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Sample records for adult epilepsy patients

  1. Epilepsy in Adults with Supratentorial Glioblastoma: Incidence and Influence Factors and Prophylaxis in 184 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Shuli; Zhang, Junchen; Zhang, Shaohui; Fu, Xiangping

    2016-01-01

    Aim To analyze the incidence of epilepsy in adult patients with supratentorial glioblastoma, assess the factors influencing the development of epilepsy in these cases, and evaluate patients’ response to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in a series of 184 patients. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the 184 adult patients diagnosed with supratentorial glioblastoma. All subjects were treated within our hospital and subsequently died between 2003 and 2013. The incidence of epilepsy was assessed before and after initial resection and reexamined every 2 months thereafter. We evaluated the efficacy of prophylactic AEDs in this patient population based on the gathered incidence data. Results Of 184 patients, 43 (23.37%) were diagnosed with epilepsy before their initial resection. The total incidence of epilepsy (both pre- and postoperative) was 68.48%. The prevalence of active epilepsy reached over 80% in patients with epilepsy and survival of greater than 13 months postoperatively. Patients with glioblastoma in the frontal and/or temporal lobes had a higher prevalence of epilepsy. In the 43 patients with preoperative epilepsy, total resection of glioblastoma resulted in significantly lower seizure frequency. Patients who received epilepsy prophylaxis with AEDs for at least 6 months had significantly fewer seizures and higher Karnofsky scores than those receiving AEDs for less than one month or not at all. Conclusion The incidence of epilepsy in adult patients with glioblastoma was high and responded poorly to AEDs in the short term. However, when taken for longer periods, AEDs can reduce the frequency of seizures in patients with glioblastoma. PMID:27438472

  2. Neuropsychological profile of adult patients with nonsymptomatic occipital lobe epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Bilo, Leonilda; Santangelo, Gabriella; Improta, Ilaria; Vitale, Carmine; Meo, Roberta; Trojano, Luigi

    2013-02-01

    To explore the neuropsychological and neurobehavioral profile in adult patients affected by nonsymptomatic (cryptogenic and idiopathic) occipital lobe epilepsy (OLE), with normal intelligence, we enrolled 20 adult patients with nonsymptomatic OLE and 20 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy subjects. All participants underwent neuropsychiatric assessment scales, and standardized neuropsychological tests tapping memory, executive functions, constructional, visuospatial and visuoperceptual skills. After Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons, patients performed significantly worse than controls on several tests tapping complex visuospatial skills and frontal lobe functions. The analysis of single patients' performance revealed that a significantly higher number of OLE patients achieved age- and education-adjusted pathological scores on three tests (Benton Judgment of Line Orientation Test, Freehand Copying of Drawings Test, color-word interference task of Stroop test) with respect to controls. Patients did not differ from control subjects on neuropsychiatric aspects. The direct comparison between OLE subtypes showed that cryptogenetic OLE patients tended to achieve lower scores than idiopathic OLE patients on most tests, but no difference between the two groups was fully significant. In summary, patients with nonsymptomatic OLE can be affected by clinically relevant impairments in selected neuropsychological domains: complex visuospatial skills and executive functions. It could be speculated that frontal and visuospatial cognitive deficits might be the result of epileptic activity spreading within a neural network that includes structures far beyond the occipital lobe.

  3. Risks of suicidality in adult patients with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Hamed, Sherifa A; Elserogy, Yaser BE; Abdou, Madleen A; Abdellah, Mostafa M

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence and risks of suicidality in a group of patients with epilepsy. METHODS: Included were 200 adult patients and 100 matched healthy subjects. The clinical interview using The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th edition), Beck Depression Inventory (2nd edition) (BDI-II), Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A), Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised Rating Scale testings were used for diagnosis and assessment of severity of psychiatric symptoms. Blood concentrations of serotonin, catecholamines and dopamine were also measured. RESULTS: Suicidality was reported in 35% (compared to 9% for controls), of them 80%, 72.86%, 55.71% and 52.9% had depression, anxiety, obsession and aggression respectively. Patients with suicidality had higher scores of BDI-II (P = 0.0001), HAM-A (P = 0.0001), and Y-BOCS (P = 0.037) and lower scores of psychotic (P = 0.0001) and extroversion (P = 0.025) personality traits. Regardless the presence or absence of suicidality, patients with epilepsy had low serotonin (P = 0.006), noradrenaline (P = 0.019) and adrenaline (P = 0.0001) levels. With suicidality, significant correlations were identified between: (1) age and scores of BDI-II (r = 0.235, P = 0.0001) and HAM-A (r = 0.241, P = 0.046); (2) age at onset and concentrations of noradrenaline (r = -0.502, P = 0.024); (3) duration of illness and scores of BDI-II (r = 0.247, P = 0.041), Y-BOCS (r = 0.270, P = 0.025) and neurotic personality trait (r = -0.284, P = 0.018); and (4) doses of antiepileptic drugs and scores of psychotic personality traits (r = -0.495, P = 0.006 for carbamazepine; r = -0.508, P = 0.0001 for valproate). CONCLUSION: This is the first study which systematically estimated the prevalence and risks of suicidality in a homogenous group of patients with epilepsy. This study emphasizes the importance of epilepsy itself as a risk for suicidality and not its treatment. PMID

  4. Influence of Occupational Status on the Quality of Life of Chinese Adult Patients with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xiang-Min; Ding, Cheng-Yun; Wang, Ning; Xu, Cheng-Feng; Chen, Ze-Jie; Wang, Qin; Yao, Qin; Wang, Fu-Li

    2016-01-01

    Background: Epilepsy is one of the most common serious neurological disorders. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of occupational status on the quality of life of Chinese adult patients with epilepsy. Methods: This study surveyed 819 subjects clinically diagnosed with epilepsy for more than 1 year in 11 hospitals in Beijing; 586 were employed (71.55%). All subjects completed the case report form with inquiries on demographic data, social factors, and illness. The patients’ quality of life was assessed using the quality of life in patients with epilepsy-31 items (QOLIE-31) questionnaire. Results: The QOLIE-31 score in the employed group was significantly higher than that in the unemployed group. Furthermore, the scores in all the sections (overall quality of life, energy/fatigue, emotional well-being, seizure worry, cognition, social function, and medication effects) of the employed group were higher than those of the unemployed group. Both the employed and unemployed groups achieved the highest difference in social function. The QOLIE-31 score of students was higher than those of farmers and workers. Both the students and workers scored higher in the quality of life compared with the adult peasants living with epilepsy. The students and farmers showed significant differences in QOLIE-31 score, cognition, emotional well-being, overall quality of life, energy/fatigue, and social function. In contrast, no significant difference was noted in seizure worry and medication effects across the three different kinds of occupation. Conclusion: Occupational status might affect the quality of life of Chinese adult patients with epilepsy, and social function is the most important contributing factor. PMID:27231164

  5. Memory reorganization in adult brain: observations in three patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gleissner, Ulrike; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Elger, Christian Erich

    2002-02-01

    We present three patients with left-sided temporal lobe epilepsy who exhibited preoperatively a neuropsychological pattern characteristic for interhemispheric language transfer (marked nonverbal memory deficits, relatively preserved verbal memory and language performance). The Wada test indicated atypical language dominance in two patients, but one patient was clearly left hemispheric language dominant. All patients showed a marked recovery of nonverbal memory after left-sided surgery. Results are discussed with respect to memory transfer and plasticity for memory functions in the adult brain. PMID:11904242

  6. Epilepsy in Adults with TSC

    MedlinePlus

    ... International TSC Research Conference Text Size Get Involved EPILEPSY IN ADULTS WITH TSC Download a PDF of ... age, including either new-onset seizures or ongoing epilepsy. Recent studies indicate that more than 80% of ...

  7. Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - adult

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000221.htm Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - adult To use ... on this page, please enable JavaScript. You have epilepsy. People with epilepsy have seizures. A seizure is ...

  8. Seizure Duration Determined by Subdural Electrode Recordings in Adult Patients with Intractable Focal Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daeyoung; Cho, Jae-Wook; Lee, Jihyun; Joo, Eun Yeon; Hong, Seung Chyul; Hong, Seung Bong; Seo, Dae-Won

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose: To investigate the duration of seizures and its relationship to seizure type, epilepsy syndrome, and seizure clustering. Methods: We examined 1,251 seizures from 152 patients who underwent video-electrocorticographic monitoring with subdural electrodes. Their seizure duration, seizure types, epilepsy syndromes, and seizure clusters were analyzed. Results: The median seizure duration was 91.5s (4–1016s). There were 34 (2.7%) seizures lasting > 5 minutes in 20 (13.2%) patients. There was a significant difference in seizure duration according to seizure types (p < 0.0001), but not to epilepsy syndromes. There were 99 seizure clusters in 67 (44.1%) patients. The first seizure in a cluster of seizures tended to last longer than non-cluster seizures (median 98s versus 89s, p = 0.033). Seizure duration was significantly longer in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy than in neocortical lobe epilepsy (median 103s versus 87s, p = 0.041). Rate of seizure cluster was lower in mTLE (38.0%) than in NLE (47.1%), but this difference was not significant. Conclusions: Seizure durations were different among seizure types. Seizure clustering also differ between patients with mTLE and those with NLE, which suggests different seizure generation and propagation among different epileptogenic foci. This study has implications for the identification of abnormally prolonged seizures. PMID:24649447

  9. Problems, Needs, and Useful Strategies in Older Adults Self-Managing Epilepsy: Implications for Patient Education and Future Intervention Programs

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Wendy R.; Bakas, Tamilyn; Buelow, Janice M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine, in a sample of older adults diagnosed with epilepsy, perceived self-management problems and needs encountered since diagnosis, as well as strategies used to address problems and needs. Methods Qualitative description was used. 20 older adults engaged in face-to-face interviews. Interviews were analyzed via content analysis. Results Participants reported problems, needs, and strategies in six categories: Information, Physical and Emotional Symptoms, Memory and Concentration, Medications, Commitments, and Relationships. Conclusion Participants noted some problems and needs previously documented in the literature, though current results have built upon extant literature to reveal etiologies of and contexts surrounding problems and needs; new findings were also revealed. This knowledge can be used by health care providers in counseling and educating older adults with epilepsy, and can inform formal self-management interventions. Practice Implications Determining needs from the patient’s perspective is consistent with today’s focus on patient-centered care. Current findings have led to an organizing framework for problems and needs of older adults with epilepsy. More research is needed to develop the framework so that it can serve as a template for an intervention. In the interim, findings can inform educational practices of those caring for this population. PMID:24317297

  10. Cause-specific mortality in adult epilepsy patients from Tyrol, Austria: hospital-based study.

    PubMed

    Granbichler, Claudia A; Oberaigner, Willi; Kuchukhidze, Giorgi; Bauer, Gerhard; Ndayisaba, Jean-Pierre; Seppi, Klaus; Trinka, Eugen

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is a devastating condition with a considerable increase in mortality compared to the general population. Few studies have focused on cause-specific mortality which we analyse in detail in over 4,000 well-characterized epilepsy patients. The cohort comprised of epilepsy patients ≥ 18, treated between 1970 and 2009 at the epilepsy clinic of Innsbruck Medical University, Austria, and living in the province of Tyrol, Austria. Epilepsy diagnosis was based on ILAE guidelines (1989); patients with brain tumor were excluded. Deceased patients and causes of death (ICD-codes) were obtained via record linkage to the national death registry. We computed age-, sex-, and period-adjusted standardized mortality rates (SMR) for 36 diagnoses subgroups in four major groups. Additional analyses were performed for an incidence cohort. Overall cohort: 4,295 patients, 60,649.1 person-years, 822 deaths, overall SMR 1.7 (95 % CI 1.6-1.9), highest elevated cause-specific SMR: congenital anomalies [7.1 (95 % CI 2.3-16.6)], suicide [4.2 (95 % CI 2.0-8.1)], alcohol dependence syndrome [3.9 (95 % CI 1.8-7.4)], malignant neoplasm of esophagus [3.1 (95 % CI 1.2-6.4)], pneumonia [2.7 (95 % CI 1.6-4.2)]. Incidence cohort: 1,299 patients, 14,215.4 person-years, 267 deaths, overall SMR 1.8 (95 % CI 1.6-2.1), highest elevated cause-specific SMR congenital anomalies [10.8 (95 % CI 1.3-39.3)], suicide [6.8 (95 % CI 1.4-19.8)], alcohol dependence syndrome (6.4 [95 % CI 1.8-16.5)], pneumonia [3.9 (95 % CI 1.8-7.4)], cerebrovascular disease at 3.5 (95 % CI 2.6-4.6). Mortality due to mental health problems, such as suicide or alcohol dependence syndrome, malignant neoplasms, and cerebrovascular diseases was highly increased in our study. In addition to aim for seizure freedom, we suggest improving general health promotion, including cessation of smoking, lowering of alcohol intake, and reduction of weight as well as early identification of psychiatric comorbidity in patients with epilepsy.

  11. Adult Variant of Self-healing Cutaneous Mucinosis in a Patient with Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Yaghoobi, Reza; Bagherzade, Arezou; Aliabdi, Maryam; Kheradmand, Parvin; Kazerouni, Afshin; Feily, Amir

    2016-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman was admitted with a 3 weeks history of periorbital edema and lips swelling. She developed several subcutaneous firm erythematous papules and nodules on the face, scalp and two indurated plaques on the upper back and left forearm. These lesions grew rapidly. The patient had a positive history of epileptic seizures since childhood. General examination was normal. There was a mild pitting edema on her hands and feet. Laboratory data were within normal limits. Histopathological examination revealed a well circumscribed accumulation of mucin in the dermis. Alcian blue stain was positive. Clinical and histopathological findings followed by spontaneous resolution of the lesions within a period of 4 months was compatible with diagnosis of self-healing cutaneous mucinosis. Herein we report the first case of self-healing cutaneous mucinosis associated with epilepsy. PMID:27241546

  12. Hope language in patients undergoing epilepsy surgery.

    PubMed

    Patton, D J; Busch, R M; Yee, K M; Kubu, C S; Gonzalez-Martinez, J; Ford, P J

    2013-10-01

    Candidates for epilepsy surgery often use the word "hope" to express their attitudes and beliefs about surgery. However, studies suggest that hope has a multiplicity of meanings that are not well understood. The goal of this analysis was to evaluate whether Candidates for epilepsy surgery use hope language to express a traditional, expected optimism during presurgery interviews. We examined patients' uses of the word "hope" and its derivatives (hoping, hopeful, hopefully) through a secondary analysis of 37 interviews of adult patients prior to epilepsy surgery. Approximately 1/3 of all hope statements were coded as expressions of optimism, while 1/3 were not optimistic, and 1/3 had unclear meanings. In addition to traditionally optimistic uses of the term, other themes surrounding use of this word included ideas of dread, worry, uncertainty, and temporizing language. This information may help clinicians communicate more effectively with patients, enhancing the informed consent process for epilepsy surgery.

  13. [How parents of adults persons with epilepsy do their best].

    PubMed

    Müller, Margrit; Jaggi, Sabina; Spirig, Rebecca; Mahrer-Imhof, Romy

    2013-08-01

    Epilepsy is a common and chronic disease which affects persons at every age. Even though medication can prevent seizures, epilepsy has implications for daily living. Sorrows, increased depression rates and restrictions in everyday life were documented among family caregivers of adult persons with epilpesy. To date, no study investigated how parents adapt to the epilepsy of adult children over time. The aim of this study was to explore experiences of parents of adult patients with epilepsy. Applying an interpretative phenomenological approach, narrative interviews with parents were reviewed to investigate parents' experiences. All parents described how they did their best to live with their situation. However, parents' experiences were distinctive and can be described as: "Being on the way together", "walking on a thightrope" and "struggling and caring all along". Using paradigm cases to describe what the epilepsy of their adult children ment to parents allowed to consider the context of these parents' experiences and enhanced understanding. As parents continue to support their adult children with epilepsy they should be included in specialist counselling and involved in care planning of their adult children.

  14. Epilepsy in adults with mitochondrial disease: A cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Devine, Helen E.; Gorman, Grainne S.; Schaefer, Andrew M.; Horvath, Rita; Ng, Yi; Nesbitt, Victoria; Lax, Nichola Z.; McFarland, Robert; Cunningham, Mark O.; Taylor, Robert W.; Turnbull, Douglass M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this work was to determine the prevalence and progression of epilepsy in adult patients with mitochondrial disease. Methods We prospectively recruited a cohort of 182 consecutive adult patients attending a specialized mitochondrial disease clinic in Newcastle upon Tyne between January 1, 2005 and January 1, 2008. We then followed this cohort over a 7‐year period, recording primary outcome measures of occurrence of first seizure, status epilepticus, stroke‐like episode, and death. Results Overall prevalence of epilepsy in the cohort was 23.1%. Mean age of epilepsy onset was 29.4 years. Prevalence varied widely between genotypes, with several genotypes having no cases of epilepsy, a prevalence of 34.9% in the most common genotype (m.3243A>G mutation), and 92.3% in the m.8344A>G mutation. Among the cohort as a whole, focal seizures, with or without progression to bilateral convulsive seizures, was the most common seizure type. Conversely, all of the patients with the m.8344A>G mutation and epilepsy experienced myoclonic seizures. Patients with the m.3243A>G mutation remain at high risk of developing stroke‐like episodes (1.16% per year). However, although the standardized mortality ratio for the entire cohort was high (2.86), this ratio did not differ significantly between patients with epilepsy (2.96) and those without (2.83). Interpretation Epilepsy is a common manifestation of mitochondrial disease. It develops early in the disease and, in the case of the m.3243A>G mutation, often presents in the context of a stroke‐like episode or status epilepticus. However, epilepsy does not itself appear to contribute to the increased mortality in mitochondrial disease. Ann Neurol 2015;78:949–957 PMID:26381753

  15. Epilepsy patients' conceptions of epilepsy as a phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Räty, Lena K A; Larsson, Gerry; Starrin, Bengt; Larsson, Bodil M Wilde

    2009-08-01

    This study addressed epilepsy patients' conceptions of epilepsy as a phenomenon and emotions related to those conceptions. Nineteen outpatients were interviewed, and data were analyzed according to the phenomenographical methodology. Patients described epilepsy in six qualitatively different ways: Epilepsy is (a) an illness related to physical disturbances, (b) a condition related to physical disturbances, (c) a mental disturbance related to lack of mental capacity, (d) a handicap related to psychological and/or social aspects, (e) an identity related to being an epileptic, and (f) a punishment. The emotions confidence, happiness, hope, and annoyance were related to epilepsy as an illness or a condition, whereas shame, fear, sorrow, and guilt were related to the other four categories. This study indicated that, to patients, the phenomenon of epilepsy is above all a psychosocial nature and in that dimension closely related to negative emotions. PMID:19678506

  16. Worldwide dietary therapies for adults with epilepsy and other disorders.

    PubMed

    Cervenka, Mackenzie C; Henry, Bobbie; Nathan, Janak; Wood, Susan; Volek, Jeff S

    2013-08-01

    During the 3rd International Symposium on Dietary Therapies held in Chicago, Illinois, there was a first-ever, half-day session devoted to the management of adults with epilepsy and other disorders with dietary treatments. Speakers from 3 different continents shared their successes, challenges, and future directions in their management of these patients. Diets used to treat adults included the classic ketogenic diet, the modified Atkins diet, and a low glycemic index treatment. The utility of dietary therapies was demonstrated not only in patients with epilepsy but also patients with propriospinal myoclonus, astrocytoma, type 2 diabetes, obesity, hyperlipidemia, and metabolic disorder. The session provided evidence that dietary therapies are safe and effective in adults.

  17. Psychosocial Impact of Epilepsy in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Manacheril, Rinu; Faheem, Urooba; Labiner, David; Drake, Kendra; Chong, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of our study was to describe the quality of life of older adults with seizures or epilepsy and compare its psychosocial impact between those who were new diagnosed and those diagnosed before the age of 65. Methods: In-depth face to face interviews with open ended questions were conducted with two participant groups: Incident group: 42 older adults (>65 years) with new onset or newly diagnosed after age of 65; and Prevalent group: 15 older adults (>65 years) diagnosed before age of 65. Interviews were reviewed and coded using a list of themes and results were compared between the two groups. Eight topics were selected from the participants’ responses to questions about the psychosocial impact of epilepsy and seizures. The topics were then analyzed and compared between the two groups. Results: The topics analyzed were: Emotional and physical impact, significant life changes, co-morbidities, information gathering, stigma, AED side effects, changes in relationships and attitude toward diagnosis. Conclusion: We concluded that the age at onset and duration does seem to have a negative correlation with health related quality of life. However, the perceived health status of older adults with chronic epilepsy was significantly better and reflected in their more positive approach to the diagnosis of seizures or epilepsy probably because they have had a longer opportunity to learn to cope with their diagnosis. PMID:27417823

  18. Comparative Long-Term Effectiveness of a Monotherapy with Five Antiepileptic Drugs for Focal Epilepsy in Adult Patients: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Pan; He, Ru-Qian; Bao, Yi-Xin; Zheng, Rong-Yuan; Xu, Hui-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate and compare long-term effectiveness of five antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) for monotherapy of adult patients with focal epilepsy in routine clinical practice. Methods Adult patients with focal epilepsy, who were prescribed with carbamazepine (CBZ), valproate (VPA), lamotrigine (LTG), topiramate (TPM), or oxcarbazepine (OXC) as monotherapy, during the period from January 2004 to June 2012 registered in Wenzhou Epilepsy Follow Up Registry Database (WEFURD), were included in the study. Prospective long-term follow-up was conducted until June 2013. The endpoints were time to treatment failure, time to seizure remission, and time to first seizure. Results This study included 654 patients: CBZ (n=125), VPA (n=151), LTG (n=135), TPM (n=76), and OXC (n=167). The retention rates of CBZ, VPA, LTG, TPM, and OXC at the third year were 36.1%, 32.4%, 57.6%, 37.9%, and 41.8%, respectively. For time to treatment failure, LTG was significantly better than CBZ and VPA (LTG vs. CBZ, hazard ratio, [HR] 0.80 [95% confidence interval: 0.67-0.96], LTG vs. VPA, 0.53 [0.37-0.74]); TPM was worse than LTG (TPM vs. LTG, 1.77 [1.15-2.74]), and OXC was better than VPA (0.86 [0.78-0.96]). After initial target doses, the seizure remission rates of CBZ, VPA, LTG, TPM, and OXC were 63.0%, 77.0%, 83.6%, 67.9%, and 75.3%, respectively. LTG was significantly better than CBZ (1.44 [1.15-1.82]) and OXC (LTG vs. OXC, 0.76 [0.63-0.93]); OXC was less effective than LTG in preventing the first seizure (1.20 [1.02-1.40]). Conclusion LTG was the best, OXC was better than VPA only, while VPA was the worst. The others were equivalent for comparisons between five AEDs regarding the long-term treatment outcomes of monotherapy for adult patients with focal epilepsy in a clinical practice. For selecting AEDs for these patients among the first-line drugs, LTG is an appropriate first choice; others are reservation in the first-line but VPA is not. PMID:26147937

  19. How many adults with temporal epilepsy have a mild course and do not require epilepsy surgery?

    PubMed

    Hernández-Ronquillo, Lizbeth; Buckley, Samantha; Ladino, Lady Diana; Wu, Adam; Moien-Afshari, Farzad; Rizvi, Syed Aa; Téllez-Zenteno, Jose F

    2016-06-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common type of drug-resistant epilepsy in adults and commonly requires surgical treatment. While an overwhelming preponderance of literature supports the notion that a large percentage of patients with TLE benefit from surgery, there is a paucity of outcome data on patients who demonstrate a sustained response to pharmacological treatment. In this study, we present an adult cohort of patients with TLE, with the purpose of identifying the proportion of patients with a mild course of the disease, as well as potential risk factors. A prospective cohort study of all patients with TLE assessed and followed by the Saskatchewan Epilepsy Program, from 1 March 2007 to Jan 29(th) 2014. Patients were dichotomized as having a mild (seizure freedom without surgical intervention) or severe (surgical intervention required and/or failure to achieve seizure remission) course. Descriptive statistics, odds ratios and confidence intervals were calculated to identify predictors of seizure freedom. The cohort consisted of 159 patients. Mean patient age at last follow-up visit was 46±14.4 (range: 19-88) years. Mean follow-up period was 43.4±22.6 (6 to 84) months. Forty-six patients (29%) demonstrated mild-course TLE while 113 (71%) had a severe course of TLE. Patients with a mild course of TLE were more likely to be older (p = 0.002), have late-onset epilepsy (p < 0.001) with shorter evolution (p < 0.001). A good response to the first antiepileptic drug (OR: 6.8; 95% CI: 2.5-19; p < 0.001) was associated with a mild course of TLE. Although a majority of patients with TLE eventually require surgery, operative treatment is not necessary for all patients. This study identifies prognostic factors that may help patients and clinicians characterize long-term outcome. PMID:27100050

  20. Epilepsy

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R.S.; Frost, J.J. )

    1991-04-01

    As surgical treatments for adult and pediatric forms of epilepsy have become more refined, methods for noninvasive localization of epileptogenic foci have become increasingly important. Detection of focal brain metabolic or flow abnormalities is now well recognized as an essential step in the presurgical evaluation of many patients with epilepsy. Positron emission tomography (PET) scanning is most beneficial when used in the context of the total clinical evaluation of patients, including scalp EEG, invasive EEG, neuropsychologic testing, etc. Metabolic PET studies also give insight into pathophysiologic mechanisms of epilepsy. The dynamic nature of the interictal hypometabolism observed with 18(F)FDG in some patients suggests that excitatory or inhibitory neurotransmitters and their receptors may be involved. An exciting current application of PET scanning is the use of tracers for neurotransmitter receptors in the study of epilepsy patients. Mu and non-mu opiate receptors have been extensively studied and are beginning to give new insights into this disorder. Increased labeling of mu receptors in temporal neocortex using 11C-carfentanil has been demonstrated and, in some patients, supplements the clinical localization information from 18(F)FDG studies. Increased mu opiate receptor number or affinity is thought to play a role in anticonvulsant mechanisms. Specificity of increased mu receptors is supported by the absence of significant changes in non-mu opiate receptors. Other brain receptors are also of interest for future studies, particularly those for excitatory neurotransmitters. Combined studies of flow, metabolism, and neuroreceptors may elucidate the factors responsible for initiation and termination of seizures, thus improving patient treatment.95 references.

  1. Prevalence of Epilepsy in Adults with Mental Retardation and Related Disabilities in Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Suzanne; Moran, Robert; Platt, Tan; Wood, Hope; Isaac, Terri; Dasari, Srikanth

    2005-01-01

    Two primary care practices were used to recruit adults with and without disability. Disability groups included autism, Down syndrome, cerebral palsy, and mental retardation. The patients without disability had an epilepsy prevalence rate of 1%. The prevalence of epilepsy within the disability groups was 13% for cerebral palsy, 13.6% for Down…

  2. Epilepsy: addressing the transition from pediatric to adult care

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Seetha; Iyer, Anand

    2016-01-01

    Adolescence is a period of rapid change, both physical and psychosocial for any young person. It can be challenging when they have ongoing health problems and when their care needs to be transitioned to the adult health care system. Transition should be a planned process of addressing the medical and associated comorbid conditions from pediatric to adult care in a coordinated manner. In most cases, the young person and their family are well known to the pediatrics services and have built a relationship based on trust and often friendship over many years. Understandably, there is significant apprehension about moving from this familiar setting to the unknown adult services. Apart from having a sound knowledge of specific childhood epileptic conditions and associated comorbid disorders, it is important that both the pediatric and adult epilepsy teams are motivated to provide a successful and safe transition for these patients. It is essential that transition is seen as a continual process and not as a single event, and good preparation is the key to its success. It is also important that general practitioners are closely engaged to ensure successful transition. An overview of how to effectively address transition in epilepsy, different models of transition, transition of relevant epilepsies, and their management is discussed. PMID:27390536

  3. Epilepsy: addressing the transition from pediatric to adult care.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Seetha; Iyer, Anand

    2016-01-01

    Adolescence is a period of rapid change, both physical and psychosocial for any young person. It can be challenging when they have ongoing health problems and when their care needs to be transitioned to the adult health care system. Transition should be a planned process of addressing the medical and associated comorbid conditions from pediatric to adult care in a coordinated manner. In most cases, the young person and their family are well known to the pediatrics services and have built a relationship based on trust and often friendship over many years. Understandably, there is significant apprehension about moving from this familiar setting to the unknown adult services. Apart from having a sound knowledge of specific childhood epileptic conditions and associated comorbid disorders, it is important that both the pediatric and adult epilepsy teams are motivated to provide a successful and safe transition for these patients. It is essential that transition is seen as a continual process and not as a single event, and good preparation is the key to its success. It is also important that general practitioners are closely engaged to ensure successful transition. An overview of how to effectively address transition in epilepsy, different models of transition, transition of relevant epilepsies, and their management is discussed. PMID:27390536

  4. Ataxia in institutionalized patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Young, G B; Oppenheimer, S R; Gordon, B A; Wells, G A; Assis, L P; Kreeft, J H; Lohuis, N A; Blume, W T

    1994-08-01

    Fifty-four per cent of 41 chronically institutionalized adult patients with epilepsy had ataxia of gait (wide mean stride width). None of the following correlated with stride width: serum phenytoin, previous phenytoin toxicity, seizure frequency, or status epilepticus. Seventeen of the 41 patients had computed tomographic head scans. Patients with radiological evidence of cerebellar atrophy had a wider mean stride width, later age of onset of seizures, greater peak serum concentrations of phenytoin than did those without cerebellar atrophy. Ataxia of gait was inconsistently associated with cerebellar atrophy. Elevated serum/plasma concentrations of phenytoin may be a risk factor for cerebellar atrophy, but seizure frequency or status epilepticus are not independently related to this complication.

  5. In focus: The everyday lives of families of adult individuals with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Saada, Fahed; Wang, Zizhao Selina; Bautista, Ramon Edmundo D

    2015-09-01

    Epilepsy is a multifaceted chronic neurological disorder with diverse effects on a patient's psychosocial well-being. The impact on quality of life has been well documented, and many studies have addressed the detrimental influences epilepsy has on an individual. However, the emotional impact and the influence of the condition on family members have not been well studied. Furthermore, the majority of the studies on this topic have been confined to childhood epilepsy, and there is only scarce literature that discusses the effects on family members caring for adult patients. The purpose of this literature review was to examine the influence of adult epilepsy on the psychological and social well-being of individual family members. We explored the psychological and physical well-being, satisfaction with social circumstances, and perceived level of support in families of adult patients with intractable epilepsy. The paper also suggests best practices on how to improve the family's quality of life, as well as future directions for research. Superior medical care and a positive family support system are important conditions that can help adult individuals with epilepsy best deal with their condition.

  6. Severe epilepsy in an adult with partial trisomy 18q.

    PubMed

    del Gaudio, Luigi; Striano, Salvatore; Coppola, Antonietta

    2014-12-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common presentations associated with chromosome aberrations. Detailed descriptions of some aberration-specific epileptic and electroencephalographic (EEG) phenotypes have been reported (i.e., Angelman syndrome, ring 20 etc.). However there is limited and mixed information about the characteristics of epilepsy related to trisomy 18. Thus a common seizure phenotype has not been characterized yet. Here we describe in detail a patient with refractory epilepsy and partial 18q trisomy. PMID:25257782

  7. Interictal 12-lead electrocardiography in patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Vaishnav; Krishnamurthy, Kaarkuzhali B

    2013-10-01

    Interictal electrocardiographic predictors of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) are unknown. This study was designed to identify the unique features of the interictal 12-lead electrocardiogram (EKG) in patients with epileptic seizures. We conducted a retrospective chart review of adult patients below the age of 65 admitted to our epilepsy monitoring unit. Using EEG telemetry data, we classified patients as having nonepileptic seizures (NESs), probable epilepsy (PE), or definite epilepsy (DE) and analyzed 12-lead EKGs obtained on admission. Patients with NESs were assigned as the control group. We included patients taking antipsychotic and/or antidepressant medications but excluded patients with medical conditions or taking other medications that would otherwise confound EKG measurements. Out of the 1007 charts reviewed, 195 patients were included in our analysis, and extensive subgroup analyses were performed. We found that patients with definite localization-related epilepsy displayed a significantly longer average PR interval (162.1 ms) than patients with NESs (148.8 ms). This effect was pronounced in female patients and did not vary with the number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) prescribed. In contrast to previous studies, mean QTc intervals were not significantly different between DE (428 ms) and NESs (422.6 ms). However, within females, this difference reached statistical significance (DE: 434.6 ms, NESs: 424.6 ms). Antiepileptic drug polytherapy was associated with a significantly lower QTc interval (416 ms in patients on 4-6 drugs and 436.4 ms in patients on 0-1 drugs). Levetiracetam was the most commonly used AED and was associated with the longest average PR (163 ms) and QTc (432 ms) intervals. The mean QRS axis displayed a significant leftward shift in patients with localization-related epilepsy (35.6° versus 54.3° in patients with NESs) and also in female patients with DE (42.1° versus 55.4° in female patients with NESs). No differences were

  8. Chronotypes in Patients with Epilepsy: Does the Type of Epilepsy Make a Difference?

    PubMed

    Kendis, Hallie; Baron, Kelly; Schuele, Stephan U; Patel, Bhavita; Attarian, Hrayr

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms govern all biological functions. Circadian misalignment has a major impact on health. Late chronotype is a risk factor for circadian misalignment which in turn can affect the control of seizures in epilepsy patients. We compared a group of 87 confirmed epilepsy patients regardless of subtypes with age- and sex-matched healthy controls. We compared generalized epilepsy patients with localization related epilepsy patients and with healthy controls. We found that primary generalized epilepsy patients were 5 times more likely to have a late chronotype than healthy controls. We did not find any significant differences between localization related epilepsy patients and healthy controls or between the overall epilepsy cohort and healthy controls. Generalized epilepsy patients are more likely to be evening types as compared to those with focal epilepsy or subjects without epilepsy. Epilepsy patients do not experience the same age related increase in morningness as do age-matched healthy controls. This is important in regard to timing of AED, identifying and preventing sleep deprivation, and integrating chronotype evaluations and chronotherapy in comprehensive epilepsy care. Further studies, using objective phase markers or the impact of chronotherapy on seizure control, are necessary. PMID:26078488

  9. Hypothermia associated with clobazam use in adult epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Angela C; Quraishi, Imran H; Mattson, Richard H

    2016-01-01

    Clobazam, a 1,5-benzodiazepine FDA-approved in 2011, is commonly used to treat anxiety and epilepsy. It has not associated with hypothermia until very recently, in a case report involving two pediatric patients. Here, we report the first case of hypothermia development in an adult patient with epilepsy associated with clobazam use. A couple months after starting clobazam, the patient started developing episodes of hypothermia every several weeks, with temperatures ranging from 90 °F-95 °F. Normothermia was achieved with Bair Hugger therapy. Thyroid-stimulating hormone and cortisol levels were normal, and there was no evidence of infection in most instances. After 11 total episodes of hypothermia over a year of clobazam use, the drug was discontinued. It has now been 7 months after discontinuation, and the patient has not experienced any more episodes of hypothermia. Early recognition of the link between clobazam and hypothermia may prevent avoidable Emergency Department visits and hospitalizations. PMID:26870662

  10. Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Cervenka, Mackenzie C; Kaplan, Peter W

    2016-08-01

    The accurate diagnosis and classification of seizures is critical in informing prognosis and determining appropriate antiseizure treatments for patients with epilepsy. The electroencephalogram is the gold standard for diagnosis. Obtaining a thorough history, performing a careful physical examination, and selecting appropriate diagnostic studies are also essential in determining the underlying seizure etiology. The authors provide clinical pearls and pitfalls in the diagnosis and management of epilepsy. PMID:27643902

  11. Delivery of epilepsy care to adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Asato, Miya; Camfield, Peter; Geller, Eric; Kanner, Andres M.; Keller, Seth; Kerr, Michael; Kossoff, Eric H.; Lau, Heather; Kothare, Sanjeev; Singh, Baldev K.; Wirrell, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is common in people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). In adulthood, patients with IDD and epilepsy (IDD-E) have neurologic, psychiatric, medical, and social challenges compounded by fragmented and limited care. With increasing neurologic disability, there is a higher frequency of epilepsy, especially symptomatic generalized and treatment-resistant epilepsies. The causes of IDD-E are increasingly recognized to be genetic based on chromosomal microarray analysis to identify copy number variants, gene panels (epilepsy, autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability), and whole-exome sequencing. A specific genetic diagnosis may guide care by pointing to comorbid disorders and best therapy. Therapy to control seizures should be individualized, with drug selection based on seizure types, epilepsy syndrome, concomitant medications, and comorbid disorders. There are limited comparative antiepileptic drug data in the IDD-E population. Vagus nerve and responsive neural stimulation therapies and resective surgery should be considered. Among the many comorbid disorders that affect patients with IDD-E, psychiatric and sleep disorders are common but often unrecognized and typically not treated. Transition from holistic and coordinated pediatric to adult care is often a vulnerable period. Communication among adult health care providers is complex but essential to ensure best care when these patients are seen in outpatient, emergency room, and inpatient settings. We propose specific recommendations for minimum care standards for people with IDD-E. PMID:26423430

  12. Identifying Family History and Substance Use Associations for Adult Epilepsy from the Electronic Health Record.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Chen, Elizabeth S; Leppik, Ilo; Pakhomov, Serguei; Sarkar, Indra Neil; Melton, Genevieve B

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a prevalent chronic neurological disorder afflicting about 50 million people worldwide. There is evidence of a strong relationship between familial risk factors and epilepsy, as well as associations with substance use. The goal of this study was to explore the interactions between familial risk factors and substance use based on structured data from the family and social history modules of an electronic health record system for adult epilepsy patients. A total of 8,957patients with 38,802 family history entries and 8,822 substance use entries were gathered and mined for associations at different levels of granularity for three age groupings (>18, 18-64, and ≥65 years old). Our results demonstrate the value of an association rule mining approach to validate knowledge of familial risk factors. The preliminary findings also suggest that substance use does not demonstrate significant association between social and familial risk factors for epilepsy. PMID:27570679

  13. Identifying Family History and Substance Use Associations for Adult Epilepsy from the Electronic Health Record

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Chen, Elizabeth S.; Leppik, Ilo; Pakhomov, Serguei; Sarkar, Indra Neil; Melton, Genevieve B.

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a prevalent chronic neurological disorder afflicting about 50 million people worldwide. There is evidence of a strong relationship between familial risk factors and epilepsy, as well as associations with substance use. The goal of this study was to explore the interactions between familial risk factors and substance use based on structured data from the family and social history modules of an electronic health record system for adult epilepsy patients. A total of 8,957patients with 38,802 family history entries and 8,822 substance use entries were gathered and mined for associations at different levels of granularity for three age groupings (>18, 18-64, and ≥65 years old). Our results demonstrate the value of an association rule mining approach to validate knowledge of familial risk factors. The preliminary findings also suggest that substance use does not demonstrate significant association between social and familial risk factors for epilepsy. PMID:27570679

  14. Cognitive deterioration in adult epilepsy: Does accelerated cognitive ageing exist?

    PubMed

    Breuer, L E M; Boon, P; Bergmans, J W M; Mess, W H; Besseling, R M H; de Louw, A; Tijhuis, A G; Zinger, S; Bernas, A; Klooster, D C W; Aldenkamp, A P

    2016-05-01

    A long-standing concern has been whether epilepsy contributes to cognitive decline or so-called 'epileptic dementia'. Although global cognitive decline is generally reported in the context of chronic refractory epilepsy, it is largely unknown what percentage of patients is at risk for decline. This review is focused on the identification of risk factors and characterization of aberrant cognitive trajectories in epilepsy. Evidence is found that the cognitive trajectory of patients with epilepsy over time differs from processes of cognitive ageing in healthy people, especially in adulthood-onset epilepsy. Cognitive deterioration in these patients seems to develop in a 'second hit model' and occurs when epilepsy hits on a brain that is already vulnerable or vice versa when comorbid problems develop in a person with epilepsy. Processes of ageing may be accelerated due to loss of brain plasticity and cognitive reserve capacity for which we coin the term 'accelerated cognitive ageing'. We believe that the concept of accelerated cognitive ageing can be helpful in providing a framework understanding global cognitive deterioration in epilepsy.

  15. Cognitive deterioration in adult epilepsy: Does accelerated cognitive ageing exist?

    PubMed

    Breuer, L E M; Boon, P; Bergmans, J W M; Mess, W H; Besseling, R M H; de Louw, A; Tijhuis, A G; Zinger, S; Bernas, A; Klooster, D C W; Aldenkamp, A P

    2016-05-01

    A long-standing concern has been whether epilepsy contributes to cognitive decline or so-called 'epileptic dementia'. Although global cognitive decline is generally reported in the context of chronic refractory epilepsy, it is largely unknown what percentage of patients is at risk for decline. This review is focused on the identification of risk factors and characterization of aberrant cognitive trajectories in epilepsy. Evidence is found that the cognitive trajectory of patients with epilepsy over time differs from processes of cognitive ageing in healthy people, especially in adulthood-onset epilepsy. Cognitive deterioration in these patients seems to develop in a 'second hit model' and occurs when epilepsy hits on a brain that is already vulnerable or vice versa when comorbid problems develop in a person with epilepsy. Processes of ageing may be accelerated due to loss of brain plasticity and cognitive reserve capacity for which we coin the term 'accelerated cognitive ageing'. We believe that the concept of accelerated cognitive ageing can be helpful in providing a framework understanding global cognitive deterioration in epilepsy. PMID:26900650

  16. Epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Epilepsy KidsHealth > For Kids > Epilepsy Print A A A ... With Epilepsy Different? en español Epilepsia What Is Epilepsy? Epilepsy comes from a Greek word meaning "to ...

  17. Theory of Mind in Patients with Epilepsy: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Elizabeth; Catroppa, Cathy; Lah, Suncica

    2016-03-01

    The ability to understand our own thoughts, intentions, beliefs and emotions and those of others (Theory of Mind; ToM) is a high-order social cognitive skill that is vital for social interaction and which has been found to be impaired in patients with epilepsy. Studies examining ToM in patients with epilepsy, however, have yielded inconsistent findings. The main aim of this study is to determine whether the magnitude of ToM deficits varies as a function of the site of epilepsy focus and/or the type of ToM task used. Electronic databases searches included Psychinfo, Medline/PubMed and EMBASE. Studies were included if they examined a group of patients with epilepsy and a group of healthy controls, reported original research, were published in the English language in peer reviewed journals, and used one of five empirically validated measures of ToM: False Belief, Reading the Mind in the Eyes Task (RMET), Faux-pas, Strange Stories, Cartoon ToM vignettes. Twelve studies were identified, ten included adults and two included children with epilepsy. Findings revealed marked ToM deficits in adults with focal seizures emanating from core brain regions underpinning ToM: temporal and frontal lobes (frontal lobe epilepsy, FLE; temporal lobe epilepsy, TLE), but not in adults with focal seizures outside the temporal and frontal lobes (extra-TLE/FLE). ToM deficits were also observed in children with generalised seizures (idiopathic generalised epilepsy, IGE). ToM deficits were documented across ToM tasks. In conclusion, ToM deficits represent a robust finding in adults with frontal and temporal epilepsy, but are also found in children with generalised seizures. Further research into ToM is needed, especially in children with epilepsy as early ToM may have cumulative, negative effects on development of social skills that continues into adulthood. PMID:26797753

  18. Theory of Mind in Patients with Epilepsy: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Elizabeth; Catroppa, Cathy; Lah, Suncica

    2016-03-01

    The ability to understand our own thoughts, intentions, beliefs and emotions and those of others (Theory of Mind; ToM) is a high-order social cognitive skill that is vital for social interaction and which has been found to be impaired in patients with epilepsy. Studies examining ToM in patients with epilepsy, however, have yielded inconsistent findings. The main aim of this study is to determine whether the magnitude of ToM deficits varies as a function of the site of epilepsy focus and/or the type of ToM task used. Electronic databases searches included Psychinfo, Medline/PubMed and EMBASE. Studies were included if they examined a group of patients with epilepsy and a group of healthy controls, reported original research, were published in the English language in peer reviewed journals, and used one of five empirically validated measures of ToM: False Belief, Reading the Mind in the Eyes Task (RMET), Faux-pas, Strange Stories, Cartoon ToM vignettes. Twelve studies were identified, ten included adults and two included children with epilepsy. Findings revealed marked ToM deficits in adults with focal seizures emanating from core brain regions underpinning ToM: temporal and frontal lobes (frontal lobe epilepsy, FLE; temporal lobe epilepsy, TLE), but not in adults with focal seizures outside the temporal and frontal lobes (extra-TLE/FLE). ToM deficits were also observed in children with generalised seizures (idiopathic generalised epilepsy, IGE). ToM deficits were documented across ToM tasks. In conclusion, ToM deficits represent a robust finding in adults with frontal and temporal epilepsy, but are also found in children with generalised seizures. Further research into ToM is needed, especially in children with epilepsy as early ToM may have cumulative, negative effects on development of social skills that continues into adulthood.

  19. Epilepsy and seizure ontology: towards an epilepsy informatics infrastructure for clinical research and patient care

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Satya S; Lhatoo, Samden D; Gupta, Deepak K; Cui, Licong; Zhao, Meng; Jayapandian, Catherine; Bozorgi, Alireza; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Objective Epilepsy encompasses an extensive array of clinical and research subdomains, many of which emphasize multi-modal physiological measurements such as electroencephalography and neuroimaging. The integration of structured, unstructured, and signal data into a coherent structure for patient care as well as clinical research requires an effective informatics infrastructure that is underpinned by a formal domain ontology. Methods We have developed an epilepsy and seizure ontology (EpSO) using a four-dimensional epilepsy classification system that integrates the latest International League Against Epilepsy terminology recommendations and National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) common data elements. It imports concepts from existing ontologies, including the Neural ElectroMagnetic Ontologies, and uses formal concept analysis to create a taxonomy of epilepsy syndromes based on their seizure semiology and anatomical location. Results EpSO is used in a suite of informatics tools for (a) patient data entry, (b) epilepsy focused clinical free text processing, and (c) patient cohort identification as part of the multi-center NINDS-funded study on sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. EpSO is available for download at http://prism.case.edu/prism/index.php/EpilepsyOntology. Discussion An epilepsy ontology consortium is being created for community-driven extension, review, and adoption of EpSO. We are in the process of submitting EpSO to the BioPortal repository. Conclusions EpSO plays a critical role in informatics tools for epilepsy patient care and multi-center clinical research. PMID:23686934

  20. Epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Epilepsy KidsHealth > For Teens > Epilepsy Print A A A ... embarrass himself or scare his friends. What Is Epilepsy? Epilepsy is a condition of the nervous system ...

  1. Epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Epilepsy Information Page Clinical Trials Epilepsy Surgery This study ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Epilepsy? The epilepsies are a spectrum of brain disorders ...

  2. A prospective study of the modified Atkins diet for adults with idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kverneland, Magnhild; Selmer, Kaja K; Nakken, Karl O; Iversen, Per O; Taubøll, Erik

    2015-12-01

    For children with pharmacoresistant epilepsy, the ketogenic diet is an established treatment option worldwide. However, for adults, this treatment is less frequently offered, and its efficacy less well-documented. The aim of this study was to examine efficacy and tolerability of such a diet as an adjuvant therapy to antiepileptic drugs for adult patients with pharmacoresistant generalized epilepsy. Thirteen patients (12 women) aged 16-57 years were included prospectively. They were treated with a modified Atkins diet for 12 weeks. Nine of the 13 participants had juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), two had childhood absence epilepsy, one had Jeavons syndrome, and one had generalized epilepsy of unknown type. Six participants, all with JME, completed the 12-week study period. Among these six, four had >50% seizure reduction. Their seizure severity, using the revised Liverpool Seizure Severity Scale, was reduced by 1, 5, 57.5, and 70 points, respectively (scale: 1-100 points). In three of these four responders, quality of life, assessed by QOLIE-89, increased more than 20 points (scale: 0-100 points). Mean reduction of body weight after 12 weeks on diet was 6.5 (range: 4.3-8.1) kg. Lack of motivation, poor compliance, and seizure aggravation were the main reasons for premature termination of the diet. Apart from one patient who developed gallstones when ending the treatment after 10 months, no adverse effects were noted. In conclusion, using a modified Atkins diet for 12 weeks led to a clinically relevant reduction of seizure frequency in four of thirteen adult patients with pharmacoresistant generalized epilepsy. All responders were diagnosed with JME. In three of the four, the benefits of diet were so considerable that they chose to continue the treatment.

  3. Internet use and looking up information online in adults with epilepsy varies by epilepsy status--2013 National Health Interview Survey.

    PubMed

    Us Centers For Disease Control And Prevention Epilepsy Program

    2016-01-01

    We estimated US national prevalences of Internet use and looking up health information online among adults with epilepsy and those without, overall (age-standardized) and by three age groups (18-44, 45-59, and ≥60years) using the 2013 National Health Interview Survey. Results showed that both overall and across all age groups, a significantly lower percentage of adults with active epilepsy reported using the Internet compared with that of adults without epilepsy. However, among Internet users, the percentage of looking up health information online did not differ by epilepsy status or age. Ensuring access to the Internet and encouraging use of quality, secure, and easy-to-access resources and e-tools might help adults with epilepsy to optimize their self-management and improve their quality of life.

  4. Chronotype in patients with epilepsy: A controlled study in 60 subjects with late-onset focal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Manni, Raffaele; Cremascoli, Riccardo; De Icco, Roberto; Terzaghi, Michele

    2015-09-01

    Studies based on self-administered questionnaires indicate that most patients with epilepsy are morning-oriented. We aimed to investigate chronotype in patients with epilepsy with late-onset focal epilepsy by combining subjective data with dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) as an objective marker of the circadian phase. Sixty adult patients (mean age 46.5±13.8; 27 males) with late-onset focal epilepsy under pharmacological treatment were prospectively studied. Subjective chronotype was determined using the Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ) and circadian phase through analysis of salivary melatonin secretion, considering 3pg/ml as the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) threshold. The mean MEQ score was significantly higher in the patients with epilepsy than in the controls, and significantly, more patients had a MEQ score indicative of the morning type (50.0% vs 30.0%, p=0.02). However, no significant differences were found in mean time of DLMO (21:38±01:21 vs 21:26±01:03; p=ns), and DLMO time was in the range indicative of an intermediate chronotype in both patients and controls. Sleep onset and sleep offset phase angles were significantly shorter in the patients. Patients whose global MEQ score identified them as morning types were significantly older than those with an intermediate or evening chronotype, and they had less social jet lag. No difference in epilepsy features and treatments was found between morning-oriented and nonmorning-oriented patients. Our analyses showed that the patients with epilepsy tended to be morning-oriented and to perceive themselves as morning types, even though this was not reflected in their DLMO values which did not differ significantly from those of controls and mostly fell within the intermediate chronotype range. Several factors may considerably influence subjective chronotype. We speculate that, in patients with epilepsy, the disease itself, prompting certain lifestyle choices, including a regular sleep schedule and

  5. Role of valproate across the ages. Treatment of epilepsy in adults.

    PubMed

    Ben-Menachem, E; Schmitz, B; Tomson, T; Vajda, F

    2006-01-01

    A workshop was held in Göteborg in June 2005 to discuss the place of valproate in treating adult epilepsies. Consensus positions were developed on the epilepsy types for which the drug is most suitable and the use of valproate in women of child-bearing age, in men and in patients with psychiatric comorbidity. Valproate was considered to be effective across a broad variety of epilepsy syndromes and seizure types and should be considered a suitable choice for first-line monotherapy of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and other idiopathic generalized epilepsies. The use of valproate by women of child-bearing age is associated with potential harm to the foetus. A conservative approach to treatment is recommended in these patients whereby alternative antiepileptic drugs should be proposed to women planning pregnancies wherever satisfactory seizure control can be thereby maintained. In cases where valproate is used during pregnancy, either because the pregnancy was unplanned or because alternative treatment options of equivalent efficacy are unavailable, appropriate counselling, precautionary measures and monitoring should be provided. The evidence for an impact of valproate on male reproductive health is equivocal and considerations of male fertility should not be taken into account in deciding whether to prescribe valproate to men. Valproate can be proposed safely to patients with comorbid psychiatric disease or underlying psychiatric vulnerability.

  6. Transition From Pediatric to Adult Epilepsy Care: A Difficult Process Marked by Medical and Social Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Camfield, Peter; Camfield, Carol; Pohlmann-Eden, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    When epilepsy does not remit in childhood, transition and transfer to adult care is eventually required. Youth must leave the family-centered approach of pediatric care for the individual focus of adult medicine. Evidence from population-based studies indicates that many of those with childhood-onset epilepsy have major social difficulties in adulthood even if their epilepsy has resolved. Epilepsy may have major effects on normal adolescent development, and societal attitudes confound this difficult period in the lives of young people with epilepsy. Very little objective data are available to assist in the designing of models of care for youth with epilepsy; however, based on our clinical experience and the limited available literature, it appears that a transition program to prepare children for adult care is best started during childhood and adolescence. The formal transfer to adult services may be assisted by a transition clinic jointly attended by pediatric and adult epilepsy specialists. PMID:23476118

  7. Mirror focus in a patient with intractable occipital lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyoung; Shin, Hae Kyung; Hwang, Kyoung Jin; Choi, Su Jung; Joo, Eun Yeon; Hong, Seung Bong; Hong, Seung Chul; Seo, Dae-Won

    2014-06-01

    Mirror focus is one of the evidence of progression in epilepsy, and also has practical points for curative resective epilepsy surgery. The mirror foci are related to the kindling phenomena that occur through interhemispheric callosal or commissural connections. A mirror focus means the secondary epileptogenic foci develop in the contralateral hemispheric homotopic area. Thus mirror foci are mostly reported in patients with temporal or frontal lobe epilepsy, but not in occipital lobe epilepsy. We have observed occipital lobe epilepsy with mirror focus. Before epilepsy surgery, the subject's seizure onset zone was observed in the left occipital area by ictal studies. Her seizures abated for 10 months after the resection of left occipital epileptogenic focus, but recurred then. The recurred seizures were originated from the right occipital area which was in the homotopic contralateral area. This case can be an evidence that occipital lobe epilepsy may have mirror foci, even though each occipital lobe has any direct interhemispheric callosal connections between them.

  8. Pattern and frequency of use of complementary and alternative medicine among patients with epilepsy in the midwestern United States.

    PubMed

    Liow, Kore; Ablah, Elizabeth; Nguyen, John C; Sadler, Toni; Wolfe, Deborah; Tran, Ky-Dieu; Guo, Lisa; Hoang, Tina

    2007-06-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is recognized to be commonly used by patients, yet there have been few studies regarding the scope of CAM use by patients with epilepsy. This study assessed usage and perceptions of CAM by patients with epilepsy in the midwest of the United States. A 25-item survey was administered to adult patients with epilepsy, and data were collected from 228 patients. The survey collected demographics, specific CAM usage, adverse effects of CAM therapy, and perceptions of the effectiveness of CAM. Thirty-nine percent reported using CAM; 25% reported using CAM specifically for their epilepsy. Prayer/spirituality was the most commonly used form of CAM (46%), followed by "mega" vitamins (25%), chiropractic care (24%), and stress management (16%). CAM use is common among midwestern patients with epilepsy, although the pattern of use may be slightly different than in other regions of the United States and elsewhere. PMID:17459780

  9. Isolated Hyperreligiosity in a Patient with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Santibanez, Rocio; Sarva, Harini

    2015-01-01

    A 40-year-old man with history of temporal lobe epilepsy presented to the emergency department with hyperreligiosity after medication noncompliance. After medications were resumed, he returned to baseline. Many famous prophets are believed to have suffered epilepsy. Waxman and Geschwind described a group of traits in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy consisting of hyperreligiosity, hypergraphia, altered sexual behavior, aggressiveness, preoccupation with details, and circumstantiality. The incidence of religious experiences ranges from 0.3 to 3.1 percent in patients with epilepsy. Religious experiences can be ictal, interictal, or postictal. Treatment is aimed at the underlying seizure etiology. PMID:26351599

  10. Alcohol and marijuana: effects on epilepsy and use by patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gordon, E; Devinsky, O

    2001-10-01

    We review the safety of alcohol or marijuana use by patients with epilepsy. Alcohol intake in small amounts (one to two drinks per day) usually does not increase seizure frequency or significantly affect serum levels of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Adult patients with epilepsy should therefore be allowed to consume alcohol in limited amounts. However, exceptions may include patients with a history of alcohol or substance abuse, or those with a history of alcohol-related seizures. The most serious risk of seizures in connection with alcohol use is withdrawal. Alcohol withdrawal lowers the seizure threshold, an effect that may be related to alcohol dose, rapidity of withdrawal, and chronicity of exposure. Individuals who chronically abuse alcohol are at significantly increased risk of developing seizures, which can occur during withdrawal or intoxication. Alcohol abuse predisposes to medical and metabolic disorders that can lower the seizure threshold or cause symptoms that mimic seizures. Therefore, in evaluating a seizure in a patient who is inebriated or has abused alcohol, one must carefully investigate to determine the cause. Animal and human research on the effects of marijuana on seizure activity are inconclusive. There are currently insufficient data to determine whether occasional or chronic marijuana use influences seizure frequency. Some evidence suggests that marijuana and its active cannabinoids have antiepileptic effects, but these may be specific to partial or tonic-clonic seizures. In some animal models, marijuana or its constituents can lower the seizure threshold. Preliminary, uncontrolled clinical studies suggest that cannabidiol may have antiepileptic effects in humans. Marijuana use can transiently impair short-term memory, and like alcohol use, may increase noncompliance with AEDs. Marijuana use or withdrawal could potentially trigger seizures in susceptible patients.

  11. The effect of epilepsy and antiepileptic drugs on sexual, reproductive and gonadal health of adults with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Sherifa A

    2016-06-01

    Epilepsy is a common chronic medical illness. Hyposexuality is the most frequent abnormality in men and women with epilepsy. In men with epilepsy, hypoandrogenimia, hypogonadism and sperm abnormalities are common. Testicular atrophy was also infrequently reported. In women with epilepsy, hyperandrogenism, polycystic ovaries (PCOs) and PCO syndrome are frequent. Decreased serum free testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone levels, free androgen index and free testosterone/leutinizing hormone (LH) ratio and increased sex hormone binding globulin, estradiol, prolactin, LH, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels and LH/FSH ratio are common with epilepsy. Disturbance of central and/or peripheral control of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and alteration of central neurotrasmitters (GABA, glutamate and serotonin) by epileptic discharges or antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), direct gonadal toxicity by AEDs and pcyshicatric/psychosocial factors are all incriminated in sexual, reproductive and gonadal abnormalities associated with epilepsy. Patients may benefit from multidisplinary evaluation, tight seizure control, change the AED, androgen therapy, genital vasodilators, L-carnitine supplementation and psychotherapy.

  12. Hyperfamiliarity in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Amlerova, Jana; Cavanna, Andrea E; Bradac, Ondrej; Javurkova, Alena; Marusic, Petr

    2012-07-01

    Hyperfamiliarity is a type of paramnesia characterized by an increased feeling of familiarity to unfamiliar faces. This dysfunction has been associated with frontal and temporal lobe pathology. The study investigated hyperfamiliarity in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) by assessing their ability to recognize both familiar and unfamiliar faces. We evaluated 61 patients with pharmacoresistant TLE (33 right-sided, 28 left-sided) and 16 controls. The ability to recognize familiar faces was similar in patients and controls, although patients with left-sided TLE showed poorer performance in familiar face naming compared to both right-sided TLE patients and controls. Hyperfamiliarity was observed in a significantly higher number of patients with TLE compared to controls; in subgroup analysis, only right-sided TLE patients expressed hyperfamiliarity. Overall, patients with right-sided TLE showed more severe impairment compared to patients with left-sided TLE. It is proposed that hyperfamiliarity can be a relatively common symptom in patients with treatment-refractory TLE and right-sided focus.

  13. Initial Evaluation of the Patient with Suspected Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Jetté, Nathalie; Wiebe, Samuel

    2016-05-01

    The initial evaluation of the patient with suspected epilepsy is multifaceted and includes a careful history, diagnostic evaluation (EEG and brain imaging) and prompt referral to an epilepsy specialist to clarify seizure types and epilepsy syndrome. Screening for mental health conditions also should be considered, along with neurocognitive testing when deficits of language, memory, learning, attention, or executive function are present or when MRI shows involvement of brain regions implicated in cognitive function. In this review, we examine the approach to the initial evaluation of those with new-onset unprovoked seizures and possible epilepsy. PMID:27086982

  14. Epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    Epilepsy is a brain disorder that causes people to have recurring seizures. The seizures happen when clusters ... may have violent muscle spasms or lose consciousness. Epilepsy has many possible causes, including illness, brain injury, ...

  15. Self-Management education for adults with poorly controlled epILEpsy (SMILE (UK)): a randomised controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Teaching people with epilepsy to identify and manage seizure triggers, implement strategies to remember to take antiepileptic drugs, implement precautions to minimize risks during seizures, tell others what to do during a seizure and learn what to do during recovery may lead to better self-management. No teaching programme exists for adults with epilepsy in the United Kingdom although a number of surveys have shown patients want more information. Methods/Design This is a multicentre, pragmatic, parallel group randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a two-day Self-Management education for epILEpsy (SMILE (UK)), which was originally developed in Germany (MOSES). Four hundred and twenty eight adult patients who attended specialist epilepsy outpatient clinics at 15 NHS participating sites in the previous 12 months, and who fulfil other eligibility criteria will be randomised to receive the intervention (SMILE (UK) course with treatment as usual- TAU) or to have TAU only (control). The primary outcome is the effect on patient reported quality of life (QoL). Secondary outcomes are seizure frequency and psychological distress (anxiety and depression), perceived impact of epilepsy, adherence to medication, management of adverse effects from medication, and improved self-efficacy in management (mastery/control) of epilepsy. Within the trial there will be a nested qualitative study to explore users’ views of the intervention, including barriers to participation and the perceived benefits of the intervention. The cost-effectiveness of the intervention will also be assessed. Discussion This study will provide quantitative and qualitative evidence of the impact of a structured self management programme on quality of life and other aspects of clinical and cost effectiveness in adults with poorly controlled epilepsy. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN57937389. PMID:24694207

  16. Counseling Epilepsy Patients on Driving and Employment.

    PubMed

    Krumholz, Allan; Hopp, Jennifer L; Sanchez, Ana M

    2016-05-01

    People with epilepsy identify driving and employment among their major concerns. People with controlled seizures may be permitted to drive in every state in the United States, but people with uncontrolled seizures are restricted from licensure. Unemployment and underemployment for people with epilepsy are serious problems that depend on the frequency and type of seizure disorder and associated medical and psychological problems. Most jobs, with reasonable accommodation by employers, are suitable for people with epilepsy. Federal protections through the Americans with Disabilities Act confer civil rights protection by law on people with disabilities such as epilepsy. PMID:27086988

  17. PCDH19-related epilepsy in two mosaic male patients.

    PubMed

    Terracciano, Alessandra; Trivisano, Marina; Cusmai, Raffaella; De Palma, Luca; Fusco, Lucia; Compagnucci, Claudia; Bertini, Enrico; Vigevano, Federico; Specchio, Nicola

    2016-03-01

    PCDH19 gene mutations have been recently associated with an epileptic syndrome characterized by focal and generalized seizures. The PCDH19 gene (Xq22.1) has an unusual X-linked inheritance with a selective involvement for female subjects. A cellular interference mechanism has been hypothesized and male patients can manifest epilepsy only in the case of a mosaicism. So far about 100 female patients, and only one symptomatic male have been described. Using targeted next generation sequencing (NGS) approach we found a PCDH19 point mutation in two male patients with a clinical picture suggestive of PCDH19-related epilepsy. The system allowed us to verify that the two c.1352 C>T; p.(Pro451Leu) and c.918C>G; p.(Tyr306*) variants occurred in mosaic status. Mutations were confirmed by Sanger sequencing and quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Up to now, the traditional molecular screening for PCDH19-related epilepsy has been targeted to all females with early onset epilepsy with or without cognitive impairment. Male patients were generally excluded. We describe for the first time two mosaic PCDH19 point mutations in two male patients with a clinical picture suggestive of PCDH19-related epilepsy. This finding opens new opportunities for the molecular diagnoses in patients with a peculiar type of epilepsy that remains undiagnosed in male patients.

  18. Severe Myoclonic Epilepsy in Infancy – Adult Phenotype with Bradykinesia, Hypomimia, and Perseverative Behavior: Report of Five Cases

    PubMed Central

    Martin, P.; Rautenstrauβ, B.; Abicht, A.; Fahrbach, J.; Koster, S.

    2011-01-01

    Dravet syndrome or severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy (SMEI) is an epileptic syndrome characterised by refractory epilepsy and intellectual disability, typically presenting with febrile and afebrile generalised and unilateral clonic/tonic-clonic seizures in the first year of life and other types of seizures appearing later in the course of the disease. Five adult patients with SMEI and SCN1A mutations are reported, in which motor and behavioural abnormalities were outstanding symptoms. Bradykinesia, responding with latency, slow speaking with a thin voice, midface hypomimia and perseveration were distinctive features in all cases. These symptoms may be fit to define the adult phenotype of SMEI beyond seizure/epilepsy criteria. The motor and behavioural symptoms are discussed in the context of a possibly underlying frontal lobe/mesofrontal and cerebellar dysfunction. PMID:22140375

  19. Sex differences in face recognition memory in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, patients with generalized epilepsy, and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Bengner, T; Fortmeier, C; Malina, T; Lindenau, M; Voges, B; Goebell, E; Stodieck, S

    2006-12-01

    The influence of sex on face recognition memory was studied in 49 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, 20 patients with generalized epilepsy, and 32 healthy controls. After learning 20 faces, serially presented for 5 seconds each, subjects had to recognize the 20 among 40 faces (including 20 new faces) immediately and 24 hours later. Women had better face recognition than men, with no significant differences between groups. Women's advantage was due mainly to superior delayed recognition. Taken together, the results suggest that sex has a similar impact on face recognition in patients with epilepsy and healthy controls, and that testing delayed face recognition raises sensitivity for sex differences. The influence of sex on face recognition in patients with epilepsy should be acknowledged when evaluating individuals or comparing groups.

  20. Calcium metabolism in adult outpatients with epilepsy receiving long-term anticonvulsant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pylypchuk, G.; Oreopoulos, D.G.; Wilson, D.R.; Harrison, J.E.; McNeill, K.G.; Meema, H.E.; Ogilvie, R.; Sturtridge, W.C.; Murray, T.M.

    1978-01-01

    Long-term anticonvulsant drug therapy may lead to abnormalities of calcium metabolism resulting in osteomalacia. The prevalence and severity of altered calcium metabolism was studied in an adult outpatient population of persons with epilepsy receiving anticonvulsant therapy for a minimum of 2 years. Assessment of calcium metabolism was based on serum concentrations of calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol and of plasma parathyroid hormone, intestinal absorption of isotopic calcium and skeletal bone mineral mass as determined by in vivo neutron activation or x-ray photodensitometry. Thirty-nine patients who had been receiving anticonvulsant therapy for an average of 20 years were studied; none had clinical evidence of metabolic bone disease. Decreased serum calcium concentration was noted in 10%, decreased serum phosphorus concentration in 10% and elevated serum alkaline phosphatase concentration in 44%. The mean serum 25-hydroxycholecalciferol concentration was significantly lower (P < 0.001) than in a control group (11.6 v. 19.6 mg/mL). None of 18 patients studied had an increased plasma concentration of parathyroid hormone, and only 1 of 17 patients had decreased intestinal absorption of isotopic calcium. Bone mineral mass was decreased in 44% of 32 patients studied. It was concluded that long-term treatment with anticonvulsant drugs leads to mild abnormalities of calcium metabolism and decreased bone mineral mass in a substantial percentage of adult outpatients with epilepsy. These abnormalities probably predispose the patients to the development of clinically significant metabolic bone disease. PMID:418865

  1. Epilepsy in patients with spina bifida in the lumbosacral region.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Fumiaki; Morioka, Takato; Hashiguchi, Kimiaki; Kawamura, Tadao; Miyagi, Yasushi; Nagata, Shinji; Mihara, Futoshi; Ohshio, Mayu; Sasaki, Tomio

    2006-10-01

    This study aimed to assess the relevance of epilepsy and spina bifida in the lumbosacral region. We evaluated 75 patients with spina bifida admitted to the Kyushu University Hospital from 1980 to 2004. Patients were classified as having meningocele (MC, 4 cases), myelomeningocele (MMC, 6), myeloschisis (MS, 45), and lumbosacral lipoma (LL, 20). Nine cases had epileptic disorders, and all showed MS. Meticulous neuroradiological investigations revealed cerebral abnormalities such as polymicrogyria or hypogenesis of the corpus callosum in all epileptic cases. Locations of cerebral abnormalities topographically correlated with areas of interictal EEG abnormalities. Although all epileptic cases had ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt for hydrocephalus before the onset of epilepsy, interictal EEG abnormalities could not be explained by location of the VP shunt. In all LL patients, neither history of epilepsy nor cerebral abnormalities were noted on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Epileptogenesis in spina bifida patients seemed to correlate with coexisting cerebral abnormalities in MS patients rather than with the VP shunt. However, not all spina bifida patients associated with cerebral abnormalities had epilepsy, and not all cerebral abnormalities were epileptogenic, suggesting that epilepsy in spina bifida patients was multifactorial.

  2. Epidemiology of Epilepsy in Older Adults with an Intellectual Disability in Ireland: Associations and Service Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarron, Mary; O'Dwyer, Marie; Burke, Eilish; McGlinchey, Eimear; McCallion, Philip

    2014-01-01

    There are limited studies on the prevalence of epilepsy and co-morbid conditions in older adults with an ID. To begin to address this prevalence of epilepsy was estimated for participants in the Intellectual Disability Supplement to the Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing. Associations with demographic variables and co morbid health conditions were…

  3. Quality of life is social--towards an improvement of social abilities in patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Szemere, Emily; Jokeit, Hennric

    2015-03-01

    Quality of life (QoL) for people with epilepsy is considered worse than the condition's clinical and medical prognosis would predict. Quantity and quality of social interaction considerably determine QoL. Research shows that a significant proportion of patients with epilepsy experience difficulties with social functioning that is thought to be related to impaired QoL. The aim of this review article is to provide an evidence base for conceptualising and developing interventions to improve quality of life through social functioning, for adults with epilepsy. Previous and current research is considered initially with regards to why such difficulties arise and established interventions that address social competence and functioning are reviewed and explored from the field of schizophrenia, a condition also associated with similar difficulties in social cognition, cognition and negative symptoms. The paper considers the advantages and disadvantages of these interventions, the outcomes and emerging research in this area. Positive findings are found from interventional studies in schizophrenia such as the enhancing potential and generalisation of training in social cognition, the benefits of an integrated approach to improving social functioning and proposal of 'online' interaction approaches. These findings provide interesting and exciting directions for the ultimate goal towards interventions for the improvement of social functioning and quality of life in patients with epilepsy. This is of particular significance as at present there is currently no such dedicated program for people with epilepsy.

  4. Marital adjustment for patients with epilepsy in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiani; Zhang, Yaoying; Hong, Zhen; Sander, Josemir W; Zhou, Dong

    2013-07-01

    Marriage is a major source of social support and a predictor of health; however, marriages that involve people with epilepsy are more likely to fail. To explore this issue in China, we compared the marital adjustment of patients with epilepsy to control subjects using the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS). A total of 136 married persons with epilepsy and 145 healthy control subjects were recruited. The DAS score was significantly lower in people with active epilepsy than in the controls (102.0±17.8 vs. 109.2±15.8, p<0.001). A hierarchical regression showed that depression and social support satisfaction were significant predictors for DAS. Psychosocial variables accounted for 24.0% of the variance in DAS after control for demographic and seizure-related factors in patients with active epilepsy. The result suggests that people with active epilepsy in our sample encountered more marital discord than controls. Treatment to control mood disorder and support intervention might be important for their marital adjustment.

  5. Neurogenesis in the Hippocampus of Patients with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qin; Ren, Bo-Xu; Tang, Feng-Ru

    2016-02-01

    The mobilization of endogenous neural stem cells in order to substitute lost neurons in the adult brain may reduce the negative effects of patients with chronic neurodegenerative diseases. However, abnormal neurogenesis may be harmful and could lead to the worsening of patients' symptoms. In the brains of patients and animal models with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), increased newly generated neurons in the subgranular zone (SGZ) at early stages after brain insults have been speculated to be involved in epileptogenesis. However, this argument is unsupported by evidence showing that (1) hippocampal neurogenesis is reduced at chronic stages of intractable TLE, (2) decreased neurogenesis is involved in epileptogenesis, and (3) spontaneous recurrent seizures occur before newly generated neurons are integrated into hippocampal neural pathways. Therefore, the hypothesis of increased neurogenesis in epileptogenesis may need to be re-evaluated. In this paper, we systemically reviewed brain neurogenesis and relevant molecules in the regulation of neurogenesis in SGZ. We aimed to update researchers and epileptologists on current progresses on pathophysiological changes of neurogenesis at different stages of TLE in patients and animal models of TLE. The interactions among neurogenesis, epileptogenesis and cognitive impairment, and molecules' mechanism involved in neurogenesis would also be discussed. Future research directions are proposed at the end of this paper.

  6. Characterisation of a syndrome of autoimmune adult onset focal epilepsy and encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Sudarshini; Bleasel, Andrew; Parratt, John; Orr, Carolyn; Dale, Russell C; Vincent, Angela; Fung, Victor S C

    2014-07-01

    We report a series of patients with a clinical syndrome characterised by the explosive onset in adulthood of recurrent focal seizures of frontotemporal onset and features suggestive of autoimmune encephalitis. We propose that this presentation of "autoimmune adult onset focal epilepsy and encephalitis" is a recognisable clinical syndrome, and provide evidence it may be associated with heterogeneous immunological targets. Between 2008 and 2011 we encountered six patients with new-onset epilepsy in whom we suspected an autoimmune aetiology. We first characterised the clinical, electroencephalographic, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), imaging, and pathological findings of this syndrome. We subsequently tested them for antibodies against both intracellular and neuronal cell surface antigens. All patients presented with recurrent seizures with focal frontotemporal onset, refractory to multiple anticonvulsants. Four had focal T2-weighted hyperintensities on MRI. CSF mononuclear cells were variably elevated with positive oligoclonal bands in four. Brain biopsy in one patient demonstrated perivascular lymphocytic infiltration. Two were treated with immunosuppression and went on to achieve complete seizure control and return to baseline cognition. Three of four patients who received only pulsed steroids or no treatment had ongoing frequent seizures, with two dying of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. Subsequently, three had antibodies identified against neuronal cell surface antigens including N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor and leucine-rich glioma inactivated 1. We suggest that patients with such a presentation should be carefully evaluated for a suspected autoimmune aetiology targeting cell surface antigens and have a therapeutic trial of immunosuppression as this may improve their long-term outcome. PMID:24518268

  7. OPIC: Ontology-driven Patient Information Capturing system for epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Satya S; Zhao, Meng; Luo, Lingyun; Bozorgi, Alireza; Gupta, Deepak; Lhatoo, Samden D; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    The widespread use of paper or document-based forms for capturing patient information in various clinical settings, for example in epilepsy centers, is a critical barrier for large-scale, multi-center research studies that require interoperable, consistent, and error-free data collection. This challenge can be addressed by a web-accessible and flexible patient data capture system that is supported by a common terminological system to facilitate data re-usability, sharing, and integration. We present OPIC, an Ontology-driven Patient Information Capture (OPIC) system that uses a domain-specific epilepsy and seizure ontology (EpSO) to (1) support structured entry of multi-modal epilepsy data, (2) proactively ensure quality of data through use of ontology terms in drop-down menus, and (3) identify and index clinically relevant ontology terms in free-text fields to improve accuracy of subsequent analytical queries (e.g. cohort identification). EpSO, modeled using the Web Ontology Language (OWL), conforms to the recommendations of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) classification and terminological commission. OPIC has been developed using agile software engineering methodology for rapid development cycles in close collaboration with domain expert and end users. We report the result from the initial deployment of OPIC at the University Hospitals Case Medical Center (UH CMC) epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU) as part of the NIH-funded project on Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). Preliminary user evaluation shows that OPIC has achieved its design objectives to be an intuitive patient information capturing system that also reduces the potential for data entry errors and variability in use of epilepsy terms. PMID:23304354

  8. OPIC: Ontology-driven Patient Information Capturing system for epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Satya S; Zhao, Meng; Luo, Lingyun; Bozorgi, Alireza; Gupta, Deepak; Lhatoo, Samden D; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    The widespread use of paper or document-based forms for capturing patient information in various clinical settings, for example in epilepsy centers, is a critical barrier for large-scale, multi-center research studies that require interoperable, consistent, and error-free data collection. This challenge can be addressed by a web-accessible and flexible patient data capture system that is supported by a common terminological system to facilitate data re-usability, sharing, and integration. We present OPIC, an Ontology-driven Patient Information Capture (OPIC) system that uses a domain-specific epilepsy and seizure ontology (EpSO) to (1) support structured entry of multi-modal epilepsy data, (2) proactively ensure quality of data through use of ontology terms in drop-down menus, and (3) identify and index clinically relevant ontology terms in free-text fields to improve accuracy of subsequent analytical queries (e.g. cohort identification). EpSO, modeled using the Web Ontology Language (OWL), conforms to the recommendations of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) classification and terminological commission. OPIC has been developed using agile software engineering methodology for rapid development cycles in close collaboration with domain expert and end users. We report the result from the initial deployment of OPIC at the University Hospitals Case Medical Center (UH CMC) epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU) as part of the NIH-funded project on Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). Preliminary user evaluation shows that OPIC has achieved its design objectives to be an intuitive patient information capturing system that also reduces the potential for data entry errors and variability in use of epilepsy terms.

  9. VNS in drug resistant epilepsy: preliminary report on a small group of patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In 1997 Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS) received approval from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as an adjunctive therapy in the treatment of medically intractable partial epilepsy in people aged 12 years and older who are ineligible for resective epilepsy surgery. Although the exact mechanisms of action are unknown, the use of VNS with children has increased, including those younger than 12 years of age, or those with generalized epilepsy. Methods We describe the outcome for the first group of nine patients, aged 8-28 years, who had pharmaco-resistant epilepsy and were treated with VNS. During the follow up, we gradually and slowly increased the parameters of the stimulation in order to assess the efficacy of VNS even at parameters which would usually be considered "non-therapeutic", along with possible side effects and changes in quality of life. Results At the last follow, up 1 patient was "seizures free", 3 were "very good responders", 3 were "good responders" and 2 were "non responders". We obtained an initial seizure reduction with low stimulation parameters, the highest current reached being 2.00 mA. This observation supports the possibility that, for younger patients, lower stimulation intensities than those commonly used in clinical practice for adults can be therapeutic. We also wanted to underline the reduction in seizure frequency (~91,7%) and the reduction in seizure duration (> 50%) in the patients affected by drug-resistant absence epilepsy. Adverse effects were mild, tolerable and, in most of cases, easily resolved by adjusting the stimulation parameters. Hoarseness of voice was the most frequent side effect. The improvements in the quality of life are relevant and seem to be independent of the VNS effect in controlling seizures. Conclusions Our small experience seems to confirm the efficacy and safety of VNS in drug resistant partial and generalized epilepsy in developing age groups. PMID:20398284

  10. Idiopathic childhood occipital epilepsy of Gastaut: report of 12 patients.

    PubMed

    Wakamoto, Hiroyuki; Nagao, Hideo; Fukuda, Mitsumasa; Watanabe, Shohei; Motoki, Takahiro; Ohmori, Hiromitsu; Ishii, Eiichi

    2011-03-01

    This study sought to present clinical and outcome data of patients with idiopathic childhood occipital epilepsy of Gastaut, to validate previously reported characteristics of this epilepsy. The study group was comprised of 12 affected children (three boys and nine girls), with a median age of onset at 10.3 years. Common ictal manifestations included elementary visual hallucinations (75.0%), blindness or blurring of vision (50.0%), headache (50.0%), and secondarily generalized tonic-clonic seizures (58.3%). Interictal electroencephalography revealed occipital spike-wave paroxysms reactive to eye closure and opening in all patients, accompanied by spike-wave activity in the extra-occipital areas in four (33.3%), and by generalized spike-wave discharges in two (16.7%). One patient exhibited the onset of occipital lobe seizures 1 year after manifesting absence epilepsy. Seizure remission occurred in 81.8% of cases, in half of which medication was discontinued by late adolescence. This study confirmed the previously delineated electroclinical features of epilepsy syndrome, with additional aspects including the frequent association of generalized tonic-clonic seizures and atypical evolution from childhood absence epilepsy.

  11. Reprogramming patient-derived cells to study the epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Parent, Jack M; Anderson, Stewart A

    2015-03-01

    The epilepsies and related disorders of brain circuitry present significant challenges associated with the use of human cells to study disease mechanisms and develop new therapies. Some of these obstacles are being overcome through the use of induced pluripotent stem cells to obtain patient-derived neural cells for in vitro studies and as a source of cell-based treatments. The field is evolving rapidly with the addition of genome-editing approaches and expanding protocols for generating different neural cell types and three-dimensional tissues, but the application of these techniques to neurological disorders, and particularly to the epilepsies, is in its infancy. We discuss the progress made and the distinct advantages and limitations of using patient-derived cells to study or treat epilepsy, as well as critical future directions for the field. PMID:25710838

  12. A follow-up study of cognitive function in young adults who had resective epilepsy surgery in childhood.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mary Lou; Olds, Janet; Snyder, Thomas; Elliott, Irene; Lach, Lucyna; Whiting, Sharon

    2014-03-01

    This study examined cognitive function in young adults who had epilepsy surgery in childhood. Thirty-seven individuals with medically intractable epilepsy with onset at 16 years or younger who had resective epilepsy surgery at least two years in the past (mean follow-up duration of 8.5 years) were assessed; of these, 13 had seizures within the year prior to the study, and the remainder had none. A comparison group of 16 individuals with childhood-onset intractable epilepsy who had not had surgery, all of whom had experienced at least one seizure in the past 12 months, was also included. The cognitive tests included measures of vocabulary, visuoconstructive ability, memory, and concept formation. Group differences were found only for the vocabulary and verbal memory tests, with the surgical group with seizures having the lowest performance. A subset of the surgical patients had preoperative data available on comparable tests, allowing for an examination of performance over time. Vocabulary scores were higher at follow-up, a finding which was present irrespective of seizure status. The results suggest that after epilepsy surgery in childhood or adolescence, few improvements in cognitive skills related to surgery or seizure outcome are to be expected.

  13. Etiology of Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Patients with Epilepsy: Experience of Tertiary Referral Hospital in Sapporo City, Japan

    PubMed Central

    MIYATA, Kei; OCHI, Satoko; ENATSU, Rei; WANIBUCHI, Masahiko; MIKUNI, Nobuhiro; INOUE, Hiroyuki; UEMURA, Shuji; TANNO, Katsuhiko; NARIMATSU, Eichi; MAEKAWA, Kunihiko; USUI, Keiko; MIZOBUCHI, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that epilepsy patients had higher risk of sudden death than that of the general population. However, in Japan, there is very little literature on the observational research conducted on sudden fatal events in epilepsy. We performed a single-center, retrospective study on all the out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients treated in our emergency department between 2007 and 2013. Among the OHCA patients, we extracted those with a history of epilepsy and then analyzed the characteristics of the fatal events and the background of epilepsy. From 1,823 OHCA patients, a total of 10 cases were enrolled in our study. The median age was 34 years at the time of the incident [9–52 years; interquartile range (IQR), 24–45]. We determined that half of our cases resulted from external causes of death such as drowning and suffocation and the other half were classified as sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). In addition, asphyxia was implicated as the cause in eight cases. Only the two near-drowning patients were immediately resuscitated, but the remaining eight patients died. The median age of first onset of epilepsy was 12 years (0.5–30; IQR, 3–21), and the median disease duration was 25 years (4–38; IQR, 6–32). Patients with active epilepsy accounted for half of our series and they were undergoing poly anti-epileptic drug therapy. The fatal events related to epilepsy tended to occur in the younger adult by external causes. An appropriate therapeutic intervention and a thorough observation were needed for its prevention. PMID:26948699

  14. Psychiatric disorders and suicidal behavior in neurotypical young adults with childhood-onset epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Baldin, Elisa; Hesdorffer, Dale C; Caplan, Rochelle; Berg, Anne T.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We examined the association between lifetime, current history of psychiatric disorders, suicidal thoughts and behaviors with childhood-onset epilepsies in a community-based cohort of young adults. METHODS Cases were neurotypical (normal neurological, cognitive, and imaging exams and no evidence of a brain insult responsible for the epilepsy) young adults with childhood-onset epilepsy followed since the onset of their epilepsy approximately 15 years earlier and recruited as part of a community-based study. They were compared to two different control groups, siblings and external controls from the National Comorbidity Survey-Replication (NCS-R). The Diagnostic Interview Survey assessed lifetime and current DSM-IV-TR diagnoses of mood disorders and anxiety disorders. Suicidal thoughts and suicide attempt were assessed using the Diagnostic Interview Survey for Children-IV and the Diagnostic Interview Survey. RESULTS Two hundred fifty-seven cases and 134 sibling controls participated in the DIS portion of the young adult assessment. Comparing cases both to their sibling controls and to the controls drawn from the NCS-R, we did not find any evidence to suggest a higher prevalence of lifetime and current mood or anxiety disorders, suicidal thoughts and suicide attempt in young adults with childhood-onset epilepsies. SIGNIFICANCE Our findings, from a community-based sample of neurotypical young adults, do not suggest a substantial or lasting association between childhood epilepsy and psychiatric disorders and suicidal behavior. PMID:26387857

  15. Neurobehavior inventory: correlation with clinical aspects and quality of life in patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Tedrus, Glória Maria Almeida Souza; Fonseca, Lineu Corrêa; Carvalho, Rachel Marin

    2013-08-01

    Fifty-five adult patients with epilepsy were evaluated, and the Neurobehavior Inventory (NBI) was administered. The relationship between the NBI data and clinical aspects and quality of life (QoL) was studied. The total NBI score was 58 ± 18.2. The domains with the highest scores were "religious conviction", "orderliness", and "sense of personal destiny". There was a significant difference in "hatred and revenge" and "religious conviction" according to the epileptic syndrome. The "physical well-being" score was higher for patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with right hippocampal sclerosis than for left sclerosis (2.77 ± 1.6 × 1.57 ± 0.5, respectively, p = 0.002). The total NBI score was higher in patients with psychiatric comorbidities and with depression according to the Hamilton Depression Scale and was negatively correlated with the "emotional well-being" QOLIE score (-0.398, p = 0.005). The NBI findings showed that behavioral changes can be present in various epilepsies and that there is a complex bidirectional neurobiological relationship between epilepsy and psychiatric comorbidity, sustained by common physiopathological mechanisms. PMID:23770631

  16. Mortality from Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP) in a Cohort of Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiani, R.; Tyrer, F.; Jesu, A.; Bhaumik, S.; Gangavati, S.; Walker, G.; Kazmi, S.; Barrett, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: People with intellectual disability (ID) and epilepsy are more likely to die prematurely than the general population. A significant number of deaths in people with epilepsy may be potentially preventable through better seizure control, regular monitoring and raising awareness among patients and carers. The aim of this project was to…

  17. Safety of tianeptine use in patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jangsup; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Shin, Jung-Won; Lim, Jung-Ah; Byun, Jung-Ick; Lee, Soon-Tae; Chu, Kon; Lee, Sang Kun

    2014-05-01

    Depression is a frequent comorbidity in patients with epilepsy (PWE). However, it is often undertreated because of concerns of seizure exacerbation by antidepressant treatment. The effect of tianeptine on seizure frequency is not known as yet. Thus, we aimed to evaluate the influence of tianeptine on the seizure frequency in PWE. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of PWE who received tianeptine between January 2006 and June 2013 at the Epilepsy Center of Seoul National University Hospital. Patients were excluded if the dose or type of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) they took was altered at the start of tianeptine treatment or if the treatment period of tianeptine was <3 months. A total of 74 PWE were enrolled in our study (male: 32, mean age: 41.9±14.5). Sixty-nine patients had localization-related epilepsy, and 5 had idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). Mean seizure frequency during the 3-month period just after tianeptine exposure was compared with the baseline seizure frequency, which showed no change in 69 (93.2%) patients, decrease in 2 (2.7%) patients, and increase in 3 patients (4.1%). The type of epileptic syndrome, the baseline seizure frequency, and the number of coadministered AEDs did not influence the change in seizure frequency after tianeptine prescription. Change in seizure frequency did not differ between the patients given tianeptine as an additive antidepressant and those given tianeptine as a replacement antidepressant. Our data suggest that tianeptine can be prescribed safely to PWE with depression without increasing the seizure frequency regardless of the baseline severity of epilepsy. Tianeptine may be actively considered as a first-choice antidepressant or as an alternative antidepressant in PWE with depression.

  18. Safety of tianeptine use in patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jangsup; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Shin, Jung-Won; Lim, Jung-Ah; Byun, Jung-Ick; Lee, Soon-Tae; Chu, Kon; Lee, Sang Kun

    2014-05-01

    Depression is a frequent comorbidity in patients with epilepsy (PWE). However, it is often undertreated because of concerns of seizure exacerbation by antidepressant treatment. The effect of tianeptine on seizure frequency is not known as yet. Thus, we aimed to evaluate the influence of tianeptine on the seizure frequency in PWE. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of PWE who received tianeptine between January 2006 and June 2013 at the Epilepsy Center of Seoul National University Hospital. Patients were excluded if the dose or type of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) they took was altered at the start of tianeptine treatment or if the treatment period of tianeptine was <3 months. A total of 74 PWE were enrolled in our study (male: 32, mean age: 41.9±14.5). Sixty-nine patients had localization-related epilepsy, and 5 had idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). Mean seizure frequency during the 3-month period just after tianeptine exposure was compared with the baseline seizure frequency, which showed no change in 69 (93.2%) patients, decrease in 2 (2.7%) patients, and increase in 3 patients (4.1%). The type of epileptic syndrome, the baseline seizure frequency, and the number of coadministered AEDs did not influence the change in seizure frequency after tianeptine prescription. Change in seizure frequency did not differ between the patients given tianeptine as an additive antidepressant and those given tianeptine as a replacement antidepressant. Our data suggest that tianeptine can be prescribed safely to PWE with depression without increasing the seizure frequency regardless of the baseline severity of epilepsy. Tianeptine may be actively considered as a first-choice antidepressant or as an alternative antidepressant in PWE with depression. PMID:24739449

  19. Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy in Adults with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Jerry R.; Bodfish, James W.

    2000-01-01

    Medical records of residents of a facility for persons with mental retardation from January 1, 1978, through December 31, 1997, were analyzed to identify incidence of sudden unexpected death for 180 individuals with and 125 without comorbid epilepsy. Eighty deaths were identified, with 55 occurring in those with epilepsy. (Contains 15 references.)…

  20. Epilepsy, sex hormones and antiepileptic drugs in female patients.

    PubMed

    Verrotti, Alberto; D'Egidio, Claudia; Coppola, Giangennaro; Parisi, Pasquale; Chiarelli, Francesco

    2009-12-01

    Women with epilepsy have a higher incidence of reproductive endocrine disorders than the general female population. These alterations include polycystic ovary syndrome, hyperandrogenemia, infertility, hypothalamic amenorrhea and hyperprolactinemia. Reproductive dysfunction is attributed both to epilepsy itself and to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Focal epileptic discharges from the temporal lobe may have a direct influence on the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, thus altering the release of sex steroid hormones, including the production of luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, gonadotropin-releasing hormone and prolactin. AEDs may modulate hormone release from the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and they may alter the metabolism of sex hormones and their binding proteins. Hepatic enzyme-inducing AEDs, such as carbamazepine and phenytoin, may be most clearly linked to altered metabolism of sex steroid hormones, but valproic acid, an enzyme inhibitor, has also been associated with a frequent occurrence of polycystic ovary syndrome and hyperandrogenism in women with epilepsy. Therefore, treatment of epilepsy and selection of AEDs are important for reproductive health in female patients. The aim of the present review is to critically evaluate the recently published data concerning the interactions between sex hormones, epilepsy and AEDs.

  1. Outpatient education reduces emergency room use by patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Franchette T; Hoang, Kathy; Hollen, Christopher; Swearingen, Richard; Hakimi, Andrea S; King, Jeanne Ann; Thompson, David

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is a costly diagnosis, with emergency room (ER) visits and hospital admissions comprising a large portion of total direct cost. An educational intervention to decrease the number of ER visits was implemented on outpatients with epilepsy, using educational handouts and DVD. The number of ER visits declined significantly in the four months following intervention compared with the preceding four months. This finding supports patient education as a valuable tool to reduce ER use, which may, in turn, cut down on health-care cost. PMID:25499153

  2. The significance of folic acid for epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Moore, James Layne

    2005-09-01

    The following is a comprehensive review of the current understanding of the many important roles of folic acid in the health of patients with epilepsy. A review of past and current literature reveals that folic acid plays important roles in the areas of hematology, neurology, development, and reproduction. Also highlighted are new areas for exploration.

  3. Chronic psychosis in epilepsy. A clinical investigation of 29 patients.

    PubMed

    Parnas, J; Korsgaard, S; Krautwald, O; Jensen, P S

    1982-10-01

    A clinical study comprising psychiatric, psychological and neurological examination of 29 patients suffering from long-term psychosis and severe epilepsy was performed. Only five patients fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of schizophrenia. They differed from the rest of the patients by being less organic and having infrequent laterality to the left of their epileptogenic focus. They were regarded as genuine schizophrenics, while the pathogenesis of the remaining sample was considered multifactorial, including both organic and psycho-social causes. PMID:6816012

  4. Clinical characteristics of children and young adults with co-occurring autism spectrum disorder and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    El Achkar, Christelle M; Spence, Sarah J

    2015-06-01

    The association between autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and epilepsy has been described for decades, and yet we still lack the full understanding of this relationship both clinically and at the pathophysiologic level. This review evaluates the available data in the literature pertaining to the clinical characteristics of patients with autism spectrum disorder who develop epilepsy and, conversely, patients with epilepsy who develop autism spectrum disorder. Many studies demonstrate an increased risk of epilepsy in individuals with ASD, but rates vary widely. This variability is likely secondary to the different study methods employed, including the study population and definitions of the disorders. Established risk factors for an increased risk of epilepsy in patients with ASD include intellectual disability and female gender. There is some evidence of an increased risk of epilepsy associated with other factors such as ASD etiology (syndromic), severity of autistic features, developmental regression, and family history. No one epilepsy syndrome or seizure type has been associated, although focal or localization-related seizures are often reported. The age at seizure onset can vary from infancy to adulthood with some evidence of a bimodal age distribution. The severity and intractability of epilepsy in populations with ASD have not been well studied, and there is very little investigation of the role that epilepsy plays in the autism behavioral phenotype. There is evidence of abnormal EEGs (especially epileptiform abnormalities) in children with ASD even in the absence of clinical seizures, but very little is known about this phenomenon and what it means. The development of autism spectrum disorder in patients with epilepsy is less well studied, but there is evidence that the ASD risk is greater in those with epilepsy than in the general population. One of the risk factors is intellectual disability, and there is some evidence that the presence of a particular seizure

  5. Selenium and topiramate attenuates blood oxidative toxicity in patients with epilepsy: a clinical pilot study.

    PubMed

    Yürekli, Vedat Ali; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa

    2013-05-01

    It is well known that oxidative stress plays an important role in the etiology of epilepsy. We investigated effects of selenium (Se) and topiramate (TPM) combination supplementation on antioxidant and oxidant values in control and patients with epilepsy and refractory epilepsy. For the aim, we used control (n = 19), epilepsy + TPM (n = 19), epilepsy + TPM + Se (n = 15) groups. We also used control (n = 15), refractory epilepsy (n = 15), and refractory epilepsy + Se (n = 8) groups. TPM (0.2 mg/daily) and Se, as sodium selenite (twice daily with 0.1 mg doses), were orally supplemented to the patients for 45 days. Erythrocyte lipid peroxidation levels were higher in refractory epilepsy groups than in control although its level and seizure numbers were decreased in TPM and TPM + Se supplemented groups of the patients. The erythrocyte reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), plasma total antioxidant status (TAS), and vitamin E concentration in refractory epilepsy group were lower than in control. However, the erythrocyte and plasma TAS, erythrocyte GSH and GSH-Px, and plasma vitamins A and C values were increased either by Se or Se + TPM in epilepsy and refractory epilepsy groups. There were no effects of TPM and Se on plasma β-carotene values in the groups. In conclusion, TPM and selenium caused protective effects on the epilepsy and refractory epilepsy-induced oxidative injury by inhibiting free radical production and supporting antioxidant redox system.

  6. Validity of the Neurology Quality of Life (Neuro-QoL) Measurement System in Adult Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Victorson, David; Cavazos, Jose E.; Holmes, Gregory L.; Reder, Anthony T.; Wojna, Valerie; Nowinski, Cindy; Miller, Deborah; Buono, Sarah; Mueller, Allison; Moy, Claudia; Cella, David

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder that results in recurring seizures and can have a significant adverse effect on health related quality of life (HRQL). Neuro-QoL is an NINDS-funded system of patient reported outcome measures for neurology clinical research, which was designed to provide a precise and standardized way to measure HRQL in epilepsy and other neurological disorders. Using mixed-methods and item response theory-based approaches, we developed generic item banks and targeted scales for adults and children with major neurological disorders. This paper provides empirical results from a clinical validation study with a sample of adults diagnosed with epilepsy. One hundred twenty one people diagnosed with epilepsy participated, of which the majority were male (62%), Caucasian (95%), with a mean age of 47.3 (SD=16.9). Baseline assessments included Neuro-QoL short forms and general and external validity measures. Neuro-QoL short forms that are not typically found in other epilepsy-specific HRQL instruments include Stigma, Sleep Disturbance, Emotional and Behavioral Dyscontrol and Positive Affect & Well-being. Neuro-QoL short forms demonstrated adequate reliability (internal consistency range = .86–.96; test-retest range = .57–.89). Pearson correlations (p<.01) between Neuro-QoL forms of emotional distress (Anxiety, Depression, Stigma) and the QOLIE-31 Emotional Well-being Subscale were in the moderate to strong range (r’s = .66, .71 & .53, respectively), as were relations with the PROMIS Global Mental Health subscale (r’s = .59, .74 & .52, respectively). Moderate correlations were observed between Neuro-QoL Social Role Performance and Satisfaction and the QOLIE-31 Social Function (r’s = .58 & .52, respectively). In measuring aspects of physical function, the Neuro-QoL Mobility and Upper Extremity forms demonstrated moderate associations with the PROMIS Global Physical Function Subscale (r’s = .60 & .61, respectively). Neuro-QoL measures of

  7. Factor analyses of an Adult Epilepsy Self-Management Measurement Instrument (AESMMI).

    PubMed

    Escoffery, Cam; Bamps, Yvan; LaFrance, W Curt; Stoll, Shelley; Shegog, Ross; Buelow, Janice; Shafer, Patricia; Thompson, Nancy J; McGee, Robin E; Hatfield, Katherine

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the psychometric properties of an enhanced Adult Epilepsy Self-Management Measurement Instrument (AESMMI). An instrument of 113 items, covering 10 a priori self-management domains, was generated through a multiphase process, based on a review of the literature, validated epilepsy and other chronic condition self-management scales and expert input. Reliability and exploratory factor analyses were conducted on data collected from 422 adults with epilepsy. The instrument was reduced to 65 items, converging on 11 factors: Health-care Communication, Coping, Treatment Management, Seizure Tracking, Social Support, Seizure Response, Wellness, Medication Adherence, Safety, Stress Management, and Proactivity. Exploratory factors supported the construct validity for 6 a priori domains, albeit with significant changes in the retained items or in their scope and 3 new factors. One a priori domain was split in 2 subscales pertaining to treatment. The configuration of the 11 factors provides additional insight into epilepsy self-management behaviors. Internal consistency reliability of the 65-item instrument was high (α=.935). Correlations with independent measures of health status, quality of life, depression, seizure severity, and life impact of epilepsy further validated the instrument. This instrument shows potential for use in research and clinical settings and for assessing intervention outcomes and self-management behaviors in adults with epilepsy.

  8. Terminology and classification of seizures and epilepsy in veterinary patients.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Christopher L

    2013-05-01

    The classification of epileptic seizures and epilepsy is a controversial and dynamic topic that has undergone many iterations in human medicine. The International League against Epilepsy is a multinational organization that has formed a number of task forces and subcommittees to study this issue, and has ratified several reports outlining recommended terminology and classification schemes for human patients. Veterinary publications on this issue have generally adapted these schemes to fit small animal patients, but a formally endorsed system to classify seizures and epilepsy has never been developed for veterinary patients. This review outlines the classification systems that have been published for human patients and summarizes previous efforts by veterinary authors to utilize these methods. Finally, a set of definitions and terminology for use in veterinary patients is proposed, which includes a glossary of descriptive terminology for ictal semiology and a diagnostic scheme for classification of individual patients. This document is intended as a starting point of discussion, which will hopefully eventually result in a formally ratified document that will be useful for communication between health professionals, the design of clinical trials and for guiding treatment decisions and prognostication for veterinary patients with seizures.

  9. The history of invasive EEG evaluation in epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Reif, Philipp S; Strzelczyk, Adam; Rosenow, Felix

    2016-10-01

    Modern invasive EEG recording techniques are the result of an interdisciplinary research process between neurologists and neurosurgeons that began in the 19th century. In the beginning, stimulation studies were the basis of our understanding of cortical functions. After the introduction of EEG in humans by Hans Berger and its implementation in diagnostic procedures in epilepsy patients, a new era began when Forster and Altenburger performed the first invasive EEG recording five years later. The fruitful work of Wilder Penfield and Herbert Jasper was the basis of a new understanding of epilepsy and influenced the investigations of the next generation of researchers. The development of stereotactic devices advanced by Jean Talairach and Jean Bancaud was fundamental to the understanding of deep brain functions and pathophysiological processes in epilepsy patients. In subsequent decades, new recording techniques were established and long-term video-EEG-recordings became the gold standard in presurgical evaluation. The development of imaging techniques allowed a combination of structural and electrophysiological data and restricted the indications for invasive evaluations, but also led to new concepts in the diagnostic process, including the epileptogenic network and the pathophysiological understanding of epileptogenic tissue. The following article provides an overview of the history of invasive EEG evaluation in epilepsy from the 19th century until today. PMID:27131772

  10. Disparities in surgery among patients with intractable epilepsy in a universal health system

    PubMed Central

    Shariff, Salimah Z.; Liu, Kuan; Leonard, Sean; Saposnik, Gustavo; Garg, Amit X.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the use of epilepsy surgery in patients with medically intractable epilepsy in a publicly funded universal health care system. Methods: We performed a population-based retrospective cohort study using linked health care databases for Ontario, Canada, between 2001 and 2010. We identified all patients with medically intractable epilepsy, defined as those with seizures that did not respond to at least 2 adequate trials of seizure medications. We assessed the proportion of patients who had epilepsy surgery within the following 2 years. We further identified the characteristics associated with epilepsy surgery. Results: A total of 10,661 patients were identified with medically intractable epilepsy (mean age 47 years, 51% male); most (74%) did not have other comorbidities. Within 2 years of being defined as medically intractable, only 124 patients (1.2%) underwent epilepsy surgery. Death occurred in 12% of those with medically intractable epilepsy. Those who underwent the procedure were younger and had fewer comorbidities compared to those who did not. Conclusion: In our setting of publicly funded universal health care, more than 10% of patients died within 2 years of developing medically intractable epilepsy. Epilepsy surgery may be an effective treatment for some patients; however, fewer than 2% of patients who may have benefited from epilepsy surgery received it. PMID:26643546

  11. Guidelines and Quality Standards for Adults with Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Mary Jo; McMillan, Katharine K

    2016-05-01

    Guidelines and quality measures for epilepsy care have the potential to improve the quality of epilepsy care. Quality measures are increasingly used for pay-for-performance. This article describes different guidelines and quality measures that have been used to identify best practices, types of best practices for use in clinical care developed using each of these approaches, and information on how to interpret the recommendations in specific guidelines and quality measures described elsewhere in this issue. PMID:27086980

  12. Pharmacological treatment of psychiatric comorbidity in patients with refractory epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Karouni, Mohamad; Henning, Oliver; Larsson, Pål G; Johannessen, Svein I; Johannessen Landmark, Cecilie

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to describe the use of psychopharmacological drugs for the treatment of a stated or presumed psychiatric comorbid condition in patients with refractory epilepsy and discuss the clinical implications of such treatment. The study was a retrospective descriptive study in patients admitted to the National Center for Epilepsy in Norway based on medication described in medical records. The mean age was 40 years (range: 9-90), and the gender ratio was 56/44% female/male. Psychotropic drugs (antidepressants and antipsychotics) were used to a lower extent than in the general population in Norway. Drugs for ADHD were predominantly used in children. The prevalence of patients treated with psychiatric comedication was 13% (143 of 1139 patients). The patients used two to eight concomitant CNS-active drugs, which calls for the close monitoring of potential pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions and should challenge clinicians to achieve a less complex pharmacotherapy. Psychiatric comorbidity is an important concern in patients with refractory epilepsy and may be undertreated.

  13. Prevalence of Epilepsy and Associated Health Service Utilization and Mortality among Patients with Intellectual Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Christopher Ll.; Baxter, Helen; Kerr, Michael P.

    2003-01-01

    Examination of the prevalence of epilepsy and health service utilization in 1,595 people with intellectual disabilities in Wales found 16.1% had epilepsy. Standardized activity ratios were 3.07, 2.03, and 3.09 for inpatients, outpatients, and accident and emergency, respectively. Patients with intellectual disability and co-existing epilepsy used…

  14. [Clinical presentations of the secondary bilateral synchronization syndrome in adults with epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Fedin, A I; Generalov, V O; Amcheslavskaia, E V; Mishniakova, L P; Sadykov, T R

    2008-01-01

    One thousand eight hundreds and eighty patients with symptomatic and cryptogenic forms of focal epilepsy have been studied. Ninety patients (4.7%) had the secondary bilateral synchronization (SBS) syndrome in the EEG. Criteria of the syndrome are the presence of focal epileptiform activity in the EEG and SBS detected during the long-term video-EEG monitoring. In this group of patients, secondary generalized tonic-clonic, myoclonic and complex partial seizures were found. The clinical presentations of focal epilepsy were similar to the syndromes of idiopathic epilepsy in most cases. Long-term video-EEG monitoring is a method of choice in the instrumental diagnostics of these forms of epilepsy which are different in genesis and prognosis but similar in the kinematic characteristics.

  15. Assessment of quality of life in epilepsy patients receiving anti-epileptic drugs in a tertiary care teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Pimpalkhute, Sonali A.; Bajait, Chaitali S.; Dakhale, Ganesh N.; Sontakke, Smita D.; Jaiswal, Kavita M.; Kinge, Parag

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Health-related quality of life (QOL) is an important outcome in epilepsy treatment. Very few studies have been carried out on the quality of life in epilepsy (QOLIE-31) in India. The present study aimed to determine the level of health-related QOLIE-31 in patients of epilepsy. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study conducted in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Respondents were adults aged at least 18-year-old with a diagnosis of epilepsy. QOLIE-31 was used for collecting data on health-related QOL. The unpaired t-test or one-way analysis of variance was used to compare means of QOL scores between groups. Results: Totally, 60 patients of epilepsy were included in the study. The mean (standard deviation) total score of QOLIE-31 was 64.61. A score of cognitive and medication effect were significantly better in carbamazepine group as compared to valproate group. Conclusions: Patients on monotherapy had a better QOL as compared to patients receiving polytherapy. PMID:26600647

  16. A health-related quality of life instrument for patients evaluated for epilepsy surgery.

    PubMed

    Vickrey, B G; Hays, R D; Graber, J; Rausch, R; Engel, J; Brook, R H

    1992-04-01

    The goals of surgery in treating intractable epilepsy are to eliminate seizures and improve quality of life. This report describes the development of the Epilepsy Surgery Inventory (ESI)-55, a 55-item measure of health-related quality of life for epilepsy patients. The ESI-55 includes the following scales (number of items in parentheses): health perceptions (9), energy/fatigue (4), overall quality of life (2), social function (2), emotional well-being (5), cognitive function (5), physical function (10), pain (2), and three separate scales of role limitations due to emotional, physical, or memory problems (5 items each). Also included is one change in health item. The ESI-55 was completed by 89% of 224 adults who had undergone a protocol evaluation for epilepsy surgery since 1974. Alpha internal consistency reliability coefficients ranged from 0.76 to 0.88 except for social function (alpha = 0.68). Multitrait scaling analyses supported item discrimination across scales. Factor analysis confirmed previously identified mental and physical health factors, and yielded a third factor defined by cognitive function and role limitations scales. Construct validity was supported by correlations of the ESI-55 with a mood profile instrument. Analysis of ESI-55 scale scores by seizure classification showed that the 44 patients who were seizure-free following surgery scored higher than did 55 patients who continued to have seizures (P less than 0.05 for all comparisons); 43 patients having seizures without loss of consciousness scored in between. Results of this study indicate that the ESI-55 is reliable, valid, and sensitive to differences in seizure status. PMID:1556879

  17. Epilepsy in patients with gliomas: incidence and control of seizures.

    PubMed

    Iuchi, Toshihiko; Hasegawa, Yuzo; Kawasaki, Koichiro; Sakaida, Tsukasa

    2015-01-01

    Brain tumor-related epilepsy (BTRE) is a unique condition that is distinct from primary epilepsy. The aim of this retrospective study was to clarify the epidemiology and results of treatment of BTRE in a single institution. From a database of 121 consecutive patients with supratentorial gliomas treated at Chiba Cancer Center from 2006-2012, the incidence and control of seizures before and after surgery were retrospectively evaluated. Epilepsy occurred in 33.9% of patients before surgery. All patients received prophylactic anti-epileptic drugs (AED) during surgery; however, seizures occurred in 9.1% of patients within the first postoperative week. During follow-up, seizures occurred in 48.3% of patients. The overall incidence of seizures was 73.7% in patients with World Health Organization Grade II gliomas, 66.7% in those with Grade III and 56.8% in those with Grade IV gliomas. Levetiracetam was very well tolerated. However, carbamazepine and phenytoin were poorly tolerated because of adverse effects. AED were discontinued in 56 patients. Fifteen of these patients (26.8%) had further seizures, half occurring within 3 months and 80% within 6 months of AED withdrawal. No clinical factors that indicated it was safe to discontinue AED were identified. The unpredictable epileptogenesis associated with gliomas and their excision requires prolonged administration of AED. To maintain quality of life and to safely and effectively control the tumor, it is necessary to select AED that do not adversely affect cognitive function or interact with other drugs, including anti-cancer agents.

  18. Patients with intractable epilepsy have low melatonin, which increases following seizures

    PubMed Central

    Bazil, Carl W.; Short, Douglas; Crispin, David; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin, which is used to treat sleep disorders, has anticonvulsant properties. The authors measured salivary melatonin and cortisol, at baseline and following seizures, in patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy and controls. Melatonin was reduced in patients with epilepsy at baseline compared with controls, and increased threefold following seizures. Cortisol also increased following seizures. Patients with intractable epilepsy have low baseline melatonin levels that increase dramatically following seizures. PMID:11113238

  19. 3D source localization of interictal spikes in epilepsy patients with MRI lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Lei; Worrell, Gregory A.; Lagerlund, Terrence D.; He, Bin

    2006-08-01

    The present study aims to accurately localize epileptogenic regions which are responsible for epileptic activities in epilepsy patients by means of a new subspace source localization approach, i.e. first principle vectors (FINE), using scalp EEG recordings. Computer simulations were first performed to assess source localization accuracy of FINE in the clinical electrode set-up. The source localization results from FINE were compared with the results from a classic subspace source localization approach, i.e. MUSIC, and their differences were tested statistically using the paired t-test. Other factors influencing the source localization accuracy were assessed statistically by ANOVA. The interictal epileptiform spike data from three adult epilepsy patients with medically intractable partial epilepsy and well-defined symptomatic MRI lesions were then studied using both FINE and MUSIC. The comparison between the electrical sources estimated by the subspace source localization approaches and MRI lesions was made through the coregistration between the EEG recordings and MRI scans. The accuracy of estimations made by FINE and MUSIC was also evaluated and compared by R2 statistic, which was used to indicate the goodness-of-fit of the estimated sources to the scalp EEG recordings. The three-concentric-spheres head volume conductor model was built for each patient with three spheres of different radii which takes the individual head size and skull thickness into consideration. The results from computer simulations indicate that the improvement of source spatial resolvability and localization accuracy of FINE as compared with MUSIC is significant when simulated sources are closely spaced, deep, or signal-to-noise ratio is low in a clinical electrode set-up. The interictal electrical generators estimated by FINE and MUSIC are in concordance with the patients' structural abnormality, i.e. MRI lesions, in all three patients. The higher R2 values achieved by FINE than MUSIC

  20. Rate and complications of adult epilepsy surgery in North America: Analysis of multiple databases.

    PubMed

    Rolston, John D; Englot, Dario J; Knowlton, Robert C; Chang, Edward F

    2016-08-01

    Epilepsy surgery is under-utilized, but recent studies reach conflicting conclusions regarding whether epilepsy surgery rates are currently declining, increasing, or remaining steady. However, data in these prior studies are biased toward high-volume epilepsy centers, or originate from sources that do not disaggregate various procedure types. All major epilepsy surgery procedures were extracted from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Part B National Summary Data File and the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. Procedure rates, trends, and complications were analyzed, and patient-level predictors of postoperative adverse events were identified. Between 2000-2013, 6200 cases of epilepsy surgery were identified. Temporal lobectomy was the most common procedure (59% of cases), and most did not utilize electrocorticography (63-64%). Neither temporal nor extratemporal lobe epilepsy surgery rates changed significantly during the study period, suggesting no change in utilization. Adverse events, including major and minor complications, occurred in 15.3% of temporal lobectomies and 55.6% of hemispherectomies. Our findings suggest stagnant rates of both temporal and extratemporal lobe epilepsy surgery across U.S. surgical centers over the past decade. This finding contrasts with prior reports suggesting a recent dramatic decline in temporal lobectomy rates at high-volume epilepsy centers. We also observed higher rates of adverse events when both low- and high-volume centers were examined together, as compared to reports from high-volume centers alone. This is consistent with the presence of a volume-outcome relationship in epilepsy surgery. PMID:27259069

  1. 16p13.11 microdeletion in a patient with hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Miteff, Christina I; Smith, Robert L; Bain, Nicole L; Subramanian, Gopinath; Brown, Janis E; Kamien, Ben

    2015-01-01

    We describe a patient with hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome. The pathophysiology of hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome remains uncertain and there are probably multiple potential contributing factors. Our patient had a chromosomal 16p13.11 microdeletion that confers susceptibility to various types of epilepsy. This is the first report detailing an association of hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome with a 16p13.11 deletion and identifies another potential causal factor for hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome. PMID:24453159

  2. Behavior Problems: Differences among Intellectually Disabled Adults with Co-Morbid Autism Spectrum Disorders and Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kimberly R. M.; Matson, Johnny L.

    2010-01-01

    Behavior problems such as aggression, property destruction, stereotypy, self-injurious behavior, and other disruptive behavior are commonly observed among adults with intellectual disabilities (ID), autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and epilepsy residing at state-run facilities. However, it is unknown how these populations differ on behavior…

  3. Psychopathology: Differences among Adults with Intellectually Disabled, Comorbid Autism Spectrum Disorders and Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kimberly R. M.; Matson, Johnny L.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to systematically examine group differences among adults with intellectual disabilities (ID), comorbid autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and epilepsy through a detailed exploration of the characteristics that these disorders present in the area of psychopathology. Previous studies indicating that individuals with ID have…

  4. Intracranial Cortical Calcifications in a Focal Epilepsy Patient with Pseudohypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ye Sel; Park, Jihyung; Park, Yoonkyung; Hwang, KyoungJin; Koo, Dae Lim; Kim, Daeyoung; Seo, Dae-Won

    2016-06-01

    Patients with chronic parathyroid dysfunction often have intracranial calcification in deep gray matter (GM) and subcortical white matter (WM) of their brain. Some of them are also epilepsy patients. Although cortical etiologies are main cause of epileptic seizure, cortical calcification has not been reported in these patients. We report a newly diagnosed focal epilepsy patient whose brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed intracranial calcifications in cortical as well as subcortical areas. Blood lab revealed that he had hypocalcemia due to pseudohypoparathyroidism. Video EEG monitoring revealed the ictal EEG mainly consist of polymorphic delta to theta waves with maximum at right temporal area followed by background attenuation and muscle artifacts. The interictal EEG showed multiple focal spike-wave discharges. After given oral calcium and calcitriol supplement, his calcium and phosphorous level normalized and he remains seizure free. This is the first case to show cortical calcification in a patient with pseudohypoparathyroidism. Cortical calcification could be an important measure of seizure burden in these patients and thus sophisticated imaging protocols should be used to visualize the extent of calcium deposits. PMID:27390678

  5. Intracranial Cortical Calcifications in a Focal Epilepsy Patient with Pseudohypoparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ye Sel; Park, Jihyung; Park, Yoonkyung; Hwang, KyoungJin; Koo, Dae Lim; Kim, Daeyoung; Seo, Dae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic parathyroid dysfunction often have intracranial calcification in deep gray matter (GM) and subcortical white matter (WM) of their brain. Some of them are also epilepsy patients. Although cortical etiologies are main cause of epileptic seizure, cortical calcification has not been reported in these patients. We report a newly diagnosed focal epilepsy patient whose brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed intracranial calcifications in cortical as well as subcortical areas. Blood lab revealed that he had hypocalcemia due to pseudohypoparathyroidism. Video EEG monitoring revealed the ictal EEG mainly consist of polymorphic delta to theta waves with maximum at right temporal area followed by background attenuation and muscle artifacts. The interictal EEG showed multiple focal spike-wave discharges. After given oral calcium and calcitriol supplement, his calcium and phosphorous level normalized and he remains seizure free. This is the first case to show cortical calcification in a patient with pseudohypoparathyroidism. Cortical calcification could be an important measure of seizure burden in these patients and thus sophisticated imaging protocols should be used to visualize the extent of calcium deposits. PMID:27390678

  6. Thoughts, emotions, and dissociative features differentiate patients with epilepsy from patients with psychogenic nonepileptic spells (PNESs).

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Rick; Popescu, Alexandra; Ghearing, Gena; Bagic, Anto

    2015-10-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic spells (PNESs) are often very difficult to treat, which may be, in part, related to the limited information known about what a person experiences while having PNESs. For this retrospective study, thoughts, emotions, and dissociative features during a spell were evaluated in 351 patients diagnosed with PNESs (N=223) or epilepsy (N=128). We found that a statistically higher number of thoughts, emotions, and dissociative symptoms were endorsed by patients with PNESs versus patients with epilepsy. Patients with PNESs reported significantly more anxiety and frustration, but not depression, compared with those with epilepsy. Emotions and dissociations, but not thoughts, and a history of any type of abuse were endorsed significantly more often by patients with PNESs. Patients with PNESs are prone to having poor outcomes, and interventions focusing on their actual experiences may be helpful for treatment planning.

  7. WMS-III performance in epilepsy patients following temporal lobectomy.

    PubMed

    Doss, Robert C; Chelune, Gordon J; Naugle, Richard I

    2004-03-01

    We examined performances on the Wechsler Memory Scale-3rd Edition (WMS-III) among patients who underwent temporal lobectomy for the control of medically intractable epilepsy. There were 51 right (RTL) and 56 left (LTL) temporal lobectomy patients. All patients were left hemisphere speech-dominant. The LTL and RTL patients were comparable in terms of general demographic, epilepsy, and intellectual/attention factors. Multivariate analyses revealed a significant crossover interaction (p <.001), with the RTL group scoring significantly lower on the visual than auditory indexes while the LTL group scored significantly lower on the auditory than visual memory indexes. Within-group pairwise analyses revealed statistically significant auditory versus visual index score comparisons (all p <.001) for both surgical groups. Discriminant analysis (p <.001) identified Verbal Paired Associates I, Faces I, and Family Pictures II to significantly discriminate RTL and LTL patients, with an overall correct classification rate of 81.3%. Our findings suggest that the WMS-III is sensitive to modality-specific memory performance associated with unilateral temporal lobectomy.

  8. Vitamin D in epilepsy: vitamin D levels in epilepsy patients, patients on antiepileptic drug polytherapy and drug-resistant epilepsy sufferers.

    PubMed

    Nagarjunakonda, S; Amalakanti, S; Uppala, V; Rajanala, L; Athina, S

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess vitamin D levels in epileptic patients and to compare its serum levels in patients on antiepileptic monotherapy and polytherapy. We analyzed the serum 25-hydroxy (25-OH) vitamin D levels in 98 consecutive subjects (43 epileptic patients and 55 non-epileptics). Factors influencing its serum levels such as degree of sun exposure, physical activity and dietary intake were taken into consideration. Overall, 41% had deficient, 49% had insufficient and 9% had sufficient levels of serum vitamin D. Elderly individuals (>60 years) and people employed in offices and schools had lower blood vitamin D levels. Across both the sexes, epileptic patients and non-epileptics, epileptic patients on monotherapy and polytherapy and patients with drug-responsive and -resistant seizures, there were no significant differences in serum 25-OH vitamin D levels. Our study shows that people with epilepsy suffer with vitamin D deficiency along with their normal peers.

  9. Topiramate in patients with epilepsy and intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Martin, Peter; Schreiner, Andreas; Rettig, Klaus; Schäuble, Barbara

    2009-03-01

    This noninterventional single-arm study explored effectiveness and behavioral outcomes in intellectually disabled patients treated with topiramate for epilepsy. Data from 21 patients diagnosed with cerebral palsy were available for evaluation. Behavioral changes were assessed using the validated Aberrant Behavior Checklist and Matson Evaluation of Social Skills for Individuals with Severe Retardation (MESSIER) scales. Some improvement in nearly all behavioral aspects was observed under concomitant topiramate therapy; for example, the Aberrant Behavior Checklist total score changed from 33.7+/-25.8 to 25.3+/-19.1 (P=0.047). In addition, seizure frequency decreased from 16.1+/-22.2/4 weeks to 12.2+/-17.0/4 weeks (N=21, P=0.164). Fifty-two percent of the patients experienced at least 50% seizure reduction during the 24-week treatment period. The safety profile is in accordance with the current Summary of Product Characteristics of Topiramate. Two unexpected deaths were attributed to sudden unexpected death in epilepsy.

  10. Keeping patients with epilepsy safe: a surmountable challenge?

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Rohit; Newman, Craig; Hanna, Jane; ashton, juliet; Jory, Caryn; McLean, Brendan; Anderson, Tamsyn; Walker, Matthew; cox, david; Ewins, Liz

    2015-01-01

    This quality improvement project was inspired as an answer to a problem that intellectual disability teams have been struggling to manage whilst caring for people with epilepsy (PWE). The issue was that despite guidance to discuss the possibility of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) be discussed with a newly diagnosed PWE this is rarely done. Additionally when, how, and what to discuss about SUDEP and reduce its risk is arbitrary, non-person centred, and with no structured evidence. Prior to initiating changes a discussion of SUDEP was recorded in just 10% of PWE. We introduced a check-list to help identify risk factors for SUDEP. We then modified the check-list, and then used it via telehealth, a way of contacting patients and their carers over the phone using the check-list approach. Following interventions, discussions of SUDEP are now recorded in 80% of PWE. Feedback from patients, carers and primary and secondary care professionals has been positive. We are now developing an app so that patients and carers can monitor their own risk factors, thus empowering them and increasing their knowledge and awareness of SUDEP. PMID:26734336

  11. Brivaracetam: A Review in Partial-Onset (Focal) Seizures in Patients with Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Sheridan M

    2016-08-01

    Brivaracetam (Briviact(®); BRIVLERA™) is a high affinity synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A) ligand available orally (as a tablet or solution) or intravenously (as a bolus or infusion) in various countries worldwide, including the USA, Canada and those of the EU. It is approved as adjunctive therapy for the treatment of partial-onset seizures (POS) in adults (aged ≥18 years) [USA, EU and Canada] and adolescents (aged 16 to <18 years) [USA and EU] with epilepsy. In multinational, phase III studies in adults and adolescents (aged ≥16 years), oral brivaracetam as adjunctive therapy to other antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) was generally associated with significant median percent reductions over placebo in seizure frequency and significant improvements in the proportion of patients achieving a ≥50 % reduction in seizure frequency compared with placebo. These benefits appeared to be sustained during up to 96 months' therapy in follow-up studies. Whether administered orally or intravenously, adjunctive brivaracetam was generally well tolerated in clinical studies, with the majority of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) being mild or moderate in intensity. In the absence of head-to-head studies, definitive conclusions on the comparative efficacy and tolerability of brivaracetam versus newer AEDs are not yet possible. In the meantime, brivaracetam extends the options currently available for the treatment of POS in patients aged ≥16 years with epilepsy. PMID:27503181

  12. Sexual problems in people with refractory epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Henning, Oliver J; Nakken, Karl O; Træen, Bente; Mowinckel, Petter; Lossius, Morten

    2016-08-01

    Sexual dysfunction is an important but often neglected aspect of epilepsy. The objective of this study was to explore the prevalence and types of sexual problems in patients with epilepsy and compare the results with similar data obtained from a representative sample of the general population. At the National Centre for Epilepsy in Norway, 171 of 227 consecutive adult inpatients and outpatients with epilepsy (response rate: 75.3%) and their neurologists participated in a questionnaire study about epilepsy and sexuality. The results were compared with data available from 594 adult Norwegians who had completed the same questionnaire. Patients with epilepsy had a significantly higher prevalence of sexual problems (women: 75.3% vs. 12.0%; men: 63.3% vs. 9.6%). The most commonly reported problems (>30%) were reduced sexual desire, orgasm problems, erection problems, and vaginal dryness. The patients reported considerable dissatisfaction regarding sexual functioning. Significantly more sexual problems were found in patients of both sexes with reduced quality of life and in women with symptoms of depression. We found no significant association between sexual problems and age of epilepsy onset, type of epilepsy, or use of enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs. Whereas age at sexual debut did not differ between the patients with epilepsy and the general population, men with epilepsy had a lower number of partners during the last 12months, and the proportion of women with a low frequency of intercourse was higher in the group with epilepsy. In conclusion, sexual problems are significantly greater in Norwegian patients with epilepsy than in the general adult population. As no single epilepsy type or treatment could be identified as a specific predisposing factor, it seems likely that there are multiple causes underlying our results, including both organic and psychosocial factors. PMID:27371882

  13. Neurostimulation to improve level of consciousness in patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gummadavelli, Abhijeet; Kundishora, Adam J; Willie, Jon T; Andrews, John P; Gerrard, Jason L; Spencer, Dennis D; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2015-06-01

    When drug-resistant epilepsy is poorly localized or surgical resection is contraindicated, current neurostimulation strategies such as deep brain stimulation and vagal nerve stimulation can palliate the frequency or severity of seizures. However, despite medical and neuromodulatory therapy, a significant proportion of patients continue to experience disabling seizures that impair awareness, causing disability and risking injury or sudden unexplained death. We propose a novel strategy in which neuromodulation is used not only to reduce seizures but also to ameliorate impaired consciousness when the patient is in the ictal and postictal states. Improving or preventing alterations in level of consciousness may have an effect on morbidity (e.g., accidents, drownings, falls), risk for death, and quality of life. Recent studies may have elucidated underlying networks and mechanisms of impaired consciousness and yield potential novel targets for neuromodulation. The feasibility, benefits, and pitfalls of potential deep brain stimulation targets are illustrated in human and animal studies involving minimally conscious/vegetative states, movement disorders, depth of anesthesia, sleep-wake regulation, and epilepsy. We review evidence that viable therapeutic targets for impaired consciousness associated with seizures may be provided by key nodes of the consciousness system in the brainstem reticular activating system, hypothalamus, basal ganglia, thalamus, and basal forebrain.

  14. National Audit of Seizure management in Hospitals (NASH): results of the national audit of adult epilepsy in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Peter A; Kirkham, Jamie J; Marson, Anthony G; Pearson, Mike G

    2015-01-01

    Objectives About 100 000 people present to hospitals each year in England with an epileptic seizure. How they are managed is unknown; thus, the National Audit of Seizure management in Hospitals (NASH) set out to assess prior care, management of the acute event and follow-up of these patients. This paper describes the data from the second audit conducted in 2013. Setting 154 emergency departments (EDs) across the UK. Participants Data from 4544 attendances (median age of 45 years, 57% men) showed that 61% had a prior diagnosis of epilepsy, 12% other neurological problems and 22% were first seizure cases. Each ED identified 30 consecutive adult cases presenting due to a seizure. Primary and secondary outcome measures Details were recorded of the patient's prior care, management at hospital and onward referral to neurological specialists onto an online database. Descriptive results are reported at national level. Results Of those with epilepsy, 498 (18%) were on no antiepileptic drug therapy and 1330 (48%) were on monotherapy. Assessments were often incomplete and witness histories were sought in only 759 (75%) of first seizure patients, 58% were seen by a senior doctor and 57% were admitted. For first seizure patients, advice on further seizure management was given to 264 (27%) and only 55% were referred to a neurologist or epilepsy specialist. For each variable, there was wide variability among sites that was not explicable. For the sites who partook in both audits, there was a trend towards better care in 2013, but this was small and dwarfed by the intersite variability. Conclusions These results have parallels with the Sentinel Audit of Stroke performed a decade earlier. There is wide intersite variability in care covering the entire care pathway, and a need for better organised and accessible care for these patients. PMID:25829372

  15. Biopsychosocial approaches to a patient with vomiting of 10 years' duration – a case of temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Mutsuura, Hiromi; Fukunaga, Mikihiko; Kanbara, Kenji; Yagyu, Takami; Yamamoto, Kazumi; Kitamura, Kana; Ban, Ikumi; Nakai, Yoshihide

    2009-01-01

    Background Vomiting is commonly encountered in clinical medicine. When organic gastrointestinal, metabolic, and brain diseases are ruled out, many cases are considered to be functional. We experienced an adult patient with epilepsy whose main symptom was vomiting. Biopsychosocial approaches were needed to control the symptoms. Case presentation A 26-year-old female with a 10-year history of persistent vomiting was found to have temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Throughout this time, during which the vomiting had become part of a vicious cycle, her epilepsy was poorly controlled by medication. Biopsychosocial approaches were employed successfully and the patient subsequently undertook training to become a home-helper, started a job, and was able to leave her parents' house and live independently. All of her symptoms resolved after she became self-sufficient. Discussion Vomiting without impaired consciousness is seldom considered to be a manifestation of epilepsy. Difficulty in recording an electroencephalogram (EEG) because of the presence of persistent vomiting delayed the diagnosis. The improvement of symptoms was thought to have been due to the patient's emotional stabilization and physical improvement, which may have stabilized the limbic system. Conclusion When an illness persists for many years and conditioning and a vicious cycle occur secondarily, systematic biopsychosocial approaches are needed in addition to general treatment. Also, secondary symptoms make the diagnosis more difficult when efforts at treatment are ineffective. PMID:19166585

  16. Long-term outcomes from the PEARLS randomized trial for the treatment of depression in patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Chaytor, Naomi; Ciechanowski, Paul; Miller, John W; Fraser, Robert; Russo, Joan; Unutzer, Jurgen; Gilliam, Frank

    2011-03-01

    Depression is associated with higher rates of suicide and lower quality of life in individuals with epilepsy. We previously published the 12-month outcome from our randomized clinical trial of PEARLS (Ciechanowski P, Chaytor N, Miller J, et al. Epilepsy Behav. Epub 5 July 2010). The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term effectiveness of PEARLS, a home-based collaborative care intervention consisting of problem-solving treatment, behavioral activation, and psychiatric consultation, in individuals with epilepsy. Patients were randomly assigned to PEARLS (N=40) or usual care (N=40), and assessed at baseline and 6, 12, and 18 months. Patients assigned to PEARLS achieved lower depression severity (P<0.05) (Hopkins Symptoms Checklist-20), lower suicidal ideation (P<0.02), and better emotional well being (QOLIE-31) (P<0.02) over 18 months, compared with patients given the usual care. The PEARLS program significantly reduces depressive symptoms in adults with epilepsy, and this effect is maintained for 18 months after baseline and for more than 1 year after completion of home visits.

  17. [Mental disorders and cerebral sensomotor asymmetry in patients with epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Zemlianaia, A A; Kalinin, V V; Koviazina, M S; Krylov, O E

    2010-01-01

    A neurological, psychiatric and instrumental (electroencephalography, computer tomography, etc.) study of 84 patients was aimed at assessing an effect of sensomotor asymmetry profile and side of the epileptic focus on semiotics of seizures and psychopathological presentations in partial epilepsy. A data analysis included 111 variables, i.e., psychometric and neuropsychological ones. Groups of patients with left and right profiles of functional interhemispheric asymmetry (LHA and RHA) were singled out. No between-group differences were found in severity of mental disturbances. However, cognitive functions were mostly affected in RHA and psychopathological phenomenon emerged mostly in LPA. The formation of multiple epileptic foci with the involvement of frontal and temporary lobes was the best predictor of mental disorders manifestation compared to age at disease onset, illness duration, frequency and severity of seizures.

  18. Clinical characteristics of patients with epilepsy in a specialist neuropsychiatry service.

    PubMed

    Osman, Adam; Seri, Stefano; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2016-05-01

    Neuropsychiatry services provide specialist input into the assessment and management of behavioral symptoms associated with a range of neurological conditions, including epilepsy. Despite the centrality of epilepsy to neuropsychiatry and the recent expansion of neuropsychiatry service provision, little is known about the clinical characteristics of patients with epilepsy who are routinely seen by a specialist neuropsychiatry service. This retrospective study filled this gap by retrospectively evaluating a naturalistic series of 60 consecutive patients with epilepsy referred to and assessed within a neuropsychiatry setting. Fifty-two patients (86.7%) had active epilepsy and were under the ongoing care of the referring neurologist for seizure management. The majority of patients (N=42; 70.0%) had a diagnosis of localization-related epilepsy, with temporal lobe epilepsy as the most common epilepsy type (N=37; 61.7%). Following clinical assessment, 39 patients (65.0%) fulfilled formal diagnostic criteria for at least one psychiatric disorder; nonepileptic attack disorder (N=37; 61.7%), major depression (N=23; 38.3%), and generalized anxiety disorder (N=16; 26.7%) were the most commonly diagnosed comorbidities. The clinical characteristics of patients seen in specialist neuropsychiatry settings are in line with the results from previous studies in neurology clinics in terms of both epilepsy and psychiatric comorbidity. Our findings confirm the need for the development and implementation of structured care pathways for the neuropsychiatric aspects of epilepsy, with focus on comorbid nonepileptic attacks and affective and anxiety symptoms. This is of particular importance in consideration of the impact of behavioral symptoms on patients' health-related quality of life. PMID:27057744

  19. Network Alterations Supporting Word Retrieval in Patients with Medial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Protzner, Andrea B.; McAndrews, Mary Pat

    2011-01-01

    Although the hippocampus is not considered a key structure in semantic memory, patients with medial-temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) have deficits in semantic access on some word retrieval tasks. We hypothesized that these deficits reflect the negative impact of focal epilepsy on remote cerebral structures. Thus, we expected that the networks that…

  20. Multiple personality and related dissociative phenomena in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Schenk, L; Bear, D

    1981-10-01

    Many patients with temporal lobe epilepsy also experience dissociative episodes. Three patients with multiple personality exhibited alterations in speech pattern, personality, handedness, and sense of personal identity and claimed amnesia for the dissociative episodes. Another 10 patients identified alternative personalities or demons as motivators of ego-alien behavior. Of clinic patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, 33% exhibited some dissociative phenomena, which had no apparent association with individual seizures but always followed the development of the seizure disorder. The authors propose that intensified, dystonic affects, characteristic of the interictal period in temporal lobe epilepsy, may predispose some individuals to dissociative reactions.

  1. Stigma and health-related quality of life in Asian adults with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yi-Jing; Chan, Sui-Yung; Ko, Yu

    2009-12-01

    This study aims to (1) review the impact of epilepsy on the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of Asian adult persons with epilepsy (PWE), and (2) identify the extent of stigma they experience and the associated factors. The electronic databases Medline, PsycINFO, ISI Web of Science, and the International Pharmaceutical Abstracts were searched using a combination of keywords to identify relevant journal articles published before October 2007, and supplemental manual searches of article bibliographies and the journal Neurology Asia were conducted. Thirty-six articles that met the predetermined inclusion criteria were selected and reviewed. The HRQoL of Asian adult PWE was lower than that of the general population. These PWE had difficulties in both physical and psychosocial functioning. Psychosocial factors appeared to have a more significant impact on PWE's HRQoL than physical factors. Stigma and negative attitudes towards marriage and employment of PWE was prevalent in many Asian countries, and the stigma's associated factors were multifaceted. Given the prevalent negative attitudes towards epilepsy, public education campaigns targeting misconceptions and associated factors may help reduce stigma and, together with psychosocial support, the HRQoL of Asian adult PWE can be improved. PMID:19782536

  2. A dyadic model of living with epilepsy based on the perspectives of adults with epilepsy and their support persons.

    PubMed

    Walker, Elizabeth Reisinger; Barmon, Christina; McGee, Robin E; Engelhard, George; Sterk, Claire E; DiIorio, Colleen; Thompson, Nancy J

    2015-12-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic condition that significantly affects the lives of individuals with epilepsy and their support persons, though few studies have examined the experiences of both. To examine these experiences and explore the interpersonal relationships between dyad members, we conducted in-depth interviews with 22 persons with epilepsy and 16 support persons. Data analysis was guided by a grounded theory perspective. We developed a model that shows how epilepsy impacts the lives of both persons with epilepsy and their support persons and how the experiences of persons with epilepsy and supporters influence one another. The core model elements were seizure and treatment factors, relationship characteristics, self-management, seizure control, support provided, illness intrusiveness, and quality of life. Persons with epilepsy moved through the model in five trajectories depending on seizure control, relationship type, and gender. Support providers followed four trajectories based on seizure control, perception of burden, and support for themselves. Persons with epilepsy and their primary support providers have varied experiences in how epilepsy affects their lives. This model could serve as a basis for future research and intervention efforts focused on ways to reduce illness intrusiveness and improve quality of life for persons with epilepsy and their supporters.

  3. The impact of education and acculturation on nonverbal neuropsychological test performance among Latino/a patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Saez, Pedro A; Bender, Heidi Allison; Barr, William B; Rivera Mindt, Monica; Morrison, Chris E; Hassenstab, Jason; Rodriguez, Marivelisse; Vazquez, Blanca

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between various sociocultural factors (e.g., acculturation, education), neurological variables (e.g., epilepsy duration and seizure frequency) and nonverbal neuropsychological (NP) test performance in a sample of 305 Latino/a and Non-Latino/a White adults with and without epilepsy. All participants completed nonverbal NP measures of visuospatial skills, memory, executive functioning, and psychomotor speed. An acculturation scale was administered to Spanish-speaking epilepsy patients and controls. Education was strongly correlated with performance on all but one of the nonverbal measures across the entire sample. Among Spanish-speaking Latino/a patients with epilepsy, level of acculturation to U.S. culture was associated with a measure of behavioral inflexibility (p < .05) and with a composite measure of nonverbal NP test performance (p < .05). Finally, the results of hierarchical regression models showed that sociocultural factors accounted for a greater proportion of variance in nonverbal NP test performance than did neurological factors. These results provide further evidence that sociocultural factors are strong predictors of NP test performance in clinical populations, even on nonverbal tests. Assessment of acculturation may be as critical as assessment of disease factors in interpreting cognitive performance in Latino/a individuals.

  4. Postoperative epilepsy in patients undergoing craniotomy for glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Telfeian, A E; Philips, M F; Crino, P B; Judy, K D

    2001-03-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has associated with it one of the poorest prognoses among brain tumors. Postoperative seizures and the side effects of anticonvulsants, routinely given for prophylactic purposes, add to patient morbidity. The primary goal of this study was to determine who, of those undergoing craniotomy for GBM resection, is at risk for epilepsy. We studied 72 consecutive patients who underwent craniotomy and palliative resection for GBM. Twenty-nine presented with seizures and 17 had postoperative seizures. All patients were treated with a postoperative anticonvulsant for at least six months; anticonvulsants were continued longer if there was a postoperative seizure. Patient factors examined for an association with risk for postoperative seizure included age, sex, tumor size, tumor location, adjuvant therapy, postoperative complications and history of preoperative seizures. The majority of patients with no prior seizure history and who seized postoperatively had their first seizure after withdrawal from their anticonvulsant medication. All, but one, of the patients with both pre- and postoperative seizures had their first postoperative seizure while still on anticonvulsants. Smaller tumor size and frontal resection were associated with an increased risk of postoperative seizures. Our data suggests that those who do not present with seizures and undergo GBM resection may still be prone to seize but more easily protected from postoperative seizures with anticonvulsant therapy than patients who present with seizures; resection of frontal tumors and smaller tumors seemed to indicate an increased risk for postoperative seizures. PMID:11370829

  5. Epilepsy Care in Ontario: An Economic Analysis of Increasing Access to Epilepsy Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, James M.; Snead, O. Carter; Chandra, Kiran; Blackhouse, Gord; Goeree, Ron

    2012-01-01

    found to provide favourable clinical outcomes and has been demonstrated to be cost-effective in both adult and child patient populations. The first step to increasing access to epilepsy surgery is to provide access to evidence-based care for all patients with epilepsy, both adults and children, through the provision of resources to expand EMU bed capacity and associated clinical personnel across the province of Ontario. Plain Language Summary Epilepsy, characterized by recurrent, unpredictable, and spontaneous seizures, affects approximately 70,000 people in Ontario. About 30% continue to suffer from seizures despite using 2 or more anti-seizure medications. For these individuals epilepsy surgery is a treatment option to stop the seizures or at least reduce their frequency. Awareness of this treatment option is not widespread and people are not commonly referred to those hospitals in Ontario where this surgery is available. A proposal to increase access to epilepsy care and surgery has been made by an expert committee that provided a report to the Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee (OHTAC). In order to address the lack of access of patients with medically intractable epilepsy to the possibility of curative surgical treatment, it is necessary to design a system that provides equal availability of evidence-based treatment for all epilepsy patients in Ontario, both adults and children. To this end, the establishment of district epilepsy care centres and the further development of the existing regional epilepsy care centres in the province have been proposed. This report outlines the estimated additional funds that will be required to implement the proposal. It also examines the cost-effectiveness of referral to these centres and epilepsy surgery. For the 21,000 people in the province with drug-refractory epilepsy, referral to an epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU) located at one of the epilepsy care centres is the first step to determining if epilepsy surgery is an

  6. The Use of Ketogenic Diet in Pediatric Patients with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Misiewicz Runyon, Amanda; So, Tsz-Yin

    2012-01-01

    A ketogenic diet is a nonpharmacologic treatment strategy to control refractory epilepsy in children. Although this diet has been used successfully to reduce seizures since the 1920s, the anticonvulsant mechanism of ketosis remains unknown. The initiation of the diet requires an average four-day hospitalization to achieve ketosis in the patient as well as to provide thorough education on diet maintenance for both the patient and the caregivers. A ketogenic diet, consisting of low carbohydrate and high fat intake, leaves little room for additional carbohydrates supplied by medications. Patients on ketogenic diets who exceed their daily carbohydrate limit have the risk of seizure relapse, necessitating hospital readmission to repeat the diet initiation process. These patients are at a high risk for diversion from the diet. Patients admitted to the hospital setting are often initiated on multiple medications, and many hospital systems are not equipped with appropriate monitoring systems to prevent clinicians from introducing medications with high carbohydrate contents. Pharmacists have the resources and the expertise to help identify and prevent the initiation of medications with high carbohydrate content in patients on ketogenic diets. PMID:22970384

  7. Discussing sudden unexpected death in epilepsy: Are we empowering our patients? A questionnaire survey

    PubMed Central

    Keddie, S; Angus-Leppan, H; Parker, T; Toescu, S; Nash, A; Adewunmi, O

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine patient knowledge about sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) compared to other risks in epilepsy. To explore patients’ experiences surrounding SUDEP disclosure and opinions on how information should be delivered. Design A cross-sectional questionnaire. Setting Royal Free Hospital, London outpatient epilepsy clinics. Participants New and follow-up patients attending epilepsy clinics at a London teaching hospital over six months. Patients identified as being at risk of suffering negative emotional or psychological consequences of SUDEP discussions were excluded. Main outcome measures Patient knowledge about epilepsy risks; patient opinion regarding source, timing and delivery of SUDEP information; impact on health seeking behaviour. Results Ninety-eight per cent of patients were aware of medication adherence, 84% of factors influencing seizure frequency, 78% of driving regulations, 50% of SUDEP and 38% of status epilepticus; 72% of patients felt that SUDEP information should be given to all patients. Preferences for timing of SUDEP discussions varied between those wanting information at diagnosis (40%) and those preferring to receive it after three clinic appointments (18%) to avoid information overload at the first consultation. Emotional responses (48% positive, 38% negative) predominated over measurable behavioural change following SUDEP discussions. Conclusions Less than half the patients knew about SUDEP and status epilepticus. Although the majority of patients with epilepsy wish to be informed about SUDEP early on in their diagnosis, information must be delivered in a way that promotes patient knowledge and empowerment.

  8. Discussing sudden unexpected death in epilepsy: Are we empowering our patients? A questionnaire survey

    PubMed Central

    Keddie, S; Angus-Leppan, H; Parker, T; Toescu, S; Nash, A; Adewunmi, O

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine patient knowledge about sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) compared to other risks in epilepsy. To explore patients’ experiences surrounding SUDEP disclosure and opinions on how information should be delivered. Design A cross-sectional questionnaire. Setting Royal Free Hospital, London outpatient epilepsy clinics. Participants New and follow-up patients attending epilepsy clinics at a London teaching hospital over six months. Patients identified as being at risk of suffering negative emotional or psychological consequences of SUDEP discussions were excluded. Main outcome measures Patient knowledge about epilepsy risks; patient opinion regarding source, timing and delivery of SUDEP information; impact on health seeking behaviour. Results Ninety-eight per cent of patients were aware of medication adherence, 84% of factors influencing seizure frequency, 78% of driving regulations, 50% of SUDEP and 38% of status epilepticus; 72% of patients felt that SUDEP information should be given to all patients. Preferences for timing of SUDEP discussions varied between those wanting information at diagnosis (40%) and those preferring to receive it after three clinic appointments (18%) to avoid information overload at the first consultation. Emotional responses (48% positive, 38% negative) predominated over measurable behavioural change following SUDEP discussions. Conclusions Less than half the patients knew about SUDEP and status epilepticus. Although the majority of patients with epilepsy wish to be informed about SUDEP early on in their diagnosis, information must be delivered in a way that promotes patient knowledge and empowerment. PMID:27688898

  9. Test-retest IQ changes of epilepsy patients: assessing the influence of practice effects.

    PubMed

    Seidenberg, M; O'Leary, D S; Giordani, B; Berent, S; Boll, T J

    1981-10-01

    A number of recent studies have emphasized the role of practice effect on test-retest changes in performance often seen on neuropsychological tests. An attempt is made to separate the influence of practice effect from other functional changes in the test-retest differences observed on the WAIS for a sample of adult epilepsy patients. Fifty-eight epilepsy patients were divided into three groups based on their WAIS test-retest score changes. Their corresponding test-retest performance on the Halstead-Reitan Battery and changes in seizure frequency were compared and analyzed. Results indicated that there was a correspondence between improvement in neuropsychological test performance, reduced seizure frequency, and improvement on the WAIS. It was concluded that test-retest changes in neuropsychological test performance reflected changes in psychological functioning of these individuals rather than the influence of practice effect. Some general issues relating to the question of disentangling the influence of practice effect from other functional changes in status were raised and discussed.

  10. Should we reconsider epilepsy surgery? The motivation of patients once rejected.

    PubMed

    Zijlmans, Maeike; Buskens, Erik; Hersevoort, Maaike; Huiskamp, Geertjan; van Huffelen, Alexander C; Leijten, Frans S S

    2008-06-01

    The pre-surgical work-up of patients with medically refractory epilepsy changes with the availability of new diagnostic procedures. New diagnostic investigations may also open up prospects for patients rejected in the past. A cohort of 71 Dutch patients rejected for epilepsy surgery 0.5-5 years earlier were approached to evaluate their willingness to undergo novel techniques. 64 (90%) responded to a questionnaire evaluating social and medical status, quality of life (QoL) and motivation to be reconsidered for epilepsy surgery. Four patients (6%) did not have seizures during the last 6 months. 56 patients (88%) were highly motivated to undergo new diagnostic procedures. Inability to localize the seizure focus had been the reason for rejection in 70% of these. We conclude that most patients once rejected for epilepsy surgery would like to benefit from novel techniques.

  11. Seizures accelerate forgetting in patients with left-sided temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Jokeit, H; Daamen, M; Zang, H; Janszky, J; Ebner, A

    2001-07-10

    Ten patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy performed a word-position association learning task every 24 hours during video EEG monitoring. On 55 occasions recall performance was tested 30 minutes and 24 hours after the initial learning phase. Patients with left- but not right-sided temporal lobe epilepsy exhibited impaired retention of word position if a seizure had occurred during the preceding 24-hour interval. Seizures may impair the consolidation of memory in patients with left-sided temporal lobe epilepsy beyond the chronic memory deficits caused by the underlying pathology.

  12. [Treatment of pediatric epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Ito, Susumu; Oguni, Hirokazu

    2014-05-01

    Recently, the treatment strategy for pediatric epilepsy has been dramatically changed in Japan, because of the approval of new-generation antiepileptic drugs. Since 2006, a total of 6 new antiepileptic drugs, including gabapentin (GBP; adults/pediatric patients: 2006/2011 [year of approval]), topiramate (TPM; 2007/2013), lamotrigine (LTG; 2008/2008), levetiracetam (LEV; 2010/2013), stiripentol (STP; 2012/2012), and rufinamide (RUF; 2013/2013), have been introduced. Thus far, valproate (VPA) and carbamazepine (CBZ) have been first indicated for "generalized" epilepsy and "focal" epilepsy syndromes/types, respectively, in Japan. However, the approval of these new drugs could allow us to choose more effective and less toxic ones at an early stage of treatment. In this chapter, we describe the latest domestic and foreign guidelines for the treatment of pediatric epilepsy. PMID:24912285

  13. [Treatment of pediatric epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Ito, Susumu; Oguni, Hirokazu

    2014-05-01

    Recently, the treatment strategy for pediatric epilepsy has been dramatically changed in Japan, because of the approval of new-generation antiepileptic drugs. Since 2006, a total of 6 new antiepileptic drugs, including gabapentin (GBP; adults/pediatric patients: 2006/2011 [year of approval]), topiramate (TPM; 2007/2013), lamotrigine (LTG; 2008/2008), levetiracetam (LEV; 2010/2013), stiripentol (STP; 2012/2012), and rufinamide (RUF; 2013/2013), have been introduced. Thus far, valproate (VPA) and carbamazepine (CBZ) have been first indicated for "generalized" epilepsy and "focal" epilepsy syndromes/types, respectively, in Japan. However, the approval of these new drugs could allow us to choose more effective and less toxic ones at an early stage of treatment. In this chapter, we describe the latest domestic and foreign guidelines for the treatment of pediatric epilepsy.

  14. Awakening epilepsy ('Aufwach-Epilepsie') revisited.

    PubMed

    Niedermeyer, E

    1991-01-01

    The concept of 'awakening epilepsy' (introduced by Janz, 1953) occupies a crucial position for the comprehension of primary generalized epilepsy. The associated electroencephalographic manifestations are discussed and the role of abnormal (paroxysmal) arousal responses ('dyshormia') is stressed. The origin of these bilateral-synchronous discharges appears to be located below the frontal midline scalp region in mesial portions of the supplementary motor region. 'Awakening epilepsy' is also interesting from the viewpoint of sleep research. There is also an important age factor; these seizures (mostly grand mal and classical petit mal absences) are most common in older children, adolescents and young adults. The general management of these patients has to take into account the patient's special vulnerability after a night of poor sleep.

  15. Societal problems that patients with epilepsy are facing in Sharjah, UAE.

    PubMed

    Abduelkarem, Abduelmula R

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the knowledge and gauge the level of understanding and attitudes of the public towards patients with epilepsy in Sharjah, UAE. A questionnaire-based survey was used, and a total of 400 surveys were distributed in several parts of the city. Among 388 (97%) returned surveys, 94.3% reported that they had heard about epilepsy, and 62.9% believed that epilepsy is a curable disease. More than half of the respondents believed that epilepsy is not a mental illness, and 61.1% respondents that epilepsy is a nervous system disorder. Interestingly, almost 4% of the sample believed that epilepsy is either a supernatural power or an evil spirit. Despite the fact that more than 80% of the respondents accepted that people with epilepsy can become useful members of society and can receive academic education, almost half of the sample reported that society discriminates against people with epilepsy, and 14% of respondents still think that people with epilepsy should be isolated from the healthy population. Furthermore, when respondents were asked if they will allow their son or daughter to marry a girl or boy with epilepsy, 213 (82.5%) and 217 (81.4%) of the respondents reported either "No" or "Don't know", respectively. Negative attitudes and inadequate knowledge among the public in Sharjah, UAE likely contribute to the stigma and discrimination faced by those with epilepsy in this region. Educational programs are urgently needed to increase awareness and to improve knowledge and attitudes among the public. PMID:27152460

  16. Semantic Processing Impairment in Patients with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Jaimes-Bautista, Amanda G; Rodríguez-Camacho, Mario; Martínez-Juárez, Iris E; Rodríguez-Agudelo, Yaneth

    2015-01-01

    The impairment in episodic memory system is the best-known cognitive deficit in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Recent studies have shown evidence of semantic disorders, but they have been less studied than episodic memory. The semantic dysfunction in TLE has various cognitive manifestations, such as the presence of language disorders characterized by defects in naming, verbal fluency, or remote semantic information retrieval, which affects the ability of patients to interact with their surroundings. This paper is a review of recent research about the consequences of TLE on semantic processing, considering neuropsychological, electrophysiological, and neuroimaging findings, as well as the functional role of the hippocampus in semantic processing. The evidence from these studies shows disturbance of semantic memory in patients with TLE and supports the theory of declarative memory of the hippocampus. Functional neuroimaging studies show an inefficient compensatory functional reorganization of semantic networks and electrophysiological studies show a lack of N400 effect that could indicate that the deficit in semantic processing in patients with TLE could be due to a failure in the mechanisms of automatic access to lexicon. PMID:26257956

  17. Semantic Processing Impairment in Patients with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Jaimes-Bautista, Amanda G.; Rodríguez-Camacho, Mario; Martínez-Juárez, Iris E.; Rodríguez-Agudelo, Yaneth

    2015-01-01

    The impairment in episodic memory system is the best-known cognitive deficit in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Recent studies have shown evidence of semantic disorders, but they have been less studied than episodic memory. The semantic dysfunction in TLE has various cognitive manifestations, such as the presence of language disorders characterized by defects in naming, verbal fluency, or remote semantic information retrieval, which affects the ability of patients to interact with their surroundings. This paper is a review of recent research about the consequences of TLE on semantic processing, considering neuropsychological, electrophysiological, and neuroimaging findings, as well as the functional role of the hippocampus in semantic processing. The evidence from these studies shows disturbance of semantic memory in patients with TLE and supports the theory of declarative memory of the hippocampus. Functional neuroimaging studies show an inefficient compensatory functional reorganization of semantic networks and electrophysiological studies show a lack of N400 effect that could indicate that the deficit in semantic processing in patients with TLE could be due to a failure in the mechanisms of automatic access to lexicon. PMID:26257956

  18. Semantic Processing Impairment in Patients with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Jaimes-Bautista, Amanda G; Rodríguez-Camacho, Mario; Martínez-Juárez, Iris E; Rodríguez-Agudelo, Yaneth

    2015-01-01

    The impairment in episodic memory system is the best-known cognitive deficit in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Recent studies have shown evidence of semantic disorders, but they have been less studied than episodic memory. The semantic dysfunction in TLE has various cognitive manifestations, such as the presence of language disorders characterized by defects in naming, verbal fluency, or remote semantic information retrieval, which affects the ability of patients to interact with their surroundings. This paper is a review of recent research about the consequences of TLE on semantic processing, considering neuropsychological, electrophysiological, and neuroimaging findings, as well as the functional role of the hippocampus in semantic processing. The evidence from these studies shows disturbance of semantic memory in patients with TLE and supports the theory of declarative memory of the hippocampus. Functional neuroimaging studies show an inefficient compensatory functional reorganization of semantic networks and electrophysiological studies show a lack of N400 effect that could indicate that the deficit in semantic processing in patients with TLE could be due to a failure in the mechanisms of automatic access to lexicon.

  19. International Bureau for Epilepsy survey of children, teenagers, and young people with epilepsy: data in China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Pei-Min; Ding, Ding; Zhu, Guo-Xing; Hong, Zhen

    2009-09-01

    The goals of this study were to assess the perception of people with or directly involved with childhood and adolescent epilepsy in China, and to gain insight into the real-life effects that epilepsy can have on quality of life, development, and opportunities for the future. Survey questionnaires were developed by the International Bureau for Epilepsy for three groups: teenagers and young adults, parents/caregivers of children with epilepsy, and health care professionals. In total we received 968 responses from 20 cities in China. Nearly two-thirds of teenagers and young adults with epilepsy (64.9%) and two-thirds of parents/caregivers of children with epilepsy (64.0%) who responded to the survey had kept epilepsy a secret from others. When asked specifically about drug-related side effects, more than half of teenagers and young adults with epilepsy reported experiencing side effects, specifically dizziness (23.9%), weight change (22.9%), and headache (14.5%). Health care professionals reported cognitive side effects (94.2%), mood change (56.7%), and skin rash (50%) in their patients with epilepsy. More than two-thirds of the teenagers and young adults with epilepsy (75.7%) expected the condition to hinder their lives in the future, affecting their chances of getting a job (52.6%), continuing their education (35.5%), and getting a boyfriend or girlfriend (33.7%). Among parents/caregivers of children with epilepsy, 85.7% expected the condition to hinder their child's life in the future. This survey documents some of the real-life consequences of epilepsy and highlights the important challenges and issues faced by people with epilepsy and their families in China. Ensuring that people are as free from seizures as possible and minimizing the side effects of treatment must be the primary goals of epilepsy management.

  20. Concentration of soluble adhesion molecules in cerebrospinal fluid and serum of epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jing; Wang, Wei; Xi, Zhiqin; Dan, Chen; Wang, Liang; Xiao, Zheng; Wang, Xuefeng

    2014-12-01

    Mounting evidence supports the involvement of brain inflammation and the associated blood-brain barrier damage from which spontaneous and recurrent seizures originate. Detection of the soluble form of adhesion molecules (AM) has also been proven to predict outcomes in central nervous system (CNS) disorders. A recent study has shown that expression of AM in brain vessels was upregulated 24 h after kainic acid (KA) induced seizures. The aim of the present study was to investigate soluble AM levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum of epilepsy patients. Paired CSF and serum samples were analyzed by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to determine the concentrations of soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1). Increased serum concentrations of sICAM-1 were present in epileptic patients (41 localization-related of unknown etiology, 19 idiopathic generalized). Serum sICAM-1 level in drug-refractory epilepsy was elevated as compared to new diagnosis epilepsy and drug-responsive epilepsy. CSF sVCAM-1 and serum sVCAM-1 concentrations in the epilepsy group were higher as compared to the neurosis group. Moreover, CSF sVCAM-1 and serum sVCAM-1 concentrations in drug-refractory epilepsy were raised as compared to drug-responsive epilepsy and new diagnosis epilepsy. However, there were no significant differences in concentrations of CSF sICAM-1 between the epilepsy and neurosis groups. Our results suggest that sVCAM-1 and sICAM-1 could play an important role in the drug-refractory epilepsy. PMID:25001004

  1. Alteration of cardiac autonomic function in patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Goit, Rajesh K; Jha, Santosh K; Pant, Bhawana N

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine if heart rate variability (HRV) showed any changes in patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy in comparison with controls. Sixty-five patients with epilepsy (38 males and 27 females), aged 30-50 years, who had never previously received treatment with antiepileptic drugs were eligible for inclusion in this study. Resting electrocardiogram (ECG) at spontaneous respiration was recorded for 5 min in supine position. Time-domain analysis, frequency-domain analysis, and Poincare plot of HRV were recorded from ECG In time-domain measures, the square root of the mean of the sum of the squares of differences between adjacent RR intervals (RMSSD) and percentage of consecutive RR intervals that differ by more than 50 msec (pNN50) were significantly less in patients with epilepsy. In frequency-domain measures, high frequency [(HF) msec(2)], HF (nu), and low frequency [LF (msec(2))] were significantly less in patients with epilepsy while LF (nu) and LF/HF were significantly high in patients with epilepsy. In Poincare plot, standard deviation perpendicular to line of Poincare plot (SD1) and standard deviation along the line of entity in Poincare plot (SD2) were significantly less in patients with epilepsy. Our results suggest that epileptic patients have an impact on the cardiac autonomic function as measured by HRV.

  2. Gray Matter Loss and Related Functional Connectivity Alterations in A Chinese Family With Benign Adult Familial Myoclonic Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ling-Li; Long, Lili; Shen, Hui; Fang, Peng; Song, Yanmin; Zhang, Linlin; Xu, Lin; Gong, Jian; Zhang, Yunci; Zhang, Yong; Xiao, Bo; Hu, Dewen

    2015-10-01

    Benign adult familial myoclonic epilepsy (BAFME) is a non-progressive monogenic epilepsy syndrome. So far, the structural and functional brain reorganizations in BAFME remain uncharacterized. This study aims to investigate gray matter atrophy and related functional connectivity alterations in patients with BAFME using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).Eleven BAFME patients from a Chinese pedigree and 15 matched healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Optimized voxel-based morphometric and resting-state functional MRI approaches were performed to measure gray matter atrophy and related functional connectivity, respectively. The Trail-Making Test-part A and part B, Digit Symbol Test (DST), and Verbal Fluency Test (VFT) were carried out to evaluate attention and executive functions.The BAFME patients exhibited significant gray matter loss in the right hippocampus, right temporal pole, left orbitofrontal cortex, and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. With these regions selected as seeds, the voxel-wise functional connectivity analysis revealed that the right hippocampus showed significantly enhanced connectivity with the right inferior parietal lobule, bilateral middle cingulate cortex, left precuneus, and left precentral gyrus. Moreover, the BAFME patients showed significant lower scores in DST and VFT tests compared with the healthy controls. The gray matter densities of the right hippocampus, right temporal pole, and left orbitofrontal cortex were significantly positively correlated with the DST scores. In addition, the gray matter density of the right temporal pole was significantly positively correlated with the VFT scores, and the gray matter density of the right hippocampus was significantly negatively correlated with the duration of illness in the patients.The current study demonstrates gray matter loss and related functional connectivity alterations in the BAFME patients, perhaps underlying deficits in attention and executive functions in the BAFME.

  3. Gray Matter Loss and Related Functional Connectivity Alterations in A Chinese Family With Benign Adult Familial Myoclonic Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ling-Li; Long, Lili; Shen, Hui; Fang, Peng; Song, Yanmin; Zhang, Linlin; Xu, Lin; Gong, Jian; Zhang, Yunci; Zhang, Yong; Xiao, Bo; Hu, Dewen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Benign adult familial myoclonic epilepsy (BAFME) is a non-progressive monogenic epilepsy syndrome. So far, the structural and functional brain reorganizations in BAFME remain uncharacterized. This study aims to investigate gray matter atrophy and related functional connectivity alterations in patients with BAFME using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Eleven BAFME patients from a Chinese pedigree and 15 matched healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Optimized voxel-based morphometric and resting-state functional MRI approaches were performed to measure gray matter atrophy and related functional connectivity, respectively. The Trail-Making Test-part A and part B, Digit Symbol Test (DST), and Verbal Fluency Test (VFT) were carried out to evaluate attention and executive functions. The BAFME patients exhibited significant gray matter loss in the right hippocampus, right temporal pole, left orbitofrontal cortex, and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. With these regions selected as seeds, the voxel-wise functional connectivity analysis revealed that the right hippocampus showed significantly enhanced connectivity with the right inferior parietal lobule, bilateral middle cingulate cortex, left precuneus, and left precentral gyrus. Moreover, the BAFME patients showed significant lower scores in DST and VFT tests compared with the healthy controls. The gray matter densities of the right hippocampus, right temporal pole, and left orbitofrontal cortex were significantly positively correlated with the DST scores. In addition, the gray matter density of the right temporal pole was significantly positively correlated with the VFT scores, and the gray matter density of the right hippocampus was significantly negatively correlated with the duration of illness in the patients. The current study demonstrates gray matter loss and related functional connectivity alterations in the BAFME patients, perhaps underlying deficits in attention and executive functions in the

  4. Mitochondrial DNA variant m.15218A > G in Finnish epilepsy patients who have maternal relatives with epilepsy, sensorineural hearing impairment or diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial diseases caused by mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) affect tissues with high energy demand. Epilepsy is one of the manifestations of mitochondrial dysfunction when the brain is affected. We have studied here 79 Finnish patients with epilepsy and who have maternal first- or second-degree relatives with epilepsy, sensorineural hearing impairment or diabetes mellitus. Methods The entire mtDNA was studied by using conformation sensitive gel electrophoresis and PCR fragments that differed in mobility were directly sequenced. Results We found a common nonsynonymous variant m.15218A > G (p.T158A, MTCYB) that occurs in haplogroup U5a1 to be more frequent in patients with epilepsy. The m.15218A > G variant was present in five patients with epilepsy and in four out of 403 population controls (p = 0.0077). This variant was present in two branches in the phylogenetic network constructed on the basis of mtDNA variation among the patients. Three algorithms predicted that m.15218A > G is damaging in effect. Conclusions We suggest that the m.15218A > G variant is mildly deleterious and that mtDNA involvement should be considered in patients with epilepsy and who have a maternal history of epilepsy, sensorineural hearing impairment or diabetes mellitus. PMID:23870133

  5. Clinical characteristics of patients with benign nonlesional temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiyeon; Kim, Seong Hoon; Lim, Sung Chul; Kim, Woojun; Shon, Young-Min

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the evolution of nonlesional temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE-NL) in patients treated exclusively with antiepileptic drugs and to elucidate clinical phenotypes related to the prognosis of these patients. Methods Clinical, radiological, and electroencephalographic (EEG) findings in 84 patients with TLE-NL were reviewed. A good response group (GRG) and a poor response group (PRG) were defined if the duration of their seizure-free period was >1 year, or <1 year, respectively. Results There were 46 (54.8%) patients in the GRG and 38 (45.2%) patients in the PRG. The number of antiepileptic drugs administered was significantly lower in the GRG than that in the PRG (1.3±0.8 vs 2.8±1.0, respectively; P<0.05). The GRG had a significantly older age of onset than the PRG and a lower occurrence of initial precipitating events, such as febrile seizures, central nervous system infection, and head trauma (P<0.05). The prevalence of EEG abnormality, presence of aura, generalized seizures, and automatism was less frequently observed in the GRG (P<0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that the presence of automatism and initial precipitating events were significantly associated with a poor prognosis (P<0.05). Conclusion In contrast to the commonly assumed intractability of TLE, we found that more than 54% of patients with TLE-NL achieved a long seizure-free period. Older age at onset of TLE-NL was associated with a better prognosis. However, the presence of automatism and initial precipitating events were related to a poor prognosis. Future prospective studies with a much larger population are warranted. PMID:27555776

  6. Increased expression of interleukin 17 in the cortex and hippocampus from patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    He, Jiao-Jiang; Sun, Fei-Ji; Wang, Yu; Luo, Xiao-Qin; Lei, Peng; Zhou, Jie; Zhu, Di; Li, Zhi-Yun; Yang, Hui

    2016-09-15

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is the most common form of focal epilepsies in adults and proinflammatory cytokines have long been thought to play an important role in pathogenesis and epileptogenicity. In the present study, we investigated the levels and expression patterns of the interleukin 17 (IL-17) system in temporal neocortex and hippocampus from 24 patients with MTLE and 8 control (Ctr) samples. We found that IL-17 and IL-17 receptor (IL-17R) were clearly upregulated in MTLE at both mRNA and protein levels, compared with Ctr. Immunostaining indicated that neurons, astrocytes, microglia and endothelial cells of blood vessels are the major sources of IL-17. These findings suggest that IL-17 system may be involved in the pathogenesis and epileptogenicity of MTLE. PMID:27609289

  7. Sleep and Epilepsy: Strange Bedfellows No More.

    PubMed

    St Louis, Erik K

    2011-09-01

    Ancient philosophers and theologians believed that altered consciousness freed the mind to prophesy the future, equating sleep with seizures. Only recently has the bidirectional influences of epilepsy and sleep upon one another received more substantive analysis. This article reviews the complex and increasingly recognized interrelationships between sleep and epilepsy. NREM sleep differentially activates interictal epileptiform discharges during slow wave (N3) sleep, while ictal seizure events occur more frequently during light NREM stages N1 and N2. The most commonly encountered types of sleep-related epilepsies (those with preferential occurrence during sleep or following arousal) include frontal and temporal lobe partial epilepsies in adults, and benign epilepsy of childhood with centrotemporal spikes (benign rolandic epilepsy) and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy in children and adolescents. Comorbid sleep disorders are frequent in patients with epilepsy, particularly obstructive sleep apnea in refractory epilepsy patients which may aggravate seizure burden, while treatment with nasal continuous positive airway pressure often improves seizure frequency. Distinguishing nocturnal events such as NREM parasomnias (confusional arousals, sleep walking, and night terrors), REM parasomnias including REM sleep behavior disorder, and nocturnal seizures if frequently difficult and benefits from careful history taking and video-EEG-polysomnography in selected cases. Differentiating nocturnal seizures from primary sleep disorders is essential for determining appropriate therapy, and recognizing co-existent sleep disorders in patients with epilepsy may improve their seizure burden and quality of life. PMID:23539488

  8. Patient Reported Outcome (PRO) assessment in epilepsy: a review of epilepsy-specific PROs according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory requirements

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Despite collection of patient reported outcome (PRO) data in clinical trials of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), PRO results are not being routinely reported on European Medicines Agency (EMA) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) product labels. This review aimed to evaluate epilepsy-specific PRO instruments against FDA regulatory standards for supporting label claims. Structured literature searches were conducted in Embase and Medline databases to identify epilepsy-specific PRO instruments. Only instruments that could potentially be impacted by pharmacological treatment, were completed by adults and had evidence of some validation work were selected for review. A total of 26 PROs were reviewed based on criteria developed from the FDA regulatory standards. The ability to meet these criteria was classified as either full, partial or no evidence, whereby partial reflected some evidence but not enough to comprehensively address the FDA regulatory standards. Most instruments provided partial evidence of content validity. Input from clinicians and literature was common although few involved patients in both item generation and cognitive debriefing. Construct validity was predominantly compromised by no evidence of a-priori hypotheses of expected relationships. Evidence for test-retest reliability and internal consistency was available for most PROs although few included complete results regarding all subscales and some failed to reach recommended thresholds. The ability to detect change and interpretation of change were not investigated in most instruments and no PROs had published evidence of a conceptual framework. The study concludes that none of the 26 have the full evidence required by the FDA to support a label claim, and all require further research to support their use as an endpoint. The Subjective Handicap of Epilepsy (SHE) and the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy (NDDI-E) have the fewest gaps that would need to be addressed through

  9. Patient Reported Outcome (PRO) assessment in epilepsy: a review of epilepsy-specific PROs according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory requirements.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Annabel; Kerr, Cicely; Breheny, Katie; Wild, Diane

    2013-03-11

    Despite collection of patient reported outcome (PRO) data in clinical trials of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), PRO results are not being routinely reported on European Medicines Agency (EMA) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) product labels. This review aimed to evaluate epilepsy-specific PRO instruments against FDA regulatory standards for supporting label claims. Structured literature searches were conducted in Embase and Medline databases to identify epilepsy-specific PRO instruments. Only instruments that could potentially be impacted by pharmacological treatment, were completed by adults and had evidence of some validation work were selected for review. A total of 26 PROs were reviewed based on criteria developed from the FDA regulatory standards. The ability to meet these criteria was classified as either full, partial or no evidence, whereby partial reflected some evidence but not enough to comprehensively address the FDA regulatory standards. Most instruments provided partial evidence of content validity. Input from clinicians and literature was common although few involved patients in both item generation and cognitive debriefing. Construct validity was predominantly compromised by no evidence of a-priori hypotheses of expected relationships. Evidence for test-retest reliability and internal consistency was available for most PROs although few included complete results regarding all subscales and some failed to reach recommended thresholds. The ability to detect change and interpretation of change were not investigated in most instruments and no PROs had published evidence of a conceptual framework. The study concludes that none of the 26 have the full evidence required by the FDA to support a label claim, and all require further research to support their use as an endpoint. The Subjective Handicap of Epilepsy (SHE) and the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy (NDDI-E) have the fewest gaps that would need to be addressed through

  10. Bilateral reductions in hippocampal volume in adults with epilepsy and a history of febrile seizures

    PubMed Central

    Barr, W.; Ashtari, M.; Schaul, N.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To examine the degree and frequency of reductions in hippocampal volume in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy with and without a history of febrile seizures.
METHODS—In vivo measures of hippocampal volume were computed from three dimensional gradient echo (FLASH) images in 44 patients undergoing comprehensive evaluations for epilepsy surgery. Twenty one patients (48%) reported a history of febrile seizures. The volumes from these patients were compared with those from 23 patients without a history of febrile seizures and 34 healthy controls.
RESULTS—The febrile seizure group had significant reductions in volume, both ipsilateral (30% decrease) and contralateral (15% decrease), to the EEG seizure focus. Twelve of 18 patients with febrile seizures exhibited clinically significant ipsilateral volume reductions, defined as volumes falling 2 SD below the mean obtained from the control sample. Only four of 19 patients without febrile seizures exhibited this degree of reduction. No significant correlations were found between seizure variables (for example, duration of epilepsy, seizure frequency) and ipsilateral reductions in volume. However, a significant inverse correlation (r=−0.45, P<0.05) between seizure frequency and the volume of the hippocampus contralateral to the seizure focus was found in the febrile seizure group.
CONCLUSION—These results suggest that a history of febrile seizures is associated with the finding of a smaller hippocampus on the side ipsilateral to the subsequent temporal lobe focus whereas chronic factors seem to be be related to pathology contralateral to the seizure focus.

 PMID:9343124

  11. NRSF and BDNF polymorphisms as biomarkers of cognitive dysfunction in adults with newly diagnosed epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Warburton, Alix; Miyajima, Fabio; Shazadi, Kanvel; Crossley, Joanne; Johnson, Michael R.; Marson, Anthony G.; Baker, Gus A.; Quinn, John P.; Sills, Graeme J.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is a common comorbidity in people with epilepsy, but its causes remain unclear. It may be related to the etiology of the disorder, the consequences of seizures, or the effects of antiepileptic drug treatment. Genetics may also play a contributory role. We investigated the influence of variants in the genes encoding neuron-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), proteins previously associated with cognition and epilepsy, on cognitive function in people with newly diagnosed epilepsy. A total of 82 patients who had previously undergone detailed neuropsychological assessment were genotyped for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the NRSF and BDNF genes. Putatively functional SNPs were included in a genetic association analysis with specific cognitive domains, including memory, psychomotor speed, and information processing. Cross-sectional and longitudinal designs were used to explore genetic influences on baseline cognition at diagnosis and change from baseline over the first year since diagnosis, respectively. We found a statistically significant association between genotypic variation and memory function at both baseline (NRSF: rs1105434, rs2227902 and BDNF: rs1491850, rs2030324, rs11030094) and in our longitudinal analysis (NRSF: rs2227902 and BDNF: rs12273363). Psychomotor speed was also associated with genotype (NRSF rs3796529) in the longitudinal assessment. In line with our previous work on general cognitive function in the healthy aging population, we observed an additive interaction between risk alleles for the NRSF rs2227902 (G) and BDNF rs6265 (A) polymorphisms which was again consistent with a significantly greater decline in delayed recall over the first year since diagnosis. These findings support a role for the NRSF–BDNF pathway in the modulation of cognitive function in patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy. PMID:26708060

  12. NRSF and BDNF polymorphisms as biomarkers of cognitive dysfunction in adults with newly diagnosed epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Warburton, Alix; Miyajima, Fabio; Shazadi, Kanvel; Crossley, Joanne; Johnson, Michael R; Marson, Anthony G; Baker, Gus A; Quinn, John P; Sills, Graeme J

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is a common comorbidity in people with epilepsy, but its causes remain unclear. It may be related to the etiology of the disorder, the consequences of seizures, or the effects of antiepileptic drug treatment. Genetics may also play a contributory role. We investigated the influence of variants in the genes encoding neuron-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), proteins previously associated with cognition and epilepsy, on cognitive function in people with newly diagnosed epilepsy. A total of 82 patients who had previously undergone detailed neuropsychological assessment were genotyped for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the NRSF and BDNF genes. Putatively functional SNPs were included in a genetic association analysis with specific cognitive domains, including memory, psychomotor speed, and information processing. Cross-sectional and longitudinal designs were used to explore genetic influences on baseline cognition at diagnosis and change from baseline over the first year since diagnosis, respectively. We found a statistically significant association between genotypic variation and memory function at both baseline (NRSF: rs1105434, rs2227902 and BDNF: rs1491850, rs2030324, rs11030094) and in our longitudinal analysis (NRSF: rs2227902 and BDNF: rs12273363). Psychomotor speed was also associated with genotype (NRSF rs3796529) in the longitudinal assessment. In line with our previous work on general cognitive function in the healthy aging population, we observed an additive interaction between risk alleles for the NRSF rs2227902 (G) and BDNF rs6265 (A) polymorphisms which was again consistent with a significantly greater decline in delayed recall over the first year since diagnosis. These findings support a role for the NRSF-BDNF pathway in the modulation of cognitive function in patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy. PMID:26708060

  13. NRSF and BDNF polymorphisms as biomarkers of cognitive dysfunction in adults with newly diagnosed epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Warburton, Alix; Miyajima, Fabio; Shazadi, Kanvel; Crossley, Joanne; Johnson, Michael R; Marson, Anthony G; Baker, Gus A; Quinn, John P; Sills, Graeme J

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is a common comorbidity in people with epilepsy, but its causes remain unclear. It may be related to the etiology of the disorder, the consequences of seizures, or the effects of antiepileptic drug treatment. Genetics may also play a contributory role. We investigated the influence of variants in the genes encoding neuron-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), proteins previously associated with cognition and epilepsy, on cognitive function in people with newly diagnosed epilepsy. A total of 82 patients who had previously undergone detailed neuropsychological assessment were genotyped for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the NRSF and BDNF genes. Putatively functional SNPs were included in a genetic association analysis with specific cognitive domains, including memory, psychomotor speed, and information processing. Cross-sectional and longitudinal designs were used to explore genetic influences on baseline cognition at diagnosis and change from baseline over the first year since diagnosis, respectively. We found a statistically significant association between genotypic variation and memory function at both baseline (NRSF: rs1105434, rs2227902 and BDNF: rs1491850, rs2030324, rs11030094) and in our longitudinal analysis (NRSF: rs2227902 and BDNF: rs12273363). Psychomotor speed was also associated with genotype (NRSF rs3796529) in the longitudinal assessment. In line with our previous work on general cognitive function in the healthy aging population, we observed an additive interaction between risk alleles for the NRSF rs2227902 (G) and BDNF rs6265 (A) polymorphisms which was again consistent with a significantly greater decline in delayed recall over the first year since diagnosis. These findings support a role for the NRSF-BDNF pathway in the modulation of cognitive function in patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy.

  14. Risk of epilepsy in stroke patients receiving acupuncture treatment: a nationwide retrospective matched-cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Shu-Wen; Liao, Chien-Chang; Yeh, Chun-Chieh; Chen, Ta-Liang; Lane, Hsin-Long; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Shih, Chun-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the risk of epilepsy in stroke patients receiving and not receiving acupuncture treatment. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting This study was based on Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database that included information on stroke patients hospitalised between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2004. Participants We identified 42 040 patients hospitalised with newly diagnosed stroke who were aged 20 years and above. Primary and secondary outcome measures We compared incident epilepsy during the follow-up period until the end of 2009 in stroke patients who were and were not receiving acupuncture. The adjusted HRs and 95% CIs of epilepsy associated with acupuncture were calculated using multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression. Results Stroke patients who received acupuncture treatment (9.8 per 1000 person-years) experienced a reduced incidence of epilepsy compared to those who did not receive acupuncture treatment (11.5 per 1000 person-years), with an HR of 0.74 (95% CI 0.68 to 0.80) after adjustment for sociodemographic factors and coexisting medical conditions. Acupuncture treatment was associated with a decreased risk of epilepsy, particularly among stroke patients aged 20–69 years. The log-rank test probability curve indicated that stroke patients receiving acupuncture treatment had a reduced probability of epilepsy compared with individuals who did not receive acupuncture treatment during the follow-up period (p<0.0001). Conclusions Stroke patients who received acupuncture treatment had a reduced risk of epilepsy compared with those not receiving acupuncture treatment. However, the protective effects associated with acupuncture treatment require further validation in prospective cohort studies. PMID:27412100

  15. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy--a report of 11 patients at the University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Manonmani, V; Tan, C T

    1993-10-01

    This is a report on 11 cases of Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy (JME) from the University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur, all of whom were diagnosed in the last one and a half years. This genetic syndrome is seen in all the three main racial groups: Chinese, Malays and Indians. It accounts for 2% of the epilepsy patients seen at the neurology clinic. Lack of awareness is the main hindrance to diagnosis.

  16. Aberrant neuronal avalanches in cortical tissue removed from juvenile epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Jon P; Smith, Jodi L; Beggs, John M

    2010-12-01

    Some forms of epilepsy may arise as a result of pathologic interactions among neurons. Many forms of collective activity have been identified, including waves, spirals, oscillations, synchrony, and neuronal avalanches. All these emergent activity patterns have been hypothesized to show pathologic signatures associated with epilepsy. Here, the authors used 60-channel multielectrode arrays to record neuronal avalanches in cortical tissue removed from juvenile epilepsy patients. For comparison, they also recorded activity in rat cortical slices. The authors found that some human tissue removed from epilepsy patients exhibited prolonged periods of hyperactivity not seen in rat slices. In addition, they found a positive correlation between the branching parameter, a measure of network gain, and firing rate in human slices during periods of hyperactivity. This relationship was not present in rat slices. The authors suggest that this positive correlation between the branching parameter and the firing rate is part of a positive feedback loop and may contribute to some forms of epilepsy. These results also indicate that neuronal avalanches are abnormally regulated in slices removed from pediatric epilepsy patients.

  17. Prevalence and Factors Associated with Perceived Stigma among Patients with Epilepsy in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Fanta, Tolesa; Azale, Telake; Assefa, Dawit; Getachew, Mekbit

    2015-01-01

    Background. Epilepsy stigma is considered to be one of the most important factors that have a negative influence on people with epilepsy. Among all types of stigma perceived stigma further exerts stress and restricts normal participation in society. Methods. Hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted from May 1, 2013, to May 30, 2013. All patients with epilepsy in Ethiopia were source population. The sample size was determined using single population proportion formula and 347 subjects were selected by using systematic random sampling method. Data was analyzed by using SPSS version 20. Results. A total of 346 participants with mean age of 29.3 ± 8.5 SD participated with a response rate of 99.7%. The prevalence of perceived stigma was 31.2%. Age range between 18 and 24 [AOR = 2.84, 95%CI: 1.02, 7.92], difficulty to attend follow-up because of stigma [AOR = 3.15, 95%CI: 1.19, 8.34], seizure related injury [AOR = 1.88, 95%CI: 1.12, 3.15], and contagion belief [AOR = 1.88, 95%CI: 1.10, 5.08] were significantly associated with perceived stigma. Conclusions. Perceived stigma was found to be a common problem among patients suffering from epilepsy. The results reinforce the need for creating awareness among patients with epilepsy and addressing misconceptions attached to epilepsy. PMID:26425541

  18. Comparative persistence of antiepileptic drugs in patients with epilepsy: A STROBE-compliant retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lai, Edward Chia-Cheng; Hsieh, Cheng-Yang; Su, Chien-Chou; Yang, Yea-Huei Kao; Huang, Chin-Wei; Lin, Swu-Jane; Setoguchi, Soko

    2016-08-01

    We compared persistence of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) including carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, topiramate, valproic acid, and phenytoin in an Asian population with epilepsy.A retrospective cohort study was conducted by analyzing Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). Adult epilepsy patients newly prescribed with AEDs between 2005 and 2009 were included. The primary outcome was persistence, defined as the treatment duration from the date of AED initiation to the date of AED discontinuation, switching, hospitalization due to seizure or disenrollment from databases, whichever came first. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the risk of non-persistence with AEDs.Among the 13,061 new users of AED monotherapy (mean age: 58 years; 60% men), the persistence ranged from 218.8 (gabapentin) to 275.9 (oxcarbazepine) days in the first treatment year. The risks of non-persistence in patients receiving oxcarbazepine (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.78; 95% CI, 0.74-0.83), valproic acid (0.88; 0.85-0.92), lamotrigine (0.72; 0.65-0.81), and topiramate (0.90; 0.82-0.98) were significantly lower than in the carbamazepine group. Compared with carbamazepine users, the non-persistence risk was higher in phenytoin users (1.10; 1.06-1.13), while gabapentin users (1.03; 0.98-1.09) had similar risk. For risk of hospitalization due to seizure and in comparison with carbamazepine users, oxcarbazepine (0.66; 0.58-0.74) and lamotrigine (0.46; 0.35-0.62) users had lower risk, while phenytoin (1.35; 1.26-1.44) users had higher risk. The results remained consistent throughout series of sensitivity and stratification analyses.The persistence varied among AEDs and was better for oxcarbazepine, valproic acid, lamotrigine, and topiramate, but worse for phenytoin when compared with carbamazepine. PMID:27583857

  19. Spatial memory for asymmetrical dot locations predicts lateralization among patients with presurgical mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Franklin C; Hirsch, Lawrence J; Spencer, Dennis D

    2015-11-01

    This study examined the ability of an asymmetrical dot location memory test (Brown Location Test, BLT) and two verbal memory tests (Verbal Selective Reminding Test (VSRT) and California Verbal Learning Test, Second Edition (CVLT-II)) to correctly lateralize left (LTLE) or right (RTLE) mesial temporal lobe epilepsy that was confirmed with video-EEG. Subjects consisted of 16 patients with medically refractory RTLE and 13 patients with medically refractory LTLE who were left hemisphere language dominant. Positive predictive values for lateralizing TLE correctly were 87.5% for the BLT, 72.7% for the VSRT, and 80% for the CVLT-II. Binary logistic regression indicated that the BLT alone correctly classified 76.9% of patients with left temporal lobe epilepsy and 87.5% of patients with right temporal lobe epilepsy. Inclusion of the verbal memory tests improved this to 92.3% of patients with left temporal lobe epilepsy and 100% correct classification of patients with right temporal lobe epilepsy. Though of a limited sample size, this study suggests that the BLT alone provides strong laterality information which improves with the addition of verbal memory tests. PMID:26398592

  20. Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP): Are All Your Patients Informed?

    PubMed

    Marin Collazo, I Vanessa; Tatum, William O

    2016-07-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is a devastating direct epilepsy-related cause of death. Although its occurrence has some risk factors, it is unanticipated and very traumatic to the families of affected patients. Effective preventive measures for SUDEP are lacking; therefore, efforts are directed at modifiable risk factors. The majority of caregivers of patients with epilepsy and SUDEP wish they would have known more about the topic before the terminal event. SUDEP is a difficult topic for physicians and clearly even more challenging to discuss with patients and caregivers. The pathophysiology of SUDEP is controversial, but awareness should be raised despite individual opinions. During the last decade SUDEP has received substantial attention, and efforts are being made to increase worldwide awareness. The American Epilepsy Society and Epilepsy Foundation Joint Task force, National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, and the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network recommend educating patients about SUDEP. Education will potentially help meet treatment goals, promote better patient-physician rapport, decrease anxiety and fear, serve as a filter for inaccurate information, and lessen grief and blame in the families of patients affected by SUDEP. This article will cover a literature review on SUDEP, epidemiology, risk factors, proposed mechanism, potential interventions, physician practices and suggested measurements, and public websites designed to increase SUDEP awareness. PMID:27348142

  1. Cause-specific mortality among children and young adults with epilepsy: Results from the U.S. National Child Death Review Case Reporting System.

    PubMed

    Tian, Niu; Shaw, Esther C; Zack, Matthew; Kobau, Rosemarie; Dykstra, Heather; Covington, Theresa M

    2015-04-01

    We investigated causes of death in children and young adults with epilepsy by using data from the U.S. National Child Death Review Case Reporting System (NCDR-CRS), a passive surveillance system composed of comprehensive information related to deaths reviewed by local child death review teams. Information on a total of 48,697 deaths in children and young adults 28days to 24years of age, including 551 deaths with epilepsy and 48,146 deaths without epilepsy, was collected from 2004 through 2012 in 32 states. In a proportionate mortality analysis by official manner of death, decedents with epilepsy had a significantly higher percentage of natural deaths but significantly lower percentages of deaths due to accidents, homicide, and undetermined causes compared with persons without epilepsy. With respect to underlying causes of death, decedents with epilepsy had significantly higher percentages of deaths due to drowning and most medical conditions including pneumonia and congenital anomalies but lower percentages of deaths due to asphyxia, weapon use, and unknown causes compared with decedents without epilepsy. The increased percentages of deaths due to pneumonia and drowning in children and young adults with epilepsy suggest preventive interventions including immunization and better instruction and monitoring before or during swimming. State-specific and national population-based mortality studies of children and young adults with epilepsy are recommended.

  2. Generalized epilepsy in a patient with mosaic Turner syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Reports on cases of epilepsy in Turner syndrome are rare and most of them have cortical developmental malformations. We report the case of a Taiwanese patient with mosaic Turner syndrome with generalized tonic–clonic epilepsy and asymmetrical lateral ventricles but no apparent cortical anomaly. Case presentation A 49-year-old Taiwanese woman without family history presented with infrequent generalized tonic–clonic epilepsy since she was 11 years old. On examination, her short stature, webbed neck, swelling of hands and feet, retrognathic face, and mild intellectual disability were noted. She had spontaneous menarche and regular menses. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed asymmetrical lateral ventricles and diffuse subcortical white matter T2-weighted hyperintensities. Chromosome studies disclosed low aneuploid (10%) 45,X/46,XX/47,XXX mosaic Turner syndrome. Conclusions There is increasing evidence that epilepsy can be an uncommon presentation of Turner syndrome. Mosaic Turner syndrome with 47, XXX probably increases the risk of epilepsy but more research is needed to reach a conclusion. This case also strengthens our knowledge that Turner syndrome can be one of the pathologic bases of asymmetrical lateral ventricles. When a patient has idiopathic/cryptogenic epilepsy or asymmetrical lateral ventricles on brain images, the presence of a mild Turner phenotype warrants further chromosome studies. PMID:24694237

  3. Role of cortisol in mood and memory in patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Frazier, T.; Chapin, J.S.; Hamrahian, A.H.; Diehl, B.; Alexopoulos, A.; Unnwongse, K.; Naugle, R.I.; Kubu, C.S.; Tesar, G.E.; Najm, I.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study prospectively examined the relationships among late night salivary cortisol (NSC) levels and depressive symptoms, memory performance, and hippocampal volumes in patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and the potential mediating effects of cortisol in the relationships between these variables. Methods: Participants included 24 adults with well-characterized medically refractory TLE (right = 11; left = 12; bitemporal = 1). All patients provided saliva samples and completed measures of mood, anxiety, and memory (objective and subjective). MRI-based volumetric analyses of the hippocampi were also conducted. Results: As hypothesized, cortisol was found to be negatively related to several memory measures such that patients with higher cortisol levels demonstrated lower memory performance. However, unexpectedly, cortisol was not related to current symptoms of depression or anxiety, subjective memory ratings, or hippocampal volumes. Consistent with previous findings in the literature, a number of other relationships among the study variables were observed (objective memory and hippocampal volume; subjective memory and mood/anxiety). Results of mediator analyses suggested that cortisol does not mediate the relationship between depression and memory dysfunction or the relationship between depression and hippocampal atrophy. Conclusions: While cortisol may play a role in memory performance in patients with TLE, it does not fully explain the relationship between depression and mesial temporal dysfunction, likely reflecting the complex and multifactorial relationships among these variables. Results confirm the relationship between memory performance and structural brain integrity and provide further support for a role of depression in subjective memory complaints. PMID:22442430

  4. Disruption of learning and long-term retention of prose passages in patients with focal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Monica; Mohamed, Armin; Savage, Greg; Miller, Laurie A

    2015-10-01

    Recent investigations of accelerated long-term forgetting, a condition in which newly acquired memory is normal initially but decays rapidly over days or weeks, indicate that multiple factors might influence whether this phenomenon is seen in patients with epilepsy. Test-based differences such as learning condition or type of memory measure (e.g., recall vs recognition) as well as epilepsy variables (e.g., side, site, or frequency of epileptiform activity) may be important. The present study sought to characterize factors affecting learning and memory for prose passages in patients with focal epilepsy. We enrolled 21 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, with and without hippocampal lesions, 11 patients with extratemporal epilepsy (ETE), and 29 healthy controls. Two matched passages were used to compare effects of initial learning condition (one exposure versus learning-to-criterion) on subsequent patterns of retention. Recall and recognition were tested at different delays (i.e., immediately, 30min, 24h, and 4days). Regression analyses and one-way ANOVAs indicated that having a left-hemisphere epileptic focus had a negative impact on learning, whilst presence of a hippocampal lesion (irrespective of side) was associated with deterioration in recall for intervals up to 24h postencoding. Learning condition affected patterns of memory decay in that the ETE group showed significant decline in recall between 24h and 4days only when stories were learned to criterion. In contrast with recall, no changes over time were evident in recognition memory, as patients with hippocampal lesions were impaired from 30min onward. Epilepsy variables other than side and site of epilepsy/lesion did not influence performance. In conclusion, the left hemisphere is involved in learning of prose material, and the hippocampus is involved in the consolidation of this material mainly for the first 24h. After this, cortical regions outside the hippocampus become important for recall.

  5. Pyridoxine deficiency in adult patients with status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Dave, Hina N; Eugene Ramsay, Richard; Khan, Fawad; Sabharwal, Vivek; Irland, Megan

    2015-11-01

    An 8-year-old girl treated at our facility for superrefractory status epilepticus was found to have a low pyridoxine level at 5 μg/L. After starting pyridoxine supplementation, improvement in the EEG for a 24-hour period was seen. We decided to look at the pyridoxine levels in adult patients admitted with status epilepticus. We reviewed the records on patients admitted to the neurological ICU for status epilepticus (SE). Eighty-one adult patients were identified with documented pyridoxine levels. For comparison purposes, we looked at pyridoxine levels in outpatients with epilepsy (n=132). Reported normal pyridoxine range is >10 ng/mL. All but six patients admitted for SE had low normal or undetectable pyridoxine levels. A selective pyridoxine deficiency was seen in 94% of patients with status epilepticus (compared to 39.4% in the outpatients) which leads us to believe that there is a relationship between status epilepticus and pyridoxine levels.

  6. Phenotypic and Imaging Features of FLNA-Negative Patients With Bilateral Periventricular Nodular Heterotopia and Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Fallil, Zianka; Pardoe, Heath; Bachman, Robert; Cunningham, Benjamin; Parulkar, Isha; Shain, Catherine; Poduri, Annapurna; Knowlton, Robert; Kuzniecky, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Periventricular nodular heterotopia (PVNH) is a malformation of cortical development due to impaired neuronal migration resulting in the formation of nodular masses of neurons and glial cells in close proximity to the ventricular walls. We report the clinical characteristics of the largest case series of FLNA negative patients with seizures and bilateral periventricular heterotopia. Methods Participants were recruited through the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project (EPGP), a multicenter collaborative effort to collect detailed phenotypic data and DNA on a large number of individuals with epilepsy, including a cohort with symptomatic epilepsy related to PVNH. Included subjects had epilepsy and MRI confirmed bilateral PVNH. MRI studies were visually and quantitatively reviewed to investigate the topographic extent of PVNH, symmetry and laterality. Key Findings We analyze data on 71 patients with bilateral PVNH. The incidence of febrile seizures was 16.6%. There was at least one other family member with epilepsy in 36.9% of this population. Developmental delay was present in 21.8%. Focal onset seizures were the most common type of seizure presentation (79.3%). High heterotopia burden was strongly associated with female gender and trigonal nodular localization. There was no evidence for differences in brain volume between PVNH subjects and controls. No relationship was observed between heterotopic volume and gender, developmental delay, location of PVNH, ventricular or cerebellar abnormalities, laterality of seizure onset, age at seizure onset and duration of epilepsy. Significance A direct correlation was observed between high heterotopia burden, female gender and trigonal location in this large cohort of FLNA-negative bilateral PVNH patients with epilepsy. Quantitative MRI measurements indicate that this correlation is based on the diffuse nature of the heterotopic nodules rather than on the total volume of abnormal heterotopic tissue. PMID:26340046

  7. Panic attack symptoms differentiate patients with epilepsy from those with psychogenic nonepileptic spells (PNES).

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Rick; Popescu, Alexandra; Dixit, Ronak; Ghearing, Gena; Bagic, Anto

    2014-08-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic spells (PNES) are frequently challenging to differentiate from epileptic seizures. The experience of panic attack symptoms during an event may assist in distinguishing PNES from seizures secondary to epilepsy. A retrospective analysis of 354 patients diagnosed with PNES (N=224) or with epilepsy (N=130) investigated the thirteen Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-IV-Text Revision panic attack criteria endorsed by the two groups. We found a statistically higher mean number of symptoms reported by patients with PNES compared with those with epilepsy. In addition, the majority of the panic attack symptoms including heart palpitations, sweating, shortness of breath, choking feeling, chest discomfort, dizziness/unsteadiness, derealization or depersonalization, fear of dying, paresthesias, and chills or hot flashes were significantly more frequent in those with PNES. As patients with PNES frequently have poor clinical outcomes, treatment addressing the anxiety symptomatology may be beneficial. PMID:25084477

  8. Determinants of Autobiographical Memory in Patients with Unilateral Temporal Lobe Epilepsy or Excisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Laurent, Marie; Moscovitch, Morris; Levine, Brian; McAndrews, Mary Pat

    2009-01-01

    Patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy from hippocampal origin and patients with unilateral surgical excision of an epileptic focus located in the medial temporal lobe were compared to healthy controls on a version of the Autobiographical Interview (AI) adapted to assess memory for event-specific and generic personal episodes. For both…

  9. Concise Review: Exciting Cells: Modeling Genetic Epilepsies with Patient-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Tidball, Andrew M; Parent, Jack M

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) models of epilepsy are becoming a revolutionary platform for mechanistic studies and drug discovery. The skyrocketing pace of epilepsy gene discovery is vastly outstripping the development of in vivo animal models. Currently, antiepileptic drug prescribing to patients with specific genetic epilepsies is based on small-scale clinical trials and empiricism; however, rapid production of patient-derived iPSC models will allow for precision therapy. We review iPSC-based studies that have already afforded novel discoveries in diseases with epileptic phenotypes, as well as challenges to using iPSC-based neurological disease models. We also discuss iPSC-derived cardiomyocyte studies of arrhythmia-inducing ion channelopathies that exemplify novel drug discovery and use of multielectrode array technology that can be translated to epilepsy research. Beyond initial studies of Rett, Timothy, Phelan-McDermid, and Dravet syndromes, the stage is set for groundbreaking iPSC-based mechanistic and therapeutic discoveries in genetic epilepsies with the potential to impact patient treatment and quality of life.

  10. Concise Review: Exciting Cells: Modeling Genetic Epilepsies with Patient-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Tidball, Andrew M; Parent, Jack M

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) models of epilepsy are becoming a revolutionary platform for mechanistic studies and drug discovery. The skyrocketing pace of epilepsy gene discovery is vastly outstripping the development of in vivo animal models. Currently, antiepileptic drug prescribing to patients with specific genetic epilepsies is based on small-scale clinical trials and empiricism; however, rapid production of patient-derived iPSC models will allow for precision therapy. We review iPSC-based studies that have already afforded novel discoveries in diseases with epileptic phenotypes, as well as challenges to using iPSC-based neurological disease models. We also discuss iPSC-derived cardiomyocyte studies of arrhythmia-inducing ion channelopathies that exemplify novel drug discovery and use of multielectrode array technology that can be translated to epilepsy research. Beyond initial studies of Rett, Timothy, Phelan-McDermid, and Dravet syndromes, the stage is set for groundbreaking iPSC-based mechanistic and therapeutic discoveries in genetic epilepsies with the potential to impact patient treatment and quality of life. PMID:26373465

  11. Qualitative research and its methods in epilepsy: Contributing to an understanding of patients' lived experiences of the disease.

    PubMed

    Rapport, Frances; Clement, Clare; Doel, Marcus A; Hutchings, Hayley A

    2015-04-01

    This review paper makes the case for the usefulness of qualitative research methods in the context of epilepsy research. It begins with an assessment of the current state of epilepsy literature and identifies gaps especially in the following: research in 'developing' countries and research around surgery for adults with epilepsy. It makes the case that disclosure of people's behaviors, actions, and reactions in different, often complex health-care situations can indicate how they bring meaning to their disease experiences and support needs. It shows the value of encouraging work that clarifies how patients manage their illness and how they understand changes in their health and well-being over the life course of their illness and how health-care professionals and other stakeholder groups care for those with epilepsy. The paper suggests a range of methods for addressing gaps in the literature and highlights a range of data collection, data analysis, and data interpretation and synthesis techniques that are appropriate in this context. It pays particular attention to the strengths of qualitative applications in mixed-methods research using an example from a recent ulcerative colitis drug trial that indicates how they can be integrated into study findings, add rich description, and enhance study outcomes. Ethnographic methodology is also presented, as a way of offering rare access to the 'lived experience' dimension, before the paper concludes with an assessment of the qualitative criteria of credibility, dependability, transferability, and confirmability for judging a study's 'trustworthiness'. The criteria evidence not only the trustworthiness of data and findings but also the ways in which a study has approached any challenges inherent in its research design.

  12. Qualitative research and its methods in epilepsy: Contributing to an understanding of patients' lived experiences of the disease.

    PubMed

    Rapport, Frances; Clement, Clare; Doel, Marcus A; Hutchings, Hayley A

    2015-04-01

    This review paper makes the case for the usefulness of qualitative research methods in the context of epilepsy research. It begins with an assessment of the current state of epilepsy literature and identifies gaps especially in the following: research in 'developing' countries and research around surgery for adults with epilepsy. It makes the case that disclosure of people's behaviors, actions, and reactions in different, often complex health-care situations can indicate how they bring meaning to their disease experiences and support needs. It shows the value of encouraging work that clarifies how patients manage their illness and how they understand changes in their health and well-being over the life course of their illness and how health-care professionals and other stakeholder groups care for those with epilepsy. The paper suggests a range of methods for addressing gaps in the literature and highlights a range of data collection, data analysis, and data interpretation and synthesis techniques that are appropriate in this context. It pays particular attention to the strengths of qualitative applications in mixed-methods research using an example from a recent ulcerative colitis drug trial that indicates how they can be integrated into study findings, add rich description, and enhance study outcomes. Ethnographic methodology is also presented, as a way of offering rare access to the 'lived experience' dimension, before the paper concludes with an assessment of the qualitative criteria of credibility, dependability, transferability, and confirmability for judging a study's 'trustworthiness'. The criteria evidence not only the trustworthiness of data and findings but also the ways in which a study has approached any challenges inherent in its research design. PMID:25847427

  13. A General Practice-Based Prevalence Study of Epilepsy among Adults with Intellectual Disabilities and of Its Association with Psychiatric Disorder, Behaviour Disturbance and Carer Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, T.; Weston, N.; Baxter, H.; Felce, D.; Kerr, M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Although the elevated occurrence of epilepsy in people with intellectual disabilities (ID) is well recognized, the nature of seizures and their association with psychopathology and carer strain are less clearly understood. The aims were to determine the prevalence and features of epilepsy in a community-based population of adults with…

  14. Number of patient-reported allergies helps distinguish epilepsy from psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Nathaniel M; Larimer, Phillip; Bourgeois, James A; Lowenstein, Daniel H

    2016-02-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are relatively common, accounting for 5-40% of visits to tertiary epilepsy centers. Inpatient video-electroencephalogram (vEEG) monitoring is the gold standard for diagnosis, but additional positive predictive tools are necessary given vEEG's relatively scarce availability. In this study, we investigated if the number of patient-reported allergies distinguishes between PNES and epilepsy. Excessive allergy-reporting, like PNES, may reflect somatization. Using electronic medical records, ICD-9 codes, and text-identification algorithms to search EEG reports, we identified 905 cases of confirmed PNES and 5187 controls with epilepsy but no PNES. Patients with PNES averaged more self-reported allergies than patients with epilepsy alone (1.93 vs. 1.00, p<0.001). Compared to those with no allergies, each additional allergy linearly increased the percentage of patients with PNES by 2.98% (R(2)=0.71) such that with ≥12 allergies, 12/28 patients (42.8%) had PNES compared to 349/3368 (11.6%) of the population with no allergies (odds ratio=6.49). This relationship remained unchanged with logistic regression analysis. We conclude that long allergy lists may help identify patients with PNES. We hypothesize that a tendency to inaccurately self-report allergies reflects a maladaptive externalization of psychologic distress and that a similar mechanism may be responsible for PNES in some patients with somatic symptom disorder.

  15. Depressogenic medications and other risk factors for depression among Polish patients with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Bosak, Magdalena; Turaj, Wojciech; Dudek, Dominika; Siwek, Marcin; Szczudlik, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of depression among patients with epilepsy and to establish the risk factors of depression in that group, with special focus on the use of potentially depressogenic medications. Patients and methods We studied 289 consecutive patients who visited epilepsy outpatient clinic (University Hospital of Krakow) and met inclusion criteria. All patients were screened with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and those with BDI score ≥12 were further evaluated by a psychiatrist. Results Mean age of patients was 35.7 years, and mean duration of epilepsy was 14.7 years. Idiopathic generalized epilepsy was diagnosed in 63 patients (21.8%), focal epilepsy was found in 189 subjects (65.4%), and unclassified epilepsy was diagnosed in 37 patients (12.8%). Frequent seizures (>1 per month) were reported in 107 patients (37.0%). Thirty-five patients (12.1%) reported an ongoing treatment with one or more of the predefined potentially depressogenic medication (β-blockers, combined estrogen and progestogen, corticosteroid, or flunarizine). In a group of 115 patients (39.8%) who scored ≥12 points in BDI, depression was finally diagnosed in 84 subjects (29.1%) after psychiatric evaluation. Only 20 of those patients (23.8%) were treated with antidepressant. Independent variables associated with the diagnosis of depression in the logistic regression model included frequent seizures (odds ratio [OR] =2.43 [95% confidence interval, 95% CI =1.38–4.29], P=0.002), use of potentially depression-inducing medications (OR =3.33 [95% CI =1.50–7.39], P=0.003), age (OR =1.03 [95% CI =1.01–1.05] per year], P=0.005), and use of oxcarbazepine (OR =2.26 [95% CI =1.04–4.9], P=0.038). Conclusion The prevalence of depression among consecutive Polish patients with epilepsy reached 29.1%. Less than quarter of them received antidepressant treatment at the moment of evaluation. Independent variables associated with depression included age

  16. Numeracy and framing bias in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyunmi; Wong, John B; Mendiratta, Anil; Heiman, Gary A; Hamberger, Marla J

    2011-01-01

    Patients with epilepsy are frequently confronted with complex treatment decisions. Communicating treatment risks is often difficult because patients may have difficulty with basic statistical concepts (i.e., low numeracy) or might misconceive the statistical information based on the way information is presented, a phenomenon known as "framing bias." We assessed numeracy and framing bias in 95 adults with chronic epilepsy and explored cognitive correlates of framing bias. Compared with normal controls, patients with epilepsy had significantly poorer performance on the Numeracy scale (P=0.02), despite a higher level of education than normal controls (P<0.001). Compared with patients with higher numeracy, patients with lower numeracy were significantly more likely to exhibit framing bias. Abstract problem solving performance correlated with the degree of framing bias (r=0.631, P<0.0001), suggesting a relationship between aspects of executive functioning and framing bias. Poor numeracy and susceptibility framing bias place patients with epilepsy at risk for uninformed decisions.

  17. Using Patient-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Model and Treat Epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xixi; Parent, Jack M.

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are transforming the fields of disease modeling and precision therapy. For the treatment of neurological disorders, iPSCs introduce the possibility for targeted cell-based therapies by deriving patient-specific neural tissue in vitro that may ultimately be used for transplantation. We review iPSC technologies and their applications that have already advanced our understanding of neurological disorders, focusing on the epilepsies. We also discuss the application of powerful new tools such as genome editing and multi-well, multielectrode array recording platforms to iPSC disease modeling and therapy development for the epilepsies. Despite some limitations, the field of iPSCs is evolving rapidly and is quickly becoming vital for understanding mechanisms of genetic epilepsies and for future patient-specific therapeutic applications. PMID:26319172

  18. A unique ictal EEG pattern in a patient with the coexistence of generalized and focal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ladino, Lady Diana; Gleadow, Aaron; Téllez-Zenteno, José F

    2015-04-01

    The coexistence of focal and generalized epilepsy is rare. We report on a 17-year-old male with drug-resistant focal epilepsy and idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). He began to experience generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) at the age of 3 years, with a good response to phenobarbital. At the age of 14 years, he began to experience complex partial seizures (CPS). Video-electroencephalography (video-EEG) telemetry showed the coexistence of right temporal spikes and bursts of generalized spike-wave (GSW). The ictal EEG showed a unique EEG pattern characterized by a 4- to 5-second burst of GSW followed by rhythmic delta activity over the right temporal region. A magnetic resonance image (MRI) showed right hippocampal sclerosis. The patient underwent a right temporal lobectomy that significantly improved his seizure control. He was rendered seizure free of the complex partial seizures and improvement of the GTCS. This case illustrates a very uncommon ictal EEG pattern, and shows that the decision for surgery in patients with focal drug-resistant epilepsy should not be affected by coexistent generalized epilepsy. PMID:24615929

  19. Auras in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and mesial temporal sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Nei, Maromi; Sharan, Ashwini; Sperling, Michael R

    2016-05-15

    We investigated auras in patients with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). We also investigated the clinical differences between patients with MTS and abdominal auras and those with MTS and non-mesial temporal auras. All patients with drug-resistant TLE and unilateral MTS who underwent epilepsy surgery at Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center from 1986 through 2014 were evaluated. Patients with good postoperative seizure outcome were investigated. One hundred forty-nine patients (71 males and 78 females) were studied. Thirty-one patients (20.8%) reported no auras, while 29 patients (19.5%) reported abdominal aura, and 30 patients (20.1%) reported non-mesial temporal auras; 16 patients (10.7%) had sensory auras, 11 patients (7.4%) had auditory auras, and five patients (3.4%) reported visual auras. A history of preoperative tonic-clonic seizures was strongly associated with non-mesial temporal auras (odds ratio 3.8; 95% CI: 1.15-12.98; p=0.02). About one-fifth of patients who had MTS in their MRI and responded well to surgery reported auras that are historically associated with non-mesial temporal structures. However, the presence of presumed non-mesial temporal auras in a patient with MTS may herald a more widespread epileptogenic zone. PMID:27084209

  20. The effective evaluation of thyroid status in patients on phenytoin, carbamazepine or sodium valproate attending an epilepsy clinic.

    PubMed Central

    Connacher, A. A.; Borsey, D. Q.; Browning, M. C.; Davidson, D. L.; Jung, R. T.

    1987-01-01

    To assess the most efficient means of monitoring thyroid status in an epilepsy clinic, total thyroxine (T4), free thyroxine stimulating hormone (TSH) were measured in 71 adult patients treated long-term with either phenytoin (DPH), carbamazepine (CBZ) or sodium valproate (VAL). Twenty-seven patients with one or more abnormal thyroid hormone results were further investigated by a thyrotrophin releasing hormone (TRH) test and clinical assessment. T4 was found to be normal in 85% on VAL, 40% on CBZ and 39% on DPH. FT4 was normal in more patients, namely 95% on VAL, 70% on CBZ and 65% on DPH. The TRH tests indicated that FT4 was the most efficient screening test for hypothyroidism in this epileptic population. We estimate that the use of FT4 alone as a screening test would have reduced by 60% the number of TRH tests required. PMID:3128778

  1. Neuronal autoantibodies in epilepsy patients with peri-ictal autonomic findings.

    PubMed

    Baysal-Kirac, Leyla; Tuzun, Erdem; Erdag, Ece; Ulusoy, Canan; Vanli-Yavuz, Ebru Nur; Ekizoglu, Esme; Peach, Sian; Sezgin, Mine; Bebek, Nerses; Gurses, Candan; Gokyigit, Aysen; Vincent, Angela; Baykan, Betul

    2016-03-01

    Autonomic dysfunction has frequently been reported in autoimmune encephalitis associated with seizures and there is growing evidence that epilepsy patients may display neuronal autoantibodies (NAAb). The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of NAAb in epilepsy patients with peri-ictal autonomic findings. Fifty-eight patients (37 women/21 men; average age of 34.2 ± 9.9 years and epilepsy duration of 19.1 ± 9.6 years) who had at least one video-EEG recorded focal or secondary generalized seizure with clear-cut documented peri-ictal autonomic findings, or consistently reported seizures with autonomic semiology, were included. NAAb were tested by RIA or cell based assays. NAAb were present in 17 of 58 (29.3%) patients. Among seropositive patients, antibodies were directed against N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) in 5 (29%), contactin-associated protein-like 2 (CASPR2) in 5 (29%), uncharacterized voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC)-complex antigens in 3 (18%), glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in 2 (12%), glycine receptor (GLYR) in one (6%) and type A gamma aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAAR) in one patient (6%). Peri-ictal gastrointestinal manifestations, piloerection, ictal fever, urinary urge, and cough occurred more commonly in the seropositive group. The prevalences of psychotic attacks and status epilepticus were significantly increased in the seropositive group. Seropositivity prevalence in our patient group with peri-ictal autonomic findings is higher than other previously reported epilepsy cohorts. In our study, ictal fever-VGKC-complex antibody and pilomotor seizure-GABAAR antibody associations were documented for the first time. Chronic epilepsy patients with peri-ictal autonomic semiology, history of status epilepticus and psychotic disorder may benefit from autoantibody screening.

  2. Neuroimaging in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Bano, Shahina; Yadav, Sachchida Nand; Chaudhary, Vikas; Garga, Umesh Chandra

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy is the most common neurological disease worldwide and is second only to stroke in causing neurological morbidity. Neuroimaging plays a very important role in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with epilepsy. This review article highlights the specific role of various imaging modalities in patients with epilepsy, and their practical applications in the management of epileptic patients. PMID:21977082

  3. Gene expression variance in hippocampal tissue of temporal lobe epilepsy patients corresponds to differential memory performance.

    PubMed

    Bungenberg, Julia; Surano, Natascha; Grote, Alexander; Surges, Rainer; Pernhorst, Katharina; Hofmann, Andrea; Schoch, Susanne; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Becker, Albert J

    2016-02-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a severe brain disorder affecting particularly young adults. TLE is frequently associated with memory deterioration and neuronal damage of the hippocampal formation. It thereby reveals striking parallels to neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD). TLE patients differ with respect to their cognitive performance, but currently little is known about relevant molecular-genetic factors. Here, we correlated differential memory performance of pharmacoresistant TLE patients undergoing neurosurgery for seizure control with in-vitro findings of their hippocampal tissues. We analyzed mRNA transcripts and subsequently promoter variants specifically altered in brain tissue of individuals with 'very severe' memory impairment. TLE patients (n=79) were stratified according to preoperative memory impairment using an established four-tiered grading system ranging from 'average' to 'very severely'. Multimodal cluster analyses revealed molecules specifically associated with synaptic function and abundantly expressed in TLE patients with very impaired memory performance. In a subsequent promoter analysis, we found the single nucleotide polymorphism rs744373 C-allele to be associated with high mRNA levels of bridging integrator 1 (BIN1)/Amphiphysin 2, i.e. a major component of the endocytotic machinery and located in a crucial genetic AD risk locus. Using in vitro luciferase transfection assays, we found that BIN1 promoter activation is genotype dependent and strongly increased by reduced binding of the transcriptional repressor TGIF. Our data indicate that poor memory performance in patients with TLE strongly corresponds to distinctly altered neuronal transcript signatures, which - as demonstrated for BIN1 - can correlate with a particular allelic promoter variant. Our data suggest aberrant transcriptional signaling to significantly impact synaptic dynamics in TLE resulting in impaired memory performance and may serve as basis for

  4. Gene expression variance in hippocampal tissue of temporal lobe epilepsy patients corresponds to differential memory performance.

    PubMed

    Bungenberg, Julia; Surano, Natascha; Grote, Alexander; Surges, Rainer; Pernhorst, Katharina; Hofmann, Andrea; Schoch, Susanne; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Becker, Albert J

    2016-02-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a severe brain disorder affecting particularly young adults. TLE is frequently associated with memory deterioration and neuronal damage of the hippocampal formation. It thereby reveals striking parallels to neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD). TLE patients differ with respect to their cognitive performance, but currently little is known about relevant molecular-genetic factors. Here, we correlated differential memory performance of pharmacoresistant TLE patients undergoing neurosurgery for seizure control with in-vitro findings of their hippocampal tissues. We analyzed mRNA transcripts and subsequently promoter variants specifically altered in brain tissue of individuals with 'very severe' memory impairment. TLE patients (n=79) were stratified according to preoperative memory impairment using an established four-tiered grading system ranging from 'average' to 'very severely'. Multimodal cluster analyses revealed molecules specifically associated with synaptic function and abundantly expressed in TLE patients with very impaired memory performance. In a subsequent promoter analysis, we found the single nucleotide polymorphism rs744373 C-allele to be associated with high mRNA levels of bridging integrator 1 (BIN1)/Amphiphysin 2, i.e. a major component of the endocytotic machinery and located in a crucial genetic AD risk locus. Using in vitro luciferase transfection assays, we found that BIN1 promoter activation is genotype dependent and strongly increased by reduced binding of the transcriptional repressor TGIF. Our data indicate that poor memory performance in patients with TLE strongly corresponds to distinctly altered neuronal transcript signatures, which - as demonstrated for BIN1 - can correlate with a particular allelic promoter variant. Our data suggest aberrant transcriptional signaling to significantly impact synaptic dynamics in TLE resulting in impaired memory performance and may serve as basis for

  5. Dopamine abnormalities in the neocortex of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Luisa; Alonso-Vanegas, Mario; Villeda-Hernández, Juana; Mújica, Mario; Cisneros-Franco, José Miguel; López-Gómez, Mario; Zavala-Tecuapetla, Cecilia; Frías-Soria, Christian Lizette; Segovia-Vila, José; Borsodi, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Experiments were designed to evaluate different variables of the dopaminergic system in the temporal cortex of surgically treated patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) associated with mesial sclerosis (MTLE, n=12) or with cerebral tumor or lesion (n=8). In addition, we sought to identify dopaminergic abnormalities in those patients with epilepsy that had comorbid anxiety and depression. Specifically, we investigated changes in dopamine and its metabolites, D1 and D2 receptors, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine transporter. Results obtained from patients with epilepsy were compared with those found in experiments using autopsy material. The neocortex of patients with MTLE demonstrated high D1 expression (1680%, p<0.05) and binding (layers I-II, 31%, p<0.05; layers V-VI, 28%, p<0.05), and decreased D2 expression (77%, p<0.05). The neocortex of patients with TLE secondary to cerebral tumor or lesion showed high expression of D1 receptors (1100%, p<0.05), and D2-like induced activation of G proteins (layers I-II, 503%; layers III-IV, 557%; layers V-VI, 964%, p<0.05). Both epileptic groups presented elevated binding to the dopamine transporter and low tissue content of dopamine and its metabolites. Analysis revealed the following correlations: a) D1 receptor binding correlated negatively with seizure onset age and seizure frequency, and positively with duration of epilepsy; b) D2 receptor binding correlated positively with age of seizure onset and negatively with duration of epilepsy; c) dopamine transporter binding correlated positively with duration of epilepsy and frequency of seizures; d) D2-like induced activation of G proteins correlated positively with the age of patients. When compared with autopsies and patients with anxiety and depression, patients without neuropsychiatric disorders showed high D2-like induced activation of G proteins, an effect that correlated positively with age of patient and seizure onset age, and negatively with duration of

  6. The impact of a citywide audit with educational intervention on the care of patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Minshall, I; Smith, D

    2008-04-01

    The care of patients with epilepsy historically has been well documented to be poor. Previous attempts to improve care through education have been unsuccessful. The New GP Contract in the UK introduced epilepsy as a core quality indicator from April 2004. This prospective audit assesses the impact of an audit with educational intervention on the process of care of patients with epilepsy. The case notes of 610 patients, of all ages, with epilepsy on treatment, in 13 general practices serving Chester and surrounding area were reviewed before and 2 years after an intervention, comprising (a) the provision of a comprehensive template, (b) individualised categorisation for each patient and (c) an educational session led by a Neurologist. The overall review rate increased in the first year from 41 to 49% (p<0.0001) and by 2 years to 63% (p<0.0001). Documented remission rate increased from 29 to 43% (p<0.0001). Admissions to accident and emergency fell significantly (p=0.0026). There was no fall in the non-compliance rate. Forty five percent of patients with documented poor control were not under shared care. Issues highlighted in the audit generated 77 referrals. There were clear health gains in 62 (13%) individuals from referrals and practice interventions related to the audit. This original audit identified significant improvements in review rate, documented remission rate and beneficial outcomes in individual patients. The changes were attributable to both the educational intervention and the coincidental acceptance of the New GP Contract. Remaining problems include lack of shared care for patients with active epilepsy. PMID:17913517

  7. Cerebellar Dysfunction and Ataxia in Patients with Epilepsy: Coincidence, Consequence, or Cause?

    PubMed Central

    Marcián, Václav; Filip, Pavel; Bareš, Martin; Brázdil, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Basic epilepsy teachings assert that seizures arise from the cerebral cortex, glossing over infratentorial structures such as the cerebellum that are believed to modulate rather than generate seizures. Nonetheless, ataxia and other clinical findings in epileptic patients are slowly but inevitably drawing attention to this neural node. Tracing the evolution of this line of inquiry from the observed coincidence of cerebellar atrophy and cerebellar dysfunction (most apparently manifested as ataxia) in epilepsy to their close association, this review considers converging clinical, physiological, histological, and neuroimaging evidence that support incorporating the cerebellum into epilepsy pathology. We examine reports of still controversial cerebellar epilepsy, studies of cerebellar stimulation alleviating paroxysmal epileptic activity, studies and case reports of cerebellar lesions directly associated with seizures, and conditions in which ataxia is accompanied by epileptic seizures. Finally, the review substantiates the role of this complex brain structure in epilepsy whether by coincidence, as a consequence of deleterious cortical epileptic activity or antiepileptic drugs, or the very cause of the disease. PMID:27375960

  8. Natural evolution from idiopathic photosensitive occipital lobe epilepsy to idiopathic generalized epilepsy in an untreated young patient.

    PubMed

    Bonini, Francesca; Egeo, Gabriella; Fattouch, Jinan; Fanella, Martina; Morano, Alessandra; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2014-04-01

    Idiopathic photosensitive occipital lobe epilepsy (IPOE) is an idiopathic localization-related epilepsy characterized by age-related onset, specific mode of precipitation, occipital photic-induced seizures--frequently consisting of visual symptoms--and good prognosis. This uncommon epilepsy, which usually starts in childhood or adolescence, has rarely been observed in families in which idiopathic generalized epilepsy also affects other members. We describe a nuclear family in which the proband showed electro-clinical features of idiopathic photosensitive occipital lobe epilepsy in childhood, which subsequently evolved into absences and a single generalized tonico-clonic seizure in early adolescence. His mother had features suggestive of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. This case illustrates a continuum between focal and generalized entities in the spectrum of the so-called idiopathic (genetically determined) epileptic syndromes. PMID:23815968

  9. Natural evolution from idiopathic photosensitive occipital lobe epilepsy to idiopathic generalized epilepsy in an untreated young patient.

    PubMed

    Bonini, Francesca; Egeo, Gabriella; Fattouch, Jinan; Fanella, Martina; Morano, Alessandra; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2014-04-01

    Idiopathic photosensitive occipital lobe epilepsy (IPOE) is an idiopathic localization-related epilepsy characterized by age-related onset, specific mode of precipitation, occipital photic-induced seizures--frequently consisting of visual symptoms--and good prognosis. This uncommon epilepsy, which usually starts in childhood or adolescence, has rarely been observed in families in which idiopathic generalized epilepsy also affects other members. We describe a nuclear family in which the proband showed electro-clinical features of idiopathic photosensitive occipital lobe epilepsy in childhood, which subsequently evolved into absences and a single generalized tonico-clonic seizure in early adolescence. His mother had features suggestive of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. This case illustrates a continuum between focal and generalized entities in the spectrum of the so-called idiopathic (genetically determined) epileptic syndromes.

  10. In vivo demonstration of altered benzodiazepine receptor density in patients with generalised epilepsy.

    PubMed Central

    Savic, I; Pauli, S; Thorell, J O; Blomqvist, G

    1994-01-01

    Electrophysiological data suggest that an abnormal oscillatory pattern of discharge in cortical and thalamic neurons may be the major mechanism underlying primary generalised epilepsy. No neurochemical or anatomical substrate for this theory has hitherto been demonstrated in humans and the pathophysiology of primary generalised epilepsy remains unknown. By means of PET and the benzodiazepine (BZ) ligand [11C]flumazenil it has been previously shown that the BZ receptor density is reduced in the epileptic foci of patients with partial epilepsy. In the present study the method was further developed and used in a comparative analysis of cortical, cerebellar, and subcortical BZ receptor binding in patients with primary generalised tonic and clonic seizures (n = 8), and healthy controls (n = 8). Patients with generalised seizures had an increased BZ receptor density in the cerebellar nuclei (p = 0.006) and decreased density in the thalamus (p = 0.003). No significant changes were seen in the cerebral and cerebellar cortex or in the basal ganglia. The observed alterations suggest that the gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA)-BZ system may be affected in the cerebello-thalamocortical loop of patients with generalised epilepsy and indicate possible targets for selective pharmacological treatment. Images PMID:8021664

  11. Left Hippocampal Pathology Is Associated with Atypical Language Lateralization in Patients with Focal Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Bernd; Wellmer, Jorg; Reuber, Markus; Mormann, Florian; Weis, Susanne; Urbach, Horst; Ruhlmann, Jurgen; Elger, Christian E.; Fernandez, Guillen

    2006-01-01

    It is well recognized that the incidence of atypical language lateralization is increased in patients with focal epilepsy. The hypothesis that shifts in language dominance are particularly likely when epileptic lesions are located in close vicinity to the so-called language-eloquent areas rather than in more remote brain regions such as the…

  12. Spectrum of Epilepsy and Electroencephalogram Patterns in Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome: Experience with 87 Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battaglia, Agatino; Filippi, Tiziana; South, Sarah T.; Carey, John C.

    2009-01-01

    To define the spectrum of epilepsy in Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) better, we studied 87 patients (54 females, 33 males; median age 5.6 years; age range 1-25.6 years) with confirmed 4p16.3 deletion. On the basis of clinical charts, we retrospectively analyzed the evolution of the electroencephalogram (EEG) findings and seizures. Epilepsy…

  13. Teaching the adult ostomy patient.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, H S

    2001-01-01

    Ostomy education is based on principles of adult learning, including assessment of the learners' readiness, ability, and need to learn. Such teaching incorporates specific strategies designed to promote cognitive, affective, and psychomotor learning and strategies to overcome potential cultural barriers. In addition, modifications may be included to meet the needs of aged or disabled patients who have cognitive deficits or low literacy skills. Finally, ostomy education must include an evaluation of its effectiveness. This article reviews general guidelines for planning, implementing, and evaluating patient education for adult patients with ostomies.

  14. [Medico-social aspects of risk factors impairing quality of life in patients with epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Beghi, E; Gromov, S A; Lipatova, L V; Mikhaĭlov, V A

    2002-01-01

    The results of 2-year multicenter project "Epilepsy, risk factors and insurance" organized by Epilepsy European Commission, on risk factors deteriorating quality of life of epileptic patients in 9 European countries (Italy, Germany, Spain, Netherlands, England, Portugal, Estonia, Russia and Slovenia), have been used in the study. The "patient-control" pairs were matched for various features characterizing social aspects of epileptic patient's life (educational level, professional level and employment, marital status, driving abilities, sports, medical insurance) as well as medical events (concomitant diseases, medical complications, seizures, frequency of accidents, hospitalization, disablement indices, etc). Patients at low and high risk for quality of life impairment were defined. In Russia, the rate of these risk factors in epileptic patients corresponds in general to that in other European countries.

  15. Comparative persistence of antiepileptic drugs in patients with epilepsy: A STROBE-compliant retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Edward Chia-Cheng; Hsieh, Cheng-Yang; Su, Chien-Chou; Yang, Yea-Huei Kao; Huang, Chin-Wei; Lin, Swu-Jane; Setoguchi, Soko

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We compared persistence of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) including carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, topiramate, valproic acid, and phenytoin in an Asian population with epilepsy. A retrospective cohort study was conducted by analyzing Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). Adult epilepsy patients newly prescribed with AEDs between 2005 and 2009 were included. The primary outcome was persistence, defined as the treatment duration from the date of AED initiation to the date of AED discontinuation, switching, hospitalization due to seizure or disenrollment from databases, whichever came first. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the risk of non-persistence with AEDs. Among the 13,061 new users of AED monotherapy (mean age: 58 years; 60% men), the persistence ranged from 218.8 (gabapentin) to 275.9 (oxcarbazepine) days in the first treatment year. The risks of non-persistence in patients receiving oxcarbazepine (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.78; 95% CI, 0.74–0.83), valproic acid (0.88; 0.85–0.92), lamotrigine (0.72; 0.65–0.81), and topiramate (0.90; 0.82–0.98) were significantly lower than in the carbamazepine group. Compared with carbamazepine users, the non-persistence risk was higher in phenytoin users (1.10; 1.06–1.13), while gabapentin users (1.03; 0.98–1.09) had similar risk. For risk of hospitalization due to seizure and in comparison with carbamazepine users, oxcarbazepine (0.66; 0.58–0.74) and lamotrigine (0.46; 0.35–0.62) users had lower risk, while phenytoin (1.35; 1.26–1.44) users had higher risk. The results remained consistent throughout series of sensitivity and stratification analyses. The persistence varied among AEDs and was better for oxcarbazepine, valproic acid, lamotrigine, and topiramate, but worse for phenytoin when compared with carbamazepine. PMID:27583857

  16. Are dyslexia and dyscalculia associated with Rolandic epilepsy? A short report on ten Italian patients.

    PubMed

    Canavese, Carlotta; Rigardetto, Roberto; Viano, Vilma; Vittorini, Roberta; Bassi, Bianca; Pieri, Ilaria; Capizzi, Giorgio

    2007-12-01

    Rolandic epilepsy (RE) is the most common childhood epilepsy syndrome with a good, long-term outcome. Nevertheless, some studies indicate that children with RE have more scholastic and neuropsychological problems than controls. The purpose of this study was to describe neuropsychological findings in a small group of Italian children with RE, focusing on dyslexia and dyscalculia. Possible correlations between these findings and the age-at-onset of seizures, duration of active epilepsy, frequency, type and localization of epileptic discharges were examined. Children affected by RE, aged nine to eleven years were selected from patients admitted to the outpatient service of our Clinic. They underwent cognitive evaluation, specific evaluation for dyslexia and dyscalculia, and awake and sleep EEG recordings. We found two patients out of the ten with dyscalculia, one of whom also had characteristics of dyslexia. This small study suggests that dyscalculia and dyslexia might be more frequent than expected in children with RE. No significant correlations between this finding and EEG, seizure-frequency or age-at-onset of epilepsy were found in our patients. PMID:18077230

  17. The Natural History of Epilepsy in 163 Untreated Patients: Looking for “Oligoepilepsy”

    PubMed Central

    Gasparini, Sara; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Leonardi, Cinzia Grazia; Cianci, Vittoria; Mumoli, Laura; Sueri, Chiara; Labate, Angelo; Gambardella, Antonio; Aguglia, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    The clinical evolution of untreated epilepsy has been rarely studied in developed countries, and the existence of a distinct syndrome characterized by rarely repeated seizures (oligoepilepsy) is debated. The aim of this study is to assess the natural history of 163 untreated patients with epilepsy in order to evaluate whether oligoepilepsy retains specific features. We retrospectively evaluated 7344 patients with ≥2 unprovoked seizures. Inclusion criteria: sufficient anamnestic/EEG data, disease duration ≥10 years, follow-up ≥3 years. Exclusion criteria: psychogenic seizures, natural history of disease <5 years. The 163 included subjects were divided into 2 groups according to seizure frequency: oligoepilepsy (≤1/year; 47 subjects) and controls (>1/year; 116 subjects). We also evaluated seizure frequency during the natural history. There were no differences between groups regarding duration of natural history, family history of epilepsy/febrile seizures, interictal EEG. Subjects with oligoepilepsy differed from controls in terms of sex (females 38% vs. 58%, p = 0.03) and drug resistance (6% vs 28%; p = 0.003). Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy was more frequent in controls (9.5% vs 0%, p = 0.04). Patients with oligoepilepsy, differently from controls, had stable seizure frequency. Oligoepilepsy represents a favourable evolution of different epileptic syndromes and keeps a stable seizure frequency over time. PMID:27657542

  18. Patient views on primary care services for epilepsy and areas where additional professional knowledge would be welcome.

    PubMed

    Chappell, B; Smithson, W H

    1998-12-01

    In the past decade there has been increasing interest in the part that general practice can play in the care of people with epilepsy. Primary care services for epilepsy vary from practice to practice. Some studies have suggested that people with epilepsy prefer secondary care services and are not keen for their epilepsy to be managed in general practice, but much of the data were collected in secondary care. This study collected data from various sources about present provision of services, patient satisfaction with services, views about service development, areas where GP knowledge may be improved and whether the site of data collection influenced the results. A questionnaire was piloted, then distributed and collected through branches of the British Epilepsy Association, general practice and secondary care clinics. Data collected were both quantitative and qualitative. One hundred and seventy-eight questionnaires were collected from three sources. The responders were a severe seizure group. Structured care in general practice was uncommon with 54% being seen only when needed. Dose and type of antiepileptic medication was rarely altered in general practice. Information about their condition was given to 44% of the responders by their GP. Sixty-one percent would prefer their epilepsy care to be 'shared' between primary and secondary services. The majority of patients were satisfied with GP services, felt they could easily discuss their epilepsy, but 58% felt they 'rarely' or 'never' received enough information about their condition in general practice. Satisfaction with GP care varied, dependent on where the data were collected. Patients would value more information and more time to discuss the effects of their epilepsy. In conclusion general practice care for epilepsy is still reactive. Patients value more information and more time to discuss implications. The data collection point affects the results; any conclusions about the organisation of epilepsy care should

  19. Application of MSI in MRI-negative focal cortical dysplasia patients with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jilin; Jia, Xiuchuan; Liu, Xi; Wu, Jie; Li, Sumin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is the most common cause of intractable epilepsy in children and adolescent. Purpose: To evaluate the application value of magnetic source imaging (MSI) in treatment of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-negative FCD patients with epilepsy. Methods: MSI characteristics of 17 cases of MRI-negative focal cortical dysplasia patients with epilepsy were retrospectively analyzed. All patients were treated by surgery. Results: In 17 patients, there were 3 cases of FCD Ia, 7 cases of FCDIb, 3 cases of FCDIIa and 4 cases of FCDIIb. FCD was located at temporal lobe in 8 cases, occipital lobe in 3 cases, frontal lobe in 2 cases and two lobes in 4 cases. In follow-up, 14 patients obtained satisfied curative effect. 1 patient was improved significantly and 2 patients were fine. The concordance between MSI and electrocorticogram in localizing epileptogenic foci was 65%. Conclusion: MSI is a new prospective noninvasive functional neuroimaging technique for identifying and delineating epileptogenic foci in MRI-negative FCD patients. PMID:26770448

  20. Autoimmune epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Greco, Antonio; Rizzo, Maria Ida; De Virgilio, Armando; Conte, Michela; Gallo, Andrea; Attanasio, Giuseppe; Ruoppolo, Giovanni; de Vincentiis, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Despite the fact that epilepsy is the third most common chronic brain disorder, relatively little is known about the processes leading to the generation of seizures. Accumulating data support an autoimmune basis in patients with antiepileptic drug-resistant seizures. Besides, recent studies show that epilepsy and autoimmune disease frequently co-occur. Autoimmune epilepsy is increasingly recognized in the spectrum of neurological disorders characterized by detection of neural autoantibodies in serum or spinal fluid and responsiveness to immunotherapy. An autoimmune cause is suspected based on frequent or medically intractable seizures and the presence of at least one neural antibody, inflammatory changes indicated in serum or spinal fluid or on MRI, or a personal or family history of autoimmunity. It is essential that an autoimmune etiology be considered in the initial differential diagnosis of new onset epilepsy, because early immunotherapy assures an optimal outcome for the patient.

  1. Musicogenic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Berman, I W

    1981-01-10

    Musicogenic epilepsy is a form of temporal lobe epilepsy, and belongs to the group of reflex epilepsies. Convulsions are generally triggered by a specific passage of music. It is not as rare as is generally assumed, and physicians and neurologists were aware of the condition as early as the latter part of the 19th century. Many of its sufferers have above-average musicality. In some patients autonomic manifestations are conspicuous, but their role as preciptation factors is not clear. Electro-encephalographic studies have shown conclusively that musicogenic epilepsy is not hysterical. Most but not all of its victims respond well to anti-ictal medication. Psychotherapy has a place in the treatment of some patients. PMID:7006106

  2. Autoimmune epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Greco, Antonio; Rizzo, Maria Ida; De Virgilio, Armando; Conte, Michela; Gallo, Andrea; Attanasio, Giuseppe; Ruoppolo, Giovanni; de Vincentiis, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Despite the fact that epilepsy is the third most common chronic brain disorder, relatively little is known about the processes leading to the generation of seizures. Accumulating data support an autoimmune basis in patients with antiepileptic drug-resistant seizures. Besides, recent studies show that epilepsy and autoimmune disease frequently co-occur. Autoimmune epilepsy is increasingly recognized in the spectrum of neurological disorders characterized by detection of neural autoantibodies in serum or spinal fluid and responsiveness to immunotherapy. An autoimmune cause is suspected based on frequent or medically intractable seizures and the presence of at least one neural antibody, inflammatory changes indicated in serum or spinal fluid or on MRI, or a personal or family history of autoimmunity. It is essential that an autoimmune etiology be considered in the initial differential diagnosis of new onset epilepsy, because early immunotherapy assures an optimal outcome for the patient. PMID:26626229

  3. Safety of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with epilepsy: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Luisa Santos; Müller, Vanessa Teixeira; da Mota Gomes, Marleide; Rotenberg, Alexander; Fregni, Felipe

    2016-04-01

    Approximately one-third of patients with epilepsy remain with pharmacologically intractable seizures. An emerging therapeutic modality for seizure suppression is repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). Despite being considered a safe technique, rTMS carries the risk of inducing seizures, among other milder adverse events, and thus, its safety in the population with epilepsy should be continuously assessed. We performed an updated systematic review on the safety and tolerability of rTMS in patients with epilepsy, similar to a previous report published in 2007 (Bae EH, Schrader LM, Machii K, Alonso-Alonso M, Riviello JJ, Pascual-Leone A, Rotenberg A. Safety and tolerability of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with epilepsy: a review of the literature. Epilepsy Behav. 2007; 10 (4): 521-8), and estimated the risk of seizures and other adverse events during or shortly after rTMS application. We searched the literature for reports of rTMS being applied on patients with epilepsy, with no time or language restrictions, and obtained studies published from January 1990 to August 2015. A total of 46 publications were identified, of which 16 were new studies published after the previous safety review of 2007. We noted the total number of subjects with epilepsy undergoing rTMS, medication usage, incidence of adverse events, and rTMS protocol parameters: frequency, intensity, total number of stimuli, train duration, intertrain intervals, coil type, and stimulation site. Our main data analysis included separate calculations for crude per subject risk of seizure and other adverse events, as well as risk per 1000 stimuli. We also performed an exploratory, secondary analysis on the risk of seizure and other adverse events according to the type of coil used (figure-of-8 or circular), stimulation frequency (≤ 1 Hz or > 1 Hz), pulse intensity in terms of motor threshold (<100% or ≥ 100%), and number of stimuli per session (< 500 or ≥ 500

  4. Epilepsy and Mood

    MedlinePlus

    ... Editors David C. Spencer, MD Steven Karceski, MD Epilepsy and mood Update Steven Karceski, MD In their ... important and worrisome topic for peo- ple with epilepsy. In short, a patient may wonder, “ Will the ...

  5. Utility of an immunotherapy trial in evaluating patients with presumed autoimmune epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Toledano, M.; Britton, J.W.; McKeon, A.; Shin, C.; Lennon, V.A.; Quek, A.M.L.; So, E.; Worrell, G.A.; Cascino, G.D.; Klein, C.J.; Lagerlund, T.D.; Wirrell, E.C.; Nickels, K.C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate a trial of immunotherapy as an aid to diagnosis in suspected autoimmune epilepsy. Method: We reviewed the charts of 110 patients seen at our autoimmune neurology clinic with seizures as a chief complaint. Twenty-nine patients met the following inclusion criteria: (1) autoimmune epilepsy suspected based on the presence of ≥1 neural autoantibody (n = 23), personal or family history or physical stigmata of autoimmunity, and frequent or medically intractable seizures; and (2) initiated a 6- to 12-week trial of IV methylprednisolone (IVMP), IV immune globulin (IVIg), or both. Patients were defined as responders if there was a 50% or greater reduction in seizure frequency. Results: Eighteen patients (62%) responded, of whom 10 (34%) became seizure-free; 52% improved with the first agent. Of those receiving a second agent after not responding to the first, 43% improved. A favorable response correlated with shorter interval between symptom onset and treatment initiation (median 9.5 vs 22 months; p = 0.048). Responders included 14/16 (87.5%) patients with antibodies to plasma membrane antigens, 2/6 (33%) patients seropositive for glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 antibodies, and 2/6 (33%) patients without detectable antibodies. Of 13 responders followed for more than 6 months after initiating long-term oral immunosuppression, response was sustained in 11 (85%). Conclusions: These retrospective findings justify consideration of a trial of immunotherapy in patients with suspected autoimmune epilepsy. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that in patients with suspected autoimmune epilepsy, IVMP, IVIg, or both improve seizure control. PMID:24706013

  6. Role of plasma homocysteine levels and MTHFR polymorphisms on IQ scores in children and young adults with epilepsy treated with antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Di Rosa, Gabriella; Lenzo, Patrizia; Parisi, Eleonora; Neri, Milena; Guerrera, Silvia; Nicotera, Antonio; Alibrandi, Angela; Germanò, Eva; Caccamo, Daniela; Spanò, Maria; Tortorella, Gaetano

    2013-12-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is a sulfur-containing amino acid involved in methionine metabolism. High plasma total Hcy (tHcy) has been quite frequently reported in patients with epilepsy treated with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) mainly related to plasma folate reduction induced by AEDs themselves. The role of C677T and A1298C polymorphisms of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) on the increase of plasma tHcy in patients with epilepsy taking AEDs is still controversial. Cognitive impairment may be associated with epilepsy either as the result of the epileptic syndrome per se or as a side effect induced by the AEDs. High plasma tHcy levels were associated with lower cognitive performances in patients affected by Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment and in healthy elderly. We searched for a correlation between plasma tHcy levels with the intelligence quotient (IQ) scores in a population of children and young adults with epilepsy treated with old and/or newer AEDs. The study group encompassed 179 patients (92 M, 51.5%) followed at our Unit of Child Neuropsychiatry and aged between 4 and 25years (mean+SD: 14.03±4.25). The inclusion criteria included the following: 1) diagnosis of epilepsy of "unknown cause" (cryptogenic) according to the ILAE classification, 2) age older than 3years, 3) stabilized antiepileptic treatment for at least 6months, and 4) clinical records of cognitive tests, plasma tHcy value, and results of MTHFR polymorphisms. Patients' mean tHcy value was 9.71±3.13μM/L (tHcy<9μM/L as our laboratory cutoff in nonepileptic controls). The mean TIQ score was 85.22 (SD±24.12); the mean VIQ score was 86.32 (SD±20.86); and the mean PIQ score was 86.94 (SD±21.51). C677T and A1298C MTHFR polymorphisms were detected in 74/92 (80%) examined patients and distributed into the following: CT (22.3%), TT (14.9%), CC (10.3%) for C677T, AC (16%), CC (1.1%), and AA (30.3%) for A1298C. Plasma tHcy levels were not significantly related to the IQ scores

  7. Autoimmune epilepsy: distinct subpopulations of epilepsy patients harbor serum autoantibodies to either glutamate/AMPA receptor GluR3, glutamate/NMDA receptor subunit NR2A or double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Ganor, Yonatan; Goldberg-Stern, Hadassa; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Teichberg, Vivian I; Levite, Mia

    2005-06-01

    We studied 82 patients with different types of epilepsy and 49 neurologically intact non-epileptic controls, and identified three different subpopulations of epilepsy patients bearing significantly elevated levels of autoantibodies to either GluR3B-peptide of glutamate/AMPA receptor subtype 3 (17/82; 21% of patients), or to a peptide of NR2A subunit of glutamate/NMDA receptors (15/82; 18%), or to double-stranded (ds) DNA, the hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (13/80; 16%). Most patients had only one antibody type, arguing against cross-reactivity. Nearly all anti-dsDNA Ab-positive patients did not harbor anti-nuclear autoantibodies. Most patients had no history of brain damage, febrile convulsions, early onset epilepsy, acute epilepsy or intractable seizures. We suggest to measure the 'autoimmune-fingerprints' of epilepsy patients for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:15978777

  8. An interictal schizophrenia-like psychosis in an adult patient with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tastuzawa, Yasutaka; Sekinaka, Kanako; Suda, Tetsufumi; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Otabe, Hiroyuki; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Yoshino, Aihide

    2015-01-01

    In addition to causing polymalformative syndrome, 22q11.2 deletion can lead to various neuropsychiatric disorders including mental retardation, psychosis, and epilepsy. However, few reports regarding epilepsy-related psychosis in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) exist. We describe the clinical characteristics and course of 22q11.2DS in a Japanese patient with comorbid mild mental retardation, childhood-onset localization-related epilepsy, and adult-onset, interictal schizophrenia-like psychosis. From a diagnostic viewpoint, early detection of impaired intellectual functioning and hyperprolinemia in patients with epilepsy with 22q11.2DS may be helpful in predicting the developmental timing of interictal psychosis. From a therapeutic viewpoint, special attention needs to be paid to phenytoin-induced hypocalcemia in this syndrome. PMID:25870791

  9. Category-Specific Naming and Recognition Deficits in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Drane, Daniel L.; Ojemann, George A.; Aylward, Elizabeth; Ojemann, Jeffrey G.; Johnson, L. Clark; Silbergeld, Daniel L.; Miller, John W.; Tranel, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Objective Based upon Damasio's “Convergence Zone” model of semantic memory, we predicted that epilepsy surgical patients with anterior temporal lobe (TL) seizure onset would exhibit a pattern of category-specific naming and recognition deficits not observed in patients with seizures arising elsewhere. Methods We assessed epilepsy patients with unilateral seizure onset of anterior TL or other origin (n = 22), pre- or postoperatively, using a set of category-specific items and a conventional measure of visual naming (Boston Naming Test: BNT). Results Category-specific naming deficits were exhibited by patients with dominant anterior TL seizure onset/resection for famous faces and animals, while category-specific recognition deficits for these same categories were exhibited by patients with nondominant anterior TL onset/resection. Patients with other seizure onset did not exhibit category-specific deficits. Naming and recognition deficits were frequently not detected by the BNT, which samples only a limited range of stimuli. Interpretation Consistent with the “convergence zone” framework, results suggest that the nondominant anterior TL plays a major role in binding sensory information into conceptual percepts for certain stimuli, while dominant TL regions function to provide a link to verbal labels for these percepts. Although observed category-specific deficits were striking, they were often missed by the BNT, suggesting that they are more prevalent than recognized in both pre- and postsurgical epilepsy patients. Systematic investigation of these deficits could lead to more refined models of semantic memory, aid in the localization of seizures, and contribute to modifications in surgical technique and patient selection in epilepsy surgery to improve neurocognitive outcome. PMID:18206185

  10. Attachment and Parenting in Adult Patients with Anxiety Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Picardi, Angelo; Caroppo, Emanuele; Fabi, Elisa; Proietti, Serena; Gennaro, Giancarlo Di; Meldolesi, Giulio Nicolò; Martinotti, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Background: The literature suggests that dysfunctional parenting and insecure attachment may increase risk of anxiety-related psychopathology. This study aimed at testing the association between anxiety disorders, attachment insecurity and dysfunctional parenting while controlling for factors usually not controlled for in previous studies, such as gender, age, and being ill. Methods: A sample of 32 non-psychotic inpatients with SCID-I diagnosis of an anxiety disorder, either alone or in comorbidity, was compared with two age- and sex-matched control groups consisting of 32 non-clinical participants and 32 in-patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. Study measures included the Experience in Close Relationships questionnaire (ECR) and the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI). Results: The patients with anxiety disorders scored significantly higher on attachment-related anxiety and avoidance than patients with drug-resistant epilepsy and non-clinical participants. These findings were independent of comorbidity for mood disorders. ECR scores did not differ among diagnostic subgroups (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, other anxiety disorders). Patients with anxiety disorders scored significantly lower on PBI mother’s care and borderline significantly lower on PBI father's care than patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. Conclusions: Although limitations such as the relatively small sample size and the cross-sectional nature suggest caution in interpreting these findings, they are consistent with the few previous adult studies performed on this topic and corroborate Bowlby's seminal hypothesis of a link between negative attachment-related experiences, attachment insecurity, and clinical anxiety. Attachment theory provides a useful theoretical framework for integrating research findings from several fields concerning the development of anxiety disorders and for planning therapeutic interventions. PMID:24155770

  11. The role of outpatient ambulatory electroencephalography in the diagnosis and management of adults with epilepsy or nonepileptic attack disorder: A systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Lawley, Andrew; Evans, Shaun; Manfredonia, Francesco; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2015-12-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is an established diagnostic tool with important implications for the clinical management of patients with epilepsy or nonepileptic attack disorder. Different types of long-term EEG recording strategies have been developed over the last decades, including the widespread use of ambulatory electroencephalography (AEEG), which holds great potential in terms of both clinical usefulness and cost-effectiveness. In this paper, we present the results of a systematic review of the scientific literature on the use of AEEG in the diagnosis of epilepsy and nonepileptic attacks in adult patients. Taken together, our findings confirmed that AEEG is a useful diagnostic tool in patients with equivocal findings on routine EEG studies and influences management decisions in the majority of studies. There is evidence that AEEG is also more likely to capture events than sleep-deprived EEG; however, there are currently insufficient data available to compare the diagnostic utility of modern AEEG technology with inpatient video-telemetry. Further research on the combined use of AEEG and home-video recording is, therefore, warranted. PMID:26515156

  12. Impact of aggression, depression, and anxiety levels on quality of life in epilepsy patients

    PubMed Central

    Izci, Filiz; Fındıklı, Ebru; Camkurt, Mehmet Akif; Tuncel, Deniz; Şahin, Merve

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of aggression levels on the quality of life (QoL) of epilepsy patients. This study was conducted on 66 volunteer control subjects, who were matched by age and sex to the patient group, which consisted of 66 patients who applied to the Psychiatry and Neurology clinics for outpatient treatment, were aged between 18 years and 65 years, and were diagnosed with epilepsy. A sociodemographic and clinical data form designed by us was distributed among the study participants, along with Buss–Perry Aggression Scale, Beck Anxiety Scale, Beck Depression Scale, and the Quality of Life Scale Short Form (SF-36). Compared with the control group, the patient group displayed higher scores in all subgroups of Buss–Perry Aggression Scale subscales at a statistically significant level (P<0.05). As per the SF-36 questionnaire, physical functioning, physical role disability, general health perception, social functioning, mental health perception, and pain subscales were statistically lower in the patient group (P<0.05). Significant links between Beck Depression Scale and Beck Anxiety Scale levels, as well as some subscales of QoL and aggression levels, were also determined. In conclusion, epilepsy patients experienced impaired QoL compared with the healthy control group and their QoL was further impaired due to increased levels of anxiety, depression, and aggression. PMID:27785037

  13. Spiritual/religious coping in patients with epilepsy: relationship with sociodemographic and clinical aspects and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Tedrus, Glória Maria Almeida Souza; Fonseca, Lineu Corrêa; De Pietro Magri, Fabiane; Mendes, Pedro Henrique Magalhães

    2013-09-01

    One hundred and ten patients with epilepsy with a mean age of 45.9 were assessed by a clinical-neurological evaluation, Quality of Life in Epilepsy Inventory-31 (QOLIE-31), and the Spiritual/Religious Coping (SRCOPE) Scale. The objective of this study was to evaluate if patients with epilepsy used positive and/or negative spiritual/religious coping and the relationships between this type of coping and the sociodemographic and clinical aspects of epilepsy and the QOLIE-31. A greater use of positive coping (3.0±0.7) than negative coping (2.3±0.7) was found. The use of the positive factor was greater in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) than in other types of epilepsy. The ratio of negative/positive coping was associated with lower scores in the QOLIE-31 (-0.222; p=0.036). Patients with epilepsy appear to use spiritual/religious coping, especially those with MTLE, and a predominance of negative coping was associated with a reduced quality of life. Future studies should evaluate interventions considering the knowledge of spiritual/religious strategies by the patients.

  14. Chemotactic and mitogenic stimuli of neuronal apoptosis in patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Fiala, Milan; Avagyan, Hripsime; Merino, Jose Joaquin; Bernas, Michael; Valdivia, Juan; Espinosa-Jeffrey, Araceli; Witte, Marlys; Weinand, Martin

    2012-01-01

    To identify the upstream signals of neuronal apoptosis in patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), we evaluated by immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy brain tissues of 13 TLE patients and 5 control patients regarding expression of chemokines and cell-cycle proteins. The chemokine RANTES (CCR5) and other CC-chemokines and apoptotic markers (caspase-3, -8, -9) were expressed in lateral temporal cortical and hippocampal neurons of TLE patients, but not in neurons of control cases. The chemokine RANTES is usually found in cytoplasmic and extracellular locations. However, in TLE neurons, RANTES was displayed in an unusual location, the neuronal nuclei. In addition, the cell-cycle regulatory transcription factor E2F1 was found in an abnormal location in neuronal cytoplasm. The pro-inflammatory enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 and cytokine interleukin-1β were expressed both in neurons of patients suffering from temporal lobe epilepsy and from cerebral trauma. The vessels showed fibrin leakage, perivascular macrophages and expression of IL-6 on endothelial cells. In conclusion, the cytoplasmic effects of E2F1 and nuclear effects of RANTES might have novel roles in neuronal apoptosis of TLE neurons and indicate a need to develop new medical and/or surgical neuroprotective strategies against apoptotic signaling by these molecules. Both RANTES and E2F1 signaling are upstream from caspase activation, thus the antagonists of RANTES and/or E2F1 blockade might be neuroprotective for patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. The results have implications for the development of new medical and surgical therapies based on inhibition of chemotactic and mitogenic stimuli of neuronal apoptosis in patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:22444245

  15. Childhood epilepsy and sleep

    PubMed Central

    Al-Biltagi, Mohammed A

    2014-01-01

    Sleep and epilepsy are two well recognized conditions that interact with each other in a complex bi-directional way. Some types of epilepsies have increased activity during sleep disturbing it; while sleep deprivation aggravates epilepsy due to decreased seizure threshold. Epilepsy can deteriorate the sleep-related disorders and at the same time; the parasomnias can worsen the epilepsy. The secretion of sleep-related hormones can also be affected by the occurrence of seizures and supplementation of epileptic patients with some of these sleep-related hormones may have a beneficial role in controlling epilepsy. PMID:25254184

  16. Video game epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Singh, R; Bhalla, A; Lehl, S S; Sachdev, A

    2001-12-01

    Reflex epilepsy is the commonest form of epilepsy in which seizures are provoked by specific external stimulus. Photosensitive reflex epilepsy is provoked by environmental flicker stimuli. Video game epilepsy is considered to be its variant or a pattern sensitive epilepsy. The mean age of onset is around puberty and boys suffer more commonly as they are more inclined to play video games. Television set or computer screen is the commonest precipitants. The treatment remains the removal of the offending stimulus along with drug therapy. Long term prognosis in these patients is better as photosensitivity gradually declines with increasing age. We present two such case of epilepsy induced by video game.

  17. Consensus Guidelines into the Management of Epilepsy in Adults with an Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, M.; Scheepers, M.; Arvio, M.; Beavis, J.; Brandt, C.; Brown, S.; Huber, B.; Iivanainen, M.; Louisse, A. C.; Martin, P.; Marson, A. G.; Prasher, V.; Singh, B. K.; Veendrick, M.; Wallace, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Epilepsy has a pervasive impact on the lives of people with intellectual disability and their carers. The delivery of high-quality care is impacted on by the complexity and diversity of epilepsy in this population. This article presents the results of a consensus clinical guideline process. Results: A Delphi process identified a list…

  18. Modulation of cardiac autonomic balance with adjuvant yoga therapy in patients with refractory epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sathyaprabha, T N; Satishchandra, P; Pradhan, C; Sinha, S; Kaveri, B; Thennarasu, K; Murthy, B T C; Raju, T R

    2008-02-01

    The practice of yoga regulates body physiology through control of posture, breathing, and meditation. Effects of yoga on autonomic functions of patients with refractory epilepsy, as quantified by standardized autonomic function tests (AFTs), were determined. The yoga group (n=18) received supervised training in yoga, and the exercise group (n=16) practiced simple routine exercises. AFTs were repeated after 10 weeks of daily sessions. Data were compared with those of healthy volunteers (n=142). The yoga group showed significant improvement in parasympathetic parameters and a decrease in seizure frequency scores. There was no improvement in blood pressure parameters in either group. Two patients in the yoga group achieved normal autonomic functions at the end of 10 weeks of therapy, whereas there were no changes in the exercise group. The data suggest that yoga may have a role as an adjuvant therapy in the management of autonomic dysfunction in patients with refractory epilepsy.

  19. Effect of Sahaja yoga practice on stress management in patients of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Panjwani, U; Gupta, H L; Singh, S H; Selvamurthy, W; Rai, U C

    1995-04-01

    An attempt was made to evaluate the effect of Sahaja yoga meditation in stress management in patients of epilepsy. The study was carried out on 32 patients of epilepsy who were rendomly divided into 3 groups: group I subjects practised Sahaja yoga meditation for 6 months, group II subjects practised postural exercises mimicking Sahaja yoga and group III served as the epileptic control group. Galvanic skin resistance (GSR), blood lactate and urinary vinyl mandelic acid (U-VMA) were recorded at 0, 3 and 6 months. There were significant changes at 3 & 6 months as compared to 0 month values in GSR, blood lactate and U-VMA levels in group I subjects, but not in group II and group III subjects. The results indicate that reduction in stress following Sahaja yoga practice may be responsible for clinical improvement which had been earlier reported in patients who practised Sahaja yoga.

  20. Epilepsy in children.

    PubMed

    Arnold, S T; Dodson, W E

    1996-12-01

    Childhood epilepsies comprise a broad range of disorders which vary from benign to progressive and disabling. Accurate diagnosis of epilepsy type and determination of aetiology, when possible, are essential for appropriate treatment. The most common seizure type encountered in children is febrile seizures. These represent a benign condition which is not, in fact, epilepsy and usually does not require antiepileptic medication. When partial seizures occur in childhood, benign syndromes with spontaneous remission, such as rolandic epilepsy, must be distinguished from symptomatic epilepsies which may be refractory to medical management. Complex partial seizures in young children may appear different than in adults. The adverse effect profiles and dosing regimens of antiepileptic drugs in children are also different than in adults, and influence the choice of treatment. Epilepsy surgery should be considered for some children with intractible partial seizures. Generalized epilepsies also have a broader spectrum in children. The idiopathic generalized absence epilepsies are usually easy to control with medication. They range from childhood absence epilepsy which tends to remit in adolescence to juvenile myoclonic epilepsy which is a lifelong condition. In contrast, the seizures of West syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome are difficult to control, and treatment involves therapeutic modalities rarely used in adults such as ACTH and the ketogenic diet. Many childhood epilepsy syndromes have a familial predisposition, and the genetic bases for several disorders have been described.

  1. Autoimmune epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Britton, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are a common manifestation of autoimmune limbic encephalitis and multifocal paraneoplastic disorders. Accumulating evidence supports an autoimmune basis for seizures in the absence of syndromic manifestations of encephalitis. The autoimmune epilepsies are immunologically mediated disorders in which recurrent seizures are a primary and persistent clinical feature. When other etiologies have been excluded, an autoimmune etiology is suggested in a patient with epilepsy upon detection of neural autoantibodies and/or the presence of inflammatory changes on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or magnetic resonance imaging. In such patients, immunotherapy may be highly effective, depending on the particular autoimmune epilepsy syndrome present. In this chapter, several autoimmune epilepsy syndromes are discussed. First, epilepsies secondary to other primary autoimmune disorders will be discussed, and then those associated with antibodies that are likely to be pathogenic, such as voltage-gated potassium channel-complex and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor, gamma-aminobutyric acid A and B receptor antibodies. For each syndrome, the typical clinical, imaging, electroencephaloram, CSF, and serologic features, and pathophysiology and treatment are described. Finally, suggested guidelines for the recognition, evaluation, and treatment of autoimmune epilepsy syndromes are provided. PMID:27112680

  2. Autoradiography reveals selective changes in serotonin binding in neocortex of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Luisa; Lorigados-Pedre, Lourdes; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra; Morales-Chacón, Lilia; Alonso-Vanegas, Mario; García-Maeso, Iván; Villeda-Hernández, Juana; Osorio-Rico, Laura; Estupiñán, Bárbara; Quintana, Christian

    2007-08-15

    The main goal of the present study was to evaluate binding to serotonin in the neocortex surrounding the epileptic focus of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Binding to 5-HT, 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(4), 5-HT(7) receptors and serotonin transporter (5-HTT) in T1-T2 gyri of 15 patients with MTLE and their correlations with clinical data, neuronal count and volume were determined. Autopsy material acquired from subjects without epilepsy (n=6) was used as control. The neocortex from MTLE patients demonstrated decreased cell count in layers III-IV (21%). No significant changes were detected on the neuronal volume. Autoradiography experiments showed the following results: reduced 5-HT and 5-HT(1A) binding in layers I-II (24% and 92%, respectively); enhanced 5-HT(4) binding in layers V-VI (32%); no significant changes in 5-HT(7) binding; reduced 5-HTT binding in all layers (I-II, 90.3%; III-IV, 90.3%, V-VI, 86.9%). Significant correlations were found between binding to 5-HT(4) and 5-HT(7) receptors and age of seizure onset, duration of epilepsy and duration of antiepileptic treatment. The present results support an impaired serotoninergic transmission in the neocortex surrounding the epileptic focus of patients with MTLE, a situation that could be involved in the initiation and propagation of seizure activity.

  3. Chinese Internet Searches Provide Inaccurate and Misleading Information to Epilepsy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian-Ming; Xu, Ru-Xiang; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Ren, Lian-Kun; Qiao, Hui; Ding, Hu; Liu, Zhi-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Most patients with epilepsy want to learn as much as possible about the disease, and many have turned to the internet for information. Patients are likely to use information obtained from the internet to control their epilepsy, but little is known about the accuracy of this information. In this survey, we have assessed the feasibility and usability of internet-based interventions for the treatment of epilepsy. Methods: Data were collected from an internet search. Different search terms were used to obtain general information on epilepsy together with information about medication, types of epilepsy, treatment, women's health, and other information. The accuracy of the information was evaluated by a group of experts. Results: A total of 1320 web pages were assessed. The majority were websites related to health. A large number (80.2%) of web pages contained content related to the search term. A significant number of web pages 450/1058 (42.5%) claimed to provide information from a credible source; however, only 206/1058 (19.5%) of the information was accurate and complete; 326/1058 (30.8%) was accurate but incomplete; 328/1058 (31.0%) was correct but nonstandard, and 198/1058 (18.8%) was inaccurate. The authenticity of the information was not significantly different between the two search engines (χ2 = 0.009, P = 0.924). No significant difference was observed in the information obtained from a specialist or nonspecialist source (χ2 = 7.538, P = 0.057). There was also no correlation between the quality of the information and the priority (χ2 = 6.880, P = 0.076). Conclusions: Searching for information about epilepsy on the internet is convenient, but the information provided is not reliable. Too much information is inaccurate or for advertisement purposes, and it is difficult for patients to find the useful information. Turning to the internet for medical knowledge may be harmful. Physicians should be aware that their patients may search for information on

  4. Adult Prevalence of Epilepsy in Spain: EPIBERIA, a Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-Castro, Pedro J.; Mauri-Llerda, Jose Angel; Hernández-Ramos, Francisco José; Sánchez-Alvarez, Juan Carlos; Parejo-Carbonell, Beatriz; Quiroga-Subirana, Pablo; Vázquez-Gutierrez, Fernando; Santos-Lasaosa, Sonia; Mendez-Lucena, Carolina; Redondo-Verge, Luis; Tejero-Juste, Carlos; Morandeira-Rivas, Clara; Sancho-Rieger, Jerónimo; Matías-Guiu, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Background. This study assesses the lifetime and active prevalence of epilepsy in Spain in people older than 18 years. Methods. EPIBERIA is a population-based epidemiological study of epilepsy prevalence using data from three representative Spanish regions (health districts in Zaragoza, Almería, and Seville) between 2012 and 2013. The study consisted of two phases: screening and confirmation. Participants completed a previously validated questionnaire (EPIBERIA questionnaire) over the telephone. Results. A total of 1741 valid questionnaires were obtained, including 261 (14.99%) raising a suspicion of epilepsy. Of these suspected cases, 216 (82.75%) agreed to participate in phase 2. Of the phase 2 participants, 22 met the International League Against Epilepsy's diagnostic criteria for epilepsy. The estimated lifetime prevalence, adjusted by age and sex per 1,000 people, was 14.87 (95% CI: 9.8–21.9). Active prevalence was 5.79 (95% CI: 2.8–10.6). No significant age, sex, or regional differences in prevalence were detected. Conclusions. EPIBERIA provides the most accurate estimate of epilepsy prevalence in the Mediterranean region based on its original methodology and its adherence to ILAE recommendations. We highlight that the lifetime prevalence and inactive epilepsy prevalence figures observed here were compared to other epidemiological studies. PMID:26783554

  5. Using max entropy ratio of recurrence plot to measure electrocorticogram changes in epilepsy patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jiaqing; Wang, Yinghua; Ouyang, Gaoxiang; Yu, Tao; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-02-01

    A maximum entropy ratio (MER) method is firstly adapted to investigate the high-dimensional Electrocorticogram (ECoG) data from epilepsy patients. MER is a symbolic analysis approach for the detection of recurrence domains of complex dynamical systems from time series. Data were chosen from eight patients undergoing pre-surgical evaluation for drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy. MERs for interictal and ictal data were calculated and compared. A statistical test was performed to evaluate the ability of MER to separate the interictal state from the ictal state. MER showed significant changes from the interictal state into the ictal state, where MER was low at the ictal state and is significantly different with that at the interictal state. These suggest that MER is able to separate the ictal state from the interictal state based on ECoG data. It has the potential of detecting the transition between normal brain activity and the ictal state.

  6. The treatment of patients with hypothalamic hamartomas, epilepsy and behavioural abnormalities: facts and hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Palmini, André; Paglioli-Neto, Eliseu; Montes, Jose; Farmer, Jean-Paul

    2003-12-01

    The growing interest in the association between hypothalamic hamartomas (HH), epilepsy and behavioural abnormalities witnessed in recent years, has led to significant progress regarding the clinical presentations, pathophysiology and management of this entity. Patients with these lesions may occupy different points within a spectrum of severity of the epileptic and behavioural disorder, and may dynamically progress toward more malignant epilepsies with time. The role of the subcortical lesion in the generation of the gelastic seizures has been established, and encouraging results have been obtained with surgical resection, destruction or disconnection of the hamartoma. The present work highlights several aspects that should be taken into account for the selection of medical and surgical treatment for individual patients. We conclude with a reflection on what we still do not understand as regards in the genesis and surgical management of the neuropsychiatric disabilities related to this disorder. PMID:14975794

  7. Illness perceptions mediate the relationship between depression and quality of life in patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Shallcross, Amanda J; Becker, Danielle A; Singh, Anuradha; Friedman, Daniel; Montesdeoca, Jacqueline; French, Jacqueline; Devinsky, Orrin; Spruill, Tanya M

    2015-11-01

    The current study examined whether negative illness perceptions help explain the link between depression and quality of life. Seventy patients with epilepsy completed standardized self-report questionnaires measuring depression, illness perception, and quality of life (QOL). Illness perception statistically mediated the relationship between depression and QOL (Indirect effect (CI; confidence interval) = -.72, lower limit = -1.7, upper limit = -.22, p < .05). Results held with and without adjusting for potential confounding variables (age, sex, ethnicity, income, and seizure frequency) and when operationalizing depression as a continuous variable that indexed severity of symptoms or as a dichotomous variable that indexed criteria consistent with a diagnosis of major depressive disorder. This study is the first to suggest that illness perceptions may be a useful target in screening and intervention approaches in order to improve QOL among low-income, racially/ethnically diverse patients with epilepsy.

  8. [Neuropsychology in epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Helmstaedter, C; Witt, J-A

    2009-11-01

    In order to understand cognitive impairment associated with epilepsy, it is essential to appreciate that independent static and dynamic factors affect brain function in this disease. Whereas morphological lesions or structural changes are associated with more or less irreversible deficits, epileptic activity, seizures, and the treatment of epilepsy can cause dynamic and principally reversible impairment. The relative contribution of these factors differs depending on the type of epilepsy, the age at lesion/epilepsy onset, the localization and lateralization of epilepsy and individual demographic patient characteristics. Altered brain structure and function can result in epilepsy, but epilepsy can also alter the functional cerebral organization of the brain. Thus epilepsy-related cognitive impairment must be integrated within a developmental neuropsychological framework. The aetiology of epilepsy is strongly related to the age of onset. From a neuropsychological point of view, it makes a big difference for cognitive outcome as to whether epilepsy hits the maturing versus mature or aging brain. Dependent on this, epilepsy can result in retardation, loss of acquired functions, or accelerated mental decline. It will be demonstrated that cognitive impairments in epilepsy mostly exist from the beginning of epilepsy, that early onset lesions/epilepsy interfere with mental development, and that a progressive aetiology, severe seizures, and lesions secondary to epilepsy may accelerate mental decline. It will furthermore be discussed that uncontrolled epilepsy and epileptic activity may reversibly and irreversibly contribute to cognitive impairment. The same is demonstrated with regard to the pharmacological treatment of epilepsy. Finally, the cognitive risks and benefits of epilepsy surgery and the advantages of selective surgery will be addressed. The consequences for the neuropsychological assessment are discussed in part two of this review.

  9. 15q26.1 microdeletion encompassing only CHD2 and RGMA in two adults with moderate intellectual disability, epilepsy and truncal obesity.

    PubMed

    Courage, Carolina; Houge, Gunnar; Gallati, Sabina; Schjelderup, Jack; Rieubland, Claudine

    2014-09-01

    We report two patients with microdeletions in chromosomal subdomain 15q26.1 encompassing only two genes, CHD2 and RGMA. Both patients present a distinct phenotype with intellectual disability, epilepsy, behavioral issues, truncal obesity, scoliosis and facial dysmorphism. CHD2 haploinsufficiency is known to cause intellectual disability and epilepsy, RGMA haploinsufficiency might explain truncal obesity with onset around puberty observed in our two patients. PMID:24932903

  10. Determining the relationship between sleep architecture, seizure variables and memory in patients with focal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Laurie A; Ricci, Monica; van Schalkwijk, Frank J; Mohamed, Armin; van der Werf, Ysbrand D

    2016-06-01

    Sleep has been shown to be important to memory. Both sleep and memory have been found to be abnormal in patients with epilepsy. In this study, we explored the effects that nocturnal epileptiform discharges and the presence of a hippocampal lesion have on sleep patterns and memory. Twenty-five patients with focal epilepsy who underwent a 24-hr ambulatory EEG also completed the Everyday Memory Questionnaire (EMQ). The EEG record was scored for length of time spent in the various sleep stages, time spent awake after sleep onset, and rapid eye movement (REM) latency. Of these sleep variables, only REM latency differed when the epilepsy patients were divided on the bases of either presence/absence of nocturnal discharges or presence/absence of a hippocampal lesion. In both cases, presence of the abnormality was associated with longer latency. Furthermore, longer REM latency was found to be a better predictor of EMQ score than either number of discharges or presence of a hippocampal lesion. Longer REM latency was associated with a smaller percentage of time spent in slow-wave sleep in the early part of the night and may serve as a particularly sensitive marker to disturbances in sleep architecture. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26854742

  11. Novel Histopathological Patterns in Cortical Tubers of Epilepsy Surgery Patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    PubMed

    Mühlebner, Angelika; van Scheppingen, Jackelien; Hulshof, Hanna M; Scholl, Theresa; Iyer, Anand M; Anink, Jasper J; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Nellist, Mark D; Jansen, Floor E; Spliet, Wim G M; Krsek, Pavel; Benova, Barbora; Zamecnik, Josef; Crino, Peter B; Prayer, Daniela; Czech, Thomas; Wöhrer, Adelheid; Rahimi, Jasmin; Höftberger, Romana; Hainfellner, Johannes A; Feucht, Martha; Aronica, Eleonora

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) is a genetic hamartoma syndrome frequently associated with severe intractable epilepsy. In some TSC patients epilepsy surgery is a promising treatment option provided that the epileptogenic zone can be precisely delineated. TSC brain lesions (cortical tubers) contain dysmorphic neurons, brightly eosinophilic giant cells and white matter alterations in various proportions. However, a histological classification system has not been established for tubers. Therefore, the aim of this study was to define distinct histological patterns within tubers based on semi-automated histological quantification and to find clinically significant correlations. In total, we studied 28 cortical tubers and seven samples of perituberal cortex from 28 TSC patients who had undergone epilepsy surgery. We assessed mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activation, the numbers of giant cells, dysmorphic neurons, neurons, and oligodendrocytes, and calcification, gliosis, angiogenesis, inflammation, and myelin content. Three distinct histological profiles emerged based on the proportion of calcifications, dysmorphic neurons and giant cells designated types A, B, and C. In the latter two types we were able to subsequently associate them with specific features on presurgical MRI. Therefore, these histopathological patterns provide consistent criteria for improved definition of the clinico-pathological features of cortical tubers identified by MRI and provide a basis for further exploration of the functional and molecular features of cortical tubers in TSC. PMID:27295297

  12. Novel Histopathological Patterns in Cortical Tubers of Epilepsy Surgery Patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    PubMed Central

    Hulshof, Hanna M.; Scholl, Theresa; Iyer, Anand M.; Anink, Jasper J.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Nellist, Mark D.; Jansen, Floor E.; Spliet, Wim G. M.; Krsek, Pavel; Benova, Barbora; Zamecnik, Josef; Crino, Peter B.; Prayer, Daniela; Czech, Thomas; Wöhrer, Adelheid; Rahimi, Jasmin; Höftberger, Romana; Hainfellner, Johannes A.; Feucht, Martha; Aronica, Eleonora

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) is a genetic hamartoma syndrome frequently associated with severe intractable epilepsy. In some TSC patients epilepsy surgery is a promising treatment option provided that the epileptogenic zone can be precisely delineated. TSC brain lesions (cortical tubers) contain dysmorphic neurons, brightly eosinophilic giant cells and white matter alterations in various proportions. However, a histological classification system has not been established for tubers. Therefore, the aim of this study was to define distinct histological patterns within tubers based on semi-automated histological quantification and to find clinically significant correlations. In total, we studied 28 cortical tubers and seven samples of perituberal cortex from 28 TSC patients who had undergone epilepsy surgery. We assessed mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activation, the numbers of giant cells, dysmorphic neurons, neurons, and oligodendrocytes, and calcification, gliosis, angiogenesis, inflammation, and myelin content. Three distinct histological profiles emerged based on the proportion of calcifications, dysmorphic neurons and giant cells designated types A, B, and C. In the latter two types we were able to subsequently associate them with specific features on presurgical MRI. Therefore, these histopathological patterns provide consistent criteria for improved definition of the clinico-pathological features of cortical tubers identified by MRI and provide a basis for further exploration of the functional and molecular features of cortical tubers in TSC. PMID:27295297

  13. Gelastic seizures: incidence, clinical and EEG features in adult patients undergoing video-EEG telemetry.

    PubMed

    Kovac, Stjepana; Diehl, Beate; Wehner, Tim; Fois, Chiara; Toms, Nathan; Walker, Matthew C; Duncan, John S

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine clinical features of adult patients with gelastic seizures recorded on video -electroencephalography (EEG) over a 5-year period. We screened video-EEG telemetry reports for the occurrence of the term "gelastic" seizures, and assessed the semiology, EEG features, and duration of those seizures. Gelastic seizures were identified in 19 (0.8%) of 2,446 admissions. The presumed epileptogenic zone was in the hypothalamus in one third of the cases, temporal lobe epilepsy was diagnosed in another third, and the remainder of the cases presenting with gelastic seizures were classified as frontal, parietal lobe epilepsy or remained undetermined or were multifocal. Gelastic seizures were embedded in a semiology, with part of the seizure showing features of automotor seizures. A small proportion of patients underwent epilepsy surgery. Outcome of epilepsy surgery was related to the underlying pathology; two patients with hippocampal sclerosis had good outcomes following temporal lobe resection and one of four patients with hypothalamic hamartomas undergoing gamma knife surgery had a good outcome.

  14. [Control of epilepsy in adult patients with tuberous sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Gallardo-Tur, Alejandro; García-Martín, Guillermina; Chamorro-Muñoz, María Isabel; Romero-Godoy, Jorge; Romero-Acebal, Manuel

    2013-06-01

    Introduccion. La esclerosis tuberosa es una enfermedad genetica cuyas manifestaciones principales son la formacion de tumores neuroectodermicos, que asocia epilepsia secundaria muy frecuentemente. Objetivo. Describir el perfil epileptico, el control, la frecuencia de crisis y la efectividad del tratamiento en pacientes adultos con esclerosis tuberosa. Pacientes y metodos. Estudio descriptivo en el que se han incluido pacientes adultos (mayores de 14 anos) con diagnostico confirmado de esclerosis tuberosa. Se ha analizado la frecuencia y tipos de crisis. Se ha realizado un estudio y contabilizacion de los diferentes farmacos antiepilepticos en cada paciente, la frecuencia de uso de cada principio activo y un estudio comparativo entre control de crisis y tipo de terapia. Resultados. De 19 adultos estudiados, tuvieron crisis epilepticas 16 (84%). Presentaron control de crisis completo, crisis esporadicas y crisis frecuentes el 44%, 25% y 31%, respectivamente. Hubo frecuencia de crisis focales, generalizadas y ambas en el 38%, 6% y 25%, respectivamente. Estaban en tratamiento con farmacos antiepilepticos en monoterapia, biterapia y triterapia el 38%, 44% y 19%, respectivamente. El mas consumido globalmente fue el levetiracetam, seguido de la carbamacepina y el acido valproico. En monoterapia, el mas frecuente fue la carbamacepina, con mayor proporcion de control completo. Conclusiones. La epilepsia en la esclerosis tuberosa es relativamente benigna, y se consigue un aceptable control en la mayoria de casos con un numero de antiepilepticos acorde con lo aconsejado en las guias de tratamiento. Se observa estabilidad de lesiones, y no hay malignizacion en nuestra serie. El bajo numero de la muestra limita el estudio, pero se observan proporciones similares de efectividad del tratamiento respecto a otra serie publicada.

  15. Genomic analysis of the interleukin-1β-511 and interleukin-6-174 gene polymorphisms in Turkish patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gök, I; Esen, V; Kose Ozlece, H

    2014-10-20

    In this study, we examined the frequency of polymorphisms in the interleukin (IL) genes IL-1β-511 and IL-6-174 in patients with epilepsy as well as a control group in Kars, Turkey. A total of 100 patients diagnosed with epilepsy and 100 nonepileptic subjects as a control group were examined. Peripheral blood samples were acquired from patients and control subjects for DNA extraction. The target region was amplified using polymerase chain reaction and digested using the restriction enzymes SfaNI and AvaI. Restriction products were extracted from agarose gel electrophoresis and polymorphisms were analyzed using gel images. For IL-1β, the most common genotype among the epilepsy group was the CT genotype with a 62% frequency; the T allele was the most common allele with a frequency of 34%. Among the control group, however, the CT genotype showed a frequency of 25% and the T allele had a 22% frequency. For IL-6-174, among the epilepsy group, the GG genotype prevalence was approximately 42% and G allele prevalence was 46%. The GG genotype was approximately 50% and the G allele was 53% in the control group. Thus, changes in the allele frequency of the T allele of IL-1β-174 may be associated with epilepsy. However, there was no significant difference for the G allele frequency of IL-6-511. A larger sample size should be examined to verify these relationships, which could help to improve the clinical diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy.

  16. Electrical source localization by LORETA in patients with epilepsy: Confirmation by postoperative MRI

    PubMed Central

    Akdeniz, Gülsüm

    2016-01-01

    Background: Few studies have been conducted that have compared electrical source localization (ESL) results obtained by analyzing ictal patterns in scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) with the brain areas that are found to be responsible for seizures using other brain imaging techniques. Additionally, adequate studies have not been performed to confirm the accuracy of ESL methods. Materials and Methods: In this study, ESL was conducted using LORETA (Low Resolution Brain Electromagnetic Tomography) in 9 patients with lesions apparent on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and in 6 patients who did not exhibit lesions on their MRIs. EEGs of patients who underwent surgery for epilepsy and had follow-ups for at least 1 year after operations were analyzed for ictal spike, rhythmic, paroxysmal fast, and obscured EEG activities. Epileptogenic zones identified in postoperative MRIs were then compared with localizations obtained by LORETA model we employed. Results: We found that brain areas determined via ESL were in concordance with resected brain areas for 13 of the 15 patients evaluated, and those 13 patients were post-operatively determined as being seizure-free. Conclusion: ESL, which is a noninvasive technique, may contribute to the correct delineation of epileptogenic zones in patients who will eventually undergo surgery to treat epilepsy, (regardless of neuroimaging status). Moreover, ESL may aid in deciding on the number and localization of intracranial electrodes to be used in patients who are candidates for invasive recording. PMID:27011626

  17. Mutations in epilepsy and intellectual disability genes in patients with features of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Olson, Heather E; Tambunan, Dimira; LaCoursiere, Christopher; Goldenberg, Marti; Pinsky, Rebecca; Martin, Emilie; Ho, Eugenia; Khwaja, Omar; Kaufmann, Walter E; Poduri, Annapurna

    2015-09-01

    Rett syndrome and neurodevelopmental disorders with features overlapping this syndrome frequently remain unexplained in patients without clinically identified MECP2 mutations. We recruited a cohort of 11 patients with features of Rett syndrome and negative initial clinical testing for mutations in MECP2. We analyzed their phenotypes to determine whether patients met formal criteria for Rett syndrome, reviewed repeat clinical genetic testing, and performed exome sequencing of the probands. Using 2010 diagnostic criteria, three patients had classical Rett syndrome, including two for whom repeat MECP2 gene testing had identified mutations. In a patient with neonatal onset epilepsy with atypical Rett syndrome, we identified a frameshift deletion in STXBP1. Among seven patients with features of Rett syndrome not fulfilling formal diagnostic criteria, four had suspected pathogenic mutations, one each in MECP2, FOXG1, SCN8A, and IQSEC2. MECP2 mutations are highly correlated with classical Rett syndrome. Genes associated with atypical Rett syndrome, epilepsy, or intellectual disability should be considered in patients with features overlapping with Rett syndrome and negative MECP2 testing. While most of the identified mutations were apparently de novo, the SCN8A variant was inherited from an unaffected parent mosaic for the mutation, which is important to note for counseling regarding recurrence risks.

  18. Delineating potential epileptogenic areas utilizing resting functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Pizarro, Ricardo; Nair, Veena; Meier, Timothy; Holdsworth, Ryan; Tunnell, Evelyn; Rutecki, Paul; Sillay, Karl; Meyerand, Mary E; Prabhakaran, Vivek

    2016-08-01

    Seizure localization includes neuroimaging like electroencephalogram, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with limited ability to characterize the epileptogenic network. Temporal clustering analysis (TCA) characterizes epileptogenic network congruent with interictal epileptiform discharges by clustering together voxels with transient signals. We generated epileptogenic areas for 12 of 13 epilepsy patients with TCA, congruent with different areas of seizure onset. Resting functional MRI (fMRI) scans are noninvasive, and can be acquired quickly, in patients with different levels of severity and function. Analyzing resting fMRI data using TCA is quick and can complement clinical methods to characterize the epileptogenic network. PMID:27362339

  19. Idiopathic generalised epilepsies with 3 Hz and faster spike wave discharges: a population-based study with evaluation and long-term follow-up in 71 patients.

    PubMed

    Siren, Auli; Eriksson, Kai; Jalava, Heli; Kilpinen-Loisa, Päivi; Koivikko, Matti

    2002-09-01

    For several years we have been following patients with intractable, childhood-onset idiopathic generalised epilepsies with > or = 3 Hz spike-wave discharges. Our need to find explanations for their intractability was the starting point for this study. We were interested in identifying characteristics, which would predict intractability; evaluating how these patients were treated and whether polytherapy was useful. We identified patients with > or = 3 Hz spike-wave discharges by reviewing EEG reports recorded between 1983 and 1992. Data were collected from medical records and through personal interviews. We identified 82 patients with tentative idiopathic generalised epilepsy. Eleven were excluded. Thirty-eight patients had childhood absence epilepsy, 18 had juvenile absence epilepsy, 13 had juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and two had eyelid myoclonia with absences: 89.5, 78, 38 and 0% of the patients in each group, respectively, had been seizure free for more than 2 years. Twenty percent of the patients had intractable seizures. All intractable patients with juvenile absence epilepsy had rhythmic, random eyelid blinking and generalised tonic-clonic seizures. A history of more than ten generalised tonic-clonic seizures was associated with intractability in juvenile myoclonic patients. Monotherapy with ethosuximide or valproate resulted in seizure control in 65% of patients. Seventeen patients (24%) were treated with polytherapy, six achieved remission. These six patients had childhood absence epilepsy and juvenile absence epilepsy. Positive outcome was found in childhood absence epilepsy and juvenile absence epilepsy. Intractable seizures were more frequent among patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. None of them benefited from polytherapy with conventional anti-epileptic drugs.

  20. Perspectives of Adults With Epilepsy and Their Support Persons on Self-Management Support

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Elizabeth Reisinger; Barmon, Christina; McGee, Robin E.; Engelhard, George; Sterk, Claire E.; DiIorio, Colleen; Thompson, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    Social support is an important mechanism for improving self-management, although little is known about its role in epilepsy self-management. We examined the type of support provided to people with epilepsy and its influence on self-management. We conducted in-depth interviews with 22 people with epilepsy and 16 support persons, representing 14 pairs and 10 unpaired individuals. We analyzed the data using principles of grounded theory. Supporters, who were mainly parents and spouses, aided people with epilepsy in every dimension of self-management. Support for self-management occurred along a continuum from person with epilepsy-led management to support person-led management. Where the pairs fell on the continuum depended on developmental stage, relationship type, and relationship dynamics. Seizure control shaped individuals' experiences with self-management and support within each group. The self-management continuum provides a new aspect that can be integrated into existing models of self-and family-management. PMID:25192759

  1. Approximate Entropies for Stochastic Time Series and EKG Time Series of Patients with Epilepsy and Pseudoseizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyhnalek, Brian; Zurcher, Ulrich; O'Dwyer, Rebecca; Kaufman, Miron

    2009-10-01

    A wide range of heart rate irregularities have been reported in small studies of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy [TLE]. We hypothesize that patients with TLE display cardiac dysautonomia in either a subclinical or clinical manner. In a small study, we have retrospectively identified (2003-8) two groups of patients from the epilepsy monitoring unit [EMU] at the Cleveland Clinic. No patients were diagnosed with cardiovascular morbidities. The control group consisted of patients with confirmed pseudoseizures and the experimental group had confirmed right temporal lobe epilepsy through a seizure free outcome after temporal lobectomy. We quantified the heart rate variability using the approximate entropy [ApEn]. We found similar values of the ApEn in all three states of consciousness (awake, sleep, and proceeding seizure onset). In the TLE group, there is some evidence for greater variability in the awake than in either the sleep or proceeding seizure onset. Here we present results for mathematically-generated time series: the heart rate fluctuations ξ follow the γ statistics i.e., p(ξ)=γ-1(k) ξ^k exp(-ξ). This probability function has well-known properties and its Shannon entropy can be expressed in terms of the γ-function. The parameter k allows us to generate a family of heart rate time series with different statistics. The ApEn calculated for the generated time series for different values of k mimic the properties found for the TLE and pseudoseizure group. Our results suggest that the ApEn is an effective tool to probe differences in statistics of heart rate fluctuations.

  2. Neuropsychological performance before and after partial or complete insulectomy in patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Olivier; Rouleau, Isabelle; Escudier, Frédérique; Malenfant, Annie; Denault, Carole; Charbonneau, Simon; Finet, Patrice; Lassonde, Maryse; Lepore, Franco; Bouthillier, Alain; Nguyen, Dang K

    2015-02-01

    Resection of the insular cortex is becoming more frequent as it is increasingly recognized that a nonnegligible proportion of surgical candidates with drug-resistant epilepsy have an epileptogenic zone that involves the insula. In the last decades, however, the insula has been proposed to be involved in several neuropsychological functions, and there is a lack of documentation on whether partial or complete insulectomy results in permanent cognitive impairments in this clinical population. In this study, we conducted standard preoperative and postoperative neuropsychological assessments in 18 patients undergoing epilepsy surgery that included the removal of the insula in the right (n=13) or the left (n=5) hemisphere. Postoperative testing was conducted at least five months after surgery. Cognitive impairments were common and heterogeneous prior to surgery, with language and verbal memory impairments being especially frequent among patients in whom epileptic seizures originated from the left hemisphere. After surgery, declines and improvements occurred on a variety of outcomes, although new deficits were relatively infrequent among patients who had obtained normal performance at baseline. Statistical comparisons between preoperative and postoperative assessments revealed significant deterioration of only one outcome - the color naming condition of the Stroop test - which relies on oro-motor speed and lexical access. These findings suggest that partial or complete resection of the insular cortex in patients with drug-refractory epilepsy can be conducted without major permanent neuropsychological impairments in a vast majority of patients. However, small decrements in specific cognitive functions can be expected, which should also be taken into account when considering the surgical option in this clinical population.

  3. Presurgical language mapping in epilepsy: Using fMRI of reading to identify functional reorganization in a patient with long-standing temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gould, Layla; Mickleborough, Marla J S; Wu, Adam; Tellez, Jose; Ekstrand, Chelsea; Lorentz, Eric; Ellchuk, Tasha; Babyn, Paul; Borowsky, Ron

    2016-01-01

    We report a 55-year-old, right-handed patient with intractable left temporal lobe epilepsy, who previously had a partial left temporal lobectomy. The patient could talk during seizures, suggesting that he might have language dominance in the right hemisphere. Presurgical fMRI localization of language processing including reading of exception and regular words, pseudohomophones, and dual meaning words confirmed the clinical hypothesis of right language dominance, with only small amounts of activation near the planned surgical resection and, thus, minimal eloquent cortex to avoid during surgery. Postoperatively, the patient was rendered seizure-free without speech deficits. PMID:27330987

  4. Cognitive adverse events of topiramate in patients with epilepsy and intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Christian; Lahr, Denise; May, Theodor W

    2015-04-01

    Topiramate (TPM) is an effective antiepileptic drug (AED). A high proportion of patients, however, experiences cognitive adverse events (CAEs), especially in verbal fluency, memory spans, and working memory. To our knowledge, CAEs of TPM have not been studied systematically in patients with intellectual disability (ID). This may be due to the fact that many of those patients are not able to follow test instructions properly and that neuropsychological instruments are not validated for that group. Cognitive deterioration in patients with ID may thus easily be overlooked. Topiramate is in frequent use in persons with ID. We included 26 consecutive patients with epilepsy and ID in this observational study who had undergone neuropsychological examinations as part of clinical routine before and after the introduction of TPM into the therapeutic regimen (n=4) or before and after the withdrawal of TPM (n=22). Examinations under TPM showed reduced cognitive speed, reduced verbal memory, reduced verbal fluency, and reduced flexibility compared to examinations without TPM. Despite some limitations (especially small sample size, high interindividual variation of the results dependent on the degree of ID, effects of other - limited - changes in the therapeutic regimen), our study indicates that TPM in persons with epilepsy and ID may lead to CAEs comparable to those in persons with normal intelligence. Neuropsychological testing is mandatory in order not to miss CAEs that might severely impair quality of life.

  5. [Current management of epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Mizobuchi, Masahiro

    2013-09-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders. Global neurological knowledge is essential for differential diagnosis of epileptic syndromes due to the diversity of ictal semiology, causes and syndromes. Neurologists play an important role in planning the medical care for patients with epilepsy, as medication is the most fundamental therapeutic strategy. Some patients with early-onset epilepsy require joint care by pediatric neurologists, those with intractable epilepsy by neurosurgeons, and those with psychological comorbidity by psychiatrists, and neurologists should play a coordinating role. While there is a great need for neurologists to participate in epilepsy care, neurologists in Japan currently do not participate substantially in the epilepsy management system. It is necessary to train more neurologists who can provide epilepsy care and conduct basic and clinical research on epilepsy by providing continuous education on epilepsy for general neurologists as well as pre- and post-graduate medical students. Most of the patients who require long-term treatment experience many medical problems and social handicaps, such as adverse effects of medication, social stigma, educational disadvantages and difficulties in obtaining driver's license. To improve the quality of life of patients with epilepsy, it is desirable to build broad medical-social networks participated by patients, doctors, neurological nurses, psychologists, social workers, school teachers, managers of employment support facilities and care givers. PMID:24018740

  6. [Current management of epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Mizobuchi, Masahiro

    2013-09-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders. Global neurological knowledge is essential for differential diagnosis of epileptic syndromes due to the diversity of ictal semiology, causes and syndromes. Neurologists play an important role in planning the medical care for patients with epilepsy, as medication is the most fundamental therapeutic strategy. Some patients with early-onset epilepsy require joint care by pediatric neurologists, those with intractable epilepsy by neurosurgeons, and those with psychological comorbidity by psychiatrists, and neurologists should play a coordinating role. While there is a great need for neurologists to participate in epilepsy care, neurologists in Japan currently do not participate substantially in the epilepsy management system. It is necessary to train more neurologists who can provide epilepsy care and conduct basic and clinical research on epilepsy by providing continuous education on epilepsy for general neurologists as well as pre- and post-graduate medical students. Most of the patients who require long-term treatment experience many medical problems and social handicaps, such as adverse effects of medication, social stigma, educational disadvantages and difficulties in obtaining driver's license. To improve the quality of life of patients with epilepsy, it is desirable to build broad medical-social networks participated by patients, doctors, neurological nurses, psychologists, social workers, school teachers, managers of employment support facilities and care givers.

  7. Asymmetric Gray Matter Volume Changes Associated with Epilepsy Duration and Seizure Frequency in Temporal-Lobe-Epilepsy Patients with Favorable Surgical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Sik; Koo, Dae Lim; Joo, Eun Yeon; Kim, Sung Tae; Seo, Dae Won

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose This study aimed to estimate the changes in gray matter volume (GMV) and their hemispheric difference in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) using a voxel-based morphometry (VBM) methodology, and to determine whether GMV changes are correlated with clinical features. Methods VBM analysis of brain MRI using statistical parametric mapping 8 (SPM8) was performed for 30 left MTLE (LMTLE) and 30 right MTLE (RMTLE) patients and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. We also analyzed the correlations between GMV changes and clinical features of MTLE patients. Results In SPM8-based analyses, MTLE patients showed significant GMV reductions in the hippocampus ipsilateral to the epileptic focus, bilateral thalamus, and contralateral putamen in LMTLE patients. The GMV reductions were more extensive in the ipsilateral hippocampus, thalamus, caudate, putamen, uncus, insula, inferior temporal gyrus, middle occipital gyrus, cerebellum, and paracentral lobule in RMTLE patients. These patients also exhibited notable reductions of GMV in the contralateral hippocampus, thalamus, caudate, putamen, and inferior frontal gyrus. We observed that GMV reduction was positively correlated with several clinical features (epilepsy duration and seizure frequency in RMTLE, and history of febrile seizure in LMTLE) and negatively correlated with seizure onset age in both the RMTLE and LMTLE groups. Conclusions Our study revealed GMV decreases in the hippocampus and extrahippocampal regions. Furthermore, the GMV reduction was more extensive in the RMTLE group than in the LMTLE group, since it included the contralateral hemisphere in the former. This difference in the GMV reduction patterns between LMTLE and RMTLE may be related to a longer epilepsy duration and higher seizure frequency in the latter. PMID:27449913

  8. Event-Related Potentials Reveal Preserved Attention Allocation but Impaired Emotion Regulation in Patients with Epilepsy and Comorbid Negative Affect

    PubMed Central

    De Taeye, Leen; Pourtois, Gilles; Meurs, Alfred; Boon, Paul; Vonck, Kristl; Carrette, Evelien; Raedt, Robrecht

    2015-01-01

    Patients with epilepsy have a high prevalence of comorbid mood disorders. This study aims to evaluate whether negative affect in epilepsy is associated with dysfunction of emotion regulation. Event-related potentials (ERPs) are used in order to unravel the exact electrophysiological time course and investigate whether a possible dysfunction arises during early (attention) and/or late (regulation) stages of emotion control. Fifty epileptic patients with (n = 25) versus without (n = 25) comorbid negative affect plus twenty-five matched controls were recruited. ERPs were recorded while subjects performed a face- or house-matching task in which fearful, sad or neutral faces were presented either at attended or unattended spatial locations. Two ERP components were analyzed: the early vertex positive potential (VPP) which is normally enhanced for faces, and the late positive potential (LPP) that is typically larger for emotional stimuli. All participants had larger amplitude of the early face-sensitive VPP for attended faces compared to houses, regardless of their emotional content. By contrast, in patients with negative affect only, the amplitude of the LPP was significantly increased for unattended negative emotional expressions. These VPP results indicate that epilepsy with or without negative affect does not interfere with the early structural encoding and attention selection of faces. However, the LPP results suggest abnormal regulation processes during the processing of unattended emotional faces in patients with epilepsy and comorbid negative affect. In conclusion, this ERP study reveals that early object-based attention processes are not compromised by epilepsy, but instead, when combined with negative affect, this neurological disease is associated with dysfunction during the later stages of emotion regulation. As such, these new neurophysiological findings shed light on the complex interplay of epilepsy with negative affect during the processing of emotional

  9. Pattern and predictors of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among pediatric patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Doering, Jan H; Reuner, Gitta; Kadish, Navah E; Pietz, Joachim; Schubert-Bast, Susanne

    2013-10-01

    Parents of pediatric patients with chronic conditions such as epilepsy increasingly opt for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). However, data on the pattern and reasons of CAM use in childhood epilepsy are scarce. The objectives of this study were as follows: first, to characterize CAM use among pediatric patients with epilepsy by assessing its spectrum, prevalence, costs, and frequency of use; second, to evaluate the influence of CAM use on compliance and satisfaction with conventional care as well as to explore parent-child neurologist communication concerning CAM; and third, to investigate predictors of CAM use. A postal survey was administered to all parents of pediatric outpatients with epilepsy aged 6 to 12, who have received treatment at the neuropediatric outpatient clinic of the University Children's Hospital Heidelberg between 2007 and 2009. One hundred thirty-two of the 297 distributed questionnaires were suitable for inclusion in statistical analysis (44.7%). Forty-nine participants indicated that their children used CAM during the previous year (37.1%). Thirty different types of CAM were used, with homeopathy (55.1%), osteopathy (24.5%), and kinesiology (16.3%) being the most commonly named. A mean of 86€ (0€-500€) and 3h (1 h-30 h) per month was committed to CAM treatment. Only 53% of the users informed their child neurologist of the additional CAM treatment, while 85.6% of all parents wished to discuss CAM options with their child neurologist. Seventy-five percent of users considered the CAM treatment effective. Among the participants most likely to seek CAM treatment are parents whose children show a long duration of epileptic symptoms, parents who make use of CAM treatment themselves, and parents who value a holistic and natural treatment approach. A substantial portion of pediatric patients with epilepsy receive CAM treatment. The high prevalence of use and significant level of financial and time resources spent on CAM indicate the

  10. Sleep Studies of Adults with Severe or Profound Mental Retardation and Epilepsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espie, Colin A.; Paul, Audrey; McFie, Joyce; Amos, Pat; Hamilton, David; McColl, John H.; And Others

    1998-01-01

    A study of the sleep patterns of 28 people with severe or profound mental retardation and epilepsy found atypical sleep stages with significant depletion of REM sleep and a predominance of indiscriminate non-REM sleep. Sleep diaries completed by caregivers reveal lengthy sleep periods, especially among those with profound mental retardation.…

  11. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose and 18F-flumazenil positron emission tomography in patients with refractory epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Topakian, Raffi; Pichler, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by epileptic seizures as a result of excessive neuronal activity in the brain. Approximately 65 million people worldwide suffer from epilepsy; 20–40% of them are refractory to medication therapy. Early detection of disease is crucial in the management of patients with epilepsy. Correct localization of the ictal onset zone is associated with a better surgical outcome. The modern non-invasive techniques used for structural-functional localization of the seizure focus includes electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), single photon emission tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). PET/CT can predict surgical outcome in patients with refractory epilepsy. The aim of the article is to review the current role of routinely used tracer 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) as well as non routinely used 18F-Flumazenil (18F-FMZ) tracers PET/CT in patients with refractory epilepsy. Conclusions Functional information delivered by PET and the morphologic information delivered by CT or MRI are essential in presurgical evaluation of epilepsy. Nowadays 18F-FDG PET/CT is a routinely performed imaging modality in localization of the ictal onset zone in patients with refractory epilepsy who are unresponsive to medication therapy. Unfortunately, 18F-FDG is not an ideal PET tracer regarding the management of patients with epilepsy: areas of glucose hypometabolism do not correlate precisely with the proven degree of change within hippocampal sclerosis, as observed by histopathology or MRI. Benzodiazepine-receptor imaging is a promising alternative in nuclear medicine imaging of epileptogenic focus. The use of 11C-FMZ in clinical practice has been limited by its short half-life and necessitating an on-site cyclotron for production. Therefore, 18F-FMZ might be established as one of the tracers of choice for patients

  12. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose and 18F-flumazenil positron emission tomography in patients with refractory epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Topakian, Raffi; Pichler, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by epileptic seizures as a result of excessive neuronal activity in the brain. Approximately 65 million people worldwide suffer from epilepsy; 20–40% of them are refractory to medication therapy. Early detection of disease is crucial in the management of patients with epilepsy. Correct localization of the ictal onset zone is associated with a better surgical outcome. The modern non-invasive techniques used for structural-functional localization of the seizure focus includes electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), single photon emission tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). PET/CT can predict surgical outcome in patients with refractory epilepsy. The aim of the article is to review the current role of routinely used tracer 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) as well as non routinely used 18F-Flumazenil (18F-FMZ) tracers PET/CT in patients with refractory epilepsy. Conclusions Functional information delivered by PET and the morphologic information delivered by CT or MRI are essential in presurgical evaluation of epilepsy. Nowadays 18F-FDG PET/CT is a routinely performed imaging modality in localization of the ictal onset zone in patients with refractory epilepsy who are unresponsive to medication therapy. Unfortunately, 18F-FDG is not an ideal PET tracer regarding the management of patients with epilepsy: areas of glucose hypometabolism do not correlate precisely with the proven degree of change within hippocampal sclerosis, as observed by histopathology or MRI. Benzodiazepine-receptor imaging is a promising alternative in nuclear medicine imaging of epileptogenic focus. The use of 11C-FMZ in clinical practice has been limited by its short half-life and necessitating an on-site cyclotron for production. Therefore, 18F-FMZ might be established as one of the tracers of choice for patients

  13. Association between equivalent current dipole source localization and focal cortical dysplasia in epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Blenkmann, Alejandro; Seifer, Gustavo; Princich, Juan Pablo; Consalvo, Damian; Kochen, Silvia; Muravchik, Carlos

    2012-02-01

    We analysed the association between focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) visible in MRI and the location of equivalent current dipole (ECD) of single interictal scalp EEG spikes (IIS) in 11 epilepsy patients. We calculated several indicators of distance of ECDs to the FCD border. The results confirm some previous studies suggesting that the epileptogenic zone associated to the location of ECDs extends beyond the FCD visible in MRI. The analysis suggests the ECDs to be in a shell parallel to part of the FCD surface.

  14. Functional MRI of neuronal activation in epilepsy patients with malformations of cortical development.

    PubMed

    Nikolova, Simona; Bartha, Robert; Parrent, Andrew G; Steven, David A; Diosy, David; Burneo, Jorge G

    2015-10-01

    Malformations of cortical development are disturbances in brain formation that arise from abnormalities affecting the processes of cortical development. Surgical treatment of intractable epilepsy in patients with malformations of cortical development requires localization of both epileptogenic and eloquent cortices. Functional magnetic resonance imaging has been shown to detect the reorganization of activation patterns in such patients. The purpose of this study was to determine whether functional reorganization of the primary sensory and motor cortices occurs in patients with epileptogenic malformations of cortical development. Functional MRI data were obtained for 11 patients (four male, seven female) with a mean age of 36 years (range 18-55 years). The mean age at epilepsy onset was 23 years (range 3-55 years). Twelve healthy controls (six male, six female) with mean age of 33 years (range 28-51 years) were also recruited for comparison. High resolution anatomical MRI was used to confirm the presence and the location of the malformation. All imaging experiments were performed using a 3.0T Siemens Tim Trio whole body MRI. Each subject performed four block-paradigm fMRI experiments to study motor and sensory activation for each hand. A total of 132 image sets were collected for each paradigm over 5.5min (2.5s per image). Each paradigm consisted of seven stimulus periods lasting 30s (12 images) and stimulus onset of 30, 90, 150, 210 and 270s. Functional data were obtained from all eligible patients and compared to those of controls. Reorganization and reduction in function in the motor and sensory areas were observed in patients with cortical dysplasia. Patients with polymicrogyria did not present with significant functional reorganization and patients with heterotopias and coexisting polymicrogyria and/or cortical dysplasia had variable patterns of activation. In summary, this study showed evidence of functional reorganization of sensory and motor cortices in

  15. Amygdala Volumetry in Patients with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy and Normal Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Paramdeep; Kaur, Rupinderjeet; Saggar, Kavita; Singh, Gagandeep; Aggarwal, Simmi

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background It has been suggested that the pathophysiology of temporal lobe epilepsy may relate to abnormalities in various brain structures, including the amygdala. Patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) without MRI abnormalities (MTLE-NMRI) represent a challenge for diagnosis of the underlying abnormality and for presurgical evaluation. To date, however, only few studies have used quantitative structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging-based techniques to examine amygdalar pathology in these patients. Material/Methods Based on clinical examination, 24-hour video EEG recordings and MRI findings, 50 patients with EEG lateralized TLE and normal structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging results were included in this study. Volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the amygdalas and hippocampi were conducted in 50 non-epileptic controls (age 7–79 years) and 50 patients with MTLE with normal MRI on a 1.5-Tesla scanner. Visual assessment and amygdalar volumetry were performed on oblique coronal T2W and T1W MP-RAGE images respectively. The T2 relaxation times were measured using the 16-echo Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill sequence (TE, 22–352). Volumetric data were normalized for variation in head size between individuals. Results were assessed by SSPS statistic program. Results Individual manual volumetric analysis confirmed statistically significant amygdala enlargement (AE) in eight (16%) patients. Overall, among all patients with AE and a defined epileptic focus, 7 had predominant increased volume ipsilateral to the epileptic focus. The T2 relaxometry demonstrated no hyperintense signal of the amygdala in any patient with significant AE. Conclusions This paper presented AE in a few patients with TLE and normal MRI. These findings support the hypothesis that there might be a subgroup of patients with MTLE-NMRI in which the enlarged amygdala could be related to the epileptogenic process. PMID:27231493

  16. [The changes of basal brain electric activity in patients with epilepsy after callosotomy].

    PubMed

    Beĭn, B N; Dravert, N E; Tatarenko, S A

    2008-01-01

    Short-term and long-term outcomes of basal brain activity were estimated in 20 epileptic patients with a medical history of callosotomy. Patients with malignant courses selected for callosotomy retained the high capacity of cerebral electric activity after surgery. In spite of limitations of bilateral synchronized irradiation of electric discharges in the brain, patients had the high power of cerebral electric genesis. A clinical study revealed the decrease of the number of seizures and their severity in patients who underwent the surgery. Thus, callosotomy plays only a palliative role in epileptic processes. Of primary importance is individual selection of anti-epileptic drugs to support cell mechanisms of epilepsy and improvement of treatment outcomes.

  17. Epilepsy coexisting with depression.

    PubMed

    Błaszczyk, Barbara; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2016-10-01

    Depression episodes in epilepsy is the most common commorbidity, affecting between 11% and 62% of patients with epilepsy. Although researchers have documented a strong association between epilepsy and psychiatric comorbidities, the nature of this relationship is poorly understood. The manifestation of depression in epilepsy is a complex issue having many interacting neurobiological and psychosocial determinants, including clinical features of epilepsy (seizure frequency, type, foci, or lateralization of foci) and neurochemical or iatrogenic mechanisms. Other risk factors are a family history of psychiatric illness, particularly depression, a lack of control over the seizures and iatrogenic causes (pharmacologic and surgical). In addition, treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) as well as social coping and adaptation skills have also been recognised as risk factors of depression associated with epilepsy. Epilepsy may foster the development of depression through being exposed to chronic stress. The uncertainty and unpredictability of seizures may instigate sadness, loneliness, despair, low self-esteem, and self-reproach in patients with epilepsy and lead to social isolation, stigmatization, or disability. Often, depression is viewed as a reaction to epilepsy's stigma and the associated poor quality of life. Moreover, patients with epilepsy display a 4-5 higher rate of depression and suicide compared with healthy population. PMID:27634589

  18. Christianity and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Owczarek, K; Jędrzejczak, J

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic seizures have been known from time immemorial. Throughout the ages, however, ideas concerning the aetiology and treatment of epilepsy have changed considerably. Epilepsy is mentioned many times in the Pentateuch, where it is portrayed as a mysterious condition, whose symptoms, course and contingencies evade rational laws and explanations. In the Middle Ages, the accepted view which prevailed in social consciousness was that patients with epilepsy were possessed by Satan and other impure spirits. One common method of treatment of epileptic seizures was to submit the patient to cruel exorcisms. Patients were frequently injured in the process and some of them even died. Our understanding of epilepsy and its social consequences has improved considerably within the last century. The most significant progress as far as diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy is concerned took place in the last four decades of the twentieth century. Although we now know much more about epilepsy than we used to, this knowledge is still insufficiently popularized.

  19. Pharmacoresistant epilepsy and nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Rosillo-de la Torre, Argelia; Luna-Bárcenas, Gabriel; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra; Salgado-Ceballos, Hermelinda; García, Perla; Lazarowski, Alberto; Rocha, Luisa

    2014-06-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic neurological disorders. Furthermore, it is associated to diminished health-related quality of life and is thus considered a major public health problem. In spite of the large number of available and ongoing development of several new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), a high percentage of patients with epilepsy (35-40%) are resistant to pharmacotherapy. A hypothesis to explain pharmacoresistance in epilepsy suggests that overexpression of multidrug resistance proteins, such as P-glycoprotein, on the endothelium of the blood brain barrier represents a challenge for effective AED delivery and concentration levels in the brain. Proven therapeutic strategies to control pharmacoresistant epilepsy include epilepsy surgery and neuromodulation. Unfortunately, not all patients are candidates for these therapies. Nanotechnology represents an attractive strategy to overcome the limited brain access of AEDs in patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy. This manuscript presents a review of evidences supporting this idea.

  20. Christianity and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Owczarek, K; Jędrzejczak, J

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic seizures have been known from time immemorial. Throughout the ages, however, ideas concerning the aetiology and treatment of epilepsy have changed considerably. Epilepsy is mentioned many times in the Pentateuch, where it is portrayed as a mysterious condition, whose symptoms, course and contingencies evade rational laws and explanations. In the Middle Ages, the accepted view which prevailed in social consciousness was that patients with epilepsy were possessed by Satan and other impure spirits. One common method of treatment of epileptic seizures was to submit the patient to cruel exorcisms. Patients were frequently injured in the process and some of them even died. Our understanding of epilepsy and its social consequences has improved considerably within the last century. The most significant progress as far as diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy is concerned took place in the last four decades of the twentieth century. Although we now know much more about epilepsy than we used to, this knowledge is still insufficiently popularized. PMID:23821425

  1. Pharmacoresistant epilepsy and nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Rosillo-de la Torre, Argelia; Luna-Bárcenas, Gabriel; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra; Salgado-Ceballos, Hermelinda; García, Perla; Lazarowski, Alberto; Rocha, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic neurological disorders. Furthermore, it is associated to diminished health-related quality of life and is thus considered a major public health problem. In spite of the large number of available and ongoing development of several new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), a high percentage of patients with epilepsy (35-40%) are resistant to pharmacotherapy. A hypothesis to explain pharmacoresistance in epilepsy suggests that overexpression of multidrug resistance proteins, such as P-glycoprotein, on the endothelium of the blood brain barrier represents a challenge for effective AED delivery and concentration levels in the brain. Proven therapeutic strategies to control pharmacoresistant epilepsy include epilepsy surgery and neuromodulation. Unfortunately, not all patients are candidates for these therapies. Nanotechnology represents an attractive strategy to overcome the limited brain access of AEDs in patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy. This manuscript presents a review of evidences supporting this idea. PMID:24896209

  2. Linkage analysis of idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) and marker loci on chromosome 6p in families of patients with juvenile myocloni epilepsy: No evidence for an epilepsy locus in the HLA region

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehouse, W.P.; Rees, M.; Curtis, D.; Sundqvist, A.; Parker, K.; Chung, E.; Baralle, D.; Gardiner, R.M.

    1993-09-01

    Evidence for a locus (EJM1) in the HLA region of chromosome 6p predisposing to idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) in the families of patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) has been obtained in two previous studies of separately ascertained groups of kindreds. Linkage analysis has been undertaken in a third set of 25 families including a patient with JME and at least one first-degree relative with IGE. Family members were typed for eight polymorphic loci on chromosome 6p: F13A, D6889, D6S109, D6S105, D6S10, C4B, DQA1/A2, and TCTE1. Pairwise and multipoint linkage analysis was carried out assuming autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive inheritance and age-dependent high or low penetrance. No significant evidence in favor of linkage was obtained at any locus. Multipoint linkage analysis generated significant exclusion data (lod score < -2.0) at HLA and for a region 10-30 cM telomeric to HLA, the extent of which varied with the level of penetrance assumed. These observations indicate that genetic heterogeneity exists within this epilepsy phenotype. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Novel Carboxypeptidase A6 (CPA6) Mutations Identified in Patients with Juvenile Myoclonic and Generalized Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Sapio, Matthew R.; Vessaz, Monique; Thomas, Pierre; Genton, Pierre; Fricker, Lloyd D.; Salzmann, Annick

    2015-01-01

    Carboxypeptidase A6 (CPA6) is a peptidase that removes C-terminal hydrophobic amino acids from peptides and proteins. The CPA6 gene is expressed in the brains of humans and animals, with high levels of expression during development. It is translated with a prodomain (as proCPA6), which is removed before secretion. The active form of CPA6 binds tightly to the extracellular matrix (ECM) where it is thought to function in the processing of peptides and proteins. Mutations in the CPA6 gene have been identified in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and febrile seizures. In the present study, we screened for CPA6 mutations in patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and identified two novel missense mutations: Arg36His and Asn271Ser. Patients harboring these mutations also presented with generalized epilepsy. Neither of the novel mutations was found in a control population. Asn271 is highly conserved in CPA6 and other related metallocarboxypeptidases. Arg36 is present in the prodomain and is not highly conserved. To assess structural consequences of the amino acid substitutions, both mutants were modeled within the predicted structure of the enzyme. To examine the effects of these mutations on enzyme expression and activity, we expressed the mutated enzymes in human embryonic kidney 293T cells. These analyses revealed that Asn271Ser abolished enzymatic activity, while Arg36His led to a ~50% reduction in CPA6 levels in the ECM. Pulse-chase using radio-labeled amino acids was performed to follow secretion. Newly-synthesized CPA6 appeared in the ECM with peak levels between 2-8 hours. There was no major difference in time course between wild-type and mutant forms, although the amount of radiolabeled CPA6 in the ECM was lower for the mutants. Our experiments demonstrate that these mutations in CPA6 are deleterious and provide further evidence for the involvement of CPA6 mutations in the predisposition for several types of epilepsy. PMID:25875328

  4. Cannabidiol and epilepsy: Rationale and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Leo, Antonio; Russo, Emilio; Elia, Maurizio

    2016-05-01

    Despite the introduction of new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), the quality of life and therapeutic response for patients with epilepsy remains still poor. Unfortunately, besides several advantages, these new AEDs have not satisfactorily reduced the number of refractory patients. Therefore, the need for different other therapeutic options to manage epilepsy is still a current issue. To this purpose, emphasis has been given to phytocannabinoids, which have been medicinally used since ancient time in the treatment of neurological disorders including epilepsy. In particular, the nonpsychoactive compound cannabidiol (CBD) has shown anticonvulsant properties, both in preclinical and clinical studies, with a yet not completely clarified mechanism of action. However, it should be made clear that most phytocannabinoids do not act on the endocannabinoid system as in the case of CBD. In in vivo preclinical studies, CBD has shown significant anticonvulsant effects mainly in acute animal models of seizures, whereas restricted data exist in chronic models of epilepsy as well as in animal models of epileptogenesis. Likewise, clinical evidence seems to indicate that CBD is able to manage epilepsy both in adults and children affected by refractory seizures, with a favourable side effect profile. However, to date, clinical trials are both qualitatively and numerically limited, thus yet inconsistent. Therefore, further preclinical and clinical studies are undoubtedly needed to better evaluate the potential therapeutic profile of CBD in epilepsy, although the actually available data is promising. PMID:26976797

  5. Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) spectrum: clinical manifestations and SCN1A mutations in Indonesian patients.

    PubMed

    Herini, Elisabeth Siti; Gunadi; Harahap, Indra Sari Kusuma; Yusoff, Surini; Morikawa, Satoru; Patria, Suryono Yudha; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Sunartini; Sutaryo; Takada, Satoshi; Matsuo, Masafumi; Nishio, Hisahide

    2010-06-01

    Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) is a childhood genetic epilepsy syndrome. GEFS+ includes a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, and SCN1A mutations have frequently been reported among the GEFS+-related gene abnormalities. In this study, to clarify the distributions of the clinical subtypes, we analyzed 34 families with GEFS+ in Indonesia using the hospital records of the patients and questionnaires for the family members. The number of patients with febrile seizures plus (FS+), FS+ and afebrile generalized/partial seizures, borderline severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy (SMEB) and severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy (SMEI) were 9, 11, 7, and 7, respectively. Most patients had a family history of febrile seizures. Next, we performed molecular analyses to clarify the contributions of SCN1A mutations to the development of the GEFS+ subtypes. Only 3 of 34 probands showed SCN1A mutations. These mutations were two missense mutations, p.V1612I and p.C1756G, in two patients with SMEI and SMEB, and one silent mutation, p.G1762G, in a patient with FS+ and afebrile partial seizures. In conclusion, the majority of GEFS+ patients in Indonesia were not associated with SCN1A mutations. To detect the GEFS+-causing mutations, we must search and analyze other genes in these patients.

  6. Psychiatric comorbidity in chronic epilepsy: identification, consequences, and treatment of major depression.

    PubMed

    Hermann, B P; Seidenberg, M; Bell, B

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the topic of interictal psychiatric comorbidity among adult patients with chronic epilepsy, focusing specifically on those studies that have used contemporary psychiatric nosology. Five specific issues are addressed: (a) the risk and predominant type(s) of psychiatric comorbidity in chronic epilepsy, (b) adequacy of recognition and treatment of psychiatric comorbidity, (c) the additional burdens that comorbid psychiatric disorders impose upon patients with chronic epilepsy, (d) the etiology of these disorders, and (e) strategies for treatment. Current appreciation for these issues in epilepsy is contrasted to related fields (e.g., primary care, psychiatry, and epidemiology), where considerable attention has been devoted to the identification, consequences, and treatment of psychiatric comorbidity. The issue of psychiatric comorbidity in epilepsy is reviewed with the aim of identifying a clinical and research agenda that will advance understanding of at least one important psychiatric condition associated with epilepsy-namely, major depression.

  7. Investigation of GRIN2A in common epilepsy phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Lal, Dennis; Steinbrücker, Sandra; Schubert, Julian; Sander, Thomas; Becker, Felicitas; Weber, Yvonne; Lerche, Holger; Thiele, Holger; Krause, Roland; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Nürnberg, Peter; Palotie, Aarno; Neubauer, Bernd A; Muhle, Hiltrud; Stephani, Ulrich; Helbig, Ingo; Becker, Albert J; Schoch, Susanne; Hansen, Jörg; Dorn, Thomas; Hohl, Christin; Lüscher, Nicole; von Spiczak, Sarah; Lemke, Johannes R

    2015-09-01

    Recently, mutations and deletions in the GRIN2A gene have been identified to predispose to benign and severe idiopathic focal epilepsies (IFE), revealing a higher incidence of GRIN2A alterations among the more severe phenotypes. This study aimed to explore the phenotypic boundaries of GRIN2A mutations by investigating patients with the two most common epilepsy syndromes: (i) idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) and (ii) temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Whole exome sequencing data of 238 patients with IGE as well as Sanger sequencing of 84 patients with TLE were evaluated for GRIN2A sequence alterations. Two additional independent cohorts comprising 1469 IGE and 330 TLE patients were screened for structural deletions (>40kb) involving GRIN2A. Apart from a presumably benign, non-segregating variant in a patient with juvenile absence epilepsy, neither mutations nor deletions were detected in either cohort. These findings suggest that mutations in GRIN2A preferentially are involved in genetic variance of pediatric IFE and do not contribute significantly to either adult focal epilepsies as TLE or generalized epilepsies.

  8. Autoimmune Epilepsy: Some Epilepsy Patients Harbor Autoantibodies to Glutamate Receptors and dsDNA on both Sides of the Blood-brain Barrier, which may Kill Neurons and Decrease in Brain Fluids after Hemispherotomy

    PubMed Central

    Ganor, Yonatan; Goldberg-Stern, Hadassa; Amrom, Dina; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Teichberg, Vivian I.; Pelled, Dori; Futerman, Anthony H.; Ben Zeev, Bruria; Freilinger, Michael; Verheulpen, Denis; Van Bogaert, Patrick; Levite, Mia

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Elucidating the potential contribution of specific autoantibodies (Ab's) to the etiology and/or pathology of some human epilepsies. Methods: Six epilepsy patients with Rasmussen's encephalitis (RE) and 71 patients with other epilepsies were tested for Ab's to the –B— peptide (amino acids 372-395) of the glutamate/AMPA subtype 3 receptor (GluR3B peptide), double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), and additional autoimmune disease-associated autoantigens, and for the ability of their serum and cerebrospinal-fluid (CSF) to kill neurons. Results: Elevated anti-GluR3B Ab's were found in serum and CSF of most RE patients, and in serum of 17/71 (24%) patients with other epilepsies. In two RE patients, anti-GluR3B Ab's decreased drastically in CSF following functional-hemispherotomy, in association with seizure cessation and neurological improvement. Serum and CSF of two RE patients, and serum of 12/71 (17%) patients with other epilepsies, contained elevated anti-dsDNA Ab's, the hallmark of systemic-lupus-erythematosus. The sera (but not the CSF) of some RE patients contained also clinically elevated levels of –classical— autoimmune Ab's to glutamic-acid-decarboxylase, cardiolipin, β2-glycoprotein-I and nuclear-antigens SS-A and RNP-70. Sera and CSF of some RE patients caused substantial death of hippocampal neurons. Conclusions: Some epilepsy patients harbor Ab's to GluR3 and dsDNA on both sides of the blood-brain barrier, and additional autoimmune Ab's only in serum. Since all these Ab's may be detrimental to the nervous system and/or peripheral organs, we recommend testing for their presence in epilepsy, and silencing their activity in Ab-positive patients. PMID:15559370

  9. [Follow-up of a cohort of patients after substitution of phenytoin for phenytoin sodium in an epilepsy center].

    PubMed

    Lavandier, N; Tourniaire, D

    2015-02-01

    In March 2012, the French Health Products Safety Agency interrupted the commercialization of di-hydan (phenytoin). It was replaced by diphantoïne (phenytoin sodium) and prescribers were informed that posology was equivalent for both products. We conducted a retrospective study of phenytoinemia and clinical effects comparatively for these two drugs in a population of adult patients with epilepsy admitted in La TEPPE. Forty-four patients were included. Mean age was 47.6 years. Phenytoinemia significantly decreased after substitution (17.14mg/L with di-hydan versus 12.17mg/L with diphantoïne, P<8 10(-6)). Moreover an increase in post substitution posology of diphantoïne was noticed (264.77mg/L with di-hydan versus 274.73mg/L with diphantoïne), although not significant (P=0.11). Increase of seizures was non-significant (P = 0.09). The decrease of phenytoinemia was probably due to the difference of composition between the drugs: a 100mg di-hydan tablet contains 100mg of phenytoin whereas a 100mg diphantoïne tablet contains 92mg. The specific non-linear kinetics of phenytoin reinforces this difference. A prospective study could better evaluate the risk of substituting di-hydan with diphantoïne.

  10. Decreased expression of thyroid receptor-associated protein 220 in temporal lobe tissue of patients with refractory epilepsy

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jinmei . E-mail: jinmeimery@Yahoo.com.cn; Wang Xuefeng . E-mail: rengang68@vip.sina.com; Xi Zhiqin; Gong Yun; Liu Fengying; Sun Jijun; Wu Yuan; Luan Guoming; Wang Yuping; Li Yunlin; Zhang Jianguo; Lu Yong; Li Hongwei

    2006-10-06

    Purpose: TRAP220 (thyroid hormone receptor-associated protein) functions as a coactivator for nuclear receptors and stimulates transcription by recruiting the TRAP mediator complex to hormone responsive promoter regions. Thus, TRAP220 enhances the function of thyroid/steroid hormone receptors such as thyroid hormone and oestrogen receptors. This study investigated the expression of TRAP220 mRNA and protein level in epileptic brains comparing with human control. Methods: We examined the expression of TRAP220 mRNA and protein levels in temporal lobes from patients with chronic pharmacoresistant epilepsy who have undergone surgery. Results: Expression of TRAP220 mRNA and protein was shown to be decreased significantly in the temporal cortex of the patients with epilepsy. Conclusions: Our work showed that a decrease in TRAP220 mRNA and protein levels may be involved in the pathophysiology of epilepsy and may be associated with impairment of the brain caused by frequent seizures.

  11. The Clinical Utility of a Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism Microarray in Patients With Epilepsy at a Tertiary Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Hrabik, Sarah A; Standridge, Shannon M; Greiner, Hansel M; Neilson, Derek E; Pilipenko, Valentina V; Zimmerman, Sarah L; Connor, Jessica A; Spaeth, Christine G

    2015-11-01

    Microarray testing has revolutionized clinical cytogenetics, as it provides a significantly higher resolution and greater clinical yield than karyotype analysis. This study assessed the clinical utility of single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray in patients with epilepsy. Study subjects were patients between the ages of birth to 23 years who were diagnosed with epilepsy and had a microarray performed at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. Statistical analysis explored the association of microarray results and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), seizure type, and structural malformations. Approximately 17.7% (26/147) of participants had an abnormal microarray as defined by laboratory guidelines. There were no differences in frequency of abnormal brain MRI or seizure type between the abnormal and normal microarray groups. There was a higher prevalence of musculoskeletal malformations (P < .0035) and cardiovascular malformations (P < .0081) in subjects with abnormal microarrays. Clinicians should consider microarray analysis in individuals who have epilepsy, especially in combination with musculoskeletal malformation or cardiovascular malformation.

  12. Severe burns as a consequence of seizures in patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Spitz, M C

    1992-01-01

    We report 10 seizure-related thermal injuries severe enough to require hospitalization in patients with epilepsy. Eight of the ten incidents were with patients who had had seizures with impaired consciousness two or more times a month. This suggests that seizure frequency is a risk factor and implies the importance of striving for optimal seizure control. Two burns each occurred from an electric iron, a hand-held hair dryer, and stove-top cooking. Minimizing these activities, especially in patients with frequent consciousness-altering seizures, may be useful. Three burns occurred while showering; these resulted in the most severe injuries, with hospital stays of 29, 30, and 41 days. Simple plumbing devices may have prevented these injuries.

  13. Memory for famous people in patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy and excisions.

    PubMed

    Viskontas, Indre V; McAndrews, Mary Pat; Moscovitch, Morris

    2002-10-01

    Memory for famous individuals was assessed by the use of a recognition test in which participants first made familiarity judgments, followed by forced-choice decisions to specific probes for identity. Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) or excisions, 12 left hemisphere and 12 right hemisphere, and 18 control participants identified famous figures across 3 decades (1970s-1990s). Only patients with right TLE were impaired at familiarity judgments of faces; this deficit was evident only for the most recent decades. Both groups of patients, however, were impaired at naming famous faces and at providing semantic information about famous people. These findings suggest the integrity of temporal structures in both hemispheres is critical for retrieval of detailed semantic information about famous individuals. PMID:12382986

  14. Effect of Sahaja yoga practice on seizure control & EEG changes in patients of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Panjwani, U; Selvamurthy, W; Singh, S H; Gupta, H L; Thakur, L; Rai, U C

    1996-03-01

    The effect of Sahaja yoga meditation on seizure control and electroencephalographic alterations was assessed in 32 patients of idiopathic epilepsy. The subjects were randomly divided into 3 groups. Group I (n = 10) practised Sahaja yoga for 6 months, Group II (n = 10) practised exercises mimicking Sahaja yoga for 6 months and Group III (n = 12) served as the epileptic control group. Group I subjects reported a 62 per cent decrease in seizure frequency at 3 months and a further decrease of 86 per cent at 6 months of intervention. Power spectral analysis of EEG showed a shift in frequency from 0-8 Hz towards 8-20 Hz. The ratios of EEG powers in delta (D), theta (T), alpha (A) and beta (B) bands i.e., A/D, A/D + T, A/T and A + B/D + T were increased. Per cent D power decreased and per cent A increased. No significant changes in any of the parameters were found in Groups II and III, indicating that Sahaja yoga practice brings about seizure reduction and EEG changes. Sahaja yoga could prove to be beneficial in the management of patients of epilepsy.

  15. Primary sleep disorders in people with epilepsy: clinical questions and answers.

    PubMed

    Grigg-Damberger, Madeleine M; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    The questions facing clinicians with patients with sleep disorder and epilepsy are addressed in this article. Both adult and child epilepsy are discussed in the context of the most typical questions a clinician would have, such as "Are parasomnias more common in people with epilepsy?", "Is sleep architecture abnormal in children with epilepsy", along with outcomes of numerous questionnaire-based, case-based, and double-blind placebo studies on such aspects as sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, anxiety and fears, limb movement, nocturnal seizures, agitation, behavioral disorders, and learning disorders. PMID:25455580

  16. Retention rates of rufinamide in pediatric epilepsy patients with and without Lennox–Gastaut Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Sudha Kilaru; McCarthy, Ann; Cnaan, Avital; Dlugos, Dennis J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of rufinamide (RFM) in patients with Lennox–Gastaut Syndrome (LGS) compared to those with other epilepsy syndromes using time to treatment failure (retention rate) as the outcome measure. Methods In this retrospective cohort study, characteristics and outcomes of all patients receiving RFM in 2009 and 2010 were recorded. The primary outcome measure was RFM failure, defined as discontinuation of RFM or initiation of an additional antiepileptic therapy. The secondary outcome measure was discontinuation of RFM. Kaplan–Meier method survival curves were generated for time to RFM failure, for all patients and by the presence or absence of Lennox Gastaut Syndrome (LGS). The impact of age, seizure type, fast or slow drug titration, and concomitant therapy with valproate on retention rate were evaluated using Cox regression models. Results One hundred thirty-three patients were included, 39 (30%) of whom had LGS. For all patients, the probability of remaining on RFM without additional therapy was 45% at 12 months and 30% at 24 months. LGS diagnosis was an independent predictor of time to RFM failure (HR 0.51, 95% CI 0.31–0.83), with a median time to failure of 18 months in LGS compared to 6 months in all others (p = 0.006). Conclusions In a broad population of children with refractory epilepsy, around half will continue taking the medication for at least a year without additional therapy. Patients with LGS are two times more likely to continue RFM without additional therapy compared to those without LGS. PMID:25847334

  17. Hyperphosphorylated tau in patients with refractory epilepsy correlates with cognitive decline: a study of temporal lobe resections.

    PubMed

    Tai, Xin You; Koepp, Matthias; Duncan, John S; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Pamela; Baxendale, Sallie; Liu, Joan Y W; Reeves, Cheryl; Michalak, Zuzanna; Thom, Maria

    2016-09-01

    SEE BERNASCONI DOI101093/AWW202 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: Temporal lobe epilepsy, the most prevalent form of chronic focal epilepsy, is associated with a high prevalence of cognitive impairment but the responsible underlying pathological mechanisms are unknown. Tau, the microtubule-associated protein, is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. We hypothesized that hyperphosphorylated tau pathology is associated with cognitive decline in temporal lobe epilepsy and explored this through clinico-pathological study. We first performed pathological examination on tissue from 33 patients who had undergone temporal lobe resection between ages 50 and 65 years to treat drug-refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. We identified hyperphosphorylated tau protein using AT8 immunohistochemistry and compared this distribution to Braak patterns of Alzheimer's disease and patterns of chronic traumatic encephalopathy. We quantified tau pathology using a modified tau score created specifically for analysis of temporal lobectomy tissue and the Braak staging, which was limited without extra-temporal brain areas available. Next, we correlated tau pathology with pre- and postoperative cognitive test scores and clinical risk factors including age at time of surgery, duration of epilepsy, history of secondary generalized seizures, history of head injury, handedness and side of surgery. Thirty-one of 33 cases (94%) showed hyperphosphorylated tau pathology in the form of neuropil threads and neurofibrillary tangles and pre-tangles. Braak stage analysis showed 12% of our epilepsy cohort had a Braak staging III-IV compared to an age-matched non-epilepsy control group from the literature (8%). We identified a mixture of tau pathology patterns characteristic of Alzheimer's disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. We also found unusual patterns of subpial tau deposition, sparing of the hippocampus and

  18. Hyperphosphorylated tau in patients with refractory epilepsy correlates with cognitive decline: a study of temporal lobe resections.

    PubMed

    Tai, Xin You; Koepp, Matthias; Duncan, John S; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Pamela; Baxendale, Sallie; Liu, Joan Y W; Reeves, Cheryl; Michalak, Zuzanna; Thom, Maria

    2016-09-01

    SEE BERNASCONI DOI101093/AWW202 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: Temporal lobe epilepsy, the most prevalent form of chronic focal epilepsy, is associated with a high prevalence of cognitive impairment but the responsible underlying pathological mechanisms are unknown. Tau, the microtubule-associated protein, is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. We hypothesized that hyperphosphorylated tau pathology is associated with cognitive decline in temporal lobe epilepsy and explored this through clinico-pathological study. We first performed pathological examination on tissue from 33 patients who had undergone temporal lobe resection between ages 50 and 65 years to treat drug-refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. We identified hyperphosphorylated tau protein using AT8 immunohistochemistry and compared this distribution to Braak patterns of Alzheimer's disease and patterns of chronic traumatic encephalopathy. We quantified tau pathology using a modified tau score created specifically for analysis of temporal lobectomy tissue and the Braak staging, which was limited without extra-temporal brain areas available. Next, we correlated tau pathology with pre- and postoperative cognitive test scores and clinical risk factors including age at time of surgery, duration of epilepsy, history of secondary generalized seizures, history of head injury, handedness and side of surgery. Thirty-one of 33 cases (94%) showed hyperphosphorylated tau pathology in the form of neuropil threads and neurofibrillary tangles and pre-tangles. Braak stage analysis showed 12% of our epilepsy cohort had a Braak staging III-IV compared to an age-matched non-epilepsy control group from the literature (8%). We identified a mixture of tau pathology patterns characteristic of Alzheimer's disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. We also found unusual patterns of subpial tau deposition, sparing of the hippocampus and

  19. From here to epilepsy: the risk of seizure in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nicastro, Nicolas; Assal, Frédéric; Seeck, Margitta

    2016-03-01

    To describe the association between Alzheimer's disease and seizures by reviewing epidemiological data from available literature and to assess the putative pathophysiological links between neurodegeneration and altered cortical excitability. We also discuss specific antiepileptic treatment strategies in patients with Alzheimer's disease, as well as transient epileptic amnesia as a possible crossroads between degeneration and epilepsy. Regarding epidemiology, we searched publications in Pubmed, Medline, Scopus and Web of Science (until September 2015) using the keywords "incidence", "prevalence" and "frequency", as well as "Alzheimer's disease" and "seizures". In addition, therapeutic aspects for seizures in Alzheimer's disease were searched using the key words "antiepileptic drugs", "seizure treatment" and "Alzheimer". The prevalence and incidence rates of seizures were found to be increased 2 to 6-fold in patients with Alzheimer's disease compared to age-adjusted control patients. Treatment strategies have mainly been extrapolated from elderly patients without dementia, except for one single randomised trial, in which levetiracetam, lamotrigine and phenobarbital efficacy and tolerance were investigated in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Mouse models appear to show a major role of amyloid precursor protein and its cleavage products in the generation of cortical hyperexcitability. A link between Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy has long been described and recent cohort studies have more clearly delineated risk factors associated with the genesis of seizures, such as early onset and possibly severity of dementia. As genetic forms of Alzheimer's disease and experimental mouse models suggest, beta-amyloid may play a prominent role in the propagation of synchronised abnormal discharges, perhaps more via an excitatory mode than a direct neurodegenerative effect. PMID:26907471

  20. From here to epilepsy: the risk of seizure in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nicastro, Nicolas; Assal, Frédéric; Seeck, Margitta

    2016-03-01

    To describe the association between Alzheimer's disease and seizures by reviewing epidemiological data from available literature and to assess the putative pathophysiological links between neurodegeneration and altered cortical excitability. We also discuss specific antiepileptic treatment strategies in patients with Alzheimer's disease, as well as transient epileptic amnesia as a possible crossroads between degeneration and epilepsy. Regarding epidemiology, we searched publications in Pubmed, Medline, Scopus and Web of Science (until September 2015) using the keywords "incidence", "prevalence" and "frequency", as well as "Alzheimer's disease" and "seizures". In addition, therapeutic aspects for seizures in Alzheimer's disease were searched using the key words "antiepileptic drugs", "seizure treatment" and "Alzheimer". The prevalence and incidence rates of seizures were found to be increased 2 to 6-fold in patients with Alzheimer's disease compared to age-adjusted control patients. Treatment strategies have mainly been extrapolated from elderly patients without dementia, except for one single randomised trial, in which levetiracetam, lamotrigine and phenobarbital efficacy and tolerance were investigated in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Mouse models appear to show a major role of amyloid precursor protein and its cleavage products in the generation of cortical hyperexcitability. A link between Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy has long been described and recent cohort studies have more clearly delineated risk factors associated with the genesis of seizures, such as early onset and possibly severity of dementia. As genetic forms of Alzheimer's disease and experimental mouse models suggest, beta-amyloid may play a prominent role in the propagation of synchronised abnormal discharges, perhaps more via an excitatory mode than a direct neurodegenerative effect.

  1. Low incidence of SCN1A genetic mutation in patients with hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Wook; Lim, Byung Chan; Kim, Ki Joong; Chae, Jong Hee; Lee, Ran; Lee, Sang Kun

    2013-10-01

    Genetic mutations in SCN1A account for more than two-thirds of patients with classic Dravet syndrome. A role for SCN1A genetic mutations in the development of hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy (HHE) syndrome was recently suggested based on the observation that HHE syndrome and classic Dravet syndrome share many clinical features. We previously identified a 2 bp-deletion mutation in SCN1A in a Dravet patient, and we found out the patient also had HHE syndrome upon clinical re-evaluation. We subsequently screened 10 additional HHE patients for SCN1A. Among the 11 patients who were diagnosed with HHE syndrome, six patients had no other etiology with the exception of prolonged febrile illness, therefore classified as idiopathic HHE syndrome, whereas five patients were classified as symptomatic HHE syndrome. Direct sequencing of all coding exons and flanking intronic sequences of the SCN1A gene was performed, but we failed to identify additional mutations in 10 patients. The patient with SCN1A mutation had the earliest onset of febrile convulsion and hemiparesis. Our study suggests that SCN1A genetic mutation is only a rare predisposing cause of HHE syndrome.

  2. Abnormalities of hippocampal-cortical connectivity in temporal lobe epilepsy patients with hippocampal sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; He, Huiguang; Lu, Jingjing; Wang, Chunheng; Li, Meng; Lv, Bin; Jin, Zhengyu

    2011-03-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis (HS) is the most common damage seen in the patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). In the present study, the hippocampal-cortical connectivity was defined as the correlation between the hippocampal volume and cortical thickness at each vertex throughout the whole brain. We aimed to investigate the differences of ipsilateral hippocampal-cortical connectivity between the unilateral TLE-HS patients and the normal controls. In our study, the bilateral hippocampal volumes were first measured in each subject, and we found that the ipsilateral hippocampal volume significantly decreased in the left TLE-HS patients. Then, group analysis showed significant thinner average cortical thickness of the whole brain in the left TLE-HS patients compared with the normal controls. We found significantly increased ipsilateral hippocampal-cortical connectivity in the bilateral superior temporal gyrus, the right cingulate gyrus and the left parahippocampal gyrus of the left TLE-HS patients, which indicated structural vulnerability related to the hippocampus atrophy in the patient group. However, for the right TLE-HS patients, no significant differences were found between the patients and the normal controls, regardless of the ipsilateral hippocampal volume, the average cortical thickness or the patterns of hippocampal-cortical connectivity, which might be related to less atrophies observed in the MRI scans. Our study provided more evidence for the structural abnormalities in the unilateral TLE-HS patients.

  3. Limbic encephalitis associated with anti-voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies as a cause of adult-onset mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Tomoko; Akamatsu, Naoki; Tsuji, Sadatoshi; Nishizawa, Shigeru

    2014-06-01

    Recently, some reports have indicated that limbic encephalitis associated with anti-voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies (VGKC-Ab) is a cause of adult-onset mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). We report a 53-year-old woman who had her first epileptic seizure at the age of 50 years old. Examination by 3-Tesla brain MRI revealed left hippocampal high signal intensity and swelling on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T2-weighted imaging at 2 months after her first seizure. The patient received intravenous methylprednisolone and carbamazepine 300 mg/day. One month later, MRI revealed improvement of her left hippocampal abnormalities. Thereafter, she had no seizures, however, three years after her first seizure, EEG revealed a seizure pattern in the left temporal region. Brain MRI revealed left hippocampal high signal intensity and brain fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography revealed hypermetabolism. Her serum VGKC-Ab levels were 118 pM(normal < 100 pM). Intravenous methylprednisolone therapy was reinitiated. Two months later, her hippocampal abnormalities had improved and 3 months later her VGKC-Ab levels decreased to 4.4 pM. Remission of the epileptic seizures was also observed. This MTLE in the middle age was considered as limbic encephalitis associated with anti- VGKC-Ab. In cases of unexplained adult-onset MTLE, limbic encephalitis associated with anti-VGKC-Ab, which responds well to immunotherapy, should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  4. A signal processing based analysis and prediction of seizure onset in patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Namazi, Hamidreza; Kulish, Vladimir V; Hussaini, Jamal; Hussaini, Jalal; Delaviz, Ali; Delaviz, Fatemeh; Habibi, Shaghayegh; Ramezanpoor, Sara

    2016-01-01

    One of the main areas of behavioural neuroscience is forecasting the human behaviour. Epilepsy is a central nervous system disorder in which nerve cell activity in the brain becomes disrupted, causing seizures or periods of unusual behaviour, sensations and sometimes loss of consciousness. An estimated 5% of the world population has epileptic seizure but there is not any method to cure it. More than 30% of people with epilepsy cannot control seizure. Epileptic seizure prediction, refers to forecasting the occurrence of epileptic seizures, is one of the most important but challenging problems in biomedical sciences, across the world. In this research we propose a new methodology which is based on studying the EEG signals using two measures, the Hurst exponent and fractal dimension. In order to validate the proposed method, it is applied to epileptic EEG signals of patients by computing the Hurst exponent and fractal dimension, and then the results are validated versus the reference data. The results of these analyses show that we are able to forecast the onset of a seizure on average of 25.76 seconds before the time of occurrence.

  5. Functional Study of NIPA2 Mutations Identified from the Patients with Childhood Absence Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Han; Zhang, Yuehua; Zhang, Pingping; Wang, Jingmin; Wu, Ye; Wu, Xiru; Netoff, Theoden; Jiang, Yuwu

    2014-01-01

    Recently many genetic mutations that are associated with epilepsy have been identified. The protein NIPA2 (non-imprinted in Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region protein 2) is a highly selective magnesium transporter encoded by the gene NIPA2 in which we have found three mutations (p.I178F, p.N244S and p.N334_E335insD) within a population of patients with childhood absence epilepsy (CAE). In this study, immunofluorescence labeling, inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), MTT metabolic rate detection and computational modeling were utilized to elucidate how these mutations result in CAE. We found in cultured neurons that NIPA2 (wild-type) proteins were localized to the cell periphery, whereas mutant proteins were not effectively trafficked to the cell membrane. Furthermore, we found a decrease in intracellular magnesium concentration in the neurons transfected with mutant NIPA2, but no effect on the survival of neurons. To understand how low intracellular magnesium resulted in hyperexcitability, we built and analyzed a computational model to simulate the effects of mutations. The model suggested that lower intracellular magnesium concentration enhanced synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) currents. This study primarily reveals that a selective magnesium transporter NIPA2 may play a role in the pathogenesis of CAE. PMID:25347071

  6. Unsupervised Classification of High-Frequency Oscillations in Human Neocortical Epilepsy and Control Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stead, Matt; Krieger, Abba; Viventi, Jonathan; Marsh, W. Richard; Lee, Kendall H.; Worrell, Gregory A.; Litt, Brian

    2010-01-01

    High-frequency oscillations (HFOs) have been observed in animal and human intracranial recordings during both normal and aberrant brain states. It has been proposed that the relationship between subclasses of these oscillations can be used to identify epileptic brain. Studies of HFOs in epilepsy have been hampered by selection bias arising primarily out of the need to reduce the volume of data so that clinicians can manually review it. In this study, we introduce an algorithm for detecting and classifying these signals automatically and demonstrate the tractability of analyzing a data set of unprecedented size, over 31,000 channel-hours of intracranial electroencephalographic (iEEG) recordings from micro- and macroelectrodes in humans. Using an unsupervised approach that does not presuppose a specific number of clusters in the data, we show direct evidence for the existence of distinct classes of transient oscillations within the 100- to 500-Hz frequency range in a population of nine neocortical epilepsy patients and two controls. The number of classes we find, four (three plus one putative artifact class), is consistent with prior studies that identify “ripple” and “fast ripple” oscillations using human-intensive methods and, additionally, identifies a less examined class of mixed-frequency events. PMID:20810694

  7. Functional study of NIPA2 mutations identified from the patients with childhood absence epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Han; Zhang, Yuehua; Zhang, Pingping; Wang, Jingmin; Wu, Ye; Wu, Xiru; Netoff, Theoden; Jiang, Yuwu

    2014-01-01

    Recently many genetic mutations that are associated with epilepsy have been identified. The protein NIPA2 (non-imprinted in Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region protein 2) is a highly selective magnesium transporter encoded by the gene NIPA2 in which we have found three mutations (p.I178F, p.N244S and p.N334_E335insD) within a population of patients with childhood absence epilepsy (CAE). In this study, immunofluorescence labeling, inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), MTT metabolic rate detection and computational modeling were utilized to elucidate how these mutations result in CAE. We found in cultured neurons that NIPA2 (wild-type) proteins were localized to the cell periphery, whereas mutant proteins were not effectively trafficked to the cell membrane. Furthermore, we found a decrease in intracellular magnesium concentration in the neurons transfected with mutant NIPA2, but no effect on the survival of neurons. To understand how low intracellular magnesium resulted in hyperexcitability, we built and analyzed a computational model to simulate the effects of mutations. The model suggested that lower intracellular magnesium concentration enhanced synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) currents. This study primarily reveals that a selective magnesium transporter NIPA2 may play a role in the pathogenesis of CAE. PMID:25347071

  8. A signal processing based analysis and prediction of seizure onset in patients with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, Hamidreza; Kulish, Vladimir V.

    2016-01-01

    One of the main areas of behavioural neuroscience is forecasting the human behaviour. Epilepsy is a central nervous system disorder in which nerve cell activity in the brain becomes disrupted, causing seizures or periods of unusual behaviour, sensations and sometimes loss of consciousness. An estimated 5% of the world population has epileptic seizure but there is not any method to cure it. More than 30% of people with epilepsy cannot control seizure. Epileptic seizure prediction, refers to forecasting the occurrence of epileptic seizures, is one of the most important but challenging problems in biomedical sciences, across the world. In this research we propose a new methodology which is based on studying the EEG signals using two measures, the Hurst exponent and fractal dimension. In order to validate the proposed method, it is applied to epileptic EEG signals of patients by computing the Hurst exponent and fractal dimension, and then the results are validated versus the reference data. The results of these analyses show that we are able to forecast the onset of a seizure on average of 25.76 seconds before the time of occurrence. PMID:26586477

  9. Cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity profile of an epilepsy patient with periventricular nodular heterotopia.

    PubMed

    Emiliano, Santarnecchi; Giampaolo, Vatti; Daniela, Marino; Nicola, Polizzotto; Alfonso, Cerase; Raffaele, Rocchi; Alessandro, Rossi

    2012-09-01

    Periventricular nodular heterotopia (PNH) is a rare malformation of cortical development often associated with drug resistant focal onset epilepsy. The link between nodules and neocortex have been demonstrated with depth electrodes investigations showing that seizures may arise from both structures. In the last years fMRI resting-state (fMRI-RS) have received a surge in interest due to its capability to track non-invasively physiological and pathological relevant differences in brain network organization. We performed a cerebro-cerebellar voxel-wise and region-of-interest resting state fMRI (RS-fMRI) functional connectivity analysis in a seizure-free epilepsy patient with a PNH in the right temporal horn. Our finding confirms a spontaneous synchronization between PNH and its surrounding cortex, specifically in the inferior temporal, fusiform and occipital gyrus. We also found a significant connectivity with bilateral cerebellum, more intense and widespread on the PNH cerebellar contralateral lobule. RS-fMRI confirmed its potential as a promising tool for non-invasive mapping of cortical and subcortical brain functional organization.

  10. Does antiepileptic drug withdrawal predispose patients undergoing temporal lobe epilepsy surgery to late onset of psychiatric morbidity? A report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Garima; Agarwal, Priya; Sagar, Rajesh; Sood, Mamta; Gupta, Aditya; Suri, Ashish; Garg, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Surgery is an established and increasingly utilized treatment option in medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. Many psychiatric problems are known to complicate in the postoperative period. Most studies have a follow-up period of less than 24 months. We report the cases of three patients who developed severe psychiatric problems in the late postoperative period after successful temporal lobectomy for refractory epilepsy — Psychosis, major depression with psychosis, and severe anxiety disorder, respectively. None of the patients had past or family history of psychiatric disease. All three patients had undergone anterior temporal lobectomy on the right side for intractable epilepsy. They remained absolutely seizure-free after surgery. We conclude that psychiatric morbidity may arise de novo long after temporal lobectomy. This association between temporal lobectomy for epilepsy and late onset psychiatric morbidity should be carefully studied. Mechanisms underlying this late complication require deeper understanding of the effects of epilepsy surgery. PMID:27570392

  11. Does antiepileptic drug withdrawal predispose patients undergoing temporal lobe epilepsy surgery to late onset of psychiatric morbidity? A report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Garima; Agarwal, Priya; Sagar, Rajesh; Sood, Mamta; Gupta, Aditya; Suri, Ashish; Garg, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Surgery is an established and increasingly utilized treatment option in medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. Many psychiatric problems are known to complicate in the postoperative period. Most studies have a follow-up period of less than 24 months. We report the cases of three patients who developed severe psychiatric problems in the late postoperative period after successful temporal lobectomy for refractory epilepsy - Psychosis, major depression with psychosis, and severe anxiety disorder, respectively. None of the patients had past or family history of psychiatric disease. All three patients had undergone anterior temporal lobectomy on the right side for intractable epilepsy. They remained absolutely seizure-free after surgery. We conclude that psychiatric morbidity may arise de novo long after temporal lobectomy. This association between temporal lobectomy for epilepsy and late onset psychiatric morbidity should be carefully studied. Mechanisms underlying this late complication require deeper understanding of the effects of epilepsy surgery. PMID:27570392

  12. Effective process or dangerous precipice: qualitative comparative embedded case study with young people with epilepsy and their parents during transition from children’s to adult services

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Transition from children’s to adult epilepsy services is known to be challenging. Some young people partially or completely disengage from contact with services, thereby risking their health and wellbeing. We conducted a mixed-method systematic review that showed current epilepsy transition models enabling information exchange and developing self-care skills were not working well. We used synthesised evidence to develop a theoretical framework to inform this qualitative study. The aim was to address a critical research gap by exploring communication, information needs, and experiences of knowledge exchange in clinical settings by young people and their parents, during transition from children’s to adult epilepsy services. Method Qualitative comparative embedded Case study with 2 'transition’ cases (epilepsy services) in two hospitals. Fifty-eight participants: 30 young people (13–19 years) and 28 parents were interviewed in-depth (individual or focus group). Clinical documents/guidelines were collated. 'Framework’ thematic analysis was used. The theoretical framework was tested using themes, pattern matching and replication logic. Theory-based evaluation methods were used to understand how and why different models of service delivery worked. Results A joint epilepsy clinic for young people 14–17 years coordinated by children’s and adult services was more likely to influence young people’s behaviour by facilitating more positive engagement with adult healthcare professionals and retention of epilepsy-related self-care information. Critical success factors were continuity of care, on-going and consistent age-appropriate and person centred communication and repeated information exchange. Three young people who experienced a single handover clinic disengaged from services. Psychosocial care was generally inadequate and healthcare professionals lacked awareness of memory impairment. Parents lacked knowledge, skills and support to enable their

  13. Low plasma antioxidant status in patients with epilepsy and the role of antiepileptic drugs on oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Bindu; Ramalingam, Krishnan; Kumar, Rajendiran Vinoth

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress has been implicated in various disorders including epilepsy. We studied the antioxidant status in patients with epilepsy and aimed at determining whether there was any difference in the antioxidant levels between patients and controls, patients who are not on antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), and on treatment, between individual AEDs and patients on monotherapy and polytherapy. Materials and Methods: Antioxidant levels like catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), vitamin E, glutathione (GSH), thiol group (SH), uric acid, and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were compared between 100 patients with epilepsy and equal number of controls. Twenty-five patients who were not on AEDs were compared with patients on AEDs and the control group. Patients were divided into monotherapy and polytherapy group and antioxidant status was compared between the two groups and between individual drugs. Results: Catalase, SH, vitamin E, and TAC were significantly low in patients with epilepsy than those in the control group (P < 0.001). GSH and uric acid did not show any difference; GPx in patients was significantly higher than those in the control group There were no differences in the antioxidant levels between the treated and the untreated groups; however, it was lower in untreated patients than controls (P < 0.001), suggesting that AEDs do not modify the oxidative stress. Patients on Valproate (VPA) showed higher catalase and GPx levels. Catalase was higher in the monotherapy than polytherapy group (P < 0.04). Conclusion: Our study found significantly low levels of antioxidant in patients as compared to controls. AED did not influence the antioxidant status suggesting that seizures induce oxidative stress. PMID:25506160

  14. [Neuronal death in the neocortex of drug resistant temporal lobe epilepsy patients].

    PubMed

    Lorigados Pedre, L; Orozco Suárez, S; Morales Chacón, L; García Maeso, I; Estupiñán Diaz, B; Bender del Busto, J E; Pavón Fuentes, N; Paula Piñero, B; Rocha Arrieta, L

    2008-11-01

    Introduction. Participation of apoptotic death mechanisms in drug resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (DRTLE) is currently under great debate. We have investigated if there is neuronal loss and the immunodetection to different markers in neocortical tissue death in eigth patients with DRTLE. The neocortexes of five patients deceased due to non-neurological causes, paired in age and gender were evaluated as control tissue. Methods. The evaluation of neuronal loss was made by means of a stereological study and with immunohistochemical techniques with the synaptophysin marker. Immunopositivity to different apoptotic markers (annexin V, caspase 3 and 8, bcl-2 and p53) and detection of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragmentation (TUNEL) were analyzed and double labeling with synaptophysin was performed in every case. The results were evaluated with confocal microscope and analyzed with the Zeiss LSM 5 Image Browser Program, 2.80.1113 (Germany). Results. A statistically significant decrease in the total number of cells (p < 0.05) and the synaptophysin cells+ (p<0.01) in the neocortex (layer IV) of the patients with DRTLE when compared with the control tissue was found. No significant differences were found in the apoptotic markers bcl-2, p53, caspase 3 and 8 for any of the neocortex layers while there was a statistically significant increase in the number of TUNEL cells+ (p<0.05) and annexin V+ (p<0.05) in the neocortical layer IV of the patients. Conclusions. This group of evidence speaks in favor of the existence of an effect on the neuronal number in the neocortex layer IV that may be associated with noncaspase dependent apoptotic death process, without being able to rule out death by necrosis. Key words: Drug resistant temporal lobe epilepsy. Apoptosis. Necrosis. Neuronal loss. Neurología 2008;23(9):555-565.

  15. Disruption of Spelling-to-Sound Correspondence Mapping during Single-Word Reading in Patients with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledoux, Kerry; Gordon, Barry

    2011-01-01

    Processing and/or hemispheric differences in the neural bases of word recognition were examined in patients with long-standing, medically-intractable epilepsy localized to the left (N = 18) or right (N = 7) temporal lobe. Participants were asked to read words that varied in the frequency of their spelling-to-sound correspondences. For the right…

  16. Antiepileptic Drugs with Mood Stabilizing Properties and Their Relation with Psychotropic Drug Use in Institutionalized Epilepsy Patients with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leunissen, C. L. F.; de la Parra, N. M.; Tan, I. Y.; Rentmeester, Th. W.; Vader, C. I.; Veendrick-Meekes, M. J. B. M.; Aldenkamp, A. P.

    2011-01-01

    A large number of patients with epilepsy and intellectual disability take medication, amongst which antiepileptic and psychotropic drugs, often simultaneously. Certain antiepileptic drugs have mood-stabilizing properties, e.g. carbamazepine, valproic acid and lamotrigine. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the use of these…

  17. Epilepsy Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gastaut Syndrome Infantile Spasms and Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Facebook < > Epilepsy Foundation of America Watch the next George ... consider the Epilepsy Foundation your #UnwaveringAlly on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram! Epilepsy Foundation of America Star Trek ...

  18. Epilepsy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - epilepsy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on epilepsy : Epilepsy Foundation -- www.efa.org National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/ ...

  19. Skin conductance biofeedback training in adults with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy and stress-triggered seizures: a proof-of-concept study.

    PubMed

    Micoulaud-Franchi, Jean-Arthur; Kotwas, Iliana; Lanteaume, Laura; Berthet, Christelle; Bastien, Mireille; Vion-Dury, Jean; McGonigal, Aileen; Bartolomei, Fabrice

    2014-12-01

    The present proof-of-concept study investigated the feasibility of skin conductance biofeedback training in reducing seizures in adults with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), whose seizures are triggered by stress. Skin conductance biofeedback aims to increase levels of peripheral sympathetic arousal in order to reduce cortical excitability. This might seem somewhat counterintuitive, since such autonomic arousal may also be associated with increased stress and anxiety. Thus, this sought to verify that patients with TLE and stress-triggered seizures are not worsened in terms of stress, anxiety, and negative emotional response to this nonpharmacological treatment. Eleven patients with drug-resistant TLE with seizures triggered by stress were treated with 12 sessions of biofeedback. Patients did not worsen on cognitive evaluation of attentional biases towards negative emotional stimuli (P>.05) or on psychometric evaluation with state anxiety inventory (P = .059); in addition, a significant improvement was found in the Negative Affect Schedule (P = .014) and in the Beck Depression Inventory (P = .009). Biofeedback training significantly reduced seizure frequency with a mean reduction of -48.61% (SD = 27.79) (P = .005). There was a correlation between the mean change in skin conductance activity over the biofeedback treatment and the reduction of seizure frequency (r(11) = .62, P = .042). Thus, the skin conductance biofeedback used in the present study, which teaches patients to achieve an increased level of peripheral sympathetic arousal, was a well-tolerated nonpharmacological treatment. Further, well-controlled studies are needed to confirm the therapeutic value of this nonpharmacological treatment in reducing seizures in adults with drug-resistant TLE with seizures triggered by stress. PMID:25461224

  20. Skin conductance biofeedback training in adults with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy and stress-triggered seizures: a proof-of-concept study.

    PubMed

    Micoulaud-Franchi, Jean-Arthur; Kotwas, Iliana; Lanteaume, Laura; Berthet, Christelle; Bastien, Mireille; Vion-Dury, Jean; McGonigal, Aileen; Bartolomei, Fabrice

    2014-12-01

    The present proof-of-concept study investigated the feasibility of skin conductance biofeedback training in reducing seizures in adults with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), whose seizures are triggered by stress. Skin conductance biofeedback aims to increase levels of peripheral sympathetic arousal in order to reduce cortical excitability. This might seem somewhat counterintuitive, since such autonomic arousal may also be associated with increased stress and anxiety. Thus, this sought to verify that patients with TLE and stress-triggered seizures are not worsened in terms of stress, anxiety, and negative emotional response to this nonpharmacological treatment. Eleven patients with drug-resistant TLE with seizures triggered by stress were treated with 12 sessions of biofeedback. Patients did not worsen on cognitive evaluation of attentional biases towards negative emotional stimuli (P>.05) or on psychometric evaluation with state anxiety inventory (P = .059); in addition, a significant improvement was found in the Negative Affect Schedule (P = .014) and in the Beck Depression Inventory (P = .009). Biofeedback training significantly reduced seizure frequency with a mean reduction of -48.61% (SD = 27.79) (P = .005). There was a correlation between the mean change in skin conductance activity over the biofeedback treatment and the reduction of seizure frequency (r(11) = .62, P = .042). Thus, the skin conductance biofeedback used in the present study, which teaches patients to achieve an increased level of peripheral sympathetic arousal, was a well-tolerated nonpharmacological treatment. Further, well-controlled studies are needed to confirm the therapeutic value of this nonpharmacological treatment in reducing seizures in adults with drug-resistant TLE with seizures triggered by stress.

  1. Incidence and localizing value of vertigo and dizziness in patients with epilepsy: Video-EEG monitoring study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Wook; Sunwoo, Jun-Sang; Lee, Sang Kun

    2016-10-01

    Vertigo and dizziness are common neurological complaints that have long been associated with epilepsy. However, studies of patients with epileptic vertigo or dizziness with concurrent EEG monitoring are scarce. We performed the present study to investigate the incidence and localizing value of vertigo and dizziness in patients with epilepsy who had confirmation of EEG changes via video-EEG monitoring. Data of aura and clinical seizure episodes of 831 consecutive patients who underwent video-EEG monitoring were analyzed retrospectively. Out of 831 patients, 40 patients (4.8%) experienced vertigo or dizziness as aura (mean age, 32.8±11.8years), all of whom had partial seizures. Eight had mesial temporal, 20 had lateral temporal, four had frontal, one had parietal, and seven had occipital lobe onset seizures. An intracranial EEG with cortical stimulation study was performed in seven patients, and the area of stimulation-induced vertigo or dizziness coincided with the ictal onset area in only one patient. Our study showed that vertigo or dizziness is a common aura in patients with epilepsy, and that the temporal lobe is the most frequent ictal onset area in these patients. However, it can be suggested that the symptomatogenic area in patients with epileptic vertigo and dizziness may not coincide with the ictal onset area. PMID:27454529

  2. Headache and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Bauer, P R; Carpay, J A; Terwindt, G M; Sander, J W; Thijs, R J; Haan, J; Visser, G H

    2013-08-01

    Headache and epilepsy often co-occur. Epidemiologic studies conducted in the past few years reinforce the notion of a bi-directional association between migraine and epilepsy. Data on an association between headache (in general) and epilepsy, however, are less clear. Peri-ictal headache often presents with migraine-like symptoms and can be severe. A correct diagnosis and management are paramount. It was demonstrated that cortical hyperexcitability may underlie both epilepsy and migraine. A recent study linked spreading depolarisation, the supposed underlying pathophysiological mechanism of migraine with aura, to epilepsy. Although this study was carried out in patients who had suffered a subarachnoid haemorrhage, the finding may shed light on pathophysiological mechanisms common to epilepsy and migraine.

  3. [Sleep disorders in epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Kotova, O V; Akarachkova, E S

    2014-01-01

    The review of the literature on sleep disorders in epilepsy over the last two decades is presented. Paroxysmal phenomena of epileptic origin, nonepileptic paroxysms, antiepileptic drugs, polypragmasia and comorbid depression may affect sleep in epilepsy.Shortening of sleep time may cause seizures, hallucinations and depression because sleep plays an important role in the regulation of excitatory and inhibitory processes in the brain both in healthy people and in patients with epilepsy. According to the literature data, drugs (short treatment courses of hypnotics) or nonpharmacological methods should be used for treatment insomnia inpatients with epilepsy.

  4. A balanced translocation disrupts SYNGAP1 in a patient with intellectual disability, speech impairment, and epilepsy with myoclonic absences (EMA).

    PubMed

    Klitten, Laura L; Møller, Rikke S; Nikanorova, Marina; Silahtaroglu, Asli; Hjalgrim, Helle; Tommerup, Niels

    2011-12-01

    Epilepsy with myoclonic absences (EMA) is a rare form of generalized epilepsy occurring in childhood and is often difficult to treat. The underlying etiology of EMA is unknown in the majority of patients. Herein, we describe a patient with EMA and intellectual disability who carries a de novo balanced translocation: t(6;22)(p21.32;q11.21). We mapped the translocation breakpoints by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and the breakpoint at 6p21.32 was found to truncate the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor associated gene SYNGAP1. The breakpoint at 22q11.21 was within a highly variable region without known protein-coding genes. Mutations of SYNGAP1 are associated with nonsyndromal intellectual disability (NSID). Two-thirds of the patients described so far also have generalized epilepsy. This finding, together with our report, suggests that dysfunction of SYNGAP1 contributes to the development of generalized epilepsy, including EMA.

  5. Mapping and mining interictal pathological gamma (30–100 Hz) oscillations with clinical intracranial EEG in patients with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Smart, Otis; Maus, Douglas; Marsh, Eric; Dlugos, Dennis; Litt, Brian; Meador, Kimford

    2012-01-01

    Localizing an epileptic network is essential for guiding neurosurgery and antiepileptic medical devices as well as elucidating mechanisms that may explain seizure-generation and epilepsy. There is increasing evidence that pathological oscillations may be specific to diseased networks in patients with epilepsy and that these oscillations may be a key biomarker for generating and indentifying epileptic networks. We present a semi-automated method that detects, maps, and mines pathological gamma (30–100 Hz) oscillations (PGOs) in human epileptic brain to possibly localize epileptic networks. We apply the method to standard clinical iEEG (<100 Hz) with interictal PGOs and seizures from six patients with medically refractory epilepsy. We demonstrate that electrodes with consistent PGO discharges do not always coincide with clinically determined seizure onset zone (SOZ) electrodes but at times PGO-dense electrodes include secondary seizure-areas (SS) or even areas without seizures (NS). In 4/5 patients with epilepsy surgery, we observe poor (Engel Class 4) post-surgical outcomes and identify more PGO-activity in SS or NS than in SOZ. Additional studies are needed to further clarify the role of PGOs in epileptic brain. PMID:23105174

  6. Prognostic Role of Functional Neuroimaging after Multilobar Resection in Patients with Localization-Related Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun Bin; Seo, Dae-Won; Hong, Seung-Chyul

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the usage of functional neuroimaging as a prognostic tool for seizure recurrence and long-term outcomes in patients with multilobar resection, we recruited 90 patients who received multilobar resections between 1995 and 2013 with at least 1-year follow-up (mean 8.0 years). All patients were monitored using intracranial electroencephalography (EEG) after pre-surgical evaluation. Clinical data (demographics, electrophysiology, and neuroimaging) were reviewed retrospectively. Surgical outcomes were evaluated at 1, 2, 5 years after surgery, and at the end of the study. After 1 year, 56 patients (62.2%) became Engel class I and at the last follow-up, 47 patients (52.2%) remained seizure-free. Furthermore, non-localized 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET), identifying hypometabolic areas not concordant with ictal onset zones, significantly correlated with seizure recurrence after 1 year. Non-lesional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and left-sided resection correlated with poor outcomes. In the last follow-up, non-localized PET and left-sided resection significantly correlated with seizure recurrence. Both localized PET and ictal-interictal SPECT subtraction co-registered to MR (SISCOM) predicted good surgical outcomes in the last follow-up (69.2%, Engel I). This study suggests that PET and SISCOM may predict postoperative outcomes for patients after multilobar epilepsy and shows comparable long-term surgical outcomes after multilobar resection. PMID:26305092

  7. John Hall and his epileptic patients--epilepsy management in early 17th century England.

    PubMed

    Betts, T; Betts, H

    1998-10-01

    John Hall, a physician, practised in Stratford in the early 17th century and was the son-in-law of William Shakespeare. During his career he kept records of his patients (in Latin) which he may have been preparing for publication when he died. Despite his instruction for them to be destroyed some were later translated into English and published by another physician. The case records were popular and have recently been reprinted with a commentaryl. We have searched the case records for descriptions of epilepsy and examined the treatments offered (and the attitudes to) this condition in early 17th century England. Treatment consisted of standard remedies ('fumes' of hartshorn and extracts of peony) related to the Galenic system of medicine, plus individual remedies. Interestingly, there is no evidence that the condition was stigmatized. PMID:9808119

  8. Confirmatory factor analysis of the WMS-III in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Nancy J; Strauss, Esther; Chelune, Gordon J; Hermann, Bruce P; Hunter, Michael; Loring, David W; Martin, Roy C; Sherman, Elisabeth M S

    2003-03-01

    Five competing models specifying the factor structure underlying the Wechsler Memory Scale-Third Edition (D. Wechsler, 1997b) primary subtest scores were evaluated in a sample of patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (N = 254). Models specifying separate immediate and delayed constructs resulted in inadmissible parameter estimates and model specification error. There were negligible goodness-of-fit differences between a 3-factor model of working memory, auditory memory, and visual memory and a nested--more parsimonious--2-factor model of working memory and general memory. The results suggest that specifying a separate visual memory factor provides little advantage for this sample--an unexpected finding in a population with lateralized dysfunction, for which one might have predicted separate auditory and visual memory dimensions.

  9. [Surgical management of epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Laura; Chéramy, Isabelle; de Beaumont, Ségolène; Benghezal, Mouna; Bulteau, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy surgery raises hopes, but still remains reserved for a small number of cases of epilepsy resistant to medical treatments. It requires the involvement of multidisciplinary medical and allied health teams with expertise in this field. From the patient's admission through to their discharge, the nurse and the electroencephalogram technician have an essential role to play.

  10. An open-label, prospective, exploratory study of patients with epilepsy switching from levetiracetam to brivaracetam.

    PubMed

    Yates, Stephen L; Fakhoury, Toufic; Liang, Wei; Eckhardt, Klaus; Borghs, Simon; D'Souza, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    We evaluated nonpsychotic behavioral adverse events (BAEs) in patients receiving levetiracetam (LEV) who switched to brivaracetam (BRV). Patients ≥16 years of age, receiving 2-3 antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), including LEV 1-3g/day, and experiencing BAEs within 16 weeks of LEV treatment initiation, enrolled in an open-label Phase 3b study (NCT01653262) comprising a ≤1-week screening period, an immediate switch from LEV to BRV 200mg/day (without titration), and a 12-week treatment period. The percentages of patients with investigator-assessed clinically meaningful reduction in BAEs, shift in maximum BAE intensity, and change in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) (Patient-Weighted Quality of Life in Epilepsy Inventory-Form 31 [QOLIE-31-P]) were assessed. Of 29 patients enrolled, 26 (89.7%) completed the study. At the end of the treatment period, 27/29 (93.1%) patients switched to BRV had clinically meaningful reductions in BAEs. Physicians reported a reduction in the maximum intensity of primary BAEs in 27/29 (93.1%) patients. Mean change from baseline to Week 12 in QOLIE-31-P total score was 12.1, indicating improved HRQoL. During the treatment period, 23/29 (79.3%) patients reported treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs). One patient reported a serious TEAE (suicidal ideation and suicide attempt). Two patients discontinued BRV because of TEAEs. Findings from this small study suggest that patients experiencing BAEs associated with LEV may benefit from switching to BRV.

  11. Different effects of anterior temporal lobectomy and selective amygdalohippocampectomy on verbal memory performance of patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Olivier; Dagenais, Emmanuelle; Bouthillier, Alain; Nguyen, Dang Khoa; Rouleau, Isabelle

    2015-11-01

    The advantage of selective amygdalohippocampectomy (SAH) over anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) for the treatment of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) remains controversial. Because ATL is more extensive and involves the lateral and medial parts of the temporal lobe, it may be predicted that its impact on memory is more important than SAH, which involves resection of medial temporal structures only. However, several studies do not support this assumption. Possible explanations include task-specific factors such as the extent of semantic and syntactic information to be memorized and failure to control for main confounders. We compared preoperative vs. postoperative memory performance in 13 patients with SAH with 26 patients who underwent ATL matched on side of surgery, IQ, age at seizure onset, and age at surgery. Memory function was assessed using the Logical Memory subtest from the Wechsler Memory Scales - 3rd edition (LM-WMS), the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT), the Digit Span subtest from the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, and the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test. Repeated measures analyses of variance revealed opposite effects of SAH and ATL on the two verbal learning memory tests. On the immediate recall trial of the LM-WMS, performance deteriorated after ATL in comparison with that after SAH. By contrast, on the delayed recognition trial of the RAVLT, performance deteriorated after SAH compared with that after ATL. However, additional analyses revealed that the latter finding was only observed when surgery was conducted in the right hemisphere. No interaction effects were found on other memory outcomes. The results are congruent with the view that tasks involving rich semantic content and syntactical structure are more sensitive to the effects of lateral temporal cortex resection as compared with mesiotemporal resection. The findings highlight the importance of task selection in the assessment of memory in patients undergoing TLE surgery.

  12. Enriched Environment Altered Aberrant Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Improved Long-Term Consequences After Temporal Lobe Epilepsy in Adult Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoqian; Liu, Tingting; Zhou, Zhike; Mu, Xiaopeng; Song, Chengguang; Xiao, Ting; Zhao, Mei; Zhao, Chuansheng

    2015-06-01

    Abnormal hippocampal neurogenesis is thought to contribute to cognitive impairments in chronic temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and its specific receptor CXCR4 play important roles in neurogenesis. We investigated whether enriched environment (EE) might be beneficial for TLE. Adult rats were randomly assigned as control rats, rats subjected to status epilepticus (SE), or post-SE rats treated with EE for 30 days. We used immunofluorescence staining to analyze the hippocampal neurogenesis and Nissl staining to evaluate hippocampal damage. Electroencephalography was used to measure the duration of spontaneous seizures. Cognitive function was evaluated by Morris water maze. Western blot was used to measure the expression of SDF-1 and CXCR4 in the hippocampus. In the present study, we found the TLE model resulted in aberrant neurogenesis such as reduced proliferation, intensified dendritic development of newborn neurons, as well as spontaneous seizures and cognitive impairments. More importantly, EE treatment significantly increased the cell proliferation and survival, extended the apical dendrites, and delayed the attenuation of the expression of SDF-1 and CXCR4, accompanied by decreased long-term seizure activity and improved cognitive impairments in adult rats after TLE. These results provided morphological evidence that EE might be beneficial for treating TLE. PMID:25946980

  13. Predictors of prognosis in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy after anterior temporal lobectomy

    PubMed Central

    SUN, ZHENXING; ZUO, HUANCONG; YUAN, DAN; SUN, YAXING; ZHANG, KAI; CUI, ZHIQIANG; WANG, JIN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of prognostic factors for the surgical outcome of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) using Engel seizure classification. The clinical data of 121 patients with MTLE who underwent anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) and received a 1-year minimum follow-up were collected between January 2005 and December 2008. Patients were divided into seizure and seizure-free groups according to the Engel seizure classification. Univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis were used to analyze the potential predictive and prognostic factors, including medical history, clinical features of seizures, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and video-electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring results. Univariate analysis indicated no statistically significant differences in gender, age at seizure onset, age at surgery, history of traumatic brain injury, perinatal anoxia, intracranial infection, family history of seizure, auras or site of surgery between the two groups; however, significant differences were detected in pre-surgical seizure duration, history of febrile seizures, seizure types, MRI and video-EEG results. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that a pre-surgical seizure duration of <10 years, history of positive febrile seizures, simple complex partial seizure, positive MRI results and unilateral local video-EEG spikes may be considered as predictors of a good prognosis. These results indicate that remission may be achieved in patients with MTLE via the collection of accurate clinical information and adequate pre-surgical evaluation. PMID:26640569

  14. Definition of intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Shobhit; Siddiqui, Khurram A

    2011-01-01

    Defining intractable epilepsy is essential not only to identify up to 40% of patients refractory to pharmacological management, but also to facilitate selection and comparison of such patients for research purposes. The ideal definition still eludes us. Multiple factors including number of antiepileptic drug (AED) failures, seizure frequency and duration of unresponsiveness, etiology, and epilepsy syndromes are considered in formulating the definition of pharmaco-resistant epilepsy. Most definitions used in the literature agree on the number of AED failures, which seem to be 2 or 3, however, the seizure frequency and time factor are varied. The International League Against Epilepsy proposed a definition of drug-resistant epilepsy as a failure of adequate trials of 2 tolerated and appropriately chosen and used AED schedules. This for now, could provide an operational definition for clinical and research settings. However, with emergence of new data and novel treatments the criteria for intractability may change.

  15. Diagnosis of Adult Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nick, Jerry A; Nichols, David P

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) is being made with increasing frequency in adults. Patients with CF diagnosed in adulthood typically present with respiratory complaints, and often have recurrent or chronic airway infection. At the time of initial presentation individuals may appear to have clinical manifestation limited to a single organ, but with subclinical involvement of the respiratory tract. Adult-diagnosed patients have a good response to CF center care, and newly available cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor-modulating therapies are promising for the treatment of residual function mutation, thus increasing the importance of the diagnosis in adults with unexplained bronchiectasis.

  16. Effects of vagus nerve stimulation in a patient with temporal lobe epilepsy and Asperger syndrome: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Warwick, Tanya C; Griffith, James; Reyes, Bernardo; Legesse, Benalfew; Evans, Melanie

    2007-03-01

    Seizures are a common comorbidity of autism and occur in as many as 30% of patients. This case report describes a 23-year-old man diagnosed with both Asperger syndrome and bitemporal epilepsy. The patient had behavioral regression that correlated with worsening of his intractable seizures. He subsequently underwent implantation of a vagus nerve stimulation therapy device for his refractory epilepsy. Both his seizures and his behavior were monitored for 6 months. We describe the efficacy of vagus nerve stimulation therapy in reducing seizure severity as well as improving the behavioral components of his Asperger syndrome. We also review the current literature regarding epilepsy in autistic spectrum disorders.

  17. Dietary therapy is the best option for refractory nonsurgical epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Felton, Elizabeth A; Cervenka, Mackenzie C

    2015-09-01

    Ketogenic diet therapies for epilepsy have been described since the fifth century and published in scientific literature since the early 1900s. Since that time, the diet's popularity has waxed and waned as newer drugs and other treatments have been introduced. However, in recent years, dietary therapy for epilepsy has been increasingly accepted by physicians and desired by patients as an alternative to new drugs and neurostimulation. The introduction of less restrictive versions of the classic ketogenic diet, such as the modified Atkins diet (MAD), have led to increased numbers of adult patients with refractory epilepsy who are initiating dietary treatment. Approximately half of adults and children who start a ketogenic diet have a >50% seizure reduction, which is impressive given that these patients typically have medically refractory epilepsy. We believe that ketogenic dietary treatment is the best option for children and adults with refractory nonsurgical epilepsy due to its efficacy, rapid seizure reduction, synergistic effects with other antiseizure treatments, known and treatable side effects, potential to treat comorbid medical conditions, and worldwide availability.

  18. Art and epilepsy surgery.

    PubMed

    Ladino, Lady Diana; Hunter, Gary; Téllez-Zenteno, José Francisco

    2013-10-01

    The impact of health and disease has led many artists to depict these themes for thousands of years. Specifically, epilepsy has been the subject of many famous works, likely because of the dramatic and misunderstood nature of the clinical presentation. It often evokes religious and even mythical processes. Epilepsy surgical treatment has revolutionized the care of selected patients and is a relatively recent advance. Epilepsy surgery has been depicted in very few artistic works. The first portrait showing a potential surgical treatment for patients with epilepsy was painted in the 12th century. During the Renaissance, Bosch famously provided artistic commentary on traditional beliefs in "The stone of madness". Several of these works demonstrate a surgeon extracting a stone from a patient's head, at one time believed to be the source of all "folly", including epileptic seizures, psychosis, intellectual disability, depression, and a variety of other illnesses. There are some contemporary art pieces including themes around epilepsy surgery, all of them depicting ancient Inca Empire procedures such as trepanning. This article reviews the most relevant artistic works related with epilepsy surgery and also its historical context at the time the work was produced. We also present a painting from the Mexican artist Eduardo Urbano Merino that represents the patient's journey through refractory epilepsy, investigations, and ultimately recovery. Through this work, the artist intends to communicate hope and reassurance to patients going through this difficult process.

  19. Art and epilepsy surgery.

    PubMed

    Ladino, Lady Diana; Hunter, Gary; Téllez-Zenteno, José Francisco

    2013-10-01

    The impact of health and disease has led many artists to depict these themes for thousands of years. Specifically, epilepsy has been the subject of many famous works, likely because of the dramatic and misunderstood nature of the clinical presentation. It often evokes religious and even mythical processes. Epilepsy surgical treatment has revolutionized the care of selected patients and is a relatively recent advance. Epilepsy surgery has been depicted in very few artistic works. The first portrait showing a potential surgical treatment for patients with epilepsy was painted in the 12th century. During the Renaissance, Bosch famously provided artistic commentary on traditional beliefs in "The stone of madness". Several of these works demonstrate a surgeon extracting a stone from a patient's head, at one time believed to be the source of all "folly", including epileptic seizures, psychosis, intellectual disability, depression, and a variety of other illnesses. There are some contemporary art pieces including themes around epilepsy surgery, all of them depicting ancient Inca Empire procedures such as trepanning. This article reviews the most relevant artistic works related with epilepsy surgery and also its historical context at the time the work was produced. We also present a painting from the Mexican artist Eduardo Urbano Merino that represents the patient's journey through refractory epilepsy, investigations, and ultimately recovery. Through this work, the artist intends to communicate hope and reassurance to patients going through this difficult process. PMID:23933914

  20. Tracking Psychosocial Health in Adults with Epilepsy—Estimates from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kobau, R; Cui, W; Kadima, N; Zack, MM; Sajatovic, M; Kaiboriboon, K; Jobst, B

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study provides population-based estimates of psychosocial health among U.S. adults with epilepsy from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey. Methods Multinomial logistic regression was used to estimate the prevalence of the following measures of psychosocial health among adults with and those without epilepsy: 1) the Kessler-6 scale of Serious Psychological Distress; 2) cognitive limitation; the extent of impairments associated with psychological problems; and work limitation; 3) Social participation; and 4) the Patient Reported Outcome Measurement Information System Global Health scale. Results Compared with adults without epilepsy, adults with epilepsy, especially those with active epilepsy, reported significantly worse psychological health, more cognitive impairment, difficulty in participating in some social activities, and reduced health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Conclusions These disparities in psychosocial health in U.S. adults with epilepsy serve as baseline national estimates of their HRQOL, consistent with Healthy People 2020 national objectives on HRQOL. PMID:25305435

  1. Epilepsy emergency rescue training

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Rohit; Jory, Caryn; ashton, juliet; McLean, Brendan; Walker, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The NICE audit of epilepsy related deaths revealed that 1200 epilepsy deaths occur every year in the UK, with 42% potentially avoidable.[1] Convulsive status epilepticus (SE) is a life-threatening condition with over 20% mortality rate, especially if early treatment is not initiated.[2] Ten percent of all UK emergency department (ED) admissions are due to epilepsy, usually over represented by cases of SE.[3] Six out of seven epilepsy cases seen in the ED are admitted into medical care.[4] Patients with chronic and/or treatment resistant epilepsy carry a higher risk of premature death. When a seizure lasts for five minutes or more then the patient is at high risk of continuing to SE and this may result in causing brain damage or death.[2] Buccal midazolam is an emergency rescue medication prescribed on a special named patient license to reduce the duration of an epileptic seizure and prevent SE.[2,5] It should be administered by a trained person and is widely used due to its effectiveness and social acceptability. In the UK, epilepsy education and training courses are expected to be conducted by epilepsy professionals in line with the agreed training guidelines of Joint Epilepsy Council (JEC) backed up by evidence from NICE.[6,7] Training should provide an overview of epilepsy to facilitate safe care and appropriate administration of rescue medication for people with epilepsy (PWE) when experiencing a prolonged seizure. The medication is prescribed on specialist advice by the GP or specialists directly. Unfortunately the JEC guidelines are not robust enough to provide assurances of safe care. This problem had a myriad of complexities and an appropriate solution using web based resource was piloted, tested, and applied successfully using quality improvement methodology. PMID:26734339

  2. Age at onset and seizure frequency affect white matter diffusion coefficient in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Szilvia A; Horváth, Réka; Perlaki, Gábor; Orsi, Gergely; Barsi, Péter; John, Flóra; Horváth, Andrea; Kovács, Norbert; Bogner, Péter; Ábrahám, Hajnalka; Bóné, Beáta; Gyimesi, Csilla; Dóczi, Tamás; Janszky, József

    2016-08-01

    In mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS), structural abnormalities are present not only in the hippocampus but also in the white matter with ipsilateral predominance. Although the timing of epilepsy onset is commonly associated with clinical and semiological dissimilarities, limited data exist regarding white matter diffusion changes with respect to age at epilepsy onset. The aim of this study was to investigate diffusion changes in the white matter of patients with unilateral MTLE-HS with respect to clinical parameters and to compare them with an age- and sex-matched healthy control group. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were derived using monoexponential approaches from 22 (11 early and 11 late age at onset) patients with unilateral MTLE-HS and 22 age- and sex-matched control subjects after acquiring diffusion-weighted images on a 3T MRI system. Data were analyzed using two-tailed t-tests and multiple linear regression models. In the group with early onset MTLE-HS, ADC was significantly elevated in the ipsilateral hemispheric (p=0.04) and temporal lobe white matter (p=0.01) compared with that in controls. These differences were not detectable in late onset MTLE-HS patients. Apparent diffusion coefficient of the group with early onset MTLE-HS was negatively related to age at epilepsy onset in the ipsilateral hemispheric white matter (p=0.03) and the uncinate fasciculus (p=0.03), while in patients with late onset MTLE-HS, ADC was no longer dependent on age at epilepsy onset itself but rather on the seizure frequency in the ipsilateral uncinate fasciculus (p=0.03). Such diffusivity pattern has been associated with chronic white matter degeneration, reflecting myelin loss and higher extracellular volume which are more pronounced in the frontotemporal regions and also depend on clinical features. In the group with early onset MTLE-HS, the timing of epilepsy seems to be the major cause of white matter abnormalities while in late

  3. Meditation and epilepsy: a still hung jury.

    PubMed

    St Louis, Erik K; Lansky, Ephraim Philip

    2006-01-01

    Meditation has been advocated as a treatment for several medical problems, including epilepsy. Conversely, concern has been raised that meditation may aggravate or even precipitate epilepsy. We present a case of new onset mesial temporal lobe epilepsy in a young woman meditator lacking other apparent risk factors for epilepsy as a springboard for a balanced discussion concerning the potential relationship between meditation and epilepsy, and a criticism of the current literature in this field. Prospective clinical studies of meditators with video-electroencephalography and clinical trials of meditation in refractory epilepsy patients are needed to resolve current controversies concerning meditation and epilepsy.

  4. Obesity and its association with generalised epilepsy, idiopathic syndrome, and family history of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ladino, Lady D; Hernández-Ronquillo, Lizbeth; Téllez-Zenteno, José F

    2014-09-01

    Aim. Previous studies support the concept that obesity is a common comorbid condition in patients with epilepsy (PWE). In this study, we present the body mass index (BMI) and data from a survey to assess physical activity in a sample of PWE from an epilepsy clinic. Methods. Between June of 2011 and January of 2013, 100 PWE from an adult epilepsy clinic were included. We obtained BMI, waist circumference, and information regarding physical activity using a standardised questionnaire. Clinical, demographic, electrographic, and imaging parameters were collected from charts. Results. Mean age of patients was 40 ± 14 (18-77) years. The BMI distribution was as follows: 2 patients (2%) underweight, 26 (26%) normal weight, 34 (34%) overweight, 25 (25%) obese, and 13 (13%) with morbid obesity. In our study, obesity was defined as having a BMI ≥ 30. We found 38 (38%) patients in this range. There was no difference in the rate of drug-resistant epilepsy between obese and non-obese patients (55 vs. 55%; p=0.05). Leisure time habit was reported in 82% of obese patients and 79% of patients without obesity. Overall, the most frequent activity was walking (70%). Factors associated with obesity were generalised epilepsy (OR: 2.7, 1.1-6.6; p=0.012), idiopathic syndrome (OR: 2.7, 1.04-7; p=0.018), and family history of epilepsy (OR: 6.1, 1.5-24.2; p=0.002). Conclusion. Our study suggests an association between obesity, idiopathic generalised epilepsy, and family history of epilepsy. Our study shows that PWE are physically active and there is no clear relation between exercise and obesity. We could not identify any association between drug-resistant epilepsy and obesity. Absence of direct comparison with a control non-epileptic population; a cross-sectional design not allowing evaluation of a causal association among variables; and reliance on self-reported physical activity are to be considered as limitations of the present study. PMID:25179745

  5. [A national framework for educational programs in epileptic patients, children and adults].

    PubMed

    Prévos-Morgant, M; Petit, J; Grisoni, F; André-Obadia, N; Auvin, S; Derambure, P

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic disease with a wide range of presentations occurring at any age. It affects the patient's quality of life, implying a need for numerous healthcare services. Therapeutic education programs (TEPs) are designed to match patient age, disease course, and individual learning abilities. In France, these programs are proposed by the national health authorities (Superior Health Authority), and authorized by the Regional Health Agencies. Two years ago, a Therapeutic Education Programs Commission (TEPC), supported by the French League against Epilepsy (FLAE), was created. The goal was to bring together representative healthcare professionals in a working group in order to standardize practices. This led to the creation of a national reference of healthcare skills specific for children and adults with epilepsy. Five tables, for five "life periods", outline the framework of this professional reference tool. Program personalization, an essential part of TEPs, is necessary to develop a creative atmosphere. This slow process is specific to the various stages of life and can be influenced by the occurrence of various handicaps. Family and caregivers make key contributions to the process. The national framework for therapeutic education in epilepsy serves as a central crossroad where professions can find essential information to create or adapt their own TEPs. In the near future, regional experiences will be documented and collected for regular updates. This professional therapeutic education network will help promote therapeutic education programs and facilitate standard practices. Finally, several TEP files and tools will be shared on the FLAE website available for professional access. Today, the group's goal is to achieve national deployment of this "referential" framework.

  6. Fetal onset ventriculomegaly and subependymal cysts in a pyridoxine dependent epilepsy patient.

    PubMed

    Jain-Ghai, Shailly; Mishra, Navin; Hahn, Cecil; Blaser, Susan; Mercimek-Mahmutoglu, Saadet

    2014-04-01

    Pyridoxine dependent epilepsy (PDE) is caused by mutations in the ALDH7A1 gene encoding α-aminoadipic semialdehyde dehydrogenase. The classic clinical presentation is neonatal seizures responsive only to pyridoxine therapy. White matter abnormalities, corpus callosum agenesis or hypoplasia, megacisterna magna, cortical dysplasia, neuronal heterotopias, intracerebral hemorrhage, and hydrocephalus in neuroimaging have been reported in patients with PDE. We report a new patient with asymmetric progressive ventriculomegaly noted on fetal sonography at 22 weeks' gestation. Postnatal brain sonography on day 1 and MRI on day 5 confirmed bilateral asymmetric ventriculomegaly caused by bilateral subependymal cysts. Intractable seizures at age 7 days initially responded to phenobarbital. Markedly elevated urinary α-aminoadipic acid semialdehyde levels and compound heterozygous mutations in the ALDH7A1 gene (c.446C>A/c.919C>T) confirmed the diagnosis of PDE caused by ALDH7A1 genetic defect. Despite the presence of structural brain malformations and subependymal cysts, PDE should always be included in the differential diagnosis of neonatal seizures that are refractory to treatment with antiepileptic drugs.

  7. WMS-III performance in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy: group differences and individual classification.

    PubMed

    Wilde, N; Strauss, E; Chelune, G J; Loring, D W; Martin, R C; Hermann, B P; Sherman, E; Hunter, M

    2001-11-01

    The utility of the WMS-III in detecting lateralized impairment was examined in a large sample of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Methods of analysis included evaluation of group means on the various indexes and subtest scores, the use of ROC curves, and an examination of Auditory-Visual Index discrepancy scores. In addition, performance on immediate and delayed indexes in the auditory and the visual modality was compared within each group. Of the WMS-III scores, the Auditory-Visual Delayed Index difference score appeared most sensitive to side of temporal dysfunction, although patient classification rates were not within an acceptable range to have clinical utility. The ability to predict laterality based on statistically significant index score differences was particularly weak for those with left temporal dysfunction. The use of unusually large discrepancies led to improved prediction, however, the rarity of such scores in this population limits their usefulness. Although the utility of the WMS-III in detecting laterality may be limited in preoperative cases, the WMS-III may still hold considerable promise as a measure of memory in documenting baseline performance and in detecting those that may be at risk following surgery.

  8. Effect of dietary lysine restriction and arginine supplementation in two patients with pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Yuzyuk, Tatiana; Thomas, Amanda; Viau, Krista; Liu, Aiping; De Biase, Irene; Botto, Lorenzo D; Pasquali, Marzia; Longo, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    Pyridoxine-Dependent Epilepsy (PDE) is a recessive disorder caused by deficiency of α-aminoadipic semialdehyde dehydrogenase in the catabolic pathway of lysine. It is characterized by intractable seizures controlled by the administration of pharmacological doses of vitamin B6. Despite seizure control with pyridoxine, intellectual disability and developmental delays are still observed in some patients with PDE, likely due to the accumulation of toxic intermediates in the lysine catabolic pathway: alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde (AASA), delta-1-piperideine-6-carboxylate (P6C), and pipecolic acid. Here we evaluate biochemical and clinical parameters in two PDE patients treated with a lysine-restricted diet and arginine supplementation (100-150mg/kg), aimed at reducing the levels of PDE biomarkers. Lysine restriction resulted in decreased accumulation of PDE biomarkers and improved development. Plasma lysine but not plasma arginine, directly correlated with plasma levels of AASA-P6C (p<0.001, r(2)=0.640) and pipecolic acid (p<0.01, r(2)=0.484). In addition, plasma threonine strongly correlated with the levels of AASA-P6C (p<0.0001, r(2)=0.732) and pipecolic acid (p<0.005, r(2)=0.527), suggesting extreme sensitivity of threonine catabolism to pyridoxine availability. Our results further support the use of dietary therapies in combination with pyridoxine for the treatment of PDE. PMID:27324284

  9. Heautoscopy, epilepsy, and suicide.

    PubMed Central

    Brugger, P; Agosti, R; Regard, M; Wieser, H G; Landis, T

    1994-01-01

    Heautoscopy (the doppelgänger experience), epilepsy, and suicide is a triad primarily known from literary accounts. This paper reports a patient with complex partial seizures who tried to commit suicide during the experience of heautoscopy. PMID:8021672

  10. Common pediatric epilepsy syndromes.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun T; Shahid, Asim M; Jammoul, Adham

    2015-02-01

    Benign rolandic epilepsy (BRE), childhood idiopathic occipital epilepsy (CIOE), childhood absence epilepsy (CAE), and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) are some of the common epilepsy syndromes in the pediatric age group. Among the four, BRE is the most commonly encountered. BRE remits by age 16 years with many children requiring no treatment. Seizures in CAE also remit at the rate of approximately 80%; whereas, JME is considered a lifelong condition even with the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Neonates and infants may also present with seizures that are self-limited with no associated psychomotor disturbances. Benign familial neonatal convulsions caused by a channelopathy, and inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, have a favorable outcome with spontaneous resolution. Benign idiopathic neonatal seizures, also referred to as "fifth-day fits," are an example of another epilepsy syndrome in infants that carries a good prognosis. BRE, CIOE, benign familial neonatal convulsions, benign idiopathic neonatal seizures, and benign myoclonic epilepsy in infancy are characterized as "benign" idiopathic age-related epilepsies as they have favorable implications, no structural brain abnormality, are sensitive to AEDs, have a high remission rate, and have no associated psychomotor disturbances. However, sometimes selected patients may have associated comorbidities such as cognitive and language delay for which the term "benign" may not be appropriate.

  11. Nonrandomness, nonlinear dependence, and nonstationarity of electroencephalographic recordings from epilepsy patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrzejak, Ralph G.; Schindler, Kaspar; Rummel, Christian

    2012-10-01

    To derive tests for randomness, nonlinear-independence, and stationarity, we combine surrogates with a nonlinear prediction error, a nonlinear interdependence measure, and linear variability measures, respectively. We apply these tests to intracranial electroencephalographic recordings (EEG) from patients suffering from pharmacoresistant focal-onset epilepsy. These recordings had been performed prior to and independent from our study as part of the epilepsy diagnostics. The clinical purpose of these recordings was to delineate the brain areas to be surgically removed in each individual patient in order to achieve seizure control. This allowed us to define two distinct sets of signals: One set of signals recorded from brain areas where the first ictal EEG signal changes were detected as judged by expert visual inspection (“focal signals”) and one set of signals recorded from brain areas that were not involved at seizure onset (“nonfocal signals”). We find more rejections for both the randomness and the nonlinear-independence test for focal versus nonfocal signals. In contrast more rejections of the stationarity test are found for nonfocal signals. Furthermore, while for nonfocal signals the rejection of the stationarity test increases the rejection probability of the randomness and nonlinear-independence test substantially, we find a much weaker influence for the focal signals. In consequence, the contrast between the focal and nonfocal signals obtained from the randomness and nonlinear-independence test is further enhanced when we exclude signals for which the stationarity test is rejected. To study the dependence between the randomness and nonlinear-independence test we include only focal signals for which the stationarity test is not rejected. We show that the rejection of these two tests correlates across signals. The rejection of either test is, however, neither necessary nor sufficient for the rejection of the other test. Thus, our results suggest that

  12. Evaluation of machine learning algorithms for treatment outcome prediction in patients with epilepsy based on structural connectome data.

    PubMed

    Munsell, Brent C; Wee, Chong-Yaw; Keller, Simon S; Weber, Bernd; Elger, Christian; da Silva, Laura Angelica Tomaz; Nesland, Travis; Styner, Martin; Shen, Dinggang; Bonilha, Leonardo

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate machine learning algorithms aimed at predicting surgical treatment outcomes in groups of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) using only the structural brain connectome. Specifically, the brain connectome is reconstructed using white matter fiber tracts from presurgical diffusion tensor imaging. To achieve our objective, a two-stage connectome-based prediction framework is developed that gradually selects a small number of abnormal network connections that contribute to the surgical treatment outcome, and in each stage a linear kernel operation is used to further improve the accuracy of the learned classifier. Using a 10-fold cross validation strategy, the first stage in the connectome-based framework is able to separate patients with TLE from normal controls with 80% accuracy, and second stage in the connectome-based framework is able to correctly predict the surgical treatment outcome of patients with TLE with 70% accuracy. Compared to existing state-of-the-art methods that use VBM data, the proposed two-stage connectome-based prediction framework is a suitable alternative with comparable prediction performance. Our results additionally show that machine learning algorithms that exclusively use structural connectome data can predict treatment outcomes in epilepsy with similar accuracy compared with "expert-based" clinical decision. In summary, using the unprecedented information provided in the brain connectome, machine learning algorithms may uncover pathological changes in brain network organization and improve outcome forecasting in the context of epilepsy.

  13. Real-life memory and spatial navigation in patients with focal epilepsy: ecological validity of a virtual reality supermarket task.

    PubMed

    Grewe, P; Lahr, D; Kohsik, A; Dyck, E; Markowitsch, H J; Bien, C G; Botsch, M; Piefke, M

    2014-02-01

    Ecological assessment and training of real-life cognitive functions such as visual-spatial abilities in patients with epilepsy remain challenging. Some studies have applied virtual reality (VR) paradigms, but external validity of VR programs has not sufficiently been proven. Patients with focal epilepsy (EG, n=14) accomplished an 8-day program in a VR supermarket, which consisted of learning and buying items on a shopping list. Performance of the EG was compared with that of healthy controls (HCG, n=19). A comprehensive neuropsychological examination was administered. Real-life performance was investigated in a real supermarket. Learning in the VR supermarket was significantly impaired in the EG on different VR measures. Delayed free recall of products did not differ between the EG and the HCG. Virtual reality scores were correlated with neuropsychological measures of visual-spatial cognition, subjective estimates of memory, and performance in the real supermarket. The data indicate that our VR approach allows for the assessment of real-life visual-spatial memory and cognition in patients with focal epilepsy. The multimodal, active, and complex VR paradigm may particularly enhance visual-spatial cognitive resources.

  14. Evaluation of machine learning algorithms for treatment outcome prediction in patients with epilepsy based on structural connectome data

    PubMed Central

    Munsell, Brent C.; Wee, Chong-Yaw; Keller, Simon S.; Weber, Bernd; Elger, Christian; da Silva, Laura Angelica Tomaz; Nesland, Travis; Styner, Martin; Shen, Dinggang; Bonilha, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate machine learning algorithms aimed at predicting surgical treatment outcomes in groups of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) using only the structural brain connectome. Specifically, the brain connectome is reconstructed using white matter fiber tracts from presurgical diffusion tensor imaging. To achieve our objective, a two-stage connectome-based prediction framework is developed that gradually selects a small number of abnormal network connections that contribute to the surgical treatment outcome, and in each stage a linear kernel operation is used to further improve the accuracy of the learned classifier. Using a 10-fold cross validation strategy, the first stage in the connectome-based framework is able to separate patients with TLE from normal controls with 80% accuracy, and second stage in the connectome-based framework is able to correctly predict the surgical treatment outcome of patients with TLE with 70% accuracy. Compared to existing state-of-the-art methods that use VBM data, the proposed two-stage connectome-based prediction framework is a suitable alternative with comparable prediction performance. Our results additionally show that machine learning algorithms that exclusively use structural connectome data can predict treatment outcomes in epilepsy with similar accuracy compared with “expert-based” clinical decision. In summary, using the unprecedented information provided in the brain connectome, machine learning algorithms may uncover pathological changes in brain network organization and improve outcome forecasting in the context of epilepsy. PMID:26054876

  15. Temporal Lobe White Matter Asymmetry and Language Laterality in Epilepsy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ellmore, Timothy M.; Beauchamp, Michael S.; Breier, Joshua I.; Slater, Jeremy D.; Kalamangalam, Giridhar P.; O’Neill, Thomas J.; Disano, Michael A.; Tandon, Nitin

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have advanced our knowledge of the organization of white matter subserving language function. It remains unclear, however, how DTI may be used to predict accurately a key feature of language organization: its asymmetric representation in one cerebral hemisphere. In this study of epilepsy patients with unambiguous lateralization on Wada testing (19 left and 4 right lateralized subjects; no bilateral subjects), the predictive value of DTI for classifying the dominant hemisphere for language was assessed relative to the existing standard - the intra-carotid Amytal (Wada) procedure. Our specific hypothesis is that language laterality in both unilateral left- and right-hemisphere language dominant subjects may be predicted by hemispheric asymmetry in the relative density of three white matter pathways terminating in the temporal lobe implicated in different aspects of language function: the arcuate (AF), uncinate (UF), and inferior longitudinal fasciculi (ILF). Laterality indices computed from asymmetry of high anisotropy AF pathways, but not the other pathways, classified the majority (19 of 23) of patients using the Wada results as the standard. A logistic regression model incorporating information from DTI of the AF, fMRI activity in Broca’s area, and handedness was able to classify 22 of 23 (95.6%) patients correctly according to their Wada score. We conclude that evaluation of highly anisotropic components of the AF alone has significant predictive power for determining language laterality, and that this markedly asymmetric distribution in the dominant hemisphere may reflect enhanced connectivity between frontal and temporal sites to support fluent language processes. Given the small sample reported in this preliminary study, future research should assess this method on a larger group of patients, including subjects with bihemispheric dominance. PMID:19874899

  16. White Matter Abnormalities in Patients with Treatment-Resistant Genetic Generalized Epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Lee, Seongtaek; Allendorfer, Jane B; Gaston, Tyler E; Knowlton, Robert C; Pati, Sandipan; Ver Hoef, Lawrence W; Deutsch, Georg

    2016-06-10

    BACKGROUND Genetic generalized epilepsies (GGEs) are associated with microstructural brain abnormalities that can be evaluated with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Available studies on GGEs have conflicting results. Our primary goal was to compare the white matter structure in a cohort of patients with video/EEG-confirmed GGEs to healthy controls (HCs). Our secondary goal was to assess the potential effect of age at GGE onset on the white matter structure. MATERIAL AND METHODS A convenience sample of 23 patients with well-characterized treatment-resistant GGEs (13 female) was compared to 23 HCs. All participants received MRI at 3T. DTI indices, including fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD), were compared between groups using Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS). RESULTS After controlling for differences between groups, abnormalities in DTI parameters were observed in patients with GGEs, including decreases in functional anisotropy (FA) in the hemispheric (left>right) and brain stem white matter. The examination of the effect of age at GGE onset on the white matter integrity revealed a significant negative correlation in the left parietal white matter region FA (R=-0.504; p=0.017); similar trends were observed in the white matter underlying left motor cortex (R=-0.357; p=0.103) and left posterior limb of the internal capsule (R=-0.319; p=0.148). CONCLUSIONS Our study confirms the presence of widespread white matter abnormalities in patients with GGEs and provides evidence that the age at GGE onset may have an important effect on white matter integrity.

  17. White Matter Abnormalities in Patients with Treatment-Resistant Genetic Generalized Epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Szaflarski, Jerzy P.; Lee, Seongtaek; Allendorfer, Jane B.; Gaston, Tyler E.; Knowlton, Robert C.; Pati, Sandipan; Ver Hoef, Lawrence W.; Deutsch, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Background Genetic generalized epilepsies (GGEs) are associated with microstructural brain abnormalities that can be evaluated with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Available studies on GGEs have conflicting results. Our primary goal was to compare the white matter structure in a cohort of patients with video/EEG-confirmed GGEs to healthy controls (HCs). Our secondary goal was to assess the potential effect of age at GGE onset on the white matter structure. Material/Methods A convenience sample of 23 patients with well-characterized treatment-resistant GGEs (13 female) was compared to 23 HCs. All participants received MRI at 3T. DTI indices, including fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD), were compared between groups using Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS). Results After controlling for differences between groups, abnormalities in DTI parameters were observed in patients with GGEs, including decreases in functional anisotropy (FA) in the hemispheric (left>right) and brain stem white matter. The examination of the effect of age at GGE onset on the white matter integrity revealed a significant negative correlation in the left parietal white matter region FA (R=−0.504; p=0.017); similar trends were observed in the white matter underlying left motor cortex (R=−0.357; p=0.103) and left posterior limb of the internal capsule (R=−0.319; p=0.148). Conclusions Our study confirms the presence of widespread white matter abnormalities in patients with GGEs and provides evidence that the age at GGE onset may have an important effect on white matter integrity. PMID:27283395

  18. Verbal working memory components can be selectively influenced by transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with left temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Düzel, E; Hufnagel, A; Helmstaedter, C; Elger, C

    1996-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be used for a lateralization of verbal and non-verbal memory functions in candidates for epilepsy surgery by inducing focal, material-specific memory deficits. Twenty patients who underwent presurgical epilepsy evaluation with chronically implanted subdural strip electrodes were submitted to focal TMS over the temporal lobes and the vertex while sequences of items of the Digit Span and the Corsi Block test were presented on a computer screen. TMS was applied synchronously or 200 msec following presentation of each item. The effects of TMS on the memory span and the serial position curve were analysed in comparison to baseline levels. The following results were obtained: the quantitative effects on the verbal (Digit Span) and non-verbal (Corsi Block) memory span were not significant, but there were significant qualitative changes of serial position effects. In the group of six patients with left temporal epilepsy, TMS over the left temporal lobe induced a significant recency effect in the Digit Span test, while TMS over the vertex significantly increased the recency errors. The absolute number of errors remained unchanged. No such effects were observed in the group of nine patients with right temporal lobe epilepsy. These results suggest that in the presence of a left temporal lobe focus TMS can induce qualitative, material specific changes in verbal working memory (phonological loop) which become apparent in the serial position curve. The dissociation of TMS effects for temporal and vertex stimulation imply that TMS can selectively influence specific phonological loop components and that the phonological loop has a functionally and neuroanatomically multimodular structure.

  19. Evaluation of positive and negative predictors of seizure outcomes among patients with immune-mediated epilepsy: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Divyanshu; Farzal, Zehra; Hays, Ryan; Brown, L Steven; Vernino, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to analyze published literature on autoimmune epilepsy and assess predictors of seizure outcome. Methods: From PubMed and EMBASE databases, two reviewers independently identified publications reporting clinical presentations, management and outcomes of patients with autoimmune epilepsy. A meta-analysis of 46 selected studies was performed. Demographic/clinical variables (sex, age, clinical presentation, epilepsy focus, magnetic resonance imaging [MRI] characteristics, time to diagnosis and initiation of immunomodulatory therapy, and type of immunomodulatory therapy) were compared between two outcome groups (responders and nonresponders). Clinical response was defined as >50% reduction in seizure frequency. Unstandardized effect sizes were collected for the studies for responder and nonresponder groups. Sample size was used as the weight in the meta-analysis. The random effects model was used to account for heterogeneity in the studies. Results: The 46 reports included 186 and 96 patients in responder and nonresponder groups respectively. Mean age of the responders and nonresponders was 43 and 31 years (p < 0.01). Responders were more likely to have cell-surface antibodies (68% versus 39%, p < 0.05), particularly voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies (p < 0.01). Mean duration from symptom onset to diagnosis, and symptom onset to initiation of immunomodulation was significantly lower among the responders (75 versus 431 days, p < 0.05, and 80 versus 554, p < 0.01, respectively). There was no outcome difference based on gender, MRI characteristics, seizure type, type of acute immunomodulatory therapy, or use of chronic immunomodulation. Conclusions: Among published cases to date, older age, presence of cell-surface antibodies, early diagnosis and immunomodulatory treatment are associated with better seizure outcomes among patients with autoimmune epilepsy. PMID:27582892

  20. Use of interictal (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET and magnetoencephalography (MEG) to localize epileptogenic foci in non-lesional epilepsy in a cohort of 16 patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuchun; Liu, Bo; Fu, Liqi; Cui, Zhiqiang

    2015-08-15

    We assessed the efficacy of interictal 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) for localizing the epileptogenic foci in a small cohort of patients with non-lesional epilepsy. Sixteen patients, aged 8-32 years, with non-lesional epilepsy underwent MRI, continuous scalp video-electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring, interictal (FDG)-PET and MEG at our institution. Each patient subsequently underwent intracranial grid placement. The data from the intracranial grids was correlated with the previous studies to determine the efficacy of FDG-PET and MEG in localizing the epileptogenic zone. Of the 16 patients, the epileptogenic zone was accurately localized in 8 (50%) using FDG-PET and in 12 patients (75%) using MEG. Of the 11 patients with a temporal hypometabolism, only 4 were ultimately confirmed as temporal lobe epilepsy via intracranial grids and 2 additional patients were found to have extra-temporal lobe epilepsy. Compared to interictal FDG-PET, MEG appears to be more sensitive to detection of the epileptogenic zone in this small cohort of non-lesional epilepsy patients though provided more diffuse foci. Our findings can help in determining the surgical eligibility of a patient especially when MRI or video-EEG monitoring are non-localizing, and can help with placement of subdural grids and strips for EEG studies.

  1. The variants of reading epilepsy. A clinical and video-EEG study of 17 patients with reading-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Koutroumanidis, M; Koepp, M J; Richardson, M P; Camfield, C; Agathonikou, A; Ried, S; Papadimitriou, A; Plant, G T; Duncan, J S; Panayiotopoulos, C P

    1998-08-01

    We present the clinical and electrographic data of 17 patients with reading-induced seizures documented with ictal video-EEG studies during provocation with language related tasks. The median age at onset was 15 years (range 11-22 years) and the male:female ratio was 2.4. Fourteen patients had no spontaneous seizures of any type while the remaining three had infrequent generalized tonic-clonic seizures during nocturnal sleep. Two distinct electroclinical ictal patterns were confirmed on video-EEG analysis. (i) Fifteen patients had reading-induced jerks which invariably involved the region of the jaw but also included the upper limbs in five of them. Ictal EEG discharges were noted in 12 patients; these were brief but varied in terms of morphology and spatial distribution, with a clear tendency for left-sided predominance. All but one of these patients had similar myoclonic seizures induced by linguistic activities other than reading, the phenomenon probably justifying the term 'language-induced epilepsy'. Some patients had evidence of transient cognitive impairment associated with the reading-induced jaw or limb jerks. Three patients had a sibling with reading epilepsy but there was no other family history of epileptic seizures. (ii) Two patients had reading-provoked paroxysmal alexia without motor symptoms, associated with prolonged focal ictal EEG abnormalities. Reading provoked a subclinical, continuous and reproducible EEG activation over the left posterior temporal area. We propose that ictogenesis in reading or language-induced epilepsy is based on the reflex activation of a hyperexcitable network that subserves the function of speech and extends over multiple cerebral areas on both hemispheres. The parts of this network responding to the stimulus may, secondarily, drive the relative motor areas producing the typical regional myoclonus. This network hyperexcitability can be genetically determined and its clinical expression is age-related.

  2. Defining regions of interest using cross-frequency coupling in extratemporal lobe epilepsy patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guirgis, Mirna; Chinvarun, Yotin; del Campo, Martin; Carlen, Peter L.; Bardakjian, Berj L.

    2015-04-01

    Objective. Clinicians identify seizure onset zones (SOZs) for resection in an attempt to localize the epileptogenic zone (EZ), which is the cortical tissue that is indispensible for seizure generation. An automated system is proposed to objectively localize this EZ by identifying regions of interest (ROIs). Methods. Intracranial electroencephalogram recordings were obtained from seven patients presenting with extratemporal lobe epilepsy and the interaction between neuronal rhythms in the form of phase-amplitude coupling was investigated. Modulation of the amplitude of high frequency oscillations (HFOs) by the phase of low frequency oscillations was measured by computing the modulation index (MI). Delta- (0.5-4 Hz) and theta- (4-8 Hz) modulation of HFOs (30-450 Hz) were examined across the channels of a 64-electrode subdural grid. Surrogate analysis was performed and false discovery rates were computed to determine the significance of the modulation observed. Mean MI values were subjected to eigenvalue decomposition (EVD) and channels defining the ROIs were selected based on the components of the eigenvector corresponding to the largest eigenvalue. ROIs were compared to the SOZs identified by two independent neurologists. Global coherence values were also computed. Main results. MI was found to capture the seizure in time for six of seven patients and identified ROIs in all seven. Patients were found to have a poorer post-surgical outcome when the number of EVD-selected channels that were not resected increased. Moreover, in patients who experienced a seizure-free outcome (i.e., Engel Class I) all EVD-selected channels were found to be within the resected tissue or immediately adjacent to it. In these Engel Class I patients, delta-modulated HFOs were found to identify more of the channels in the resected tissue compared to theta-modulated HFOs. However, for the Engel Class IV patient, the delta-modulated HFOs did not identify any of the channels in the resected

  3. Use of the mTOR inhibitor everolimus in a patient with multiple manifestations of tuberous sclerosis complex including epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Wheless, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a genetic disease in which overactivation of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling leads to the growth of benign hamartomas in multiple organs, including the brain, and is associated with a high rate of epilepsy and neurological deficits. The mTOR inhibitor everolimus has been used in the treatment of subependymal giant cell astrocytomas and renal angiomyolipomas in patients with TSC. This article describes the case of a 13-year-old girl with TSC-associated epilepsy with refractory generalized seizures who initiated treatment with everolimus and experienced subsequent improvement in several TSC manifestations, including a reduction in seizure frequency from clusters of two or three daily to one every 2 to 4 weeks after 1.5 years of treatment. PMID:26543807

  4. Effects of Oxcarbazepine and Levetiracetam on Calcium, Ionized Calcium, and 25-OH Vitamin-D3 Levels in Patients with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Duygu; Güveli, Betül Tekin; Ak, Pelin Doğan; Sarı, Hüseyin; Ataklı, Dilek; Arpacı, Baki

    2016-01-01

    Objective The primary objective of the present study was to further elucidate the effects of oxcarbazepine (OXC) and levetiracetam (LEV) monotherapies on the bone health status of patients with epilepsy. Methods This study included 48 patients who attended our epilepsy outpatient clinic, had a diagnosis of epilepsy, and were undergoing either OXC or LEV monotherapy and 42 healthy control subjects. The demographic and clinical features of the patients, including gender, age, onset of disease, daily drug dosage, and duration of disease, were noted. Additionally, the calcium, ionized calcium, and 25-OH vitamin-D3 levels of the participants were prospectively evaluated. Results The 25-OH vitamin-D3, calcium, and ionized calcium levels of the patients taking OXC were significantly lower than those of the control group. These levels did not significantly differ between the patients taking LEV and the control group, but there was a significant negative relationship between daily drug dose and ionized calcium levels in the LEV patients. Conclusion In the present study, anti-epileptic drugs altered the calcium, ionized calcium, and 25-OH vitamin-D3 levels of epilepsy patients and resulted in bone loss, abnormal mineralization, and fractures. These findings suggest that the calcium, ionized calcium, and 25-OH vitamin-D3 levels of patients with epilepsy should be regularly assessed. PMID:26792043

  5. Recognition and identification of famous faces in patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Seidenberg, Michael; Griffith, Randall; Sabsevitz, David; Moran, Maria; Haltiner, Alan; Bell, Brian; Swanson, Sara; Hammeke, Thomas; Hermann, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    We examined the performance of 21 patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and hippocampal damage (10 lefts, and 11 rights) and 10 age-matched controls on the recognition and identification (name and occupation) of well-known faces. Famous face stimuli were selected from four time periods; 1970s, 1980s, 1990-1994, and 1995-1996. Differential patterns of performance were observed for the left and right TLE group across distinct face processing components. The left TLE group showed a selective impairment in naming famous faces while they performed similar to the controls in face recognition and semantic identification (i.e. occupation). In contrast, the right TLE group was impaired across all components of face memory; face recognition, semantic identification, and face naming. Face naming impairment in the left TLE group was characterized by a temporal gradient with better naming performance for famous faces from more distant time periods. Findings are discussed in terms of the role of the temporal lobe system for the acquisition, retention, and retrieval of face semantic networks, and the differential effects of lateralized temporal lobe lesions in this process.

  6. Greater Response to Placebo in Children Than in Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis in Drug-Resistant Partial Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Rheims, Sylvain; Cucherat, Michel; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Ryvlin, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Background Despite guidelines establishing the need to perform comprehensive paediatric drug development programs, pivotal trials in children with epilepsy have been completed mostly in Phase IV as a postapproval replication of adult data. However, it has been shown that the treatment response in children can differ from that in adults. It has not been investigated whether differences in drug effect between adults and children might occur in the treatment of drug-resistant partial epilepsy, although such differences may have a substantial impact on the design and results of paediatric randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Methods and Findings Three electronic databases were searched for RCTs investigating any antiepileptic drug (AED) in the add-on treatment of drug-resistant partial epilepsy in both children and adults. The treatment effect was compared between the two age groups using the ratio of the relative risk (RR) of the 50% responder rate between active AEDs treatment and placebo groups, as well as meta-regression. Differences in the response to placebo and to active treatment were searched using logistic regression. A comparable approach was used for analysing secondary endpoints, including seizure-free rate, total and adverse events-related withdrawal rates, and withdrawal rate for seizure aggravation. Five AEDs were evaluated in both adults and children with drug-resistant partial epilepsy in 32 RCTs. The treatment effect was significantly lower in children than in adults (RR ratio: 0.67 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.51–0.89]; p = 0.02 by meta-regression). This difference was related to an age-dependent variation in the response to placebo, with a higher rate in children than in adults (19% versus 9.9%, p < 0.001), whereas no significant difference was observed in the response to active treatment (37.2% versus 30.4%, p = 0.364). The relative risk of the total withdrawal rate was also significantly lower in children than in adults (RR ratio: 0.65 [95

  7. Spike voltage topography in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Asadollahi, Marjan; Shimamoto, Shoichi; Lorenzo, Matthew; Sperling, Michael R

    2016-07-15

    We investigated the voltage topography of interictal spikes in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) to see whether topography was related to etiology for TLE. Adults with TLE, who had epilepsy surgery for drug-resistant seizures from 2011 until 2014 at Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center were selected. Two groups of patients were studied: patients with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) on MRI and those with other MRI findings. The voltage topography maps of the interictal spikes at the peak were created using BESA software. We classified the interictal spikes as polar, basal, lateral, or others. Thirty-four patients were studied, from which the characteristics of 340 spikes were investigated. The most common type of spike orientation was others (186 spikes; 54.7%), followed by lateral (146; 42.9%), polar (5; 1.5%), and basal (3; 0.9%). Characteristics of the voltage topography maps of the spikes between the two groups of patients were somewhat different. Five spikes in patients with MTS had polar orientation, but none of the spikes in patients with other MRI findings had polar orientation (odds ratio=6.98, 95% confidence interval=0.38 to 127.38; p=0.07). Scalp topographic mapping of interictal spikes has the potential to offer different information than visual inspection alone. The present results do not allow an immediate clinical application of our findings; however, detecting a polar spike in a patient with TLE may increase the possibility of mesial temporal sclerosis as the underlying etiology. PMID:27288809

  8. Spike voltage topography in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Asadollahi, Marjan; Shimamoto, Shoichi; Lorenzo, Matthew; Sperling, Michael R

    2016-07-15

    We investigated the voltage topography of interictal spikes in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) to see whether topography was related to etiology for TLE. Adults with TLE, who had epilepsy surgery for drug-resistant seizures from 2011 until 2014 at Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center were selected. Two groups of patients were studied: patients with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) on MRI and those with other MRI findings. The voltage topography maps of the interictal spikes at the peak were created using BESA software. We classified the interictal spikes as polar, basal, lateral, or others. Thirty-four patients were studied, from which the characteristics of 340 spikes were investigated. The most common type of spike orientation was others (186 spikes; 54.7%), followed by lateral (146; 42.9%), polar (5; 1.5%), and basal (3; 0.9%). Characteristics of the voltage topography maps of the spikes between the two groups of patients were somewhat different. Five spikes in patients with MTS had polar orientation, but none of the spikes in patients with other MRI findings had polar orientation (odds ratio=6.98, 95% confidence interval=0.38 to 127.38; p=0.07). Scalp topographic mapping of interictal spikes has the potential to offer different information than visual inspection alone. The present results do not allow an immediate clinical application of our findings; however, detecting a polar spike in a patient with TLE may increase the possibility of mesial temporal sclerosis as the underlying etiology.

  9. Epilepsy and the law.

    PubMed

    Joubert, A F; Verschoor, T; von Rensburg, P H

    1997-01-01

    Epilepsy, and the treatment thereof, has effects on many aspects of life, with far-reaching implications for the patient, his family and the community. Epilepsy causes a great deal of social difficulties and restrictions due to the associated stigma and prejudice. It is not a rare condition and is associated with many other conditions, such as schizophrenia, mental retardation, autism, and terminal Alzheimer's disease. Other associated disorders may include cognitive difficulties, personality disturbances or psychoses of various types and durations. Only by the 1850's was epilepsy defined as a "neurological" disease.

  10. Autoimmune Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Quek, Amy M. L.; Britton, Jeffrey W.; McKeon, Andrew; So, Elson; Lennon, Vanda A.; Shin, Cheolsu; Klein, Christopher J.; Watson, Robert E.; Kotsenas, Amy L.; Lagerlund, Terrence D.; Cascino, Gregory D.; Worrell, Gregory A.; Wirrell, Elaine C.; Nickels, Katherine C.; Aksamit, Allen J.; Noe, Katherine H.; Pittock, Sean J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe clinical characteristics and immunotherapy responses in patients with autoimmune epilepsy. Design Observational, retrospective case series. Setting Mayo Clinic Health System. Patients Thirty-two patients with an exclusive (n=11) or predominant (n = 21) seizure presentation in whom an autoimmune etiology was suspected (on the basis of neural autoantibody [91%], inflammatory cerebrospinal fluid [31%], or magnetic resonance imaging suggesting inflammation [63%]) were studied. All had partial seizures: 81% had failed treatment with 2 or more anti-epileptic drugs and had daily seizures and 38% had seizure semiologies that were multifocal or changed with time. Head magnetic resonance imaging was normal in 15 (47%) at onset. Electroencephalogram abnormalities included interictal epileptiform discharges in 20; electrographic seizures in 15; and focal slowing in 13. Neural autoantibodies included voltage-gated potassium channel complex in 56% (leucine-rich, glioma-inactivated 1 specific, 14; contactin-associated proteinlike 2 specific, 1); glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 in 22%; collapsin response-mediator protein 5 in 6%; and Ma2, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, and ganglionic acetylcholine receptor in 1 patient each. Intervention Immunotherapy with intravenous methylprednisolone; intravenous immune globulin; and combinations of intravenous methylprednisolone, intravenous immune globulin, plasmapheresis, or cyclo-phosphamide. Main Outcome Measure Seizure frequency. Results After a median interval of 17 months (range, 3–72 months), 22 of 27 (81%) reported improvement postimmunotherapy; 18 were seizure free. The median time from seizure onset to initiating immunotherapy was 4 months for responders and 22 months for nonresponders (P<.05). All voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibody–positive patients reported initial or lasting benefit (P<.05). One voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibody–positive patient was seizure free after

  11. Expression of HIF-1α and MDR1/P-glycoprotein in refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy patients and pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy rat model kindled by coriaria lactone.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaohua; Chen, Jianbin; Zeng, Tianfang; Lei, Ding; Chen, Lei; Zhou, Dong

    2014-08-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is thought to mediate pharmacoresistance in tumor by inducing Pgp overexpression. We aimed to investigate the expression of HIF-1α and MDR1/P-glycoprotein in refractory epilepsy, to explore the correlation of HIF-1α with epilepsy multidrug resistance. We collected hippocampus and mesial temporal lobe (MTL) cortex of refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) patients that underwent surgery, and established a pharmacoresistant TLE rat model kindled by coriaria lactone. We used real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) and western blot to investigate expression of HIF-1α and MDR1 in hippocampus and MTL/entorhinal cortex. We found that the expression of HIF-1α and MDR1, at both mRNA and protein levels, were up-regulated in hippocampus and MTL cortex of mTLE patients compared with the control cortex (all P < 0.05), and increased in hippocampus and entorhinal cortex of kindled rat model versus the control group (all P < 0.05). These results demonstrated the overexpression of HIF-1α and MDR1/Pgp in hippocampus and MTL/entorhinal cortex of mTLE patients and the pharmacoresistant TLE rat model. HIF-1α may have a regulatory effect on MDR1 expression in refractory epilepsy, which is probably consistent with MDR mechanism in tumor.

  12. Zonisamide in the management of epilepsy in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Romigi, Andrea; Femia, Eti A; Fattore, Cinzia; Vitrani, Giuseppe; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Franco, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Zonisamide (ZNS), a second-generation antiepileptic drug, indicated as add-on treatment of focal epilepsy, has been recently approved as monotherapy for the treatment of partial seizures in adults affected by newly diagnosed epilepsy in Europe. Evidence on the efficacy and tolerability of antiepileptic drugs in the elderly is still lacking as these patients are frequently excluded from clinical trials. Here, a comprehensive overview of available data regarding the use of ZNS in the treatment of epilepsy in elderly people is provided. In a pooled analysis conducted in patients aged ≥65 years, no new/unexpected safety findings have emerged. Few data from uncontrolled investigations suggest that ZNS may be effective and well tolerated when administered as monotherapy or adjunctive antiepileptic treatment in the elderly. However, evidence from these observational studies is less than satisfactory, and randomized controlled trials focused on these patients are still needed. PMID:26089654

  13. Reversible Valproate Induced Pisa Syndrome and Parkinsonism in a Neuro-Oncology Patient with Depression and Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Botturi, Andrea; Silvani, Antonio; Pravettoni, Gabriella; Paoli, Riccardo Augusto; Lucchiari, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Neurological and psychiatric conditions frequently overlap in neuro-oncology. This overlapping negatively affects patients’ quality of life and decreases the ability of providers to manage specific symptoms by therapy modulation, especially when psychopharmacotherapy needs to be prescribed. We describe here a patient with recurrent brain tumor, symptomatic epilepsy and depression who developed Pisa syndrome and parkinsonism after several months of valproic acid use. An accurate recognition of symptoms and treatment side effect allowed an appropriate clinical approach so as to rapidly improve both movement disorder and depression without increasing the risk of developing seizure. This has improved the autonomy and quality of life in a patient with poor prognosis. PMID:27462241

  14. Preliminary evidence for gender effects of levetiracetam monotherapy duration on bone health of patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Artemiadis, Artemios K; Lambrinoudaki, Irene; Voskou, Panagiota; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Safouris, Apostolos; Bougea, Anastasia; Giannopoulos, Sotiris; Gatzonis, Stergios; Triantafyllou, Nikolaos

    2016-02-01

    Enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs AEDs have adverse effects on bone mineral density (BMD), whereas studies on levetiracetam (LEV), a nonenzyme-inducing agent, have showed conflicting results. The aim of this study was to further elucidate the role of LEV in bone health. A sample of forty-six patients with epilepsy (mean age: 35.7 years, range: 20.2-64.2 years, 39.1% males) on LEV monotherapy for at least one year (range: 1.5-14.5 years, median 5.5 years) underwent femoral neck (FN) and lumbar spine (LS) BMD measurements. The T- and Z-scores were calculated. Results showed that 15.2% of the patients were identified with osteopenia and none with osteoporosis. Pearson's correlations revealed a negative but not significant association of LEV duration with bone-related measurements (range of rhos: from -0.004 to -0.23), except for LS T-scores. In terms of FN BMD measurements, Z-scores, and T-scores, longer LEV therapy duration had adverse but not significant effects on bone health after adjusting for age and gender. With regard to LS BMD measurements, Z-scores, and T-scores, men taking LEV for at least 5.5 years had better, although not significant, bone health compared with men with shorter LEV exposure, after adjusting for age. The opposite was found in women, although differences did not reach significance. These preliminary results are indicative of a differential effect of LEV therapy duration in men and women, which could presumably account for the incongruity of the already published studies. Also, LS assessments were more sensitive to these gender differences. Future larger studies should validate these results. PMID:26773675

  15. Febrile Seizures and Epilepsy: Possible Outcomes

    MedlinePlus

    ... whether they could increase the risk of developing epilepsy later. Febrile seizures are defined as seizures that ... brains of patients who underwent surgery for severe epilepsy. 3 The children with FSE were com- pared ...

  16. Duty, desire or indifference? A qualitative study of patient decisions about recruitment to an epilepsy treatment trial

    PubMed Central

    Canvin, Krysia; Jacoby, Ann

    2006-01-01

    Background Epilepsy is a common neurological condition, in which drugs are the mainstay of treatment and drugs trials are commonplace. Understanding why patients might or might not opt to participate in epilepsy drug trials is therefore of some importance, particularly at a time of rapid drug development and testing; and the findings may also have wider applicability. This study examined the role of patient perceptions in the decision-making process about recruitment to an RCT (the SANAD Trial) that compared different antiepileptic drug treatments for the management of new-onset seizures and epilepsy. Methods In-depth interviews with 23 patients recruited from four study centres. All interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed; the transcripts were analysed thematically using a qualitative data analysis package. Results Of the nineteen informants who agreed to participate in SANAD, none agreed for purely altruistic reasons. The four informants who declined all did so for very specific reasons of self-interest. Informants' perceptions of the nature of the trial, of the drugs subject to trial, and of their own involvement were all highly influential in their decision-making. Informants either perceived the trial as potentially beneficial or unlikely to be harmful, and so agreed to participate; or as potentially harmful or unlikely to be beneficial and so declined to participate. Conclusion Most patients applied 'weak altruism', while maintaining self-interest. An emphasis on the safety and equivalence of treatments allowed some patients to be indifferent to the question of involvement. There was evidence that some participants were subject to 'therapeutic misconceptions'. The findings highlight the individual nature of trials but nonetheless raise some generic issues in relation to their design and conduct. PMID:17163988

  17. A case of autoimmune epilepsy associated with anti-leucine-rich glioma inactivated subunit 1 antibodies manifesting electrical shock-like sensations and transparent sadness

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Yoshiko; Watanabe, Osamu; Taniguchi, Go; Sone, Daichi; Fujioka, Mao; Okazaki, Mitsutoshi; Nakagawa, Eiji; Watanabe, Yutaka; Watanabe, Masako

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune epilepsy is an isolated phenotype of autoimmune encephalitis, which may be suspected in patients with unexplained adult-onset seizure disorders or resistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Antibodies against leucine-rich glioma inactivated subunit 1 of the voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex, recently termed anti-LGI-1 antibodies, are one of the causes of autoimmune epilepsies. Bizarre symptoms with extremely short duration and high frequency are clues to the possible presence of autoimmune epilepsy with anti-LGI-1 antibodies. Precise diagnosis is important because autoimmune epilepsy is treatable and the prognosis can be predicted. PMID:26543815

  18. A case of autoimmune epilepsy associated with anti-leucine-rich glioma inactivated subunit 1 antibodies manifesting electrical shock-like sensations and transparent sadness.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yoshiko; Watanabe, Osamu; Taniguchi, Go; Sone, Daichi; Fujioka, Mao; Okazaki, Mitsutoshi; Nakagawa, Eiji; Watanabe, Yutaka; Watanabe, Masako

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune epilepsy is an isolated phenotype of autoimmune encephalitis, which may be suspected in patients with unexplained adult-onset seizure disorders or resistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Antibodies against leucine-rich glioma inactivated subunit 1 of the voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex, recently termed anti-LGI-1 antibodies, are one of the causes of autoimmune epilepsies. Bizarre symptoms with extremely short duration and high frequency are clues to the possible presence of autoimmune epilepsy with anti-LGI-1 antibodies. Precise diagnosis is important because autoimmune epilepsy is treatable and the prognosis can be predicted.

  19. A case of autoimmune epilepsy associated with anti-leucine-rich glioma inactivated subunit 1 antibodies manifesting electrical shock-like sensations and transparent sadness.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yoshiko; Watanabe, Osamu; Taniguchi, Go; Sone, Daichi; Fujioka, Mao; Okazaki, Mitsutoshi; Nakagawa, Eiji; Watanabe, Yutaka; Watanabe, Masako

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune epilepsy is an isolated phenotype of autoimmune encephalitis, which may be suspected in patients with unexplained adult-onset seizure disorders or resistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Antibodies against leucine-rich glioma inactivated subunit 1 of the voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex, recently termed anti-LGI-1 antibodies, are one of the causes of autoimmune epilepsies. Bizarre symptoms with extremely short duration and high frequency are clues to the possible presence of autoimmune epilepsy with anti-LGI-1 antibodies. Precise diagnosis is important because autoimmune epilepsy is treatable and the prognosis can be predicted. PMID:26543815

  20. Definition of the epileptogenic zone in a patient with non-lesional temporal lobe epilepsy arising from the dominant hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Najm, Imad M; Naugle, Richard; Busch, Robyn M; Bingaman, William; Lüders, Hans

    2006-08-01

    Pharmacoresistant epilepsy arising from the dominant temporal region in patients with intact memory and normal anatomical imaging, presents major challenges in the preoperative definition of the epileptogenic zone, and the planning of the extent of the surgical resection. We report on the case of a 42-year-old, right-handed male who presented with recurrent daily seizures that were resistant to antiepileptic drugs. Multiple, non-invasive (scalp) video-EEG evaluations revealed focal epilepsy arising from the left fronto-temporal region. Multiple high resolution MRIs that were performed at multiple Epilepsy Centers failed to show any abnormality. Fluoro-deoxyglucose PET scan showed extensive, left antero-mesial temporal hypometabolism, and ictal SPECT showed increased perfusion in the left insula in addition to the left mesial and anterior temporal pole. Neuropsychological testing and intracarotid methohexital testing revealed excellent memory to the left, dominant side. A two-stage invasive evaluation with subdural grid electrodes followed by depth electrode recordings allowed the localization of the epileptogenic region to the temporal pole. A selective resection of the left temporal pole (that spared the hippocampal formation) resulted in a seizure-free outcome (one year follow-up) with no significant consequences on memory function. We conclude that targeted, invasive recording techniques should be used for the accurate localization and delineation of the extent of the epileptogenic zone in cases of suspected, non-lesional, dominant hemisphere, temporal lobe epilepsy with preserved memory function. The use of the staged invasive approach may increase the chances for memory (function) sparing through tailored, temporal resection.

  1. Two-year seizure reduction in adults with medically intractable partial onset epilepsy treated with responsive neurostimulation: Final results of the RNS System Pivotal trial

    PubMed Central

    Heck, Christianne N; King-Stephens, David; Massey, Andrew D; Nair, Dileep R; Jobst, Barbara C; Barkley, Gregory L; Salanova, Vicenta; Cole, Andrew J; Smith, Michael C; Gwinn, Ryder P; Skidmore, Christopher; Van Ness, Paul C; Bergey, Gregory K; Park, Yong D; Miller, Ian; Geller, Eric; Rutecki, Paul A; Zimmerman, Richard; Spencer, David C; Goldman, Alica; Edwards, Jonathan C; Leiphart, James W; Wharen, Robert E; Fessler, James; Fountain, Nathan B; Worrell, Gregory A; Gross, Robert E; Eisenschenk, Stephan; Duckrow, Robert B; Hirsch, Lawrence J; Bazil, Carl; O'Donovan, Cormac A; Sun, Felice T; Courtney, Tracy A; Seale, Cairn G; Morrell, Martha J

    2014-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of responsive stimulation at the seizure focus as an adjunctive therapy to reduce the frequency of seizures in adults with medically intractable partial onset seizures arising from one or two seizure foci. Methods Randomized multicenter double-blinded controlled trial of responsive focal cortical stimulation (RNS System). Subjects with medically intractable partial onset seizures from one or two foci were implanted, and 1 month postimplant were randomized 1:1 to active or sham stimulation. After the fifth postimplant month, all subjects received responsive stimulation in an open label period (OLP) to complete 2 years of postimplant follow-up. Results All 191 subjects were randomized. The percent change in seizures at the end of the blinded period was −37.9% in the active and −17.3% in the sham stimulation group (p = 0.012, Generalized Estimating Equations). The median percent reduction in seizures in the OLP was 44% at 1 year and 53% at 2 years, which represents a progressive and significant improvement with time (p < 0.0001). The serious adverse event rate was not different between subjects receiving active and sham stimulation. Adverse events were consistent with the known risks of an implanted medical device, seizures, and of other epilepsy treatments. There were no adverse effects on neuropsychological function or mood. Significance Responsive stimulation to the seizure focus reduced the frequency of partial-onset seizures acutely, showed improving seizure reduction over time, was well tolerated, and was acceptably safe. The RNS System provides an additional treatment option for patients with medically intractable partial-onset seizures. PMID:24621228

  2. Increased expression of BDNF transcript with exon VI in hippocampi of patients with pharmaco-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Levy, G A; Rocha, L; Lubin, F D; Alonso-Vanegas, M A; Nani, A; Buentello-García, R M; Pérez-Molina, R; Briones-Velasco, M; Recillas-Targa, F; Pérez-Molina, A; San-Juan, D; Cienfuegos, J; Cruz-Fuentes, C S

    2016-02-01

    A putative role of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in epilepsy has emerged from in vitro and animal models, but few studies have analyzed human samples. We assessed the BDNF expression of transcripts with exons I (BDNFI), II (BDNFII), IV (BDNFIV) and VI (BDNFVI) and methylation levels of promoters 4 and 6 in the hippocampi of patients with pharmaco-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) (n=24). Hippocampal sclerosis (HS) and pre-surgical pharmacological treatment were considered as clinical independent variables. A statistical significant increase for the BDNFVI (p<0.05) was observed in TLE patients compared to the autopsy control group (n=8). BDNFVI was also increased in anxiety/depression TLE (N=4) when compared to autopsies or to the remaining group of patients (p<0.05). In contrast, the use of the antiepileptic drug Topiramate (TPM) (N=3) was associated to a decrease in BDNFVI expression (p<0.05) when compared to the remaining group of patients. Methylation levels at the BDNF promoters 4 and 6 were similar between TLE and autopsies and in relation to the use of either Sertraline (SRT) or TPM. These results suggest an up-regulated expression of a specific BDNF transcript in patients with TLE, an effect that seems to be dependent on the use of specific drugs. PMID:26621122

  3. Increased expression of BDNF transcript with exon VI in hippocampi of patients with pharmaco-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Levy, G A; Rocha, L; Lubin, F D; Alonso-Vanegas, M A; Nani, A; Buentello-García, R M; Pérez-Molina, R; Briones-Velasco, M; Recillas-Targa, F; Pérez-Molina, A; San-Juan, D; Cienfuegos, J; Cruz-Fuentes, C S

    2016-02-01

    A putative role of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in epilepsy has emerged from in vitro and animal models, but few studies have analyzed human samples. We assessed the BDNF expression of transcripts with exons I (BDNFI), II (BDNFII), IV (BDNFIV) and VI (BDNFVI) and methylation levels of promoters 4 and 6 in the hippocampi of patients with pharmaco-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) (n=24). Hippocampal sclerosis (HS) and pre-surgical pharmacological treatment were considered as clinical independent variables. A statistical significant increase for the BDNFVI (p<0.05) was observed in TLE patients compared to the autopsy control group (n=8). BDNFVI was also increased in anxiety/depression TLE (N=4) when compared to autopsies or to the remaining group of patients (p<0.05). In contrast, the use of the antiepileptic drug Topiramate (TPM) (N=3) was associated to a decrease in BDNFVI expression (p<0.05) when compared to the remaining group of patients. Methylation levels at the BDNF promoters 4 and 6 were similar between TLE and autopsies and in relation to the use of either Sertraline (SRT) or TPM. These results suggest an up-regulated expression of a specific BDNF transcript in patients with TLE, an effect that seems to be dependent on the use of specific drugs.

  4. Effect of partial volume correction on muscarinic cholinergic receptor imaging with single-photon emission tomography in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Weckesser, M; Hufnagel, A; Ziemons, K; Griessmeier, M; Sonnenberg, F; Hackländer, T; Langen, K J; Holschbach, M; Elger, C E; Müller-Gärtner, H

    1997-09-01

    Animal experiments and preliminary results in humans have indicated alterations of hippocampal muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) in temporal lobe epilepsy. Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy often present with a reduction in hippocampal volume. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of hippocampal atrophy on the quantification of mAChR with single photon emission tomography (SPET) in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Cerebral uptake of the muscarinic cholinergic antagonist [123I]4-iododexetimide (IDex) was investigated by SPET in patients suffering from temporal lobe epilepsy of unilateral (n=6) or predominantly unilateral (n=1) onset. Regions of interest were drawn on co-registered magnetic resonance images. Hippocampal volume was determined in these regions and was used to correct the SPET results for partial volume effects. A ratio of hippocampal IDex binding on the affected side to that on the unaffected side was used to detect changes in muscarinic cholinergic receptor density. Before partial volume correction a decrease in hippocampal IDex binding on the focus side was found in each patient. After partial volume no convincing differences remained. Our results indicate that the reduction in hippocampal IDex binding in patients with epilepsy is due to a decrease in hippocampal volume rather than to a decrease in receptor concentration. PMID:9283110

  5. Bridging the Gap between Evidence and Practice for Adults with Medically Refractory Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Is a Change in Funding Policy Needed to Stimulate a Shift in Practice?

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Alireza; Aldakkan, Abdulrahman; Kosicka, Magda J.; Tarride, Jean-Eric; Valiante, Taufik A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Surgery for medically refractory epilepsy (MRE) in adults has been shown to be effective but underutilized. Comprehensive health economic evaluations of surgery compared with continued medical management are limited. Policy changes may be necessary to influence practice shift. Methods. A critical review of the literature on health economic analyses for adults with MRE was conducted. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, CRD, and EconLit databases were searched using relevant subject headings and keywords pertaining to adults, epilepsy, and health economic evaluations. The screening was conducted independently and in duplicate. Results. Four studies were identified (1 Canadian, 2 American, and 1 French). Two were cost-utility analyses and 2 were cost-effectiveness evaluations. Only one was conducted after the effectiveness of surgery was established through a randomized trial. All suggested surgery to be favorable in the medium to long term (7-8 years and beyond). The reduction of medication use was the major cost-saving parameter in favor of surgery. Conclusions. Although updated evaluations that are more generalizable across settings are necessary, surgery appears to be a favorable option from a health economic perspective. Given the limited success of knowledge translation endeavours, funder-level policy changes such as quality-based purchasing may be necessary to induce a shift in practice. PMID:26770822

  6. Towards precision medicine in epilepsy surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Pingping; Wu, Dongyan; Li, Xiaoxuan

    2016-01-01

    Up to a third of all patients with epilepsy are refractory to medical therapy even in the context of the introduction of new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) with considerable advantages in safety and tolerability over the last two decades. It has been widely accepted that epilepsy surgery is a highly effective therapeutic option in a selected subset of patients with refractory focal seizure. There is no doubt that accurate localization of the epileptogenic zone (EZ) is crucial to the success of resection surgery for intractable epilepsy. The pre-surgical evaluation requires a multimodality approach wherein each modality provides unique and complimentary information. Accurate localization of EZ still remains challenging, especially in patients with normal features on MRI. Whereas substantial progress has been made in the methods of pre-surgical assessment in recent years, which widened the applicability of surgical treatment for children and adults with refractory seizure. Advances in neuroimaging including voxel-based morphometric MRI analysis, multimodality techniques and computer-aided subtraction ictal SPECT co-registered to MRI have improved our ability to identify subtle structural and metabolic lesions causing focal seizure. Considerable observations from animal model with epilepsy and pre-surgical patients have consistently found a strong correlation between high frequency oscillations (HFOs) and epileptogenic brain tissue that suggest HFOs could be a potential biomarker of EZ. Since SEEG emphasizes the importance to study the spatiotemporal dynamics of seizure discharges, accounting for the dynamic, multidirectional spatiotemporal organization of the ictal discharges, it has greatly deep our understanding of the anatomo-electro-clinical profile of seizure. In this review, we focus on some state-of-the-art pre-surgical investigations that contribute to the precision medicine. Furthermore, advances also provide opportunity to achieve the minimal side effects and

  7. Presurgical language lateralization assessment by fMRI and dichotic listening of pediatric patients with intractable epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Norrelgen, Fritjof; Lilja, Anders; Ingvar, Martin; Åmark, Per; Fransson, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical use of a method to assess hemispheric language dominance in pediatric candidates for epilepsy surgery. The method is designed for patients but has previously been evaluated with healthy children. Methods Nineteen patients, 8–18 years old, with intractable epilepsy and candidates for epilepsy surgery were assessed. The assessment consisted of two functional MRI protocols (fMRI) intended to target frontal and posterior language networks respectively, and a behavioral dichotic listening task (DL). Regional left/right indices for each fMRI task from the frontal, temporal and parietal lobe were calculated, and left/right indices of the DL task were calculated from responses of consonants and vowels, separately. A quantitative analysis of each patient's data set was done in two steps based on clearly specified criteria. First, fMRI data and DL data were analyzed separately to determine whether the result from each of these assessments were conclusive or not. Thereafter, the results from the individual assessments were combined to reach a final conclusion regarding hemispheric language dominance. Results For 14 of the 19 subjects (74%) a conclusion was reached about their hemispheric language dominance. Nine subjects had a left-sided and five subjects had a right-sided hemispheric dominance. In three cases (16%) DL provided critical data to reach a conclusive result. Conclusions The success rate of conclusive language lateralization assessments in this study is comparable to reported rates on similar challenged pediatric populations. The results are promising but data from more patients than in the present study will be required to conclude on the clinical applicability of the method. PMID:25610785

  8. Parkinson's Disease and Cryptogenic Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Son, Andre Y; Biagioni, Milton C; Kaminski, Dorian; Gurevich, Alec; Stone, Britt; Di Rocco, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is an uncommon comorbidity of Parkinson's disease (PD) and has been considered not directly associated with PD. We present five patients (3 men and 2 women; ages 49-85) who had concomitant PD and cryptogenic epilepsy. Although rare, epilepsy can coexist with PD and their coexistence may influence the progression of PD. While this may be a chance association, an evolving understanding of the neurophysiological basis of either disease may suggest a mechanistic association. PMID:27688919

  9. Parkinson's Disease and Cryptogenic Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Dorian; Gurevich, Alec; Stone, Britt; Di Rocco, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is an uncommon comorbidity of Parkinson's disease (PD) and has been considered not directly associated with PD. We present five patients (3 men and 2 women; ages 49–85) who had concomitant PD and cryptogenic epilepsy. Although rare, epilepsy can coexist with PD and their coexistence may influence the progression of PD. While this may be a chance association, an evolving understanding of the neurophysiological basis of either disease may suggest a mechanistic association. PMID:27688919

  10. Parkinson's Disease and Cryptogenic Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Dorian; Gurevich, Alec; Stone, Britt; Di Rocco, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is an uncommon comorbidity of Parkinson's disease (PD) and has been considered not directly associated with PD. We present five patients (3 men and 2 women; ages 49–85) who had concomitant PD and cryptogenic epilepsy. Although rare, epilepsy can coexist with PD and their coexistence may influence the progression of PD. While this may be a chance association, an evolving understanding of the neurophysiological basis of either disease may suggest a mechanistic association.

  11. [Contemporary opinions on classification, pathogenesis and treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Jóźwiak, Sergiusz

    2007-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most frequent neurological disorders, both in children and adult persons. About 0.5-1% of general population suffer from epilepsy, which means that about 50 million people in the world are affected. First years of life and very late adulthood are periods in human's life particularly predisposing to epilepsy. Repetitive epileptic seizures may cause many life-threatening situations and significantly lower patient's quality of life. To the most serious complications belong status epilepticus and sudden unexpected deaths due to epilepsy (SUDEP). Absences from work or school caused by seizures, difficulties in social life, frequent injuries and necessity of polytherapy are also important for patients. All these factors result in low self-esteem and poor quality of life. The main aim of the treatment was control of epileptic seizures. However, despite of new antiepileptic drugs developed almost every year, in one third of all patients with epilepsy seizures remain out of control. Those patients are regarded to have "drug-resistant epilepsy". Despite of significant scale of the problem, there is no one definition of the phenomenon. In the presented review the authors outline current definitions, recent opinions on pathogenesis and risk factors, and provide practical rules of pharmacotherapy of epilepsy, which should help to restrict drug-resistancy.

  12. Markers of bone turnover in patients with epilepsy and their relationship to management of bone diseases induced by antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Sherifa A

    2016-01-01

    Data from cross-sectional and prospective studies revealed that patients with epilepsy and on long-term treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are at increased risk for metabolic bone diseases. Bone diseases were reported in about 50% of patients on AEDs. Low bone mineral density, osteopenia/osteoporosis, osteomalacia, rickets, altered concentration of bone turnover markers and fractures were reported with phenobarbital, phenytoin, carbamazepine, valproate, oxcarbazepine and lamotrigine. The mechanisms for AEDs-induced bone diseases are heterogeneous and include hypovitaminosis D, hypocalcemia and direct acceleration of bone loss and/or reduction of bone formation. This article reviews the evidence, predictors and mechanisms of AEDs-induced bone abnormalities and its clinical implications. For patients on AEDs, regular monitoring of bone health is recommended. Prophylactic administration of calcium and vitamin D is recommended for all patients. Treatment doses of calcium and vitamin D and even anti-resorptive drug therapy are reserved for patients at high risk of pathological fracture.

  13. The Pharmacological Basis of Cannabis Therapy for Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Doodipala Samba; Golub, Victoria M

    2016-04-01

    Recently, cannabis has been suggested as a potential alternative therapy for refractory epilepsy, which affects 30% of epilepsy, both adults and children, who do not respond to current medications. There is a large unmet medical need for new antiepileptics that would not interfere with normal function in patients with refractory epilepsy and conditions associated with refractory seizures. The two chief cannabinoids are Δ-9-tetrahyrdrocannabinol, the major psychoactive component of marijuana, and cannabidiol (CBD), the major nonpsychoactive component of marijuana. Claims of clinical efficacy in epilepsy of CBD-predominant cannabis or medical marijuana come mostly from limited studies, surveys, or case reports. However, the mechanisms underlying the antiepileptic efficacy of cannabis remain unclear. This article highlights the pharmacological basis of cannabis therapy, with an emphasis on the endocannabinoid mechanisms underlying the emerging neurotherapeutics of CBD in epilepsy. CBD is anticonvulsant, but it has a low affinity for the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2; therefore the exact mechanism by which it affects seizures remains poorly understood. A rigorous clinical evaluation of pharmaceutical CBD products is needed to establish the safety and efficacy of their use in the treatment of epilepsy. Identification of mechanisms underlying the anticonvulsant efficacy of CBD is also critical for identifying other potential treatment options.

  14. Whole exome sequencing identifies the first STRADA point mutation in a patient with polyhydramnios, megalencephaly, and symptomatic epilepsy syndrome (PMSE).

    PubMed

    Bi, Weimin; Glass, Ian A; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Eng, Christine M; Yang, Yaping; Sun, Angela

    2016-08-01

    Polyhydramnios, megalencephaly, and symptomatic epilepsy syndrome (PMSE) is an ultra rare neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe, infantile-onset intractable epilepsy, neurocognitive delay, macrocephaly, and craniofacial dysmorphism. The molecular diagnosis of this condition has thus far only been made in 16 Old Order Mennonite patients carrying a homozygous 7 kb founder deletion of exons 9-13 of STRADA. We performed clinical whole exome sequencing (WES) on a 4-year-old Indian male with global developmental delay, history of failure to thrive, infantile spasms, repetitive behaviors, hypotonia, low muscle mass, marked joint laxity, and dysmorphic facial features including tall forehead, long face, arched eyebrows, small chin, wide mouth, and tented upper lip. A homozygous single nucleotide duplication, c.842dupA (p.D281fs), in exon 10 of STRADA was identified. Sanger sequencing confirmed the mutation in the individual and identified both parents as carriers. In light of the molecular discoveries, the patient's clinical phenotype was considered to be a good fit for PMSE. We identified for the first time a homozygous point mutation in STRADA causing PMSE. Additional bi-allelic mutations related to PMSE thus far have not been observed in Baylor ∼6,000 consecutive clinical WES cases, supporting the rarity of this disorder. Our findings may have treatment implications for the patient since previous studies have shown rapamycin as a potential therapeutic agent for the seizures and cognitive problems in PMSE patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27170158

  15. FMRI in Epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Araújo, Dráulio B.; Araújo, David; Rosset, Sara; Wichert-Ana, Lauro; Baffa, Oswaldo; Ceiki Sakamoto, Américo; Pereira Leite, João; Santos, Antônio Carlos

    2004-09-01

    Localization of eloquent areas is of utmost importance in neurosurgical planning, especially in epilepsy surgery. Mass, destructive, or developmental lesions may distort brain anatomy. Functional MRI (fMRI) can localize eloquent areas despite these distortions and provide useful information for the planning of tailored resections. This paper deals with the major issues concerning the use of fMRI in epilepsy surgery, including its limitations. We present results derived from the clinical experience of the Epilepsy Surgery Center at Ribeirão Preto School of Medicine, where typical finger tapping and language fMRI paradigms were applied to 40 patients being considered for resective epilepsy surgery around eloquent cortex. Our results confirmed that although fMRI may not be used as a single tool for surgical planning, in conjunction with other methods it is useful in reducing the surgical time, it improves lesion resection, and prevents functional deficits.

  16. Sexual dysfunction in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Morrell, M J

    1991-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction may arise more frequently in men and women with epilepsy than with other chronic illnesses, manifesting primarily as diminished sexual desire and potency. Studies using retrospective self-report of sexual attitude and behavior find an incidence of sexual dysfunction ranging from 14-66%. Sexual dysfunction may be more common in partial than in generalized epilepsies. Sexual dysfunction in epilepsy may result from a disturbance in social or psychological factors affecting sexual responsiveness. Alternatively, epileptiform discharges may disrupt the function of structures mediating sexual behavior, particularly the limbic cortex, or alter the release of hypothalamic or pituitary hormones. Antiepileptic drugs modulate hormone release from the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and may have direct inhibitory effects on sexual behavior. Evidence both supports and refutes each of these etiologies in the sexual dysfunction seen with epilepsy. Specific evaluation and treatment protocols for patients with sexual dysfunction are available.

  17. Using anxiolytics in epilepsy: neurobiological, neuropharmacological and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Mula, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Anxiety disorders represent a common psychiatric comorbidity in patients with epilepsy, affecting prognosis and quality of life. However, they are still underdiagnosed and undertreated. In clinical practice, a number of compounds are currently used as anxiolytics, with benzodiazepines being the most popular. Other drug classes, especially antiepileptic drugs, are increasingly prescribed for the treatment of anxiety. This article discusses the neurobiological targets and basic neuropharmacological aspects of anxiolytics in order to give the reader clear insight into their activity and mechanism of action. Clinical data regarding the treatment of anxiety in both adults and children with epilepsy are also summarised, emphasising the need for further studies. PMID:27435111

  18. Determinants of intelligence in childhood-onset epilepsy: a single-center study.

    PubMed

    Park, Jungmee; Yum, Mi-Sun; Choi, Hae-won; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Hyo Won; Ko, Tae-Sung

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the intelligence of children with epilepsy and to determine the clinical factors associated with intellectual impairment. The medical records of patients diagnosed with childhood-onset epilepsy at a single tertiary medical center in Korea between 2006 and 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. The Korean Education Development Institute-Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children or Korean Wechsler Intelligence Scale for adults was used to quantify the level of intelligence. Age at seizure onset, etiology, epilepsy duration, number of seizures in the last year, use of antiepileptic drugs, EEG/MRI findings, and epilepsy classification were recorded. The association between clinical factors and the intelligence was determined using logistic regression. Three hundred and twenty-two patients were included in the analysis. One hundred and seventy-six (54.7%) patients had low intelligence (intelligence quotient [IQ]<80) with 18 (5.6%) defined as borderline mental retardation (IQ 70-79), 47 (14.6%) as mild mental retardation (IQ 60-69), and 111 (34.5%) as moderate-to-severe mental retardation (IQ<60). Epilepsy duration, number of seizures in the last year, and epilepsy classification were significantly associated with low intelligence in multivariate logistic regression (p<0.05). However, when analyzed according to etiology, these factors were not associated with low intelligence in children with idiopathic epilepsy. The most important factors associated with low intelligence in childhood-onset epilepsy are the underlying etiology and, in cryptogenic and symptomatic epilepsy, seizure burden. The results of this study underscore the importance of seizure control to alleviate the harmful impact of epilepsy on cognition.

  19. Topiramate and its effect on fMRI of language in patients with right or left temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Allendorfer, Jane B

    2012-05-01

    Topiramate (TPM) is well recognized for its negative effects on cognition, language performance and lateralization results on the intracarotid amobarbital procedure (IAP). But, the effects of TPM on functional MRI (fMRI) of language and the fMRI signals are less clear. Functional MRI is increasingly used for presurgical evaluation of epilepsy patients in place of IAP for language lateralization. Thus, the goal of this study was to assess the effects of TPM on fMRI signals. In this study, we included 8 patients with right temporal lobe epilepsy (RTLE) and 8 with left temporal lobe epilepsy (LTLE) taking TPM (+TPM). Matched to them for age, handedness and side of seizure onset were 8 patients with RTLE and 8 with LTLE not taking TPM (-TPM). Matched for age and handedness to the patients with TLE were 32 healthy controls. The fMRI paradigm involved semantic decision/tone decision task (in-scanner behavioral data were collected). All epilepsy patients received a standard neuropsychological language battery. One sample t-tests were performed within each group to assess task-specific activations. Functional MRI data random-effects analysis was performed to determine significant group activation differences and to assess the effect of TPM dose on task activation. Direct group comparisons of fMRI, language and demographic data between patients with R/L TLE +TPM vs. -TPM and the analysis of the effects of TPM on blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal were performed. Groups were matched for age, handedness and, within the R/L TLE groups, for the age of epilepsy onset/duration and the number of AEDs/TPM dose. The in-scanner language performance of patients was worse when compared to healthy controls - all p<0.044. While all groups showed fMRI activation typical for this task, regression analyses comparing L/R TLE +TPM vs. -TPM showed significant fMRI signal differences between groups (increases in left cingulate gyrus and decreases in left superior temporal gyrus in

  20. [Antidepressants in epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Castaño-Monsalve, Beatriz

    2013-08-01

    Depression is a common condition in patients with epilepsy that entails a deterioration of the quality of life of this population and that, therefore, requires appropriate treatment. The potential risk of antidepressants in relation to the seizure threshold is overestimated by many professionals, and this has an influence when it comes to making the decision to treat them. It sometimes means that the patients do not receive antidepressant drugs. In this regard, the aim of this review is to present the current state of the art in terms of the safety of antidepressants in patients with epilepsy. A search of the medical literature was conducted and, following its analysis, the most significant results are presented. Current information indicates that most antidepressants are safe for epileptic patients at therapeutic doses and that the risk of seizures occurs mainly in cases of overdose. Preferred drugs for treating depression in epilepsy are serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Bupropion and tricyclic antidepressants must be avoided.

  1. Two-year real-world experience with perampanel in patients with refractory focal epilepsy: Austrian data

    PubMed Central

    Rohracher, Alexandra; Kalss, Gudrun; Leitinger, Markus; Granbichler, Claudia; Deak, Ildiko; Dobesberger, Judith; Kuchukhidze, Giorgi; Thomschewski, Aljoscha; Höfler, Julia; Trinka, Eugen

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to analyse registry data of seizure outcome and adverse events (AEs) for perampanel as add-on therapy in patients with focal epilepsy since its approval in 2012 for adjunctive treatment of focal epilepsy in patients ⩾12 years. Method: A retrospective 2-year chart review of all patients receiving perampanel was carried out. Results: A total of 122 patients received perampanel [median treatment length: 20.1 (range: 3.4–26.8) months]; 71 (58%) remained on treatment at last follow up. Overall, 33 patients (27%) were seizure-free for ⩾3 months at last follow up; of these, eight were seizure free for ⩾3 times the longest interictal interval before perampanel therapy; 18 (15%) had reduced seizure frequency ⩾50%. A total of 58 (47%) had an AE and 34 (28%) withdrew from treatment because of AEs. AEs included dizziness (33%), fatigue (12%), psychiatric symptoms (8%), cognitive deficits (7%), speech problems (5%), nausea (4%) and gait problems (4%). AEs subsided in 17/18 patients (94%) following a 2 mg dose reduction. A total of 43 (35%) took a concomitant enzyme inducer. Patients not taking enzyme inducers were more likely to be seizure free (p = 0.002); there were no other between-group differences. Conclusions: Perampanel was well tolerated and improved seizure control in 42% of patients (50– 100% reduction), with higher rates in those not receiving a concomitant enzyme inducer. AEs, particularly dizziness, were common but often disappeared with a slight dose reduction. The results are consistent with those from randomized controlled trials. PMID:27800020

  2. Epilepsy, Antiepileptic Drugs, and Aggression: An Evidence-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Besag, Frank; Ettinger, Alan B.; Mula, Marco; Gobbi, Gabriella; Comai, Stefano; Aldenkamp, Albert P.; Steinhoff, Bernhard J.

    2016-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have many benefits but also many side effects, including aggression, agitation, and irritability, in some patients with epilepsy. This article offers a comprehensive summary of current understanding of aggressive behaviors in patients with epilepsy, including an evidence-based review of aggression during AED treatment. Aggression is seen in a minority of people with epilepsy. It is rarely seizure related but is interictal, sometimes occurring as part of complex psychiatric and behavioral comorbidities, and it is sometimes associated with AED treatment. We review the common neurotransmitter systems and brain regions implicated in both epilepsy and aggression, including the GABA, glutamate, serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline systems and the hippocampus, amygdala, prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and temporal lobes. Few controlled clinical studies have used behavioral measures to specifically examine aggression with AEDs, and most evidence comes from adverse event reporting from clinical and observational studies. A systematic approach was used to identify relevant publications, and we present a comprehensive, evidence-based summary of available data surrounding aggression-related behaviors with each of the currently available AEDs in both adults and in children/adolescents with epilepsy. A psychiatric history and history of a propensity toward aggression/anger should routinely be sought from patients, family members, and carers; its presence does not preclude the use of any specific AEDs, but those most likely to be implicated in these behaviors should be used with caution in such cases. PMID:27255267

  3. Epilepsy, Antiepileptic Drugs, and Aggression: An Evidence-Based Review.

    PubMed

    Brodie, Martin J; Besag, Frank; Ettinger, Alan B; Mula, Marco; Gobbi, Gabriella; Comai, Stefano; Aldenkamp, Albert P; Steinhoff, Bernhard J

    2016-07-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have many benefits but also many side effects, including aggression, agitation, and irritability, in some patients with epilepsy. This article offers a comprehensive summary of current understanding of aggressive behaviors in patients with epilepsy, including an evidence-based review of aggression during AED treatment. Aggression is seen in a minority of people with epilepsy. It is rarely seizure related but is interictal, sometimes occurring as part of complex psychiatric and behavioral comorbidities, and it is sometimes associated with AED treatment. We review the common neurotransmitter systems and brain regions implicated in both epilepsy and aggression, including the GABA, glutamate, serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline systems and the hippocampus, amygdala, prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and temporal lobes. Few controlled clinical studies have used behavioral measures to specifically examine aggression with AEDs, and most evidence comes from adverse event reporting from clinical and observational studies. A systematic approach was used to identify relevant publications, and we present a comprehensive, evidence-based summary of available data surrounding aggression-related behaviors with each of the currently available AEDs in both adults and in children/adolescents with epilepsy. A psychiatric history and history of a propensity toward aggression/anger should routinely be sought from patients, family members, and carers; its presence does not preclude the use of any specific AEDs, but those most likely to be implicated in these behaviors should be used with caution in such cases. PMID:27255267

  4. A five-year follow-up study of the general public awareness and perception of epilepsy in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Bagić, Dragan; Mastilica, Miroslav; Bagić, Anto

    2012-10-01

    Public reception of epilepsy in Croatia was re-assessed in 2009, 5 years after an initial survey, by interviewing 1000 randomly selected adults. Ninety-two percent (-5.0%) of the respondents had heard about epilepsy, 47% (-7.9%) knew someone with epilepsy, and 38.6% (-6.0%) had witnessed a seizure. Interviewees were quite ready to accept a person with epilepsy. Almost 8% (+1.1%) would object if their child played with a child with epilepsy, and 77.8% (+1.8%) believed that a child with epilepsy could succeed as well as a child without epilepsy. Although 45.9% (-6.6%) would approach a person having a seizure and help, 36.1% (+3.0%) would also call "911." Citizens of Croatia re-declared a high tolerance toward people with epilepsy and positive attitude toward children with epilepsy. Experiential factors remained strong predictors of more positive attitudes. A more prominent role of patients and implementation of social marketing in addressing a large persisting degree of prejudice and stigmatization worldwide are warranted.

  5. Sabril® registry 5-year results: Characteristics of adult patients treated with vigabatrin.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Gregory; Faught, Edward; Foroozan, Rod; Pellock, John M; Sergott, Robert C; Shields, W Donald; Ziemann, Adam; Dribinsky, Yekaterina; Lee, Deborah; Torri, Sarah; Othman, Feisal; Isojarvi, Jouko

    2016-03-01

    Vigabatrin (Sabril®), approved in the US in 2009, is currently indicated as adjunctive therapy for refractory complex partial seizures (rCPS) in patients ≥ 10 years old who have responded inadequately to several alternative treatments and as monotherapy for infantile spasms (IS) in patients 1 month to 2 years of age. Because of reports of vision loss following vigabatrin exposure, FDA approval required a risk evaluation mitigation strategy (REMS) program. Vigabatrin is only available in the US through Support, Help, And Resources for Epilepsy (SHARE), which includes a mandated registry. This article describes 5 years of demographic and treatment exposure data from adult patients (≥ 17 years old) in the US treated with vigabatrin and monitored in the ongoing Sabril® registry. Registry participation is mandatory for all US Sabril® prescribers and patients. A benefit-risk assessment must be documented by the physician for a patient to progress to maintenance therapy, defined as 1 month of vigabatrin treatment for patients with IS and 3 months for patients with rCPS. Ophthalmologic assessments must be documented during and after completion of therapy. As of August 26, 2014, a total of 6823 patients were enrolled in the registry, of which 1200 were adults at enrollment. Of these patients, 1031 (86%) were naïve to vigabatrin. The majority of adult patients (n=783, 65%) had previously been prescribed ≥ 4 AEDs, and 719 (60%) were receiving ≥ 3 concomitant AEDs at vigabatrin initiation. Prescribers submitted an initial ophthalmological assessment form for 863 patients; an ophthalmologic exam was not completed for 300 (35%) patients and thus, were considered exempted from vision testing. Of these patients, 128 (43%) were exempted for neurologic disabilities. Clinicians discontinued treatment in 8 patients because of visual field deficits (VFD) (5 patients naïve to vigabatrin and 3 patients previously exposed). Based on Kaplan-Meier survival estimates, it is

  6. Ab Interno Trabeculectomy in the Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    SooHoo, Jeffrey R.; Seibold, Leonard K.; Kahook, Malik Y.

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a potentially blinding disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The mainstay of treatment is lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP) through the use of medications, laser and/or incisional surgery. The trabecular meshwork (TM) is thought to be the site of significant resistance to aqueous outflow in open angle glaucoma. Theoretically, an incision through TM or TM removal should decrease this resistance and lead to a significant reduction in IOP. This approach, commonly referred to as goniotomy or trabeculotomy, has been validated in the pediatric population and has been associated with long-term IOP control. In adults, however, removal of TM tissue has been historically associated with more limited and short-lived success. More recent evidence, reveals that even adult patients may benefit significantly from removal of diseased TM tissue and can lead to a significant reduction in IOP that is long-lasting and safe. In this review, we discuss current evidence and techniques for ab interno trabeculectomy using various devices in the adult patient. PMID:25624670

  7. Ab interno trabeculectomy in the adult patient.

    PubMed

    SooHoo, Jeffrey R; Seibold, Leonard K; Kahook, Malik Y

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a potentially blinding disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The mainstay of treatment is lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP) through the use of medications, laser and/or incisional surgery. The trabecular meshwork (TM) is thought to be the site of significant resistance to aqueous outflow in open angle glaucoma. Theoretically, an incision through TM or TM removal should decrease this resistance and lead to a significant reduction in IOP. This approach, commonly referred to as goniotomy or trabeculotomy, has been validated in the pediatric population and has been associated with long-term IOP control. In adults, however, removal of TM tissue has been historically associated with more limited and short-lived success. More recent evidence, reveals that even adult patients may benefit significantly from removal of diseased TM tissue and can lead to a significant reduction in IOP that is long-lasting and safe. In this review, we discuss current evidence and techniques for ab interno trabeculectomy using various devices in the adult patient.

  8. The effects of phenytoin and sodium valproate on the periodontal health of adult epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Seymour, R A; Smith, D G; Turnbull, D N

    1985-07-01

    The periodontal health of 30 adult epileptic patients treated with either sodium valproate or phenytoin was compared with a control group (n = 15) of otherwise healthy patients. The 3 groups were matched for age and sex. Patients on phenytoin therapy showed significantly higher plaque scores (P less than 0.05), gingival index (P less than 0.05) and pocketing (P less than 0.05) than patients in the control group. The % of gingival hyperplasia was significantly higher (P less than 0.05) in the phenytoin-treated patients than those on sodium valproate or in the control group. However, patients on phenytoin therapy had significantly less bone loss than those on sodium valproate (P less than 0.05) or in the control group (P less than 0.01). No significant differences were observed between the sodium valproate group and the control group on any of the parameters assessed. The results from this study would suggest that sodium valproate has no unwanted effects on periodontal health and may be considered a safe alternative, regarding the periodontal aspects, to phenytoin for the treatment of adult onset epilepsy.

  9. Epilepsy, aggression, and criminal responsibility.

    PubMed

    Borum, R; Appelbaum, K L

    1996-07-01

    Although epilepsy-related violence can occur, accounts of criminal behavior caused by epilepsy remain rare and unconvincing. The authors describe a case of apparent postictal aggression, resulting in felony assault charges, by a patient who had nocturnal complex partial seizures, followed by what appeared to be sleepwalking and periods of postictal wandering and confusion.

  10. Remembering versus knowing during face recognition in unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy patients with or without hippocampal sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bengner, Thomas; Malina, Thomas

    2008-11-01

    Recognition memory involves knowing an item was learned (familiarity) and remembering contextual details about the prior learning episode (recollection). We tested three competing hypotheses about the role of the hippocampus in recollection and familiarity. It mediates either recollection or familiarity, or serves both processes. We further tested whether the left temporal lobe mediates recollection and the right temporal lobe familiarity (modes of processing view), or whether the two temporal lobes mediate remembering material specifically (material specificity view). We investigated 24-h face recognition using the "remember-know" procedure. We studied 23 left and 24 right temporal lobe epilepsy (LTLE/RTLE) patients with and without hippocampal sclerosis (HS+/HS-) and 31 healthy participants. HS+ patients made fewer know responses than HS- patients or healthy participants. RTLE was related to fewer remember responses than LTLE. Our results suggest the hippocampus has a critical role in familiarity. Further, our findings support the material specificity hypothesis of laterality.

  11. Determining Surgical Candidacy in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Alireza; Fallah, Aria; Valiante, Taufik A.

    2012-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common form of adult epilepsy that is amenable to surgical treatment. In the carefully selected patient, excellent seizure outcome can be achieved with minimal or no side effects from surgery. This may result in improved psychosocial functioning, achieving higher education, and maintaining or gaining employment. The objective of this paper is to discuss the surgical selection process of a patient with TLE. We define what constitutes a patient that has medically refractory TLE, describe the typical history and physical examination, and distinguish between mesial TLE and neocortical TLE. We then review the role of routine (ambulatory/sleep-deprived electroencephalography (EEG), video EEG, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), neuropsychological testing, and Wada testing) and ancillary preoperative testing (positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), subtraction ictal SPECT correlated to MRI (SISCOM), magnetoencephalography, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and functional MRI) in selecting surgical candidates. We describe the surgical options for resective epilepsy surgery in TLE and its commonly associated risks while highlighting some of the controversies. Lastly, we present teaching cases to illustrate the presurgical workup of patients with medically refractory TLE. PMID:22957238

  12. Using Lorenz plot and Cardiac Sympathetic Index of heart rate variability for detecting seizures for patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Jeppesen, Jesper; Beniczky, Sandor; Johansen, Peter; Sidenius, Per; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Tachycardia is often seen during epileptic seizures, but it also occurs during physical exercise. In order to assess whether focal epileptic seizures can be detected by short term moving window Heart Rate Variability (HRV) analysis, we modified the geometric HRV method, Lorenz plot, to consist of only 30, 50 or 100 R-R intervals per analyzed window. From each window we calculated the longitudinal (L) and transverse (T) variability of Lorenz plot to retrieve the Cardiac Sympathetic Index (CSI) as (L/T) and "Modified CSI" (described in methods), and compared the maximum during the patient's epileptic seizures with that during the patient's own exercise and non-seizure sessions as control. All five analyzed patients had complex partial seizures (CPS) originating in the temporal lobe (11 seizures) during their 1-5 days long term video-EEG monitoring. All CPS with electroencephalographic correlation were selected for the HRV analysis. The CSI and Modified CSI were correspondently calculated after each heart beat depicting the prior 30, 50 and 100 R-R intervals at the time. CSI (30, 50 and 100) and Modified CSI (100) showed a higher maximum peak during seizures than exercise/non-seizure (121-296%) for 4 of the 5 patients within 4 seconds before till 60 seconds after seizure onset time even though exercise maximum HR exceeded that of the seizures. The results indicate a detectable, sudden and inordinate shift towards sympathetic overdrive in the sympathovagal balance of the autonomic nervous system just around seizure-onset for certain patients. This new modified moving window Lorenz plot method seems promising way of constructing a portable ECG-based epilepsy alarm for certain patients with epilepsy who needs aid during seizure.

  13. Epilepsy and athletics.

    PubMed

    Cantu, R V; Cantu, R

    1998-01-01

    This article reviews the debate regarding epileptic patients and their participation in sports, particularly contact (i.e., basketball, soccer, baseball) and collision (i.e., football, rugby, hockey) sports. Epilepsy is defined and described, as well as the dangers and benefits of exercise to the epileptic patient, including participation in athletic competition.

  14. Adolescents and adults affected by Cornelia de Lange syndrome: A report of 73 Italian patients.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Milena; Decimi, Valentina; Bettini, Laura Rachele; Maitz, Silvia; Gervasini, Cristina; Masciadri, Maura; Ajmone, Paola; Kullman, Gaia; Dinelli, Marco; Panceri, Roberto; Cereda, Anna; Selicorni, Angelo

    2016-06-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a rare genetic condition related to mutation of various cohesion complex related genes. Its natural history is quite well characterized as regard pediatric age. Relatively little information is available regarding the evolution of the disease in young-adult age. In medical literature, only one specific study has been published on this topic. We report on our experience on 73 Italian CdLS patients (40 males and 33 females) with and age range from 15 to 49 years. Our results confirm the previous study indicating that gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the main medical problem of these patients in childhood and young-adult age. Other medical features that should be considered in the medical follow-up are tendency to overweight/frank obesity, constipation, discrepancy of limbs' length, epilepsy, hearing, and visual problems. Behavioral problems are particularly frequent as well. For this reason, every source of hidden pain should be actively searched for in evaluating a patient showing such a disorder. Finally, recommendations for medical follow-up in adult age are discussed. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27164219

  15. Epilepsy Surgery: An Evidence Summary

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Medical Advisory Secretariat, the predecessor of Health Quality Ontario, published an evidence-based analysis on functional brain imaging. This analysis highlighted the low uptake of epilepsy surgery in Ontario and internationally. Objective The objective of this analysis was to review the effectiveness of epilepsy surgery at reducing seizure frequency, as well as the safety of epilepsy surgery. Data Sources The literature search included studies published between January 1995 and March 2012. Search terms included epilepsy, surgery, resection, safety, and complications. Review Methods Studies were eligible for inclusion if they included at least 20 patients undergoing surgery; had a comparison group of patients with epilepsy who were not undergoing surgery; and reported follow-up periods of at least 1 year. Outcomes of interest included seizure frequency and complications associated with surgery. Results Six systematic reviews reported pooled seizure-free rates that ranged from 43% to 75%. Two randomized controlled trials compared the effectiveness of epilepsy surgery with no surgery in patients with drug-refractory epilepsy. Both trials reported significant improvements in the seizure frequency in the surgery group compared with the nonsurgery group. Eight retrospective cohort studies reported on the safety of epilepsy surgery. Of the 2,725 patients included in these studies, there were 3 deaths reportedly related to surgery. Other complications included hemiparesis, infection, and visual field defects. The studies had long follow-up periods ranging from a mean of 2 to 7 years. Limitations The most recent randomized controlled trial was stopped early due to slow enrolment rates. Thus results need to be interpreted with caution. Conclusions There is high quality evidence that epilepsy surgery is effective at reducing seizure frequency. Two randomized controlled trials compared surgery to no surgery in patients with drug-refractory epilepsy. Both

  16. Epilepsy and athletics.

    PubMed

    Fountain, Nathan B; May, Anthony C

    2003-07-01

    It may seem logical to place restrictions on athletes with epilepsy, but there are no studies to suggest that even contact sports exacerbate seizures, and there is ample evidence that exercise reduces seizure frequency and improves well-being. Thus, sports participation should generally be encouraged for epilepsy patients. The risk-benefit analysis for an individual patient is highly dependent on the athletic activity considered; type of seizure, the likelihood that a seizure will occur during the activity, and comorbid conditions. Water sports (scuba diving, swimming, boating), sports performed at heights (piloting, sky diving, climbing, horseback riding), and motor sports require specific considerations.

  17. Transition issues for benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes, nonlesional focal epilepsy in otherwise normal children, childhood absence epilepsy, and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Camfield, Carol S; Berg, Anne; Stephani, Ulrich; Wirrell, Elaine C

    2014-08-01

    This chapter covers the syndromes of benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS), nonlesional focal epilepsy in otherwise normal children (NLFN), and the genetic generalized epilepsies. BECTS is an epilepsy syndrome that always enters terminal remission before the general age of a planned transition of adolescents. This is also the case for the majority (65%) of those with childhood absence epilepsy (CAE). Approximately 15% of patients with CAE who initially remit during their childhood years later develop juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) as teenagers. They will have many issues for continuing medical care and transition, because their seizure disorder generally persists into adulthood. A significant minority of NLFN (~35%) and most patients with JME continue to have active epilepsy into adulthood. In addition, CAE, JME, and NLFN patients are at risk of a number of significant adverse social outcomes that require ongoing advice and counseling.

  18. Carboplatin dosing for adult Japanese patients.

    PubMed

    Ando, Yuichi; Shimokata, Tomoya; Yasuda, Yoshinari; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2014-02-01

    Carboplatin is a platinum-based anticancer drug that has been long used to treat many types of solid cancer. Because the clearance of carboplatin strongly correlates with the glomerular filtration rate (GFR), its dosage is calculated with the Calvert formula on the basis of the patient's GFR to achieve the target area under the plasma drug concentration-time curve (AUC) for each patient. However, many lines of evidence from previous clinical studies should be interpreted with caution because different methods were used to estimate drug clearance and derive the dosage of carboplatin. There is a particularly high risk of carboplatin overdosing when the dosage is determined on the basis of standardized serum creatinine values. When deciding the dose of carboplatin for adult Japanese patients, preferred methods to assess renal function instead of directly measuring GFR include (1) 24-h urinary collection-based creatinine clearance adjusted by adding 0.2 mg/dl to the serum creatinine concentration measured by standardized methods, and (2) equation-based GFR (eGFR) with a back calculation to units of ml/min per subject. Given the limitations of serum creatinine-based GFR estimations, the GFR or creatinine clearance should be directly measured in each patient whenever possible. To ensure patient safety and facilitate a medical-team approach, the single most appropriate method available at each institute or medical team should be consistently used to calculate the dose of carboplatin with the Calvert formula.

  19. Learning real-life cognitive abilities in a novel 360°-virtual reality supermarket: a neuropsychological study of healthy participants and patients with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To increase the ecological validity of neuropsychological instruments the use of virtual reality (VR) applications can be considered as an effective tool in the field of cognitive neurorehabilitation. Despite the growing use of VR programs, only few studies have considered the application of everyday activities like shopping or travelling in VR training devices. Methods We developed a novel 360°- VR supermarket, which is displayed on a circular arrangement of 8 touch-screens – the “OctaVis”. In this setting, healthy human adults had to memorize an auditorily presented shopping list (list A) and subsequently buy all remembered products of this list in the VR supermarket. This procedure was accomplished on three consecutive days. On day four, a new shopping list (list B) was introduced and participants had to memorize and buy only products of this list. On day five, participants had to buy all remembered items of list A again, but without new presentation of list A. Additionally, we obtained measures of participants’ presence, immersion and figural-spatial memory abilities. We also tested a sample of patients with focal epilepsy with an extended version of our shopping task, which consisted of eight days of training. Results We observed a comprehensive and stable effect of learning for the number of correct products, the required time for shopping, and the length of movement trajectories in the VR supermarket in the course of the training program. Task performance was significantly correlated with participants’ figural-spatial memory abilities and subjective level of immersion into the VR. Conclusions Learning effects in our paradigm extend beyond mere verbal learning of the shopping list as the data show evidence for multi-layered learning (at least visual-spatial, strategic, and verbal) on concordant measures. Importantly, learning also correlated with measures of figural-spatial memory and the degree of immersion into the VR. We propose that

  20. Neuroimaging of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Cendes, Fernando; Theodore, William H; Brinkmann, Benjamin H; Sulc, Vlastimil; Cascino, Gregory D

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is pivotal in the evaluation and management of patients with seizure disorders. Elegant structural neuroimaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may assist in determining the etiology of focal epilepsy and demonstrating the anatomical changes associated with seizure activity. The high diagnostic yield of MRI to identify the common pathological findings in individuals with focal seizures including mesial temporal sclerosis, vascular anomalies, low-grade glial neoplasms and malformations of cortical development has been demonstrated. Positron emission tomography (PET) is the most commonly performed interictal functional neuroimaging technique that may reveal a focal hypometabolic region concordant with seizure onset. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies may assist performance of ictal neuroimaging in patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy being considered for neurosurgical treatment. This chapter highlights neuroimaging developments and innovations, and provides a comprehensive overview of the imaging strategies used to improve the care and management of people with epilepsy. PMID:27430454

  1. Atlantoaxial Rotatory Fixation in Adults Patient

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Sei Woong; Moon, Seung Myung; Choi, Sun Kil

    2009-01-01

    Atlantoaxial rotatory fixation (AARF) in adult is a rare disorder that occurs followed by a trauma. The patients were presented with painful torticollis and a typical 'cock robin' position of the head. The clinical diagnosis is generally difficult and often made in the late stage. In some cases, an irreducible or chronic fixation develops. We reported a case of AARF in adult patient which was treated by immobilization with conservative treatment. A 25-year-old female was presented with a posterior neck pain and limitation of motion of cervical spine after a traffic accident. She had no neurological deficit but suffered from severe defect on the scalp and multiple thoracic compression fractures. Plain radiographs demonstrated torticollis, lateral shift of odontoid process to one side and widening of one side of C1-C2 joint space. Immobilization with a Holter traction were performed and analgesics and muscle relaxants were given. Posterior neck pain and limitation of the cervical spine's motion were resolved. Plain cervical radiographs taken at one month after the injury showed that torticollis disappeared and the dens were in the midline position. The authors reported a case of type I post-traumatic AARF that was successfully treated by immobilization alone. PMID:19444353

  2. Detection and Magnetic Source Imaging of Fast Oscillations (40-160 Hz) Recorded with Magnetoencephalography in Focal Epilepsy Patients.

    PubMed

    von Ellenrieder, Nicolás; Pellegrino, Giovanni; Hedrich, Tanguy; Gotman, Jean; Lina, Jean-Marc; Grova, Christophe; Kobayashi, Eliane

    2016-03-01

    We present a framework to detect fast oscillations (FOs) in magnetoencephalography (MEG) and to perform magnetic source imaging (MSI) to determine the location and extent of their generators in the cortex. FOs can be of physiologic origin associated to sensory processing and memory consolidation. In epilepsy, FOs are of pathologic origin and biomarkers of the epileptogenic zone. Seventeen patients with focal epilepsy previously confirmed with identified FOs in scalp electroencephalography (EEG) were evaluated. To handle data deriving from large number of sensors (275 axial gradiometers) we used an automatic detector with high sensitivity. False positives were discarded by two human experts. MSI of the FOs was performed with the wavelet based maximum entropy on the mean method. We found FOs in 11/17 patients, in only one patient the channel with highest FO rate was not concordant with the epileptogenic region and might correspond to physiologic oscillations. MEG FOs rates were very low: 0.02-4.55 per minute. Compared to scalp EEG, detection sensitivity was lower, but the specificity higher in MEG. MSI of FOs showed concordance or partial concordance with proven generators of seizures and epileptiform activity in 10/11 patients. We have validated the proposed framework for the non-invasive study of FOs with MEG. The excellent overall concordance with other clinical gold standard evaluation tools indicates that MEG FOs can provide relevant information to guide implantation for intracranial EEG pre-surgical evaluation and for surgical treatment, and demonstrates the important added value of choosing appropriate FOs detection and source localization methods. PMID:26830767

  3. Functional MRI evidence for language plasticity in adult epileptic patients: Preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Cousin, Emilie; Baciu, Monica; Pichat, Cédric; Kahane, Philippe; Le Bas, Jean-François

    2008-01-01

    The present fMRI study explores the cerebral reorganisation of language in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, according to the age of seizures onset (early or late) and the hippocampal sclerosis (associated or not). Seven right-handed control volunteers and seven preoperative adult epileptic patients performed a rhyme decision (language condition) and a visual detection (control condition) tasks in visually presented words and unreadable characters, respectively. All patients were left hemisphere dominant for language. Appropriate statistical analyses provided the following preliminary results: (1) patients compared with healthy subjects showed lower degree of hemispheric lateralization with supplementary involvement of the right hemisphere; (2) the degree of hemispheric specialization depends on the considered region; (3) patients with early seizures show signs of temporal and parietal reorganization more frequently than patients with late onset of seizures; (4) patients with early seizures show a tendency for intra-hemispheric frontal reorganisation; (5) associated hippocampal sclerosis facilitates the inter-hemispheric shift of temporal activation. Although our patients were left hemisphere predominant for language, the statistical analyses indicated that the degree of lateralization was significantly lower than in healthy subjects. This result has been considered as the indication of atypical lateralization of language. PMID:18728818

  4. Epilepsy and vaccinations: Italian guidelines.

    PubMed

    Pruna, Dario; Balestri, Paolo; Zamponi, Nelia; Grosso, Salvatore; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Romeo, Antonino; Franzoni, Emilio; Osti, Maria; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Longhi, Riccardo; Verrotti, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    Reports of childhood epilepsies in temporal association with vaccination have had a great impact on the acceptance of vaccination programs by health care providers, but little is known about this possible temporal association and about the types of seizures following vaccinations. For these reasons the Italian League Against Epilepsy (LICE), in collaboration with other Italian scientific societies, has decided to generate Guidelines on Vaccinations and Epilepsy. The aim of Guidelines on Vaccinations and Epilepsy is to present recent unequivocal evidence from published reports on the possible relationship between vaccines and epilepsy in order to provide information about contraindications and risks of vaccinations in patients with epilepsy. The following main issues have been addressed: (1) whether contraindications to vaccinations exist in patients with febrile convulsions, epilepsy, and/or epileptic encephalopathies; and (2) whether any vaccinations can cause febrile seizures, epilepsy, and/or epileptic encephalopathies. Diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccination and measles, mumps, and rubella vaccination (MMR) increase significantly the risk of febrile seizures. Recent observations and data about the relationships between vaccination and epileptic encephalopathy show that some cases of apparent vaccine-induced encephalopathy could in fact be caused by an inherent genetic defect with no causal relationship with vaccination.

  5. Epilepsy (generalised)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction About 3% of people will be diagnosed with epilepsy during their lifetime, but about 70% of people with epilepsy eventually go into remission. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of monotherapy in newly diagnosed generalised epilepsy (tonic clonic type)? What are the effects of additional treatments in people with drug-resistant generalised epilepsy? What are the effects of surgery in people with drug-resistant generalised epilepsy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 8 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: monotherapy using carbamazepine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, phenobarbital, phenytoin, sodium valproate, or topiramate; addition of second-line drugs (lamotrigine or levetiracetam) for drug-resistant epilepsy; and hemispherectomy for drug-resistant epilepsy. PMID:22348419

  6. Epilepsy (generalised)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction About 3% of people will be diagnosed with epilepsy during their lifetime, but about 70% of people with epilepsy eventually go into remission. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of monotherapy in newly diagnosed generalised epilepsy (tonic clonic type)? What are the effects of additional treatments in people with drug-resistant generalised epilepsy? What are the effects of surgery in people with drug-resistant generalised epilepsy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found eight systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: monotherapy using carbamazepine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, phenobarbital, phenytoin, sodium valproate, or topiramate; addition of second-line drugs (lamotrigine or levetiracetam) for drug-resistant epilepsy; and hemispherectomy for drug-resistant epilepsy. PMID:21418687

  7. Peri-ictal water drinking: a rare automatic behaviour in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Pietrafusa, Nicola; Trivisano, Marina; de Palma, Luca; Serino, Domenico; Moavero, Romina; Benvenga, Antonella; Cappelletti, Simona; Boero, Giovanni; Vigevano, Federico; La Neve, Angela; Specchio, Nicola

    2015-12-01

    Peri-ictal water drinking (PIWD) has been reported as the action of drinking during or within two minutes of an electroclinical seizure. It is considered a peri-ictal vegetative symptom, evident both during childhood and adulthood epilepsy. The aim of this paper was to describe the clinical and electroencephalographic features of two new adult subjects suffering from symptomatic temporal lobe epilepsy with episodes of PIWD recorded by VIDEO-EEG and to review literature data in order to better define this peculiar event during seizures, a rare and probably underestimated semiological sign. To date, 51 cases with focal epilepsy and seizures associated with PIWD have been reported. All patients presented with temporal lobe epilepsy. All cases but one had symptomatic epilepsy. Most of the patients had an involvement of the right hemisphere. Water drinking was reported as an ictal sign in the majority of patients, and less frequently was reported as postictal. We believe that PIWD might be considered a rare automatic behaviour, like other automatisms. Automatisms are more frequently described in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. PIWD was reported also to have lateralizing significance in the non-dominant temporal lobe, however, because of its rarity, this finding remains unclear.

  8. Anthropometric Indices in Children With Refractory Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    AMINZADEH, Vahid; DALILI, Setila; ASHOORIAN, Yalda; KOHMANAEE, Shahin; HASSANZADEH RAD, Afagh

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to assess the effect of body mass index (BMI) on reducing the risk of refractory seizure due to lipoid tissue factors. Materials & Methods This matched case-control study, consisted of cases (Patients with refractory epilepsy) and controls (Healthy children) referred to 17 Shahrivar Hospital, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Guilan, Iran during 2013-2014. Data were gathered by a form including demographic characteristics, type of epilepsy, predominant time of epilepsy, therapeutic approach, frequency of epilepsy, time of disease onset and anthropometric indices. We measured anthropometric indices and transformed them into Z-scores. Data were reported by descriptive statistics (mean and standard deviation) and analyzed by Pearson correlation coefficient, paired t test and multinomial regression analysis test using SPSS 19. Results There was no significant difference between sex groups regarding anthropometric indices. Generalized and focal types of epilepsies were noted on 57.5% and 38.75% of patients, respectively. Daytime epilepsies happened in 46.25% of patients and 33.75% noted no predominant time for epilepsies. Clinicians indicated poly-therapy for the majority of patients (92.5%). The most common onset times for epilepsies were 36-72 months for 32.5% of patients. Lower onset time indicated lower frequency of refractory epilepsies. Although, there was significant difference between Zheight and predominant time of epilepsies but no significant relation was found between types of epilepsies and frequency of epilepsies with anthropometric indices. Using multivariate regression analysis by backward LR, Zweight and birth weight were noted as the predicting factors of refractory epilepsies. Conclusion This effect may be because of leptin. Therefore, researchers recommend further investigations regarding this issue in children with epilepsy. PMID:27057188

  9. Effects of parental gender and level of education on the quality of life and general health of pediatric patients with epilepsy: An outpatient cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Meisam; Amirsalari, Susan; Radfar, Shokofeh; Haidari, Mohsen Reza

    2016-07-01

    The quality of life (QOL) of children with epilepsy has been widely studied, and several problems related to cognition, behavior, social lives, and physical activity among these children have been reported. Family life and parental care are important aspects of the lives of these patients. The impact of parental education on the QOL of pediatric patients with epilepsy is an understudied topic, especially in developing countries. In this study, we investigated the QOL and general health (GH) of patients with epilepsy presenting at the pediatric neurology clinic at Baqiyatallah Hospital and a private clinic. The Quality of Life in Childhood Epilepsy (QOLCE) questionnaire, which is a 92-item epilepsy-specific questionnaire covering physical activity, well-being, cognition, behavior, social activity, overall QOL, and GH, was used for interviewing parents. A total of 106 patients (m=61, 57.5% and f=45, 42.5%) aged 5-17years (mean: 10.31±2.91) participated in the study. Overall, there was no significant difference between the QOL and GH results of male and female patients. However, the maternal education level had a significant impact on the overall QOL (high school: 3.02±0.85 vs. B.Sc.: 3.67±0.61, p<0.05) and GH (high school: 2.81±0.79 vs. B.Sc.: 3.8±0.94, p<0.05) of male patients, while paternal education had no significant effect. A multiple linear regression showed that the maternal education level had an independently significant association with the physical activity of the patients (p=0.02, CI: 1.4-6.25), and the paternal education level had an independently significant association with the well-being of the patients (p=0.02, CI: 0.43-5.36). In addition, the maternal education level (high school vs. B.Sc.) had a significant effect on physical activity, well-being, cognition, and behavior for all of the patients (p<0.05), while the paternal education level (high school vs. B.Sc.) had no significant impact. However, in a comparison of high school vs. higher

  10. Role of Oxidative Stress in Refractory Epilepsy: Evidence in Patients and Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas-Rodriguez, Noemi; Huerta-Gertrudis, Bernardino; Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Montesinos-Correa, Hortencia; Bandala, Cindy; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress, a state of imbalance in the production of reactive oxygen species and nitrogen, is induced by a wide variety of factors. This biochemical state is associated with systemic diseases, and diseases affecting the central nervous system. Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder with refractoriness to drug therapy at about 30%. Currently, experimental evidence supports the involvement of oxidative stress in seizures, in the process of their generation, and in the mechanisms associated with refractoriness to drug therapy. Hence, the aim of this review is to present information in order to facilitate the handling of this evidence and determine the therapeutic impact of the biochemical status for this pathology. PMID:23344052

  11. Focal reading epilepsy--a rare variant of reading epilepsy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Osei-Lah, Abena D; Casadei, Angela; Richardson, Mark P; Alarcon, Gonzalo

    2010-11-01

    Reading epilepsy is a distinct form of epilepsy in which all or almost all seizures are precipitated by reading. Seizures typically show orofacial or jaw myoclonus. Nevertheless, reading epilepsy is not homogenous and its classification is unclear. We report a patient with reading-induced prolonged left temporal seizures, presenting clinically as dyslexia.

  12. A novel giant gene CSMD3 encoding a protein with CUB and sushi multiple domains: a candidate gene for benign adult familial myoclonic epilepsy on human chromosome 8q23.3-q24.1.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Atsushi; Asakawa, Shuichi; Sasaki, Takashi; Yamazaki, Satoru; Yamagata, Hidehisa; Kudoh, Jun; Minoshima, Shinsei; Kondo, Ikuko; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi

    2003-09-12

    We identified a novel giant gene encoding a transmembrane protein with CUB and sushi multiple domains on the human chromosome 8q23.3-q24.1 in which benign adult familial myoclonic epilepsy type 1 (BAFME1/FAME, OMIM:601068) has been mapped. This giant gene consists of 73 exons and spans over 1.2Mb on the genomic DNA region. It showed significant homology to two genes, CSMD1 gene on 8p23 and CSMD2 gene on 1p34, at reduced amino acid sequence level and hence we designated as CSMD3. The CSMD3 gene was expressed mainly in adult and fetal brains. We performed mutation analysis on the CSMD3 gene for seven patients with BAFME1/FAME, but no mutation was found in the coding sequence of the CSMD3 gene. Comparative genomic analysis revealed a conserved family of CSMD genes in the mouse and fugu genomes. Possible functions of the CSMD gene family are discussed.

  13. [Biofeedback treatment for epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yoko; Matsuura, Masato

    2011-04-01

    Anti-epileptic drugs are the mainstay in the management of epilepsy. However, approximately 30% of patients continue to have seizures despite optimal drug therapy. Behavioural interventions that include biofeedback have become increasingly popular over the last 3 decades, and the results have mostly been encouraging. Biofeedback is a non-invasive behavioural treatment that enables a patient to gain volitional control over a physiological process. In epilepsy, targeted parameters for biofeedback include electroencephalographic (EEG) measures of cortical activity, such as different EEG frequencies or cortical potentials (i.e., neurofeedback), and peripheral autonomic activity, such as Galvanic Skin Response (GSR). In this review, biofeedback using Sensory Motor Rhythm (SMR), Slow Cortical Potentials (SCP), and GSR are discussed. SMR biofeedback was established in the 1970s and is the most prominent methodology for biofeedback treatment of epilepsy in published literature. The technique is now regaining its popularity. SCP biofeedback was introduced in the 1990s. In contrast to SMR biofeedback, which modulates the frequency components of EEG, SCP biofeedback focuses on the regulation of potential changes (amplitude of DC shift). The clinical trials conducted using SCP biofeedback were larger than those conducted using SMR biofeedback, and their overall outcomes were promising. GSR biofeedback is a relatively new methodology in its application to epilepsy and focuses on the modulation of electrodermal measures of sympathetic activity. Compared to the neurofeedback approach, GSR biofeedback is much easier to implement, and evidence suggests that its clinical benefits can be achieved more rapidly. Although the biofeedback treatment may never achieve the status of an alternative to pharmacotherapy for epilepsy, current research findings strongly suggest that biofeedback has the potential to become a potent adjunctive non-pharmacological approach to reduce seizure

  14. [Knowledge of epilepsy and practices of parents in Mali: a community study].

    PubMed

    Maiga, Y; Napon, C; Dicko, F; Fofana, T; Traore, B; Sidibe, Ln; Diakite, A; Cissoko, Y; Sidibe, T; Maiga, M Y; Traore, H A

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of epilepsy in Sub-Saharan Africa is about 15 per thousand; against 6 to 8 per thousand in industrialized countries. Health, social, economic conditions and misknowledge could explain this situation. The objective of this survey was to study the knowledge of parents of children with or without epilepsy about this disease in Mali. 423 adults were interviewed, 15% children with epilepsy. The mean age was 34 ± 9,3 years; females represents 60% of the population. 26% of interviewed subjects heard about epilepsy from their neighbourhood, 20% from traditional healers, 11% from health care professional; the tonic-clonic crisis was the most known form of the disease. 59% thought epilepsy to be contagious. The organicity of the disease was known by 51% of the population. 23 % of the population believed there was a link between the onset of the crisis and the presence of the hole moon. 78% of subjects have already seen at least one crisis of epilepsy, but only 33% have got an attitude of first help that was to pour fresh water on the face of the patient in 22% of cases. 57% of subject's acknowledge having as first recourse traditional medicine. The fight against epilepsy in Mali as in the others countries of the third world should go through information and education of the population, in particular parents.

  15. Influence of uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase inducers and inhibitors on the plasma lamotrigine concentration in pediatric patients with refractory epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoshiaki; Takahashi, Yukitoshi; Imai, Katsumi; Ikeda, Hiroko; Takahashi, Masaaki; Nakai, Masahiko; Inoue, Yushi; Kagawa, Yoshiyuki

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluated the influence of concomitant antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on the plasma concentration of lamotrigine (LTG) in pediatric patients with epilepsy. We retrospectively reviewed 1653 plasma samples from 709 patients (aged 6 months to 16 years) and compared the concentration-to-dose ratio (CD ratio) of LTG among different AED regimens. The median CD ratio of patients receiving LTG monotherapy was 1.25 μg/mL/mg/kg. In patients receiving LTG plus VPA, the CD ratio was increased by about 140%. The CD ratio was elevated from a low VPA concentration (<40 μg/mL) and the increase was VPA concentration-dependent. In contrast, the median CD ratio of patients treated with LTG plus the inducers phenytoin, phenobarbital, and carbamazepine was 0.42, 0.63, and 0.66, respectively, and phenytoin significantly reduced the CD ratio in comparison with phenobarbital or carbamazepine (p < 0.001). Pediatric patients of all ages beyond infancy showed similar susceptibility to VPA or inducers, but infants had higher CD ratios compared with the other age groups. Among other AEDs, topiramate, ethosuximide, and rufinamide reduced the CD ratio. These findings should be useful for estimating interactions between LTG and concomitant AEDs. PMID:25825021

  16. Selective amygdalohippocampectomy versus standard temporal lobectomy in patients with mesiotemporal lobe epilepsy and unilateral hippocampal sclerosis: post-operative facial emotion recognition abilities.

    PubMed

    Wendling, Anne-Sophie; Steinhoff, Bernhard J; Bodin, Frédéric; Staack, Anke M; Zentner, Josef; Scholly, Julia; Valenti, Maria-Paula; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Hirsch, Edouard

    2015-03-01

    Surgical treatment of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) patients involves the removal either of the left or the right hippocampus. Since the mesial temporal lobe is responsible for emotion recognition abilities, we aimed to assess facial emotion recognition (FER) in two homogeneous patient cohorts that differed only in the administered surgery design since anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) or selective amygdalohippocampectomy (SAH) were performed independently of the underlying electroclinical conditions. The patient selection for the two respective surgical procedures was carried out retrospectively between 2000 and 2009 by two independent epilepsy centres, the Kork Epilepsy Centre, Germany and the University Hospital of Strasbourg, France. All included patients had presented with unilateral hippocampus sclerosis (HS) without associated dysplasia or white matter blurring and had become seizure-free postoperatively. Psychometric evaluation was carried out with the Ekman 60 Faces Test and screened for depression and psychosomatic symptoms with the SCL-90 R and the BDI. Thirty healthy volunteers participated as control subjects. Sixty patients were included, 27 had undergone SAH and 33 ATL. Patients and controls obtained comparable scores in FER for surprise, happiness, anger and sadness. Concerning fear and disgust the patient group scored significantly worse. Left-sided operations led to the the most pronounced impairment. The ATL group scored significantly worse for recognition of fear compared with SAH patients. Inversely, after SAH scores for disgust were significantly lower than after ATL, independently of the side of resection. Unilateral temporal damage impairs FER. Different neurosurgical procedures may affect FER differently. PMID:25769370

  17. [Detection of subtelomeric rearrangements due to MLPA in paediatric patients with refractory epilepsy in Colombia: the role of the CHL1 gene in pharmacoresistance].

    PubMed

    Maradei-Anaya, Silvia J; Espinosa, Eugenia; Izquierdo, Álvaro; Velasco-Parra, Harvy M

    2013-11-16

    INTRODUCTION. Epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterised by a predisposition to the recurrence of seizures of distinct causation and with variable clinical manifestations. Up to 40% of patients do not manage to control their seizures with the first anticonvulsive drug and the addition of a second pharmaceutical affords control in only another 11%. Given the aetiological heterogeneity of pharmacoresistance, it has been suggested that the presence of genomic disorders in patients with refractoriness could be elements worthy of analysis when it comes to estimating the alteration in the pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic profiles of these patients. AIM. To detect the presence of subtelomeric rearrangements in Colombian paediatric patients with refractory epilepsy. PATIENTS AND METHODS. The multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique was used to evaluate the presence of cytogenetically non-visible chromosome aberrations in subtelomeric regions of 113 patients diagnosed with refractory epilepsy from three national referral centres in Colombia. RESULTS. Subtelomeric chromosome aberrations were detected in 0.9% of patients corresponding to a duplication of locus 3p26.3 in gene CHL1. CONCLUSIONS. This study suggests the use of the MLPA methodology to detect subtelomeric rearrangements that may be associated with phenotypes of refractoriness in epileptic patients.

  18. [Detection of subtelomeric rearrangements due to MLPA in paediatric patients with refractory epilepsy in Colombia: the role of the CHL1 gene in pharmacoresistance].

    PubMed

    Maradei-Anaya, Silvia J; Espinosa, Eugenia; Izquierdo, Álvaro; Velasco-Parra, Harvy M

    2013-11-16

    INTRODUCTION. Epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterised by a predisposition to the recurrence of seizures of distinct causation and with variable clinical manifestations. Up to 40% of patients do not manage to control their seizures with the first anticonvulsive drug and the addition of a second pharmaceutical affords control in only another 11%. Given the aetiological heterogeneity of pharmacoresistance, it has been suggested that the presence of genomic disorders in patients with refractoriness could be elements worthy of analysis when it comes to estimating the alteration in the pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic profiles of these patients. AIM. To detect the presence of subtelomeric rearrangements in Colombian paediatric patients with refractory epilepsy. PATIENTS AND METHODS. The multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique was used to evaluate the presence of cytogenetically non-visible chromosome aberrations in subtelomeric regions of 113 patients diagnosed with refractory epilepsy from three national referral centres in Colombia. RESULTS. Subtelomeric chromosome aberrations were detected in 0.9% of patients corresponding to a duplication of locus 3p26.3 in gene CHL1. CONCLUSIONS. This study suggests the use of the MLPA methodology to detect subtelomeric rearrangements that may be associated with phenotypes of refractoriness in epileptic patients. PMID:24203666

  19. Selective amygdalohippocampectomy versus standard temporal lobectomy in patients with mesiotemporal lobe epilepsy and unilateral hippocampal sclerosis: post-operative facial emotion recognition abilities.

    PubMed

    Wendling, Anne-Sophie; Steinhoff, Bernhard J; Bodin, Frédéric; Staack, Anke M; Zentner, Josef; Scholly, Julia; Valenti, Maria-Paula; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Hirsch, Edouard

    2015-03-01

    Surgical treatment of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) patients involves the removal either of the left or the right hippocampus. Since the mesial temporal lobe is responsible for emotion recognition abilities, we aimed to assess facial emotion recognition (FER) in two homogeneous patient cohorts that differed only in the administered surgery design since anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) or selective amygdalohippocampectomy (SAH) were performed independently of the underlying electroclinical conditions. The patient selection for the two respective surgical procedures was carried out retrospectively between 2000 and 2009 by two independent epilepsy centres, the Kork Epilepsy Centre, Germany and the University Hospital of Strasbourg, France. All included patients had presented with unilateral hippocampus sclerosis (HS) without associated dysplasia or white matter blurring and had become seizure-free postoperatively. Psychometric evaluation was carried out with the Ekman 60 Faces Test and screened for depression and psychosomatic symptoms with the SCL-90 R and the BDI. Thirty healthy volunteers participated as control subjects. Sixty patients were included, 27 had undergone SAH and 33 ATL. Patients and controls obtained comparable scores in FER for surprise, happiness, anger and sadness. Concerning fear and disgust the patient group scored significantly worse. Left-sided operations led to the the most pronounced impairment. The ATL group scored significantly worse for recognition of fear compared with SAH patients. Inversely, after SAH scores for disgust were significantly lower than after ATL, independently of the side of resection. Unilateral temporal damage impairs FER. Different neurosurgical procedures may affect FER differently.

  20. Symptomatic Epilepsies due to Cerebrovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dakaj, Nazim; Shatri, Nexhat; Isaku, Enver; Zeqiraj, Kamber

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Cerebro-vascular diseases (CVD) are the leading cause of symptomatic epilepsies. This study aims to investigate: a) Frequency of epilepsy in patients with CVD; b) Correlation of epilepsy with the type of CVD (ischemic and hemorrhage) and with age. Methodology: It is analyzed medical documentation of 816 hospitalized patients with CVD in the clinic of Neurology in University Clinical Center (UCC) during the period January - December 2010. The study included data on patients presenting with epileptic seizures after CVD, and those with previously diagnosed epilepsy, are not included in the study. The diagnosis of CVD, are established in clinical neurological examination and the brain imaging (computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging). The diagnosis of epilepsy is established by the criteria of ILAE (International League against Epilepsy) 1983, and epileptic seizures are classified according to the ILAE classification, of 1981. Results: Out of 816 patients with CVD, 692 were with ischemic stroke and 124 with hemorrhage. From 816 patients, epileptic seizures had 81 (10%), of which 9 patients had been diagnosed with epilepsy earlier and they are not included in the study. From 72 (99%) patients with seizures after CVD 25 (33%) have been with ischemia, whereas 47 (67%) with hemorrhage. Conclusion: CVD present fairly frequent cause of symptomatic epilepsies among patients treated in the clinic of Neurology at UCC (about 10%). The biggest number of patients with epilepsy after CVD was with intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:25685086

  1. Epilepsy and physical exercise.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, José; Tojal, Raquel; Morgado, Joana

    2015-02-01

    Epilepsy is one of the commonest neurologic diseases and has always been associated with stigma. In the interest of safety, the activities of persons with epilepsy (PWE) are often restricted. In keeping with this, physical exercise has often been discouraged. The precise nature of a person's seizures (or whether seizures were provoked or unprovoked) may not have been considered. Although there has been a change in attitude over the last few decades, the exact role of exercise in inducing seizures or aggravating epilepsy still remains a matter of discussion among experts in the field. Based mainly on retrospective, but also on prospective, population and animal-based research, the hypothesis that physical exercise is prejudicial has been slowly replaced by the realization that physical exercise might actually be beneficial for PWE. The benefits are related to improvement of physical and mental health parameters and social integration and reduction in markers of stress, epileptiform activity and the number of seizures. Nowadays, the general consensus is that there should be no restrictions to the practice of physical exercise in people with controlled epilepsy, except for scuba diving, skydiving and other sports at heights. Whilst broader restrictions apply for patients with uncontrolled epilepsy, individual risk assessments taking into account the seizure types, frequency, patterns or triggers may allow PWE to enjoy a wide range of physical activities. PMID:25458104

  2. Epilepsy and physical exercise.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, José; Tojal, Raquel; Morgado, Joana

    2015-02-01

    Epilepsy is one of the commonest neurologic diseases and has always been associated with stigma. In the interest of safety, the activities of persons with epilepsy (PWE) are often restricted. In keeping with this, physical exercise has often been discouraged. The precise nature of a person's seizures (or whether seizures were provoked or unprovoked) may not have been considered. Although there has been a change in attitude over the last few decades, the exact role of exercise in inducing seizures or aggravating epilepsy still remains a matter of discussion among experts in the field. Based mainly on retrospective, but also on prospective, population and animal-based research, the hypothesis that physical exercise is prejudicial has been slowly replaced by the realization that physical exercise might actually be beneficial for PWE. The benefits are related to improvement of physical and mental health parameters and social integration and reduction in markers of stress, epileptiform activity and the number of seizures. Nowadays, the general consensus is that there should be no restrictions to the practice of physical exercise in people with controlled epilepsy, except for scuba diving, skydiving and other sports at heights. Whilst broader restrictions apply for patients with uncontrolled epilepsy, individual risk assessments taking into account the seizure types, frequency, patterns or triggers may allow PWE to enjoy a wide range of physical activities.

  3. Epilepsy - overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... due to a medical condition or injury that affects the brain. Or the cause may be unknown (idiopathic). Common ... order to adjust medicines. Many epilepsy drugs may affect the ... abnormal brain cells causing the seizures. Place a vagal nerve ...

  4. Nonvisual spatial navigation fMRI lateralizes mesial temporal lobe epilepsy in a patient with congenital blindness.

    PubMed

    Toller, Gianina; Adhimoolam, Babu; Grunwald, Thomas; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen; König, Kristina; Jokeit, Hennric

    2015-01-01

    Nonvisual spatial navigation functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) may help clinicians determine memory lateralization in blind individuals with refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). We report on an exceptional case of a congenitally blind woman with late-onset left MTLE undergoing presurgical memory fMRI. To activate mesial temporal structures despite the lack of visual memory, the patient was requested to recall familiar routes using nonvisual multisensory and verbal cues. Our findings demonstrate the diagnostic value of a nonvisual fMRI task to lateralize MTLE despite congenital blindness and may therefore contribute to the risk assessment for postsurgical amnesia in rare cases with refractory MTLE and accompanying congenital blindness.

  5. Learning intervention-induced deformations for non-rigid MR-CT registration and electrode localization in epilepsy patients

    PubMed Central

    Onofrey, John A.; Staib, Lawrence H.; Papademetris, Xenophon

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a framework for learning a statistical model of non-rigid deformations induced by interventional procedures. We make use of this learned model to perform constrained non-rigid registration of pre-procedural and post-procedural imaging. We demonstrate results applying this framework to non-rigidly register post-surgical computed tomography (CT) brain images to pre-surgical magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of epilepsy patients who had intra-cranial electroencephalography electrodes surgically implanted. Deformations caused by this surgical procedure, imaging artifacts caused by the electrodes, and the use of multi-modal imaging data make non-rigid registration challenging. Our results show that the use of our proposed framework to constrain the non-rigid registration process results in significantly improved and more robust registration performance compared to using standard rigid and non-rigid registration methods. PMID:26900569

  6. Role of Neuroimaging in the Presurgical Evaluation of Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Lüders, Hans

    2008-01-01

    A significant minority of patients with focal epilepsy are candidates for resective epilepsy surgery. Structural and functional neuroimaging plays an important role in the presurgical evaluation of theses patients. The most frequent etiologies of pharmacoresistant epilepsy in the adult population are mesial temporal sclerosis, malformations of cortical development, cavernous angiomas, and low-grade neoplasms. High-resolution multiplanar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with sequences providing T1 and T2 contrast is the initial imaging study of choice to detect these epileptogenic lesions. The epilepsy MRI protocol can be individually tailored when considering the patient's clinical and electrophysiological data. Metabolic imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) visualize metabolic alterations of the brain in the ictal and interictal states. These techniques may have localizing value in patients with a normal MRI scan. Functional MRI is helpful in non-invasively identifying areas of eloquent cortex. Developments in imaging technology and digital postprocessing may increase the yield for imaging studies to detect the epileptogenic lesion and to characterize its connectivity within the epileptic brain. PMID:19513318

  7. Epilepsy (partial)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction About 3% of people will be diagnosed with epilepsy during their lifetime, but about 70% of people with epilepsy eventually go into remission. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of starting antiepileptic drug treatment following a single seizure? What are the effects of drug monotherapy in people with partial epilepsy? What are the effects of additional drug treatments in people with drug-resistant partial epilepsy? What is the risk of relapse in people in remission when withdrawing antiepileptic drugs? What are the effects of behavioural and psychological treatments for people with epilepsy? What are the effects of surgery in people with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 83 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiepileptic drugs after a single seizure; monotherapy for partial epilepsy using carbamazepine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, phenobarbital, phenytoin, sodium valproate, or topiramate; addition of second-line drugs for drug-resistant partial epilepsy (allopurinol, eslicarbazepine, gabapentin, lacosamide, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, losigamone, oxcarbazepine, retigabine, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin, or zonisamide); antiepileptic drug withdrawal for people with partial or

  8. Epilepsy surgery in India.

    PubMed

    Singh, V P

    2011-10-01

    Modern epilepsy started in India in 1995 at Sri Chitra Tirunal Institute of Medical Science and Technology, Trivandrum and at All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi. At both centres the attempt was to get the program going with patients having surgically remediable epilepsy syndromes -who could be evaluated with non invasive investigations. The mainstay of the evaluation was a good quality epilepsy specific MRI and video EEG coupled with a SPECT study and a neuropsychological evaluation. Concordance of the focus on all investigations was critical to a good outcome. There were several problems on the way - but they were managed keeping in consideration our local needs and requirements. Intraoperative electocorticography was done and good outcomes attained. The critical determinants of success were the formation of a team with various interdisciplinary specialists and a strong will to succeed. PMID:22069424

  9. Musicogenic epilepsy.

    PubMed Central

    Brien, S E; Murray, T J

    1984-01-01

    A case of musicogenic epilepsy is reported in which the seizures were precipitated by singing voices. It was found that some singers' voices were particularly epileptogenic and that some of their songs, but not others, would precipitate a seizure. A study of the "offending" songs and singers did not reveal a common key, chord, harmonic interval, pitch or rhythm, and the emotional feeling or intensity of the music did not seem to be relevant. However, the voices that caused the seizures had a throaty, "metallic" quality. Such a singing voice results from incorrect positioning of the larynx such that it is not allowed to descend fully during singing; consequently, the vowel sounds produced must be manipulated by the lips or jaw to be distinguished. This trait is most common in singers with a low voice range who sing softly and use a microphone. It is not seen in trained operatic or musical theatre singers. The results of repeated testing showed that the seizures in this patient were caused by listening to singers who positioned the larynx incorrectly. PMID:6498678

  10. [Impact of early benefit assessment on patients with epilepsy in Germany: Current healthcare provision and therapeutic needs].

    PubMed

    Strzelczyk, A; Hamer, H M

    2016-04-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic neurological diseases and represents a significant burden for patients, their families and society. In more than 75 % of patients anticonvulsant therapy consists of valproate, carbamazepine, lamotrigine or levetiracetam. There is a need for polytherapy in drug-refractory patients and they suffer from negative effects on quality of life and employment that is associated with high indirect costs. To allow a comprehensive treatment in this patient group, access to new anticonvulsants with novel modes of action is needed; however, all applications for new antiepileptic drugs failed to prove added benefits during the Pharmaceutical Market Restructuring Act (AMNOG) in Germany. One of the main reasons is the mandatory definition of a standard comparative therapy. It remains unclear whether there will be studies in the future which will fulfill the requirements of the current version of AMNOG. Observational studies after approval and marketing of new antiepileptic drugs could be better alternatives to prove added benefits for individual patients in the current German healthcare system. PMID:26927680

  11. [Impact of early benefit assessment on patients with epilepsy in Germany: Current healthcare provision and therapeutic needs].

    PubMed

    Strzelczyk, A; Hamer, H M

    2016-04-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic neurological diseases and represents a significant burden for patients, their families and society. In more than 75 % of patients anticonvulsant therapy consists of valproate, carbamazepine, lamotrigine or levetiracetam. There is a need for polytherapy in drug-refractory patients and they suffer from negative effects on quality of life and employment that is associated with high indirect costs. To allow a comprehensive treatment in this patient group, access to new anticonvulsants with novel modes of action is needed; however, all applications for new antiepileptic drugs failed to prove added benefits during the Pharmaceutical Market Restructuring Act (AMNOG) in Germany. One of the main reasons is the mandatory definition of a standard comparative therapy. It remains unclear whether there will be studies in the future which will fulfill the requirements of the current version of AMNOG. Observational studies after approval and marketing of new antiepileptic drugs could be better alternatives to prove added benefits for individual patients in the current German healthcare system.

  12. Screening LGI1 in a cohort of 26 lateral temporal lobe epilepsy patients with auditory aura from Turkey detects a novel de novo mutation.

    PubMed

    Kesim, Yesim F; Uzun, Gunes Altiokka; Yucesan, Emrah; Tuncer, Feyza N; Ozdemir, Ozkan; Bebek, Nerses; Ozbek, Ugur; Iseri, Sibel A Ugur; Baykan, Betul

    2016-02-01

    Autosomal dominant lateral temporal lobe epilepsy (ADLTE) is an autosomal dominant epileptic syndrome characterized by focal seizures with auditory or aphasic symptoms. The same phenotype is also observed in a sporadic form of lateral temporal lobe epilepsy (LTLE), namely idiopathic partial epilepsy with auditory features (IPEAF). Heterozygous mutations in LGI1 account for up to 50% of ADLTE families and only rarely observed in IPEAF cases. In this study, we analysed a cohort of 26 individuals with LTLE diagnosed according to the following criteria: focal epilepsy with auditory aura and absence of cerebral lesions on brain MRI. All patients underwent clinical, neuroradiological and electroencephalography examinations and afterwards they were screened for mutations in LGI1 gene. The single LGI1 mutation identified in this study is a novel missense variant (NM_005097.2: c.1013T>C; p.Phe338Ser) observed de novo in a sporadic patient. This is the first study involving clinical analysis of a LTLE cohort from Turkey and genetic contribution of LGI1 to ADLTE phenotype. Identification of rare LGI1 gene mutations in sporadic cases supports diagnosis as ADTLE and draws attention to potential familial clustering of ADTLE in suggestive generations, which is especially important for genetic counselling.

  13. A community-based case–control study of prevalence and pattern of cognitive impairments in patients with epilepsy residing in South-Eastern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Arinzechi, Eugene O.; Ogunrin, Olubunmi A.; Nwosu, Cosmas M.; Nwani, Paul O.; Enwereji, Kelechi O.; Asomugha, Lasbrey A.; Dimkpa, Uche

    2016-01-01

    Background: Epilepsy is the commonest neurological disorder encountered in Sub-Saharan Africa. The quality of life of patients with epilepsy (PWEs) is adversely affected by cognitive impairments. Aim: This study investigated the prevalence and pattern of cognitive impairments in PWE in Ukpo community located in a South-Eastern state in Nigeria using Community Screening Interview for Dementia (CSID) and a computer-assisted cognitive test battery (FePsy). Methods and Patients: Fifty-one PWEs were studied and compared with 51 age-, sex-and level of education-matched healthy controls. Diagnosis of epilepsy was confirmed clinically with eye-witness corroboration. Sociodemographic data and information on epilepsy variables were obtained with the aid of a questionnaire. Cognitive domains assessed include language, memory, orientation, attention, psychomotor speed and constructional praxis. Results: The prevalence rate of cognitive impairment using total CSID score was 19.6%. Analysis of CSID scores revealed significant impairment in language (17.6%), memory (29.4%), orientation (15.7%), attention (7.8%) and constructional praxis (15.7%) compared to healthy controls. A similar pattern was observed with FePsy but with better sensitivity indices for detecting cognitive impairment. Conclusion: This study indicated significant prevalence rate of cognitive impairment among treatment-naïve PWE with profound affectation of memory, mental speed and language. In addition, the FePsy was found to be more sensitive and specific in assessment of cognitive function in PWE. PMID:27365959

  14. Electrical Stimulation for Drug-Resistant Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, A; Bowen, JM

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the effectiveness of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) for the treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy in adults and children. Data Sources A literature search was performed using MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination database, for studies published from January 2007 until December 2012. Review Methods Systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials (RCTs), and observational studies (in the absence of RCTs) of adults or children were included. DBS studies were included if they specified that the anterior nucleus of thalamus was the area of the brain stimulated. Outcomes of interest were seizure frequency, health resource utilization, and safety. A cost analysis was also performed. Results The search identified 6 studies that assessed changes in seizure frequency after electrical stimulation: 1 RCT on DBS in adults, 4 RCTs on VNS in adults, and 1 RCT on VNS in children. The studies of DBS and VNS in adults found significantly improved rates of seizure frequency, but the study of VNS in children did not find a significant difference in seizure frequency between the high and low stimulation groups. Significant reductions in hospitalizations and emergency department visits were found for adults and children who received VNS. No studies addressed the use of health resources for patients undergoing DBS. Five studies reported on adverse events, which ranged from serious to transient for both procedures in adults and were mostly transient in the 1 study of VNS in children. Limitations We found no evidence on DBS in children or on health care use related to DBS. The measurement of seizure frequency is self-reported and is therefore subject to bias and issues of compliance. Conclusions Based on evidence of low to moderate quality, both DBS and VNS seemed to reduce seizure frequency in adults. In children, VNS did not appear to be as

  15. Living with Epilepsy--Not around It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apel, Laura

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an interview on Kevin Eggers, a 19-year-old college student from Seattle, Washington, who was diagnosed with epilepsy but had not let it prevent him from accomplishing his goals. As an Epilepsy Advocate, Kevin helps other teens and young adults realize that having a disability does not mean not living a normal and fulfilling…

  16. Assessment of Time and Frequency Domain Parameters of Heart Rate Variability and Interictal Cardiac Rhythm Abnormalities in Drug-naïve Patients with Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kilinc, Ozden; Cincin, Altug; Pehlivan, Aslihan; Midi, Ipek; Kepez, Alper; Agan, Kadriye

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Epilepsy is a disease known to occur with autonomous phenomenons. Earlier studies indicate decreased heart rate variability (HRV) during ictal and interictal periods among epilepsy patients. In this study, we aim to investigate cardiac rhythm abnormalities and HRV during interictal period between drug-naïve patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) and healthy control group. Methods: Twenty-six patients with IGE and 26 healthy individuals included in the study. In order to eliminate any structural cardiac pathology, transthoracic echocardiography was performed in all subjects and time and frequency domain parameters of HRV were evaluated after 24-hour rhythm holter monitoring. Results: Between two groups, no significant difference was detected in terms of mean heart rate and maximum duration between the start of the Q waves and the end of the T waves (QT intervals). In the time domain analysis of HRV, no statically significant difference was detected for standard deviation of all R - R intervals and root-mean-square of successive differences between patient and control group (p = 0,070 and p = 0,104 respectively). In the frequency domain analysis of HRV, patients tended to display lower total power and very low frequency power than did healthy subjects, but the differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Our results suggest that there is no major effect of the epilepsy on HRV in patients with IGE. It should be emphasized that, in this study, HRV was evaluated only in patients with IGE and that the results are not proper to be generalized for patients with partial seizures. PMID:27390676

  17. Long-term treatment outcome of two patients with pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy caused by ALDH7A1 mutations: normal neurocognitive outcome.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Enas; Mamak, Eva; Feigenbaum, Anette; Donner, Elizabeth J; Mercimek-Mahmutoglu, Saadet

    2015-04-01

    Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy is an autosomal recessively inherited disorder of lysine catabolism caused by mutations in the ALDH7A1 gene. We report 2 patients with normal neurocognitive outcome (full-scale IQ of 108 and 74) and their more than 10 years' treatment outcome on pyridoxine monotherapy. Both patients had specific borderline impairments in visual processing speed. More long-term treatment outcome reports will increase our knowledge about the natural history of the disease. PMID:24789515

  18. Combined variants in reading epilepsy; coexisting anterior and posterior variants camouflaged as heat cramps where the patient finds his own diagnosis searching the internet.

    PubMed

    Olberg, Henning Kristian; Eichele, Tom; Schwarzlmüller, Thomas; Lind, Jonas; Hjelland, Ina Elen; Engelsen, Bernt Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Reading epilepsy is a form of reflex-induced seizures. Two entities are postulated as part of a clinical spectrum; one anterior variant with jaw jerks and orofacial myoclonia and another posterior variant with visual symptoms and alexia or dyslexia. We present a case with suggestible evidence of both conditions coexisting within the same patient, a finding that, to our knowledge, has not been previously reported. The diagnosis in this specific case was contributed to by the patient searching the internet. PMID:27222799

  19. Combined variants in reading epilepsy; coexisting anterior and posterior variants camouflaged as heat cramps where the patient finds his own diagnosis searching the internet.

    PubMed

    Olberg, Henning Kristian; Eichele, Tom; Schwarzlmüller, Thomas; Lind, Jonas; Hjelland, Ina Elen; Engelsen, Bernt Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Reading epilepsy is a form of reflex-induced seizures. Two entities are postulated as part of a clinical spectrum; one anterior variant with jaw jerks and orofacial myoclonia and another posterior variant with visual symptoms and alexia or dyslexia. We present a case with suggestible evidence of both conditions coexisting within the same patient, a finding that, to our knowledge, has not been previously reported. The diagnosis in this specific case was contributed to by the patient searching the internet.

  20. Treatment of depression in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy: A pilot study of cognitive behavioral therapy vs. selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Orjuela-Rojas, Juan Manuel; Martínez-Juárez, Iris E; Ruiz-Chow, Angel; Crail-Melendez, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    There is a high prevalence of depression in patients with epilepsy, which negatively impacts their quality of life (QOL) and seizure control. Currently, the first-line of treatment for depression in patients with epilepsy is based on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). The main objective of this pilot study was to compare cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) versus SSRIs for the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Seven patients who received group CBT were compared with eight patients treated with SSRIs. All were diagnosed with MDD and TLE. Patients were assessed at baseline before treatment and at six and 12weeks during treatment with the Quality of Life in Epilepsy Scale of 31 items (QOLIE 31), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Seizure records were also taken on a monthly basis. After 12weeks of treatment, both groups showed improved QOL and reduced severity of depression symptoms. There were no statistically significant group differences in the final scores for the BDI (p=0.40) and QOLIE 31 (p=0.72), although the effect size on QOL was higher for the group receiving CBT. In conclusion, the present study suggests that both CBT and SSRIs may improve MDD and QOL in patients with TLE. We found no significant outcome differences between both treatment modalities. These findings support further study using a double-blind controlled design to demonstrate the efficacy of CBT and SSRIs in the treatment of MDD and QOL in patients with TLE.

  1. Role of Frontotemporal Fiber Tract Integrity in Task-Switching Performance of Healthy Controls and Patients with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kucukboyaci, N. Erkut; Girard, H.M.; Hagler, D.J.; Kuperman, J.; Tecoma, E.S.; Iragui, V.J.; Halgren, E.; McDonald, C.R.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the relationships among frontotemporal fiber tract compromise and task-switching performance in healthy controls and patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We performed diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) on 30 controls and 32 patients with TLE (15 left TLE). Fractional anisotropy (FA) was calculated for four fiber tracts [uncinate fasciculus (UncF), arcuate fasciculus (ArcF), dorsal cingulum (CING), and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF)]. Participants completed the Trail Making Test-B (TMT-B) and Verbal Fluency Category Switching (VFCS) test. Multivariate analyses of variances (MANOVAs) were performed to investigate group differences in fiber FA and set-shifting performances. Canonical correlations were used to examine the overall patterns of structural-cognitive relationships and were followed by within-group bivariate correlations. We found a significant canonical correlation between fiber FA and task-switching performance. In controls, TMT-B correlated with left IFOF, whereas VFCS correlated with FA of left ArcF and left UncF. These correlations were not significant in patients with TLE. We report significant correlations between frontotemporal fiber tract integrity and set-shifting performance in healthy controls that appear to be absent or attenuated in patients with TLE. These findings suggest a breakdown of typical structure-function relationships in TLE that may reflect aberrant developmental or degenerative processes. PMID:22014246

  2. Atypical cortical language organization in epilepsy patients: evidence for divergent hemispheric dominance for receptive and expressive language function.

    PubMed

    Eliashiv, Dawn S; Kurelowech, Lacey; Quint, Patti; Chung, Jeffrey M; Otis, Shirley M; Gage, Nicole M

    2014-06-01

    The central goal of presurgical language mapping is to identify brain regions that subserve cortical language function to minimize postsurgical language deficits. Presurgical language mapping in patients with epilepsy presents a key challenge because of the atypical pattern of hemispheric language dominance found in this population, with higher incidences of bilateral and right-biased language dominance than typical. In this prospective study, we combine magnetoencephalography with a panel of tasks designed to separately assess receptive and expressive function to provide a sensitive measure of language function in 15 candidates for resective surgery. We report the following: 4 of 15 patients (27%) showed left hemisphere dominance across all tasks, 4 of 15 patients (27%) showed right hemisphere dominance across all tasks, and 7 of 15 (46%) showed discordant language dominance, with right-dominant receptive and left-dominant expressive language. All patients with discordant language dominance showed this right-receptive and left-expressive pattern. Results provide further evidence supporting the importance of using a panel of tasks to assess separable aspects of language function. The clinical relevance of the findings is discussed, especially about current clinical operative measures for assessing language dominance, which use single hemisphere procedure (intracarotid amobarbital procedure and awake intraoperative stimulation) for determining language laterality.

  3. No unified reward prediction error in local field potentials from the human nucleus accumbens: evidence from epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Stenner, Max-Philipp; Rutledge, Robb B; Zaehle, Tino; Schmitt, Friedhelm C; Kopitzki, Klaus; Kowski, Alexander B; Voges, Jürgen; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Dolan, Raymond J

    2015-08-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), cyclic voltammetry, and single-unit electrophysiology studies suggest that signals measured in the nucleus accumbens (Nacc) during value-based decision making represent reward prediction errors (RPEs), the difference between actual and predicted rewards. Here, we studied the precise temporal and spectral pattern of reward-related signals in the human Nacc. We recorded local field potentials (LFPs) from the Nacc of six epilepsy patients during an economic decision-making task. On each trial, patients decided whether to accept or reject a gamble with equal probabilities of a monetary gain or loss. The behavior of four patients was consistent with choices being guided by value expectations. Expected value signals before outcome onset were observed in three of those patients, at varying latencies and with nonoverlapping spectral patterns. Signals after outcome onset were correlated with RPE regressors in all subjects. However, further analysis revealed that these signals were better explained as outcome valence rather than RPE signals, with gamble gains and losses differing in the power of beta oscillations and in evoked response amplitudes. Taken together, our results do not support the idea that postsynaptic potentials in the Nacc represent a RPE that unifies outcome magnitude and prior value expectation. We discuss the generalizability of our findings to healthy individuals and the relation of our results to measurements of RPE signals obtained from the Nacc with other methods. PMID:26019312

  4. No unified reward prediction error in local field potentials from the human nucleus accumbens: evidence from epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Stenner, Max-Philipp; Rutledge, Robb B; Zaehle, Tino; Schmitt, Friedhelm C; Kopitzki, Klaus; Kowski, Alexander B; Voges, Jürgen; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Dolan, Raymond J

    2015-08-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), cyclic voltammetry, and single-unit electrophysiology studies suggest that signals measured in the nucleus accumbens (Nacc) during value-based decision making represent reward prediction errors (RPEs), the difference between actual and predicted rewards. Here, we studied the precise temporal and spectral pattern of reward-related signals in the human Nacc. We recorded local field potentials (LFPs) from the Nacc of six epilepsy patients during an economic decision-making task. On each trial, patients decided whether to accept or reject a gamble with equal probabilities of a monetary gain or loss. The behavior of four patients was consistent with choices being guided by value expectations. Expected value signals before outcome onset were observed in three of those patients, at varying latencies and with nonoverlapping spectral patterns. Signals after outcome onset were correlated with RPE regressors in all subjects. However, further analysis revealed that these signals were better explained as outcome valence rather than RPE signals, with gamble gains and losses differing in the power of beta oscillations and in evoked response amplitudes. Taken together, our results do not support the idea that postsynaptic potentials in the Nacc represent a RPE that unifies outcome magnitude and prior value expectation. We discuss the generalizability of our findings to healthy individuals and the relation of our results to measurements of RPE signals obtained from the Nacc with other methods.

  5. No unified reward prediction error in local field potentials from the human nucleus accumbens: evidence from epilepsy patients

    PubMed Central

    Rutledge, Robb B.; Zaehle, Tino; Schmitt, Friedhelm C.; Kopitzki, Klaus; Kowski, Alexander B.; Voges, Jürgen; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), cyclic voltammetry, and single-unit electrophysiology studies suggest that signals measured in the nucleus accumbens (Nacc) during value-based decision making represent reward prediction errors (RPEs), the difference between actual and predicted rewards. Here, we studied the precise temporal and spectral pattern of reward-related signals in the human Nacc. We recorded local field potentials (LFPs) from the Nacc of six epilepsy patients during an economic decision-making task. On each trial, patients decided whether to accept or reject a gamble with equal probabilities of a monetary gain or loss. The behavior of four patients was consistent with choices being guided by value expectations. Expected value signals before outcome onset were observed in three of those patients, at varying latencies and with nonoverlapping spectral patterns. Signals after outcome onset were correlated with RPE regressors in all subjects. However, further analysis revealed that these signals were better explained as outcome valence rather than RPE signals, with gamble gains and losses differing in the power of beta oscillations and in evoked response amplitudes. Taken together, our results do not support the idea that postsynaptic potentials in the Nacc represent a RPE that unifies outcome magnitude and prior value expectation. We discuss the generalizability of our findings to healthy individuals and the relation of our results to measurements of RPE signals obtained from the Nacc with other methods. PMID:26019312

  6. Magnetoencephalographic study of hand and foot sensorimotor organization in 325 consecutive patients evaluated for tumor or epilepsy surgery

    PubMed Central

    Willemse, Ronald B.; Hillebrand, Arjan; Ronner, Hanneke E.; Peter Vandertop, W.; Stam, Cornelis J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The presence of intracranial lesions or epilepsy may lead to functional reorganization and hemispheric lateralization. We applied a clinical magnetoencephalography (MEG) protocol for the localization of the contralateral and ipsilateral S1 and M1 of the foot and hand in patients with non-lesional epilepsy, stroke, developmental brain injury, traumatic brain injury and brain tumors. We investigated whether differences in activation patterns could be related to underlying pathology. Methods Using dipole fitting, we localized the sources underlying sensory and motor evoked magnetic fields (SEFs and MEFs) of both hands and feet following unilateral stimulation of the median nerve (MN) and posterior tibial nerve (PTN) in 325 consecutive patients. The primary motor cortex was localized using beamforming following a self-paced repetitive motor task for each hand and foot. Results The success rate for motor and sensory localization for the feet was significantly lower than for the hands (motor_hand 94.6% versus motor_feet 81.8%, p < 0.001; sensory_hand 95.3% versus sensory_feet 76.0%, p < 0.001). MN and PTN stimulation activated 86.6% in the contralateral S1, with ipsilateral activation < 0.5%. Motor cortex activation localized contralaterally in 76.1% (5.2% ipsilateral, 7.6% bilateral and 11.1% failures) of all motor MEG recordings. The ipsilateral motor responses were found in 43 (14%) out of 308 patients with motor recordings (range: 8.3–50%, depending on the underlying pathology), and had a higher occurrence in the foot than in the hand (motor_foot 44.8% versus motor_hand 29.6%, p = 0.031). Ipsilateral motor responses tended to be more frequent in patients with a history of stroke, traumatic brain injury (TBI) or developmental brain lesions (p = 0.063). Conclusions MEG localization of sensorimotor cortex activation was more successful for the hand compared to the foot. In patients with neural lesions, there were signs of brain reorganization as

  7. Burns and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Berrocal, M

    1997-01-01

    This is a report of the first descriptive analytic study of a group of 183 burn patients, treated in the Burn Unit at the University Hospital of Cartagena, Colombia during the period since January 1985 until December 1990. There is presented experience with the selected group of 24 patients in whom the diagnosis of burn was associated with epilepsy. There is also analysed and described the gravity of the scars sequels, neurological disorders, the complication of the burn and an impact of this problem on the patient, his (her) family and the community. It is very important to report that there was found Neurocisticercosis in 66.6% of the group of burn patients with epilepsy, and it is probably the first risk factor of burn in this group.

  8. Sustained Reduction of Seizures in Patients with Intractable Epilepsy after Self-Regulation Training of Slow Cortical Potentials – 10 Years After

    PubMed Central

    Strehl, Ute; Birkle, Sarah M.; Wörz, Sonja; Kotchoubey, Boris

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the reduction of seizures in patients with intractable epilepsy after self-regulation of slow cortical potentials (SCPs) was maintained almost 10 years after the end of treatment. Originally, 41 patients received training with SCP-neurofeedback. A control group of 12 patients received respiratory feedback while another group of 11 patients had their anticonvulsant medications reviewed. Nineteen patients in the experimental group participated at least in parts of the long-term follow-up, but only two patients from each control group agreed to do so. The follow-up participants completed the same seizure diaries as in the original study. Patients of the experimental group also took part in three SCP-training sessions at the follow-up evaluation. Due to the small sample size, the results of participants in the control groups were not considered in the analysis. A significant decrease in seizure frequency was found about 10 years after the end of SCP treatment. The clinical significance of this result is considered medium to high. All patients were still able to self-regulate their SCPs during the feedback condition. This success was achieved without booster sessions. This is the longest follow-up evaluation of the outcome of a psychophysiological treatment in patients with epilepsy ever reported. Reduced seizure frequency may be the result of patients continued ability to self-regulate their SCPs. Given such a long follow-up period, the possible impact of confounding variables should be taken into account. The small number of patients participating in this follow-up evaluation diminishes the ability to make causal inferences. However, the consistency and duration of improvement for patients who received SCP-feedback training suggests that such treatment may be considered as a treatment for patients with intractable epilepsy and as an adjunct to conventional therapies. PMID:25152725

  9. Effects of carbamazepine on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in male patients with epilepsy: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Isojärvi, J I; Pakarinen, A J; Myllylä, V V

    1989-01-01

    The effects of carbamazepine (CBZ) monotherapy on serum sex hormone levels and on pituitary responsiveness to various stimuli were evaluated in a prospective study with 21 male patients with epilepsy. The serum levels of testosterone (T), free testosterone (FT), sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), estradiol (E2), luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), prolactin (PRL), and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) were assayed, and the free androgen index (FAI) values were calculated for each patient before and after 2-month CBZ treatment. The pituitary PRL, LH, and FSH responses to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH), thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), and metoclopramide (MC) were also measured before and after CBZ treatment. The baseline serum hormone and SHBG levels were measured and the FAI values calculated in 16 healthy male control subjects of similar age. The mean E2 level was higher in patients before CBZ treatment than in control subjects, and untreated patients had greater variances for FAI values, PRL levels, and LH levels than control subjects. No other significant differences were found between untreated patients and control subjects. The FAI values and DHEAS levels of patients decreased during 2-month treatment with CBZ. The PRL response to MC was higher after CBZ treatment than before. The baseline levels of other hormones and SHBG, as well as the LH and FSH responses to LH-RH, remained unaltered. The results indicate that during the first 2 months of CBZ treatment the androgen balance in male epileptic patients changes: Serum DHEAS levels and FAI values decrease, although FT levels remain unchanged. The clinical relevance of these hormonal changes is obscure.

  10. Contrast and glare sensitivity in epilepsy patients treated with vigabatrin or carbamazepine monotherapy compared with healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Nousiainen, I.; Kalviainen, R.; Mantyjarvi, M.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM—Many antiepileptic drugs have influence on visual functions. The aim of this study was to investigate possible changes in contrast sensitivity, macular photostress, and brightness acuity (glare) tests in patients with epilepsy undergoing vigabatrin (VGB) or carbamazepine (CBZ) monotherapy compared with healthy volunteers.
METHODS—32 patients undergoing VGB therapy, 18 patients undergoing CBZ therapy, and 35 healthy volunteers were asked to participate in an ophthalmological examination. In the previous study, visual field constrictions were reported in 40% of the patients treated with VGB monotherapy. In the present study, these VGB and CBZ monotherapy patients were examined for photopic contrast sensitivity with the Pelli-Robson letter chart and brightness acuity and macular photostress with the Mentor BAT brightness acuity tester.
RESULTS—Contrast sensitivity with the Pelli-Robson letter chart showed no difference between these groups and normal subjects (ANOVA: p= 0.534 in the right eye, p= 0.692 in the left eye) but the VGB therapy patients showed a positive correlation between the contrast sensitivity values and the extents of the visual fields in linear regression (R = 0.498, p = 0.05 in the right eye, R = 0.476, p = 0.06 in the left eye). Macular photostress and glare tests were equal in both groups and did not differ from normal values.
CONCLUSION—The results of this study indicate that carbamazepine therapy has no effect on contrast sensitivity. Vigabatrin seems to impair contrast sensitivity in those patients who have concentrically constricted in their visual fields. Neither GBZ nor VGB affect glare sensitivity.

 PMID:10837389

  11. De novo EEF1A2 mutations in patients with characteristic facial features, intellectual disability, autistic behaviors and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, J; Okamoto, N; Tohyama, J; Kato, M; Arai, H; Funahashi, O; Tsurusaki, Y; Nakashima, M; Kawashima, H; Saitsu, H; Matsumoto, N; Miyake, N

    2015-04-01

    Eukaryotic elongation factor 1, alpha-2 (eEF1A2) protein is involved in protein synthesis, suppression of apoptosis, and regulation of actin function and cytoskeletal structure. EEF1A2 gene is highly expressed in the central nervous system and Eef1a2 knockout mice show the neuronal degeneration. Until now, only one missense mutation (c.208G > A, p.Gly70Ser) in EEF1A2 has been reported in two independent patients with neurological disease. In this report, we described two patients with de novo mutations (c.754G > C, p.Asp252His and c.364G > A, p.Glu122Lys) in EEF1A2 found by whole-exome sequencing. Common clinical features are shared by all four individuals: severe intellectual disability, autistic behavior, absent speech, neonatal hypotonia, epilepsy and progressive microcephaly. Furthermore, the two patients share the similar characteristic facial features including a depressed nasal bridge, tented upper lip, everted lower lip and downturned corners of the mouth. These data strongly indicate that a new recognizable disorder is caused by EEF1A2 mutations.

  12. Significant discrepancies between immediate and delayed WMS-III indices are rare in temporal lobe epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Bell, Brian D; Hermann, Bruce P; Seidenberg, Michael

    2004-05-01

    Initial factor analysis of Wechsler Memory Scale-Third Edition (WMS-III) standardization data resulted in a five-factor model that included separate immediate (IMM) and delayed (DEL) memory factors for auditory (AUD) and visual (VIS) memory. However, recent factor analyses that revealed three factors--AUD, VIS, and working memory--were discovered to be more accurate. Continued use of separate WMS-III IMM and DEL indices has been recommended because future studies with clinical groups might support this distinction. Data from this investigation of 88 temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients suggested separate IMM and DEL WMS-III indices are not necessary in this population. Results were as follows: 1) There was no significant difference between the IMM and DEL indices for AUD or VIS memory. 2) The percentage of individuals with a significant difference between the IMM and DEL indices (IMM minus DEL >11 or <-12) was similar for our TLE group and the standardization sample. 3) The mean percent retention standard score (SS) was at the average level for the four memory subtests, and for each subtest only about 10% of the TLE patients had impaired scores. 4) Hippocampal volumes correlated significantly with both IMM and DEL indices. These data suggest that combining the appropriate WMS-III IMM and DEL memory subtest scores to form AUD and VIS memory indices is appropriate for TLE patients.

  13. Women with Epilepsy: Drug Risks and Safety During Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Guideline for PATIENTS and their FAMILIES WOMEN WITH EPILEPSY: DRUG RISKS AND SAFETY DURING PREGNANCY This fact ... you understand which drugs are safest for treating epilepsy during pregnancy. It also gives information on how ...

  14. Hippocampal gene expression dysregulation of Klotho, nuclear factor kappa B and tumor necrosis factor in temporal lobe epilepsy patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous research in animal seizure models indicates that the pleiotropic cytokine TNF is an important effector/mediator of neuroinflammation and cell death. Recently, it has been demonstrated that TNF downregulates Klotho (KL) through the nuclear factor kappa B (NFkB) system in animal models of chronic kidney disease and colitis. KL function in the brain is unclear, although Klotho knockout (Kl−/−) mice exhibit neural degeneration and a reduction of hippocampal synapses. Our aim was to verify if the triad KL-NFKB1-TNF is also dysregulated in temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis (TLE(HS)) patients. Findings We evaluated TNF, NFKB1 and KL relative mRNA expression levels by reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) in resected hippocampal tissue samples from 14 TLE(HS) patients and compared them to five post mortem controls. Four reference genes were used: GAPDH, HPRT1, ENO2 and TBP. We found that TNF expression was dramatically upregulated in TLE(HS) patients (P <0.005). NFKB1 expression was also increased (P <0.03) while KL was significantly downregulated (P <0.03) in TLE(HS) patients. Hippocampal KL expression had an inverse correlation with NFKB1 and TNF. Conclusions Our data suggest that, similar to other inflammatory diseases, TNF downregulates KL through NFkB in TLE(HS) patients. The remarkable TNF upregulation in patients is a strong indication of hippocampal chronic inflammation. Our finding of hippocampal KL downregulation has wide implications not only for TLE(HS) but also for other neuronal disorders related to neurodegeneration associated with inflammation. PMID:23634661

  15. Parent and Family Stress Factors Predict Health-Related Quality in Pediatric Patients with New-Onset Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yelena P.; Follansbee-Junger, Katherine; Rausch, Joseph; Modi, Avani

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective To examine the influence of parent and family general and epilepsy-related stress on longitudinal generic and epilepsy-specific HRQOL for children with new-onset epilepsy, controlling for demographic characteristics, disease factors, and antiepileptic drug adherence. Methods This prospective, longitudinal study included 124 children with new-onset epilepsy (mean age=7.2 years, SD=2.9 years). Parents completed questionnaires on parenting stress, perceived stigma, fears and concerns, and HRQOL at 1, 13, and 25-months post-diagnosis. Adherence to antiepileptic medication was assessed using electronic monitors. A medical chart review was conducted at each visit to obtain seizure and side effect data. Results Higher levels of general and epilepsy-specific parent and family stress, fears and concerns, and perceived stigma negatively impacted child generic and epilepsy-specific HRQOL, above and beyond disease and demographic factors. General parenting and family stress impacted child generic and epilepsy-specific HRQOL more in the first year of disease management than at 2 years post-diagnosis. Higher fears and concerns predicted higher epilepsy-specific HRQOL at 13 months post-diagnosis, whereas 2 years post-diagnosis, higher fears and concerns predicted lower epilepsy-specific HRQOL. Several demographic (i.e., age) and disease-related variables (i.e., side effects, AED adherence) influenced child generic and epilepsy-specific HRQOL. While some findings were consistent across generic and epilepsy-specific HRQOL measures, others were unique. Significance Modifiable parent factors (i.e., general and disease-specific parent and family stress, perceived stigma) impact HRQOL for children with new-onset epilepsy differently over the first two years post-diagnosis. Psychosocial interventions to improve HRQOL within the first year post-diagnosis should address parenting and family stress, overall coping, and anticipatory guidance on managing epilepsy

  16. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene mutations and autism: literature review and a case report of a patient with Cowden syndrome, autistic disorder, and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Conti, Sara; Condò, Maria; Posar, Annio; Mari, Francesca; Resta, Nicoletta; Renieri, Alessandra; Neri, Iria; Patrizi, Annalisa; Parmeggiani, Antonia

    2012-03-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene mutations are associated with a spectrum of clinical disorders characterized by skin lesions, macrocephaly, hamartomatous overgrowth of tissues, and an increased risk of cancers. Autism has rarely been described in association with these variable clinical features. At present, 24 patients with phosphatase and tensin homolog gene mutation, autism, macrocephaly, and some clinical findings described in phosphatase and tensin homolog syndromes have been reported in the literature. We describe a 14-year-old boy with autistic disorder, focal epilepsy, severe and progressive macrocephaly, and multiple papular skin lesions and palmoplantar punctate keratoses, characteristic of Cowden syndrome. The boy has a de novo phosphatase and tensin homolog gene mutation. Our patient is the first case described to present a typical Cowden syndrome and autism associated with epilepsy.

  17. Episodic nocturnal wandering in a patient with epilepsy due to a right temporoinsular low-grade glioma: relief following resection. Case report.

    PubMed

    Duffau, Hugues; Kujas, Michèle; Taillandier, Luc

    2006-03-01

    Although controversial, episodic nocturnal wandering (ENW) is thought to be a rare and atypical form of nocturnal epilepsy, originating in the frontal lobe and responsive to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). The authors report the case of a patient harboring a right temporoinsular low-grade glioma, who presented with a 3-year history of agitated somnambulent episodes resistant to AEDs. Interestingly, the ENW totally resolved after tumor resection and the patient reported no recurrence during a follow-up period of 4.5 years. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of ENW due to a glioma; the findings support the theory that ENW may represent an unusual type of lesional epilepsy that is surgically correctable. Moreover, a temporoinsular origin of ENW can now be considered.

  18. [The systematization of epilepsy remissions].

    PubMed

    Gromov, S A; Fedotenkova, T N

    1995-01-01

    Problems of systematization of remissions of epileptic seizures and epilepsy are discussed on the basis of clinical examination of 341 epileptic patients with seizures suppressed for many years and international classifications of epilepsy. A classification, developed by the authors, is presented. It reflects stages of regress of the disease in achievement of prolonged (for years) control of seizures. The possibility of drug dependence development in these therapeutic remissions is also taken into consideration.

  19. Clobazam: A Safe, Efficacious, and Newly Rediscovered Therapeutic for Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Angela C; Mattson, Richard H

    2015-07-01

    Clobazam is an oral 1,5-benzodiazepine used worldwide for the treatment of many types of epilepsies, although it is currently only approved for Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in the USA. This anticonvulsant and anxiolytic therapeutic has repeatedly demonstrated great efficacy and a high safety profile in refractory epilepsy as well as in a few monotherapy trials in both children and adults. Clobazam allosterically activates the GABAA receptor, and it binds less to subunits that mediate sedative effects than other benzodiazepines. It acts quickly, maintaining a therapeutic effect for a long duration due to its active metabolite, N-desmethylclobazam. Dosage is between 5 mg and 40 mg a day, depending on patient weight, efficacy, and tolerability. Efficacy tolerance has not been a problem in the best studies. Clobazam has provided many benefits to epileptic patients. It should be used by clinicians early as an adjuvant therapy in the treatment of refractory epilepsy and even considered as monotherapy in a broad spectrum of epilepsy syndromes. PMID:25917225

  20. [Bacterial parotitis in an immunocompromised patient in adult ICU].

    PubMed

    Vassal, O; Bernet, C; Wallet, F; Friggeri, A; Piriou, V

    2013-09-01

    Bacterial parotitis is a common childhood disease with a favorable outcome. Staphylococcus aureus is the most frequently involved pathogen. Clinical presentation in adult patients can be misleading, Onset occurs in patients with multiple comorbidities, making diagnosis difficult--particularly in ICU. Different pathogens are found in adults with worse outcomes observed. We report here the case of a critically ill patient and discuss diagnosis and management of bacterial parotitis.

  1. Epilepsy with myoclonic absences.

    PubMed

    Manonmani, V; Wallace, S J

    1994-04-01

    The cases are described of eight children, five of them girls, who had epilepsy with myoclonic absences. The mean age of onset was 4.9 years. Brief episodes of loss of awareness with bilateral clonic jerking of the upper limbs were associated with rhythmic 3 cycles/second spike-wave discharges on electroencephalogram. Generalised tonic-clonic or astatic seizures, or both, also occurred in seven patients. All now have learning difficulties, and seven have behavioural problems. Conventional treatment for absences was effective in only two children. Of six patients treated with lamotrigine, five have improved substantially, but only one is in sustained complete remission. One recently diagnosed patient continues to have frequent myoclonic absences. As the response to treatment and long term outcome are much poorer, it is important to differentiate myoclonic absences from typical childhood absence epilepsy.

  2. [Epilepsy And Driving Ability: The New Guideline].

    PubMed

    Kurthen, Martin

    2015-10-28

    The Swiss Guideline concerning epilepsy and driving has recently been revised. Recommendations have changed significantly in several respects. Some modifications arise indirectly from a change in the overall concept of epilepsy. As a consequence of the application of the new ILAE definition and diagnostic criteria for epilepsy, there are now cases in which the diagnosis of epilepsy is established even after one single seizure. Furthermore, a concept of imminent epilepsy was introduced to identify patients without seizures, but with a high risk of a first seizure within twelve months. On the other hand, the concept of a "resolved epilepsy" was established to loosen driving regulations for longterm seizure-free patients. In addition, the new guideline provides differential recommendations for provoked vs. unprovoked seizures in several clinical constellations.

  3. Epilepsy is a possible feature in Williams-Beuren syndrome patients harboring typical deletions of the 7q11.23 critical region.

    PubMed

    Nicita, Francesco; Garone, Giacomo; Spalice, Alberto; Savasta, Salvatore; Striano, Pasquale; Pantaleoni, Chiara; Spartà, Maria Valentina; Kluger, Gerhard; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Pruna, Dario; Freri, Elena; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Verrotti, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are rarely reported in Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS)--a contiguous-gene-deletion disorder caused by a 7q11.23 heterozygous deletion of 1.5-1.8 Mb--and no previous study evaluated electro-clinical features of epilepsy in this syndrome. Furthermore, it has been hypothesized that atypical deletion (e.g., larger than 1.8 Mb) may be responsible for a more pronounced neurological phenotypes, especially including seizures. Our objectives are to describe the electro-clinical features in WBS and to correlate the epileptic phenotype with deletion of the 7q11.23 critical region. We evaluate the electro-clinical features in one case of distal 7q11.23 deletion syndrome and in eight epileptic WBS (eWBS) patients. Additionally, we compare the deletion size-and deleted genes-of four epileptic WBS (eWBS) with that of four non-epileptic WBS (neWBS) patients. Infantile spasms, focal (e.g., motor and dyscognitive with autonomic features) and generalized (e.g., tonic-clonic, tonic, clonic, myoclonic) seizures were encountered. Drug-resistance was observed in one patient. Neuroimaging discovered one case of focal cortical dysplasia, one case of fronto-temporal cortical atrophy and one case of periventricular nodular heterotopia. Comparison of deletion size between eWBS and neWBS patients did not reveal candidate genes potentially underlying epilepsy. This is the largest series describing electro-clinical features of epilepsy in WBS. In WBS, epilepsy should be considered both in case of typical and atypical deletions, which do not involve HIP1, YWHAG or MAGI2.

  4. Refractory focal epilepsy in a patient with methylmalonic aciduria: case report on positive and long-lasting effect of rufinamide.

    PubMed

    von Stülpnagel, C; Leichsenring, M; Müller, A; Staudt, M; Kluger, G

    2011-02-01

    We report on a 5-year-old boy with methylmalonic aciduria, an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism leading to accumulation of methylmalonic-CoA and thereby causing intoxication with leading symptoms of hyperammonaemia and metabolic acidosis. Hyperammonemia itself causes brain oedema. In our patient, this led to a vast metabolic stroke of the left hemisphere and subsequent pharmacoresistant epilepsy. Guided by his main seizures--drop attacks--the orphan drug rufinamide (RUF) was introduced as "off-label use" and led to freedom of drop attacks and tonic-clonic seizures over a period of 14 months as well as normalisation of the electroencephalogramm. Only once during an episode of fever and diarrhoea with reduced level of RUF did some provoked seizures with focal complex semiology for the time period of infection occur. In the 16 months follow-up, the patient also improved in his development, showing a more stable gait with the hemiparesis and understanding more complex sentences. PMID:21547865

  5. Testing patients during seizures: A European consensus procedure developed by a joint taskforce of the ILAE - Commission on European Affairs and the European Epilepsy Monitoring Unit Association.

    PubMed

    Beniczky, Sándor; Neufeld, Miri; Diehl, Beate; Dobesberger, Judith; Trinka, Eugen; Mameniskiene, Ruta; Rheims, Sylvain; Gil-Nagel, Antonio; Craiu, Dana; Pressler, Ronit; Krysl, David; Lebedinsky, Angelina; Tassi, Laura; Rubboli, Guido; Ryvlin, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    There is currently no international consensus procedure for performing comprehensive periictal testing of patients in the epilepsy monitoring units (EMUs). Our primary goal was to develop a standardized procedure for managing and testing patients during and after seizures in EMUs. The secondary goal was to assess whether it could be implemented in clinical practice (feasibility). A taskforce was appointed by the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE)-Commission on European Affairs and the European Epilepsy Monitoring Unit Association, to develop a standardized ictal testing battery (ITB) based on expert opinion and experience with various local testing protocols. ITB contains a comprehensive set of 10 items that evidence the clinically relevant semiologic features, and it is adaptive to the dynamics of the individual seizures. The feasibility of the ITB was prospectively evaluated on 250 seizures from 152 consecutive patients in 10 centers. ITB was successfully implemented in clinical practice in all 10 participating centers and was considered feasible in 93% of the tested seizures. ITB was not feasible for testing seizures of very short duration.

  6. Testing patients during seizures: A European consensus procedure developed by a joint taskforce of the ILAE - Commission on European Affairs and the European Epilepsy Monitoring Unit Association.

    PubMed

    Beniczky, Sándor; Neufeld, Miri; Diehl, Beate; Dobesberger, Judith; Trinka, Eugen; Mameniskiene, Ruta; Rheims, Sylvain; Gil-Nagel, Antonio; Craiu, Dana; Pressler, Ronit; Krysl, David; Lebedinsky, Angelina; Tassi, Laura; Rubboli, Guido; Ryvlin, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    There is currently no international consensus procedure for performing comprehensive periictal testing of patients in the epilepsy monitoring units (EMUs). Our primary goal was to develop a standardized procedure for managing and testing patients during and after seizures in EMUs. The secondary goal was to assess whether it could be implemented in clinical practice (feasibility). A taskforce was appointed by the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE)-Commission on European Affairs and the European Epilepsy Monitoring Unit Association, to develop a standardized ictal testing battery (ITB) based on expert opinion and experience with various local testing protocols. ITB contains a comprehensive set of 10 items that evidence the clinically relevant semiologic features, and it is adaptive to the dynamics of the individual seizures. The feasibility of the ITB was prospectively evaluated on 250 seizures from 152 consecutive patients in 10 centers. ITB was successfully implemented in clinical practice in all 10 participating centers and was considered feasible in 93% of the tested seizures. ITB was not feasible for testing seizures of very short duration. PMID:27440172

  7. Value of autoantibodies for prediction of treatment response in patients with autoimmune epilepsy: review of the literature and suggestions for clinical management.

    PubMed

    Bien, Christian G

    2013-05-01

    The detection of antineural autoantibodies in patients with epilepsy has led to the new concept of "autoimmune epilepsy." A particularly important implication is that knowledge of the antigenic target of the underlying antibody permits prognostic estimates. Patients with antibodies to the potassium channel complex (mostly to its leucine-rich glioma inactivated 1 [LGI1] component) have a high chance of becoming seizure free within days to months upon immunotherapy but less so with antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment alone. Seizures in the setting of antibodies to the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor also have a high likelihood to remit, again especially with rapid institution of immunotherapy. In contrast to these antibodies to neuronal surface molecules, antibodies directed to intracellular antigens (onconeural antibodies, antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase) portend a low likelihood of seizure remission, regardless of the treatments chosen. These outcome differences are probably related to the underlying pathophysiology--with largely reversible functional effects of antibodies to surface antigens and irreversible destructive sequelae (probably caused by T cells) in patients with antibodies to intracellular antigens. With ongoing experience with these conditions, clinical and paraclinical clues to the diagnosis of autoimmune epilepsies are emerging. PMID:23646971

  8. [Epilepsy, society and rights].

    PubMed

    Villanueva-Gómez, F

    1998-02-01

    Although from the medical point of view epilepsy is considered to be a neurological disorder, this has not always been so. It was once included in the group of psychiatric disorders by the medical profession and others. In the case law