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Sample records for adult drosophila midgut

  1. Intestinal stem cells in the adult Drosophila midgut

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Huaqi; Edgar, Bruce A.

    2011-11-15

    Drosophila has long been an excellent model organism for studying stem cell biology. Notably, studies of Drosophila's germline stem cells have been instrumental in developing the stem cell niche concept. The recent discovery of somatic stem cells in adult Drosophila, particularly the intestinal stem cells (ISCs) of the midgut, has established Drosophila as an exciting model to study stem cell-mediated adult tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Here, we review the major signaling pathways that regulate the self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation of Drosophila ISCs, discussing how this regulation maintains midgut homeostasis and mediates regeneration of the intestinal epithelium after injury. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The homeostasis and regeneration of adult fly midguts are mediated by ISCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Damaged enterocytes induce the proliferation of intestinal stem cells (ISC). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGFR and Jak/Stat signalings mediate compensatory ISC proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Notch signaling regulates ISC self-renewal and differentiation.

  2. EGFR/Ras/MAPK signaling mediates adult midgut epithelial homeostasis and regeneration in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Huaqi; Grenley, Marc O.; Bravo, Maria-Jose; Blumhagen, Rachel Z.; Edgar, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    Many tissues in higher animals undergo dynamic homeostatic growth, wherein damaged or aged cells are replaced by the progeny of resident stem cells. To maintain homeostasis, stem cells must respond to tissue needs. Here we show that in response to damage or stress in the intestinal (midgut) epithelium of adult Drosophila, multiple EGFR ligands and rhomboids (intramembrane proteases that activate some EGFR ligands) are induced, leading to the activation of EGFR signaling in intestinal stem cells (ISCs). Activation of EGFR signaling promotes ISC division and midgut epithelium regeneration, thus maintaining tissue homeostasis. ISCs defective in EGFR signaling cannot grow or divide, are poorly maintained, and cannot support midgut epithelium regeneration following enteric infection by the bacterium, Pseudomonas entomophila. Furthermore, ISC proliferation induced by Jak/Stat signaling is dependent upon EGFR signaling. Thus the EGFR/Ras/MAPK signaling pathway plays central, essential roles in ISC maintenance and the feedback system that mediates intestinal homeostasis. PMID:21167805

  3. GATAe regulates intestinal stem cell maintenance and differentiation in Drosophila adult midgut.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Takashi; Takeda, Koji; Kuchiki, Megumi; Akaishi, Marie; Taniguchi, Kiichiro; Adachi-Yamada, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Adult intestinal tissues, exposed to the external environment, play important roles including barrier and nutrient-absorption functions. These functions are ensured by adequately controlled rapid-cell metabolism. GATA transcription factors play essential roles in the development and maintenance of adult intestinal tissues both in vertebrates and invertebrates. We investigated the roles of GATAe, the Drosophila intestinal GATA factor, in adult midgut homeostasis with its first-generated knock-out mutant as well as cell type-specific RNAi and overexpression experiments. Our results indicate that GATAe is essential for proliferation and maintenance of intestinal stem cells (ISCs). Also, GATAe is involved in the differentiation of enterocyte (EC) and enteroendocrine (ee) cells in both Notch (N)-dependent and -independent manner. The results also indicate that GATAe has pivotal roles in maintaining normal epithelial homeostasis of the Drosophila adult midgut through interaction of N signaling. Since recent reports showed that mammalian GATA-6 regulates normal and cancer stem cells in the adult intestinal tract, our data also provide information on the evolutionally conserved roles of GATA factors in stem-cell regulation. PMID:26719127

  4. Requirement of matrix metalloproteinase-1 for intestinal homeostasis in the adult Drosophila midgut

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Shin-Hae; Park, Joung-Sun; Kim, Young-Shin; Chung, Hae-Young; Yoo, Mi-Ae

    2012-03-10

    Stem cells are tightly regulated by both intrinsic and extrinsic signals as well as the extracellular matrix (ECM) for tissue homeostasis and regenerative capacity. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), proteolytic enzymes, modulate the turnover of numerous substrates, including cytokine precursors, growth factors, and ECM molecules. However, the roles of MMPs in the regulation of adult stem cells are poorly understood. In the present study, we utilize the Drosophila midgut, which is an excellent model system for studying stem cell biology, to show that Mmp1 is involved in the regulation of intestinal stem cells (ISCs). The results showed that Mmp1 is expressed in the adult midgut and that its expression increases with age and with exposure to oxidative stress. Mmp1 knockdown or Timp-overexpressing flies and flies heterozygous for a viable, hypomorphic Mmp1 allele increased ISC proliferation in the gut, as shown by staining with an anti-phospho-histone H3 antibody and BrdU incorporation assays. Reduced Mmp1 levels induced intestinal hyperplasia, and the Mmp1depletion-induced ISC proliferation was rescued by the suppression of the EGFR signaling pathway, suggesting that Mmp1 regulates ISC proliferation through the EGFR signaling pathway. Furthermore, adult gut-specific knockdown and whole-animal heterozygotes of Mmp1 increased additively sensitivity to paraquat-induced oxidative stress and shortened lifespan. Our data suggest that Drosophila Mmp1 is involved in the regulation of ISC proliferation for maintenance of gut homeostasis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1 is expressed in the adult midgut. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1 is involved in the regulation of ISC proliferation activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1-related ISC proliferation is associated with EGFR signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1 in the gut is required for the intestinal homeostasis and longevity.

  5. Enteroendocrine cells are generated from stem cells through a distinct progenitor in the adult Drosophila posterior midgut

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xiankun; Hou, Steven X.

    2015-01-01

    Functional mature cells are continually replenished by stem cells to maintain tissue homoeostasis. In the adult Drosophila posterior midgut, both terminally differentiated enterocyte (EC) and enteroendocrine (EE) cells are generated from an intestinal stem cell (ISC). However, it is not clear how the two differentiated cells are generated from the ISC. In this study, we found that only ECs are generated through the Su(H)GBE+ immature progenitor enteroblasts (EBs), whereas EEs are generated from ISCs through a distinct progenitor pre-EE by a novel lineage-tracing system. EEs can be generated from ISCs in three ways: an ISC becoming an EE, an ISC becoming a new ISC and an EE through asymmetric division, or an ISC becoming two EEs through symmetric division. We further identified that the transcriptional factor Prospero (Pros) regulates ISC commitment to EEs. Our data provide direct evidence that different differentiated cells are generated by different modes of stem cell lineage specification within the same tissues. PMID:25670791

  6. Bursicon-α subunit modulates dLGR2 activity in the adult Drosophila melanogaster midgut independently to Bursicon-β.

    PubMed

    Scopelliti, Alessandro; Bauer, Christin; Cordero, Julia B; Vidal, Marcos

    2016-06-17

    Bursicon is the main regulator of post molting and post eclosion processes during arthropod development. The active Bursicon hormone is a heterodimer of Burs-α and Burs-β. However, adult midguts express Burs-α to regulate the intestinal stem cell niche. Here, we examined the potential expression and function of its heterodimeric partner, Burs-β in the adult midgut. Unexpectedly, our evidence suggests that Burs-β is not significantly expressed in the adult midgut. burs-β mutants displayed the characteristic developmental defects but showed wild type-like adult midguts, thus uncoupling the developmental and adult phenotypes seen in burs-α mutants. Gain of function data and ex vivo experiments using a cAMP biosensor, demonstrated that Burs-α is sufficient to drive stem cell quiescence and to activate dLGR2 in the adult midgut. Our evidence suggests that the post developmental transactivation of dLGR2 in the adult midgut is mediated by Burs-α and that the β subunit of Bursicon is dispensable for these activities. PMID:27191973

  7. Bursicon-α subunit modulates dLGR2 activity in the adult Drosophila melanogaster midgut independently to Bursicon-β

    PubMed Central

    Scopelliti, Alessandro; Bauer, Christin; Cordero, Julia B.; Vidal, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bursicon is the main regulator of post molting and post eclosion processes during arthropod development. The active Bursicon hormone is a heterodimer of Burs-α and Burs-β. However, adult midguts express Burs-α to regulate the intestinal stem cell niche. Here, we examined the potential expression and function of its heterodimeric partner, Burs-β in the adult midgut. Unexpectedly, our evidence suggests that Burs-β is not significantly expressed in the adult midgut. burs-β mutants displayed the characteristic developmental defects but showed wild type-like adult midguts, thus uncoupling the developmental and adult phenotypes seen in burs-α mutants. Gain of function data and ex vivo experiments using a cAMP biosensor, demonstrated that Burs-α is sufficient to drive stem cell quiescence and to activate dLGR2 in the adult midgut. Our evidence suggests that the post developmental transactivation of dLGR2 in the adult midgut is mediated by Burs-α and that the β subunit of Bursicon is dispensable for these activities. PMID:27191973

  8. Increased centrosome amplification in aged stem cells of the Drosophila midgut

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Joung-Sun; Pyo, Jung-Hoon; Na, Hyun-Jin; Jeon, Ho-Jun; Kim, Young-Shin; Arking, Robert; Yoo, Mi-Ae

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • Increased centrosome amplification in ISCs of aged Drosophila midguts. • Increased centrosome amplification in ISCs of oxidative stressed Drosophila midguts. • Increased centrosome amplification in ISCs by overexpression of PVR, EGFR, and AKT. • Supernumerary centrosomes can be responsible for abnormal ISC polyploid cells. • Supernumerary centrosomes can be a useful marker for aging stem cells. - Abstract: Age-related changes in long-lived tissue-resident stem cells may be tightly linked to aging and age-related diseases such as cancer. Centrosomes play key roles in cell proliferation, differentiation and migration. Supernumerary centrosomes are known to be an early event in tumorigenesis and senescence. However, the age-related changes of centrosome duplication in tissue-resident stem cells in vivo remain unknown. Here, using anti-γ-tubulin and anti-PH3, we analyzed mitotic intestinal stem cells with supernumerary centrosomes in the adult Drosophila midgut, which may be a versatile model system for stem cell biology. The results showed increased centrosome amplification in intestinal stem cells of aged and oxidatively stressed Drosophila midguts. Increased centrosome amplification was detected by overexpression of PVR, EGFR, and AKT in intestinal stem cells/enteroblasts, known to mimic age-related changes including hyperproliferation of intestinal stem cells and hyperplasia in the midgut. Our data show the first direct evidence for the age-related increase of centrosome amplification in intestinal stem cells and suggest that the Drosophila midgut is an excellent model for studying molecular mechanisms underlying centrosome amplification in aging adult stem cells in vivo.

  9. A tetraspanin regulates septate junction formation in Drosophila midgut.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Yasushi; Motoishi, Minako; Furuse, Kyoko; Furuse, Mikio

    2016-03-15

    Septate junctions (SJs) are membrane specializations that restrict the free diffusion of solutes through the paracellular pathway in invertebrate epithelia. In arthropods, two morphologically different types of septate junctions are observed; pleated (pSJs) and smooth (sSJs), which are present in ectodermally and endodermally derived epithelia, respectively. Recent identification of sSJ-specific proteins, Mesh and Ssk, in Drosophila indicates that the molecular compositions of sSJs and pSJs differ. A deficiency screen based on immunolocalization of Mesh identified a tetraspanin family protein, Tsp2A, as a newly discovered protein involved in sSJ formation in Drosophila Tsp2A specifically localizes at sSJs in the midgut and Malpighian tubules. Compromised Tsp2A expression caused by RNAi or the CRISPR/Cas9 system was associated with defects in the ultrastructure of sSJs, changed localization of other sSJ proteins, and impaired barrier function of the midgut. In most Tsp2A mutant cells, Mesh failed to localize to sSJs and was distributed through the cytoplasm. Tsp2A forms a complex with Mesh and Ssk and these proteins are mutually interdependent for their localization. These observations suggest that Tsp2A cooperates with Mesh and Ssk to organize sSJs. PMID:26848177

  10. Whole-genome expression analysis in the third instar larval midgut of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Harrop, Thomas W R; Pearce, Stephen L; Daborn, Phillip J; Batterham, Philip

    2014-09-05

    Survival of insects on a substrate containing toxic substances such as plant secondary metabolites or insecticides is dependent on the metabolism or excretion of those xenobiotics. The primary sites of xenobiotic metabolism are the midgut, Malpighian tubules, and fat body. In general, gene expression in these organs is reported for the entire tissue by online databases, but several studies have shown that gene expression within the midgut is compartmentalized. Here, RNA sequencing is used to investigate whole-genome expression in subsections of third instar larval midguts of Drosophila melanogaster. The data support functional diversification in subsections of the midgut. Analysis of the expression of gene families that are implicated in the metabolism of xenobiotics suggests that metabolism may not be uniform along the midgut. These data provide a starting point for investigating gene expression and xenobiotic metabolism and other functions of the larval midgut.

  11. Whole-Genome Expression Analysis in the Third Instar Larval Midgut of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Harrop, Thomas W. R.; Pearce, Stephen L.; Daborn, Phillip J.; Batterham, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Survival of insects on a substrate containing toxic substances such as plant secondary metabolites or insecticides is dependent on the metabolism or excretion of those xenobiotics. The primary sites of xenobiotic metabolism are the midgut, Malpighian tubules, and fat body. In general, gene expression in these organs is reported for the entire tissue by online databases, but several studies have shown that gene expression within the midgut is compartmentalized. Here, RNA sequencing is used to investigate whole-genome expression in subsections of third instar larval midguts of Drosophila melanogaster. The data support functional diversification in subsections of the midgut. Analysis of the expression of gene families that are implicated in the metabolism of xenobiotics suggests that metabolism may not be uniform along the midgut. These data provide a starting point for investigating gene expression and xenobiotic metabolism and other functions of the larval midgut. PMID:25193493

  12. Plant Defense Inhibitors Affect the Structures of Midgut Cells in Drosophila melanogaster and Callosobruchus maculatus.

    PubMed

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Pittendrigh, Barry R; Murdock, Larry L

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce proteins such as protease inhibitors and lectins as defenses against herbivorous insects and pathogens. However, no systematic studies have explored the structural responses in the midguts of insects when challenged with plant defensive proteins and lectins across different species. In this study, we fed two kinds of protease inhibitors and lectins to the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and alpha-amylase inhibitors and lectins to the cowpea bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus. We assessed the changes in midgut cell structures by comparing them with such structures in insects receiving normal diets or subjected to food deprivation. Using light and transmission electron microscopy in both species, we observed structural changes in the midgut peritrophic matrix as well as shortened microvilli on the surfaces of midgut epithelial cells in D. melanogaster. Dietary inhibitors and lectins caused similar lesions in the epithelial cells but not much change in the peritrophic matrix in both species. We also noted structural damages in the Drosophila midgut after six hours of starvation and changes were still present after 12 hours. Our study provided the first evidence of key structural changes of midguts using a comparative approach between a dipteran and a coleopteran. Our particular observation and discussion on plant-insect interaction and dietary stress are relevant for future mode of action studies of plant defensive protein in insect physiology. PMID:27594789

  13. Plant Defense Inhibitors Affect the Structures of Midgut Cells in Drosophila melanogaster and Callosobruchus maculatus

    PubMed Central

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Pittendrigh, Barry R.; Murdock, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce proteins such as protease inhibitors and lectins as defenses against herbivorous insects and pathogens. However, no systematic studies have explored the structural responses in the midguts of insects when challenged with plant defensive proteins and lectins across different species. In this study, we fed two kinds of protease inhibitors and lectins to the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and alpha-amylase inhibitors and lectins to the cowpea bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus. We assessed the changes in midgut cell structures by comparing them with such structures in insects receiving normal diets or subjected to food deprivation. Using light and transmission electron microscopy in both species, we observed structural changes in the midgut peritrophic matrix as well as shortened microvilli on the surfaces of midgut epithelial cells in D. melanogaster. Dietary inhibitors and lectins caused similar lesions in the epithelial cells but not much change in the peritrophic matrix in both species. We also noted structural damages in the Drosophila midgut after six hours of starvation and changes were still present after 12 hours. Our study provided the first evidence of key structural changes of midguts using a comparative approach between a dipteran and a coleopteran. Our particular observation and discussion on plant–insect interaction and dietary stress are relevant for future mode of action studies of plant defensive protein in insect physiology. PMID:27594789

  14. Plant Defense Inhibitors Affect the Structures of Midgut Cells in Drosophila melanogaster and Callosobruchus maculatus

    PubMed Central

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Pittendrigh, Barry R.; Murdock, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce proteins such as protease inhibitors and lectins as defenses against herbivorous insects and pathogens. However, no systematic studies have explored the structural responses in the midguts of insects when challenged with plant defensive proteins and lectins across different species. In this study, we fed two kinds of protease inhibitors and lectins to the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and alpha-amylase inhibitors and lectins to the cowpea bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus. We assessed the changes in midgut cell structures by comparing them with such structures in insects receiving normal diets or subjected to food deprivation. Using light and transmission electron microscopy in both species, we observed structural changes in the midgut peritrophic matrix as well as shortened microvilli on the surfaces of midgut epithelial cells in D. melanogaster. Dietary inhibitors and lectins caused similar lesions in the epithelial cells but not much change in the peritrophic matrix in both species. We also noted structural damages in the Drosophila midgut after six hours of starvation and changes were still present after 12 hours. Our study provided the first evidence of key structural changes of midguts using a comparative approach between a dipteran and a coleopteran. Our particular observation and discussion on plant–insect interaction and dietary stress are relevant for future mode of action studies of plant defensive protein in insect physiology.

  15. Adult midgut malrotation presented with acute bowel obstruction and ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zengin, Akile; Uçar, Bercis İmge; Düzgün, Şükrü Aydın; Bayhan, Zülfü; Zeren, Sezgin; Yaylak, Faik; Şanal, Bekir; Bayhan, Nilüfer Araz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intestinal malrotation refers to the partial or complete failure of rotation of midgut around the superior mesenteric vessels in embryonic life. Arrested midgut rotation results due to narrow-based mesentery and increases the risk of twisting midgut and subsequent obstruction and necrosis. Presentation of case 40 years old female patient admitted to emergency service with acute abdomen and computerized tomography scan showed dilated large and small intestine segments with air-fluid levels and twisted mesentery around superior mesenteric artery and vein indicating “whirpool sign”. Discussion Malrotation in adults is a rare cause of midgut volvulus as though it should be considered in differential diagnosis in patients presented with acute abdomen and intestinal ischemia. Even though clinical symptoms are obscure, adult patients usually present with vomiting and recurrent abdominal pain due to chronic partial obstruction. Contrast enhanced radiograph has been shown to be the most accurate method. Typical radiological signs are corkscrew sign, which is caused by the dilatation of various duodenal segments at different levels and the relocation of duodenojejunal junction due to jejunum folding. As malrotation commonly causes intestinal obstruction, patients deserve an elective laparotomy. Conclusion Malrotation should be considered in differential diagnosis in patients presented with acute abdomen and intestinal ischemia. Surgical intervention should be prompt to limit morbidity and mortality. PMID:27015011

  16. Suppressor of Deltex mediates Pez degradation and modulates Drosophila midgut homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Wenxiang; Yin, Meng-Xin; Hu, Lianxin; Li, Peixue; Xu, Jiajun; Huang, Hongling; Wang, Shimin; Lu, Yi; Wu, Wenqing; Ho, Margaret S; Li, Lin; Zhao, Yun; Zhang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Pez functions as an upstream negative regulator of Yorkie (Yki) to regulate intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation and is essential for the activity of the Hippo pathway specifically in the Drosophila midgut epithelium. Here we report that Suppressor of Deltex (Su(dx)) acts as a negative regulator of Pez. We show that Su(dx) targets Pez for degradation both in vitro and in vivo. Overexpression of Su(dx) induces proliferation in the fly midgut epithelium, which can be rescued by overexpressed Pez. We also demonstrate that the interaction between Su(dx) and Pez, bridged by WW domains and PY/PPxY motifs, is required for Su(dx)-mediated Pez degradation. Furthermore, we find that Kibra, a binding partner of Pez, stabilizes Pez via WW-PY/PPxY interaction. Moreover, PTPN14, a Pez mammalian homolog, is degraded by overexpressed Su(dx) or Su(dx) homologue WWP1 in mammalian cells. These results reveal a previously unrecognized mechanism of Pez degradation in maintaining the homeostasis of Drosophila midgut. PMID:25814387

  17. Fine-structural changes in the midgut of old Drosophila melanogaster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anton-Erxleben, F.; Miquel, J.; Philpott, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    Senescent fine-structural changes in the midgut of Drosophila melanogaster are investigated. A large number of midgut mitochondria in old flies exhibit nodular cristae and a tubular system located perpendicular to the normal cristae orientation. Anterior intestinal cells show a senescent accumulation of age pigment, either with a surrounding two-unit membrane or without any membrane. The predominant localization of enlarged mitochondria and pigment in the luminal gut region may be related to the polarized metabolism of the intestinal cells. Findings concur with previous observations of dense-body accumulations and support the theory that mitochondria are involved in the aging of fixed post-mitotic cells. Demonstrated by statistical analyses is that mitochondrial size increase is related to mitochondrial variation increase.

  18. Changes in Drosophila melanogaster midgut proteins in response to dietary Bowman-Birk inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Li, H-M; Margam, V; Muir, W M; Murdock, L L; Pittendrigh, B R

    2007-10-01

    The midgut proteome of Drosophila melanogaster was compared in larvae fed dietary Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI) vs. larvae fed a control diet. By using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, nine differentially expressed proteins were observed, which were associated with enzymes or transport functions such as sterol carrier protein X (SCPX), ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, endopeptidase, receptor signalling protein kinase, ATP-dependent RNA helicase and alpha-tocopherol transport. Quantitative real-time PCR verified differential expression of transcripts coding for six of the proteins observed from the proteomic analysis. BBI evidently affects expression of proteins associated with protein degradation, transport and fatty acid catabolism. We then tested the hypothesis that SCPX was critical for the Drosophila third instars' response to BBI treatment. Inhibition of SCPX caused the third instars to become more susceptible to dietary BBI. PMID:17725801

  19. Midgut-enriched receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP52F is required for Drosophila development during larva-pupa transition.

    PubMed

    Santhanam, Abirami; Liang, Suh-Yuen; Chen, Dong-Yuan; Chen, Guang-Chao; Meng, Tzu-Ching

    2013-01-01

    To date our understanding of Drosophila receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (R-PTPs) in the regulation of signal transduction is limited. Of the seven R-PTPs identified in flies, six are involved in the axon guidance that occurs during embryogenesis. However, whether and how R-PTPs may control key steps of Drosophila development is not clear. In this study we investigated the potential role of Drosophila R-PTPs in developmental processes outside the neuronal system and beyond the embryogenesis stage. Through systematic data mining of available microarray databases, we found the mRNA level of PTP52F to be highly enriched in the midgut of flies at the larva-pupa transition. This finding was confirmed by gut tissue staining with a specific antibody. The unique spatiotemporal expression of PTP52F suggests that it is possibly involved in regulating metamorphosis during the transformation from larva to pupa. To test this hypothesis, we employed RNA interference to examine the defects of transgenic flies. We found that ablation of endogenous PTP52F led to high lethality characterized by the pharate adult phenotype, occurring due to post pupal eclosion failure. These results show that PTP52F plays an indispensable role during the larva-pupa transition. We also found that PTP52F could be reclassified as a member of the subtype R3 PTPs instead of as an unclassified R-PTP without a human ortholog, as suggested previously. Together, these findings suggest that Drosophila R-PTPs may control metamorphosis and other biological processes beyond our current knowledge.

  20. Posterior midgut epithelial cells differ in their organization of the membrane skeleton from other drosophila epithelia.

    PubMed

    Baumann, O

    2001-11-01

    In epithelial cells, the various components of the membrane skeleton are segregated within specialized subregions of the plasma membrane, thus contributing to the development and stabilization of cell surface polarity. It has previously been shown that, in various Drosophila epithelia, the membrane skeleton components ankyrin and alphabeta-spectrin reside at the lateral surface, whereas alphabeta(H)-spectrin is restricted to the apical domain. By use of confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, the present study characterizes the membrane skeleton of epithelial cells in the posterior midgut, leading to a number of unexpected results. First, ankyrin and alphabeta-spectrin are not detected on the entire lateral surface but appear to be restricted to the apicolateral area, codistributing with fasciclin III at smooth septate junctions. The presumptive ankyrin-binding proteins neuroglian and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, however, do not colocalize with ankyrin. Second, alphabeta(H)-spectrin is enriched at the apical domain but is also present in lower amounts on the entire lateral surface, colocalizing apicolaterally with ankyrin/alphabeta-spectrin. Finally, despite the absence of zonulae adherentes, F-actin, beta(H)-spectrin, and nonmuscle myosin-II are enriched in the midlateral region. Thus, the model established for the organization of the membrane skeleton in Drosophila epithelia does not hold for the posterior midgut, and there is quite some variability between the different epithelia with respect to the organization of the membrane skeleton.

  1. Adult midgut expressed sequence tags from the tsetse fly Glossina morsitans morsitans and expression analysis of putative immune response genes

    PubMed Central

    Lehane, M J; Aksoy, S; Gibson, W; Kerhornou, A; Berriman, M; Hamilton, J; Soares, M B; Bonaldo, M F; Lehane, S; Hall, N

    2003-01-01

    Background Tsetse flies transmit African trypanosomiasis leading to half a million cases annually. Trypanosomiasis in animals (nagana) remains a massive brake on African agricultural development. While trypanosome biology is widely studied, knowledge of tsetse flies is very limited, particularly at the molecular level. This is a serious impediment to investigations of tsetse-trypanosome interactions. We have undertaken an expressed sequence tag (EST) project on the adult tsetse midgut, the major organ system for establishment and early development of trypanosomes. Results A total of 21,427 ESTs were produced from the midgut of adult Glossina morsitans morsitans and grouped into 8,876 clusters or singletons potentially representing unique genes. Putative functions were ascribed to 4,035 of these by homology. Of these, a remarkable 3,884 had their most significant matches in the Drosophila protein database. We selected 68 genes with putative immune-related functions, macroarrayed them and determined their expression profiles following bacterial or trypanosome challenge. In both infections many genes are downregulated, suggesting a malaise response in the midgut. Trypanosome and bacterial challenge result in upregulation of different genes, suggesting that different recognition pathways are involved in the two responses. The most notable block of genes upregulated in response to trypanosome challenge are a series of Toll and Imd genes and a series of genes involved in oxidative stress responses. Conclusions The project increases the number of known Glossina genes by two orders of magnitude. Identification of putative immunity genes and their preliminary characterization provides a resource for the experimental dissection of tsetse-trypanosome interactions. PMID:14519198

  2. Netrins and Frazzled/DCC promote the migration and mesenchymal to epithelial transition of Drosophila midgut cells

    PubMed Central

    Pert, Melissa; Gan, Miao; Saint, Robert; Murray, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mesenchymal-epithelial transitions (METs) are important in both development and the growth of secondary tumours. Although the molecular basis for epithelial polarity is well studied, less is known about the cues that induce MET. Here we show that Netrins, well known as chemotropic guidance factors, provide a basal polarising cue during the Drosophila midgut MET. Both netrinA and netrinB are expressed in the visceral mesoderm, the substrate upon which midgut cells migrate, while their receptor frazzled (fra) is expressed in midgut cells. Netrins are required to polarise Fra to the basal surface, and Netrins and Fra undergo mutually-dependent endocytosis, with Fra subsequently trafficking to late endosomes. Mutations to fra and netrins affect both migration and MET but to different degrees. Loss of fra strongly delays migration, midgut cells fail to extend protrusions, and apico-basal polarisation of proteins and epithelium formation is inhibited. In netrin mutants, the migration phenotype is weaker and cells still extend protrusions. However, apico-basal polarisation of proteins, including Fra, and FActin is greatly disrupted and a monolayer fails to form. Delocalised accumulations of FActin are prevalent in netrin mutants but not fra mutants suggesting delocalised Fra may disrupt the MET. βPS localisation is also affected in netrin mutants in that a basal gradient is reduced while localisation to the midgut/VM interface is increased. Since a similar effect is seen when endocytosis is inhibited, Netrin and Fra may regulate Integrin turnover. The results suggest Netrin-dependent basal polarisation of Fra is critical for the formation of an epithelium. PMID:25617422

  3. Netrins and Frazzled/DCC promote the migration and mesenchymal to epithelial transition of Drosophila midgut cells.

    PubMed

    Pert, Melissa; Gan, Miao; Saint, Robert; Murray, Michael J

    2015-01-23

    Mesenchymal-epithelial transitions (METs) are important in both development and the growth of secondary tumours. Although the molecular basis for epithelial polarity is well studied, less is known about the cues that induce MET. Here we show that Netrins, well known as chemotropic guidance factors, provide a basal polarising cue during the Drosophila midgut MET. Both netrinA and netrinB are expressed in the visceral mesoderm, the substrate upon which midgut cells migrate, while their receptor frazzled (fra) is expressed in midgut cells. Netrins are required to polarise Fra to the basal surface, and Netrins and Fra undergo mutually-dependent endocytosis, with Fra subsequently trafficking to late endosomes. Mutations to fra and netrins affect both migration and MET but to different degrees. Loss of fra strongly delays migration, midgut cells fail to extend protrusions, and apico-basal polarisation of proteins and epithelium formation is inhibited. In netrin mutants, the migration phenotype is weaker and cells still extend protrusions. However, apico-basal polarisation of proteins, including Fra, and FActin is greatly disrupted and a monolayer fails to form. Delocalised accumulations of FActin are prevalent in netrin mutants but not fra mutants suggesting delocalised Fra may disrupt the MET. βPS localisation is also affected in netrin mutants in that a basal gradient is reduced while localisation to the midgut/VM interface is increased. Since a similar effect is seen when endocytosis is inhibited, Netrin and Fra may regulate Integrin turnover. The results suggest Netrin-dependent basal polarisation of Fra is critical for the formation of an epithelium.

  4. Ecdysteroid receptors in Drosophila melanogaster adult females

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ecdysteroid receptors were identified and partially characterized from total cell extracts of whole animals and dissected tissues from Drosophila melanogaster adult females. Binding studies indicated the presence of two ecdysteroid binding components having high affinity and specificity consistent w...

  5. Barber Pole Sign in CT Angiography, Adult Presentation of Midgut Malrotation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Garcelan-Trigo, Juan Arsenio; Tello-Moreno, Manuel; Rabaza-Espigares, Manuel Jesus; Talavera-Martinez, Ildefonso

    2015-01-01

    Adult midgut volvulus is a challenging diagnosis because of its low incidence and nonspecific symptoms. Diagnostic delay and long-term complaints are frequent in this clinical scenario. We reported a patient referred to our diagnostic imaging unit with intermittent abdominal pain, bloating and episodic vomiting for several years. He underwent barium gastrointestinal transit and abdominal ultrasound, which revealed severe gastric dilatation, food retention and slow transit until a depressed duodenojejunal flexure, with malrotation of the midgut and jejunal loops being located in the right upper quadrant. Computed tomography angiography was performed, showing rotation of the small intestine around the mesentery root, suggestive of midgut malrotation. In addition, an abnormal twisted disposition of superior mesenteric artery with corkscrew appearance was seen, shaping the pole-barber sign which was evident in volume rendering three-dimensional reconstructions. The patient underwent scheduled surgical treatment without any complication and had good outcome after hospital discharge and follow-up. Computed tomography plays an important role in evaluation of adult midgut volvulus. In addition, angiographic reconstructions can help us to assess the anatomic disposition of mesenteric vascular supply. Both of these assessments are useful in preoperative management. PMID:26557278

  6. Forces driven by morphogenesis modulate Twist Expression to determine Anterior Mid-gut Differentiation in Drosophila embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farge, Emmanuel

    2008-03-01

    By combining magnetic tweezers to in vivo laser ablation, we locally manipulate Drosophila embryonic tissues with physiologically relevant forces. We demonstrate that high level of Twist expression in the stomodeal primordium is mechanically induced in response to compression by the 60±20 nN force developed during germ-band extension (GBE). We find that this force triggers the junctional release and nuclear translocation of Armadillo involved in Twist mechanical induction in the stomodeum in a Src42A dependent way. Finally, stomodeal-specific RNAi-mediated silencing of Twist during compression impairs the differentiation of midgut cells, as revealed by strong defects in Dve expression and abnormal larval lethality. Thus, mechanical induction of Twist overexpression in stomodeal cells is necessary for subsequent midgut differentiation. In collaboration with Nicolas Desprat, Willy Supatto, and Philippe-Alexandre Pouille, MGDET, UMR168 CNRS, Institut Curie11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75005, Paris, France; and Emmanuel Beaurepaire, LOB, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS and INSERM U 696, 91128 Palaiseau, France.

  7. Fluid absorption in the isolated midgut of adult female yellow fever mosquitoes (Aedes aegypti).

    PubMed

    Onken, Horst; Moffett, David F

    2015-07-01

    The transepithelial voltage (Vte) and the volume of isolated posterior midguts of adult female yellow fever mosquitoes (Aedes aegypti) were monitored. In all experiments, the initial Vte after filling the midgut was lumen negative, but subsequently became lumen positive at a rate of approximately 1 mV min(-1). Simultaneously, the midgut volume decreased, indicating spontaneous fluid absorption. When the midguts were filled and bathed with mosquito saline, the average rate of fluid absorption was 36.5±3.0 nl min(-1) (N=4, ±s.e.m.). In the presence of theophylline (10 mmol l(-1)), Vte reached significantly higher lumen-positive values, but the rate of fluid absorption was not affected (N=6). In the presence of NaCN (5 mmol l(-1)), Vte remained close to 0 mV (N=4) and fluid absorption was reduced (14.4±1.3 nl min(-1), N=3, ±s.e.m.). When midguts were filled with buffered NaCl (154 mmol l(-1) plus 1 mmol l(-1) HEPES) and bathed in mosquito saline with theophylline, fluid absorption was augmented (50.0±5.8 nl min(-1), N=12, ±s.e.m.). Concanamycin A (10 µmol l(-1)), ouabain (1 mmol l(-1)), and acetazolamide (1 mmol l(-1)) affected Vte in different ways, but all reduced fluid absorption by 60-70% of the value before addition of the drugs.

  8. Dpp signaling determines regional stem cell identity in the regenerating adult Drosophila gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongjie; Qi, Yanyan; Jasper, Heinrich

    2013-07-11

    The gastrointestinal tract is lined by a series of epithelia that share functional requirements but also have distinct, highly specialized roles. Distinct populations of somatic stem cells (SCs) regenerate these epithelia, yet the mechanisms that maintain regional identities of these SCs are not well understood. Here, we identify a role for the BMP-like Dpp signaling pathway in diversifying regenerative processes in the adult gastrointestinal tract of Drosophila. Dpp secreted from enterocytes at the boundary between the posterior midgut and the middle midgut (MM) sets up a morphogen gradient that selectively directs copper cell (CC) regeneration from gastric SCs in the MM and thus determines the size of the CC region. In vertebrates, deregulation of BMP signaling has been associated with Barrett's metaplasia, wherein the squamous esophageal epithelium is replaced by a columnar epithelium, suggesting that the maintenance of regional SC identities by BMP is conserved.

  9. More Frequent than Desired: Midgut Stem Cell Somatic Mutations.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Ip, Y Tony

    2015-12-01

    The accumulation of somatic mutations in adult stem cells contributes to the decline of tissue functions and cancer initiation. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Siudeja et al. (2015) investigate the rate and mechanism of naturally occurring mutations in Drosophila midgut intestinal stem cells during aging and find high-frequency mutations arising from multiple mechanisms. PMID:26637937

  10. A subset of enteroendocrine cells is activated by amino acids in the Drosophila midgut.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong-Ho; Chen, Ji; Jang, Sooin; Ahn, Tae Jung; Kang, KyeongJin; Choi, Min Sung; Kwon, Jae Young

    2016-02-01

    The intestine is involved in digestion and absorption, as well as the regulation of metabolism upon sensation of the internal intestinal environment. Enteroendocrine cells are thought to mediate these internal intestinal chemosensory functions. Using the CaLexA (calcium-dependent nuclear import of LexA) method, we examined the enteroendocrine cell populations that are activated when flies are subjected to various dietary conditions such as starvation, sugar, high fat, protein, or pathogen exposure. We find that a specific subpopulation of enteroendocrine cells in the posterior midgut which express Dh31 and tachykinin are activated by the presence of proteins and amino acids. PMID:26801353

  11. Endocrine remodelling of the adult intestine sustains reproduction in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Reiff, Tobias; Jacobson, Jake; Cognigni, Paola; Antonello, Zeus; Ballesta, Esther; Tan, Kah Junn; Yew, Joanne Y; Dominguez, Maria; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The production of offspring is energetically costly and relies on incompletely understood mechanisms that generate a positive energy balance. In mothers of many species, changes in key energy-associated internal organs are common yet poorly characterised functionally and mechanistically. In this study, we show that, in adult Drosophila females, the midgut is dramatically remodelled to enhance reproductive output. In contrast to extant models, organ remodelling does not occur in response to increased nutrient intake and/or offspring demands, but rather precedes them. With spatially and temporally directed manipulations, we identify juvenile hormone (JH) as an anticipatory endocrine signal released after mating. Acting through intestinal bHLH-PAS domain proteins Methoprene-tolerant (Met) and Germ cell-expressed (Gce), JH signals directly to intestinal progenitors to yield a larger organ, and adjusts gene expression and sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) activity in enterocytes to support increased lipid metabolism. Our findings identify a metabolically significant paradigm of adult somatic organ remodelling linking hormonal signals, epithelial plasticity, and reproductive output.

  12. Endocrine remodelling of the adult intestine sustains reproduction in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Reiff, Tobias; Jacobson, Jake; Cognigni, Paola; Antonello, Zeus; Ballesta, Esther; Tan, Kah Junn; Yew, Joanne Y; Dominguez, Maria; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The production of offspring is energetically costly and relies on incompletely understood mechanisms that generate a positive energy balance. In mothers of many species, changes in key energy-associated internal organs are common yet poorly characterised functionally and mechanistically. In this study, we show that, in adult Drosophila females, the midgut is dramatically remodelled to enhance reproductive output. In contrast to extant models, organ remodelling does not occur in response to increased nutrient intake and/or offspring demands, but rather precedes them. With spatially and temporally directed manipulations, we identify juvenile hormone (JH) as an anticipatory endocrine signal released after mating. Acting through intestinal bHLH-PAS domain proteins Methoprene-tolerant (Met) and Germ cell-expressed (Gce), JH signals directly to intestinal progenitors to yield a larger organ, and adjusts gene expression and sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) activity in enterocytes to support increased lipid metabolism. Our findings identify a metabolically significant paradigm of adult somatic organ remodelling linking hormonal signals, epithelial plasticity, and reproductive output. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06930.001 PMID:26216039

  13. Molecular mechanism and functional significance of acid generation in the Drosophila midgut

    PubMed Central

    Overend, Gayle; Luo, Yuan; Henderson, Louise; Douglas, Angela E.; Davies, Shireen A.; Dow, Julian A. T.

    2016-01-01

    The gut of Drosophila melanogaster includes a proximal acidic region (~pH 2), however the genome lacks the H+/K+ ATPase characteristic of the mammalian gastric parietal cell, and the molecular mechanisms of acid generation are poorly understood. Here, we show that maintenance of the low pH of the acidic region is dependent on H+ V-ATPase, together with carbonic anhydrase and five further transporters or channels that mediate K+, Cl− and HCO3− transport. Abrogation of the low pH did not influence larval survival under standard laboratory conditions, but was deleterious for insects subjected to high Na+ or K+ load. Insects with elevated pH in the acidic region displayed increased susceptibility to Pseudomonas pathogens and increased abundance of key members of the gut microbiota (Acetobacter and Lactobacillus), suggesting that the acidic region has bacteriostatic or bacteriocidal activity. Conversely, the pH of the acidic region was significantly reduced in germ-free Drosophila, indicative of a role of the gut bacteria in shaping the pH conditions of the gut. These results demonstrate that the acidic gut region protects the insect and gut microbiome from pathological disruption, and shed light on the mechanisms by which low pH can be maintained in the absence of H+, K+ ATPase. PMID:27250760

  14. Mesenchymal to epithelial transition during tissue homeostasis and regeneration: Patching up the Drosophila midgut epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Antonello, Zeus A.; Reiff, Tobias; Dominguez, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are responsible for preserving morphology and function of adult tissues. Stem cells divide to self-renew and to generate progenitor cells to sustain cell demand from the tissue throughout the organism's life. Unlike stem cells, the progenitor cells have limited proliferation potential but have the capacity to terminally differentiate and thereby to substitute older or damaged mature cells. Recent findings indicate that adult stem cells can adapt their division kinetics dynamically to match changes in tissue demand during homeostasis and regeneration. However, cell turnover not only requires stem cell division but also needs timed differentiation of the progenitor cells, which has been much less explored. In this Extra View article, we discuss the ability of progenitor cells to actively postpone terminal differentiation in the absence of a local demand and how tissue demand activates terminal differentiation via a conserved mesenchymal-epithelial transition program revealed in our recent EMBO J paper and other published and unpublished data. The extent of the significance of these results is discussed for models of tissue dynamics during both homeostasis and regeneration. PMID:26760955

  15. Taste Preference Assay for Adult Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bantel, Andrew P; Tessier, Charles R

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory and gustatory perception of the environment is vital for animal survival. The most obvious application of these chemosenses is to be able to distinguish good food sources from potentially dangerous food sources. Gustation requires physical contact with a chemical compound which is able to signal through taste receptors that are expressed on the surface of neurons. In insects, these gustatory neurons can be located across the animal's body allowing taste to play an important role in many different behaviors. Insects typically prefer compounds containing sugars, while compounds that are considered bitter tasting are avoided. Given the basic biological importance of taste, there is intense interest in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying this sensory modality. We describe an adult Drosophila taste assay which reflects the preference of the animals for a given tastant compound. This assay may be applied to animals of any genetic background to examine the taste preference for a desired soluble compound. PMID:27684591

  16. Wildtype adult stem cells, unlike tumor cells, are resistant to cellular damages in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ma, Meifang; Zhao, Hang; Zhao, Hanfei; Binari, Richard; Perrimon, Norbert; Li, Zhouhua

    2016-03-15

    Adult stem cells or residential progenitor cells are critical to maintain the structure and function of adult tissues (homeostasis) throughout the lifetime of an individual. Mis-regulation of stem cell proliferation and differentiation often leads to diseases including cancer, however, how wildtype adult stem cells and cancer cells respond to cellular damages remains unclear. We find that in the adult Drosophila midgut, intestinal stem cells (ISCs), unlike tumor intestinal cells, are resistant to various cellular damages. Tumor intestinal cells, unlike wildtype ISCs, are easily eliminated by apoptosis. Further, their proliferation is inhibited upon autophagy induction, and autophagy-mediated tumor inhibition is independent of caspase-dependent apoptosis. Interestingly, inhibition of tumorigenesis by autophagy is likely through the sequestration and degradation of mitochondria, as compromising mitochondria activity in these tumor models mimics the induction of autophagy and increasing the production of mitochondria alleviates the tumor-suppression capacity of autophagy. Together, these data demonstrate that wildtype adult stem cells and tumor cells show dramatic differences in sensitivity to cellular damages, thus providing potential therapeutic implications targeting tumorigenesis. PMID:26845534

  17. Metformin inhibits age-related centrosome amplification in Drosophila midgut stem cells through AKT/TOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Na, Hyun-Jin; Park, Joung-Sun; Pyo, Jung-Hoon; Jeon, Ho-Jun; Kim, Young-Shin; Arking, Robert; Yoo, Mi-Ae

    2015-07-01

    We delineated the mechanism regulating the inhibition of centrosome amplification by metformin in Drosophila intestinal stem cells (ISCs). Age-related changes in tissue-resident stem cells may be closely associated with tissue aging and age-related diseases, such as cancer. Centrosome amplification is a hallmark of cancers. Our recent work showed that Drosophila ISCs are an excellent model for stem cell studies evaluating age-related increase in centrosome amplification. Here, we showed that metformin, a recognized anti-cancer drug, inhibits age- and oxidative stress-induced centrosome amplification in ISCs. Furthermore, we revealed that this effect is mediated via down-regulation of AKT/target of rapamycin (TOR) activity, suggesting that metformin prevents centrosome amplification by inhibiting the TOR signaling pathway. Additionally, AKT/TOR signaling hyperactivation and metformin treatment indicated a strong correlation between DNA damage accumulation and centrosome amplification in ISCs, suggesting that DNA damage might mediate centrosome amplification. Our study reveals the beneficial and protective effects of metformin on centrosome amplification via AKT/TOR signaling modulation. We identified a new target for the inhibition of age- and oxidative stress-induced centrosome amplification. We propose that the Drosophila ISCs may be an excellent model system for in vivo studies evaluating the effects of anti-cancer drugs on tissue-resident stem cell aging.

  18. Transcriptomic analysis provides insights on hexavalent chromium induced DNA double strand breaks and their possible repair in midgut cells of Drosophila melanogaster larvae.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Manish; Sharma, A; Shukla, A K; Pragya, P; Murthy, R C; de Pomerai, David; Dwivedi, U N; Chowdhuri, D Kar

    2013-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a well known mutagen and carcinogen. Since genomic instability due to generation of double strand breaks (DSBs) is causally linked to carcinogenesis, we tested a hypothesis that Cr(VI) causes in vivo generation of DSBs and elicits DNA damage response. We fed repair proficient Drosophila melanogaster (Oregon R(+)) larvae Cr(VI) (20.0μg/ml) mixed food for 24 and 48h and observed a significant (p<0.05) induction of DSBs in their midgut cells after 48h using neutral Comet assay. Global gene expression profiling in Cr(VI)-exposed Oregon R(+) larvae unveiled mis-regulation of DSBs responsive repair genes both after 24 and 48h. In vivo generation of DSBs in exposed Drosophila was confirmed by an increased pH2Av immunostaining along with the activation of cell cycle regulation genes. Analysis of mis-regulated genes grouped under DSB response by GOEAST indicated the participation of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DSB repair pathway. We selected two strains, one mutant (ligIV) and another ku80-RNAi (knockdown of ku80), whose functions are essentially linked to NHEJ-DSB repair pathway. As a proof of principle, we compared the DSBs generation in larvae of these two strains with that of repair proficient Oregon R(+). Along with this, DSBs generation in spn-A and okr [essential genes in homologous recombination repair (HR) pathway] mutants was also tested for the possible involvement of HR-DSB repair. A significantly increased DSBs generation in the exposed ku80-RNAi and ligIV (mutant) larvae because of impaired repair, concomitant with an insignificant DSBs generation in okr and spn-A mutant larvae indicates an active participation of NHEJ repair pathway. The study, first of its kind to our knowledge, while providing evidences for in vivo generation of DSBs in Cr(VI) exposed Drosophila larvae, assumes significance for its relevance to higher organisms due to causal link between DSB generation and Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis.

  19. Whole-mount immunostaining of the adult Drosophila gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Micchelli, Craig A.

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract harbors an essential barrier epithelium that separates an organism from its changing external environment. As such, the gut epithelium is a fascinating nexus of stem cell biology, immunology and physiology. Investigators have sought to mine this rich interface for new biological and mechanistic insights. Many of the powerful genetic approaches developed in Drosophila have proven effective in the study of the gut. The goal of this article is to present a method for dissecting, immunostaining and mounting samples of the adult Drosophila GI tract. This protocol combines readily with techniques to label cell lineages and/or challenge the system with environmental perturbations, which are briefly discussed. PMID:24680702

  20. Dietary glucose regulates yeast consumption in adult Drosophila males

    PubMed Central

    Lebreton, Sébastien; Witzgall, Peter; Olsson, Marie; Becher, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    The adjustment of feeding behavior in response to hunger and satiety contributes to homeostatic regulation in animals. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster feeds on yeasts growing on overripe fruit, providing nutrients required for adult survival, reproduction and larval growth. Here, we present data on how the nutritional value of food affects subsequent yeast consumption in Drosophila adult males. After a period of starvation, flies showed intensive yeast consumption. In comparison, flies stopped feeding after having access to a nutritive cornmeal diet. Interestingly, dietary glucose was equally efficient as the complex cornmeal diet. In contrast, flies fed with sucralose, a non-metabolizable sweetener, behaved as if they were starved. The adipokinetic hormone and insulin-like peptides regulate metabolic processes in insects. We did not find any effect of the adipokinetic hormone pathway on this modulation. Instead, the insulin pathway was involved in these changes. Flies lacking the insulin receptor (InR) did not respond to nutrient deprivation by increasing yeast consumption. Together these results show the importance of insulin in the regulation of yeast consumption in response to starvation in adult D. melanogaster males. PMID:25566097

  1. Genotypic structure of a Drosophila population for adult locomotor activity

    SciTech Connect

    Grechanyi, G.V.; Korzun, V.M.

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of the variation of adult locomotor activity in four samples taken at different times from a natural population of Drosophila melanogaster showed that the total variation of this trait is relatively stable in time and has a substantial genetic component. Genotypic structure of the population for locomotor activity is characterized by the presence of large groups of genotypes with high and low values of this trait. A possible explanation for the presence of such groups in a population is cyclic density-dependent selection.

  2. A method to measure myocardial calcium handling in adult Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Na; Badie, Nima; Yu, Lin; Abraham, Dennis; Cheng, Heping; Bursac, Nenad; Rockman, Howard A.; Wolf, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Normal cardiac physiology requires highly regulated cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations and abnormalities in Ca2+ handling are associated with heart failure. The majority of approaches to identify the components that regulate intracellular Ca2+ dynamics rely on cells in culture, mouse models, and human samples. However, a genetically robust system for unbiased screens of mutations that affect Ca2+ handling remains a challenge. Objective We sought to develop a new method to measure myocardial Ca2+ cycling in adult Drosophila and determine whether cardiomyopathic fly hearts recapitulate aspects of diseased mammalian myocardium. Methods and Results Using engineered transgenic Drosophila that have cardiac-specific expression of Ca2+ sensing fluorescent protein, GCaMP2, we developed methods to measure parameters associated with myocardial Ca2+ handling. The following key observations were identified: (1) Control w1118 Drosophila hearts have readily measureable Ca2+-dependent fluorescent signals that are dependent on L-type Ca2+ channels and SR Ca2+ stores and originate from rostral and caudal pacemakers; (2) A fly mutant, held-up2 (hdp2) that has a point mutation in Troponin I and has a dilated cardiomyopathic phenotype demonstrates abnormalities in myocardial Ca2+ handling that include increases in the duration of the 50% rise in intensity to peak intensity, the half-time of fluorescence decline from peak, the full duration at half maximal intensity (FDHM) and decreases in the linear slope of decay from 80% to 20% intensity decay; and (3) Hearts from hdp2 mutants had reductions in caffeine-induced Ca2+ increases and reductions in ryanodine receptor (RyR) without changes in L-type Ca2+ channel transcripts compared to w1118. Conclusions Our results show that the cardiac-specific expression of GCaMP2 provides a means to characterize propagating Ca2+ transients in adult fly hearts. Moreover, the adult fruit fly heart recapitulates several aspects of Ca2+ regulation

  3. Migration of Drosophila intestinal stem cells across organ boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Takashima, Shigeo; Paul, Manash; Aghajanian, Patrick; Younossi-Hartenstein, Amelia; Hartenstein, Volker

    2013-01-01

    All components of the Drosophila intestinal tract, including the endodermal midgut and ectodermal hindgut/Malpighian tubules, maintain populations of dividing stem cells. In the midgut and hindgut, these stem cells originate from within larger populations of intestinal progenitors that proliferate during the larval stage and form the adult intestine during metamorphosis. The origin of stem cells found in the excretory Malpighian tubules (‘renal stem cells’) has not been established. In this paper, we investigate the migration patterns of intestinal progenitors that take place during metamorphosis. Our data demonstrate that a subset of adult midgut progenitors (AMPs) move posteriorly to form the adult ureters and, consecutively, the renal stem cells. Inhibiting cell migration by AMP-directed expression of a dominant-negative form of Rac1 protein results in the absence of stem cells in the Malpighian tubules. As the majority of the hindgut progenitor cells migrate posteriorly and differentiate into hindgut enterocytes, a group of the progenitor cells, unexpectedly, invades anteriorly into the midgut territory. Consequently, these progenitor cells differentiate into midgut enterocytes. The midgut determinant GATAe is required for the differentiation of midgut enterocytes derived from hindgut progenitors. Wingless signaling acts to balance the proportion of hindgut progenitors that differentiate as midgut versus hindgut enterocytes. Our findings indicate that a stable boundary between midgut and hindgut/Malpighian tubules is not established during early embryonic development; instead, pluripotent progenitor populations cross in between these organs in both directions, and are able to adopt the fate of the organ in which they come to reside. PMID:23571215

  4. Phagocytic ability declines with age in adult Drosophila hemocytes

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Lucas; Leips, Jeff; Starz-Gaiano, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Most multicellular organisms show a physiological decline in immune function with age. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying these changes. We examined Drosophila melanogaster, an important model for identifying genes affecting innate immunity and senescence, to explore the role of phagocytosis in age-related immune dysfunction. We characterized the localized response of immune cells at the dorsal vessel to bacterial infection in 1-week- and 5-week-old flies. We developed a quantitative phagocytosis assay for adult Drosophila and utilized this to characterize the effect of age on phagocytosis in transgenic and natural variant lines. We showed that genes necessary for bacterial engulfment in other contexts are also required in adult flies. We found that blood cells from young and old flies initially engulf bacteria equally well, while cells from older flies accumulate phagocytic vesicles and thus are less capable of destroying pathogens. Our results have broad implications for understanding how the breakdown in cellular processes influences immune function with age. PMID:24828474

  5. Two genes encoding midgut-specific maltase-like polypeptides from Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Zheng, L; Whang, L H; Kumar, V; Kafatos, F C

    1995-11-01

    Full-length cDNA clones of two genes have been isolated from the African malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles gambiae. These genes, designated Agm1 and Agm2, encode maltase-like polypeptides of 498 and 599 residues, respectively. Deduced amino acid sequences contain a putative signal peptide sequence and four potential glycosylation sites. Agm1 and Agm2 show highest similarities to the Mal1 gene from Aedes aegypti and three clustered maltase genes from Drosophila melanogaster. Both genes are located at position 46D, in the terminal division of the left arm of the third chromosome. Agm2 has very strict tissue and temporal specificity, being expressed exclusively in the adult midgut. The specificity of Agm1 is similar but appears slightly broader; transcripts of this gene are detected at a low level in the pupae, and occasionally in the adult carcass after removal of the midgut.

  6. Locomotion Induced by Spatial Restriction in Adult Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Chengfeng; Robertson, R. Meldrum

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila adults display an unwillingness to enter confined spaces but the behaviors induced by spatial restriction in Drosophila are largely unknown. We developed a protocol for high-throughput analysis of locomotion and characterized features of locomotion in a restricted space. We observed intense and persistent locomotion of flies in small circular arenas (diameter 1.27 cm), whereas locomotion was greatly reduced in large circular arenas (diameter 3.81 cm). The increased locomotion induced by spatial restriction was seen in male flies but not female flies, indicating sexual dimorphism of the response to spatial restriction. In large arenas, male flies increased locomotion in arenas previously occupied by male but not female individuals. In small arenas, such pre-conditioning had no effect on male flies, which showed intense and persistent locomotion similar to that seen in fresh arenas. During locomotion with spatial restriction, wildtype Canton-S males traveled slower and with less variation in speed than the mutant w1118 carrying a null allele of white gene. In addition, wildtype flies showed a stronger preference for the boundary than the mutant in small arenas. Genetic analysis with a series of crosses revealed that the white gene was not associated with the phenotype of boundary preference in wildtype flies. PMID:26351842

  7. Impact of floral feeding on adult Drosophila suzukii survival and nutrient status

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drosophila suzukii, spotted wing drosophila, is a serious pest of small fruits and cherries in many regions of the world. While host usage has been well studied at the ovipositional and larval feeding stages, little is known about the feeding ecology of adults. This study addressed the impact of fee...

  8. The Drosophila Prosecretory Transcription Factor dimmed Is Dynamically Regulated in Adult Enteroendocrine Cells and Protects Against Gram-Negative Infection.

    PubMed

    Beebe, Katherine; Park, Dongkook; Taghert, Paul H; Micchelli, Craig A

    2015-05-20

    The endocrine system employs peptide hormone signals to translate environmental changes into physiological responses. The diffuse endocrine system embedded in the gastrointestinal barrier epithelium is one of the largest and most diverse endocrine tissues. Furthermore, it is the only endocrine tissue in direct physical contact with the microbial environment of the gut lumen. However, it remains unclear how this sensory epithelium responds to specific pathogenic challenges in a dynamic and regulated manner. We demonstrate that the enteroendocrine cells of the adult Drosophila melanogaster midgut display a transient, sensitive, and systemic induction of the prosecretory factor dimmed (dimm) in response to the Gram-negative pathogen Pseudomonas entomophila (Pe). In enteroendocrine cells, dimm controls the levels of the targets Phm, dcat-4, and the peptide hormone, Allatostatin A. Finally, we identify dimm as a host factor that protects against Pe infection and controls the expression of antimicrobial peptides. We propose that dimm provides "gain" in enteroendocrine output during the adaptive response to episodic pathogen exposure.

  9. Engrailed expression in subsets of adult Drosophila sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Blagburn, Jonathan M.

    2008-01-01

    Engrailed (En) has an important role in neuronal development in vertebrates and invertebrates. In adult Drosophila, although En expression persists throughout adulthood, a detailed description of its expression in sensory neurons has not been made. In this study, en-GAL4 was used to drive UAS-CD8::GFP expression and the projections of sensory neurons were examined with confocal microscopy. En protein expression was confirmed using immunocytochemistry. In the antenna, En is present in subsets of Johnston’s organ neurons and of olfactory neurons. En-driven GFP is expressed in axons projecting to 18 identifed olfactory glomeruli, originating from basiconic, trichoid and coeloconic sensilla. In most cases both neurons of a sensillum express En. En expression overlaps with that of Acj6, another transcription factor. En-driven GFP is also expressed in a subset of maxillary palp olfactory neurons and in all mechanosensory and gustatory sensilla in the posterior compartment of the labial palps. In the legs and halteres, en-driven GFP is expressed in only a subset of the sensory neurons of different modalities that arise in the posterior compartment. Finally, en-driven GFP is expressed in a single multidendritic sensory neuron in each abdominal segment. PMID:18597129

  10. Octopamine mediates starvation-induced hyperactivity in adult Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhe; Yu, Yue; Zhang, Vivian; Tian, Yinjun; Qi, Wei; Wang, Liming

    2015-04-21

    Starved animals often exhibit elevated locomotion, which has been speculated to partly resemble foraging behavior and facilitate food acquisition and energy intake. Despite its importance, the neural mechanism underlying this behavior remains unknown in any species. In this study we confirmed and extended previous findings that starvation induced locomotor activity in adult fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster. We also showed that starvation-induced hyperactivity was directed toward the localization and acquisition of food sources, because it could be suppressed upon the detection of food cues via both central nutrient-sensing and peripheral sweet-sensing mechanisms, via induction of food ingestion. We further found that octopamine, the insect counterpart of vertebrate norepinephrine, as well as the neurons expressing octopamine, were both necessary and sufficient for starvation-induced hyperactivity. Octopamine was not required for starvation-induced changes in feeding behaviors, suggesting independent regulations of energy intake behaviors upon starvation. Taken together, our results establish a quantitative behavioral paradigm to investigate the regulation of energy homeostasis by the CNS and identify a conserved neural substrate that links organismal metabolic state to a specific behavioral output.

  11. Octopamine mediates starvation-induced hyperactivity in adult Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhe; Yu, Yue; Zhang, Vivian; Tian, Yinjun; Qi, Wei; Wang, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Starved animals often exhibit elevated locomotion, which has been speculated to partly resemble foraging behavior and facilitate food acquisition and energy intake. Despite its importance, the neural mechanism underlying this behavior remains unknown in any species. In this study we confirmed and extended previous findings that starvation induced locomotor activity in adult fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster. We also showed that starvation-induced hyperactivity was directed toward the localization and acquisition of food sources, because it could be suppressed upon the detection of food cues via both central nutrient-sensing and peripheral sweet-sensing mechanisms, via induction of food ingestion. We further found that octopamine, the insect counterpart of vertebrate norepinephrine, as well as the neurons expressing octopamine, were both necessary and sufficient for starvation-induced hyperactivity. Octopamine was not required for starvation-induced changes in feeding behaviors, suggesting independent regulations of energy intake behaviors upon starvation. Taken together, our results establish a quantitative behavioral paradigm to investigate the regulation of energy homeostasis by the CNS and identify a conserved neural substrate that links organismal metabolic state to a specific behavioral output. PMID:25848004

  12. The Glycolytic Enzymes Activity in the Midgut of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) adult and their Seasonal Changes

    PubMed Central

    Guzik, Joanna; Nakonieczny, Mirosław; Tarnawska, Monika; Bereś, Paweł K.; Drzewiecki, Sławomir; Migula, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    The western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) is an important pest of maize. The diet of the D. virgifera imago is rich in starch and other polysaccharides present in cereals such as maize. Therefore, knowledge about enzymes involved in digestion of such specific food of this pest seems to be important. The paper shows, for the first time, the activities of main glycolytic enzymes in the midgut of D. virgifera imago: endoglycosidases (α-amylase, cellulase, chitinase, licheninase, laminarinase); exoglycosidases (α- and β-glucosidases, α- and β-galactosidases) and disaccharidases (maltase, isomaltase, sucrase, trehalase, lactase, and cellobiase). Activities of α-amylase, α-glucosidase, and maltase were the highest among assayed endoglycosidases, exoglycosidases, and disaccharidases, respectively. This indicates that in the midgut of D. virgifera imago α-amylase, α-glucosidase and maltase are important enzymes in starch hydrolysis and products of its digestion. These results lead to conclusion that inhibition of most active glycolytic enzymes of D. virgifera imago may be another promising method for chemical control of this pest of maize.

  13. Morphology of the midgut of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806) (Acari: Ixodidae) adult ticks in different feeding stages.

    PubMed

    Remedio, R N; Sampieri, B R; Vendramini, M C R; Souza, N M; Anholeto, L A; Denardo, T A G B; Camargo-Mathias, M I

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal epithelial cells of ticks are fundamental for their full feeding and reproductive success, besides being considered important sites for the development of pathogens. Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks are known for their great medical and veterinary importance, and for this reason, the knowledge of their intestinal morphology may provide relevant subsidies for the control of these animals, either by direct acaricidal action over these cells or by the production of vaccines. Therefore, this study aimed to describe the midgut morphology of male and female R. sanguineus ticks in different feeding stages, by means of histological analysis. Significant differences were observed between the genders, and such alterations may refer mainly to the distinct demands for nutrients, much higher in females, which need to develop and carry out the egg-laying process. In general, the midgut is coated by a thin muscle layer and presents a pseudostratified epithelium, in which two basic types of cells can be observed, connected to a basal membrane-generative or stem and digestive cells. The latter was classified as follows: residual, deriving from the phase anterior to ecdysis; pinocytic, with vesicles containing liquid or pre-digested components of blood; phagocytic, with entire cells or remnants of nuclear material inside cytoplasmic vesicles; and mature, free in the lumen. Digestion is presumably intracellular and asynchronous and corresponds to a process which starts with the differentiation of generative cells into pinocytic digestive cells, which subsequently start to phagocytize intact blood cells and finally detach from the epithelium, being eliminated with feces.

  14. Drosophila as a model for the identification of genes causing adult human heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Matthew J.; Amrein, Hubert; Izatt, Joseph A.; Choma, Michael A.; Reedy, Mary C.; Rockman, Howard A.

    2006-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster genetics provides the advantage of molecularly defined P-element insertions and deletions that span the entire genome. Although Drosophila has been extensively used as a model system to study heart development, it has not been used to dissect the genetics of adult human heart disease because of an inability to phenotype the adult fly heart in vivo. Here we report the development of a strategy to measure cardiac function in awake adult Drosophila that opens the field of Drosophila genetics to the study of human dilated cardiomyopathies. Through the application of optical coherence tomography, we accurately distinguish between normal and abnormal cardiac function based on measurements of internal cardiac chamber dimensions in vivo. Normal Drosophila have a fractional shortening of 87 ± 4%, whereas cardiomyopathic flies that contain a mutation in troponin I or tropomyosin show severe impairment of systolic function. To determine whether the fly can be used as a model system to recapitulate human dilated cardiomyopathy, we generated transgenic Drosophila with inducible cardiac expression of a mutant of human δ-sarcoglycan (δsgS151A), which has previously been associated with familial dilated cardiomyopathy. Compared to transgenic flies overexpressing wild-type δsg, or the standard laboratory strain w1118, Drosophila expressing δsgS151A developed marked impairment of systolic function and significantly enlarged cardiac chambers. These data illustrate the utility of Drosophila as a model system to study dilated cardiomyopathy and the applicability of the vast genetic resources available in Drosophila to systematically study the genetic mechanisms responsible for human cardiac disease. PMID:16432241

  15. Raf-mediated cardiac hypertrophy in adult Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lin; Daniels, Joseph; Glaser, Alex E.; Wolf, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In response to stress and extracellular signals, the heart undergoes a process called cardiac hypertrophy during which cardiomyocytes increase in size. If untreated, cardiac hypertrophy can progress to overt heart failure that causes significant morbidity and mortality. The identification of molecular signals that cause or modify cardiomyopathies is necessary to understand how the normal heart progresses to cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling is essential for normal human cardiac function, and the inhibition of RTKs can cause dilated cardiomyopathies. However, neither investigations of activated RTK signaling pathways nor the characterization of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the adult fly heart has been previously described. Therefore, we developed strategies using Drosophila as a model to circumvent some of the complexities associated with mammalian models of cardiovascular disease. Transgenes encoding activated EGFRA887T, Ras85DV12 and Ras85DV12S35, which preferentially signal to Raf, or constitutively active human or fly Raf caused hypertrophic cardiomyopathy as determined by decreased end diastolic lumen dimensions, abnormal cardiomyocyte fiber morphology and increased heart wall thicknesses. There were no changes in cardiomyocyte cell numbers. Additionally, activated Raf also induced an increase in cardiomyocyte ploidy compared with control hearts. However, preventing increases in cardiomyocyte ploidy using fizzy-related (Fzr) RNAi did not rescue Raf-mediated cardiac hypertrophy, suggesting that Raf-mediated polyploidization is not required for cardiac hypertrophy. Similar to mammals, the cardiac-specific expression of RNAi directed against MEK or ERK rescued Raf-mediated cardiac hypertrophy. However, the cardiac-specific expression of activated ERKD334N, which promotes hyperplasia in non-cardiac tissues, did not cause myocyte hypertrophy. These results suggest that ERK is necessary, but not sufficient, for

  16. Gene Deletion Screen for Cardiomyopathy in Adult Drosophila Identifies a New Notch Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Il-Man; Wolf, Matthew J.; Rockman, Howard A.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Drosophila has been recognized as a model to study human cardiac diseases. Objective Despite these findings, and the wealth of tools that are available to the fly community, forward genetic screens for adult heart phenotypes have been rarely performed due to the difficulty in accurately measuring cardiac function in adult Drosophila. Methods and Results Using optical coherence tomography to obtain real-time analysis of cardiac function in awake Drosophila, we performed a genomic deficiency screen in adult flies. Based on multiple complementary approaches, we identified CG31665 as a novel gene causing dilated cardiomyopathy. CG31665, which we name weary (wry), has structural similarities to members of the Notch family. Using cell aggregation assays and γ-secretase inhibitors we show that Wry is a novel Notch ligand that can mediate cellular adhesion with Notch expressing cells and transactivates Notch to promote signaling and nuclear transcription. Importantly, Wry lacks a DSL (Delta-Serrate-Lag) domain that is common feature to the other Drosophila Notch ligands. We further show that Notch signaling is critically important for the maintenance of normal heart function of the adult fly. Conclusions In conclusion, we identify a previously unknown Notch ligand in Drosophila that when deleted causes cardiomyopathy. Our study suggests that Notch signaling components may be a therapeutic target for dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:20203305

  17. Cold Hardiness of Winter-Acclimated Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) Adults.

    PubMed

    Stephens, A R; Asplen, M K; Hutchison, W D; Venette, R C

    2015-12-01

    Drosophila suzukii Matsumura, often called spotted wing drosophila, is an exotic vinegar fly that is native to Southeast Asia and was first detected in the continental United States in 2008. Previous modeling studies have suggested that D. suzukii might not survive in portions of the northern United States or southern Canada due to the effects of cold. As a result, we measured two aspects of insect cold tolerance, the supercooling point and lower lethal temperature, for D. suzukii summer-morph pupae and adults and winter-morph adults. Supercooling points were compared to adults of Drosophila melanogaster Meigen. The lower lethal temperature of D. suzukii winter-morph adults was significantly colder than that for D. suzukii summer-morph adults, while supercooling points of D. suzukii winter-morph adults were actually warmer than that for D. suzukii summer-morph adults and pupae. D. suzukii summer-morph adult supercooling points were not significantly different than those for D. melanogaster adults. These measures indicate that D. suzukii is a chill intolerant insect, and winter-morph adults are the most cold-tolerant life stage. These results can be used to improve predictions of where D. suzukii might be able to establish overwintering populations and cause extensive damage to spring fruit crops.

  18. The Osa-containing SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex regulates stem cell commitment in the adult Drosophila intestine.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiankun; Lin, Xinhua; Hou, Steven X

    2013-09-01

    The proportion of stem cells versus differentiated progeny is well balanced to maintain tissue homeostasis, which in turn depends on the balance of the different signaling pathways involved in stem cell self-renewal versus lineage-specific differentiation. In a screen for genes that regulate cell lineage determination in the posterior midgut, we identified that the Osa-containing SWI/SNF (Brahma) chromatin-remodeling complex regulates Drosophila midgut homeostasis. Mutations in subunits of the Osa-containing complex result in intestinal stem cell (ISC) expansion as well as enteroendocrine (EE) cell reduction. We further demonstrated that Osa regulates ISC self-renewal and differentiation into enterocytes by elaborating Notch signaling, and ISC commitment to differentiation into EE cells by regulating the expression of Asense, an EE cell fate determinant. Our data uncover a unique mechanism whereby the commitment of stem cells to discrete lineages is coordinately regulated by chromatin-remodeling factors.

  19. An integrated hybrid microfluidic device for oviposition-based chemical screening of adult Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Leung, Jacob C K; Hilliker, Arthur J; Rezai, Pouya

    2016-02-21

    Chemical screening using Drosophila melanogaster (the fruit fly) is vital in drug discovery, agricultural, and toxicological applications. Oviposition (egg laying) on chemically-doped agar plates is an important read-out metric used to quantitatively assess the biological fitness and behavioral responses of Drosophila. Current oviposition-based chemical screening studies are inaccurate, labor-intensive, time-consuming, and inflexible due to the manual chemical doping of agar. In this paper, we have developed a novel hybrid agar-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic device for single- and multi-concentration chemical dosing and on-chip oviposition screening of free-flying adult stage Drosophila. To achieve this, we have devised a novel technique to integrate agar with PDMS channels using ice as a sacrificial layer. Subsequently, we have conducted single-chemical toxicity and multiple choice chemical preference assays on adult Drosophila melanogaster using zinc and acetic acid at various concentrations. Our device has enabled us to 1) demonstrate that Drosophila is capable of sensing the concentration of different chemicals on a PDMS-agar microfluidic device, which plays significant roles in determining oviposition site selection and 2) investigate whether oviposition preference differs between single- and multi-concentration chemical environments. This device may be used to study fundamental and applied biological questions in Drosophila and other egg laying insects. It can also be extended in design to develop sophisticated and dynamic chemical dosing and high-throughput screening platforms in the future that are not easily achievable with the existing oviposition screening techniques.

  20. Starvation-Induced Dietary Behaviour in Drosophila melanogaster Larvae and Adults.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Muhammad; Chaudhary, Safee Ullah; Afzal, Ahmed Jawaad; Tariq, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster larvae are classified as herbivores and known to feed on non-carnivorous diet under normal conditions. However, when nutritionally challenged these larvae exhibit cannibalistic behaviour by consuming a diet composed of larger conspecifics. Herein, we report that cannibalism in Drosophila larvae is confined not only to scavenging on conspecifics that are larger in size, but also on their eggs. Moreover, such cannibalistic larvae develop as normally as those grown on standard cornmeal medium. When stressed, Drosophila melanogaster larvae can also consume a carnivorous diet derived from carcasses of organisms belonging to diverse taxonomic groups, including Musca domestica, Apis mellifera, and Lycosidae sp. While adults are ill-equipped to devour conspecific carcasses, they selectively oviposit on them and also consume damaged cadavers of conspecifics. Thus, our results suggest that nutritionally stressed Drosophila show distinct as well as unusual feeding behaviours that can be classified as detritivorous, cannibalistic and/or carnivorous. PMID:26399327

  1. Starvation-Induced Dietary Behaviour in Drosophila melanogaster Larvae and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Muhammad; Chaudhary, Safee Ullah; Afzal, Ahmed Jawaad; Tariq, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster larvae are classified as herbivores and known to feed on non-carnivorous diet under normal conditions. However, when nutritionally challenged these larvae exhibit cannibalistic behaviour by consuming a diet composed of larger conspecifics. Herein, we report that cannibalism in Drosophila larvae is confined not only to scavenging on conspecifics that are larger in size, but also on their eggs. Moreover, such cannibalistic larvae develop as normally as those grown on standard cornmeal medium. When stressed, Drosophila melanogaster larvae can also consume a carnivorous diet derived from carcasses of organisms belonging to diverse taxonomic groups, including Musca domestica, Apis mellifera, and Lycosidae sp. While adults are ill-equipped to devour conspecific carcasses, they selectively oviposit on them and also consume damaged cadavers of conspecifics. Thus, our results suggest that nutritionally stressed Drosophila show distinct as well as unusual feeding behaviours that can be classified as detritivorous, cannibalistic and/or carnivorous. PMID:26399327

  2. The midgut of the silkmoth Bombyx mori is able to recycle molecules derived from degeneration of the larval midgut epithelium.

    PubMed

    Franzetti, Eleonora; Romanelli, Davide; Caccia, Silvia; Cappellozza, Silvia; Congiu, Terenzio; Rajagopalan, Muthukumaran; Grimaldi, Annalisa; de Eguileor, Magda; Casartelli, Morena; Tettamanti, Gianluca

    2015-08-01

    The midgut represents the middle part of the alimentary canal and is responsible for nutrient digestion and absorption in insect larva. Despite the growing interest in this organ for different purposes, such as studies on morphogenesis and differentiation, stem cell biology, cell death processes and transport mechanisms, basic information on midgut development is still lacking for a large proportion of insect species. Undoubtedly, this lack of data could hinder the full exploitation of practical applications that involve midgut as their primary target. This may represent in particular a significant problem for Lepidoptera, an insect order that includes some of the most important species of high economic importance. With the aim of overcoming this fragmentation of knowledge, we performed a detailed morphofunctional analysis of the midgut of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, a representative model among Lepidoptera, during its development from the larval up to the adult stage, focusing attention on stem cells. Our data demonstrate stem cell proliferation and differentiation, not only in the larval midgut but also in the pupal and adult midgut epithelium. Moreover, we present evidence for a complex trophic relationship between the dying larval epithelium and the new adult one, which is established during metamorphosis. This study, besides representing the first morphological and functional characterization of the changes that occur in the midgut of a lepidopteron during the transition from the larva to the moth, provides a detailed analysis of the midgut of the adult insect, a stage that has been neglected up to now.

  3. Larval ethanol exposure alters adult circadian free-running locomotor activity rhythm in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Seggio, Joseph A; Possidente, Bernard; Ahmad, S Tariq

    2012-02-01

    Alcohol consumption causes disruptions in a variety of daily rhythms, including the sleep-wake cycle. Few studies have explored the effect of alcohol exposure only during developmental stages preceding maturation of the adult circadian clock, and none have examined the effects of alcohol on clock function in Drosophila. This study investigates developmental and behavioral correlates between larval ethanol exposure and the adult circadian clock in Drosophila melanogaster, a well-established model for studying circadian rhythms and effects of ethanol exposure. We reared Drosophila larvae on 0%, 10%, or 20% ethanol-supplemented food and assessed effects upon eclosion and the free-running period of the circadian rhythm of locomotor activity. We observed a dose-dependent effect of ethanol on period, with higher doses resulting in shorter periods. We also identified the third larval instar stage as a critical time for the developmental effects of 10% ethanol on circadian period. These results demonstrate that developmental ethanol exposure causes sustainable shortening of the adult free-running period in Drosophila melanogaster, even after adult exposure to ethanol is terminated, and suggests that the third instar is a sensitive time for this effect. PMID:22217104

  4. Wolbachia-mediated antiviral protection in Drosophila larvae and adults following oral infection.

    PubMed

    Stevanovic, Aleksej L; Arnold, Pieter A; Johnson, Karyn N

    2015-12-01

    Understanding viral dynamics in arthropods is of great importance when designing models to describe how viral spread can influence arthropod populations. The endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia spp., which is present in up to 40% of all insect species, has the ability to alter viral dynamics in both Drosophila spp. and mosquitoes, a feature that in mosquitoes may be utilized to limit spread of important arboviruses. To understand the potential effect of Wolbachia on viral dynamics in nature, it is important to consider the impact of natural routes of virus infection on Wolbachia antiviral effects. Using adult Drosophila strains, we show here that Drosophila-Wolbachia associations that have previously been shown to confer antiviral protection following systemic viral infection also confer protection against virus-induced mortality following oral exposure to Drosophila C virus in adults. Interestingly, a different pattern was observed when the same fly lines were challenged with the virus when still larvae. Analysis of the four Drosophila-Wolbachia associations that were protective in adults indicated that only the w1118-wMelPop association conferred protection in larvae following oral delivery of the virus. Analysis of Wolbachia density using quantitative PCR (qPCR) showed that a high Wolbachia density was congruent with antiviral protection in both adults and larvae. This study indicates that Wolbachia-mediated protection may vary between larval and adult stages of a given Wolbachia-host combination and that the variations in susceptibility by life stage correspond with Wolbachia density. The differences in the outcome of virus infection are likely to influence viral dynamics in Wolbachia-infected insect populations in nature and could also have important implications for the transmission of arboviruses in mosquito populations.

  5. Wolbachia-Mediated Antiviral Protection in Drosophila Larvae and Adults following Oral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Stevanovic, Aleksej L.; Arnold, Pieter A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding viral dynamics in arthropods is of great importance when designing models to describe how viral spread can influence arthropod populations. The endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia spp., which is present in up to 40% of all insect species, has the ability to alter viral dynamics in both Drosophila spp. and mosquitoes, a feature that in mosquitoes may be utilized to limit spread of important arboviruses. To understand the potential effect of Wolbachia on viral dynamics in nature, it is important to consider the impact of natural routes of virus infection on Wolbachia antiviral effects. Using adult Drosophila strains, we show here that Drosophila-Wolbachia associations that have previously been shown to confer antiviral protection following systemic viral infection also confer protection against virus-induced mortality following oral exposure to Drosophila C virus in adults. Interestingly, a different pattern was observed when the same fly lines were challenged with the virus when still larvae. Analysis of the four Drosophila-Wolbachia associations that were protective in adults indicated that only the w1118-wMelPop association conferred protection in larvae following oral delivery of the virus. Analysis of Wolbachia density using quantitative PCR (qPCR) showed that a high Wolbachia density was congruent with antiviral protection in both adults and larvae. This study indicates that Wolbachia-mediated protection may vary between larval and adult stages of a given Wolbachia-host combination and that the variations in susceptibility by life stage correspond with Wolbachia density. The differences in the outcome of virus infection are likely to influence viral dynamics in Wolbachia-infected insect populations in nature and could also have important implications for the transmission of arboviruses in mosquito populations. PMID:26407882

  6. Midgut morphophysiology in Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky, 1855 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Géssica; Conte, Helio

    2013-08-01

    Sitophilus zeamais is one of the most aggressive pests of stored grains, causing a significant decrease in the nutritional quality of the grains and major losses in economic trade. The foraging capacity of this pest is assigned to its highly efficient digestive system. Investigations on the morphofunctional features of the midgut, which is the most active region of the alimentary canal, are fundamental to understand the feeding habits of this species. In this study, the midgut of adult insects was isolated, processed, and analyzed on light microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, protein and enzymatic activities determination, including analyses of the starch hydrolysis products. In S. zeamais, the midgut was differentiated into anterior midgut and posterior midgut, and consisted of digestive, regenerative and endocrine cells. The anterior midgut showed high density of regenerative crypts. Cells containing organelles associated with protein synthesis and presence of amylases and lipases indicated that majority of the digestion process occurred in the anterior midgut. The posterior midgut exhibited numerous gastric caeca and peritrophic membrane. Cells with poorly differentiated cytoplasmic into organelles, elongated microvilli, and low enzymatic activities indicated that the posterior midgut was mainly involved in absorption.

  7. big bang gene modulates gut immune tolerance in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Bonnay, François; Cohen-Berros, Eva; Hoffmann, Martine; Kim, Sabrina Y.; Boulianne, Gabrielle L.; Hoffmann, Jules A.; Matt, Nicolas; Reichhart, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammation of the intestine is detrimental to mammals. Similarly, constant activation of the immune response in the gut by the endogenous flora is suspected to be harmful to Drosophila. Therefore, the innate immune response in the gut of Drosophila melanogaster is tightly balanced to simultaneously prevent infections by pathogenic microorganisms and tolerate the endogenous flora. Here we describe the role of the big bang (bbg) gene, encoding multiple membrane-associated PDZ (PSD-95, Discs-large, ZO-1) domain-containing protein isoforms, in the modulation of the gut immune response. We show that in the adult Drosophila midgut, BBG is present at the level of the septate junctions, on the apical side of the enterocytes. In the absence of BBG, these junctions become loose, enabling the intestinal flora to trigger a constitutive activation of the anterior midgut immune response. This chronic epithelial inflammation leads to a reduced lifespan of bbg mutant flies. Clearing the commensal flora by antibiotics prevents the abnormal activation of the gut immune response and restores a normal lifespan. We now provide genetic evidence that Drosophila septate junctions are part of the gut immune barrier, a function that is evolutionarily conserved in mammals. Collectively, our data suggest that septate junctions are required to maintain the subtle balance between immune tolerance and immune response in the Drosophila gut, which represents a powerful model to study inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:23378635

  8. big bang gene modulates gut immune tolerance in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bonnay, François; Cohen-Berros, Eva; Hoffmann, Martine; Kim, Sabrina Y; Boulianne, Gabrielle L; Hoffmann, Jules A; Matt, Nicolas; Reichhart, Jean-Marc

    2013-02-19

    Chronic inflammation of the intestine is detrimental to mammals. Similarly, constant activation of the immune response in the gut by the endogenous flora is suspected to be harmful to Drosophila. Therefore, the innate immune response in the gut of Drosophila melanogaster is tightly balanced to simultaneously prevent infections by pathogenic microorganisms and tolerate the endogenous flora. Here we describe the role of the big bang (bbg) gene, encoding multiple membrane-associated PDZ (PSD-95, Discs-large, ZO-1) domain-containing protein isoforms, in the modulation of the gut immune response. We show that in the adult Drosophila midgut, BBG is present at the level of the septate junctions, on the apical side of the enterocytes. In the absence of BBG, these junctions become loose, enabling the intestinal flora to trigger a constitutive activation of the anterior midgut immune response. This chronic epithelial inflammation leads to a reduced lifespan of bbg mutant flies. Clearing the commensal flora by antibiotics prevents the abnormal activation of the gut immune response and restores a normal lifespan. We now provide genetic evidence that Drosophila septate junctions are part of the gut immune barrier, a function that is evolutionarily conserved in mammals. Collectively, our data suggest that septate junctions are required to maintain the subtle balance between immune tolerance and immune response in the Drosophila gut, which represents a powerful model to study inflammatory bowel diseases.

  9. big bang gene modulates gut immune tolerance in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bonnay, François; Cohen-Berros, Eva; Hoffmann, Martine; Kim, Sabrina Y; Boulianne, Gabrielle L; Hoffmann, Jules A; Matt, Nicolas; Reichhart, Jean-Marc

    2013-02-19

    Chronic inflammation of the intestine is detrimental to mammals. Similarly, constant activation of the immune response in the gut by the endogenous flora is suspected to be harmful to Drosophila. Therefore, the innate immune response in the gut of Drosophila melanogaster is tightly balanced to simultaneously prevent infections by pathogenic microorganisms and tolerate the endogenous flora. Here we describe the role of the big bang (bbg) gene, encoding multiple membrane-associated PDZ (PSD-95, Discs-large, ZO-1) domain-containing protein isoforms, in the modulation of the gut immune response. We show that in the adult Drosophila midgut, BBG is present at the level of the septate junctions, on the apical side of the enterocytes. In the absence of BBG, these junctions become loose, enabling the intestinal flora to trigger a constitutive activation of the anterior midgut immune response. This chronic epithelial inflammation leads to a reduced lifespan of bbg mutant flies. Clearing the commensal flora by antibiotics prevents the abnormal activation of the gut immune response and restores a normal lifespan. We now provide genetic evidence that Drosophila septate junctions are part of the gut immune barrier, a function that is evolutionarily conserved in mammals. Collectively, our data suggest that septate junctions are required to maintain the subtle balance between immune tolerance and immune response in the Drosophila gut, which represents a powerful model to study inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:23378635

  10. Clonal development and organization of the adult Drosophila central brain

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hung-Hsiang; Awasaki, Takeshi; Schroeder, Mark David; Long, Fuhui; Yang, Jacob S.; He, Yisheng; Ding, Peng; Kao, Jui-Chun; Wu, Gloria Yueh-Yi; Peng, Hanchuan; Myers, Gene; Lee, Tzumin

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background The insect brain can be divided into neuropils that are formed by neurites of both local and remote origin. The complexity of the interconnections obscures how these neuropils are established and interconnected through development. The Drosophila central brain develops from a fixed number of neuroblasts (NBs) that deposit neurons in regional clusters. Results By determining individual NB clones and pursuing their projections into specific neuropils we unravel the regional development of the brain neural network. Exhaustive clonal analysis revealed 95 stereotyped neuronal lineages with characteristic cell body locations and neurite trajectories. Most clones show complex projection patterns, but despite the complexity, neighboring clones often co-innervate the same local neuropil(s) and further target a restricted set of distant neuropils. Conclusions These observations argue for regional clonal development of both neuropils and neuropil connectivity throughout the Drosophila central brain. PMID:23541733

  11. A Distinct Perisynaptic Glial Cell Type Forms Tripartite Neuromuscular Synapses in the Drosophila Adult

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Alexandra L.; Kawasaki, Fumiko; Ordway, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies of Drosophila flight muscle neuromuscular synapses have revealed their tripartite architecture and established an attractive experimental model for genetic analysis of glial function in synaptic transmission. Here we extend these findings by defining a new Drosophila glial cell type, designated peripheral perisynaptic glia (PPG), which resides in the periphery and interacts specifically with fine motor axon branches forming neuromuscular synapses. Identification and specific labeling of PPG was achieved through cell type-specific RNAi-mediated knockdown (KD) of a glial marker, Glutamine Synthetase 2 (GS2). In addition, comparison among different Drosophila neuromuscular synapse models from adult and larval developmental stages indicated the presence of tripartite synapses on several different muscle types in the adult. In contrast, PPG appear to be absent from larval body wall neuromuscular synapses, which do not exhibit a tripartite architecture but rather are imbedded in the muscle plasma membrane. Evolutionary conservation of tripartite synapse architecture and peripheral perisynaptic glia in vertebrates and Drosophila suggests ancient and conserved roles for glia-synapse interactions in synaptic transmission. PMID:26053860

  12. Chinmo is sufficient to induce male fate in somatic cells of the adult Drosophila ovary.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qing; de Cuevas, Margaret; Matunis, Erika L

    2016-03-01

    Sexual identity is continuously maintained in specific differentiated cell types long after sex determination occurs during development. In the adult Drosophila testis, the putative transcription factor Chronologically inappropriate morphogenesis (Chinmo) acts with the canonical male sex determinant DoublesexM (Dsx(M)) to maintain the male identity of somatic cyst stem cells and their progeny. Here we find that ectopic expression of chinmo is sufficient to induce a male identity in adult ovarian somatic cells, but it acts through a Dsx(M)-independent mechanism. Conversely, the feminization of the testis somatic stem cell lineage caused by loss of chinmo is enhanced by expression of the canonical female sex determinant Dsx(F), indicating that chinmo acts in parallel with the canonical sex determination pathway to maintain the male identity of testis somatic cells. Consistent with this finding, ectopic expression of female sex determinants in the adult testis disrupts tissue morphology. The miRNA let-7 downregulates chinmo in many contexts, and ectopic expression of let-7 in the adult testis is sufficient to recapitulate the chinmo loss-of-function phenotype, but we find no apparent phenotypes upon removal of let-7 in the adult ovary or testis. Our finding that chinmo is necessary and sufficient to promote a male identity in adult gonadal somatic cells suggests that the sexual identity of somatic cells can be reprogrammed in the adult Drosophila ovary as well as in the testis. PMID:26811385

  13. Left-Sided Appendicitis in an Elderly Patient with Midgut Malrotation.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Pei Wen; Huang, Bo-Ming; Liu, Chung Hsien; Chen, Chien-Chin; Tsai, Ming-Jen

    2015-12-01

    Appendicitis is a common surgical abdominal disease with various presentations. Its diagnosis may be obscured by asymptomatic congenital anatomical anomalies like midgut malrotation. Midgut malrotation is a rare fetal anomaly resulting from incomplete or failure of midgut rotation and fixation. It is mostly presented with bowel obstruction or volvulus in early life. Presentation in adult is rare. Here, we report an elderly patient presented with left lower abdominal pain and urinary tract infection. Abdominal computed tomography revealed left-sided appendicitis with non-rotational-type midgut malrotation. Clinicians should bear in mind the possibility of underlying midgut malrotation, as appendicitis could be the first presentation of this rare congenital condition. PMID:27011586

  14. Affecting Rhomboid-3 Function Causes a Dilated Heart in Adult Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lin; Lee, Teresa; Lin, Na; Wolf, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    Drosophila is a well recognized model of several human diseases, and recent investigations have demonstrated that Drosophila can be used as a model of human heart failure. Previously, we described that optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be used to rapidly examine the cardiac function in adult, awake flies. This technique provides images that are similar to echocardiography in humans, and therefore we postulated that this approach could be combined with the vast resources that are available in the fly community to identify new mutants that have abnormal heart function, a hallmark of certain cardiovascular diseases. Using OCT to examine the cardiac function in adult Drosophila from a set of molecularly-defined genomic deficiencies from the DrosDel and Exelixis collections, we identified an abnormally enlarged cardiac chamber in a series of deficiency mutants spanning the rhomboid 3 locus. Rhomboid 3 is a member of a highly conserved family of intramembrane serine proteases and processes Spitz, an epidermal growth factor (EGF)–like ligand. Using multiple approaches based on the examination of deficiency stocks, a series of mutants in the rhomboid-Spitz–EGF receptor pathway, and cardiac-specific transgenic rescue or dominant-negative repression of EGFR, we demonstrate that rhomboid 3 mediated activation of the EGF receptor pathway is necessary for proper adult cardiac function. The importance of EGF receptor signaling in the adult Drosophila heart underscores the concept that evolutionarily conserved signaling mechanisms are required to maintain normal myocardial function. Interestingly, prior work showing the inhibition of ErbB2, a member of the EGF receptor family, in transgenic knock-out mice or individuals that received herceptin chemotherapy is associated with the development of dilated cardiomyopathy. Our results, in conjunction with the demonstration that altered ErbB2 signaling underlies certain forms of mammalian cardiomyopathy, suggest that an

  15. Dexterous robotic manipulation of alert adult Drosophila for high-content experimentation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cheng; Maxey, Jessica R.; Schnitzer, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a robot that enables high-content studies of alert adult Drosophila by combining operations including gentle picking, translations and rotations, characterizations of fly phenotypes and behaviors, micro-dissection or release. To illustrate, we assessed fly morphology, tracked odor-evoked locomotion, sorted flies by sex, and dissected the cuticle to image neural activity. The robot's tireless capacity for precise manipulations enables a scalable platform for screening flies’ complex attributes and behavioral patterns. PMID:26005812

  16. Dexterous robotic manipulation of alert adult Drosophila for high-content experimentation.

    PubMed

    Savall, Joan; Ho, Eric Tatt Wei; Huang, Cheng; Maxey, Jessica R; Schnitzer, Mark J

    2015-07-01

    We present a robot that enables high-content studies of alert adult Drosophila by combining operations including gentle picking; translations and rotations; characterizations of fly phenotypes and behaviors; microdissection; or release. To illustrate, we assessed fly morphology, tracked odor-evoked locomotion, sorted flies by sex, and dissected the cuticle to image neural activity. The robot's tireless capacity for precise manipulations enables a scalable platform for screening flies' complex attributes and behavioral patterns.

  17. [Adult of Drosophila melanogaster parasitized in human nasal cavity: a case report].

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xiaodong; Tang, Xiaoniu; Wang, Shaosheng

    2015-05-01

    We reported a case of adult Drosophila melanogaster parasitized in nasal cavity of a 81-year-old woman who was living in Xuancheng City, Anhui Province now. She was admitted for treatment of cerebral infarction and water accumulation in the lungs in 2014 June. The patient was also suffering from secretory otitis media, a history of hypertension and heart stents were placed in 2007. A foreign body was found in the left nasal cavity during the preoperative examination process, and then the part of the inflammatory tissue was removed through the nasal endoscopy, and sent to our department for identification. There are three adults of Drosophila in paraffin-embedded biopsy specimens. The parasites length is approximately 3mm, with huge red compound eyes. The end of the body is tip, with 5 ring lines in back, has no dark spots. The abdomen of the parasites have seven sections. Tarsus of foot I have no sex comb on base, and they are male adult of Drosophila melanogaster after identification. After a thorough reviewing of medical history, we knew the patient began to sneeze violently and frequently six years ago. But there was no clear or purulent nasal discharge flowing, therefore did not attract attention. After removing the parasites the sneezing symptoms were relieved, and had no abnormal symptoms in the follow-up 6 months. PMID:26281068

  18. Oral magnetite nanoparticles disturb the development of Drosophila melanogaster from oogenesis to adult emergence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hanqing; Wang, Bing; Feng, Weiyue; Du, Wei; Ouyang, Hong; Chai, Zhifang; Bi, Xiaolin

    2015-05-01

    The potential impacts of nanomaterials (NMs) on fetal development have attracted great concerns because of the increased potential exposure to NMs during pregnancy. Drosophila melanogaster oogenesis and developmental transitions may provide an attractive system to study the biological and environmental effects of NMs on the embryonic development. In this study, the effects of three types of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (MNPs): UN-MNPs (pristine), CA-MNPs (citric acid modified) and APTS-MNPs (3-aminopropyltriethoxylsilane coated) on the development of Drosophila at 300 and 600 μg/g dosage were studied. The uptake of MNPs by female and male flies caused obvious reduction in the female fecundity, and the developmental delay at the egg-pupae and pupae-adult transitions, especially in those treated by the positive APTS-MNPs. Further investigation demonstrates that the parental uptake of MNPs disturbs the oogenesis period, induces ovarian defect, reduces the length of eggs, decreases the number of nurse cells and delays egg chamber development, which may contribute to the decrease of fecundity of female Drosophila and the development delay of their offspring. Using the synchrotron radiation-based micro-X-ray fluorescence (SR-μXRF), the dyshomeostasis of trace elements such as Fe, Ca and Cu along the anterior-posterior axis of the fertilized eggs was found, which may be an important reason for the development delay of Drosophila.

  19. A Subset of Serotonergic Neurons Evokes Hunger in Adult Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Albin, Stephanie D; Kaun, Karla R; Knapp, Jon-Michael; Chung, Phuong; Heberlein, Ulrike; Simpson, Julie H

    2015-09-21

    Hunger is a complex motivational state that drives multiple behaviors. The sensation of hunger is caused by an imbalance between energy intake and expenditure. One immediate response to hunger is increased food consumption. Hunger also modulates behaviors related to food seeking such as increased locomotion and enhanced sensory sensitivity in both insects and vertebrates. In addition, hunger can promote the expression of food-associated memory. Although progress is being made, how hunger is represented in the brain and how it coordinates these behavioral responses is not fully understood in any system. Here, we use Drosophila melanogaster to identify neurons encoding hunger. We found a small group of neurons that, when activated, induced a fed fly to eat as though it were starved, suggesting that these neurons are downstream of the metabolic regulation of hunger. Artificially activating these neurons also promotes appetitive memory performance in sated flies, indicating that these neurons are not simply feeding command neurons but likely play a more general role in encoding hunger. We determined that the neurons relevant for the feeding effect are serotonergic and project broadly within the brain, suggesting a possible mechanism for how various responses to hunger are coordinated. These findings extend our understanding of the neural circuitry that drives feeding and enable future exploration of how state influences neural activity within this circuit.

  20. Persistent Activation of the Innate Immune Response in Adult Drosophila Following Radiation Exposure During Larval Development.

    PubMed

    Sudmeier, Lisa J; Samudrala, Sai-Suma; Howard, Steven P; Ganetzky, Barry

    2015-11-01

    Cranial radiation therapy (CRT) is an effective treatment for pediatric central nervous system malignancies, but survivors often suffer from neurological and neurocognitive side effects that occur many years after radiation exposure. Although the biological mechanisms underlying these deleterious side effects are incompletely understood, radiation exposure triggers an acute inflammatory response that may evolve into chronic inflammation, offering one avenue of investigation. Recently, we developed a Drosophila model of the neurotoxic side effects of radiation exposure. Here we use this model to investigate the role of the innate immune system in response to radiation exposure. We show that the innate immune response and NF-ĸB target gene expression is activated in the adult Drosophila brain following radiation exposure during larval development, and that this response is sustained in adult flies weeks after radiation exposure. We also present preliminary data suggesting that innate immunity is radioprotective during Drosophila development. Together our data suggest that activation of the innate immune response may be beneficial initially for survival following radiation exposure but result in long-term deleterious consequences, with chronic inflammation leading to impaired neuronal function and viability at later stages. This work lays the foundation for future studies of how the innate immune response is triggered by radiation exposure and its role in mediating the biological responses to radiation. These studies may facilitate the development of strategies to reduce the deleterious side effects of CRT.

  1. Persistent Activation of the Innate Immune Response in Adult Drosophila Following Radiation Exposure During Larval Development

    PubMed Central

    Sudmeier, Lisa J.; Samudrala, Sai-Suma; Howard, Steven P.; Ganetzky, Barry

    2015-01-01

    Cranial radiation therapy (CRT) is an effective treatment for pediatric central nervous system malignancies, but survivors often suffer from neurological and neurocognitive side effects that occur many years after radiation exposure. Although the biological mechanisms underlying these deleterious side effects are incompletely understood, radiation exposure triggers an acute inflammatory response that may evolve into chronic inflammation, offering one avenue of investigation. Recently, we developed a Drosophila model of the neurotoxic side effects of radiation exposure. Here we use this model to investigate the role of the innate immune system in response to radiation exposure. We show that the innate immune response and NF-ĸB target gene expression is activated in the adult Drosophila brain following radiation exposure during larval development, and that this response is sustained in adult flies weeks after radiation exposure. We also present preliminary data suggesting that innate immunity is radioprotective during Drosophila development. Together our data suggest that activation of the innate immune response may be beneficial initially for survival following radiation exposure but result in long-term deleterious consequences, with chronic inflammation leading to impaired neuronal function and viability at later stages. This work lays the foundation for future studies of how the innate immune response is triggered by radiation exposure and its role in mediating the biological responses to radiation. These studies may facilitate the development of strategies to reduce the deleterious side effects of CRT. PMID:26333838

  2. Muscle niche-driven Insulin-Notch-Myc cascade reactivates dormant Adult Muscle Precursors in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Aradhya, Rajaguru; Zmojdzian, Monika; Da Ponte, Jean Philippe; Jagla, Krzysztof

    2015-12-09

    How stem cells specified during development keep their non-differentiated quiescent state, and how they are reactivated, remain poorly understood. Here, we applied a Drosophila model to follow in vivo behavior of adult muscle precursors (AMPs), the transient fruit fly muscle stem cells. We report that emerging AMPs send out thin filopodia that make contact with neighboring muscles. AMPs keep their filopodia-based association with muscles throughout their dormant state but also when they start to proliferate, suggesting that muscles could play a role in AMP reactivation. Indeed, our genetic analyses indicate that muscles send inductive dIlp6 signals that switch the Insulin pathway ON in closely associated AMPs. This leads to the activation of Notch, which regulates AMP proliferation via dMyc. Altogether, we report that Drosophila AMPs display homing behavior to muscle niche and that the niche-driven Insulin-Notch-dMyc cascade plays a key role in setting the activated state of AMPs.

  3. Avoidance of heat and attraction to optogenetically induced sugar sensation as operant behavior in adult Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Nuwal, Nidhi; Stock, Patrick; Hiemeyer, Jochen; Schmid, Benjamin; Fiala, André; Buchner, Erich

    2012-09-01

    Animals have to perform adequate behavioral actions dependent on internal states and environmental situations, and adjust their behavior according to positive or negative consequences. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster represents a key model organism for the investigation of neuronal mechanisms underlying adaptive behavior. The authors are using a behavioral paradigm in which fruit flies attached to a manipulator can walk on a Styrofoam ball whose movements are recorded such that intended left or right turns of the flies can be registered and used to operantly control heat stimuli or optogenetic activation of distinct subsets of neurons. As proof of principle, the authors find that flies in this situation avoid heat stimuli but prefer optogenetic self-stimulation of sugar receptors. Using this setup it now should be possible to study the neuronal network underlying positive and negative value assessment of adult Drosophila in an operant setting.

  4. Avoidance of heat and attraction to optogenetically induced sugar sensation as operant behavior in adult Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Nuwal, Nidhi; Stock, Patrick; Hiemeyer, Jochen; Schmid, Benjamin; Fiala, André; Buchner, Erich

    2012-09-01

    Animals have to perform adequate behavioral actions dependent on internal states and environmental situations, and adjust their behavior according to positive or negative consequences. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster represents a key model organism for the investigation of neuronal mechanisms underlying adaptive behavior. The authors are using a behavioral paradigm in which fruit flies attached to a manipulator can walk on a Styrofoam ball whose movements are recorded such that intended left or right turns of the flies can be registered and used to operantly control heat stimuli or optogenetic activation of distinct subsets of neurons. As proof of principle, the authors find that flies in this situation avoid heat stimuli but prefer optogenetic self-stimulation of sugar receptors. Using this setup it now should be possible to study the neuronal network underlying positive and negative value assessment of adult Drosophila in an operant setting. PMID:22834571

  5. 20-Hydroxyecdysone stimulates the accumulation of translatable yolk polypeptide gene transcript in adult male Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Shirk, P D; Minoo, P; Postlethwait, J H

    1983-01-01

    Yolk polypeptide (YP) synthesis is hormonally stimulated during maturation of adult female Drosophila melanogaster. Synthesis of the three YPs is sex specific and occurs in fat body cells and follicle cells of adult females. However, males have been shown to produce YPs when treated with the steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20-HE). By using a cell-free translation system as an assay for YP mRNA, we found that 20-HE also causes the accumulation of translatable YP message in males. In addition, hybridization of cloned copies of genes for both YP1 and YP3 to total RNA from males showed that 20-HE caused the appearance of YP gene transcripts in males. Eight hours after treatment of males with 20-HE, YP gene transcript levels had increased at least 25-fold to approximately 2.7 x 10(6) copies of YP1 gene transcript per adult male fly. In normal adult females, there were 42 x 10(6) copies per fly by 24 hr. There was neither detectable YP synthesis nor translatable YP gene transcript in either normal 1- to 3-day-old males or 24-hr-old males treated with a juvenile hormone analogue. This evidence shows that 20-HE acts to regulate the levels of translatable YP mRNA in male Drosophila.

  6. Regulation of starvation-induced hyperactivity by insulin and glucagon signaling in adult Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yue; Huang, Rui; Ye, Jie; Zhang, Vivian; Wu, Chao; Cheng, Guo; Jia, Junling; Wang, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Starvation induces sustained increase in locomotion, which facilitates food localization and acquisition and hence composes an important aspect of food-seeking behavior. We investigated how nutritional states modulated starvation-induced hyperactivity in adult Drosophila. The receptor of the adipokinetic hormone (AKHR), the insect analog of glucagon, was required for starvation-induced hyperactivity. AKHR was expressed in a small group of octopaminergic neurons in the brain. Silencing AKHR+ neurons and blocking octopamine signaling in these neurons eliminated starvation-induced hyperactivity, whereas activation of these neurons accelerated the onset of hyperactivity upon starvation. Neither AKHR nor AKHR+ neurons were involved in increased food consumption upon starvation, suggesting that starvation-induced hyperactivity and food consumption are independently regulated. Single cell analysis of AKHR+ neurons identified the co-expression of Drosophila insulin-like receptor (dInR), which imposed suppressive effect on starvation-induced hyperactivity. Therefore, insulin and glucagon signaling exert opposite effects on starvation-induced hyperactivity via a common neural target in Drosophila. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15693.001 PMID:27612383

  7. Juvenile Hormone Is Required in Adult Males for Drosophila Courtship

    PubMed Central

    Wijesekera, Thilini P.; Saurabh, Sumit; Dauwalder, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile Hormone (JH) has a prominent role in the regulation of insect development. Much less is known about its roles in adults, although functions in reproductive maturation have been described. In adult females, JH has been shown to regulate egg maturation and mating. To examine a role for JH in male reproductive behavior we created males with reduced levels of Juvenile Hormone Acid O-Methyl Transferase (JHAMT) and tested them for courtship. JHAMT regulates the last step of JH biosynthesis in the Corpora Allata (CA), the organ of JH synthesis. Males with reduced levels of JHAMT showed a reduction in courtship that could be rescued by application of Methoprene, a JH analog, shortly before the courtship assays were performed. In agreement with this, reducing JHAMT conditionally in mature flies led to courtship defects that were rescuable by Methoprene. The same result was also observed when the CA were conditionally ablated by the expression of a cellular toxin. Our findings demonstrate that JH plays an important physiological role in the regulation of male mating behavior. PMID:27003411

  8. The functional organisation of glia in the adult brain of Drosophila and other insects

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Tara N.; Meinertzhagen, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    This review annotates and categorises the glia of adult Drosophila and other model insects and describes the developmental origins of these in the Drosophila optic lobe. The functions of glia in the adult vary depending upon their sub-type and location in the brain. The task of annotating glia is essentially complete only for the glia of the fly's lamina, which comprise: two types of surface glia - the pseudocartridge and fenestrated glia; two types of cortex glia - the distal and proximal satellite glia; and two types of neuropile glia - the epithelial and marginal glia. We advocate that the term subretinal glia, as used to refer to both pseudocartridge and fenestrated glia, be abandoned. Other neuropiles contain similar glial subtypes, but other than the antennal lobes these have not been described in detail. Surface glia form the blood brain barrier, regulating the flow of substances into and out of the nervous system, both for the brain as a whole and the optic neuropiles in particular. Cortex glia provide a second level of barrier, wrapping axon fascicles and isolating neuronal cell bodies both from neighbouring brain regions and from their underlying neuropiles. Neuropile glia can be generated in the adult and a subtype, ensheathing glia, are responsible for cleaning up cellular debris during Wallerian degeneration. Both the neuropile ensheathing and astrocyte-like glia may be involved in clearing neurotransmitters from the extracellular space, thus modifying the levels of histamine, glutamate and possibly dopamine at the synapse to ultimately affect behaviour. PMID:20109517

  9. Multipotent stem cells in the Malpighian tubules of adult Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shree Ram; Hou, Steven X.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Excretion is an essential process of an organism's removal of the waste products of metabolism to maintain a constant chemical composition of the body fluids despite changes in the external environment. Excretion is performed by the kidneys in vertebrates and by Malpighian tubules (MTs) in Drosophila. The kidney serves as an excellent model organ to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying organogenesis. Mammals and Drosophila share common principles of renal development. Tissue homeostasis, which is accomplished through self-renewal or differentiation of stem cells, is critical for the maintenance of adult tissues throughout the lifetime of an animal. Growing evidence suggests that stem cell self-renewal and differentiation is controlled by both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Deregulation of stem cell behavior results in cancer formation, tissue degeneration, and premature aging. The mammalian kidney has a low rate of cellular turnover but has a great capacity for tissue regeneration following an ischemic injury. However, there is an ongoing controversy about the source of regenerating cells in the adult kidney that repopulate injured renal tissues. Recently, we identified multipotent stem cells in the MTs of adult Drosophila and found that these stem cells are able to proliferate and differentiate in several types of cells in MTs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that an autocrine JAK-STAT (Janus kinase–signal transducers and activators of transcription) signaling regulates stem cell self-renewal or differentiation of renal stem cells. The Drosophila MTs provide an excellent in vivo system for studying the renal stem cells at cellular and molecular levels. Understanding the molecular mechanisms governing stem cell self-renewal or differentiation in vivo is not only crucial to using stem cells for future regenerative medicine and gene therapy, but it also will increase our understanding of the mechanisms underlying cancer formation

  10. Hox proteins coordinate peripodial decapentaplegic expression to direct adult head morphogenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Stultz, Brian G.; Park, Sung Yeon; Mortin, Mark A.; Kennison, James A.; Hursh, Deborah A.

    2012-01-01

    The Drosophila BMP, decapentaplegic (dpp), controls morphogenesis of the ventral adult head through expression limited to the lateral peripodial epithelium of the eye-antennal disc by a 3.5 kb enhancer in the 5’ end of the gene. We recovered a 15 bp deletion mutation within this enhancer that identified a homeotic (Hox) response element that is a direct target of labial and the homeotic cofactors homothorax and extradenticle. Expression of labial and homothorax are required for dpp expression in the peripodial epithelium, while the Hox gene Deformed represses labial in this location, thus limiting its expression and indirectly that of dpp to the lateral side of the disc. The expression of these homeodomain genes is in turn regulated by the dpp pathway, as dpp signaling is required for labial expression but represses homothorax. This Hox-BMP regulatory network is limited to the peripodial epithelium of the eye-antennal disc, yet is crucial to the morphogenesis of the head, which fate maps suggest arises primarily from the disc proper, not the peripodial epithelium. Thus Hox/BMP interactions in the peripodial epithelium of the eye-antennal disc contribute inductively to the shape of the external form of the adult Drosophila head. PMID:22824425

  11. The influence of Adh function on ethanol preference and tolerance in adult Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Ogueta, Maite; Cibik, Osman; Eltrop, Rouven; Schneider, Andrea; Scholz, Henrike

    2010-11-01

    Preference determines behavioral choices such as choosing among food sources and mates. One preference-affecting chemical is ethanol, which guides insects to fermenting fruits or leaves. Here, we show that adult Drosophila melanogaster prefer food containing up to 5% ethanol over food without ethanol and avoid food with high levels (23%) of ethanol. Although female and male flies behaved differently at ethanol-containing food sources, there was no sexual dimorphism in the preference for food containing modest ethanol levels. We also investigated whether Drosophila preference, sensitivity and tolerance to ethanol was related to the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh), the primary ethanol-metabolizing enzyme in D. melanogaster. Impaired Adh function reduced ethanol preference in both D. melanogaster and a related species, D. sechellia. Adh-impaired flies also displayed reduced aversion to high ethanol concentrations, increased sensitivity to the effects of ethanol on postural control, and negative tolerance/sensitization (i.e., a reduction of the increased resistance to ethanol's effects that normally occurs upon repeated exposure). These data strongly indicate a linkage between ethanol-induced behavior and ethanol metabolism in adult fruit flies: Adh deficiency resulted in reduced preference to low ethanol concentrations and reduced aversion to high ones, despite recovery from ethanol being strongly impaired. PMID:20739429

  12. Hox proteins coordinate peripodial decapentaplegic expression to direct adult head morphogenesis in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Stultz, Brian G; Park, Sung Yeon; Mortin, Mark A; Kennison, James A; Hursh, Deborah A

    2012-09-15

    The Drosophila BMP, decapentaplegic (dpp), controls morphogenesis of the ventral adult head through expression limited to the lateral peripodial epithelium of the eye-antennal disc by a 3.5 kb enhancer in the 5' end of the gene. We recovered a 15 bp deletion mutation within this enhancer that identified a homeotic (Hox) response element that is a direct target of labial and the homeotic cofactors homothorax and extradenticle. Expression of labial and homothorax are required for dpp expression in the peripodial epithelium, while the Hox gene Deformed represses labial in this location, thus limiting its expression and indirectly that of dpp to the lateral side of the disc. The expression of these homeodomain genes is in turn regulated by the dpp pathway, as dpp signalling is required for labial expression but represses homothorax. This Hox-BMP regulatory network is limited to the peripodial epithelium of the eye-antennal disc, yet is crucial to the morphogenesis of the head, which fate maps suggest arises primarily from the disc proper, not the peripodial epithelium. Thus Hox/BMP interactions in the peripodial epithelium of the eye-antennal disc contribute inductively to the shape of the external form of the adult Drosophila head.

  13. The influence of Adh function on ethanol preference and tolerance in adult Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Ogueta, Maite; Cibik, Osman; Eltrop, Rouven; Schneider, Andrea; Scholz, Henrike

    2010-11-01

    Preference determines behavioral choices such as choosing among food sources and mates. One preference-affecting chemical is ethanol, which guides insects to fermenting fruits or leaves. Here, we show that adult Drosophila melanogaster prefer food containing up to 5% ethanol over food without ethanol and avoid food with high levels (23%) of ethanol. Although female and male flies behaved differently at ethanol-containing food sources, there was no sexual dimorphism in the preference for food containing modest ethanol levels. We also investigated whether Drosophila preference, sensitivity and tolerance to ethanol was related to the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh), the primary ethanol-metabolizing enzyme in D. melanogaster. Impaired Adh function reduced ethanol preference in both D. melanogaster and a related species, D. sechellia. Adh-impaired flies also displayed reduced aversion to high ethanol concentrations, increased sensitivity to the effects of ethanol on postural control, and negative tolerance/sensitization (i.e., a reduction of the increased resistance to ethanol's effects that normally occurs upon repeated exposure). These data strongly indicate a linkage between ethanol-induced behavior and ethanol metabolism in adult fruit flies: Adh deficiency resulted in reduced preference to low ethanol concentrations and reduced aversion to high ones, despite recovery from ethanol being strongly impaired.

  14. Inhibiting the Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter during Development Impairs Memory in Adult Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Drago, Ilaria; Davis, Ronald L

    2016-09-01

    The uptake of cytoplasmic calcium into mitochondria is critical for a variety of physiological processes, including calcium buffering, metabolism, and cell survival. Here, we demonstrate that inhibiting the mitochondrial calcium uniporter in the Drosophila mushroom body neurons (MBn)-a brain region critical for olfactory memory formation-causes memory impairment without altering the capacity to learn. Inhibiting uniporter activity only during pupation impaired adult memory, whereas the same inhibition during adulthood was without effect. The behavioral impairment was associated with structural defects in MBn, including a decrease in synaptic vesicles and an increased length in the axons of the αβ MBn. Our results reveal an in vivo developmental role for the mitochondrial uniporter complex in establishing the necessary structural and functional neuronal substrates for normal memory formation in the adult organism. PMID:27568554

  15. Agar-polydimethylsiloxane devices for quantitative investigation of oviposition behaviour of adult Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Jacob C. K.; Taylor-Kamall, Rhodri W.; Hilliker, Arthur J.; Rezai, Pouya

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) is a model organism and its behaviours including oviposition (egg-laying) on agar substrates have been widely used for assessment of a variety of biological processes in flies. Physical and chemical properties of the substrate are the dominant factors affecting Drosophila's oviposition, but they have not been investigated precisely and parametrically with the existing manual approaches. As a result, many behavioral questions about Drosophila oviposition, such as the combined effects of the aforementioned substrate properties (e.g., exposure area, sugar content, and stiffness) on oviposition and viability, and their threshold values, are yet to be answered. In this paper, we have devised a simple, easily implementable, and novel methodology that allows for modification of physical and chemical composition of agar substrates in order to quantitatively study survival and oviposition of adult fruit flies in an accurate and repeatable manner. Agar substrates have been modified by surface patterning using single and hexagonally arrayed through-hole polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes with various diameters and interspacing, as well as by substrate stiffness and sugar content modification via alteration of chemical components. While pure PDMS substrates showed a significant lethal effect on flies, a 0.5 mm diameter through-hole access to agar was found to abruptly increase the survival of adult flies to more than 93%. Flies avoided ovipositing on pure PDMS and on top of substrates with 0.5 mm diameter agar exposure areas. At a hole diameter of 2 mm (i.e., 0.25% exposure area) or larger, eggs were observed to be laid predominately inside the through-holes and along the edges of the PDMS-agar interface, showing a trending increase in site selection with 4 mm (i.e., 1% exposure area threshold) demonstrating natural oviposition rates similar to pure agar. The surface-modified agar-PDMS hybrid devices and the threshold values

  16. Acquisition of high-quality digital video of Drosophila larval and adult behaviors from a lateral perspective.

    PubMed

    Zenger, Beatrix; Wetzel, Sabine; Duncan, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a powerful experimental model system for studying the function of the nervous system. Gene mutations that cause dysfunction of the nervous system often produce viable larvae and adults that have locomotion defective phenotypes that are difficult to adequately describe with text or completely represent with a single photographic image. Current modes of scientific publishing, however, support the submission of digital video media as supplemental material to accompany a manuscript. Here we describe a simple and widely accessible microscopy technique for acquiring high-quality digital video of both Drosophila larval and adult phenotypes from a lateral perspective. Video of larval and adult locomotion from a side-view is advantageous because it allows the observation and analysis of subtle distinctions and variations in aberrant locomotive behaviors. We have successfully used the technique to visualize and quantify aberrant crawling behaviors in third instar larvae, in addition to adult mutant phenotypes and behaviors including grooming. PMID:25350294

  17. Acquisition of High-Quality Digital Video of Drosophila Larval and Adult Behaviors from a Lateral Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Zenger, Beatrix; Wetzel, Sabine; Duncan, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a powerful experimental model system for studying the function of the nervous system. Gene mutations that cause dysfunction of the nervous system often produce viable larvae and adults that have locomotion defective phenotypes that are difficult to adequately describe with text or completely represent with a single photographic image. Current modes of scientific publishing, however, support the submission of digital video media as supplemental material to accompany a manuscript. Here we describe a simple and widely accessible microscopy technique for acquiring high-quality digital video of both Drosophila larval and adult phenotypes from a lateral perspective. Video of larval and adult locomotion from a side-view is advantageous because it allows the observation and analysis of subtle distinctions and variations in aberrant locomotive behaviors. We have successfully used the technique to visualize and quantify aberrant crawling behaviors in third instar larvae, in addition to adult mutant phenotypes and behaviors including grooming. PMID:25350294

  18. The Drosophila melanogaster Muc68E Mucin Gene Influences Adult Size, Starvation Tolerance, and Cold Recovery.

    PubMed

    Reis, Micael; Silva, Ana C; Vieira, Cristina P; Vieira, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Mucins have been implicated in many different biological processes, such as protection from mechanical damage, microorganisms, and toxic molecules, as well as providing a luminal scaffold during development. Nevertheless, it is conceivable that mucins have the potential to modulate food absorption as well, and thus contribute to the definition of several important phenotypic traits. Here we show that the Drosophila melanogaster Muc68E gene is 40- to 60-million-yr old, and is present in Drosophila species of the subgenus Sophophora only. The central repeat region of this gene is fast evolving, and shows evidence for repeated expansions/contractions. This and/or frequent gene conversion events lead to the homogenization of its repeats. The amino acid pattern P[ED][ED][ST][ST][ST] is found in the repeat region of Muc68E proteins from all Drosophila species studied, and can occur multiple times within a single conserved repeat block, and thus may have functional significance. Muc68E is a nonessential gene under laboratory conditions, but Muc68E mutant flies are smaller and lighter than controls at birth. However, at 4 d of age, Muc68E mutants are heavier, recover faster from chill-coma, and are more resistant to starvation than control flies, although they have the same percentage of lipids as controls. Mutant flies have enlarged abdominal size 1 d after chill-coma recovery, which is associated with higher lipid content. These results suggest that Muc68E has a role in metabolism modulation, food absorption, and/or feeding patterns in larvae and adults, and under normal and stress conditions. Such biological function is novel for mucin genes. PMID:27172221

  19. The Drosophila melanogaster Muc68E Mucin Gene Influences Adult Size, Starvation Tolerance, and Cold Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Micael; Silva, Ana C.; Vieira, Cristina P.; Vieira, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Mucins have been implicated in many different biological processes, such as protection from mechanical damage, microorganisms, and toxic molecules, as well as providing a luminal scaffold during development. Nevertheless, it is conceivable that mucins have the potential to modulate food absorption as well, and thus contribute to the definition of several important phenotypic traits. Here we show that the Drosophila melanogaster Muc68E gene is 40- to 60-million-yr old, and is present in Drosophila species of the subgenus Sophophora only. The central repeat region of this gene is fast evolving, and shows evidence for repeated expansions/contractions. This and/or frequent gene conversion events lead to the homogenization of its repeats. The amino acid pattern P[ED][ED][ST][ST][ST] is found in the repeat region of Muc68E proteins from all Drosophila species studied, and can occur multiple times within a single conserved repeat block, and thus may have functional significance. Muc68E is a nonessential gene under laboratory conditions, but Muc68E mutant flies are smaller and lighter than controls at birth. However, at 4 d of age, Muc68E mutants are heavier, recover faster from chill-coma, and are more resistant to starvation than control flies, although they have the same percentage of lipids as controls. Mutant flies have enlarged abdominal size 1 d after chill-coma recovery, which is associated with higher lipid content. These results suggest that Muc68E has a role in metabolism modulation, food absorption, and/or feeding patterns in larvae and adults, and under normal and stress conditions. Such biological function is novel for mucin genes. PMID:27172221

  20. Average shape standard atlas for the adult Drosophila ventral nerve cord.

    PubMed

    Boerner, Jana; Duch, Carsten

    2010-07-01

    Neuroanatomy benefits from quantification of neural structures, i.e., neurons, circuits, and brain parts, within a common reference system. Recent improvements in imaging techniques and increased computational power have made the creation of Web-based databases possible, which serve as common platforms for incorporating anatomical data. This study establishes a standard average shape atlas for the ventral nerve cord (VNC) of Drosophila melanogaster. This atlas allows for the registration of morphological, developmental, and genetic data into one quantitative 3D reference system. The standard is based on an average adult Drosophila VNC neuropil as labeled in 24 whole-mount preparations with the commercially available antibody (nc82) recognizing the Drosophila Bruchpilot protein (Brp). For the standardization procedure no expert knowledge of brain anatomy is required and global thresholding as well as straightforward affine and elastic registration procedures minimize user interactions. Successful registration is demonstrated for tracts and commissures, gene expression patterns, and geometric reconstructions of individual neurons. Any structure that is counterstained with anti-Brp can be registered into the standard, allowing for fast comparison of data from different experiments and different laboratories. In addition, standard transformations can be applied to gray scale image data, so that any confocal image stack that is colabeled with anti-Brp can be analyzed within standardized 3D reference coordinates. This allows for the creation of putative neural connectivity maps and the comparison of expression patterns derived from different preparations. The standard and protocols for histological methods, segmentation, and registration procedures will be made available on the Web. PMID:20503421

  1. Functional genomics identifies regulators of the phototransduction machinery in the Drosophila larval eye and adult ocelli.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Abhishek Kumar; Bargmann, Bastiaan O R; Tsachaki, Maria; Fritsch, Cornelia; Sprecher, Simon G

    2016-02-15

    Sensory perception of light is mediated by specialized Photoreceptor neurons (PRs) in the eye. During development all PRs are genetically determined to express a specific Rhodopsin (Rh) gene and genes mediating a functional phototransduction pathway. While the genetic and molecular mechanisms of PR development is well described in the adult compound eye, it remains unclear how the expression of Rhodopsins and the phototransduction cascade is regulated in other visual organs in Drosophila, such as the larval eye and adult ocelli. Using transcriptome analysis of larval PR-subtypes and ocellar PRs we identify and study new regulators required during PR differentiation or necessary for the expression of specific signaling molecules of the functional phototransduction pathway. We found that the transcription factor Krüppel (Kr) is enriched in the larval eye and controls PR differentiation by promoting Rh5 and Rh6 expression. We also identified Camta, Lola, Dve and Hazy as key genes acting during ocellar PR differentiation. Further we show that these transcriptional regulators control gene expression of the phototransduction cascade in both larval eye and adult ocelli. Our results show that PR cell type-specific transcriptome profiling is a powerful tool to identify key transcriptional regulators involved during several aspects of PR development and differentiation. Our findings greatly contribute to the understanding of how combinatorial action of key transcriptional regulators control PR development and the regulation of a functional phototransduction pathway in both larval eye and adult ocelli.

  2. Functional genomics identifies regulators of the phototransduction machinery in the Drosophila larval eye and adult ocelli.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Abhishek Kumar; Bargmann, Bastiaan O R; Tsachaki, Maria; Fritsch, Cornelia; Sprecher, Simon G

    2016-02-15

    Sensory perception of light is mediated by specialized Photoreceptor neurons (PRs) in the eye. During development all PRs are genetically determined to express a specific Rhodopsin (Rh) gene and genes mediating a functional phototransduction pathway. While the genetic and molecular mechanisms of PR development is well described in the adult compound eye, it remains unclear how the expression of Rhodopsins and the phototransduction cascade is regulated in other visual organs in Drosophila, such as the larval eye and adult ocelli. Using transcriptome analysis of larval PR-subtypes and ocellar PRs we identify and study new regulators required during PR differentiation or necessary for the expression of specific signaling molecules of the functional phototransduction pathway. We found that the transcription factor Krüppel (Kr) is enriched in the larval eye and controls PR differentiation by promoting Rh5 and Rh6 expression. We also identified Camta, Lola, Dve and Hazy as key genes acting during ocellar PR differentiation. Further we show that these transcriptional regulators control gene expression of the phototransduction cascade in both larval eye and adult ocelli. Our results show that PR cell type-specific transcriptome profiling is a powerful tool to identify key transcriptional regulators involved during several aspects of PR development and differentiation. Our findings greatly contribute to the understanding of how combinatorial action of key transcriptional regulators control PR development and the regulation of a functional phototransduction pathway in both larval eye and adult ocelli. PMID:26769100

  3. Induced overexpression of mitochondrial Mn-superoxide dismutase extends the life span of adult Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jingtao; Folk, Donna; Bradley, Timothy J; Tower, John

    2002-01-01

    A transgenic system ("FLP-out") based on yeast FLP recombinase allowed induced overexpression of MnSOD enzyme in adult Drosophila melanogaster. With FLP-out a brief heat pulse (HP) of young, adult flies triggered the rearrangement and subsequent expression of a MnSOD transgene throughout the adult life span. Control (no HP) and overexpressing (HP) flies had identical genetic backgrounds. The amount of MnSOD enzyme overexpression achieved varied among six independent transgenic lines, with increases up to 75%. Life span was increased in proportion to the increase in enzyme. Mean life span was increased by an average of 16%, with some lines showing 30-33% increases. Maximum life span was increased by an average of 15%, with one line showing as much as 37% increase. Simultaneous overexpression of catalase with MnSOD had no added benefit, consistent with previous observations that catalase is present in excess in the adult fly with regard to life span. Cu/ZnSOD overexpression also increases mean and maximum life span. For both MnSOD and Cu/ZnSOD lines, increased life span was not associated with decreased metabolic activity, as measured by O2 consumption. PMID:12072463

  4. Lin-28 promotes symmetric stem cell division and drives adaptive growth in the adult Drosophila intestine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Huan; Luhur, Arthur; Sokol, Nicholas

    2015-10-15

    Stem cells switch between asymmetric and symmetric division to expand in number as tissues grow during development and in response to environmental changes. The stem cell intrinsic proteins controlling this switch are largely unknown, but one candidate is the Lin-28 pluripotency factor. A conserved RNA-binding protein that is downregulated in most animals as they develop from embryos to adults, Lin-28 persists in populations of adult stem cells. Its function in these cells has not been previously characterized. Here, we report that Lin-28 is highly enriched in adult intestinal stem cells in the Drosophila intestine. lin-28 null mutants are homozygous viable but display defects in this population of cells, which fail to undergo a characteristic food-triggered expansion in number and have reduced rates of symmetric division as well as reduced insulin signaling. Immunoprecipitation of Lin-28-bound mRNAs identified Insulin-like Receptor (InR), forced expression of which completely rescues lin-28-associated defects in intestinal stem cell number and division pattern. Furthermore, this stem cell activity of lin-28 is independent of one well-known lin-28 target, the microRNA let-7, which has limited expression in the intestinal epithelium. These results identify Lin-28 as a stem cell intrinsic factor that boosts insulin signaling in intestinal progenitor cells and promotes their symmetric division in response to nutrients, defining a mechanism through which Lin-28 controls the adult stem cell division patterns that underlie tissue homeostasis and regeneration.

  5. Lin-28 promotes symmetric stem cell division and drives adaptive growth in the adult Drosophila intestine

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ching-Huan; Luhur, Arthur; Sokol, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells switch between asymmetric and symmetric division to expand in number as tissues grow during development and in response to environmental changes. The stem cell intrinsic proteins controlling this switch are largely unknown, but one candidate is the Lin-28 pluripotency factor. A conserved RNA-binding protein that is downregulated in most animals as they develop from embryos to adults, Lin-28 persists in populations of adult stem cells. Its function in these cells has not been previously characterized. Here, we report that Lin-28 is highly enriched in adult intestinal stem cells in the Drosophila intestine. lin-28 null mutants are homozygous viable but display defects in this population of cells, which fail to undergo a characteristic food-triggered expansion in number and have reduced rates of symmetric division as well as reduced insulin signaling. Immunoprecipitation of Lin-28-bound mRNAs identified Insulin-like Receptor (InR), forced expression of which completely rescues lin-28-associated defects in intestinal stem cell number and division pattern. Furthermore, this stem cell activity of lin-28 is independent of one well-known lin-28 target, the microRNA let-7, which has limited expression in the intestinal epithelium. These results identify Lin-28 as a stem cell intrinsic factor that boosts insulin signaling in intestinal progenitor cells and promotes their symmetric division in response to nutrients, defining a mechanism through which Lin-28 controls the adult stem cell division patterns that underlie tissue homeostasis and regeneration. PMID:26487778

  6. A simple method for imaging axonal transport in aging neurons using the adult Drosophila wing.

    PubMed

    Vagnoni, Alessio; Bullock, Simon L

    2016-09-01

    There is growing interest in the link between axonal cargo transport and age-associated neuronal dysfunction. The study of axonal transport in neurons of adult animals requires intravital or ex vivo imaging approaches, which are laborious and expensive in vertebrate models. We describe simple, noninvasive procedures for imaging cargo motility within axons using sensory neurons of the translucent Drosophila wing. A key aspect is a method for mounting the intact fly that allows detailed imaging of transport in wing neurons. Coupled with existing genetic tools in Drosophila, this is a tractable system for studying axonal transport over the life span of an animal and thus for characterization of the relationship between cargo dynamics, neuronal aging and disease. Preparation of a sample for imaging takes ∼5 min, with transport typically filmed for 2-3 min per wing. We also document procedures for the quantification of transport parameters from the acquired images and describe how the protocol can be adapted to study other cell biological processes in aging neurons. PMID:27560175

  7. Muscle niche-driven Insulin-Notch-Myc cascade reactivates dormant Adult Muscle Precursors in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Aradhya, Rajaguru; Zmojdzian, Monika; Da Ponte, Jean Philippe; Jagla, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    How stem cells specified during development keep their non-differentiated quiescent state, and how they are reactivated, remain poorly understood. Here, we applied a Drosophila model to follow in vivo behavior of adult muscle precursors (AMPs), the transient fruit fly muscle stem cells. We report that emerging AMPs send out thin filopodia that make contact with neighboring muscles. AMPs keep their filopodia-based association with muscles throughout their dormant state but also when they start to proliferate, suggesting that muscles could play a role in AMP reactivation. Indeed, our genetic analyses indicate that muscles send inductive dIlp6 signals that switch the Insulin pathway ON in closely associated AMPs. This leads to the activation of Notch, which regulates AMP proliferation via dMyc. Altogether, we report that Drosophila AMPs display homing behavior to muscle niche and that the niche-driven Insulin-Notch-dMyc cascade plays a key role in setting the activated state of AMPs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08497.001 PMID:26650355

  8. Aging Drosophila melanogaster display altered pre- and postsynaptic ultrastructure at adult neuromuscular junctions.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Nicole; Laugks, Ulrike; Heckmann, Manfred; Asan, Esther; Neuser, Kirsa

    2015-11-01

    Although age-related changes in synaptic plasticity are an important focus within neuroscience, little is known about ultrastructural changes of synaptic morphology during aging. Here we report how aging affects synaptic ultrastructure by using fluorescence and electron microscopy at the adult Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ) of ventral abdominal muscles. Mainly four striking morphological changes of aging NMJs were revealed. 1) Bouton size increases with proportionally rising number of active zones (AZs). 2) Synaptic vesicle density at AZs is increased in old flies. 3) Late endosomes, cisternae, and multivesicular bodies accumulate in the presynaptic terminal, and vesicles accumulate between membranes of the terminal bouton and the subsynaptic reticulum. 4) The electron-dense pre- and postsynaptic apposition is expanded in aging NMJs, which is accompanied by an expansion of the postsynaptic glutamate receptor fields. These findings suggest that aging is possibly accompanied by impaired synaptic vesicle release and recycling and a potentially compensatory expansion of AZs and postsynaptic densities. PMID:25940748

  9. Muscle organizers in Drosophila: the role of persistent larval fibers in adult flight muscle development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, E. R.; Fernandes, J.; Keshishian, H.

    1996-01-01

    In many organisms muscle formation depends on specialized cells that prefigure the pattern of the musculature and serve as templates for myoblast organization and fusion. These include muscle pioneers in insects and muscle organizing cells in leech. In Drosophila, muscle founder cells have been proposed to play a similar role in organizing larval muscle development during embryogenesis. During metamorphosis in Drosophila, following histolysis of most of the larval musculature, there is a second round of myogenesis that gives rise to the adult muscles. It is not known whether muscle founder cells organize the development of these muscles. However, in the thorax specific larval muscle fibers do not histolyze at the onset of metamorphosis, but instead serve as templates for the formation of a subset of adult muscles, the dorsal longitudinal flight muscles (DLMs). Because these persistent larval muscle fibers appear to be functioning in many respects like muscle founder cells, we investigated whether they were necessary for DLM development by using a microbeam laser to ablate them singly and in combination. We found that, in the absence of the larval muscle fibers, DLMs nonetheless develop. Our results show that the persistent larval muscle fibers are not required to initiate myoblast fusion, to determine DLM identity, to locate the DLMs in the thorax, or to specify the total DLM fiber volume. However, they are required to regulate the number of DLM fibers generated. Thus, while the persistent larval muscle fibers are not obligatory for DLM fiber formation and differentiation, they are necessary to ensure the development of the correct number of fibers.

  10. Reducing Lissencephaly-1 levels augments mitochondrial transport and has a protective effect in adult Drosophila neurons

    PubMed Central

    Vagnoni, Alessio; Hoffmann, Patrick C.; Bullock, Simon L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Defective transport of mitochondria in axons is implicated in the pathogenesis of several age-associated neurodegenerative diseases. However, the regulation and function of axonal mitochondrial motility during normal ageing is poorly understood. Here, we use novel imaging procedures to characterise axonal transport of these organelles in the adult Drosophila wing nerve. During early adult life there is a boost and progressive decline in the proportion of mitochondria that are motile, which is not due to general changes in cargo transport. Experimental inhibition of the mitochondrial transport machinery specifically in adulthood accelerates the appearance of focal protein accumulations in ageing axons, which is suggestive of defects in protein homeostasis. Unexpectedly, lowering levels of Lissencephaly-1 (Lis1), a dynein motor co-factor, augments axonal mitochondrial transport in ageing wing neurons. Lis1 mutations suppress focal protein accumulations in ageing neurons, including those caused by interfering with the mitochondrial transport machinery. Our data provide new insights into the dynamics of mitochondrial motility in adult neurons in vivo, identify Lis1 as a negative regulator of transport of these organelles, and provide evidence of a link between mitochondrial movement and neuronal protein homeostasis. PMID:26598558

  11. Low evolutionary potential for egg-to-adult viability in Drosophila melanogaster at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Torsten N; Overgaard, Johannes; Lassen, Jan; Hoffmann, Ary A; Sgrò, Carla

    2015-03-01

    To cope with the increasing and less-predictable temperature forecasts under climate change, many terrestrial ectotherms will have to migrate or rely on adaptation through plastic or evolutionary means. Studies suggest that some ectotherms have a limited potential to change their upper thermal limits via evolutionary shifts, but research has mostly focused on adult life stages under laboratory conditions. Here we use replicate populations of Drosophila melanogaster and a nested half-sib/full-sib quantitative genetic design to estimate heritabilities and genetic variance components for egg-to-adult viability under both laboratory and seminatural field conditions, encompassing cold, benign, and hot temperatures in two separate populations. The results demonstrated temperature-specific heritabilities and additive genetic variances for egg-to-adult viability. Heritabilities and genetic variances were higher under cold and benign compared to hot temperatures when tested under controlled laboratory conditions. Tendencies toward lower evolutionary potential at higher temperatures were also observed under seminatural conditions although the results were less clear in the field setting. Overall the results suggest that ectotherms that already experience temperatures close to their upper thermal tolerance limits have a restricted capacity to adapt to higher temperatures by evolutionary means.

  12. Cdk4 functions in multiple cell types to control Drosophila intestinal stem cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Adlesic, Mojca; Frei, Christian; Frew, Ian J

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation of intestinal stem cells (ISCs) and differentiation of enteroblasts to form mature enteroendocrine cells and enterocytes in the Drosophila intestinal epithelium must be tightly regulated to maintain homeostasis. We show that genetic modulation of CyclinD/Cdk4 activity or mTOR-dependent signalling cell-autonomously regulates enterocyte growth, which influences ISC proliferation and enteroblast differentiation. Increased enterocyte growth results in higher numbers of ISCs and defective enterocyte growth reduces ISC abundance and proliferation in the midgut. Adult midguts deficient for Cdk4 show severe disruption of intestinal homeostasis characterised by decreased ISC self-renewal, enteroblast differentiation defects and low enteroendocrine cell and enterocyte numbers. The ISC/enteroblast phenotypes result from a combination of cell autonomous and non-autonomous requirements for Cdk4 function. One non-autonomous consequence of Cdk4-dependent deficient enterocyte growth is high expression of Delta in ISCs and Delta retention in enteroblasts. We postulate that aberrant activation of the Delta-Notch pathway is a possible partial cause of lost ISC stemness. These results support the idea that enterocytes contribute to a putative stem cell niche that maintains intestinal homeostasis in the Drosophila anterior midgut. PMID:26879465

  13. Cdk4 functions in multiple cell types to control Drosophila intestinal stem cell proliferation and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Adlesic, Mojca; Frei, Christian; Frew, Ian J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The proliferation of intestinal stem cells (ISCs) and differentiation of enteroblasts to form mature enteroendocrine cells and enterocytes in the Drosophila intestinal epithelium must be tightly regulated to maintain homeostasis. We show that genetic modulation of CyclinD/Cdk4 activity or mTOR-dependent signalling cell-autonomously regulates enterocyte growth, which influences ISC proliferation and enteroblast differentiation. Increased enterocyte growth results in higher numbers of ISCs and defective enterocyte growth reduces ISC abundance and proliferation in the midgut. Adult midguts deficient for Cdk4 show severe disruption of intestinal homeostasis characterised by decreased ISC self-renewal, enteroblast differentiation defects and low enteroendocrine cell and enterocyte numbers. The ISC/enteroblast phenotypes result from a combination of cell autonomous and non-autonomous requirements for Cdk4 function. One non-autonomous consequence of Cdk4-dependent deficient enterocyte growth is high expression of Delta in ISCs and Delta retention in enteroblasts. We postulate that aberrant activation of the Delta–Notch pathway is a possible partial cause of lost ISC stemness. These results support the idea that enterocytes contribute to a putative stem cell niche that maintains intestinal homeostasis in the Drosophila anterior midgut. PMID:26879465

  14. Analyzing variation in egg-to-adult viability in experimental populations of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Wallace, B

    1989-03-01

    Selective culling in populations of most organisms is rank-order: individuals of low rank on a scale of potential fitnesses tend to be eliminated during early development, whereas surviving adults (whose number reflects the carrying capacity of the environment) are generally drawn from the distribution's upper end. Haldane pointed out [Haldane, J.B.S. (1932) The Causes of Evolution (Harper & Row, New York)] that selection which favors individuals in the upper tail of a composite distribution curve tends to favor members of the more variable of two populations, rather than members of a less variable one, even though the latter may possess the higher mean. In addition to reviewing earlier observations bearing on Haldane's argument, the present report describes an analysis of the comparative egg-to-adult viabilities of flies (Drosophila melanogaster) carrying combinations of second chromosomes obtained from one or another of eight experimental populations. Overall, the viabilities of flies carrying combinations of chromosomes one of which is shared (i/j vs. j/k) are as different as those of flies carrying combinations of independently sampled chromosomes (i/j vs. k/l). Episodes seemingly occurred within the populations during which flies carrying combinations that shared a chromosome differed more in their viabilities than flies carrying unrelated combinations. Such episodes could reflect the occurrence of selection of the sort described by Haldane. PMID:2494660

  15. Lineage mapping identifies molecular and architectural similarities between the larval and adult Drosophila central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Lacin, Haluk; Truman, James W

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenesis in Drosophila occurs in two phases, embryonic and post-embryonic, in which the same set of neuroblasts give rise to the distinct larval and adult nervous systems, respectively. Here, we identified the embryonic neuroblast origin of the adult neuronal lineages in the ventral nervous system via lineage-specific GAL4 lines and molecular markers. Our lineage mapping revealed that neurons born late in the embryonic phase show axonal morphology and transcription factor profiles that are similar to the neurons born post-embryonically from the same neuroblast. Moreover, we identified three thorax-specific neuroblasts not previously characterized and show that HOX genes confine them to the thoracic segments. Two of these, NB2-3 and NB3-4, generate leg motor neurons. The other neuroblast is novel and appears to have arisen recently during insect evolution. Our findings provide a comprehensive view of neurogenesis and show how proliferation of individual neuroblasts is dictated by temporal and spatial cues. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13399.001 PMID:26975248

  16. [Carbohydrate restriction in the larval diet causes oxidative stress in adult insects of Drosophila melanogaster].

    PubMed

    Rovenko, B M; Lushchak, V I; Lushchak, O V

    2013-01-01

    The influence of 20 and 1% glucose and fructose, which were components of larval diet, on the level of oxidized proteins and lipids, low molecular mass antioxidant content as well as activities of antioxidant and associated enzymes in adult fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster were investigated. The restriction of carbohydrates in larval diet leads to oxidative stress in adult insects. It is supported by 40-50% increased content of protein carbonyl groups and by 60-70% decreased level of protein thiol groups as well as by a 4-fold increase of lipid peroxide content in 2-day-old flies of both sexes, developed on the diet with 1% carbohydrates. Oxidative stress, induced by carbohydrate restriction of the larval diet, caused the activation of antioxidant defence, differently exhibited in male and female fruit flies. Caloric restriction increased activity of superoxide dismutase and thioredoxin reductase associating only in males with 2-fold higher activity of NADPH-producing enzymes--glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and isocitrate dehydrogenase. Carbohydrate restriction in the larval diet caused the increase of uric acid content, but the decrease in catalase activity in males. In females the values of these parameters were changed in opposite direction compared with males. The obtained results let us conclude the different involvement of low molecular mass antioxidants, glutathione and uric acid, and antioxidant enzyme catalase in the protection of male and female fruit fly macromolecules against oxidative damages, caused by calorie restriction of larval diet.

  17. Mef2 Interacts with the Notch Pathway during Adult Muscle Development in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Caine, Charlotte; Kasherov, Petar; Silber, Joël; Lalouette, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    Myogenesis of indirect flight muscles (IFMs) in Drosophila melanogaster follows a well-defined cellular developmental scheme. During embryogenesis, a set of cells, the Adult Muscle Precursors (AMPs), are specified. These cells will become proliferating myoblasts during the larval stages which will then give rise to the adult IFMs. Although the cellular aspect of this developmental process is well studied, the molecular biology behind the different stages is still under investigation. In particular, the interactions required during the transition from proliferating myoblasts to differentiated myoblasts ready to fuse to the muscle fiber. It has been previously shown that the Notch pathway is active in proliferating myoblasts, and that this pathway is inhibited in developing muscle fibers. Furthermore, the Myocyte Enhancing Factor 2 (Mef2), Vestigial (Vg) and Scalloped (Sd) transcription factors are necessary for IFM development and that Vg is required for Notch pathway repression in differentiating fibers. Here we examine the interactions between Notch and Mef2 and mechanisms by which the Notch pathway is inhibited during differentiation. We show that Mef2 is capable of inhibiting the Notch pathway in non myogenic cells. A previous screen for Mef2 potential targets identified Delta a component of the Notch pathway. Dl is expressed in Mef2 and Sd-positive developing fibers. Our results show that Mef2 and possibly Sd regulate a Dl enhancer specifically expressed in the developing IFMs and that Mef2 is required for Dl expression in developing IFMs. PMID:25247309

  18. Differential effects of arsenite and arsenate to Drosophila melanogaster in a combined adult/developmental toxicity assay

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, S.H.; Babich, H.

    1989-02-01

    Current concern of the environmental consequences of chemical wastes in soils has led to the development of microbial, plant, and, to a lesser extent, animal bioassays for terrestrial ecosystems. This paper evaluated a Drosophila assay that yields data both on acute toxicity to adults and on developmental toxicity to offspring and which is applicable for screening extracts from soils contaminated with chemical wastes. Acute toxicity assays with Drosophila have been used to evaluate the relative potencies of chemicals. The acute toxicity to adults and the developmental exposure bioassays were designed to be performed as separate tests. This paper combined these two tests into a single bioassay, using arsenic compounds as the test agents. Arsenite and arsenate were selected to evaluate the sensitivity of this combined assay in distinguishing between the toxicities of closely related chemicals.

  19. A Systematic Analysis of Drosophila Regulatory Peptide Expression in Enteroendocrine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ji; Kim, Seol-min; Kwon, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    The digestive system is gaining interest as a major regulator of various functions including immune defense, nutrient accumulation, and regulation of feeding behavior, aside from its conventional function as a digestive organ. The Drosophila midgut epithelium is completely renewed every 1–2 weeks due to differentiation of pluripotent intestinal stem cells in the midgut. Intestinal stem cells constantly divide and differentiate into enterocytes that secrete digestive enzymes and absorb nutrients, or enteroendocrine cells that secrete regulatory peptides. Regulatory peptides have important roles in development and metabolism, but study has mainly focused on expression and functions in the nervous system, and not much is known about the roles in endocrine functions of enteroendocrine cells. We systemically examined the expression of 45 regulatory peptide genes in the Drosophila midgut, and verified that at least 10 genes are expressed in the midgut enteroendocrine cells through RT-PCR, in situ hybridization, antisera, and 25 regulatory peptide-GAL transgenes. The Drosophila midgut is highly compartmentalized, and individual peptides in enteroendocrine cells were observed to express in specific regions of the midgut. We also confirmed that some peptides expressed in the same region of the midgut are expressed in mutually exclusive enteroendocrine cells. These results indicate that the midgut enteroendocrine cells are functionally differentiated into different subgroups. Through this study, we have established a basis to study regulatory peptide functions in enteroendocrine cells as well as the complex organization of enteroendocrine cells in the Drosophila midgut. PMID:27025390

  20. Nucleolar stress in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    James, Allison; Cindass Jr, Renford; Mayer, Dana; Terhoeve, Stephanie; Mumphrey, Courtney; DiMario, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Nucleolar stress results when ribosome biogenesis is disrupted. An excellent example is the human Treacher Collins syndrome in which the loss of the nucleolar chaperone, Treacle, leads to p53-dependent apoptosis in embryonic neural crest cells and ultimately to craniofacial birth defects. Here, we show that depletion of the related nucleolar phosphoprotein, Nopp140, in Drosophila melanogaster led to nucleolar stress and eventual lethality when multiple tissues were depleted of Nopp140. We used TEM, immuno-blot analysis and metabolic protein labeling to show the loss of ribosomes. Targeted loss of Nopp140 in larval wing discs caused Caspase-dependent apoptosis which eventually led to defects in the adult wings. These defects were not rescued by a p53 gene deletion, as the craniofacial defects were in the murine model of TCS, thus suggesting that apoptosis caused by nucleolar stress in Drosophila is induced by a p53-independent mechanism. Loss of Nopp140 in larval polyploid midgut cells induced premature autophagy as marked by the accumulation of mCherry-ATG8a into autophagic vesicles. We also found elevated phenoloxidase A3 levels in whole larval lysates and within the hemolymph of Nopp140-depleted larvae vs. hemolymph from parental genotype larvae. Phenoloxidase A3 enrichment was coincident with the appearance of melanotic tumors in the Nopp140-depleted larvae. The occurrence of apoptosis, autophagy and phenoloxidase A3 release to the hemolymph upon nucleolar stress correlated well with the demonstrated activation of Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in Nopp140-depleted larvae. We propose that JNK is a central stress response effector that is activated by nucleolar stress in Drosophila larvae. PMID:23412656

  1. Differential requirements for Myocyte Enhancer Factor-2 during adult myogenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Bryantsev, Anton L.; Baker, Phillip W.; Lovato, TyAnna L.; Jaramillo, MaryAnn S.; Cripps, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Identifying the genetic program that leads to formation of functionally and morphologically distinct muscle fibers is one of the major challenges in developmental biology. In Drosophila, the Myocyte Enhancer Factor-2 (MEF2) transcription factor is important for all types of embryonic muscle differentiation. In this study we investigated the role of MEF2 at different stages of adult skeletal muscle formation, where a diverse group of specialized muscles arises. Through stage- and tissue- specific expression of Mef2 RNAi constructs, we demonstrate that MEF2 is critical at the early stages of adult myoblast fusion: mutant myoblasts are attracted normally to their founder cell targets, but are unable to fuse to form myotubes. Interestingly, ablation of Mef2 expression at later stages of development showed MEF2 to be more dispensable for structural gene expression: after myoblast fusion, Mef2 knockdown did not interrupt expression of major structural gene transcripts, and myofibrils were formed. However, the MEF2-depleted fibers showed impaired integrity and a lack of fibrillar organization. When Mef2 RNAi was induced in muscles following eclosion, we found no adverse effects of attenuating Mef2 function. We conclude that in the context of adult myogenesis, MEF2 remains an essential factor, participating in control of myoblast fusion, and myofibrillogenesis in developing myotubes. However, MEF2 does not show a major requirement in the maintenance of muscle structural gene expression. Our findings point to the importance of a diversity of regulatory factors that are required for the formation and function of the distinct muscle fibers found in animals. PMID:22008792

  2. Drosophila's contribution to stem cell research

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gyanesh

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of Drosophila stem cells with striking similarities to mammalian stem cells has brought new hope for stem cell research. Recent developments in Drosophila stem cell research is bringing wider opportunities for contemporary stem cell biologists. In this regard, Drosophila germ cells are becoming a popular model of stem cell research. In several cases, genes that controlled Drosophila stem cells were later discovered to have functional homologs in mammalian stem cells. Like mammals, Drosophila germline stem cells (GSCs) are controlled by both intrinsic as well as external signals. Inside the Drosophila testes, germline and somatic stem cells form a cluster of cells (the hub). Hub cells depend on JAK-STAT signaling, and, in absence of this signal, they do not self-renew. In Drosophila, significant changes occur within the stem cell niche that contributes to a decline in stem cell number over time. In case of aging Drosophila, somatic niche cells show reduced DE-cadherin and unpaired (Upd) proteins. Unpaired proteins are known to directly decrease stem cell number within the niches, and, overexpression of upd within niche cells restored GSCs in older males also . Stem cells in the midgut of Drosophila are also very promising. Reduced Notch signaling was found to increase the number of midgut progenitor cells. On the other hand, activation of the Notch pathway decreased proliferation of these cells. Further research in this area should lead to the discovery of additional factors that regulate stem and progenitor cells in Drosophila. PMID:26180635

  3. Drosophila's contribution to stem cell research.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gyanesh

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of Drosophila stem cells with striking similarities to mammalian stem cells has brought new hope for stem cell research. Recent developments in Drosophila stem cell research is bringing wider opportunities for contemporary stem cell biologists. In this regard, Drosophila germ cells are becoming a popular model of stem cell research. In several cases, genes that controlled Drosophila stem cells were later discovered to have functional homologs in mammalian stem cells. Like mammals, Drosophila germline stem cells (GSCs) are controlled by both intrinsic as well as external signals. Inside the Drosophila testes, germline and somatic stem cells form a cluster of cells (the hub). Hub cells depend on JAK-STAT signaling, and, in absence of this signal, they do not self-renew. In Drosophila, significant changes occur within the stem cell niche that contributes to a decline in stem cell number over time. In case of aging Drosophila, somatic niche cells show reduced DE-cadherin and unpaired (Upd) proteins. Unpaired proteins are known to directly decrease stem cell number within the niches, and, overexpression of upd within niche cells restored GSCs in older males also . Stem cells in the midgut of Drosophila are also very promising. Reduced Notch signaling was found to increase the number of midgut progenitor cells. On the other hand, activation of the Notch pathway decreased proliferation of these cells. Further research in this area should lead to the discovery of additional factors that regulate stem and progenitor cells in Drosophila. PMID:26180635

  4. Structural and functional changes in the olfactory pathway of adult Drosophila take place at a critical age.

    PubMed

    Devaud, Jean-Marc; Acebes, Angel; Ramaswami, Mani; Ferrús, Alberto

    2003-07-01

    The olfactory system of several holometabolous insect species undergoes anatomical changes after eclosion of the imago, following those occurring during metamorphosis. In parallel, odor experience and learning performance also evolve with age. Here, we analyze the case of adult Drosophila females. Synaptogenesis in the antennal lobe (AL) starts in late pupa and continues during the first days of adult life, at the same time as the behavioral response to odors matures. Individual olfactory glomeruli (DM6, DM2, and V) display specific growth patterns between days 1 and 12 of adult life. Experience can modify the olfactory pathway both structurally and functionally as shown by adaptation experiments. The modifications associated with this form of nonassociative learning seem to take place at a critical age. Exposure to benzaldehyde at days 2-5 of adult life, but not at 8-11, causes behavioral adaptation as well as structural changes in DM2 and V glomeruli. Altered levels in intracellular cAMP, caused by dunce and rutabaga mutants, do not affect the normal changes in glomerular size, at least at day 6 of development, but they prevent those elicited by experience, establishing a molecular difference between glomerular changes of intrinsic versus environmental origin. Taken together, these data demonstrate an imprinting-like phenomenon in the olfactory pathway of young Drosophila adults, and illustrate its glomerulus-specific dynamics.

  5. Multiple Cis-Acting Sequences Contribute to Evolved Regulatory Variation for Drosophila Adh Genes

    PubMed Central

    Fang, X. M.; Brennan, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    Drosophila affinidisjuncta and Drosophila hawaiiensis are closely related species that display distinct tissue-specific expression patterns for their homologous alcohol dehydrogenase genes (Adh genes). In Drosophila melanogaster transformants, both genes are expressed at high levels in the larval and adult fat bodies, but the D. affinidisjuncta gene is expressed 10-50-fold more strongly in the larval and adult midguts and Malpighian tubules. The present study reports the mapping of cis-acting sequences contributing to the regulatory differences between these two genes in transformants. Chimeric genes were constructed and introduced into the germ line of D. melanogaster. Stage- and tissue-specific expression patterns were determined by measuring steady-state RNA levels in larvae and adults. Three portions of the promoter region make distinct contributions to the tissue-specific regulatory differences between the native genes. Sequences immediately upstream of the distal promoter have a strong effect in the adult Malpighian tubules, while sequences between the two promoters are relatively important in the larval Malpighian tubules. A third gene segment, immediately upstream of the proximal promoter, influences levels of the proximal Adh transcript in all tissues and developmental stages examined, and largely accounts for the regulatory difference in the larval and adult midguts. However, these as well as other sequences make smaller contributions to various aspects of the tissue-specific regulatory differences. In addition, some chimeric genes display aberrant RNA levels for the whole organism, suggesting close physical association between sequences involved in tissue-specific regulatory differences and those important for Adh expression in the larval and adult fat bodies. PMID:1644276

  6. Influence of temperature and activity on the metabolic rate of adult Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Berrigan, D; Partridge, L

    1997-12-01

    We measured metabolic rates of adult male Drosophila melanogaster allowed to evolve in the laboratory at 18 and 25 degrees C and compared these with measurements of metabolic rates of flies collected along a latitudinal gradient in Australia. Metabolic rates of flies that had evolved in the laboratory at low temperature were 5-7% higher than those of flies allowed to evolve at high temperature. Metabolic rates of field collected increased with latitude when measured at 18 degrees C but not at higher temperature (25 degrees C) and were about 9% greater in high latitude (approximately 41'00) flies than low latitude (16'53) flies. Metabolic rate was strongly influenced by measurement temperature; estimated Q10s ranged from 1.79 to 2.5 for measurements made at 18 and 25 degrees C. Metabolic rate scaled isometrically with body mass; the estimated slope of a ln-ln regression of metabolic rate and body mass was 1.03 +/- 0.1. We used our measures of metabolic rate and activity to estimate the minimum cost of transport (MCOT) while walking. The estimates of MCOT have high standard errors (lab, 34.30 +/- 14.2 ml O2/g/km; and field, 38.0 +/- 17.0 ml O2/g/km); however, they differ by only 3-9% from predicted values based on allometric relationships reported in the literature.

  7. Purification and characterization of an endo-exonuclease from adult flies of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Shuai, K; Das Gupta, C K; Hawley, R S; Chase, J W; Stone, K L; Williams, K R

    1992-01-01

    An endo-exonuclease (designated nuclease III) has been purified to near homogeneity from adult flies of Drosophila melanogaster. The enzyme degrades single- and double-stranded DNA and RNA. It has a sedimentation co-efficient of 3.1S and a strokes radius of 27A The native form of the purified enzyme appears to be a monomer of 33,600 dalton. It has a pH optimum of 7-8.5 and requires Mg2+ or Mn2+ but not Ca2+ or Co2+ for its activity. The enzyme activity on double-stranded DNA was inhibited 50% by 30 mM NaCl, while its activity on single-stranded DNA required 100 mM NaCl for 50% inhibition. Under the latter conditions, its activity on double-stranded DNA was inhibited approximately 98%. The enzyme degrades DNA to complete acid soluble products which are a mixture of mono- and oligonucleotides with 5'-P and 3'-OH termini. Supercoiled DNA was converted by the enzyme to nicked and subsequently to linear forms in a stepwise fashion under the condition in which the enzyme works optimally on single-stranded DNA. The amino acid composition and amino acid sequencing of tryptic peptides from purified nuclease III is also reported. Images PMID:1313969

  8. Why Adult Stem Cell Functionality Declines with Age? Studies from the Fruit Fly Drosophila Melanogaster Model Organism

    PubMed Central

    Gonen, Oren; Toledano, Hila

    2014-01-01

    Highly regenerative adult tissues are supported by rare populations of stem cells that continuously divide to self-renew and generate differentiated progeny. This process is tightly regulated by signals emanating from surrounding cells to fulfill the dynamic demands of the tissue. One of the hallmarks of aging is slow and aberrant tissue regeneration due to deteriorated function of stem and supporting cells. Several Drosophila regenerative tissues are unique in that they provide exact identification of stem and neighboring cells in whole-tissue anatomy. This allows for precise tracking of age-related changes as well as their targeted manipulation within the tissue. In this review we present the stem cell niche of Drosophila testis, ovary and intestine and describe the major changes and phenotypes that occur in the course of aging. Specifically we discuss changes in both intrinsic properties of stem cells and their microenvironment that contribute to the decline in tissue functionality. Understanding these mechanisms in adult Drosophila tissues will likely provide new paradigms in the field of aging. PMID:24955030

  9. Adult plasticity of cold tolerance in a continental-temperate population of Drosophila suzukii.

    PubMed

    Jakobs, Ruth; Gariepy, Tara D; Sinclair, Brent J

    2015-08-01

    Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura) (Diptera: Drosophilidae) is a worldwide emerging pest of soft fruits, but its cold tolerance has not been thoroughly explored. We determined the cold tolerance strategy, low temperature thermal limits, and plasticity of cold tolerance in both male and female adult D. suzukii. We reared flies under common conditions (long days, 21°C; control) and induced plasticity by rapid cold-hardening (RCH, 1h at 0°C followed by 1h recovery), cold acclimation (CA, 5 days at 6°C) or acclimation under fluctuating temperatures (FA). D. suzukii had supercooling points (SCPs) between -16 and -23°C, and were chill-susceptible. 80% of control flies were killed after 1h at -7.2°C (males) or -7.5°C (females); CA and FA improved survival of this temperature in both sexes, but RCH did not. 80% of control flies were killed after 70 h (male) or 92 h (female) at 0°C, and FA shifted this to 112 h (males) and 165 h (females). FA flies entered chill coma (CTmin) at approximately -1.7°C, which was ca. 0.5°C colder than control flies; RCH and CA increased the CTmin compared to controls. Control and RCH flies exposed to 0°C for 8h took 30-40 min to recover movement, but this was reduced to <10 min in CA and FA. Flies placed outside in a field cage in London, Ontario, were all killed by a transient cold snap in December. We conclude that adult phenotypic plasticity is not sufficient to allow D. suzukii to overwinter in temperate habitats, and suggest that flies could overwinter in association with built structures, or that there may be additional cold tolerance imparted by developmental plasticity.

  10. Faster development does not lead to correlated evolution of greater pre-adult competitive ability in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Shakarad, Mallikarjun; Prasad, N G; Gokhale, Kaustubh; Gadagkar, Vikram; Rajamani, M; Joshi, Amitabh

    2005-03-22

    In comparisons across Drosophila species, faster pre-adult development is phenotypically correlated with increased pre-adult competitive ability, suggesting that these two traits may also be evolutionary correlates of one another. However, correlations between traits within- and among- species can differ, and in most cases it is the within-species genetic correlations that are likely to act as constraints on adaptive evolution. Moreover, laboratory studies on Drosophila melanogaster have shown that the suite of traits that evolves in populations subjected to selection for faster development is the opposite of the traits that evolve in populations selected for increased pre-adult competitive ability. This observation led us to propose that, despite having a higher carrying capacity and a reduced minimum food requirement for completing development than controls, D. melanogaster populations subjected to selection for faster development should have lower competitive ability than controls owing to their reduced larval feeding rates and urea tolerance. Here, we describe results from pre-adult competition experiments that clearly show that the faster developing populations are substantially poorer competitors than controls when reared at high density in competition with a marked mutant strain. We briefly discuss these results in the context of different formulations of density-dependent selection theory.

  11. Overwintering Survival of Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) and the Effect of Food on Adult Survival in California's San Joaquin Valley.

    PubMed

    Kaçar, Gülay; Wang, Xin-Geng; Stewart, Thomas J; Daane, Kent M

    2016-08-01

    The overwintering survival and development of Drosophila suzukii Matsumura were investigated in California's San Joaquin Valley. Drosophila suzukii were exposed to overwintering conditions in cages hung in a citrus orchard, and the pupae were buried in the soil. Eggs exposed from late November to January did not survive; a low percentage (<3%) of larvae and pupae developed into adults. Survival of pupae was significantly higher when buried in the soil than on the citrus tree. From late January to March, all life stages developed into adults and overwintered adult female D. suzukii produced eggs when provided with 10% honey-water and sliced oranges. Adult survival varied among fruit juice provision treatments and overwintering exposure periods, ranging from 3.4 ± 0.9 d (water) to 44.1 ± 3.0 d (10% honey-water). Fruit juices of apple, cherry, grape, orange, and pomegranate were tested as adult food sources; results showed that adult female and male D. suzukii lived only 2 d with water only, whereas adults survived from 14.2 to 34.8 d with fruit juice treatments and the 10% honey-water control. An unexpected event was the oviposition and immature development of D. suzukii with the fruit juice. In a follow-up laboratory trial, when 10% honey-water or orange juice were provided along with an artificial diet for oviposition and immature development, female D. suzukii survived for 21.6 ± 2.4 or 21.6 ± 1.5 d, and produced 106.8 ± 14.1 or 98.5 ± 13.1 offspring, respectively. We discuss factors potentially influencing overwintering survival of D. suzukii. PMID:26654917

  12. Intestinal malrotation and midgut volvulus.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, Hidayatullah; Obaidy, Yalda; Maroof, Sahar

    2016-09-01

    A four-day-old boy presented with persistent bilious vomiting, bloody stained stool, and mild abdominal distension. Transabdominal ultrasound demonstrated a round soft-tissue mass-like structure in the right upper quadrant. With color Doppler ultrasound, the whirlpool sign was observed. Abdominal radiograph showed nonspecific findings. Upper gastrointestinal series revealed upper gastrointestinal tract obstruction at the level of distal duodenum. The diagnosis of intestinal malrotation with midgut volvulus was established and the treated surgically. Intestinal malrotation is congenital abnormal positioning of the bowel loops within the peritoneal cavity resulting in abnormal shortening of mesenteric root that is predisposed to midgut volvulus. Neonates and infants with persistent bilious vomiting should undergo diagnostic workup and preferably ultrasound as the first step. With classic sonographic appearance of whirlpool sign, even further imaging investigations is often not needed, and the surgeon should be alerted to plan surgery. PMID:27594965

  13. Gene-environment interplay in Drosophila melanogaster: chronic food deprivation in early life affects adult exploratory and fitness traits.

    PubMed

    Burns, James Geoffrey; Svetec, Nicolas; Rowe, Locke; Mery, Frederic; Dolan, Michael J; Boyce, W Thomas; Sokolowski, Marla B

    2012-10-16

    Early life adversity has known impacts on adult health and behavior, yet little is known about the gene-environment interactions (GEIs) that underlie these consequences. We used the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to show that chronic early nutritional adversity interacts with rover and sitter allelic variants of foraging (for) to affect adult exploratory behavior, a phenotype that is critical for foraging, and reproductive fitness. Chronic nutritional adversity during adulthood did not affect rover or sitter adult exploratory behavior; however, early nutritional adversity in the larval period increased sitter but not rover adult exploratory behavior. Increasing for gene expression in the mushroom bodies, an important center of integration in the fly brain, changed the amount of exploratory behavior exhibited by sitter adults when they did not experience early nutritional adversity but had no effect in sitters that experienced early nutritional adversity. Manipulation of the larval nutritional environment also affected adult reproductive output of sitters but not rovers, indicating GEIs on fitness itself. The natural for variants are an excellent model to examine how GEIs underlie the biological embedding of early experience.

  14. Non-Nutritive Polyol Sweeteners Differ in Insecticidal Activity When Ingested by Adult Drosophila melanogaster (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Sean; Baudier, Kaitlin; Marenda, Daniel R

    2016-01-01

    Previous work showed the non-nutritive polyol sweetener Erythritol was toxic when ingested by Drosophila melanogaster (Meigen, 1930). This study assessed whether insect toxicity is a general property of polyols. Among tested compounds, toxicity was highest for erythritol. Adult fruit flies (D. melanogaster) fed erythritol had reduced longevity relative to controls. Other polyols did not reduce longevity; the only exception was a weaker but significant reduction of female (but not male) longevity when flies were fed D-mannitol. We conclude at least some non-nutritive polyols are not toxic to adult D. melanogaster when ingested for 17 days. The longer time course (relative to erythritol) and female specificity of D-mannitol mortality suggests different mechanisms for D-mannitol and erythritol toxicity to D. melanogaster. PMID:27271968

  15. Non-Nutritive Polyol Sweeteners Differ in Insecticidal Activity When Ingested by Adult Drosophila melanogaster (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Sean; Baudier, Kaitlin; Marenda, Daniel R

    2016-01-01

    Previous work showed the non-nutritive polyol sweetener Erythritol was toxic when ingested by Drosophila melanogaster (Meigen, 1930). This study assessed whether insect toxicity is a general property of polyols. Among tested compounds, toxicity was highest for erythritol. Adult fruit flies (D. melanogaster) fed erythritol had reduced longevity relative to controls. Other polyols did not reduce longevity; the only exception was a weaker but significant reduction of female (but not male) longevity when flies were fed D-mannitol. We conclude at least some non-nutritive polyols are not toxic to adult D. melanogaster when ingested for 17 days. The longer time course (relative to erythritol) and female specificity of D-mannitol mortality suggests different mechanisms for D-mannitol and erythritol toxicity to D. melanogaster.

  16. Non-Nutritive Polyol Sweeteners Differ in Insecticidal Activity When Ingested by Adult Drosophila melanogaster (Diptera: Drosophilidae)

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Sean; Baudier, Kaitlin; Marenda, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Previous work showed the non-nutritive polyol sweetener Erythritol was toxic when ingested by Drosophila melanogaster (Meigen, 1930). This study assessed whether insect toxicity is a general property of polyols. Among tested compounds, toxicity was highest for erythritol. Adult fruit flies (D. melanogaster) fed erythritol had reduced longevity relative to controls. Other polyols did not reduce longevity; the only exception was a weaker but significant reduction of female (but not male) longevity when flies were fed D-mannitol. We conclude at least some non-nutritive polyols are not toxic to adult D. melanogaster when ingested for 17 days. The longer time course (relative to erythritol) and female specificity of D-mannitol mortality suggests different mechanisms for D-mannitol and erythritol toxicity to D. melanogaster. PMID:27271968

  17. The Jak-STAT target Chinmo prevents sex transformation of adult stem cells in the Drosophila testis niche

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qing; Wawersik, Matthew; Matunis, Erika L.

    2014-01-01

    Local signals maintain adult stem cells in many tissues. Whether the sexual identity of adult stem cells must also be maintained was not known. In the adult Drosophila testis niche, local Jak-STAT signaling promotes somatic cyst stem cell (CySC) renewal through several effectors, including the putative transcription factor Chronologically inappropriate morphogenesis (Chinmo). Here, we find that Chinmo also prevents feminization of CySCs. Chinmo promotes expression of the canonical male sex determination factor DoublesexM (DsxM) within CySCs and their progeny, and ectopic expression of DsxM in the CySC lineage partially rescues the chinmo sex transformation phenotype, placing Chinmo upstream of DsxM. The Dsx homologue DMRT1 prevents the male-to female conversion of differentiated somatic cells in the adult mammalian testis, but its regulation is not well understood. Our work indicates that sex maintenance occurs in adult somatic stem cells, and that this highly conserved process is governed by effectors of niche signals. PMID:25453558

  18. Superior mesenteric vein rotation: a CT sign of midgut malrotation

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, D.M.; Li, D.K.

    1983-10-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the pancreas, with its excellent display of peripancreatic anatomy, allows visualization of the major vessels entering the mesenteric root. In scans of the normal upper abdomen obtained at or just below the level of the uncinate process of the pancreas, the proximal superior mesenteric vein (SMV) easily can be identified lying on the right ventral aspect of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). The authors have observed a characteristic abnormality in this normal vascular arrangement on CT scans of the pancreas in three adult patients with suspected chronic pancreatitis who were subsequently proved to have midgut malrotation. They called this the SMV rotation sign and believe that its detection even on CT scans limited to the level of the pancreas should alert the radiologist to the presence of a midgut malrotation that may have been unsuspected.

  19. DNA damage in haemocytes and midgut gland cells of Steatoda grossa (Theridiidae) spiders exposed to food contaminated with cadmium.

    PubMed

    Stalmach, Monika; Wilczek, Grażyna; Wilczek, Piotr; Skowronek, Magdalena; Mędrzak, Monika

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the genotoxic effects of Cd on haemocytes and midgut gland cells of web-building spiders, Steatoda grossa (Theridiidae), exposed to the metal under laboratory conditions. Analyzes were conducted on adult females and males, fed for four weeks with cadmium-contaminated Drosophila hydei flies, grown on a medium suplemented with 0.25 mM CdCl2. The comet assay, providing a quantitative measure of DNA strand breaks, was used to evaluate the DNA damage caused by the metal. Cadmium content was measured in whole spider bodies by the AAS method. Metal body burden was significantly lower in females (0.25 µgg(-1) dry weight) than in males (3.03 µgg(-1) dry weight), suggesting that females may have more effective mechanisms controlling the uptake of metal, via the digestive tract, or its elimination from the body. Irrespectively of sex, spiders fed prey contaminated with cadmium showed significantly higher values of comet parameters: tail DNA (TDNA), tail length (TL) and olive tail moment (OTM), in comparison with the control. In midgut gland cells, the level of DNA damage was higher for males than females, while in haemocytes the genotoxic effect of cadmium was greater in females. The obtained results indicate that in spiders cadmium displays strong genotoxic effects and may cause DNA damage even at low concentrations, however the severity of damage seems to be sex- and internal organ-dependent. The comet assay can be considered a sensitive tool for measuring the deleterious effect of cadmium on DNA integrity in spiders.

  20. Larval Population Density Alters Adult Sleep in Wild-Type Drosophila melanogaster but Not in Amnesiac Mutant Flies.

    PubMed

    Chi, Michael W; Griffith, Leslie C; Vecsey, Christopher G

    2014-08-11

    Sleep has many important biological functions, but how sleep is regulated remains poorly understood. In humans, social isolation and other stressors early in life can disrupt adult sleep. In fruit flies housed at different population densities during early adulthood, social enrichment was shown to increase subsequent sleep, but it is unknown if population density during early development can also influence adult sleep. To answer this question, we maintained Drosophila larvae at a range of population densities throughout larval development, kept them isolated during early adulthood, and then tested their sleep patterns. Our findings reveal that flies that had been isolated as larvae had more fragmented sleep than those that had been raised at higher population densities. This effect was more prominent in females than in males. Larval population density did not affect sleep in female flies that were mutant for amnesiac, which has been shown to be required for normal memory consolidation, adult sleep regulation, and brain development. In contrast, larval population density effects on sleep persisted in female flies lacking the olfactory receptor or83b, suggesting that olfactory signals are not required for the effects of larval population density on adult sleep. These findings show that population density during early development can alter sleep behavior in adulthood, suggesting that genetic and/or structural changes are induced by this developmental manipulation that persist through metamorphosis.

  1. DNA-histone interactions are sufficient to position a single nucleosome juxtaposing Drosophila Adh adult enhancer and distal promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, J R; Benyajati, C

    1993-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase gene (Adh) of Drosophila melanogaster is transcribed from two tandem promoters in distinct developmental and tissue-specific patterns. Both promoters are regulated by separate upstream enhancer regions. In its wild-type context the adult enhancer specifically stimulates only the distal promoter, approximately 400 bp downstream, and not the proximal promoter, which is approximately 700 bp further downstream. Genomic footprinting and micrococcal nuclease analyses have revealed a specifically positioned nucleosome between the distal promoter and adult enhancer. In vitro reconstitution of this nucleosome demonstrated that DNA-core histone interactions alone are sufficient to position the nucleosome. Based on this observation and sequence periodicities in the underlying DNA, the mechanism of positioning appears to involve specific DNA structural features (ie flexibility or curvature). We have observed this nucleosome positioned early during development, before tissue differentiation, and before non-histone protein-DNA interactions are established at the distal promoter or adult enhancer. This nucleosome positioning element in the Adh regulatory region could be involved in establishing a specific tertiary nucleoprotein structure that facilitates specific cis-element accessibility and/or distal promoter-adult enhancer interactions. Images PMID:8451195

  2. UPRT, a suicide-gene therapy candidate in higher eukaryotes, is required for Drosophila larval growth and normal adult lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arpan C.; Shimell, MaryJane; Leof, Emma R.; Haley, Macy J.; O’Connor, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT) is a pyrimidine salvage pathway enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of uracil to uridine monophosphate (UMP). The enzyme is highly conserved from prokaryotes to humans and yet phylogenetic evidence suggests that UPRT homologues from higher-eukaryotes, including Drosophila, are incapable of binding uracil. Purified human UPRT also do not show any enzymatic activity in vitro, making microbial UPRT an attractive candidate for anti-microbial drug development, suicide-gene therapy, and cell-specific mRNA labeling techniques. Nevertheless, the enzymatic site of UPRT remains conserved across the animal kingdom indicating an in vivo role for the enzyme. We find that the Drosophila UPRT homologue, krishah (kri), codes for an enzyme that is required for larval growth, pre-pupal/pupal viability and long-term adult lifespan. Our findings suggest that UPRT from all higher eukaryotes is likely enzymatically active in vivo and challenges the previous notion that the enzyme is non-essential in higher eukaryotes and cautions against targeting the enzyme for therapeutic purposes. Our findings also suggest that expression of the endogenous UPRT gene will likely cause background incorporation when using microbial UPRT as a cell-specific mRNA labeling reagent in higher eukaryotes. PMID:26271729

  3. Contribution of ethyl methanesulfonate vapors to the yield of mutations detected in Drosophila melanogaster when the adult feeding technique is used

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    Ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) is an alkylating agent widely used in mutation research. In experiments with adult Drosophila melanogaster, EMS is either injected or fed to the flies using different feeding methods that essentially consist of placing the flies in bottles or vials with a piece of tissue paper moistened with a sucrose solution containing the desired concentration of EMS. To determine the extent to which vapors contribute to the mutagenic effect detected in Drosophila when the feeding technique is used, 7-day-old wild-type Samarkand males were fed EMS or were exposed only to its vapors.

  4. Midgut of the non-hematophagous mosquito Toxorhynchites theobaldi (Diptera, Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Godoy, Raquel S M; Fernandes, Kenner M; Martins, Gustavo F

    2015-10-30

    In most mosquito species, the females require a blood-feeding for complete egg development. However, in Toxorhynchites mosquitoes, the eggs develop without blood-feeding, and both females and males exclusively feed on sugary diets. The midgut is a well-understood organ in blood-feeding mosquitoes, but little is known about it in non-blood-feeding ones. In the present study, the detailed morphology of the midgut of Toxorhynchites theobaldi were investigated using histochemical and ultrastructural methods. The midgut of female and male T. theobaldi adults consists of a long, slender anterior midgut (AMG), and a short, dilated posterior midgut (PMG). The AMG is subdivided into AMG1 (short, with folds) and AMG2 (long, without folds). Nerve branches and enteroendocrine cells are present in AMG and PMG, respectively. Compared with the PMG of blood-feeding female mosquitoes, the PMG of T. theobaldi is smaller; however, in both mosquitoes, PMG seems be the main region of food digestion and absorption, and protein secretion. The epithelial folds present in the AMG of T. theobaldi have not been reported in other mosquitoes; however, the midgut muscle organization and endocrine control of the digestion process are conserved in both T. theobaldi and blood-feeding mosquitoes.

  5. Midgut of the non-hematophagous mosquito Toxorhynchites theobaldi (Diptera, Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Raquel S. M.; Fernandes, Kenner M.; Martins, Gustavo F.

    2015-01-01

    In most mosquito species, the females require a blood-feeding for complete egg development. However, in Toxorhynchites mosquitoes, the eggs develop without blood-feeding, and both females and males exclusively feed on sugary diets. The midgut is a well-understood organ in blood-feeding mosquitoes, but little is known about it in non-blood-feeding ones. In the present study, the detailed morphology of the midgut of Toxorhynchites theobaldi were investigated using histochemical and ultrastructural methods. The midgut of female and male T. theobaldi adults consists of a long, slender anterior midgut (AMG), and a short, dilated posterior midgut (PMG). The AMG is subdivided into AMG1 (short, with folds) and AMG2 (long, without folds). Nerve branches and enteroendocrine cells are present in AMG and PMG, respectively. Compared with the PMG of blood-feeding female mosquitoes, the PMG of T. theobaldi is smaller; however, in both mosquitoes, PMG seems be the main region of food digestion and absorption, and protein secretion. The epithelial folds present in the AMG of T. theobaldi have not been reported in other mosquitoes; however, the midgut muscle organization and endocrine control of the digestion process are conserved in both T. theobaldi and blood-feeding mosquitoes. PMID:26514271

  6. Ultrastructure of the digestive system and the fate of midgut during embryonic development in Porcellio scaber (Crustacea: Isopoda).

    PubMed

    Strus, Jasna; Klepal, Waltraud; Repina, Janja; Tusek-Znidaric, Magda; Milatovic, Masa; Pipan, Ziva

    2008-07-01

    Microscopic anatomy of the digestive system in embryos and larvae of the terrestrial isopod crustacean Porcellio scaber was investigated by light bright field, fluorescence and electron microscopy. During marsupial ontogenetic development the event-dependent staging was used to discriminate the various embryonic stages. At the late embryo stage the differentiation of the ectodermal part of the gut into the complex filtering foregut and the hindgut with absorptive and transporting functions is accomplished. The gut of the marsupial manca larva is fully developed and similar to that of the adult. In early embryos the endodermal midgut gland primordia are filled with yolk and lipid globules. In late embryos the epithelium of paired midgut gland tubes is composed of two cell types; one of them exhibits orange autofluorescence. The endodermal cells located between the foregut and the midgut glands of late embryos form the prospective midgut. The cells have electron dense cytoplasm, abundant glycogen fields, endoplasmic reticulum, dictyosomes and numerous vesicles. In the adults the endodermal cells of the midgut remain only in the midgut gland ducts which connect the midgut glands and the foregut. Details of the cellular ultrastructure and morphogenesis of the ectodermal and endodermal parts of the digestive system during embryonic development of Porcellio scaber provide data for further phylogenetic and comparative studies in peracaridan crustaceans and other arthropods.

  7. Thermal evolution of pre-adult life history traits, geometric size and shape, and developmental stability in Drosophila subobscura.

    PubMed

    Santos, M; Brites, D; Laayouni, H

    2006-11-01

    Replicated lines of Drosophila subobscura originating from a large outbred stock collected at the estimated Chilean epicentre (Puerto Montt) of the original New World invasion were allowed to evolve under controlled conditions of larval crowding for 3.5 years at three temperature levels (13, 18 and 22 degrees C). Several pre-adult life history traits (development time, survival and competitive ability), adult life history related traits (wing size, wing shape and wing-aspect ratio), and wing size and shape asymmetries were measured at the three temperatures. Cold-adapted (13 degrees C) populations evolved longer development times and showed lower survival at the highest developmental temperature. No divergence for wing size was detected following adaptation to temperature extremes (13 and 22 degrees C), in agreement with earlier observations, but wing shape changes were obvious as a result of both thermal adaptation and development at different temperatures. However, the evolutionary trends observed for the wing-aspect ratio were inconsistent with an adaptive hypothesis. There was some indication that wing shape asymmetry has evolutionarily increased in warm-adapted populations, which suggests that there is additive genetic variation for fluctuating asymmetry and that it can evolve under rapid environmental changes caused by thermal stress. Overall, our results cast strong doubts on the hypothesis that body size itself is the target of selection, and suggest that pre-adult life history traits are more closely related to thermal adaptation.

  8. Maintenance of Glia in the Optic Lamina Is Mediated by EGFR Signaling by Photoreceptors in Adult Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yuan-Ming; Sun, Y. Henry

    2015-01-01

    The late onset of neurodegeneration in humans indicates that the survival and function of cells in the nervous system must be maintained throughout adulthood. In the optic lamina of the adult Drosophila, the photoreceptor axons are surrounded by multiple types of glia. We demonstrated that the adult photoreceptors actively contribute to glia maintenance in their target field within the optic lamina. This effect is dependent on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligands produced by the R1-6 photoreceptors and transported to the optic lamina to act on EGFR in the lamina glia. EGFR signaling is necessary and sufficient to act in a cell-autonomous manner in the lamina glia. Our results suggest that EGFR signaling is required for the trafficking of the autophagosome/endosome to the lysosome. The loss of EGFR signaling results in cell degeneration most likely because of the accumulation of autophagosomes. Our findings provide in vivo evidence for the role of adult neurons in the maintenance of glia and a novel role for EGFR signaling in the autophagic flux. PMID:25909451

  9. FoxK mediates TGF-β signalling during midgut differentiation in flies

    PubMed Central

    Casas-Tinto, Sergio; Gomez-Velazquez, Melisa; Granadino, Begoña; Fernandez-Funez, Pedro

    2008-01-01

    Inductive signals across germ layers are important for the development of the endoderm in vertebrates and invertebrates (Tam, P.P., M. Kanai-Azuma, and Y. Kanai. 2003. Curr. Opin. Genet. Dev. 13:393–400; Nakagoshi, H. 2005. Dev. Growth Differ. 47:383–392). In flies, the visceral mesoderm secretes signaling molecules that diffuse into the underlying midgut endoderm, where conserved signaling cascades activate the Hox gene labial, which is important for the differentiation of copper cells (Bienz, M. 1997. Curr. Opin. Genet. Dev. 7:683–688). We present here a Drosophila melanogaster gene of the Fox family of transcription factors, FoxK, that mediates transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signaling in the embryonic midgut endoderm. FoxK mutant embryos fail to generate midgut constrictions and lack Labial in the endoderm. Our observations suggest that TGF-β signaling directly regulates FoxK through functional Smad/Mad-binding sites, whereas FoxK, in turn, regulates labial expression. We also describe a new cooperative activity of the transcription factors FoxK and Dfos/AP-1 that regulates labial expression in the midgut endoderm. This regulatory activity does not require direct labial activation by the TGF-β effector Mad. Thus, we propose that the combined activity of the TGF-β target genes FoxK and Dfos is critical for the direct activation of lab in the endoderm. PMID:19075113

  10. Postembryonic lineages of the Drosophila ventral nervous system: Neuroglian expression reveals the adult hemilineage associated fiber tracts in the adult thoracic neuromeres

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Robin; Williams, Darren W.; Truman, James W.

    2016-01-01

    During larval life most of the thoracic neuroblasts (NBs) in Drosophila undergo a second phase of neurogenesis to generate adult‐specific neurons that remain in an immature, developmentally stalled state until pupation. Using a combination of MARCM and immunostaining with a neurotactin antibody, Truman et al. (2004; Development 131:5167–5184) identified 24 adult‐specific NB lineages within each thoracic hemineuromere of the larval ventral nervous system (VNS), but because of the neurotactin labeling of lineage tracts disappearing early in metamorphosis, they were unable extend the identification of these lineages into the adult. Here we show that immunostaining with an antibody against the cell adhesion molecule neuroglian reveals the same larval secondary lineage projections through metamorphosis and bfy identifying each neuroglian‐positive tract at selected stages we have traced the larval hemilineage tracts for all three thoracic neuromeres through metamorphosis into the adult. To validate tract identifications we used the genetic toolkit developed by Harris et al. (2015; Elife 4) to preserve hemilineage‐specific GAL4 expression patterns from larval into the adult stage. The immortalized expression proved a powerful confirmation of the analysis of the neuroglian scaffold. This work has enabled us to directly link the secondary, larval NB lineages to their adult counterparts. The data provide an anatomical framework that 1) makes it possible to assign most neurons to their parent lineage and 2) allows more precise definitions of the neuronal organization of the adult VNS based in developmental units/rules. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2677–2695, 2016. © 2016 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26878258

  11. Selection on the timing of adult emergence results in altered circadian clocks in fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shailesh; Kumar, Dhanya; Paranjpe, Dhanashree A; R, Akarsh C; Sharma, Vijay Kumar

    2007-03-01

    To investigate whether circadian clocks in fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster evolve as a consequence of selection on the timing of adult emergence, we raised four replicate populations each of early (early(1..4)) and late (late(1..4)) emerging flies by selecting for adults that emerged during the morning and the evening hours. We estimated the percentage of flies that emerged during the two selection windows to evaluate the direct response to selection, and the circadian phenotypes of adult emergence and locomotor activity rhythms under light/dark (LD) and constant darkness (DD) to assess the correlated response to selection. After 55 generations, the percentage of flies emerging during the morning window increased in the early populations, but decreased in the late populations. The percentage of flies emerging during the evening window increased in the late populations, but decreased in the early populations. The time course and waveform of emergence and locomotor activity rhythms of the selected populations diverged from each other as well as from the controls. Further, the circadian periodicity of the early populations was significantly shorter than the controls, while that of the late populations was significantly longer than the controls. The light-induced phase response curve of the selected populations differed significantly within groups as well as from the controls. Such modifications in the circadian phenotypes of the selected populations due to heritable changes in genetic architecture, in response to imposed selection pressure, suggest that the circadian clocks underlying emergence and locomotor activity rhythms in D. melanogaster evolve as a correlated response to selection on the timing of adult emergence.

  12. CCHamide-2 Is an Orexigenic Brain-Gut Peptide in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ren, Guilin R; Hauser, Frank; Rewitz, Kim F; Kondo, Shu; Engelbrecht, Alexander F; Didriksen, Anders K; Schjøtt, Suzanne R; Sembach, Frederikke E; Li, Shizhong; Søgaard, Karen C; Søndergaard, Leif; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P

    2015-01-01

    The neuroendocrine peptides CCHamide-1 and -2, encoded by the genes ccha1 and -2, are produced by endocrine cells in the midgut and by neurons in the brain of Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we used the CRISPR/Cas9 technique to disrupt the ccha1 and -2 genes and identify mutant phenotypes with a focus on ccha-2 mutants. We found that both larval and adult ccha2 mutants showed a significantly reduced food intake as measured in adult flies by the Capillary Feeding (CAFE) assay (up to 72% reduced food intake compared to wild-type). Locomotion tests in adult flies showed that ccha2 mutants had a significantly reduced locomotor activity especially around 8 a.m. and 8 p.m., where adult Drosophila normally feeds (up to 70% reduced locomotor activity compared to wild-type). Reduced larval feeding is normally coupled to a delayed larval development, a process that is mediated by insulin. Accordingly, we found that the ccha2 mutants had a remarkably delayed development, showing pupariation 70 hours after the pupariation time point of the wild-type. In contrast, the ccha-1 mutants were not developmentally delayed. We also found that the ccha2 mutants had up to 80% reduced mRNA concentrations coding for the Drosophila insulin-like-peptides-2 and -3, while these concentrations were unchanged for the ccha1 mutants. From these experiments we conclude that CCHamide-2 is an orexigenic peptide and an important factor for controlling developmental timing in Drosophila. PMID:26168160

  13. Open Source Tracking and Analysis of Adult Drosophila Locomotion in Buridan's Paradigm with and without Visual Targets

    PubMed Central

    Colomb, Julien; Reiter, Lutz; Blaszkiewicz, Jedrzej; Wessnitzer, Jan; Brembs, Bjoern

    2012-01-01

    Background Insects have been among the most widely used model systems for studying the control of locomotion by nervous systems. In Drosophila, we implemented a simple test for locomotion: in Buridan's paradigm, flies walk back and forth between two inaccessible visual targets [1]. Until today, the lack of easily accessible tools for tracking the fly position and analyzing its trajectory has probably contributed to the slow acceptance of Buridan's paradigm. Methodology/Principal Findings We present here a package of open source software designed to track a single animal walking in a homogenous environment (Buritrack) and to analyze its trajectory. The Centroid Trajectory Analysis (CeTrAn) software is coded in the open source statistics project R. It extracts eleven metrics and includes correlation analyses and a Principal Components Analysis (PCA). It was designed to be easily customized to personal requirements. In combination with inexpensive hardware, these tools can readily be used for teaching and research purposes. We demonstrate the capabilities of our package by measuring the locomotor behavior of adult Drosophila melanogaster (whose wings were clipped), either in the presence or in the absence of visual targets, and comparing the latter to different computer-generated data. The analysis of the trajectories confirms that flies are centrophobic and shows that inaccessible visual targets can alter the orientation of the flies without changing their overall patterns of activity. Conclusions/Significance Using computer generated data, the analysis software was tested, and chance values for some metrics (as well as chance value for their correlation) were set. Our results prompt the hypothesis that fixation behavior is observed only if negative phototaxis can overcome the propensity of the flies to avoid the center of the platform. Together with our companion paper, we provide new tools to promote Open Science as well as the collection and analysis of digital

  14. Transgenerational Effects of Parental Larval Diet on Offspring Development Time, Adult Body Size and Pathogen Resistance in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Valtonen, Terhi M.; Kangassalo, Katariina; Pölkki, Mari; Rantala, Markus J.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental conditions experienced by parents are increasingly recognized to affect offspring performance. We set out to investigate the effect of parental larval diet on offspring development time, adult body size and adult resistance to the bacterium Serratia marcescens in Drosophila melanogaster. Flies for the parental generation were raised on either poor or standard diet and then mated in the four possible sex-by-parental diet crosses. Females that were raised on poor food produced larger offspring than females that were raised on standard food. Furthermore, male progeny sired by fathers that were raised on poor food were larger than male progeny sired by males raised on standard food. Development times were shortest for offspring whose one parent (mother or the father) was raised on standard and the other parent on poor food and longest for offspring whose parents both were raised on poor food. No evidence for transgenerational effects of parental diet on offspring disease resistance was found. Although paternal effects have been previously demonstrated in D. melanogaster, no earlier studies have investigated male-mediated transgenerational effects of diet in this species. The results highlight the importance of not only considering the relative contribution each parental sex has on progeny performance but also the combined effects that the two sexes may have on offspring performance. PMID:22359607

  15. Drosophila adult muscle precursors form a network of interconnected cells and are specified by the rhomboid-triggered EGF pathway.

    PubMed

    Figeac, Nicolas; Jagla, Teresa; Aradhya, Rajaguru; Da Ponte, Jean Philippe; Jagla, Krzysztof

    2010-06-01

    In Drosophila, a population of muscle-committed stem-like cells called adult muscle precursors (AMPs) keeps an undifferentiated and quiescent state during embryonic life. The embryonic AMPs are at the origin of all adult fly muscles and, as we demonstrate here, they express repressors of myogenic differentiation and targets of the Notch pathway known to be involved in muscle cell stemness. By targeting GFP to the AMP cell membranes, we show that AMPs are tightly associated with the peripheral nervous system and with a subset of differentiated muscles. They send long cellular processes running along the peripheral nerves and, by the end of embryogenesis, form a network of interconnected cells. Based on evidence from laser ablation experiments, the main role of these cellular extensions is to maintain correct spatial positioning of AMPs. To gain insights into mechanisms that lead to AMP cell specification, we performed a gain-of-function screen with a special focus on lateral AMPs expressing the homeobox gene ladybird. Our data show that the rhomboid-triggered EGF signalling pathway controls both the specification and the subsequent maintenance of AMP cells. This finding is supported by the identification of EGF-secreting cells in the lateral domain and the EGF-dependent regulatory modules that drive expression of the ladybird gene in lateral AMPs. Taken together, our results reveal an unsuspected capacity of embryonic AMPs to form a cell network, and shed light on the mechanisms governing their specification and maintenance.

  16. Prostaglandin biosynthesis by midgut tissue isolated from the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Büyükgüzel, K; Tunaz, H; Putnam, S M; Stanley, D

    2002-04-01

    We describe prostaglandin (PG) biosynthesis by isolated midgut preparations from tobacco hornworms, Manduca sexta. Microsomal-enriched midgut preparations yielded four PGs, PGA/B(2), PGD(2), PGE(2) and PGF(2alpha), all of which were confirmed by analysis on gas chromatography--mass spectrometry (GC--MS). PGA and PGB are double bond isomers which do not resolve on TLC but do resolve by GC; for convenience, we use the single term PGA(2) for this product. PGA(2) was the major product under most conditions. The midgut preparations were sensitive to reaction conditions, including radioactive substrate, protein concentration (optimal at 1mg/reaction), reaction time (optimal at 0.5 min), temperature (optimal at 22 degrees C), buffer pH (highest at pH 6), and the presence of a co-factor cocktail composed of reduced glutathione, hydroquinine and hemoglobin. In vitro PG biosynthesis was inhibited by two cyclooxygenase inhibitors, indomethacin and naproxen. Subcellular localization of PG biosynthetic activity in midgut preparations, determined by ultracentrifugation, revealed the presence of PG biosynthetic activity in the cytosolic and microsomal fractions, although most activity was found in the cytosolic fractions. This is similar to other invertebrates, and different from mammalian preparations, in which the activity is exclusively associated with the microsomal fractions. Midgut preparations from M. sexta pupae, adult cockroach, Periplaneta americana, and corn ear worms, Helicoverpa zea, also produced the same four major PG products. We infer that insect midguts are competent to biosynthesize PGs, and speculate they exert important, albeit unrevealed, actions in midgut physiology.

  17. Rapid laboratory evolution of adult wing area in Drosophila melanogaster in response to humidity.

    PubMed

    Kennington, W Jason; Killeen, James R; Goldstein, David B; Partridge, Linda

    2003-04-01

    We examined the evolutionary response of wing area (a trait highly correlated with other measures of body size) to relative humidity (RH), temperature, and their interaction in Drosophila melanogaster, using replicated lines that had been allowed to evolve at low or high humidity at 18 degrees C or at 25 degrees C. We found that after 20 weeks of selection (5-10 generations), low RH lines had significantly greater wing areas than high RH lines in both sexes. This evolutionary response may have resulted from selection of larger flies with a smaller surface area for water loss relative to their weight, or as a correlated response to selection on some other unidentified trait. There were no evolutionary effects of temperature on wing area or cell density. This may have been due to the short duration of the selection experiment, and/or counteracting selection pressures on body size at warm temperature.

  18. Aging and Autophagic Function Influences the Progressive Decline of Adult Drosophila Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Kotzebue, Roxanne W.; Gonzalez, Arysa; Achal, Madhulika; Barekat, Ayeh; Finley, Kaelyn A.; Sparhawk, Jonathan M.; Robinson, James E.; Herr, Deron R.; Harris, Greg L.; Joiner, William J.; Finley, Kim D.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple neurological disorders are characterized by the abnormal accumulation of protein aggregates and the progressive impairment of complex behaviors. Our Drosophila studies demonstrate that middle-aged wild-type flies (WT, ~4-weeks) exhibit a marked accumulation of neural aggregates that is commensurate with the decline of the autophagy pathway. However, enhancing autophagy via neuronal over-expression of Atg8a (Atg8a-OE) reduces the age-dependent accumulation of aggregates. Here we assess basal locomotor activity profiles for single- and group-housed male and female WT flies and observed that only modest behavioral changes occurred by 4-weeks of age, with the noted exception of group-housed male flies. Male flies in same-sex social groups exhibit a progressive increase in nighttime activity. Infrared videos show aged group-housed males (4-weeks) are engaged in extensive bouts of courtship during periods of darkness, which is partly repressed during lighted conditions. Together, these nighttime courtship behaviors were nearly absent in young WT flies and aged Atg8a-OE flies. Previous studies have indicated a regulatory role for olfaction in male courtship partner choice. Coincidently, the mRNA expression profiles of several olfactory genes decline with age in WT flies; however, they are maintained in age-matched Atg8a-OE flies. Together, these results suggest that middle-aged male flies develop impairments in olfaction, which could contribute to the dysregulation of courtship behaviors during dark time periods. Combined, our results demonstrate that as Drosophila age, they develop early behavior defects that are coordinate with protein aggregate accumulation in the nervous system. In addition, the nighttime activity behavior is preserved when neuronal autophagy is maintained (Atg8a-OE flies). Thus, environmental or genetic factors that modify autophagic capacity could have a positive impact on neuronal aging and complex behaviors. PMID:26182057

  19. Maintenance of midgut epithelial cells from Dendroctonus valens (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, L; Andrade, J L; Cisneros, R; Zúñiga, G

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the culture of epithelial cells from anterior and posterior midgut regions of adult Dendroctonus valens. Culture conditions were established, and cell adherence was improved by means of a new technique that allowed the cells to grow between two glass coverslips. Cytoplasmic projections occur as anterior midgut cells grow to confluence; these projections were not observed in cells of the posterior midgut. The optimal culture medium for the maintenance of these epithelial cells was Roswell Park Memorial Institute 1640 medium at 25 degrees C. Cells in Grace's medium died in 24 h. Cultures did not require CO(2) atmosphere, but culture development was favored by the microaerophilic environment and the dark conditions in which the cells were grown, between the coverslips.

  20. Regulation of intestinal stem cell proliferation by human methyl-CpG-binding protein-2 in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shin-Hae; Kim, In-Joo; Kim, Joong-Gook; Park, Joung-Sun; Kim, Young-Shin; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu; Kim, Cheol-Min; Yoo, Mi-Ae

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested the involvement of epigenetic factors such as methyl-CpG-binding protein-2 (MeCP2) in tumorigenesis. In addition, cancer may represent a stem cell-based disease, suggesting that understanding of stem cell regulation could provide valuable insights into the mechanisms of tumorigenesis. However, the function of epigenetic factors in stem cell regulation in adult tissues remains poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the role of human MeCP2 (hMeCP2), a bridge factor linked to DNA modification and histone modification, in stem cell proliferation using adult Drosophila midgut, which appears to be an excellent model system to study stem cell biology. Results show that enterocyte (EC)-specific expression of hMeCP2 in adult midgut using an exogenous GAL4/UAS expression system induced intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation marked by staining with anti-phospho-histone H3 antibody and BrdU incorporation assays. In addition, hMeCP2 expression in ECs activated extracellular stress-response kinase signals in ISCs. Furthermore, expression of hMeCP2 modulated the distribution of heterochromatin protein-1 in ECs. Our data suggests the hypothesis that the expression of hMeCP2 in differentiated ECs stimulates ISC proliferation, implying a role of MeCP2 as a stem cell regulator.

  1. Assessing Basal and Acute Autophagic Responses in the Adult Drosophila Nervous System: The Impact of Gender, Genetics and Diet on Endogenous Pathway Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Brandon; Mauntz, Ruth E.; Gonzalez, Arysa; Barekat, Ayeh; El-Mecharrafie, Nadja; Garza, Shannon; Gurney, Michael A.; Achal, Madhulika; Linton, Phyllis-Jean; Harris, Greg L.; Finley, Kim D.

    2016-01-01

    The autophagy pathway is critical for the long-term homeostasis of cells and adult organisms and is often activated during periods of stress. Reduced pathway efficacy plays a central role in several progressive neurological disorders that are associated with the accumulation of cytotoxic peptides and protein aggregates. Previous studies have shown that genetic and transgenic alterations to the autophagy pathway impacts longevity and neural aggregate profiles of adult Drosophila. In this study, we have identified methods to measure the acute in vivo induction of the autophagy pathway in the adult fly CNS. Our findings indicate that the genotype, age, and gender of adult flies can influence pathway responses. Further, we demonstrate that middle-aged male flies exposed to intermittent fasting (IF) had improved neuronal autophagic profiles. IF-treated flies also had lower neural aggregate profiles, maintained more youthful behaviors and longer lifespans, when compared to ad libitum controls. In summary, we present methodology to detect dynamic in vivo changes that occur to the autophagic profiles in the adult Drosophila CNS and that a novel IF-treatment protocol improves pathway response in the aging nervous system. PMID:27711219

  2. Notch Is Required in Adult Drosophila Sensory Neurons for Morphological and Functional Plasticity of the Olfactory Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Struhl, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) convey odor information to the central brain, but like other sensory neurons were thought to play a passive role in memory formation and storage. Here we show that Notch, part of an evolutionarily conserved intercellular signaling pathway, is required in adult Drosophila ORNs for the structural and functional plasticity of olfactory glomeruli that is induced by chronic odor exposure. Specifically, we show that Notch activity in ORNs is necessary for the odor specific increase in the volume of glomeruli that occurs as a consequence of prolonged odor exposure. Calcium imaging experiments indicate that Notch in ORNs is also required for the chronic odor induced changes in the physiology of ORNs and the ensuing changes in the physiological response of their second order projection neurons (PNs). We further show that Notch in ORNs acts by both canonical cleavage-dependent and non-canonical cleavage-independent pathways. The Notch ligand Delta (Dl) in PNs switches the balance between the pathways. These data define a circuit whereby, in conjunction with odor, N activity in the periphery regulates the activity of neurons in the central brain and Dl in the central brain regulates N activity in the periphery. Our work highlights the importance of experience dependent plasticity at the first olfactory synapse. PMID:26011623

  3. Multigenerational Effects of Rearing Atmospheric Oxygen Level on the Tracheal Dimensions and Diffusing Capacities of Pupal and Adult Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Klok, C Jaco; Kaiser, Alexander; Socha, John J; Lee, Wah-Keat; Harrison, Jon F

    2016-01-01

    Insects are small relative to vertebrates, and were larger in the Paleozoic when atmospheric oxygen levels were higher. The safety margin for oxygen delivery does not increase in larger insects, due to an increased mass-specific investment in the tracheal system and a greater use of convection in larger insects. Prior studies have shown that the dimensions and number of tracheal system branches varies inversely with rearing oxygen in embryonic and larval insects. Here we tested whether rearing in 10, 21, or 40 kPa atmospheric oxygen atmospheres for 5-7 generations affected the tracheal dimensions and diffusing capacities of pupal and adult Drosophila. Abdominal tracheae and pupal snorkel tracheae showed weak responses to oxygen, while leg tracheae showed strong, but imperfect compensatory changes. The diffusing capacity of leg tracheae appears closely matched to predicted oxygen transport needs by diffusion, perhaps explaining the consistent and significant responses of these tracheae to rearing oxygen. The reduced investment in tracheal structure in insects reared in higher oxygen levels may be important for conserving tissue PO2 and may provide an important mechanism for insects to invest only the space and materials necessary into respiratory structure. PMID:27343104

  4. The Drosophila HNF4 nuclear receptor promotes glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and mitochondrial function in adults

    PubMed Central

    Barry, William E; Thummel, Carl S

    2016-01-01

    Although mutations in HNF4A were identified as the cause of Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young 1 (MODY1) two decades ago, the mechanisms by which this nuclear receptor regulates glucose homeostasis remain unclear. Here we report that loss of Drosophila HNF4 recapitulates hallmark symptoms of MODY1, including adult-onset hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance and impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). These defects are linked to a role for dHNF4 in promoting mitochondrial function as well as the expression of Hex-C, a homolog of the MODY2 gene Glucokinase. dHNF4 is required in the fat body and insulin-producing cells to maintain glucose homeostasis by supporting a developmental switch toward oxidative phosphorylation and GSIS at the transition to adulthood. These findings establish an animal model for MODY1 and define a developmental reprogramming of metabolism to support the energetic needs of the mature animal. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11183.001 PMID:27185732

  5. Multigenerational Effects of Rearing Atmospheric Oxygen Level on the Tracheal Dimensions and Diffusing Capacities of Pupal and Adult Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Klok, C Jaco; Kaiser, Alexander; Socha, John J; Lee, Wah-Keat; Harrison, Jon F

    2016-01-01

    Insects are small relative to vertebrates, and were larger in the Paleozoic when atmospheric oxygen levels were higher. The safety margin for oxygen delivery does not increase in larger insects, due to an increased mass-specific investment in the tracheal system and a greater use of convection in larger insects. Prior studies have shown that the dimensions and number of tracheal system branches varies inversely with rearing oxygen in embryonic and larval insects. Here we tested whether rearing in 10, 21, or 40 kPa atmospheric oxygen atmospheres for 5-7 generations affected the tracheal dimensions and diffusing capacities of pupal and adult Drosophila. Abdominal tracheae and pupal snorkel tracheae showed weak responses to oxygen, while leg tracheae showed strong, but imperfect compensatory changes. The diffusing capacity of leg tracheae appears closely matched to predicted oxygen transport needs by diffusion, perhaps explaining the consistent and significant responses of these tracheae to rearing oxygen. The reduced investment in tracheal structure in insects reared in higher oxygen levels may be important for conserving tissue PO2 and may provide an important mechanism for insects to invest only the space and materials necessary into respiratory structure.

  6. A correlation of reactive oxygen species accumulation by depletion of superoxide dismutases with age-dependent impairment in the nervous system and muscles of Drosophila adults.

    PubMed

    Oka, Saori; Hirai, Jun; Yasukawa, Takashi; Nakahara, Yasuyuki; Inoue, Yoshihiro H

    2015-08-01

    The theory that accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in internal organs is a major promoter of aging has been considered negatively. However, it is still controversial whether overexpression of superoxide dismutases (SODs), which remove ROS, extends the lifespan in Drosophila adults. We examined whether ROS accumulation by depletion of Cu/Zn-SOD (SOD1) or Mn-SOD (SOD2) influenced age-related impairment of the nervous system and muscles in Drosophila. We confirmed the efficient depletion of Sod1 and Sod2 through RNAi and ROS accumulation by monitoring of ROS-inducible gene expression. Both RNAi flies displayed accelerated impairment of locomotor activity with age and shortened lifespan. Similarly, adults with nervous system-specific depletion of Sod1 or Sod2 also showed reduced lifespan. We then found an accelerated loss of dopaminergic neurons in the flies with suppressed SOD expression. A half-dose reduction of three pro-apoptotic genes resulted in a significant suppression of the neuronal loss, suggesting that apoptosis was involved in the neuronal loss caused by SOD silencing. In addition, depletion of Sod1 or Sod2 in musculature is also associated with enhancement of age-related locomotion impairment. In indirect flight muscles from SOD-depleted adults, abnormal protein aggregates containing poly-ubiquitin accumulated at an early adult stage and continued to increase as the flies aged. Most of these protein aggregates were observed between myofibril layers. Moreover, immuno-electron microscopy indicated that the aggregates were predominantly localized in damaged mitochondria. These findings suggest that muscular and neuronal ROS accumulation may have a significant effect on age-dependent impairment of the Drosophila adults.

  7. Tie-mediated signal from apoptotic cells protects stem cells in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yalan; Su, Tin Tin; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele

    2015-01-01

    Many types of normal and cancer stem cells are resistant to killing by genotoxins, but the mechanism for this resistance is poorly understood. Here we show that adult stem cells in Drosophila melanogaster germline and midgut are resistant to ionizing radiation (IR) or chemically induced apoptosis and dissect the mechanism for this protection. We find that upon IR the receptor tyrosine kinase Tie/Tie-2 is activated, leading to the upregulation of microRNA bantam that represses FOXO-mediated transcription of pro-apoptotic Smac/DIABLO orthologue, Hid in germline stem cells. Knockdown of the IR-induced putative Tie ligand, Pvf1, a functional homologue of human Angiopoietin, in differentiating daughter cells renders germline stem cells sensitive to IR, suggesting that the dying daughters send a survival signal to protect their stem cells for future repopulation of the tissue. If conserved in cancer stem cells, this mechanism may provide therapeutic options for the eradication of cancer. PMID:25959206

  8. Orthodenticle is necessary for survival of a cluster of clonally related dopaminergic neurons in the Drosophila larval and adult brain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The dopaminergic (DA) neurons present in the central brain of the Drosophila larva are spatially arranged in stereotyped groups that define clusters of bilaterally symmetrical neurons. These clusters have been classified according to anatomical criteria (position of the cell bodies within the cortex and/or projection pattern of the axonal tracts). However, information pertaining to the developmental biology, such as lineage relationship of clustered DA neurons and differential cell subtype-specific molecular markers and mechanisms of differentiation and/or survival, is currently not available. Results Using MARCM and twin-spot MARCM techniques together with anti-tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity, we have analyzed the larval central brain DA neurons from a developmental point of view and determined their time of birth, their maturation into a DA neurotransmitter phenotype as well as their lineage relationships. In addition, we have found that the homeodomain containing transcription factor Orthodenticle (Otd) is present in a cluster of clonally related DA neurons in both the larval and adult brain. Taking advantage of the otd hypomorphic mutation ocelliless (oc) and the oc2-Gal4 reporter line, we have studied the involvement of orthodenticle (otd) in the survival and/or cell fate specification of these post-mitotic neurons. Conclusions Our findings provide evidence of the presence of seven neuroblast lineages responsible for the generation of the larval central brain DA neurons during embryogenesis. otd is expressed in a defined group of clonally related DA neurons from first instar larvae to adulthood, making it possible to establish an identity relationship between the larval DL2a and the adult PPL2 DA clusters. This poses otd as a lineage-specific and differential marker of a subset of clonally related DA neurons. Finally, we show that otd is required in those DA neurons for their survival. PMID:21999236

  9. Proteomic Analysis of the Ubiquitin Landscape in the Drosophila Embryonic Nervous System and the Adult Photoreceptor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Juanma; Martinez, Aitor; Lectez, Benoit; Lee, So Young; Franco, Maribel; Barrio, Rosa; Dittmar, Gunnar; Mayor, Ugo

    2015-01-01

    Background Ubiquitination is known to regulate physiological neuronal functions as well as to be involved in a number of neuronal diseases. Several ubiquitin proteomic approaches have been developed during the last decade but, as they have been mostly applied to non-neuronal cell culture, very little is yet known about neuronal ubiquitination pathways in vivo. Methodology/Principal Findings Using an in vivo biotinylation strategy we have isolated and identified the ubiquitinated proteome in neurons both for the developing embryonic brain and for the adult eye of Drosophila melanogaster. Bioinformatic comparison of both datasets indicates a significant difference on the ubiquitin substrates, which logically correlates with the processes that are most active at each of the developmental stages. Detection within the isolated material of two ubiquitin E3 ligases, Parkin and Ube3a, indicates their ubiquitinating activity on the studied tissues. Further identification of the proteins that do accumulate upon interference with the proteasomal degradative pathway provides an indication of the proteins that are targeted for clearance in neurons. Last, we report the proof-of-principle validation of two lysine residues required for nSyb ubiquitination. Conclusions/Significance These data cast light on the differential and common ubiquitination pathways between the embryonic and adult neurons, and hence will contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms by which neuronal function is regulated. The in vivo biotinylation methodology described here complements other approaches for ubiquitome study and offers unique advantages, and is poised to provide further insight into disease mechanisms related to the ubiquitin proteasome system. PMID:26460970

  10. Does phenotypic plasticity for adult size versus food level in Drosophila melanogaster evolve in response to adaptation to different rearing densities?

    PubMed

    Mueller, Laurence D; Cabral, Larry G

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies with Drosophila have suggested that there is extensive genetic variability for phenotypic plasticity of body size versus food level. If true, we expect that the outcome of evolution at very different food levels should yield genotypes whose adult size show different patterns of phenotypic plasticity. We have tested this prediction with six independent populations of Drosophila melanogaster kept at extreme densities for 125 generations. We found that the phenotypic plasticity of body size versus food level is not affected by selection or the presence of competitors of a different genotype. However, we document increasing among population variation in phenotypic plasticity due to random genetic drift. Several reasons are explored to explain these results including the possibility that the use of highly inbred lines to make inferences about the evolution of genetically variable populations may be misleading.

  11. Discovery of midgut genes for the RNA interference control of corn rootworm.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xu; Richtman, Nina M; Zhao, Jian-Zhou; Duncan, Keith E; Niu, Xiping; Procyk, Lisa A; Oneal, Meghan A; Kernodle, Bliss M; Steimel, Joseph P; Crane, Virginia C; Sandahl, Gary; Ritland, Julie L; Howard, Richard J; Presnail, James K; Lu, Albert L; Wu, Gusui

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising new technology for corn rootworm control. This paper presents the discovery of new gene targets - dvssj1 and dvssj2, in western corn rootworm (WCR). Dvssj1 and dvssj2 are orthologs of the Drosophila genes snakeskin (ssk) and mesh, respectively. These genes encode membrane proteins associated with smooth septate junctions (SSJ) which are required for intestinal barrier function. Based on bioinformatics analysis, dvssj1 appears to be an arthropod-specific gene. Diet based insect feeding assays using double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) targeting dvssj1 and dvssj2 demonstrate targeted mRNA suppression, larval growth inhibition, and mortality. In RNAi treated WCR, injury to the midgut was manifested by "blebbing" of the midgut epithelium into the gut lumen. Ultrastructural examination of midgut epithelial cells revealed apoptosis and regenerative activities. Transgenic plants expressing dsRNA targeting dvssj1 show insecticidal activity and significant plant protection from WCR damage. The data indicate that dvssj1 and dvssj2 are effective gene targets for the control of WCR using RNAi technology, by apparent suppression of production of their respective smooth septate junction membrane proteins located within the intestinal lining, leading to growth inhibition and mortality. PMID:27464714

  12. Discovery of midgut genes for the RNA interference control of corn rootworm

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xu; Richtman, Nina M.; Zhao, Jian-Zhou; Duncan, Keith E.; Niu, Xiping; Procyk, Lisa A.; Oneal, Meghan A.; Kernodle, Bliss M.; Steimel, Joseph P.; Crane, Virginia C.; Sandahl, Gary; Ritland, Julie L.; Howard, Richard J.; Presnail, James K.; Lu, Albert L.; Wu, Gusui

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising new technology for corn rootworm control. This paper presents the discovery of new gene targets - dvssj1 and dvssj2, in western corn rootworm (WCR). Dvssj1 and dvssj2 are orthologs of the Drosophila genes snakeskin (ssk) and mesh, respectively. These genes encode membrane proteins associated with smooth septate junctions (SSJ) which are required for intestinal barrier function. Based on bioinformatics analysis, dvssj1 appears to be an arthropod-specific gene. Diet based insect feeding assays using double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) targeting dvssj1 and dvssj2 demonstrate targeted mRNA suppression, larval growth inhibition, and mortality. In RNAi treated WCR, injury to the midgut was manifested by “blebbing” of the midgut epithelium into the gut lumen. Ultrastructural examination of midgut epithelial cells revealed apoptosis and regenerative activities. Transgenic plants expressing dsRNA targeting dvssj1 show insecticidal activity and significant plant protection from WCR damage. The data indicate that dvssj1 and dvssj2 are effective gene targets for the control of WCR using RNAi technology, by apparent suppression of production of their respective smooth septate junction membrane proteins located within the intestinal lining, leading to growth inhibition and mortality. PMID:27464714

  13. Drosophila Pez acts in Hippo signaling to restrict intestinal stem cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Poernbacher, Ingrid; Baumgartner, Roland; Marada, Suresh K; Edwards, Kevin; Stocker, Hugo

    2012-03-01

    The conserved Hippo signaling pathway acts in growth control and is fundamental to animal development and oncogenesis. Hippo signaling has also been implicated in adult midgut homeostasis in Drosophila. Regulated divisions of intestinal stem cells (ISCs), giving rise to an ISC and an enteroblast (EB) that differentiates into an enterocyte (EC) or an enteroendocrine (EE) cell, enable rapid tissue turnover in response to intestinal stress. The damage-related increase in ISC proliferation requires deactivation of the Hippo pathway and consequential activation of the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie (Yki) in both ECs and ISCs. Here, we identify Pez, an evolutionarily conserved FERM domain protein containing a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) domain, as a novel binding partner of the upstream Hippo signaling component Kibra. Pez function--but not its PTP domain--is essential for Hippo pathway activity specifically in the fly midgut epithelium. Thus, Pez displays a tissue-specific requirement and functions as a negative upstream regulator of Yki in the regulation of ISC proliferation. PMID:22305752

  14. Local overexpression of Su(H)-MAPK variants affects Notch target gene expression and adult phenotypes in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Auer, Jasmin S; Nagel, Anja C; Schulz, Adriana; Wahl, Vanessa; Preiss, Anette

    2015-12-01

    In Drosophila, Notch and EGFR signalling pathways are closely intertwined. Their relationship is mostly antagonistic, and may in part be based on the phosphorylation of the Notch signal transducer Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)] by MAPK. Su(H) is a transcription factor that together with several cofactors regulates the expression of Notch target genes. Here we address the consequences of a local induction of three Su(H) variants on Notch target gene expression. To this end, wild-type Su(H), a phospho-deficient Su(H) (MAPK-) (ko) and a phospho-mimetic Su(H) (MAPK-ac) isoform were overexpressed in the central domain of the wing anlagen. The expression of the Notch target genes cut, wingless, E(spl)m8-HLH and vestigial, was monitored. For the latter two, reporter genes were used (E(spl)m8-lacZ, vg (BE) -lacZ). In general, Su(H) (MAPK-) (ko) induced a stronger response than wild-type Su(H), whereas the response to Su(H) (MAPK-ac) was very weak. Notch target genes cut, wingless and vg (BE) -lacZ were ectopically activated, whereas E(spl)m8-lacZ was repressed by overexpression of Su(H) proteins. In addition, in epistasis experiments an activated form of the EGF-receptor (DER (act) ) or the MAPK (rl (SEM) ) and individual Su(H) variants were co-overexpressed locally, to compare the resultant phenotypes in adult flies (thorax, wings and eyes) as well as to assay the response of the Notch target gene cut in cell clones.

  15. Origin and development of neuropil glia of the Drosophila larval and adult brain: two distinct glial populations derived from separate progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Omoto, Jaison Jiro; Yogi, Puja; Hartenstein, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Glia comprise a conspicuous population of non-neuronal cells in vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems. Drosophila serves as a favorable model to elucidate basic principles of glial biology in vivo. The Drosophila neuropil glia (NPG), subdivided into astrocyte-like (ALG) and ensheathing glia (EG), extend reticular processes which associate with synapses and sheath-like processes which surround neuropil compartments, respectively. In this paper we characterize the development of NPG throughout fly brain development. We find that differentiated neuropil glia of the larval brain originate as a cluster of precursors derived from embryonic progenitors located in the basal brain. These precursors undergo a characteristic migration to spread over the neuropil surface while specifying/differentiating into primary ALG and EG. Embryonically-derived primary NPG are large cells which are few in number, and occupy relatively stereotyped positions around the larval neuropil surface. During metamorphosis, primary NPG undergo cell death. Neuropil glia of the adult (secondary NPG) are derived from type II lineages during the postembryonic phase of neurogliogenesis. These secondary NPG are much smaller in size but greater in number than primary NPG. Lineage tracing reveals that both NPG subtypes derive from intermediate neural progenitors of multipotent type II lineages. Taken together, this study reveals previously uncharacterized dynamics of NPG development and provides a framework for future studies utilizing Drosophila glia as a model. PMID:25779704

  16. Recurrent Midgut Bleeding due to Jejunal Angioleiomyoma

    PubMed Central

    Mityushin, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Angioleiomyoma being a type of true smooth muscle gastrointestinal tumors can lead to serious life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding. We report a case of 21-year-old male patient with recurrent midgut bleeding. Contrast-enhanced CT revealed highly vascular small bowel neoplasm. The patient underwent laparotomy with bowel resection and recovered uneventfully. Histopathology revealed jejunal angioleiomyoma. PMID:27668116

  17. Recurrent Midgut Bleeding due to Jejunal Angioleiomyoma.

    PubMed

    Gachabayov, Mahir; Mityushin, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Angioleiomyoma being a type of true smooth muscle gastrointestinal tumors can lead to serious life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding. We report a case of 21-year-old male patient with recurrent midgut bleeding. Contrast-enhanced CT revealed highly vascular small bowel neoplasm. The patient underwent laparotomy with bowel resection and recovered uneventfully. Histopathology revealed jejunal angioleiomyoma. PMID:27668116

  18. Recurrent Midgut Bleeding due to Jejunal Angioleiomyoma

    PubMed Central

    Mityushin, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Angioleiomyoma being a type of true smooth muscle gastrointestinal tumors can lead to serious life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding. We report a case of 21-year-old male patient with recurrent midgut bleeding. Contrast-enhanced CT revealed highly vascular small bowel neoplasm. The patient underwent laparotomy with bowel resection and recovered uneventfully. Histopathology revealed jejunal angioleiomyoma.

  19. Correlated changes in life history traits in response to selection for faster pre-adult development in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Pankaj; Sharma, Vijay Kumar

    2014-02-15

    Insects including the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster are under intense pressure to develop rapidly because they inhabit ephemeral habitats. We have previously shown that when selection for faster development was artificially imposed on D. melanogaster in the laboratory, reduction of pre-adult development time and shortening of the clock period occurs, suggesting a role for circadian clocks in the regulation of life history traits. Circadian clocks in D. melanogaster have also been implicated in the control of metabolic pathways, ageing processes, oxidative stress and defense responses to exogenous stressors. In order to rigorously examine correlations between pre-adult development time and other life history traits, we assayed pre-adult survivorship, starvation and desiccation resistance, body size and body weight, fecundity and adult lifespan in faster developing populations of D. melanogaster. The results revealed that selection for faster pre-adult development significantly reduced several adult fitness traits in the faster developing flies without affecting pre-adult survivorship. Although overall fecundity of faster developing flies was reduced, their egg output per unit body weight was significantly higher than that of controls, indicating that reduction in adult lifespan might be due to disproportionate investment in reproduction. Thus our results suggest that selection for faster pre-adult development in D. melanogaster yields flies with higher reproductive fitness. Because these flies also have shorter clock periods, our results can be taken to suggest that pre-adult development time and circadian clock period are correlated with various adult life history traits in D. melanogaster, implying that circadian clocks may have adaptive significance.

  20. A survey of ovary-, testis-, and soma-biased gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster adults

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Michael; Nuttall, Rachel; Edwards, Pamela; Minor, James; Naiman, Daniel; Lü, Jining; Doctolero, Michael; Vainer, Marina; Chan, Cathy; Malley, James; Eastman, Scott; Oliver, Brian

    2004-01-01

    Background Sexual dimorphism results in the formation of two types of individuals with specialized reproductive roles and is most evident in the germ cells and gonads. Results We have undertaken a global analysis of transcription between the sexes using a 31,464 element FlyGEM microarray to determine what fraction of the genome shows sex-biased expression, what tissues express these genes, the predicted functions of these genes, and where these genes map onto the genome. Females and males (both with and without gonads), dissected testis and ovary, females and males with genetically ablated germlines, and sex-transformed flies were sampled. Conclusions Using any of a number of criteria, we find extensive sex-biased expression in adults. The majority of cases of sex differential gene expression are attributable to the germ cells. There is also a large class of genes with soma-biased expression. There is little germline-biased expression indicating that nearly all genes with germline expression also show sex-bias. Monte Carlo simulations show that some genes with sex-biased expression are non-randomly distributed in the genome. PMID:15186491

  1. The Drosophila Couch Potato Gene: An Essential Gene Required for Normal Adult Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Bellen, H. J.; Vaessin, H.; Bier, E.; Kolodkin, A.; D'Evelyn, D.; Kooyer, S.; Jan, Y. N.

    1992-01-01

    Through enhancer detection screens we have isolated 14 insertions in an essential gene that is expressed in embryonic sensory mother cells (SMC), in most cells of the mature embryonic peripheral nervous system (PNS), and in glial cells of the PNS and the central nervous system (CNS). Embryos homozygote for amorphic alleles die, but show no obvious defects in their cuticle, PNS or CNS. The gene has been named couch potato (cpo) because several insertional alleles alter adult behavior. Homozygous hypomorphic cpo flies recover slowly from ether anaesthesia, show aberrant flight behavior, fail to move toward light and do not exhibit normal negative geotactic behavior. However, the flies are able to groom and walk, and some are able to fly when prodded, indicating that not all processes required for behavior are severely affected. A molecular analysis shows that the 14 insertions are confined to a few hundred nucleotides which probably contain key regulatory sequences of the gene. The orientation of these insertions and their position within this DNA fragment play an important role in the couch potato phenotype. In situ hybridization to whole mount embryos suggest that some insertions affect the levels of transcription of cpo in most cells in which it is expressed. PMID:1644278

  2. Seasonality and Locality Affect the Diversity of Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles coluzzii Midgut Microbiota from Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Gendrin, Mathilde; Pels, Nana Adjoa P.; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Christophides, George K.; Wilson, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Symbiotic bacteria can have important implications in the development and competence of disease vectors. In Anopheles mosquitoes, the composition of the midgut microbiota is largely influenced by the larval breeding site, but the exact factors shaping this composition are currently unknown. Here, we examined whether the proximity to urban areas and seasons have an impact on the midgut microbial community of the two major malaria vectors in Africa, An. coluzzii and An. gambiae. Larvae and pupae were collected from selected habitats in two districts of Ghana during the dry and rainy season periods. The midgut microbiota of adults that emerged from these collections was determined by 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal DNA. We show that in both mosquito species, Shewanellaceae constituted on average of 54% and 73% of the midgut microbiota from each site in the dry and rainy season, respectively. Enterobacteriaceae was found in comparatively low abundance below 1% in 22/30 samples in the dry season, and in 25/38 samples in the rainy season. Our data indicate that seasonality and locality significantly affect both the diversity of microbiota and the relative abundance of bacterial families with a positive impact of dry season and peri-urban settings. PMID:27322614

  3. Seasonality and Locality Affect the Diversity of Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles coluzzii Midgut Microbiota from Ghana.

    PubMed

    Akorli, Jewelna; Gendrin, Mathilde; Pels, Nana Adjoa P; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Christophides, George K; Wilson, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Symbiotic bacteria can have important implications in the development and competence of disease vectors. In Anopheles mosquitoes, the composition of the midgut microbiota is largely influenced by the larval breeding site, but the exact factors shaping this composition are currently unknown. Here, we examined whether the proximity to urban areas and seasons have an impact on the midgut microbial community of the two major malaria vectors in Africa, An. coluzzii and An. gambiae. Larvae and pupae were collected from selected habitats in two districts of Ghana during the dry and rainy season periods. The midgut microbiota of adults that emerged from these collections was determined by 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal DNA. We show that in both mosquito species, Shewanellaceae constituted on average of 54% and 73% of the midgut microbiota from each site in the dry and rainy season, respectively. Enterobacteriaceae was found in comparatively low abundance below 1% in 22/30 samples in the dry season, and in 25/38 samples in the rainy season. Our data indicate that seasonality and locality significantly affect both the diversity of microbiota and the relative abundance of bacterial families with a positive impact of dry season and peri-urban settings.

  4. Seasonality and Locality Affect the Diversity of Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles coluzzii Midgut Microbiota from Ghana.

    PubMed

    Akorli, Jewelna; Gendrin, Mathilde; Pels, Nana Adjoa P; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Christophides, George K; Wilson, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Symbiotic bacteria can have important implications in the development and competence of disease vectors. In Anopheles mosquitoes, the composition of the midgut microbiota is largely influenced by the larval breeding site, but the exact factors shaping this composition are currently unknown. Here, we examined whether the proximity to urban areas and seasons have an impact on the midgut microbial community of the two major malaria vectors in Africa, An. coluzzii and An. gambiae. Larvae and pupae were collected from selected habitats in two districts of Ghana during the dry and rainy season periods. The midgut microbiota of adults that emerged from these collections was determined by 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal DNA. We show that in both mosquito species, Shewanellaceae constituted on average of 54% and 73% of the midgut microbiota from each site in the dry and rainy season, respectively. Enterobacteriaceae was found in comparatively low abundance below 1% in 22/30 samples in the dry season, and in 25/38 samples in the rainy season. Our data indicate that seasonality and locality significantly affect both the diversity of microbiota and the relative abundance of bacterial families with a positive impact of dry season and peri-urban settings. PMID:27322614

  5. Whole Mount Preparation of the Adult Drosophila Ventral Nerve Cord for Giant Fiber Dye Injection

    PubMed Central

    Boerner, Jana; Godenschwege, Tanja A.

    2011-01-01

    To analyze the axonal and dendritic morphology of neurons, it is essential to obtain accurate labeling of neuronal structures. Preparing well labeled samples with little to no tissue damage enables us to analyze cell morphology and to compare individual samples to each other, hence allowing the identification of mutant anomalies. In the demonstrated dissection method the nervous system remains mostly inside the adult fly. Through a dorsal incision, the abdomen and thorax are opened and most of the internal organs are removed. Only the dorsal side of the ventral nerve cord (VNC) and the cervical connective (CvC) containing the big axons of the giant fibers (GFs)1 are exposed, while the brain containing the GF cell body and dendrites remains2 in the intact head. In this preparation most nerves of the VNC should remain attached to their muscles. Following the dissection, the intracellular filling of the giant fiber (GF) with a fluorescent dye is demonstrated. In the CvC the GF axons are located at the dorsal surface and thus can be easily visualized under a microscope with differential interference contrast (DIC) optics. This allows the injection of the GF axons with dye at this site to label the entire GF including the axons and their terminals in the VNC. This method results in reliable and strong staining of the GFs allowing the neurons to be imaged immediately after filling with an epifluorescent microscope. Alternatively, the fluorescent signal can be enhanced using standard immunohistochemistry procedures3 suitable for high resolution confocal microscopy. PMID:21673644

  6. Adipocyte amino acid sensing controls adult germline stem cell number via the amino acid response pathway and independently of Target of Rapamycin signaling in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Alissa R.; Laws, Kaitlin M.; Drummond-Barbosa, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    How adipocytes contribute to the physiological control of stem cells is a critical question towards understanding the link between obesity and multiple diseases, including cancers. Previous studies have revealed that adult stem cells are influenced by whole-body physiology through multiple diet-dependent factors. For example, nutrient-dependent pathways acting within the Drosophila ovary control the number and proliferation of germline stem cells (GSCs). The potential role of nutrient sensing by adipocytes in modulating stem cells in other organs, however, remains largely unexplored. Here, we report that amino acid sensing by adult adipocytes specifically modulates the maintenance of GSCs through a Target of Rapamycin-independent mechanism. Instead, reduced amino acid levels and the consequent increase in uncoupled tRNAs trigger activation of the GCN2-dependent amino acid response pathway within adipocytes, causing increased rates of GSC loss. These studies reveal a new step in adipocyte-stem cell crosstalk. PMID:25359724

  7. Bunched and Madm Function Downstream of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex to Regulate the Growth of Intestinal Stem Cells in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yingchao; Li, Qi; Amcheslavsky, Alla; Duhart, Juan Carlos; Veraksa, Alexey; Stocker, Hugo; Raftery, Laurel A; Ip, Y Tony

    2015-12-01

    The Drosophila adult midgut contains intestinal stem cells that support homeostasis and repair. We show here that the leucine zipper protein Bunched and the adaptor protein Madm are novel regulators of intestinal stem cells. MARCM mutant clonal analysis and cell type specific RNAi revealed that Bunched and Madm were required within intestinal stem cells for proliferation. Transgenic expression of a tagged Bunched showed a cytoplasmic localization in midgut precursors, and the addition of a nuclear localization signal to Bunched reduced its function to cooperate with Madm to increase intestinal stem cell proliferation. Furthermore, the elevated cell growth and 4EBP phosphorylation phenotypes induced by loss of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex or overexpression of Rheb were suppressed by the loss of Bunched or Madm. Therefore, while the mammalian homolog of Bunched, TSC-22, is able to regulate transcription and suppress cancer cell proliferation, our data suggest the model that Bunched and Madm functionally interact with the TOR pathway in the cytoplasm to regulate the growth and subsequent division of intestinal stem cells.

  8. Cytotoxic effects of neem oil in the midgut of the predator Ceraeochrysa claveri.

    PubMed

    Scudeler, Elton Luiz; Garcia, Ana Silvia Gimenes; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Pinheiro, Patricia Fernanda Felipe; dos Santos, Daniela Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    Studies of morphological and ultrastructural alterations in target organs have been useful for evaluating the sublethal effects of biopesticides regarded as safe for non-target organisms in ecotoxicological analyses. One of the most widely used biopesticides is neem oil, and its safety and compatibility with natural enemies have been further clarified through bioassays performed to analyze the effects of indirect exposure by the intake of poisoned prey. Thus, this study examined the cellular response of midgut epithelial cells of the adult lacewing, Ceraeochrysa claveri, to neem oil exposure via intake of neem oil-contaminated prey during the larval stage. C. claveri larvae were fed Diatraea saccharalis eggs treated with neem oil at concentrations of 0.5%, 1% and 2% throughout the larval stage. The adult females obtained from these treatments were used at two ages (newly emerged and at the start of oviposition) in morphological and ultrastructural analyses. Neem oil was found to cause pronounced cytotoxic effects in the adult midgut, such as cell dilation, emission of cytoplasmic protrusions, cell lysis, loss of integrity of the cell cortex, dilation of cisternae of the rough endoplasmic reticulum, swollen mitochondria, vesiculated appearance of the Golgi complex and dilated invaginations of the basal labyrinth. Epithelial cells responded to those injuries with various cytoprotective and detoxification mechanisms, including increases in cell proliferation, the number of calcium-containing cytoplasmic granules, and HSP 70 expression, autophagic processes and the development of smooth endoplasmic reticulum, but these mechanisms were insufficient for recovery from all of the cellular damage to the midgut. This study demonstrates that neem oil exposure impairs the midgut by causing sublethal effects that may affect the physiological functions of this organ, indicating the importance of studies of different life stages of this species and similar species to evaluate the

  9. Cytotoxic effects of neem oil in the midgut of the predator Ceraeochrysa claveri.

    PubMed

    Scudeler, Elton Luiz; Garcia, Ana Silvia Gimenes; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Pinheiro, Patricia Fernanda Felipe; dos Santos, Daniela Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    Studies of morphological and ultrastructural alterations in target organs have been useful for evaluating the sublethal effects of biopesticides regarded as safe for non-target organisms in ecotoxicological analyses. One of the most widely used biopesticides is neem oil, and its safety and compatibility with natural enemies have been further clarified through bioassays performed to analyze the effects of indirect exposure by the intake of poisoned prey. Thus, this study examined the cellular response of midgut epithelial cells of the adult lacewing, Ceraeochrysa claveri, to neem oil exposure via intake of neem oil-contaminated prey during the larval stage. C. claveri larvae were fed Diatraea saccharalis eggs treated with neem oil at concentrations of 0.5%, 1% and 2% throughout the larval stage. The adult females obtained from these treatments were used at two ages (newly emerged and at the start of oviposition) in morphological and ultrastructural analyses. Neem oil was found to cause pronounced cytotoxic effects in the adult midgut, such as cell dilation, emission of cytoplasmic protrusions, cell lysis, loss of integrity of the cell cortex, dilation of cisternae of the rough endoplasmic reticulum, swollen mitochondria, vesiculated appearance of the Golgi complex and dilated invaginations of the basal labyrinth. Epithelial cells responded to those injuries with various cytoprotective and detoxification mechanisms, including increases in cell proliferation, the number of calcium-containing cytoplasmic granules, and HSP 70 expression, autophagic processes and the development of smooth endoplasmic reticulum, but these mechanisms were insufficient for recovery from all of the cellular damage to the midgut. This study demonstrates that neem oil exposure impairs the midgut by causing sublethal effects that may affect the physiological functions of this organ, indicating the importance of studies of different life stages of this species and similar species to evaluate the

  10. The DHR96 nuclear receptor controls triacylglycerol homeostasis in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sieber, Matthew H; Thummel, Carl S

    2009-12-01

    Triacylglycerol (TAG) homeostasis is an integral part of normal physiology and essential for proper energy metabolism. Here we show that the single Drosophila ortholog of the PXR and CAR nuclear receptors, DHR96, plays an essential role in TAG homeostasis. DHR96 mutants are sensitive to starvation, have reduced levels of TAG in the fat body and midgut, and are resistant to diet-induced obesity, while DHR96 overexpression leads to starvation resistance and increased TAG levels. We show that DHR96 function is required in the midgut for the breakdown of dietary fat and that it exerts this effect through the CG5932 gastric lipase, which is essential for TAG homeostasis. This study provides insights into the regulation of dietary fat metabolism in Drosophila and demonstrates that the regulation of lipid metabolism is an ancestral function of the PXR/CAR/DHR96 nuclear receptor subfamily. PMID:19945405

  11. Clock accuracy and precision evolve as a consequence of selection for adult emergence in a narrow window of time in fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Nisha N; Vaze, Koustubh M; Sharma, Vijay Kumar

    2012-10-15

    Although circadian clocks are believed to have evolved under the action of periodic selection pressures (selection on phasing) present in the geophysical environment, there is very little rigorous and systematic empirical evidence to support this. In the present study, we examined the effect of selection for adult emergence in a narrow window of time on the circadian rhythms of fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster. Selection was imposed in every generation by choosing flies that emerged during a 1 h window of time close to the emergence peak of baseline/control flies under 12 h:12 h light:dark cycles. To study the effect of selection on circadian clocks we estimated several quantifiable features that reflect inter- and intra-individual variance in adult emergence and locomotor activity rhythms. The results showed that with increasing generations, incidence of adult emergence and activity of adult flies during the 1 h selection window increased gradually in the selected populations. Flies from the selected populations were more homogenous in their clock period, were more coherent in their phase of entrainment, and displayed enhanced accuracy and precision in their emergence and activity rhythms compared with controls. These results thus suggest that circadian clocks in D. melanogaster evolve enhanced accuracy and precision when subjected to selection for emergence in a narrow window of time.

  12. Drosophila mutants of the autism candidate gene neurobeachin (rugose) exhibit neuro-developmental disorders, aberrant synaptic properties, altered locomotion, impaired adult social behavior and activity patterns

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Alexandra; Tenezaca, Luis; Fernandez, Robert W.; Schatoff, Emma; Flores, Julian; Ueda, Atsushi; Zhong, Xiaotian; Wu, Chun-Fang; Simon, Anne F.; Venkatesh, Tadmiri

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder in humans characterized by complex behavioral deficits, including intellectual disability, impaired social interactions and hyperactivity. ASD exhibits a strong genetic component with underlying multi-gene interactions. Candidate gene studies have shown that the neurobeachin gene is disrupted in human patients with idiopathic autism (Castermans et al., 2003). The gene for neurobeachin (NBEA) spans the common fragile site FRA 13A and encodes a signal scaffold protein (Savelyeva et al., 2006). In mice, NBEA has been shown to be involved in the trafficking and function of a specific subset of synaptic vesicles. (Medrihan et al., 2009; Savelyeva, Sagulenko, Schmitt, & Schwab, 2006). rugose (rg) is the Drosophila homologue of the mammalian and human neurobeachin. Our previous genetic and molecular analyses have shown that rg encodes an A kinase anchor protein (DAKAP 550), which interacts with components of the EGFR and Notch mediated signaling pathways, facilitating cross-talk between these and other pathways (Shamloula et al., 2002). We now present functional data from studies on the larval neuromuscular junction that reveal abnormal synaptic architecture and physiology. In addition, adult rg loss-of-function mutants exhibit defective social interactions, impaired habituation, aberrant locomotion and hyperactivity. These results demonstrate that Drosophila neurobeachin (rugose) mutants exhibit phenotypic characteristics reminiscent of human ASD and thus could serve as a genetic model for studying autism spectrum disorders. PMID:26100104

  13. Experimentally Increased Codon Bias in the Drosophila Adh Gene Leads to an Increase in Larval, But Not Adult, Alcohol Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hense, Winfried; Anderson, Nathan; Hutter, Stephan; Stephan, Wolfgang; Parsch, John; Carlini, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Although most amino acids can be encoded by more than one codon, the synonymous codons are not used with equal frequency. This phenomenon is known as codon bias and appears to be a universal feature of genomes. The translational selection hypothesis posits that the use of optimal codons, which match the most abundant species of isoaccepting tRNAs, results in increased translational efficiency and accuracy. Previous work demonstrated that the experimental reduction of codon bias in the Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene led to a significant decrease in ADH protein expression. In this study we performed the converse experiment: we replaced seven suboptimal leucine codons that occur naturally in the Drosophila melanogaster Adh gene with the optimal codon. We then compared the in vivo ADH activities imparted by the wild-type and mutant alleles. The introduction of optimal leucine codons led to an increase in ADH activity in third-instar larvae. In adult flies, however, the introduction of optimal codons led to a decrease in ADH activity. There is no evidence that other selectively constrained features of the Adh gene, or its rate of transcription, were altered by the synonymous replacements. These results are consistent with translational selection for codon bias being stronger in the larval stage and suggest that there may be a selective conflict over optimal codon usage between different developmental stages. PMID:19966063

  14. Experimentally increased codon bias in the Drosophila Adh gene leads to an increase in larval, but not adult, alcohol dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Hense, Winfried; Anderson, Nathan; Hutter, Stephan; Stephan, Wolfgang; Parsch, John; Carlini, David B

    2010-02-01

    Although most amino acids can be encoded by more than one codon, the synonymous codons are not used with equal frequency. This phenomenon is known as codon bias and appears to be a universal feature of genomes. The translational selection hypothesis posits that the use of optimal codons, which match the most abundant species of isoaccepting tRNAs, results in increased translational efficiency and accuracy. Previous work demonstrated that the experimental reduction of codon bias in the Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene led to a significant decrease in ADH protein expression. In this study we performed the converse experiment: we replaced seven suboptimal leucine codons that occur naturally in the Drosophila melanogaster Adh gene with the optimal codon. We then compared the in vivo ADH activities imparted by the wild-type and mutant alleles. The introduction of optimal leucine codons led to an increase in ADH activity in third-instar larvae. In adult flies, however, the introduction of optimal codons led to a decrease in ADH activity. There is no evidence that other selectively constrained features of the Adh gene, or its rate of transcription, were altered by the synonymous replacements. These results are consistent with translational selection for codon bias being stronger in the larval stage and suggest that there may be a selective conflict over optimal codon usage between different developmental stages.

  15. Odd-skipped labels a group of distinct neurons associated with the mushroom body and optic lobe in the adult Drosophila brain.

    PubMed

    Levy, Peter; Larsen, Camilla

    2013-11-01

    Olfactory processing has been intensively studied in Drosophila melanogaster. However, we still know little about the descending neural pathways from the higher order processing centers and how these connect with other neural circuits. Here we describe, in detail, the adult projections patterns that arise from a cluster of 78 neurons, defined by the expression of the Odd-skipped transcription factor. We term these neurons Odd neurons. By using expression of genetically encoded axonal and dendritic markers, we show that a subset of the Odd neurons projects dendrites into the calyx of the mushroom body (MB) and axons into the inferior protocerebrum. We exclude the possibility that the Odd neurons are part of the well-known Kenyon cells whose projections form the MB and conclude that the Odd neurons belong to a previously not described class of extrinsic MB neurons. In addition, three of the Odd neurons project into the lobula plate of the optic lobe, and two of these cells extend axons ipsi- and contralaterally in the brain. Anatomically, these cells do not resemble any previously described lobula plate tangential cells (LPTCs) in Drosophila. We show that the Odd neurons are predominantly cholinergic but also include a small number of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurons. Finally, we provide evidence that the Odd neurons are a hemilineage, suggesting they are born from a defined set of neuroblasts. Our anatomical analysis hints at the possibility that subgroups of Odd neurons could be involved in olfactory and visual processing.

  16. Ref(2)P, the Drosophila melanogaster homologue of mammalian p62, is required for the formation of protein aggregates in adult brain.

    PubMed

    Nezis, Ioannis P; Simonsen, Anne; Sagona, Antonia P; Finley, Kim; Gaumer, Sébastien; Contamine, Didier; Rusten, Tor Erik; Stenmark, Harald; Brech, Andreas

    2008-03-24

    P62 has been proposed to mark ubiquitinated protein bodies for autophagic degradation. We report that the Drosophila melanogaster p62 orthologue, Ref(2)P, is a regulator of protein aggregation in the adult brain. We demonstrate that Ref(2)P localizes to age-induced protein aggregates as well as to aggregates caused by reduced autophagic or proteasomal activity. A similar localization to protein aggregates is also observed in D. melanogaster models of human neurodegenerative diseases. Although atg8a autophagy mutant flies show accumulation of ubiquitin- and Ref(2)P-positive protein aggregates, this is abrogated in atg8a/ref(2)P double mutants. Both the multimerization and ubiquitin binding domains of Ref(2)P are required for aggregate formation in vivo. Our findings reveal a major role for Ref(2)P in the formation of ubiquitin-positive protein aggregates both under physiological conditions and when normal protein turnover is inhibited.

  17. Identification of singles bar as a direct transcriptional target of Drosophila Myocyte enhancer factor-2 and a regulator of adult myoblast fusion.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, Tonya M; Fremin, Brayon J; Cripps, Richard M

    2015-05-15

    In Drosophila, myoblast fusion is a conserved process in which founder cells (FCs) and fusion competent myoblasts (FCMs) fuse to form a syncytial muscle fiber. Mutants for the myogenic regulator Myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) show a failure of myoblast fusion, indicating that MEF2 regulates the fusion process. Indeed, chromatin immunoprecipitation studies show that several genes involved in myoblast fusion are bound by MEF2 during embryogenesis. Of these, the MARVEL domain gene singles bar (sing), is down-regulated in MEF2 knockdown pupae, and has five consensus MEF2 binding sites within a 9000-bp region. To determine if MEF2 is an essential and direct regulator of sing during pupal muscle development, we identified a 315-bp myoblast enhancer of sing. This enhancer was active during myoblast fusion, and mutation of two MEF2 sites significantly decreased enhancer activity. We show that lack of sing expression resulted in adult lethality and muscle loss, due to a failure of fusion during the pupal stage. Additionally, we sought to determine if sing was required in either FCs or FCMs to support fusion. Interestingly, knockdown of sing in either population did not significantly affect fusion, however, knockdown in both FCs and FCMs resulted in muscles with significantly reduced nuclei numbers, provisionally indicating that sing function is required in either cell type, but not both. Finally, we found that MEF2 regulated sing expression at the embryonic stage through the same 315-bp enhancer, indicating that sing is a MEF2 target at both critical stages of myoblast fusion. Our studies define for the first time how MEF2 directly controls fusion at multiple stages of the life cycle, and provide further evidence that the mechanisms of fusion characterized in Drosophila embryos is also used in the formation of the more complex adult muscles.

  18. The bHLH Transcription Factor Hand Regulates the Expression of Genes Critical to Heart and Muscle Function in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Hallier, Benjamin; Hoffmann, Julia; Roeder, Thomas; Tögel, Markus; Meyer, Heiko; Paululat, Achim

    2015-01-01

    Hand proteins belong to the highly conserved family of basic Helix-Loop-Helix transcription factors and are critical to distinct developmental processes, including cardiogenesis and neurogenesis in vertebrates. In Drosophila melanogaster a single orthologous hand gene is expressed with absence of the respective protein causing semilethality during early larval instars. Surviving adult animals suffer from shortened lifespan associated with a disorganized myofibrillar structure being apparent in the dorsal vessel, the wing hearts and in midgut tissue. Based on these data, the major biological significance of Hand seems to be related to muscle development, maintenance or function; however, up to now the physiological basis for Hand functionality remains elusive. Thus, the identification of genes whose expression is, directly or indirectly, regulated by Hand has considerable relevance with respect to understanding its biological functionality in flies and vertebrates. Beneficially, hand mutants are viable and exhibit affected tissues, which renders Drosophila an ideal model to investigate up- or downregulated target genes by a comparative microarray approach focusing on the respective tissues from mutant specimens. Our present work reveals for the first time that Drosophila Hand regulates the expression of numerous genes of diverse physiological relevancy, including distinct factors required for proper muscle development and function such as Zasp52 or Msp-300. These results relate Hand activity to muscle integrity and functionality and may thus be highly beneficial to the evaluation of corresponding hand phenotypes. PMID:26252215

  19. Imidacloprid impairs the post-embryonic development of the midgut in the yellow fever mosquito Stegomyia aegypti (=Aedes aegypti).

    PubMed

    Fernandes, K M; Gonzaga, W G; Pascini, T V; Miranda, F R; Tomé, H V V; Serrão, J E; Martins, G F

    2015-09-01

    The mosquito Stegomyia aegypti (=Aedes aegypti) (Diptera: Culicidae) is a vector for the dengue and yellow fever viruses. As blood digestion occurs in the midgut, this organ constitutes the route of entry of many pathogens. The effects of the insecticide imidacloprid on the survival of St. aegypti were investigated and the sub-lethal effects of the insecticide on midgut development were determined. Third instar larvae were exposed to different concentrations of imidacloprid (0.15, 1.5, 3.0, 6.0 and 15.0 p.p.m.) and survival was monitored every 24 h for 10 days. Midguts from imidacloprid-treated insects at different stages of development were dissected and processed for analyses by transmission electron microscopy, immunofluorescence microscopy and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL) assays. Imidacloprid concentrations of 3.0 and 15.0 p.p.m. were found to affect midgut development similarly. Digestive cells of the fourth instar larvae (L4) midgut exposed to imidacloprid had more multilamellar bodies, abundantly found in the cell apex, and more electron-lucent vacuoles in the basal region compared with those from untreated insects. Moreover, imidacloprid interfered with the differentiation of regenerative cells, dramatically reducing the number of digestive and endocrine cells and leading to malformation of the midgut epithelium in adults. The data demonstrate that imidacloprid can reduce the survival of mosquitoes and thus indicate its potentially high efficacy in the control of St. aegypti populations.

  20. Circular DNA Molecules in the Genus Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Travaglini, E. C.; Schultz, J.

    1972-01-01

    The satellite DNA's from the embryos of five species of Drosophila (D. melanogaster, D. simulans, D. nasuta, D. virilis and D. hydei) have been analyzed for the presence of closed circular duplex DNA molecules, as determined by CsCl-EBr gradients. Circular DNA molecules were found in every species but D. melanogaster. Analyses of cell fractions from adult Drosophila and organ fractions from Drosophila larvae show that fractions containing mitochondria are highly enriched in these molecules. PMID:4643820

  1. Premating isolation is determined by larval rearing substrates in cactophilic Drosophila mojavensis. X. Age-specific dynamics of adult epicuticular hydrocarbon expression in response to different host plants

    PubMed Central

    Etges, William J; de Oliveira, Cassia C

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of sexual selection and sexual isolation in Drosophila mojavensis and its relatives has revealed a pervasive role of rearing substrates on adult courtship behavior when flies were reared on fermenting cactus in preadult stages. Here, we assessed expression of contact pheromones comprised of epicuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) from eclosion to 28 days of age in adults from two populations reared on fermenting tissues of two host cacti over the entire life cycle. Flies were never exposed to laboratory food and showed significant reductions in average CHC amounts consistent with CHCs of wild-caught flies. Overall, total hydrocarbon amounts increased from eclosion to 14–18 days, well past age at sexual maturity, and then declined in older flies. Most flies did not survive past 4 weeks. Baja California and mainland populations showed significantly different age-specific CHC profiles where Baja adults showed far less age-specific changes in CHC expression. Adults from populations reared on the host cactus typically used in nature expressed more CHCs than on the alternate host. MANCOVA with age as the covariate for the first six CHC principal components showed extensive differences in CHC composition due to age, population, cactus, sex, and age × population, age × sex, and age × cactus interactions. Thus, understanding variation in CHC composition as adult D. mojavensis age requires information about population and host plant differences, with potential influences on patterns of mate choice, sexual selection, and sexual isolation, and ultimately how these pheromones are expressed in natural populations. Studies of drosophilid aging in the wild are badly needed. PMID:25360246

  2. Incidental midgut malrotation detected during second laparotomy: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Vural, Veli; Türkoğlu, Mehmet Akif; Karatas, Gulnur

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Intestinal malrotation is defined as intestinal nonrotation or incomplete rotation around superior mesenteric artery (SMA), involving anomalies of intestinal fixation as well. The patients may be recognized incidentally during other surgical procedures or at autopsy. Here in, we present a case of midgut malrotation which was diagnosed incidentally during hepaticojejunostomy procedure for benign biliary stricture. Presentation of case A 46 years old male patient was referred to our clinic with failed surgery for biliary stricture due to extensive adhesions. Prior to our surgery, intestinal malrotation was not reported and noticed by the diagnostic tools. When the patient underwent relaparotomy, midgut malrotation was observed. Discussion Distruption in the normal embryological development of bowel is the cause of intestinal malrotation. Various anatomic configurations and anomalies resulting from rotation anomalies of midgut. Adult patients are usually asymptomatic and the anomaly is discovered only at autopsy or incidentally at surgery. The role of additional surgery especially in patients with asymptomatic disease related to malrotation is debated. Conclusion Performing loop hepaticojejunostomy with Braun enteroenterostomy is feasible and acceptable option rather than Roux-N-Y hepaticojejunostomy in case of intestinal malrotation. PMID:25533325

  3. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against midgut of ixodid tick, Haemaphysalis longicornis.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Mie; Kodama, Michi; Yanase, Haruko; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Mulenga, Albert; Ohashi, Kazuhiko; Onuma, Misao

    2003-08-14

    There are concerted efforts toward development of tick vaccines to replace current chemical control strategies that have serious limitations [Parasitologia 32 (1990) 145; Infectious Disease Clinics of North America (1999) 209-226]. In this study, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific to Haemaphysalis longicornis midgut proteins were produced and characterized. Eight antibody-secreting hybridomas were cloned and the mAbs typed as IgG1, IgG2a and IgG2b. On immunoblots, all mAbs reacted with a midgut protein band of about 76 kDa. All mAbs uniformly immunogold-stained the surface or epithelial layers of H. longicornis midgut and endosomes. Adult ticks (50%) that fed on an ascitic mouse producing the IgGs developed a red coloration and did not oviposit. As such, the 76 kDa protein that reacted with the mAbs could, therefore, be a potential candidate for tick vaccine development.

  4. Environmental ethanol as an ecological constraint on dietary breadth of Spotted-Wing Drosophila, Drosophila suzukii Mat. (Diptera: Drosophilidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spotted-wing Drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii, is a recent fruit pest of the Americas whose destructiveness stems from its subcutaneous insertion of eggs into cultivated berries via a female’s prominent double bladed and serrated ovipositor. Atypical of most other Drosophila, D. suzukii adults a...

  5. Curly Encodes Dual Oxidase, Which Acts with Heme Peroxidase Curly Su to Shape the Adult Drosophila Wing

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Thomas Ryan; Liang, Feng-Xia; Lehmann, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Curly, described almost a century ago, is one of the most frequently used markers in Drosophila genetics. Despite this the molecular identity of Curly has remained obscure. Here we show that Curly mutations arise in the gene dual oxidase (duox), which encodes a reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating NADPH oxidase. Using Curly mutations and RNA interference (RNAi), we demonstrate that Duox autonomously stabilizes the wing on the last day of pupal development. Through genetic suppression studies, we identify a novel heme peroxidase, Curly Su (Cysu) that acts with Duox to form the wing. Ultrastructural analysis suggests that Duox and Cysu are required in the wing to bond and adhere the dorsal and ventral cuticle surfaces during its maturation. In Drosophila, Duox is best known for its role in the killing of pathogens by generating bactericidal ROS. Our work adds to a growing number of studies suggesting that Duox’s primary function is more structural, helping to form extracellular and cuticle structures in conjunction with peroxidases. PMID:26587980

  6. The effect of developmental nutrition on life span and fecundity depends on the adult reproductive environment in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    May, Christina M; Doroszuk, Agnieszka; Zwaan, Bas J

    2015-01-01

    Both developmental nutrition and adult nutrition affect life-history traits; however, little is known about whether the effect of developmental nutrition depends on the adult environment experienced. We used the fruit fly to determine whether life-history traits, particularly life span and fecundity, are affected by developmental nutrition, and whether this depends on the extent to which the adult environment allows females to realize their full reproductive potential. We raised flies on three different developmental food levels containing increasing amounts of yeast and sugar: poor, control, and rich. We found that development on poor or rich larval food resulted in several life-history phenotypes indicative of suboptimal conditions, including increased developmental time, and, for poor food, decreased adult weight. However, development on poor larval food actually increased adult virgin life span. In addition, we manipulated the reproductive potential of the adult environment by adding yeast or yeast and a male. This manipulation interacted with larval food to determine adult fecundity. Specifically, under two adult conditions, flies raised on poor larval food had higher reproduction at certain ages – when singly mated this occurred early in life and when continuously mated with yeast this occurred during midlife. We show that poor larval food is not necessarily detrimental to key adult life-history traits, but does exert an adult environment-dependent effect, especially by affecting virgin life span and altering adult patterns of reproductive investment. Our findings are relevant because (1) they may explain differences between published studies on nutritional effects on life-history traits; (2) they indicate that optimal nutritional conditions are likely to be different for larvae and adults, potentially reflecting evolutionary history; and (3) they urge for the incorporation of developmental nutritional conditions into the central life-history concept of

  7. Ttk69 acts as a master repressor of enteroendocrine cell specification in Drosophila intestinal stem cell lineages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenhui; Guo, Xingting; Dou, Kun; Chen, Hongyan; Xi, Rongwen

    2015-10-01

    In adult Drosophila midgut, intestinal stem cells (ISCs) periodically produce progenitor cells that undergo a binary fate choice determined primarily by the levels of Notch activity that they receive, before terminally differentiating into enterocytes (ECs) or enteroendocrine (EE) cells. Here we identified Ttk69, a BTB domain-containing transcriptional repressor, as a master repressor of EE cell specification in the ISC lineages. Depletion of ttk69 in progenitor cells induced ISC proliferation and caused all committed progenitor cells to adopt EE fate, leading to the production of supernumerary EE cells in the intestinal epithelium. Conversely, forced expression of Ttk69 in progenitor cells was sufficient to prevent EE cell specification. The expression of Ttk69 was not regulated by Notch signaling, and forced activation of Notch, which is sufficient to induce EC specification of normal progenitor cells, failed to prevent EE cell specification of Ttk69-depleted progenitors. Loss of Ttk69 led to derepression of the acheate-scute complex (AS-C) genes scute and asense, which then induced prospero expression to promote EE cell specification. These studies suggest that Ttk69 functions in parallel with Notch signaling and acts as a master repressor of EE cell specification in Drosophila ISC lineages primarily by suppressing AS-C genes.

  8. Cell Competition Modifies Adult Stem Cell and Tissue Population Dynamics in a JAK-STAT-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Kolahgar, Golnar; Suijkerbuijk, Saskia J.E.; Kucinski, Iwo; Poirier, Enzo Z.; Mansour, Sarah; Simons, Benjamin D.; Piddini, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Summary Throughout their lifetime, cells may suffer insults that reduce their fitness and disrupt their function, and it is unclear how these potentially harmful cells are managed in adult tissues. We address this question using the adult Drosophila posterior midgut as a model of homeostatic tissue and ribosomal Minute mutations to reduce fitness in groups of cells. We take a quantitative approach combining lineage tracing and biophysical modeling and address how cell competition affects stem cell and tissue population dynamics. We show that healthy cells induce clonal extinction in weak tissues, targeting both stem and differentiated cells for elimination. We also find that competition induces stem cell proliferation and self-renewal in healthy tissue, promoting selective advantage and tissue colonization. Finally, we show that winner cell proliferation is fueled by the JAK-STAT ligand Unpaired-3, produced by Minute−/+ cells in response to chronic JNK stress signaling. PMID:26212135

  9. Snoo and Dpp Act as Spatial and Temporal Regulators Respectively of Adult Progenitor Cells in the Drosophila Trachea

    PubMed Central

    Djabrayan, Nareg J.-V.; Casanova, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Clusters of differentiated cells contributing to organ structures retain the potential to re-enter the cell cycle and replace cells lost during development or upon damage. To do so, they must be designated spatially and respond to proper activation cues. Here we show that in the case of Drosophila differentiated larval tracheal cells, progenitor potential is conferred by the spatially restricted activity of the Snoo transcription cofactor. Furthermore, Dpp signalling regulated by endocrine hormonal cues provides the temporal trigger for their activation. Finally, we elucidate the genetic network elicited by Snoo and Dpp activity. These results illustrate a regulatory mechanism that translates intrinsic potential and extrinsic cues into the facultative stem cell features of differentiated progenitors. PMID:26942411

  10. Culture-independent analysis of midgut microbiota in the arbovirus vector Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Campbell, Corey L; Mummey, Daniel L; Schmidtmann, Edward T; Wilson, William C

    2004-05-01

    Differences in midgut microbial communities inhabiting Culicoides spp., insect vectors of virus pathogens, may affect the variation observed in the ability of these biting midges to propagate arthropod-borne viruses. As a first step toward addressing this hypothesis, midgut bacterial communities were compared between Culicoides species expected to be efficient and inefficient vectors of virus pathogens. We used 16S rDNA sequence and restriction fragment information to provisionally identify 36 bacterial genera from guts of wild adult female biting midges, Culicoides sonorensis Wirth and Jones and Culicoides variipennis (Coquillet), from two geographical locations. Bacterial identification was made by sequence analysis of 16S rDNA fragments and by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified 16S rDNA fragments from adult guts. Of 36 bacterial genera identified, 12 had been previously identified in other insects: Comomonas, Enterobacter, Klebsiella, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, Staphylococcus, Chryseobacterium, Moraxella, Acholeplasma, Flavobacterium, and Rickettsia, Significant differences in bacterial community composition were found between all three groups of wild adult females analyzed: live-trapped C. sonorensis, laboratory-emerged C. sonorensis, and laboratory-emerged C. variipennis.

  11. Local and systemic effects of targeted zinc redistribution in Drosophila neuronal and gastrointestinal tissues.

    PubMed

    Richards, Christopher D; Burke, Richard

    2015-12-01

    While the effects of systemic zinc ion deficiency and toxicity on animal health are well documented, the impacts of localized, tissue-specific disturbances in zinc homeostasis are less well understood. Previously we have identified zinc dyshomeostasis scenarios caused by the targeted manipulation of zinc transport genes in the Drosophila eye. Over expression of the uptake transporter dZIP42C.1 (dZIP1) combined with knockdown of the efflux transporter dZNT63C (dZNT1) causes a zinc toxicity phenotype, as does over expression of dZIP71B or dZNT86D. However, all three genotypes result in different morphologies, responses to dietary zinc, and genetic interactions with the remaining zinc transport genes, indicating that each causes a different redistribution of zinc within affected cells. dZNT86D (eGFP) over expression generates a completely different phenotype, interpreted as a Golgi zinc deficiency. Here we assess the effect of each of these transgenes when targeted to a range of Drosophila tissues. We find that dZIP71B is a particularly potent zinc uptake gene, causing early developmental lethality when targeted to multiple different tissue types. dZNT86D over expression (Golgi-only zinc toxicity) is less deleterious, but causes highly penetrant adult cuticle, sensory bristle and wing expansion defects. The dZIP42C.1 over expression, dZNT63C knockdown combination causes only moderate adult cuticle defects and sensitivity to dietary zinc when expressed in the midgut. The Golgi-only zinc deficiency caused by dZNT86D (eGFP) expression results in mild cuticle defects, highly penetrant wing expansion defects and developmental lethality when targeted to the central nervous system and, uniquely, the fat bodies.

  12. Local and systemic effects of targeted zinc redistribution in Drosophila neuronal and gastrointestinal tissues.

    PubMed

    Richards, Christopher D; Burke, Richard

    2015-12-01

    While the effects of systemic zinc ion deficiency and toxicity on animal health are well documented, the impacts of localized, tissue-specific disturbances in zinc homeostasis are less well understood. Previously we have identified zinc dyshomeostasis scenarios caused by the targeted manipulation of zinc transport genes in the Drosophila eye. Over expression of the uptake transporter dZIP42C.1 (dZIP1) combined with knockdown of the efflux transporter dZNT63C (dZNT1) causes a zinc toxicity phenotype, as does over expression of dZIP71B or dZNT86D. However, all three genotypes result in different morphologies, responses to dietary zinc, and genetic interactions with the remaining zinc transport genes, indicating that each causes a different redistribution of zinc within affected cells. dZNT86D (eGFP) over expression generates a completely different phenotype, interpreted as a Golgi zinc deficiency. Here we assess the effect of each of these transgenes when targeted to a range of Drosophila tissues. We find that dZIP71B is a particularly potent zinc uptake gene, causing early developmental lethality when targeted to multiple different tissue types. dZNT86D over expression (Golgi-only zinc toxicity) is less deleterious, but causes highly penetrant adult cuticle, sensory bristle and wing expansion defects. The dZIP42C.1 over expression, dZNT63C knockdown combination causes only moderate adult cuticle defects and sensitivity to dietary zinc when expressed in the midgut. The Golgi-only zinc deficiency caused by dZNT86D (eGFP) expression results in mild cuticle defects, highly penetrant wing expansion defects and developmental lethality when targeted to the central nervous system and, uniquely, the fat bodies. PMID:26411574

  13. Expression of the Troponin C at 41C Gene in Adult Drosophila Tubular Muscles Depends upon Both Positive and Negative Regulatory Inputs.

    PubMed

    Chechenova, Maria B; Maes, Sara; Cripps, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    Most animals express multiple isoforms of structural muscle proteins to produce tissues with different physiological properties. In Drosophila, the adult muscles include tubular-type muscles and the fibrillar indirect flight muscles. Regulatory processes specifying tubular muscle fate remain incompletely understood, therefore we chose to analyze the transcriptional regulation of TpnC41C, a Troponin C gene expressed in the tubular jump muscles, but not in the fibrillar flight muscles. We identified a 300-bp promoter fragment of TpnC41C sufficient for the fiber-specific reporter expression. Through an analysis of this regulatory element, we identified two sites necessary for the activation of the enhancer. Mutations in each of these sites resulted in 70% reduction of enhancer activity. One site was characterized as a binding site for Myocyte Enhancer Factor-2. In addition, we identified a repressive element that prevents activation of the enhancer in other muscle fiber types. Mutation of this site increased jump muscle-specific expression of the reporter, but more importantly reporter expression expanded into the indirect flight muscles. Our findings demonstrate that expression of the TpnC41C gene in jump muscles requires integration of multiple positive and negative transcriptional inputs. Identification of the transcriptional regulators binding the cis-elements that we identified will reveal the regulatory pathways controlling muscle fiber differentiation.

  14. Control of lipid metabolism by Tachykinin in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wei; Veenstra, Jan A.; Perrimon, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Summary The intestine is a key organ for lipid uptake and distribution, and abnormal intestinal lipid metabolism is associated with obesity and hyperlipidemia. Although multiple regulatory gut hormones secreted from enteroendocrine cells (EEs) regulate systemic lipid homeostasis, such as appetite control and energy balance in adipose tissue, their respective roles regarding lipid metabolism in the intestine are not well understood. We demonstrate that Tachykinins (TKs), one of the most abundant secreted peptides expressed in midgut EEs, regulate intestinal lipid production and subsequently control systemic lipid homeostasis in Drosophila, and that TKs repress lipogenesis in enterocytes (ECs) associated with the TKR99D receptor and PKA signaling. Interestingly, nutrient deprivation enhances the production of TKs in the midgut. Finally, unlike the physiological roles of TKs produced from the brain, gut-derived TKs do not affect behavior, thus demonstrating that gut TK hormones specifically regulate intestinal lipid metabolism without affecting neuronal functions. PMID:25263556

  15. Schinus terebinthifolius Leaf Extract Causes Midgut Damage, Interfering with Survival and Development of Aedes aegypti Larvae.

    PubMed

    Procópio, Thamara Figueiredo; Fernandes, Kenner Morais; Pontual, Emmanuel Viana; Ximenes, Rafael Matos; de Oliveira, Aline Rafaella Cardoso; Souza, Carolina de Santana; Melo, Ana Maria Mendonça de Albuquerque; Navarro, Daniela Maria do Amaral Ferraz; Paiva, Patrícia Maria Guedes; Martins, Gustavo Ferreira; Napoleão, Thiago Henrique

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a leaf extract from Schinus terebinthifolius was evaluated for effects on survival, development, and midgut of A. aegypti fourth instar larvae (L4), as well as for toxic effect on Artemia salina. Leaf extract was obtained using 0.15 M NaCl and evaluated for phytochemical composition and lectin activity. Early L4 larvae were incubated with the extract (0.3-1.35%, w/v) for 8 days, in presence or absence of food. Polymeric proanthocyanidins, hydrolysable tannins, heterosid and aglycone flavonoids, cinnamic acid derivatives, traces of steroids, and lectin activity were detected in the extract, which killed the larvae at an LC50 of 0.62% (unfed larvae) and 1.03% (fed larvae). Further, the larvae incubated with the extract reacted by eliminating the gut content. No larvae reached the pupal stage in treatments at concentrations between 0.5% and 1.35%, while in the control (fed larvae), 61.7% of individuals emerged as adults. The extract (1.0%) promoted intense disorganization of larval midgut epithelium, including deformation and hypertrophy of cells, disruption of microvilli, and vacuolization of cytoplasms, affecting digestive, enteroendocrine, regenerative, and proliferating cells. In addition, cells with fragmented DNA were observed. Separation of extract components by solid phase extraction revealed that cinnamic acid derivatives and flavonoids are involved in larvicidal effect of the extract, being the first most efficient in a short time after larvae treatment. The lectin present in the extract was isolated, but did not show deleterious effects on larvae. The extract and cinnamic acid derivatives were toxic to A. salina nauplii, while the flavonoids showed low toxicity. S. terebinthifolius leaf extract caused damage to the midgut of A. aegypti larvae, interfering with survival and development. The larvicidal effect of the extract can be attributed to cinnamic acid derivatives and flavonoids. The data obtained using A. salina indicates that caution

  16. Schinus terebinthifolius Leaf Extract Causes Midgut Damage, Interfering with Survival and Development of Aedes aegypti Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Procópio, Thamara Figueiredo; Fernandes, Kenner Morais; Pontual, Emmanuel Viana; Ximenes, Rafael Matos; de Oliveira, Aline Rafaella Cardoso; Souza, Carolina de Santana; Melo, Ana Maria Mendonça de Albuquerque; Navarro, Daniela Maria do Amaral Ferraz; Paiva, Patrícia Maria Guedes; Martins, Gustavo Ferreira; Napoleão, Thiago Henrique

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a leaf extract from Schinus terebinthifolius was evaluated for effects on survival, development, and midgut of A. aegypti fourth instar larvae (L4), as well as for toxic effect on Artemia salina. Leaf extract was obtained using 0.15 M NaCl and evaluated for phytochemical composition and lectin activity. Early L4 larvae were incubated with the extract (0.3–1.35%, w/v) for 8 days, in presence or absence of food. Polymeric proanthocyanidins, hydrolysable tannins, heterosid and aglycone flavonoids, cinnamic acid derivatives, traces of steroids, and lectin activity were detected in the extract, which killed the larvae at an LC50 of 0.62% (unfed larvae) and 1.03% (fed larvae). Further, the larvae incubated with the extract reacted by eliminating the gut content. No larvae reached the pupal stage in treatments at concentrations between 0.5% and 1.35%, while in the control (fed larvae), 61.7% of individuals emerged as adults. The extract (1.0%) promoted intense disorganization of larval midgut epithelium, including deformation and hypertrophy of cells, disruption of microvilli, and vacuolization of cytoplasms, affecting digestive, enteroendocrine, regenerative, and proliferating cells. In addition, cells with fragmented DNA were observed. Separation of extract components by solid phase extraction revealed that cinnamic acid derivatives and flavonoids are involved in larvicidal effect of the extract, being the first most efficient in a short time after larvae treatment. The lectin present in the extract was isolated, but did not show deleterious effects on larvae. The extract and cinnamic acid derivatives were toxic to A. salina nauplii, while the flavonoids showed low toxicity. S. terebinthifolius leaf extract caused damage to the midgut of A. aegypti larvae, interfering with survival and development. The larvicidal effect of the extract can be attributed to cinnamic acid derivatives and flavonoids. The data obtained using A. salina indicates that caution

  17. Rearrangement of Upstream Regulatory Elements Leads to Ectopic Expression of the Drosophila Mulleri Adh-2 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Falb, D.; Fischer, J.; Maniatis, T.

    1992-01-01

    The Adh-2 gene of Drosophila mulleri is expressed in the larval fat body and the adult fat body and hindgut, and a 1500-bp element located 2-3 kb upstream of the Adh-2 promoter is necessary for maximal levels of transcription. Previous work demonstrated that deletion of sequences between this upstream element and the Adh-2 promoter results in Adh-2 gene expression in a novel larval tissue, the middle midgut. In this study we show that the upstream element possesses all of the characteristics of a transcriptional enhancer: its activity is independent of orientation, it acts on a heterologous promoter, and it functions at various positions both 5' and 3' to the Adh-2 gene. Full enhancer function can be localized to a 750-bp element, although other regions possess some redundant activity. The ectopic expression pattern is dependent on the proximity of at least two sequence elements. Thus, tissue-specific transcription can involve complex proximity-dependent interactions among combinations of regulatory elements. PMID:1459428

  18. Drosophila melanogaster lipins are tissue-regulated and developmentally regulated and present specific subcellular distributions.

    PubMed

    Valente, Valeria; Maia, Rafaela Martins; Vianna, Murilo Carlos Bizam; Paçó-Larson, Maria Luisa

    2010-11-01

    Lipins constitute a novel family of Mg(2+)-dependent phosphatidate phosphatases that catalyze the dephosphorylation of phosphatidic acid to yield diacylglycerol, an important intermediate in lipid metabolism and cell signaling. Whereas a single lipin is detected in less complex organisms, in mammals there are distinct lipin isoforms and paralogs that are differentially expressed among tissues. Compatible with organism tissue complexity, we show that the single Drosophila Lpin1 ortholog (CG8709, here named DmLpin) expresses at least three isoforms (DmLpinA, DmLpinK and DmLpinJ) in a temporal and spatially regulated manner. The highest levels of lipin in the fat body, where DmLpinA and DmLpinK are expressed, correlate with the highest levels of triacylglycerol (TAG) measured in this tissue. DmLpinK is the most abundant isoform in the central nervous system, where TAG levels are significantly lower than in the fat body. In the testis, where TAG levels are even lower, DmLpinJ is the predominant isoform. Together, these data suggest that DmLpinA might be the isoform that is mainly involved in TAG production, and that DmLpinK and DmLpinJ could perform other cellular functions. In addition, we demonstrate by immunofluorescence that lipins are most strongly labeled in the perinuclear region of the fat body and ventral ganglion cells. In visceral muscles of the larval midgut and adult testis, lipins present a sarcomeric distribution. In the ovary chamber, the lipin signal is concentrated in the internal rim of the ring canal. These specific subcellular localizations of the Drosophila lipins provide the basis for future investigations on putative novel cellular functions of this protein family. PMID:20977671

  19. Methods to assay Drosophila behavior.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Charles D; Becnel, Jaime; Pandey, Udai B

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster, the fruit fly, has been used to study molecular mechanisms of a wide range of human diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disease and various neurological diseases(1). We have optimized simple and robust behavioral assays for determining larval locomotion, adult climbing ability (RING assay), and courtship behaviors of Drosophila. These behavioral assays are widely applicable for studying the role of genetic and environmental factors on fly behavior. Larval crawling ability can be reliably used for determining early stage changes in the crawling abilities of Drosophila larvae and also for examining effect of drugs or human disease genes (in transgenic flies) on their locomotion. The larval crawling assay becomes more applicable if expression or abolition of a gene causes lethality in pupal or adult stages, as these flies do not survive to adulthood where they otherwise could be assessed. This basic assay can also be used in conjunction with bright light or stress to examine additional behavioral responses in Drosophila larvae. Courtship behavior has been widely used to investigate genetic basis of sexual behavior, and can also be used to examine activity and coordination, as well as learning and memory. Drosophila courtship behavior involves the exchange of various sensory stimuli including visual, auditory, and chemosensory signals between males and females that lead to a complex series of well characterized motor behaviors culminating in successful copulation. Traditional adult climbing assays (negative geotaxis) are tedious, labor intensive, and time consuming, with significant variation between different trials(2-4). The rapid iterative negative geotaxis (RING) assay(5) has many advantages over more widely employed protocols, providing a reproducible, sensitive, and high throughput approach to quantify adult locomotor and negative geotaxis behaviors. In the RING assay, several genotypes or drug treatments can be tested simultaneously

  20. Midgut fungal and bacterial microbiota of Aedes triseriatus and Aedes japonicus shift in response to La Crosse virus infection.

    PubMed

    Muturi, Ephantus J; Bara, Jeffrey J; Rooney, Alejandro P; Hansen, Allison K

    2016-08-01

    Understanding how midgut microbial communities of field-collected mosquitoes interact with pathogens is critical for controlling vector infection and disease. We used 16S rRNA and internal transcribed spacer sequencing to characterize the midgut bacterial and fungal communities of adult females of Aedes triseriatus and Aedes japonicus collected as pupae in tree holes, plastic bins and waste tires and their response to La Crosse virus (LACV) infection. For both mosquito species and across all habitat and virus treatments, a total of 62 bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from six phyla and 21 fungal OTUs from two phyla were identified. The majority of bacterial (92%) and fungal (71%) OTUs were shared between the mosquito species; however, several OTUs were unique to each species. Bacterial and fungal communities of individuals that took either infectious or noninfectious bloodmeals were less diverse and more homogeneous compared to those of newly emerged adults. Interestingly, LACV-infected A. triseriatus and A. japonicus had higher bacterial richness and lower fungal richness compared to individuals that took a noninfectious bloodmeal, suggesting that viral infection was associated with an increase in bacterial OTUs and a decrease in fungal OTUs. For both mosquito species, several OTUs were identified that had both high fidelity and specificity to mosquito midguts that were infected with LACV. Overall, these findings demonstrate that bacterial and fungal communities that reside in mosquito midguts respond to host diet and viral infection and could play a role in modulating vector susceptibility to LACV. PMID:27357374

  1. Drosophila spermiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, Lacramioara; Brill, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster spermatids undergo dramatic morphological changes as they differentiate from small round cells approximately 12 μm in diameter into highly polarized, 1.8 mm long, motile sperm capable of participating in fertilization. During spermiogenesis, syncytial cysts of 64 haploid spermatids undergo synchronous differentiation. Numerous changes occur at a subcellular level, including remodeling of existing organelles (mitochondria, nuclei), formation of new organelles (flagellar axonemes, acrosomes), polarization of elongating cysts and plasma membrane addition. At the end of spermatid morphogenesis, organelles, mitochondrial DNA and cytoplasmic components not needed in mature sperm are stripped away in a caspase-dependent process called individualization that results in formation of individual sperm. Here, we review the stages of Drosophila spermiogenesis and examine our current understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in shaping male germ cell-specific organelles and forming mature, fertile sperm. PMID:23087837

  2. Drosophila sensory cilia lacking MKS proteins exhibit striking defects in development but only subtle defects in adults

    PubMed Central

    Titlow, Joshua S.; Davis, Ilan; Barker, Amy R.; Dawe, Helen R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cilia are conserved organelles that have important motility, sensory and signalling roles. The transition zone (TZ) at the base of the cilium is crucial for cilia function, and defects in several TZ proteins are associated with human congenital ciliopathies such as nephronophthisis (NPHP) and Meckel–Gruber syndrome (MKS). In several species, MKS and NPHP proteins form separate complexes that cooperate with Cep290 to assemble the TZ, but flies seem to lack core components of the NPHP module. We show that MKS proteins in flies are spatially separated from Cep290 at the TZ, and that flies mutant for individual MKS genes fail to recruit other MKS proteins to the TZ, whereas Cep290 seems to be recruited normally. Although there are abnormalities in microtubule and membrane organisation in developing MKS mutant cilia, these defects are less apparent in adults, where sensory cilia and sperm flagella seem to function quite normally. Thus, localising MKS proteins to the cilium or flagellum is not essential for viability or fertility in flies. PMID:27577095

  3. Tissue- and time-dependent transcription in Ixodes ricinus salivary glands and midguts when blood feeding on the vertebrate host

    PubMed Central

    Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Schwarz, Alexandra; Erhart, Jan; Ribeiro, José M. C.

    2015-01-01

    Ixodes ricinus is a tick that transmits the pathogens of Lyme and several arboviral diseases. Pathogens invade the tick midgut, disseminate through the hemolymph, and are transmitted to the vertebrate host via the salivary glands; subverting these processes could be used to interrupt pathogen transfer. Here, we use massive de novo sequencing to characterize the transcriptional dynamics of the salivary and midgut tissues of nymphal and adult I. ricinus at various time points after attachment on the vertebrate host. Members of a number of gene families show stage- and time-specific expression. We hypothesize that gene expression switching may be under epigenetic control and, in support of this, identify 34 candidate proteins that modify histones. I. ricinus-secreted proteins are encoded by genes that have a non-synonymous to synonymous mutation rate even greater than immune-related genes. Midgut transcriptome (mialome) analysis reveals several enzymes associated with protein, carbohydrate, and lipid digestion, transporters and channels that might be associated with nutrient uptake, and immune-related transcripts including antimicrobial peptides. This publicly available dataset supports the identification of protein and gene targets for biochemical and physiological studies that exploit the transmission lifecycle of this disease vector for preventative and therapeutic purposes. PMID:25765539

  4. Midgut microbiota and host immunocompetence underlie Bacillus thuringiensis killing mechanism.

    PubMed

    Caccia, Silvia; Di Lelio, Ilaria; La Storia, Antonietta; Marinelli, Adriana; Varricchio, Paola; Franzetti, Eleonora; Banyuls, Núria; Tettamanti, Gianluca; Casartelli, Morena; Giordana, Barbara; Ferré, Juan; Gigliotti, Silvia; Ercolini, Danilo; Pennacchio, Francesco

    2016-08-23

    Bacillus thuringiensis is a widely used bacterial entomopathogen producing insecticidal toxins, some of which are expressed in insect-resistant transgenic crops. Surprisingly, the killing mechanism of B. thuringiensis remains controversial. In particular, the importance of the septicemia induced by the host midgut microbiota is still debated as a result of the lack of experimental evidence obtained without drastic manipulation of the midgut and its content. Here this key issue is addressed by RNAi-mediated silencing of an immune gene in a lepidopteran host Spodoptera littoralis, leaving the midgut microbiota unaltered. The resulting cellular immunosuppression was characterized by a reduced nodulation response, which was associated with a significant enhancement of host larvae mortality triggered by B. thuringiensis and a Cry toxin. This was determined by an uncontrolled proliferation of midgut bacteria, after entering the body cavity through toxin-induced epithelial lesions. Consequently, the hemolymphatic microbiota dramatically changed upon treatment with Cry1Ca toxin, showing a remarkable predominance of Serratia and Clostridium species, which switched from asymptomatic gut symbionts to hemocoelic pathogens. These experimental results demonstrate the important contribution of host enteric flora in B. thuringiensis-killing activity and provide a sound foundation for developing new insect control strategies aimed at enhancing the impact of biocontrol agents by reducing the immunocompetence of the host. PMID:27506800

  5. A regulatory network controls nephrocan expression and midgut patterning

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Juan; Wei, Wei; Saund, Ranajeet S.; Xiang, Ping; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Yi, Yuyin; Alder, Olivia; Lu, Daphne Y. D.; Savory, Joanne G. A.; Krentz, Nicole A. J.; Montpetit, Rachel; Cullum, Rebecca; Hofs, Nicole; Lohnes, David; Humphries, R. Keith; Yamanaka, Yojiro; Duester, Gregg; Saijoh, Yukio; Hoodless, Pamela A.

    2014-01-01

    Although many regulatory networks involved in defining definitive endoderm have been identified, the mechanisms through which these networks interact to pattern the endoderm are less well understood. To explore the mechanisms involved in midgut patterning, we dissected the transcriptional regulatory elements of nephrocan (Nepn), the earliest known midgut specific gene in mice. We observed that Nepn expression is dramatically reduced in Sox17−/− and Raldh2−/− embryos compared with wild-type embryos. We further show that Nepn is directly regulated by Sox17 and the retinoic acid (RA) receptor via two enhancer elements located upstream of the gene. Moreover, Nepn expression is modulated by Activin signaling, with high levels inhibiting and low levels enhancing RA-dependent expression. In Foxh1−/− embryos in which Nodal signaling is reduced, the Nepn expression domain is expanded into the anterior gut region, confirming that Nodal signaling can modulate its expression in vivo. Together, Sox17 is required for Nepn expression in the definitive endoderm, while RA signaling restricts expression to the midgut region. A balance of Nodal/Activin signaling regulates the anterior boundary of the midgut expression domain. PMID:25209250

  6. Aspen defense chemicals influence midgut bacterial community composition of gypsy moth.

    PubMed

    Mason, Charles J; Rubert-Nason, Kennedy F; Lindroth, Richard L; Raffa, Kenneth F

    2015-01-01

    Microbial symbionts are becoming increasingly recognized as mediators of many aspects of plant - herbivore interactions. However, the influence of plant chemical defenses on gut associates of insect herbivores is less well understood. We used gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.), and differing trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) genotypes that vary in chemical defenses, to assess the influence of foliar chemistry on bacterial communities of larval midguts. We evaluated the bacterial community composition of foliage, and of midguts of larvae feeding on those leaves, using next-generation high-throughput sequencing. Plant defense chemicals did not influence the composition of foliar communities. In contrast, both phenolic glycosides and condensed tannins affected the bacterial consortia of gypsy moth midguts. The two most abundant operational taxonomic units were classified as Ralstonia and Acinetobacter. The relative abundance of Ralstonia was higher in midguts than in foliage when phenolic glycoside concentrations were low, but lower in midguts when phenolic glycosides were high. In contrast, the relative abundance of Ralstonia was lower in midguts than in foliage when condensed tannin concentrations were low, but higher in midguts when condensed tannins were high. Acinetobacter showed a different relationship with host chemistry, being relatively more abundant in midguts than with foliage when condensed tannin concentrations were low, but lower in midguts when condensed tannins were high. Acinetobacter tended to have a greater relative abundance in midguts of insects feeding on genotypes with high phenolic glycoside concentrations. These results show that plant defense chemicals influence herbivore midgut communities, which may in turn influence host utilization.

  7. Cloning of PaAtg8 and roles of autophagy in adaptation to starvation with respect to the fat body and midgut of the Americana cockroach, Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Park, Moon Soo; Takeda, Makio

    2014-05-01

    Starvation, in particular amino acid deprivation, induces autophagy in trophocytes (adipocytes), the major component of the fat body cell types, in the larvae of Drosophila melanogaster. However, the fat body of cockroach has two additional cell types: urocytes depositing uric acid in urate vacuoles as a nitrogen resource and mycetocytes harboring an endosymbiont, Blattabacterium cuenoti, which can synthesize amino acids from the metabolites of the stored uric acid. These cells might complement the roles of autophagy in recycling amino acids in the fat body or other organs of cockroaches under starvation. We investigate the presence of autophagy in tissues such as the fat body and midgut of the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana, under starvation by immunoblotting with antibody against Atg8, a ubiquitin-like protein required for the formation of autophagosomes and by electron microscopy. Corresponding changes in acid phosphatase activity were also investigated as representing lysosome activity. Starvation increased the level of an autophagic marker, Atg8-II, in both the tissues, extensively stimulating the formation of autophagic compartments in trophocytes of the fat body and columnar cells of the midgut for over 2 weeks. Acid phosphatase showed no significant increase in the fat body of the starved cockroaches but was higher in the midgut of the continuously fed animals. Thus, a distinct autophagic mechanism operates in these tissues under starvation of 2 weeks and longer. The late induction of autophagy implies exhaustion of the stored uric acid in the fat body. High activity of acid phosphatase in the midgut of the fed cockroaches might represent enhanced assimilation and not an autophagy-related function.

  8. Cloning of PaAtg8 and roles of autophagy in adaptation to starvation with respect to the fat body and midgut of the Americana cockroach, Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Park, Moon Soo; Takeda, Makio

    2014-05-01

    Starvation, in particular amino acid deprivation, induces autophagy in trophocytes (adipocytes), the major component of the fat body cell types, in the larvae of Drosophila melanogaster. However, the fat body of cockroach has two additional cell types: urocytes depositing uric acid in urate vacuoles as a nitrogen resource and mycetocytes harboring an endosymbiont, Blattabacterium cuenoti, which can synthesize amino acids from the metabolites of the stored uric acid. These cells might complement the roles of autophagy in recycling amino acids in the fat body or other organs of cockroaches under starvation. We investigate the presence of autophagy in tissues such as the fat body and midgut of the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana, under starvation by immunoblotting with antibody against Atg8, a ubiquitin-like protein required for the formation of autophagosomes and by electron microscopy. Corresponding changes in acid phosphatase activity were also investigated as representing lysosome activity. Starvation increased the level of an autophagic marker, Atg8-II, in both the tissues, extensively stimulating the formation of autophagic compartments in trophocytes of the fat body and columnar cells of the midgut for over 2 weeks. Acid phosphatase showed no significant increase in the fat body of the starved cockroaches but was higher in the midgut of the continuously fed animals. Thus, a distinct autophagic mechanism operates in these tissues under starvation of 2 weeks and longer. The late induction of autophagy implies exhaustion of the stored uric acid in the fat body. High activity of acid phosphatase in the midgut of the fed cockroaches might represent enhanced assimilation and not an autophagy-related function. PMID:24696316

  9. Insulin receptor in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Petruzzelli, L.; Herrera, R.; Rosen, O.

    1986-05-01

    A specific, high affinity insulin receptor is present in both adult Drosophila and in Drosophila embryos. Wheat germ lectin-enriched extracts of detergent-solubilized membranes from embryos and adults bind insulin with a K/sub d/ of 15 nM. Binding is specific for insulin; micromolar concentrations of proinsulin, IGFI, and IGFII are required to displace bound /sup 125/I-insulin. Insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase activity appears during embryogenesis. It is evident between 6 and 12 hours of development, peaks between 12 and 18 hours and falls in the adult. During 0-6 hours of embryogenesis, and in the adult, a specific protein band (Mr = 135,000) is crosslinked to /sup 125/I-insulin. During 6-12 and 12-18 hours of embryogenesis stages in which insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase is high, an additional band (Mr = 100,000) becomes crosslinked to /sup 125/I-insulin. Isolation and DNA sequence analysis of genomic clones encoding the Drosophila insulin receptor will be presented as will the characterization of insulin receptor mRNA's during development.

  10. Midgut Microbial Community of Culex quinquefasciatus Mosquito Populations from India

    PubMed Central

    Chandel, Kshitij; Mendki, Murlidhar J.; Parikh, Rasesh Y.; Kulkarni, Girish; Tikar, Sachin N.; Sukumaran, Devanathan; Prakash, Shri; Parashar, Brahma D.; Shouche, Yogesh S.; Veer, Vijay

    2013-01-01

    The mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus is a ubiquitous species that serves as a major vector for west nile virus and lymphatic filariasis. Ingestion of bloodmeal by females triggers a series of physiological processes in the midgut and also exposes them to infection by these pathogens. The bacteria normally harbored in the midgut are known to influence physiology and can also alter the response to various pathogens. The midgut bacteria in female Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes collected over a large geographical area from India was studied. Examination of 16S ribosomal DNA amplicons from culturable microflora revealed the presence of 83 bacterial species belonging to 31 bacterial genera. All of these species belong to three phyla i.e. Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. Phylum Proteobacteria was the most dominant phylum (37 species), followed by Firmicutes (33 species) and Actinobacteria (13 species). Phylum Proteobacteria, was dominated by members of γ-proteobacteria class. The genus Staphylococcus was the largest genus represented by 11 species whereas Enterobacter was the most prevalent genus and recovered from all the field stations except Leh. Highest bacterial prevalence was observed from Bhuj (22 species) followed by Nagrota (18 species), Masimpur (18 species) and Hathigarh (16 species). Whereas, least species were observed from Leh (8 species). It has been observed that individual mosquito harbor extremely diverse gut bacteria and have very small overlap bacterial taxa in their gut. This variation in midgut microbiota may be one of the factors responsible for variation in disease transmission rates or vector competence within mosquito population. The present data strongly encourage further investigations to verify the potential role of the detected bacteria in mosquito for the transmission of lymphatic filariasis and west nile virus. To the best of our knowledge this is the first study on midgut microbiota of wild Cx. quinquefasciatus from over a

  11. CPB1 of Aedes aegypti interacts with DENV2 E protein and regulates intracellular viral accumulation and release from midgut cells.

    PubMed

    Tham, Hong-Wai; Balasubramaniam, Vinod R M T; Tejo, Bimo Ario; Ahmad, Hamdan; Hassan, Sharifah Syed

    2014-12-01

    Aedes aegypti is a principal vector responsible for the transmission of dengue viruses (DENV). To date, vector control remains the key option for dengue disease management. To develop new vector control strategies, a more comprehensive understanding of the biological interactions between DENV and Ae. aegypti is required. In this study, a cDNA library derived from the midgut of female adult Ae. aegypti was used in yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screenings against DENV2 envelope (E) protein. Among the many interacting proteins identified, carboxypeptidase B1 (CPB1) was selected, and its biological interaction with E protein in Ae. aegypti primary midgut cells was further validated. Our double immunofluorescent assay showed that CPB1-E interaction occurred in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of the Ae. aegypti primary midgut cells. Overexpression of CPB1 in mosquito cells resulted in intracellular DENV2 genomic RNA or virus particle accumulation, with a lower amount of virus release. Therefore, we postulated that in Ae. aegypti midgut cells, CPB1 binds to the E protein deposited on the ER intraluminal membranes and inhibits DENV2 RNA encapsulation, thus inhibiting budding from the ER, and may interfere with immature virus transportation to the trans-Golgi network. PMID:25521592

  12. Side Effects of Neem Oil on the Midgut Endocrine Cells of the Green Lacewing Ceraeochrysa claveri (Navás) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae).

    PubMed

    Scudeler, E L; Santos, D C

    2014-04-01

    We described the ultrastructure of Ceraeochrysa claveri (Navás) midgut endocrine cells in larva, pupa, and adult, and evaluated the side effects of ingested neem oil, a botanical insecticide obtained from the seeds of the neem tree (Azadirachta indica), on these cells. During the larval period, C. claveri were fed (ad libitum) Diatraea saccharalis (F.) eggs treated with neem oil at concentrations of 0.5%, 1%, or 2%. Transmission electron microscopy showed that two subtypes of endocrine cells, namely granular and vesicular, occurred in the midgut epithelium during the three stages of the life cycle. Both cell types did not reach the midgut lumen and were positioned basally in the epithelium. The endocrine cells did not show extensive infoldings of the basal plasma membrane, and there were numerous secretory granules in the basal region of the cytoplasm. In the granular endocrine cells, the granules were completely filled with a dense matrix. In the vesicular endocrine cells, the main secretory products consisted of haloed vesicles. Ultrastructural examination indicated that only the granular endocrine cells exhibited signs of morphologic changes of cell injury present in all life cycle stages after the larvae were chronically exposed to neem oil by ingestion. The major cellular damage consisted of dilatation and vesiculation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and the development of smooth endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial swelling. Our data suggest that cytotoxic effects on midgut endocrine cells can contribute to a generalized disruption of the physiological processes in this organ due to a general alteration of endocrine function.

  13. CPB1 of Aedes aegypti interacts with DENV2 E protein and regulates intracellular viral accumulation and release from midgut cells.

    PubMed

    Tham, Hong-Wai; Balasubramaniam, Vinod R M T; Tejo, Bimo Ario; Ahmad, Hamdan; Hassan, Sharifah Syed

    2014-12-16

    Aedes aegypti is a principal vector responsible for the transmission of dengue viruses (DENV). To date, vector control remains the key option for dengue disease management. To develop new vector control strategies, a more comprehensive understanding of the biological interactions between DENV and Ae. aegypti is required. In this study, a cDNA library derived from the midgut of female adult Ae. aegypti was used in yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screenings against DENV2 envelope (E) protein. Among the many interacting proteins identified, carboxypeptidase B1 (CPB1) was selected, and its biological interaction with E protein in Ae. aegypti primary midgut cells was further validated. Our double immunofluorescent assay showed that CPB1-E interaction occurred in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of the Ae. aegypti primary midgut cells. Overexpression of CPB1 in mosquito cells resulted in intracellular DENV2 genomic RNA or virus particle accumulation, with a lower amount of virus release. Therefore, we postulated that in Ae. aegypti midgut cells, CPB1 binds to the E protein deposited on the ER intraluminal membranes and inhibits DENV2 RNA encapsulation, thus inhibiting budding from the ER, and may interfere with immature virus transportation to the trans-Golgi network.

  14. BTB-Zinc Finger Oncogenes Are Required for Ras and Notch-Driven Tumorigenesis in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Doggett, Karen; Turkel, Nezaket; Willoughby, Lee F; Ellul, Jason; Murray, Michael J; Richardson, Helena E; Brumby, Anthony M

    2015-01-01

    During tumorigenesis, pathways that promote the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) can both facilitate metastasis and endow tumor cells with cancer stem cell properties. To gain a greater understanding of how these properties are interlinked in cancers we used Drosophila epithelial tumor models, which are driven by orthologues of human oncogenes (activated alleles of Ras and Notch) in cooperation with the loss of the cell polarity regulator, scribbled (scrib). Within these tumors, both invasive, mesenchymal-like cell morphology and continual tumor overgrowth, are dependent upon Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity. To identify JNK-dependent changes within the tumors we used a comparative microarray analysis to define a JNK gene signature common to both Ras and Notch-driven tumors. Amongst the JNK-dependent changes was a significant enrichment for BTB-Zinc Finger (ZF) domain genes, including chronologically inappropriate morphogenesis (chinmo). chinmo was upregulated by JNK within the tumors, and overexpression of chinmo with either RasV12 or Nintra was sufficient to promote JNK-independent epithelial tumor formation in the eye/antennal disc, and, in cooperation with RasV12, promote tumor formation in the adult midgut epithelium. Chinmo primes cells for oncogene-mediated transformation through blocking differentiation in the eye disc, and promoting an escargot-expressing stem or enteroblast cell state in the adult midgut. BTB-ZF genes are also required for Ras and Notch-driven overgrowth of scrib mutant tissue, since, although loss of chinmo alone did not significantly impede tumor development, when loss of chinmo was combined with loss of a functionally related BTB-ZF gene, abrupt, tumor overgrowth was significantly reduced. abrupt is not a JNK-induced gene, however, Abrupt is present in JNK-positive tumor cells, consistent with a JNK-associated oncogenic role. As some mammalian BTB-ZF proteins are also highly oncogenic, our work suggests that EMT

  15. BTB-Zinc Finger Oncogenes Are Required for Ras and Notch-Driven Tumorigenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Doggett, Karen; Turkel, Nezaket; Willoughby, Lee F.; Ellul, Jason; Murray, Michael J.; Richardson, Helena E.; Brumby, Anthony M.

    2015-01-01

    During tumorigenesis, pathways that promote the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) can both facilitate metastasis and endow tumor cells with cancer stem cell properties. To gain a greater understanding of how these properties are interlinked in cancers we used Drosophila epithelial tumor models, which are driven by orthologues of human oncogenes (activated alleles of Ras and Notch) in cooperation with the loss of the cell polarity regulator, scribbled (scrib). Within these tumors, both invasive, mesenchymal-like cell morphology and continual tumor overgrowth, are dependent upon Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity. To identify JNK-dependent changes within the tumors we used a comparative microarray analysis to define a JNK gene signature common to both Ras and Notch-driven tumors. Amongst the JNK-dependent changes was a significant enrichment for BTB-Zinc Finger (ZF) domain genes, including chronologically inappropriate morphogenesis (chinmo). chinmo was upregulated by JNK within the tumors, and overexpression of chinmo with either RasV12 or Nintra was sufficient to promote JNK-independent epithelial tumor formation in the eye/antennal disc, and, in cooperation with RasV12, promote tumor formation in the adult midgut epithelium. Chinmo primes cells for oncogene-mediated transformation through blocking differentiation in the eye disc, and promoting an escargot-expressing stem or enteroblast cell state in the adult midgut. BTB-ZF genes are also required for Ras and Notch-driven overgrowth of scrib mutant tissue, since, although loss of chinmo alone did not significantly impede tumor development, when loss of chinmo was combined with loss of a functionally related BTB-ZF gene, abrupt, tumor overgrowth was significantly reduced. abrupt is not a JNK-induced gene, however, Abrupt is present in JNK-positive tumor cells, consistent with a JNK-associated oncogenic role. As some mammalian BTB-ZF proteins are also highly oncogenic, our work suggests that EMT

  16. Drosophila suzukii population response to environment and management strategies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, quickly emerged as a devastating invasive pest of small and stone fruits in the Americas and Europe. To better understand the population dynamics of D. suzukii, we reviewed recent work on juvenile development, adult reproduction, and seasonal variation in...

  17. Macrophages and cellular immunity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Gold, Katrina S; Brückner, Katja

    2015-12-01

    The invertebrate Drosophila melanogaster has been a powerful model for understanding blood cell development and immunity. Drosophila is a holometabolous insect, which transitions through a series of life stages from embryo, larva and pupa to adulthood. In spite of this, remarkable parallels exist between Drosophila and vertebrate macrophages, both in terms of development and function. More than 90% of Drosophila blood cells (hemocytes) are macrophages (plasmatocytes), making this highly tractable genetic system attractive for studying a variety of questions in macrophage biology. In vertebrates, recent findings revealed that macrophages have two independent origins: self-renewing macrophages, which reside and proliferate in local microenvironments in a variety of tissues, and macrophages of the monocyte lineage, which derive from hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells. Like vertebrates, Drosophila possesses two macrophage lineages with a conserved dual ontogeny. These parallels allow us to take advantage of the Drosophila model when investigating macrophage lineage specification, maintenance and amplification, and the induction of macrophages and their progenitors by local microenvironments and systemic cues. Beyond macrophage development, Drosophila further serves as a paradigm for understanding the mechanisms underlying macrophage function and cellular immunity in infection, tissue homeostasis and cancer, throughout development and adult life. PMID:27117654

  18. Drosophila myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bothe, Ingo; Baylies, Mary K

    2016-09-12

    The skeletal muscle system is the largest organ in motile animals, constituting between 35 and 55% of the human body mass, and up to 75% of the body mass in flying organisms like Drosophila. The flight muscles alone in flying insects comprise up to 65% of total body mass. Not only is the musculature the largest organ system, it is also exquisitely complex, with single muscles existing in different shapes and sizes. These different morphologies allow for such different functions as the high-frequency beating of a wing in a hummingbird, the dilation of the pupil in a human eye, or the maintenance of posture in a giraffe's neck. PMID:27623256

  19. Genome-wide RNAi screening implicates the E3 ubiquitin ligase Sherpa in mediating innate immune signaling by Toll in Drosophila adults.

    PubMed

    Kanoh, Hirotaka; Tong, Li-Li; Kuraishi, Takayuki; Suda, Yamato; Momiuchi, Yoshiki; Shishido, Fumi; Kurata, Shoichiro

    2015-10-27

    The Drosophila Toll pathway plays important roles in innate immune responses against Gram-positive bacteria and fungi. To identify previously uncharacterized components of this pathway, we performed comparative, ex vivo, genome-wide RNA interference screening. In four screens, we overexpressed the Toll adaptor protein dMyd88, the downstream kinase Pelle, or the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) homolog Dif, or we knocked down Cactus, the Drosophila homolog of mammalian inhibitor of NF-κB. On the basis of these screens, we identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase Sherpa as being necessary for the activation of Toll signaling. A loss-of-function sherpa mutant fly exhibited compromised production of antimicrobial peptides and enhanced susceptibility to infection by Gram-positive bacteria. In cultured cells, Sherpa mediated ubiquitylation of dMyd88 and Sherpa itself, and Sherpa and Drosophila SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) were required for the proper membrane localization of an adaptor complex containing dMyd88. These findings highlight a role for Sherpa in Drosophila host defense and suggest the SUMOylation-mediated regulation of dMyd88 functions in Toll innate immune signaling. PMID:26508789

  20. Alkalinization by chloride/bicarbonate pathway in larval mosquito midgut

    PubMed Central

    Boudko, Dmitri Y.; Moroz, Leonid L.; Harvey, William R.; Linser, Paul J.

    2001-01-01

    The midgut of mosquito larvae maintains a specific lumen alkalinization profile with large longitudinal gradients (pH ≈ 3 units⋅mm−1) in which an extremely alkaline (pH ≈ 11) anterior midgut lies between near-neutral posterior midgut and gastric cecum (pH 7–8). A plasma membrane H+ V-ATPase energizes this alkalinization but the ion carriers involved are unknown. Capillary zone electrophoresis of body samples with outlet conductivity detection showed a specific transepithelial distribution of chloride and bicarbonate/carbonate ions, with high concentrations of both anions in the midgut tissue: 68.3 ± 5.64 and 50.8 ± 4.21 mM, respectively. Chloride was higher in the hemolymph, 57.6 ± 7.84, than in the lumen, 3.51 ± 2.58, whereas bicarbonate was higher in the lumen, 58.1 ± 7.34, than the hemolymph, 3.96 ± 2.89. Time-lapse video assays of pH profiles in vivo revealed that ingestion of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide and the ion exchange inhibitor DIDS (4,4′-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid), at 10−4 M eliminates lumen alkalinization. Basal application of these inhibitors in situ also reduced gradients recorded with self-referencing pH-sensitive microelectrodes near the basal membrane by ≈65% and 85% respectively. Self-referencing chloride-selective microelectrodes revealed a specific spatial profile of transepithelial chloride transport with an efflux maximum in anterior midgut. Both acetazolamide and DIDS reduced chloride effluxes. These data suggest that an H+ V-ATPase-energized anion exchange occurs across the apical membrane of the epithelial cells and implicate an electrophoretic Cl−/HCO\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{_{3}^{-}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} exchanger and carbonic anhydrase as

  1. Genetic characterization and cloning of Mothers against dpp, a gene required for decapentaplegic function in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Sekelsky, J.J.; Newfeld, S.J.; Raftery, L.A.; Chartoff, E.H.; Gelbart, W.M.

    1995-03-01

    The decapentaplegic (dpp) gene of Drosophila melanogaster encodes a growth factor that belongs to the transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) superfamily and that plays a central role in multiple cell-cell signaling events throughout development. Through genetic screens we are seeking to identify other functions that act upstream, downstream or in concert with dpp to mediate its signaling role. We report the genetic characterization and cloning of Mothers against dpp (Mad), a gene identified in two such screens. Mad loss-of-function mutations interact with dpp alleles to enhance embryonic dorsal-ventral patterning defects, as well as adult appendage defects, suggesting a role for Mad in mediating some aspect of dpp function. In support of this, homozygous Mad mutant animals exhibit defects in midgut morphogenesis, imaginal disk development and embryonic dorsal-ventral patterning that are very reminiscent of dpp mutant phenotypes. We cloned the Mad region and identified the Mad transcription unit through germline transformation rescue. We sequenced a Mad cDNA and identified three Mad point mutations that alter the coding information. The predicted MAD polypeptide lacks known protein motifs, but has strong sequence similarity to three polypeptides predicted from genomic sequence from the nematode Caenorhabiditis elegans. Hence, MAD is a member of a novel, highly conserved protein family. 60 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Cryobiological preservation of Drosophila embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, P.; Schreuders, P.D.; Cole, K.W.; Hall, J.W. ); Mahowald, A.P. )

    1992-12-18

    The inability to cryobiologically preserve the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has required that fly stocks be maintained by frequent transfer of adults. This method is costly in terms of time and can lead to loss of stocks. Traditional slow freezing methods do not succeed because the embryos are highly sensitive to chilling. With the procedures described here, 68 percent of precisely staged 15-hour Oregon R (wild-type) embryos hatch after vitrification at -205[degree]C, and 40 percent of the resulting larvae develop into normal adult flies. These embryos are among the most complex organisms successfully preserved by cryobiology.

  3. The Drosophila Midkine/Pleiotrophin Homologues Miple1 and Miple2 Affect Adult Lifespan but Are Dispensable for Alk Signaling during Embryonic Gut Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hugosson, Fredrik; Sjögren, Camilla; Birve, Anna; Hedlund, Ludmilla; Eriksson, Therese; Palmer, Ruth H.

    2014-01-01

    Midkine (MDK) and Pleiotrophin (PTN) are small heparin-binding cytokines with closely related structures. The Drosophila genome harbours two genes encoding members of the MDK/PTN family of proteins, known as miple1 and miple2. We have investigated the role of Miple proteins in vivo, in particular with regard to their proposed role as ligands for the Alk receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK). Here we show that Miple proteins are neither required to drive Alk signaling during Drosophila embryogenesis, nor are they essential for development in the fruit fly. Additionally we show that neither MDK nor PTN can activate hALK in vivo when ectopically co-expressed in the fly. In conclusion, our data suggest that Alk is not activated by MDK/PTN related growth factors Miple1 and Miple 2 in vivo. PMID:25380037

  4. Cellulolytic environment in the midgut of the wood-feeding higher termite Nasutitermes takasagoensis.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Gaku; Watanabe, Hirofumi; Hojo, Masaru; Fujita, Ai; Makiya, Hiromi; Miyagi, Mio; Arakawa, Gaku; Arioka, Manabu

    2012-01-01

    Unlike lower termites, xylophagous higher termites thrive on wood without the aid of symbiotic protists. In the higher termite Nasutitermes takasagoensis, both endogenous endo-β-1,4-glucanase and β-glucosidase genes are expressed in the midgut, which is believed to be the main site of cellulose digestion. To further explore the detailed cellulolytic system in the midgut of N. takasagoensis, we performed immunohistochemistry and digital light microscopy to determine distributions of cellulolytic enzymes in the salivary glands and the midgut as well as the total cellulolytic activity in the midgut. Although cellulolytic enzymes were uniformly produced in the midgut epithelium, the concentration of endo-β-1,4-glucanase activity and luminal volume in the midgut were comparable to those of the wood-feeding lower termite Coptotermes formosanus, which digests cellulose with the aid of hindgut protists. However, the size of ingested wood particles was considerably larger in N. takasagoensis than that in C. formosanus. Nevertheless, it is possible that the cellulolytic system in the midgut of N. takasagoensis hydrolyzes highly crystalline cellulose to a certain extent. The glucose produced did not accumulate in the midgut lumen. Therefore, the present study suggests that the midgut of the higher termite provides the necessary conditions for cellulolysis.

  5. Optogenetics in Drosophila Neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Riemensperger, Thomas; Kittel, Robert J; Fiala, André

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetic techniques enable one to target specific neurons with light-sensitive proteins, e.g., ion channels, ion pumps, or enzymes, and to manipulate their physiological state through illumination. Such artificial interference with selected elements of complex neuronal circuits can help to determine causal relationships between neuronal activity and the effect on the functioning of neuronal circuits controlling animal behavior. The advantages of optogenetics can best be exploited in genetically tractable animals whose nervous systems are, on the one hand, small enough in terms of cell numbers and to a certain degree stereotypically organized, such that distinct and identifiable neurons can be targeted reproducibly. On the other hand, the neuronal circuitry and the behavioral repertoire should be complex enough to enable one to address interesting questions. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is a favorable model organism in this regard. However, the application of optogenetic tools to depolarize or hyperpolarize neurons through light-induced ionic currents has been difficult in adult flies. Only recently, several variants of Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) have been introduced that provide sufficient light sensitivity, expression, and stability to depolarize central brain neurons efficiently in adult Drosophila. Here, we focus on the version currently providing highest photostimulation efficiency, ChR2-XXL. We exemplify the use of this optogenetic tool by applying it to a widely used aversive olfactory learning paradigm. Optogenetic activation of a population of dopamine-releasing neurons mimics the reinforcing properties of a punitive electric shock typically used as an unconditioned stimulus. In temporal coincidence with an odor stimulus this artificially induced neuronal activity causes learning of the odor signal, thereby creating a light-induced memory.

  6. Aspen defense chemicals influence midgut bacterial community composition of gypsy moth.

    PubMed

    Mason, Charles J; Rubert-Nason, Kennedy F; Lindroth, Richard L; Raffa, Kenneth F

    2015-01-01

    Microbial symbionts are becoming increasingly recognized as mediators of many aspects of plant - herbivore interactions. However, the influence of plant chemical defenses on gut associates of insect herbivores is less well understood. We used gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.), and differing trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) genotypes that vary in chemical defenses, to assess the influence of foliar chemistry on bacterial communities of larval midguts. We evaluated the bacterial community composition of foliage, and of midguts of larvae feeding on those leaves, using next-generation high-throughput sequencing. Plant defense chemicals did not influence the composition of foliar communities. In contrast, both phenolic glycosides and condensed tannins affected the bacterial consortia of gypsy moth midguts. The two most abundant operational taxonomic units were classified as Ralstonia and Acinetobacter. The relative abundance of Ralstonia was higher in midguts than in foliage when phenolic glycoside concentrations were low, but lower in midguts when phenolic glycosides were high. In contrast, the relative abundance of Ralstonia was lower in midguts than in foliage when condensed tannin concentrations were low, but higher in midguts when condensed tannins were high. Acinetobacter showed a different relationship with host chemistry, being relatively more abundant in midguts than with foliage when condensed tannin concentrations were low, but lower in midguts when condensed tannins were high. Acinetobacter tended to have a greater relative abundance in midguts of insects feeding on genotypes with high phenolic glycoside concentrations. These results show that plant defense chemicals influence herbivore midgut communities, which may in turn influence host utilization. PMID:25475786

  7. Transport of H(+), Na(+) and K(+) across the posterior midgut of blood-fed mosquitoes (Aedes aegypti).

    PubMed

    Pacey, Evan K; O'Donnell, Michael J

    2014-02-01

    Following ingestion of a blood meal, the adult female mosquito undergoes a massive diuresis during which Na(+), Cl(-) and water are secreted at high rates by the Malpighian tubules. In the hours following completion of diuresis, digestion of the K(+)-rich blood cells provides a source of energy as well as amino acids for proteins in the developing eggs. Although the transport of inorganic ions by the Malpighian tubules of blood-fed mosquitoes has been extensively characterized, relatively little is known of the epithelial transport mechanisms responsible for movement of Na(+), H(+), and K(+) across the posterior midgut. In this paper we have used the Scanning Ion-selective Electrode Technique (SIET) to measure the basal (unstimulated) rates of transport of K(+), Na(+) and H(+) across the isolated posterior midgut at intervals after the blood meal. We have also measured luminal concentrations of Na(+) and K(+) and the transepithelial electrical potential at the same time points and have calculated the electrochemical potentials for Na(+), K(+) and H(+) across the midgut. SIET measurements reveal absorption (lumen to bath) of Na(+) and H(+) and secretion of K(+) for the first 2h after blood-feeding. By 24h after the meal, absorption of Na(+) and H(+) remains active while there is an electrochemical gradient favouring absorption of K(+). Inhibition by ouabain and Ba(2+) suggest a role for the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and K(+) channels in absorption of Na(+) and K(+), respectively. Inhibition of H(+) absorption by acetazolamide implicates carbonic anhydrase in transepithelial H(+) transport.

  8. Enteritis necroticans with midgut necrosis caused by Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Clarke, L E; Diekmann-Guiroy, B; McNamee, W; Java, D J; Weiss, S M

    1994-05-01

    Enteritis necroticans is a necrotizing process manifesting as segmental gangrene of the bowel, triggered by Clostridium perfringens toxins under specific dietary conditions. It is a rare disease in developed countries and is probably underdiagnosed. A case of enteritis necroticans presenting with midgut necrosis with sepsis and hemolysis is reported herein. Bacteriologic culture of blood and peritoneal content revealed C perfringens. Dietary history, including the ingestion of meat together with sweet potatoes, should increase clinical suspicion of enteritis necroticans. Early recognition and timely surgical intervention are required for successful treatment. Clinicians are encouraged to be aware of this clinically fulminant yet rarely recognized surgical entity.

  9. Togavirus-associated pathologic changes in the midgut of a natural mosquito vector.

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, S C; Scott, T W; Lorenz, L H; Lerdthusnee, K; Romoser, W S

    1988-01-01

    Arthropod-borne viruses were not previously believed to cause discernible pathologic changes in their natural mosquito vectors. We report cytopathologic lesions in the midgut of the mosquito, Culiseta melanura, 2 to 5 days after oral infection with eastern equine encephalomyelitis virus. Sloughing of densely staining, heavily infected epithelial cells into the midgut lumen was observed by light and transmission electron microscopy, along with degeneration of cells within the epithelium. Pathological changes in midgut epithelial cells sometimes included loss of brush border and basal lamina integrity. Disruption of the midgut basal lamina could result in bypassing of barriers to virus dissemination within the mosquito and allow rapid transmission to occur. Alternatively, luminal sloughing of heavily infected midgut epithelial cells may serve to modulate mosquito infections. These findings challenge previous beliefs regarding the benign nature of arbovirus-invertebrate host relationships. Images PMID:2896802

  10. Ultrastructure and immunofluorescence of the midgut of Bombus morio (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Bombini).

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Wagner Gonzaga; Fernandes, Kenner Morais; Barcellos, Marcelo Silva; Silva, Fernanda Pereira; Magalhães-Junior, Marcos Jorge; Zanuncio, José Cola; Martins, Gustavo Ferreira; Serrão, José Eduardo

    2014-06-01

    Bumblebees are widely distributed across the world and have great economic and ecological importance as pollinators in the forest as well as in agriculture. The insect midgut consists of three cell types, which play various important roles in digestion, absorption, and hormone production. The present study characterized the anterior and posterior midgut regions of the bumblebee, Bombus morio. The digestive, regenerative and endocrine cells in the midgut showed regional differences in their number, nuclear size, as well as the size of the striated border. Ultrastructurally, the digestive cells contained many mitochondria and long microvilli; however, in the anterior midgut region, these cells showed dilated basal labyrinths with a few openings for the hemocoel, whereas the labyrinths of the basal posterior region remained inverse characteristics. Thus, the characterization of the midgut of B. morio supported an ecto-endoperitrophic circulation, contributing to a better understanding of the digestive process in this bee.

  11. Togavirus-associated pathologic changes in the midgut of a natural mosquito vector.

    PubMed

    Weaver, S C; Scott, T W; Lorenz, L H; Lerdthusnee, K; Romoser, W S

    1988-06-01

    Arthropod-borne viruses were not previously believed to cause discernible pathologic changes in their natural mosquito vectors. We report cytopathologic lesions in the midgut of the mosquito, Culiseta melanura, 2 to 5 days after oral infection with eastern equine encephalomyelitis virus. Sloughing of densely staining, heavily infected epithelial cells into the midgut lumen was observed by light and transmission electron microscopy, along with degeneration of cells within the epithelium. Pathological changes in midgut epithelial cells sometimes included loss of brush border and basal lamina integrity. Disruption of the midgut basal lamina could result in bypassing of barriers to virus dissemination within the mosquito and allow rapid transmission to occur. Alternatively, luminal sloughing of heavily infected midgut epithelial cells may serve to modulate mosquito infections. These findings challenge previous beliefs regarding the benign nature of arbovirus-invertebrate host relationships.

  12. Specification of the somatic musculature in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Dobi, Krista C; Schulman, Victoria K; Baylies, Mary K

    2015-01-01

    The somatic muscle system formed during Drosophila embryogenesis is required for larvae to hatch, feed, and crawl. This system is replaced in the pupa by a new adult muscle set, responsible for activities such as feeding, walking, and flight. Both the larval and adult muscle systems are comprised of distinct muscle fibers to serve these specific motor functions. In this way, the Drosophila musculature is a valuable model for patterning within a single tissue: while all muscle cells share properties such as the contractile apparatus, properties such as size, position, and number of nuclei are unique for a particular muscle. In the embryo, diversification of muscle fibers relies first on signaling cascades that pattern the mesoderm. Subsequently, the combinatorial expression of specific transcription factors leads muscle fibers to adopt particular sizes, shapes, and orientations. Adult muscle precursors (AMPs), set aside during embryonic development, proliferate during the larval phases and seed the formation of the abdominal, leg, and flight muscles in the adult fly. Adult muscle fibers may either be formed de novo from the fusion of the AMPs, or are created by the binding of AMPs to an existing larval muscle. While less is known about adult muscle specification compared to the larva, expression of specific transcription factors is also important for its diversification. Increasingly, the mechanisms required for the diversification of fly muscle have found parallels in vertebrate systems and mark Drosophila as a robust model system to examine questions about how diverse cell types are generated within an organism.

  13. The binding site of a steroid hormone receptor-like protein within the Drosophila Adh adult enhancer is required for high levels of tissue-specific alcohol dehydrogenase expression.

    PubMed Central

    Ayer, S; Benyajati, C

    1992-01-01

    Developmental and tissue-specific transcription from the Adh distal promoter is regulated in part by the Adh adult enhancer, located 450 to 600 bp upstream from the distal RNA start site. We have characterized four proteins (DEP1 to DEP4), present in Drosophila tissue culture cell nuclear extracts, which bind to this enhancer. DEP1 and DEP2 bind to a positive cis-acting element (-492 to -481) and share nucleotide contacts. A small linker replacement deletion mutation, which disrupts the overlapping DEP1- and DEP2-binding sites, reduces Adh distal transcription in an alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-expressing cultured cell line, in the adult fat body (the major tissue of ADH expression), as well as in some but not all adult tissues where ADH is normally expressed. This enhancer element contains an imperfect palindromic sequence similar to steroid hormone receptor superfamily response elements. Binding-site screening of a lambda gt11 expression library has identified the steroid receptor superfamily member fushi tarazu factor 1 (FTZ-F1) as a protein that binds to this site. Anti-FTZ-F1 antibodies have identified DEP1 as FTZ-F1. DEP2 also binds to the FTZ-F1 site from the fushi tarazu zebra element, suggesting that DEP2 may also be a steroid receptor superfamily member. Our results raise the possibility that Adh regulation in certain adult tissues involves a hormone-mediated pathway. Because DEP1 (FTZ-F1) and DEP2 contact some of the same nucleotides within the positive cis element, it is unlikely that they can bind simultaneously. Such alternative binding may play a role in the tissue-specific and developmental transcription of Adh. Images PMID:1732738

  14. Morpho-functional characterization and esterase patterns of the midgut of Tribolium castaneum Herbst, 1797 (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) parasitized by Gregarina cuneata (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinidae).

    PubMed

    Gigliolli, Adriana A Sinópolis; Lapenta, Ana Silva; Ruvolo-Takasusuki, Maria Claudia Colla; Abrahão, Josielle; Conte, Hélio

    2015-09-01

    Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) is a common pest of stored grains and byproducts and is normally infected by Gregarina cuneata (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinidae). The life cycle of this parasite includes the sporozoite, trophozoite, gamont, gametocyte, and oocyst stages, which occur between the epithelium and lumen of the host's midgut. This study aims to describe the morphofunctional alterations in the midgut and determine the esterase patterns in T. castaneum when parasitized by gregarines. To achieve this purpose, midguts of adult insects were isolated, processed, and analysed using light and electron microscopy. We determined total protein content, amylase activity, and the expression and related activities of the esterases by using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The midgut of T. castaneum is formed by digestive, regenerative, and endocrine cells. The effects of parasitism on the digestive cells are severe, because the gregarines remain attached to these cells to absorb all the nutrients they need throughout their development. In these cells, the most common alterations observed include expansion and fragmentation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum, development of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum, changes in mitochondrial cristae, cytoplasmic vacuolization, formation of myelin structures, spherites, large intercellular spaces, autophagic vesicles, expansion of the basal labyrinth, and cytoplasmic protrusions. Deposits of glycogen granules were also observed. Amylase activity was reduced in parasitized insects. Regenerative cells were found in disorganized crypts and did not differentiate into new cells, thus, compromising the restoration of the damaged epithelium. Though few morphological alterations were observed in the endocrine cells, results suggest that the synthesis and/or release of hormones might be impaired. Nine esterases (EST-1 to 9) were identified in the midgut of T. castaneum and were expressed in varying levels in response

  15. Drosophila C Virus Systemic Infection Leads to Intestinal Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Chtarbanova, Stanislava; Lamiable, Olivier; Lee, Kwang-Zin; Galiana, Delphine; Troxler, Laurent; Meignin, Carine; Hetru, Charles; Hoffmann, Jules A.; Daeffler, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Drosophila C virus (DCV) is a positive-sense RNA virus belonging to the Dicistroviridae family. This natural pathogen of the model organism Drosophila melanogaster is commonly used to investigate antiviral host defense in flies, which involves both RNA interference and inducible responses. Although lethality is used routinely as a readout for the efficiency of the antiviral immune response in these studies, virus-induced pathologies in flies still are poorly understood. Here, we characterize the pathogenesis associated with systemic DCV infection. Comparison of the transcriptome of flies infected with DCV or two other positive-sense RNA viruses, Flock House virus and Sindbis virus, reveals that DCV infection, unlike those of the other two viruses, represses the expression of a large number of genes. Several of these genes are expressed specifically in the midgut and also are repressed by starvation. We show that systemic DCV infection triggers a nutritional stress in Drosophila which results from intestinal obstruction with the accumulation of peritrophic matrix at the entry of the midgut and the accumulation of the food ingested in the crop, a blind muscular food storage organ. The related virus cricket paralysis virus (CrPV), which efficiently grows in Drosophila, does not trigger this pathology. We show that DCV, but not CrPV, infects the smooth muscles surrounding the crop, causing extensive cytopathology and strongly reducing the rate of contractions. We conclude that the pathogenesis associated with systemic DCV infection results from the tropism of the virus for an important organ within the foregut of dipteran insects, the crop. IMPORTANCE DCV is one of the few identified natural viral pathogens affecting the model organism Drosophila melanogaster. As such, it is an important virus for the deciphering of host-virus interactions in insects. We characterize here the pathogenesis associated with DCV infection in flies and show that it results from the

  16. Optogenetic pacing in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Alex, Aneesh; Li, Airong; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Electrical stimulation is currently the gold standard for cardiac pacing. However, it is invasive and nonspecific for cardiac tissues. We recently developed a noninvasive cardiac pacing technique using optogenetic tools, which are widely used in neuroscience. Optogenetic pacing of the heart provides high spatial and temporal precisions, is specific for cardiac tissues, avoids artifacts associated with electrical stimulation, and therefore promises to be a powerful tool in basic cardiac research. We demonstrated optogenetic control of heart rhythm in a well-established model organism, Drosophila melanogaster. We developed transgenic flies expressing a light-gated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), specifically in their hearts and demonstrated successful optogenetic pacing of ChR2-expressing Drosophila at different developmental stages, including the larva, pupa, and adult stages. A high-speed and ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence microscopy imaging system that is capable of providing images at a rate of 130 frames/s with axial and transverse resolutions of 1.5 and 3.9 μm, respectively, was used to noninvasively monitor Drosophila cardiac function and its response to pacing stimulation. The development of a noninvasive integrated optical pacing and imaging system provides a novel platform for performing research studies in developmental cardiology. PMID:26601299

  17. The Relationship between Dipeptidase Activity Variation and Larval Viability in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Hiraizumi, Kazuo; Laurie, Cathy C.

    1987-01-01

    The enzyme dipeptidase-A (DIP-A) in Drosophila melanogaster is coded by a second chromosome locus that is polymorphic for three allozymes in natural populations. DIP-A appears to be the only enzyme in D. melanogaster capable of hydrolyzing the dipeptide glycyl-l-isoleucine, since flies homozygous for null alleles at this locus have no detectable glycyl- l-isoleucine-ase activity. DIP-A activity occurs in many tissues and throughout development, but is particularly high in the larval midgut, suggesting an important role in protein digestion. These observations suggested an experimental design for investigating the adaptive significance of genetic variation in DIP-A activity. Fitness components of DIP-A variants could be estimated and compared under two environmental conditions (defined diets under axenic conditions). In the restrictive environment, the essential amino acid l-isoleucine is provided only in the form of glycyl-l-isoleucine, whereas in the permissive environment, l-isoleucine is provided in free form. We predicted that DIP-A activity would be essential in the restrictive, but not in the permissive environment. The results reported here clearly contradict this prediction. Two stocks homozygous for DIP-A null alleles from different geographic locations are each viable on the restrictive diet. Furthermore, relative viability experiments in which null allele larvae compete with larvae having DIP-A activity provide no evidence for even a partial reduction in egg to adult survival on the restrictive diet. Apparently, the null allele larvae have some alternative mechanism for obtaining l-isoleucine from the dipeptide, even though no glycyl-l-isoleucine-ase activity can be detected in vitro. These results, along with the viability of null alleles for many other enzymes, support the idea that eukaryotes have an intricate network of alternative biochemical pathways through which the same necessary function may be achieved. Such "buffering capacity" makes it very

  18. Tsetse EP Protein Protects the Fly Midgut from Trypanosome Establishment

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Lee R.; Lehane, Stella M.; Pearson, Terry W.; Lehane, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    African trypanosomes undergo a complex developmental process in their tsetse fly vector before transmission back to a vertebrate host. Typically, 90% of fly infections fail, most during initial establishment of the parasite in the fly midgut. The specific mechanism(s) underpinning this failure are unknown. We have previously shown that a Glossina-specific, immunoresponsive molecule, tsetse EP protein, is up regulated by the fly in response to gram-negative microbial challenge. Here we show by knockdown using RNA interference that this tsetse EP protein acts as a powerful antagonist of establishment in the fly midgut for both Trypanosoma brucei brucei and T. congolense. We demonstrate that this phenomenon exists in two species of tsetse, Glossina morsitans morsitans and G. palpalis palpalis, suggesting tsetse EP protein may be a major determinant of vector competence in all Glossina species. Tsetse EP protein levels also decline in response to starvation of the fly, providing a possible explanation for increased susceptibility of starved flies to trypanosome infection. As starvation is a common field event, this fact may be of considerable importance in the epidemiology of African trypanosomiasis. PMID:20221444

  19. Drosophila Models of Cardiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Nicole; Wessells, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has emerged as a useful model for cardiac diseases, both developmental abnormalities and adult functional impairment. Using the tools of both classical and molecular genetics, the study of the developing fly heart has been instrumental in identifying the major signaling events of cardiac field formation, cardiomyocyte specification, and the formation of the functioning heart tube. The larval stage of fly cardiac development has become an important model system for testing isolated preparations of living hearts for the effects of biological and pharmacological compounds on cardiac activity. Meanwhile, the recent development of effective techniques to study adult cardiac performance in the fly has opened new uses for the Drosophila model system. The fly system is now being used to study long-term alterations in adult performance caused by factors such as diet, exercise, and normal aging. The fly is a unique and valuable system for the study of such complex, long-term interactions, as it is the only invertebrate genetic model system with a working heart developmentally homologous to the vertebrate heart. Thus, the fly model combines the advantages of invertebrate genetics (such as large populations, facile molecular genetic techniques, and short lifespan) with physiological measurement techniques that allow meaningful comparisons with data from vertebrate model systems. As such, the fly model is well situated to make important contributions to the understanding of complicated interactions between environmental factors and genetics in the long-term regulation of cardiac performance. PMID:21377627

  20. Heterogeneous expression of Drosophila gustatory receptors in enteroendocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong-Ho; Kwon, Jae Young

    2011-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is emerging as a major site of chemosensation in mammalian studies. Enteroendocrine cells are chemosensory cells in the gut which produce regulatory peptides in response to luminal contents to regulate gut physiology, food intake, and glucose homeostasis, among other possible functions. Increasing evidence shows that mammalian taste receptors and taste signaling molecules are expressed in enteroendocrine cells in the gut. Invertebrate models such as Drosophila can provide a simple and genetically tractable system to study the chemosensory functions of enteroendocrine cells in vivo. To establish Drosophila enteroendocrine cells as a model for studying gut chemosensation, we used the GAL4/UAS system to examine the expression of all 68 Gustatory receptors (Grs) in the intestine. We find that 12 Gr-GAL4 drivers label subsets of enteroendocrine cells in the midgut, and examine colocalization of these drivers with the regulatory peptides neuropeptide F (NPF), locustatachykinin (LTK), and diuretic hormone 31 (DH31). RT-PCR analysis provides additional evidence for the presence of Gr transcripts in the gut. Our results suggest that the Drosophila Grs have chemosensory roles in the intestine to regulate physiological functions such as food uptake, nutrient absorption, or sugar homeostasis. PMID:22194978

  1. Characterization of an Obligate Intracellular Bacterium in the Midgut Epithelium of the Bulrush Bug Chilacis typhae (Heteroptera, Lygaeidae, Artheneinae)▿

    PubMed Central

    Kuechler, Stefan Martin; Dettner, Konrad; Kehl, Siegfried

    2011-01-01

    Many members of the suborder Heteroptera have symbiotic bacteria, which are usually found extracellularly in specific sacs or tubular outgrowths of the midgut or intracellularly in mycetomes. In this study, we describe the second molecular characterization of a symbiotic bacterium in a monophagous, seed-sucking stink bug of the family Lygaeidae (sensu stricto). Chilacis typhae possesses at the end of the first section of the midgut a structure which is composed of circularly arranged, strongly enlarged midgut epithelial cells. It is filled with an intracellular endosymbiont. This “mycetocytic belt” might represent an evolutionarily intermediate stage of the usual symbiotic structures found in stink bugs. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA and the groEL genes showed that the bacterium belongs to the Gammaproteobacteria, and it revealed a phylogenetic relationship with a secondary bacterial endosymbiont of Cimex lectularius and free-living plant pathogens such as Pectobacterium and Dickeya. The distribution and ultrastructure of the rod-shaped Chilacis endosymbiont were studied in adults and nymph stages using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and electron microscopy. The detection of symbionts at the anterior poles of developing eggs indicates that endosymbionts are transmitted vertically. A new genus and species name, “Candidatus Rohrkolberia cinguli,” is proposed for this newly characterized clade of symbiotic bacteria. PMID:21378044

  2. Tissue-Specific Expression Phenotypes of Hawaiian Drosophila Adh Genes in Drosophila Melanogaster Transformants

    PubMed Central

    Wu, C. Y.; Mote-Jr., J.; Brennan, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    Interspecific differences in the tissue-specific patterns of expression displayed by the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) genes within the Hawaiian picture-winged Drosophila represent a rich source of evolutionary variation in gene regulation. Study of the cis-acting elements responsible for regulatory differences between Adh genes from various species is greatly facilitated by analyzing the behavior of the different Adh genes in a homogeneous background. Accordingly, the Adh gene from Drosophila grimshawi was introduced into the germ line of Drosophila melanogaster by means of P element-mediated transformation, and transformants carrying this gene were compared to transformants carrying the Adh genes from Drosophila affinidisjuncta and Drosophila hawaiiensis. The results indicate that the D. affinidisjuncta and D. grimshawi genes have relatively higher levels of expression and broader tissue distribution of expression than the D. hawaiiensis gene in larvae. All three genes are expressed at similar overall levels in adults, with differences in tissue distribution of enzyme activity corresponding to the pattern in the donor species. However, certain systematic differences between Adh gene expression in transformants and in the Hawaiian Drosophila are noted along with tissue-specific position effects in some cases. The implications of these findings for the understanding of evolved regulatory variation are discussed. PMID:2165967

  3. Genotoxic effects of cisplatin in somatic tissue of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    Third instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster transdihybrid for mwh and flr were exposed to varying concentrations of cisplatin by feeding on dry media wetted with aqueous solutions of the test compound. Larval feeding continued until pupation, and surviving transdihybrid adults were collected seven days following commencement of feeding. Wings of adults were removed and scored under 400X magnification for the presence of twin spots and single spots comprised of clones of cells possessing malformed wing hairs. Cisplatin was found to induce both twin spots and single spots, and significant linear concentration-response relationships were obtained with respect to the induction of all endpoints. This capacity to induce mitotic exchange in the somatic tissue of Drosophila compares well with the compound's reported ability to induce chromosome breaks in Drosophila germ cells. However, not all compounds possess similar genotoxic profiles in the somatic an germ tissue of Drosophila.

  4. Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis by the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella: comparison of midgut proteinases from susceptible and resistant larvae.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D E; Brookhart, G L; Kramer, K J; Barnett, B D; McGaughey, W H

    1990-03-01

    Midgut homogenates from susceptible and resistant strains of the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella, were compared for their ability to activate the entomocidal parasporal crystal protein from Bacillus thuringiensis. The properties of midgut proteinases from both types of larvae were also examined. Electrophoretic patterns of crystal protein from B. thuringiensis subspecies kurstaki (HD-1) and aizawai (HD-133 and HD-144) were virtually unchanged following digestion by either type of midgut homogenate. Changes in pH (9.5 to 11.5) or midgut homogenate concentration during digestion failed to substantially alter protein electrophoretic patterns of B. thuringiensis HD-1 crystal toxin. In vitro toxicity of crystal protein activated by either type of midgut preparation was equal toward cultured insect cells from either Manduca sexta or Choristoneura fumiferana. Electrophoresis of midgut extracts in polyacrylamide gels containing gelatin as substrate also yielded matching mobility patterns of proteinases from both types of midguts. Quantitation of midgut proteolytic activity using tritiated casein as a substrate revealed variation between midgut preparations, but no statistically significant differences between proteolytic activities from susceptible and resistant Indian meal moth larvae. Inhibition studies indicated that a trypsin-like proteinase with maximal activity at pH 10 is a major constituent of Indian meal moth midguts. The results demonstrated that midguts from susceptible and resistant strains of P. interpunctella are similar both in their ability to activate B. thuringiensis protoxin and in their proteolytic activity.

  5. Side Effects of Neem Oil on the Midgut Endocrine Cells of the Green Lacewing Ceraeochrysa claveri (Navás) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae).

    PubMed

    Scudeler, E L; Santos, D C

    2014-04-01

    We described the ultrastructure of Ceraeochrysa claveri (Navás) midgut endocrine cells in larva, pupa, and adult, and evaluated the side effects of ingested neem oil, a botanical insecticide obtained from the seeds of the neem tree (Azadirachta indica), on these cells. During the larval period, C. claveri were fed (ad libitum) Diatraea saccharalis (F.) eggs treated with neem oil at concentrations of 0.5%, 1%, or 2%. Transmission electron microscopy showed that two subtypes of endocrine cells, namely granular and vesicular, occurred in the midgut epithelium during the three stages of the life cycle. Both cell types did not reach the midgut lumen and were positioned basally in the epithelium. The endocrine cells did not show extensive infoldings of the basal plasma membrane, and there were numerous secretory granules in the basal region of the cytoplasm. In the granular endocrine cells, the granules were completely filled with a dense matrix. In the vesicular endocrine cells, the main secretory products consisted of haloed vesicles. Ultrastructural examination indicated that only the granular endocrine cells exhibited signs of morphologic changes of cell injury present in all life cycle stages after the larvae were chronically exposed to neem oil by ingestion. The major cellular damage consisted of dilatation and vesiculation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and the development of smooth endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial swelling. Our data suggest that cytotoxic effects on midgut endocrine cells can contribute to a generalized disruption of the physiological processes in this organ due to a general alteration of endocrine function. PMID:27193522

  6. Ultrastructural changes of the midgut epithelium in Isohypsibius granulifer granulifer Thulin, 1928 (Tardigrada: Eutardigrada) during oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rost-Roszkowska, Magdalena M; Poprawa, Izabela; Wójtowicz, Maria; Kaczmarek, Lukasz

    2011-04-01

    The midgut epithelium of Isohypsibius granulifer granulifer (Eutardigrada) is composed of columnar digestive cells. At its anterior end, a group of cells with cytoplasm which differs from the cytoplasm of digestive cells is present. Probably, those cells respond to crescent-like cells (midgut regenerative cells) described for some tardigrade species. Their mitotic divisions have not been observed. We analyzed the ultrastructure of midgut digestive cells in relation to five different stages of oogenesis (previtellogenesis, beginning of the vitellogenesis, vitellogenesis--early choriogenesis, vitellogenesis--middle choriogenesis, late choriogenesis). In the midgut epithelium cells, the gradual accumulation of glycogen granules, lipid droplets and structures of varying electron density occurs. During vitellogenesis and choriogenesis, in the cytoplasm of midgut cells we observed the increasing number of organelles which are responsible for the intensive synthesis of lipids, proteins and saccharides such as cisterns of endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complexes. At the end of oogenesis, autophagy also intensifies in midgut epithelial cells, which is probably caused by the great amount of reserve material. Midgut epithelium of analyzed species takes part in the yolk precursor synthesis. PMID:20661605

  7. Altered protoxin activation by midgut enzymes from a Bacillus thuringiensis resistant strain of Plodia interpunctella.

    PubMed

    Oppert, B; Kramer, K J; Johnson, D E; MacIntosh, S C; McGaughey, W H

    1994-02-15

    Processing of Bacillus thuringiensis protoxins to toxins by midgut proteinases from a strain of the Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hubner), resistant to B. thuringiensis subspecies entomocidus (HD-198) was slower than that by midgut proteinases from the susceptible parent strain or a strain resistant to B. thuringiensis subspecies kurstaki (HD-1, Dipel). Midgut extracts from entomocidus-resistant insects exhibited five-fold lower activity toward the synthetic substrate alpha-N-benzoyl-DL-arginine rho-nitroanilide than extracts from susceptible or kurstaki-resistant insects. Midgut enzymes from susceptible or kurstaki-resistant insects converted the 133 kDa CryIA(c) protoxin to 61-63 kDa proteins, while incubations with entomocidus-resistant enzymes resulted in predominantly products of intermediate size, even with increased amounts of midgut extract. The 61-63 kDa proteins were only produced by entomocidus-resistant midgut extracts after long term incubations with the protoxin. The data suggest that altered protoxin activation by midgut proteinases is involved in some types of insect resistance to B. thuringiensis.

  8. Ultrastructural changes of the midgut epithelium in Isohypsibius granulifer granulifer Thulin, 1928 (Tardigrada: Eutardigrada) during oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rost-Roszkowska, Magdalena M; Poprawa, Izabela; Wójtowicz, Maria; Kaczmarek, Lukasz

    2011-04-01

    The midgut epithelium of Isohypsibius granulifer granulifer (Eutardigrada) is composed of columnar digestive cells. At its anterior end, a group of cells with cytoplasm which differs from the cytoplasm of digestive cells is present. Probably, those cells respond to crescent-like cells (midgut regenerative cells) described for some tardigrade species. Their mitotic divisions have not been observed. We analyzed the ultrastructure of midgut digestive cells in relation to five different stages of oogenesis (previtellogenesis, beginning of the vitellogenesis, vitellogenesis--early choriogenesis, vitellogenesis--middle choriogenesis, late choriogenesis). In the midgut epithelium cells, the gradual accumulation of glycogen granules, lipid droplets and structures of varying electron density occurs. During vitellogenesis and choriogenesis, in the cytoplasm of midgut cells we observed the increasing number of organelles which are responsible for the intensive synthesis of lipids, proteins and saccharides such as cisterns of endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complexes. At the end of oogenesis, autophagy also intensifies in midgut epithelial cells, which is probably caused by the great amount of reserve material. Midgut epithelium of analyzed species takes part in the yolk precursor synthesis.

  9. Acquisition and structuring of midgut bacterial communities in gypsy moth (Lepidoptera: Erebidae) larvae.

    PubMed

    Mason, Charles J; Raffa, Kenneth F

    2014-06-01

    Insects are associated with a diversity of bacteria that colonize their midguts. The extent to which these communities reflect maternal transmission, environmental acquisition, and subsequent structuring by the extreme conditions within the insect gut are poorly understood in many species. We used gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) as a model to investigate interactions between egg mass and environmental sources of bacteria on larval midgut communities. Egg masses were collected from several wild and laboratory populations, and the effects of diet, initial egg mass community, and internal host environment were evaluated using 454 16S-rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Wild populations were highly diverse, while laboratory-maintained egg masses were associated with few operational taxonomic units. As larvae developed, their midgut bacterial communities became more similar to each other and the consumed diet despite initial differences in egg mass-associated bacteria. Subsequent experiments revealed that while midgut membership was more similar to bacteria associated with diet than with egg mass-associated bacteria, we were unable to detect distinct, persistent differences attributable to specific host plants. The differences between foliar communities and midgut communities of larvae that ingested them were owing to relative changes in populations of several bacteria phylotypes. We conclude that gypsy moth has a relatively characteristic midgut bacterial community that is reflective of, but ultimately distinct from, its foliar diet. This work demonstrates that environmental acquisition of diverse microbes can lead to similar midgut bacterial assemblages, underscoring the importance of host physiological environment in structuring bacterial communities. PMID:24780292

  10. Acquisition and structuring of midgut bacterial communities in gypsy moth (Lepidoptera: Erebidae) larvae.

    PubMed

    Mason, Charles J; Raffa, Kenneth F

    2014-06-01

    Insects are associated with a diversity of bacteria that colonize their midguts. The extent to which these communities reflect maternal transmission, environmental acquisition, and subsequent structuring by the extreme conditions within the insect gut are poorly understood in many species. We used gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) as a model to investigate interactions between egg mass and environmental sources of bacteria on larval midgut communities. Egg masses were collected from several wild and laboratory populations, and the effects of diet, initial egg mass community, and internal host environment were evaluated using 454 16S-rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Wild populations were highly diverse, while laboratory-maintained egg masses were associated with few operational taxonomic units. As larvae developed, their midgut bacterial communities became more similar to each other and the consumed diet despite initial differences in egg mass-associated bacteria. Subsequent experiments revealed that while midgut membership was more similar to bacteria associated with diet than with egg mass-associated bacteria, we were unable to detect distinct, persistent differences attributable to specific host plants. The differences between foliar communities and midgut communities of larvae that ingested them were owing to relative changes in populations of several bacteria phylotypes. We conclude that gypsy moth has a relatively characteristic midgut bacterial community that is reflective of, but ultimately distinct from, its foliar diet. This work demonstrates that environmental acquisition of diverse microbes can lead to similar midgut bacterial assemblages, underscoring the importance of host physiological environment in structuring bacterial communities.

  11. Fine-Tuning of PI3K/AKT Signalling by the Tumour Suppressor PTEN Is Required for Maintenance of Flight Muscle Function and Mitochondrial Integrity in Ageing Adult Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mensah, Lawrence B.; Davison, Claire; Fan, Shih-Jung; Morris, John F.; Goberdhan, Deborah C. I.; Wilson, Clive

    2015-01-01

    Insulin/insulin-like growth factor signalling (IIS), acting primarily through the PI3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT kinase signalling cassette, plays key evolutionarily conserved regulatory roles in nutrient homeostasis, growth, ageing and longevity. The dysfunction of this pathway has been linked to several age-related human diseases including cancer, Type 2 diabetes and neurodegenerative disorders. However, it remains unclear whether minor defects in IIS can independently induce the age-dependent functional decline in cells that accompany some of these diseases or whether IIS alters the sensitivity to other aberrant signalling. We identified a novel hypomorphic allele of PI3K’s direct antagonist, Phosphatase and tensin homologue on chromosome 10 (Pten), in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Adults carrying combinations of this allele, Pten5, combined with strong loss-of-function Pten mutations exhibit subtle or no increase in mass, but are highly susceptible to a wide range of stresses. They also exhibit dramatic upregulation of the oxidative stress response gene, GstD1, and a progressive loss of motor function that ultimately leads to defects in climbing and flight ability. The latter phenotype is associated with mitochondrial disruption in indirect flight muscles, although overall muscle structure appears to be maintained. We show that the phenotype is partially rescued by muscle-specific expression of the Bcl-2 homologue Buffy, which in flies, maintains mitochondrial integrity, modulates energy homeostasis and suppresses cell death. The flightless phenotype is also suppressed by mutations in downstream IIS signalling components, including those in the mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway, suggesting that elevated IIS is responsible for functional decline in flight muscle. Our data demonstrate that IIS levels must be precisely regulated by Pten in adults to maintain the function of the highly metabolically active indirect flight muscles

  12. Antioxidant defenses in caterpillars: role of the ascorbate-recycling system in the midgut lumen.

    PubMed

    Barbehenn, R V; Bumgarner, S L; Roosen, E F; Martin, M M

    2001-04-01

    This study demonstrates that an ascorbate-recycling system in the midgut lumen can act as an effective antioxidant defense in caterpillars that feed on prooxidant-rich foods. In tannin-sensitive larvae of the forest tent caterpillar, Malacosoma disstria (Lasiocampidae), ingested tannic acid is oxidized in the midgut lumen, generating significant quantities of peroxides, including hydrogen peroxide, which readily diffuses across cell membranes and is a powerful cytotoxin. By contrast, in the tannin-tolerant larvae of the white-marked tussock moth, Orgyia leucostigma (Lymantriidae), tannic acid oxidation and the generation of peroxides are suppressed. The superior defense of O. leucostigma against oxidative stress imposed by the oxidation of ingested polyphenols can be explained by the presence of higher concentrations of ascorbate and glutathione in the midgut lumen. In O. leucostigma at least 50% of the ingested ascorbate present in the anterior midgut is still present in the posterior midgut, whereas in M. disstria, only 10% of the ascorbate is present in the posterior half of the midgut. We propose that the maintenance of higher levels of ascorbate in the midgut lumen of O. leucostigma than in M. disstria is explained by the secretion of glutathione into the midgut lumen by O. leucostigma, thereby forming a complete ascorbate-recycling system. The concentration of glutathione in the midgut lumen of O. leucostigma is 3.5-fold higher than in M. disstria and more than double the concentration in the diet. Our results emphasize the importance of a defensive strategy in herbivorous insects based on the maintenance of conditions in the gut lumen that reduce or eliminate the potential prooxidant behavior of ingested phenols.

  13. Localisation of laminin within Plasmodium berghei oocysts and the midgut epithelial cells of Anopheles stephensi

    PubMed Central

    Nacer, Adéla; Walker, Karen; Hurd, Hilary

    2008-01-01

    Background Oocysts of the malaria parasite form and develop in close proximity to the mosquito midgut basal lamina and it has been proposed that components of this structure play a crucial role in the development and maturation of oocysts that produce infective sporozoites. It is further suggested that oocysts incorporate basal lamina proteins into their capsule and that this provides them with a means to evade recognition by the mosquito's immune system. The site of production of basal lamina proteins in insects is controversial and it is still unclear whether haemocytes or midgut epithelial cells are the main source of components of the mosquito midgut basal lamina. Of the multiple molecules that compose the basal lamina, laminin is known to interact with a number of Plasmodium proteins. In this study, the localisation of mosquito laminin within the capsule and cytoplasm of Plasmodium berghei oocysts and in the midgut epithelial cells of Anopheles stephensi was investigated. Results An ultrastructural examination of midgut sections from infected and uninfected An. stephensi was performed. Post-embedded immunogold labelling demonstrated the presence of laminin within the mosquito basal lamina. Laminin was also detected on the outer surface of the oocyst capsule, incorporated within the capsule and associated with sporozoites forming within the oocysts. Laminin was also found within cells of the midgut epithelium, providing support for the hypothesis that these cells contribute towards the formation of the midgut basal lamina. Conclusion We suggest that ookinetes may become coated in laminin as they pass through the midgut epithelium. Thereafter, laminin secreted by midgut epithelial cells and/or haemocytes, binds to the outer surface of the oocyst capsule and that some passes through and is incorporated into the developing oocysts. The localisation of laminin on sporozoites was unexpected and the importance of this observation is less clear. PMID:18808667

  14. Compartmentalization of proteinases and amylases in Nauphoeta cinerea midgut.

    PubMed

    Elpidina, E N; Vinokurov, K S; Gromenko, V A; Rudenskaya, Y A; Dunaevsky, Y E; Zhuzhikov, D P

    2001-12-01

    Compartmentalization of proteinases, amylases, and pH in the midgut of Nauphoeta cinerea Oliv. (Blattoptera:Blaberidae) was studied in order to understand the organization of protein and starch digestion. Total proteolytic activity measured with azocasein was maximal at pH 11.5 both in anterior (AM) and posterior (PM) halves of the midgut, but the bulk of activity (67%) was found in PM. Total AM and PM preparations were fractionated on a Sephadex G-50 column and further analysed by means of activity electrophoresis and specific inhibitors and activators. The major activity in PM was classified as an unusual SH-dependent proteinase with M(r) 24,000 and pH optimum with synthetic substrate BApNA at 10.0. The enzyme was 43-fold activated in the presence of 1 mM DTT, insensitive to synthetic inhibitors of serine (PMSF, TLCK, TPCK) and cysteine (IAA, E-64) proteinases, strongly inhibited by STI, and displayed four active bands on zymograms. In PM, activities of trypsin-like, chymotrypsin-like, subtilisin-like, and cysteine proteinases were observed. Aspartic and metalloproteinases were not detected. In AM, activity of unusual SH-dependent proteinase also dominated and activity of chymotrypsin-like proteinase was observed, but their levels were much lower than in PM. Distribution of amylase activity, exhibiting an optimum at pH 6.0, was quite the opposite. The major part of it (67%) was located in AM. Treatment of amylase preparation with proteinases from AM and PM reduced amylase activity twofold. pH of the midgut contents was 6.0-7.2 in AM, 6.4-7.6 in the first and 8.8-9.3 in the second halves of PM. Thus, pH in AM is in good agreement with the optimal pH of amylase, located in this compartment, but the activity of proteinases, including the ability to degrade amylase, in such an environment is low. Active proteolysis takes place in the second half of PM, where pH of the gut is close to the optimal pH of proteinases.

  15. Characterization of a midgut-specific chitin synthase gene (LmCHS2) responsible for biosynthesis of chitin of peritrophic matrix in Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojian; Zhang, Huanhuan; Li, Sheng; Zhu, Kun Yan; Ma, Enbo; Zhang, Jianzhen

    2012-12-01

    Chitin, an essential component of peritrophic matrix (PM), is produced by a series of biochemical reactions. Chitin synthase plays a crucial role in chitin polymerization in chitin biosynthetic pathway. In this study, we identified and characterized a full-length cDNA of chitin synthase 2 gene (LmCHS2) from Locusta migratoria. The cDNA contains an open reading frame of 4569 nucleotides that encode 1523 amino acid residues, and 76- and 373-nucleotides for 5'- and 3'-noncoding regions, respectively. Analysis of LmCHS2 transcript in different tissues of the locust by using real-time quantitative PCR indicated that LmCHS2 was exclusively expressed in midgut and gastric caeca (a part of the midgut). The highest expression was found in the anterior midgut with a decline of the transcript level from the anterior to posterior regions. During growth and development of locusts, there was only a slight expression in eggs, but the expression gradually increased from nymphs to adults. In situ hybridization further revealed that LmCHS2 transcript mainly presented in the apical regions of brush border forming columnar cells of gastric caeca. LmCHS2 dsRNA was injected to fifth-instar nymphs to further explore biological functions of LmCHS2. Significantly down-regulated transcript of LmCHS2 resulted in a cessation of feeding and a high mortality of the insect. However, no visible abnormal morphological change of locusts was observed until insects molted to adults. After dissection, we found that the average length of midguts from the LmCHS2 dsRNA-injected locusts was shorter than that of the control insects that were injected with dsGFP. Furthermore, microsection of midguts showed that the PM of the LmCHS2 dsRNA-injected nymphs was amorphous and thin as compared with the controls. Our results demonstrate that LmCHS2 is responsible for the biosynthesis of chitin associated with PM and plays an essential role in locust growth and development. PMID:23006725

  16. Cruzipain Promotes Trypanosoma cruzi Adhesion to Rhodnius prolixus Midgut

    PubMed Central

    Uehara, Lívia Almeida; Moreira, Otacílio C.; Oliveira, Ana Carolina; Azambuja, Patrícia; Lima, Ana Paula Cabral Araujo; Britto, Constança; dos Santos, André Luis Souza; Branquinha, Marta Helena; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia Masini

    2012-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas' disease. Cysteine peptidases are relevant to several aspects of the T. cruzi life cycle and are implicated in parasite-mammalian host relationships. However, little is known about the factors that contribute to the parasite-insect host interaction. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we have investigated whether cruzipain could be involved in the interaction of T. cruzi with the invertebrate host. We analyzed the effect of treatment of T. cruzi epimastigotes with anti-cruzipain antibodies or with a panel of cysteine peptidase inhibitors (cystatin, antipain, E-64, leupeptin, iodocetamide or CA-074-OMe) on parasite adhesion to Rhodnius prolixus posterior midgut ex vivo. All treatments, with the exception of CA074-OMe, significantly decreased parasite adhesion to R. prolixus midgut. Cystatin presented a dose-dependent reduction on the adhesion. Comparison of the adhesion rate among several T. cruzi isolates revealed that the G isolate, which naturally possesses low levels of active cruzipain, adhered to a lesser extent in comparison to Dm28c, Y and CL Brener isolates. Transgenic epimastigotes overexpressing an endogenous cruzipain inhibitor (pCHAG), chagasin, and that have reduced levels of active cruzipain adhered to the insect gut 73% less than the wild-type parasites. The adhesion of pCHAG parasites was partially restored by the addition of exogenous cruzipain. In vivo colonization experiments revealed low levels of pCHAG parasites in comparison to wild-type. Parasites isolated after passage in the insect presented a drastic enhancement in the expression of surface cruzipain. Conclusions/Significance These data highlight, for the first time, that cruzipain contributes to the interaction of T. cruzi with the insect host. PMID:23272264

  17. Assembling of Holotrichia parallela (dark black chafer) midgut tissue transcriptome and identification of midgut proteins that bind to Cry8Ea toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Shu, Changlong; Tan, Shuqian; Yin, Jiao; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra; Liu, Chunqing; Geng, Lili; Song, Fuping; Li, Kebin; Zhang, Jie

    2015-09-01

    Holotrichia parallela is one of the most severe crop pests in China, affecting peanut, soybean, and sweet potato crops. Previous work showed that Cry8Ea toxin is highly effective against this insect. In order to identify Cry8Ea-binding proteins in the midgut cells of H. parallela larvae, we assembled a midgut tissue transcriptome by high-throughput sequencing and used this assembled transcriptome to identify Cry8Ea-binding proteins by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). First, we obtained de novo sequences of cDNAs from midgut tissue of H. parallela larvae and used available cDNA data in the GenBank. In a parallel assay, we obtained 11 Cry8Ea-binding proteins by pull-down assays performed with midgut brush border membrane vesicles. Peptide sequences from these proteins were matched to the H. parallela newly assembled midgut transcriptome, and 10 proteins were identified. Some of the proteins were shown to be intracellular proteins forming part of the cell cytoskeleton and/or vesicle transport such as actin, myosin, clathrin, dynein, and tubulin among others. In addition, an apolipophorin, which is a protein involved in lipid metabolism, and a novel membrane-bound alanyl aminopeptidase were identified. Our results suggest that Cry8Ea-binding proteins could be different from those characterized for Cry1A toxins in lepidopteran insects. PMID:26135984

  18. Infection Dynamics and Immune Response in a Newly Described Drosophila-Trypanosomatid Association

    PubMed Central

    Votýpka, Jan; Dostálová, Anna; Yurchenko, Vyacheslav; Bird, Nathan H.; Lukeš, Julius; Lemaitre, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Trypanosomatid parasites are significant causes of human disease and are ubiquitous in insects. Despite the importance of Drosophila melanogaster as a model of infection and immunity and a long awareness that trypanosomatid infection is common in the genus, no trypanosomatid parasites naturally infecting Drosophila have been characterized. Here, we establish a new model of trypanosomatid infection in Drosophila—Jaenimonas drosophilae, gen. et sp. nov. As far as we are aware, this is the first Drosophila-parasitic trypanosomatid to be cultured and characterized. Through experimental infections, we find that Drosophila falleni, the natural host, is highly susceptible to infection, leading to a substantial decrease in host fecundity. J. drosophilae has a broad host range, readily infecting a number of Drosophila species, including D. melanogaster, with oral infection of D. melanogaster larvae resulting in the induction of numerous immune genes. When injected into adult hemolymph, J. drosophilae kills D. melanogaster, although interestingly, neither the Imd nor the Toll pathway is induced and Imd mutants do not show increased susceptibility to infection. In contrast, mutants deficient in drosocrystallin, a major component of the peritrophic matrix, are more severely infected during oral infection, suggesting that the peritrophic matrix plays an important role in mediating trypanosomatid infection in Drosophila. This work demonstrates that the J. drosophilae-Drosophila system can be a powerful model to uncover the effects of trypanosomatids in their insect hosts. PMID:26374124

  19. Aggression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kravitz, Edward A; Fernandez, Maria de la Paz

    2015-10-01

    Aggression is used by essentially all species of animals to gain access to desired resources, including territory, food, and potential mates: Fruit flies are no exception. In Drosophila, both males and females compete in same sex fights for resources, but only males establish hierarchical relationships. Many investigators now study aggression using the fruit fly model, mainly because (a) aggression in fruit flies is a quantifiable well-defined and easily evoked behavior; (b) powerful genetic methods allow investigators to manipulate genes of interest at any place or time during embryonic, larval, pupal or adult life, and while flies are behaving; (c) the growth of the relatively new field of optogenetics makes physiological studies possible at single neuron levels despite the small sizes of neurons and other types of cells in fly brains; and (d) the rearing of fly stocks with their short generation times and limited growth space requirements can easily be performed at relatively low cost in most laboratories. This review begins with an examination of the behavior, both from a historical perspective and then from the birth of the "modern" era of studies of aggression in fruit flies including its quantitative analysis. The review continues with examinations of the roles of genes, neurotransmitters and neurohormones, peptides, nutritional and metabolic status, and surface cuticular hydrocarbons in the initiation and maintenance of aggression. It concludes with suggestions for future studies with this important model system.

  20. Rapid Establishment of a Regular Distribution of Adult Tropical Drosophila Parasitoids in a Multi-Patch Environment by Patch Defence Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Peter W.; Hemerik, Lia; Gort, Gerrit; van Alphen, Jacques J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Females of the larval parasitoid of Drosophila, Asobara citri, from sub-Saharan Africa, defend patches with hosts by fighting and chasing conspecific females upon encounter. Females of the closely related, palearctic species Asobara tabida do not defend patches and often search simultaneously in the same patch. The effect of patch defence by A. citri females on their distribution in a multi-patch environment was investigated, and their distributions were compared with those of A. tabida. For both species 20 females were released from two release-points in replicate experiments. Females of A. citri quickly reached a regular distribution across 16 patches, with a small variance/mean ratio per patch. Conversely, A. tabida females initially showed a clumped distribution, and after gradual dispersion, a more Poisson-like distribution across patches resulted (variance/mean ratio was closer to 1 and higher than for A. citri). The dispersion of A. tabida was most probably an effect of exploitation: these parasitoids increasingly made shorter visits to already exploited patches. We briefly discuss hypotheses on the adaptive significance of patch defence behaviour or its absence in the light of differences in the natural history of both parasitoid species, notably the spatial distribution of their hosts. PMID:21765889

  1. Identification and characterization of kraken, a gene encoding a putative hydrolytic enzyme in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Edwin Chan, H Y; Harris, S J; O'Kane, C J

    1998-11-19

    Kraken, a novel Drosophila gene isolated from a 4-8-h-old Drosophila embryo cDNA library, shows homology to a family of serine hydrolases whose common feature is that they all catalyse breakage of substrates with a carbonyl-containing group. It is a single-copy gene with at least two introns and maps to position 21D on polytene chromosomes. kraken is a member of a conserved gene family. Messenger RNA of kraken is expressed ubiquitously in early embryogenesis. Later, it is concentrated in the foregut and the posterior midgut primordium. Towards the end of embryogenesis, expression of kraken is confined to the gastric caeca. During the third-instar larval stage, kraken is expressed at low levels in the gastric caeca and parts of the gut, and at higher levels in the fat body. We suggest a role for Kraken in detoxification and digestion during embryogenesis and larval development. PMID:9831651

  2. Measuring thermal behavior in smaller insects: A case study in Drosophila melanogaster demonstrates effects of sex, geographic origin, and rearing temperature on adult behavior.

    PubMed

    Rajpurohit, Subhash; Schmidt, Paul S

    2016-10-01

    Measuring thermal behavior in smaller insects is particularly challenging. In this study, we describe a new horizontal thermal gradient apparatus designed to study adult thermal behavior in small insects and apply it using D. melanogaster as a model and case study. Specifically, we used this apparatus and associated methodology to examine the effects of sex, geographic origin, and developmental rearing temperature on temperature preferences exhibited by adults in a controlled laboratory environment. The thermal gradient established by the apparatus was stable over diurnal and calendar time. Furthermore, the distribution of adult flies across thermal habitats within the apparatus remained stable following the period of acclimation, as evidenced by the high degree of repeatability across both biological and technical replicates. Our data demonstrate significant and predictable variation in temperature preference for all 3 assayed variables. Behaviorally, females were more sensitive than males to higher temperatures. Flies originating from high latitude, temperate populations exhibited a greater preference for cooler temperatures; conversely, flies originating from low latitude, tropical habitats demonstrated a relative preference for higher temperatures. Similarly, larval rearing temperature was positively associated with adult thermal behavior: low culture temperatures increased the relative adult preference for cooler temperatures, and this response was distinct between the sexes and for flies from the temperate and subtropical geographic regions. Together, these results demonstrate that the temperature chamber apparatus elicits robust, predictable, and quantifiable thermal preference behavior that could readily be applied to other taxa to examine the role of temperature-mediated behavior in a variety of contexts.

  3. Comparison of midgut bacterial diversity in tropical caterpillars (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae) fed on different diets.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Tomás, Adrián A; Sittenfeld, Ana; Uribe-Lorío, Lorena; Chavarría, Felipe; Mora, Marielos; Janzen, Daniel H; Goodman, Robert M; Simon, Holly M

    2011-10-01

    As primary consumers of foliage, caterpillars play essential roles in shaping the trophic structure of tropical forests. The caterpillar midgut is specialized in plant tissue processing; its pH is exceptionally alkaline and contains high concentrations of toxic compounds derived from the ingested plant material (secondary compounds or allelochemicals) and from the insect itself. The midgut, therefore, represents an extreme environment for microbial life. Isolates from different bacterial taxa have been recovered from caterpillar midguts, but little is known about the impact of these microorganisms on caterpillar biology. Our long-term goals are to identify midgut symbionts and to investigate their functions. As a first step, different diet formulations were evaluated for rearing two species of tropical saturniid caterpillars. Using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with primers hybridizing broadly to sequences from the bacterial domain, 16S rRNA gene libraries were constructed with midgut DNA extracted from caterpillars reared on different diets. Amplified rDNA restriction analysis indicated that bacterial sequences recovered from the midguts of caterpillars fed on foliage were more diverse than those from caterpillars fed on artificial diet. Sequences related to Methylobacterium sp., Bradyrhizobium sp., and Propionibacterium sp. were detected in all caterpillar libraries regardless of diet, but were not detected in a library constructed from the diet itself. Furthermore, libraries constructed with DNA recovered from surface-sterilized eggs indicated potential for vertical transmission of midgut symbionts. Taken together, these results suggest that microorganisms associated with the tropical caterpillar midgut may engage in symbiotic interactions with these ecologically important insects.

  4. Cyp12a4 confers lufenuron resistance in a natural population of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Bogwitz, Michael R; Chung, Henry; Magoc, Lorin; Rigby, Sheena; Wong, Wayn; O'Keefe, Melanie; McKenzie, John A; Batterham, Philip; Daborn, Phillip J

    2005-09-01

    Lufenuron is an insect growth regulator insecticide mainly used for the control of the cat flea. To understand mechanisms of resistance to lufenuron, we have characterized lufenuron resistance in a natural population of Drosophila melanogaster. In this study we have used precise genetic mapping to identify a mechanism of lufenuron resistance: the overexpression of the cytochrome P450 gene Cyp12a4. Cyp12a4 is predicted to encode a mitochondrial cytochrome P450 enzyme. Expression of Cyp12a4 in D. melanogaster third-instar larvae was detected in the midgut and Malpighian tubules of both lufenuron-resistant and wild-type strains. The level of Cyp12a4 expression in the midgut is higher in the lufenuron-resistant strain than in wild-type strains. Driving the expression of Cyp12a4 in the midgut and Malpighian tubules by using the GAL4/UAS gene expression system results in lufenuron resistance, but it does not result in resistance to three other insecticide classes. Transgenic expression of Cyp12a4 in a ubiquitous expression pattern results in late embryonic lethality, suggesting that high-level ectopic expression of Cyp12a4 is detrimental to development. PMID:16120680

  5. Cyp12a4 confers lufenuron resistance in a natural population of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Bogwitz, Michael R.; Chung, Henry; Magoc, Lorin; Rigby, Sheena; Wong, Wayn; O'Keefe, Melanie; McKenzie, John A.; Batterham, Philip; Daborn, Phillip J.

    2005-01-01

    Lufenuron is an insect growth regulator insecticide mainly used for the control of the cat flea. To understand mechanisms of resistance to lufenuron, we have characterized lufenuron resistance in a natural population of Drosophila melanogaster. In this study we have used precise genetic mapping to identify a mechanism of lufenuron resistance: the overexpression of the cytochrome P450 gene Cyp12a4. Cyp12a4 is predicted to encode a mitochondrial cytochrome P450 enzyme. Expression of Cyp12a4 in D. melanogaster third-instar larvae was detected in the midgut and Malpighian tubules of both lufenuron-resistant and wild-type strains. The level of Cyp12a4 expression in the midgut is higher in the lufenuron-resistant strain than in wild-type strains. Driving the expression of Cyp12a4 in the midgut and Malpighian tubules by using the GAL4/UAS gene expression system results in lufenuron resistance, but it does not result in resistance to three other insecticide classes. Transgenic expression of Cyp12a4 in a ubiquitous expression pattern results in late embryonic lethality, suggesting that high-level ectopic expression of Cyp12a4 is detrimental to development. PMID:16120680

  6. Transcription factor broad suppresses precocious development of adult structures during larval-pupal metamorphosis in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, R; Tan, A; Bai, H; Palli, Subba R

    2008-01-01

    Broad (br), a transcription factor containing the Broad-Tramtrack-Bric-a-brac (BTB) and zinc finger domains was shown to mediate 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) action and pupal development in Drosophila melanogaster and Manduca sexta. We determined the key roles of br during larval-pupal metamorphosis using RNA interference (RNAi) in a coleopteran insect, Tribolium castaneum. Two major peaks of T. castaneum broad (Tcbr) mRNA, one peak at the end of feeding stage prior to the larvae entering the quiescent stage and another peak during the quiescent stage were detected in the whole body and midgut tissue dissected from staged insects. Expression of br during the final instar larval stage is essential for successful larval-pupal metamorphosis, because, RNAi-mediated knock-down of Tcbr during this stage derailed larval-pupal metamorphosis and produced insects that showed larval, pupal and adult structures. Tcbr dsRNA injected into the final instar larvae caused reduction in the mRNA levels of genes known to be involved in 20E action (EcRA, E74 and E75B). Tcbr dsRNA injected into the final instar larvae also caused an increase in the mRNA levels of JH-response genes (JHE and Kr-h1b). Knock-down of Tcbr expression also affected 20E-mediated remodeling of midgut during larval-pupal metamorphosis. These data suggest that the expression of Tcbr during the final instar larval stage promotes pupal program while suppressing the larval and adult programs ensuring a transitory pupal stage in holometabolous insects. PMID:18083350

  7. Biotic and abiotic factors impacting development, behavior, phenology, and reproductive biology of Drosophila suzukii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, quickly emerged as a devastating invasive pest of small and stone fruits in the Americas and Europe. To better understand the population dynamics of D. suzukii, we reviewed recent work on juvenile development, adult reproduction, and seasonal variation in...

  8. Evidence for transgenerational metabolic programming in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Buescher, Jessica L; Musselman, Laura P; Wilson, Christina A; Lang, Tieming; Keleher, Madeline; Baranski, Thomas J; Duncan, Jennifer G

    2013-09-01

    Worldwide epidemiologic studies have repeatedly demonstrated an association between prenatal nutritional environment, birth weight and susceptibility to adult diseases including obesity, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Despite advances in mammalian model systems, the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are unclear, but might involve programming mechanisms such as epigenetics. Here we describe a new system for evaluating metabolic programming mechanisms using a simple, genetically tractable Drosophila model. We examined the effect of maternal caloric excess on offspring and found that a high-sugar maternal diet alters body composition of larval offspring for at least two generations, augments an obese-like phenotype under suboptimal (high-calorie) feeding conditions in adult offspring, and modifies expression of metabolic genes. Our data indicate that nutritional programming mechanisms could be highly conserved and support the use of Drosophila as a model for evaluating the underlying genetic and epigenetic contributions to this phenomenon.

  9. Evidence for transgenerational metabolic programming in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Buescher, Jessica L.; Musselman, Laura P.; Wilson, Christina A.; Lang, Tieming; Keleher, Madeline; Baranski, Thomas J.; Duncan, Jennifer G.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Worldwide epidemiologic studies have repeatedly demonstrated an association between prenatal nutritional environment, birth weight and susceptibility to adult diseases including obesity, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Despite advances in mammalian model systems, the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are unclear, but might involve programming mechanisms such as epigenetics. Here we describe a new system for evaluating metabolic programming mechanisms using a simple, genetically tractable Drosophila model. We examined the effect of maternal caloric excess on offspring and found that a high-sugar maternal diet alters body composition of larval offspring for at least two generations, augments an obese-like phenotype under suboptimal (high-calorie) feeding conditions in adult offspring, and modifies expression of metabolic genes. Our data indicate that nutritional programming mechanisms could be highly conserved and support the use of Drosophila as a model for evaluating the underlying genetic and epigenetic contributions to this phenomenon. PMID:23649823

  10. The midgut epithelium of aquatic arthropods: a critical target organ in environmental toxicology.

    PubMed Central

    Beaty, Barry J; Mackie, Ryan S; Mattingly, Kimberly S; Carlson, Jonathan O; Rayms-Keller, Alfredo

    2002-01-01

    The midgut epithelium of aquatic arthropods is emerging as an important and toxicologically relevant organ system for monitoring environmental pollution. The peritrophic matrix of aquatic arthropods, which is secreted by the midgut epithelium cells, is perturbed by copper or cadmium. Molecular biological studies have identified and characterized two midgut genes induced by heavy metals in the midgut epithelium. Many other metal-responsive genes (MRGs) await characterization. One of the MRGs codes for an intestinal mucin, which is critical for protecting the midgut from toxins and pathogens. Another codes for a tubulin gene, which is critical for structure and function of the midgut epithelial cells. Perturbation of expression of either gene could condition aquatic arthropod survivorship. Induction of these MRGs is a more sensitive and rapid indicator of heavy-metal pollution than biological assays. Characterization of genes induced by pollutants could provide mechanistic understanding of fundamental cellular responses to pollutants and insight into determinants of aquatic arthropod population genetic structure and survivorship in nature. PMID:12634118

  11. Implications of Time Bomb model of ookinete invasion of midgut cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Yeon Soo; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2002-10-01

    In this review, we describe the experimental observations that led us to propose the Time Bomb model of ookinete midgut invasion and discuss potential implications of this model when considering malaria transmission-blocking strategies aimed at arresting parasite development within midgut cells. A detailed analysis of the molecular interactions between Anopheles stephensi midgut epithelial cells and Plasmodium berghei parasites, as they migrate through midgut cells, revealed that ookinetes induce nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression, remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton and characteristic morphological changes in the invaded epithelial cells. Parasites inflict extensive damage that ultimately leads to genome fragmentation and cell death. During their migration through the cytoplasm, ookinetes release a subtilisin-like protease (PbSub2) and the surface protein (Pbs21). The model proposes that ookinetes must escape rapidly from the invaded cells, as the responses mediating cell death could be potentially lethal to the parasites. In other words, the physical and/or chemical damage triggered by the parasite can be thought of as a 'lethal bomb'. Once this cascade of events is initiated, the parasite must leave the cellular compartment within a limited time to escape unharmed from the 'bomb' it has activated. The midgut epithelium has the ability to heal rapidly by 'budding off' the damaged cells to the midgut lumen without losing its integrity. PMID:12225921

  12. Small Interfering RNA Pathway Modulates Initial Viral Infection in Midgut Epithelium of Insect after Ingestion of Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Hanhong; Chen, Hongyan; Liu, Yuyan; Jiang, Chaoyang; Mao, Qianzhuo; Jia, Dongsheng; Chen, Qian

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Numerous viruses are transmitted in a persistent manner by insect vectors. Persistent viruses establish their initial infection in the midgut epithelium, from where they disseminate to the midgut visceral muscles. Although propagation of viruses in insect vectors can be controlled by the small interfering RNA (siRNA) antiviral pathway, whether the siRNA pathway can control viral dissemination from the midgut epithelium is unknown. Infection by a rice virus (Southern rice black streaked dwarf virus [SRBSDV]) of its incompetent vector (the small brown planthopper [SBPH]) is restricted to the midgut epithelium. Here, we show that the siRNA pathway is triggered by SRBSDV infection in continuously cultured cells derived from the SBPH and in the midgut of the intact insect. Knockdown of the expression of the core component Dicer-2 of the siRNA pathway by RNA interference strongly increased the ability of SRBSDV to propagate in continuously cultured SBPH cells and in the midgut epithelium, allowing viral titers in the midgut epithelium to reach the threshold (1.99 × 109 copies of the SRBSDV P10 gene/μg of midgut RNA) needed for viral dissemination into the SBPH midgut muscles. Our results thus represent the first elucidation of the threshold for viral dissemination from the insect midgut epithelium. Silencing of Dicer-2 further facilitated the transmission of SRBSDV into rice plants by SBPHs. Taken together, our results reveal the new finding that the siRNA pathway can control the initial infection of the insect midgut epithelium by a virus, which finally affects the competence of the virus's vector. IMPORTANCE Many viral pathogens that cause significant global health and agricultural problems are transmitted via insect vectors. The first bottleneck in viral infection, the midgut epithelium, is a principal determinant of the ability of an insect species to transmit a virus. Southern rice black streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV) is restricted exclusively to the

  13. Dimethylnitrosamine demethylase activity in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, L.C.; Nix, C.E.; Epler, J.L.

    1982-06-15

    A dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) demethylase with levels of activity comparable to that in uninduced rat liver was demonstrated in both larval and adult forms of the Hikone-R strain of Drosophila. A microsomal enzyme, it has many properties of a cytochrome P-450-containing mixed-function oxidase. Kinetic analysis indicates only a single enzyme with an apparent K/sub m/ of 10.5 mM DMN.

  14. The Drosophila visual system

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yan

    2013-01-01

    A compact genome and a tiny brain make Drosophila the prime model to understand the neural substrate of behavior. The neurogenetic efforts to reveal neural circuits underlying Drosophila vision started about half a century ago, and now the field is booming with sophisticated genetic tools, rich behavioral assays, and importantly, a greater number of scientists joining from different backgrounds. This review will briefly cover the structural anatomy of the Drosophila visual system, the animal’s visual behaviors, the genes involved in assembling these circuits, the new and powerful techniques, and the challenges ahead for ultimately identifying the general principles of biological computation in the brain.   A typical brain utilizes a great many compact neural circuits to collect and process information from the internal biological and external environmental worlds and generates motor commands for observable behaviors. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, despite of its miniature body and tiny brain, can survive in almost any corner of the world.1 It can find food, court mate, fight rival conspecific, avoid predators, and amazingly fly without crashing into trees. Drosophila vision and its underlying neuronal machinery has been a key research model for at least half century for neurogeneticists.2 Given the efforts invested on the visual system, this animal model is likely to offer the first full understanding of how visual information is computed by a multi-cellular organism. Furthermore, research in Drosophila has revealed many genes that play crucial roles in the formation of functional brains across species. The architectural similarities between the visual systems of Drosophila and vertebrate at the molecular, cellular, and network levels suggest new principles discovered at the circuit level on the relationship between neurons and behavior in Drosophila shall also contribute greatly to our understanding of the general principles for how bigger brains work.3

  15. The Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project gene disruption project: Single P-element insertions mutating 25% of vital Drosophila genes.

    PubMed Central

    Spradling, A C; Stern, D; Beaton, A; Rhem, E J; Laverty, T; Mozden, N; Misra, S; Rubin, G M

    1999-01-01

    A fundamental goal of genetics and functional genomics is to identify and mutate every gene in model organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster. The Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project (BDGP) gene disruption project generates single P-element insertion strains that each mutate unique genomic open reading frames. Such strains strongly facilitate further genetic and molecular studies of the disrupted loci, but it has remained unclear if P elements can be used to mutate all Drosophila genes. We now report that the primary collection has grown to contain 1045 strains that disrupt more than 25% of the estimated 3600 Drosophila genes that are essential for adult viability. Of these P insertions, 67% have been verified by genetic tests to cause the associated recessive mutant phenotypes, and the validity of most of the remaining lines is predicted on statistical grounds. Sequences flanking >920 insertions have been determined to exactly position them in the genome and to identify 376 potentially affected transcripts from collections of EST sequences. Strains in the BDGP collection are available from the Bloomington Stock Center and have already assisted the research community in characterizing >250 Drosophila genes. The likely identity of 131 additional genes in the collection is reported here. Our results show that Drosophila genes have a wide range of sensitivity to inactivation by P elements, and provide a rationale for greatly expanding the BDGP primary collection based entirely on insertion site sequencing. We predict that this approach can bring >85% of all Drosophila open reading frames under experimental control. PMID:10471706

  16. Drosophila Blastorderm Analysis Software

    SciTech Connect

    2006-10-25

    PointCloudMake analyzes 3D fluorescent images of whole Drosophila embryo and produces a table-style "PointCloud" file which contains the coordinates and volumes of all the nuclei, cells, their associated relative gene expression levels along with morphological features of the embryo. See: Luengo Hendrix et at 2006 3D Morphology and Gene Expression in the Drosophila Blastoderm at Cellular Resolution manuscript submitted LBNL # LBNL-60178 Knowles DW, Keranen SVE, Biggin M. Sudar S (2002) Mapping organism expression levels at cellular resolution in developing Drosophila. In: Conchello JA, Cogswell CJ, Wilson T, editors. Three-Dimensional and Multidimensional Microscopy: Image Acquisition and Processing IX. pp. 57-64

  17. From pathogens to microbiota: How Drosophila intestinal stem cells react to gut microbes.

    PubMed

    Bonfini, Alessandro; Liu, Xi; Buchon, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    The intestine acts as one of the interfaces between an organism and its external environment. As the primary digestive organ, it is constantly exposed to a multitude of stresses as it processes and absorbs nutrients. Among these is the recurring damage induced by ingested pathogenic and commensal microorganisms. Both the bacterial activity and immune response itself can result in the loss of epithelial cells, which subsequently requires replacement. In the Drosophila midgut, this regenerative role is fulfilled by intestinal stem cells (ISCs). Microbes not only trigger cell loss and replacement, but also modify intestinal and whole organism physiology, thus modulating ISC activity. Regulation of ISCs is integrated through a complex network of signaling pathways initiated by other gut cell populations, including enterocytes, enteroblasts, enteroendocrine and visceral muscles cells. The gut also receives signals from circulating immune cells, the hemocytes, to properly respond against infection. This review summarizes the types of gut microbes found in Drosophila, mechanisms for their elimination, and provides an integrated view of the signaling pathways that regulate tissue renewal in the midgut.

  18. Meiosis in male Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Bruce D.; Yan, Rihui; Tsai, Jui-He

    2012-01-01

    Meiosis entails sorting and separating both homologous and sister chromatids. The mechanisms for connecting sister chromatids and homologs during meiosis are highly conserved and include specialized forms of the cohesin complex and a tightly regulated homolog synapsis/recombination pathway designed to yield regular crossovers between homologous chromatids. Drosophila male meiosis is of special interest because it dispenses with large segments of the standard meiotic script, particularly recombination, synapsis and the associated structures. Instead, Drosophila relies on a unique protein complex composed of at least two novel proteins, SNM and MNM, to provide stable connections between homologs during meiosis I. Sister chromatid cohesion in Drosophila is mediated by cohesins, ring-shaped complexes that entrap sister chromatids. However, unlike other eukaryotes Drosophila does not rely on the highly conserved Rec8 cohesin in meiosis, but instead utilizes two novel cohesion proteins, ORD and SOLO, which interact with the SMC1/3 cohesin components in providing meiotic cohesion. PMID:23087836

  19. Morphological alterations induced by boric acid and fipronil in the midgut of worker honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) larvae : Morphological alterations in the midgut of A. mellifera.

    PubMed

    da Silva Cruz, Aline; da Silva-Zacarin, Elaine C M; Bueno, Odair C; Malaspina, Osmar

    2010-04-01

    Morphological alterations, by means of histological and ultrastructural analysis, have been used to determine the effects of boric acid and fipronil on midgut tissues of honeybee worker, Apis mellifera L. larvae. In order to observe possible morphological alterations in the midgut, two groups of bioassays were performed. In the first one, the larvae were chronically treated with different concentrations of boric acid added to the food (1.0, 2.5 and 7.5 mg/g). In the second group, the larvae were fed with diets containing different concentrations of fipronil (0.1 and 1 microg/g) and compared with control groups without these chemical compounds. In the first bioassay, the larvae were collected on day 3 and in the second bioassay on day 4, when the mortality rate obtained in the toxicological bioassay was not very high. The larval midguts were removed and processed for morphological analyses using a light and transmission electron microscopy. We observed cytoplasmic vacuolizations, with the absence of autophagic vacuoles, and chromatinic compacting in most of the cells in the groups treated with pesticides. The morphological alterations were far greater in the larvae treated with boric acid than in the larvae treated with fipronil. Our data suggest that the midgut cell death observed was in response to boric acid and fipronil action. This study significantly improves the understanding of the toxicological effect of these insecticides from the ecotoxicological perspective.

  20. A comparison of Frost expression among species and life stages of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bing, X; Zhang, J; Sinclair, Brent J

    2012-02-01

    Frost (Fst) is a gene associated with cold exposure in Drosophila melanogaster. We used real-time PCR to assess whether cold exposure induces expression of Fst in 10 different life stages of D. melanogaster, and adults of seven other Drosophila species. We exposed groups of individuals to 0 °C (2 h), followed by 1 h recovery (22 °C). Frost was significantly upregulated in response to cold in eggs, third instar larvae, and 2- and 5-day-old male and female adults in D. melanogaster. Life stages in which cold did not upregulate Fst had high constitutive expression. Frost is located on the opposite strand of an intron of Diuretic hormone (DH), but cold exposure did not upregulate DH. Frost orthologues were identified in six other species within the Melanogaster group (Drosophila sechellia, Drosophila simulans, Drosophila yakuba, Drosophila erecta, Drosophila ananassae and Drosophila mauritiana). Frost orthologues were upregulated in response to cold exposure in both sexes in adults of all of these species. The predicted structure of a putative Frost consensus protein shows highly conserved tandem repeats of motifs involved in cell signalling (PEST and TRAF2), suggesting that Fst might encode an adaptor protein involved in acute stress or apoptosis signalling in vivo.

  1. Sucrose hydrolases from the midgut of the sugarcane stalk borer Diatraea saccharalis.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Cíntia N B; Isejima, Eliza M; Samuels, Richard I; Silva, Carlos P

    2004-11-01

    A beta-fructosidase (EC 3.2.1.26) was isolated from the midgut of larval sugar cane stalk borer Diatraea saccharalis by mild-denaturing electrophoresis and further purified to near homogeneity by gel filtration. beta-Fructosidase hydrolysed sucrose, raffinose and the fructosyl-trisaccharide isokestose, but it had no activity against maltose, melibiose and synthetic substrates for alpha-glucosidases. Two other sucrose hydrolases, one resembling a alpha-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.20) and the other one active specifically against sucrose (sucrase) were detected in the larval midgut of D. saccharalis. All three sucrose hydrolases were associated with the midgut epithelium of larval D. saccharalis. Relative molecular mass (M(r)) of the beta-fructosidase was estimated around 45,000 (by gel filtration). The other two sucrose hydrolases had M(r) of 54,000 (alpha-glucosidase) and 59,000 (sucrase). The pH optima of the sucrose hydrolases were 5-10 for both alpha-glucosidase and sucrase and 7-8 for beta-fructosidase. Considering V(max)/K(m) ratios, beta-fructosidase preferentially cleaves isokestose rather than raffinose and sucrose. In order to evaluate the possible contribution of microorganisms isolated from the midgut to the pool of sucrose hydrolases, washed midgut epithelia were homogenised and plated onto appropriate media. Seven bacterial and one yeast species were isolated. None of the sucrose hydrolases extracted from the microorganisms corresponded to the enzymes isolated from midgut tissue homogenates. This result suggests that the major sucrose hydrolases found in the midgut of larval D. saccharalis were probably produced by the insect themselves not by the gut microflora.

  2. Ferritin Is Required in Multiple Tissues during Drosophila melanogaster Development

    PubMed Central

    Blowes, Liisa M.; Missirlis, Fanis; Riesgo-Escovar, Juan R.

    2015-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, iron is stored in the cellular endomembrane system inside a protein cage formed by 24 ferritin subunits of two types (Fer1HCH and Fer2LCH) in a 1:1 stoichiometry. In larvae, ferritin accumulates in the midgut, hemolymph, garland, pericardial cells and in the nervous system. Here we present analyses of embryonic phenotypes for mutations in Fer1HCH, Fer2LCH and in both genes simultaneously. Mutations in either gene or deletion of both genes results in a similar set of cuticular embryonic phenotypes, ranging from non-deposition of cuticle to defects associated with germ band retraction, dorsal closure and head involution. A fraction of ferritin mutants have embryonic nervous systems with ventral nerve cord disruptions, misguided axonal projections and brain malformations. Ferritin mutants die with ectopic apoptotic events. Furthermore, we show that ferritin maternal contribution, which varies reflecting the mother’s iron stores, is used in early development. We also evaluated phenotypes arising from the blockage of COPII transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus, feeding the secretory pathway, plus analysis of ectopically expressed and fluorescently marked Fer1HCH and Fer2LCH. Overall, our results are consistent with insect ferritin combining three functions: iron storage, intercellular iron transport, and protection from iron-induced oxidative stress. These functions are required in multiple tissues during Drosophila embryonic development. PMID:26192321

  3. The Dopaminergic System in the Aging Brain of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    White, Katherine E.; Humphrey, Dickon M.; Hirth, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Drosophila models of Parkinson's disease are characterized by two principal phenotypes: the specific loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the aging brain and defects in motor behavior. However, an age-related analysis of these baseline parameters in wildtype Drosophila is lacking. Here we analyzed the DA system and motor behavior in aging Drosophila. DA neurons in the adult brain can be grouped into bilateral symmetric clusters, each comprising a stereotypical number of cells. Analysis of TH > mCD8::GFP and cell type-specific MARCM clones revealed that DA neurons show cluster-specific, stereotypical projection patterns with terminal arborization in target regions that represent distinct functional areas of the adult brain. Target areas include the mushroom bodies, involved in memory formation and motivation, and the central complex, involved in the control of motor behavior, indicating that similar to the mammalian brain, DA neurons in the fly brain are involved in the regulation of specific behaviors. Behavioral analysis revealed that Drosophila show an age-related decline in startle-induced locomotion and negative geotaxis. Motion tracking however, revealed that walking activity, and exploration behavior, but not centrophobism increase at late stages of life. Analysis of TH > Dcr2, mCD8::GFP revealed a specific effect of Dcr2 expression on walking activity but not on exploratory or centrophobic behavior, indicating that the siRNA pathway may modulate distinct DA behaviors in Drosophila. Moreover, DA neurons were maintained between early- and late life, as quantified by TH > mCD8::GFP and anti-TH labeling, indicating that adult onset, age-related degeneration of DA neurons does not occur in the aging brain of Drosophila. Taken together, our data establish baseline parameters in Drosophila for the study of Parkinson's disease as well as other disorders affecting DA neurons and movement control. PMID:21165178

  4. Imaginal Disc Transplantation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, Tomonori; Paro, Renato

    2016-01-01

    Since Ephrussi and Beadle introduced imaginal disc transplantation to Drosophila research in 1936, the method played an important part towards a better understanding of disc patterning, tissue regeneration, and reprogramming phenomena like transdetermination. Despite increasing usage of high-throughput approaches towards solving biological problems this classical manual method is still in use for studying disc development in a semi-physiological context. Here we describe in detail a protocol and provide recommendations on the procedure in particular for analyzing the regenerative potential of imaginal disks. The steps consist of disc dissection and fragmentation, transplantation into the larval or adult abdomen, and the recovery of implants from the host abdomen. Additionally, we also describe how to make the special transplantation needle from a glass capillary. PMID:27659995

  5. Mod(mdg4) participates in hormonally regulated midgut programmed cell death during metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Mei-Juan; Liu, Wen; He, Hong-Juan; Wang, Jin-Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2012-12-01

    The insect midgut undergoes programmed cell death (PCD) during metamorphosis, but the molecular basis for this phenomenon has not been demonstrated. We report a mod(mdg4) protein [designated as mod(mdg4)1A] that is involved in hormonally regulated insect midgut PCD, from the lepidopteran Helicoverpa armigera. Mod(mdg4)1A is localized in the larval midgut and is highly expressed during metamorphosis. Knockdown of mod(mdg4)1a by feeding dsRNA to the larvae suppressed midgut PCD and delayed metamorphosis. The mechanism is that mod(mdg4)1a knockdown decreased the transcript levels of genes involved in PCD and metamorphosis, but increased the transcript level of inhibitor of apoptosis survivin. The transcript level of mod(mdg4)1a is independently upregulated by 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) or juvenile hormone (JH) analog methoprene. Overlapped 20E and methoprene counteractively regulate the transcript level of mod(mdg4)1a. 20E upregulates the mod(mdg4)1a transcript level not through its nuclear receptor EcRB1. Methoprene upregulates the mod(mdg4)1a transcript level through the juvenile hormone candidate receptor Met. These findings indicate that mod(mdg4)1a participates in midgut PCD and metamorphosis by regulating the transcript levels of a network of genes via different pathways under 20E and JH regulation.

  6. Alterations in the Helicoverpa armigera Midgut Digestive Physiology after Ingestion of Pigeon Pea Inducible Leucine Aminopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Lomate, Purushottam R.; Jadhav, Bhakti R.; Giri, Ashok P.; Hivrale, Vandana K.

    2013-01-01

    Jasmonate inducible plant leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) is proposed to serve as direct defense in the insect midgut. However, exact functions of inducible plant LAPs in the insect midgut remain to be estimated. In the present investigation, we report the direct defensive role of pigeon pea inducible LAP in the midgut of Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and responses of midgut soluble aminopeptidases and serine proteinases upon LAP ingestion. Larval growth and survival was significantly reduced on the diets supplemented with pigeon pea LAP. Aminopeptidase activities in larvae remain unaltered in presence or absence of inducible LAP in the diet. On the contrary, serine proteinase activities were significantly decreased in the larvae reared on pigeon pea LAP containing diet as compared to larvae fed on diet without LAP. Our data suggest that pigeon pea inducible LAP is responsible for the degradation of midgut serine proteinases upon ingestion. Reduction in the aminopeptidase activity with LpNA in the H. armigera larvae was compensated with an induction of aminopeptidase activity with ApNA. Our findings could be helpful to further dissect the roles of plant inducible LAPs in the direct plant defense against herbivory. PMID:24098675

  7. Insect midgut carboxypeptidases with emphasis on S10 hemipteran and M14 lepidopteran carboxypeptidases.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, C; Rebola, K G O; Cardoso, C; Bragatto, I; Ribeiro, A F; Terra, W R

    2015-04-01

    We compared the whole complement of midgut carboxypeptidases from 10 insects pertaining to five orders based on transcriptomes obtained by deep sequencing and biochemical data. Most of the carboxypeptidases were metallocarboxypeptidases from family M14, with carboxypeptidase A (CPA) predominating over carboxypeptidase B (CPB). They were found in all of the insects studied except for the hemipterans and a bruchid beetle. M14 carboxypeptidases were expressed only in the midgut of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera). The most expressed CPA from this insect (SfCPA) was cloned, sequenced and expressed as a recombinant enzyme. This enzyme was used to generate antibodies used to demonstrate that SfCPA is secreted by an exocytic route. Serine carboxypeptidases from family S10 were found in all of the insects studied here. In S. frugiperda, they are expressed in all tissues besides the midgut, in accordance with their presumed lysosomal role. In the hemipteran Dysdercus peruvianus, S10 carboxypeptidases are expressed only in midgut, suggesting that they are digestive enzymes. This was confirmed by enzyme assays of midgut contents. Furthermore, the substrate specificity of D. peruvianus S10 carboxypeptidases are predicted to be one CPC (preferring hydrophobic residues) and one CPD (preferring basic residues), thus able to hydrolyse the peptides formed by their digestive cathepsin D and cathepsin L, respectively. The role of S10 carboxypeptidases in bruchid beetles are suggested to be the same as in hemipterans.

  8. DNA duplication is essential for the repair of gastrointestinal perforation in the insect midgut

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wuren; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Bing; Beerntsen, Brenda T.; Song, Hongsheng; Ling, Erjun

    2016-01-01

    Invertebrate animals have the capacity of repairing wounds in the skin and gut via different mechanisms. Gastrointestinal perforation, a hole in the human gastrointestinal system, is a serious condition, and surgery is necessary to repair the perforation to prevent an abdominal abscess or sepsis. Here we report the repair of gastrointestinal perforation made by a needle-puncture wound in the silkworm larval midgut. Following insect gut perforation, only a weak immune response was observed because the growth of Escherichia coli alone was partially inhibited by plasma collected at 6 h after needle puncture of the larval midgut. However, circulating hemocytes did aggregate over the needle-puncture wound to form a scab. While, cell division and apoptosis were not observed at the wound site, the needle puncture significantly enhanced DNA duplication in cells surrounding the wound, which was essential to repair the midgut perforation. Due to the repair capacity and limited immune response caused by needle puncture to the midgut, this approach was successfully used for the injection of small compounds (ethanol in this study) into the insect midgut. Consequently, this needle-puncture wounding of the insect gut can be developed for screening compounds for use as gut chemotherapeutics in the future. PMID:26754166

  9. Alterations in the Helicoverpa armigera midgut digestive physiology after ingestion of pigeon pea inducible leucine aminopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Lomate, Purushottam R; Jadhav, Bhakti R; Giri, Ashok P; Hivrale, Vandana K

    2013-01-01

    Jasmonate inducible plant leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) is proposed to serve as direct defense in the insect midgut. However, exact functions of inducible plant LAPs in the insect midgut remain to be estimated. In the present investigation, we report the direct defensive role of pigeon pea inducible LAP in the midgut of Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and responses of midgut soluble aminopeptidases and serine proteinases upon LAP ingestion. Larval growth and survival was significantly reduced on the diets supplemented with pigeon pea LAP. Aminopeptidase activities in larvae remain unaltered in presence or absence of inducible LAP in the diet. On the contrary, serine proteinase activities were significantly decreased in the larvae reared on pigeon pea LAP containing diet as compared to larvae fed on diet without LAP. Our data suggest that pigeon pea inducible LAP is responsible for the degradation of midgut serine proteinases upon ingestion. Reduction in the aminopeptidase activity with LpNA in the H. armigera larvae was compensated with an induction of aminopeptidase activity with ApNA. Our findings could be helpful to further dissect the roles of plant inducible LAPs in the direct plant defense against herbivory.

  10. Peritrophic membrane origin in adult bees (Hymenoptera): immunolocalization.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Aparecida das Dores; Marques-Araújo, Solange; Zanuncio, José Cola; Serrão, José Eduado

    2015-01-01

    The midgut is a region of the digestive tract of bees with the lumen lined by a peritrophic membrane that is composed of chitin and proteins (peritrophins). The origin of the peritrophins in the midgut of adult bees is unknown. This study used an anti-peritrophin 55-kDa antibody to immunolocalize the sites of the peritrophic membrane synthesis in nine species of adult bees' representatives of different families and sociability levels. In all studied species the peritrophin-55 is produced by digestive cells in the entire midgut in the rough endoplasmic reticulum following transference to Golgi apparatus and released by secretory vesicles, which fuses with the plasma membrane and microvilli. Thus, in the representatives of different groups of bees, the PM is of type I.

  11. Does transgenic Cry1Ac + CpTI cotton pollen affect hypopharyngeal gland development and midgut proteolytic enzyme activity in the honey bee Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera, Apidae)?

    PubMed

    Han, Peng; Niu, Chang-Ying; Biondi, Antonio; Desneux, Nicolas

    2012-11-01

    The transgenic Cry1Ac (Bt toxin) + CpTI (Cowpea Trypsin Inhibitor) cotton cultivar CCRI41 is increasingly used in China and potential side effects on the honey bee Apis mellifera L. have been documented recently. Two studies have assessed potential lethal and sublethal effects in young bees fed with CCRI41 cotton pollen but no effect was observed on learning capacities, although lower feeding activity in exposed honey bees was noted (antifeedant effect). The present study aimed at providing further insights into potential side effects of CCRI41 cotton on honey bees. Emerging honey bees were exposed to different pollen diets using no-choice feeding protocols (chronic exposure) in controlled laboratory conditions and we aimed at documenting potential mechanisms underneath the CCRI41 antifeedant effect previously reported. Activity of midgut proteolytic enzyme of young adult honey bees fed on CCRI41 cotton pollen were not significantly affected, i.e. previously observed antifeedant effect was not linked to disturbed activity of the proteolytic enzymes in bees' midgut. Hypopharyngeal gland development was assessed by quantifying total extractable proteins from the glands. Results suggested that CCRI41 cotton pollen carries no risk to hypopharyngeal gland development of young adult honey bees. In the two bioassays, honey bees exposed to 1 % soybean trypsin inhibitor were used as positive controls for both midgut proteolytic enzymes and hypopharyngeal gland proteins quantification, and bees exposed to 48 ppb (part per billion) (i.e. 48 ng g(-1)) imidacloprid were used as controls for exposure to a sublethal concentration of toxic product. The results show that the previously reported antifeedant effect of CCRI41 cotton pollen on honey bees is not linked to effects on their midgut proteolytic enzymes or on the development of their hypopharyngeal glands. The results of the study are discussed in the framework of risk assessment of transgenic crops on honey bees. PMID

  12. Predatory cannibalism in Drosophila melanogaster larvae.

    PubMed

    Vijendravarma, Roshan K; Narasimha, Sunitha; Kawecki, Tadeusz J

    2013-01-01

    Hunting live prey is risky and thought to require specialized adaptations. Therefore, observations of predatory cannibalism in otherwise non-carnivorous animals raise questions about its function, adaptive significance and evolutionary potential. Here we document predatory cannibalism on larger conspecifics in Drosophila melanogaster larvae and address its evolutionary significance. We found that under crowded laboratory conditions younger larvae regularly attack and consume 'wandering-stage' conspecifics, forming aggregations mediated by chemical cues from the attacked victim. Nutrition gained this way can be significant: an exclusively cannibalistic diet was sufficient for normal development from eggs to fertile adults. Cannibalistic diet also induced plasticity of larval mouth parts. Finally, during 118 generations of experimental evolution, replicated populations maintained under larval malnutrition evolved enhanced propensity towards cannibalism. These results suggest that, at least under laboratory conditions, predation on conspecifics in Drosophila is a functional, adaptive behaviour, which can rapidly evolve in response to nutritional conditions.

  13. A holidic medium for Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Piper, Matthew D W; Blanc, Eric; Leitão-Gonçalves, Ricardo; Yang, Mingyao; He, Xiaoli; Linford, Nancy J; Hoddinott, Matthew P; Hopfen, Corinna; Soultoukis, George A; Niemeyer, Christine; Kerr, Fiona; Pletcher, Scott D; Ribeiro, Carlos; Partridge, Linda

    2014-01-01

    A critical requirement for research using model organisms is a well-defined and consistent diet. There is currently no complete chemically defined (holidic) diet available for Drosophila melanogaster. We describe a holidic medium that is equal in performance to an oligidic diet optimized for adult fecundity and lifespan. This holidic diet supports development over multiple generations but at a reduced rate. Over 7 years of experiments, the holidic diet yielded more consistent experimental outcomes than did oligidic food for egg laying by females. Nutrients and drugs were more available to flies in holidic medium and, similar to dietary restriction on oligidic food, amino acid dilution increased fly lifespan. We used this holidic medium to investigate amino acid-specific effects on food-choice behavior and report that folic acid from the microbiota is sufficient for Drosophila development.

  14. Maintenance of a Drosophila melanogaster Population Cage

    PubMed Central

    Caravaca, Juan Manuel; Lei, Elissa P.

    2016-01-01

    Large quantities of DNA, RNA, proteins and other cellular components are often required for biochemistry and molecular biology experiments. The short life cycle of Drosophila enables collection of large quantities of material from embryos, larvae, pupae and adult flies, in a synchronized way, at a low economic cost. A major strategy for propagating large numbers of flies is the use of a fly population cage. This useful and common tool in the Drososphila community is an efficient way to regularly produce milligrams to tens of grams of embryos, depending on uniformity of developmental stage desired. While a population cage can be time consuming to set up, maintaining a cage over months takes much less time and enables rapid collection of biological material in a short period. This paper describes a detailed and flexible protocol for the maintenance of a Drosophila melanogaster population cage, starting with 1.5 g of harvested material from the previous cycle. PMID:27023790

  15. The bacterial communities of Drosophila suzukii collected from undamaged cherries

    PubMed Central

    James, Pamela M.; Jospin, Guillaume; Lang, Jenna M.

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila suzukii is an introduced pest insect that feeds on undamaged, attached fruit. This diet is distinct from the fallen, discomposing fruits utilized by most other species of Drosophila. Since the bacterial microbiota of Drosophila, and of many other animals, is affected by diet, we hypothesized that the bacteria associated with D. suzukii are distinct from that of other Drosophila. Using 16S rDNA PCR and Illumina sequencing, we characterized the bacterial communities of larval and adult D. suzukii collected from undamaged, attached cherries in California, USA. We find that the bacterial communities associated with these samples of D. suzukii contain a high frequency of Tatumella. Gluconobacter and Acetobacter, two taxa with known associations with Drosophila, were also found, although at lower frequency than Tatumella in four of the five samples examined. Sampling D. suzukii from different locations and/or while feeding on different fruits is needed to determine the generality of the results determined by these samples. Nevertheless this is, to our knowledge, the first study characterizing the bacterial communities of this ecologically unique and economically important species of Drosophila. PMID:25101226

  16. Ultrastructural analysis of apoptosis and autophagy in the midgut epithelium of Piscicola geometra (Annelida, Hirudinida) after blood feeding.

    PubMed

    Rost-Roszkowska, M M; Świątek, P; Poprawa, I; Rupik, W; Swadźba, E; Kszuk-Jendrysik, M

    2015-09-01

    Cell death in the endodermal region of the digestive tract of the blood-feeding leech Piscicola geometra was analyzed using light and transmission electron microscopes and the fluorescence method. Sexually mature specimens of P. geometra were bred under laboratory conditions and fed on Danio rerio. After copulation, the specimens laid cocoons. The material for our studies were non-feeding juveniles collected just after hatching, non-feeding adult specimens, and leeches that had been fed with fish blood (D. rerio) only once ad libitum. The fed leeches were prepared for our studies during feeding and after 1, 3, 7, and 14 days (not sexually mature specimens) and some weeks after feeding (the sexually mature). Autophagy in all regions of the endodermal part of the digestive system, including the esophagus, the crop, the posterior crop caecum (PCC), and the intestine was observed in the adult non-feeding and feeding specimens. In fed specimens, autophagy occurred at very high levels--in 80 to 90 % of epithelial cells in all four regions. In contrast, in adult specimens that did not feed, this process occurred at much lower levels--about 10 % (esophagus and intestine) and about 30 % (crop and PCC) of the midgut epithelial cells. Apoptosis occurred in the feeding adult specimens but only in the crop and PCC. However, it was absent in the non-feeding adult specimens and the specimens that were collected during feeding. Moreover, neither autophagy nor apoptosis were observed in the juvenile, non-feeding specimens. The appearance of autophagy and apoptosis was connected with feeding on toxic blood. We concluded that autophagy played the role of a survival factor and was involved in the protection of the epithelium against the products of blood digestion. Quantitative analysis was prepared to determine the number of autophagic and apoptotic cells.

  17. Queuine metabolism and cadmium toxicity in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, W.R.; Siard, T. ); Jacobson, K.B. )

    1991-03-11

    Queuine is a derivative of guanine found in the first position of the anticodon of the transfer RNAs for Asp, Asn, His and Tyr. The transcripts of these tRNAs contain a guanine in this position. This guanine is enzymatically excised and replaced by queuine. The ratio of queuine-containing or (q+) tRNA to its precursor or (q{minus}) tRNA changes throughout the Drosophila life cycle. in the egg 10% of the tRNA is (q+). During the three larval stages this ratio drops to zero. In the one day old adult it is about 10%. It has previously been shown that when flies are selected for the ability to grow in the presence of cadmium, the tolerant flies had 100% (q+) tRNA at the first day after pupation instead of 10%. However, it was not known whether the elevated level of (q+) tRNA was a coincidence or if the elevated levels of (q+) tRNA was protective. The authors explored this problem using germfree Drosophila. The first thing was to determine if Drosophila can synthesize queuine. Sterilized eggs were seeded onto sterile chemically defined medium. The flies were grown to the adult stage. This study showed that Drosophila like mammals cannot synthesize queuine. A second result of this research was the demonstration that the authors could alter the ratio of (q+) to (q{minus}) tRNA by adding exogenous queuine to the medium e.g. at 0.008 mM queuine the (q+) tRNA was 95% instead of {lt} 5% in the last instar stage. Finally, the authors investigated whether or not queuine gave protection against cadmium. The results were that when the flies were grown in the presence of 0.2 mM cadmium queuine at 0.008 mM gave a statistically significant increase in the number of survivors.

  18. Midgut proteinases of Sitotroga cerealella (Oliver) (Lepidoptera:Gelechiidae): Characterization and relationship to resistance in cereals

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Lan.

    1989-01-01

    Midgut proteinases are vital to the insects which digest ingested food in the midgut. Insect midgut proteinases, therefore, have been considered as possible targets for the control of insect pests. Proteinaceous proteinase inhibitors are very attractive for their potential use in developing insect resistant plant varieties via genetic engineering. Sitotroga cerealella is one of the major storage pests of cereals, and no antibiotic resistance in wheat against this insect has been identified to date. A series of diagnostic inhibitors, thiol-reducing agents and a metal-ion chelator were used in the identification of proteinases in crude extracts from S. cerealella larval midguts with both protein and ester substrates. The partial inhibition of proteolytic activity in crude midgut extract toward ({sup 3}H)-methemoglobin by pepstatin A suggested the presence of another proteinase which was sensitive to pepstatin A. The optimum pH range for the proteolytic activity, however, indicated that the major midgut proteinases were not carboxyl proteinases. Two proteinases were successfully purified by a combination of fractionation with ammonium sulfate, gel permeation and anion exchange chromatography. Characterization of the enzymes with the purified enzyme preparations confirmed that the two major proteinases were serine endoproteinases with trypsin-like and chymotrypsin-like specificities respectively. Bioassays were conducted using the artificial seeds to test naturally occurring proteinaceous proteinase inhibitors of potential value. Soybean trypsin inhibitor and the Bowman-Birk proteinase inhibitor had adverse effects on the development of the insect. A predictive model was constructed to evaluate effects of seed resistance in conjunction with other control methods on S. cerealella population dynamics.

  19. Alpha-galactosidases from the larval midgut of Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera) and Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera).

    PubMed

    Grossmann, G A; Terra, W R

    2001-01-01

    There are three midgut alpha-galactosidases (TG1, TG2, TG3) from Tenebrio molitor larvae that are partially resolved by ion-exchange chromatography. The enzymes have approximately the same pH optimum (5.0), pl value (4.6) and Mr value (46000-49000) as determined by gel filtration or native electrophoresis run in polyacrylamide gels with different concentrations. Substrate specificities and functions were proposed for the major T. molitor midgut alpha-galactosidases (TG2 and TG3) based on chromatographic, carbodiimide inactivation, Tris inhibition, and on substrate competition data. Thus, TG2 would hydrolyse alpha-1,6-galactosaccharides, exemplified by raffinose, whereas TG3 would act on melibiose and apparently also on digalactosyldiglyceride, the most important compound in the thylacoid membranes of chloroplasts. Most galactoside digestion should occur in the lumen of the first two thirds of T. molitor larval midguts, since alpha-galactosidase activity predominates there. Spodoptera frugiperda larvae have three midgut alpha-galactosidases (SG1, SG2, SG3) partially resolved by ion-exchange chromatography. The enzymes have similar pH optimum (5.8), pl value (7.2) and Mr value (46000-52000), and at least the major alpha-galactosidase must have an active carboxyl group in the active site. Based on data similar to those described for T. molitor, SG1 and SG3 should hydrolyse melibiose and SG3 should digest raffinose and, perhaps, also digalactosyldiglyceride. The midgut distribution of alpha-galactosidase activity supports the proposal that alpha-galactosidase digestion occurs at the surface of anterior midgut cells in Spodoptera frugiperda larvae.

  20. MicroRNA-regulation of Anopheles gambiae immunity to Plasmodium falciparum infection and midgut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Dennison, Nathan J; BenMarzouk-Hidalgo, Omar J; Dimopoulos, George

    2015-03-01

    Invasion of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae midgut by Plasmodium parasites triggers transcriptional changes of immune genes that mediate the antiparasitic defense. This response is largely regulated by the Toll and Immune deficiency (IMD) pathways. To determine whether A. gambiae microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in regulating the anti-Plasmodium defense, we showed that suppression of miRNA biogenesis results in increased resistance to Plasmodium falciparum infection. In silico analysis of A. gambiae immune effector genes identified multiple transcripts with miRNA binding sites. A comparative miRNA microarray abundance analysis of P. falciparum infected and naïve mosquito midgut tissues showed elevated abundance of miRNAs aga-miR-989 and aga-miR-305 in infected midguts. Antagomir inhibition of aga-miR-305 increased resistance to P. falciparum infection and suppressed the midgut microbiota. Conversely, treatment of mosquitoes with an artificial aga-miR-305 mimic increased susceptibility to P. falciparum infection and resulted in expansion of midgut microbiota, suggesting that aga-miR-305 acts as a P. falciparum and gut microbiota agonist by negatively regulating the mosquito immune response. In silico prediction of aga-miR-305 target genes identified several anti-Plasmodium effectors. Our study shows that A. gambiae aga-miR-305 regulates the anti-Plasmodium response and midgut microbiota, likely through post-transcriptional modification of immune effector genes.

  1. Regulation of Stem Cell Proliferation and Cell Fate Specification by Wingless/Wnt Signaling Gradients Enriched at Adult Intestinal Compartment Boundaries.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ai; Benchabane, Hassina; Wang, Zhenghan; Ahmed, Yashi

    2016-02-01

    Intestinal stem cell (ISC) self-renewal and proliferation are directed by Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mammals, whereas aberrant Wnt pathway activation in ISCs triggers the development of human colorectal carcinoma. Herein, we have utilized the Drosophila midgut, a powerful model for ISC regulation, to elucidate the mechanisms by which Wingless (Wg)/Wnt regulates intestinal homeostasis and development. We provide evidence that the Wg signaling pathway, activation of which peaks at each of the major compartment boundaries of the adult intestine, has essential functions. Wg pathway activation in the intestinal epithelium is required not only to specify cell fate near compartment boundaries during development, but also to control ISC proliferation within compartments during homeostasis. Further, in contrast with the previous focus on Wg pathway activation within ISCs, we demonstrate that the primary mechanism by which Wg signaling regulates ISC proliferation during homeostasis is non-autonomous. Activation of the Wg pathway in absorptive enterocytes is required to suppress JAK-STAT signaling in neighboring ISCs, and thereby their proliferation. We conclude that Wg signaling gradients have essential roles during homeostasis and development of the adult intestine, non-autonomously controlling stem cell proliferation inside compartments, and autonomously specifying cell fate near compartment boundaries. PMID:26845150

  2. Regulation of Stem Cell Proliferation and Cell Fate Specification by Wingless/Wnt Signaling Gradients Enriched at Adult Intestinal Compartment Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ai; Benchabane, Hassina; Wang, Zhenghan; Ahmed, Yashi

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal stem cell (ISC) self-renewal and proliferation are directed by Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mammals, whereas aberrant Wnt pathway activation in ISCs triggers the development of human colorectal carcinoma. Herein, we have utilized the Drosophila midgut, a powerful model for ISC regulation, to elucidate the mechanisms by which Wingless (Wg)/Wnt regulates intestinal homeostasis and development. We provide evidence that the Wg signaling pathway, activation of which peaks at each of the major compartment boundaries of the adult intestine, has essential functions. Wg pathway activation in the intestinal epithelium is required not only to specify cell fate near compartment boundaries during development, but also to control ISC proliferation within compartments during homeostasis. Further, in contrast with the previous focus on Wg pathway activation within ISCs, we demonstrate that the primary mechanism by which Wg signaling regulates ISC proliferation during homeostasis is non-autonomous. Activation of the Wg pathway in absorptive enterocytes is required to suppress JAK-STAT signaling in neighboring ISCs, and thereby their proliferation. We conclude that Wg signaling gradients have essential roles during homeostasis and development of the adult intestine, non-autonomously controlling stem cell proliferation inside compartments, and autonomously specifying cell fate near compartment boundaries. PMID:26845150

  3. Ultrastructural analysis of midgut cells from Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae) larvae resistant to Bacillus sphaericus.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Janaina Viana; Vasconcelos, Romero Henrique Teixeira; Furtado, André Freire; Peixoto, Christina Alves; Silva-Filha, Maria Helena Neves Lobo

    2008-12-01

    The larvicidal action of the entomopathogen Bacillus sphaericus towards Culex quinquefasciatus is due to the binary (Bin) toxin present in crystals, which are produced during bacterial sporulation. The Bin toxin needs to recognize and bind specifically to a single class of receptors, named Cqm1, which are 60-kDa alpha-glucosidases attached to the apical membrane of midgut cells by a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. C. quinquefasciatus resistance to B. sphaericus has been often associated with the absence of the alpha-glucosidase Cqm1 in larvae midgut microvilli. In this work, we aimed to investigate, at the ultrastructural level, the midgut cells from C. quinquefasciatus larvae whose resistance relies on the lack of the Cqm1 receptor. The morphological analysis showed that midgut columnar cells from the resistant larvae are characterized by a pronounced production of lipid inclusions, throughout the 4th instar. At the end of this stage, resistant larvae had an increased size and number of these inclusions in the midgut cells, while only a small number were observed in the cells from susceptible larvae. The morphological differences in the midgut cells of resistant larvae found in this work suggested that the lack of the Cqm1 receptor, which also has a physiological role as being an alpha-glucosidase, can be related to changes in the cell metabolism. The ultrastructural effects of Bin toxin on midgut epithelial cells from susceptible and resistant larvae were also investigated. The cytopathological alterations observed in susceptible larvae treated with a lethal concentration of toxin included breakdown of the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondrial swelling, microvillar disruption and vacuolization. Some effects were observed in cells from resistant larvae, although those alterations did not lead to larval death, indicating that the receptor Cqm1 is essential to mediate the larvicidal action of the toxin. This is the first ultrastructural study to show differences

  4. Drosophila Blastorderm Analysis Software

    2006-10-25

    PointCloudMake analyzes 3D fluorescent images of whole Drosophila embryo and produces a table-style "PointCloud" file which contains the coordinates and volumes of all the nuclei, cells, their associated relative gene expression levels along with morphological features of the embryo. See: Luengo Hendrix et at 2006 3D Morphology and Gene Expression in the Drosophila Blastoderm at Cellular Resolution manuscript submitted LBNL # LBNL-60178 Knowles DW, Keranen SVE, Biggin M. Sudar S (2002) Mapping organism expression levelsmore » at cellular resolution in developing Drosophila. In: Conchello JA, Cogswell CJ, Wilson T, editors. Three-Dimensional and Multidimensional Microscopy: Image Acquisition and Processing IX. pp. 57-64« less

  5. Silencing of Anopheles stephensi Heme Peroxidase HPX15 Activates Diverse Immune Pathways to Regulate the Growth of Midgut Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kajla, Mithilesh; Choudhury, Tania P; Kakani, Parik; Gupta, Kuldeep; Dhawan, Rini; Gupta, Lalita; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    Anopheles mosquito midgut harbors a diverse group of endogenous bacteria that grow extensively after the blood feeding and help in food digestion and nutrition in many ways. Although, the growth of endogenous bacteria is regulated by various factors, however, the robust antibacterial immune reactions are generally suppressed in this body compartment by a heme peroxidase HPX15 crosslinked mucins barrier. This barrier is formed on the luminal side of the midgut and blocks the direct interactions and recognition of bacteria or their elicitors by the immune reactive midgut epithelium. We hypothesized that in the absence of HPX15, an increased load of exogenous bacteria will enormously induce the mosquito midgut immunity and this situation in turn, can easily regulate mosquito-pathogen interactions. In this study, we found that the blood feeding induced AsHPX15 gene in Anopheles stephensi midgut and promoted the growth of endogenous as well as exogenous fed bacteria. In addition, the mosquito midgut also efficiently regulated the number of these bacteria through the induction of classical Toll and Imd immune pathways. In case of AsHPX15 silenced midguts, the growth of midgut bacteria was largely reduced through the induction of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) gene, a downstream effector molecule of the JAK/STAT pathway. Interestingly, no significant induction of the classical immune pathways was observed in these midguts. Importantly, the NOS is a well known negative regulator of Plasmodium development, thus, we proposed that the induction of diverged immune pathways in the absence of HPX15 mediated midgut barrier might be one of the strategies to manipulate the vectorial capacity of Anopheles mosquito. PMID:27630620

  6. Silencing of Anopheles stephensi Heme Peroxidase HPX15 Activates Diverse Immune Pathways to Regulate the Growth of Midgut Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kajla, Mithilesh; Choudhury, Tania P.; Kakani, Parik; Gupta, Kuldeep; Dhawan, Rini; Gupta, Lalita; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    Anopheles mosquito midgut harbors a diverse group of endogenous bacteria that grow extensively after the blood feeding and help in food digestion and nutrition in many ways. Although, the growth of endogenous bacteria is regulated by various factors, however, the robust antibacterial immune reactions are generally suppressed in this body compartment by a heme peroxidase HPX15 crosslinked mucins barrier. This barrier is formed on the luminal side of the midgut and blocks the direct interactions and recognition of bacteria or their elicitors by the immune reactive midgut epithelium. We hypothesized that in the absence of HPX15, an increased load of exogenous bacteria will enormously induce the mosquito midgut immunity and this situation in turn, can easily regulate mosquito-pathogen interactions. In this study, we found that the blood feeding induced AsHPX15 gene in Anopheles stephensi midgut and promoted the growth of endogenous as well as exogenous fed bacteria. In addition, the mosquito midgut also efficiently regulated the number of these bacteria through the induction of classical Toll and Imd immune pathways. In case of AsHPX15 silenced midguts, the growth of midgut bacteria was largely reduced through the induction of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) gene, a downstream effector molecule of the JAK/STAT pathway. Interestingly, no significant induction of the classical immune pathways was observed in these midguts. Importantly, the NOS is a well known negative regulator of Plasmodium development, thus, we proposed that the induction of diverged immune pathways in the absence of HPX15 mediated midgut barrier might be one of the strategies to manipulate the vectorial capacity of Anopheles mosquito.

  7. Silencing of Anopheles stephensi Heme Peroxidase HPX15 Activates Diverse Immune Pathways to Regulate the Growth of Midgut Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kajla, Mithilesh; Choudhury, Tania P.; Kakani, Parik; Gupta, Kuldeep; Dhawan, Rini; Gupta, Lalita; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    Anopheles mosquito midgut harbors a diverse group of endogenous bacteria that grow extensively after the blood feeding and help in food digestion and nutrition in many ways. Although, the growth of endogenous bacteria is regulated by various factors, however, the robust antibacterial immune reactions are generally suppressed in this body compartment by a heme peroxidase HPX15 crosslinked mucins barrier. This barrier is formed on the luminal side of the midgut and blocks the direct interactions and recognition of bacteria or their elicitors by the immune reactive midgut epithelium. We hypothesized that in the absence of HPX15, an increased load of exogenous bacteria will enormously induce the mosquito midgut immunity and this situation in turn, can easily regulate mosquito-pathogen interactions. In this study, we found that the blood feeding induced AsHPX15 gene in Anopheles stephensi midgut and promoted the growth of endogenous as well as exogenous fed bacteria. In addition, the mosquito midgut also efficiently regulated the number of these bacteria through the induction of classical Toll and Imd immune pathways. In case of AsHPX15 silenced midguts, the growth of midgut bacteria was largely reduced through the induction of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) gene, a downstream effector molecule of the JAK/STAT pathway. Interestingly, no significant induction of the classical immune pathways was observed in these midguts. Importantly, the NOS is a well known negative regulator of Plasmodium development, thus, we proposed that the induction of diverged immune pathways in the absence of HPX15 mediated midgut barrier might be one of the strategies to manipulate the vectorial capacity of Anopheles mosquito. PMID:27630620

  8. Studying aging in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    He, Ying; Jasper, Heinrich

    2014-06-15

    Drosophila melanogaster represents one of the most important genetically accessible model organisms for aging research. Studies in flies have identified single gene mutations that influence lifespan and have characterized endocrine signaling interactions that control homeostasis systemically. Recent studies have focused on the effects of aging on specific tissues and physiological processes, providing a comprehensive picture of age-related tissue dysfunction and the loss of systemic homeostasis. Here we review methodological aspects of this work and highlight technical considerations when using Drosophila to study aging and age-related diseases.

  9. Identification of a polymorphic mucin-like gene expressed in the midgut of the mosquito, Aedes aegypti, using an integrated bulked segregant and differential display analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Morlais, I; Severson, D W

    2001-01-01

    The identification of putative differentially expressed genes within genome regions containing QTL determining susceptibility of the mosquito, Aedes aegypti, to the malarial parasite, Plasmodium gallinaceum, was investigated using an integrated, targeted approach based on bulked segregant and differential display analysis. A mosquito F2 population was obtained from pairwise matings between the parasite-susceptible RED strain and the resistant MOYO-R substrain. DNA from female carcasses was used to genotype individuals at RFLP markers of known chromosomal position around the major QTL (pgs 1). Midguts, dissected 48 hr after an infected blood meal, were used to prepare two RNA bulks, each representing one of the parental genotypes at the QTL interval. The RNA bulks were compared by differential display PCR. A mucin-like protein gene (AeIMUC1) was isolated and characterized. The gene maps within the pgs 1 QTL interval and is expressed in the adult female midgut. AeIMUC1 RNA abundance decreased with time after blood meal ingestion. No differential expression was observed between the two mosquito strains but three different alleles with inter- and intrastrain allelic polymorphisms including indels and SNPs were characterized. The AeIMUC1 gene chromosome location and allelic polymorphisms raise the possibility that the protein might be involved in parasite-mosquito interactions. PMID:11454761

  10. A development-based compartmentalization of the Drosophila central brain

    PubMed Central

    Pereanu, Wayne; Kumar, Abilasha; Jennett, Arnim; Reichert, Heinrich; Hartenstein, Volker

    2010-01-01

    The neuropile of the Drosophila brain is subdivided into anatomically discrete compartments. Compartments are rich in terminal neurite branching and synapses; they are the neuropile domains in which signal processing takes place. Compartment boundaries are defined by more or less dense layers of glial cells, as well as long neurite fascicles. These fascicles are formed during the larval period when the approximately 100 neuronal lineages that constitute the Drosophila central brain differentiate. Each lineage forms an axon tract with a characteristic trajectory in the neuropile; groups of spatially related tracts congregate into the brain fascicles that can be followed from the larva throughout metamorphosis into the adult stage. In this paper we provide a map of the adult brain compartments and the relevant fascicles defining compartmental boundaries. We have identified the neuronal lineages contributing to each fascicle, which allowed us to directly compare compartments of the larval and adult brain. Most adult compartments can be recognized already in the early larval brain where they form a “protomap” of the later adult compartments. Our analysis highlights the morphogenetic changes shaping the Drosophila brain; the data will be important for studies that link early acting genetic mechanisms to the adult neuronal structures and circuits controlled by these mechanisms. PMID:20533357

  11. Methods to assess Drosophila heart development, function and aging

    PubMed Central

    Ocorr, Karen; Vogler, Georg; Bodmer, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    In recent years the Drosophila heart has become an established model of many different aspects of human cardiac disease. This model has allowed identification of disease-causing mechanisms underlying congenital heart disease and cardiomyopathies and has permitted the study underlying genetic, metabolic and age-related contributions to heart function. In this review we discuss methods currently employed in the analysis of the Drosophila heart structure and function, such as optical methods to infer heart function and performance, electrophysiological and mechanical approaches to characterize cardiac tissue properties, and conclude with histological techniques used in the study of heart development and adult structure. PMID:24727147

  12. Drosophila star proteins: what can be learned from flies?

    PubMed

    Volk, Talila

    2010-01-01

    Signal transduction and activation of RNA (STAR) family of RNA binding proteins are highly conserved through evolution indicating their core role during development, as well as in adult life. This chapter focuses on two Drosophila STAR proteins: held out wing (HOW), the ortholog of mammalian quaking (QKI) and Kep1, one of the four orthologs of mammalian Sam 68. I will emphasize the orthologs similarities in splicing pattern, functions and mode of actions of the two proteins relying on recent and earlier findings in the field. I will start with general description of the STAR proteins in Drosophila with an emphasis on their specific expression patterns.

  13. Rearing the Fruit Fly Drosophila melanogaster Under Axenic and Gnotobiotic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Koyle, Melinda L; Veloz, Madeline; Judd, Alec M; Wong, Adam C-N; Newell, Peter D; Douglas, Angela E; Chaston, John M

    2016-01-01

    The influence of microbes on myriad animal traits and behaviors has been increasingly recognized in recent years. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is a model for understanding microbial interactions with animal hosts, facilitated by approaches to rear large sample sizes of Drosophila under microorganism-free (axenic) conditions, or with defined microbial communities (gnotobiotic). This work outlines a method for collection of Drosophila embryos, hypochlorite dechorionation and sterilization, and transfer to sterile diet. Sterilized embryos are transferred to sterile diet in 50 ml centrifuge tubes, and developing larvae and adults remain free of any exogenous microbes until the vials are opened. Alternatively, flies with a defined microbiota can be reared by inoculating sterile diet and embryos with microbial species of interest. We describe the introduction of 4 bacterial species to establish a representative gnotobiotic microbiota in Drosophila. Finally, we describe approaches for confirming bacterial community composition, including testing if axenic Drosophila remain bacteria-free into adulthood. PMID:27500374

  14. BMAA neurotoxicity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xianchong; Escala, Wilfredo; Papapetropoulos, Spyridon; Bradley, Walter G; Zhai, R Grace

    2009-01-01

    We report the establishment of an in vivo model using the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to investigate the toxic effects of L-BMAA. We found that dietary intake of BMAA reduced the lifespan as well as the neurological functions of flies. Furthermore, we have developed an HPLC method to reliably detect both free and protein-bound BMAA in fly tissue extracts.

  15. Heritable Endosymbionts of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Mateos, Mariana; Castrezana, Sergio J.; Nankivell, Becky J.; Estes, Anne M.; Markow, Therese A.; Moran, Nancy A.

    2006-01-01

    Although heritable microorganisms are increasingly recognized as widespread in insects, no systematic screens for such symbionts have been conducted in Drosophila species (the primary insect genetic models for studies of evolution, development, and innate immunity). Previous efforts screened relatively few Drosophila lineages, mainly for Wolbachia. We conducted an extensive survey of potentially heritable endosymbionts from any bacterial lineage via PCR screens of mature ovaries in 181 recently collected fly strains representing 35 species from 11 species groups. Due to our fly sampling methods, however, we are likely to have missed fly strains infected with sex ratio-distorting endosymbionts. Only Wolbachia and Spiroplasma, both widespread in insects, were confirmed as symbionts. These findings indicate that in contrast to some other insect groups, other heritable symbionts are uncommon in Drosophila species, possibly reflecting a robust innate immune response that eliminates many bacteria. A more extensive survey targeted these two symbiont types through diagnostic PCR in 1225 strains representing 225 species from 32 species groups. Of these, 19 species were infected by Wolbachia while only 3 species had Spiroplasma. Several new strains of Wolbachia and Spiroplasma were discovered, including ones divergent from any reported to date. The phylogenetic distribution of Wolbachia and Spiroplasma in Drosophila is discussed. PMID:16783009

  16. Apoptosis and necrosis during the circadian cycle in the centipede midgut.

    PubMed

    Rost-Roszkowska, M M; Chajec, Ł; Vilimova, J; Tajovský, K

    2016-07-01

    Three types of cells have been distinguished in the midgut epithelium of two centipedes, Lithobius forficatus and Scolopendra cingulata: digestive, secretory, and regenerative cells. According to the results of our previous studies, we decided to analyze the relationship between apoptosis and necrosis in their midgut epithelium and circadian rhythms. Ultrastructural analysis showed that these processes proceed in a continuous manner that is independent of the circadian rhythm in L. forficatus, while in S. cingulata necrosis is activated at midnight. Additionally, the description of apoptosis and necrosis showed no differences between males and females of both species analyzed. At the beginning of apoptosis, the cell cytoplasm becomes electron-dense, apparently in response to shrinkage of the cell. Organelles such as the mitochondria, cisterns of endoplasmic reticulum transform and degenerate. Nuclei gradually assume lobular shapes before the apoptotic cell is discharged into the midgut lumen. During necrosis, however, the cytoplasm of the cell becomes electron-lucent, and the number of organelles decreases. While the digestive cells of about 10 % of L. forficatus contain rickettsia-like pathogens, the corresponding cells in S. cingulata are free of rickettsia. As a result, we can state that apoptosis in L. forficatus is presumably responsible for protecting the organism against infections, while in S. cingulata apoptosis is not associated with the elimination of pathogens. Necrosis is attributed to mechanical damage, and the activation of this process coincides with proliferation of the midgut regenerative cells at midnight in S. cingulata.

  17. Perimicrovillar membrane assembly: the fate of phospholipids synthesised by the midgut of Rhodnius prolixus

    PubMed Central

    Bittencourt-Cunha, Paula Rêgo; Silva-Cardoso, Livia; de Oliveira, Giselle Almeida; da Silva, José Roberto; da Silveira, Alan Barbosa; Kluck, George Eduardo Gabriel; Souza-Lima, Michele; Gondim, Katia Calp; Dansa-Petretsky, Marilvia; Silva, Carlos Peres; Masuda, Hatisaburo; da Silva, Mario Alberto Cardoso; Atella, Georgia Correa

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we describe the fate of fatty acids that are incorporated from the lumen by the posterior midgut epithelium of Rhodnius prolixus and the biosynthesis of lipids. We also demonstrate that neutral lipids (NL) are transferred to the haemolymphatic lipophorin (Lp) and that phospholipids remain in the tissue in which they are organised into perimicrovillar membranes (PMMs). 3H-palmitic acid added at the luminal side of isolated midguts of R. prolixus females was readily absorbed and was used to synthesise phospholipids (80%) and NL (20%). The highest incorporation of 3H-palmitic acid was on the first day after a blood meal. The amounts of diacylglycerol (DG) and triacylglycerol synthesised by the tissue decreased in the presence of Lp in the incubation medium. The metabolic fates of 3H-lipids synthesised by the posterior midgut were followed and it was observed that DG was the major lipid released to Lp particles. However, the majority of phospholipids were not transferred to Lp, but remained in the tissue. The phospholipids that were synthesised and accumulated in the posterior midgut were found to be associated with Rhodnius luminal contents as structural components of PMMs. PMID:23827998

  18. Determination of pH in Regions of the Midguts of Acaridid Mites

    PubMed Central

    Erban, Tomas; Hubert, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The pH of the guts of mites strongly affects their digestive processes. This study was carried out to determine the pH in the guts of 12 species of stored product and house dust mites. Eighteen pH indicators were chosen and offered to the mites in the feeding biotest. Based on the color changes of the indicators, the gut contents of acaridid mites were determined to be within a pH range of 4 to neutral. The gut contents showed a gradient in pH from the anterior to the posterior part. The anterior midgut (ventriculus and caeca) of most species had a pH ranging from 4.5 to 5, or slightly more alkaline for most of the species, while the middle midgut (intercolon/colon) had a pH of 5 to 6. Finally, the pH of the posterior midgut (postcolon) was between 5.5 and 7. Except for Dermatophagoides spp., no remarkable differences in the pH of the gut were observed among the tested species. Dermatophagoides spp. had a more acidic anterior midgut (a pH of 4 to 5) and colon (a pH of 5) with postcolon (a pH of below 6). The results characterizing in vivo conditions in the mite gut offer useful information to study the activity of mite digestive enzymes including their inhibitors and gut microflora. PMID:20572792

  19. Gene expression in midgut tissues of Diaphorina citri: Application to biology and vector control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We produced a gene expression dataset from the midgut tissues of the Asian citrus psyllid (AsCP), Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae). The AsCP is the primary vector associated with the spread of a devastating citrus trees disease, huanglongbing (HLB). The occurrence and spread of the AsCP and H...

  20. Midgut gene expression in Asian citrus psyllid (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) Diaphorina citri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We produced a gene expression dataset from the midgut tissues of the Asian citrus psyllid (AsCP), Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae). The AsCP is the primary vector of the bacterium associated with a devastating citrus disease known as huanglongbing (HLB). The occurrence and spread of the AsCP ...

  1. Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors in the midgut of Phlebotomus papatasi

    PubMed Central

    Sigle, Leah Theresa; Ramalho-Ortigão, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae) are important disease vectors of parasites of the genus Leishmania, as well as bacteria and viruses. Following studies of the midgut transcriptome of Phlebotomus papatasi, the principal vector of Leishmania major, two non-classical Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors were identified (PpKzl1 and PpKzl2). Analyses of expression profiles indicated that PpKzl1 and PpKzl2 transcripts are both regulated by blood-feeding in the midgut of P. papatasi and are also expressed in males, larva and pupa. We expressed a recombinant PpKzl2 in a mammalian expression system (CHO-S free style cells) that was applied to in vitro studies to assess serine proteinase inhibition. Recombinant PpKzl2 inhibited α-chymotrypsin to 9.4% residual activity and also inhibited α-thrombin and trypsin to 33.5% and 63.9% residual activity, suggesting that native PpKzl2 is an active serine proteinase inhibitor and likely involved in regulating digestive enzymes in the midgut. Early stages of Leishmania are susceptible to killing by digestive proteinases in the sandfly midgut. Thus, characterising serine proteinase inhibitors may provide new targets and strategies to prevent transmission of Leishmania. PMID:24037187

  2. Alterations in the fat body and midgut of Culex quinquefasciatus larvae following exposure to different insecticides.

    PubMed

    Alves, Stênio Nunes; Serrão, José Eduardo; Melo, Alan Lane

    2010-08-01

    This study describes morphological alterations in the fat body and midgut of Culex quinquefasciatus larvae following exposure to different insecticides. To this end, both third and fourth instars of C. quinquefasciatus larvae were exposed for 30 and 60 min to organophosphate (50 ppb), pyrethroids (20 and 30 ppb), and avermectin derivates (1.5 and 54 ppb). Following incubation, pH measurements of the larvae gut were recorded. The fat body and midgut were also analyzed by light and transmission electron microscopy. These studies demonstrate a decrease in the pH of the larvae anterior midgut following exposure to all of the tested insecticides. Histochemical tests revealed a strong reaction for neutral lipids in the control group and a marked decrease in the group exposed to cypermethrin. Furthermore, a weak reaction with acidic lipids in larvae exposed to deltamethrin, temephos, ivermectin and abamectin was also observed. Insecticide-exposed larvae also exhibited cytoplasm granule differences, relative to control larvae. Finally, we noted a small reduction in microvilli size in the apex of digestive cells, although vesicles were found to be present. The destructive changes in the larvae were very similar regardless of the type of insecticide analyzed. These data suggest that alterations in the fat body and midgut are a common response to cellular intoxication.

  3. Midgut serine proteases and alternative host plant utilization in Pieris brassicae L.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rakesh; Bhardwaj, Usha; Kumar, Pawan; Mazumdar-Leighton, Sudeshna

    2015-01-01

    Pieris brassicae L. is a serious pest of cultivated crucifers in several parts of the world. Larvae of P. brassicae also feed prolifically on garden nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus L., of the family Tropaeolaceae). Proteolytic digestion was studied in larvae feeding on multiple hosts. Fourth instars were collected from cauliflower fields before transfer onto detached, aerial tissues of selected host plants in the lab. Variable levels of midgut proteases were detected in larvae fed on different hosts using protein substrates (casein and recombinant RBCL cloned from cauliflower) and diagnostic, synthetic substrates. Qualitative changes in midgut trypsin activities and quantitative changes in midgut chymotrypsin activities were implicated in physiological adaptation of larvae transferred to T. majus. Midgut proteolytic activities were inhibited to different extents by serine protease inhibitors, including putative trypsin inhibitors isolated from herbivore-attacked and herbivore-free leaves of cauliflower (CfTI) and T. majus (TpTI). Transfer of larvae to T. majus significantly influenced feeding parameters but not necessarily when transferred to different tissues of the same host. Results obtained are relevant for devising sustainable pest management strategies, including transgenic approaches using genes encoding plant protease inhibitors. PMID:25873901

  4. Apoptosis and necrosis during the circadian cycle in the centipede midgut.

    PubMed

    Rost-Roszkowska, M M; Chajec, Ł; Vilimova, J; Tajovský, K

    2016-07-01

    Three types of cells have been distinguished in the midgut epithelium of two centipedes, Lithobius forficatus and Scolopendra cingulata: digestive, secretory, and regenerative cells. According to the results of our previous studies, we decided to analyze the relationship between apoptosis and necrosis in their midgut epithelium and circadian rhythms. Ultrastructural analysis showed that these processes proceed in a continuous manner that is independent of the circadian rhythm in L. forficatus, while in S. cingulata necrosis is activated at midnight. Additionally, the description of apoptosis and necrosis showed no differences between males and females of both species analyzed. At the beginning of apoptosis, the cell cytoplasm becomes electron-dense, apparently in response to shrinkage of the cell. Organelles such as the mitochondria, cisterns of endoplasmic reticulum transform and degenerate. Nuclei gradually assume lobular shapes before the apoptotic cell is discharged into the midgut lumen. During necrosis, however, the cytoplasm of the cell becomes electron-lucent, and the number of organelles decreases. While the digestive cells of about 10 % of L. forficatus contain rickettsia-like pathogens, the corresponding cells in S. cingulata are free of rickettsia. As a result, we can state that apoptosis in L. forficatus is presumably responsible for protecting the organism against infections, while in S. cingulata apoptosis is not associated with the elimination of pathogens. Necrosis is attributed to mechanical damage, and the activation of this process coincides with proliferation of the midgut regenerative cells at midnight in S. cingulata. PMID:26277351

  5. Does autophagy in the midgut epithelium of centipedes depend on the day/night cycle?

    PubMed

    Rost-Roszkowska, M M; Chajec, Ł; Vilimova, J; Tajovský, K; Kszuk-Jendrysik, M

    2015-01-01

    The midgut epithelium of two centipedes, Lithobius forficatus and Scolopendra cingulata, is composed of digestive, secretory and regenerative cells. In L. forficatus, the autophagy occurred only in the cytoplasm of the digestive cells as a sporadic process, while in S. cingulata, it occurred intensively in the digestive, secretory and regenerative cells of the midgut epithelium. In both of the species that were analyzed, this process proceeded in a continuous manner and did not depend on the day/night cycle. Ultrastructural analysis showed that the autophagosomes and autolysosomes were located mainly in the apical and perinuclear cytoplasm of the digestive cells in L. forficatus. However, in S. cingulata, the entire cytoplasm was filled with autophagosomes and autolysosomes. Initially the membranes of phagophores surround organelles during autophagosome formation. Autolysosomes result from the fusion of autophagosomes and lysosomes. Residual bodies which are the last stage of autophagy were released into the midgut lumen due to necrosis. Autophagy in the midgut epithelia that were analyzed was confirmed using acid phosphatase and mono-dansyl-cadaverine stainings. PMID:25464151

  6. Intravital imaging of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A toxin binding sites in the midgut of silkworm.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Wang, Jing; Han, Heyou; Huang, Liang; Shao, Feng; Li, Xuepu

    2014-02-15

    Identification of the resistance mechanism of insects against Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A toxin is becoming an increasingly challenging task. This fact highlights the need for establishing new methods to further explore the molecular interactions of Cry1A toxin with insects and the receptor-binding region of Cry1A toxins for their wider application as biopesticides and a gene source for gene-modified crops. In this contribution, a quantum dot-based near-infrared fluorescence imaging method has been applied for direct dynamic tracking of the specific binding of Cry1A toxins, CrylAa and CrylAc, to the midgut tissue of silkworm. The in vitro fluorescence imaging displayed the higher binding specificity of CrylAa-QD probes compared to CrylAc-QD to the brush border membrane vesicles of midgut from silkworm. The in vivo imaging demonstrated that more CrylAa-QDs binding to silkworm midgut could be effectively and distinctly monitored in living silkworms. Furthermore, frozen section analysis clearly indicated the broader receptor-binding region of Cry1Aa compared to that of Cry1Ac in the midgut part. These observations suggest that the insecticidal activity of Cry toxins may depend on the receptor-binding sites, and this scatheless and visual near-infrared fluorescence imaging could provide a new avenue to study the resistance mechanism to maintain the insecticidal activity of B. thuringiensis toxins. PMID:24252542

  7. Characterization of Plasmodium developmental transcriptomes in Anopheles gambiae midgut reveals novel regulators of malaria transmission.

    PubMed

    Akinosoglou, Karolina A; Bushell, Ellen S C; Ukegbu, Chiamaka Valerie; Schlegelmilch, Timm; Cho, Jee-Sun; Redmond, Seth; Sala, Katarzyna; Christophides, George K; Vlachou, Dina

    2015-02-01

    The passage through the mosquito is a major bottleneck for malaria parasite populations and a target of interventions aiming to block disease transmission. Here, we used DNA microarrays to profile the developmental transcriptomes of the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei in vivo, in the midgut of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes, from parasite stages in the midgut blood bolus to sporulating oocysts on the basal gut wall. Data analysis identified several distinct transcriptional programmes encompassing genes putatively involved in developmental processes or in interactions with the mosquito. At least two of these programmes are associated with the ookinete development that is linked to mosquito midgut invasion and establishment of infection. Targeted disruption by homologous recombination of two of these genes resulted in mutant parasites exhibiting notable infection phenotypes. GAMER encodes a short polypeptide with granular localization in the gametocyte cytoplasm and shows a highly penetrant loss-of-function phenotype manifested as greatly reduced ookinete numbers, linked to impaired male gamete release. HADO encodes a putative magnesium phosphatase with distinctive cortical localization along the concave ookinete periphery. Disruption of HADO compromises ookinete development leading to significant reduction of oocyst numbers. Our data provide important insights into the molecular framework underpinning Plasmodium development in the mosquito and identifies two genes with important functions at initial stages of parasite development in the mosquito midgut.

  8. Transcriptome of the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) larval midgut in response to infection by Bacillus thuringiensis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcriptomic profiles of the lepidopteran insect pest Lymantria dispar (gypsy moth) were characterized in the larval midgut in response to infection by the biopesticide Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki. RNA-Seq approaches were used to define a set of 49,613 assembled transcript sequences, of which...

  9. Midgut epithelium in molting silkworm: A fine balance among cell growth, differentiation, and survival.

    PubMed

    Franzetti, Eleonora; Casartelli, Morena; D'Antona, Paola; Montali, Aurora; Romanelli, Davide; Cappellozza, Silvia; Caccia, Silvia; Grimaldi, Annalisa; de Eguileor, Magda; Tettamanti, Gianluca

    2016-07-01

    The midgut of insects has attracted great attention as a system for studying intestinal stem cells (ISCs) as well as cell death-related processes, such as apoptosis and autophagy. Among insects, Lepidoptera represent a good model to analyze these cells and processes. In particular, larva-larva molting is an interesting developmental phase since the larva must deal with nutrient starvation and its organs are subjected to rearrangements due to proliferation and differentiation events. Several studies have analyzed ISCs in vitro and characterized key factors involved in their division and differentiation during molt. However, in vivo studies performed during larva-larva transition on these cells, and on the whole midgut epithelium, are fragmentary. In the present study, we analyzed the larval midgut epithelium of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, during larva-larva molting, focusing our attention on ISCs. Moreover, we investigated the metabolic changes that occur in the epithelium and evaluated the intervention of autophagy. Our data on ISCs proliferation and differentiation, autophagy activation, and metabolic and functional activities of the midgut cells shed light on the complexity of this organ during the molting phase. PMID:27349418

  10. Midgut transcriptome profiling of Anoplophora glabripennis, a lignocellulose degrading Cerambycid beetle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Wood-feeding insects often work in collaboration with microbial symbionts to degrade lignin biopolymers and release glucose and other fermentable sugars from recalcitrant plant cell wall carbohydrates, including cellulose and hemicellulose. Here, we present the midgut transcriptome of la...

  11. SPARC–Dependent Cardiomyopathy in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Bodmer, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Background— The Drosophila heart is an important model for studying the genetics underpinning mammalian cardiac function. The system comprises contractile cardiomyocytes, adjacent to which are pairs of highly endocytic pericardial nephrocytes that modulate cardiac function by uncharacterized mechanisms. Identifying these mechanisms and the molecules involved is important because they may be relevant to human cardiac physiology. Methods and Results— This work aimed to identify circulating cardiomodulatory factors of potential relevance to humans using the Drosophila nephrocyte–cardiomyocyte system. A Kruppel-like factor 15 (dKlf15) loss-of-function strategy was used to ablate nephrocytes and then heart function and the hemolymph proteome were analyzed. Ablation of nephrocytes led to a severe cardiomyopathy characterized by a lengthening of diastolic interval. Rendering adult nephrocytes dysfunctional by disrupting their endocytic function or temporally conditional knockdown of dKlf15 led to a similar cardiomyopathy. Proteomics revealed that nephrocytes regulate the circulating levels of many secreted proteins, the most notable of which was the evolutionarily conserved matricellular protein Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine (SPARC), a protein involved in mammalian cardiac function. Finally, reducing SPARC gene dosage ameliorated the cardiomyopathy that developed in the absence of nephrocytes. Conclusions— The data implicate SPARC in the noncell autonomous control of cardiac function in Drosophila and suggest that modulation of SPARC gene expression may ameliorate cardiac dysfunction in humans. PMID:26839388

  12. Gp93, the Drosophila GRP94 ortholog, is required for gut epithelial homeostasis and nutrient assimilation-coupled growth control

    PubMed Central

    Maynard, Jason C.; Pham, Trang; Zheng, Tianli; Jockheck-Clark, Angela; Rankin, Helen B.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Spana, Eric P.; Nicchitta, Christopher V.

    2010-01-01

    GRP94, the endoplasmic reticulum Hsp90, is a metazoan-restricted chaperone essential for early development in mammals, yet dispensable for mammalian cell viability. This dichotomy suggests that GRP94 is required for the functional expression of secretory and/or membrane proteins that enable the integration of cells into tissues. To explore this hypothesis, we have identified the Drosophila ortholog of GRP94, Gp93, and report that Gp93 is an essential gene in Drosophila. Loss of zygotic Gp93 expression is late larval lethal and causes prominent defects in the larval midgut, the sole endoderm-derived larval tissue. Gp93 mutant larvae display pronounced defects in the midgut epithelium, with aberrant copper cell structure, markedly reduced gut acidification, atypical septate junction structure, depressed gut motility, and deficits in intestinal nutrient uptake. The metabolic consequences of the loss of Gp93-expression are profound; Gp93 mutant larvae exhibit a starvation-like metabolic phenotype, including suppression of insulin signaling and extensive mobilization of amino acids and triglycerides. The defects in copper cell structure/function accompanying loss of Gp93 expression resemble those reported for mutations in labial, an endodermal homeotic gene required for copper cell specification, and α-spectrin, thus suggesting an essential role for Gp93 in the functional expression of secretory/integral membrane protein-encoding lab protein target genes and/or integral membrane protein(s) that interact with the spectrin cytoskeleton to confer epithelial membrane specialization. PMID:20044986

  13. Characterization of proteinases from the midgut of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus involved in the generation of antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hemoglobin is a rich source of biologically active peptides, some of which are potent antimicrobials (hemocidins). A few hemocidins have been purified from the midgut contents of ticks. Nonetheless, how antimicrobials are generated in the tick midgut and their role in immunity is still poorly understood. Here we report, for the first time, the contribution of two midgut proteinases to the generation of hemocidins. Results An aspartic proteinase, designated BmAP, was isolated from the midgut of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus using three chromatographic steps. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that BmAP is restricted to the midgut. The other enzyme is a previously characterized midgut cathepsin L-like cysteine proteinase designated BmCL1. Substrate specificities of native BmAP and recombinant BmCL1 were mapped using a synthetic combinatorial peptide library and bovine hemoglobin. BmCL1 preferred substrates containing non-polar residues at P2 subsite and polar residues at P1, whereas BmAP hydrolysed substrates containing non-polar amino acids at P1 and P1'. Conclusions BmAP and BmCL1 generate hemocidins from hemoglobin alpha and beta chains in vitro. We postulate that hemocidins may be important for the control of tick pathogens and midgut flora. PMID:20663211

  14. Binding of insecticidal lectin Colocasia esculenta tuber agglutinin (CEA) to midgut receptors of Bemisia tabaci and Lipaphis erysimi provides clues to its insecticidal potential.

    PubMed

    Roy, Amit; Gupta, Sumanti; Hess, Daniel; Das, Kali Pada; Das, Sampa

    2014-07-01

    The insecticidal potential of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectins against hemipterans has been experimentally proven. However, the basis behind the toxicity of these lectins against hemipterans remains elusive. The present study elucidates the molecular basis behind insecticidal efficacy of Colocasia esculenta tuber agglutinin (CEA) against Bemisia tabaci and Lipaphis erysimi. Confocal microscopic analyses highlighted the binding of 25 kDa stable homodimeric lectin to insect midgut. Ligand blots followed by LC MS/MS analyses identified binding partners of CEA as vacuolar ATP synthase and sarcoplasmic endoplasmic reticulum type Ca(2+) ATPase from B. tabaci, and ATP synthase, heat shock protein 70 and clathrin heavy chain assembly protein from L. erysimi. Internalization of CEA into hemolymph was confirmed by Western blotting. Glycoprotein nature of the receptors was identified through glycospecific staining. Deglycosylation assay indicated the interaction of CEA with its receptors to be probably glycan mediated. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed the interaction kinetics between ATP synthase of B. tabaci with CEA. Pathway prediction study based on Drosophila homologs suggested the interaction of CEA with insect receptors that probably led to disruption of cellular processes causing growth retardation and loss of fecundity of target insects. Thus, the present findings strengthen our current understanding of the entomotoxic potentiality of CEA, which will facilitate its future biotechnological applications.

  15. Binding of insecticidal lectin Colocasia esculenta tuber agglutinin (CEA) to midgut receptors of Bemisia tabaci and Lipaphis erysimi provides clues to its insecticidal potential.

    PubMed

    Roy, Amit; Gupta, Sumanti; Hess, Daniel; Das, Kali Pada; Das, Sampa

    2014-07-01

    The insecticidal potential of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectins against hemipterans has been experimentally proven. However, the basis behind the toxicity of these lectins against hemipterans remains elusive. The present study elucidates the molecular basis behind insecticidal efficacy of Colocasia esculenta tuber agglutinin (CEA) against Bemisia tabaci and Lipaphis erysimi. Confocal microscopic analyses highlighted the binding of 25 kDa stable homodimeric lectin to insect midgut. Ligand blots followed by LC MS/MS analyses identified binding partners of CEA as vacuolar ATP synthase and sarcoplasmic endoplasmic reticulum type Ca(2+) ATPase from B. tabaci, and ATP synthase, heat shock protein 70 and clathrin heavy chain assembly protein from L. erysimi. Internalization of CEA into hemolymph was confirmed by Western blotting. Glycoprotein nature of the receptors was identified through glycospecific staining. Deglycosylation assay indicated the interaction of CEA with its receptors to be probably glycan mediated. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed the interaction kinetics between ATP synthase of B. tabaci with CEA. Pathway prediction study based on Drosophila homologs suggested the interaction of CEA with insect receptors that probably led to disruption of cellular processes causing growth retardation and loss of fecundity of target insects. Thus, the present findings strengthen our current understanding of the entomotoxic potentiality of CEA, which will facilitate its future biotechnological applications. PMID:24753494

  16. Spatiotemporal rescue of memory dysfunction in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Sean E; Le, Phuong T; Osborn, Alexander J; Matsumoto, Kunihiro; Davis, Ronald L

    2003-12-01

    We have developed a method for temporal and regional gene expression targeting (TARGET) in Drosophila and show the simultaneous spatial and temporal rescue of a memory defect. The transient expression of the rutabaga-encoded adenylyl cyclase in the mushroom bodies of the adult brain was necessary and sufficient to rescue the rutabaga memory deficit, which rules out a developmental brain defect in the etiology of this deficit and demonstrates an acute role for rutabaga in memory formation in these neurons. The TARGET system offers general utility in simultaneously addressing issues of when and where gene products are required. PMID:14657498

  17. Preventing neurodegeneration in the Drosophila mutant bubblegum.

    PubMed

    Min, K T; Benzer, S

    1999-06-18

    The Drosophila melanogaster recessive mutant bubblegum (bgm) exhibits adult neurodegeneration, with marked dilation of photoreceptor axons. The bubblegum mutant shows elevated levels of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs), as seen in the human disease adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD). In ALD, the excess can be lowered by dietary treatment with "Lorenzo's oil," a mixture of unsaturated fatty acids. Feeding the fly mutant one of the components, glyceryl trioleate oil, blocked the accumulation of excess VLCFAs as well as development of the pathology. Mutant flies thus provide a potential model system for studying mechanisms of neurodegenerative disease and screening drugs for treatment.

  18. Molecular genetic analysis of midgut serine proteases in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Isoe, Jun; Rascón, Alberto A; Kunz, Susan; Miesfeld, Roger L

    2009-12-01

    Digestion of blood meal proteins by midgut proteases provides anautogenous mosquitoes with the nutrients required to complete the gonotrophic cycle. Inhibition of protein digestion in the midgut of blood feeding mosquitoes could therefore provide a strategy for population control. Based on recent reports indicating that the mechanism and regulation of protein digestion in blood fed female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes is more complex than previously thought, we used a robust RNAi knockdown method to investigate the role of four highly expressed midgut serine proteases in blood meal metabolism. We show by Western blotting that the early phase trypsin protein (AaET) is maximally expressed at 3 h post-blood meal (PBM), and that AaET is not required for the protein expression of three late phase serine proteases, AaLT (late trypsin), AaSPVI (5G1), and AaSPVII. Using the trypsin substrate analog BApNA to analyze in vitro enzyme activity in midgut extracts from single mosquitoes, we found that knockdown of AaSPVI expression caused a 77.6% decrease in late phase trypsin-like activity, whereas, knockdown of AaLT and AaSPVII expression had no significant effect on BApNA activity. In contrast, injection of AaLT, AaSPVI, and AaSPVII dsRNA inhibited degradation of endogenous serum albumin protein using an in vivo protease assay, as well as, significantly decreased egg production in both the first and second gonotrophic cycles (P < 0.001). These results demonstrate that AaLT, AaSPVI, and AaSPVII all contribute to blood protein digestion and oocyte maturation, even though AaSPVI is the only abundant midgut late phase serine protease that appears to function as a classic trypsin enzyme. PMID:19883761

  19. Differential Protein Modulation in Midguts of Aedes aegypti Infected with Chikungunya and Dengue 2 Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Tchankouo-Nguetcheu, Stéphane; Khun, Huot; Pincet, Laurence; Roux, Pascal; Bahut, Muriel; Huerre, Michel; Guette, Catherine; Choumet, Valérie

    2010-01-01

    Background Arthropod borne virus infections cause several emerging and resurgent infectious diseases. Among the diseases caused by arboviruses, dengue and chikungunya are responsible for a high rate of severe human diseases worldwide. The midgut of mosquitoes is the first barrier for pathogen transmission and is a target organ where arboviruses must replicate prior to infecting other organs. A proteomic approach was undertaken to characterize the key virus/vector interactions and host protein modifications that happen in the midgut for viral transmission to eventually take place. Methodology and Principal Findings Using a proteomics differential approach with two-Dimensional Differential in-Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), we defined the protein modulations in the midgut of Aedes aegypti that were triggered seven days after an oral infection (7 DPI) with dengue 2 (DENV-2) and chikungunya (CHIKV) viruses. Gel profile comparisons showed that the level of 18 proteins was modulated by DENV-2 only and 12 proteins were modulated by CHIKV only. Twenty proteins were regulated by both viruses in either similar or different ways. Both viruses caused an increase of proteins involved in the generation of reactive oxygen species, energy production, and carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Midgut infection by DENV-2 and CHIKV triggered an antioxidant response. CHIKV infection produced an increase of proteins involved in detoxification. Conclusion/Significance Our study constitutes the first analysis of the protein response of Aedes aegypti's midgut infected with viruses belonging to different families. It shows that the differentially regulated proteins in response to viral infection include structural, redox, regulatory proteins, and enzymes for several metabolic pathways. Some of these proteins like antioxidant are probably involved in cell protection. On the other hand, we propose that the modulation of other proteins like transferrin, hsp60 and alpha glucosidase, may favour

  20. Composition of the Spruce Budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) Midgut Microbiota as Affected by Rearing Conditions.

    PubMed

    Landry, Mathieu; Comeau, André M; Derome, Nicolas; Cusson, Michel; Levesque, Roger C

    2015-01-01

    The eastern spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) is one of the most destructive forest insect pests in Canada. Little is known about its intestinal microbiota, which could play a role in digestion, immune protection, communication and/or development. The present study was designed to provide a first characterization of the effects of rearing conditions on the taxonomic diversity and structure of the C. fumiferana midgut microbiota, using a culture-independent approach. Three diets and insect sources were examined: larvae from a laboratory colony reared on a synthetic diet and field-collected larvae reared on balsam fir or black spruce foliage. Bacterial DNA from the larval midguts was extracted to amplify and sequence the V6-V8 region of the 16S rRNA gene, using the Roche 454 GS-FLX technology. Our results showed a dominance of Proteobacteria, mainly Pseudomonas spp., in the spruce budworm midgut, irrespective of treatment group. Taxonomic diversity of the midgut microbiota was greater for larvae reared on synthetic diet than for those collected and reared on host plants, a difference that is likely accounted for by several factors. A greater proportion of bacteria from the phylum Bacteroidetes in insects fed artificial diet constituted the main difference between this group and those reared on foliage; within the phylum Proteobacteria, the presence of the genus Bradyrhizobium was also unique to insects reared on artificial diet. Strikingly, a Bray-Curtis analysis showed important differences in microbial diversity among the treatment groups, pointing to the importance of diet and environment in defining the spruce budworm midgut microbiota. PMID:26636571

  1. Plasmodium falciparum evades mosquito immunity by disrupting JNK-mediated apoptosis of invaded midgut cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramphul, Urvashi N.; Garver, Lindsey S.; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Canepa, Gaspar E.; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    The malaria parasite, Plasmodium, must survive and develop in the mosquito vector to be successfully transmitted to a new host. The Plasmodium falciparum Pfs47 gene is critical for malaria transmission. Parasites that express Pfs47 (NF54 WT) evade mosquito immunity and survive, whereas Pfs47 knockouts (KO) are efficiently eliminated by the complement-like system. Two alternative approaches were used to investigate the mechanism of action of Pfs47 on immune evasion. First, we examined whether Pfs47 affected signal transduction pathways mediating mosquito immune responses, and show that the Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway is a key mediator of Anopheles gambiae antiplasmodial responses to P. falciparum infection and that Pfs47 disrupts JNK signaling. Second, we used microarrays to compare the global transcriptional responses of A. gambiae midguts to infection with WT and KO parasites. The presence of Pfs47 results in broad and profound changes in gene expression in response to infection that are already evident 12 h postfeeding, but become most prominent at 26 h postfeeding, the time when ookinetes invade the mosquito midgut. Silencing of 15 differentially expressed candidate genes identified caspase-S2 as a key effector of Plasmodium elimination in parasites lacking Pfs47. We provide experimental evidence that JNK pathway regulates activation of caspases in Plasmodium-invaded midgut cells, and that caspase activation is required to trigger midgut epithelial nitration. Pfs47 alters the cell death pathway of invaded midgut cells by disrupting JNK signaling and prevents the activation of several caspases, resulting in an ineffective nitration response that makes the parasite undetectable by the mosquito complement-like system. PMID:25552553

  2. Composition of the Spruce Budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) Midgut Microbiota as Affected by Rearing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Mathieu; Comeau, André M.; Derome, Nicolas; Cusson, Michel; Levesque, Roger C.

    2015-01-01

    The eastern spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) is one of the most destructive forest insect pests in Canada. Little is known about its intestinal microbiota, which could play a role in digestion, immune protection, communication and/or development. The present study was designed to provide a first characterization of the effects of rearing conditions on the taxonomic diversity and structure of the C. fumiferana midgut microbiota, using a culture-independent approach. Three diets and insect sources were examined: larvae from a laboratory colony reared on a synthetic diet and field-collected larvae reared on balsam fir or black spruce foliage. Bacterial DNA from the larval midguts was extracted to amplify and sequence the V6-V8 region of the 16S rRNA gene, using the Roche 454 GS-FLX technology. Our results showed a dominance of Proteobacteria, mainly Pseudomonas spp., in the spruce budworm midgut, irrespective of treatment group. Taxonomic diversity of the midgut microbiota was greater for larvae reared on synthetic diet than for those collected and reared on host plants, a difference that is likely accounted for by several factors. A greater proportion of bacteria from the phylum Bacteroidetes in insects fed artificial diet constituted the main difference between this group and those reared on foliage; within the phylum Proteobacteria, the presence of the genus Bradyrhizobium was also unique to insects reared on artificial diet. Strikingly, a Bray-Curtis analysis showed important differences in microbial diversity among the treatment groups, pointing to the importance of diet and environment in defining the spruce budworm midgut microbiota. PMID:26636571

  3. Midgut Transcriptome of the Cockroach Periplaneta americana and Its Microbiota: Digestion, Detoxification and Oxidative Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianhua; Zhang, Yixi; Li, Jingjing; Liu, Meiling; Liu, Zewen

    2016-01-01

    The cockroach, Periplaneta americana, is an obnoxious and notorious pest of the world, with a strong ability to adapt to a variety of complex environments. However, the molecular mechanism of this adaptability is mostly unknown. In this study, the genes and microbiota composition associated with the adaptation mechanism were studied by analyzing the transcriptome and 16S rDNA pyrosequencing of the P. americana midgut, respectively. Midgut transcriptome analysis identified 82,905 unigenes, among which 64 genes putatively involved in digestion (11 genes), detoxification (37 genes) and oxidative stress response (16 genes) were found. Evaluation of gene expression following treatment with cycloxaprid further revealed that the selected genes (CYP6J1, CYP4C1, CYP6K1, Delta GST, alpha-amylase, beta-glucosidase and aminopeptidase) were upregulated at least 2.0-fold at the transcriptional level, and four genes were upregulated more than 10.0-fold. An interesting finding was that three digestive enzymes positively responded to cycloxaprid application. Tissue expression profiles further showed that most of the selected genes were midgut-biased, with the exception of CYP6K1. The midgut microbiota composition was obtained via 16S rDNA pyrosequencing and was found to be mainly dominated by organisms from the Firmicutes phylum, among which Clostridiales, Lactobacillales and Burkholderiales were the main orders which might assist the host in the food digestion or detoxification of noxious compounds. The preponderant species, Clostridium cellulovorans, was previously reported to degrade lignocellulose efficiently in insects. The abundance of genes involved in digestion, detoxification and response to oxidative stress, and the diversity of microbiota in the midgut might provide P. americana high capacity to adapt to complex environments. PMID:27153200

  4. Bioluminescence imaging to track real-time armadillo promoter activity in live Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed

    Akiyoshi, Ryutaro; Kaneuch, Taro; Aigaki, Toshiro; Suzuki, Hirobumi

    2014-09-01

    We established a method for bioluminescence imaging (BLI) to track real-time gene expression in live Drosophila embryos. We constructed a transgenesis vector containing multiple cloning sites and enhanced green-emitting luciferase (ELuc; Emerald Luc), a brighter and pH-insensitive luciferase for promoter analysis. To evaluate the utility of BLI using an ELuc reporter together with an optimized microscope system, we visualized the expression pattern of armadillo (arm), a member of the Wnt pathway in Drosophila, throughout embryogenesis. We generated transgenic flies carrying the arm:: ELuc fusion gene, and successfully performed BLI continuously for 22 h in the same embryos. Our study showed, for the first time, that arm::Eluc expression was dramatically increased in the anterior midgut rudiment, myoblasts of the dorsal/lateral musculature, and the posterior spiracle after stage 13, and the cephalic region at stage 17. To further demonstrate the application of our BLI system, we revealed that arm transcriptional activity in embryos was modulated inversely by treatment with ionomycin or 6-bromoindirubin-3-oxime (BIO), an inhibitor and activator of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, respectively. Therefore, our microscopic BLI system is useful for monitoring gene expression in live Drosophila embryos, and for investigating regulatory mechanisms by using chemicals and mutations that might affect expression. PMID:25023969

  5. A Drosophila model to image phagosome maturation.

    PubMed

    Shandala, Tetyana; Lim, Chiaoxin; Sorvina, Alexandra; Brooks, Douglas A

    2013-01-01

    Phagocytosis involves the internalization of extracellular material by invagination of the plasma membrane to form intracellular vesicles called phagosomes, which have functions that include pathogen degradation. The degradative properties of phagosomes are thought to be conferred by sequential fusion with endosomes and lysosomes; however, this maturation process has not been studied in vivo. We employed Drosophila hemocytes, which are similar to mammalian professional macrophages, to establish a model of phagosome maturation. Adult Drosophila females, carrying transgenic Rab7-GFP endosome and Lamp1-GFP lysosome markers, were injected with E. coli DH5α and the hemocytes were collected at 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes after infection. In wild-type females, E. coli were detected within enlarged Rab7-GFP positive phagosomes at 15 to 45 minutes after infection; and were also observed in enlarged Lamp1-GFP positive phagolysosomes at 45 minutes. Two-photon imaging of hemocytes in vivo confirmed this vesicle morphology, including enlargement of Rab7-GFP and Lamp1-GFP structures that often appeared to protrude from hemocytes. The interaction of endosomes and lysosomes with E. coli phagosomes observed in Drosophila hemocytes was consistent with that previously described for phagosome maturation in human ex vivo macrophages. We also tested our model as a tool for genetic analysis using 14-3-3e mutants, and demonstrated altered phagosome maturation with delayed E. coli internalization, trafficking and/or degradation. These findings demonstrate that Drosophila hemocytes provide an appropriate, genetically amenable, model for analyzing phagosome maturation ex vivo and in vivo. PMID:24709696

  6. Sequences upstream of the homologous cis-elements of the Adh adult enhancer of Drosophila are required for maximal levels of Adh gene transcription in adults of Scaptodrosophila lebanonensis.

    PubMed Central

    Papaceit, Montserrat; Orengo, Dorcas; Juan, Elvira

    2004-01-01

    The evolution of cis-regulatory elements is of particular interest for our understanding of the evolution of gene regulation. The Adh gene of Drosophilidae shows interspecific differences in tissue-specific expression and transcript levels during development. In Scaptodrosophila lebanonensis adults, the level of distal transcripts is maximal between the fourth and eighth day after eclosion and is around five times higher than that in D. melanogaster Adh(S). To examine whether these quantitative differences are regulated by sequences lying upstream of the distal promoter, we performed in vitro deletion mutagenesis of the Adh gene of S. lebanonensis, followed by P-element-mediated germ-line transformation. All constructs included, as a cotransgene, a modified Adh gene of D. melanogaster (dAdh) in a fixed position and orientation that acted as a chromosomal position control. Using this approach, we have identified a fragment of 1.5 kb in the 5' region, 830 bp upstream of the distal start site, which is required to achieve maximal levels of distal transcript in S. lebanonensis. The presence of this fragment produces a 3.5-fold higher level of distal mRNA (as determined by real time quantitative PCR) compared with the D. melanogaster dAdh cotransgene. This region contains the degenerated end of a minisatellite sequence expanding farther upstream and does not correspond to the Adh adult enhancer (AAE) of D. melanogaster. Indeed, the cis-regulatory elements of the AAE have been identified by phylogenetic footprinting within the region 830 bp upstream of the distal start site of S. lebanonensis. Furthermore, the deletions Delta-830 and Delta-2358 yield the same pattern of tissue-specific expression, indicating that all tissue-specific elements are contained within the region 830 bp upstream of the distal start site. PMID:15166155

  7. RNA editing in Drosophila melanogaster: new targets and functionalconsequences

    SciTech Connect

    Stapleton, Mark; Carlson, Joseph W.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2006-09-05

    Adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs) catalyze the site-specific conversion of adenosine to inosine in primary mRNA transcripts. These re-coding events affect coding potential, splice-sites, and stability of mature mRNAs. ADAR is an essential gene and studies in mouse, C. elegans, and Drosophila suggest its primary function is to modify adult behavior by altering signaling components in the nervous system. By comparing the sequence of isogenic cDNAs to genomic DNA, we have identified and experimentally verified 27 new targets of Drosophila ADAR. Our analyses lead us to identify new classes of genes whose transcripts are targets of ADAR including components of the actin cytoskeleton, and genes involved in ion homeostasis and signal transduction. Our results indicate that editing in Drosophila increases the diversity of the proteome, and does so in a manner that has direct functional consequences on protein function.

  8. Deletion of Siah-Interacting Protein gene in Drosophila causes cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Casad, Michelle E.; Yu, Lin; Daniels, Joseph P.; Wolf, Matthew J.; Rockman, Howard A.

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila is a useful model organism in which to study the genetics of human diseases, including recent advances in identification of the genetics of heart development and disease in the fly. To identify novel genes that cause cardiomyopathy, we performed a deficiency screen in adult Drosophila. Using optical coherence tomography to phenotype cardiac function in awake adult Drosophila, we identified Df(1)Exel6240 as having cardiomyopathy. Using a number of strategies including customized smaller deletions, screening of mutant alleles, and transgenic rescue, we identified CG3226 as the causative gene for this deficiency. CG3226 is an uncharacterized gene in Drosophila possessing homology to the mammalian Siah-interacting-protein (SIP) gene. Mammalian SIP functions as an adaptor protein involved in one of the β-catenin degradation complexes. To investigate the effects of altering β-catenin/Armadillo signaling in the adult fly, we measured heart function in flies expressing either constitutively active Armadillo or transgenic constructs that block Armadillo signaling, specifically in the heart. While increasing Armadillo signaling in the heart did not have an effect on adult heart function, decreasing Armadillo signaling in the fly heart caused the significant reduction in heart chamber size. In summary, we show that deletion of CG3226, which has homology to mammalian SIP, causes cardiomyopathy in adult Drosophila. Alterations in Armadillo signaling during development lead to important changes in the size and function of the adult heart. PMID:22398840

  9. Aging Studies in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yaning; Yolitz, Jason; Wang, Cecilia; Spangler, Edward; Zhan, Ming; Zou, Sige

    2015-01-01

    Summary Drosophila is a genetically tractable system ideal for investigating the mechanisms of aging and developing interventions for promoting healthy aging. Here we describe methods commonly used in Drosophila aging research. These include basic approaches for preparation of diets and measurements of lifespan, food intake and reproductive output. We also describe some commonly used assays to measure changes in physiological and behavioral functions of Drosophila in aging, such as stress resistance and locomotor activity. PMID:23929099

  10. Cloning and characterization of a Drosophila tyramine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Saudou, F; Amlaiky, N; Plassat, J L; Borrelli, E; Hen, R

    1990-01-01

    Receptors for biogenic amines such as dopamine, serotonin and epinephrine belong to the family of receptors that interact with G proteins and share a putative seven transmembrane domain structure. Using a strategy based on nucleotide sequence homology between the corresponding genes, we have isolated Drosophila cDNA clones encoding a new member of the G protein-coupled receptor family. This protein exhibits highest homology to the human alpha 2 adrenergic receptors, the human 5HT1A receptor and a recently cloned Drosophila serotonin receptor. The corresponding mRNA is found predominantly in adult Drosophila heads. Membranes from mammalian cells expressing this receptor displayed high affinity binding sites for [3H]yohimbine, an alpha 2 adrenergic receptor antagonist (Kd = 4.45 x 10(-9) M). Tyramine was the most efficient of the putative Drosophila neurotransmitters at displacing [3H]yohimbine binding (EC50 = 1.25 x 10(-6) M). Furthermore tyramine induced an inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity in NIH 3T3 cells expressing this receptor. The Drosophila tyramine receptor that we have isolated might therefore be an invertebrate equivalent of the mammalian alpha 2 adrenergic receptors. Images Fig.2 Fig.5 PMID:2170118

  11. The effect of Emblica officinalis diet on lifespan, sexual behavior, and fitness characters in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Pankaj; Prasad, B R Guru; Murthy, N Anjaneya; Hegde, S N

    2011-04-01

    Drosophila is an excellent organism to test Ayurvedic medicines. The objective of our study was to explore the potential of Emblica officinalis drug on longevity, sexual behavior, and reproductive fitness of Drosophila melanogaster using adult feeding method. Increase in the lifespan, fecundity, fertility, ovarioles number, and developmental time was observed in both parents and F1 generation, but not in the F2 generation in experimental culture (control + E. officinalis). According to the Duncan's multiple range test and ANOVA, there is a significant difference between two cultures. It was also noticed that E. officinalis influence some fitness characters in Drosophila along with sexual behavior. PMID:22408317

  12. Temperature sensation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Barbagallo, Belinda; Garrity, Paul A

    2015-10-01

    Animals use thermosensory systems to achieve optimal temperatures for growth and reproduction and to avoid damaging extremes. Thermoregulation is particularly challenging for small animals like the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, whose body temperature rapidly changes in response to environmental temperature fluctuation. Recent work has uncovered some of the key molecules mediating fly thermosensation, including the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels TRPA1 and Painless, and the Gustatory Receptor Gr28b, an unanticipated thermosensory regulator normally associated with a different sensory modality. There is also evidence the Drosophila phototransduction cascade may have some role in thermosensory responses. Together, the fly's diverse thermosensory molecules act in an array of functionally distinct thermosensory neurons to drive a suite of complex, and often exceptionally thermosensitive, behaviors.

  13. Drosophila by the dozen

    SciTech Connect

    Celniker, Susan E.; Hoskins, Roger A.

    2007-07-13

    This year's conference on Drosophila research illustratedwell the current focus of Drosophila genomics on the comprehensiveidentification of functional elements in the genome sequence, includingmRNA transcripts arising from multiple alternative start sites and splicesites, a multiplicity of noncoding transcripts and small RNAs,identification of binding sites for transcription factors, sequenceconservation in related species and sequence variation within species.Resources and technologies for genetics and functional genomics aresteadily being improved, including the building of collections oftransposon insertion mutants and hairpin constructs for RNA interference(RNAi). The conference also highlighted progress in the use of genomicinformation by many laboratories to study diverse aspects of biology andmodels of human disease. Here we will review a few highlights of especialinterest to readers of Genome Biology.

  14. The Drosophila Auditory System

    PubMed Central

    Boekhoff-Falk, Grace; Eberl, Daniel F.

    2013-01-01

    Development of a functional auditory system in Drosophila requires specification and differentiation of the chordotonal sensilla of Johnston’s organ (JO) in the antenna, correct axonal targeting to the antennal mechanosensory and motor center (AMMC) in the brain, and synaptic connections to neurons in the downstream circuit. Chordotonal development in JO is functionally complicated by structural, molecular and functional diversity that is not yet fully understood, and construction of the auditory neural circuitry is only beginning to unfold. Here we describe our current understanding of developmental and molecular mechanisms that generate the exquisite functions of the Drosophila auditory system, emphasizing recent progress and highlighting important new questions arising from research on this remarkable sensory system. PMID:24719289

  15. [Estimation of the biological age in males of the taiga tick (Ixodes persulcatus: Ixodinae) by fat reserves in the midgut].

    PubMed

    Grigor'eva, L A

    2012-01-01

    Some criteria for the estimation of the biological and calendar age by the fat storage in midgut cells of Ixodes persulcatus males were established on the basis of examination of ticks from the laboratory culture.

  16. Tre1, a G Protein-Coupled Receptor, Directs Transepithelial Migration of Drosophila Germ Cells

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    In most organisms, germ cells are formed distant from the somatic part of the gonad and thus have to migrate along and through a variety of tissues to reach the gonad. Transepithelial migration through the posterior midgut (PMG) is the first active step during Drosophila germ cell migration. Here we report the identification of a novel G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), Tre1, that is essential for this migration step. Maternal tre1 RNA is localized to germ cells, and tre1 is required cell autonomously in germ cells. In tre1 mutant embryos, most germ cells do not exit the PMG. The few germ cells that do leave the midgut early migrate normally to the gonad, suggesting that this gene is specifically required for transepithelial migration and that mutant germ cells are still able to recognize other guidance cues. Additionally, inhibiting small Rho GTPases in germ cells affects transepithelial migration, suggesting that Tre1 signals through Rho1. We propose that Tre1 acts in a manner similar to chemokine receptors required during transepithelial migration of leukocytes, implying an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of transepithelial migration. Recently, the chemokine receptor CXCR4 was shown to direct migration in vertebrate germ cells. Thus, germ cells may more generally use GPCR signaling to navigate the embryo toward their target. PMID:14691551

  17. Evolution, Expression, and Function of Nonneuronal Ligand-Gated Chloride Channels in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Remnant, Emily J; Williams, Adam; Lumb, Chris; Yang, Ying Ting; Chan, Janice; Duchêne, Sebastian; Daborn, Phillip J; Batterham, Philip; Perry, Trent

    2016-01-01

    Ligand-gated chloride channels have established roles in inhibitory neurotransmission in the nervous systems of vertebrates and invertebrates. Paradoxically, expression databases in Drosophila melanogaster have revealed that three uncharacterized ligand-gated chloride channel subunits, CG7589, CG6927, and CG11340, are highly expressed in nonneuronal tissues. Furthermore, subunit copy number varies between insects, with some orders containing one ortholog, whereas other lineages exhibit copy number increases. Here, we show that the Dipteran lineage has undergone two gene duplications followed by expression-based functional differentiation. We used promoter-GFP expression analysis, RNA-sequencing, and in situ hybridization to examine cell type and tissue-specific localization of the three D. melanogaster subunits. CG6927 is expressed in the nurse cells of the ovaries. CG7589 is expressed in multiple tissues including the salivary gland, ejaculatory duct, malpighian tubules, and early midgut. CG11340 is found in malpighian tubules and the copper cell region of the midgut. Overexpression of CG11340 increased sensitivity to dietary copper, and RNAi and ends-out knockout of CG11340 resulted in copper tolerance, providing evidence for a specific nonneuronal role for this subunit in D. melanogaster Ligand-gated chloride channels are important insecticide targets and here we highlight copy number and functional divergence in insect lineages, raising the potential that order-specific receptors could be isolated within an effective class of insecticide targets.

  18. Evolution, Expression, and Function of Nonneuronal Ligand-Gated Chloride Channels in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Remnant, Emily J.; Williams, Adam; Lumb, Chris; Yang, Ying Ting; Chan, Janice; Duchêne, Sebastian; Daborn, Phillip J.; Batterham, Philip; Perry, Trent

    2016-01-01

    Ligand-gated chloride channels have established roles in inhibitory neurotransmission in the nervous systems of vertebrates and invertebrates. Paradoxically, expression databases in Drosophila melanogaster have revealed that three uncharacterized ligand-gated chloride channel subunits, CG7589, CG6927, and CG11340, are highly expressed in nonneuronal tissues. Furthermore, subunit copy number varies between insects, with some orders containing one ortholog, whereas other lineages exhibit copy number increases. Here, we show that the Dipteran lineage has undergone two gene duplications followed by expression-based functional differentiation. We used promoter-GFP expression analysis, RNA-sequencing, and in situ hybridization to examine cell type and tissue-specific localization of the three D. melanogaster subunits. CG6927 is expressed in the nurse cells of the ovaries. CG7589 is expressed in multiple tissues including the salivary gland, ejaculatory duct, malpighian tubules, and early midgut. CG11340 is found in malpighian tubules and the copper cell region of the midgut. Overexpression of CG11340 increased sensitivity to dietary copper, and RNAi and ends-out knockout of CG11340 resulted in copper tolerance, providing evidence for a specific nonneuronal role for this subunit in D. melanogaster. Ligand-gated chloride channels are important insecticide targets and here we highlight copy number and functional divergence in insect lineages, raising the potential that order-specific receptors could be isolated within an effective class of insecticide targets. PMID:27172217

  19. The migrations of Drosophila muscle founders and primordial germ cells are interdependent.

    PubMed

    Stepanik, Vincent; Dunipace, Leslie; Bae, Young-Kyung; Macabenta, Frank; Sun, Jingjing; Trisnadi, Nathanie; Stathopoulos, Angelike

    2016-09-01

    Caudal visceral mesoderm (CVM) cells migrate from posterior to anterior of the Drosophila embryo as two bilateral streams of cells to support the specification of longitudinal muscles along the midgut. To accomplish this long-distance migration, CVM cells receive input from their environment, but little is known about how this collective cell migration is regulated. In a screen we found that wunen mutants exhibit CVM cell migration defects. Wunens are lipid phosphate phosphatases known to regulate the directional migration of primordial germ cells (PGCs). PGC and CVM cell types interact while PGCs are en route to the somatic gonadal mesoderm, and previous studies have shown that CVM impacts PGC migration. In turn, we found here that CVM cells exhibit an affinity for PGCs, localizing to the position of PGCs whether mislocalized or trapped in the endoderm. In the absence of PGCs, CVM cells exhibit subtle changes, including more cohesive movement of the migrating collective, and an increased number of longitudinal muscles is found at anterior sections of the larval midgut. These data demonstrate that PGC and CVM cell migrations are interdependent and suggest that distinct migrating cell types can coordinately influence each other to promote effective cell migration during development. PMID:27578182

  20. Conserved genetic pathways controlling the development of the diffuse endocrine system in vertebrates and Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hartenstein, Volker; Takashima, Shigeo; Adams, Katrina L

    2010-05-01

    The midgut epithelium is formed by absorptive enterocytes, secretory cells and endocrine cells. Each of these lineages is derived from the pluripotent progenitors that constitute the embryonic endoderm; the mature midgut retains pools of self-renewing stem cells that continue to produce all lineages. Recent findings in vertebrates and Drosophila shed light on the genetic mechanism that specifies the fate of the different lineages. A pivotal role is played by the Notch signaling pathway that, in a manner that appears to be very similar to the way in which Notch signaling selects neural progenitors within the neurectoderm, distinguishes the fate of secretory/endocrine cells and enterocytes. Proneural genes encoding bHLH transcription factors are expressed and required in prospective endocrine cells; activation of the Notch pathways restricts the number of these cells and promotes enterocyte development. In this review we compare the development of the intestinal endocrine cells in vertebrates and insects and summarize recent findings dealing with genetic pathways controlling this cell type.

  1. Evolution, Expression, and Function of Nonneuronal Ligand-Gated Chloride Channels in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Remnant, Emily J; Williams, Adam; Lumb, Chris; Yang, Ying Ting; Chan, Janice; Duchêne, Sebastian; Daborn, Phillip J; Batterham, Philip; Perry, Trent

    2016-01-01

    Ligand-gated chloride channels have established roles in inhibitory neurotransmission in the nervous systems of vertebrates and invertebrates. Paradoxically, expression databases in Drosophila melanogaster have revealed that three uncharacterized ligand-gated chloride channel subunits, CG7589, CG6927, and CG11340, are highly expressed in nonneuronal tissues. Furthermore, subunit copy number varies between insects, with some orders containing one ortholog, whereas other lineages exhibit copy number increases. Here, we show that the Dipteran lineage has undergone two gene duplications followed by expression-based functional differentiation. We used promoter-GFP expression analysis, RNA-sequencing, and in situ hybridization to examine cell type and tissue-specific localization of the three D. melanogaster subunits. CG6927 is expressed in the nurse cells of the ovaries. CG7589 is expressed in multiple tissues including the salivary gland, ejaculatory duct, malpighian tubules, and early midgut. CG11340 is found in malpighian tubules and the copper cell region of the midgut. Overexpression of CG11340 increased sensitivity to dietary copper, and RNAi and ends-out knockout of CG11340 resulted in copper tolerance, providing evidence for a specific nonneuronal role for this subunit in D. melanogaster Ligand-gated chloride channels are important insecticide targets and here we highlight copy number and functional divergence in insect lineages, raising the potential that order-specific receptors could be isolated within an effective class of insecticide targets. PMID:27172217

  2. Reduced Gut Acidity Induces an Obese-Like Phenotype in Drosophila melanogaster and in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Jui-Hung; Kuo, Ping-Chang; Yeh, Sheng-Rong; Lin, Hung-Yu; Fu, Tsai-Feng; Wu, Ming-Shiang; Wang, Horng-Dar; Wang, Pei-Yu

    2015-01-01

    In order to identify genes involved in stress and metabolic regulation, we carried out a Drosophila P-element-mediated mutagenesis screen for starvation resistance. We isolated a mutant, m2, that showed a 23% increase in survival time under starvation conditions. The P-element insertion was mapped to the region upstream of the vha16-1 gene, which encodes the c subunit of the vacuolar-type H+-ATPase. We found that vha16-1 is highly expressed in the fly midgut, and that m2 mutant flies are hypomorphic for vha16-1 and also exhibit reduced midgut acidity. This deficit is likely to induce altered metabolism and contribute to accelerated aging, since vha16-1 mutant flies are short-lived and display increases in body weight and lipid accumulation. Similar phenotypes were also induced by pharmacological treatment, through feeding normal flies and mice with a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor (acetazolamide) or proton pump inhibitor (PPI, lansoprazole) to suppress gut acid production. Our study may thus provide a useful model for investigating chronic acid suppression in patients. PMID:26436771

  3. The bHLH transcription factor Hand is regulated by Alk in the Drosophila embryonic gut

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, Gaurav K.; Palmer, Ruth H. . E-mail: Ruth.Palmer@ucmp.umu.se

    2006-12-29

    During embryonic development the midgut visceral muscle is formed by fusion of cells within the visceral mesoderm, a process initiated by the specification of a specialised cell type, the founder cell, within this tissue. Activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Alk) in the developing visceral muscle of Drosophila melanogaster initiates a signal transduction pathway required for muscle fusion. In this paper, we have investigated downstream components which are regulated by this novel signalling pathway. Here we show that Alk-mediated signal transduction drives the expression of the bHLH transcription factor Hand in vivo. Loss of Alk function results in a complete lack of Hand expression in this tissue, whereas Alk gain of function results in an expansion of Hand expression. Finally, we have investigated the process of muscle fusion in the gut of Hand mutant animals and can find no obvious defects in this process, suggesting that Hand is not critical for visceral muscle fusion per se.

  4. The transmembrane protein, Tincar, is involved in the development of the compound eye in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Yuki; Sawamoto, Kazunobu; Takahashi, Kuniaki; Ueda, Ryu; Okano, Hideyuki

    2005-02-01

    We previously cloned and characterized the Drosophila gene, tincar (tinc), which encodes a novel protein with eight putative transmembrane domains. Here, we have studied the expression pattern and functions of tinc during developmental processes. tinc mRNA is expressed in the central and peripheral nervous systems, and midgut during embryogenesis. In the third-instar larval eye disc, tinc mRNA is strongly expressed in all the differentiating ommatidial cells within and in the vicinity of the morphogenetic furrow. Loss-of-function analysis using the RNA-interference method revealed severe defects of eye morphogenesis during the late developmental stages. Our results suggested that tinc may have an indispensable role in the normal differentiation of ommatidial cells. PMID:15654626

  5. Gene expression and localization analysis of Bombyx mori bidensovirus and its putative receptor in B. mori midgut.

    PubMed

    Ito, Katsuhiko; Shimura, Sachiko; Katsuma, Susumu; Tsuda, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Jun; Tabunoki, Hiroko; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Shimada, Toru; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko

    2016-05-01

    Bombyx mori bidensovirus (BmBDV), which causes fatal flacherie disease in the silkworm, replicates only in midgut columnar cells. The viral resistance expressed by some silkworm strains, which is characterized as non-susceptibility irrespective of the viral dose, is determined by a single gene, nsd-2. We previously identified nsd-2 by positional cloning and found that this gene encodes a putative amino acid transporter that might function as a receptor for BmBDV. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the part of the midgut expressing nsd-2 (resistance gene), +(nsd-2) (susceptibility gene) and BmBDV propagation. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis using total RNA isolated from the anterior, middle, and posterior parts of the midgut showed that nsd-2 and +(nsd-2) were strongly expressed in the posterior part of the midgut. The expression levels of both genes were very low in the anterior and middle parts. The qRT-PCR analysis showed that the expression levels of BmBDV-derived transcripts were correlated with the levels of +(nsd-2) expression. However, BmBDV-derived transcripts were clearly detected in all parts of the midgut. These results suggest that the infectivity of BmBDV depends mainly on the expression level of +(nsd-2) in the midgut and that viral infection is supported even by very faint expression of +(nsd-2). By contrast, the expression levels of +(nsd-2) were exceedingly low or undetectable in the middle part of the midgut, indicating that BmBDV infection might occur via another mechanism, independent of +(nsd-2), in the middle part of the midgut. PMID:26953258

  6. The Drosophila melanogaster host model

    PubMed Central

    Igboin, Christina O.; Griffen, Ann L.; Leys, Eugene J.

    2012-01-01

    The deleterious and sometimes fatal outcomes of bacterial infectious diseases are the net result of the interactions between the pathogen and the host, and the genetically tractable fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has emerged as a valuable tool for modeling the pathogen–host interactions of a wide variety of bacteria. These studies have revealed that there is a remarkable conservation of bacterial pathogenesis and host defence mechanisms between higher host organisms and Drosophila. This review presents an in-depth discussion of the Drosophila immune response, the Drosophila killing model, and the use of the model to examine bacterial–host interactions. The recent introduction of the Drosophila model into the oral microbiology field is discussed, specifically the use of the model to examine Porphyromonas gingivalis–host interactions, and finally the potential uses of this powerful model system to further elucidate oral bacterial-host interactions are addressed. PMID:22368770

  7. Characterization of Drosophila melanogaster cytochrome P450 genes

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Henry; Sztal, Tamar; Pasricha, Shivani; Sridhar, Mohan; Batterham, Philip; Daborn, Phillip J.

    2009-01-01

    Cytochrome P450s form a large and diverse family of heme-containing proteins capable of carrying out many different enzymatic reactions. In both mammals and plants, some P450s are known to carry out reactions essential for processes such as hormone synthesis, while other P450s are involved in the detoxification of environmental compounds. In general, functions of insect P450s are less well understood. We characterized Drosophila melanogaster P450 expression patterns in embryos and 2 stages of third instar larvae. We identified numerous P450s expressed in the fat body, Malpighian (renal) tubules, and in distinct regions of the midgut, consistent with hypothesized roles in detoxification processes, and other P450s expressed in organs such as the gonads, corpora allata, oenocytes, hindgut, and brain. Combining expression pattern data with an RNA interference lethality screen of individual P450s, we identify candidate P450s essential for developmental processes and distinguish them from P450s with potential functions in detoxification. PMID:19289821

  8. Histochemical analysis of the goblet cell matrix in the larval midgut of Manduca sexta

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, T.W.; Lozano, G.; Cajina-Quezada, M.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental analyses were made to histochemically determine the composition of the goblet cell matrix material in the larval midgut of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. Techniques employed following fixation in Carnoy fluid were the periodic acid-Schiff reaction and the alcian blue stain at pH 1.0 and pH 2.5 and following methylation and subsequent saponification. The cumulative evidence suggests that the plug material is an acid mucosubstance.

  9. Malrotation and Midgut Volvulus associated with Asymptomatic Duplication Cyst of Jejunum.

    PubMed

    Rahul, Sandip Kumar; Upadhyaya, Vijai Datta; Kumar, Basant

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal duplications can affect any part of the alimentary tract and are notorious for their variable presentation. Their association with malrotation and midgut volvulus is rare. We describe an 8-year old boy presented with episodes of abdominal pain. Radiological workup showed whirlpool sign and abnormal relationship of mesenteric vessels. At operation, malrotation with chronic volvulus was found. Incidentally, a jejunal communicating duplication cyst was also noted. PMID:27672583

  10. Malrotation and Midgut Volvulus associated with Asymptomatic Duplication Cyst of Jejunum

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyaya, Vijai Datta; Kumar, Basant

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal duplications can affect any part of the alimentary tract and are notorious for their variable presentation. Their association with malrotation and midgut volvulus is rare. We describe an 8-year old boy presented with episodes of abdominal pain. Radiological workup showed whirlpool sign and abnormal relationship of mesenteric vessels. At operation, malrotation with chronic volvulus was found. Incidentally, a jejunal communicating duplication cyst was also noted. PMID:27672583

  11. Purification, characterization and molecular cloning of the major chitinase from Tenebrio molitor larval midgut.

    PubMed

    Genta, Fernando A; Blanes, Lucas; Cristofoletti, Plínio T; do Lago, Claudimir L; Terra, Walter R; Ferreira, Clélia

    2006-10-01

    Insect chitinases are involved in degradation of chitin from the exoskeleton cuticle or from midgut peritrophic membrane during molts. cDNAs coding for insect cuticular and gut chitinases were cloned, but only chitinases from moulting fluid were purified and characterized. In this study the major digestive chitinase from T. molitor midgut (TmChi) was purified to homogeneity, characterized and sequenced after cDNA cloning. TmChi is secreted by midgut epithelial cells, has a molecular weight of 44 kDa and is unstable in the presence of midgut proteinases. TmChi shows strong substrate inhibition when acting on umbelliferyl-derivatives of chitobio- and chitotriosaccharides, but has normal Michaelis kinetics with the N-acetylglucosamine derivative as substrate. TmChi has very low activity against colloidal chitin, but effectively converts oligosaccharides to shorter fragments. The best substrate for TmChi is chitopentaose, with highest k(cat)/K(M) value. Sequence analysis and chemical modification experiments showed that the TmChi active site contains carboxylic groups and a tryptophane, which are known to be important for catalysis in family 18 chitinases. Modification with p-hidroximercuribenzoate of a cysteine residue, which is exposed after substrate binding, leads to complete inactivation of the enzyme. TmChi mRNA encodes a signal peptide plus a protein with 37 kDa and high similarity with other insect chitinases from family 18. Surprisingly, this gene does not encode the C-terminal Ser-Thr-rich connector and chitin-binding domain normally present in chitinases. The special features of TmChi probably result from its adaptation to digest chitin-rich food without damaging the peritrophic membrane.

  12. The cytological effect of ecdysterone on the midgut cells of the flesh-fly Sarcophaga bullata.

    PubMed

    Radford, S V; Misch, D W

    1971-06-01

    Larvae of the flesh-fly, Sarcophaga bullata, were injected with the synthetic moulting hormone ecdysterone or saline at the beginning of the third and final larval instar. One group was left untreated. The ecdysterone-injected larvae showed an increase in number of secondary lysosomes in the midgut epithelial cells similar to that observed at the onset of metamorphosis, an event which would normally occur about 48 hr later in these larvae.

  13. THE CYTOLOGICAL EFFECT OF ECDYSTERONE ON THE MIDGUT CELLS OF THE FLESH-FLY SARCOPHAGA BULLATA

    PubMed Central

    Radford, Sharon V.; Misch, Donald W.

    1971-01-01

    Larvae of the flesh-fly, Sarcophaga bullata, were injected with the synthetic moulting hormone ecdysterone or saline at the beginning of the third and final larval instar. One group was left untreated. The ecdysterone-injected larvae showed an increase in number of secondary lysosomes in the midgut epithelial cells similar to that observed at the onset of metamorphosis, an event which would normally occur about 48 hr later in these larvae. PMID:5092208

  14. Cytotoxic effects of thiamethoxam in the midgut and malpighian tubules of Africanized Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    PubMed

    Catae, Aline Fernanda; Roat, Thaisa Cristina; De Oliveira, Regiane Alves; Nocelli, Roberta Cornélio Ferreira; Malaspina, Osmar

    2014-04-01

    Due to its expansion, agriculture has become increasingly dependent on the use of pesticides. However, the indiscriminate use of insecticides has had additional effects on the environment. These products have a broad spectrum of action, and therefore the insecticide affects not only the pests but also non-target insects such as bees, which are important pollinators of agricultural crops and natural environments. Among the most used pesticides, the neonicotinoids are particularly harmful. One of the neonicotinoids of specific concern is thiamethoxam, which is used on a wide variety of crops and is toxic to bees. Thus, this study aimed to analyze the effects of this insecticide in the midgut and Malpighian tubule cells of Africanized Apis mellifera. Newly emerged workers were exposed until 8 days to a diet containing a sublethal dose of thiamethoxam equal to 1/10 of LC₅₀ (0.0428 ng a.i./l L of diet). The bees were dissected and the organs were processed for transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that thiamethoxam is cytotoxic to midgut and Malpighian tubules. In the midgut, the damage was more evident in bees exposed to the insecticide on the first day. On the eighth day, the cells were ultrastructurally intact suggesting a recovery of this organ. The Malpighian tubules showed pronounced alterations on the eighth day of exposure of bees to the insecticide. This study demonstrates that the continuous exposure to a sublethal dose of thiamethoxam can impair organs that are used during the metabolism of the insecticide.

  15. Shifts in the Midgut/Pyloric Microbiota Composition within a Honey Bee Apiary throughout a Season.

    PubMed

    Ludvigsen, Jane; Rangberg, Anbjørg; Avershina, Ekaterina; Sekelja, Monika; Kreibich, Claus; Amdam, Gro; Rudi, Knut

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera) are prominent crop pollinators and are, thus, important for effective food production. The honey bee gut microbiota is mainly host specific, with only a few species being shared with other insects. It currently remains unclear how environmental/dietary conditions affect the microbiota within a honey bee population over time. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to characterize the composition of the midgut/pyloric microbiota of a honey bee apiary throughout a season. The rationale for investigating the midgut/pyloric microbiota is its dynamic nature. Monthly sampling of a demographic homogenous population of bees was performed between May and October, with concordant recording of the honey bee diet. Mixed Sanger-and Illumina 16S rRNA gene sequencing in combination with a quantitative PCR analysis were used to determine the bacterial composition. A marked increase in α-diversity was detected between May and June. Furthermore, we found that four distinct phylotypes belonging to the Proteobacteria dominated the microbiota, and these displayed major shifts throughout the season. Gilliamella apicola dominated the composition early on, and Snodgrassella alvi began to dominate when the other bacteria declined to an absolute low in October. In vitro co-culturing revealed that G. apicola suppressed S. alvi. No shift was detected in the composition of the microbiota under stable environment/dietary conditions between November and February. Therefore, environmental/dietary changes may trigger the shifts observed in the honey bee midgut/pyloric microbiota throughout a season.

  16. Phylogenetically Diverse Burkholderia Associated with Midgut Crypts of Spurge Bugs, Dicranocephalus spp. (Heteroptera: Stenocephalidae)

    PubMed Central

    Kuechler, Stefan Martin; Matsuura, Yu; Dettner, Konrad; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo

    2016-01-01

    Diverse phytophagous heteropteran insects, commonly known as stinkbugs, are associated with specific gut symbiotic bacteria, which have been found in midgut cryptic spaces. Recent studies have revealed that members of the stinkbug families Coreidae and Alydidae of the superfamily Coreoidea are consistently associated with a specific group of the betaproteobacterial genus Burkholderia, called the “stinkbug-associated beneficial and environmental (SBE)” group, and horizontally acquire specific symbionts from the environment every generation. However, the symbiotic system of another coreoid family, Stenocephalidae remains undetermined. We herein investigated four species of the stenocephalid genus Dicranocephalus. Examinations via fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the typical arrangement and ultrastructures of midgut crypts and gut symbionts. Cloning and molecular phylogenetic analyses of bacterial genes showed that the midgut crypts of all species are colonized by Burkholderia strains, which were further assigned to different subgroups of the genus Burkholderia. In addition to the SBE-group Burkholderia, a number of stenocephalid symbionts belonged to a novel clade containing B. sordidicola and B. udeis, suggesting a specific symbiont clade for the Stenocephalidae. The symbiotic systems of stenocephalid bugs may provide a unique opportunity to study the ongoing evolution of symbiont associations in the stinkbug-Burkholderia interaction. PMID:27265344

  17. The bacterial flora of tsetse fly midgut and its effect on trypanosome transmission.

    PubMed

    Soumana, Illiassou Hamidou; Simo, Gustave; Njiokou, Flobert; Tchicaya, Bernadette; Abd-Alla, Adly M M; Cuny, Gérard; Geiger, Anne

    2013-03-01

    The tsetse fly, Glossina palpalis is a vector of the trypanosome that causes sleeping sickness in humans and nagana in cattle along with associated human health problems and massive economic losses. The insect is also known to carry a number of symbionts such as Sodalis, Wigglesworthia, Wolbachia whose effects on the physiology of the insect have been studied in depth. However, effects of other bacterial flora on the physiology of the host and vector competence have received little attention. Epidemiological studies on tsetse fly populations from different geographic sites revealed the presence of a variety of bacteria in the midgut. The most common of the flora belong to the genera Entrobacter (most common), Enterococcus, and Acinetobacter. It was a little surprising to find such diversity in the tsetse midgut since the insect is monophagous consuming vertebrate blood only. Diversity of bacteria is normally associated with polyphagous insects. In contrast to the symbionts, the role of resident midgut bacterial flora on the physiology of the fly and vector competence remains to be elucidated. With regard, Sodalis glossinidius, our data showed that flies harbouring this symbiont have three times greater probability of being infected by trypanosomes than flies without the symbiont. The data delineated in these studies under score the need to carry out detailed investigations on the role of resident bacteria on the physiology of the fly and vector competence.

  18. Effects of gamma irradiation on the midgut ultrastructure of Glossina palpalis subspecies

    SciTech Connect

    Stiles, J.K.; Molyneux, D.H.; Wallbanks, K.R.; Van der Vloedt, A.M.

    1989-05-01

    In the sterile insect technique, insects are sterilized prior to release in areas where they are pests. The sterile males compete for and with fertile wild individuals for mates, thus reducing the population's reproductive rate. Tsetse fly (Glossina spp.) populations have been eradicated after release of laboratory-bred flies sterilized by gamma irradiation. However, no studies exist on radiation-induced damage to the midgut morphology and function of the radiation-sterilized insects. After G. palpalis palpalis and G. p. gambiensis were subjected to 130 Gy gamma radiation, their midgut damage and recovery were monitored by electron microscopy. The first sign of damage was atrophy and loss of the microvillous border from epithelial cells. The rate of cell degeneration increased, with young as well as old cells being affected and cellular debris filling the ectoperitrophic space. Muscle cells were destroyed, patches of basal lamina were left bare, intracellular virus- and rickettsia-like organisms became more frequent, and many replacement cells became unusually large. Partial recovery occurred from the 10th day postirradiation. Such changes in midgut ultrastructure and the corresponding inhibition of functions may increase the susceptibility of the fly to trypanosome infection.

  19. Midgut tissue of male pine engraver , Ips pini, synthesizes monoterpenoid pheromone component ipsdienol de novo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Gregory M.; Tittiger, Claus; Andrews, Gracie L.; Mastick, Grant S.; Kuenzli, Marilyn; Luo, Xin; Seybold, Steven J.; Blomquist, Gary J.

    2002-02-01

    For over three decades the site and pathways of bark beetle aggregation pheromone production have remained elusive. Studies on pheromone production in Ips spp. bark beetles have recently shown de novo biosynthesis of pheromone components via the mevalonate pathway. The gene encoding a key regulated enzyme in this pathway, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase ( HMG-R), showed high transcript levels in the anterior midgut of male pine engravers, Ips pini (Say) (Coleoptera:Scolytidae). HMG-R expression in the midgut was sex, juvenile hormone, and feeding dependent, providing strong evidence that this is the site of acyclic monoterpenoid (ipsdienol) pheromone production in male beetles. Additionally, isolated midgut tissue from fed or juvenile hormone III (JH III)-treated males converted radiolabeled acetate to ipsdienol, as assayed by radio-HPLC. These data support the de novo production of this frass-associated aggregation pheromone component by the mevalonate pathway. The induction of a metazoan HMG-R in this process does not support the postulated role of microorganisms in ipsdienol production.

  20. Midgut lysozymes of Lucilia sericata - new antimicrobials involved in maggot debridement therapy.

    PubMed

    Valachova, I; Takac, P; Majtan, J

    2014-12-01

    Larvae of Lucilia sericata are used for maggot debridement therapy (MDT) because of their ability to remove necrotic tissue and eradicate bacterial pathogens of infected wounds. So far, very few antibacterial factors have been fully characterized (eg lucifensin). Using a molecular approach, some other putative antimicrobial compounds, including three novel lysozymes, have been previously identified and predicted to be involved in MDT. Nevertheless, data on lysozymes tissue origin and their functions have never been elucidated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the expression of three lysozymes in L. sericata and confirm their antibacterial effects within MDT. Moreover, we characterized the eradication process of bacteria within the digestive system of maggots and determined the role of lysozymes in this process. We found that three lysozymes are expressed in specific sections of the L. sericata midgut. Recombinant lysozymes displayed comparable antibacterial activity against Micrococcus luteus. Furthermore, the majority of Gram-positive bacteria were destroyed in vivo within the particular section of the L. sericata midgut where lysozymes are produced. Larval ingestion and subsequent eradication of wound pathogens during their passage through the intestine of maggots are due to, at least in part, antibacterial action of three midgut lysozymes.

  1. Multiple Modes of Action of the Squamocin in the Midgut Cells of Aedes aegypti Larvae

    PubMed Central

    de Paula, Sérgio Oliveira; Martins, Gustavo Ferreira; Zanuncio, José Cola

    2016-01-01

    Annonaceous acetogenins are botanical compounds with good potential for use as insecticides. In the vector, Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae), squamocin (acetogenin) has been reported to be a larvicide and cytotoxic, but the modes of action of this molecule are still poorly understood. This study evaluated the changes in the cell morphology, and in the expression of genes, for autophagy (Atg1 and Atg8), for membrane ion transporter V-ATPase, and for water channel aquaporin-4 (Aqp4) in the midgut of A. aegypti larvae exposed to squamocin from Annona mucosa Jacq. (Annonaceae). Squamocin showed cytotoxic action with changes in the midgut epithelium and digestive cells of A. aegypti larvae, increase in the expression for autophagy gene Atg1 and Atg8, decrease in the expression of V-ATPase, decrease in the expression of Aqp4 gene in LC20 and inhibition of Apq4 genes in the midgut of this vector in LC50. These multiple modes of action for squamocin are described for the first time in insects, and they are important because different sites of action of squamocin from A. mucosa may reduce the possibility of resistance of A. aegypti to this molecule. PMID:27532504

  2. Localization of post-proline cleaving peptidases in Tenebrio molitor larval midgut.

    PubMed

    Goptar, Irina A; Filippova, Irina Yu; Lysogorskaya, Elena N; Oksenoit, Elena S; Vinokurov, Konstantin S; Zhuzhikov, Dmitry P; Bulushova, Natalja V; Zalunin, Igor A; Dunaevsky, Yakov E; Belozersky, Mikhail A; Oppert, Brenda; Elpidina, Elena N

    2008-03-01

    Two soluble post-proline cleaving peptidase activities, PPCP1 and PPCP2, were demonstrated in Tenebrio molitor larval midgut with the substrate benzyloxycarbonyl-L-alanyl-L-proline p-nitroanilide. Both activities were serine peptidases. PPCP1 was active in acidic buffers, with maximum activity at pH 5.3, and was located mainly in the more acidic anterior midgut lumen. The dynamics of PPCP1 activity and the total activity of soluble digestive peptidases in the course of food digestion were similar, suggesting that the enzyme participates in protein digestion. PPCP2 is a nondigestive soluble tissue enzyme evenly distributed along the midgut. An increase in the activity of PPCP2 was observed in buffers of pH 5.6-8.6 and was maximal at pH 7.4. The sensitivity of PPCP2 to inhibitors and the effect of pH are similar to prolyl oligopeptidases with a cysteine residue near the substrate binding site.

  3. Structure, processing and midgut secretion of putative peritrophic membrane ancillary protein (PMAP) from Tenebrio molitor larvae.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A H; Cristofoletti, P T; Pimenta, D C; Ribeiro, A F; Terra, W R; Ferreira, C

    2008-02-01

    A cDNA coding for a Tenebrio molitor midgut protein named peritrophic membrane ancillary protein (PMAP) was cloned and sequenced. The complete cDNA codes for a protein of 595 amino acids with six insect-allergen-related-repeats that may be grouped in A (predicted globular)- and B (predicted nonglobular)-types forming an ABABAB structure. The PMAP-cDNA was expressed in Pichia pastoris and the recombinant protein (64kDa) was purified to homogeneity and used to raise antibodies in rabbits. The specific antibody detected PMAP peptides (22kDa) in the anterior and middle midgut tissue, luminal contents, peritrophic membrane and feces. These peptides derive from PMAP, as supported by mass spectrometry, and resemble those formed by the in vitro action of trypsin on recombinant PMAP. Both in vitro and in vivo PMAP processing seem to occur by attack of trypsin to susceptible bonds in the coils predicted to link AB pairs, thus releasing the putative functional AB structures. The AB-domain structure of PMAP is found in homologous proteins from several insect orders, except lepidopterans that have the apparently derived protein known as nitrile-specifier protein. Immunocytolocalization shows that PMAP is secreted by exocytosis and becomes entrapped in the glycocalyx, before being released into midgut contents. Circumstantial evidence suggests that PMAP-like proteins have a role in peritrophic membrane type 2 formation.

  4. Shifts in the Midgut/Pyloric Microbiota Composition within a Honey Bee Apiary throughout a Season.

    PubMed

    Ludvigsen, Jane; Rangberg, Anbjørg; Avershina, Ekaterina; Sekelja, Monika; Kreibich, Claus; Amdam, Gro; Rudi, Knut

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera) are prominent crop pollinators and are, thus, important for effective food production. The honey bee gut microbiota is mainly host specific, with only a few species being shared with other insects. It currently remains unclear how environmental/dietary conditions affect the microbiota within a honey bee population over time. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to characterize the composition of the midgut/pyloric microbiota of a honey bee apiary throughout a season. The rationale for investigating the midgut/pyloric microbiota is its dynamic nature. Monthly sampling of a demographic homogenous population of bees was performed between May and October, with concordant recording of the honey bee diet. Mixed Sanger-and Illumina 16S rRNA gene sequencing in combination with a quantitative PCR analysis were used to determine the bacterial composition. A marked increase in α-diversity was detected between May and June. Furthermore, we found that four distinct phylotypes belonging to the Proteobacteria dominated the microbiota, and these displayed major shifts throughout the season. Gilliamella apicola dominated the composition early on, and Snodgrassella alvi began to dominate when the other bacteria declined to an absolute low in October. In vitro co-culturing revealed that G. apicola suppressed S. alvi. No shift was detected in the composition of the microbiota under stable environment/dietary conditions between November and February. Therefore, environmental/dietary changes may trigger the shifts observed in the honey bee midgut/pyloric microbiota throughout a season. PMID:26330094

  5. Multiple Modes of Action of the Squamocin in the Midgut Cells of Aedes aegypti Larvae.

    PubMed

    da Silva Costa, Marilza; de Paula, Sérgio Oliveira; Martins, Gustavo Ferreira; Zanuncio, José Cola; Santana, Antônio Euzébio Goulart; Serrão, José Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Annonaceous acetogenins are botanical compounds with good potential for use as insecticides. In the vector, Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae), squamocin (acetogenin) has been reported to be a larvicide and cytotoxic, but the modes of action of this molecule are still poorly understood. This study evaluated the changes in the cell morphology, and in the expression of genes, for autophagy (Atg1 and Atg8), for membrane ion transporter V-ATPase, and for water channel aquaporin-4 (Aqp4) in the midgut of A. aegypti larvae exposed to squamocin from Annona mucosa Jacq. (Annonaceae). Squamocin showed cytotoxic action with changes in the midgut epithelium and digestive cells of A. aegypti larvae, increase in the expression for autophagy gene Atg1 and Atg8, decrease in the expression of V-ATPase, decrease in the expression of Aqp4 gene in LC20 and inhibition of Apq4 genes in the midgut of this vector in LC50. These multiple modes of action for squamocin are described for the first time in insects, and they are important because different sites of action of squamocin from A. mucosa may reduce the possibility of resistance of A. aegypti to this molecule. PMID:27532504

  6. Responses of midgut amylases of Helicoverpa armigera to feeding on various host plants.

    PubMed

    Kotkar, Hemlata M; Sarate, Priya J; Tamhane, Vaijayanti A; Gupta, Vidya S; Giri, Ashok P

    2009-08-01

    Midgut digestive amylases and proteinases of Helicoverpa armigera, a polyphagous and devastating insect pest of economic importance have been studied. We also identified the potential of a sorghum amylase inhibitor against H. armigera midgut amylase. Amylase activities were detected in all the larval instars, pupae, moths and eggs; early instars had lower amylase levels which steadily increased up to the sixth larval instar. Qualitative and quantitative differences in midgut amylases of H. armigera upon feeding on natural and artificial diets were evident. Natural diets were categorized as one or more members of legumes, vegetables, flowers and cereals belonging to different plant families. Amylase activity and isoform patterns varied depending on host plant and/or artificial diet. Artificial diet-fed H. armigera larvae had comparatively high amylase activity and several unique amylase isoforms. Correlation of amylase and proteinase activities of H. armigera with the protein and carbohydrate content of various diets suggested that H. armigera regulates the levels of these digestive enzymes in response to macromolecular composition of the diet. These adjustments in the digestive enzymes of H. armigera may be to obtain better nourishment from the diet and avoid toxicity due to nutritional imbalance. H. armigera, a generalist feeder experiences a great degree of nutritional heterogeneity in its diet. An investigation of the differences in enzyme levels in response to macronutrient balance and imbalance highlight their importance in insect nutrition.

  7. Hypergravity-induced altered behavior in Drosophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosamani, Ravikumar; Wan, Judy; Marcu, Oana; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2012-07-01

    Microgravity and mechanical stress are important factors of the spaceflight environment, and affect astronaut health and behavior. Structural, functional, and behavioral mechanisms of all cells and organisms are adapted to Earth's gravitational force, 1G, while altered gravity can pose challenges to their adaptability to this new environment. On ground, hypergravity paradigms have been used to predict and complement studies on microgravity. Even small changes that take place at a molecular and genetic level during altered gravity may result in changes in phenotypic behavior. Drosophila provides a robust and simple, yet very reliable model system to understand the complexity of hypergravity-induced altered behavior, due to availability of a plethora of genetic tools. Locomotor behavior is a sensitive parameter that reflects the array of molecular adaptive mechanisms recruited during exposure to altered gravity. Thus, understanding the genetic basis of this behavior in a hypergravity environment could potentially extend our understanding of mechanisms of adaptation in microgravity. In our laboratory we are trying to dissect out the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying hypergravity-induced oxidative stress, and its potential consequences on behavioral alterations by using Drosophila as a model system. In the present study, we employed pan-neuronal and mushroom body specific knock-down adult flies by using Gal4/UAS system to express inverted repeat transgenes (RNAi) to monitor and quantify the hypergravity-induced behavior in Drosophila. We established that acute hypergravity (3G for 60 min) causes a significant and robust decrease in the locomotor behavior in adult Drosophila, and that this change is dependent on genes related to Parkinson's disease, such as DJ-1α , DJ-1β , and parkin. In addition, we also showed that anatomically the control of this behavior is significantly processed in the mushroom body region of the fly brain. This work links a molecular

  8. Glial β-Oxidation regulates Drosophila Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Joachim G.; Laranjeira, Antonio; Van Huffel, Leen; Gärtner, Annette; Vilain, Sven; Bastianen, Jarl; Van Veldhoven, Paul P.; Dotti, Carlos G.

    2015-01-01

    The brain's impotence to utilize long-chain fatty acids as fuel, one of the dogmas in neuroscience, is surprising, since the nervous system is the tissue most energy consuming and most vulnerable to a lack of energy. Challenging this view, we here show in vivo that loss of the Drosophila carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2), an enzyme required for mitochondrial β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids as substrates for energy production, results in the accumulation of triacylglyceride-filled lipid droplets in adult Drosophila brain but not in obesity. CPT2 rescue in glial cells alone is sufficient to restore triacylglyceride homeostasis, and we suggest that this is mediated by the release of ketone bodies from the rescued glial cells. These results demonstrate that the adult brain is able to catabolize fatty acids for cellular energy production. PMID:25588812

  9. Generation of enteroendocrine cell diversity in midgut stem cell lineages

    PubMed Central

    Beehler-Evans, Ryan; Micchelli, Craig A.

    2015-01-01

    The endocrine system mediates long-range peptide hormone signaling to broadcast changes in metabolic status to distant target tissues via the circulatory system. In many animals, the diffuse endocrine system of the gut is the largest endocrine tissue, with the full spectrum of endocrine cell subtypes not yet fully characterized. Here, we combine molecular mapping, lineage tracing and genetic analysis in the adult fruit fly to gain new insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms governing enteroendocrine cell diversity. Neuropeptide hormone distribution was used as a basis to generate a high-resolution cellular map of the diffuse endocrine system. Our studies show that cell diversity is seen at two distinct levels: regional and local. We find that class I and class II enteroendocrine cells can be distinguished locally by combinatorial expression of secreted neuropeptide hormones. Cell lineage tracing studies demonstrate that class I and class II cells arise from a common stem cell lineage and that peptide profiles are a stable feature of enteroendocrine cell identity during homeostasis and following challenge with the enteric pathogen Pseudomonas entomophila. Genetic analysis shows that Notch signaling controls the establishment of class II cells in the lineage, but is insufficient to reprogram extant class I cells into class II enteroendocrine cells. Thus, one mechanism by which secretory cell diversity is achieved in the diffuse endocrine system is through cell-cell signaling interactions within individual adult stem cell lineages. PMID:25670792

  10. The developmental transcriptome of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    University of Connecticut; Graveley, Brenton R.; Brooks, Angela N.; Carlson, Joseph W.; Duff, Michael O.; Landolin, Jane M.; Yang, Li; Artieri, Carlo G.; van Baren, Marijke J.; Boley, Nathan; Booth, Benjamin W.; Brown, James B.; Cherbas, Lucy; Davis, Carrie A.; Dobin, Alex; Li, Renhua; Lin, Wei; Malone, John H.; Mattiuzzo, Nicolas R.; Miller, David; Sturgill, David; Tuch, Brian B.; Zaleski, Chris; Zhang, Dayu; Blanchette, Marco; Dudoit, Sandrine; Eads, Brian; Green, Richard E.; Hammonds, Ann; Jiang, Lichun; Kapranov, Phil; Langton, Laura; Perrimon, Norbert; Sandler, Jeremy E.; Wan, Kenneth H.; Willingham, Aarron; Zhang, Yu; Zou, Yi; Andrews, Justen; Bicke, Peter J.; Brenner, Steven E.; Brent, Michael R.; Cherbas, Peter; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Kaufman, Thomas C.; Oliver, Brian; Celniker, Susan E.

    2010-12-02

    . Whereas, 20% of Drosophila genes are annotated as encoding alternatively spliced premRNAs, splice-junction microarray experiments indicate that this number is at least 40% (ref. 7). Determining the diversity of mRNAs generated by alternative promoters, alternative splicing and RNA editing will substantially increase the inferred protein repertoire. Non-coding RNA genes (ncRNAs) including short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAS (miRNAs) (reviewed in ref. 10), and longer ncRNAs such as bxd (ref. 11) and rox (ref. 12), have important roles in gene regulation, whereas others such as small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs)and small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) are important components of macromolecular machines such as the ribosome and spliceosome. The transcription and processing of these ncRNAs must also be fully documented and mapped. As part of the modENCODE project to annotate the functional elements of the D. melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans genomes, we used RNA-Seq and tiling microarrays to sample the Drosophila transcriptome at unprecedented depth throughout development from early embryo to ageing male and female adults. We report on a high-resolution view of the discovery, structure and dynamic expression of the D. melanogaster transcriptome.

  11. The Drosophila anatomy ontology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anatomy ontologies are query-able classifications of anatomical structures. They provide a widely-used means for standardising the annotation of phenotypes and expression in both human-readable and programmatically accessible forms. They are also frequently used to group annotations in biologically meaningful ways. Accurate annotation requires clear textual definitions for terms, ideally accompanied by images. Accurate grouping and fruitful programmatic usage requires high-quality formal definitions that can be used to automate classification and check for errors. The Drosophila anatomy ontology (DAO) consists of over 8000 classes with broad coverage of Drosophila anatomy. It has been used extensively for annotation by a range of resources, but until recently it was poorly formalised and had few textual definitions. Results We have transformed the DAO into an ontology rich in formal and textual definitions in which the majority of classifications are automated and extensive error checking ensures quality. Here we present an overview of the content of the DAO, the patterns used in its formalisation, and the various uses it has been put to. Conclusions As a result of the work described here, the DAO provides a high-quality, queryable reference for the wild-type anatomy of Drosophila melanogaster and a set of terms to annotate data related to that anatomy. Extensive, well referenced textual definitions make it both a reliable and useful reference and ensure accurate use in annotation. Wide use of formal axioms allows a large proportion of classification to be automated and the use of consistency checking to eliminate errors. This increased formalisation has resulted in significant improvements to the completeness and accuracy of classification. The broad use of both formal and informal definitions make further development of the ontology sustainable and scalable. The patterns of formalisation used in the DAO are likely to be useful to developers of other

  12. Mutagenicity of four hair dyes in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Blijleven, W G

    1977-04-01

    The hair dye constituents p-phenylenediamine, 2,4-diaminoanisole sulfate, 2,4-diaminotoluene and 4-nitro-0-phenylenediamine were tested for mutagenicity in Drosophila melanogaster. The compounds were given orally to adult males. The induction of sex-linked recessive lethal mutation was used as a measure of mutagenicity. All four of the dyes tested were mutagenic with a peak mutagenic activity in metabolically active germ cells (spermatids and spermatocytes). PMID:406556

  13. Cadmium resistance in Drosophila: a small cadmium binding substance

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, K.B.; Williams, M.W.; Richter, L.J.; Holt, S.E.; Hook, G.J.; Knoop, S.M.; Sloop, F.V.; Faust, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    A small cadmium-binding substance (CdBS) has been observed in adult Drosophila melanogaster that were raised for their entire growth cycle on a diet that contained 0.15 mM CdCl/sub 2/. Induction of CdBS was observed in strains that differed widely in their sensitivity of CdCl/sub 2/. This report describes the induction of CdBS and some of its characteristics. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. A lepidopteran-specific gene family encoding valine-rich midgut proteins.

    PubMed

    Odman-Naresh, Jothini; Duevel, Margret; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Merzendorfer, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Many lepidopteran larvae are serious agricultural pests due to their feeding activity. Digestion of the plant diet occurs mainly in the midgut and is facilitated by the peritrophic matrix (PM), an extracellular sac-like structure, which lines the midgut epithelium and creates different digestive compartments. The PM is attracting increasing attention to control lepidopteran pests by interfering with this vital function. To identify novel PM components and thus potential targets for insecticides, we performed an immunoscreening with anti-PM antibodies using an expression library representing the larval midgut transcriptome of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. We identified three cDNAs encoding valine-rich midgut proteins of M. sexta (MsVmps), which appear to be loosely associated with the PM. They are members of a lepidopteran-specific family of nine VMP genes, which are exclusively expressed in larval stages in M. sexta. Most of the MsVMP transcripts are detected in the posterior midgut, with the highest levels observed for MsVMP1. To obtain further insight into Vmp function, we expressed MsVMP1 in insect cells and purified the recombinant protein. Lectin staining and glycosidase treatment indicated that MsVmp1 is highly O-glycosylated. In line with results from qPCR, immunoblots revealed that MsVmp1 amounts are highest in feeding larvae, while MsVmp1 is undetectable in starving and molting larvae. Finally using immunocytochemistry, we demonstrated that MsVmp1 localizes to the cytosol of columnar cells, which secrete MsVmp1 into the ectoperitrophic space in feeding larvae. In starving and molting larvae, MsVmp1 is found in the gut lumen, suggesting that the PM has increased its permeability. The present study demonstrates that lepidopteran species including many agricultural pests have evolved a set of unique proteins that are not found in any other taxon and thus may reflect an important adaptation in the highly specialized lepidopteran digestive tract facing

  15. The fine structure of the midgut epithelium in a centipede, Scolopendra cingulata (Chilopoda, Scolopendridae), with the special emphasis on epithelial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chajec, Lukasz; Sonakowska, Lidia; Rost-Roszkowska, Magdalena M

    2014-01-01

    Scolopendra cingulata has a tube-shaped digestive system that is divided into three distinct regions: fore-, mid- and hindgut. The midgut is lined with a pseudostratified columnar epithelium which is composed of digestive, secretory and regenerative cells. Hemocytes also appear between the digestive cells of the midgut epithelium. The ultrastructure of three types of epithelial cells and hemocytes of the midgut has been described with the special emphasis on the role of regenerative cells in the protection of midgut epithelium. The process of midgut epithelium regeneration proceeds due to the ability of regenerative cells to proliferate and differentiate according to a circadian rhythm. The regenerative cells serve as unipotent stem cells that divide in an asymmetric manner. Additionally, two types of hemocytes have been distinguished among midgut epithelial cells. They enter the midgut epithelium from the body cavity. Because of the fact that numerous microorganisms occur in the cytoplasm of midgut epithelial cells, we discuss the role of hemocytes in elimination of pathogens from the midgut epithelium. The studies were conducted with the use of transmission electron microscope and immunofluorescent methods.

  16. The fine structure of the midgut epithelium in a centipede, Scolopendra cingulata (Chilopoda, Scolopendridae), with the special emphasis on epithelial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chajec, Lukasz; Sonakowska, Lidia; Rost-Roszkowska, Magdalena M

    2014-01-01

    Scolopendra cingulata has a tube-shaped digestive system that is divided into three distinct regions: fore-, mid- and hindgut. The midgut is lined with a pseudostratified columnar epithelium which is composed of digestive, secretory and regenerative cells. Hemocytes also appear between the digestive cells of the midgut epithelium. The ultrastructure of three types of epithelial cells and hemocytes of the midgut has been described with the special emphasis on the role of regenerative cells in the protection of midgut epithelium. The process of midgut epithelium regeneration proceeds due to the ability of regenerative cells to proliferate and differentiate according to a circadian rhythm. The regenerative cells serve as unipotent stem cells that divide in an asymmetric manner. Additionally, two types of hemocytes have been distinguished among midgut epithelial cells. They enter the midgut epithelium from the body cavity. Because of the fact that numerous microorganisms occur in the cytoplasm of midgut epithelial cells, we discuss the role of hemocytes in elimination of pathogens from the midgut epithelium. The studies were conducted with the use of transmission electron microscope and immunofluorescent methods. PMID:23831526

  17. Comparative evaluation of the genomes of three common Drosophila-associated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Petkau, Kristina; Fast, David; Duggal, Aashna; Foley, Edan

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is an excellent model to explore the molecular exchanges that occur between an animal intestine and associated microbes. Previous studies in Drosophila uncovered a sophisticated web of host responses to intestinal bacteria. The outcomes of these responses define critical events in the host, such as the establishment of immune responses, access to nutrients, and the rate of larval development. Despite our steady march towards illuminating the host machinery that responds to bacterial presence in the gut, there are significant gaps in our understanding of the microbial products that influence bacterial association with a fly host. We sequenced and characterized the genomes of three common Drosophila-associated microbes: Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis and Acetobacter pasteurianus For each species, we compared the genomes of Drosophila-associated strains to the genomes of strains isolated from alternative sources. We found that environmental Lactobacillus strains readily associated with adult Drosophila and were similar to fly isolates in terms of genome organization. In contrast, we identified a strain of A. pasteurianus that apparently fails to associate with adult Drosophila due to an inability to grow on fly nutrient food. Comparisons between association competent and incompetent A. pasteurianus strains identified a short list of candidate genes that may contribute to survival on fly medium. Many of the gene products unique to fly-associated strains have established roles in the stabilization of host-microbe interactions. These data add to a growing body of literature that examines the microbial perspective of host-microbe relationships. PMID:27493201

  18. Comparative evaluation of the genomes of three common Drosophila-associated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Petkau, Kristina; Fast, David; Duggal, Aashna; Foley, Edan

    2016-09-15

    Drosophila melanogaster is an excellent model to explore the molecular exchanges that occur between an animal intestine and associated microbes. Previous studies in Drosophila uncovered a sophisticated web of host responses to intestinal bacteria. The outcomes of these responses define critical events in the host, such as the establishment of immune responses, access to nutrients, and the rate of larval development. Despite our steady march towards illuminating the host machinery that responds to bacterial presence in the gut, there are significant gaps in our understanding of the microbial products that influence bacterial association with a fly host. We sequenced and characterized the genomes of three common Drosophila-associated microbes: Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis and Acetobacter pasteurianus For each species, we compared the genomes of Drosophila-associated strains to the genomes of strains isolated from alternative sources. We found that environmental Lactobacillus strains readily associated with adult Drosophila and were similar to fly isolates in terms of genome organization. In contrast, we identified a strain of A. pasteurianus that apparently fails to associate with adult Drosophila due to an inability to grow on fly nutrient food. Comparisons between association competent and incompetent A. pasteurianus strains identified a short list of candidate genes that may contribute to survival on fly medium. Many of the gene products unique to fly-associated strains have established roles in the stabilization of host-microbe interactions. These data add to a growing body of literature that examines the microbial perspective of host-microbe relationships.

  19. Comparative evaluation of the genomes of three common Drosophila-associated bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Petkau, Kristina; Fast, David; Duggal, Aashna

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Drosophila melanogaster is an excellent model to explore the molecular exchanges that occur between an animal intestine and associated microbes. Previous studies in Drosophila uncovered a sophisticated web of host responses to intestinal bacteria. The outcomes of these responses define critical events in the host, such as the establishment of immune responses, access to nutrients, and the rate of larval development. Despite our steady march towards illuminating the host machinery that responds to bacterial presence in the gut, there are significant gaps in our understanding of the microbial products that influence bacterial association with a fly host. We sequenced and characterized the genomes of three common Drosophila-associated microbes: Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis and Acetobacter pasteurianus. For each species, we compared the genomes of Drosophila-associated strains to the genomes of strains isolated from alternative sources. We found that environmental Lactobacillus strains readily associated with adult Drosophila and were similar to fly isolates in terms of genome organization. In contrast, we identified a strain of A. pasteurianus that apparently fails to associate with adult Drosophila due to an inability to grow on fly nutrient food. Comparisons between association competent and incompetent A. pasteurianus strains identified a short list of candidate genes that may contribute to survival on fly medium. Many of the gene products unique to fly-associated strains have established roles in the stabilization of host-microbe interactions. These data add to a growing body of literature that examines the microbial perspective of host-microbe relationships. PMID:27493201

  20. Two Leptinotarsa uridine diphosphate N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylases are specialized for chitin synthesis in larval epidermal cuticle and midgut peritrophic matrix.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ji-Feng; Fu, Jia; Mu, Li-Li; Guo, Wen-Chao; Li, Guo-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Uridine diphosphate-N-acetylglucosamine-pyrophosphorylase (UAP) is involved in the biosynthesis of chitin, an essential component of the epidermal cuticle and midgut peritrophic matrix (PM) in insects. In the present paper, two putative LdUAP genes were cloned in Leptinotarsa decemlineata. In vivo bioassay revealed that 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and an ecdysteroid agonist halofenozide activated the expression of the two LdUAPs, whereas a decrease in 20E by RNA interference (RNAi) of an ecdysteroidogenesis gene LdSHD and a 20E signaling gene LdFTZ-F1 repressed the expression. Juvenile hormone (JH), a JH analog pyriproxyfen and an increase in JH by RNAi of an allatostatin gene LdAS-C downregulated LdUAP1 but upregulated LdUAP2, whereas a decrease in JH by silencing of a JH biosynthesis gene LdJHAMT had converse effects. Thus, expression of LdUAPs responded to both 20E and JH. Moreover, knockdown of LdUAP1 reduced chitin contents in whole larvae and integument samples, thinned tracheal taenidia, impaired larval-larval molt, larval-pupal ecdysis and adult emergence. In contrast, silencing of LdUAP2 significantly reduced foliage consumption, decreased chitin content in midgut samples, damaged PM, and retarded larval growth. The resulting larvae had lighter fresh weights, smaller body sizes and depleted fat body. As a result, the development was arrested. Combined knockdown of LdUAP1 and LdUAP2 caused an additive negative effect. Our data suggest that LdUAP1 and LdUAP2 have specialized functions in biosynthesizing chitin in the epidermal cuticle and PM respectively in L. decemlineata. PMID:26592348

  1. Myoblast fusion in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Haralalka, Shruti; Abmayr, Susan M.

    2010-11-01

    The body wall musculature of a Drosophila larva is composed of an intricate pattern of 30 segmentally repeated muscle fibers in each abdominal hemisegment. Each muscle fiber has unique spatial and behavioral characteristics that include its location, orientation, epidermal attachment, size and pattern of innervation. Many, if not all, of these properties are dictated by founder cells, which determine the muscle pattern and seed the fusion process. Myofibers are then derived from fusion between a specific founder cell and several fusion competent myoblasts (FCMs) fusing with as few as 3-5 FCMs in the small muscles on the most ventral side of the embryo and as many as 30 FCMs in the larger muscles on the dorsal side of the embryo. The focus of the present review is the formation of the larval muscles in the developing embryo, summarizing the major issues and players in this process. We have attempted to emphasize experimentally-validated details of the mechanism of myoblast fusion and distinguish these from the theoretically possible details that have not yet been confirmed experimentally. We also direct the interested reader to other recent reviews that discuss myoblast fusion in Drosophila, each with their own perspective on the process . With apologies, we use gene nomenclature as specified by Flybase (http://flybase.org) but provide Table 1 with alternative names and references.

  2. Genotoxic testing of titanium dioxide anatase nanoparticles using the wing-spot test and the comet assay in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Erico R; Escobar, Bibi; Vales, Gerard; Marcos, Ricard

    2015-01-15

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are widely used for preparations of sunscreens, cosmetics, food and personal care products. However, the possible genotoxic risk associated with this nano-scale material exposure is not clear, especially in whole organisms. In the present study, we explored the in vivo genotoxic activity of TiO2 NPs as well as their TiO2 bulk form using two well-established genotoxic assays, the wing spot test and the comet assay in Drosophila melanogaster. To determine the extent of tissue damage induced by TiO2 NPs in Drosophila larvae, the trypan blue dye exclusion test was also applied. Both compounds were supplied to third instar larvae by ingestion at concentration ranging from 0.08 to 1.60 mg/mL. The results obtained in the present study indicate that TiO2 NPs can reach and induce cytotoxic effects on midgut and imaginal disc tissues of larvae, but they do not promote genotoxicity in the wing-spot test of Drosophila. However, when both nano- and large-size forms of TiO2 were evaluated with the comet assay in Drosophila hemocytes, a significant increase in DNA damage, with a direct dose-response pattern, was observed for TiO2 NPs. The results obtained with the comet assay suggest that the primary DNA damage associated with TiO2 NPs exposure in Drosophila could be associated with specific physico-chemical properties of nano-TiO2, since no effects were observed with the bulk form. This study remarks the usefulness of using more than one genetic end-point in the evaluation of the genotoxic potential of nanomaterials. PMID:25726144

  3. Genotoxic testing of titanium dioxide anatase nanoparticles using the wing-spot test and the comet assay in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Erico R; Escobar, Bibi; Vales, Gerard; Marcos, Ricard

    2015-01-15

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are widely used for preparations of sunscreens, cosmetics, food and personal care products. However, the possible genotoxic risk associated with this nano-scale material exposure is not clear, especially in whole organisms. In the present study, we explored the in vivo genotoxic activity of TiO2 NPs as well as their TiO2 bulk form using two well-established genotoxic assays, the wing spot test and the comet assay in Drosophila melanogaster. To determine the extent of tissue damage induced by TiO2 NPs in Drosophila larvae, the trypan blue dye exclusion test was also applied. Both compounds were supplied to third instar larvae by ingestion at concentration ranging from 0.08 to 1.60 mg/mL. The results obtained in the present study indicate that TiO2 NPs can reach and induce cytotoxic effects on midgut and imaginal disc tissues of larvae, but they do not promote genotoxicity in the wing-spot test of Drosophila. However, when both nano- and large-size forms of TiO2 were evaluated with the comet assay in Drosophila hemocytes, a significant increase in DNA damage, with a direct dose-response pattern, was observed for TiO2 NPs. The results obtained with the comet assay suggest that the primary DNA damage associated with TiO2 NPs exposure in Drosophila could be associated with specific physico-chemical properties of nano-TiO2, since no effects were observed with the bulk form. This study remarks the usefulness of using more than one genetic end-point in the evaluation of the genotoxic potential of nanomaterials.

  4. Thermotaxis, circadian rhythms, and TRP channels in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bellemer, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is a poikilothermic organism that must detect and respond to both fine and coarse changes in environmental temperature in order maintain optimal body temperature, synchronize behavior to daily temperature fluctuations, and to avoid potentially injurious environmental hazards. Members of the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) family of cation channels are well known for their activation by changes in temperature and their essential roles in sensory transduction in both invertebrates and vertebrates. The Drosophila genome encodes 13 TRP channels, and several of these have key sensory transduction and modulatory functions in allowing larval and adult flies to make fine temperature discriminations to attain optimal body temperature, detect and avoid large environmental temperature fluctuations, and make rapid escape responses to acutely noxious stimuli. Drosophila use multiple, redundant signaling pathways and neural circuits to execute these behaviors in response to both increases and decreases in temperature of varying magnitudes and time scales. A plethora of powerful molecular and genetic tools and the fly's simple, well-characterized nervous system have given Drosophila neurobiologists a powerful platform to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms of TRP channel function and how these mechanisms are conserved in vertebrates, as well as how these channels function within sensorimotor circuits to generate both simple and complex thermosensory behaviors.

  5. Thermotaxis, circadian rhythms, and TRP channels in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Bellemer, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is a poikilothermic organism that must detect and respond to both fine and coarse changes in environmental temperature in order maintain optimal body temperature, synchronize behavior to daily temperature fluctuations, and to avoid potentially injurious environmental hazards. Members of the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) family of cation channels are well known for their activation by changes in temperature and their essential roles in sensory transduction in both invertebrates and vertebrates. The Drosophila genome encodes 13 TRP channels, and several of these have key sensory transduction and modulatory functions in allowing larval and adult flies to make fine temperature discriminations to attain optimal body temperature, detect and avoid large environmental temperature fluctuations, and make rapid escape responses to acutely noxious stimuli. Drosophila use multiple, redundant signaling pathways and neural circuits to execute these behaviors in response to both increases and decreases in temperature of varying magnitudes and time scales. A plethora of powerful molecular and genetic tools and the fly's simple, well-characterized nervous system have given Drosophila neurobiologists a powerful platform to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms of TRP channel function and how these mechanisms are conserved in vertebrates, as well as how these channels function within sensorimotor circuits to generate both simple and complex thermosensory behaviors. PMID:27227026

  6. Thermotaxis, circadian rhythms, and TRP channels in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bellemer, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is a poikilothermic organism that must detect and respond to both fine and coarse changes in environmental temperature in order maintain optimal body temperature, synchronize behavior to daily temperature fluctuations, and to avoid potentially injurious environmental hazards. Members of the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) family of cation channels are well known for their activation by changes in temperature and their essential roles in sensory transduction in both invertebrates and vertebrates. The Drosophila genome encodes 13 TRP channels, and several of these have key sensory transduction and modulatory functions in allowing larval and adult flies to make fine temperature discriminations to attain optimal body temperature, detect and avoid large environmental temperature fluctuations, and make rapid escape responses to acutely noxious stimuli. Drosophila use multiple, redundant signaling pathways and neural circuits to execute these behaviors in response to both increases and decreases in temperature of varying magnitudes and time scales. A plethora of powerful molecular and genetic tools and the fly's simple, well-characterized nervous system have given Drosophila neurobiologists a powerful platform to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms of TRP channel function and how these mechanisms are conserved in vertebrates, as well as how these channels function within sensorimotor circuits to generate both simple and complex thermosensory behaviors. PMID:27227026

  7. Enhancing undergraduate teaching and research with a Drosophila virginizing system.

    PubMed

    Venema, Dennis R

    2006-01-01

    Laboratory exercises using Drosophila crosses are an effective pedagogical method to complement traditional lecture and textbook presentations of genetics. Undergraduate thesis research is another common setting for using Drosophila. A significant barrier to using Drosophila for undergraduate teaching or research is the time and skill required to accurately collect virgins for use in controlled crosses. Erroneously collecting males or nonvirgin females contaminates crosses with unintended genotypes and confounds the results. Collecting adequate numbers of virgins requires large amounts of time, even for those skilled in virgin collection. I have adapted an effective method for virgin collection that eliminates these concerns and is straightforward to use in undergraduate settings. Using a heat-shock-induced, conditional lethal transgene specifically in males, male larvae can be eliminated from a culture before adults eclose. Females thus eclose in the absence of males and remain virgin, eliminating the need to laboriously score and segregate freshly eclosed females. This method is reliable, easily adaptable to any desired phenotypic marker, and readily scaleable to provide sufficient virgins for large laboratory classes or undergraduate research projects. In addition, it allows instructors lacking Drosophila expertise to use this organism as a pedagogical tool. PMID:17146043

  8. A role for dZIP89B in Drosophila dietary zinc uptake reveals additional complexity in the zinc absorption process.

    PubMed

    Richards, Christopher D; Warr, Coral G; Burke, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Dietary zinc is the principal source of zinc in eukaryotes, with its uptake and distribution controlled by a complex network of numerous membrane-spanning transport proteins. Dietary absorption is achieved by members of the SLC39A (ZIP) gene family, which encode proteins that are generally responsible for the movement of zinc into the cytosol. ZIP4 is thought to be the primary mammalian zinc uptake gene in the small intestine, with mutations in this gene causing the zinc deficiency disease Acrodermatitis enteropathica. In Drosophila, dual knockdown of the major dietary zinc uptake genes dZIP42C.1 (dZIP1) and dZIP42C.2 (dZIP2) results in a severe sensitivity to zinc-deficient media. However, the symptoms associated with ZIP4 loss can be reversed by zinc supplementation and dZIP42C.1 and 2 knockdown has minimal effect under normal dietary conditions, suggesting that additional pathways for zinc absorption exist in both mammals and flies. This study provides evidence that dZIP89B is an ideal candidate for this role in Drosophila, encoding a low-affinity zinc uptake transporter active in the posterior midgut. Flies lacking dZIP89B, while viable and apparently healthy, show indications of low midgut zinc levels, including reduced metallothionein B expression and compensatory up-regulation of dZIP42C.1 and 2. Furthermore dZIP89B mutants display a dramatic resistance to toxic dietary zinc levels which is abrogated by midgut-specific restoration of dZIP89B activity. We postulate that dZIP89B works in concert with the closely related dZIP42C.1 and 2 to ensure optimal zinc absorption under a range of dietary conditions.

  9. Genetic analysis of glutamatergic function in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, B.A.; Kankel, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    Neurotransmitters are essential for communication between neurons and hence are vital in the overall integrative functioning of the nervous system. Previous work on acetylcholine metabolism in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has also raised the possibility that transmitter metabolism may play a prominent role in either the achievement or maintenance of the normal structure of the central nervous system in this species. Unfortunately, acetylcholine is rather poorly characterized as a neurotransmitter in Drosophila; consequently, we have begun an analysis of the role of glutamate (probably the best characterized transmitter in this organism) in the formation and/or maintenance of nervous system structure. We present here the results of a series of preliminary analyses. To suggest where glutamatergic function may be localized, an examination of the spatial distribution of high affinity (/sup 3/H)-glutamate binding sites are presented. We present the results of an analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of enzymatic activities thought to be important in the regulation of transmitter-glutamate pools (i.e., glutamate oxaloacetic transaminase, glutaminase, and glutamate dehydrogenase). To begin to examine whether mutations in any of these functions are capable of affecting glutamatergic activity, we present the results of an initial genetic analysis of one enzymatic function, glutamate oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), chosen because of its differential distribution within the adult central nervous system and musculature.

  10. [Studies of the biological age in adult taiga ticks Ixodes persulcatus (Ixodinae)].

    PubMed

    Grigor'eva, L A

    2013-01-01

    The history of studies of the biological age in ixodid ticks is discussed. A method of estimation of the biological age in adult ticks of the genus Ixodes by the degree of fat inclusions in midgut cells and in the fat body is developed. An "age scale" for the determination of the calendar age was assumed.

  11. Histopathological effects and immunolocalization of periplocoside NW from Periploca sepium Bunge on the midgut epithelium of Mythimna separata Walker larvae.

    PubMed

    Feng, Mingxing; Shi, Baojun; Zhao, Yanchao; Hu, Zhaonong; Wu, Wenjun

    2014-10-01

    Periplocoside NW (PSNW) with pregnane glycoside skeleton is a novel insecticidal compound isolated from the root bark of Periploca sepium Bunge. This compound has a potent stomach poisoning activity against several insect pests. In this study, we observed the intoxication symptoms, investigated the histopathological effects and carried out immuno-electron microscopic localization of PSNW on the midgut epithelium of oriental armyworm Mythimna separata Walker larvae for better understanding its action mechanism against insects. Ultrastructural observations showed that cell damages caused by PSNW in the midgut of M. separata larvae are related to the degeneration of brush border microvilli. The dissolution of cytoskeletal structures in the interior and on the surface of microvilli was responsible for the decrease in size and eventual disappearance of microvilli when bubbles of cytoplasmic substances protrude into the midgut lumen of M. separata, thus resulting in cell death. The immuno-electron microscopic localization research showed that gold particle appeared on the microvilli layer of the midgut of M. separate larvae firstly. The density of gold particle gradually added with the time, and finally microvilli layer was destructed severely. Meantime, the gold particles were also presented to the intracellular organelle membrane and the organelles also were destructed. Therefore, we proposed that this membrane system on insect midgut epithelium cells is the initial acting site of PSNW against insects.

  12. Review: Thermal preference in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Michael E.; Wang, George; Garrity, Paul A.; Huey, Raymond B.

    2009-01-01

    Environmental temperature strongly affects physiology of ectotherms. Small ectotherms, like Drosophila, cannot endogenously regulate body temperature so must rely on behavior to maintain body temperature within a physiologically permissive range. Here we review what is known about Drosophila thermal preference. Work on thermal behavior in this group is particularly exciting because it provides the opportunity to connect genes to neuromolecular mechanisms to behavior to fitness in the wild. PMID:20161211

  13. EGFR/Ras Signaling Controls Drosophila Intestinal Stem Cell Proliferation via Capicua-Regulated Genes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yinhua; Ha, Nati; Forés, Marta; Xiang, Jinyi; Gläßer, Christine; Maldera, Julieta; Jiménez, Gerardo; Edgar, Bruce A

    2015-12-01

    Epithelial renewal in the Drosophila intestine is orchestrated by Intestinal Stem Cells (ISCs). Following damage or stress the intestinal epithelium produces ligands that activate the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in ISCs. This promotes their growth and division and, thereby, epithelial regeneration. Here we demonstrate that the HMG-box transcriptional repressor, Capicua (Cic), mediates these functions of EGFR signaling. Depleting Cic in ISCs activated them for division, whereas overexpressed Cic inhibited ISC proliferation and midgut regeneration. Epistasis tests showed that Cic acted as an essential downstream effector of EGFR/Ras signaling, and immunofluorescence showed that Cic's nuclear localization was regulated by EGFR signaling. ISC-specific mRNA expression profiling and DNA binding mapping using DamID indicated that Cic represses cell proliferation via direct targets including string (Cdc25), Cyclin E, and the ETS domain transcription factors Ets21C and Pointed (pnt). pnt was required for ISC over-proliferation following Cic depletion, and ectopic pnt restored ISC proliferation even in the presence of overexpressed dominant-active Cic. These studies identify Cic, Pnt, and Ets21C as critical downstream effectors of EGFR signaling in Drosophila ISCs.

  14. Restriction of Francisella novicida Genetic Diversity during Infection of the Vector Midgut

    PubMed Central

    Reif, Kathryn E.; Palmer, Guy H.; Crowder, David W.; Ueti, Massaro W.; Noh, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    The genetic diversity of pathogens, and interactions between genotypes, can strongly influence pathogen phenotypes such as transmissibility and virulence. For vector-borne pathogens, both mammalian hosts and arthropod vectors may limit pathogen genotypic diversity (number of unique genotypes circulating in an area) by preventing infection or transmission of particular genotypes. Mammalian hosts often act as “ecological filters” for pathogen diversity, where novel variants are frequently eliminated because of stochastic events or fitness costs. However, whether vectors can serve a similar role in limiting pathogen diversity is less clear. Here we show using Francisella novicida and a natural tick vector of Francisella spp. (Dermacentor andersoni), that the tick vector acted as a stronger ecological filter for pathogen diversity compared to the mammalian host. When both mice and ticks were exposed to mixtures of F. novicida genotypes, significantly fewer genotypes co-colonized ticks compared to mice. In both ticks and mice, increased genotypic diversity negatively affected the recovery of available genotypes. Competition among genotypes contributed to the reduction of diversity during infection of the tick midgut, as genotypes not recovered from tick midguts during mixed genotype infections were recovered from tick midguts during individual genotype infection. Mediated by stochastic and selective forces, pathogen genotype diversity was markedly reduced in the tick. We incorporated our experimental results into a model to demonstrate how vector population dynamics, especially vector-to-host ratio, strongly affected pathogen genotypic diversity in a population over time. Understanding pathogen genotypic population dynamics will aid in identification of the variables that most strongly affect pathogen transmission and disease ecology. PMID:25392914

  15. Sequence variation and differential splicing of the midgut cadherin gene in Trichoplusia ni.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Kain, Wendy; Wang, Ping

    2013-08-01

    The insect midgut cadherin serves as an important receptor for the Cry toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). Variation of the cadherin in insect populations provides a genetic potential for development of cadherin-based Bt resistance in insect populations. Sequence analysis of the cadherin from the cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni, together with cadherins from 18 other lepidopterans showed a similar phylogenetic relationship of the cadherins to the phylogeny of Lepidoptera. The midgut cadherin in three laboratory populations of T. ni exhibited high variability, although the resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac in the T. ni strain is not genetically associated with cadherin gene mutations. A total of 142 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in the cadherin cDNAs from the T. ni strains, including 20 missense mutations. In addition, insertion and deletion polymorphisms (indels) were also identified in the cadherin alleles in T. ni. More interestingly, the results from this study reveal that differential splicing of mRNA also occurs in the cadherin gene expression. Therefore, variation of the midgut cadherin in insects may not only be caused by cadherin gene mutations, but could also result from alternative splicing of its mRNA regulated by factors acting in trans. Analysis of cadherin gene alleles in F2, F3 and F4 progenies from the cross between the Cry1Ac resistant and the susceptible strain after consecutive selections with Cry1Ac for three generations showed that selection with Cry1Ac did not result in an increase of frequencies of the cadherin alleles originated from the resistant strain. PMID:23743444

  16. Tigutcystatin, a cysteine protease inhibitor from Triatoma infestans midgut expressed in response to Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Buarque, Diego S.; Spindola, Leticia M.N.; Martins, Rafael M.; Braz, Gloria R.C.; Tanaka, Aparecida S.

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Tigutcystatin inhibits Trypanosoma cruzi cysteine proteases with high specificity. {yields} Tigutcystatin expression is up-regulated in response to T. cruzi infection. {yields} It is the first cysteine proteases inhibitor characterized from a triatomine insect. -- Abstract: The insect Triatoma infestans is a vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. A cDNA library was constructed from T. infestans anterior midgut, and 244 clones were sequenced. Among the EST sequences, an open reading frame (ORF) with homology to a cystatin type 2 precursor was identified. Then, a 288-bp cDNA fragment encoding mature cystatin (lacking signal peptide) named Tigutcystatin was cloned fused to a N-terminal His tag in pET-14b vector, and the protein expressed in Escherichia coli strain Rosetta gami. Tigutcystatin purified and cleaved by thrombin to remove His tag presented molecular mass of 11 kDa and 10,137 Da by SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, respectively. Purified Tigutcystatin was shown to be a tight inhibitor towards cruzain, a T. cruzi cathepsin L-like enzyme (K{sub i} = 3.29 nM) and human cathepsin L (K{sub i} = 3.78 nM). Tissue specific expression analysis showed that Tigutcystatin was mostly expressed in anterior midgut, although amplification in small intestine was also detected by semi quantitative RT-PCR. qReal time PCR confirmed that Tigutcystatin mRNA is significantly up-regulated in anterior midgut when T. infestans is infected with T. cruzi. Together, these results indicate that Tigutcystatin may be involved in modulation of T. cruzi in intestinal tract by inhibiting parasite cysteine proteases, which represent the virulence factors of this protozoan.

  17. Tissue-specific transcriptome profiling of Plutella xylostella third instar larval midgut.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen; Lei, Yanyuan; Fu, Wei; Yang, Zhongxia; Zhu, Xun; Guo, Zhaojiang; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Xu, Baoyun; Zhou, Xuguo; Zhang, Youjun

    2012-01-01

    The larval midgut of diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, is a dynamic tissue that interfaces with a diverse array of physiological and toxicological processes, including nutrient digestion and allocation, xenobiotic detoxification, innate and adaptive immune response, and pathogen defense. Despite its enormous agricultural importance, the genomic resources for P. xylostella are surprisingly scarce. In this study, a Bt resistant P. xylostella strain was subjected to the in-depth transcriptome analysis to identify genes and gene networks putatively involved in various physiological and toxicological processes in the P. xylostella larval midgut. Using Illumina deep sequencing, we obtained roughly 40 million reads containing approximately 3.6 gigabases of sequence data. De novo assembly generated 63,312 ESTs with an average read length of 416 bp, and approximately half of the P. xylostella sequences (45.4%, 28,768) showed similarity to the non-redundant database in GenBank with a cut-off E-value below 10(-5). Among them, 11,092 unigenes were assigned to one or multiple GO terms and 16,732 unigenes were assigned to 226 specific pathways. In-depth analysis identified genes putatively involved in insecticide resistance, nutrient digestion, and innate immune defense. Besides conventional detoxification enzymes and insecticide targets, novel genes, including 28 chymotrypsins and 53 ABC transporters, have been uncovered in the P. xylostella larval midgut transcriptome; which are potentially linked to the Bt toxicity and resistance. Furthermore, an unexpectedly high number of ESTs, including 46 serpins and 7 lysozymes, were predicted to be involved in the immune defense.As the first tissue-specific transcriptome analysis of P. xylostella, this study sheds light on the molecular understanding of insecticide resistance, especially Bt resistance in an agriculturally important insect pest, and lays the foundation for future functional genomics research. In addition, current

  18. Drosophila, Genetic Screens, and Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Matthew J.; Rockman, Howard A.

    2011-01-01

    The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has been used to study genetics, development, and signaling for nearly a century but only over the past few decades has this tremendous resource been the focus of cardiovascular research. Fly genetics offers sophisticated transgenic systems, molecularly-defined genomic deficiencies, genome-wide transgenic RNAi lines, and numerous curated mutants to perform genetic screens. As a genetically-tractable model, the fly facilitates gene discovery and can complement mammalian models of disease. The circulatory system in the fly is comprised of well-defined sets of cardiomyocytes and methodological advances have permitted accurate characterization of cardiac morphology and function. Thus, fly genetics and genomics offers new approaches for gene discovery of adult cardiac phenotypes to identify evolutionarily conserved molecular signals that drive cardiovascular disease. PMID:21921272

  19. Neuroendocrine Control of Drosophila Larval Light Preference

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Naoki; Romero, Nuria M.; Martin, Francisco A.; Rewitz, Kim F.; Sun, Mu; O’Connor, Michael B.; Léopold, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Animal development is coupled with innate behaviors that maximize chances of survival. Here we show that the prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH), a neuropeptide that controls the developmental transition from juvenile stage to sexual maturation, also regulates light avoidance in Drosophila melanogaster larvae. PTTH, through its receptor Torso, acts on two light sensors, the Bolwig’s organ and the peripheral class IV dendritic arborization neurons, to regulate light avoidance. We find that PTTH concomitantly promotes steroidogenesis and light avoidance at the end of larval stage, thereby driving animals towards a darker environment to initiate the immobile maturation phase. Thus, PTTH controls the decisions of when and where animals undergo metamorphosis, optimizing conditions for adult development. PMID:24009394

  20. Control of apoptosis by Drosophila DCAF12.

    PubMed

    Hwangbo, Dae-Sung; Biteau, Benoit; Rath, Sneha; Kim, Jihyun; Jasper, Heinrich

    2016-05-01

    Regulated Apoptosis (Programmed Cell Death, PCD) maintains tissue homeostasis in adults, and ensures proper growth and morphogenesis of tissues during development of metazoans. Accordingly, defects in cellular processes triggering or executing apoptotic programs have been implicated in a variety of degenerative and neoplastic diseases. Here, we report the identification of DCAF12, an evolutionary conserved member of the WD40-motif repeat family of proteins, as a new regulator of apoptosis in Drosophila. We find that DCAF12 is required for Diap1 cleavage in response to pro-apoptotic signals, and is thus necessary and sufficient for RHG (Reaper, Hid, and Grim)-mediated apoptosis. Loss of DCAF12 perturbs the elimination of supernumerary or proliferation-impaired cells during development, and enhances tumor growth induced by loss of neoplastic tumor suppressors, highlighting the wide requirement for DCAF12 in PCD. PMID:26972874

  1. Control of apoptosis by Drosophila DCAF12.

    PubMed

    Hwangbo, Dae-Sung; Biteau, Benoit; Rath, Sneha; Kim, Jihyun; Jasper, Heinrich

    2016-05-01

    Regulated Apoptosis (Programmed Cell Death, PCD) maintains tissue homeostasis in adults, and ensures proper growth and morphogenesis of tissues during development of metazoans. Accordingly, defects in cellular processes triggering or executing apoptotic programs have been implicated in a variety of degenerative and neoplastic diseases. Here, we report the identification of DCAF12, an evolutionary conserved member of the WD40-motif repeat family of proteins, as a new regulator of apoptosis in Drosophila. We find that DCAF12 is required for Diap1 cleavage in response to pro-apoptotic signals, and is thus necessary and sufficient for RHG (Reaper, Hid, and Grim)-mediated apoptosis. Loss of DCAF12 perturbs the elimination of supernumerary or proliferation-impaired cells during development, and enhances tumor growth induced by loss of neoplastic tumor suppressors, highlighting the wide requirement for DCAF12 in PCD.

  2. Total management of short gut secondary to midgut volvulus without prolonged total parenteral alimentation.

    PubMed

    Tepas, J J; MacLean, W C; Kolbach, S; Shermeta, D W

    1978-12-01

    Absorption studies in rats have shown that intestinal adaptation after catastrophic injury can be stimulated by early enteral feeding. Using this concept, we have devised a technique of early initiation and advancement of oral feedings that begins with Cho-Free and Polycose and gradually adds sucrose and MCT in increasing proportions. The increasing complexity and caloric density of this diet provide sufficient nutrition to allow weaning from total parenteral alimentation within 2--3 wk. Our preliminary experience in babies with midgut volvulus, necrotizing enterocolitis, and gastroschisis has been successful and uncomplicated. These patients have demonstrated consistent weight gain and have been spared the complications associated with prolonged parenteral alimentation.

  3. Dietary influences over proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression in the locust midgut.

    PubMed

    Zudaire, E; Simpson, S J; Illa, I; Montuenga, L M

    2004-06-01

    We have studied the influence of variations in dietary protein (P) and digestible carbohydrate (C), the quantity of food eaten, and insect age during the fifth instar on the expression of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in the epithelial cells of the midgut (with special reference to the midgut caeca) in the African migratory locust, Locusta migratoria. Densitometric analysis of PCNA-immunostained cells was used as an indirect measure of the levels of expression of PCNA, and a PCNA cellular index (PCNA-I) was obtained. Measurements of the DNA content of the cells have also been carried out by means of microdensitometry of Feulgen-stained, thick sections of midgut. A comparison between the PCNA nuclear level and the DNA content was performed. The PCNA levels were significantly different among the cells of the five regions studied: caeca, anterior ventricle, medial ventricle, posterior ventricle and ampullae of the Malpighian tubules. We have studied in more detail the region with highest PCNA-I, i.e. the caeca. The quality and the quantity of food eaten under ad libitum conditions were highly correlated with both the PCNA and DNA levels in the caeca cells. Locusts fed a diet with a close to optimal P:C content (P 21%, C 21%) showed the highest PCNA and DNA content. In locusts fed a food that also contained a 1:1 ratio of P to C but was diluted three-fold by addition of indigestible cellulose (P 7%, C 7%), a compensatory increase in consumption was critical to maintaining PCNA levels. Our measurements also showed that the nuclear DNA content of the mature and differentiated epithelial cells was several-fold higher than the levels in the undifferentiated stem cells of the regenerative nests. These results, combined with the low number of mitotic figures found in the regenerative nests of the caeca and the marked variation in PCNA levels among groups, suggest that some type of DNA endoreduplication process may be taking place. Our data also indicate that

  4. A Small Molecule Glycosaminoglycan Mimetic Blocks Plasmodium Invasion of the Mosquito Midgut

    PubMed Central

    Ranucci, Elisabetta; Tao, Dingyin; Ferruti, Paolo; Ortega, Corrie; Staples, Gregory O.; Zaia, Joseph; Takashima, Eizo; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Borg, Natalie A.; Verotta, Luisella; Dinglasan, Rhoel R.

    2013-01-01

    Malaria transmission-blocking (T-B) interventions are essential for malaria elimination. Small molecules that inhibit the Plasmodium ookinete-to-oocyst transition in the midgut of Anopheles mosquitoes, thereby blocking sporogony, represent one approach to achieving this goal. Chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans (CS-GAGs) on the Anopheles gambiae midgut surface are putative ligands for Plasmodium falciparum ookinetes. We hypothesized that our synthetic polysulfonated polymer, VS1, acting as a decoy molecular mimetic of midgut CS-GAGs confers malaria T-B activity. In our study, VS1 repeatedly reduced midgut oocyst development by as much as 99% (P<0.0001) in mosquitoes fed with P. falciparum and Plasmodium berghei. Through direct-binding assays, we observed that VS1 bound to two critical ookinete micronemal proteins, each containing at least one von Willebrand factor A (vWA) domain: (i) circumsporozoite protein and thrombospondin-related anonymous protein-related protein (CTRP) and (ii) vWA domain-related protein (WARP). By immunofluorescence microscopy, we observed that VS1 stains permeabilized P. falciparum and P. berghei ookinetes but does not stain P. berghei CTRP knockouts or transgenic parasites lacking the vWA domains of CTRP while retaining the thrombospondin repeat region. We produced structural homology models of the first vWA domain of CTRP and identified, as expected, putative GAG-binding sites on CTRP that align closely with those predicted for the human vWA A1 domain and the Toxoplasma gondii MIC2 adhesin. Importantly, the models also identified patches of electropositive residues that may extend CTRP's GAG-binding motif and thus potentiate VS1 binding. Our molecule binds to a critical, conserved ookinete protein, CTRP, and exhibits potent malaria T-B activity. This study lays the framework for a high-throughput screen of existing libraries of safe compounds to identify those with potent T-B activity. We envision that such compounds when used as

  5. Carbonic anhydrases and anion transport in mosquito midgut pH regulation

    PubMed Central

    Linser, Paul J.; Smith, Kristin E.; Seron, Terri J.; Neira Oviedo, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Summary Mosquito larvae use a digestive strategy that is relatively rare in nature. The anterior half of the larval mosquito midgut has a luminal pH that ranges between 10.5 and 11.5. Most other organisms, both large and small, initiate digestion in an acid medium. The relative uniqueness of the highly alkaline digestive strategy has been a long-standing research focus in larval lepidopterans. More recently, the disease vector potential of mosquitoes has fueled specific interest in larval mosquito biology and the alkaline digestive environment in the midgut. The probable principle anion influencing the highly alkaline gut lumen is bicarbonate/carbonate. Bicarbonate/carbonate is regulated at least in part by the activity of carbonic anhydrases. Hence, we have focused attention on the carbonic anhydrases of the mosquito larva. Anopheles gambiae, the major malaria mosquito of Africa, is an organism with a published genome which has facilitated molecular analyses of the 12 carbonic anhydrase genes annotated for this mosquito. Microarray expression analyses, tissue-specific quantitative RT-PCR, and antibody localization have been used to generate a picture of carbonic anhydrase distribution in the larval mosquito. Cytoplasmic, GPI-linked extracellular membrane-bound and soluble extracellular carbonic anhydrases have been located in the midgut and hindgut. The distribution of the enzymes is consistent with an anion regulatory system in which carbonic anhydrases provide a continuous source of bicarbonate/carbonate from the intracellular compartments of certain epithelial cells to the ectoperitrophic space between the epithelial cells and the acellular membrane separating the food bolus from the gut cells and finally into the gut lumen. Carbonic anhydrase in specialized cells of the hindgut (rectum) probably plays a final role in excretion of bicarbonate/carbonate into the aquatic environment of the larva. Detection and characterization of classic anion exchangers of the

  6. DNA Sequencing Reveals the Midgut Microbiota of Diamondback Moth, Plutella xylostella (L.) and a Possible Relationship with Insecticide Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xiaofeng; Zheng, Dandan; Zhong, Huanzi; Qin, Bingcai; Gurr, Geoff M.; Vasseur, Liette; Lin, Hailan; Bai, Jianlin; He, Weiyi; You, Minsheng

    2013-01-01

    Background Insect midgut microbiota is important in host nutrition, development and immune response. Recent studies indicate possible links between insect gut microbiota and resistance to biological and chemical toxins. Studies of this phenomenon and symbionts in general have been hampered by difficulties in culture-based approach. In the present study, DNA sequencing was used to examine the midgut microbiota of diamondback moth (DBM), Plutella xylostella (L.), a destructive pest that attacks cruciferous crops worldwide. Its ability to develop resistance to many types of synthetic insecticide and even Bacillus thuringiensis toxins makes it an important species to study. Methodology/Principal Findings Bacteria of the DBM larval midgut in a susceptible and two insecticide (chlorpyrifos and fipronil) resistant lines were examined by Illumina sequencing sampled from an insect generation that was not exposed to insecticide. This revealed that more than 97% of the bacteria were from three orders: Enterobacteriales, Vibrionales and Lactobacillales. Both insecticide-resistant lines had more Lactobacillales and the much scarcer taxa Pseudomonadales and Xanthomonadales with fewer Enterobacteriales compared with the susceptible strain. Consistent with this, a second study observed an increase in the proportion of Lactobacillales in the midgut of DBM individuals from a generation treated with insecticides. Conclusions/Significance This is the first report of high-throughput DNA sequencing of the entire microbiota of DBM. It reveals differences related to inter- and intra-generational exposure to insecticides. Differences in the midgut microbiota among susceptible and insecticide-resistant lines are independent of insecticide exposure in the sampled generations. While this is consistent with the hypothesis that Lactobacillales or other scarcer taxa play a role in conferring DBM insecticide resistance, further studies are necessary to rule out other possibilities. Findings

  7. Dissimilar Regulation of Antimicrobial Proteins in the Midgut of Spodoptera exigua Larvae Challenged with Bacillus thuringiensis Toxins or Baculovirus.

    PubMed

    Crava, Cristina M; Jakubowska, Agata K; Escriche, Baltasar; Herrero, Salvador; Bel, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and lysozymes are the main effectors of the insect immune system, and they are involved in both local and systemic responses. Among local responses, midgut immune reaction plays an important role in fighting pathogens that reach the insect body through the oral route, as do many microorganisms used in pest control. Under this point of view, understanding how insects defend themselves locally during the first phases of infections caused by food-borne pathogens is important to further improve microbial control strategies. In the present study, we analyzed the transcriptional response of AMPs and lysozymes in the midgut of Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), a polyphagous pest that is commonly controlled by products based on Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) or baculovirus. First, we comprehensively characterized the transcripts encoding AMPs and lysozymes expressed in S. exigua larval midgut, identifying 35 transcripts that represent the S. exigua arsenal against microbial infection. Secondly, we analyzed their expression in the midgut after ingestion of sub-lethal doses of two different pore-forming B. thuringiensis toxins, Cry1Ca and Vip3Aa, and the S. exigua nucleopolyhedrovirus (SeMNPV). We observed that both Bt toxins triggered a similar, wide and in some cases high transcriptional activation of genes encoding AMPs and lysozymes, which was not reflected in the activation of the classical systemic immune-marker phenoloxidase in hemolymph. Baculovirus ingestion resulted in the opposed reaction: Almost all transcripts coding for AMPs and lysozymes were down-regulated or not induced 96 hours post infection. Our results shed light on midgut response to different virulence factors or pathogens used nowadays as microbial control agents and point out the importance of the midgut immune response contribution to the larval immunity.

  8. Dissimilar Regulation of Antimicrobial Proteins in the Midgut of Spodoptera exigua Larvae Challenged with Bacillus thuringiensis Toxins or Baculovirus

    PubMed Central

    Crava, Cristina M.; Jakubowska, Agata K.; Escriche, Baltasar; Herrero, Salvador; Bel, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and lysozymes are the main effectors of the insect immune system, and they are involved in both local and systemic responses. Among local responses, midgut immune reaction plays an important role in fighting pathogens that reach the insect body through the oral route, as do many microorganisms used in pest control. Under this point of view, understanding how insects defend themselves locally during the first phases of infections caused by food-borne pathogens is important to further improve microbial control strategies. In the present study, we analyzed the transcriptional response of AMPs and lysozymes in the midgut of Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), a polyphagous pest that is commonly controlled by products based on Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) or baculovirus. First, we comprehensively characterized the transcripts encoding AMPs and lysozymes expressed in S. exigua larval midgut, identifying 35 transcripts that represent the S. exigua arsenal against microbial infection. Secondly, we analyzed their expression in the midgut after ingestion of sub-lethal doses of two different pore-forming B. thuringiensis toxins, Cry1Ca and Vip3Aa, and the S. exigua nucleopolyhedrovirus (SeMNPV). We observed that both Bt toxins triggered a similar, wide and in some cases high transcriptional activation of genes encoding AMPs and lysozymes, which was not reflected in the activation of the classical systemic immune-marker phenoloxidase in hemolymph. Baculovirus ingestion resulted in the opposed reaction: Almost all transcripts coding for AMPs and lysozymes were down-regulated or not induced 96 hours post infection. Our results shed light on midgut response to different virulence factors or pathogens used nowadays as microbial control agents and point out the importance of the midgut immune response contribution to the larval immunity. PMID:25993013

  9. Gene expression analysis of the endosymbiont-bearing midgut tissue during ontogeny of the carpenter ant Camponotus floridanus.

    PubMed

    Ratzka, Carolin; Gross, Roy; Feldhaar, Heike

    2013-06-01

    Insects have frequently evolved mutualistic relationships with extracellular and/or intracellular bacterial endosymbionts. Infection with endosymbionts seems to affect several cellular functions of the host such as immune pathways, oxidative stress regulation and autophagy. Our current knowledge about specific host factors leading to endosymbiont tolerance and/or control is still scarce and is based on very few associations between insect hosts and bacteria only. Camponotus floridanus ants harbour the obligate intracellular bacterium Blochmannia floridanus within specialized midgut cells called bacteriocytes. The number of Blochmannia endosymbionts within the midgut tissue increases strongly during host development and reaches a maximum at the late pupal stage, where the entire midgut is transformed into a symbiotic organ. After eclosion of workers the number of Blochmannia strongly decreases again. We chose 15 candidate genes from C. floridanus likely to be involved in host-symbiont interactions based on their significant homology to previously investigated symbiosis-relevant genes from other insects. We determined the expression of these genes in the endosymbiont-bearing midgut tissue in comparison to the residual body tissue at different developmental stages of C. floridanus in order to reveal changes in gene expression correlating with changes in endosymbiont number per host. Strikingly, two pattern recognition receptors (amidase PGRP-LB and PGRP-SC2) were highly expressed in the midgut tissue at the pupal stage, potentially down-modulating the IMD pathway to enable endosymbiont tolerance. Moreover, we investigated the immune gene expression in response to bacterial challenge at the pupal stage. Results showed that the midgut tissue differs in expression pattern in contrast to the residual body. Our results support a key role for amidase PGRPs, especially PGRP-LB, in regulation of the immune response towards endosymbionts in C. floridanus and suggest an

  10. Gene expression analysis of the endosymbiont-bearing midgut tissue during ontogeny of the carpenter ant Camponotus floridanus.

    PubMed

    Ratzka, Carolin; Gross, Roy; Feldhaar, Heike

    2013-06-01

    Insects have frequently evolved mutualistic relationships with extracellular and/or intracellular bacterial endosymbionts. Infection with endosymbionts seems to affect several cellular functions of the host such as immune pathways, oxidative stress regulation and autophagy. Our current knowledge about specific host factors leading to endosymbiont tolerance and/or control is still scarce and is based on very few associations between insect hosts and bacteria only. Camponotus floridanus ants harbour the obligate intracellular bacterium Blochmannia floridanus within specialized midgut cells called bacteriocytes. The number of Blochmannia endosymbionts within the midgut tissue increases strongly during host development and reaches a maximum at the late pupal stage, where the entire midgut is transformed into a symbiotic organ. After eclosion of workers the number of Blochmannia strongly decreases again. We chose 15 candidate genes from C. floridanus likely to be involved in host-symbiont interactions based on their significant homology to previously investigated symbiosis-relevant genes from other insects. We determined the expression of these genes in the endosymbiont-bearing midgut tissue in comparison to the residual body tissue at different developmental stages of C. floridanus in order to reveal changes in gene expression correlating with changes in endosymbiont number per host. Strikingly, two pattern recognition receptors (amidase PGRP-LB and PGRP-SC2) were highly expressed in the midgut tissue at the pupal stage, potentially down-modulating the IMD pathway to enable endosymbiont tolerance. Moreover, we investigated the immune gene expression in response to bacterial challenge at the pupal stage. Results showed that the midgut tissue differs in expression pattern in contrast to the residual body. Our results support a key role for amidase PGRPs, especially PGRP-LB, in regulation of the immune response towards endosymbionts in C. floridanus and suggest an

  11. A GPI-anchored alkaline phosphatase is a functional midgut receptor of Cry11Aa toxin in Aedes aegypti larvae.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Luisa E; Aimanova, Karlygash G; Gill, Sarjeet S; Bravo, Alejandra; Soberón, Mario

    2006-02-15

    A 65 kDa GPI (glycosylphosphatidyl-inositol)-anchored ALP (alkaline phosphatase) was characterized as a functional receptor of the Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis Cry11Aa toxin in Aedes aegypti midgut cells. Two (a 100 kDa and a 65 kDa) GPI-anchored proteins that bound Cry11Aa toxin were preferentially extracted after treatment of BBMV (brush boder membrane vesicles) from Ae. aegypti midgut epithelia with phospholipase C. The 65 kDa protein was further purified by toxin affinity chromatography. The 65 kDa protein showed ALP activity. The peptide-displaying phages (P1.BBMV and P8.BBMV) that bound to the 65 kDa GPI-ALP (GPI-anchored ALP) and competed with the Cry11Aa toxin to bind to BBMV were isolated by selecting BBMV-binding peptide-phages by biopanning. GPI-ALP was shown to be preferentially distributed in Ae. aegypti in the posterior part of the midgut and in the caeca, by using P1.BBMV binding to fixed midgut tissue sections to determine the location of GPI-ALP. Cry11Aa binds to the same regions of the midgut and competed with P1.BBMV and P8.BBMV to bind to BBMV. The importance of this interaction was demonstrated by the in vivo attenuation of Cry11Aa toxicity in the presence of these phages. Our results shows that GPI-ALP is an important receptor molecule involved in Cry11Aa interaction with midgut cells and toxicity to Ae. aegypti larvae.

  12. Drosophila Avoids Parasitoids by Sensing Their Semiochemicals via a Dedicated Olfactory Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahim, Shimaa A. M.; Dweck, Hany K. M.; Stökl, Johannes; Hofferberth, John E.; Trona, Federica; Weniger, Kerstin; Rybak, Jürgen; Seki, Yoichi; Stensmyr, Marcus C.; Sachse, Silke; Hansson, Bill S.; Knaden, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Detecting danger is one of the foremost tasks for a neural system. Larval parasitoids constitute clear danger to Drosophila, as up to 80% of fly larvae become parasitized in nature. We show that Drosophila melanogaster larvae and adults avoid sites smelling of the main parasitoid enemies, Leptopilina wasps. This avoidance is mediated via a highly specific olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) type. While the larval OSN expresses the olfactory receptor Or49a and is tuned to the Leptopilina odor iridomyrmecin, the adult expresses both Or49a and Or85f and in addition detects the wasp odors actinidine and nepetalactol. The information is transferred via projection neurons to a specific part of the lateral horn known to be involved in mediating avoidance. Drosophila has thus developed a dedicated circuit to detect a life-threatening enemy based on the smell of its semiochemicals. Such an enemy-detecting olfactory circuit has earlier only been characterized in mice and nematodes. PMID:26674493

  13. Restriction of viral dissemination from the midgut determines incompetence of small brown planthopper as a vector of Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus.

    PubMed

    Jia, Dongsheng; Chen, Hongyan; Mao, Qianzhuo; Liu, Qifei; Wei, Taiyun

    2012-08-01

    Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV), a fijivirus, is transmitted by the white-backed planthopper in a persistent-propagative manner. In this study, we found that another planthopper species, the small brown planthopper (SBPH), could acquire SRBSDV but not transmit it. To identify the transmission barrier for SRBSDV in SBPHs, sequential infection by SRBSDV in the organs of SBPHs was studied with immunofluorescence for viral antigens. SRBSDV initially entered the epithelial cells of the midgut, then viroplasms, the sites for viral replication, formed in the midgut of viruliferous SBPHs. Furthermore, SRBSDV spread within the midgut, but failed to disseminate from the midgut into the hemocoel or into the salivary glands. All these results indicated that the inability of SBPH to transmit SRBSDV could be due to the restriction of viral dissemination from the midgut of SBPH, which led to the failure of viral spread to the salivary glands for virus transmission.

  14. Restriction of viral dissemination from the midgut determines incompetence of small brown planthopper as a vector of Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus.

    PubMed

    Jia, Dongsheng; Chen, Hongyan; Mao, Qianzhuo; Liu, Qifei; Wei, Taiyun

    2012-08-01

    Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV), a fijivirus, is transmitted by the white-backed planthopper in a persistent-propagative manner. In this study, we found that another planthopper species, the small brown planthopper (SBPH), could acquire SRBSDV but not transmit it. To identify the transmission barrier for SRBSDV in SBPHs, sequential infection by SRBSDV in the organs of SBPHs was studied with immunofluorescence for viral antigens. SRBSDV initially entered the epithelial cells of the midgut, then viroplasms, the sites for viral replication, formed in the midgut of viruliferous SBPHs. Furthermore, SRBSDV spread within the midgut, but failed to disseminate from the midgut into the hemocoel or into the salivary glands. All these results indicated that the inability of SBPH to transmit SRBSDV could be due to the restriction of viral dissemination from the midgut of SBPH, which led to the failure of viral spread to the salivary glands for virus transmission. PMID:22683297

  15. Morphological changes in the midgut of Aedes aegypti L. (Diptera: Culicidae) larvae following exposure to an Annona coriacea (Magnoliales: Annonaceae) extract.

    PubMed

    Costa, M S; Pinheiro, D O; Serrão, J E; Pereira, M J B

    2012-08-01

    Bioinsecticides are important in the control of disease vectors, but data regarding their physiological effects on target insects are incomplete. This study describes morphological changes that occur in the midgut of third instar Aedes aegypti L. (Diptera: Culicidae) following treatment with a methanolic extract of Annona coriacea (Magnoliales: Annonaceae). Dissected midguts were subdivided into anterior and posterior regions and analyzed by light and scanning electron microscopy. Insects exposed to the extract displayed intense, destructive cytoplasmic vacuolization in columnar and regenerative midgut cells. The apical surfaces of columnar cells exhibited cytoplasmic protrusions oriented toward the lumen, suggesting that these cells could be involved in apocrine secretory processes and/or apoptosis. We report that A. coriacea extracts induced morphological alterations in the midgut of A. aegypti midgut larvae, supporting the use of plant extracts for control of the dengue vector.

  16. Glutathione S-transferase in the midgut tissue of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) caterpillars exposed to dietary cadmium.

    PubMed

    Vlahović, Milena; Ilijin, Larisa; Mrdaković, Marija; Todorović, Dajana; Matić, Dragana; Lazarević, Jelica; Mataruga, Vesna Perić

    2016-06-01

    Activity of glutathione S-transferase (GST) in midgut of gypsy moth caterpillars exposed to 10 and 30μg Cd/g dry food was examined. Based on the enzyme reaction through conjugation with glutathione, overall activity remained unaltered after acute and chronic treatment. No-observed-effect-concentration (10μg Cd/g dry food) significantly increased activity only after 3-day recovery following cadmium administration. Almost all comparisons of the indices of phenotypic plasticity revealed statistically significant differences. Despite the facts that GST has important role in xenobiotic biotransformation, our results indicate that this enzyme in insect midgut does not represent the key factor in cadmium detoxification.

  17. Three-dimensional organization of Drosophila melanogaster interphase nuclei. I. Tissue-specific aspects of polytene nuclear architecture

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Interphase chromosome organization in four different Drosophila melanogaster tissues, covering three to four levels of polyteny, has been analyzed. The results are based primarily on three-dimensional reconstructions from unfixed tissues using a computer-based data collection and modeling system. A characteristic organization of chromosomes in each cell type is observed, independent of polyteny, with some packing motifs common to several or all tissues and others tissue-specific. All chromosomes display a right-handed coiling chirality, despite large differences in size and degree of coiling. Conversely, in each cell type, the heterochromatic centromeric regions have a unique structure, tendency to associate, and intranuclear location. The organization of condensed nucleolar chromatin is also tissue-specific. The tightly coiled prothoracic gland chromosomes are arrayed in a similar fashion to the much larger salivary gland chromosomes described previously, having polarized orientations, nonintertwined spatial domains, and close packing of the arms of each autosome, whereas hindgut and especially the unusually straight midgut chromosomes display striking departures from these regularities. Surprisingly, gut chromosomes often appear to be broken in the centric heterochromatin. Severe deformations of midgut nuclei observed during gut contractions in living larvae may account for their unusual properties. Finally, morphometric measurements of chromosome and nuclear dimensions provide insights into chromosome growth and substructure and also suggest an unexpected parallel with diploid chromatin organization. PMID:3108264

  18. Impact on bacterial community in midguts of the Asian corn borer larvae by transgenic Trichoderma strain overexpressing a heterologous chit42 gene with chitin-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingying; Fu, Kehe; Gao, Shigang; Wu, Qiong; Fan, Lili; Li, Yaqian; Chen, Jie

    2013-01-01

    This paper is the first report of the impact on the bacterial community in the midgut of the Asian corn borer (Ostrinia furnacalis) by the chitinase from the transgenic Trichoderma strain. In this study, we detected a change of the bacterial community in the midgut of the fourth instar larvae by using a culture-independent method. Results suggested that Proteobacteria and Firmicutes were the most highly represented phyla, being present in all the midgut bacterial communities. The observed species richness was simple, ranging from four to five of all the 16S rRNA clone libraries. When using Trichoderma fermentation liquids as additives, the percentages of the dominant flora in the total bacterial community in larval midgut changed significantly. The community of the genus Ochrobactrum in the midgut decreased significantly when the larvae were fed with the fermentation liquids of the transgenic Trichoderma strain Mc4. However, the Enterococcus community increased and then occupied the vacated niche of the Ochrobactrum members. Furthermore, the Shannon-Wiener (H) and the Simpson (1-D) indexes of the larval midgut bacterial library treated by feeding fermentation liquids of the transgenic Trichoderma strain Mc4 was the lowest compared with the culture medium, fermentation liquids of the wild type strain T30, and the sterile artificial diet. The Enterococcus sp. strain was isolated and characterized from the healthy larvae midgut of the Asian corn borer. An infection study of the Asian corn borer larvae using Enterococcus sp. ACB-1 revealed that a correlation existed between the increased Enterococcus community in the larval midgut and larval mortality. These results demonstrated that the transgenic Trichoderma strain could affect the composition of the midgut bacterial community. The change of the midgut bacterial community might be viewed as one of the factors resulting in the increased mortality of the Asian corn borer larvae.

  19. Mechanisms of planar cell polarity establishment in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal-Gonzalez, Jose Maria

    2014-01-01

    Correct patterning and polarization of epithelial and mesenchymal cells are essential for morphogenesis and function of all organs and organisms. Epithelial cells are generally polarized in two axes: (a) the ubiquitous apical-basal axis and (b) polarity within the plane of the epithelium. The latter is generally referred to as planar cell polarity (PCP) and also is found in several contexts of mesenchymal cell patterning. In Drosophila, all adult structures display PCP features, and two conserved molecular systems (the Fat [Ft]/Dachsous [Ds] system and the Frizzled [Fz]/PCP pathway) that regulate this process have been identified. Although significant progress has been made in dissecting aspects of PCP signaling within cells, much remains to be discovered about the mechanisms of long-range and local PCP cell-cell interactions. Here, we discuss the current models based on Drosophila studies and incorporate recent insights into this long-standing cell and developmental biology problem. PMID:25580252

  20. Heterochromatin remodeling by CDK12 contributes to learning in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Pan, Lixia; Xie, Wenbing; Li, Kai-Le; Yang, Zhihao; Xu, Jiang; Zhang, Wenhao; Liu, Lu-Ping; Ren, Xingjie; He, Zhimin; Wu, Junyu; Sun, Jin; Wei, Hui-Min; Wang, Daliang; Xie, Wei; Li, Wei; Ni, Jian-Quan; Sun, Fang-Lin

    2015-11-10

    Dynamic regulation of chromatin structure is required to modulate the transcription of genes in eukaryotes. However, the factors that contribute to the plasticity of heterochromatin structure are elusive. Here, we report that cyclin-dependent kinase 12 (CDK12), a transcription elongation-associated RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) kinase, antagonizes heterochromatin enrichment in Drosophila chromosomes. Notably, loss of CDK12 induces the ectopic accumulation of heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) on euchromatic arms, with a prominent enrichment on the X chromosome. Furthermore, ChIP and sequencing analysis reveals that the heterochromatin enrichment on the X chromosome mainly occurs within long genes involved in neuronal functions. Consequently, heterochromatin enrichment reduces the transcription of neuronal genes in the adult brain and results in a defect in Drosophila courtship learning. Taken together, these results define a previously unidentified role of CDK12 in controlling the epigenetic transition between euchromatin and heterochromatin and suggest a chromatin regulatory mechanism in neuronal behaviors. PMID:26508632

  1. Heterochromatin remodeling by CDK12 contributes to learning in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Lixia; Xie, Wenbing; Li, Kai-Le; Yang, Zhihao; Xu, Jiang; Zhang, Wenhao; Liu, Lu-Ping; Ren, Xingjie; He, Zhimin; Wu, Junyu; Sun, Jin; Wei, Hui-Min; Wang, Daliang; Xie, Wei; Li, Wei; Ni, Jian-Quan; Sun, Fang-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic regulation of chromatin structure is required to modulate the transcription of genes in eukaryotes. However, the factors that contribute to the plasticity of heterochromatin structure are elusive. Here, we report that cyclin-dependent kinase 12 (CDK12), a transcription elongation-associated RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) kinase, antagonizes heterochromatin enrichment in Drosophila chromosomes. Notably, loss of CDK12 induces the ectopic accumulation of heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) on euchromatic arms, with a prominent enrichment on the X chromosome. Furthermore, ChIP and sequencing analysis reveals that the heterochromatin enrichment on the X chromosome mainly occurs within long genes involved in neuronal functions. Consequently, heterochromatin enrichment reduces the transcription of neuronal genes in the adult brain and results in a defect in Drosophila courtship learning. Taken together, these results define a previously unidentified role of CDK12 in controlling the epigenetic transition between euchromatin and heterochromatin and suggest a chromatin regulatory mechanism in neuronal behaviors. PMID:26508632

  2. Cadmium-binding proteins in midgut gland of freshwater crayfish Procambarus clarkii

    SciTech Connect

    Del Ramo, J.; Pastor, A.; Torreblanca, A.; Medina, J.; Diza-Mayans, J.

    1989-02-01

    Metallothioneins, metal binding proteins, were originally isolated and characterized by Margoshes and Vallee. These proteins have a high affinity for various heavy metals, particularly cadmium and mercury and have extensively been studied in mammals. Metal binding proteins have been observed in a variety of marine invertebrates; however, there is very little information available on metal binding proteins in freshwater invertebrates, and particularly in freshwater crustaceans. Cadmium is an ubiquitous non essential element which possesses high toxicity to aquatic organisms. Cadmium binding proteins observed in invertebrates have similar characteristics to mammalian metallothioneins. In 1978, the American red crayfish appeared in Albufera Lake and the surrounding rice fields (Valencia, Spain). Albufera Lake and the surrounding rice fields waters are subjected to very heavy loads of sewage and toxic industrial residues (including heavy metals) from the many urban and wastewaters in this area. In previous reports the authors studied the toxicity and accumulation of cadmium on Procambarus clarkii of Albufera Lake. This crayfish shows a high resistance to cadmium and a great accumulation rate of this metal in several tissues, including midgut gland. Since Procambarus clarkii shows a high resistance to cadmium, the presence of cadmium binding proteins (Cd-BP) in midgut gland of these crayfish would be expected. This report describes results on the characterization of Cd-BPs obtained from cadmium exposed crayfish Procambarus clarkii, demonstrating their presence in this freshwater crayfish.

  3. Malaria parasites form filamentous cell-to-cell connections during reproduction in the mosquito midgut.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Ingrid; Sologub, Ludmilla; Williamson, Kim C; Scheuermayer, Matthias; Reininger, Luc; Doerig, Christian; Eksi, Saliha; Kombila, Davy U; Frank, Matthias; Pradel, Gabriele

    2011-04-01

    Physical contact is important for the interaction between animal cells, but it can represent a major challenge for protists like malaria parasites. Recently, novel filamentous cell-cell contacts have been identified in different types of eukaryotic cells and termed nanotubes due to their morphological appearance. Nanotubes represent small dynamic membranous extensions that consist of F-actin and are considered an ancient feature evolved by eukaryotic cells to establish contact for communication. We here describe similar tubular structures in the malaria pathogen Plasmodium falciparum, which emerge from the surfaces of the forming gametes upon gametocyte activation in the mosquito midgut. The filaments can exhibit a length of > 100 μm and contain the F-actin isoform actin 2. They actively form within a few minutes after gametocyte activation and persist until the zygote transforms into the ookinete. The filaments originate from the parasite plasma membrane, are close ended and express adhesion proteins on their surfaces that are typically found in gametes, like Pfs230, Pfs48/45 or Pfs25, but not the zygote surface protein Pfs28. We show that these tubular structures represent long-distance cell-to-cell connections between sexual stage parasites and demonstrate that they meet the characteristics of nanotubes. We propose that malaria parasites utilize these adhesive "nanotubes" in order to facilitate intercellular contact between gametes during reproduction in the mosquito midgut.

  4. High-frequency conjugative transfer of antibiotic resistance genes to Yersinia pestis in the flea midgut.

    PubMed

    Hinnebusch, B Joseph; Rosso, Marie-Laure; Schwan, Tom G; Carniel, Elisabeth

    2002-10-01

    The acquisition of foreign DNA by horizontal transfer from unrelated organisms is a major source of variation leading to new strains of bacterial pathogens. The extent to which this occurs varies widely, due in part to lifestyle factors that determine exposure to potential donors. Yersinia pestis, the plague bacillus, infects normally sterile sites in its mammalian host, but forms dense aggregates in the non-sterile digestive tract of its flea vector to produce a transmissible infection. Here we show that unrelated co-infecting bacteria in the flea midgut are readily incorporated into these aggregates, and that this close physical contact leads to high-frequency conjugative genetic exchange. Transfer of an antibiotic resistance plasmid from an Escherichia coli donor to Y. pestis occurred in the flea midgut at a frequency of 10-3 after only 3 days of co-infection, and after 4 weeks 95% of co-infected fleas contained an average of 103 antibiotic-resistant Y. pestis transconjugants. Thus, transit in its arthropod vector exposes Y. pestis to favourable conditions for efficient genetic exchange with microbial flora of the flea gut. Horizontal gene transfer in the flea may be the source of antibiotic-resistant Y. pestis strains recently isolated from plague patients in Madagascar. PMID:12406213

  5. Differential protein expression in the midgut of Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes induced by the insecticide temephos.

    PubMed

    Games, P D; Alves, S N; Katz, B B; Tomich, J M; Serrão, J E

    2016-09-01

    Mosquitoes are vectors for pathogens of malaria, lymphatic filariasis, dengue, chikungunya, yellow fever and Japanese encephalitis. Culex quinquefasciatus Say, 1823 (Diptera: Culicidae) is a known vector of lymphatic filariasis. Its control in Brazil has been managed using the organophosphate temephos. Studies examining the proteins of Cx. quinquefasciatus that are differentially expressed in response to temephos further understanding of the modes of action of the insecticide and may potentially identify resistance factors in the mosquito. In the present study, a comparative proteomic analysis, using 2-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time of flight (TOF)/TOF mass spectrometry, and bioinformatics analyses were performed to identify midgut proteins in Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae that were differentially expressed in response to exposure to temephos relative to those in untreated controls. A total of 91 protein spots were differentially expressed; 40 were upregulated and 51 were downregulated by temephos. A total of 22 proteins, predominantly upregulated, were identified as known to play a role in the immune response, whereas the downregulated proteins were involved in energy and protein catabolism. This is the first proteome study of the midgut of Cx. quinquefasciatus and it provides insights into the molecular mechanisms of insecticide-induced responses in the mosquito.

  6. Internalization of Sambucus nigra agglutinins I and II in insect midgut CF-203 cells.

    PubMed

    Shahidi-Noghabi, Shahnaz; Van Damme, Els J M; De Vos, Winnok H; Smagghe, Guy

    2011-04-01

    In this project, the uptake mechanisms and localization of two lectins from Sambucus nigra, further referred to as S. nigra agglutinin (SNA)-I and SNA-II, into insect midgut CF-203 cells were studied. SNA-I is a chimeric lectin belonging to the class of ribosome-inactivating proteins, whereas SNA-II is a hololectin devoid of enzymatic activity. Internalization of the fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled lectin was investigated using confocal microscopy. Both lectins were internalized into the cytoplasm of CF-203 cells at similar rates. Preexposure of the insect midgut cells to specific inhibitors of clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis resulted in an inhibition of lectin uptake in CF-203 cells and caspase-induced cytotoxicity caused by SNA-I and SNA-II, confirming the involvement of both endocytosis pathways. Further studies demonstrated that the uptake mechanism(s) for both lectins required phosphoinositide 3-kinases, but did not depend on the actin cytoskeleton. Since the hololectin SNA-II apparently uses a similar endocytosis pathway as the chimerolectin SNA-I, it can be concluded that the endocytosis process mainly relies on the carbohydrate-binding activity of the lectins under investigation. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:21254203

  7. The Anopheles-midgut APN1 structure reveals a new malaria transmission-blocking vaccine epitope.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Sarah C; Armistead, Jennifer S; Mathias, Derrick K; Sandeu, Maurice M; Tao, Dingyin; Borhani-Dizaji, Nahid; Tarimo, Brian B; Morlais, Isabelle; Dinglasan, Rhoel R; Borg, Natalie A

    2015-07-01

    Mosquito-based malaria transmission-blocking vaccines (mTBVs) target midgut-surface antigens of the Plasmodium parasite's obligate vector, the Anopheles mosquito. The alanyl aminopeptidase N (AnAPN1) is the leading mTBV immunogen; however, AnAPN1's role in Plasmodium infection of the mosquito and how anti-AnAPN1 antibodies functionally block parasite transmission have remained elusive. Here we present the 2.65-Å crystal structure of AnAPN1 and the immunoreactivity and transmission-blocking profiles of three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to AnAPN1, including mAb 4H5B7, which effectively blocks transmission of natural strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Using the AnAPN1 structure, we map the conformation-dependent 4H5B7 neoepitope to a previously uncharacterized region on domain 1 and further demonstrate that nonhuman-primate neoepitope-specific IgG also blocks parasite transmission. We discuss the prospect of a new biological function of AnAPN1 as a receptor for Plasmodium in the mosquito midgut and the implications for redesigning the AnAPN1 mTBV. PMID:26075520

  8. Microarray Analysis of Juvenile Hormone Response in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A microchip array encompassing probes for 14,010 genes of Drosophila melanogaster was used to analyze the effect of juvenile hormone (JH) on genome-wide gene expression. JH is a member of a key group of insect hormones involved in regulating larval development and adult reproductive processes. Altho...

  9. Learning and Memory Deficits upon TAU Accumulation in "Drosophila" Mushroom Body Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mershin, Andreas; Pavlopoulos, Elias; Fitch, Olivia; Braden, Brittany C.; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V.; Skoulakis, Efthimios M. C.

    2004-01-01

    Mutations in the neuronal-specific microtubule-binding protein TAU are associated with several dementias and neurodegenerative diseases. However, the effects of elevated TAU accumulation on behavioral plasticity are unknown. We report that directed expression of wild-type vertebrate and "Drosophila" TAU in adult mushroom body neurons, centers for…

  10. The role of reduced oxygen in the developmental physiology of growth and metamorphosis initiation in Drosophila

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rearing oxygen level is known to affect final body size in a variety of insects, but the physiological mechanisms by which oxygen affects size are incompletely understood. In Manduca and Drosophila, the larval size at which metamorphosis is initiated largely determines adult size, and metamorphosis ...

  11. Activities of natural methyl farnesoids on pupariation and metamorphosis of Drosophila melanogaster

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl farnesoate (MF) and juvenile hormone (JH III), which respectively bind to the receptors USP and MET, and bisepoxy JH III (bisJHIII) were assessed for several activities during Drosophila larval development, and during prepupal development to eclosed adults. Dietary MF and JH III were similar...

  12. Genome of Drosophila suzukii, the spotted wing drosophila.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Joanna C; Jiang, Xuanting; Zhao, Li; Hamm, Christopher A; Cridland, Julie M; Saelao, Perot; Hamby, Kelly A; Lee, Ernest K; Kwok, Rosanna S; Zhang, Guojie; Zalom, Frank G; Walton, Vaughn M; Begun, David J

    2013-12-09

    Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (spotted wing drosophila) has recently become a serious pest of a wide variety of fruit crops in the United States as well as in Europe, leading to substantial yearly crop losses. To enable basic and applied research of this important pest, we sequenced the D. suzukii genome to obtain a high-quality reference sequence. Here, we discuss the basic properties of the genome and transcriptome and describe patterns of genome evolution in D. suzukii and its close relatives. Our analyses and genome annotations are presented in a web portal, SpottedWingFlyBase, to facilitate public access.

  13. Genome of Drosophila suzukii, the Spotted Wing Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Joanna C.; Jiang, Xuanting; Zhao, Li; Hamm, Christopher A.; Cridland, Julie M.; Saelao, Perot; Hamby, Kelly A.; Lee, Ernest K.; Kwok, Rosanna S.; Zhang, Guojie; Zalom, Frank G.; Walton, Vaughn M.; Begun, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (spotted wing drosophila) has recently become a serious pest of a wide variety of fruit crops in the United States as well as in Europe, leading to substantial yearly crop losses. To enable basic and applied research of this important pest, we sequenced the D. suzukii genome to obtain a high-quality reference sequence. Here, we discuss the basic properties of the genome and transcriptome and describe patterns of genome evolution in D. suzukii and its close relatives. Our analyses and genome annotations are presented in a web portal, SpottedWingFlyBase, to facilitate public access. PMID:24142924

  14. Morphogenesis of the somatic musculature in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Schulman, Victoria K.; Dobi, Krista C.; Baylies, Mary K.

    2015-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the somatic muscle system is first formed during embryogenesis, giving rise to the larval musculature. Later during metamorphosis, this system is destroyed and replaced by an entirely new set of muscles in the adult fly. Proper formation of the larval and adult muscles is critical for basic survival functions such as hatching and crawling (in the larva), walking and flying (in the adult), and feeding (at both larval and adult stages). Myogenesis, from mononucleated muscle precursor cells to multinucleated functional muscles, is driven by a number of cellular processes that have begun to be mechanistically defined. Once themesodermal cells destined for themyogenic lineage have been specified, individual myoblasts fuse together iteratively to form syncytial myofibers. Combining cytoplasmic contents demands a level of intracellular reorganization that, most notably, leads to redistribution of the myonuclei to maximize internuclear distance. Signaling from extending myofibers induces terminal tendon cell differentiation in the ectoderm, which results in secure muscle-tendon attachments that are critical formuscle contraction. Simultaneously, muscles become innervated and undergo sarcomerogenesis to establish the contractile apparatus that will facilitate movement. The cellular mechanisms governing these morphogenetic events share numerous parallels to mammalian development, and the basic unit of all muscle, the myofiber, is conserved from flies to mammals. Thus, studies of Drosophila myogenesis and comparisons to muscle development in other systems highlight conserved regulatory programs of biomedical relevance to general muscle biology and studies of muscle disease. PMID:25758712

  15. Maternal inheritance of transcripts from three Drosophila src-related genes.

    PubMed Central

    Wadsworth, S C; Madhavan, K; Bilodeau-Wentworth, D

    1985-01-01

    The Drosophila genome contains three major sequences related to the v-src gene. Previously published molecular studies have confirmed the structural homology between v-src and two of the Drosophila sequences. We have sequenced a portion of the third v-src-related Drosophila gene and found that it also shares structural homology with vertebrate and Drosophila src-family genes. RNA sequences from each of the src genes are present in pre-blastoderm embryos indicating that they are of maternal origin. As embryogenesis proceeds, the levels of each of the src RNA sequences decline. The pre-blastoderm src gene transcripts contain poly(A) and are present on polyribosomes suggesting that they are functional mRNAs. Since the Drosophila src transcripts were maternally inherited, we also investigated their distribution in adult females. The majority of the src transcripts in adult females were contained in ovaries. Only low levels of the transcripts were detected in males. These results strongly suggest that an abundant supply of src protein is required during early embryogenesis, perhaps at the time of cellularization of the blastoderm nuclei. Images PMID:3923437

  16. Why Drosophila to Study Phototransduction?

    PubMed Central

    Pak, William L.

    2010-01-01

    This review recounts the early history of Drosophila phototransduction genetics, covering the period between approximately 1966 to 1979. Early in this period, the author felt that there was an urgent need for a new approach in phototransduction research. Through inputs from a number of colleagues, he was led to consider isolating Drosophila mutants that are defective in the electroretinogram. Thanks to the efforts of dedicated associates and technical staff, by the end of this period, he was able to accumulate a large number of such mutants. Particularly important in this effort was the use of the mutant assay protocol based on the “prolonged depolarizing afterpotential.” This collection of mutants formed the basis of the subsequent intensive investigations of the Drosophila phototransduction cascade by many investigators. PMID:20536286

  17. Olfactory Learning in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Busto, Germain U.; Cervantes-Sandoval, Isaac; Davis, Ronald L.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of olfactory learning in Drosophila have provided key insights into the brain mechanisms underlying learning and memory. One type of olfactory learning, olfactory classical conditioning, consists of learning the contingency between an odor with an aversive or appetitive stimulus. This conditioning requires the activity of molecules that can integrate the two types of sensory information, the odorant as the conditioned stimulus and the aversive or appetitive stimulus as the unconditioned stimulus, in brain regions where the neural pathways for the two stimuli intersect. Compelling data indicate that a particular form of adenylyl cyclase functions as a molecular integrator of the sensory information in the mushroom body neurons. The neuronal pathway carrying the olfactory information from the antennal lobes to the mushroom body is well described. Accumulating data now show that some dopaminergic neurons provide information about aversive stimuli and octopaminergic neurons about appetitive stimuli to the mushroom body neurons. Inhibitory inputs from the GABAergic system appear to gate olfactory information to the mushroom bodies and thus control the ability to learn about odors. Emerging data obtained by functional imaging procedures indicate that distinct memory traces form in different brain regions and correlate with different phases of memory. The results from these and other experiments also indicate that cross talk between mushroom bodies and several other brain regions is critical for memory formation. PMID:21186278

  18. Micromechanics of Drosophila Audition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göpfert, M. C.; Robert, D.

    2003-02-01

    An analysis is presented of the auditory micromechanics of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. In this animal, the distal part of the antenna constitutes a resonantly tuned sound receiver, the vibrations of which are transduced by a chordotonal sense organ in the antenna's base. Analyzing the mechanical behavior of the antennal receiver by means of microscanning laser Doppler vibrometry, we show that the auditory system of wild-type flies exhibits a hardening stiffness nonlinearity and spontaneously generates oscillations in the absence of external stimuli. According to the deprivation of these mechanical properties in mechanosensory mutants, the receiver's nonlinearity and oscillation activity are introduced by chordotonal auditory neurons. Requiring the mechanoreceptor-specific extracellular linker protein No-mechanoreceptor-potential-A (NompA), NompC mechanosensory transduction channels, Beethoven (Btv), and Touch-insensitive-larva-B (TilB), nonlinearity and oscillation activity of the fly's antennal receiver depend on prominent components of the auditory transduction machinery and seem to originate from motility of auditory receptor cilia.

  19. Metabolism of cydiastatin 4 and analogues by enzymes associated with the midgut and haemolymph of Manduca sexta larvae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval Syste