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Sample records for adult english speakers

  1. Adult Basic Education for Non-English Speakers: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stupp, Emma Gonzalez, Comp.; Gage, Jennifer, Comp.

    This bibliography is a collection of 51 entries concerning adult basic education for non-English speakers. Each entry contains an abstract describing the contents of the material. Information is also provided regarding availability, as well as indexing terms. (AMH)

  2. Literacy Skill Differences between Adult Native English and Native Spanish Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Julia; Cote, Nicole Gilbert; Reilly, Lenore; Binder, Katherine S.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the literacy skills of adult native English and native Spanish ABE speakers. Participants were 169 native English speakers and 124 native Spanish speakers recruited from five prior research projects. The results showed that the native Spanish speakers were less skilled on morphology and passage comprehension…

  3. Romanization to Facilitate the Teaching of Modern Hebrew to Adult Native Speakers of English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellogg, E. P., Jr.

    Five research projects concerning the Romanization of the Hebrew alphabet and its effect on the progress of adult English speakers learning Hebrew as a second language are reviewed. The hypotheses, subjects, procedures, results, conclusions, and validity of each study are summarized. The studies dealt with the Hebrew alphabet, spelling, plural…

  4. Subglottal resonances of adult male and female native speakers of American English

    PubMed Central

    Lulich, Steven M.; Morton, John R.; Arsikere, Harish; Sommers, Mitchell S.; Leung, Gary K. F.; Alwan, Abeer

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a large-scale study of subglottal resonances (SGRs) (the resonant frequencies of the tracheo-bronchial tree) and their relations to various acoustical and physiological characteristics of speakers. The paper presents data from a corpus of simultaneous microphone and accelerometer recordings of consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) words embedded in a carrier phrase spoken by 25 male and 25 female native speakers of American English ranging in age from 18 to 24 yr. The corpus contains 17 500 utterances of 14 American English monophthongs, diphthongs, and the rhotic approximant [ɹ] in various CVC contexts. Only monophthongs are analyzed in this paper. Speaker height and age were also recorded. Findings include (1) normative data on the frequency distribution of SGRs for young adults, (2) the dependence of SGRs on height, (3) the lack of a correlation between SGRs and formants or the fundamental frequency, (4) a poor correlation of the first SGR with the second and third SGRs but a strong correlation between the second and third SGRs, and (5) a significant effect of vowel category on SGR frequencies, although this effect is smaller than the measurement standard deviations and therefore negligible for practical purposes. PMID:23039452

  5. Racializing the Nonnative English Speaker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuck, Gail

    2006-01-01

    This article identifies some discursive processes by which White, middle-class, native-English-speaking, U.S.-born college students draw on a monolingualist ideology and position themselves and others within a language-race-nationality matrix. These processes construct the speakers' Whiteness and nativeness in English as unmarked and normal; mark…

  6. The Investigation of Faculty Training Needs for Instructing Adult Nonstandard English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gouveia-Whitehead, Maureen M.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological study explored and describes the lived experiences of faulty members who instruct and prepare adult nonstandard English-speaking students while employed at a technical education institution in the Southeast. Ten faculty members (5 males and 5 females) participated in sharing his or her perception (through…

  7. Teach English, Teach about the Environment: A Resource for Teachers of Adult English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Environmental Protection Agency, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This paper was developed to help teachers teach English to adult students while introducing basic concepts about the environment and individual environmental responsibility. These concepts can help the newly-arrived be part of cleaner and healthier communities by understanding and practicing the "3Rs" of solid waste management: reduce, reuse, and…

  8. Perception of English palatal codas by Korean speakers of English

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeon, Sang-Hee

    2003-04-01

    This study aimed at looking at perception of English palatal codas by Korean speakers of English to determine if perception problems are the source of production problems. In particular, first, this study looked at the possible first language effect on the perception of English palatal codas. Second, a possible perceptual source of vowel epenthesis after English palatal codas was investigated. In addition, individual factors, such as length of residence, TOEFL score, gender and academic status, were compared to determine if those affected the varying degree of the perception accuracy. Eleven adult Korean speakers of English as well as three native speakers of English participated in the study. Three sets of a perception test including identification of minimally different English pseudo- or real words were carried out. The results showed that, first, the Korean speakers perceived the English codas significantly worse than the Americans. Second, the study supported the idea that Koreans perceived an extra /i/ after the final affricates due to final release. Finally, none of the individual factors explained the varying degree of the perceptional accuracy. In particular, TOEFL scores and the perception test scores did not have any statistically significant association.

  9. The In-Service Training of Adult Literacy, Numeracy and English for Speakers of Other Languages Teachers in England; the Challenges of a "Standards-Led Model"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Norman

    2007-01-01

    Drawing upon two research projects, this paper analyses changes affecting the in-service training of adult literacy, numeracy and teachers of English for Speakers of Other Languages in England. There are many issues raised in this paper, particularly how in-service teacher education programmes in England can meet the diversity of learner need, how…

  10. Tongue Palate Contact Patterns of Velar Stops in Normal Adult English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liker, Marko; Gibbon, Fiona E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides a more detailed description of normal tongue palate contact patterns for the occlusion phase of velar stops than currently exists. The study used electropalatography (EPG) to record seven normally speaking adults' contact patterns of voiceless velar stops in nine VkV contexts. A variety of EPG indices measured: per cent…

  11. Pronunciation Features of Thai Speakers of English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Jack

    1969-01-01

    This paper describes some of the pronunciation features of Thai speakers of English in New Zealand, based on the observation of Thai students during their language laboratory sessions in a pre-university English course. Regular pronunciation features and consistent patterns of sound replacement were observed, which seemed to be characteristic of,…

  12. During Threaded Discussions Are Non-Native English Speakers Always at a Disadvantage?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafer Willner, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    When participating in threaded discussions, under what conditions might non¬native speakers of English (NNSE) be at a comparative disadvantage to their classmates who are native speakers of English (NSE)? This study compares the threaded discussion perspectives of closely-matched NNSE and NSE adult students having different levels of threaded…

  13. Systematic Learning of the English Negation System by a Native Speaker of Polish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, William

    The English speech of an adult native Polish speaker learning English as a second language was analyzed for the acquisition of the English negation system. The types of errors made appeared to be developmental rather than language transfer errors. There was little trouble with single negation in English which contrasts with multiple negation in…

  14. Production and Perception of the English /ae/-/?/ Contrast in Switched-Dominance Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casillas, Joseph V.; Simonet, Miquel

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates how fluent second-language (L2) learners of English produce and perceive the /ae/-/?/ vowel contrast of Southwestern American English. Two learner groups are examined: (1) early, proficient English speakers who were raised by Spanish-speaking families but who became dominant in English during childhood and, as adults, lack…

  15. Spelling and dialect: comparisons between speakers of African American vernacular English and White speakers.

    PubMed

    Treiman, Rebecca

    2004-04-01

    One characteristic of African American vernacular English (AAVE) is final obstruent devoicing, where the final consonant of a word like rigid is pronounced more like /t/ than /d/. To determine whether this dialect characteristic influences adults' spelling, African American and White college students spelled words such as rigid and ballot, pronounced by either a speaker of their own dialect or a speaker of the other dialect. African Americans, especially those who often devoiced final /d/, were more likely than Whites to confuse d and t. Both African American and White spellers made more d/t confusions when the words were spoken by an African American experimenter than by a White experimenter. Thus, the different phonological systems of AAVE and White speakers can cause them to make different types of spelling errors. Discussions of AAVE and literacy have focused on its syntax, but its phonology must also be considered.

  16. Some thoughts on the Native Speaker of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    No, Keum Sook; Park, Kyung-Ja

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to reconsider the concept of the native speaker of English in light of the heightened status of English as a global language. The broadening and acceptance of criteria regarding who is a native speaker is historically discussed and placed in a modern context. In particular, perceptions towards the English native…

  17. Speaking Japanese in Japan: Issues for English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Meredith

    2010-01-01

    Due to the global momentum of English as a Lingua Franca (ELF), Anglophones may perceive that there is less urgency for them to learn other languages than for speakers of other languages to learn English. The monolingual expectations of English speakers are evidenced not only in Anglophone countries but also abroad. This study reports on the…

  18. 7 CFR 247.13 - Provisions for non-English or limited-English speakers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Provisions for non-English or limited-English speakers... § 247.13 Provisions for non-English or limited-English speakers. (a) What must State and local agencies do to ensure that non-English or limited-English speaking persons are aware of their rights...

  19. 7 CFR 247.13 - Provisions for non-English or limited-English speakers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Provisions for non-English or limited-English speakers... § 247.13 Provisions for non-English or limited-English speakers. (a) What must State and local agencies do to ensure that non-English or limited-English speaking persons are aware of their rights...

  20. 7 CFR 247.13 - Provisions for non-English or limited-English speakers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Provisions for non-English or limited-English speakers... § 247.13 Provisions for non-English or limited-English speakers. (a) What must State and local agencies do to ensure that non-English or limited-English speaking persons are aware of their rights...

  1. 7 CFR 247.13 - Provisions for non-English or limited-English speakers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Provisions for non-English or limited-English speakers... § 247.13 Provisions for non-English or limited-English speakers. (a) What must State and local agencies do to ensure that non-English or limited-English speaking persons are aware of their rights...

  2. 7 CFR 247.13 - Provisions for non-English or limited-English speakers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Provisions for non-English or limited-English speakers... § 247.13 Provisions for non-English or limited-English speakers. (a) What must State and local agencies do to ensure that non-English or limited-English speaking persons are aware of their rights...

  3. Native Speakers' Perception of Non-Native English Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaber, Maysa; Hussein, Riyad F.

    2011-01-01

    This study is aimed at investigating the rating and intelligibility of different non-native varieties of English, namely French English, Japanese English and Jordanian English by native English speakers and their attitudes towards these foreign accents. To achieve the goals of this study, the researchers used a web-based questionnaire which…

  4. English vowel learning by speakers of Mandarin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Ron I.

    2005-04-01

    One of the most influential models of second language (L2) speech perception and production [Flege, Speech Perception and Linguistic Experience (York, Baltimore, 1995) pp. 233-277] argues that during initial stages of L2 acquisition, perceptual categories sharing the same or nearly the same acoustic space as first language (L1) categories will be processed as members of that L1 category. Previous research has generally been limited to testing these claims on binary L2 contrasts, rather than larger portions of the perceptual space. This study examines the development of 10 English vowel categories by 20 Mandarin L1 learners of English. Imitation of English vowel stimuli by these learners, at 6 data collection points over the course of one year, were recorded. Using a statistical pattern recognition model, these productions were then assessed against native speaker norms. The degree to which the learners' perception/production shifted toward the target English vowels and the degree to which they matched L1 categories in ways predicted by theoretical models are discussed. The results of this experiment suggest that previous claims about perceptual assimilation of L2 categories to L1 categories may be too strong.

  5. Native Speaker and Nonnative Speaker Identities in Repair Practices of English Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bae, Eun Young; Oh, Sun-Young

    2013-01-01

    Within the theoretical and methodological framework of Conversation Analysis, the present study explores the nature of the native speaker (NS) and nonnative speaker (NNS) identities in repair practices of English conversation. It has identified and analyzed in detail repair sequences in the data and has also conducted quantitative analyses in…

  6. English Speakers Attend More Strongly than Spanish Speakers to Manner of Motion when Classifying Novel Objects and Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kersten, Alan W.; Meissner, Christian A.; Lechuga, Julia; Schwartz, Bennett L.; Albrechtsen, Justin S.; Iglesias, Adam

    2010-01-01

    Three experiments provide evidence that the conceptualization of moving objects and events is influenced by one's native language, consistent with linguistic relativity theory. Monolingual English speakers and bilingual Spanish/English speakers tested in an English-speaking context performed better than monolingual Spanish speakers and bilingual…

  7. Cantonese Speakers' Memory for English Sentences with Prosodic Cues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Martha C.; Ellis, Nick C.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews the nature and functions of prosody, and contrasts English and Cantonese for this feature of language as background for two experimental studies. Thirty Cantonese advanced speakers of English were tested for their recognition memory of English sentences in which prosody-cued meaning contrasts in otherwise identical sentence pairs. Results…

  8. Prosodic Marking of Information Structure by Malaysian Speakers of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gut, Ulrike; Pillai, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    Various researchers have shown that second language (L2) speakers have difficulties with marking information structure in English prosodically: They deviate from native speakers not only in terms of pitch accent placement (Grosser, 1997; Gut, 2009; Ramírez Verdugo, 2002) and the type of pitch accent they produce (Wennerstrom, 1994, 1998) but also…

  9. Uneven Reassembly of Tense, Telicity and Discourse Features in L2 Acquisition of the Chinese "shì…de" Cleft Construction by Adult English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mai, Ziyin; Yuan, Boping

    2016-01-01

    This article reports an empirical study investigating L2 acquisition of the Mandarin Chinese "shì…de" cleft construction by adult English-speaking learners within the framework of the Feature Reassembly Hypothesis (Lardiere, 2009). A Sentence Completion task, an interpretation task, two Acceptability Judgement tasks, and a felicity…

  10. Effects of Age and Experience on the Production of English Word-Final Stops by Korean Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effect of second language (L2) age of acquisition and amount of experience on the production of word-final stop consonant voicing by adult native Korean learners of English. Thirty learners, who differed in amount of L2 experience and age of L2 exposure, and 10 native English speakers produced 8 English monosyllabic words…

  11. Sentence Comprehension in Swahili-English Bilingual Agrammatic Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abuom, Tom O.; Shah, Emmah; Bastiaanse, Roelien

    2013-01-01

    For this study, sentence comprehension was tested in Swahili-English bilingual agrammatic speakers. The sentences were controlled for four factors: (1) order of the arguments (base vs. derived); (2) embedding (declarative vs. relative sentences); (3) overt use of the relative pronoun "who"; (4) language (English and Swahili). Two theories were…

  12. Nominal Compounding in Native and Non-Native Speakers of English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Donna L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the differences between the English native and nonnative speaker's creation and use of nominal compounds. A comparison between English speakers and Japanese native speakers indicates that not only must nonnative speakers acquire rules in order to effectively compound words in English, but that rules must indeed exist, indicating that…

  13. Student Writing from NYC Programs in English for Speakers of Other Languages: September 11, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Winston, Comp.

    This publication contains a collection of writings by New York City adult learners enrolled in English for Speakers of Other Languages programs. The writings focus on their feelings about and experiences with the World Trade Center attacks of September 11, 2001. Some of the titles include: "Why?"; "Sad Feeling"; "A Day of Remembrance"; "I Want to…

  14. Variation in vowel duration among southern African American English speakers

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Yolanda Feimster; Jacewicz, Ewa; Fox, Robert Allen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Atypical duration of speech segments can signal a speech disorder. This study examined variation in vowel duration in African American English (AAE) relative to White American English (WAE) speakers living in the same dialect region in the South in order to characterize the nature of systematic variation between the two groups. The goal was to establish whether segmental durations in minority populations differ from the well-established patterns in mainstream populations. Method Participants were 32 AAE and 32 WAE speakers differing in age who, in their childhood, attended either segregated (older speakers) or integrated (younger speakers) public schools. Speech materials consisted of 14 vowels produced in hVd-frame. Results AAE vowels were significantly longer than WAE vowels. Vowel duration did not differ as a function of age. The temporal tense-lax contrast was minimized for AAE relative to WAE. Female vowels were significantly longer than male vowels for both AAE and WAE. Conclusions African Americans should be expected to produce longer vowels relative to White speakers in a common geographic area. These longer durations are not deviant but represent a typical feature of AAE. This finding has clinical importance in guiding assessments of speech disorders in AAE speakers. PMID:25951511

  15. Acquisition of English Verb Transitivity by Native Speakers of Japanese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagano, Tomonori

    2012-01-01

    This study is concerned with the acquisition of English verb transitivity by native speakers of Japanese. Both a verb's semantic class (Levin, 1993; Pinker, 1989) and its frequency (Ambridge et al., 2008) have been proposed to influence the acquisition of verbs in L1. For example, verbs whose meaning entails change-of-location or…

  16. Voice Recognition Software Accuracy with Second Language Speakers of English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coniam, D.

    1999-01-01

    Explores the potential of the use of voice-recognition technology with second-language speakers of English. Involves the analysis of the output produced by a small group of very competent second-language subjects reading a text into the voice recognition software Dragon Systems "Dragon NaturallySpeaking." (Author/VWL)

  17. Do English and Mandarin Speakers Think about Time Differently?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boroditsky, Lera; Fuhrman, Orly; McCormick, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    Time is a fundamental domain of experience. In this paper we ask whether aspects of language and culture affect how people think about this domain. Specifically, we consider whether English and Mandarin speakers think about time differently. We review all of the available evidence both for and against this hypothesis, and report new data that…

  18. Perception and Production of English Lexical Stress by Thai Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jangjamras, Jirapat

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of first language prosodic transfer on the perception and production of English lexical stress and the relation between stress perception and production by second language learners. To test the effect of Thai tonal distribution rules and stress patterns on native Thai speakers' perception and production of…

  19. Investigating Chinese Speakers' Acquisition of Telicity in English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Bin

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation is concerned with Chinese speakers' acquisition of telicity in L2 English. Telicity is a semantic notion having to do with whether an event has an inherent endpoint or not. Most existing work on L2 telicity is conceptualized within an L1-transfer framework and examines learning situations where L1 and L2 differ on whether…

  20. Native Italian speakers' perception and production of English vowels.

    PubMed

    Flege, J E; MacKay, I R; Meador, D

    1999-11-01

    This study examined the production and perception of English vowels by highly experienced native Italian speakers of English. The subjects were selected on the basis of the age at which they arrived in Canada and began to learn English, and how much they continued to use Italian. Vowel production accuracy was assessed through an intelligibility test in which native English-speaking listeners attempted to identify vowels spoken by the native Italian subjects. Vowel perception was assessed using a categorial discrimination test. The later in life the native Italian subjects began to learn English, the less accurately they produced and perceived English vowels. Neither of two groups of early Italian/English bilinguals differed significantly from native speakers of English either for production or perception. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis of the speech learning model [Flege, in Speech Perception and Linguistic Experience: Theoretical and Methodological Issues (York, Timonium, MD, 1995)] that early bilinguals establish new categories for vowels found in the second language (L2). The significant correlation observed to exist between the measures of L2 vowel production and perception is consistent with another hypothesis of the speech learning model, viz., that the accuracy with which L2 vowels are produced is limited by how accurately they are perceived. PMID:10573909

  1. Evaluation of Speakers with Foreign-Accented Speech in Japan: The Effect of Accent Produced by English Native Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsurutani, Chiharu

    2012-01-01

    Foreign-accented speakers are generally regarded as less educated, less reliable and less interesting than native speakers and tend to be associated with cultural stereotypes of their country of origin. This discrimination against foreign accents has, however, been discussed mainly using accented English in English-speaking countries. This study…

  2. Revisiting the Issue of Native Speakerism: "I Don't Want to Speak Like a Native Speaker of English"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Lee Jin

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study of English Korean bilinguals explores the ways in which they legitimize themselves as "good" bilinguals in relation to the discourse of native-speakerism. I first survey the essentialist discourse of native speakerism still prevalent in the field of English language teaching and learning despite the growing…

  3. Non-Native English Speakers and Nonstandard English: An In-Depth Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polat, Brittany

    2012-01-01

    Given the rising prominence of nonstandard varieties of English around the world (Jenkins 2007), learners of English as a second language are increasingly called on to communicate with speakers of both native and non-native nonstandard English varieties. In many classrooms around the world, however, learners continue to be exposed only to…

  4. Linguistically Directed Attention to the Temporal Aspect of Action Events in Monolingual English Speakers and Chinese-English Bilingual Speakers with Varying English Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Jenn-Yeu; Su, Jui-Ju; Lee, Chao-Yang; O'Seaghdha, Padraig G.

    2012-01-01

    Chinese and English speakers seem to hold different conceptions of time which may be related to the different codings of time in the two languages. Employing a sentence-picture matching task, we have investigated this linguistic relativity in Chinese-English bilinguals varying in English proficiency and found that those with high proficiency…

  5. Vowel reduction across tasks for male speakers of American English.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Christina; Weismer, Gary

    2016-07-01

    This study examined acoustic variation of vowels within speakers across speech tasks. The overarching goal of the study was to understand within-speaker variation as one index of the range of normal speech motor behavior for American English vowels. Ten male speakers of American English performed four speech tasks including citation form sentence reading with a clear-speech style (clear-speech), citation form sentence reading (citation), passage reading (reading), and conversational speech (conversation). Eight monophthong vowels in a variety of consonant contexts were studied. Clear-speech was operationally defined as the reference point for describing variation. Acoustic measures associated with the conventions of vowel targets were obtained and examined. These included temporal midpoint formant frequencies for the first three formants (F1, F2, and F3) and the derived Euclidean distances in the F1-F2 and F2-F3 planes. Results indicated that reduction toward the center of the F1-F2 and F2-F3 planes increased in magnitude across the tasks in the order of clear-speech, citation, reading, and conversation. The cross-task variation was comparable for all speakers despite fine-grained individual differences. The characteristics of systematic within-speaker acoustic variation across tasks have potential implications for the understanding of the mechanisms of speech motor control and motor speech disorders. PMID:27475161

  6. Acquisition of Article Semantics by Child and Adult L2-English Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ionin, Tania; Zubizarreta, Maria Luisa; Philippov, Vadim

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines article use in the L2-English of adult and child speakers of Russian, an article-less language. In earlier work on articles in adult L2-English, Ionin, Ko and Wexler (2004) proposed that speakers of article-less L1s fluctuate between dividing English articles on the basis of definiteness vs. specificity, as a result of direct…

  7. Native and Non-Native English Speakers' Current Usage of "Can" and "May" in Requesting Permission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Susan M.

    A study investigated patterns of usage of "can" and "may" (e.g., "May/Can I go to the bathroom?") among native speakers and non-native speakers of English. A questionnaire was administered to 25 native English-speakers, most aged 19-26 and the remainder over age 45, and 56 non-native speakers taking advanced English-as-a-Second-Language classes.…

  8. Articulatory settings of French-English bilingual speakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Ian

    2005-04-01

    The idea of a language-specific articulatory setting (AS), an underlying posture of the articulators during speech, has existed for centuries [Laver, Historiogr. Ling. 5 (1978)], but until recently it had eluded direct measurement. In an analysis of x-ray movies of French and English monolingual speakers, Gick et al. [Phonetica (in press)] link AS to inter-speech posture, allowing measurement of AS without interference from segmental targets during speech, and they give quantitative evidence showing AS to be language-specific. In the present study, ultrasound and Optotrak are used to investigate whether bilingual English-French speakers have two ASs, and whether this varies depending on the mode (monolingual or bilingual) these speakers are in. Specifically, for inter-speech posture of the lips, lip aperture and protrusion are measured using Optotrak. For inter-speech posture of the tongue, tongue root retraction, tongue body and tongue tip height are measured using optically-corrected ultrasound. Segmental context is balanced across the two languages ensuring that the sets of sounds before and after an inter-speech posture are consistent across languages. By testing bilingual speakers, vocal tract morphology across languages is controlled for. Results have implications for L2 acquisition, specifically the teaching and acquisition of pronunciation.

  9. English Variety for the Public Domain in Kenya: Speakers' Attitudes and Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kioko, Angelina Nduku; Muthwii, Margaret Jepkirui

    2003-01-01

    The study sought to establish the attitudes of Kenyan speakers (n = 210) towards three varieties of English: (1) ethnically marked Kenyan English, (2) standard Kenyan English and (3) native speaker English (British, American, Australian, etc). Of the three varieties, the most preferred by both rural and urban respondents for use in the media and…

  10. On Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages. Series II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreidler, Carol J., Ed.

    The papers in this volume, read at the second national TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) conference, are grouped by general subject as follows: (1) TESOL as a Professional Field--C.H. Prator, J.M. Cowan, T.W. Russell, J.E. Alatis; (2) Reports on Special Programs--H. Thompson, A.D. Nance, D. Pantell, P. Rojas, R.F. Robinett,…

  11. On Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages. Series I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Virginia French, Ed.

    The contents of this volume, a compilation of papers read at the first conference of TESOL (Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages), are grouped according to general subject and authors: (1) TESOL as a Professional Field--A.H. Marckwardt, F.J. Colligan, W.F. Marquardt; (2) Reports on Special Programs--J.E. Officer, R.B. Long, M.C.…

  12. Teaching the Native English Speaker How to Teach English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odhuu, Kelli

    2014-01-01

    This article speaks to teachers who have been paired with native speakers (NSs) who have never taught before, and the feelings of frustration, discouragement, and nervousness on the teacher's behalf that can occur as a result. In order to effectively tackle this situation, teachers need to work together with the NSs. Teachers in this scenario…

  13. The Impact of Teleconferencing with Native English Speakers on English Learning by Taiwanese Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Wen-Chi; Marek, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Because there are few native speakers of English in Taiwan, students of English in Taiwan are often poorly motivated, having few opportunities to develop their skills and learn about American culture outside of class. Recent advancements in distance education allow live audio and video teleconferences via the Internet, a technology that has the…

  14. "The English Is Not the Same": Challenges in Thesis Writing for Second Language Speakers of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Pat

    2012-01-01

    In this article I describe my interaction as an English for academic purposes (EAP) practitioner with a supervisor and her two postgraduate international students, both of whom were second language speakers of English (L2). Because of linguistic and relationship issues the supervisory experience for the parties was challenging and frustrating. I…

  15. Discrepancy Between Native English Speaker Teachers' Teaching Styles and Chinese English Learners' Learning Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Li; Fan, Zhi-zhong

    2007-01-01

    Recent decades have witnessed a growing number of native English speakers teaching English in Chinese classroom. However, their teaching does not gain expected ends. Extensive studies have found that the mismatch between learning styles and teaching styles is a possible reason for this phenomenon. This paper aims to investigate whether the…

  16. Fairness Issues in a Standardized English Test for Nonnative Speakers of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puspawati, Indah

    2014-01-01

    For nonnative English speakers, taking a standardized English proficiency test seems inevitable, because the scores achieved play an important role in such life events as admission to a school, gaining a scholarship, or securing a job. Considering their importance, it is imperative that such tests be not only valid and reliable, but also fair.…

  17. "De Dog and De Cat": Assisting Speakers of Black English as They Begin to Write.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markham, Lynda R.

    1984-01-01

    Indicates features of Black dialect, or Black English vernacular, and discusses relationships between speaking Black English and learning to read and write. Suggestions for teaching speakers of Black English to write are offered. (RH)

  18. Effects of Speaker Variability on Learning Foreign-Accented English for EFL Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Yuan; Low, Renae; Jin, Putai; Sweller, John

    2013-01-01

    Using a cognitive load theory approach, we investigated the effects of speaker variability when individuals are learning to understand English as a foreign language (EFL) spoken by foreign-accented speakers. The use of multiple, Indian-accented speakers was compared to that of a single speaker for Chinese EFL learners with a higher or lower…

  19. Studies in English to Speakers of Other Languages and Standard English to Speakers of Non-Standard Dialect. Monograph No. 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Rodolfo, Ed.

    1971-01-01

    Suggesting that America should strive for linguistic and cultural pluralism, this special issue gathers in one place the latest thoughts of scholars on topics related to the concept of cultural pluralism, i.e., English to speakers of other languages (ESOL) and standard English to speakers of a nonstandard dialect (SESOD). Kenneth Croft, James Ney,…

  20. Inconsistencies in Error Production by Non-Native English Speakers and in Error Gravity Judgment by Native Speakers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arani, Mhmoud T.

    The purpose of this study was to: (1) describe differences in performance by non-native learners of English, when writing in different genres; (2) determine communicative value of grammatical errors as judged by a panel of native speakers; and (3) demonstrate inconsistencies in native speaker judgment of error gravity. Subjects were 20…

  1. Auditory Training for Experienced and Inexperienced Second-Language Learners: Native French Speakers Learning English Vowels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iverson, Paul; Pinet, Melanie; Evans, Bronwen G.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether high-variability auditory training on natural speech can benefit experienced second-language English speakers who already are exposed to natural variability in their daily use of English. The subjects were native French speakers who had learned English in school; experienced listeners were tested in England and the less…

  2. A Study of Non-Native English Speakers' Academic Performance at Santa Ana College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slark, Julie; Bateman, Harold

    A study was conducted in 1980-81 at Santa Ana College (SAC) to collect data on the English communication skills of non-native English speakers and to determine if a relationship existed between these skills and student's educational success. A sample of 22 classes, with an enrollment of at least 50% non-native English speakers and representing a…

  3. English vowel spaces produced by Japanese speakers: the smaller point vowels' and the greater schwas'.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Kaoru; Yamada, Jun; Takatsuka, Shigenobu

    2010-10-01

    This study investigated how Japanese-speaking learners of English pronounce the three point vowels /i/, /u/, and /a/ appearing in the first and second monosyllabic words of English noun phrases, and the schwa /ə/ appearing in English disyllabic words. First and second formant (F1 and F2) values were measured for four Japanese speakers and two American English speakers. The hypothesis that the area encompassed by the point vowels in the F1-F2 vowel space tends to be smaller for the Japanese speakers than for the English speakers was verified. The hypothesis that the area formed by the three schwas in chicke_n, spoonfu_l, and Tarza_n is greater for the Japanese speakers than for the English speakers and its related hypothesis were largely upheld. Implications for further research are briefly discussed.

  4. "Tight" and "Loose" Are Not Created Equal: An Asymmetry Underlying the Representation of "Fit" in English- and Korean-Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norbury, Heather M.; Waxman, Sandra R.; Song, Hyun-Joo

    2008-01-01

    Research concerning the spatial dimension "fit" ("tight" versus "loose") has been based on a tacit but untested assumption that the dimension "fit" is symmetrical, with tight- and loose-fitting relations highlighting the dimension "fit" with equal force. We propose a reformulation, documenting that adult speakers of English (Experiment 1) and…

  5. Native Speaker Norms and China English: From the Perspective of Learners and Teachers in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Deyuan; Zhang, Qunying

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the question of whether the norms based on native speakers of English should be kept in English teaching in an era when English has become World Englishes. This is an issue that has been keenly debated in recent years, not least in the pages of "TESOL Quarterly." However, "China English" in such debates has been given lesser…

  6. Differences of English Mental Lexicon Organization: A Comparative Study between Advanced Chinese English Language Learners and English Native Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Sibo

    2012-01-01

    Among various study topics of advanced second language (L2) learners, mental lexicon shares a unique significance. This paper will introduce a comparative experiment between advanced Chinese English as a Second Language (CESL) learners and English as first language (EL1) speakers. The research question of the study is whether advanced CESL…

  7. The Influence of Language Anxiety on English Reading and Writing Tasks among Native Hebrew Speakers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argaman, Osnat; Abu-Rabia, Salim

    2002-01-01

    Examined the influence of language anxiety as measured by a questionnaire on achievements in English writing and reading comprehension tasks. Subjects were native speakers of Hebrew, aged 12-13 years, learning English as a second language.(Author/VWL)

  8. Increasing Accountability: Faculty Perspectives on the English Language Competence of Nonnative English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrade, Maureen S.

    2010-01-01

    The cultural, ethnic, and linguistic diversity of today's tertiary students necessitates exploring a variety of approaches to support learning. This study reports on a university's efforts to understand the teaching and learning of its diverse students--international students who are nonnative English speakers (NNESs). Faculty were surveyed to…

  9. "Cool" English: Stylized Native-Speaker English in Japanese Television Shows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furukawa, Gavin

    2015-01-01

    This article analyzes stylized pronunciations of English by Japanese speakers on televised variety shows in Japan. Research on style and mocking has done much to reveal how linguistic forms are utilized in interaction as resources of identity construction that can oftentimes subvert hegemonic discourse (Chun 2004). Within this research area,…

  10. Attitudes and Training of Public School Clinicians Providing Services to Speakers of Black English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bountress, Nicholas G.

    1980-01-01

    To investigate speech-language clinicians' attitudes regarding treatment goal setting for children who were speakers of Black English, questionnaires based on W. Wolfram and R. Fasold's conceivable goals in teaching standard English to speakers of nonstandard dialects were distributed to 103 clinicians. (Author/CL)

  11. Promoting Communities of Practice among Non-Native Speakers of English in Online Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hoe Kyeung

    2011-01-01

    An online discussion involving text-based computer-mediated communication has great potential for promoting equal participation among non-native speakers of English. Several studies claimed that online discussions could enhance the academic participation of non-native speakers of English. However, there is little research around participation…

  12. Turkish Students' Perspectives on Speaking Anxiety in Native and Non-Native English Speaker Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozavli, Ebubekir; Gulmez, Recep

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to reveal the effect of FLA (foreign language anxiety) in native/non-native speaker of English classrooms. In this study, two groups of students (90 in total) of whom 38 were in NS (native speaker) class and 52 in NNS (non-native speaker) class taking English as a second language course for 22 hours a week at Erzincan…

  13. Oral language skills of adult cleft palate speakers.

    PubMed

    Pannbacker, M

    1975-01-01

    This study investigated selected oral language skills and their relationship to speech intelligibility in forty cleft palate and normal adult speakers. Connected speech samples were analyzed to determine spoken language status which included response length, grammar or syntax, and vocabulary size. The subjects were judged for intelligibility by two groups of listeners: sophisticated and unsophisticated. It was concluded: (a) cleft palate speakers used shorter responses and were more consistent in their language usage; (b) there were no significant differnences in syntax and vocabulary; (c) for cleft palate speakers there was a relationship between intelligibility and language measures; (d) unsophisticated listiners were more consisitent in intelligibility judgements, and (e) sophisticated listeners rated cleft palate speakers poorer than unsophisticated listeners.

  14. Thresholds for color discrimination in English and Korean speakers.

    PubMed

    Roberson, Debi; Hanley, J Richard; Pak, Hyensou

    2009-09-01

    Categorical perception (CP) is said to occur when a continuum of equally spaced physical changes is perceived as unequally spaced as a function of category membership (Harnad, S. (Ed.) (1987). Psychophysical and cognitive aspects of categorical perception: A critical overview. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press). A common suggestion is that CP for color arises because perception is qualitatively distorted when we learn to categorize a dimension. Contrary to this view, we here report that English speakers show no evidence of lowered discrimination thresholds at the boundaries between blue and green categories even though CP is found at these boundaries in a supra-threshold task. Furthermore, there is no evidence of different discrimination thresholds between individuals from two language groups (English and Korean) who use different color terminology in the blue-green region and have different supra-threshold boundaries. Our participants' just noticeable difference (JND) thresholds suggest that they retain a smooth continuum of perceptual space that is not warped by stretching at category boundaries or by within-category compression. At least for the domain of color, categorical perception appears to be a categorical, but not a perceptual phenomenon.

  15. Sentence comprehension in Swahili-English bilingual agrammatic speakers.

    PubMed

    Abuom, Tom O; Shah, Emmah; Bastiaanse, Roelien

    2013-05-01

    For this study, sentence comprehension was tested in Swahili-English bilingual agrammatic speakers. The sentences were controlled for four factors: (1) order of the arguments (base vs. derived); (2) embedding (declarative vs. relative sentences); (3) overt use of the relative pronoun "who"; (4) language (English and Swahili). Two theories were tested: the Trace Deletion Hypothesis (TDH; [Grodzinsky, Y. (1995). A restrictive theory of agrammatic comprehension. Brain and Language, 50, 27-51]) that assumes a representational deficit in agrammatic aphasia and the Derived Order Problem Hypothesis (DOP-H; Bastiaanse & Van Zonneveld, 2005), which is a processing account. Both theories have the same predictions for sentences in derived order. The difference is that the TDH predicts chance level performance for sentences in which the arguments are not in base order, whereas the DOP-H predicts poorer performance when processing demands increase. The results show that word order influences performance, in that sentences in which the arguments are in derived order are harder to comprehend than sentences in which the arguments are in base order. However, there is a significant interaction with the factor "embedding": sentences with an embedding are harder to comprehend than simple declaratives and this influence is larger in derived order sentences. There is no effect of language nor of the use of a relative pronoun. These results are correctly accounted for by the DOP-H.

  16. Stuttering and Lexical Category in Adult Arabic Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdalla, Fauzia; Robb, Michael P.; Al-Shatti, Tareq

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test whether the content and function word dichotomy of speech disfluency found in English-speaking adults who stutter (AWS) was evident in a language other than English. A group of adult Arabic-speaking AWS were sampled across spontaneous speaking, oral reading, and single-word naming tasks. Moments of disfluency…

  17. The Discrimination, Perception, and Production of German /r/ Allophones by German Speakers and Two Groups of American English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tepeli, Dilara

    2011-01-01

    The German /r/ sound is one of the most difficult sounds for American English (AE) speakers who are learning German as a foreign language to produce. The standard German /r/ variant [/R/] and dialectal variant [R] are achieved by varying the tongue constriction degree, while keeping the place of articulation constant [Schiller and Mooshammer…

  18. The Performance of Native Speakers of English and ESL Speakers on the Computer-based TOEFL and GRE General Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stricker, L. J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to replicate previous research on the construct validity of the paper-based version of the TOEFL and extend it to the computer-based TOEFL. Two samples of Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test-takers were used: native speakers of English specially recruited to take the computer-based TOEFL, and ESL…

  19. New and Not so New Horizons: Brief Encounters between UK Undergraduate Native-Speaker and Non-Native-Speaker Englishes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Juliet

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the apparent contradiction between the valuing and promoting of diverse literacies in most UK HEIs, and the discursive construction of spoken native-speaker English as the medium of good grades and prestige academic knowledge. During group interviews on their experiences of university internationalisation, 38 undergraduate…

  20. Disadvantages of publishing biomedical research articles in English for non-native speakers of English

    PubMed Central

    Rezaeian, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: English has become the most frequently used language for scientific communication in the biomedical field. Therefore, scholars from all over the world try to publish their findings in English. This trend has a number of advantages, along with several disadvantages. METHODS: In the current article, the most important disadvantages of publishing biomedical research articles in English for non-native speakers of English are reviewed. RESULTS: The most important disadvantages of publishing biomedical research articles in English for non-native speakers may include: Overlooking, either unintentionally or even deliberately, the most important local health problems; failure to carry out groundbreaking research due to limited medical research budgets; violating generally accepted codes of publication ethics and committing research misconduct and publications in open-access scam/predatory journals rather than prestigious journals. CONCLUSIONS: The above mentioned disadvantages could eventually result in academic establishments becoming irresponsible or, even worse, corrupt. In order to avoid this, scientists, scientific organizations, academic institutions, and scientific associations all over the world should design and implement a wider range of collaborative and comprehensive plans. PMID:25968115

  1. The Use of Academic Words in the Analytical Writing of Secondary English Learners and Native English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cons, Andrea M.

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the following research question: How do secondary English learners (ELs) and Re-designated fluent English proficient students (RFEPs) use academic words in analytical writing in comparison to native English speakers (NESs)? It highlights previously overlooked differences in academic word use in the writing of students who are…

  2. Linguistic Support for Non-Native English Speakers: Higher Education Practices in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow Andrade, Maureen; Evans, Norman W.; Hartshorn, K. James

    2014-01-01

    Higher education institutions in English-speaking nations host significant populations of non-native English speakers (NNES), both international and resident. English language proficiency is a critical factor to their success. This study reviews higher education practices in the United States related to this population. Findings indicate…

  3. Physiological Indices of Bilingualism: Oral-Motor Coordination and Speech Rate in Bengali-English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chakraborty, Rahul; Goffman, Lisa; Smith, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To examine how age of immersion and proficiency in a 2nd language influence speech movement variability and speaking rate in both a 1st language and a 2nd language. Method: A group of 21 Bengali-English bilingual speakers participated. Lip and jaw movements were recorded. For all 21 speakers, lip movement variability was assessed based on…

  4. A Statistical Method of Evaluating the Pronunciation Proficiency/Intelligibility of English Presentations by Japanese Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kibishi, Hiroshi; Hirabayashi, Kuniaki; Nakagawa, Seiichi

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a statistical evaluation method of pronunciation proficiency and intelligibility for presentations made in English by native Japanese speakers. We statistically analyzed the actual utterances of speakers to find combinations of acoustic and linguistic features with high correlation between the scores estimated by the…

  5. The Attitudes of University Students towards Non-Native Speakers English Teachers in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ling, Cheung Yin; Braine, George

    2007-01-01

    Although non-native speakers (NNS) English teachers have taught alongside native speaker (NS) teachers for centuries, studies on the effectiveness of NNS teachers, their self-perceptions, or the attitudes of students towards these teachers, have only been conducted recently. Most of these studies have been conducted in the USA in ESL contexts.…

  6. Compliment Responses: Comparing American Learners of Japanese, Native Japanese Speakers, and American Native English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatsumi, Naofumi

    2012-01-01

    Previous research shows that American learners of Japanese (AJs) tend to differ from native Japanese speakers in their compliment responses (CRs). Yokota (1986) and Shimizu (2009) have reported that AJs tend to respond more negatively than native Japanese speakers. It has also been reported that AJs' CRs tend to lack the use of avoidance or…

  7. Improving Reading Skills: The Relationship between the Oral Language of Black English Speakers and Their Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lass, Bonnie

    1980-01-01

    Study conducted to determine whether Black English speakers are likely to encounter problems in reading standard English. Results indicate no relationship between the use of Black English and subjects' grade level or reading performance. (Author/JLF)

  8. Short Assessment of Health Literacy—Spanish and English: A Comparable Test of Health Literacy for Spanish and English Speakers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shoou-Yih Daniel; Stucky, Brian D; Lee, Jessica Y; Rozier, R Gary; Bender, Deborah E

    2010-01-01

    Objective The intent of the study was to develop and validate a comparable health literacy test for Spanish-speaking and English-speaking populations. Study Design The design of the instrument, named the Short Assessment of Health Literacy—Spanish and English (SAHL-S&E), combined a word recognition test, as appearing in the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM), and a comprehension test using multiple-choice questions designed by an expert panel. We used the item response theory (IRT) in developing and validating the instrument. Data Collection Validation of SAHL-S&E involved testing and comparing the instrument with other health literacy instruments in a sample of 201 Spanish-speaking and 202 English-speaking subjects recruited from the Ambulatory Care Center at the University of North Carolina Healthcare System. Principal Findings Based on IRT analysis, 18 items were retained in the comparable test. The Spanish version of the test, SAHL-S, was highly correlated with other Spanish health literacy instruments, Short Assessment of Health Literacy for Spanish-Speaking Adults (r=0.88, p<.05) and the Spanish Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (TOFHLA) (r=0.62, p<.05). The English version, SAHL-E, had high correlations with REALM (r=0.94, p<.05) and the English TOFHLA (r=0.68, p<.05). Significant correlations were found between SAHL-S&E and years of schooling in both Spanish- and English-speaking samples (r=0.15 and 0.39, respectively). SAHL-S&E displayed satisfactory reliability of 0.80 and 0.89 in the Spanish- and English-speaking samples, respectively. IRT analysis indicated that the SAHL-S&E score was highly reliable for individuals with a low level of health literacy. Conclusions The new instrument, SAHL-S&E, has good reliability and validity. It is particularly useful for identifying individuals with low health literacy and could be used to screen for low health literacy among Spanish and English speakers. PMID:20500222

  9. Comparison of native and non-native phone imitation by English and Spanish speakers

    PubMed Central

    Olmstead, Anne J.; Viswanathan, Navin; Aivar, M. Pilar; Manuel, Sarath

    2013-01-01

    Experiments investigating phonetic convergence in conversation often focus on interlocutors with similar phonetic inventories. Extending these experiments to those with dissimilar inventories requires understanding the capacity of speakers to imitate native and non-native phones. In the present study, we tested native Spanish and native English speakers to determine whether imitation of non-native tokens differs qualitatively from imitation of native tokens. Participants imitated a [ba]–[pa] continuum that varied in VOT from −60 ms (prevoiced, Spanish [b]) to +60 ms (long lag, English [p]) such that the continuum consisted of some tokens that were native to Spanish speakers and some that were native to English speakers. Analysis of the imitations showed two critical results. First, both groups of speakers demonstrated sensitivity to VOT differences in tokens that fell within their native regions of the VOT continuum (prevoiced region for Spanish and long lag region for English). Secondly, neither group of speakers demonstrated such sensitivity to VOT differences among tokens that fell in their non-native regions of the continuum. These results show that, even in an intentional imitation task, speakers cannot accurately imitate non-native tokens, but are clearly flexible in producing native tokens. Implications of these findings are discussed with reference to the constraints on convergence in interlocutors from different linguistic backgrounds. PMID:23898316

  10. Acoustic properties of vowels in clear and conversational speech by female non-native English speakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chi-Nin; So, Connie K.

    2005-04-01

    Studies have shown that talkers can improve the intelligibility of their speech when instructed to speak as if talking to a hearing-impaired person. The improvement of speech intelligibility is associated with specific acoustic-phonetic changes: increases in vowel duration and fundamental frequency (F0), a wider pitch range, and a shift in formant frequencies for F1 and F2. Most previous studies of clear speech production have been conducted with native speakers; research with second language speakers is much less common. The present study examined the acoustic properties of non-native English vowels produced in a clear speaking style. Five female Cantonese speakers and a comparison group of English speakers were recorded producing four vowels (/i u ae a/) in /bVt/ context in conversational and clear speech. Vowel durations, F0, pitch range, and the first two formants for each of the four vowels were measured. Analyses revealed that for both groups of speakers, vowel durations, F0, pitch range, and F1 spoken clearly were greater than those produced conversationally. However, F2 was higher in conversational speech than in clear speech. The findings suggest that female non-native English speakers exhibit acoustic-phonetic patterns similar to those of native speakers when asked to produce English vowels clearly.

  11. The acquisition of Taiwan Mandarin vowels by native American English speakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Cyun-Jhan

    2005-04-01

    Previous work on the production of English and French phones by native American English speakers indicated that equivalence classification prevent L2 learners from approximating L2 phonetic norms of similar phones and that learning French would not affect English speakers' production of L1 similar phone /u/ (Flege, 1987). In this study, there were five subjects, including 2 advanced native American English learners of Taiwan Mandarin, 2 basic native American English learners of Taiwan Mandarin, and 1 monolingual Taiwan Mandarin speaker. The corpus were 12 English words ``heed, who'd, hod; leak, Luke, lock; beat, suit, bot; peat, suit, pot,'' and 12 Mandarin words [i,u, a; li, lu, la; pi, pu, pa; phi, phu, pha]. Both advanced and basic learners' production of English and Mandarin words and monolingual Taiwan Mandarin speaker's production of Mandarin words were directly recorded onto a PC. Vowel formants were taken from spectrograms generated by Praat. Preliminary results showed the vowel space of advanced learners between Taiwan Mandarin [i] and [u] was larger than that of basic learners, and closer to the Taiwan Mandarin norms. Besides, the vowel space between English [i] and [u] by basic learners was dramatically smaller than that of American English norms.

  12. The relationship between brain reaction and English reading tests for non-native English speakers.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Pei-Wen; Tian, Yu-Jie; Kuo, Ting-Hua; Sun, Koun-Tem

    2016-07-01

    This research analyzed the brain activity of non-native English speakers while engaged in English reading tests. The brain wave event-related potentials (ERPs) of participants were used to analyze the difference between making correct and incorrect choices on English reading test items. Three English reading tests of differing levels were designed and 20 participants, 10 males and 10 females whose ages ranged from 20 to 24, voluntarily participated in the experiment. Experimental results were analyzed by performing independent t-tests on the ERPs of participants for gender, difficulty level, and correct versus wrong options. Participants who chose incorrect options elicited a larger N600, verifying results found in the literature. Another interesting result was found: For incorrectly answered items, different areas of brain showing a significant difference in ERPs between the chosen and non-chosen options corresponded to gender differences; for males, this area was located in the right hemisphere whereas for females, it was located in the left. Experimental results imply that non-native English speaking males and females employ different areas of the brain to comprehend the meaning of difficult items.

  13. English and Thai Speakers' Perception of Mandarin Tones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Language learners' language experience is predicted to display a significant effect on their accurate perception of foreign language sounds (Flege, 1995). At the superasegmental level, there is still a debate regarding whether tone language speakers are better able to perceive foreign lexical tones than non-tone language speakers (i.e Lee et al.,…

  14. Do English Speakers Address Their Japanese Colleagues by Their First Name, while Talking in English in Japan?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okamura, Akiko

    2009-01-01

    This study examines how English speakers address, and are addressed by, their Japanese colleagues in Japan, and the deciding factors and motivation for the choice of address-forms in a given context. The local norms of English and Japanese are also examined through interviews with 15 British and 15 Japanese office workers in their home countries,…

  15. English Language Proficiency and Progress: Students Receiving English for Speakers of Other Languages Services from 2012 to 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Huafang; Maina, Nyambura

    2015-01-01

    This is one of several studies conducted by the Office of Shared Accountability that evaluated students identified as eligible for English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) services in Montgomery County (Maryland) Public Schools (MCPS). This study has two major purposes: (1) to examine English proficiency levels and progress in English…

  16. Pen Pal Writing: A Holistic and Socio-Cultural Approach to Adult English Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larrotta, Clarena; Serrano, Arlene F.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study reports the findings implementing a pen pal letter exchange project between adult English language learners and volunteer native English speakers. The pen pal project was implemented using a holistic and socio-cultural approach to English literacy development. This article presents pen pal writing as an authentic language…

  17. Insight into the Structure of Compound Words among Speakers of Chinese and English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jie; Anderson, Richard C.; Wang, Qiuying; Packard, Jerome; Wu, Xinchun; Tang, Shan; Ke, Xiaoling

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of compound word structures in Chinese and English was investigated, comparing 435 Chinese and 258 Americans, including second, fourth, and sixth graders, and college undergraduates. As anticipated, the results revealed that Chinese speakers performed better on a word structure analogy task than their English-speaking counterparts. Also,…

  18. Affricate gemination in the English of Polish speakers: A study in second language variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurgood, Ela

    2003-04-01

    This study investigates the nature of the acoustic variation in sequences of identical affricates produced by Polish learners of English. In both English and Polish sequences of identical affricates occur across word boundaries, but only in Polish do such sequences also occur root internally and across morpheme boundaries. In Polish sequences of identical affricates are manifested variably both by rearticulation of both affricates and by articulation of a single affricate but with lengthened duration of either the stop or the fricative. To investigate their English, the subjects performed two tasks: repetition of 12 English sentences and orally responding to 17 multiple choice questions. The task produced significant cross-speaker differences in the phonetics of the geminates, differences correlated with differences in their proficiency levels in English. The more Polish-like singly articulated long affricates were produced by 22% of the intermediate speakers but by 48% of the advanced speakers, the opposite of what one might expect. The intermediate speakers appear to have paid more attention to the phonetics of the English cues, thus producing more fully rearticulated affricates; the more advanced speakers appear to have paid less attention to the phonetics of the cues, thus reverting more to the norms of Polish pronunciation.

  19. Error Analysis of Present Simple Tense in the Interlanguage of Adult Arab English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muftah, Muneera; Rafik-Galea, Shameem

    2013-01-01

    The present study analyses errors on present simple tense among adult Arab English language learners. It focuses on the error on 3sg "-s" (the third person singular present tense agreement morpheme "-s"). The learners are undergraduate adult Arabic speakers learning English as a foreign language. The study gathered data from…

  20. Discrimination and production of English vowels by bilingual speakers of Spanish and English.

    PubMed

    Levey, Sandra

    2004-10-01

    The goal of this study was to examine whether listeners bilingual in Spanish and English would have difficulty in the discrimination of English vowel contrasts. An additional goal was to estimate the correlation between their discrimination and production of these vowels. Participants (40 bilingual Spanish- and English-speaking and 40 native monolingual English-speaking college students, 23-36 years of age) participated (M age = 25.3 yr., Mdn = 25.0). The discrimination and production of English vowels in real and novel words by adult participants bilingual in Spanish and English were examined and their discrimination was compared with that of 40 native monolingual English-speaking participants. Stimuli were presented within triads in an ABX paradigm. Novel words were chosen to represent new words when learning a new language and to provide a more valid test of discrimination. Bilingual participants' productions of vowels were judged by two independent listeners to estimate the correlation between discrimination and production. Discrimination accuracy was significantly greater for native English-speaking participants than for bilingual participants for vowel contrasts and novel words. Significant errors also appeared in the bilingual participants' productions of certain vowels. Earlier age of acquisition, absence of communication problems, and greater percentage of time devoted to communication contributed to greater accuracy in discrimination and production.

  1. Item-Level Psychometrics and Predictors of Performance for Spanish/English Bilingual Speakers on "An Object and Action Naming Battery"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonds, Lisa A.; Donovan, Neila J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: There is a pressing need for psychometrically sound naming materials for Spanish/English bilingual adults. To address this need, in this study the authors examined the psychometric properties of An Object and Action Naming Battery (An O&A Battery; Druks & Masterson, 2000) in bilingual speakers. Method: Ninety-one Spanish/English…

  2. Essential English for Micronesian Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Jo Ann; Reinecke, Hank

    This student workbook is designed to help Micronesian adults learn everyday English. Its ten chapters move from simple one-word picture labeling to more abstract ideas in a spiraled fashion, reiterating the essential elements of the English language in different, more complicated ways. Subjects covered include names for everyday objects and…

  3. The Effects of L2 Proficiency Level on the Processing of "Wh"-Questions among Dutch Second Language Speakers of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Carrie N.; van Hell, Janet G.

    2011-01-01

    Using a self-paced reading task, the present study explores how Dutch-English L2 speakers parse English "wh"-subject-extractions and "wh"-object-extractions. Results suggest that English native speakers and highly-proficient Dutch-English L2 speakers do not always exhibit measurable signs of on-line reanalysis when reading subject-versus…

  4. Cortical encoding and neurophysiological tracking of intensity and pitch cues signaling English stress patterns in native and nonnative speakers.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wei-Lun; Bidelman, Gavin M

    2016-01-01

    We examined cross-language differences in neural encoding and tracking of intensity and pitch cues signaling English stress patterns. Auditory mismatch negativities (MMNs) were recorded in English and Mandarin listeners in response to contrastive English pseudowords whose primary stress occurred either on the first or second syllable (i.e., "nocTICity" vs. "NOCticity"). The contrastive syllable stress elicited two consecutive MMNs in both language groups, but English speakers demonstrated larger responses to stress patterns than Mandarin speakers. Correlations between the amplitude of ERPs and continuous changes in the running intensity and pitch of speech assessed how well each language group's brain activity tracked these salient acoustic features of lexical stress. We found that English speakers' neural responses tracked intensity changes in speech more closely than Mandarin speakers (higher brain-acoustic correlation). Findings demonstrate more robust and precise processing of English stress (intensity) patterns in early auditory cortical responses of native relative to nonnative speakers. PMID:27140864

  5. Cortical encoding and neurophysiological tracking of intensity and pitch cues signaling English stress patterns in native and nonnative speakers.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wei-Lun; Bidelman, Gavin M

    2016-01-01

    We examined cross-language differences in neural encoding and tracking of intensity and pitch cues signaling English stress patterns. Auditory mismatch negativities (MMNs) were recorded in English and Mandarin listeners in response to contrastive English pseudowords whose primary stress occurred either on the first or second syllable (i.e., "nocTICity" vs. "NOCticity"). The contrastive syllable stress elicited two consecutive MMNs in both language groups, but English speakers demonstrated larger responses to stress patterns than Mandarin speakers. Correlations between the amplitude of ERPs and continuous changes in the running intensity and pitch of speech assessed how well each language group's brain activity tracked these salient acoustic features of lexical stress. We found that English speakers' neural responses tracked intensity changes in speech more closely than Mandarin speakers (higher brain-acoustic correlation). Findings demonstrate more robust and precise processing of English stress (intensity) patterns in early auditory cortical responses of native relative to nonnative speakers.

  6. Switches to English during French Service Encounters: Relationships with L2 French Speakers' Willingness to Communicate and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNaughton, Stephanie; McDonough, Kim

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study investigated second language (L2) French speakers' service encounters in the multilingual setting of Montreal, specifically whether switches to English during French service encounters were related to L2 speakers' willingness to communicate or motivation. Over a two-week period, 17 French L2 speakers in Montreal submitted…

  7. Acquired Dyslexia in a Turkish-English Speaker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raman, Ilhan; Weekes, Brendan S.

    2005-01-01

    The Turkish script is characterised by completely transparent bidirectional mappings between orthography and phonology. To date, there has been no reported evidence of acquired dyslexia in Turkish speakers leading to the naive view that reading and writing problems in Turkish are probably rare. We examined the extent to which phonological…

  8. A Guide for Teaching Standard English to Black Dialect Speakers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Theresa A.

    Strategies are suggested that can be used by teachers who are trying to get Black Dialect speaking students to speak and write the General Dialect. The approach takes into account the fact that all speakers are not on the same level. The need for careful pre-testing and determination of class rank is suggested, as are various ways of evaluating…

  9. Comparing the Performance of the S-TOFHLA and NVS Among and Between English and Spanish Speakers.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Zohfeld, Vanessa; Rademaker, Alfred W; Dolan, Nancy C; Ferreira, M Rosario; Eder, Milton Mickey; Liu, Dachao; Wolf, Michael S; Cameron, Kenzie A

    2015-01-01

    Given the growing body of evidence demonstrating the significant implications of health literacy on a myriad of outcomes, researchers continue to incorporate health literacy metrics in studies. With this proliferation in measurement of health literacy in research, it has become increasingly important to understand how various health literacy tools perform in specific populations. Our objective was to compare the performance of two widely used tests, the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (S-TOFHLA) and the Newest Vital Sign (NVS) among and between a sample of English and Spanish-speaking patients. Adults (N = 402) ages 50-75 years participating in a trial to promote colorectal cancer screening completed in-person interviews which included both measures of health literacy. In the full sample, the tests were moderately correlated (r = 0.69, p < .0001); however, there was a stronger correlation among those completing the test in Spanish (r = 0.83) as compared with English (r = 0.58, p < .0001). English speakers more often were categorized as having adequate literacy by the S-TOFHLA as compared with the NVS, whereas Spanish speakers scored consistently low on both instruments. These findings indicate that the categorization of participants into levels of literacy is likely to vary, depending on whether the NVS or S-TOFHLA is used for assessment, a factor which researchers should be aware of when selecting literacy assessments. PMID:26147770

  10. How I Became a "Different" English Speaker and Listener

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hashimoto, Ryota

    2016-01-01

    The author went to the United States to study applied linguistics. Although he was there for nine months, his English proficiency did not improve as much as he had hoped, considering that he was using English almost exclusively every day. After his time in the United States, he spent 10 months in Australia working and traveling on a working…

  11. Stuttering Characteristics of German-English Bilingual Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafer, Martina; Robb, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine stuttering behavior in German-English bilingual people who stutter (PWS), with particular reference to the frequency of stuttering on content and function words. Fifteen bilingual PWS were sampled who spoke German as the first language (L1) and English as a second language (L2). Conversational speech was…

  12. Phonological Awareness Skills in Young African American English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitri, Souraya Mansour; Terry, Nicole Patton

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine African American children's performance on a phonological awareness task that included items reflecting differences between African American English (AAE) and mainstream American English. The relationship between spoken production of AAE forms and performance on phonological awareness, vocabulary, and…

  13. Negotiating Identity in English-Medium Settings: Agency, Resistance and Appropriation among Speakers of Other Languages in an International School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sears, Coreen

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a qualitative investigation into the ways that speakers of other languages negotiate their identities in an English-medium international school. As elective-bilinguals, it is generally assumed that such individuals are exempt from unfavourable positioning. As beginning speakers of English, however, older participants in…

  14. A Concise Examination of the Artificial Battle between Native and Non-Native Speaker Teachers of English in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, Servet

    2006-01-01

    This paper serves as a theoretical commentary on the debate regarding native and non-native speaker teachers of English as it draws from the discussions in the literature, as well as from personal experience. The author, a nonnative English teacher himself, points out the possible pros and cons of being a native and non-native speaker teacher of…

  15. Conceptualization of American English Native Speaker Norms: A Case Study of an English Language Classroom in South Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahn, Kyungja

    2011-01-01

    This case study aims to reveal how conceptualization of native speakership was constructed and reinforced in a South Korean university classroom of English as a foreign language (EFL). In addition, it examines how this conceptualization positions native speakers, a non-native EFL teacher, and learners, and what learning opportunities were provided…

  16. Non-Native Speakers Speak in Phonemes: A Phono-Acoustic Analysis of Fricatives and Affricates by Native and Chinese Speakers of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Wei

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation measured the acoustic properties of the English fricatives and affricates produced by native and Chinese L2 speakers of English to identify the phonetic basis and sources of a foreign accent and to explore the mechanism involved in L2 speech production and L2 phonological acquisition at the segmental level. Based on a Network…

  17. Identification of American English vowels by native Japanese speakers: Talker-and-token-based analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozawa, Takeshi; Frieda, Elaina M.; Wayland, Ratree

    2005-09-01

    Native speakers of Japanese identified American English vowels /i, I, ɛ, æ, squflg, squflg/ produced by four female native speakers of American English in /CVC/ contexts. Native speakers of American English served as the control group, and they outperformed the Japanese subjects in identifying all the English vowels in every /CVC/ context. In another experiment the Japanese subjects equated these English vowels with Japanese vowels. In general, English vowels were equated with phonetically close Japanese vowels, but significant talker effect was observed. The /i/ tokens equated with the Japanese long high front vowel /ii/ were much more correctly identified as /i/ than those equated with the Japanese short high front vowel /i/. These tokens were more often misidentified as /I/. The /squflg/ and /squflg/ tokens were predominantly equated with the Japanese low vowel /a/. The percent-correct identification of /squflg/ and /squflg/ was low in most of the /CVC/ contexts, and these two vowels were often misidentified as each other, and the Japanese subjects' latency before they decided what vowel they had heard was longer when /squflg/ or /squflg/ tokens were presented. The Japanese subjects do not seem to have salient cues to differentiate /squflg/ and /squflg/.

  18. The Acquisition of Null and Overt Pronominals in Japanese by English Speakers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanno, Kazue

    1997-01-01

    Examines the role of Universal Grammar in the second-language acquisition of Japanese by English speakers. The study focuses on the acquisition of the principle that prevents overt pronouns from having quantified noun phrases as antecedents in languages (such as Japanese) that have null pronouns. (16 references) (Author/CK)

  19. Speaker-Specific Kinematic Properties of Alveolar Reductions in English and German

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhnert, Barbara; Hoole, Phil

    2004-01-01

    A simultaneous EPG/EMA study of tongue gestures of five speakers was conducted to investigate the kinematic events accompanying alveolar stop reductions in the context of a velar plosive /k/ and in the context of a laryngeal fricative /h/ in two languages, English and German. No systematic language differences could be detected. Alveolar…

  20. Compliment Responses of Thai and Punjabi Speakers of English in Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sachathep, Sukchai

    2014-01-01

    This variational pragmatics (VP) study investigates the similarities and differences of compliment responses (CR) between Thai and Punjabi speakers of English in Thailand, focusing on the strategies used in CR when the microsociolinguistic variables are integrated into the Discourse Completion Task (DCT). The participants were 20 Thai and 20…

  1. Exploring the Potential Relationship between Eye Gaze and English L2 Speakers' Responses to Recasts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonough, Kim; Crowther, Dustin; Kielstra, Paula; Trofimovich, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study investigated whether joint attention through eye gaze was predictive of second language (L2) speakers' responses to recasts. L2 English learners (N = 20) carried out communicative tasks with research assistants who provided feedback in response to non-targetlike (non-TL) forms. Their interaction was audio-recorded and their…

  2. The Second Language Acquisition of Mandarin Chinese Tones by English, Japanese and Korean Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Hang

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation explores the second language acquisition of Mandarin Chinese tones by speakers of non-tonal languages within the framework of Optimality Theory. The effects of three L1s are analyzed: American English, a stress-accent language; Tokyo Japanese, a lexical pitch accent language; and Seoul Korean, a non-stress and non-pitch accent…

  3. Acoustic Cues to Perception of Word Stress by English, Mandarin, and Russian Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chrabaszcz, Anna; Winn, Matthew; Lin, Candise Y.; Idsardi, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated how listeners' native language affects their weighting of acoustic cues (such as vowel quality, pitch, duration, and intensity) in the perception of contrastive word stress. Method: Native speakers (N = 45) of typologically diverse languages (English, Russian, and Mandarin) performed a stress identification…

  4. The Acquisition of English by a Five-Year Old French Speaker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerbault, Jeannine

    This paper summarizes the results of a longitudinal study of a child native speaker of French acquiring English. The observation period covered the child's progress from age 4 years, 9 months to age 5 years, 8 months. An analysis was made of the acquisition of the interrogative and negative structures and of nine grammatical morphemes. In…

  5. Developing Communication in the Workplace for Non-Native English Speakers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Pat; Watkins, Lisa

    This curriculum module contains materials for conducting a course designed to build oral and written English skills for nonnative speakers. The course focuses on increasing vocabulary, improving listening/speaking skills, extracting information from various written texts (such as memos, notes, business forms, manuals, letters), and developing…

  6. What's in a Name? How Different Languages Result in Different Brains in English and Chinese Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Chao

    2010-01-01

    The linguistic relativity hypothesis proposes that speakers of different languages perceive and conceptualize the world differently, but do their brains reflect these differences? In English, most nouns do not provide linguistic clues to their categories, whereas most Mandarin Chinese nouns provide explicit category information, either…

  7. "Wh-on-Earth" in Chinese Speakers' L2 English: Evidence of Dormant Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Boping

    2014-01-01

    Adopting a decompositional approach to items in the lexicon, this article reports on an empirical study investigating Chinese speakers' second language (L2) acquisition of English "wh-on-earth" questions (i.e. questions with phrases like what on earth or "who on earth"). An acceptability judgment task, a…

  8. A Survey of Online Teaching by Native-Speaker English Instructors at Japanese Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracher, John

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates how native-speaker English teachers working at Japanese universities use the Internet in their classes. In 2008, 50 instructors completed a survey about their teaching-related use of the Internet; another group of 50 was polled in 2012. The respondents were asked about their teaching situations, whether they used…

  9. A Semiotic Approach to Teaching Media Literacy to Nonnative Speakers of English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curry, Mary Jane

    This paper examines how semiotic analysis may be useful in teaching media literacy to nonnative speakers of English (NNSs), including both immigrants and international students who plan to return to their countries. It focuses on two television shows. The first show, "Friends," covers issues and problems of contemporary urban life for members of…

  10. Language Variation and Score Variation in the Testing of English Language Learners, Native Spanish Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solano-Flores, Guillermo; Li, Min

    2009-01-01

    We investigated language variation and score variation in the testing of English language learners, native Spanish speakers. We gave students the same set of National Assessment of Educational Progress mathematics items in both their first language and their second language. We examined the amount of score variation due to the main and interaction…

  11. Basic Report for Targeted Communications; Teaching a Standard English to Speakers of Other Dialects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Karen M.

    Designed to interpret and synthesize the existing research and related information about dialects for those people who are involved in teaching a standard English to speakers of other dialects, the information in this report is based on an analysis and synthesis of over 1,250 articles and reports dealing with dialects and dialect learning. The…

  12. Attitudes to Spoken Australian English: Judgements of Ingroup and Ethnic Outgroup Speakers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallois, Cynthia; Callan, Victor J.

    1989-01-01

    Two studies examined Anglo-Australians attitudes toward male and female Australian and immigrant speakers using English. Results support view that foreign or ethnic accent is sufficient cue to elicit ethnic stereotypes, that such stereotypes are salient to Anglo-Australians, and that accent can combine with other vocal cues to social group…

  13. Linguistic Constraints on the Acquisition of English Syllable Codas by Native Speakers of Mandarin Chinese.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Jette G.

    2001-01-01

    Investigated the acquisition of English syllable codas by speakers of Mandarin Chinese. Three participants' naturalistic production of syllable codas were studied and analyzed through VARBRUL and descriptive statistics to determine accuracy orders and production modifications of codas by length at two data collection times with a time span of 6…

  14. Reactions of Prospective English Teachers toward Speakers of a Non-Standard Dialect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewett, Nancy

    This study supports the hypothesis that educated white listeners react negatively to the phonological variations of non-standard English. White college freshmen and seniors listened to a recorded tape of ten speakers, black and white with standard and non-standard styles of pronunciation, all reading the same passage. Students were asked to judge…

  15. Native English Speakers' Perception of Arabic Emphatic Consonants and the Influence of Vowel Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes-Harb, Rachel; Durham, Kristie

    2016-01-01

    Native English speakers experience difficulty acquiring Arabic emphatic consonants. Arabic language textbooks have suggested that learners focus on adjacent vowels for cues to these consonants; however, the utility of such a strategy has not been empirically tested. This study investigated the perception of Arabic emphatic-plain contrasts by means…

  16. English Native Speakers' L2 Acquisition of the Spanish Clitic Se

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Carolina

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the acquisition of the Spanish clitic se by English native speakers in passive, middle, and impersonal constructions. Little research has been done on this topic in SLA within a UG framework (Bayona, 2005; Bruhn de Garavito, 1999). VanPatten (2004) proposed the Processing Instruction (PI) model arguing for the necessity of…

  17. Improving the Spelling Ability among Speakers of African American English through Explicit Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, Ramona T.; Joshi, R. Malatesha; Carreker, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this eight week study was to provide explicit instruction to improve spelling to 124 sixth grade students who are speakers of African American English (AAE). Two classroom teachers taught 14 different language arts class sections. The research design was a pretest/posttest/posttest design using wait-list-control. The treatment group…

  18. Brain Plasticity in Speech Training in Native English Speakers Learning Mandarin Tones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzen, Christina Carolyn

    The current study employed behavioral and event-related potential (ERP) measures to investigate brain plasticity associated with second-language (L2) phonetic learning based on an adaptive computer training program. The program utilized the acoustic characteristics of Infant-Directed Speech (IDS) to train monolingual American English-speaking listeners to perceive Mandarin lexical tones. Behavioral identification and discrimination tasks were conducted using naturally recorded speech, carefully controlled synthetic speech, and non-speech control stimuli. The ERP experiments were conducted with selected synthetic speech stimuli in a passive listening oddball paradigm. Identical pre- and post- tests were administered on nine adult listeners, who completed two-to-three hours of perceptual training. The perceptual training sessions used pair-wise lexical tone identification, and progressed through seven levels of difficulty for each tone pair. The levels of difficulty included progression in speaker variability from one to four speakers and progression through four levels of acoustic exaggeration of duration, pitch range, and pitch contour. Behavioral results for the natural speech stimuli revealed significant training-induced improvement in identification of Tones 1, 3, and 4. Improvements in identification of Tone 4 generalized to novel stimuli as well. Additionally, comparison between discrimination of across-category and within-category stimulus pairs taken from a synthetic continuum revealed a training-induced shift toward more native-like categorical perception of the Mandarin lexical tones. Analysis of the Mismatch Negativity (MMN) responses in the ERP data revealed increased amplitude and decreased latency for pre-attentive processing of across-category discrimination as a result of training. There were also laterality changes in the MMN responses to the non-speech control stimuli, which could reflect reallocation of brain resources in processing pitch patterns

  19. Orthographic processing of polysyllabic words by native and nonnative English speakers.

    PubMed

    Taft, Marcus

    2002-01-01

    How polysyllabic English words are analyzed in silent reading was examined in three experiments by comparing lexical decision responses to words physically split on the screen. The gap was compatible either with the Maximal Onset Principle or the Maximal Coda Principle. The former corresponds to the spoken syllable (e.g., ca det), except when the word has a stressed short first vowel (e.g., ra dish), while the reverse is true for the latter (giving cad et and rad ish). Native English speakers demonstrated a general preference for the Max Coda analysis and a correlation with reading ability when such an analysis did not correspond with the spoken syllable. Native Japanese speakers, on the other hand, showed a Max Onset preference regardless of the type of word, while native Mandarin Chinese speakers showed no preference at all. It is concluded that a maximization of the coda is the optimal representation of polysyllabic words in English and that poorer native readers are more influenced by phonology than are better readers. The way that nonnative readers mentally represent polysyllabic English words is affected by the way such words are structured in their native language, which may not lead to optimal English processing.

  20. Durations of American English vowels by native and non-native speakers: acoustic analyses and perceptual effects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Jin, Su-Hyun; Chen, Chia-Tsen

    2014-06-01

    The goal of this study was to examine durations of American English vowels produced by English-, Chinese-, and Korean-native speakers and the effects of vowel duration on vowel intelligibility. Twelve American English vowels were recorded in the /hVd/ phonetic context by native speakers and non-native speakers. The English vowel duration patterns as a function of vowel produced by non-native speakers were generally similar to those produced by native speakers. These results imply that using duration differences across vowels may be an important strategy for non-native speakers' production before they are able to employ spectral cues to produce and perceive English speech sounds. In the intelligibility experiment, vowels were selected from 10 native and non-native speakers and vowel durations were equalized at 170 ms. Intelligibility of vowels with original and equalized durations was evaluated by American English native listeners. Results suggested that vowel intelligibility of native and non-native speakers degraded slightly by 3-8% when durations were equalized, indicating that vowel duration plays a minor role in vowel intelligibility.

  1. Bilingual Language Development and Disorders in Spanish-English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Brian A., Ed.

    2004-01-01

    With the increasing number of Spanish-English bilingual children in the U.S., both SLPs and researchers must understand speech and language developments in these children--and SLPs also need reliable assessment and intervention approaches for serving bilingual children with language disorders. This comprehensive text is one of the few to offer…

  2. The Acquisition of Korean Plural Marking by Native English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Sun Hee

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the L2 acquisition of Korean plural marking by English-speaking learners within a feature-reassembly approach--a formal feature-based approach suggesting that native-like attainment of L2 morphosyntactic knowledge is determined by whether learners can reconfigure the formal features assembled in functional categories and…

  3. On English Speakers' Ability to Communicate Emotion in Mandarin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jian, Hua-Li

    2015-01-01

    The ability of Mandarin learners to express emotion in Mandarin has received little attention. This study examines how English L1 users express emotions in Mandarin and how this expression differs from that of Mandarin L1 users. Scenarios were adopted to elicit joy, anger, sadness, fear, and neutrality. Both groups articulated anger, joy, and fear…

  4. A Microwave Course in Spanish (for English Speakers).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delisle, Gilles L.; Avila, Hector

    This textbook is designed for English-speaking students of Spanish. The distinctive feature of a microwave course is the emphasis on communicative use of each structural element as soon as it appears. The principal component is a series of 'cycles' which, because of their extreme shortness, have been given the name 'microwaves.' This text consists…

  5. Segmentation by lexical subtraction in Hungarian speakers of second-language English.

    PubMed

    White, Laurence; Melhorn, James F; Mattys, Sven L

    2010-03-01

    Using cross-modal form priming, we compared the use of stress and lexicality in the segmentation of spoken English by native English speakers (L1) and by native Hungarian speakers of second-language English (L2). For both language groups, lexicality was found to be an effective segmentation cue. That is, spoken disyllabic word fragments were stronger primes in a subsequent visual word recognition task when preceded by meaningful words than when preceded by nonwords: For example, the first two syllables of corridor were a more effective prime for visually presented corridor when heard in the phrase anythingcorri than in imoshingcorri. The stress pattern of the prime (strong-weak vs. weak-strong) did not affect the degree of priming. For L1 speakers, this supports previous findings about the preferential use of high-level segmentation strategies in clear speech. For L2 speakers, the lexical strategy was employed regardless of L2 proficiency level and instead of exploiting the consistent stress pattern of their native language. This is clear evidence for the primacy and robustness of segmentation by lexical subtraction even in individuals whose lexical knowledge is limited.

  6. Early mathematics achievement trajectories: English-language learner and native English-speaker estimates, using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Survey.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Greg; Bryant, Diane

    2011-07-01

    This study used data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Survey, Kindergarten Class of 1998-1999, to (a) estimate mathematics achievement trends through 5th grade in the population of students who are English-language proficient by the end of kindergarten, (b) compare trends across primary language groups within this English-language proficient group, (c) evaluate the effect of low socioeconomic status (SES) for English-language proficient students and within different primary language groups, and (d) estimate language-group trends in specific mathematics skill areas. The group of English-language proficient English-language learners (ELLs) was disaggregated into native Spanish speakers and native speakers of Asian languages, the 2 most prevalent groups of ELLs in the United States. Results of multilevel latent variable growth modeling suggest that primary language may be less salient than SES in explaining the mathematics achievement of English-language proficient ELLs. The study also found that mathematics-related school readiness is a key factor in explaining subsequent achievement differences and that the readiness gap is prevalent across the range of mathematics-related skills.

  7. The Acquisition of English Focus Marking by Non-Native Speakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Rachel Elizabeth

    This dissertation examines Mandarin and Korean speakers' acquisition of English focus marking, which is realized by accenting particular words within a focused constituent. It is important for non-native speakers to learn how accent placement relates to focus in English because appropriate accent placement and realization makes a learner's English more native-like and easier to understand. Such knowledge may also improve their English comprehension skills. In this study, 20 native English speakers, 20 native Mandarin speakers, and 20 native Korean speakers participated in four experiments: (1) a production experiment, in which they were recorded reading the answers to questions, (2) a perception experiment, in which they were asked to determine which word in a recording was the last prominent word, (3) an understanding experiment, in which they were asked whether the answers in recorded question-answer pairs had context-appropriate prosody, and (4) an accent placement experiment, in which they were asked which word they would make prominent in a particular context. Finally, a new group of native English speakers listened to utterances produced in the production experiment, and determined whether the prosody of each utterance was appropriate for its context. The results of the five experiments support a novel predictive model for second language prosodic focus marking acquisition. This model holds that both transfer of linguistic features from a learner's native language (L1) and features of their second language (L2) affect learners' acquisition of prosodic focus marking. As a result, the model includes two complementary components: the Transfer Component and the L2 Challenge Component. The Transfer Component predicts that prosodic structures in the L2 will be more easily acquired by language learners that have similar structures in their L1 than those who do not, even if there are differences between the L1 and L2 in how the structures are realized. The L2

  8. Acoustic comparisons of Japanese and English vowels produced by native speakers of Japanese

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Kanae; Akahane-Yamada, Reiko; Kubo, Rieko; Strange, Winifred

    2003-10-01

    This study explored acoustic similarities/differences between Japanese (J) and American English (AE) vowels produced by native J speakers and compared production patterns to their perceptual assimilation of AE vowels [Strange et al., J. Phonetics 26, 311-344 (1998)]. Eight male native J speakers who had served as listeners in Strange et al. produced 18 Japanese (J) vowels (5 long-short pairs, 2 double vowels, and 3 long-short palatalized pairs) and 11 American English (AE) vowels in /hVbopena/ disyllables embedded in a carrier sentence. Acoustical parameters included formant frequencies at syllable midpoint (F1/F2/F3), formant change from 25% to 75% points in syllable (formant change), and vocalic duration. Results of linear discriminant analyses showed rather poor acoustic differentiation of J vowel categories when F1/F2/F3 served as input variables (60% correct classification), which greatly improved when duration and formant change were added. In contrast, correct classification of J speakers' AE vowels using F1/F2/F3 was very poor (66%) and did not improve much when duration and dynamic information were added. J speakers used duration to differentiate long/short AE vowel contrasts except for mid-to-low back vowels; these vowels were perceptually assimilated to a single Japanese vowel, and are very difficult for Japanese listeners to identify.

  9. Accent, Intelligibility, and the Role of the Listener: Perceptions of English-Accented German by Native German Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes-Harb, Rachel; Watzinger-Tharp, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    We explore the relationship between accentedness and intelligibility, and investigate how listeners' beliefs about nonnative speech interact with their accentedness and intelligibility judgments. Native German speakers and native English learners of German produced German sentences, which were presented to 12 native German speakers in accentedness…

  10. New Sounds of the English Consonants for Spanish Speakers Learning English (Sonidos Nuevos de las Consonantes Inglesas Para los de Habla Espanola Aprendiendo Ingles).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagore, Mary Louise

    This book "represents an effort to present in simply and readily understood terms some of the sounds in English that create problems for the Spanish speaker learning English." Each of the 18 chapters teaches a specific consonant through a comparison of the Spanish and English pronunciations, facial diagrams, explanations of articulation, minimal…

  11. English Voiceless and Voiced Stops as Produced by Native and Finnish Speakers. Jyvaskyla Contrastive Studies, 2. Reports from the Department of English, University of Jyvaskyla, No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suomi, Kari

    It is well known to anyone involved in teaching English to Finnish students that it is difficult for Finns to distinguish between English /ptk/ and /bdg/. This second volume in a series on a Finnish-English contrastive project reports on a study which attempted to obtain more concrete knowledge about the ability of speakers of Finnish to use the…

  12. Achievement and Language Proficiency of Latino Students in Dual Language Programmes: Native English Speakers, Fluent English/Previous ELLs, and Current ELLs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindholm-Leary, Kathryn; Hernandez, Ana

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the language proficiency and achievement outcomes of Latino students enrolled in a dual language programme who varied by language proficiency (Native English speakers, Current English Language Learners--ELLs, Fluent English Proficient/Previous ELLs). Most previous research has not disaggregated Latino students, especially…

  13. A Comparison of Teacher-Rated Classroom Conduct, Social Skills, and Teacher-Child Relationship Quality between Preschool English Learners and Preschool English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luchtel, Molly; Hughes, Kere; Luze, Gayle; Bruna, Katherine Richardson; Peterson, Carla

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the differences between preschool English learners and preschool English speakers in the areas of classroom conduct, social skills, and teacher-child relationship quality, as rated by their teachers. Data were taken from the Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project. Students who were English learners were rated…

  14. Understanding speaker attitudes from prosody by adults with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Monetta, Laura; Cheang, Henry S; Pell, Marc D

    2008-09-01

    The ability to interpret vocal (prosodic) cues during social interactions can be disrupted by Parkinson's disease, with notable effects on how emotions are understood from speech. This study investigated whether PD patients who have emotional prosody deficits exhibit further difficulties decoding the attitude of a speaker from prosody. Vocally inflected but semantically nonsensical 'pseudo-utterances' were presented to listener groups with and without PD in two separate rating tasks. Task I required participants to rate how confident a speaker sounded from their voice and Task 2 required listeners to rate how polite the speaker sounded for a comparable set of pseudo-utterances. The results showed that PD patients were significantly less able than HC participants to use prosodic cues to differentiate intended levels of speaker confidence in speech, although the patients could accurately detect the politelimpolite attitude of the speaker from prosody in most cases. Our data suggest that many PD patients fail to use vocal cues to effectively infer a speaker's emotions as well as certain attitudes in speech such as confidence, consistent with the idea that the basal ganglia play a role in the meaningful processing of prosodic sequences in spoken language (Pell & Leonard, 2003).

  15. Psychological inflexibility and depressive symptoms among Asian English speakers: A study on Indian, Philippine, and Singaporean samples.

    PubMed

    Kato, Tsukasa

    2016-04-30

    Psychological inflexibility is a core concept in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. The primary aim of this study was to examine psychological inflexibility and depressive symptoms among Asian English speakers. A total of 900 adults in India, the Philippines, and Singapore completed some measures related to psychological inflexibility and depressive symptoms through a Web-based survey. Multiple regression analyses revealed that higher psychological inflexibility was significantly associated with higher levels of depressive symptoms in all the samples, after controlling for the effects of gender, marital status, and interpersonal stress. In addition, the effect sizes of the changes in the R(2) values when only psychological flexibility scores were entered in the regression model were large for all the samples. Moreover, overall, the beta-weight of the psychological flexibility scores obtained by the Philippine sample was the lowest of all three samples. PMID:27086203

  16. "I'm Very Not About the Law Part": Nonnative Speakers of English and the Miranda Warnings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlenko, Aneta

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a case study of a police interrogation of a nonnative speaker (NNS) of English. I show that the high linguistic and conceptual complexity of police cautions, such as the Miranda warnings, complicates understanding of these texts even by NNSs of English with a high level of interactional competence. I argue that the U.S.…

  17. Persian Native Speakers Reading Persian and English Texts: Their Strategic Behavior to Overcome Syntactic and Semantic Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alimorad, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to discover semantic and syntactic problems Persian native speakers might have while reading English and Persian texts and different strategies they use to overcome those problems. To this end, a convenient sample of 40 intermediate students studying English Literature at Shiraz University was selected. Twenty of them were asked…

  18. Do We All Apologize the Same?--An Empirical Study on the Act of Apologizing by Spanish Speakers Learning English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mir, Montserrat

    1992-01-01

    A study examined the production of English apology strategies by Spanish speakers learning English, by analyzing the remedial move in native and non-native social interactions. To restore harmony when an offensive act has been committed, remedial exchanges are performed according to the rules of speaking and the social norms of the speech…

  19. Intelligibility of American English Vowels of Native and Non-Native Speakers in Quiet and Speech-Shaped Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Chang; Jin, Su-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    This study examined intelligibility of twelve American English vowels produced by English, Chinese, and Korean native speakers in quiet and speech-shaped noise in which vowels were presented at six sensation levels from 0 dB to 10 dB. The slopes of vowel intelligibility functions and the processing time for listeners to identify vowels were…

  20. Acquiring a New Second Language Contrast: An Analysis of the English Laryngeal System of Native Speakers of Dutch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the acquisition of the English laryngeal system by native speakers of (Belgian) Dutch. Both languages have a two-way laryngeal system, but while Dutch contrasts prevoiced with short-lag stops, English has a contrast between short-lag and long-lag stops. The primary aim of the article is to test two hypotheses on the acquisition…

  1. The Comparative Effects of Processing Instruction and Dictogloss on the Acquisition of the English Passive by Speakers of Turkish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uludag, Onur; Vanpatten, Bill

    2012-01-01

    The current study presents the results of an experiment investigating the effects of processing instruction (PI) and dictogloss (DG) on the acquisition of the English passive voice. Sixty speakers of Turkish studying English at university level were assigned to three groups: one receiving PI, the other receiving DG and the third serving as a…

  2. Accent and Identity: Exploring the Perceptions among Bilingual Speakers of English as a Lingua Franca in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sung, Chit Cheung Matthew

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a study that investigated the perceptions of a group of bilingual speakers of English and Chinese in Hong Kong concerning issues surrounding accent, identity and English as a lingua franca (ELF). Data were primarily collected via in-depth interviews with 28 university students in Hong Kong who are also regular users of…

  3. Influence of L2 Proficiency on Speech Movement Variability: Production of Prosodic Contrasts by Bengali-English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chakraborty, Rahul

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the influence of age of immersion and proficiency in a second language on speech movement consistency in both a first and a second language. Ten monolingual speakers of English and 20 Bengali-English bilinguals (10 with low L2 proficiency and 10 with high L2 proficiency) participated. Lip movement variability was assessed based…

  4. Non-Native Speakers of English in the Classroom: What Are the Effects on Pupil Performance? CEE DP 137

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geay, Charlotte; McNally, Sandra; Telhaj, Shqiponja

    2012-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increase in the number of children going to school in England who do not speak English as a first language. We investigate whether this has an impact on the educational outcomes of native English speakers at the end of primary school. We show that the negative correlation observed in the raw data is mainly an…

  5. Effects of Reading Span and Plausibility in the Reanalysis of "Wh"-Gaps by Chinese-English Second Language Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dussias, Paola E.; Pinar, Pilar

    2010-01-01

    This study utilizes a moving window technique to investigate how individual cognitive resources (operationalized in terms of reading span scores) might modulate the extent to which native English speakers and Chinese second language (L2) learners of English utilize plausibility information to recover from an initial misparse in the processing of…

  6. Recovery from First-Language Transfer: The Second Language Acquisition of English Double Objects by Korean Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Eunjeong

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies on second language (L2) acquisition of English dative alternation by Korean speakers (Oh and Zubizarreta, 2003, 2006a, 2006b) have shown that the acquisition of English benefactive double object (DO) (e.g. "John baked Mary a cake") lags behind that of its counterpart goal double object (e.g. "John sent Mary the letter"). This…

  7. The Role of Speaker Identification in Korean University Students' Attitudes towards Five Varieties of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yook, Cheongmin; Lindemann, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates how the attitudes of 60 Korean university students towards five varieties of English are affected by the identification of the speaker's nationality and ethnicity. The study employed both a verbal guise technique and questions eliciting overt beliefs and preferences related to learning English. While the majority of…

  8. Learning More, Perceiving More? A Comparison of L1 Cantonese--L2 English--L3 French Speakers and L1 Cantonese--L2 English Speakers in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsang, Wai Lan

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on a study examining the relationship between language learning and perceived language differences. Two groups of native Cantonese speakers in Hong Kong, L1 Cantonese--L2 English (CE) and L1 Cantonese--L2 English--L3 French (CEF), were asked to complete two tasks: a placement test in English (as well as in French for the CEF…

  9. The Relative Effectiveness of Three Video Oral English Instructional Conditions for Illiterate or Undereducated Non-English Speaking Adults, Spanish Speaking Adults. A Report of Statistical Findings and Recommendations Based on a Field Testing Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valencia, Atilano A.

    The instructional effectiveness of videotaped instruction in basic oral English to non-English speaking, adult speakers of Spanish is the focus of this report. A field testing program involving subjects who had been exposed to the films developed by the Southwestern Cooperative Educational Laboratory ascertains the effectiveness of the lessons in…

  10. The influence of visual speech information on the intelligibility of English consonants produced by non-native speakers.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Saya; Hannah, Beverly; Wang, Yue

    2014-09-01

    This study examines how visual speech information affects native judgments of the intelligibility of speech sounds produced by non-native (L2) speakers. Native Canadian English perceivers as judges perceived three English phonemic contrasts (/b-v, θ-s, l-ɹ/) produced by native Japanese speakers as well as native Canadian English speakers as controls. These stimuli were presented under audio-visual (AV, with speaker voice and face), audio-only (AO), and visual-only (VO) conditions. The results showed that, across conditions, the overall intelligibility of Japanese productions of the native (Japanese)-like phonemes (/b, s, l/) was significantly higher than the non-Japanese phonemes (/v, θ, ɹ/). In terms of visual effects, the more visually salient non-Japanese phonemes /v, θ/ were perceived as significantly more intelligible when presented in the AV compared to the AO condition, indicating enhanced intelligibility when visual speech information is available. However, the non-Japanese phoneme /ɹ/ was perceived as less intelligible in the AV compared to the AO condition. Further analysis revealed that, unlike the native English productions, the Japanese speakers produced /ɹ/ without visible lip-rounding, indicating that non-native speakers' incorrect articulatory configurations may decrease the degree of intelligibility. These results suggest that visual speech information may either positively or negatively affect L2 speech intelligibility. PMID:25190408

  11. Perception and production of English vowels by Mandarin speakers: age-related differences vary with amount of L2 exposure.

    PubMed

    Jia, Gisela; Strange, Winifred; Collado, Julissa; Guan, Qi

    2006-02-01

    In this study we assessed age-related differences in the perception and production of American English (AE) vowels by native Mandarin speakers as a function of the amount of exposure to the target language. Participants included three groups of native Mandarin speakers: 87 children, adolescents and young adults living in China, 77 recent arrivals who had lived in the U.S. for two years or less, and 54 past arrivals who had lived in the U.S. between three and five years. The latter two groups arrived in the U.S. between the ages of 7 and 44 years. Discrimination of six AE vowel pairs /i-i/, /i-e(I)/, /e-ae/, /ae-a/, /a-(symbol see text)/, and /u-a/ was assessed with a categorial AXB task. Production of the eight vowels /i, i, e(I), e, ae, (symbol see text), a, u/ was assessed with an immediate imitation task. Age-related differences in performance accuracy changed from an older-learner advantage among participants in China, to no age differences among recent arrivals, and to a younger-learner advantage among past arrivals. Performance on individual vowels and vowel contrasts indicated the influence of the Mandarin phonetic/phonological system. These findings support a combined environmental and L1 interference/transfer theory as an explanation of the long-term younger-learner advantage in mastering L2 phonology.

  12. Textual Enhancements and Comprehension with Adult Readers of English in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brantmeier, Cindy; Callender, Aimee; Yu, Xiucheng; McDaniel, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The present study utilizes texts from social psychology to examine the effects of textual enhancements on reading comprehension with 185 native adult Chinese speakers learning English in China. Participants read two different vignettes, either with or without an adjunct. Each adjunct consisted of a "what" question along with instructions to either…

  13. Globalization and Native English Speakers in English Programme in Korea (EPIK)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeon, Mihyon

    2009-01-01

    This study demonstrates how English Programme in Korea (EPIK) is an example of Korea's active response to the globalization process through which Korea not only accommodates external demands but also strategically pursues national interests through equipping its citizens with a command of English. EPIK, affiliated with the Korean Ministry of…

  14. A Prekindergarten Curriculum Supplement for Enhancing Mainstream American English Knowledge in Nonmainstream American English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Jan R.; Rosin, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a curriculum supplement designed to enhance awareness of Mainstream American English (MAE) in African American English- (AAE-) speaking prekindergarten children. Method: Children in 2 Head Start classrooms participated in the study. The experimental classroom received the Talking…

  15. The Structure of Clinical Consultation: A Case of Non-Native Speakers of English as Participants

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, H.; Ibrahim, N. A.; Habil, H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In many parts of the world, patients may find it difficult to visit doctors who share the same language and culture due to the intermingling of people and international recruitment of doctors among many other reasons. In these multilingual multicultural settings (MMSs), doctor-patient interactions face new communication challenges. This study aims to identify the structure of clinical consultation and its phases in an MMS where both doctors and patients are non-native speakers (NNSs) of English. Method: This study takes on a discourse analytic approach to examine the structure of clinical consultation as an activity type. 25 clinical consultation sessions between non-native speakers of English in a public healthcare centre in Malaysia were audio-recorded. Findings and Discussion: The results show that there are some deviations from the mainstream structure of clinical consultations although, in general, the pattern is compatible with previous studies. Deviations are particularly marked in the opening and closing phases of consultation. Conclusion: In almost all interactions, there is a straightforward manner of beginning medical consultations. The absence of greetings may have naturally reduced the length of talk. Hence, by directly entering medical talks, the doctors voice their concern on the curing aspects of the consultation rather than its caring facets. The preference of curing priority to caring is more goal-oriented and in alignment with the consultation as an activity type. PMID:25560336

  16. The effects of L2 proficiency level on the processing of wh-questions among Dutch second language speakers of English

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Carrie N.; van Hell, Janet G.

    2012-01-01

    Using a self-paced reading task, the present study explores how Dutch-English L2 speakers parse English wh-subject-extractions and wh-object-extractions. Results suggest that English native speakers and highly-proficient Dutch-English L2 speakers do not always exhibit measurable signs of on-line reanalysis when reading subject- versus object-extractions in English. However, less-proficient Dutch-English L2 speakers exhibit greater processing costs on subject-extractions relative to object-extractions, similar to previously reported findings (e.g., Dussias and Piñar, forthcoming; Juffs 2005; Juffs and Harrington 1995). These findings are discussed in light of relevant research surrounding on-line processing among L2 speakers and their ability to adopt native-like processing patterns in the L2. PMID:22888175

  17. The discrimination and the production of English vowels by bilingual Spanish/English speakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levey, Sandra

    2001-05-01

    The discrimination of English vowels in real and novel words by 40 bilingual Spanish/English participants was examined. Their discrimination was compared with that of 40 native monolingual English participants. Participants were 23-36 years of age (mean 25.3; median 25.0). Stimuli were presented within triads in an ABX paradigm. This categorial discrimination paradigm was selected to avoid labeling, allowing participants to indicate categories to which stimuli belonged. Bilingual participants' productions of vowels in real words used in the discrimination task were judged by two independent listeners. The goal was to determine the degree of correlation between discrimination and production. Vowels were studied as these segments present second language learners with more difficulty than consonants. Discrimination difficulty was significantly greater for bilingual participants than for native English participants for vowel contrasts and novel words. Significant errors also appeared in the bilingual participants' production of certain vowels. English vowels absent from Spanish presented the greatest difficulty, while vowels similar to those in Spanish presented the least difficulty. Earlier age of acquisition, absence of communication problems, and greater percentage of time devoted to communication in English contributed to greater accuracy in discrimination and production. [Work supported by PSC-CUNY.

  18. Initial Teacher Training Courses and Non-Native Speaker Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Jason

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on a study contrasting 41 native speakers (NSs) and 38 non-native speakers (NNSs) of English from two short initial teacher training courses, the Cambridge Certificate in English Language Teaching to Adults and the Trinity College London CertTESOL. After a brief history and literature review, I present findings on teachers'…

  19. Differences in Mental Rotation Strategies for Native Speakers of Chinese and English and How They Vary as a Function of Sex and College Major

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Yingli; O'Boyle, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    In this study we examine how native language, sex, and college major interact to influence accuracy and preferred strategy when performing mental rotation (MR). Native monolingual Chinese and English speakers rotated 3-D shapes while maintaining a concurrent verbal or spatial memory load. For English speakers, male physical science majors were…

  20. Native Speakers as Teachers in Turkey: Non-Native Pre-Service English Teachers' Reactions to a Nation-Wide Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coskun, Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    Although English is now a recognized international language and the concept of native speaker is becoming more doubtful every day, the empowerment of the native speakers of English as language teaching professionals is still continuing (McKay, 2002), especially in Asian countries like China and Japan. One of the latest examples showing the…

  1. Creole English Speakers' Treatment of Tense-Aspect Morphology in English Interlanguage Written Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clachar, Arlene

    2005-01-01

    The study sought to examine the effect of lexical aspect and narrative discourse structure on the pattern of acquisition and use of English verbal morphology exhibited by creole-speaking students. Findings indicated that the emergent pattern of morphology in the creole participants' written interlanguage appeared to be influenced not only by…

  2. Teaching English to Young Learners: Supporting the Case for the Bilingual Native English Speaker Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copland, Fiona; Yonetsugi, Eli

    2016-01-01

    The growing number of young children around the world learning English has resulted in an increase in research in the field. Many of the studies have investigated approaches to learning and teaching, with a particular emphasis on effective pedagogies (e.g. Harley 1998; Shak and Gardner 2008). Other studies have focused on the linguistic gains of…

  3. Survey of Native English Speakers and Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners in Tertiary Introductory Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesser, Lawrence M.; Wagler, Amy E.; Esquinca, Alberto; Valenzuela, M. Guadalupe

    2013-01-01

    The framework of linguistic register and case study research on Spanish-speaking English language learners (ELLs) learning statistics informed the construction of a quantitative instrument, the Communication, Language, And Statistics Survey (CLASS). CLASS aims to assess whether ELLs and non-ELLs approach the learning of statistics differently with…

  4. Temporal patterns of native Mandarin Chinese speakers' productions of English stop-vowel syllable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; Behne, Dawn M.

    2001-05-01

    Second language (L2) production can be a kind of interlanguage, a relatively stable system bearing the nature of both the native language (L1) and L2. Within such a system sound components of a syllable may bear their own interlanguage characteristics and yet interact with the other component sounds. The present study investigates temporal patterns of L1-L2 interaction at the syllable level. Audio recordings were made of English stop-vowel syllables produced by native speakers of Mandarin who were fluent in English (ChE). Native English productions (AmE) of these syllables and native productions of Mandarin (ChM) stop-vowel syllables were acquired as native norms. Temporal measures included stop closure duration, voice-onset time (VOT), vowel duration, and syllable duration. Results show that the internal timing components of ChE often deviate from AmE, with the closure duration, VOT, and vowel duration being intermediate to AmE and ChM. However, at the syllable level, ChE productions tend to follow the overall patterns of AmE. Temporal deviations were often compensated by temporal compensation of other components in the syllable, maintaining a balanced consonant/vowel distribution. These findings have implications for a broader understanding of L2 productions.

  5. Perception and production of English stops by tonal and non-tonal Korean dialect speakers.

    PubMed

    Choi, Tae-Hwan; Kim, Gyung-Ho; Han, Jeong-Im

    2013-12-01

    This study examines whether relative weightings of voice onset time and onset F0 in Korean tonal vs non-tonal dialects affect the production and perception of English voiced and voiceless stops. Following Shultz et al. [(2012). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 132, EL95-EL101], discriminant function analysis and logistic regression were conducted to calculate each speaker's relative weightings of these two cues in the production of target words and the labeling of the synthesized tokens according to these cues, respectively. The results demonstrated that the acquisition of second language (L2) contrasts is influenced by native language dialects, and production and perception are not developed in parallel in L2 acquisition.

  6. 3D Talking-Head Mobile App: A Conceptual Framework for English Pronunciation Learning among Non-Native Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Ahmad Zamzuri Mohamad; Segaran, Kogilathah

    2013-01-01

    One of the critical issues pertaining learning English as second language successfully is pronunciation, which consequently contributes to learners' poor communicative power. This situation is moreover crucial among non-native speakers. Therefore, various initiatives have been taken in order to promote effective language learning, which includes…

  7. Training Professionals in Early Childhood Special Education/Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (ECSE/TESOL).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothlein, Liz; Vaughn, Sharon

    This final report describes the objectives, activities and outcomes of a federally funded project that was designed to provide a high quality, interdisciplinary graduate degree program in Early Childhood Special Education with an emphasis on Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (ECSE/TESOL) at the University of Miami, Florida. A portion…

  8. Using Simplified English to Identify Potential Problems for Non-Native Speakers in the Language of Engineering Examination Papers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Sandra; Morgan, Roger

    2012-01-01

    There is an increasing sensitivity to the challenges posed by the language of examination papers and of instruction in scientific subjects, especially for non-native speakers of English. It has been observed that in addition to technical subject-specific vocabulary, non-technical words such as instructional verbs have been sources of difficulty,…

  9. U.S. History and Modern World History Courses for English Speakers of Other Languages in Montgomery County Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Huafang; Wade, Julie

    2014-01-01

    The Office of Shared Accountability (OSA) in Montgomery County (Maryland) Public Schools (MCPS) examined academic performance of English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) students in U.S. History and Modern World History courses, as well as the course sequence in ESOL U.S. History and Modern World History. In MCPS, students who are not ESOL…

  10. Does Grammatical Aspect Affect Motion Event Cognition? A Cross-Linguistic Comparison of English and Swedish Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Athanasopoulos, Panos; Bylund, Emanuel

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we explore whether cross-linguistic differences in grammatical aspect encoding may give rise to differences in memory and cognition. We compared native speakers of two languages that encode aspect differently (English and Swedish) in four tasks that examined verbal descriptions of stimuli, online triads matching, and memory-based…

  11. To Speak Like a TED Speaker--A Case Study of TED Motivated English Public Speaking Study in EFL Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Yingxia; Gao, Ying; Zhang, Dongyu

    2016-01-01

    This paper intends to investigate the effectiveness of a new course pattern--TED-motivated English Public Speaking Course in EFL teaching in China. This class framework adopts TED videos as the learning materials to stimulate students to be a better speaker. Meanwhile, it aims to examine to what extent the five aspects of language skills are…

  12. Students Writing Emails to Faculty: An Examination of E-Politeness among Native and Non-Native Speakers of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biesenbach-Lucas, Sigrun

    2007-01-01

    This study combines interlanguage pragmatics and speech act research with computer-mediated communication and examines how native and non-native speakers of English formulate low- and high-imposition requests to faculty. While some research claims that email, due to absence of non-verbal cues, encourages informal language, other research has…

  13. Little Houses and Casas Pequenas: Message Formulation and Syntactic Form in Unscripted Speech with Speakers of English and Spanish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown-Schmidt, Sarah; Konopka, Agnieszka E.

    2008-01-01

    During unscripted speech, speakers coordinate the formulation of pre-linguistic messages with the linguistic processes that implement those messages into speech. We examine the process of constructing a contextually appropriate message and interfacing that message with utterance planning in English ("the small butterfly") and Spanish ("la mariposa…

  14. Fraz ak Mo Ki Itil Angle-Kreyol Ayisyen = English-Haitian Creole Phrasebook with Useful Wordlist (for Kreyol Speakers).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of State, Washington, DC. Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration.

    This phrasebook with wordlist is designed for speakers of Haitian Creole who are immigrants to the United States. The English phrases presented are grouped by subject and selected for their directness, brevity, and relevance to the needs of newly-arrived residents. Most are presented in the form of brief, two-line dialogues. Phrases and…

  15. EFL Learners' Perceived Use of Conversation Maintenance Strategies during Synchronous Computer-Mediated Communication with Native English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ino, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the perceived use of conversation maintenance strategies during synchronous computer-mediated communication with native English speakers. I also correlated the relationships of the strategies used with students' speaking ability and comprehensive proficiency level. The research questions were: (1) how were the learners'…

  16. A Computational Approach to Detecting Collocation Errors in the Writing of Non-Native Speakers of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Futagi, Yoko; Deane, Paul; Chodorow, Martin; Tetreault, Joel

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the first prototype of an automated tool for detecting collocation errors in texts written by non-native speakers of English. Candidate strings are extracted by pattern matching over POS-tagged text. Since learner texts often contain spelling and morphological errors, the tool attempts to automatically correct them in order to…

  17. Ultimate Attainment of Second Language Articles: A Case Study of an Endstate Second Language Turkish-English Speaker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snape, Neal; Kupisch, Tanja

    2010-01-01

    An area of considerable interest in second language (L2) acquisition is the difficulties learners face with the acquisition of articles. This article examines the role of prosody in the acquisition of articles by an endstate L2 English speaker focusing on the free morphemes "the" and "a". In order to analyse the articles produced by a Turkish…

  18. Faithful Imitator, Legitimate Speaker, Playful Creator and Dialogical Communicator: Shift in English Learners' Identity Prototypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Yihong

    2014-01-01

    This paper attempts to conceptualize identity prototypes regarding model L2 learners/users of English over the past 50 years, as embedded in research discourses. For a long time, the ideal learner was a "faithful imitator" whose L2 use and cultural conduct were strictly modeled on the native speaker (NS). With postcolonial changes around…

  19. Lesson Adaptations and Accommodations: Working with Native Speakers and English Language Learners in the Same Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Diana C.; Pappamihiel, N. Eleni; Lake, Vickie E.

    2004-01-01

    This article brings theory into practice and demonstrates clearly how to apply commonly accepted language acquisition theories to science lesson plans designed for native speakers of English. In the first section of the article, readers will learn not only how to apply theory to science lessons, but also, and more important, why to apply certain…

  20. Learning Arabic Sounds: A Guide to the Pronunciation of the Phonemes of Arabic for Native Speakers of English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liberto, Shelley M.

    The purpose of this guide is to teach English speakers accurate pronunciation of the Modern Standard Arabic phonemes. Included are discussions concerning attitudes toward language learning in general, basic linguistic concepts, a descriptive survey of the phonemes with detailed instructions for their production, and lists of minimal pairs…

  1. The Immediate and Chronic Influence of Spatio-Temporal Metaphors on the Mental Representations of Time in English, Mandarin, and Mandarin-English Speakers

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Vicky Tzuyin; Boroditsky, Lera

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we examine whether experience with spatial metaphors for time has an influence on people’s representation of time. In particular we ask whether spatio-temporal metaphors can have both chronic and immediate effects on temporal thinking. In Study 1, we examine the prevalence of ego-moving representations for time in Mandarin speakers, English speakers, and Mandarin-English (ME) bilinguals. As predicted by observations in linguistic analyses, we find that Mandarin speakers are less likely to take an ego-moving perspective than are English speakers. Further, we find that ME bilinguals tested in English are less likely to take an ego-moving perspective than are English monolinguals (an effect of L1 on meaning-making in L2), and also that ME bilinguals tested in Mandarin are more likely to take an ego-moving perspective than are Mandarin monolinguals (an effect of L2 on meaning-making in L1). These findings demonstrate that habits of metaphor use in one language can influence temporal reasoning in another language, suggesting the metaphors can have a chronic effect on patterns in thought. In Study 2 we test Mandarin speakers using either horizontal or vertical metaphors in the immediate context of the task. We find that Mandarin speakers are more likely to construct front-back representations of time when understanding front-back metaphors, and more likely to construct up-down representations of time when understanding up-down metaphors. These findings demonstrate that spatio-temporal metaphors can also have an immediate influence on temporal reasoning. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that the metaphors we use to talk about time have both immediate and long-term consequences for how we conceptualize and reason about this fundamental domain of experience. PMID:23630505

  2. An event-related potential study of visual rhyming effects in native and non-native English speakers.

    PubMed

    Botezatu, Mona R; Miller, Carol A; Misra, Maya

    2015-02-11

    English monolinguals and highly proficient, but first language (L1)-dominant, Spanish-English and Chinese-English bilinguals made rhyme judgments of visually presented English word pairs while behavioral and EEG measures were being recorded. Two types of conditions were considered: rhyming and nonrhyming pairs that were orthographically dissimilar (e.g. white-fight, child-cough) and those that were orthographically similar (e.g. right-fight, dough-cough). Both native and non-native English speakers were faster and more accurate in responding to nonrhyming than rhyming targets under orthographically dissimilar conditions, although the response times of Chinese-English bilinguals differed from those of the other groups. All groups were slower and less accurate in responding to nonrhyming targets under orthographically similar conditions, with the response times and accuracy rates of Spanish-English bilinguals differing from those of the other groups. All participant groups showed more negative N450 mean amplitudes to nonrhyming compared with rhyming targets, regardless of orthographic similarity, and this rhyming effect did not differ across groups under the orthographically similar conditions. However, under orthographically dissimilar conditions, the rhyming effect was less robust in non-native speakers, being modulated by English proficiency.

  3. Adult Education for Limited English Proficient Adults. Fact Sheet 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Vocational and Adult Education (ED), Washington, DC. Adult Learning and Literacy Clearinghouse.

    An overview of adult education programs and services for limited-English-proficient adults is offered. The population targeted by these programs and services is estimated at 4 to 6.5 million United States residents, refugees, and immigrants. Adults and out-of-school youth 16 years and older are eligible for federal adult…

  4. A Prekindergarten Curriculum Supplement for Enhancing Mainstream American English Knowledge in Nonmainstream American English Speakers

    PubMed Central

    Rosin, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a curriculum supplement designed to enhance awareness of Mainstream American English (MAE) in African American English- (AAE-) speaking prekindergarten children. Method Children in 2 Head Start classrooms participated in the study. The experimental classroom received the Talking and Learning for Kindergarten program (Edwards, Rosin, Gross, & Chen, 2013), which used contrastive analysis to highlight morphological, phonological, and pragmatic differences between MAE and AAE. The control classroom received the Kindness Curriculum (Flook, Goldberg, Pinger, & Davidson, 2014), which was designed to promote mindfulness and emotional self-regulation. The amount of instruction was the same across the 2 programs. Both classrooms participated in pre- and posttest assessments. Results Children in the experimental classroom, but not the control classroom, showed significant improvement in 3 norm-referenced measures of phonological awareness and in an experimental measure that evaluated comprehension of words that are ambiguous in AAE, but unambiguous in MAE, because of morphological and phonological differences between the 2 dialects. Conclusion Although more research needs to be done on the efficacy of the Talking and Learning for Kindergarten program, these results suggest that it is possible to enhance AAE-speaking children's awareness of MAE prior to kindergarten entry. PMID:27096218

  5. Conversational and clear speech intelligibility of /bVd/ syllables produced by native and non-native English speakers.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Catherine L; DeMasi, Teresa M; Krause, Jean C

    2010-07-01

    The ability of native and non-native speakers to enhance intelligibility of target vowels by speaking clearly was compared across three talker groups: monolingual English speakers and native Spanish speakers with either an earlier or a later age of immersion in an English-speaking environment. Talkers produced the target syllables "bead, bid, bayed, bed, bad" and "bod" in 'conversational' and clear speech styles. The stimuli were presented to native English-speaking listeners in multi-talker babble with signal-to-noise ratios of -8 dB for the monolingual and early learners and -4 dB for the later learners. The monolinguals and early learners of English showed a similar average clear speech benefit, and the early learners showed equal or greater intelligibility than monolinguals for most target vowels. The 4-dB difference in signal-to-noise ratio yielded approximately equal average intelligibility for the monolinguals and later learners. The average clear speech benefit was smallest for the later learners, and a significant clear speech decrement was obtained for the target syllable "bid." These results suggest that later learners of English as a second language may be less able than monolinguals to accommodate listeners in noisy environments, due to a reduced ability to improve intelligibility by speaking more clearly. PMID:20649235

  6. Variation in language networks in monolingual and bilingual English speakers: consequences for language mapping for surgical preplanning.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Robin J; Constable, R Todd

    2009-11-01

    Proficient, nonnative English-speaking neurosurgery candidates are assessed for language function in English. In order to understand whether it is necessary to also assess native-language function, we examined the influence of native language on the bilingual language network of early, proficient bilinguals using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We compared the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) response to a language task in well-matched groups of monolingual native English speakers (MLEs), bilingual native English speakers (BLE1s), and bilingual nonnative English speakers (BLE2s). Random effects analysis revealed a significant main effect of group in temporal-parietal regions highly germane to the planning of temporal lobe surgical procedures. To explore how the three groups differed, we examined the average time course in each area of main effect for each group. We found significant differences between the monolinguals and the two bilingual groups. We interpret our results as evidence for a difference between the language network of early bilinguals and that of monolinguals.

  7. Components and context: exploring sources of reading difficulties for language minority learners and native English speakers in urban schools.

    PubMed

    Kieffer, Michael J; Vukovic, Rose K

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on the cognitive and ecological domains within the componential model of reading, this longitudinal study explores heterogeneity in the sources of reading difficulties for language minority learners and native English speakers in urban schools. Students (N = 150) were followed from first through third grade and assessed annually on standardized English language and reading measures. Structural equation modeling was used to investigate the relative contributions of code-related and linguistic comprehension skills in first and second grade to third grade reading comprehension. Linguistic comprehension and the interaction between linguistic comprehension and code-related skills each explained substantial variation in reading comprehension. Among students with low reading comprehension, more than 80% demonstrated weaknesses in linguistic comprehension alone, whereas approximately 15% demonstrated weaknesses in both linguistic comprehension and code-related skills. Results were remarkably similar for the language minority learners and native English speakers, suggesting the importance of their shared socioeconomic backgrounds and schooling contexts.

  8. Effects of L1 prosody on segmental contrast in L2: The case of English stop voicing contrast produced by Korean speakers.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jiyoun; Kim, Sahyang; Cho, Taehong

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated how the L1 phonetics-prosody interface transfers to L2 by examining prosodic strengthening effects (due to prosodic position and focus) on English voicing contrast (bad-pad) as produced by Korean vs English speakers. Under prosodic strengthening, Korean speakers showed a greater F0 difference due to voicing than English speakers, suggesting that their experience with the macroprosodic use of F0 in Korean transfers into L2. Furthermore, Korean speakers produced voiced stops with low F0 and short voice onset time as English speakers did, although such a cue pairing is absent in Korean, showing dissociation of cues from L1 segments for L2 production. PMID:27036291

  9. Using Event-Related Brain Potentials to Assess Perceptibility: The Case of French Speakers and English [h

    PubMed Central

    Mah, Jennifer; Goad, Heather; Steinhauer, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    French speaking learners of English encounter persistent difficulty acquiring English [h], thus confusing words like eat and heat in both production and perception. We assess the hypothesis that the acoustic properties of [h] may render detection of this segment in the speech stream insufficiently reliable for second language acquisition. We use the mismatch negativity (MMN) in event-related potentials to investigate [h] perception in French speaking learners of English and native English controls, comparing both linguistic and non-linguistic conditions in an unattended oddball paradigm. Unlike native speakers, French learners of English elicit an MMN response only in the non-linguistic condition. Our results provide neurobiological evidence against the hypothesis that French speakers’ difficulties with [h] are acoustically based. They instead suggest that the problem is in constructing an appropriate phonological representation for [h] in the interlanguage grammar. PMID:27757086

  10. An Analysis of the Relationship between the Attitudes of Iranian EFL Learners to Native English Speakers and Their Reported Identity Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mokhtarnia, Shabnam; Ghafar-Samar, Reza

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at exploring the possible differences between Iranian English and non-English major students in terms of their attitude towards native English speakers and reported self-identity change. It also attempted to investigate the possible significant relationships between these two variables. The results of the independent-sample…

  11. An acoustic investigation of the interpretation of Russian palatalized consonants by American English speakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwade, Allan Jay

    This thesis experimentally addresses a theoretical debate in the loanword literature concerning the validity of the perception and production approaches to adaptation. According to the perception approach, adapters who only know the borrowing language generate loans by taking a non-native auditory representation and mapping the perceived constituents to existing native categories. In the production theory, adapters who know both the source and borrowing languages generate loans by taking the categorical form of a source word and passing it through the borrowing phonological grammar. In order to evaluate the validity of each theory, Russian words containing palatalized consonants were auditorily presented to English monolingual speakers and Russian-English bilinguals who were then asked to "Americanize" the words. Since palatalization has a host of co-articulatory effects that would be familiar to bilinguals but not monolinguals, it was predicted that the palatalization would not manifest itself in bilingual borrowings but would in monolingual borrowings. The logic underlying these predictions is that co-articulation is noise which bilinguals would avoid including in their adaptations. The monolinguals, with no knowledge of what constitutes noise in the foreign words presented to them, would preserve the co-articulation in some form. The results of the study support these predictions. Bilinguals overwhelmingly adapted palatalized consonants as plain (i.e. tja > ta) while monolinguals sometimes preserved the co-articulation in a variety of expected ways (e.g. tja > ti.a, tju > tSu, etc). These results suggest that the production account is valid since bilinguals were insensitive to phonetic details and the perception account is valid since monolinguals were sensitive to them.

  12. Language, context, and speaker effects in the identification and discrimination of English /r/ and /l/ by Japanese and Korean listeners.

    PubMed

    Ingram, J C; Park, S G

    1998-02-01

    Japanese and Korean listeners' identification and discrimination of English /r/ and /l/ were compared using a common set of minimal pair stimuli. The effects of speakers (two native speakers of Australian English), position of the contrast within the word (word initial, initial consonant cluster. and medial positions), and listening task (forced choice identification versus oddball discrimination) were examined, with a view to assessing the relative importance of language-specific and language-independent factors operating at the acoustic-phonetic and phonological levels of signal processing in "foreign sound" speech perception. Both prior phonological learning and the relative acoustic discriminability of the items affected subjects' performance on the identification test. Where both factors were engaged, phonological learning effects predominated over the effects of acoustic discriminability. The extent to which a speaker encoded critical acoustic cues for the /r-l/ distinction was found to affect /r-l/ identification. Dynamic spectral features known to be relevant for the /r-l/ contrast were effective in predicting (in a linear regression analysis) speaker-dependent differences in identification scores. Although the discrimination test may have been influenced by ceiling effects, the performance profiles on the identification and discrimination tests were quite different, indicating that the identification and discrimination tests imposed quite different task demands upon listeners and that phonological processing of the signal was more engaged by the former task. PMID:9479769

  13. Training native English speakers to perceive Japanese length contrasts in word versus sentence contexts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Yukari

    2004-10-01

    This study investigated whether native speakers of American English with no knowledge of Japanese could learn to perceive Japanese vowel and consonant length distinctions through auditory training with immediate feedback. One group of participants was trained to identify the number of moras in Japanese words spoken in isolation (word training), and another group in sentences (sentence training). Trained groups' pretest and post-test scores in the words-in-isolation context (word context) and the words-in-sentences context (sentence context) were compared to those of an untrained control group. The questions addressed were whether there was an overall effect of training, and whether there were differential effects of two types of training. Both trained groups showed similar improvement in their overall test scores. The results suggested that learning in one context generalized to the other. However, an advantage of sentence training over word training was found: at the post-test, there was a greater difference between the scores of the two contexts for the word-training group than for the sentence-training group. The results are discussed in terms of the factors that might contribute to the differences in second language learning between the word and the sentence contexts. .

  14. Electrophysiological correlates of cross-linguistic speech perception in native English speakers.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Gaxiola, M; Csibra, G; Johnson, M H; Karmiloff-Smith, A

    2000-06-15

    The present study examined the electrophysiological responses that Native English speakers display during a passive oddball task when they are presented with different types of syllabic contrasts, namely a labial /ba/-dental /d a/, a Hindi dental /d a/-retroflex /da/ and a within-category (two /ba/ tokens) contrasts. The analyses of the event-related potentials obtained showed that subjects pre-attentively perceive the differences in all experimental conditions, despite not showing such detection behaviourally in the Hindi and within-category conditions. These results support the notion that there is no permanent loss of the initial perceptual abilities that humans have as infants, but that there is an important neural reorganisation which allows the system to overcome the differences detected and only be aware of contrasts that are relevant in the language which will become the subjects native tongue. We also report order asymmetries in the ERP responses and suggest that the percepts and not only the physical attributes of the stimuli have to be considered for the evaluation of the responses obtained.

  15. Systeme des fautes et correction phonetique des Anglais qui apprennent le francais (System of Errors and Phonetic Correction of English Speakers Learning French)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lebrun, Claire

    1975-01-01

    This article provides the results of an investigation of the system of pronunciation faults of English speakers learning French, and describes means of correction based on the verbo-tonal system. (Text is in French.) (CLK)

  16. Linguistic Skills of Adult Native Speakers, as a Function of Age and Level of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulder, Kimberley; Hulstijn, Jan H.

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed, in a sample of 98 adult native speakers of Dutch, how their lexical skills and their speaking proficiency varied as a function of their age and level of education and profession (EP). Participants, categorized in terms of their age (18-35, 36-50, and 51-76 years old) and the level of their EP (low versus high), were tested on…

  17. Teaching Pronunciation to Adult English Language Learners. CAELA Network Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaetzel, Kirsten; Low, Ee Ling

    2009-01-01

    Adult English language learners in the United States approach the learning of English pronunciation from a wide variety of native language backgrounds. They may speak languages with sound systems that vary a great deal from that of English. The pronunciation goals and needs of adult English language learners are diverse. These goals and needs…

  18. Reflecting on Native Speaker Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    The issues surrounding native speakers (NSs) and nonnative speakers (NNSs) as teachers (NESTs and NNESTs, respectively) in the field of teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL) are a current topic of interest. In many contexts, the native speaker of English is viewed as the model teacher, thus putting the NEST into a position of…

  19. Hyperarticulation of vowels enhances phonetic change responses in both native and non-native speakers of English: evidence from an auditory event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Uther, Maria; Giannakopoulou, Anastasia; Iverson, Paul

    2012-08-27

    The finding that hyperarticulation of vowel sounds occurs in certain speech registers (e.g., infant- and foreigner-directed speech) suggests that hyperarticulation may have a didactic function in facilitating acquisition of new phonetic categories in language learners. This event-related potential study tested whether hyperarticulation of vowels elicits larger phonetic change responses, as indexed by the mismatch negativity (MMN) component of the auditory event-related potential (ERP) and tested native and non-native speakers of English. Data from 11 native English-speaking and 10 native Greek-speaking participants showed that Greek speakers in general had smaller MMNs compared to English speakers, confirming previous studies demonstrating sensitivity of the MMN to language background. In terms of the effect of hyperarticulation, hyperarticulated stimuli elicited larger MMNs for both language groups, suggesting vowel space expansion does elicit larger pre-attentive phonetic change responses. Interestingly Greek native speakers showed some P3a activity that was not present in the English native speakers, raising the possibility that additional attentional switch mechanisms are activated in non-native speakers compared to native speakers. These results give general support for models of speech learning such as Kuhl's Native Language Magnet enhanced (NLM-e) theory.

  20. White Native English Speakers Needed: The Rhetorical Construction of Privilege in Online Teacher Recruitment Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruecker, Todd; Ives, Lindsey

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few decades, scholars have paid increasing attention to the role of native speakerism in the field of TESOL. Several recent studies have exposed instances of native speakerism in TESOL recruitment discourses published through a variety of media, but none have focused specifically on professional websites advertising programs in…

  1. Human neuronal encoding of English syntactic violations as revealed by both L1 and L2 speakers.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Mikio; Ferrari, Paul; Roberts, Timothy P L

    2004-09-23

    Our previous study [M. Kubota, P. Ferrari, T.P.L. Roberts, Magnetoencephalography detection of early syntactic processes in humans: comparison between L1 speakers and L2 learners, Neurosci. Lett. 353 (2003) 107-110] showed that an early syntactic response was elicited in first language (L1) speakers for within-phrase, but not across-phrase violations, implying that there may exist a continuum of neuronal error gravity. Such an early component was not elicited by second-language (L2) learners. The current auditory study investigated whether two types of different syntactic violations regarding noun-phrase raising (NP-raising) and case-filter constructions would elicit a prominent early syntactic component in each hemisphere for both L1 and advanced L2 speakers of English. Neuromagnetic fields were recorded, using a dual 37-channel gradiometer system. A prominent component, peaking at approximately 150 ms post-onset, was observed in both hemispheres of two groups in response to NP-raising induced violations, but not case-filter violations. The findings imply that L1 and L2 speakers have similar neuronal mechanisms subserving syntactic processing of such violations.

  2. A Study of the Non-Standard English of Negro and Puerto Rican Speakers in New York City. Volume I: Phonological and Grammatical Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labov, William; And Others

    This study investigates the structural and functional differences between the non-standard Negro English of northern ghetto areas (NNE) and standard English (SE). The major field work was done in Central Harlem with (1) a geographically random sample of 50 pre-adolescent speakers in Vacation Day Camps, (2) six pre-adolescent and adolescent peer…

  3. A Cross-Cultural Study of Offering Advice Speech Acts by Iranian EFL Learners and English Native Speakers: Pragmatic Transfer in Focus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babaie, Sherveh; Shahrokhi, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the speech act of offering advice as realized by Iranian EFL learners and English native speakers. The study, more specifically, attempted to find out whether there was any pragmatic transfer from Persian (L1) among Iranian EFL learners while offering advice in English. It also examined whether…

  4. Winds of Change in the English Language--Air of Peril for Native Speakers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paradowski, Michal B.

    2008-01-01

    English today is one of the most hybrid and rapidly changing languages in the world. New users of the language are not just passively absorbing, but actively shaping it, breeding a variety of regional Englishes, as well as pidgins and English-lexified creoles. Also, as in an increasing number of countries English is becoming an element of core…

  5. Non-native English language speakers benefit most from the use of lecture capture in medical school.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Graham P; Molnar, David

    2011-01-01

    Medical education in the United States and Canada continues to evolve. However, many of the changes in pedagogy are being made without appropriate evaluation. Here, we attempt to evaluate the effectiveness of lecture capture technology as a learning tool in Podiatric medical education. In this pilot project, student performance in an inaugural lecture capture-supported biochemistry course was compared to that in the previous academic year. To examine the impact of online lecture podcasts on student performance a within-subjects design was implemented, a two way ANCOVA with repeated measures. The use of lecture capture-supported pedagogy resulted in significantly higher student test scores, than achieved historically using traditional pedagogy. The overall course performance using this lecture capture-supported pedagogy was almost 6% higher than in the previous year. Non-native English language speakers benefitted more significantly from the lecture capture-supported pedagogy than native English language speakers, since their performance improved by 10.0 points. Given that underrepresented minority (URM) students, whose native language is not English, makes up a growing proportion of medical school matriculates, these observations support the use of lecture capture technology in other courses. Furthermore, this technology may also be used as part of an academic enrichment plan to improve performance on the American Podiatric Medical Licensing Examination, reduce the attrition of URM students and potentially address the predicted minority physician shortage in 2020.

  6. Teaching English to Speakers of Choctaw, Navajo and Papago; A Contrastive Approach. Indian Education Curriculum Bulletin No. 6 [Part I, English for Speakers of Choctaw].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicklas, Thurston Dale

    This article, the first of three in the Bureau of Indian Affairs'"Curriculum Guide Number 6," edited by Sirarpi Ohannessian and William Gage of the Center for Applied Linguistics, is an attempt "to help break the language barrier" which exists for the many Choctaw children who lack proper skill in speaking English. Some Choctaw children know no…

  7. Making the Transition from Non-Native Speaker to Near-Native Speaker Teachers of English: Facing Globalization Challenges in Teaching English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bin Mohamed Ali, Haja Mohideen

    2009-01-01

    Many job advertisements seeking teachers of English to work in Japan, China, South Korea and Thailand, for instance, specify that they are looking for native speaking teachers from USA, UK, Australia and New Zealand. They do not seem to be interested even in trained non-native speaking teachers from their own countries. This situation also exists…

  8. Representational deficit or processing effect? An electrophysiological study of noun-noun compound processing by very advanced L2 speakers of English.

    PubMed

    De Cat, Cecile; Klepousniotou, Ekaterini; Baayen, R Harald

    2015-01-01

    The processing of English noun-noun compounds (NNCs) was investigated to identify the extent and nature of differences between the performance of native speakers of English and advanced Spanish and German non-native speakers of English. The study sought to establish whether the word order of the equivalent structure in the non-native speakers' mothertongue (L1) had an influence on their processing of NNCs in their second language (L2), and whether this influence was due to differences in grammatical representation (i.e., incomplete acquisition of the relevant structure) or processing effects. Two mask-primed lexical decision experiments were conducted in which compounds were presented with their constituent nouns in licit vs. reversed order. The first experiment used a speeded lexical decision task with reaction time registration, and the second a delayed lexical decision task with EEG registration. There were no significant group differences in accuracy in the licit word order condition, suggesting that the grammatical representation had been fully acquired by the non-native speakers. However, the Spanish speakers made slightly more errors with the reversed order and had longer response times, suggesting an L1 interference effect (as the reverse order matches the licit word order in Spanish). The EEG data, analyzed with generalized additive mixed models, further supported this hypothesis. The EEG waveform of the non-native speakers was characterized by a slightly later onset N400 in the violation condition (reversed constituent order). Compound frequency predicted the amplitude of the EEG signal for the licit word order for native speakers, but for the reversed constituent order for Spanish speakers-the licit order in their L1-supporting the hypothesis that Spanish speakers are affected by interferences from their L1. The pattern of results for the German speakers in the violation condition suggested a strong conflict arising due to licit constituents being

  9. The Influence of the Pinyin and Zhuyin Writing Systems on the Acquisition of Mandarin Word Forms by Native English Speakers

    PubMed Central

    Hayes-Harb, Rachel; Cheng, Hui-Wen

    2016-01-01

    The role of written input in second language (L2) phonological and lexical acquisition has received increased attention in recent years. Here we investigated the influence of two factors that may moderate the influence of orthography on L2 word form learning: (i) whether the writing system is shared by the native language and the L2, and (ii) if the writing system is shared, whether the relevant grapheme-phoneme correspondences are also shared. The acquisition of Mandarin via the Pinyin and Zhuyin writing systems provides an ecologically valid opportunity to explore these factors. We first asked whether there is a difference in native English speakers' ability to learn Pinyin and Zhuyin grapheme-phoneme correspondences. In Experiment 1, native English speakers assigned to either Pinyin or Zhuyin groups were exposed to Mandarin words belonging to one of two conditions: in the “congruent” condition, the Pinyin forms are possible English spellings for the auditory words (e.g., < nai> for [nai]); in the “incongruent” condition, the Pinyin forms involve a familiar grapheme representing a novel phoneme (e.g., < xiu> for [ɕiou]). At test, participants were asked to indicate whether auditory and written forms matched; in the crucial trials, the written forms from training (e.g., < xiu>) were paired with possible English pronunciations of the Pinyin written forms (e.g., [ziou]). Experiment 2 was identical to Experiment 1 except that participants additionally saw pictures depicting word meanings during the exposure phase, and at test were asked to match auditory forms with the pictures. In both experiments the Zhuyin group outperformed the Pinyin group due to the Pinyin group's difficulty with “incongruent” items. A third experiment confirmed that the groups did not differ in their ability to perceptually distinguish the relevant Mandarin consonants (e.g., [ɕ]) from the foils (e.g., [z]), suggesting that the findings of Experiments 1 and 2 can be attributed to

  10. The Influence of the Pinyin and Zhuyin Writing Systems on the Acquisition of Mandarin Word Forms by Native English Speakers.

    PubMed

    Hayes-Harb, Rachel; Cheng, Hui-Wen

    2016-01-01

    The role of written input in second language (L2) phonological and lexical acquisition has received increased attention in recent years. Here we investigated the influence of two factors that may moderate the influence of orthography on L2 word form learning: (i) whether the writing system is shared by the native language and the L2, and (ii) if the writing system is shared, whether the relevant grapheme-phoneme correspondences are also shared. The acquisition of Mandarin via the Pinyin and Zhuyin writing systems provides an ecologically valid opportunity to explore these factors. We first asked whether there is a difference in native English speakers' ability to learn Pinyin and Zhuyin grapheme-phoneme correspondences. In Experiment 1, native English speakers assigned to either Pinyin or Zhuyin groups were exposed to Mandarin words belonging to one of two conditions: in the "congruent" condition, the Pinyin forms are possible English spellings for the auditory words (e.g., < nai> for [nai]); in the "incongruent" condition, the Pinyin forms involve a familiar grapheme representing a novel phoneme (e.g., < xiu> for [ɕiou]). At test, participants were asked to indicate whether auditory and written forms matched; in the crucial trials, the written forms from training (e.g., < xiu>) were paired with possible English pronunciations of the Pinyin written forms (e.g., [ziou]). Experiment 2 was identical to Experiment 1 except that participants additionally saw pictures depicting word meanings during the exposure phase, and at test were asked to match auditory forms with the pictures. In both experiments the Zhuyin group outperformed the Pinyin group due to the Pinyin group's difficulty with "incongruent" items. A third experiment confirmed that the groups did not differ in their ability to perceptually distinguish the relevant Mandarin consonants (e.g., [ɕ]) from the foils (e.g., [z]), suggesting that the findings of Experiments 1 and 2 can be attributed to the effects

  11. The Influence of the Pinyin and Zhuyin Writing Systems on the Acquisition of Mandarin Word Forms by Native English Speakers.

    PubMed

    Hayes-Harb, Rachel; Cheng, Hui-Wen

    2016-01-01

    The role of written input in second language (L2) phonological and lexical acquisition has received increased attention in recent years. Here we investigated the influence of two factors that may moderate the influence of orthography on L2 word form learning: (i) whether the writing system is shared by the native language and the L2, and (ii) if the writing system is shared, whether the relevant grapheme-phoneme correspondences are also shared. The acquisition of Mandarin via the Pinyin and Zhuyin writing systems provides an ecologically valid opportunity to explore these factors. We first asked whether there is a difference in native English speakers' ability to learn Pinyin and Zhuyin grapheme-phoneme correspondences. In Experiment 1, native English speakers assigned to either Pinyin or Zhuyin groups were exposed to Mandarin words belonging to one of two conditions: in the "congruent" condition, the Pinyin forms are possible English spellings for the auditory words (e.g., < nai> for [nai]); in the "incongruent" condition, the Pinyin forms involve a familiar grapheme representing a novel phoneme (e.g., < xiu> for [ɕiou]). At test, participants were asked to indicate whether auditory and written forms matched; in the crucial trials, the written forms from training (e.g., < xiu>) were paired with possible English pronunciations of the Pinyin written forms (e.g., [ziou]). Experiment 2 was identical to Experiment 1 except that participants additionally saw pictures depicting word meanings during the exposure phase, and at test were asked to match auditory forms with the pictures. In both experiments the Zhuyin group outperformed the Pinyin group due to the Pinyin group's difficulty with "incongruent" items. A third experiment confirmed that the groups did not differ in their ability to perceptually distinguish the relevant Mandarin consonants (e.g., [ɕ]) from the foils (e.g., [z]), suggesting that the findings of Experiments 1 and 2 can be attributed to the effects

  12. The Intelligibility and Comprehensibility of World Englishes to Non-Native Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Mi-Young

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate which pronunciations of English are difficult or different from one's first language, as well as to explore which factors are crucial for communication with people from other cultures when English is used as one of the World Englishes. Ninety-one undergraduate students (85 females and 6 males) from two…

  13. Language Learning in the American Southwestern Borderlands: Navajo Speakers and Their Transition to Academic English Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyc, Gloria

    2002-01-01

    The Navajo Nation wants a 2-year Navajo language requirement for regional colleges. At the same time, literacy in academic English is required for Navajo students wishing to enter the sciences, medicine, and law. The difficulties students face as they make the transition from English to Navajo and from Navajo to English are described. Four…

  14. Catching Up with Europe: Speakers and Functions of English in Hungary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petzold, Ruth; Berns, Margie

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the functional range of English and its penetration into Hungarian society and shows that in just a few years English has become an essential tool for modernization and economic development and a significant medium in the tourist and entertainment industries as well as education. The need for and use of English in the workplace has had a…

  15. English Vowel Spaces Produced by Japanese Speakers: The Smaller Point Vowels' and the Greater Schwas'

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomita, Kaoru; Yamada, Jun; Takatsuka, Shigenobu

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated how Japanese-speaking learners of English pronounce the three point vowels /i/, /u/, and /a/ appearing in the first and second monosyllabic words of English noun phrases, and the schwa /[image omitted]/ appearing in English disyllabic words. First and second formant (F1 and F2) values were measured for four Japanese…

  16. Assessing the Double Phonemic Representation in Bilingual Speakers of Spanish and English: An Electrophysiological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Sierra, Adrian; Ramirez-Esparza, Nairan; Silva-Pereyra, Juan; Siard, Jennifer; Champlin, Craig A.

    2012-01-01

    Event Related Potentials (ERPs) were recorded from Spanish-English bilinguals (N = 10) to test pre-attentive speech discrimination in two language contexts. ERPs were recorded while participants silently read magazines in English or Spanish. Two speech contrast conditions were recorded in each language context. In the "phonemic in English"…

  17. A Profile of Limited English Proficient Adult Immigrants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batalova, Jeanne; Fix, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the 2003 National Assessment of Adult Literacy (NAAL) to develop a profile of immigrant adults with varying levels of oral English proficiency. The NAAL data on adult limited English proficient (LEP) immigrants are used here to examine their education levels, workforce involvement, incomes, use of public benefits,…

  18. Assessing the double phonemic representation in bilingual speakers of Spanish and English: an electrophysiological study.

    PubMed

    García-Sierra, Adrián; Ramírez-Esparza, Nairán; Silva-Pereyra, Juan; Siard, Jennifer; Champlin, Craig A

    2012-06-01

    Event Related Potentials (ERPs) were recorded from Spanish-English bilinguals (N=10) to test pre-attentive speech discrimination in two language contexts. ERPs were recorded while participants silently read magazines in English or Spanish. Two speech contrast conditions were recorded in each language context. In the phonemic in English condition, the speech sounds represented two different phonemic categories in English, but represented the same phonemic category in Spanish. In the phonemic in Spanish condition, the speech sounds represented two different phonemic categories in Spanish, but represented the same phonemic categories in English. Results showed pre-attentive discrimination when the acoustics/phonetics of the speech sounds match the language context (e.g., phonemic in English condition during the English language context). The results suggest that language contexts can affect pre-attentive auditory change detection. Specifically, bilinguals' mental processing of stop consonants relies on contextual linguistic information.

  19. Some linguistic and pragmatic considerations affecting science reporting in English by non-native speakers of the language

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 50% of publications in English peer reviewed journals are contributed by non-native speakers (NNS) of the language. Basic thought processes are considered to be universal yet there are differences in thought patterns and particularly in discourse management of writers with different linguistic and cultural backgrounds. The study highlights some areas of potential incompatibility in native and NNS processing of English scientific papers. Principles and conventions in generating academic discourse are considered in terms of frequently occurring failures of NNS to meet expectations of editors, reviewers, and readers. Major problem areas concern organization and flow of information, principles of cohesion and clarity, cultural constraints, especially those of politeness and negotiability of ideas, and the complicated area of English modality pragmatics. The aim of the paper is to sensitize NN authors of English academic reports to problem areas of discourse processing which are stumbling blocks, often affecting acceptance of manuscripts. The problems discussed are essential for acquiring pragmalinguistic and sociocultural competence in producing effective communication. PMID:23118596

  20. Self-Disclosure in Initial Interactions amongst Speakers of American and Australian English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haugh, Michael; Carbaugh, Donal

    2015-01-01

    Getting acquainted with others is one of the most basic interpersonal communication events. Yet there has only been a limited number of studies that have examined variation in the interactional practices through which unacquainted persons become acquainted and establish relationships across speakers of the same language. The current study focuses…

  1. Bilingual Language Development and Disorders in Spanish-English Speakers. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Brian A., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Because dual language learners are the fastest--growing segment of the U.S. student population--and the majority speak Spanish as a first language--the new generation of SLPs must have comprehensive knowledge of how to work effectively with bilingual speakers. That's what they'll get in the second edition of this book, an ideal graduate-level text…

  2. Selectivity in L1 Attrition: Differential Object Marking in Spanish Near-Native Speakers of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamorro, Gloria; Sturt, Patrick; Sorace, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has shown L1 attrition to be restricted to structures at the interfaces between syntax and pragmatics, but not to occur with syntactic properties that do not involve such interfaces ("Interface Hypothesis", Sorace and Filiaci in "Anaphora resolution in near-native speakers of Italian." "Second Lang…

  3. Structural Correlates for Lexical Efficiency and Number of Languages in Non-Native Speakers of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grogan, A.; Parker Jones, O.; Ali, N.; Crinion, J.; Orabona, S.; Mechias, M. L.; Ramsden, S.; Green, D. W.; Price, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    We used structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and voxel based morphometry (VBM) to investigate whether the efficiency of word processing in the non-native language (lexical efficiency) and the number of non-native languages spoken (2+ versus 1) were related to local differences in the brain structure of bilingual and multilingual speakers.…

  4. Topic Continuity in Informal Conversations between Native and Non-Native Speakers of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris-Adams, Muna

    2013-01-01

    Topic management by non-native speakers (NNSs) during informal conversations has received comparatively little attention from researchers, and receives surprisingly little attention in second language learning and teaching. This article reports on one of the topic management strategies employed by international students during informal, social…

  5. Evaluating causes of foreign accent in English sentences spoken by native speakers of Italian differing in age of arrival (AOA) in Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flege, James; Mackay, Ian; Imai, Satomi

    2003-04-01

    This study evaluated potential causes of foreign accent (FA) by including native Italian (NI) speakers with a later age of arrival (AOA) in Canada than in previous studies. Three NI groups (n=18 each) differing in AOA (means=10, 18, and 26 years) participated. Listeners used a 9-point scale to rate sentences produced by the three NI groups and native English controls. The ratings obtained for all four groups differed significantly. The stronger foreign accents of the AOA-18 than AOA-10 group might be attributed to the passing of a critical period, or to stronger cross-language interference by more robust Italian phonetic categories. The difference might also be attributed to differences in language use. This is because the AOA-10 and AOA-18 groups (but not the AOA-18 and AOA-26 groups) differed significantly in percentage of English and Italian use, length of residence in Canada, and years of education in Canada. None of these explanations will apparently explain the stronger FAs of the AOA-26 than AOA-18 group. The difference between these groups might be attributed to cognitive aging [Hakuta et al., Appl. Psycholinguistics (in press)], which results in gradually less successful second-language acquisition across the adult life span. [Work supported by NIH.

  6. Performance of Native and Non-Native Speakers of English on Subtests of the Comprehensive English Language Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aitken, Kenneth G.

    1978-01-01

    The listening comprehension and structure subtests of the Comprehensive English Language Test (CELT) were administered to 211 secondary students from an urban center on Canada's west coast. The subtests appeared to be powerful enough to separate immigrant students of English (Second Language) from Canadian born bilinguals and monolinguals. (EJS)

  7. Second Language Acquisition of Reflexive Verbs in Russian by L1 Speakers of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexieva, Petia Dimitrova

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the process of acquisition of semantic classes of reflexive verbs (RVs) in Russian by L2 learners with a native language English. The purpose of this study is to bridge the gap between current linguistic knowledge and the pedagogical literature existing in English on reflexives in Russian. RVs are taught partially and…

  8. Lab Reports: A Concise Guide for Non-Native English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soundranayagam, Luxshmi

    2014-01-01

    College students in the non-English-speaking world have to overcome formidable barriers in reading and writing when their medium of instruction is English. One particular problem faced by science majors is the writing of lab reports, a demanding task that might not be effectively supported by the standard guides and manuals available. This paper…

  9. Listening with a foreign-accent: The interlanguage speech intelligibility benefit in Mandarin speakers of English

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xin; Fowler, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the intelligibility of native and Mandarin-accented English speech for native English and native Mandarin listeners. In the latter group, it also examined the role of the language environment and English proficiency. Three groups of listeners were tested: native English listeners (NE), Mandarin-speaking Chinese listeners in the US (M-US) and Mandarin listeners in Beijing, China (M-BJ). As a group, M-US and M-BJ listeners were matched on English proficiency and age of acquisition. A nonword transcription task was used. Identification accuracy for word-final stops in the nonwords established two independent interlanguage intelligibility effects. An interlanguage speech intelligibility benefit for listeners (ISIB-L) was manifest by both groups of Mandarin listeners outperforming native English listeners in identification of Mandarin-accented speech. In the benefit for talkers (ISIB-T), only M-BJ listeners were more accurate identifying Mandarin-accented speech than native English speech. Thus, both Mandarin groups demonstrated an ISIB-L while only the M-BJ group overall demonstrated an ISIB-T. The English proficiency of listeners was found to modulate the magnitude of the ISIB-T in both groups. Regression analyses also suggested that the listener groups differ in their use of acoustic information to identify voicing in stop consonants. PMID:24293741

  10. TEACHING ENGLISH TO SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES, UNITED STATES ACTIVITIES--1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCARDLE, LOIS

    THIS REPORT ON NEW PROGRAMS AND ON SIGNIFICANT DEVELOPMENTS IN ONGOING PROGRAMS WAS PREPARED FOR THE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON SECOND LANGUAGE PROBLEMS (8TH, HEIDELBERG, GERMANY, APRIL 26-29, 1967). PROGRAMS LISTED ARE (1) GENERAL ACTIVITIES, (2) ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING AND TEACHER TRAINING OVERSEAS, (3) ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING AND TEACHER…

  11. Environmental Considerations: Home and School Comparison of Spanish-English Speakers' Vocalizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Carla W.; Callender, Maya F.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined differences in the quantity of child vocalizations (CVs) between preschool and home environments using the Language Environmental Analysis (LENA). The sample included monolingual English-speaking children (n = 27) and Spanish-English speaking dual language learners (n = 30). A two-way mixed effects analysis of variance with one…

  12. Learning through Standard English: Cognitive Implications for Post-Pidgin/-Creole Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malcolm, Ian G.

    2011-01-01

    Despite their (albeit limited) access to Standard Australian English through education, Australian Indigenous communities have maintained their own dialect (Aboriginal English) for intragroup communication and are increasingly using it as a medium of cultural expression in the wider community. Most linguists agree that the most significant early…

  13. Forced-Choice Analysis of Segmental Production by Chinese-Accented English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Catherine L.; Dalby, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    This study describes the development of a minimal-pairs word list targeting phoneme contrasts that pose difficulty for Mandarin Chinese-speaking learners of English as a second language. The target phoneme inventory was compiled from analysis of phonetic transcriptions of about 800 mono- and polysyllabic English words with examples of all the…

  14. Empirical Research on Native Chinese Speakers Reading in English: Data Driven Issues and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brantmeier, Cindy; Xiucheng, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Mastery of English in China has gathered increased prominence due to the need to foster cultural, political, and economic connections worldwide. Reading is an obvious skill of vital importance for advancing efforts as a player in the world economy. The present article examines research published in academic journals in Chinese and English to…

  15. Listening with a foreign-accent: The interlanguage speech intelligibility benefit in Mandarin speakers of English.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xin; Fowler, Carol A

    2013-09-01

    This study examined the intelligibility of native and Mandarin-accented English speech for native English and native Mandarin listeners. In the latter group, it also examined the role of the language environment and English proficiency. Three groups of listeners were tested: native English listeners (NE), Mandarin-speaking Chinese listeners in the US (M-US) and Mandarin listeners in Beijing, China (M-BJ). As a group, M-US and M-BJ listeners were matched on English proficiency and age of acquisition. A nonword transcription task was used. Identification accuracy for word-final stops in the nonwords established two independent interlanguage intelligibility effects. An interlanguage speech intelligibility benefit for listeners (ISIB-L) was manifest by both groups of Mandarin listeners outperforming native English listeners in identification of Mandarin-accented speech. In the benefit for talkers (ISIB-T), only M-BJ listeners were more accurate identifying Mandarin-accented speech than native English speech. Thus, both Mandarin groups demonstrated an ISIB-L while only the M-BJ group overall demonstrated an ISIB-T. The English proficiency of listeners was found to modulate the magnitude of the ISIB-T in both groups. Regression analyses also suggested that the listener groups differ in their use of acoustic information to identify voicing in stop consonants.

  16. Enhanced Plasticity in Spoken Language Acquisition for Child Learners: Evidence from Phonetic Training Studies in Child and Adult Learners of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giannakopoulou, Anastasia; Uther, Maria; Ylinen, Sari

    2013-01-01

    Speech sounds that contain multiple phonetic cues are often difficult for foreign-language learners, especially if certain cues are weighted differently in the foreign and native languages. Greek adult and child speakers of English were studied to determine the effect of native language on second-language (L2) cue weighting and, in particular, to…

  17. Is He Floating across or Crossing Afloat? Cross-Influence of L1 and L2 in Spanish-English Bilingual Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohenstein, Jill; Eisenberg, Ann; Naigles, Letitia

    2006-01-01

    Research has begun to address the question of transfer of language usage patterns beyond the idea that people's native language (L1) can influence the way they produce a second language (L2). This study investigated bidirectional transfer, of both lexical and grammatical features, in adult speakers of English and Spanish who varied in age of L2…

  18. Who Was Walking on the Beach? Anaphora Resolution in Spanish Heritage Speakers and Adult Second Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keating, Gregory D.; VanPatten, Bill; Jegerski, Jill

    2011-01-01

    The position of antecedent strategy (Carminati, 2002) claims that speakers of null-subject languages prefer to resolve intrasentential anaphora by linking pro to an antecedent in the specifier of the inflection phrase and the overt pronoun to an antecedent lower in the clause. The present study has two aims: (a) to determine whether adult early…

  19. Resources for TESOL Teaching: A Handbook for Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages. Program & Training Journal Reprint Series, No. 26.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boone, Eleanor C., Comp.; And Others

    This resource guide for teachers of English to speakers of other languages contains two sections, one dealing with resources and the second dealing with the language itself. The first section contains teaching ideas, techniques, and suggestions on how to present, develop, and reinforce pronunciation, grammar, vocabulary, reading, writing, and…

  20. Middle-Class English Speakers in a Two-Way Immersion Bilingual Classroom: "Everybody Should Be Listening to Jonathan Right Now..."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Deborah K.

    2009-01-01

    Two-way bilingual immersion education, offered in a fast-growing number of primary schools in the United States, provides primary language maintenance to minority language speakers while simultaneously offering an enrichment "foreign" language immersion experience to English-speaking children in the same classroom, generally with the same teacher.…

  1. The Development of Instructional Materials for Vocational Personnel Serving Students Who Are Speakers of Other Languages and Have Limited English Proficiency. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamsky, Richard A.; And Others

    The first part of this document provides a brief account of a project to develop learning modules on the microcomputer and the microscope for use with limited English-proficient speakers of other languages who are enrolled in vocational education courses. The bulk of the document consists of appendixes presenting the modules themselves. The…

  2. Category and Perceptual Interference in Second-Language Phoneme Learning: An Examination of English /w/-/v/ Learning by Sinhala, German, and Dutch Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iverson, Paul; Ekanayake, Dulika; Hamann, Silke; Sennema, Anke; Evans, Bronwen G.

    2008-01-01

    The present study investigated the perception and production of English /w/ and /v/ by native speakers of Sinhala, German, and Dutch, with the aim of examining how their native language phonetic processing affected the acquisition of these phonemes. Subjects performed a battery of tests that assessed their identification accuracy for natural…

  3. Long-Distance Wh-Movement and Long-Distance Wh-Movement Avoidance in L2 English: Evidence from French and Bulgarian Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavkov, Nikolay

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates spoken productions of complex questions with long-distance wh-movement in the L2 English of speakers whose first language is (Canadian) French or Bulgarian. Long-distance wh-movement is of interest as it can be argued that it poses difficulty in acquisition due to its syntactic complexity and related high processing load.…

  4. Native Speakers' Perceptions of Nonnative Speakers: Related to Phonetic Errors and Spoken Grammatical Errors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ruth; Jenks, Frederick L.

    A study investigated the perceptions of native English-speakers concerning the spoken grammatical and phonetic (accent) errors of non-native speakers. Speech samples were collected from three non-native speakers of English of varied linguistic backgrounds (German, Spanish, and Arabic) and one speaker of North American English. Each of the four…

  5. Representational deficit or processing effect? An electrophysiological study of noun-noun compound processing by very advanced L2 speakers of English.

    PubMed

    De Cat, Cecile; Klepousniotou, Ekaterini; Baayen, R Harald

    2015-01-01

    The processing of English noun-noun compounds (NNCs) was investigated to identify the extent and nature of differences between the performance of native speakers of English and advanced Spanish and German non-native speakers of English. The study sought to establish whether the word order of the equivalent structure in the non-native speakers' mothertongue (L1) had an influence on their processing of NNCs in their second language (L2), and whether this influence was due to differences in grammatical representation (i.e., incomplete acquisition of the relevant structure) or processing effects. Two mask-primed lexical decision experiments were conducted in which compounds were presented with their constituent nouns in licit vs. reversed order. The first experiment used a speeded lexical decision task with reaction time registration, and the second a delayed lexical decision task with EEG registration. There were no significant group differences in accuracy in the licit word order condition, suggesting that the grammatical representation had been fully acquired by the non-native speakers. However, the Spanish speakers made slightly more errors with the reversed order and had longer response times, suggesting an L1 interference effect (as the reverse order matches the licit word order in Spanish). The EEG data, analyzed with generalized additive mixed models, further supported this hypothesis. The EEG waveform of the non-native speakers was characterized by a slightly later onset N400 in the violation condition (reversed constituent order). Compound frequency predicted the amplitude of the EEG signal for the licit word order for native speakers, but for the reversed constituent order for Spanish speakers-the licit order in their L1-supporting the hypothesis that Spanish speakers are affected by interferences from their L1. The pattern of results for the German speakers in the violation condition suggested a strong conflict arising due to licit constituents being

  6. Direct and Indirect Roles of Morphological Awareness in the English Reading Comprehension of Native English, Spanish, Filipino, and Vietnamese Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieffer, Michael J.; Lesaux, Nonie K.

    2012-01-01

    This study tested three hypotheses about the direct and indirect contributions of derivational morphological awareness to English reading comprehension in sixth-grade students from differing language backgrounds (n= 952). Students included Spanish-speaking, Filipino-speaking, and Vietnamese-speaking language minority learners as well as native…

  7. Cultural Transfer as an Obstacle for Writing Well in English: The Case of Arabic Speakers Writing in English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rass, Ruwaida Abu

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews and strengthens the data on cultural transfer by Arab Muslim students writing in English and adds the significant element of the cultural impact of Islam on such writing. This qualitative study examines the writing of 18 teacher trainees at an Arab language teacher training college in Israel. Results point to a strong cultural…

  8. Category and perceptual interference in second-language phoneme learning: an examination of English /w/-/v/ learning by Sinhala, German, and Dutch speakers.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Paul; Ekanayake, Dulika; Hamann, Silke; Sennema, Anke; Evans, Bronwen G

    2008-10-01

    The present study investigated the perception and production of English /w/ and /v/ by native speakers of Sinhala, German, and Dutch, with the aim of examining how their native language phonetic processing affected the acquisition of these phonemes. Subjects performed a battery of tests that assessed their identification accuracy for natural recordings, their degree of spoken accent, their relative use of place and manner cues, the assimilation of these phonemes into native-language categories, and their perceptual maps (i.e., multidimensional scaling solutions) for these phonemes. Most Sinhala speakers had near-chance identification accuracy, Germans ranged from chance to 100% correct, and Dutch speakers had uniformly high accuracy. The results suggest that these learning differences were caused more by perceptual interference than by category assimilation; Sinhala and German speakers both have a single native-language phoneme that is similar to English /w/ and /v/, but the auditory sensitivities of Sinhala speakers make it harder for them to discern the acoustic cues that are critical to /w/-/v/ categorization.

  9. Category and perceptual interference in second-language phoneme learning: an examination of English /w/-/v/ learning by Sinhala, German, and Dutch speakers.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Paul; Ekanayake, Dulika; Hamann, Silke; Sennema, Anke; Evans, Bronwen G

    2008-10-01

    The present study investigated the perception and production of English /w/ and /v/ by native speakers of Sinhala, German, and Dutch, with the aim of examining how their native language phonetic processing affected the acquisition of these phonemes. Subjects performed a battery of tests that assessed their identification accuracy for natural recordings, their degree of spoken accent, their relative use of place and manner cues, the assimilation of these phonemes into native-language categories, and their perceptual maps (i.e., multidimensional scaling solutions) for these phonemes. Most Sinhala speakers had near-chance identification accuracy, Germans ranged from chance to 100% correct, and Dutch speakers had uniformly high accuracy. The results suggest that these learning differences were caused more by perceptual interference than by category assimilation; Sinhala and German speakers both have a single native-language phoneme that is similar to English /w/ and /v/, but the auditory sensitivities of Sinhala speakers make it harder for them to discern the acoustic cues that are critical to /w/-/v/ categorization. PMID:18823213

  10. The Politics of ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages): Implications for Citizenship and Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Christine; Starkey, Hugh; Green, Andy

    2010-01-01

    A number of countries in Europe, including the UK, have adopted language and citizenship tests or courses as a requirement for granting citizenship to immigrants. To acquire citizenship, immigrants to the UK must pass a test on British society and culture, or demonstrate progress in the English language. For those with an insufficient command of…

  11. Online and Face-to-Face Activities of Non-Native English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Carmen Susanne

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine non-native English speaking students' activity in face-to-face versus online learning environments. The amount of foreign students in the United States increased by 3% in the academic year 2009-2010 (Open Doors, 2010). Adding close to $20 billion to the USA economy, "higher education is among the…

  12. Social and Educational Insights into Teaching Standard English to Speakers of Other Dialects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imhoof, Maurice I., Ed.

    1971-01-01

    This document presents a series of lectures on various aspects of the language problems of inner-city children delivered during the second semester of the 1969-70 academic year at the Department of Urban and Overseas English Programs of the School of Education of Indiana University. The papers are: Roger W. Shuy, "Sociolinguistic Strategies for…

  13. Past Tense Grammaticality Judgment and Production in Non-Native and Stressed Native English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Janet L.; Roussel, Cristine C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores whether the poor mastery of morphosyntax exhibited by second language (L2) learners can be tied to difficulties with non-syntactic processing. Specifically, we examine whether problems with English regular and irregular past tense are related to poor L2 phonological ability and lexical access, respectively. In Experiment 1, L2…

  14. Dynamic Assessment of Elicited Imitation: A Case Analysis of an Advanced L2 English Speaker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Compernolle, Rémi A.; Zhang, Haomin

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on the design, administration, and scoring of a dynamically administered elicited imitation test of L2 English morphology. Drawing on Vygotskian sociocultural psychology, particularly the concepts of zone of proximal development and dynamic assessment, we argue that support provided during the elicited imitation test…

  15. Substitution of Dental Fricatives in English by Dutch L2 Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wester, Femke; Gilbers, Dicky; Lowie, Wander

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates the nature of the substitutions used for the dental fricatives (/theta/ and /eth/) by Dutch learners of English as a second language. By means of an OT analysis, the underlying reasons for the difficulties encountered with these sounds are brought to light. The present data reveal that phonetics (or acoustics) rather than…

  16. Second Language Acquisition of Spanish /e/ and /ei/ by Native English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz, Miriam; Simonet, Miquel

    2015-01-01

    The present article reports on the findings of a cross-sectional acoustic study of the production of the Spanish /e/-/ei/ contrast, as in "pena-peina" and "reno-reino," by native-English intermediate and advanced learners of Spanish. The acoustic parameter that distinguishes Spanish /e/ from /ei/ is formant change--/e/ is a…

  17. BE, DO, and Modal Auxiliaries of 3-Year-Old African American English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newkirk-Turner, Brandi L.; Oetting, Janna B.; Stockman, Ida J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined African American English--speaking children's use of BE, DO, and modal auxiliaries. Method: The data were based on language samples obtained from 48 three-year-olds. Analyses examined rates of marking by auxiliary type, auxiliary surface form, succeeding element, and syntactic construction and by a number of child…

  18. Dialogue Journals between Native Speakers of English and Second Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Gloria

    2009-01-01

    Public school educators in the United States are coping with the immigration of families from non-English speaking countries. Teachers are pressed by federal mandates to meet the challenges of increased cultural diversity and language deficiencies of students with new skills. This study explored the effectiveness of journaling between bilingual…

  19. Legitimacy of Teaching English Composition as a Non-Native Speaker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulamur, Ayse Naz

    2013-01-01

    I examine how American students respond to foreign instructors, who teach English Composition and Research Writing. I discuss how minority teacher's cultural, lingual, and ethnic differences interfere with classroom dynamics in the United States. I rely on my experiences as a Turkish instructor of composition at the University of Wisconsin,…

  20. Developmental and communicative factors affecting VOT production in English and Arabic bilingual and monolingual speakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khattab, Ghada

    2001-05-01

    VOT patterns were investigated in the production of three Lebanese-English bilinguals' aged 5, 7, and 10, six aged-matched monolingual controls from the bilinguals' immediate communities, and the parents of bilinguals and monolinguals. The aim was to examine the extent to which children exposed to two languages acquire separate VOT patterns for each language and to determine the factors that affect such acquisition. Results showed that VOT patterns for each bilingual child differed significantly across the two languages. But while the contrast in English resembled a monolingual-like model, that for Arabic exhibited persisting developmental features; explanations were offered in terms of the relationship between input and complexity of voicing lead production. Evidence was used from developmental changes that were noted for two of the bilingual subjects over a period of 18 months. English code-switches produced by the bilinguals during Arabic sessions exhibited different VOT patterns from those produced during English sessions, which underlined the importance of taking the language context into consideration. Finally, results from monolinguals and bilinguals showed that the short lag categories for the two languages were different despite a degree of overlap. Such findings require finer divisions of the three universal VOT categories to account for language-specific patterns.

  1. Haunting Native Speakerism? Students' Perceptions toward Native Speaking English Teachers in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Kun-huei; Ke, Chung

    2009-01-01

    This paper intends to explore how Taiwanese university students perceive their native-speaking English teachers (NESTs). Mutual expectations between the NESTs and students are also investigated. Collected data include questionnaires from 107 students and interviews with three NESTs and 19 students who have filled out the questionnaire. The result…

  2. Composition Medium Comparability in a Direct Writing Assessment of Non-Native English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Edward W.; Manalo, Jonathan R.

    2004-01-01

    The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) contains a direct writing assessment, and examinees are given the option of composing their responses at a computer terminal using a keyboard or composing their responses in handwriting. This study sought to determine whether performance on a direct writing assessment is comparable for examinees…

  3. Examining the Writing of Adolescent African American English Speakers: Suggestions for Assessment and Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton-Ikard, RaMonda; Pittman, Ramona T.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the use of African American English (AAE) in the written and oral language of African American adolescents who struggle with writing. Written and oral language samples of 22 African American 10th-grade students were transcribed, analyzed, and coded for AAE, grammatical errors, spelling errors, and punctuation errors. Four…

  4. Learning to Talk Like the Test: Guiding Speakers of African American Vernacular English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Douglas; Lapp, Diane

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we focus on instructional support for 91 students who speak African American Vernacular English and who are at high risk for not passing the required state exams. We profile the instruction that was provided and the results from that instruction, providing examples of how students' language was scaffolded such that they could…

  5. Representational deficit or processing effect? An electrophysiological study of noun-noun compound processing by very advanced L2 speakers of English

    PubMed Central

    De Cat, Cecile; Klepousniotou, Ekaterini; Baayen, R. Harald

    2015-01-01

    The processing of English noun-noun compounds (NNCs) was investigated to identify the extent and nature of differences between the performance of native speakers of English and advanced Spanish and German non-native speakers of English. The study sought to establish whether the word order of the equivalent structure in the non-native speakers' mothertongue (L1) had an influence on their processing of NNCs in their second language (L2), and whether this influence was due to differences in grammatical representation (i.e., incomplete acquisition of the relevant structure) or processing effects. Two mask-primed lexical decision experiments were conducted in which compounds were presented with their constituent nouns in licit vs. reversed order. The first experiment used a speeded lexical decision task with reaction time registration, and the second a delayed lexical decision task with EEG registration. There were no significant group differences in accuracy in the licit word order condition, suggesting that the grammatical representation had been fully acquired by the non-native speakers. However, the Spanish speakers made slightly more errors with the reversed order and had longer response times, suggesting an L1 interference effect (as the reverse order matches the licit word order in Spanish). The EEG data, analyzed with generalized additive mixed models, further supported this hypothesis. The EEG waveform of the non-native speakers was characterized by a slightly later onset N400 in the violation condition (reversed constituent order). Compound frequency predicted the amplitude of the EEG signal for the licit word order for native speakers, but for the reversed constituent order for Spanish speakers—the licit order in their L1—supporting the hypothesis that Spanish speakers are affected by interferences from their L1. The pattern of results for the German speakers in the violation condition suggested a strong conflict arising due to licit constituents being

  6. Do Decision Rules Matter? A Descriptive Study of English Language Proficiency Assessment Classifications for English-Language Learners and Native English Speakers in Fifth Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Patricia E.; Bailey, Alison L.

    2016-01-01

    English language proficiency assessments (ELPA) are used in the United States to measure annually the English language progress and proficiency of English-language learners (ELLs), a subgroup of language minority students who receive language acquisition support mandated and largely funded by Title III (NCLB, 2001). ELPA proficient and…

  7. Toward a Composite, Personalized, and Institutionalized Teacher Identity for Non-Native English Speakers in U.S. Secondary ESL Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, I-Chen; Varghese, Manka M.

    2015-01-01

    Research in English language teaching and teacher identity has increasingly focused on understanding non-native English-speaking teachers. In addition, much of this research has been conducted in adult English as a second language (ESL) settings. Through a multiple-case qualitative study of four teachers in an underexplored research setting--that…

  8. How Similar Are Adult Second Language Learners and Spanish Heritage Speakers? Spanish Clitics and Word Order

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montrul, Silvina

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies of heritage speakers, many of whom possess incomplete knowledge of their family language, suggest that these speakers may be linguistically superior to second language (L2) learners only in phonology but not in morphosyntax. This study reexamines this claim by focusing on knowledge of clitic pronouns and word order in 24 L2 learners…

  9. The ESL Logjam: Waiting Times for Adult ESL Classes and the Impact on English Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, James Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Broad agreement exists in the society about the desirability of U.S. residents speaking English. Policymakers, community and civic leaders, and social scientists--and especially non-English speakers themselves--agree that knowledge of English is the gateway to full participation in U.S. society and its many rewards. Yet learning a language is…

  10. Structural correlates for lexical efficiency and number of languages in non-native speakers of English.

    PubMed

    Grogan, A; Parker Jones, O; Ali, N; Crinion, J; Orabona, S; Mechias, M L; Ramsden, S; Green, D W; Price, C J

    2012-06-01

    We used structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and voxel based morphometry (VBM) to investigate whether the efficiency of word processing in the non-native language (lexical efficiency) and the number of non-native languages spoken (2+ versus 1) were related to local differences in the brain structure of bilingual and multilingual speakers. We dissociate two different correlates for non-native language processing. Firstly, multilinguals who spoke 2 or more non-native languages had higher grey matter density in the right posterior supramarginal gyrus compared to bilinguals who only spoke one non-native language. This is interpreted in relation to previous studies that have shown that grey matter density in this region is related to the number of words learnt in bilinguals relative to monolinguals and in monolingual adolescents with high versus low vocabulary. Our second result was that, in bilinguals, grey matter density in the left pars opercularis was positively related to lexical efficiency in second language use, as measured by the speed and accuracy of lexical decisions and the number of words produced in a timed verbal fluency task. Grey matter in the same region was also negatively related to the age at which the second language was acquired. This is interpreted in terms of previous findings that associated the left pars opercularis with phonetic expertise in the native language.

  11. Processing of Tense Morphology and Filler-Gap Dependencies by Chinese Second Language Speakers of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Zhiyin Renee

    2014-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate in the field of Second Language Acquisition concerning whether a fundamental difference exists between the native language (L1) and adult second language (L2) online processing of syntax and morpho-syntax. The Shallow Structure Hypothesis (SSH) (Clahsen and Felser, 2006a, b) states that L2 online parsing is qualitatively…

  12. Taking Limited English Proficient Adults into Account in the Federal Adult Education Funding Formula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capps, Randy; Fix, Michael; McHugh, Margie; Lin, Serena Yi-Ying

    2009-01-01

    This new report by Migration Policy Institute's (MPI's) National Center on Immigrant Integration Policy examines the funding formula used to distribute Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Title II federal funds for adult education, literacy, and English as a Second Language instruction. Though all adults with limited English proficiency (LEP) are…

  13. Maryland Adult English as a Second Language Program Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore. Adult Continuing Education Section.

    This document is an official statement of the State of Maryland, outlining in detail the state's adult English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) program standards. The standards are not specific instructional standards, but rather overall guidelines for identifying and improving major components of quality adult ESL programs. The document has three…

  14. A language-familiarity effect for speaker discrimination without comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, David; Giordano, Bruno L.; Caldara, Roberto; Belin, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    The influence of language familiarity upon speaker identification is well established, to such an extent that it has been argued that “Human voice recognition depends on language ability” [Perrachione TK, Del Tufo SN, Gabrieli JDE (2011) Science 333(6042):595]. However, 7-mo-old infants discriminate speakers of their mother tongue better than they do foreign speakers [Johnson EK, Westrek E, Nazzi T, Cutler A (2011) Dev Sci 14(5):1002–1011] despite their limited speech comprehension abilities, suggesting that speaker discrimination may rely on familiarity with the sound structure of one’s native language rather than the ability to comprehend speech. To test this hypothesis, we asked Chinese and English adult participants to rate speaker dissimilarity in pairs of sentences in English or Mandarin that were first time-reversed to render them unintelligible. Even in these conditions a language-familiarity effect was observed: Both Chinese and English listeners rated pairs of native-language speakers as more dissimilar than foreign-language speakers, despite their inability to understand the material. Our data indicate that the language familiarity effect is not based on comprehension but rather on familiarity with the phonology of one’s native language. This effect may stem from a mechanism analogous to the “other-race” effect in face recognition. PMID:25201950

  15. Effects of Speech Practice on Fast Mapping in Monolingual and Bilingual Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kan, Pui Fong; Sadagopan, Neeraja; Janich, Lauren; Andrade, Marixa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines the effects of the levels of speech practice on fast mapping in monolingual and bilingual speakers. Method: Participants were 30 English-speaking monolingual and 30 Spanish-English bilingual young adults. Each participant was randomly assigned to 1 of 3 practice conditions prior to the fast-mapping task: (a) intensive…

  16. Exploring Non-Native English Speaker Teachers' Classroom Language Use in South Korean Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabbidge, Michael; Chappell, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The teaching of English as a foreign language in South Korean public schools has seen the implementation of a number of new innovations. One such innovation, the teaching of English through English, dubbed TETE, is a government-initiated policy that requires public schools to teach English by only using English. Nevertheless, studies reveal that…

  17. Sociolinguistic Competence in the Complimenting Act of Native Chinese and American English Speakers: A Mirror of Cultural Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Ming-chung

    2005-01-01

    The present study examines sociolinguistic features of a particular speech act, paying compliments, by comparing and contrasting native Chinese and native American speakers' performances. By focusing on a relatively understudied speaker group such as the Chinese, typically regarded as having rules of speaking and social norms very different from…

  18. Assessing the Literacy Skills of Adult Immigrants and Adult English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wrigley, Heide Spruck; Chen, Jing; White, Sheida; Soroui, Jaleh

    2009-01-01

    This chapter examines the characteristics and performance of adult immigrants and adult English language learners on the National Assessment of Adult Literacy. These factors are related to key social outcomes such as involvement in the labor force, income, and welfare participation, and the data reported can be used in making decisions about…

  19. Managing Programs for Adults Learning English. CAELA Network Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Amber Gallup; Burt, Miriam; Peyton, Joy Kreeft; Ueland, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    Programs for adults learning English vary widely in size and scope. Some are large, multilevel programs, such as the Arlington Education and Employment Program (REEP) in Virginia, which has more than 45 staff members, over 100 volunteers, and an array of student services for the 7,500 learners served annually at the program's 7 locations. Others…

  20. Tensions in Prioritizing Adult English Language Learners' Literacy Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haworth, Penny

    2014-01-01

    Despite increasing ethnic diversity globally, there has been little research into meeting the further education needs of these learners (Bidgood, Saebi, & May, 2006). In particular, the international literature provides scant understanding of how organizations go about meeting the literacy needs of adult English language learners (ELLs). It is…

  1. English as a Second Language for Adults: A Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selman, Mary; And Others

    To help improve English as a Second Language (ESL) programs for adult learners, this curriculum guide provides informative materials for the teacher and 30 sections of lessons suitable for adaptation by the teacher. Teacher information includes materials on language teaching and learning, use of the guide, needs assessment, adapting lesson plans,…

  2. Volunteer English as a Second Language Instructional Program for Non-English Speaking Adults. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catholic Social Services, Harrisburg, PA.

    The primary goal of a multi-purpose project was to utilize both Literacy Volunteers of America (LVA) and Laubach Literacy Action (LLA) in training volunteers to teach English to refugees. Catholic Social Services trained 163 volunteers who were placed in adult basic education (ABE) classes, small group instruction settings, and one-to-one tutoring…

  3. L1-Spanish Speakers' Acquisition of the English /i/-/I/ Contrast II: Perception of Vowel Inherent Spectral Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Geoffrey Stewart

    2009-01-01

    L1-Spanish learners of English have been reported to distinguish English /i/ and /I/ on the basis of duration cues, whereas L1-English listeners primarily use spectral cues. Morrison (2008a) hypothesized that duration-based perception is a secondary developmental stage that emerges from an initial stage of multidimensional-category-goodness…

  4. Transforming Passive Listeners into Active Speakers: A Study with Portuguese Undergraduates in "English for the Social Sciences"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amorim, Rita M.

    2013-01-01

    In the present context of English as a Lingua Franca (ELF) or English as International Language (EIL), it has become extremely relevant to maximize speaking opportunities in the English as a Foreign Language (EFL) classroom which aim at developing fluency and real-life communication skills. University students in Portugal need to practice…

  5. The relative degree of difficulty of L2 Spanish /d, t/, trill, and tap by L1 English speakers: Auditory and acoustic methods of defining pronunciation accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltmunson, Jeremy C.

    2005-07-01

    This study has investigated the L2 acquisition of Spanish word-medial /d, t, r, (fish hook)/, word-initial /r/, and onset cluster /(fish hook)/. Two similar experiments were designed to address the relative degree of difficulty of the word-medial contrasts, as well as the effect of word-position on /r/ and /(fish hook)/ accuracy scores. In addition, the effect of vowel height on the production of [r] and the L2 emergence of the svarabhakti vowel in onset cluster /(fish hook)/ were investigated. Participants included 34 Ll English speakers from a range of L2 Spanish levels who were recorded in multiple sessions across a 6-month or 2-month period. The criteria for assessing segment accuracy was based on auditory and acoustic features found in productions by native Spanish speakers. In order to be scored as accurate, the L2 productions had to evidence both the auditory and acoustic features found in native speaker productions. L2 participant scores for each target were normalized in order to account for the variation of features found across native speaker productions. The results showed that word-medial accuracy scores followed two significant rankings (from lowest to highest): /r <= d <= (fish hook) <= t/ and /r <= (fish hook) <= d <= t/; however, when scores for /t/ included a voice onset time criterion, only the ranking /r <= (fish hook) <= d <= t/ was significant. These results suggest that /r/ is most difficult for learners while /t/ is least difficult, although individual variation was found. Regarding /r/, there was a strong effect of word position and vowel height on accuracy scores. For productions of /(fish hook)/, there was a strong effect of syllable position on accuracy scores. Acoustic analyses of taps in onset cluster revealed that only the experienced L2 Spanish participants demonstrated svarabhakti vowel emergence with native-like performance, suggesting that its emergence occurs relatively late in L2 acquisition.

  6. Dominant Language Transfer in Spanish Heritage Speakers and Second Language Learners in the Interpretation of Definite Articles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montrul, Silvina; Ionin, Tania

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates dominant language transfer (from English) in adult Spanish second language (L2) learners and Spanish heritage speakers. We focus on contrasting properties of English and Spanish definite articles with respect to generic reference ("Elephants have ivory tusks" vs. "Los elefantes tienen colmillos de marfil") and inalienable…

  7. The Effects of Fundamental Frequency Level on Voice Onset Time in Normal Adult Male Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrea, Christopher R.; Morris, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of fundamental frequency (F[0]) on stop consonant voice onset time (VOT). VOT was measured from the recordings of 56 young men reading phrases containing all 6 English voiced and voiceless stops in word-initial position across high-, medium-, and low-F[0] levels. Separate analyses of variance for…

  8. Effect of Training Japanese L1 Speakers in the Production of American English /r/ Using Spectrographic Visual Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patten, Iomi; Edmonds, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    The present study examines the effects of training native Japanese speakers in the production of American /r/ using spectrographic visual feedback. Within a modified single-subject design, two native Japanese participants produced single words containing /r/ in a variety of positions while viewing live spectrographic feedback with the aim of…

  9. Speech dynamics are coded in the left motor cortex in fluent speakers but not in adults who stutter

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, T. N. Linh; Neef, Andreas; Paulus, Walter; Sommer, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The precise excitability regulation of neuronal circuits in the primary motor cortex is central to the successful and fluent production of speech. Our question was whether the involuntary execution of undesirable movements, e.g. stuttering, is linked to an insufficient excitability tuning of neural populations in the orofacial region of the primary motor cortex. We determined the speech-related time course of excitability modulation in the left and right primary motor tongue representation. Thirteen fluent speakers (four females, nine males; aged 23–44) and 13 adults who stutter (four females, nine males, aged 21–55) were asked to build verbs with the verbal prefix ‘auf’. Single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation was applied over the primary motor cortex during the transition phase between a fixed labiodental articulatory configuration and immediately following articulatory configurations, at different latencies after transition onset. Bilateral electromyography was recorded from self-adhesive electrodes placed on the surface of the tongue. Off-line, we extracted the motor evoked potential amplitudes and normalized these amplitudes to the individual baseline excitability during the fixed configuration. Fluent speakers demonstrated a prominent left hemisphere increase of motor cortex excitability in the transition phase (P = 0.009). In contrast, the excitability of the right primary motor tongue representation was unchanged. Interestingly, adults afflicted with stuttering revealed a lack of left-hemisphere facilitation. Moreover, the magnitude of facilitation was negatively correlated with stuttering frequency. Although orofacial midline muscles are bilaterally innervated from corticobulbar projections of both hemispheres, our results indicate that speech motor plans are controlled primarily in the left primary speech motor cortex. This speech motor planning-related asymmetry towards the left orofacial motor cortex is missing in stuttering. Moreover, a

  10. Speech dynamics are coded in the left motor cortex in fluent speakers but not in adults who stutter.

    PubMed

    Neef, Nicole E; Hoang, T N Linh; Neef, Andreas; Paulus, Walter; Sommer, Martin

    2015-03-01

    The precise excitability regulation of neuronal circuits in the primary motor cortex is central to the successful and fluent production of speech. Our question was whether the involuntary execution of undesirable movements, e.g. stuttering, is linked to an insufficient excitability tuning of neural populations in the orofacial region of the primary motor cortex. We determined the speech-related time course of excitability modulation in the left and right primary motor tongue representation. Thirteen fluent speakers (four females, nine males; aged 23-44) and 13 adults who stutter (four females, nine males, aged 21-55) were asked to build verbs with the verbal prefix 'auf'. Single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation was applied over the primary motor cortex during the transition phase between a fixed labiodental articulatory configuration and immediately following articulatory configurations, at different latencies after transition onset. Bilateral electromyography was recorded from self-adhesive electrodes placed on the surface of the tongue. Off-line, we extracted the motor evoked potential amplitudes and normalized these amplitudes to the individual baseline excitability during the fixed configuration. Fluent speakers demonstrated a prominent left hemisphere increase of motor cortex excitability in the transition phase (P = 0.009). In contrast, the excitability of the right primary motor tongue representation was unchanged. Interestingly, adults afflicted with stuttering revealed a lack of left-hemisphere facilitation. Moreover, the magnitude of facilitation was negatively correlated with stuttering frequency. Although orofacial midline muscles are bilaterally innervated from corticobulbar projections of both hemispheres, our results indicate that speech motor plans are controlled primarily in the left primary speech motor cortex. This speech motor planning-related asymmetry towards the left orofacial motor cortex is missing in stuttering. Moreover, a negative

  11. Implementing Training in Portuguese for Speakers of Other Languages in Portugal: The Case of Adult Immigrants with Little or No Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matias, Ana Raquel; Oliveira, Nuno; Ortiz, Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    Courses in Portuguese for Speakers of Other Languages, in particular for adult immigrants, have been steadily expanding in Portugal over the last 15 years. These programmes aim to promote educational and labour market integration, access to Portuguese nationality, and cognitive development. This paper argues that official Portuguese learning…

  12. The interlanguage speech intelligibility benefit for native speakers of Mandarin: Production and perception of English word-final voicing contrasts

    PubMed Central

    Hayes-Harb, Rachel; Smith, Bruce L.; Bent, Tessa; Bradlow, Ann R.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the intelligibility of native and Mandarin-accented English speech for native English and native Mandarin listeners. The word-final voicing contrast was considered (as in minimal pairs such as `cub' and `cup') in a forced-choice word identification task. For these particular talkers and listeners, there was evidence of an interlanguage speech intelligibility benefit for listeners (i.e., native Mandarin listeners were more accurate than native English listeners at identifying Mandarin-accented English words). However, there was no evidence of an interlanguage speech intelligibility benefit for talkers (i.e., native Mandarin listeners did not find Mandarin-accented English speech more intelligible than native English speech). When listener and talker phonological proficiency (operationalized as accentedness) was taken into account, it was found that the interlanguage speech intelligibility benefit for listeners held only for the low phonological proficiency listeners and low phonological proficiency speech. The intelligibility data were also considered in relation to various temporal-acoustic properties of native English and Mandarin-accented English speech in effort to better understand the properties of speech that may contribute to the interlanguage speech intelligibility benefit. PMID:19606271

  13. The Production of Referring Expressions in Oral Narratives of Chinese-English Bilingual Speakers and Monolingual Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Liang; Lei, Jianghua

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluates the extent to which the production of referring expressions such as noun phrases and pronouns to fulfill various discourse functions in narratives of Chinese-English bilingual children matches that of their monolingual peers in each of the two languages. Spoken narratives in English and Chinese were elicited from 30 9-year-old…

  14. Monitoring for Equality? Asylum Seekers and Refugees' Retention and Achievement in English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillimore, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    Interest in the integration of refugees has grown with the increase in numbers of asylum seekers dispersed across the UK. The ability to communicate effectively in English is seen as the key priority in facilitating integration, while a lack of English language is seen as one of the major barriers to refugee employment. Some 267 million British…

  15. Inventing Culturally Relevant Pedagogy in Two Fourth/Fifth-Grade Combination Classrooms: Diversity and Diglossia among Black English Speakers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulentic, Margaret-Mary Martine

    When educators lack the knowledge, understanding and acceptance of their students' language and culture, especially when it differs from their own, a huge mismatch can and often does occur between school and home. What happens to African American children who are raised speaking Black English but schooled in standard English? How do teachers help…

  16. Perception of American English Dark /l/ by Normally Hearing Young Adult Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roussel, Nancye; Oxley, Judith

    2010-01-01

    This perceptual study describes changes in how listeners perceive VCV elements within successive truncations taken from an iambic phrase containing l (e.g. "a leaf", or "a load") spoken by four male speakers of General American English. Evidence of the respective roles of dorsal gestural affiliation between l and the reduced vowel, (V[subscript…

  17. Performance of bilingual speakers on the English and Spanish versions of the Hearing in Noise Test (HINT).

    PubMed

    Weiss, Deborah; Dempsey, James J

    2008-01-01

    This study compared the performance of bilingual participants on the English and Spanish versions of the Hearing in Noise Test (HINT). The participants were divided into an early bilingual (EB) group and a late bilingual (LB) group based on age of second-language acquisition. All participants acquired Spanish as their first language (L1) and English as a second language (L2). Care was taken to ensure that all participants demonstrated at least a "good competence level" for self-rated speaking, understanding, reading, and writing skills in both English and Spanish. Results revealed superior performance on the Spanish HINT versus the English HINT in both quiet and in noise for both groups of participants. Significant differences in performance were noted for the EB versus the LB participants. A number of possible explanations for superior performance in L1 are provided, and implications for educating students in their L2 are discussed. PMID:18637406

  18. Performance of bilingual speakers on the English and Spanish versions of the Hearing in Noise Test (HINT).

    PubMed

    Weiss, Deborah; Dempsey, James J

    2008-01-01

    This study compared the performance of bilingual participants on the English and Spanish versions of the Hearing in Noise Test (HINT). The participants were divided into an early bilingual (EB) group and a late bilingual (LB) group based on age of second-language acquisition. All participants acquired Spanish as their first language (L1) and English as a second language (L2). Care was taken to ensure that all participants demonstrated at least a "good competence level" for self-rated speaking, understanding, reading, and writing skills in both English and Spanish. Results revealed superior performance on the Spanish HINT versus the English HINT in both quiet and in noise for both groups of participants. Significant differences in performance were noted for the EB versus the LB participants. A number of possible explanations for superior performance in L1 are provided, and implications for educating students in their L2 are discussed.

  19. Adult Speakers' Tongue-Palate Contact Patterns for Bilabial Stops within Complex Clusters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zharkova, Natalia; Schaeffler, Sonja; Gibbon, Fiona E.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies using Electropalatography (EPG) have shown that individuals with speech disorders sometimes produce articulation errors that affect bilabial targets, but currently there is limited normative data available. In this study, EPG and acoustic data were recorded during complex word final sps clusters spoken by 20 normal adults. A total…

  20. Language Key to Learning: Selected Papers from the Annual State Convention of the Illinois Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages/Bilingual Education (12th, 1984). Volume V.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, David J., Ed.; Terdy, Dennis, Ed.

    Selected papers from the state conference of the Illinois Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages include two plenary session presentations and six concurrent session presentations. The plenary session presentations are "Who's In Charge Here?" by Jesan Handscombe and "So What Do You Do In There Anyway?" by Dennis Terdy. The concurrent…

  1. A Normative-Speaker Validation Study of Two Indices Developed to Quantify Tongue Dorsum Activity from Midsagittal Tongue Shapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zharkova, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    This study reported adult scores on two measures of tongue shape, based on midsagittal tongue shape data from ultrasound imaging. One of the measures quantified the extent of tongue dorsum excursion, and the other measure represented the place of maximal excursion. Data from six adult speakers of Scottish Standard English without speech disorders…

  2. Rasch techniques for detecting bias in performance assessments: an example comparing the performance of native and non-native speakers on a test of academic English.

    PubMed

    Elder, Catherine; McNamara, Tim; Congdon, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The use of common tasks and rating procedures when assessing the communicative skills of students from highly diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds poses particular measurement challenges, which have thus far received little research attention. If assessment tasks or criteria are found to function differentially for particular subpopulations within a test candidature with the same or a similar level of criterion ability, then the test is open to charges of bias in favour of one or other group. While there have been numerous studies involving dichotomous language test items (see e.g. Chen and Henning, 1985 and more recently Elder, 1996) few studies have considered the issue of bias in relation to performance based tasks which are assessed subjectively, via analytic and holistic rating scales. The paper demonstrates how Rasch analytic procedures can be applied to the investigation of item bias or differential item functioning (DIF) in both dichotomous and scalar items on a test of English for academic purposes. The data were gathered from a pilot English language test administered to a representative sample of undergraduate students (N= 139) enrolled in their first year of study at an English-medium university. The sample included native speakers of English who had completed up to 12 years of secondary schooling in their first language (L1) and immigrant students, mainly from Asian language backgrounds, with varying degrees of prior English language instruction and exposure. The purpose of the test was to diagnose the academic English needs of incoming undergraduates so that additional support could be offered to those deemed at risk of failure in their university study. Some of the tasks included in the assessment procedure involved objectively-scored items (measuring vocabulary knowledge, text-editing skills and reading and listening comprehension) whereas others (i.e. a report and an argumentative writing task) were subjectively-scored. The study models a

  3. "I Understand English but Can't Write It": The Power of Native Language Instruction for Adult English Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukes, Marguerite

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the potential of native language literacy instruction for adult immigrant English language learners who have limited formal schooling or have had interruptions in their formal education. By examining 3 programs that provide native language literacy in combination with English as a second language (ESL) instruction, this study…

  4. Hands-On English: A Periodical for Teachers and Tutors of Adult English as a Second Language, 2002-2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silliman, Anna, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    These six issues of a periodical intended for teachers and tutors of adult English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) students offer articles and features including the following: readers' comments and questions; in-class map practice ideas; songs for English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) learning; suggested films to show in class; conversation activities;…

  5. A Curriculum Guide for English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Center Programs in the Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince George's County Public Schools, Upper Marlboro, MD.

    A program and curriculum guide intended for teachers, counselors, and administrators concerned with English-as-a-second-language (ESL) instruction in Prince George's County public secondary schools is presented. The guide describes the intensive language program; academic and cultural problems often found within the school and related to the…

  6. Elementary ESOL Center Program - Intermediate Level, K-6. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL). A Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Lillian; And Others

    This elementary school, intermediate level curriculum guide for English as a second language (ESL) contains introductory sections on the program's educational objectives and philosophy, outlines for 10 units on basic elements of grammar, and an appendix. Each unit outline includes a listing of structural items, cultural concepts, lexical items,…

  7. An Annotated Guide of Available Films. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Secondary Centers. Beginning and Intermediate Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Linda; Nahmani, Lois

    This guide to films appropriate for junior and senior high school classes of English as a second language (ESL) includes general comments on the use of films in ESL instruction, notes on how to use the film guide, an outline of procedures and class activities for the presentation of films, and an annotated filmography. The films are listed in two…

  8. Elementary ESOL Center Program - Beginning Level, K-6. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL). A Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brill, Charlotte; And Others

    This elementary school, introductory level curriculum guide for English as a second language (ESL) contains information on the program's educational objectives and philosophy, outlines for 10 units on basic elements of grammar, and appendixes. Each unit outline includes a listing of structural items, cultural concepts, notes on pronunciation and…

  9. Noun and Noun Phrase Stress: A Phonetic Study of English Supplemented with an Error Analysis Using Finnish Speaker-Hearers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niemi, Jussi

    1979-01-01

    Confirms previous observations about the tonal character of English stress. Notes that Finnish listeners relied on duration as the perceptual cue for noun/noun phrase distinction (blackbird/black bird), reflecting the absence of linguistic contrasts based on an active use of the larynx in standard Finnish stress and intonation. (Author/RL)

  10. The Death of the Non-Native Speaker? English as a Lingua Franca in Business Communication: A Research Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickerson, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    The impact of globalisation in the last 20 years has led to an overwhelming increase in the use of English as the medium through which many business people get their work done. As a result, the linguistic landscape within which we now operate as researchers and teachers has changed both rapidly and beyond all recognition. In the discussion below,…

  11. A Selected Annotated Bibliography for Teaching English to Speakers of Vietnamese. Vietnamese Refugee Education Series, No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robson, Barbara, Comp.; Sutherland, Kenton, Comp.

    This annotated bibliography represents a selection of materials which are of most immediate practical relevance and utility to those concerned with the English language education at all levels of refugees from Indochina, particularly Vietnam. An effort was made to include a basic and up-to-date selection of professional materials for those with…

  12. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Response to Intervention: Comparing the Reading Achievement of ELLs and Native English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapienza, Philip Kiersten

    2012-01-01

    Teaching reading in the mainstream classroom is a challenge. This challenge is compounded when trying to meet the needs of English language learners. Recently, Response to Intervention (RTI) has been suggested as a framework for classroom teachers to use in order to meet the wide range of needs of their students. The purpose of this study was to…

  13. English Compound and Non-Compound Processing in Bilingual and Multilingual Speakers: Effects of Dominance and Sequential Multilingualism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    González Alonso, Jorge; Villegas, Julián; García Mayo, María del Pilar

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on a study investigating the relative influence of the first language and dominant language (L1) on second language (L2) and third language (L3) morpho-lexical processing. A lexical decision task compared the responses to English NV-er compounds (e.g. "taxi driver") and non-compounds provided by a group of native…

  14. Perceptual Confusions of American-English Vowels and Consonants by Native Arabic Bilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafiro, Valeriy; Levy, Erika S.; Khamis-Dakwar, Reem; Kharkhurin, Anatoliy

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the perception of American-English (AE) vowels and consonants by young adults who were either (a) early Arabic-English bilinguals whose native language was Arabic or (b) native speakers of the English dialects spoken in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), where both groups were studying. In a closed-set format, participants…

  15. Voice onset time (VOT) in Canadian French and English: Monolingual and bilingual adults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Andrea A. N.; Stoel-Gammon, Carol

    2005-04-01

    This study focused on the contrasts produced by early bilingual speakers (n=6) across their two languages in comparison with monolingual speakers (Canadian English (CE), n=5; Canadian French (CF), n=6). VOT production was measured in monosyllabic CE and CF words that began with one of four stop consonants, /p, b, t, d/ followed by one of three vowels. A total of 14-18 words for each of the four stop consonants for each language was elicited with a total number 1700 acoustically analyzed productions. The participants were tested individually in quiet rooms using a single target language throughout the session. As expected, the monolingual speakers produced a two-way contrast (statistically significant: p<0.05): for CE speakers, short-lag VOT versus long-lag VOT; for CF speakers, lead VOT versus short-lag VOT. Rather than producing a two-way contrast (e.g., lead VOT versus lag VOT) or a three-way contrast (e.g., lead VOT versus short-lag VOT versus long-lag VOT), the bilingual speakers produced a four-way contrast (statistically significant: p<0.05): long lead VOT (CF /b, d/), short lead VOT (CE /b, d/), short-lag VOT (CF /p, t/) and long-lag VOT (CE /p,t/). These results suggest that bilinguals are maintaining phonetic contrasts both within and across their two languages.

  16. Influences of Social and Style Variables on Adult Usage of African American English Features

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Holly K.; Grogger, Jeffrey T.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In this study, the authors examined the influences of selected social (gender, employment status, educational achievement level) and style variables (race of examiner, interview topic) on the production of African American English (AAE) by adults. Method Participants were 50 African American men and women, ages 20–30 years. The authors used Rapid and Anonymous Survey (RAS) methods to collect responses to questions on informal situational and formal message-oriented topics in a short interview with an unacquainted interlocutor. Results Results revealed strong systematic effects for academic achievement, but not gender or employment status. Most features were used less frequently by participants with higher educational levels, but sharp declines in the usage of 5 specific features distinguished the participants differing in educational achievement. Strong systematic style effects were found for the 2 types of questions, but not race of addressee. The features that were most commonly used across participants—copula absence, variable subject–verb agreement, and appositive pronouns—were also the features that showed the greatest style shifting. Conclusions The findings lay a foundation with mature speakers for rate-based and feature inventory methods recently shown to be informative for the study of child AAE and demonstrate the benefits of the RAS. PMID:22361105

  17. Examining English Language Learning Motivation of Adult International Learners Studying Abroad in the US

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weger, Heather D.

    2013-01-01

    The present study reports on the motivations of adult, international learners of English, studying English 20 hours a week in a US-based Intensive English Program (IEP). Though often used as participants in language acquisition studies, there are few studies of these learners' motivational profiles. In the current study, a questionnaire designed…

  18. Multilingual Speakers' Problems in Decoding in a Second Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaldor, Susan; Shell, Ruth

    Through an experiment investigating the processes used by several speakers of Asian languages to decode passages by speakers of Australian English, this paper seeks to establish and categorize the types of problems encountered by multilingual speakers when decoding the speech of monolingual speakers in one of their (the multilinguals') second…

  19. Pronunciation Lessons for Adults. Vol. 6, Asian Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles City Schools, CA. Div. of Career and Continuing Education.

    This pronunciation text is the sixth in a seven-volume series of curriculum materials for the teaching of English as a second language to adults. The lessons are designed specifically for Asian students and Spanish speakers, focusing mainly on the English sounds that are absent in the non-English languages. The lesson sequence does not reflect a…

  20. Reanalysis in Adult Heritage Language: New Evidence in Support of Attrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polinsky, Maria

    2011-01-01

    This study presents and analyzes the comprehension of relative clauses in child and adult speakers of Russian, comparing monolingual controls with Russian heritage speakers (HSs) who are English-dominant. Monolingual and bilingual children demonstrate full adultlike mastery of relative clauses. Adult HSs, however, are significantly different from…

  1. Adult Education in Continental Europe. An Annotated Bibliography of English-Language Materials. 1970-1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulich, Jindra

    A listing of English-language sources available on adult education in Europe presents 556 items covering a period of five years and supplements the bibliography Adult Education in Continental Europe: An Annotated Bibliography of English-language Materials 1945-1969. The bibliography is organized by country, with a section on Europe and a section…

  2. Spanish-English Speech Perception in Children and Adults: Developmental Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brice, Alejandro E.; Gorman, Brenda K.; Leung, Cynthia B.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the developmental trends and phonetic category formation in bilingual children and adults. Participants included 30 fluent Spanish-English bilingual children, aged 8-11, and bilingual adults, aged 18-40. All completed gating tasks that incorporated code-mixed Spanish-English stimuli. There were significant differences in…

  3. Young Adults' Linguistic Manipulation of English in Bangla in Bangladesh

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sultana, Shaila

    2014-01-01

    It is commonly assumed in the print media that bilingual young adults in Bangladesh are subjugated by the colonial legacy of English and they are "polluting" Bangla, the national language of Bangladesh, by their indiscriminate insertion of English in it. However, this ethnographic study on a group of young adults in a university in…

  4. A comparison of the codeswitching patterns of aphasic and neurologically normal bilingual speakers of English and Spanish.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, M L; Marquardt, T P; Copeland, G

    1999-02-01

    Conversational discourse samples were obtained from four aphasic and four neurologically normal Hispanic bilinguals in monolingual English, monolingual Spanish, and bilingual contexts to identify codeswitching patterns. Analysis of the samples based on the Matrix Language Frame (MLF) Model (Myers-Scotton, 1993a) revealed consistent matching of the language context by the aphasic and normal subjects. The aphasic subjects demonstrated a greater frequency of MLF constituents and codeswitching patterns not evident in the speech samples of the normal subjects. Results suggest an increased dependence on both languages for communication following neurological impairment.

  5. Effects of Negative and Positive Evidence on Adult Word Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strapp, Chehalis M.; Helmick, Augusta L.; Tonkovich, Hayley M.; Bleakney, Dana M.

    2011-01-01

    This study compared negative and positive evidence in adult word learning, predicting that adults would learn more forms following negative evidence. Ninety-two native English speakers (32 men and 60 women [M[subscript age] = 20.38 years, SD = 2.80]), learned nonsense nouns and verbs provided within English frames. Later, participants produced…

  6. Laryngeal adjustments for devoicing of /h/: A within-speaker study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Laura

    2005-09-01

    Past work has investigated cross-speaker and cross-gender differences in voicing of /h/ in English speakers. The purpose of this study was to see whether a phonetically sophisticated speaker could intentionally alter his /h/ voicing patterns, and, if so, how he would effect any changes. One adult male speaker of American English, a trained phonetician and dialectologist, produced approximately 500 repetitions of intervocalic /h/ in short carrier phrases, with differing vowel contexts and loudness levels. In the first block, the speaker produced the utterances normally (i.e., without specific instructions on /h/ production); in the second, he was explicitly asked to devoice his /h/'s. Results indicated that the incidence of devoiced /h/ increased from 2% in the first block to 69% in the second block. On average, the /h/'s in the second block were produced with higher baseline airflows, indicating more extreme laryngeal abduction. This alone did not account for the speaker's devoicing behavior, however, since the soft condition, which had the lowest peak airflows in the second block, had the most devoicing. Voice source measures will be compared between the two blocks to clarify how the speaker altered his laryngeal setting to achieve more devoicing. [Work supported by NIH.

  7. Processing advantage for emotional words in bilingual speakers.

    PubMed

    Ponari, Marta; Rodríguez-Cuadrado, Sara; Vinson, David; Fox, Neil; Costa, Albert; Vigliocco, Gabriella

    2015-10-01

    Effects of emotion on word processing are well established in monolingual speakers. However, studies that have assessed whether affective features of words undergo the same processing in a native and nonnative language have provided mixed results: Studies that have found differences between native language (L1) and second language (L2) processing attributed the difference to the fact that L2 learned late in life would not be processed affectively, because affective associations are established during childhood. Other studies suggest that adult learners show similar effects of emotional features in L1 and L2. Differences in affective processing of L2 words can be linked to age and context of learning, proficiency, language dominance, and degree of similarity between L2 and L1. Here, in a lexical decision task on tightly matched negative, positive, and neutral words, highly proficient English speakers from typologically different L1s showed the same facilitation in processing emotionally valenced words as native English speakers, regardless of their L1, the age of English acquisition, or the frequency and context of English use.

  8. Are South African Speech-Language Therapists adequately equipped to assess English Additional Language (EAL) speakers who are from an indigenous linguistic and cultural background? A profile and exploration of the current situation.

    PubMed

    Mdladlo, Thandeka; Flack, Penelope; Joubert, Robin

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the results of a survey conducted on Speech-Language Therapists (SLTs) regarding current practices in the assessment of English Additional Language (EAL) speakers in South Africa. It forms part of the rationale for a broader (PhD) study that critiques the use of assessment instruments on EAL speakers from an indigenous linguistic and cultural background. This article discusses an aspect of the broader research and presents the background, method, findings, discussion and implications of the survey. The results of this survey highlight the challenges of human and material resources to, and the dominance of English in, the profession in South Africa. The findings contribute to understanding critical factors for acquiring reliable and valid assessment results with diverse populations, particularly the implications from a cultural and linguistic perspective. PMID:27247254

  9. Processing of Compound Words by Adult Korean-English Bilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ko, In Yeong

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation study is to investigate how Korean-English bilinguals process compound words in both English and Korean. The major research question is: when Korean-English bilinguals process Korean or English compound words, what information is used to segment compound words into their constituents and, in particular, does…

  10. A Learning Curriculum: Toward Student-Driven Pedagogy in the Context of Adult English for Academic Purposes, English for Specific Purposes, and Workplace English Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ananyeva, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces the concept of a learning curriculum that places adult English as a second language (ESL) students' needs in the center and encourages the engagement of ESL learners in curriculum design. The study is based on contemporary research in the field of adult ESL program planning. It summarizes key components of a learning…

  11. Speaker Identity Supports Phonetic Category Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mani, Nivedita; Schneider, Signe

    2013-01-01

    Visual cues from the speaker's face, such as the discriminable mouth movements used to produce speech sounds, improve discrimination of these sounds by adults. The speaker's face, however, provides more information than just the mouth movements used to produce speech--it also provides a visual indexical cue of the identity of the speaker. The…

  12. A signal delection theory-based analysis of American English vowel identification and production performance by native speakers of Japanese

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambacher, Stephen; Martens, William; Kakehi, Kazuhiko

    2005-04-01

    The identification and production performance by two groups of native Japanese of the American English (AE) vowels /æ/, /a/, /squflg/, /squflg/, /squflg/ was measured before and after a six-week, identification training program. A signal detection theory (SDT) analysis of the confusion data, as measured by d', revealed that all five AE vowels were more identifiable by the experimental trained group than the control untrained group. The d' results showed that /squflg/ was less identifiable than /squflg/ in the pretest, even though the percentage identification rate for /squflg/ was slightly greater than that for /squflg/. Both groups productions of a list of CVCs, each containing one of the target AE vowels, were presented to a group of native AE listeners in a series of identification tasks. The d' results revealed that the AE listeners could more sensitively identify the experimental groups post-test vowel productions than they could the control groups. SDT analysis also clarified an additional potentially confusing result: /squflg/ was somewhat less identifiable than /squflg/, despite the fact that the percentage identification rate for /squflg/ was higher. Overall, the SDT-based analysis served to change the pattern of results observed for L2 vowel identification and influenced the interpretation of the data.

  13. ESOL and the Adult Learner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regan, Timothy F.

    Problems of adult basic education in the United States, symptomatic of the connection between poverty, poor education, and unemployment, have forged for the disadvantaged adult most of the links in the unbreakable chain of deprivation, frustration, and despair. The problem of ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) instruction is…

  14. Imperfect Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulcahy, Betty

    1975-01-01

    Examines the art of professional verse speaking and suggests the creation of standards for the training of specialized speakers. Available from: Speech and Drama, Anthony Jackman, Editor, 205 Ashby Road, Loughborough, Leics LE11 3AD. Subscription Rates: non-members (USA) $6.00 p.a.; singles $2.50 surface post free. (MH)

  15. Making Teaching Lexis and Structures to Adult EFL Learners More Effective through Creating a Learning Community and Fostering Some Specific Learning Skills: A Curriculum for a Short-Term Development Course for Non-Native Speaker EFL Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klyevanov, Oleksandr

    This paper is an attempt to design a curriculum for a short-term development course for a non-native speaker English-as-a-foreign-language (EFL) teachers. The purpose is to share experiences in the effective teaching of lexis and structures; to make its participants aware of the importance of such necessities and creating a learning community and…

  16. Sabemos y Podemos: Learning for Social Action. Adult Education Curriculum. English Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Rachel

    This adult education curriculum, part of the Aprender Es Poder (To Learn Is Power) program, explores the themes of school success for Latino children, expands the work options and improves the working conditions of Latino adults, and identifies community issues. It is meant to be a resource for English as a Second Language Literacy and adult basic…

  17. Promoting Learner Engagement when Working with Adult English Language Learners. CAELA Network Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Susan Finn

    2010-01-01

    Teachers of adults learning English often compete with many demands on learners' attention. Concerns about family, jobs, money, and transportation; fatigue; and negative past experiences with education are some of the factors that might inhibit an adult learner's full engagement in class. In a study of learner engagement in adult literacy…

  18. Anticipatory coarticulation and stability of speech in typically fluent speakers and people who stutter.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Stefan A; Maxfield, Nathan; Belmont, Alissa

    2016-01-01

    This project replicates and extends previous work on coarticulation in velar-vowel sequences in English. Coarticulatory data for 46 young adult speakers, 23 who stutter and 23 who do not stutter show coarticulatory patterns in young adults who stutter that are no different from typical young adults. Additionally, the stability of velar-vowel production is analysed in token-to-token variability found in multiple repetitions of the same velar-vowel sequence. Across participants, identical patterns of coarticulation were found between people who do and do not stutter, but decreased stability was found in velar closure production in a significant subset of people who stutter. Other people who stutter appeared no different than typical speakers. Outcomes of this study suggest that articulatory maturation in young adults who stutter is, on average, no different from typical young adults, but that some young adults who stutter could be viewed as having less stably activated articulatory sub-systems. PMID:26913792

  19. Learning Pitch Patterns in Lexical Identification by Native English-Speaking Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Patrick C. M.; Perrachione, Tyler K.

    2007-01-01

    The current study investigates the learning of nonnative suprasegmental patterns for word identification. Native English-speaking adults learned to use suprasegmentals (pitch patterns) to identify a vocabulary of six English pseudosyllables superimposed with three pitch patterns (18 words). Successful learning of the vocabulary necessarily…

  20. Use of Language Learning Strategies by Spanish Adults for Mastering Business English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judge, Jeffrey Wallace

    2010-01-01

    Research of language learning strategy (LLS) has provided insight for language learners from many international cultures since this branch of research began in the 1970s. Despite the urgent need for competence in the use of business English in Western Europe, LLS studies have not been conducted on Spanish adults who use English for business. The…

  1. English Learning Predictors of Listening and Speaking Self-Efficacy for Adult Second Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grafals, Zoraida

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold. First, this study was conducted to compare English communicative competency achievement between two different models of instruction. Adult English language learners (AELLs) participated in either the communicative task-based (CTB) or in a more traditional (MT) language instructional approach. The goal of the…

  2. Metacognitive Awareness and Strategy Use in Academic English Reading among Adult English as a Second Language (ESL) Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwai, Yuko

    2009-01-01

    This mixed method research study explored the role of metacognitive awareness in reading among adult English as a Second Language (ESL) students of various academic levels enrolled in a university in the southeastern part of the United States of America while engaged in academic reading. In addition, this study examined metacognitive reading…

  3. English That Works: Preparing Adult English Language Learners for Success in the Workforce and Community. ERIC Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Brigitte

    This report discusses efforts in adult English as a Second Language (ESL) education to link language instruction to workforce and civic skills (skills needed for successful participation in the community). It looks at the social forces that underlie these efforts (shifts in the U.S. economy, welfare reform, accountability requirements, and learner…

  4. Hands-On English: A Periodical for Teachers and Tutors of Adult English as a Second Language, 1991-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silliman, Anna, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    These 18 issues of a newsletter designed for teachers and tutors of adult English as a Second Language, represent three volumes spanning the three-year period May/June 1991 through March/April 1994. Each issue contains brief articles, editorials, and materials reviews on classroom instruction, professional trends, and special projects. Typical…

  5. Hands-On English: A Periodical for Teachers and Tutors of Adult English as a Second Language, 1999-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silliman, Anna, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This periodical is a source of practical teaching advice for adult English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) teachers and tutors since 1991. Articles and ideas are contributed by the experienced teachers and tutors among the readership. Among the topics covered in this volume are the following: tips on teaching older students, preparing students for the…

  6. Hands-On English: A Periodical for Teachers and Tutors of Adult English as a Second Language, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silliman, Anna, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    These six issues of the periodical offer teachers and tutors practical ideas for teaching English as a Second Language (ESL) to adults. The publications include such teaching activities as multilevel crossword puzzles, multilevel dictation, a grammar grab-bag, role play games, an ESL board game, and a newspaper search activity. They also offer…

  7. Speaker independent acoustic-to-articulatory inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, An

    Acoustic-to-articulatory inversion, the determination of articulatory parameters from acoustic signals, is a difficult but important problem for many speech processing applications, such as automatic speech recognition (ASR) and computer aided pronunciation training (CAPT). In recent years, several approaches have been successfully implemented for speaker dependent models with parallel acoustic and kinematic training data. However, in many practical applications inversion is needed for new speakers for whom no articulatory data is available. In order to address this problem, this dissertation introduces a novel speaker adaptation approach called Parallel Reference Speaker Weighting (PRSW), based on parallel acoustic and articulatory Hidden Markov Models (HMM). This approach uses a robust normalized articulatory space and palate referenced articulatory features combined with speaker-weighted adaptation to form an inversion mapping for new speakers that can accurately estimate articulatory trajectories. The proposed PRSW method is evaluated on the newly collected Marquette electromagnetic articulography -- Mandarin Accented English (EMA-MAE) corpus using 20 native English speakers. Cross-speaker inversion results show that given a good selection of reference speakers with consistent acoustic and articulatory patterns, the PRSW approach gives good speaker independent inversion performance even without kinematic training data.

  8. The early phase of /see symbol/ production development in adult Japanese learners of English.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kazuya; Munro, Murray J

    2014-12-01

    Although previous research indicates that Japanese speakers' second language (L2) perception and production of English /see symbol/ may improve with increased L2 experience, relatively little is known about the fine phonetic details of their /see symbol/ productions, especially during the early phase of L2 speech learning. This cross-sectional study examined acoustic properties of word-initial /see symbol/ from 60 Japanese learners with a length of residence of between one month and one year in Canada. Their performance was compared to that of 15 native speakers of English and 15 low-proficiency Japanese learners of English. Formant frequencies (F2 and F3) and F1 transition durations were evaluated under three task conditions--word reading, sentence reading, and timed picture description. Learners with as little as two to three months of residence demonstrated target-like F2 frequencies. In addition, increased LOR was predictive of more target-like transition durations. Although the learners showed some improvement in F3 as a function of LOR, they did so mainly at a controlled level of speech production. The findings suggest that during the early phase of L2 segmental development, production accuracy is task-dependent and is influenced by the availability of L1 phonetic cues for redeployment in L2.

  9. Adults Learning Together. Resources for Staff Development with an Orientation toward Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toner, Helena; Burrichter, Art

    This guide contains ideas and resources for adult education. It provides practical suggestions and specific guidance in five areas of adult education: adult basic education, high school completion/general education development, English for speakers of other languages, exceptional adult basic education, and the elderly. The guide focuses on the…

  10. Native Language Effects on Spelling in English as a Foreign Language: A Time-Course Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dich, Nadya; Pedersen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    The study explores first language (L1) influences on the mechanisms of spelling in English as a foreign language (EFL). We hypothesized that the transparency of L1 orthography influences (a) the amount of hesitation associated with spelling irregular English words, and (b) the size of units EFL spellers operate. Participants were adult speakers of…

  11. Using Videos with Adult English Language Learners. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burt, Miriam

    Videos are a powerful tool in helping English language learners improve their language skills. They provide the learner with content, context, and language, and will play an increasing role in both classroom English-as-a-Second-Language instruction and self-study. Regardless of the quality and sophistication of videos, whether they are in use in a…

  12. 30 Is the New 20: Emerging Adult Perspectives on Success in English Developmental Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston-Borja, Nadine Vanessa

    2011-01-01

    This study examined aspects of emerging adulthood that contribute to success in English developmental courses. The research approach included qualitative interviews with a collective case study of 12 emerging adults between the ages of 18-25 who successfully completed EN085 and EN085L at the University of Guam. The emerging adults shared…

  13. Motivation Management of Project-Based Learning for Business English Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xiaoqin

    2016-01-01

    The paper finds out poor engagement in business English training program prevents adult learners at College of Continuing Education of Guangdong University of Foreign Studies from improving their communication skills. PBL (Project-Based Learning) is proposed to motivate adult learners to get involved with learning a lot. Based on the perspective…

  14. Adult Education in Continental Europe: An Annotated Bibliography of English-Language Materials, 1945-1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulich, Jindra

    This annotated bibliography aims at bringing together most of the English-language materials on adult education in Continental Europe published during the 25 years since the end of the Second World War. In accord with the variety of concepts and differences of opinion on definitions of what does or does not constitute adult education, which abound…

  15. Faculty Perspectives and Needs in Supporting Adult English Learners: Linking Measurement to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Jane; Lentini, Jennifer; Molloy, Hillary; Steinberg, Jonathan; Holtzman, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Results from a survey of 227 adult English learner (EL) faculty in community and technical colleges in the United States reveal a clear desire to better serve adult ELs, but a lack of resources specifically designed to do so. Faculty want and need more resources to support the teaching and learning process, in the form of thoughtful assessments,…

  16. Reaching a Culturally Diverse Immigrant Population of Adult English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Joan; Owen, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Culturally Responsive Teaching (CRT) is a framework to help adult English as a second language (ESL) educators renovate their practices into effective, culturally responsive programs, readily accessible to adult learners. Four CRT strategies that can be used include (a) validation through caring, (b) valuing cultural experiences, (c) creating a…

  17. Effect of Speaker Age on Speech Recognition and Perceived Listening Effort in Older Adults with Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAuliffe, Megan J.; Wilding, Phillipa J.; Rickard, Natalie A.; O'Beirne, Greg A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Older adults exhibit difficulty understanding speech that has been experimentally degraded. Age-related changes to the speech mechanism lead to natural degradations in signal quality. We tested the hypothesis that older adults with hearing loss would exhibit declines in speech recognition when listening to the speech of older adults,…

  18. Nonnative Speaker Teachers of Spanish: Insights from Novice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Amy S.; Fioramonte, Amy

    2012-01-01

    A sizable body of literature has been established surrounding native speaker teachers versus nonnative speaker teachers of English. Presently, a paucity of research exists related to teachers working with languages other than English. In an attempt to fill this research gap, this qualitative research study presents the experiences of novice…

  19. The Nonstandard Speaker and "Standard" Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, William H.

    Before teachers can decide how to teach writing to nonstandard dialect speakers, they should determine whether college students can in fact learn to command a second dialect (in this case, Standard English), as well as the most effective way to provide access to command of Standard English while educating the public about the values of nonstandard…

  20. The Contribution of Phonological and Orthographic Processing Skills to Adult ESL Reading: Evidence from Native Speakers of Farsi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassaji, Hossein; Geva, Esther

    1999-01-01

    Investigated the role of phonological and orthographic processing skills in second-language reading of 60 native-Farsi-speaking English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) graduate students. Three types of ESL reading variables were used: reading and comprehension, silent reading rate, and ability to recognize individual words. Efficiency in phonological…

  1. Parallel deterioration to language processing in a bilingual speaker.

    PubMed

    Druks, Judit; Weekes, Brendan Stuart

    2013-01-01

    The convergence hypothesis [Green, D. W. (2003). The neural basis of the lexicon and the grammar in L2 acquisition: The convergence hypothesis. In R. van Hout, A. Hulk, F. Kuiken, & R. Towell (Eds.), The interface between syntax and the lexicon in second language acquisition (pp. 197-218). Amsterdam: John Benjamins] assumes that the neural substrates of language representations are shared between the languages of a bilingual speaker. One prediction of this hypothesis is that neurodegenerative disease should produce parallel deterioration to lexical and grammatical processing in bilingual aphasia. We tested this prediction with a late bilingual Hungarian (first language, L1)-English (second language, L2) speaker J.B. who had nonfluent progressive aphasia (NFPA). J.B. had acquired L2 in adolescence but was premorbidly proficient and used English as his dominant language throughout adult life. Our investigations showed comparable deterioration to lexical and grammatical knowledge in both languages during a one-year period. Parallel deterioration to language processing in a bilingual speaker with NFPA challenges the assumption that L1 and L2 rely on different brain mechanisms as assumed in some theories of bilingual language processing [Ullman, M. T. (2001). The neural basis of lexicon and grammar in first and second language: The declarative/procedural model. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, 4(1), 105-122]. PMID:24527801

  2. Parallel deterioration to language processing in a bilingual speaker.

    PubMed

    Druks, Judit; Weekes, Brendan Stuart

    2013-01-01

    The convergence hypothesis [Green, D. W. (2003). The neural basis of the lexicon and the grammar in L2 acquisition: The convergence hypothesis. In R. van Hout, A. Hulk, F. Kuiken, & R. Towell (Eds.), The interface between syntax and the lexicon in second language acquisition (pp. 197-218). Amsterdam: John Benjamins] assumes that the neural substrates of language representations are shared between the languages of a bilingual speaker. One prediction of this hypothesis is that neurodegenerative disease should produce parallel deterioration to lexical and grammatical processing in bilingual aphasia. We tested this prediction with a late bilingual Hungarian (first language, L1)-English (second language, L2) speaker J.B. who had nonfluent progressive aphasia (NFPA). J.B. had acquired L2 in adolescence but was premorbidly proficient and used English as his dominant language throughout adult life. Our investigations showed comparable deterioration to lexical and grammatical knowledge in both languages during a one-year period. Parallel deterioration to language processing in a bilingual speaker with NFPA challenges the assumption that L1 and L2 rely on different brain mechanisms as assumed in some theories of bilingual language processing [Ullman, M. T. (2001). The neural basis of lexicon and grammar in first and second language: The declarative/procedural model. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, 4(1), 105-122].

  3. Women and Adult Literacy. Adult Education Newsletter, Volume 17 Number 1. Special Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TESOL Adult Education Newsletter, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Articles in this special issue of the newsletter of the Adult Education Interest Section of Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) address the following topics related to women and adult literacy: (1) dealing with failures in tutoring (E. Radick); (2) color as a key to teaching literacy (J. Langelier); (3) a preschool home…

  4. A University Program Provides Services to Young Adults of Severe Handicaps and Autism Who Are of Limited English Proficiency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duran, Elva

    Approximately 15 autistic and severely handicapped limited English or non-English proficient adults, 22 to 35 years old, attend 8 hours of classes a day at the University of Texas at El Paso. The students learn independent living skills, vocational, leisure, and social skills with instruction in both Spanish and English. Parent interviews assist…

  5. Politeness Strategies in the Workplace: Which Experiences Help Japanese Businessmen Acquire American English Native-like Strategies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakajima, Yuko

    1997-01-01

    A study investigated which experiences helped Japanese learners of English as a second language acquire native-like politeness strategies and how Japanese businessmen perceive the relationship between degrees of indirectness and politeness in Japanese and in English. Subjects were 22 adult males, including 17 native speakers of Japanese working…

  6. Representation and Embodiment of Meaning in L2 Communication: Motion Events in the Speech and Gesture of Advanced L2 Korean and L2 English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Soojung; Lantolf, James P.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the interface between speech and gesture in second language (L2) narration within Slobin's (2003) thinking-for-speaking (TFS) framework as well as with respect to McNeill's (1992, 2005) growth point (GP) hypothesis. Specifically, our interest is in whether speakers shift from a first language (L1) to a L2 TFS pattern as…

  7. Comparing English Vocabulary in a Spoken Learner Corpus with a Native Speaker Corpus: Pedagogical Implications Arising from an Empirical Study in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shirato, Junko; Stapleton, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Insights from corpus linguistics have come to be seen as having a significant impact in second language pedagogy. Learner corpora, or collections of texts spoken or written by non-native speakers (NNS) of a language, are now being used for the purposes of enhancing language teaching. Specifically, by comparing the corpus of NNS with native…

  8. Adult Education in Continental Europe: An Annotated Bibliography of English-language Materials l980-1982. Monographs on Comparative and Area Studies in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulich, Jindra, Comp.

    This bibliography contains 682 listings covering English language materials on adult education in Europe published during 1980-82. Materials were chosen in accord with a broad definition of adult education that includes vocational education for adults; training in business and industry; adult secondary and postsecondary study; activities of…

  9. The ELAA 2 Citizen Science Project: The Case for Science, Equity, and Critical Thinking in Adult English Language Instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basham, M.

    2012-08-01

    This article summarizes a paper presented at the recent ASP conference Connecting People to Science in Baltimore 2011. This action research study currently in progress aims to explore the impact of integrating science into English language instruction (English Language Acquisition for Adults, or ELLA) serving largely Hispanic immigrants at an adult learning center based in Phoenix, Arizona.

  10. Evaluating the spectral distinction between sibilant fricatives through a speaker-centered approach

    PubMed Central

    Haley, Katarina L.; Seelinger, Elizabeth; Mandulak, Kerry Callahan; Zajac, David J.

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the feasibility of using the spectral mean and/or spectral skewness to distinguish between alveolar and palato-alveolar fricatives produced by individual adult speakers of English. Five male and five female speaker participants produced 100 CVC words with an initial consonant /s/ or /ʃ/. The spectral mean and skewness were derived every 10 milliseconds throughout the fricative segments and plotted for all productions. Distinctions were examined for each speaker through visual inspection of these time history plots and statistical comparisons were completed for analysis windows centered 50 ms after the onset of the fricative segment. The results showed significant differences between the alveolar and palato-alveolar fricatives for both the mean and skewness values. However, there was considerable inter-speaker overlap, limiting the utility of the measures to evaluate the adequacy of the phonetic distinction. When the focus shifted to individual speakers rather than average group performance, only the spectral mean distinguished consistently between the two phonetic categories. The robustness of the distinction suggests that intra-speaker overlap in spectral mean between prevocalic /s/ and /ʃ/ targets may be indicative of abnormal fricative production and a useful measure for clinical applications. PMID:21278849

  11. South African English: A New Voice of Freedom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatsuki, Donna Hurst

    In this paper, a case study describes the lexis, phonology, grammar, and syntax of a speaker of South African English (SAE) and shows how these elements differ from those of a General American English (GAE) speaker. The subject was a 32-year-old female speaker of SAE, and that although she is a bilingual speaker of English and Afrikaans, English…

  12. English Teaching Profile: Cameroon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Council, London (England). English Language and Literature Div.

    A description of the role and status of the English language in Cameroon begins with an overview of the distribution of English speakers and the common uses of English. Subsequent sections outline (1) the use and status of English within the educational system at all levels, including teacher education; (2) the availability of English language…

  13. English Teaching Profile: Iraq.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Council, London (England). English Language and Literature Div.

    A description of the role and status of the English language in Iraq begins with an overview of the distribution of English speakers and the most common uses of English. Subsequent sections outline: (1) the use and status of English within the educational system at all levels, including teacher education; (2) the availability of English language…

  14. The Role of Oral Language Skills in Reading and Listening Comprehension of Text: A Comparison of Monolingual (L1) and Bilingual (L2) Speakers of English Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babayigit, Selma

    2014-01-01

    The study examined the role of oral language skills in reading comprehension and listening comprehension levels of 125 monolingual (L1) and bilingual (L2) English-speaking learners (M = 121.5 months, SD = 4.65) in England. All testing was conducted in English. The L1 learners outperformed their L2 peers on the measures of oral language and text…

  15. Ideology, Gender Roles, and Pronominal Choice: A Sociolinguistic Analysis of the Use of English Third Person Generic Pronouns by Native Speakers of Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abudalbuh, Mujdey

    2012-01-01

    This study is a sociolinguistic investigation of the use of four English generic pronouns ("he," "she," "he or she," singular "they") by Arabic-speaking second language learners of English. This study takes a different approach to the investigation of second language (L2) acquisition and use by examining the…

  16. The L2 Acquisition of Spanish Rhotics by L1 English Speakers: The Effect of L1 Articulatory Routines and Phonetic Context for Allophonic Variation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    This article offers a fine-grained investigation of how first-language (L1) phonetics involving English rhotics affect Spanish rhotic production by second-language (L2) learners. Specifically, this study investigates how different L1 English rhotic articulatory routines (retroflex-like and bunched-like) and the phonetic context that produces…

  17. New Border Crossings for the Interaction Hypothesis: The Effects of Feedback on Gonja Speakers Learning English in a Rural School in Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherris, Ari; Burns, M. Susan

    2015-01-01

    While Ghanaians in urban and rural settings are multilingual, English is the language of Ghanaian newspapers, politicians, the courts, much of television and radio in the metropolitan centres of the country. Indeed, urban Ghanaian adolescents have expanding opportunities to use English, the only official language of Ghana, even when not in school.…

  18. Japanese adult's and children's production and perception of English fricatives: A longitudinal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Katsura; Guion, Susan; Yamada, Tsuneo; Akahane-Yamada, Reiko

    2002-05-01

    This study examined the production and perception of English fricatives by native Japanese (NJ) adults and children (16 per group, mean age=40 and 10 years), and age-matched native English (NE) adults and children (16 per group). The subjects were tested two times (T1, T2) 1 year apart. (At T1, the NJ subjects' mean length of residence in the U.S. was 0.5 year.) A picture-naming task was used to elicit the production of English words beginning with /s/ and /θ/, and intelligibility scores were obtained for both. The intelligibility scores of the NJ children but not adults improved significantly from T1 to T2. The NJ children obtained significantly lower scores than the NJ adults did at T1, but at T2 the adult-child difference was nonsignificant. The perception of /s/ and /θ/ was tested by a categorial discrimination task. Although the NJ adult's and children's scores improved from T1 to T2, the T1-T2 differences were nonsignificant. Thus, the results showed that the NJ children's production scores improved significantly from T1 to T2, while there was no significant change for the perception scores on the discrimination of /s/-/θ/. The relationship between production and perception in L2 speech learning will be discussed. [Work supported by NIH.

  19. A Psychometric Measurement Model for Adult English Language Learners: Pearson Test of English Academic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pae, Hye K.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to apply Rasch modeling to an examination of the psychometric properties of the "Pearson Test of English Academic" (PTE Academic). Analyzed were 140 test-takers' scores derived from the PTE Academic database. The mean age of the participants was 26.45 (SD = 5.82), ranging from 17 to 46. Conformity of the participants'…

  20. Language Learning Strategy Use by Colombian Adult English Language Learners: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paredes, Elsie Elena

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to describe how Colombian adult English language learners (ELL) select and use language learning strategies (LLS). This study used Oxford's (1990a) taxonomy for LLS as its theoretical framework. Semi-structured interviews and a focus group interview, were conducted, transcribed, and analyzed for 12…

  1. Does Learning Spanish Grammatical Gender Change English-Speaking Adults' Categorization of Inanimate Objects?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurinski, Elena; Sera, Maria D.

    2011-01-01

    Second language acquisition studies can contribute to the body of research on the influence of language on thought by examining cognitive change as a result of second language learning. We conducted a longitudinal study that examined how the acquisition of Spanish grammatical gender influences categorization in native English-speaking adults. We…

  2. Practices Used in English as a Second Language Classes for Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Joyce Fowlkes

    This collection of techniques used in adult English-as-a-Second-Language instruction consists of practices that complement or supplement regular instruction. These techniques have been contributed by classroom teachers, and are categorized by language proficiency level (beginning, intermediate, and advanced). The activities focus on: vocabulary…

  3. Understanding the Experiences of Adult English as a Second Language Instructors: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, Marni Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    Positioned within the social constructivist view of learning that individuals make meaning from their experiences and through their social actions and interactions, this qualitative study explores the ways in which nine instructors of underprepared adult English as a Second Language students made meaning of their classroom experiences. Through…

  4. A Taste of English: Nutrition Workbook for Adult ESL Students. Teacher's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Farmworker Opportunity Program, Arlington, VA.

    This workbook introduces basic concepts of nutrition and health to beginning adult students of English as a Second Language (ESL). The text may also be adapted for use with new readers. It is intended as a supplement to existing instructional materials. An introductory section offers teachers suggestions for use of the text and notes on the design…

  5. Comparing Reading Comprehension in Spanish and English by Adult Hispanics Entering a Two-Year College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aron, Helen

    This study compared three reading skill areas (recalling details, understanding a main idea not explicitly stated, and making inferences) in Spanish, the subjects' native language, and American English, their second language. The sample consisted of 47 adults from nine Latin American countries and Puerto Rico who were completing an intensive ESOL…

  6. Use of Technology in an Adult Intensive English Program: Benefits and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchs, Carolin; Akbar, Farah Sultana

    2013-01-01

    This exploratory study presents results of an online survey on student teachers' technology proficiencies and uses of various tools in an adult Intensive English Program (IEP) in the United States. The ultimate goal was to identify areas of improvement for teacher education programs with regard to technology-enhanced language teaching and student…

  7. Developing a Placement Test for Adults in English-Second-Language Programs in California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilyin, Donna

    This paper describes the development of the English-Second-Language Placement Test (EPT) 100-200-300, which places adult students into the first three levels of ESL classes, and discusses work done on EPT 400-500-600, an experimental test to place students in the last three levels of classes. A structured test, EPT 100-200-300 tests ability to…

  8. Learning English as Thai Adult Learners: An Insight into Experience in Using Learning Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suwanarak, Kasma

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to understand language learning strategies of Thai adult learners and factors affecting their strategy use. The participants are forty officers of General Service Division of the Council of State of Thailand, attending an English training course for developing their work potential. The data were collected through the…

  9. Stability and Change in One Adult's Second Language English Negation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauser, Eric

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on how, against a background of relatively stable patterns of second language negation, a Japanese-speaking adult learning English made use of a negative formula, "I don't know," and how, in and through interaction, analyzed it into its component parts and began using "don't" more productively.…

  10. ESL Bibliography: Materials for Teaching English as a Second Language to Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Vickie L., Ed.

    This bibliography lists instructional materials for teaching adult learners of English as a Second Language (ESL). The resources listed are print materials made available through the Free Library of Philadelphia's Reader Development Program. All are on or below the eighth grade reading level, as determined with the Gunning Fog readability formula.…

  11. Receptivity toward Immigrants in Rural Pennsylvania: Perceptions of Adult English as Second Language Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prins, Esther; Toso, Blaire Willson

    2012-01-01

    This article uses interview and questionnaire data to examine how adult English as a second language (ESL) providers in rural Pennsylvania perceive community receptivity toward immigrants and the factors they believe foster or hinder receptivity and immigrants' integration. ESL providers' depictions of local responses to immigrants ranged from…

  12. Intercultural Communicative Competence: Beliefs and Practices of Adult English as a Second Language Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickley, Celeste; Rossiter, Marian J.; Abbott, Marilyn L.

    2014-01-01

    Effective and appropriate communication is critical for the successful integration of newcomers in Canada. In this paper, we describe the intercultural communicative competence beliefs and practices of 70 adult English as a second language (ESL) instructors. Responses to an online survey indicated a strong belief in the value of integrating…

  13. Incorporating Audio Support into English Composition CAI for Adult Learners. Phase II Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mid-Continent Regional Educational Lab., Aurora, CO.

    A research and development project focused on designing a basic English writing skills curriculum for adult basic education students and implementing that curriculum in a computer-assisted, audio-supported format. Materials were designed for MS-DOS computers and consumer grade audiotape players. The project involved developing 18 computer lessons…

  14. Resource Manual for Teachers of Non-English Speaking Adults. Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alesi, Gladys E.; Brain, Joseph J.

    Designed especially for the inexperienced teacher or volunteer, the 35-page manual intends to help the teacher identify appropriate methods and materials for use with adults to whom English is a new language, particularly those who are preparing for citizenship. Prepared by professionally trained, experienced teachers, the resource manual places…

  15. Influences of Social and Style Variables on Adult Usage of African American English Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Holly K.; Grogger, Jeffrey T.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors examined the influences of selected social (gender, employment status, educational achievement level) and style variables (race of examiner, interview topic) on the production of African American English (AAE) by adults. Method: Participants were 50 African American men and women, ages 20-30 years. The authors…

  16. Authenticity in the Adult ESOL Classroom and beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Celia; Cooke, Melanie

    2009-01-01

    The debate over authenticity is a longstanding one in the teaching of English to speakers of other languages. This article revisits that debate in the context of linguistic-minority adults who, in the process of migration, experience a loss of independence and cultural capital (Bourdieu, 1986/2004). Adult migrants must develop authentic voices in…

  17. Lexically Specific Knowledge and Individual Differences in Adult Native Speakers' Processing of the English Passive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Street, James A.; Dabrowska, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    This article provides experimental evidence for the role of lexically specific representations in the processing of passive sentences and considerable education-related differences in comprehension of the passive construction. The experiment measured response time and decision accuracy of participants with high and low academic attainment using an…

  18. A Study of Culturally Responsive Teaching Practices of Adult ESOL and EAP Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, Christy M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how frequently adult education English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and English for Academic Purposes (EAP) teachers in Florida used specific culturally responsive teaching practices and how important they believed those practices were to their teaching. Using Ginsberg and Wlodkowski's…

  19. Aptitude, Phonological Memory, and Second Language Proficiency in Nonnovice Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hummel, Kirsten M.

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between aptitude, phonological memory (PM), and second language (L2) proficiency in nonnovice adult learners of English as an L2. Native speakers of French (N = 77) enrolled in a university Teaching English as a Second Language program were the participants in the study. Exploratory factor analysis revealed…

  20. Proficiency Differences in Syntactic Processing of Monolingual Native Speakers Indexed by Event-related Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Pakulak, Eric; Neville, Helen J.

    2010-01-01

    While anecdotally there appear to be differences in the way native speakers use and comprehend their native language, most empirical investigations of language processing study university students and none have studied differences in language proficiency which may be independent of resource limitations such as working memory span. We examined differences in language proficiency in adult monolingual native speakers of English using an event-related potential (ERP) paradigm. ERPs were recorded to insertion phrase structure violations in naturally spoken English sentences. Participants recruited from a wide spectrum of society were given standardized measures of English language proficiency, and two complementary ERP analyses were performed. In between-groups analyses, participants were divided, based on standardized proficiency scores, into Lower Proficiency (LP) and Higher Proficiency (HP) groups. Compared to LP participants, HP participants showed an early anterior negativity that was more focal, both spatially and temporally, and a larger and more widely distributed positivity (P600) to violations. In correlational analyses, we utilized a wide spectrum of proficiency scores to examine the degree to which individual proficiency scores correlated with individual neural responses to syntactic violations in regions and time windows identified in the between-group analyses. This approach also employed partial correlation analyses to control for possible confounding variables. These analyses provided evidence for the effects of proficiency that converged with the between-groups analyses. These results suggest that adult monolingual native speakers of English who vary in language proficiency differ in the recruitment of syntactic processes that are hypothesized to be at least in part automatic as well as of those thought to be more controlled. These results also suggest that in order to fully characterize neural organization for language in native speakers it is

  1. SPECIAL ENGLISH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English Language Services, Inc., Washington, DC.

    THIS 14-VOLUME SERIES OF TECHNICAL ENGLISH TEXTS IS DESIGNED TO PROVIDE PRACTICE IN TECHNICAL TERMINOLOGY FOR NON-NATIVE SPEAKERS OF ENGLISH. LANGUAGE FLUENCY LEVEL IS UPPER-INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED. THE VARIOUS FIELDS OF INDUSTRY WHICH THE TEXTS DEAL WITH ARE AS FOLLOWS--(1) AGRICULTURE--BOOK 1, SOILS (2) AGRICULTURE--BOOK 2, FIELD CROPS (3)…

  2. Some Observations on Navajo English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartelt, H. Guillermo

    1981-01-01

    Aspects of Navajo English are examined to illustrate how Native American English differs from standard English of native speakers. Phonological, morphological, and syntactic characteristics of Navajo English are noted. Navajo English also differs from standard English in its approach to time frameworks and tenses. It is suggested that much of the…

  3. Request Strategies: Cross-Sectional Study of Iranian EFL Learners and Australian Native Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jalilifar, Alireza

    2009-01-01

    This study was a cross-sectional investigation into the request strategies used by Iranian learners of English as a Foreign Language and Australian native speakers of English. The sample involved 96 BA and MA Persian students and 10 native speakers of English. A Discourse Completion Test (DCT) was used to generate data related to the request…

  4. Vowel production in Korean, Korean-accented English, and American English

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jimin; Weismer, Gary

    2005-09-01

    The current study compares vowel formant frequencies and durations produced by ten native speakers of Korean, those same speakers producing American English vowels, and ten native speakers of American English. The Korean speakers were chosen carefully to have a minimum of 2 years, and maximum of 5 years residence in the United States; all speakers were between the ages of 22 and 27. In addition, the native speakers of Korean were chosen, by means of a small-scale dialect-severity experiment, from a larger pool of speakers to achieve some homogeneity in their mastery of English phonetics. The full vowel systems of both languages were explored, and a rate condition was included (conversational versus fast) to test the hypothesis that the English vowel space is modified by rate differently for native speakers of Korean who produce English, versus native speakers of English. Results will be discussed in terms of language- and rate-induced adjustments of the vowel systems under study.

  5. Using Electronic Technology in Adult Literacy Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, David J.

    1999-01-01

    Students in adult literacy education, including basic and secondary education and English for speakers of other languages (ESOL), are increasingly using computers to write, find information, publish their writings, communicate by e-mail, learn basic skills, and for other purposes. In this chapter the focus is on computers, the Internet (including…

  6. Consolidation of novel word learning in native English speaking adults

    PubMed Central

    Kurdziel, Laura B. F.; Spencer, Rebecca M. C.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep has been shown to improve the retention of newly learned words. However, most methodologies have used artificial or foreign language stimuli, with learning limited to word/novel word or word/image pairs. Such stimuli differ from many word-learning scenarios in which definition strings are learned with novel words. Thus, we examined sleep's benefit on learning new words within a native language by using very low frequency words. Participants learned 45 low-frequency English words and, at subsequent recall, attempted to recall the words when given the corresponding definitions. Participants either learned in the morning with recall in the evening (wake group), or learned in the evening with recall the following morning (sleep group). Performance change across the delay was significantly better in the sleep than the wake group. Additionally, the Levenshtein Distance, a measure of correctness of the typed word compared to the target word, became significantly worse following wake, whereas sleep protected correctness of recall. Polysomnographic data from a subsample of participants suggested that REM sleep may be particularly important for this benefit. These results lend further support for sleep's function on semantic learning even for word/definition pairs within a native language. PMID:25768336

  7. A Manual for Closed Captioned Television in ESOL Instruction. Elementary and Secondary K-12 English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parks, Carolyn

    Closed-captioned videotapes and accompanying print materials are available to the Prince George's County Public Schools English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) program to help students develop their sight and meaning vocabulary, oral reading fluency, prediction skills, and ability to locate information in written texts. This manual is intended to…

  8. Synthese et methodologie des moyens de correction phonetique du "R" francais enseigne aux anglophones (Methods of Correcting the Pronunciation of the French "R" for English Speakers).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lebel, Jean-Guy

    The present work begins with a phonetic description of the acceptable French /R/ and descriptions of several allophones of English /R/ which must be avoided while learning the French. Various theories are discussed concerning the relationship between the position of the /R/ in an utterance and the difficulty students have in pronouncing it…

  9. Career Education: Learning with a Purpose. Secondary Guide-Vol. 1. Art, English, Industrial Arts, Physical Education, Science, Field Trips and Guest Speakers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Marilyn; And Others

    The guide offers a compilation of teacher developed career education materials which may be integrated with secondary level curriculum and, in some cases, complete unit or course outlines are included. Suggested activities and ideas are presented for the following five subject areas and their related units: art, English (activity suggestions for…

  10. Bilingual Metric Education Modules for Postsecondary and Adult Vocational Education. Core Units, I - V (English and Spanish).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis Associates, Inc., College Park, MD.

    Five instructional units on the metric system of weights and measures are provided in this document designed for use with bilingual (English and Spanish) students in postsecondary and adult vocational education programs. (This document, divided into Spanish and English versions, is designed to be used with three documents--CE 022 167, CE 022 168,…

  11. Adult English as a Second Language Students in the United States: Learner Characteristics, Goals, and Academic Writing Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Olga Demin

    2009-01-01

    Adult English as a second language (ESL) students learning English outside of traditional academic settings are an understudied population of second language learners. The purpose of the research reported here is to contribute to meeting the instructional needs of these students more effectively by investigating the relationships between their…

  12. ESL Idea Book: A Bibliography of Instructor-Developed Materials for Teaching English as a Second Language to Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Martha A.

    This bibliography contains annotated citations of primarily non-commercial instructional materials for adult literacy education in English as a Second Language (ESL). All are for learners at beginning to intermediate English language skill levels, and were selected for ease of use by volunteers, relevance to an urban area, overall applicability to…

  13. Chinese Attitudes towards Varieties of English: A Pre-Olympic Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Wei; Wang, Yu; Case, Rod E.

    2010-01-01

    This study reports on findings of an investigation into Chinese students' attitudes towards varieties of English before the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games. One hundred and eight college students in mainland China evaluated six English speeches by two American English speakers, two British English speakers, and two Chinese English speakers for social…

  14. Native- and Non-Native Speaking English Teachers in Vietnam: Weighing the Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walkinshaw, Ian; Duong, Oanh Thi Hoang

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines a common belief that learners of English as a foreign language prefer to learn English from native-speaker teachers rather than non-native speakers of English. 50 Vietnamese learners of English evaluated the importance of native-speakerness compared with seven qualities valued in an English language teacher: teaching…

  15. Mismatch: Globalization and Native Speaker Models of Linguistic Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgson, Kevin Michael

    2014-01-01

    Although the paradigm shift towards English as an International Language (EIL) has been generally accepted within the academic community, a valorization of native speaker norms continues to be prevalent among many non-native speakers (NNSs). Through data drawn from a qualitative questionnaire and proficiency assessment results (TOEIC), this mixed…

  16. The Denial of Ideology in Perceptions of "Nonnative Speaker" Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holliday, Adrian; Aboshiha, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    There is now general acceptance that the traditional "nonnative speaker" label for teachers of English is problematic on sociolinguistic grounds and can be the source of employment discrimination. However, there continues to be disagreement regarding how far there is a prejudice against "nonnative speaker" teachers which is deep and sustained and…

  17. Language Transference by Mentally Retarded Spanish Speakers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flaherty, Carol

    In an investigation of language transference vs. language interference, 12 trainable mentally retarded Spanish speakers (5 to 9 years old) were trained to name in English objects previously identified receptively and objects not previously identified receptively in Spanish. Results indicated no significant difference in the number of words learned…

  18. A Comparison of the Effects of Classroom and Multi-User Virtual Environments on the Perceived Speaking Anxiety of Adult Post-Secondary English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abal, Abdulaziz

    2013-01-01

    The population of English Language Learners (ELLs) globally has been increasing substantially every year. In the United States alone, adult ELLs are the fastest growing portion of learners in adult education programs (Yang, 2005). There is a significant need to improve the teaching of English to ELLs in the United States and other English-speaking…

  19. Politeness Phenomena in South African Black English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Kadt, Elizabeth

    1992-01-01

    A study investigated requests as speech acts in "Zulu English," the English of Zulu first-language speakers, seeking to explain miscommunication in interactions between Zulu- and English-speakers by pointing to pragmatic transfer as one possible cause. Data were collected by means of a series of discourse completion tests in Zulu, Zulu English,…

  20. Grammatical Gender in Adult L2 Acquisition: Relations between Lexical and Syntactic Variability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopp, Holger

    2013-01-01

    In order to identify the causes of inflectional variability in adult second-language (L2) acquisition, this study investigates lexical and syntactic aspects of gender processing in real-time L2 production and comprehension. Twenty advanced to near-native adult first language (L1) English speakers of L2 German and 20 native controls were tested in…

  1. Being a (Good) Student: Conceptions of Identity of Adult Basic Education Participants Transitioning to College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Mina

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the perceptions of identity of a category of students that has rarely been studied in the context of higher education. These are adults who have participated in GED preparation or English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) courses in Adult Basic Education (ABE) programs. A college education is increasingly necessary for…

  2. Modeling Child-Based Theoretical Reading Constructs with Struggling Adult Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nanda, Alice O.; Greenberg, Daphne; Morris, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This study examined whether measurement constructs behind reading-related tests for struggling adult readers are similar to what is known about measurement constructs for children. The sample included 371 adults reading between the third-and fifth-grade levels, including 127 men and 153 English speakers of other languages. Using measures of skills…

  3. Effects of orthographic consistency on eye movement behavior: German and English children and adults process the same words differently.

    PubMed

    Rau, Anne K; Moll, Kristina; Snowling, Margaret J; Landerl, Karin

    2015-02-01

    The current study investigated the time course of cross-linguistic differences in word recognition. We recorded eye movements of German and English children and adults while reading closely matched sentences, each including a target word manipulated for length and frequency. Results showed differential word recognition processes for both developing and skilled readers. Children of the two orthographies did not differ in terms of total word processing time, but this equal outcome was achieved quite differently. Whereas German children relied on small-unit processing early in word recognition, English children applied small-unit decoding only upon rereading-possibly when experiencing difficulties in integrating an unfamiliar word into the sentence context. Rather unexpectedly, cross-linguistic differences were also found in adults in that English adults showed longer processing times than German adults for nonwords. Thus, although orthographic consistency does play a major role in reading development, cross-linguistic differences are detectable even in skilled adult readers. PMID:25462034

  4. Effects of orthographic consistency on eye movement behavior: German and English children and adults process the same words differently.

    PubMed

    Rau, Anne K; Moll, Kristina; Snowling, Margaret J; Landerl, Karin

    2015-02-01

    The current study investigated the time course of cross-linguistic differences in word recognition. We recorded eye movements of German and English children and adults while reading closely matched sentences, each including a target word manipulated for length and frequency. Results showed differential word recognition processes for both developing and skilled readers. Children of the two orthographies did not differ in terms of total word processing time, but this equal outcome was achieved quite differently. Whereas German children relied on small-unit processing early in word recognition, English children applied small-unit decoding only upon rereading-possibly when experiencing difficulties in integrating an unfamiliar word into the sentence context. Rather unexpectedly, cross-linguistic differences were also found in adults in that English adults showed longer processing times than German adults for nonwords. Thus, although orthographic consistency does play a major role in reading development, cross-linguistic differences are detectable even in skilled adult readers.

  5. Mandarin Oral Narratives Compared with English: The Pear/Guava Stories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erbaugh, Mary S.

    1990-01-01

    Compared American English and Mandarin Chinese speakers' oral descriptions of a film that had sound but no dialogue. Results revealed that Chinese speakers provided at least as much chronological detail as and more social and moral interpretations than English speakers, although the English speakers offered more personal comments. (21 references)…

  6. Partially supervised speaker clustering.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao; Chu, Stephen Mingyu; Hasegawa-Johnson, Mark; Huang, Thomas S

    2012-05-01

    Content-based multimedia indexing, retrieval, and processing as well as multimedia databases demand the structuring of the media content (image, audio, video, text, etc.), one significant goal being to associate the identity of the content to the individual segments of the signals. In this paper, we specifically address the problem of speaker clustering, the task of assigning every speech utterance in an audio stream to its speaker. We offer a complete treatment to the idea of partially supervised speaker clustering, which refers to the use of our prior knowledge of speakers in general to assist the unsupervised speaker clustering process. By means of an independent training data set, we encode the prior knowledge at the various stages of the speaker clustering pipeline via 1) learning a speaker-discriminative acoustic feature transformation, 2) learning a universal speaker prior model, and 3) learning a discriminative speaker subspace, or equivalently, a speaker-discriminative distance metric. We study the directional scattering property of the Gaussian mixture model (GMM) mean supervector representation of utterances in the high-dimensional space, and advocate exploiting this property by using the cosine distance metric instead of the euclidean distance metric for speaker clustering in the GMM mean supervector space. We propose to perform discriminant analysis based on the cosine distance metric, which leads to a novel distance metric learning algorithm—linear spherical discriminant analysis (LSDA). We show that the proposed LSDA formulation can be systematically solved within the elegant graph embedding general dimensionality reduction framework. Our speaker clustering experiments on the GALE database clearly indicate that 1) our speaker clustering methods based on the GMM mean supervector representation and vector-based distance metrics outperform traditional speaker clustering methods based on the “bag of acoustic features” representation and statistical

  7. Thanking Responders in Cameroon English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouafeu, Yves Talla Sando

    2009-01-01

    An analysis of authentic or genuine interactions among Cameroon English speakers reveals that conversational routines in this variety of English differ a good deal from those obtained in other varieties of English, non-native varieties of English inclusive, and more specifically in native varieties of English. This paper looks at "thanking…

  8. English: History, Diversity and Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graddol, David, Ed.; And Others

    Essays examine development of the English language from Old English to the present, characteristics and use of contemporary varieties, and what the language means to speakers around the world. "English Voices" (Joan Swann) raises issues and questions about variation in English, to be addressed in later chapters. "English Manuscripts: The Emergence…

  9. Modern Greek Language: Acquisition of Morphology and Syntax by Non-Native Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreou, Georgia; Karapetsas, Anargyros; Galantomos, Ioannis

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the performance of native and non native speakers of Modern Greek language on morphology and syntax tasks. Non-native speakers of Greek whose native language was English, which is a language with strict word order and simple morphology, made more errors and answered more slowly than native speakers on morphology but not…

  10. Effects of EPG Treatment for English Consonant Contrasts on L2 Perception and Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Anna Marie

    2012-01-01

    Links between perception and production were investigated for two adult native speakers of Korean who participated in electropalatographic (EPG) treatment designed to teach phonological and articulatory contrasts between English /s/ - /[esh]/, /z/ - /[voiced palato-alveolar affricate]/, and /l/ - /[alveolar approximant]/. Participants were…

  11. Verb-Noun Collocations in Second Language Writing: A Corpus Analysis of Learners' English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laufer, Batia; Waldman, Tina

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigates the use of English verb-noun collocations in the writing of native speakers of Hebrew at three proficiency levels. For this purpose, we compiled a learner corpus that consists of about 300,000 words of argumentative and descriptive essays. For comparison purposes, we selected LOCNESS, a corpus of young adult native…

  12. Speakers of Different Languages Process the Visual World Differently

    PubMed Central

    Chabal, Sarah; Marian, Viorica

    2015-01-01

    Language and vision are highly interactive. Here we show that people activate language when they perceive the visual world, and that this language information impacts how speakers of different languages focus their attention. For example, when searching for an item (e.g., clock) in the same visual display, English and Spanish speakers look at different objects. Whereas English speakers searching for the clock also look at a cloud, Spanish speakers searching for the clock also look at a gift, because the Spanish names for gift (regalo) and clock (reloj) overlap phonologically. These different looking patterns emerge despite an absence of direct linguistic input, showing that language is automatically activated by visual scene processing. We conclude that the varying linguistic information available to speakers of different languages affects visual perception, leading to differences in how the visual world is processed. PMID:26030171

  13. Black English and Rule-Based Spelling Output.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwab, Donna

    The question of whether the Black English dialect affects the spelling performance of children who speak Black English is explored in this paper. Evidence is cited from existing research to show that Black English speakers make significantly more dialect-related errors than do non-Black English speakers. The various Black English features which…

  14. "Yes Kylie, Echidna's "Are" Almost Wombats!" Adult Responses to Young Children's Answers in Two Languages: Lebanese-Arabic and English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieschild, Verna Robertson

    1994-01-01

    Examines some aspects of English and Lebanese-Arabic adult responses to child answers, exploring the way the use of preferred communication strategies reflects culturally based assumptions about learning and guiding learning. The article argues that adults who regularly deal with young children develop preferred interactive strategies deriving…

  15. A multisite community-based health literacy intervention for Spanish speakers.

    PubMed

    Soto Mas, F; Cordova, C; Murrietta, A; Jacobson, H E; Ronquillo, F; Helitzer, D

    2015-06-01

    The National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy emphasizes the importance of community-based opportunities for education, such as English as a second language (ESL) programs. It recommends collaborations among the adult literacy and ESL communities. However, limited attention has been given to researching the effectiveness of community-based interventions that combine ESL and health literacy. The purpose of this study was to explore the feasibility of using different community settings for improving health literacy among adult Spanish speakers through an English language program. The study used a pre-experimental, single arm pretest-posttest design, and implemented the Health Literacy and ESL Curriculum. A collaborative was established between the community and university researchers. Participants were recruited at three distinctive sites. Health literacy was assessed using the Spanish version of the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (TOFHLA). Analysis included descriptive and paired-group t test. Forty-nine participants completed the intervention and post-tests (92% retention rate). Overall--all sites--posttest scores significantly improved for total TOFHLA, raw numeracy, and reading comprehension (p < 0.0001). Similarly, all three sites yielded significantly better mean differences for the total TOFHLA score while numeracy and reading comprehension significantly improved in some sites. Results suggest that community sites are viable venues for delivering health literacy/language instruction to Spanish speaking adults. The study also points to community engagement and ESL programs as two essential components of effective health literacy interventions among Spanish speakers.

  16. Conversational Management and Involvement in Chinese-English Business Talk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Li; Hua, Zhu; Yue, Li

    2001-01-01

    Using conversation analysis, examines one sequence of interaction during the closing stage of a business negotiation in English among four speakers--three native Mandarin speakers who speak fluent English and one native British English speaker. Attempts to reveal how their cultural beliefs and values inform their conversational styles. Notion of…

  17. A comparison of proficiency levels in 4-year-old monolingual and trilingual speakers of Afrikaans, isiXhosa and South African English across SES boundaries, using LITMUS-CLT.

    PubMed

    Perold Potgieter, Anneke; Southwood, Frenette

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated how trilinguals fare on the cross-linguistic lexical tasks (CLT)-Afrikaans, -isiXhosa and -South African English (SAE) (cf. Haman et al., 2015) compared to monolingual controls, and whether the CLT-Afrikaans renders comparable results across socioeconomic status (SES) backgrounds. The LITMUS-CLTs were administered to 41 low SES 4-year-olds (11 trilinguals; 10 monolingual speakers of Afrikaans, isiXhosa and SAE) and the LITMUS-CLT-Afrikaans to 11 mid-SES 4-year-old monolinguals. Results (a) indicate that trilinguals' proficiency in their exposure-dominant language did not differ significantly from monolinguals' proficiency, but their proficiency in their additional two languages was significantly lower than monolinguals' proficiency; (b) reflect the extent, but not current amount, of exposure trilinguals had had over time to each of their languages; and (c) show that low and mid-SES monolinguals differed significantly on noun-related, but not verb-related, CLT measures. Possible reasons for and the clinical implications of these results are discussed. PMID:26785940

  18. Vocabulary Use by Low, Moderate, and High ASL-Proficient Writers Compared to Hearing ESL and Monolingual Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singleton, Jenny L.; Morgan, Dianne; DiGello, Elizabeth; Wiles, Jill; Rivers, Rachel

    2004-01-01

    The written English vocabulary of 72 deaf elementary school students of various proficiency levels in American Sign Language (ASL) was compared with the performance of 60 hearing English-as-a-second-language (ESL) speakers and 61 hearing monolingual speakers of English, all of similar age. Students were asked to retell "The Tortoise and the Hare"…

  19. Project Re-Start. A Program for Homeless Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelzer, Dagmar F.; And Others

    Project Re-Start, of the Dade County Public Schools in Florida, was funded under the Adult Education Act and the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act. Classes in literacy skills, General Educational Development (GED) preparation, English for speakers of other languages, employability skills, and life coping skills were conducted at most of…

  20. Auditory Discrimination as a Condition for E-Learning Based Speech Therapy: A Proposal for an Auditory Discrimination Test (ADT) for Adult Dysarthric Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beijer, L. J.; Rietveld, A. C. M.; van Stiphout, A. J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Web based speech training for dysarthric speakers, such as E-learning based Speech Therapy (EST), puts considerable demands on auditory discrimination abilities. Aims: To discuss the development and the evaluation of an auditory discrimination test (ADT) for the assessment of auditory speech discrimination skills in Dutch adult…

  1. Implicit Attitudes towards Native and Non-Native Speaker Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, R. Watson; Pojanapunya, Punjaporn

    2009-01-01

    The academic literature and educational principle suggest that native and non-native English speaking teachers should be treated equally, yet in many countries there is a broad social and commercial preference for native speaker teachers which may also involve racial issues. Attitudes towards native and non-native English speaking teachers have…

  2. Non-Native Speakers: Problems of Language Usage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Narain, Mona

    Writing teachers need to recognize the special circumstances of culturally displaced students. A specific category of such students are those from the Asian subcontinent, who are not exactly non-native speakers of English, but who do speak non-standard American English. These students occupy a subaltern (marginal) position: they can neither be…

  3. The Storage and Composition of Inflected Forms in Adult-Learned Second Language: A Study of the Influence of Length of Residence, Age of Arrival, Sex, and Other Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babcock, Laura; Stowe, John C.; Maloof, Christopher J.; Brovetto, Claudia; Ullman, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    It remains unclear whether adult-learned second language (L2) depends on similar or different neurocognitive mechanisms as those involved in first language (L1). We examined whether English past tense forms are computed similarly or differently by L1 and L2 English speakers, and what factors might affect this: regularity (regular vs. irregular…

  4. Learning foreign labels from a foreign speaker: the role of (limited) exposure to a second language.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Nameera; Menjivar, Jennifer; Hoicka, Elena; Sabbagh, Mark A

    2012-11-01

    Three- and four-year-olds (N = 144) were introduced to novel labels by an English speaker and a foreign speaker (of Nordish, a made-up language), and were asked to endorse one of the speaker's labels. Monolingual English-speaking children were compared to bilingual children and English-speaking children who were regularly exposed to a language other than English. All children tended to endorse the English speaker's labels when asked 'What do you call this?', but when asked 'What do you call this in Nordish?', children with exposure to a second language were more likely to endorse the foreign label than monolingual and bilingual children. The findings suggest that, at this age, exposure to, but not necessarily immersion in, more than one language may promote the ability to learn foreign words from a foreign speaker.

  5. English for Diplomats.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noss, Richard B.

    A course in English as a second language for diplomats, offered in Washington, D.C. is described. The course consists of two levels: the first aims at non-native speakers of English with threshold proficiency, and the second is designed for current and prospective personnel in foreign diplomatic services of non-English-speaking countries. The…

  6. Teaching English from a Global Perspective. Case Studies in TESOL Practice Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages, Inc. (TESOL), 2005

    2005-01-01

    To be an English teacher today is to play an inevitable part in the globalizing of English. This volume canvasses important questions for English language teachers that are posed by the phenomenon of a global English: (1) Whose language? English speakers today are more likely to use English with multilingual speakers than with monolingual…

  7. On the rhythm of infant- versus adult-directed speech in Australian English.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher S; Kitamura, Christine; Burnham, Denis; Todd, Neil P McAngus

    2014-07-01

    The findings are reported of an investigation into rhythmic differences between infant-directed speech (IDS) and adult-directed speech (ADS) in a corpus of utterances from Australian English mothers speaking to their infants and to another adult. Given the importance of rhythmic cues to stress and word-segmentation in English, the investigation focused on the extent to which IDS makes such cues salient. Two methods of analysis were used: one focused on segmental durational properties, using a variety of durational measures; the other focused on the prominence of vocalic/sonorant segments, as determined by their duration, intensity, pitch, and spectral balance, using individual measures as well as composite measures of prominence derived from auditory-model analyses. There were few IDS/ADS differences/trends on the individual measures, though mean pitch and pitch variability were higher in IDS than ADS, while IDS vowels showed more negative spectral tilt. However, the model-based analyses suggested that differences in the prominence of vowels/sonorant segments were reduced in IDS, with further analysis suggesting that pitch contributed little to prominence. The reduction in prominence contrasts may be due to the importance of mood-regulation in speech to young infants, and may suggest that infants rely on segmental cues to stress and word-segmentation.

  8. Black English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Charles-James N.

    This paper, presented as part of a military lecture series given by the Division of Continuing Education and Community Service Speakers' Bureau of the University of Hawaii to military personnel at Schofield Barracks and Fort Shafter, investigates the origins and present status of Black English. A discussion of early studies in the Gullah dialect…

  9. Appalachian English Stereotypes: Language Attitudes in Kentucky.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luhman, Reid

    1990-01-01

    Employs the matched guise technique to compare attitudes in Kentucky about Appalachian English and Standard American English held by speakers of both language varieties. The study suggests that speakers of Appalachian English partially accept low status evaluation of their dialect, but reject other negative stereotypes about their community…

  10. The Haptics of the English Handshake.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosnahan, Irene Teoh

    1979-01-01

    A description is presented of the aspects and interpretations of the haptics of the English handshake in order to raise consciousness among native English speakers and to provide directions for non-native English speakers who might wish to learn or teach these aspects of the handshake. (SW)

  11. Phonetic Parallels between the Close-Mid Vowels of Tyneside English: Are They Internally or Externally Motivated?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, Dominic J. L.

    2000-01-01

    The distribution of variants of the FACE and GOAT vowels in Tyneside English (TE) is assessed with reference to the age, sex, and social class of 32 adult TE speakers. Effects of phonological context and speaking style are also examined. Patterns in the data are suggestive of dialect leveling, whereby localized speech variants become recessive and…

  12. Semantic and Conceptual Factors in Spanish-English Bilinguals' Processing of Lexical Categories in Their Two Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gathercole, Virginia C. Mueller; Stadthagen-González, Hans; Pérez-Tattam, Rocío; Yava?, Feryal

    2016-01-01

    This study examines possible semantic interaction in fully fluent adult simultaneous and early second language (L2) bilinguals. Monolingual and bilingual speakers of Spanish and English (n = 144) were tested for their understanding of lexical categories that differed in their two languages. Simultaneous bilinguals came from homes in which Spanish…

  13. Interpreter-Mediated Neuropsychological Testing of Monolingual Spanish Speakers

    PubMed Central

    Casas, Rachel; Guzmán-Vélez, Edmarie; Cardona-Rodriguez, Javier; Rodriguez, Nayra; Quiñones, Gabriela; Juan, San; Izaguirre, Borja; Tranel, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate empirically whether using an interpreter to conduct neuropsychological testing of monolingual Spanish speakers affects test scores. Participants included 40 neurologically normal Spanish-speakers with limited English proficiency, ages 18–65 years (M= 39.7, SD =13.9), who completed the Vocabulary, Similarities, Block Design, and Matrix Reasoning subtests of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III in two counterbalanced conditions: with and without an interpreter. Results indicated that interpreter use significantly increased scores on Vocabulary and Similarities. However, scores on Block Design and Matrix Reasoning did not differ depending upon whether or not an interpreter was used. In addition, the findings suggested a trend toward higher variability in scores when an interpreter was used to administer Vocabulary and Similarities; this trend did not show up for Block Design or Matrix Reasoning. Together, the results indicate that interpreter use may significantly affect scores for some tests commonly used in neuropsychological practice, with this influence being greater for verbally mediated tests. Additional research is needed to identify the types of tests that may be most affected as well as the factors that contribute to the effects. In the meantime, neuropsychologists are encouraged to avoid interpreter use whenever practically possible, particularly for tests with high demands on interpreter abilities and skills, with tests that have not been appropriately adapted and translated into the patient’s target language, and with interpreters who are not trained professionals. PMID:22185676

  14. Proceedings of the Annual Midwest Research-to-Practice Conference in Adult Continuing, and Community Education (18th, St. Louis, Missouri, September 22-24, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Ann, Ed.; Hynes, Geraldine E., Ed.; Miller, Roxanne T., Ed.

    This document contains the proceedings of a 1999 conference on adult, continuing, and community education held in St. Louis, Missouri. The following 39 papers are included: "Program Effectiveness Evaluation: Recertification and Job Upgrading for Adult Refugees" (Non-Native Speakers of English) (Adelman); "Rethinking the Linkages between Higher and…

  15. A Perspective of the Effectiveness of Project Based Bilingual Curriculum in Personal Empowerment of the Adult English Language Learner: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Cameron

    This case study offers a perspective on the effectiveness of project-based bilingual curricula in empowering the adult English language learner. The purpose of this study is to examine the English acquisition process of adult Latina women who participate in a project based bilingual language program. The program uses techniques that include…

  16. The Hyphen in English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Michael

    1978-01-01

    Even English speakers do not always know when to use a hyphen. Examples are given of some fairly clear-cut cases where the hyphen should be used, leading to the formulation of some usable rules. (IFS/WGA)

  17. Standards for Speakers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storm, William D.

    1981-01-01

    Enumerates criteria for the selection of audio system speaker equipment for archivists interested in achieving sound reproduction fidelity, noting frequency response, flat response, intermodulation distortion, arrival time, and placement of equipment. Illustrative materials and three references are provided. (EJS)

  18. Revisiting Speech Rate and Utterance Length Manipulations in Stuttering Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blomgren, Michael; Goberman, Alexander M.

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate stuttering frequency across a multidimensional (2 x 2) hierarchy of speech performance tasks. Specifically, this study examined the interaction between changes in length of utterance and levels of speech rate stability. Forty-four adult male speakers participated in the study (22 stuttering speakers and 22…

  19. Learning speaker-specific characteristics with a deep neural architecture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke; Salman, Ahmad

    2011-11-01

    Speech signals convey various yet mixed information ranging from linguistic to speaker-specific information. However, most of acoustic representations characterize all different kinds of information as whole, which could hinder either a speech or a speaker recognition (SR) system from producing a better performance. In this paper, we propose a novel deep neural architecture (DNA) especially for learning speaker-specific characteristics from mel-frequency cepstral coefficients, an acoustic representation commonly used in both speech recognition and SR, which results in a speaker-specific overcomplete representation. In order to learn intrinsic speaker-specific characteristics, we come up with an objective function consisting of contrastive losses in terms of speaker similarity/dissimilarity and data reconstruction losses used as regularization to normalize the interference of non-speaker-related information. Moreover, we employ a hybrid learning strategy for learning parameters of the deep neural networks: i.e., local yet greedy layerwise unsupervised pretraining for initialization and global supervised learning for the ultimate discriminative goal. With four Linguistic Data Consortium (LDC) benchmarks and two non-English corpora, we demonstrate that our overcomplete representation is robust in characterizing various speakers, no matter whether their utterances have been used in training our DNA, and highly insensitive to text and languages spoken. Extensive comparative studies suggest that our approach yields favorite results in speaker verification and segmentation. Finally, we discuss several issues concerning our proposed approach. PMID:21954206

  20. Learning speaker-specific characteristics with a deep neural architecture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke; Salman, Ahmad

    2011-11-01

    Speech signals convey various yet mixed information ranging from linguistic to speaker-specific information. However, most of acoustic representations characterize all different kinds of information as whole, which could hinder either a speech or a speaker recognition (SR) system from producing a better performance. In this paper, we propose a novel deep neural architecture (DNA) especially for learning speaker-specific characteristics from mel-frequency cepstral coefficients, an acoustic representation commonly used in both speech recognition and SR, which results in a speaker-specific overcomplete representation. In order to learn intrinsic speaker-specific characteristics, we come up with an objective function consisting of contrastive losses in terms of speaker similarity/dissimilarity and data reconstruction losses used as regularization to normalize the interference of non-speaker-related information. Moreover, we employ a hybrid learning strategy for learning parameters of the deep neural networks: i.e., local yet greedy layerwise unsupervised pretraining for initialization and global supervised learning for the ultimate discriminative goal. With four Linguistic Data Consortium (LDC) benchmarks and two non-English corpora, we demonstrate that our overcomplete representation is robust in characterizing various speakers, no matter whether their utterances have been used in training our DNA, and highly insensitive to text and languages spoken. Extensive comparative studies suggest that our approach yields favorite results in speaker verification and segmentation. Finally, we discuss several issues concerning our proposed approach.

  1. Adult Education in Continental Europe: An Annotated Bibliography of English-Language Materials 1992-1994. Monographs on Comparative and Area Studies in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulich, Jindra

    This annotated bibliography contains 1,033 entries describing English-language materials regarding adult education (AE) in continental Europe that were identified through a systematic search of 188 periodicals. Entries are arranged by country. Among the topics of the works included are the following: history of AE; comparative studies; state and…

  2. The Effects of Instruction Using a Mnemonic Graphic Organizer on Vocabulary Acquisition among Adult English-as-a-Second-Language Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaelin, Ann Marie

    A study investigated the efficacy of the mnemonic graphic organizer strategy on the vocabulary acquisition of beginning and advanced adult English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) students. Subjects, 48 adults enrolled in two adult ESL classes at a metropolitan adult school, were randomly divided into control and experimental groups. The experimental…

  3. An Urgent Challenge: Enhancing Academic Speaking Opportunities for English Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Jane; Fang, Chloe; Rollins, Jenice; Valadez, Destinee

    2016-01-01

    This project sought to gain a closer look at the contrast of oral language opportunities experienced by English learners and native speakers of English in order to draw implications for practicing teachers. Specifically, the authors explored how often and when English learners and native speakers of English engage in academic speaking in K-8…

  4. Preschoolers' credulity toward misinformation from ingroup versus outgroup speakers.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Kyla P; Ma, Lili

    2016-08-01

    The current research examined preschoolers' credulity toward misinformation from ingroup versus outgroup speakers. Experiment 1 showed that when searching for a hidden toy, Caucasian English monolingual 4-year-olds were credulous toward the false testimony of a race-and-accent ingroup speaker, despite their firsthand observations of the hiding event, but were skeptical when the false testimony was provided by a race-and-accent outgroup speaker. In the same experiment, 3-year-olds were credulous toward the false testimony of both speakers. Experiment 2 showed that when the false testimony was provided by a same-race-only or same-accent-only speaker, 4-year-olds were not particularly credulous or skeptical. The findings are discussed in relation to how intergroup bias might contribute to the selective credulity in the 4-year-olds as well as the factors that might explain the indiscriminate credulity in the 3-year-olds. PMID:27135169

  5. The Connections among Immigration, Nation Building, and Adult Education English as a Second Language Instruction in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ullman, Char

    2010-01-01

    Since its inception at the turn of the last century, adult education English as a Second Language (ESL) instruction in the United States has been entwined with immigration processes and ideas of the nation. In spite of current uncertainty about the overhauling of federal immigration policy, increasingly anti-immigrant laws in states such as…

  6. Adult English Language Learners' Perceptions of Audience Response Systems (Clickers) as Communication Aides: A Q-Methodology Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Lisa Ann; Shepard, MaryFriend

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the perceptions of adult English language learners about audience response systems (clickers) as tools to facilitate communication. According to second language acquisition theory, learners' receptive capabilities in the early stages of second language acquisition surpass expressive capabilities, often rendering them silent in…

  7. Profiling the Phonological Processes Shaping the Fossilized IL of Adult Learners of English as a Foreign Language: Some Theoretical Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroy, Rafael

    2001-01-01

    Describes the frozen interlanguage (IL) of adult learners of English in a natural setting to profile phonological processes that underlie their output. Also examines the impact on learners' oral behavior and the role played by transfer and developmental processes in such behavior. Analysis yields 10 processes shaping learners' IL that are…

  8. Age of acquisition and allophony in Spanish-English bilinguals.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Jessica A

    2014-01-01

    This study examines age of acquisition (AoA) in Spanish-English bilinguals' phonetic and phonological knowledge of /l/ in English and Spanish. In English, the lateral approximant /l/ varies in darkness by context [based on the second formant (F2) and the difference between F2 and the first formant (F1)], but the Spanish /l/ does not. Further, English /l/ is overall darker than Spanish /l/. Thirty-eight college-aged adults participated: 11 Early Spanish-English bilinguals who learned English before the age of 5 years, 14 Late Spanish-English bilinguals who learned English after the age of 6 years, and 13 English monolinguals. Participants' /l/ productions were acoustically analyzed by language and context. The results revealed a Spanish-to-English phonetic influence on /l/ productions for both Early and Late bilinguals, as well as an English-to-Spanish phonological influence on the patterning of /l/ for the Late Bilinguals. These findings are discussed in terms of the Speech Learning Model and the effect of AoA on the interaction between a bilingual speaker's two languages.

  9. Age of acquisition and allophony in Spanish-English bilinguals.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Jessica A

    2014-01-01

    This study examines age of acquisition (AoA) in Spanish-English bilinguals' phonetic and phonological knowledge of /l/ in English and Spanish. In English, the lateral approximant /l/ varies in darkness by context [based on the second formant (F2) and the difference between F2 and the first formant (F1)], but the Spanish /l/ does not. Further, English /l/ is overall darker than Spanish /l/. Thirty-eight college-aged adults participated: 11 Early Spanish-English bilinguals who learned English before the age of 5 years, 14 Late Spanish-English bilinguals who learned English after the age of 6 years, and 13 English monolinguals. Participants' /l/ productions were acoustically analyzed by language and context. The results revealed a Spanish-to-English phonetic influence on /l/ productions for both Early and Late bilinguals, as well as an English-to-Spanish phonological influence on the patterning of /l/ for the Late Bilinguals. These findings are discussed in terms of the Speech Learning Model and the effect of AoA on the interaction between a bilingual speaker's two languages. PMID:24795664

  10. Word Learning in Adults with Second-Language Experience: Effects of Phonological and Referent Familiarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaushanskaya, Margarita; Yoo, Jeewon; Van Hecke, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this research was to examine whether phonological familiarity exerts different effects on novel word learning for familiar versus unfamiliar referents and whether successful word learning is associated with increased second-language experience. Method: Eighty-one adult native English speakers with various levels of Spanish…

  11. Developing a New Course for Adult Learners. TESOL Language Curriculum Development Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Marguerite Ann, Ed.; Kamhi-Stein, Lia, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages, Inc. (TESOL), introduces "Developing a New Course for Adult Learners," edited by Marguerite Ann Snow and Lia Kamhi-Stein. This volume in TESOL's Language Curriculum Development Series presents the stories of teachers, curriculum developers, and administrators from all over the world who seek to…

  12. Adult ESOL Students and Service-Learning: Voices, Experiences, and Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bippus, Sharon L.; Eslami, Zohreh R.

    2013-01-01

    This multiple-case study examined the unique perspectives of six adult English for speakers of other languages (ESOL) students who participated as the givers of a service in a semester-long service learning community college ESOL course. Their ages ranged from 19 to 45 and they hailed from five different countries (Colombia, Mexico, South Korea,…

  13. A Key to the Dream for Adult Learners: The Acquisition of Academic Writing Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Cynthia M.

    2013-01-01

    Adult students are now enrolling into colleges and universities in large numbers. Their life responsibilities and time away from school create challenges for academic success. A portion of these learners are also non-native English speakers who face compounded difficulties. One of the skill areas that these students need to cultivate is academic…

  14. Learning to contend with accents in infancy: benefits of brief speaker exposure.

    PubMed

    van Heugten, Marieke; Johnson, Elizabeth K

    2014-02-01

    Although adults rapidly adjust to accented speakers' pronunciation of words, young children appear to struggle when confronted with unfamiliar variants of their native language (e.g., American English-learning 15-month-olds cannot recognize familiar words spoken in Jamaican English; Best et al., 2009). It is currently unclear, however, why this is the case, or how infants overcome this apparent inability. Here, we begin to address these crucial questions. Experiments 1 and 2 confirm with a new population that infants are initially unable to recognize familiar words produced in unfamiliar accents. That is, Canadian English-learning infants cannot recognize familiar words spoken in Australian English until they near their second birthday. However, Experiments 3 and 4 show that this early inability to recognize accented words can readily be overcome when infants are exposed to a story read in the unfamiliar accent prior to test. Importantly, this adaptation only occurs when the story is highly familiar, consistent with the idea that top-down lexical feedback may enable the adaptation process. We conclude that infants, like adults, have the cognitive capacity to rapidly deduce the mapping between their own and an unfamiliar variant of their native language. Thus, the essential machinery underlying spoken language communication is in place much earlier than previous studies have suggested. PMID:23506084

  15. Voice Onset Time in Indian English-Accented Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awan, Shaheen N.; Stine, Carolyn L

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine possible differences in voice onset time (VOT) between speakers of standard American English (AE) and Indian English (IE) in a continuous speech context. The participants were 20 AE speakers, who were native to the Northeastern Pennsylvania region, and 20 IE speakers from the Indian subcontinent who had…

  16. The relationship of language acculturation (English proficiency) to current self-rated health among African immigrant adults.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Maria-Theresa C; Carter-Pokras, Olivia D; Picot, Sandra J; Zhan, Min

    2013-06-01

    Although over 1.5 million African immigrants live in the US, few studies have examined the relationship of language acculturation to health outcomes among African immigrant adults. The primary objective of this research was to investigate the relationship between English proficiency and current self-rated health among African immigrant adults. Using a cross-sectional design, a secondary data analysis was performed on baseline data from the African immigrant adult subsample (n = 763) of the 2003 New Immigrant Survey, a longitudinal study of lawful permanent residents. Limited English proficiency (LEP), increased duration of US residence, older age at immigration, being male, less than 12 years of education, poor pre-migration health, and chronic disease were associated with good/fair/poor current self-rated health. Findings support consideration of pre-migration health and chronic disease in future acculturation and health studies, and provision of linguistically competent interventions for LEP African immigrants at risk for poor health outcomes.

  17. Predictive Validity and Accuracy of Oral Reading Fluency for English Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderwood, Michael L.; Tung, Catherine Y.; Checca, C. Jason

    2014-01-01

    The predictive validity and accuracy of an oral reading fluency (ORF) measure for a statewide assessment in English language arts was examined for second-grade native English speakers (NESs) and English learners (ELs) with varying levels of English proficiency. In addition to comparing ELs with native English speakers, the impact of English…

  18. Classroom Interactions as Cross-Cultural Encounters: Native Speakers in EFL Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luk, Jasmine C. M.; Lin, Angel M. Y.

    2006-01-01

    This book is about native English speakers teaching English as a global language in non-English speaking countries. Through analysis of naturally occurring dialogic encounters, the authors examine the multifaceted ways in which teachers and students utilize diverse communicative resources to construct, display, and negotiate their identities as…

  19. A fundamental residue pitch perception bias for tone language speakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petitti, Elizabeth

    A complex tone composed of only higher-order harmonics typically elicits a pitch percept equivalent to the tone's missing fundamental frequency (f0). When judging the direction of residue pitch change between two such tones, however, listeners may have completely opposite perceptual experiences depending on whether they are biased to perceive changes based on the overall spectrum or the missing f0 (harmonic spacing). Individual differences in residue pitch change judgments are reliable and have been associated with musical experience and functional neuroanatomy. Tone languages put greater pitch processing demands on their speakers than non-tone languages, and we investigated whether these lifelong differences in linguistic pitch processing affect listeners' bias for residue pitch. We asked native tone language speakers and native English speakers to perform a pitch judgment task for two tones with missing fundamental frequencies. Given tone pairs with ambiguous pitch changes, listeners were asked to judge the direction of pitch change, where the direction of their response indicated whether they attended to the overall spectrum (exhibiting a spectral bias) or the missing f0 (exhibiting a fundamental bias). We found that tone language speakers are significantly more likely to perceive pitch changes based on the missing f0 than English speakers. These results suggest that tone-language speakers' privileged experience with linguistic pitch fundamentally tunes their basic auditory processing.

  20. Fundamentals of English Language Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitao, S. Kathleen; Kitao, Kenji

    English is not the most widely spoken language in the world, but it is the most widely used by non-native speakers, making the teaching of English as a Second Language a very important endeavor. This book provides an overview of English language teaching, giving the reader a general background on the issues related to language…