell or bone marrow transplantation, stratified according to transplantation center and disease risk. The median follow-up of surviving patients was 36 months (interquartile range, 30 to 37). RESULTS The overall survival rate at 2 years in the peripheral-blood group was 51% (95% confidence interval [CI], 45 to 57), as compared with 46% (95% CI, 40 to 52) in the bone marrow group (P = 0.29), with an absolute difference of 5 percentage points (95% CI, −3 to 14). The overall incidence of graft failure in the peripheral-blood group was 3% (95% CI, 1 to 5), versus 9% (95% CI, 6 to 13) in the bone marrow group (P = 0.002). The incidence of chronic GVHD at 2 years in the peripheral-blood group was 53% (95% CI, 45 to 61), as compared with 41% (95% CI, 34 to 48) in the bone marrow group (P = 0.01). There were no significant between-group differences in the incidence of acute GVHD or relapse. CONCLUSIONS We did not detect significant survival differences between peripheral-blood stem-cell and bone marrow transplantation from unrelated donors. Exploratory analyses of secondary end points indicated that peripheral

  9. Application of acetate, lactate, and fumarate as electron donors in microbial fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyliv, Oresta M.; Bilyy, Oleksandr I.; Ferensovych, Yaroslav P.; Hnatush, Svitlana O.

    2013-09-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are devices that use bacteria as the catalysts to oxidize organic and inorganic matter and generate current. Up to now, several classes of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms have been elucidated for various microorganisms. Shewanellaceae and Geobacteraceae families include the most of model exoelectrogenic microorganisms. Desulfuromonas acetoxidans bacterium inhabits aquatic sedimental sulfur-containing environments and is philogenetically close to representatives of Geobacteraceae family. Two chamber microbial fuel cell (0.3 l volume) was constructed with application of D. acetoxidans IMV B-7384 as anode biocatalyst. Acetic, lactic and fumaric acids were separately applied as organic electron donors for bacterial growth in constructed MFC. Bacterial cultivation in MFC was held during twenty days. Lactate oxidation caused electric power production with the highest value up to 0.071 mW on 64 hour of D. acetoxidans IMV B-7384 growth. Addition of acetic and fumaric acids into bacterial growth medium caused maximal power production up to 0.075 and 0.074 mW respectively on the 40 hour of their growth. Increasing of incubation time up to twentieth day caused decrease of generated electric power till 0.018 mW, 0.042 mW and 0.047 mW under usage of lactic, acetic and fumaric acids respectively by investigated bacteria. Power generation by D. acetoxidans IMV B-7384 was more stabile and durable under application of acetic and fumaric acids as electron donors in constructed MFC, than under addition of lactic acid in the same concentration into the growth medium.

  10. Design of Bicontinuous Donor/Acceptor Morphologies for Use as Organic Solar Cell Active Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipp, Dylan; Mok, Jorge; Verduzco, Rafael; Ganesan, Venkat

    Two of the primary challenges limiting the marketability of organic solar cells are i) the smaller device efficiency of the organic solar cell relative to the conventional silicon-based solar cell and ii) the long term thermal instability of the device active layer. The achievement of equilibrium donor/acceptor morphologies with the characteristics believed to yield high device performance characteristics could address each of these two challenges. In this work, we present the results of a combined simulations and experiments-based approach to investigate if a conjugated BCP additive can be used to control the self-assembled morphologies taken on by conjugated polymer/PCBM mixtures. First, we use single chain in mean field Monte Carlo simulations to identify regions within the conjugated polymer/PCBM composition space in which addition of copolymers can lead to bicontinuous equilibrium morphologies with high interfacial areas and nanoscale dimensions. Second, we conduct experiments as directed by the simulations to achieve such morphologies in the PTB7 + PTB7- b-PNDI + PCBM model blend. We characterize the results of our experiments via a combination of transmission electron microscopy and X-ray scattering techniques and demonstrate that the morphologies from experiments agree with those predicted in simulations. Accordingly, these results indicate that the approach utilized represents a promising approach to intelligently design the morphologies taken on by organic solar cell active layers.

  11. Reduced-Intensity Conditioning Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-19

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Polycythemia Vera; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non

  12. Xenogeneic Transfer of Adult Quail (Coturnix coturnix) Spermatogonial Stem Cells to Embryonic Chicken (Gallus gallus) Hosts: A Model for Avian Conservation1

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Mandi; McDonald, Nastassja; Durrant, Barbara; Jensen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT As advanced reproductive technologies have become routine for domesticated species, they have begun to be applied in the field of endangered species conservation. For avian conservation, the most promising technology is the transfer of germ stem cells of exotic species to domestic hosts for the production of gametes. In this study, adult quail (model for exotic species) spermatogonial stem cells were xenogeneically transferred to stages 14–17 chicken host embryos. Fluorescent cellular dyes, quail-specific antibodies, and quail-specific quantitative PCR confirmed donor cell migration to and colonization of the host gonadal ridge. Donor-derived cells were observed by fluorescent microscopy in the caudal area as early as 2 h after injection, in the gonadal ridge at 4 h after injection, as well as in the gonads of stages 35–38 host embryos. Four of eight donor-derived cell flow cytometry-positive host gonads were confirmed by quantitative PCR using quail-specific primers. There was no statistically significant effect of host stage of injection, host gonad isolation stage, or host sex on the number of hosts positive for donor cells or the percent of donor-derived cells per positive gonad. Donor-derived cells isolated from stages 35–38 host gonads costained with the germ stem cell marker SSEA-1, indicating that the donor-derived cells have maintained stem cell-ness. This is the first study to suggest that it is feasible to rescue adult germ stem cells of deceased birds to prolong the reproductive lifespan of critically endangered species or genetically valuable individuals by transferring them to an embryonic chicken host. PMID:23575150

  13. Generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells from a Bombay individual: Moving towards 'universal-donor' red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Seifinejad, Ali; Taei, Adeleh; Totonchi, Mehdi; Vazirinasab, Hamed; Hassani, Seideh Nafiseh; Aghdami, Nasser; Shahbazi, Ebrahim; Yazdi, Reza Salman; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini; Baharvand, Hossein

    2010-01-01

    Bombay phenotype is one of the rare phenotypes in the ABO blood group system that fails to express ABH antigens on red blood cells. Nonsense or missense mutations in fucosyltransfrase1 (FUT1) and fucosyltransfrase2 (FUT2) genes are known to create this phenotype. This blood group is compatible with all other blood groups as a donor, as it does not express the H antigen on the red blood cells. In this study, we describe the establishment of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from the dermal fibroblasts of a Bombay blood-type individual by the ectopic expression of established transcription factors Klf4, Oct4, Sox2, and c-Myc. Sequence analyses of fibroblasts and iPSCs revealed a nonsense mutation 826C to T (276 Gln to Ter) in the FUT1 gene and a missense mutation 739G to A (247 Gly to Ser) in the FUT2 gene in the Bombay phenotype under study. The established iPSCs resemble human embryonic stem cells in morphology, passaging, surface and pluripotency markers, normal karyotype, gene expression, DNA methylation of critical pluripotency genes, and in-vitro differentiation. The directed differentiation of the iPSCs into hematopoietic lineage cells displayed increased expression of the hematopoietic lineage markers such as CD34, CD133, RUNX1, KDR, {alpha}-globulin, and {gamma}-globulin. Such specific stem cells provide an unprecedented opportunity to produce a universal blood group donor, in-vitro, thus enabling cellular replacement therapies, once the safety issue is resolved.

  14. Generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells from a Bombay individual: moving towards "universal-donor" red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Seifinejad, Ali; Taei, Adeleh; Totonchi, Mehdi; Vazirinasab, Hamed; Hassani, Seideh Nafiseh; Aghdami, Nasser; Shahbazi, Ebrahim; Yazdi, Reza Salman; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini; Baharvand, Hossein

    2010-01-01

    Bombay phenotype is one of the rare phenotypes in the ABO blood group system that fails to express ABH antigens on red blood cells. Nonsense or missense mutations in fucosyltransfrase1 (FUT1) and fucosyltransfrase2 (FUT2) genes are known to create this phenotype. This blood group is compatible with all other blood groups as a donor, as it does not express the H antigen on the red blood cells. In this study, we describe the establishment of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from the dermal fibroblasts of a Bombay blood-type individual by the ectopic expression of established transcription factors Klf4, Oct4, Sox2, and c-Myc. Sequence analyses of fibroblasts and iPSCs revealed a nonsense mutation 826C to T (276 Gln to Ter) in the FUT1 gene and a missense mutation 739G to A (247 Gly to Ser) in the FUT2 gene in the Bombay phenotype under study. The established iPSCs resemble human embryonic stem cells in morphology, passaging, surface and pluripotency markers, normal karyotype, gene expression, DNA methylation of critical pluripotency genes, and in-vitro differentiation. The directed differentiation of the iPSCs into hematopoietic lineage cells displayed increased expression of the hematopoietic lineage markers such as CD34, CD133, RUNX1, KDR, alpha-globulin, and gamma-globulin. Such specific stem cells provide an unprecedented opportunity to produce a universal blood group donor, in-vitro, thus enabling cellular replacement therapies, once the safety issue is resolved.

  15. Generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells from a Bombay individual: moving towards "universal-donor" red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Seifinejad, Ali; Taei, Adeleh; Totonchi, Mehdi; Vazirinasab, Hamed; Hassani, Seideh Nafiseh; Aghdami, Nasser; Shahbazi, Ebrahim; Yazdi, Reza Salman; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini; Baharvand, Hossein

    2010-01-01

    Bombay phenotype is one of the rare phenotypes in the ABO blood group system that fails to express ABH antigens on red blood cells. Nonsense or missense mutations in fucosyltransfrase1 (FUT1) and fucosyltransfrase2 (FUT2) genes are known to create this phenotype. This blood group is compatible with all other blood groups as a donor, as it does not express the H antigen on the red blood cells. In this study, we describe the establishment of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from the dermal fibroblasts of a Bombay blood-type individual by the ectopic expression of established transcription factors Klf4, Oct4, Sox2, and c-Myc. Sequence analyses of fibroblasts and iPSCs revealed a nonsense mutation 826C to T (276 Gln to Ter) in the FUT1 gene and a missense mutation 739G to A (247 Gly to Ser) in the FUT2 gene in the Bombay phenotype under study. The established iPSCs resemble human embryonic stem cells in morphology, passaging, surface and pluripotency markers, normal karyotype, gene expression, DNA methylation of critical pluripotency genes, and in-vitro differentiation. The directed differentiation of the iPSCs into hematopoietic lineage cells displayed increased expression of the hematopoietic lineage markers such as CD34, CD133, RUNX1, KDR, alpha-globulin, and gamma-globulin. Such specific stem cells provide an unprecedented opportunity to produce a universal blood group donor, in-vitro, thus enabling cellular replacement therapies, once the safety issue is resolved. PMID:19912985

  16. Human oocytes reprogram adult somatic nuclei of a type 1 diabetic to diploid pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Mitsutoshi; Johannesson, Bjarki; Sagi, Ido; Burnett, Lisa Cole; Kort, Daniel H; Prosser, Robert W; Paull, Daniel; Nestor, Michael W; Freeby, Matthew; Greenberg, Ellen; Goland, Robin S; Leibel, Rudolph L; Solomon, Susan L; Benvenisty, Nissim; Sauer, Mark V; Egli, Dieter

    2014-06-26

    The transfer of somatic cell nuclei into oocytes can give rise to pluripotent stem cells that are consistently equivalent to embryonic stem cells, holding promise for autologous cell replacement therapy. Although methods to induce pluripotent stem cells from somatic cells by transcription factors are widely used in basic research, numerous differences between induced pluripotent stem cells and embryonic stem cells have been reported, potentially affecting their clinical use. Because of the therapeutic potential of diploid embryonic stem-cell lines derived from adult cells of diseased human subjects, we have systematically investigated the parameters affecting efficiency of blastocyst development and stem-cell derivation. Here we show that improvements to the oocyte activation protocol, including the use of both kinase and translation inhibitors, and cell culture in the presence of histone deacetylase inhibitors, promote development to the blastocyst stage. Developmental efficiency varied between oocyte donors, and was inversely related to the number of days of hormonal stimulation required for oocyte maturation, whereas the daily dose of gonadotropin or the total number of metaphase II oocytes retrieved did not affect developmental outcome. Because the use of concentrated Sendai virus for cell fusion induced an increase in intracellular calcium concentration, causing premature oocyte activation, we used diluted Sendai virus in calcium-free medium. Using this modified nuclear transfer protocol, we derived diploid pluripotent stem-cell lines from somatic cells of a newborn and, for the first time, an adult, a female with type 1 diabetes.

  17. Erythroid differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells is independent of donor cell type of origin

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Isabel; Klich, Katharina; Arauzo-Bravo, Marcos J.; Radstaak, Martina; Santourlidis, Simeon; Ghanjati, Foued; Radke, Teja F.; Psathaki, Olympia E.; Hargus, Gunnar; Kramer, Jan; Einhaus, Martin; Kim, Jeong Beom; Kögler, Gesine; Wernet, Peter; Schöler, Hans R.; Schlenke, Peter; Zaehres, Holm

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic memory in induced pluripotent stem cells, which is related to the somatic cell type of origin of the stem cells, might lead to variations in the differentiation capacities of the pluripotent stem cells. In this context, induced pluripotent stem cells from human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells might be more suitable for hematopoietic differentiation than the commonly used fibroblast-derived induced pluripotent stem cells. To investigate the influence of an epigenetic memory on the ex vivo expansion of induced pluripotent stem cells into erythroid cells, we compared induced pluripotent stem cells from human neural stem cells and human cord blood-derived CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells and evaluated their potential for differentiation into hematopoietic progenitor and mature red blood cells. Although genome-wide DNA methylation profiling at all promoter regions demonstrates that the epigenetic memory of induced pluripotent stem cells is influenced by the somatic cell type of origin of the stem cells, we found a similar hematopoietic induction potential and erythroid differentiation pattern of induced pluripotent stem cells of different somatic cell origin. All human induced pluripotent stem cell lines showed terminal maturation into normoblasts and enucleated reticulocytes, producing predominantly fetal hemoglobin. Differences were only observed in the growth rate of erythroid cells, which was slightly higher in the induced pluripotent stem cells derived from CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells. More detailed methylation analysis of the hematopoietic and erythroid promoters identified similar CpG methylation levels in the induced pluripotent stem cell lines derived from CD34+ cells and those derived from neural stem cells, which confirms their comparable erythroid differentiation potential. PMID:25326431

  18. Protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha regulates cell detachment and cell death profiles induced by nitric oxide donors in the A431 human carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Paulo E; Batista, Wagner L; Curcio, Marli F; Moraes, Miriam S; Borges, Roberta Eller; Nascimento, Patrícia A; Travassos, Luiz R; Monteiro, Hugo P

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the role of protein tyrosine phosphatase-alpha (PTPα) expression in the cell death profile of the A431 human carcinoma cell line that was induced by cytotoxic concentrations of the nitric oxide (NO) donors sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and 3,3-bis-(aminoethyl)-1-hydroxy-2-oxo-1-triazene (NOC-18). Both NO donors promoted extensive cell detachment in A431 parental cells as compared to the detachment observed for A431 cells that ectopically expressed PTPα (A431 (A27B(PTPα)) cells). The NO-induced cell death characteristics for both cell lines were examined. After incubation for 10 hours with 2.0 mM SNP, attached or detached A431 cells underwent apoptosis. Cells were highly positive for Annexin-V, featured increased cleavage of procaspase-8, activation of downstream caspase-3, and activation of poly-ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1). In contrast, exposure of A431 (A27B(PTPα)) cells to 2.0 mM SNP produced an increase in the release of lactate dehydrogenase and enhanced incorporation of propidium iodide. In addition, A431 (A27B(PTPα)) cells showed partial inhibition of the activities of caspase-8, caspase-3, and PARP-1 upon detachment and cell death induced by SNP treatment. Results indicate that necrotic cell damage was induced, characterized by cellular swelling and lysis. We conclude from these results that PTPα regulates the A431 tumor cell death profile mediated by NO donors. Expression of PTPα or its absence may determine the occurrence of NO-induced cell death with necrotic or apoptotic features, respectively.

  19. Donor Telomere Length SAA

    Cancer.gov

    A new NCI study has found that, among patients with severe aplastic anemia who received a hematopoietic cell transplant from an unrelated donor, those whose donor white blood cells had longer telomeres had higher survival rates five-years after transplant

  20. Adult thymus transplantation with allogeneic intra-bone marrow–bone marrow transplantation from same donor induces high thymopoiesis, mild graft-versus-host reaction and strong graft-versus-tumour effects

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Takashi; Hosaka, Naoki; Cui, Wenhao; Nishida, Teruhisa; Takaki, Takashi; Inaba, Muneo; Kamiyama, Yasuo; Ikehara, Susumu

    2009-01-01

    Although allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) plus donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) is performed for solid tumours to enhance graft-versus-tumour (GVT) effects, a graft-versus-host reaction (GVHR) is also elicited. We carried out intra-bone marrow–bone marrow transplantation (IBM-BMT) plus adult thymus transplantation (ATT) from the same donor to supply alloreactive T cells continually. Normal mice treated with IBM-BMT + ATT survived for a long time with high donor-derived thymopoiesis and mild GVHR. The percentage of CD4+ FoxP3+ regulatory T cells in the spleen of the mice treated with IBM-BMT + ATT was lower than in normal B6 mice or mice treated with IBM-BMT alone, but higher than in mice treated with IBM-BMT + DLI; the mice treated with IBM-BMT + DLI showed severe GVHR. In tumour-bearing mice, tumour growth was more strongly inhibited by IBM-BMT + ATT than by IBM-BMT alone. Mice treated with IBM-BMT + a high dose of DLI also showed tumour regression comparable to that of mice treated with IBM-BMT + ATT but died early of GVHD. By contrast, mice treated with IBM-BMT + a low dose of DLI showed longer survival but less tumour regression than the mice treated with IBM-BMT + ATT. Histologically, significant numbers of CD8+ T cells were found to have infiltrated the tumour in the mice treated with IBM-BMT + ATT. The number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labelling (TUNEL)-positive apoptotic tumour cells also significantly increased in the mice treated with IBM-BMT + ATT. Allogeneic IBM-BMT + ATT thus can induce high thymopoiesis, preserving strong GVT effects without severe GVHR. PMID:18778285

  1. Abnormal T-cell subpopulations in hemophilic patients receiving factor VIII concentrates from voluntary donors.

    PubMed

    Wearne, A; Joshua, D E; Rickard, K A; Kronenberg, H

    1984-04-01

    Recently, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has been reported in hemophiliacs in the USA, Canada and Spain, and this has caused considerable concern amongst hemophiliacs regarding the use of factor VIII concentrates. The aim of this study was to determine whether hemophiliacs in Australia have T-lymphocyte subpopulation changes similar to those observed in patients with AIDS. Factor VIII produced in Australia is derived from a totally volunteer blood donor system and none of the hemophiliacs in this study had received commercial blood products. For the hemophiliacs, the T-helper cell to T-suppressor cell ratio was 1.1 +/- 0.6 (mean +/- SD) which was significantly less (p less than 0.001) than that of the normal age and sex-matched controls. There was a significant relative (p less than 0.001) and absolute (p less than 0.05) reduction of the helper cell subsets and a significant relative (p less than 0.001) and absolute (p less than 0.05) increase of the suppressor cell subsets, in the hemophiliacs compared to the normal controls. There appears to be no correlation between the amount of factor VIII therapy received during the last three years and the T-cell subset changes. All patients with Christmas disease had T-cell subsets within the normal range. All patients were negative for the hepatitis B virus antigen, but all were positive for the antibody, indicating that there had been exposure to the hepatitis virus in all cases. Cytomegalovirus titres were uniformly low and immunoglobulin levels were normal.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Late effects in patients with Fanconi anemia following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from alternative donors

    PubMed Central

    Anur, Praveen; Friedman, Danielle N; Sklar, Charles; Oeffinger, Kevin; Castiel, Mercedes; Kearney, Julia; Singh, Bhuvanesh; Prockop, Susan E; Kernan, Nancy A; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Kobos, Rachel; Curran, Kevin; Ruggiero, Julianne; Zakak, Nicole; O’Reilly, Richard J; Boulad, Farid

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is curative for hematological manifestations of Fanconi anemia (FA). We performed a retrospective analysis of 22 patients with FA and aplastic anemia, myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myelogenous leukemia who underwent a HSCT at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and survived at least one year post-HSCT. Patients underwent either a total body irradiation (TBI) (N=18) or busulfan (N=4) based cytoreduction followed by T-cell depleted transplants from alternative donors. Twenty patients were alive at time of study with a 5 and 10 year overall survival of 100% and 84% and no evidence of chronic GVHD. Among the 18 patients receiving a TBI-based regimen, 11 (61%) had persistent hemochromatosis, four (22%) developed hypothyroidism, seven (39%) had insulin resistance and five (27%) developed hypertriglyceridemia after transplant. Eleven of 16 evaluable patients (68%), receiving TBI, developed gonadal dysfunction. Two patients who received a TBI-based regimen died of squamous cell carcinoma. One patient developed hemochromatosis, hypothyroidism, and gonadal dysfunction after Busulfan-based cytoreduction. TBI appears to be a risk factor for malignant and endocrine late effects in the FA host. Multidisciplinary follow-up of patients with FA (including cancer screening) is essential for early detection and management of late complications, and improving long-term outcomes. PMID:26999465

  3. Characterization of inverted polymer solar cells with low-band-gap polymers as donor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hong Il; Cho, Jung Min; Shin, Won Suk; Lee, Sang Kyu; Lee, Jong-Cheol; Moon, Sang-Jin; Kim, Jong Hak

    2012-06-01

    Inverted polymer solar cells with low-band-gap polymers were characterized. Molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) and tungsten trioxide (WO3) were deposited between the active layer and the silver top electrode in inverted polymer solar cells (PSCs) with titanium oxide (TiO x ) and indium tin oxide (ITO) as a buffer layer and a cathode, respectively. The performances of different anode buffer layers and three different polymers were compared. The best performance was achieved for the device with poly[N-9″-heptadecanyl-2,7-carbazole-alt-5,5-(5',8'-di-2-thienyl-2,3-bis(4-octyloxyl)phenyl)quinoxaline] (P2) as a donor polymer and a 20 nm MoO3 layer between the active layer and Ag, that device exhibited a open circuit voltage (V oc ) of 0.84 V, a short circuit current (J sc ) of 8.15 mA/cm2, and a fill factor (FF) of 0.41. The overall power conversion efficiency (PCE) for this cell was 2.79%.

  4. Adoptable strategic approaches to improve outcomes of allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantations from unrelated donors.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Sang Kyun; Moon, Joon Ho

    2014-06-01

    While previous studies have shown comparable clinical results for related and unrelated bone marrow transplantation (BMT), the transplantation outcomes for related and unrelated peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) may not follow the same pattern due to a higher incidence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD)-related morbidity and mortality in the case of long-term survival after unrelated PBSCT. Thus, given the higher possibility of an impaired quality of life due to severe GVHD in long-term survivors who receive unrelated PBSCT, the selection of the stem cell source needs to be decided very carefully. In addition, strategic approaches, such as the extended use of immunosuppressant as a GVHD prophylaxis, the use of antithymocyte globulins (ATGs), choosing a younger donor, and optimizing the CD34+ cell dose, need to be adopted to improve the transplantation outcomes by minimizing GVHD-related morbidity and mortality in an unrelated PBSCT setting. This review article provides a comparison of BMT and PBSCT, and related and unrelated PBSCT, plus introduces several adoptable strategies to improve the outcomes of unrelated PBSCT.

  5. Transmission of an expanding donor-derived del(20q) clone through allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation without the development of a hematologic neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, Vania; Porter, David; Luskin, Marlise R; Bagg, Adam; Morrissette, Jennifer J D

    2015-12-01

    Donor cell leukemia is a rare complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), which may result from the development of a new malignancy in previously healthy donor cells after transplant into the recipient, or it may derive from the transmission of an occult leukemia from donor to recipient. We report a case of donor derived 20q11.2 deletion in a male patient who received an allogeneic HSCT from his HLA-identical sister for the treatment of his chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Bone marrow cells from the donor were found to contain the 20q deletion that expanded over time, but which was absent in her peripheral blood cells. Although cases of donor cell leukemia after HSCT have been reported, in this case there has been no evidence of an associated hematologic neoplasm in either the donor or recipient. Pre-transplant donor bone marrow evaluations are not practical or warranted, however the finding of new cytogenetic abnormalities after transplant mandates a thorough evaluation of the donor.

  6. Donor-Derived T-Cell Large Granular Lymphocytic Leukemia in a Patient With Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Juliana E Hidalgo; Yabe, Mariko; Carballo-Zarate, Adrian A; Wang, Sa A; Jorgensen, Jeffrey L; Ahmed, Sairah; Lee, John; Li, Shaoying; Schlette, Ellen; McDonnell, Timothy; Miranda, Roberto N; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E; Yin, C Cameron

    2016-08-01

    T-cell large granular lymphocytic (T-LGL) leukemia after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is rare and its natural history and clinical outcome have not been well described. We report the clinical, morphologic, immunophenotypic, and molecular features of a case of donor-derived T-LGL leukemia in a 16-year-old man who received allogeneic SCT for peripheral T-cell lymphoma not otherwise specified (PTCL-NOS). The patient presented with persistent neutropenia and splenomegaly 9 months after SCT when the chimerism study showed a 100% donor pattern. A splenectomy revealed T-LGL leukemia. Flow cytometric analysis showed an aberrant T-cell population positive for CD3, CD5 (dim, subset), CD7, CD8, CD16 (subset), CD57, CD94 (dim, partial), and T-cell receptor (TCR) αβ, and negative for CD4, CD26, CD56, and TCRγδ. Molecular studies showed monoclonal TCRβ and TCRγ gene rearrangements. Both the immunophenotype and molecular profile of the T-LGL leukemia were different from the pre-SCT PTCL. Sequencing analysis for STAT3 exon 21 did not reveal any mutation in both pre-SCT and post-SCT specimens. The patient did not receive any treatment for T-LGL leukemia; however, his count progressively increased after splenectomy, despite the presence of persistent T-LGL leukemia in the bone marrow. There was no evidence of recurrent PTCL. We propose an algorithm to diagnose this rare post-SCT neoplasm. PMID:27496109

  7. Cyanomethylbenzoic acid: an acceptor for donor-π-acceptor chromophores used in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Wanchun; Gupta, Akhil; Kashif, Muhammad Kalim; Duffy, Noel; Bilic, Ante; Evans, Richard A; Spiccia, Leone; Bach, Udo

    2013-02-01

    Sensing the sun: Incorporation of a cyanomethyl benzoic acid electron acceptor into donor-π-acceptor sensitizers for dye-sensitized-solar cell is shown to lead to devices with improved conversion efficiency when compared with more widely used cyanoacetic acid acceptor.

  8. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Homozygous β Thalassemia and β Thalassemia/Hemoglobin E Patients from Haploidentical Donors

    PubMed Central

    Anurathapan, U; Hongeng, S; Pakakasama, S; Sirachainan, N; Songdej, D; Chuansumrit, A; Charoenkwan, P; Jetsrisuparb, A; Sanpakit, K; Rujkijyanont, P; Meekaewkunchorn, A; Lektrakul, Y; Iamsirirak, P; Surapolchai, P; Satayasai, W; Sirireung, S; Sruamsiri, R; Wahidiyat, PA; Ungkanont, A; Issaragrisil, S; Andersson, BS

    2016-01-01

    Thalassemia free survival after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is about 80–90% with either matched related or unrelated donors. However, the probability of finding a HLA-compatible donor is less than 50%. We explored the use of a mismatched related (“Haplo-”) donor. All patients received two courses of pre-transplant immunosuppression therapy (PTIS) with fludarabine (Flu) and dexamethasone (Dxm) to facilitate engraftment. After two courses of PTIS, a reduced-toxicity conditioning regimen of rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG), Flu, and IV Busulfan (Bu) was given followed by T-cell replete peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC). GVHD prophylaxis consisted of cyclophosphamide (Cy) on days SCT +3 and +4 (Post-Cy), and on day SCT +5 tacrolimus or sirolimus was started together with a short course of mycophenolate mofetil. Thirty-one patients underwent haplo-SCT. Their median age was ten years (range, 2 to 20 years). Twenty-nine patients engrafted with 100% donor chimerism. Two of three patients with high titers of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies suffered primary graft failure. Median time to neutrophil engraftment was 14 days (range, 11 to 18 days). Five patients developed mild to moderate, reversible veno-occlusive disease, while nine patients developed acute GVHD grade II, that quickly responded to steroid therapy. Only five patients developed limited chronic GVHD. Projected overall and event-free survival rates at two years are 95% and 94%, respectively. The median follow up time is 12 months (range; 7 to 33 months). This haplo-SCT protocol may yield excellent outcomes for thalassemia patients, and provide a treatment option for patients lacking a HLA-matched donor. PMID:26878659

  9. Regenerative medicine using adult neural stem cells: the potential for diabetes therapy and other pharmaceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Tomoko; Asashima, Makoto

    2012-06-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs), which are responsible for continuous neurogenesis during the adult stage, are present in human adults. The typical neurogenic regions are the hippocampus and the subventricular zone; recent studies have revealed that NSCs also exist in the olfactory bulb. Olfactory bulb-derived neural stem cells (OB NSCs) have the potential to be used in therapeutic applications and can be easily harvested without harm to the patient. Through the combined influence of extrinsic cues and innate programming, adult neurogenesis is a finely regulated process occurring in a specialized cellular environment, a niche. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms of adult NSCs and their cellular niche is not only important to understand the physiological roles of neurogenesis in adulthood, but also to provide the knowledge necessary for developing new therapeutic applications using adult NSCs in other organs with similar regulatory environments. Diabetes is a devastating disease affecting more than 200 million people worldwide. Numerous diabetic patients suffer increased symptom severity after the onset, involving complications such as retinopathy and nephropathy. Therefore, the development of treatments for fundamental diabetes is important. The utilization of autologous cells from patients with diabetes may address challenges regarding the compatibility of donor tissues as well as provide the means to naturally and safely restore function, reducing future risks while also providing a long-term cure. Here, we review recent findings regarding the use of adult OB NSCs as a potential diabetes cure, and discuss the potential of OB NSC-based pharmaceutical applications for neuronal diseases and mental disorders.

  10. Generation of human lactoferrin transgenic cloned goats using donor cells with dual markers and a modified selection procedure.

    PubMed

    An, Li-You; Yuan, Yu-Guo; Yu, Bao-Li; Yang, Ting-Jia; Cheng, Yong

    2012-10-01

    The objective was to use dual markers to accurately select genetically modified donor cells and ensure that the resulting somatic cell nuclear transfer kids born were transgenic. Fetal fibroblast cells were transfected with dual marking gene vector (pCNLF-ng) that contained the red-shifted variant of the jellyfish green fluorescent protein (LGFP) and neomycin resistance (Neo) markers. Cell clones that were G418-resistant and polymerase chain reaction-positive were subcultured for several passages; individual cells of the clones were examined with fluorescence microscopy to confirm transgenic integration. Clones in which every cell had bright green fluorescence were used as donor cells for nuclear transfer. In total, 86.7% (26/30) cell clones were confirmed to have transgenic integration of the markers by polymerase chain reaction, 76.7% (23/30) exhibited fluorescence, but only 40% (12/30) of these fluorescent cell clones had fluorescence in all cell populations. Moreover, through several cell passages, only 20% (6/30) of the cell clones exhibited stable LGFP expression. Seven transgenic cloned offspring were produced from these cells by nuclear transfer. Overall, the reconstructed embryo fusion rate was 76.6%, pregnancy rates at 35 and 60 days were 39.1% and 21.7%, respectively, and the offspring birth rate was 1.4%. There were no significant differences between nuclear transfer with dual versus a single (Neo) marker (overall, 73.8% embryo fusion rate, 53.8% and 26.9% pregnancy rates, and 1.9% birth rate with five offspring). In conclusion, the use of LGFP/Neo dual markers and an optimized selection procedure reliably screened genetically modified donor cells, excluded pseudotransgenic cells, and led to production of human lactoferrin transgenic goats. Furthermore, the LGFP/Neo markers had no adverse effects on the efficiency of somatic cell nuclear transfer.

  11. Low-Dose Total Body Irradiation and Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Lymphocyte Infusion in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Multiple Myeloma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-24

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  12. Infections after Transplantation of Bone Marrow or Peripheral Blood Stem Cells from Unrelated Donors.

    PubMed

    Young, Jo-Anne H; Logan, Brent R; Wu, Juan; Wingard, John R; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Mudrick, Cathryn; Knust, Kristin; Horowitz, Mary M; Confer, Dennis L; Dubberke, Erik R; Pergam, Steven A; Marty, Francisco M; Strasfeld, Lynne M; Brown, Janice Wes M; Langston, Amelia A; Schuster, Mindy G; Kaul, Daniel R; Martin, Stanley I; Anasetti, Claudio

    2016-02-01

    Infection is a major complication of hematopoietic cell transplantation. Prolonged neutropenia and graft-versus-host disease are the 2 major complications with an associated risk for infection, and these complications differ according to the graft source. A phase 3, multicenter, randomized trial (Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network [BMT CTN] 0201) of transplantation of bone marrow (BM) versus peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) from unrelated donors showed no significant differences in 2-year survival between these graft sources. In an effort to provide data regarding whether BM or PBSC could be used as a preferential graft source for transplantation, we report a detailed analysis of the infectious complications for 2 years after transplantation from the BMT CTN 0201 trial. A total of 499 patients in this study had full audits of infection data. A total of 1347 infection episodes of moderate or greater severity were documented in 384 (77%) patients; 201 of 249 (81%) of the evaluable patients had received a BM graft and 183 of 250 (73%) had received a PBSC graft. Of 1347 infection episodes, 373 were severe and 123 were life-threatening and/or fatal; 710 (53%) of these episodes occurred on the BM arm and 637 (47%) on the PBSC arm, resulting in a 2-year cumulative incidence 84.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 79.6 to 89.8) for BM versus 79.7% (95% CI, 73.9 to 85.5) for PBSC, P = .013. The majority of these episodes, 810 (60%), were due to bacteria, with a 2-year cumulative incidence of 72.1% and 62.9% in BM versus PBSC recipients, respectively (P = .003). The cumulative incidence of bloodstream bacterial infections during the first 100 days was 44.8% (95% CI, 38.5 to 51.1) for BM versus 35.0% (95% CI, 28.9 to 41.1) for PBSC (P = .027). The total infection density (number of infection events/100 patient days at risk) was .67 for BM and .60 for PBSC. The overall infection density for bacterial infections was .4 in both arms; for viral infections

  13. Elutriated stem cells derived from the adult bone marrow differentiate into insulin-producing cells in vivo and reverse chemical diabetes.

    PubMed

    Iskovich, Svetlana; Goldenberg-Cohen, Nitza; Stein, Jerry; Yaniv, Isaac; Fabian, Ina; Askenasy, Nadir

    2012-01-01

    An ongoing debate surrounds the existence of stem cells in the adult endowed with capacity to differentiate into multiple lineages. We examined the possibility that adult bone marrow cells participate in recovery from chemical diabetes through neogenesis of insulin-producing cells. Small-sized cells negative for lineage markers derived by counterflow centrifugal elutriation from the bone marrow were transplanted into mice made diabetic with streptozotocin and sublethal irradiation. These cells homed efficiently to the injured islets and contributed to tissue revascularization. Islet-homed CD45-negative donor cells identified by sex chromosomes downregulated GFP, expressed PDX-1 and proinsulin, and converted the hormone precursor to insulin. An estimated 7.6% contribution of newly formed insulin-producing cells to islet cellularity increased serum insulin and stabilized glycemic control starting at 5 weeks post-transplant and persisting for 20 weeks. Newly differentiated cells displayed normal diploid genotype and there was no evidence of fusion between the grafted stem cells or their myeloid progeny and injured β-cells. Considering the extensive functional incorporation of insulin-producing donor cells in the injured islets, we conclude that the adult bone marrow contains a subset of small cells endowed with plastic developmental capacity.

  14. Detection of 549 new HLA alleles in potential stem cell donors from the United States, Poland and Germany.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Frederick, C J; Cereb, N; Giani, A S; Ruppel, J; Maraszek, A; Pingel, J; Sauter, J; Schmidt, A H; Yang, S Y

    2016-01-01

    We characterized 549 new human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and class II alleles found in newly registered stem cell donors as a result of high-throughput HLA typing. New alleles include 101 HLA-A, 132 HLA-B, 105 HLA-C, 2 HLA-DRB1, 89 HLA-DQB1 and 120 HLA-DPB1 alleles. Mainly, new alleles comprised single nucleotide variations when compared with homologous sequences. We identified nonsynonymous nucleotide mutations in 70.7% of all new alleles, synonymous variations in 26.4% and nonsense substitutions in 2.9% (null alleles). Some new alleles (55, 10.0%) were found multiple times, HLA-DPB1 alleles being the most frequent among these. Furthermore, as several new alleles were identified in individuals from ethnic minority groups, the relevance of recruiting donors belonging to such groups and the importance of ethnicity data collection in donor centers and registries is highlighted.

  15. Theoretical investigations of metal-free dyes for solar cells: Effects of electron donor and acceptor groups on sensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhanamoorthi, Nachimuthu; Lai, Kuan-Hwa; Taufany, Fadlilatul; Jiang, Jyh-Chiang

    2013-11-01

    The adsorption of different model dyes on the anatase (101) TiO2 surface has been investigated using density functional theory calculations. The main aim of this study is to investigate the effects of different strength of donor and acceptor groups which are substituted in the present organic dyes on the ability of electron injection to the surface. Analysis of the density of states (DOS) demonstrated that the increased strength of the donor and acceptor dyes shifts the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (LUMO) values and decreases the band gap. The strength of the donor and acceptor parts is shown to be effective for the electron injection process. Our present results provide the possibility of the design strategy of dyes to achieve the best dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs).

  16. Solid phase red cell adherence immunoassay for anti-HIV 1: a simple, rapid, and accurate method for donor screening.

    PubMed

    Watson-Williams, E J; Yee, J L; Carlson, J R; Mertens, S C; Holland, P; Sinor, L; Plapp, F V

    1988-01-01

    In technically developed countries in which acquired immunodeficiency syndrome is a risk to the recipients of blood or tissue, it is mandatory to screen the donor for evidence of HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) infection. Current tests, based on enzyme-linked immunoassay, are time-consuming and expensive and as such are unsuitable for developing countries. We describe a second generation test using anti-human IgG coupled to red cells as the indicator of antibody having reacted with test antigen (1). The test is complete within ten minutes, simple to perform and to read and has 100% sensitivity and 99% specificity compared with Western blot. It is ideal for the rapid screening of organ donors and for the screening of blood donors where cost is a major consideration.

  17. Survival after T cell–depleted haploidentical stem cell transplantation is improved using the mother as donor

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Loredana; Mancusi, Antonella; Bernardo, Maria Ester; de Angelis, Claudia; Bucher, Christoph; Locatelli, Franco; Aversa, Franco; Velardi, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    We hypothesized that transplacental leukocyte trafficking during pregnancy, which induces long-term, stable, reciprocal microchimerism in mother and child, might influence outcome of patients with acute leukemia given parental donor haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We analyzed the outcome of 118 patients who received transplants for acute leukemia in 2 centers. Patients received highly T cell–depleted haploidentical grafts after myelo-ablative conditioning. Five-year event-free survival was better in patients who received transplants from the mother than from the father (50.6% ± 7.6% vs 11.1% ± 4.2%; P < .001). Better survival was the result of both reduced incidence of relapse and transplantation-related mortality. The protective effect was seen in both female and male recipients, in both lymphoid and myeloid diseases; it was more evident in patients receiving transplants in remission than in chemotherapy-resistant relapse. Incidences of rejection and acute graft-versus-host disease were not significantly influenced. Multivariate analysis confirmed donor sex in parental donor transplantation as an independent prognostic factor for survival (hazard ratio, father vs mother = 2.36; P = .003). In contrast, in a control cohort of patients who received transplants from haploidentical siblings, donor sex had no influence on outcome. Although obtained in a retrospective analysis, these data suggest that the mother of the patient should be preferred as donor for haploidentical HSCT. PMID:18492955

  18. Standardized surgical techniques for adult living donor liver transplantation using a modified right lobe graft: a video presentation from bench to reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Shin; Ha, Tae-Yong; Ahn, Chul-Soo; Moon, Deok-Bog; Kim, Ki-Hun; Song, Gi-Won; Jung, Dong-Hwan; Park, Gil-Chun; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-08-01

    After having experienced more than 2,000 cases of adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), we established the concepts of right liver graft standardization. Right liver graft standardization intends to provide hemodynamics-based and regeneration-compliant reconstruction of vascular inflow and outflow. Right liver graft standardization consists of the following components: Right hepatic vein reconstruction includes a combination of caudal-side deep incision and patch venoplasty of the graft right hepatic vein to remove the acute angle between the graft right hepatic vein and the inferior vena cava; middle hepatic vein reconstruction includes interposition of a uniform-shaped conduit with large-sized homologous or prosthetic grafts; if the inferior right hepatic vein is present, its reconstruction includes funneling and unification venoplasty for multiple short hepatic veins; if donor portal vein anomaly is present, its reconstruction includes conjoined unification venoplasty for two or more portal vein orifices. This video clip that shows the surgical technique from bench to reperfusion was a case presentation of adult LDLT using a modified right liver graft from the patient's son. Our intention behind proposing the concept of right liver graft standardization is that it can be universally applicable and may guarantee nearly the same outcomes regardless of the surgeon's experience. We believe that this reconstruction model would be primarily applied to a majority of adult LDLT cases. PMID:27621745

  19. Standardized surgical techniques for adult living donor liver transplantation using a modified right lobe graft: a video presentation from bench to reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Tae-Yong; Ahn, Chul-Soo; Moon, Deok-Bog; Kim, Ki-Hun; Song, Gi-Won; Jung, Dong-Hwan; Park, Gil-Chun; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    After having experienced more than 2,000 cases of adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), we established the concepts of right liver graft standardization. Right liver graft standardization intends to provide hemodynamics-based and regeneration-compliant reconstruction of vascular inflow and outflow. Right liver graft standardization consists of the following components: Right hepatic vein reconstruction includes a combination of caudal-side deep incision and patch venoplasty of the graft right hepatic vein to remove the acute angle between the graft right hepatic vein and the inferior vena cava; middle hepatic vein reconstruction includes interposition of a uniform-shaped conduit with large-sized homologous or prosthetic grafts; if the inferior right hepatic vein is present, its reconstruction includes funneling and unification venoplasty for multiple short hepatic veins; if donor portal vein anomaly is present, its reconstruction includes conjoined unification venoplasty for two or more portal vein orifices. This video clip that shows the surgical technique from bench to reperfusion was a case presentation of adult LDLT using a modified right liver graft from the patient's son. Our intention behind proposing the concept of right liver graft standardization is that it can be universally applicable and may guarantee nearly the same outcomes regardless of the surgeon's experience. We believe that this reconstruction model would be primarily applied to a majority of adult LDLT cases. PMID:27621745

  20. Standardized surgical techniques for adult living donor liver transplantation using a modified right lobe graft: a video presentation from bench to reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Shin; Ha, Tae-Yong; Ahn, Chul-Soo; Moon, Deok-Bog; Kim, Ki-Hun; Song, Gi-Won; Jung, Dong-Hwan; Park, Gil-Chun; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-08-01

    After having experienced more than 2,000 cases of adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), we established the concepts of right liver graft standardization. Right liver graft standardization intends to provide hemodynamics-based and regeneration-compliant reconstruction of vascular inflow and outflow. Right liver graft standardization consists of the following components: Right hepatic vein reconstruction includes a combination of caudal-side deep incision and patch venoplasty of the graft right hepatic vein to remove the acute angle between the graft right hepatic vein and the inferior vena cava; middle hepatic vein reconstruction includes interposition of a uniform-shaped conduit with large-sized homologous or prosthetic grafts; if the inferior right hepatic vein is present, its reconstruction includes funneling and unification venoplasty for multiple short hepatic veins; if donor portal vein anomaly is present, its reconstruction includes conjoined unification venoplasty for two or more portal vein orifices. This video clip that shows the surgical technique from bench to reperfusion was a case presentation of adult LDLT using a modified right liver graft from the patient's son. Our intention behind proposing the concept of right liver graft standardization is that it can be universally applicable and may guarantee nearly the same outcomes regardless of the surgeon's experience. We believe that this reconstruction model would be primarily applied to a majority of adult LDLT cases.

  1. IFN-γ Receptor Deficient Donor T cells Mediate Protection from Graft-versus-Host Disease and Preserve Graft-versus-Tumor Responses After Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kai; Hsiao, Hui-Hua; Li, Minghui; Ames, Erik; Bouchlaka, Myriam; Welniak, Lisbeth A.; Hagino, Takeshi; Jagdeo, Jared; Pai, Chien-Chun; Chen, Mingyi; Blazar, Bruce R.; Abedi, Mehrdad; Murphy, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major complication of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). It has been previously reported that lung GVHD severity directly correlates with the expansion of donor Th17 cells in the absence of IFN-γ. However, the consequence of Th17-associated lung GVHD in the presence of IFN-γ has not been well-characterized. In the current study, T cells from IFN-γ receptor knockout (IFN-γR-/-) mice, capable of producing IFN-γ but unable to signal in response to IFN-γ, have been used to further elucidate the role of IFN-γ in GVHD. We found the transfer of donor T cells from either IFN-γR-/- or IFN-γ knockout (IFN-γ-/-) mice resulted in significant increases in donor Th17 cells in the lung. Marked increases in IL4-producing Th2 cells infiltrating the lungs were also observed in the mice of donor IFN-γR-/- T cells. Interestingly, despite the presence of these cells, these mice did not show the severe immune mediated histopathological lung injury observed in mice receiving donor IFN-γ-/- T cells. Increases in lung GVHD did occur in mice with donor IFN-γR-/- T cells when treated in vivo with anti-IFN-γ demonstrating that the cytokine has a protective role on host tissues in GVHD. A survival benefit from acute GVHD was also observed using donor cells from IFN-γR-/-T cells compared with control donors. Importantly, tumor-bearing mice receiving IFN-γR-/- T cells, versus wild-type donor T cells, displayed similar graft-versus tumor (GVT) effects. These results demonstrate the critical role of the IFN-γ on host tissues and cell effector functions in GVHD/GVT. PMID:22778394

  2. Dual Kidney Allocation Score: A Novel Algorithm Utilizing Expanded Donor Criteria for the Allocation of Dual Kidneys in Adults.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Adam P; Price, Thea P; Lieby, Benjamin; Doria, Cataldo

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Dual kidney transplantation (DKT) of expanded-criteria donors is a cost-intensive procedure that aims to increase the pool of available deceased organ donors and has demonstrated equivalent outcomes to expanded-criteria single kidney transplantation (eSKT). The objective of this study was to develop an allocation score based on predicted graft survival from historical dual and single kidney donors. MATERIAL AND METHODS We analyzed United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) data for 1547 DKT and 26 381 eSKT performed between January 1994 and September 2013. We utilized multivariable Cox regression to identify variables independently associated with graft survival in dual and single kidney transplantations. We then derived a weighted multivariable product score from calculated hazard ratios to model the benefit of transplantation as dual kidneys. RESULTS Of 36 donor variables known at the time of listing, 13 were significantly associated with graft survival. The derived dual allocation score demonstrated good internal validity with strong correlation to improved survival in dual kidney transplants. Donors with scores less than 2.1 transplanted as dual kidneys had a worsened median survival of 594 days (24%, p-value 0.031) and donors with scores greater than 3.9 had improved median survival of 1107 days (71%, p-value 0.002). There were 17 733 eSKT (67%) and 1051 DKT (67%) with scores in between these values and no differences in survival (p-values 0.676 and 0.185). CONCLUSIONS We have derived a dual kidney allocation score (DKAS) with good internal validity. Future prospective studies will be required to demonstrate external validity, but this score may help to standardize organ allocation for dual kidney transplantation.

  3. Dual Kidney Allocation Score: A Novel Algorithm Utilizing Expanded Donor Criteria for the Allocation of Dual Kidneys in Adults.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Adam P; Price, Thea P; Lieby, Benjamin; Doria, Cataldo

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Dual kidney transplantation (DKT) of expanded-criteria donors is a cost-intensive procedure that aims to increase the pool of available deceased organ donors and has demonstrated equivalent outcomes to expanded-criteria single kidney transplantation (eSKT). The objective of this study was to develop an allocation score based on predicted graft survival from historical dual and single kidney donors. MATERIAL AND METHODS We analyzed United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) data for 1547 DKT and 26 381 eSKT performed between January 1994 and September 2013. We utilized multivariable Cox regression to identify variables independently associated with graft survival in dual and single kidney transplantations. We then derived a weighted multivariable product score from calculated hazard ratios to model the benefit of transplantation as dual kidneys. RESULTS Of 36 donor variables known at the time of listing, 13 were significantly associated with graft survival. The derived dual allocation score demonstrated good internal validity with strong correlation to improved survival in dual kidney transplants. Donors with scores less than 2.1 transplanted as dual kidneys had a worsened median survival of 594 days (24%, p-value 0.031) and donors with scores greater than 3.9 had improved median survival of 1107 days (71%, p-value 0.002). There were 17 733 eSKT (67%) and 1051 DKT (67%) with scores in between these values and no differences in survival (p-values 0.676 and 0.185). CONCLUSIONS We have derived a dual kidney allocation score (DKAS) with good internal validity. Future prospective studies will be required to demonstrate external validity, but this score may help to standardize organ allocation for dual kidney transplantation. PMID:27605410

  4. Adult equine bone marrow stromal cells produce a cartilage-like ECM mechanically superior to animal-matched adult chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kopesky, P W; Lee, H-Y; Vanderploeg, E J; Kisiday, J D; Frisbie, D D; Plaas, A H K; Ortiz, C; Grodzinsky, A J

    2010-06-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the age-dependent mechanical phenotype of bone marrow stromal cell- (BMSC-) and chondrocyte-produced cartilage-like neo-tissue and to elucidate the matrix-associated mechanisms which generate this phenotype. Cells from both immature (2-4 month-old foals) and skeletally-mature (2-5 year-old adults) mixed-breed horses were isolated from animal-matched bone marrow and cartilage tissue, encapsulated in self-assembling-peptide hydrogels, and cultured with and without TGF-beta1 supplementation. BMSCs and chondrocytes from both donor ages were encapsulated with high viability. BMSCs from both ages produced neo-tissue with higher mechanical stiffness than that produced by either young or adult chondrocytes. Young, but not adult, chondrocytes proliferated in response to TGF-beta1 while BMSCs from both age groups proliferated with TGF-beta1. Young chondrocytes stimulated by TGF-beta1 accumulated ECM with 10-fold higher sulfated-glycosaminoglycan content than adult chondrocytes and 2-3-fold higher than BMSCs of either age. The opposite trend was observed for hydroxyproline content, with BMSCs accumulating 2-3-fold more than chondrocytes, independent of age. Size-exclusion chromatography of extracted proteoglycans showed that an aggrecan-like peak was the predominant sulfated proteoglycan for all cell types. Direct measurement of aggrecan core protein length and chondroitin sulfate chain length by single molecule atomic force microscopy imaging revealed that, independent of age, BMSCs produced longer core protein and longer chondroitin sulfate chains, and fewer short core protein molecules than chondrocytes, suggesting that the BMSC-produced aggrecan has a phenotype more characteristic of young tissue than chondrocyte-produced aggrecan. Aggrecan ultrastructure, ECM composition, and cellular proliferation combine to suggest a mechanism by which BMSCs produce a superior cartilage-like neo-tissue than either young or adult chondrocytes. PMID:20153827

  5. Highly variable individual donor cell fates characterize robust horizontal gene transfer of an integrative and conjugative element

    PubMed Central

    Delavat, François; Mitri, Sara; Pelet, Serge; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2016-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer is an important evolutionary mechanism for bacterial adaptation. However, given the typical low transfer frequencies in a bacterial population, little is known about the fate and interplay of donor cells and the mobilized DNA during transfer. Here we study transfer of an integrative and conjugative element (ICE) among individual live bacterial cells. ICEs are widely distributed mobile DNA elements that are different than plasmids because they reside silent in the host chromosome and are maintained through vertical descent. Occasionally, ICEs become active, excise, and transmit their DNA to a new recipient, where it is reintegrated. We develop a fluorescent tool to differentiate excision, transfer, and reintegration of a model ICE named ICEclc (for carrying the clc genes for chlorocatechol metabolism) among single Pseudomonas cells by using time-lapse microscopy. We find that ICEclc activation is initiated in stationary phase cells, but excision and transfer predominantly occur only when such cells have been presented with new nutrients. Donors with activated ICE develop a number of different states, characterized by reduced cell division rates or growth arrest, persistence, or lysis, concomitant with ICE excision, and likely, ICE loss or replication. The donor cell state transitions can be described by using a stochastic model, which predicts that ICE fitness is optimal at low initiation rates in stationary phase. Despite highly variable donor cell fates, ICE transfer is remarkably robust overall, with 75% success after excision. Our results help to better understand ICE behavior and shed a new light on bacterial cellular differentiation during horizontal gene transfer. PMID:27247406

  6. Highly variable individual donor cell fates characterize robust horizontal gene transfer of an integrative and conjugative element.

    PubMed

    Delavat, François; Mitri, Sara; Pelet, Serge; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2016-06-14

    Horizontal gene transfer is an important evolutionary mechanism for bacterial adaptation. However, given the typical low transfer frequencies in a bacterial population, little is known about the fate and interplay of donor cells and the mobilized DNA during transfer. Here we study transfer of an integrative and conjugative element (ICE) among individual live bacterial cells. ICEs are widely distributed mobile DNA elements that are different than plasmids because they reside silent in the host chromosome and are maintained through vertical descent. Occasionally, ICEs become active, excise, and transmit their DNA to a new recipient, where it is reintegrated. We develop a fluorescent tool to differentiate excision, transfer, and reintegration of a model ICE named ICEclc (for carrying the clc genes for chlorocatechol metabolism) among single Pseudomonas cells by using time-lapse microscopy. We find that ICEclc activation is initiated in stationary phase cells, but excision and transfer predominantly occur only when such cells have been presented with new nutrients. Donors with activated ICE develop a number of different states, characterized by reduced cell division rates or growth arrest, persistence, or lysis, concomitant with ICE excision, and likely, ICE loss or replication. The donor cell state transitions can be described by using a stochastic model, which predicts that ICE fitness is optimal at low initiation rates in stationary phase. Despite highly variable donor cell fates, ICE transfer is remarkably robust overall, with 75% success after excision. Our results help to better understand ICE behavior and shed a new light on bacterial cellular differentiation during horizontal gene transfer. PMID:27247406

  7. Adult Mouse Cortical Cell Taxonomy by Single Cell Transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Tasic, Bosiljka; Menon, Vilas; Nguyen, Thuc Nghi; Kim, Tae Kyung; Jarsky, Tim; Yao, Zizhen; Levi, Boaz; Gray, Lucas T.; Sorensen, Staci A.; Dolbeare, Tim; Bertagnolli, Darren; Goldy, Jeff; Shapovalova, Nadiya; Parry, Sheana; Lee, Changkyu; Smith, Kimberly; Bernard, Amy; Madisen, Linda; Sunkin, Susan M.; Hawrylycz, Michael; Koch, Christof; Zeng, Hongkui

    2016-01-01

    Nervous systems are composed of various cell types, but the extent of cell type diversity is poorly understood. Here, we construct a cellular taxonomy of one cortical region, primary visual cortex, in adult mice based on single cell RNA-sequencing. We identify 49 transcriptomic cell types including 23 GABAergic, 19 glutamatergic and seven non-neuronal types. We also analyze cell-type specific mRNA processing and characterize genetic access to these transcriptomic types by many transgenic Cre lines. Finally, we show that some of our transcriptomic cell types display specific and differential electrophysiological and axon projection properties, thereby confirming that the single cell transcriptomic signatures can be associated with specific cellular properties. PMID:26727548

  8. Adult mouse cortical cell taxonomy revealed by single cell transcriptomics.

    PubMed

    Tasic, Bosiljka; Menon, Vilas; Nguyen, Thuc Nghi; Kim, Tae Kyung; Jarsky, Tim; Yao, Zizhen; Levi, Boaz; Gray, Lucas T; Sorensen, Staci A; Dolbeare, Tim; Bertagnolli, Darren; Goldy, Jeff; Shapovalova, Nadiya; Parry, Sheana; Lee, Changkyu; Smith, Kimberly; Bernard, Amy; Madisen, Linda; Sunkin, Susan M; Hawrylycz, Michael; Koch, Christof; Zeng, Hongkui

    2016-02-01

    Nervous systems are composed of various cell types, but the extent of cell type diversity is poorly understood. We constructed a cellular taxonomy of one cortical region, primary visual cortex, in adult mice on the basis of single-cell RNA sequencing. We identified 49 transcriptomic cell types, including 23 GABAergic, 19 glutamatergic and 7 non-neuronal types. We also analyzed cell type-specific mRNA processing and characterized genetic access to these transcriptomic types by many transgenic Cre lines. Finally, we found that some of our transcriptomic cell types displayed specific and differential electrophysiological and axon projection properties, thereby confirming that the single-cell transcriptomic signatures can be associated with specific cellular properties.

  9. Total Body Irradiation-Based Myeloablative Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation Is a Safe and Effective Alternative to Unrelated Donor Transplantation in Patients Without Matched Sibling Donors.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Scott R; Sizemore, Connie A; Sanacore, Melissa; Zhang, Xu; Brown, Stacey; Holland, H Kent; Morris, Lawrence E; Bashey, Asad

    2015-07-01

    We enrolled 30 patients on a prospective phase II trial utilizing a total body irradiation (TBI)-based myeloablative preparative regimen (fludarabine 30 mg/m2/day × 3 days and TBI 150 cGy twice per day on day -4 to -1 [total dose 1200 cGy]) followed by infusion of unmanipulated peripheral blood stem cells from a haploidentical family donor (haplo). Postgrafting immunosuppression consisted of cyclophosphamide 50 mg/kg/day on days 3 and 4, mycophenolate mofetil through day 35, and tacrolimus through day 180. Median patient age was 46.5 years (range, 24 to 60). Transplantation diagnosis included acute myelogenous leukemia (n = 16), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n = 6), chronic myelogenous leukemia (n = 5), myelodysplastic syndrome (n = 1), and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (n = 2). Using the Dana Farber/Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research/Disease Risk Index (DRI), patients were classified as low (n = 4), intermediate (n = 12), high (n = 11), and very high (n = 3) risk. All patients engrafted with a median time to neutrophil and platelet recovery of 16 and 25 days, respectively. All evaluable patients achieved sustained complete donor T cell and myeloid chimerism by day +30. Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) grades II to IV and III and IV was seen in 43% and 23%, respectively. The cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD was 56% (severe in 10%). After a median follow-up of 24 months, the estimated 2-year overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), nonrelapse mortality, and relapse rate were 78%, 73%, 3%, and 24%, respectively. Two-year DFS and relapse rate in patients with low/intermediate risk disease was 100% and 0%, respectively, compared with 39% and 53% for patients with high/very high risk disease. When compared with a contemporaneously treated cohort of patients at our institution receiving myeloablative HLA-matched unrelated donor (MUD) transplantation (acute myelogenous leukemia [n = 17], acute lymphoblastic leukemia [n = 15

  10. Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-15

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Erythroid Leukemia in Remission; Acute Leukemia in Remission; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With FLT3/ITD Mutation; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(3)(q21q26.2) or t(3;3)(q21;q26.2); RPN1-EVI1; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(3)(q21q26.2); RPN1-EVI1; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(6;9)(p23;q34); DEK-NUP214; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission; B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(1;19)(q23;p13.3); E2A-PBX1 (TCF3-PBX1); B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission; DS Stage II Plasma Cell Myeloma; DS Stage III Plasma Cell Myeloma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  11. Ovarian adult stem cells: hope or pitfall?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    For many years, ovarian biology has been based on the dogma that oocytes reserve in female mammals included a finite number, established before or at birth and it is determined by the number and quality of primordial follicles developed during the neonatal period. The restricted supply of oocytes in adult female mammals has been disputed in recent years by supporters of postnatal neo-oogenesis. Recent experimental data showed that ovarian surface epithelium and cortical tissue from both mouse and human were proved to contain very low proportion of cells able to propagate themselves, but also to generate immature oocytes in vitro or in vivo, when transplanted into immunodeficient mice ovaries. By mentioning several landmarks of ovarian stem cell reserve and addressing the exciting perspective of translation into clinical practice as treatment for infertility pathologies, the purpose of this article is to review the knowledge about adult mammalian ovarian stem cells, a topic that, since the first approach quickly attracted the attention of both the scientific media and patients. PMID:25018783

  12. An Obvious Improvement in the Performance of Ternary Organic Solar Cells with "Guest" Donor Present at the "Host" Donor/Acceptor Interface.

    PubMed

    Bi, Peng-Qing; Wu, Bo; Zheng, Fei; Xu, Wei-Long; Yang, Xiao-Yu; Feng, Lin; Zhu, Furong; Hao, Xiao-Tao

    2016-09-01

    A small-molecule material, 7,7-(4,4-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-4H-silolo[3,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-2,6-diyl)bis(6-fluoro-4-(5'-hexyl-[2,2'-bithiophen]-5-yl)benzo-[c] [1,2,5]thiadiazole) (p-DTS(FBTTH2)2), was used to modify the morphology and electron-transport properties of the polymer blend of poly(3-hexythiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) bulk heterojunctions. As a result, a 24% increase in the power-conversion efficiency (PCE) of the p-DTS(FBTTH2)2:P3HT:PC71BM ternary organic solar cells (OSCs) is obtained. The improvement in the performance of OSCs is attributed to the constructive energy cascade path in the ternary system that benefits an efficient Förster resonance energy/charge transfer process between P3HT and p-DTS(FBTTH2)2, thereby improving photocurrent generation. It is shown that p-DTS(FBTTH2)2 molecules engage themselves at the P3HT/PC71BM interface. A combination of absorption enhancement, efficient energy transfer process, and ordered nanomorphology in the ternary system favors exciton dissociation and charge transportation in the polymer bulk heterojunction. The finding of this work reveals that distribution of the appropriate "guest" donor at the "host" donor/acceptor interface is an effective approach for attaining high-performance OSCs. PMID:27525544

  13. Quantitative & qualitative analysis of endothelial cells of donor cornea before & after penetrating keratoplasty in different pathological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Aruna K.R.; Gupta, Roopam K.R.

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Endothelial cells of the donor cornea are known to be affected quantitatively and qualitatively in different pathological conditions after penetrating keratoplasty (PK) and this has direct effect on the clarity of vision obtained after PK. This study was undertaken to analyze the qualitative and quantitative changes in donor endothelial cells before and after PK in different pathological conditions. Methods: A prospective investigational analysis of 100 consecutive donor corneas used for penetrating keratoplasty between June 2006 and June 2008, was conducted. The patients were evaluated on the first day, at the end of first week, first month, third and six months and one year. Results: A decrease was observed in endothelial cell count in all pathological conditions. After one year of follow up the loss was 33.1 per cent in corneal opacity, 45.9 per cent in acute infective keratitis (AIK), 58.5 per cent in regrafts, 28.5 per cent in pseudophakic bullous keratopathy (PBK), 37 per cent in descemetocele, 27 per cent in keratoconus and 35.5 per cent in aphakic bullous keratopathy (ABK) cases. Interpretation & conclusions: The endothelial cell loss was highest in regraft cases which was significant (P<0.05), while the least endothelial cell loss was seen in keratoconus cases. The cell loss was associated with increase in coefficient of variation (CV), i.e. polymegathism and pleomorphism. Inspite of this polymegathism and pleomorphism, the clarity of the graft was maintained. PMID:27121519

  14. Costimulated tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes are a feasible and safe alternative donor cell therapy for relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fellowes, Vicki; Rose, Jeremy J.; Odom, Jeanne; Pittaluga, Stefania; Steinberg, Seth M.; Blacklock-Schuver, Bazetta; Avila, Daniele N.; Memon, Sarfraz; Kurlander, Roger J.; Khuu, Hahn M.; Stetler-Stevenson, Maryalice; Mena, Esther; Dwyer, Andrew J.; Levine, Bruce L.; June, Carl H.; Reshef, Ran; Vonderheide, Robert H.; Gress, Ronald E.; Fowler, Daniel H.; Hakim, Frances T.; Bishop, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI), a standard relapse treatment after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (AlloSCT), has limited efficacy and often triggers GVHD. We hypothesized that after AlloSCT tumor-infiltrating donor lymphocytes could be costimulated ex vivo to preferentially activate/expand antitumor effectors. We tested the feasibility and safety of costimulated, tumor-derived donor lymphocyte (TDL) infusion in a phase 1 trial. Tumor was resected from 8 patients with B-cell malignancy progression post-AlloSCT; tumor cell suspensions were costimulated with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 Ab-coated magnetic beads and cultured to generate TDL products for each patient. Costimulation yielded increased proportions of T-bet+FoxP3− type 1 effector donor T cells. A median of 2.04 × 107 TDL/kg was infused; TDLs were well tolerated, notably without GVHD. Two transient positron emission tomography (PET) responses and 2 mixed responses were observed in these refractory tumors. TDL are a feasible, tolerable, and novel donor cell therapy alternative for relapse after AlloSCT. This trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov as no. NCT00445666. PMID:22289893

  15. Loss of B7-H1 expression by recipient parenchymal cells leads to expansion of infiltrating donor CD8+ T cells and persistence of GVHD

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofan; Deng, Ruishu; He, Wei; Liu, Can; Wang, Miao; Young, James; Meng, Zhipeng; Du, Chantal; Huang, Wendong; Chen, Lieping; Chen, Yuan-Zhong; Martin, Paul; Forman, Stephen; Zeng, Defu

    2013-01-01

    Previous experimental studies have shown that acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is associated with two waves of donor CD8+ T cell expansion. In the current studies, we used in vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI), in vivo BrdU-labeling, and three different experimental GVHD systems to show that B7-H1 expression by recipient parenchymal cells controls the second wave of alloreactive donor CD8+ T cell expansion and the associated second phase of GVHD. Loss of B7-H1 expression by parenchymal cells during the course of GVHD was associated with persistent proliferation of donor CD8+ T cells in GVHD target tissues and continued tissue injury, whereas persistent expression of B7-H1 expression by parenchymal cells led to reduced proliferation of donor CD8+ T cells in GVHD target tissues and resolution of GVHD. These studies demonstrate that parenchymal cell expression of B7-H1 is required for tolerizing infiltrating T cells and preventing the persistence of GVHD. Our results suggest that therapies designed to preserve or restore expression of B7-H1 expression by parenchymal tissues in the recipient could prevent or ameliorate GVHD in humans. PMID:22156590

  16. Safety of in vitro amplified HLA-haploidentical donor immune cell infusions for childhood malignancies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fei; Sun, Xiao-Fei; Li, Yong-Qiang; Zhen, Zi-Jun; Zheng, Hai-Xia; Zhu, Jia; Wang, Qi-Jing; Lu, Su-Ying; He, Jia; Wang, Juan; Pan, Ke; Cai, Rui-Qing; Chen, Yan; Weng, De-Sheng; Sun, Fei-Fei; Xia, Jian-Chuan

    2013-12-01

    In vitro amplified human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-haploidentical donor immune cell infusion (HDICI) is not commonly used in children. Therefore, our study sought to evaluate its safety for treating childhood malignancies. Between September 2011 and September 2012, 12 patients with childhood malignancies underwent HDICI in Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center. The median patient age was 5.1 years (range, 1.7-8.4 years). Of the 12 patients, 9 had high-risk neuroblastoma (NB) [7 showed complete response (CR), 1 showed partial response (PR), and 1 had progressive disease (PD) after multi-modal therapies], and 3 had Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-LPD). The 12 patients underwent a total of 92 HDICIs at a mean dose of 1.6×10(8) immune cells/kg body weight: 71 infusions with natural killer (NK) cells, 8 with cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells, and 13 with cascade primed immune cells (CAPRIs); 83 infusions with immune cells from the mothers, whereas 9 with cells from the fathers. Twenty cases (21.7%) of fever, including 6 cases (6.5%) accompanied with chills and 1 (1.1%) with febrile convulsion, occurred during infusions and were alleviated after symptomatic treatments. Five cases (5.4%) of mild emotion changes were reported. No other adverse events occurred during and after the completion of HDIDIs. Neither acute nor chronic graft versus host disease (GVHD) was observed following HDICIs. After a median of 5.0 months (range, 1.0-11.5 months) of follow-up, the 2 NB patients with PR and PD developed PD during HDICIs. Of the other 7 NB patients in CR, 2 relapsed in the sixth month of HDICIs, and 5 maintained CR with disease-free survival (DFS) ranging from 4.5 to 11.5 months (median, 7.2 months). One EBV-LPD patient achieved PR, whereas 2 had stable disease (SD). Our results show that HDICI is a safe immunotherapy for childhood malignancies, thus warranting further studies.

  17. Methyl Donor Deficiency Affects Fetal Programming of Gastric Ghrelin Cell Organization and Function in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Bossenmeyer-Pourié, Carine; Blaise, Sébastien; Pourié, Grégory; Tomasetto, Catherine; Audonnet, Sandra; Ortiou, Sandrine; Koziel, Violette; Rio, Marie-Christine; Daval, Jean-Luc; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Beck, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Methyl donor deficiency (MDD) during pregnancy influences intrauterine development. Ghrelin is expressed in the stomach of fetuses and influences fetal growth, but MDD influence on gastric ghrelin is unknown. We examined the gastric ghrelin system in MDD-induced intrauterine growth retardation. By using specific markers and approaches (such as periodic acid–Schiff, bromodeoxyuridine, homocysteine, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick end labeling, immunostaining, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction), we studied the gastric oxyntic mucosa cellular organization and ghrelin gene expression in the mucosa in 20-day-old fetuses and weanling pups, and plasma ghrelin concentration in weanling rat pups of dams either normally fed or deprived of choline, folate, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 during gestation and suckling periods. MDD fetuses weighed less than controls; the weight deficit reached 57% at weaning (P < 0.001). Both at the end of gestation and at weaning, they presented with an aberrant gastric oxyntic mucosa formation with loss of cell polarity, anarchic cell migration, abnormal progenitor differentiation, apoptosis, and signs of surface layer erosion. Ghrelin cells were abnormally located in the pit region of oxyntic glands. At weaning, plasma ghrelin levels were decreased (−28%; P < 0.001) despite unchanged mRNA expression in the stomach. This decrease was associated with lower body weight. Taken together, these data indicate that one mechanism through which MDD influences fetal programming is the remodeling of gastric cellular organization, leading to dysfunction of the ghrelin system and dramatic effects on growth. PMID:19948829

  18. Venous Outflow Reconstruction in Adult Living Donor Liver Transplant: Outcome of a Policy for Right Lobe Grafts without the Middle Hepatic Vein

    PubMed Central

    Badawy, Mohamad T.; Soliman, Hosam El-Din; El-Gendy, Magdy; Ibrahim, Tarek; Davidson, Brian R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. The difficulty and challenge of recovering a right lobe graft without MHV drainage is reconstructing the outflow tract of the hepatic veins. With the inclusion or the reconstruction of the MHV, early graft function is satisfactory. The inclusion of the MHV or not in the donor's right lobectomy should be based on sound criteria to provide adequate functional liver mass for recipient, while keeping risk to donor to the minimum. Objective. Reviewing the results of a policy for right lobe grafts transplant without MHV and analyzing methods of venous reconstruction related to outcome. Materials and Methods. We have two groups Group A (with more than one HV anast.) (n = 16) and Group B (single HV anast.) (n = 24). Both groups were compared regarding indications for reconstruction, complications, and operative details and outcomes, besides describing different modalities used for venous reconstruction. Results. Significant increase in operative details time in Group A. When comparison came to complications and outcomes in terms of laboratory findings and overall hospital stay, there were no significant differences. Three-month and one-year survival were better in Group A. Conclusion. Adult LDLT is safely achieved with better outcome to recipients and donors by recovering the right lobe without MHV, provided that significant MHV tributaries (segments V, VIII more than 5 mm) are reconstructed, and any accessory considerable inferior right hepatic veins (IRHVs) or superficial RHVs are anastomosed. PMID:24489434

  19. Determination of Eligibility in Related Pediatric Hematopoietic Cell Donors: Ethical and Clinical Considerations. Recommendations from a Working Group of the Worldwide Network for Blood and Marrow Transplantation Association.

    PubMed

    Bitan, Menachem; van Walraven, Suzanna M; Worel, Nina; Ball, Lynne M; Styczynski, Jan; Torrabadella, Marta; Witt, Volker; Shaw, Bronwen E; Seber, Adriana; Yabe, Hiromasa; Greinix, Hildegard T; Peters, Christina; Gluckman, Eliane; Rocha, Vanderson; Halter, Joerg; Pulsipher, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Related donors for hematopoietic cell (HC) transplantation are a growing population in recent years because of expanding indications for allogeneic transplantation. The safety and welfare of the donor are major concerns for the transplantation community, especially for related sibling donors of young recipients who are children and, thus, not able to fully consent. Because donation of HC does not improve the donor's own physical health and carries a risk of side effects, careful assessment of medical risks specific to the individual donor, as well as consideration of ethical and legal aspects associated with donation from a child, must be considered. In addition, donor centers must balance the needs of both the donor and the recipient, understanding the inherent conflict parents may have as they can be overly focused on the very sick child receiving a transplant, rather than on the relatively less significant health or emotional problems that a sibling donor may have, which could impact risk with donation. Likewise, consideration must be made regarding the nature of the relationship of the sibling donor to the recipient and also aspects of performing research on pediatric HC donors. In this article, as members of the Donor Issues Committee of the Worldwide Network for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, we review key ethical concerns associated with pediatric donation and then give recommendations for screening potential child donors with underlying health conditions. These recommendations are aimed at protecting the physical and emotional well-being of childhood donors and arise out of the Third International Conference on Health and Safety of Donors sponsored by the Worldwide Network for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. PMID:26307344

  20. Donor-derived peripheral mononuclear cell DNA is associated with stable kidney allograft function: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Solgi, Ghasem; Mytilineos, Joannis; Gadi, Vijayakrishna; Paul, Biswajit; Pourmand, Gholamreza; Mehrsai, Abdolrasoul; Nikbin, Behrouz; Amirzargar, Ali Akbar

    2011-01-01

    A large body of literature has documented an inconsistent relationship of peripheral donor cell chimerism with alloimmune tolerance following kidney transplantation. We revisit this association with assays capable of quantifying cellular microchimerism with 150-1500-fold greater sensitivity than previously utilized allo-antibody based flow cytometric approaches. Forty renal transplant patients, 20 with concurrent donor bone marrow infusion (DBMI) and 20 control participants without infusion were prospectively monitored for peripheral blood microchimerism using donor polymorphism-specific quantitative real-time PCR. Thirty-eight patients were evaluated for microchimerism, 19 in each group. The frequency of testing positive for (95% vs. 58%, p = 0.02) and mean concentrations of microchimerism (115 ± 66 vs. 13 ± 3 donor genomes/million recipient genomes, p = 0.007), respectively, were higher in infused patients compared with controls. Thirty-one patients maintained stable graft function; 17 in the DBMI group vs. 14 in controls. Patients with stable graft function in the DBMI group compared with control patients harbored microchimerism more frequently (94 vs. 50%, p = 0.01) and at higher concentrations (123 ± 67 vs. 11 ± 4, p = 0.007), respectively. Significant correlation between dose of infused cells and microchimerism levels was found post-transplant (p = 0.01). Using very sensitive assays, our findings demonstrate associations between the presence and quantity of microchimerism with stable graft function in infused patients.

  1. Role of the liver in determining alloimmune response in vitro following donor-specific spleen cell injection.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, Masaki; Nagano, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Shogo; He, Li; Ota, Hirofumi; Shimizu, Junzo; Takeda, Yutaka; Masrubashi, Shigeru; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Tanemuea, Masahiro; Dono, Keizo; Sakon, Masato; Umeshita, Koji; Gotoh, Mitsukazu; Monden, Morito

    2010-02-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the allogeneic influence inside and outside the liver in vitro following donor-specific cell injection (DSI). DA rats (RT1a) were used as donors and WS rats (RT1k) as recipients. WS were sensitized with DA spleen cells, followed 24h later by total hepatectomy. The liver was transplanted into another WS (sensitized liver-grafted; SL-Grafted). The hepatectomized WS underwent liver transplantation from a naive WS (sensitized liver-removed; SL-Removed). Alloantigens accumulated in the liver in SL-Grafted and in the extrahepatic tissue/organ(s) in SL-Removed. DA hearts were transplanted 10days after antigen administration. To analyze the immune responses, we measured Th1/Th2 cytokine profiles, and perforin mRNA in various organs, allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR), and donor-specific immunoglobulin. Th1 cytokine levels in the liver of SL-Grafted and in spleen of SL-Removed were highly and rapidly upregulated but decreased thereafter. IFN-gamma and perforin mRNAs were significantly higher in SL-Grafted and lower in SL-Removed. MLR was significantly higher in SL-Grafted than SL-Removed and controls. There was no significant difference in the donor-specific immunoglobulin level. Our findings suggest that liver and other organs may behave differently to alloantigen, suggesting the importance of an early Th1 reaction in the liver and spleen.

  2. Effect of blood bank storage on the rheological properties of male and female donor red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Daly, Amanda; Raval, Jay S; Waters, Jonathan H; Yazer, Mark H; Kameneva, Marina V

    2014-01-01

    It was previously demonstrated that red blood cell (RBC) deformability progressively decreases during storage along with other changes in RBC mechanical properties. Recently, we reported that the magnitude of changes in RBC mechanical fragility associated with blood bank storage in a variety of additive solutions was strongly dependent on the donor gender [15]. Yet, the potential dependence of changes in the deformability and relaxation time of stored blood bank RBCs on donor gender is not known. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of donor gender and blood bank storage on RBC deformability and relaxation time through the measurement of RBC suspension viscoelasticity. Packed RBC units preserved in AS-5 solution from 12 male and 12 female donors (three from each ABO group) were obtained from the local blood center and tested at 1, 4 and 7 weeks of storage at 1-6°C. At each time point, samples were aseptically removed from RBC units and hematocrit was adjusted to 40% before assessment of cell suspension viscoelasticity. RBC suspensions from both genders demonstrated progressive increases (p < 0.05) in viscosity, elasticity and relaxation time at equivalent shear rates over seven weeks of storage indicating a decrease in RBC deformability. No statistically significant differences in RBC deformability or relaxation time were observed between male and female RBCs at any storage time. The decrease in RBC deformability during blood bank storage may reduce tissue perfusion and RBC lifespan in patients receiving blood bank RBCs.

  3. Graft-versus-host-related immunosuppression is induced in mixed chimeras by alloresponses against either host or donor lymphohematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Graft-vs.-host (GVH)-related immunosuppression has previously been demonstrated in F1 rodent recipients of parental lymphoid cells, and has been thought to result from an immunologic attack of the donor against the host. Since all cells of such F1 recipients could potentially bear target class I MHC alloantigens, it has not previously been possible to determine precisely the target tissues responsible for development of GVH-related effects. In the present studies we have used mixed allogeneic chimeras as recipients of host or donor-strain lymphocyte inocula, and have made the surprising observation that "GVH- induced" immune unresponsiveness does not require GVH reactivity, per se, but develops in the presence of a one-way alloresponse against lymphohematopoietic cells in either the GVH or the host-versus-graft direction. PMID:3264329

  4. BCL-2 delay apoptosis and PARP cleavage induced by NO donors in GT1-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Bonfoco, E; Zhivotovsky, B; Rossi, A D; Aguilar-Santelises, M; Orrenius, S; Lipton, S A; Nicotera, P

    1996-12-20

    BCL-2 is a negative regulator of cell death in several systems. Here we report that bcl-2 expression protects against apoptosis induced by nitric oxide (NO) donors in GT1-7 hypothalamic cells. BCL-2 significantly inhibited neuronal death caused by 200 microM S-nitroso-cysteine (SNOC), 200 microM S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP), or 1 mM 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1). To explore further the protective mechanism(s) elicited by bcl-2 expression, we investigated whether BCL-2 could prevent NO-induced cleavage of poly-ADP-ribose-polymerase (PARP), which is a substrate for interleukin-1 beta converting enzyme (ICE)-like proteases in apoptosis. Formation of 85 and 25 kDa PARP fragments elicited by NO donors was inhibited in cells over-expressing bcl-2. PMID:9051794

  5. Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Stroke: Challenges and Progress

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Oh Young; Kim, Eun Hee; Cha, Jae Min; Moon, Gyeong Joon

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and physical disability among adults. It has been 15 years since clinical trials of stem cell therapy in patients with stroke have been conducted using adult stem cells like mesenchymal stem cells and bone marrow mononuclear cells. Results of randomized controlled trials showed that adult stem cell therapy was safe but its efficacy was modest, underscoring the need for new stem cell therapy strategies. The primary limitations of current stem cell therapies include (a) the limited source of engraftable stem cells, (b) the presence of optimal time window for stem cell therapies, (c) inherited limitation of stem cells in terms of growth, trophic support, and differentiation potential, and (d) possible transplanted cell-mediated adverse effects, such as tumor formation. Here, we discuss recent advances that overcome these hurdles in adult stem cell therapy for stroke. PMID:27733032

  6. Time-dependent efficiency measurements of donor-acceptor, dye-sensitized polymer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandaccari, Kyle; Chesmore, Grace; Tajalli-Tehrani Valverde, Parisa; Bugaj, Mitchel; McNelis, Brian; Barber, Richard, Jr.

    The fullerene/polymer active layer pairing of PCBM/P3HT has become the model system within the field of polymer solar cell research. A large body of work concerned with reporting improved efficiencies for this system exists, but truly quantitative studies of device lifetime and long-term degradation tendencies are much rarer. Here, we report the effects of two donor-acceptor diazo dye sensitizers on efficiency and lifetime upon addition into the PCBM/P3HT active layer at varied concentrations. The electrical and efficiency measurements were supplemented by time-dependent UV-visible spectroscopy studies and morphology investigations via atomic-force microscopy (AFM). This pairing with spectroscopy offers an internal check on the data as the rate of change in absorbance of the active layer correlates almost exactly to the rate of power conversion efficiency decrease. Additionally, AFM imaging reveals different morphology patterns when dye concentrations and functionalities change. Such observations suggest that such small-molecule sensitizers exert yet undetermined effects on the organization of components within the active layer at the molecular level.

  7. A hybrid electron donor comprising cyclopentadithiophene and dithiafulvenyl for dye-sensitized solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Sorohhov, Gleb; Yi, Chenyi; Grätzel, Michael; Decurtins, Silvio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Two new photosensitizers featured with a cyanoacrylic acid electron acceptor (A) and a hybrid electron donor (D) of cyclopentadithiophene and dithiafulvenyl, either directly linked or separated by a phenyl ring, were synthesized and characterized. Both of them undergo two reversible oxidations and strongly absorb in the visible spectral region due to a photo-induced intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) transition. To a great extent, the electronic interaction between the D and A units is affected by the presence of a phenyl spacer. Without a phenyl ring, the D unit appears more difficult to oxidize due to a strong electron-withdrawing effect of the A moiety. In sharp contrast, the insertion of the phenyl ring between the D and A units leads to a broken π-conjugation and therefore, the oxidation potentials remain almost unchanged compared to those of an analogue without the A group, suggesting that the electronic coupling between D and A units is relatively weak. As a consequence, the lowest-energy absorption band shows a slight hypsochromic shift upon the addition of the phenyl spacer, indicative of an increased HOMO–LUMO gap. In turn, the direct linkage of D and A units leads to an effective π-conjugation, thus substantially lowering the HOMO–LUMO gap. Moreover, the application in dye-sensitized solar cells was investigated, showing that the power conversion efficiency increases by the insertion of the phenyl unit. PMID:26199660

  8. A model utilizing adult murine stem cells for creation of personalized islets for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Song, L J; Gerber, D A; Fair, J H; Rice, L; LaPaglia, M; Andreoni, K A

    2004-05-01

    Clinical islet cell transplantation has demonstrated great promise for diabetes treatment. Two major obstacles are the organ donor shortage and the immunoresponse. The purpose of this study was to create a model using the patient's own adult stem cell sources, possibly in combination with non-self cells, such as pancreatic, hepatic, or embryonic stem cells, to create "personalized" islets. We hypothesize that the reconstructed islets have the normal capability to produce insulin and glucagon with reduced immunoresponses after transplantation. Stem cells are a proliferating population of master cells that have the ability for self-renewal and multilineage differentiation. The recently developed photolithograph-based, biologic, microelectromechanic system (BioMEMS) technique supplies a useful tool for biomedical applications. Our lab has developed a novel method that integrates the adult stem cell and BioMEMS to reconstruct personalized islets. We selected islet-derived progenitor cells (IPC) for repairing and reconstructing STZ-diabetic islets. A6(+)/PYY(+) or A6(+)/ngn3(+) cells were selected to manipulate the neoislets. After 3 to 4 weeks in culture, the reconstructed cells formed islet-like clusters containing insulin or glucagon producing cells. The pilot results showed the ability of these reconstructed islets to correct hyperglycemia when transplanted into a STZ-diabetic isograft mouse model. Although several technical problems remain with the mouse model, namely, the difficulty to collect enough islets from a single mouse because of animal size, the mouse isograft model is suitable for personalized islet development.

  9. Role of regulatory T cells in transferable immunological tolerance to bone marrow donor in murine mixed chimerism model.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Il-Hee; Kim, Yong-Hee; Kim, You-sun; Shin, Jun-Seop; Park, Chung-Gyu

    2013-12-01

    Constructing a bone marrow chimera prior to graft transplantation can induce donor-specific immune tolerance. Mixed chimerism containing hematopoietic cells of both recipient- and donor-origin has advantages attributed from low dose of total body irradiation. In this study, we explored the mechanism of mixed chimerism supplemented with depletion of Natural Killer cells. Mixed chimerism with C57BL/6 bone marrow cells was induced in recipient BALB/c mice which were given 450 cGy of γ-ray irradiation (n = 16). As revealed by reduced proliferation and cytokine production in mixed leukocyte reaction and ELISpot assay (24.6 vs 265.5), the allo-immune response to bone marrow donor was reduced. Furthermore, the induction of transferable immunological tolerance was confirmed by adoptive transfer and subsequent acceptance of C57BL/6 skin graft (n = 4). CD4(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells were increased in the recipient compartment of the mixed chimera (19.2% → 33.8%). This suggests that regulatory T cells may be therapeutically used for the induction of graft-specific tolerance by mixed chimerism.

  10. Donor hyperfine Stark shift and the role of central-cell corrections in tight-binding theory.

    PubMed

    Usman, Muhammad; Rahman, Rajib; Salfi, Joe; Bocquel, Juanita; Voisin, Benoit; Rogge, Sven; Klimeck, Gerhard; Hollenberg, Lloyd L C

    2015-04-22

    Atomistic tight-binding (TB) simulations are performed to calculate the Stark shift of the hyperfine coupling for a single arsenic (As) donor in silicon (Si). The role of the central-cell correction is studied by implementing both the static and the non-static dielectric screenings of the donor potential, and by including the effect of the lattice strain close to the donor site. The dielectric screening of the donor potential tunes the value of the quadratic Stark shift parameter (η2) from -1.3 × 10(-3) µm(2) V(-2) for the static dielectric screening to -1.72 × 10(-3) µm(2) V(-2) for the non-static dielectric screening. The effect of lattice strain, implemented by a 3.2% change in the As-Si nearest-neighbour bond length, further shifts the value of η2 to -1.87 × 10(-3) µm(2) V(-2), resulting in an excellent agreement of theory with the experimentally measured value of -1.9 ± 0.2 × 10(-3) µm(2) V(-2). Based on our direct comparison of the calculations with the experiment, we conclude that the previously ignored non-static dielectric screening of the donor potential and the lattice strain significantly influence the donor wave function charge density and thereby leads to a better agreement with the available experimental data sets. PMID:25783758

  11. Yttrium Y 90 Ibritumomab Tiuxetan, Fludarabine, Radiation Therapy, and Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-21

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  12. Phase 2 clinical trial of rapamycin-resistant donor CD4+ Th2/Th1 (T-Rapa) cells after low-intensity allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Daniel H.; Mossoba, Miriam E.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Halverson, David C.; Stroncek, David; Khuu, Hahn M.; Hakim, Frances T.; Castiello, Luciano; Sabatino, Marianna; Leitman, Susan F.; Mariotti, Jacopo; Gea-Banacloche, Juan C.; Sportes, Claude; Hardy, Nancy M.; Hickstein, Dennis D.; Pavletic, Steven Z.; Rowley, Scott; Goy, Andre; Donato, Michele; Korngold, Robert; Pecora, Andrew; Levine, Bruce L.; June, Carl H.; Gress, Ronald E.; Bishop, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    In experimental models, ex vivo induced T-cell rapamycin resistance occurred independent of T helper 1 (Th1)/T helper 2 (Th2) differentiation and yielded allogeneic CD4+ T cells of increased in vivo efficacy that facilitated engraftment and permitted graft-versus-tumor effects while minimizing graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). To translate these findings, we performed a phase 2 multicenter clinical trial of rapamycin-resistant donor CD4+ Th2/Th1 (T-Rapa) cells after allogeneic-matched sibling donor hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for therapy of refractory hematologic malignancy. T-Rapa cell products, which expressed a balanced Th2/Th1 phenotype, were administered as a preemptive donor lymphocyte infusion at day 14 post-HCT. After T-Rapa cell infusion, mixed donor/host chimerism rapidly converted, and there was preferential immune reconstitution with donor CD4+ Th2 and Th1 cells relative to regulatory T cells and CD8+ T cells. The cumulative incidence probability of acute GVHD was 20% and 40% at days 100 and 180 post-HCT, respectively. There was no transplant-related mortality. Eighteen of 40 patients (45%) remain in sustained complete remission (range of follow-up: 42-84 months). These results demonstrate the safety of this low-intensity transplant approach and the feasibility of subsequent randomized studies to compare T-Rapa cell-based therapy with standard transplantation regimens. This trial was registered at www.cancer.gov/clinicaltrials as #NCT 00077480. PMID:23426943

  13. Suppressor T cells prevent in vitro expression of IgM rheumatoid factor in some healthy adults

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, W.J.

    1981-12-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (MNL) from 11 of 30 healthy adults elaborated detectable IgM RF when stimulated with pokeweed mitogen. The influence of T cells on IgM RF production by autologous B Cells prepared from donors whose unfractionated MNL synthesized IgM RF in response to PMW was investigated. Untreated T cells supported IgM RF production by autologous B cells with optimal synthesis observed at T:B cell ratios of 2:1 at higher T:B cell ratios a decline in IgM RF production occurred. In contrast, at higher T:B cell ratios irradiated T cells supported consistently higher levels of IgM RF production than untreated T cells suggesting the presence of radiosensitive suppressor T cells for IgM RF in these individuals. Irridiated T cells were compared to untreated T cells for capacity to support IgM RF production by autologous B cells from 12 randomly selected donors at T:B cell ratios of 3:1. Untreated T cells from 4 of 12 individuals were capable of cooperating in induction of IgM RF production by autologous B cells, whereas irradiated T cells supported IgM RF production in 6 of 12 individuals. Levels of IgM RF production in all 6 individuals were significantly higher with irradiated T cells than with untreated T cells; in 2 individuals IgM RF synthesis by autologous B cells was observed only in the presence of irradiated T cells. In 4 of 6 individuals increases in the ratio of IgM RF total IgM synthesis occured with irradiated T cells (when compared to untreated T cells), suggesting disproportionate suppression of RF production. These results indicate the presence of radiosensitive T cells capable of suppressing IgM RF production in a significant fraction of healthy adults and raise the possibility that these cells may regulate in vivo expression of RF.

  14. Cytomegalovirus infection-associated fulminant hepatitis in an immunocompetent adult requiring emergency living-donor liver transplantation: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Yu, Young-Dong; Park, Gil-Chun; Park, Pyoung-Jae; Choi, Young-Il; Hwang, Shin; Song, Gi-Won; Jung, Dong-Hwan; Ahn, Chul-Soo; Kim, Ki-Hun; Moon, Deog-Bok; Ha, Tae-Yong; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2013-04-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is usually self-limiting in healthy adults, but it can lead to significant complications. This report presents the case of an immunocompetent adult with fulminant hepatitis caused by a CMV infection requiring emergency living-donor liver transplantation. A 39-year-old female with persistent fever for 6 weeks was referred for fulminant hepatitis, but the underlying etiology was not identified. Rapid deterioration of consciousness led to an emergency living-donor liver transplant using a modified right lobe graft. She showed increasing CMV antigenemia after surgery and the explant liver pathology showed massive hepatic necrosis with positive staining for CMV protein. Treatment with ganciclovir improved the graft liver function and her general condition recovered. This report presents a rare case of CMV-associated fulminant hepatitis which led to emergency liver transplantation. Although CMV is rare, it should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with severe hepatitis, even immunocompetent patients, after other more common etiologies have been excluded.

  15. Adverse events and retention of donors of double red cell units by apheresis

    PubMed Central

    Keshelashvili, Ketevan; O’Meara, Alix; Stern, Martin; Jirout, Zuzana; Pehlic, Vildana; Holbro, Andreas; Buser, Andreas; Sigle, Jörg; Infanti, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background Safety of double-erythrocyte (2RBC) collection and reasons for ceasing 2RBC donation were retrospectively analysed in the blood donor population of Basel, Switzerland. Methods Donors with at least 1 2RBC apheresis were included in the study. Minimal requirements were Hb ≥140 g/L and body weight ≥70 kg; serum ferritin (SF) values were measured routinely, but were not part of the selection criteria. 2RBC collections were performed with ALYX devices at 6-month intervals. Adverse events (AEs) were systematically recorded and classified according to the ISBT EHN 2008 criteria. Data of procedures were retrieved from the ALYX software. Demographics, apheresis data and AEs were analysed with descriptive statistics. Results Data of 4,377 2RBC aphereses performed in 793 donors (779 males) between 1st January 2003 and 31st May 2015 were evaluated. Mean donor age at first 2RBC donation was 44 years (standard deviation [SD] 21), median number of donations was 4 (interquartile range [IQR] 8); 32% of the donors underwent a single procedure. There were 161 AEs, mostly local haematomas (55%) and vasovagal reactions (20%); fatigue was reported in 6% of the cases and was more frequent than citrate toxicity. Two severe AEs were observed. The most frequent reasons for abandoning 2RBC donation were low SF levels and donor choice (both 11%), but most donors simply did not reply to invitations (16%). Overall, procedure-related causes (AEs, low SF levels, no time for apheresis, inadequate venous access) were observed in 14% of the cases. At the end of the observation period, 40% of the donors were still active blood donors, but only 20% were donating 2RBC. Discussion 2RBC donation is overall safe. Donor retention was low over a period of 11 years. An important reason for abandoning 2RBC was the detection of low SF levels. The impact of fatigue on donor retention and the course of iron stores after repeated 6-monthly 2RBC apheresis require further investigation. PMID:27136442

  16. Assessing glomerular filtration rate in healthy adult potential kidney donors in Bangladesh: a comparison of various prediction equations with measured glomerular filtration rate by diethylentriamine pentaacetic acid renogram.

    PubMed

    Jahan, F; Chowdhury, M N U; Mahbub, T; Arafat, S M; Jahan, S; Hossain, M; Khan, M F

    2013-08-01

    To ensure that potential kidney donors in Bangladesh have no renal impairment, it is extremely important to have accurate methods for evaluating the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). We evaluated the performance of serum creatinine based GFR in healthy adult potential kidney donors in Bangladesh to compare GFR determined by DTPA with that determined by various prediction equations. In this study GFR in 61 healthy adult potential kidney donors were measured with 99mTc-diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA) renogram. We also estimated GFR using a four variable equation modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD), Cockcroft-Gault creatinine clearance (CGCrCl), Cockcroft-Gault glomerular filtration rate (CG-GFR). The mean age of study population was 34.31 +/- 9.46 years and out of them 65.6% was male. In this study mean mGFR was 85.4 +/- 14.8. Correlation of estimated GFR calculated by CG-CrCl, CG-GFR and MDRD were done with measured GFR DTPA using quartile. Kappa values were also estimated which was found to be 0.104 for (p = 0.151), 0.336 for (p = 0.001) and 0.125 for (p = 0.091) respectively. This indicates there is no association between estimated GFR calculated by CG-CrCl, CG-GFR, MDRD with measured GFR DTPA. These results show poor performance of these equations in evaluation of renal function among healthy population and also raise question regarding validity of these equations for assessment of renal function in chronic kidney disease in our population.

  17. Clinically relevant RHD-CE genotypes in patients with sickle cell disease and in African Brazilian donors

    PubMed Central

    Gaspardi, Ane C.; Sippert, Emília A.; de Macedo, Mayra Dorigan; Pellegrino, Jordão; Costa, Fernando F.; Castilho, Lilian

    2016-01-01

    Background As a consequence of the homology and opposite orientation of RHD and RHCE, numerous gene rearrangements have occurred in Africans and resulted in altered RH alleles that predict partial antigens, contributing to the high rate of Rh alloimmunisation among patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). In this study, we characterised variant RH alleles encoding partial antigens and/or lacking high prevalence antigens in patients with SCD and in African Brazilian donors, in order to support antigen-matched blood for transfusion. Material and methods RH genotypes were determined in 168 DNA samples from SCD patients and 280 DNA samples from African Brazilian donors. Laboratory developed tests, RHD BeadChipTM, RHCE BeadChipTM, cloning and sequencing were used to determine RHD-CE genotypes among patients and African Brazilian blood donors. Results The distributions of RHD and RHCE alleles in donors and patients were similar. We found RHCE variant alleles inherited with altered RHD alleles in 25 out of 168 patients (15%) and in 22 out of 280 (7.8%) African Brazilian donors. The RHD and RHCE allele combinations found in the population studied were: RHD*DAR with RHCE*ceAR; RHD*weak D type 4.2.2 with RHCE*ceAR, RHD*weak D type 4.0 with RHCE*ceVS.01 and RHCE*ceVS.02; RHD*DIIIa with RHCE*ceVS.02. Thirteen patients and six donors had RHD-CE genotypes with homozygous or compound heterozygous alleles predicting partial antigens and/or lacking high prevalence antigens. Eleven patients were alloimmunised to Rh antigens. For six patients with RHD-CE genotypes predicting partial antigens, no donors with similar genotypes were found. Discussion Knowledge of the distribution and prevalence of RH alleles in patients with SCD and donors of African origin may be important for implementing a programme for RH genotype matching in SCD patients with RH variant alleles and clinically significant Rh antibodies. PMID:27177398

  18. Successful semiallogeneic and allogeneic bone marrow reconstitution of lethally irradiated adult mice mediated by neonatal spleen cells

    SciTech Connect

    LaFace, D.M.; Peck, A.B.

    1987-11-01

    Spleens of fetal/newborn mice less than 3-4 days of age contain a naturally occurring cell population capable of suppressing T-dependent and T-independent immune responses of third-party adult cells both in vitro and in vivo. We have utilized newborn spleen cells to prevent acute graft-versus-host (GVH) disease in lethally irradiated adult hosts reconstituted with semiallogeneic or even allogeneic bone marrow cells. Pretreatment of reconstituting cell populations with newborn spleen cells reduced the incidence of GVH disease from 100% to 20% in semiallogeneic and from 100% to 40% in allogeneic combinations. Long-term-surviving reconstituted hosts proved immunologically unresponsive to both donor and host histocompatibility antigens, yet possessed a fully chimeric lymphoid system responsive to T and B cell mitogens, as well as unrelated third-party alloantigens.

  19. Prolonged renal allograft survival by donor interleukin-6 deficiency: association with decreased alloantibodies and increased intragraft T regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Guan, Qiunong; Lan, Zhu; Li, Shuyuan; Ge, Wei; Chen, Huifang; Nguan, Christopher Y C; Du, Caigan

    2012-01-15

    Both humoral and cellular immune responses are involved in renal allograft rejection. Interleukin (IL)-6 is a regulatory cytokine for both B and Foxp3 (forkhead box P3)-expressing regulatory T (Treg) cells. This study was designed to investigate the impact of donor IL-6 production on renal allograft survival. Donor kidneys from IL-6 knockout (KO) vs. wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice (H-2(b)) were orthotopically transplanted to nephrotomized BALB/c mice (H-2(d)). Alloantibodies and Treg cells were examined by fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis. Graft survival was determined by the time to graft failure. Here, we showed that a deficiency in IL-6 expression in donor kidneys significantly prolonged renal allograft survival compared with WT controls. IL-6 protein was upregulated in renal tubules and endothelium of renal allografts following rejection, which correlated with an increase in serum IL-6 compared with that in those receiving KO grafts or naive controls. The absence of graft-producing IL-6 or lower levels of serum IL-6 in the recipients receiving IL-6 KO allografts was associated with decreased circulating anti-graft alloantibodies and increased the percentage of intragraft CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells compared with those with WT allografts. In conclusion, the lack of graft-producing IL-6 significantly prolongs renal allograft survival, which is associated with reduced alloantibody production and/or increased intragraft Treg cell population, implying that targeting donor IL-6 may effectively prevent both humoral and cellular rejection of kidney transplants.

  20. Influence of somatic cell donor breed on reproductive performance and comparison of prenatal growth in cloned canines.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yeon Woo; Kim, Joung Joo; Hossein, Mohammad Shamim; Hwang, Kyu Chan; Hwang, In-sung; Hyun, Sang Hwan; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Han, Ho Jae; Hwang, Woo Suk

    2014-06-01

    Using in vivo-flushed oocytes from a homogenous dog population and subsequent embryo transfer after nuclear transfer, we studied the effects of donor cells collected from 10 different breeds on cloning efficiency and perinatal development of resulted cloned puppies. The breeds were categorized into four groups according to their body weight: small (≤9 kg), medium (>9-20 kg), large (>20-40 kg), and ultra large (>40 kg). A total of 1611 cloned embryos were transferred into 454 surrogate bitches for production of cloned puppies. No statistically significant differences were observed for initial pregnancy rates at Day 30 of embryo transfer for the donor cells originated from different breeds. However, full-term pregnancy rates were 16.5%, 11.0%, 10.0%, and 7.1% for the donor cells originated from ultra-large breed, large, medium, and small breeds, respectively, where pregnancy rate in the ultra-large group was significantly higher compared with the small breeds (P < 0.01). Perinatal mortality until weaning was significantly higher in small breeds (33.3%) compared with medium, large, or ultra-large breeds where no mortality was observed. The mean birth weight of cloned pups significantly increased proportional to breed size. The highest litter size was examined in ultra-large breeds. There was no correlation between the number of embryo transferred and litter size. Taken together, the efficiency of somatic cell cloning and fetal survival after embryo transfer may be affected significantly by selecting the appropriate genotype.

  1. Microarray Analysis of Cell Cycle Gene Expression in Adult Human Corneal Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ha Thi, Binh Minh; Campolmi, Nelly; He, Zhiguo; Pipparelli, Aurélien; Manissolle, Chloé; Thuret, Jean-Yves; Piselli, Simone; Forest, Fabien; Peoc'h, Michel; Garraud, Olivier; Gain, Philippe; Thuret, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Corneal endothelial cells (ECs) form a monolayer that controls the hydration of the cornea and thus its transparency. Their almost nil proliferative status in humans is responsible, in several frequent diseases, for cell pool attrition that leads to irreversible corneal clouding. To screen for candidate genes involved in cell cycle arrest, we studied human ECs subjected to various environments thought to induce different proliferative profiles compared to ECs in vivo. Donor corneas (a few hours after death), organ-cultured (OC) corneas, in vitro confluent and non-confluent primary cultures, and an immortalized EC line were compared to healthy ECs retrieved in the first minutes of corneal grafts. Transcriptional profiles were compared using a cDNA array of 112 key genes of the cell cycle and analysed using Gene Ontology classification; cluster analysis and gene map presentation of the cell cycle regulation pathway were performed by GenMAPP. Results were validated using qRT-PCR on 11 selected genes. We found several transcripts of proteins implicated in cell cycle arrest and not previously reported in human ECs. Early G1-phase arrest effectors and multiple DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest-associated transcripts were found in vivo and over-represented in OC and in vitro ECs. Though highly proliferative, immortalized ECs also exhibited overexpression of transcripts implicated in cell cycle arrest. These new effectors likely explain the stress-induced premature senescence that characterizes human adult ECs. They are potential targets for triggering and controlling EC proliferation with a view to increasing the cell pool of stored corneas or facilitating mass EC culture for bioengineered endothelial grafts. PMID:24747418

  2. High-Efficiency Nonfullerene Polymer Solar Cell Enabling by Integration of Film-Morphology Optimization, Donor Selection, and Interfacial Engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Li, Weiping; Yao, Jiannian; Zhan, Chuanlang

    2016-06-22

    Carrier mobility is a vital factor determining the electrical performance of organic solar cells. In this paper we report that a high-efficiency nonfullerene organic solar cell (NF-OSC) with a power conversion efficiency of 6.94 ± 0.27% was obtained by optimizing the hole and electron transportations via following judicious selection of polymer donor and engineering of film-morphology and cathode interlayers: (1) a combination of solvent annealing and solvent vapor annealing optimizes the film morphology and hence both hole and electron mobilities, leading to a trade-off of fill factor and short-circuit current density (Jsc); (2) the judicious selection of polymer donor affords a higher hole and electron mobility, giving a higher Jsc; and (3) engineering the cathode interlayer affords a higher electron mobility, which leads to a significant increase in electrical current generation and ultimately the power conversion efficiency (PCE). PMID:27246160

  3. Quinoxaline-based π-conjugated donor polymer for highly efficient organic thin-film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazawa, Daisuke; Watanabe, Nobuhiro; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Tsukamoto, Jun

    2009-08-01

    A quinoxaline-based π-conjugated donor polymer, poly[2,7-(9,9-dioctylfluorene)-alt-5,5-(5',8'-di-2-thienyl-2',3'-diphenylquinoxaline)] (N-P7), was synthesized to achieve a high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of bulk heterojunction (BHJ)-based solar cells. The optical band-gap and highest occupied molecular orbital level of N-P7 were 1.95 and -5.37 eV, respectively. BHJ-based solar cells using N-P7 as a donor and phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester as an acceptor gave a PCE as high as 5.5% under AM 1.5G 100 mW/cm2 illumination. We also investigated the effects of substituent groups of quinoxaline-based polymers on the morphology of the BHJ layer.

  4. High-Efficiency Nonfullerene Polymer Solar Cell Enabling by Integration of Film-Morphology Optimization, Donor Selection, and Interfacial Engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Li, Weiping; Yao, Jiannian; Zhan, Chuanlang

    2016-06-22

    Carrier mobility is a vital factor determining the electrical performance of organic solar cells. In this paper we report that a high-efficiency nonfullerene organic solar cell (NF-OSC) with a power conversion efficiency of 6.94 ± 0.27% was obtained by optimizing the hole and electron transportations via following judicious selection of polymer donor and engineering of film-morphology and cathode interlayers: (1) a combination of solvent annealing and solvent vapor annealing optimizes the film morphology and hence both hole and electron mobilities, leading to a trade-off of fill factor and short-circuit current density (Jsc); (2) the judicious selection of polymer donor affords a higher hole and electron mobility, giving a higher Jsc; and (3) engineering the cathode interlayer affords a higher electron mobility, which leads to a significant increase in electrical current generation and ultimately the power conversion efficiency (PCE).

  5. Evidence for tissue-resident mesenchymal stem cells in human adult lung from studies of transplanted allografts.

    PubMed

    Lama, Vibha N; Smith, Lisa; Badri, Linda; Flint, Andrew; Andrei, Adin-Cristian; Murray, Susan; Wang, Zhuo; Liao, Hui; Toews, Galen B; Krebsbach, Paul H; Peters-Golden, Marc; Pinsky, David J; Martinez, Fernando J; Thannickal, Victor J

    2007-04-01

    The origin and turnover of connective tissue cells in adult human organs, including the lung, are not well understood. Here, studies of cells derived from human lung allografts demonstrate the presence of a multipotent mesenchymal cell population, which is locally resident in the human adult lung and has extended life span in vivo. Examination of plastic-adherent cell populations in bronchoalveolar lavage samples obtained from 76 human lung transplant recipients revealed clonal proliferation of fibroblast-like cells in 62% (106 of 172) of samples. Immunophenotyping of these isolated cells demonstrated expression of vimentin and prolyl-4-hydroxylase, indicating a mesenchymal phenotype. Multiparametric flow cytometric analyses revealed expression of cell-surface proteins, CD73, CD90, and CD105, commonly found on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Hematopoietic lineage markers CD14, CD34, and CD45 were absent. Multipotency of these cells was demonstrated by their capacity to differentiate into adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteocytes. Cytogenetic analysis of cells from 7 sex-mismatched lung transplant recipients harvested up to 11 years after transplant revealed that 97.2% +/- 2.1% expressed the sex genotype of the donor. The presence of MSCs of donor sex identity in lung allografts even years after transplantation provides what we believe to be the first evidence for connective tissue cell progenitors that reside locally within a postnatal, nonhematopoietic organ.

  6. T cell proliferative response induced by DNA topoisomerase I in patients with systemic sclerosis and healthy donors.

    PubMed Central

    Kuwana, M; Medsger, T A; Wright, T M

    1995-01-01

    The in vitro T cell proliferative response to DNA topoisomerase I (topo I) was examined in 26 systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients with anti-topo I antibody, 10 SSc patients without anti-topo I antibody, and 21 healthy donors. Using recombinant fusion proteins encompassing the entire human topo I amino acid sequence, a topo I-specific proliferative response was detected in PBMC cultures from 25 (96%) anti-topo I-positive SSc patients, 4 (40%) anti-topo I-negative SSc patients, and 13 (62%) healthy donors. Molecular typing at MHC class II loci revealed that all SSc patients and healthy donors having either DRB1*1501,2 (DR15), DRB1*1101,3,4 (DR11), or DRB1*07 (DR7) were responders. Characterization of the topo I-induced T cell proliferative response showed that (a) the responding cells were CD4+ T cells; (b) antigen-presenting cells were necessary for the response; (c) the response was restricted by HLA-DR, and to a lesser extent by HLA-DQ; and (d) the estimated frequency of the responding T cells determined by limiting dilution analysis was 1/9,277-1/24,853. PBMC cultures from anti-topo I-positive SSc patients showed a high T cell proliferative response after only 3 d of culture with topo I. Anti-topo I-negative SSc patients and healthy donors had no proliferative response after 3 d, but did respond after 7 d of culture. T cell proliferative responses to six truncated topo I fragments tested individually showed different patterns of T cell proliferation that were dependent upon the responder's HLA-DR alleles. These results indicate that T cells reactive with topo I are components of the normal T cell repertoire, and that the topo I-specific T cell proliferative response is not associated with the presence or absence of SSc or anti-topo I antibody, but is restricted by MHC class II alleles. PMID:7615831

  7. Changes in liver and spleen volumes after living liver donation: A report from the Adult-to-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Cohort Study (A2ALL)

    PubMed Central

    Emond, Jean C.; Fisher, Robert A.; Everson, Gregory; Samstein, Benjamin; Pomposelli, James J.; Zhao, Binsheng; Forney, Sarah; Olthoff, Kim M.; Baker, Talia B.; Gillespie, Brenda W.; Merion, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Previous reports have drawn attention to persistently decreased platelet counts among liver donors. We hypothesized an etiologic association between altered platelet counts and post-donation splenomegaly and sought to explore this relationship. This study analyzed de-identified CT/MR scans of 388 donors from 9 A2ALL centers read at a central computational image analysis lab. Resulting liver and spleen volumes were correlated with time-matched clinical lab values. Pre-donation liver volumes varied twofold in healthy subjects, even when normalized by body surface area (BSA) (range: 522 – 1887cc/m2, N=346). At 3 months post-donation liver volumes were, on average, 79% of pre-donation volumes (IQR: 73-86%, N=165) and approached 88% at 1 year (IQR: 80-93%, N=75). The mean spleen volume pre-donation was 245 cc (N=346). Spleen volumes greater than 100% of pre-donation volume occurred in 92% of donors at 3 months (N=165) and 88% at 1 year post-donation (N=75). We sought to develop a standard spleen volume (SSV) model to predict “normal” spleen volumes in donors pre-donation and found that decreased platelet counts, younger age, higher pre-donation liver volume, higher hemoglobin and higher BSA predicted a larger spleen volume (N=344, R2=0.52). When applied to post-donation values some large volumes were under predicted by the SSV model. Models developed on the reduced sample of post-donation volumes yielded smaller under-predictions. These findings confirm previous observations of thrombocytopenia associated with splenomegaly post-donation. The results of the SSV model suggest the biology of this phenomenon is complex. This merits further long term mechanistic studies of liver donors with investigation into the role of other factors such as thrombopoietin, and exposure to viral infections to better understand the evolution of spleen volume after liver donation. PMID:25488878

  8. Fetal and adult liver stem cells for liver regeneration and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Fiegel, H C; Lange, Claudia; Kneser, U; Lambrecht, W; Zander, A R; Rogiers, X; Kluth, D

    2006-01-01

    For the development of innovative cell-based liver directed therapies, e.g. liver tissue engineering, the use of stem cells might be very attractive to overcome the limitation of donor liver tissue. Liver specific differentiation of embryonic, fetal or adult stem cells is currently under investigation. Different types of fetal liver (stem) cells during development were identified, and their advantageous growth potential and bipotential differentiation capacity were shown. However, ethical and legal issues have to be addressed before using fetal cells. Use of adult stem cells is clinically established, e.g. transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells. Other bone marrow derived liver stem cells might be mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). However, the transdifferentiation potential is still in question due to the observation of cellular fusion in several in vivo experiments. In vitro experiments revealed a crucial role of the environment (e.g. growth factors and extracellular matrix) for specific differentiation of stem cells. Co-cultured liver cells also seemed to be important for hepatic gene expression of MSC. For successful liver cell transplantation, a novel approach of tissue engineering by orthotopic transplantation of gel-immobilized cells could be promising, providing optimal environment for the injected cells. Moreover, an orthotopic tissue engineering approach using bipotential stem cells could lead to a repopulation of the recipients liver with healthy liver and biliary cells, thus providing both hepatic functions and biliary excretion. Future studies have to investigate, which stem cell and environmental conditions would be most suitable for the use of stem cells for liver regeneration or tissue engineering approaches.

  9. Donor/Acceptor Molecular Orientation-Dependent Photovoltaic Performance in All-Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ke; Zhang, Rui; Liu, Jiangang; Li, Mingguang; Yu, Xinhong; Xing, Rubo; Han, Yanchun

    2015-11-18

    The correlated donor/acceptor (D/A) molecular orientation plays a crucial role in solution-processed all-polymer solar cells in term of photovoltaic performance. For the conjugated polymers PTB7-th and P(NDI2OD-T2), the preferential molecular orientation of neat PTB7-th films kept face-on regardless of the properties of processing solvents. However, an increasing content of face-on molecular orientation in the neat P(NDI2OD-T2) films could be found by changing processing solvents from chloronaphthalene (CN) and o-dichlorobenzene (oDCB) to chlorobenzene (CB). Besides, the neat P(NDI2OD-T2) films also exhibited a transformation of preferential molecular orientation from face-on to edge-on when extending film drying time by casting in the same solution. Consequently, a distribution diagram of molecular orientation for P(NDI2OD-T2) films was depicted and the same trend could be observed for the PTB7-th/P(NDI2OD-T2) blend films. By manufacture of photovoltaic devices with blend films, the relationship between the correlated D/A molecular orientation and device performance was established. The short-circuit current (Jsc) of devices processed by CN, oDCB, and CB enhanced gradually from 1.24 to 8.86 mA/cm(2) with the correlated D/A molecular orientation changing from face-on/edge-on to face-on/face-on, which could be attributed to facile exciton dissociation at D/A interface with the same molecular orientation. Therefore, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of devices processed by CN, oDCB, and CB improved from 0.53% to 3.52% ultimately.

  10. Nonmyeloablative Stem Cell Transplantation with Alemtuzumab/Low-Dose Irradiation to Cure and Improve the Quality of Life of Adults with Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Saraf, Santosh L; Oh, Annie L; Patel, Pritesh R; Jalundhwala, Yash; Sweiss, Karen; Koshy, Matthew; Campbell-Lee, Sally; Gowhari, Michel; Hassan, Johara; Peace, David; Quigley, John G; Khan, Irum; Molokie, Robert E; Hsu, Lewis L; Mahmud, Nadim; Levinson, Dennis J; Pickard, A Simon; Garcia, Joe G N; Gordeuk, Victor R; Rondelli, Damiano

    2016-03-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is rarely performed in adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). We utilized the chemotherapy-free, alemtuzumab/total body irradiation 300 cGy regimen with sirolimus as post-transplantation immunosuppression in 13 high-risk SCD adult patients between November 2011 and June 2014. Patients received matched related donor (MRD) granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells, including 2 cases that were ABO incompatible. Quality-of-life (QoL) measurements were performed at different time points after HSCT. All 13 patients initially engrafted. A stable mixed donor/recipient chimerism was maintained in 12 patients (92%), whereas 1 patient not compliant with sirolimus experienced secondary graft failure. With a median follow-up of 22 months (range, 12 to 44 months) there was no mortality, no acute or chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and no grades 3 or 4 extramedullary toxicities. At 1 year after transplantation, patients with stable donor chimerism have normalized hemoglobin concentrations and improved cardiopulmonary and QoL parameters including bodily pain, general health, and vitality. In 4 patients, sirolimus was stopped without rejection or SCD-related complications. These results underscore the successful use of a chemotherapy-free regimen in MRD HSCT for high-risk adult SCD patients and demonstrates a high cure rate, absence of GVHD or mortality, and improvement in QoL including the applicability of this regimen in ABO mismatched cases (NCT number 01499888). PMID:26348889

  11. Impaired response to oxidative stress in senescent cells may lead to accumulation of DNA damage in mesothelial cells from aged donors

    SciTech Connect

    Ksiazek, Krzysztof Piatek, Katarzyna; Witowski, Janusz

    2008-08-22

    The accumulation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG) exemplifies oxidative DNA injury, which is strongly implicated in ageing. We show that human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMCs) from donors >75 years have lower proliferative capacity but increased 8-OH-dG content compared with cells from individuals <25 years. We detected a positive relationship between the donor's age and the 8-OH-dG level in early-passage HPMCs, and an inverse relationship between those 8-OH-dG levels and subsequent replicative lifespan of HPMCs (n = 30). In early-passage cells from donors >75 years, the repair of oxidant-induced 8-OH-dG was delayed compared to cells from donors <25 years. This was coupled with prolonged removal of reactive oxygen species and faster decline in superoxide dismutase activity. Similar effects were observed in HPMCs rendered senescent in vitro. These results indicate that increased 8-OH-dG levels in HPMCs from aged individuals may reflect the in vivo presence of senescent cells with increased vulnerability to oxidative stress-induced DNA damage.

  12. Thymic function recovery after unrelated donor cord blood or T-cell depleted HLA-haploidentical stem cell transplantation correlates with leukemia relapse

    PubMed Central

    Clave, Emmanuel; Lisini, Daniela; Douay, Corinne; Giorgiani, Giovanna; Busson, Marc; Zecca, Marco; Moretta, Francesca; Acquafredda, Gloria; Brescia, Letizia P.; Locatelli, Franco; Toubert, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    Use of alternative donors/sources of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), such as cord blood (CB) or HLA-haploidentical (Haplo)-related donors, is associated with a significant delay in immune reconstitution after transplantation. Long-term T-cell immune reconstitution largely relies on the generation of new T cells in the recipient thymus, which can be evaluated through signal joint (sj) and beta T-cell-Receptor Excision Circles (TREC) quantification. We studied two groups of 33 and 24 children receiving, respectively, HSC Transplantation (HSCT) from an HLA-haploidentical family donor or an unrelated CB donor, for both malignant (46) and non-malignant disorders (11). Relative and absolute sj and beta-TREC values indicated comparable thymic function reconstitution at 3 and 6 months after the allograft in both groups. Compared to children with non-malignant disorders, those with hematological malignancies had significantly lower pre-transplantation TREC counts. Patients who relapsed after HSCT had a significantly less efficient thymic function both before and 6 months after HSCT with especially low beta-TREC values, this finding suggesting an impact of early intra-thymic T-cell differentiation on the occurrence of leukemia relapse. PMID:23459761

  13. Characteristics and stimulation potential with BMP-2 and BMP-7 of tenocyte-like cells isolated from the rotator cuff of female donors.

    PubMed

    Klatte-Schulz, Franka; Pauly, Stephan; Scheibel, Markus; Greiner, Stefan; Gerhardt, Christian; Hartwig, Jelka; Schmidmaier, Gerhard; Wildemann, Britt

    2013-01-01

    Tendon bone healing of the rotator cuff is often associated with non-healing or recurrent defects, which seems to be influenced by the patient's age and sex. The present study aims to examine cellular biological characteristics of tenocyte-like cells that may contribute to this impaired rotator cuff healing. Moreover, a therapeutic approach using growth factors could possibly stimulate tendon bone healing. Therefore, our second aim was to identify patient groups who would particularly benefit from growth factor stimulation. Tenocyte-like cells isolated from supraspinatus tendons of female donors younger and older than 65 years of age were characterized with respect to different cellular biological parameters, such as cell density, cell count, marker expression, collagen-I protein synthesis, and stem cell potential. Furthermore, cells of the donor groups were stimulated with BMP-2 and BMP-7 (200 and 1000 ng/ml) in 3D-culture and analyzed for cell count, marker expression and collagen-I protein synthesis. Female donors older than 65 years of age showed significantly decreased cell count and collagen-I protein synthesis compared to cells from donors younger than 65 years. Cellular biological parameters including cell count, collagen-I and -III expression, and collagen-I protein synthesis of cells from both donor groups were stimulated with BMP-2 and BMP-7. The cells from donors older than 65 years revealed a decreased stimulation potential for cell count compared to the younger group. Cells from female donors older than 65 years of age showed inferior cellular biological characteristics. This may be one reason for a weaker healing potential observed in older female patients and should be taken into consideration for tendon bone healing of the rotator cuff. PMID:23825642

  14. Characteristics and Stimulation Potential with BMP-2 and BMP-7 of Tenocyte-Like Cells Isolated from the Rotator Cuff of Female Donors

    PubMed Central

    Klatte-Schulz, Franka; Pauly, Stephan; Scheibel, Markus; Greiner, Stefan; Gerhardt, Christian; Hartwig, Jelka; Schmidmaier, Gerhard; Wildemann, Britt

    2013-01-01

    Tendon bone healing of the rotator cuff is often associated with non-healing or recurrent defects, which seems to be influenced by the patient’s age and sex. The present study aims to examine cellular biological characteristics of tenocyte-like cells that may contribute to this impaired rotator cuff healing. Moreover, a therapeutic approach using growth factors could possibly stimulate tendon bone healing. Therefore, our second aim was to identify patient groups who would particularly benefit from growth factor stimulation. Tenocyte-like cells isolated from supraspinatus tendons of female donors younger and older than 65 years of age were characterized with respect to different cellular biological parameters, such as cell density, cell count, marker expression, collagen-I protein synthesis, and stem cell potential. Furthermore, cells of the donor groups were stimulated with BMP-2 and BMP-7 (200 and 1000 ng/ml) in 3D-culture and analyzed for cell count, marker expression and collagen-I protein synthesis. Female donors older than 65 years of age showed significantly decreased cell count and collagen-I protein synthesis compared to cells from donors younger than 65 years. Cellular biological parameters including cell count, collagen-I and –III expression, and collagen-I protein synthesis of cells from both donor groups were stimulated with BMP-2 and BMP-7. The cells from donors older than 65 years revealed a decreased stimulation potential for cell count compared to the younger group. Cells from female donors older than 65 years of age showed inferior cellular biological characteristics. This may be one reason for a weaker healing potential observed in older female patients and should be taken into consideration for tendon bone healing of the rotator cuff. PMID:23825642

  15. Mycophenolate Mofetil and Cyclosporine in Reducing Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients With Hematologic Malignancies or Metastatic Kidney Cancer Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Renal Cell Carcinoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell

  16. Photovoltaic enhancement of organic solar cells by a bridged donor-acceptor block copolymer approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Sam-Shajing; Zhang, Cheng; Ledbetter, Abram; Choi, Soobum; Seo, Kang; Bonner, Carl E.; Drees, Martin; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar

    2007-01-01

    The authors show that a photovoltaic device composed of a -donor-bridge-acceptor-bridge- type block copolymer thin film exhibits a significant performance improvement over its corresponding donor/acceptor blend (Voc increased from 0.14to1.10V and Jsc increased from 0.017 to 0.058mA/cm2) under identical conditions, where donor is an alkyl derivatized poly-p-phenylenevinylene (PPV) conjugated block, acceptor is a sulfone-alkyl derivatized PPV conjugated block, and bridge is a nonconjugated and flexible unit. The authors attribute such improvement to the block copolymer intrinsic nanophase separation and molecular self-assembly that results in the reduction of the exciton and carrier losses.

  17. Infection Prophylaxis and Management in Treating Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Infection in Patients With Hematologic Malignancies Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Aplastic Anemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Cytomegalovirus Infection; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Extramedullary Plasmacytoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Isolated Plasmacytoma of Bone; Mast Cell Leukemia; Meningeal Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma

  18. Highly Photoactive Titanyl Phthalocyanine Polymorphs as Textured Donor Layers in Organic Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Placencia, Diogenes; Wang, Weining; Gantz, Jeremy; Jenkins, Judith L.; Armstrong, Neal R.

    2011-09-29

    We present a comparison of the photovoltaic activity of organic solar cells (OPVs) based on vacuum-deposited and solvent-annealed titanyl phthalocyanine (TiOPc) donor layers with C₆₀ as the electron acceptor, where the TiOPc donor layer exists in three different polymorphic forms: TiOPc included the “as-deposited” form, with a Q-band absorbance spectrum reminiscent of the phase I polymorph, and films subjected to solvent annealing which systematically increased the fraction of either the phase II (α-phase) or the phase III (γ-TiOPc) polymorphs. As-deposited TiOPc/C₆₀ heterojunctions showed open-circuit photopotentials (V{sub OC}) of ca. 0.65 V, with estimated AM 1.5G efficiencies of ca. 1.4%. Partial conversion of these thin films to their phase II or phase III polymorphs significantly enhanced the short-circuit photocurrent (J{sub SC}), as a result of (i) texturing of the TiOPc layers (ca. 100 nm length scales) and (ii) enhancements in near-IR absorptivity/photoelectrical activity. All TiOPc/C₆₀ heterojunctions, characterized by UV–photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), showed that estimated E{sub HOMO}{sup Pc} – E{sub LUMO}{sup C60} energy differences, which set the upper limit for VOC, are nearly identical for each TiOPc polymorph. Incident and absorbed photon current efficiency measurements (IPCE, APCE) are consistent with previous studies that showed a majority of the photoactivity in these higher order polymorphs deriving from excitonic states created at λ{sub max} ≈ 680 and 844 nm for both the phase II and the phase III polymorphs. The near-IR absorbance features (844 nm) in these Pc polymorphs are believed to have substantial charge-transfer (CT) character, leading to enhanced probabilities for photoinduced electron transfer (PIET). APCE measurements of TiOPc/C₆₀ OPVs, however, show that higher photocurrent yields per absorbed photon arise from the higher energy (680 nm) excitonic state. When C₇₀ is used as the electron acceptor

  19. Altering histone acetylation status in donor cells with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid does not affect dog cloning efficiency.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Oh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Geon A; Suh, Han Na; Jo, Young Kwang; Choi, Yoo Bin; Kim, Dong Hoon; Han, Ho Jae; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2015-10-15

    Although dog cloning technology has been applied to conservation of endangered canids, propagation of elite dogs, and production of transgenic dogs, the efficiency of cloning is still very low. To help overcome this problem, we evaluated the effect of treating donor cells with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, on dog cloning efficiency. Relative messenger RNA expressions of the bax1/bcl2 ratio and Dnmt1 in fibroblasts treated with different concentrations (0, 1, 10, 50 μM) of SAHA and durations (0, 20, 44 hours) were compared. Treatment with 1 μM for 20 hours showed significantly lower bax1/bcl2 and Dnmt1 transcript abundance. Acetylation of H3K9 was significantly increased after SAHA treatment, but H4K5, H4K8 and H4K16 were not changed. After SCNT using control or donor cells treated with SAHA, a total of 76 and 64 cloned embryos were transferred to seven and five recipients, respectively. Three fetuses were diagnosed in both control and SAHA-treated groups by ultrasonography 29 days after the embryo transfer, but there was no significant difference in the pregnancy rate (4.2% vs. 4.3%). In conclusion, although SAHA treatment as used in this study significantly decreased bax1/bcl2 and Dnmt1 transcripts of donor nuclei, as well as increased H3 acetylation, it was not enough to increase in vivo developmental competence of cloned dog embryos.

  20. Microscopic simulations of electronic excitations in donor-acceptor heterojunctions of small-molecule based solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumeier, Bjoern

    2015-03-01

    Fundamental processes involving electronic excitations govern the functionality of molecular materials in which the dynamics of excitons and charges is determined by an interplay of molecular electronic structure and morphological order. To understand, e.g., charge separation and recombination at donor-acceptor heterojunctions in organic solar cells, knowledge about the microscopic details influencing these dynamics in the bulk and across the interface is required. For a set of prototypical heterojunctions of small-molecule donor materials with C60, we employ a hybrid QM/MM approach linking density-functional and many-body Green's functions theory and analyze the charged and neutral electronic excitations therein. We pay special attention the spatially-resolved electron/hole transport levels, as well as the relative energies of Frenkel and charge-transfer excitations at the interface. Finally, we link the molecular architecture of the donor material, its orientation on the fullerene substrate as well as mesoscale order to the solar cell performance.

  1. "Hot or cold": how do charge transfer states at the donor-acceptor interface of an organic solar cell dissociate?

    PubMed

    Bässler, Heinz; Köhler, Anna

    2015-11-21

    Electron transfer from an excited donor to an acceptor in an organic solar cell (OSC) is an exothermic process, determined by the difference in the electronegativities of donor and acceptor. It has been suggested that the associated excess energy facilitates the escape of the initially generated electron-hole pair from their mutual coulomb well. Recent photocurrent excitation spectroscopy on conjugated polymer/PCBM cells challenged this view. In this perspective we shall briefly outline the strengths and weaknesses of relevant experimental approaches and concepts. We shall enforce the notion that the charge separating state is a vibrationally cold charge transfer (CT) state. It can easily dissociate provided that (i) there is electrostatic screening at the interface and (ii) the charge carriers are delocalized, e.g. if the donor is a well ordered conjugated polymer. Both effects diminish the coulomb attraction and assure that the in-built electric field existing in the OSC under short current condition is already sufficient to separate most the CT states. The remaining CT excitations relax towards tail states of the disorder controlled density of states distribution, such as excimer forming states, that are more tightly bound and have longer lifetimes.

  2. Design principle for efficient charge separation at the donor-acceptor interface for high performance organic solar cell device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Wanyi; Gupta, Gautam; Crone, Brian; Wang, Hsing-Lin; Mohite, Aditya; MPA-11 Material synthesis and integrated device Team; MPA-chemistry Team

    2014-03-01

    The performance of donor (D) /acceptor (A) structure based organic electronic devices, such as solar cell, light emitting devices etc., relays on the charge transfer process at the interface dramatically. In organic solar cell, the photo-induced electron-hole pair is tightly bonded and will form a charge transfer (CT) state at the D/A interface after dissociation. There is a large chance for them to recombine through CT state and thus is a major loss that limit the overall performance. Here, we report three different strategies that allow us to completely suppress the exciplex (or charge transfer state) recombination between any D/A system. We observe that the photocurrent increases by 300% and the power conversion efficiency increases by 4-5 times simply by inserting a spacer layer in the form of an a) insulator b) Oliogomer or using a c) heavy atom at the donor-acceptor interface in a P3HT/C60 bilayer device. By using those different functional mono layers, we successfully suppressed the exciplex recombination in evidence of increased photocurrent and open circuit voltage. Moreover, these strategies are applicable universally to any donor-acceptor interface. And we demonstrated such strategies in a bulk-heterojunction device which improved the power conversion efficiency from 3.5% up to 4.6%.

  3. Identification of 2127 new HLA class I alleles in potential stem cell donors from Germany, the United States and Poland.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Frederick, C J; Giani, A S; Cereb, N; Sauter, J; Silva-González, R; Pingel, J; Schmidt, A H; Ehninger, G; Yang, S Y

    2014-03-01

    We describe 2127 new human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I alleles found in registered stem cell donors. These alleles represent 28.9% of the currently known class I alleles. Comparing new allele sequences to homologous sequences, we found 68.1% nonsynonymous nucleotide substitutions, 28.9% silent mutations and 3.0% nonsense mutations. Many substitutions occurred at positions that have not been known to be polymorphic before. A large number of HLA alleles and nucleotide variations underline the extreme diversity of the HLA system. Strikingly, 156 new alleles were found not only multiple times, but also in carriers of various parentage, suggesting that some new alleles are not necessarily rare. Moreover, new alleles were found especially often in minority donors. This emphasizes the benefits of specifically recruiting such groups of individuals.

  4. Utility of saliva and hair follicles in donor selection for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and chimerism monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurvinder; Kumar, Neeraj; Nandakumar, Ramya; Rapthap, Chowphi C; Sharma, Gaurav; Neolia, Shekhar; Kumra, Heena; Mahalwar, Prateek; Garg, Abhinav; Kumar, Sunil; Kaur, Jasmeet; Hakim, Mrinali; Kumar, Lalit; Mehra, Narinder K

    2012-01-01

    Selection of an HLA identical donor is a critical pre-requisite for successful hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Most transplant centers utilize blood as the most common source of DNA for HLA testing. However, obtaining blood through phlebotomy is often challenging in patients with conditions like severe leucopenia or hemophilia, pediatric and elderly patients. We have used a simple in-house protocol and shown that HLA genotypes obtained on DNA extracted from saliva or hair are concordant with blood and hence can be used for selection of donors for HSCT or organ transplantation. Similarly, for post-HSCT chimerism monitoring, non-availability of pre-transplant DNA samples poses a major limitation of reference STR fingerprints. This study shows that DNA obtained post-HSCT from hair follicles can be used to generate pre-transplant patient specific fingerprints while the STR profiles obtained in saliva samples cannot as these display a mixed state of chimerism.

  5. Ligation of left renal vein for large spontaneous splenorenal shunt to prevent portal flow steal in adult living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Gyu; Moon, Deok-Bog; Ahn, Chul-Soo; Kim, Ki-Hun; Hwang, Shin; Park, Kwang-Min; Ha, Tae-Yong; Ko, Gi-Young; Sung, Kyu-Bo; Song, Gi-Won; Jung, Dong-Hwan; Moon, Ki-Myung; Kim, Bum-Soo; Cho, Yong-Pil

    2007-01-01

    Persistance of a large spontaneous splenorenal shunt (SRS) may result in graft failure in adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) because it reduces the effective portal perfusion to the partial liver graft by diversion of hepatotrophic portal flow into this hepatofugal pathway. We performed a prospective study to evaluate the efficacy of ligation of left renal vein (LRV) to prevent portal flow steal and the safety of this procedure to the renal function in adult LDLT patients with SRS. Between October 2001 and January 2005, 44 cirrhotic patients with large SRS underwent LDLT with ligation of LRV. Each patient received pre- and postoperative computed tomography and Doppler USG to assess the changes of collaterals and portal flow, as well as serial renal and liver function tests. Portal flow after ligation of LRV was statistically and significantly increased when compared with pre-operative value (P = 0.001). Whereas four patients (9.1%) demonstrated sustained, elevated serum creatinine levels after operation, the renal function tests returned to normal in 40 patients. All patients recovered with satisfactory regeneration of the partial liver graft and there was no procedure-related permanent renal dysfunction. In conclusion, ligation of LRV to prevent a 'portal steal phenomenon' seems to be a safe and effective graft salvage procedure for large spontaneous SRS (>10-mm diameter) in adult LDLT.

  6. Sirolimus, Cyclosporine, and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Preventing Graft-versus-Host Disease in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies Undergoing Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-06

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Adult Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large B -Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Cell Neoplasm; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Plasma Cell Myeloma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  7. A Dithienosilole-Benzooxadiazole Donor-Acceptor Copolymer for Utility in Organic Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Caputo, Bruno J. A.; Welch, Gregory C.; Kamkar, Daniel A.; Henson, Zachary B.; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen; Bazan, Guillermo C.

    2011-04-20

    A systematic evaluation of a novel conjugated polymer, bearing alkyl side chains on both the donor and acceptor units, is conducted using nanoscale characterization techniques and device fabrication. How to manage the use of solvent additives to achieve power-conversion efficiencies of up to 3.7% is demonstrated.

  8. Micropatterning control of tubular commitment in human adult renal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sciancalepore, Anna G; Portone, Alberto; Moffa, Maria; Persano, Luana; De Luca, Maria; Paiano, Aurora; Sallustio, Fabio; Schena, Francesco P; Bucci, Cecilia; Pisignano, Dario

    2016-07-01

    The treatment of renal injury by autologous, patient-specific adult stem cells is still an unmet need. Unsolved issues remain the spatial integration of stem cells into damaged areas of the organ, the commitment in the required cell type and the development of improved bioengineered devices. In this respect, biomaterials and architectures have to be specialized to control stem cell differentiation. Here, we perform an extensive study on micropatterned extracellular matrix proteins, which constitute a simple and non-invasive approach to drive the differentiation of adult renal progenitor/stem cells (ARPCs) from human donors. ARPCs are interfaced with fibronectin (FN) micropatterns, in the absence of exogenous chemicals or cellular reprogramming. We obtain the differentiation towards tubular cells of ARPCs cultured in basal medium conditions, the tubular commitment thus being specifically induced by micropatterned substrates. We characterize the stability of the tubular differentiation as well as the induction of a polarized phenotype in micropatterned ARPCs. Thus, the developed cues, driving the functional commitment of ARPCs, offer a route to recreate the microenvironment of the stem cell niche in vitro, that may serve, in perspective, for the development of ARPC-based bioengineered devices. PMID:27105437

  9. Effects of donors' age and passage number on the biological characteristics of menstrual blood-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinyang; Du, Xiaochun; Chen, Qian; Xiang, Charlie

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of donor age and passage number on the biological characteristics of menstrual blood-derived stem cells (MenSCs) by comparing MenSCs derived from donors with three different age ranges and after different passage times. Continuous passage, flat cloning, cell proliferation assays, flow cytometric phenotyping and whole human genome microarray were performed to systematically analyze the relationship between the self-renewal ability of MenSCs as well as their potential to maintain their stem cell characteristics and to resist aging. The results demonstrated that the immunophenotypes and in vitro cultural characteristics of MenSCs did not change significantly with the progression of aging. However, some important signal pathways including MAPK, the insulin signaling pathway, pathways involved in carcinogenesis such as PPAR and P53, and cytokines and their receptors, as well as other pathways associated with immune response and aging, changed to various extents under the conditions of aging after a long time in vitro. The enriched differentially-expressed genes were mainly involved in transcriptional regulation, stress response, cell proliferation, development and apoptosis. The key differentially-expressed genes associated with age and passage number were identified for use as biomarkers of cell aging.

  10. Effects of donors' age and passage number on the biological characteristics of menstrual blood-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinyang; Du, Xiaochun; Chen, Qian; Xiang, Charlie

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of donor age and passage number on the biological characteristics of menstrual blood-derived stem cells (MenSCs) by comparing MenSCs derived from donors with three different age ranges and after different passage times. Continuous passage, flat cloning, cell proliferation assays, flow cytometric phenotyping and whole human genome microarray were performed to systematically analyze the relationship between the self-renewal ability of MenSCs as well as their potential to maintain their stem cell characteristics and to resist aging. The results demonstrated that the immunophenotypes and in vitro cultural characteristics of MenSCs did not change significantly with the progression of aging. However, some important signal pathways including MAPK, the insulin signaling pathway, pathways involved in carcinogenesis such as PPAR and P53, and cytokines and their receptors, as well as other pathways associated with immune response and aging, changed to various extents under the conditions of aging after a long time in vitro. The enriched differentially-expressed genes were mainly involved in transcriptional regulation, stress response, cell proliferation, development and apoptosis. The key differentially-expressed genes associated with age and passage number were identified for use as biomarkers of cell aging. PMID:26823782

  11. Prevention of lethal murine graft versus host disease by treatment of donor cells with L-leucyl-L-leucine methyl ester

    SciTech Connect

    Charley, M.; Thiele, D.L.; Bennett, M.; Lipsky, P.E.

    1986-11-01

    Graft vs. host disease (GVHD) remains one of the main problems associated with bone marrow transplantation. The current studies were undertaken to determine whether treatment of the donor inoculum with the anticytotoxic cell compound L-leucyl-L-leucine methyl ester (Leu-Leu-OMe) would alter the development of GVHD in a murine model. Irradiated recipient mice transplanted with a mixture of control bone marrow and spleen cells from naive semiallogeneic donors died rapidly from GVHD, whereas the recipients of cells incubated with 250 microM Leu-Leu-OMe all survived. In addition, Leu-Leu-OMe treatment of cells obtained from donors immunized against host alloantigens resulted in significantly prolonged survival. Phenotypic characterization of spleen cells from the various groups of mice that had received Leu-Leu-OMe-treated cells and survived consistently revealed the donor phenotype. Treatment of marrow cells with 250 microM Leu-Leu-OMe appeared to have no adverse effects on stem cell function. Erythropoiesis was undiminished, as assayed by splenic 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine-/sup 125/I uptake. Moreover, granulocytic and megakaryocytic regeneration were histologically equivalent in the spleens of recipients of control or Leu-Leu-OMe-treated cells. Treatment of the donor inoculum with Leu-Leu-OMe thus prevents GVHD in this murine strain combination with no apparent stem cell toxicity.

  12. Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tsukasaki, Kunihiro

    2012-04-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL) was first described in 1977 as a distinct clinico-pathological entity with a suspected viral etiology. Subsequently, a novel RNA retrovirus, human T-cell leukemia/lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) was isolated from a cell line established from the leukemic cells of an ATL patient, and the finding of a clear association with ATL led to its inclusion among human carcinogenic pathogens. The three major routes of HTLV-1 transmission are mother-to-child infections via breast milk, sexual intercourse, and blood transfusions. HTLV-1 infection early in life, presumably from breast feeding, is crucial in the development of ATL. The diversity in clinical features and prognosis of patients with this disease has led to its subtype-classification into four categories, acute, lymphoma, chronic, and smoldering types defined by organ involvement, and LDH and calcium values. In cases of acute, lymphoma, or unfavorable chronic subtypes (aggressive ATL), intensive chemotherapy such as VCAP-AMP-VECP is usually recommended. In cases of favorable chronic or smoldering ATL (indolent ATL), watchful waiting until disease progression has been recommended although the long term prognosis was inferior to those of, for instance, chronic lymphoid leukemia. Retrospective analysis suggested that the combination of interferon alpha and zidovudine was apparently promising for the treatment of ATL, especially for types with leukemic manifestation. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is also promising for the treatment of aggressive ATL possibly reflecting graft vs. ATL effect. Several new agent-trials for ATL are ongoing and in preparation, including a defucosylated humanized anti-CC chemokine receptor 4 monoclonal antibody. Two steps should be considered for the prevention of HTLV-1-associated ATL. The first is the prevention of HTLV-1 infections and the second is the prevention of ATL among HTLV-1 carriers. So far, no agent has been found to be

  13. Cross-dressing by donor dendritic cells after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation contributes to formation of the immunological synapse and maximizes responses to indirectly presented antigen.

    PubMed

    Markey, Kate A; Koyama, Motoko; Gartlan, Kate H; Leveque, Lucie; Kuns, Rachel D; Lineburg, Katie E; Teal, Bianca E; MacDonald, Kelli P A; Hill, Geoffrey R

    2014-06-01

    The stimulation of naive donor T cells by recipient alloantigen is central to the pathogenesis of graft-versus-host disease after bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Using mouse models of transplantation, we have observed that donor cells become "cross-dressed" in very high levels of recipient hematopoietic cell-derived MHC class I and II molecules following BMT. Recipient-type MHC is transiently present on donor dendritic cells (DCs) after BMT in the setting of myeloablative conditioning but is persistent after nonmyeloablative conditioning, in which recipient hematopoietic cells remain in high numbers. Despite the high level of recipient-derived alloantigen present on the surface of donor DCs, donor T cell proliferative responses are generated only in response to processed recipient alloantigen presented via the indirect pathway and not in response to cross-dressed MHC. Assays in which exogenous peptide is added to cross-dressed MHC in the presence of naive TCR transgenic T cells specific to the MHC class II-peptide combination confirm that cross-dressed APC cannot induce T cell proliferation in isolation. Despite failure to induce T cell proliferation, cross-dressing by donor DCs contributes to generation of the immunological synapse between DCs and CD4 T cells, and this is required for maximal responses induced by classical indirectly presented alloantigen. We conclude that the process of cross-dressing by donor DCs serves as an efficient alternative pathway for the acquisition of recipient alloantigen and that once acquired, this cross-dressed MHC can assist in immune synapse formation prior to the induction of full T cell proliferative responses by concurrent indirect Ag presentation.

  14. Hepatic Tissue Environment in NEMO-Deficient Mice Critically Regulates Positive Selection of Donor Cells after Hepatocyte Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kaldenbach, Michaela; Cubero, Francisco Javier; Erschfeld, Stephanie; Liedtke, Christian; Trautwein, Christian; Streetz, Konrad

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatocyte transplantation (HT) is a promising alternative treatment strategy for end-stage liver diseases compared with orthotopic liver transplantation. A limitation for this approach is the low engraftment of donor cells. The deletion of the I-kappa B kinase-regulatory subunit IKKγ/NEMO in hepatocytes prevents nuclear factor (NF)-kB activation and triggers spontaneous liver apoptosis, chronic hepatitis and the development of liver fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. We hypothesized that NEMOΔhepa mice may therefore serve as an experimental model to study HT. Methods Pre-conditioned NEMOΔhepa mice were transplanted with donor-hepatocytes from wildtype (WT) and mice deficient for the pro-apoptotic mediator Caspase-8 (Casp8Δhepa). Results Transplantation of isolated WT-hepatocytes into pre-conditioned NEMOΔhepa mice resulted in a 6-7 fold increase of donor cells 12 weeks after HT, while WT-recipients showed no liver repopulation. The use of apoptosis-resistant Casp8Δhepa-derived donor cells further enhanced the selection 3-fold after 12-weeks and up to 10-fold increase after 52 weeks compared with WT donors. While analysis of NEMOΔhepa mice revealed strong liver injury, HT-recipient NEMOΔhepa mice showed improved liver morphology and decrease in serum transaminases. Concomitant with these findings, the histological examination elicited an improved liver tissue architecture associated with significantly lower levels of apoptosis, decreased proliferation and a lesser amount of liver fibrogenesis. Altogether, our data clearly support the therapeutic benefit of the HT procedure into NEMOΔhepa mice. Conclusion This study demonstrates the feasibility of the NEMOΔhepa mouse as an in vivo tool to study liver repopulation after HT. The improvement of the characteristic phenotype of chronic liver injury in NEMOΔhepa mice after HT suggests the therapeutic potential of HT in liver diseases with a chronic inflammatory phenotype and opens a new door for

  15. A protocol for adult somatic cell nuclear transfer in medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) with a high rate of viable clone formation.

    PubMed

    Bubenshchikova, Ekaterina; Kaftanovskaya, Elena; Adachi, Tomoko; Hashimoto, Hisashi; Kinoshita, Masato; Wakamatsu, Yuko

    2013-12-01

    Previously, we successfully generated fully grown, cloned medaka (the Japanese rice fish, Oryzias latipes) using donor nuclei from primary culture cells of adult caudal fin tissue and nonenucleated recipient eggs that were heat shock-treated to induce diploidization of the nuclei. However, the mechanism of clone formation using this method is unknown, and the rate of adult clone formation is not high enough for studies in basic and applied sciences. To gain insight into the mechanism and increase the success rate of this method of clone formation, we tested two distinct nuclear transfer protocols. In one protocol, the timing of transfer of donor nuclei was changed, and in the other, the size of the donor cells was changed; each protocol was based on our original methodology. Ultimately, we obtained an unexpectedly high rate of adult clone formation using the protocol that differed with respect to the timing of donor nuclei transfer. Specifically, 17% of the transplants that developed to the blastula stage ultimately developed into adult clones. The success rate with this method was 13 times higher than that obtained using the original method. Analyses focusing on the reasons for this high success rate of clone formation will help to elucidate the mechanism of clone formation that occurs with this method.

  16. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Radiation Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Immunosuppression in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Systemic Amyloidosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell

  17. Alemtuzumab, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Cyclosporine and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Treating Patients Who Are Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-13

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell

  18. Differences between graft-versus-leukemia and graft-versus-host reactivity. I. Interaction of donor immune T cells with tumor and/or host cells.

    PubMed

    Rocha, M; Umansky, V; Lee, K H; Hacker, H J; Benner, A; Schirrmacher, V

    1997-03-15

    Graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) and Graft-versus-host (GVH) reactions were compared after systemic transfer of allogeneic antitumor immune T lymphocytes from B10.D2 (H-2d; Mls(b)) into DBA/2 (H-2d; Mis(a)) mice. Before immune cell transfer, recipient DBA/2 mice were sublethally irradiated with 5 Gy to prevent host-versus-graft reactivity. Recipients were either bearing syngeneic metastatic ESb lymphomas (GVL system) or were normal, non-tumor-bearing mice (GVH system). We previously reported that this adoptive immunotherapy protocol (ADI) had pronounced GVL activity and led to immune rejection of even advanced metastasized cancer. In this study, monoclonal antibodies were used for immunohistochemical analysis of native frozen tissue sections from either spleen or liver to distinguish donor from host cells, to differentiate between CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes, and to stain sialoadhesin-positive macrophages at different time points after cell transfer. The kinetics of donor cell infiltration in spleen and liver differed in that the lymphoid organ was infiltrated earlier (days 1 to 5 after transfer) than the nonlymphoid organ (days 5 to 20). After reaching a peak, donor cell infiltration decreased gradually and was not detectable in the spleen after day 20 and in the liver after day 30. The organ-infiltrating donor immune cells were mostly T lymphocytes and stained positive for CD4 or CD8 T-cell markers. A remarkable GVL-associated observation was made with regard to a subset of macrophages bearing the adhesion molecule sialoadhesin (SER+ macrophages). In the livers of tumor-bearing mice, their numbers increased between days 1 and 12 after ADI by a factor greater than 30. Double-staining for donor cell marker and SER showed that the sialoadhesin-expressing macrophages were of host origin. The SER+ host macrophages from GVL livers were isolated by enzyme perfusion and rosetting 12 days after ADI, when they reached peak values of about 60 cells per liver lobule, and were

  19. Hhex is Required at Multiple Stages of Adult Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Goodings, Charnise; Smith, Elizabeth; Mathias, Elizabeth; Elliott, Natalina; Cleveland, Susan M.; Tripathi, Rati M.; Layer, Justin H.; Chen, Xi; Guo, Yan; Shyr, Yu; Hamid, Rizwan; Du, Yang; Davé, Utpal P.

    2015-01-01

    Hhex encodes a homeodomain transcription factor that is widely expressed in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell populations. Its enforced expression induces T-cell leukemia and we have implicated it as an important oncogene in early T-cell precursor leukemias where it is immediately downstream of an LMO2-associated protein complex. Conventional Hhex knockouts cause embryonic lethality precluding analysis of adult hematopoiesis. Thus, we induced highly efficient conditional knockout (cKO) using vav-Cre transgenic mice. Hhex cKO mice were viable and born at normal litter sizes. At steady state, we observed a defect in B-cell development that we localized to the earliest B-cell precursor, the pro-B-cell stage. Most remarkably, bone marrow transplantation using Hhex cKO donor cells revealed a more profound defect in all hematopoietic lineages. In contrast, sublethal irradiation resulted in normal myeloid cell repopulation of the bone marrow but markedly impaired repopulation of T- and B-cell compartments. We noted that Hhex cKO stem and progenitor cell populations were skewed in their distribution and showed enhanced proliferation compared to WT cells. Our results implicate Hhex in the maintenance of LT-HSCs and in lineage allocation from multipotent progenitors especially in stress hematopoiesis. PMID:25968920

  20. Hhex is Required at Multiple Stages of Adult Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Goodings, Charnise; Smith, Elizabeth; Mathias, Elizabeth; Elliott, Natalina; Cleveland, Susan M; Tripathi, Rati M; Layer, Justin H; Chen, Xi; Guo, Yan; Shyr, Yu; Hamid, Rizwan; Du, Yang; Davé, Utpal P

    2015-08-01

    Hhex encodes a homeodomain transcription factor that is widely expressed in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell populations. Its enforced expression induces T-cell leukemia and we have implicated it as an important oncogene in early T-cell precursor leukemias where it is immediately downstream of an LMO2-associated protein complex. Conventional Hhex knockouts cause embryonic lethality precluding analysis of adult hematopoiesis. Thus, we induced highly efficient conditional knockout (cKO) using vav-Cre transgenic mice. Hhex cKO mice were viable and born at normal litter sizes. At steady state, we observed a defect in B-cell development that we localized to the earliest B-cell precursor, the pro-B-cell stage. Most remarkably, bone marrow transplantation using Hhex cKO donor cells revealed a more profound defect in all hematopoietic lineages. In contrast, sublethal irradiation resulted in normal myeloid cell repopulation of the bone marrow but markedly impaired repopulation of T- and B-cell compartments. We noted that Hhex cKO stem and progenitor cell populations were skewed in their distribution and showed enhanced proliferation compared to WT cells. Our results implicate Hhex in the maintenance of LT-HSCs and in lineage allocation from multipotent progenitors especially in stress hematopoiesis.

  1. Reduced toxicity, myeloablative conditioning with BU, fludarabine, alemtuzumab and SCT from sibling donors in children with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, M; Jin, Z; Baker, C; Geyer, M B; Radhakrishnan, K; Morris, E; Satwani, P; George, D; Garvin, J; Del Toro, G; Zuckerman, W; Lee, M T; Licursi, M; Hawks, R; Smilow, E; Baxter-Lowe, L A; Schwartz, J; Cairo, M S

    2014-07-01

    BU and CY (BU/CY; 200 mg/kg) before HLA-matched sibling allo-SCT in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) is associated with ~85% EFS but is limited by the acute and late effects of BU/CY myeloablative conditioning. Alternatives include reduced toxicity but more immunosuppressive conditioning. We investigated in a prospective single institutional study, the safety and efficacy of a reduced-toxicity conditioning (RTC) regimen of BU 12.8-16 mg/kg, fludarabine 180 mg/m(2), alemtuzumab 54 mg/m(2) (BFA) before HLA-matched sibling donor transplantation in pediatric recipients with symptomatic SCD. Eighteen patients, median age 8.9 years (2.3-20.2), M/F 15/3, 15 sibling BM and 3 sibling cord blood (CB) were transplanted. Mean whole blood and erythroid donor chimerism was 91% and 88%, at days +100 and +365, respectively. Probability of grade II-IV acute GVHD was 17%. Two-year EFS and OS were both 100%. Neurological, pulmonary and cardiovascular function were stable or improved at 2 years. BFA RTC and HLA-matched sibling BM and CB allo-SCT in pediatric recipients result in excellent EFS, long-term donor chimerism, low incidence of GVHD and stable/improved organ function.

  2. Joint electrical, photophysical, and photovoltaic studies on truxene dye-sensitized solar cells: impact of arylamine electron donors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihui; Liang, Mao; Wang, He; Wang, Peng; Cheng, Fangyi; Sun, Zhe; Song, Xue

    2014-03-01

    The judicious design of electron donors is one of the viable tactics to improve the efficiency of organic dyes for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) employing outer-sphere redox couples. Herein, a hexahexyltruxene-substituted 4-(hexyloxy)-N-phenylaniline (HT-HPA) segment is constructed and employed as the electron donor in two organic push-pull dyes (M28 and M29) with high molar absorption coefficient values. Relative to its congener (C241) possessing the dihexyloxy-substituted triphenylamine electron donor, M29 exhibits red-shifted absorption as well as enhanced maximum molar absorption coefficient values. A thorough comparison with M29 and C241 demonstrates that the HT-HPA segment adequately insulates the TiO2 surface from the electrolyte, which prevents back-recombination and prolongs electron lifetime in the semiconductor. The diminishment of charge recombination not only enables attainment of strikingly high photovoltages (approaching 1 V), but also overcompensates the disadvantageous impact of lower dye-load amounts. As a result, the dye transformation from C241 to M29 brings forth an efficiency improvement from 7.3 % to 8.5 % at the 100 mW cm(-2) simulated AM1.5 conditions. Our work should shed light on the future design of more powerful push-pull organic photosensitizers for iodine-free DSCs.

  3. Cell Phone Use by Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryen, Diane Nelson; Carey, Allison; Friedman, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Although cell phone use has grown dramatically, there is a gap in cell phone access between people with disabilities and the general public. The importance of cell phone use among people with intellectual disabilities and studies about use of cell phones by adults with intellectual disabilities was described. Our goal was to determine the extent…

  4. Definition of three somatic adult cell nuclear transplant methods in zebrafish (Danio rerio): before, during and after egg activation by sperm fertilization.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Camps, M; Cardona-Costa, J; Francisco-Simao, M; García-Ximénez, F

    2010-02-01

    Zebrafish somatic nuclear transplant has only been attempted using preactivated eggs. In this work, three methods to carry out the nuclear transplant using adult cells before, during and after the egg activation/fertilization were developed in zebrafish with the aim to be used in reprogramming studies. The donor nucleus from somatic adult cells was inserted: (method A) in the central region of the egg and subsequently fertilized; (method B) in the incipient animal pole at the same time that the egg was fertilized; and (method C) in the completely defined animal pole after fertilization. Larval and adult specimens were obtained using the three methods. Technical aspects related to temperature conditions, media required, egg activation/fertilization, post-ovulatory time of the transplant, egg aging, place of the donor nucleus injection in each methodology are presented. In conclusion, the technical approach developed in this work can be used in reprogramming studies.

  5. Hematopoietic bone marrow cells participate in endothelial, but not epithelial or mesenchymal cell renewal in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Odörfer, Kathrin I; Egerbacher, Monika; Unger, Nina J; Weber, Karin; Jamnig, Angelika; Lepperdinger, Günter; Kleiter, Miriam; Sandgren, Eric P; Erben, Reinhold G

    2011-01-01

    The extent to which bone marrow (BM) contributes to physiological cell renewal is still controversial. Using the marker human placental alkaline phosphatase (ALPP) which can readily be detected in paraffin and plastic sections by histochemistry or immunohistochemistry, and in ultrathin sections by electron microscopy after pre-embedding staining, we examined the role of endogenous BM in physiological cell renewal by analysing tissues from lethally irradiated wild-type inbred Fischer 344 (F344) rats transplanted (BMT) with unfractionated BM from ALPP-transgenic F344 rats ubiquitously expressing the marker. Histochemical, immunohistochemical and immunoelectron microscopic analysis showed that the proportion of ALPP+ capillary endothelial cells (EC) profoundly increased from 1 until 6 months after BMT in all organs except brain and adrenal medulla. In contrast, pericytes and EC in large blood vessels were ALPP–. Epithelial cells in kidney, liver, pancreas, intestine and brain were recipient-derived at all time-points. Similarly, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, striated muscle and smooth muscle cells were exclusively of recipient origin. The lack of mesenchymal BM-derived cells in peripheral tissues prompted us to examine whether BMT resulted in engraftment of mesenchymal precursors. Four weeks after BMT, all haematopoietic BM cells were of donor origin by flow cytometric analysis, whereas isolation of BM mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) failed to show engraftment of donor MSC. In conclusion, our data show that BM is an important source of physiological renewal of EC in adult rats, but raise doubt whether reconstituted irradiated rats are an apt model for BM-derived regeneration of mesenchymal cells in peripheral tissues. PMID:21091631

  6. Sibling cord blood donor program for hematopoietic cell transplantation: the 20-year experience in the Rome Cord Blood Bank.

    PubMed

    Screnci, Maria; Murgi, Emilia; Valle, Veronica; Tamburini, Anna; Pellegrini, Maria Grazia; Strano, Sabrina; Corona, Francesca; Ambrogi, Eleonora Barbacci; Girelli, Gabriella

    2016-03-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) represents a source of hematopoietic stem cells for patients lacking a suitably matched and readily available related or unrelated stem cell donor. As UCB transplantation from compatible sibling provides good results in children therefore directed sibling UCB collection and banking is indicated in family who already have a child with a disease potentially treatable with an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Particularly, related UCB collection is recommended when the patients urgently need a transplantation. To provide access to all patients in need, we developed a "Sibling cord blood donor program for hematopoietic cell transplantation". Here we report results of this project started 20years ago. To date, in this study a total of 194 families were enrolled, a total of 204 UCB samples were successfully collected and 15 pediatric patients have been transplanted. Recently, some authors have suggested novel role for UCB other than in the transplantation setting. Therefore, future studies in the immunotherapy and regenerative medicine areas could expand indication for sibling directed UCB collection.

  7. Palifermin in Preventing Chronic Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients Who Have Undergone Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-19

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Graft Versus Host Disease; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma

  8. T cell subset profile in healthy Zambian adults at the University Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Chisenga, Caroline Cleopatra; Kelly, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Symptom-free human immunodeficiency virus antibody-negative Zambian adults (51 subjects, aged 20 to 62 years, 33.3% women and 66.7% men) were studied to establish T cell subset reference ranges. Methods We carried out across sectional study at the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka. Blood samples were collected from healthy donor volunteers from hospital health care staff, between February and March 2015. Immunopheno typing was undertaken to characterize Tcell subsets using the markers CD3, CD4, CD8, α4β7, Ki67, CD25, CCR7, CD54RA, CD57, CD28, CD27 and HLA-DR. Results Among 51 volunteers, Women had significantly higher absolute CD4 count (median 1042; IQR 864, 1270) than in men (671; 545, 899) (p=0.003). Women also had more CD4 cells expressing homing, naïve, effector and effector memory T cell subsets compared to men. However, in the CD8 population, only the effector cells were significantly different with women expressing more than the males. Conclusion We provide early reference range for T cell subsets in Zambian adults and conclude that among the African women some T cell subsets are higher than men. PMID:27231509

  9. EVALUATION OF RED BLOOD CELL INDICES RELATED DISORDERS AMONG ELIGIBLE BLOOD DONORS AT THE UNIVERSITI PUTRA MALAYSIA (UPM).

    PubMed

    Riahi, Shahrzad; Mei, I Lai; Idris, Fariddh Binti; George, Elizabeth; Noor, Sabariah Md

    2015-09-01

    Pre-donation screening declarations and hemoglobin (Hb) testing are measures used to determine the quality of donated blood. The copper sulphate (CuSo4) method used to screen for blood abnormalities can give inaccurate results if strict quality control is not applied. Blood donors who are carriers of thalassemia and those with mild iron deficiency anemia (IDA) are usually asymptomatic and frequently missed at blood donation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the red blood cell (RBC) indices related disorders among blood donors who were deemed qualified to donate blood after screening with CuSo4 method. One hundred fifty-eight volunteer blood donors at the Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), who had passed the CuSo4 screening method, were recruited for this study. Their bloods specimens were examined with a complete blood count. Subjects with a low mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) level were examined further by checking a serum ferritin level, Hb quantification, and molecular analysis to examine for common RBC disorders. Fourteen point six percent of subjects had a low Hb level, two (1.3%) had IDA and four (2.5%) had thalassemia or some other hemoglobinopathy. Using a MCH level < 27 pg as a cut-off point, 58 subjects (36.7%) had suspected IDA, thalassemia or some other hemoglobinopathy. Eight point nine percent of subjects with a normal Hb level had thalassemia, and 3.8% had IDA. Malaysia has a high prevalence of thalassemia and other hemoglobinopathies. Pre-donation accurate screening is crucial to protect the quality of blood transfusion products. Public education regarding RBC disorders especially among blood donors is important. PMID:26863862

  10. UGT2B17 minor histocompatibility mismatch and clinical outcome after HLA-identical sibling donor stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Santos, N; Rodríguez-Romanos, R; Nieto, J B; Buño, I; Vallejo, C; Jiménez-Velasco, A; Brunet, S; Buces, E; López-Jiménez, J; González, M; Ferrá, C; Sampol, A; de la Cámara, R; Martínez, C; Gallardo, D

    2016-01-01

    Minor histocompatibility Ags (mHags) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of GVHD after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Uridine diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase 2B17 (UGT2B17) gene deletion may act as a mHag and its association with acute GVHD (aGVHD) has been described. We retrospectively studied the clinical impact of a UGT2B17 mismatch in a cohort of 1127 patients receiving a HSCT from an HLA-identical sibling donor. UGT2B17 mismatch was present in 69 cases (6.1%). Incidence of severe aGVHD was higher in the UGT2B17 mismatched pairs (22.7% vs 14.6%), but this difference was not statistically significant (P: 0.098). We did not detect differences in chronic GVHD, overall survival, relapse-free survival, transplant-related mortality or relapse. Nevertheless, when we analyzed only those patients receiving grafts from a male donor (616 cases), aGVHD was significantly higher in the UGT2B17 mismatched group (25.1% vs 12.8%; P: 0.005) and this association was confirmed by the multivariate analysis (P: 0.043; hazard ratio: 2.16, 95% confidence interval: 1.03-4.57). Overall survival was worse for patients mismatched for UGT2B17 (P: 0.005). We conclude that UGT2B17 mismatch has a negative clinical impact in allogeneic HSCT from HLA-identical sibling donors only when a male donor is used. These results should be confirmed by other studies. PMID:26367234

  11. Markers of epidermal stem cell subpopulations in adult mammalian skin.

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Kai; Watt, Fiona M

    2014-10-01

    The epidermis is the outermost layer of mammalian skin and comprises a multilayered epithelium, the interfollicular epidermis, with associated hair follicles, sebaceous glands, and eccrine sweat glands. As in other epithelia, adult stem cells within the epidermis maintain tissue homeostasis and contribute to repair of tissue damage. The bulge of hair follicles, where DNA-label-retaining cells reside, was traditionally regarded as the sole epidermal stem cell compartment. However, in recent years multiple stem cell populations have been identified. In this review, we discuss the different stem cell compartments of adult murine and human epidermis, the markers that they express, and the assays that are used to characterize epidermal stem cell properties.

  12. Fludarabine Phosphate, Melphalan, Total-Body Irradiation, Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Cancer or Bone Marrow Failure Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-05

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Aplastic Anemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Fanconi Anemia; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  13. EBV-negative aggressive B-cell lymphomas of donor origin after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Federmann, Birgit; Bonzheim, Irina; Schittenhelm, Jens; Quintanilla-Martínez, Leticia; Mankel, Barbara; Vogel, Wichard; Faul, Christoph; Bethge, Wolfgang; Fend, Falko

    2016-11-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) develop as a consequence of iatrogenic immunosuppression, and the majority is associated with EBV. PTLD after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT) are rare. Most cases are donor-derived, reflecting immune reconstitution by malignant transformed donor cells, and are EBV-positive. We report three unusual cases of aggressive EBV-negative PTLD of monomorphic type after allo-HCT. All cases were of donor origin and arose with long latency, 4-12 years after HCT. The patients had a history of severe graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) resulting in prolonged immunosuppression before the diagnosis of lymphoma. In one case, the temporal evolution of the malignant clone was analyzed by clone-specific PCR targeting the immunoglobulin heavy chain rearrangement. A tumor-specific product was already detected 3 years before lymphoma development. This indicates that chronic antigenic stimulation and reduced immune surveillance, may promote the outgrowth of premalignant donor-derived clones after acquisition of additional genetic alterations.

  14. Clonal deletion induced by either radioresistant thymic host cells or lymphohemopoietic donor cells at different stages of class I-restricted T cell ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) products and self-antigens expressed in the thymus determine the repertoire of mature alpha/beta T cells. While positive selection of self-MHC-restricted T cells is directed by MHC molecules expressed by thymic epithelial cells, negative selection depends to a large extent on self-antigens presented by lymphohemopoietic cells. However, radioresistant components of the thymus also influence negative selection, but it remains controversial whether this is accomplished by clonal deletion, clonal anergy, or other mechanisms. In this study, T cell development in mice expressing a transgenic T cell receptor (TCR) specific for lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) plus H-2Db was analyzed in the presence or absence of the viral antigen. A novel approach to analyze the thymic tissue requirements for negative selection was possible by comparing thymocyte selection in H-2Db versus H-2Dbm13 mice, since the latter allowed positive selection but not LCMV-specific deletion of transgenic TCR-expressing thymocytes. In irradiation bone marrow chimeras expressing the restriction element for negative selection (H-2Db) on host tissue, we show that radioresistant recipient cells in the thymus deleted developing T cells at an early stage of differentiation. In contrast, chimeras expressing H-2Db on lymphohemopoietic donor cells showed clonal deletion at a later stage during ontogeny. PMID:1533241

  15. Combination Chemotherapy and Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Aplastic Anemia or Hematologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-03

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Diseases; Nonmalignant Neoplasm; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  16. Early donor chimerism levels predict relapse and survival after allogeneic stem-cell transplantation with reduced intensity conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Reshef, Ran; Hexner, Elizabeth O.; Loren, Alison W.; Frey, Noelle V.; Stadtmauer, Edward A.; Luger, Selina M.; Mangan, James K.; Gill, Saar I.; Vassilev, Pavel; Lafferty, Kathryn A.; Smith, Jacqueline; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Mick, Rosemarie; Porter, David L.

    2014-01-01

    The success of hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) with reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) is limited by a high rate of disease relapse. Early risk assessment could potentially improve outcomes by identifying appropriate patients for pre-emptive strategies that may ameliorate this high risk. Using a series of landmark analyses, we investigated the predictive value of early (day-30) donor chimerism measurements on disease relapse, graft-versus-host disease and survival in a cohort of 121 patients who were allografted with a uniform RIC regimen. Chimerism levels were analyzed as continuous variables. In multivariate analysis, day-30 whole blood chimerism levels were significantly associated with relapse (HR=0.90, p<0.001), relapse-free survival (HR=0.89, p<0.001) and overall survival (HR=0.94, p=0.01). Day-30 T-cell chimerism levels were also significantly associated with relapse (HR=0.97, p=0.002), relapse-free survival (HR=0.97, p<0.001) and overall survival (HR=0.99, p=0.05). Multivariate models that included T-cell chimerism provided a better prediction for these outcomes compared to whole blood chimerism. Day-30 chimerism levels were not associated with acute or chronic graft-versus-host disease. We found that high donor chimerism levels were significantly associated with a low lymphocyte count in the recipient prior to transplant, highlighting the impact of pre-transplant lymphopenia on the kinetics of engraftment after RIC HSCT. In summary, low donor chimerism levels are associated with relapse and mortality and can potentially be used as an early predictive and prognostic marker. These findings can be used to design novel approaches to prevent relapse and to improve survival after RIC HSCT. PMID:25016197

  17. Increasing histone acetylation of cloned embryos, but not donor cells, by sodium butyrate improves their in vitro development in pigs.

    PubMed

    Das, Ziban Chandra; Gupta, Mukesh Kumar; Uhm, Sang Jun; Lee, Hoon Taek

    2010-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that increased histone acetylation in donor cells or cloned embryos, by applying a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) such as trichostatin A (TSA), significantly enhances their developmental competence. However, its effect may vary with the type of HDACi and the target species, with some research showing nonsignificant or detrimental effects of TSA on in vitro and in vivo development of embryos. In this study, we show that sodium salt of butyric acid, a short-chain fatty acid produced naturally in the body by bacterial degradation of dietary fibers in the colon and rectum, increases histone acetylation in pig fibroblast and embryos at a concentration of 1.0 and 5.0 mM, respectively. However, treatment of donor cells with NaBu did not affect the rate of blastocyst formation or embryo quality in terms of histone acetylation and total nuclei per blastocyst (p > 0.05). On the contrary, treatment of cloned pig embryos with NaBu for 4 h significantly enhanced (p < 0.01) the rate of blastocyst formation (18.3 +/- 2.1 vs. 11.2 +/- 3.0%), although the total nuclei number per blastocyst did not differ. More importantly, blastocysts generated from NaBu-treated cloned embryos had increased levels of histone acetylation that was comparable to those of in vitro fertilized (IVF) embryos (36.7 +/- 3.6 vs. 45.9 +/- 2.5). In conclusion, our data suggest that histone hyperacetylation by NaBu treatment of cloned embryos, but not donor cell, enhances their in vitro development up to blastocyst stage.

  18. Beclomethasone Dipropionate in Preventing Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-05

    Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Extramedullary Plasmacytoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Graft Versus Host Disease; Isolated Plasmacytoma of Bone; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Meningeal Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Disease, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small

  19. Potential of embryonic and adult stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Czyz, Jaroslaw; Wiese, Cornelia; Rolletschek, Alexandra; Blyszczuk, Przemyslaw; Cross, Michael; Wobus, Anna M

    2003-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of stem cell research indicate their enormous potential as a source of tissue for regenerative therapies. The success of such applications will depend on the precise properties and potentials of stem cells isolated either from embryonic, fetal or adult tissues. Embryonic stem cells established from the inner cell mass of early mouse embryos are characterized by nearly unlimited proliferation, and the capacity to differentiate into derivatives of essentially all lineages. The recent isolation and culture of human embryonic stem cell lines presents new opportunities for reconstructive medicine. However, important problems remain; first, the derivation of human embryonic stem cells from in vitro fertilized blastocysts creates ethical problems, and second, the current techniques for the directed differentiation into somatic cell populations yield impure products with tumorigenic potential. Recent studies have also suggested an unexpectedly wide developmental potential of adult tissue-specific stem cells. Here too, many questions remain concerning the nature and status of adult stem cells both in vivo and in vitro and their proliferation and differentiation/transdifferentiation capacity. This review focuses on those issues of embryonic and adult stem cell biology most relevant to their in vitro propagation and differentiation. Questions and problems related to the use of human embryonic and adult stem cells in tissue regeneration and transplantation are discussed.

  20. [18F]FHBG PET/CT Imaging of CD34-TK75 Transduced Donor T Cells in Relapsed Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Patients: Safety and Feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Eissenberg, Linda G; Rettig, Michael P; Ritchey, Julie K; Prior, Julie L; Schwarz, Sally W; Frye, Jennifer; White, Brian S; Fulton, Robert S; Ghobadi, Armin; Cooper, Matthew L; Couriel, Daniel R; Seegulam, Muhammad Esa; Piwnica-Worms, David; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Cornetta, Kenneth; DiPersio, John F

    2015-01-01

    Described herein is a first-in-man attempt to both genetically modify T cells with an imagable suicide gene and track these transduced donor T cells in allogeneic stem cell transplantation recipients using noninvasive positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT) imaging. A suicide gene encoding a human CD34-Herpes Simplex Virus-1-thymidine kinase (CD34-TK75) fusion enabled enrichment of retrovirally transduced T cells (TdT), control of graft-versus-host disease and imaging of TdT migration and expansion in vivo in mice and man. Analysis confirmed that CD34-TK75-enriched TdT contained no replication competent γ-retrovirus, were sensitive to ganciclovir, and displayed characteristic retroviral insertion sites (by targeted sequencing). Affinity-purified CD34-TK75+-selected donor T cells (1.0–13 × 105)/kg were infused into eight patients who relapsed after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Six patients also were administered 9-[4-(18F)fluoro-3-hydroxymethyl-butyl]guanine ([18F]FHBG) to specifically track the genetically modified donor T cells by PET/CT at several time points after infusion. All patients were assessed for graft-versus-host disease, response to ganciclovir, circulating TdT cells (using both quantitative polymerase chain reaction and [18F]FHBG PET/CT imaging), TdT cell clonal expansion, and immune response to the TdT. This phase 1 trial demonstrated that genetically modified T cells and [18F]FHBG can be safely infused in patients with relapsed hematologic malignancies after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:25807290

  1. Fludarabine Phosphate, Melphalan, and Low-Dose Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Aplastic Anemia; Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Congenital Amegakaryocytic Thrombocytopenia; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Polycythemia Vera; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell

  2. Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation to adults with hematologic malignancies: analysis of 66 cases at a single Japanese center.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Toshiro; Ishiyama, Ken; Ozaki, Jun; Yamashita, Yumiko; Iwaki, Noriko; Saito, Chizuru; Arahata, Masahisa; Kaya, Hiroyasu; Yoshida, Takashi

    2010-05-01

    Sixty-six adult patients with hematologic malignancies underwent haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (haplo-HSCT) without T cell depletion. The patients were preconditioned with a reduced intensity regimen, and tacrolimus was used for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis. Successful engraftment occurred in 60 patients (90.1%) and graft rejection in only 4 patients (6.1%). Among the 60 engrafted patients, only 5 developed severe (grade III or IV) acute GVHD. Twenty patients, including 19 relapse-free patients were alive at a median follow-up of 48 months (range 6-77 months). The overall survival (OS) at 6 years was 29.3%. The OS of 45 patients < 60 years of age was 43.6%, which was superior to that of 21 patients who were 60 years of age and older (9.5%) (P < 0.01). The OS of 11 patients from human leukocyte antigen (HLA) 1 locus-mismatched donors (63.6%) was higher than that of 28 patients from HLA 3 loci-mismatched donors (12.5%) (P < 0.01). Organ injury and infection were the main causes of mortality. Notably, immunosuppressive therapy could be successfully stopped in 9 patients transplanted from HLA 2 or 3 loci-mismatched donors with a median duration of 45 months (range 5-71 months). These data suggest that haplo-HSCT is a promising treatment for patients who need urgent allogeneic transplantation but lack HLA-identical family donors.

  3. Characteristics of Human Turbinate-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Are Not Affected by Allergic Condition of Donor.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Se Hwan; Cho, Hye Kyung; Park, Sang Hi; Lee, WeonSun; Lee, Hee Jin; Lee, Dong Chang; Park, Sun Hwa; Lim, Mi Hyun; Back, Sang A; Yun, Byeong Gon; Sun, Dong Il; Kang, Jun Myung; Kim, Sung Won

    2015-01-01

    The characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from human turbinates (hTMSCs) have not been investigated in allergic rhinitis. We evaluated the influence of allergic state of the donor on the characteristics, proliferation, and differentiation potential of hTMSCs, compared with hTMSCs derived from non-allergic patients. hTMSCs were isolated from five non-allergic and five allergic patients. The expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs) in hTMSCs was measured by FACS, and cell proliferation was measured using a cell counting kit. Cytokine secretion was analyzed using multiplex immunoassays. The osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic differentiation potentials of hTMSCs were evaluated by histology and gene expression analysis. In allergic patients, FACS analysis showed that TLR3 and TLR4 were more highly expressed on the surface of hTMSCs than TLR2 and TLR5. The proliferation of hTMSCs was not influenced by the presence of TLR priming. The expression of IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, IP-10, and RANTES was upregulated after the TLR4 priming. The differentiation potential of hTMSCs was not influenced by TLR priming. These characteristics of hTMSCs were similar to those of hTMSCs from non-allergic patients. We conclude that the allergic condition of the donor does not influence TLR expression, proliferation, or immunomodulatory potential of hTMSCs.

  4. [Reducing the need in donor blood in reconstructive surgery of the aorta: using a Cell Saver apparatus].

    PubMed

    Mierbekov, E M; Ilialetdinov, I D

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of using a Cell Saver "Sequestra 1000" apparatus (Medtronics) for reducing the need for donor blood in reconstructive surgery for aortic aneurism was evaluated within the case study. Thirty-seven patients, who were made different reconstructive procedures on the ascending and abdominal aorta, were examined. Twelve patients with aneurism in the ascending aorta section (AAS) and with insufficiency of the aortal valve were made prosthesis of AAS and aortal valve under extracorporeal circulation (AEC). Twenty-five patients, who were operated on the abdominal aorta section, were resected aneurysm with linear prosthesis (9), aorto-hip bifurcational alloprosthesis (15) and branching of arterio-venous fistula (1). Five patients with aneurysm in the abdominal aorta, including 3 cases of aneurysm rupture, were operated on the emergency basis. The use of a Sequestra 1000 (Medtronics) apparatus based on the Cell Saver technology aorta reconstructions cut essentially the need in donor packed red blood cells at the intraoperative (3.6 times) and postoperative (2.8 times) stages. PMID:15573718

  5. Theoretical investigation of self-assembled donor-acceptor phthalocyanine complexes and their application in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lijuan; Lin, Li; Liu, Yuwen; Li, Renjie

    2015-06-01

    A theoretical investigation of self-assembled donor-acceptor dyads (ZnPca, ZnPcb and ZnPcc) formed by axial coordination of zinc phthalocyanines appended with 4-carboxyl pyridine has been conducted with the density functional theory (DFT) method and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) calculations. A comparison between the molecular structures, atomic charges, molecular orbitals, UV-vis spectra and infrared (IR) spectra has been studied. Further, as sensitizers for the TiO2-based dye-sensitized solar cells, the photovoltaic performances have been investigated. The ZnPcc-sensitized solar cell exhibits a higher conversion efficiency than the ZnPcb and ZnPca-sensitized ones under AM 1.5G solar irradiation, while the ZnPca-sensitized cell performs the poorest due to the lack of peripheral substituents (n-butyoxyl groups) which can be confirmed by the result of the theoretical research. It shows that the directionality of charge transfer in the self-assembled donor-acceptor dyads is important and benefit for the efficiency of the DSSC.

  6. Total-Body Irradiation and Fludarabine Phosphate Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies or Kidney Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-14

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Childhood Renal Cell Carcinoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Progression of Multiple Myeloma or Plasma Cell Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Renal Medullary Carcinoma; Type 1 Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma; Type 2 Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  7. Alemtuzumab, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Low-Dose Total Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Hematological Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-05

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute

  8. Adult Human Pancreatic Islet Beta-Cells Display Limited Turnover and Long Lifespan as Determined by In-Vivo Thymidine Analog Incorporation and Radiocarbon Dating

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, S; Kushner, J A; Buchholz, B A; Meeker, A K; Stein, G M; Hsieh, M; Kirby, M; Pechhold, S; Liu, E H; Harlan, D M; Tisdale, J F

    2010-03-15

    Diabetes mellitus results from an absolute or relative deficiency of insulin producing pancreatic beta-cells. The adult human beta-cell's turnover rate remains unknown. We employed novel techniques to examine adult human islet beta-cell turnover and longevity in vivo. Subjects enrolled in NIH clinical trials received thymidine analogues [iododeoxyuridine (IdU) or bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)] 8-days to 4-years prior to death. Archival autopsy samples from ten patients (aged 17-74 years) were employed to assess beta-cell turnover by scoring nuclear analog labeling within insulin staining cells. Human adult beta-cell longevity was determined by estimating the cells genomic DNA integration of atmospheric carbon-14 ({sup 14}C). DNA was purified from pancreatic islets isolated from cadaveric donors; whole islet prep DNA was obtained from a 15 year old donor, and purified beta-cell DNA was obtained from two donors (age 48 and 80 years). {sup 14}C levels were then determined using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Cellular 'birth date' was determined by comparing the subject's DNA {sup 14}C content relative to a well-established {sup 14}C atmospheric prevalence curve. In the two subjects less than age 20 years, 1-2% of the beta-cell nuclei co-stained for BrdU/IdU. No beta-cell nuclei co-stained in the eight patients more than 30 years old. Consistent with the BrdU/IdU turnover data, beta-cell DNA {sup 14}C content indicated the cells 'birth date' occurred within the subject's first 30 years of life. Under typical circumstances, adult human beta-cells and their cellular precursors are established by young adulthood.

  9. Relationship between triterpenoid anticancer drug resistance, autophagy, and caspase-1 in adult T-cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Tsukasa; Morita, Kentaro; Tsukada, Junichi; Kanazawa, Tamotsu

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that the inflammasome inhibitor cucurbitacin D (CuD) induces apoptosis in human leukemia cell lines. Here, we investigated the effects of CuD and a B-cell lymphoma extra-large (Bcl-xL) inhibitor on autophagy in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) isolated from adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) patients. CuD induced PBL cell death in patients but not in healthy donors. This effect was not significantly inhibited by treatment with rapamycin or 3-methyladenine (3-MA). The Bcl-xL inhibitor Z36 induced death in primary cells from ATL patients including that induced by CuD treatment, effects that were partly inhibited by 3-MA. Similarly, cell death induced by the steroid prednisolone was enhanced in the presence of Z36. A western blot analysis revealed that Z36 also promoted CuD-induced poly(ADP ribose) polymerase cleavage. Interestingly, the effects of CuD and Z36 were attenuated in primary ATL patient cells obtained upon recurrence after umbilical cord blood transplantation, as compared to those obtained before chemotherapy. Furthermore, cells from this patient expressed a high level of caspase-1, and treatment with caspase-1 inhibitor-enhanced CuD-induced cell death. Taken together, these results suggest that rescue from resistance to steroid drugs can enhance chemotherapy, and that caspase-1 is a good marker for drug resistance in ATL patients. PMID:27190722

  10. All-Polymer Solar Cell Performance Optimized via Systematic Molecular Weight Tuning of Both Donor and Acceptor Polymers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nanjia; Dudnik, Alexander S; Li, Ting I N G; Manley, Eric F; Aldrich, Thomas J; Guo, Peijun; Liao, Hsueh-Chung; Chen, Zhihua; Chen, Lin X; Chang, Robert P H; Facchetti, Antonio; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica; Marks, Tobin J

    2016-02-01

    The influence of the number-average molecular weight (Mn) on the blend fil